WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer research training

  1. Prostate Cancer Research Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    evaluate medication safety. Examples of HERCe research include recent publications on breast cancer treatments, complications of chemotherapy for...with specific interest in minimally invasive procedures, new techniques, and outcomes. Dr. Brown initiated many of the laparoscopic and robotic ... surgery as it is one of the main areas of his clinical expertise. Currently, he performs more prostate cancer surgery than any other physician in

  2. Prostate Cancer Research Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Associate, Department of Internal Medicine (319-356-4159) http://www.int- med.uiowa.edu/Divisions/ Cardiology /Directory/Micha elSchultz.html Dr. Schultz’s...Core, DNA Core, Flow Cytometry Core, to name but a few. For research that includes laboratory animals, professional, humane veterinary care is

  3. Prostate Cancer Research Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Iowa. It is conveniently located on the northern edge of the campus and is served by the free Cambus transportation system. The Mayflower has...and museums (art, natural history, and sports). In addition, there are a large number of restaurants ranging from fast food to fine dining...of Iowa. It is conveniently located on the west campus near the research labs and is served by the free Cambus transportation system. The

  4. Interdisciplinary Research Training in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-01

    University. An Internet-Based Low- Literacy Cancer Communication Intervention. $1,500, funded. * 2004- Pfizer Clear Health Communication Program. An...Internet-Based Low- Literacy Cancer Communication Intervention. $195,000, not funded. 0 2004- DOD Breast Cancer Research Program, Multidisciplinary...of Connecticut and Yale University. While providing didactic experience in advanced research, methodology, it allows the candidate to have sustained

  5. African Organization for Research and Training in Cancer: position and vision for cancer research on the African Continent

    OpenAIRE

    Ogunbiyi, J. Olufemi; Stefan, D. Cristina; Timothy R. Rebbeck

    2016-01-01

    The African Organization for Research and training in Cancer (AORTIC) bases the following position statements on a critical appraisal of the state on cancer research and cancer care in Africa including information on the availability of data on cancer burden, screening and prevention for cancer in Africa, cancer care personnel, treatment modalities, and access to cancer care.

  6. Biopsychosocial Research Training in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    In A.S. Manstead & M. Hewstone (Eds), Blackwell encyclopedia of social psychology. Oxford and New York: Basil Blackwell. Schneiderman, N., Antoni...information on stress responses and coping, teach anxiety reduction skills such as progressive muscle relaxation and relaxing imagery ( Bernstein & Borkovec...Beach Center on Families and Disabilities. Bernstein , B., & Borkovec T. (1973). Progressive muscle relaxation training: A manual for ൢ the helping

  7. Summer Prostate Cancer Research Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    addition, contributed patients for study of circulating tumor cells before and after prostatectomy, and, more recently, helped to develop a prospective...gynecologic cancers and gestational disorders such as pre-eclampsia and pre-term birth. PLAC1 is expressed in numerous tissues during fetal development...exclusively in placental trophoblasts in reproductive age women and in gynecologic tumors. It is, thus, the only known example of an onco- fetal

  8. Prostate Cancer Research Training in Health Disparities for Minority Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    that may be associated with prostate cancer . The overlap between environment and diet, toxicology , exposure assessment, risk assessment/risk...of the Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center. She completed her doctoral training in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology at the University of...Microbiology and Immunology , and Associate Professor of Cancer Biology at Vanderbilt University. He earned the MBBS (MD) degree from Ahmadu Bello

  9. Redes En Acción. Increasing Hispanic participation in cancer research, training, and awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Amelie G; Talavera, Gregory A; Marti, Jose; Penedo, Frank J; Medrano, Martha A; Giachello, Aida L; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J

    2006-10-15

    Hispanics are affected by many health care disparities. The National Cancer Institute (NCI), through its Special Populations Branch, is supporting networking and capacity-building activities designed to increase Hispanic participation and leadership in cancer research. Redes En Acción established a national network of cancer research centers, community-based organizations, and federal partners to facilitate opportunities for junior Hispanic scientists to participate in training and research projects on cancer control. Since 2000, Redes En Acción has established a network of more than 1800 Hispanic leaders involved in cancer research and education. The project has sustained 131 training positions and submitted 29 pilot projects to NCI for review, with 16 awards for a total of $800,000, plus an additional $8.8 million in competing grant funding based on pilot study results to date. Independent research has leveraged an additional $32 million in non-Redes funding, and together the national and regional network sites have participated in more than 1400 community and professional awareness events. In addition, the program conducted extensive national survey research that provided the basis for the Redes En Acción Latino Cancer Report, a national agenda on Hispanic cancer issues. Redes En Acción has increased participation in cancer control research, training, and awareness among Hispanic scientists and within Hispanic communities. Cancer 2006. (c) 2006 American Cancer Society.

  10. Automated Literature Searches for Longitudinal Tracking of Cancer Research Training Program Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Luz A; Desmond, Renee A; Brooks, C Michael; Waterbor, John W

    2016-10-12

    A key outcome measure of cancer research training programs is the number of cancer-related peer-reviewed publications after training. Because program graduates do not routinely report their publications, staff must periodically conduct electronic literature searches on each graduate. The purpose of this study is to compare findings of an innovative computer-based automated search program versus repeated manual literature searches to identify post-training peer-reviewed publications. In late 2014, manual searches for publications by former R25 students identified 232 cancer-related articles published by 112 of 543 program graduates. In 2016, a research assistant was instructed in performing Scopus literature searches for comparison with individual PubMed searches on our 543 program graduates. Through 2014, Scopus found 304 cancer publications, 220 of that had been retrieved manually plus an additional 84 papers. However, Scopus missed 12 publications found manually. Together, both methods found 316 publications. The automated method found 96.2 % of the 316 publications while individual searches found only 73.4 %. An automated search method such as using the Scopus database is a key tool for conducting comprehensive literature searches, but it must be supplemented with periodic manual searches to find the initial publications of program graduates. A time-saving feature of Scopus is the periodic automatic alerts of new publications. Although a training period is needed and initial costs can be high, an automated search method is worthwhile due to its high sensitivity and efficiency in the long term.

  11. Training Program in the Molecular Basis of Breast Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-01

    regulating the proteasomes in a protozoan species, the Trypanosomes" Francis Barany "New methods of detecting genetic diseases and cancers" Steven...WA Burkhart, MB Moyer, W Ramos, ZB Mackey, JM Besterman and J Chen. 1995 Purification and characterization of DNA ligase III from bovine testes ...hypothesis under test is that BRCA1 can influence negatively the expression of a repertoire of AP12-regulated genes. This control function may be

  12. An Evaluation Methodology for Longitudinal Studies of Short-Term Cancer Research Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Luz A; Venkatesh, Raam; Daniel, Casey L; Desmond, Renee A; Brooks, C Michael; Waterbor, John W

    2016-03-01

    The need to familiarize medical students and graduate health professional students with research training opportunities that cultivate the appeal of research careers is vital to the future of research. Comprehensive evaluation of a cancer research training program can be achieved through longitudinal tracking of program alumni to assess the program's impact on each participant's career path and professional achievements. With advances in technology and smarter means of communication, effective ways to track alumni have changed. In order to collect data on the career outcomes and achievements of nearly 500 short-term cancer research training program alumni from 1999-2013, we sought to contact each alumnus to request completion of a survey instrument online, or by means of a telephone interview. The effectiveness of each contact method that we used was quantified according to ease of use and time required. The most reliable source of contact information for tracking alumni from the early years of the program was previous tracking results, and for alumni from the later years, the most important source of contact information was university alumni records that provided email addresses and telephone numbers. Personal contacts with former preceptors were sometimes helpful, as were generic search engines and people search engines. Social networking was of little value for most searches. Using information from two or more sources in combination was most effective in tracking alumni. These results provide insights and tools for other research training programs that wish to track their alumni for long-term program evaluation.

  13. HBCU Summer Undergraduate Training Program in Prostate Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    prostate cell line (BPH1). ERG knockdown inhibited the cell growth and altered the morphology of VCaP cells. ERG knockdown in VCaP cells correlated with... Morphology and quantification of prostate cancer cells recovered from urine has led to development of an optimized protocol. • Recovered cells could...Grant From DoD-PCRP: ………………………..…...Attachment 4-6 University of the District of Columbia Newsletters “Fire Bird” ………………...Attachment 7, 8 28

  14. Career Satisfaction and Perceived Salary Competitiveness among Individuals Who Completed Postdoctoral Research Training in Cancer Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faupel-Badger, Jessica M; Nelson, David E; Izmirlian, Grant

    2017-01-01

    Studies examining career satisfaction of biomedical scientists are limited, especially in the context of prior postdoctoral training. Here we focused on career satisfaction defined as satisfaction with one's career trajectory and perceived salary competitiveness among a predominantly Ph.D.-trained population of scientists who completed cancer prevention-related postdoctoral training between 1987-2011. National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program (CPFP) alumni (n = 114), and previous recipients of NCI-sponsored Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA/F32) postdoctoral fellowships (n = 140) completed online surveys. Associations of career satisfaction and perception of salary competitiveness with demographic, training, and employment-related factors were examined using logistic regression. Overall, 61% reported high levels of satisfaction with their career trajectory to-date. Higher salary (odds ratio [OR] = 2.86, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.07-7.69) and having more leadership roles (OR = 2.26, 95% CI:1.04-4.90) were independently associated with higher career satisfaction. Persons with race/ethnicity other than white (OR = 0.40, 95% CI: 0.20-0.82) or age ≥ 50 (OR = 0.40, 95%CI: 0.17-0.94) had lower career satisfaction levels. There were no statistically significant differences in career satisfaction levels by gender, scientific discipline, or employment sector. 74% perceived their current salary as competitive, but persons with 5-9, or ≥10 years in their current position reported lower levels (OR = 0.31, 95% CI: 0.15-0.65; and OR = 0.37, 95% CI: 0.16-0.87, respectively), as did individuals in government positions (OR = 0.33, 95% CI: 0.11-0.98). These data add to the understanding of career satisfaction of those with advanced training in biomedical research by examining these measures in relation to prior postdoctoral research training and across multiple career sectors.

  15. The next generation of large-scale epidemiologic research: implications for training cancer epidemiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitz, Margaret R; Lam, Tram Kim; Schully, Sheri D; Khoury, Muin J

    2014-11-15

    There is expanding consensus on the need to modernize the training of cancer epidemiologists to accommodate rapidly emerging technological advancements and the digital age, which are transforming the practice of cancer epidemiology. There is also a growing imperative to extend cancer epidemiology research that is etiological to that which is applied and has the potential to affect individual and public health. Medical schools and schools of public health are recognizing the need to develop such integrated programs; however, we lack the data to estimate how many current training programs are effectively equipping epidemiology students with the knowledge and tools to design, conduct, and analyze these increasingly complex studies. There is also a need to develop new mentoring approaches to account for the transdisciplinary team-science environment that now prevails. With increased dialogue among schools of public health, medical schools, and cancer centers, revised competencies and training programs at predoctoral, doctoral, and postdoctoral levels must be developed. Continuous collection of data on the impact and outcomes of such programs is also recommended.

  16. ENTERVISION: Research Training in 3D Digital Imaging for Cancer Radiation Therapy

    CERN Multimedia

    Dosanjh, M

    2013-01-01

    ENTERVISION, is a Marie Curie Initial Training Network project providing training for 12 Early - Stage Researchers and 4 Experienced Researchers in the field of online medical imaging for hadron therapy. It was established in response to the critical need for reinforcing research in online imaging and for training of highly skilled professionals, with the aim of early detection and more precise treatment of tumours.

  17. Mentoring Strategies and Outcomes of Two Federally Funded Cancer Research Training Programs for Underrepresented Students in the Biomedical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Marvella E; Abraham, Latecia M; Harrison, Anita L; Jefferson, Melanie S; Hazelton, Tonya R; Varner, Heidi; Cannady, Kimberly; Frichtel, Carla S; Bagasra, Omar; Davis, Leroy; Rivers, David E; Slaughter, Sabra C; Salley, Judith D

    2016-06-01

    The US is experiencing a severe shortage of underrepresented biomedical researchers. The purpose of this paper is to present two case examples of cancer research mentoring programs for underrepresented biomedical sciences students. The first case example is a National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute (NIH/NCI) P20 grant titled "South Carolina Cancer Disparities Research Center (SC CaDRe)" Training Program, contributing to an increase in the number of underrepresented students applying to graduate school by employing a triple-level mentoring strategy. Since 2011, three undergraduate and four graduate students have participated in the P20 SC CaDRe program. One graduate student published a peer-reviewed scientific paper. Two graduate students (50 %) have completed their master's degrees, and the other two graduate students will receive their degrees in spring 2015. Two undergraduate students (67 %) are enrolled in graduate or professional school (grad./prof. school), and the other graduate student is completing her final year of college. The second case example is a prostate cancer-focused Department of Defense grant titled "The SC Collaborative Undergraduate HBCU Student Summer Training Program," providing 24 students training since 2009. Additionally, 47 students made scientific presentations, and two students have published peer-reviewed scientific papers. All 24 students took a GRE test preparation course; 15 (63 %) have applied to graduate school, and 11 of them (73 %) are enrolled in grad./prof. school. Thirteen remaining students (54 %) are applying to grad./prof. school. Leveraged funding provided research-training opportunities to an additional 201 National Conference on Health Disparities Student Forum participants and to 937 Ernest E. Just Research Symposium participants at the Medical University of South Carolina.

  18. Contrasting the ethical perspectives of biospecimen research among individuals with familial risk for hereditary cancer and biomedical researchers: implications for researcher training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Koskan, Alexis; Sehovic, Ivana; Pal, Tuya; Meade, Cathy; Gwede, Clement K

    2014-07-01

    While ethical concerns about participating in biospecimen research have been previously identified, few studies have reported the concerns among individuals with familial risk for hereditary cancer (IFRs). At the same time, biomedical researchers often lack training in discussing such concerns to potential donors. This study explores IFRs' and biomedical researchers' perceptions of ethical concerns about participating in biobanking research. In separate focus groups, IFRs and biomedical researchers participated in 90-min telephone focus groups. Focus group questions centered on knowledge about laws that protect the confidentiality of biospecimen donors, understanding of informed consent and study procedures, and preferences for being recontacted about potential incidental discovery and also study results. A total of 40 IFRs and 32 biomedical researchers participated in the focus groups. Results demonstrated discrepancies between the perceptions of IFRs and researchers. IFRs' concerns centered on health information protection; potential discrimination by insurers and employers; and preferences for being recontacted upon discovery of gene mutations or to communicate study results. Researchers perceived that participants understood laws protecting donors' privacy and (detailed study information outlined in the informed consent process), study outcomes were used to create a training tool kit to increase researchers' understanding of IFRs' concerns about biobanking.

  19. Types of Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    An infographic from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) describing the four broad categories of cancer research: basic research, clinical research, population-based research, and translational research.

  20. Breast Cancer Research Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JavaScript on. Feature: Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Research Update Winter 2017 Table of Contents National Cancer Institute ... Addressing Breast Cancer's Unequal Burden / Breast Cancer Research Update Winter 2017 Issue: Volume 11 Number 4 Page ...

  1. Project INSPIRE-HBCU Undergraduate Collaborative Summer Training Program to Inspire Students in Prostate Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    in cancer cells without adversely affecting normal cells (2, 3, 4, and 8). It is now widely appreciated that agents capable of inducing apoptosis in...Sci., 63, 1397-1403. 9. Sarkar FH and Yiwei Li. (2006). Using chemopreventive agents to enhance the efficacy of cancer therapy. Cancer Res., 66...and Blackburn GL. (2003). Soy phytochemicals and tea bioactive components synergistically inhibit androgen-sensitive human prostate tumors in

  2. INITIAL TRAINING OF RESEARCHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Alejandra Cruz-Pallares

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The document presents results of a research that used as strategy a complementary training project with thirty-three students of a Bachelors Degree in Primary School 1997(DPS,1997 of an Education Faculty for the initial training of investigators, applied by four teachers members of the academic research group in Mexico; that develops through process of action research methodology. Highlighted in results is the strengthening of the competition of reading, understanding and writing scientific texts, which is analogous to the first feature of the graduate profile called intellectual skills. Among the conclusions it is emphasized that the initial training of teachers in a task that is quite interesting, challenging and complex, as is the educational complex phenomenon.

  3. Nebraska Prostate Cancer Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    2011.  LaTayia Aaron and Joann Powell. (2012). Dioxin exposure enhances nuclear localization of androgen receptor...to be trained in different areas of prostate cancer research. For example, the focus areas or research include Biomarkers , Therapy, Genetics, and...example, the focus areas or research include Biomarkers , Therapy, Genetics, and Tumor Biology as outlined by the laboratory research descriptions in the

  4. Post-Doctoral Training Program in Bio-Behavioral Breast Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    Personality and Individual Differences , 35...Care Cancer, 10(5): 416-421. Kim Y, Seidlitz L (2002). Spirituality moderates the effect of stress on emotional and physical adjustment. Personality and Individual Differences , 32...2004). Spirituality and affect: A function of changes in religious affiliation. Personality and Individual Differences , 37: 861-870. Sheldon

  5. Training research through EFL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardanshina Rimma M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In a globalized research market, developing students’ research skills by means of a foreign language is of particular importance. Students’ research work within the framework of the syllabus and extracurricular activities constitute the system of scientific work of students in a higher education institution. The potential of a foreign language in shaping the academic and research competence of students of Economics is revealed in the content and process aspects. Linguistics and economics as fields of scientific knowledge are reflected in the content aspect. Regarding the mode of training research, the emphasis is on reading strategies and activities aimed at fluent comprehension and handling professional and scientific information. Students’ scientific conference survey proves the potential of EFL in research activities and sheds the light on the new ways to develop research competence.

  6. A Partnership Training Program in Breast Cancer Research Using Molecular Imaging Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    through a 26- gauge needle attached to a 1-mL hypodermic syringe 8-10 times. Protein concentrations were determined using the BioRad Detergent-Compatible...ratio by detecting the difference in ‘molecular properties’ between cancer and normal tissues (7-9). This should, in theory , allow for detection of...models. In vitro analysis demonstrated that the TfNIR–LipNBD-CA nanocomplex dramatically improved the uptake of CA in monolayer cultures of MDA-MB

  7. A Partnership Training Program in Breast Cancer Research Using Molecular Imaging Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    NO via some unknown mechanism. NO-Fe(II)- Hb, formed by NO reaction with heme proteins, was detectable in the venous blood 1 h after dosing, and its...ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter ABCB5, In Melanoma Cells and In Melanocytes. Pigment Cell Research, 2005, 18 (2): 102-112. 7. Liang, X.J, Shen, D.W

  8. Role of mathematics in cancer research: attitudes and training of Japanese mathematicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudô, A

    1979-10-01

    An extensive survey of attitude towards scientific information of scientists in Japan was conducted in Japan. It was published in a technical report, and this survey is reviewed in this paper, with the hope that this will furnish findings important in working out the plan for promoting exploitation of mathematical talent in biomedical research. Findings are concordant with the impression of foreign visitors: (1) pure mathematicians tend to concentrate on mathematics only; (2) applied mathematics and statistics are heavily oriented toward industry; (3) mathematicians and pharmacologists are very different in their attitudes to scientific information. Based on the personal experience of the author, difficulties to be circumvented in utilizing aptitudes for mathematics and/or statistics in biomedical research are discussed.

  9. Research training of students in minority and international settings: lessons learned from cancer epidemiology education in special populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Amr S; Mullan, Patricia B; Chamberlain, Robert M

    2010-06-01

    This article describes the development and evaluation of an NCI-sponsored short-term summer cancer research education program. The study questions examined: the feasibility of conducting a cancer education program in special populations at multiple US and international field sites for masters students; the merit and worth that students and faculty attribute to the program; and students' scholarly and cancer-related career outcomes. Developing a new curriculum, increasing the pool of mentors, utilizing and increasing the number of field sites, and program dissemination were also evaluated. Evidence of the program's success included students' completion of field experiences at multiple sites and their subsequent 70% project-related publication rate, with 79% of trainees reporting themselves as likely to pursue future cancer-related careers. Evaluation-guided future plans for the program include implementing faculty development to further enhance the program outcomes.

  10. Global cancer research initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard R Love

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Richard R LoveThe Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, OH, USAAbstract: Cancer is an increasing problem for low- and middle-income countries undergoing an epidemiologic transition from dominantly acute communicable disease to more frequent chronic disease with increased public health successes in the former domain. Progress against cancer in high-income countries has been modest and has come at enormous expense. There are several well-conceived global policy and planning initiatives which, with adequate political will, can favorably impact the growing global cancer challenges. Most financial resources for cancer, however, are spent on diagnosis and management of patients with disease in circumstances where specific knowledge about effective approaches is significantly limited, and the majority of interventions, other than surgery, are not cost-effective in resource-limited countries by global standards. In summary, how to intervene effectively on a global scale for the majority of citizens who develop cancer is poorly defined. In contrast to technology-transfer approaches, markedly increased clinical research activities are more likely to benefit cancer sufferers. In these contexts, a global cancer research initiative is proposed, and mechanisms for realizing such an effort are suggested.Keywords: breast cancer, research, global, international, low-income, middle-income

  11. Profiles in Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    These articles put a face to some of the thousands of individuals who contribute to NCI’s cancer research efforts. The profiles highlight the work of scientists and clinicians and describe the circumstances and motivation behind their work.

  12. Bioprinting for cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Onal, Sevgi; Yu, Chu Hsiang; Zhao, Jean J; Tasoglu, Savas

    2015-09-01

    Bioprinting offers the ability to create highly complex 3D architectures with living cells. This cutting-edge technique has significantly gained popularity and applicability in several fields. Bioprinting methods have been developed to effectively and rapidly pattern living cells, biological macromolecules, and biomaterials. These technologies hold great potential for applications in cancer research. Bioprinted cancer models represent a significant improvement over previous 2D models by mimicking 3D complexity and facilitating physiologically relevant cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Here we review bioprinting methods based on inkjet, microextrusion, and laser technologies and compare 3D cancer models with 2D cancer models. We discuss bioprinted models that mimic the tumor microenvironment, providing a platform for deeper understanding of cancer pathology, anticancer drug screening, and cancer treatment development.

  13. HBCU Summer Undergraduate Training Program in Prostate Cancer: A Partnership Between USU-CPDR and UDC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-02

    Undergraduate Training Program in Prostate Cancer by USU-CPDR and UDC selection committee to provide motivating experience in the state -of-the- art CaP research...Department of Defense, United States Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC), has awarded a new 3-year Prostate Cancer Research Program (PCRP...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-14-2-0142 TITLE: HBCU Summer Undergraduate Training Program in Prostate Cancer : A Partnership Between

  14. Strength Training May Prevent Side Effect of Breast Cancer Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162473.html Strength Training May Prevent Side Effect of Breast Cancer Surgery ... 9, 2016 FRIDAY, Dec. 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Strength training might benefit breast cancer survivors who've undergone ...

  15. AERA Research Training Program 1969. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popham, W. James

    This report describes and evaluates a training program for educational researchers conducted prior to and following the 1969 annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association. The report's description of each of the program's 12 specific training sessions, which served a total of 542 educational researchers, includes the following…

  16. Cancer Cachexia: Muscle Physiology and Exercise Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew L. Goodwin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Cachexia in cancer patients is a condition marked by severe tissue wasting and a myriad of quality of life and health consequences. Cachexia is also directly linked to the issues of morbidity and survivability in cancer patients. Therapeutic means of mitigating cachexia and its effects are thus critical in cancer patient treatment. We present a discussion on the use of physical exercise activities in the context of such treatment as a means to disruption the tissue wasting effects (i.e., muscle tissue losses via anorexigenic pro-inflammatory cytokines of cachexia. In addition we propose a theoretical model (Exercise Anti-Cachectic Hypothetical—“EACH” model as to how exercise training may promote a disruption in the cycle of events leading to advancing cachexia and in turn promote an enhanced functionality and thus improved quality of life in cancer patients.

  17. Breast Cancer Research Training Grant

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-10-01

    eight students are: 1994: Yvette Cozier (BA, Liberal Arts , Harvard Extension School, 1987; MPH, BUSPH, 1994) was admitted to the Biostatistics and...ROOM L301, REFRESHMENTS AT 1:00 September 20 Alexander Urbano Identification of novel endonucleases in drug- Department of Pathology & Laboratory

  18. Breast Cancer Research Training Grant

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-03-01

    45, ROOM L301, REFRESHMENTS AT 1:30 FEBRUARY 12 Dr. Howard Eichenbaum Neural mechanisms of declarative memory. Department of Psychology, Boston...virus. Mialocq P.. Clayette P.. Dereuddre-Bosquet N.. Martin . M. Iormont. 1). CEA, SNV (DSV/DRM). CRSSA, IPSC, Fontenay aux R, Janneke Meulenberg

  19. Fostering Cooperation in Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thursday, June 25, 2015 Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) was signed between US National Cancer Institute and three agencies of the Indian government - the Department of Biotechnology, the Indian Council of Medical Research, and the Indian National Cancer Institute, a part of the All India Institute of Medical Sciences to foster cooperation in cancer research.

  20. Attention theory and training research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, James G., Jr.; Wickens, Christopher D.; Lintern, Gavan; Harwood, Kelly

    1987-01-01

    This study used elements of attention theory as a methodological basis to decompose a complex training task in order to improve training efficiency. The complex task was a microcomputer flight simulation where subjects were required to control the stability of their own helicopter while acquiring and engaging enemy helicopers in a threat enviroment. Subjects were divided into whole-task, part-task, and part/open loop adaptive task groups in a transfer of training paradigm. The effect of reducing mental workload at the early stages of learning was examined with respect to the degree that subordinate elements of the complex task could be automated through practice of consistent, learnable stimulus-response relationships. Results revealed trends suggesting the benefit of isolating consistently mapped sub-tasks for part-task training and the presence of a time-sharing skill over and above the skill required for the separate subtasks.

  1. Research in Danish cancer rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høybye, Mette Terp; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Christensen, Jane

    2008-01-01

    of the cancer survivors with respect to cancer site, sociodemographic variables, social network, lifestyle, self-rated health and the prevalence of cancer-related late effects. The study is part of the FOCARE research project, in which the long-term effects of the rehabilitation programme are evaluated...

  2. Basic research in kidney cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterwijk, E.; Rathmell, W.K.; Junker, K.; Brannon, A.R.; Pouliot, F.; Finley, D.S.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Kirkali, Z.; Uemura, H.; Belldegrun, A.

    2011-01-01

    CONTEXT: Advances in basic research will enhance prognosis, diagnosis, and treatment of renal cancer patients. OBJECTIVE: To discuss advances in our understanding of the molecular basis of renal cancer, targeted therapies, renal cancer and immunity, and genetic factors and renal cell carcinoma (RCC)

  3. The Florida Prostate Cancer Research Training Opportunities for Outstanding Leaders (ReTOOL (registered trademark)) Program: Creating Opportunities for Minority HBCU Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    multifaceted mentoring model for minority researchers to address HIV health disparities. Am J Public Health 99:S65. 4. Jeste D, Twamley E, Cardenas V...recognition as targets for cancer therapy, and ewer the last decade several antkancer drugs have been developed against these molecules. Dr Daaka provided the...Facilities: • 2-story masonry with brick veneer buildings • Commons building with a manager’s office, laundry, recreation /study room • Playgrounds

  4. Exercise training as treatment in cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, Fábio Santos; Neto, José Cesar Rosa; Seelaender, Marília

    2014-06-01

    Cachexia is a wasting syndrome that may accompany a plethora of diseases, including cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, aids, and rheumatoid arthritis. It is associated with central and systemic increases of pro-inflammatory factors, and with decreased quality of life, response to pharmacological treatment, and survival. At the moment, there is no single therapy able to reverse cachexia many symptoms, which include disruption of intermediary metabolism, endocrine dysfunction, compromised hypothalamic appetite control, and impaired immune function, among other. Growing evidence, nevertheless, shows that chronic exercise, employed as a tool to counteract systemic inflammation, may represent a low-cost, safe alternative for the prevention/attenuation of cancer cachexia. Despite the well-documented capacity of chronic exercise to counteract sustained disease-related inflammation, few studies address the effect of exercise training in cancer cachexia. The aim of the present review was hence to discuss the results of cachexia treatment with endurance training. As opposed to resistance exercise, endurance exercise may be performed devoid of equipment, is well tolerated by patients, and an anti-inflammatory effect may be observed even at low-intensity. The decrease in inflammatory status induced by endurance protocols is paralleled by recovery of various metabolic pathways. The mechanisms underlying the response to the treatment are considered.

  5. A Little Training Helps Couples Ease into Skin Cancer Checks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html A Little Training Helps Couples Ease Into Skin Cancer Checks Study finds the potentially life-saving routine ... 14, 2016 WEDNESDAY, Dec. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Skin cancer checks between couples don't have to be ...

  6. Current concepts in cancer research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Kok Seng Yap

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cancer research is an extremely broadtopic covering many scientific disciplines includingbiology (e.g. biochemistry and signal transduction,chemistry (e.g. drug discover and development,physics (e.g. diagnostic devices and even computerscience (e.g. bioinformatics. Some would argue thatcancer research will continue in much the same wayas it is by adding further layers of complexity to thescientific knowledge that is already complex and almostbeyond measure. But we anticipate that cancer researchwill undergo a dramatic paradigm shift due to therecent explosion of new discoveries in cancer biology.This review article focuses on the latest horizons incancer research concerning cancer epigenetics, cancerstem cells, cancer immunology and cancer metabolism.

  7. Research Training in the Biomedical, Behavioral, and Clinical Research Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academies Press, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive research and a highly-trained workforce are essential for the improvement of health and health care both nationally and internationally. During the past 40 years the National Research Services Award (NRSA) Program has played a large role in training the workforce responsible for dramatic advances in the understanding of various…

  8. Cancer-Related Fatigue and Rehabilitation : A Randomized Controlled Multicenter Trial Comparing Physical Training Combined With Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy With Physical Training Only and With No Intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Weert, E.; May, A.M.; Korstjens, I.; Post, W.J.; van der Schans, C.P.; van den Borne, B.; Mesters, I.; Ros, W.J.G.; Hoekstra-Weebers, J.E.H.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Research suggests that cancer rehabilitation reduces fatigue in survivors of cancer. To date, it is unclear what type of rehabilitation is most beneficial. Objective. This randomized controlled trial compared the effect on cancer-related fatigue of physical training combined with cogniti

  9. American Institute for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Cancer By Cancer Site What Is Cancer Foods That Fight Cancer Tools You Can Use Cancer Infographics & Multimedia Studying ... About Cancer By Cancer Site What Is Cancer Foods That Fight Cancer Tools You Can Use Cancer Infographics & Multimedia Studying ...

  10. Key considerations for the experimental training and evaluation of cancer odour detection dogs: lessons learnt from a double-blind, controlled trial of prostate cancer detection

    OpenAIRE

    Elliker, Kevin R; Sommerville, Barbara A; Donald M. Broom; Neal, David E.; Armstrong, Sarah; Williams, Hywel C

    2014-01-01

    Background Cancer detection using sniffer dogs is a potential technology for clinical use and research. Our study sought to determine whether dogs could be trained to discriminate the odour of urine from men with prostate cancer from controls, using rigorous testing procedures and well-defined samples from a major research hospital. Methods We attempted to train ten dogs by initially rewarding them for finding and indicating individual prostate cancer urine samples (Stage 1). If dogs were suc...

  11. What's New in Thyroid Cancer Research and Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer What’s New in Thyroid Cancer Research and Treatment? Important research into thyroid cancer ... in Thyroid Cancer Research and Treatment? More In Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  12. What's New in Testicular Cancer Research and Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testicular Cancer About Testicular Cancer What’s New in Testicular Cancer Research and Treatment? Important research into testicular cancer ... in Testicular Cancer Research and Treatment? More In Testicular Cancer About Testicular Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  13. Meharry-Johns Hopkins Center for Prostate Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Prostate cancer, Dietary risk factors , Lycopene, Genetic predisposition, African-Americans, Cancer research training, Quality of life, Community...that of CA men (73.9 per 100,000 AA / 25.6 per 100,000 C). Genetic and dietary factors have been identified in explaining a portion of the excess...cancer may occur earlier and be more aggressive among African-American men.  Other possible risk factors include obesity , lifestyle and environmental

  14. Mouse models for cancer research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Lynette Moore; Ping Ji

    2011-01-01

    Mouse models of cancer enable researchers to leamn about tumor biology in complicated and dynamic physiological systems. Since the development of gene targeting in mice, cancer biologists have been among the most frequent users of transgenic mouse models, which have dramatically increased knowledge about how cancers form and grow. The Chinese Joumnal of Cancer will publish a series of papers reporting the use of mouse models in studying genetic events in cancer cases. This editorial is an overview of the development and applications of mouse models of cancer and directs the reader to upcoming papers describing the use of these models to be published in coming issues, beginning with three articles in the current issue.

  15. Reducing Clinical Errors in Cancer Education: Interpreter Training

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Over 22 million US residents are limited English proficient. Hospitals often call upon untrained persons to interpret. There is a dearth of information on errors in medical interpreting and their impact upon cancer education. We conducted an experimental study of standardized medical interpreting training on interpreting errors in the cancer encounter, by comparing trained and untrained interpreters, using identical content. Nine interpreted cancer encounters with identical scripts were recor...

  16. Nebraska Prostate Cancer Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Annual National Symposium on Prostate Cancer by CCRTD, CAU, March 16-19, 2014. 15. Appendix #15: Peer- reviewed scientific publication with inputs...and  Immunology Y. Tu CU Regulation of G‐Protein‐Coupled  Receptors in Prostate  Cancer     Acknowledgements: DOD CDMRP PCa Research Program PC121645...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0264 TITLE: Nebraska Prostate Cancer Research Program PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ming-Fong Lin, Ph.D

  17. Integrating Research Skills Training into Non--Research Methods Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Jules

    2014-01-01

    Research skills are a valued commodity by industry and university administrators. Despite the importance placed on these skills students typically dislike taking research method courses where these skills are learned. However, training in research skills does not necessarily have to be confined to these courses. In this study participants at a…

  18. Breast Cancer Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    tion of tumor cells with red indicating the highest density of tumor cells at the primary tumor (4th mammary fat pad ) and purple/blue showing the...Idea Award Elaine Hardman and Philippe Georgel “ Maternal Consumption of Omega 3 Fatty Acids to Reduce Breast Cancer Risk in Offspring” FY09

  19. ISS Microgravity Research Payload Training Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlagheck, Ronald; Geveden, Rex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Microgravity Research Discipline has multiple categories of science payloads that are being planned and currently under development to operate on various ISS on-orbit increments. The current program includes six subdisciplines; Materials Science, Fluids Physics, Combustion Science, Fundamental Physics, Cellular Biology and Macromolecular Biotechnology. All of these experiment payloads will require the astronaut various degrees of crew interaction and science observation. With the current programs planning to build various facility class science racks, the crew will need to be trained on basic core operations as well as science background. In addition, many disciplines will use the Express Rack and the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) to utilize the accommodations provided by these facilities for smaller and less complex type hardware. The Microgravity disciplines will be responsible to have a training program designed to maximize the experiment and hardware throughput as well as being prepared for various contingencies both with anomalies as well as unexpected experiment observations. The crewmembers will need various levels of training from simple tasks as power on and activate to extensive training on hardware mode change out to observing the cell growth of various types of tissue cultures. Sample replacement will be required for furnaces and combustion type modules. The Fundamental Physics program will need crew EVA support to provide module change out of experiment. Training will take place various research centers and hardware development locations. It is expected that onboard training through various methods and video/digital technology as well as limited telecommunication interaction. Since hardware will be designed to operate from a few weeks to multiple research increments, flexibility must be planned in the training approach and procedure skills to optimize the output as well as the equipment maintainability. Early increment lessons learned

  20. Research training of Senior High School teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Oropeza Largher

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses the development of research competence as a component of the teachers’ training program in Mexico. The objective is to analyze current trends in approaching training in research by the teachers of Senior High Schools. Documents and bibliographic sources were consulted to construct a theoretical framework; surveys, interviews and supervising lessons were used to gather information for a diagnosis of the staff development. The findings include a diagnosis of staff competence in education researching, the promotion of project method among pupils, and a contextual approach to research competence in Mexican environment, leading to arrive at the conclusion that teachers are facing a two challenges, one related to self-development and the other connected to pupils’ education.

  1. Training program attracts work and health researchers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skakon, Janne

    2007-01-01

    Each year in Canada, the costs of disability arising from work-related causes – including workers’ compensation and health-care costs – exceed $6.7 billion. Despite the significant financial and social impacts of worker injury and illness, only a small fraction of Canadian researchers are dedicated...... to examining work disability prevention issues. An innovative program that attracts international students, the Work Disability Prevention Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Strategic Training Program, aims to build research capacity in young researchers and to create a strong network that examines...

  2. Training HBCU Faculty and Students in Prostate Cancer (PC) Research: Signal Transduction and Receptor-Inhibitor Interactions in the Progress of PC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    wife of the late Dr. Dunae Johnson. KaTani has a background in cancer genetics and genomics related to health disaparities and along with her husband ...measure of prostate cancer risk that is specifically tailored to each patient based on any set of risk factors. In a recent problem studied by...Robert Nam et al [ 2 ] , the authors constructed a clinical nomogram instrument to estimate individual risk for having prostate cancer (PC) for patients

  3. Stress management training for breast cancer surgery patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garssen, B.; Boomsma, M.F.; Ede, J. van; Porsild, T.; Berkhof, J.; Berbee, M.; Visser, A.; Meijer, S.; Beelen, R.H.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the psychological effects of a pre-surgical stress management training (SMT) in cancer patients. METHODS: Stress management training comprised four sessions in total: on 5 days and 1 day pre-surgery and on 2 days and 1 month post-surgery. Patients also received audio

  4. Cancer-related fatigue and rehabilitation: A randomized controlled multicenter trial comparing physical training combined with cognitive-behavioral therapy with physical training only and with no intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van Weert (Ellen); A.M. May (Anne); I. Korstjens (Irene); W.J. Post (Wendy); C.P. van der Schans (Cees); B. van den Borne (Bart); I. Mesters (Ilse); W.J.G. Ros (Wynand); J.E.H.M. Hoekstra-Weebers (Josette)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Research suggests that cancer rehabilitation reduces fatigue in survivors of cancer. To date, it is unclear what type of rehabilitation is most beneficial. Objective. This randomized controlled trial compared the effect on cancerrelated fatigue of physical training combined w

  5. Preconference Educational Research Training Program in Music Education. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Robert; And Others

    The 1970 Preconference Educational Research Training Program (RTP) provided three 3-day sessions of intensive research training for a total of 160 music educators from across the country. The primary purpose of the RTP activity was to provide music education researchers and users of research with intensive training in three major areas (1)…

  6. What's New in Liver Cancer Research and Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Cancer About Liver Cancer What's New in Liver Cancer Research and Treatment? Because there are only a ... in Liver Cancer Research and Treatment? More In Liver Cancer About Liver Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  7. What's New in Ovarian Cancer Research and Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ovarian Cancer About Ovarian Cancer What's New in Ovarian Cancer Research and Treatment? Risk factors and causes Scientists ... in Ovarian Cancer Research and Treatment? More In Ovarian Cancer About Ovarian Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  8. Independent Association of Postdoctoral Training with Subsequent Careers in Cancer Prevention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M Faupel-Badger

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the career paths of alumni from the National Cancer Institute (NCI Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program (CPFP, a structured in-house postdoctoral training program of 3-4 years duration, and specifically what proportion of the alumni were currently performing cancer prevention-related activities. The analyses here included 119 CPFP alumni and 85 unsuccessful CPFP applicants, all of whom completed postdoctoral training between 1987-2011 and are currently employed. Postdoctoral training experiences and current career outcomes data were collected via online surveys. Differences between groups were assessed using chi-square and Fisher's exact test p-values and subsequent regression analyses adjusted for differences between the groups. Compared to 15.3% of unsuccessful CPFP applicants, 52.1% of CPFP alumni (odds ratio [OR] = 4.99, 95% confidence interval [95% CI: 1.91-13.0 were currently spending the majority of their time working in cancer prevention. Among those doing any cancer prevention-focused work, 54.3% of CPFP alumni spent the majority of their time performing cancer prevention research activities when compared to 25.5% of unsuccessful applicants (OR = 4.26, 95% CI: 1.38-13.2. In addition to the independent effect of the NCI CPFP, scientific discipline, and employment sector were also associated with currently working in cancer prevention and involvement in cancer prevention research-related activities. These results from a structured postdoctoral training program are relevant not only to the cancer prevention community but also to those interested in evaluating alignment of postdoctoral training programs with available and desired career paths more broadly.

  9. Independent Association of Postdoctoral Training with Subsequent Careers in Cancer Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faupel-Badger, Jessica M; Nelson, David E; Izmirlian, Grant; Ross, Katherine H; Raue, Kimberley; Tsakraklides, Sophia; Miyaoka, Atsushi; Spiegelman, Maura

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the career paths of alumni from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program (CPFP), a structured in-house postdoctoral training program of 3-4 years duration, and specifically what proportion of the alumni were currently performing cancer prevention-related activities. The analyses here included 119 CPFP alumni and 85 unsuccessful CPFP applicants, all of whom completed postdoctoral training between 1987-2011 and are currently employed. Postdoctoral training experiences and current career outcomes data were collected via online surveys. Differences between groups were assessed using chi-square and Fisher's exact test p-values and subsequent regression analyses adjusted for differences between the groups. Compared to 15.3% of unsuccessful CPFP applicants, 52.1% of CPFP alumni (odds ratio [OR] = 4.99, 95% confidence interval [95% CI): 1.91-13.0) were currently spending the majority of their time working in cancer prevention. Among those doing any cancer prevention-focused work, 54.3% of CPFP alumni spent the majority of their time performing cancer prevention research activities when compared to 25.5% of unsuccessful applicants (OR = 4.26, 95% CI: 1.38-13.2). In addition to the independent effect of the NCI CPFP, scientific discipline, and employment sector were also associated with currently working in cancer prevention and involvement in cancer prevention research-related activities. These results from a structured postdoctoral training program are relevant not only to the cancer prevention community but also to those interested in evaluating alignment of postdoctoral training programs with available and desired career paths more broadly.

  10. Treatment-related cardiovascular late effects and exercise training countermeasures in testicular germ cell cancer survivorship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jesper F; Bandak, Mikkel; Campbell, Anna

    2015-01-01

    -induced cardiovascular dysfunction to prevent premature onset of clinical cardiovascular disease in germ cell cancer survivors, with a view towards highlighting future directions of exercise-based survivorship research in the germ cell cancer setting. CONCLUSION: As exercise training may have the potential to ameliorate...... and/or reverse long-term cardiovascular disease sequelae in germ cell cancer survivors, a strong rationale exists for the promotion of exercise oncology research in this setting, in order to provide exercise recommendations for optimal germ cell cancer survivorship......., are subjected to toxicities, which individually, and synergistically, can cause physiological impairments leading to sub-clinical or clinical cardiovascular disorders (i.e. the 'multiple-hit hypothesis'). Furthermore, we discuss the efficacy and utility of structured exercise training to ameliorate treatment...

  11. Gene-Environment Research and Cancer Epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program supports extramural research that investigates both genetic and environmental factors that may contribute to the etiology of cancer and/or impact cancer outcomes.

  12. Center for Herbal Research on Colorectal Cancer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Research Area: Herbs Program:Centers of Excellence for Research on CAM Description:Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer and the third leading cause of...

  13. Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Among the many cancer research laboratories operated by NCI, the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research(FNLCR) is unique in that it is a Federally Funded...

  14. What's New in Research and Treatment for Thymus Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer What’s New in Research and Treatment for Thymus Cancer? There is always research going on in ... Research and Treatment for Thymus Cancer? More In Thymus Cancer About Thymus Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  15. Alliance for Sequestration Training, Outreach, Research & Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Hilary

    2013-09-01

    The Sequestration Training, Outreach, Research and Education (STORE) Alliance at The University of Texas at Austin completed its activity under Department of Energy Funding (DE- FE0002254) on September 1, 2013. The program began as a partnership between the Institute for Geophysics, the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering Department at UT. The initial vision of the program was to promote better understanding of CO2 utilization and storage science and engineering technology through programs and opportunities centered on training, outreach, research and technology transfer, and education. With over 8,000 hrs of formal training and education (and almost 4,500 of those hours awarded as continuing education credits) to almost 1,100 people, STORE programs and activities have provided benefits to the Carbon Storage Program of the Department of Energy by helping to build a skilled workforce for the future CCS and larger energy industry, and fostering scientific public literacy needed to continue the U.S. leadership position in climate change mitigation and energy technologies and application. Now in sustaining mode, the program is housed at the Center for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering, and benefits from partnerships with the Gulf Coast Carbon Center, TOPCORP and other programs at the university receiving industry funding.

  16. Drosophila models for cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Marcos; Cagan, Ross L

    2006-02-01

    Drosophila is a model system for cancer research. Investigation with fruit flies has facilitated a number of important recent discoveries in the field: the hippo signaling pathway, which coordinates cell proliferation and death to achieve normal tissue size; 'social' behaviors of cells, including cell competition and apoptosis-induced compensatory proliferation, that help ensure normal tissue size; and a growing understanding of how oncogenes and tumor suppressors cooperate to achieve tumor growth and metastasis in situ. In the future, Drosophila models can be extended beyond basic research in the search for human therapeutics.

  17. DATUM for Health: Research data management training for health studies

    OpenAIRE

    McLeod, Julie

    2011-01-01

    This collaborative project sought to promote research data management skills of postgraduate research students in the health studies discipline through a specially-developed training programme which focuses on qualitative, unstructured research data. The project aimed to: design and pilot a training programme on research data management for postgraduate research students in health studies as an integral part of a doctoral training programme evaluate the usefulness and effectiveness of the tra...

  18. Prostate cancer research in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan-Cheng Ren; Rui Chen; Ying-Hao Sun

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) research in China has been on a rocketing trend in recent years.The first genome-wide association study (GWAS)in China identified two new PCa risk associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs).Next generation sequencing is beginning to be used,yielding novel findings:gene fusions,long non-coding RNAs and other variations.Mechanisms of PCa progression have been illustrated while various diagnosis biomarkers have been investigated extensively.Personalized therapy based on genetic factors,nano-medicine and traditional Chinese medicine has been the focus of experimental therapeutic research for PCa.This review intends to shed light upon the recent progress in PCa research in China and points out the possible breakthroughs in the future.

  19. Building capacity for sustainable research programmes for cancer in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewole, Isaac; Martin, Damali N; Williams, Makeda J; Adebamowo, Clement; Bhatia, Kishor; Berling, Christine; Casper, Corey; Elshamy, Karima; Elzawawy, Ahmed; Lawlor, Rita T; Legood, Rosa; Mbulaiteye, Sam M; Odedina, Folakemi T; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olopade, Christopher O; Parkin, Donald M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Ross, Hana; Santini, Luiz A; Torode, Julie; Trimble, Edward L; Wild, Christopher P; Young, Annie M; Kerr, David J

    2014-05-01

    Cancer research in Africa will have a pivotal role in cancer control planning in this continent. However, environments (such as those in academic or clinical settings) with limited research infrastructure (laboratories, biorespositories, databases) coupled with inadequate funding and other resources have hampered African scientists from carrying out rigorous research. In September 2012, over 100 scientists with expertise in cancer research in Africa met in London to discuss the challenges in performing high-quality research, and to formulate the next steps for building sustainable, comprehensive and multi-disciplinary programmes relevant to Africa. This was the first meeting among five major organizations: the African Organisation for Research and Training in Africa (AORTIC), the Africa Oxford Cancer Foundation (AfrOx), and the National Cancer Institutes (NCI) of Brazil, France and the USA. This article summarizes the discussions and recommendations of this meeting, including the next steps required to create sustainable and impactful research programmes that will enable evidenced-based cancer control approaches and planning at the local, regional and national levels.

  20. Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program supports a multidisciplinary network of scientists, clinicians, and community partners to examine the effects of environmental exposures that may predispose a woman to breast cancer throughout her life.

