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Sample records for cancer resistance protein

  1. [Proteins in cancer multidrug resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popęda, Marta; Płuciennik, Elżbieta; Bednarek, Andrzej K

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug Resistance (MDR) is defined as insensitivity to administered medicines that are structurally unrelated and have different molecular targets. Cancers possess numerous mechanisms of drug resistance, involving various aspects of cell biology. A pivotal role in this phenomenon is played by proteins--enzymatic or structural parts of the cell. Membrane transporters, including the main members of ABC protein family--P-gp, MRP1 and BCRP, as well as LRP, which builds structure of vaults, determine the multidrug-resistant phenotype by decreasing drug concentration within the cell or modifying its distribution to intracellular compartments. The π isoform of protein enzyme--glutathione S-transferase (GSTP-1), is responsible for excessive intensity of detoxification of cytostatics. A common example of altered drug target site that does not respond to chemotherapy is topoisomerase II α (TopoIIa). Alterations of programmed cell death result from expression of metallothionein (MT)--inhibitor of the process, and cytokeratin 18 (CK18), which, if in high concentration, also prevents apoptosis of cells. Several methods of decreasing activity of these proteins have been developed, aiming to overcome MDR in cancer cells. However, for a variety of reasons, their clinical suitability is still very low, leading to continuous increase in death rate among patients. This paper presents current state of knowledge on the most important examples of proteins responsible for MDR of cancer cells and molecular mechanisms of their action. PMID:24864112

  2. Multidrug Resistance Proteins (MRPs) and Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun-Kai; Wang, Yi-Jun; Gupta, Pranav; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2015-07-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are members of a protein superfamily that are known to translocate various substrates across membranes, including metabolic products, lipids and sterols, and xenobiotic drugs. Multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs) belong to the subfamily C in the ABC transporter superfamily. MRPs have been implicated in mediating multidrug resistance by actively extruding chemotherapeutic substrates. Moreover, some MRPs are known to be essential in physiological excretory or regulatory pathways. The importance of MRPs in cancer therapy is also implied by their clinical insights. Modulating the function of MRPs to re-sensitize chemotherapeutic agents in cancer therapy shows great promise in cancer therapy; thus, multiple MRP inhibitors have been developed recently. This review article summarizes the structure, distribution, and physiological as well as pharmacological function of MRP1-MRP9 in cancer chemotherapy. Several novel modulators targeting MRPs in cancer therapy are also discussed. PMID:25840885

  3. Marine Natural Products as Breast Cancer Resistance Protein Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilia Cherigo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP is a protein belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter superfamily that has clinical relevance due to its multi-drug resistance properties in cancer. BCRP can be associated with clinical cancer drug resistance, in particular acute myelogenous or acute lymphocytic leukemias. The overexpression of BCRP contributes to the resistance of several chemotherapeutic drugs, such as topotecan, methotrexate, mitoxantrone, doxorubicin and daunorubicin. The Food and Drugs Administration has already recognized that BCRP is clinically one of the most important drug transporters, mainly because it leads to a reduction of clinical efficacy of various anticancer drugs through its ATP-dependent drug efflux pump function as well as its apparent participation in drug resistance. This review article aims to summarize the different research findings on marine natural products with BCRP inhibiting activity. In this sense, the potential modulation of physiological targets of BCRP by natural or synthetic compounds offers a great possibility for the discovery of new drugs and valuable research tools to recognize the function of the complex ABC-transporters.

  4. Modulation of breast cancer resistance protein mediated atypical multidrug resistance using RNA interference delivered by adenovirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wen-tong; ZHOU Geng-yin; WANG Chun-ling; GUO Cheng-hao; SONG Xian-rang; CHI Wei-ling

    2005-01-01

    @@ Clinical multidrug resistance (MDR) of malignancies to many antineoplastic agents is the major obstacle in the successful treatment of cancer. The emergence of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding cassette (ABC) transporter family, has necessitated the development of antagonists. To overcome the BCRP-mediated atypical MDR, RNA interference (RNAi) delivered by adenovirus targeting BCRP mRNA was used to inhibit the atypical MDR expression by infecting MCF-7/MX100 cell lines with constructed RNAi adenovirus.

  5. Nuclear export of proteins and drug resistance in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Joel G.; Dawson, Jana; Sullivan, Daniel M.

    2011-01-01

    The intracellular location of a protein is crucial to its normal functioning in a cell. Cancer cells utilize the normal processes of nuclear-cytoplasmic transport through the nuclear pore complex of a cell to effectively evade anti-neoplastic mechanisms. CRM1-mediated export is increased in various cancers. Proteins that are exported in cancer include tumor-suppressive proteins such as retinoblastoma, APC, p53, BRAC1, FOXO proteins, INI1/hSNF5, galectin-3, Bok, nucleophosmin, RASSF2, Merlin, ...

  6. The expression and significance of P-glycoprotein, lung resistance protein and multidrug resistance-associated protein in gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To detect the expression of multidrug resistance molecules P-glycoprotein (P-gp, Lung resistnce protein (LRP and Multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP and analyze the relationship between them and the clinico-pathological features. Methods The expressions of P-gp, LRP and MRP in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections from 59 gastric cancer patients were determined by a labbelled Streptavidin-Peroxidase (SP immunohistochemical technique, and the results were analyzed in correlation with clinicopathological data. None of these patients received chemotherapy prior to surgery. Results The positive rates of P-gp, LRP, MRP were 86.4%, 84.7% and 27.1%, respectively. The difference between the positive rate of P-gp and MRP was significant statistically, as well as the difference between the expression of MRP and LRP. No significant difference was observed between P-gp and LRP, but the positively correlation between the expression of P-gp and LRP had been found. No significant correlation between the expression of P-gp, LRP, MRP and the grade of differentiation were observed. The expression of P-gp was correlated with clinical stages positively (r = 0.742, but the difference with the expression of P-gp in different stages was not significant. Conclusion The expressions of P-gp, LRP and MRP in patients with gastric cancer without prior chemotherapy are high, indicating that innate drug resistance may exist in gastric cancer.

  7. A Serum Protein Profile Predictive of the Resistance to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Advanced Breast Cancers*

    OpenAIRE

    Hyung, Seok-Won; Lee, Min Young; Yu, Jong-Han; Shin, Byunghee; Jung, Hee-Jung; Park, Jong-Moon; Han, Wonshik; Lee, Kyung-min; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Zhang, Hui; Aebersold, Ruedi; Hwang, Daehee; Lee, Sang-Won; Yu, Myeong-Hee; Noh, Dong-Young

    2011-01-01

    Prediction of the responses to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) can improve the treatment of patients with advanced breast cancer. Genes and proteins predictive of chemoresistance have been extensively studied in breast cancer tissues. However, noninvasive serum biomarkers capable of such prediction have been rarely exploited. Here, we performed profiling of N-glycosylated proteins in serum from fifteen advanced breast cancer patients (ten patients sensitive to and five patients resistant to N...

  8. Identification of a putative protein profile associating with tamoxifen therapy resistance in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umar, Arzu; Kang, Hyuk; Timmermans, A. M.; Look, Maxime P.; Meijer-van Gelder, M. E.; den Bakker, Michael A.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Martens, John W.; Luider, Theo M.; Foekens, John A.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2009-06-01

    Tamoxifen-resistance is a major cause of death in patients with recurrent breast cancer. Current clinical factors can correctly predict therapy response in only half of the treated patients. Identification of proteins that associate with tamoxifen-resistance is a first step towards better response prediction and tailored treatment of patients. In the present study we intended to identify putative protein biomarkers indicative of tamoxifen therapy-resistance in breast cancer, using nanoLC coupled with FTICR MS. Comparative proteome analysis was performed on ~5,500 pooled tumor cells (corresponding to ~550 ng protein lysate/analysis) obtained through laser capture microdissection (LCM) from two independently processed data sets (n=24 and n=27) containing both tamoxifen therapy-sensitive and therapy-resistant tumors. Peptides and proteins were identified by matching mass and elution time of newly acquired LC-MS features to information in previously generated accurate mass and time tag (AMT) reference databases.

  9. Expression of multidrug resistance proteins P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance protein 1, breast cancer resistance protein and lung resistance related protein in locally advanced bladder cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy: biological and clinical implications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diestra, JE; Condom, E; Muro, XG Del; Scheffer, G.L.; Perez, J; Zurita, AJ; Munoz-Segui, J; Vigues, F; Scheper, R.J.; Capella, G; Germa-Lluch, JR; Izquierdo, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: Resistance to chemotherapy is a major obstacle to overcome in the conservative treatment of patients with locally advanced bladder cancer (LABC). We investigated the predictive value of the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) and prognosis of the expression of multidrug resistance (

  10. Uremic toxins inhibit transport by breast cancer resistance protein and multidrug resistance protein 4 at clinically relevant concentrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henricus A M Mutsaers

    Full Text Available During chronic kidney disease (CKD, there is a progressive accumulation of toxic solutes due to inadequate renal clearance. Here, the interaction between uremic toxins and two important efflux pumps, viz. multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4 and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP was investigated. Membrane vesicles isolated from MRP4- or BCRP-overexpressing human embryonic kidney cells were used to study the impact of uremic toxins on substrate specific uptake. Furthermore, the concentrations of various uremic toxins were determined in plasma of CKD patients using high performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Our results show that hippuric acid, indoxyl sulfate and kynurenic acid inhibit MRP4-mediated [(3H]-methotrexate ([(3H]-MTX uptake (calculated Ki values: 2.5 mM, 1 mM, 25 µM, respectively and BCRP-mediated [(3H]-estrone sulfate ([(3H]-E1S uptake (Ki values: 4 mM, 500 µM and 50 µM, respectively, whereas indole-3-acetic acid and phenylacetic acid reduce [(3H]-MTX uptake by MRP4 only (Ki value: 2 mM and IC(50 value: 7 mM, respectively. In contrast, p-cresol, p-toluenesulfonic acid, putrescine, oxalate and quinolinic acid did not alter transport mediated by MRP4 or BCRP. In addition, our results show that hippuric acid, indole-3-acetic acid, indoxyl sulfate, kynurenic acid and phenylacetic acid accumulate in plasma of end-stage CKD patients with mean concentrations of 160 µM, 4 µM, 129 µM, 1 µM and 18 µM, respectively. Moreover, calculated Ki values are below the maximal plasma concentrations of the tested toxins. In conclusion, this study shows that several uremic toxins inhibit active transport by MRP4 and BCRP at clinically relevant concentrations.

  11. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α induces multidrug resistance protein in colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv Y

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Yingqian Lv, Shan Zhao, Jinzhu Han, Likang Zheng, Zixin Yang, Li Zhao Department of Oncology, The Second Hospital, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Multidrug resistance is the major cause of chemotherapy failure in many solid tumors, including colon cancer. Hypoxic environment is a feature for all solid tumors and is important for the development of tumor resistance to chemotherapy. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α is the key transcription factor that mediates cellular response to hypoxia. HIF-1α has been shown to play an important role in tumor resistance; however, the mechanism is still not fully understood. Here, we found that HIF-1α and the drug resistance-associated gene multidrug resistance associated protein 1 (MRP1 were induced by treatment of colon cancer cells with the hypoxia-mimetic agent cobalt chloride. Inhibition of HIF-1α by RNA interference and dominant-negative protein can significantly reduce the induction of MRP1 by hypoxia. Bioinformatics analysis showed that a hypoxia response element is located at -378 to -373 bp upstream of the transcription start site of MRP1 gene. Luciferase reporter assay combined with mutation analysis confirmed that this element is essential for hypoxia-mediated activation of MRP gene. Furthermore, RNA interference revealed that HIF-1α is necessary for this hypoxia-driven activation of MRP1 promoter. Importantly, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that HIF-1α could directly bind to this HRE site in vivo. Together, these data suggest that MRP1 is a downstream target gene of HIF-1α, which provides a potential novel mechanism for HIF-1α-mediated drug resistance in colon cancer and maybe other solid tumors as well. Keywords: hypoxia, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, multidrug resistance associated protein, transcriptional regulation, chemotherapy tolerance

  12. Dynamic changes and surveillance function of prion protein expression in gastric cancer drug resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-Heng Wang; Jing-Ping Du; Ying-Hai Zhang; Xiao-Jun Zhao; Ru-Ying Fan; Zhi-Hong Wang; Zi-Tao Wu; Ying Han

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To explore the dynamic changes of prion protein (PrPc) in the process of gastric cancer drug resistance and the role of PrPc expression in the prognosis of gastric cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. METHODS: A series of gastric cancer cell lines resistant to different concentrations of adriamycin was established,and the expression of PrPc, Bcl-2 and Bax was detected in these cells. Apoptosis was determined using Annexin V staining. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were performed to detect the expression of PrPc in patients receiving chemotherapy and to explore the role of PrPc expression in predicting the chemosensitivity and the outcome of gastric cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Follow-up was performed for 2 years. RESULTS: PrPc expression was increased with the increase in drug resistance. Bcl-2, together with PrPc, increased the level of anti-apoptosis of cancer cells. Increased PrPc expression predicted the enhanced level of anti-apoptosis and resistance to anticancer drugs. PrPc expression could be used as a marker for predicting the efficacy of chemotherapy and the prognosis of gastric cancer. Increased PrPc expression predicted both poor chemosensitivity and a low 2-year survival rate. Contrarily, low PrPc expression predicted favorable chemosensitivity and a relatively high 2-year survival rate.CONCLUSION: PrPc expression is associated with histological types and differentiation of gastric cancer cells; The PrPc expression level might be a valuable marker in predicting the efficacy of chemotherapy and the prognosis of gastric cancer patients receiving chemotherapy.

  13. Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2): its role in multidrug resistance and regulation of its gene expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takeo Nakanishi; Douglas D. Ross

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP)/ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter identified as a molecular cause of multidrug resistance (MDR) in diverse cancer cells.BCRP physiologically functions as a part of a self-defense mechanism for the organism; it enhances elimination of toxic xenobiotic substances and harmful agents in the gut and biliary tract,as well as through the blood-brain,placental,and possibly blood-testis barriers.BCRP recognizes and transports numerous anticancer drugs including conventional chemotherapeutic and targeted small therapeutic molecules relatively new in clinical use.Thus,BCRP expression in cancer cells directly causes MDR by active efflux of anticancer drugs.Because BCRP is also known to be a stem cell marker,its expression in cancer cells could be a manifestation of metabolic and signaling pathways that confer multiple mechanisms of drug resistance,self-renewal (stemness),and invasiveness (aggressiveness),and thereby impart a poor prognosis.Therefore,blocking BCRP-mediated active efflux may provide a therapeutic benefit for cancers.Delineating the precise molecular mechanisms for BCRP gene expression may lead to identification of a novel molecular target to modulate BCRP-mediated MDR.Current evidence suggests that BCRP gene transcription is regulated by a number of trans-acting elements including hypoxia inducible factor 1α, estrogen receptor, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor.Furthermore,alternative promoter usage,demethylation of the BCRP promoter,and histone modificationare likely associated with drug-induced BCRP overexpression in cancer cells.Finally,PI3K/AKT signaling may play a critical role in modulating BCRP function under a variety of conditions.These biological events seem involved in a complicated manner.Untangling the events would be an essential first step to developing a method to modulate BCRP function to aid patients with cancer.This review will

  14. Multidrug Transporter ABCG2/Breast Cancer Resistance Protein Secretes Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) into Milk▿

    OpenAIRE

    van Herwaarden, Antonius E.; Wagenaar, Els; Merino, Gracia; Jonker, Johan W.; Rosing, Hilde; Beijnen, Jos H.; Schinkel, Alfred H.

    2006-01-01

    The multidrug transporter breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) is strongly induced in the mammary gland during pregnancy and lactation. We here demonstrate that BCRP is responsible for pumping riboflavin (vitamin B2) into milk, thus supplying the young with this important nutrient. In Bcrp1−/− mice, milk secretion of riboflavin was reduced >60-fold compared to that in wild-type mice. Yet, under laboratory conditions, Bcrp1−/− pups showed no riboflavin deficiency due to concomitant mi...

  15. Mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 mediates resistance to Hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in Human hepatobiliary Cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen Ho-Bouldoires, Thang Huong; Clapéron, Audrey; Mergey, Martine; Wendum, Dominique; Desbois-Mouthon, Christèle; Tahraoui, Sylvana; Fartoux, Laetitia; Chettouh, Hamza; Merabtene, Fatiha; Scatton, Olivier; Gaestel, Matthias; Praz, Françoise; Housset, Chantal; Fouassier, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The development and progression of liver cancer are characterized by increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS-induced oxidative stress impairs cell proliferation and ultimately leads to cell death. Although liver cancer cells are especially resistant to oxidative stress, mechanisms of such resistance remain understudied. We identified the MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2)/Heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) signaling pathway mediating defenses against oxidative stress. Besides to ...

  16. Correlation between uptake of 99TcM-MIBI and multidrug resistant proteins of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To assess the correlation between 99Tcm-MIBI uptake and the expression level of multidrug resistant proteins of breast cancer. Methods: Thirty patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma were enrolled in this study. 99Tcm-MIBI scintigraphy were performed at 15 min and 90 min after injecting the tracer. The uptake of 99Tcm-MIBI were evaluated as tumor over background ratio with region of interest technique. Such indexes as early uptake ratio (EUR), delay uptake ratio (DUR) and retention index (RI) were calculated respectively. P-gp (P-glycoprotein) and MRP (multidrug resistant-associated protein) expression in surgically resected tumors were investigated by immunohistochemistry. Immunohistochemistry HPIAS-1000 image analysis system was used to determined the level of P-gp and MRP expression. The difference of P-gp and MRP level in the group with RI ≥ 0 and the group with RI99Tcm-MIBI on delayed scans in breast cancer. The uptake of 99Tcm-MIBI may be not related to the levels of MRP expression. Thus 99Tcm-MIBI scintigraphy may predict the MDR development which associated with P-gp expression in breast carcinoma. (authors)

  17. Suppression of Poly(rC)-Binding Protein 4 (PCBP4) reduced cisplatin resistance in human maxillary cancer cells

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    Ito, Yumi; Narita, Norihiko; Nomi, Nozomi; Sugimoto, Chizuru; Takabayashi, Tetsuji; Yamada, Takechiyo; Karaya, Kazuhiro; Matsumoto, Hideki; Fujieda, Shigeharu

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin plays an important role in the therapy for human head and neck cancers. However, cancer cells develop cisplatin resistance, leading to difficulty in treatment and poor prognosis. To analyze cisplatin-resistant mechanisms, a cisplatin-resistant cell line, IMC-3CR, was established from the IMC-3 human maxillary cancer cell line. Flow cytometry revealed that, compared with IMC-3 cells, cisplatin more dominantly induced cell cycle G2/M arrest rather than apoptosis in IMC-3CR cells. That fact suggests that IMC-3CR cells avoid cisplatin-induced apoptosis through induction of G2/M arrest, which allows cancer cells to repair damaged DNA and survive. In the present study, we specifically examined Poly(rC)-Binding Protein 4 (PCBP4), which reportedly induces G2/M arrest. Results showed that suppression of PCBP4 by RNAi reduced cisplatin-induced G2/M arrest and enhanced apoptosis in IMC-3CR cells, resulting in the reduction of cisplatin resistance. In contrast, overexpression of PCBP4 in IMC-3 cells induced G2/M arrest after cisplatin treatment and enhanced cisplatin resistance. We revealed that PCBP4 combined with Cdc25A and suppressed the expression of Cdc25A, resulting in G2/M arrest. PCBP4 plays important roles in the induction of cisplatin resistance in human maxillary cancers. PCBP4 is a novel molecular target for the therapy of head and neck cancers, especially cisplatin-resistant cancers. PMID:26196957

  18. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Ovarian Cancer Cells Identified Mitochondrial Proteins Associated with Paclitaxel Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Yuan; Tan, Aik-Choon; Sun, Xiaer; Olson, Matthew T.; Xie, Zhi; Jinawath, Natini; Chan, Daniel W; Shih, Ie-Ming; Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Hui

    2009-01-01

    Paclitaxel has been widely used as an anti-mitotic agent in chemotherapy for a variety of cancers and adds substantial efficacy as the first-line chemotherapeutic regimen for ovarian cancers. However, the frequent occurrence of paclitaxel resistance limits its function in long-term management. Despite abundant clinical and cellular demonstration of paclitaxel resistant tumors, the molecular mechanisms leading to paclitaxel resistance are poorly understood. Using genomic approaches, we have pr...

  19. Differentially expressed proteins in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells sensitive and resistant to paclitaxel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavlíková, N.; Bartoňová, I.; Balušíková, K.; Kopperová, D.; Halada, Petr; Kovář, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 333, č. 1 (2015), s. 1-10. ISSN 0014-4827 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Breast cancer * Taxane resistance * 2-D electrophoresis Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.246, year: 2014

  20. Breast Cancer Resistance Protein and P-glycoprotein in Brain Cancer: Two Gatekeepers Team Up

    OpenAIRE

    Agarwal, Sagar; Hartz, Anika M.S.; Elmquist, William F.; Bauer, Björn

    2011-01-01

    Brain cancer is a devastating disease. Despite extensive research, treatment of brain tumors has been largely ineffective and the diagnosis of brain cancer remains uniformly fatal. Failure of brain cancer treatment may be in part due to limitations in drug delivery, influenced by the ABC drug efflux transporters P-gp and BCRP at the blood-brain and blood-tumor barriers, in brain tumor cells, as well as in brain tumor stem-like cells. P-gp and BCRP limit various anti-cancer drugs from entering...

  1. In silico prediction of inhibition of promiscuous breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Lung Ding

    Full Text Available Breast cancer resistant protein has an essential role in active transport of endogenous substances and xenobiotics across extracellular and intracellular membranes along with P-glycoprotein. It also plays a major role in multiple drug resistance and permeation of blood-brain barrier. Therefore, it is of great importance to derive theoretical models to predict the inhibition of both transporters in the process of drug discovery and development. Hitherto, very limited BCRP inhibition predictive models have been proposed as compared with its P-gp counterpart.An in silico BCRP inhibition model was developed in this study using the pharmacophore ensemble/support vector machine scheme to take into account the promiscuous nature of BCRP. The predictions by the PhE/SVM model were found to be in good agreement with the observed values for those molecules in the training set (n= 22, r2 =0.82, qCV2=0.73, RMSE= 0.40, s = 0.24, test set (n =97, q2=0.75-0.89, RMSE= 0.31, s= 0.21, and outlier set (n= 16, q2 =0.72-0.91, RMSE= 0.29, s=0.17. When subjected to a variety of statistical validations, the developed PhE/SVM model consistently met the most stringent criteria. A mock test by HIV protease inhibitors also asserted its predictivity.It was found that this accurate, fast, and robust PhE/SVM model can be employed to predict the BCRP inhibition of structurally diverse molecules that otherwise cannot be carried out by any other methods in a high-throughput fashion to design therapeutic agents with insignificant drug toxicity and unfavorable drug-drug interactions mediated by BCRP to enhance clinical efficacy and/or circumvent drug resistance.

  2. Mechanistic Nanotherapeutic Approach Based on siRNA-Mediated DJ-1 Protein Suppression for Platinum-Resistant Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Canan; Chan, Stephanie; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Khal, Shannon; Moskal, Vitaliya; Shah, Vidhi; Alani, Adam W G; Taratula, Olena; Taratula, Oleh

    2016-06-01

    We report an efficient therapeutic modality for platinum resistant ovarian cancer based on siRNA-mediated suppression of a multifunctional DJ-1 protein that is responsible for the proliferation, growth, invasion, oxidative stress, and overall survival of various cancers. The developed therapeutic strategy can work alone or in concert with a low dose of the first line chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin, to elicit a maximal therapeutic response. To achieve an efficient DJ-1 knockdown, we constructed the polypropylenimine dendrimer-based nanoplatform targeted to LHRH receptors overexpressed on ovarian cancer cells. The quantitative PCR and Western immunoblotting analysis revealed that the delivered DJ-1 siRNA downregulated the expression of targeted mRNA and corresponding protein by more than 80% in various ovarian cancer cells. It was further demonstrated that siRNA-mediated DJ-1 suppression dramatically impaired proliferation, viability, and migration of the employed ovarian cancer cells. Finally, the combinatorial approach led to the most pronounced therapeutic response in all the studied cell lines, outperforming both siRNA-mediated DJ-1 knockdown and cisplatin treatment alone. It is noteworthy that the platinum-resistant cancer cells (A2780/CDDP) with the highest basal level of DJ-1 protein are most susceptible to the developed therapy and this susceptibility declines with decreasing basal levels of DJ-1. Finally, we interrogate the molecular underpinnings of the DJ-1 knockdown effects in the treatment of the ovarian cancer cells. By using various experimental techniques, it was revealed that DJ-1 depletion (1) decreases the activity of the Akt pathway, thereby reducing cellular proliferation and migration and increasing the antiproliferative effect of cisplatin on ovarian cancer cells; (2) enhances the activity of p53 tumor suppressor protein therefore restoring cell cycle arrest functionality and upregulating the Bax-caspase pathway, triggering cell death; and (3

  3. Intestinal ciprofloxacin efflux: the role of breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, I S; Wright, J A; O'Reilly, D A; Sherlock, D J; Coleman, T; Simmons, N L

    2011-12-01

    Intestinal secretory movement of the fluoroquinolone antibiotic, ciprofloxacin, may limit its oral bioavailability. Active ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters such as breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) have been implicated in ciprofloxacin transport. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that BCRP alone mediates intestinal ciprofloxacin secretion. The involvement of ABC transport proteins in ciprofloxacin secretory flux was investigated with the combined use of transfected cell lines [bcrp1/BCRP-Madin-Darby canine kidney II (MDCKII) and multidrug resistance-related protein 4 (MRP4)-human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293] and human intestinal Caco-2 cells, combined with pharmacological inhibition using 3-(6-isobutyl-9-methoxy-1,4-dioxo-1,2,3,4,6, 7,12,12a-octahydropyrazino[1',2':1,6]pyrido[3,4-b]indol-3-yl)-propionic acid tert-butyl ester (Ko143), cyclosporine, 3-[[3-[2-(7-chloroquinolin-2-yl)vinyl]phenyl]-(2-dimethylcarbamoylethylsulfanyl)methylsulfanyl] propionic acid (MK571), and verapamil as ABC-selective inhibitors. In addition, the regional variation in secretory capacity was investigated using male Han Wistar rat intestine mounted in Ussing chambers, and the first indicative measurements of ciprofloxacin transport by ex vivo human jejunum were made. Active, Ko143-sensitive ciprofloxacin secretion was observed in bcrp1-MDCKII cell layers, but in low-passage (BCRP-expressing) Caco-2 cell layers only a 54% fraction was Ko143-sensitive. Ciprofloxacin accumulation was lower in MRP4-HEK293 cells than in the parent line, indicating that ciprofloxacin is also a substrate for this transporter. Ciprofloxacin secretion by Caco-2 cell layers was not inhibited by MK571. Secretory flux showed marked regional variability in the rat intestine, increasing from the duodenum to peak in the ileum. Ciprofloxacin secretion was present in human jejunum and was reduced by Ko143 but showed marked interindividual variability. Ciprofloxacin is a substrate for human and

  4. Adjudin disrupts spermatogenesis by targeting drug transporters: Lesson from the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xiaojing; Cheng, Yan-Ho; Jenardhanan, Pranitha; Mruk, Dolores D; Mathur, Premendu P; Xia, Weiliang; Silvestrini, Bruno; Cheng, C Yan

    2013-04-01

    For non-hormonal male contraceptives that exert their effects in the testis locally instead of via the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis, such as adjudin that disrupts germ cell adhesion, a major hurdle in their development is to improve their bioavailability so that they can be efficiently delivered to the seminiferous epithelium by transporting across the blood-testis barrier (BTB). If this can be done, it would widen the gap between their efficacy and general toxicity. However, Sertoli cells that constitute the BTB, peritubular myoid cells in the tunica propria, germ cells at different stages of their development, as well as endothelial cells that constitute the microvessels in the interstitium are all equipped with multiple drug transporters, most notably efflux drug transporters, such as P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance-related protein 1 (MRP1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) that can actively prevent drugs (e.g., adjudin) from entering the seminiferous epithelium to exert their effects. Recent studies have shown that BCRP is highly expressed by endothelial cells of the microvessels in the interstitium in the testis and also peritubular myoid cells in tunica propria even though it is absent from Sertoli cells at the site of the BTB. Furthermore, BCRP is also expressed spatiotemporally by Sertoli cells and step 19 spermatids in the rat testis and stage-specifically, limiting to stage VII‒VIII of the epithelial cycle, and restricted to the apical ectoplasmic specialization [apical ES, a testis-specific F-actin-rich adherens junction (AJ)]. Interestingly, adjudin was recently shown to be capable of downregulating BCRP expression at the apical ES. In this Opinion article, we critically discuss the latest findings on BCRP; in particular, we provide some findings utilizing molecular modeling to define the interacting domains of BCRP with adjudin. Based on this information, it is hoped that the next generation of adjudin analogs to be

  5. Relationship between Methylation Status of Multi-drug Resistance Protein(MRP) and Multi-drug Resistance in Lung Cancer Cell Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Rui-jun; ZHONG Hong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between the methylation status of multi-drug resistance protein (MRP) gene and the expression of its mRNA and protein in lung cancer cell lines. Methods: Human embryo lung cell line WI-38, lung adenocarcinoma cell line SPCA-1 and its drug-resistant cells induced by different concentrations of doxorubicin were treated with restriction endonuclease Eco47Ⅲ. The methylation status of MRP was examined by PCR, and the expressions of its mRNA and protein were evaluated by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Results: MRP gene promoter region of WI-38 cells was in hypermethylation status, but the promoter region of MRP in SPCA-1 cells and their resistant derivatives induced by different concentrations of doxorubicin were in hypomethylation status. There were significant differences in the expression of MRP mRNA among WI-38 cell line, SPCA-1 cells and their drug-resistant derivatives induced by different concentration of doxorubicin. Consistently, MRP immunostaining presented similar significant differences. Conclusion: The promoter region of MRP in SPCA-1 lung adenocarcinoma cells was in hypomethylation status. The hypomethylation status of 5' regulatory region of MRP promoter is an important structural basis that can increase the activity of transcription and results in the development of drug resistance in lung cancer.

  6. The relationship of platinum resistance and ERCC1 protein expression in epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Karina Dahl; Waldstrøm, Marianne; Jakobsen, Anders

    2009-01-01

    : Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections from 101 patients with newly diagnosed ovarian cancer were used for immunohistochemical staining for the ERCC1 protein. All patients received carboplatin-paclitaxel combination chemotherapy. RESULTS: Excision repair cross-complementation group 1 enzyme...

  7. Clinical evaluation of multidrug resistance associated protein expression by FDG PET and MIBI SPECT in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multidrug resistance is one of the major obstacles in the successful anticancer therapy. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether FDG PET and MIBI SPECT can be markers for p-glycoprotein (Pgp), multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP), lung resistance protein (LRP) expression in lung cancer tissues. Eighty-eight patients with 92 lung cancer lesions were enrolled in this study. Before surgery, FDG PET imaging was performed 40 min after injection of FDG 185 MBq, and standardized uptake values (SUVs) were obtained. MIBI SPECT imaging was performed 15 min and 3 hour after injection of MIBI 370 MBq. Early ratio (ER), delayed ratio (DR), and washout rate (WR) were obtained. Pgp, MRP, and LRP expression in lung cancer tissues were determined by immunohistochemical staining. No significant correlations were observed between MIBI uptake and expression of Pgp, MRP and LRP. FDG uptake significantly correlated with expression of Pgp and LRP. The lung cancer with high degree of Pgp and LRP expression had significantly low FDG uptake. However, there is no correlation between FDG uptake and MRP expression. Pgp and LRP expression of adenocarcinomas were significantly higher than that of squamous cell carcinomas. FDG uptake of adenocarcinomas were significantly lower than that of squamous cell carcinomas. In lung adenocarcinomas, Pgp and LRP expression of bronchioloalveolar carcinomas were significantly higher than that of poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas. In contrast, FDG uptake of bronchioloalveolar carcinomas were significantly low when compared with that of poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas. In addition, it was also suggested that biological behavior of LRP expression was similar to that of Pgp expression. FDG uptake may be a marker for Pgp and LRP expression but not for MRP expression in patients with lung cancer. Both Pgp, LRP expression and FDG uptake correlate with cellular differentiation and histological type. (author)

  8. Genipin-induced inhibition of uncoupling protein-2 sensitizes drug-resistant cancer cells to cytotoxic agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan J Mailloux

    Full Text Available Uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2 is known to suppress mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS production and is employed by drug-resistant cancer cells to mitigate oxidative stress. Using the drug-sensitive HL-60 cells and the drug-resistant MX2 subline as model systems, we show that genipin, a UCP2 inhibitor, sensitizes drug-resistant cells to cytotoxic agents. Increased MX2 cell death was observed upon co-treatment with genipin and different doses of menadione, doxorubicin, and epirubicin. DCFH-DA fluorimetry revealed that the increase in MX2 cell death was accompanied by enhanced cellular ROS levels. The drug-induced increase in ROS was linked to genipin-mediated inhibition of mitochondrial proton leak. State 4 and resting cellular respiratory rates were higher in the MX2 cells in comparison to the HL-60 cells, and the increased respiration was readily suppressed by genipin in the MX2 cells. UCP2 accounted for a remarkable 37% of the resting cellular oxygen consumption indicating that the MX2 cells are functionally reliant on this protein. Higher amounts of UCP2 protein were detected in the MX2 versus the HL-60 mitochondria. The observed effects of genipin were absent in the HL-60 cells pointing to the selectivity of this natural product for drug-resistant cells. The specificity of genipin for UCP2 was confirmed using CHO cells stably expressing UCP2 in which genipin induced an ∼22% decrease in state 4 respiration. These effects were absent in empty vector CHO cells expressing no UCP2. Thus, the chemical inhibition of UCP2 with genipin sensitizes multidrug-resistant cancer cells to cytotoxic agents.

  9. Spontaneous T-cell responses against peptides derived from the Taxol resistance-associated gene-3 (TRAG-3) protein in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Anders; Hadrup, Sine Reker; Svane, Inge Marie;

    2005-01-01

    Expression of the cancer-testis antigen Taxol resistance - associated gene-3 (TRAG-3) protein is associated with acquired paclitaxel ( Taxol) resistance, and is expressed in various cancer types; e. g., breast cancer, leukemia, and melanoma. Thus, TRAG-3 represents an attractive target for...... immunotherapy of cancer. To identify HLA-A* 02.01 - restricted epitopes from TRAG-3, we screened cancer patients for spontaneous cytotoxic T-cell responses against TRAG-3 - derived peptides. The TRAG-3 protein sequence was screened for 9mer and 10mer peptides possessing HLA-A* 02.01 - binding motifs. Of 12...... potential binders, 9 peptides were indeed capable of binding to the HLA-A* 02.01 molecule, with binding affinities ranging from strong to weak binders. Subsequently, lymphocytes from cancer patients ( 9 breast cancer patients, 12 melanoma patients, and 13 patients with hematopoietic malignancies) were...

  10. Enhanced Brain Disposition and Effects of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol in P-Glycoprotein and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein Knockout Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Spiro, Adena S.; Alexander Wong; Boucher, Aurélie A.; Arnold, Jonathon C.

    2012-01-01

    The ABC transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp, Abcb1) and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp, Abcg2) regulate the CNS disposition of many drugs. The main psychoactive constituent of cannabis Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) has affinity for P-gp and Bcrp, however it is unknown whether these transporters modulate the brain accumulation of THC and its functional effects on the CNS. Here we aim to show that mice devoid of Abcb1 and Abcg2 retain higher brain THC levels and are more sensitive to ca...

  11. Function of the ABC transporters, P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance protein and breast cancer resistance protein, in minimal residual disease in acute myeloid leukemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, van der M.A.; Broxterman, H.J.; Pater, JM; Feller, N.; Maas, M.; Weijers, GW; Scheffer, G.L.; Allen, JD; Scheper, R.J.; Loevezijn, van A; Ossenkoppele, G.J.; Schuurhuis, G.J.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Relapse is common in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) because of persistence of minimal residual disease (MRD). ABC-transporters P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and multidrug resistance protein (MRP), are thought to contribute to treatment failure, while it is unknown whether breast canc

  12. Technetium-99m-hexakis-2-methoxyisobutylisonitrile scintigraphy and multidrug resistance-related protein expression in human primary lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The occurrence of multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major cause of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents in patients with lung cancer, in part owing to the overexpression of MDR-related proteins. Technetium-99m-hexakis-2-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (99mTc-MIBI) has been shown to be a substrate for some MDR-related proteins. The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of 99mTc-MIBI scintigraphy for functional imaging of MDR-related protein phenotypes. To determine the correlation between 99mTc-MIBI scintigraphy and the expression level of P-glycoprotein (Pgp), multidrug-resistance protein (MRP), and glutathione-S-transferase Pi (GSTπ), 26 patients (17 men and 9 women, median age 57.5 years) with primary lung cancer were investigated. Following intravenous administration of 925 MBq 99mTc-MIBI, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and computed tomography (CT) were performed at 15 min and 2 h. On the basis of the fused images, tumor to background (T/B) ratio of both early and delayed images, and washout rate (WR%) of 99mTc-MIBI were calculated. The immunohistochemical staining of Pgp, MRP, and GSTπ was performed, and the expression level was semiquantitated using a pathoimage analysis system. The imaging results were compared with the status of Pgp, MRP, and GSTπ expression. The WR% of 99mTc-MIBI showed a significant positive correlation with Pgp expression (r=0.560, P=0.003), as no correlation was observed between WR% and MRP or GSTπ (r=0.354, P=0.076; r=0.324, P=0.106). Neither early T/B nor delayed T/B correlated with the expression level of Pgp, MRP, and GSTπ. WR%, Pgp, and GSTπ expression showed significant differences between squamous cell carcinoma (group A) and adenocarcinoma (group B). There was no significant difference among Pgp, MRP, and GSTπ expression levels in any cases (P>0.05). Our data confirmed that 99mTc-MIBI scintigraphy is useful for determining the MDR caused by Pgp in patients with primary lung cancer. (author)

  13. Protection of stromal cell-derived factor 2 by heat shock protein 72 prevents oxaliplatin-induced cell death in oxaliplatin-resistant human gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Tanaka, Masako; Yashiro, Masakazu; Matsumoto, Masaki; Ohtsuka, Asuka; Nakayama, Keiichi I; Izumi, Yasukatsu; Nagayama, Katsuya; Miura, Katsuyuki; Iwao, Hiroshi; Shiota, Masayuki

    2016-08-01

    Heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) is a molecular chaperone that assists in the folding of nascent polypeptides and in the refolding of denatured proteins. In many cancers, Hsp72 is constitutively expressed at elevated levels, which can result in enhanced stress tolerance. Similarly, following treatment with anticancer drugs, Hsp72 binds to denatured proteins that may be essential for survival. We therefore hypothesized that Hsp72 client proteins may play a crucial role in drug resistance. Here, we aimed to identify proteins that are critical for oxaliplatin (OXA) resistance by analyzing human gastric cancer cell lines, as well as OXA-resistant cells via a mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach combined with affinity purification using anti-Hsp72 antibodies. Stromal cell-derived factor 2 (SDF-2) was identified as an Hsp72 client protein unique to OCUM-2M/OXA cells. SDF-2 was overexpressed in OXA-resistant cells and SDF-2 silencing promoted the apoptotic effects of OXA. Furthermore, Hsp72 prevented SDF-2 degradation in a chaperone activity-dependent manner. Together, our data demonstrate that Hsp72 protected SDF-2 to avoid OXA-induced cell death. We propose that inhibition of SDF-2 may comprise a novel therapeutic strategy to counteract OXA-resistant cancers. PMID:27157913

  14. Blood-Brain Barrier and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein: A Limit to the Therapy of CNS Tumors and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Anna Lisa; da Ros, Martina; Fantappiè, Ornella; Lucchesi, Maurizio; Facchini, Ludovica; Stival, Alessia; Becciani, Sabrina; Guidi, Milena; Favre, Claudio; de Martino, Maurizio; Genitori, Lorenzo; Sardi, Iacopo

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of brain tumors and neurodegenerative diseases, represents an ongoing challenge. In Central Nervous System (CNS) the achievement of therapeutic concentration of chemical agents is complicated by the presence of distinct set of efflux proteins, such as ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters localized on the Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB). The activity of ABC transporters seems to be a common mechanism that underlies the poor response of CNS diseases to therapies. The molecular characterization of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP/ABCG2), as an ABC transporter conferring multidrug resistance (MDR), has stimulated many studies to investigate its activity on the BBB, its involvement in physiology and CNS diseases and its role in limiting the delivery of drugs in CNS. In this review, we highlight the activity and localization of BCRP on the BBB and the action that this efflux pump has on many conventional drugs or latest generation molecules used for the treatment of CNS tumors and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26584727

  15. Requirement of T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase for TRAIL resistance of human HeLa cervical cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK) appears to be highly expressed in various cancer cells and to play an important role in maintaining proliferation of cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanism by which TOPK regulates growth of cancer cells remains elusive. Here we report that upregulated endogenous TOPK augments resistance of cancer cells to apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL). Stable knocking down of TOPK markedly increased TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of human HeLa cervical cancer cells, as compared with control cells. Caspase 8 or caspase 3 activities in response to TRAIL were greatly incremented in TOPK-depleted cells. Ablation of TOPK negatively regulated TRAIL-mediated NF-κB activity. Furthermore, expression of NF-κB-dependent genes, FLICE-inhibitory protein (FLIP), inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (c-IAP1), or X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) was reduced in TOPK-depleted cells. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that TOPK contributed to TRAIL resistance of cancer cells via NF-κB activity, suggesting that TOPK might be a potential molecular target for successful cancer therapy using TRAIL.

  16. Binding and inhibition of drug transport proteins by heparin: a potential drug transporter modulator capable of reducing multidrug resistance in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunliang; Scully, Michael; Petralia, Gloria; Kakkar, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    A major problem in cancer treatment is the development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, multidrug resistance (MDR), associated with increased activity of transmembrane drug transporter proteins which impair cytotoxic treatment by rapidly removing the drugs from the targeted cells. Previously, it has been shown that heparin treatment of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy increases survival. In order to determine whether heparin is capable reducing MDR and increasing the potency of chemotherapeutic drugs, the cytoxicity of a number of agents toward four cancer cell lines (a human enriched breast cancer stem cell line, two human breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and a human lung cancer cell line A549) was tested in the presence or absence of heparin. Results demonstrated that heparin increased the cytotoxicity of a range of chemotherapeutic agents. This effect was associated with the ability of heparin to bind to several of the drug transport proteins of the ABC and non ABC transporter systems. Among the ABC system, heparin treatment caused significant inhibition of the ATPase activity of ABCG2 and ABCC1, and of the efflux function observed as enhanced intracellular accumulation of specific substrates. Doxorubicin cytoxicity, which was enhanced by heparin treatment of MCF-7 cells, was found to be under the control of one of the major non-ABC transporter proteins, lung resistance protein (LRP). LRP was also shown to be a heparin-binding protein. These findings indicate that heparin has a potential role in the clinic as a drug transporter modulator to reduce multidrug resistance in cancer patients. PMID:24253450

  17. Defects in mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 are linked to apoptotic resistance and autophagy in a lung cancer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Jean Thomas

    Full Text Available Evasion of apoptosis is implicated in almost all aspects of cancer progression, as well as treatment resistance. In this study, resistance to apoptosis was identified in tumorigenic lung epithelial (A549 cells as a consequence of defects in mitochondrial and autophagic function. Mitochondrial function is determined in part by mitochondrial morphology, a process regulated by mitochondrial dynamics whereby the joining of two mitochondria, fusion, inhibits apoptosis while fission, the division of a mitochondrion, initiates apoptosis. Mitochondrial morphology of A549 cells displayed an elongated phenotype-mimicking cells deficient in mitochondrial fission protein, Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1. A549 cells had impaired Drp1 mitochondrial recruitment and decreased Drp1-dependent fission. Cytochrome c release and caspase-3 and PARP cleavage were impaired both basally and with apoptotic stimuli in A549 cells. Increased mitochondrial mass was observed in A549 cells, suggesting defects in mitophagy (mitochondrial selective autophagy. A549 cells had decreased LC3-II lipidation and lysosomal inhibition suggesting defects in autophagy occur upstream of lysosomal degradation. Immunostaining indicated mitochondrial localized LC3 punctae in A549 cells increased after mitochondrial uncoupling or with a combination of mitochondrial depolarization and ectopic Drp1 expression. Increased inhibition of apoptosis in A549 cells is correlated with impeded mitochondrial fission and mitophagy. We suggest mitochondrial fission defects contribute to apoptotic resistance in A549 cells.

  18. High levels of X-linked Inhibitor-of-Apoptosis Protein (XIAP) are indicative of radio chemotherapy resistance in rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mainstay of treatment in rectal cancer is neoadjuvant radio chemotherapy prior to surgery, in an attempt to downstage the tumour, allowing for more complete removal during surgery. In 40 % of cases however, this neoadjuvant radio chemotherapy fails to achieve tumour regression, partly due insufficient apoptosis signaling. X-linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein (XIAP) is an anti-apoptotic protein that has been reported to contribute to disease progression and chemotherapy resistance. We obtained rectal biopsy normal and matched tumour tissue from 29 rectal cancer patients with varying degrees of tumour regression, and using Western blot, examined anti-apoptotic XIAP and pro-apoptotic Smac protein levels in these tissues, with the aim to examine whether disturbed XIAP/Smac levels may be an indicator of neoadjuvant radio chemotherapy resistance. Expression of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins cIAP-1 and cIAP-2 was also examined. We found that levels of XIAP increased in accordance with the degree of radio chemotherapy resistance of the tissue. Levels of this protein were also significantly higher in tumour tissue, compared to matched normal tissue in highly resistant tissue. In contrast, Smac protein levels did not increase with radio chemotherapy resistance, and the protein was similarly expressed in normal and tumour tissue, indicating a shift in the balance of these proteins. Post treatment surgical resection tissue was available for 8 patients. When we compared matched tissue pre- and post- radio chemotherapy we found that XIAP levels increased significantly during treatment in both normal and tumour tissue, while Smac levels did not change. cIAP-1 and cIAP-2 levels were not differentially expressed in varying degrees of radio chemotherapy resistance, and neoadjuvant therapy did not alter expression of these proteins. These data indicate that disturbance of the XIAP/Smac balance may be a driver of radio chemotherapy resistance, and hence high levels of XIAP may

  19. Targeting AMP-activated protein kinase in adipocytes to modulate obesity-related adipokine production associated with insulin resistance and breast cancer cell proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grisouard Jean

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adipokines, e.g. TNFα, IL-6 and leptin increase insulin resistance, and consequent hyperinsulinaemia influences breast cancer progression. Beside its mitogenic effects, insulin may influence adipokine production from adipocyte stromal cells and paracrine enhancement of breast cancer cell growth. In contrast, adiponectin, another adipokine is protective against breast cancer cell proliferation and insulin resistance. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK activity has been found decreased in visceral adipose tissue of insulin-resistant patients. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS link systemic inflammation to high fat diet-induced insulin resistance. Modulation of LPS-induced adipokine production by metformin and AMPK activation might represent an alternative way to treat both, insulin resistance and breast cancer. Methods Human preadipocytes obtained from surgical biopsies were expanded and differentiated in vitro into adipocytes, and incubated with siRNA targeting AMPKalpha1 (72 h, LPS (24 h, 100 μg/ml and/or metformin (24 h, 1 mM followed by mRNA extraction and analyses. Additionally, the supernatant of preadipocytes or derived-adipocytes in culture for 24 h was used as conditioned media to evaluate MCF-7 breast cancer cell proliferation. Results Conditioned media from preadipocyte-derived adipocytes, but not from undifferentiated preadipocytes, increased MCF-7 cell proliferation (p Conclusions Adipocyte-secreted factors enhance breast cancer cell proliferation, while AMPK and metformin improve the LPS-induced adipokine imbalance. Possibly, AMPK activation may provide a new way not only to improve the obesity-related adipokine profile and insulin resistance, but also to prevent obesity-related breast cancer development and progression.

  20. Enhanced brain disposition and effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol in P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein knockout mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adena S Spiro

    Full Text Available The ABC transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp, Abcb1 and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp, Abcg2 regulate the CNS disposition of many drugs. The main psychoactive constituent of cannabis Δ(9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC has affinity for P-gp and Bcrp, however it is unknown whether these transporters modulate the brain accumulation of THC and its functional effects on the CNS. Here we aim to show that mice devoid of Abcb1 and Abcg2 retain higher brain THC levels and are more sensitive to cannabinoid-induced hypothermia than wild-type (WT mice. Abcb1a/b (-/-, Abcg2 (-/- and wild-type (WT mice were injected with THC before brain and blood were collected and THC concentrations determined. Another cohort of mice was examined for THC-induced hypothermia by measuring rectal body temperature. Brain THC concentrations were higher in both Abcb1a/b (-/- and Abcg2 (-/- mice than WT mice. ABC transporter knockout mice exhibited delayed elimination of THC from the brain with the effect being more prominent in Abcg2 (-/- mice. ABC transporter knockout mice were more sensitive to THC-induced hypothermia compared to WT mice. These results show P-gp and Bcrp prolong the brain disposition and hypothermic effects of THC and offer a novel mechanism for both genetic vulnerability to the psychoactive effects of cannabis and drug interactions between CNS therapies and cannabis.

  1. Functional expression of the human breast cancer resistance protein in Pichia pastoris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report functional expression of BCRP in Pichia pastoris in which BCRP was produced as a 62 kDa underglycosylated protein. BCRP expression level in P. pastoris was comparable to that in HEK cells. The basal BCRP ATPase activity in the yeast membranes was approximately 40-80 nmol Pi/min/mg protein, which can be modulated by known BCRP substrates and inhibitors. Photolabeling of BCRP with 8-azido[α-32P]ATP was dependent preferentially on the presence of Co2+ than Mg2+ and could be inhibited by a molar excess of ATP. Vanadate-induced trapping of 8-azido[α-32P]ADP by BCRP was much more significant in the presence of Co2+ than that with Mg2+. The Km and Vmax values of BCRP for [3H]E1S transport were 3.6 ± 0.3 μM and 55.2 ± 1.6 pmol/min/mg protein, respectively. This efficient and cost-effective expression system should facilitate large scale production and purification of BCRP for further structural and functional analyses

  2. Prognostic implications of survivin and lung resistance protein in advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with platinum-based chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Wenfeng; Mao, Yan; ZHAN, YONGZI; Huang, Jianfeng; Wang, Xiangping; LUO, PENGHUI; Li LI; MO, DUNCHANG; Liu, Qiong; Xu, Huimin; Huang, Changjie

    2015-01-01

    Platinum-based chemotherapy is the first-line treatment for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but the chemotherapy often results in the development of chemoresistance. The present study aimed to explore the prognostic implications of survivin and lung resistance protein (LRP) in advanced NSCLC treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. Tumor samples were collected from 61 hospitalized patients with stage IIIB-IV NSCLC that underwent platinum-based chemotherapy. All patient samples were colle...

  3. First evidence of sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase protein expression and activity downregulation in human neoplasm: implication for resistance to therapeutics in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizuela, Leyre; Ader, Isabelle; Mazerolles, Catherine; Bocquet, Magalie; Malavaud, Bernard; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2012-09-01

    This is the first report of sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase (SPL) protein expression and enzymatic activity in human neoplasm. This enzyme drives irreversible degradation of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), a bioactive lipid associated with resistance to therapeutics in various cancers, including prostate adenocarcinoma. In fresh human prostatectomy specimens, a remarkable decrease in SPL enzymatic activity was found in tumor samples, as compared with normal adjacent tissues. A significant relationship between loss of SPL expression and higher Gleason score was confirmed in tissue microarray (TMA) analysis. Moreover, SPL protein expression and activity were inversely correlated with those of sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1), the enzyme producing S1P. SPL and SphK1 expressions were independently predictive of aggressive cancer on TMA, supporting the relevance of S1P in prostate cancer. In human C4-2B and PC-3 cell lines, silencing SPL enhanced survival after irradiation or chemotherapy by decreasing expression of proteins involved in sensing and repairing DNA damage or apoptosis, respectively. In contrast, enforced expression of SPL sensitized cancer cells to irradiation or docetaxel by tilting the ceramide/S1P balance toward cell death. Interestingly, the S1P degradation products failed to sensitize to chemo- and radiotherapy, supporting the crucial role of ceramide/S1P balance in cancer. Of note, the combination of SPL enforced expression with a SphK1 silencing strategy by further decreasing S1P content made prostate cancer cells even more sensitive to anticancer therapies, suggesting that a dual strategy aimed at stimulating SPL, and inhibiting SphK1 could represent a future approach to sensitize cancer cells to cancer treatments. PMID:22784711

  4. Cellular prion protein contributes to LS 174T colon cancer cell carcinogenesis by increasing invasiveness and resistance against doxorubicin-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieng, Cornelius Kwang-Lee; Say, Yee-How

    2015-09-01

    As the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) has been implicated in carcinogenesis, we aimed to investigate the effects of cancer cell-specific PrP(C) overexpression from the invasion, metastasis, and apoptosis aspects, by performing cell motility assays, cell proliferation assays under anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent conditions, and apoptosis evasion when subjected to multiple anti-cancer drugs. Overexpression of PrP(C) in LS 174T was achieved by stable transfection. PrP(C) overexpression was shown to increase cell proliferation in anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent manners, as shown by more viable cells in 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, more colonies formed in soft agar assay and increased resistance to anoikis in poly-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-coated surface. PrP(C) overexpression also increased cell motility and invasiveness of LS 174T. Cell adhesion to extracellular matrix using collagen- and fibronectin-coated surfaces revealed increased cell attachment in LS 174T cells overexpressing PrP(C). Analysis of apoptotic and necrotic cells by propidium iodide/annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate microscopy and 7-amino-actinomycin D/annexin V-phycoerythrin flow cytometry revealed that PrP(C) overexpression attenuated doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. Human apoptosis antibody array with 35 apoptosis-related proteins revealed that three inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs)-survivin, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), and cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1 (cIAP-1)-were upregulated in LS 174T cells overexpressing PrP(C) in doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, the overexpression of PrP(C) could enhance the invasiveness and survival of LS 174T colorectal cancer cells, indicating that PrP(C) plays a role in colorectal cancer biology. PMID:25983001

  5. Tamoxifen Resistance in Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Minsun

    2012-01-01

    Tamoxifen is a central component of the treatment of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer as a partial agonist of ER. It has been clinically used for the last 30 years and is currently available as a chemopreventive agent in women with high risk for breast cancer. The most challenging issue with tamoxifen use is the development of resistance in an initially responsive breast tumor. This review summarizes the roles of ER as the therapeutic target of tamoxifen in cancer treatment, clin...

  6. To predict response chemotherapy using technetium-99m tetrofosmin chest images in patients with untreated small cell lung cancer and compare with p-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance related protein-1, and lung resistance-related protein expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our preliminary studies found technetium-99m tetrofosmin (Tc- TF) chest imaging was related to Pgp or MRP1 expression and successfully predict chemotherapy response and in SCLC in human. However, there was no published literature to study relationship of Tc-TF chest images and LRP expression in SCLC patients. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the relationships among Tc- TF accumulation in untreated small cell lung cancer (SCLC), the expression of P-glycoprotein (Pgp), multidrug resistance related protein-1 (MRP1), and lung resistance-related protein (LRP), as well as the response to chemotherapy in patients with untreated SCLC. Thirty patients with SCLC were studied with chest images 15 to 30 minutes after intravenous injection of Tc-TF before chemotherapeutic induction. Tumor-to-background (T/B) ratios were obtained on the static and plantar Tc-TF chest images. The response to chemotherapy was evaluated upon completion of chemotherapy by clinical and radiological methods. These patients were separated into 15 patients with good response and 15 patients with poor response. No significant differences of prognostic factors (Karnofsky performance status, tumor size, or tumor stage) were found between the patients with good and poor responses. Immunohistochemical analyses were performed on multiple nonconsecutive sections of biopsy specimens to detect Pgp, MRP1, and LRP expression. The difference in T/B ratios on the Tc-TF chest images of the patients with good versus poor response was significant. The differences in T/B ratios of the patients with positive versus negative Pgp expression and with positive versus negative MRP1 expression were significant. The difference in T/B ratios of the patients with positive versus negative LRP expression was not significant. We concluded that Tc-TF chest images could accurately predict chemotherapy response of patients with SCLC. In addition, The Tc-TF tumor uptake was related to Pgp or MRP1 but not LPR

  7. Multidrug resistance associated proteins in multidrug resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kamlesh Sodani; Atish Patel; Rishil J. Kathawala; Zhe-Sheng Chen

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs) are members of the C family of a group of proteins named ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters.These ABC transporters together form the largest branch of proteins within the human body.The MRP family comprises of 13 members,of which MRP1 to MRP9 are the major transporters indicated to cause multidrug resistance in tumor cells by extruding anticancer drugs out of the cell.They are mainly lipophilic anionic transporters and are reported to transport free or conjugates of glutathione (GSH),glucuronate,or sulphate.In addition,MRP1 to MRP3 can transport neutral organic drugs in free form in the presence of free GSH.Collectively,MRPs can transport drugs that differ structurally and mechanistically,including natural anticancer drugs,nucleoside analogs,antimetabolites,and tyrosine kinase inhibitors.Many of these MRPs transport physiologically important anions such as leukotriene C4,bilirubin glucuronide,and cyclic nucleotides.This review focuses mainly on the physiological functions,cellular resistance characteristics,and probable in vivo role of MRP1 to MRP9.

  8. p38γ Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Contributes to Oncogenic Properties Maintenance and Resistance to Poly (ADP-Ribose-Polymerase-1 Inhibition in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanyan Meng

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available p38γ MAPK, one of the four members of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs, has previously been shown to harbor oncogenic functions. However, the biologic function of p38γ MAPK in breast cancer has not been well defined. In this study, we have shown that p38γ MAPK is overexpressed in highly metastatic human and mouse breast cancer cell lines and p38γ MAPK expression is preferentially associated with basal-like and metastatic phenotypes of breast tumor samples. Ectopic expression of p38γ MAPK did not lead to an increase in oncogenic properties in vitro in most tested mammary epithelial cells. However, knockdown of p38γ MAPK expression resulted in a dramatic decrease in cell proliferation, colony formation, cell migration, invasion in vitro and significant retardation of tumorigenesis, and long-distance metastasis to the lungs in vivo. Moreover, knockdown of p38γ MAPK triggered the activation of AKT signaling. Inhibition of this feedback loop with various PI3K/AKT signaling inhibitors facilitated the effect of targeting p38γ MAPK. We further found that overexpression of p38γ MAPK did not promote cell resistance to chemotherapeutic agents doxorubicin and paclitaxel but significantly increased cell resistance to PJ-34, a DNA damage agent poly (ADP-ribose-polymerase-1 (PARP inhibitor in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we identified that p38γ MAPK overexpression led to marked cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase. Our study for the first time clearly demonstrates that p38γ MAPK is a promising target for the design of targeted therapies for basal-like breast cancer with metastatic characteristics and for overcoming potential resistance against the PARP inhibitor.

  9. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 is a marker for antiestrogen resistant human breast cancer cell lines but is not a major growth regulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juncker-Jensen, A; Lykkesfeldt, A E; Worm, J;

    2006-01-01

    Antiestrogens target the estrogen receptor and counteract the growth stimulatory action of estrogen on human breast cancer. However, acquired resistance to antiestrogens is a major clinical problem in endocrine treatment of breast cancer patients. To mimic acquired resistance, we have used a mode...... resistant cell growth was observed. Thus, we were able to establish IGFBP-2 as a marker for antiestrogen resistant breast cancer cell lines, although IGFBP-2 was not a major contributor to the resistant cell growth.......Antiestrogens target the estrogen receptor and counteract the growth stimulatory action of estrogen on human breast cancer. However, acquired resistance to antiestrogens is a major clinical problem in endocrine treatment of breast cancer patients. To mimic acquired resistance, we have used a model...... system with the antiestrogen sensitive human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 and several antiestrogen resistant cell lines derived from the parental MCF-7 cell line. This model system was used to study the expression and possible involvement in resistant cell growth of insulin-like growth factor binding...

  10. Subtle Structural Differences Trigger Inhibitory Activity of Propafenone Analogues at the Two Polyspecific ABC Transporters: P-Glycoprotein (P-gp) and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Theresa; Montanari, Floriane; Cseke, Anna; Wlcek, Katrin; Visvader, Lene; Palme, Sarah; Chiba, Peter; Kuchler, Karl; Urban, Ernst; Ecker, Gerhard F

    2016-06-20

    The transmembrane ABC transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) are widely recognized for their role in cancer multidrug resistance and absorption and distribution of compounds. Furthermore, they are linked to drug-drug interactions and toxicity. Nevertheless, due to their polyspecificity, a molecular understanding of the ligand-transporter interaction, which allows designing of both selective and dual inhibitors, is still in its infancy. This study comprises a combined approach of synthesis, in silico prediction, and in vitro testing to identify molecular features triggering transporter selectivity. Synthesis and testing of a series of 15 propafenone analogues with varied rigidity and basicity of substituents provide first trends for selective and dual inhibitors. Results indicate that both the flexibility of the substituent at the nitrogen atom, as well as the basicity of the nitrogen atom, trigger transporter selectivity. Furthermore, inhibitory activity of compounds at P-gp seems to be much more influenced by logP than those at BCRP. Exploiting these differences further should thus allow designing specific inhibitors for these two polyspecific ABC-transporters. PMID:26970257

  11. Up-regulation of ribosomal protein S13 and L23 are associated with multidrug-resistant phenotype of gastric cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Aims:Prevous study using differential display-PCR had found up-regulation of ribosomal protein S13(RPS13) and L23(RPL23) in vincristine-resistant gastric cancer cells.The aim of this study was to explore the association of RPS13 and RPL23 with multidrug-resistant phenotype of gastric cancer cells.Methods:Northern blot analysis was used to determine the expression of RPS13 and RPL23 in vincristine-resistant gastric cancer cells SGC7901/VCR and its parental cells SGC7901.The full-length cDNAs encoding RPS13 and RPL23 were amplified from SGC7901/VCR cells using RT-PCR.Their sense and antisense expression vectors were constructed by DNA recombinant technique,and transferred into SGC7901 cells(sense vectors) or SGC7901/VCR cells(antisense vectors)by means of Lipofactamine.Drug sensitivity of gastric cancer cells was evalu-ated using MTT assay.Cell cycle analysis was performed using flow cytometry and proliferous index(PI) was calculated.Results:As Northem blot analysis indicated,RNA from SGC7902/VCR cells exhibited moderate signals of PRL23 and RPS13,while RNA from SGC7901 cells exhibited no signal of RPL23 and very weak signal of RPS13.RNA dot blot analysis indicated that RPS13 or RPL23 upregulated SGC7901 cells(SGC7901-RPS13,SGC7901-RPL23)and RPS13 or RPL23 down-regulated SGC7901/VCR cells(SGC7901/VCR-anRPS13,SGC7901/VCR-anRPL23) were successfully prepared by gene transduction.The results of MTT assay indicated that,comparing with non-transfected and empty vector transfected cells,SGC7901-RPL23 cells showed significantly increased IC50 values and resistance index(RI) of vincristine(VCR),adriamycin(ADR),5-fludrouracil(5-Fu) and mitomycin(MMC);SGC7901-RPS12 cells showed significantly increased IC50 values and RI of VCR,ADR and 5-Fu;SGC7901/VCR-anRPL23 cells showed significantly decreased IC50 values and RI of MMC and cisplatin(DDP);SGC7901/VCR-anRPS13 cells showed significantly decreased IC50 values and RI of VCR and MMC.Cell cycle analysis indicated that,comparing with

  12. Protein folding, protein homeostasis, and cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John H. Van Drie

    2011-01-01

    Proteins fold into their functional 3-dimensional structures from a linear amino acid sequence. In vitro this process is spontaneous; while in vivo it is orchestrated by a specialized set of proteins, called chaperones. Protein folding is an ongoing cellular process, as cellular proteins constantly undergo synthesis and degradation. Here emerging links between this process and cancer are reviewed. This perspective both yields insights into the current struggle to develop novel cancer chemotherapeutics and has implications for future chemotherapy discovery.

  13. Phorbol esters induce multidrug resistance in human breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanisms responsible for broad-based resistance to antitumor drugs derived from natural products (multidrug resistance) are incompletely understood. Agents known to reverse the multidrug-resistant phenotype (verapamil and trifluoperazine) can also inhibit the activity of protein kinase C. When the authors assayed human breast cancer cell lines for protein kinase C activity, they found that enzyme activity was 7-fold higher in the multidrug-resistance cancer cells compared with the control, sensitive parent cells. Exposure of drug-sensitive cells to the phorbol ester phorbol 12,13-dibutyate [P(BtO)2] led to an increase in protein kinase C activity and induced a drug-resistance phenotype, whereas exposure of drug-resistant cells to P(BtO)2 further increased drug resistance. In sensitive cells, this increased resistance was accomplished by a 3.5-fold increased phosphorylation of a 20-kDa particulate protein and a 35-40% decreased intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin and vincristine. P(BtO)2 induced resistance to agents involved in the multidrug-resistant phenotype (doxorubicin and vincristine) but did not affect sensitivity to an unrelated alkylating agent (melphalan). The increased resistance was partially or fully reversible by the calcium channel blocker verapamil and by the calmodulin-antagonist trifluoperazine. These data suggest that stimulation of protein kinase C playus a role in the drug-transport changes in multidrug-resistant cells. This may occur through modulation of an efflux pump by protein phosphorylation

  14. Comparative uptake of Tc-99m sestamibi and Tc-99m tetrofosmin in cancer cells and tissue expressing P-Glycoprotein or multidrug resistance associated protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    99mTc-sestamibi(MIBI) and 99mTc-tetrofosmin have been used as substrates for P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP), which are closely associated with multidrug resistance of the tumors. To understand different handling of radiotracers in cancer cell lines expressing Pgp and MRP, we compared cellular uptakes of 99mTc-MIBI and 99mTc-tetrofosmin. The effects of cyclosporin A (CsA), well-known multidrug resistant reversing agent, on the uptake of both tracers were also compared. HCT15/CL02 human colorectal cancer cells for Pgp expressing cells, and human non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells for MRP expressing cells, were used for in vitro and in vivo studies. RT-PCR, western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry were used for detection of Pgp and MRP. MDR-reversal effect with CsA was evaluated at different drug concentrations after incubation with MIBI or tetrofosmin. Radioactivities of supernatant and pellet were measured with gamma well counter. Tumoral uptake of the tracers were measured from tumor bearing nude mice treated with or without CsA. RT-PCR, western blot analysis of the cells and immunochemical staining revealed selective expression of Pgp and MRP for HCT15/CL02 and A549 cells, respectively. There were no significant difference in cellular uptakes of both tracers in HCT15/CL02 cells, but MIBI uptake was slightly higher than that of tetrofosmin in A549 cells. Co-incubation with CsA resulted in a increase in cellular uptakes of MIBI and tetrofosmin. Uptake of MIBI or tetrofosmin in HCT15/CL02 cells was increased by 10-and 2.4-fold, and by 7.5 and 6.3-fold in A549 cells, respectively. Percentage increase of MIBI was higher than that of tetrofosmin with CsA for both cells (ρ < 0.05). In vivo biodistribution study showed that MIBI (114% at 10 min, 257% at 60 min, 396% at 24C min) and tetrofosmin uptake (110% at 10 min, 205% at 60 min, 410% at 240 min) were progressively increased by the time, up to 240 min with CsA. But

  15. Comparative uptake of Tc-99m sestamibi and Tc-99m tetrofosmin in cancer cells and tissue expressing P-Glycoprotein or multidrug resistance associated protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jung Ah; Lee, Jae Tae; Yoo, Jung Ah [School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2005-02-15

    {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi(MIBI) and {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin have been used as substrates for P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP), which are closely associated with multidrug resistance of the tumors. To understand different handling of radiotracers in cancer cell lines expressing Pgp and MRP, we compared cellular uptakes of {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI and {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin. The effects of cyclosporin A (CsA), well-known multidrug resistant reversing agent, on the uptake of both tracers were also compared. HCT15/CL02 human colorectal cancer cells for Pgp expressing cells, and human non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells for MRP expressing cells, were used for in vitro and in vivo studies. RT-PCR, western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry were used for detection of Pgp and MRP. MDR-reversal effect with CsA was evaluated at different drug concentrations after incubation with MIBI or tetrofosmin. Radioactivities of supernatant and pellet were measured with gamma well counter. Tumoral uptake of the tracers were measured from tumor bearing nude mice treated with or without CsA. RT-PCR, western blot analysis of the cells and immunochemical staining revealed selective expression of Pgp and MRP for HCT15/CL02 and A549 cells, respectively. There were no significant difference in cellular uptakes of both tracers in HCT15/CL02 cells, but MIBI uptake was slightly higher than that of tetrofosmin in A549 cells. Co-incubation with CsA resulted in a increase in cellular uptakes of MIBI and tetrofosmin. Uptake of MIBI or tetrofosmin in HCT15/CL02 cells was increased by 10-and 2.4-fold, and by 7.5 and 6.3-fold in A549 cells, respectively. Percentage increase of MIBI was higher than that of tetrofosmin with CsA for both cells ({rho} < 0.05). In vivo biodistribution study showed that MIBI (114% at 10 min, 257% at 60 min, 396% at 24C min) and tetrofosmin uptake (110% at 10 min, 205% at 60 min, 410% at 240 min) were progressively increased by the time, up to

  16. 乳腺癌耐受蛋白介导5-氟脲嘧啶的耐受及机制探讨%Breast Cancer Resistance Protein Mediates 5-Fluorouracil Resistance and Its Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁建辉; 贺智敏; 吕辉; 余艳辉; 陈主初

    2005-01-01

    AIM To filtrate breast cancer resistance protein(BCRP)-mediated resistance agents and investigate the mechanism,so as to provide valuable datum for optimization clinical chemotherapy scheme to tumor with evaluation marker of BCRP expression. METHODS MTT assay was used to filtrate BCRP-mediated resistance agents with PA317/Tet-on/TRE-BCRP cell of different expression levels of BCRP after treated with different concentration anticancer agents. High performance liquid chromatography(HPLC) was applied to measure relative dose of intracellular retention resistance agents. Nuclear DNA fluorescence dye,Hochest 33258, staining and flow cytometry were adopted to detect apoptotic cells after treated with drugs. RESULTS There were shown increasing durg-resistance to 5-fluorouracil,methotrexate, doxirubicin, pirarubicin,etoposide and mitoxantrone followed with increasing expression of BCRP on PA317/Tet-on/TRE-BCRP cells(P<0.05, n=3),but shown sensitive to paclitaxel, cisplatin, vincristine, mitomycin and vindesine. There also was shown significant negative correlation between the intracellular retention dose of 5-fluorouracil with different expression of BCRP(r=-0.885, P<0.05, n=3).There were shown parallel results of that decreasing cellular apoptotic rate with increasing cellular expression of BCRP after treated with 5-fluorouracil by fluorescence dye staining and flow cytometry(P<0.05, n=3),and also shown significate rise of the apoptotic rate of BCRP expression cells after treated with Ko143 (P<0.05, n=3). Every group of cells could be different extently blocked in phase of G0/G1 treated with 5-fluorouracil. CONCLUSION Resistance of 5-fluorouracil could be especially mediated by conjugated with BCRP and acted as drug exclude-pump substrate. Cellular ability resistant to 5-fluorouracil-induced apoptosis could be reinforced by BCRP expression.

