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Sample records for cancer registry contributes

  1. Cancer Registry Data

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-05-24

    Dr. Loria Pollack, a Senior Medical Epidemiologist, talks about the importance of cancer registry data to understanding how cancer affects the United States–now and in the future.  Created: 5/24/2017 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/24/2017.

  2. Data from a national lung cancer registry contributes to improve outcome and quality of surgery: Danish results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Erik; Palshof, Torben; Østerlind, Kell

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In 1998 The Danish Lung Cancer Group published the first edition of guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer. A national registry was implemented in the year 2000 with the primary objective to monitor the implementation of these guidelines and nationwide to secure and impr......OBJECTIVE: In 1998 The Danish Lung Cancer Group published the first edition of guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer. A national registry was implemented in the year 2000 with the primary objective to monitor the implementation of these guidelines and nationwide to secure...... has decreased from 23% to 11%. The proportion of patients having surgery within 14 days from referral has increased from 69% to 87%. CONCLUSIONS: Establishment of a national lung cancer group with the primary tasks to implement updated national guidelines and to secure valid registration of clinical...

  3. The Danish Lung Cancer Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Erik; Rasmussen, Torben Riis

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Lung Cancer Registry (DLCR) was established by the Danish Lung Cancer Group. The primary and first goal of the DLCR was to improve survival and the overall clinical management of Danish lung cancer patients. STUDY POPULATION: All Danish primary lung cancer patients since...... 2000 are included into the registry and the database today contains information on more than 50,000 cases of lung cancer. MAIN VARIABLES: The database contains information on patient characteristics such as age, sex, diagnostic procedures, histology, tumor stage, lung function, performance...... the results are commented for local, regional, and national audits. Indicator results are supported by descriptive reports with details on diagnostics and treatment. CONCLUSION: DLCR has since its creation been used to improve the quality of treatment of lung cancer in Denmark and it is increasingly used...

  4. Danish Prostate Cancer Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgstrand, J Thomas; Klemann, Nina; Røder, Martin Andreas

    2016-01-01

    of SNOMED codes were identified. A computer algorithm was developed to transcode SNOMED codes into an analyzable format including procedure (eg, biopsy, transurethral resection, etc), diagnosis, and date of diagnosis. For validation, ~55,000 pathological reports were manually reviewed. Prostate-specific...... antigen, vital status, causes of death, and tumor-node-metastasis classification were integrated from national registries. RESULTS: Of the 161,525 specimens from 113,801 males identified, 83,379 (51.6%) were sets of prostate biopsies, 56,118 (34.7%) were transurethral/transvesical resections......BACKGROUND: Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine (SNOMED) codes are computer-processable medical terms used to describe histopathological evaluations. SNOMED codes are not readily usable for analysis. We invented an algorithm that converts prostate SNOMED codes into an analyzable format. We...

  5. Danish Childhood Cancer Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Henrik; Rechnitzer, Catherine; Wehner, Peder Skov

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The overall aim is to monitor the quality of childhood cancer care in Denmark; to register late effects of treatment; to analyze complications of permanent central venous catheters (CVCs); to study blood stream infections in children with cancer; and to study acute toxicity of high......-dose methotrexate infusions in children with leukemia. STUDY POPULATION: All children below 15 years of age at diagnosis living in Denmark diagnosed after January 1, 1985 according to the International Classification of Diseases 10, including diagnoses DC00-DD48. MAIN VARIABLES: Cancer type, extent of disease......, and outcome of antimicrobial chemotherapy. DESCRIPTIVE DATA: Since 1985, 4,944 children below 15 years of age have been registered in the database. There has been no significant change in the incidence of childhood cancer in Denmark since 1985. The 5-year survival has increased significantly since 1985...

  6. Veterans Affairs Central Cancer Registry (VACCR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Veterans Affairs Central Cancer Registry (VACCR) receives and stores information on cancer diagnosis and treatment constraints compiled and sent in by the local...

  7. Linking Medicare, Medicaid, and Cancer Registry Data...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Linking Medicare, Medicaid, and Cancer Registry Data to Study the Burden of Cancers in West Virginia In the United States, the elderly carry an unequal burden of...

  8. Common variables in European pancreatic cancer registries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Leede, E. M.; Sibinga Mulder, B. G.; Bastiaannet, E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Quality assurance of cancer care is of utmost importance to detect and avoid under and over treatment. Most cancer data are collected by different procedures in different countries, and are poorly comparable at an international level. EURECCA, acronym for European Registration of Cancer...... registries, as well as specific pancreatic cancer audits/registries, were invited to participate in EURECCA Pancreas. Participating countries were requested to share an overview of their collected data items. Of the received datasets, a shared items list was made which creates insight in similarities between...

  9. [History of the cancer registry in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allende-López, Aldo; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo

    2011-01-01

    A cancer registry is to record the data which let us to know the epidemiology of neoplasm, but led us take a decision in medical policy about this health problem that benefit patients. In this paper we did a brief historical review about models and attempts for having a cancer registry in Mexico. However, since 1940 "the fight against cancer" was declared, we have not had a confident cancer registry today validated and built with data from whole the country. In 1982, the Registro Nacional del Cancer was created. The design and validation of a registration card in four hospitals were the main results. In 1988, the Registro Nacional del Cancer was reinforced with a computerized system for facilitation the data capture. In 1994, it was signed the first interinstitutional agreement that led to Registro Histopatol6gico de Neoplasias Malignas. In 1996, the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social established a cancer registry in children in Mexico with the intention to have data from this population.

  10. Development of an International Prostate Cancer Outcomes Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Sue M; Nag, Nupur; Roder, David; Brooks, Andrew; Millar, Jeremy L; Moretti, Kim L; Pryor, David; Skala, Marketa; McNeil, John J

    2016-04-01

    To establish a Prostate Cancer Outcomes Registry-Australia and New Zealand (PCOR-ANZ) for monitoring outcomes of prostate cancer treatment and care, in a cost-effective manner. Stakeholders were recruited based on their interest, importance in achieving the monitoring and reporting of clinical practice and patient outcomes, and in amalgamation of existing registries. Each participating jurisdiction is responsible for local governance, site recruitment, data collection, and data transfer into the PCOR-ANZ. To establish each local registry, hospitals and clinicians within a jurisdiction were approached to voluntarily contribute to the registry following relevant ethical approval. Patient contact occurs following notification of prostate cancer through a hospital or pathology report, or from a cancer registry. Patient registration is based on an opt-out model. The PCOR-ANZ is a secure web-based registry adhering to ISO 27001 standards. Based on a standardised minimum data set, information on demographics, diagnosis, treatment, outcomes, and patient reported quality of life, are collected. Eight of nine jurisdictions have agreed to contribute to the PCOR-ANZ. Each jurisdiction has commenced implementation of necessary infrastructure to support rapid rollout. PCOR-ANZ has defined a minimum data set for collection, to enable analysis of key quality indicators that will aid in assessing clinical practice and patient focused outcomes. PCOR-ANZ will provide a useful resource of risk-adjusted evidence-based data to clinicians, hospitals, and decision makers on prostate cancer clinical practice. © 2016 The Authors BJU International © 2016 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Costing Tool for International Cancer Registries

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-11-21

    A health economist at CDC talks about a new tool for estimating how much it costs to run cancer registries in developing countries.  Created: 11/21/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 11/21/2016.

  12. Uses of cancer registries for public health and clinical research in Europe: Results of the European Network of Cancer Registries survey among 161 population-based cancer registries during 2010–2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; Louwman, W.J.; Kwast, A.; van den Hurk, C.J.G.; O'Callaghan, M.; Rosso, S.; Zanetti, R.; Storm, H.; Comber, H.; Steliarova-Foucher, E.; Coebergh, J.W.W.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To provide insight into cancer registration coverage, data access and use in Europe. This contributes to data and infrastructure harmonisation and will foster a more prominent role of cancer registries (CRs) within public health, clinical policy and cancer research, whether within or outside the

  13. The history and use of cancer registry data by public health cancer control programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mary C; Babcock, Frances; Hayes, Nikki S; Mariotto, Angela B; Wong, Faye L; Kohler, Betsy A; Weir, Hannah K

    2017-12-15

    Because cancer registry data provide a census of cancer cases, registry data can be used to: 1) define and monitor cancer incidence at the local, state, and national levels; 2) investigate patterns of cancer treatment; and 3) evaluate the effectiveness of public health efforts to prevent cancer cases and improve cancer survival. The purpose of this article is to provide a broad overview of the history of cancer surveillance programs in the United States, and illustrate the expanding ways in which cancer surveillance data are being made available and contributing to cancer control programs. The article describes the building of the cancer registry infrastructure and the successful coordination of efforts among the 2 federal agencies that support cancer registry programs, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Cancer Institute, and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries. The major US cancer control programs also are described, including the National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program, the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program, and the Colorectal Cancer Control Program. This overview illustrates how cancer registry data can inform public health actions to reduce disparities in cancer outcomes and may be instructional for a variety of cancer control professionals in the United States and in other countries. Cancer 2017;123:4969-76. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  14. The History and Use of Cancer Registry Data by Public Health Cancer Control Programs in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mary C.; Babcock, Frances; Hayes, Nikki S.; Mariotto, Angela B.; Wong, Faye L.; Kohler, Betsy A.; Weir, Hannah K.

    2018-01-01

    Because cancer registry data provide a census of cancer cases, registry data can be used to: 1) define and monitor cancer incidence at the local, state, and national levels; 2) investigate patterns of cancer treatment; and 3) evaluate the effectiveness of public health efforts to prevent cancer cases and improve cancer survival. The purpose of this article is to provide a broad overview of the history of cancer surveillance programs in the United States, and illustrate the expanding ways in which cancer surveillance data are being made available and contributing to cancer control programs. The article describes the building of the cancer registry infrastructure and the successful coordination of efforts among the 2 federal agencies that support cancer registry programs, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Cancer Institute, and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries. The major US cancer control programs also are described, including the National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program, the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program, and the Colorectal Cancer Control Program. This overview illustrates how cancer registry data can inform public health actions to reduce disparities in cancer outcomes and may be instructional for a variety of cancer control professionals in the United States and in other countries. PMID:29205307

  15. Workload and time management in central cancer registries: baseline data and implication for registry staffing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Susan A; Mulvihill, Linda; Herrera, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    The Workload and Time Management Survey of Central Cancer Registries was conducted in 2011 to assess the amount of time spent on work activities usually performed by cancer registrars. A survey including 39 multi-item questions,together with a work activities data collection log, was sent by email to the central cancer registry (CCR) manager in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Twenty-four central cancer registries (47%) responded to the survey.Results indicate that registries faced reductions in budgeted staffing from 2008-2009. The number of source records and total cases were important indicators of workload. Four core activities, including abstracting at the registry, visual editing,case consolidation, and resolving edit reports, accounted for about half of registry workload. We estimate an average of 12.4 full-time equivalents (FTEs) are required to perform all cancer registration activities tracked by the survey; however,estimates vary widely by registry size. These findings may be useful for registries as a benchmark for their own registry workload and time-management data and to develop staffing guidelines.

  16. Cancer incidence in Morocco: report from Casablanca registry 2005 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Few population-based cancer registries are in place in developing countries. In order to know the burden of cancer in Moroccan population, cancer registry initiative was put in place in the Casablanca district, the biggest city of Morocco. Methods: The data collected covers 3.6 millions inhabitant and included ...

  17. Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shats, Oleg; Goldner, Whitney; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Smith, Russell B; Sherman, Simon

    2016-01-01

    A multicenter, web-based Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR, http://tccr.unmc.edu) allows for the collection and management of various data on thyroid cancer (TC) and thyroid nodule (TN) patients. The TCCR is coupled with OpenSpecimen, an open-source biobank management system, to annotate biospecimens obtained from the TCCR subjects. The demographic, lifestyle, physical activity, dietary habits, family history, medical history, and quality of life data are provided and may be entered into the registry by subjects. Information on diagnosis, treatment, and outcome is entered by the clinical personnel. The TCCR uses advanced technical and organizational practices, such as (i) metadata-driven software architecture (design); (ii) modern standards and best practices for data sharing and interoperability (standardization); (iii) Agile methodology (project management); (iv) Software as a Service (SaaS) as a software distribution model (operation); and (v) the confederation principle as a business model (governance). This allowed us to create a secure, reliable, user-friendly, and self-sustainable system for TC and TN data collection and management that is compatible with various end-user devices and easily adaptable to a rapidly changing environment. Currently, the TCCR contains data on 2,261 subjects and data on more than 28,000 biospecimens. Data and biological samples collected by the TCCR are used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against TC.

  18. Establishment of the Fox Chase Network Breast Cancer Risk Registry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Daly, Mary

    1997-01-01

    .... The development of the Fox Chase Cancer Center Breast Cancer Risk Registry was proposed to facilitate research in the epidemiologic and genetic predictors of disease and will permit evaluation...

  19. Time Trends in Breast Cancer Among Indian Women Population: An Analysis of Population Based Cancer Registry Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Meesha; Vaitheeswaran, K; Satishkumar, K; Das, Priyanka; Stephen, S; Nandakumar, A

    2015-12-01

    The trends observed in cancer breast among Indian women are an indication of effect of changing lifestyle in population. To draw an appropriate inference regarding the trends of a particular type of cancer in a country, it is imperative to glance at the reliable data collected by Population Based Cancer Registries over a period of time. To give an insight of changing trends of breast cancer which have taken place over a period of time among women in Cancer Registries of India. Breast Cancer trends for invasive breast cancer in women in Indian Registries have varied during the selected period. Occurrence of breast cancers has also shown geographical variation in India. This data was collected by means of a 'Standard Core Proforma' designed by NCRP conforming to the data fields as suggested by International norms. The Proforma was filled by trained Registry workers based on interview/ hospital medical records/ supplementing data by inputs from treating surgeons/radiation oncologists/involved physicians/pathologists. The contents of the Proforma are entered into specifically created software and transmitted electronically to the coordinating center at Bangalore. The registries contributing to more number of years of data are called as older registries, while other recently established registries are called newer registries. While there has been an increase recorded in breast cancer in most of the registries, some of them have recorded an insignificant increase. Comparison of Age Adjusted Rates (AARs) among Indian Registries has been carried out after which trends observed in populations covered by Indian Registries are depicted. A variation in broad age groups of females and the proneness of females developing breast cancer over the period 1982 to 2010 has been shown. Comparisons of Indian registries with International counterparts have also been carried out. There are marked changes in incidence rates of cancer breast which have occurred in respective registries in a

  20. The first report of a 5-year period cancer registry in Greece (2009-2013): a pathology-based cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsea, Eleni; Kaklamanis, Loukas; Batistatou, Anna

    2018-04-01

    Cancer registries are essential in health care, since they allow more accurate planning of necessary health services and evaluation of programs for cancer prevention and control. The Hellenic Society of Pathology (HSP) having recognized the lack of such information in Greece has undertaken the task of a 5-year pathology-based cancer registry in Greece (2009-2013). In this study, > 95% of all pathology laboratories in the national health system hospitals and 100% of pathology laboratories in private hospitals, as well as > 80% of private pathology laboratories have contributed their data. The most common cancer types overall were as follows: breast cancer (18.26%), colorectal cancer (15.49%), prostate cancer (13.49%), and lung cancer (10.24% of all registered cancers). In men, the most common neoplasms were as follows: prostate cancer, colorectal cancer, lung cancer, and gastric cancer. In women, the most common neoplasms were as follows: breast cancer, colorectal cancer, thyroid cancer, and lung cancer. The data on cancer burden in Greece, presented herein, fill the void of cancer information in Greece that affects health care not only nationally but Europe-wise.

  1. Regional Cancer Registries – 20 Years and Growing

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI, Center for Global Health (CGH), the University of California at Irvine, the Middle East Cancer Consortium, and the International Agency for Research on Cancer partnered in support of the training course, held in Ankara, Turkey this past October, on The Uses of Cancer Registry Data in Cancer Control Research.

  2. Presenting an Evaluation Model for the Cancer Registry Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddasi, Hamid; Asadi, Farkhondeh; Rabiei, Reza; Rahimi, Farough; Shahbodaghi, Reihaneh

    2017-12-01

    As cancer is increasingly growing, cancer registry is of great importance as the main core of cancer control programs, and many different software has been designed for this purpose. Therefore, establishing a comprehensive evaluation model is essential to evaluate and compare a wide range of such software. In this study, the criteria of the cancer registry software have been determined by studying the documents and two functional software of this field. The evaluation tool was a checklist and in order to validate the model, this checklist was presented to experts in the form of a questionnaire. To analyze the results of validation, an agreed coefficient of %75 was determined in order to apply changes. Finally, when the model was approved, the final version of the evaluation model for the cancer registry software was presented. The evaluation model of this study contains tool and method of evaluation. The evaluation tool is a checklist including the general and specific criteria of the cancer registry software along with their sub-criteria. The evaluation method of this study was chosen as a criteria-based evaluation method based on the findings. The model of this study encompasses various dimensions of cancer registry software and a proper method for evaluating it. The strong point of this evaluation model is the separation between general criteria and the specific ones, while trying to fulfill the comprehensiveness of the criteria. Since this model has been validated, it can be used as a standard to evaluate the cancer registry software.

  3. The Prostate Cancer Registry: monitoring patterns and quality of care for men diagnosed with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Sue M; Millar, Jeremy L; Wood, Julie M; Davis, Ian D; Bolton, Damien; Giles, Graham G; Frydenberg, Mark; Frauman, Albert; Costello, Antony; McNeil, John J

    2013-04-01

    To establish a pilot population-based clinical registry with the aim of monitoring the quality of care provided to men diagnosed with prostate cancer. All men aged >18 years from the contributing hospitals in Victoria, Australia, who have a diagnosis of prostate cancer confirmed by histopathology report notified to the Victorian Cancer Registry are eligible for inclusion in the Prostate Cancer Registry (PCR). A literature review was undertaken aiming to identify existing quality indicators and source evidence-based guidelines from both Australia and internationally. A Steering Committee was established to determine the minimum dataset, select quality indicators to be reported back to clinicians, identify the most effective recruitment strategy, and provide a governance structure for data requests; collection, analysis and reporting of data; and managing outliers. A minimum dataset comprising 72 data items is collected by the PCR, enabling ten quality indicators to be collected and reported. Outcome measures are risk adjusted according to the established National Comprehensive Cancer Network and Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment Score (surgery only) risk stratification model. Recruitment to the PCR occurs concurrently with mandatory notification to the state-based Cancer Registry. The PCR adopts an opt-out consent process to maximize recruitment. The data collection approach is standardized, using a hybrid of data linkage and manual collection, and data collection forms are electronically scanned into the PCR. A data access policy and escalation policy for mortality outliers has been developed. The PCR provides potential for high-quality population-based data to be collected and managed within a clinician-led governance framework. This approach satisfies the requirement for health services to establish quality assessment, at the same time as providing clinically credible data to clinicians to drive practice improvement. © 2012 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL

  4. Colon and rectal cancer survival by tumor location and microsatellite instability: the Colon Cancer Family Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Amanda I; Lindor, Noralane M; Jenkins, Mark A; Baron, John A; Win, Aung Ko; Gallinger, Steven; Gryfe, Robert; Newcomb, Polly A

    2013-08-01

    Cancers in the proximal colon, distal colon, and rectum are frequently studied together; however, there are biological differences in cancers across these sites, particularly in the prevalence of microsatellite instability. We assessed the differences in survival by colon or rectal cancer site, considering the contribution of microsatellite instability to such differences. This is a population-based prospective cohort study for cancer survival. This study was conducted within the Colon Cancer Family Registry, an international consortium. Participants were identified from population-based cancer registries in the United States, Canada, and Australia. Information on tumor site, microsatellite instability, and survival after diagnosis was available for 3284 men and women diagnosed with incident invasive colon or rectal cancer between 1997 and 2002, with ages at diagnosis ranging from 18 to 74. Cox regression was used to calculate hazard ratios for the association between all-cause mortality and tumor location, overall and by microsatellite instability status. Distal colon (HR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.49-0.71) and rectal cancers (HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.57-0.81) were associated with lower mortality than proximal colon cancer overall. Compared specifically with patients with proximal colon cancer exhibiting no/low microsatellite instability, patients with distal colon and rectal cancers experienced lower mortality, regardless of microsatellite instability status; patients with proximal colon cancer exhibiting high microsatellite instability had the lowest mortality. Study limitations include the absence of stage at diagnosis and cause-of-death information for all but a subset of study participants. Some patient groups defined jointly by tumor site and microsatellite instability status are subject to small numbers. Proximal colon cancer survival differs from survival for distal colon and rectal cancer in a manner apparently dependent on microsatellite instability status. These

  5. Cost of Operating Central Cancer Registries and Factors That Affect Cost: Findings From an Economic Evaluation of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Program of Cancer Registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangka, Florence K L; Subramanian, Sujha; Beebe, Maggie Cole; Weir, Hannah K; Trebino, Diana; Babcock, Frances; Ewing, Jean

    2016-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) evaluated the economics of the National Program of Cancer Registries to provide the CDC, the registries, and policy makers with the economics evidence-base to make optimal decisions about resource allocation. Cancer registry budgets are under increasing threat, and, therefore, systematic assessment of the cost will identify approaches to improve the efficiencies of this vital data collection operation and also justify the funding required to sustain registry operations. To estimate the cost of cancer registry operations and to assess the factors affecting the cost per case reported by National Program of Cancer Registries-funded central cancer registries. We developed a Web-based cost assessment tool to collect 3 years of data (2009-2011) from each National Program of Cancer Registries-funded registry for all actual expenditures for registry activities (including those funded by other sources) and factors affecting registry operations. We used a random-effects regression model to estimate the impact of various factors on cost per cancer case reported. The cost of reporting a cancer case varied across the registries. Central cancer registries that receive high-quality data from reporting sources (as measured by the percentage of records passing automatic edits) and electronic data submissions, and those that collect and report on a large volume of cases had significantly lower cost per case. The volume of cases reported had a large effect, with low-volume registries experiencing much higher cost per case than medium- or high-volume registries. Our results suggest that registries operate with substantial fixed or semivariable costs. Therefore, sharing fixed costs among low-volume contiguous state registries, whenever possible, and centralization of certain processes can result in economies of scale. Approaches to improve quality of data submitted and increasing electronic reporting can also reduce cost.

  6. Cohort profile: the TrueNTH Global Registry - an international registry to monitor and improve localised prostate cancer health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Sue M; Millar, Jeremy L; Moore, Caroline M; Lewis, John D; Huland, Hartwig; Sampurno, Fanny; Connor, Sarah E; Villanti, Paul; Litwin, Mark S

    2017-11-28

    Globally, prostate cancer treatment and outcomes for men vary according to where they live, their race and the care they receive. The TrueNTH Global Registry project was established as an international registry monitoring care provided to men with localised prostate cancer (CaP). Sites with existing CaP databases in Movember fundraising countries were invited to participate in the international registry. In total, 25 Local Data Centres (LDCs) representing 113 participating sites across 13 countries have nominated to contribute to the project. It will collect a dataset based on the International Consortium for Health Outcome Measures (ICHOM) standardised dataset for localised CaP. A governance strategy has been developed to oversee registry operation, including transmission of reversibly anonymised data. LDCs are represented on the Project Steering Committee, reporting to an Executive Committee. A Project Coordination Centre and Data Coordination Centre (DCC) have been established. A project was undertaken to compare existing datasets, understand capacity at project commencement (baseline) to collect the ICHOM dataset and assist in determining the final data dictionary. 21/25 LDCs provided data dictionaries for review. Some ICHOM data fields were well collected (diagnosis, treatment start dates) and others poorly collected (complications, comorbidities). 17/94 (18%) ICHOM data fields were relegated to non-mandatory fields due to poor capture by most existing registries. Participating sites will transmit data through a web interface biannually to the DCC. Recruitment to the TrueNTH Global Registry-PCOR project will commence in late 2017 with sites progressively contributing reversibly anonymised data following ethical review in local regions. Researchers will have capacity to source deidentified data after the establishment phase. Quality indicators are to be established through a modified Delphi approach in later 2017, and it is anticipated that reports on

  7. Cancer incidence and mortality in Mongolia - National Registry Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandagdorj, Tuvshingerel; Sanjaajamts, Erdenechimeg; Tudev, Undarmaa; Oyunchimeg, Dondov; Ochir, Chimedsuren; Roder, David

    2010-01-01

    The National Cancer Registry of Mongolia began as a hospital-based registry in the early 1960s but then evolved to have a population-wide role. The Registry provides the only cancer data available from Mongolia for international comparison. The descriptive data presented in this report are the first to be submitted on cancer incidence in Mongolia to a peer-reviewed journal. The purpose was to describe cancer incidence and mortality for all invasive cancers collectively, individual primary sites, and particularly leading sites, and consider cancer control opportunities. This study includes data on new cancer cases registered in Mongolia in 2003-2007. Incidence and mortality rates were calculated as mean annual numbers per 100,000 residents. Age-standardized incidence (ASR) and age-standardized mortality (ASMR) rates were calculated from age-specific rates by weighting directly to the World Population standard. Between 2003 and 2007, 17,271 new cases of invasive cancer were recorded (52.2% in males, 47.7% in females). The five leading primary sites in males were liver, stomach, lung, esophagus, and colon/rectum; whereas in females they were liver, cervix, stomach, esophagus and breast. ASRs were lower in females than males for cancers of the liver at 63.0 and 99.1 per 100,000 respectively; cancers of the stomach at 19.1 and 42.1 per 100,000 respectively; and cancers of the lung at 8.3 and 33.2 per 100,000 respectively. Liver cancer was the most common cause of death in each gender, the ASMR being lower for females than males at 60.6 compared with 94.8 per 100,000. In females the next most common sites of cancer death were the stomach and esophagus, whereas in males, they were the stomach and lung. Available data indicate that ASRs of all cancers collectively have increased over the last 20 years. Rates are highest for liver cancer, at about four times the world average. The most common cancers are those with a primary site of liver, stomach and esophagus, for which

  8. Paternal lineage early onset hereditary ovarian cancers: A Familial Ovarian Cancer Registry study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin H Eng

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Given prior evidence that an affected woman conveys a higher risk of ovarian cancer to her sister than to her mother, we hypothesized that there exists an X-linked variant evidenced by transmission to a woman from her paternal grandmother via her father. We ascertained 3,499 grandmother/granddaughter pairs from the Familial Ovarian Cancer Registry at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute observing 892 informative pairs with 157 affected granddaughters. We performed germline X-chromosome exome sequencing on 186 women with ovarian cancer from the registry. The rate of cancers was 28.4% in paternal grandmother/granddaughter pairs and 13.9% in maternal pairs consistent with an X-linked dominant model (Chi-square test X2 = 0.02, p = 0.89 and inconsistent with an autosomal dominant model (X2 = 20.4, p<0.001. Paternal grandmother cases had an earlier age-of-onset versus maternal cases (hazard ratio HR = 1.59, 95%CI: 1.12-2.25 independent of BRCA1/2 status. Reinforcing the X-linked hypothesis, we observed an association between prostate cancer in men and ovarian cancer in his mother and daughters (odds ratio, OR = 2.34, p = 0.034. Unaffected mothers with affected daughters produced significantly more daughters than sons (ratio = 1.96, p<0.005. We performed exome sequencing in reported BRCA negative cases from the registry. Considering age-of-onset, one missense variant (rs176026 in MAGEC3 reached chromosome-wide significance (Hazard ratio HR = 2.85, 95%CI: 1.75-4.65 advancing the age of onset by 6.7 years. In addition to the well-known contribution of BRCA, we demonstrate that a genetic locus on the X-chromosome contributes to ovarian cancer risk. An X-linked pattern of inheritance has implications for genetic risk stratification. Women with an affected paternal grandmother and sisters of affected women are at increased risk for ovarian cancer. Further work is required to validate this variant and to characterize carrier families.

  9. Oral cancer in Libya and development of regional oral cancer registries: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BenNasir, E; El Mistiri, M; McGowan, R; Katz, R V

    2015-10-01

    The aims of this paper are three-fold: (1) to summarize the current epidemiological data on oral cancer in Libya as reported in the published literature and as compared to other national oral cancer rates in the region; (2) to present both the history of the early development, and future goals, of population-based oral cancer tumor registries in Libya as they partner with the more established regional and international population-based cancer tumor registries; and, (3) to offer recommendations that will likely be required in the near future if these nascent, population-based Libyan oral cancer registries are to establish themselves as on-going registries for describing the oral cancer disease patterns and risk factors in Libya as well as for prevention and treatment. This comprehensive literature review revealed that the current baseline incidence of oral cancer in Libya is similar to those of other North Africa countries and China, but is relatively low compared to the United Kingdom, the United States, and India. The recently established Libyan National Cancer Registry Program, initiated in 2007, while envisioning five cooperating regional cancer registries, continues to operate at a relatively suboptimal level. Lack of adequate levels of national funding continue to plague its development…and the accompanying quality of service that could be provided to the Libyan people.

  10. Breast cancer survival rate according to data of cancer registry and death registry systems in Bushehr province, 2001-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Rampisheh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is the most common female cancer worldwide. Survival rate of breast cancer, especially as an indicator of the successful implementation of screening, diagnosis and treatment programs, has been at the center of attention of public health experts Material and Methods: In a survival study, the records of breast cancer cases in cancer registry system of Bushehr Province were extracted during 2001, March to 2013, September. These records were linked and matched with records of death registry system. After determining patients, status regarding being alive or dead, survival analysis was done. Life table, Kaplan-Mayer analysis, log rank and Breslow tests were used for computing and comparing survival rates. Results: In 300 recorded breast cancer cases, mean and standard deviation of age was 51.26±13.87. Survival rates were 95, 88, 78, 73 and 68 percent since the first year through the fifth year, respectively. Mean survival was 87.20 months (95% CI= 81.28- 93.12. There was no significant difference in mean survival regarding age and different geographical areas. Conclusion: Although survival rates of registered breast cancer patients in Bushehr Province are similar to other provinces, they are far from those of developed countries. This situation demands more extensive efforts regarding public education and improving the process of diagnosis, treatment and care of patients especially during first two years after diagnosis.