  1. Designing a Community-Based Lay Health Advisor Training Curriculum to Address Cancer Health Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwede, Clement K.; Ashley, Atalie A.; McGinnis, Kara; Montiel-Ishino, F. Alejandro; Standifer, Maisha; Baldwin, Julie; Williams, Coni; Sneed, Kevin B.; Wathington, Deanna; Dash-Pitts, Lolita; Green, B. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Racial and ethnic minorities have disproportionately higher cancer incidence and mortality than their White counterparts. In response to this inequity in cancer prevention and care, community-based lay health advisors (LHAs) may be suited to deliver effective, culturally relevant, quality cancer education, prevention/screening, and early detection services for underserved populations. Approach and Strategies Consistent with key tenets of community-based participatory research (CBPR), this project engaged community partners to develop and implement a unique LHA training curriculum to address cancer health disparities among medically underserved communities in a tricounty area. Seven phases of curriculum development went into designing a final seven-module LHA curriculum. In keeping with principles of CBPR and community engagement, academic–community partners and LHAs themselves were involved at all phases to ensure the needs of academic and community partners were mutually addressed in development and implementation of the LHA program. Discussion and Conclusions Community-based LHA programs for outreach, education, and promotion of cancer screening and early detection, are ideal for addressing cancer health disparities in access and quality care. When community-based LHAs are appropriately recruited, trained, and located in communities, they provide unique opportunities to link, bridge, and facilitate quality cancer education, services, and research. PMID:22982709

  2. Barriers to Research and Implications for Training Counselors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R Ruby

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Research is an important part of quality clinical practice in the field of counseling. This study addresses the constraints that produce a gap in master’s level practitioner research among counselors in Illinois. Ninety-nine master’s level clinicians responded to surveys and answered a series of questions regarding what constrains them from being more involved in research. These respondents provided valuable feedback regarding possible recommendations for training that might encourage increased research activity for future master’s level counselors. Training improvements such as mentored research activity and training in less complex research methods were indicated. Keywords: Clinical practice, Implications, Barriers to research, less complex research

  3. A Framework for Training Transdisciplinary Scholars in Cancer Prevention and Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Aimee S; Gehlert, Sarah; Bowen, Deborah J; Colditz, Graham A

    2015-12-01

    Traditionally, postdoctoral training programs largely have focused efforts within a single discipline or closely related fields. Yet, addressing the complex questions around cancer prevention and control increasingly requires the ability to work and communicate across disciplines in order to gain a perspective that encompasses the multilevel and multifaceted issues involved with this public health issue. To address this complexity, a transdisciplinary training program was implemented to cultivate the professional and scientific development of the postdoctoral fellows in Washington University in St Louis School of Medicine's Division of Public Health Sciences and NCI-funded centers (Community Networks Program Center and Transdisciplinary Research in Energetics in Cancer Center). Fellows are matched with primary mentors and assemble a multidisciplinary mentoring team. Structured programs support the transition of fellows from disciplinary trainees to independent transdisciplinary scholars and provide exposure to multiple disciplines. This article describes the training program, challenges encountered in implementation, solutions to those problems, and the metrics employed to evaluate the program's success. The goal of the program is to train emerging investigators in the conceptual bases, language, and practices that underlie a transdisciplinary perspective on cancer prevention and control research, to create an infrastructure for continued cross-discipline dialogue and collaboration, and to develop disseminable strategies for such training.

  4. Recovery Act: Geologic Sequestration Training and Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Peter; Esposito, Richard; Theodorou, Konstantinos; Hannon, Michael; Lamplugh, Aaron; Ellison, Kirk

    2013-06-30

    Work under the project entitled "Geologic Sequestration Training and Research," was performed by the University of Alabama at Birmingham and Southern Company from December 1, 2009, to June 30, 2013. The emphasis was on training of students and faculty through research on topics central to further development, demonstration, and commercialization of carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS). The project had the following components: (1) establishment of a laboratory for measurement of rock properties, (2) evaluation of the sealing capacity of caprocks, (3) evaluation of porosity, permeability, and storage capacity of reservoirs, (4) simulation of CO{sub 2} migration and trapping in storage reservoirs and seepage through seal layers, (5) education and training of students through independent research on rock properties and reservoir simulation, and (6) development of an advanced undergraduate/graduate level course on coal combustion and gasification, climate change, and carbon sequestration. Four graduate students and one undergraduate student participated in the project. Two were awarded Ph.D. degrees for their work, the first in December 2010 and the second in August 2013. A third graduate student has proposed research on an advanced technique for measurement of porosity and permeability, and has been admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. The fourth graduate student is preparing his proposal for research on CCUS and solid waste management. The undergraduate student performed experimental measurements on caprock and reservoir rock samples and received his B.S.M.E. degree in May 2012. The "Caprock Integrity Laboratory," established with support from the present project, is fully functional and equipped for measurement of porosity, permeability, minimum capillary displacement pressure, and effective permeability to gas in the presence of wetting phases. Measurements are made at ambient temperature and under reservoir conditions, including supercritical CO{sub 2

  5. Academic Training: New Trends in Fusion Research

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    11, 12 and 13 October 2004-2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 11 October from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs, 12 and 13 October from 10.00 to 12.00 hrs - 11 and 12 October in the Main Auditorium, bldg. 500, 13 October in the TH Amphitheatre New Trends in Fusion Research A. FASOLI / EPFL, Lausanne, CH The efforts of the international fusion community aim at demonstrating the scientific feasibility of thermonuclear fusion energy power plants. Understanding the behavior of burning plasmas, i.e. plasmas with strong self-heating, represents a primary scientific challenge for fusion research and a new science frontier. Although integrated studies will only be possible, in new, dedicated experimental facilities, such as the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER), present devices can address specific issues in regimes relevant to burning plasmas. Among these are an improvement of plasma performance via a reduction of the energy and particle transport, an optimization of the path to ignition or to su...

  6. Academic Training: New Trends in Fusion Research

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    11, 12 and 13 October 2004-2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 11 October from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs, 12 and 13 October from 10.00 to 12.00 hrs - 11 and 12 October in the Main Auditorium, bldg. 500, 13 October in the Theory Conference Room, bldg. 4 New Trends in Fusion Research A. FASOLI / EPFL, Lausanne, CH The efforts of the international fusion community aim at demonstrating the scientific feasibility of thermonuclear fusion energy power plants. Understanding the behavior of burning plasmas, i.e. plasmas with strong self-heating, represents a primary scientific challenge for fusion research and a new science frontier. Although integrated studies will only be possible, in new, dedicated experimental facilities, such as the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER), present devices can address specific issues in regimes relevant to burning plasmas. Among these are an improvement of plasma performance via a reduction of the energy and particle transport, an optimization of the path to i...

  7. Lysyl oxidase in cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perryman, Lara; Erler, Janine T

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is the main reason for cancer-associated deaths and therapies are desperately needed to target the progression of cancer. Lysyl oxidase (LOX) plays a pivotal role in cancer progression, including metastasis, and is therefore is an attractive therapeutic target. In this review we will breakdown the process of cancer progression and the various roles that LOX plays has in the advancement of cancer. We will highlight why LOX is an exciting therapeutic target for the future.

  8. Basic research on cancer related to radiation associated medical researches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong In; Hwang, Dae Yong; Bang, Ho Yoon [and others

    2000-12-01

    Basic Research on Cancer related to Radiation Associated Medical Researches including 1. Establishment of animal model of colorectal cancer liver metastasis and measurement of angiogenesis, 2. Tissue expression of Tie-1 and Tie-2 in human colorectal cancer, 3. Enhancement of G2/Mphase Cell Fraction by Adenovirus-mediated p53 Gene Transfer in Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines, 4. Clinical Characteristics of the patients with Non-B Non-C Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Frequency of HBV, HCV and TTV Viremia in these Patients, 5. Significance of serum iron and ferritin in patients with stomach cancer, 6. Telomerase assay for early detection of lung cancer, 7. Study on the Usefulness of Aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 Genotyping for Risk Group of Alcohol-related Cancer Screening, 8. Gene therapy using hepatoma specific promoter, 9. Study on the Influence of DNA repair gene, XRCC1 Genotypes on the Risk of Head and Neck Cancer were performed.

  9. Novel translational strategies in colorectal cancer research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Defining translational research is still a complex task. In oncology, translational research implies using our basic knowledge learnt from in vitro and in vivo experiments to directly improve diagnostic tools and therapeutic approaches in cancer patients. Moreover, the better understanding of human cancer and its use to design more reliable tumor models and more accurate experimental systems also has to be considered a good example of translational research. The identification and characterization of new molecular markers and the discovery of novel targeted therapies are two main goals in colorectal cancer translational research. However, the straightforward translation of basic research findings, specifically into colorectal cancer treatment and vice versa is still underway. In the present paper, a summarized view of some of the new available approaches on colorectal cancer translational research is provided. Pros and cons are discussed for every approach exposed.

  10. Nutrition and Cancer Prevention Research Practicum | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Nutritional Science Research Group in the Division of Cancer Prevention at the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health and the Department of Nutrition at the Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health are offering a one week educational opportunity in "Nutrition and Cancer Prevention Research" for individuals with a sustained commitment to nutrition and health promotion. This one-week intense learning session provides specialized instruction in the role of diet and bioactive food components as modifiers of cancer incidence and tumor behavior. |

  11. Research and comprehensive cancer control coalitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinson, Cynthia; La Porta, Madeline; Todd, William; Palafox, Neal A; Wilson, Katherine M; Fairley, Temeika

    2010-12-01

    The goal of cancer control research is "to generate basic knowledge about how to monitor and change individual and collective behavior and to ensure that knowledge is translated into practice and policy rapidly, effectively, and efficiently" (Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences in Cancer control framework and synthese rationale, 2010). Research activities span the cancer control continuum from prevention to early detection and diagnosis through treatment and survivorship (Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences in Cancer control framework and synthese rationale, 2010). While significant advancements have been made in understanding, preventing and treating cancer in the past few decades, these benefits have yielded disproportionate results in cancer morbidity and mortality across various socioeconomic and racial/ethnic subgroups (Ozols et al in J Clin Oncol, 25(1):146-1622, 2007). It has been a high priority since the beginning of the Comprehensive Cancer Control (CCC) movement to utilize research in the development and implementation of cancer plans in the states, tribes and tribal organizations, territories and US Pacific Island Jurisdictions. Nevertheless, dissemination and implementation of research in coalition activities has been challenging for many programs. Lessons learned from programs and coalitions in the implementation and evaluation of CCC activities, as well as resources provided by national partners, can assist coalitions with the translation of research into practice.

  12. Environmental training research project. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    Santa Fe Community College serves an area including the city and county of Santa Fe. The population has a high percentage of Hispanics and a Native American population of about 3%. The student body at the college generally reflects that of the service district. The college strives to recruit students from all segments of the population so there is representation among all ethnic and economic groups. The college strives to serve students and the community by offering educational opportunities that meet the needs of both elements and which will lead to gainful employment. Instruction is also offered to meets needs for retraining, upgrades, and personal enlightenment. The college started a hazardous materials management program in the fall of 1991 which has since been renamed environmental management. The purpose of this program is to prepare students for environmental careers, to provide required training such as OSHA HAZWOPER and refresher courses, and to provide educational opportunities that would make the public more environmentally aware. The program content needs to be studied to ensure we`re meeting the needs of the students and the business community. There had not been a significant opportunity to conduct this research.

  13. Genomic Datasets for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A variety of datasets from genome-wide association studies of cancer and other genotype-phenotype studies, including sequencing and molecular diagnostic assays, are available to approved investigators through the Extramural National Cancer Institute Data Access Committee.

  14. One Health research and training in Australia and New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of the review: This review was performed to create a repository of information on One Health research and training in Australia and New Zealand (ANZ). The review sought to determine 1) how many training activities there are in ANZ, 2) how much research on zoonotic diseases is undertaken by multidisciplinary teams, and 3) how collaborative and integrated they are.Recent findings: There are few opportunities for training in One Health in ANZ. The majority require enrolment in a postgrad...

  15. Nebraska Prostate Cancer Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    MacDonald, Richard G; Mehta, Parmender P; Mott, Justin L; Naslavsky, Naava; Palanimuthu Ponnusamy, Moorthy; Ramaley, Robert F; Sorgen, Paul L; Steinke...feedback regulation of PI3K and androgen receptor signaling in PTEN-deficient prostate cancer, Cancer Cell 19 (2011) 575–586. [29] B.J. Feldman , D... Feldman , The development of androgen-independent prostate cancer, Nat. Rev. Cancer 1 (2001) 34–45. [30] J.D. Debes, D.J. Tindall, Mechanisms of androgen

  16. Multicultural Counselor Training in a Single Course: Review of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malott, Krista M.

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to provide clarity and future direction in training and research practices, this article consolidates the literature related to outcomes from a single multicultural counseling course (e.g., a course of 15 to 17 weeks). A critique of the literature and implications for future research and training are included. (Contains 1 table.)

  17. Trained to battle cancer with particles

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    The successful treatment of tumours with hadrons – hadron therapy – is only possible when accelerator experts, physicists, biologists and oncologists combine their efforts and share their expertises. The PARTNER project aims at training young students to become the future leaders in this field. Four of them are affiliated to CERN as fellows. The four CERN students participating in the PARTNER project. From left to right: Daniel Abler (Germany), Faustin Laurentiu Roman (Romania), Vassiliki Kanellopoulos (Greece/Germany) and Till Tobias Boehlen (Germany). Students attending the first course organised in June 2009 by the PARTNER Network in Valencia, Spain.Till (Germany), Faustin (Romania), Vassiliki (Greece/Germany) and Daniel (Germany) are the four PhD students based at CERN and working for PARTNER – a Marie Curie programme funded by the European Commission over four years. Its main goal is t...

  18. Training: Who Needs It? Research Report 1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood-Richardson, Stephen; And Others

    This report provides results of a study of training in the catering and hospitality industry in Great Britain in 1994-95. An executive summary presents 22 key recommendations for action to stimulate skills development in the industry and outlines key outcomes. Section 1 provides a broad overview of current training activity, based on interviews…

  19. Building National Capacity for Research Mentor Training: An Evidence-Based Approach to Training the Trainers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfund, Christine; Spencer, Kimberly C.; Asquith, Pamela; House, Stephanie C.; Miller, Sarah; Sorkness, Christine A.

    2015-01-01

    Research mentor training (RMT), based on the published "Entering Mentoring" curricula series, has been shown to improve the knowledge and skills of research mentors across career stages, as self-reported by both the mentors engaged in training and their mentees. To promote widespread dissemination and empower others to implement this…

  20. Research Training Program in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    release from CF~s in a form that then activates histone gene transcription. Many Nucleosoines Histones transcription factors accumulate in inactive pools ...nitrocellulose before immunob- Cajal, S.R.Y. 1903. Un sencillo metodo de coloracion seletiva lotting and autoradiography. del reticulo

  1. Predoctoral Training Program in Breast Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-01

    34 " " t " " Molecular Cell Biolo .... ...........S..................o !.•. d ... ...c.. . •.L .. o . . .. .... i .. ..... .. : .... .... i...controls MAP kinase-mediated negative feedback mechanism for signaling by FGF receptors. Molecular Cell , Oct 2002; 10(4): 709-719. INPREPARA TION FOR

  2. Summer Student Breast Cancer Research Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    comment]. J Cell Biol 2000:150:155-64. 24 Table 1: Experimental Diets n-6 Diet n-3 Diet Carbohydrates (% calories) 58.8 58.8 Starch (g/100g) 25.0 25.0...purchased from Fisher Scientific (Chicago, IL). Precast polyacrylamide gels, electrophoresis buffers and nitrocellulose membranes were purchased from...protein kinase inhibitor; PI, propidium iodide; A i4m, mitochondrial membrane potential; SDS- PAGE, sodium dodecyl sulfate- polyacrylamide gel

  3. Research Training Program in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-07-01

    UTP (1000 Ci.mmol-F, ICN). In situ hybridization was performed on 14.5-day-old mouse embryos as described Electromobility shift assay previously...6,23]. For EMSA ( electromobility shift assay) studies, proteins R E S U L T S were prepared (with or without [35S]Met) from different DNA constructs...antibody on response elements. On electromobility shift assays the Ets-1/DNA complex formation or to the possibility (EMSA) Ets-1 is able to bind to its

  4. Psychotherapy training: Suggestions for core ingredients and future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, James F; Castonguay, Louis G

    2007-12-01

    Despite our considerable depth and breadth of empirical knowledge on psychotherapy process and outcome, research on psychotherapy training is somewhat lacking. We would argue, however, that the scientist-practitioner model should not only guide practice, but also the way our field approaches training. In this paper we outline our perspective on the crucial elements of psychotherapy training based on available evidence, theory, and clinical experience, focusing specifically on the structure, key components, and important skills to be learned in a successful training program. In addition, we derive specific research directions based on the crucial elements of our proposed training perspective, and offer general considerations for research on training, including method and measurement issues. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Effects of qigong training on health-related quality of life, functioning, and cancer-related symptoms in survivors of nasopharyngeal cancer: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Shirley S M; Ng, Shamay S M; Luk, W S; Chung, Louisa M Y; Wong, Janet Y H; Chung, Joanne W Y

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of Qigong intervention on quality of life (QOL), health-related functioning, and cancer-related symptoms in survivors of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). Twenty-five survivors of NPC were included in the experimental group (mean age ± SD: 55.4 ± 7.5 years) and 27 in the control group (mean age ± SD: 58.7 ± 9.5 years). The experimental group underwent a weekly 1.5-hour Qigong training program and an identical home program (three times/week) for six months. The control group received no training. Global health status/QOL, functioning, and cancer-related symptoms were assessed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 and QLQ-H&N35 questionnaires before training began, after three months of Qigong training, at the end of the six-month Qigong intervention (i.e., posttest), and six months posttest. Intention-to-treat analysis revealed no statistically (P > 0.05) or clinically significant improvement in global health status/QOL, functioning, or symptoms in either group. The experimental group had 45.8% fewer sense-related (smell and taste) problems (P Qigong intervention. Qigong training resulted in no apparent improvement in health-related QOL, functionality, or cancer-related symptoms in cancer-free survivors of NPC, except for a possible reduction in smell- and taste-related problems.

  6. Impact of the Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network: Accelerating the Translation of Research Into Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribisl, Kurt M; Fernandez, Maria E; Friedman, Daniela B; Hannon, Peggy A; Leeman, Jennifer; Moore, Alexis; Olson, Lindsay; Ory, Marcia; Risendal, Betsy; Sheble, Laura; Taylor, Vicky M; Williams, Rebecca S; Weiner, Bryan J

    2017-03-01

    The Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network (CPCRN) is a thematic network dedicated to accelerating the adoption of evidence-based cancer prevention and control practices in communities by advancing dissemination and implementation science. Funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and National Cancer Institute, CPCRN has operated at two levels: Each participating network center conducts research projects with primarily local partners as well as multicenter collaborative research projects with state and national partners. Through multicenter collaboration, thematic networks leverage the expertise, resources, and partnerships of participating centers to conduct research projects collectively that might not be feasible individually. Although multicenter collaboration is often advocated, it is challenging to promote and assess. Using bibliometric network analysis and other graphical methods, this paper describes CPCRN's multicenter publication progression from 2004 to 2014. Searching PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science in 2014 identified 249 peer-reviewed CPCRN publications involving two or more centers out of 6,534 total. The research and public health impact of these multicenter collaborative projects initiated by CPCRN during that 10-year period were then examined. CPCRN established numerous workgroups around topics such as: 2-1-1, training and technical assistance, colorectal cancer control, federally qualified health centers, cancer survivorship, and human papillomavirus. This paper discusses the challenges that arise in promoting multicenter collaboration and the strategies that CPCRN uses to address those challenges. The lessons learned should broadly interest those seeking to promote multisite collaboration to address public health problems, such as cancer prevention and control.

  7. Practical Qualitative Research Strategies: Training Interviewers and Coders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodell, L Suzanne; Stage, Virginia C; Cooke, Natalie K

    2016-09-01

    The increased emphasis on incorporating qualitative methodologies into nutrition education development and evaluation underscores the importance of using rigorous protocols to enhance the trustworthiness of the findings. A 5-phase protocol for training qualitative research assistants (data collectors and coders) was developed as an approach to increase the consistency of the data produced. This training provides exposure to the core principles of qualitative research and then asks the research assistant to apply those principles through practice in a setting structured on critical reflection.

  8. Training in Patient Navigation: A Review of the Research Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustjanauskas, Amy E; Bredice, Marissa; Nuhaily, Sumayah; Kath, Lisa; Wells, Kristen J

    2016-05-01

    Despite the proliferation of patient navigation programs designed to increase timely receipt of health care, little is known about the content and delivery of patient navigation training, or best practices in this arena. The current study begins to address these gaps in understanding, as it is the first study to comprehensively review descriptions of patient navigation training in the peer-reviewed research literature. Seventy-five patient navigation efficacy studies published since 1995, identified through PubMed and by the authors, were included in this narrative review. Fifty-nine of the included studies (79%) mentioned patient navigation training, and 55 of these studies additionally provided a description of training. Most studies did not thoroughly document patient navigation training practices. Additionally, several topics integral to the role of patient navigators, as well as components of training central to successful adult learning, were not commonly described in the research literature. Descriptions of training also varied widely across studies in terms of duration, location, format, learning strategies employed, occupation of trainer, and content. These findings demonstrate the need for established standards of navigator training as well as for future research on the optimal delivery and content of patient navigation training.

  9. Psychobiology and psychopharmacology: issues in clinical research training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowsky, D S; Glick, I D; Lash, L; Mitnick, L; Klein, D F; Goodwin, F K; Hanin, I; Nemeroff, C; Robins, L

    1986-02-01

    Although the scope of basic studies in psychopharmacology and psychobiology has been expanding steadily for about 30 years, relatively few clinical psychiatrists, psychologists, and psychopharmacologists now choose to become researchers or teachers in these disciplines. Such training is crucial to the future vitality of both academic and private-practice psychiatry, and in view of increasing constraints on training funds, student researchers may well be an endangered species. With these concerns in mind, at its 1984 meeting, the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology's Education and Training Committee organized a symposium of investigators, administrators, and former trainees to explore aspects of effective clinical research training in psychobiology and psychopharmacology. Aspects discussed included mentoring, settings and content of training, depth versus breadth of curriculum, and the effect of a critical mass of colleagues at various stages of professional development. Following a brief overview, selected panelists addressed the issues from their individual perspectives.

  10. Clinical research training of Peruvian neurologists: a baseline assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Carlos Navarro-Chumbes

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In Peru, despite a strong clinical research infrastructure in Lima, and Masters degree programs in epidemiology at three universities, few neurologists participate in clinical research. It was our objective to identify perceived needs and opportunities for increasing clinical research capacity and training opportunities for Peruvian neurologists. We conducted a descriptive, cross-sectional survey of Peruvian neurologists in Lima and Arequipa, Peru. Forty-eight neurologists completed written surveys and oral interviews. All neurologists reported interest in clinical research, but noted that lack of time and financial resources limited their ability to participate. Although most neurologists had received some training in epidemiology and research design as medical students or residents, the majority felt these topics were not adequately covered. Neurologists in Arequipa noted international funding for clinical research was uncommon outside the capital city of Lima. We concluded that clinical research is important to Peruvian neurologists. The three main barriers to increased participation in clinical research identified by neurologists were insufficient training in clinical research methodology, meager funding opportunities, and lack of dedicated time to participate in clinical research. Distance learning holds promise as a method for providing additional training in clinical research methodology, especially for neurologists who may have difficulty traveling to larger cities for additional training.

  11. Clinical research training of Peruvian neurologists: a baseline assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Chumbes, Gian Carlos; Montano-Torres, Silvia Margarita; Díaz-Vásquez, Alberto; Zunt, Joseph Raymond

    2010-06-21

    In Peru, despite a strong clinical research infrastructure in Lima, and Masters degree programs in epidemiology at three universities, few neurologists participate in clinical research. It was our objective to identify perceived needs and opportunities for increasing clinical research capacity and training opportunities for Peruvian neurologists. We conducted a descriptive, cross-sectional survey of Peruvian neurologists in Lima and Arequipa, Peru. Forty-eight neurologists completed written surveys and oral interviews. All neurologists reported interest in clinical research, but noted that lack of time and financial resources limited their ability to participate. Although most neurologists had received some training in epidemiology and research design as medical students or residents, the majority felt these topics were not adequately covered. Neurologists in Arequipa noted international funding for clinical research was uncommon outside the capital city of Lima. We concluded that clinical research is important to Peruvian neurologists. The three main barriers to increased participation in clinical research identified by neurologists were insufficient training in clinical research methodology, meager funding opportunities, and lack of dedicated time to participate in clinical research. Distance learning holds promise as a method for providing additional training in clinical research methodology, especially for neurologists who may have difficulty traveling to larger cities for additional training.

  12. Learner Strategy Training in the Classroom: An Action Research Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, David

    1996-01-01

    Reports on an action research project that involved strategy training for several groups of first-year undergraduate students at the University of Hong Kong. The strategy training was used to experiment with ways of making students more active participants in their language learning. (Author/CK)

  13. Community-based participatory research: its role in future cancer research and public health practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonds, Vanessa W; Wallerstein, Nina; Duran, Bonnie; Villegas, Malia

    2013-05-16

    The call for community-based participatory research approaches to address cancer health disparities is increasing as concern grows for the limited effectiveness of existing public health practice and research in communities that experience a disparate burden of disease. A national study of participatory research projects, Research for Improved Health, funded by the National Institutes of Health (2009-2013), identified 64 of 333 projects focused on cancer and demonstrated the potential impact participatory approaches can have in reducing cancer disparities. Several projects highlight the success of participatory approaches to cancer prevention and intervention in addressing many of the challenges of traditional practice and research. Best practices include adapting interventions within local contexts, alleviating mistrust, supporting integration of local cultural knowledge, and training investigators from communities that experience cancer disparities. The national study has implications for expanding our understanding of the impact of participatory approaches on alleviating health disparities and aims to enhance our understanding of the barriers and facilitators to effective community-based participatory research.

  14. CRM Assessment: Determining the Generalization of Rater Calibration Training. Summary of Research Report: Gold Standards Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, David P.

    2002-01-01

    The extent to which pilot instructors are trained to assess crew resource management (CRM) skills accurately during Line-Oriented Flight Training (LOFT) and Line Operational Evaluation (LOE) scenarios is critical. Pilot instructors must make accurate performance ratings to ensure that proper feedback is provided to flight crews and appropriate decisions are made regarding certification to fly the line. Furthermore, the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Advanced Qualification Program (AQP) requires that instructors be trained explicitly to evaluate both technical and CRM performance (i.e., rater training) and also requires that proficiency and standardization of instructors be verified periodically. To address the critical need for effective pilot instructor training, the American Institutes for Research (AIR) reviewed the relevant research on rater training and, based on "best practices" from this research, developed a new strategy for training pilot instructors to assess crew performance. In addition, we explored new statistical techniques for assessing the effectiveness of pilot instructor training. The results of our research are briefly summarized below. This summary is followed by abstracts of articles and book chapters published under this grant.

  15. DCB - Cancer Immunology, Hematology, and Etiology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Part of NCI’s Division of Cancer Biology’s research portfolio, studies supported include the characterization of basic mechanisms relevant to anti-tumor immune responses and hematologic malignancies.

  16. Training for Certification: Demonstration & Research Pest Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi State Univ., State College. Cooperative Extension Service.

    This Cooperative Extension Service publication from Mississippi State University is a training guide for commercial pesticide applicators. Focusing on agricultural pest control, this publication includes a full range of topics from uses of pesticides for agricultural animal pest control to the toxicity of common pesticides to fish and bees.…

  17. Research Areas: Causes of Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the exposures and risk factors that cause cancer, as well as the genetic abnormalities associated with the disease, has helped us to reduce certain exposures and to ameliorate their harmful effects.

  18. Cancer systems biology: signal processing for cancer research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Olli Yli-Harja; Antti Ylip(a)(a); Matti Nykter; Wei Zhang

    2011-01-01

    In this editorial we introduce the research paradigms of signal processing in the era of systems biology. Signal processing is a field of science traditionally focused on modeling electronic and communications systems, but recently it has turned to biological applications with astounding results. The essence of signal processing is to describe the natural world by mathematical models and then, based on these models, develop efficient computational tools for solving engineering problems. Here, we underline, with examples, the endless possibilities which arise when the battle-hardened tools of engineering are applied to solve the problems that have tormented cancer researchers. Based on this approach, a new field has emerged, called cancer systems biology. Despite its short history, cancer systems biology has already produced several success stories tackling previously impracticable problems. Perhaps most importantly, it has been accepted as an integral part of the major endeavors of cancer research, such as analyzing the genomic and epigenomic data produced by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project. Finally, we show that signal processing and cancer research, two fields that are seemingly distant from each other, have merged into a field that is indeed more than the sum of its parts.

  19. Cancer systems biology: signal processing for cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yli-Harja, Olli; Ylipää, Antti; Nykter, Matti; Zhang, Wei

    2011-04-01

    In this editorial we introduce the research paradigms of signal processing in the era of systems biology. Signal processing is a field of science traditionally focused on modeling electronic and communications systems, but recently it has turned to biological applications with astounding results. The essence of signal processing is to describe the natural world by mathematical models and then, based on these models, develop efficient computational tools for solving engineering problems. Here, we underline, with examples, the endless possibilities which arise when the battle-hardened tools of engineering are applied to solve the problems that have tormented cancer researchers. Based on this approach, a new field has emerged, called cancer systems biology. Despite its short history, cancer systems biology has already produced several success stories tackling previously impracticable problems. Perhaps most importantly, it has been accepted as an integral part of the major endeavors of cancer research, such as analyzing the genomic and epigenomic data produced by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project. Finally, we show that signal processing and cancer research, two fields that are seemingly distant from each other, have merged into a field that is indeed more than the sum of its parts.

  20. From inclusion to independence – Training consumers to review research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girgis Afaf

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Health and medical research invariably impacts on the lives of everyday people. Organisations in the developed world are increasingly involving the public in health research projects, and research governance structures and processes. The form the involvement takes varies, as does the level of involvement, from individuals, to groups, to the wider community. Lay community members can be trained to independently review health and medical research, and wider societal involvement in funding decisions, can be effectively fostered. The theoretical foundation, design and development of a task based consumer-training program, including a number of enabling factors to support the success of such training are presented. This work is likely to be of value to those planning to train consumers in technical or complex areas.

  1. Stylistics in Teacher Training: Research Programs and Future Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Ana Clara

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to analyse and systematize the conceptual and empirical bases of the available literature on research approaches, objects of study, and future prospects in the field of stylistics, in order to encourage best practice in teacher training. Three research approaches are presented: the empiricist-behaviorist approach, the…

  2. Special Research Training Program for Public School Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Arthur N.

    Specific evaluative research training was provided for 47 public school personnel based on school-systemwide problems identified by trainees. Objectives were to provide research understanding, transfer of that understanding to an ongoing project, and development of ability to communicate research results. Individual and group instruction was given…

  3. Market Research Manual for Providers of Vocational Education and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamblyn, Annette; Shelton, Diane

    This manual, which is intended for vocational education and training (VET) providers, does the following: explains fundamental market research concepts; highlights situations where market research can help VET providers with their planning and policy development; and illustrates the uses of market research in VET institutions. The following topics…

  4. TCGA researchers identify 4 subtypes of stomach cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stomach cancers fall into four distinct molecular subtypes, researchers with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Network have found. Scientists report that this discovery could change how researchers think about developing treatments for stomach cancer, also c

  5. Infectious Agents and Cancer Epidemiology Research Webinar Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infectious Agents and Cancer Epidemiology Research Webinar Series highlights emerging and cutting-edge research related to infection-associated cancers, shares scientific knowledge about technologies and methods, and fosters cross-disciplinary discussions on infectious agents and cancer epidemiology.

  6. Research Data Management Training for Geographers: First Impressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Helbig

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sharing and secondary analysis of data have become increasingly important for research. Especially in geography, the collection of digital data has grown due to technological changes. Responsible handling and proper documentation of research data have therefore become essential for funders, publishers and higher education institutions. To achieve this goal, universities offer support and training in research data management. This article presents the experiences of a pilot workshop in research data management, especially for geographers. A discipline-specific approach to research data management training is recommended. The focus of this approach increases researchers’ interest and allows for more specific guidance. The instructors identified problems and challenges of research data management for geographers. In regards to training, the communication of benefits and reaching the target groups seem to be the biggest challenges. Consequently, better incentive structures as well as communication channels have to be established.

  7. Pedagogical Training and Research in Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wankat, Phillip C.

    2008-01-01

    Ferment in engineering has focused increased attention on undergraduate engineering education, and has clarified the need for rigorous research in engineering education. This need has spawned the new research field of Engineering Education and greatly increased interest in earning Ph.D. degrees based on rigorous engineering education research.…

  8. About the Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group conducts and fosters the development of research on the prevention and early detection of breast cancer, cervix and human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers, endometrial cancers, ovarian cancers, and precursor conditions related to these cancers. |

  9. Quantitative Research Attitudes and Research Training Perceptions among Master's-Level Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Janeé M.; Rawls, Glinda J.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored master's-level counseling students' (N = 804) perceptions of training in the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (2009) Research and Program Evaluation standard, and their attitudes toward quantitative research. Training perceptions and quantitative research attitudes were low to moderate,…

  10. Building capacity for clinical research in developing countries: the INDOX Cancer Research Network experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Raghib; Finlayson, Alexander; Indox Cancer Research Network

    2012-01-01

    Transnational Organisations increasingly prioritise the need to support local research capacity in low and middle income countries in order that local priorities are addressed with due consideration of contextual issues. There remains limited evidence on the best way in which this should be done or the ways in which external agencies can support this process.We present an analysis of the learning from the INDOX Research Network, established in 2005 as a partnership between the Institute of Cancer Medicine at the University of Oxford and India's top nine comprehensive cancer centres. INDOX aims to enable Indian centres to conduct clinical research to the highest international standards; to ensure that trials are developed to address the specific needs of Indian patients by involving Indian investigators from the outset; and to provide the training to enable them to design and conduct their own studies. We report on the implementation, outputs and challenges of simultaneously trying to build capacity and deliver meaningful research output.

  11. Reserve Manpower, Personnel, and Training Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-01

    ucM) q 24 WWESWEEPMR (MCJ/M"𔃾 28 MOBLE NHORE UNDERSEA WAAR LHTS 4 ADPICIIA 94PS (LST/LSf) 22 CRAFT OF OPPORTIJT UNITS (COOP) 4 SALVAE SUPS (ARS) 4...Centers with the aid of computer technology . Once decentralized, personnel data would .- be captured, maintained, and reported at the local level. In... Technology Mr. Eugene R. Hall 202/696-4844 Novel Training Systems Center 305/646-4498 ,- CDR George Connor, USU Office of the CNO, Op-091 Dr. Stanley A

  12. The Impact of Training on Women's Micro-Enterprise Development. Education Research Paper. Knowledge & Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Fiona; Abdulla, Salwa; Appleton, Helen; el-Bushra, Judy; Cardenas, Nora; Kebede, Kibre; Lewis, Viv; Sitaram, Shashikala

    A study investigated the impact of training on women's micro-enterprise development in four programs in Ethiopia, India, Peru, and Sudan. Research design was a series of case studies of projects and programs providing training in technical or business skills. Impact of training was measured against these four indicators: income, access to and…

  13. Building national capacity for research mentor training: an evidence-based approach to training the trainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfund, Christine; Spencer, Kimberly C; Asquith, Pamela; House, Stephanie C; Miller, Sarah; Sorkness, Christine A

    2015-01-01

    Research mentor training (RMT), based on the published Entering Mentoring curricula series, has been shown to improve the knowledge and skills of research mentors across career stages, as self-reported by both the mentors engaged in training and their mentees. To promote widespread dissemination and empower others to implement this evidence-based training at their home institutions, we developed an extensive, interactive, multifaceted train-the-trainer workshop. The specific goals of these workshops are to 1) increase facilitator knowledge of an RMT curriculum, 2) increase facilitator confidence in implementing the curriculum, 3) provide a safe environment to practice facilitation of curricular activities, and 4) review implementation strategies and evaluation tools. Data indicate that our approach results in high satisfaction and significant confidence gains among attendees. Of the 195 diverse attendees trained in our workshops since Fall 2010, 44% report implementation at 39 different institutions, collectively training more than 500 mentors. Further, mentors who participated in the RMT sessions led by our trained facilitators report high facilitator effectiveness in guiding discussion. Implications and challenges to building the national capacity needed for improved research mentoring relationships are discussed.

  14. Phenomenology in pediatric cancer nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fochtman, Dianne

    2008-01-01

    What does it mean to have cancer as a child or adolescent? To understand this, researchers must study the illness from the child's point of view and listen to these children's descriptions of their "lived world." Phenomenology is a qualitative research methodology that can be used to discover and interpret meaning. To use phenomenology congruently, the philosophical background must be understood as well as the adaptation of the philosophical basis to research in the caring sciences. Only when clinicians truly understand the meaning of this illness to the child can they design nursing interventions to ease suffering and increase quality of life in children and adolescents with cancer.

  15. NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Sexually Transmitted Diseases NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... mystery. Most important, however, is to have a vaccine which potentially can ... focusing their research on helping to produce second-generation HPV vaccines ...

  16. Antiproton radiation found effective in cancer research

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "An international collaboration of scientists has completed the first ever antiproton beam experiments designed to reveal the biological effectiveness of antiproton radiation in terminating cells used for cancer research...PBar Labs assembled the collaboration at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research in Geneva) to perform the measurements" (1 page).

  17. Research: General Semantics Training: Pride or Prejudice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckman, Bruce K.

    1978-01-01

    Argues that general semantics research into prejudice has made only minor contributions to an understanding of prejudice because of weak experimental designs. Suggests improvements in research methodology and urges that knowledge of the semantic world of minority groups be sought as a prerequisite to eliminating cultural bias in standardized…

  18. Improved physical fitness of cancer survivors : A randomised controlled trial comparing physical training with physical and cognitive-behavioural training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    May, Anne M.; Van Weert, Ellen; Korstjens, Irene; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette E. H. M.; Van Der Schans, Cees P.; Zonderland, Maria L.; Mesters, Ilse; Van Den Borne, Bart; Ros, Wynand J. G.

    2008-01-01

    We compared the effect of a group-based 12-week supervised exercise programme, i.e. aerobic and resistance exercise, and group sports, with that of the same programme combined with cognitive-behavioural training on physical fitness and activity of cancer survivors. One hundred and forty seven cancer

  19. Updates in colorectal cancer stem cell research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Jie Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the world most common malignant tumors, also is the main disease, which cause tumor-associated death. Surgery and chemotherapy are the most used treatment of CRC. Recent research reported that, cancer stem cells (CSCs are considered as the origin of tumor genesis, development, metastasis and recurrence in theory. At present, it has been proved that, CSCs existed in many tumors including CRC. In this review, we summary the identification of CSCs according to the cell surface markers, and the development of drugs that target colorectal cancer stem cells.

  20. Radiation related basic cancer research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Hoon; Yoo, Young Do; Hong, Seok Il [and others

    2000-04-01

    We studied the mechanism of radiation-induced apoptosis, the factors involved signaling, and the establishment of radiation-resistant cell lines in this study. During the TGF beta-stimulated epithelial mesenchymal transition(EMT), actin rearrangement occurred first and fibronectin matrix assembly followed. These two events were considered independent since cytochalasin-D did not inhibit TGF stimulated matrix assembly and fibronectin supplementation did not induce EMT. During EMT, alpha 5 beta 1 integrin and alpha v integrin have increased but MMP activation was not accompanied, which suggest that induction of extracellular matrix and activation of integrins may be main contributor for the EMT. Serum depriving induced apoptosis of HUVECs was prevented by vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGF) and PMA. The apoptosis prevention by VEGF and PMA were conformed by DNA fragmentation assay. The p53 expression level was down regulated by VEGF and PMA compared with serum deprived HUVECs. However, VEGF and PMA induces c-Myc expression level on these cells. We made the 5 radiation-resistant clones from breast, lung and cervical cancer cells. More than 70%, 100% and 50% increased resistance was detected in breast cancer cells, lung cancer cells, and cervical cells, respectively. We carried out differential display-PCR to clone the radiation-resistant genes. 9 out of 10 genes were analyzed their sequence.

  1. Child Welfare Research and Training: A Response to David Stoesz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brenda D.; Vandiver, Vikki L.

    2016-01-01

    In this response to David Stoesz' critique, "The Child Welfare Cartel," the authors agree that child welfare research and training must be improved. The authors disagree, however, with Stoesz' critique of social work education, his assessment of the most-needed forms of child welfare research, and his depiction of the goals and…

  2. Research and Development of the Training Decisions System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-01

    helping make the TDS a success. Dr Joe H. Ward, Jr., consultant with CONSAD Research (now a counsultant with Metrica , Inc.), San Antonio, TX Dr S...Consultant for CONSAD Research (now with Metrica Inc.), San Antonio, TX Mr Winston R. Bennett, TDS Manager, AFHRL Training Systems Division, Brooks AFB, TX

  3. Subject Didactic Studies of Research Training in Biology and Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lybeck, Leif

    1984-01-01

    The objectives and design of a 3-year study of research training and supervision in biology and physics are discussed. Scientific problems arising from work on the thesis will be a focus for the postgraduate students and their supervisors. Attention will be focused on supervisors' and students' conceptions of science, subject range, research,…

  4. Stepping up Open Science Training for European Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Schmidt

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Open science refers to all things open in research and scholarly communication: from publications and research data to code, models and methods as well as quality evaluation based on open peer review. However, getting started with implementing open science might not be as straightforward for all stakeholders. For example, what do research funders expect in terms of open access to publications and/or research data? Where and how to publish research data? How to ensure that research results are reproducible? These are all legitimate questions and, in particular, early career researchers may benefit from additional guidance and training. In this paper we review the activities of the European-funded FOSTER project which organized and supported a wide range of targeted trainings for open science, based on face-to-face events and on a growing suite of e-learning courses. This article reviews the approach and experiences gained from the first two years of the project.

  5. The lung cancer exercise training study: a randomized trial of aerobic training, resistance training, or both in postsurgical lung cancer patients: rationale and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crawford Jeffrey

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Lung Cancer Exercise Training Study (LUNGEVITY is a randomized trial to investigate the efficacy of different types of exercise training on cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2peak, patient-reported outcomes, and the organ components that govern VO2peak in post-operative non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients. Methods/Design Using a single-center, randomized design, 160 subjects (40 patients/study arm with histologically confirmed stage I-IIIA NSCLC following curative-intent complete surgical resection at Duke University Medical Center (DUMC will be potentially eligible for this trial. Following baseline assessments, eligible participants will be randomly assigned to one of four conditions: (1 aerobic training alone, (2 resistance training alone, (3 the combination of aerobic and resistance training, or (4 attention-control (progressive stretching. The ultimate goal for all exercise training groups will be 3 supervised exercise sessions per week an intensity above 70% of the individually determined VO2peak for aerobic training and an intensity between 60 and 80% of one-repetition maximum for resistance training, for 30-45 minutes/session. Progressive stretching will be matched to the exercise groups in terms of program length (i.e., 16 weeks, social interaction (participants will receive one-on-one instruction, and duration (30-45 mins/session. The primary study endpoint is VO2peak. Secondary endpoints include: patient-reported outcomes (PROs (e.g., quality of life, fatigue, depression, etc. and organ components of the oxygen cascade (i.e., pulmonary function, cardiac function, skeletal muscle function. All endpoints will be assessed at baseline and postintervention (16 weeks. Substudies will include genetic studies regarding individual responses to an exercise stimulus, theoretical determinants of exercise adherence, examination of the psychological mediators of the exercise - PRO relationship, and exercise-induced changes

  6. Automation of Technology for Cancer Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ent, Wietske; Veneman, Wouter J; Groenewoud, Arwin; Chen, Lanpeng; Tulotta, Claudia; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W; Spaink, Herman P; Snaar-Jagalska, B Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish embryos can be obtained for research purposes in large numbers at low cost and embryos develop externally in limited space, making them highly suitable for high-throughput cancer studies and drug screens. Non-invasive live imaging of various processes within the larvae is possible due to their transparency during development, and a multitude of available fluorescent transgenic reporter lines.To perform high-throughput studies, handling large amounts of embryos and larvae is required. With such high number of individuals, even minute tasks may become time-consuming and arduous. In this chapter, an overview is given of the developments in the automation of various steps of large scale zebrafish cancer research for discovering important cancer pathways and drugs for the treatment of human disease. The focus lies on various tools developed for cancer cell implantation, embryo handling and sorting, microfluidic systems for imaging and drug treatment, and image acquisition and analysis. Examples will be given of employment of these technologies within the fields of toxicology research and cancer research.

  7. TRAINING POLICY OF MILITANTS MST: RESEARCH REPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suely Aparecida Martin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available : This article analyzes the experience of political education of MST, based on research results, held in Paraná. Tries to demonstrate how the different experiences provided by this movement to provide political formation of its members. The text is organized into three parts: the first presents the experience category develop by Edward Palmer Thompson, used as reference for analysis, the second presents a brief history of political formation in the context of MST, and highlights the latest research results. The research were conducted between 2006 and 2008, had a qualitative character. In addition to literature review , there was the reading of documents produced by the movement and interviews with members of the MST.

  8. Environmental and occupational health research and training needs in Colombia: A Delphi study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Villamizar, Laura A.; González, Beatriz Elena; Vera, Lina María; Patz, Jonathan; Bautista, Leonelo E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Environmental factors contribute with 16% of the burden of disease in Colombia. A main obstacle in implementing national and regional environmental and occupational health policies is the limited knowledge on the local ability to study and control the impact of harmful exposures on health. Objective To identify needs for research and training in environmental and occupational health in Colombia. Materials and methods We conducted a three-round hybrid Delphi study. A group of environmental and occupational health Colombian experts (n=16) from government agencies, universities, and research centers was recruited to participate in the study. Expert’s opinions on research and training needs were gathered through online questionnaires, followed by an in-person meeting. The percentage of agreement and the coefficient of variation were used to measure consensus. Results Air pollution and chemical products were considered the most important environmental and occupational exposures, due to their significant impact on chronic non-communicable diseases, such as respiratory diseases, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. Research on the effects of outdoor air pollution on cardiovascular and respiratory diseases was considered of the greatest importance. Priority training areas included environmental and occupational health risk assessment, exposure modeling, advanced statistical methods, urban planning, occupational safety and hygiene, and epidemiology and toxicology. Conclusions These findings provide a valuable input for the definition and implementation of national environmental and occupational health policies and for the development of a regional hub aimed at strengthening the capacity for research and training in Colombia. PMID:26535742

  9. Teamwork, Soft Skills, and Research Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibert, Anaïs; Tozer, Wade C; Westoby, Mark

    2017-02-01

    We provide a list of soft skills that are important for collaboration and teamwork, based on our own experience and from an opinion survey of team leaders. Each skill can be learned to some extent. We also outline workable short courses for graduate schools to strengthen teamwork and collaboration skills among research students.

  10. One Health research and training in Australia and New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon A. Reid

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the review: This review was performed to create a repository of information on One Health research and training in Australia and New Zealand (ANZ. The review sought to determine 1 how many training activities there are in ANZ, 2 how much research on zoonotic diseases is undertaken by multidisciplinary teams, and 3 how collaborative and integrated they are. Recent findings: There are few opportunities for training in One Health in ANZ. The majority require enrolment in a postgraduate degree programme, and there is only one postgraduate level course that is also available for continuing professional development (CPD. Of the broad range of One Health research performed in ANZ, the majority is performed by teams with limited disciplinary diversity, although diversity is improving. Summary: Progress has been made in building collaboration between human, animal, and environmental health professions. However, the lack of clearly defined competencies and agreed purpose for One Health may be impeding collaboration.

  11. One Health research and training in Australia and New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Simon A.; McKenzie, Joanna; Woldeyohannes, Solomon M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of the review This review was performed to create a repository of information on One Health research and training in Australia and New Zealand (ANZ). The review sought to determine 1) how many training activities there are in ANZ, 2) how much research on zoonotic diseases is undertaken by multidisciplinary teams, and 3) how collaborative and integrated they are. Recent findings There are few opportunities for training in One Health in ANZ. The majority require enrolment in a postgraduate degree programme, and there is only one postgraduate level course that is also available for continuing professional development (CPD). Of the broad range of One Health research performed in ANZ, the majority is performed by teams with limited disciplinary diversity, although diversity is improving. Summary Progress has been made in building collaboration between human, animal, and environmental health professions. However, the lack of clearly defined competencies and agreed purpose for One Health may be impeding collaboration. PMID:27906122

  12. Grant opportunities for academic research and training

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2016-08-30

    As an unbiased, multidisciplinary science organization, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is dedicated to the timely, relevant, and impartial study of the health of our ecosystems and environment, our natural resources, the impacts of climate and land-use change, and the natural hazards that affect our lives. Grant opportunities for researchers and faculty to participate in USGS science through the engagement of students are available in the selected programs described in this publication.