  17. The study of relationship between breast cancer 99Tcm-MIBI imaging with the expression of P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the relationship between the uptake, washout of 99Tcm-methoxy-isobutylisonitrile (MIBI) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) or multidrug resistance-related protein (MRP) expression in 36 breast cancer patients. Methods: 36 patients with untreated breast cancer were studied prospectively a week before surgical operation, all were injected intravenously with 740 MBq 99Tcm-MIBI in the arm contralateral to the lesion. Anterior planar images were acquired at 10 and 180 min after injection and the tumor-to-normal breast ratios (T/N) and washout rates (WR) were calculated. Immunohistochemical analyses of P-gp and MRP expression were used to evaluate the removed tumor tissues after operation and categorized into four groups. The differences of the early T/N ratios, the late T/N ratios and the WR among them were compared. Results: The early T/N ratios in group A and B were higher than that in group D. There was statistic difference between group A and D (P=0.001 ), and also in group B and D (P=0.045). The late T/N ratios had no statistic differences among them (F=0.499, P=0.686). The WR of group A, B, C were higher than that in group D and there were significant differences between them (P99Tcm-MIBI from the lesions and expression of P-gp or MRP in untreated breast cancer patients. 99Tcm-MIBI imaging with washout analysis might be a useful method for evaluating P-gp or MRP overexpression and their function in breast cancer. (authors)

  18. Overexpression of kinesins mediates docetaxel resistance in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Sarmishtha; Cipriano, Rocky; Jackson, Mark W; Stark, George R

    2009-10-15

    Resistance to chemotherapy remains a major barrier to the successful treatment of cancer. To understand mechanisms underlying docetaxel resistance in breast cancer, we used an insertional mutagenesis strategy to identify proteins whose overexpression confers resistance. A strong promoter was inserted approximately randomly into the genomes of tumor-derived breast cancer cells, using a novel lentiviral vector. We isolated a docetaxel-resistant clone in which the level of the kinesin KIFC3 was elevated. When KIFC3 or the additional kinesins KIFC1, KIF1A, or KIF5A were overexpressed in the breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB231 and MDA-MB 468, the cells became more resistant to docetaxel. The binding of kinesins to microtubules opposes the stabilizing effect of docetaxel that prevents cytokinesis and leads to apoptosis. Our finding that kinesins can mediate docetaxel resistance might lead to novel therapeutic approaches in which kinesin inhibitors are paired with taxanes. PMID:19789344

  19. P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein in acute myeloid leukaemia cells treated with the Aurora-B Kinase Inhibitor barasertib-hQPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurora kinases play an essential role in orchestrating chromosome alignment, segregation and cytokinesis during mitotic progression, with both aurora-A and B frequently over-expressed in a variety of human malignancies. Over-expression of the ABC drug transporter proteins P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) is a major obstacle for chemotherapy in many tumour types with Pgp conferring particularly poor prognosis in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Barasertib-hQPA is a highly selective inhibitor of aurora-B kinase that has shown tumouricidal activity against a range tumour cell lines including those of leukaemic AML origin. Effect of barasertib-hQPA on the pHH3 biomarker and cell viability was measured in a panel of leukaemic cell lines and 37 primary AML samples by flow cytometry. Pgp status was determined by flow cytometry and BCRP status by flow cytometry and real-time PCR. In this study we report the creation of the cell line OCI-AML3DNR, which over-expresses Pgp but not BCRP or multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP), through prolonged treatment of OCI-AML3 cells with daunorubicin. We demonstrate that Pgp (OCI-AML3DNR and KG-1a) and BCRP (OCI-AML6.2) expressing AML cell lines are less sensitive to barasertib-hQPA induced pHH3 inhibition and subsequent loss of viability compared to transporter negative cell lines. We also show that barasertib-hQPA resistance in these cell lines can be reversed using known Pgp and BCRP inhibitors. We report that barasertib-hQPA is not an inhibitor of Pgp or BCRP, but by using 14[C]-barasertib-hQPA that it is effluxed by these transporters. Using phosphoHistone H3 (pHH3) as a biomarker of barasertib-hQPA responsiveness in primary AML blasts we determined that Pgp and BCRP positive primary samples were less sensitive to barasertib-hQPA induced pHH3 inhibition (p = <0.001) than samples without these transporters. However, we demonstrate that IC50 inhibition of pHH3 by barasertib-hQPA was achieved in

  20. P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein in acute myeloid leukaemia cells treated with the Aurora-B Kinase Inhibitor barasertib-hQPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Nigel H

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aurora kinases play an essential role in orchestrating chromosome alignment, segregation and cytokinesis during mitotic progression, with both aurora-A and B frequently over-expressed in a variety of human malignancies. Over-expression of the ABC drug transporter proteins P-glycoprotein (Pgp and Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP is a major obstacle for chemotherapy in many tumour types with Pgp conferring particularly poor prognosis in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML. Barasertib-hQPA is a highly selective inhibitor of aurora-B kinase that has shown tumouricidal activity against a range tumour cell lines including those of leukaemic AML origin. Methods Effect of barasertib-hQPA on the pHH3 biomarker and cell viability was measured in a panel of leukaemic cell lines and 37 primary AML samples by flow cytometry. Pgp status was determined by flow cytometry and BCRP status by flow cytometry and real-time PCR. Results In this study we report the creation of the cell line OCI-AML3DNR, which over-expresses Pgp but not BCRP or multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP, through prolonged treatment of OCI-AML3 cells with daunorubicin. We demonstrate that Pgp (OCI-AML3DNR and KG-1a and BCRP (OCI-AML6.2 expressing AML cell lines are less sensitive to barasertib-hQPA induced pHH3 inhibition and subsequent loss of viability compared to transporter negative cell lines. We also show that barasertib-hQPA resistance in these cell lines can be reversed using known Pgp and BCRP inhibitors. We report that barasertib-hQPA is not an inhibitor of Pgp or BCRP, but by using 14[C]-barasertib-hQPA that it is effluxed by these transporters. Using phosphoHistone H3 (pHH3 as a biomarker of barasertib-hQPA responsiveness in primary AML blasts we determined that Pgp and BCRP positive primary samples were less sensitive to barasertib-hQPA induced pHH3 inhibition (p = 50 inhibition of pHH3 by barasertib-hQPA was achieved in 94.6% of these samples after 1

  1. EXPRESSION OF MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN (MRP) AND ITS RELATIONSHIP WITH CLINICOPATHOLOGICAL FACTORS IN NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝军; 王辉; 王恩华; 邱雪杉; 李庆昌; 刘云鹏

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between the expression of multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) and clinicopathological factors and prognosis.Methods: The expression of MRP in 62 cases with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was detected using immunohistochemistry method. The expression of MRP in 30 cases of NSCLC and corresponding normal lung tissues were detected using immunohistochemistry and Western Blot. Results: this study of tumor tissues confirmed the plasma membrane and/or cytoplasm locations of MRP.There was apparent difference between normal lung tissues and NSCLC in MRP. The survival analysis of 62 NSCLC showed that the mean survival time of the patients with negative MRP expression was 69.81+17.41 months and that of patients with positive MRP expression, 25.38+4.46months. Log-rank test suggested that the difference between them was significant (P=0.0156). It was also found that in squanous cell lung cancer the statistically significant difference between the mean survival time of patients with positive MRP expression and those with negative MRP expression (P=0.0153). Multivariate Cox model analysis suggested that the survival time was significantly related to expression of MRP (P=0.035) and lymphatic metastasis (P=0.038). Conclusion: MRP expression in NSCLC is significantly higher compared with normal lung tissues. The mean survival time of patients with negative MRP was relative longer and expression of MRP was an independent factor for prognosis.

  2. The predictive value of ERG protein expression for development of castration-resistant prostate cancer in hormone-naïve advanced prostate cancer treated with primary androgen deprivation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper Drimer; Røder, Martin A; Thomsen, Frederik B;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Biomarkers predicting response to primary androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and risk of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is lacking. We aimed to analyse the predictive value of ERG expression for development of CRPC. METHODS: In total, 194 patients with advanced and....../or metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) treated with first-line castration-based ADT were included. ERG protein expression was analysed in diagnostic specimens using immunohistochemistry (anti-ERG, EPR3864). Time to CRPC was compared between ERG subgroups using multiple cause-specific Cox regression stratified on...... ERG-status. Risk reclassification and time-dependent area under the ROC curves were used to assess the discriminative ability of ERG-status. Time to PSA-nadir, proportion achieving PSA-nadir ≤0.2 ng/ml, and risk of PCa-specific death were secondary endpoints. RESULTS: Median follow-up was 6.8 years...

  3. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN ADIPONECTIN, INSULIN RESISTANCE, AND ENDOMETRIAL CANCER

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Obesity is a well-known risk factor for the development of endometrial cancer; however, weight alone does not account for all cases. The authors hypothesized that insulin resistance also contributes to an increased risk for endometrial cancer. Adiponectin is a protein secreted by adipose...

  4. Diversity in fosfomycin resistance proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew K. Thompson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Certain strains of the soil microorganism Streptomyces produce an antibiotic, fosfomycin [(1 R,2 S-epoxypropylphosphonic acid], which is effective against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens by inhibiting the first committed step in cell-wall biosynthesis. Fosfomycin resistance proteins are metallo-enzymes that are known to inactivate the antibiotic by the addition of nucleophiles such as water, glutathione (GSH, l-cysteine and bacillithiol (BSH to the oxirane ring of the molecule. Progress in the characterisation of FosB-type fosfomycin resistance proteins found in many Gram-positive organisms has been slow. This paper provides a brief description of the diversity of fosfomycin resistance proteins in general and, more specifically, new data characterising the substrate selectivity, structure, mechanism and metal-ion dependence of FosB enzymes from pathogenic strains of Staphylococcus and Bacillus. These new findings include the high-resolution X-ray diffraction structures of FosB enzymes from Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus in various liganded states and kinetic data that suggest that Mn(II and BSH are the preferred divalent cation and thiol substrate for the reaction, respectively. The discovery of the inhibition of the enzyme by Zn(II led to the determination of a ternary structure of the FosB·Zn(II·fosfomycin·l-Cys complex which reveals both substrates present in a pose prior to reaction.

  5. Troglitazone reverses the multiple drug resistance phenotype in cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald F Davies

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Gerald F Davies1, Bernhard HJ Juurlink2, Troy AA Harkness11Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada; 2College of Medicine, Alfaisal University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaAbstract: A major problem in treating cancer is the development of drug resistance. We previously demonstrated doxorubicin (DOX resistance in K562 human leukemia cells that was associated with upregulation of glyoxalase 1 (GLO-1 and histone H3 expression. The thiazolidinedione troglitazone (TRG downregulated GLO-1 expression and further upregulated histone H3 expression and post-translational modifications in these cells, leading to a regained sensitivity to DOX. Given the pleiotropic effects of epigenetic changes in cancer development, we hypothesized that TRG may downregulate the multiple drug resistance (MDR phenotype in a variety of cancer cells. To test this, MCF7 human breast cancer cells and K562 cells were cultured in the presence of low-dose DOX to establish DOX-resistant cell lines (K562/DOX and MCF7/DOX. The MDR phenotype was confirmed by Western blot analysis of the 170 kDa P-glycoprotein (Pgp drug efflux pump multiple drug resistance protein 1 (MDR-1, and the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP. TRG markedly decreased expression of both MDR-1 and BCRP in these cells, resulting in sensitivity to DOX. Silencing of MDR-1 expression also sensitized MCF7/DOX cells to DOX. Use of the specific and irreversible peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ inhibitor GW9662 in the nanomolar range not only demonstrated that the action of TRG on MCF/DOX was PPARγ-independent, but indicated that PPARγ may play a role in the MDR phenotype, which is antagonized by TRG. We conclude that TRG is potentially a useful adjunct therapy in chemoresistant cancers. Keywords: chemotherapy, doxorubicin, breast cancer resistance protein-1, multiple drug resistance, multiple drug resistance protein 1

  6. The hallmarks of castration-resistant prostate cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsogiannou, Maria; Ziouziou, Hajer; Karaki, Sara; Andrieu, Claudia; Henry de Villeneuve, Marie; Rocchi, Palma

    2015-07-01

    Prostate cancer has become a real public health issue in industrialized countries, mainly due to patients' relapse by castration-refractory disease after androgen ablation. Castration-resistant prostate cancer is an incurable and highly aggressive terminal stage of prostate cancer, seriously jeopardizing the patient's quality of life and lifespan. The management of castration-resistant prostate cancer is complex and has opened new fields of research during the last decade leading to an improved understanding of the biology of the disease and the development of new therapies. Most advanced tumors resistant to therapy still maintain the androgen receptor-pathway, which plays a central role for survival and growth of most castration-resistant prostate cancers. Many mechanisms induce the emergence of the castration resistant phenotype through this pathway. However some non-related AR pathways like neuroendocrine cells or overexpression of anti-apoptotic proteins like Hsp27 are described to be involved in CRPC progression. More recently, loss of expression of tumor suppressor gene, post-transcriptional modification using miRNA, epigenetic alterations, alternatif splicing and gene fusion became also hallmarks of castration-resistant prostate cancer. This review presents an up-to-date overview of the androgen receptor-related mechanisms as well as the latest evidence of the non-AR-related mechanisms underlying castration-resistant prostate cancer progression. PMID:25981454

  7. Cancer Drug-Resistance and a Look at Specific Proteins: Rho GDP-Dissociation Inhibitor 2, Y-Box Binding Protein 1, and HSP70/90 Organizing Protein in Proteomics Clinical Application

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skalníková, Helena; Martinková, Jiřina; Hrabáková, Rita; Halada, Petr; Dziechciarková, M.; Hajdúch, M.; Gadher, S. J.; Hammar, A.; Enetoft, D.; Ekefjard, A.; Forsstrom-Olsson, O.; Kovářová, Hana

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 2 (2011), s. 404-415. ISSN 1535-3893 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07017; GA ČR GA301/08/1649 Grant ostatní: Operational Program Research and Development for Innovations(CZ) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/01.0030 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : cancer * anti-cancer drugs * drug resistance Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 5.113, year: 2011

  8. Evaluation of the P-glycoprotein- and breast cancer resistance protein-mediated brain penetration of 11C-labeled topotecan using small-animal positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Topotecan (TPT) is a camptothecin derivative and is an anticancer drug working as a topoisomerase-I-specific inhibitor. But TPT cannot penetrate through the blood-brain barrier. In this study, we synthesized a new positron emission tomography (PET) probe, [11C]TPT, to evaluate the P-glycoprotein (Pgp)- and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP)-mediated brain penetration of [11C]TPT using small-animal PET. Methods: [11C]TPT was synthesized by the reaction of a desmethyl precursor with [11C]CH3I. In vitro study using [11C]TPT was carried out in MES-SA and doxorubicin-resistant MES-SA/Dx5 cells in the presence or absence of elacridar, a specific inhibitor for Pgp and BCRP. The biodistribution of [11C]TPT was determined using small-animal PET and the dissection method in mice. Results: The transport of [11C]TPT to the extracellular side was determined in MES-SA/Dx5 cells exhibiting the expressions of Pgp and BCRP at high levels. This transport was inhibited by coincubation with elacridar. In Mdr1a/b-/-Bcrp1-/- mice, PET results indicated that the brain uptake of [11C]TPT was about two times higher than that in wild-type mice. Similarly, the brain penetration of [11C]TPT in wild-type mice was increased by treatment with elacridar. The radioactivity in the brain of elacridar-treated mice was maintained at a certain level after the injection of [11C]TPT, although the radioactivity in the blood decreased with time. Conclusions: We demonstrated the increase of brain penetration of [11C]TPT by deficiency and inhibition of Pgp and BCRP functions using small-animal PET in mice.

  9. Prognostic value of expression of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p21 and lung resistance protein as predicting factors in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study was to investigate whether cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p21 (p21) and lung resistance protein (LRP) could be predicting factors for recurrence after surgery for breast cancer. Immunostainings of p53, p21 and LRP were carried out to breast tissues which had been curatively resected. Prognostic factors were searched by means of multivariate analysis. In a Cox proportional hazard model, p21 and LRP were factors affecting the recurrence. Patients with p21 (-) and LRP (+) developed postoperative recurrence in a high frequency. Of patients administered anticancer drugs, the disease-free survical rate in those with p21 (-) was significantly low and all patients with p21 (-) and LRP (+) developed recurrence. Of patients having received postoperative irradiation, a significant difference was seen in the disease-free survical rate between groups with p21 (+) and p21 (-). In conclusion, expression of p21 (+) and LRP can each be an independent prognostic factor. And a combination of p21 (+) and LRP (-) predict the best prognosis along with favourable response to chemoradiotherapy following surgery. On the century a combination of p21 (-) and LRP (+) meet disappointing response to chemoradiotherapy. (author)

  10. The linker region of breast cancer resistance protein ABCG2 is critical for coupling of ATP-dependent drug transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macalou, S; Robey, R W; Jabor Gozzi, G; Shukla, S; Grosjean, I; Hegedus, T; Ambudkar, S V; Bates, S E; Di Pietro, A

    2016-05-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters of class G display a different domain organisation than P-glycoprotein/ABCB1 and bacterial homologues with a nucleotide-binding domain preceding the transmembrane domain. The linker region connecting these domains is unique and its function and structure cannot be predicted. Sequence analysis revealed that the human ABCG2 linker contains a LSGGE sequence, homologous to the canonical C-motif/ABC signature present in all ABC nucleotide-binding domains. Predictions of disorder and of secondary structures indicated that this C2-sequence was highly mobile and located between an α-helix and a loop similarly to the C-motif. Point mutations of the two first residues of the C2-sequence fully abolished the transport-coupled ATPase activity, and led to the complete loss of cell resistance to mitoxantrone. The interaction with potent, selective and non-competitive, ABCG2 inhibitors was also significantly altered upon mutation. These results suggest an important mechanistic role for the C2-sequence of the ABCG2 linker region in ATP binding and/or hydrolysis coupled to drug efflux. PMID:26708291

  11. Imaging of multidrug resistance in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Dizdarevic, S.; Peters, A M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Primary intrinsic and/or acquired multidrug resistance (MDR) is the main obstacle to successful cancer treatment. Functional molecular imaging of MDR in cancer using single photon or positron emitters may be helpful to identify multidrug-resistant tumours and predict not only those patients who are resistant to treatment, with a clinically unfavourable prognosis, but also those who are susceptible to the development of drug toxicity or even certain tumours . Variations in the mdr1 ge...

  12. High levels of X-linked Inhibitor-of-Apoptosis Protein (XIAP) are indicative of radio chemotherapy resistance in rectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Flanagan, L; Kehoe, J.; Fay, J.(Université de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS-IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Villeurbanne, France); Bacon, O; Lindner, A.U.; Kay, E W; Deasy, J.; McNamara, D A; Prehn, J. H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The mainstay of treatment in rectal cancer is neoadjuvant radio chemotherapy prior to surgery, in an attempt to downstage the tumour, allowing for more complete removal during surgery. In 40 % of cases however, this neoadjuvant radio chemotherapy fails to achieve tumour regression, partly due insufficient apoptosis signaling. X-linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein (XIAP) is an anti-apoptotic protein that has been reported to contribute to disease progression and chemotherapy resis...

  13. Breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) in clinical pharmacokinetics and drug interactions: practical recommendations for clinical victim and perpetrator drug-drug interaction study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Caroline A; O'Connor, Meeghan A; Ritchie, Tasha K; Galetin, Aleksandra; Cook, Jack A; Ragueneau-Majlessi, Isabelle; Ellens, Harma; Feng, Bo; Taub, Mitchell E; Paine, Mary F; Polli, Joseph W; Ware, Joseph A; Zamek-Gliszczynski, Maciej J

    2015-04-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; ABCG2) limits intestinal absorption of low-permeability substrate drugs and mediates biliary excretion of drugs and metabolites. Based on clinical evidence of BCRP-mediated drug-drug interactions (DDIs) and the c.421C>A functional polymorphism affecting drug efficacy and safety, both the US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency recommend preclinical evaluation and, when appropriate, clinical assessment of BCRP-mediated DDIs. Although many BCRP substrates and inhibitors have been identified in vitro, clinical translation has been confounded by overlap with other transporters and metabolic enzymes. Regulatory recommendations for BCRP-mediated clinical DDI studies are challenging, as consensus is lacking on the choice of the most robust and specific human BCRP substrates and inhibitors and optimal study design. This review proposes a path forward based on a comprehensive analysis of available data. Oral sulfasalazine (1000 mg, immediate-release tablet) is the best available clinical substrate for intestinal BCRP, oral rosuvastatin (20 mg) for both intestinal and hepatic BCRP, and intravenous rosuvastatin (4 mg) for hepatic BCRP. Oral curcumin (2000 mg) and lapatinib (250 mg) are the best available clinical BCRP inhibitors. To interrogate the worst-case clinical BCRP DDI scenario, study subjects harboring the BCRP c.421C/C reference genotype are recommended. In addition, if sulfasalazine is selected as the substrate, subjects having the rapid acetylator phenotype are recommended. In the case of rosuvastatin, subjects with the organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1B1 c.521T/T genotype are recommended, together with monitoring of rosuvastatin's cholesterol-lowering effect at baseline and DDI phase. A proof-of-concept clinical study is being planned by a collaborative consortium to evaluate the proposed BCRP DDI study design. PMID:25587128

  14. Interaction of drugs of abuse and maintenance treatments with human P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournier, Nicolas; Chevillard, Lucie; Megarbane, Bruno; Pirnay, Stéphane; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel; Declèves, Xavier

    2010-08-01

    Drug interaction with P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) may influence its tissue disposition including blood-brain barrier transport and result in potent drug-drug interactions. The limited data obtained using in-vitro models indicate that methadone, buprenorphine, and cannabinoids may interact with human P-gp; but almost nothing is known about drugs of abuse and BCRP. We used in vitro P-gp and BCRP inhibition flow cytometric assays with hMDR1- and hBCRP-transfected HEK293 cells to test 14 compounds or metabolites frequently involved in addiction, including buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, methadone, ibogaine, cocaine, cocaethylene, amphetamine, N-methyl-3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, nicotine, ketamine, Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), naloxone, and morphine. Drugs that in vitro inhibited P-gp or BCRP were tested in hMDR1- and hBCRP-MDCKII bidirectional transport studies. Human P-gp was significantly inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by norbuprenorphine>buprenorphine>methadone>ibogaine and THC. Similarly, BCRP was inhibited by buprenorphine>norbuprenorphine>ibogaine and THC. None of the other tested compounds inhibited either transporter, even at high concentration (100 microm). Norbuprenorphine (transport efflux ratio approoximately 11) and methadone (transport efflux ratio approoximately 1.9) transport was P-gp-mediated; however, with no significant stereo-selectivity regarding methadone enantiomers. BCRP did not transport any of the tested compounds. However, the clinical significance of the interaction of norbuprenorphine with P-gp remains to be evaluated. PMID:19887017

  15. In vivo evaluation of P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein modulation in the brain using [{sup 11}C]gefitinib

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Kazunori [Department of Molecular Probes, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: kawamur@nirs.go.jp; Yamasaki, Tomoteru; Yui, Joji; Hatori, Akiko; Konno, Fujiko; Kumata, Katsushi; Irie, Toshiaki; Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Kanno, Iwao; Zhang Mingrong [Department of Molecular Probes, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2009-04-15

    Gefitinib (Iressa) is a selective inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase. Recent studies confirmed that gefitinib interacted with the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) at submicromolar concentrations, whereas other multidrug transporters, including P-glycoprotein (P-gp), showed much lower reactivity toward gefitinib. Recently, many tracers for positron emission tomography (PET) have been prepared to study P-gp function in vivo; however, PET tracers had not been evaluated for both P-gp and BCRP modulation in the brain. Therefore, we evaluated in vivo brain penetration-mediated P-gp and BCRP in mice using [{sup 11}C]gefitinib. Co-injection with gefitinib (over 50 mg/kg), a nonspecific P-gp modulator cyclosporin A (50 mg/kg), and the dual P-gp and BCRP modulator GF120918 (over 5 mg/kg) induced an increase in the brain uptake of [{sup 11}C]gefitinib in mice 30 min after injection. In the PET study of mice, the radioactivity level in the brain with co-injection of GF120918 (5 mg/kg) was three- to fourfold higher than that in control after initial uptake. The radioactivity level in the brain in P-gp and Bcrp knockout mice was approximately eightfold higher than that in wild-type mice 60 min after injection. In conclusion, [{sup 11}C]gefitinib is a promising PET tracer to evaluate the penetration of gefitinib into the brain by combined therapy with P-gp or BCRP modulators, and into brain tumors. Furthermore, PET study with GF120918 is a promising approach for evaluating brain penetration-mediated P-gp and BCRP.

  16. In vivo evaluation of P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein modulation in the brain using [11C]gefitinib

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gefitinib (Iressa) is a selective inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase. Recent studies confirmed that gefitinib interacted with the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) at submicromolar concentrations, whereas other multidrug transporters, including P-glycoprotein (P-gp), showed much lower reactivity toward gefitinib. Recently, many tracers for positron emission tomography (PET) have been prepared to study P-gp function in vivo; however, PET tracers had not been evaluated for both P-gp and BCRP modulation in the brain. Therefore, we evaluated in vivo brain penetration-mediated P-gp and BCRP in mice using [11C]gefitinib. Co-injection with gefitinib (over 50 mg/kg), a nonspecific P-gp modulator cyclosporin A (50 mg/kg), and the dual P-gp and BCRP modulator GF120918 (over 5 mg/kg) induced an increase in the brain uptake of [11C]gefitinib in mice 30 min after injection. In the PET study of mice, the radioactivity level in the brain with co-injection of GF120918 (5 mg/kg) was three- to fourfold higher than that in control after initial uptake. The radioactivity level in the brain in P-gp and Bcrp knockout mice was approximately eightfold higher than that in wild-type mice 60 min after injection. In conclusion, [11C]gefitinib is a promising PET tracer to evaluate the penetration of gefitinib into the brain by combined therapy with P-gp or BCRP modulators, and into brain tumors. Furthermore, PET study with GF120918 is a promising approach for evaluating brain penetration-mediated P-gp and BCRP.

  17. Challenges of drug resistance in the management of pancreatic cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sheikh, Rizwan

    2012-02-01

    The current treatment of choice for metastatic pancreatic cancer involves single-agent gemcitabine or a combination of gemcitabine with capecitabine or erlotinib (a tyrosine kinase inhibitor). Only 25–30% of patients respond to this treatment and patients who do respond initially ultimately exhibit disease progression. Median survival for pancreatic cancer patients has reached a plateau due to inherent and acquired resistance to these agents. Key molecular factors implicated in this resistance include: deficiencies in drug uptake, alteration of drug targets, activation of DNA repair pathways, resistance to apoptosis and the contribution of the tumor microenvironment. Moreover, for newer agents including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, overexpression of signaling proteins, mutations in kinase domains, activation of alternative pathways, mutations of genes downstream of the target and\\/or amplification of the target represent key challenges for treatment efficacy. Here we will review the contribution of known mechanisms and markers of resistance to key pancreatic cancer drug treatments.

  18. Defining Resistance and Tolerance to Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adler R. Dillman

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available There are two ways to maintain fitness in the face of infection: resistance is a host’s ability to reduce microbe load and disease tolerance is the ability of the host to endure the negative health effects of infection. Resistance and disease tolerance should be applicable to any insult to the host and have been explored in depth with regards to infection but have not been examined in the context of cancer. Here, we establish a framework for measuring and separating resistance and disease tolerance to cancer in Drosophila melanogaster. We plot a disease tolerance curve to cancer in wild-type flies and then compare this to natural variants, identifying a line with reduced cancer resistance. Quantitation of these two traits opens an additional dimension for analysis of cancer biology.

  19. Clinical imaging of multidrug resistance in cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most well-characterized mechanism of multidrug resistance (MDR) involves P-glycoprotein (Pgp), a transmembrane protein acting as an ATP-dependent drug efflux pump. The recognition of 99mTc-Sestamibi and other lipophilic cations as transport substrates for Pgp provided the necessary tool for the clinical assessment of Pgp function in patients with cancer. Many clinical studies from different institutions and trials including variety of malignancies indicate that both tumor uptake and clearance of 99mTc-Sestamibi are correlate with Pgp expression and may be used for the phenotypic assessment of multidrug resistance. Although both parameters may predict tumor responsible to chemotherapy, the extraction of efflux rate constants appeared o provide a more direct index of Pgp function as compared tp tracer uptake ratio allowing to trace a continuous spectrum of drug transport activity. Preliminary studies the use of MDR imaging agents to monitor the modulating ability of revertant compounds. Although the results support the feasibility of this approach, the alteration of tracer pharmacokinetics induced by the modulators certainly constitute a challenge in the development of a simple functional test suitable in clinical practice. The extension of the acquired imaging methodology to tumors with redundant intrinsic resistant mechanism. Due to multifactorial nature of phenomenon, the development of new tracers with substrate specificity for other known the complex array of cellular mechanisms contributing to treatment failure

  20. Clinical imaging of multidrug resistance in cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Vecchi, S.; Ciarmiello, A.; Salvatore, M. [Naples Univ. Federico 2. (Italy). Medicina Nucleare. Dipt. di Scienze Biomorfologiche e Funzionali

    1999-06-01

    The most well-characterized mechanism of multidrug resistance (MDR) involves P-glycoprotein (Pgp), a transmembrane protein acting as an ATP-dependent drug efflux pump. The recognition of {sup 9}9mTc-Sestamibi and other lipophilic cations as transport substrates for Pgp provided the necessary tool for the clinical assessment of Pgp function in patients with cancer. Many clinical studies from different institutions and trials including variety of malignancies indicate that both tumor uptake and clearance of {sup 9}9mTc-Sestamibi are correlate with Pgp expression and may be used for the phenotypic assessment of multidrug resistance. Although both parameters may predict tumor responsible to chemotherapy, the extraction of efflux rate constants appeared o provide a more direct index of Pgp function as compared tp tracer uptake ratio allowing to trace a continuous spectrum of drug transport activity. Preliminary studies the use of MDR imaging agents to monitor the modulating ability of revertant compounds. Although the results support the feasibility of this approach, the alteration of tracer pharmacokinetics induced by the modulators certainly constitute a challenge in the development of a simple functional test suitable in clinical practice. The extension of the acquired imaging methodology to tumors with redundant intrinsic resistant mechanism. Due to multifactorial nature of phenomenon, the development of new tracers with substrate specificity for other known the complex array of cellular mechanisms contributing to treatment failure.

  1. 耐药相关蛋白P-gp、MRP、LRP在非小细胞肺癌组织中的表达及意义%The expression and significance of the multidrug resistance-related proteins P-gp, MRP and LRP in human non-small cell lung cancer tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the expression and significance of the multidrug resistance-related proteins P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance-related protein (MRP), lung resistance protein (LRP) in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissues and paratumor tissues. Methods: Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to examine the expression level of proteins P-gp, MRP and LRP in 43 samples of NSCLC and 15 samples of paratumor tissues. Results: The expression rates of P-gp, MRP and LRP in 43 tumor tissues were 74.42% (32/43), 67.44% (29/43) and 88.37% (38/43), respectively, while in 15 paratumor tissues were 13.33% (2/15), 20.00% (3/15) and 6.67% (1/15), respectively. There was significant difference in the expression of proteins (P-gp, MRP and LRP) between lung cancer tissues and paratumor tissues (P < 0.05). The expression of proteins P-gp, LRP in lung adenocarcinoma were higher than that in other pathological carcinomas (P < 0.05). The expression of protein MRP was not related to pathological type, clinical stage and classification of histodifferentiation (P >0.05). Conclusion: Multidrug resistance is more common in NSCLC. The proteins of P-gp, MRP and LRP participated in the formation of multidrug resistance in lung cancer. Detection of multidrug resistance-related proteins in lung cancer tissues may be useful to choice drugs.

  2. Whey Protein- The Role of Protein Supplementation in Resistance Training

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmer, Raymond

    2005-01-01

    Adequate protein intake is an important concern for many athletes who are undergoing strength-training programs. Many athletes choose to take a protein supplement, such as whey protein, in order to help them build lean muscle mass more efficiently. But the benefit of very high levels of dietary protein in resistance training remains questionable. This paper examines the effectiveness of whey protein, and other forms of protein supplements, in helping athletes augment their muscle mass. A comp...

  3. Reduced selenium-binding protein 1 in breast cancer correlates with poor survival and resistance to the anti-proliferative effects of selenium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Zhang

    Full Text Available Supplemental dietary selenium is associated with reduced incidence of many cancers. The antitumor function of selenium is thought to be mediated through selenium-binding protein 1 (SELENBP1. However, the significance of SELENBP1 expression in breast cancer is still largely unknown. A total of 95 normal and tumor tissues assay and 12 breast cancer cell lines were used in this study. We found that SELENBP1 expression in breast cancer tissues is reduced compared to normal control. Low SELENBP1 expression in ER(+ breast cancer patients was significantly associated with poor survival (p<0.01, and SELENBP1 levels progressively decreased with advancing clinical stages of breast cancer. 17-β estradiol (E2 treatment of high SELENBP1-expressing ER(+ cell lines led to a down-regulation of SELENBP1, a result that did not occur in ER(- cell lines. However, after ectopic expression of ER in an originally ER(- cell line, down-regulation of SELENBP1 upon E2 treatment was observed. In addition, selenium treatment resulted in reduced cell proliferation in endogenous SELENBP1 high cells; however, after knocking-down SELENBP1, we observed no significant reduction in cell proliferation. Similarly, selenium has no effect on inhibition of cell proliferation in low endogenous SELENBP1 cells, but the inhibitory effect is regained following ectopic SELENBP1 expression. Furthermore, E2 treatment of an ER silenced high endogenous SELENBP1 expressing cell line showed no abolishment of cell proliferation inhibition upon selenium treatment. These data indicate that SELENBP1 expression is regulated via estrogen and that the cell proliferation inhibition effect of selenium treatment is dependent on the high level of SELENBP1 expression. Therefore, the expression level of SELENBP1 could be an important marker for predicting survival and effectiveness of selenium supplementation in breast cancer. This is the first study to reveal the importance of monitoring SELENBP1 expression

  4. [18F]FDG is not transported by P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein at the rodent blood–brain barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Transport of 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]FDG) by the multidrug efflux transporters P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) at the blood–brain barrier (BBB) may confound the interpretation of [18F]FDG brain PET data. Aim of this study was to assess the influence of ABCB1 and ABCG2 at the BBB on brain distribution of [18F]FDG in vivo by performing [18F]FDG PET scans in wild-type and transporter knockout mice and by evaluating changes in [18F]FDG brain distribution after transporter inhibition. Methods: Dynamic small-animal PET experiments (60 min) were performed with [18F]FDG in groups of wild-type and transporter knockout mice (Abcb1a/b(−/−), Abcg2(−/−) and Abcb1a/b(−/−)Abcg2(−/−)) and in wild-type rats without and with i.v. pretreatment with the known ABCB1 inhibitor tariquidar (15 mg/kg, given at 2 h before PET). Blood was sampled from animals from the orbital sinus vein at the end of the PET scans and measured in a gamma counter. Brain uptake of [18F]FDG was expressed as the brain-to-blood radioactivity concentration ratio in the last PET time frame (Kb,brain). Results: Kb,brain values of [18F]FDG were not significantly different between different mouse types both without and with tariquidar pretreatment. The blood-to-brain transfer rate constant of [18F]FDG was significantly lower in tariquidar-treated as compared with vehicle-treated rats (0.350 ± 0.025 mL/min/g versus 0.416 ± 0.024 mL/min/g, p = 0.026, paired t-test) but Kb,brain values were not significantly different between both rat groups. Conclusion: Our results show that [18F]FDG is not transported by Abcb1 at the mouse and rat BBB in vivo. In addition we found no evidence for Abcg2 transport of [18F]FDG at the mouse BBB. Advances in knowledge and implications for patient care: Our findings imply that functional activity of ABCB1 and ABCG2 at the BBB does not need to be taken into account when interpreting brain [18F]FDG PET data

  5. Tumor microenvironment and cancer therapy resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu

    2016-09-28

    Innate resistance to various therapeutic interventions is a hallmark of cancer. In recent years, however, acquired resistance has emerged as a daunting challenge to anticancer treatments including chemotherapy, radiation and targeted therapy, which abolishes the efficacy of otherwise successful regimens. Cancer cells gain resistance through a variety of mechanisms in both primary and metastatic sites, involving cell intrinsic and extrinsic factors, but the latter often remains overlooked. Mounting evidence suggests critical roles played by the tumor microenvironment (TME) in multiple aspects of cancer progression particularly therapeutic resistance. The TME decreases drug penetration, confers proliferative and antiapoptotic advantages to surviving cells, facilitates resistance without causing genetic mutations and epigenetic changes, collectively modifying disease modality and distorting clinical indices. Recent studies have set the baseline for future investigation on the intricate relationship between cancer resistance and the TME in pathological backgrounds. This review provides an updated outline of research advances in TME biology and highlights the prospect of targeting the TME as an essential strategy to overcome cancer resistance and improve therapeutic outcomes through precise intervention. In the long run, continued inputs into translational medicine remain highly desired to achieve durable responses in the current era of personalized clinical oncology. PMID:26272180

  6. Multidrug Resistance in Prostate Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. van Brussel

    2005-01-01

    textabstractAdvanced hormone refractory prostate cancer constitutes a therapeutic challenge, because all available treatment strategies have failed to substantially increase cancer specific survival. Among these strategies, a multitude of chemotherapeutic approaches did not offer a superior life

  7. Protein breakdown in cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandri, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscle is a highly adaptive tissue, capable of altering muscle fiber size, functional capacity and metabolism in response to physiological stimuli. However, pathological conditions such as cancer growth compromise the mechanisms that regulate muscle homeostasis, resulting in loss of muscle mass, functional impairment and compromised metabolism. This tumor-induced condition is characterized by enhanced muscle protein breakdown and amino acids release that sustain liver gluconeogenesis and tissue protein synthesis. Proteolysis is controlled by the two most important cellular degradation systems, the ubiquitin proteasome and autophagy lysosome. These systems are carefully regulated by different signalling pathways that determine protein and organelle turnover. In this review we will describe the involvement of the ubiquitin proteasome and autophagy lysosome systems in cancer cachexia and the principal signalling pathways that regulate tumor-induced protein breakdown in muscle. PMID:26564688

  8. Bcl-w, a Radio-resistant Protein, Promotes the Gastric Cancer Cell Migration by inducing the phosphorylation of Focal Adhesion Kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastric cancer is one of the leading malignancies in many countries and lethal for the high incidence of recurrence even after drastic surgical resection. Because local invasion and subsequent metastasis contributes to the failure of anticancer treatments of gastric cancer, a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in tumor invasiveness within the stomach seems to be essential for the control of this disease. Bcl-w is a prosurvival member of the Bcl-2 protein family, and thus protects cells from γ-irradiation. Recent reports suggest that Bcl-w can be upregulated in gastric cancer cells in a manner associated with the infiltrative (diffuse) types of the tumor. An analysis of Bcl-w function consistently revealed that Bcl-w can also promote the migratory and invasive potentials of gastric cancer cells. While it was shown that Bcl-w increases the invasiveness of cancer cells by sequentially inducing PI3K, Akt, SP1, and MMP-2, cellular components involved in Bcl-w-induced cell migration remain to be determined. This was the reason why we undertook the present study, which shows that FAK is a critical mediator of the cell migration induced by Bcl-w

  9. Tandutinib (MLN518) reverses multidrug resistance by inhibiting the efflux activity of the multidrug resistance protein 7 (ABCC10)

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Wen; Dai, Chun-ling; Chen, Jun-Jiang; KATHAWALA, RISHIL J.; SUN, YUE-LI; CHEN, HAI-FAN; Fu, Li-wu; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) is one of the major mechanisms that causes resistance to antineoplastic drugs in cancer cells. ABC transporters can significantly decrease the intracellular concentration of antineoplastic drugs by increasing their efflux, thereby lowering their cytotoxic activity. One of these transporters, the multidrug resistance protein 7 (MRP7/ABCC10), has already been shown to produce resistance to ant...

  10. Broad distribution of the multidrug resistance-related vault lung resistance protein in normal human tissues and tumors.

    OpenAIRE

    Izquierdo, M. A.; Scheffer, G L; Flens, M.J.; Giaccone, G.; Broxterman, H. J.; Meijer, C J; van der Valk, P; Scheper, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to anticancer drugs is a major cause of treatment failure in cancer. The lung resistance protein LRP is a newly described protein related to MDR in several in vitro models. LRP has been shown to be a strong predictor of poor response to chemotherapy and prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia and in ovarian carcinoma patients. Recently, based on a 57% and 88% amino acid identity with major vault proteins from Dictyostelium discoideum and Rattus norvegicus, respectively,...

  11. Nanodrug Delivery in Reversing Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonali eKapse-Mistry

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Different mechanisms in cancer cells become resistant to one or more chemotherapeutics is known as multidrug resistance(MDR which hinders chemotherapy efficacy. Potential factors for MDR includes enhanced drug detoxification, decreased drug uptake, increased intracellular nucleophiles levels, enhanced repair of drug induced DNA damage, overexpression of drug transporter such as P-glycoprotein(P-gp, multidrug resistance-associated proteins(MRP1, MRP2 and breast cancer resistance protein(BCRP. Currently nanoassemblies such as polymeric/solid lipid/inorganic/metal nanoparticles, quantum dots, dendrimers, liposomes, micelles has emerged as an innovative, effective and promising platforms for treatment of drug resistant cancer cells. Nanocarriers have potential to improve drug therapeutic index, ability for multifunctionality, divert ABC-transporter mediated drug efflux mechanism and selective targeting to tumor cells, cancer stem cells, tumor initiating cells or cancer microenvironment. Selective nanocarrier targeting to tumor overcomes dose-limiting side effects, lack of selectivity, tissue toxicity, limited drug access to tumor tissues, high drug doses and emergence of multiple drug resistance with conventional or combination chemotherapy. Current review highlights various nanodrug delivery systems to overcome mechanism of MDR by neutralizing, evading or exploiting the drug efflux pumps and those independent of drug efflux pump mechanism by silencing Bcl-2 and HIF1 gene expressions by siRNA and miRNA, modulating ceramide levels and targeting NF-B. Theragnostics combining a cytotoxic agent, targeting moiety, chemosensitizing agent and diagnostic imaging aid are highlighted as effective and innovative systems for tumor localization and overcoming MDR. Physical approaches such as combination of drug with thermal/ultrasound/photodynamic therapies to overcome MDR are focused. The review focuses on newer drug delivery systems developed to overcome

  12. Cancer stem cells and chemoradiation resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer is a disease of genetic and epigenetic alterations, which are emphasized as the central mechanisms of tumor progression in the multistepwise model. Discovery of rare subpopulations of cancer stem cells (CSCs) has created a new focus in cancer research. The heterogeneity of tumors can be explained with the help of CSCs supported by antiapoptotic signaling. CSCs mimic normal adult stem cells by demonstrating resistance to toxic injuries and chemoradiation therapy. Moreover, they might be responsible for tumor relapse following apparent beneficial treatments. Compared with hematopoietic malignancies, conventional therapy regimes in solid tumors have improved the overall survival marginally, illustrating the profound impact of treatment resistance. This implies that the present therapies, which follow total elimination of rapidly dividing and differentiated tumor cells, need to be modified to target CSCs that repopulate the tumor. In this review article, we report on recent findings regarding the involvement of CSCs in chemoradiation resistance and provide new insights into their therapeutic implications in cancer. (author)

  13. Targeting protein kinases to reverse multidrug resistance in sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua; Shen, Jacson; Choy, Edwin; Hornicek, Francis J; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2016-02-01

    Sarcomas are a group of cancers that arise from transformed cells of mesenchymal origin. They can be classified into over 50 subtypes, accounting for approximately 1% of adult and 15% of pediatric cancers. Wide surgical resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy are the most common treatments for the majority of sarcomas. Among these therapies, chemotherapy can palliate symptoms and prolong life for some sarcoma patients. However, sarcoma cells can have intrinsic or acquired resistance after treatment with chemotherapeutics drugs, leading to the development of multidrug resistance (MDR). MDR attenuates the efficacy of anticancer drugs and results in treatment failure for sarcomas. Therefore, overcoming MDR is an unmet need for sarcoma therapy. Certain protein kinases demonstrate aberrant expression and/or activity in sarcoma cells, which have been found to be involved in the regulation of sarcoma cell progression, such as cell cycle, apoptosis, and survival. Inhibiting these protein kinases may not only decrease the proliferation and growth of sarcoma cells, but also reverse their resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs to subsequently reduce the doses of anticancer drugs and decrease drug side-effects. The discovery of novel strategies targeting protein kinases opens a door to a new area of sarcoma research and provides insight into the mechanisms of MDR in chemotherapy. This review will focus on the recent studies in targeting protein kinase to reverse chemotherapeutic drug resistance in sarcoma. PMID:26827688

  14. Drug Resistance Proteins and Refractory Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-01-01

    Expression of multi-drug resistance gene-1 P-glycoprotein (MDR1) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) in refractory epilepsy was studied at the Epilepsy Research Group, Institutes of Neurology and Child Health, University College, London, and Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford, UK.

  15. Current Status on Marine Products with Reversal Effect on Cancer Multidrug Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Huiqin Guo; Zhe-Sheng Chen; Khalid El Sayed; Ioana Abraham

    2012-01-01

    The resistance of tumor cells to a broad range of anticancer agents continues to be a problem for the success of cancer chemotherapy. Multidrug resistance (MDR) is due in part to three drug transporter proteins: ABCB1/P-glycoprotein (P-gp), ABCC1/multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) and ABCG2/breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). These transporters are part of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily, whose members function as ATP-dependent drug-efflux pumps. Their activity can be block...

  16. Transmembrane transporters ABCC – structure, function and role in multidrug resistance of cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Dębska

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to cytotoxic drugs is a significant problem of systemic treatment of cancers. Apart from drug inactivation, changes in target enzymes and proteins, increased DNA repair and suppression of apoptosis, an important mechanism of resistance is an active drug efflux from cancer cells. Drug efflux across the cell membrane is caused by transport proteins such as ABC proteins (ATP-binding cassette. This review focuses on the ABCC protein subfamily, whose members are responsible for multidrug cross-resistance of cancer cells to cytotoxic agents. The authors discuss the structure of ABCC proteins, their physiological function and diseases provoked by mutations of respective genes, their expression in many different malignancies and its connection with resistance to anticancer drugs, as well as methods of reversion of such resistance.

  17. Drug efflux proteins in multidrug resistant bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanVeen, HW; Konings, WN

    1997-01-01

    Bacteria contain an array of transport proteins in their cytoplasmic membrane. Many of these proteins play an important role in conferring resistance to toxic compounds. The multidrug efflux systems encountered in prokaryotic cells are very similar to those observed in eukaryotic cells. Therefore, a

  18. Ionizing radiation enhances therapeutic activity of mda-7/IL-24: overcoming radiation- and mda-7/IL-24-resistance in prostate cancer cells overexpressing the antiapoptotic proteins bcl-xL or bcl-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Z-Z; Lebedeva, I V; Sarkar, D; Emdad, L; Gupta, P; Kitada, S; Dent, P; Reed, J C; Fisher, P B

    2006-04-13

    Subtraction hybridization applied to terminally differentiating human melanoma cells identified mda-7/IL-24, a cytokine belonging to the IL-10 gene superfamily. Adenoviral-mediated delivery of mda-7/IL-24 (Ad.mda-7) provokes apoptosis selectively in a wide spectrum of cancers in vitro in cell culture, in vivo in human tumor xenograft animal models and in patients with advanced carcinomas and melanomas. In human prostate cancer cells, a role for mitochondrial dysfunction and induction of reactive oxygen species in the apoptotic process has been established. Ectopic overexpression of bcl-xL and bcl-2 prevents these changes including apoptosis induction in prostate tumor cells by Ad.mda-7. We now document that this resistance to apoptosis can be reversed by treating bcl-2 family overexpressing prostate tumor cells with ionizing radiation in combination with Ad.mda-7 or purified GST-MDA-7 protein. Additionally, radiation augments apoptosis induction by mda-7/IL-24 in parental and neomycin-resistant prostate tumor cells. Radiosensitization to mda-7/IL-24 is dependent on JNK signaling, as treatment with the JNK 1/2/3 inhibitor SP600125 abolishes this effect. Considering that elevated expression of bcl-xL and bcl-2 are frequent events in prostate cancer development and progression, the present studies support the use of ionizing radiation in combination with mda-7/IL-24 as a means of augmenting the therapeutic benefit of this gene in prostate cancer, particularly in the context of tumors displaying resistance to radiation therapy owing to bcl-2 family member overexpression. PMID:16331261

  19. Obesity, Insulin Resistance and Cancer Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Jee, Sun Ha; Kim, Hee Jin; Lee, Jakyoung

    2005-01-01

    Obesity is a known cause of metabolic syndrome which includes Type II diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. It is well documented that insulin resistance contributes to the mortality and the incidence of metabolic syndromes including central obesity, dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia and hypertension. Both obesity and diabetes are emerging topics for researchers to consider as having a possible causal association with cancer since the two factors have been viewed as risk factors for cancer. The...

  20. Zinc finger proteins in cancer progression

    OpenAIRE

    Jen, Jayu; Wang, Yi-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Zinc finger proteins are the largest transcription factor family in human genome. The diverse combinations and functions of zinc finger motifs make zinc finger proteins versatile in biological processes, including development, differentiation, metabolism and autophagy. Over the last few decades, increasing evidence reveals the potential roles of zinc finger proteins in cancer progression. However, the underlying mechanisms of zinc finger proteins in cancer progression vary in different cancer...

  1. Overcoming Resistance to Targeted Therapies in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Keara L; Papafili, Anastasia; Lawler, Mark; Van Schaeybroeck, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    The recent discovery of oncogenic drivers and subsequent development of novel targeted strategies has significantly added to the therapeutic armamentarium of anti-cancer therapies. Targeting BCR-ABL in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) or HER2 in breast cancer has led to practice-changing clinical benefits, while promising therapeutic responses have been achieved by precision medicine approaches in EGFR mutant lung cancer, colorectal cancer and BRAF mutant melanoma. However, although initial therapeutic responses to targeted therapies can be substantial, many patients will develop disease progression within 6-12 months. An increasing application of powerful omics-based approaches and improving preclinical models have enabled the rapid identification of secondary resistance mechanisms. Herein, we discuss how this knowledge has translated into rational, novel treatment strategies for relapsed patients in genomically selected cancer populations. PMID:26615134

  2. Insulin resistance and breast-cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruning, P F; Bonfrèr, J M; van Noord, P A; Hart, A A; de Jong-Bakker, M; Nooijen, W J

    1992-10-21

    Life-style has a major influence on the incidence of breast cancer. To evaluate the effects of life-style related metabolic-endocrine factors on breast cancer risk we conducted a case-control study comparing 223 women aged 38 to 75 years presenting with operable (stage I or II) breast cancer and 441 women of the same age having no breast cancer, who participated in a population-based breast cancer screening program. Women reporting diabetes mellitus were excluded. Sera from 110 women of the same age group presenting with early stage melanoma, lymphoma or cervical cancer were used as a second 'other-cancer control group'. Serum levels of C-peptide were significantly higher in early breast cancer cases compared to controls. The same was found for the ratios C-peptide to glucose or C-peptide to fructosamine, indicating insulin resistance. Sex hormone binding globulin was inversely, triglycerides and available estradiol were positively related to C-peptide. Serum C-peptide levels were related to body mass index (BMI), and to waist/hip ratio (WHR), in particular in controls. However, the relative increase of C-peptide, C-peptide to glucose or C-peptide to fructosamine in cases was independent of BMI or WHR. The log relative risk was linearly related to the log C-peptide levels. Relative risk according to quintiles, and adjusted for age, family history, BMI and WHR, for women at the 80% level was 2.9 as compared with those at the 20% level for C-peptide. Elevated C-peptide or C-peptide to fructosamine values were not observed in the sera from women belonging to the 'other-cancer control group'. This study suggests that hyperinsulinemia with insulin resistance is a significant risk factor for breast cancer independent of general adiposity or body fat distribution. PMID:1399128

  3. Mechanisms of Nuclear Export in Cancer and Resistance to Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Tanani, Mohamed; Dakir, El-Habib; Raynor, Bethany; Morgan, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Tumour suppressor proteins, such as p53, BRCA1, and ABC, play key roles in preventing the development of a malignant phenotype, but those that function as transcriptional regulators need to enter the nucleus in order to function. The export of proteins between the nucleus and cytoplasm is complex. It occurs through nuclear pores and exported proteins need a nuclear export signal (NES) to bind to nuclear exportin proteins, including CRM1 (Chromosomal Region Maintenance protein 1), and the energy for this process is provided by the RanGTP/RanGDP gradient. Due to the loss of DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoints, drug resistance is a major problem in cancer treatment, and often an initially successful treatment will fail due to the development of resistance. An important mechanism underlying resistance is nuclear export, and a number of strategies that can prevent nuclear export may reverse resistance. Examples include inhibitors of CRM1, antibodies to the nuclear export signal, and alteration of nuclear pore structure. Each of these are considered in this review. PMID:26985906

  4. Proteomic analysis of cell lines to identify the irinotecan resistance proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xing-Chen Peng; Feng-Ming Gong; Meng Wei; X I Chen; Y E Chen; K E Cheng; Feng Gao; Feng Xu; FENG Bi; Ji-Yan Liu

    2010-12-01

    Chemotherapeutic drug resistance is a frequent cause of treatment failure in colon cancer patients. Several mechanisms have been implicated in drug resistance. However, they are not sufficient to exhaustively account for this resistance emergence. In this study, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and the PDQuest software analysis were applied to compare the differential expression of irinotecan-resistance-associated protein in human colon adenocarcinoma LoVo cells and irinotecan-resistant LoVo cells (LoVo/irinotecan). The differential protein dots were excised and analysed by ESI-Q-TOF mass spectrometry (MS). Fifteen proteins were identified, including eight proteins with decreased expression and seven proteins with increased expression. The identified known proteins included those that function in diverse biological processes such as cellular transcription, cell apoptosis, electron transport/redox regulation, cell proliferation/differentiation and retinol metabolism pathways. Identification of such proteins could allow improved understanding of the mechanisms leading to the acquisition of chemoresistance.

  5. Reduced expression of p27 is a novel mechanism of docetaxel resistance in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Docetaxel is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of breast cancer. Breast cancers can have an inherent or acquired resistance to docetaxel but the causes of this resistance remain unclear. However, apoptosis and cell cycle regulation are key mechanisms by which most chemotherapeutic agents exert their cytotoxic effects. We created two docetaxel-resistant human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) and performed cDNA microarray analysis to identify candidate genes associated with docetaxel resistance. Gene expression changes were validated at the RNA and protein levels by reverse transcription PCR and western analysis, respectively. Gene expression cDNA microarray analysis demonstrated reduced p27 expression in docetaxel-resistant breast cancer cells. Although p27 mRNA expression was found to be reduced only in MCF-7 docetaxel-resistant sublines (2.47-fold), reduced expression of p27 protein was noted in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 docetaxel-resistant breast cancer cells (2.83-fold and 3.80-fold, respectively). This study demonstrates that reduced expression of p27 is associated with acquired resistance to docetaxel in breast cancer cells. An understanding of the genes that are involved in resistance to chemotherapy may allow further development in modulating drug resistance, and may permit selection of those patients who are most likely to benefit from such therapies

  6. Stress Proteins and Pancreatic Cancer Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Cano, Carla E.; Iovanna, Juan L.

    2010-01-01

    Tumor metastasis is challenged by its resistance to microenvironmental stress infringed during escape from the primary tumor and the colonization of a foreign secondary tissue. Because of its great metastatic potential and its strong resistance to anticancer drugs, pancreatic cancer is regarded as a paradigm of the adaptation of cancer cells to microenvironmental stress. Thus, to understand how pancreatic cancer cells adapt to the different endogenous and therapy-related stresses is crucial f...

  7. Current Status on Marine Products with Reversal Effect on Cancer Multidrug Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiqin Guo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The resistance of tumor cells to a broad range of anticancer agents continues to be a problem for the success of cancer chemotherapy. Multidrug resistance (MDR is due in part to three drug transporter proteins: ABCB1/P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCC1/multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1 and ABCG2/breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP. These transporters are part of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC superfamily, whose members function as ATP-dependent drug-efflux pumps. Their activity can be blocked by various drugs such as verapamil (calcium channel blocker and cyclosporin A (immunosuppressive agent, etc. These compounds are called MDR modulators or reversals. This review highlights several marine natural products with reversal effect on multidrug resistance in cancer, including agosterol A, ecteinascidin 743, sipholane triterpenoids, bryostatin 1, and welwitindolinones.

  8. Cancer resistance as an acquired and inheritable trait

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Janne; Hau, Jann; Jensen, Henrik Elvang;

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To induce cancer resistance in wild-type mice and detect if the resistance could be inherited to the progeny of the induced resistant mice. Furthermore to investigate the spectrum and immunology of this inherited cancer resistance. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Resistance to with live S180 cancer...... cells in BALB/c mice was induced by immunization with inactivated S180 cancer cells. The immunization was performed by either frozen/thawed or irradiated cancer cells or cell-free ascitic fluid (CFAF). RESULTS: In all instances the induced resistance was demonstrated to be inheritable. The phenotype was...... named HICR (heritable induced cancer resistance) and was defined as primary resistant progeny from mice immunized with frozen/thawed or irradiated S180 cells or CFAF obtained from mice with S180 induced ascites. Notably, this resistance was transferred from both male and female mice to the offspring of...

  9. Characterisation and Manipulation of Docetaxel Resistant Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, Amanda J

    2011-10-07

    Abstract Background There is no effective treatment strategy for advanced castration-resistant prostate cancer. Although Docetaxel (Taxotere®) represents the most active chemotherapeutic agent it only gives a modest survival advantage with most patients eventually progressing because of inherent or acquired drug resistance. The aims of this study were to further investigate the mechanisms of resistance to Docetaxel. Three Docetaxel resistant sub-lines were generated and confirmed to be resistant to the apoptotic and anti-proliferative effects of increasing concentrations of Docetaxel. Results The resistant DU-145 R and 22RV1 R had expression of P-glycoprotein and its inhibition with Elacridar partially and totally reversed the resistant phenotype in the two cell lines respectively, which was not seen in the PC-3 resistant sublines. Resistance was also not mediated in the PC-3 cells by cellular senescence or autophagy but multiple changes in pro- and anti-apoptotic genes and proteins were demonstrated. Even though there were lower basal levels of NF-κB activity in the PC-3 D12 cells compared to the Parental PC-3, docetaxel induced higher NF-κB activity and IκB phosphorylation at 3 and 6 hours with only minor changes in the DU-145 cells. Inhibition of NF-κB with the BAY 11-7082 inhibitor reversed the resistance to Docetaxel. Conclusion This study confirms that multiple mechanisms contribute to Docetaxel resistance and the central transcription factor NF-κB plays an immensely important role in determining docetaxel-resistance which may represent an appropriate therapeutic target.

  10. Increased STAT1 signaling in endocrine-resistant breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Huang

    Full Text Available Proteomic profiling of the estrogen/tamoxifen-sensitive MCF-7 cell line and its partially sensitive (MCF-7/LCC1 and fully resistant (MCF-7/LCC9 variants was performed to identify modifiers of endocrine sensitivity in breast cancer. Analysis of the expression of 120 paired phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated epitopes in key oncogenic and tumor suppressor pathways revealed that STAT1 and several phosphorylated epitopes (phospho-STAT1(Tyr701 and phospho-STAT3(Ser727 were differentially expressed between endocrine resistant and parental controls, confirmed by qRT-PCR and western blotting. The STAT1 inhibitor EGCG was a more effective inhibitor of the endocrine resistant MCF-7/LCC1 and MCF-7/LCC9 lines than parental MCF-7 cells, while STAT3 inhibitors Stattic and WP1066 were equally effective in endocrine-resistant and parental lines. The effects of the STAT inhibitors were additive, rather than synergistic, when tested in combination with tamoxifen in vitro. Expression of STAT1 and STAT3 were measured by quantitative immunofluorescence in invasive breast cancers and matched lymph nodes. When lymph node expression was compared to its paired primary breast cancer expression, there was greater expression of cytoplasmic STAT1 (∼3.1 fold, phospho-STAT3(Ser727 (∼1.8 fold, and STAT5 (∼1.5 fold and nuclear phospho-STAT3(Ser727 (∼1.5 fold in the nodes. Expression levels of STAT1 and STAT3 transcript were analysed in 550 breast cancers from publicly available gene expression datasets (GSE2990, GSE12093, GSE6532. When treatment with tamoxifen was considered, STAT1 gene expression was nearly predictive of distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS, log-rank p = 0.067, while STAT3 gene expression was predictive of DMFS (log-rank p<0.0001. Analysis of STAT1 and STAT3 protein expression in a series of 546 breast cancers also indicated that high expression of STAT3 protein was associated with improved survival (DMFS, p = 0.006. These results suggest

  11. Multi drug resistance to cancer chemotherapy: Genes involved and blockers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last three decades, important and considerable research efforts had been performed to investigate the mechanism through which cancer cells overcome the cytotoxic effects of a variety of chemotherapeutic drugs. Most of the previously published work has been focused on the resistance of tumor cells to those anticancer drugs of natural source. Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a cellular cross-resistance to a broad spectrum of natural products used in cancer chemotherapy and is believed to be the major cause of the therapeutic failures of the drugs belonging to different naturally obtained or semisynthetic groups including vinca alkaloids, taxans, epipodophyllotoxins and certain antibiotics. This phenomenon results from overexpression of four MDR genes and their corresponding proteins that act as membrane-bound ATP consuming pumps. These proteins mediate the efflux of many structurally and functionally unrelated anticancer drugs of natural source. MDR may be intrinsic or acquired following exposure to chemotherapy. The existence of intrinsically resistant tumor cell clone before and following chemotherapeutic treatment has been associated with a worse final outcome because of increased incidence of distant metasis. In view of irreplaceability of natural product anticancer drugs as effective chemotherapeutic agents, and in view of MDR as a major obstacle to successful chemotherapy, this review is aimed to highlight the genes involved in MDR, classical MDR blockers and gene therapy approaches to overcome MDR. (author)

  12. The centrality of cancer proteins in human protein-protein interaction network: a revisit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wei; Xie, Luyu; Zhou, Shuigeng; Liu, Hui; Guan, Jihong

    2014-01-01

    Topological analysis of protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks has been widely applied to the investigation on cancer mechanisms. However, there is still a debate on whether cancer proteins exhibit more topological centrality compared to the other proteins in the human PPI network. To resolve this debate, we first identified four sets of human proteins, and then mapped these proteins into the yeast PPI network by homologous genes. Finally, we compared these proteins' properties in human and yeast PPI networks. Experiments over two real datasets demonstrated that cancer proteins tend to have higher degree and smaller clustering coefficient than non-cancer proteins. Experimental results also validated that cancer proteins have larger betweenness centrality compared to the other proteins on the STRING dataset. However, on the BioGRID dataset, the average betweenness centrality of cancer proteins is larger than that of disease and control proteins, but smaller than that of essential proteins. PMID:24878726

  13. Bipolar resistive switching in different plant and animal proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Bag, A.

    2014-06-01

    We report bipolar resistive switching phenomena observed in different types of plant and animal proteins. Using protein as the switching medium, resistive switching devices have been fabricated with conducting indium tin oxide (ITO) and Al as bottom and top electrodes, respectively. A clockwise bipolar resistive switching phenomenon is observed in all proteins. It is shown that the resistive switching phenomena originate from the local redox process in the protein and the ion exchange from the top electrode/protein interface.

  14. (Patho)physiological function of the Multidrug Resistance protein MRP1

    OpenAIRE

    Renes, Jan Willem

    2000-01-01

    Overexpression of the multidrug resistance protein MRP1 confer multidrug resistance (MDR) to cancer cells. The contents of this thesis describe the involvement of MRP1 in MDR and its importance as transporter for physiological phase II detoxification conjugates. ... Zie: Chapter 8

  15. Predicting Resistance Mutations Using Protein Design Algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, K.; Georgiev, I; Donald, B; Anderson, A

    2010-01-01

    Drug resistance resulting from mutations to the target is an unfortunate common phenomenon that limits the lifetime of many of the most successful drugs. In contrast to the investigation of mutations after clinical exposure, it would be powerful to be able to incorporate strategies early in the development process to predict and overcome the effects of possible resistance mutations. Here we present a unique prospective application of an ensemble-based protein design algorithm, K*, to predict potential resistance mutations in dihydrofolate reductase from Staphylococcus aureus using positive design to maintain catalytic function and negative design to interfere with binding of a lead inhibitor. Enzyme inhibition assays show that three of the four highly-ranked predicted mutants are active yet display lower affinity (18-, 9-, and 13-fold) for the inhibitor. A crystal structure of the top-ranked mutant enzyme validates the predicted conformations of the mutated residues and the structural basis of the loss of potency. The use of protein design algorithms to predict resistance mutations could be incorporated in a lead design strategy against any target that is susceptible to mutational resistance.

  16. Integration and bioinformatics analysis of DNA-methylated genes associated with drug resistance in ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    YAN, BINGBING; YIN, FUQIANG; WANG, QI; ZHANG, WEI; LI, LI

    2016-01-01

    The main obstacle to the successful treatment of ovarian cancer is the development of drug resistance to combined chemotherapy. Among all the factors associated with drug resistance, DNA methylation apparently plays a critical role. In this study, we performed an integrative analysis of the 26 DNA-methylated genes associated with drug resistance in ovarian cancer, and the genes were further evaluated by comprehensive bioinformatics analysis including gene/protein interaction, biological process enrichment and annotation. The results from the protein interaction analyses revealed that at least 20 of these 26 methylated genes are present in the protein interaction network, indicating that they interact with each other, have a correlation in function, and may participate as a whole in the regulation of ovarian cancer drug resistance. There is a direct interaction between the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene and at least half of the other genes, indicating that PTEN may possess core regulatory functions among these genes. Biological process enrichment and annotation demonstrated that most of these methylated genes were significantly associated with apoptosis, which is possibly an essential way for these genes to be involved in the regulation of multidrug resistance in ovarian cancer. In addition, a comprehensive analysis of clinical factors revealed that the methylation level of genes that are associated with the regulation of drug resistance in ovarian cancer was significantly correlated with the prognosis of ovarian cancer. Overall, this study preliminarily explains the potential correlation between the genes with DNA methylation and drug resistance in ovarian cancer. This finding has significance for our understanding of the regulation of resistant ovarian cancer by methylated genes, the treatment of ovarian cancer, and improvement of the prognosis of ovarian cancer. PMID:27347118

  17. The mutational landscape of lethal castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Catherine S; Wu, Yi-Mi; Robinson, Dan R; Cao, Xuhong; Dhanasekaran, Saravana M; Khan, Amjad P; Quist, Michael J; Jing, Xiaojun; Lonigro, Robert J; Brenner, J Chad; Asangani, Irfan A; Ateeq, Bushra; Chun, Sang Y; Siddiqui, Javed; Sam, Lee; Anstett, Matt; Mehra, Rohit; Prensner, John R; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Ryslik, Gregory A; Vandin, Fabio; Raphael, Benjamin J; Kunju, Lakshmi P; Rhodes, Daniel R; Pienta, Kenneth J; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Tomlins, Scott A

    2012-07-12

    Characterization of the prostate cancer transcriptome and genome has identified chromosomal rearrangements and copy number gains and losses, including ETS gene family fusions, PTEN loss and androgen receptor (AR) amplification, which drive prostate cancer development and progression to lethal, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, less is known about the role of mutations. Here we sequenced the exomes of 50 lethal, heavily pre-treated metastatic CRPCs obtained at rapid autopsy (including three different foci from the same patient) and 11 treatment-naive, high-grade localized prostate cancers. We identified low overall mutation rates even in heavily treated CRPCs (2.00 per megabase) and confirmed the monoclonal origin of lethal CRPC. Integrating exome copy number analysis identified disruptions of CHD1 that define a subtype of ETS gene family fusion-negative prostate cancer. Similarly, we demonstrate that ETS2, which is deleted in approximately one-third of CRPCs (commonly through TMPRSS2:ERG fusions), is also deregulated through mutation. Furthermore, we identified recurrent mutations in multiple chromatin- and histone-modifying genes, including MLL2 (mutated in 8.6% of prostate cancers), and demonstrate interaction of the MLL complex with the AR, which is required for AR-mediated signalling. We also identified novel recurrent mutations in the AR collaborating factor FOXA1, which is mutated in 5 of 147 (3.4%) prostate cancers (both untreated localized prostate cancer and CRPC), and showed that mutated FOXA1 represses androgen signalling and increases tumour growth. Proteins that physically interact with the AR, such as the ERG gene fusion product, FOXA1, MLL2, UTX (also known as KDM6A) and ASXL1 were found to be mutated in CRPC. In summary, we describe the mutational landscape of a heavily treated metastatic cancer, identify novel mechanisms of AR signalling deregulated in prostate cancer, and prioritize candidates for future study. PMID

  18. Protein Kinase A in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Caretta

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In the past, many chromosomal and genetic alterations have been examined as possible causes of cancer. However, some tumors do not display a clear molecular and/or genetic signature. Therefore, other cellular processes may be involved in carcinogenesis. Genetic alterations of proteins involved in signal transduction have been extensively studied, for example oncogenes, while modifications in intracellular compartmentalization of these molecules, or changes in the expression of unmodified genes have received less attention. Yet, epigenetic modulation of second messenger systems can deeply modify cellular functioning and in the end may cause instability of many processes, including cell mitosis. It is important to understand the functional meaning of modifications in second messenger intracellular pathways and unravel the role of downstream proteins in the initiation and growth of tumors. Within this framework, the cAMP system has been examined. cAMP is a second messenger involved in regulation of a variety of cellular functions. It acts mainly through its binding to cAMP-activated protein kinases (PKA, that were suggested to participate in the onset and progression of various tumors. PKA may represent a biomarker for tumor detection, identification and staging, and may be a potential target for pharmacological treatment of tumors.