  11. [Implantation of a hospital registry of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, J; Ginard, D; Barranco, L; Escarda, A; Vanrell, M; Mariño, Z; Garau, I; Llompart, A; Gayà, J; Obrador, A

    2006-10-01

    Identification of patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) can allow colorectal cancer (CRC) prevention through colonoscopy and polypectomies. The purpose of this study was to report the clinical characteristics of HNPCC families in our registry. HNPCC was identified using the Amsterdam criteria. Familial clustering of CRC and extracolonic cancers were investigated in families. Individuals at risk were offered annual colonoscopy, starting from the age of 25 years. Twelve HNPCC families were identified. There were 46 cases of CRC in 38 patients. The mean age at diagnosis of CRC was 45.4 +/- 12.7 years (range 25-73 years). In patients with documented disease, right-sided tumors predominated. Eleven patients with extracolonic cancer were identified (six tumors located in the endometrium). Of 43 at-risk individuals, 29 accepted surveillance. Our data confirm the importance of the family history in identifying HNPCC. This study confirms previously described characteristics in HNPCC, namely, early age at onset of CRC, right-sided predominance, multiple synchronous and metachronous neoplasms, and increased extracolonic cancers. This is the first study of clinical data in a Spanish HNPCC registry.

  12. Hereditary association between testicular cancer and familial ovarian cancer: A Familial Ovarian Cancer Registry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etter, John Lewis; Eng, Kevin; Cannioto, Rikki; Kaur, Jasmine; Almohanna, Hani; Alqassim, Emad; Szender, J Brian; Joseph, Janine M; Lele, Shashikant; Odunsi, Kunle; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2018-04-01

    Although family history of testicular cancer is well-established as a risk factor for testicular cancer, it is unknown whether family history of ovarian cancer is associated with risk of testicular cancer. Using data from the Familial Ovarian Cancer Registry on 2636 families with multiple cases of ovarian cancer, we systematically compared relative frequencies of ovarian cancer among relatives of men with testicular and non-testicular cancers. Thirty-one families with cases of both ovarian and testicular cancer were identified. We observed that, among men with cancer, those with testicular cancer were more likely to have a mother with ovarian cancer than those with non-testicular cancers (OR = 3.32, p = 0.004). Zero paternal grandmothers of men with testicular cancer had ovarian cancer. These observations provide compelling preliminary evidence for a familial association between ovarian and testicular cancers Future studies should be designed to further investigate this association and evaluate X-linkage. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Economic evaluation of Mumbai and its satellite cancer registries: Implications for expansion of data collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyande, Shravani; Subramanian, Sujha; Edwards, Patrick; Hoover, Sonja; Deshmane, Vinay; Tankga, Florence; Dikshit, Rajesh; Saraiya, Mona

    2016-12-01

    The Mumbai Cancer Registry is a population-based cancer registry that has been in operation for more than five decades and has successfully initiated and integrated three satellite registries in Pune, Nagpur, and Aurangabad, each covering specific urban populations of the Indian state Maharashtra. Data collectors at the satellites perform data abstraction, but Mumbai carries out all other core registration activities such as data analysis and quality assurance. Each of the three satellite registries follows the same data collection methodology as the main Mumbai Cancer Registry. This study examines the cost of operating the Mumbai and its satellite cancer registries. We modified and used the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) International Registry Costing Tool (IntRegCosting Tool) to collect cost and resource use data for the Mumbai Cancer Registry and three satellites. Almost 60% of the registration expenditure was borne by the Indian Cancer Society, which hosts the Mumbai Cancer Registry, and more than half of the registry expenditure was related to data collection activities. Across the combined registries, 93% of the expenditure was spent on labor. Overall, registration activities had a low cost per case of 226.10 Indian rupees (or a little less than 4.00 US dollars in 2014 [used average exchange rate in 2014: 1 US $=60 Indian rupees]). The centralization of fixed-cost activities in Mumbai likely resulted in economies of scale in operating the Mumbai and satellite registries, which, together, report on almost 20,000 cancer cases annually. In middle-income countries like India, where financial resources are limited, the operational framework provided by the Mumbai and satellite registries can serve as a model for other registries looking to expand data collection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Economic evaluation of Mumbai and its satellite cancer registries: Implications for expansion of data collection☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyande, Shravani; Subramanian, Sujha; Edwards, Patrick; Hoover, Sonja; Deshmane, Vinay; Tankga, Florence; Dikshit, Rajesh; Saraiya, Mona

    2018-01-01

    Background The Mumbai Cancer Registry is a population-based cancer registry that has been in operation for more than five decades and has successfully initiated and integrated three satellite registries in Pune, Nagpur, and Aurangabad, each covering specific urban populations of the Indian state Maharashtra. Data collectors at the satellites perform data abstraction, but Mumbai carries out all other core registration activities such as data analysis and quality assurance. Each of the three satellite registries follows the same data collection methodology as the main Mumbai Cancer Registry. This study examines the cost of operating the Mumbai and its satellite cancer registries. Methods We modified and used the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) International Registry Costing Tool (IntRegCosting Tool) to collect cost and resource use data for the Mumbai Cancer Registry and three satellites. Results Almost 60% of the registration expenditure was borne by the Indian Cancer Society, which hosts the Mumbai Cancer Registry, and more than half of the registry expenditure was related to data collection activities. Across the combined registries, 93% of the expenditure was spent on labor. Overall, registration activities had a low cost per case of 226.10 Indian rupees (or a little less than 4.00 US dollars in 2014 [used average exchange rate in 2014: 1 US $ = 60 Indian rupees]). Conclusion The centralization of fixed-cost activities in Mumbai likely resulted in economies of scale in operating the Mumbai and satellite registries, which, together, report on almost 20,000 cancer cases annually. In middle-income countries like India, where financial resources are limited, the operational framework provided by the Mumbai and satellite registries can serve as a model for other registries looking to expand data collection. PMID:27726981

  15. Comparing sexual minority cancer survivors recruited through a cancer registry to convenience methods of recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehmer, Ulrike; Clark, Melissa A; Timm, Alison; Glickman, Mark; Sullivan, Mairead

    2011-01-01

    Sexual minority women, defined as having a lesbian or bisexual identity or reporting a preference for a female partner, are not considered by cancer surveillance. This study assesses the representativeness of sexual minority breast cancer survivors, defined as having a lesbian or bisexual identity or reporting a preference for a female partner, who were recruited into a convenience sample compared with a population-based registry sample of sexual minority breast cancer survivors. Long-term survivors of non-metastatic breast cancer who self-reported as sexual minority were recruited from a cancer registry and subsequently from the community using convenience recruitment methods. Sexual minority breast cancer survivors who screened eligible participated in a telephone survey about their quality of life and factors associated therewith. Participants in the convenience sample were similar to the registry-based sample with respect to adjustment to cancer, physical health, trust in physician, coping, social support, and sexual minority experiences. Compared with the convenience sample, breast cancer survivors in the registry sample were more likely married, more educated, diagnosed more recently, at an earlier stage of cancer, and more likely treated with breast-conserving surgery; they differed on adjuvant therapies. Because sexual minority breast cancer survivors who volunteered for the community-based sample shared most characteristics of the sample recruited from the cancer registry, we concluded that the community sample had comparable representational quality. In the absence of cancer surveillance of sexual minorities, thoughtful convenience recruitment methods provide good representational quality convenience samples. Copyright © 2011 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Occurance of head and neck cancers at the Nairobi Cancer Registry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Occurance of head and neck cancers at the Nairobi Cancer Registry in Kenya 2000-2002. AK Limo, A Rugutt-Korir, JO Gichana, EA Dimba, ML Chindia, GZ Mutuma. Abstract. No Abstract. African Journal of Oral Health Sciences Vol. 5 (1) 2007: pp. 2-4. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL ...

  17. International incidence of childhood cancer, 2001-10: a population-based registry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steliarova-Foucher, Eva; Colombet, Murielle; Ries, Lynn A G; Moreno, Florencia; Dolya, Anastasia; Bray, Freddie; Hesseling, Peter; Shin, Hee Young; Stiller, Charles A

    2017-06-01

    Cancer is a major cause of death in children worldwide, and the recorded incidence tends to increase with time. Internationally comparable data on childhood cancer incidence in the past two decades are scarce. This study aimed to provide internationally comparable local data on the incidence of childhood cancer to promote research of causes and implementation of childhood cancer control. This population-based registry study, devised by the International Agency for Research on Cancer in collaboration with the International Association of Cancer Registries, collected data on all malignancies and non-malignant neoplasms of the CNS diagnosed before age 20 years in populations covered by high-quality cancer registries with complete data for 2001-10. Incidence rates per million person-years for the 0-14 years and 0-19 years age groups were age-adjusted using the world standard population to provide age-standardised incidence rates (WSRs), using the age-specific incidence rates (ASR) for individual age groups (0-4 years, 5-9 years, 10-14 years, and 15-19 years). All rates were reported for 19 geographical areas or ethnicities by sex, age group, and cancer type. The regional WSRs for children aged 0-14 years were compared with comparable data obtained in the 1980s. Of 532 invited cancer registries, 153 registries from 62 countries, departments, and territories met quality standards, and contributed data for the entire decade of 2001-10. 385 509 incident cases in children aged 0-19 years occurring in 2·64 billion person-years were included. The overall WSR was 140·6 per million person-years in children aged 0-14 years (based on 284 649 cases), and the most common cancers were leukaemia (WSR 46·4), followed by CNS tumours (WSR 28·2), and lymphomas (WSR 15·2). In children aged 15-19 years (based on 100 860 cases), the ASR was 185·3 per million person-years, the most common being lymphomas (ASR 41·8) and the group of epithelial tumours and melanoma (ASR 39·5

  18. Cancer prevention strategies: use of cancer prevention research registries.

    OpenAIRE

    Anton-Culver, H

    1995-01-01

    We present a model to plan a rational strategy for cancer prevention that has two main functions--assessment and intervention. The assessment function includes three main components: to identify populations at high cancer risk, which may be due to their ethnic group, occupational and environmental exposures, family history, cigarette smoking, or other risk factors; to assess exposure to known carcinogens through the general and occupational environments, lifestyle factors, and the home as wel...

  19. Enhancing cancer registry data for comparative effectiveness research (CER) project: overview and methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Vivien W; Eheman, Christie R; Johnson, Christopher J; Hernandez, Monique N; Rousseau, David; Styles, Timothy S; West, Dee W; Hsieh, Meichin; Hakenewerth, Anne M; Celaya, Maria O; Rycroft, Randi K; Wike, Jennifer M; Pearson, Melissa; Brockhouse, Judy; Mulvihill, Linda G; Zhang, Kevin B

    2014-01-01

    Following the Institute of Medicine's 2009 report on the national priorities for comparative effectiveness research (CER), funding for support of CER became available in 2009 through the American Recovery and Re-investment Act. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) received funding to enhance the infrastructure of population-based cancer registries and to expand registry data collection to support CER. The CDC established 10 specialized registries within the National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR) to enhance data collection for all cancers and to address targeted CER questions, including the clinical use and prognostic value of specific biomarkers. The project also included a special focus on detailed first course of treatment for cancers of the breast, colon, and rectum, as well as chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) diagnosed in 2011. This paper describes the methodology and the work conducted by the CDC and the NPCR specialized registries in collecting data for the 4 special focused cancers, including the selection of additional data variables, development of data collection tools and software modifications, institutional review board approvals, training, collection of detailed first course of treatment, and quality assurance. It also presents the characteristics of the study population and discusses the strengths and limitations of using population-based cancer registries to support CER as well as the potential future role of population-based cancer registries in assessing the quality of patient care and cancer control.

  20. Nordic Cancer Registries - an overview of their procedures and data comparability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukkala, Eero; Engholm, Gerda; Højsgaard Schmidt, Lise Kristine; Storm, Hans; Khan, Staffan; Lambe, Mats; Pettersson, David; Ólafsdóttir, Elínborg; Tryggvadóttir, Laufey; Hakanen, Tiina; Malila, Nea; Virtanen, Anni; Johannesen, Tom Børge; Larønningen, Siri; Ursin, Giske

    2018-04-01

    The Nordic Cancer Registries are among the oldest population-based registries in the world, with more than 60 years of complete coverage of what is now a combined population of 26 million. However, despite being the source of a substantial number of studies, there is no published paper comparing the different registries. Therefore, we did a systematic review to identify similarities and dissimilarities of the Nordic Cancer Registries, which could possibly explain some of the differences in cancer incidence rates across these countries. We describe and compare here the core characteristics of each of the Nordic Cancer Registries: (i) data sources; (ii) registered disease entities and deviations from IARC multiple cancer coding rules; (iii) variables and related coding systems. Major changes over time are described and discussed. All Nordic Cancer Registries represent a high quality standard in terms of completeness and accuracy of the registered data. Even though the information in the Nordic Cancer Registries in general can be considered more similar than any other collection of data from five different countries, there are numerous differences in registration routines, classification systems and inclusion of some tumors. These differences are important to be aware of when comparing time trends in the Nordic countries.

  1. Melanoma of the skin in the Danish Cancer Registry and the Danish Melanoma Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sidsel Arnspang; Schmidt, Sigrun Alba Johannesdottir; Klausen, Siri

    2018-01-01

    estimated the positive predictive value (PPV) of melanoma diagnosis for random samples of 200 patients from the Cancer Registry (n=200) and the Melanoma Database (n=200) during 2004-2014, using the Danish Pathology Registry as 'gold-standard' reference. We further validated tumor characteristics...

  2. Analysis and visualization of disease courses in a semantically-enabled cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban-Gil, Angel; Fernández-Breis, Jesualdo Tomás; Boeker, Martin

    2017-09-29

    Regional and epidemiological cancer registries are important for cancer research and the quality management of cancer treatment. Many technological solutions are available to collect and analyse data for cancer registries nowadays. However, the lack of a well-defined common semantic model is a problem when user-defined analyses and data linking to external resources are required. The objectives of this study are: (1) design of a semantic model for local cancer registries; (2) development of a semantically-enabled cancer registry based on this model; and (3) semantic exploitation of the cancer registry for analysing and visualising disease courses. Our proposal is based on our previous results and experience working with semantic technologies. Data stored in a cancer registry database were transformed into RDF employing a process driven by OWL ontologies. The semantic representation of the data was then processed to extract semantic patient profiles, which were exploited by means of SPARQL queries to identify groups of similar patients and to analyse the disease timelines of patients. Based on the requirements analysis, we have produced a draft of an ontology that models the semantics of a local cancer registry in a pragmatic extensible way. We have implemented a Semantic Web platform that allows transforming and storing data from cancer registries in RDF. This platform also permits users to formulate incremental user-defined queries through a graphical user interface. The query results can be displayed in several customisable ways. The complex disease timelines of individual patients can be clearly represented. Different events, e.g. different therapies and disease courses, are presented according to their temporal and causal relations. The presented platform is an example of the parallel development of ontologies and applications that take advantage of semantic web technologies in the medical field. The semantic structure of the representation renders it easy to

  3. Evaluation of LexisNexis Batch Solutions in the New York State Cancer Registry

    OpenAIRE

    Pradhan, Eva; Boscoe, Francis P.

    2014-01-01

    Using Lexis Nexis Batch Solutions, the New York State Cancer Registry was able to identify substantial numbers of missing addresses, birth dates, and social security numbers, for persons diagnosed as far back as 1976.

  4. Oral cancer statistics in India on the basis of first report of 29 population-based cancer registries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Swati; Satyanarayana, L; Asthana, Smitha; Shivalingesh, KK; Goutham, Bala Subramanya; Ramachandra, Sujatha

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: To summarize and provide an overview of age-specific oral cancer incidence reported in 29 population-based cancer registry in India. Materials and Methods: Secondary data on age-adjusted rates (AARs) of incidence of oral cancer and other associated sites for all ages (0–75 years) were collected from the report of the National Cancer Registry Programme 2012–2014 in 29 population-based control registries. Results: Among both males and females, mouth cancer had maximum Age adjusted incidence rates (64.8) in the central zone, while oropharynx cancer had minimum AAR (0) in all regions. Conclusion: Oral cancer incidence increases with age with typical pattern of cancer of associated sites of oral cavity seen in the northeast region. PMID:29731552

  5. Melanoma of the Skin in the Danish Cancer Registry and the Danish Melanoma Database: A Validation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Sidsel Arnspang; Schmidt, Sigrun Alba Johannesdottir; Klausen, Siri; Pottegård, Anton; Friis, Søren; Hölmich, Lisbet Rosenkrantz; Gaist, David

    2018-05-01

    The nationwide Danish Cancer Registry and the Danish Melanoma Database both record data on melanoma for purposes of monitoring, quality assurance, and research. However, the data quality of the Cancer Registry and the Melanoma Database has not been formally evaluated. We estimated the positive predictive value (PPV) of melanoma diagnosis for random samples of 200 patients from the Cancer Registry (n = 200) and the Melanoma Database (n = 200) during 2004-2014, using the Danish Pathology Registry as "gold standard" reference. We further validated tumor characteristics in the Cancer Registry and the Melanoma Database. Additionally, we estimated the PPV of in situ melanoma diagnoses in the Melanoma Database, and the sensitivity of melanoma diagnoses in 2004-2014. The PPVs of melanoma in the Cancer Registry and the Melanoma Database were 97% (95% CI = 94, 99) and 100%. The sensitivity was 90% in the Cancer Registry and 77% in the Melanoma Database. The PPV of in situ melanomas in the Melanoma Database was 97% and the sensitivity was 56%. In the Melanoma Database, we observed PPVs of ulceration of 75% and Breslow thickness of 96%. The PPV of histologic subtypes varied between 87% and 100% in the Cancer Registry and 93% and 100% in the Melanoma Database. The PPVs for anatomical localization were 83%-95% in the Cancer Registry and 93%-100% in the Melanoma Database. The data quality in both the Cancer Registry and the Melanoma Database is high, supporting their use in epidemiologic studies.

  6. [The cancer registry is fundamental for the treatment, prevention and control of childhood cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Miranda, Guadalupe; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo

    2011-01-01

    During the last 10 years cancer in the Mexican pediatric population is growing. It is the second leading cause of death (children 1 to 14 years of age). The first step in controlling these diseases by registering the cases. Cancer Registry (CR) is fundamental for gaining knowledge that can be used for planning medical treatment and future research into causal factors and for the prevention. A CR is an information system designed to collect and encode data concerning individuals with cancer, and then to disseminate the compiled epidemiological results to various groups of stakeholders. Data are obtained from a hospital or group of hospitals, with special emphasis being placed on the quality of the data (completeness, validity and timeliness data). It is necessary a group of highly trained individuals called registrars, who are experts in the collection, encoding, and dissemination of internal reports to researchers and medical personnel. There are two main types of registries: those that are hospital based and those that are population based. The categories of data that should be collected are demographic data of the patient; descriptors of the cancer; details of the treatment administered; and details of the outcome of the treatment. It must be emphasized that all data conceming patients with cancer should be held in the strictest confidence.

  7. A Suitable Approach to Estimate Cancer Incidence in Area without Cancer Registry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitton, N.; Colonna, M.; Colonna, M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. Use of cancer cases from registries and PMSI claims database to estimate Department-specific incidence of four major cancers. Methods. Case extraction used principal diagnosis then surgery codes. PMSI cases/registry cases ratios for 2004 were modelled then Department-specific incidence for 2007 estimated using these ratios and 2007 PMSI cases. Results. For 2007, only colon-rectum and breast cancer estimations were satisfactorily validated for infra national incidence not ovary and kidney cancers. For breast, the estimated national incidence was 50,578 cases and the incidence rate 98.6 cases per 100,000 person per year. For colon-rectum, incidence was 21,172 in men versus 18,327 in women and the incidence rate 38 per 100,000 versus 24.8. For ovary, the estimated incidence was 4,637 and the rate 8.6 per 100,000. For kidney, incidence was 6,775 in men versus 3,273 in women and the rate 13.3 per 100.000 versus 5.2. Conclusion. Incidence estimation using PMSI patient identifiers proved encouraging though still dependent on the assumption of uniform cancer treatments and coding.

  8. Cancer incidence in Arkhangelskaja Oblast in northwestern Russia. The Arkhangelsk Cancer Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tkatsjov Anatolij V

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data concerning incidence and prevalence of cancer in the different regions of Russia have traditionally not been provided on a basis that facilitated comparison with data from countries in western parts of Europe. The oncological hospital in Arkhangelsk, in co-operation with Universitetet i Tromsø (Norway, has established a population based cancer registry for Arkhangelskaja Oblast (AO. AO is an administrative unit with 1.3 million inhabitants in northwestern Russia. The aim of this investigation was to assess the content and quality of the AO cancer registry (AKR, and to present the site-specific cancer-incidence rates in AO in the period 1993–2001. Methods The population in this study consisted of all individuals registered as residents of AO. All new cancer cases in the period 1993 – 2001, registered the AKR, were included in the study (ICD-10: C00-C95, except for C77-78. The annual gender and age-group-specific population figures were obtained from the AO statistics office. Results A total of 34 697 cases of primary cancers were included. The age-adjusted (world standard incidence rate for all sites combined was 164/100 000 for women and 281/100 000 for men. The highest incidence was for cancer of the trachea, bronchus and lung (16.3% of all cases, whereof 88.6 % of the cases were among men. Among women, cancer of the breast constituted 15.9 percent of all cases. The age-adjusted incidences of the most frequent cancer sites among men were: lung (77.4/100 000; stomach (45.9; rectum (13.4; oesophagus (13.0; colon (12.2; bladder (11.6; and prostate cancer (11.1. Among women they were: breast (28.5; stomach (19.7; colon (12.2; and ovary cancer (9.0. Conclusion Our findings confirm and strengthen the indication that the incidences of stomach, larynx, liver, pancreas, prostate, colon, bladder and melanoma cancer are quite different in male populations in Russia compared to many other European countries. Among women, most

  9. Childhood leukaemia in Europe after Chernobyl: Five year follow-up of cancer registry populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkin, D.M.; Black, R.J.; Kramarova, E.; Clayton, D.

    1997-01-01

    The European Childhood Leukaemia-Lymphoma Incidence Study (ECLIS) aims to monitor trends in the incidence of these diseases in European populations in relation to estimated exposures to radioactive material released at the time of the Chernobyl accident. Thirty-six cancer registries in 23 countries are collaborating in ECLIS, coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). 3 figs, 3 tabs

  10. Childhood leukaemia in Europe after Chernobyl: Five year follow-up of cancer registry populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkin, D M; Black, R J; Kramarova, E [International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon (France); Clayton, D [University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    1997-09-01

    The European Childhood Leukaemia-Lymphoma Incidence Study (ECLIS) aims to monitor trends in the incidence of these diseases in European populations in relation to estimated exposures to radioactive material released at the time of the Chernobyl accident. Thirty-six cancer registries in 23 countries are collaborating in ECLIS, coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). 3 figs, 3 tabs.

  11. Breast Cancer in Ghana: Demonstrating the Need for Population-Based Cancer Registries in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail S. Thomas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Breast cancer, the most common cancer worldwide, is the leading cause of cancer mortality in Ghanaian women. Previous studies find Ghanaian women are diagnosed at a younger age and at more advanced stages (III and IV, and have tumors with characteristics similar to African American women. We sought to remedy gaps in knowledge about breast cancer survival in Ghana and its relation to demographic and biologic factors of the tumors at diagnosis to assist in cancer control and registration planning. Methods: Individuals with a breast cancer diagnosis who sought care at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital from 2009 to 2014 were identified via medical records. Follow-up telephone interviews were held to assess survival. Kaplan-Meier plots and Cox proportional hazards models assessed survival associated with clinical and demographic characteristics. Results: A total of 223 patients completed follow-up and were analyzed. The median survival was 3.8 years. Approximately 50% of patients were diagnosed with grade 3 tumors, which significantly increased the risk of recurrence or death (hazard ratio [HR] for grade 2 versus 1, 2.98; 95% CI, 1.26 to 7.02; HR grade 3 v 1, 2.56; 95% CI, 1.08 to 6.07; P = .04. No other variables were significantly associated with survival. Conclusion: Higher tumor grade was significantly associated with shorter survival, indicating impact of aggressive biology at diagnosis on higher risk of cancer spread and recurrence. Contrary to prevailing notions, telephone numbers were not reliable for follow-up. Collecting additional contact information will likely contribute to improvements in patient care and tracking. A region-wide population-based active registry is important to implement cancer control programs and improve survival in sub-Saharan Africa.

  12. Quality of record linkage in a highly automated cancer registry that relies on encrypted identity data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidtmann, Irene

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In the absence of unique ID numbers, cancer and other registries in Germany and elsewhere rely on identity data to link records pertaining to the same patient. These data are often encrypted to ensure privacy. Some record linkage errors unavoidably occur. These errors were quantified for the cancer registry of North Rhine Westphalia which uses encrypted identity data. Methods: A sample of records was drawn from the registry, record linkage information was included. In parallel, plain text data for these records were retrieved to generate a gold standard. Record linkage error frequencies in the cancer registry were determined by comparison of the results of the routine linkage with the gold standard. Error rates were projected to larger registries.Results: In the sample studied, the homonym error rate was 0.015%; the synonym error rate was 0.2%. The F-measure was 0.9921. Projection to larger databases indicated that for a realistic development the homonym error rate will be around 1%, the synonym error rate around 2%.Conclusion: Observed error rates are low. This shows that effective methods to standardize and improve the quality of the input data have been implemented. This is crucial to keep error rates low when the registry’s database grows. The planned inclusion of unique health insurance numbers is likely to further improve record linkage quality. Cancer registration entirely based on electronic notification of records can process large amounts of data with high quality of record linkage.

  13. Common data items in seven European oesophagogastric cancer surgery registries: towards a European upper GI cancer audit (EURECCA Upper GI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Steur, W O; Henneman, D; Allum, W H; Dikken, J L; van Sandick, J W; Reynolds, J; Mariette, C; Jensen, L; Johansson, J; Kolodziejczyk, P; Hardwick, R H; van de Velde, C J H

    2014-03-01

    Seven countries (Denmark, France, Ireland, the Netherlands, Poland, Sweden, United Kingdom) collaborated to initiate a EURECCA (European Registration of Cancer Care) Upper GI project. The aim of this study was to identify a core dataset of shared items in the different data registries which can be used for future collaboration between countries. Item lists from all participating Upper GI cancer registries were collected. Items were scored 'present' when included in the registry, or when the items could be deducted from other items in the registry. The definition of a common item was that it was present in at least six of the seven participating countries. The number of registered items varied between 40 (Poland) and 650 (Ireland). Among the 46 shared items were data on patient characteristics, staging and diagnostics, neoadjuvant treatment, surgery, postoperative course, pathology, and adjuvant treatment. Information on non-surgical treatment was available in only 4 registries. A list of 46 shared items from seven participating Upper GI cancer registries was created, providing a basis for future quality assurance and research in Upper GI cancer treatment on a European level. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Recruitment of representative samples for low incidence cancer populations: Do registries deliver?

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    Sanson-Fisher Rob

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recruiting large and representative samples of adolescent and young adult (AYA cancer survivors is important for gaining accurate data regarding the prevalence of unmet needs in this population. This study aimed to describe recruitment rates for AYAs recruited through a cancer registry with particular focus on: active clinician consent protocols, reasons for clinicians not providing consent and the representativeness of the final sample. Methods Adolescents and young adults aged 14 to19 years inclusive and listed on the cancer registry from January 1 2002 to December 31 2007 were identified. An active clinician consent protocol was used whereby the registry sent a letter to AYAs primary treating clinicians requesting permission to contact the survivors. The registry then sent survivors who received their clinician's consent a letter seeking permission to forward their contact details to the research team. Consenting AYAs were sent a questionnaire which assessed their unmet needs. Results The overall consent rate for AYAs identified as eligible by the registry was 7.8%. Of the 411 potentially eligible survivors identified, just over half (n = 232, 56% received their clinician's consent to be contacted. Of those 232 AYAs, 65% were unable to be contacted. Only 18 AYAs (7.8% refused permission for their contact details to be passed on to the research team. Of the 64 young people who agreed to be contacted, 50% (n = 32 completed the questionnaire. Conclusions Cancer registries which employ active clinician consent protocols may not be appropriate for recruiting large, representative samples of AYAs diagnosed with cancer. Given that AYA cancer survivors are highly mobile, alternative methods such as treatment centre and clinic based recruitment may need to be considered.

  15. Automated selection of relevant information for notification of incident cancer cases within a multisource cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouhet, V; Defossez, G; Ingrand, P

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a selection algorithm of relevant records for the notification of incident cases of cancer on the basis of the individual data available in a multi-source information system. This work was conducted on data for the year 2008 in the general cancer registry of Poitou-Charentes region (France). The selection algorithm hierarchizes information according to its level of relevance for tumoral topography and tumoral morphology independently. The selected data are combined to form composite records. These records are then grouped in respect with the notification rules of the International Agency for Research on Cancer for multiple primary cancers. The evaluation, based on recall, precision and F-measure confronted cases validated manually by the registry's physicians with tumours notified with and without records selection. The analysis involved 12,346 tumours validated among 11,971 individuals. The data used were hospital discharge data (104,474 records), pathology data (21,851 records), healthcare insurance data (7508 records) and cancer care centre's data (686 records). The selection algorithm permitted performances improvement for notification of tumour topography (F-measure 0.926 with vs. 0.857 without selection) and tumour morphology (F-measure 0.805 with vs. 0.750 without selection). These results show that selection of information according to its origin is efficient in reducing noise generated by imprecise coding. Further research is needed for solving the semantic problems relating to the integration of heterogeneous data and the use of non-structured information.

  16. Cancer Incidence in Saudi Arabia: 2012 Data from the Saudi Cancer Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazarbashi, Shouki; Al Eid, Haya; Minguet, Joan

    2017-09-27

    Background: In order to most appropriately allocate healthcare and research funding for cancer, it is important to have accurate population-based incidence data. The Saudi Cancer Registry (SCR) provides such information, covering the time period from 1994 to the present day. The current report concerns an overview of cancer incidence statistics for Saudi Arabia in 2012. Methods: The SCR collects data from healthcare facilities throughout the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. All newly diagnosed cases of cancer are recorded, with information on site and histology. For the present report, age-standardised and age-specific incidence rates (ASR, AIR, respectively) were calculated, with attention to gender-specific and regional differences. Results: The total number of incident cases of cancer identified by the SCR in 2012 was 14,336, with 6,791 (47.5%) among males and 7,545 (52.6%) among females. Of this total, 11,034 cases (76.9%) occurred in patients of Saudi origin. For Saudi males, the overall ASR (inc. all cancer sites) was 78.1 per 100,000 people, while that for females was 86.7. Incidence varied by region, with the Eastern region and Riyadh displaying the highest ASRs for both males and females, and Hail and Jazan displaying the lowest. Incidence varied by gender, with colorectal cancer (13.3%), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL; 8.4%), and leukaemia (8.2%) being the most common types in males, and breast (25.8%), thyroid (11.7%), and colorectal cancers (9.3%) being the most common in females. Conclusions: This analysis of cancer incidence in Saudi Arabia demonstrated significant differences according to gender, age, and region of the Kingdom. The data should help ensure the most appropriate allocation of resources, with the aim of minimising the healthcare burden associated with cancer. Creative Commons Attribution License

  17. National Cancer Patient Registry--a patient registry/clinical database to evaluate the health outcomes of patients undergoing treatment for cancers in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, G C C; Azura, D

    2008-09-01

    Cancer burden in Malaysia is increasing. Although there have been improvements in cancer treatment, these new therapies may potentially cause an exponential increase in the cost of cancer treatment. Therefore, justification for the use of these treatments is mandated. Availability of local data will enable us to evaluate and compare the outcome of our patients. This will help to support our clinical decision making and local policy, improve access to treatment and improve the provision and delivery of oncology services in Malaysia. The National Cancer Patient Registry was proposed as a database for cancer patients who seek treatment in Malaysia. It will be a valuable tool to provide timely and robust data on the actual setting in oncology practice, safety and cost effectiveness of treatment and most importantly the outcome of these patients.