  13. Assessing tobacco use by cancer patients and facilitating cessation: an American Association for Cancer Research policy statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toll, Benjamin A; Brandon, Thomas H; Gritz, Ellen R; Warren, Graham W; Herbst, Roy S

    2013-04-15

    When diagnosed with cancer, patients can immediately make a meaningful positive impact on their health by stopping their tobacco use. Scientific evidence clearly shows that tobacco use in patients with cancer leads to poorer outcomes. The specific biological processes driving tobacco consumption's interference in cancer therapy are the subject of continuing research, but the evidence is clear that tobacco use in patients with cancer leads to decreased treatment efficacy and safety, decreased survival, decreased quality of life, increased treatment-related toxicity, and increased risk of cancer recurrence and second primary tumors. Data suggest that tobacco cessation can improve outcomes and survival in patients with cancer, yet full execution of evidence-based cessation interventions is infrequent in oncology settings. Therefore, both improved provision of cessation assistance to all patients with cancer who use tobacco or have recently quit and further study of the deleterious effects of tobacco use and benefits of tobacco cessation on cancer progression and treatment are needed and recommended by the American Association for Cancer Research. Progress on both fronts begins with universal assessment and documentation of tobacco use as a standard of quality cancer care regardless of treatment setting and will be further facilitated through the development of reliable, valid, and standard measures of tobacco use, incorporation of evidence-based procedures into quality and accreditation procedures, and the development of appropriate training, clinical infrastructure, and incentives for delivery of tobacco cessation interventions.

  14. A Collaborative Strategy with Medical Providers to Improve Training for Teachers of Children with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael B.; Bolen, Larry M.; Brinkman, Tara M.; Carreira, Kay; Cole, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to illustrate the collaborative development of a teacher training program for teachers who have a child with cancer in their classroom. Five hundred twenty-eight kindergarten through 12th grade public school teachers were surveyed to identify their training needs. Based on these needs a computer-based training program…

  15. Institutional shared resources and translational cancer research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Paoli Paolo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The development and maintenance of adequate shared infrastructures is considered a major goal for academic centers promoting translational research programs. Among infrastructures favoring translational research, centralized facilities characterized by shared, multidisciplinary use of expensive laboratory instrumentation, or by complex computer hardware and software and/or by high professional skills are necessary to maintain or improve institutional scientific competitiveness. The success or failure of a shared resource program also depends on the choice of appropriate institutional policies and requires an effective institutional governance regarding decisions on staffing, existence and composition of advisory committees, policies and of defined mechanisms of reporting, budgeting and financial support of each resource. Shared Resources represent a widely diffused model to sustain cancer research; in fact, web sites from an impressive number of research Institutes and Universities in the U.S. contain pages dedicated to the SR that have been established in each Center, making a complete view of the situation impossible. However, a nation-wide overview of how Cancer Centers develop SR programs is available on the web site for NCI-designated Cancer Centers in the U.S., while in Europe, information is available for individual Cancer centers. This article will briefly summarize the institutional policies, the organizational needs, the characteristics, scientific aims, and future developments of SRs necessary to develop effective translational research programs in oncology. In fact, the physical build-up of SRs per se is not sufficient for the successful translation of biomedical research. Appropriate policies to improve the academic culture in collaboration, the availability of educational programs for translational investigators, the existence of administrative facilitations for translational research and an efficient organization

  16. Focusing the research agenda for simulation training visual system requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Charles J.

    2014-06-01

    Advances in the capabilities of the display-related technologies with potential uses in simulation training devices continue to occur at a rapid pace. Simultaneously, ongoing reductions in defense spending stimulate the services to push a higher proportion of training into ground-based simulators to reduce their operational costs. These two trends result in increased customer expectations and desires for more capable training devices, while the money available for these devices is decreasing. Thus, there exists an increasing need to improve the efficiency of the acquisition process and to increase the probability that users get the training devices they need at the lowest practical cost. In support of this need the IDEAS program was initiated in 2010 with the goal of improving display system requirements associated with unmet user needs and expectations and disrupted acquisitions. This paper describes a process of identifying, rating, and selecting the design parameters that should receive research attention. Analyses of existing requirements documents reveal that between 40 and 50 specific design parameters (i.e., resolution, contrast, luminance, field of view, frame rate, etc.) are typically called out for the acquisition of a simulation training display system. Obviously no research effort can address the effects of this many parameters. Thus, we developed a defensible strategy for focusing limited R&D resources on a fraction of these parameters. This strategy encompasses six criteria to identify the parameters most worthy of research attention. Examples based on display design parameters recommended by stakeholders are provided.

  17. Impact of proteomics on bladder cancer research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celis, Julio E; Gromova, Irina; Moreira, José Manuel Alfonso

    2004-01-01

    Detecting bladder cancer at an early stage and predicting how a tumor will behave and act in response to therapy, as well as the identification of new targets for therapeutic intervention, are among the main areas of research that will benefit from the current explosion in the number of powerful ...

  18. Physical exercise training interventions for children and young adults during and after treatment for childhood cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braam, Katja I.; van der Torre, Patrick; Takken, Tim; Veening, Margreet A.; van Dulmen-den Broeder, Eline; Kaspers, Gertjan J L

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A decreased physical fitness has been reported in patients and survivors of childhood cancer. This is influenced by the negative effects of the disease and the treatment of childhood cancer. Exercise training for adult cancer patients has frequently been reported to improve physical fitn

  19. Analysis of 10-Year Training Results of Medical Students Using the Microvascular Research Center Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoda, Satoshi; Kimata, Yoshihiro; Sugiyama, Narushi; Tokuyama, Eijiro; Matsumoto, Kumiko; Ota, Tomoyuki; Thuzar, Moe

    2016-06-01

    Background In this article, we reviewed the training results of medical students using the Microvascular Research Center Training Program (MRCP), and proposed an ideal microsurgical training program for all individuals by analyzing the training results of medical students who did not have any surgical experience. Methods As of 2015, a total of 29 medical students completed the MRCP. In the most recent 12 medical students, the number of trials performed for each training stage and the number of rats needed to complete the training were recorded. Additionally, we measured the operating time upon finishing stage 5 for the recent six medical students after it became a current program. Results The average operating time upon finishing stage 5 for the recent six medical students was 120 minutes ± 11 minutes (standard deviation [SD]). The average vascular anastomosis time (for the artery and vein) was 52 minutes ± 2 minutes (SD). For the most recent 12 medical students, there was a negative correlation between the number of trials performed in the non-rat stages (stages 1-3) and the number of rats used in the rat stages (stages 4-5). Conclusion Analysis of the training results of medical students suggests that performing microsurgery first on silicon tubes and chicken wings saves animals' lives later during the training program. We believe that any person can learn the technique of microsurgery by performing 7 to 8 hours of training per day over a period of 15 days within this program setting.

  20. Effects of Qigong Training on Health-Related Quality of Life, Functioning, and Cancer-Related Symptoms in Survivors of Nasopharyngeal Cancer: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley S. M. Fong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effects of Qigong intervention on quality of life (QOL, health-related functioning, and cancer-related symptoms in survivors of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC. Twenty-five survivors of NPC were included in the experimental group (mean age ± SD: 55.4 ± 7.5 years and 27 in the control group (mean age ± SD: 58.7 ± 9.5 years. The experimental group underwent a weekly 1.5-hour Qigong training program and an identical home program (three times/week for six months. The control group received no training. Global health status/QOL, functioning, and cancer-related symptoms were assessed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 and QLQ-H&N35 questionnaires before training began, after three months of Qigong training, at the end of the six-month Qigong intervention (i.e., posttest, and six months posttest. Intention-to-treat analysis revealed no statistically (P>0.05 or clinically significant improvement in global health status/QOL, functioning, or symptoms in either group. The experimental group had 45.8% fewer sense-related (smell and taste problems (P<0.05 but 98.6% more speech-related problems (P<0.05 than the control group after the Qigong intervention. Qigong training resulted in no apparent improvement in health-related QOL, functionality, or cancer-related symptoms in cancer-free survivors of NPC, except for a possible reduction in smell- and taste-related problems.

  1. EDUCATIONAL PLANNING, A DIRECTORY OF TRAINING AND RESEARCH INSTITUTIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    COOMBS, PHILIP H.

    TO ACCELERATE THE PROCESS OF IDENTIFYING THE COMPONENTS FROM WHICH A STRONG INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY FOR RESEARCH AND TRAINING IN EDUCATIONAL PLANNING MAY BE DEVELOPED, THIS DIRECTORY, PUBLISHED BY THE UNITED NATIONS EDUCATIONAL SCIENTIFIC AND CULTURAL ORGANIZATION, DESCRIBES 99 INTERNATIONAL, NATIONAL, AND REGIONAL ORGANIZATIONS IN THE FIELD. EACH…

  2. One Health training, research, and outreach in North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Stroud

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The One Health (OH concept, formerly referred to as ‘One Medicine’ in the later part of the 20th century, has gained exceptional popularity in the early 21st century, and numerous academic and non-academic institutions have developed One Health programs. Objectives: To summarize One Health training, research, and outreach activities originating in North America. Methods: We used data from extensive electronic records maintained by the One Health Commission (OHC (www.onehealthcommission.org/ and the One Health Initiative (www.onehealthinitiative.com/ and from web-based searches, combined with the corporate knowledge of the authors and their professional contacts. Finally, a call was released to members of the OHC's Global One Health Community listserv, asking that they populate a Google document with information on One Health training, research, and outreach activities in North American academic and non-academic institutions. Results: A current snapshot of North American One Health training, research, and outreach activities as of August 2016 has evolved. Conclusions: It is clear that the One Health concept has gained considerable recognition during the first decade of the 21st century, with numerous current training and research activities carried out among North American academic, non-academic, government, corporate, and non-profit entities.

  3. Balancing Consistency and Flexibility in Student Training Entitlements: Research Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Kaye; McKenna, Suzy; Griffin, Tabatha

    2016-01-01

    This research overview summarizes the work undertaken by Kaye Bowman and Suzy McKenna in exploring jurisdictional approaches to the implementation of student entitlements to vocational skills training, a key reform initiative in the National Partnership Agreement on Skills Reform (NPASR) of 2012-16. The overview is a condensed summary of three…

  4. Southeast Asian Mental Health: Treatment, Prevention, Services, Training and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owan, Tom Choken, Ed.

    This sourcebook contains 19 papers which discuss the mental health service needs of Southeast Asian refugees in the United States. The volume is divided into five sections: Treatment; Prevention; Services; Training; and Research. The papers (and their authors) are: (1) "Psychiatric Care for Southeast Asians: How Different Is Different?"…

  5. Research Training in Medical Informatics: The Stanford Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortliffe, Edward H.; Fagan, Lawrence M.

    1989-01-01

    Stanford University created an interdisciplinary program to train researchers and academic leaders in the field of medical information sciences. The program is described, identifying experiences of interest to people developing such a program. The program's background and history, students, curriculum and philosophy, and lessons learned are…

  6. Museum Accessibility: Combining Audience Research and Staff Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levent, Nina; Reich, Christine

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses an audience-informed professional development model that combines audience research focus groups and staff training that includes interaction and direct feedback from visitors, in this case, visitors with low vision. There are two critical components to this model: one is that museums' programming decisions are informed by…

  7. Ubiquitin proteasome system research in gastrointestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jia-Ling; Huang, Chang-Zhi

    2016-02-15

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is important for the degradation of proteins in eukaryotic cells. It is involved in nearly every cellular process and plays an important role in maintaining body homeostasis. An increasing body of evidence has linked alterations in the UPS to gastrointestinal malignancies, including esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancers. Here, we summarize the current literature detailing the involvement of the UPS in gastrointestinal cancer, highlighting its role in tumor occurrence and development, providing information for therapeutic targets research and anti-gastrointestinal tumor drug design.

  8. Translating basic research in cancer patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Maugeri-Saccà

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of molecular targeted therapies and the development of high-throughput biotechnologies, it has become evident that progress in cancer research is largely due to the creation of multidisciplinary teams able to plan clinical trials supported by appropriate molecular hypotheses. These efforts have culminated in the identification and validation of biomarkers predictive of response, as well as in the generation of more accurate prognostic tools. The identification of cancer stem cells has provided further insights into mechanisms of cancer, and many studies have tried to translate this biological notion into prognostic and predictive information. In this regard, new agents targeting key stemness-related pathways have entered the clinical development, and preliminary data suggested an encouraging antitumor activity.

  9. Microarray Applications in Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Il-Jin; Kang, Hio Chung

    2004-01-01

    DNA microarray technology permits simultaneous analysis of thousands of DNA sequences for genomic research and diagnostics applications. Microarray technology represents the most recent and exciting advance in the application of hybridization-based technology for biological sciences analysis. This review focuses on the classification (oligonucleotide vs. cDNA) and application (mutation-genotyping vs. gene expression) of microarrays. Oligonucleotide microarrays can be used both in mutation-genotyping and gene expression analysis, while cDNA microarrays can only be used in gene expression analysis. We review microarray mutation analysis, including examining the use of three oligonucleotide microarrays developed in our laboratory to determine mutations in RET, β-catenin and K-ras genes. We also discuss the use of the Affymetrix GeneChip in mutation analysis. We review microarray gene expression analysis, including the classifying of such studies into four categories: class comparison, class prediction, class discovery and identification of biomarkers. PMID:20368836

  10. Collaborative field research and training in occupational health and ergonomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogi, K

    1998-01-01

    Networking collaborative research and training in Asian developing countries includes three types of joint activities: field studies of workplace potentials for better safety and health, intensive action training for improvement of working conditions in small enterprises, and action-oriented workshops on low-cost improvements for managers, workers, and farmers. These activities were aimed at identifying workable strategies for making locally adjusted improvements in occupational health and ergonomics. Many improvements have resulted as direct outcomes. Most these improvements were multifaceted, low-cost, and practicable using local skills. Three common features of these interactive processes seem important in facilitating realistic improvements: 1) voluntary approaches building on local achievements; 2) the use of practical methods for identifying multiple improvements; and 3) participatory steps for achieving low-cost results first. The effective use of group work tools is crucial. Stepwise training packages have thus proven useful for promoting local problem-solving interventions based on voluntary initiatives.

  11. RESEARCH ON ROMANIAN MANAGER TRAINING IN PRE-UNIVERSITY EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuşa Ana

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Following the implementation of educational reform, school leadership has become very important. School principals have become managers and it was necessary a qualification process for them. The purpose of this study was to establish training needs and training school managers. The research instrument was a questionnaire applied to a number of 38 school managers of the eight regions of Romania. Analyzing data from the questionnaires respondents received, we found the following: • there is a clear idea of managerial tasks • school management issues are not fully known by the respondents. School education directors reported several problems such as: • Requiring high problems that have not been trained • The need for skills in areas such as accounting, administration, legal, information technology • Making teaching standard together with managerial activity A percentage of 62.70% of executives felt they were not sufficiently prepared for effective business management.

  12. Introduction: Epidemiologic research and prevention of occupational cancer in Europe.

    OpenAIRE

    Boffetta, P.; Kogevinas, M.

    1999-01-01

    Research on occupational cancer epidemiology has been an important area of occupational health in Europe since the early studies were conducted in the United Kingdom in the 1950s and 1960s. During the last decade, occupational cancer research in Europe has gained an international dimension and become increasingly interdisciplinary in nature. At present, occupational exposures might be responsible for 13 to 18% of lung cancers, 2 to 10% of bladder cancers, and 2 to 8% of laryngeal cancers in E...

  13. Research Funding, Patent Search Training and Technology Transfer: a collaboration

    KAUST Repository

    Tyhurst, Janis

    2016-01-01

    This paper will focus on the collaboration efforts of three different university departments to create, teach and evaluate the benefits of a joint patent training series, as well as the future directions this collaboration will take. KAUST has as one of its goals the diversification of the Saudi economy. There is a strong focus at the university on developing entrepreneurial ideas and commercializing research done. The University Library supports this goal through the provision of electronic resources and introductory patent search training skills. However, the patent training class offered by the University Library is only one step in a process that faculty and students need when starting or taking their research to the next level. In the Fall of 2015, I met with representatives of the two major stakeholders in the patent arena, the office of Sponsored Research (OSR) and the Technology Transfer Office (TTO), to develop a patent training program to meet the needs of researchers. The OSR provides funding to researchers who have demonstrated that their ideas have merit with potential applications, the TTO works with researchers who are at the point of needing IP protection. The resulting discussion led us to collaborate on creating a workshop series that benefit the researcher’s information needs and each of our departments as well. In the first of the series of three 2 hour workshops, the Manager of TTO and the Lead Integrative Specialist from the OSR presented a workshop on an overview of Intellectual Property and the patenting process. These presentations focused on when and how to determine whether research is potentially patentable, why a researcher needs to protect his/her research and how to go about protecting it. The second workshop focused on introductory patent search skills and tools, how to expand a literature search to include the information found in patents, and how this kind of research will improve not only the literature search but the research

  14. A pilot randomized study of skills training for African American cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Cindy; Rust, Connie; Choi, Sam

    2014-01-01

    This study tested the efficacy of a psychosocial group intervention for African American breast cancer survivors based on the Cancer Survival Toolbox with the specific aim of decreasing distress and improving aspects of psychosocial functioning and quality of life. This pilot study utilized a randomized, repeated measures, experimental design. The study sample (N = 71) consisted of an intervention group (n = 23) of cancer survival skills training for 6 weeks and a control group (n = 48). The study could not confirm that cancer skills training in a psychoeducational group setting had a positive effect on decreasing stress or improving aspects of psychosocial functioning and quality of life.

  15. Lactate Transporters Expression in Tumor of Balb/c Mice Bearing Breast Cancer after Endurance Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Aveseh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Changes in the metabolism of cancer cells plays a major role in the survival and their expansion. The aim of this study was to determine expression of lactate transmitters in Balb/c mice with breast cancer after endurance training. Methods: In this experimental study twenty-five Balb C mice were randomly divided into two groups of breast cancer control (N=13 and breast cancer training (N=12. Breast cancer was induced in mammary fat pad by injection of cancer cells (MC4L2 in mice and endurance training protocol was applied for 7 weeks in the experimental group. Tumor volume and MCT1, MCT4, and CD147 expression were measured by micro digital caliper and western blotting technique respectively. Data were analyzed statistically using Student t and Pearson. Results: Significant decreases was found in weight and CD147 expression of tumor after 7 weeks of endurance training in the exercise group compared to the control group. No significant differences were seen in MCT4 expression and tumor volume between the groups (05 / 0p>0.05. Significant correlation was found between tumor MCT1 and CD147 expression (P < 0.05, while the relationship between MCT4 and CD147 expression in tumors was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Endurance training can reduce lactate metabolism in cancer cells through suppression of lactate transporters expression and provides a useful tool in breast cancer treatment or prevention.

  16. Improving Cancer Care Through Nursing Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Deborah K

    2015-09-01

    Nursing research and nurse researchers have been an integral and significant part of the Oncology Nursing Society's (ONS's) history, as evidenced by the development of the Nursing Research Committee within a few years of ONS's establishment. Ruth McCorkle, PhD, RN, FAAN, was the committee's first chairperson in 1979. This was followed by the creation of the Advanced Nursing Research Special Interest Group in 1989 under the leadership of Jean Brown, PhD, RN, FAAN. ONS also began to recognize nurse researchers in 1994 by creating the annual ONS Distinguished Researcher Award to recognize the contributions of a member who has conducted or promoted research that has enhanced the science and practice of oncology nursing. The list of recipients and of their work is impressive and reflects the wide range of our practice areas (see http://bit.ly/1MTC5cp for the recipient list). In addition, the ONS Foundation began funding research in 1981 and has distributed more than $24 million in research grants, research fellowships, and other scholarships, lectures, public education projects, and career development awards (ONS Foundation, 2015). And, in 2006, the Putting Evidence Into Practice resource was unveiled, which provides evidence-based intervention reviews for the 20 most common problems experienced by patients with cancer and their caregivers (www.ons
.org/practice-resources/pep)
.

  17. Cervical cancer prevention training in South East Asian LMICs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Soon-Yau Ng

    2017-02-01

    Singapore is a first-world economy with a healthcare system that can support this mode of training and is geographically proximate to Southeast Asian LMICs that need this training. This makes it possible for model of tiered training with trainers on site in the LMICs and more advanced training where trainees receive training in Singapore. We present a case study where this tiered system of training is applied to Cambodia and demonstrate that this model of training is not only effective but also sustainable.

  18. Gaps in nutritional research among older adults with cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Presley, Carolyn J.; Dotan, Efrat; Soto-Perez-de-Celis, Enrique; Jatoi, Aminah; Mohile, Supriya G.; Won, Elizabeth; Alibhai, Shabbir; Kilari, Deepak; Harrison, Robert; Klepin, Heidi D.; Wildes, Tanya M.; Mustian, Karen; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional issues among older adults with cancer are an understudied area of research despite significant prognostic implications for treatment side effects, cancer-specific mortality, and overall survival. In May of 2015, the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute on Aging co-sponsored a conference focused on future directions in geriatric oncology research. Nutritional research among older adults with cancer was highlighted as a major area of concern as most nutritional cance...

  19. A Milestone in Cancer Research and Treatment in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tata Memorial Center is celebrating 75 years of leadership service towards cancer control and research in India. In honor of this anniversary, TMC is hosting A Conference of New Ideas in Cancer – Challenging Dogmas on February 26-28th, 2016 as part of its platinum jubilee events. CGH Director, Dr. Ted Trimble, will give a plenary talk: "Thinking Outside the Box in Cancer Research - Perspectives from the US NCI” in the session titled: Future of Cancer Research: US and European perspectives.

  20. Research on the Business English training model within MBA program

    OpenAIRE

    Natalia Yankovskaya; Olga Neklyudova

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a brief summary of the research on the Business English training model within MBA program students. This study is devoted to the problem of developing a professional foreign language communicative competency of MBA program participants. A particular feature of additional MBA qualification is its international status which presupposes that its graduates (mid-level and top managers) should realize their professional tasks in a foreign language. The analysis of literary ...

  1. The cancer translational research informatics platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Kimberly

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the pressing need for the creation of applications that facilitate the aggregation of clinical and molecular data, most current applications are proprietary and lack the necessary compliance with standards that would allow for cross-institutional data exchange. In line with its mission of accelerating research discoveries and improving patient outcomes by linking networks of researchers, physicians, and patients focused on cancer research, caBIG (cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid™ has sponsored the creation of the caTRIP (Cancer Translational Research Informatics Platform tool, with the purpose of aggregating clinical and molecular data in a repository that is user-friendly, easily accessible, as well as compliant with regulatory requirements of privacy and security. Results caTRIP has been developed as an N-tier architecture, with three primary tiers: domain services, the distributed query engine, and the graphical user interface, primarily making use of the caGrid infrastructure to ensure compatibility with other tools currently developed by caBIG. The application interface was designed so that users can construct queries using either the Simple Interface via drop-down menus or the Advanced Interface for more sophisticated searching strategies to using drag-and-drop. Furthermore, the application addresses the security concerns of authentication, authorization, and delegation, as well as an automated honest broker service for deidentifying data. Conclusion Currently being deployed at Duke University and a few other centers, we expect that caTRIP will make a significant contribution to further the development of translational research through the facilitation of its data exchange and storage processes.

  2. Disaster Research Team Building: A Case Study of a Web-based Disaster Research Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaton, Randal D; Johnson, L Clark; Maida, Carl A; Houston, J Brian; Pfefferbaum, Betty

    2012-11-19

    This case study describes the process and outcomes of the Northwest Center for Public Health Practice Child and Family Disaster Research Training (UWDRT) Program housed at the University of Washington, which used web-based distance learning technology. The purposes of this program were to provide training and to establish a regional cadre of researchers and clinicians; to increase disaster mental health research capacity and collaboration; and to improve the scientific rigor of research investigations of disaster mental health in children and families. Despite a number of obstacles encountered in development and implementation, outcomes of this program included increased team member awareness and knowledge of child and family disaster mental health issues; improved disaster and public health instruction and training independent of the UWDRT program; informed local and state disaster response preparedness and response; and contributions to the child and family disaster mental health research literature.

  3. Interdisciplinary research and training program in the plant sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolk, C.P.

    1991-01-01

    This document is the compiled progress reports from the Interdisciplinary Research and Training Program in the Plant Sciences funded through the MSU-DOE Plant Research Laboratory. Fourteen reports are included, covering topics such as the molecular basis of plant/microbe symbiosis, cell wall proteins and assembly, gene expression, stress responses, growth regulator biosynthesis, interaction between nuclear and organelle genomes, sensory transduction and tropisms, intracellular sorting and membrane trafficking, regulation of lipid metabolism, the molecular basis of disease resistance and plant pathogenesis, developmental biology of Cyanobacteria and hormonal involvement in environmental control of plant growth. 132 refs. (MHB)

  4. Communication between nurses and simulated patients with cancer: evaluation of a communication training programme.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijver, I.P.M.; Kerkstra, A.; Kerssens, J.J.; Holtkamp, C.C.M.; Bensing, J.M.; Wiel, H.B.M. van de

    2001-01-01

    In this paper the effect of a communication training programme on the instrumental and affective communication skills employed by ward nurses during the admittance interview with recently diagnosed cancer patients was investigated. The training focused on teaching nurses skills to discuss and handle

  5. Multicultural competency in research: examining the relationships among multicultural competencies, research training and self-efficacy, and the multicultural environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, William Ming; Sheu, Hung-Bin; Williams, Katie

    2004-11-01

    Research on multicultural competencies has mainly focused on the practice dimension of psychology training and practice. Little theoretical or empirical research has examined multicultural research training and self-efficacy. In this study, 119 psychology graduate students filled out a Web survey focusing on the research training environment, research self-efficacy, multicultural competency, the multicultural environment, and social desirability. Results showed that multicultural competency, research training, and the multicultural environment were related to multicultural research self-efficacy. Hierarchical regressions showed that multicultural competency predicted students' research anxiety; social desirability predicted multicultural research utility, multicultural competency, and the research training environment; and multicultural competency predicted students' confidence in research and perceptions that their graduate training programs were multicultural. Implications are discussed.

  6. About the Prostate and Urologic Cancer Research Group | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Prostate and Urologic Cancer Research Group conducts and supports research on prostate and bladder cancers, and new approaches to clinical prevention studies including cancer immunoprevention. The group develops, implements and monitors research efforts in chemoprevention, nutrition, genetic, and immunologic interventions, screening, early detection and other prevention strategies. |

  7. NCI Community Oncology Research Program Approved | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    On June 24, 2013, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Board of Scientific Advisors approved the creation of the NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP). NCORP will bring state-of-the art cancer prevention, control, treatment and imaging clinical trials, cancer care delivery research, and disparities studies to individuals in their own communities. |

  8. Adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research recommendations and breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Holly R; Bergkvist, Leif; Wolk, Alicja

    2016-06-01

    The World Cancer Research Fund/American Association for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) has published eight nutrition-related recommendations for the prevention of cancer. However, few prospective studies have examined these recommendations by breast cancer hormone receptor subtype and only one case-control study has included the dietary supplements recommendation in their evaluation. We investigated whether adherence to the WCRF/AICR cancer prevention recommendations was associated with breast cancer incidence, overall and by hormone receptor subtype, in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Among 31,514 primarily postmenopausal women diet and lifestyle factors were assessed with a self-administered food frequency questionnaire. A score was constructed based on adherence to the recommendations for body fatness, physical activity, energy density, plant foods, animal foods, alcoholic drinks and dietary supplements (score range 0-7). Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). During 15 years of follow-up 1,388 cases of breast cancer were identified. Women who met six to seven recommendations had a 51% decreased risk of breast cancer compared to women meeting only zero to two recommendations (95% CI = 0.35-0.70). The association between each additional recommendation met and breast cancer risk was strongest for the ER-positive/PR-positive subtype (HR = 0.86; 95% CI = 0.79-0.94), while for the ER-negative/PR-negative subtype the individual recommendations regarding plant and animal foods were most strongly associated with reduced risk. Our findings support that adherence to the WCRF/AICR recommendations reduces breast cancer risk in a population of primarily postmenopausal women. Promoting these recommendations to the public could help reduce breast cancer incidence.

  9. Cancer survivorship research: a review of the literature and summary of current NCI-designated cancer center projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrop, J Phil; Dean, Julie A; Paskett, Electra D

    2011-10-01

    The number of cancer survivors and the amount of cancer survivorship research have grown substantially during the past three decades. This article provides a review of interventional and observational cancer survivorship research efforts as well as a summary of current cancer survivorship research projects being conducted by National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers in an effort to identify areas that need further attention.

  10. GMES Initial Operations - Network for Earth Observation Research Training (GIONET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas-Perea, V.; Balzter, H.

    2012-12-01

    GMES Initial Operations - Network for Earth Observation Research Training (GIONET) is a Marie Curie funded project that aims to establish the first of a kind European Centre of Excellence for Earth Observation Research Training. GIONET is a partnership of leading Universities, research institutes and private companies from across Europe aiming to cultivate a community of early stage researchers in the areas of optical and radar remote sensing skilled for the emerging GMES land monitoring services during the GMES Initial Operations period (2011-2013) and beyond. GIONET is expected to satisfy the demand for highly skilled researchers and provide personnel for operational phase of the GMES and monitoring and emergency services. It will achieve this by: -Providing postgraduate training in Earth Observation Science that exposes students to different research disciplines and complementary skills, providing work experiences in the private and academic sectors, and leading to a recognized qualification (Doctorate). -Enabling access to first class training in both fundamental and applied research skills to early-stage researchers at world-class academic centers and market leaders in the private sector. -Building on the experience from previous GMES research and development projects in the land monitoring and emergency information services. The training program through supervised research focuses on 14 research topics (each carried out by an Early Stage Researchers based in one of the partner organization) divided in 5 main areas: Forest monitoring: Global biomass information systems Forest Monitoring of the Congo Basin using Synthetic Aperture radar (SAR) Multi-concept Earth Observation Capabilities for Biomass Mapping and Change Detection: Synergy of Multi-temporal and Multi-frequency Interferometric Radar and Optical Satellite Data Land cover and change: Multi-scale Remote Sensing Synergy for Land Process Studies: from field Spectrometry to Airborne Hyperspectral and

  11. Plant biology research and training for the 21st century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, K. (ed.)

    1992-01-01

    The committee was assembled in response to a request from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), and the US Department of Energy (DoE). The leadership of these agencies asked the National Academy of Sciences through the National Research Council (NRC) to assess the status of plant-science research in the United States in light of the opportunities arising from advances inother areas of biology. NRC was asked to suggest ways of accelerating the application of these new biologic concepts and tools to research in plant science with the aim of enhancing the acquisition of new knowledge about plants. The charge to the committee was to examine the following: Organizations, departments, and institutions conducting plant biology research; human resources involved in plant biology research; graduate training programs in plant biology; federal, state, and private sources of support for plant-biology research; the role of industry in conducting and supporting plant-biology research; the international status of US plant-biology research; and the relationship of plant biology to leading-edge research in biology.

  12. Plant biology research and training for the 21st century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, K. [ed.

    1992-12-31

    The committee was assembled in response to a request from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), and the US Department of Energy (DoE). The leadership of these agencies asked the National Academy of Sciences through the National Research Council (NRC) to assess the status of plant-science research in the United States in light of the opportunities arising from advances inother areas of biology. NRC was asked to suggest ways of accelerating the application of these new biologic concepts and tools to research in plant science with the aim of enhancing the acquisition of new knowledge about plants. The charge to the committee was to examine the following: Organizations, departments, and institutions conducting plant biology research; human resources involved in plant biology research; graduate training programs in plant biology; federal, state, and private sources of support for plant-biology research; the role of industry in conducting and supporting plant-biology research; the international status of US plant-biology research; and the relationship of plant biology to leading-edge research in biology.

  13. Progress through Collaboration - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI), through the Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR), has signed two Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) in the areas of sharing proteomics reagents and protocols and also in regulatory science.

  14. GIONET (GMES Initial Operations Network for Earth Observation Research Training)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, V.; Balzter, H.

    2013-12-01

    GMES Initial Operations - Network for Earth Observation Research Training (GIONET) is a Marie Curie funded project that aims to establish the first of a kind European Centre of Excellence for Earth Observation Research Training. Copernicus (previously known as GMES (Global Monitoring for Environment and Security) is a joint undertaking of the European Space Agency and the European Commission. It develops fully operational Earth Observation monitoring services for a community of end users from the public and private sector. The first services that are considered fully operational are the land monitoring and emergency monitoring core services. In GIONET, 14 early stage researchers are being trained at PhD level in understanding the complex physical processes that determine how electromagnetic radiation interacts with the atmosphere and the land surface ultimately form the signal received by a satellite. In order to achieve this, the researchers are based in industry and universities across Europe, as well as receiving the best technical training and scientific education. The training programme through supervised research focuses on 14 research topics. Each topic is carried out by an Early Stage Researcher based in one of the partner organisations and is expected to lead to a PhD degree. The 14 topics are grouped in 5 research themes: Forest monitoring Land cover and change Coastal zone and freshwater monitoring Geohazards and emergency response Climate adaptation and emergency response The methods developed and used in GIONET are as diverse as its research topics. GIONET has already held two summer schools; one at Friedrich Schiller University in Jena (Germany), on 'New operational radar satellite applications: Introduction to SAR, Interferometry and Polarimetry for Land Surface Mapping'. The 2nd summer school took place last September at the University of Leicester (UK )on 'Remote sensing of land cover and forest in GMES'. The next Summer School in September 2013

  15. 77 FR 41431 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request: Impact of Clinical Research Training and Medical Education...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-13

    ... Research Training and Medical Education at the Clinical Center on Physician Careers in Academia and... Collection Title: The Impact of Clinical Research Training and Medical Education at the Clinical Center on... clinical research training and medical education of the highest quality to each trainee. Frequency...

  16. The need for research training in orthopaedic residency education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Robert W

    2006-08-01

    Orthopaedic surgery residents should be exposed during their clinical training to the processes of creativity and innovation that are the basis of research. The definition of a research experience for surgery residents should be broad and include not only traditional bench research in a basic science environment but also translational and clinical research to move innovation from bench to bedside and validate its value in a scientific manner. Additionally, there are enormous opportunities for surgeons to study healthcare delivery and policy and to develop new approaches to educating colleagues, other medical personnel, and patients. The question that must be addressed is how can the knowledge and human resources residing in orthopaedic surgery best be used to meet the challenges future residents will face as healthcare undergoes profound changes? How these issues are managed in a rapidly changing environment is the critical issue and the challenge faced by surgical training programs wishing to remain viable and provide trainees with the opportunity to adapt and be successful in the future. What is state of the art today will not be tomorrow and unless trainees are encouraged and taught to be creative and innovative they risk becoming surgical dinosaurs.

  17. Aquatic invasive species: Lessons from cancer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, Adam; Ray, Andrew; Al-Chokhachy, Robert K.; Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Gresswell, Robert E.; Gross, Jackson A.; Kershner, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic invasive species are disrupting ecosystems with increasing frequency. Successful control of these invasions has been rare: Biologists and managers have few tools for fighting aquatic invaders. In contrast, the medical community has long worked to develop tools for preventing and fighting cancer. Its successes are marked by a coordinated research approach with multiple steps: prevention, early detection, diagnosis, treatment options and rehabilitation. The authors discuss how these steps can be applied to aquatic invasive species, such as the American bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus), in the Northern Rocky Mountain region of the United States, to expedite tool development and implementation along with achievement of biodiversity conservation goals.

  18. Undergraduate physiotherapy research training in south africa: the Medunsa experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Mothabeng

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Research interest has increased in physiotherapy in the past two decades. During this period, the physiotherapy department at the Medical University of Southern Africa(MEDUNSA started its degree programme. The first undergraduateresearch projects (UGRP were produced in 1985. The purpose of this study was to analyze the UGRPs conducted between 1985 and 1999 in terms of methodological trends (qualitative versus quantitative and subject content.Methods: A retrospective analysis of the 114 UGRPs carried out in the department was conducted. The projects were read and analyzed according to methodology, research context and topic categories. The 15-year period was analyzed in three 5-year phases (1985 - 1989; 1990 - 1994 and 1995 - 1999, using descriptive statistics. Results: There was a gradual increase in the number of UGRPs during the study period in keeping with the increase in student numbers, with the last five years recording the highest number of projects. An interesting finding was a decline in experimental and clinical research, which was lowest in the last five years. Conclusion: The findings are paradoxical, given the need for experimental research to validate current clinical  practice. Non-experimental qualitative research is however important in the view of the national health plan.  A balance between qualitative and quantitative research is therefore important and must be emphasized in student training. Student research projects need to be maximally utilized to improve departmental research output.

  19. One Health training and research activities in Western Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikkema, Reina; Koopmans, Marion

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The increase in emerging human infectious diseases that have a zoonotic origin and the increasing resistance of microorganisms to antimicrobial drugs have shown the need for collaborations between the human, animal and environmental health sectors. The One Health concept increasingly receives recognition from policy makers and researchers all over the world. This overview compiled research and education activities in the area of One Health in Western Europe (Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Iceland, Ireland, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Monaco, the Netherlands, Portugal, Scandinavia, Spain, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom (UK), with a focus on infectious diseases. It can serve as a starting point for future initiatives and collaborations. Material and methods A literature search for ‘One Health’ was performed using National Center for Biotechnology Information and Google. Moreover, information from global and European policy documents was collected and a questionnaire was designed to gather current One Health research and training activities in Western Europe. Results This overview shows that there is considerable recognition for One Health in Europe, although most educational initiatives are recent. In Europe, the One Health approach is currently mainly advocated in relation to antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Many countries have incorporated the One Health approach in their policy to fight AMR, and funding possibilities for AMR research increased significantly. The number of national and international multidisciplinary research networks in the area of zoonotic diseases and One Health is increasing. Discussion Although One Health has gained recognition in Europe, often a One Health approach to research and education in the area of zoonotic diseases and AMR is not implemented. In many countries, collaboration between sectors is still lacking, and One Health activities are predominantly initiated by the veterinary sector. To facilitate the

  20. One Health training and research activities in Western Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reina Sikkema

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The increase in emerging human infectious diseases that have a zoonotic origin and the increasing resistance of microorganisms to antimicrobial drugs have shown the need for collaborations between the human, animal and environmental health sectors. The One Health concept increasingly receives recognition from policy makers and researchers all over the world. This overview compiled research and education activities in the area of One Health in Western Europe (Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Iceland, Ireland, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Monaco, the Netherlands, Portugal, Scandinavia, Spain, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom (UK, with a focus on infectious diseases. It can serve as a starting point for future initiatives and collaborations. Material and methods: A literature search for ‘One Health’ was performed using National Center for Biotechnology Information and Google. Moreover, information from global and European policy documents was collected and a questionnaire was designed to gather current One Health research and training activities in Western Europe. Results: This overview shows that there is considerable recognition for One Health in Europe, although most educational initiatives are recent. In Europe, the One Health approach is currently mainly advocated in relation to antimicrobial resistance (AMR. Many countries have incorporated the One Health approach in their policy to fight AMR, and funding possibilities for AMR research increased significantly. The number of national and international multidisciplinary research networks in the area of zoonotic diseases and One Health is increasing. Discussion: Although One Health has gained recognition in Europe, often a One Health approach to research and education in the area of zoonotic diseases and AMR is not implemented. In many countries, collaboration between sectors is still lacking, and One Health activities are predominantly initiated by the veterinary

  1. Collaborative Undergraduate HBCU Student Summer Prostate Cancer Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    The role of vitamin D and parathyroid hormone in African Americans and Caucasians with early stage prostate cancer Ms. Claudia Thompson SC State...ABSTRACT The role of vitamin D and parathyroid hormone in African Americans and Caucasians with early stage prostate cancer Introduction: Prostate...cancer is a malignant tumor that begins in the prostate gland and is the second most deadly cancer in men in the United States. It is has been

  2. Gaps in nutritional research among older adults with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presley, Carolyn J; Dotan, Efrat; Soto-Perez-de-Celis, Enrique; Jatoi, Aminah; Mohile, Supriya G; Won, Elizabeth; Alibhai, Shabbir; Kilari, Deepak; Harrison, Robert; Klepin, Heidi D; Wildes, Tanya M; Mustian, Karen; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2016-07-01

    Nutritional issues among older adults with cancer are an understudied area of research despite significant prognostic implications for treatment side effects, cancer-specific mortality, and overall survival. In May of 2015, the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute on Aging co-sponsored a conference focused on future directions in geriatric oncology research. Nutritional research among older adults with cancer was highlighted as a major area of concern as most nutritional cancer research has been conducted among younger adults, with limited evidence to guide the care of nutritional issues among older adults with cancer. Cancer diagnoses among older adults are increasing, and the care of the older adult with cancer is complicated due to multimorbidity, heterogeneous functional status, polypharmacy, deficits in cognitive and mental health, and several other non-cancer factors. Due to this complexity, nutritional needs are dynamic, multifaceted, and dependent on the clinical scenario. This manuscript outlines the proceedings of this conference including knowledge gaps and recommendations for future nutritional research among older adults with cancer. Three common clinical scenarios encountered by oncologists include (1) weight loss during anti-cancer therapy, (2) malnutrition during advanced disease, and (3) obesity during survivorship. In this manuscript, we provide a brief overview of relevant cancer literature within these three areas, knowledge gaps that exist, and recommendations for future research.

  3. RESEARCH CHALLENGES IN SCHOOLS TRAINING OF TEACHERS OF TLAXCALA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darney Mendoza-Morales

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available With the intention of keeping the status of educational research Forming Schools teachers in Tlaxcala, has initiated an diagnosis to define the challenges facing these institutions, mainly the Rural Normal School Lic Benito Juarez. This research is documentary, quantitative and qualitative, is still in process. area systematized information. Statistics of the Educational Services Unit of the State of Tlaxcala, the PEFEN 2011-2012 and Curriculum 2012 and also various policy documents, research data at national level and normal schools were reviewed. The first approach suggests that teacher training institutions face major challenges, which they can no longer delay therefore involves a reorganization of the activities developed by teachers and institutions.

  4. Current Research and Management of Ovarian Cancer in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUMeijiao; SHIWei

    2002-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is ne of the most lethal malignant tumors in China,represents the third most common cancer after cervical cancer and endometrial cancer,and the first leading cause of death from hynaecological cancers.Due to the lack of effective screening strategies and the absence of symptoms in early-stage of disease,over 70% of patients present at an advanced stage.Despite the advances in surgical techniques and conventional chemotheraphy,the prognosis of ovarian cancer has not been improved significantly,and indeed the long-term survival for patients with advanced disease does not exceed 20%.The aetiology of ovarian cancer temains poorly understood.In China,the major focus of research is to clarify the mechanism underlying ovarian cancer,develop more effective life-saving diagnostic and therapeutic measures,and undertake more population-based studies.This article summarizes current research,diagnosis and management of ovarian cancer in China.

  5. Propagating the nephrology research workforce: a Kidney Research National Dialogue training commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohan, Donald E; Parker, Mark G; Furth, Susan L; Hudson, Billy G; Warburton, Karen M; Rys-Sikora, Krystyna E; Rankin, Tracy L

    2014-06-06

    The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases conducted the Kidney Research National Dialogue as an interactive means to formulate and prioritize research goals necessary to address the needs of patients with renal disease. This commentary summarizes the discussion and priorities arising from the training domain of the dialogue and posits three overall strategies to broaden the nephrology research workforce pipeline. The community needs to recruit and provide support for mentors in nephrology, target medical and graduate students earlier in their education for exposure to renal research, and expand the research workforce to include basic scientists from many disciplines as well as under-represented minorities.

  6. A Feasibility Study Related To Inactive Cancer Survivors Compared with Non-Cancer Controls during Aerobic Exercise Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drum, Scott N.; Klika, Riggs J.; Carter, Susan D.; Sprod, Lisa K.; Donath, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Cancer survivors (CA) tend to demonstrate metabolic, cardiac, and ventilatory alterations due to previous chemotherapy and radiation that may impair adaptability following aerobic exercise training. Exercise training adaptations of CA finished with primary treatment compared to non-cancer participants (NC) have not yet been extensively elucidated. Thus, the present study compared physiologic responses of CA versus NC following a low-to-moderate intensity, 8-wk aerobic training program. Thirty-seven previously sedentary participants (CA: n = 14, 12 females; NC: n = 23, 19 females) with no heart or metabolic disease did not differ in age, height, weight, and body mass index (51 ± 2 y, 1.66 ± 0.02 m, 83.8 ± 3.2 kg, and 30.5 ± 1 kg·m-2). Each participant underwent baseline, 3-, 6-, and 8-wk VO2peak treadmill testing using the USAFSAM protocol and walked on a treadmill three times per week at 80-90% of ventilatory threshold (VT) for approximately 40-min·session-1. Variables obtained on the VO2peak tests included: HR at stage 2 (HR@stage2), rating of perceived exertion at stage 2 (RPE@stage2), lactate threshold (LT), ventilatory threshold (VT), salivary cortisol at 30-min post VO2peak test (SC@30-minPost),VO2peak level, time of fatigue (TOF), and maximal heart rate (HRmax). NC had significantly (p exercise capacity during 8 weeks of aerobic training and did not show altered adaptability compared to NC. We suggest prescribing aerobic exercise training at low/moderate intensity and duration initially, with progressive increases in duration and intensity after approximately 8-weeks. If available and supported, we advise clinicians to utilize submaximal threshold concepts obtained from cardiopulmonary exercise testing to prescribe more precise aerobic exercise training parameters. Key points Cancer survivors will most likely begin an exercise program after cancer therapy with a diminished functional capacity whereby baseline cardiopulmonary testing is recommended. By

  7. Research priorities in light of current trends in microsurgical training: revalidation, simulation, cross-training, and standardisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Rebecca Spenser; Madada-Nyakauru, Rudo N; Irri, Renu Anita; Myers, Simon Richard; Ghanem, Ali Mahmoud

    2014-05-01

    Plastic surgery training worldwide has seen a thorough restructuring over the past decade, with the introduction of formal training curricula and work-based assessment tools. Part of this process has been the introduction of revalidation and a greater use of simulation in training delivery. Simulation is an increasingly important tool for educators because it provides a way to reduce risks to both trainees and patients, whilst facilitating improved technical proficiency. Current microsurgery training interventions are often predicated on theories of skill acquisition and development that follow a 'practice makes perfect' model. Given the changing landscape of surgical training and advances in educational theories related to skill development, research is needed to assess the potential benefits of alternative models, particularly cross-training, a model now widely used in non-medical areas with significant benefits. Furthermore, with the proliferation of microsurgery training interventions and therefore diversity in length, cost, content and models used, appropriate standardisation will be an important factor to ensure that courses deliver consistent and effective training that achieves appropriate levels of competency. Key research requirements should be gathered and used in directing further research in these areas to achieve on-going improvement of microsurgery training.

  8. Global health diplomacy training for military medical researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Rebecca; Blazes, David; Bae, Jennifer; Puntambekar, Nisha; Perdue, Christopher L; Fischer, Julie

    2014-04-01

    Given the unprecedented growth of global health initiatives in the past decade, informal diplomacy between technical partners plays an increasingly important role in shaping opportunities and outcomes. This article describes a course developed and executed specifically to equip U.S. military health professionals with core skills in practical diplomacy critical to help them successfully plan and implement public health surveillance, research, and capacity building programs with partner nation governments and organizations. We identified core competencies in practical diplomacy for laboratory and public health researchers, catalogued and evaluated existing training programs, and then developed a pilot course in global health diplomacy for military medical researchers. The pilot course was held in June 2012, and focused on analyzing contemporary issues related to global health diplomacy through the framework of actors, drivers, and policies that affect public health research and capacity-building, beginning at the level of global health governance and cooperation and moving progressively to regional (supranational), national, and institutional perspective. This course represents an approach geared toward meeting the needs specific to U.S. military public health personnel and researchers working in international settings.

  9. Job Opening for Medical Officer in DCP’s Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group (BGCRG), Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP), National Cancer Institute (NCI), has an opening for an experienced Medical Officer. BGCRG focuses on fostering the development and conduct of research on the prevention and early detection of breast cancer, cervix and human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers, endometrial cancers, ovarian cancers, and precursor conditions related to these cancers. Learn more about BGCRG. |

  10. Research on the Effectiveness of Outdoor Management Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Richard J.

    A 6-year study of outdoor-based management training (OMT) programs used traditional evaluation methods and new methods designed specifically for these unique programs. A survey of 1,000 training directors indicated that this type of training was very controversial. The next step was to use traditional training and organizational behavior…

  11. Human Research Program: Long Duration, Exploration-Class Mission Training Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barshi, Immanuel; Dempsey, Donna L.

    2016-01-01

    This is a presentation to the International Training Control Board that oversees astronaut training for ISS. The presentation explains the structure of HRP, the training-related work happening under the different program elements, and discusses in detail the research plan for the Training Risk under SHFHSHFE. The group includes the crew training leads for all the space agencies involved in ISS: Japan, Europe, Russia, Canada, and the US.