  19. Protein Kinase A in Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caretta, Antonio; Mucignat-Caretta, Carla, E-mail: carla.mucignat@unipd.it [Department of Human Anatomy and Physiology, University of Padova, Via Marzolo 3, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2011-02-28

    In the past, many chromosomal and genetic alterations have been examined as possible causes of cancer. However, some tumors do not display a clear molecular and/or genetic signature. Therefore, other cellular processes may be involved in carcinogenesis. Genetic alterations of proteins involved in signal transduction have been extensively studied, for example oncogenes, while modifications in intracellular compartmentalization of these molecules, or changes in the expression of unmodified genes have received less attention. Yet, epigenetic modulation of second messenger systems can deeply modify cellular functioning and in the end may cause instability of many processes, including cell mitosis. It is important to understand the functional meaning of modifications in second messenger intracellular pathways and unravel the role of downstream proteins in the initiation and growth of tumors. Within this framework, the cAMP system has been examined. cAMP is a second messenger involved in regulation of a variety of cellular functions. It acts mainly through its binding to cAMP-activated protein kinases (PKA), that were suggested to participate in the onset and progression of various tumors. PKA may represent a biomarker for tumor detection, identification and staging, and may be a potential target for pharmacological treatment of tumors.

  20. Overcoming Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karobi Moitra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The principle mechanism of protection of stem cells is through the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters. These transporters serve as the guardians of the stem cell population in the body. Unfortunately these very same ABC efflux pumps afford protection to cancer stem cells in tumors, shielding them from the adverse effects of chemotherapy. A number of strategies to circumvent the function of these transporters in cancer stem cells are currently under investigation. These strategies include the development of competitive and allosteric modulators, nanoparticle mediated delivery of inhibitors, targeted transcriptional regulation of ABC transporters, miRNA mediated inhibition, and targeting of signaling pathways that modulate ABC transporters. The role of ABC transporters in cancer stem cells will be explored in this paper and strategies aimed at overcoming drug resistance caused by these particular transporters will also be discussed.

  1. Major cancer protein amplifies global gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists may have discovered why a protein called MYC can provoke a variety of cancers. Like many proteins associated with cancer, MYC helps regulate cell growth. A new study carried out by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and colleagues

  2. The reversal of antineoplastic drug resistance in cancer cells by β-elemene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guan-Nan; Ashby, Charles R; Zhang, Yun-Kai; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Guo, Huiqin

    2015-11-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR), defined as the resistance of cancer cells to compounds with diverse structures and mechanisms of actions, significantly limits the efficacy of antitumor drugs. A major mechanism that mediates MDR in cancer is the overexpression of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporters. These transporters bind to their respective substrates and catalyze their efflux from cancer cells, thereby lowering the intracellular concentrations of the substrates and thus attenuating or even abolishing their efficacy. In addition, cancer cells can become resistant to drugs via mechanisms that attenuate apoptosis and cell cycle arrest such as alterations in the p53, check point kinase, nuclear factor kappa B, and the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which β-elemene, a compound extracted from Rhizoma zedoariae that has clinical antitumor efficacy, overcomes drug resistance in cancer. PMID:26370907

  3. Detecting and treating breast cancer resistance to EGFR inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moonlee, Sun-Young; Bissell, Mina J.; Furuta, Saori; Meier, Roland; Kenny, Paraic A.

    2016-04-05

    The application describes therapeutic compositions and methods for treating cancer. For example, therapeutic compositions and methods related to inhibition of FAM83A (family with sequence similarity 83) are provided. The application also describes methods for diagnosing cancer resistance to EGFR inhibitors. For example, a method of diagnosing cancer resistance to EGFR inhibitors by detecting increased FAM83A levels is described.

  4. Targeting Gb3 and apoptosis-related proteins to overcome cisplatin resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Tyler, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background Cisplatin is used for treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) but treatment with cisplatin often leads to acquired resistance to cisplatin, resulting in poor patient survival. Globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1) have been associated with cisplatin resistance. Gb3 serves as a receptor for verotoxin-1 (VT-1), which induces apoptosis, and has been shown to have a functional dependency to MDR1 and heat s...

  5. Omega 3 fatty acids chemosensitize multidrug resistant colon cancer cells by down-regulating cholesterol synthesis and altering detergent resistant membranes composition

    OpenAIRE

    Gelsomino, Giada; Corsetto, Paola A.; Campia, Ivana; Montorfano, Gigliola; Kopecka, Joanna; Castella, Barbara; Gazzano, Elena; Ghigo, Dario; Rizzo, Angela M; Riganti, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    Background The activity of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and multidrug resistance related protein 1 (MRP1), two membrane transporters involved in multidrug resistance of colon cancer, is increased by high amounts of cholesterol in plasma membrane and detergent resistant membranes (DRMs). It has never been investigated whether omega 3 polyunsatured fatty acids (PUFAs), which modulate cholesterol homeostasis in dyslipidemic syndromes and have chemopreventive effects in colon cancer, may affect the respo...

  6. LAMP3 is involved in tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer cells through the modulation of autophagy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagelkerke, A.P.; Sieuwerts, A.M.; Bussink, J.; Sweep, F.C.; Look, M.P.; Foekens, J.A.; Martens, J.W.; Span, P.N.

    2014-01-01

    Lysosome-associated membrane protein 3 (LAMP3) is a member of the LAMP-family of proteins, which are involved in the process of autophagy. Autophagy is induced by tamoxifen in breast cancer cells and may contribute to tamoxifen resistance. In this study, the significance of LAMP3 for tamoxifen resis

  7. LAMP3 is involved in tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer cells through the modulation of autophagy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Nagelkerke (Anika); A.M. Sieuwerts (Anieta); J. Bussink (Johan); F.C. Sweep (Fred); M.P. Look (Maxime); J.A. Foekens (John); J.W.M. Martens (John); P.N. Span (Paul)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractLysosome-associated membrane protein 3 (LAMP3) is a member of the LAMP-family of proteins, which are involved in the process of autophagy. Autophagy is induced by tamoxifen in breast cancer cells and may contribute to tamoxifen resistance. In this study, the significance of LAMP3 for tam

  8. Retinoic acid receptor alpha is associated with tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, Henrik J; Sanchez, Betzabe C.; Mundt, Filip; Forshed, Jenny; Kovacs, Aniko; Panizza, Elena; Hultin-Rosenberg, Lina; Lundgren, Bo; Martens, Ulf; Máthé, Gyöngyvér; Yakhini, Zohar; Helou, Khalil; Krawiec, Kamilla; Kanter, Lena; Hjerpe, Anders

    2013-01-01

    About one-third of oestrogen receptor alpha-positive breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen relapse. Here we identify the nuclear receptor retinoic acid receptor alpha as a marker of tamoxifen resistance. Using quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics, we show that retinoic acid receptor alpha protein networks and levels differ in a tamoxifen-sensitive (MCF7) and a tamoxifen-resistant (LCC2) cell line. High intratumoural retinoic acid receptor alpha protein levels also correlate...

  9. Transcriptional Regulation of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP) by p53 in p53-null Saos-2 cells%p53对乳腺癌耐药蛋白基因的转录调控

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴新刚; 彭姝彬; 闾四平; 张年凤; 邹进

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. BCRP confers drug resistance in cancer by transporting chemotherapeutic agents such as mitoxantrone, topotecan, and methotrexate. Although a recent study demonstrated that wild type p53 (wt-p53) may suppress BCRP expression through the nuclear factor-KB (NF-kB) pathway in breast cancer cell line MCF-7, which expresses wt-p53 at low level, the detailed molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation on BCRP remain unclear. Here, we set out to reveal the exogenous p53's role on the expression of BCRP. In the human osteosarcoma cell line Saos-2, a p53-null cell line, transient transfection assays showed that the BCRP expression was activated by wt-p53 but not p53 mutants, p53R175H and p53R248W. We further co-transfected the p53 expression plasmid with BCRP luciferasepromoter reporter construct into the Saos-2 cell, and the results revealed that wt-p53 may facilitate the BCRP promoter activity. However, we did not find any p53 binding site by applying Matlnspector. Strikingly, NF-kB activity inhibition downplayed the activation effect of BCRP promoter activity by wt-p53. These results suggested that transcriptional activation of BCRP by wt-p53 is NF-kB- dependent.%乳腺癌耐药蛋白(breast cancer resistance protein,BCRP)是ATP结合盒转运蛋白超家族成员之一,其通过主动外排化疗药物如米托蒽醌、托泊替康和甲氨蝶呤,进而介导肿瘤化疗耐受.最近有研究发现,在野生型p53 (wild type p53,wt-p53)低表达的乳腺癌细胞系MCF-7中,外源性wt-p53通过抑制核转录因子-κB (nuclear factor-κB,NF-κB)的活性进而抑制BCRP的表达,但其详细的分子机制有待进一步阐明.本研究选用p53缺失的骨肉瘤细胞系Saos-2,通过瞬时转染技术发现,wt-p53可以激活BCRP的表达,而突变型p53的激活作用消失;报告基因试验显示,wt-p53可以上调BCRP启动子活性;通过生

  10. Resistance to paclitaxel in a cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cell line is mediated by P-glycoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Stordal

    Full Text Available The IGROVCDDP cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cell line is also resistant to paclitaxel and models the resistance phenotype of relapsed ovarian cancer patients after first-line platinum/taxane chemotherapy. A TaqMan low-density array (TLDA was used to characterise the expression of 380 genes associated with chemotherapy resistance in IGROVCDDP cells. Paclitaxel resistance in IGROVCDDP is mediated by gene and protein overexpression of P-glycoprotein and the protein is functionally active. Cisplatin resistance was not reversed by elacridar, confirming that cisplatin is not a P-glycoprotein substrate. Cisplatin resistance in IGROVCDDP is multifactorial and is mediated in part by the glutathione pathway and decreased accumulation of drug. Total cellular glutathione was not increased. However, the enzyme activity of GSR and GGT1 were up-regulated. The cellular localisation of copper transporter CTR1 changed from membrane associated in IGROV-1 to cytoplasmic in IGROVCDDP. This may mediate the previously reported accumulation defect. There was decreased expression of the sodium potassium pump (ATP1A, MRP1 and FBP which all have been previously associated with platinum accumulation defects in platinum-resistant cell lines. Cellular localisation of MRP1 was also altered in IGROVCDDP shifting basolaterally, compared to IGROV-1. BRCA1 was also up-regulated at the gene and protein level. The overexpression of P-glycoprotein in a resistant model developed with cisplatin is unusual. This demonstrates that P-glycoprotein can be up-regulated as a generalised stress response rather than as a specific response to a substrate. Mechanisms characterised in IGROVCDDP cells may be applicable to relapsed ovarian cancer patients treated with frontline platinum/taxane chemotherapy.

  11. Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90 Expression and Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos A. Papadimitriou

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Hsp90 is an abundant protein in mammalian cells. It forms several discrete complexes, each containing distinct groups of co-chaperones that assist protein folding and refolding during stress, protein transport and degradation. It interacts with a variety of proteins that play key roles in breast neoplasia including estrogen receptors, tumor suppressor p53 protein, angiogenesis transcription factor HIF-1alpha, antiapoptotic kinase Akt, Raf-1 MAP kinase and a variety of receptor tyrosine kinases of the erbB family. Elevated Hsp90 expression has been documented in breast ductal carcinomas contributing to the proliferative activity of breast cancer cells; whilst a significantly decreased Hsp90 expression has been shown in infiltrative lobular carcinomas and lobular neoplasia. Hsp90 overexpression has been proposed as a component of a mechanism through which breast cancer cells become resistant to various stress stimuli. Therefore, pharmacological inhibition of HSPs can provide therapeutic opportunities in the field of cancer treatment. 17-allylamino,17-demethoxygeldanamycin is the first Hsp90 inhibitor that has clinically been investigated in phase II trial, yielding promising results in patients with HER2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer, whilst other Hsp90 inhibitors (retaspimycin HCL, NVP-AUY922, NVP-BEP800, CNF2024/BIIB021, SNX-5422, STA-9090, etc. are currently under evaluation.

  12. Expression and Prognostic Significance of Multidrug Resistance Associated Protein (MRP) Gene in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer by in Site Hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study on the effect of MRP gene overexpression on prognosis of patients with non-small lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Paraffin-embedded tissues from 47 cases of NSCLC who had undergone radical tumor resection were examined for expression of MRP gene mRNA by in situ hybridization using labelled digoxigenin probes combined with immunohistochemistry. All the patients were retrospectively followed-up. Results: All of the 47 lung cancer specimens were found to have overexpression of MRP gene mRNA. It was significantly correlated with patients' survival time, response to chemotherapy, recurrence or metastases after surgery, but was not correlated with histology, tumor size, node status, TNM stage, degree of differentiation, age and sex. Conclusion: Overexpression of MRP gene is a marker of prognostic significance in patients with NSCLC.

  13. Comparison of the kinetics of active efflux of Tc-99m-MIBI in cells with P-glycoprotein-mediated and multidrug-resistance protein-associated multidrug-resistance phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergote, J; Moretti, JL; De Vries, EGE; Garnier-Suillerot, A

    1998-01-01

    The overexpression of two membrane glycoproteins, P-glycoprotein and multidrug-resistance protein (MRP1) is a major cause of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of human cancers. Both proteins confer a similar multidrug-resistant (MDR) phenotype. Tc-99m-MIBI, a myocardial imaging

  14. Evaluation of the P-glycoprotein- and breast cancer resistance protein-mediated brain penetration of {sup 11}C-labeled topotecan using small-animal positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamasaki, Tomoteru; Fujinaga, Masayuki; Kawamura, Kazunori; Hatori, Akiko; Yui, Joji [Department of Molecular Probes, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Nengaki, Nobuki; Ogawa, Masanao; Yoshida, Yuichiro [Department of Molecular Probes, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); SHI Accelerator Service, Ltd., Tokyo 141-8686 (Japan); Wakizaka, Hidekatsu [Department of Biophysics, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yanamoto, Kazuhiko [Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Fukumura, Toshimitsu [Department of Molecular Probes, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Zhang Mingrong, E-mail: zhang@nirs.go.jp [Department of Molecular Probes, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2011-07-15

    Introduction: Topotecan (TPT) is a camptothecin derivative and is an anticancer drug working as a topoisomerase-I-specific inhibitor. But TPT cannot penetrate through the blood-brain barrier. In this study, we synthesized a new positron emission tomography (PET) probe, [{sup 11}C]TPT, to evaluate the P-glycoprotein (Pgp)- and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP)-mediated brain penetration of [{sup 11}C]TPT using small-animal PET. Methods: [{sup 11}C]TPT was synthesized by the reaction of a desmethyl precursor with [{sup 11}C]CH{sub 3}I. In vitro study using [{sup 11}C]TPT was carried out in MES-SA and doxorubicin-resistant MES-SA/Dx5 cells in the presence or absence of elacridar, a specific inhibitor for Pgp and BCRP. The biodistribution of [{sup 11}C]TPT was determined using small-animal PET and the dissection method in mice. Results: The transport of [{sup 11}C]TPT to the extracellular side was determined in MES-SA/Dx5 cells exhibiting the expressions of Pgp and BCRP at high levels. This transport was inhibited by coincubation with elacridar. In Mdr1a/b{sup -/-}Bcrp1{sup -/-} mice, PET results indicated that the brain uptake of [{sup 11}C]TPT was about two times higher than that in wild-type mice. Similarly, the brain penetration of [{sup 11}C]TPT in wild-type mice was increased by treatment with elacridar. The radioactivity in the brain of elacridar-treated mice was maintained at a certain level after the injection of [{sup 11}C]TPT, although the radioactivity in the blood decreased with time. Conclusions: We demonstrated the increase of brain penetration of [{sup 11}C]TPT by deficiency and inhibition of Pgp and BCRP functions using small-animal PET in mice.

  15. Overcoming docetaxel resistance in prostate cancer: a perspective review

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Clara

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer has been historically challenging, with few therapeutic successes. Docetaxel was the first cytotoxic therapy associated with a survival benefit in castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Toxicity is typical of other cytotoxic agents, with myelosuppression being the dose-limiting toxicity and neurotoxicity also a notable side effect for some patients. Unfortunately, a significant proportion of men with castrate-resistant prostate cance...

  16. Characterization of DNA topoisomerase I in three SN-38 resistant human colon cancer cell lines reveals a new pair of resistance-associated mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Niels Frank; Agama, Keli; Roy, Amit; Smith, David Hersi; Pfister, Thomas D.; Rømer, Maria Unni; Zhang, Hong-Liang; Doroshow, James H.; Knudsen, Birgitta R.; Stenvang, Jan; Brünner, Nils; Pommier, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Background DNA topoisomerase I (Top1) is a DNA unwinding protein and the specific target of the camptothecin class of chemotherapeutic drugs. One of these, irinotecan, acting through its active metabolite SN-38, is used in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. However, resistance to irinotecan represents a major clinical problem. Since molecular alterations in Top1 may result in resistance to irinotecan, we characterized Top1 in three human colon cancer cell lines with acquired resis...

  17. Expression of RET finger protein predicts chemoresistance in epithelial ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resistance to platinum- and taxane-based chemotherapy is a major cause of treatment failure in ovarian cancer. Thus, it is necessary to develop a predictive marker and molecular target for overcoming drug resistance in ovarian cancer treatment. In a previous report, using an in vitro model, we found that the RET finger protein (RFP) (also known as tripartite motif-containing protein 27, TRIM27) confers cancer cell resistance to anticancer drugs. However, the significance of RFP expression in cancer patients remains elusive. In this study, we showed that RFP was expressed in 62% of ovarian cancer patients and its positivity significantly correlated with drug resistance. Consistent with clinical data, depletion of RFP by RNA interference (RNAi) in ovarian cancer cell lines, SKOV3 and HEY, significantly increased carboplatin- or paclitaxel-induced apoptosis and resulted in reduced anticancer drug resistance. In a nude mouse tumor xenograft model, inoculated RFP-knockdown ovarian cancer cells exhibited lower carboplatin resistance than control cells. These findings suggest that RFP could be a predictive marker for chemoresistance in ovarian cancer patients and also a candidate for a molecular-targeted agent

  18. Upregulation of AKT3 Confers Resistance to the AKT Inhibitor MK2206 in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stottrup, Casey; Tsang, Tiffany; Chin, Y Rebecca

    2016-08-01

    Acquired resistance to molecular targeted therapy represents a major challenge for the effective treatment of cancer. Hyperactivation of the PI3K/AKT pathway is frequently observed in virtually all human malignancies, and numerous PI3K and AKT inhibitors are currently under clinical evaluation. However, mechanisms of acquired resistance to AKT inhibitors have yet to be described. Here, we use a breast cancer preclinical model to identify resistance mechanisms to a small molecule allosteric AKT inhibitor, MK2206. Using a step-wise and chronic high-dose exposure, breast cancer cell lines harboring oncogenic PI3K resistant to MK2206 were established. Using this model, we reveal that AKT3 expression is markedly upregulated in AKT inhibitor-resistant cells. Induction of AKT3 is regulated epigenetically by the bromodomain and extra terminal domain proteins. Importantly, knockdown of AKT3, but not AKT1 or AKT2, in resistant cells restores sensitivity to MK2206. AKT inhibitor-resistant cells also display an epithelial to mesenchymal transition phenotype as assessed by alterations in the levels of E-Cadherin, N-Cadherin, and vimentin, as well as enhanced invasiveness of tumor spheroids. Notably, the invasive morphology of resistant spheroids is diminished upon AKT3 depletion. We also show that resistance to MK2206 is reversible because upon drug removal resistant cells regain sensitivity to AKT inhibition, accompanied by reexpression of epithelial markers and reduction of AKT3 expression, implying that epigenetic reprogramming contributes to acquisition of resistance. These findings provide a rationale for developing therapeutics targeting AKT3 to circumvent acquired resistance in breast cancer. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1964-74. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27297869

  19. The major vault protein is related to the toxic anion resistance protein (TelA) family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suprenant, Kathy A; Bloom, Nathan; Fang, Jianwen; Lushington, Gerald

    2007-03-01

    Vaults are barrel-shaped ribonucleoprotein particles that are abundant in certain tumors and multidrug resistant cancer cells. Prokaryotic relatives of the major vault protein, MVP, have not been identified. We used sequence analysis and molecular modeling to show that MVP and the toxic anion resistance protein, TelA of Rhodobacter sphaeroides strain 2.4.1, share a novel fold that consists of a three-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet. Because of this strong structural correspondence, we examined whether mammalian cell vaults respond to tellurite treatment. In the presence of the oxyanion tellurite, large vault aggregates, or vaultosomes, appear at the cell periphery in 15 min or less. Vaultosome formation is temperature-dependent, reversible, and occurs in normal human umbilical vein endothelial cells as well as transformed HeLa cervical cancer cells. Vaultosome formation is not restricted to tellurite and occurs in the presence of other toxic oxyanions (selenate, selinite, arsenate, arsenite, vanadate). In addition, vaultosomes form independently from other stress-induced ribonucleoprotein complexes, stress granules and aggresomes. Vaultosome formation is therefore a unique cellular response to an environmental toxin. PMID:17337707

  20. Global characterization of signalling networks associated with tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Browne, Brigid C.; Hochgräfe, Falko; Wu, Jianmin;

    2013-01-01

    Acquired resistance to the anti‐estrogen tamoxifen remains a significant challenge in breast cancer management. In this study, we used an integrative approach to characterize global protein expression and tyrosine phosphorylation events in tamoxifen‐resistant MCF7 breast cancer cells (Tam...... perturbed in TamR cells, together with pathways enriched for proteins associated with growth factor, cell–cell and cell matrix‐initiated signalling. Consistent with known roles for Ras/MAPK and PI3‐kinase signalling in tamoxifen resistance, tyrosine‐phosphorylated MAPK1, SHC1 and PIK3R2 were elevated in Tam...... molecular alterations associated with the tamoxifen‐resistant phenotype, and identify MARCKS as a potential biomarker of therapeutic responsiveness that may assist in stratification of patients for optimal therapy....

  1. ABCC3 as a marker for multidrug resistance in non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yanbin Zhao; Hailing Lu; An Yan; Yanmei Yang; Qingwei Meng; Lichun Sun; Hui Pang; Chunhong Li; Xiaoqun Dong; Li Cai

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) contributes to the failure of chemotherapy and high mortality in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We aim to identify MDR genes that predict tumor response to chemotherapy. 199 NSCLC fresh tissue samples were tested for chemosensitivity by MTT assay. cDNA microarray was done with 5 samples with highest resistance and 6 samples with highest sensitivity. Expression of ABCC3 mRNA and protein was detected by real-time PCR and immunohistochemisty, respectively. The ass...

  2. Increased Expression of Several Collagen Genes is Associated with Drug Resistance in Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januchowski, Radosław; Świerczewska, Monika; Sterzyńska, Karolina; Wojtowicz, Karolina; Nowicki, Michał; Zabel, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynaecological cancer. The main reason for the high mortality among ovarian cancer patients is the development of drug resistance. The expression of collagen genes by cancer cells can increase drug resistance by inhibiting the penetration of the drug into the cancer tissue as well as increase apoptosis resistance. In this study, we present data that shows differential expression levels of collagen genes and proteins in cisplatin- (CIS), paclitaxel- (PAC), doxorubicin- (DOX), topotecan- (TOP), vincristine- (VIN) and methotrexate- (MTX) resistant ovarian cancer cell lines. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions were performed to determine the mRNA levels. Protein expression was detected using Western blot and immunocytochemistry assays. In the drug resistant cell lines, we observed the upregulation of eight collagen genes at the mRNA level and based on these expression levels, we divided the collagen genes into the following three groups: 1. Genes with less than a 50-fold increase in expression: COL1A1, COL5A2, COL12A1 and COL17A1. 2. Genes with greater than a 50-fold increase in expression: COL1A2, COL15A1 and COL21A1. 3. Gene with a very high level of expression: COL3A1. Expression of collagen (COL) proteins from groups 2 and 3 were also confirmed using immunocytochemistry. Western blot analysis showed very high expression levels of COL3A1 protein, and immunocytochemistry analysis showed the presence of extracellular COL3A1 in the W1TR cell line. The cells mainly responsible for the extracellular COL3A1 production are aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 (ALDH1A1) positive cells. All correlations between the types of cytostatic drugs and the expression levels of different COL genes were studied, and our results suggest that the expression of fibrillar collagens may be involved in the TOP and PAC resistance of the ovarian cancer cells. The expression pattern of COL genes provide a preliminary view into the role of these proteins in

  3. TRPM4 protein expression in prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper Drimer; Soldini, Davide; Jung, Maria;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 4 (TRPM4) messenger RNA (mRNA) has been shown to be upregulated in prostate cancer (PCa) and might be a new promising tissue biomarker. We evaluated TRPM4 protein expression and correlated the expression level with.......79-2.62; p = 0.01-0.03 for the two observers) when compared to patients with a lower staining intensity. CONCLUSIONS: TRPM4 protein expression is widely expressed in benign and cancerous prostate tissue, with highest staining intensities found in PCa. Overexpression of TRPM4 in PCa (combination of high...

  4. Role of Uncoupling Proteins in Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) are a family of inner mitochondrial membrane proteins whose function is to allow the re-entry of protons to the mitochondrial matrix, by dissipating the proton gradient and, subsequently, decreasing membrane potential and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Due to their pivotal role in the intersection between energy efficiency and oxidative stress, UCPs are being investigated for a potential role in cancer. In this review we compile the latest evidence showing a link between uncoupling and the carcinogenic process, paying special attention to their involvement in cancer initiation, progression and drug chemoresistance

  5. Role of Uncoupling Proteins in Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle, Adamo; Oliver, Jordi; Roca, Pilar, E-mail: pilar.roca@uib.es [Grupo Multidisciplinar de Oncología Traslacional, Institut Universitari d' Investigació en Ciències de la Salut, Universitat de les Illes Balears/Cra. Valldemossa km 7.5, E-07122, Palma de Mallorca, Illes Balears (Spain)

    2010-04-16

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) are a family of inner mitochondrial membrane proteins whose function is to allow the re-entry of protons to the mitochondrial matrix, by dissipating the proton gradient and, subsequently, decreasing membrane potential and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Due to their pivotal role in the intersection between energy efficiency and oxidative stress, UCPs are being investigated for a potential role in cancer. In this review we compile the latest evidence showing a link between uncoupling and the carcinogenic process, paying special attention to their involvement in cancer initiation, progression and drug chemoresistance.

  6. Role of Uncoupling Proteins in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamo Valle

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Uncoupling proteins (UCPs are a family of inner mitochondrial membrane proteins whose function is to allow the re-entry of protons to the mitochondrial matrix, by dissipating the proton gradient and, subsequently, decreasing membrane potential and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Due to their pivotal role in the intersection between energy efficiency and oxidative stress, UCPs are being investigated for a potential role in cancer. In this review we compile the latest evidence showing a link between uncoupling and the carcinogenic process, paying special attention to their involvement in cancer initiation, progression and drug chemoresistance.

  7. ERK/p38 MAPK inhibition reduces radio-resistance to a pulsed proton beam in breast cancer stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Myung-Hwan; Park, Jeong Chan

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies have identified highly tumorigenic cells with stem cell-like characteristics, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs) in human cancers. CSCs are resistant to conventional radiotherapy and chemotherapy owing to their high DNA repair ability and oncogene overexpression. However, the mechanisms regulating CSC radio-resistance, particularly proton beam resistance, remain unclear. We isolated CSCs from the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, which expressed the characteristic breast CSC membrane protein markers CD44+/CD24-/ low , and irradiated the CSCs with pulsed proton beams. We confirmed that CSCs were resistant to pulsed proton beams and showed that treatment with p38 and ERK inhibitors reduced CSC radio-resistance. Based on these results, BCSC radio-resistance can be reduced during proton beam therapy by co-treatment with ERK1/2 or p38 inhibitors, a novel approach to breast cancer therapy.

  8. Urban Endocrine Disruptors Targeting Breast Cancer Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes-Grajales, Diana; Bernardes, Gonçalo J L; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus

    2016-02-15

    Humans are exposed to a huge amount of environmental pollutants called endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). These molecules interfere with the homeostasis of the body, usually through mimicking natural hormones leading to activation or blocking of their receptors. Many of these compounds have been associated with a broad range of diseases including the development or increased susceptibility to breast cancer, the most prevalent cancer in women worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. Thus, this article presents a virtual high-throughput screening (vHTS) to evaluate the affinity of proteins related to breast cancer, such as ESR1, ERBB2, PGR, BCRA1, and SHBG, among others, with EDCs from urban sources. A blind docking strategy was employed to screen each protein-ligand pair in triplicate in AutoDock Vina 2.0, using the computed binding affinities as ranking criteria. The three-dimensional structures were previously obtained from EDCs DataBank and Protein Data Bank, prepared and optimized by SYBYL X-2.0. Some of the chemicals that exhibited the best affinity scores for breast cancer proteins in each category were 1,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, bisphenol A derivatives, perfluorooctanesulfonic acid, and benzo(a)pyrene, for catalase, several proteins, sex hormone-binding globulin, and cytochrome P450 1A2, respectively. An experimental validation of this approach was performed with a complex that gave a moderate binding affinity in silico, the sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), and bisphenol A (BPA) complex. The protein was obtained using DNA recombinant technology and the physical interaction with BPA assessed through spectroscopic techniques. BPA binds on the recombinant SHBG, and this results in an increase of its α helix content. In short, this work shows the potential of several EDCs to bind breast cancer associated proteins as a tool to prioritize compounds to perform in vitro analysis to benefit the regulation or exposure prevention by the

  9. Surfactant-based drug delivery systems for treating drug-resistant lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Prabhjot; Garg, Tarun; Rath, Goutam; Murthy, R S R; Goyal, Amit K

    2016-01-01

    Among all cancers, lung cancer is the major cause of deaths. Lung cancer can be categorized into two classes for prognostic and treatment purposes: small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Both categories of cancer are resistant to certain drugs. Various mechanisms behind drug resistance are over-expression of superficial membrane proteins [glycoprotein (P-gp)], lung resistance-associated proteins, aberration of the intracellular enzyme system, enhancement of the cell repair system and deregulation of cell apoptosis. Structure-performance relationships and chemical compatibility are consequently major fundamentals in surfactant-based formulations, with the intention that a great deal investigation is committed to this region. With the purpose to understand the potential of P-gp in transportation of anti-tumor drugs to cancer cells with much effectiveness and specificity, several surfactant-based delivery systems have been developed which may include microspheres, nanosized drug carriers (nanoparticles, nanoemulsions, stealth liposomes, nanogels, polymer-drug conjugates), novel powders, hydrogels and mixed micellar systems intended for systemic and/or localized delivery. PMID:25013959

  10. Mechanisms of acquired resistance to androgen receptor targeting drugs in castration resistant prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chism, David D.; De Silva, Dinuka; Whang, Young E.

    2014-01-01

    After initial response to androgen receptor targeting drugs abiraterone or enzalutamide, most patients develop progressive disease and therefore, castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) remains a terminal disease. Multiple mechanisms underlying acquired resistance have been postulated. Intratumoral androgen synthesis may resume after abiraterone treatment. A point mutation in the ligand binding domain of androgen receptor may confer resistance to enzalutamide. Emergence of androgen recept...

  11. Mitomycin resistance in mammalian cells expressing the bacterial mitomycin C resistance protein MCRA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcourt, M F; Penketh, P G; Hodnick, W F; Johnson, D A; Sherman, D H; Rockwell, S; Sartorelli, A C

    1999-08-31

    The mitomycin C-resistance gene, mcrA, of Streptomyces lavendulae produces MCRA, a protein that protects this microorganism from its own antibiotic, the antitumor drug mitomycin C. Expression of the bacterial mcrA gene in mammalian Chinese hamster ovary cells causes profound resistance to mitomycin C and to its structurally related analog porfiromycin under aerobic conditions but produces little change in drug sensitivity under hypoxia. The mitomycins are prodrugs that are enzymatically reduced and activated intracellularly, producing cytotoxic semiquinone anion radical and hydroquinone reduction intermediates. In vitro, MCRA protects DNA from cross-linking by the hydroquinone reduction intermediate of these mitomycins by oxidizing the hydroquinone back to the parent molecule; thus, MCRA acts as a hydroquinone oxidase. These findings suggest potential therapeutic applications for MCRA in the treatment of cancer with the mitomycins and imply that intrinsic or selected mitomycin C resistance in mammalian cells may not be due solely to decreased bioactivation, as has been hypothesized previously, but instead could involve an MCRA-like mechanism. PMID:10468636

  12. Broad distribution of the multidrug resistance-related vault lung resistance protein in normal human tissues and tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo, M A; Scheffer, G L; Flens, M J; Giaccone, G; Broxterman, H J; Meijer, C J; van der Valk, P; Scheper, R J

    1996-03-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to anticancer drugs is a major cause of treatment failure in cancer. The lung resistance protein LRP is a newly described protein related to MDR in several in vitro models. LRP has been shown to be a strong predictor of poor response to chemotherapy and prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia and in ovarian carcinoma patients. Recently, based on a 57% and 88% amino acid identity with major vault proteins from Dictyostelium discoideum and Rattus norvegicus, respectively, we identified LRP as the human major vault protein, the main component of highly conserved cellular organelles named vaults. We have studied the immunohistochemical expression of LRP in freshly frozen normal human tissues and 174 cancer specimens of 28 tumor types. LRP was broadly distributed in normal and malignant cells, but distinct patterns of expression were noticed. High LRP expression was seen in bronchus, digestive tract, renal proximal tubules, keratinocytes, macrophages, and adrenal cortex whereas varying ing levels were observed in other organs. LRP was detected in all tumor types examined, but its frequency varied, fairly reflecting the chemosensitivity of different cancers. For example, low rates of LRP positivity were seen in testicular cancer, neuroblastoma, and acute myeloid leukemia; intermediate in ovarian cancer; and high in colon, renal, and pancreatic carcinomas. The wide occurrence of LRP in normal and transformed cells in humans, its similar distribution to that of vaults in other species, as well as the high level of conservation among eukaryotic cells of both the amino acid sequence of the major vault protein and the composition and structure of vaults, suggest that vault function is important to eukaryotic cells. PMID:8774142

  13. Overcome Cancer Cell Drug Resistance Using Natural Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy is one of the major treatment methods for cancer. However, failure in chemotherapy is not uncommon, mainly due to dose-limiting toxicity associated with drug resistance. Management of drug resistance is important towards successful chemotherapy. There are many reports in the Chinese literature that natural products can overcome cancer cell drug resistance, which deserve sharing with scientific and industrial communities. We summarized the reports into four categories: (1 in vitro studies using cell line models; (2 serum pharmacology; (3 in vivo studies using animal models; and (4 clinical studies. Fourteen single compounds were reported to have antidrug resistance activity for the first time. In vitro, compounds were able to overcome drug resistance at nontoxic or subtoxic concentrations, in a dose-dependent manner, by inhibiting drug transporters, cell detoxification capacity, or cell apoptosis sensitivity. Studies in vivo showed that single compounds, herbal extract, and formulas had potent antidrug resistance activities. Importantly, many single compounds, herbal extracts, and formulas have been used clinically to treat various diseases including cancer. The review provides comprehensive data on use of natural compounds to overcome cancer cell drug resistance in China, which may facilitate the therapeutic development of natural products for clinical management of cancer drug resistance.

  14. Overcoming doxorubicin resistance of cancer cells by Cas9-mediated gene disruption

    OpenAIRE

    Jong Seong Ha; Juyoung Byun; Dae-Ro Ahn

    2016-01-01

    In this study, Cas9 system was employed to down-regulate mdr1 gene for overcoming multidrug resistance of cancer cells. Disruption of the MDR1 gene was achieved by delivery of the Cas9-sgRNA plasmid or the Cas9-sgRNA ribonucleoprotein complex using a conventional gene transfection agent and protein transduction domain (PTD). Doxorubicin showed considerable cytotoxicity to the drug-resistant breast cancer cells pre-treated with the RNA-guided endonuclease (RGEN) systems, whereas virtually non-...

  15. Heat shock protein 90: the cancer chaperone

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Len Neckers

    2007-04-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a molecular chaperone required for the stability and function of a number of conditionally activated and/or expressed signalling proteins, as well as multiple mutated, chimeric, and/or over-expressed signalling proteins, that promote cancer cell growth and/or survival. Hsp90 inhibitors are unique in that, although they are directed towards a specific molecular target, they simultaneously inhibit multiple cellular signalling pathways. By inhibiting nodal points in multiple overlapping survival pathways utilized by cancer cells, combination of an Hsp90 inhibitor with standard chemotherapeutic agents may dramatically increase the in vivo efficacy of the standard agent. Hsp90 inhibitors may circumvent the characteristic genetic plasticity that has allowed cancer cells to eventually evade the toxic effects of most molecularly targeted agents. The mechanism-based use of Hsp90 inhibitors, both alone and in combination with other drugs, should be effective toward multiple forms of cancer. Further, because Hsp90 inhibitors also induce Hsf-1-dependent expression of Hsp70, and because certain mutated Hsp90 client proteins are neurotoxic, these drugs display ameliorative properties in several neurodegenerative disease models, suggesting a novel role for Hsp90 inhibitors in treating multiple pathologies involving neurodegeneration.

  16. Protein nanomedicines for cancer diagnostics and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New results and applications of the work on anti-cancer therapy using nanomedicines at the Amrita Centre for Nanosciences are presented. Proteins have been selected as having good potential for clinical translation and are excellent carriers for drugs, provide good release kinetics and are also amenable for fluorescent tagging with multiple functionalities for diagnostic purposes. (author)

  17. Mismatch repair and treatment resistance in ovarian cancer

    OpenAIRE

    van der Burg Maria EL; Ewing Patricia C; Ritstier Kirsten; van Kuijk Patricia F; Dinjens Winand NM; van Staveren Iris L; Helleman Jozien; Stoter Gerrit; Berns Els MJJ

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The treatment of ovarian cancer is hindered by intrinsic or acquired resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy. The aim of this study is to determine the frequency of mismatch repair (MMR) inactivation in ovarian cancer and its association with resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy. Methods We determined, microsatellite instability (MSI) as a marker for MMR inactivation (analysis of BAT25 and BAT26), MLH1 promoter methylation status (methylation specific PCR on bisulfi...

  18. AGR2 Predicts Tamoxifen Resistance in Postmenopausal Breast Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Roman Hrstka; Veronika Brychtova; Pavel Fabian; Borivoj Vojtesek; Marek Svoboda

    2013-01-01

    Endocrine resistance is a significant problem in breast cancer treatment. Thus identification and validation of novel resistance determinants is important to improve treatment efficacy and patient outcome. In our work, AGR2 expression was determined by qRT-PCR in Tru-Cut needle biopsies from tamoxifen-treated postmenopausal breast cancer patients. Our results showed inversed association of AGR2 mRNA levels with primary treatment response (P = 0.0011) and progression-free survival (P = 0.0366)...

  19. Carboplatin treatment of antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mathilde S; Yde, Christina Westmose; Christensen, Ib J;

    2012-01-01

    sensitivity to carboplatin, as it was previously shown with cisplatin, and whether low Bcl-2 expression levels have a potential value as marker for increased carboplatin sensitivity. Breast cancer cells resistant to the pure antiestrogen fulvestrant, and two out of four cell lines resistant to the...... antiestrogen tamoxifen, were more sensitive to carboplatin treatment compared to the parental MCF-7 cell line. This indicates that carboplatin may be an advantageous treatment in antiestrogen‑resistant breast cancer; however, a marker for increased sensitivity would be needed. Low Bcl-2 expression was...... combination with Bcl-xL and Bax, could explain the observed responses to carboplatin in all tamoxifen‑resistant cell lines, indicating that more markers are needed to predict the response to carboplatin in tamoxifen‑resistant breast cancer....

  20. Mechanisms of Therapeutic Resistance in Cancer (Stem) Cells with Emphasis on Thyroid Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine; Natarajan, Suchitra; Thanasupawat, Thatchawan; Medapati, Manoj; PATHAK, ALOK; Ghavami, Saeid; Klonisch, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The two main reasons for death of cancer patients, tumor recurrence and metastasis, are multi-stage cellular processes that involve increased cell plasticity and coincide with elevated resistance to anti-cancer treatments. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key contributor to metastasis in many cancer types, including thyroid cancer and is known to confer stem cell-like properties onto cancer cells. This review provides an overview of molecular mechanisms and factors known to con...

  1. Overcoming cisplatin resistance of ovarian cancer cells by targeting HIF-1-regulated cancer metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Zhihong; Lu, Yang; Qiu, Songbo; Fan, Zhen

    2016-04-01

    Cisplatin is currently one of the most effective chemotherapeutic drugs used for treating ovarian cancer; however, resistance to cisplatin is common. In this study, we explored an experimental strategy for overcoming cisplatin resistance of human ovarian cancer from the new perspective of cancer cell metabolism. By using two pairs of genetically matched cisplatin-sensitive and cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cell lines, we tested the hypothesis that downregulating hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), which regulates metabolic enzymes involved in glycolysis, is a promising strategy for overcoming cisplatin resistance of human ovarian cancer cells. We found that cisplatin downregulated the level of the regulatable α subunit of HIF-1, HIF-1α, in cisplatin-sensitive ovarian cancer cells through enhancing HIF-1α degradation but did not downregulate HIF-1α in their cisplatin-resistant counterparts. Overexpression of a degradation-resistant HIF-1α (HIF-1α ΔODD) reduced cisplatin-induced apoptosis in cisplatin-sensitive cells, whereas genetic knockdown of HIF-1α or pharmacological promotion of HIF-1α degradation enhanced response to cisplatin in both cisplatin-sensitive and cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells. We further demonstrated that knockdown of HIF-1α improved the response of cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin by redirecting the aerobic glycolysis in the resistant cancer cells toward mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, leading to cell death through overproduction of reactive oxygen species. Our findings suggest that the HIF-1α-regulated cancer metabolism pathway could be a novel target for overcoming cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer. PMID:26801746

  2. Specific kinesin expression profiles associated with taxane resistance in basal-like breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Min Han; De, Sarmishtha; Bebek, Gurkan; Orloff, Mohammed S; Wesolowski, Robert; Downs-Kelly, Erinn; Budd, G Thomas; Stark, George R; Eng, Charis

    2012-02-01

    Breast cancer is a genetically heterogenous disease with subtypes differing in prognosis and chemosensitivity. The basal-like breast cancer (BLBC) molecular subtype is associated with poorer outcomes, but is more responsive to taxane-based chemotherapy. Kinesins are intracellular transport proteins that interact with microtubules, which are also the mechanistic target for taxanes. We investigated the relationship between taxane resistance in BLBC and kinesins using both expression and functional studies. Kinesin (KIF) expression was evaluated in three settings in relation to taxane resistance: (i) the NCI-60 cancer cell lines, (ii) pre-treatment samples from four BLBC patient cohorts receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimens with and without taxanes, and (iii) post-treatment samples from residual breast cancer following neoadjuvant taxane-containing chemotherapy. We used a novel functional approach to gene modification, validation-based insertional mutagenesis, to select kinesin-overexpressing clones of BLBC cells for evaluation of related mechanisms of taxane resistance. In the NCI-60 cell line dataset, overexpression of the kinesin KIFC3 is significantly correlated with resistance to both docetaxel (P breast cancers (2.8-fold-change). Functional studies established that overexpression of KIFC3, KIF5A, and KIF12 were specific in mediating resistance to docetaxel and not vincristine or doxorubicin. Mutation of the ATP-binding domain of a kinesin abolished its ability to mediate docetaxel resistance. Overall, kinesin overexpression correlates with specific taxane resistance in BLBC cell lines and tissues. Our results suggest a novel approach for drug development to overcome taxane resistance in breast cancer through concurrent or sequential use of kinesin inhibitors. PMID:21479552

  3. Macrolide Resistance Mediated by a Bifidobacterium breve Membrane Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Margolles, Abelardo; Moreno, José Antonio; van Sinderen, Douwe; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G.

    2005-01-01

    A gene coding for a hypothetical membrane protein from Bifidobacterium breve was expressed in Lactococcus lactis. Immunoblotting demonstrated that this protein is located in the membrane. Phenotypical changes in sensitivity towards 21 antibiotics were determined. The membrane protein-expressing cells showed higher levels of resistance to several macrolides.

  4. PTEN overexpression improves cisplatin-resistance of human ovarian cancer cells through upregulating KRT10 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Huijuan; Wang, Ke; Liu, Wenxin; Hao, Quan, E-mail: quan_haotj@126.com

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Overexpression of PTEN enhanced the sensitivity of C13K cells to cisplatin. • KRT10 is a downstream molecule of PTEN involved in the resistance-reversing effect. • Overexpression of KRT10 enhanced the chemosensitivity of C13K cells to cisplatin. - Abstract: Multi-drug resistance (MDR) is a common cause of the failure of chemotherapy in ovarian cancer. PTEN, a tumor suppressor gene, has been demonstrated to be able to reverse cisplatin-resistance in ovarian cancer cell line C13K. However, the downstream molecules of PTEN involved in the resistance-reversing effect have not been completely clarified. Therefore, we screened the downstream molecules of PTEN and studied their interactions in C13K ovarian cancer cells using a 3D culture model. Firstly, we constructed an ovarian cancer cell line stably expressing PTEN, C13K/PTEN. MTT assay showed that overexpression of PTEN enhanced the sensitivity of C13K cells to cisplatin, but not to paclitaxel. Then we examined the differently expressed proteins that interacted with PTEN in C13K/PTEN cells with or without cisplatin treatment by co-immunoprecipitation. KRT10 was identified as a differently expressed protein in cisplatin-treated C13K/PTEN cells. Further study confirmed that cisplatin could induce upregulation of KRT10 mRNA and protein in C13K/PTEN cells and there was a directly interaction between KRT10 and PTEN. Forced expression of KRT10 in C13K cells also enhanced cisplatin-induced proliferation inhibition and apoptosis of C13K cells. In addition, KRT10 siRNA blocked cisplatin-induced proliferation inhibition of C13K/PTEN cells. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that KRT10 is a downstream molecule of PTEN which improves cisplatin-resistance of ovarian cancer and forced KRT10 overexpression may also act as a therapeutic method for overcoming MDR in ovarian cancer.

  5. PTEN overexpression improves cisplatin-resistance of human ovarian cancer cells through upregulating KRT10 expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Overexpression of PTEN enhanced the sensitivity of C13K cells to cisplatin. • KRT10 is a downstream molecule of PTEN involved in the resistance-reversing effect. • Overexpression of KRT10 enhanced the chemosensitivity of C13K cells to cisplatin. - Abstract: Multi-drug resistance (MDR) is a common cause of the failure of chemotherapy in ovarian cancer. PTEN, a tumor suppressor gene, has been demonstrated to be able to reverse cisplatin-resistance in ovarian cancer cell line C13K. However, the downstream molecules of PTEN involved in the resistance-reversing effect have not been completely clarified. Therefore, we screened the downstream molecules of PTEN and studied their interactions in C13K ovarian cancer cells using a 3D culture model. Firstly, we constructed an ovarian cancer cell line stably expressing PTEN, C13K/PTEN. MTT assay showed that overexpression of PTEN enhanced the sensitivity of C13K cells to cisplatin, but not to paclitaxel. Then we examined the differently expressed proteins that interacted with PTEN in C13K/PTEN cells with or without cisplatin treatment by co-immunoprecipitation. KRT10 was identified as a differently expressed protein in cisplatin-treated C13K/PTEN cells. Further study confirmed that cisplatin could induce upregulation of KRT10 mRNA and protein in C13K/PTEN cells and there was a directly interaction between KRT10 and PTEN. Forced expression of KRT10 in C13K cells also enhanced cisplatin-induced proliferation inhibition and apoptosis of C13K cells. In addition, KRT10 siRNA blocked cisplatin-induced proliferation inhibition of C13K/PTEN cells. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that KRT10 is a downstream molecule of PTEN which improves cisplatin-resistance of ovarian cancer and forced KRT10 overexpression may also act as a therapeutic method for overcoming MDR in ovarian cancer

  6. Prognostic Significance of Multidrug Resistance Gene 1 (MDR1), Multidrug Resistance-related Protein (MRP) and Lung Resistance Protein (LRP) mRNA Expression in Acute Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Huh, Hee Jin; Park, Chan-Jeoung; Jang, Seongsoo; Seo, Eul-Ju; Chi, Hyun-Sook; Lee, Je-Hwan; Lee, Kyoo-Hyung; Seo, Jong Jin; Moon, Hyung Nam; Ghim, Thad

    2006-01-01

    The prognostic significance of multidrug resistance (MDR) gene expression is controversial. We investigated whether multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1), multidrug resistance-related protein (MRP) and lung resistance protein (LRP) mRNA expression are associated with outcomes in acute leukemia patients. At diagnosis we examined MDR1, MRP and LRP mRNA expression in bone marrow samples from 71 acute leukemia patients (39 myeloid, 32 lymphoblastic) using nested RT-PCR. The expression of each of the...

  7. Glucocorticoid receptor antagonism reverts docetaxel resistance in human prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, Jan; Puhr, Martin; Buijs, Jeroen T.; Van Der Horst, Geertje; Lemhemmer, Daniël; Marijt, Koen A.; Hwang, Ming S.; Masood, Motasim; Grimm, Stefan; Storm, Gert; Metselaar, Josbert M.; Meijer, Onno C.; Culig, Zoran; Van Der Pluijm, Gabri

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to docetaxel is a major clinical problem in advanced prostate cancer (PCA). Although glucocorticoids (GCs) are frequently used in combination with docetaxel, it is unclear to what extent GCs and their receptor, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), contribute to the chemotherapy resistance. I

  8. The role of RAD51 in etoposide (VP16) resistance in small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lasse Tengbjerg; Lundin, Cecilia; Spang-Thomsen, Mogens;

    2003-01-01

    investigated DSB repair and cellular VP16 sensitivity of SCLC cells. VP16 sensitivity and RAD51, DNA-PK(cs), topoisomerase IIalpha and P-glycoprotein protein levels were determined in 17 SCLC cell lines. In order to unravel the role of RAD51 in VP16 resistance, we cloned the human RAD51 gene, transfected SCLC......Etoposide (VP16) is a potent inducer of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and is efficiently used in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) therapy. However, acquired VP16 resistance remains an important barrier to effective treatment. To understand the underlying mechanisms for VP16 resistance in SCLC, we...

  9. RIN4-like proteins mediate resistance protein-derived soybean defense against Pseudomonas syringae

    OpenAIRE

    Selote, Devarshi; Kachroo, Aardra

    2010-01-01

    Resistance (R) protein mediated recognition of pathogen avirulence effectors triggers signaling that induces a very robust form of species-specific immunity in plants. The soybean Rpg1-b protein mediates this form of resistance against the bacterial blight pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae expressing AvrBPgyrace4. Likewise, the Arabidopsis RPM1 protein also mediates species-specific resistance against AvrB expressing bacteria. RPM1 and Rpg1-b are non-orthologous and differ in their requirements ...

  10. Heat shock and other apoptosis-related proteins as therapeutic targets in prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Costantine Albany; Noah M Hahn

    2014-01-01

    Defects within apoptotic pathways have been implicated in prostate cancer (PCa) tumorigenesis, metastatic progression and treatment resistance. A hallmark of cancers is the ability to derail apoptosis by inhibiting the apoptotic signal, reducing the expression of apoptotic proteins and/or amplifying survival signals through increased production of antiapoptotic molecule. This review describes associations between heat shock proteins (HSPs) and the human androgen receptor (AR), the role of HSPs and other stress-induced proteins in PCa development and emerging strategies in targeting these protective proteins to treat PCa.

  11. 乳腺癌实施化疗后癌干细胞同P-糖蛋白及耐药蛋白在残存癌组织中表达的相关性%Breast cancer stem cells after chemotherapy with P - glycoprotein and resistant protein expression of correlation in the residual carcinoma tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔婉晴; 涂巍

    2014-01-01

    目的:研究乳腺癌实施化疗后癌干细胞、P-糖蛋白及耐药蛋白在残存癌组织中的表达情况。方法将本院2012年5月至2013年5月收治的53例乳腺癌患者作为研究对象,比较化疗前后癌组织中癌干细胞、P-糖蛋白及耐药蛋白表达情况。结果患者化疗后,残留癌细胞中的癌干细胞含量上升且形成的微球体直径增加,与化疗前相比差异具有显著性(t=6.3615,191.3086;P=0.0000);患者化疗后,残留癌细胞中癌干细胞内谷胱甘肽转移酶π、拓补异构酶Ⅱ的阳性表达率上升,与化疗前相比差异具有显著性(χ2=3.9775,4.4002;P=0.0461,0.0359);患者化疗后,残留癌组织中P-糖蛋白表达水平上升,而耐药蛋白表达水平上升极其明显;与化疗前相比差异极其显著(t=6.5045,11.2765;P=0.0000)。结论乳腺癌患者在化疗后,残存癌组织中的癌干细胞含量上升、P-糖蛋白及耐药蛋白的阳性表达率上升,产生一定的耐药性。%ObjectiveTo study the breast cancer stem cells after chemotherapy, P-glycoprotein and resistant protein expression in the residual carcinoma tissue.MethodsFrom May 2012 to May 2013 were 53 cases of breast cancer patients as the research object, compared before and after chemotherapy cancer stem cells in cancer tissue, P-glycoprotein and resistant protein expression.ResultsThe patients after chemotherapy, residual carcinoma cells in cancer stem cells content increased and the formation of the microsphere diameter increase, signiifcant difference compared with before treatment (t=6.3615, 191.3086;P=6.3615). Cancer stem cells in patients after chemotherapy, residual cancer cells within the glutathione transferase PI, the topology isomerase II the positive expression rate of rise, compared with before treatment with statistical signiifcance (χ2=3.9775, 3.9775;P=0.0461, 0.0359); after chemotherapy, patients with residual P

  12. Application of Metabolomics in Drug Resistant Breast Cancer Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha N. Shajahan-Haq

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic profiles of breast cancer cells are different from normal mammary epithelial cells. Breast cancer cells that gain resistance to therapeutic interventions can reprogram their endogenous metabolism in order to adapt and proliferate despite high oxidative stress and hypoxic conditions. Drug resistance in breast cancer, regardless of subgroups, is a major clinical setback. Although recent advances in genomics and proteomics research has given us a glimpse into the heterogeneity that exists even within subgroups, the ability to precisely predict a tumor’s response to therapy remains elusive. Metabolomics as a quantitative, high through put technology offers promise towards devising new strategies to establish predictive, diagnostic and prognostic markers of breast cancer. Along with other “omics” technologies that include genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics, metabolomics fits into the puzzle of a comprehensive systems biology approach to understand drug resistance in breast cancer. In this review, we highlight the challenges facing successful therapeutic treatment of breast cancer and the innovative approaches that metabolomics offers to better understand drug resistance in cancer.

  13. Nanomedicine therapeutic approaches to overcome cancer drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markman, Janet L; Rekechenetskiy, Arthur; Holler, Eggehard; Ljubimova, Julia Y

    2013-11-01

    Nanomedicine is an emerging form of therapy that focuses on alternative drug delivery and improvement of the treatment efficacy while reducing detrimental side effects to normal tissues. Cancer drug resistance is a complicated process that involves multiple mechanisms. Here we discuss the major forms of drug resistance and the new possibilities that nanomedicines offer to overcome these treatment obstacles. Novel nanomedicines that have a high ability for flexible, fast drug design and production based on tumor genetic profiles can be created making drug selection for personal patient treatment much more intensive and effective. This review aims to demonstrate the advantage of the young medical science field, nanomedicine, for overcoming cancer drug resistance. With the advanced design and alternative mechanisms of drug delivery known for different nanodrugs including liposomes, polymer conjugates, micelles, dendrimers, carbon-based, and metallic nanoparticles, overcoming various forms of multi-drug resistance looks promising and opens new horizons for cancer treatment. PMID:24120656

  14. MicroRNAs and cancer resistance: A new molecular plot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanini, F; Fabbri, M

    2016-05-01

    The most common cause of cancer relapse is drug resistance, acquired or intrinsic, which strongly limits the efficacy of both conventional and new targeted chemotherapy. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a growing, large family of short noncoding RNAs frequently dysregulated in malignancies. Although the mechanism of miRNA-mediated drug resistance is not fully understood, an increasing amount of evidence suggests their involvement in the acquisition of tumor cell drug resistance, pointing towards the need for novel and more innovative therapeutic approaches. Use of antagomiRs or mimics can modulate specific miRNAs in order to restore gene networks and signaling pathways, perhaps optimizing chemotherapies by increasing cancer cell sensitivity to drugs. The aim of this review is to provide a state-of-the-art scenario with regard to the most recent discoveries in the field of miRNAs involved in the process of resistance to cancer therapy. PMID:26875151

  15. Selective Toxicity of NSC 73306 in MDR1-positive cells as a New Strategy to Circumvent Multidrug Resistance in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ludwig, Joseph A.; Szakács, Gergely; Martin, Scott E.; Chu, Benjamin F.; Cardarelli, Carol; Sauna, Zuben E.; Caplen, Natasha J.; Fales, Henry M.; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Weinstein, John N.; Gottesman, Michael M.

    2006-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins include the best known mediators of resistance to anticancer drugs. In particular, ABCB1 (MDR1/P-gp) extrudes many types of drugs from cancer cells, thereby conferring resistance to those agents. Attempts to overcome P-gp-mediated drug resistance using specific inhibitors of P-gp has had limited success, and has faced many therapeutic challenges. As an alternative approach to using P-gp inhibitors, we characterize a thiosemicarbazone derivative (NSC73306) i...

  16. Enzalutamide for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Wijdan H; Kabbara, Wissam K; Al Basiouni Al Masri, Hiba S

    2015-01-01

    Objective To review and evaluate current literature on the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug enzalutamide (XTANDI®) in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Data sources Literature search was done through PubMed using the terms enzalutamide, MDV3100, abiraterone, and castration-resistant prostate cancer. Data from FDA product labels were also used. Study selection and data extraction Recent and relevant studies were included in the review. Collected clinical trials were screened and evaluated. Data synthesis Enzalutamide is an androgen receptor (AR) inhibitor with high selectivity and affinity to the AR. It was approved by the FDA to treat metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer in patients previously treated with docetaxel, after a Phase III trial (AFFIRM) that showed a 4.8-month survival benefit in this population. Recently, the FDA expanded the approval of enzalutamide as first-line therapy for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) who did not receive chemotherapy. Moreover, enzalutamide is shown to be associated with an acceptable safety profile. Conclusion Enzalutamide has been shown to be both safe and effective in improving overall survival in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer postchemotherapy with docetaxel and as a first line treatment before initiation of chemotherapy. However, additional studies and head-to-head trials are needed. PMID:25945058

  17. TWO OPTIMAL CONTROL PROBLEMS IN CANCER CHEMOTHERAPY WITH DRUG RESISTANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Krabs

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate two well-known basic optimal control problems forchemotherapeutic cancer treatment modified by introducing a timedependent “resistance factor”. This factor should be responsible for the effect of the drug resistance of tumor cells on the dynamical growth for the tumor. Both optimal control problems have common pointwise but different integral constraints on the control. We show that in both models the usually practised bang-bang control is optimal if the resistance is sufficiently strong. Further, we discuss different optimal strategies in both models for general resistance.

  18. Quantitative proteomics as a tool to identify resistance mechanisms in erlotinib-resistant subclones of the non-small cell lung cancer cell line HCC827

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kirstine

    identification of novel resistance mechanisms. We identified 2875 cytoplasmic proteins present in all 4 cell lines. Of these 87, 56 and 23 are upregulated >1.5 fold; and 117, 72 and 32 are downregulated >1.5 fold, respectively, in the 3 resistant clones compared to the parental cell line. By network analysis, we...... downregulated, indicating a bypass signaling mechanism to achieve resistance. More specifically, mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK1) and synovial apoptosis inhibitor 1 (SYNV1) were upregulated. Conclusions: In conclusion, cancer-related networks such as proliferation and apoptosis were found to be...... regulated, supporting the validity of the model. EGFR was consistently downregulated and MAPK1 activated, indicating a bypass resistance mechanism, likely leading to activation of downstream proteins obviating EGFR. Generally, the overlap of regulated proteins between the 3 subclones was low, indicating the...

  19. Castration-resistant prostate cancer: systemic therapy in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando C. Maluf

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common non-cutaneous neoplasm in the male population worldwide. It is typically diagnosed in its early stages, and the disease exhibits a relatively indolent course in most patients. Despite the curability of localized disease with prostatectomy and radiation therapy, some patients develop metastatic disease and die. Although androgen deprivation is present in the majority of patients with metastatic prostate cancer, a state of androgen resistance eventually develops. Castration-resistant prostate cancer, defined when there is progression of disease despite low levels of testosterone, requires specialized care, and improved communication between medical and urologic oncologists has been identified as a key component in delivering effective therapy. Despite being considered a chemoresistant tumor in the past, the use of a prostate-specific antigen has paved the way for a new generation of trials for castration-resistant prostate cancer. Docetaxel is a life-prolonging chemotherapy that has been established as the standard first-line agent in two phase III clinical trials. Cabazitaxel, a novel taxane with activity in cancer models resistant to paclitaxel and docetaxel, is the only agent that has been compared to a chemotherapy control in a phase III clinical trial as a second-line therapy; it was found to prolong the overall survival of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer previously treated with docetaxel when compared to mitoxantrone. Other agents used in this setting include abiraterone and sipuleucel-T, and novel therapies are continually being investigated in an attempt to improve the outcome for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  20. Abrogating endocrine resistance by targeting ER alpha and PI3K in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ToddWMiller

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Antiestrogen therapies targeting estrogen receptor alpha (ER signaling are a mainstay for patients with ER+ breast cancer. While many cancers exhibit resistance to antiestrogen therapies, a large body of clinical and experimental evidence indicates that hyperactivation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K pathway promotes antiestrogen resistance. In addition, continued ligand-independent ER signaling in the setting of estrogen deprivation may contribute to resistance to endocrine therapy. PI3K activates several proteins which promote cell cycle progression and survival. In ER+ breast cancer cells, PI3K promotes ligand-dependent and -independent ER transcriptional activity. Models of antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer often remain sensitive to estrogen stimulation and PI3K inhibition, suggesting that clinical trials with combinations of drugs targeting both the PI3K and ER pathways are warranted. Herein, we review recent findings on the roles of PI3K and ER in antiestrogen resistance, and clinical trials testing drug combinations which target both pathways. We also discuss the need for clinical investigation of ER downregulators in combination with PI3K inhibitors.

  1. Exosomes in development, metastasis and drug resistance of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Dan-Dan; Wu, Ying; Shen, Hong-yu; Lv, Meng-meng; Chen, Wei-Xian; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Zhong, Shan-liang; Tang, Jin-Hai; Zhao, Jian-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Transport through the cell membrane can be divided into active, passive and vesicular types (exosomes). Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles released by a variety of cells. Emerging evidence shows that exosomes play a critical role in cancers. Exosomes mediate communication between stroma and cancer cells through the transfer of nucleic acid and proteins. It is demonstrated that the contents and the quantity of exosomes will change after occurrence of cancers. Over the last decade, growing attent...

  2. Neratinib overcomes trastuzumab resistance in HER2 amplified breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canonici, Alexandra; Gijsen, Merel; Mullooly, Maeve; Bennett, Ruth; Bouguern, Noujoude; Pedersen, Kasper; O'Brien, Neil A; Roxanis, Ioannis; Li, Ji-Liang; Bridge, Esther; Finn, Richard; Siamon, Dennis; McGowan, Patricia; Duffy, Michael J; O'Donovan, Norma; Crown, John; Kong, Anthony

    2013-10-01

    Trastuzumab has been shown to improve the survival outcomes of HER2 positive breast cancer patients. However, a significant proportion of HER2-positive patients are either inherently resistant or develop resistance to trastuzumab. We assessed the effects of neratinib, an irreversible panHER inhibitor, in a panel of 36 breast cancer cell lines. We further assessed its effects with or without trastuzumab in several sensitive and resistant breast cancer cells as well as a BT474 xenograft model. We confirmed that neratinib was significantly more active in HER2-amplified than HER2 non-amplified cell lines. Neratinib decreased the activation of the 4 HER receptors and inhibited downstream pathways. However, HER3 and Akt were reactivated at 24 hours, which was prevented by the combination of trastuzumab and neratinib. Neratinib also decreased pHER2 and pHER3 in acquired trastuzumab resistant cells. Neratinib in combination with trastuzumab had a greater growth inhibitory effect than either drug alone in 4 HER2 positive cell lines. Furthermore, trastuzumab in combination with neratinib was growth inhibitory in SKBR3 and BT474 cells which had acquired resistance to trastuzumab as well as in a BT474 xenograft model. Innately trastuzumab resistant cell lines showed sensitivity to neratinib, but the combination did not enhance response compared to neratinib alone. Levels of HER2 and phospho-HER2 showed a direct correlation with sensitivity to neratinib. Our data indicate that neratinib is an effective anti-HER2 therapy and counteracted both innate and acquired trastuzumab resistance in HER2 positive breast cancer. Our results suggest that combined treatment with trastuzumab and neratinib is likely to be more effective than either treatment alone for both trastuzumab-sensitive breast cancer as well as HER2-positive tumors with acquired resistance to trastuzumab. PMID:24009064

  3. Reprogramming mediated radio-resistance of 3D-grown cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vitro 3D growth of tumors is a new cell culture model that more closely mimics the features of the in vivo environment and is being used increasingly in the field of biological and medical research. It has been demonstrated that cancer cells cultured in 3D matrices are more radio-resistant compared with cells in monolayers. However, the mechanisms causing this difference remain unclear. Here we show that cancer cells cultured in a 3D microenvironment demonstrated an increase in cells with stem cell properties. This was confirmed by the finding that cells in 3D cultures upregulated the gene and protein expression of the stem cell reprogramming factors such as OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, LIN28 and miR-302a, compared with cells in monolayers. Moreover, the expression of β-catenin, a regulating molecule of reprogramming factors, also increased in 3D-grown cancer cells. These findings suggest that cancer cells were reprogrammed to become stem cell-like cancer cells in a 3D growth culture microenvironment. Since cancer stem cell-like cells demonstrate an increased radio-resistance and chemo-resistance, our results offer a new perspective as to why. Our findings shed new light on understanding the features of the 3D growth cell model and its application in basic research into clinical radiotherapy and medicine. (author)

  4. Targeting AMPK Signaling Pathway to Overcome Drug Resistance for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiyu; Liu, Pengxi; Chen, Qianjun; Deng, Shigui; Liu, Xiaoyan; Situ, Honglin; Zhong, Shaowen; Hann, Swei; Lin, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Mulitdrug resistance (MDR) is one of critical factorslimiting the efficacy of cancer chemoor radiotherapy. Emerging evidence has indicated that MDR is a complex process regulated by multiple factors, among which stress response molecules are considered as central players. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a major regulator balancing energy supply and ultimately protects cells from harmful stresses via coordinating multiple metabolic pathways Notably, AMPK activation was recently shown to mediate the metabolism reprogramming in drug resistant cancer cells including promoting Warburg effects and mitochondrial biogenesis. Furthermore, AMPK activity has also been shown to regulate the self-renewal ability of cancer stem cells that are often refractory to chemotherapy. In addition, AMPK phosphorylation was critical in mediating autophagy induction, a process demonstrated to be effective in chemosensitivity modulation via degrading cellular components to satisfy nutrients requirement under stressful condition. Meanwhile, drug discovery targeting AMPK has been developed to validate the pathological significance of AMPK in cancer prevention and treatment. Although conflicting evidence focusing on the AMPK modulation for cancer treatment is still remained, this might be attributed to differences in AMPK isotypes in specific tissues, off-targets effects, the degree and duration of drug administration and experimental setting of stress conditions. This review will focus on AMPK mediated resistance to cancer therapy and discuss its potential therapeutic implication and targeting drug development. PMID:25777274

  5. Cancer stem cells and resistance to chemo and radio therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Babar; Nie, Daotai

    2012-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs, or tumor initiating cells) are responsible for tumor initiation. If cancer treatment kills most of cancer cells in the stage of transit amplifying and differentiation without killing the stem cells, the surviving CSCs will eventually lead to recurrence of tumors. Studies have suggested that CSCs may be the primary mediators of resistance to chemo- and radio-therapy, leading to failure in cancer therapy. Numerous targets are being investigated for their potential involvement in the self-renewal and chemo- and radio-resistance of cancer cells. However, despite the intensive efforts invested into characterizing the role of cancer stem cells, there is a sense of uncertainty regarding the identity and number of these cells as well as the implications in cancer treatment. In this review, we will discuss the identification of CSCs by cell surface markers, the biology of CSCs, and the role of CSCs in resistance to radio- and chemo-therapy. This review will discuss the advances in targeting CSCs to improve the efficacy of chemo- and radio-therapy. PMID:22202026

  6. Cabozantinib overcomes crizotinib resistance in ROS1 fusion positive cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Ryohei; Kobayashi, Yuka; Friboulet, Luc; Lockerman, Elizabeth. L.; Koike, Sumie; Shaw, Alice T.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Fujita, Naoya

    2014-01-01

    Purpose ROS1 rearrangement leads to constitutive ROS1 activation with potent transforming activity. In an ongoing phase 1 trial, the ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) crizotinib shows remarkable initial responses in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring ROS1 fusions; however, cancers eventually develop crizotinib resistance due to acquired mutations such as G2032R in ROS1. Thus, understanding the crizotinib resistance mechanisms in ROS1 rearranged NSCLC and identification of therapeutic strategies to overcome the resistance are required. Experimental Design The sensitivity of CD74-ROS1-transformed Ba/F3 cells to multiple ALK inhibitors was examined. Acquired ROS1 inhibitor resistant mutations in CD74-ROS1 fusion were screened by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis with Ba/F3 cells. To overcome the resistance mutation, we performed high throughput drug screening with small molecular inhibitors and anticancer drugs used in clinical practice or being currently tested in clinical trials. The effect of the identified drug was assessed in the CD74-ROS1 mutant Ba/F3 cells and crizotinib resistant patient-derived cancer cells (MGH047) harboring G2032R mutated CD74-ROS1. Results We identified multiple novel crizotinib resistance mutations in the ROS1 kinase domain including the G2032R mutation. As the result of high-throughput drug screening, we found that the cMET/RET/VEGFR inhibitor cabozantinib (XL184) effectively inhibited the survival of CD74-ROS1-WT and resistant mutants harboring Ba/F3 and MGH047 cells. Furthermore, cabozantinib could overcome all the resistance by all newly identified secondary mutations. Conclusions We developed a comprehensive model of acquired resistance to ROS1 inhibitors in NSCLC with ROS1 rearrangement and identified cabozantinib as a therapeutic strategy to overcome the resistance. PMID:25351743

  7. Protein expression on Cr resistant microorganism using electrophoresis method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SAJIDAN

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatmawati U, Suranto, Sajidan. 2009. Protein expression on Cr resistant microorganism using electrophoresis method. Nusantara Bioscience 1: 31-37. Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI is known as toxic heavy metals, so the need is reduced to Cr(III is much less toxicity. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas putida, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pantoea sp. and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are resistant Cr(VI microorganism and have ability to reduce Cr(VI. The aim of this research is to know ability of microorganism to reduce Cr(VI and to know protein band pattern between Cr(VI resistant microorganism and non resistant microorganism which inoculated on LB broth. SDS-PAGE was used to indentify protein expression. While, Cr(VI concentration was identified by 1.5 diphenylcarbazide method. The quantitative data was analyzed by two factorial ANOVA that continued with DMRT at 1% level test. The qualitative data i.e. protein expression analyzed by relative mobility (Rf. The results showed that the ability of microorganisms to reduce Cr(VI at initial concentration of 0.5 ppm, 1 ppm, 5 ppm and 10 ppm may vary, the average percentage of the ability of each microorganism in reducing Cr(VI is P. putida (65% > S. cerevisiae (64.45% >. P. aeruginosa (60.73% > Pantoea sp. (50.22% > K. pneumoniae (47.82% > without microorganisms (34.25%. The adding microorganisms have significantly influenced toward reduction of Cr(VI. The SDS-PAGE shows that protein expression between resistant and not resistant microorganisms are no different, but resistant microorganisms have more protein (protein band is thicker.