  18. Cancer incidence in North West Algeria (Mascara) 2000-2010: results from a population-based cancer registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benarba, Bachir; Meddah, Boumedienne; Hamdani, Houria

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide accounting for 7.4 million deaths. Cancer has become a major public health concern in Algeria. The aim of the present study was to estimate cancer incidence in Mascara Province based on the population-based cancer registry. We analyzed data from the cancer registry of Mascara covering all cancer cases diagnosed by all methods and included in the registry from 1st January 2000 to 31st December 2010. The results are presented as incidence rates of cases by site, sex, age, and crude rate. Age-standardized rates per 100,000 person-years (ASRs) were calculated, using the direct method of standardization to the world population. A total of 1875 cases of invasive cancer were recorded. The mean age of diagnosis for all cancers was 52.66 ± 0.5 in men and 59.18 ± 0.6 in women. The ASR for all cancers in females was 27.8 per 100,000, and that for males was 23.6 per 100,000. The most important finding of the present study was the high incidence of liver cancer among males and females in Mascara. Among females, breast cancer was the most frequently reported followed by Cervix uteri, liver and colon. The most frequent cancer types in males were lung, colon, esophagus and stomach and liver. Cancer incidence in Mascara province was lower than that reported in other national and regional registries. Findings of the present study revealed high incidence of liver cancer in the province, the highest in Algeria, suggesting high prevalence of risk factors. PMID:26417294

  19. Multiple neoplasms among cervical cancer patients in the material of the lower Silesian cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izmajłowicz, Barbara; Kornafel, Jan; Błaszczyk, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    According to the definition by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), primary multiple neoplasms are two or more neoplasms of different histopathological build in one organ, or two or more tumors occurring in one patient, regardless of the time of their occurrence (synchronic - up to 6 months, metachronous - after 6 months), coming from an organ or a tissue and not being an infiltration from another neoplasm, a relapse or a metastasis. It was the aim of the study to analyze the frequency of the occurrence of multiple neoplasms among patients suffering from uterine cervix cancer, with a special interest in coexistent neoplasms, the time of their occurrence and total 5-year survivals. The data from the Lower Silesian Cancer Registry concerning the years 1984-2009 formed the material of the present study. 5.3% of all cervix neoplasms occurred as multiple cancers. Cervix neoplasms were 13.4% of multiple neoplasms. On average, cervical cancer occurred as a subsequent cancer in 6 patients yearly (60.7% of the occurrences of cervical cancer were in the period of 5 years following treatment for the first neoplasm). 5-year survival in patients suffering from primarily multiple cervix neoplasms constituted 57% and was convergent with the results for all patients suffering from cervical cancer. Cervical cancer as the first neoplasm occurred in 287 patients, on average in 11 patients annually. In the period of the first 5 years after the treatment of cervical cancer, there were 42.8% occurrences of other cancers. Cervical neoplasms most frequently coexisted with cancers of the breast, lung and large intestine. The frequency of the occurrence of multiple neoplasm among cervical cancer patients is increasing. Most frequently they coexist with other tobacco-related neoplasms, those related to HPV infections and with secondary post-radiation neoplasms. These facts should be taken into consideration during post-treatment observation and when directing diagnostic

  20. Epidemiology of Breast Cancer among Bahraini Women; Data from the Bahrain Cancer Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randah R. Hamadeh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiology of breast cancer among the Bahraini female population in the years 2000‒2010 and examine its health policy implications. Methods: All breast cancer cases in the Bahrain Cancer Registry from 1st January 2000 to 31st December 2010 were included. Results: There were 1,005 cases, 12.7% of which were detected by screening. The overall mean age at diagnosis was 50.9 years (95% confidence interval 50.1–51.6. The age-standardised incidence rate declined from 58.2 per 100,000 in 2000 to 44.4 per 100,000 in 2010. The majority of cases were infiltrating ductal carcinoma (76.9%. Of the registered cases, 44.1% and 48.1% had an unknown grade and stage, respectively. The five-year survival rate was 63 ± 2%. Conclusion: The low percentage of cases detected by screening merits further evaluation of Bahrain’s screening programme. More effort should be made to reduce the proportion of unknown stage and grade breast cancers. Future research has to be directed towards understanding the reasons for Bahrain having the highest incidence rate of breast cancer in the Gulf Cooperation Council countries.

  1. Cancer registries and monitoring the impact of prophylactic human papillomavirus vaccines: the potential role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiya, Mona; Goodman, Marc T; Datta, S Deblina; Chen, Vivien W; Wingo, Phyllis A

    2008-11-15

    The recent US Food and Drug Administration licensure of a prophylactic vaccine against oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18, the first of its kind, poses unique challenges in postmarketing vaccine surveillance, especially in measuring vaccine effectiveness against biologic endpoints of HPV infection. Historically, the national system of population-based cancer registries in the US has provided high-quality data on cancer incidence and mortality for the most important biologic endpoints, namely, anogenital cancers and some oral cavity/oropharyngeal cancers. There also has been some data collection on cancer precursors; however, this activity has been inconsistent and of lower priority. Because effectiveness against HPV-associated cancers will not be measurable for several decades, strengthening and possibly expanding the capacity of registries to collect precancer data, which are earlier manifestations of infection, must be considered. Collecting type-specific data on HPV-associated precancers and cancers. While keeping in mind the current limitations of registry operations, they discuss resources that may be needed to implement and sustain these types of activities.

  2. Leukaemia and occupation: a New Zealand Cancer Registry-based case-control Study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McLean, D.; 't Mannetje, A.; Dryson, E.; Walls, C.; McKenzie, F.; Maule, M.; Cheng, S.; Cunningham, C.; Kromhout, H.; Boffetta, P.; Blair, A.; Pearce, N.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To examine the association between occupation and leukaemia. METHODS: We interviewed 225 cases (aged 20-75 years) notified to the New Zealand Cancer Registry during 2003-04, and 471 controls randomly selected from the Electoral Roll collecting demographic details, information on

  3. Substantial underreporting of anastomotic leakage after anterior resection for rectal cancer in the Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutegård, Martin; Kverneng Hultberg, Daniel; Angenete, Eva; Lydrup, Marie-Louise

    2017-12-01

    The causes and effects of anastomotic leakage after anterior resection are difficult to study in small samples and have thus been evaluated using large population-based national registries. To assess the accuracy of such research, registries should be validated continuously. Patients who underwent anterior resection for rectal cancer during 2007-2013 in 15 different hospitals in three healthcare regions in Sweden were included in the study. Registry data and information from patient records were retrieved. Registered anastomotic leakage within 30 postoperative days was evaluated, using all available registry data and using only the main variable anastomotic insufficiency. With the consensus definition of anastomotic leakage developed by the International Study Group on Rectal Cancer as reference, validity measures were calculated. Some 1507 patients were included in the study. The negative and positive predictive values for registered anastomotic leakage were 96 and 88%, respectively, while the κ-value amounted to 0.76. The false-negative rate was 29%, whereas the false-positive rate reached 1.3% (the vast majority consisting of actual leaks, but occurring after postoperative day 30). Using the main variable anastomotic insufficiency only, the false-negative rate rose to 41%. There is considerable underreporting of anastomotic leakage after anterior resection for rectal cancer in the Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry. It is probable that this causes an underestimation of the true effects of leakage on patient outcomes, and further quality control is needed.

  4. Implementing a Childhood Cancer Outcomes Surveillance System Within a Population-Based Cancer Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Ramirez

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Approximately 80% of cases of childhood cancer occur in low- and middle-income countries and are associated with high mortality rates. Assessing outcomes is essential for designing effective strategies to improve outcomes equally worldwide. We implemented a real-time surveillance system, VIGICANCER, embedded in a population-based cancer registry (PBCR to assess childhood cancer outcomes. Methods: VIGICANCER was established in 2009 as an integral part of Cali’s PBCR to collect real-time data on outcomes of patients (age < 19 years with a new diagnosis of cancer treated in pediatric oncology units in Cali, Colombia. Baseline and follow-up data (death, relapse, treatment abandonment, second neoplasms were collected from medical records, hospital discharge logs, pathology reports, death certificates, and the National Public Health Insurance database. A quality assurance process was implemented for the system. Results: From 2009 to 2013, data from 1,242 patients were included in VIGICANCER: 32% of patients were younger than 5 years, 55% were male, and 15% were Afro-descendants. International Classification of Childhood Cancer group I diagnoses predominated in all age groups except children younger than 1 year old, in whom CNS tumors predominated. Five-year overall survival for all cancers was 51.7% (95% CI, 47.9% to 55.4% for children (< 15 years, and 39.4% (95% CI, 29.8% to 50.5% for adolescents (15 to 18.9 years. Five-year overall survival for acute lymphoblastic leukemia was 55.6% (95% CI, 48.5% to 62.2%. Conclusion: Our study demonstrates the feasibility of implementing a real-time childhood cancer outcomes surveillance system embedded in a PBCR that can guide interventions to improve clinical outcomes in low- and middle-income countries.

  5. Cancer Registries and Monitoring the Impact of Prophylactic Human Papillomavirus Vaccines: The Potential Role

    OpenAIRE

    Saraiya, Mona; Goodman, Marc T.; Datta, S. Deblina; Chen, Vivien W.; Wingo, Phyllis A.

    2008-01-01

    The recent US Food and Drug Administration licensure of a prophylactic vaccine against oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18, the first of its kind, poses unique challenges in postmarketing vaccine surveillance, especially in measuring vaccine effectiveness against biologic endpoints of HPV infection. Historically, the national system of population-based cancer registries in the US has provided high-quality data on cancer incidence and mortality for the most important biologic ...

  6. Targeted sequencing of established and candidate colorectal cancer genes in the Colon Cancer Family Registry Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskin, Leon; Guo, Yan; Du, Liping; Clendenning, Mark; Rosty, Christophe; Lindor, Noralane M; Gruber, Stephen B; Buchanan, Daniel D

    2017-11-07

    The underlying genetic cause of colorectal cancer (CRC) can be identified for 5-10% of all cases, while at least 20% of CRC cases are thought to be due to inherited genetic factors. Screening for highly penetrant mutations in genes associated with Mendelian cancer syndromes using next-generation sequencing (NGS) can be prohibitively expensive for studies requiring large samples sizes. The aim of the study was to identify rare single nucleotide variants and small indels in 40 established or candidate CRC susceptibility genes in 1,046 familial CRC cases (including both MSS and MSI-H tumor subtypes) and 1,006 unrelated controls from the Colon Cancer Family Registry Cohort using a robust and cost-effective DNA pooling NGS strategy. We identified 264 variants in 38 genes that were observed only in cases, comprising either very rare (minor allele frequency cancer susceptibility genes BAP1, CDH1, CHEK2, ENG, and MSH3 . For the candidate CRC genes, we identified likely pathogenic variants in the helicase domain of POLQ and in the LRIG1 , SH2B3 , and NOS1 genes and present their clinicopathological characteristics. Using a DNA pooling NGS strategy, we identified novel germline mutations in established CRC susceptibility genes in familial CRC cases. Further studies are required to support the role of POLQ , LRIG1 , SH2B3 and NOS1 as CRC susceptibility genes.

  7. A Global Cancer Surveillance Framework Within Noncommunicable Disease Surveillance: Making the Case for Population-Based Cancer Registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeros, Marion; Znaor, Ariana; Mery, Les; Bray, Freddie

    2017-01-01

    The growing burden of cancer among several major noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) requires national implementation of tailored public health surveillance. For many emerging economies where emphasis has traditionally been placed on the surveillance of communicable diseases, it is critical to understand the specificities of NCD surveillance and, within it, of cancer surveillance. We propose a general framework for cancer surveillance that permits monitoring the core components of cancer control. We examine communalities in approaches to the surveillance of other major NCDs as well as communicable diseases, illustrating key differences in the function, coverage, and reporting in each system. Although risk factor surveys and vital statistics registration are the foundation of surveillance of NCDs, population-based cancer registries play a unique fundamental role specific to cancer surveillance, providing indicators of population-based incidence and survival. With an onus now placed on governments to collect these data as part of the monitoring of NCD targets, the integration of cancer registries into existing and future NCD surveillance strategies is a vital requirement in all countries worldwide. The Global Initiative for Cancer Registry Development, endorsed by the World Health Organization, provides a means to enhance cancer surveillance capacity in low- and middle-income countries. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Stage III & IV colon and rectal cancers share a similar genetic profile: a review of the Oregon Colorectal Cancer Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlick, Ute; Lu, Kim C; Douthit, Miriam A; Diggs, Brian S; Schuff, Kathryn G; Herzig, Daniel O; Tsikitis, Vassiliki L

    2013-05-01

    Determining the molecular profile of colon and rectal cancers offers the possibility of personalized cancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to determine whether known genetic mutations associated with colorectal carcinogenesis differ between colon and rectal cancers and whether they are associated with survival. The Oregon Colorectal Cancer Registry is a prospectively maintained, institutional review board-approved tissue repository with associated demographic and clinical information. The registry was queried for any patient with molecular analysis paired with clinical data. Patient demographics, tumor characteristics, microsatellite instability status, and mutational analysis for p53, AKT, BRAF, KRAS, MET, NRAS, and PIK3CA were analyzed. Categorical variables were compared using chi-square tests. Continuous variables between groups were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U tests. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used for survival studies. Comparisons of survival were made using log-rank tests. The registry included 370 patients: 69% with colon cancer and 31% with rectal cancer. Eighty percent of colon cancers and 68% of rectal cancers were stages III and IV. Mutational analysis found no significant differences in detected mutations between colon and rectal cancers, except that there were significantly more BRAF mutations in colon cancers compared with rectal cancers (10% vs 0%, P colon versus rectal cancers when stratified by the presence of KRAS, PIK3CA, and BRAF mutations. Stage III and IV colon and rectal cancers share similar molecular profiles, except that there were significantly more BRAF mutations in colon cancers compared with rectal cancers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Establishment of the Fox Chase Network Breast Cancer Risk Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-10-01

    related to caner also are d ed. breast cancer. Participants learn about screening guidelines and prevention options. The Cancer Center Eligibility...ever treated with a series of x-rays to the front of your neck for acne, neck tumor or any other reason? (This does not include routine screening x-rays...hysterectomy (surgical removal of the uterus )? 10] Yes CONTINUE 20 No CONTINUE 80 Don’t know CONTINUE a. If yes, how old were you? (-) years 10. Have

  10. Using a statistical process control chart during the quality assessment of cancer registry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myles, Zachary M; German, Robert R; Wilson, Reda J; Wu, Manxia

    2011-01-01

    Statistical process control (SPC) charts may be used to detect acute variations in the data while simultaneously evaluating unforeseen aberrations that may warrant further investigation by the data user. Using cancer stage data captured by the Summary Stage 2000 (SS2000) variable, we sought to present a brief report highlighting the utility of the SPC chart during the quality assessment of cancer registry data. Using a county-level caseload for the diagnosis period of 2001-2004 (n=25,648), we found the overall variation of the SS2000 variable to be in control during diagnosis years of 2001 and 2002, exceeded the lower control limit (LCL) in 2003, and exceeded the upper control limit (UCL) in 2004; in situ/localized stages were in control throughout the diagnosis period, regional stage exceeded UCL in 2004, and distant stage exceeded the LCL in 2001 and the UCL in 2004. Our application of the SPC chart with cancer registry data illustrates that the SPC chart may serve as a readily available and timely tool for identifying areas of concern during the data collection and quality assessment of central cancer registry data.

  11. Cancer in ANCA-Associated Glomerulonephritis: A Registry-Based Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeevan Sriskandarajah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Immunosuppressive therapy for antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis has been associated with increased malignancy risk. Objectives. To quantify the cancer risk associated with contemporary cyclophosphamide-sparing protocols. Methods. Patients from the Norwegian Kidney Biopsy Registry between 1988 and 2012 who had biopsy-verified pauci-immune glomerulonephritis and positive antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA serology were included. Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs were calculated to compare the study cohort with the general population. Results. The study cohort included 419 patients. During 3010 person-years, cancer developed in 41 patients (9.79%; the expected number of cancer cases was 37.5 (8.95%. The cohort had SIRs as follows: 1.09, all cancer types (95% CI, 0.81 to 1.49; 0.96, all types except nonmelanoma skin cancer (95% CI, 0.69 to 1.34; 3.40, nonmelanoma skin cancer (95% CI, 1.62 to 7.14; 3.52, hematologic cancer (95% CI, 1.32 to 9.37; 2.12, posttransplant cancer (95% CI, 1.01 to 4.44; and 1.53, during the 1–5-year follow-up after diagnosis (95% CI, 1.01 to 2.32. Conclusions. Cancer risk did not increase significantly in this cohort with ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis. However, increased risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer, posttransplant cancer, and hematologic cancer indicates an association between immunosuppression and malignancy.

  12. Childhood Cancer Incidence in India Betweem 2012 and 2014: Report of a Population-based Cancer Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Suman; Paul, Dilip Kumar; Anshu, Kumar; Bhakta, Subhajit

    2017-12-15

    To provide an overview of childhood cancer incidence in India between 2012-2014. Secondary data analysis on age-adjusted rates of cancer incidence for children (0-14 years) were collected from the report of the National Cancer Registry Programme in the year 2016. Age-adjusted rates of childhood cancer incidence ranged from 18.5 per million in the state of Nagaland to 235.3 per million in Delhi for boys. The rates were 11.4 per million in East Khasi Hill district and 152.3 per million in Delhi for girls. Leukemia was the most predominant cancer for both boys and girls. Lymphoma was the second most common cancer in boys, and brain tumors in girls. Childhood cancer incidence is increasing in India compared to population-based cancer registry survey of 2009-2011. Cancers are mostly affecting 0-4 years age group, and there is a rising trend of Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  13. Genetic variations in SMAD7 are associated with colorectal cancer risk in the colon cancer family registry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejuan Jiang

    Full Text Available Recent genome-wide studies identified a risk locus for colorectal cancer at 18q21, which maps to the SMAD7 gene. Our objective was to confirm the association between SMAD7 SNPs and colorectal cancer risk in the multi-center Colon Cancer Family Registry.23 tagging SNPs in the SMAD7 gene were genotyped among 1,592 population-based and 253 clinic-based families. The SNP-colorectal cancer associations were assessed in multivariable conditional logistic regression.Among the population-based families, both SNPs rs12953717 (odds ratio, 1.29; 95% confidence interval, 1.12-1.49, and rs11874392 (odds ratio, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.70-0.92 were associated with risk of colorectal cancer. These associations were similar among the population- and the clinic-based families, though they were significant only among the former. Marginally significant differences in the SNP-colorectal cancer associations were observed by use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, cigarette smoking, body mass index, and history of polyps.SMAD7 SNPs were associated with colorectal cancer risk in the Colon Cancer Family Registry. There was evidence suggesting that the association between rs12953717 and colorectal cancer risk may be modified by factors such as smoking and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

  14. Facilitating enrollment in a Cancer Registry through modified consent procedures: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazanec, Susan; Daly, Barbara; Meropol, Neal J; Step, Mary

    2012-12-01

    Research registries are increasingly important in medical research and are essential to the mission of cancer centers. However, designing enrollment and data collection procedures that are consistent with ethical norms and regulatory requirements yet are efficient and cost effective is a major challenge. Current standard consent forms can be a barrier to enrollment because of their length, multiple components, and technical language. We pilot tested an IRB-approved registry booklet and simplified one-page, tiered consent form, allowing for choice of extent of participation. The booklet was mailed to patients with breast cancer as part of their routine information packet prior to the first clinic appointment. A research nurse met with 27 patients at initial treatment to review the booklet, answer questions, obtain informed consent, and collect quality of life data. The consent rate was 78% with 21 patients enrolling in the study. Twelve of the 21 patients (57%) did not read the booklet prior to the visit. The 9 patients (43%) who had read the booklet prior to arrival found it easy to understand. The multi-stage, simplified consent process and data collection were acceptable to these patients and readily integrated into clinical operations. An easy-to-read registry booklet may be an effective guide for discussion, but in-person consent procedures and further testing of the approach are required.

  15. Prostate Cancer in South Africa: Pathology Based National Cancer Registry Data (1986–2006 and Mortality Rates (1997–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Babb

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is one of the most common male cancers globally; however little is known about prostate cancer in Africa. Incidence data for prostate cancer in South Africa (SA from the pathology based National Cancer Registry (1986–2006 and data on mortality (1997–2009 from Statistics SA were analysed. World standard population denominators were used to calculate age specific incidence and mortality rates (ASIR and ASMR using the direct method. Prostate cancer was the most common male cancer in all SA population groups (excluding basal cell carcinoma. There are large disparities in the ASIR between black, white, coloured, and Asian/Indian populations: 19, 65, 46, and 19 per 100 000, respectively, and ASMR was 11, 7, 52, and 6 per 100 000, respectively. Prostate cancer was the second leading cause of cancer death, accounting for around 13% of male deaths from a cancer. The average age at diagnosis was 68 years and 74 years at death. For SA the ASIR increased from 16.8 in 1986 to 30.8 in 2006, while the ASMR increased from 12.3 in 1997 to 16.7 in 2009. There has been a steady increase of incidence and mortality from prostate cancer in SA.

  16. Prostate cancer in South Africa: pathology based national cancer registry data (1986-2006) and mortality rates (1997-2009).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babb, Chantal; Urban, Margaret; Kielkowski, Danuta; Kellett, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common male cancers globally; however little is known about prostate cancer in Africa. Incidence data for prostate cancer in South Africa (SA) from the pathology based National Cancer Registry (1986-2006) and data on mortality (1997-2009) from Statistics SA were analysed. World standard population denominators were used to calculate age specific incidence and mortality rates (ASIR and ASMR) using the direct method. Prostate cancer was the most common male cancer in all SA population groups (excluding basal cell carcinoma). There are large disparities in the ASIR between black, white, coloured, and Asian/Indian populations: 19, 65, 46, and 19 per 100 000, respectively, and ASMR was 11, 7, 52, and 6 per 100 000, respectively. Prostate cancer was the second leading cause of cancer death, accounting for around 13% of male deaths from a cancer. The average age at diagnosis was 68 years and 74 years at death. For SA the ASIR increased from 16.8 in 1986 to 30.8 in 2006, while the ASMR increased from 12.3 in 1997 to 16.7 in 2009. There has been a steady increase of incidence and mortality from prostate cancer in SA.

  17. Breast Cancer Challenges and Screening in China: Lessons From Current Registry Data and Population Screening Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qing-Kun; Wang, Xiao-Li; Zhou, Xin-Na; Yang, Hua-Bing; Li, Yu-Chen; Wu, Jiang-Ping; Ren, Jun; Lyerly, Herbert Kim

    2015-07-01

    As one of its responses to the increasing global burden of breast cancer (BC), China has deployed a national registration and BC screening campaign. The present report describes these programs and the initial results of these national BC control strategies, highlighting the challenges to be considered. The primary BC incidence and prevalence data were obtained from the Chinese National Central Cancer Registry. MapInfo software was used to map the geographic distribution and variation. The time trends were estimated by the annual percentage of change from 2003 to 2009. The description of the screening plans and preliminary results were provided by the Ministry of Health. Chinese cancer registries were primarily developed and activated in the East and Coastal regions of China, with only 12.5% of the registries located in West China. Geographic variation was noted, with the incidence of BC higher in North China than in South China and in urban areas compared with rural areas. Of great interest, these registries reported that the overall BC incidence has been increasing in China, with an earlier age of onset compared with Western countries and a peak incidence rate at age 50. In response to this increasing incidence and early age of onset, BC screening programs assessed 1.46 million women aged 35-59 years, using clinical breast examinations and ultrasound as primary screening tools between 2009 and 2011. The diagnostic rate for this screening program was only 48.0/10(5) with 440 cases of early stage BC. Early stage BC was detected in nearly 70% of screened patients. Subsequently, a second-generation screening program was conducted that included older women aged 35-64 years and an additional 6 million women were screened. The cancer registration system in China has been uneven, with a greater focus on East rather than West China. The data from these registries demonstrate regional variation, an increasing BC incidence, and an early age of onset. The 2009 to 2011 BC

  18. Breast cancer as heterogeneous disease: contributing factors and carcinogenesis mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, Julia; Akushevich, Igor; Seewaldt, Victoria L; Abernethy, Amy P; Lyerly, H Kim

    2011-07-01

    The observed bimodal patterns of breast cancer incidence in the U.S. suggested that breast cancer may be viewed as more than one biological entity. We studied the factors potentially contributing to this phenomenon, specifically focusing on how disease heterogeneity could be linked to breast carcinogenesis mechanisms. Using empirical analyses and population-based biologically motivated modeling, age-specific patterns of incidence of ductal and lobular breast carcinomas from the SEER registry (1990-2003) were analyzed for heterogeneity and characteristics of carcinogenesis, stratified by race, stage, grade, and estrogen (ER)/progesterone (PR) receptor status. The heterogeneity of breast carcinoma age patterns decreased after stratification by grade, especially for grade I and III tumors. Stratification by ER/PR status further reduced the heterogeneity, especially for ER(+)/PR(-) and ER(-)/(-) tumors; however, the residual heterogeneity was still observed. The number of rate-limiting events of carcinogenesis and the latency of ductal and lobular carcinomas differed, decreasing from grade I to III, with poorly differentiated tumors associated with the least number of carcinogenesis stages and the shortest latency. Tumor grades play important role in bimodal incidence of breast carcinoma and have distinct mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Race and cancer subtype could play modifying role. ER/PR status contributes to the observed heterogeneity, but is subdominant to tumor grade. Further studies on sources of "remaining" heterogeneity of population with breast cancer (such as genetic/epigenetic characteristics) are necessary. The results of this study could suggest stratification rather than unification of breast cancer prevention strategies, risk assessment, and treatment.

  19. The natural history of Leydig cell testicular tumours: an analysis of the National Cancer Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nason, G J; Redmond, E J; Considine, S W; Omer, S I; Power, D; Sweeney, P

    2018-05-01

    Leydig cell tumour (LCT) of the testis is a rare histological subtype of stromal tumours, accounting for 1 to 3% of testicular neoplasms. The natural history of LCT is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence and natural history of Leydig cell tumours (LCT) of the testes. A search of the National Cancer Registry of Ireland database was performed regarding Leydig cell testicular tumours. Recurrence free survival (RFS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) were analysed. Between 1994 and 2013, 2755 new cases of testicular cancer were diagnosed in Ireland. Of these, 22 (0.79%) were Leydig cell tumours. Nineteen were invasive (stage T1) and three were in situ (stage Tis). One patient developed a local recurrence following an organ preserving procedure and underwent a completion orchidectomy 107 days after initial diagnosis. No further treatment was required. There have been no disease-specific deaths. The 1-, 3- and 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 95.5, 88.2 and 73.3%, respectively. The 5-year disease-specific survival (DSS) was 100% and the 5-year recurrence free survival (RFS) was 93.3%. From the National Cancer Registry, LCT has been shown to be a rare subtype of testicular tumour. Due to the relatively favourable natural history, it may be possible to tailor less aggressive surveillance regimens in these patients.

  20. Carcinogenicity of Mustard Gas: Report of the Cancer Registry Project Among Mustard Gas Exposed Iranian Veterans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soroush, M. R.

    2007-01-01

    Since 2003 The Janbazan Medical and Engineering Research Center in collaboration with Tehran University has conducted a nationwide cancer registry project among all Iranian Veterans with history of exposure to mustard gas during 1980-1988 Iran Iraq war. The mixed cohort study has a retrospective phase from the exposure time to 2003 and a prospective phase from 2003 to 2013. The main goal is to find any possible relationship between exposure to mustard gas and developing cancer as a long term health effect. A total number of 7500 individual (both military and civilians) with confirmed medical records of exposure to mustard gas have been included in the study to be compared with the same number of control population as well as the statistics of the national cancer registry system. The follow up of all cases is being done as a part of the national health monitoring program of the Janbazan (veterans) organization. In this report the latest findings of this project will be presented.(author)

  1. Co-Care: A Registry for Individuals at Increased Risk for Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, Dylan; Jandorf, Lina; Sriphanlop, Pathu; Martinez, Clarissa; Brown, Karen L; Soper, Emily R; Hiraki, Susan; Itzkowitz, Steven H

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer death for both men and women in the United States. Several factors can increase one’s risk of CRC, including a personal or family history of CRC, a diagnosis or family history of a hereditary colon cancer syndrome, or a diagnosis of chronic inflammatory bowel disease. The purpose of this project was to create a colorectal cancer registry (Co-Care) for individuals with a personal or family history of CRC, and those with disorders of the colon or rectum that are associated with an increased risk for developing CRC. Methods: To be eligible for the registry, patients either had a personal or family history of CRC, a diagnosis or family history of Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, or a diagnosis of Crohn’s colitis or ulcerative colitis with dysplasia. Participants were recruited after seeing their gastroenterologist or genetic counselor, or after undergoing a full or partial colectomy at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. Eligible patients who agreed to participate were interviewed by a member of the research staff and asked a wide range of questions pertaining to CRC risk. RESULTS: A total of 224 patients were enrolled in the registry. Participants are mostly white, born in the United States, and married, with a bachelor’s or graduate degree, reporting an annual household income of $100,000 or more. The largest portion have a family history of CRC (27.2%), and almost half of participants are of Jewish descent (46.2%) and have undergone full or partial colectomy (48.2%). More than half of participants have neither received genetic counseling (54.5%) nor undergone genetic testing (59.7%). Only 3.6% report that they currently smoke cigarettes, and 41.1% consume alcohol at least once per week. Lastly, 18.3%, 10.3%, and 27.7% of participants report that they currently take aspirin, folic acid/folate pills or tablets, or calcium pills/tablets, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This

  2. Accuracy of Self-Reported Breast Cancer Information among Women from the Ontario Site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barisic, A.; Glendon, G.; Andrulis, I. L.; Knight, J. A.; Barisic, A.; Knight, J. A.; Glendon, G.; Weerasooriya, N.; Andrulis, I. L.