  12. Towards meeting the research needs of Australian cancer consumers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saunders Carla

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a growing amount of literature to support the view that active involvement in research by consumers, especially informed and networked consumers, benefits the quality and direction of research itself, the research process and, most importantly, people affected by cancer. Our exploratory project focuses on identifying their priorities and developing a process to assess the research needs of Australian cancer consumers which may be useful beyond the cancer scenario. Methods This project was consumer initiated, developed and implemented, with the assistance of a leading Australian cancer consumer advocacy group, Cancer Voices NSW (CVN. Such direct involvement is unusual and ensures that the priorities identified, and the process itself, are not influenced by other interests, regardless how well-intentioned they may be. The processes established, and data collection via a workshop, followed by a questionnaire to confirm and prioritise findings, and comparison with a similar UK exercise, are detailed in this paper. Results Needs across five topic areas reflecting cancer control domains (prevention and risk; screening and diagnosis; treatment; survivorship; and end of life were identified. Cancer consumers high priority research needs were found to be: earlier diagnosis of metastatic cancers; the extent of use of best practice palliative care guidelines; identifying barriers to cancer risk behaviour change; and environmental, nutrition and lifestyle risk factors for people with cancer. A process for identifying consumers’ research priorities was developed and applied; this may be useful for further investigation in this under-studied area. Conclusion The findings provide a model for developing a consumer derived research agenda in Australia which can be used to inform the strategic direction of cancer research. Consumers have been seeking a workable method to achieve this and have worked in collaboration with a major

  13. Differential network analysis in human cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Ryan; Datta, Somnath; Datta, Susmita

    2014-01-01

    A complex disease like cancer is hardly caused by one gene or one protein singly. It is usually caused by the perturbation of the network formed by several genes or proteins. In the last decade several research teams have attempted to construct interaction maps of genes and proteins either experimentally or reverse engineer interaction maps using computational techniques. These networks were usually created under a certain condition such as an environmental condition, a particular disease, or a specific tissue type. Lately, however, there has been greater emphasis on finding the differential structure of the existing network topology under a novel condition or disease status to elucidate the perturbation in a biological system. In this review/tutorial article we briefly mention some of the research done in this area; we mainly illustrate the computational/statistical methods developed by our team in recent years for differential network analysis using publicly available gene expression data collected from a well known cancer study. This data includes a group of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and a group with acute myeloid leukemia. In particular, we describe the statistical tests to detect the change in the network topology based on connectivity scores which measure the association or interaction between pairs of genes. The tests under various scores are applied to this data set to perform a differential network analysis on gene expression for human leukemia. We believe that, in the future, differential network analysis will be a standard way to view the changes in gene expression and protein expression data globally and these types of tests could be useful in analyzing the complex differential signatures.

  14. Lung Cancer:Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatments & Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Lung Cancer Lung Cancer: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatments & Research Past Issues / Winter 2013 ... lung cancer are given intravenously or by mouth. Lung Cancer Research The large-scale National Lung Screening Trial, ...

  15. Cancer immunoinformatics: a new assistant tool for malignant disease research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Weijia; Zhang Rupeng; Liang Han; Zhang Hui; Li Fangxuan; Yu Jinpu; Li Hui

    2014-01-01

    Objective To introduce the recent developments in cancer immunoinformatics with an emphasis on the latest trends and future direction.Data sources All related articles in this review were searched from PubMed published in English from 1992 to 2013.The search terms were cancer,immunoinformatics,immunological databases,and computational vaccinology.Study selection Original articles and reviews those were related to application of cancer immunoinformatics about tumor basic and clinical research were selected.Results Cancer immunoinformatics has been widely researched and applied in a series of fields of cancer research,including computational tools for cancer,cancer immunological databases,computational vaccinology,and cancer diagnostic workflows.Furthermore,the improvement of its theory and technology brings an enlightening insight into understanding and researching cancer and helps expound more deep and complete mechanisms of tumorigenesis and progression.Conclusion Cancer immunoinformatics provides promising methods and novel strategies for the discovery and development of tumor basic and clinical research.

  16. 100 years of training and development research: What we know and where we should go.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Bradford S; Tannenbaum, Scott I; Ford, J Kevin; Noe, Raymond A; Kraiger, Kurt

    2017-03-01

    Training and development research has a long tradition within applied psychology dating back to the early 1900s. Over the years, not only has interest in the topic grown but there have been dramatic changes in both the science and practice of training and development. In the current article, we examine the evolution of training and development research using articles published in the Journal of Applied Psychology (JAP) as a primary lens to analyze what we have learned and to identify where future research is needed. We begin by reviewing the timeline of training and development research in JAP from 1918 to the present in order to elucidate the critical trends and advances that define each decade. These trends include the emergence of more theory-driven training research, greater consideration of the role of the trainee and training context, examination of learning that occurs outside the classroom, and understanding training's impact across different levels of analysis. We then examine in greater detail the evolution of 4 key research themes: training criteria, trainee characteristics, training design and delivery, and the training context. In each area, we describe how the focus of research has shifted over time and highlight important developments. We conclude by offering several ideas for future training and development research. (PsycINFO Database Record

  17. Rehabilitation in cancer: Training and talking? Effects of physical training versus physical training combined with cognitive-behavioural therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    May-de Groot, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective. As a result of recent advances in diagnosis and treatment, the number of people surviving cancer is increasing. A subgroup of cancer survivors report long-lasting physical and psychological complaints including decreased cardiorespiratory capacity, decreased physical functioning, and decr

  18. Research of inverse mathematical model to high-speed trains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱涛; 肖守讷; 马卫华; 阳光武

    2014-01-01

    Operation safety and stability of the train mainly depend on the interaction between the wheel and rail. Knowledge of wheel/rail contact force is important for vehicle control systems that aim to enhance vehicle stability and passenger safety. Since wheel/rail contact forces of high-speed train are very difficult to measure directly, a new estimation process for wheel/rail contact forces was introduced in this work. Based on the state space equation, dynamic programming methods and the Bellman principle of optimality, the main theoretical derivation of the inversion mathematical model was given. The new method overcomes the weakness of large fluctuations which exist in current inverse techniques. High-speed vehicle was chosen as the research object, accelerations of axle box as input conditions, 10 degrees of freedom vertical vibration model and 17 degrees of freedom lateral vibration model were established, respectively. Under 250 km/h, the vertical and lateral wheel/rail forces were identified. From the time domain and frequency domain, the comparison of the results between inverse and SIMPACK models were given. The results show that the inverse mathematical model has high precision for inversing the wheel/rail contact forces of an operation high-speed vehicle.

  19. The John Milner Nutrition and Cancer Prevention Research Practicum | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Nutritional Science Research Group in the Division of Cancer Prevention at the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health and the Department of Nutrition at the Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center are offering a one-week educational opportunity in Nutrition and Cancer Prevention Research for individuals with a sustained commitment to nutrition and health promotion. |

  20. Research on Methods of Nutrition after Middle and Long Distance Runners Training of Teenagers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study uses the method of literature research, interview, investigation, mathematical statistics and so on, combined with the actual situation in the teaching and training, analyzing the two main factors to affect the adolescent fatigue of muscles and nervous system after the middle distance race training, exploring the methods and measures of the recovery. Through the data access, our country to the adult middle-long-distance athletes training research has a lot of, but for teenage training, especially (youth physical training methods, characteristics and should pay attention to problem research is less.

  1. Integrated research training program of excellence in radiochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapi, Suzanne [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-09-18

    The overall goal of this “Integrated Research Training Program of Excellence in Radiochemistry” is to provide a rich and deep research experience in state-of-the-art radiochemistry and in the fundamentals of radioisotopic labeling and tracer methodology to develop researchers who are capable of meeting the challenges of designing and preparing radiotracers of broad applicability for monitoring and imaging diverse biological systems and environmental processes. This program was based in the Departments of Radiology and Radiation Oncology at Washington University Medical School and the Department of Chemistry at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, and it was initially directed by Professor Michael J. Welch as Principal Investigator. After his passing in 2012, the program was led by Professor Suzanne E. Lapi. Programmatic content and participant progress was overseen by an Internal Advisory Committee of senior investigators consisting of the PIs, Professor Mach from the Department of Radiology at Washington University and Professor John A. Katzenellenbogen of the Department of Chemistry at the University of Illinois. A small External Advisory Committee to give overall program guidance was also constituted of experts in radiolabeled compounds and in their applications in environmental and plant science.

  2. Biography: Dr Iain Frame, director of research, prostate cancer UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, Iain; Maprayil, Sophia

    2014-11-01

    Sophia Maprayil, Commissioning Editor for Expert Review of Anticancer Therapy, talks to Dr Iain Frame, Director of Research for Prostate Cancer UK. Iain is Prostate Cancer UK's first Director of Research, responsible for overseeing the development and implementation of the charity's ambitious new research strategy. He joined Prostate Cancer UK in 2012 from Diabetes UK where he held the post of Research Director for 5 years. Since joining Prostate Cancer UK in 2012 Iain has overseen a dramatic increase in the charity's research spend, from 2 million a year, to 7.5 million a year. Previously Iain worked in research management at the Wellcome Trust and before that as a parasitologist and researcher exploring various aspects of molecular biology of a number of different parasites.

  3. The potential consequences for cancer care and cancer research of Brexit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, Peter; Lawler, Mark; Baird, Richard; Banks, Ian; Johnston, Patrick; Nurse, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Following the UK “Brexit” vote in June 2016, there are many uncertainties and risks for cancer research and cancer care in the UK. These are summarised and the importance of sustained engagement and influence from the cancer community on UK governments is emphasised. PMID:28275394

  4. Bringing global cancer leaders together at the 4th Annual Symposium on Global Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Annual Symposium on Global Cancer Research held in April 2016 was developed with a special focus on innovative and low-cost technologies in global cancer control, and brought inspiring keynote speakers such as John Seffrin, Former CEO of the American Cancer Society, and Tom Bollyky, Senior Fellow for Global Health at the Council on Foreign Relations.

  5. The potential consequences for cancer care and cancer research of Brexit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, Peter; Lawler, Mark; Baird, Richard; Banks, Ian; Johnston, Patrick; Nurse, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Following the UK "Brexit" vote in June 2016, there are many uncertainties and risks for cancer research and cancer care in the UK. These are summarised and the importance of sustained engagement and influence from the cancer community on UK governments is emphasised.

  6. Cancer complementary and alternative medicine research at the US National Cancer Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Libin

    2012-05-01

    The United States National Cancer Institute (NCI) supports complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) research which includes different methods and practices (such as nutrition therapies) and other medical systems (such as Chinese medicine). In recent years, NCI has spent around $120 million each year on various CAM-related research projects on cancer prevention, treatment, symptom/side effect management and epidemiology. The categories of CAM research involved include nutritional therapeutics, pharmacological and biological treatments, mind-body interventions, manipulative and body based methods, alternative medical systems, exercise therapies, spiritual therapies and energy therapies on a range of types of cancer. The NCI Office of Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine (OCCAM) supports various intramural and extramural cancer CAM research projects. Examples of these cancer CAM projects are presented and discussed. In addition, OCCAM also supports international research projects.

  7. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworska, Dagmara; Król, Wojciech; Szliszka, Ewelina

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve the prognosis for patients with advanced stages of the disease.

  8. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Jaworska

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve the prognosis for patients with advanced stages of the disease.

  9. Exercise for Breast Cancer Survivors: Research Evidence and Clinical Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courneya, Kerry S.; Mackey, John R.; McKenzie, Donald C.

    2002-01-01

    Exercise can significantly benefit breast cancer survivors during and after treatment. Moderate intensity aerobic exercise as well as resistance training are important. Psychological health is optimized by enjoyable exercise that develops new skills, incorporates social interaction, and occurs in a stimulating environment. Several conditions…

  10. Enhancing cancer registry data for comparative effectiveness research (CER) project: overview and methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Vivien W; Eheman, Christie R; Johnson, Christopher J; Hernandez, Monique N; Rousseau, David; Styles, Timothy S; West, Dee W; Hsieh, Meichin; Hakenewerth, Anne M; Celaya, Maria O; Rycroft, Randi K; Wike, Jennifer M; Pearson, Melissa; Brockhouse, Judy; Mulvihill, Linda G; Zhang, Kevin B

    2014-01-01

    Following the Institute of Medicine's 2009 report on the national priorities for comparative effectiveness research (CER), funding for support of CER became available in 2009 through the American Recovery and Re-investment Act. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) received funding to enhance the infrastructure of population-based cancer registries and to expand registry data collection to support CER. The CDC established 10 specialized registries within the National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR) to enhance data collection for all cancers and to address targeted CER questions, including the clinical use and prognostic value of specific biomarkers. The project also included a special focus on detailed first course of treatment for cancers of the breast, colon, and rectum, as well as chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) diagnosed in 2011. This paper describes the methodology and the work conducted by the CDC and the NPCR specialized registries in collecting data for the 4 special focused cancers, including the selection of additional data variables, development of data collection tools and software modifications, institutional review board approvals, training, collection of detailed first course of treatment, and quality assurance. It also presents the characteristics of the study population and discusses the strengths and limitations of using population-based cancer registries to support CER as well as the potential future role of population-based cancer registries in assessing the quality of patient care and cancer control.

  11. Safety and efficacy of resistance training in germ cell cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jesper Frank; Jones, L W; Tolver, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Bleomycin–etoposid–cisplatin (BEP) chemotherapy is curative in most patients with disseminated germ cell cancer (GCC) but also associated with toxic actions and dysfunction in non-targeted tissues. We investigated changes in muscle function during BEP and the safety...... and efficacy of resistance training to modulate these changes. Methods: Thirty GCC patients were randomly assigned to resistance training (resistance training group (INT), n=15) or usual care (CON, n=15) during 9 weeks of BEP therapy. Resistance training consisted of thrice weekly sessions of four exercises, 3...... changes compared with the INT-group (PBEP was associated with significant reduction in lean mass and strength and trends toward unfavourable changes in muscle fibre size and phenotype composition. Resistance training was safe and attenuated dysfunction in selected endpoints, but BEP...

  12. Educating Low-SES and LEP Survivors About Breast Cancer Research: Pilot Test of the Health Research Engagement Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, Alyssa; Burke, Nancy J.; Cohen, Elly; Caprio, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The Health Research Engagement Intervention (HREI) aims to reduce information and access disparities for breast cancer research opportunities among low-socioeconomic status (SES) and limited English proficient (LEP) breast cancer survivors by providing neutral, non-trial-specific information about health research via a trusted patient navigator. Qualitative methods in the context of a community-based participatory research design were used to iteratively design the HREI in collaboration with community-based care navigators from a trusted community organization, Shanti Project, and to locate appropriate research studies in collaboration with a web-based trial-matching service, BreastCancerTrials.org (BCT). Navigators were first trained in clinical trials and health research and then to deliver the HREI, providing feedback that was incorporated into both the HREI design and BCT's interface. Our intervention pilot with low SES and LEP survivors (n=12) demonstrated interest in learning about “health research.” All 12 participants opted to obtain more information when offered the opportunity. Post-intervention questionnaires showed that three of 11 (27 %) participants independently pursued additional information about research opportunities either online or by phone in the week following the intervention. Post-intervention navigator questionnaires indicated that navigators could confidently and efficiently deliver the intervention. LEP patients who pursued information independently faced language barriers. The HREI is a promising and potentially scalable intervention to increase access to neutral information about breast cancer research opportunities for low-SES and LEP individuals. However, in order for it to be effective, systems barriers to participation such as language accessibility at sources of health research information must be addressed. PMID:24744119

  13. Educating low-SES and LEP survivors about breast cancer research: pilot test of the Health Research Engagement Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, Alyssa; Burke, Nancy J; Cohen, Elly; Caprio, Maria; Joseph, Galen

    2014-12-01

    The Health Research Engagement Intervention (HREI) aims to reduce information and access disparities for breast cancer research opportunities among low-socioeconomic status (SES) and limited English proficient (LEP) breast cancer survivors by providing neutral, non-trial-specific information about health research via a trusted patient navigator. Qualitative methods in the context of a community-based participatory research design were used to iteratively design the HREI in collaboration with community-based care navigators from a trusted community organization, Shanti Project, and to locate appropriate research studies in collaboration with a web-based trial-matching service, BreastCancerTrials.org (BCT). Navigators were first trained in clinical trials and health research and then to deliver the HREI, providing feedback that was incorporated into both the HREI design and BCT's interface. Our intervention pilot with low SES and LEP survivors (n = 12) demonstrated interest in learning about "health research." All 12 participants opted to obtain more information when offered the opportunity. Post-intervention questionnaires showed that three of 11 (27 %) participants independently pursued additional information about research opportunities either online or by phone in the week following the intervention. Post-intervention navigator questionnaires indicated that navigators could confidently and efficiently deliver the intervention. LEP patients who pursued information independently faced language barriers. The HREI is a promising and potentially scalable intervention to increase access to neutral information about breast cancer research opportunities for low-SES and LEP individuals. However, in order for it to be effective, systems barriers to participation such as language accessibility at sources of health research information must be addressed.

  14. Situated learning in translation research training: academic research as a reflection of practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risku, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Situated learning has become a dominant goal in the translation classroom: translation didactics is being developed in a learner-, situation- and experience-based direction, following constructivist and participatory teaching philosophies. However, the explicit use of situated approaches has, so far, not been the centre of attention in translation theory teaching and research training. As a consequence, translation theory often remains unconnected to the skills learned and topics tackled in language-specific translation teaching and the challenges experienced in real-life translation practice. This article reports on the results of an exploratory action research project into the teaching of academic research skills in translation studies at Master’s level. The goal of the project is to develop and test possibilities for employing situated learning in translation research training. The situatedness perspective has a double relevance for the teaching project: the students are involved in an authentic, ongoing research project, and the object of the research project itself deals with authentic translation processes at the workplace. Thus, the project has the potential to improve the expertise of the students as both researchers and reflective practitioners. PMID:27499805

  15. Situated learning in translation research training: academic research as a reflection of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risku, Hanna

    2016-01-02

    Situated learning has become a dominant goal in the translation classroom: translation didactics is being developed in a learner-, situation- and experience-based direction, following constructivist and participatory teaching philosophies. However, the explicit use of situated approaches has, so far, not been the centre of attention in translation theory teaching and research training. As a consequence, translation theory often remains unconnected to the skills learned and topics tackled in language-specific translation teaching and the challenges experienced in real-life translation practice. This article reports on the results of an exploratory action research project into the teaching of academic research skills in translation studies at Master's level. The goal of the project is to develop and test possibilities for employing situated learning in translation research training. The situatedness perspective has a double relevance for the teaching project: the students are involved in an authentic, ongoing research project, and the object of the research project itself deals with authentic translation processes at the workplace. Thus, the project has the potential to improve the expertise of the students as both researchers and reflective practitioners.

  16. Employee Training and Development in Nigerian Organisaitons: Some Observations and Agenda for Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Obisi , Ph.D

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The ultimate aim of any training program is to add value and once a training program cannot add value, it should be reworked or altogether cancelled. Without training, it will be very difficult to acquire skills and without skills organizations will not achieve its objectives through people. Some organizations see training as an expensive venture and may put embargo on training and utilize the money for other projects in the organization. Organizations must encourage learning organizations through its serious approach to training and development. A leadership organization is one which continuously enhances the skills of its entireworkforce. Organizations should show in words and indeed its resolve to place high emphasis on training by having a training philosophy, identifying training needs, training objectives, training administration and also evaluating training needs. It is discovered that organizations show poor attitude to training administration by not preparing and equipping their trainees before, during and after a training program. More importantly, research efforts should be devoted to identifying missing gaps in the reviewed materials. Priority would be given to empirical analysis of the significance of identifying specific and appropriate needs before venturing into training and the reason why training fails.

  17. Research on cancer diagnosis in Malaysia: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looi, L M; Zubaidah, Z; Cheah, P L; Cheong, S K; Gudum, H R; Iekhsan, O; Ikram, S I; Jamal, R; Mak, J W; Othman, N H; Puteri, J N; Rosline, H; Sabariah, A R; Seow, H F; Sharifah, N A

    2004-06-01

    Cancer is a major morbidity and mortality concern in Malaysia. Based on National Cancer Registry data, the Malaysian population is estimated to bear a cancer burden of about 40,000 new cases per year, and a cumulative lifetime risk of about 1:4. Cancer research in Malaysia has to consider needs relevant to our population, and resources constraints. Hence, funding bodies prioritise cancers of high prevalence, unique to our community and posing specific clinical problems. Cancer diagnosis is crucial to cancer management. While cancer diagnosis research largely aims at improvements in diagnostic information towards more appropriate therapy, it also impacts upon policy development and other areas of cancer management. The scope of cancer diagnosis upon which this paper is based, and their possible impact on other R&D areas, has been broadly categorized into: (1) identification of aetiological agents and their linkages to the development of precancer and cancer (impact on policy development, cancer prevention and treatment), (2) cancer biology and pathogenesis (impact on cancer prevention, treatment strategies and product development), (3) improvements in accuracy, sensitivity and specificity in cancer detection, monitoring and classification (impact on technology development) and (4) prognostic and predictive parameters (impact on treatment strategies). This paper is based on data collected by the Working Group on Cancer Diagnosis Research for the First National Conference on Cancer Research Coordination in April 2004. Data was collated from the databases of Institutions/Universities where the authors are employed, the Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation (MOSTI) and targeted survey feedback from key cancer researchers. Under the 7th Malaysia Plan, 76 cancer projects were funded through the Intensified Research in Priority Areas (IRPA) scheme of MOSTI, amounting to almost RM15 million of grant money. 47(61.8%) of these projects were substantially in cancer

  18. Special Training Project in Research in Music Education (March 11-14, 1968). Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, James C.; Petzold, Robert G.

    A 4-day training project for 51 music education professors was designed to increase their orientation toward systematic research, to improve their competence to train doctoral candidates as systematic researchers, and to improve their own competency in conducting research. Opportunities for small-group activities were interspersed with large-group…

  19. Research Training Needs of Scientist-Practitioners: Implications for Counselor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Christina Hamme; Hall, Sean B.; Buser, Juleen K.

    2016-01-01

    Counselors (N = 911) reported the research skills needed for practice and subsequent research training needs. Findings indicate that counselors have a high need for research skills at work, but training needs differ significantly by counselor type. Recommendations include increasing emphasis on single-case design, survey design, and widely…

  20. Cancer Research Repository for Individuals With Cancer Diagnosis, High Risk Individuals, and Individuals With No History of Cancer (Control)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-14

    Pancreatic Cancer; Thyroid Cancer; Lung Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Thymus Cancer; Colon Cancer; Rectal Cancer; GIST; Anal Cancer; Bile Duct Cancer; Duodenal Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Liver Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer; Peritoneal Surface Malignancies; Familial Adenomatous Polyposis; Lynch Syndrome; Bladder Cancer; Kidney Cancer; Penile Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Testicular Cancer; Ureter Cancer; Urethral Cancer; Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Laryngeal Cancer; Lip Cancer; Oral Cavity Cancer; Nasopharyngeal Cancer; Oropharyngeal Cancer; Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Nasal Cavity Cancer; Salivary Gland Cancer; Skin Cancer; CNS Tumor; CNS Cancer; Mesothelioma; Breastcancer; Leukemia; Melanoma; Sarcoma; Unknown Primary Tumor; Multiple Myeloma; Ovarian Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Vaginal Cancer

  1. Towards discovery-driven translational research in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    Discovery-driven translational research in breast cancer is moving steadily from the study of cell lines to the analysis of clinically relevant samples that, together with the ever increasing number of novel and powerful technologies available within genomics, proteomics and functional genomics......, promise to have a major impact on the way breast cancer will be diagnosed, treated and monitored in the future. Here we present a brief report on long-term ongoing strategies at the Danish Centre for Translational Breast Cancer Research to search for markers for early detection and targets for therapeutic...... biology approach to fight breast cancer....

  2. [The applications and advantages of Drosophila melanogaster in cancer research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Guitao; Lu, Jianjun; Qu, Zhe; Lin, Zhi; Zhang, Di; Yang, Yanwei; Li, Bo

    2014-01-01

    The common fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has been used to study human disease as a model organism for many years. Many basic biological, physiological, and neurological properties are conserved between mammals and fly. Moreover, Drosophila melanogaster has its unique advantage as a model organism. Recent studies showed that the high level of signaling pathway conservation in tumorigenesis between fly and human and its feasible genetic operation make fly an effective model for oncology research. Numerous research findings showed Drosophila melanogaster was an ideal model for studying the molecular mechanisms of tumorigenesis, invasion and metastasis. This review mainly focuses on the advantages of Drosophila melanogaster in cancer research, established models used for the research of specific cancers and prospective research direction of oncology. It is hoped that this paper can provide insight for cancer research and development of anti-cancer drugs.

  3. The development of a TED-Ed online resident research training program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. Moreau

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pediatric health research is important for improving the health and well-being of children and their families. To foster the development of physicians’ research competencies, it is vital to integrate practical and context-specific research training into residency programs. Purpose: To describe the development of a resident research training program at one tertiary care pediatric academic health sciences center in Ontario, Canada. Methods: We surveyed residents and pediatricians/research staff to establish the need and content for a resident research training program. Results: Residents and resident research supervisors agreed or strongly agreed that research training is important for residents. However, few residents and supervisors believed that their academic health sciences center provided adequate training and resources to support resident research. As such, an online resident research training program was established. Residents and supervisors agreed that the program should focus on the following topics: 1 critically evaluating research literature, 2 writing a research proposal, 3 submitting an application for research funding, and 4 writing a manuscript. Discussion: This highly accessible, context-specific, and inexpensive online program model may be of interest and benefit to other residency programs as a means to enhance residents’ scholarly roles. A formal evaluation of the research training program is now underway.

  4. Training: Who Needs It? Research Report 1995. Key Issues for Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotel and Catering Training Co., London (England).

    Aimed at all those involved in the supply of training and vocational education for the hospitality industry, this report summarizes findings of the research report, "Training Who Needs It?" It draws out and explores in more detail key issues relating to the provision of training, support, and related initiatives for the industry. Section…

  5. Effects of cancer rehabilitation on problem-solving, anxiety and depression : A RCT comparing physical and cognitive-behavioural training versus physical training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korstjens, Irene; Mesters, Ilse; May, Anne M.; van Weert, Ellen; van den Hout, Johanna H. C.; Ros, Wynand; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette E. H. M.; van der Schans, Cees P.; van den Borne, Bart

    2011-01-01

    We tested the effects on problem-solving, anxiety and depression of 12-week group-based self-management cancer rehabilitation, combining comprehensive physical training (PT) and cognitive-behavioural problem-solving training (CBT), compared with PT. We expected that PT + CBT would outperform PT in i

  6. Ethical considerations in clinical training, care and research in psychopharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strous, Rael D

    2011-04-01

    Psychopharmacology is a powerful tool in psychiatry; however, it is one that demands responsibility in order to deal with the ethical complexities that accompany advances in the field. It is important that questions are asked and that ethical mindfulness and sensitivity are developed along with clinical skills. In order to cultivate and deepen ethical awareness and subsequently solve issues in optimal fashion, investment should be made in the development of an ethical decision-making process as well as in education in the ethics of psychopharmacology to trainees in the field at all stages of their educational development. A clear approach to identifying ethical problems, engaging various ethical concepts in considering solutions and then applying these principles in problem resolution is demanded. An openness in identifying and exploring issues has become crucial to the future development and maturation of psychopharmacologists, both research and clinical. Consideration must be given to the social implications of psychopharmacological practice, with the best interests of patients always paramount. From both a research and clinical perspective, psychopharmacology has to be practised with fairness, sensitivity and ethical relevance to all. While ethical issues related to psychopharmacological practice are varied and plentiful, this review focuses on advances in technology and biological sciences, personal integrity, special populations, and education and training.

  7. Effectiveness of Teach-Back Self-Management Training Program on Happiness of Breast Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadidarrehsima, Sudabeh; Rahnama, Mozhgan; Afshari, Mahdi; Asadi Bidmeshki, Elahe

    2016-10-01

    Self-management training is one of the ways to empower patients to cope with disease. The aim of this before-and-after quasi-experimental study was to determine effects of a teach-back self-management training method on breast cancer patient happiness. Fifty breast cancer patients who visited the Park-e Neshat Limited Surgery Clinic in Kerman, Iran were randomly divided into intervention and control groups after convenience sampling and checking for inclusion eligibility. Data were collected using a demographic questionnaire and the Oxford Happiness Inventory before and after teach-back training and analyzed using SPSS 23. Findings showed no significant difference between mean happiness scores in the two groups before the intervention. However, after the intervention, the mean happiness score in the intervention group increased from 37.2 to 62.9, while it decreased from 41.4 to 29.8 in the control group. These changes were statistically significant (p<0.001). Even after controlling for the effect of confounding factors such as residence location and history of cancer education, the observed differences between the groups were statistically significant (p<0.001). A teach-back self-management training program can increase happiness levels in breast cancer patients. Therefore, the use of this method is recommended to improve self-management and increase happiness.

  8. Next generation distributed computing for cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Pankaj; Owzar, Kouros

    2014-01-01

    Advances in next generation sequencing (NGS) and mass spectrometry (MS) technologies have provided many new opportunities and angles for extending the scope of translational cancer research while creating tremendous challenges in data management and analysis. The resulting informatics challenge is invariably not amenable to the use of traditional computing models. Recent advances in scalable computing and associated infrastructure, particularly distributed computing for Big Data, can provide solutions for addressing these challenges. In this review, the next generation of distributed computing technologies that can address these informatics problems is described from the perspective of three key components of a computational platform, namely computing, data storage and management, and networking. A broad overview of scalable computing is provided to set the context for a detailed description of Hadoop, a technology that is being rapidly adopted for large-scale distributed computing. A proof-of-concept Hadoop cluster, set up for performance benchmarking of NGS read alignment, is described as an example of how to work with Hadoop. Finally, Hadoop is compared with a number of other current technologies for distributed computing.

  9. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, fourteen topics were selected as major research advances in gynecologic oncology. For ovarian cancer, high-level evidence for annual screening with multimodal strategy which could reduce ovarian cancer deaths was reported. The best preventive strategies with current status of evidence level were also summarized. Final report of chemotherapy or upfront surgery (CHORUS) trial of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in advanced stage ovarian cancer and individualized therapy based on gene characteristics followed. There was no sign of abating in great interest in immunotherapy as well as targeted therapies in various gynecologic cancers. The fifth Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference which was held in November 7–9 in Tokyo was briefly introduced. For cervical cancer, update of human papillomavirus vaccines regarding two-dose regimen, 9-valent vaccine, and therapeutic vaccine was reviewed. For corpus cancer, the safety concern of power morcellation in presumed fibroids was explored again with regard to age and prevalence of corpus malignancy. Hormone therapy and endometrial cancer risk, trabectedin as an option for leiomyosarcoma, endometrial cancer and Lynch syndrome, and the radiation therapy guidelines were also discussed. In addition, adjuvant therapy in vulvar cancer and the updated of targeted therapy in gynecologic cancer were addressed. For breast cancer, palbociclib in hormone-receptor-positive advanced disease, oncotype DX Recurrence Score in low-risk patients, regional nodal irradiation to internal mammary, supraclavicular, and axillary lymph nodes, and cavity shave margins were summarized as the last topics covered in this review. PMID:27775259

  10. [Research progression of translational medicine in gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Maoran; Zhao, Gang; Zhu, Chunchao

    2014-02-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors which is a great threat to human health. In recent years, the reform of surgical mordalities and the optimization of radiation and chemotherapy is still far from reducing morbidity and mortality of gastric cancer. As a new research pattern, translational medicine has emerged in various clinical subjects, which leads to remarkable effects. In this paper, the definition and development of translational medicine, molecular markers and drug treatment of gastric cancer will be discussed and the feasibility of translational medicine in the treatment of gastric cancer will be explained. In our opinion, the intervention of translational medicine could change the current situation that scientific researches is severely disconnected with clinical practice and increase the detection rate of gastric cancer and the effective rate of adjuvant therapy after surgery to improve the prognosis of patients with gastric cancer.

  11. The Changing Landscape of Lung Cancer Research and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Along with the Lung Cancer Social Media (#LCSM) community, the National Cancer Institute will be co-hosting a lively and interactive Google Hangout on Air about the changing landscape of lung cancer research and treatment. During the chat, viewers will have the opportunity to pose questions to a panel of lung cancer experts including NCI's Dr. Shakun Malik, the head of thoracic oncology therapeutics, Roy S. Herbst, MD, PhD, Chief of Medical Oncology, Yale Cancer Center and Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale-New Haven and David Tom Cooke MD FACS, Head, Section of General Thoracic Surgery University of California, Davis. You can also learn more and follow along on the #LCSM Chat page. The chat will be moderated by lung cancer advocate and #LCSM co-founder, Janet Freeman-Daily. To ask questions of our experts, simply use the #LCSM hashtag during the chat.

  12. Biomedical text mining and its applications in cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fei; Patumcharoenpol, Preecha; Zhang, Cheng; Yang, Yang; Chan, Jonathan; Meechai, Asawin; Vongsangnak, Wanwipa; Shen, Bairong

    2013-04-01

    Cancer is a malignant disease that has caused millions of human deaths. Its study has a long history of well over 100years. There have been an enormous number of publications on cancer research. This integrated but unstructured biomedical text is of great value for cancer diagnostics, treatment, and prevention. The immense body and rapid growth of biomedical text on cancer has led to the appearance of a large number of text mining techniques aimed at extracting novel knowledge from scientific text. Biomedical text mining on cancer research is computationally automatic and high-throughput in nature. However, it is error-prone due to the complexity of natural language processing. In this review, we introduce the basic concepts underlying text mining and examine some frequently used algorithms, tools, and data sets, as well as assessing how much these algorithms have been utilized. We then discuss the current state-of-the-art text mining applications in cancer research and we also provide some resources for cancer text mining. With the development of systems biology, researchers tend to understand complex biomedical systems from a systems biology viewpoint. Thus, the full utilization of text mining to facilitate cancer systems biology research is fast becoming a major concern. To address this issue, we describe the general workflow of text mining in cancer systems biology and each phase of the workflow. We hope that this review can (i) provide a useful overview of the current work of this field; (ii) help researchers to choose text mining tools and datasets; and (iii) highlight how to apply text mining to assist cancer systems biology research.

  13. The Future of Prostate Cancer Research and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    On January 12, 2017 prostate cancer experts William Dahut, M.D. of the National Cancer Institute and Dr. Heather Cheng, M.D. of the University of Washington had a vibrant discussion about current and future research areas and treatment options for prostate cancer. The panel was moderated by Ana Fadich, MPH, CHES Vice President at Men’s Health of the Men's Health Network.

  14. Supportive and Palliative Care Research | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supportive and palliative care research includes studies to prevent or treat the acute and chronic symptoms and morbidities related to cancer and its treatment, and to examine the effects of cancer and its treatment on quality of life and psychosocial issues and treatment strategies at the end of life. Active Projects can range from caregiver issues to geriatrics, physical functioning to cognitive dysfunction. | Examining symptoms and morbidities related to cancer, its treatment, quality of life and end of life.

  15. International Partnerships for Clinical Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    CGH co-sponsors the 2015 International Symposium on Cancer Clinical Trials and related meetings held in partnership with the Japanese National Cancer Center (JNCC) and Embassies of France, Korea, United Kingdom (UK), and United States (US) in Tokyo on May 14 - 15, 2015.

  16. Graphic Evolution Witness the Development of Lung Cancer Translational Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao ZHANG

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer treatment has altered from conventional chemotherapy to targeted treatment, which now has been turned to the immunotherapy. Translational research has played an irreplaceable role during this progression which graphic evolution has witnessed. The evolution has gone through forest plot, KM-curve, waterfall plot, spider plot and timeline-area, showing us the refining concept and gradual process of lung cancer treatment undergoing from community towards individual. Even though the latest immunotherapy is getting increasingly hot, the result isn’t quite expected. Meanwhile, the limitations of conventional treatment still exist which require further research. This article will primarily illustrate the development of translational research of lung cancer via the aspect of curve evolution and analysis some abortive clinical trials in lung cancer surgery for inspiring the next graphic style and lung cancer treatment.

  17. Collaborative Undergraduate HBCU Student Summer Prostate Cancer Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Educational Training Fitness Interventions Nutritional Interventions Spiritual Interventions Infrastructure Changes Policy Changes In collaboration...Major Thomas Hundley Fitness Trainer Consultant Jeannette Jordan, RD, CDE Nutrition and Health Educator Consultant Dr. James Stukes Education Core...patient Procedure 0 Digestive Vomiting 0.2 Dysphagia 0.2 Respiratory System Pneumonia 0.8 Dyspnea 0.6 Apnea 0 CVS Hypotension 0.2 Heart arrest 0

  18. [Recommendations for cancer prevention of World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF): situational analysis for Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crovetto, Mirta; Uauy, Ricardo

    2013-05-01

    The main diet-related cancers include colorectal, lung, breast in (postmenopausal) women, stomach, esophagus, prostate and pancreas. After tobacco, obesity is the leading cause of cancer; it accounts for one third of all cancers. Cancer is associated with high total body fat, abdominal fat and weight gain in adult life. These are all potentially modifiable risk factors. Consumption of a "healthy diet" and living an "active life" can significantly reduce the risk of cancer. The aim of this study was to analyze the recommendations published by the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) and American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) for the prevention of cancer in 2007. We compared the recommendations of Food, Nutrition and Physical Activity and the Prevention of Cancer: a global perspective", with the national situation in Chile, analyzing the national report on the prevalence of risk factors. Our main finding was that the pattern of consumption and lifestyles differ markedly from the WCRF recommendations: we observed an over consumption of sugary drinks and high intake of processed foods high in sodium and total fat and low consumption of legumes, vegetables, fruits high in antioxidants and fiber that protect from cancer. Chile has an increased cancer prevalence which is associated with poor quality diets, rising mean body mass index and a sedentary behavior. We recommend the strengthening programs to promote healthy diets and active living, in order to reduce cancer risk.

  19. MO-DE-BRA-04: The CREATE Medical Physics Research Training Network: Training of New Generation Innovators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seuntjens, J; Collins, L; Devic, S; El Naqa, I; Nadeau, J; Reader, A [McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Beaulieu, L; Despres, P [Centre Hospitalier Univ de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Pike, B [University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Over the past century, physicists have played a major role in transforming scientific discovery into everyday clinical applications. However, with the increasingly stringent requirements to regulate medical physics as a health profession, the role of physicists as scientists and innovators has become at serious risk of erosion. These challenges trigger the need for a new, revolutionized training program at the graduate level that respects scientific rigor, attention for medical physics-relevant developments in basic sciences, innovation and entrepreneurship. Methods: A grant proposal was funded by the Collaborative REsearch and Training Experience program (CREATE) of the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada. This enabled the creation of the Medical Physics Research Training Network (MPRTN) around two CAMPEP-accredited medical physics programs. Members of the network consist of medical device companies, government (research and regulatory) and academia. The MPRTN/CREATE program proposes a curriculum with three main themes: (1) radiation physics, (2) imaging & image processing and (3) radiation response, outcomes and modeling. Results: The MPRTN was created mid 2013 (mprtn.com) and features (1) four new basic Ph.D. courses; (2) industry participation in research projects; (3) formal job-readiness training with involvement of guest faculty from academia, government and industry. MPRTN activities since 2013 include 22 conferences; 7 workshops and 4 exchange travels. Three patents were filed or issued, nine awards/best papers were won. Fifteen journal publications were accepted/published, 102 conference abstracts. There are now 13 industry partners. Conclusion: A medical physics research training network has been set up with the goal to harness graduate student’s job-readiness for industry, government and academia in addition to the conventional clinical role. Two years after inception, significant successes have been booked

  20. NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) is a national network of cancer care investigators, providers, academia, and other organizations that care for diverse populations in health systems. View the list of publications from NCORP. | Clinical Trials network of cancer care professionals who care for diverse populations across the U.S.

  1. Biospecimen Core Resource - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this notice is to notify the community that the National Cancer Institute's (NCI’s) Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR) is seeking sources to establish a Biospecimen Core Resource (BCR), capable of receiving, qualifying, processing, and distributing annotated biospecimens.

  2. Does cancer research focus on areas of importance to patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorcraft, Sing Yu; Sangha, Amrit; Peckitt, Clare; Sanchez, Rodrigo; Lee, Martin; Pattison, Natalie; Wiseman, Theresa

    2016-01-01

    The majority of research ideas are proposed by clinicians or scientists and little is currently known about which areas of research patients feel are important. We performed a 4 week pilot patient survey at the Royal Marsden (a specialist cancer centre) to investigate patients' views on priorities for cancer research. A total of 780 patients completed the survey and the top research priorities were identified as: detection and prevention of cancer, scientific understanding, curative treatment and personalised treatment. The top research priorities were remarkably consistent across age, gender and a variety of tumour types. We believe that patients' views should be considered alongside those of clinicians and researchers when devising research proposals and strategies.

  3. Sniffer dogs as part of a bimodal bionic research approach to develop a lung cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boedeker, Enole; Friedel, Godehard; Walles, Thorsten

    2012-05-01

    Lung cancer (LC) continues to represent a heavy burden for health care systems worldwide. Epidemiological studies predict that its role will increase in the near future. While patient prognosis is strongly associated with tumour stage and early detection of disease, no screening test exists so far. It has been suggested that electronic sensor devices, commonly referred to as 'electronic noses', may be applicable to identify cancer-specific volatile organic compounds in the breath of patients and therefore may represent promising screening technologies. However, three decades of research did not bring forward a clinically applicable device. Here, we propose a new research approach by involving specially trained sniffer dogs into research strategies by making use of their ability to identify LC in the breath sample of patients.

  4. Shoulder Mobility, Muscular Strength, and Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Survivors with and without Tai Chi Qigong Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley S. M. Fong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To compare the shoulder mobility, muscular strength, and quality of life (QOL among breast cancer survivors with and without Tai Chi (TC Qigong training to those of healthy individuals and to explore the associations between shoulder impairments and QOL in breast cancer survivors with regular TC Qigong training. Methods. Eleven breast cancer survivors with regular TC Qigong training, 12 sedentary breast cancer survivors, and 16 healthy participants completed the study. Shoulder mobility and rotator muscle strength were assessed by goniometry and isokinetic dynamometer, respectively. QOL was assessed using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast (FACT-B questionnaire. Results. Goniometric measurements of the active range of motion in the flexion, abduction, and hand-behind-the-back directions were similar among the three groups. The TC Qigong-trained breast cancer survivors had significantly higher isokinetic peak torques of the shoulder rotator muscles (at than untrained survivors, and their isokinetic shoulder muscular strength reached the level of healthy individuals. Greater shoulder muscular strength was significantly associated with better functional wellbeing in breast cancer survivors with TC Qigong training. However, no significant between-group difference was found in FACT-B total scores. Conclusions. TC Qigong training might improve shoulder muscular strength and functional wellbeing in breast cancer survivors.

  5. Shoulder Mobility, Muscular Strength, and Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Survivors with and without Tai Chi Qigong Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Shirley S M; Ng, Shamay S M; Luk, W S; Chung, Joanne W Y; Chung, Louisa M Y; Tsang, William W N; Chow, Lina P Y

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To compare the shoulder mobility, muscular strength, and quality of life (QOL) among breast cancer survivors with and without Tai Chi (TC) Qigong training to those of healthy individuals and to explore the associations between shoulder impairments and QOL in breast cancer survivors with regular TC Qigong training. Methods. Eleven breast cancer survivors with regular TC Qigong training, 12 sedentary breast cancer survivors, and 16 healthy participants completed the study. Shoulder mobility and rotator muscle strength were assessed by goniometry and isokinetic dynamometer, respectively. QOL was assessed using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast (FACT-B) questionnaire. Results. Goniometric measurements of the active range of motion in the flexion, abduction, and hand-behind-the-back directions were similar among the three groups. The TC Qigong-trained breast cancer survivors had significantly higher isokinetic peak torques of the shoulder rotator muscles (at 180°/s) than untrained survivors, and their isokinetic shoulder muscular strength reached the level of healthy individuals. Greater shoulder muscular strength was significantly associated with better functional wellbeing in breast cancer survivors with TC Qigong training. However, no significant between-group difference was found in FACT-B total scores. Conclusions. TC Qigong training might improve shoulder muscular strength and functional wellbeing in breast cancer survivors.

  6. Stem cell concepts renew cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, John E

    2008-12-15

    Although uncontrolled proliferation is a distinguishing property of a tumor as a whole, the individual cells that make up the tumor exhibit considerable variation in many properties, including morphology, proliferation kinetics, and the ability to initiate tumor growth in transplant assays. Understanding the molecular and cellular basis of this heterogeneity has important implications in the design of therapeutic strategies. The mechanistic basis of tumor heterogeneity has been uncertain; however, there is now strong evidence that cancer is a cellular hierarchy with cancer stem cells at the apex. This review provides a historical overview of the influence of hematology on the development of stem cell concepts and their linkage to cancer.

  7. Master's Training as a Part of Young Researcher's Professional Development: British and Ukrainian Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidyuk, Natalya

    2014-01-01

    The problem of the professional development of young researchers in terms of Master's training has been analyzed. The analysis of the literature references, documental and other sources gave grounds to state that the basic principle of Master's professional training is a research-oriented paradigm. The necessity of using the innovative ideas of…

  8. Training for Innovation: Capacity-Building in Agricultural Research in Post-War Sierra Leone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gboku, Matthew L. S.; Bebeley, Jenneh F.

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines how the Sierra Leone Agricultural Research Institute (SLARI) used training and development to build capacity for innovation in agricultural research following the country's civil war which ended in 2002. The Institute's training for innovation addressed different agricultural product value chains (APVCs) within the framework of…

  9. Health Science Students' Perception about Research Training Programs Offered in Saudi Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kuwaiti, Ahmed; Subbarayalu, Arun Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to examine the perceptions of students of health sciences on research training programs offered at Saudi universities. Design/methodology/approach: A cross-sectional survey design was adopted to capture the perceptions of health science students about research training programs offered at selected Saudi…

  10. Research Progress of Exosomes in Lung Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbo ZOU

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available As the leading cause of morbidity and cancer related-death worldwide, lung cancer has a serious threat to human health. Exosomes are nanoscale lipid membrane vesicles derived from multivesicles, which containing active biomolecules including proteins, lipids, nucleic acids and etc. Exosomes play important roles in lung cancer initiation and progression by promoting the formation of tumor microenvironment, enhancing tumor invasive and metastasis capability, leading to immunosuppression and resistance to chemoradiotherapy, and also have the application value in early diagnosis and treatment. This review summarizes the research progress of exosomes in tumor initiation and progression, and its roles in diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer.

  11. Operations Research for Freight Train Routing and Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrod, Steven; Gorman, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the service design activities that plan and implement the rail freight operating plan. Elements of strategic service design include the setting of train frequency, the routing of cars among trains, and the consolidation of cars, called blocking. At the operational level, tr...

  12. Breast Cancer Translational Research Center of Excellence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    the standard of care for treating breast diseases and breast cancer. This approach integrates prevention , screening, diagnosis, treatment and...follow a healthy lifestyle ?” (submitted for publication clearance April 2015). Ellsworth RE, Mamula KA, Costantino NS, Deyarmin B, Kostyniak PJ, Chi...disorders. The project will continue utilizing a multidisciplinary approach as the standard of care for treating breast diseases and breast cancer. This

  13. Building an Inclusive Research Team: The Importance of Team Building and Skills Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strnadová, Iva; Cumming, Therese M.; Knox, Marie; Parmenter, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Background: Inclusive research teams typically describe their experiences and analyse the type of involvement of researchers with disability, but the process of building research teams and the need for research training still remain underexplored in the literature. Materials and Method: Four researchers with intellectual disabilities and four…

  14. Training Grant in Epidemiology and Prevention of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-01

    at first birth 25-29 years/!-4 children, age at first immunoassay. The laboratory of Dr. Christopher Longcope at the University of birth Ž->30 years/l...postmenopausal women. J NatI Cancer Inst 1995:87:190-7. (2) Colditz GA, Hankinson SE, Hunter DJ, Willett WC, Manson JE, Stampfer (25) Zeleniuch-Jacquotte...Hankinson SE, Willett WC, Manson JE, Hunter DJ, Colditz GA, Stampfer (30) Cauley JA, Lucas FL, Kuller LH, Stone K, Browner W, Cummings SR. MJ, et al. Alcohol

  15. Training Math and Science Teacher-Researchers in a Collaborative Research Environment: Implications for Math and Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyei-Blankson, Lydia

    2014-01-01

    In this mixed-methods study, the effect of training teacher-researchers in a collaborative research environment is examined for a cohort of teachers enrolled in a Math and Science Partnership (MSP) master's degree program. The teachers describe changes in their research views and in their application of research in practice, and detail the…

  16. Big Data-Led Cancer Research, Application, and Insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, James A L; Ni Chonghaile, Triona; Matchett, Kyle B; Lynam-Lennon, Niamh; Kiely, Patrick A

    2016-11-01

    Insights distilled from integrating multiple big-data or "omic" datasets have revealed functional hierarchies of molecular networks driving tumorigenesis and modifiers of treatment response. Identifying these novel key regulatory and dysregulated elements is now informing personalized medicine. Crucially, although there are many advantages to this approach, there are several key considerations to address. Here, we examine how this big data-led approach is impacting many diverse areas of cancer research, through review of the key presentations given at the Irish Association for Cancer Research Meeting and importantly how the results may be applied to positively affect patient outcomes. Cancer Res; 76(21); 6167-70. ©2016 AACR.