  8. Dietary protein to maximize resistance training: a review and examination of protein spread and change theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosse John D

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An appreciable volume of human clinical data supports increased dietary protein for greater gains from resistance training, but not all findings are in agreement. We recently proposed “protein spread theory” and “protein change theory” in an effort to explain discrepancies in the response to increased dietary protein in weight management interventions. The present review aimed to extend “protein spread theory” and “protein change theory” to studies examining the effects of protein on resistance training induced muscle and strength gains. Protein spread theory proposed that there must have been a sufficient spread or % difference in g/kg/day protein intake between groups during a protein intervention to see muscle and strength differences. Protein change theory postulated that for the higher protein group, there must be a sufficient change from baseline g/kg/day protein intake to during study g/kg/day protein intake to see muscle and strength benefits. Seventeen studies met inclusion criteria. In studies where a higher protein intervention was deemed successful there was, on average, a 66.1% g/kg/day between group intake spread versus a 10.2% g/kg/day spread in studies where a higher protein diet was no more effective than control. The average change in habitual protein intake in studies showing higher protein to be more effective than control was +59.5% compared to +6.5% when additional protein was no more effective than control. The magnitudes of difference between the mean spreads and changes of the present review are similar to our previous review on these theories in a weight management context. Providing sufficient deviation from habitual intake appears to be an important factor in determining the success of additional protein in enhancing muscle and strength gains from resistance training. An increase in dietary protein favorably effects muscle and strength during resistance training.

  9. Heterologously expressed bacterial and human multidrug resistance proteins confer cadmium resistance to Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achard-Joris, M; van Saparoea, HBV; Driessen, AJM; Bourdineaud, JP; Bourdineaud, Jean-Paul

    2005-01-01

    The human MDR1 gene is induced by cadmium exposure although no resistance to this metal is observed in human cells overexpressing hMDR1. To access the role of MDR proteins in cadmium resistance, human MDR1, Lactococcus lactis lmrA, and Oenococcus oeni omrA were expressed in an Escherichia coli tolC

  10. G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Shavit, Rachel; Maoz, Myriam; Kancharla, Arun; Nag, Jeetendra Kumar; Agranovich, Daniel; Grisaru-Granovsky, Sorina; Uziely, Beatrice

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest signal-conveying receptor family and mediate many physiological processes, their role in tumor biology is underappreciated. Numerous lines of evidence now associate GPCRs and their downstream signaling targets in cancer growth and development. Indeed, GPCRs control many features of tumorigenesis, including immune cell-mediated functions, proliferation, invasion and survival at the secondary site. Technological advances have further substantiated GPCR modifications in human tumors. Among these are point mutations, gene overexpression, GPCR silencing by promoter methylation and the number of gene copies. At this point, it is imperative to elucidate specific signaling pathways of “cancer driver” GPCRs. Emerging data on GPCR biology point to functional selectivity and “biased agonism”; hence, there is a diminishing enthusiasm for the concept of “one drug per GPCR target” and increasing interest in the identification of several drug options. Therefore, determining the appropriate context-dependent conformation of a functional GPCR as well as the contribution of GPCR alterations to cancer development remain significant challenges for the discovery of dominant cancer genes and the development of targeted therapeutics. PMID:27529230

  11. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Induced Doxorubicin Resistance in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dar-Ren Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC is an aggressive histological subtype with limited treatment options and a worse clinical outcome compared with other breast cancer subtypes. Doxorubicin is considered to be one of the most effective agents in the treatment of TNBC. Unfortunately, resistance to this agent is common. In some drug-resistant cells, drug efflux is mediated by adenosine triphosphate-dependent membrane transporter termed adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC transporter, which can drive the substrates across membranes against concentration gradient. In the tumor microenvironment, upon interaction with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, tumor cells exhibit altered biological functions of certain gene clusters, hence increasing stemness of tumor cells, migration ability, angiogenesis, and drug resistance. In our present study, we investigated the mechanism of TNBC drug resistance induced by adipose-derived MSCs. Upon exposure of TNBC to MSC-secreted conditioned medium (CM, noticeable drug resistance against doxorubicin with markedly increased BCRP protein expression was observed. Intracellular doxorubicin accumulation of TNBC was also decreased by MSC-secreted CM. Furthermore, we found that doxorubicin resistance of TNBC was mediated by IL-8 presented in the MSC-secreted CM. These findings may enrich the list of potential targets for overcoming drug resistance induced by MSCs in TNBC patients.

  12. Overcoming multidrug resistance(MDR) in cancer by nanotechnology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The emerging nanotechnology-based drug delivery holds tremendous potential to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs for treatment of multidrug resistance(MDR) cancer.This drug delivery system could improve the pharmacokinetic behavior of antitumor drugs,deliver chemotherapeutic drugs to target sites,control release of drugs,and reduce the systemic toxicity of drugs in MDR cancer.This review addresses the use of nanotechnology to overcome MDR classified on the bases of the fundamental mechanisms of MDR and various approaches to deliver drugs for treatment of MDR cancer.

  13. Cancer resistance, high molecular weight hyaluronic acid, and longevity

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    Longevity varies greatly among mammals. The naked mole rat is among the longest-lived rodents, having an average lifespan of 32 years, compared to the similarly-sized house mouse with lifespan of 4 years. The rate of cancer also varies widely among mammals and interestingly, the naked mole rat is essentially cancer-free (Gorbunova et al., Nat Rev Genet 15(531):540, 2014). A series of elegant studies (Tian et al. Nature 499:346–349, 2013) has revealed that this cancer resistance derives from t...

  14. Phytosphingosine can overcome resistance to ionizing radiation in ionizing radiation-resistant cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Moon Taek; Choi, Jung A; Kim, Min Jeong; Bae, Sang Woo; Kang, Chang Mo; Cho, Chul Koo; Lee, Yun Sil; Lee, Su Jae [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Seong Man [Graduate School of Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hee Yong [College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Although the majority of cancer cells are killed by inonizing radiation, certain types show resistance to it. We previously reported that phytosphingosine also induces apoptotic cell death in caspase dependent pathway in human cancer cells. In the present study, we examined whether phytosphingosine could overcome radiation resistance in the variant Jurkat clones. We first selected radiation-resistant Jurkat clones and examined cross-responsiveness of the clones between radiation and phytosphingosine. Treatment with phytosphingosine significantly did not affect apoptosis in all the clones, indicating that there seemed to be cross-resistance between radiation and phytosphingosine. Nevertheless, combined treatment of phytosphingosine with radiation synergistically enhanced killing of radiation-resistant cells, compared to radiation or phytosphingosine alone. The pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk did not completely inhibit the synergistic cell killing induced by combined treatment of ionizing radiation and phytosphingosine. These results demonstrated that apoptosis induced by combined treatment of radiation and phytosphingosine in radiation-resistant cells was associated with caspase independent pathway. We also found that apoptotic cell death induced by combined treatment of ionizing radiation and phytosphingosine correlated to the increases of ROS. The enhancement of ROS generation induced the loss of mitochondria transmembrane potential. In conclusion, ROS generation in combined treatment of phytosphingosine with radiation significantly induced the translocation of AIF to nucleus from mitochondria, suggesting a potential clinical application of combination treatment of radiation and phytosphingosine to radiation-resistant cancer cells.

  15. Role of integrin-linked kinase in drug resistance of lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Z

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Zhiyang Jia Department of Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou City, People’s Republic of ChinaObjective: The objective of the present investigation was to investigate the role of integrin-linked kinase (ILK in the gemcitabine-resistant lung cancer cell line A549 and explore the underlying mechanism.Materials and methods: Gemcitabine-resistant A549 (A549/GemR cell line was established by pulse-exposed to moderate concentration of gemcitabine (Gem, and the drug resistant index was measured by MTT assay. Expression of ILK in A549/GemR cell line was detected by Western blot and real-time PCR. An ILK gene-silencing cell line was constructed using lentivirus-coated ILK shRNA. MTT assay was used to detect the drug sensitivity of the A549/GemR cell line to Gem after the ILK gene silencing. Western blot was used to measure the expression of E-cadherin, fibronectin, and MRP1 (multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 after silencing the ILK gene.Result: The drug resistance index of A549/GemR was 13.5, and the messenger RNA and protein level of ILK was increased in A549/GemR. IC50 (half maximal inhibitory concentration decreased from 14.69 to 4.13 mg/L when ILK was knocked down in A549/GemR. The expression of fibronectin and MRP1 was upregulated and E-cadherin expression was downregulated in A549/GemR, and these changes were reversed after ILK was knocked down.Conclusion: ILK was involved in drug resistance to Gem in lung cancer, and this function may be mediated by epithelial–mesenchymal transition and the MRP1 pathway.Keywords: lung cancer, drug resistance, gemcitabine, ILK, EMT

  16. The cellular cancer resistance of the SR/CR mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Janne; Hau, Jann; Jensen, Henrik Elvang;

    2012-01-01

    injection showed formations of immune cells morphologically resembling polymorphonuclear granulocytes and macrophages adjoining the cancer cells. The results point to the potential involvement of innate immune cells in cancer immunology. Our data support migration of polymorphonuclear granulocytes......The SR/CR mouse phenotype, first described in 1999 in BALB/c and later bred into C57BL/6 mice, is resistant to cancer formation following high doses of cancer cells administered intraperitoneally. The tumor cell targeting and destruction mechanisms have not been identified. By fluorescence......-activated cell sorting analysis, the immune response of SR/CR mice after intraperitoneal injection of cancer cells was investigated and compared with parent strain mice. A massive influx of leukocytes into the peritoneal cavity was found. A large fraction of these leukocytes were polymorphonuclear granulocytes...

  17. Long-term effect of resistant starch on cancer risk in carriers of hereditary colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathers, John C; Movahedi, Mohammad; Macrae, Finlay;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Observational studies report that higher intake of dietary fibre (a heterogeneous mix including non-starch polysaccharides and resistant starches) is associated with reduced risk of colorectal cancer, but no randomised trials with prevention of colorectal cancer as a primary endpoint ...

  18. Overexpression of long non-coding RNA PVT1 in ovarian cancer cells promotes cisplatin resistance by regulating apoptotic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Enling; Liu, Zheng; Zhou, Yuxiu; Mi, Ruoran; Wang, Dehua

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Cisplatin is a very effective cancer chemotherapy drug, but cisplatin resistance is a crucial problem of therapy failure. Overexpression of PVT1 has been demonstrated in ovarian cancer. The mRNA level of PVT1 in ovarian cancer tissues of cisplatin-resistant patients and cisplatin-sensitive patients, cisplatin-resistant cells SKOV-3/DDP and A2780/DDP, cisplatin-sensitive cells SKOV-3 and A2780 were determined by qRT-PCR. The influence of the knockdown or overexpression of PVT1 on cisplatin resistance was measured by measuring the cytotoxicity of cisplatin and the apoptotic rate of ovarian cancer cells was detected by CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry, respectively. The mRNA levels and protein expression of TGF-β1, Smad4, p-Smad4 and Caspase-3 in apoptotic pathways were determined. The mRNA level of PVT1 was significantly higher in ovarian cancer tissues of cisplatin-resistant patients and cisplatin-resistant cells. SKOV-3/DDP and A2780/DDP cell viability and the percentage of apoptotic cells after transfection with PVT-1 siRNA and treated with cisplatin was markedly lower and higher than the control, respectively. Moreover, the overexpression of PVT1 exhibited the anti-apoptotic property in SKOV-3 and A2780 cells after transfection with LV-PVT1-GFP and treated with cisplatin. The mRNA levels and protein expression of TGF-β1, p-Smad4 and Caspase-3 were much higher in cisplatin-resistant cells transfected with siPVT1. Overexpression of LncRNA PVT1 in ovarian cancer promotes cisplatin resistance by regulating apoptotic pathways. PMID:26884974

  19. Cancer-drug induced insulin resistance : Innocent bystander or unusual suspect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariaans, G.; de Jong, S.; Gietema, J. A.; Lefrandt, J. D.; de Vries, E. G. E.; Jalving, M.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence strongly suggests an association between type 2 diabetes mellitus and cancer. Insulin resistance, causing hyperinsulinaemia and eventually hyperglycaemia, appears to increase cancer incidence and disease progression. In addition, insulin resistance seems to

  20. Serum Oxidized Protein and Prostate Cancer Risk within the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hoque, Ashraful; Ambrosone, Christine B; Till, Cathee; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Tangen, Cathy; Kristal, Alan; Lucia, Scott; Wang, Qiao; Kappil, Maya; Thompson, Ian; Hsing, Ann W.; Parnes, Howard; Lippman, Scott M.; Santella, Regina M.

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the role of oxidative stress in prostate cancer risk, we analyzed serum levels of protein carbonyl groups in 1808 prostate cancer cases and 1805 controls, nested in the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial, a randomized, placebo-control trial that found finasteride decreased prostate cancer risk. There were no significant differences in protein carbonyl levels in baseline samples between those later diagnosed with prostate cancer and those without at the end of study biopsy. Adjusted ...

  1. Vanadate-resistant yeast mutants are defective in protein glycosylation.

    OpenAIRE

    Ballou, L; Hitzeman, R A; Lewis, M. S.; Ballou, C E

    1991-01-01

    Spontaneous recessive orthovanadate-resistant mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were obtained in five complementation groups, and all show defects in protein glycosylation that mimic the previously isolated mnn mutants. Three of the groups are allelic to the known mnn8, mnn9, and mnn10 mutants, whereas the other two groups show other glycosylation defects. The vanadate-resistant phenotype was associated with enhanced hygromycin B sensitivity. The glycosylation phenotypes of the mutants are ...

  2. News in the studies of multidrug resistance of breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Stavrovskaya

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer (BC is the most common cancer among women in Russia. One of the main treatment methods of BC is systemic chemotherapy. Multidrug resistance of tumor cells (MDR is the important hindrance on the way to successful chemotherapy. The new data concerning molecular mechanisms of MDR will be presented in this review. The recent data concerning some new biological prognostic markers will be also discussed. There are data showing that transporters of ABC family (ABC transporters influence tumor progression not only by MDR induction but also by the influence on the traits of malignancy in tumor cells. The results of the studies of ABC transporters, participation in the processes of accumulation of tumor stem cells under the influence of chemotherapy will be discussed. The problem of the participation of ABC transporters in the phenomenon of influence of PI3K/AKT/PTEN signal transduction pathway on the MDR regulation is discussed. The results of the studies of the role of microRNA deregulation in breast cancer drug resistance as well as studies of some epigenetic mechanisms of MDR regulation will be considered. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A, serine/threonine phosphatase, PTK7 (protein tyrosine kinase 7. fascin (an actin bundling cytoskeletal protein multifunctional YB-1 protein will considered as new BC prognostic markers. The perspectives of MDR studies will be discussed as well.

  3. Correlation Between Akt and p53 Protein Expression and Chemoradiotherapy Response in Cervical Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IIN KURNIA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Akt is a protein that is associated with cell proliferation and is expressed at high levels in cancer cells. Some research indicates it may play a role in increasing the resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy treatment. P53 is a tumor suppressor protein that influences the cell cycle and apoptosis. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the expression of Akt and p53 in cancerous tissue before chemoradiation treatment, and the clinical response to treatment of cervical cancer patients. Twenty microscopic tissue samples were taken from cervical cancer biopsies obtained from patients before cancer treatment. The tissue samples were stained with p53 and Akt antibodies via immunohistochemistry technique, to measure expression of both proteins. After completion of chemoradiotherapy, patients’ clinical response to treatment was determined using the pelvic control method. Our results revealed no correlation between expression of Akt and p53 index (P = 0.74 as well as between p53 Index and chemoradiotherapy clinical response (P=0.29. There was significant correlation between expression of Akt and cervical cancer chemoradiotherapy response (P = 0.03. There was no correlation found between p53 index and chemoradiotherapy clinical response (P = 0.29. High expression of Akt may related with high cell proliferation and resistance to chemoradiotherapy.

  4. [Erythropoietin and drug resistance in breast and ovarian cancers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szenajch, Jolanta M; Synowiec, Agnieszka E

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) is used in breast and ovarian cancer patients to alleviate cancer- and chemotherapy-related anemia. Some clinical trials have reported that rhEPO may adversely impact survival and increase the risk of thrombovascular events in patients with breast cancer but not with ovarian cancer. The latter may potentially benefit the most from rhEPO treatment due to the nephrotoxic and myelosuppresive effects of standard platinum-based chemotherapy used in ovarian cancer disease. However, over the last decade the preclinical data have revealed that EPO is not only the principal growth factor and the hormone which regulates erythropoiesis, but also a cytokine with a pleiotropic activity which also can affect cancer cells. EPO can stimulate survival, ability to form metastases and drug resistance not only in continuous breast- and ovarian cancer cell lines but also in breast cancer stem-like cells. EPO receptor (EPOR) can also be constitutively active in both these cancers and, in breast cancer cells, may act in an interaction with estrogen receptor (ER) and epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2). EPOR, by an EPO-independent mechanism, promotes proliferation of breast cancer cells in cooperation with estrogen receptor, resulting in decreased effectiveness of tamoxifen treatment. In another interaction, as a result of the molecular antagonism between EPOR and HER2, rhEPO protects breast cancer cells against trastuzumab. Both clinical and preclinical evidence strongly suggest the urgent need to reevaluate the traditional use of rhEPO in the oncology setting. PMID:27321103

  5. Heat shock proteins 27, 40, and 70 as combinational and dual therapeutic cancer targets

    OpenAIRE

    McConnell, Jeanette R.; McAlpine, Shelli R.

    2013-01-01

    The heat shock proteins are essential players in the development of cancer and they are prime therapeutic targets. Targeting multiple hsps in dual therapies decreases the likelihood of drug resistance compared to utilizing mono-therapies. Further, employing an hsp inhibitor in combination with another therapy has proven clinically successful. Examples of efficacious strategies include the inhibition of hsp27, which prevents protein aggregation, controlling hsp40’s role as an ATPase modulator,...

  6. Investigation into taxane resistant breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kenicer, Juliet Elisabeth Margaret

    2011-01-01

    One group of chemotherapeutics that are used successfully to treat breast cancer, alone or in combination with other agents, are the taxanes; paclitaxel and docetaxel. They act by interfering with the spindle microtubule dynamics of the cell causing cell cycle arrest. However, the complexities underlying the mechanism of action are yet to be fully elucidated. Arguably, one of the most significant problems with taxanes is chemoresistance. Unfortunately, some patients are intrins...

  7. Visceral adiposity, insulin resistance and cancer risk

    OpenAIRE

    Donohoe Claire L; Doyle Suzanne L; Reynolds John V

    2011-01-01

    PUBLISHED Background: There is a well established link between obesity and cancer. Emerging research is characterising this relationship further and delineating the specific role of excess visceral adiposity, as opposed to simple obesity, in promoting tumorigenesis. This review summarises the evidence from an epidemiological and pathophysiological perspective. Methods: Relevant medical literature was identified from searches of PubMed and references cited in appropriate articles...

  8. AGR2 Predicts Tamoxifen Resistance in Postmenopausal Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Hrstka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine resistance is a significant problem in breast cancer treatment. Thus identification and validation of novel resistance determinants is important to improve treatment efficacy and patient outcome. In our work, AGR2 expression was determined by qRT-PCR in Tru-Cut needle biopsies from tamoxifen-treated postmenopausal breast cancer patients. Our results showed inversed association of AGR2 mRNA levels with primary treatment response (P=0.0011 and progression-free survival (P=0.0366 in 61 ER-positive breast carcinomas. As shown by our experimental and clinical evaluations, elevated AGR2 expression predicts decreased efficacy of tamoxifen treatment. From this perspective, AGR2 is a potential predictive biomarker enabling selection of an optimal algorithm for adjuvant hormonal therapy in postmenopausal ER-positive breast cancer patients.

  9. Visceral adiposity, insulin resistance and cancer risk

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donohoe, Claire L

    2011-06-22

    Abstract Background There is a well established link between obesity and cancer. Emerging research is characterising this relationship further and delineating the specific role of excess visceral adiposity, as opposed to simple obesity, in promoting tumorigenesis. This review summarises the evidence from an epidemiological and pathophysiological perspective. Methods Relevant medical literature was identified from searches of PubMed and references cited in appropriate articles identified. Selection of articles was based on peer review, journal and relevance. Results Numerous epidemiological studies consistently identify increased risk of developing carcinoma in the obese. Adipose tissue, particularly viscerally located fat, is metabolically active and exerts systemic endocrine effects. Putative pathophysiological mechanisms linking obesity and carcinogenesis include the paracrine effects of adipose tissue and systemic alterations associated with obesity. Systemic changes in the obese state include chronic inflammation and alterations in adipokines and sex steroids. Insulin and the insulin-like growth factor axis influence tumorigenesis and also have a complex relationship with adiposity. There is evidence to suggest that insulin and the IGF axis play an important role in mediating obesity associated malignancy. Conclusions There is much evidence to support a role for obesity in cancer progression, however further research is warranted to determine the specific effect of excess visceral adipose tissue on tumorigenesis. Investigation of the potential mechanisms underpinning the association, including the role of insulin and the IGF axis, will improve understanding of the obesity and cancer link and may uncover targets for intervention.

  10. Contribution of Specific Amino Acid Changes in Penicillin Binding Protein 1 to Amoxicillin Resistance in Clinical Helicobacter pylori isolates ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Qureshi, Nadia N.; Morikis, Dimitrios; Schiller, Neal L.

    2010-01-01

    Amoxicillin is commonly used to treat Helicobacter pylori, a major cause of peptic ulcers, stomach cancer, and B-cell mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Amoxicillin resistance in H. pylori is increasing steadily, especially in developing countries, leading to treatment failures. In this study, we characterize the mechanism of amoxicillin resistance in the U.S. clinical isolate B258. Transformation of amoxicillin-susceptible strain 26695 with the penicillin binding protein 1 gene (pbp...

  11. Oxidative metabolism drives inflammation-induced platinum resistance in human ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matassa, D S; Amoroso, M R; Lu, H; Avolio, R; Arzeni, D; Procaccini, C; Faicchia, D; Maddalena, F; Simeon, V; Agliarulo, I; Zanini, E; Mazzoccoli, C; Recchi, C; Stronach, E; Marone, G; Gabra, H; Matarese, G; Landriscina, M; Esposito, F

    2016-09-01

    Tumour cells have long been considered defective in mitochondrial respiration and mostly dependent on glycolytic metabolism. However, this assumption is currently challenged by several lines of evidence in a growing number of tumours. Ovarian cancer (OC) is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide, but it continues to be a poorly understood disease and its metabolic features are far to be elucidated. In this context, we investigated the role of tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 (TRAP1), which is found upregulated in several cancer types and is a key modulator of tumour cell metabolism. Surprisingly, we found that TRAP1 expression inversely correlated with grade, stage and lower survival in a large cohort of OC patients. Accordingly, TRAP1 silencing induced resistance to cisplatin, resistant cells showed increased oxidative metabolism compared with their sensitive counterpart, and the bioenergetics cellular index of higher grade tumours indicated increased mitochondrial respiration. Strikingly, cisplatin resistance was reversible upon pharmacological inhibition of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation by metformin/oligomycin. At molecular level, increased oxidative metabolism in low TRAP1-expressing OC cells and tissues enhanced production of inflammatory mediators such as interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. Mechanistically, we identified members of the multidrug resistance complex (MDR) as key mediators of such metabolism-driven, inflammation-induced process. Indeed, treatment of OC cell lines with TNFα and IL6 induced a selective increase in the expression of TAP1 and multidrug resistance protein 1, whereas TAP1 silencing sensitized cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Our results unveil a novel role for TRAP1 and oxidative metabolism in cancer progression and suggest the targeting of mitochondrial bioenergetics to increase cisplatin efficacy in human OC. PMID:27206315

  12. Mismatch repair and treatment resistance in ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The treatment of ovarian cancer is hindered by intrinsic or acquired resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy. The aim of this study is to determine the frequency of mismatch repair (MMR) inactivation in ovarian cancer and its association with resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy. We determined, microsatellite instability (MSI) as a marker for MMR inactivation (analysis of BAT25 and BAT26), MLH1 promoter methylation status (methylation specific PCR on bisulfite treated DNA) and mRNA expression of MLH1, MSH2, MSH3, MSH6 and PMS2 (quantitative RT-PCR) in 75 ovarian carcinomas and eight ovarian cancer cell lines MSI was detected in three of the eight cell lines i.e. A2780 (no MLH1 mRNA expression due to promoter methylation), SKOV3 (no MLH1 mRNA expression) and 2774 (no altered expression of MMR genes). Overall, there was no association between cisplatin response and MMR status in these eight cell lines. Seven of the 75 ovarian carcinomas showed MLH1 promoter methylation, however, none of these showed MSI. Forty-six of these patients received platinum-based chemotherapy (11 non-responders, 34 responders, one unknown response). The resistance seen in the eleven non-responders was not related to MSI and therefore also not to MMR inactivation. No MMR inactivation was detected in 75 ovarian carcinoma specimens and no association was seen between MMR inactivation and resistance in the ovarian cancer cell lines as well as the ovarian carcinomas. In the discussion, the results were compared to that of twenty similar studies in the literature including in total 1315 ovarian cancer patients. Although no association between response and MMR status was seen in the primary tumor the possible role of MMR inactivation in acquired resistance deserves further investigation

  13. Increased p38-MAPK is responsible for chemotherapy resistance in human gastric cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemoresistance is one of the main obstacles to successful cancer therapy and is frequently associated with Multidrug resistance (MDR). Many different mechanisms have been suggested to explain the development of an MDR phenotype in cancer cells. One of the most studied mechanisms is the overexpression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), which is a product of the MDR1 gene. Tumor cells often acquire the drug-resistance phenotype due to upregulation of the MDR1 gene. Overexpression of MDR1 gene has often been reported in primary gastric adenocarcinoma. This study investigated the role of p38-MAPK signal pathway in vincristine-resistant SGC7901/VCR cells. P-gp and MDR1 RNA were detected by Western blot analysis and RT-PCR amplification. Mitgen-activated protein kinases and function of P-gp were demonstrated by Western blot and FACS Aria cytometer analysis. Ap-1 activity and cell apoptosis were detected by Dual-Luciferase Reporter Assay and annexin V-PI dual staining. The vincristine-resistant SGC7901/VCR cells with increased expression of the multidrug-resistance 1 (MDR1) gene were resistant to P-gp-related drug and P-gp-unrelated drugs. Constitutive increases of phosphorylated p38-MAPK and AP-1 activities were also found in the drug-resistant cells. Inhibition of p38-MAPK by SB202190 reduced activator protein-1 (AP-1) activity and MDR1 expression levels and increased the sensitivity of SGC7901/VCR cells to chemotherapy. Activation of the p38-MAPK pathway might be responsible for the modulation of P-glycoprotein-mediated and P-glycoprotein-unmediated multidrug resistance in the SGC7901/VCR cell line

  14. Insulin resistance of muscle protein metabolism in aging

    OpenAIRE

    Rasmussen, Blake B.; Fujita, Satoshi; Wolfe, Robert R.; Mittendorfer, Bettina; Roy, Mona; Rowe, Vincent L.; Volpi, Elena

    2006-01-01

    A reduced response of older skeletal muscle to anabolic stimuli may contribute to the development of sarcopenia. We hypothesized that muscle proteins are resistant to the anabolic action of insulin in the elderly. We examined the effects of hyperinsulinemia on muscle protein metabolism in young (25±2 year) and older (68±1 year) healthy subjects using stable isotope tracer techniques. Leg blood flow was higher in the young at baseline and increased during hyperinsulinemia, whereas it did not c...

  15. Overcoming Resistance of Cancer Cells to PARP-1 Inhibitors with Three Different Drug Combinations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Yalon

    Full Text Available Inhibitors of poly[ADP-ribose] polymerase 1 (PARPis show promise for treatment of cancers which lack capacity for homologous recombination repair (HRR. However, new therapeutic strategies are required in order to overcome innate and acquired resistance to these drugs and thus expand the array of cancers that could benefit from them. We show that human cancer cell lines which respond poorly to ABT-888 (a PARPi, become sensitive to it when co-treated with vorinostat (a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi. Vorinostat also sensitized PARPis insensitive cancer cell lines to 6-thioguanine (6-TG-a drug that targets PARPis sensitive cells. The sensitizing effect of vorinostat was associated with increased phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF 2α which in and of itself increases the sensitivity of cancer cells to ABT-888. Importantly, these drug combinations did not affect survival of normal fibroblasts and breast cells, and significantly increased the inhibition of xenograft tumor growth relative to each drug alone, without affecting the mice weight or their liver and kidney function. Our results show that combination of vorinostat and ABT-888 could potentially prove useful for treatment of cancer with innate resistance to PARPis due to active HRR machinery, while the combination of vorinostat and 6-TG could potentially overcome innate or acquired resistance to PARPis due to secondary or reversal BRCA mutations, to decreased PARP-1 level or to increased expression of multiple drug resistant proteins. Importantly, drugs which increase phosphorylation of eIF2α may mimic the sensitizing effect of vorinostat on cellular response to PARPis or to 6-TG, without activating all of its downstream effectors.

  16. Targeting Alternative Sites on the Androgen Receptor to Treat Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S. Rennie

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent, metastatic prostate cancer continues to be a leading cause of cancer-death in men. The androgen receptor (AR is a modular, ligand-inducible transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes that can drive the progression of this disease, and as a consequence, this receptor is a key therapeutic target for controlling prostate cancer. The current drugs designed to directly inhibit the AR are called anti-androgens, and all act by competing with androgens for binding to the androgen/ligand binding site. Unfortunately, with the inevitable progression of the cancer to castration resistance, many of these drugs become ineffective. However, there are numerous other regulatory sites on this protein that have not been exploited therapeutically. The regulation of AR activity involves a cascade of complex interactions with numerous chaperones, co-factors and co-regulatory proteins, leading ultimately to direct binding of AR dimers to specific DNA androgen response elements within the promoter and enhancers of androgen-regulated genes. As part of the family of nuclear receptors, the AR is organized into modular structural and functional domains with specialized roles in facilitating their inter-molecular interactions. These regions of the AR present attractive, yet largely unexploited, drug target sites for reducing or eliminating androgen signaling in prostate cancers. The design of small molecule inhibitors targeting these specific AR domains is only now being realized and is the culmination of decades of work, including crystallographic and biochemistry approaches to map the shape and accessibility of the AR surfaces and cavities. Here, we review the structure of the AR protein and describe recent advancements in inhibiting its activity with small molecules specifically designed to target areas distinct from the receptor’s androgen binding site. It is anticipated that these new classes of anti-AR drugs will provide an additional

  17. Drug Resistance and Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, João Pedro Couto

    2012-01-01

    O cancro do pulmão é a principal causa de morte por cancro a nível mundial. Apesar do crescente conhecimento sobre os mecanismos subjacentes ao processo tumorigénico não se tem observado alteração significativa na sobrevivência dos pacientes. É, por isso, urgente encontrar novas estratégias terapêuticas que visem superar a resistência, tanto intrínseca como extrínseca, observada com a quimioterapia corrente. Os tumores são caracterizados pela sua heterogeneidade celular, devido à coexistên...

  18. Phosphoproteome and Transcriptome of RA-Responsive and RA-Resistant Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Marilyn; Joint, Mathilde; Lutzing, Régis; Page, Adeline; Rochette-Egly, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), the main active vitamin A metabolite, controls multiple biological processes such as cell proliferation and differentiation through genomic programs and kinase cascades activation. Due to these properties, RA has proven anti-cancer capacity. Several breast cancer cells respond to the antiproliferative effects of RA, while others are RA-resistant. However, the overall signaling and transcriptional pathways that are altered in such cells have not been elucidated. Here, in a large-scale analysis of the phosphoproteins and in a genome-wide analysis of the RA-regulated genes, we compared two human breast cancer cell lines, a RA-responsive one, the MCF7 cell line, and a RA-resistant one, the BT474 cell line, which depicts several alterations of the “kinome”. Using high-resolution nano-LC-LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry associated to phosphopeptide enrichment, we found that several proteins involved in signaling and in transcription, are differentially phosphorylated before and after RA addition. The paradigm of these proteins is the RA receptor α (RARα), which was phosphorylated in MCF7 cells but not in BT474 cells after RA addition. The panel of the RA-regulated genes was also different. Overall our results indicate that RA resistance might correlate with the deregulation of the phosphoproteome with consequences on gene expression. PMID:27362937

  19. Clinical significance of PHPT1 protein expression in lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU An-jian; XIA Xiang-hou; DU Song-tao; GU Jun-chao

    2010-01-01

    Background in our previous studies, we found the expression of 14-kD phosphohistidine phosphatase (PHPT1) was associated with lung cancer cells migration and invasion, and PHPT1 mRNA expression level in lung cancer tissues clinically correlated with lymph node metastasis. in the present study, we aimed to further investigate the expression of PHPT1 protein in lung cancer.Methods Expression of PHPT1 protein in tissue samples from 146 lung cancers and 30 normal tissues adjacent to lung cancers was assessed using immunohistochemical method. Fisher's exact test was used to analyze expression patterns of PHPT1 protein in these tissue types. Meanwhile, we studied the correlation between expression of PHPT1 protein and clinicopathological features in lung cancer.Results Significantly higher expression levels of PHPT1 protein were found in lung cancer samples (53.42%) than in normal tissues adjacent to lung cancer (23.33%) (P=0.003). Fisher's exact test showed that lung cancer stage positively correlated with expression of PHPT1 protein (P=0.02), and lung cancer samples with lymph node metastasis showed higher PHPT1 protein expression (P=0.016) than the samples without lymph node metastasis.Conclusions The results of this study agree with findings from our previous study of PHPT1 mRNA expression in lung cancer tissues, and strongly suggest that PHPT1 protein is closely associated with the carcinogenesis and metastasis of lung cancer. Thus, therapy targeting PHPT1 (inhibition or silencing) could be potentially benefited for lung cancer patients.

  20. Glucocorticoid receptor antagonism reverts docetaxel resistance in human prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, Jan; Puhr, Martin; Buijs, Jeroen T; van der Horst, Geertje; Hemmer, Daniëlle M; Marijt, Koen A; Hwang, Ming S; Masood, Motasim; Grimm, Stefan; Storm, Gert; Metselaar, Josbert M; Meijer, Onno C; Culig, Zoran; van der Pluijm, Gabri

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to docetaxel is a major clinical problem in advanced prostate cancer (PCa). Although glucocorticoids (GCs) are frequently used in combination with docetaxel, it is unclear to what extent GCs and their receptor, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), contribute to the chemotherapy resistance. In this study, we aim to elucidate the role of the GR in docetaxel-resistant PCa in order to improve the current PCa therapies. GR expression was analyzed in a tissue microarray of primary PCa specimens from chemonaive and docetaxel-treated patients, and in cultured PCa cell lines with an acquired docetaxel resistance (PC3-DR, DU145-DR, and 22Rv1-DR). We found a robust overexpression of the GR in primary PCa from docetaxel-treated patients and enhanced GR levels in cultured docetaxel-resistant human PCa cells, indicating a key role of the GR in docetaxel resistance. The capability of the GR antagonists (RU-486 and cyproterone acetate) to revert docetaxel resistance was investigated and revealed significant resensitization of docetaxel-resistant PCa cells for docetaxel treatment in a dose- and time-dependent manner, in which a complete restoration of docetaxel sensitivity was achieved in both androgen receptor (AR)-negative and AR-positive cell lines. Mechanistically, we demonstrated down-regulation of Bcl-xL and Bcl-2 upon GR antagonism, thereby defining potential treatment targets. In conclusion, we describe the involvement of the GR in the acquisition of docetaxel resistance in human PCa. Therapeutic targeting of the GR effectively resensitizes docetaxel-resistant PCa cells. These findings warrant further investigation of the clinical utility of the GR antagonists in the management of patients with advanced and docetaxel-resistant PCa. PMID:26483423

  1. Mitomycin resistance in mammalian cells expressing the bacterial mitomycin C resistance protein MCRA

    OpenAIRE

    Belcourt, Michael F.; Penketh, Philip G.; Hodnick, William F.; Johnson, David A.; David H Sherman; Rockwell, Sara; Sartorelli, Alan C.

    1999-01-01

    The mitomycin C-resistance gene, mcrA, of Streptomyces lavendulae produces MCRA, a protein that protects this microorganism from its own antibiotic, the antitumor drug mitomycin C. Expression of the bacterial mcrA gene in mammalian Chinese hamster ovary cells causes profound resistance to mitomycin C and to its structurally related analog porfiromycin under aerobic conditions but produces little change in drug sensitivity under hypoxia. The mitomycins are prodrugs that are enzymatically reduc...

  2. Castration resistant prostate cancer - something new in the year 2014?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the most frequent solid neoplasm in Europe and therefore is regarded as one of the major medical problem of the male population. PC is extremely complicated and interindividual different tumor. The method of treatment depends on several factors, but mainly on the stage of prostate cancer. The term Hormone resistant (refractory) prostate cancer (HRPC) was used in older terminology. HRPC is cancer that progresses despite castrate levels of testosterone achieved androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), which is resistant to any hormonal therapy. Currently is increasingly used (instead of name HRPC) name CRPC – so called PC resistant for castration (CRPC – castration resistant prostate cancer), which is still able to respond to certain hormonal manipulation, although it meets the the criteria for HRPC. This state probably arises from either clonal selection of androgen – independent cell lines or increased ligand – independent activation of androgen receptors. Men with CRPC are quite a heterogeneous group; they include men with increasing prostate specific antigen (PSA) only and no demonstrable metastases, and men who have many bone and/ or visceral metastases, pain and poor functional status. Survival can range from only a few months to 4 years or more. Historically, therapy had little effect beyond modest palliation. More recently, significantly more options have become available and there are now several treatments that not only improve quality of life and pain palliation, but also increase overall survival. Some of the trials with important results for the treatment of CRPC are summarized in this paper. Objectives of article: provide information to the general medical community (and especially urologists and oncologists) about the possible pathogenesis of CRPC, complicated issues of treatment and evaluation of its effectiveness in patients with CRPC. The article presented basic data on the current and future possibilities of such therapy

  3. ABCG2 Inhibition as a Therapeutic Approach for Overcoming Multidrug Resistance in Cancer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Maryam Hosseini Hasanabady; Fatemeh Kalalinia

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCP or MXR) / ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) was characterized as a multidrug resistance efflux transporter in 1998. ABCG2 physiologically acts as a part of a self-defense mechanism for the organism; it enhances eliminating of toxic xenobiotic substances and harmful agents in the intestine, as well as through the blood-brain barrier and placental. ABCG2 recognizes and transports numerous anticancer drugs including conventional chemotherapeutic and new targeted small therapeutic molecules in clinical usage. Development of ABCG2 inhibitors for clinical usage may allow increased penetration of therapeutic agents into sanctuary sites and increased their intestinal absorption. In this report, we review the mechanisms that modulate MDR mediated by the ABC transporter ABCG2 in normal and cancer cells by different levels including, epigenetic modifications, transcriptional, posttranscriptional, translation and posttranslational regulation. Some clinical applications of ABCG2 inhibitors, also is explained.

  4. Tcf3 and cell cycle factors contribute to butyrate resistance in colorectal cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiaro, Christopher, E-mail: cchiaro@tcmedc.org [Department of Basic Sciences, The Commonwealth Medical College, 525 Pine Street, Scranton, PA 18509 (United States); Lazarova, Darina L., E-mail: dlazarova@tcmedc.org [Department of Basic Sciences, The Commonwealth Medical College, 525 Pine Street, Scranton, PA 18509 (United States); Bordonaro, Michael, E-mail: mbordonaro@tcmedc.org [Department of Basic Sciences, The Commonwealth Medical College, 525 Pine Street, Scranton, PA 18509 (United States)

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate mechanisms responsible for butyrate resistance in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tcf3 modulates butyrate's effects on Wnt activity and cell growth in resistant cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tcf3 modulation of butyrate's effects differ by cell context. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell cycle factors are overexpressed in the resistant cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reversal of altered gene expression can enhance the anti-cancer effects of butyrate. -- Abstract: Butyrate, a fermentation product of dietary fiber, inhibits clonal growth in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells dependent upon the fold induction of Wnt activity. We have developed a CRC cell line (HCT-R) that, unlike its parental cell line, HCT-116, does not respond to butyrate exposure with hyperactivation of Wnt signaling and suppressed clonal growth. PCR array analyses revealed Wnt pathway-related genes, the expression of which differs between butyrate-sensitive HCT-116 CRC cells and their butyrate-resistant HCT-R cell counterparts. We identified overexpression of Tcf3 as being partially responsible for the butyrate-resistant phenotype, as this DNA-binding protein suppresses the hyperinduction of Wnt activity by butyrate. Consequently, Tcf3 knockdown in HCT-R cells restores their sensitivity to the effects of butyrate on Wnt activity and clonal cell growth. Interestingly, the effects of overexpressed Tcf3 differ between HCT-116 and HCT-R cells; thus, in HCT-116 cells Tcf3 suppresses proliferation without rendering the cells resistant to butyrate. In HCT-R cells, however, the overexpression of Tcf3 inhibits Wnt activity, and the cells are still able to proliferate due to the higher expression levels of cell cycle factors, particularly those driving the G{sub 1} to S transition. Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms determining the variable sensitivity of CRC cells to butyrate may assist in developing approaches that

  5. Tcf3 and cell cycle factors contribute to butyrate resistance in colorectal cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We investigate mechanisms responsible for butyrate resistance in colon cancer cells. ► Tcf3 modulates butyrate’s effects on Wnt activity and cell growth in resistant cells. ► Tcf3 modulation of butyrate’s effects differ by cell context. ► Cell cycle factors are overexpressed in the resistant cells. ► Reversal of altered gene expression can enhance the anti-cancer effects of butyrate. -- Abstract: Butyrate, a fermentation product of dietary fiber, inhibits clonal growth in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells dependent upon the fold induction of Wnt activity. We have developed a CRC cell line (HCT-R) that, unlike its parental cell line, HCT-116, does not respond to butyrate exposure with hyperactivation of Wnt signaling and suppressed clonal growth. PCR array analyses revealed Wnt pathway-related genes, the expression of which differs between butyrate-sensitive HCT-116 CRC cells and their butyrate-resistant HCT-R cell counterparts. We identified overexpression of Tcf3 as being partially responsible for the butyrate-resistant phenotype, as this DNA-binding protein suppresses the hyperinduction of Wnt activity by butyrate. Consequently, Tcf3 knockdown in HCT-R cells restores their sensitivity to the effects of butyrate on Wnt activity and clonal cell growth. Interestingly, the effects of overexpressed Tcf3 differ between HCT-116 and HCT-R cells; thus, in HCT-116 cells Tcf3 suppresses proliferation without rendering the cells resistant to butyrate. In HCT-R cells, however, the overexpression of Tcf3 inhibits Wnt activity, and the cells are still able to proliferate due to the higher expression levels of cell cycle factors, particularly those driving the G1 to S transition. Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms determining the variable sensitivity of CRC cells to butyrate may assist in developing approaches that prevent or reverse butyrate resistance.

  6. Mechanisms of Acquired Resistance to ALK Inhibitors and the Rationale for Treating ALK-positive Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isozaki, Hideko [Department of Clinical Pharmaceutics, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Takigawa, Nagio, E-mail: ntakigaw@gmail.com [Department of General Internal Medicine 4, Kawasaki Medical School, Okayama 700-8505 (Japan); Kiura, Katsuyuki [Department of Allergy and Respiratory Medicine, Okayama University Hospital, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan)

    2015-04-30

    The discovery of an echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene led to improved clinical outcomes in patients with lung cancer after the development of the first ALK-targeting agent, crizotinib. Some second-generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), which might be more potent than crizotinib or effective on crizotinib-resistant patients, have been developed. Although these ALK-TKIs show an excellent response initially, most patients eventually acquire resistance. Therefore, careful consideration of the resistance mechanisms might lead to superior therapeutic strategies. Here, we summarize the history of ALK-TKIs and their underlying resistance mechanisms in both the preclinical and clinical settings. In addition, we discuss potential future treatment strategies in ALK-TKI-naïve and -resistant patients with lung cancer harboring the EML4-ALK fusion gene.

  7. Mechanisms of Acquired Resistance to ALK Inhibitors and the Rationale for Treating ALK-positive Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of an echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene led to improved clinical outcomes in patients with lung cancer after the development of the first ALK-targeting agent, crizotinib. Some second-generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), which might be more potent than crizotinib or effective on crizotinib-resistant patients, have been developed. Although these ALK-TKIs show an excellent response initially, most patients eventually acquire resistance. Therefore, careful consideration of the resistance mechanisms might lead to superior therapeutic strategies. Here, we summarize the history of ALK-TKIs and their underlying resistance mechanisms in both the preclinical and clinical settings. In addition, we discuss potential future treatment strategies in ALK-TKI-naïve and -resistant patients with lung cancer harboring the EML4-ALK fusion gene

  8. Cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitor RO 48-8071 suppresses growth of hormone-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Y

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yayun Liang,1 Benford Mafuvadze,1 Johannes D Aebi,2 Salman M Hyder1 1Dalton Cardiovascular Research Center and Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO, USA; 2Medicinal Chemistry, Roche Pharma Research and Early Development (pRED, Roche Innovation Center Basel, F Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd., Basel, Switzerland Abstract: Standard treatment for primary prostate cancer includes systemic exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs that target androgen receptor or antihormone therapy (chemical castration; however, drug-resistant cancer cells generally emerge during treatment, limiting the continued use of systemic chemotherapy. Patients are then treated with more toxic standard therapies. Therefore, there is an urgent need for novel and more effective treatments for prostate cancer. The cholesterol biosynthetic pathway is an attractive therapeutic target for treating endocrine-dependent cancers because cholesterol is an essential structural and functional component of cell membranes as well as the metabolic precursor of endogenous steroid hormones. In this study, we have examined the effects of RO 48-8071 (4'-[6-(allylmethylaminohexyloxy]-4-bromo-2'-fluorobenzophenone fumarate; Roche Pharmaceuticals internal reference: RO0488071 (RO, which is an inhibitor of 2, 3-oxidosqualene cyclase (a key enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway, on prostate cancer cells. Exposure of both hormone-dependent and castration-resistant human prostate cancer cells to RO reduced prostate cancer cell viability and induced apoptosis in vitro. RO treatment reduced androgen receptor protein expression in hormone-dependent prostate cancer cells and increased estrogen receptor β (ERβ protein expression in both hormone-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancer cell lines. Combining RO with an ERβ agonist increased its ability to reduce castration-resistant prostate cancer cell viability. In addition, RO effectively suppressed the

  9. Heterologously expressed bacterial and human multidrug resistance proteins confer cadmium resistance to Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Achard-Joris, M; van Saparoea, HBV; Driessen, AJM; Bourdineaud, JP; Bourdineaud, Jean-Paul

    2005-01-01

    The human MDR1 gene is induced by cadmium exposure although no resistance to this metal is observed in human cells overexpressing hMDR1. To access the role of MDR proteins in cadmium resistance, human MDR1, Lactococcus lactis lmrA, and Oenococcus oeni omrA were expressed in an Escherichia coli tolC mutant strain which proved to be hypersensitive to cadmium. Both the human and bacterial MDR genes conferred cadmium resistance to E. coli up to 0.4 mM concentration. Protection was abolished by 10...

  10. Lysophosphatidate induces chemo-resistance by releasing breast cancer cells from taxol-induced mitotic arrest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Samadi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Taxol is a microtubule stabilizing agent that arrests cells in mitosis leading to cell death. Taxol is widely used to treat breast cancer, but resistance occurs in 25-69% of patients and it is vital to understand how Taxol resistance develops to improve chemotherapy. The effects of chemotherapeutic agents are overcome by survival signals that cancer cells receive. We focused our studies on autotaxin, which is a secreted protein that increases tumor growth, aggressiveness, angiogenesis and metastasis. We discovered that autotaxin strongly antagonizes the Taxol-induced killing of breast cancer and melanoma cells by converting the abundant extra-cellular lipid, lysophosphatidylcholine, into lysophosphatidate. This lipid stimulates specific G-protein coupled receptors that activate survival signals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we determined the basis of these antagonistic actions of lysophosphatidate towards Taxol-induced G2/M arrest and cell death using cultured breast cancer cells. Lysophosphatidate does not antagonize Taxol action in MCF-7 cells by increasing Taxol metabolism or its expulsion through multi-drug resistance transporters. Lysophosphatidate does not lower the percentage of cells accumulating in G2/M by decreasing exit from S-phase or selective stimulation of cell death in G2/M. Instead, LPA had an unexpected and remarkable action in enabling MCF-7 and MDA-MB-468 cells, which had been arrested in G2/M by Taxol, to normalize spindle structure and divide, thus avoiding cell death. This action involves displacement of Taxol from the tubulin polymer fraction, which based on inhibitor studies, depends on activation of LPA receptors and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This work demonstrates a previously unknown consequence of lysophosphatidate action that explains why autotaxin and lysophosphatidate protect against Taxol-induced cell death and promote resistance to the action of this

  11. Modulating cancer multidrug resistance by sertraline in combination with a nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinberg, Velthe; Bitcover, Rivka; Rajchenbach, Wolf; Peer, Dan

    2014-11-28

    Inherent and acquired multiple drug resistance (MDR) to chemotherapeutic drugs is a major obstacle in cancer treatment. The ATP Binding Cassettes (ABC) transporter super family that act as extrusion pumps such as P-glycoprotein and multidrug-resistance-associated-proteins have prominent roles in cancer MDR. One of the most efficient strategies to modulate this active drug efflux from the cells is to physically block the pump proteins and thus change the balance between drug influx and efflux toward an accumulation of drug inside the cell, which eventually cumulates into cell death. MDR modulators (also known as chemosensitizers) were found among drugs approved for non-cancer indications. Yet, toxicity, adverse effects, and poor solubility at doses required for MDR reversal prevent their clinical application. Previous reports have shown that drugs belonging to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) family, which are clinically used as antidepressants, can act as effective chemosensitizers both in vitro and in vivo in tumor bearing mouse models. Here, we set out to explore whether sertraline (Zoloft®), a molecule belonging to the SSRI family, can be used as an MDR modulator. Combining sertraline with another FDA approved drug, Doxil® (pegylated liposomal doxorubicin), is expected to enhance the effect of chemotherapy while potentially reducing adverse effects. Our findings reveal that sertraline acts as a pump modulator in cellular models of MDR. In addition, in an aggressive and highly resistant human ovarian xenograft mouse model the use of sertraline in combination with Doxil® generated substantial reduction in tumor progression, with extension of the median survival of tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, our results show that sertraline could act as a clinically relevant cancer MDR inhibitor. Moreover, combining two FDA approved drugs, DOXIL®, which favor the influx of chemotherapy inside the malignant cell with sertraline, which blocks the

  12. [Current status of castration-resistant prostate cancer translational research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeno, Atsushi; Habuchi, Tomonori

    2016-01-01

    Recently, new drugs including abiraterone and enzalutamide have been able to be used for castration resistant prostate cancer(CRPC) patients. However, a subset of these patients who receive the new drugs does not response to the therapies. Furthermore, most patients who initially response to the drugs, progress to secondary resistance eventually. Therefore, it is important to investigate a novel therapeutic target and a novel treatment-selection marker for CRPC. In this review, we focused on AR-V7, TMPRSS2-ERG fusion gene and EP4 antagonist as representative translational researches. PMID:26793877

  13. Mutations in G protein beta subunits promote transformation and kinase inhibitor resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoda, Akinori; Adelmant, Guillaume; Tamburini, Jerome; Chapuy, Bjoern; Shindoh, Nobuaki; Yoda, Yuka; Weigert, Oliver; Kopp, Nadja; Wu, Shuo-Chieh; Kim, Sunhee S.; Liu, Huiyun; Tivey, Trevor; Christie, Amanda L.; Elpek, Kutlu G.; Card, Joseph; Gritsman, Kira; Gotlib, Jason; Deininger, Michael W.; Makishima, Hideki; Turley, Shannon J.; Javidi-Sharifi, Nathalie; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.; Jaiswal, Siddhartha; Ebert, Benjamin L.; Rodig, Scott J.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Marto, Jarrod A.; Weinstock, David M.; Lane, Andrew A.

    2014-01-01

    Activating mutations of G protein alpha subunits (Gα) occur in 4–5% of all human cancers1 but oncogenic alterations in beta subunits (Gβ) have not been defined. Here we demonstrate that recurrent mutations in the Gβ proteins GNB1 and GNB2 confer cytokine-independent growth and activate canonical G protein signaling. Multiple mutations in GNB1 affect the protein interface that binds Gα subunits as well as downstream effectors, and disrupt Gα-Gβγ interactions. Different mutations in Gβ proteins clustered to some extent based on lineage; for example, all eleven GNB1 K57 mutations were in myeloid neoplasms while 7 of 8 GNB1 I80 mutations were in B cell neoplasms. Expression of patient-derived GNB1 alleles in Cdkn2a-deficient bone marrow followed by transplantation resulted in either myeloid or B cell malignancies. In vivo treatment with the dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor BEZ235 suppressed GNB1-induced signaling and markedly increased survival. In several human tumors, GNB1 mutations co-occurred with oncogenic kinase alterations, including BCR/ABL, JAK2 V617F and BRAF V600K. Co-expression of patient-derived GNB1 alleles with these mutant kinases resulted in inhibitor resistance in each context. Thus, GNB1 and GNB2 mutations confer transformed and resistance phenotypes across a range of human tumors and may be targetable with inhibitors of G protein signaling. PMID:25485910

  14. MicroRNA-21 directly targets MARCKS and promotes apoptosis resistance and invasion in prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common malignant cancers in men. Recent studies have shown that microRNA-21 (miR-21) is overexpressed in various types of cancers including prostate cancer. Studies on glioma, colon cancer cells, hepatocellular cancer cells and breast cancer cells have indicated that miR-21 is involved in tumor growth, invasion and metastasis. However, the roles of miR-21 in prostate cancer are poorly understood. In this study, the effects of miR-21 on prostate cancer cell proliferation, apoptosis, and invasion were examined. In addition, the targets of miR-21 were identified by a reported RISC-coimmunoprecipitation-based biochemical method. Inactivation of miR-21 by antisense oligonucleotides in androgen-independent prostate cancer cell lines DU145 and PC-3 resulted in sensitivity to apoptosis and inhibition of cell motility and invasion, whereas cell proliferation were not affected. We identified myristoylated alanine-rich protein kinase c substrate (MARCKS), which plays key roles in cell motility, as a new target in prostate cancer cells. Our data suggested that miR-21 could promote apoptosis resistance, motility, and invasion in prostate cancer cells and these effects of miR-21 may be partly due to its regulation of PDCD4, TPM1, and MARCKS. Gene therapy using miR-21 inhibition strategy may therefore be useful as a prostate cancer therapy.

  15. Dynamic protein-protein interaction subnetworks of lung cancer in cases with smoking history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Smoking is the primary cause of lung cancer and is linked to 85% of lung cancer cases. However, how lung cancer develops in patients with smoking history remains unclear. Systems approaches that combine human protein-protein interaction (PPI networks and gene expression data are superior to traditional methods. We performed these systems to determine the role that smoking plays in lung cancer development and used the support vector machine (SVM model to predict PPIs. By defining expression variance (EV, we found 520 dynamic proteins (EV>0.4 using data from the Human Protein Reference Database and Gene Expression Omnibus Database, and built 7 dynamic PPI subnetworks of lung cancer in patients with smoking history. We also determined the primary functions of each subnetwork: signal transduction, apoptosis, and cell migration and adhesion for subnetwork A; cell-sustained angiogenesis for subnetwork B; apoptosis for subnetwork C; and, finally, signal transduction and cell replication and proliferation for subnetworks D-G. The probability distribution of the degree of dynamic protein and static protein differed, clearly showing that the dynamic proteins were not the core proteins which widely connected with their neighbor proteins. There were high correlations among the dynamic proteins, suggesting that the dynamic proteins tend to form specific dynamic modules. We also found that the dynamic proteins were only correlated with the expression of selected proteins but not all neighbor proteins when cancer occurred.

  16. Targeting the sphingolipid metabolism to defeat pancreatic cancer cell resistance to the chemotherapeutic gemcitabine drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillermet-Guibert, Julie; Davenne, Lise; Pchejetski, Dimitri; Saint-Laurent, Nathalie; Brizuela, Leyre; Guilbeau-Frugier, Céline; Delisle, Marie-Bernadette; Cuvillier, Olivier; Susini, Christiane; Bousquet, Corinne

    2009-04-01

    Defeating pancreatic cancer resistance to the chemotherapeutic drug gemcitabine remains a challenge to treat this deadly cancer. Targeting the sphingolipid metabolism for improving tumor chemosensitivity has recently emerged as a promising strategy. The fine balance between intracellular levels of the prosurvival sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and the proapoptotic ceramide sphingolipids determines cell fate. Among enzymes that control this metabolism, sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1), a tumor-associated protein overexpressed in many cancers, favors survival through S1P production, and inhibitors of SphK1 are used in ongoing clinical trials to sensitize epithelial ovarian and prostate cancer cells to various chemotherapeutic drugs. We here report that the cellular ceramide/S1P ratio is a critical biosensor for predicting pancreatic cancer cell sensitivity to gemcitabine. A low level of the ceramide/S1P ratio, associated with a high SphK1 activity, correlates with a robust intrinsic pancreatic cancer cell chemoresistance toward gemcitabine. Strikingly, increasing the ceramide/S1P ratio, by using pharmacologic (SphK1 inhibitor or ceramide analogue) or small interfering RNA-based approaches to up-regulate intracellular ceramide levels or reduce SphK1 activity, sensitized pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine. Conversely, decreasing the ceramide/S1P ratio, by up-regulating SphK1 activity, promoted gemcitabine resistance in these cells. Development of novel pharmacologic strategies targeting the sphingolipid metabolism might therefore represent an interesting promising approach, when combined with gemcitabine, to defeat pancreatic cancer chemoresistance to this drug. PMID:19372554

  17. Modulation of P-Glycoprotein Mediated Multidrug Resistance (Mdr in Cancer Using Chemosensitizers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velingkar V.S

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance (MDR is one of the main obstacles in the chemotherapy of cancer. MDR is associated with the over expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp, resulting in increased efflux of chemotherapy from cancer cells. Inhibiting P-gp as a method to reverse MDR in cancer patients has been studied extensively, but the results have generally been disappointing. First-generation agents were limited by unacceptable toxicity, whereas second-generation agents had bettertolerability but were confounded by unpredictable pharmacokinetic interactions and interactions with other transporter proteins. Third-generation inhibitors have high potency and specificity for P-gp. Furthermore, pharmacokinetic studies to date have shown no appreciable impact on drug metabolism and no clinically significant drug interactions with common chemotherapy agents. Third-generation P-gp inhibitors have shown promise in clinical trials. The continued development of these agents may establish the true therapeutic potential of P-gp-mediated MDR reversal.

  18. Mitochondrial localization of cyclooxygenase-2 and calcium-independent phospholipase A2 in human cancer cells: Implication in apoptosis resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is inducible by myriad stimuli. The inducible COX-2 in primary cultured human cells has been reported to localize to nuclear envelope, endoplasmic reticulum, nucleus and caveolae. As COX-2 plays an important role in tumor growth, we were interested in its subcellular location in cancer cells. We examined COX-2 localization in several cancer cell lines by confocal microscopy. A majority of COX-2 was colocalized with heat shock protein 60, a mitochondrial protein, in colon cancer (HT-29, HCT-15 and DLD-1), breast cancer (MCF7), hepatocellular cancer (HepG2) and lung cancer cells (A549) with a similar distribution pattern. By contrast, COX-2 was not localized to mitochondria in human foreskin fibroblasts or endothelial cells. Immunoblot analysis of COX-2 in mitochondrial and cytosolic fractions confirmed localization of COX-2 to mitochondria in HT-29 and DLD-1 cells but not in fibroblasts. Calcium-independent phospholipase A2 was colocalized with heat shock protein 60 to mitochondria not only in cancer cells (HT-29 and DLD-1) but also in fibroblasts. HT-29 which expressed more abundant mitochondrial COX-2 than DLD-1 was highly resistant to arachidonic acid and H2O2-induced apoptosis whereas DLD-1 was less resistant and human fibroblasts were highly susceptible. Treatment of HT-29 cells with sulindac or SC-236, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, resulted in loss of resistance to apoptosis. These results suggest that mitochondrial COX-2 in cancer cells confer resistance to apoptosis by reducing the proapoptotic arachidonic acid

  19. DNA Methylation and Apoptosis Resistance in Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pierre-François Cartron; François Marie Vallette; Eric Hervouet; Mathilde Cheray

    2013-01-01

    Apoptosis is a cell death programme primordial to cellular homeostasis efficiency. This normal cell suicide program is the result of the activation of a cascade of events in response to death stimuli. Apoptosis occurs in normal cells to maintain a balance between cell proliferation and cell death. A deregulation of this balance due to modifications in the apoptosic pathway leads to different human diseases including cancers. Apoptosis resistance is one of the most important hallmarks of cance...

  20. Slow-Cycling Therapy-Resistant Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Nathan; Houghton, JeanMarie; Lyle, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Tumor recurrence after chemotherapy is a major cause of patient morbidity and mortality. Recurrences are thought to be secondary to small subsets of cancer cells that are better able to survive traditional forms of chemotherapy and thus drive tumor regrowth. The ability to isolate and better characterize these therapy-resistant cells is critical for the future development of targeted therapies aimed at achieving more robust and long-lasting responses. Using a novel application for the prolife...

  1. New Therapeutics to Treat Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ömer Acar; Tarık Esen; Lack, Nathan A.

    2013-01-01

    Hindawi Publishing Corporation The ScientificWorld Journal Volume 2013, Article ID 379641, 8 pages http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/379641 Review Article New Therapeutics to Treat Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer Ömer Acar,1 TarJk Esen,1,2 and Nathan A. Lack1 1 VKF American Hospital, Guzelbahce sokak, Nisantasi, Istanbul 34365, Turkey 2 School of Medicine, Koc¸ University, Rumelifeneri Yolu, Sariyer, Istanbul 34450, Turkey Correspondence should be addressed to Natha...

  2. The Links Between Insulin Resistance, Diabetes, and Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Orgel, Etan; Mittelman, Steven D

    2013-01-01

    The growing epidemic of obesity has resulted in a large increase in multiple related diseases. Recent evidence has strengthened the proposed synergistic relationship between obesity-related insulin resistance (IR) and/or diabetes mellitus (DM) and cancer. Within the past year, many studies have examined this relationship. Although the precise mechanisms and pathways are uncertain, it is becoming clear that hyperinsulinemia and possibly sustained hyperglycemia are important regulators of not o...

  3. Colorectal cancer stem cells : regulation of the phenotype and implications for therapy resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Emmink, B.L.

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis different aspects of cancer stem cells in colorectal cancer are discribed. We focus on the therapy resistance of cancer stem cells and the effect that reactive oxygen species and hypoxia have on the cancer stem cell phenotype. For this purpose a novel culture method to propagate cancer stem cells form resected tumor specimens was used.

  4. MRP1 expression in CTCs confers resistance to irinotecan-based chemotherapy in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Emne Ali; Fanelli, Marcello Ferretti; Souza E Silva, Virgílio; Machado Netto, Marcelo Calil; Gasparini Junior, José Luiz; Araújo, Daniel Vilarim; Ocea, Luciana Menezes Mendonça; Buim, Marcilei Eliza Cavicchioli; Tariki, Milena Shizue; Alves, Vanessa da Silva; Piana de Andrade, Victor; Dettino, Aldo Lourenço Abbade; Abdon Lopes de Mello, Celso; Chinen, Ludmilla Thomé Domingos

    2016-08-15

    Circulating tumor cells are important markers of tumor progression and can reflect tumor behavior in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Identification of proteins that confer resistance to treatment is an important step to predict response and better selection of treatment for patients. Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) and Multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 (MRP4) play a role in irinotecan-resistance, and Excision Repair Cross-Complementation group 1 (ERCC1) expression can confer resistance to platinum compounds. Here, we included 34 patients with mCRC and most of them received FOLFIRI or FOLFOX chemotherapy (91.1%). CTCs were isolated by ISET(®) Technology and identified in 30 patients (88.2%), with a median of 2.0 CTCs/mL (0-31.0). We analyzed the immunocytochemical expression of MRP1, MRP4 and ERCC1 only in patients who had previously detectable CTCs, accordingly to treatment received (n = 19, 15 and 13 patients, respectively). Among patients treated with irinotecan-based chemotherapy, 4 out of 19 cases with MRP1 positive CTCs showed a worse progression free survival (PFS) in comparison to those with MRP1 negative CTCs (2.1 months vs. 9.1 months; p = 0.003). None of the other proteins studied in CTCs had significant association with PFS. We analyzed also histological sections of primary tumors and metastases by immunohistochemistry, and found no association with clinicopathological characteristics or with PFS. Our results show MRP1 as a potential biomarker of resistance to treatment with irinotecan when found in CTCs from mCRC patients. This is a small proof-of-principle study and these early findings need to be validated in a larger cohort of patients. PMID:26950035

  5. Wound Healing and Cancer Stem Cells: Inflammation as a Driver of Treatment Resistance in Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, Kimberly M; Opdenaker, Lynn M.; Daniel Flynn; Jennifer Sims-Mourtada

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between wound healing and cancer has long been recognized. The mechanisms that regulate wound healing have been shown to promote transformation and growth of malignant cells. In addition, chronic inflammation has been associated with malignant transformation in many tissues. Recently, pathways involved in inflammation and wound healing have been reported to enhance cancer stem cell (CSC) populations. These cells, which are highly resistant to current treatments, are capable o...

  6. Tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells possess cancer stem-like cell properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hui; ZHANG Heng-wei; SUN Xian-fu; GUO Xu-hui; HE Ya-ning; CUI Shu-de; FAN Qing-xia

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are the cause of cancer recurrence because they are resistant to conventional therapy and contribute to cancer growth and metastasis.Endocrinotherapy is the most common breast cancer therapy and acquired tamoxifen (TAM) resistance is the main reason for endocrinotherapy failure during such therapy.Although acquired resistance to endocrine treatment has been extensively studied,the underlying mechanisms are unclear.We hypothesized that breast CSCs played an important role in TAM-induced resistance during breast cancer therapy.Therefore,we investigated the biological characteristics of TAM-resistant (TAM-R) breast cancer cells.Methods Mammosphere formation and tumorigenicity of wild-type (WT) and TAM-R MCF7 cells were tested by a mammosphere assay and mouse tumor xenografts respectively.Stem-cell markers (SOX-2,OCT-4,and CD133) and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers were tested by quantitative real-time (qRT)-PCR.Morphological observation was performed to characterize EMT.Results After induction of TAM resistance,TAM-R MCF7 cells exhibited increased proliferation in the presence of TAM compared to that of WT MCF7 cells (P <0.05),indicating enhanced TAM resistance of TAM-R MCF7 cells compared to that of WT MCF7 cells.TAM-R MCF7 cells showed enhanced mammosphere formation and tumorigenicity in nude mice compared to that of WT MCF7 cells (P <0.01),demonstrating the elevated CSC properties of TAM-R MCF7 cells.Consistently,qRT-PCR revealed that TAM-R MCF7 cells expressed increased mRNA levels of stem cell markers including SOX-2,OCT-4,and CD133,compared to those of WT MCF7 cells (P <0.05).Morphologically,TAM-R MCF7 cells showed a fibroblastic phenotype,but WT MCF7 cells were epithelial-like.After induction of TAM resistance,qRT-PCR indicated that MCF7 cells expressed increased mRNA levels of Snail,vimentin,and N-cadherin and decreased levels of E-cadherin,which are considered as EMT characteristics (P <0

  7. Novel agents in the management of castration resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Chaturvedi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is a leading cause of cancer mortality in men and despite high cure rates with surgery and/or radiation, 30-40% of patients will eventually develop advanced disease. Androgen deprivation is the first line therapy for standard of care for men with advanced disease. Eventually however all men will progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. Insight into the molecular mechanisms of androgen resistance has led to the development of alternative novel hormonal agents. Newer hormonal agents such as abiraterone, enzalutamide and TOK-001; and the first cancer vaccine, Sipuleucel T have been approved for use in men with CRPC. The recognition of the importance of bone health and morbidity associated with skeletal related events has led to the introduction of the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B-ligand inhibitor denosumab. Other molecularly targeted therapies have shown promise in pre-clinical studies, but this has not consistently translated into clinical efficacy. It is increasingly evident that CRPC is a heterogeneous disease and an individualized approach directed at identifying primary involvement of specific pathways could maximize the benefit from targeted therapies. This review focuses on targeted therapy for PCa with special emphasis on therapies that have been Food and Drug Administration approved for use in men with CRPC.