    2012-01-01

    Obtaining complete medical record information can be challenging and expensive in breast cancer studies. The current literature is limited with respect to the accuracy of self-report and factors that may influence this. We assessed the agreement between self-reported and medical record breast cancer information among women from the Ontario site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry. Women aged 20-69 years diagnosed with incident breast cancer 1996-1998 were identified from the Ontario Cancer Registry, sampled on age and family history. We calculated kappa statistics, proportion correct, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values and conducted unconditional logistic regression to examine whether characteristics of the women influenced agreement. The proportions of women who correctly reported having received a broad category of therapy (hormone therapy, chemotherapy, radiation, or surgery) as well as sensitivity and specificity were above 90%, and the kappa statistics were above 0.80. The specific type of hormonal or chemotherapy was reported with low-to-moderate agreement. Aside from recurrence, no factors were consistently associated with agreement. Thus, most women were able to accurately report broad categories of treatment but not necessarily specific treatment types. The finding of this study can aid researchers in the use and design of self-administered treatment questionnaires

  3. Sex differences in lung cancer survival: long-term trends using population-based cancer registry data in Osaka, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Fukuaki Lee; Ito, Yuri; Morishima, Toshitaka; Miyashiro, Isao; Nakayama, Tomio

    2017-09-01

    Several studies of sex differences in lung cancer survival have been reported. However, large-size population-based studies based on long-term observation are scarce. We investigated long-term trends in sex differences in lung cancer survival using population-based cancer registry data from Osaka, Japan. We analyzed 79 330 cases from the Osaka Cancer Registry (OCR) diagnosed between 1975 and 2007. We calculated 5-year relative survival in the six periods (1975-1980, 1981-1986, 1987-1992, 1993-1997, 1998-2002 and 2003-2007). To estimate the trends in sex differences in lung cancer survival throughout the study period, we applied a multivariate excess hazard model to control for confounders. The proportion of adenocarcinoma (ADC) and 5-year relative relative survival have increased for both sexes. Sex differences in lung cancer survival have widened over the period, especially in ADC and since the late 1990s. The excess hazard ratio of death within 5 years for males was 1.19 (95% CI: 1.16-1.21), adjusting for period at diagnosis, histologic type, stage, age group and treatment. We reported that females have better prognosis in lung cancer than males and the sex differences in lung cancer survival have become wider in Osaka, Japan. This can be partly explained by the sex differences in the proportions of histologic type and stage. Further studies considering other factors that influence sex differences in lung cancer survival are needed. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  4. Recruiting families at risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer from a statewide cancer registry: a methodological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katapodi, Maria C; Duquette, Deb; Yang, James J; Mendelsohn-Victor, Kari; Anderson, Beth; Nikolaidis, Christos; Mancewicz, Emily; Northouse, Laurel L; Duffy, Sonia; Ronis, David; Milliron, Kara J; Probst-Herbst, Nicole; Merajver, Sofia D; Janz, Nancy K; Copeland, Glenn; Roberts, Scott

    2017-03-01

    Cancer genetic services (counseling/testing) are recommended for women diagnosed with breast cancer younger than 45 years old (young breast cancer survivors-YBCS) and at-risk relatives. We present recruitment of YBCS, identification and recruitment of at-risk relatives, and YBCS willingness to contact their cancer-free, female relatives. A random sample of 3,000 YBCS, stratified by race (Black vs. White/Other), was identified through a population-based cancer registry and recruited in a randomized trial designed to increase use of cancer genetic services. Baseline demographic, clinical, and family characteristics, and variables associated with the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) were assessed as predictors of YBCS' willingness to contact at-risk relatives. The 883 YBCS (33.2% response rate; 40% Black) who returned a survey had 1,875 at-risk relatives and were willing to contact 1,360 (72.5%). From 853 invited at-risk relatives (up to two relatives per YBCS), 442 responded (51.6% response rate). YBCS with larger families, with a previous diagnosis of depression, and motivated to comply with recommendations from family members were likely to contact a greater number of relatives. Black YBCS were more likely to contact younger relatives and those living further than 50 miles compared to White/Other YBCS. It is feasible to recruit diverse families at risk for hereditary cancer from a population-based cancer registry. This recruitment approach can be used as a paradigm for harmonizing processes and increasing internal and external validity of large-scale public health genomic initiatives in the era of precision medicine.

  5. Clinical verification of genetic results returned to research participants: findings from a Colon Cancer Family Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurino, Mercy Y; Truitt, Anjali R; Tenney, Lederle; Fisher, Douglass; Lindor, Noralane M; Veenstra, David; Jarvik, Gail P; Newcomb, Polly A; Fullerton, Stephanie M

    2017-11-01

    The extent to which participants act to clinically verify research results is largely unknown. This study examined whether participants who received Lynch syndrome (LS)-related findings pursued researchers' recommendation to clinically verify results with testing performed by a CLIA-certified laboratory. The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center site of the multinational Colon Cancer Family Registry offered non-CLIA individual genetic research results to select registry participants (cases and their enrolled relatives) from 2011 to 2013. Participants who elected to receive results were counseled on the importance of verifying results at a CLIA-certified laboratory. Twenty-six (76.5%) of the 34 participants who received genetic results completed 2- and 12-month postdisclosure surveys; 42.3% of these (11/26) participated in a semistructured follow-up interview. Within 12 months of result disclosure, only 4 (15.4%) of 26 participants reported having verified their results in a CLIA-certified laboratory; of these four cases, all research and clinical results were concordant. Reasons for pursuing clinical verification included acting on the recommendation of the research team and informing future clinical care. Those who did not verify results cited lack of insurance coverage and limited perceived personal benefit of clinical verification as reasons for inaction. These findings suggest researchers will need to address barriers to seeking clinical verification in order to ensure that the intended benefits of returning genetic research results are realized. © 2017 The Authors. Molecular Genetics & Genomic Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Breast cancer screening-opportunistic use of registry and linked screening data for local evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roder, David; Farshid, Gelareh; Gill, Grantley; Kollias, Jim; Koczwara, Bogda; Karapetis, Chris; Adams, Jacqui; Joshi, Rohit; Keefe, Dorothy; Powell, Kate; Fusco, Kellie; Eckert, Marion; Buckley, Elizabeth; Beckmann, Kerri

    2017-06-01

    Screening has been found to reduce breast cancer mortality at a population level in Australia, but these studies did not address local settings where numbers of deaths would generally have been too low for evaluation. Clinicians, administrators, and consumer groups are also interested in local service outcomes. We therefore use more common prognostic and treatment measures and survivals to gain evidence of screening effects among patients attending 4 local hospitals for treatment. To compare prognostic, treatment, and survival measures by screening history to determine whether expected screening effects are occurring. Employing routine clinical registry and linked screening data to investigate associations of screening history with these measures, using unadjusted and adjusted analyses. Screened women had a 10-year survival from breast cancer of 92%, compared with 78% for unscreened women; and 79% of screened surgical cases had breast conserving surgery compared with 64% in unscreened women. Unadjusted analyses indicated that recently screened cases had earlier tumor node metastasis stages, smaller diameters, less nodal involvement, better tumor differentiation, more oestrogen and progesterone receptor positive lesions, more hormone therapy, and less chemotherapy. Radiotherapy tended to be more common in screening participants. More frequent use of adjunctive radiotherapy applied when breast conserving surgery was used. Results confirm the screening effects expected from the scientific literature and demonstrate the value of opportunistic use of available registry and linked screening data for indicating to local health administrations, practitioners, and consumers whether local screening services are having the effects expected. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Risk Factors Associated With Circumferential Resection Margin Positivity in Rectal Cancer: A Binational Registry Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Satish K; Kong, Joseph Cherng; Guerra, Glen R; Chittleborough, Timothy J; Naik, Arun; Ramsay, Robert G; Lynch, A Craig; Heriot, Alexander G

    2018-04-01

    Rectal cancer outcomes have improved with the adoption of a multidisciplinary model of care. However, there is a spectrum of quality when viewed from a national perspective, as highlighted by the Consortium for Optimizing the Treatment of Rectal Cancer data on rectal cancer care in the United States. The aim of this study was to assess and identify predictors of circumferential resection margin involvement for rectal cancer across Australasia. A retrospective study from a prospectively maintained binational colorectal cancer database was interrogated. This study is based on a binational colorectal cancer audit database. Clinical information on all consecutive resected rectal cancer cases recorded in the registry from 2007 to 2016 was retrieved, collated, and analyzed. The primary outcome measure was positive circumferential resection margin, measured as a resection margin ≤1 mm. A total of 3367 patients were included, with 261 (7.5%) having a positive circumferential resection margin. After adjusting for hospital and surgeon volume, hierarchical logistic regression analysis identified a 6-variable model encompassing the independent predictors, including urgent operation, abdominoperineal resection, open technique, low rectal cancer, T3 to T4, and N1 to N2. The accuracy of the model was 92.3%, with an receiver operating characteristic of 0.783 (p risk associated with circumferential resection margin positivity ranged from risk factors) to 43% (6 risk factors). This study was limited by the lack of recorded long-term outcomes associated with circumferential resection margin positivity. The rate of circumferential resection margin involvement in patients undergoing rectal cancer resection in Australasia is low and is influenced by a number of factors. Risk stratification of outcome is important with the increasing demand for publicly accessible quality data. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/A512.

  8. Initial results of the oesophageal and gastric cancer registry from the Comunidad Valenciana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escrig, Javier; Mingol, Fernando; Martí, Roberto; Puche, José; Trullenque, Ramón; Barreras, José Antonio; Asencio, Francisco; Aguiló, Javier; Navarro, José Manuel; Alberich, Carmen; Salas, Dolores; Lacueva, Francisco Javier

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the initial results of the oesophagogastric cancer registry developed for the Sociedad Valenciana de Cirugía and the Health Department of the Comunidad Valenciana (Spain). Fourteen of the 24 public hospitals belonging to the Comunidad Valenciana participated. All patients with diagnosis of oesophageal or gastric carcinomas operated from January 2013 to December 2014 were evaluated. Demographic, clinical and pathological data were analysed. Four hundred and thirty-four patients (120 oesophageal carcinomas and 314 gastric carcinomas) were included. Only two hospitals operated more than 10 patients with oesophageal cancer per year. Transthoracic oesophaguectomy was the most frequent approach (84.2%) in tumours localized within the oesophagus. A total gastrectomy was performed in 50.9% patients with gastroesophageal junction (GOJ) carcinomas. Postoperative 30-day and 90-day mortality were 8% and 11.6% in oesophageal carcinoma and 5.9 and 8.6% in gastric carcinoma. Before surgery, middle oesophagus carcinomas were treated mostly (76,5%) with chemoradiotherapy. On the contrary, lower oesophagus and GOJ carcinomas were treated preferably with chemotherapy alone (45.5 and 53.4%). Any neoadjuvant treatment was administered to 73.6% of gastric cancer patients. Half patients with oesophageal carcinoma or gastric carcinoma received no adjuvant treatment. This registry revealed that half patients with oesophageal cancer were operated in hospitals with less than 10 cases per year at the Comunidad Valenciana. Also, it detected capacity improvement for some clinical outcomes of oesophageal and gastric carcinomas. Copyright © 2017 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Validity of Danish Breast Cancer Group (DBCG) registry data used in the predictors of breast cancer recurrence (ProBeCaRe) premenopausal breast cancer cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P; Kjærsgaard, Anders; Ahern, Thomas P

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Validation studies of the Danish Breast Cancer Group (DBCG) registry show good agreement with medical records for adjuvant treatment data, but inconsistent recurrence information. No studies have validated changes in menopausal status or endocrine therapy during follow-up. In a longit...

  10. Epidemiologic contributions to recent cancer trends among HIV-infected people in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Hilary A; Shiels, Meredith S; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Engels, Eric A

    2014-03-27

    HIV-infected people have elevated risk for some cancers. Changing incidence of these cancers over time may reflect changes in three factors: HIV population demographic structure (e.g. age distribution), general population (background) cancer rates, and HIV-associated relative risks. We assessed the contributions of these factors to time trends for 10 cancers during 1996-2010. Population-based registry linkage study. We applied Poisson models to data from the U.S. HIV/AIDS Cancer Match Study to estimate annual percentage changes (APCs) in incidence rates of AIDS-defining cancers [ADCs: Kaposi sarcoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), and cervical cancer] and seven non-AIDS-defining cancers (NADCs). We evaluated HIV-infected cancer trends with and without adjustment for demographics, trends in background rates, and trends in standardized incidence ratios (SIRs, to capture relative risk). Cancer rates among HIV-infected people rose over time for anal (APC 3.8%), liver (8.5%), and prostate (9.8%) cancers, but declined for Kaposi sarcoma (1996-2000: -29.3%; 2000-2010: -7.8%), NHL (1996-2003: -15.7%; 2003-2010: -5.5%), cervical cancer (-11.1%), Hodgkin lymphoma (-4.0%), and lung cancer (-2.8%). Breast and colorectal cancer incidence did not change over time. Based on comparison to adjusted models, changing demographics contributed to trends for Kaposi sarcoma and breast, colorectal, liver, lung, and prostate cancers (all P cancers. SIRs declined for ADCs, Hodgkin lymphoma (APC -3.2%), and lung cancer (-4.4%). Demographic shifts influenced several cancer trends among HIV-infected individuals. Falling relative risks largely explained ADC declines, while background incidence contributed to some NADC trends.

  11. Analyzing quality of colorectal cancer care through registry statistics: a small community hospital example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopewood, Ian

    2011-01-01

    As the quantity of elderly Americans requiring oncologic care grows, and as cancer treatment and medicine become more advanced, assessing quality of cancer care becomes a necessary and advantageous practice for any facility.' Such analysis is especially practical in small community hospitals, which may not have the resources of their larger academic counterparts to ensure that the care being provided is current and competitive in terms of both technique and outcome. This study is a comparison of the colorectal cancer care at one such center, Falmouth Community Hospital (FCH)--located in Falmouth, Massachusetts, about an hour and a half away from the nearest metropolitan center--to the care provided at a major nearby Boston Tertiary Center (BTC) and at teaching and research facilities across New England and the United States. The metrics used to measure performance encompass both outcome (survival rate data) as well as technique, including quality of surgery (number of lymph nodes removed) and the administration of adjuvant treatments, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy, as per national guidelines. All data for comparison between FCH and BTC were culled from those hospitals' tumor registries. Data for the comparison between FCH and national tertiary/referral centers were taken from the American College of Surgeons' Commission on Cancer, namely National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) statistics, Hospital Benchmark Reports and Practice Profile Reports. The results showed that, while patients at FCH were diagnosed at both a higher age and at a more advanced stage of colorectal cancer than their BTC counterparts, FCH stands up favorably to BTC and other large centers in terms of the metrics referenced above. Quality assessment such as the analysis conducted here can be used at other community facilities to spotlight, and ultimately eliminate, deficiencies in cancer programs.

  12. Changing cancer survival in China during 2003-15: a pooled analysis of 17 population-based cancer registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hongmei; Chen, Wanqing; Zheng, Rongshou; Zhang, Siwei; Ji, John S; Zou, Xiaonong; Xia, Changfa; Sun, Kexin; Yang, Zhixun; Li, He; Wang, Ning; Han, Renqiang; Liu, Shuzheng; Li, Huizhang; Mu, Huijuan; He, Yutong; Xu, Yanjun; Fu, Zhentao; Zhou, Yan; Jiang, Jie; Yang, Yanlei; Chen, Jianguo; Wei, Kuangrong; Fan, Dongmei; Wang, Jian; Fu, Fangxian; Zhao, Deli; Song, Guohui; Chen, Jianshun; Jiang, Chunxiao; Zhou, Xin; Gu, Xiaoping; Jin, Feng; Li, Qilong; Li, Yanhua; Wu, Tonghao; Yan, Chunhua; Dong, Jianmei; Hua, Zhaolai; Baade, Peter; Bray, Freddie; Jemal, Ahmedin; Yu, Xue Qin; He, Jie

    2018-05-01

    From 2003 to 2005, standardised 5-year cancer survival in China was much lower than in developed countries and varied substantially by geographical area. Monitoring population-level cancer survival is crucial to the understanding of the overall effectiveness of cancer care. We therefore aimed to investigate survival statistics for people with cancer in China between 2003 and 2015. We used population-based data from 17 cancer registries in China. Data for the study population was submitted by the end of July 31, 2016, with follow-up data on vital status obtained on Dec 31, 2015. We used anonymised, individual cancer registration records of patients (aged 0-99 years) diagnosed with primary, invasive cancers from 2003 to 2013. Patients eligible for inclusion had data for demographic characteristics, date of diagnosis, anatomical site, morphology, behaviour code, vital status, and last date of contact. We analysed 5-year relative survival by sex, age, and geographical area, for all cancers combined and 26 different cancer types, between 2003 and 2015. We stratified survival estimates by calendar period (2003-05, 2006-08, 2009-11, and 2012-15). There were 678 842 records of patients with invasive cancer who were diagnosed between 2003 and 2013. Of these records, 659 732 (97·2%) were eligible for inclusion in the final analyses. From 2003-05 to 2012-15, age-standardised 5-year relative survival increased substantially for all cancers combined, for both male and female patients, from 30·9% (95% CI 30·6-31·2) to 40·5% (40·3-40·7). Age-standardised 5-year relative survival also increased for most cancer types, including cancers of the uterus (average change per calendar period 5·5% [95% CI 2·5-8·5]), thyroid (5·4% [3·2-7·6]), cervix (4·5% [2·9-6·2]), and bone (3·2% [2·1-4·4]). In 2012-15, age-standardised 5-year survival for all patients with cancer was higher in urban areas (46·7%, 95% CI 46·5-47·0) than in rural areas (33·6%, 33·3-33·9

  13. Changing cancer survival in China during 2003–15: a pooled analysis of 17 population-based cancer registries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmei Zeng, PhD

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Background: From 2003 to 2005, standardised 5-year cancer survival in China was much lower than in developed countries and varied substantially by geographical area. Monitoring population-level cancer survival is crucial to the understanding of the overall effectiveness of cancer care. We therefore aimed to investigate survival statistics for people with cancer in China between 2003 and 2015. Methods: We used population-based data from 17 cancer registries in China. Data for the study population was submitted by the end of July 31, 2016, with follow-up data on vital status obtained on Dec 31, 2015. We used anonymised, individual cancer registration records of patients (aged 0–99 years diagnosed with primary, invasive cancers from 2003 to 2013. Patients eligible for inclusion had data for demographic characteristics, date of diagnosis, anatomical site, morphology, behaviour code, vital status, and last date of contact. We analysed 5-year relative survival by sex, age, and geographical area, for all cancers combined and 26 different cancer types, between 2003 and 2015. We stratified survival estimates by calendar period (2003–05, 2006–08, 2009–11, and 2012–15. Findings: There were 678 842 records of patients with invasive cancer who were diagnosed between 2003 and 2013. Of these records, 659 732 (97·2% were eligible for inclusion in the final analyses. From 2003–05 to 2012–15, age-standardised 5-year relative survival increased substantially for all cancers combined, for both male and female patients, from 30·9% (95% CI 30·6–31·2 to 40·5% (40·3–40·7. Age-standardised 5-year relative survival also increased for most cancer types, including cancers of the uterus (average change per calendar period 5·5% [95% CI 2·5–8·5], thyroid (5·4% [3·2–7·6], cervix (4·5% [2·9–6·2], and bone (3·2% [2·1–4·4]. In 2012–15, age-standardised 5-year survival for all patients with cancer was higher in urban

  14. Contributions of cytology examination and methods in lung cancer diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerse, M.; Tercelj, M.

    2006-01-01

    Background. Lung cancer (LC) is still the leading cause of cancer death according to published data worldwide and confirmed also by the data obtained from the central Cancer Registry of Slovenia. Early detection of LC has an important impact on the long-term survival rate of the patients. In spite of a great advance in imaging technology for a better visualization and early detection of the neoplasms and a variety of screening tests, only cytopathology examination finally define the neoplastic lesion. Methods. To evaluate the contribution of cytology examination in the diagnosis of LC we studied the cytology diagnoses, comparing them with histology reports in patients, who underwent the diagnostic procedure under suspicion of the LC during last 2 years. Results. Of a total 772 patients, in 241 patients cancer was microscopically confirmed. The most frequent diagnoses were adenocarcinoma (36.9%), squamous cell carcinoma (26.6%), and small cell carcinoma (SCLC) (12.9%). There were 22% of neoplasms classified as non-small cell carcinomas (NSCLC). From the clinician point of view considering the therapy it is very important to distinguish NSCLC from SCLC. And in our study the cytology-histology correlation between these two major types of carcinoma was almost 100%. Based only on cytology, 68 (28.2%) patients received microscopic diagnosis of malignoma, and the specimens for this group of patients were obtained mostly from transbronchial or transthoracic fine needle aspiration biopsies. Conclusions. Cytology is of great diagnostic value, a reliable and relatively non-invasive method for patients. Cytology specimens should be taken in cases where it is not possible to obtain samples for histology. (author)

  15. ABRAXAS (FAM175A) and Breast Cancer Susceptibility: No Evidence of Association in the Breast Cancer Family Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, Anne-Laure; Lesueur, Fabienne; Coulombe, Yan; Gobeil, Stéphane; Soucy, Penny; Hamdi, Yosr; Desjardins, Sylvie; Le Calvez-Kelm, Florence; Vallée, Maxime; Voegele, Catherine; Hopper, John L; Andrulis, Irene L; Southey, Melissa C; John, Esther M; Masson, Jean-Yves; Tavtigian, Sean V; Simard, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Approximately half of the familial aggregation of breast cancer remains unexplained. This proportion is less for early-onset disease where familial aggregation is greater, suggesting that other susceptibility genes remain to be discovered. The majority of known breast cancer susceptibility genes are involved in the DNA double-strand break repair pathway. ABRAXAS is involved in this pathway and mutations in this gene impair BRCA1 recruitment to DNA damage foci and increase cell sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Moreover, a recurrent germline mutation was reported in Finnish high-risk breast cancer families. To determine if ABRAXAS could be a breast cancer susceptibility gene in other populations, we conducted a population-based case-control mutation screening study of the coding exons and exon/intron boundaries of ABRAXAS in the Breast Cancer Family Registry. In addition to the common variant p.Asp373Asn, sixteen distinct rare variants were identified. Although no significant difference in allele frequencies between cases and controls was observed for the identified variants, two variants, p.Gly39Val and p.Thr141Ile, were shown to diminish phosphorylation of gamma-H2AX in MCF7 human breast adenocarcinoma cells, an important biomarker of DNA double-strand breaks. Overall, likely damaging or neutral variants were evenly represented among cases and controls suggesting that rare variants in ABRAXAS may explain only a small proportion of hereditary breast cancer.

  16. Evaluation of data quality at the National Cancer Registry of Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhov, Anton; Bray, Freddie; Ferlay, Jacques; Fedorenko, Zoya; Goulak, Liudmyla; Gorokh, Yevgeniy; Soumkina, Olena; Znaor, Ariana

    2018-04-01

    Cancer notification has been mandatory in Ukraine since 1953, with the National Cancer Registry of Ukraine (NCRU) established in 1996. The aim of this study was to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the data quality at the NCRU. Qualitative and semi-quantitative methods were used to assess the comparability, completeness, validity and timeliness of cancer incidence data from the NCRU for the period 2002-2012. Cancer registration procedures at the NCRU are in accordance with international standards and recommendations. Semi-quantitative methods suggested the NCRU's data was reasonably complete, although decreases in age-specific incidence and mortality rates in the elderly indicated some missing cases at older ages. The proportion of microscopically-verified cases increased from 73.6% in 2002 to 82.3% in 2012, with death-certificate-only (DCO) proportions stable at around 0.1% and unknown stage recorded in 9.6% of male and 7.5% of female solid tumours. Timeliness was considered acceptable, with reporting >99% complete within a turn-around time of 15 months. While timely reporting of national data reflects the advantages of a mandatory data collection system, a low DCO% and observed age-specific declines suggest possible underreporting of incidence and mortality data, particularly at older ages. Overall, the evaluation indicates that the data are reasonably comparable and thus may be used to describe the magnitude of the cancer burden in Ukraine. Given its central role in monitoring and evaluation of cancer control activities, ensuring the sustainability of NCRU operations throughout the process of healthcare system reform is of utmost importance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Breast cancer in a multi-ethnic Asian setting : Results from the Singapore-Malaysia hospital-based breast cancer registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pathy, Nirmala Bhoo; Yip, Cheng Har; Taib, Nur Aishah; Hartman, Mikael; Saxena, Nakul; Lau, Philip; Bulgiba, Awang M.; Lee, Soo Chin; Lim, Siew Eng; Wong, John E. L.; Verkooijen, Helena M.

    Two hospital-based breast cancer databases (University Malaya Medical Center, Malaysia [n = 1513] and National University Hospital, Singapore [n = 2545]) were merged into a regional registry of breast cancer patients diagnosed between 1990 and 2007. A review of the data found 51% of patients

  18. Coupled variable selection for regression modeling of complex treatment patterns in a clinical cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtmann, I; Elsäßer, A; Weinmann, A; Binder, H

    2014-12-30

    For determining a manageable set of covariates potentially influential with respect to a time-to-event endpoint, Cox proportional hazards models can be combined with variable selection techniques, such as stepwise forward selection or backward elimination based on p-values, or regularized regression techniques such as component-wise boosting. Cox regression models have also been adapted for dealing with more complex event patterns, for example, for competing risks settings with separate, cause-specific hazard models for each event type, or for determining the prognostic effect pattern of a variable over different landmark times, with one conditional survival model for each landmark. Motivated by a clinical cancer registry application, where complex event patterns have to be dealt with and variable selection is needed at the same time, we propose a general approach for linking variable selection between several Cox models. Specifically, we combine score statistics for each covariate across models by Fisher's method as a basis for variable selection. This principle is implemented for a stepwise forward selection approach as well as for a regularized regression technique. In an application to data from hepatocellular carcinoma patients, the coupled stepwise approach is seen to facilitate joint interpretation of the different cause-specific Cox models. In conditional survival models at landmark times, which address updates of prediction as time progresses and both treatment and other potential explanatory variables may change, the coupled regularized regression approach identifies potentially important, stably selected covariates together with their effect time pattern, despite having only a small number of events. These results highlight the promise of the proposed approach for coupling variable selection between Cox models, which is particularly relevant for modeling for clinical cancer registries with their complex event patterns. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons

  19. Age-specific interval breast cancers in Japan. Estimation of the proper sensitivity of screening using a population-based cancer registry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Akihiko; Kuriyama, Shinichi; Kawai, Masaaki

    2008-01-01

    The age-specific sensitivity of a screening program was investigated using a population-based cancer registry as a source of false-negative cancer cases. A population-based screening program for breast cancer was run using either clinical breast examinations (CBE) alone or mammography combined with CBE in the Miyagi Prefecture from 1997 to 2002. Interval cancers were newly identified by linking the screening records to the population-based cancer registry to estimate the number of false-negative cases of screening program. Among 112071 women screened by mammography combined with CBE, the number of detected cancers, false-negative cases and the sensitivity were 289, 22 and 92.9%, respectively, based on the reports from participating municipalities. The number of newly found false-negative cases and corrected sensitivity when using the registry were 34 and 83.8%, respectively. In detected cancers, the sensitivity of screening by mammography combined with CBE in women ranging from 40 to 49 years of age based on a population-based cancer registry was much lower than that in women 50-59 and 60-69 years of age (40-49: 18, 71.4%, 50-59: 19, 85.8%, 60-69: 19, 87.2%). These data suggest that the accurate outcome of an evaluation of breast cancer screening must include the use of a population-based cancer registry for detecting false-negative cases. Screening by mammography combined with CBE may therefore not be sufficiently sensitive for women ranging from 40 to 49 years of age. (author)

  20. Thyroid cancer and multiple primary tumors in the SEER cancer registries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronckers, Cécile M.; McCarron, Peter; Ron, Elaine

    2005-01-01

    Thyroid cancer incidence rates have increased steadily in the United States and elsewhere. Radiation exposure at a young age is a strong risk factor, but otherwise the etiology is unclear. To explore etiologic clues, we studied the risk of thyroid cancer after an earlier primary cancer, as well as

  1. Identification of constitutional MLH1 epimutations and promoter variants in colorectal cancer patients from the Colon Cancer Family Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Robyn L.; Dobbins, Timothy; Lindor, Noralane M.; Rapkins, Robert W.; Hitchins, Megan P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Constitutional MLH1 epimutations manifest as promoter methylation and silencing of the affected allele in normal tissues, predisposing to Lynch syndrome–associated cancers. This study investigated their frequency and inheritance. Methods: A total of 416 individuals with a colorectal cancer showing loss of MLH1 expression and without deleterious germline mutations in MLH1 were ascertained from the Colon Cancer Family Registry (C-CFR). Constitutive DNA samples were screened for MLH1 methylation in all 416 subjects and for promoter sequence changes in 357 individuals. Results: Constitutional MLH1 epimutations were identified in 16 subjects. Of these, seven (1.7%) had mono- or hemi-allelic methylation and eight had low-level methylation (2%). In one subject the epimutation was linked to the c.-27C>A promoter variant. Testing of 37 relatives from nine probands revealed paternal transmission of low-level methylation segregating with a c.+27G>A variant in one case. Five additional probands had a promoter variant without an MLH1 epimutation, with three showing diminished promoter activity in functional assays. Conclusion: Although rare, sequence changes in the regulatory region of MLH1 and aberrant methylation may alone or together predispose to the development of cancer. Screening for these changes is warranted in individuals who have a negative germline sequence screen of MLH1 and loss of MLH1 expression in their tumor. PMID:22878509

  2. Evaluating Early Case Capture of Pediatric Cancers in Seven Central Cancer Registries in the United States, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckett, Mary; Neri, Antonio; Rohan, Elizabeth; Clerkin, Castine; Underwood, J Michael; Ryerson, A Blythe; Stewart, Sherri L