  17. Gastric cancer research in Mexico: a public health priority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampieri, Clara Luz; Mora, Mauricio

    2014-04-28

    This study aimed review studies conducted on Mexican patients diagnosed with gastric cancer and/or diseases associated with its development, in which at least one Mexican institute has participated, and to assess their contributions to the primary and secondary prevention of this disease. A search of the Medline database was conducted using the following keywords: gastric/stomach cancer, Mexico. Studies of the Mexican population were selected in which at least one Mexican Institute had participated and where the findings could support public policy proposals directed towards the primary or secondary prevention of gastric cancer. Of the 148 studies found in the Medline database, 100 were discarded and 48 were reviewed. According to the analysis presented, these studies were classified as: epidemiology of gastric cancer (5/48); risk factors and protectors relating to gastric cancer (9/48); relationship between Helicobacter pylori and pathologies associated with gastric cancer and the development of the disease (16/48); relationship between the Epstein-Barr virus and pathologies associated with gastric cancer and the development of the disease (3/48); molecular markers for the development of diseases associated with gastric cancer and gastric cancer (15/48). Mexico requires a program for the prevention and control of gastric cancer based on national health indicators. This should be produced by a multidisciplinary committee of experts who can propose actions that are relevant in the current national context. The few studies of gastric cancer conducted on the Mexican population in national institutes highlight the poor connection that currently exists between the scientific community and the health sector in terms of resolving this health issue. Public policies for health research should support projects with findings that can be translated into benefits for the population. This review serves to identify national research groups studying gastric cancer in the Mexican

  18. Gastric cancer research in Mexico: A public health priority

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampieri, Clara Luz; Mora, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed review studies conducted on Mexican patients diagnosed with gastric cancer and/or diseases associated with its development, in which at least one Mexican institute has participated, and to assess their contributions to the primary and secondary prevention of this disease. A search of the Medline database was conducted using the following keywords: gastric/stomach cancer, Mexico. Studies of the Mexican population were selected in which at least one Mexican Institute had participated and where the findings could support public policy proposals directed towards the primary or secondary prevention of gastric cancer. Of the 148 studies found in the Medline database, 100 were discarded and 48 were reviewed. According to the analysis presented, these studies were classified as: epidemiology of gastric cancer (5/48); risk factors and protectors relating to gastric cancer (9/48); relationship between Helicobacter pylori and pathologies associated with gastric cancer and the development of the disease (16/48); relationship between the Epstein-Barr virus and pathologies associated with gastric cancer and the development of the disease (3/48); molecular markers for the development of diseases associated with gastric cancer and gastric cancer (15/48). Mexico requires a program for the prevention and control of gastric cancer based on national health indicators. This should be produced by a multidisciplinary committee of experts who can propose actions that are relevant in the current national context. The few studies of gastric cancer conducted on the Mexican population in national institutes highlight the poor connection that currently exists between the scientific community and the health sector in terms of resolving this health issue. Public policies for health research should support projects with findings that can be translated into benefits for the population. This review serves to identify national research groups studying gastric cancer in the Mexican

  19. Football training in men with prostate cancer undergoing androgen deprivation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uth, Jacob; Hornstrup, Therese; Christensen, Jesper F

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the activity profile of football training and its short-term effects on bone mass, bone turnover markers (BTMs) and postural balance in men with prostate cancer (PCa) undergoing androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). METHODS: This was a randomised 12-week study in which men...... with PCa undergoing ADT were assigned to a football intervention group [FTG, n = 29, 67 ± 7 (±SD) years] training 2‒3 times per week for 45‒60 min or to a control group (n = 28, 66 ± 5 years). The activity profile was measured using a 5-Hz GPS. The outcomes were total body and leg bone mineral content (BMC...

  20. A survey of etiologic hypotheses among testicular cancer researchers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stang, A; Trabert, B; Rusner, C

    2015-01-01

    the plausibility of the suggested etiologic hypotheses on a scale of 1 (very implausible) to 10 (very plausible). This report describes the methodology of the survey, the score distributions by individual hypotheses, hypothesis group, and the participants' major research fields, and discuss the hypotheses......Basic research results can provide new ideas and hypotheses to be examined in epidemiological studies. We conducted a survey among testicular cancer researchers on hypotheses concerning the etiology of this malignancy. All researchers on the mailing list of Copenhagen Testis Cancer Workshops...

  1. Research on Aerodynamic Noise Reduction for High-Speed Trains

    OpenAIRE

    Yadong Zhang; Jiye Zhang; Tian Li; Liang Zhang; Weihua Zhang

    2016-01-01

    A broadband noise source model based on Lighthill’s acoustic theory was used to perform numerical simulations of the aerodynamic noise sources for a high-speed train. The near-field unsteady flow around a high-speed train was analysed based on a delayed detached-eddy simulation (DDES) using the finite volume method with high-order difference schemes. The far-field aerodynamic noise from a high-speed train was predicted using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD)/Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H)...

  2. [Research of genetics teaching in biological teacher-training specialty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu

    2008-02-01

    Genetics is an essential subject of life science, at the same time, it is a required course in the major of biology. Some colleges such as: agriculture, forest, animals, medicine, teacher-training and general college all offer genetics, because of the difference in specialized character and aim of training, genetics has the distinction in the system of knowledge and laying particular emphasis on content. The author seeks how to make genetics well in teaching content, method and so on in biological teacher-training specialty, and puts views.

  3. A comparison of cancer burden and research spending reveals discrepancies in the distribution of research funding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carter Ashley JR

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ideally, the distribution of research funding for different types of cancer should be equitable with respect to the societal burden each type of cancer imposes. These burdens can be estimated in a variety of ways; “Years of Life Lost” (YLL measures the severity of death in regard to the age it occurs, "Disability-Adjusted Life-Years" (DALY estimates the effects of non-lethal disabilities incurred by disease and economic metrics focus on the losses to tax revenue, productivity or direct medical expenses. We compared research funding from the National Cancer Institute (NCI to a variety of burden metrics for the most common types of cancer to identify mismatches between spending and societal burden. Methods Research funding levels were obtained from the NCI website and information for societal health and economic burdens were collected from government databases and published reports. We calculated the funding levels per unit burden for a wide range of different cancers and burden metrics and compared these values to identify discrepancies. Results Our analysis reveals a considerable mismatch between funding levels and burden. Some cancers are funded at levels far higher than their relative burden suggests (breast cancer, prostate cancer, and leukemia while other cancers appear underfunded (bladder, esophageal, liver, oral, pancreatic, stomach, and uterine cancers. Conclusions These discrepancies indicate that an improved method of health care research funding allocation should be investigated to better match funding levels to societal burden.

  4. A syllabus for research ethics committees: training needs and resources in different European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairoli, Ester; Davies, Hugh T; Helm, Jürgen; Hook, Georg; Knupfer, Petra; Wells, Frank

    2012-03-01

    This paper reports a European Forum for Good Clinical Practice workshop held in 2011 to consider a research ethics committee training syllabus, subsequent training needs and resources. The syllabus that was developed was divided into four competencies: committee working; scientific method; ethical analysis and the regulatory framework. Appropriate training needs for each, with possible resources, were discussed. Lack of funding for training was reported as a major problem but affordable alternatives were debated. Strengths and weaknesses of this approach were discussed and the resultant proposal will be disseminated through the European Forum for Good Clinical Practice and the research ethics committees of member states.

  5. Nutrigenetics in cancer research--folate metabolism and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Cornelia M

    2005-11-01

    The B vitamin folate is essential for one-carbon transfer reactions, including those related to the methylation of DNA or other substrates and nucleotide synthesis. Epidemiologic and experimental studies implicate low-folate intakes in elevated risk of colorectal neoplasia and suggest that biologic mechanisms underlying this relation include disturbances in DNA methylation patterns or adverse effects on DNA synthesis and repair. With the completion of the Human Genome Project, a vast amount of data on inherited genetic variability has become available. This genetic information can be used in studies of molecular epidemiology to provide information on multiple aspects of folate metabolism. First, studies linking polymorphisms in folate metabolism to an altered risk of cancer provide evidence for a causal link between this pathway and colorectal carcinogenesis. Second, studies on genetic characteristics can help clarify whether certain individuals may benefit from higher or lower intakes of folate or nutrients relevant to folate metabolism. Third, studies on genetic polymorphisms can generate hypotheses regarding possible biologic mechanisms that connect this pathway to carcinogenesis. Last, genetic variability in folate metabolism may predict survival after a cancer diagnosis, possibly via pharmacogenetic effects. To solve the puzzle of the folate-cancer relation, a transdisciplinary approach is needed that integrates knowledge from epidemiology, clinical studies, experimental nutrition, and mathematical modeling. This review illustrates knowledge that can be gained from molecular epidemiology in the context of nutrigenetics, and the questions that this approach can answer or raise.

  6. Social Problem Solving Skill Research and Social-Skill Training

    OpenAIRE

    一前, 春子

    1996-01-01

    Reseach on the relation between social information-processing and social adjustment in childhood is reviewed and interpreted within the framework of social informationprocessing model and INS model.The review suggests that two models have different useful aspects. Then, efforts of social-skill training and their effects on children are examined.Results of social-skill training indicates that both children with problems and normal children receive benefit.

  7. Brain Cancer in Workers Employed at a Laboratory Research Facility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Collins

    Full Text Available An earlier study of research facility workers found more brain cancer deaths than expected, but no workplace exposures were implicated.Adding four additional years of vital-status follow-up, we reassessed the risk of death from brain cancer in the same workforce, including 5,284 workers employed between 1963, when the facility opened, and 2007. We compared the work histories of the brain cancer decedents in relationship to when they died and their ages at death.As in most other studies of laboratory and research workers, we found low rates of total mortality, total cancers, accidents, suicides, and chronic conditions such as heart disease and diabetes. We found no new brain cancer deaths in the four years of additional follow-up. Our best estimate of the brain cancer standardized mortality ratio (SMR was 1.32 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.66-2.37, but the SMR might have been as high as 1.69. Deaths from benign brain tumors and other non-malignant diseases of the nervous system were at or below expected levels.With the addition of four more years of follow-up and in the absence of any new brain cancers, the updated estimate of the risk of brain cancer death is smaller than in the original study. There was no consistent pattern among the work histories of decedents that indicated a common causative exposure.

  8. Advances in cancer research. Volume 41

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, G.; Weinhouse, S.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains seven chapters. They are: The Epidemiology of Diet and Cancer; Molecular Aspects of Immunoglobin Expression by Human B Cell Leukemias and Lymphomas; Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus: Transcriptional Control and Involvement in Tumorigenesis; Dominant Susceptibility to Cancer in Man; Multiple Myeloma; Waldenstreom's Macroglobulinemia, and Benign Monoclonal Gammopathy: Characteristics of the B Cell Clone, Immunoregulatory Cell Populations and Clinical Implications; Idiotype Network Interactions in Tumor Immunity; and Chromosomal Location of Immunoglobulin Genes: Partial Mapping of these Genes in the Rabbit and Comparison with Ig Genes Carrying Chromosomes of Man and Mouse.

  9. Exercise training in childhood cancer survivors with subclinical cardiomyopathy who were treated with anthracyclines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Webb A; Ness, Kirsten K; Joshi, Vijaya; Hudson, Melissa M; Robison, Leslie L; Green, Daniel M

    2013-11-06

    Childhood cancer survivors (CCS) treated with anthracyclines are at risk for cardiomyopathy. This case series evaluated the response of anthracycline exposed CCS with subclinical cardiomyopathy to aerobic and strength training. Body composition, strength and cardiopulmonary fitness were evaluated before and after the 12-week intervention. All equipment and materials were provided to five 10+ year CCS (3 males, mean age 38.0 ± 3.3 years) for a guideline-based home exercise program. All five completed the study with no adverse events. Compliance with exercise was 86%. These results suggest that exercise training may improve exercise capacity of CCS with subclinical cardiomyopathy. Pediatr Blood Cancer. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Pancreatic Cancer: Updates on Translational Research and Future Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos G Sarris

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies with a mortality rate almost equal to its incidence. It is ranked as the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States, and despite intensive basic and clinical research over the last few years, the survival benefit for the majority of patients with pancreatic cancer is still disappointing. Due to the absence of specific symptoms and the lack of early detection tests, pancreatic cancer is usually diagnosed at an advanced inoperrable stage and palliative chemotherapy with the purine analogue gemcitabine in combination with the targeted agent erlotinib, remains the mainstay method in the management of these patients. Therefore, there is an imperative need for new findings in the translational research field with prognostic, predictive and therapeutic value. In this paper we summarize five most interesting research abstracts as presented at the 2013 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium. In particular, we focus on Abstract #141 which investigates the interaction between liver and pancreatic organ damage in patients with pancreatic cancer and the potential contribution of the patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3 (PNPLA3 gene variation in pancreatic cancer development and on Abstract #149, in which, the prognostic and predictive role of SWI/SNF complex, a chromatin-remodeling complex, is examined. The key role of pharmacogenomics, in terms of predicting response and resistance to chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer patients, is analyzed in Abstract #142 and the contribution of circulating tumor cell detection in the early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, allowing the avoidance of more invasive procedures like EUS-FNA, is discussed in Abstract #157. Lastly, in Abstract #164, the diagnostic utility of YKL-40 and IL-6 in pancreatic cancer patients is investigated.

  11. Troubling objectivity: the promises and pitfalls of training Haitian clinicians in qualitative research methods.H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minn, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Building research capacity is a central component of many contemporary global health programs and partnerships. While medical anthropologists have been conducting qualitative research in resource-poor settings for decades, they are increasingly called on to train "local" clinicians, researchers, and students in qualitative research methods. In this article, I describe the process of teaching introductory courses in qualitative research methods to Haitian clinicians, hospital staff, and medical students, who rarely encounter qualitative research in their training or practice. These trainings allow participants to identify and begin to address challenges related to health services delivery, quality of care, and provider-patient relations. However, they also run the risk of perpetuating colonial legacies of objectification and reinforcing hierarchies of knowledge and knowledge production. As these trainings increase in number and scope, they offer the opportunity to reflect critically on new forms of transnational interventions that aim to reduce health disparities.

  12. The research rotation: competency-based structured and novel approach to research training of internal medicine residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrov Vihren

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the United States, the Accreditation Council of graduate medical education (ACGME requires all accredited Internal medicine residency training programs to facilitate resident scholarly activities. However, clinical experience and medical education still remain the main focus of graduate medical education in many Internal Medicine (IM residency-training programs. Left to design the structure, process and outcome evaluation of the ACGME research requirement, residency-training programs are faced with numerous barriers. Many residency programs report having been cited by the ACGME residency review committee in IM for lack of scholarly activity by residents. Methods We would like to share our experience at Lincoln Hospital, an affiliate of Weill Medical College Cornell University New York, in designing and implementing a successful structured research curriculum based on ACGME competencies taught during a dedicated "research rotation". Results Since the inception of the research rotation in 2004, participation of our residents among scholarly activities has substantially increased. Our residents increasingly believe and appreciate that research is an integral component of residency training and essential for practice of medicine. Conclusion Internal medicine residents' outlook in research can be significantly improved using a research curriculum offered through a structured and dedicated research rotation. This is exemplified by the improvement noted in resident satisfaction, their participation in scholarly activities and resident research outcomes since the inception of the research rotation in our internal medicine training program.

  13. Examining the Relationship between the Research Training Environment, Course Experiences, and Graduate Students’ Research Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Chesnut

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the relationship between graduate students’ research training environment, course experience, and research self-efficacy beliefs. The findings of the descriptive and regression analyses suggest that graduate students’ (n = 161 general research, quantitative, and qualitative research self-efficacy beliefs varied and that these beliefs were related to different aspects of the research training environment and course experiences, including their own personal research experiences. While course experience variables were significant predictors of quantitative and qualitative research self-efficacy, they were not predictive of general research methods self-efficacy. Also, while mentorship was a significant predictor of general research methods self-efficacy, it was not a significant predictor of quantitative and qualitative research self-efficacy. The implications of this study for research and graduate education are discussed.

  14. Epigenetic research in cancer epidemiology: trends, opportunities, and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Mukesh; Rogers, Scott; Divi, Rao L; Schully, Sheri D; Nelson, Stefanie; Joseph Su, L; Ross, Sharon A; Pilch, Susan; Winn, Deborah M; Khoury, Muin J

    2014-02-01

    Epigenetics is emerging as an important field in cancer epidemiology that promises to provide insights into gene regulation and facilitate cancer control throughout the cancer care continuum. Increasingly, investigators are incorporating epigenetic analysis into the studies of etiology and outcomes. To understand current progress and trends in the inclusion of epigenetics in cancer epidemiology, we evaluated the published literature and the National Cancer Institute (NCI)-supported research grant awards in this field to identify trends in epigenetics research. We present a summary of the epidemiologic studies in NCI's grant portfolio (from January 2005 through December 2012) and in the scientific literature published during the same period, irrespective of support from the NCI. Blood cells and tumor tissue were the most commonly used biospecimens in these studies, although buccal cells, cervical cells, sputum, and stool samples were also used. DNA methylation profiling was the focus of the majority of studies, but several studies also measured microRNA profiles. We illustrate here the current status of epidemiologic studies that are evaluating epigenetic changes in large populations. The incorporation of epigenomic assessments in cancer epidemiology studies has and is likely to continue to provide important insights into the field of cancer research.

  15. Interactive dedicated training curriculum improves accuracy in the interpretation of MR imaging of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akin, Oguz; Zhang, Jingbo; Hricak, Hedvig [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Riedl, Christopher C. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Ishill, Nicole M.; Moskowitz, Chaya S. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, New York, NY (United States)

    2010-04-15

    To assess the effect of interactive dedicated training on radiology fellows' accuracy in assessing prostate cancer on MRI. Eleven radiology fellows, blinded to clinical and pathological data, independently interpreted preoperative prostate MRI studies, scoring the likelihood of tumour in the peripheral and transition zones and extracapsular extension. Each fellow interpreted 15 studies before dedicated training (to supply baseline interpretation accuracy) and 200 studies (10/week) after attending didactic lectures. Expert radiologists led weekly interactive tutorials comparing fellows' interpretations to pathological tumour maps. To assess interpretation accuracy, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was conducted, using pathological findings as the reference standard. In identifying peripheral zone tumour, fellows' average area under the ROC curve (AUC) increased from 0.52 to 0.66 (after didactic lectures; p < 0.0001) and remained at 0.66 (end of training; p < 0.0001); in the transition zone, their average AUC increased from 0.49 to 0.64 (after didactic lectures; p = 0.01) and to 0.68 (end of training; p = 0.001). In detecting extracapsular extension, their average AUC increased from 0.50 to 0.67 (after didactic lectures; p = 0.003) and to 0.81 (end of training; p < 0.0001). Interactive dedicated training significantly improved accuracy in tumour localization and especially in detecting extracapsular extension on prostate MRI. (orig.)

  16. Prostate Cancer Research Training in Health Disparities for Minority Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    have ever been immunized for: Tuberculosis (TB) ______ If so, when ______________ Hepatitis ...and Immunology , Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 1211 Medical Center Drive, Nashville, TN 37232 2Department of Surgery, Meharry Medical College

  17. Training Program in the Molecular Basis of Breast Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-01

    activities of Rad5l viable, no growth defects binding of DSB ends Rad52-1- ES cells show a moderate reduction in homologous recombination frequency Rad54... recombination frequency and are sensitive to IR, sister chromatid exchange MMS, and mitomycin C V(D)J recombination and non-homologous end-joining

  18. A Training Program in Breast Cancer Research Using NMR Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-01

    mice coexpressing mutant presenilin I and amyloid precursor proteins., Neuron, 19 (1997) 939-45. 4. Cavalieri, B. Geometria indivibilibus continuorum...Bononi: Typis Clementis Ferronij, 1635. Reprint from: Geometria degli indivisibili. Torino: Unione Tipografico-Editrice Torinese, 1966.’ 5. Convit, A

  19. A Training Program in Breast Cancer Research Using NMR Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    relative fluorescence of the oxonol-stained cell types. Oxonol fluorescence intensity measures membrane po- tential when the extracellular potassium ...final temperature of 290jC and hold for 0.75 min. Helium was used as the carrier gas at a constant velocity of 41 cm/s. Electron impact ionization at...fresh dilution 1:3 by volume with deionized water was prepared and a 5-mL droplet was micropi- petted onto a standard 200-mesh transmission electron

  20. Training Program in the Molecular Basis of Breast Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-10-01

    pig/gram body weight) Gowen, L.C., B.L. Johnson, A.M. Latour , K. Sulik, and B.H. Kol- (Sigma) was injected intraperitoneally into pregnant females. ler...Laboratory Press. Cold Spring Harbor, New York. 33. Sobol, R. W., J. K. Horton, R. Kuhn , H. Gu, R. K. Singhal, R. Prasad, K. Rajewsky and S. H. Wilson. 1996

  1. Training Highly Qualified Health Research Personnel: The Pain in Child Health Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl L von Baeyer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Pain in Child Health (PICH is a transdisciplinary, international research training consortium. PICH has been funded since 2002 as a Strategic Training Initiative in Health Research of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, with contributions from other funding partners and the founding participation of five Canadian universities. The goal of PICH has been to create a community of scholars in pediatric pain to improve child health outcomes.

  2. Promising Tools in Prostate Cancer Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonomo, Silvia; Hansen, Cecilie H; Petrunak, Elyse M

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 17A1 (CYP17A1) is an important target in the treatment of prostate cancer because it produces androgens required for tumour growth. The FDA has approved only one CYP17A1 inhibitor, abiraterone, which contains a steroidal scaffold similar to the endogenous CYP17A1 substrates...

  3. Evidence and research in rectal cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentini, V.; Beets-Tan, R.; Borras, J.M.; Krivokapic, Z.; Leer, J.W.H.; Pahlman, L.; Rodel, C.; Schmoll, H.J.; Scott, N.; Velde, C.V.; Verfaillie, C.

    2008-01-01

    The main evidences of epidemiology, diagnostic imaging, pathology, surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and follow-up are reviewed to optimize the routine treatment of rectal cancer according to a multidisciplinary approach. This paper reports on the knowledge shared between different specialists inv

  4. Testicular Cancer Survivorship : Research Strategies and Recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Travis, Lois B.; Beard, Clair; Allan, James M.; Dahl, Alv A.; Feldman, Darren R.; Oldenburg, Jan; Daugaard, Gedske; Kelly, Jennifer L.; Dolan, M. Eileen; Hannigan, Robyn; Constine, Louis S.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Okunieff, Paul; Armstrong, Greg; Wiljer, David; Miller, Robert C.; Gietema, Jourik A.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Williams, Jacqueline P.; Nichols, Craig R.; Einhorn, Lawrence H.; Fossa, Sophie D.

    2010-01-01

    Testicular cancer represents the most curable solid tumor, with a 10-year survival rate of more than 95%. Given the young average age at diagnosis, it is estimated that effective treatment approaches, in particular, platinum-based chemotherapy, have resulted in an average gain of several decades of

  5. The Conundrum of Training and Capacity Building for People with Learning Disabilities Doing Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nind, Melanie; Chapman, Rohhss; Seale, Jane; Tilley, Liz

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study explores the training involved when people with learning disabilities take their place in the community as researchers. This was a theme in a recent UK seminar series where a network of researchers explored pushing the boundaries of participatory research. Method: Academics, researchers with learning disabilities, supporters…

  6. MicroRNAs – important molecules in lung cancer research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra eLeidinger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNA are important regulators of gene expression. They are involved in many physiological processes ensuring the cellular homeostasis of human cells. Alterations of the miRNA expression have increasingly been associated with pathophysiological changes of cancer cells making miRNAs currently to one of the most analyzed molecules in cancer research. Here we provide an overview of miRNAs in lung cancer. Specifically, we address biological functions of miRNAs in lung cancer cells, miRNA signatures generated from tumor tissue and from patients’ body fluids, the potential of miRNAs as diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for lung cancer, and its role as therapeutical target.

  7. Training of young researchers and PhD supervisors for the future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Anette

    2004-01-01

    If Europe is to develop an integrated knowledge society and ERA, the research practice has to be developed. Further development of the research practice can among others take place through training of young researchers, which is not only based on the principles of apprenticeship, but a training...... which contributes to break down the usual ways of thinking and to incorporate both intercultural and interdisciplinary principles, and a valued orientation towards trade and industry. The PhD supervisors should also be trained so that light is thrown on the aims, methods and contents of the supervision...

  8. Healthy Lungs: cancer education for middle school teachers using a "train and equip" method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, E Robert

    2012-03-01

    Prevention of the initiation of tobacco use, which is associated with increased risk of developing cancer of the lung, the oral cavity, larynx, and emphysema, should target middle school-age children because that is where experimentation with tobacco use usually begins. Millions of children attending school do not receive proper education regarding the biological science of the human respiratory system coupled with the impact that tobacco use has at the cell, tissue, and organ levels of biological organization because their teachers are ill-prepared and ill-equipped to teach this normal and cancer-related content. The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences has a statewide outreach program that provides middle school teachers training in a "Healthy Lungs" curriculum that covers the normal functional anatomy of the respiratory system as a basis for adding the effect of tobacco use and its associated cancers and emphysema. This training also provides each participant a resource kit of supplies, materials, and items of equipment. A long-term implementation survey identified a high degree of transference of content and use of the resource kit items into new classroom learning activities for the trainee's students for both the normal functional anatomy of the human respiratory system and associated general and cell/tissue/organ-specific cancer biology.

  9. Assessment of training needs and preferences for geographic information systems (GIS) mapping in state comprehensive cancer-control programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopfer, Suellen; Chadwick, Amy E; Parrott, Roxanne L; Ghetian, Christie B; Lengerich, Eugene J

    2009-10-01

    Geographic information systems (GIS) mapping technologies have potential to advance public health promotion by mapping regional differences in attributes (e.g., disease burden, environmental exposures, access to health care services) to suggest priorities for public health interventions. Training in GIS for comprehensive cancer control (CCC) has been overlooked. State CCC programs' GIS training needs were assessed by interviewing 49 state CCC directors. A majority perceived a need for GIS training, slightly more than half of state CCC programs had access to geocoded data, and the majority of programs did not require continuing education credits of their staff. CCC directors perceived judging maps and realizing their limitations as important skills and identified epidemiologists, CCC staff, public health officials, policy makers, and cancer coalition members as training audiences. They preferred in-class training sessions that last a few hours to a day. Lessons learned are shared to develop training programs with translatable GIS skills for CCC.

  10. A DVD program on fall prevention skills training for cancer family caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Patricia; Olsen, Sarah; Kuhrik, Marilee; Kuhrik, Nancy; Huntley, Lance R

    2012-03-01

    This feasibility study tested an instructional DVD program for improving cancer family caregivers' knowledge and preparedness in fall prevention and reducing fall occurrence among the patients they care for at home. DVD program features included training caregivers on safe mobility skills. Family caregivers of cancer patients were surveyed before and after viewing the DVD program on "Moving Safely" in the home. Cancer patients were followed 4 months postintervention to determine if fall occurrence was reduced. There was a decrease in the number of patients who fell postintervention compared with those who fell preintervention. Caregivers' perceptions of knowledge about fall prevention improved significantly after viewing the DVD. An instructional DVD program is an effective educational tool for preparing family caregivers with the knowledge and skills needed to reduce the incidence of falls in the home setting. Educators must develop programs for preparing family caregivers to perform nursing skills within the home.

  11. Improving public health training and research capacity in Africa: a replicable model for linking training to health and socio-demographic surveillance data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill R. Williams

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Research training for public health professionals is key to the future of public health and policy in Africa. A growing number of schools of public health are connected to health and socio-demographic surveillance system field sites in developing countries, in Africa and Asia in particular. Linking training programs with these sites provides important opportunities to improve training, build local research capacity, foreground local health priorities, and increase the relevance of research to local health policy. Objective: To increase research training capacity in public health programs by providing targeted training to students and increasing the accessibility of existing data. Design: This report is a case study of an approach to linking public health research and training at the University of the Witwatersrand. We discuss the development of a sample training database from the Agincourt Health and Socio-demographic Surveillance System in South Africa and outline a concordant transnational intensive short course on longitudinal data analysis offered by the University of the Witwatersrand and the University of Colorado-Boulder. This case study highlights ways common barriers to linking research and training can be overcome. Results and Conclusions: This collaborative effort demonstrates that linking training to ongoing data collection can improve student research, accelerate student training, and connect students to an international network of scholars. Importantly, the approach can be adapted to other partnerships between schools of public health and longitudinal research sites.

  12. Relational goods in training university groups: A research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietra Daniela Di Paola

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to identify relational goods in the transcriptions produced by sound recording of a median group experience at University of Palermo. In particular, the present work proposes to analyze the most representative qualities of this phenomenon. The group becomes the elective setting where take place activities promoting professional training and encourages emerging of inter subjective space of relational learning. In this way, the story of relationship between individuals in a contest represents the central lump from which develop personal well-being and the capability to optimize human resources.Keywords: Relational good; Median training group; Well-being

  13. Acupuncture Research at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javdan, Bahar; Cassileth, Barrie

    2015-06-01

    Acupuncture may help treat specific cancer-related symptoms. Here, we summarize our clinical trials that sought to determine acupuncture's role in managing cancer-related symptoms. Trials have been conducted to determine acupuncture's ability to mitigate cancer-related symptoms including dyspnea, fatigue, xerostomia, lymphedema, hot flashes, postoperative ileus, pain and dysfunction after neck dissection, and postthoracotomy pain. Published studies indicate that acupuncture versus placebo acupuncture failed to reduce cancer-related dyspnea. Both true and sham acupuncture alleviated fatigue slightly, but no significant differences between groups emerged. Compared with sham acupuncture, our research showed that acupuncture significantly improved saliva production in patients with xerostomia and significantly reduced lymphedema patients' arm circumference in a pilot study. However, acupuncture failed to significantly reduce hot flashes and was no more successful than sham acupuncture in reducing postoperative ileus. Significant reductions in pain and dysfunction occurred in cancer patients after neck dissection. In a feasibility study, acupuncture was found to be acceptable to lung cancer patients and did not interfere with standard postoperative care. In summary, acupuncture is a potential candidate for the treatment of some important cancer-related symptoms. Large clinical trials and research to investigate mechanistic pathways are warranted.

  14. Network for Translational Research - Cancer Imaging Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperative agreement (U54) awards to establish Specialized Research Resource Centers that will participate as members of a network of inter-disciplinary, inter-institutional research teams for the purpose of supporting translational research in optical imaging and/or spectroscopy in vivo, with an emphasis on multiple modalities.

  15. Cancer Prevention and Control Research Manpower Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-01

    34 : problem areas such as self-care (Dodd & Dibble, lishing a multisite team to conduct research with a ’r 1993), communication ( Northouse & Wortman, 1990...Guidelines for collaborative research. Applied Nurs- Northouse , L.L., & Wortman, C.B. (1990). Models of helping and cop- ing Research, 2, 150-183. ing in

  16. Sampling Methods and the Accredited Population in Athletic Training Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, W. David; Volberding, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Context: We describe methods of sampling the widely-studied, yet poorly defined, population of accredited athletic training education programs (ATEPs). Objective: There are two purposes to this study; first to describe the incidence and types of sampling methods used in athletic training education research, and second to clearly define the…

  17. Abduction Prevention Training: A Review of Findings and Issues for Future Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miltenberger, Raymond G.; Olsen, Laurie A.

    1996-01-01

    This study reviewed the research evaluating procedures for teaching abduction prevention skills to children. Examination of types of skills, types of abduction scenarios, training procedures, and assessment strategies indicated that children can learn abduction prevention skills through behavioral skills training procedures, and that individual…

  18. Survey on Knowledge, Attitudes, and Training Needs of Italian Residents on Genetic Tests for Hereditary Breast and Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Panic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of the study was to assess knowledge and attitudes of medical residents working in Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy, on genetic tests for breast and colorectal cancer. Methods. We distributed self-administered questionnaire to the residents. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the determinants of knowledge and attitudes towards the tests. Results. Of 754 residents, 364 filled in questionnaire. Around 70% and 20% answered correctly >80% of questions on breast and colorectal cancer tests, respectively. Knowledge on tests for breast cancer was higher among residents who attended course on cancer genetic testing during graduate training (odds ratio (OR: 1.72; 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.05–2.82 and inversely associated with male gender (OR: 0.55; 95% CI: 0.35–0.87. As for colorectal cancer, residents were more knowledgeable if they attended courses on cancer genetic testing (OR: 2.08; 95% CI: 1.07–4.03 or postgraduate training courses in epidemiology and evidence-based medicine (OR: 1.95; 95% CI: 1.03–3.69. More than 70% asked for the additional training on the genetic tests for cancer during the specialization school. Conclusion. The knowledge of Italian residents on genetic tests for colorectal cancer appears to be insufficient. There is a need for additional training in this field.

  19. Undergraduate Research Training Program in Geosciences at NC A&T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, G.; Jackson, C. R.; Burbach, G. N.; Clemence, D.; Lin, Q.

    2004-12-01

    In this talk we present an ongoing effort to develop an undergraduate research training program in geosciences at North Carolina A&T State University. The National Science Foundation HBCU Undergraduate Program (HBCU-UP) funded in 1999 the University's Talent-21: Gateway for Advancing Science and Mathematics Talent. Defined in the Talent-21 Project is a research training component where a facility has been situated for undergraduate research training in the geophysical and environmental sciences. Planned for the undergraduate geophysical research training program is a three-pronged approach of generating (1) real-world seismic data by seismic field surveys, (2) physical modeled data through the Seismic Physical Modeling System, and (3) computer simulated data through mathematical modeling and numerical simulation to mutually refine understanding of site, the data, and the methods selected for testing. The results will be used to build models that simulate earth subsurface structures. This research training program aims to expose students to theory via topical seminars and workshops, and to practice via hands-on experience in field geophysical surveying, comparative field data analysis, physical modeling, computational modeling, and synthetic seismic data acquisition. It offers structured education and training activities that guide experiences in geophysical topics and techniques, and research for students to increase interest and participation in geophysical science with STEM career development. Students usually start the program with academic year research training to prepare themselves for research projects, and continue their pursuit through intensive summer REU program to undertake research projects and write project reports. Students are encouraged to present their research results at regional or national undergraduate research conferences. Four summer REU programs have been conducted since 2001, and some of the student research projects and results will be

  20. Report on the Workshop and Regular Meeting of the Imode-CKD and Bcmolmed Marie Curie Training and Research Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krochmal, Magdalena; Cisek, Katryna; Markoska, Katerina; Spasovski, Goce; Vlahou, Antonia

    2015-01-01

    A Workshop and Regular Meeting of the Marie Curie Training and Research Programs iMODECKD (Identification of the Molecular Determinants of established Chronic Kidney Disease) and BCMolMed (Molecular Medicine for Bladder Cancer) was held from 20-22 March at the Macedonian Academy of Science and Arts (MASA). The meeting was hosted by the participating center University of Skopje (SKO) - Goce Spasovski and MASA - Momir Polenakovic (R. Macedonia). The representative from MASA proteomic research center - Katerina Davalieva (R. Macedonia) had presentation on proteomic research in prostate cancer (PCa). 40 researchers from 13 different countries participated at the meeting. The Workshop was devoted on "Chronic Kidney Disease: Clinical Management issues", and consisted of 15 oral presentations given by nephrologists and experts in the field of CKD. Raymond Vanholder (Belgium) - past president of ERA-EDTA had a keynote lecture on "CKD: Questions that need to be answered and are not (or at least not entirely)". The workshop continued in four sessions with lectures from Alberto Ortiz (Spain), Olivera Stojceva-Taneva (R. Macedonia), Dimitrios Goumenos (Greece), Joachim Beige (Germany), Marian Klinger (Poland), Goce Spasovski (R. Macedonia), Joachim Jankowski (Germany), Adalbert Schiller (Romania), Robert Johnson (USA), Franco Ferrario (Italy), Ivan Rychlik (Czech Republic), Fulvio Magni (Italy) and Giovambattista Capasso (Italy), all covering a training theme. Within the meeting there were two lectures on complimentary skills for ethics in science and career advancement from two principal investigators - Goce Spasovski (R. Macedonia) and Joost Schanstra (France). During the Regular Meeting, 13 PhD students i.e. Early Stage Researchers and one Experienced Researcher from both Programs presented their work and progress within iMODE-CKD and BCMolMed projects. This meeting was a great opportunity to exchange experience and ideas in the field of systems biology approaches and

  1. Advanced Pediatric Brain Imaging Research and Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    similar challenges o Military Newsletter o Medical Journals 15 Table 4. Technical and training support recommendations Technical Support...MRS), morphological analyses such as voxel-based morphometry (VBM), and functional MRI (fMRI). In terms of prior issues, the only problem identified

  2. Using Research to Design Integrated Education and Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, Michele; Schaffer, William R.

    2016-01-01

    With the passage of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) of 2014, Northampton Community College began the creation of Integrated Education and Training (IE&T) programs in October 2015. After a needs assessment was conducted with the partners, programs were created to address the needs in the hospitality and healthcare sectors.…

  3. Multimorbidity and cancer outcomes: a need for more research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sørensen HT

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Henrik Toft Sørensen Editor in Chief Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, DenmarkCancer incidence increases with age, and about 43% of men and 30% of women aged 65 will develop cancer in their remaining lifetimes.1 The global population is rapidly aging, and by 2030 about 70% of cancer in, for example, the US, will be diagnosed in older patients.2 Fortunately, cancer survival has improved and 5-year survival exceeds 80% for many common cancers.3 As a result of these two complementary trends, the population of cancer survivors is growing at a rate of almost 2% per year.4As comorbidities accumulate with age, the number of patients with multimorbidity, ie, the coexistence of several chronic diseases, is increasing dramatically.5 In the US, about 80% of Medicare funds are spent on patients with four or more chronic conditions. Multimorbidity is associated with mortality, disability, low functional status, and risks of adverse drug events.6,7Clinical and epidemiological research on cancer prognosis has mainly focused on cancers in isolation, ignoring the impact of comorbidity and co-medication on the risk of complications and mortality. Comorbidity is a medical condition that exists at the time of diagnosis of the cancer or later, but which is not a consequence of the cancer itself.8Comorbidity is common in cancer patients, who often have adverse lifestyle factors such as alcohol use, obesity, and smoking, which cause other chronic diseases. Thus, many cancer patients have chronic disorders such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acute myocardial infarction, stroke, metabolic syndrome, and osteoporosis.9–13 With the growing population of elderly patients with cancer and other chronic diseases, modern medicine will need to address multiple medical problems at once, focusing on mortality, treatment complications, quality of life, and implications for screening.7,14 In this issue of Clinical Epidemiology

  4. Cancer immunotherapy out of the gate: the 22nd annual Cancer Research Institute International Immunotherapy Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tontonoz, Matthew; Gee, Connie E

    2015-05-01

    The 22nd annual Cancer Research Institute (CRI) International Immunotherapy Symposium was held from October 5-8, 2014, in New York City. Titled "Cancer Immunotherapy: Out of the Gate," the symposium began with a Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium satellite meeting focused on issues in immunotherapy drug development, followed by five speaker sessions and a poster session devoted to basic and clinical cancer immunology research. The second annual William B. Coley lecture was delivered by Lieping Chen, one of the four recipients of the 2014 William B. Coley Award for Distinguished Research in Tumor Immunology; the other three recipients were Gordon Freeman, Tasuku Honjo, and Arlene Sharpe. Prominent themes of the conference were the use of genomic technologies to identify neoantigens and the emergence of new immune modulatory molecules, beyond CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L1, as new therapeutic targets for immunotherapy.

  5. Integrating Heterogeneous Biomedical Data for Cancer Research: the CARPEM infrastructure

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cancer research involves numerous disciplines. The multiplicity of data sources and their heterogeneous nature render the integration and the exploration of the data more and more complex. Translational research platforms are a promising way to assist scientists in these tasks. In this article, we identify a set of scientific and technical principles needed to build a translational research platform compatible with ethical requirements, data protection and data-integration problems. W...

  6. Effect of aerobic exercise and relaxation training on fatigue and physical performance of cancer patients after surgery. A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimeo, Fernando C; Thomas, Frank; Raabe-Menssen, Cornelia; Pröpper, Felix; Mathias, Michael

    2004-11-01

    Fatigue is a frequent problem after surgical treatment of solid tumours. Aerobic exercise and psychosocial interventions have been shown to reduce the severity of this symptom in cancer patients. Therefore, we compared the effect of the two therapies on fatigue in a randomised controlled study. Seventy-two patients who underwent surgery for lung (n=27) or gastrointestinal tumours (n=42) were assigned to an aerobic exercise group (stationary biking 30 min five times weekly) or a progressive relaxation training group (45 min three times per week). Both interventions were carried out for 3 weeks. At the beginning and the end of the study, we evaluated physical, cognitive and emotional status and somatic complaints with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core Module (EORTC-QLQ-30) questionnaire, and maximal physical performance with an ergometric stress test. Physical performance of the training group improved significantly during the programme (9.4+/-20 watts, p=0.01) but remained unchanged in the relaxation group (1.5+/-14.8 watts, p=0.37). Fatigue and global health scores improved in both groups during the intervention (fatigue: training group 21%, relaxation group 19%; global health of both groups 19%, p for all training programme improves the physical performance of patients recovering from surgery for solid tumours. However, exercise is not better than progressive relaxation training for the treatment of fatigue in this setting.

  7. 77 FR 41391 - Final Priority; Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Vocational Rehabilitation and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-13

    ... Network, including Regional Technical Assistance and Continuing Education (TACE) Centers to disseminate... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Final Priority; Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Vocational Rehabilitation and...

  8. Public figure announcements about cancer and opportunities for cancer communication: a review and research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noar, Seth M; Willoughby, Jessica Fitts; Myrick, Jessica Gall; Brown, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Announcements by public figures and celebrities about cancer diagnosis or death represent significant events in public life. But what are the substantive effects of such events, if any? The purpose of this article is to systematically review studies that examined the impact of public figure cancer announcements on cancer-oriented outcomes. Using comprehensive search procedures, we identified k = 19 studies that examined 11 distinct public figures. The most commonly studied public figures were Jade Goody, Kylie Minogue, Nancy Reagan, and Steve Jobs, with the most common cancers studied being breast (53%), cervical (21%), and pancreatic (21%) cancer. Most studies assessed multiple outcome variables, including behavioral outcomes (k = 15), media coverage (k = 10), information seeking (k = 8), cancer incidence (k = 3), and interpersonal communication (k = 2). Results fairly consistently indicated that cancer announcements from public figures had meaningful effects on many, if not most, of these outcome variables. While such events essentially act as naturally occurring interventions, the effects tend to be relatively short term. Gaps in this literature include few contemporary studies of high-profile public figures in the United States and a general lack of theory-based research. Directions for future research as well as implications for cancer communication and prevention are discussed.

  9. Training highly qualified health research personnel: The Pain in Child Health consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Baeyer, Carl L; Stevens, Bonnie J; Chambers, Christine T; Craig, Kenneth D; Finley, G Allen; Grunau, Ruth E; Johnston, C Celeste; Riddell, Rebecca Pillai; Stinson, Jennifer N; Dol, Justine; Campbell-Yeo, Marsha; McGrath, Patrick J

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Pain in Child Health (PICH) is a transdisciplinary, international research training consortium. PICH has been funded since 2002 as a Strategic Training Initiative in Health Research of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, with contributions from other funding partners and the founding participation of five Canadian universities. The goal of PICH has been to create a community of scholars in pediatric pain to improve child health outcomes. METHODS: Quantitative analyses enumerated PICH faculty, trainees, training activities and scientific outputs. Interviews with PICH stakeholders were analyzed using qualitative methods capturing perceptions of the program’s strengths, limitations, and opportunities for development and sustainability. RESULTS: PICH has supported 218 trainee members from 2002 through 2013, from 14 countries and more than 16 disciplines. The faculty at the end of 2013 comprised nine co-principal investigators, 14 Canadian coinvestigators, and 28 Canadian and international collaborators. Trainee members published 697 peer-reviewed journal articles on pediatric pain through 2013, among other research dissemination activities including conference presentations and webinars. Networks have been established between new and established researchers across Canada and in 13 other countries. Perceptions from stakeholders commended PICH for its positive impact on the development of pediatric pain researchers. Stakeholders emphasized skills and abilities gained through PICH, the perceived impact of PICH training on this research field, and considerations for future training in developing researchers in pediatric pain. CONCLUSIONS: PICH has been successfully developing highly qualified health research personnel within a Canadian and international community of pediatric pain scholarship. PMID:25299474

  10. A survey of etiologic hypotheses among testicular cancer researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stang, A; Trabert, B; Rusner, C; Poole, C; Almstrup, K; Rajpert-De Meyts, E; McGlynn, K A

    2015-01-01

    Basic research results can provide new ideas and hypotheses to be examined in epidemiological studies. We conducted a survey among testicular cancer researchers on hypotheses concerning the etiology of this malignancy. All researchers on the mailing list of Copenhagen Testis Cancer Workshops and corresponding authors of PubMed-indexed articles identified by the search term 'testicular cancer' and published within 10 years (in total 2750 recipients) were invited to respond to an e-mail-based survey. Participants of the 8th Copenhagen Testis Cancer Workshop in May 2014 were subsequently asked to rate the plausibility of the suggested etiologic hypotheses on a scale of 1 (very implausible) to 10 (very plausible). This report describes the methodology of the survey, the score distributions by individual hypotheses, hypothesis group, and the participants' major research fields, and discuss the hypotheses that scored as most plausible. We also present plans for improving the survey that may be repeated at a next international meeting of experts in testicular cancer. Overall 52 of 99 (53%) registered participants of the 8th Copenhagen Testis Cancer Workshop submitted the plausibility rating form. Fourteen of 27 hypotheses were related to exposures during pregnancy. Hypotheses with the highest mean plausibility ratings were either related to pre-natal exposures or exposures that might have an effect during pregnancy and in post-natal life. The results of the survey may be helpful for triggering more specific etiologic hypotheses that include factors related to endocrine disruption, DNA damage, inflammation, and nutrition during pregnancy. The survey results may stimulate a multidisciplinary discussion about new etiologic hypotheses of testicular cancer.

  11. Research Donor Program Needs Your Help to Advance Cancer and AIDS Research | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI at Frederick employees have a unique opportunity to contribute directly to cancer and AIDS research by donating blood, saliva, and other samples through the Research Donor Program (RDP). Donors are compensated for their time, which is typically between 10 and 30 minutes. The RDP, which is administered by Occupational Health Services (OHS), Leidos Biomedical Research, provides samples from healthy donors for use in in vitro research conducted at NCI at Frederick and Fort Detrick. Samples are provided anonymously to researchers.

  12. Advanced Pediatric Brain Imaging Research and Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Given that Dr. York was unable to continue his training on site following the military travel moratorium, we organized remote video conferencing ...have also set up remote video conferencing capabilities to allow Dr. York and others to participate in these seminars when they are off-site. This is a...learning solutions, such as video conferencing with several onsite meetings per year that would be limited to long weekends. In addition, we suggested

  13. Frontiers in cancer epidemiology: a challenge to the research community from the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program at the National Cancer Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Muin J; Freedman, Andrew N; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Harvey, Chinonye E; Kaefer, Christie; Reid, Britt C; Rogers, Scott; Schully, Sheri D; Seminara, Daniela; Verma, Mukesh

    2012-07-01

    The Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program (EGRP) at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) is developing scientific priorities for cancer epidemiology research in the next decade. We would like to engage the research community and other stakeholders in a planning effort that will include a workshop in December 2012 to help shape new foci for cancer epidemiology research. To facilitate the process of defining the future of cancer epidemiology, we invite the research community to join in an ongoing web-based conversation at http://blog-epi.grants.cancer.gov/ to develop priorities and the next generation of high-impact studies.

  14. Commentary: Compliance education and training: a need for new responses in clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Mindy J; Rubin, Elaine R

    2010-03-01

    Increasing regulatory mandates, heightened concerns about compliance, accountability, and liability, as well as a movement toward organizational integration are prompting assessment and transformation in education and training programs at academic health centers, particularly with regard to clinical research compliance. Whereas education and training have become a major link between all research and compliance functions, the infrastructure to support and sustain these activities has not been examined in any systematic, comprehensive fashion, leaving many critical interrelated issues unaddressed. Through a series of informal interviews in late 2008 with chief compliance officers and other senior leadership at 10 academic health centers, the authors studied the organization, management, and administration of clinical research compliance education and training programs. The interviews revealed that while clinical research compliance education and training are undergoing growth and expansion to accommodate a rapidly changing regulatory environment and research paradigm, there are no strategies or models for development. The decentralization of education and training is having serious consequences for leadership, resources, and effectiveness. The authors recommend that leaders of academic health centers conduct a comprehensive analysis of clinical research compliance education and training as clinical trials administration undergoes change, focusing on strategic planning, communication, collaboration across the institution, and program evaluation.