  8. Loss of Scribble Promotes Snail Translation through Translocation of HuR and Enhances Cancer Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yi; Chang, Renxu; Ji, Weiwei; Wang, Na; Qi, Meiyan; Xu, Yi; Guo, Jingyu; Zhan, Lixing

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance of cancer cells to various therapeutic agents and molecular targets is a major problem facing current cancer research. The tumor suppressor gene Scribble encodes a polarity protein that is conserved between Drosophila and mammals; loss of the locus disrupts cell polarity, inhibits apoptosis, and mediates cancer process. However, the role of Scribble in drug resistance remains unknown. We show here that knockdown of Scribble enhances drug resistance by permitting accumulation of Snail, which functions as a transcription factor during the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Then, loss of Scribble activates the mRNA-binding protein human antigen R (HuR) by facilitating translocation of HuR from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Furthermore, we demonstrate HuR can recognize AU-rich elements of the Snail-encoding mRNA, thereby regulating Snail translation. Moreover, loss of Scribble-induced HuR translocation mediates the accumulation of Snail via activation of the p38 MAPK pathway. Thus, this work clarifies the role of polarity protein Scribble, which is directly implicated in the regulation of developmental transcription factor Snail, and suggesting a mechanism for Scribble mediating cancer drug resistance. PMID:26527679

  9. Involvement of miR-30c in resistance to doxorubicin by regulating YWHAZ in breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Y. [Department of Central Laboratory, The First Affiliated People’s Hospital, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu (China); Shen, H. [Department of Oncology, The First Affiliated People’s Hospital, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu (China); Cao, Y. [Department of Central Laboratory, The First Affiliated People’s Hospital, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu (China); Li, H. [Department of Central Laboratory, The Fourth Affiliated People’s Hospital, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu (China); Qin, R. [Department of Oncology, The First Affiliated People’s Hospital, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu (China); Chen, Q. [Department of Central Laboratory, The First Affiliated People’s Hospital, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu (China); Long, L. [Department of Oncology, The First Affiliated People’s Hospital, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu (China); Zhu, X.L. [Department of Central Laboratory, The Fourth Affiliated People’s Hospital, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu (China); Xie, C.J. [Department of Central Laboratory, The First Affiliated People’s Hospital, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu (China); Xu, W.L. [Department of Central Laboratory, The Fourth Affiliated People’s Hospital, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu (China)

    2014-01-10

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNA molecules that modulate gene expression implicated in cancer, which play crucial roles in diverse biological processes, such as development, differentiation, apoptosis, and proliferation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether miR-30c mediated the resistance of breast cancer cells to the chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin (ADR) by targeting tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxygenase activation protein zeta (YWHAZ). miR-30c was downregulated in the doxorubicin-resistant human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7/ADR and MDA-MB-231/ADR compared with their parental MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines, respectively. Furthermore, we observed that transfection of an miR-30c mimic significantly suppressed the ability of MCF-7/ADR to resist doxorubicin. Moreover, the anti-apoptotic gene YWHAZ was confirmed as a target of miR-30c by luciferase reporter assay, and further studies indicated that the mechanism for miR-30c on the sensitivity of breast cancer cells involved YWHAZ and its downstream p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) pathway. Together, our findings provided evidence that miR-30c was one of the important miRNAs in doxorubicin resistance by regulating YWHAZ in the breast cancer cell line MCF-7/ADR.

  10. Thymidylate synthase gene amplification in human colon cancer cell lines resistant to 5-fluorouracil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copur, S; Aiba, K; Drake, J C; Allegra, C J; Chu, E

    1995-05-17

    A series of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-resistant human colon H630 cancer cell lines were established by continuous exposure of cells to 5-FU. The concentration of 5-FU required to inhibit cell proliferation by 50% (IC50) in the parent colon line (H630) was 5.5 microM. The 5-FU IC50 values for the resistant H630-R1, H630-R10, and H630-R cell lines were 11-, 29-, and 27-fold higher than that for the parent H630 cell line. Using both the radioenzymatic 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine-5'-monophosphate (FdUMP) binding and catalytic assays for measurement of thymidylate synthase (TS) enzyme activity, there was significantly increased TS activity in resistant H630-R1 (13- and 23-fold), H630-R10 (37- and 40-fold), and H630-R (24- and 34-fold) lines, for binding and catalytic assays, respectively, compared with the parent H630 line. The level of TS protein, as determined by western immunoblot analysis, was increased markedly in resistant H630-R1 (23-fold), H630-R10 (33-fold), and H630-R (26-fold) cells. Northern analysis revealed elevations in TS mRNA levels in H630-R1 (18-fold), H630-R10 (39-fold), and H630-R (36-fold) cells relative to parent H630 cells. Although no major rearrangements of the TS gene were noted by Southern analysis, there was significant amplification of the TS gene in 5-FU-resistant cells, which was confirmed by DNA slot blot analysis. These studies demonstrate that continuous exposure of human colon cancer cells to 5-FU leads to TS gene amplification and overexpression of TS protein with resultant development of fluoropyrimidine resistance. PMID:7763285

  11. Vitamin E derivative-based multifunctional nanoemulsions for overcoming multidrug resistance in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Nannan; Gao, Yanan; Ji, Hongyu; Wu, Linhua; Qi, Xuejing; Liu, Xiaona; Tang, Jingling

    2016-08-01

    The multidrug resistance (MDR), including intrinsic and acquired multidrug resistance, is a major problem in tumor chemotherapy. Here, we proposed a strategy for modulating intrinsic and/or acquired multidrug resistance by altering the levels of Bax and Bcl-2 expression and inhibiting the transport function of P-gp, increasing the intracellular concentration of its substrate anticancer drugs. Vitamin E derivative-based nanoemulsions containing paclitaxel (MNEs-PTX) were fabricated in this study, and in vitro anticancer efficacy of the nanoemulsion system was evaluated in the paclitaxel-resistant human ovarian carcinoma cell line A2780/Taxol. The MNEs-PTX exhibited a remarkably enhanced antiproliferation effect on A2780/Taxol cells than free paclitaxel (PTX) (p Vitamin E derivative-based multifunctional nanoemulsion (MNEs) obviously increased intracellular accumulation of rhodamine 123 (P-gp substrate). Overexpression of Bcl-2 is generally associated with tumor drug resistance, we found that MNEs could reduce Bcl-2 protein level and increase Bax protein level. Taken together, our findings suggest that anticancer drugs associated with MNEs could play a role in the development of MDR in cancers. PMID:26710274

  12. Colorectal cancer cell lines made resistant to SN38-and Oxaliplatin: Roles of altered ion transporter function in resistance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandra, Christensen; Jensen, Niels Frank; Stoeckel, Johanne Danmark;

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the 3rd most common cancer globally, with 5year survival rates of ~50%. Response rates to standard treatments (irinotecan (SN38) or Oxaliplatin (Oxp)) are 31–56% and drug resistance is a major problem. Thus, we established in vitro CRC models to investigate SN38 and Oxp...... not previously been implicated in SN38 or Oxp resistance and are generally restricted to the CNS, they are potential novel biomarkers for resistance and interesting candidates for therapeutic targeting....

  13. Role of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Signaling Pathway in Cisplatin-Resistant Lung Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Yunguang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Zheng Siyuan [Department of Biomedical Informatics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Torossian, Artour; Speirs, Christina K.; Schleicher, Stephen; Giacalone, Nicholas J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Carbone, David P. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Zhao Zhongming, E-mail: zhongming.zhao@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Biomedical Informatics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Lu Bo, E-mail: bo.lu@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: The development of drug-resistant phenotypes has been a major obstacle to cisplatin use in non-small-cell lung cancer. We aimed to identify some of the molecular mechanisms that underlie cisplatin resistance using microarray expression analysis. Methods and Materials: H460 cells were treated with cisplatin. The differences between cisplatin-resistant lung cancer cells and parental H460 cells were studied using Western blot, MTS, and clonogenic assays, in vivo tumor implantation, and microarray analysis. The cisplatin-R cells were treated with human recombinant insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding protein-3 and siRNA targeting IGF-1 receptor. Results: Cisplatin-R cells illustrated greater expression of the markers CD133 and aldehyde dehydrogenase, more rapid in vivo tumor growth, more resistance to cisplatin- and etoposide-induced apoptosis, and greater survival after treatment with cisplatin or radiation than the parental H460 cells. Also, cisplatin-R demonstrated decreased expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 and increased activation of IGF-1 receptor signaling compared with parental H460 cells in the presence of IGF-1. Human recombinant IGF binding protein-3 reversed cisplatin resistance in cisplatin-R cells and targeting of IGF-1 receptor using siRNA resulted in sensitization of cisplatin-R-cells to cisplatin and radiation. Conclusions: The IGF-1 signaling pathway contributes to cisplatin-R to cisplatin and radiation. Thus, this pathway represents a potential target for improved lung cancer response to treatment.

  14. Role of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Signaling Pathway in Cisplatin-Resistant Lung Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The development of drug-resistant phenotypes has been a major obstacle to cisplatin use in non–small-cell lung cancer. We aimed to identify some of the molecular mechanisms that underlie cisplatin resistance using microarray expression analysis. Methods and Materials: H460 cells were treated with cisplatin. The differences between cisplatin-resistant lung cancer cells and parental H460 cells were studied using Western blot, MTS, and clonogenic assays, in vivo tumor implantation, and microarray analysis. The cisplatin-R cells were treated with human recombinant insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding protein-3 and siRNA targeting IGF-1 receptor. Results: Cisplatin-R cells illustrated greater expression of the markers CD133 and aldehyde dehydrogenase, more rapid in vivo tumor growth, more resistance to cisplatin- and etoposide-induced apoptosis, and greater survival after treatment with cisplatin or radiation than the parental H460 cells. Also, cisplatin-R demonstrated decreased expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 and increased activation of IGF-1 receptor signaling compared with parental H460 cells in the presence of IGF-1. Human recombinant IGF binding protein-3 reversed cisplatin resistance in cisplatin-R cells and targeting of IGF-1 receptor using siRNA resulted in sensitization of cisplatin-R-cells to cisplatin and radiation. Conclusions: The IGF-1 signaling pathway contributes to cisplatin-R to cisplatin and radiation. Thus, this pathway represents a potential target for improved lung cancer response to treatment.

  15. High Levels of Expression of P-glycoprotein/Multidrug Resistance Protein Result in Resistance to Vintafolide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guertin, Amy D; O'Neil, Jennifer; Stoeck, Alexander; Reddy, Joseph A; Cristescu, Razvan; Haines, Brian B; Hinton, Marlene C; Dorton, Ryan; Bloomfield, Alicia; Nelson, Melissa; Vetzel, Marilynn; Lejnine, Serguei; Nebozhyn, Michael; Zhang, Theresa; Loboda, Andrey; Picard, Kristen L; Schmidt, Emmett V; Dussault, Isabelle; Leamon, Christopher P

    2016-08-01

    Targeting surface receptors overexpressed on cancer cells is one way to specifically treat cancer versus normal cells. Vintafolide (EC145), which consists of folate linked to a cytotoxic small molecule, desacetylvinblastine hydrazide (DAVLBH), takes advantage of the overexpression of folate receptor (FR) on cancer cells. Once bound to FR, vintafolide enters the cell by endocytosis, and the reducing environment of the endosome cleaves the linker, releasing DAVLBH to destabilize microtubules. Vintafolide has shown efficacy and improved tolerability compared with DAVLBH in FR-positive preclinical models. As the first FR-targeting drug to reach the clinic, vintafolide has achieved favorable responses in phase II clinical trials in FR-positive ovarian and lung cancer. However, some FR-positive patients in these clinical trials do not respond to vintafolide. We sought to identify potential biomarkers of resistance to aid in the future development of this and other FR-targeting drugs. Here, we confirm that high P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression was the strongest predictor of resistance to DAVLBH in a panel of 359 cancer cell lines. Furthermore, targeted delivery of DAVLBH via the FR, as in vintafolide, fails to overcome P-gp-mediated efflux of DAVLBH in both in vitro and in vivo preclinical models. Therefore, we suggest that patients whose tumors express high levels of P-gp be excluded from future clinical trials for vintafolide as well as other FR-targeted therapeutics bearing a P-gp substrate. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1998-2008. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27256377

  16. Prolactin confers resistance against cisplatin in breast cancer cells by activating glutathione-S-transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPensee, Elizabeth W; Schwemberger, Sandy J; LaPensee, Christopher R; Bahassi, El Mustapha; Afton, Scott E; Ben-Jonathan, Nira

    2009-08-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy is a major obstacle for successful treatment of breast cancer patients. Given that prolactin (PRL) acts as an anti-apoptotic/survival factor in the breast, we postulated that it antagonizes cytotoxicity by chemotherapeutic drugs. Treatment of breast cancer cells with PRL caused variable resistance to taxol, vinblastine, doxorubicin and cisplatin. PRL prevented cisplatin-induced G(2)/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In the presence of PRL, significantly less cisplatin was bound to DNA, as determined by mass spectroscopy, and little DNA damage was seen by gamma-H2AX staining. PRL dramatically increased the activity of glutathione-S-transferase (GST), which sequesters cisplatin in the cytoplasm; this increase was abrogated by Jak and mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors. PRL upregulated the expression of the GSTmu, but not the pi, isozyme. A GST inhibitor abrogated antagonism of cisplatin cytotoxicity by PRL. In conclusion, PRL confers resistance against cisplatin by activating a detoxification enzyme, thereby reducing drug entry into the nucleus. These data provide a rational explanation for the ineffectiveness of cisplatin in breast cancer, which is characterized by high expression of both PRL and its receptor. Suppression of PRL production or blockade of its actions should benefit patients undergoing chemotherapy by allowing for lower drug doses and expanded drug options. PMID:19443905

  17. Everolimus downregulates estrogen receptor and induces autophagy in aromatase inhibitor-resistant breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lui, Asona; New, Jacob; Ogony, Joshua; Thomas, Sufi; Lewis-Wambi, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Background mTOR inhibition of aromatase inhibitor (AI)-resistant breast cancer is currently under evaluation in the clinic. Everolimus/RAD001 (Afinitor®) has had limited efficacy as a solo agent but is projected to become part of combination therapy for AI-resistant breast cancer. This study was conducted to investigate the anti-proliferative and resistance mechanisms of everolimus in AI-resistant breast cancer cells. Methods In this study we utilized two AI-resistant breast cancer cell lines...

  18. Interpreting cancer genomes using systematic host network perturbations by tumour virus proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenblatt-Rosen, Orit; Deo, Rahul C; Padi, Megha; Adelmant, Guillaume; Calderwood, Michael A; Rolland, Thomas; Grace, Miranda; Dricot, Amélie; Askenazi, Manor; Tavares, Maria; Pevzner, Samuel J; Abderazzaq, Fieda; Byrdsong, Danielle; Carvunis, Anne-Ruxandra; Chen, Alyce A; Cheng, Jingwei; Correll, Mick; Duarte, Melissa; Fan, Changyu; Feltkamp, Mariet C; Ficarro, Scott B; Franchi, Rachel; Garg, Brijesh K; Gulbahce, Natali; Hao, Tong; Holthaus, Amy M; James, Robert; Korkhin, Anna; Litovchick, Larisa; Mar, Jessica C; Pak, Theodore R; Rabello, Sabrina; Rubio, Renee; Shen, Yun; Singh, Saurav; Spangle, Jennifer M; Tasan, Murat; Wanamaker, Shelly; Webber, James T; Roecklein-Canfield, Jennifer; Johannsen, Eric; Barabási, Albert-László; Beroukhim, Rameen; Kieff, Elliott; Cusick, Michael E; Hill, David E; Münger, Karl; Marto, Jarrod A; Quackenbush, John; Roth, Frederick P; DeCaprio, James A; Vidal, Marc

    2012-07-26

    Genotypic differences greatly influence susceptibility and resistance to disease. Understanding genotype-phenotype relationships requires that phenotypes be viewed as manifestations of network properties, rather than simply as the result of individual genomic variations. Genome sequencing efforts have identified numerous germline mutations, and large numbers of somatic genomic alterations, associated with a predisposition to cancer. However, it remains difficult to distinguish background, or 'passenger', cancer mutations from causal, or 'driver', mutations in these data sets. Human viruses intrinsically depend on their host cell during the course of infection and can elicit pathological phenotypes similar to those arising from mutations. Here we test the hypothesis that genomic variations and tumour viruses may cause cancer through related mechanisms, by systematically examining host interactome and transcriptome network perturbations caused by DNA tumour virus proteins. The resulting integrated viral perturbation data reflects rewiring of the host cell networks, and highlights pathways, such as Notch signalling and apoptosis, that go awry in cancer. We show that systematic analyses of host targets of viral proteins can identify cancer genes with a success rate on a par with their identification through functional genomics and large-scale cataloguing of tumour mutations. Together, these complementary approaches increase the specificity of cancer gene identification. Combining systems-level studies of pathogen-encoded gene products with genomic approaches will facilitate the prioritization of cancer-causing driver genes to advance the understanding of the genetic basis of human cancer. PMID:22810586

  19. Interpreting cancer genomes using systematic host perturbations by tumour virus proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenblatt-Rosen, Orit; Deo, Rahul C.; Padi, Megha; Adelmant, Guillaume; Calderwood, Michael A.; Rolland, Thomas; Grace, Miranda; Dricot, Amélie; Askenazi, Manor; Tavares, Maria; Pevzner, Sam; Abderazzaq, Fieda; Byrdsong, Danielle; Carvunis, Anne-Ruxandra; Chen, Alyce A.; Cheng, Jingwei; Correll, Mick; Duarte, Melissa; Fan, Changyu; Feltkamp, Mariet C.; Ficarro, Scott B.; Franchi, Rachel; Garg, Brijesh K.; Gulbahce, Natali; Hao, Tong; Holthaus, Amy M.; James, Robert; Korkhin, Anna; Litovchick, Larisa; Mar, Jessica C.; Pak, Theodore R.; Rabello, Sabrina; Rubio, Renee; Shen, Yun; Singh, Saurav; Spangle, Jennifer M.; Tasan, Murat; Wanamaker, Shelly; Webber, James T.; Roecklein-Canfield, Jennifer; Johannsen, Eric; Barabási, Albert-László; Beroukhim, Rameen; Kieff, Elliott; Cusick, Michael E.; Hill, David E.; Münger, Karl; Marto, Jarrod A.; Quackenbush, John; Roth, Frederick P.; DeCaprio, James A.; Vidal, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Genotypic differences greatly influence susceptibility and resistance to disease. Understanding genotype-phenotype relationships requires that phenotypes be viewed as manifestations of network properties, rather than simply as the result of individual genomic variations1. Genome sequencing efforts have identified numerous germline mutations associated with cancer predisposition and large numbers of somatic genomic alterations2. However, it remains challenging to distinguish between background, or “passenger” and causal, or “driver” cancer mutations in these datasets. Human viruses intrinsically depend on their host cell during the course of infection and can elicit pathological phenotypes similar to those arising from mutations3. To test the hypothesis that genomic variations and tumour viruses may cause cancer via related mechanisms, we systematically examined host interactome and transcriptome network perturbations caused by DNA tumour virus proteins. The resulting integrated viral perturbation data reflects rewiring of the host cell networks, and highlights pathways that go awry in cancer, such as Notch signalling and apoptosis. We show that systematic analyses of host targets of viral proteins can identify cancer genes with a success rate on par with their identification through functional genomics and large-scale cataloguing of tumour mutations. Together, these complementary approaches result in increased specificity for cancer gene identification. Combining systems-level studies of pathogen-encoded gene products with genomic approaches will facilitate prioritization of cancer-causing driver genes so as to advance understanding of the genetic basis of human cancer. PMID:22810586

  20. [Development of three-dimensional breast cancer cell culture drug resistance model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hong; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Xiu-Zhen; Hou, Liang; Lu, Ying-Jin; Chen, Pei-Pei; Zhang, Can; Feng, Di; Kong, Li; Wang, Xiu-Li

    2016-04-25

    The aim of the present study was to develop three-dimensional (3D) culture model, a more pathologically relevant model, of human breast cancer for drug resistance study. MCF-7 cells were embedded within collagen gel to establish 3D culture model. Cellular morphology was observed using Carmine and HE staining. Cell proliferation was evaluated by CCK-8 assay, and cell activity was detected by Live/Dead staining kit. Drug sensitivities of the 3D culture to doxorubicin, carboplatin, 5-fluorouracil were assayed and compared with those of monolayer (2D) culture. In addition, the levels of drug resistance-related genes P-glycoprotein (P-gp), mrp2 mRNA expressions were detected by real time RT-PCR. Expression level of P-gp protein was detected by Western blot. The results showed that MCF-7 cells in 3D culture formed a number of cell aggregates, and most of them displayed good cell viability. The IC50 values of doxorubicin, carboplatin, 5-fluorouracil were all increased significantly in 3D culture compared with those in 2D culture. Moreover, compared with MCF-7 cells in 2D culture, the cells in 3D culture showed increased mRNA levels of P-gp and mrp2, as well as up-regulated protein expression of P-gp. These results suggest that in vitro collagen-embedded culture system of human breast cancer cells represents an improved pathologically relevant 3D microenvironment for breast cancer cells, providing a robust tool to explore the mechanism of drug resistance of cancer cells. PMID:27108905

  1. Akt kinase-interacting protein1, a novel therapeutic target for lung cancer with EGFR-activating and gatekeeper mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Yamada, Tadaaki; Takeuchi, Shinji; Fujita, Naoya; Nakamura, Akito; Wang, Wei; Li, Qi; Oda, Makoto; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Yatabe, Yasushi; Sekido, Yoshitaka; Yoshida, Junji; Higashiyama, Masahiko; Noguchi, Masayuki; Uehara, Hisanori; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Despite initial dramatic response, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutant lung cancer patients always acquire resistance to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Gatekeeper T790M mutation in EGFR is the most prevalent genetic alteration underlying acquired resistance to EGFR-TKI, and EGFR mutant lung cancer cells are reported to be addictive to EGFR/Akt signaling even after acquired T790M mutation. Here, we focused on Akt kinase-interacting protein1 (Aki1), a scaffold protein of PI3...

  2. Plasma AR and abiraterone-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanel, Alessandro; Gasi Tandefelt, Delila; Conteduca, Vincenza; Jayaram, Anuradha; Casiraghi, Nicola; Wetterskog, Daniel; Salvi, Samanta; Amadori, Dino; Zafeiriou, Zafeiris; Rescigno, Pasquale; Bianchini, Diletta; Gurioli, Giorgia; Casadio, Valentina; Carreira, Suzanne; Goodall, Jane; Wingate, Anna; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Tunariu, Nina; Flohr, Penny; De Giorgi, Ugo; de Bono, Johann S; Demichelis, Francesca; Attard, Gerhardt

    2015-11-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) gene aberrations are rare in prostate cancer before primary hormone treatment but emerge with castration resistance. To determine AR gene status using a minimally invasive assay that could have broad clinical utility, we developed a targeted next-generation sequencing approach amenable to plasma DNA, covering all AR coding bases and genomic regions that are highly informative in prostate cancer. We sequenced 274 plasma samples from 97 castration-resistant prostate cancer patients treated with abiraterone at two institutions. We controlled for normal DNA in patients' circulation and detected a sufficiently high tumor DNA fraction to quantify AR copy number state in 217 samples (80 patients). Detection of AR copy number gain and point mutations in plasma were inversely correlated, supported further by the enrichment of nonsynonymous versus synonymous mutations in AR copy number normal as opposed to AR gain samples. Whereas AR copy number was unchanged from before treatment to progression and no mutant AR alleles showed signal for acquired gain, we observed emergence of T878A or L702H AR amino acid changes in 13% of tumors at progression on abiraterone. Patients with AR gain or T878A or L702H before abiraterone (45%) were 4.9 and 7.8 times less likely to have a ≥50 or ≥90% decline in prostate-specific antigen (PSA), respectively, and had a significantly worse overall [hazard ratio (HR), 7.33; 95% confidence interval (CI), 3.51 to 15.34; P = 1.3 × 10(-9)) and progression-free (HR, 3.73; 95% CI, 2.17 to 6.41; P = 5.6 × 10(-7)) survival. Evaluation of plasma AR by next-generation sequencing could identify cancers with primary resistance to abiraterone. PMID:26537258

  3. Intercellular interactions and progression of hormonal resistance of breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Semina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of the study is the analysis of the role of cell-cell interactions in the formation of the tumor cell resistance to hormonal drugs. About 70 % of breast tumors contain estrogen receptor (ER, a key molecular target for hormone (endocrine therapy. However, the efficiency of endocrine therapy of breast cancer is limited by the development of hormone resistance which leads to progression of tumor cells to hormone-independent phenotype, increase in tumor malignancy and worse prognosis. Hormonal independence may be accompanied with the loss of the receptors, as well as with the another mechanisms including ligand-independent receptor activation, disbalance between receptor activators and repressors, stimulation of hormone-independent pathways. It is less known about the role of the intercellular interactions in the progression of hormonal resistance. Several studies demonstrate the involvement of cell junctions in the mediating of cell response to (anti estrogens, however the significance of cell-cell contacts in the formation of hormonal resistance still not clear. Here we have hypothesized that the formation of the hormone resistance of tumors may be based, at least in part, on the transferring of the resistant phenotype from the resistant to hormone-sensitive cells – as a result of the secretion of the specific factors acting in the paracrine manner or via the direct cell-cell contacts. Using the estrogen-dependent breast cancer cells MCF-7 and the resistant subline MCF-7 / T developed by long-term cultivation of MCF-7 cells in the presence of antiestrogen tamoxifen, we investigated the possible changes in the hormonal sensitivity of these cells caused by the co-cultivation in vitro. To discern the cell cultures, the MCF-7 / T cells were previously transfected with the plasmid containing the gene of the green fluorescent protein (GFP, and GFP-positive hormone-resistant subline MCF-7 / T / GFP+ was developed. We showed that the co

  4. Mitochondrial-Targeting MET Kinase Inhibitor Kills Erlotinib-Resistant Lung Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tianming; Ng, Wai Har; Chen, Huan; Chomchopbun, Kamon; Huynh, The Hung; Go, Mei Lin; Kon, Oi Lian

    2016-08-11

    Lung cancer cells harboring activating EGFR mutations acquire resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) by activating several bypass mechanisms, including MET amplification and overexpression. We show that a significant proportion of activated MET protein in EGFR TKI-resistant HCC827 lung cancer cells resides within the mitochondria. Targeting the total complement of MET in the plasma membrane and mitochondria should render these cells more susceptible to cell death and hence provide a means of circumventing drug resistance. Herein, the mitochondrial targeting triphenylphosphonium (TPP) moiety was introduced to the selective MET kinase inhibitor PHA665752. The resulting TPP analogue rapidly localized to the mitochondria of MET-overexpressing erlotinib-resistant HCC827 cells, partially suppressed the phosphorylation (Y1234/Y1235) of MET in the mitochondrial inner membrane and was as cytotoxic and apoptogenic as the parent compound. These findings provide support for the targeting of mitochondrial MET with a TPP-TKI conjugate as a means of restoring responsiveness to chemotherapy. PMID:27563407

  5. Overexpression of S100A4 in human cancer cell lines resistant to methotrexate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández Jose L

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methotrexate is a chemotherapeutic drug that is used in therapy of a wide variety of cancers. The efficiency of treatment with this drug is compromised by the appearance of resistance. Combination treatments of MTX with other drugs that could modulate the expression of genes involved in MTX resistance would be an adequate strategy to prevent the development of this resistance. Methods The differential expression pattern between sensitive and MTX-resistant cells was determined by whole human genome microarrays and analyzed with the GeneSpring GX software package. A global comparison of all the studied cell lines was performed in order to find out differentially expressed genes in the majority of the MTX-resistant cells. S100A4 mRNA and protein levels were determined by RT-Real-Time PCR and Western blot, respectively. Functional validations of S100A4 were performed either by transfection of an expression vector for S100A4 or a siRNA against S100A4. Transfection of an expression vector encoding for β-catenin was used to inquire for the possible transcriptional regulation of S100A4 through the Wnt pathway. Results S100A4 is overexpressed in five out of the seven MTX-resistant cell lines studied. Ectopic overexpression of this gene in HT29 sensitive cells augmented both the intracellular and extracellular S100A4 protein levels and caused desensitization toward MTX. siRNA against S100A4 decreased the levels of this protein and caused a chemosensitization in combined treatments with MTX. β-catenin overexpression experiments support a possible involvement of the Wnt signaling pathway in S100A4 transcriptional regulation in HT29 cells. Conclusions S100A4 is overexpressed in many MTX-resistant cells. S100A4 overexpression decreases the sensitivity of HT29 colon cancer human cells to MTX, whereas its knockdown causes chemosensitization toward MTX. Both approaches highlight a role for S100A4 in MTX resistance.

  6. Overexpression of S100A4 in human cancer cell lines resistant to methotrexate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methotrexate is a chemotherapeutic drug that is used in therapy of a wide variety of cancers. The efficiency of treatment with this drug is compromised by the appearance of resistance. Combination treatments of MTX with other drugs that could modulate the expression of genes involved in MTX resistance would be an adequate strategy to prevent the development of this resistance. The differential expression pattern between sensitive and MTX-resistant cells was determined by whole human genome microarrays and analyzed with the GeneSpring GX software package. A global comparison of all the studied cell lines was performed in order to find out differentially expressed genes in the majority of the MTX-resistant cells. S100A4 mRNA and protein levels were determined by RT-Real-Time PCR and Western blot, respectively. Functional validations of S100A4 were performed either by transfection of an expression vector for S100A4 or a siRNA against S100A4. Transfection of an expression vector encoding for β-catenin was used to inquire for the possible transcriptional regulation of S100A4 through the Wnt pathway. S100A4 is overexpressed in five out of the seven MTX-resistant cell lines studied. Ectopic overexpression of this gene in HT29 sensitive cells augmented both the intracellular and extracellular S100A4 protein levels and caused desensitization toward MTX. siRNA against S100A4 decreased the levels of this protein and caused a chemosensitization in combined treatments with MTX. β-catenin overexpression experiments support a possible involvement of the Wnt signaling pathway in S100A4 transcriptional regulation in HT29 cells. S100A4 is overexpressed in many MTX-resistant cells. S100A4 overexpression decreases the sensitivity of HT29 colon cancer human cells to MTX, whereas its knockdown causes chemosensitization toward MTX. Both approaches highlight a role for S100A4 in MTX resistance

  7. Diversity and evolution of the small multidrug resistance protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Raymond J

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the small multidrug resistance (SMR protein family are integral membrane proteins characterized by four α-helical transmembrane strands that confer resistance to a broad range of antiseptics and lipophilic quaternary ammonium compounds (QAC in bacteria. Due to their short length and broad substrate profile, SMR proteins are suggested to be the progenitors for larger α-helical transporters such as the major facilitator superfamily (MFS and drug/metabolite transporter (DMT superfamily. To explore their evolutionary association with larger multidrug transporters, an extensive bioinformatics analysis of SMR sequences (> 300 Bacteria taxa was performed to expand upon previous evolutionary studies of the SMR protein family and its origins. Results A thorough annotation of unidentified/putative SMR sequences was performed placing sequences into each of the three SMR protein subclass designations, namely small multidrug proteins (SMP, suppressor of groEL mutations (SUG, and paired small multidrug resistance (PSMR using protein alignments and phylogenetic analysis. Examination of SMR subclass distribution within Bacteria and Archaea taxa identified specific Bacterial classes that uniquely encode for particular SMR subclass members. The extent of selective pressure acting upon each SMR subclass was determined by calculating the rate of synonymous to non-synonymous nucleotide substitutions using Syn-SCAN analysis. SUG and SMP subclasses are maintained under moderate selection pressure in comparison to integron and plasmid encoded SMR homologues. Conversely, PSMR sequences are maintained under lower levels of selection pressure, where one of the two PSMR pairs diverges in sequence more rapidly than the other. SMR genomic loci surveys identified potential SMR efflux substrates based on its gene association to putative operons that encode for genes regulating amino acid biogenesis and QAC-like metabolites. SMR subclass protein

  8. Global DNA hypermethylation-associated cancer chemotherapy resistance and its reversion with the demethylating agent hydralazine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benitez-Bribiesca Luis

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of resistance to cytotoxic chemotherapy continues to be a major obstacle for successful anticancer therapy. It has been shown that cells exposed to toxic concentrations of commonly used cancer chemotherapy agents develop DNA hypermetylation. Hence, demethylating agents could play a role in overcoming drug resistance. Methods MCF-7 cells were rendered adriamycin-resistant by weekly treatment with adriamycin. Wild-type and the resulting MCF-7/Adr cells were analyzed for global DNA methylation. DNA methyltransferase activity and DNA methyltransferase (dnmt gene expression were also determined. MCF-7/Adr cells were then subjected to antisense targeting of dnmt1, -3a, and -b genes and to treatment with the DNA methylation inhibitor hydralazine to investigate whether DNA demethylation restores sensitivity to adriamycin. Results MCF-7/Adr cells exhibited the multi-drug resistant phenotype as demonstrated by adriamycin resistance, mdr1 gene over-expression, decreased intracellular accumulation of adriamycin, and cross-resistance to paclitaxel. The mdr phenotype was accompanied by global DNA hypermetylation, over-expression of dnmt genes, and increased DNA methyltransferase activity as compared with wild-type MCF-7 cells. DNA demethylation through antisense targeting of dnmts or hydralazine restored adriamycin sensitivity of MCF-7/Adr cells to a greater extent than verapamil, a known inhibitor of mdr protein, suggesting that DNA demethylation interferes with the epigenetic reprogramming that participates in the drug-resistant phenotype. Conclusion We provide evidence that DNA hypermethylation is at least partly responsible for development of the multidrug-resistant phenotype in the MCF-7/Adr model and that hydralazine, a known DNA demethylating agent, can revert the resistant phenotype.

  9. Role of HGF/MET axis in resistance of lung cancer to contemporary management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghav, Kanwal Pratap Singh; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the number one cause of cancer related mortality with over 1 million cancer deaths worldwide. Numerous therapies have been developed for the treatment of lung cancer including radiation, cytotoxic chemotherapy and targeted therapies. Histology, stage of presentation and molecular aberrations are main determinants of prognosis and treatment strategy. Despite the advances that have been made, overall prognosis for lung cancer patients remains dismal. Chemotherapy and/or targeted therapy yield objective response rates of about 35% to 60% in advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Even with good initial responses, median overall survival of is limited to about 12 months. This reflects that current therapies are not universally effective and resistance develops quickly. Multiple mechanisms of resistance have been proposed and the MET/HGF axis is a potential key contributor. The proto-oncogene MET (mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor gene) and its ligand hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) interact and activate downstream signaling via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) pathway and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/AKT) pathways that regulate gene expression that promotes carcinogenesis. Aberrant MET/HGF signaling promotes emergence of an oncogenic phenotype by promoting cellular proliferation, survival, migration, invasion and angiogenesis. The MET/HGF axis has been implicated in various tumor types including lung cancers and is associated with adverse clinicopathological profile and poor outcomes. The MET/HGF axis plays a major role in development of radioresistance and chemoresistance to platinums, taxanes, camtothecins and anthracyclines by inhibiting apoptosis via activation of PI3K-AKT pathway. DNA damage from these agents induces MET and/or HGF expression. Another resistance mechanism is inhibition of chemoradiation induced translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) thereby preventing apoptosis. Furthermore, this

  10. Protein found to promote DNA repair, prevent cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ An abundant chromosomal protein that binds to damaged DNA prevents cancer development by enhancing DNA repair, researchers at University of Texas reported on-line in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Science.

  11. SWI/SNF proteins as targets in cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Schiaffino-Ortega, Santiago; Balinas, Carlos; Cuadros Celorrio, Marta; Medina Vico, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Recent identification of synthetic lethal interactions involving several proteins of the SWI/SNF complex discussed in this Research Highlight has opened the possibility of new cancer therapeutic approaches.

  12. Chemometrics of differentially expressed proteins from colorectal cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lay-Chin Yeoh; Saravanan Dharmaraj; Boon-Hui Gooi; Manjit Singh; Lay-Harn Gam

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the usefulness of differentially expressed proteins from colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues for differentiating cancer and normal tissues. METHODS: A Proteomic approach was used to identify the differentially expressed proteins between CRC and normal tissues. The proteins were extracted using Tris buffer and thiourea lysis buffer (TLB) for extraction of aqueous soluble and membrane-associated proteins, respectively. Chemometrics, namely principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA), were used to assess the usefulness of these proteins for identifying the cancerous state of tissues. RESULTS: Differentially expressed proteins identified were 37 aqueous soluble proteins in Tris extracts and 24 membrane-associated proteins in TLB extracts. Based on the protein spots intensity on 2D-gel images, PCA by applying an eigenvalue > 1 was successfully used to reduce the number of principal components (PCs) into 12 and seven PCs for Tris and TLB extracts, respectively, and subsequently six PCs, respectively from both the extracts were used for LDA. The LDA classification for Tris extract showed 82.7% of original samples were correctly classified, whereas 82.7% were correctly classified for the cross-validated samples. The LDA for TLB extract showed that 78.8% of original samples and 71.2% of the cross-validated samples were correctly classified. CONCLUSION: The classification of CRC tissues by PCA and LDA provided a promising distinction between normal and cancer types. These methods can possibly be used for identification of potential biomarkers among the differentially expressed proteins identified.

  13. Evaluation of complement proteins as screening markers for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Line; Christensen, Ib J; Jensenius, Jens C;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Lack of symptoms results in late detection and increased mortality. Inflammation, including complement activation, plays an important role in tumorigenesis. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The concentrations of nine proteins of....... CONCLUSION: CL-L1, M-ficolin and MAp44 in combination discriminate between CRC and patients without cancer. The markers did not have sufficient discriminatory value for CRC detection, but may prove useful for screening when combined with other markers....

  14. Response of Patient-Derived Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Xenografts to Classical and Targeted Therapies Is Not Related to Multidrug Resistance Markers

    OpenAIRE

    Jana Rolff; Iduna Fichtner; Johannes Merk; Cornelia Dorn

    2009-01-01

    Tumor cells that are nonsensitive to anticancer drugs frequently have a multidrug resistant (MDR) phenotype. Many studies with cell lines and patient material have been done to investigate the impact of different resistance markers at protein and mRNA level in drug resistance but with contradictory outcome. In the present study, 26 well-characterised patient-derived non-small cell lung cancer xenografts were used. The known chemosensitivity to etoposide, carboplatin, gemcitabine, paclitaxel a...

  15. The phenomenon of acquired resistance to metformin in breast cancer cells: The interaction of growth pathways and estrogen receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherbakov, Alexander M; Sorokin, Danila V; Tatarskiy, Victor V; Prokhorov, Nikolay S; Semina, Svetlana E; Berstein, Lev M; Krasil'nikov, Mikhail A

    2016-04-01

    Metformin, a biguanide antidiabetic drug, is used to decrease hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes. Recently, the epidemiological studies revealed the potential of metformin as an anti-tumor drug for several types of cancer, including breast cancer. Anti-tumor metformin action was found to be mediated, at least in part, via activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-intracellular energy sensor, which inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and some other signaling pathways. Nevertheless, some patients can be non-sensitive or resistant to metformin action. Here we analyzed the mechanism of the formation of metformin-resistant phenotype in breast cancer cells and its role in estrogen receptor (ER) regulation. The experiments were performed on the ER-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells and metformin-resistant MCF-7 subline (MCF-7/M) developed due to long-term metformin treatment. The transcriptional activity of NF-κB and ER was measured by the luciferase reporter gene analysis. The protein expression was determined by immunoblotting (Snail1, (phospho)AMPK, (phospho)IκBα, (phospho)mTOR, cyclin D1, (phospho)Akt and ERα) and immunohistochemical analysis (E-cadherin). We have found that: 1) metformin treatment of MCF-7 cells is accompanied with the stimulation of AMPK and inhibition of growth-related proteins including IκBα, NF-κB, cyclin D1 and ERα; 2) long-term metformin treatment lead to the appearance and progression of cross-resistance to metformin and tamoxifen; the resistant cells are characterized with the unaffected AMPK activity, but the irreversible ER suppression and constitutive activation of Akt/Snail1 signaling; 3) Akt/Snail1 signaling is involved into progression of metformin resistance. The results presented may be considered as the first evidence of the progression of cross-resistance to metformin and tamoxifen in breast cancer cells. Importantly, the acquired resistance to both drugs is based on the

  16. Down-regulation of ATM Protein Sensitizes Human Prostate Cancer Cells to Radiation-induced Apoptosis*

    OpenAIRE

    Truman, Jean-Philip; Gueven, Nuri; Lavin, Martin; Leibel, Steven; Kolesnick, Richard; Fuks, Zvi; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana

    2005-01-01

    Treatment with the protein kinase C activator 12-O tetradecanoylphorbol 12-acetate (TPA) enables radiation-resistant LNCaP human prostate cancer cells to undergo radiation-induced apoptosis, mediated via activation of the enzyme ceramide synthase (CS) and de novo synthesis of the sphingolipid ceramide (Garzotto, M., Haimovitz-Friedman, A., Liao, W. C., White-Jones, M., Huryk, R., Heston, D. W. W., Cardon-Cardo, C., Kolesnick, R., and Fuks, Z. (1999) Cancer Res. 59, 5194-5201). Here, we show t...

  17. Exoskeletal proteins from the crab, Cancer pagurus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Svend Olav

    Crustacea; decapods; cuticle; exoskeleton; structural protein; amino acid sequence; mass spectrometry......Crustacea; decapods; cuticle; exoskeleton; structural protein; amino acid sequence; mass spectrometry...

  18. Wallichinine reverses ABCB1-mediated cancer multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Min; Qiu, Jian-Ge; Zhang, Wen-Ji; Jiang, Qi-Wei; Qin, Wu-Ming; Yang, Yang; Zheng, Di-Wei; Chen, Yao; Huang, Jia-Rong; Wang, Kun; Wei, Meng-Ning; Cheng, Ke-Jun; Shi, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of ABCB1 in cancer cells is one of the main reasons of cancer multidrug resistance (MDR). Wallichinine is a compound isolated from piper wallichii and works as an antagonist of platelet activiating factor receptor to inhibit the gathering of blood platelet. In this study, we investigate the effect of wallichinine on cancer MDR mediated by ABCB1 transporter. Wallichinine significantly potentiates the effects of two ABCB1 substrates vincristine and doxorubicin on inhibition of growth, arrest of cell cycle and induction of apoptosis in ABCB1 overexpressing cancer cells. Furthermore, wallichinine do not alter the sensitivity of non-ABCB1 substrate cisplatin. Mechanistically, wallichinine blocks the drug-efflux activity of ABCB1 to increase the intracellular accumulation of rhodamine 123 and doxorubicin and stimulates the ATPase of ABCB1 without alteration of the expression of ABCB1. The predicted binding mode shows the hydrophobic interactions of wallichinine within the large drug binding cavity of ABCB1. At all, our study of the interaction of wallichinine with ABCB1 presented herein provides valuable clues for the development of novel MDR reversal reagents from natural products. PMID:27508017

  19. The resistance-reversal effect of artesunate on human esophageal cancer transplanted in nude mice

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Liang; Zuo, Lian-Fu; Jin-ya LI; Guo, Jian-Wen; Wang, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between ABCG2 and multidrug resistance of esophageal cancer and the mechanism of resistance-reversal effect by artesunate(Art).Methods To establish the bearing cancer nude mice model by inoculating with Eca109/ABCG2 cells subcutaneously on the left subscapularis and study the resistance-reversal effect of artesunate on esophageal cancer using nude mice model.Injection drugs after subcutaneous tumor formation.Intraperitoneal injection with artesunate and a...

  20. Overcoming EMT-associated resistance to anti-cancer drugs via Src/FAK pathway inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Catherine; Nicholes, Katrina; Bustos, Daisy; Lin, Eva; Song, Qinghua; Stephan, Jean-Philippe; Kirkpatrick, Donald S.; Settleman, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key process in embryonic development and has been associated with cancer metastasis and drug resistance. For example, in EGFR mutated non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), EMT has been associated with acquired resistance to the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib. Moreover, “EGFR-addicted” cancer cell lines induced to undergo EMT become erlotinib-resistant in vitro. To identify potential therapeutic vulnerabilities specifically within these mesenchymal, erl...

  1. Identification of microRNAs and mRNAs associated with multidrug resistance of human laryngeal cancer Hep-2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Wanzhong; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xin [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, The First Clinical Hospital, Norman Bethune College of Medicine, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Song, Wenzhi [Department of Stomatology, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Cui, Xiangyan; Yu, Hong; Zhu, Wei [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, The First Clinical Hospital, Norman Bethune College of Medicine, Jilin University, Changchun (China)

    2013-06-12

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) poses a serious impediment to the success of chemotherapy for laryngeal cancer. To identify microRNAs and mRNAs associated with MDR of human laryngeal cancer Hep-2 cells, we developed a multidrug-resistant human laryngeal cancer subline, designated Hep-2/v, by exposing Hep-2 cells to stepwise increasing concentrations of vincristine (0.02-0.96'µM). Microarray assays were performed to compare the microRNA and mRNA expression profiles of Hep-2 and Hep-2/v cells. Compared to Hep-2 cells, Hep-2/v cells were more resistant to chemotherapy drugs (∼45-fold more resistant to vincristine, 5.1-fold more resistant to cisplatin, and 5.6-fold more resistant to 5-fluorouracil) and had a longer doubling time (42.33±1.76 vs 28.75±1.12'h, P<0.05), higher percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase (80.98±0.52 vs 69.14±0.89, P<0.05), increased efflux of rhodamine 123 (95.97±0.56 vs 12.40±0.44%, P<0.01), and up-regulated MDR1 expression. A total of 7 microRNAs and 605 mRNAs were differentially expressed between the two cell types. Of the differentially expressed mRNAs identified, regulator of G-protein signaling 10, high-temperature requirement protein A1, and nuclear protein 1 were found to be the putative targets of the differentially expressed microRNAs identified. These findings may open a new avenue for clarifying the mechanisms responsible for MDR in laryngeal cancer.

  2. Identification of microRNAs and mRNAs associated with multidrug resistance of human laryngeal cancer Hep-2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) poses a serious impediment to the success of chemotherapy for laryngeal cancer. To identify microRNAs and mRNAs associated with MDR of human laryngeal cancer Hep-2 cells, we developed a multidrug-resistant human laryngeal cancer subline, designated Hep-2/v, by exposing Hep-2 cells to stepwise increasing concentrations of vincristine (0.02-0.96'µM). Microarray assays were performed to compare the microRNA and mRNA expression profiles of Hep-2 and Hep-2/v cells. Compared to Hep-2 cells, Hep-2/v cells were more resistant to chemotherapy drugs (∼45-fold more resistant to vincristine, 5.1-fold more resistant to cisplatin, and 5.6-fold more resistant to 5-fluorouracil) and had a longer doubling time (42.33±1.76 vs 28.75±1.12'h, P<0.05), higher percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase (80.98±0.52 vs 69.14±0.89, P<0.05), increased efflux of rhodamine 123 (95.97±0.56 vs 12.40±0.44%, P<0.01), and up-regulated MDR1 expression. A total of 7 microRNAs and 605 mRNAs were differentially expressed between the two cell types. Of the differentially expressed mRNAs identified, regulator of G-protein signaling 10, high-temperature requirement protein A1, and nuclear protein 1 were found to be the putative targets of the differentially expressed microRNAs identified. These findings may open a new avenue for clarifying the mechanisms responsible for MDR in laryngeal cancer

  3. P-gp、MRP1、GST-Π与新疆维吾尔族宫颈癌新辅助化疗疗效的相关性研究%Relationship Among the Expression of P-Glycoprotein, Multiple ResistanceAssociated Protein-1,and GST-Π in Cervical Squmous Cancer for Prediction of Response to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Uigur Women

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕锡芳; 李文婷; 许跃勋; 王英红

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the Relationship among the expression of P-glycoprotein, Multiple Resistance-associated Protein-1,and GST-π in Cervical Squmous Cancer for Prediction of Response to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Uigur woman. Methods: The specimens of 22 cases with cervical squmous Cancer before and after NACT are examined by S-P immunohistochemistry in ethnic Uigur women with 20 cases of normal control. Results: ①In ethnic Uigur women:P-gp positive expression rate in normal and cervical squmous cancer before NACT are 10% and 40.9%; MRP1 positive expression rate in normal and cervical squmous cancer before NACT are 15% 、31.8%; GST-π positive expression rate in normal and cervical squmous cancer before NACT are 45%、9.01%o The positive expression rate of P-gp and GST-π in cervical squmous cancer before NACT have a significantly higher than in normal cervical (P0.05). Conclusion: P-glycoprotein,Multiple Resistance-associated Protein-1 and GST-π can not be used as predictive markers of NACT effective in cervical squmous cancer in Uigur and han women.%目的:探讨新疆维吾尔族宫颈癌新辅助化疗前后P-gp、MRPI和GST-Π的表达及其与化疗疗效的关系.方法:运用S-P法分别检测维吾尔族妇女宫颈鳞癌组织22例新辅助化疗前后及正常宫颈组织20例P-gP、MRPI和GST-Π的表达水平.结果:①新疆维吾尔族正常宫颈、初治宫颈癌组织中P-gp的阳性表达率分别为10%、40.9%;MRP1的阳性表达率分别为15%、31.8%;GST-Π的阳性表达率分别为45%、9.01%.P-gp和GST-Π在各组间比较差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05)MRP1差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).②NACT后宫颈癌组织中P-pg阳性表达显著上升(P<0.05),有统计学意义.NACT后宫颈癌组织中MRP1、GST-Π性表达上升但差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).③新疆维吾尔族妇女新辅助化疗前宫颈鳞癌组织中P-gp、MRP1及GST-Π表达阴性和阳性患者NACT

  4. Mutations in G protein β subunits promote transformation and kinase inhibitor resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoda, Akinori; Adelmant, Guillaume; Tamburini, Jerome; Chapuy, Bjoern; Shindoh, Nobuaki; Yoda, Yuka; Weigert, Oliver; Kopp, Nadja; Wu, Shuo-Chieh; Kim, Sunhee S; Liu, Huiyun; Tivey, Trevor; Christie, Amanda L; Elpek, Kutlu G; Card, Joseph; Gritsman, Kira; Gotlib, Jason; Deininger, Michael W; Makishima, Hideki; Turley, Shannon J; Javidi-Sharifi, Nathalie; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Jaiswal, Siddhartha; Ebert, Benjamin L; Rodig, Scott J; Tyner, Jeffrey W; Marto, Jarrod A; Weinstock, David M; Lane, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    Activating mutations in genes encoding G protein α (Gα) subunits occur in 4-5% of all human cancers, but oncogenic alterations in Gβ subunits have not been defined. Here we demonstrate that recurrent mutations in the Gβ proteins GNB1 and GNB2 confer cytokine-independent growth and activate canonical G protein signaling. Multiple mutations in GNB1 affect the protein interface that binds Gα subunits as well as downstream effectors and disrupt Gα interactions with the Gβγ dimer. Different mutations in Gβ proteins clustered partly on the basis of lineage; for example, all 11 GNB1 K57 mutations were in myeloid neoplasms, and seven of eight GNB1 I80 mutations were in B cell neoplasms. Expression of patient-derived GNB1 variants in Cdkn2a-deficient mouse bone marrow followed by transplantation resulted in either myeloid or B cell malignancies. In vivo treatment with the dual PI3K-mTOR inhibitor BEZ235 suppressed GNB1-induced signaling and markedly increased survival. In several human tumors, mutations in the gene encoding GNB1 co-occurred with oncogenic kinase alterations, including the BCR-ABL fusion protein, the V617F substitution in JAK2 and the V600K substitution in BRAF. Coexpression of patient-derived GNB1 variants with these mutant kinases resulted in inhibitor resistance in each context. Thus, GNB1 and GNB2 alterations confer transformed and resistance phenotypes across a range of human tumors and may be targetable with inhibitors of G protein signaling. PMID:25485910

  5. Long non-coding RNAs in cancer drug resistance development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidinia, Maryam; Yousefi, Bahman

    2016-09-01

    The presence or emergence of chemoresistance in tumor cells is a major burden in cancer therapy. While drug resistance is a multifactorial phenomenon arising from altered membrane transport of drugs, altered drug metabolism, altered DNA repair, reduced apoptosis rate and alterations of drug metabolism, it can also be linked to genetic and epigenetic factors. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have important regulatory roles in many aspects of genome function including gene transcription, splicing, and epigenetics as well as biological processes involved in cell cycle, cell differentiation, development, and pluripotency. As such, it may not be surprising that some lncRNAs have been recently linked to carcinogenesis and drug resistance/sensitivity. Research is accelerating to decipher the exact molecular mechanism of lncRNA-regulated drug resistance and its therapeutic implications. In this article, we will review the structure, biogenesis, and mode of action of lncRNAs. Then, the involvement of lncRNAs in drug resistance will be discussed in detail. PMID:27427176

  6. Battling resistance mechanisms in antihormonal prostate cancer treatment: Novel agents and combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maeseneer, Daan Joost; Van Praet, Charles; Lumen, Nicolaas; Rottey, Sylvie

    2015-07-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is a hormone-sensitive disease. Androgen deprivation therapy lowers serum testosterone levels (castration) or blocks the androgen receptor (AR) ligand-binding domain. Especially in metastatic disease, hormonal therapy has been able to delay disease progression, reduce symptoms, and improve overall survival. Despite subsequent disease progression and development of castration resistance, PCa remains AR driven. Secondary hormonal treatments such as abiraterone acetate or enzalutamide have demonstrated increased overall survival. However, new resistance mechanisms to these agents have been identified, and systemic chemotherapy is still needed especially in fast-progressing castration-resistant PCa. Several promising androgen synthesis inhibitors (orteronel and galeterone), AR inhibitors (ARN-509, EPI-001, AZD3514, and ODM-201), and heat shock protein modulators (AT11387, 17-DMAG, STA-9090, and OGX-427) are currently under investigation. The wide variety in upcoming systemic agents underlines the molecular heterogeneity of castration-resistant PCa. This article reviews antihormonal therapy in PCa and resistance mechanisms and focuses on novel and upcoming agents currently in clinical testing. PMID:25708954

  7. Inhibition of multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) improves chemotherapy drug response in primary and recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Tivnan, Amanda; Zakaria, Zaitun; O'Leary, Caitrín; Kögel, Donat; Pokorny, Jenny L.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Prehn, Jochen H M

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly aggressive brain cancer with extremely poor prognostic outcome despite intensive treatment. All chemotherapeutic agents currently used have no greater than 30–40% response rate, many fall into the range of 10–20%, with delivery across the blood brain barrier (BBB) or chemoresistance contributing to the extremely poor outcomes despite treatment. Increased expression of the multidrug resistance protein 1(MRP1) in high grade glioma, and it's role in BBB ...

  8. Inhibition of Multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) improves chemotherapy drug response in primary and recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Amanda eTivnan; Zaitun eZakaria; Caitrin eO'Leary; Donat eKogel; Pokorny, Jenny L.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Prehn, Jochen H M

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly aggressive brain cancer with extremely poor prognostic outcome despite intensive treatment. All chemotherapeutic agents currently used have no greater than 30-40% response rate, many fall into the range of 10-20%, with delivery across the blood brain barrier (BBB) or chemoresistance contributing to the extremely poor outcomes despite treatment. Increased expression of the multidrug resistance protein 1(MRP1) in high grade glioma, and it’s role in BB...

  9. Role of multidrug resistance protein 2 (MRP2) in chemoresistance and clinical outcome in oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Yamasaki, M; Makino, T; Masuzawa, T; Kurokawa, Y.; Miyata, H.; Takiguchi, S; K. Nakajima; Fujiwara, Y.; Matsuura, N; M. Mori; Doki, Y

    2011-01-01

    Background: Although multidrug resistance protein 2 (MRP2) confers chemoresistance in some cancer types, its implication on oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) remains unclear. Methods: We evaluated MRP2 expression by immunohistochemistry and RT–PCR using 81 resected specimens from ESCC patients who did or did not receive neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (NACT), including 5-fluorouracil, doxorubicin, and cisplatin (CDDP). Correlation between MRP2 expression and response to chemotherapy was al...

  10. Overexpression of SOX2 is involved in paclitaxel resistance of ovarian cancer via the PI3K/Akt pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Chen, Kangdong; Li, Lei; Li, Rui; Zhang, Juxin; Ren, Wu

    2015-12-01

    Paclitaxel is recommended as a first-line chemotherapeutic agent against ovarian cancer, but drug resistance becomes a major limitation of its success clinically. The key molecule or mechanism associated with paclitaxel resistance in ovarian cancer still remains unclear. Sex-determining region Y-box 2 (SOX2) is of vital importance in the regulation of stem cell proliferation and carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of SOX2 in ovarian cancer tumorigenesis and paclitaxel resistance. In the present study, the expression of SOX2 was examined by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and real-time PCR in 40 clinical samples and in SKOV3 cells and SKOV3/TAX cells (paclitaxel-resistant human ovarian adenocarcinoma cell line). The effects of SOX2 knockdown on ovarian cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion were also studied. The IHC and real-time PCR results showed that the difference of SOX2 expression between ovarian cancer and the adjacent non-tumorous ovarian tissues was statistically significant. Western blot analysis revealed that the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway was inhibited in cells overexpressing SOX2. Western blot analysis showed that the SOX2 protein was overexpressed in paclitaxel-resistant cells and weakly detectable in paclitaxel-sensitive cells. SOX2 silencing significantly potentiated apoptosis induced by paclitaxel in SKOV3-TR with SOX2 knockdown compared to SKOV3-TR transfected with control small interfering RNA (siRNA). Our work indicates SOX2 will become both a rational indicator of ovarian cancer prognosis and a promising target for ovarian cancer gene therapy. PMID:26159849

  11. Is Cancer Cachexia Attributed to Impairments in Basal or Postprandial Muscle Protein Metabolism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstman, Astrid M H; Olde Damink, Steven W; Schols, Annemie M W J; van Loon, Luc J C

    2016-01-01

    Cachexia is a significant clinical problem associated with very poor quality of life, reduced treatment tolerance and outcomes, and a high mortality rate. Mechanistically, any sizeable loss of skeletal muscle mass must be underpinned by a structural imbalance between muscle protein synthesis and breakdown rates. Recent data indicate that the loss of muscle mass with aging is, at least partly, attributed to a blunted muscle protein synthetic response to protein feeding. Whether such anabolic resistance is also evident in conditions where cachexia is present remains to be addressed. Only few data are available on muscle protein synthesis and breakdown rates in vivo in cachectic cancer patients. When calculating the theoretical changes in basal or postprandial fractional muscle protein synthesis and breakdown rates that would be required to lose 5% of body weight within a six-month period, we can define the changes that would need to occur to explain the muscle mass loss observed in cachectic patients. If changes in both post-absorptive and postprandial muscle protein synthesis and breakdown rates contribute to the loss of muscle mass, it would take alterations as small as 1%-2% to induce a more than 5% decline in body weight. Therefore, when trying to define impairments in basal and/or postprandial muscle protein synthesis or breakdown rates using contemporary stable isotope methodology in cancer cachexia, we need to select large homogenous groups of cancer patients (>40 patients) to allow us to measure physiological and clinically relevant differences in muscle protein synthesis and/or breakdown rates. Insight into impairments in basal or postprandial muscle protein synthesis and breakdown rates in cancer cachexia is needed to design more targeted nutritional, pharmaceutical and/or physical activity interventions to preserve skeletal muscle mass and, as such, to reduce the risk of complications, improve quality of life, and lower mortality rates during the various

  12. Involvement of Cox-2 in the metastatic potential of chemotherapy-resistant breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major problem with the use of current chemotherapy regimens for several cancers, including breast cancer, is development of intrinsic or acquired drug resistance, which results in disease recurrence and metastasis. However, the mechanisms underlying this drug resistance are unknown. To study the molecular mechanisms underlying the invasive and metastatic activities of drug-resistant cancer cells, we generated a doxorubicin-resistant MCF-7 breast cancer cell line (MCF-7/DOX). We used MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assays, flow cytometry assays, DNA fragmentation assays, Western blot analysis, cell invasion assays, small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, experimental lung metastasis models, and gelatin and fibrinogen/plasminogen zymography to study the molecular mechanism of metastatic activities in MCF-7/DOX cells. We found that MCF-7/DOX acquired invasive activities. In addition, Western blot analysis showed increased expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Cox-2 in MCF-7/DOX cells. Inhibition of Cox-2, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt, or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways effectively inhibited the invasive activities of MCF-7/DOX cells. Gelatin and fibrinogen/plasminogen zymography analysis showed that the enzymatic activities of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, and urokinase-type plasminogen activator were markedly higher in MCF-7/DOX cells than in the MCF-7 cells. In vitro invasion assays and mouse models of lung metastasis demonstrated that MCF-7/DOX cells acquired invasive abilities. Using siRNAs and agonists specific for prostaglandin E (EP) receptors, we found that EP1 and EP3 played important roles in the invasiveness of MCF-7/DOX cells. We found that the invasive activity of MCF-7/DOX cells is mediated by Cox-2, which is induced by the EGFR-activated PI3K/Akt and MAPK pathways. In addition, EP1 and EP3 are important in

  13. INFLUENCE OF NEOADJUVANT INTRAARTERIAL INFUSION CHEMOTHERAPY ON APOPTOSIS AND MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE ASSOCIATED GENES OF ENDOMETRIAL CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱雪琼; 岳天孚; 张颖; 惠京; 王德华

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Through investigating the influence of neoadjuvant intraarterial infusion chemotherapy (NIAC) on the timing changes of apoptosis, PCNA and multiple drug resistance associated genes of endometrial cancer, to study the mechanism of chemotherapy and to define the best operation time. Methods: Twenty patients were subjected to neoadjuvant consecutive uterine arterial infusion with CDDP 100 mg and ADM 50 mg. The biopsy of endometrial tumor tissues was performed before, immediate after and 1, 2-2+3 w, 3+3-4 w after chemotherapy. Apoptosis index (AI) was estimated by a combination of histologic and TUNEL assays. Proliferative index (PI) was examined by SABC immunohistochemical staining. Expressions of multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1), multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) and lung resistance protein (LRP) were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results: The AI of endometrial cancer cells immediate after and 1, 2-2+3 w, after chemotherapy were 3.03%, 3.47% and 5.04%, respectively, much higher than that before chemotherapy which was 2.31%. After chemotherapy, AI/PI gradually increased. It was highest in 2-2+3 w, while 3+3-4 w after chemotherapy the AI and AI/PI were both significantly lower than that before chemotherapy. The expression of MDR1, MRP and LRP all decreased temporarily after chemotherapy, while 3+3-4 w after chemotherapy they all increased to levels higher than that before chemotherapy, but the difference were not significant (P>0.05). Conclusion: Neoadjuvant consecutive intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy via uterine artery can inhibit tumor cells proliferation and induce apoptosis effectively. To evaluate the response of intra-arterial chemotherapy the change of apoptosis index and cell proliferation should be analyzed. The most suitable time for the operation is 3 weeks after intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy.

  14. Self-assembled micelles of amphiphilic PEGylated rapamycin for loading paclitaxel and resisting multidrug resistance cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    W. Tian; Liu, J; Guo, Y; Shen, Y.; D. Zhou; Guo, S.

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembled micelles of amphiphilic PEG–rapamycin conjugates loaded with paclitaxel have been developed for co-delivery and simultaneous intracellular release of paclitaxel and rapamycin, bypassing the cancer cell drug resistant mechanism and maximising the synergy of dual-drug combinational therapy. This novel nanomedicine offers 20-fold improved potency over free paclitaxel against a model multidrug resistant human breast cancer cell.

  15. Comparative Analysis of Protein-Protein Interactions in Cancer-Associated Genes 25

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Purnima Guda; Sridar V. Chittur; Chittibabu Guda

    2009-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) have been widely studied to understand the bi-ological processes or molecular functions associated with different disease systems like cancer. While focused studies on individual cancers have generated valuable in-formation, global and comparative analysis of datasets from different cancer types has not been done. In this work, we carried out bioinformatic analysis of PPIs corresponding to differentially expressed genes from microarrays of various tumor tissues (belonging to bladder, colon, kidney and thyroid cancers) and compared their associated biological processes and molecular functions (based on Gene On-tology terms). We identified a set of processes or functions that are common to all these cancers, as well as those that are specific to only one or partial cancer types. Similarly, protein interaction networks in nucleic acid metabolism were compared to identify the common/specific clusters of proteins across different cancer types. Our results provide a basis for further experimental investigations to study protein interaction networks associated with cancer. The methodology developed in this work can also be applied to study similar disease systems.

  16. Stromal Cell-Derived Factor 1α Mediates Resistance to mTOR-Directed Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin D. Weekes

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The factors preventing the translation of preclinical findings supporting the clinical development mTOR-targeted therapy in pancreatic cancer therapy remain undetermined. Stromal cell.derived factor 1α (SDF-1α-CXCR4 signaling was examined as a representative microenvironmental factor able to promote mTOR-targeted therapy resistance in pancreatic cancer. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Primary pancreas explant xenografts and in vitro experiments were used to perform pharmacodynamic analyses of SDF-1α-CXCR4 regulation of the mTOR pathway. Combinatorial effects of CXCR4, EGFR, and mTOR pharmacologic inhibition were evaluated in temsirolimus-resistant and -sensitive xenografts. Intratumoral gene and protein expressions of mTOR pathway effectors cyclin D1, c-Myc, and VEGF were evaluated. RESULTS: Baseline intratumoral SDF-1α gene expression correlated with temsirolimus resistance in explant models. SDF-1α stimulation of pancreatic cells resulted in CXCR4-mediated PI3-kinase-dependent S6-RP phosphorylation (pS6-RP on exposure to temsirolimus. Combinatorial therapy with AMD3465 (CXCR4 small-molecule inhibitor and temsirolimus resulted in effective tumor growth inhibition to overcome temsirolimus resistance. In contrast, SDF-1α exposure induced a temsirolimus-resistant phenotype in temsirolimus-sensitive explants. AMD3465 inhibited CXCR4-mediated intratumoral S6-RP phosphorylation and cyclin D and c-myc gene expression. Next, CXCR4 promoted intratumoral EGFR expression in association with temsirolimus resistance. Treatment with AMD3465, temsirolimus- and erlotinib-mediated tumor growth inhibition to overcome temsirolimus resistance in the explant model. Lastly, SDF-1α-CXCR4 signaling increased intratumoral VEGF gene and protein expression. CONCLUSIONS: SDF-1α-CXCR4 signaling represents a microenvironmental factor that can maintain mTOR pathway fidelity to promote resistance to mTOR-targeted therapy in pancreatic cancer by a variety of mechanisms

  17. Breast cancer cells with acquired antiestrogen resistance are sensitized to cisplatin-induced cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yde, Christina Westmose; Gyrd-Hansen, Mads; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E; Issinger, Olaf-Georg; Stenvang, Jan

    2007-01-01

    future breast cancer treatment. In this study, we have investigated the effect of the chemotherapeutic compound cisplatin using a panel of antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cell lines established from the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. We show that the antiestrogen-resistant cells are...... parental MCF-7 cells. Our data show that Bcl-2 can protect antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cells from cisplatin-induced cell death, indicating that the reduced expression of Bcl-2 in the antiestrogen-resistant cells plays a role in sensitizing the cells to cisplatin treatment.......Antiestrogens are currently used for treating breast cancer patients who have estrogen receptor-positive tumors. However, patients with advanced disease will eventually develop resistance to the drugs. Therefore, compounds effective on antiestrogen-resistant tumors will be of great importance for...

  18. High mobility group A1 protein expression reduces the sensitivity of colon and thyroid cancer cells to antineoplastic drugs

    OpenAIRE

    D’Angelo, Daniela; Mussnich, Paula; De Rosa, Roberta; Bianco, Roberto; Tortora, Giampaolo; Fusco, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Background Development of resistance to conventional drugs and novel biological agents often impair long-term chemotherapy. HMGA gene overexpression is often associated with antineoplastic drug resistance and reduced survival. Inhibition of HMGA expression in thyroid cancer cells reduces levels of ATM protein, the main cellular sensor of DNA damage, and enhances cellular sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. HMGA1 overexpression promotes chemoresistance to gemcitabine in pancreatic adenocarcino...