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is the second-leading cause of death in children, but incidence data are not available until two years after diagnosis, thereby delaying data dissemination and research. An early case capture (ECC) surveillance program was piloted in seven state cancer registries to register pediatric cancer cases within 30 days of diagnosis. We sought to determine the quality of ECC data and understand pilot implementation. We used quantitative and qualitative methods to evaluate ECC. We assessed data quality by comparing demographic and clinical characteristics from the initial ECC submission to a resubmission of ECC pilot data and to the most recent year of routinely collected cancer data for each state individually and in aggregate. We conducted telephone focus groups with registry staff to determine ECC practices and difficulties in August and September 2013. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and coded to identify themes. Comparing ECC initial submissions with submissions for all states, ECC data were nationally representative for age (9.7 vs. 9.9 years) and sex (673 of 1,324 [50.9%] vs. 42,609 of 80,547 [52.9%] male cases), but not for primary site (472 of 1,324 [35.7%] vs. 27,547 of 80,547 [34.2%] leukemia/lymphoma cases), behavior (1,219 of 1,324 [92.1%] vs. 71,525 of 80,547 [88.8%] malignant cases), race/ethnicity (781 of 1,324 [59.0%] vs. 64,518 of 80,547 [80.1%] white cases), or diagnostic confirmation (1,233 of 1,324 [93.2%] vs. 73,217 of 80,547 [90.9%] microscopically confirmed cases). When comparing initial ECC data with resubmission data, differences were seen in race/ethnicity (808 of 1,324 [61.1%] vs. 1,425 of 1,921 [74.2%] white cases), primary site (475 of 1,324 [35.9%] vs. 670 of 1,921 [34.9%] leukemia/lymphoma cases), and behavior (1,215 of 1,324 [91.8%] vs. 1,717 of 1,921 [89.4%] malignant cases). Common themes from focus group analysis included implementation challenges and facilitators, benefits of ECC, and utility of ECC data. ECC provided data

  3. Incidence, mortality and receptor status of breast cancer in African Caribbean women: Data from the cancer registry of Guadeloupe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloumeaux, J; Gaumond, S; Bhakkan, B; Manip M'Ebobisse, Nsome; Lafrance, W; Lancelot, Pierre; Vacque, D; Negesse, Y; Diedhiou, A; Kadhel, P

    2017-04-01

    Geographical disparities in breast cancer incidence and outcomes are reported worldwide. Women of African descent show lower incidence, higher mortality rates and earlier age of onset. We analyzed data from the cancer registry of Guadeloupe for the period 2008-2013. We describe breast cancer characteristics by molecular subtype, as well as estimated observed and net survival. We used Cox proportional hazard models to determine associations between cancer subtypes and death rate, adjusted for variables of interest. Overall, 1275 cases were recorded with a mean age at diagnosis of 57(±14) years. World standardized incidence and mortality were respectively 71.9/100,000 and 14.1/100,000 person-years. Age-specific incidence rates were comparable to European and US populations below the age of 45, and higher in Guadeloupean women aged between 45 and 55 years. Overall, 65.1% of patients were hormone receptor (HR)+ and 20.1% were HR-. Triple negative breast cancers (TNBC) accounted for 14% of all cases, and were more frequent in patients under 40 (21.6% vs. 13.4%, p=0.02). Five-year net survival was 84.9% [81.4-88.6]. It was higher for HR+/Her2+ and HR+/Her2- subtypes, and lower for HR-/Her2+ and TNBC patients. We found high age-specific incidence rates of breast cancer in women aged 45 to 55 years, which warrants further investigation in our population. However, this population of mainly African descent had good overall survival rates, and data according to subtypes are consistent with those reported internationally. These results may suggest that poorer survival in other African descent populations may not be an inherent feature of the disease but may be amenable to improvement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Breast Density Notification Legislation and Breast Cancer Stage at Diagnosis: Early Evidence from the SEER Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Ilana; Asch, Steven M; Bendavid, Eran; Bhattacharya, Jay; Owens, Douglas K

    2017-06-01

    Twenty-eight states have passed breast density notification laws, which require physicians to inform women of a finding of dense breasts on mammography. To evaluate changes in breast cancer stage at diagnosis after enactment of breast density notification legislation. Using a difference-in-differences analysis, we examined changes in stage at diagnosis among women with breast cancer in Connecticut, the first state to enact legislation, compared to changes among women in control states. We used data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER) registry, 2005-2013. Women ages 40-74 with breast cancer. Breast density notification legislation, enacted in Connecticut in October of 2009. Breast cancer stage at diagnosis. Our study included 466,930 women, 25,592 of whom lived in Connecticut. Legislation was associated with a 1.38-percentage-point (95 % CI 0.12 to 2.63) increase in the proportion of women in Connecticut versus control states who had localized invasive cancer at the time of diagnosis, and a 1.12-percentage-point (95 % CI -2.21 to -0.08) decline in the proportion of women with ductal carcinoma in situ at diagnosis. Breast density notification legislation was not associated with a change in the proportion of women in Connecticut versus control states with regional-stage (-0.09 percentage points, 95 % CI -1.01 to 1.02) or metastatic disease (-0.24, 95 % CI -0.75 to 0.28). County-level analyses and analyses limited to women younger than 50 found no statistically significant associations. Single intervention state, limited follow-up, potential confounding from unobserved trends. Breast density notification legislation in Connecticut was associated with a small increase in the proportion of women diagnosed with localized invasive breast cancer in individual-level but not county-level analyses. Whether this finding reflects potentially beneficial early detection or potentially harmful overdiagnosis is not known. Legislation was not

  5. Quality of care achievements of the Prostate Cancer Outcomes Registry-Victoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampurno, Fanny; Earnest, Arul; Kumari, Patabendi B; Millar, Jeremy L; Davis, Ian D; Murphy, Declan G; Frydenberg, Mark; Kearns, Paul A; Evans, Sue M

    2016-05-02

    To analyse the performance of the quality of prostate cancer (CaP) care over a 5-year period with reference to three quality indicators (QIs) reported by the Prostate Cancer Outcomes Registry-Victoria (PCOR-Vic):QI-1: Alignment with the modified Prostate Cancer Research International Active Surveillance (PRIAS) protocol guideline;QI-2: Timeliness of CaP care for men with high risk and locally advanced disease;QI-3: Positive surgical margins (PSMs) for organ-confined pathological T2 disease. Between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2013, 4708 men diagnosed with CaP who met the QI-1, QI-2 or QI-3 inclusion criteria were recruited from Victorian hospitals.Outcome measures and statistical analysis: Trend analysis was conducted to monitor performance according to QI-1, QI-2 and QI-3. We used the autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model to account for any inherent autocorrelation in the data when analysing the monthly incidence of each indicator. Differences in the annual figures for the indicators across years were also analysed by aggregating data by year and applying the ARIMA model. There was a downward trend over the 5 years in the percentage of men with low risk disease who underwent active treatment (45% to 34%; P = 0.024), an upward trend in the percentage of those with high risk and locally advanced disease who received active treatment within 12 months of diagnosis (88% to 93%; P = 0.181), and a decline in PSM rate in men with pathological T2 disease after radical prostatectomy (21% to 12%; P = 0.036). Limitations of the study include the fact that the improvement in the QIs was detected using PCOR-Vic as a single population, but there may be institutional variations in quality improvement. Over 2009-2013, the performance of the Victorian health system improved according to the three processes of care indicators reported by the PCOR-Vic.

  6. [Assessing the economic impact of cancer in Chile: a direct and indirect cost measurement based on 2009 registries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid, Camilo; Herrera, Cristian; Rodríguez, Rodrigo; Bastías, Gabriel; Jiménez, Jorge

    2016-08-02

    This paper aims to determine the economic impact that cancer represents to Chile, exploring the share of costs for the most important cancers and the differences between the public and private sector. We used the cost of illness methodology, through the assessment of the direct and indirect costs associated with cancer treatment. Data was obtained from 2009 registries of the Chilean Ministry of Health and the Superintendence of Health. Indirect costs were calculated by days of job absenteeism and potential years of life lost. Over US$ 2.1 billion were spent on cancer in 2009, which represents almost 1% of Chile’s Gross Domestic Product. The direct per capita cost was US$ 47. Indirect costs were 1.92 times more than direct costs. The three types of cancer that embody the highest share of costs were gastric cancer (17.6%), breast cancer (7%) and prostate cancer (4.2%) in the public sector, and breast cancer (14%), lung cancer (7.5%) and prostate cancer (4.1%) in the private sector. On average men spent 30.33% more than women. There are few studies of this kind in Chile and the region. The country can be classified as having a cancer economic impact below the average of those in European Union countries. We expect that this information can be used to develop access policies and resource allocation decision making, and as a first step into further cancer-costing studies in Chile and the Latin American and Caribbean region.

  7. Name Recognition to Identify Patients of South Asian Ethnicity within the Cancer Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savitri Singh-Carlson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The goal of this project was to develop a list of forenames and surnames of South Asian (SA women that could be used to identify SA breast cancer patients within the cancer registry. This list was compiled, evaluated, and validated to ensure comprehensiveness, accuracy, and applicability of SA names. Methods: This project was conducted by Canadian researchers who are immersed in conducting behavioral studies with SA women diagnosed with cancer in the province of British Columbia. Recruiting SA cancer patients for research can be a difficult task due to social and cultural factors. Methods used by other researchers to identify ethnicity related unique names were employed to filter surnames and forenames that were not common to this ethnic group. Co-author (Gurpreet Oshan of SA ethnicity rigorously identified and deleted multiple lists and redundant entries along with common English forenames which resulted in a list of 16,888 SA forenames. All co-authors of Indian ethnicity (Gurpreet Oshan, Savitri Singh-Carlson, Harajit Lail were involved in critiquing and manually reviewing the names list throughout this process. Comprehensive lists of SA surnames and women′s forenames were reviewed to identify those that were unique to SA ethnicity. Accuracy was ensured by constantly filtering the redundancy by using an Excel program which helped to illustrate the number of times each name was spelled in different ways. Results: The final lists included 9112 surnames and 16,888 forenames of SA ethnicity. On the basis of the surname linkage only, the sensitivity of the list was 76.6%, specificity was 62.9%, and the positive predictive value was 58.5%. On the basis of both the surname and forename linkage, the specificity of the list was 88.6%. These lists include variations in spelling forenames and surnames as well. Conclusions: The list of surnames and forenames can be useful tools to identify SA ethnic groups from large population database in

  8. Survival of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma in the San Joaquin Valley: a comparison with California Cancer Registry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atla, Pradeep R; Sheikh, Muhammad Y; Mascarenhas, Ranjan; Choudhury, Jayanta; Mills, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Variation in the survival of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is related to racial differences, socioeconomic disparities and treatment options among different populations. A retrospective review of the data from medical records of patients diagnosed with HCC were analyzed at an urban tertiary referral teaching hospital and compared to patients in the California Cancer Registry (CCR) - a participant in the Survival Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)program of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The main outcome measure was overall survival rates. 160 patients with the diagnosis of HCC (M/F=127/33), mean age 59.7±10 years, 32% white, 49% Hispanic, 12% Asian and 6% African American. Multivariate analysis identified tumor size, model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score, portal vein invasion and treatment offered as the independent predictors of survival (p <0.05). Survival rates across racial groups were not statistically significant. 5.6% received curative treatments (orthotopic liver transplantation, resection, rediofrequency ablation) (median survival 69 months), 34.4% received nonsurgical treatments (trans-arterial chemoembolization, systemic chemotherapy) (median survival 9 months), while 60% received palliative or no treatment (median survival 3 months) (p <0.001). There was decreased survival in our patient population with HCC beyond 2 years. 60% of our study population received only palliative or no treatment suggesting a possible lack of awareness of chronic liver disease as well as access to appropriate surveillance modalities. Ethnic disparities such as Hispanic predominance in this study in contrast to the CCR/SEER database may have been a contributing factor for poorer outcome.

  9. Analysis of stage and clinical/prognostic factors for colon and rectal cancer from SEER registries: AJCC and collaborative stage data collection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Vivien W; Hsieh, Mei-Chin; Charlton, Mary E; Ruiz, Bernardo A; Karlitz, Jordan; Altekruse, Sean F; Ries, Lynn A G; Jessup, J Milburn

    2014-12-01

    The Collaborative Stage (CS) Data Collection System enables multiple cancer registration programs to document anatomic and molecular pathology features that contribute to the Tumor (T), Node (N), Metastasis (M) - TNM - system of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC). This article highlights changes in CS for colon and rectal carcinomas as TNM moved from the AJCC 6th to the 7th editions. Data from 18 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) population-based registries were analyzed for the years 2004-2010, which included 191,361colon and 73,341 rectal carcinomas. Overall, the incidence of colon and rectal cancers declined, with the greatest decrease in stage 0. The AJCC's 7th edition introduction of changes in the subcategorization of T4, N1, and N2 caused shifting within stage groups in 25,577 colon and 10,150 rectal cancers diagnosed in 2010. Several site-specific factors (SSFs) introduced in the 7th edition had interesting findings: 1) approximately 10% of colon and rectal cancers had tumor deposits - about 30%-40% occurred without lymph node metastases, which resulted in 2.5% of colon and 3.3% of rectal cases becoming N1c (stage III A/B) in the AJCC 7th edition; 2) 10% of colon and 12% of rectal cases had circumferential radial margins Cancer Society.

  10. The association between mammographic calcifications and breast cancer prognostic factors in a population-based registry cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyante, Sarah J; Lee, Sheila S; Benefield, Thad S; Hoots, Tiffany N; Henderson, Louise M

    2017-01-01

    Mammographic calcifications can be a marker of malignancy, but their association with prognosis is less well established. In the current study, the authors examined the relationship between calcifications and breast cancer prognostic factors in the population-based Carolina Mammography Registry. The current study included 8472 invasive breast cancers diagnosed in the Carolina Mammography Registry between 1996 and 2011 for which information regarding calcifications occurring within 2 years of diagnosis was reported. Calcification-specific Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) assessments were reported prospectively by a radiologist. Tumor characteristic data were obtained from the North Carolina Central Cancer Registry and/or pathology reports. Multivariable-adjusted associations between the presence of calcifications in the breast affected by cancer and tumor characteristics were estimated using logistic regression. Statistical tests were 2-sided. The presence of calcifications was found to be positively associated with tumors that were high grade (vs low grade: odds ratio [OR], 1.43; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.10-1.88) or had an in situ component (vs without: OR, 2.15; 95% CI, 1.81-2.55). Calcifications were found to be inversely associated with hormone receptor-negative status (vs positive status: OR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.57-0.93), size >35 mm (vs ≤8 mm: OR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.37-0.61), and lobular tumors (vs ductal: OR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.22-0.69). The association between the presence of calcifications and an in situ component was limited to BI-RADS category 4 and 5 calcifications and was absent for BI-RADS category 2 or 3 calcifications (P for heterogeneity Cancer 2017;123:219-227. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  11. Occupational risk factors for testicular cancer: a registry-based case-control study in Rhineland Palatinate – Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Lamyaa; Hammer, Gaël P.; Emrich, Katharina; Blettner, Maria; Zeeb, Hajo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Testicular cancer affects mainly men below the age of 50. An association with occupation and social status has been suggested but risk factors are not well understood. A registry-based case-control study focusing on occupation was performed in Germany. Methods: All 348 testicular cancer cases with available gainful occupational information registered between 2000 and 2005; as well as 564 suitable controls (from a pool of other cancers) were drawn from the Cancer Registry of Rhineland-Palatinate. Unconditional logistic regression was used to compute odds ratios (OR) and associated 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Slightly elevated OR were observed for technicians and related professionals (OR 1.62, 95% CI 1.00–2.63) and for clerical support workers (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.14–2.56). This increase was highest in the age group 20–50 for technicians (OR 2.02, 95% CI 1.23–3.33) and clerks (OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.30–3.09), respectively. An association with testicular cancer was observed for no other occupation. Conclusion: An increased risk of testicular cancer was observed for technicians and related professionals and clerical support workers. This could be related to socioeconomic status or sedentary life style, two factors that were identified in previous studies. While the feasibility of a purely registry-based study was shown, missing occupational data and the choice of cancer controls represent challenges to the validity of this approach. PMID:24265602

  12. Cancer incidence in Bucaramanga Metropolitan Area, 2000-2004. First five years report from population based cancer registry of Metropolitan Area of Bucaramanga.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Eliana Meza Durán

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the most common chronic diseases that cause high morbidity and mortality. In the evaluation of all illnessand its impact on the community, a surveillance system becomes necessary to allows us to know its incidence. Cancersurveillance is achieved by the population-based cancer registry. Methodology: The Population Based Cancer Registry ofMetropolitan Area of Bucaramanga (RPC-AMB collected information from the years 2000 to 2004, in patients with anymalignant cancer the which include both invasive and in situ behavior in addition to reside within this geographical area . TheCancer Registry also collects data on brain and nervous system tumors classified as benign or those that have uncertainbehavior. Basal cell cancers of the skin were included during the two first years as well as all the intraepithelial neoplasm ofthe cervix. Active collections of information at all sources by registry staff were made (Hospitals, Health care institutions,especially oncology centers and Pathology and Hematology Laboratories and some specialist in oncology attention. Theinclusion approaches are verified and collects data on specific sociodemographic information (age, gender, residence, placeof birth, etc. and on the anatomic site of the tumor, the cell type of the cancer, behavior and extension on each individualdiagnosed with cancer. Each case was coded using the International Classification of Diseases Oncology Third Edition (ICDO-3, for topographical and morphological code. The data was entered into a computer with CanReg-4 software that is aconfigurable computer program designed for cancer registration in population-based registries and was provided as aservice by the Descriptive Epidemiology Unit to members of the International Association of Cancer Registries. This softwareprovides the number of cancer cases (frequency and the incidence rates. The quality control included exhaustiveness of thecases and information, verification of the

  13. A Nation-Wide Cancer Registry-Based Study of Adenosquamous Carcinoma in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Tzu Lan

    Full Text Available Adenosquamous carcinoma (ASC is a rare disease involving various organs, yet there are no large-scale population-based comparative studies on ASC among different organs.The incidence and overall survival of ASC among various organs in cases diagnosed in Taiwan from January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2010 were calculated and compared using data from the Taiwan Cancer Registry (TCR. The various organs were classified and divided into three different systems: the female reproductive, respiratory, and alimentary systems. Survival analysis were also compared among 30,850 patients diagnosed as ASC, adenocarcinoma (AC or squamous cell carcinoma (SCC in organs with frequent ASC.During the study period, a total of 576 ASC cases were diagnosed in Taiwan. The most common primary system was respiratory (73.8%, followed by alimentary (16.2% and female reproductive (10%. The overall survival were significantly higher for cases involving the female reproductive system, followed by the respiratory and alimentary systems (P = 0.016. The median overall survival were worse in males than females for cases involving the respiratory system (22.4 vs. 31.8 months, P = 0.044. Multivariate analysis showed that age ≧ 65, more advanced T and N categories were independent unfavorable prognostic factors of overall survival in ASC. ASC histology is an independent unfavorable prognostic factor compared with AC and SCC.ASC at an old age and more advanced T and N categories were found to be associated with a poor prognosis.

  14. A Nation-Wide Cancer Registry-Based Study of Adenosquamous Carcinoma in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yuan-Tzu; Huang, Kuo-Hung; Liu, Chien-An; Tai, Ling-Chen; Chen, Ming-Huang; Chao, Yee; Li, Anna Fen-Yau; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Shyr, Yi-Ming; Wu, Chew-Wun; Fang, Wen-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Background Adenosqamous carcinoma (ASC) is a rare disease involving various organs, yet there are no large-scale population-based comparative studies on ASC among different organs. Methods The incidence and overall survival of ASC among various organs in cases diagnosed in Taiwan from January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2010 were calculated and compared using data from the Taiwan Cancer Registry (TCR). The various organs were classified and divided into three different systems: the female reproductive, respiratory, and alimentary systems. Survival analysis were also compared among 30,850 patients diagnosed as ASC, adenocarcinoma (AC) or squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in organs with frequent ASC. Results During the study period, a total of 576 ASC cases were diagnosed in Taiwan. The most common primary system was respiratory (73.8%), followed by alimentary (16.2%) and female reproductive (10%). The overall survival were significantly higher for cases involving the female reproductive system, followed by the respiratory and alimentary systems (P = 0.016). The median overall survival were worse in males than females for cases involving the respiratory system (22.4 vs. 31.8 months, P = 0.044). Multivariate analysis showed that age≧65, more advanced T and N categories were independent unfavorable prognostic factors of overall survival in ASC. ASC histology is an independent unfavorable prognostic factor compared with AC and SCC. Conclusions ASC at an old age and more advanced T and N categories were found to be associated with a poor prognosis. PMID:26445240

  15. Representativeness of two sampling procedures for an internet intervention targeting cancer-related distress: a comparison of convenience and registry samples

    OpenAIRE

    Owen, Jason E.; Bantum, Erin O'Carroll; Criswell, Kevin; Bazzo, Julie; Gorlick, Amanda; Stanton, Annette L.

    2013-01-01

    Internet interventions often rely on convenience sampling, yet convenience samples may differ in important ways from systematic recruitment approaches. The purpose of this study was to evaluate potential demographic, medical, and psychosocial differences between Internet-recruited and registry-recruited cancer survivors in an Internet-based intervention. Participants were recruited from a cancer registry (n = 80) and via broad Internet outreach efforts (n = 160). Participants completed a set ...

  16. Cancer spectrum in DNA mismatch repair gene mutation carriers: results from a hospital based Lynch syndrome registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Mala; Wei, Chongjuan; Chen, Jinyun; Amos, Christopher I; Lynch, Patrick M; Lu, Karen H; Lucio, Laura A; Boyd-Rogers, Stephanie G; Bannon, Sarah A; Mork, Maureen E; Frazier, Marsha L

    2012-09-01

    The spectrum of cancers seen in a hospital based Lynch syndrome registry of mismatch repair gene mutation carriers was examined to determine the distribution of cancers and examine excess cancer risk. Overall there were 504 cancers recorded in 368 mutation carriers from 176 families. These included 236 (46.8 %) colorectal and 268 (53.2 %) extracolonic cancers. MLH1 mutation carriers had a higher frequency of colorectal cancers whereas MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 mutation carriers had more extracolonic cancers although these differences were not statistically significant. Men had fewer extracolonic cancers than colorectal (45.3 vs. 54.7 %), whereas women had more extracolonic than colorectal cancers (59.0 vs. 41.0 %). The mean age at diagnosis overall for extracolonic cancers was older than for colorectal, 49.1 versus 44.8 years (P ≤ 0.001). As expected, the index cancer was colorectal in 58.1 % of patients and among the extracolonic index cancers, endometrial was the most common (13.8 %). A significant number of non-Lynch syndrome index cancers were recorded including breast (n = 5) prostate (n = 3), thyroid (n = 3), cervix (n = 3), melanoma (n = 3), and 1 case each of thymoma, sinus cavity, and adenocarcinoma of the lung. However, standardized incidence ratios calculated to assess excess cancer risk showed that only those cancers known to be associated with Lynch syndrome were significant in our sample. We found that Lynch syndrome patients can often present with cancers that are not considered part of Lynch syndrome. This has clinical relevance both for diagnosis of Lynch syndrome and surveillance for cancers of different sites during follow-up of these patients.

  17. Meat intake, cooking methods, dietary carcinogens, and colorectal cancer risk: findings from the Colorectal Cancer Family Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Amit D; Kim, Andre; Lewinger, Juan Pablo; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Potter, John D; Cotterchio, Michelle; Le Marchand, Loic; Stern, Mariana C

    2015-06-01

    Diets high in red meat and processed meats are established colorectal cancer (CRC) risk factors. However, it is still not well understood what explains this association. We conducted comprehensive analyses of CRC risk and red meat and poultry intakes, taking into account cooking methods, level of doneness, estimated intakes of heterocyclic amines (HCAs) that accumulate during meat cooking, tumor location, and tumor mismatch repair proficiency (MMR) status. We analyzed food frequency and portion size data including a meat cooking module for 3364 CRC cases, 1806 unaffected siblings, 136 unaffected spouses, and 1620 unaffected population-based controls, recruited into the CRC Family Registry. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for nutrient density variables were estimated using generalized estimating equations. We found no evidence of an association between total nonprocessed red meat or total processed meat and CRC risk. Our main finding was a positive association with CRC for pan-fried beefsteak (P(trend) carcinogens relevant for CRC risk. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Living with the physical and mental consequences of an ostomy : A study among 1–10-year rectal cancer survivors from the population-based PROFILES registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mols, F.; Lemmens, V.E.P.P.; Bosscha, K.J.; Broek van den, W.; Thong, M.S.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background This study examined the physical and mental consequences of an ostomy among 1–10-year rectal cancer survivors. Methods Patients with rectal cancer diagnosed from 2000 to 2009, as registered in the population-based Eindhoven Cancer Registry, received a questionnaire on quality of life

  19. Long-term weight loss after colorectal cancer diagnosis is associated with lower survival: The Colon Cancer Family Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocarnik, Jonathan M; Hua, Xinwei; Hardikar, Sheetal; Robinson, Jamaica; Lindor, Noralane M; Win, Aung Ko; Hopper, John L; Figueiredo, Jane C; Potter, John D; Campbell, Peter T; Gallinger, Steven; Cotterchio, Michelle; Adams, Scott V; Cohen, Stacey A; Phipps, Amanda I; Newcomb, Polly A

    2017-12-01

    Body weight is associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) risk and survival, but to the authors' knowledge, the impact of long-term postdiagnostic weight change is unclear. Herein, the authors investigated whether weight change over the 5 years after a diagnosis of CRC is associated with survival. CRC cases diagnosed from 1997 to 2008 were identified through 4 population-based cancer registry sites. Participants enrolled within 2 years of diagnosis and reported their height and weight 2 years prior. Follow-up questionnaires were administered approximately 5 years after diagnosis. Associations between change in weight (in kg) or body mass index (BMI) with overall and CRC-specific survival were estimated using Cox regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, American Joint Committee on Cancer stage of disease, baseline BMI, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, smoking, time between diagnosis and enrollment, and study site. At the 5-year postdiagnostic survey, 2049 participants reported higher (53%; median plus 5 kg), unchanged (12%), or lower (35%; median -4 kg) weight. Over a median of 5.1 years of subsequent follow-up (range, 0.3-9.9 years), 344 participants died (91 of CRC). Long-term weight loss (per 5 kg) was found to be associated with poorer overall survival (hazard ratio, 1.13; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-1.21) and CRC-specific survival (hazard ratio, 1.25; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-1.39). Significantly lower survival was similarly observed for relative weight loss (>5% vs ≤5% change), BMI reduction (per 1 unit), or BMI category change (overweight to normal vs remaining overweight). Weight loss 5 years after a diagnosis of CRC was found to be significantly associated with decreased long-term survival, suggesting the importance of avoiding weight loss in survivors of CRC. Future research should attempt to further evaluate this association, accounting for whether this weight change was intentional or represents a marker of declining health. Cancer 2017

  20. Breast cancer trends differ by ethnicity: a report from the South African National Cancer Registry (1994-2009).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, E; Joffe, M; Cubasch, H; Ruff, P; Norris, S A; Pisa, P T

    2017-02-01

    To describe breast cancer (BC) incidence and mortality by ethnicity in South Africa (SA). Sources of data included the South African National Cancer Registry (NCR) pathology-based reports (1994–2009) and Statistics South Africa (SSA) mortality data (1997–2009). Numbers of cases, age-standardised incidence rates (ASIR) and lifetime risk (LR) were extracted from the NCR database for 1994–2009. Age-specific incidence rates were calculated for five-year age categories. The direct method of standardisation was employed to calculate age-standardised mortality rates (ASMR) using mortality data. Between 1994 and 2009, there were 85 561 female BC. For the Black, Coloured and Asian groups, increases in ASIR and LR were observed between 1994 and 2009. In 2009, the ASIR for the total population, Blacks, Whites, Coloureds and Asians were 26.9, 18.7, 50.2, 40.9 and 51.2 per 100 000, respectively. For Asians, an increase in proportion of BC as a percentage of all female cancers was observed between 1994 and 2002 (11.1%) and continued to increase to 2009 (a further 4.5%). Whites and Asians presented higher incidences of BC at earlier ages compared with Blacks and Coloureds in 2009. In 1998, there were 1618 BC deaths in SA compared with 2784 deaths in 2009. ASMR between 1997 and 2004 increased but stabilised thereafter. This paper demonstrated that SA BC incidence rates are similar to other countries in the region, but lower than other countries with similar health systems. Ethnic differences in BC trends were observed. However, the reasons for observed ethnic differences are unclear. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  1. Extracolonic Cancer in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Data from the GETECCU Eneida Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro, María; Ramas, M; Benítez, J M; López-García, A; Juan, A; Guardiola, J; Mínguez, M; Calvet, X; Márquez, L; Fernández Salazar, L I; Bujanda, L; García, C; Zabana, Y; Lorente, R; Barrio, J; Hinojosa, E; Iborra, M; Cajal, M Domínguez; Van Domselaar, M; García-Sepulcre, M F; Gomollón, F; Piqueras, M; Alcaín, G; García-Sánchez, V; Panés, J; Domènech, E; García-Esquinas, E; Rodríguez-Artalejo, F; Gisbert, J P

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this study was (a) To know the prevalence and distribution of extracolonic cancer (EC) in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); (b) To estimate the incidence rate of EC; (c) To evaluate the association between EC and treatment with immunosuppressants and anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents. This was an observational cohort study. IBD and inclusion in the ENEIDA Project (a prospectively maintained registry) from GETECCU. Patients with EC before the diagnosis of IBD, lack of relevant data for this study, and previous treatment with immunosuppressants other than corticosteroids, thiopurines, methotrexate, or anti-TNF agents. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to evaluate the impact of several variables on the risk of EC, and any differences between survival curves were evaluated using the log-rank test. Stepwise multivariate Cox regression analysis was used to investigate factors potentially associated with the development of EC, including drugs for the treatment of IBD, during follow-up. A total of 11,011 patients met the inclusion criteria and were followed for a median of 98 months. Forty-eight percent of patients (5,303) had been exposed to immunosuppressants or anti-TNF drugs, 45.8% had been exposed to thiopurines, 4.7% to methotrexate, and 21.6% to anti-TNF drugs. The prevalence of EC was 3.6%. In the multivariate analysis, age (HR=1.05, 95% CI=1.04-1.06) and having smoked (hazards ratio (HR)=1.47, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.10-1.80) were the only variables associated with a higher risk of EC. Neither immunosuppressants nor anti-TNF drugs seem to increase the risk of EC. Older age and smoking were associated with a higher prevalence of EC.