  15. CRISPR-Cas9: from Genome Editing to Cancer Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Si; Sun, Heng; Miao, Kai; Deng, Chu-Xia

    2016-01-01

    Cancer development is a multistep process triggered by innate and acquired mutations, which cause the functional abnormality and determine the initiation and progression of tumorigenesis. Gene editing is a widely used engineering tool for generating mutations that enhance tumorigenesis. The recent developed clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated 9 (CRISPR-Cas9) system renews the genome editing approach into a more convenient and efficient way. By rapidly introducing genetic modifications in cell lines, organs and animals, CRISPR-Cas9 system extends the gene editing into whole genome screening, both in loss-of-function and gain-of-function manners. Meanwhile, the system accelerates the establishment of animal cancer models, promoting in vivo studies for cancer research. Furthermore, CRISPR-Cas9 system is modified into diverse innovative tools for observing the dynamic bioprocesses in cancer studies, such as image tracing for targeted DNA, regulation of transcription activation or repression. Here, we view recent technical advances in the application of CRISPR-Cas9 system in cancer genetics, large-scale cancer driver gene hunting, animal cancer modeling and functional studies.

  16. Advanced Research on Circulating Tumor Cells in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui LI

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the malignant disease with the highest rate in terms of incidence and mortality in China. Early diagnosis and timely monitoring tumor recurrence and metastasis are extremely important for improving 5-year survival rate of lung cancer patients. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs, as a "liquid biopsy specimens” for the primary tumor, provide the possibility to perform real-time, non-invasive histological identification for lung cancer patients. The detection of CTCs contributes to early diagnosis, surveillance of tumor recurrence and metastasis, and prediction of therapeutic efficacy and prognosis. Furthermore, CTCs-dependent detection emerges as a new approach for molecularly pathologic examination, study of molecular mechanisms involved in drug resistance, and resolution for tumor heterogeneity. This study reviewed the recent progress of CTCs in lung cancer research field.

  17. Research advances in traditional Chinese medicine syndromes in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Qing; Luo, Yun-quan; Wang, Wen-hai; Liu, Xuan; Li, Qi; Su, Shi-bing

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) syndrome, also known as TCM ZHENG or TCM pattern, is an integral and essential part of TCM theory that helps to guide the design of individualized treatments. A TCM syndrome, in essence, is a characteristic profile of all clinical manifestations in one patient that can be readily identified by a TCM practitioner. In this article, the authors reviewed the presentations of TCM syndromes in seven common malignancies (liver, lung, gastric, breast, colorectal, pancreatic and esophageal cancers), the objectivity and the standardization of TCM syndrome differentiation, the evaluation of TCM syndrome modeling in cancer research, and syndrome differentiation-guided TCM treatment of cancers. A better understanding of TCM syndrome theory, as well as its potential biological basis, may contribute greatly to the clinical TCM diagnosis and the treatment of cancer.

  18. Mississippi CaP HBCU Undergraduate Research Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Web Map Preferences, and DNA 2.0 CRISPR gRNA Design Tool. Then, the amplification of the lnRNAs was performed using PCR and the DNA was visualized...suppressive role in the prostate. Presence of Lfng in a healthy prostate enhanced Notch3 activation. The increase was accompanied by an increase in... enhanced my knowledge about the symptoms and treatments that are used for prostate cancer. Also, I learned how to perform basic techniques such as

  19. Major Programs | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention supports major scientific collaborations, research networks, investigator-initiated grants, postdoctoral training, and specialized resources across the United States. |

  20. Researchers Identify Early Sign of Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be detected before the disease is diagnosed.” The researchers utilized blood samples collected years earlier from 1,500 people participating in large health-tracking studies. They analyzed the samples for more than ...

  1. Cancer therapies in HIV cure research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas A; Anderson, Jenny L; Wightman, Fiona;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This article provides an overview of anticancer therapies in various stages of clinical development as potential interventions to target HIV persistence. RECENT FINDINGS: Epigenetic drugs developed for cancer have been investigated in vitro, ex vivo and in clinical trials...... as interventions aimed at reversing HIV latency and depleting the amount of virus that persists on antiretroviral therapy. Treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors induced HIV expression in patients on antiretroviral therapy but did not reduce the frequency of infected cells. Other interventions that may...... accelerate the decay of latently infected cells, in the presence or absence of latency-reversing therapy, are now being explored. These include apoptosis-promoting agents, nonhistone deacetylase inhibitor compounds to reverse HIV latency and immunotherapy interventions to enhance antiviral immunity...

  2. Research Policy in the Training of Professionals in Medical Sciences. A Reflective Look

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Mur Villar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The academic environment must become the main way of involving students in the research movement, as part of the social mission of the university. This paper aims to discuss the substantive functions of the university and the development of the university curriculum, emphasizing on undergraduate research activity. It reflects on research policy in the training of professionals in medical sciences. Some observations that may contribute to the integration of the research activity in the training process of professionals in coordination with the whole process are made.

  3. Alliance Against Cancer, the network of Italian cancer centers bridging research and care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paoli, Paolo; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Ferrarini, Manlio; Pelicci, PierGiuseppe; Dellabona, Paolo; De Lorenzo, Francesco; Mantovani, Alberto; Musto, Pellegrino; Opocher, Giuseppe; Picci, Piero; Ricciardi, Walter; De Maria, Ruggero

    2015-11-14

    Alliance Against Cancer (ACC) was established in Rome in 2002 as a consortium of six Italian comprehensive cancer centers (Founders). The aims of ACC were to promote a network among Italian oncologic institutions in order to develop specific, advanced projects in clinical and translational research. During the following years, many additional full and associate members joined ACC, that presently includes the National Institute of Health, 17 research-oriented hospitals, scientific and patient organizations. Furthermore, in the last three years ACC underwent a reorganization process that redesigned the structure, governance and major activities. The present goal of ACC is to achieve high standards of care across Italy, to implement and harmonize principles of modern personalized and precision medicine, by developing cost effective processes and to provide tailored information to cancer patients. We herein summarize some of the major initiatives that ACC is currently developing to reach its goal, including tumor genetic screening programs, establishment of clinical trial programs for cancer patients treated in Italian cancer centers, facilitate their access to innovative drugs under development, improve quality through an European accreditation process (European Organization of Cancer Institutes), and develop international partnerships. In conclusion, ACC is a growing organization, trying to respond to the need of networking in Italy and may contribute significantly to improve the way we face cancer in Europe.

  4. Multi-targeted approach to cancer treatment: an international translational cancer research symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Kapil; Gandhi, Varsha; Pathak, Sen; Aggarwal, Bharat B; Grover, Rajesh K

    2014-11-01

    Whether it is chronic myeloid leukemia, ALK-expressing malignancies, or HER2-positive breast cancer, targeted-therapies for treatment of human cancers have shown great promise. However, as they hit a single molecule expressed in neoplastic cells, their use is frequently associated with development of resistance. In cancer cells many signaling pathways operate in parallel, hence the idea of multi-targeted therapy is prevailing. The Society of Translational Cancer Research held its biennial meeting in the capital city of India, Delhi from February 6th through 9th, 2014 to discuss 'Multi-targeted Approach to Treatment of Cancer'. Over 200 scientists, clinicians, trainees, and industry representatives from different countries gathered in Vigyan Bhavan, the hotspot of Delhi for four days to talk and discuss on a variety of topics related to multi-targeted therapeutic approaches. Talks were presented by leaders in the cancer research field from various countries. It became clear from this conference that coupling multiple targeted-agents or using an agent that hits an individual target in several independent locations in the disease-causing pathway(s) may be the best approach to treat different cancers.

  5. Translational genomics in cancer research:converting proifles into personalized cancer medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lalit Patel; Brittany Parker; Da Yang; Wei Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Cancer genomics is a rapidly growing discipline in which the genetic molecular basis of malignancy is studied at the scale of whole genomes. While the discipline has been successful with respect to identifying specific oncogenes and tumor suppressors involved in oncogenesis, it is also challenging our approach to managing patients suffering from this deadly disease. Speciifcally cancer genomics is driving clinical oncology to take a more molecular approach to diagnosis, prognostication, and treatment selection. We review here recent work undertaken in cancer genomics with an emphasis on translation of genomic ifndings. Finally, we discuss scientiifc challenges and research opportunities emerging from ifndings derived through analysis of tumors with high-depth sequencing.

  6. Training Of Teacher-Researcher As Prior Consideration Of Professional Training Of Pedagogues In Great Britain Abstract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozubovska Iryna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the problem of professional training of pedagogues in foreign countries. Special attention has been paid to the experience of Great Britain. It has been underlined that the teacher has to acquire thorough knowledge in profession as well as to master the methods of teaching. Nevertheless, this is not enough to reach success in a professional field. The educational system today needs a teacher-researcher. It has been proved that the process which provides scientific and educational unity by means of involving students into scientific work is stirring up in European pedagogical institutions. The problem of orientating the teachers to be on research work is considered to be the most important condition of their personal professional self-determination and professional culture. A new teacher-researcher training pattern in British higher educational system has been made. This pattern includes some interdependent components and is successful under certain pedagogic conditions: the possession of research position by a teacher-to-be; ensuring creative interaction and cooperation among students and teachers; introduction of special educative modules with research orientation; the use of project technologies; the arrangement of creative educational atmosphere; establishing friendly relationships among university teachers (lecturers, students and school teachers. The accent is made on the urgent necessity of implementation of British experience in Ukraine.

  7. Mapping cancer, cardiovascular and malaria research in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.S. Rodrigues

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents performance indicators for the Brazilian cancer, cardiovascular and malaria research areas from 1981 to 1995. The data show an increasing number of papers since 1981 and author numbers indicate a continuous growth of the scientific community and suggest an expected impact of scientific activity on biomedical education. The data also characterize cardiovascular research as a well-established area and cancer research as a faster growing consolidating field. The 1989-1994 share of Brazilian articles among world publications shows a growing trend for the cancer (1.61 and cardiovascular (1.59 areas, and a decrease for the malaria area (0.89. The burden of the three diseases on society is contrasted by the small number of consolidated Brazilian research groups, and a questionable balance of thematic activity, especially with regard to malaria. Brazilian periodicals play an important role in increasing the international visibility of science produced in the country. Cancer and cardiovascular research is strongly concentrated in the Southeastern and in Southern regions of Brazil, especially in São Paulo (at least one address from São Paulo in 64.5% of the 962 cancer articles and in 66.9% of the 2250 cardiovascular articles, the second state being Rio de Janeiro with at least one address in 14.1 and 11% of those articles, respectively. Malaria research (468 articles is more evenly distributed across the country, following the pattern of the endemic distribution of the disease. Surveying these national indicator trends can be useful to establish policies in the decision process about health sciences, medical education and public health.

  8. Prevention and Treatment of Cancer: Hypes and Hopes 6th International Translational Cancer Research Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Prabhudas; Vora, Hemangini; Aggarwal, Bharat B; Gandhi, Varsha; Mehta, Kapil; Pathak, Sen

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is primarily an "old-age" disease that has an "age-old" history. The overall incidence of cancer is much higher in Western countries, but is rapidly growing in Eastern countries perhaps due to change in life-style. Almost three million studies published to date indicate that cancer is a hyperproliferative disorder that arises from dysregulation of multiple cell signaling pathways. The cancer genome landscape indicates that approximately 140 genes and 12 cell signaling pathways drive almost all cancers. "Targeted therapy," a buzz word in cancer treatment for the past two decades, has provided antibodies, as well as small-molecule inhibitors. These therapies have been successful only in few instances. However, in most cases, minor increase in overall survival has been reported at the cost of huge expense. An alternative strategy is to prevent cancer or to diagnose and treat the disease at an early stage to gain survival benefits. Such interventions are also cost-effective. To address some of these issues, the 6th International Translational Cancer Research Conference was held during February 4-7th, 2016, in Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India; the homeland of Mahatma Gandhi. This conference was focused on utilizing multidisciplinary approaches for prevention and early treatment that would likely simultaneously or sequentially target many key pathways. Several distinguished speakers were invited from around the world. This article highlights primary features of this conference.

  9. About the Nutritional Science Research Group | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Nutritional Science Research Group (NSRG) promotes and supports studies establishing a comprehensive understanding of the precise role of diet and food components in modulating cancer risk and tumor cell behavior. This focus includes approaches to characterize molecular targets and variability in individual responses to nutrients and dietary patterns. |

  10. Mexican breast cancer research output, 2003-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Santos, Jose Luis Martin; Anaya-Ruiz, Maricruz

    2013-01-01

    The objetive of this study was to explore a bibliometric approach to quantitatively assess current research trends with regard to breast cancer in Mexico. Articles were analyzed by scientific output and research performances of individuals, institutes, and collaborative countries with Mexico. Data were retrieved from the Web of Science database from 2003 to 2012; this was searched using different terms related to breast cancer, including "breast cancer", "mammary ductal carcinoma" and "breast tumour". Data were then extracted from each file, transferred to Excel charts and visualised as diagrams. A total of 256 articles were retrieved. The institutions with the majority of publications were the National Autonomous University of Mexico (22.3%), the National Institute of Cancerology (21.9%), and Social Security Mexican Institute (20.3%); clinical observation studies were the dominant investigation type (64%), and the main types of research were metabolics (24.2%) and pathology (21.5%). This article demonstrates the usefulness of bibliometrics to address key evaluation questions and to establish priorities, define future areas of research, and develop breast cancer control strategies in Mexico.

  11. Tumor Cold Ischemia - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a recently published manuscript in the journal of Molecular and Cellular Proteomics, researchers from the National Cancer Institutes (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) investigated the effect of cold ischemia on the proteome of fresh frozen tumors.

  12. Simulator Training Requirements and Effectiveness Study (STRES): Future Research Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    simulation technology. The AFHRL/OT program, using the ASPT and SAAC devices, is already embarked on an extensive visual technology research effort, one...facilities that would be required to conduct the research described. In some cases, specific research devices are mentioned, such as ASPT , SAAC, and the...configuration of a particular device cannot be foreseen at this point (e.g., the ASPT might have a variety of possible specific cockpit configurations), no

  13. Football training improves lean body mass in men with prostate cancer undergoing androgen deprivation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uth, J; Hornstrup, Therese; Schmidt, Jakob Friis;

    2014-01-01

    ). Fifty-seven men aged 67 (range: 43-74) were randomly assigned to a football group (FG, n = 29) or a usual care control group (CON, n = 28). The primary outcome was change in lean body mass (LBM) assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scanning. Secondary outcomes included changes in knee.......7%; 95%CI 1.3-0.0; P = 0.06), but these changes were not significantly different from CON. In conclusion, football training over 12 weeks improved LBM and muscle strength compared with usual care in men with prostate cancer receiving ADT....

  14. Swallowing therapy and progressive resistance training in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredslund Hajdu, Sara Vinther; Wessel, Irene; Johansen, Christoffer

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Head and neck cancer (HNC) patients are often challenged by treatment induced dysphagia and trismus. Traditionally, rehabilitation is initiated when loss of function has already occurred. There is increasing evidence that it is of benefit to patients to initiate an early rehabilitation...... process before and during treatment. HNC patients have a unique set of functional challenges such as pre- and post-treatment dysphagia, pain and weight loss. The aim of the trial is to investigate the effects of swallowing and mouth-opening exercises combined with progressive resistance training (PRT...... that exercise according to protocol is tolerable and feasible....

  15. Systems biology in the frontier of cancer research:a report of the Second International Workshop of Cancer Systems Biology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Cui; Yan-Chun Liang; Ying Xu

    2012-01-01

    The report summarizes the Second International Workshop of Cancer Systems Biology held on July 5-6,2012 in Changchun,China.The goal of the workshop was to bring together cancer researchers with different backgrounds to share their views about cancer and their experiences in fighting against cancer,and to gain new and systems-level understanding about cancer formation,progression,diagnosis,and treatment through exchanging ideas.

  16. Feasibility and preliminary efficacy of progressive resistance exercise training in lung cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddle-McIntyre, Carolyn J; Bell, Gordon; Fenton, David; McCargar, Linda; Courneya, Kerry S

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer survivors exhibit poor functional capacity, physical functioning, and quality of life (QoL). Here, we report the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a progressive resistance exercise training (PRET) intervention in post-treatment lung cancer survivors. Seventeen post-treatment lung cancer survivors (10 female), with a mean age of 67 (range 50-85), mean BMI of 25, and diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer (94%) were recruited in Edmonton, Canada between August 2009 and August 2010 to undergo PRET. The primary outcomes focused on feasibility including eligibility and recruitment rate, loss to follow-up, measurement completion, exercise adherence, and program evaluation. Secondary outcomes addressed preliminary efficacy and included changes in muscular strength (1 repetition maximum), muscular endurance (repetitions at 70% of 1 repetition maximum), body composition (DXA scan), physical functioning (6-minute-walk-test, up-and-go, sit-to-stand, arm curls), and patient-reported outcomes including QoL (SF-36, FACT-L), fatigue (FACT-F), dyspnea (MRCD), and patient-rated function (LLFI). Forty of 389 lung cancer survivors were eligible (10%) and 17 of the 40 (43%) were recruited. Over 80% of participants were able to complete all testing; two participants were lost to follow-up, and the median adherence rate was 96% (range: 25-100%). Ratings of testing burden were low (i.e., less than two out of seven for all items), and trial evaluation was high (i.e., greater than six out of seven for all measures). Paired t-tests showed significant increases in muscular strength (plung cancer survivors in the post-treatment setting.

  17. Targeting hedgehog signaling in cancer: research and clinical developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie J

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Jingwu Xie, Christopher M Bartels, Scott W Barton, Dongsheng GuWells Center for Pediatric Research, Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Indiana University Simon Cancer Center, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN, USAAbstract: Since its first description in Drosophila by Drs Nusslein-Volhard and Wieschaus in 1980, hedgehog (Hh signaling has been implicated in regulation of cell differentiation, proliferation, tissue polarity, stem cell maintenance, and carcinogenesis. The first link of Hh signaling to cancer was established through studies of Gorlin syndrome in 1996 by two independent teams. Later, it was shown that Hh signaling may be involved in many types of cancer, including skin, leukemia, lung, brain, and gastrointestinal cancers. In early 2012, the US Food and Drug Administration approved the clinical use of Hh inhibitor Erivedge/vismodegib for treatment of locally advanced and metastatic basal cell carcinomas. With further investigation, it is possible to see more clinical applications of Hh signaling inhibitors. In this review, we will summarize major advances in the last 3 years in our understanding of Hh signaling activation in human cancer, and recent developments in preclinical and clinical studies using Hh signaling inhibitors.Keywords: hedgehog, smoothened, PTCH1, cancer, signal transduction, clinical trials, animal model

  18. 76 FR 66728 - Government-Owned Inventions; Licensing and Collaborative Research Opportunity for PANVAC-Cancer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-27

    ... the Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, NCI. The CRADA partner... Research Opportunity for PANVAC--Cancer Vaccine for the Prevention and Treatment of Colorectal Cancer... Technology Transfer Center, National Cancer Institute, 6120 Executive Boulevard, Suite 450, Rockville,...

  19. Leveraging the power of pooled data for cancer outcomes research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kiara Hugh-Yeun; Winson Y. Cheung

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clinical trials continue to be the gold standard for determining the effcacy of novel cancer treatments, but they may also expose participants to the potential risks of unpredictable or severe toxicities. The development of validated tools that better inform patients of the beneifts and risks associated with clinical trial participation can facilitate the informed consent process. The design and validation of such instruments are strengthened when we leverage the power of pooled data analysis for cancer outcomes research. Main body: In a recent study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology entitled“Determinants of early mortal‑ity among 37,568 patients with colon cancer who participated in 25 clinical trials from the adjuvant colon cancer endpoints database,”using a large pooled analysis of over 30,000 study participants who were enrolled in clinical trials of adjuvant therapy for early‑stage colon cancer, we developed and validated a nomogram depicting the predictors of early cancer mortality. This database of pooled individual‑level data allowed for a comprehensive analysis of poor prognostic factors associated with early death;furthermore, it enabled the creation of a nomogram that was able to reliably capture and quantify the beneift‑to‑risk proifle for patients who are considering clinical trial participation. This tool can facilitate treatment decision‑making discussions. Conclusion: As China and other Asian countries continue to conduct oncology clinical trials, efforts to collate patient‑level information from these studies into a large data repository should be strongly considered since pooled data can increase future capacity for cancer outcomes research, which, in turn, can enhance patient‑physician discus‑sions and optimize clinical care.

  20. Cancer research and therapy: Where are we today?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sampada Sawant

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Till date scientists are struggling to understand the complete mechanism of carcinogenesis. In future, the real time detection of cancer may help scientists to identify some of the complicated biological mechanisms. Certain special features of cancer cells enable researchers to deliver the drug or to develop the right drug therapy. These cell properties include over expression or over activity in uptake of certain nutrients e.g. folic acid and increased permeability. Listed properties might vary depending upon the type of cancer and can be fully exploited by using nanoparticles either to detect the site of cancer or to direct the drug at the affected site. Product approach like drug conjugates, complexes serves as a good platform to solve issues like solubility, toxicity, poor penetration and stability related to cancer drugs. Beside this, several drug delivery platforms are under development by researchers in academia as well as in industry to deliver therapeutic molecules and new chemical entities to the targeted site in body. Amongst them, nanotechnology both at molecular and supramolecular level is a leading platform and can help to image, detect and treat cancer. Surface modification of nanoparticles by coating or anchoring their surface with special markers, materials, peptide, proteins, antibodies or antigens add extra feature and thereby can enhance the effectiveness. These treatments can be used individually or in combined form. In this review, advances on nanotechnological platform are discussed together with some assisting techniques like magnetic field, photo or light field, sonic rays are touched upon. New biological therapies that are advancing in this direction include the antisense therapy, cell therapy, gene therapy, radiation therapy and SiRNA interfaces which are discussed in brief in this article. This article gives short overview on use of complementary and alternative medicine for treatment of cancer such as traditional

  1. Educational-researching and Information Resources In Interdisciplinary Automated Training System Based On Internet Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Savitskaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is the study of the functionality of modular object-oriented dynamic learning environment (Moodle to development the informational and educational and educational research resource for training students in the disciplines of natural-scientific and engineer science. Have considered scientific-practical and methodological experience in the development, implementation and use of the interdisciplinary automated training system based on the Moodle system in the educational process. Presented the structure of the typical training course and set out recommendations for the development of information and educational resources different types of lessons and self-study students.Have considered the features of preparation of teaching-research resources of the assignments for lab using the software package MatLab. Also has considered the experience of implementing the discipline “Remote educational technologies and electronic learning in the scientific and the educational activities” for the training of graduate students at the Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology of Russia. The proposed an article approaches to the implementation of informational and educational and educational research resources in the interdisciplinary automated training system can be applied for a wide range of similar disciplines of natural-scientific and engineering sciences in a multilevel system of training of graduates.

  2. A new paradigm for graduate research and training in the biomedical sciences and engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, J D; Coté, G L; Walton, J R; Meininger, G A; Laine, G A

    2005-06-01

    98Emphasis on the individual investigator has fostered discovery for centuries, yet it is now recognized that the complexity of problems in the biomedical sciences and engineering requires collaborative efforts from individuals having diverse training and expertise. Various approaches can facilitate interdisciplinary interactions, but we submit that there is a critical need for a new educational paradigm for the way that we train biomedical engineers, life scientists, and mathematicians. We cannot continue to train graduate students in isolation within single disciplines, nor can we ask any one individual to learn all the essentials of biology, engineering, and mathematics. We must transform how students are trained and incorporate how real-world research and development are done-in diverse, interdisciplinary teams. Our fundamental vision is to create an innovative paradigm for graduate research and training that yields a new generation of biomedical engineers, life scientists, and mathematicians that is more diverse and that embraces and actively pursues a truly interdisciplinary, team-based approach to research based on a known benefit and mutual respect. In this paper, we describe our attempt to accomplish this via focused training in biomechanics, biomedical optics, mathematics, mechanobiology, and physiology. The overall approach is applicable, however, to most areas of biomedical research.

  3. The Research on Biochemical Indexes of Athletes after Taking Nutritional Supplements during Winter Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Pan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper takes hemoglobin and blood urea as the indexes of biochemical monitoring and accordingly supplying sports nutritional supplements into them at the same time, the effect on exercise capacity and the changes in biochemical indicators in different training stages will be observed in this research. The quality of winter training determines the motion states of athletes in the next year. However, the poor weather condition and the large amount of training will lead to the accumulation of fatigue, affecting the training status of athletes seriously. Therefore, it is essential to monitor their biochemical indicators and supply them with special nutrition. In order to ensure the completion of a large load of training for athletes, it is far enough to supplement the nutrients just by food, some special powerful nutrition are also needed in a scientific way.

  4. Collaboration - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite great strides in proteomics and the growing number of articles citing the discovery of potential biomarkers, the actual rate of introduction of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved protein analytes has been relatively unchanged over the past 10 years. One of reasons for the lack of new protein-based biomarkers approved has been a lack of information and understanding by the proteomics research community to the regulatory process used by the FDA.

  5. WE-A-16A-01: International Medical Physics Symposium: Increasing Access to Medical Physics Education/Training and Research Excellence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bortfeld, T [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Ngoma, T [Ocean Road Cancer Institute, Dar Es Salaam (Tanzania, United Republic of); Odedina, F [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Morgan, S [IAEA PACT, Vienna (Austria); Wu, R [University of Arizona Cancer Center, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Sajo, E [University Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA (United States); Ngwa, W [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    In response to a world in which cancer is a growing global health challenge, there is now a greater need for US Medical Physicists and other Radiation Oncology professionals across institutions to work together and be more globally engaged in the fight against cancer. There are currently many opportunities for Medical Physicists to contribute to alleviating this pressing need, especially in helping enhance access to Medical Physics Education/training and Research Excellence across international boundaries, particularly for low and middle-income countries (LMIC), which suffer from a drastic shortage of accessible knowledge and quality training programs in radiotherapy. Many Medical Physicists are not aware of the range of opportunities that even with small effort could have a high impact. Faculty at the two CAMPEP-accredited Medical Physics Programs in New England: the University of Massachusetts Lowell and Harvard Medical School have developed a growing alliance to increase Access to Medical Physics Education/training and Research Excellence (AMPERE), and facilitate greater active involvement of U.S. Medical Physicists in helping the global fight against cancer and cancer disparities. In this symposium, AMPERE Alliance members and partners from Europe and Africa will present and discuss the growing global cancer challenge, the dearth of knowledge, research, and other barriers to providing life-saving radiotherapy in LMIC, mechanisms for meeting these challenges, the different opportunities for participation by Medical Physicists, including students and residents, and how participation can be facilitated to increase AMPERE for global health. Learning Objectives: To learn about the growing global cancer challenge, areas of greatest need and limitations to accessing knowledge and quality radiotherapy training programs, especially in LMIC; To learn about the range of opportunities for Medical Physicists, including students and residents, to work together in global

  6. CPTAC Scientific Symposium - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    On behalf of the National Cancer Institute and the Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research, you are invited to the First Annual CPTAC Scientific Symposium on Wednesday, November 13, 2013. The purpose of this symposium, which consists of plenary and poster sessions, is for investigators from CPTAC community and beyond to share and discuss novel biological discoveries, analytical methods, and translational approaches using CPTAC data. All scientists who use, or wish to use CPTAC data are welcome to participate at this free event. The symposium will be held at the Natcher Conference Facility on the main campus of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland.

  7. The value of research collaborations and consortia in rare cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blay, Jean-Yves; Coindre, Jean-Michel; Ducimetière, Françoise; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle

    2016-02-01

    Rare cancers are defined by an incidence of less than six per 100,000 people per year. They represent roughly 20% of all human cancers and are associated with worse survival than are so-called frequent tumours, because of delays to accurate diagnosis, inadequate treatments, and fewer opportunities to participate in clinical trials (because of a paucity of dedicated trials from both academic and industrial sponsors). In this Series paper, we discuss how these challenges can be addressed by research consortia and suggest the integration of these consortia with reference networks, which gather multidisciplinary expert centres, for management of rare tumours.

  8. Action Research as an educational strategy in post-initial teacher training: an example

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponte, P.; Beers, R.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the value of action-research within the context of the professionalization of teachers in further education. Further education based on action research will be elaborated on with reference to the training course for 'School Counselling & Guidance' at the Fa

  9. 77 FR 41387 - Applications for New Awards; Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Vocational...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-13

    ... research in refereed journals. The number of products (e.g., new or improved tools, methods, discoveries... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Applications for New Awards; Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Vocational Rehabilitation...

  10. Assessment of Professional Training Programmes in International Agricultural Research Institutions: The Case of ICRAF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanjiku, Julliet; Mairura, Franklin; Place, Frank

    2010-01-01

    The following survey was undertaken in 2005 to assess the effectiveness of professional training activities in international agricultural research organizations that were undertaken between 1999 and 2002 at ICRAF (International Centre for Research in Agroforestry), now World Agroforestry Centre, Nairobi. Trainees were randomly selected from…

  11. In-Service Teacher Training and Coaching on Marzano's Instructional Strategies: An Action Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Shenequa C.

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this action research study was the implementation of a professional development initiative comprised of two phases: a training program for teachers on Marzano's nine research-based instructional strategies, and the implementation, supported by follow-up coaching, during "Pear Mountain" High School's (a pseudonym) six-week…

  12. Evaluation of a Training Program in Aging Research for Social Work Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Chandra M.; Townsend, Aloen; Berkman, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Since 2004, we have offered a postgraduate training program in aging research for social work faculty from across the country. The overarching goal of the program is to expand the pool of social work faculty engaged in aging research. This, in turn, will reinvigorate participants' teaching; prepare them to update aging-related content in the…

  13. Clinical cancer research: the past, present and the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVita, Vincent T; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Hellman, Samuel; Kerr, David J

    2014-11-01

    In the past decade, we have witnessed unprecedented changes and some remarkable advances that have enabled true personalized medicine. Nevertheless, many challenges in clinical cancer research remain and need to be overcome if we are to witness similar progress in the next decade. Such hurdles include, but are not limited to, clinical development and testing of multiple agents in combination, design of clinical trials to best accommodate the ever increasing knowledge of heterogeneity of the disease, regulatory challenges relating to drug development and trial design, and funding for basic research. With this in mind, we asked four leading cancer researchers from around the world, and who have been associated with the journal since its launch in November 2004 what, in their opinion, we have learnt over the past 10 years and how we should progress in the next 10 years.

  14. Why is it crucial to reintegrate pathology into cancer research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Eberle, Franziska C; Jaffe, Elaine S; Emmert-Buck, Michael R

    2011-07-01

    The integration of pathology with molecular biology is vital if we are to enhance the translational value of cancer research. Pathology represents a bridge between medicine and basic biology, it remains the gold standard for cancer diagnosis, and it plays an important role in discovery studies. In the past, pathology and cancer research were closely associated; however, the molecular biology revolution has shifted the focus of investigators toward the molecular alterations of tumors. The reductionist approach taken in molecular studies is producing great insight into the inner workings of neoplasia, but it can also minimize the importance of histopathology and of understanding the disease as a whole. In turn, pathologists can underestimate the role of molecular studies in developing new ancillary techniques for clinical diagnosis. A multidisciplinary approach that integrates pathology and molecular biology within a translational research system is needed. This process will require overcoming cultural barriers and can be achieved through education, a more effective incorporation of pathology into biological research, and conversely an integration of biological research into the pathology laboratory.

  15. A qualitative approach to Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) training development: identification of metacognitive strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kligyte, Vykinta; Marcy, Richard T; Sevier, Sydney T; Godfrey, Elaine S; Mumford, Michael D

    2008-03-01

    Although Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) training is common in the sciences, the effectiveness of RCR training is open to question. Three key factors appear to be particularly important in ensuring the effectiveness of ethics education programs: (1) educational efforts should be tied to day-to-day practices in the field, (2) educational efforts should provide strategies for working through the ethical problems people are likely to encounter in day-to-day practice, and (3) educational efforts should be embedded in a broader program of on-going career development efforts. This article discusses a complex qualitative approach to RCR training development, based on a sensemaking model, which strives to address the afore-mentioned training concerns. Ethnographic observations and prior RCR training served the purpose of collecting information specific to a multi-disciplinary and multi-university research center with the goal of identifying metacognitive reasoning strategies that would facilitate ethical decision-making. The extensive qualitative analyses resulted in the identification of nine metacognitive reasoning strategies on which future RCR training will be developed. The implications of the findings for RCR training in the sciences are discussed.

  16. Effects of Six Weeks Endurance Training and Aloe Vera Supplementation on COX-2 and VEGF Levels in Mice with Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirali, Saeed; Barari, Alireza; Hosseini, Seyed Ahmad; Khodadi, Elaheh

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine effects of six weeks endurance training and Aloe Vera supplementation on COX-2 and VEGF levels in mice with breast cancer. For this purpose, 35 rats were randomly divided into 5 groups: control (healthy) and 4 cancer groups: control (cancer only), training, Aloe Vera and Aloe Vera + training. Breast cancer tumors were generated in mice by implantind. The training program comprised six weeks of swimming training accomplished in three sessions per week. Training time started with 10 minutes on the first day and increased to 60 minutes in the second week and the water flow rate was increased from 7 to 15 liters per minute at a constant rate. Aloe Vera extract at a dose of 300 mg/kg BW was administrated to rats by intraperitoneal injection. At the end of the study period, rats were anesthetized and blood samples were taken. Significant differences were concluded at pAloe Vera extract caused significant decrease in the COX-2 level in the cancer group. Also, in the training (swimming exercise) and Aloe Vera + training cancer groups, we observed significant decrease in the VEGF level as compared to controls. Our results suggest that Aloe Vera and training inhibit the COX pathway and cause decrease production of prostaglandin E2. Hence administration of Aloe Vera in combination with endurance training might synergistically improve the host milieu in mice bearing breast cancers.

  17. ENRICH Forum: Ethical aNd Regulatory Issues in Cancer ResearcH

    Science.gov (United States)

    ENRICH Forum: Ethical aNd Regulatory Issues in Cancer ResearcH, designed to stimulate dialogue on ethical and regulatory issues in cancer research and promote awareness of developing policies and best practices.

  18. Starting them Early: Incorporating Communication Training into Undergraduate Research Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, B. A.; Morris, A. R.; Charlevoix, D.

    2014-12-01

    In order to truly broaden the impact of our scientific community, effective communication should be taught alongside research skills to developing scientists. In the summer of 2014, we incorporated an informal communications course into the 10th year of UNAVCO's Research Experiences in Solid Earth Science for Students (RESESS), a year-long internship program centered around an 11-week intensive summer research experience. The goals of the newly designed course included giving students the tools they need to make a broader impact with their science, starting now; improving the students' confidence in public speaking and using social media for outreach; and giving students the tools they need to apply for jobs or graduate school. Specifically, the course included teaching of professional communication skills, such as e-mail and phone etiquette, resume and CV tailoring, and interview techniques, and public communications skills, such as crafting and simplifying messages, visual communication for the public, and public speaking. Student interns were encouraged to step back from the details of their research projects to put their work into a big-picture context relevant to the public and to policy makers. The course benefited from input and/or participation from UNAVCO Education and Community Engagement staff, engineering and managerial staff, and graduate student interns outside the RESESS program, and University of Colorado research and communications mentors already involved in RESESS. As the summer program is already packed with research and skill development, one major challenge was fitting in teaching these communications skills amongst many other obligations: a GRE course, a peer-focused scientific communications course, a computing course, and, of course, research. Can we do it all? This presentation will provide an overview of the course planning, articulation of course goals, and execution challenges and successes. We will present our lessons learned from

  19. Recommendations for Recruiting and Retaining Adolescent Girls in Chronic Exercise (Training Research Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Massie

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Extensive challenges are often encountered when recruiting participants to chronic exercise (training studies. High participant burden during chronic exercise training programmes can result in low uptake to and/or poor compliance with the study. The aim of this qualitative study was to identify factors affecting adolescent girls’ recruitment and adherence to chronic exercise training research studies. Twenty-six adolescent girls (aged 12 to 15 years participated in one of five focus groups discussing recruitment and retention to exercise physiology research involving a chronic exercise training programme. A thematic analysis was used to analyse the data and eight final themes were inductively identified. Seven evidence-based practical recommendations are suggested to improve the recruitment and retention of participants for prospective, chronic exercise training studies. Successful recruitment requires: (i the defining of exercise-related terms; (ii appropriate choice of recruitment material; and (iii an understanding of participant motivations. Retention strategies include: (iv regular monitoring of participant motives; and (v small groups which foster peer and researcher support. Finally, (vi friendship and ability groups were favoured in addition to (vii a variety of activities to promote adherence to an exercise training programme.

  20. Proteomics in epigenetics: new perspectives for cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartke, Till; Borgel, Julie; DiMaggio, Peter A

    2013-05-01

    The involvement of epigenetic processes in the origin and progression of cancer is now widely appreciated. Consequently, targeting the enzymatic machinery that controls the epigenetic regulation of the genome has emerged as an attractive new strategy for therapeutic intervention. The development of epigenetic drugs requires a detailed knowledge of the processes that govern chromatin regulation. Over the recent years, mass spectrometry (MS) has become an indispensable tool in epigenetics research. In this review, we will give an overview of the applications of MS-based proteomics in studying various aspects of chromatin biology. We will focus on the use of MS in the discovery and mapping of histone modifications and how novel proteomic approaches are being utilized to identify and study chromatin-associated proteins and multi-subunit complexes. Finally, we will discuss the application of proteomic methods in the diagnosis and prognosis of cancer based on epigenetic biomarkers and comment on their future impact on cancer epigenetics.

  1. The effect of progressive resistance training on lean body mass in post-treatment cancer patients - A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønbro, Simon

    2014-01-01

    resistance training on lean body mass in post-treatment cancer patients. A comprehensive literature search was conducted and ultimately 12 studies were included. Methodological quality of the included studies was evaluated using the PEDro scale and the effect of progressive resistance training was reported......Loss of lean body mass is a common problem in many post-treatment cancer patients and may negatively affect physical capacity in terms of maximal muscle strength and functional performance. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the scientific evidence on the effect of progressive...... as the range of mean changes among RCTs and non-RCTs. Six RCTs and six non-RCTs were included in the study. In the RCTs the change in lean body mass in the progressive resistance training groups relative to control groups ranged from -0.4% to 3.9%, and in four of six trials the training effect...

  2. Translational Research in Oncology Research & Development and Its Impact on Early Development in China: report of the 5th Annual Meeting of the US Chinese Anti-Cancer Association (USCACA) at 2013 AACR Annual Meeting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lingjie Guan; Yun Dai; Roger Luo

    2013-01-01

    In April 2013,the US Chinese Anti-Cancer Association (USCACA) held its 5th annual meeting in conjunction with the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) 2013 Annual Meeting in Washington DC.The USCACA executive committee reported activities and programs and highlighted the partnership and collaboration between USCACA and other major organizations.The key initiatives and programs of USCACA included 1) USCACA-TIGM Esophageal Cancer Program that funds translational research of esophageal cancer prevention and treatment at the Xinxiang Medical University in Henan province,China; 2) the USCACA-NFCR-AFCR Scholarship Program,which has supported 10 young outstanding Chinese cancer researchers and will award 4 fellowships at the Guangzhou International Symposium on Oncology in November this year; 3) USCACA-Hengrui Training Program for Early Phase Clinical Research,which has supported the training of a Chinese scholar at two major cancer centers in the US; and 4) USCACA has continued its partnership with the Chinese Journal of Cancer,which has reached significant international impact.

  3. HOW TO USE ACTION RESEARCH IN TEACHER TRAINING PROGRAMMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KÖPRÜLÜ, Özlem

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on action research study which was conducted with the third class students of English Language Teaching Department ,which was completed in four weeks.The aim was to introduce action research to teachers-in-preparation and encourage them to use it after their graduation to help them to become reflective teachers..Before this action research began,teachers-in-preparation had been tutoring for five weeks.In the first week of the action research study,in the classroom, students tried to find common teaching problems they had while tutoring and they used data collection techniques such as video-taping and peer observation, and in the second week they shared what they had learned about their problems and what their action plans were.In later weeks they shared the results of their the action plans and how successful their plans were.It was hoped that teachers-in-preparation would become more flexible in their thinking,be more open to new ideas and would learn to develop professional autonomy.

  4. Training in the Archives: Archival Research as Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehl, Jonathan; Chute, Tamar; Fields, Anne

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the rationale and efficacy of a graduate-level teaching module providing loosely structured practice with real archives. Introducing early career scholars to archival methods changed their beliefs about knowledge, research, teaching, and their discipline(s). This case study suggests that archives can be productive training…

  5. Research on cultures: how to use it in training?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstede, G.J.

    2009-01-01

    This article targets researchers who use culture as a control variable and trainers or consultants who use it when they speak about leadership, communication, management or other aspects of working life. It briefly sketches the state of the art in the study of culture. By and large the dimensional p

  6. Research and Studies Directory for Manpower, Personnel, and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    ASSESSMENT AIR FORCE ARNAIZ J* GENTEX CORP 717-282-3550 SUPPORT OF THE EVALUATION OF NIGHT VISION DEVICES SARSON G ARMSTRONG AEROSPACE MEDICAL RESEARCH...INST AND RETINA FOUNDATION 9 74 ARNAIZ J* GENTEX CORP 10 90 ATHANS M* MASSACHUSETTS INST OF TECHNOLOGY 9 67 AVEDISIAN K NAVAL ELECTRONICS SYSTEMS

  7. Endurance training improves insulin sensitivity and body composition in prostate cancer patients treated with androgen deprivation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Thine; Winding, Kamilla; Rinnov, Anders;

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance and changes in body composition are side effects of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) given to prostate cancer patients. The present study investigated whether endurance training improves insulin sensitivity and body composition in ADT-treated prostate cancer patients. Nine men...... and magnetic resonance imaging). The secondary endpoint was systemic inflammation. Statistical analysis was carried out using two-way ANOVA. Endurance training increased VO2max (ml(O2)/min per kg) by 11 and 13% in the patients and controls respectively (P...

  8. The effect of strength training on muscle cellular stress in prostate cancer patients on ADT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T S Nilsen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT for prostate cancer (PCa is associated with several side effects, including loss of muscle mass. Muscle atrophy is associated with reduced mitochondrial function and increased muscle cellular stress that may be counteracted by strength training. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of strength training on mitochondrial proteins and indicators of muscle cellular stress in PCa patients on ADT. Methods Men diagnosed with locally advanced PCa receiving ADT were randomised to a strength training group (STG (n=16 or a control group (CG (n=15 for 16 weeks. Muscle biopsies were collected pre- and post-intervention from the vastus lateralis muscle, and analysed for mitochondrial proteins (citrate synthase, cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV (COXIV, HSP60 and indicators of muscle cellular stress (heat shock protein (HSP 70, alpha B-crystallin, HSP27, free ubiquitin, and total ubiquitinated proteins using Western blot and ELISA. Results No significant intervention effects were observed in any of the mitochondrial proteins or indicators of muscle cellular stress. However, within-group analysis revealed that the level of HSP70 was reduced in the STG and a tendency towards a reduction in citrate synthase levels was observed in the CG. Levels of total ubiquitinated proteins were unchanged in both groups. Conclusion Although reduced HSP70 levels indicated reduced muscle cellular stress in the STG, the lack of an intervention effect precluded any clear conclusions.

  9. Funding Opportunities Available for Innovative SBIR Development - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Does your small business need early-stage financing to take its cancer research to the next level? The National Cancer Institute Small Business Innovation Research (NCI SBIR) Development Center has released $5 million for new contract funding opportunities to support cancer research and technology development in key emerging areas of need.

  10. A bibliometric analysis of diets and breast cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotepui, Manas; Wannaiampikul, Sivaporn; Chupeerach, Chaowanee; Duangmano, Suwit

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide. The primary aim of this work was to provide an in-depth evaluation of research publications in the field of diets and breast cancer. The impact of economic outcome on national academic productivity was also investigated. Data were retrieved using Pubmed for English-language publications. The search included all research for which articles included words relating to "diets and breast cancer". Population and national income data were obtained from publicly available databases. Impact factors for journals were obtained from Journal Citation Reports® (Thomson Scientific). There were 2,396 publications from 60 countries in 384 journals with an impact factor. Among them, 1,652 (68.94%) publications were Original articles. The United States had the highest quantity (51% of total) and highest of mean impact factor (8.852) for publication. Sweden had the highest productivity of publication when adjusted for number of population (6 publications per million population). Publications from the Asian nation increased from 5.3% in 2006 to 14.6% in 2012. The Original article type was also associated with geography (p<0.001; OR=2.183; 95%CI=1.526-3.123), Asian countries produced more proportion of Original articles (82%) than those of rest of the world (67.6%). Diets and breast cancer-associated research output continues to increase annually worldwide including publications from Asian countries. Although the United States produced the most publications, European nations per capita were higher in publication output.

  11. Tissue-engineered models of human tumors for cancer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villasante, Aranzazu; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Drug toxicity often goes undetected until clinical trials, which are the most costly and dangerous phase of drug development. Both the cultures of human cells and animal studies have limitations that cannot be overcome by incremental improvements in drug-testing protocols. A new generation of bioengineered tumors is now emerging in response to these limitations, with potential to transform drug screening by providing predictive models of tumors within their tissue context, for studies of drug safety and efficacy. An area that could greatly benefit from these models is cancer research. Areas covered In this review, the authors first describe the engineered tumor systems, using Ewing's sarcoma as an example of human tumor that cannot be predictably studied in cell culture and animal models. Then, they discuss the importance of the tissue context for cancer progression and outline the biomimetic principles for engineering human tumors. Finally, they discuss the utility of bioengineered tumor models for cancer research and address the challenges in modeling human tumors for use in drug discovery and testing. Expert opinion While tissue models are just emerging as a new tool for cancer drug discovery, they are already demonstrating potential for recapitulating, in vitro, the native behavior of human tumors. Still, numerous challenges need to be addressed before we can have platforms with a predictive power appropriate for the pharmaceutical industry. Some of the key needs include the incorporation of the vascular compartment, immune system components, and mechanical signals that regulate tumor development and function. PMID:25662589

  12. Final priority; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Advanced Rehabilitation Research Training Program. Final priority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-11

    The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services announces a priority for the Advanced Rehabilitation Research Training (ARRT) program under the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program administered by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for competitions in fiscal year (FY) 2013 and later years. We take this action to ensure that NIDRR's resources are appropriately allocated across the three outcome domains--community living and participation, employment, and health and function. We intend this priority to (1) strengthen the capacity of the disability and rehabilitation field to train qualified individuals, including individuals with disabilities, to conduct high-quality, advanced multidisciplinary rehabilitation research; and (2) improve outcomes for individuals with disabilities across the domains of community living and participation, employment, and health and function.

  13. Creating an infrastructure for training in the responsible conduct of research: the University of Pittsburgh's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Barbara E; Friedman, Charles P; Rosenberg, Jerome L; Russell, Joanne; Beedle, Ari; Levine, Arthur S

    2006-02-01

    In response to public concerns about the consequences of research misconduct, academic institutions have become increasingly cognizant of the need to implement comprehensive, effective training in the responsible conduct of research (RCR) for faculty, staff, students, and external collaborators. The ability to meet this imperative is challenging as universities confront declining financial resources and increasing complexity of the research enterprise. The authors describe the University of Pittsburgh's design, implementation, and evaluation of a Web-based, institution-wide RCR training program called Research and Practice Fundamentals (RPF). This project, established in 2000, was embedded in the philosophy, organizational structure, and technology developed through the Integrated Advanced Information Management Systems grant from the National Library of Medicine. Utilizing a centralized, comprehensive approach, the RPF system provides an efficient mechanism for deploying content to a large, diverse cohort of learners and supports the needs of research administrators by providing access to information about who has successfully completed the training. During its first 3 years of operation, the RPF served over 17,000 users and issued more than 38,000 training certificates. The 18 modules that are currently available address issues required by regulatory mandates and other content areas important to the research community. RPF users report high levels of satisfaction with content and ease of using the system. Future efforts must explore methods to integrate non-RCR education and training into a centralized, cohesive structure. The University of Pittsburgh's experience with the RPF demonstrates the importance of developing an infrastructure for training that is comprehensive, scalable, reliable, centralized, affordable, and sustainable.