  19. Protein arginine methyltransferase 1 may be involved in pregnane x receptor-activated overexpression of multidrug resistance 1 gene during acquired multidrug resistant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tingting; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony; Ma, Zhiqiang; Liu, Haiyan; Liu, Pinghua; Xiao, Yu; Jiang, Xuehua; Wang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Pregnane x receptor (PXR) - activated overexpression of the multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene is an important way for tumor cells to acquire drug resistance. However, the detailed mechanism still remains unclear. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether protein arginine methyl transferase 1(PRMT1) is involved in PXR - activated overexpression of MDR1 during acquired multidrug resistant. Experimental Design Arginine methyltransferase inhibitor 1 (AMI-1) was used to pharmacologically block PRMT1 in resistant breast cancer cells (MCF7/adr). The mRNA and protein levels of MDR1 were detected by real-time PCR and western blotting analysis. Immunofluorescence microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation were used to investigate the physical interaction between PXR and PRMT1. Then, 136 candidate compounds were screened for PRMT1 inhibitors. Lastly, luciferase reporter gene and nude mice bearing resistant breast cancer xenografts were adopted to investigate the anti-tumor effect of PRMT1 inhibitors when combined with adriamycin. Results AMI-1 significantly suppressed the expression of MDR1 in MCF7/adr cells and increased cells sensitivity of MCF7/adr to adriamycin. Physical interaction between PRMT1 and PXR exists in MCF7/adr cells, which could be disrupted by AMI-1. Those results suggest that PRMT1 may be involved in PXR-activated overexpression of MDR1 in resistant breast cancer cells, and AMI-1 may suppress MDR1 by disrupting the interaction between PRMT1 and PXR. Then, five compounds including rutin, isoquercitrin, salvianolic acid A, naproxen, and felodipline were identified to be PRMT1 inhibitors. Finally, those PRMT1 inhibitors were observed to significantly decrease MDR1 promoter activity in vitro and enhance the antitumor effect of adriamycin in nude mice that bearing resistant breast cancer xenografts. Conclusions PRMT1 may be an important co-activator of PXR in activating MDR1 gene during acquired resistance, and PRMT1 inhibitor combined with

  20. Glucose-related protein (GRP78) and its relationship to the drug-resistance proteins P170, GST-pi, LRP56 and angiogenesis in non-small cell lung carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koomägi, R; Mattern, J; Volm, M

    1999-01-01

    Several studies have documented that induction of the glucose-related protein (GRP78) is associated with the development of drug-resistance to antitumor drugs. However, nothing has been reported concerning GRP78 in human lung tumors and its relationship to several resistance proteins and angiogenesis. Therefore, this study analyzed the expression of GRP78 in a series of 62 consecutive lung cancer patients and examined whether or not a relationship exists between GRP78, several resistance proteins and microvessel density (MVD). Secondary, it evaluated the relationship of GRP78, LRP56 and GST-pi in cancer cell lines under hypoxic conditions and in sensitive and resistant cell lines. We determined that a relationship exists between GRP78 and the resistance proteins P170, LRP56 and GST-pi in human lung cancer. Furthermore, we observed an up-regulation of GRP78 in the resistant cell lines LUTC-ML54, OAW-Dox and OAW-Tax, but not in sensitive cell lines. Abnormal vascularization of malignant tumors is associated with the development of hypoxic regions. In hypoxic regions, several proteins, including drug resistance proteins, are expressed in greater quantities. Our study detected an inverse correlation between GRP78 and MVD. Carcinomas with low MVD exhibited a higher expression of GRP78. Furthermore, protein expression of GRP78, GST-pi and LRP56 increased in the cell lines A-549, RPMI-2650 and SC-MES-1 under hypoxic conditions. These observations suggest that hypoxia, tumor vascularization and the simultaneous expression of many resistance-related proteins, including GRP78, may play an important role in drug response and therapeutic effectiveness. PMID:10628396

  1. Dynamic Assessment of Mitoxantrone Resistance and Modulation of Multidrug Resistance by Valspodar (PSC833) in Multidrug Resistance Human Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Fei; Barbara J Bailey; Chu, Shaoyou; Bence, Aimee K.; Xue, Xinjian; Erickson, Priscilla; Safa, Ahmad R.; Beck, William T.; Erickson, Leonard C.

    2009-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp), a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter family, is one of the major causes for multidrug resistance (MDR). We report using confocal microscopy to study the roles of Pgp in mediating the efflux of the anticancer agent mitoxantrone and the reversal of MDR by the specific Pgp inhibitor valspodar (PSC833). The net uptake and efflux of mitoxantrone and the effect of PSC833 were quantified and compared in Pgp-expressing human cancer MDA-MB-435 ...

  2. Recent changes in bacteremia in patients with cancer: a systematic review of epidemiology and antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montassier, E; Batard, E; Gastinne, T; Potel, G; de La Cochetière, M F

    2013-07-01

    Bacteremia remains a major cause of life-threatening complication in patients with cancer. Significant changes in the spectrum of microorganisms isolated from blood culture have been reported in cancer patients over the past years. The aim of our systematic review was to inventory the recent trends in epidemiology and antibiotic resistance of microorganisms causing bacteremia in cancer patients. Data for this review was identified by searches of Medline, Scopus and Cochrane Library for indexed articles and abstracts published in English since 2008. The principal search terms were: "antimicrobial resistance", "bacteremia", "bacterial epidemiology", "bloodstream infection", "cancer patients", "carbapenem resistance", "Escherichia coli resistance", "extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing E. coli", "febrile neutropenia", "fluoroquinolone resistance", "neutropenic cancer patient", "vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus", and "multidrug resistance". Boolean operators (NOT, AND, OR) were also used in succession to narrow and widen the search. Altogether, 27 articles were selected to be analyzed in the review. We found that Gram-negative bacteria were the most frequent pathogen isolated, particularly in studies with minimal use of antibiotic prophylaxis. Another important trend is the extensive emergence of antimicrobial-resistant strains associated with increased risk of morbidity, mortality and cost. This increasing incidence of antibiotic resistance has been reported in Gram-negative bacteria as well as in Gram-positive bacteria. This exhaustive review, reporting the recent findings in epidemiology and antibiotic resistance of bacteremia in cancer patients, highlights the necessity of local continuous surveillance of bacteremia and stringent enforcement of antibiotic stewardship programs in cancer patients. PMID:23354675

  3. EMT transcription factors snail and slug directly contribute to cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haslehurst Alexandria M

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT is a molecular process through which an epithelial cell undergoes transdifferentiation into a mesenchymal phenotype. The role of EMT in embryogenesis is well-characterized and increasing evidence suggests that elements of the transition may be important in other processes, including metastasis and drug resistance in various different cancers. Methods Agilent 4 × 44 K whole human genome arrays and selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry were used to investigate mRNA and protein expression in A2780 cisplatin sensitive and resistant cell lines. Invasion and migration were assessed using Boyden chamber assays. Gene knockdown of snail and slug was done using targeted siRNA. Clinical relevance of the EMT pathway was assessed in a cohort of primary ovarian tumours using data from Affymetrix GeneChip Human Genome U133 plus 2.0 arrays. Results Morphological and phenotypic hallmarks of EMT were identified in the chemoresistant cells. Subsequent gene expression profiling revealed upregulation of EMT-related transcription factors including snail, slug, twist2 and zeb2. Proteomic analysis demonstrated up regulation of Snail and Slug as well as the mesenchymal marker Vimentin, and down regulation of E-cadherin, an epithelial marker. By reducing expression of snail and slug, the mesenchymal phenotype was largely reversed and cells were resensitized to cisplatin. Finally, gene expression data from primary tumours mirrored the finding that an EMT-like pathway is activated in resistant tumours relative to sensitive tumours, suggesting that the involvement of this transition may not be limited to in vitro drug effects. Conclusions This work strongly suggests that genes associated with EMT may play a significant role in cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer, therefore potentially leading to the development of predictive biomarkers of drug response or novel therapeutic strategies for

  4. [Treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffo, Orazio

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) represents one of the oncological fields where the most impressive improvements has been observed in the last decades. At the beginning of this century, the expected survival of mCRPC patients was not more than 12 months. After the introduction of docetaxel in the clinical practice in 2004, and the recent availability of new drugs cabazitaxel, abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide, and radium-223 the landscape is dramatically changed with an expected median survival of about three years. The possibility of administering docetaxel, abiraterone acetate, and enzalutamide as first line treatment, and cabazitaxel, abiretone acetate, and enzalutamide as second line, as well as the availability of radium-223 for the treatment of mCRPC patients regardless of chemotherapy administration, changed the natural history of the disease. At the same time, it is probable that also the biology of the disease is changing with the appearance of mechanisms of resistance which are common to all the drugs. This plays a central role in sequencing the available drugs not only in the first and second line setting but also beyond the second line. The future challenges for the oncologists will be to develop new drugs able to overcome the resistances, mainly when they are native, to find the optimal sequence to optimize the use of available drugs, to place at the best place other active drugs, such as vaccines and radiopharmaceuticals, to exploit the new drugs also in a hormone-sensitive phase. PMID:25621779

  5. Cancer cell resistance to AURK-directed therapy: implications for anti-cancer strategies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrabáková, Rita; Kollareddy, M.; Mairychová, Kateřina; Halada, Petr; Hajduch, M.; Kovářová, Hana

    Praha: Institute of Animal Physiology and Genetics ASCR, v. v. i, 2011. s. 23-23. [5th Central and Eastern European Proteomics Conference.. 19.09.2011-22.9.2011, Praha] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07017 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : drug resistance * anti-cancer therapy * proteomics * biomarker Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  6. Expression of proteins correlated with the unique cisplatin-sensitivity of testicular cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, Trude; de Jong, Steven; deVries, EGE; Mulder, NH

    1997-01-01

    Cisplatin (CDDP) has a curative effect in approximately 80% of patients with testicular cancer, in contrast to the frequent development of resistance in patients with small cell lung cancer and ovarian cancer, and to the natural resistance of colon cancer. At present it is unknown which factors expl

  7. LncRNA HOTAIR Enhances the Androgen-Receptor-Mediated Transcriptional Program and Drives Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Zhang; Jonathan C. Zhao; Jung Kim; Ka-wing Fong; Yeqing Angela Yang; Debabrata Chakravarti; Yin-Yuan Mo; Jindan Yu

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Understanding the mechanisms of androgen receptor (AR) activation in the milieu of low androgen is critical to effective treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Here, we report HOTAIR as an androgen-repressed lncRNA, and, as such, it is markedly upregulated following androgen deprivation therapies and in CRPC. We further demonstrate a distinct mode of lncRNA-mediated gene regulation, wherein HOTAIR binds to the AR protein to block its interaction with the E3 ubiquiti...

  8. Development of Fourth Generation ABC Inhibitors from Natural Products: A Novel Approach to Overcome Cancer Multidrug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, Subburayan; Hoti, Sugeerappa Laxmanappa

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer caused due to overexpression of ABC drug transporters is a major problem in modern chemotherapy. Molecular investigations on MDR have revealed that the resistance is due to various transport proteins of the ABC superfamily which include Phosphoglycoprotein (P-gp/MDR1/ ABCB1), multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 (MRP1), and the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). They have been characterized functionally and are considered as major players in the development of MDR in cancer cells. These ATP-dependent transporter proteins cause MDR either by decreased uptake of the drug or increased efflux of the drug from the target organelles. Several MDR-reversing agents are being developed and are in various stages of clinical trials. The first three generations of ABC modulators such as quinine, verapamil, cyclosporine-A, tariquitor, PSC 833, LY335979, and GF120918 required to be administered in high doses to reverse MDR and were associated with adverse effects. Additionally, these modulators non-selectively inhibit ABC and adversely accumulate chemotherapeutic drugs in brain and kidney. Currently, research has stepped up towards reversing MDR by using natural products which exhibitted potential as chemosensitizers. Globally, there is a rich biodiversity of natural products which can be sourced for developing drugs. These products may provide more lead compounds with superior activity, foremost to the development of more effective therapies for MDR cancer cells. Here, we briefly review the status of natural products for reversing MDR modulators, and discuss the long term goal of MDR strategies in current clinical settings. PMID:25584696

  9. Distinctive serum protein profiles involving abundant proteins in lung cancer patients based upon antibody microarray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer serum protein profiling by mass spectrometry has uncovered mass profiles that are potentially diagnostic for several common types of cancer. However, direct mass spectrometric profiling has a limited dynamic range and difficulties in providing the identification of the distinctive proteins. We hypothesized that distinctive profiles may result from the differential expression of relatively abundant serum proteins associated with the host response. Eighty-four antibodies, targeting a wide range of serum proteins, were spotted onto nitrocellulose-coated microscope slides. The abundances of the corresponding proteins were measured in 80 serum samples, from 24 newly diagnosed subjects with lung cancer, 24 healthy controls, and 32 subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Two-color rolling-circle amplification was used to measure protein abundance. Seven of the 84 antibodies gave a significant difference (p < 0.01) for the lung cancer patients as compared to healthy controls, as well as compared to COPD patients. Proteins that exhibited higher abundances in the lung cancer samples relative to the control samples included C-reactive protein (CRP; a 13.3 fold increase), serum amyloid A (SAA; a 2.0 fold increase), mucin 1 and α-1-antitrypsin (1.4 fold increases). The increased expression levels of CRP and SAA were validated by Western blot analysis. Leave-one-out cross-validation was used to construct Diagonal Linear Discriminant Analysis (DLDA) classifiers. At a cutoff where all 56 of the non-tumor samples were correctly classified, 15/24 lung tumor patient sera were correctly classified. Our results suggest that a distinctive serum protein profile involving abundant proteins may be observed in lung cancer patients relative to healthy subjects or patients with chronic disease and may have utility as part of strategies for detecting lung cancer

  10. Protein disulfide isomerases in the endoplasmic reticulum promote anchorage-independent growth of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Randi; Duhachek-Muggy, Sara; Qi, Yue; Zolkiewski, Michal; Zolkiewska, Anna

    2016-06-01

    Metastatic breast cancer cells are exposed to stress of detachment from the extracellular matrix (ECM). Cultured breast cancer cells that survive this stress and are capable of anchorage-independent proliferation form mammospheres. The purpose of this study was to explore a link between mammosphere growth, ECM gene expression, and the protein quality control system in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We compared the mRNA and protein levels of ER folding factors in SUM159PT and MCF10DCIS.com breast cancer cells grown as mammospheres versus adherent conditions. Publicly available gene expression data for mammospheres formed by primary breast cancer cells and for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) were analyzed to assess the status of ECM/ER folding factor genes in clinically relevant samples. Knock-down of selected protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) family members was performed to examine their roles in SUM159PT mammosphere growth. We found that cells grown as mammospheres had elevated expression of ECM genes and ER folding quality control genes. CTC gene expression data for an index patient indicated that upregulation of ECM and ER folding factor genes occurred at the time of acquired therapy resistance and disease progression. Knock-down of PDI, ERp44, or ERp57, three members of the PDI family with elevated protein levels in mammospheres, in SUM159PT cells partially inhibited the mammosphere growth. Thus, breast cancer cell survival and growth under detachment conditions require enhanced assistance of the ER protein folding machinery. Targeting ER folding factors, in particular members of the PDI family, may improve the therapeutic outcomes in metastatic breast cancer. PMID:27161215

  11. Free radicals, whey proteins and colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    YALÇIN, A. Suha; ATTAALLAH, Wafi; YILMAZ, Ayşe Mine; AKTAN, A. Özdemir

    2014-01-01

    Evidence that has accumulated for many years suggests that diet isan important environmental factor in the etiology of colorectalcancers. Epidemiological data generally support the associationbetween total energy intake, high fat diets, red meat intake andincreased colon cancer risk. The Western-style diet and cookingtechniques are risk factors for developing colon cancer. Further,oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species plays asignificant role in a number of age-specific diseases s...

  12. Regulatory Effects of X-linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein and Pro-apoptotic Protein Smac on Apoptosis Resistance to Chemotherapy in Pancreatic Cancer Cells%凋亡抑制蛋白XIAP和促凋亡因子Smac在胰腺癌化疗抵抗中的调控作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜冀晖; 张厚德; 雷萍; 苏卓娃; 郑芳; 龚非力

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relation of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) and secondmitochondria-derived activator of caspase (Smac) signaling pathway to chemoresistance in human pancreatic cancer Panc-1 and BXPC-3 cells. Methods: Apoptosis and the changes of XIAP expression in permeabilized cells induced by cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (FU) were measured by flow cytometry. The cytosolic expression of XIAP, Smac and caspase-3 was detected by Western blot. A recombinant plasmid vector pEGFP-N1/Smac was constructed and transfected into of Panc-1 cells. The effect of cytosolic over expression of Smac on apoptosis of Panc-1 cells was evaluated by flow cytometry. Results: Pane-1 was more resistant to cisplatin or 5-FU induced apoptosis than BXPC-3. Western blot revealed that chemore sistant Pane-1 highly expressed XIAP, and increased cytosolic expression of Smac might be responsible for the marked down-regulation of XIAP in chemo-sensitive BXPC-3 cells after exposure to cisplatin or 5-FU. Furthermore, cytosolic overexpression of Smac could significantly down-regulate the levels of XIAP and promote the activity of caspase-3, as well as sensitize Panc-1 cells to anticancer drug-induced apopto sis. Conclusion: Anticancer drug-induced apoptosis requires mitochondrial release of Smac and downregulation of XIAP, which may be an important determinant of chemo-sensitivity in pancreatic cancer cells. Up-regulation of cytosolic expression of Smac may act as an effective modifying signal to overcome apoptosis resistance to chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer cells.

  13. Sphingosine enhances apoptosis of radiation-resistant prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, V E; Cuvillier, O; Edsall, L C; Kimura, K; Milstien, S; Gelmann, E P; Spiegel, S

    2000-08-15

    Ceramide has been implicated as an important component of radiation-induced apoptosis of human prostate cancer cells. We examined the role of the sphingolipid metabolites--ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine-1-phosphate--in susceptibility to radiation-induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cell lines with different sensitivities to gamma-irradiation. Exposure of radiation-sensitive TSU-Pr1 cells to 8-Gy irradiation led to a sustained increase in ceramide, beginning after 12 h of treatment and increasing to 2.5- to 3-fold within 48 h. Moreover, irradiation of TSU-Pr1 cells also produced a marked and rapid 50% decrease in the activity of sphingosine kinase, the enzyme that phosphorylates sphingosine to form sphingosine-1-phosphate. In contrast, the radiation-insensitive cell line, LNCaP, had sustained sphingosine kinase activity and did not produce elevated ceramide levels on 8-Gy irradiation. Although LNCaP cells are highly resistant to gamma-irradiation-induced apoptosis, they are sensitive to the death-inducing effects of tumor necrosis factor alpha, which also increases ceramide levels in these cells (K. Kimura et al., Cancer Res., 59: 1606-1614, 1999). Moreover, we found that although irradiation alone did not increase sphingosine levels in LNCaP cells, tumor necrosis factor alpha plus irradiation induced significantly higher sphingosine levels and markedly reduced intracellular levels of sphingosine-1-phosphate. The elevation of sphingosine levels either by exogenous sphingosine or by treatment with the sphingosine kinase inhibitor N,N-dimethylsphingosine induced apoptosis and also sensitized LNCaP cells to gamma-irradiation-induced apoptosis. Our data suggest that the relative levels of sphingolipid metabolites may play a role in determining the radiosensitivity of prostate cancer cells, and that the enhancement of ceramide and sphingosine generation could be of therapeutic value. PMID:10969794

  14. Discovering Distinct Functional Modules of Specific Cancer Types Using Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Ru Shen; Xiaosheng Wang; Chittibabu Guda

    2015-01-01

    Background. The molecular profiles exhibited in different cancer types are very different; hence, discovering distinct functional modules associated with specific cancer types is very important to understand the distinct functions associated with them. Protein-protein interaction networks carry vital information about molecular interactions in cellular systems, and identification of functional modules (subgraphs) in these networks is one of the most important applications of biological networ...

  15. Protease-resistant prions selectively decrease Shadoo protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel C Watts

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The central event in prion diseases is the conformational conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C into PrP(Sc, a partially protease-resistant and infectious conformer. However, the mechanism by which PrP(Sc causes neuronal dysfunction remains poorly understood. Levels of Shadoo (Sho, a protein that resembles the flexibly disordered N-terminal domain of PrP(C, were found to be reduced in the brains of mice infected with the RML strain of prions [1], implying that Sho levels may reflect the presence of PrP(Sc in the brain. To test this hypothesis, we examined levels of Sho during prion infection using a variety of experimental systems. Sho protein levels were decreased in the brains of mice, hamsters, voles, and sheep infected with different natural and experimental prion strains. Furthermore, Sho levels were decreased in the brains of prion-infected, transgenic mice overexpressing Sho and in infected neuroblastoma cells. Time-course experiments revealed that Sho levels were inversely proportional to levels of protease-resistant PrP(Sc. Membrane anchoring and the N-terminal domain of PrP both influenced the inverse relationship between Sho and PrP(Sc. Although increased Sho levels had no discernible effect on prion replication in mice, we conclude that Sho is the first non-PrP marker specific for prion disease. Additional studies using this paradigm may provide insight into the cellular pathways and systems subverted by PrP(Sc during prion disease.

  16. Natural coagulation inhibitors and active protein c resistance in preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cengiz Demir

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The etiology of preeclampsia is not fully established. A few studies have shown a relationship between natural coagulation inhibitors and preeclampsia. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to investigate the status of natural coagulation inhibitors and active protein C resistance (APC-R in preeclampsia. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We studied 70 women with preeclampsia recruited consecutively and 70 healthy pregnant and 70 nonpregnant women as controls. Plasma protein C (PC, free protein S (fPS, antithrombin III (ATIII and APC-R were evaluated. RESULTS: ATIII values were found to be significantly lower in preeclamptic patients than in the control groups (p< 0.001. Nevertheless, there was no significant difference between the healthy pregnant and nonpregnant women groups (p=0.141. The fPS values of the preeclamptic and healthy pregnant groups were lower than that of the nonpregnant group (p< 0.001, and the fPS value of the preeclamptic pregnant women was lower than that of healthy pregnant women (p<0.001. The PC value of the preeclamptic pregnant women was lower than that of the control groups (p< 0.001. The PC value of the healthy pregnant women was lower than that of the nonpregnant women (p< 0.001. The mean APC activity values were lower in the preeclamptic patients than that of the control groups (p< 0.001, p< 0.001. The APC-R positivity rates of the preeclamptic groups were higher than that of the control groups (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that ATIII, fPS, PC values and APC resistance were lower and APC-R positivity was higher in preeclamptic women than in normal pregnant and nonpregnant women.

  17. Small Molecule Inhibitors of Bcl-2 Family Proteins for Pancreatic Cancer Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) has a complex etiology and displays a wide range of cellular escape pathways that allow it to resist different treatment modalities. Crucial signaling molecules that function downstream of the survival pathways, particularly at points where several of these pathways crosstalk, provide valuable targets for the development of novel anti-cancer drugs. Bcl-2 family member proteins are anti-apoptotic molecules that are known to be overexpressed in most cancers including PC. The anti-apoptotic machinery has been linked to the observed resistance developed to chemotherapy and radiation and therefore is important from the targeted drug development point of view. Over the past ten years, our group has extensively studied a series of small molecule inhibitors of Bcl-2 against PC and provide solid preclinical platform for testing such novel drugs in the clinic. This review examines the efficacy, potency, and function of several small molecule inhibitor drugs targeted to the Bcl-2 family of proteins and their preclinical progress against PC. This article further focuses on compounds that have been studied the most and also discusses the anti-cancer potential of newer class of Bcl-2 drugs

  18. Timing and distribution of protein ingestion during prolonged recovery from resistance exercise alters myofibrillar protein synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areta, José L; Burke, Louise M; Ross, Megan L; Camera, Donny M; West, Daniel W D; Broad, Elizabeth M; Jeacocke, Nikki A; Moore, Daniel R; Stellingwerff, Trent; Phillips, Stuart M; Hawley, John A; Coffey, Vernon G

    2013-01-01

    Quantity and timing of protein ingestion are major factors regulating myofibrillar protein synthesis (MPS). However, the effect of specific ingestion patterns on MPS throughout a 12 h period is unknown. We determined how different distributions of protein feeding during 12 h recovery after resistance exercise affects anabolic responses in skeletal muscle. Twenty-four healthy trained males were assigned to three groups (n= 8/group) and undertook a bout of resistance exercise followed by ingestion of 80 g of whey protein throughout 12 h recovery in one of the following protocols: 8 × 10 g every 1.5 h (PULSE); 4 × 20 g every 3 h (intermediate: INT); or 2 × 40 g every 6 h (BOLUS). Muscle biopsies were obtained at rest and after 1, 4, 6, 7 and 12 h post exercise. Resting and post-exercise MPS (l-[ring-13C6] phenylalanine), and muscle mRNA abundance and cell signalling were assessed. All ingestion protocols increased MPS above rest throughout 1–12 h recovery (88–148%, P INT>PULSE hierarchy in magnitude of phosphorylation. MuRF-1 and SLC38A2 mRNA were differentially expressed with BOLUS. In conclusion, 20 g of whey protein consumed every 3 h was superior to either PULSE or BOLUS feeding patterns for stimulating MPS throughout the day. This study provides novel information on the effect of modulating the distribution of protein intake on anabolic responses in skeletal muscle and has the potential to maximize outcomes of resistance training for attaining peak muscle mass. PMID:23459753

  19. Detection of the Mr 110,000 lung resistance-related protein LRP/MVP with monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeijers, A B; Scheffer, G L; Reurs, A W; Pijnenborg, A C; Abbondanza, C; Wiemer, E A; Scheper, R J

    2001-11-01

    The Mr 110,000 lung resistance-related protein (LRP), also termed the major vault protein (MVP), constitutes >70% of subcellular ribonucleoprotein particles called vaults. Overexpression of LRP/MVP and vaults has been linked directly to MDR in cancer cells. Clinically, LRP/MVP expression can be of value to predict response to chemotherapy and prognosis. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against LRP/MVP have played a critical role in determining the relevance of this protein in clinical drug resistance. We compared the applicability of the previously described MAbs LRP-56, LMR-5, LRP, 1027, 1032, and newly isolated MAbs MVP-9, MVP-16, MVP-18, and MVP-37 for the immunodetection of LRP/MVP by immunoblotting analysis and by immunocyto- and histochemistry. The availability of a broader panel of reagents for the specific and sensitive immunodetection of LRP/MVP should greatly facilitate biological and clinical studies of vault-related MDR. PMID:11668191

  20. Breast cancers radiation-resistance: key role of the cancer stem cells marker CD24

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work focuses on the characterization of radiation-resistant breast cancer cells, responsible for relapse after radiotherapy. The 'Cancer Stem Cells' (CSC) theory describes a radiation-resistant cellular sub-population, with enhanced capacity to induce tumors and proliferate. In this work, we show that only the CSC marker CD24-/low defines a radiation resistant cell population, able to transmit the 'memory' of irradiation, expressed as long term genomic instability in the progeny of irradiated cells. We show that CD24 is not only a marker, but is an actor of radiation-response. So, CD24 expression controls cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo, and ROS level before and after irradiation. As a result, CD24-/low cells display enhanced radiation-resistance and genomic stability. For the first time, our results attribute a role to CD24-/low CSCs in the transmission of genomic instability. Moreover, by providing informations on tumor intrinsic radiation-sensitivity, CD24- marker could help to design new radiotherapy protocols. (author)

  1. Decreased chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II expression in tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Krista A; Wickramasinghe, Nalinie S; Cochrum, Renate K; Watts, Mary Beth; Klinge, Carolyn M

    2006-10-15

    Tamoxifen (TAM) is successfully used for the treatment and prevention of breast cancer. However, many patients that are initially TAM responsive develop tumors that are antiestrogen/TAM resistant (TAM-R). The mechanism behind TAM resistance in estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha)-positive tumors is not understood. The orphan nuclear receptor chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor (COUP-TF)-I interacts directly with 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT)- and estradiol (E(2))-occupied ERalpha, corepressors NCoR and SMRT, and inhibit E(2)-induced gene transcription in breast cancer cells. Here we tested the hypothesis that reduced COUP-TFI and COUP-TFII correlate with TAM resistance. We report for the first time that COUP-TFII, but not COUP-TFI, is reduced in three antiestrogen/TAM-R cell lines derived from TAM-sensitive (TAM-S) MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and in MDA-MB-231 cells compared with MCF-7. ERalpha and ERbeta protein expression was not different between TAM-S and TAM-R cells, but progesterone receptor (PR) was decreased in TAM-R cells. Further, E(2) increased COUP-TFII transcription in MCF-7, but not TAM-R, cells. Importantly, reexpression of COUP-TFII in TAM-S cells to levels comparable to those in MCF-7 was shown to increase 4-OHT-mediated growth inhibition and increased apoptosis. Conversely, knockdown of COUP-TFII in TAM-S MCF-7 cells blocked growth inhibitory activity and increased 4-OHT agonist activity. 4-OHT increased COUP-TFII-ERalpha interaction approximately 2-fold in MCF-7 cells. COUP-TFII expression in TAM-R cells also inhibited 4-OHT-induced endogenous PR and pS2 mRNA expression. These data indicate that reduced COUP-TFII expression correlates with acquired TAM resistance in human breast cancer cell lines and that COUP-TFII plays a role in regulating the growth inhibitory activity of TAM in breast cancer cells. PMID:17047084

  2. Deoxyribonucleic-binding homeobox proteins are augmented in human cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Mercurio, A M; Chung, S Y;

    1990-01-01

    Homeobox genes encode sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins that are involved in the regulation of gene expression during embryonic development. In this study, we examined the expression of homeobox proteins in human cancer. Antiserum was obtained against a synthetic peptide derived from the...... isolated and used to elicit a rabbit antiserum. In immunostaining, both antisera reacted with the nuclei of cultured tumor cells. In tissue sections of human carcinoma, nuclear immunoreactivity was observed in the tumor cells in 40 of 42 cases examined. Adjacent normal epithelial tissue obtained from the...... presence of the homeobox transcript in human carcinoma was documented by in situ hybridization and RNase protection mapping. These results demonstrate that human cancer is associated with the expression of homeobox proteins. Such homeobox proteins, as well as other regulatory proteins, could be involved in...

  3. HOXC10 Expression Supports the Development of Chemotherapy Resistance by Fine Tuning DNA Repair in Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadik, Helen; Korangath, Preethi; Nguyen, Nguyen K; Gyorffy, Balazs; Kumar, Rakesh; Hedayati, Mohammad; Teo, Wei Wen; Park, Sunju; Panday, Hardik; Munoz, Teresa Gonzalez; Menyhart, Otilia; Shah, Nilay; Pandita, Raj K; Chang, Jenny C; DeWeese, Theodore; Chang, Howard Y; Pandita, Tej K; Sukumar, Saraswati

    2016-08-01

    Development of drug resistance is a major factor limiting the continued success of cancer chemotherapy. To overcome drug resistance, understanding the underlying mechanism(s) is essential. We found that HOXC10 is overexpressed in primary carcinomas of the breast, and even more significantly in distant metastasis arising after failed chemotherapy. High HOXC10 expression correlates with shorter recurrence-free and overall survival in patients with estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy. We found that HOXC10 promotes survival in cells treated with doxorubicin, paclitaxel, or carboplatin by suppressing apoptosis and upregulating NF-κB Overexpressed HOXC10 increases S-phase-specific DNA damage repair by homologous recombination (HR) and checkpoint recovery in cells at three important phases. For double-strand break repair, HOXC10 recruits HR proteins at sites of DNA damage. It enhances resection and lastly, it resolves stalled replication forks, leading to initiation of DNA replication following DNA damage. We show that HOXC10 facilitates, but is not directly involved in DNA damage repair mediated by HR. HOXC10 achieves integration of these functions by binding to, and activating cyclin-dependent kinase, CDK7, which regulates transcription by phosphorylating the carboxy-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II. Consistent with these findings, inhibitors of CDK7 reverse HOXC10-mediated drug resistance in cultured cells. Blocking HOXC10 function, therefore, presents a promising new strategy to overcome chemotherapy resistance in breast cancer. Cancer Res; 76(15); 4443-56. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27302171

  4. Sensitization of multidrug-resistant human cancer cells to Hsp90 inhibitors by down-regulation of SIRT1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hak-Bong; Lee, Su-Hoon; Um, Jee-Hyun; Oh, Won Keun; Kim, Dong-Wan; Kang, Chi-Dug; Kim, Sun-Hee

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of Hsp90 inhibitors as anticancer agents was limited in multidrug-resistant (MDR) human cancer cells due to induction of heat shock proteins (Hsps) such as Hsp70/Hsp27 and P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated efflux. In the present study, we showed that resistance to Hsp90 inhibitors of MDR human cancer cells could be overcome with SIRT1 inhibition. SIRT1 knock-down or SIRT1 inhibitors (amurensin G and EX527) effectively suppressed the resistance to Hsp90 inhibitors (17-AAG and AUY922) in several MDR variants of human lymphoblastic leukemia and human breast cancer cell lines. SIRT1 inhibition down-regulated the expression of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) and subsequently Hsps and facilitated Hsp90 multichaperone complex disruption via hyperacetylation of Hsp90/Hsp70. These findings were followed by acceleration of ubiquitin ligase CHIP-mediated mutant p53 (mut p53) degradation and subsequent down-regulation of P-gp in 17-AAG-treated MDR cancer cells expressing P-gp and mut p53 after inhibition of SIRT1. Therefore, combined treatment with Hsp90 inhibitor and SIRT1 inhibitor could be a more effective therapeutic approach for Hsp90 inhibitor-resistant MDR cells via down-regulation of HSF1/Hsps, mut p53 and P-gp. PMID:26416354

  5. Downregulation of gene MDR1 by shRNA to reverse multidrug-resistance of ovarian cancer A2780 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hongyi Zhang; Jing Wang; Kai Cai; Longwei Jiang; Dandan Zhou; Cuiping Yang,; Junsong Chen,; Dengyu Chen,; Jun Dou

    2012-01-01

    Background: To explore the effects of downregulated multidrug-resistance P-glycoprotein (MDR1/ABCB1) and reversed multidrug-resistance in human A2780 ovarian cancer cells. Materials and Methods: Three shRNAs targeting the MDR1 gene were synthesized, and cloned into plasmid pSUPER-enhanced green fluorescent protein 1 (EGFP1). The formed pSUPER-EGFP1-MDR1-shRNAs were transfected into the A2780 cells, respectively, and the quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and west...

  6. Development of new estrogen receptor-targeting therapeutic agents for tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Quan; Zheng, Shilong; Wang, Guangdi

    2013-01-01

    Despite our deepening understanding of the mechanisms of resistance and intensive efforts to develop therapeutic solutions to combat resistance, de novo and acquired tamoxifen resistance remains a clinical challenge, and few effective regimens exist to treat tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer. The complexity of tamoxifen resistance calls for diverse therapeutic approaches. This review presents several therapeutic strategies and lead compounds targeting the estrogen receptor signaling pathways ...

  7. Anticancer effect of metformin on estrogen receptor-positive and tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinkyoung; Lee, Jiyun; Jang, Soon Young; Kim, Chungyeul; Choi, Yoojin; Kim, Aeree

    2016-05-01

    Acquisition of tamoxifen resistance (TR) during anti-estrogenic therapy using tamoxifen is a major obstacle in the treatment of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer. As a biguanide derivative, metformin is commonly used to treat type II diabetes. It has recently emerged as a potential anticancer agent. The objective of the present study was to investigate the anticancer activity of metformin in relation to ERα expression and its signaling pathway in ERα-positive MCF-7 and MDA-MB-361 breast cancer cells as well as TR MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Metformin inhibited both protein and mRNA levels of ERα in the presence or absence of estrogen (E2) in the MCF-7, TR MCF-7 and MDA-MB-361 cells. Metformin repressed E2-inducible estrogen response element (ERE) luciferase activity, protein levels and mRNA levels of E2/ERα-regulated genes [including c-Myc, cyclin D1, progesterone receptor (PR) and pS2] to a greater degree than tamoxifen, resulting in inhibition of cell proliferation of MCF-7, TR MCF-7 and MDA-MB-361 cells. Collectively, our results suggest that one of the anticancer mechanisms of metformin could be attributable to the repression of expression and transcriptional activity of ERα. Metformin may be a good therapeutic agent for treating ERα-positive breast cancer by inhibiting the expression and function of ERα. In addition, metformin may be useful to treat tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer. PMID:26986571

  8. Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1 overexpression in human breast cancer stem cells and resistance to olaparib.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine Gilabert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs have been recognized as playing a major role in various aspects of breast cancer biology. To identify specific biomarkers of BCSCs, we have performed comparative proteomics of BCSC-enriched and mature cancer cell populations from the human breast cancer cell line (BCL, BrCA-MZ-01. METHODS: ALDEFLUOR assay was used to sort BCSC-enriched (ALDH+ and mature cancer (ALDH- cell populations. Total proteins were extracted from both fractions and subjected to 2-Dimensional Difference In-Gel Electrophoresis (2-D DIGE. Differentially-expressed spots were excised and proteins were gel-extracted, digested and identified using MALDI-TOF MS. RESULTS: 2-D DIGE identified poly(ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1 as overexpressed in ALDH+ cells from BrCA-MZ-01. This observation was confirmed by western blot and extended to four additional human BCLs. ALDH+ cells from BRCA1-mutated HCC1937, which had the highest level of PARP1 overexpression, displayed resistance to olaparib, a specific PARP1 inhibitor. CONCLUSION: An unbiased proteomic approach identified PARP1 as upregulated in ALDH+, BCSC-enriched cells from various human BCLs, which may contribute to clinical resistance to PARP inhibitors.

  9. MicroRNA-320a promotes 5-FU resistance in human pancreatic cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Weibin Wang; Lijun Zhao; Xueju Wei; Lanlan Wang; Siqi Liu; Yu Yang; Fang Wang; Guotao Sun; Junwu Zhang; Yanni Ma; Yupei Zhao; Jia Yu

    2016-01-01

    The drug-resistance of pancreatic cancer cells results in poor therapeutic effect. To predict the therapeutic effect of the chemotherapy drugs to specific patients and to reverse the resistance of pancreatic cancer cells are critical for chemotherapy of pancreatic cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been reported to play important roles in the genesis of drug-resistance of various cancer types. There are also many advantages of miRNAs in diagnosis and therapy of disease. Although several miRNAs r...

  10. Monitoring protein synthesis in single live cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Chengyi; Santo, Loredana; Mishima, Yuko; Raje, Noopur; Smilansky, Zeev; Zoldan, Janet

    2016-05-16

    Protein synthesis is generally under sophisticated and dynamic regulation to meet the ever-changing demands of a cell. Global up or down-regulation of protein synthesis and the shift of protein synthesis location (as shown, for example, during cellular stress or viral infection) are recognized as cellular responses to environmental changes such as nutrient/oxygen deprivation or to alterations such as pathological mutations in cancer cells. Monitoring protein synthesis in single live cells can be a powerful tool for cancer research. Here we employed a microfluidic platform to perform high throughput delivery of fluorescent labeled tRNAs into multiple myeloma cells with high transfection efficiency (∼45%) and high viability (>80%). We show that the delivered tRNAs were actively recruited to the ER for protein synthesis and that treatment with puromycin effectively disrupted this process. Interestingly, we observed the scattered distribution of tRNAs in cells undergoing mitosis, which has not been previously reported. Fluorescence lifetime analysis detected extensive FRET signals generated from tRNAs labeled as FRET pairs, further confirming that the delivered tRNAs were used by active ribosomes for protein translation. Our work demonstrates that the microfluidic delivery of FRET labeled tRNAs into living cancer cells can provide new insights into basic cancer metabolism and has the potential to serve as a platform for drug screening, diagnostics, or personalized medication. PMID:26956582

  11. Baseline C-reactive protein is associated with incident cancer and survival in patients with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allin, Kristine H; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: We tested the hypothesis that baseline plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with risk of incident cancer in the general population and early death in patients with cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 10,408 individuals from the Danish general population who had CRP...

  12. Aurora kinase B is important for antiestrogen resistant cell growth and a potential biomarker for tamoxifen resistant breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sarah L; Yde, Christina W; Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke;

    2015-01-01

    endocrine resistance, immunohistochemistry was performed on archival primary tumor tissue from breast cancer patients who have received adjuvant endocrine treatment with tamoxifen. RESULTS: The selective Aurora kinase B inhibitor barasertib was identified to preferentially inhibit growth of fulvestrant...... and PARP cleavage in the fulvestrant resistant cells. Barasertib also exerted preferential growth inhibition of tamoxifen resistant T47D cell lines. Finally, high percentage of Aurora kinase B positive tumor cells was significantly associated with reduced disease-free and overall survival in 261 ER......-positive breast cancer patients, who have received tamoxifen as first-line adjuvant endocrine treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that Aurora kinase B is a driving factor for growth of antiestrogen resistant T47D breast cancer cell lines, and a biomarker for reduced benefit of tamoxifen treatment. Thus...

  13. Emerging Role of miRNAs in the Drug Resistance of Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riquelme, Ismael; Letelier, Pablo; Riffo-Campos, Angela L.; Brebi, Priscilla; Roa, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Unfortunately, most gastric cancer cases are diagnosed in an advanced, non-curable stage and with a limited response to chemotherapy. Drug resistance is one of the most important causes of therapy failure in gastric cancer patients. Although the mechanisms of drug resistance have been broadly studied, the regulation of these mechanisms has not been completely understood. Accumulating evidence has recently highlighted the role of microRNAs in the development and maintenance of drug resistance due to their regulatory features in specific genes involved in the chemoresistant phenotype of malignancies, including gastric cancer. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the miRNAs’ characteristics, their regulation of the genes involved in chemoresistance and their potential as targeted therapies for personalized treatment in resistant gastric cancer. PMID:27011182

  14. Phenylethyl isothiocyanate reverses cisplatin resistance in biliary tract cancer cells via glutathionylation-dependent degradation of Mcl-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiwei; Zhan, Ming; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Benpeng; Yang, Kai; Yang, Jie; Yi, Jing; Huang, Qihong; Mohan, Man; Hou, Zhaoyuan; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Biliary tract cancer (BTC) is a highly malignant cancer. BTC exhibits a low response rate to cisplatin (CDDP) treatment, and therefore, an understanding of the mechanism of CDDP resistance is urgently needed. Here, we show that BTC cells develop CDDP resistance due, in part, to upregulation of myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl-1). Phenylethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), a natural compound found in watercress, could enhance the efficacy of CDDP by degrading Mcl-1. PEITC-CDDP co-treatment also increased the rate of apoptosis of cancer stem-like side population (SP) cells and inhibited xenograft tumor growth without obvious toxic effects. In vitro, PEITC decreased reduced glutathione (GSH), which resulted in decreased GSH/oxidized glutathione (GSSG) ratio and increased glutathionylation of Mcl-1, leading to rapid proteasomal degradation of Mcl-1. Furthermore, we identified Cys16 and Cys286 as Mcl-1 glutathionylation sites, and mutating them resulted in PEITC-mediated degradation resistant Mcl-1 protein. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that CDDP resistance is partially associated with Mcl-1 in BTC cells and we identify a novel mechanism that PEITC can enhance CDDP-induced apoptosis via glutathionylation-dependent degradation of Mcl-1. Hence, our results provide support that dietary intake of watercress may help reverse CDDP resistance in BTC patients. PMID:26848531

  15. Argonaute proteins: potential biomarkers for human colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although Argonaute proteins are considered to play important roles in stem cell self-renewal, RNA interference (RNAi) and translational regulation, relatively little is known about their functions in human disease. In this study, we investigated the expression of eight members of human Argonaute family in colon cancer and identified their potential roles in tumor development and progression. Antibodies against human Argonaute proteins were prepared by immunizing rabbits with synthetic peptides derived from the sequences of Argonaute members. Then we constructed a tissue microarray containing 75 specimens from colon cancer and 75 specimens from adjacent non-cancer tissue, and assayed eight different proteins (EIF2C1, EIF2C2, EIF2C3, EIF2C4, PIWIL1, PIWIL2, PIWIL3 and PIWIL4) by immunohistochemistry on consecutive formalin-fixed tissue microarray sections. The expression of EIF2C1-4 and PIWIL1-4 was significantly higher in tumorous tissue than in adjacent tissue. Notably, a significant correlation was observed between the positive expression of EIF2C2, EIF2C3, EIF2C4, PIWIL4 and the presence of distant metastasis. Logistic regression analysis revealed that an increased expression of EIF2C1 and PIWIL2 was significantly associated with occurrence of colon cancer tissue compared with non-cancer tissue. Argonaute proteins are overexpressed in colon cancer relative to adjacent non-cancer tissue. The expression of EIF2C2-4 and PIWIL4 appears increased in advanced tumors with distant metastasis, suggesting it may promote tumor invasion. Furthermore, EIF2C1 and PIWIL2 might represent novel colon cancer markers with early diagnostic significance

  16. Targeting Protein Kinase C subtypes in pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Storz, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In preclinical studies protein kinase C (PKC) enzymes have been implicated in regulating many aspects of pancreatic cancer development and progression. However, clinical phase I or phase II trials with compounds targeting classical PKC isoforms were not successful. Recent studies implicate that mainly atypical and novel PKC enzymes regulate oncogenic signaling pathways in pancreatic cancer. Members of these two subgroups converge signaling induced by mutant Kras, growth factors and inflammato...

  17. Downregulation of HuR as a new mechanism of doxorubicin resistance in breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latorre Elisa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HuR, an RNA binding protein involved in the post-transcriptional regulation of a wide spectrum of mRNAs, has been demonstrated to be a determinant of carcinogenesis and tumor aggressiveness in several cancer types. In this study, we investigated the role of HuR in the apoptosis and in the chemoresistance induced by the widely used anticancer drug doxorubicin in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7. Results We showed that HuR acts in the early phase of cell response to doxorubicin, being induced to translocate into the cytoplasm upon phosphorylation. Reducing HuR levels diminished the apoptotic response to doxorubicin. Doxorubicin-induced apoptosis was also correlated with the presence of HuR in the cytoplasm. Rottlerin, which was able to block HuR nuclear export, had correspondingly antagonistic effects with doxorubicin on cell toxicity. The proapoptotic activity of HuR was not due to cleavage to an active form, as was previously reported. In in vitro selected doxorubicin resistant MCF-7 cells (MCF-7/doxoR overexpressing the multidrug resistance (MDR related ABCG2 transporter, we observed a significant HuR downregulation that was paralleled by a corresponding downregulation of HuR targets and by loss of rottlerin toxicity. Restoration of HuR expression in these cells resensitized MCF-7/doxoR cells to doxorubicin, reactivating the apoptotic response. Conclusions The present study shows that HuR is necessary to elicit the apoptotic cell response to doxorubicin and that restoration of HuR expression in resistant cells resensitizes them to the action of this drug, thereby identifying HuR as a key protein in doxorubicin pharmacology.

  18. Tumor matrix protein collagen XIα1 in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raglow, Zoe; Thomas, Sufi M

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is increasingly recognized as an essential player in cancer development and progression. Collagens are one of the most important components of the extracellular matrix, and have themselves been implicated in many aspects of neoplastic transformation. Collagen XI is a minor collagen whose main physiologic function is to regulate the diameter of major collagen fibrils. The α1 chain of collagen XI (colXIα1), has known pathogenic roles in several musculoskeletal disorders. Recent research has highlighted the importance of colXIα1 in many types of cancer, including its roles in metastasis, angiogenesis, and drug resistance, as well as its potential utility in screening tests and as a therapeutic target. High levels of colXIα1 overexpression have been reported in multiple expression profile studies examining differences between cancerous and normal tissue, and between beginning and advanced stage cancer. Its expression has been linked to poor progression-free and overall survival. The consistency of this data across cancer types is particularly striking, including colorectal, ovarian, breast, head and neck, lung, and brain cancers. This review discusses the role of collagen XIα1 in cancer and its potential as a target for cancer therapy. PMID:25511741

  19. Therapeutic potential of thalidomide for gemcitabine-resistant bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yen Ta; Cheng, Chuan Chu; Chiu, Ted H; Lai, Pei Chun

    2015-11-01

    Controversial effects of thalidomide for solid malignancies have been reported. In the present study, we evaluate the effects of thalidomide for transitional cell carcinoma (TCC), the most common type of bladder cancer. Thalidomide precipitates were observed when its DMSO solution was added to the culture medium. No precipitation was found when thalidomide was dissolved in 45% γ-cyclodextrin, and this concentration of γ-cyclodextrin elicited slight cytotoxicity on TCC BFTC905 and primary human urothelial cells. Thalidomide-γ-cyclodextrin complex exerted a concentration-dependent cytotoxicity in TCC cells, but was relatively less cytotoxic (with IC50 of 200 µM) in BFTC905 cells than the other 3 TCC cell lines, possibly due to upregulation of Bcl-xL and HIF-1α mediated carbonic anhydrase IX, and promotion of quiescence. Gemcitabine-resistant BFTC905 cells were chosen for additional experiments. Thalidomide induced apoptosis through downregulation of survivin and securin. The secretion of VEGF and TNF-α was ameliorated by thalidomide, but they did not affect cell proliferation. Immune-modulating lenalidomide and pomalidomide did not elicit cytotoxicity. In addition, cereblon did not play a role in the thalidomide effect. Oxidative DNA damage was triggered by thalidomide, and anti-oxidants reversed the effect. Thalidomide also inhibited TNF-α induced invasion through inhibition of NF-κB, and downregulation of effectors, ICAM-1 and MMP-9. Thalidomide inhibited the growth of BFTC905 xenograft tumors in SCID mice via induction of DNA damage and suppression of angiogenesis. Higher average body weight, indicating less chachexia, was observed in thalidomide treated group. Sedative effect was observed within one-week of treatment. These pre-clinical results suggest therapeutic potential of thalidomide for gemcitabine-resistant bladder cancer. PMID:26398114

  20. Identification of microRNAs associated with tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Lai-yee.; 劉麗儀.

    2011-01-01

    Tamoxifen is the most widely used endocrine therapy for both early and advanced estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer patients. About half of the patients that initially respond to the antiestrogen become estrogen-independent and ultimately develop resistance to the treatment. The precise molecular mechanisms of tamoxifen resistance remain poorly understood. Dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) has been frequently reported in breast cancer and linked to cancer development, progression...

  1. ZNF93 increases resistance to ET-743 (Trabectedin; Yondelis and PM00104 (Zalypsis in human cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenfeng Duan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: ET-743 (trabectedin, Yondelis and PM00104 (Zalypsis are marine derived compounds that have antitumor activity. ET-743 and PM00104 exposure over sustained periods of treatment will result in the development of drug resistance, but the mechanisms which lead to resistance are not yet understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human chondrosarcoma cell lines resistant to ET-743 (CS-1/ER or PM00104 (CS-1/PR were established in this study. The CS-1/ER and CS-1/PR exhibited cross resistance to cisplatin and methotrexate but not to doxorubicin. Human Affymetrix Gene Chip arrays were used to examine relative gene expression in these cell lines. We found that a large number of genes have altered expression levels in CS-1/ER and CS-1/PR when compared to the parental cell line. 595 CS-1/ER and 498 CS-1/PR genes were identified as overexpressing; 856 CS-1/ER and 874 CS-1/PR transcripts were identified as underexpressing. Three zinc finger protein (ZNF genes were on the top 10 overexpressed genes list. These genes have not been previously associated with drug resistance in tumor cells. Differential expressions of ZNF93 and ZNF43 genes were confirmed in both CS-1/ER and CS-1/PR resistant cell lines by real-time RT-PCR. ZNF93 was overexpressed in two ET-743 resistant Ewing sarcoma cell lines as well as in a cisplatin resistant ovarian cancer cell line, but was not overexpressed in paclitaxel resistant cell lines. ZNF93 knockdown by siRNA in CS-1/ER and CS-1/PR caused increased sensitivity for ET-743, PM00104, and cisplatin. Furthermore, ZNF93 transfected CS-1 cells are relatively resistant to ET-743, PM00104 and cisplatin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study suggests that zinc finger proteins, and ZNF93 in particular, are involved in resistance to ET-743 and PM00104.

  2. HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN gp96 AND CANCER IMMUNOTHERAPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岳培彬; 杨树德; 黄常志

    2002-01-01

    Heat shock protein gp96 is a highly conserved and monomorphic glycoprotein in the endoplasmic reticulum.It functions as molecular chaperone and can associate with a variety of antigenic peptides noncovalently in vivo and in vitro. Recent studies have indicated that gp96 molecules participate in major histocompatibility complex class I - restricted antigen presentation pathway. Immunization of mice with gp96 preparations isolated from cancer cells can elicit a cancer - specific protective T cell immune response that is recallable, which is a prerequisite for gp96 as a therapeutic vaccine against cancers. The immunogenicity of gp96 molecules has been attributed to the antigenic peptides associated with them. These phenomena provide a new pathway for cancer immunotherapy. The mechanism that the gp96 -peptide complex induces specific immune response and the explorations for gp96 - peptide complex as a therapeutic cancer vaccine are reviewed.

  3. Targeting the Human Cancer Pathway Protein Interaction Network by Structural Genomics*

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Yuanpeng Janet; Hang, Dehua; Lu, Long Jason; Tong, Liang; Gerstein, Mark B; Montelione, Gaetano T.

    2008-01-01

    Structural genomics provides an important approach for characterizing and understanding systems biology. As a step toward better integrating protein three-dimensional (3D) structural information in cancer systems biology, we have constructed a Human Cancer Pathway Protein Interaction Network (HCPIN) by analysis of several classical cancer-associated signaling pathways and their physical protein-protein interactions. Many well known cancer-associated proteins play central roles as “hubs” or “b...

  4. Radium-223 in metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Winston Vuong; Oliver Sartor; Sumanta K Pal

    2014-01-01

    In 2004, docetaxel was approved for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). For the next several years, there was a lull in drug approvals. However, from 2010 onwards, 5 additional therapies have been approved on the basis of showing a survival beneift in phase III studies. These agents include sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, abiraterone, enzalutamide and (most recently) radium-223. Amongst radiopharmaceuticals currently used for advanced prostate cancer (e.g. samarium-153 and strontium-89), radium-223 possesses several unique properties. As an alpha-emitting compound, the agent produces a high-energy output over a short range, facilitating selective destruction of tissue within the bone in the region of osteoblastic lesions while sparing surrounding normal tissue. The current review will outline biological rationale for radium-223 and also provide an overview of preclinical and clinical development of the agent. Rational sequencing of radium-223 and combinations, in the increasingly complex landscape of mCRPC will be discussed, along with factors inlfuencing clinical implementation.

  5. Tpl2 induces castration resistant prostate cancer progression and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Won; Cho, Hyun Jung; Lee, Se Jeong; Song, Hye Jin; Cho, Hee Jin; Park, Min Chul; Seol, Ho Jun; Lee, Jung-Il; Kim, Sunghoon; Lee, Hyun Moo; Choi, Han Yong; Nam, Do-Hyun; Joo, Kyeung Min

    2015-05-01

    Progression to metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is the major lethal pathway of prostate cancer (PC). Herein, we demonstrated that tumor progression locus 2 (Tpl2) kinase is the fundamental molecule provoking progression and metastasis of CRPC. Tpl2 upregulates CXCR4 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) to activate CXCL12/CXCR4 and FAK/Akt signalling pathway. Consequently, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and stemness of androgen depletion independent (ADI) PC cells are induced, which is dependent on the kinase activity of Tpl2. In vitro, proliferation, clonogenicity, migration, invasion and chemoresistance of ADI PC cells were enhanced by Tpl2. In vivo, Tpl2 overexpression and downregulation showed significant stimulatory and inhibitory effects on tumorigenic and metastatic potential of ADI PC cells, respectively. Moreover, the prognostic effects of Tpl2 and expressional correlation between Tpl2 and EMT-related molecules/CXCR4 were validated in clinical PC databases. Since Tpl2 exerts metastatic progression promoting activities in CRPC, Tpl2 could serve as a novel therapeutic target for metastatic CRPC. PMID:25274482

  6. The stepwise evolution of the exome during acquisition of docetaxel resistance in breast cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Stine Ninel; Ehlers, Natasja Spring; Zhu, Shida;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Resistance to taxane-based therapy in breast cancer patients is a major clinical problem that may be addressed through insight of the genomic alterations leading to taxane resistance in breast cancer cells. In the current study we used whole exome sequencing to discover somatic genomic...... concentrations of docetaxel. Whole exome sequencing performed at five successive stages during this process was used to identify single point mutational events, insertions/deletions and copy number alterations associated with the acquisition of docetaxel resistance. Acquired coding variation undergoing positive...... genomic event sufficiently predicts resistance to docetaxel, but require genomic alterations affecting multiple pathways that in concert establish the final resistance stage....

  7. Topological robustness analysis of protein interaction networks reveals key targets for overcoming chemotherapy resistance in glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Hátylas; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2015-11-01

    Biological networks display high robustness against random failures but are vulnerable to targeted attacks on central nodes. Thus, network topology analysis represents a powerful tool for investigating network susceptibility against targeted node removal. Here, we built protein interaction networks associated with chemoresistance to temozolomide, an alkylating agent used in glioma therapy, and analyzed their modular structure and robustness against intentional attack. These networks showed functional modules related to DNA repair, immunity, apoptosis, cell stress, proliferation and migration. Subsequently, network vulnerability was assessed by means of centrality-based attacks based on the removal of node fractions in descending orders of degree, betweenness, or the product of degree and betweenness. This analysis revealed that removing nodes with high degree and high betweenness was more effective in altering networks’ robustness parameters, suggesting that their corresponding proteins may be particularly relevant to target temozolomide resistance. In silico data was used for validation and confirmed that central nodes are more relevant for altering proliferation rates in temozolomide-resistant glioma cell lines and for predicting survival in glioma patients. Altogether, these results demonstrate how the analysis of network vulnerability to topological attack facilitates target prioritization for overcoming cancer chemoresistance.

  8. Relationship of LRP-human major vault protein to in vitro and clinical resistance to anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo, M A; Scheffer, G L; Flens, M J; Shoemaker, R H; Rome, L H; Scheper, R J

    1996-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) has been related to two members of the ABC-superfamily of transporters, P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and Multidrug Resistance-associated Protein (MRP). We have described a 110 kD protein termed the Lung Resistance-related Protein (LRP) that is overexpressed in several non-Pgp MDR cells lines of different histogenetic origin. Reversal of MDR parallels a decrease in LRP expression. In a panel of 61 cancer cell lines which have not been subjected to laboratory drug selection, LRP was a superior predictor for in vitro resistance to MDR-related drugs when compared to Pgp and MRP, and LRP's predictive value extended to MDR unrelated drugs, such as platinum compounds. LRP is widely distributed in clinical cancer specimens, but the frequency of LRP expression inversely correlates with the known chemosensitivity of different tumour types. Furthermore, LRP expression at diagnosis has been shown to be a strong and independent prognostic factor for response to chemotherapy and outcome in acute myeloid leukemia and ovarian carcinoma (platinum-based treatment) patients. Recently, LRP has been identified as the human major protein. Vaults are novel cellular organelles broadly distributed and highly conserved among diverse eukaryotic cells, suggesting that they play a role in fundamental cell processes. Vaults localise to nuclear pore complexes and may be the central plug of the nuclear pore complexes. Vaults structure and localisation support a transport function for this particle which could involve a variety of substrates. Vaults may therefore play a role in drug resistance by regulating the nucleocytoplasmic transport of drugs. PMID:8862006

  9. Protein-Resistant Biodegradable Amphiphilic Graft Copolymer Vesicles as Protein Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yupeng; Yan, Lesan; Li, Bin; Qi, Yanxin; Xie, Zhigang; Jing, Xiabin; Chen, Xuesi; Huang, Yubin

    2015-09-01

    The protein adsorption and self-assembly behavior of biocompatible graft copolymer, poly(lactide-co-diazidomethyl trimethylene carbonate)-g-poly(ethylene glycol) [P(LA-co-DAC)-g-PEG], were systematically studied. The graft copolymers showed enhanced resistance to non-specific protein adsorption compared with their block copolymer counterparts, indicative of the increased effect of PEG density beyond PEG length. Diverse nanostructures including vesicles can be assembled from the amphiphilic graft copolymers with well-defined nano-sizes. Hemoglobin (Hb), as a model protein, can be entrapped in the formed vesicles and keep the gas-binding capacity. The reduced release rate of Hb from graft copolymer vesicles indicated the relatively stable membrane packing compared with block copolymer counterpart. PMID:26036907

  10. Modulation of function of multidrug resistance associated-proteins by Kaempferia parviflora extracts and their components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patanasethanont, Denpong; Nagai, Junya; Matsuura, Chie; Fukui, Kyoko; Sutthanut, Khaetthareeya; Sripanidkulchai, Bung-orn; Yumoto, Ryoko; Takano, Mikihisa

    2007-07-01

    In this study, the effects of extracts and flavone derivatives from the rhizome of Kaempferia parviflora on multidrug resistance associated-proteins (MRP)-mediated transport in A549 cells were examined. The cells employed express MRP1 and MRP2, but not P-glycoprotein. The cellular accumulation of calcein, an MRP substrate, was significantly increased by various MRP inhibitors without being affected by verapamil, a typical P-glycoprotein inhibitor. Ethanol and aqueous extracts from K. parviflora rhizome increased the accumulation of calcein and doxorubicin in A549 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory potency of the ethanol extract for MRP function was greater than that of the aqueous extract. Among six flavone derivatives isolated from K. parviflora rhizome, 5,7-dimethoxyflavone exhibited a maximal stimulatory effect on the accumulation of doxorubicin in A549 cells. The accumulation of doxorubicin was increased by four flavone derivatives without 5-hydroxy group, but not by the other two flavone derivatives with 5-hydroxy group. In addition, 5,7-dimethoxyflavone and 3,5,7,3',4'-pentamethoxyflavone decreased resistance to doxorubicin in A549 cells. These findings indicate that extracts and flavone derivatives from the rhizome of K. parviflora suppress MRP function, and therefore may be useful as modulators of multidrug resistance in cancer cells. PMID:17481606

  11. Anticancer Effects of the Nitric Oxide-Modified Saquinavir Derivative Saquinavir-NO against Multidrug-Resistant Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Rothweiler

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV protease inhibitor saquinavir shows anticancer activity. Although its nitric oxide-modified derivative saquinavir-NO (saq-NO was less toxic to normal cells, it exerted stronger inhibition of B16 melanoma growth in syngeneic C57BL/6 mice than saquinavir did. Saq-NO has been shown to block proliferation, upregulate p53 expression, and promote differentiation of C6 glioma and B16 cells. The anticancer activity of substances is frequently hampered by cancer cell chemoresistance mechanisms. Therefore, we here investigated the roles of p53 and the ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp, multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1, and breast cancer resistance protein 1 (BCRP1 in cancer cell sensitivity to saq-NO to get more information about the potential of saq-NO as anticancer drug. Saq-NO exerted anticancer effects in lower concentrations than saquinavir in a panel of human cancer cell lines. Neither p53 mutation or depletion nor expression of P-gp, MRP1, or BCRP1 affected anticancer activity of saq-NO or saquinavir. Moreover, saq-NO sensitized P-gp-, MRP1-, or BCRP1-expressing cancer cells to chemotherapy. Saq-NO induced enhanced sensitization of P-gp- or MRP1-expressing cancer cells to chemotherapy compared with saquinavir, whereas both substances similarly sensitized BCRP1-expressing cells. Washout kinetics and ABC transporter ATPase activities demonstrated that saq-NO is a substrate of P-gp as well as of MRP1. These data support the further investigation of saq-NO as an anticancer drug, especially in multidrug-resistant tumors.

  12. Combined Phosphoproteomics and Bioinformatics Strategy in Deciphering Drug Resistant Related Pathways in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyu Deng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of the absence of a clear therapeutic target for triple negative breast cancer (TNBC, conventional chemotherapy is the only available systemic treatment option for these patients. Despite chemotherapy treatment, TNBC patients still have worse prognosis when compared with other breast cancer patients. The study is to investigate unique phosphorylated proteins expressed in chemoresistant TNBC cell lines. In the current study, twelve TNBC cell lines were subjected to drug sensitivity assays against chemotherapy drugs docetaxel, doxorubicin, gemcitabine, and cisplatin. Based on their half maximal inhibitory concentrations, four resistant and two sensitive cell lines were selected for further analysis. The phosphopeptides from these cells were enriched with TiO2 beads and fractionated using strong cation exchange. 1,645 phosphoprotein groups and 9,585 unique phosphopeptides were identified by a high throughput LC-MS/MS system LTQ-Orbitrap. The phosphopeptides were further filtered with Ascore system and 1,340 phosphoprotein groups, 2,760 unique phosphopeptides, and 4,549 unique phosphosites were identified. Our study suggested that differentially phosphorylated Cdk5, PML, AP-1, and HSF-1 might work together to promote vimentin induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT in the drug resistant cells. EGFR and HGF were also shown to be involved in this process.

  13. Akt kinase-interacting protein1, a novel therapeutic target for lung cancer with EGFR-activating and gatekeeper mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, T; Takeuchi, S; Fujita, N; Nakamura, A; Wang, W; Li, Q; Oda, M; Mitsudomi, T; Yatabe, Y; Sekido, Y; Yoshida, J; Higashiyama, M; Noguchi, M; Uehara, H; Nishioka, Y; Sone, S; Yano, S

    2013-09-12

    Despite initial dramatic response, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutant lung cancer patients always acquire resistance to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Gatekeeper T790M mutation in EGFR is the most prevalent genetic alteration underlying acquired resistance to EGFR-TKI, and EGFR mutant lung cancer cells are reported to be addictive to EGFR/Akt signaling even after acquired T790M mutation. Here, we focused on Akt kinase-interacting protein1 (Aki1), a scaffold protein of PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)/PDK1 (3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase)/Akt that determines receptor signal selectivity for non-mutated EGFR, and assessed its role in EGFR mutant lung cancer with or without gatekeeper T790M mutation. Cell line-based assays showed that Aki1 constitutively associates with mutant EGFR in lung cancer cells with (H1975) or without (PC-9 and HCC827) T790M gatekeeper mutation. Silencing of Aki1 induced apoptosis of EGFR mutant lung cancer cells. Treatment with Aki1 siRNA dramatically inhibited growth of H1975 cells in a xenograft model. Moreover, silencing of Aki1 further potentiated growth inhibitory effect of new generation EGFR-TKIs against H1975 cells in vitro. Aki1 was frequently expressed in tumor cells of EGFR mutant lung cancer patients (53/56 cases), including those with acquired resistance to EGFR-TKI treatment (7/7 cases). Our data suggest that Aki1 may be a critical mediator of survival signaling from mutant EGFR to Akt, and may therefore be an ideal target for EGFR mutant lung cancer patients, especially those with acquired EGFR-TKI resistance due to EGFR T790M gatekeeper mutation. PMID:23045273

  14. Preliminary research on dendritic cells loaded with resistant breast cancer antigens in breast cancer-bearing nude mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhuang; Limin Lun

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to investigate the inhibitory ef ects of dendritic cel s (DCs) loaded with resistant breast cancer antigens on breast cancer in nude mice. Methods A single-cel suspension was prepared from a primary breast cancer and chemotherapeutic drugs were screened using the ATP-PCA susceptibility testing system. Cancer cel s were treated with 1/10 × IC50, 1/5 × IC50, 1/2 × IC50, 1 × IC50, and 2 × IC50 medium until their growth became steady in the 2 × IC50 medium. Peripheral blood mononuclear cel s (PBMCs) were obtained from the peripheral blood of patients with leukapheresis. The obtained adherent cel s were induced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimu-lating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) to generate DCs, which carried resistant strain cel lysis compounds or non-treated cancer cel lysis compounds. The former mature DCs carried resistant breast tumor antigens. A breast tumor-bearing nude mouse model was established with these resistant strains and the mice were randomly divided in three groups. The mice in the treatment group were injected with DCs loaded with resistant breast cancer antigens. The control group consisted of mice injected with DCs loaded with primary tumor cel antigens and the blank group consisted of mice injected with the same volume of normal saline. Changes in the cancers were observed. Results After treatment with the ef ector cel s, the cancer volume and weight were significantly dif erent to those before treatment in every group of mice (P Conclusion DCs loaded with resistant breast cancer antigens demonstrated a significant inhibition ef ect on the cancers of breast tumor-bearing nude mice.

  15. Tumor promotion by caspase-resistant retinoblastoma protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Helena L.; Bird, Jeff; Wasson, Katherine; Cardiff, Robert D.; Varki, Nissi; Eckmann, Lars; Wang, Jean Y. J.