  2. Risk of breast cancer following fertility treatment--a registry based cohort study of parous women in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigstad, Marte Myhre; Larsen, Inger Kristin; Myklebust, Tor Åge; Robsahm, Trude Eid; Oldereid, Nan Birgitte; Omland, Anne Katerine; Vangen, Siri; Brinton, Louise Annette; Storeng, Ritsa

    2015-03-01

    Despite increasing numbers of women availing themselves of assisted reproductive technology (ART), effects on cancer risk remain unresolved. Given hormonal exposures, breast cancer risk is of particular concern. The aim of this study is to investigate breast cancer risk amongst women giving birth following ART as compared to that amongst women who gave birth without ART. Data on all women who gave birth in Norway with or without ART, between 1984 and 2010 were obtained from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway (MBRN). 808,834 women eligible for study were linked to the Cancer Registry of Norway. Cox proportional models computed hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of breast cancer between the two groups, adjusting for age, parity, age at first birth, calendar period and region of residence. In total, 8,037 women were diagnosed with breast cancer during the study period, 138 ART women and 7,899 unexposed. Total follow-up time was 12,401,121 person-years (median 16.0); median age at entry was 32.5 years (range 18.6-49.9) for ART women and 26.3 (range 10.5-54.6) for unexposed. Women exposed to ART had an elevated risk of breast cancer (adjusted HR 1.20, 95% CI 1.01-1.42). Subgroup analyses gave an HR of 1.30 (95% CI 1.07-1.57) for women treated with IVF and 1.35 (95 % CI 1.07-1.71) for women with follow-up >10 years, compared with controls. Our findings of increased risk in the study population warrant continued monitoring of women treated with ART as this population advances into more typical cancer age ranges. © 2014 UICC.

  3. Meat intake, cooking methods, dietary carcinogens, and colorectal cancer risk: findings from the Colorectal Cancer Family Registry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Amit D; Kim, Andre; Lewinger, Juan Pablo; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Potter, John D; Cotterchio, Michelle; Le Marchand, Loic; Stern, Mariana C

    2015-01-01

    Diets high in red meat and processed meats are established colorectal cancer (CRC) risk factors. However, it is still not well understood what explains this association. We conducted comprehensive analyses of CRC risk and red meat and poultry intakes, taking into account cooking methods, level of doneness, estimated intakes of heterocyclic amines (HCAs) that accumulate during meat cooking, tumor location, and tumor mismatch repair proficiency (MMR) status. We analyzed food frequency and portion size data including a meat cooking module for 3364 CRC cases, 1806 unaffected siblings, 136 unaffected spouses, and 1620 unaffected population-based controls, recruited into the CRC Family Registry. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for nutrient density variables were estimated using generalized estimating equations. We found no evidence of an association between total nonprocessed red meat or total processed meat and CRC risk. Our main finding was a positive association with CRC for pan-fried beefsteak (P trend < 0.001), which was stronger among MMR deficient cases (heterogeneity P = 0.059). Other worth noting associations, of borderline statistical significance after multiple testing correction, were a positive association between diets high in oven-broiled short ribs or spareribs and CRC risk (P trend = 0.002), which was also stronger among MMR-deficient cases, and an inverse association with grilled hamburgers (P trend = 0.002). Our results support the role of specific meat types and cooking practices as possible sources of human carcinogens relevant for CRC risk

  4. Estimates of thyroid cancer incidence at district level using cancer registries data and linkage of two sources of medico-administrative data, France, 2007-2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatignoux, Edouard; Decool, Elsa; Maria, Florence de; Uhry, Zoe; Remontet, Laurent; Grosclaude, Pascale; Guizard, Anne-Valerie; Delafosse, Patricia; Colonna, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Objectives - In France, cancer registries cover 20% of the population. The objective of this study was to provide estimations of thyroid cancer incidence at the administrative district level ( 'departements') over the 2007-2011 period in metropolitan France, using registries data and medico-administrative data. Methods - A medico-administrative indicator 'HUL' [Hospital union LLD] combining Hospital discharge data and health insurance data on Long Duration Diseases (LDD) was constructed. It counts the number of people with a new LDD or hospitalized for thyroid cancer. The principle of the estimation consists in adjusting HUL data at the district level by the Incidence/HUL ratio of the registry area. The accuracy of the estimations was first evaluated in the districts covered by registries by comparing estimated to observed incidence. Results - The preliminary phase of the assessment confirmed that the HUL/Incidence ratio were sufficiently accurate to provide district level estimates of thyroid cancer incidence over the whole territory. The district variability of the estimations for the 2007-2011 period was important: the 5. and 95. percentiles of the distribution of standardized incidence rates across districts were 2.8 and 7.1 for 100,000 in men, and 8.3 and 21.2 for 100,000 in women. Areas with significant over-incidence were observed in the South-East, and on the South-West coast of France compared to the national level. Conclusion - This study confirms the magnitude of geographical variability of thyroid cancer incidence between French administrative districts. It also confirms the value of cross-referencing medico-administrative data to estimate the incidence at an administrative district level. (authors)

  5. Application of data mining techniques and data analysis methods to measure cancer morbidity and mortality data in a regional cancer registry: The case of the island of Crete, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlamis, Iraklis; Apostolakis, Ioannis; Sifaki-Pistolla, Dimitra; Dey, Nilanjan; Georgoulias, Vassilios; Lionis, Christos

    2017-07-01

    Micro or macro-level mapping of cancer statistics is a challenging task that requires long-term planning, prospective studies and continuous monitoring of all cancer cases. The objective of the current study is to present how cancer registry data could be processed using data mining techniques in order to improve the statistical analysis outcomes. Data were collected from the Cancer Registry of Crete in Greece (counties of Rethymno and Lasithi) for the period 1998-2004. Data collection was performed on paper forms and manually transcribed to a single data file, thus introducing errors and noise (e.g. missing and erroneous values, duplicate entries etc.). Data were pre-processed and prepared for analysis using data mining tools and algorithms. Feature selection was applied to evaluate the contribution of each collected feature in predicting patients' survival. Several classifiers were trained and evaluated for their ability to predict survival of patients. Finally, statistical analysis of cancer morbidity and mortality rates in the two regions was performed in order to validate the initial findings. Several critical points in the process of data collection, preprocessing and analysis of cancer data were derived from the results, while a road-map for future population data studies was developed. In addition, increased morbidity rates were observed in the counties of Crete (Age Standardized Morbidity/Incidence Rates ASIR= 396.45 ± 2.89 and 274.77 ±2.48 for men and women, respectively) compared to European and world averages (ASIR= 281.6 and 207.3 for men and women in Europe and 203.8 and 165.1 in world level). Significant variation in cancer types between sexes and age groups (the ratio between deaths and reported cases for young patients, less than 34 years old, is at 0.055 when the respective ratio for patients over 75 years old is 0.366) was also observed. This study introduced a methodology for preprocessing and analyzing cancer data, using a

  6. DOE Research Contributions to Radiation and Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    dropdown arrow Site Map A-Z Index Menu Synopsis DOE Research Contributions to Radiation and Cancer Therapy Possible: DOE Advanced Biomedical Technology Research, page 10 Over the time span of many years, DOE's research has made many contributions to radiation and cancer therapy, including PEREGRINE and Boron Neutron

  7. Socio-economic inequalities in the incidence of four common cancers: a population-based registry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweed, E J; Allardice, G M; McLoone, P; Morrison, D S

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between socio-economic circumstances and cancer incidence in Scotland in recent years. Population-based study using cancer registry data. Data on incident cases of colorectal, lung, female breast, and prostate cancer diagnosed between 2001 and 2012 were obtained from a population-based cancer registry covering a population of approximately 2.5 million people in the West of Scotland. Socio-economic circumstances were assessed based on postcode of residence at diagnosis, using the Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD). For each cancer, crude and age-standardised incidence rates were calculated by quintile of SIMD score, and the number of excess cases associated with socio-economic deprivation was estimated. 93,866 cases met inclusion criteria, comprising 21,114 colorectal, 31,761 lung, 23,757 female breast, and 15,314 prostate cancers. Between 2001 and 2006, there was no consistent association between socio-economic circumstances and colorectal cancer incidence, but 2006-2012 saw an emerging deprivation gradient in both sexes. The incidence rate ratio (IRR) for colorectal cancer between most deprived and least deprived increased from 1.03 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.91-1.16) to 1.24 (95% CI 1.11-1.39) during the study period. The incidence of lung cancer showed the strongest relationship with socio-economic circumstances, with inequalities widening across the study period among women from IRR 2.66 (95% CI 2.33-3.05) to 2.91 (95% CI 2.54-3.33) in 2001-03 and 2010-12, respectively. Breast and prostate cancer showed an inverse relationship with socio-economic circumstances, with lower incidence among people living in more deprived areas. Significant socio-economic inequalities remain in cancer incidence in the West of Scotland, and in some cases are increasing. In particular, this study has identified an emerging, previously unreported, socio-economic gradient in colorectal cancer incidence among women as well as men. Actions

  8. Adjuvant brachytherapy removes survival disadvantage of local disease extension in stage IIIC endometrial cancer: a SEER registry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Peter J; Jani, Ashesh B; Horowitz, Ira R; Johnstone, Peter A S

    2008-01-01

    To assess the role of radiotherapy (RT) in women with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer. The 17-registry Survival, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database was searched for patients with lymph node-positive non-Stage IV epithelial endometrial cancer diagnosed and treated between 1988 and 1998. Two subgroups were identified: those with organ-confined Stage IIIC endometrial cancer and those with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer with direct extension of the primary tumor. RT was coded as external beam RT (EBRT) or brachytherapy (BT). Observed survival (OS) was reported with a minimum of 5 years of follow-up; the survival curves were compared using the log-rank test. The therapy data revealed 611 women with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer during this period. Of these women, 51% were treated with adjuvant EBRT, 21% with EBRT and BT, and 28% with no additional RT (NAT). Of the 611 patients, 293 had organ-confined Stage IIIC endometrial cancer and 318 patients had Stage IIIC endometrial cancer with direct extension of the primary tumor. The 5-year OS rate for all patients was 40% with NAT, 56% after EBRT, and 64% after EBRT/BT. Adjuvant RT improved survival compared with NAT (p primary tumor was present, the addition of BT to EBRT was even more beneficial.

  9. Leukaemia and occupation: a New Zealand Cancer Registry-based case-control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, David; Mannetje, Andrea 't; Dryson, Evan; Walls, Chris; McKenzie, Fiona; Maule, Milena; Cheng, Soo; Cunningham, Chris; Kromhout, Hans; Boffetta, Paolo; Blair, Aaron; Pearce, Neil

    2009-04-01

    To examine the association between occupation and leukaemia. We interviewed 225 cases (aged 20-75 years) notified to the New Zealand Cancer Registry during 2003-04, and 471 controls randomly selected from the Electoral Roll collecting demographic details, information on potential confounders and a comprehensive employment history. Associations between occupation and leukaemia were analysed using logistic regression adjusted for gender, age, ethnicity and smoking. Elevated odds ratios (ORs) were observed in agricultural sectors including horticulture/fruit growing (OR: 2.62, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.51, 4.55), plant nurseries (OR: 7.51, 95% CI: 1.85, 30.38) and vegetable growing (OR: 3.14, 95% CI: 1.18, 8.40); and appeared greater in women (ORs: 4.71, 7.75 and 7.98, respectively). Elevated ORs were also observed in market farmers/crop growers (OR: 1.84, 95% CI: 1.12, 3.02), field crop/vegetable growers (OR: 3.98, 95% CI: 1.46, 10.85), market gardeners (OR: 5.50, 95% CI: 1.59, 19.02), and nursery growers/workers (OR: 4.23, 95% CI: 1.34, 13.35); also greater in women (ORs: 3.48, 7.62, 15.74 and 11.70, respectively). These elevated ORs were predominantly for chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). Several associations persisted after semi-Bayes adjustment. Elevated ORs were observed in rubber/plastics products machine operators (OR: 3.76, 95% CI: 1.08, 13.08), predominantly in plastic product manufacturing. CLL was also elevated in tailors and dressmakers (OR: 7.01, 95% CI: 1.78, 27.68), cleaners (OR: 2.04, 95% CI: 1.00, 4.14) and builder's labourers (OR: 4.03, 95% CI: 1.30, 12.53). These findings suggest increased leukaemia risks associated with certain agricultural, manufacturing, construction and service occupations in New Zealand.

  10. Methylation of Breast Cancer Predisposition Genes in Early-Onset Breast Cancer: Australian Breast Cancer Family Registry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron M Scott

    Full Text Available DNA methylation can mimic the effects of both germline and somatic mutations for cancer predisposition genes such as BRCA1 and p16INK4a. Constitutional DNA methylation of the BRCA1 promoter has been well described and is associated with an increased risk of early-onset breast cancers that have BRCA1-mutation associated histological features. The role of methylation in the context of other breast cancer predisposition genes has been less well studied and often with conflicting or ambiguous outcomes. We examined the role of methylation in known breast cancer susceptibility genes in breast cancer predisposition and tumor development. We applied the Infinium HumanMethylation450 Beadchip (HM450K array to blood and tumor-derived DNA from 43 women diagnosed with breast cancer before the age of 40 years and measured the methylation profiles across promoter regions of BRCA1, BRCA2, ATM, PALB2, CDH1, TP53, FANCM, CHEK2, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. Prior genetic testing had demonstrated that these women did not carry a germline mutation in BRCA1, ATM, CHEK2, PALB2, TP53, BRCA2, CDH1 or FANCM. In addition to the BRCA1 promoter region, this work identified regions with variable methylation at multiple breast cancer susceptibility genes including PALB2 and MLH1. Methylation at the region of MLH1 in these breast cancers was not associated with microsatellite instability. This work informs future studies of the role of methylation in breast cancer susceptibility gene silencing.

  11. Melanoma reporting to central cancer registries by US dermatologists: an analysis of the persistent knowledge and practice gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartee, Todd V; Kini, Seema P; Chen, Suephy C

    2011-11-01

    Every state requires diagnosing physicians to report new cases of melanoma to its central cancer registry. Previous regional studies and anecdotal experience suggest that few dermatologists are cognizant of this obligation. This oversight could result in a large number of unreported melanomas annually and, in turn, US melanoma statistics that markedly underestimate the true incidence of the disease. We sought to quantify the percentage of dermatologists who are unaware of melanoma reporting requirements (the knowledge gap) and who are not reporting melanoma diagnoses (the practice gap). We also sought to delineate factors predictive of reporting knowledge and behavior. A survey was administered to attendees of the Cutaneous Oncology Symposium at the 2010 American Academy of Dermatology annual meeting. In all, 104 of 419 eligible attendees completed surveys (response rate 26%). Fifty percent of respondents do not believe they are required to report melanomas and 56% do not actively report their diagnoses to a registry. Practice duration of less than 10 years was significantly associated with both a knowledge gap (P = .047) and practice gap (P = .056). Similarly, dermatologists who diagnosed fewer than 10 melanomas per year were more likely to possess a knowledge gap (P = .096) and a practice gap (P = .087) than those who diagnosed more than 10. Limitations include small sample size and low response rate. A majority of dermatologists are not reporting melanomas they diagnose to a cancer registry, and half of those surveyed were not aware that diagnosing physicians are required to report melanoma. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Automated Cancer Registry Notifications: Validation of a Medical Text Analytics System for Identifying Patients with Cancer from a State-Wide Pathology Repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Anthony N; Moore, Julie; O'Dwyer, John; Philpot, Shoni

    2016-01-01

    The paper assesses the utility of Medtex on automating Cancer Registry notifications from narrative histology and cytology reports from the Queensland state-wide pathology information system. A corpus of 45.3 million pathology HL7 messages (including 119,581 histology and cytology reports) from a Queensland pathology repository for the year of 2009 was analysed by Medtex for cancer notification. Reports analysed by Medtex were consolidated at a patient level and compared against patients with notifiable cancers from the Queensland Oncology Repository (QOR). A stratified random sample of 1,000 patients was manually reviewed by a cancer clinical coder to analyse agreements and discrepancies. Sensitivity of 96.5% (95% confidence interval: 94.5-97.8%), specificity of 96.5% (95.3-97.4%) and positive predictive value of 83.7% (79.6-86.8%) were achieved for identifying cancer notifiable patients. Medtex achieved high sensitivity and specificity across the breadth of cancers, report types, pathology laboratories and pathologists throughout the State of Queensland. The high sensitivity also resulted in the identification of cancer patients that were not found in the QOR. High sensitivity was at the expense of positive predictive value; however, these cases may be considered as lower priority to Cancer Registries as they can be quickly reviewed. Error analysis revealed that system errors tended to be tumour stream dependent. Medtex is proving to be a promising medical text analytic system. High value cancer information can be generated through intelligent data classification and extraction on large volumes of unstructured pathology reports.

  13. Swedish National Registry of Urinary Bladder Cancer: No difference in relative survival over time despite more aggressive treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnson, Staffan; Hosseini Aliabad, Abolfazl; Holmäng, Sten; Jancke, Georg; Liedberg, Fredrik; Ljungberg, Börje; Malmström, Per-Uno; Rosell, Johan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use the Swedish National Registry of Urinary Bladder Cancer (SNRUBC) to investigate changes in patient and tumour characteristics, management and survival in bladder cancer cases over a period of 15 years. All patients with newly detected bladder cancer reported to the SNRUBC during 1997-2011 were included in the study. The cohort was divided into three groups, each representing 5 years of the 15 year study period. The study included 31,266 patients (74% men, 26% women) with a mean age of 72 years. Mean age was 71.7 years in the first subperiod (1997-2001) and 72.5 years in the last subperiod (2007-2011). Clinical T categorization changed from the first to the last subperiod: Ta from 45% to 48%, T1 from 21.6% to 22.4%, and T2-T4 from 27% to 25%. Also from the first to the last subperiod, intravesical treatment after transurethral resection for T1G2 and T1G3 tumours increased from 15% to 40% and from 30% to 50%, respectively, and cystectomy for T2-T4 tumours increased from 30% to 40%. No differences between the analysed subperiods were found regarding relative survival in patients with T1 or T2-T4 tumours, or in the whole cohort. This investigation based on a national bladder cancer registry showed that the age of the patients at diagnosis increased, and the proportion of muscle-invasive tumours decreased. The treatment of all tumour stages became more aggressive but relative survival showed no statistically significant change over time.

  14. Cancer survival in Australia, Canada, Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and the UK, 1995–2007 (the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership): an analysis of population-based cancer registry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, MP; Forman, D; Bryant, H; Butler, J; Rachet, B; Maringe, C; Nur, U; Tracey, E; Coory, M; Hatcher, J; McGahan, CE; Turner, D; Marrett, L; Gjerstorff, ML; Johannesen, TB; Adolfsson, J; Lambe, M; Lawrence, G; Meechan, D; Morris, EJ; Middleton, R; Steward, J; Richards, MA

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Cancer survival is a key measure of the effectiveness of health-care systems. Persistent regional and international differences in survival represent many avoidable deaths. Differences in survival have prompted or guided cancer control strategies. This is the first study in a programme to investigate international survival disparities, with the aim of informing health policy to raise standards and reduce inequalities in survival. Methods Data from population-based cancer registries in 12 jurisdictions in six countries were provided for 2·4 million adults diagnosed with primary colorectal, lung, breast (women), or ovarian cancer during 1995–2007, with follow-up to Dec 31, 2007. Data quality control and analyses were done centrally with a common protocol, overseen by external experts. We estimated 1-year and 5-year relative survival, constructing 252 complete life tables to control for background mortality by age, sex, and calendar year. We report age-specific and age-standardised relative survival at 1 and 5 years, and 5-year survival conditional on survival to the first anniversary of diagnosis. We also examined incidence and mortality trends during 1985–2005. Findings Relative survival improved during 1995–2007 for all four cancers in all jurisdictions. Survival was persistently higher in Australia, Canada, and Sweden, intermediate in Norway, and lower in Denmark, England, Northern Ireland, and Wales, particularly in the first year after diagnosis and for patients aged 65 years and older. International differences narrowed at all ages for breast cancer, from about 9% to 5% at 1 year and from about 14% to 8% at 5 years, but less or not at all for the other cancers. For colorectal cancer, the international range narrowed only for patients aged 65 years and older, by 2–6% at 1 year and by 2–3% at 5 years. Interpretation Up-to-date survival trends show increases but persistent differences between countries. Trends in cancer incidence and

  15. Comorbidity and cervical cancer survival of Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australian women: A semi-national registry-based cohort study (2003-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Abbey; Baade, Peter D; Valery, Patricia C; Whop, Lisa J; Moore, Suzanne P; Cunningham, Joan; Garvey, Gail; Brotherton, Julia M L; O'Connell, Dianne L; Canfell, Karen; Sarfati, Diana; Roder, David; Buckley, Elizabeth; Condon, John R

    2018-01-01

    Little is known about the impact of comorbidity on cervical cancer survival in Australian women, including whether Indigenous women's higher prevalence of comorbidity contributes to their lower survival compared to non-Indigenous women. Data for cervical cancers diagnosed in 2003-2012 were extracted from six Australian state-based cancer registries and linked to hospital inpatient records to identify comorbidity diagnoses. Five-year cause-specific and all-cause survival probabilities were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Flexible parametric models were used to estimate excess cause-specific mortality by Charlson comorbidity index score (0,1,2+), for Indigenous women compared to non-Indigenous women. Of 4,467 women, Indigenous women (4.4%) compared to non-Indigenous women had more comorbidity at diagnosis (score ≥1: 24.2% vs. 10.0%) and lower five-year cause-specific survival (60.2% vs. 76.6%). Comorbidity was associated with increased cervical cancer mortality for non-Indigenous women, but there was no evidence of such a relationship for Indigenous women. There was an 18% reduction in the Indigenous: non-Indigenous hazard ratio (excess mortality) when comorbidity was included in the model, yet this reduction was not statistically significant. The excess mortality for Indigenous women was only evident among those without comorbidity (Indigenous: non-Indigenous HR 2.5, 95%CI 1.9-3.4), indicating that factors other than those measured in this study are contributing to the differential. In a subgroup of New South Wales women, comorbidity was associated with advanced-stage cancer, which in turn was associated with elevated cervical cancer mortality. Survival was lowest for women with comorbidity. However, there wasn't a clear comorbidity-survival gradient for Indigenous women. Further investigation of potential drivers of the cervical cancer survival differentials is warranted. The results highlight the need for cancer care guidelines and multidisciplinary

  16. Comorbidity and cervical cancer survival of Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australian women: A semi-national registry-based cohort study (2003-2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbey Diaz

    Full Text Available Little is known about the impact of comorbidity on cervical cancer survival in Australian women, including whether Indigenous women's higher prevalence of comorbidity contributes to their lower survival compared to non-Indigenous women.Data for cervical cancers diagnosed in 2003-2012 were extracted from six Australian state-based cancer registries and linked to hospital inpatient records to identify comorbidity diagnoses. Five-year cause-specific and all-cause survival probabilities were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Flexible parametric models were used to estimate excess cause-specific mortality by Charlson comorbidity index score (0,1,2+, for Indigenous women compared to non-Indigenous women.Of 4,467 women, Indigenous women (4.4% compared to non-Indigenous women had more comorbidity at diagnosis (score ≥1: 24.2% vs. 10.0% and lower five-year cause-specific survival (60.2% vs. 76.6%. Comorbidity was associated with increased cervical cancer mortality for non-Indigenous women, but there was no evidence of such a relationship for Indigenous women. There was an 18% reduction in the Indigenous: non-Indigenous hazard ratio (excess mortality when comorbidity was included in the model, yet this reduction was not statistically significant. The excess mortality for Indigenous women was only evident among those without comorbidity (Indigenous: non-Indigenous HR 2.5, 95%CI 1.9-3.4, indicating that factors other than those measured in this study are contributing to the differential. In a subgroup of New South Wales women, comorbidity was associated with advanced-stage cancer, which in turn was associated with elevated cervical cancer mortality.Survival was lowest for women with comorbidity. However, there wasn't a clear comorbidity-survival gradient for Indigenous women. Further investigation of potential drivers of the cervical cancer survival differentials is warranted.The results highlight the need for cancer care guidelines and

  17. Nonmuscle Tissues Contribution to Cancer Cachexia

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    Josep M. Argilés

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cachexia is a syndrome associated with cancer, characterized by body weight loss, muscle and adipose tissue wasting, and inflammation, being often associated with anorexia. In spite of the fact that muscle tissue represents more than 40% of body weight and seems to be the main tissue involved in the wasting that occurs during cachexia, recent developments suggest that tissues/organs such as adipose (both brown and white, brain, liver, gut, and heart are directly involved in the cachectic process and may be responsible for muscle wasting. This suggests that cachexia is indeed a multiorgan syndrome. Bearing all this in mind, the aim of the present review is to examine the impact of nonmuscle tissues in cancer cachexia.

  18. Does architectural lighting contribute to breast cancer?

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    Figueiro Mariana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives There is a growing interest in the role that light plays on nocturnal melatonin production and, perhaps thereby, the incidence of breast cancer in modern societies. The direct causal relationships in this logical chain have not, however, been fully established and the weakest link is an inability to quantitatively specify architectural lighting as a stimulus for the circadian system. The purpose of the present paper is to draw attention to this weakness. Data Sources and Extraction We reviewed the literature on the relationship between melatonin, light at night, and cancer risk in humans and tumor growth in animals. More specifically, we focused on the impact of light on nocturnal melatonin suppression in humans and on the applicability of these data to women in real-life situations. Photometric measurement data from the lighted environment of women at work and at home is also reported. Data Synthesis The literature review and measurement data demonstrate that more quantitative knowledge is needed about circadian light exposures actually experienced by women and girls in modern societies. Conclusion Without such quantitative knowledge, limited insights can be gained about the causal relationship between melatonin and the etiology of breast cancer from epidemiological studies and from parametric studies using animal models.

  19. Changes in autopsy rates among cancer patients and their impact on cancer statistics from a public health point of view: a longitudinal study from 1980 to 2010 with data from Cancer Registry Zurich.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieri, Uwe; Moch, Holger; Dehler, Silvia; Korol, Dimitri; Rohrmann, Sabine

    2015-06-01

    During the last decades, autopsy rates have dramatically decreased in many countries. The Cancer Registry Zurich, which exists since 1980, provides the opportunity to address to what extent the number of autopsies in cancer patients has changed over a longer period of time and how often autopsies provide a diagnosis of clinically undetected cancer. Data from the Cancer Registry Zurich consisting of 102,434 cancer cases among 89,933 deceased patients between 1980 and 2010 were analyzed by means of descriptive statistics. The autopsy rate declined from 60 % in 1980 to 7 % in 2010. The total number of autopsies performed decreased from 1179 in 1986 to 220 in 2010. Furthermore, there was also a decline in the rate of newly detected tumours based on autopsy information. In 1980, the rate of newly detected tumours through autopsy was 42 % compared with 2010, when the rate had declined to 17 %. A consequence of the reduced autopsy rate is the reduction of incidental findings at autopsy in cancer registration. However, this reduction has not negatively affected the total incidence of cancer. It seems that the state-of-the-art diagnostic tools used for tumour detection are sufficiently reliable, allowing the scientific community to trust the quality of data provided by cancer registries in spite of decreasing autopsy rates.

  20. The nursing contribution to nutritional care in cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkinson, Jane B

    2015-11-01

    Cancer cachexia is a complex syndrome. Its defining feature is involuntary weight loss, which arises, in part, because of muscle atrophy and is accompanied by functional decline. International expert consensus recommends that nutritional support and counselling is a component of multimodal therapy for cancer cachexia, as poor nutritional intake can contribute to progression of the syndrome. The present paper focuses on what is presently known about the nursing contribution to nutritional care in cancer cachexia. There is potential for nurses to play an important role. However, obstacles to this include lack of a robust evidence base to support their nutritional care practices and unmet need for education about nutrition in cancer. The nursing role's boundaries and the outcomes of nurse-delivered nutritional care in cancer cachexia are both uncertain and should be investigated.

  1. Contributions of 3D Cell Cultures for Cancer Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Maddaly; Ramesh, Aarthi; Pattabhi, Aishwarya

    2017-10-01

    Cancer cell lines have contributed immensely in understanding the complex physiology of cancers. They are excellent material for studies as they offer homogenous samples without individual variations and can be utilised with ease and flexibility. Also, the number of assays and end-points one can study is almost limitless; with the advantage of improvising, modifying or altering several variables and methods. Literally, a new dimension to cancer research has been achieved by the advent of 3Dimensional (3D) cell culture techniques. This approach increased many folds the ways in which cancer cell lines can be utilised for understanding complex cancer biology. 3D cell culture techniques are now the preferred way of using cancer cell lines to bridge the gap between the 'absolute in vitro' and 'true in vivo'. The aspects of cancer biology that 3D cell culture systems have contributed include morphology, microenvironment, gene and protein expression, invasion/migration/metastasis, angiogenesis, tumour metabolism and drug discovery, testing chemotherapeutic agents, adaptive responses and cancer stem cells. We present here, a comprehensive review on the applications of 3D cell culture systems for these aspects of cancers. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 2679-2697, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The contemporary management of prostate cancer in the United States: lessons from the cancer of the prostate strategic urologic research endeavor (CapSURE), a national disease registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperberg, Matthew R; Broering, Jeanette M; Litwin, Mark S; Lubeck, Deborah P; Mehta, Shilpa S; Henning, James M; Carroll, Peter R

    2004-04-01

    The epidemiology and treatment of prostate cancer have changed dramatically in the prostate specific antigen era. A large disease registry facilitates the longitudinal observation of trends in disease presentation, management and outcomes. The Cancer of the Prostate Strategic Urologic Research Endeavor (CaPSURE) is a national disease registry of more than 10000 men with prostate cancer accrued at 31 primarily community based sites across the United States. Demographic, clinical, quality of life and resource use variables are collected on each patient. We reviewed key findings from the data base in the last 8 years in the areas of disease management trends, and oncological and quality of life outcomes. Prostate cancer is increasingly diagnosed with low risk clinical characteristics. With time patients have become less likely to receive pretreatment imaging tests, less likely to pursue watchful waiting and more likely to receive brachytherapy or hormonal therapy. Relatively few patients treated with radical prostatectomy in the database are under graded or under staged before surgery, whereas the surgical margin rate is comparable to that in academic series. CaPSURE data confirm the usefulness of percent positive biopsies in risk assessment and they have further been used to validate multiple preoperative nomograms. CaPSURE results strongly affirm the necessity of patient reported quality of life assessment. Multiple studies have compared the quality of life impact of various treatment options, particularly in terms of urinary and sexual function, and bother. The presentation and management of prostate cancer have changed substantially in the last decade. CaPSURE will continue to track these trends as well as oncological and quality of life outcomes, and will continue to be an invaluable resource for the study of prostate cancer at the national level.