  14. Combined approach to counteract experimental cancer cachexia: eicosapentaenoic acid and training exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penna, Fabio; Busquets, Silvia; Pin, Fabrizio; Toledo, Miriam; Baccino, Francesco M; López-Soriano, Francisco J; Costelli, Paola; Argilés, Josep M

    2011-06-01

    BACKGROUND: Cancer cachexia is a syndrome characterized by loss of skeletal muscle protein, depletion of lipid stores, anorexia, weakness, and perturbations of the hormonal homeostasis. Despite several therapeutic approaches described in the past, effective interventions countering cancer cachexia are still lacking. METHODS: The present work was aimed to verify the ability of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) to prevent the muscle depletion in Lewis lung carcinoma-bearing mice and to test the ability of endurance exercise training to increase the EPA effect. RESULTS: EPA alone did not prevent the muscle loss induced by tumor growth while the combination with exercise induced a partial rescue of muscle strength and mass. Moreover, the association of EPA and exercise reduced the dramatic PAX-7 accumulation and stimulated the increase of PCG-1 protein. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the present data suggest that exercise is an effective tool that should be added for combined therapeutic approaches against cancer cachexia. ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL: The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s13539-011-0028-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  15. Journal club: Integrating research awareness into postgraduate nurse training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Davis

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evidence-based nursing requires nurses to maintain an awareness of recently published research findings to integrate into their clinical practice. In the South African setting keeping up with recent literature has additional challenges, including the diversity of nurses’ home language, geographically foreign origins of published work, and limited economic resources. Students enrolled in a postgraduate programme came from various paediatric settings and displayed limited awareness of nursing literature as an evidence base for practice.Objectives: The study aimed to design and introduce a journal club as an educational strategy into the postgraduate programmes in children’s nursing at the University of Cape Town (UCT, and then to refine the way it is used to best serve programme outcomes and facilitate student learning whilst still being an enjoyable activity.Method: An action research methodology using successive cycles of ‘assess-plan-act-observe’ was used to design, implement and refine the structure of a journal club within the postgraduate diploma programme over four academic years. Six educators actively tracked and reflected on journal club sessions, and then analysed findings during and after each annual cycle to plan improvement and increasing programme alignment.Results: Considerable refinement of the intervention included changing how it was structured, the preparation required by both students and educators, the article selection process and the intervention’s alignment with other learning activities in the programme.Conclusion: Journal club facilitated an increase in student awareness and reading of nursing literature, offering the opportunity to consider application of published research to current nursing practice. Another benefit was enabling students to become familiar with the specialised and technical language of research, children’s nursing and the critical care of children and neonates, by speaking

  16. Cancer Treatment-Related Cardiotoxicity: Understanding the Current State of Knowledge and Developing Future Research Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer Treatment-Related Cardiotoxicity: Understanding the Current State of Knowledge and Developing Future Research Priorities, a 2013 workshop sponsored by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program.

  17. Cancer genomics object model: an object model for multiple functional genomics data for cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yu Rang; Lee, Hye Won; Cho, Sung Bum; Kim, Ju Han

    2007-01-01

    The development of functional genomics including transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics allow us to monitor a large number of key cellular pathways simultaneously. Several technology-specific data models have been introduced for the representation of functional genomics experimental data, including the MicroArray Gene Expression-Object Model (MAGE-OM), the Proteomics Experiment Data Repository (PEDRo), and the Tissue MicroArray-Object Model (TMA-OM). Despite the increasing number of cancer studies using multiple functional genomics technologies, there is still no integrated data model for multiple functional genomics experimental and clinical data. We propose an object-oriented data model for cancer genomics research, Cancer Genomics Object Model (CaGe-OM). We reference four data models: Functional Genomic-Object Model, MAGE-OM, TMAOM and PEDRo. The clinical and histopathological information models are created by analyzing cancer management workflow and referencing the College of American Pathology Cancer Protocols and National Cancer Institute Common Data Elements. The CaGe-OM provides a comprehensive data model for integrated storage and analysis of clinical and multiple functional genomics data.

  18. Automatic detection of lung nodules in computed tomography images: training and validation of algorithms using public research databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarlinghi, Niccolò

    2013-09-01

    Lung cancer is one of the main public health issues in developed countries. Lung cancer typically manifests itself as non-calcified pulmonary nodules that can be detected reading lung Computed Tomography (CT) images. To assist radiologists in reading images, researchers started, a decade ago, the development of Computer Aided Detection (CAD) methods capable of detecting lung nodules. In this work, a CAD composed of two CAD subprocedures is presented: , devoted to the identification of parenchymal nodules, and , devoted to the identification of the nodules attached to the pleura surface. Both CADs are an upgrade of two methods previously presented as Voxel Based Neural Approach CAD . The novelty of this paper consists in the massive training using the public research Lung International Database Consortium (LIDC) database and on the implementation of new features for classification with respect to the original VBNA method. Finally, the proposed CAD is blindly validated on the ANODE09 dataset. The result of the validation is a score of 0.393, which corresponds to the average sensitivity of the CAD computed at seven predefined false positive rates: 1/8, 1/4, 1/2, 1, 2, 4, and 8 FP/CT.

  19. Training for life science experiments in space at the NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Annette T.; Maese, A. Christopher

    1993-01-01

    As this country prepares for exploration to other planets, the need to understand the affects of long duration exposure to microgravity is evident. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center's Space Life Sciences Payloads Office is responsible for a number of non-human life sciences payloads on NASA's Space Shuttle's Spacelab. Included in this responsibility is the training of those individuals who will be conducting the experiments during flight, the astronauts. Preparing a crew to conduct such experiments requires training protocols that build on simple tasks. Once a defined degree of performance proficiency is met for each task, these tasks are combined to increase the complexity of the activities. As tasks are combined into in-flight operations, they are subjected to time constraints and the crew enhances their skills through repetition. The science objectives must be completely understood by the crew and are critical to the overall training program. Completion of the in-flight activities is proof of success. Because the crew is exposed to the background of early research and plans for post-flight analyses, they have a vested interest in the flight activities. The salient features of this training approach is that it allows for flexibility in implementation, consideration of individual differences, and a greater ability to retain experiment information. This training approach offers another effective alternative training tool to existing methodologies.

  20. Research on Athletic Training and Nutritional Supplement of Sugar and Protein in Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Mi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The research has the significance of revealing that the human being originates from the sports and develops with the sports, the human being is closely related with the sports. Through exercise, the energy is consumed, but at same time, the health is enhanced. For professional athletic training, the energy replacement shall be made in a scientific, careful and comprehensive way. Through supplement of nutritional ingredients such as sugar and protein etc., in diet, the human metabolism will be enhanced and the cardio-pulmonary function can be improved. Therefore, how to realize the most effective athletic training and energy supplement is an important subject for long term study. By means of the methods such as documentary analysis, data comparison and case analysis etc., the issues existing in athletic training and supplement of sugar and protein in diet are studied, so as to realize the best athletic training and nutritional supplement. The research conclusion lies in that the athletic training and nutritional supplement of sugar and protein in diet not only make the athletes recover and improve their energy, but also play an active guaranteeing role for athletic training.

  1. Teachers’ training and the use of educational technologies: research results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Chiaro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquire technological skills is an important requirement clearly evident by teachers in primary and secondary school at the end of a blended training course held at the University of Rome Three about issues related to students with Learning Disabilities. It is also significant the chance for teachers to constitute professional communities, such as the Community of Practice in the Lifelong Learning perspective, that might lead to collaborative strategies, knowledge sharing, discussion and reflection that are necessary to face the difficulties that every innovation involves. These factors can help teachers to overcome the condition of isolation which represents an important barrier to the development of an inclusive school in order to design inclusive educational strategies with the use of Information and Communication Technology according to the cultural perspective of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health for Children and Youth.Formazione degli insegnanti ed impiego delle tecnologie didattiche per l’inclusione: risultati di ricercaAcquisire competenze tecnologiche rappresenta una importante esigenza palesata da docenti in servizio nella scuola primaria e secondaria di I e II grado al termine di un percorso formativo svolto in modalità blended presso l’Università degli Studi di Roma Tre su tematiche relative agli allievi con Disturbi Specifici di Apprendimento. Rilevante anche la possibilità per gli insegnanti di costituire delle comunità professionali, quali le Comunità di Pratica, in ottica di lifelong learning, che possano dar luogo a strategie collaborative, di condivisione delle conoscenze, di confronto e riflessione necessari per affrontare le difficoltà che ogni innovazione comporta. Tali modalità possono rappresentare un supporto al superamento della condizione di isolamento in cui spesso i docenti si trovano ad operare, aspetto che costituisce uno dei principali ostacoli allo sviluppo di una

  2. Overcoming the challenges to consumer involvement in cancer research

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, Tony; Wilde, David; Hunt, John; Ahmedzai, Sam H

    2003-01-01

    Introduction  Within the last decade, there have been many government initiatives to promote consumer involvement in research, especially in cancer. At the same time, the number and influence of consumer groups themselves have expanded. However, the organizational infrastructure necessary to facilitate consumer involvement has not been developed. Consequently, consumer involvement has tended to remain essentially localized and project driven, with no strategic or regional lead.

  3. Interdisciplinary Research and Training Program in the Plant Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolk, C.P.

    1992-01-01

    Research on plants continued. Topics include: Molecular basis of symbiotic plant-microbe interations; enzymatic mechanisms and regulation of plant cell wall biosynthesis; molecular mechanisms that regulate the expression of genes in plants; resistance of plants to environmental stress; studies on hormone biosynthesis and action; plant cell wall proteins; interaction of nuclear and organelle genomes; sensor transduction in plants; molecular mechanisms of trafficking in the plant cell; regulation of lipid metabolism; molecular bases of plant disease resistance mechanisms; biochemical and molecular aspects of plant pathogenesis; developmental biology of nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria; environmental control of plant development and its relation to plant hormones.

  4. Harnessing information and communication technologies to leverage scarce resources for cancer education, research and practice in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andela Valentine B

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In developing countries, low levels of awareness, cost and organizational constraints on access to specialized care contribute to inadequate patient help-seeking behavior. As much as 95% of cancer patients in developing countries are diagnosed at late to end stage disease. Consequently, treatment outcome is dismally poor and a vicious cycle sets in, with public mystification of cancer and the admonishment of cancer medicine as a futile effort, all, to the further detriment of patient help-seeking behavior and treatment engagement. The situation spirals down, when the practice of cancer medicine is not gratifying to the medical practitioner and does not appeal as a medical specialty to those in training. The future of cancer medicine in developing countries thus hinges on the demystification of cancer through positive information, coupled to an effective organization that allows for the optimal use of available resources, facilitates access to specialized care and promotes the flow of knowledge and technology amongst various stakeholders. This paper strives to make a cogent argument and highlight the capital importance of information and communication technologies in organizing and leveraging scarce resources for cancer education, research and practice in developing countries.

  5. Integrating research into clinical internship training bridging the science/practice gap in pediatric psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuaid, Elizabeth L; Spirito, Anthony

    2012-03-01

    Existing literature highlights a critical gap between science and practice in clinical psychology. The internship year is a "capstone experience"; training in methods of scientific evaluation should be integrated with the development of advanced clinical competencies. We provide a rationale for continued exposure to research during the clinical internship year, including, (a) critical examination and integration of the literature regarding evidence-based treatment and assessment, (b) participation in faculty-based and independent research, and (c) orientation to the science and strategy of grantsmanship. Participation in research provides exposure to new empirical models and can foster the development of applied research questions. Orientation to grantsmanship can yield an initial sense of the "business of science." Internship provides an important opportunity to examine the challenges to integrating the clinical evidence base into professional practice; for that reason, providing research exposure on internship is an important strategy in training the next generation of pediatric psychologists.

  6. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer Non-Hodgkin lymphoma Ovarian cancer Pancreatic cancer Testicular cancer Thyroid cancer Uterine cancer Symptoms Symptoms of cancer ... tumor Obesity Pancreatic cancer Prostate cancer Stomach cancer Testicular cancer Throat or larynx cancer Thyroid cancer Patient Instructions ...

  7. Consumer input into research: the Australian Cancer Trials website

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butow Phyllis N

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Australian Cancer Trials website (ACTO was publicly launched in 2010 to help people search for cancer clinical trials recruiting in Australia, provide information about clinical trials and assist with doctor-patient communication about trials. We describe consumer involvement in the design and development of ACTO and report our preliminary patient evaluation of the website. Methods Consumers, led by Cancer Voices NSW, provided the impetus to develop the website. Consumer representative groups were consulted by the research team during the design and development of ACTO which combines a search engine, trial details, general information about trial participation and question prompt lists. Website use was analysed. A patient evaluation questionnaire was completed at one hospital, one week after exposure to the website. Results ACTO's main features and content reflect consumer input. In February 2011, it covered 1, 042 cancer trials. Since ACTO's public launch in November 2010, until the end of February 2011, the website has had 2, 549 new visits and generated 17, 833 page views. In a sub-study of 47 patient users, 89% found the website helpful for learning about clinical trials and all respondents thought patients should have access to ACTO. Conclusions The development of ACTO is an example of consumers working with doctors, researchers and policy makers to improve the information available to people whose lives are affected by cancer and to help them participate in their treatment decisions, including consideration of clinical trial enrolment. Consumer input has ensured that the website is informative, targets consumer priorities and is user-friendly. ACTO serves as a model for other health conditions.

  8. One Health research and training and government support for One Health in South Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Joanna S.; Dahal, Rojan; Kakkar, Manish; Debnath, Nitish; Rahman, Mahmudur; Dorjee, Sithar; Naeem, Khalid; Wijayathilaka, Tikiri; Sharma, Barun Kumar; Maidanwal, Nasir; Halimi, Asmatullah; Kim, Eunmi; Chatterjee, Pranab; Devleesschauwer, Brecht

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Considerable advocacy, funding, training, and technical support have been provided to South Asian countries to strengthen One Health (OH) collaborative approaches for controlling diseases with global human pandemic potential since the early 2000s. It is essential that the OH approach continues to be strengthened given South Asia is a hot spot for emerging and endemic zoonotic diseases. The objectives of this article are to describe OH research and training and capacity building activities and the important developments in government support for OH in these countries to identify current achievements and gaps. Materials and methods A landscape analysis of OH research, training, and government support in South Asia was generated by searching peer-reviewed and grey literature for OH research publications and reports, a questionnaire survey of people potentially engaged in OH research in South Asia and the authors’ professional networks. Results Only a small proportion of zoonotic disease research conducted in South Asia can be described as truly OH, with a significant lack of OH policy-relevant research. A small number of multisectoral OH research and OH capacity building programmes were conducted in the region. The governments of Bangladesh and Bhutan have established operational OH strategies, with variable progress institutionalising OH in other countries. Identified gaps were a lack of useful scientific information and of a collaborative culture for formulating and implementing integrated zoonotic disease control policies and the need for ongoing support for transdisciplinary OH research and policy-relevant capacity building programmes. Discussion Overall we found a very small number of truly OH research and capacity building programmes in South Asia. Even though significant progress has been made in institutionalising OH in some South Asian countries, further behavioural, attitudinal, and institutional changes are required to strengthen OH research

  9. Development and Evaluation of a Hematology-Oriented Clinical Research Training Program in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Lillian; Rego, Eduardo; Riva, Eloisa; Elwood, Jessica; Basso, Joe; Clayton, Charles P; Mikhael, Joseph

    2016-03-15

    The objectives of the study were to describe the development of a patient-oriented clinical research training program in a low- or middle-income country (LMIC) setting, to describe perceived benefits of the program and barriers to application, and to make recommendations for future training programs. The program was developed by the American Society of Hematology in collaboration with Latin American stakeholders and clinical researchers. Session types were didactic, small group, and one-on-one faculty/participant dyad formats. Outcomes were assessed by quantitative surveys of trainees and qualitative feedback from both trainees and faculty members. The program is an annual 2-day course specifically for Latin American hematologists. Through course evaluations, all trainees described that the didactic sessions were relevant. All session types were useful for gaining knowledge and skills, particularly one-on-one meetings. The potential for networking was highly valued. Barriers to trainee applications were the concerns that skill level, proposed research program, and knowledge of English were not sufficiently strong to warrant acceptance into the course, and financial costs of attendance. We have described the development and initial evaluation of a clinical research training program in a LMIC setting. We learned several valuable lessons that are applicable to other research training programs.

  10. Collaborating to Move Research Forward: Proceedings of the 10th Annual Bladder Cancer Think Tank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Ashish M; Agarwal, Piyush; Bivalacqua, Trinity; Chisolm, Stephanie; Daneshmand, Sia; Doroshow, James H; Efstathiou, Jason A; Galsky, Matthew; Iyer, Gopa; Kassouf, Wassim; Shah, Jay; Taylor, John; Williams, Stephen B; Quale, Diane Zipursky; Rosenberg, Jonathan E

    2016-04-27

    The 10th Annual Bladder Cancer Think Tank was hosted by the Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network and brought together a multidisciplinary group of clinicians, researchers, representatives and Industry to advance bladder cancer research efforts. Think Tank expert panels, group discussions, and networking opportunities helped generate ideas and strengthen collaborations between researchers and physicians across disciplines and between institutions. Interactive panel discussions addressed a variety of timely issues: 1) data sharing, privacy and social media; 2) improving patient navigation through therapy; 3) promising developments in immunotherapy; 4) and moving bladder cancer research from bench to bedside. Lastly, early career researchers presented their bladder cancer studies and had opportunities to network with leading experts.

  11. Preschool Math Skills and Training Research in Turkey: Synthesis Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu BAĞCI

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available – In this study, an attempt to create a synthesis of publications on preschool period mathematic abilities and education in peer-reviewed journals throughout the years 2000 and 2015. Constituting a literature review, the sample of this study is 45 articles that were published in peer-reviewed journals, either in print or electronically, between the years 2000 and 2015 on preschool mathematic abilities and education. Using the document analysis technique, there has been determined to be an increase in the number of preschool mathematic education studies from the year 2004 onward. This study (1 employs an emphasis on qualitative methods, (2 is more of a literature review, (3 contains a single set of data obtained from testing and surve y, (4 has a sample group consisting of 5-6-year-old children attending preschool. Research subjects, methodology, data analysis methods of studies from the near past will shed light on further studies.

  12. Active Barrett's Esophagus Translational Research Network Grants | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  13. Supportive and Palliative Care Research Clinical Trials | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  14. Supportive and Palliative Care Research Funding Opportunities | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  15. Academical training of Health Sciences professionals as a resource to integrate teaching, assistance and research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Mur Villar

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Academic training of Health Sciences professionals is an essential resource to integrate teaching, assistance and research and should be considered as an inherent attribute of professional practice. In present times this issue is still being questioned, because educational practice has not been fully transformed in the clinical setting. This work supports the potentials of academic training in Health Sciences to achieve this integration and is a call for professionals to create scientific basis of educational knowledge production in order to link health care practice to teaching and research. Bibliographic analysis showed that assistance centers should be academic centers for the development of Health Sciences. Academic training of professionals enables the integration we are looking for and establishes a mutual empowerment relationship, where each dimension is favoured in its interface.

  16. "A Great First Step into Research": Stepping Into Research Is an Effective and Sustainable Model for Research Training in Clinical Settings: A Report of 6-Year Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Katherine E; Shields, Nora; Whiteside, Mary; Taylor, Nicholas F

    2016-01-01

    Cultivating a dynamic research culture is critical to growing the allied health professions. The Stepping into Research training program was developed in 2008 using small group training and mentoring to train allied health clinicians at a large health service in basic research skills. This paper describes the outcomes 6 years after its implementation, including translation of the program to a second health service. This mixed-methods observational evaluation included (1) quantitative data on research outputs (publications, conference presentations- and enrolment in further research training) and (2) qualitative analysis of the experiences of the first cohort of participants following translation of the program to a second site, with comparison to a previous evaluation conducted at the first site. Of the 55 participants enrolled in the program over 6 years, 49 completed the basic program resulting in 22 academic publications, 21 conference presentations, and 5 PhD enrolments. Qualitative data suggest the first cohort of participants and mentors at both sites experienced similar benefits and challenges. The Stepping into Research program has led to tangible research outcomes, has been sustained over 6 years, and been translated to a second health service. Questions remain about the impact of the program on clinical outcomes and research culture.

  17. Cancer Research Participation Beliefs and Behaviors of a Southern Black Population: A Quantitative Analysis of the Role of Structural Factors in Cancer Research Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Deeonna E; Brandt, Heather M; Comer, Kimberly D; Jackson, Dawnyéa D; Pandya, Kinjal; Friedman, Daniela B; Ureda, John R; Williams, Deloris G; Scott, Dolores B; Green, Wanda; Hébert, James R

    2015-09-01

    Increasing the participation of Blacks in cancer research is a vital component of a strategy to reduce racial inequities in cancer burden. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is especially well-suited to advancing our knowledge of factors that influence research participation to ultimately address cancer-related health inequities. A paucity of literature focuses on the role of structural factors limiting participation in cancer research. As part of a larger CBPR project, we used survey data from a statewide cancer needs assessment of a Black faith community to examine the influence of structural factors on attitudes toward research and the contributions of both structural and attitudinal factors on whether individuals participate in research. Regression analyses and non-parametric statistics were conducted on data from 727 adult survey respondents. Structural factors, such as having health insurance coverage, experiencing discrimination during health care encounters, and locale, predicted belief in the benefits, but not the risks, of research participation. Positive attitudes toward research predicted intention to participate in cancer research. Significant differences in structural and attitudinal factors were found between cancer research participants and non-participants; however, directionality is confounded by the cross-sectional survey design and causality cannot be determined. This study points to complex interplay of structural and attitudinal factors on research participation as well as need for additional quantitative examinations of the various types of factors that influence research participation in Black communities.

  18. A Partnership Training Program: Studying Targeted Drug Delivery Using Nanoparticles In Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Surface Receptors Using Targeted Contrast Agents Current Pharmaceutical Biotechnology 5 (6): 485-494, 2004. 3. Cohen B, Dafni H, Meir G , Harmelin A... ProteinA Antibody DNA Fusion tag Biotin Protein Streptavidin Linker (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) ( g ) (h) (i) (j) N H 2 N H 2 Figure 7: Schematic diagram of...breast cancer research have resulted from the development of contrast agents (CAs) that generate receptor - targeted or molecular targeted contrast

  19. What's New in Stomach Cancer Research and Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the body’s immune system fight the cancer. A Korean study showed that combining chemotherapy with an immunotherapy ... Cancer Atlas Press Room Cancer Statistics Center Volunteer Learning Center Follow Us Twitter Facebook Instagram Cancer Information, ...

  20. Lower Breast Cancer Risk among Women following the World Cancer Research Fund and American Institute for Cancer Research Lifestyle Recommendations: EpiGEICAM Case-Control Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela Castelló

    Full Text Available According to the "World Cancer Research Fund" and the "American Institute of Cancer Research" (WCRF/AICR one in four cancer cases could be prevented through a healthy diet, weight control and physical activity.To explore the association between the WCRF/AICR recommendations and risk of breast cancer.During the period 2006 to 2011 we recruited 973 incident cases of breast cancer and 973 controls from 17 Spanish Regions. We constructed a score based on 9 of the WCRF/AICR recommendations for cancer prevention:: 1Maintain adequate body weight; 2Be physically active; 3Limit the intake of high density foods; 4Eat mostly plant foods; 5Limit the intake of animal foods; 6Limit alcohol intake; 7Limit salt and salt preserved food intake; 8Meet nutritional needs through diet; S1Breastfeed infants exclusively up to 6 months. We explored its association with BC by menopausal status and by intrinsic tumor subtypes (ER+/PR+ & HER2-; HER2+; ER&PR-&HER2- using conditional and multinomial logistic models respectively.Our results point to a linear association between the degree of noncompliance and breast cancer risk. Taking women who met 6 or more recommendations as reference, those meeting less than 3 showed a three-fold excess risk (OR=2.98(CI95%:1.59-5.59, especially for postmenopausal women (OR=3.60(CI95%:1.24;10.47 and ER+/PR+&HER2- (OR=3.60(CI95%:1.84;7.05 and HER2+ (OR=4.23(CI95%:1.66;10.78 tumors. Noncompliance of recommendations regarding the consumption of foods and drinks that promote weight gain in premenopausal women (OR=2.24(CI95%:1.18;4.28; p for interaction=0.014 and triple negative tumors (OR=2.93(CI95%:1.12-7.63; the intake of plant foods in postmenopausal women (OR=2.35(CI95%:1.24;4.44 and triple negative tumors (OR=3.48(CI95%:1.46-8.31; and the alcohol consumption in ER+/PR+&HER2- tumors (OR=1.52 (CI95%:1.06-2.19 showed the strongest associations.Breast cancer prevention might be possible by following the "World Cancer Research Fund" and the

  1. Center for Energy Research and Training (CERT) infrastructure support under USDOE/MEIAP. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallik, A.K.; Rojeski, P. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    As one of the several institutions of higher education, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University at Greensboro has received support from the office of Minority Education Institution Assistance Program (MEIAP) of the US Department of Energy primarily to provide infrastructure support to promote and enhance interdisciplinary energy-related research. In this effort, the university was authorized to prepare a plan to create a Center for Energy Research and Training (CERT), which was initiated on September 30, 1987. The goals and objectives for CERT are as specified below: (1) To encourage research by the faculty in many academic disciplines and to enhance their success in finding and obtaining funds for interdisciplinary and multi-school research. (2) To enhance students` energy education with increased opportunities for: theoretical and practical contact with energy issues and technologies; new courses and improved course content; internships and graduate funding; and ability and desire to pursue careers in energy field. (3) To establish training and service programs for off-campus constituents in energy issues, use, and management. (4) To develop cooperative relationships with industry, businesses, universities, and other private and professional organizations and with the State Energy Office. (5) To cooperate in establishing communications and collaborative research projects with various national research laboratories and other federal agencies. (6) To develop a permanent university infrastructure for energy research, training, and community service. Summaries of activities from September, 1992 to September, 1993 are presented.

  2. Progressive strength training to prevent LYmphoedema in the first year after breast CAncer - the LYCA feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammitzbøll, Gunn; Lanng, Charlotte; Kroman, Niels;

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lymphoedema is a common late effect after breast cancer (BC) that has no effective cure once chronic. Accumulating evidence supports progressive strength training (PRT) as a safe exercise modality in relation to the onset and exacerbation of lymphoedema. In the 'preventive intervention...

  3. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Testicular Cancer and Testicular Self-Examination Training for Patient Care Personnel: Intervention Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akar, Serife Zehra; Bebis, Hatice

    2014-01-01

    Testicular cancer (TC) is the most common malignancy among men aged 15-35 years. Testicular self-examination (TSE) is an important tool for preventing late-stage TC diagnoses. This study aimed to assess health beliefs and knowledge related to TC and TSE and the effectiveness of TC and TSE training for patient care staff in a hospital. This was a…

  4. Endocrine and immune responses to resistance training in prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvão, D A; Nosaka, K; Taaffe, D R; Peake, J; Spry, N; Suzuki, K; Yamaya, K; McGuigan, M R; Kristjanson, L J; Newton, R U

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the effect of 20 weeks resistance training on a range of serum hormones and inflammatory markers at rest, and following acute bouts of exercise in prostate cancer patients undergoing androgen deprivation. Ten patients exercised twice weekly at high intensity for several upper and lower-body muscle groups. Neither testosterone nor prostate-specific antigen changed at rest or following an acute bout of exercise. However, serum growth hormone (GH), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and differential blood leukocyte counts increased (P exercise. Resistance exercise does not appear to compromise testosterone suppression, and acute elevations in serum GH and DHEA may partly underlie improvements observed in physical function.

  5. Cancer clinical research in Latin America: current situation and opportunities. Expert opinion from the first ESMO workshop on clinical trials, Lima, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfo, Christian; Caglevic, Christian; Bretel, Denisse; Hong, David; Raez, Luis E; Cardona, Andres F; Oton, Ana B; Gomez, Henry; Dafni, Urania; Vallejos, Carlos; Zielinski, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Latin America and the Caribbean have not yet developed strong clinical cancer research programmes. In order to improve this situation two international cancer organisations, the Latin American Society of Clinical Oncology (SLACOM) and the European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) worked closely with the Peruvian Cooperative Oncology Group (GECOPERU) and organised a clinical cancer research workshop held in Lima, Peru, in October 2015. Many oncologists from different Latin American countries participated in this gathering. The opportunities for and strengths of clinical oncology research in Latin American and Caribbean countries were identified as the widespread use of the Spanish language, the high cancer burden, growing access to information, improving patient education, access to new drugs for research centres, regional networks and human resources. However, there are still many weaknesses and problems including the long timeline for regulatory approval, lack of economic investment, lack of training and lack of personnel participating in clinical research, lack of cancer registries, insufficient technology and insufficient supplies for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, few cancer specialists, low general levels of education and the negative attitude of government authorities towards clinical research. PMID:27843620

  6. CLOUD ORIENTED TECHNOLOGIES AS A FACTOR OF RESEARCH-BASED TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmytro M. Bodnenko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to develop a mechanism for the organization of research work of students toward mastery of ICT literacy. In the article it has been formed the model of research work organization for students in the learning process of informatic disciplines; produced the algorithm of learning cloud-oriented technology use in the organization of students’ research work; described recommendations for the structure and the content of electronic learning materials in the study of learning cloud-oriented technologies (as a part of the training course in LMS Moodle; formed the recommendations on the organization of the scientific group work on the basis of the implementation of the research-based training and development of the ICT competencies.

  7. 78 FR 60885 - Proposed Collection; 60-Day Notice Request: Application Process for Clinical Research Training...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... Process for Clinical Research Training and Medical Education at the Clinical Center and Its Impact on... and Budget (OMB) for review and approval. Written comments and/or suggestions from the public and... collection plans and instruments, submit comments in writing, or request more information on the...

  8. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Metacognitive Strategy Training for Reading Research Articles in an ESP Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhieb-Henia, Nebila

    2003-01-01

    Reports on an investigation into the reading processes of English-as-a-Foreign-Language/English for Special purposes students with respect to research articles in their specialty area: Biology. Specially explored how metacognitive strategy training influenced a group of readers' declarative and procedural knowledge and their choice and use of…

  9. Teacher Training and Effective Pedagogy in the Context of Student Diversity. Research in Bilingual Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minaya-Rowe, Liliana, Ed.

    This collection of papers includes nine chapters in three parts. Part 1, "Effective Practices in Teacher Training," offers: (1) "Research-Based Teaching Practices that Improve the Education of English Language Learners" (Hersh C. Waxman and Yolanda N. Padron); (2) "Relationship between Pre-Service Teachers' Beliefs About…

  10. Guidelines from the Consumer: Improving Consumer Involvement in Research and Training for Persons with Mental Retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Tamar; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Interviews with 22 adults with mental retardation suggest that, although they and other individuals with mental retardation have participated in various roles in research and training, there are many barriers to meaningful consumer involvement (such as professional jargon) and there is a need to bring out individuals' strengths and capabilities.…

  11. Alberta's Suicide Prevention Training Programs: A Retrospective Comparison with Rothman's Developmental Research Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, R. F.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Compared Rothman's social research and development (R&D) method with procedure used to develop Suicide Prevention Training Programs in Alberta, Canada. Retrospective review found that Alberta method closely paralleled phases of Rothman's model and that transformation of knowledge about suicide into widely disseminated suicide prevention…

  12. 76 FR 50457 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Military Training Activities and Research Conducted Within...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-15

    ... training, maintenance, and research, development, testing, and evaluation (RDT&E) activities to be... sampling and photography of a group of pilot whales. From March 20 to April 11, 2010, visual observations... and biopsy sampling. A single biopsy sample was collected from a sei whale in the waters off of...

  13. National Research Priorities for Tertiary Education and Training: 2011-13

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2010

    2010-01-01

    The objective of a national government-funded research program for tertiary education and training is to support the achievement of major social and economic goals. These include increased opportunities for participation in the labour market, improvements in productivity and enhanced social inclusion. In essence, the overarching lens is to…

  14. Whither Instructional Design and Teacher Training? The Need for Experimental Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gropper, George L.

    2015-01-01

    This article takes a contrarian position: an "instructional design" or "teacher training" model, because of the sheer number of its interconnected parameters, is too complex to assess or to compare with other models. Models may not be the way to go just yet. This article recommends instead prior experimental research on limited…

  15. A Knowledge-Based Economy Landscape: Implications for Tertiary Education and Research Training in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Heather; Evans, Terry; Hickey, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the higher education sector's role in a knowledge-based economy though research training, that is, doctoral education. It also examines how a Faculty of Education supports its doctoral candidates in their endeavours to become "knowledge producers". Two themes are explored: one is Australia's limited investment in…

  16. A New Phase in Cancer Research at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The first meeting of the ENLIGHT network, set up to co-ordinate the development of light ion cancer therapy projects in Europe, took place at CERN last week. This is a form of therapy ideally suited to the treatment of deep-seated tumours and those near critical organs. Hans Hoffmann, Director for Technology transfer and scientific computing, and Director General Luciano Maiani during the opening of the first meeting of the ENLIGHT network that was held at CERN last week. The fruit of several years of work, this meeting offers new hope for the treatment of certain types of cancer. Around 70 specialists, including radiotherapists, oncologists, physicists and engineers, got together at CERN for the first meeting of a European cancer therapy research network named ENLIGHT (European Network for research in LIGHt ion Therapy(1)). This initiative, headed by oncologists and funded by the European Commission, aims to promote the development of light ion (hadron) therapy projects. The choice of CERN as a venue for ...

  17. Integration of Translational Research in the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Research (EORTC) Clinical Trial Cooperative Group Mechanisms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Lehmann (Frederick); D. Lacombe (Denis); A.M.M. Eggermont (Alexander)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe landscape for cancer research is profoundly different today from that only one decade ago. Basic science is moving rapidly and biotechnological revolutions in molecular targeting and immunology have completely modified the opportunities and concepts for cancer treat

  18. Cross-Cultural Communication Training for Students in Multidisciplinary Research Area of Biomedical Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigehiro Hashimoto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Biomedical Engineering makes multidisciplinary research area, which includes biology, medicine, engineering and others. Communication training is important for students, who have a potential to develop Biomedical Engineering. Communication is not easy in a multidisciplinary research area, because each area has its own background of thinking. Because each nation has its own background of culture, on the other hand, international communication is not easy, either. A cross-cultural student program has been designed for communication training in the multidisciplinary research area. Students from a variety of backgrounds of research area and culture have joined in the program: mechanical engineering, material science, environmental engineering, science of nursing, dentist, pharmacy, electronics, and so on. The program works well for communication training in the multidisciplinary research area of biomedical engineering. Foreign language and digital data give students chance to study several things: how to make communication precisely, how to quote previous data. The experience in the program helps students not only understand new idea in the laboratory visit, but also make a presentation in the international research conference. The program relates to author's several experiences: the student internship abroad, the cross-cultural student camp, multi PhD theses, various affiliations, and the creation of the interdisciplinary department.

  19. Recent progress in 8igenomic research of liver cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Along the course of occurrence and development of liver cancer,the corresponding somatic cells accumulate some important genetic variations.These variations may be divided into two categories.For the genetic changes closely related to etiology of liver cancer,the well-known cases include insertion and integration of the hepatitis B virus(HBV) DNA after infection,and mutations at site 249 of the tumor suppressor gene p53 induced by exposure to aflatoxin B1.The secondary genetic changes include amplification and deletion of certain chromosome regions,mutations in p53 at the sites other than 249,as well as the mutational activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signal pathway.The tumor cells with these genetic variations may gradually become the dominant clones under evolutionary selection.Besides,identification of genetic susceptible against risk of liver malignancy is also an important aspect of research in this field.

  20. Recent progress in 8igenomic research of liver cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN ZeGuang

    2009-01-01

    Along the course of occurrence and development of liver cancer, the corresponding somatic cells ac-cumulate some important genetic variations. These variations may be divided into two categories. For the genetic changes closely related to etiology of liver cancer, the well-known cases include insertion and integration of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA after infection, and mutations at site 249 of the tumor suppressor gene p53 induced by exposure to aflatoxin B1. The secondary genetic changes include amplification and deletion of certain chromosome regions, mutations in p53 at the sites other than 249, as well as the mutational activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signal pathway. The tumor cells with these genetic variations may gradually become the dominant clones under evolutionary selection. Besides, identification of genetic susceptible against risk of liver malignancy is also an important aspect of re-search in this field.

  1. Research Progress of Lung Cancer with Leptomeningeal Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhua MA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Leptomeningeal metastases is one of the most serious complications of lung cancer, the patients with poor prognosis. Leptomeningeal metastasis in patients with lack specificity of clinical manifestations. The main clinical performance are the damage of cerebral symptoms, cranial nerve and spinal nerve. The diagnosis primarily based on the history of tumor, clinical symptoms, enhance magnetic resnance image (MRI scan and cerebrospinal fluid cytology. In recent years, new ways of detecting clinically, significantly increase the rate of early detection of leptomeningeal metastases. The effect of comprehensive treatments are still sad. The paper make a review of research progress in pathologic physiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis methods and treatments of lung cancer with leptomeningeal metastases.

  2. Efficacy of communication skills training on colorectal cancer screening by GPs: a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubin-Auger, I; Laouénan, C; Le Bel, J; Mercier, A; Baruch, D; Lebeau, J P; Youssefian, A; Le Trung, T; Peremans, L; Van Royen, P

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) mass screening has been implemented in France since 2008. Participation rates remain too low. The objective of this study was to test if the implementation of a training course focused on communication skills among general practitioners (GP) would increase the delivery of gaiac faecal occult blood test and CRC screening participation among the target population of each participating GP. A cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted with GP's practice as a cluster unit. GPs from practices in the control group were asked to continue their usual care. GPs of the intervention group received a 4-h educational training, built with previous qualitative data on CRC screening focusing on doctor-patient communication with a follow-up of 7 months for both groups. The primary outcome measure was the patients' participation rate in the target population for each GP. Seventeen GPs (16 practices) in intervention group and 28 GPs (19 practices) in control group participated. The patients' participation rate in the intervention group were 36.7% vs. 24.5% in the control group (P = 0.03). Doctor-patient communication should be developed and appear to be one of the possible targets of improvement patients adherence and participation rate in the target population for CRC mass screening.

  3. Attention and memory deficits in breast cancer survivors: implications for nursing practice and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Jennifer Sandson; Vance, David E; Jukkala, Angela; Meneses, Karen M

    2014-10-01

    Breast cancer survivors (BCSs) commonly report deficits in attention and memory, cognitive functions crucial for daily optimal functioning. Perceived deficits are reported before, during, and after adjuvant therapy and affect quality of life throughout survivorship. Deficits of attention and memory are particularly disruptive for BCSs working or attending school who report that subtle impairment diminishes their confidence and their performance at all levels of occupation. Chemotherapy and endocrine therapy contribute to attention and memory deficits, but research findings have not fully established the extent or timing of that influence. Fortunately, potential interventions for attention and memory deficits in BCSs are promising. These include cognitive remediation therapies aimed at training for specific areas of deficit, cognitive behavioral therapies aimed at developing compensatory strategies for areas of deficit, complementary therapies, and pharmacologic therapies.

  4. Radiation protection personnel training in Research Reactors; Capacitacion en proteccion radiologica para reactores de investigacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, Carlos Dario; Lorenzo, Nestor Pedro de [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Rio Negro (Argentina). Centro Atomico Bariloche. Instituto Balseiro

    1996-07-01

    The RA-6 research reactor is considering the main laboratory in the training of different groups related with radiological protection. The methodology applied to several courses over 15 years of experience is shown in this work. The reactor is also involved in the construction, design, start-up and sell of different installation outside Argentina for this reason several theoretical and practical courses had been developed. The acquired experience obtained is shown in this paper and the main purpose is to show the requirements to be taken into account for every group (subjects, goals, on-job training, etc) (author)

  5. Psycho-pedagogical Research of Inclusive Education in the Undergraduates Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyohina S. V.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The author examines the cultural and historical psychology as a methodological basis of research in the inclusive process of education. The article presents the current trends in research of inclusive education such as the design of organizational and psychological and pedagogical conditions for reinforcing the cultural norms of inclusion in the school: individual development in inclusive education; designing an inclusive educational environment. The article describes the logic of the research master students training. The author suggests for discussion some variants of design and research tasks in order to form the necessary research and development competencies of master students. The author is convinced that the quality of an inclusive process in basic education linked to the development of inclusive practice based on scientific research. Cultural-historical framework and its main idea becomes the methodological basis of psychological research as it claims a leading role of social environment in the development and educating of children

  6. A 3-week multimodal intervention involving high-intensity interval training in female cancer survivors: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Joachim; Lindner, Nathalie; Reuss-Borst, Monika; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Sperlich, Billy

    2016-02-01

    To compare the effects of a 3-week multimodal rehabilitation involving supervised high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on female breast cancer survivors with respect to key variables of aerobic fitness, body composition, energy expenditure, cancer-related fatigue, and quality of life to those of a standard multimodal rehabilitation program. A randomized controlled trial design was administered. Twenty-eight women, who had been treated for cancer were randomly assigned to either a group performing exercise of low-to-moderate intensity (LMIE; n = 14) or a group performing high-intensity interval training (HIIT; n = 14) as part of a 3-week multimodal rehabilitation program. No adverse events related to the exercise were reported. Work economy improved following both HIIT and LMIE, with improved peak oxygen uptake following LMIE. HIIT reduced mean total body fat mass with no change in body mass, muscle or fat-free mass (best P HIIT can be performed by female cancer survivors without adverse health effects. Here, HIIT and LMIE both improved work economy, quality of life and cancer-related fatigue, body composition or energy expenditure. Since the outcomes were similar, but HIIT takes less time, this may be a time-efficient strategy for improving certain aspects of the health of female cancer survivors.

  7. Adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research guidelines and risk of death in Europe : results from the European Prospective Investigation into Nutrition and Cancer cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Romaguera, Dora; Peeters, Petra H.; van Gils, Carla H.; Chan, Doris S. M.; Romieu, Isabelle; Freisling, Heinz; Ferrari, Pietro; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Fagherazzi, Guy; Dartois, Laureen; Li, Kuanrong; Tikk, Kaja; Bergmann, Manuela M.; Boeing, Heiner; Tjonneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Overvad, Kim; Dahm, Christina C.; Luisa Redondo, Maria; Agudo, Antonio; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Amiano, Pilar; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Ardanaz, Eva; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick J.; Crowe, Francesca; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Orfanos, Philippos; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Masala, Giovanna; Sieri, Sabina; Tumino, Rosario; Vineis, Paolo; Panico, Salvatore; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Ros, Martine M.; May, Anne; Wirfalt, Elisabet; Sonestedt, Emily; Johansson, Ingegerd; Hallmans, Goeran; Lund, Eiliv; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Parr, Christine L.; Riboli, Elio; Norat, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Background: In 2007, the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) and the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) issued recommendations on diet, physical activity, and weight management for cancer prevention on the basis of the most comprehensive collection of available evidence. Objective: We inves

  8. Adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research guidelines and risk of death in Europe: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Nutrition and Cancer cohort study1,4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergnaud, A.C.; Romaguera, D.; Peeters, P.H.M.; Gils, C.H. van; Chan, D.S.; Romieu, I.; Freisling, H.; Ferrari, P.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Fagherazzi, G.; Dartois, L.; Li, K.; Tikk, K.; Bergmann, M.M.; Boeing, H.; Tjonneland, A.; Olsen, A.; Overvad, K.; Dahm, C.C.; Redondo, M.L.; Agudo, A.; Sanchez, M.J.; Amiano, P.; Chirlaque, M.D.; Ardanaz, E.; Khaw, K.T.; Wareham, N.J.; Crowe, F.; Trichopoulou, A.; Orfanos, P.; Trichopoulos, D.; Masala, G.; Sieri, S.; Tumino, R.; Vineis, P.; Panico, S.; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H.B.; Ros, M.M.; May, A.; Wirfalt, E.; Sonestedt, E.; Johansson, I.; Hallmans, G.; Lund, E.; Weiderpass, E.; Parr, C.L.; Riboli, E.; Norat, T.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2007, the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) and the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) issued recommendations on diet, physical activity, and weight management for cancer prevention on the basis of the most comprehensive collection of available evidence. OBJECTIVE: We inves

  9. Publication performance and research output of Neurology and Neurosurgery training institutes in India: A 5-year analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh S Madhugiri

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: This evaluation of the publication performance and research output of neurology and neurosurgery training institutes would serve as a baseline data for future evaluations and comparisons. The absence of any publication and research output from several training institutes is a matter of concern.

  10. Integration of research and teaching practices and the training of reflective professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Therrien

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study approaches critical reflexivity as a mediating element of the integration between research and teaching practices in the training of the education professional. Based on the parameter of research as an educational principle associated to the presupposition that involvement in research activities encourages the development of rationalities that support reflective practices, which lead the most significant and independent learning processes, this essay aims at, on the one hand, identifying “macro” theoretic schemes that may support the analysis of different knowledge types and therefore, the rationalities that affect theory-practice dynamics in education initiatives and on the other hand, finding “micro” theoretical-practical schemes for reflective training related to the practice in learning contexts. The study analyzes proposals made by reference authors, as well as educational practices that support enunciated presuppositions.

  11. Effective strategies for global health research, training and clinical care: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Rebekah J; Campbell, Jennifer A; Egede, Leonard E

    2014-09-29

    The purpose of this narrative review was to synthesize the evidence on effective strategies for global health research, training and clinical care in order to identify common structures that have been used to guide program development. A Medline search from 2001 to 2011 produced 951 articles, which were reviewed and categorized. Thirty articles met criteria to be included in this review. Eleven articles discussed recommendations for research, 8 discussed training and 11 discussed clinical care. Global health program development should be completed within the framework of a larger institutional commitment or partnership. Support from leadership in the university or NGO, and an engaged local community are both integral to success and sustainability of efforts. It is also important for program development to engage local partners from the onset, jointly exploring issues and developing goals and objectives. Evaluation is a recommended way to determine if goals are being met, and should include considerations of sustainability, partnership building, and capacity. Global health research programs should consider details regarding the research process, context of research, partnerships, and community relationships. Training for global health should involve mentorship, pre-departure preparation of students, and elements developed to increase impact. Clinical care programs should focus on collaboration, sustainability, meeting local needs, and appropriate process considerations.

  12. Differential Regulatory Analysis Based on Coexpression Network in Cancer Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyi Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With rapid development of high-throughput techniques and accumulation of big transcriptomic data, plenty of computational methods and algorithms such as differential analysis and network analysis have been proposed to explore genome-wide gene expression characteristics. These efforts are aiming to transform underlying genomic information into valuable knowledges in biological and medical research fields. Recently, tremendous integrative research methods are dedicated to interpret the development and progress of neoplastic diseases, whereas differential regulatory analysis (DRA based on gene coexpression network (GCN increasingly plays a robust complement to regular differential expression analysis in revealing regulatory functions of cancer related genes such as evading growth suppressors and resisting cell death. Differential regulatory analysis based on GCN is prospective and shows its essential role in discovering the system properties of carcinogenesis features. Here we briefly review the paradigm of differential regulatory analysis based on GCN. We also focus on the applications of differential regulatory analysis based on GCN in cancer research and point out that DRA is necessary and extraordinary to reveal underlying molecular mechanism in large-scale carcinogenesis studies.

  13. The Training Project of Star Researchers, Outstanding Teaching Staff and Leaders with Facilities Available

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer KARAHAN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a general consensus on the requirement of a serious regulation at our universities. It is argued that it is necessary to change Constitution and Institution of Higher Education Law for the serious regulation. However, it is impossible to say that all the facilities of the present legislation are used. Our aim is to create a project based on benefiting from continuing education centers to meet the need of star researchers, outstanding teaching staff and leaders in Turkey via the legislation in force. In this study, accessible studies from publications related to university, higher education and continuing education centers are studied. Th e current situation and solution off ers, applications and continuing education centers'activities have been determined. In accordance with these data, solution off ers have been proposed and discussed in line with the literature. According to the data obtained, our students who come with deficiencies from high schools to universities are not given the adequate undergraduate, graduate and postgraduate education. Th ere are studies such as ‘Double Major Program', ‘Medical-Science Physicians Integrated (MD-PhD Doctorate Program which upgrade the qualities. However, these programs are not suff icient and common. Th erefore, it is imposssible to train outstanding teaching staff , star researchesr and leaders who will meet the needs of our country and contribute to the World. Our academic potential needs a quality training except for branch training. On the other hand, the contribution of the Continuing Education Centers existing in university embodiments is limited. It is possible to provide basic skills, integration and research education to the outstanding teaching staff , star researcher and leader candidates. Th ese trainings should be given in a continuous instutionalization and in the formal education system. For this purpose, an academician school can be established within the body continuing

  14. Developing a plasma focus research training system for the fusion energy age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.