    2005-01-01

    The retinoblastoma (RB) protein regulates cell proliferation and cell death. RB is cleaved by caspase during apoptosis. A mutation of the caspase-cleavage site in the RB C terminus has been made in the mouse Rb-1 locus; the resulting Rb-MI mice are resistant to endotoxin-induced apoptosis in the intestine. The Rb-MI mice do not exhibit increased tumor incidence, because the MI mutation does not disrupt the Rb tumor suppressor function. In this study, we show that Rb-MI can promote the formation of colonic adenomas in the p53-null genetic background. Consistent with this tumor phenotype, Rb-MI reduces colorectal epithelial apoptosis and ulceration caused by dextran sulfate sodium. By contrast, Rb-MI does not affect the lymphoma phenotype of p53-null mice, in keeping with its inability to protect thymocytes and splenocytes from apoptosis. The Rb-MI protein is expressed and phosphorylated in the tumors, thereby inactivating its growth suppression function. These results suggest that RB tumor suppressor function, i.e., inhibition of proliferation, is inactivated by phosphorylation, whereas RB tumor promoting function, i.e., inhibition of apoptosis, is inactivated by caspase cleavage. PMID:16227443

  16. The Reversal Effect and Its Mechanisms of Tetramethylpyrazine on Multidrug Resistance in Human Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanshan; Lei, Ting; Zhang, Man

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy is an important strategy for the treatment of bladder cancer. However, the main problem limiting the success of chemotherapy is the development of multidrug resistance (MDR). To improve the management of bladder cancer, it is an urgent matter to search for strategies to reverse MDR. We chose three kinds of herbal medicines including ginsenoside Rh2, (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) to detect their effects on bladder cancer. Reversal effects of these three herbal medicines for drug resistance in adriamycin (ADM)-resistant Pumc-91 cells (Pumc-91/ADM) were assessed by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) cell proliferation assay system. The mechanisms of reversal effect for TMP were explored in Pumc-91/ADM and T24/DDP cells. After Pumc-91/ADM and T24/DDP cells were treated with TMP, cell cycle distribution analysis was performed by flow cytometry. The expression of MRP1, GST, BCL-2, LRP and TOPO-II was evaluated using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), immunefluorescence assay and western blot. It was observed that TMP was capable of enhancing the cytotoxicity of anticancer agents on Pumc-91/ADM cells in response to ADM, however Rh2 and EGCG were unable to. The reversal effect of TMP was also demonstrated in T24/DDP cells. Moreover, the treatment with TMP in Pumc-91/ADM and T24/DDP cells led to an increased of G1 phase accompanied with a concomitant decrease of cell numbers in S phase. Compared to the control group, an obvious decrease of MRP1, GST, BCL-2 and an increase of TOPO-II were shown in TMP groups with a dose-dependency in mRNA and protein levels. However, there was no difference on LRP expression between TMP groups and the control group. TMP could effectively reverse MDR of Pumc-91/ADM and T24/DDP cells and its mechanisms might be correlated with the alteration of MRP1, GST, BCL-2 and TOPO-II. TMP might be a potential candidate for reversing drug resistance in bladder cancer chemotherapy. PMID

  17. Protein-protein interaction studies revealed genes associated with plant disease resistance and drought tolerance (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under natural conditions, plants are frequently subjected to biotic and abiotic constraints that cause considerable damage and limit plant productivity worldwide. Biotic and abiotic stresses results in the accumulation of Reactive Oxygen Species, ROS (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, O/sub 2/), Nitric oxide (NO) and cytosolic calcium (Ca/sup 2), indicating that plant responses to diseases and drought may operate, at least in part, through common molecular pathways. Additionally, stress-inducible genes have been categorized in two different groups: (a) genes that directly protect against environmental stresses and (b) genes that encode protein kinases intriguingly, protein kinases are also involved in disease resistance since many resistance genes (R genes) are in fact kinases. Here, we describe an interactor hunt using the bacterial virulent gene, VirPphA as a bait to screen an Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA prey library. VirPpha shares sequence similarity with another type III effector protein. AvrPtoB. The screen, originally designed to search for key signaling components involved in disease resistance, identified several putative and promising interactors (2-cys peroxiredoxin-like protein, kinase-like protein and ER6 protein, which is a universal stress protein) that might be involved in both biotic and abiotic stress responses. Simultaneously, another screen using AvrPtoB as a bait was conducted searching the same library for common interactors. Fibrillin (Fibri, At4g04020) was identified in both screens indicating a possible involvement in plant disease resistance through its influence on the plant cytoskeleton, which has been implicated in localized defence response. Furthermore, At4g04020 is 82% similar to the Rice fibrillin, At4g22240, which was recently shown to interact the, rice SGT1 (OsSGT1). SGT1 is a gene that is required for multiple R-gene function. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, fibrillin was found to interact strongly with all VirPphA homologues identified in

  18. Multidrug resistance proteins: role of P-glycoprotein, MRP1, MRP2, and BCRP (ABCG2) in tissue defense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In tumor cell lines, multidrug resistance is often associated with an ATP-dependent decrease in cellular drug accumulation which is attributed to the overexpression of certain ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins. ABC proteins that confer drug resistance include (but are not limited to) P-glycoprotein (gene symbol ABCB1), the multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1, gene symbol ABCC1), MRP2 (gene symbol ABCC2), and the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, gene symbol ABCG2). In addition to their role in drug resistance, there is substantial evidence that these efflux pumps have overlapping functions in tissue defense. Collectively, these proteins are capable of transporting a vast and chemically diverse array of toxicants including bulky lipophilic cationic, anionic, and neutrally charged drugs and toxins as well as conjugated organic anions that encompass dietary and environmental carcinogens, pesticides, metals, metalloids, and lipid peroxidation products. P-glycoprotein, MRP1, MRP2, and BCRP/ABCG2 are expressed in tissues important for absorption (e.g., lung and gut) and metabolism and elimination (liver and kidney). In addition, these transporters have an important role in maintaining the barrier function of sanctuary site tissues (e.g., blood-brain barrier, blood-cerebral spinal fluid barrier, blood-testis barrier and the maternal-fetal barrier or placenta). Thus, these ABC transporters are increasingly recognized for their ability to modulate the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity of xenobiotics. In this review, the role of these four ABC transporter proteins in protecting tissues from a variety of toxicants is discussed. Species variations in substrate specificity and tissue distribution of these transporters are also addressed since these properties have implications for in vivo models of toxicity used for drug discovery and development

  19. Cutaneous necrosis in pregnancy secondary to activated protein C resistance in hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, W; Downie, I; Keefe, M; Chisholm, M

    1995-04-01

    A 26-year-old woman with hereditary angineurotic oedema (HAE) presented at 22 weeks gestation with severe cutaneous necrosis similar to that seen in coumarin skin necrosis. Protein S deficiency secondary to HAE and pregnancy was postulated. Treatment with heparin, C1-inhibitor concentrates, systemic steroids and surgical debridement resulted in a successful outcome for both mother and child. Subsequent investigations revealed normal levels of protein C, antithrombin III, total protein S, free protein S but reduced function protein S activity with evidence of activated protein C resistance. Cutaneous necrosis has not been reported in associated with activated protein C resistance previously and the possible mechanisms are discussed. PMID:7745572

  20. Human S100A9 protein is stabilized by inflammatory stimuli via the formation of proteolytically-resistant homodimers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Riva

    Full Text Available S100A8 and S100A9 are Ca(2+-binding proteins that are associated with acute and chronic inflammation and cancer. They form predominantly heterodimers even if there are data supporting homodimer formation. We investigated the stability of the heterodimer in myeloid and S100A8/S100A9 over-expressing COS cells. In both cases, S100A8 and S100A9 proteins were not completely degraded even 48 hrs after blocking protein synthesis. In contrast, in single transfected cells, S100A8 protein was completely degraded after 24 h, while S100A9 was completely unstable. However, S100A9 protein expression was rescued upon S100A8 co-expression or inhibition of proteasomal activity. Furthermore, S100A9, but not S100A8, could be stabilized by LPS, IL-1β and TNFα treatment. Interestingly, stimulation of S100A9-transfected COS cells with proteasomal inhibitor or IL-1β lead to the formation of protease resistant S100A9 homodimers. In summary, our data indicated that S100A9 protein is extremely unstable but can be rescued upon co-expression with S100A8 protein or inflammatory stimuli, via proteolytically resistant homodimer formation. The formation of S100A9 homodimers by this mechanism may constitute an amplification step during an inflammatory reaction.

  1. The Adipocyte-Derived Hormone Leptin Has Proliferative Actions on Androgen-Resistant Prostate Cancer Cells Linking Obesity to Advanced Stages of Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Raschid Hoda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Because obesity may be a risk factor for prostate cancer, we investigated proliferative effects of adipocytes-derived hormone leptin on human prostate cancer cells and assessed the role of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathway in mediating these actions. Material and Methods. Three human prostate cancer cell lines were treated with increasing doses of recombinant leptin. Cell growth was measured under serum-free conditions using a spectrophotometric assay. Further, Western blotting was applied to detect the phosphorylation of an ERK1/2, and a specific inhibitor of MAPK (PD98059; 40 μM was used. Results. In both androgen-resistant cell lines DU145 and PC-3, cell growth was dose-dependently increased by leptin after 24 hrs and 48 hrs of incubation, whereas leptin’s proliferative effects on androgen-sensitive cell line LNCaP was less pronounced. Further, leptin caused dose-dependent ERK1/2 phosphorylation in both androgen-resistant cell lines, and pretreatment of these cells with PD98059 inhibited these responses. Conclusions. Leptin may be a potential link between obesity and risk of progression of prostate cancer. Thus, studies on leptin and obesity association to prostate cancer should differentiate patients according to androgen sensitivity.

  2. Chromatin-regulating proteins as targets for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromatin-regulating proteins represent a large class of novel targets for cancer therapy. In the context of radiotherapy, acetylation and deacetylation of histones by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) play important roles in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks generated by ionizing irradiation, and are therefore attractive targets for radiosensitization. Small-molecule inhibitors of HATs (garcinol, anacardic acid and curcumin) and HDACs (vorinostat, sodium butyrate and valproic acid) have been shown to sensitize cancer cells to ionizing irradiation in preclinical models, and some of these molecules are being tested in clinical trials, either alone or in combination with radiotherapy. Meanwhile, recent large-scale genome analyses have identified frequent mutations in genes encoding chromatin-regulating proteins, especially in those encoding subunits of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex, in various human cancers. These observations have driven researchers toward development of targeted therapies against cancers carrying these mutations. DOT1L inhibition in MLL-rearranged leukemia, EZH2 inhibition in EZH2-mutant or MLL-rearranged hematologic malignancies and SNF5-deficient tumors, BRD4 inhibition in various hematologic malignancies, and BRM inhibition in BRG1-deficient tumors have demonstrated promising anti-tumor effects in preclinical models, and these strategies are currently awaiting clinical application. Overall, the data collected so far suggest that targeting chromatin-regulating proteins is a promising strategy for tomorrow's cancer therapy, including radiotherapy and molecularly targeted chemotherapy. (author)

  3. Chromatin-regulating proteins as targets for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oike, Takahiro; Ogiwara, Hideaki; Amornwichet, Napapat; Nakano, Takashi; Kohno, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    Chromatin-regulating proteins represent a large class of novel targets for cancer therapy. In the context of radiotherapy, acetylation and deacetylation of histones by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) play important roles in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks generated by ionizing irradiation, and are therefore attractive targets for radiosensitization. Small-molecule inhibitors of HATs (garcinol, anacardic acid and curcumin) and HDACs (vorinostat, sodium butyrate and valproic acid) have been shown to sensitize cancer cells to ionizing irradiation in preclinical models, and some of these molecules are being tested in clinical trials, either alone or in combination with radiotherapy. Meanwhile, recent large-scale genome analyses have identified frequent mutations in genes encoding chromatin-regulating proteins, especially in those encoding subunits of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex, in various human cancers. These observations have driven researchers toward development of targeted therapies against cancers carrying these mutations. DOT1L inhibition in MLL-rearranged leukemia, EZH2 inhibition in EZH2-mutant or MLL-rearranged hematologic malignancies and SNF5-deficient tumors, BRD4 inhibition in various hematologic malignancies, and BRM inhibition in BRG1-deficient tumors have demonstrated promising anti-tumor effects in preclinical models, and these strategies are currently awaiting clinical application. Overall, the data collected so far suggest that targeting chromatin-regulating proteins is a promising strategy for tomorrow's cancer therapy, including radiotherapy and molecularly targeted chemotherapy. PMID:24522270

  4. Wound Healing and Cancer Stem Cells: Inflammation as a Driver of Treatment Resistance in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Kimberly M; Opdenaker, Lynn M; Flynn, Daniel; Sims-Mourtada, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between wound healing and cancer has long been recognized. The mechanisms that regulate wound healing have been shown to promote transformation and growth of malignant cells. In addition, chronic inflammation has been associated with malignant transformation in many tissues. Recently, pathways involved in inflammation and wound healing have been reported to enhance cancer stem cell (CSC) populations. These cells, which are highly resistant to current treatments, are capable of repopulating the tumor after treatment, causing local and systemic recurrences. In this review, we highlight proinflammatory cytokines and developmental pathways involved in tissue repair, whose deregulation in the tumor microenvironment may promote growth and survival of CSCs. We propose that the addition of anti-inflammatory agents to current treatment regimens may slow the growth of CSCs and improve therapeutic outcomes. PMID:25674014

  5. Blast resistance of CC-NB-LRR protein Pb1 is mediated by WRKY45 through protein–protein interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Inoue, Haruhiko; Hayashi, Nagao; Matsushita, Akane; Xinqiong, Liu; Nakayama, Akira; Sugano, Shoji; Jiang, Chang-Jie; Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Panicle blast 1 (Pb1) is a panicle blast resistance gene derived from the indica rice cultivar “Modan.” Pb1 encodes a coiled-coil–nucleotide-binding site–leucine-rich repeat (CC-NB-LRR) protein and confers durable, broad-spectrum resistance to Magnaporthe oryzae races. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying Pb1-mediated blast resistance. The Pb1 protein interacted with WRKY45, a transcription factor involved in induced resistance via the salicylic acid signaling pathway tha...

  6. Receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatases in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Du

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs play an important role in regulating cell signaling events in coordination with tyrosine kinases to control cell proliferation, apoptosis, survival, migration, and invasion. Receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPRs are a subgroup of PTPs that share a transmembrane domain with resulting similarities in function and target specificity. In this review, we summarize genetic and epigenetic alterations including mutation, deletion, amplification, and promoter methylation of PTPRs in cancer and consider the consequences of PTPR alterations in different types of cancers. We also summarize recent developments using PTPRs as prognostic or predictive biomarkers and/or direct targets. Increased understanding of the role of PTPRs in cancer may provide opportunities to improve therapeutic approaches.

  7. Exosomal Proteins as a Diagnostic Biomarkers in Lung Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandfeld-Paulsen, B; Jakobsen, K R; Bæk, R;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exosomes have been suggested as promising biomarkers in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), since they contain proteins from their originating cells and are readily available in plasma. In this study, we explore the potential of exosome protein profiling in diagnosing lung cancer...... patients of all stages and various histological subtypes. METHODS: Plasma was isolated from 581 patients (431 with lung cancer, 150 controls). The Extracellular Vesicle (EV) Array was used to phenotype exosomes. The EV Array contained 49 antibodies for capturing exosomes. Subsequently, a cocktail of biotin......-conjugated CD9, CD81 and CD63 antibodies was used to detect and visualize captured exosomes. Multi-marker models were made combining two or more markers. The optimal multi-marker model was evaluated by Area under the curve (AUC) and Random Forests analysis. RESULTS: The markers CD151, CD171 and Tspan8 were...

  8. Up-regulation of fas reverses cisplatin resistance of human small cell lung cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Wei

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background/Aim Fas/FasL system is a major regulator of apoptosis. The mechanisms by which Fas mediates cisplatin resistance remain unclear. The aim of this study is to explore the effect of Fas over-expression on cisplatin resistance of small cell lung cancer cells and its possible mechanisms. Materials and methods Fas was over-expressed in H446/CDDP cells by infection with the adenoviruses containing Fas. Sensitivity of Fas-overexpressed H446/CDDP cells to cisplatin was evaluated using MTT assay. Expressions of Fas, GST-π and ERCC1 were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Apoptosis rate was examined by FACS. Results Over-expression of Fas in H446/CDDP cells significantly decreased the expressions of GST-π and ERCC1 at mRNA and protein levels, and increased the cell apoptosis. Furthermore, up-regulation of Fas significantly decreased the tolerance of H446/CDDP cells to cisplatin. Conclusion Over-expression of Fas reverses drug resistance of H446/CDDP cells, possibly due to the increased cell sensitivity to apoptosis and the decreased expressions of GST-π and ERCC1.

  9. Role of volume-regulated and calcium-activated anion channels in cell volume homeostasis, cancer and drug resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay; Sørensen, Belinda Halling; Sauter, Daniel Rafael Peter;

    2015-01-01

    Volume-regulated channels for anions (VRAC) / organic osmolytes (VSOAC) play essential roles in cell volume regulation and other cellular functions, e.g. proliferation, cell migration and apoptosis. LRRC8A, which belongs to the leucine rich-repeat containing protein family, was recently shown to be...... an essential component of both VRAC and VSOAC. Reduced VRAC and VSOAC activities are seen in drug resistant cancer cells. ANO1 is a calcium-activated chloride channel expressed on the plasma membrane of e.g. secretory epithelia. ANO1 is amplified and highly expressed in a large number of carcinomas...... important cellular functions as well as their role in cancer and drug resistance....

  10. Chromatin-modifying proteins in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fog, Cathrine K; Jensen, Klaus T; Lund, Anders Henrik

    2007-01-01

    Chromatin-modifying proteins mold the genome into areas that are accessible for transcriptional activity and areas that are transcriptionally silent. This epigenetic gene regulation allows for different transcriptional programs to be conducted in different cell types at different timepoints-despi...

  11. PI3K-AKT-mTOR signaling in prostate cancer progression and androgen deprivation therapy resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Merritt P Edlind; Andrew C Hsieh

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second most common malignancy among men in the world. Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is the lethal form of the disease, which develops upon resistance to ifrst line androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Emerging evidence demonstrates a key role for the PI3K-AKT-mTOR signaling axis in the development and maintenance of CRPC. This pathway, which is deregulated in the majority of advanced PCas, serves as a critical nexus for the integration of growth signals with downstream cellular processes such as protein synthesis, proliferation, survival, metabolism and differentiation, thus providing mechanisms for cancer cells to overcome the stress associated with androgen deprivation. Furthermore, preclinical studies have elucidated a direct connection between the PI3K-AKT-mTOR and androgen receptor (AR) signaling axes, revealing a dynamic interplay between these pathways during the development of ADT resistance. Thus, there is a clear rationale for the continued clinical development of a number of novel inhibitors of the PI3K pathway, which offer the potential of blocking CRPC growth and survival. In this review, we will explore the relevance of the PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway in PCa progression and castration resistance in order to inform the clinical development of speciifc pathway inhibitors in advanced PCa. In addition, we will highlight current deifciencies in our clinical knowledge, most notably the need for biomarkers that can accurately predict for response to PI3K pathway inhibitors.

  12. The 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO disrupts mammary epithelial morphogenesis and promotes breast cancer cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoting Wu

    Full Text Available Mitochondria play important roles in cancer progression and have emerged as viable targets for cancer therapy. Increasing levels of the outer mitochondrial membrane protein, 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO, are associated with advancing breast cancer stage. In particular, higher TSPO levels are found in estrogen receptor (ER-negative breast tumors, compared with ER-positive tumors. In this study, we sought to define the roles of TSPO in the acquisition of breast cancer malignancy. Using a three-dimensional Matrigel culture system, we determined the impact of elevated TSPO levels on mammary epithelial morphogenesis. Our studies demonstrate that stable overexpression of TSPO in mammary epithelial MCF10A acini drives proliferation and provides partial resistance to luminal apoptosis, resulting in enlarged acinar structures with partially filled lumen that resemble early stage breast lesions leading to breast cancer. In breast cancer cell lines, TSPO silencing or TSPO overexpression significantly altered the migratory activity. In addition, we found that combination treatment with the TSPO ligands (PK 11195 or Ro5-4864 and lonidamine, a clinical phase II drug targeting mitochondria, decreased viability of ER-negative breast cancer cell lines. Taken together, these data demonstrate that increases in TSPO levels at different stages of breast cancer progression results in the acquisition of distinct properties associated with malignancy. Furthermore, targeting TSPO, particularly in combination with other mitochondria-targeting agents, may prove useful for the treatment of ER-negative breast cancer.

  13. The ALK inhibitor ceritinib overcomes crizotinib resistance in non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Friboulet, Luc; Li, Nanxin; Katayama, Ryohei; Lee, Christian C.; Gainor, Justin F.; Crystal, Adam S.; Michellys, Pierre-Yves; Awad, Mark M.; Yanagitani, Noriko; Kim, Sungjoon; Pferdekamper, AnneMarie C.; Li, Jie; Kasibhatla, Shailaja; Sun, Frank; Sun, Xiuying

    2014-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) harboring anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements invariably develop resistance to the ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) crizotinib. Herein, we report the first preclinical evaluation of the next-generation ALK TKI, ceritinib (LDK378) in the setting of crizotinib resistance. Interrogation of in vitro and in vivo models of acquired resistance to crizotinib, including cell lines established from biopsies of crizotinib-resistant NSCLC patients r...

  14. SERPINB3 in the chicken model of ovarian cancer: a prognostic factor for platinum resistance and survival in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whasun Lim

    Full Text Available Serine protease inhibitors (SERPINs appear to be ubiquitously expressed in a variety of species and play important roles in pivotal physiological processes such as angiogenesis, immune responses, blood coagulation and fibronolysis. Of these, squamous cell carcinoma antigen 1 (SCCA1, also known as a SERPINB3, was first identified in squamous cell carcinoma tissue from the cervix of women. However, there is little known about the SERPINB3 expression in human epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the functional role of SERPINB3 gene in human EOC using chickens, the most relevant animal model. In 136 chickens, EOC was found in 10 (7.4%. SERPINB3 mRNA was induced in cancerous, but not normal ovaries of chickens (P<0.01, and it was abundant only in the glandular epithelium of cancerous ovaries of chickens. Further, several microRNAs, specifically miR-101, miR-1668 and miR-1681 were discovered to influence SERPINB3 expression via its 3'-UTR which suggests that post-transcriptional regulation influences SERPINB3 expression in chickens. SERPINB3 protein was localized predominantly to the glandular epithelium in cancerous ovaries of chickens, and it was abundant in the nucleus of both chicken and human ovarian cancer cell lines. In 109 human patients with EOC, 15 (13.8%, 66 (60.6% and 28 (25.7% patients showed weak, moderate and strong expression of SERPINB3 protein, respectively. Strong expression of SERPINB3 protein was a prognostic factor for platinum resistance (adjusted OR; odds ratio, 5.94; 95% Confidence Limits, 1.21-29.15, and for poor progression-free survival (PFS; adjusted HR; hazard ratio, 2.07; 95% CI; confidence interval, 1.03-4.41. Therefore, SERPINB3 may play an important role in ovarian carcinogenesis and be a novel biomarker for predicting platinum resistance and a poor prognosis for survival in patients with EOC.

  15. Glycosylation status of vitamin D binding protein in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehder, Douglas S; Nelson, Randall W; Borges, Chad R

    2009-10-01

    On the basis of the results of activity studies, previous reports have suggested that vitamin D binding protein (DBP) is significantly or even completely deglycosylated in cancer patients, eliminating the molecular precursor of the immunologically important Gc macrophage activating factor (GcMAF), a glycosidase-derived product of DBP. The purpose of this investigation was to directly determine the relative degree of O-linked trisaccharide glycosylation of serum-derived DBP in human breast, colorectal, pancreatic, and prostate cancer patients. Results obtained by electrospray ionization-based mass spectrometric immunoassay showed that there was no significant depletion of DBP trisaccharide glycosylation in the 56 cancer patients examined relative to healthy controls. These results suggest that alternative hypotheses regarding the molecular and/or structural origins of GcMAF must be considered to explain the relative inability of cancer patient serum to activate macrophages. PMID:19642159

  16. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein mediates tumor cell resistance to antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, M K; Sauer, S J; Nath, S; Robinson, T J; Morse, M A; Devi, G R

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the deadliest, distinct subtype of breast cancer. High expression of epidermal growth factor receptors [EGFR or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)] in IBC tumors has prompted trials of anti-EGFR/HER2 monoclonal antibodies to inhibit oncogenic signaling; however, de novo and acquired therapeutic resistance is common. Another critical function of these antibodies is to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), which enables immune effector cells to engage tumors and deliver granzymes, activating executioner caspases. We hypothesized that high expression of anti-apoptotic molecules in tumors would render them resistant to ADCC. Herein, we demonstrate that the most potent caspase inhibitor, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), overexpressed in IBC, drives resistance to ADCC mediated by cetuximab (anti-EGFR) and trastuzumab (anti-HER2). Overexpression of XIAP in parental IBC cell lines enhances resistance to ADCC; conversely, targeted downregulation of XIAP in ADCC-resistant IBC cells renders them sensitive. As hypothesized, this ADCC resistance is in part a result of the ability of XIAP to inhibit caspase activity; however, we also unexpectedly found that resistance was dependent on XIAP-mediated, caspase-independent suppression of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, which otherwise occurs during ADCC. Transcriptome analysis supported these observations by revealing modulation of genes involved in immunosuppression and oxidative stress response in XIAP-overexpressing, ADCC-resistant cells. We conclude that XIAP is a critical modulator of ADCC responsiveness, operating through both caspase-dependent and -independent mechanisms. These results suggest that strategies targeting the effects of XIAP on caspase activation and ROS suppression have the potential to enhance the activity of monoclonal antibody-based immunotherapy. PMID:26821068

  17. Programmable protein arrays for immunoprofiling HPV-associated cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewaisha, Radwa; Meshay, Ian; Resnik, Jack; Katchman, Benjamin A; Anderson, Karen S

    2016-04-01

    Over 600,000 cancers each year are attributed to the human papillomavirus (HPV), including cervical, anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers (OPC). A key challenge in understanding HPV immunobiology is the diversity of oncogenic HPV types and the need for multiplexed display of HPV antigens to measure antibody responses. We have generated custom HPV protein microarrays displaying 98 proteins as C-terminal GST fusion proteins, representing eight antigens of two low-risk HPV types (HPV6 and 11) and ten oncogenic high-risk HPV types (HPV16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52 and 58). We demonstrate robust and reproducible protein expression of 96/98 of the antigens using a human cell lysate expression system. The target epitopes and specificities of four monoclonal antibodies were identified. Using sera from ten patients with newly diagnosed OPC and ten controls, we demonstrate specific IgG seroreactivity to HPV16 E1, E2, and E7 (a fold increase of 1.52, 2.19 and 1.35 in cases vs. controls, respectively, all p Abs in serum from a patient with cervical cancer. The HPV protein array has potential for rapid identification of serologic responses to 12 HPV types. PMID:27089055

  18. Nanotechnology-based treatment for chemotherapy-resistant breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouzeid, Abraham H.; Patel, Niravkumar R.; Rachman, Ilya M.; Senn, Sean; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2014-08-01

    Background: Treatment of metastatic cancer remains a formidable clinical challenge. Better therapeutic options with improved tissue penetration and tumor cell uptake are urgently needed. Targeted nanotherapy, for improved delivery, and combinatory drug administration aimed at inhibiting chemo-resistance may be the solution. Purpose: The study was performed to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of polymeric PEG-PE micelles, co-loaded with curcumin (CUR) and doxorubicin (DOX), and targeted with anti-GLUT1 antibody (GLUT1) against MDA-MB-231 human breast adenocarcinoma cells both in vitro and in vivo. Methods: MDA-MB-231 DOX-resistant cells were treated with non-targeted and GLUT1-targeted CUR and DOX micelles as a single agent or in combination. Tumor cells were also inoculated in female nude mice. Established tumors were treated with the micellar formulations at a dose of 6 mg/kg CUR and 1 mg/kg DOX every 2 d for a total of 7 injections. Results: CUR+DOX-loaded micelles decorated with GLUT1 had a robust killing effect even at low doses of DOX in vitro. At the doses chosen, non-targeted CUR and CUR+DOX micelles did not exhibit significant tumor inhibition versus control. However, GLUT1-CUR and GLUT1-CUR+DOX micelles showed a significant tumor inhibition effect with an improvement in survival. Conclusion: We showed a dramatic improvement in efficacy between the non-targeted and GLUT1-targeted formulations both in vitro and in vivo. Also, importantly, the addition of CUR to the micelle, has restored sensitivity to DOX, with resultant tumor growth inhibition. Hence, we confirmed that GLUT1-CUR+DOX micelles are effective in vitro and in vivo and deserve further investigation.

  19. Thymoquinone up-regulates PTEN expression and induces apoptosis in doxorubicin-resistant human breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of innocuous naturally occurring compounds to overcome drug resistance and cancer recalcitrance is now in the forefront of cancer research. Thymoquinone (TQ) is a bioactive constituent of the volatile oil derived from seeds of Nigella sativa Linn. TQ has shown promising anti-carcinogenic and anti-tumor activities through different mechanisms. However, the effect of TQ on cell signaling and survival pathways in resistant cancer cells has not been fully delineated. Here, we report that TQ greatly inhibits doxorubicin-resistant human breast cancer MCF-7/DOX cell proliferation. TQ treatment increased cellular levels of PTEN proteins, resulting in a substantial decrease of phosphorylated Akt, a known regulator of cell survival. The PTEN expression was accompanied with elevation of PTEN mRNA. TQ arrested MCF-7/DOX cells at G2/M phase and increased cellular levels of p53 and p21 proteins. Flow cytometric analysis and agarose gel electrophoresis revealed a significant increase in Sub-G1 cell population and appearance of DNA ladders following TQ treatment, indicating cellular apoptosis. TQ-induced apoptosis was associated with disrupted mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of caspases and PARP cleavage in MCF-7/DOX cells. Moreover, TQ treatment increased Bax/Bcl2 ratio via up-regulating Bax and down-regulating Bcl2 proteins. More importantly, PTEN silencing by target specific siRNA enabled the suppression of TQ-induced apoptosis resulting in increased cell survival. Our results reveal that up-regulation of the key upstream signaling factor, PTEN, in MCF-7/DOX cells inhibited Akt phosphorylation, which ultimately causes increase in their regulatory p53 levels affecting the induction of G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Overall results provide mechanistic insights for understanding the molecular basis and utility of the anti-tumor activity of TQ.

  20. Thymoquinone up-regulates PTEN expression and induces apoptosis in doxorubicin-resistant human breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arafa, El-Shaimaa A.; Zhu Qianzheng [Department of Radiology, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Shah, Zubair I. [James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Wani, Gulzar; Barakat, Bassant M.; Racoma, Ira [Department of Radiology, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); El-Mahdy, Mohamed A., E-mail: Mohamed.el-mahdy@osumc.edu [Department of Radiology, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Wani, Altaf A., E-mail: wani.2@osu.edu [Department of Radiology, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); DNA Research Chair, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-01-10

    The use of innocuous naturally occurring compounds to overcome drug resistance and cancer recalcitrance is now in the forefront of cancer research. Thymoquinone (TQ) is a bioactive constituent of the volatile oil derived from seeds of Nigella sativa Linn. TQ has shown promising anti-carcinogenic and anti-tumor activities through different mechanisms. However, the effect of TQ on cell signaling and survival pathways in resistant cancer cells has not been fully delineated. Here, we report that TQ greatly inhibits doxorubicin-resistant human breast cancer MCF-7/DOX cell proliferation. TQ treatment increased cellular levels of PTEN proteins, resulting in a substantial decrease of phosphorylated Akt, a known regulator of cell survival. The PTEN expression was accompanied with elevation of PTEN mRNA. TQ arrested MCF-7/DOX cells at G2/M phase and increased cellular levels of p53 and p21 proteins. Flow cytometric analysis and agarose gel electrophoresis revealed a significant increase in Sub-G1 cell population and appearance of DNA ladders following TQ treatment, indicating cellular apoptosis. TQ-induced apoptosis was associated with disrupted mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of caspases and PARP cleavage in MCF-7/DOX cells. Moreover, TQ treatment increased Bax/Bcl2 ratio via up-regulating Bax and down-regulating Bcl2 proteins. More importantly, PTEN silencing by target specific siRNA enabled the suppression of TQ-induced apoptosis resulting in increased cell survival. Our results reveal that up-regulation of the key upstream signaling factor, PTEN, in MCF-7/DOX cells inhibited Akt phosphorylation, which ultimately causes increase in their regulatory p53 levels affecting the induction of G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Overall results provide mechanistic insights for understanding the molecular basis and utility of the anti-tumor activity of TQ.

  1. Identification of novel therapeutic target genes in acquired lapatinib-resistant breast cancer by integrative meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Seok; Hwang, Sun Goo; Kim, Jin Ki; Park, Tae Hwan; Kim, Young Rae; Myeong, Ho Sung; Choi, Jong Duck; Kwon, Kang; Jang, Cheol Seong; Ro, Young Tae; Noh, Yun Hee; Kim, Sung Young

    2016-02-01

    Acquired resistance to lapatinib is a highly problematic clinical barrier that has to be overcome for a successful cancer treatment. Despite efforts to determine the mechanisms underlying acquired lapatinib resistance (ALR), no definitive genetic factors have been reported to be solely responsible for the acquired resistance in breast cancer. Therefore, we performed a cross-platform meta-analysis of three publically available microarray datasets related to breast cancer with ALR, using the R-based RankProd package. From the meta-analysis, we were able to identify a total of 990 differentially expressed genes (DEGs, 406 upregulated, 584 downregulated) that are potentially associated with ALR. Gene ontology (GO) function and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analysis of the DEGs showed that "response to organic substance" and "p53 signaling pathway" may be largely involved in ALR process. Of these, many of the top 50 upregulated and downregulated DEGs were found in oncogenesis of various tumors and cancers. For the top 50 DEGs, we constructed the gene coexpression and protein-protein interaction networks from a huge database of well-known molecular interactions. By integrative analysis of two systemic networks, we condensed the total number of DEGs to six common genes (LGALS1, PRSS23, PTRF, FHL2, TOB1, and SOCS2). Furthermore, these genes were confirmed in functional module eigens obtained from the weighted gene correlation network analysis of total DEGs in the microarray datasets ("GSE16179" and "GSE52707"). Our integrative meta-analysis could provide a comprehensive perspective into complex mechanisms underlying ALR in breast cancer and a theoretical support for further chemotherapeutic studies. PMID:26361955

  2. Developing imaging strategies for castration resistant prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in the understanding of castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) have lead to a growing number of experimental therapies, many of which are directed against the androgen-receptor (AR) signaling axis. These advances generate the need for reliable molecular imaging biomarkers to non-invasively determine efficacy, and to better guide treatment selection of these promising AR-targeted drugs. Methods. We draw on our own experience, supplemented by review of the current literature, to discuss the systematic development of imaging biomarkers for use in the context of CRPC, with a focus on bone scintigraphy, F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) and PET imaging of the AR signaling axis. Results. The roadmap to biomarker development mandates rigorous standardization and analytic validation of an assay before it can be qualified successfully for use in an appropriate clinical context. The Prostate Cancer Working Group 2 (PCWG2) criteria for 'radiographic' progression by bone scintigraphy serve as a paradigm of this process. Implemented by the Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Consortium (PCCTC), these consensus criteria may ultimately enable the co-development of more potent and versatile molecular imaging biomarkers. Purported to be superior to single-photon bone scanning, the added value of Na18F-PET for imaging of bone metastases is still uncertain. FDG-PET already plays an integral role in the management of many diseases, but requires further evaluation before being qualified in the context of CRPC. PET tracers that probe the AR signaling axis, such as 18F-FDHT and 89Zr-591, are now under development as pharmacodynamic markers, and as markers of efficacy, in tandem with FDG-PET. Semi-automated analysis programs for facilitating PET interpretation may serve as a valuable tool to help navigate the biomarker roadmap. Conclusions. Molecular imaging strategies, particularly those that probe the AR signaling axis, have the potential to

  3. Discovery of dachshund 2 protein as a novel biomarker of poor prognosis in epithelial ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nodin Björn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Dachshund homolog 2 (DACH2 gene has been implicated in development of the female genital tract in mouse models and premature ovarian failure syndrome, but to date, its expression in human normal and cancerous tissue remains unexplored. Using the Human Protein Atlas as a tool for cancer biomarker discovery, DACH2 protein was found to be differentially expressed in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC. Here, the expression and prognostic significance of DACH2 was further evaluated in ovarian cancer cell lines and human EOC samples. Methods Immunohistochemical expression of DACH2 was examined in tissue microarrays with 143 incident EOC cases from two prospective, population-based cohorts, including a subset of benign-appearing fallopian tubes (n = 32. A nuclear score (NS, i.e. multiplier of staining fraction and intensity, was calculated. For survival analyses, cases were dichotomized into low (NS 3 using classification and regression tree analysis. Kaplan Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modelling were used to assess the impact of DACH2 expression on survival. DACH2 expression was analysed in the cisplatin sensitive ovarian cancer cell line A2780 and its cisplatin resistant derivative A2780-Cp70. The specificity of the DACH2 antibody was tested using siRNA-mediated silencing of DACH2 in A2780-Cp70 cells. Results DACH2 expression was considerably higher in the cisplatin resistant A2780-Cp70 cells compared to the cisplatin-sensitive A2780 cells. While present in all sampled fallopian tubes, DACH2 expression ranged from negative to strong in EOC. In EOC, DACH2 expression correlated with several proteins involved in DNA integrity and repair, and proliferation. DACH2 expression was significantly higher in carcinoma of the serous subtype compared to non-serous carcinoma. In the full cohort, high DACH2 expression was significantly associated with poor prognosis in univariable analysis, and in carcinoma of the serous subtype

  4. Myofibrillar protein synthesis following ingestion of soy protein isolate at rest and after resistance exercise in elderly men

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Yifan; Churchward-Venne Tyler A; Burd Nicholas A; Breen Leigh; Tarnopolsky Mark A; Phillips Stuart M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Increased amino acid availability stimulates muscle protein synthesis, however, aged muscle appears less responsive to the anabolic effects of amino acids when compared to the young. We aimed to compare changes in myofibrillar protein synthesis (MPS) in elderly men at rest and after resistance exercise following ingestion of different doses of soy protein and compare the responses to those we previously observed with ingestion of whey protein isolate. Methods Thirty elderl...

  5. Antibiotic-resistant gram-negative bacterial infections in patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Federico; Adachi, Javier; Bonomo, Robert A

    2014-11-15

    Patients with cancer are at high risk for infections caused by antibiotic resistant gram-negative bacteria. In this review, we summarize trends among the major pathogens and clinical syndromes associated with antibiotic resistant gram-negative bacterial infection in patients with malignancy, with special attention to carbapenem and expanded-spectrum β-lactam resistance in Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia--all major threats to our cancer patients. Optimal therapy for these antibiotic-resistant pathogens still remains to be determined. PMID:25352627

  6. Establishment of a human colorectal cancer cell line P6C with stem cell properties and resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guan-hua RAO; Hong-min LIU; Bao-wei LI; Jia-jie HAO; Yan-lei YANG; Ming-rong WANG; Xiao-hui WANG

    2013-01-01

    Aim:Cancer stem cells have the capacity to initiate and sustain tumor growth.In this study,we established a CD44+ colorectal cancer stem cell line with particular emphasis on its self-renewal capacity,enhanced tumor initiation and drug resistance.Methods:Fresh colon cancer and paired normal colon tissues were collected from 13 patients who had not received chemotherapy or radiotherapy prior to surgery.Among the 6 single-cell derived clones,only the P6C cell line was cultured for more than 20 passages in serial culture and formed holoclones with high efficiency,and then the stemness gene expression,colony formation,tumorigenicity and drug sensitivities of the P6C cell line were examined.Results:Stemness proteins,including c-Myc,0ct3/4,Nanog,Lgr5,and SOX2,were highly expressed in the P6C cell line.Oct3/4-positive P6C cells mostly generated holoclones through symmetric division,while a small number of P6C cells generated meroclones through asymmetric division.P6C cells stably expressed CD44 and possessed a high capacity to form tumor spheres.A single cellderived sphere was capable of generating xenograft tumors in nude mice.Compared to SW480 and HCT116 colorectal cancer cells,P6C cells were highly resistant to Camptothecin and 5-fluorouracil,the commonly used chemotherapeutic agents to treat colorectal cancers.Conclusion:We established a colorectal cancer stem cell line P6C with a high tumorigenic capacity and the characteristics of normal stem cells.It will benefit the mechanistic studies on cancer stem cells and the development of drugs that specifically target the cancer stem cells.

  7. The cellular uptake mechanism, intracellular transportation, and exocytosis of polyamidoamine dendrimers in multidrug-resistant breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Mengjun; Sun, Yuqi; Zhang, Xiaojun; Guan, Guannan; Zhao, Xiuli; Qiao, Mingxi; Chen, Dawei; Hu, Haiyang

    2016-01-01

    Polyamidoamine dendrimers, which can deliver drugs and genetic materials to resistant cells, are attracting increased research attention, but their transportation behavior in resistant cells remains unclear. In this paper, we performed a systematic analysis of the cellular uptake, intracellular transportation, and efflux of PAMAM-NH2 dendrimers in multidrug-resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR cells) using sensitive breast cancer cells (MCF-7 cells) as the control. We found that the uptake rate of PAMAM-NH2 was much lower and exocytosis of PAMAM-NH2 was much greater in MCF-7/ADR cells than in MCF-7 cells due to the elimination of PAMAM-NH2 from P-glycoprotein and the multidrug resistance-associated protein in MCF-7/ADR cells. Macropinocytosis played a more important role in its uptake in MCF-7/ADR cells than in MCF-7 cells. PAMAM-NH2 aggregated and became more degraded in the lysosomal vesicles of the MCF-7/ADR cells than in those of the MCF-7 cells. The endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex were found to participate in the exocytosis rather than endocytosis process of PAMAM-NH2 in both types of cells. Our findings clearly showed the intracellular transportation process of PAMAM-NH2 in MCF-7/ADR cells and provided a guide of using PAMAM-NH2 as a drug and gene vector in resistant cells. PMID:27536106

  8. Prolactin-inducible proteins in human breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of action of prolactin in target cells and the role of prolactin in human breast cancer are poorly understood phenomena. The present study examines the effect of human prolactin (hPRL) on the synthesis of unique proteins by a human breast cancer cell line, T-47D, in serum-free medium containing bovine serum albumin. [35S]Methionine-labeled proteins were analysed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis and fluorography. Treatment of cells with hPRL (1-1000 ng/ml) and hydrocortisone (1 microgram/ml) for 36 h or longer resulted in the synthesis and secretion of three proteins having molecular weights of 11,000, 14,000, and 16,000. Neither hPRL nor hydrocortisone alone induced these proteins. Of several other peptide hormones tested, only human growth hormone, a hormone structurally and functionally similar to hPRL, could replace hPRL in causing protein induction. These three proteins were, therefore, referred to as prolactin-inducible proteins (PIP). Each of the three PIPs was purified to homogeneity by preparative sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and specific antibodies were generated to them in rabbits. By immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting (Western blot) of proteins secreted by T-47D cells, it was demonstrated that the three PIPs were immunologically identical to one another. In addition, the 16-kDa and 14-kDa proteins (PIP-16 and PIP-14), and not the 11-kDa protein (PIP-11), incorporated [3H]glycosamine. Furthermore, 2-deoxyglucose (2 mM) and tunicamycin (0.5 micrograms/ml), two compounds known to inhibit glycosylation, blocked the production of PIP-16 and PIP-14, with a concomitant increase in the accumulation of PIP-11

  9. Prediction of HIV drug resistance from genotype with encoded three-dimensional protein structure

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Xiaxia; Weber, Irene T.; Harrison, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Drug resistance has become a severe challenge for treatment of HIV infections. Mutations accumulate in the HIV genome and make certain drugs ineffective. Prediction of resistance from genotype data is a valuable guide in choice of drugs for effective therapy. Results In order to improve the computational prediction of resistance from genotype data we have developed a unified encoding of the protein sequence and three-dimensional protein structure of the drug target for classificati...

  10. Effect of protein/essential amino acids and resistance training on skeletal muscle hypertrophy: A case for whey protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stout Jeffrey R

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Regardless of age or gender, resistance training or provision of adequate amounts of dietary protein (PRO or essential amino acids (EAA can increase muscle protein synthesis (MPS in healthy adults. Combined PRO or EAA ingestion proximal to resistance training, however, can augment the post-exercise MPS response and has been shown to elicit a greater anabolic effect than exercise plus carbohydrate. Unfortunately, chronic/adaptive response data comparing the effects of different protein sources is limited. A growing body of evidence does, however, suggest that dairy PRO, and whey in particular may: 1 stimulate the greatest rise in MPS, 2 result in greater muscle cross-sectional area when combined with chronic resistance training, and 3 at least in younger individuals, enhance exercise recovery. Therefore, this review will focus on whey protein supplementation and its effects on skeletal muscle mass when combined with heavy resistance training.

  11. [The structure of cellular vaults, their role in the normal cell and in the multidrug resistance of cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szaflarski, Witold; Nowicki, Michał; Zabel, Maciej

    2011-01-01

    The cellular vaults have been described for the first time in 1986 as ribonucleoprotein complexes composed of three proteins, MVP, TEP1 and vPARP and several vRNA strains. Biochemical and structural studies revealed their ubiquitous existence in the cytoplasm of many eukaryotic cells and their barrel-like structure indicating their engagement in the intracellular transport. Furthermore, the high homology between MVP and LRP which was already known to be involved in multidrug resistance mechanism opened a discussion about the role of vaults in both normal and cancer cells. The histopathology research demonstrated an increased amount of MVP/LRP proteins in the cancer as well as showed translocation possibility between cytoplasm and nuclear envelope, which can be of crucial point in the prevention of nucleus against anticancer drugs. PMID:22235652

  12. Down-expression of tumor protein p53-induced nuclear protein 1 in human gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei-Hong Jiang; Yoshiharu Motoo; Stéphane Garcia; Juan Lucio Iovanna; Marie-Josèphe Pébusque; Norio Sawabu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: Overexpression of tumor protein p53-induced nuclear protein 1 (TP53INP1) induces G1 cell cycle arrest and increases p53-mediated apoptosis. To clarify the clinical importance of TP53INP1, we analyzed TP53INP1and p53 expression in gastric cancer.METHODS: TP53INP1 and p53 expression were examined using immunohistochemistry in 142 cases of gastric cancer. The apoptosis of gastric cancer cells was analyzed using the TUNEL method. The relationship between the expression of TP53INP1 and clinicopathological factors was statistically analyzed.RESULTS: TP53INP1 was expressed in 98% (139/142cases) of non-cancerous gastric tissues and was downexpressed in 64% (91/142 cases) of gastric cancer lesions from the same patients. TP53INP1 expression was significantly decreased (43.9%) in poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma compared with well or moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma (81.6%).Cancers invading the submucosa or deeper showed lower positively (59.1%) compared with mucosal cancers (85.2%). Decrease or loss of TP53INP1 expression was significantly correlated with lymphatic invasion (54.3%vs 82.0% without lymphatic invasion) and node-positive patients (31.3% vs 68.3% in node-negative patients).P53 was expressed in 68 (47.9%) patients of gastric cancer, whereas it was absent in normal gastric tissues.A significant association was also observed between TP53INP1 status and the level of apoptosis in tumor cells: the apoptotic index in TP53INP1-positive tissues was significantly higher than that in TP53INP1-negative portions. Finally, when survival data were analyzed,loss of TP53INP1 expression had a significant effect in predicting a poor prognosis (P= 0.0006).CONCLUSION: TP53INP1-positive rate decreases with the progression of gastric cancer. TP53INP1 protein negativity is significantly associated with aggressive pathological phenotypes of gastric cancer. TP53INP1is related to the apoptosis of gastric cancer cells. The decreased expression of the TP53INP1 protein may

  13. The hippo pathway effector YAP regulates motility, invasion, and castration-resistant growth of prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Yang, Shuping; Chen, Xingcheng; Stauffer, Seth; Yu, Fang; Lele, Subodh M; Fu, Kai; Datta, Kaustubh; Palermo, Nicholas; Chen, Yuanhong; Dong, Jixin

    2015-04-01

    Yes-associated protein (YAP) is an effector of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway. The functional significance of YAP in prostate cancer has remained elusive. In this study, we first show that enhanced expression of YAP is able to transform immortalized prostate epithelial cells and promote migration and invasion in both immortalized and cancerous prostate cells. We found that YAP mRNA was upregulated in androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells (LNCaP-C81 and LNCaP-C4-2 cells) compared to the level in androgen-sensitive LNCaP cells. Importantly, ectopic expression of YAP activated androgen receptor signaling and was sufficient to promote LNCaP cells from an androgen-sensitive state to an androgen-insensitive state in vitro, and YAP conferred castration resistance in vivo. Accordingly, YAP knockdown greatly reduced the rates of migration and invasion of LNCaP-C4-2 cells and under androgen deprivation conditions largely blocked cell division in LNCaP-C4-2 cells. Mechanistically, we found that extracellular signal-regulated kinase-ribosomal s6 kinase signaling was downstream of YAP for cell survival, migration, and invasion in androgen-insensitive cells. Finally, immunohistochemistry showed significant upregulation and hyperactivation of YAP in castration-resistant prostate tumors compared to their levels in hormone-responsive prostate tumors. Together, our results identify YAP to be a novel regulator in prostate cancer cell motility, invasion, and castration-resistant growth and as a potential therapeutic target for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). PMID:25645929

  14. G protein-coupled receptors as promising cancer targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; An, Su; Ward, Richard; Yang, Yang; Guo, Xiao-Xi; Li, Wei; Xu, Tian-Rui

    2016-07-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) regulate an array of fundamental biological processes, such as growth, metabolism and homeostasis. Specifically, GPCRs are involved in cancer initiation and progression. However, compared with the involvement of the epidermal growth factor receptor in cancer, that of GPCRs have been largely ignored. Recent findings have implicated many GPCRs in tumorigenesis, tumor progression, invasion and metastasis. Moreover, GPCRs contribute to the establishment and maintenance of a microenvironment which is permissive for tumor formation and growth, including effects upon surrounding blood vessels, signaling molecules and the extracellular matrix. Thus, GPCRs are considered to be among the most useful drug targets against many solid cancers. Development of selective ligands targeting GPCRs may provide novel and effective treatment strategies against cancer and some anticancer compounds are now in clinical trials. Here, we focus on tumor related GPCRs, such as G protein-coupled receptor 30, the lysophosphatidic acid receptor, angiotensin receptors 1 and 2, the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors and gastrin releasing peptide receptor. We also summarize their tissue distributions, activation and roles in tumorigenesis and discuss the potential use of GPCR agonists and antagonists in cancer therapy. PMID:27000991

  15. Emerging targeted therapies for castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo eAdamo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, few therapeutic options were available for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. Since 2010, four new molecules with a demonstrated benefit (sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, abiraterone and denosumab have been approved in this setting, and to-date several other agents are under investigation in clinical trials. The purpose of this review is to present an update of targeted therapies for CRPC. Presented data are obtained from literature and congress reports updated until December 2011. Targeted therapies in advanced phases of clinical development include novel hormone-therapeutic, intracellular molecular pathways inhibiting, anti-angiogenic, bone microenvironment targeting and immunotherapeutic agents. Radium-223 and MDV3100 demonstrated a survival advantage in phase III trials and the road for their introduction in clinical practice is rapidly ongoing. Results are also awaited for phase III studies currently underway or planned with new drugs given as monotherapy (TAK-700, cabozantinib, tasquinimod, PROSTVAC-VF, ipilimumab or in combination with docetaxel (custirsen, aflibercept, dasatinib, zibotentan. Optimal timing, right combination and/or sequencing of emerging therapies as well as use of more sensitive biological markers to individualize therapies for CRPC remain challenging and studies to investigate these aspects are needed.

  16. β-catenin is regulated by USP9x and mediates resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Wen; Zhang, Shimin; Yang, Bo; Yang, Chunxu; Zhang, Junhong; Zhou, Fuxiang; Xie, Conghua

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the regulatory mechanisms of decoy receptor expression in TRAIL-resistant breast cancer MCF-7 cells, cytotoxicity and apoptosis assays were applied to examine sensitivity to TRAIL in breast cancer cells. Immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation were used to detect the co-localization and interaction of USP9x and β-catenin. Luciferase assay was used to examine activity of the DcR1/DcR2/OPG reporter. Overexpression/silencing of β-catenin was performed to confirm β-catenin mediated transcription of the decoy receptors. Additionally, silencing of USP9x was performed to prove that USP9X stabilizes β-catenin and mediates TRAIL-resistance. It was found that USP9x interacted with β-catenin and inhibited the degradation of β-catenin through the deubiquitination of β-catenin. Luciferase reporter assays showed induction of DcR1/DcR2/OPG reporter activity observed upon co-transfection of β-catenin and Tcf-4. The overexpression/silencing of β-catenin further confirmed the role of β-catenin in the regulation of transcription of the decoy receptors. Silencing of USP9x directly evidenced that USP9x affected the protein expression level of β-catenin, the transcription level of the decoy receptors, and reversed TRAIL-resistance of MCF-7 cells. In conclusion, USP9x interacted with and stabilized β-catenin through deubiquitination to mediate transcription of the decoy receptors in breast cancer cells. Our results offer new insights into the mechanisms of resistance to TRAIL, and USP9x could potentially be a therapeutic target for TRAIL-resistant breast cancers. PMID:26717875

  17. The mRNA and protein expression of folylpolyglutamate synthetase in methotrexate enantiomer-resistant A549 cell lines%信息动态

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the expression of folylpolyglutamate synthetase ( FPGS ) in methotrexate ( MTX ) enantiomer-resistant A549 cell lines [ L-( + )-MTX and D-( - )-MTX ]. Methods The expression of FPGS on genetic and protein level was determined by FQ-PCR and Western blot in lung cancer A549 cells, and MTX enantiomer-resistant A549 cells [ L-( + )-MTX and D-( - )-MTX ], with the concentration of drug resistance was 15 μmol/L. Results The genetic expression level of FPGS was ( 0.80 ± 0. 09 ) and ( 2. 04 ± 0. 34 ) folds in L-( + )- MTX/A549 cells and D-( - )-MTX/A549 cells compared with lung cancer A549 cells, there was statistical difference between two groups ( P < 0.05 ). The protein expression level of FPGS was ( 0. 85 ± 0. 12 ) and( 1.62 ± 0. 24 ) folds in L-( + )-MTX/A549 cells and D-( - )-MTX/A549 cells compared with lung cancer A549 cells,there was statistical difference ( P < 0. 05 ). Conclusion The expression level of FPGS on genetic and protein level in drug resistant cells have been changed, and significant difference in two enantiomer-resistant cells are appeared.

  18. Acquisition of docetaxel resistance in breast cancer cells reveals upregulation of ABCB1 expression as a key mediator of resistance accompanied by discrete upregulation of other specific genes and pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ninel Hansen, Stine; Westergaard, David; Borg Houlberg Thomsen, Mathilde;

    2015-01-01

    analysis singled out ABCB1, which encodes permeability glycoprotein (Pgp), as the top upregulated gene in both MCF7RES and MDARES. Functional validation revealed Pgp as a key resistance mediator at low docetaxel concentrations (first-phase response), whereas additional resistance mechanisms appeared to be...... resistance and thereby identify key molecular mechanisms and predictive molecular characteristics to docetaxel resistance. Two docetaxel-resistant cell lines, MCF7RES and MDARES, were generated from their respective parental cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 by stepwise selection in docetaxel dose increments...... prominent at higher docetaxel concentrations (second-phase response). Additional resistance mechanisms were indicated by gene expression profiling, including genes in the interferon-inducible protein family in MCF7RES and cancer testis antigen family in MDARES. Also, upregulated expression of various ABC...

  19. Up-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2-derived prostaglandin E2 in colon cancer cells resistant to 5-fluorouracil

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Cheol Hee; Lee, Tae Bum; Lee, Yeon Ah; Choi, Suk; Kim, Kyung Jong

    2011-01-01

    Purpose It has been suggested that constitutive up-regulation of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 is associated with resistance to apoptosis, increased angiogenesis, and increased tumor invasiveness in various cancers including colon cancer. There are many factors involved in the resistance to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in colon cancer. However, little is known about the role of COX-2 in acquired resistance to 5-FU in colon cancer. Methods Hence we investigated whether COX-2 contribute to acquired resistanc...

  20. Mechanisms Behind the Resistance to Trastuzumab in HER2-Amplified Breast Cancer and Strategies to Overcome It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque-Cabal, María; García-Teijido, Paula; Fernández-Pérez, Yolanda; Sánchez-Lorenzo, Luisa; Palacio-Vázquez, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of trastuzumab therapy markedly improved the poor prognosis associated with HER2-amplified breast cancers. Despite this, the presence of primary and acquired resistance to trastuzumab treatment remains a significant common challenge. The identification of resistance mechanisms and the incorporation of new drugs that achieve a better blockade of HER family receptors signaling have resulted in improved outcomes. The phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, cross-talk with estrogen receptors, immune response, cell cycle control mechanisms, and other tyrosine kinase receptors such as insulin-like growth factor I receptor are potential pathways involved in trastuzumab resistance. Different therapeutic interventions targeting these pathways are currently under evaluation. PMID:27042153

  1. Multiplexed electrochemical protein detection and translation to personalized cancer diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusling, James F

    2013-06-01

    Measuring diagnostic panels of multiple proteins promises a new, personalized approach to early detection and therapy of diseases like cancer. Levels of biomarker proteins in patient serum can provide a continually updated record of disease status. Research in electrochemical detection of proteins has produced exquisitely sensitive approaches. Most utilize ELISA-like sandwich immunoassays incorporating various aspects of nanotechnology. Several of these ultrasensitive methodologies have been extended to microfluidic multiplexed protein detection, but engineered solutions are needed to measure more proteins in a single device from a small patient sample such as a drop of blood or tissue lysate. To achieve clinical or point-of-care (POC) use, simplicity and low cost are essential. In multiplexed microfluidic immunoassays, required reagent additions and washing steps pose a significant problem calling for creative engineering. A grand challenge is to develop a general cancer screening device to accurately measure 50-100 proteins in a simple, cost-effective fashion. This will require creative solutions to simplified reagent addition and multiplexing. PMID:23635325

  2. Increased Levels of Antinutritional and/or Defense Proteins Reduced the Protein Quality of a Disease-Resistant Soybean Cultivar

    OpenAIRE

    Daniele O. B. Sousa; Carvalho, Ana F. U.; José Tadeu A. Oliveira; Davi F. Farias; Ivan Castelar; Oliveira, Henrique P.; Ilka M. Vasconcelos

    2015-01-01

    The biochemical and nutritional attributes of two soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) cultivars, one susceptible (Seridó) and the other resistant (Seridó-RCH) to stem canker, were examined to assess whether the resistance to pathogens was related to levels of antinutritional and/or defense proteins in the plant and subsequently affected the nutritional quality. Lectin, urease, trypsin inhibitor, peroxidase and chitinase activities were higher in the resistant cultivar. Growing rats were fed with...

  3. Daytime pattern of post-exercise protein intake affects whole-body protein turnover in resistance-trained males

    OpenAIRE

    Moore Daniel R; Areta Jose; Coffey Vernon G; Stellingwerff Trent; Phillips Stuart M; Burke Louise M; Cléroux Marilyn; Godin Jean-Philippe; Hawley John A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The pattern of protein intake following exercise may impact whole-body protein turnover and net protein retention. We determined the effects of different protein feeding strategies on protein metabolism in resistance-trained young men. Methods Participants were randomly assigned to ingest either 80g of whey protein as 8x10g every 1.5h (PULSE; n=8), 4x20g every 3h (intermediate, INT; n=7), or 2x40g every 6h (BOLUS; n=8) after an acute bout of bilateral knee extension exerci...

  4. Saikosaponin-d: A potential chemotherapeutics in castration resistant prostate cancer by suppressing cancer metastases and cancer stem cell phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Di; Zhang, Hui-Jian; Jiang, Yao-Dong; Wu, Peng; Qi, Huan; Cai, Chao; Zheng, Shao-Bin; Dang, Qiang

    2016-06-10

    Androgen deprivation therapy is the gold standard regimen for advanced Prostate cancer (PCa) patients, nevertheless, patients eventually develop into castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Currently only a few chemotherapeutics are available for CRPC. Therefore, it is critical for identifying a new drug. In this study, we will explore a new agent, Saikosaponin-d (SSd), for CRPC therapy based on its mechanism of action. DU145 and CWR22Rv1 cells representing CRPC were employed in this study. A series of cell, biochemical, and molecular biologic assays such as Immunofluorescence, Zymography, Sphere formation, Colony formation, and MTT were used. Finally, we find SSd can significantly inhibit the growth of PCa cells in both dose- and time-dependent and suppress the colony formation during a long-term drug administration, it also can inhibit their migration and invasion abilities, which was accompanied by reverse the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and suppress MMP2/9 expression as well as activities. Furthermore, SSd can suppress cancer stem cell (CSC) phenotypes such as self-renewal ability. Mechanistically, SSd blocks Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway by decreasing GSK3β phosphorylation to affect EMT and CSC. These findings demonstrate the mechanism of anti-cancer activity of SSd in targeting EMT and CSC, suggesting SSd can be a potent agent for CRPC therapy. PMID:27155154

  5. Gambogic acid inhibits growth, induces apoptosis, and overcomes drug resistance in human colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Chuangyu; Huang, Lanlan; Chen, Junxiong; Lin, Mengmeng; Li, Wen; Lu, Biyan; Rutnam, Zina Jeyapalan; Iwamoto, Aikichi; Wang, Zhongyang; Yang, Xiangling; Liu, Huanliang

    2015-11-01

    The emergence of chemoresistance is a major limitation of colorectal cancer (CRC) therapies and novel biologically based therapies are urgently needed. Natural products represent a novel potential anticancer therapy. Gambogic acid (GA), a small molecule derived from Garcinia hanburyi Hook. f., has been demonstrated to be highly cytotoxic to several types of cancer cells and have low toxicity to the hematopoietic system. However, the potential role of GA in colorectal cancer and its ability to overcome the chemotherapeutic resistance in CRC cells have not been well studied. In the present study, we showed that GA directly inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in both 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) sensitive and 5-FU resistant colorectal cancer cells; induced apoptosis via activating JNK signaling pathway. The data, therefore, suggested an alternative strategy to overcome 5-FU resistance in CRC and that GA could be a promising medicinal compound for colorectal cancer therapy. PMID:26397804

  6. Nuclear Multidrug-Resistance Related Protein 1 Contributes to Multidrug-Resistance of Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma Mainly via Regulating Multidrug-Resistance Protein 1: A Human Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma Cells Model and Spearman's Rank Correlation Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Bolei Cai; Ye Miao; Yuan Liu; Xiaofang Xu; Sumin Guan; Junzheng Wu; Yanpu Liu

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multidrug resistance-related protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1/P-glycoprotein/ABCB1) are both membrane-bound drug transporters. In contrast to MDR1, MRP1 also transports glutathione (GSH) and drugs conjugated to GSH. Due to its extraordinary transport properties, MRP1/ABCC1 contributes to several physiological functions and pathophysiological incidents. We previously found that nuclear translocation of MRP1 contributes to multidrug-resistance (MDR) of...

  7. Effects of Whey Protein Supplementation on Hematological Parameters in Healthy Young Resistance Male Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    S. M. Marandi; A. Zand-Moghaddam; Karandish, M; Eslami, S.

    2010-01-01

    Physical activity changes hematological parameters in athletes which result in cessation of their exercises. There is limited data available about the effects of protein supplements on hematological parameters of resistance exercise. In this clinical trial, changes of hematological parameters were studied after one month resistance training and whey protein supplementation in 32 healthy young subjects (16 in supplement group and 16 in control group). Whey protein supplement (6.6 g day-1) and ...

  8. Whey protein hydrolysate augments tendon and muscle hypertrophy independent of resistance exercise contraction mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farup, Jean; Rahbek, S K; Vendelbo, M H;

    2014-01-01

    In a comparative study, we investigated the effects of maximal eccentric or concentric resistance training combined with whey protein or placebo on muscle and tendon hypertrophy. 22 subjects were allocated into either a high-leucine whey protein hydrolysate + carbohydrate group (WHD) or a...... contraction mode effects. In conclusion, high-leucine whey protein hydrolysate augments muscle and tendon hypertrophy following 12 weeks of resistance training – irrespective of contraction mode....

  9. Paclitaxel targets FOXM1 to regulate KIF20A in mitotic catastrophe and breast cancer paclitaxel resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khongkow, P; Gomes, A R; Gong, C; Man, E P S; Tsang, J W-H; Zhao, F; Monteiro, L J; Coombes, R C; Medema, R H; Khoo, U S; Lam, E W-F

    2016-02-25

    FOXM1 has been implicated in taxane resistance, but the molecular mechanism involved remains elusive. In here, we show that FOXM1 depletion can sensitize breast cancer cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts into entering paclitaxel-induced senescence, with the loss of clonogenic ability, and the induction of senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity and flat cell morphology. We also demonstrate that FOXM1 regulates the expression of the microtubulin-associated kinesin KIF20A at the transcriptional level directly through a Forkhead response element (FHRE) in its promoter. Similar to FOXM1, KIF20A expression is downregulated by paclitaxel in the sensitive MCF-7 breast cancer cells and deregulated in the paclitaxel-resistant MCF-7Tax(R) cells. KIF20A depletion also renders MCF-7 and MCF-7Tax(R) cells more sensitive to paclitaxel-induced cellular senescence. Crucially, resembling paclitaxel treatment, silencing of FOXM1 and KIF20A similarly promotes abnormal mitotic spindle morphology and chromosome alignment, which have been shown to induce mitotic catastrophe-dependent senescence. The physiological relevance of the regulation of KIF20A by FOXM1 is further highlighted by the strong and significant correlations between FOXM1 and KIF20A expression in breast cancer patient samples. Statistical analysis reveals that both FOXM1 and KIF20A protein and mRNA expression significantly associates with poor survival, consistent with a role of FOXM1 and KIF20A in paclitaxel action and resistance. Collectively, our findings suggest that paclitaxel targets the FOXM1-KIF20A axis to drive abnormal mitotic spindle formation and mitotic catastrophe and that deregulated FOXM1 and KIF20A expression may confer paclitaxel resistance. These findings provide insights into the underlying mechanisms of paclitaxel resistance and have implications for the development of predictive biomarkers and novel chemotherapeutic strategies for paclitaxel resistance. PMID:25961928

  10. Fallopia japonica, a Natural Modulator, Can Overcome Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Safaa Yehia Eid; Mahmoud Zaki El-Readi; Mohamed Lotfy Ashour; Michael Wink

    2015-01-01

    Resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy is controlled by the decrease of intracellular drug accumulation, increase of detoxification, and diminished propensity of cancer cells to undergo apoptosis. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) membrane transporters with intracellular metabolic enzymes contribute to the complex and unresolved phenomenon of multidrug resistance (MDR). Natural products as alternative medicine have great potential to discover new MDR inhibitors with diverse modes of action. In t...

  11. Chemotherapeutic Activities of Carthami Flos and Its Reversal Effect on Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jimmy Yiu-Cheong; Yu, Zhi-Ling; Fong, Wang-Fun; Shi, Yi-Qian

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug-resistance (MDR) represents a major cause of failure in cancer chemotherapy. The need for a reduction in MDR by natural-product-based drugs of low toxicity led to the current investigation of applying medicinal herbs in future cancer adjuvant therapy. Carthami Flos (CF), the dried flower of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.), is one of the most popular traditional Chinese medicinal herbs used to alleviate pain, increase circulation, and reduce blood-stasis syndrome. The drug resist...

  12. The unfolding treatment landscape for men with castration-resistant prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jenny J.; Keizman, Daniel; Denmeade, Samuel R.; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.

    2011-01-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is a fatal disease in virtually all patients. Docetaxel chemotherapy became the standard front-line agent based on the results of the TAX327 trial in 2004, with a survival advantage of 3 months achieved over mitoxantrone. Over the past few years, an improved understanding of the molecular biology of castration-resistance has resulted in expansion of the treatment armamentarium for advanced prostate cancer with the emergence of novel androgen recepto...

  13. Virtual screening of ABCC1 transporter nucleotidebinding domains as a therapeutic target in multidrug resistant cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rungsardthong, Kanin; Mares- Sámano, Sergio; Penny, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    ABCC1 is a member of the ATP-binding Cassette super family of transporters, actively effluxes xenobiotics from cells. Clinically, ABCC1 expression is linked to cancer multidrug resistance. Substrate efflux is energised by ATP binding and hydrolysis at the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) and inhibition of these events may help combat drug resistance. The aim of this study is to identify potential inhibitors of ABCC1 through virtual screening of National Cancer Institute (NCI) compounds. A th...

  14. Resolving breast cancer heterogeneity by searching reliable protein cancer biomarkers in the breast fluid secretome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the major goals in cancer research is to find and evaluate the early presence of biomarkers in human fluids and tissues. To resolve the complex cell heterogeneity of a tumor mass, it will be useful to characterize the intricate biomolecular composition of tumor microenvironment (the so called cancer secretome), validating secreted proteins as early biomarkers of cancer initiation and progression. This approach is not broadly applicable because of the paucity of well validated and FDA-approved biomarkers and because most of the candidate biomarkers are mainly organ-specific rather than tumor-specific. For these reasons, there is an urgent need to identify and validate a panel of biomarker combinations for early detection of human tumors. This is especially important for breast cancer, the cancer spread most worldwide among women. It is well known that patients with early diagnosed breast cancer live longer, require less extensive treatment and fare better than patients with more aggressive and/or advanced disease. In the frame of searching breast cancer biomarkers (especially using nipple aspirate fluid mirroring breast microenvironment), studies have highlighted an optimal combination of well-known biomarkers: uPA + PAI-1 + TF. When individually investigated they did not show perfect accuracy in predicting the presence of breast cancer, whereas the triple combination has been demonstrated to be highly predictive of pre-cancer and/or cancerous conditions, approaching 97-100% accuracy. Despite the heterogeneous composition of breast cancer and the difficulties to find specific breast cancer biomolecules, the noninvasive analysis of the nipple aspirate fluid secretome may significantly improve the discovery of promising biomarkers, helping also the differentiation among benign and invasive breast diseases, opening new frontiers in early oncoproteomics

  15. Resistance to ursolic acid-induced apoptosis through involvement of melanogenesis and COX-2/PGE2 pathways in human M4Beu melanoma cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Lama; Pinon, Aline; Limami, Youness; Seeman, Josiane; Fidanzi-Dugas, Chloe; Martin, Frederique; Badran, Bassam; Simon, Alain; Liagre, Bertrand

    2016-07-01

    Melanoma is one of the most aggressive forms of cancer with a continuously growing incidence worldwide and is usually resistant to chemotherapy agents, which is due in part to a strong resistance to apoptosis. Previously, we had showed that B16-F0 murine melanoma cells undergoing apoptosis are able to delay their own death induced by ursolic acid (UA), a natural pentacyclic triterpenoid compound. We had demonstrated that tyrosinase and TRP-1 up-regulation in apoptotic cells and the subsequent production of melanin were implicated in an apoptosis resistance mechanism. Several resistance mechanisms to apoptosis have been characterized in melanoma such as hyperactivation of DNA repair mechanisms, drug efflux systems, and reinforcement of survival signals (PI3K/Akt, NF-κB and Raf/MAPK pathways). Otherwise, other mechanisms of apoptosis resistance involving different proteins, such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), have been described in many cancer types. By using a strategy of specific inhibition of each ways, we suggested that there was an interaction between melanogenesis and COX-2/PGE2 pathway. This was characterized by analyzing the COX-2 expression and activity, the expression of tyrosinase and melanin production. Furthermore, we showed that anti-proliferative and proapoptotic effects of UA were mediated through modulation of multiple signaling pathways including Akt and ERK-1/2 proteins. Our study not only uncovers underlying molecular mechanisms of UA action in human melanoma cancer cells but also suggest its great potential as an adjuvant in treatment and cancer prevention. PMID:27262506

  16. Structure, function and subcellular localization of the potato Resistance protein Rx1

    OpenAIRE

    Slootweg, E.J.

    2009-01-01

    Resistance proteins are part of the plant’s immune system and mediate a defence response upon recognizing their cognate pathogens. They are thought to be present in the cell as part of a larger protein complex. The modular architecture of R proteins suggests that they form a scaffold for various interacting proteins, involved in pathogen recognition, downstream signalling or protein stabilization. However, few common interactors have been found for the CC-NB-ARC domains despite extensive scre...