  3. Lung, Breast, and Prostate Cancer Patients with Unknown Ethnicity in US Department of Defense Cancer Registry Data: Comparisons to Patients with Known Ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jie; Kamamia, Christine; Shao, Stephanie; Brown, Derek; Rockswold, Paul D; Butts, Elizabeth; Shriver, Craig D; Zhu, Kangmin

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer death for both men and women in the United States. Several factors can increase one’s risk of CRC, including a personal or family history of CRC, a diagnosis or family history of a hereditary colon cancer syndrome, or a diagnosis of chronic inflammatory bowel disease. The purpose of this project was to create a colorectal cancer registry (Co-Care) for individuals with a personal or family history of CRC, and those with disorders of the colon or rectum that are associated with an increased risk for developing CRC. METHODS: To be eligible for the registry, patients either had a personal or family history of CRC, a diagnosis or family history of Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, or a diagnosis of Crohn’s colitis or ulcerative colitis with dysplasia. Participants were recruited after seeing their gastroenterologist or genetic counselor, or after undergoing a full or partial colectomy at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. Eligible patients who agreed to participate were interviewed by a member of the research staff and asked a wide range of questions pertaining to CRC risk. RESULTS: A total of 224 patients were enrolled in the registry. Participants are mostly white, born in the United States, and married, with a bachelor’s or graduate degree, reporting an annual household income of $100,000 or more. The largest portion have a family history of CRC (27.2%), and almost half of participants are of Jewish descent (46.2%) and have undergone full or partial colectomy (48.2%). More than half of participants have neither received genetic counseling (54.5%) nor undergone genetic testing (59.7%). Only 3.6% report that they currently smoke cigarettes, and 41.1% consume alcohol at least once per week. Lastly, 18.3%, 10.3%, and 27.7% of participants report that they currently take aspirin, folic acid/folate pills or tablets, or calcium pills/tablets, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This

  4. Do pregnancy characteristics contribute to rising childhood cancer incidence rates in the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehm, Rebecca D; Osypuk, Theresa L; Poynter, Jenny N; Vock, David M; Spector, Logan G

    2018-03-01

    Since 1975, childhood cancer incidence rates have gradually increased in the United States; however, few studies have conducted analyses across time to unpack this temporal rise. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that increasing cancer incidence rates are due to secular trends in pregnancy characteristics that are established risk factors for childhood cancer incidence including older maternal age, higher birthweight, and lower birth order. We also considered temporal trends in sociodemographic characteristics including race/ethnicity and poverty. We conducted a time series county-level ecologic analysis using linked population-based data from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results cancer registries (1975-2013), birth data from the National Center for Health Statistics (1970-2013), and sociodemographic data from the US Census (1970-2010). We estimated unadjusted and adjusted average annual percent changes (AAPCs) in incidence of combined (all diagnoses) and individual types of cancer among children, ages 0-4 years, from Poisson mixed models. There was a statistically significant unadjusted temporal rise in incidence of combined childhood cancers (AAPC = 0.71%; 95% CI = 0.55-0.86), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (0.78%; 0.49-1.07), acute myeloid leukemia (1.86%; 1.13-2.59), central nervous system tumors (1.31%; 0.94-1.67), and hepatoblastoma (2.70%; 1.68-3.72). Adjustment for county-level maternal age reduced estimated AAPCs between 8% (hepatoblastoma) and 55% (combined). However, adjustment for other county characteristics did not attenuate AAPCs, and AAPCs remained significantly above 0% in models fully adjusted for county-level characteristics. Although rising maternal age may account for some of the increase in childhood cancer incidence over time, other factors, not considered in this analysis, may also contribute to temporal trends. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The incidence rate of corpus uteri cancer among females in Saudi Arabia: an observational descriptive epidemiological analysis of data from Saudi Cancer Registry 2001–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alghamdi IG

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim G Alghamdi,1 Issam I Hussain,1 Mohamed S Alghamdi,2 Mohamed A El-Sheemy1,3 1University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, Lincoln, UK; 2Ministry of Health, General Directorate of Health Affairs, Al-Baha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 3Research and Development, Lincoln Hospital, Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust, Lincoln, UK Background: The present study reviews the epidemiological data on corpus uteri cancer among Saudi women, including its frequency, crude incidence rate, and age-standardized incidence rate (ASIR, adjusted by region and year of diagnosis. Methods: A retrospective, descriptive epidemiological analysis was conducted of all the corpus uteri cancer cases recorded in the Saudi Cancer Registry between January 2001 and December 2008. The statistical analyses were performed using descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, Poisson regression, and a simple linear model. Results: A total of 1,060 corpus uteri cancer cases were included. Women aged 60–74 years of age were most affected by the disease. The region of Riyadh in Saudi Arabia had the highest overall ASIR, at 4.4 cases per 100,000 female patients, followed by the eastern region, at 4.2, and Makkah, at 3.7. Jazan, Najran, and Qassim had the lowest average ASIRs, ranging from 0.8 to 1.4. A Poisson regression model using Jazan as the reference revealed that the corpus uteri cancer incidence rate ratio was significantly higher for the regions of Makkah, at 16.5 times (95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.0–23.0, followed by Riyadh, at 16.0 times (95% CI: 9.0–22.0, and the eastern region, at 9.9 times (95% CI: 5.6–17.6. The northern region experienced the highest changes in ASIRs of corpus uteri cancer among female Saudi patients between 2001 and 2008. Conclusion: There was a slight increase in the crude incidence rates and ASIRs for corpus uteri cancer in Saudi Arabia between 2001 and 2008. Older Saudi women were most affected by the disease. Riyadh, the eastern region, and Makkah

  6. Prognostic value of tumor volumetry data of routine imaging data in a head and neck cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oemus, Daniela; Inhestern, Johanna; Schmalenberg, Harald; Schultze-Mosgau, Stefan; Mentzel, Hans-Joachim; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the impact of tumor volume (TV) measurements as prognosticator for recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) from data of head and neck cancer (HNC) registries. TV measurements were performed in pre-treatment computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance images (MRI) of 392 unselected HNC patients. TV measurements were feasible in 275 patients (70 %). Median CT TV and MRI TV were 11.43 and 10.4 cm(3), respectively. The CT TV was significantly different only between T1 and T4. CT TV was significantly different only between T1 and T4 (p = 0.041). MRI TV was significantly different between T1 and T4 (p = 0.003) as well as between T2 and T4 (p = 0.002). Median follow-up was 26.1 months. Median RFS was 80.7 months. Median OS was 66.5 months. On univariate analysis, significant prognostic factors for decreased RFS were advanced T stage (p = 0.010); M1 (p = 0.001) and an MRI TV > 10.4 cm(3) (p = 0.001). Significant prognostic factors for a decreased OS were advanced T stage (p = 0.001), N+ (p = 0 006), M+ (p TV (p = 0.005), and MRI TV (p = 0.012). On multivariate analysis for RFS, MRI TV was the best independent prognosticator (p = 0.003). On multivariate analysis for OS, T stage (p = 0.006) was a better prognosticator than CT or MRI TV. Using CT and MRI data sets of an unselected series of HNC patients in a cancer registry, TV measurements were not feasible in all patients. MRT TV was a powerful prognosticator for RFS.

  7. Coding completeness and quality of relative survival-related variables in the National Program of Cancer Registries Cancer Surveillance System, 1995-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Reda J; O'Neil, M E; Ntekop, E; Zhang, Kevin; Ren, Y

    2014-01-01

    Calculating accurate estimates of cancer survival is important for various analyses of cancer patient care and prognosis. Current US survival rates are estimated based on data from the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End RESULTS (SEER) program, covering approximately 28 percent of the US population. The National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR) covers about 96 percent of the US population. Using a population-based database with greater US population coverage to calculate survival rates at the national, state, and regional levels can further enhance the effective monitoring of cancer patient care and prognosis in the United States. The first step is to establish the coding completeness and coding quality of the NPCR data needed for calculating survival rates and conducting related validation analyses. Using data from the NPCR-Cancer Surveillance System (CSS) from 1995 through 2008, we assessed coding completeness and quality on 26 data elements that are needed to calculate cancer relative survival estimates and conduct related analyses. Data elements evaluated consisted of demographic, follow-up, prognostic, and cancer identification variables. Analyses were performed showing trends of these variables by diagnostic year, state of residence at diagnosis, and cancer site. Mean overall percent coding completeness by each NPCR central cancer registry averaged across all data elements and diagnosis years ranged from 92.3 percent to 100 percent. RESULTS showing the mean percent coding completeness for the relative survival-related variables in NPCR data are presented. All data elements but 1 have a mean coding completeness greater than 90 percent as was the mean completeness by data item group type. Statistically significant differences in coding completeness were found in the ICD revision number, cause of death, vital status, and date of last contact variables when comparing diagnosis years. The majority of data items had a coding

  8. Worry Is Good for Breast Cancer Screening: A Study of Female Relatives from the Ontario Site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, L.; Knight, J. A.; Andrulis, I. L.; Chiarelli, A. M.; Glendon, G.; Ritvo, P.

    2012-01-01

    Few prospective studies have examined associations between breast cancer worry and screening behaviours in women with elevated breast cancer risks based on family history. Methods. This study included 901 high familial risk women, aged 23-71 years, from the Ontario site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry. Self-reported breast screening behaviours at year-one followup were compared between women at low (N=305), medium ( N=433), and high (N=163) levels of baseline breast cancer worry using logistic regression. Nonlinear relationships were assessed using likelihood ratio tests. Results. A significant non-linear inverted “U” relationship was observed between breast cancer worry and mammography screening (π=0. 034) for all women, where women at either low or high worry levels were less likely than those at medium to have a screening mammogram. A similar significant non-linear inverted “U” relationship was also found among all women and women at low familial risk for worry and screening clinical breast examinations (CBEs). Conclusions. Medium levels of cancer worries predicted higher rates of screening mammography and CBE among high-risk women

  9. Patterns of care and outcomes for stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer in the TNM-7 era: Results from the Netherlands Cancer Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickhoff, C; Dahele, M; Smit, E F; Paul, M A; Senan, S; Hartemink, K J; Damhuis, R A

    2017-08-01

    There is limited data on the pattern of care for locally advanced, clinical (c) IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the TNM-7 staging era. The primary aim of this study was to investigate national patterns of care and outcomes in the Netherlands, with a secondary focus on the use of surgery. Data from patients treated for TNM-7 cIIIB NSCLC between 2010 and 2014, was extracted from the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR). Survival data was obtained from the automated Civil Registry. 43.762 patients with NSCLC were recorded in the NCR during this 5-year period, with cIIIB accounting for 10% (n=4.401). Clinical N2 (37%) and N3 (63%) nodal involvement was pathologically confirmed in 50.8%. The use of endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) increased with time from 9% to 29% (pNetherlands, CRT is the most frequent treatment for cIIIB NSCLC in the TNM-7 era. The use of surgery is limited. Accurate staging requires specific attention and the scarce use of radical treatment in elderly patients merits further evaluation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Thyroid Cancer Incidences From Selected South America Population-Based Cancer Registries: An Age-Period-Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Karin da Mota Borges

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The incidence of thyroid cancer (TC has increased substantially worldwide. However, there is a lack of knowledge about age-period-cohort (APC effects on incidence rates in South American countries. This study describes the TC incidence trends and analyzes APC effects in Cali, Colombia; Costa Rica; Goiânia, Brazil; and Quito, Ecuador. Materials and Methods: Data were obtained from the Cancer Incidence in Five Continents series, and the crude and age-standardized incidence rates were calculated. Trends were assessed using the estimated annual percentage change, and APC models were estimated using Poisson regression for individuals between age 20 and 79 years. Results: An increasing trend in age-standardized incidence rates was observed among women from Goiânia (9.2%, Costa Rica (5.7%, Quito (4.0%, and Cali (3.4%, and in men from Goiânia (10.0% and Costa Rica (3.4%. The APC modeling showed that there was a period effect in all regions and for both sexes. Increasing rate ratios were observed among women over the periods. The best fit model was the APC model in women from all regions and in men from Quito, whereas the age-cohort model showed a better fit in men from Cali and Costa Rica, and the age-drift model showed a better fit among men from Goiânia. Conclusion: These findings suggest that overdiagnosis is a possible explanation for the observed increasing pattern of TC incidence. However, some environmental exposures may also have contributed to the observed increase.

  11. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer: A veteran administration registry study

    OpenAIRE

    Makhoul, Issam; Yacoub, Abdulraheem; Siegel, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background: The etiology of pancreatic cancer remains elusive. Several studies have suggested a role for diabetes mellitus, but the magnitude of its contribution remains controversial. Objectives: Utilizing a large administrative database, this retrospective cohort study was designed to investigate the relationship between type 2 diabetes mellitus and pancreatic cancer. Patients and design: Using the Veterans Integrated Services Network 16 database, 322,614 subjects were enrolled in the study...

  12. [Epidemiology and incidence of primary lung cancer in a region with low tobacco consumption: Guadeloupe (French West Indies). Data from the cancer registry 2008-2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadelis, G; Kaddah, S; Bhakkan, B; Quellery, M; Deloumeaux, J

    2013-09-01

    Few data are available about primary lung cancer in the Caribbean. The purpose of this study was to provide, for the first time, the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of primary lung cancer in the archipelago of Guadeloupe (French West Indies). From the cancer registry, we identified in this retrospective study, all incident cases of primary lung cancer that had occurred between 1st January 2008 and 31st December 2009 in Guadeloupe. Over the period from 2008 to 2009, 106 patients with primary lung cancer were identified. Males accounted for 72.6% and the women for 27.4%. Mean incidence rate over the 2 years was estimated at 13.4/100000 persons-years (95% CI: [6.0-20.8]) in men (world standardized) and 4.2/100000 persons-years (95% CI: [0.3-8.1]) in women. The median age at initial diagnosis was 65 years for men and 66 years for women. We noted a proportion of 61.3% of current smokers, 4.7% of passive smokers and 34% of non-smokers. The comorbidities were present in 41% of patients. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounted for 88.7% of lung cancers and small cell lung cancer for 7.5%. The most common histological type was adenocarcinoma (43%) followed by squamous cell (24%). Stage III and IV patients accounted for 64.1% of individuals with NSCLC. The incidence of primary lung cancer in Guadeloupe is relatively low compared to metropolitan France. Guadeloupe is also a French department where the rate of tobacco consumption is one of the lowest. Copyright © 2013 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Validity of Race, Ethnicity, and National Origin in Population-based Cancer Registries and Rapid Case Ascertainment Enhanced With a Spanish Surname List.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Lisa C; Rull, Rudolph P; Ayanian, John Z; Boer, Robert; Deapen, Dennis; West, Dee W; Kahn, Katherine L

    2016-01-01

    Accurate information regarding race, ethnicity, and national origins is critical for identifying disparities in the cancer burden. To examine the use of a Spanish surname list to improve the quality of race-related information obtained from rapid case ascertainment (RCA) and to estimate the accuracy of race-related information obtained from cancer registry records collected by routine reporting. Self-reported survey responses of 3954 participants from California enrolled in the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance Consortium. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and percent agreement. We used logistic regression to identify predictors of underreporting and overreporting of a race/ethnicity. Use of the Spanish surname list increased the sensitivity of RCA for Latino ethnicity from 37% to 83%. Sensitivity for cancer registry records collected by routine reporting was ≥95% for whites, blacks, and Asians, and specificity was high for all groups (86%-100%). However, patterns of misclassification by race/ethnicity were found that could lead to biased cancer statistics for specific race/ethnicities. Discordance between self-reported and registry-reported race/ethnicity was more likely for women, Latinos, and Asians. Methods to improve race and ethnicity data, such as using Spanish surnames in RCA and instituting data collection guidelines for hospitals, are needed to ensure minorities are accurately represented in clinical and epidemiological research.

  14. Effect of testosterone administration to men with prostate cancer is unpredictable: a word of caution and suggestions for a registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Alvaro

    2011-05-01

    To assess the evidence for the concept that the androgen receptor of prostate cancer (PCa) cells becomes saturated when testosterone values exceed castrate levels, so that testosterone administration in hypogonadal men with untreated PCa does not stimulate tumour growth. To propose basic criteria for administration of testosterone to untreated patients with PCa and, as this is a rare clinical situation, to encourage the establishment of an international registry for these patients. Men with a diagnosis of PCa and symptomatic testosterone deficiency received testosterone therapy (TTh). Patients were assessed quarterly. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) velocity was used as the criterion to discontinue therapy and a return to nadir PSA levels allowed re-initiation of testosterone supplementation. The responses to testosterone supplementation were varied according to each individual and were unpredictable. While some men showed little change after years of treatment, others exhibited a rapid and significant increase in PSA levels. In others, the use of intermittent therapy resulted in synchronous changes in PSA levels. Interruption of TTh invariably translated into a decrease in PSA to pre-therapy levels. Available evidence regarding the effect of testosterone administration to hypogonadal men with untreated PCa is too limited to be considered reliable. In addition, the response to this treatment appears to be varied and unpredictable. Hypogonadism associated with untreated PCa is not common, therefore, we propose the establishment of an international registry as the quickest way to establish the basic parameters for consideration of TTh in this situation and recommendations for follow-up. Until credible evidence becomes available, the current restrictions regarding the administration of testosterone to men with PCa should remain in place. © 2011 THE AUTHOR. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2011 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  15. Cancer incidence among Arab Americans in California, Detroit, and New Jersey SEER registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmans, Rachel; Soliman, Amr S; Ruterbusch, Julie; Meza, Rafael; Hirko, Kelly; Graff, John; Schwartz, Kendra

    2014-06-01

    We calculated cancer incidence for Arab Americans in California; Detroit, Michigan; and New Jersey, and compared rates with non-Hispanic, non-Arab Whites (NHNAWs); Blacks; and Hispanics. We conducted a study using population-based data. We linked new cancers diagnosed in 2000 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER) to an Arab surname database. We used standard SEER definitions and methodology for calculating rates. Population estimates were extracted from the 2000 US Census. We calculated incidence and rate ratios. Arab American men and women had similar incidence rates across the 3 geographic regions, and the rates were comparable to NHNAWs. However, the thyroid cancer rate was elevated among Arab American women compared with NHNAWs, Hispanics, and Blacks. For all sites combined, for prostate and lung cancer, Arab American men had a lower incidence than Blacks and higher incidence than Hispanics in all 3 geographic regions. Arab American male bladder cancer incidence was higher than that in Hispanics and Blacks in these regions. Our results suggested that further research would benefit from the federal recognition of Arab Americans as a specified ethnicity to estimate and address the cancer burden in this growing segment of the population.

  16. Does fear of cancer recurrence differ between cancer types? A study from the population-based PROFILES registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, M.A. van de; Poll-Franse, L. van de; Prins, J.B.; Gielissen, M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Knowledge of factors associated with fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) may inform intervention development and improve patient care. The aims were (1) to compare FCR severity between cancer types and (2) to identify associations between FCR, demographics, medical characteristics,

  17. Estimating environmental and occupational contribution to cancer in Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdallah, Y. M. Y.; Beden, S. J.; Khalifa, A. A.

    2012-12-01

    This study was performed in Radiation and Isotopes Center of Khartoum (RICK) and National Cancer Institute (NCI) University of Gazeria. It focused on cancer patients who were treated by radiation therapy in the period between 2008 and 2009. The study investigator the risk and causative factors and geographical distribution over the sudan states and the relationship of incidence with some patient's customs and dietary habits. This study summarizes recent scientific evidence of environmental and occupational links to nearly 30 types of cancer. the discussion of each cancer type is introduced by highlights of trends in incidence. The study considers additional indication that involuntary exposures are linked to cancers, such as patterns observed in different geographic areas and among different population patterns of cancer in children. The purpose of this study is to review scientific evidence, particular y epidemiologic evidence. regarding the contribution of environmental and occupational exposures to the overall cancer incidence in the Sudan. The study discussed that the widespread exposures from air and water pollution, the work environment, exposure resulting form personal habits such as smoking and drinking and the diet are major contributors to cancer in human. In the past three decades, there have been several efforts to estimate the proportion of caner due to these involuntary exposure, starting with an ambitious effort by different scientists. This study provided and alternative interpretation of the evidence of cancer incidence to particular factors. We conclude the study by recommending the significance of giving environmental and occupational links to cancer serious consideration by individuals and institutions concerned with cancer prevention, particularly those involved in research and education. (Author)

  18. Oral malignant melanomas and other head and neck neoplasms in Danish dogs--data from the Danish Veterinary Cancer Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brønden, Louise B; Eriksen, Thomas; Kristensen, Annemarie T

    2009-12-18

    Head and neck cancers (HNC) are relatively common and often very serious diseases in both dogs and humans. Neoplasms originating in the head and neck region are a heterogeneous group. HNC often has an unfavourable prognosis and the proximity of the tissue structures renders extirpation of tumours with sufficient margins almost incompatible with preservation of functionality. In humans oral malignant melanoma (OMM) is extremely rare, but represents a particular challenge since it is highly aggressive as is the canine counterpart, which thus may be of interest as a spontaneous animal model. Canine cases entered in the Danish Veterinary Cancer Registry (DVCR) from May 15th 2005 through February 29th 2008 were included in this study. Fisher's exact test was used to compare proportions of HNC in dogs and humans as well as proportions of surgically treated cases of OMM and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). Also the proportions of benign and malignant neoplasms of different locations in dogs were compared using Fisher's exact test. A total of 1768 cases of neoplasias (679 malignant, 826 benign, 263 unknown) were submitted. Of all neoplasias HNC accounted for 7.2% (n = 128). Of these, 64 (50%) were malignant and 44 (34%) benign. The most common types of malignant neoplasia were SCC (18; 28% of malignant), OMM (13; 20% of malignant), soft tissue sarcoma (11; 17% of malignant) and adenocarcinoma (5; 11% of malignant). The most common types of benign neoplasms were adenoma (7; 16% of benign), polyps (6; 14% of benign) and fibroma (5; 11% of benign). In the current study, the proportion of neoplasia in the head and neck region in dogs in Denmark was similar to other canine studies and significantly more common than in humans with a large proportion of malignancies. Spontaneous HNC in dogs thus, may serve as a model for HNC in humans.Canine OMM is a spontaneous cancer in an outbred, immune-competent large mammal population and could be a clinical model for OMM in humans.

  19. Availability of stage at diagnosis, cancer treatment delay and compliance with cancer guidelines as cancer registry indicators for cancer care in Europe: Results of EUROCHIP-3 survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; Kwast, A.; Gavin, A.; Baili, P.; Otter, R.

    2013-01-01

    EUROCHIP (European Cancer Health Indicators Project) focuses on understanding inequalities in the cancer burden, care and survival by the indicators “stage at diagnosis,” “cancer treatment delay” and “compliance with cancer guidelines” as the most important indicators. Our study aims at providing

  20. Impact of (18)F-Fluoride PET on Intended Management of Patients with Cancers Other Than Prostate Cancer: Results from the National Oncologic PET Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillner, Bruce E; Siegel, Barry A; Hanna, Lucy; Duan, Fenghai; Shields, Anthony F; Quinn, Bruce; Coleman, R Edward

    2014-07-01

    The National Oncologic PET Registry prospectively assessed the impact of PET with (18)F-sodium fluoride (NaF PET) on intended management of Medicare patients with suspected or known osseous metastasis. We report our findings for cancers other than prostate and make selected comparisons to our previously reported prostate cancer cohort. Data were collected from both referring and interpreting physicians before and after NaF PET in patients (age ≥ 65 y) stratified for initial staging (IS; n = 570), for suspected first osseous metastasis (FOM; n = 1,814; breast, 781 [43%]; lung, 380 [21%]; and all other cancers, 653 [36%]), and for suspected progression of osseous metastasis (POM; n = 435). The dominant indication was bone pain. If NaF PET were unavailable, conventional bone scintigraphy would have been ordered in 85% of patients. In IS, 28% of patients had suspected or confirmed nonosseous metastasis. If neither conventional bone scintigraphy nor NaF PET were available, referring physicians would have ordered other advanced imaging more than 70% of the time rather than initiate treatment for suspected FOM (11%-16%) or POM (18%-22%). When intended management was classified as either treatment or nontreatment, the intended management change for each cancer type was highest in POM, lower in IS, and lowest in FOM. For suspected FOM, intended management change was lower in breast (24%), lung (36%), or other cancers (31%), compared with prostate cancer (44%) (P definite metastases) frequencies were similar across cancer types. After normal/benign/equivocal PET results, 15% of breast, 30% lung, and 38% prostate cancer patients had treatment, likely reflecting differences in management of nonosseous disease. For patients with definite metastasis on NaF PET, nonprostate, compared with prostate, cancer patients had post-PET plans for more frequent biopsy, alternative imaging, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. In the smaller IS and POM cohorts, differences among cancer types

  1. The incidence rate of female breast cancer in Saudi Arabia: an observational descriptive epidemiological analysis of data from Saudi Cancer Registry 2001–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alghamdi IG

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim G Alghamdi,1 Issam I Hussain,1 Mohamed S Alghamdi,2 Mohamed A El-Sheemy1,3 1University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, Lincoln, United Kingdom; 2Ministry of Health, General Directorate of Health Affairs Al-Baha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 3Lincoln Hospital, Research and Development, United Lincolnshire Hospitals, National Health Service Trust, Lincoln, United Kingdom Background: This study presents descriptive epidemiological data related to breast cancer cases diagnosed from 2001 to 2008 among Saudi women, including the frequency and percentage of cases, the crude incidence rate (CIR, and the age-standardized incidence rate (ASIR, adjusted by the region and year of diagnosis. Methods: This is a retrospective descriptive epidemiological study of all Saudi female breast cancer cases from 2001 to 2008. The statistical analyses were conducted using descriptive statistics, a linear regression model, and analysis of variance with the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 20 (IBM Corporation, Armonk, NY, USA. Results: A total of 6,922 female breast cancer cases were recorded in the Saudi Cancer Registry from 2001 to 2008. The highest overall percentages (38.6% and 31.2% of female breast cancer cases were documented in women who were 30–44 and 45–59 years of age, respectively. The eastern region of Saudi Arabia had the highest overall ASIR, at 26.6 per 100,000 women, followed by Riyadh at 20.5 and Makkah at 19.4. Jazan, Baha, and Asir had the lowest average ASIRs, at 4.8, 6.1, and 7.3 per 100,000 women, respectively. The region of Jouf (24.2%; CIR 11.2, ASIR 17.2 had the highest changes in CIR and ASIR from 2001 to 2008. While Qassim, Jazan and Tabuk recorded down-trending rates with negative values. Conclusion: There was a significant increase in the CIRs and ASIRs for female breast cancer between 2001 and 2008. The majority of breast cancer cases occurred among younger women. The region of Jouf had the greatest significant

  2. Incidence rate of ovarian cancer cases in Saudi Arabia: an observational descriptive epidemiological analysis of data from Saudi Cancer Registry 2001–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alghamdi IG

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim G Alghamdi,1,2 Issam I Hussain,1 Mohamed S Alghamdi,3 Mansour M Alghamdi,4 Ahlam A Dohal,4 Mohammed A El-Sheemy51School of Life Sciences, University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, Lincoln, UK; 2Al-Baha University, Kingdom of Saudia Arabia; 3Ministry of Health, General Directorate of Health Affairs, Al-Baha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 4King Fahad Specialist Hospital–Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 5Department of Research and Development, Lincoln Hospital, United Lincolnshire Hospitals, National Health Service Trust, Lincoln, UKPurpose: This study provides descriptive epidemiological data, such as the percentage of cases diagnosed, crude incidence rate (CIR, and age-standardized incidence rate (ASIR of ovarian cancer in Saudi Arabia from 2001–2008. Patients and methods: A retrospective descriptive epidemiological analysis of all ovarian cancer cases recorded in the Saudi Cancer Registry (SCR from January 2001–December 2008 was performed. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, analysis of variance tests, Poisson regression, and simple linear modeling.Results: A total of 991 ovarian cancer cases were recorded in the SCR from January 2001–December 2008. The region of Riyadh had the highest overall ASIR at 3.3 cases per 100,000 women, followed by the Jouf and Asir regions at 3.13 and 2.96 cases per 100,000 women. However, Hail and Jazan had the lowest rates at 1.4 and 0.6 cases per 100,000 women, respectively. Compared to Jazan, the incidence rate ratio for the number of ovarian cancer cases was significantly higher (P<0.001 in the Makkah region at 6.4 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.13–9.83, followed by Riyadh at 6.3 (95% CI: 4.10–9.82, and the eastern region of Saudi Arabia at 4.52 (95% CI: 2.93–6.98. The predicted annual CIR and ASIR for ovarian cancer in Saudi Arabia could be defined by the equations 0.9 + (0.07× years and 1.71 + (0.09× years, respectively.Conclusion: We observed a slight increase in the CIRs and

  3. Metastatic Colorectal Cancer in Young Adults: A Study From the South Australian Population-Based Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatandoust, Sina; Price, Timothy J; Ullah, Shahid; Roy, Amitesh C; Beeke, Carole; Young, Joanne P; Townsend, Amanda; Padbury, Robert; Roder, David; Karapetis, Christos S

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common malignancy. There is growing evidence that CRC incidence is increasing in the younger population. There is controversy surrounding the prognosis of young patients with CRC. In this study we reviewed Australian patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC) who were younger than 40 years of age at the time of diagnosis of metastatic disease. To our knowledge this is the first study to focus on this age group with mCRC. This was a retrospective study using data from the South Australian Metastatic Colorectal Cancer database. We compared patient and disease characteristics, management approaches, and outcomes for age groups Young-onset mCRC patients, when defined as aged younger than 40 years, have equivalent survival compared with their older counterparts. This is despite differences in disease characteristics and management approach between the 2 groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Does fear of cancer recurrence differ between cancer types? : A study from the population-based PROFILES registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wal, M.A.; van de Poll-Franse, L.V.; Prins, J.; Gielissen, M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Knowledge of factors associated with fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) may inform intervention development and improve patient care. The aims were (1) to compare FCR severity between cancer types and (2) to identify associations between FCR, demographics, medical characteristics, information

  5. Radiological Patterns of Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer Patients: A Subproject of the German Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer (BMBC Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Laakmann

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Evidence about distribution patterns of brain metastases with regard to breast cancer subtypes and its influence on the prognosis of patients is insufficient. Clinical data, cranial computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scans of 300 breast cancer patients with brain metastases (BMs were collected retrospectively in four centers participating in the Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer Registry (BMBC in Germany. Patients with positive estrogen (ER, progesterone (PR, or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 statuses, had a significantly lower number of BMs at diagnosis. Concerning the treatment mode, HER2-positive patients treated with trastuzumab before the diagnosis of BMs showed a lower number of intracranial metastases (p < 0.001. Patients with a HER2-positive tumor-subtype developed cerebellar metastases more often compared with HER2-negative patients (59.8% vs. 44.5%, p = 0.021, whereas patients with triple-negative primary tumors had leptomeningeal disease more often (31.4% vs. 18.3%, p = 0.038. The localization of Brain metastases (BMs was associated with prognosis: patients with leptomeningeal disease had shorter survival compared with patients without signs of leptomeningeal disease (median survival 3 vs. 5 months, p = 0.025. A shorter survival could also be observed in the patients with metastases in the occipital lobe (median survival 3 vs. 5 months, p = 0.012. Our findings suggest a different tumor cell homing to different brain regions depending on subtype and treatment.