    2014-08-01

    The 3 kJ UNU/ICTP Plasma Focus Facility is the most significant device associated with the AAAPT (Asian African Association for Plasma Training). In original and modified/upgraded form it has trained generations of plasma focus (PF) researchers internationally, producing many PhD theses and peer-reviewed papers. The Lee Model code was developed for the design of this PF. This code has evolved to cover all PF machines for design, interpretation and optimization, for derivation of radiation scaling laws; and to provide insights into yield scaling limitations, radiative collapse, speed-enhanced and current-stepped PF variants. As example of fresh perspectives derivable from this code, this paper presents new results on energy transfers of the axial and radial phases of generalized PF devices. As the world moves inexorably towards the Fusion Energy Age it becomes ever more important to train plasma fusion researchers. A recent workshop in Nepal shows that demand for such training continues. Even commercial project development consultants are showing interest. We propose that the AAAPT-proven research package be upgraded, by modernizing the small PF for extreme modes of operation, switchable from the typical strong-focus mode to a slow-mode which barely pinches, thus producing a larger, more uniform plasma stream with superior deposition properties. Such a small device would be cost-effective and easily duplicated, and have the versatility of a range of experiments from intense multi-radiation generation and target damage studies to superior advanced-materials deposition. The complementary code is used to reference experiments up to the largest existing machine. This is ideal for studying machine limitations and scaling laws and to suggest new experiments. Such a modernized versatile PF machine complemented by the universally versatile code would extend the utility of the PF experience; so that AAAPT continues to provide leadership in pulsed plasma research training in

  15. Historical Trends in Graduate Research and Training of Diplomates of the American Board of Forensic Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethard, Jonathan D

    2017-01-01

    The history of forensic anthropology has been documented by numerous scholars. These contributions have described the work of early pioneers in the field and have described important milestones, such as the founding of the Physical Anthropology Section of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences (AAFS) in 1972 and the American Board of Forensic Anthropology (ABFA) in 1977. This paper contributes to the growing literature on the history of forensic anthropology by documenting the academic training of all individuals who have been granted diplomate status by the ABFA (n = 115). Doctoral dissertation titles were queried to discern broad patterns of research foci. A total of 39 doctoral granting institutions have trained diplomates and 77.3% of board-certified forensic anthropologists wrote dissertations involving skeletal biology, bioarchaeology, or forensic anthropology. Board-certified forensic anthropologists are a broadly trained group of professionals with far-reaching anthropological interests and expertise.

  16. Multi-modality molecular imaging for gastric cancer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jimin; Chen, Xueli; Liu, Junting; Hu, Hao; Qu, Xiaochao; Wang, Fu; Nie, Yongzhan

    2011-12-01

    Because of the ability of integrating the strengths of different modalities and providing fully integrated information, multi-modality molecular imaging techniques provide an excellent solution to detecting and diagnosing earlier cancer, which remains difficult to achieve by using the existing techniques. In this paper, we present an overview of our research efforts on the development of the optical imaging-centric multi-modality molecular imaging platform, including the development of the imaging system, reconstruction algorithms and preclinical biomedical applications. Primary biomedical results show that the developed optical imaging-centric multi-modality molecular imaging platform may provide great potential in the preclinical biomedical applications and future clinical translation.

  17. Cancer research in Brazil - stuck in second gear?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P. Lepique

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the main issues regarding clinical cancer research in Brazil, including both the opportunities and the hurdles. Scientists and clinicians in this field had the opportunity to talk to regulatory agencies and to the Health Ministry representative at a meeting held in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in April 2014. Our conclusions are that we do indeed have opportunities; however, we need to move forward regarding partnerships between academia and industry, increase the availability of funding, and provide easier navigation through the regulatory processes.

  18. Barrett's Esophagus Translational Research Network (BETRNet) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of BETRNet is to reduce the incidence, morbidity, and mortality of esophageal adenocarcinoma by answering key questions related to the progression of the disease, especially in the premalignant stage. In partnership with NCI’s Division of Cancer Biology, multidisciplinary translational research centers collaborate to better understand the biology of Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma to improve risk stratification and develop prevention strategies.  | Multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional collaboration to enhance understanding of Barrett's esophagus and to prevent esophageal adenocarcinoma.

  19. Community Residency Programme (CRP)--a tool for research and rural health training for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, H

    2002-12-01

    Rural health training is an important element in the training of medical students in the University of Malaya. There is a need for the undergraduates to be familiar with the rural health infrastructure and to understand the social and economic aspects of the rural poor. The objective of the training is to make the students understand the problems faced by the poor in the rural areas so that when they practice in rural health areas, after graduation, they will understand the problems of the rural poor. They will have the knowledge of the diseases in the rural areas and also understand the community and the environmental factors that contribute to the disease. The training lasts' for 4 weeks, one week for lectures on health survey, two weeks for the field trip and one week of data analysis and presentation of their findings to an expert panel. During the field trip the students are divided into groups and they go to different parts of the country. Each group will do a field survey to find out the socio-demography, environmental, economic, nutritional and health problems in the village. In addition to the survey they also do a research project on any topic. The students also do social work, visit places of public health interest like the water treatment plant, sewage disposal, factory visits and others. Apart from technical skills in statistics and epidemiology, various other managerial skills like leadership, teamwork, communications and public relations are also learnt during the training. In conclusion this rural health training is an important aspect of the medical students training as it imparts several skills to them that are needed as a doctor.

  20. Impact of biospecimens handling on biomarker research in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callari Maurizio

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression profiling is moving from the research setting to the practical clinical use. Gene signatures able to correctly identify high risk breast cancer patients as well as to predict response to treatment are currently under intense investigation. While technical issues dealing with RNA preparation, choice of array platforms, statistical analytical tools are taken into account, the tissue collection process is seldom considered. The time elapsed between surgical tissue removal and freezing of samples for biological characterizations is rarely well defined and/or recorded even for recently stored samples, despite the publications of standard operating procedures for biological sample collection for tissue banks. Methods Breast cancer samples from 11 patients were collected immediately after surgical removal and subdivided into aliquots. One was immediately frozen and the others were maintained at room temperature for respectively 2, 6 and 24 hrs. RNA was extracted and gene expression profile was determined using cDNA arrays. Phosphoprotein profiles were studied in parallel. Results Delayed freezing affected the RNA quality only in 3 samples, which were not subjected to gene profiling. In the 8 breast cancer cases with apparently intact RNA also in sample aliquots frozen at delayed times, 461 genes were modulated simply as a function of freezing timing. Some of these genes were included in gene signatures biologically and clinically relevant for breast cancer. Delayed freezing also affected detection of phosphoproteins, whose pattern may be crucial for clinical decision on target-directed drugs. Conclusion Time elapsed between surgery and freezing of samples appears to have a strong impact and should be considered as a mandatory variable to control for clinical implications of inadequate tissue handling.

  1. Impact of design research on industrial practice tools, technology, and training

    CERN Document Server

    Lindemann, Udo

    2016-01-01

    Showcasing exemplars of how various aspects of design research were successfully transitioned into and influenced, design practice, this book features chapters written by eminent international researchers and practitioners from industry on the Impact of Design Research on Industrial Practice. Chapters written by internationally acclaimed researchers of design analyse the findings (guidelines, methods and tools), technologies/products and educational approaches that have been transferred as tools, technologies and people to transform industrial practice of engineering design, whilst the chapters that are written by industrial practitioners describe their experience of how various tools, technologies and training impacted design practice. The main benefit of this book, for educators, researchers and practitioners in (engineering) design, will be access to a comprehensive coverage of case studies of successful transfer of outcomes of design research into practice; as well as guidelines and platforms for successf...

  2. Integrating Science Communication Training and Public Outreach Activities into the Juneau Icefield Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, K.; Kavanaugh, J. L.; Beedle, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Creating better linkages between scientific research activities and the general public relies on developing the science communication skills of upcoming generations of geoscientists. Despite the valuable role of science outreach, education, and communication activities, few graduate and even fewer undergraduate science departments and programs actively foster the development of these skills. The Juneau Icefield Research Program (JIRP) was established in 1946 to train and engage primarily undergraduate students in the geosciences, field research skills, and to prepare students for careers in extreme and remote environments. During the course of the 8-week summer program, students make the 125-mile traverse across the Juneau Icefield from Juneau, Alaska to Atlin, British Columbia. Along the way, students receive hands on experience in field research methods, lectures from scientists across several disciplines, and develop and carry out individual research projects. Until the summer of 2012, a coordinated science communication training and field-based outreach campaign has not been a part of the program. During the 2012 Juneau Icefield Research Program, 15 undergraduate and graduate students from across the United States and Canada participated in JIRP. Throughout the 2-month field season, students contributed blog text, photos, and videos to a blog hosted at GlacierChange.org. In addition to internet outreach, students presented their independent research projects to public audiences in Atlin, British Columbia and Juneau, Alaska. To prepare students for completing these activities, several lectures in science communication and outreach related skills were delivered throughout the summer. The lectures covered the reasons to engage in outreach, science writing, photography, and delivering public presentations. There is no internet connection on the Icefield, few computers, and outreach materials were primarily sent out using existing helicopter support. The successes

  3. Accelerating Progress in Eating Disorders Prevention: A Call for Policy Translation Research and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, S Bryn

    2016-01-01

    The public health burden of eating disorders is well documented, and over the past several decades, researchers have made important advances in the prevention of eating disorders and related problems with body image. Despite these advances, however, several critical limitations to the approaches developed to date leave the field far from achieving the large-scale impact that is needed. This commentary provides a brief review of what achievements in prevention have been made and identifies the gaps that limit the potential for greater impact on population health. A plan is then offered with specific action steps to accelerate progress in high-impact prevention, most compellingly by promoting a shift in priorities to policy translation research and training for scholars through the adoption of a triggers-to-action framework. Finally, the commentary provides an example of the application of the triggers-to-action framework as practiced at the Strategic Training Initiative for the Prevention of Eating Disorders, a program based at the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health and Boston Children's Hospital. Much has been achieved in the nearly 30 years of research carried out for the prevention of eating disorders and body image problems, but several critical limitations undermine the field's potential for meaningful impact. Through a shift in the field's priorities to policy translation research and training with an emphasis on macro-environmental influences, the pace of progress in prevention can be accelerated and the potential for large-scale impact substantially improved.

  4. Research on Immunotherapy: Using the Immune System to Treat Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cells that suppress immune responses. These advances in cancer immunotherapy are the result of long-term investments in ... Engineering Patients’ Immune Cells to Treat Their Cancers Cancer immunotherapy in children: How does it differ from approaches ...

  5. Formation of the research competence of future breeder-geneticists during the practical training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Наталія Павлівна Антіпова

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the article were analyzed content, structure and special features of the practical training of the future breeder-geneticists. There was specified that for bachelor breeder-geneticists of the 6.090101 “Agronomy” training direction are provided the following practices: botany, tractors and cars, soil science, agricultural machines, fruit growing, vegetable growing, agriculture, agrochemistry, plant growing, entomology, phytopathology, technology of retreatment and preservation of plant growing production, selection and seed growing of agricultural crops; work practice on agronomy.In the article was grounded the structural-logic scheme of organization of practices of the future breeder-geneticists for forming their professional research competences. There were analyzed functions and methods of scientific-cognitive activity, forms, means and methods of the practical education. According to the types of practices there were elucidated and grounded the structure of practical training of the future breeder-geneticists – natural-technical and special-professional – educational and work practices.The natural-technical, special-professional and production-technological practices form in bachelor agronomists breeder-geneticists professional scientific-research competences: theoretical-analytical ones – geosphere, bio-geo-physical-chemical, meteorological-climatological, informative, fundamental and applied ecological, fundamental-scientific agrosphere; professional competences of professionally oriented and special practical training – agricultural, branch, techno-service, technological, selective, special-genetic-engineering ones; managerial ones

  6. Enhancing research ethics capacity in the Middle East: experience and challenges of a Fogarty-sponsored training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Henry; Edwards, Hillary; Shamoo, Adil; Matar, Amal

    2013-12-01

    We describe the research ethics capacity needs of the countries from the Middle East region. Against this background, we relate the experience of an international training program focused on providing long-term training in research ethics to individuals from low and middle-income countries in the Middle East area. We describe our pedagogical approach to training, program changes to address challenges faced, and accomplishments of trainees. Many former trainees developed research ethics curricula in their home institutions, established or enhanced their institutions' research ethics committees, provided leadership to national research ethics systems, and conducted research in research ethics. Based on our analysis, we make recommendations for how trainees can further address current regional research ethics needs in the Middle East and conduct future research. This paper is part of a collection of papers analyzing the Fogarty International Center's International Research Ethics Education and Curriculum Development program.

  7. Training courses on neutron detection systems on the ISIS research reactor: on-site and through internet training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lescop, B.; Badeau, G.; Ivanovic, S.; Foulon, F. [National Institute for Nuclear science and Technology French Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission (CEA), Saclay Research Center, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-07-01

    Today, ISIS research reactor is an essential tool for Education and Training programs organized by the National Institute for Nuclear Science and Technology (INSTN) from CEA. In the field of nuclear instrumentation, the INSTN offers both, theoretical courses and training courses on the use of neutron detection systems taking advantage of the ISIS research reactor for the supply of a wide range of neutron fluxes. This paper describes the content of the training carried out on the use of neutron detectors and detection systems, on-site or remote. The ISIS reactor is a 700 kW open core pool type reactor. The facility is very flexible since neutron detectors can be inserted into the core or its vicinity, and be used at different levels of power according to the needs of the course. Neutron fluxes, typically ranging from 1 to 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2}.s, can be obtained for the characterisation of the neutron detectors and detection systems. For the monitoring of the neutron density at low level of power, the Instrumentation and Control (I and C) system of the reactor is equipped with two detection systems, named BN1 and BN2. Each way contains a fission chamber, type CFUL01, connected to an electronic system type SIREX.The system works in pulse mode and exhibits two outputs: the counting rate and the doubling time. For the high level of power, the I and C is equipped with two detection systems HN1 and HN2.Each way contain a boron ionization chamber (type CC52) connected to an electronics system type SIREX. The system works in current mode and has two outputs: the current and the doubling time. For each mode, the trainees can observe and measure the signal at the different stages of the electronic system, with an oscilloscope. They can understand the role of each component of the detection system: detector, cable and each electronic block. The limitation of the detection modes and their operating range can be established from the measured signal. The trainees can also

  8. Implementation of tissue microarrays technique for cancer research in Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Lahera-Sánchez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The tissue microarray (TMA technique is based on making cylindrical cores from paraffin donor blocks and transfer to a single recipient block. The TMA has revolutionized the field of pathology for the possibility to evaluate multiple samples in one slide. There is no precedent of this subject in Cuba, so the objective of this research was to implement the TMA technique. The concordance of the results obtained by complete section and the TMA were evaluated for this purpose, in the evaluation of the estrogen receptors (ER, progesterone (PR and epidermal growth factor type 2 (HER2 in samples of breast cancer. Forty-five paraffin-embedded samples from women diagnosed with breast cancer at the Institute of Oncology in 2012 were studied. Two TMA blocks were constructed, and subsequently the expression of markers ER, PR and HER2 was determined by immunohistochemistry, in the complete section of tissue and in the TMA. Kappa index was used for concordance analysis. A good concordance was obtained for all three markers (ER k=0.8272; PR k=0.793 and HER2 k=0.716. This study constitutes the first report on the TMA technique in Cuba and shows that it is a valuable tool, suggesting its potential use in translational research and clinical trials on vaccines.

  9. Stem cell research: paths to cancer therapies and regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, Irving

    2005-09-21

    Most tissues in complex metazoans contain a rare subset of cells that, at the single-cell level, can self-renew and also give rise to mature daughter cells. Such stem cells likely in development build tissues and are retained in adult life to regenerate them. Cancers and leukemias are apparently not an exception: rare leukemia stem cells and cancer stem cells have been isolated that contain all of the tumorigenicity of the whole tumor, and it is their properties that will guide future therapies. None of this was apparent just 20 years ago, yet this kind of stem cell thinking already provides new perspectives in medical science and could usher in new therapies. Today, political, religious, and ethical issues surround embryonic stem cell and patient-specific pluripotent stem cell research and are center stage in the attempts by governments to ban these fields for discovery and potential therapies. These interventions require physicians and physician-scientists to determine for themselves whether patient welfare or personal ethics will dominate in their practices, and whether all aspects of stem cell research can be pursued in a safe and regulated fashion.

  10. Collaborative Research in Childhood Cancer Survivorship: The Current Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Smita; Armenian, Saro H; Armstrong, Gregory T; van Dulmen-den Broeder, Eline; Hawkins, Michael M; Kremer, Leontien C M; Kuehni, Claudia E; Olsen, Jørgen H; Robison, Leslie L; Hudson, Melissa M

    2015-09-20

    Survivors of childhood cancer carry a substantial burden of morbidity and are at increased risk for premature death. Furthermore, clear associations exist between specific therapeutic exposures and the risk for a variety of long-term complications. The entire landscape of health issues encountered for decades after successful completion of treatment is currently being explored in various collaborative research settings. These settings include large population-based or multi-institutional cohorts and single-institution studies. The ascertainment of outcomes has depended on self-reporting, linkage to registries, or clinical assessments. Survivorship research in the cooperative group setting, such as the Children's Oncology Group, has leveraged the clinical trials infrastructure to explore the molecular underpinnings of treatment-related adverse events, and to understand specific complications in the setting of randomized risk-reduction strategies. This review highlights the salient findings from these large collaborative initiatives, emphasizing the need for life-long follow-up of survivors of childhood cancer, and describing the development of several guidelines and efforts toward harmonization. Finally, the review reinforces the need to identify populations at highest risk, facilitating the development of risk prediction models that would allow for targeted interventions across the entire trajectory of survivorship.

  11. Building up careers in translational neuroscience and mental health research: Education and training in the Centre for Biomedical Research in Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapado-Castro, Marta; Pazos, Ángel; Fañanás, Lourdes; Bernardo, Miquel; Ayuso-Mateos, Jose Luis; Leza, Juan Carlos; Berrocoso, Esther; de Arriba, Jose; Roldán, Laura; Sanjuán, Julio; Pérez, Victor; Haro, Josep M; Palomo, Tomás; Valdizan, Elsa M; Micó, Juan Antonio; Sánchez, Manuel; Arango, Celso

    2015-01-01

    The number of large collaborative research networks in mental health is increasing. Training programs are an essential part of them. We critically review the specific implementation of a research training program in a translational Centre for Biomedical Research in Mental Health in order to inform the strategic integration of basic research into clinical practice to have a positive impact in the mental health system and society. Description of training activities, specific educational programs developed by the research network, and challenges on its implementation are examined. The Centre for Biomedical Research in Mental Health has focused on training through different activities which have led to the development of an interuniversity master's degree postgraduate program in mental health research, certified by the National Spanish Agency for Quality Evaluation and Accreditation. Consolidation of training programs within the Centre for Biomedical Research in Mental Health has considerably advanced the training of researchers to meet competency standards on research. The master's degree constitutes a unique opportunity to accomplish neuroscience and mental health research career-building within the official framework of university programs in Spain.

  12. The Data Management Skills Support Initiative: Synthesising Postgraduate Training in Research Data Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Molloy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper will describe the efforts and findings of the JISC Data Management Skills Support Initiative (‘DaMSSI’. DaMSSI was co-funded by the JISC Managing Research Data programme and the Research Information Network (RIN, in partnership with the Digital Curation Centre, to review, synthesise and augment the training offerings of the JISC Research Data Management Training Materials (‘RDMTrain’ projects.DaMSSI tested the effectiveness of the Society of College, National and University Libraries’ Seven Pillars of Information Literacy model (SCONUL, 2011, and Vitae’s Researcher Development Framework (‘Vitae RDF’ for consistently describing research data management (‘RDM’ skills and skills development paths in UK HEI postgraduate courses.With the collaboration of the RDMTrain projects, we mapped individual course modules to these two models and identified basic generic data management skills alongside discipline-specific requirements. A synthesis of the training outputs of the projects was then carried out, which further investigated the generic versus discipline-specific considerations and other successful approaches to training that had been identified as a result of the projects’ work. In addition we produced a series of career profiles to help illustrate the fact that data management is an essential component – in obvious and not-so-obvious ways – of a wide range of professions.We found that both models had potential for consistently and coherently describing data management skills training and embedding this within broader institutional postgraduate curricula. However, we feel that additional discipline-specific references to data management skills could also be beneficial for effective use of these models. Our synthesis work identified that the majority of core skills were generic across disciplines at the postgraduate level, with the discipline-specific approach showing its value in engaging the audience and

  13. Public involvement in breast cancer research: an analysis and model for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Sabrina; Brody, Julia; Brown, Phil; Polk, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    Public involvement in health program planning has been taking place for many years, and has provided a precedent for the emergence of public involvement in research conducted since the early 1990s. Such involvement is now widely seen in breast cancer research, due to the large public concern and major social movement activity. This article reviews current practices and general models of public involvement in research and constructs a prototype. The authors interviewed researchers, program officers, and laypeople in order to understand the obstacles, processes, and benefits. They conclude that public involvement has major ramifications for the democratization of science and the construction of knowledge by teaching lay people about science and sensitizing researchers to concerns of the public. There is growing support on the part of scientists and government agents for public involvement.

  14. Perceptual-cognitive skill training and its transfer to expert performance in the field: future research directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, David P; Causer, Joe; Williams, A Mark; Ford, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    Perceptual-cognitive skills training provides a potentially valuable method for training athletes on key skills, such as anticipation and decision-making. It can be used when athletes are unable to physically train or are unable to experience repeated key situations from their sport. In this article, we review research on perceptual-cognitive skills training and describe future research areas focusing on a number of key theories and principles. The main aim of any training intervention should be the efficacy of retention and transfer of learning from training to field situations, which should be the key consideration when designing the representative tasks used in perceptual-cognitive skills training. We review the principles that seek to create practice tasks that replicate those found in the field, so as to increase the amount of transfer that occurs. These principles are perception-action coupling, the contextual interference effect and contextual information, which suggest there should be a high level of similarity between training and real-life performance when designing perceptual-cognitive skills training. In the final section, we discuss the transfer of retained skill acquisition from perceptual-cognitive skills training to field performance, which we suggest to be the key area for future research in this area.

  15. Healthy Skin: Cancer Education for School Teachers and Nurses Using a "Train and Equip" Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, E Robert

    2017-03-01

    Skin cancer, especially malignant melanoma, continues on the increase. Different interventions are attempting to impact on this problem. The approach used by the Partners in Health Sciences program at the University of Arkansas for Medical Science is to both "train" and, importantly, "equip" classroom teachers and school nurses in a "Healthy Skin" professional development curriculum. Each participant not only received face-to-face interactive content training in a workshop setting that lasted 6 h; each also received a resource kit of supplies, materials, and equipment used in the workshop and designed for the trainee to use with students in a classroom/school setting. This single "hit" professional development event then can be replicated by each trainee annually for the span of her/his teaching/school-nursing career. A total of 588 trainees participated in "Healthy Skin" workshops that were held in 17 communities throughout the state. Participants attended from 188 different towns/cities. Of those in attendance, 511 (87 %) were females, 77 (13 %) males, 81 % Caucasian, 16 % African Americans, and the remaining 3 % self-identified as "other". There were 471 teachers, 85 nurses, and 32 "others" (administrators, school counselors). Trainees completed anonymous pre/post test measures with an increase in knowledge of 28.5 %. A short-term evaluation was conducted at the end of the workshop. After a minimum of 6 months had elapsed, a long-term evaluation was used to capture data on how the workshop experience transferred into new curricular/learning activities for the students of the workshop participants. There was a high level of satisfaction with the workshop experience and use of workshop content and resource kits. Our experiences in this type of professional development outreach provide a model of how institutions of higher education could contribute to the professional development of K-12 teachers and their students in any content area.

  16. Final priority; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program--Rehabilitation Research Training Centers. Final priority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-20

    The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services announces a priority for a Rehabilitation Research Training Center (RRTC) on Disability Statistics and Demographics under the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers program administered by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for a competition in fiscal year (FY) 2013 and later years. We take this action to focus research attention on areas of national need. We intend to use this priority to improve outcomes for individuals with disabilities.

  17. Evaluation of the Family Physician Assistants’ Views to Sexual Dysfunction in a Training and Research Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Yusuf A. Güçlü1; Yasemin K. Öztürk1; Özgür E. Öztürk; et al

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study is to investigate the view of sight of the family medicine residents about the sexual education and sexual functional disorders. Methods: A sectional descriptive questionnaire form study is designed at Tepecik Training Research Hospital during May and June 2013. The questionnaire about sexual education and sexual functional disorders is applied to all the family medicine residents who agreed to participate the study. Data are decoded in Microsoft Excel program; de...

  18. Three-Dimensional Printing of a Hemorrhagic Cervical Cancer Model for Postgraduate Gynecological Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Stephen; Doucet, Gregory; Murphy, Deanna; Turner, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    Introduction A realistic hemorrhagic cervical cancer model was three-dimensionally (3D) printed and used in a postgraduate medical simulation training session. Materials and methods Computer-assisted design (CAD) software was the platform of choice to create and refine the cervical model. Once the prototype was finalized, another software allowed for the addition of a neoplastic mass, which included openings for bleeding from the neoplasm and cervical os. 3D printing was done using two desktop printers and three different materials. An emergency medicine simulation case was presented to obstetrics and gynecology residents who were at varying stages of their training. The scenario included history taking and physical examination of a standardized patient. This was a hybrid simulation; a synthetic pelvic task trainer that allowed the placement of the cervical model was connected to the standardized patient. The task trainer was placed under a drape and appeared to extend from the standardized patient’s body. At various points in the simulation, the standardized patient controlled the cervical bleeding through a peripheral venous line. Feedback forms were completed, and the models were discussed and evaluated with staff. Results A final cervical model was created and successfully printed. Overall, the models were reported to be similar to a real cervix. The models bled well. Most models were not sutured during the scenarios, but overall, the value of the printed cervical models was reported to be high. Discussion The models were well received, but it was suggested that more colors be integrated into the cervix in order to better emphasize the intended pathology. The model design requires further improvement, such as the addition of a locking mechanism, in order to ensure that the cervix stays inside the task trainer throughout the simulation. Adjustments to the simulated blood product would allow the bleeding to flow more vigorously. Additionally

  19. ADVANTAGES AND APPLICATIONS OF TISSUE MICROARRAY TECHNOLOGY ON CANCER RESEARCH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张喜平; 苏丹; 程琪辉

    2003-01-01

    S To provide evidences for exploiting tissue microarray (TMA) technology, we reviewed advantages and applications of TMA on tumor research. TMA has many advantages, including (1) section from TMA blocks can be utilized for the simultaneous analysis of up to 1,000 different tumors at DNA, RNA or protein level; (2) TMA is highly representative of their donor tissues; (3) TMA can improve conservation of tissue resources and experimental reagents, improve internal experimental control, and increase sample numbers per experiment, and can be used for large-scale, massively parallel in situ analysis; (4) TMA facilitates rapid translation of molecular discoveries to clinical applications. TMA has been applied to tumor research, such as glioma, breast tumor, lung cancer and so on. The development of novel biochip technologies has opened up new possibilities for the high-throughput molecular profiling of human tumors. Novel molecular markers emerging from high-throughput expression surveys could be analyzed on tumor TMA. It is anticipated that TMA, a new member of biochip, will soon become a widely used tool for all types of tissue-based research. TMA will lead to a significant acceleration of the transition of basic research findings into clinical applications.

  20. In Vitro Photothermal Destruction of Cancer Cells Using Gold Nanorods and Pulsed-Train Near-Infrared Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Teng Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel pulsed-train near-IR diode laser system with real-time temperature monitoring of the laser-heated cancer cell mixed in gold nanorod solution. Near-IR diode laser at 808 nm matching the gold nanorod absorption peak (with an aspect ratio about 4.0 was used in this study. Both surface and volume temperatures were measured and kept above 43°C, the temperature for cancer cells destruction. The irradiation time needed in our pulsed-train system with higher laser fluence for killing the cancel cells is about 1–3 minutes, much shorter than conventional methods (5–10 minutes. Cell viabilities in gold nanorod mixed and controlled solutions are studied by green fluorescence.

  1. Multidisciplinary Meeting on Male Breast Cancer : Summary and Research Recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korde, Larissa A.; Zujewski, Jo Anne; Kamin, Leah; Giordano, Sharon; Domchek, Susan; Anderson, William F.; Bartlett, John M. S.; Gelmon, Karen; Nahleh, Zeina; Bergh, Jonas; Cutuli, Bruno; Pruneri, Giancarlo; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; Gralow, Julie; Hortobagyi, Gabriel; Cardoso, Fatima

    2010-01-01

    Male breast cancer is a rare disease, accounting for less than 1% of all breast cancer diagnoses worldwide. Most data on male breast cancer comes from small single-institution studies, and because of the paucity of data, the optimal treatment for male breast cancer is not known. This article summari

  2. Cancer patient and survivor research from the cancer information service research consortium: a preview of three large randomized trials and initial lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Alfred C; Diefenbach, Michael A; Stanton, Annette L; Miller, Suzanne M; Fleisher, Linda; Raich, Peter C; Morra, Marion E; Perocchia, Rosemarie Slevin; Tran, Zung Vu; Bright, Mary Anne

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe 3 large randomized trials from the Cancer Information Service Research Consortium. Three web-based multimedia programs are being tested to help newly diagnosed prostate (Project 1) and breast cancer patients (Project 2) make informed treatment decisions and breast cancer patients prepare for life after treatment (Project 3). Project 3 also tests a telephone callback intervention delivered by a cancer information specialist. All participants receive standard print material specific to each project. Preliminary results from the 2-month follow-up interviews are reported for the initial wave of enrolled participants, most of whom were recruited from the Cancer Information Service (1-800-4-CANCER) telephone information program (Project 1: n =208; Project 2: n =340; Project 3: n =792). Self-reported use of the multimedia program was 51%, 52%, and 67% for Projects 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Self-reported use of the print materials (read all, most, or some) was 90%, 85%, and 83% for Projects 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The callback intervention was completed by 92% of Project 3 participants. Among those using the Cancer Information Service Research Consortium interventions, perceived usefulness and benefit was high, and more than 90% reported that they would recommend them to other cancer patients. The authors present 5 initial lessons learned that may help inform future cancer communications research.

  3. Interdisciplinary training in mathematical biology through team-based undergraduate research and courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jason E; Walston, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Inspired by BIO2010 and leveraging institutional and external funding, Truman State University built an undergraduate program in mathematical biology with high-quality, faculty-mentored interdisciplinary research experiences at its core. These experiences taught faculty and students to bridge the epistemological gap between the mathematical and life sciences. Together they created the infrastructure that currently supports several interdisciplinary courses, an innovative minor degree, and long-term interdepartmental research collaborations. This article describes how the program was built with support from the National Science Foundation's Interdisciplinary Training for Undergraduates in Biology and Mathematics program, and it shares lessons learned that will help other undergraduate institutions build their own program.

  4. Modulation of Circulating Angiogenic Factors and Tumor Biology by Aerobic Training in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Lee W.; Fels, Diane R.; West, Miranda; Allen, Jason D.; Broadwater, Gloria; Barry, William T; Wilke, Lee G.; Masko, Elisabeth; Douglas, Pamela S.; Dash, Rajesh C.; Povsic, Thomas J.; Peppercorn, Jeffrey; Marcom, P. Kelly; Kimberly L Blackwell; Kimmick, Gretchen

    2013-01-01

    Aerobic exercise training (AET) is an effective adjunct therapy to attenuate the adverse side-effects of adjuvant chemotherapy in women with early breast cancer. Whether AET interacts with the antitumor efficacy of chemotherapy has received scant attention. We carried out a pilot study to explore the effects of AET in combination with neoadjuvant doxorubicin–cyclophosphamide (AC+AET), relative to AC alone, on: (i) host physiology [exercise capacity (VO2 peak), brachial artery flow-mediated di...

  5. Research on Fast Track Surgery Application in Lung Cancer Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiyun YANG

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Fast track surgery (FTS is a systematical method to accelerate the recovery of surgical patients by reducing the physical and mental trauma stress of them. The research is to investigate the feasibility of FTS application in lung cancer surgery. Methods A total of 80 cases of lung cancer patients with single leaf lobotomy resection were randomized into two groups. While the experimental group was treated with the conception of FTS, and the control group was treated with the traditional methods. The incident rate of post-operation pain degrees, telecasts, pleural effusion, the post-operation time stay in hospital time and the total cost during hospitalization in two groups were compared respectively. Results In FTS group: the VAS score of post-operation pain at 1 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h and 48 h all significantly decreased compared to the traditional therapy group. The incidence rate of telecast was 10.53%. The incidence rate of pleural effusion was 26.31%. The length of stay after operation was (4±1 d and the total cost was RMB 15 600±7 600. In the control group, the above values were 77.78%, 33.33%, 22.22%, (9±1 d, RMB 23 600±5 400, respectively. The post operation pain (VAS method of FTS group was remarkablely below the control group. There has significant difference of the incident rate of telecasts, stay time in hospital and the total cast in two groups (P < 0.05. No significant difference was observed in the incident rate of pleural effusion. Conclusion The new methods of FTS can apparently accelerates recovery after lung cancer resection, reduces complications, shorten timestay in hospital and cut down the total cost.

  6. Research of ERM Training%探究我国ERM履约培训的开展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付乾坤

    2012-01-01

    The STCW Convention Manila Revision has already effected. ERM training has already started. In initial stage of ERM Training, people are looking for the most suitable method. The text introduces some related research of ERM training. For example, ERM&STCW, related activity of our country, training types and methods, 5 main factors of ERM, etc.%在STCW马尼拉修正案生效后的履约过渡期内,我国正在开展相关履约培训。就我国在履约培训初期如何开展相关的ERM履约培训进行了探讨。具体地从ERM与STCW、我国正采取的相关行动,到ERM在培训中的体现形式与方法和ERM的五要素进行了阐述,并重点对培训实操环节的模式进行了论述。

  7. The Impact of a Research Ethics Training Program: Romania as a Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loue, Sana

    2014-12-01

    Case Western Reserve University's (CWRU) Training Program in International Research Ethics, funded by the Fogarty International Center, has been ongoing in Romania since 2000. The program consists of multiple components: a U.S.- based MA degree program for long-term trainees, Romania-based short courses, a U.S.-based opportunity for mid-and senior-level personnel to develop collaborative writing or research projects and present lectures, and a newsletter and various Internet-based activities. We evaluated the impact of the training program on bioethics in Romania through a survey of the training program's long-term trainees, a literature search for trainee publications, interviews with key informants, and identification of key events during the course of the program. Findings indicate that the program has had a considerable impact in the field of bioethics through trainee authorship of peer-reviewed publications, books, and chapters; trainee career trajectories that encompass activities related to research ethics; and the development of a Romania-based master's degree program in bioethics and a Center of Bioethics and Health Policy. We attribute these achievements to the establishment of strong relationships between CWRU in Cleveland and the University of Medicine and Pharmacy Gr. T. Popa in Iasi, Romania, prior to the initiation of the training program; collaboration with key Romania-based institutional partners that are equally invested in the program's success; reliance of the program on a solid theoretical framework; ongoing program responsiveness to trainee and country needs; and a sustained commitment of time, expertise, and funding by the funders, sponsors, and in-country collaborators.

  8. Understanding breast cancer patients' preference for two types of exercise training during chemotherapy in an unblinded randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallance Jeffrey K

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient preference for group assignment may affect outcomes in unblinded trials but few studies have attempted to understand such preferences. The purpose of the present study was to examine factors associated with breast cancer patients' preference for two types of exercise training during chemotherapy. Methods Breast cancer patients (N = 242 completed a battery of tests including a questionnaire that assessed patient preference and the theory of planned behavior (TPB prior to being randomized to usual care, resistance exercise training (RET, or aerobic exercise training (AET. Results 99 (40.9% participants preferred RET, 88 (36.4% preferred AET, and 55 (22.7% reported no preference. Past exercisers (p = 0.023, smokers (p = 0.004, and aerobically fitter participants (p = 0.005 were more likely to prefer RET. As hypothesized, participants that preferred AET had more favorable TPB beliefs about AET whereas participants that preferred RET had more favorable TPB beliefs about RET. In multivariate modeling, patient preference for RET versus AET was explained (R2 = .46; p 2 = .48; p Conclusion Breast cancer patients' preference for RET versus AET during chemotherapy was predicted largely by a difference in motivation for each type of exercise which, in turn, was based on differences in their beliefs about the anticipated benefits, enjoyment, and difficulty of performing each type of exercise during chemotherapy. These findings may help explain patient preference effects in unblinded behavioral trials. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT00115713.

  9. Leveraging epidemiology and clinical studies of cancer outcomes: recommendations and opportunities for translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elena, Joanne W; Travis, Lois B; Simonds, Naoko I; Ambrosone, Christine B; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel; Bhatia, Smita; Cerhan, James R; Hartge, Patricia; Heist, Rebecca S; Kushi, Lawrence H; Lash, Timothy L; Morton, Lindsay M; Onel, Kenan; Pierce, John P; Robison, Leslie L; Rowland, Julia H; Schrag, Deborah; Sellers, Thomas A; Seminara, Daniela; Shu, Xiao Ou; Thomas, Nancy E; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Freedman, Andrew N

    2013-01-16

    As the number of cancer survivors continues to grow, research investigating the factors that affect cancer outcomes, such as disease recurrence, risk of second malignant neoplasms, and the late effects of cancer treatments, becomes ever more important. Numerous epidemiologic studies have investigated factors that affect cancer risk, but far fewer have addressed the extent to which demographic, lifestyle, genomic, clinical, and psychosocial factors influence cancer outcomes. To identify research priorities as well as resources and infrastructure needed to advance the field of cancer outcomes and survivorship research, the National Cancer Institute sponsored a workshop titled "Utilizing Data from Cancer Survivor Cohorts: Understanding the Current State of Knowledge and Developing Future Research Priorities" on November 3, 2011, in Washington, DC. This commentary highlights recent findings presented at the workshop, opportunities to leverage existing data, and recommendations for future research, data, and infrastructure needed to address high priority clinical and research questions. Multidisciplinary teams that include epidemiologists, clinicians, biostatisticians, and bioinformaticists will be essential to facilitate future cancer outcome studies focused on improving clinical care of cancer patients, identifying those at high risk of poor outcomes, and implementing effective interventions to ultimately improve the quality and duration of survival.

  10. Growth Analysis of Cancer Biology Research, 2000-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshava,

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Methods and Material: The PubMed database was used for retrieving data on 'cancer biology.' Articles were downloaded from the years 2000 to 2011. The articles were classified chronologically and transferred to a spreadsheet application for analysis of the data as per the objectives of the study. Statistical Method: To investigate the nature of growth of articles via exponential, linear, and logistics tests. Result: The year wise analysis of the growth of articles output shows that for the years 2000 to 2005 and later there is a sudden increase in output, during the years 2006 to 2007 and 2008 to 2011. The high productivity of articles during these years may be due to their significance in cancer biology literature, having received prominence in research. Conclusion: There is an obvious need for better compilations of statistics on numbers of publications in the years from 2000 to 2011 on various disciplines on a worldwide scale, for informed critical assessments of the amount of new knowledge contributed by these publications, and for enhancements and refinements of present Scientometric techniques (citation and publication counts, so that valid measures of knowledge growth may be obtained. Only then will Scientometrics be able to provide accurate, useful descriptions and predictions of knowledge growth.

  11. Research progress in the treatment of small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yan-fang; Liu, Zhi-gang; Yang, Wen-juan; Zhao, Yu; Tang, Jiao; Tang, Wei-zhi; Jin, Yi; Li, Fang; Zhong, Rui; Wang, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) accounts for approximately 10-15% of all lung cancers. No significant improvement has been made for patients with SCLC in the past several decades. The main progresses were the thoracic radiation and prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) that improved the patient survival rate. For patients with limited disease and good performance status (PS), concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) followed by PCI should be considered. For extensive disease, the combination of etoposide and platinum-based chemotherapy remains the standard treatment and consolidative thoracic radiotherapy is beneficial for patients who have a significant respond to initial chemotherapy. However, the prognosis still remains poor. Recently, efforts have been focused on molecular targets and immunotherapy. But numerous molecular targets methods have failed to show a significant clinical benefit in patients with SCLC. It is anticipated that further development of research will depend on the on-going trials for molecular targeted therapy and immunotherapy which are promising and may improve the outcomes for SCLC in the next decade.

  12. The HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute: Training Early-Career Scientists to Conduct Research on Research Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Celia B; Yuko, Elizabeth

    2015-12-01

    The responsible conduct of HIV/drug abuse prevention research requires investigators with both the knowledge of and ability to generate empirical data that can enhance global ethical practices and policies. This article describes a multidisciplinary program offering early-career professionals a 2-year intensive summer curriculum along with funding to conduct a mentored research study on a wide variety of HIV/drug abuse research ethics topics. Now in its fifth year, the program has admitted 29 trainees who have to date demonstrated increased knowledge of research ethics, produced 17 peer-reviewed publications, 46 professional presentations, and submitted or been awarded five related federal grants. The institute also hosts a global information platform providing general and HIV/drug abuse relevant research ethics educational and research resources that have had more than 38,800 unique visitors from more than 150 countries.

  13. Highlights of recent developments and trends in cancer nanotechnology research--view from NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, L C; Farrell, D; Grodzinski, P

    2014-01-01

    Although the incidence of cancer and cancer related deaths in the United States has decreased over the past two decades due to improvements in early detection and treatment, cancer still is responsible for a quarter of the deaths in this country. There is much room for improvement on the standard treatments currently available and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has recognized the potential for nanotechnology and nanomaterials in this area. The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer was formed in 2004 to support multidisciplinary researchers in the application of nanotechnology to cancer diagnosis and treatment. The researchers in the Alliance have been productive in generating innovative solutions to some of the central issues of cancer treatment including how to detect tumors earlier, how to target cancer cells specifically, and how to improve the therapeutic index of existing chemotherapies and radiotherapy treatments. Highly creative ideas are being pursued where novelty in nanomaterial development enables new modalities of detection or therapy. This review highlights some of the innovative materials approaches being pursued by researchers funded by the NCI Alliance. Their discoveries to improve the functionality of nanoparticles for medical applications includes the generation of new platforms, improvements in the manufacturing of nanoparticles and determining the underlying reasons for the movement of nanoparticles in the blood.

  14. Weaving Transnational Feminist(s) Methodologies: (Re)Examining Early Childhood Linguistic Diversity Teacher Training and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Cinthya M.; Chakravarthi, Swetha; Lower, Joanna K.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to engender a space where a variety of critical feminist(s) lenses are interwoven to problematize current discursive practices in linguistic diversity training and to (re)imagine "nueavas posibilidades" for linguistic diversity research/training for pre-kindergarten teachers. Transnational feminists' projects have…

  15. Using the Critical Incident Technique to Research Decision Making regarding Access to Training and Development in Medium-Sized Enterprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzer, Alan; Redmond, Janice; Sharafizad, Jalleh

    2012-01-01

    Employees in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) form part of a "disadvantaged" group within the workforce that receives less access to training and development (T&D) than employees in large firms. Prior research into reasons for the relatively low levels of employee participation in training and development has typically involved surveys of…

  16. Using the Critical Incident Technique to Research Decision Making regarding Access to Training and Development in Medium-Sized Enterprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzer, Alan; Redmond, Janice; Sharafizad, Jalleh

    2012-01-01

    Employees in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) form part of a "disadvantaged" group within the workforce that receives less access to training and development (T&D) than employees in large firms. Prior research into reasons for the relatively low levels of employee participation in training and development has typically…

  17. Evaluative research of a learning experience within the Secondary Education Teachers’ Training Master

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente CARRASCO EMBUENA

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper contributes the results of the evaluative research of a didactic experience contextualized within the Master on Secondary education Teachers’ Training, developed at the University of Alicante during the 2009-2010 year and related to the subject Curricular Design and Adaptation, which belongs to the general module. An active learning methodological proposal has been offered to guarantee the students’ motivation, to train them in competences and to help their learning process. what has been researched is the incidence these methodologies have on learning, from a subjective perception, through the analysis of the results of a questionnaire offered to two different groups of students, which gave their opinion about the class development and about what it has contributed to their own training. On the other hand, the students’ level of achievement has been objectively analyzed. In both cases, the results show important percentages of achievement success and a high degree of satisfaction towards the class activities and the learning carried out. In addition, some suggestions to improve this curricular proposal are also set out.

  18. Cancer Imaging Training in the 21st Century: An Overview of Where We Are, and Where We Need To Be.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Stephanie A; Krajewski, Katherine M; Weissman, Barbara N; Seltzer, Steven E; Ramaiya, Nikhil H; Van den Abbeele, Annick D

    2015-07-01

    Advances in cancer care over the past decade have significantly changed treatment algorithms and life expectancies. Time from cancer diagnosis to death is rapidly increasing, as new, targeted therapies are developed, many prolonging life even in advanced disease. Tumors are now genotyped at diagnosis, allowing personalization of treatment. The FDA is continually approving new drugs that quickly become the standard of care for common tumors; the impact of these drugs and their side effects is monitored with imaging, and accurate interpretation of imaging studies has become essential as these patients live longer. Oncologists rely on radiologists to understand new patterns of treatment response and novel drug side effects that are associated with new drug classes, increasing the knowledge required for accurate image interpretation. These factors have led to the demand for dedicated cancer imaging training for radiologists, who can integrate findings throughout the body on various imaging modalities. In addition, we need to expand radiology's focus beyond diagnosis, staging, and restaging of tumors, and include education about the influence of genomics on tumor characterization and guidance for cancer care, the spectrum of treatment response, and the imaging characteristics of adverse events associated with various therapies. The time has come, therefore, to formally incorporate, as part of radiology residency, a distinct cancer imaging curriculum that is standardized, tested, and will allow the new generation of radiologists to effectively communicate with and assist their oncologic colleagues and optimally contribute to the care of patients with cancer.

  19. Stakeholder engagement for comparative effectiveness research in cancer care: experience of the DEcIDE Cancer Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Caprice C; Wind, Jennifer K; Chang, George J; Chen, Ronald C; Schrag, Deborah

    2013-03-01

    Stakeholder input is a critical component of comparative effectiveness research. To ensure that the research activities of the Developing Evidence to Inform Decisions about Effectiveness (DEcIDE) Network, supported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, translate into the greatest impact for everyday practice and policy-making in cancer, we were tasked with soliciting stakeholder input regarding priority areas in cancer-related comparative effectiveness research for the DEcIDE Cancer Consortium. Given the increasing emphasis on stakeholder engagement in research, many investigators are facing a similar task, yet there is limited literature to guide such efforts, particularly in cancer care. To help fill this gap, we present our approach to operationalizing stakeholder engagement and discuss it in the context of other recent developments in the area. We describe challenges encountered in convening stakeholders from multiple vantage points to prioritize topics and strategies used to mitigate these barriers. We offer several recommendations regarding how to best solicit stakeholder input to inform comparative effectiveness research in cancer care. These recommendations can inform other initiatives currently facing the challenges of engaging stakeholders in priority setting for cancer.

  20. Tobacco and cancer: an American Association for Cancer Research policy statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Herbst, Roy S; Land, Stephanie R; Leischow, Scott J; Shields, Peter G

    2010-05-01

    The evidence against tobacco use is clear, incontrovertible, and convincing; so is the need for urgent and immediate action to stem the global tide of tobacco-related death and suffering and to improve public health. The American Association for Cancer Research makes an unequivocal call to all who are concerned about public health to take the following immediate steps:Increase the investment in tobacco-related research, commensurate with the enormous toll that tobacco use takes on human health, to provide the scientific evidence to drive the development of effective policies and treatments necessary to dramatically reduce tobacco use and attendant disease. Develop new evidence-based strategies to more effectively prevent the initiation of tobacco use, especially for youth and young adults. Promote the further development of evidence-based treatments for tobacco cessation, including individualized therapies, and ensure coverage of and access to evidence-based behavioral and pharmacological treatments. Develop evidence-based strategies for more effective public communication to prevent, reduce, and eliminate tobacco use and to guide health policies and clinical practice. Develop effective, evidence-based policies to reduce disparities across the tobacco continuum among social groups and developed and developing nations. Implement to the fullest extent existing evidence-based, systems-wide tobacco control programs to prevent initiation and foster cessation. Adapt and implement appropriate approaches to reduce the growing burden of tobacco use in the developing world. Enhance and coordinate surveillance efforts, both in the United States and globally, to monitor tobacco products, tobacco use, and tobacco-related disease, including tobacco use in oncology clinical trials. Establish a comprehensive, science-based regulatory framework to evaluate tobacco products and manufacturers' claims. Promote research that addresses the following: the potential harms of current and