  17. Properties of resistant cells generated from lung cancer cell lines treated with EGFR inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling plays an important role in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and therapeutics targeted against EGFR have been effective in treating a subset of patients bearing somatic EFGR mutations. However, the cancer eventually progresses during treatment with EGFR inhibitors, even in the patients who respond to these drugs initially. Recent studies have identified that the acquisition of resistance in approximately 50% of cases is due to generation of a secondary mutation (T790M) in the EGFR kinase domain. In about 20% of the cases, resistance is associated with the amplification of MET kinase. In the remaining 30-40% of the cases, the mechanism underpinning the therapeutic resistance is unknown. An erlotinib resistant subline (H1650-ER1) was generated upon continuous exposure of NSCLC cell line NCI-H1650 to erlotinib. Cancer stem cell like traits including expression of stem cell markers, enhanced ability to self-renew and differentiate, and increased tumorigenicity in vitro were assessed in erlotinib resistant H1650-ER1 cells. The erlotinib resistant subline contained a population of cells with properties similar to cancer stem cells. These cells were found to be less sensitive towards erlotinib treatment as measured by cell proliferation and generation of tumor spheres in the presence of erlotinib. Our findings suggest that in cases of NSCLC accompanied by mutant EGFR, treatment targeting inhibition of EGFR kinase activity in differentiated cancer cells may generate a population of cancer cells with stem cell properties

  18. A Role for Notch Signalling in Breast Cancer and Endocrine Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Ahmet; Simões, Bruno M.; Clarke, Robert B.; Brennan, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, there has been growing interest in the Notch signalling pathway within the breast cancer field. This interest stemmed initially from the observation that Notch signalling is aberrantly activated in breast cancer and its effects on various cellular processes including proliferation, apoptosis, and cancer stem cell activity. However more recently, elevated Notch signalling has been correlated with therapy resistance in oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. As a result, inhibiting Notch signalling with therapeutic agents is being explored as a promising treatment option for breast cancer patients. PMID:26880941

  19. Cancer stem cells, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and drug resistance in high-grade ovarian serous carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xiaoxiang; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Zhihong; Li, Hongxia; CHENG, WENJUN; Liu, Jinsong

    2013-01-01

    Although epithelial ovarian cancer cells are eliminated by debulking surgery and chemotherapy during initial treatment, it is believed that only a subset of cancer cells, that is, cancer stem cells, may be an important source of tumor recurrence and drug resistance. This review highlights our current understanding of high-grade serous carcinoma, ovarian cancer stem cells, common methods for enrichment of ovarian cancer stem cells, mechanisms involved in drug resistance, and potential strategi...

  20. Combining targeted drugs to overcome and prevent resistance of solid cancers with some stem-like cell features

    OpenAIRE

    Jokinen, Elina; Laurila, Niina; Koivunen, Peppi; Koivunen, Jussi P

    2014-01-01

    Treatment resistance significantly inhibits the efficiency of targeted cancer therapies in drug-sensitive genotypes. In the current work, we studied mechanisms for rapidly occurring, adaptive resistance in targeted therapy-sensitive lung, breast, and melanoma cancer cell lines. The results show that in ALK translocated lung cancer lines H3122 and H2228, cells with cancer stem-like cell features characterized by high expression of cancer stem cell markers and/or in vivo tumorigenesis can media...

  1. Diet-induced Obesity and Insulin Resistance Spur Tumor Growth and Cancer Cachexia in Rats Bearing the Yoshida Sarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Honors, Mary Ann; Kinzig, Kimberly P.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance are associated with increased risk of cancer and cancer mortality. However, it is currently unknown whether they contribute to the development of cancer cachexia, a syndrome that contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality in individuals with cancer. The present experiment addresses the question of whether pre-existing obesity and insulin resistance alter tumor growth and cancer cachexia symptoms in Yoshida sarcoma bearing male rats. Obesity and insulin...

  2. Molecular mechanisms of heptaplatin effective against cisplatin-resistant cancer cell lines: less involvement of metallothionein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon Sung-Pyo

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heptaplatin is a new platinum derivative with anticancer activity against various cancer cell lines, including cisplatin-resistant cancer cell lines (Cancer Chemother Pharmacol 1995; 35: 441. Methods Molecular mechanisms of heptaplatin effective against cisplatin-resistant cancer cell lines has been investigated in connection with metallothionein (MT. Cytotoxicity was determined by an MTT assay. MT mRNA, was determined by RT-PCR assay. Transfection study was carried out to examine the function of MT. Results Of various gastric cancer cell lines, SNU-638 and SNU-601 showed the highest and lowest levels of MT mRNA, respectively, showing 80-fold difference. The IC50 values of SNU-638 to cisplatin, carboplatin and heptaplatin were 11.2-fold, 5.1-fold and 2.0-fold greater than those of SNU-601, respectively. Heptaplatin was more effective against cisplatin-resistant and MT-transfected gastric cancer sublines than cisplatin or carboplatin was. In addition, heptaplatin attenuated cadmium, but not zinc, induction of MT. Conclusion These results indicate that molecular mechanisms of heptaplatin effective against cisplatin-resistant gastric cancer sublines is at least in part due to the less involvement of MT in heptaplatin resistance as well as its attenuation of MT induction.

  3. HDAC4-regulated STAT1 activation mediates platinum resistance in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stronach, Euan A; Alfraidi, Albandri; Rama, Nona; Datler, Christoph; Studd, James B; Agarwal, Roshan; Guney, Tankut G; Gourley, Charlie; Hennessy, Bryan T; Mills, Gordon B; Mai, Antonello; Brown, Robert; Dina, Roberto; Gabra, Hani

    2011-07-01

    Ovarian cancer frequently acquires resistance to platinum chemotherapy, representing a major challenge for improving patient survival. Recent work suggests that resistant clones exist within a larger drug-sensitive cell population prior to chemotherapy, implying that resistance is selected for rather than generated by treatment. We sought to compare clinically derived, intrapatient paired models of initial platinum response and subsequent resistant relapse to define molecular determinants of evolved resistance. Transcriptional analysis of a matched cell line series from three patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer before and after development of clinical platinum resistance (PEO1/PEO4/PEO6, PEA1/PEA2, PEO14/PEO23) identified 91 up- and 126 downregulated genes common to acquired resistance. Significantly enhanced apoptotic response to platinum treatment in resistant cells was observed following knockdown of histone deacetylase (HDAC) 4, FOLR2, PIK3R1, or STAT1 (P < 0.05). Interestingly, HDAC4 and STAT1 were found to physically interact. Acetyl-STAT1 was detected in platinum-sensitive cells but not in HDAC4 overexpressing platinum-resistant cells from the same patient. In resistant cells, STAT1 phosphorylation/nuclear translocation was seen following platinum exposure, whereas silencing of HDAC4 increased acetyl-STAT1 levels, prevented platinum-induced STAT1 activation, and restored cisplatin sensitivity. Conversely, matched sensitive cells were refractory to STAT1 phosphorylation on platinum treatment. Analysis of 16 paired tumor biopsies taken before and after development of clinical platinum resistance showed significantly increased HDAC4 expression in resistant tumors [n = 7 of 16 (44%); P = 0.04]. Therefore, clinical selection of HDAC4-overexpressing tumor cells upon exposure to chemotherapy promotes STAT1 deacetylation and cancer cell survival. Together, our findings identify HDAC4 as a novel, therapeutically tractable target to counter platinum

  4. Locoregional treatment outcomes for inoperable anthracycline-resistant breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the therapeutic outcomes and treatment-related morbidity of patients treated with radiation for inoperable breast cancer resistant to anthracycline-containing primary chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the medical records of breast cancer patients treated on five consecutive institutional trials who had been designated as having inoperable locoregional disease after completion of primary chemotherapy, without evidence of distant metastases at diagnosis. The cohort for this analysis was 38 (4.4%) of 867 patients enrolled in these trials. Kaplan-Meier statistics were used for survival analysis, and prognostic factors were compared using log-rank tests. The median follow-up of surviving patients was 6.1 years. Results: Thirty-two (84%) of the 38 patients were able to undergo mastectomy after radiotherapy. For the whole group, the overall survival rate at 5 years was 46%, with a distant disease-free survival rate of 32%. The 5-year survival rate for patients who were inoperable because of primary disease extent was 64% compared with 30% for those who were inoperable because of nodal disease extent (p = 0.0266). The 5-year rate of locoregional control was 73% for the surgically treated patients and 64% for the overall group. Of the 32 who underwent mastectomy, the 5-year rate of significant postoperative complications was 53%, with 4 (13%) requiring subsequent hospitalization and additional surgical revision. Preoperative radiation doses of ≥54 Gy were significantly associated with the development of complications requiring surgical treatment (70% vs. 9% for doses <54 Gy, p 0.0257). Conclusion: Despite the poorer prognosis of patients with inoperable disease after primary chemotherapy, almost one-half remained alive at 5 years and one-third were free of distant disease after multidisciplinary locoregional management. These patients have high rates of locoregional recurrence after preoperative radiotherapy and mastectomy, and the

  5. Polymeric micelles containing reversibly phospholipid-modified anti-survivin siRNA: a promising strategy to overcome drug resistance in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Salzano, G; Riehle, R.; Navarro, Gemma; Perche, Federico; Rosa, G.; Torchilin, VT

    2013-01-01

    The discovery that survivin, a small anti-apoptotic protein, is involved in chemoresistance, opens a new scenario to overcome the drug resistance in cancer. It was shown that siRNA can efficiently inhibit the expression of survivin in cancer cells. However, the clinical use of siRNA is still hampered by an unfavorable pharmacokinetic profile. To address this problem, earlier we developed a novel system to deliver siRNA into cancer cells. Namely, we reversibly modified the survivin siRNA with ...

  6. EPHA2 Blockade Overcomes Acquired Resistance to EGFR Kinase Inhibitors in Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Katherine R; Wang, Shan; Tan, Li; Hastings, Andrew K; Song, Wenqiang; Lovly, Christine M; Meador, Catherine B; Ye, Fei; Lu, Pengcheng; Balko, Justin M; Colvin, Daniel C; Cates, Justin M; Pao, William; Gray, Nathanael S; Chen, Jin

    2016-01-15

    Despite the success of treating EGFR-mutant lung cancer patients with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), all patients eventually acquire resistance to these therapies. Although various resistance mechanisms have been described, there are currently no FDA-approved therapies that target alternative mechanisms to treat lung tumors with acquired resistance to first-line EGFR TKI agents. Here we found that EPHA2 is overexpressed in EGFR TKI-resistant tumor cells. Loss of EPHA2 reduced the viability of erlotinib-resistant tumor cells harboring EGFR(T790M) mutations in vitro and inhibited tumor growth and progression in an inducible EGFR(L858R+T790M)-mutant lung cancer model in vivo. Targeting EPHA2 in erlotinib-resistant cells decreased S6K1-mediated phosphorylation of cell death agonist BAD, resulting in reduced tumor cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. Furthermore, pharmacologic inhibition of EPHA2 by the small-molecule inhibitor ALW-II-41-27 decreased both survival and proliferation of erlotinib-resistant tumor cells and inhibited tumor growth in vivo. ALW-II-41-27 was also effective in decreasing viability of cells with acquired resistance to the third-generation EGFR TKI AZD9291. Collectively, these data define a role for EPHA2 in the maintenance of cell survival of TKI-resistant, EGFR-mutant lung cancer and indicate that EPHA2 may serve as a useful therapeutic target in TKI-resistant tumors. PMID:26744526

  7. Anti-cancer effect of metformin by suppressing signaling pathway of HER2 and HER3 in tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinkyoung; Lee, Jiyun; Kim, Chungyeul; Choi, Jinhyuk; Kim, Aeree

    2016-05-01

    Development of new therapeutic strategies is becoming increasingly important to overcome tamoxifen resistance. Recently, much interest has been focused on anti-tumor effects of metformin commonly used to treat type II diabetes. Increased protein expression and signaling of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family is a possible mechanism involved in tamoxifen resistance. Since HER2/HER3 heterodimers are able to induce strong downstream signaling and activate various biological responses such as cellular proliferation and growth, we investigated the anti-cancer effect of metformin by inhibition of signaling pathway via downregulation of HER2 and HER3 using tamoxifen-resistant MCF-7 (TR MCF-7) cells. Compared to MCF-7 cells, TR MCF-7 cells showed increased expression of EGFR, HER2, and HER3, and metformin inhibited the expression of these proteins in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Metformin inhibited activation of HER2 (Tyr1248)/HER3 (Tyr1289)/Akt (Ser473) as well as cell proliferation and colony formation by estrogenic promotion in MCF-7 and TR MCF-7 cells. Known as a HER3 ligand, heregulin (HRG)-β1-induced phosphorylation of HER2, HER3 and Akt, and protein interaction of HER2/HER3 and colony formation were inhibited by metformin in both cells. Consistent with the results in the two cell lines, we identified that metformin inhibited HER2/HER3/Akt signaling axis activated by HRG-β1 using the HER2 and HER3-overexpressing breast cancer cell line SK-BR-3. Lastly, lapatinib-induced HER3 upregulation was significantly inhibited by treatment of metformin in HER3 siRNA-transfected TR MCF-7 cells. These data suggest that metformin might overcome tamoxifen resistance through the inhibition of expression and signaling of receptor tyrosine kinase HER2 and HER3. PMID:26581908

  8. Effect of Protein Hydrolysates on Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ossum, Carlo G.; Andersen, Lisa Lystbæk; Nielsen, Henrik Hauch;

    Effect of Fish Protein Hydrolysates on Pancreatic Cancer Cells Carlo G. Ossum1, Lisa Lystbæk Andersen2, Henrik Hauch Nielsen2, Else K. Hoffmann1, and Flemming Jessen2 1University of Copenhagen, Department of Biology, Denmark, 2Technical University of Denmark (DTU), National Food Institute, Denmark...... activities affecting cell proliferation and ability to modulate caspase activity in pancreatic cancer cells COLO357 and BxPC-3 in vitro. A number of the hydrolysates showed caspase promoting activity; in particular products containing muscle tissue, i.e. belly flap, were able to stimulate caspase activity...... hydrolysates obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis on cancer cell proliferation. Skin and belly flap muscle from trout were hydrolysed with the unspecific proteases Alcalase, Neutrase, or UE1 (all from Novozymes, Bagsværd, Denmark) to a hydrolysis degree of 1-15%. The hydrolysates were tested for biological...

  9. Cytoplasmic p21 expression levels determine cisplatin resistance in human testicular cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, Roelof; di Pietro, Alessandra; Timmer-Bosscha, Hetty; Gibcus, Johan H.; van den Berg, Anke; Suurmeijer, Albert J.; Bischoff, Rainer; Gietema, Jourik A.; de Jong, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Platinum-based chemotherapies such as cisplatin are used as first-line treatment for many cancers. Although there is often a high initial responsiveness, the majority of patients eventually relapse with platinum-resistant disease. For example, a subset of testicular cancer patients still die even th

  10. A new MCF-7 breast cancer cell line resistant to the arzoxifene metabolite desmethylarzoxifene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freddie, Cecilie T; Christensen, Gitte Lund; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E

    2004-01-01

    The development of resistance in tamoxifen-treated breast cancer patients and the estrogenic side effects of tamoxifen have lead to the design of many new drugs. The new SERM arzoxifene and its active metabolite desmethylarzoxifene (ARZm) inhibits growth of breast cancer cells and has less estrog...

  11. Bacteremia in Cancer Patients: A Two Center Experience of Isolates and Spectrum of Antibiotic Resistance Pattern

    OpenAIRE

    Naseh; Marashi; Asgari; Aghabarari; Mahmudi; Asadi; Hatami; Kalantar

    2015-01-01

    Background; Bacteremia is a frequent condition in cancer patients with a significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, which is a medical crisis that needs broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment. Objectives This study examined bacteremia in cancer patients from two medical centers regarding isolates and spectrum of antibiotic resistance pattern. Patients and Methods This was a prospe...

  12. Overcoming resistance and restoring sensitivity to HER2-targeted therapies in breast cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mohd Sharial, M S N

    2012-12-01

    Approximately 15%-23% of breast cancers overexpress human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), which leads to the activation of signaling pathways that stimulate cell proliferation and survival. HER2-targeted therapy has substantially improved outcomes in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. However, both de novo and acquired resistance are observed.

  13. State-Of-The-Art Treatment in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Castro; Nuria Romero; David Olmos

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PrCa) is the most common cancer type in men in developed countries. In the last few years, a dramatic change has occurred in the understanding of castration-resistant PrCa which has led to the development of new drugs that have an impact on patient survival. This review summarises the recent advances in the management of the disease.

  14. Subtyping of breast cancer using reverse phase protein arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, Johanna; Schlüter, Kerstin; Bernhardt, Stephan; Korf, Ulrike

    2014-12-01

    Reverse phase protein arrays (RPPAs) present a robust and sensitive high capacity platform for targeted proteomics that relies on highly specific antibodies to obtain a quantitative readout regarding phosphorylation state and abundance of proteins of interest. This review summarizes the current state of RPPA-based proteomic profiling of breast cancer in the context of existing preanalytical strategies and sample preparation protocols. RPPA-based subtypes identified so far are compared to those obtained by other approaches such as immunohistochemistry, genomics and transcriptomics. Special attention is given to discussing the potential of RPPA for biomarker discovery and biomarker validation. PMID:25400094

  15. Combined AKT and MEK Pathway Blockade in Pre-Clinical Models of Enzalutamide-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Toren, Paul; Kim, Soojin; Johnson, Fraser; Zoubeidi, Amina

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent improvements in patient outcomes using newer androgen receptor (AR) pathway inhibitors, treatment resistance in castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) continues to remain a clinical problem. Co-targeting alternate resistance pathways are of significant interest to treat CRPC and delay the onset of resistance. Both the AKT and MEK signaling pathways become activated as prostate cancer develops resistance to AR-targeted therapies. This pre-clinical study explores co-targeting ...

  16. Aldo-keto reductase 1B10 and its role in proliferation capacity of drug-resistant cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki eMatsunaga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The human aldo-keto reductase AKR1B10, originally identified as an aldose reductase-like protein and human small intestine aldose reductase, is a cytosolic NADPH-dependent reductase that metabolizes a variety of endogenous compounds, such as aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes and dicarbonyl compounds, and some drug ketones. The enzyme is highly expressed in solid tumors of several tissues including lung and liver, and as such has received considerable interest as a relevant biomarker for the development of those tumors. In addition, AKR1B10 has been recently reported to be significantly up-regulated in some cancer cell lines (medulloblastoma D341 and colon cancer HT29 acquiring resistance towards chemotherapeutic agents (cyclophosphamide and mitomycin c, suggesting the validity of the enzyme as a chemoresistance marker. Although the detailed information on the AKR1B10-mediated mechanisms leading to the drug resistance process is not well understood so far, the enzyme has been proposed to be involved in functional regulations of cell proliferation and metabolism of drugs and endogenous lipids during the development of chemoresistance. This article reviews the current literature focusing mainly on expression profile and roles of AKR1B10 in the drug resistance of cancer cells. Recent developments of AKR1B10 inhibitors and their usefulness in restoring sensitivity to anticancer drugs are also reviewed.

  17. Synthesis and in vivo evaluation of the putative breast cancer resistance protein inhibitor [11C]methyl 4-((4-(2-(6,7-dimethoxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolin-2-yl)ethyl)phenyl) amino-carbonyl)-2-(quinoline-2-carbonylamino)benzoate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The multidrug efflux transporter breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) is highly expressed in the blood-brain barrier (BBB), where it limits brain entry of a broad range of endogenous and exogenous substrates. Methyl 4-((4-(2-(6,7-dimethoxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolin-2-yl)ethyl)phenyl) amino-carbonyl)-2-(quinoline-2-carbonylamino)benzoate (1) is a recently discovered BCRP-selective inhibitor, which is structurally derived from the potent P-glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibitor tariquidar. The aim of this study was to develop a new PET tracer based on 1 to map BCRP expression levels in vivo. Methods: Compound 1 was labelled with 11C in its methyl ester function by reaction of the corresponding carboxylic acid 2 with [11C]methyl triflate. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of [11C]-1 was performed in wild-type, Mdr1a/b(-/-), Bcrp1(-/-) and Mdr1a/b(-/-)Bcrp1(-/-) mice (n=3 per mouse type) and radiotracer metabolism was assessed in plasma and brain. Results: Brain-to-plasma ratios of unchanged [11C]-1 were 4.8- and 10.3-fold higher in Mdr1a/b(-/-) and in Mdr1a/b(-/-)Bcrp1(-/-) mice, respectively, as compared to wild-type animals, but only modestly increased in Bcrp1(-/-) mice. [11C]-1 was rapidly metabolized in vivo giving rise to a polar radiometabolite which was taken up into brain tissue. Conclusion: Our data suggest that [11C]-1 preferably interacts with P-gp rather than BCRP at the murine BBB which questions its reported in vitro BCRP selectivity. Consequently, [11C]-1 appears to be unsuitable as a PET tracer to map cerebral BCRP expression.

  18. Structure, function and subcellular localization of the potato Resistance protein Rx1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slootweg, E.J.

    2009-01-01

    Resistance proteins are part of the plant’s immune system and mediate a defence response upon recognizing their cognate pathogens. They are thought to be present in the cell as part of a larger protein complex. The modular architecture of R proteins suggests that they form a scaffold for various int

  19. Glycosylation status of vitamin D binding protein in cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Rehder, Douglas S.; Nelson, Randall W.; Borges, Chad R.

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of the results of activity studies, previous reports have suggested that vitamin D binding protein (DBP) is significantly or even completely deglycosylated in cancer patients, eliminating the molecular precursor of the immunologically important Gc macrophage activating factor (GcMAF), a glycosidase-derived product of DBP. The purpose of this investigation was to directly determine the relative degree of O-linked trisaccharide glycosylation of serum-derived DBP in human breast, co...

  20. Chromatin-regulating proteins as targets for cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Oike, Takahiro; Ogiwara, Hideaki; Amornwichet, Napapat; Nakano, Takashi; Kohno, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin-regulating proteins represent a large class of novel targets for cancer therapy. In the context of radiotherapy, acetylation and deacetylation of histones by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) play important roles in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks generated by ionizing irradiation, and are therefore attractive targets for radiosensitization. Small-molecule inhibitors of HATs (garcinol, anacardic acid and curcumin) and HDACs (vorinostat, sodium...

  1. Protein Nanoparticles as Drug Delivery Carriers for Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Warangkana Lohcharoenkal; Liying Wang; Yi Charlie Chen; Yon Rojanasakul

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles have increasingly been used for a variety of applications, most notably for the delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. A large number of nanoparticle drug delivery systems have been developed for cancer treatment and various materials have been explored as drug delivery agents to improve the therapeutic efficacy and safety of anticancer drugs. Natural biomolecules such as proteins are an attractive alternative to synthetic polymers which are commonly used in drug formula...

  2. Predictors of Time to Metastasis in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira, DM; Howard, LE; Sourbeer, KN; Amarasekara, HS; Chow, LC; Cockrell, DC; Hanyok, BT; Aronson, WJ; Kane, CJ; Terris, MK; Amling, CL; Cooperberg, MR; Liede, A; Freedland, SJ

    2016-01-01

    To investigate predictors of time to metastasis among men treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for non-metastatic prostate cancer who developed castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) within the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) cohort.Retrospective analysis of 458 non-metastatic CRPC men. Metastases were detected in routine bone scans or other imaging tests. Predictors of time to metastasis were analyzed using proportional hazards model with CRPC as time ze...

  3. Circumvention of multi-drug resistance of cancer cells by Chinese herbal medicines

    OpenAIRE

    Chai, Stella; To, Kenneth KW; Lin, Ge

    2010-01-01

    Multi-drug resistance (MDR) of cancer cells severely limits therapeutic outcomes. A proposed mechanism for MDR involves the efflux of anti-cancer drugs from cancer cells, primarily mediated by ATP-binding cassette (ABC) membrane transporters including P-glycoprotein. This article reviews the recent progress of using active ingredients, extracts and formulae from Chinese medicine (CM) in circumventing ABC transporters-mediated MDR. Among the ABC transporters, Pgp is the most extensively studie...

  4. Andrographolide Targets Androgen Receptor Pathway in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chengfei; Nadiminty, Nagalakshmi; Tummala, Ramakumar; Chun, Jae Yeon; Lou, Wei; Zhu, Yezi; Sun, Meng; Evans, Christopher P.; Zhou, Qinghua; Gao, Allen C.

    2011-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling not only plays a pivotal role in the development of androgen-dependent prostate cancer but is also important in the growth and survival of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The first line of treatment of androgen-dependent prostate cancer is the use of androgen deprivation therapy. However, most patients will eventually relapse due to development of CRPC. Thus, development of a strategy to target AR for treatment of CRPC is urgently needed. The auth...

  5. Triclosan Potentiates Epithelial-To-Mesenchymal Transition in Anoikis-Resistant Human Lung Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Winitthana, Thidarat; Lawanprasert, Somsong; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2014-01-01

    Alteration of cancer cell toward mesenchymal phenotype has been shown to potentiate tumor aggressiveness by increasing cancer cell metastasis. Herein, we report the effect of triclosan, a widely used antibacterial agent found in many daily products, in enhancing the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in aggressive anoikis resistant human H460 lung cancer cells. EMT has been long known to increase abilities of the cells to increase migration, invasion, and survival in circulating syste...

  6. Involvement of CUL4A in Regulation of Multidrug Resistance to P-gp Substrate Drugs in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunshan Wang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available CUL4A encodes a core component of a cullin-based E3 ubiquitin ligase complex that regulates many critical processes such as cell cycle progression, DNA replication, DNA repair and chromatin remodeling by targeting a variety of proteins for ubiquitination and degradation. In the research described in this report we aimed to clarify whether CUL4A participates in multiple drug resistance (MDR in breast cancer cells. We first transfected vectors carrying CUL4A and specific shCUL4A into breast cancer cells and corresponding Adr cells respectively. Using reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions and western blots, we found that overexpression of CUL4A in MCF7 and MDA-MB-468 cells up-regulated MDR1/P-gp expression on both the transcription and protein levels, which conferred multidrug resistance to P-gp substrate drugs, as determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assays. On the other hand, silencing CUL4A in MCF7/Adr and MDA-MB-468/Adr cells led to the opposite effect. Moreover, ERK1/2 in CUL4A-overexpressing cells was highly activated and after treatment with PD98059, an ERK1/2-specific inhibitor, CUL4A-induced expression of MDR1/P-gp was decreased significantly. Lastly, immunohistochemistry in breast cancer tissues showed that P-gp expression had a positive correlation with the expression of CUL4A and ERK1/2. Thus, these results implied that CUL4A and ERK1/2 participated in multi-drug resistance in breast cancer through regulation of MDR1/P-gp expression.

  7. Expression of Robo protein in bladder cancer tissues and its effect on the growth of cancer cells by blocking Robo protein

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yang; Cheng, Hepeng; Xu, Weibo; Tian, Xin; Li, Xiaodong; Zhu, Chaoyang

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to detect the expression of Slit signaling protein ligand Robo protein in human bladder cancer and para-carcinoma tissue, and observe the tumor cell survival and growth by inoculating the bladder cancer cells with the blocked signaling protein into the subcutaneous tissue of nude mice. The expression of Robo protein was detected in T24 cells in human bladder uroepithelium carcinoma and cultivated human bladder uroepithelium carcinoma confirmed by pathological diagnosis. The c...

  8. Overexpression of the ATP-binding cassette half-transporter, ABCG2 (Mxr/BCrp/ABCP1), in flavopiridol-resistant human breast cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robey, R W; Medina-Pérez, W Y; Nishiyama, K;

    2001-01-01

    We sought to characterize the interactions of flavopiridol with members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family. Cells overexpressing multidrug resistance-1 (MDR-1) and multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) did not exhibit appreciable flavopiridol resistance, whereas cell lines...... overexpressing the ABC half-transporter, ABCG2 (MXR/BCRP/ABCP1), were found to be resistant to flavopiridol. Flavopiridol at a concentration of 10 microM was able to prevent MRP-mediated calcein efflux, whereas Pgp-mediated transport of rhodamine 123 was unaffected at flavopiridol concentrations of up to 100...... microM. To determine putative mechanisms of resistance to flavopiridol, we exposed the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 to incrementally increasing concentrations of flavopiridol. The resulting resistant subline, MCF-7 FLV1000, is maintained in 1,000 nM flavopiridol and was found to be 24-fold...

  9. Using the theory of coevolution to predict protein-protein interactions in non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Meng Zhang; Man-Him Chan; Wen-Jian Tu; Li-Ran He; Chak-Man Lee; Miao He

    2013-01-01

    Systems biology has become an effective approach for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of lung cancer. In this study, sequences of 100 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)-related proteins were downloaded from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) databases. The Theory of Coevolution was then used to build a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network of NSCLC. Adopting the reverse thinking approach, we analyzed the NSCLC proteins one at a time. ...

  10. Streptococcal tetracycline resistance mediated at the level of protein synthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Burdett, V

    1986-01-01

    The mechanism of tetracycline resistance was examined in strains containing each of the three previously identified resistance determinants in Streptococcus spp. Uptake of tetracycline was measured in tetracycline-sensitive cells as well as in cells containing each of the three resistance determinants. In cells containing tetL, uptake was not observed. However, in sensitive cells and cells containing either tetM or tetN, tetracycline was accumulated approximately 25-fold against a concentrati...

  11. Imatinib and nilotinib reverse multidrug resistance in cancer cells by inhibiting the efflux activity of the MRP7 (ABCC10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Shen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: One of the major mechanisms that could produce resistance to antineoplastic drugs in cancer cells is the ATP binding cassette (ABC transporters. The ABC transporters can significantly decrease the intracellular concentration of antineoplastic drugs by increasing their efflux, thereby lowering the cytotoxic activity of antineoplastic drugs. One of these transporters, the multiple resistant protein 7 (MRP7, ABCC10, has recently been shown to produce resistance to antineoplastic drugs by increasing the efflux of paclitaxel. In this study, we examined the effects of BCR-Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitors imatinib, nilotinib and dasatinib on the activity and expression of MRP7 in HEK293 cells transfected with MRP7, designated HEK-MRP7-2. METHODOLOGY AND/OR PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report for the first time that imatinib and nilotinib reversed MRP7-mediated multidrug resistance. Our MTT assay results indicated that MRP7 expression in HEK-MRP7-2 cells was not significantly altered by incubation with 5 microM of imatinib or nilotinib for up to 72 hours. In addition, imatinib and nilotinib (1-5 microM produced a significant concentration-dependent reversal of MRP7-mediated multidrug resistance by enhancing the sensitivity of HEK-MRP7-2 cells to paclitaxel and vincristine. Imatinib and nilotinib, at 5 microM, significantly increased the accumulation of [(3H]-paclitaxel in HEK-MRP7-2 cells. The incubation of the HEK-MRP7-2 cells with imatinib or nilotinib (5 microM also significantly inhibited the efflux of paclitaxel. CONCLUSIONS: Imatinib and nilotinib reverse MRP7-mediated paclitaxel resistance, most likely due to their inhibition of the efflux of paclitaxel via MRP7. These findings suggest that imatinib or nilotinib, in combination with other antineoplastic drugs, may be useful in the treatment of certain resistant cancers.

  12. Mechanism of c-Met and EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance through epithelial mesenchymal transition in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Ichwaku; Rajanna, Supriya; Webb, Andrew; Chhabra, Gagan; Foster, Brad; Webb, Brian; Puri, Neelu

    2016-09-01

    According to currently available estimates from Cancer Research UK, 14.1 million new lung cancer cases were diagnosed and a staggering 8.2 million people worldwide died from lung cancer in 2012. EGFR and c-Met are two tyrosine kinase receptors most commonly overexpressed or mutated in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) resulting in increased proliferation and survival of lung cancer cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), such as erlotinib, approved by the FDA as first/second line therapy for NSCLC patients have limited clinical efficacy due to acquired resistance. In this manuscript, we investigate and discuss the role of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) in the development of resistance against EGFR and c-Met TKIs in NSCLC. Our findings show that Zeb-1, a transcriptional repressor of E-Cadherin, is upregulated in TKI-resistant cells causing EMT. We observed that TKI-resistant cells have increased gene and protein expression of EMT related proteins such as Vimentin, N-Cadherin, β-Catenin and Zeb-1, while expression of E-Cadherin, an important cell adhesion molecule, was suppressed. We also confirmed that TKI-resistant cells display mesenchymal cell type morphology, and have upregulation of β-Catenin which may regulate expression of Zeb-1, a transcriptional repressor of E-Cadherin in TKI-resistant NSCLC cells. Finally, we show that down-regulating Zeb-1 by inducing miR-200a or β-Catenin siRNA can increase drug sensitivity of TKI-resistant cells. PMID:27396618

  13. Human carcinoma-associated mesenchymal stem cells promote ovarian cancer chemotherapy resistance via a BMP4/HH signaling loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, Lan G.; Choi, Yun-Jung; McLean, Karen; Allen, Benjamin L.; di Magliano, Marina Pasca; Buckanovich, Ronald J.

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is critical to cancer growth and therapy resistance. We previously characterized human ovarian carcinoma-associated mesenchymal stem cells (CA-MSCs). CA-MSCs are multi-potent cells that can differentiate into tumor microenvironment components including fibroblasts, myofibroblasts and adipocytes. We previously reported CA-MSCs, compared to normal MSCs, express high levels of BMP proteins and promote tumor growth by increasing numbers of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs). We demonstrate here that ovarian tumor cell-secreted Hedgehog (HH) induces CA-MSC BMP4 expression. CA-MSC-derived BMP4 reciprocally increases ovarian tumor cell HH expression indicating a positive feedback loop. Interruption of this loop with a HH pathway inhibitor or BMP4 blocking antibody decreases CA-MSC-derived BMP4 and tumor-derived HH preventing enrichment of CSCs and reversing chemotherapy resistance. The impact of HH inhibition was only seen in CA-MSC-containing tumors, indicating the importance of a humanized stroma. These results are reciprocal to findings in pancreatic and bladder cancer, suggesting HH signaling effects are tumor tissue specific warranting careful investigation in each tumor type. Collectively, we define a critical positive feedback loop between CA-MSC-derived BMP4 and ovarian tumor cell-secreted HH and present evidence for the further investigation of HH as a clinical target in ovarian cancer. PMID:26755648

  14. Evolving concepts in the management of drug resistant ovarian cancer: dose dense chemotherapy and the reversal of clinical platinum resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinato, David J; Graham, Janet; Gabra, Hani; Sharma, Rohini

    2013-04-01

    Despite the initially high response rate to standard front-line debulking surgery followed by platinum-based chemotherapy, the relapse rate in ovarian cancer is high and many patients will recur within 6 months of completing platinum based treatment. These patients may still require further chemotherapy despite being considered "platinum resistant". In this setting, response rates to conventionally scheduled second line platinum and non-platinum agents is low, ranging between 5% and 15%. There is an emerging body of evidence that in this scenario, chemotherapeutic activity can be enhanced using unconventionally scheduled "dose-dense" platinum and non-platinum based regimens with improved response rates of up to 65%. Randomised studies to evaluate the impact of this approach on survival in recurrent, platinum resistant disease are urgently required to confirm the promising phase II findings if there is to be a change in the standard of care of patients with platinum resistant disease. In this review we discuss the evolving strategies to overcome resistance in patients with platinum resistant ovarian cancer with a particular focus on alterations in dose schedule as a means of reversing platinum resistance. PMID:22595680

  15. CREB mediates ICAM-3: inducing radio-resistance, cell growth and migration/invasion of the human nonsmall cell lung cancer cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ICAM family proteins comprises cell surface molecules that are homologous to NCAM and are members of the single passed type 1 immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) that are anchored at the cellular membrane. The ICAM family consists of five subfamilies (ICAM-1 to ICAM-5) of heavily glycosylated cell surface receptors with common functional or structural homology. The extracellular domains of ICAM protein have roles in immune response and inflammation through various cell-cell interactions. The cytoplasmic tail residues of ICAM-3 participate in intracellular signaling such as calcium mobilization and tyrosine phosphorylation. Interestingly, the ICAM proteins appear to have a dual role in cancer. ICAM molecules may target and block tumor progression by stimulation of an immune response such as leukocyte activation. Conversely, other investigations have shown that ICAM molecules are involved in cancer malignancy because their increased expressions are associated with a poor diagnosis, lower survival rates and invasion in several cancers including melanoma, breast cancer and leukemia. We have also reported that an increase of ICAM-3 expression in several cancer cells and specimens of cervical cancer patient induce enhanced radio-resistance by the activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and promote cancer cell proliferation by the activation of Akt and p44/42 MAPK. Therefore, these previous reports imply that ICAM-3 has various undefined roles in cancer. In this study, we investigated whether ICAM-3 increase cell migration and invasion through CREB activation and CREB has a role of increase of radioresistance and cell growth

  16. CREB mediates ICAM-3: inducing radio-resistance, cell growth and migration/invasion of the human nonsmall cell lung cancer cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Kuk; So, Kwang Sup; Bae, In Hwa; Um, Hong Duck [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    The ICAM family proteins comprises cell surface molecules that are homologous to NCAM and are members of the single passed type 1 immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) that are anchored at the cellular membrane. The ICAM family consists of five subfamilies (ICAM-1 to ICAM-5) of heavily glycosylated cell surface receptors with common functional or structural homology. The extracellular domains of ICAM protein have roles in immune response and inflammation through various cell-cell interactions. The cytoplasmic tail residues of ICAM-3 participate in intracellular signaling such as calcium mobilization and tyrosine phosphorylation. Interestingly, the ICAM proteins appear to have a dual role in cancer. ICAM molecules may target and block tumor progression by stimulation of an immune response such as leukocyte activation. Conversely, other investigations have shown that ICAM molecules are involved in cancer malignancy because their increased expressions are associated with a poor diagnosis, lower survival rates and invasion in several cancers including melanoma, breast cancer and leukemia. We have also reported that an increase of ICAM-3 expression in several cancer cells and specimens of cervical cancer patient induce enhanced radio-resistance by the activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and promote cancer cell proliferation by the activation of Akt and p44/42 MAPK. Therefore, these previous reports imply that ICAM-3 has various undefined roles in cancer. In this study, we investigated whether ICAM-3 increase cell migration and invasion through CREB activation and CREB has a role of increase of radioresistance and cell growth.

  17. Expression of P-glycoprotein, Multiple Resistance-associated Protein- 1 and GST-п before and after Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Uigur and Han Woman with Cervical Squmous Cancer%新疆维、汉P-gp、MRP1、GST-п与宫颈癌新辅助化疗疗效的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕锡芳; 李文婷; 徐跃勋; 王英红

    2011-01-01

    癌化疗敏感性指标.%Objective: To investigate the Relationship among the expression of P-glycoprotein, Multiple Resistance-associated Protein-l,and GST-π in Cervical Squmous Cancer for Prediction of Response to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Uigur and Han woman.Methods: The specimens of 22 cases with cervical squmous CanCer before and after NACT are examined by S-P immunohistochemistry in ethnic Uigur women with 20 cases of normal control.The specimens of 30 cases with cervical squmous CanCer before and after NACT are examined by S-P immunohistochamistry in Han women with 30 cases of normal control. Results: ①In ethnic Uigur women: P-gp positive expression rate in normal and cervical squmous cancer before NACT are 10% and 72.7%;MRP 1 positive expression rate in normal and cervical squmous cancer before NACT are 20%、40.9%;GST-r positive expression rate in normal and cervical squmous cancer before NACT are 45%、90.9%。 The positive expression rate of P-gp and MRP1 in cervical squmous cancer before NACT have a signifi cantly higher than in normal cervical (P<0.05).②In Han women: P-gp positive expression rate in normal and cervical squmous cancer before NACT are 10% and 56.7%;MRP 1 positive expression rate in normal and cervical squmous cancer before NACT are 40%, 86.7%;GST-π positive expression rate in normal and cervical squmous cancer before NACT are 20%, 60%. The positive expression rate of P-gp, GST-π and MRP1 in cervical squmous cancer before NACT all have a significantly higher than in normal cervical (P<0.05). ③In ethnic Uigur women: GST-r positive expression rate after NACT has a significantly higher than that before NACT (P<0.05). ④In Han women: P-pg and GST-π positive expression rate after NACT has a significantly higher than that before NACT (P<0.05). ⑤In ethnic Uigur women: P-gp expression negative rate before NACT has higher effcctive rate than the positive groups(P<0.05). ⑥In Han women:P-gp GST-π expression negative rate before NACT

  18. p66Shc longevity protein regulates the proliferation of human ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniyan, Sakthivel; Chou, Yu-Wei; Tsai, Te-Jung; Thomes, Paul; Veeramani, Suresh; Benigno, Benedict B; Walker, L DeEtte; McDonald, John F; Khan, Shafiq A; Lin, Fen-Fen; Lele, Subodh M; Lin, Ming-Fong

    2015-08-01

    p66Shc functions as a longevity protein in murine and exhibits oxidase activity in regulating diverse biological activities. In this study, we investigated the role of p66Shc protein in regulating ovarian cancer (OCa) cell proliferation. Among three cell lines examined, the slowest growing OVCAR-3 cells have the lowest level of p66Shc protein. Transient transfection with p66Shc cDNA expression vector in OVCAR-3 cells increases cell proliferation. Conversely, knock-down of p66Shc by shRNA in rapidly growing SKOV-3 cells results in decreased cell growth. In estrogen (E2)-treated CaOV-3 cells, elevated p66Shc protein level correlates with ROS level, ErbB-2 and ERK/MAPK activation, and cell proliferation. Further, the E2-stimulated proliferation of CaOV-3 cells was blocked by antioxidants and ErbB-2 inhibitor. Additionally, in E2-stimulated cells, the tartrate-sensitive, but not the tartrate-resistant, phosphatase activity decreases; concurrently, the tyrosine phosphorylation of ErbB-2 increases. Conversely, inhibition of phosphatase activity by L(+)-tartrate treatment increases p66Shc protein level, ErbB-2 tyrosine phosphorylation, ERK/MAPK activation, and cell growth. Further, inhibition of the ERK/MAPK pathway by PD98059 blocks E2-induced ERK/MAPK activation and cell proliferation in CaOV-3 cells. Moreover, immunohistochemical analyses showed that the p66Shc protein level was significantly higher in cancerous cells than in noncancerous cells in archival OCa tissues (n = 76; P = 0.00037). These data collectively indicate that p66Shc protein plays a critical role in up-regulating OCa progression. PMID:24395385

  19. PD-L1 is highly expressed in Enzalutamide resistant prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bishop, Jennifer L.; Sio, Alexander; Angeles, Arkhjamil; Roberts, Morgan E; Azad, Arun A.; Chi, Kim N.; Zoubeidi, Amina

    2014-01-01

    Efficacy of Enzalutamide (ENZ) in castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients is short-lived. Immunotherapy like T cell checkpoint blockade may improve patient survival. However, when and where checkpoint molecules are expressed in CRPC and whether immune evasion is a mechanism of ENZ resistance remains unclear. Thus, we investigated whether clinically relevant immunotherapy targets, specifically PD-L1/2, PD-1 and CTLA-4, are upregulated in ENZ resistant (ENZR) patients and in a pre-...

  20. Microbeam PIXE analysis of platinum resistant and sensitive ovarian cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeynes, J.C.G., E-mail: J.C.Jeynes@surrey.ac.u [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Bailey, M.J. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Coley, H. [Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Kirkby, K.J.; Jeynes, C. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    Microbeam PIXE was used to analyse platinum in single ovarian cancer cells. Carboplatin sensitive and resistant cells were grown as a monolayer on polypropylene and treated with either carboplatin or cisplatin. Pt from the carboplatin could not be detected. The Pt from cisplatin in the cells could be detected, and significantly more Zn was found in the resistant cells compared to the sensitive cells. The sensitive cells probably accumulated more cisplatin than the resistant ones.

  1. Contributions of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor to Acquisition of Platinum Resistance in Ovarian Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Granados, Michaela L.; Hudson, Laurie G.; Samudio-Ruiz, Sabrina L.

    2015-01-01

    Acquisition of platinum resistance following first line platinum/taxane therapy is commonly observed in ovarian cancer patients and prevents clinical effectiveness. There are few options to prevent platinum resistance; however, demethylating agents have been shown to resensitize patients to platinum therapy thereby demonstrating that DNA methylation is a critical contributor to the development of platinum resistance. We previously reported the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) is a nove...

  2. DNA Methylation-Independent Reversion of Gemcitabine Resistance by Hydralazine in Cervical Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Candelaria, Myrna; de la Cruz-Hernandez, Erick; Taja-Chayeb, Lucia; Perez-Cardenas, Enrique; Trejo-Becerril, Catalina; Gonzalez-Fierro, Aurora; Chavez-Blanco, Alma; Soto-Reyes, Ernesto; Dominguez, Guadalupe; Trujillo, Jaenai E.; Diaz-Chavez, Jose; Duenas-Gonzalez, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    Background Down regulation of genes coding for nucleoside transporters and drug metabolism responsible for uptake and metabolic activation of the nucleoside gemcitabine is related with acquired tumor resistance against this agent. Hydralazine has been shown to reverse doxorubicin resistance in a model of breast cancer. Here we wanted to investigate whether epigenetic mechanisms are responsible for acquiring resistance to gemcitabine and if hydralazine could restore gemcitabine sensitivity in ...

  3. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling in Stem Cells and Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer R. Lynch; Jenny Yingzi Wang

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a large superfamily of cell-surface signaling proteins that bind extracellular ligands and transduce signals into cells via heterotrimeric G proteins. GPCRs are highly tractable drug targets. Aberrant expression of GPCRs and G proteins has been observed in various cancers and their importance in cancer stem cells has begun to be appreciated. We have recently reported essential roles for G protein-coupled receptor 84 (GPR84) and G protein subunit Gαq in ...

  4. MUC1-C ONCOPROTEIN INDUCES TAMOXIFEN RESISTANCE IN HUMAN BREAST CANCER CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Kharbanda, Akriti; Rajabi, Hasan; Jin, Caining; Raina, Deepak; Kufe, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Resistance of estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer cells to tamoxifen has been linked in part to activation of (i) certain receptor tyrosine kinases, such as HER2, and (ii) the PI3K→AKT pathway. Mucin 1 (MUC1) is aberrantly overexpressed in about 90% of human breast cancers and the oncogenic MUC1-C subunit associates with ERα. The present studies using HER2 overexpressing BT-474 breast cancer cells, which are constitutively resistant to tamoxifen, demonstrate that silencing MUC1-C i...

  5. Profile of bevacizumab in the treatment of platinum-resistant ovarian cancer: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    McClung EC; Wenham RM

    2016-01-01

    E Clair McClung, Robert M WenhamDepartment of Gynecologic Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USAAbstract: Patients with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer have progression of disease within 6 months of completing platinum-based chemotherapy. While several chemotherapeutic options exist for the treatment of platinum-resistant ovarian cancer, the overall response to any of these therapies is ~10%, with a median progression-free survival of 3–4 months and a median ...

  6. Characterization of colonic cellular glycoconjugates in colitis and cancer-prone tamarins versus colitis and cancer-resistant primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R; King, N; Alroy, J

    1988-06-01

    Differences in colonic secretory glycoconjugates (ie, mucin) between normal and ulcerative colitis-prone patients have been noted. Similar differences may occur in a corresponding primate model, the cotton-top tamarin (CTT), Saguinus oedipus, a New World monkey which suffers from spontaneous chronic colitis and colon cancer. Lectin reagents were used to characterize and compare colonic cell surface, cytoplasmic, and secretory glycoconjugates of 9 clinically healthy cotton-top tamarins, 7 colitis-susceptible, cancer-resistant tamarins (Callithrix jacchus, Saguinus fuscicollis), and 8 colitis and cancer-resistant primates (Aotus trivirgatus, Saimiri sciureus, Macaca fascicularis, and Macaca mulatta). Paraffin-embedded colonic sections were labeled with ten different biotinylated lectins and visualized by the avidin-biotin peroxidase (ABC) method. Significant differences were demonstrated in the pattern of lectin staining between the colitis-resistant and colitis-prone groups of primates. The differences were noted with Griffonia simplicifolia-I (GS-I), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), peanut agglutinin (PNA) before and after neuraminidase, Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-I), soybean agglutinin (SBA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), and succinylated WGA (S-WGA). Significant differences between the CTT and phylogenetically related colitis-prone but cancer-resistant tamarins were demonstrated with SBA, UEA-I, and PNA after desialylation with neuraminidase. These results suggest that differences in colonic cellular glycoconjugates between colitis- and cancer-susceptible species versus colitis-susceptible, cancer-resistant species may be associated with risk of cancer. PMID:3132857

  7. A combination of sorafenib and nilotinib reduces the growth of castrate-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archibald M

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Monica Archibald,1 Tara Pritchard,1 Hayley Nehoff,1 Rhonda J Rosengren,1 Khaled Greish,1,2 Sebastien Taurin1 1Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand; 2Aljawhara Centre for Molecular Medicine, Arabian Gulf University, Manama, Kingdom of Bahrain Abstract: Castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC remains incurable due to the lack of effective therapies. Several tyrosine kinases have been implicated in the development and growth of CRPC, as such targeting these kinases may offer an alternative therapeutic strategy. We established the combination of two tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs, sorafenib and nilotinib, as the most cytotoxic. In addtion, to improve their bioavailability and reduce their metabolism, we encapsulated sorafenib and nilotinib into styrene-co-maleic acid micelles. The micelles’ charge, size, and release rate were characterized. We assessed the effect of the combination on the cytotoxicity, cell cycle, apoptosis, protein expression, tumor spheroid integrity, migration, and invasion. The micelles exhibited a mean diameter of 100 nm, a neutral charge, and appeared highly stable. The micellar TKIs promoted greater cytotoxicity, decreased cell proliferation, and increased apoptosis relative to the free TKIs. In addition, the combination reduced the expression and activity of several tyrosine kinases and reduced tumor spheroid integrity and metastatic potential of CRPC cell lines more efficiently than the single treatments. The combination increased the therapeutic potential and demonstrated the relevance of a targeted combination therapy for the treatment of CRPC. In addition, the efficacy of the encapsulated drugs provides the basis for an in vivo preclinical testing. Keywords: sorafenib, nilotinib, castrate-resistant prostate cancer, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, nanomedicine

  8. RKIP inhibition in cervical cancer is associated with higher tumor aggressive behavior and resistance to cisplatin therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Martinho

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide, being high-risk group the HPV infected, the leading etiological factor. The raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP has been associated with tumor progression and metastasis in several human neoplasms, however its role on cervical cancer is unclear. In the present study, 259 uterine cervix tissues, including cervicitis, cervical intraepithelial lesions and carcinomas, were analyzed for RKIP expression by immunohistochemistry. We found that RKIP expression was significantly decreased during malignant progression, being highly expressed in non-neoplastic tissues (54% of the samples; 73/135, and expressed at low levels in the cervix invasive carcinomas (∼15% (19/124. Following in vitro downregulation of RKIP, we observed a viability and proliferative advantage of RKIP-inhibited cells over time, which was associated with an altered cell cycle distribution and higher colony number in a colony formation assay. An in vitro wound healing assay showed that RKIP abrogation is associated with increased migratory capability. RKIP downregulation was also associated with an increased vascularization of the tumors in vivo using a CAM assay. Furthermore, RKIP inhibition induced cervical cancer cells apoptotic resistance to cisplatin treatment. In conclusion, we described that RKIP protein is significantly depleted during the malignant progression of cervical tumors. Despite the lack of association with patient clinical outcome, we demonstrate, in vitro and in vivo, that loss of RKIP expression can be one of the factors that are behind the aggressiveness, malignant progression and chemotherapy resistance of cervical cancer.

  9. Endocrine therapy resistance in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchi, Tommaso; Foekens, John A; Umar, Arzu; Martens, John W M

    2016-07-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer represents the majority (∼70%) of all breast malignancies. In this subgroup of breast cancers, endocrine therapies are effective both in the adjuvant and recurrent settings, although resistance remains a major issue. Several high-throughput approaches have been used to elucidate mechanisms of resistance and to derive potential predictive markers or alternative therapies. In this review, we cover the state-of-the-art of endocrine-resistance biomarker discovery with regard to the latest technological developments, and discuss current opportunities and restrictions for their implementation into a clinical setting. PMID:27233379

  10. Single photon emission computed tomography imaging using 99Tcm-methoxyisobutylisonitrile predict the multi-drug resistance and chemotherapy efficacy of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemotherapy is one of the main comprehensive treatments for lung cancer, especially for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCIC) Multi-drug resistance of lung cancer plays an important role in the failure of chemotherapy. Early detection of multi-drug resistance (MDR) is essential for choosing a suitable chemotherapy regimen for the patients of lung cancer. In recent years lots of literature reports that MDR of lung cancer is related to many kinds of multi-drug resistance protein (MRP) expression in lung cancer. Some lipophilic chemotherapy drugs and 99Tcm-methoxyisobutylisonitrile(99Tcm-MIBI)may be the same substrate for some MRP. These MRP can transport them out of the tumor cells, then the chemotherapy is invalid or non-radioactive concentration. The retention of 99Tcm-MIBI in tumor cells is correlated with the expression of MRP, thus the prediction of the MRP expression before chemotherapy or monitoring MRP expression changes in the process of chemotherapy by using the noninvasive 99Tcm-MIBI single photon emission computed tomography imaging is helpful to predict the MDR and chemotherapy efficacy of lung cancer. (authors)

  11. Liver Label Retaining Cancer Cells Are Relatively Resistant to the Reported Anti-Cancer Stem Cell Drug Metformin

    OpenAIRE

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Ambe, Chenwi M.; Miller, Tyler C.; Chen, Jin-Qiu; Wiegand, Gordon W.; Anderson, Andrew J.; Ray, Satyajit; Mullinax, John E.; Hari, Danielle M; Koizumi, Tomotake; Godbout, Jessica D.; Goldsmith, Paul K.; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Rudloff, Udo; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims: Recently, we reported that liver Label Retaining Cancer Cells (LRCC) can initiate tumors with only 10 cells and are relatively resistant to the targeted drug Sorafenib, a standard of practice in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). LRCC are the only cancer stem cells (CSC) isolated alive according to a stem cell fundamental function, asymmetric cell division. Metformin has been reported to preferentially target many other types of CSC of different organs, including live...

  12. DNA Repair Genes ERCC1 and BRCA1 Expression in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Chemotherapy Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Liu, Feng; Zhu, Jingyan; Chen, Peng; Liu, Hongxing; Liu, Qi; Han, Junqing

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Surgery combined with chemotherapy is an important therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, chemotherapy drug resistance seriously hinders the curative effect. Studies show that DNA repair genes ERCC1 and BRCA1 are associated with NSCLC chemotherapy, but their expression and mechanism in NSCLC chemotherapy drug-resistant cells has not been elucidated. MATERIAL AND METHODS NSCLC cell line A549 and drug resistance cell line A549/DDP were cultured. Real-time PCR and Western blot analyses were used to detect ERCC1 and BRCA1 mRNA expression. A549/DDP cells were randomly divided into 3 groups: the control group; the siRNA-negative control group (scramble group); and the siRNA ERCC1 and BRCA1siRNA transfection group. Real-time PCR and Western blot analyses were used to determine ERCC1 and BRCA1 mRNA and protein expression. MTT was used to detect cell proliferation activity. Caspase 3 activity was tested by use of a kit. Western blot analysis was performed to detect PI3K, AKT, phosphorylated PI3K, and phosphorylated AKT protein expression. RESULTS ERCC1 and BRCA1 were overexpressed in A549/DDP compared with A549 (PBRCA1 mRNA and protein expression (PBRCA1 expression obviously inhibited cell proliferation and increased caspase 3 activity (PBRCA1 significantly decreased PI3K and AKT phosphorylation levels (PBRCA1 were overexpressed in NSCLC drug-resistant cells, and they regulated lung cancer occurrence and development through the phosphorylating PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. PMID:27289442

  13. Androgen receptor targeted therapies in castration-resistant prostate cancer: Bench to clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Yusuke; Sadar, Marianne D

    2016-08-01

    The androgen receptor is a transcription factor and validated therapeutic target for prostate cancer. Androgen deprivation therapy remains the gold standard treatment, but it is not curative, and eventually the disease will return as lethal castration-resistant prostate cancer. There have been improvements in the therapeutic landscape with new agents approved, such as abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide, sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel and Ra-223, in the past 5 years. New insight into the mechanisms of resistance to treatments in advanced disease is being and has been elucidated. All current androgen receptor-targeting therapies inhibit the growth of prostate cancer by blocking the ligand-binding domain, where androgen binds to activate the receptor. Persuasive evidence supports the concept that constitutively active androgen receptor splice variants lacking the ligand-binding domain are one of the resistant mechanisms underlying advanced disease. Transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor requires a functional AF-1 region in its N-terminal domain. Preclinical evidence proved that this domain is a druggable target to forecast a potential paradigm shift in the management of advanced prostate cancer. This review presents an overview of androgen receptor-related mechanisms of resistance as well as novel therapeutic agents to overcome resistance that is linked to the expression of androgen receptor splice variants in castration-resistant prostate cancer. PMID:27302572

  14. Acute Inflammatory Response to Low-, Moderate-, and High-Load Resistance Exercise in Women With Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormie, Prue; Singh, Benjamin; Hayes, Sandi; Peake, Jonathan M; Galvão, Daniel A; Taaffe, Dennis R; Spry, Nigel; Nosaka, Kazunori; Cornish, Bruce; Schmitz, Kathryn H; Newton, Robert U

    2016-09-01

    Background Resistance exercise is emerging as a potential adjunct therapy to aid in the management of breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). However, the mechanisms underlying the relationships between the acute and long-term benefits of resistance exercise on BCRL are not well understood. Purpose To examine the acute inflammatory response to upper-body resistance exercise in women with BCRL and to compare these effects between resistance exercises involving low, moderate, and high loads. The impact on lymphedema status and associated symptoms was also compared. Methods A total of 21 women, 62 ± 10 years old, with BCRL participated in the study. Participants completed low-load (15-20 repetition maximum [RM]), moderate-load (10-12 RM), and high-load (6-8 RM) exercise sessions consisting of 3 sets of 6 upper-body resistance exercises. Sessions were completed in a randomized order separated by a 7- to 10-day wash-out period. Venous blood samples were obtained to assess markers of exercise-induced muscle damage and inflammation. Lymphedema status was assessed using bioimpedance spectroscopy and arm circumferences, and associated symptoms were assessed using Visual Analogue Scales for pain, heaviness, and tightness. Measurements were conducted before and 24 hours after the exercise sessions. Results No significant changes in creatine kinase, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α were observed following the 3 resistance exercise sessions. There were no significant changes in arm swelling or symptom severity scores across the 3 resistance exercise conditions. Conclusions The magnitude of acute exercise-induced inflammation following upper-body resistance exercise in women with BCRL does not vary between resistance exercise loads. PMID:26582633

  15. ATM and p53 regulate FOXM1 expression via E2F in breast cancer epirubicin treatment and resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millour, Julie; de Olano, Natalia; Horimoto, Yoshiya; Monteiro, Lara J.; Langer, Julia K.; Aligue, Rosa; Hajji, Nabil; Lam, Eric W.-F.

    2011-01-01

    In this report we investigated the role and regulation of FOXM1 in breast cancer and epirubicin resistance. We generated epirubicin resistant MCF-7 breast carcinoma (MCF-7-EPIR) cells and found FOXM1 protein levels to be higher in MCF-7-EPIR compared to MCF-7 cells, and that FOXM1 expression is down-regulated by epirubicin in MCF-7 but not in MCF-7-EPIR cells. We also established that there is a loss of p53 function in MCF-7-EPIR cells and that epirubicin represses FOXM1 expression at transcription and gene promoter levels through activation of p53 and repression of E2F activity in MCF-7 cells. Using p53-/- MEFs, we showed that p53 is important for epirubicin sensitivity. Moreover, transient promoter transfection assays demonstrated that epirubicin and its cellular effectors p53 and E2F1 modulate FOXM1 transcription through an E2F-binding site located within the proximal promoter region. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis also revealed that epirubicin treatment increases pRB and decreases E2F1 recruitment to the FOXM1 promoter region containing the E2F-site. We also found Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein and mRNA to be overexpressed in the resistant MCF-7-EPIR cells compared to MCF-7 cells and that epirubicin can activate ATM to promote E2F activity and FOXM1 expression. Furthermore, inhibition of ATM in U2OS cells with caffeine or depletion of ATM in MCF-7-EPIR with siRNAs can re-sensitise these resistant cells to epirubicin, resulting in down-regulation of E2F1 and FOXM1 expression and cell death. In summary, our data show that ATM and p53 coordinately regulate FOXM1 via E2F to modulate epirubicin response and resistance in breast cancer. PMID:21518729

  16. High hRFI expression correlates with resistance to Fluoro pyrimidines in human colon cancer cell lines and in xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We previously reported that the over-expression of hRFI, a protein preferentially expressed in the digestive tract regions of several cancers, exhibited a tendency to inhibit TNF-α induced apoptosis. In this study, we sought to determine the potential effect of hRFI expression on the sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and/or other fluoro pyrimidines. For the whole lysates of 8 colon cancer cell lines, we performed Western blotting with anti-hRFI antibody and analyzed the correlations between the expression level of hRFI and the cell lines' sensitivity to 5-FU induced apoptosis. Furthermore, for a tissue micro array consisting of 32 xenograft derived human cancer cell lines, we examined the expression levels of hRFI and survivin by immunohistochemical staining, and analyzed the correlations between the expression of each protein and the sensitivity to several chemotherapeutic agents in the xenografts examined. Both in colon cancer cell lines and in xenografts, the expression level of hRFI was correlated with resistance to 5-FU and its derivatives. This evidence suggests that hRFI may be a marker predicting the response to fluorouracil derived chemotherapeutic agents and that the reduction of the expression level of hRFI might improve the outcome of chemotherapy

  17. A Milk Protein, Casein, as a Proliferation Promoting Factor in Prostate Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Sung-Woo; Kim, Joo-Young; Kim, You-sun; Lee, Sang Jin; Lee, Sang Don; CHUNG, MOON KEE

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Despite most epidemiologic studies reporting that an increase in milk intake affects the growth of prostate cancer, the results of experimental studies are not consistent. In this study, we investigated the proliferation of prostate cancer cells treated with casein, the main protein in milk. Materials and Methods Prostate cancer cells (LNCaP and PC3), lung cancer cells (A459), stomach cancer cells (SNU484), breast cancer cells (MCF7), immortalized human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293)...

  18. Overcoming EMT-associated resistance to anti-cancer drugs via Src/FAK pathway inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Catherine; Nicholes, Katrina; Bustos, Daisy; Lin, Eva; Song, Qinghua; Stephan, Jean-Philippe; Kirkpatrick, Donald S; Settleman, Jeff

    2014-09-15

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key process in embryonic development and has been associated with cancer metastasis and drug resistance. For example, in EGFR mutated non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), EMT has been associated with acquired resistance to the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib. Moreover, "EGFR-addicted" cancer cell lines induced to undergo EMT become erlotinib-resistant in vitro. To identify potential therapeutic vulnerabilities specifically within these mesenchymal, erlotinib-resistant cells, we performed a small molecule screen of ~200 established anti-cancer agents using the EGFR mutant NSCLC HCC827 cell line and a corresponding mesenchymal derivative line. The mesenchymal cells were more resistant to most tested agents; however, a small number of agents showed selective growth inhibitory activity against the mesenchymal cells, with the most potent being the Abl/Src inhibitor, dasatinib. Analysis of the tyrosine phospho-proteome revealed several Src/FAK pathway kinases that were differentially phosphorylated in the mesenchymal cells, and RNAi depletion of the core Src/FAK pathway components in these mesenchymal cells caused apoptosis. These findings reveal a novel role for Src/FAK pathway kinases in drug resistance and identify dasatinib as a potential therapeutic for treatment of erlotinib resistance associated with EMT. PMID:25193862

  19. Substrates and inhibitors of human multidrug resistance associated proteins and the implications in drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shu-Feng; Wang, Lin-Lin; Di, Yuan Ming; Xue, Charlie Changli; Duan, Wei; Li, Chun Guang; Li, Yong

    2008-01-01

    Human contains 49 ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter genes and the multidrug resistance associated proteins (MRP1/ABCC1, MRP2/ABCC2, MRP3/ABCC3, MRP4/ABCC4, MRP5/ABCC5, MRP6/ABCC6, MRP7/ABCC10, MRP8/ABCC11 and MRP9/ABCC12) belong to the ABCC family which contains 13 members. ABCC7 is cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator; ABCC8 and ABCC9 are the sulfonylurea receptors which constitute the ATP-sensing subunits of a complex potassium channel. MRP10/ABCC13 is clearly a pseudo-gene which encodes a truncated protein that is highly expressed in fetal human liver with the highest similarity to MRP2/ABCC2 but without transporting activity. These transporters are localized to the apical and/or basolateral membrane of the hepatocytes, enterocytes, renal proximal tubule cells and endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier. MRP/ABCC members transport a structurally diverse array of important endogenous substances and xenobiotics and their metabolites (in particular conjugates) with different substrate specificity and transport kinetics. The human MRP/ABCC transporters except MRP9/ABCC12 are all able to transport organic anions, such as drugs conjugated to glutathione, sulphate or glucuronate. In addition, selected MRP/ABCC members may transport a variety of endogenous compounds, such as leukotriene C(4) (LTC(4) by MRP1/ABCC1), bilirubin glucuronides (MRP2/ABCC2, and MRP3/ABCC3), prostaglandins E1 and E2 (MRP4/ABCC4), cGMP (MRP4/ABCC4, MRP5/ABCC5, and MRP8/ABCC11), and several glucuronosyl-, or sulfatidyl steroids. In vitro, the MRP/ABCC transporters can collectively confer resistance to natural product anticancer drugs and their conjugated metabolites, platinum compounds, folate antimetabolites, nucleoside and nucleotide analogs, arsenical and antimonial oxyanions, peptide-based agents, and in concert with alterations in phase II conjugating or biosynthetic enzymes, classical alkylating agents, alkylating agents. Several MRP/ABCC members (MRPs 1-3) are

  20. Targeting Human Cancer by a Glycosaminoglycan Binding Malaria Protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salanti, Ali; Clausen, Thomas M.; Agerbæk, Mette Ø.;

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum engineer infected erythrocytes to present the malarial protein, VAR2CSA, which binds a distinct type chondroitin sulfate (CS) exclusively expressed in the placenta. Here, we show that the same CS modification is present on a high proportion of malignant cells and that it can...... be specifically targeted by recombinant VAR2CSA (rVAR2). In tumors, placental-like CS chains are linked to a limited repertoire of cancer-associated proteoglycans including CD44 and CSPG4. The rVAR2 protein localizes to tumors in vivo and rVAR2 fused to diphtheria toxin or conjugated to hemiasterlin compounds...... strongly inhibits in vivo tumor cell growth and metastasis. Our data demonstrate how an evolutionarily refined parasite-derived protein can be exploited to target a common, but complex, malignancy-associated glycosaminoglycan modification....

  1. Suppression of the death gene BIK is a critical factor for resistance to tamoxifen in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viedma-Rodriguez, Rubí; Baiza-Gutman, Luis Arturo; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; Moreno-Fierros, Leticia; Salamanca-Gómez, Fabio; Arenas-Aranda, Diego

    2013-12-01

    Apoptosis is controlled by the BCL-2 family of proteins, which can be divided into three different subclasses based on the conservation of BCL-2 homology domains. BIK is a founding member of the BH3-only pro-apoptotic protein family. BIK is predominantly localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and induces apoptosis through the mitochondrial pathway by mobilizing calcium from the ER to the mitochondria. In this study, we determined that suppression of the death gene Bik promotes resistance to tamoxifen (TAM) in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We utilized small interfering (siRNA) to specifically knockdown BIK in MCF-7 cells and studied their response to tamoxifen. The levels of cell apoptosis, the potential mitochondrial membrane (∆Ψ(m)), and the activation of total caspases were analyzed. Western blot analysis was used to determine the expression of some BCL-2 family proteins. Flow cytometry studies revealed an increase in apoptosis level in MCF-7 cells and a 2-fold increase in relative BIK messenger RNA (mRNA) expression at a concentration of 6.0 μM of TAM. BIK silencing, with a specific RNAi, blocked TAM-induced apoptosis in 45 ± 6.78% of cells. Moreover, it decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (Ψm) and total caspase activity, and exhibited low expression of pro-apoptotic proteins BAX, BAK, PUMA and a high expression of BCl-2 and MCL-1. The above suggests resistance to TAM, regulating the intrinsic pathway and indicate that BIK comprises an important factor in the process of apoptosis, which may exert an influence the ER pathway, which regulates mitochondrial integrity. Collectively, our results show that BIK is a central component of the programmed cell death of TAM-induced MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The silencing of BIK gene will be useful for future studies to establish the mechanisms of regulation of resistance to TAM. PMID:24100375

  2. Targeting microparticle biogenesis: a novel approach to the circumvention of cancer multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseblade, Ariane; Luk, Frederick; Ung, Alison; Bebawy, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Microparticles (MPs) are released from most eukaryotic cells after the vesiculation of the plasma membrane and serve as vectors of long and short-range signaling. MPs derived from multidrug resistant (MDR) cancer cells carry molecular components of the donor cell such as nucleic acids and proteins, and can alter the activity of drug-sensitive recipient cells through the transfer of their cargo. Given the substantial role of MPs in the acquisition and dissemination of MDR, we propose that the inhibition of MP release provides a novel therapeutic approach. This study characterises the effect of a panel of molecules known to act on MP-biosynthetic pathways. We demonstrate a differential effect by these molecules on MP inhibition that appear dependent on the release of intracellular calcium stores following activation with the calcium ionophore A23187. Calpain inhibitor, PD-150606; a selective inhibitor of Rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase (ROCK), Y-27632; and the vitamin B5 derivative pantethine, inhibited MP release only upon prior activation with A23187. Calpain inhibitor II showed significant inhibition in the absence of cell activation, whereas the vitamin B5 derivatives cystamine dihydrochloride and cysteamine hydrochloride showed no effect on MP inhibition under either condition. In contrast the classical pharmacological inhibitor of MDR, the calcium channel blocker Verapamil, showed an increase in MP formation on resting cells. These results suggest a potential role for calcium in the mechanism of action for PD-150606, Y-27632 and pantethine. These molecules, together with calpain inhibitor II have shown promise as modulators of MP release and warrant consideration as potential candidates for the development of an alternative therapeutic strategy for the prevention of MP-mediated MDR in cancer. PMID:25714701

  3. Nonspecific stabilization of stress-susceptible proteins by stress-resistant proteins: a model for the biological role of heat shock