  6. Integrating patient reported outcomes with clinical cancer registry data: a feasibility study of the electronic Patient-Reported Outcomes From Cancer Survivors (ePOCS) system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Laura; Jones, Helen; Thomas, James; Newsham, Alex; Downing, Amy; Morris, Eva; Brown, Julia; Velikova, Galina; Forman, David; Wright, Penny

    2013-10-25

    Routine measurement of Patient Reported Outcomes (PROs) linked with clinical data across the patient pathway is increasingly important for informing future care planning. The innovative electronic Patient-reported Outcomes from Cancer Survivors (ePOCS) system was developed to integrate PROs, collected online at specified post-diagnostic time-points, with clinical and treatment data in cancer registries. This study tested the technical and clinical feasibility of ePOCS by running the system with a sample of potentially curable breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer patients in their first 15 months post diagnosis. Patients completed questionnaires comprising multiple Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) via ePOCS within 6 months (T1), and at 9 (T2) and 15 (T3) months, post diagnosis. Feasibility outcomes included system informatics performance, patient recruitment, retention, representativeness and questionnaire completion (response rate), patient feedback, and administration burden involved in running the system. ePOCS ran efficiently with few technical problems. Patient participation was 55.21% (636/1152) overall, although varied by approach mode, and was considerably higher among patients approached face-to-face (61.4%, 490/798) than by telephone (48.8%, 21/43) or letter (41.0%, 125/305). Older and less affluent patients were less likely to join (both Pplanning and for targeting service provision.

  7. Validation of administrative hospital data for identifying incident pancreatic and periampullary cancer cases: a population-based study using linked cancer registry and administrative hospital data in New South Wales, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creighton, Nicola; Walton, Richard; Roder, David; Aranda, Sanchia; Currow, David

    2016-07-01

    Informing cancer service delivery with timely and accurate data is essential to cancer control activities and health system monitoring. This study aimed to assess the validity of ascertaining incident cases and resection use for pancreatic and periampullary cancers from linked administrative hospital data, compared with data from a cancer registry (the 'gold standard'). Analysis of linked statutory population-based cancer registry data and administrative hospital data for adults (aged ≥18 years) with a pancreatic or periampullary cancer case diagnosed during 2005-2009 or a hospital admission for these cancers between 2005 and 2013 in New South Wales, Australia. The sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) of pancreatic and periampullary cancer case ascertainment from hospital admission data were calculated for the 2005-2009 period through comparison with registry data. We examined the effect of the look-back period to distinguish incident cancer cases from prevalent cancer cases from hospital admission data using 2009 and 2013 as index years. Sensitivity of case ascertainment from the hospital data was 87.5% (4322/4939), with higher sensitivity when the cancer was resected (97.9%, 715/730) and for pancreatic cancers (88.6%, 3733/4211). Sensitivity was lower in regional (83.3%) and remote (85.7%) areas, particularly in areas with interstate outflow of patients for treatment, and for cases notified to the registry by death certificate only (9.6%). The PPV for the identification of incident cases was 82.0% (4322/5272). A 2-year look-back period distinguished the majority (98%) of incident cases from prevalent cases in linked hospital data. Pancreatic and periampullary cancer cases and resection use can be ascertained from linked hospital admission data with sufficient validity for informing aspects of health service delivery and system-level monitoring. Limited tumour clinical information and variation in case ascertainment across population subgroups are

  8. Incidence, therapy and prognosis of colorectal cancer in different age groups. A population-based cohort study of the Rostock Cancer Registry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fietkau, R.; Zettl, H.; Kloecking, S.; Kundt, G.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Determination of frequency, treatment modalities used and prognoses of colorectal cancer in a population-specific analysis in relation to age. Material and methods: In 1999 and 2000, 644/6,016 patients were documented as having colorectal carcinomas in the Cancer Registry of Rostock. 39 patients were excluded (16 cases: 'in situ' carcinomas; 23 cases: insufficient data). Three age groups were formed: <60 years, 60-74 years; ≥75 years. Results: The relative percentage of colorectal cancer increases with advanced age (<60 years 7%; 60-74 years 12%, ≥75 years 15%; p<0.001). In older patients with stage III carcinomas, adjuvant treatment was done less frequently in accordance with the treatment recommendations (<60 years 83-89%; 60-74 years 67-77%; ≥75 years 29-36% according to stage and tumor localization); in stage IV, the use of chemotherapy was reduced (<60 years 87.5-100%; 60-74 years 38-47%; ≥75 years 33-37%). In the univariate analysis, age ≥75 years (4-year survival rates: <60 years 68±4.1%; 60-74 years 58±2.8%; ≥75 years 38±3.7%), UICC stage and surgical treatment had a significant effect on prognosis. Adjuvant treatment had no significant effect on the whole population but on patients with UICC stage III and IV. In the multivariate analysis, however, the only independent prognostic parameters were age ≥75 years (p=0.001), performance of chemotherapy (colon cancer) or radiochemotherapy (rectal cancer; p=0.004-0.001), and tumor stage (p=0.045-0.001). Sex (p=0.063) and age between 60 and 74 years (p=0.067) had a borderline influence. Conclusion: With increasing age, there is a departure in daily practice from the treatment recommendations. The patient's prognosis is dependent upon age (especially ≥75 years), tumor stage, and therapy. (orig.)

  9. Incidence, therapy and prognosis of colorectal cancer in different age groups. A population-based cohort study of the Rostock Cancer Registry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fietkau, R.; Zettl, H.; Kloecking, S. [University of Rostock (Germany). Department of Radiotherapy; Kundt, G. [University of Rostock (Germany). Institute of Medical Informatics and Biometry

    2004-08-01

    Purpose: Determination of frequency, treatment modalities used and prognoses of colorectal cancer in a population-specific analysis in relation to age. Material and methods: In 1999 and 2000, 644/6,016 patients were documented as having colorectal carcinomas in the Cancer Registry of Rostock. 39 patients were excluded (16 cases: 'in situ' carcinomas; 23 cases: insufficient data). Three age groups were formed: <60 years, 60-74 years; {>=}75 years. Results: The relative percentage of colorectal cancer increases with advanced age (<60 years 7%; 60-74 years 12%, {>=}75 years 15%; p<0.001). In older patients with stage III carcinomas, adjuvant treatment was done less frequently in accordance with the treatment recommendations (<60 years 83-89%; 60-74 years 67-77%; {>=}75 years 29-36% according to stage and tumor localization); in stage IV, the use of chemotherapy was reduced (<60 years 87.5-100%; 60-74 years 38-47%; {>=}75 years 33-37%). In the univariate analysis, age {>=}75 years (4-year survival rates: <60 years 68{+-}4.1%; 60-74 years 58{+-}2.8%; {>=}75 years 38{+-}3.7%), UICC stage and surgical treatment had a significant effect on prognosis. Adjuvant treatment had no significant effect on the whole population but on patients with UICC stage III and IV. In the multivariate analysis, however, the only independent prognostic parameters were age {>=}75 years (p=0.001), performance of chemotherapy (colon cancer) or radiochemotherapy (rectal cancer; p=0.004-0.001), and tumor stage (p=0.045-0.001). Sex (p=0.063) and age between 60 and 74 years (p=0.067) had a borderline influence. Conclusion: With increasing age, there is a departure in daily practice from the treatment recommendations. The patient's prognosis is dependent upon age (especially {>=}75 years), tumor stage, and therapy. (orig.)

  10. How Interdisciplinary Teamwork Contributes to Psychosocial Cancer Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daem, Michiel; Verbrugghe, Mathieu; Schrauwen, Wim; Leroux, Silvian; Van Hecke, Ann; Grypdonck, Maria

    2018-03-30

    The organization of psychosocial care is rather complex, and its provision diverse. Access is affected by the acceptance and attitude of patients and professional caregivers toward psychosocial care. The aims of this study were to examine when patients with cancer experience quality psychosocial care and to identify circumstances in collaboration that contribute to patient-perceived positive psychosocial care. This study used a qualitative design in which semistructured interviews were conducted with patients, hospital workers, and primary health professionals. Psychosocial care is often requested but also refused by patients with cancer. Based on this discrepancy, a distinction is made between psychosocial support and psychosocial interventions. Psychosocial support aims to reduce the chaos in patients' lives caused by cancer and is not shunned by patients. Psychosocial interventions comprise the formal care offered in response to psychosocial problems. Numerous patients are reluctant to use psychosocial interventions, which are often provided by psychologists. Psychosocial care aims to assist patients in bearing the difficulties of cancer and its treatment. Patients prefer informal support, given often in conjunction with physical care. This study confirms the important role of nurses in promoting psychosocial care. Patients perceive much support from nurses, although nurses are not considered to be professional psychosocial caregivers. Being perceived as approachable and trustworthy offers nurses a significant opportunity to bring more intense psychosocial interventions within reach of cancer patients.

  11. Concept analysis of cancer survivorship and contributions to oncological nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Rafaela Azevedo Abrantes; da Conceição, Vander Monteiro; Araujo, Jeferson Santos; Zago, Márcia Maria Fontão

    2018-02-01

    This study aims to analyse the concept of cancer survivorship using Rodgers' evolutionary concept analysis model. The lack of a consensus definition as well as the confusion and debate concerning the definitions of "survivor" and "cancer survivorship" hinder an understanding of the intrinsic needs associated with the latter. Concept analysis. A systematic literature search was performed using the following databases: PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science, LILACS, and PsycINFO with studies published between 2000 and 2014. The final sample contained 39 studies that were analysed on the basis of Rodgers' model and inductive thematic analysis, discussed through the lens of the medical anthropology concept of culture. Cancer survivorship is a broad concept that can be understood using 8 themes: changes in life plans, positive and negative aspect dualities, life reflections, identity change, individual experiences, symptom control, the need for support, and quality of care. These themes are summarized using 2 attributes: liminality process and culturally congruent care. This article contributes to understanding of cancer survivorship and the processes that are intrinsic to this concept. It calls for future investigations to enhance cancer survivorship across its 2 domains at the personal (patient's life) and clinical (nursing practice) levels. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. [Cutaneous malignant melanomas in New Caledonia. Study of the Cancer Registry (1977-1987)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Schino, M; Merouze, F; Huerre, M; Grimaldi, F; Lorthioir, J M; Breda, Y; Merrien, Y

    1989-01-01

    Investigation of cancer registration files in New Caledonia over a period of 11 years (1977-1987) draws the following conclusions: --The uncorrected incidence rate of cutaneous malignant melanoma is 3.63/100,000 inhabitants/year, for all ethnic groups together. --The incidence rate in the "non-European" population is 0.6/100,000 inhabitants/year. This low incidence and the anatomo-clinical manifestations observed (lentiginous melanoma of extremities) are common in coloured people. --The incidence rate in the "European" population is 8.75/100,000 inhabitants/year is noticeably higher than the incidence in the metropolitan population. Such conclusions are in accordance with the admitted data regarding epidemiology of cutaneous melanoma in high insolation countries. Cumulated incidence rate and topography of lesions are similar in this series whatever the sex.

  13. Global surveillance of cancer survival 1995–2009: analysis of individual data for 25 676 887 patients from 279 population-based registries in 67 countries (CONCORD-2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allemani, Claudia; Weir, Hannah K; Carreira, Helena; Harewood, Rhea; Spika, Devon; Wang, Xiao-Si; Bannon, Finian; Ahn, Jane V; Johnson, Christopher J; Bonaventure, Audrey; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael; Stiller, Charles; Silva, Gulnar Azevedo e; Chen, Wan-Qing; Ogunbiyi, Olufemi J; Rachet, Bernard; Soeberg, Matthew J; You, Hui; Matsuda, Tomohiro; Bielska-Lasota, Magdalena; Storm, Hans; Tucker, Thomas C; Coleman, Michel P

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Worldwide data for cancer survival are scarce. We aimed to initiate worldwide surveillance of cancer survival by central analysis of population-based registry data, as a metric of the effectiveness of health systems, and to inform global policy on cancer control. Methods Individual tumour records were submitted by 279 population-based cancer registries in 67 countries for 25·7 million adults (age 15–99 years) and 75 000 children (age 0–14 years) diagnosed with cancer during 1995–2009 and followed up to Dec 31, 2009, or later. We looked at cancers of the stomach, colon, rectum, liver, lung, breast (women), cervix, ovary, and prostate in adults, and adult and childhood leukaemia. Standardised quality control procedures were applied; errors were corrected by the registry concerned. We estimated 5-year net survival, adjusted for background mortality in every country or region by age (single year), sex, and calendar year, and by race or ethnic origin in some countries. Estimates were age-standardised with the International Cancer Survival Standard weights. Findings 5-year survival from colon, rectal, and breast cancers has increased steadily in most developed countries. For patients diagnosed during 2005–09, survival for colon and rectal cancer reached 60% or more in 22 countries around the world; for breast cancer, 5-year survival rose to 85% or higher in 17 countries worldwide. Liver and lung cancer remain lethal in all nations: for both cancers, 5-year survival is below 20% everywhere in Europe, in the range 15–19% in North America, and as low as 7–9% in Mongolia and Thailand. Striking rises in 5-year survival from prostate cancer have occurred in many countries: survival rose by 10–20% between 1995–99 and 2005–09 in 22 countries in South America, Asia, and Europe, but survival still varies widely around the world, from less than 60% in Bulgaria and Thailand to 95% or more in Brazil, Puerto Rico, and the USA. For cervical cancer

  14. Contribution of radon and radon daughters to respiratory cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harley, N.; Samet, J.M.; Cross, F.T.; Hess, T.; Muller, J.; Thomas, D.

    1986-01-01

    This article reviews studies on the contribution of radon and radon daughters to respiratory cancer and proposes recommendations for further research, particularly a national radon survey. The steady-state outdoor radon concentration averages 200 pCi/m3, and indoor levels are about 4 times higher. The primary source of radon in homes is the underlying soil; entry depends on multiple variables and reduced ventilation for energy conservation increases indoor radon levels. Occupational exposures are expressed in units of radon daughter potential energy concentration or working level (WL). Cumulative exposure is the product of the working level and the time exposed. The unit for cumulative exposure is the working level month (WLM). The occupational standard for radon exposure is 4 WLM/year, and 2 WLM/year has been suggested as a guideline for remedial action in homes. Epidemiologic studies show that miners with cumulative radon daughter exposures somewhat below 100 WLM have excess lung cancer mortality. Some 3% to 8% of miners studied have developed lung cancer attributable to radon daughters. All of the underground mining studies show an increased risk of lung cancer with radon daughter exposure. All cell types of lung cancer increased with radon exposure. If radon and smoking act in a multiplicative manner, then the risk for smokers could be 10 times that for nonsmokers. The potential risk of lung cancer appears to be between 1 and 2 per 10,000/WLM, which yields a significant number of lung cancers as some 220 million persons in the United States are exposed on average to 10 to 20 WLM/lifetime

  15. An Innovative Approach to Improve Completeness of Treatment and Other Key Data Elements in a Population-Based Cancer Registry: A15-Month Data Submission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Mei-Chin; Mumphrey, Brent; Pareti, Lisa; Yi, Yong; Wu, Xiao-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In order to comply with the Louisiana legislative obligation and meet funding agencies’ requirement of case completeness for 12-month data submission, hospital cancer registries are mandated to submit cancer incidence data to the Louisiana Tumor Registry (LTR) within 6 months of diagnosis. However, enforcing compliance with timely reporting may result in incomplete data on adjuvant treatment received by the LTR. Although additional treatment information can be obtained via retransmission of the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR)–modified abstracts, consolidating multiple NAACCR-modified abstracts for the same case is extremely time consuming. To avoid a huge amount of work while obtaining timely and complete data, the LTR has requested hospital cancer registries resubmit their data 15 months after the close of the diagnosis year. The purpose of this report is to assess the improvement in the completeness of data items related to treatment, staging and site specific factors. METHODS: The LTR requested that hospital cancer registries resubmit 15-month data between April 1, 2016 and April 15, 2016 for cases diagnosed in 2014. Microsoft Visual Studio Visual Basic script was used to link and compare resubmitted data with existing data in the LTR database. Data elements used for matching same patient/tumor were name, Social Security number, date of birth, primary site, laterality, and hospital identifier number. Treatment data items were compared as known vs none/ unknown and known vs known with different code. Matched records with updated information were imported into the LTR database and flagged as modified abstract records for manual consolidation. Nonmatched records were also loaded in the LTR database as potential new cases for further investigation. RESULTS: A total of 25,207 resubmitted NAACCR abstracts were received from 38 hospitals and freestanding radiation centers. About 11.1% had at least 1 update related to

  16. Incidence of cancer in children residing in ten jurisdictions of the Mexican Republic: importance of the Cancer registry (a population-based study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo; Juárez-Ocaña, Servando; González-Miranda, Guadalupe; Palma-Padilla, Virginia; Carreón-Cruz, Rogelio; Ortega-Alvárez, Manuel Carlos; Mejía-Arangure, Juan Manuel

    2007-01-01

    causes of cancer in children. Due to the little that is known about the incidence of cancer in Mexican children, it will be necessary to develop a national program to establish a cancer registry for the whole of the country

  17. Oral malignant melanomas and other head and neck neoplasms in Danish dogs - data from the Danish Veterinary Cancer Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Head and neck cancers (HNC) are relatively common and often very serious diseases in both dogs and humans. Neoplasms originating in the head and neck region are a heterogeneous group. HNC often has an unfavourable prognosis and the proximity of the tissue structures renders extirpation of tumours with sufficient margins almost incompatible with preservation of functionality. In humans oral malignant melanoma (OMM) is extremely rare, but represents a particular challenge since it is highly aggressive as is the canine counterpart, which thus may be of interest as a spontaneous animal model. Methods Canine cases entered in the Danish Veterinary Cancer Registry (DVCR) from May 15th 2005 through February 29th 2008 were included in this study. Fisher's exact test was used to compare proportions of HNC in dogs and humans as well as proportions of surgically treated cases of OMM and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). Also the proportions of benign and malignant neoplasms of different locations in dogs were compared using Fisher's exact test. Results A total of 1768 cases of neoplasias (679 malignant, 826 benign, 263 unknown) were submitted. Of all neoplasias HNC accounted for 7.2% (n = 128). Of these, 64 (50%) were malignant and 44 (34%) benign. The most common types of malignant neoplasia were SCC (18; 28% of malignant), OMM (13; 20% of malignant), soft tissue sarcoma (11; 17% of malignant) and adenocarcinoma (5; 11% of malignant). The most common types of benign neoplasms were adenoma (7; 16% of benign), polyps (6; 14% of benign) and fibroma (5; 11% of benign). Conclusions In the current study, the proportion of neoplasia in the head and neck region in dogs in Denmark was similar to other canine studies and significantly more common than in humans with a large proportion of malignancies. Spontaneous HNC in dogs thus, may serve as a model for HNC in humans. Canine OMM is a spontaneous cancer in an outbred, immune-competent large mammal population and could be a

  18. The utility of linked cancer registry and health administration data for describing system-wide outcomes and research: a BreastScreen example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Elizabeth S; Sullivan, Tom; Farshid, Gelareh; Hiller, Janet E; Roder, David M

    2016-10-01

    Stratification of women with screen-detected ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) by risk of subsequent invasive breast cancer (IBC) could assist treatment planning and selection of surveillance protocols that accord with risk. We assessed the utility of routinely collected administrative data for stratifying by IBC risk following DCIS detection in a population-based screening programme to inform ongoing surveillance protocols. A retrospective cohort design was used, employing linked data from the South Australian breast screening programme and cancer registry. Women entered the study at screening commencement and were followed until IBC diagnosis, death or end of the study period (1 December 2010), whichever came first. Routinely collected administrative data were analyzed to identify predictors of invasive breast cancer. Proportional hazards regression confirmed that the DCIS cohort had an elevated risk of IBC after adjustment for relevant confounders (HR = 4.0 (95% CL 3.4, 4.8)), which accorded with previous study results. Within the DCIS cohort, conservative breast surgery and earlier year of screening commencement were both predictive of an elevated invasive breast cancer risk. These linked cancer registry and administrative data gave plausible estimates of IBC risk following DCIS diagnosis, but were limited in coverage of key items for further risk stratification. It is important that the research utility of administrative datasets is maximized in their design phase in collaboration with researchers. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Design and implementation of a mobile system for lung cancer patient follow-up in China and initial report of the ongoing patient registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiangyun; Wei, Jia; Li, Ziming; Niu, Xiaomin; Wang, Jiemin; Chen, Yunqin; Guo, Zongming; Lu, Shun

    2017-01-17

    Management of lung cancer remains a challenge. Although clinical and biological patient data are crucial for cancer research, these data may be missing from registries and clinical trials. Biobanks provide a source of high-quality biological material for clinical research; however, linking these samples to the corresponding patient and clinical data is technically challenging. We describe the mobile Lung Cancer Care system (mLCCare), a novel tool which integrates biological and clinical patient data into a single resource. mLCCare was developed as a mobile device application (app) and an internet website. Data storage is hosted on cloud servers, with the mobile app and website acting as a front-end to the system. mLCCare also facilitates communication with patients to remind them to take their medication and attend follow-up appointments. Between January 2014 and October 2015, 5,080 patients with lung cancer have been registered with mLCCare. Data validation ensures all the patient information is of consistently high-quality. Patient cohorts can be constructed via user-specified criteria and data exported for statistical analysis by authorized investigators and collaborators. mLCCare forms the basis of establishing an ongoing lung cancer registry and could form the basis of a high-quality multisite patient registry. Integration of mLCCare with SMS messaging and WeChat functionality facilitates communication between physicians and patients. It is hoped that mLCCare will prove to be a powerful and widely used tool that will enhance both research and clinical practice.

  20. Predictors and rate of adjuvant radiation therapy following radical prostatectomy: A report from the Prostate Cancer Registry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, Christopher P.; Millar, Jeremy L.; Spelman, Tim; Sengupta, Shomik; Evans, Sue M.

    2016-01-01

    Long-term data from three randomized trials have demonstrated that adjuvant radiation therapy (ART) reduces the rate of biochemical failure in high-risk men following radical prostatectomy (RP). One of these trials has shown a survival advantage. We investigated the rate of ART in Victoria and the predictors for this treatment. We analysed data from eligible patients who were notified to the Victorian Prostate Cancer Registry (PCR) by 37 Victorian hospitals between 1 August 2008 and 31 October 2011. We defined ART as radiation therapy (RT) delivered within 6 months of RP. Predictors of ART receipt were modelled using adjusted and unadjusted logistic regression. There were 4626 eligible cases from which 2018 underwent RP with recorded date of surgery. Of these eligible prostatectomy cases, a total of 89 received ART. A subgroup of 833 men had an adverse pathologic feature, of whom 78 received ART. In a multivariate model, pathologic tumour stage pT3a (odds ratio (OR) 2.64; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4–5.00; P = 0.003), pT3b (OR 4.58; 95% CI 2.12–9.89; P = 0.000), a positive surgical margin (OR 8.91; 95% CI 4.61–17.2; P = 0.000) and pathologic Gleason grade >7 (OR 7.18; 95% CI 1.54–33.6; P = 0.012) predicted receipt of ART. Adverse pathologic features and high pathologic Gleason score predict for receiving ART in Victorian men after RP, but overall, ART is not commonly prescribed. This finding is consistent with other published series and may reflect clinician scepticism regarding the benefit of ART over salvage RT and concern about toxicity and the risk of over treatment.

  1. Representativeness of two sampling procedures for an internet intervention targeting cancer-related distress: a comparison of convenience and registry samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Jason E; Bantum, Erin O'Carroll; Criswell, Kevin; Bazzo, Julie; Gorlick, Amanda; Stanton, Annette L

    2014-08-01

    Internet interventions often rely on convenience sampling, yet convenience samples may differ in important ways from systematic recruitment approaches. The purpose of this study was to evaluate potential demographic, medical, and psychosocial differences between Internet-recruited and registry-recruited cancer survivors in an Internet-based intervention. Participants were recruited from a cancer registry (n = 80) and via broad Internet outreach efforts (n = 160). Participants completed a set of self-report questionnaires, and both samples were compared to a population-based sample of cancer survivors (n = 5,150). The Internet sample was younger, better educated, more likely to be female, had longer time since diagnosis, and had more advanced stage of disease (p's sample was over-represented by men and those with prostate or other cancer types (p's sample also exhibited lower quality of life and social support and greater mood disturbance (p's convenience and systematic samples differ has important implications for external validity and potential for dissemination of Internet-based interventions.

  2. Contribution of Neuroinflammation to the Pathogenesis of Cancer Cachexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Molfino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation characterizes the course of acute and chronic diseases and is largely responsible for the metabolic and behavioral changes occurring during the clinical journey of patients. Robust data indicate that, during cancer, functional modifications within brain areas regulating energy homeostasis contribute to the onset of anorexia, reduced food intake, and increased catabolism of muscle mass and adipose tissue. In particular, functional changes are associated with increased hypothalamic concentration of proinflammatory cytokines, which suggests that neuroinflammation may represent the adaptive response of the brain to peripheral challenges, including tumor growth. Within this conceptual framework, the vagus nerve appears to be involved in conveying alert signals to the hypothalamus, whereas hypothalamic serotonin appears to contribute to triggering catabolic signals.

  3. Contribution of Neuroinflammation to the Pathogenesis of Cancer Cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molfino, Alessio; Gioia, Gianfranco; Rossi Fanelli, Filippo; Laviano, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation characterizes the course of acute and chronic diseases and is largely responsible for the metabolic and behavioral changes occurring during the clinical journey of patients. Robust data indicate that, during cancer, functional modifications within brain areas regulating energy homeostasis contribute to the onset of anorexia, reduced food intake, and increased catabolism of muscle mass and adipose tissue. In particular, functional changes are associated with increased hypothalamic concentration of proinflammatory cytokines, which suggests that neuroinflammation may represent the adaptive response of the brain to peripheral challenges, including tumor growth. Within this conceptual framework, the vagus nerve appears to be involved in conveying alert signals to the hypothalamus, whereas hypothalamic serotonin appears to contribute to triggering catabolic signals.

  4. Revisiting the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results Cancer Registry and Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (SEER-MHOS) Linked Data Resource for Patient-Reported Outcomes Research in Older Adults with Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Erin E; Malinoff, Rochelle; Rozjabek, Heather M; Ambs, Anita; Clauser, Steven B; Topor, Marie A; Yuan, Gigi; Burroughs, James; Rodgers, Anne B; DeMichele, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Researchers and clinicians are increasingly recognizing the value of patient-reported outcome (PRO) data to better characterize people's health and experiences with illness and care. Considering the rising prevalence of cancer in adults aged 65 and older, PRO data are particularly relevant for older adults with cancer, who often require complex cancer care and have additional comorbid conditions. A data linkage between the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) cancer registry and the Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (MHOS) was created through a partnership between the National Cancer Institute and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services that created the opportunity to examine PROs in Medicare Advantage enrollees with and without cancer. The December 2013 linkage of SEER-MHOS data included the linked data for 12 cohorts, bringing the number of individuals in the linked data set to 95,723 with cancer and 1,510,127 without. This article reviews the features of the resource and provides information on some descriptive characteristics of the individuals in the data set (health-related quality of life, body mass index, fall risk management, number of unhealthy days in the past month). Individuals without (n=258,108) and with (n=3,440) cancer (1,311 men with prostate cancer, 982 women with breast cancer, 689 with colorectal cancer, 458 with lung cancer) were included in the current descriptive analysis. Given increasing longevity, advances in effective therapies and earlier detection, and population growth, the number of individuals aged 65 and older with cancer is expected to reach more than 12 million by 2020. SEER-MHOS provides population-level, self-reported, cancer registry-linked data for person-centered surveillance research on this growing population. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  5. Measurement of the Inter-Rater Reliability Rate Is Mandatory for Improving the Quality of a Medical Database: Experience with the Paulista Lung Cancer Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauricella, Leticia L; Costa, Priscila B; Salati, Michele; Pego-Fernandes, Paulo M; Terra, Ricardo M

    2018-06-01

    Database quality measurement should be considered a mandatory step to ensure an adequate level of confidence in data used for research and quality improvement. Several metrics have been described in the literature, but no standardized approach has been established. We aimed to describe a methodological approach applied to measure the quality and inter-rater reliability of a regional multicentric thoracic surgical database (Paulista Lung Cancer Registry). Data from the first 3 years of the Paulista Lung Cancer Registry underwent an audit process with 3 metrics: completeness, consistency, and inter-rater reliability. The first 2 methods were applied to the whole data set, and the last method was calculated using 100 cases randomized for direct auditing. Inter-rater reliability was evaluated using percentage of agreement between the data collector and auditor and through calculation of Cohen's κ and intraclass correlation. The overall completeness per section ranged from 0.88 to 1.00, and the overall consistency was 0.96. Inter-rater reliability showed many variables with high disagreement (>10%). For numerical variables, intraclass correlation was a better metric than inter-rater reliability. Cohen's κ showed that most variables had moderate to substantial agreement. The methodological approach applied to the Paulista Lung Cancer Registry showed that completeness and consistency metrics did not sufficiently reflect the real quality status of a database. The inter-rater reliability associated with κ and intraclass correlation was a better quality metric than completeness and consistency metrics because it could determine the reliability of specific variables used in research or benchmark reports. This report can be a paradigm for future studies of data quality measurement. Copyright © 2018 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Employment and insurance outcomes and factors associated with employment among long-term thyroid cancer survivors: a population-based study from the PROFILES registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamminga, S J; Bültmann, U; Husson, O; Kuijpens, J L P; Frings-Dresen, M H W; de Boer, A G E M

    2016-04-01

    To obtain insight into employment and insurance outcomes of thyroid cancer survivors and to examine the association between not having employment and other factors including quality of life. In this cross-sectional population-based study, long-term thyroid cancer survivors from the Netherlands participated. Clinical data were collected from the cancer registry. Information on employment, insurance, socio-demographic characteristics, long-term side effects, and quality of life was collected with questionnaires. Of the 223 cancer survivors (response rate 87 %), 71 % were employed. Of the cancer survivors who tried to obtain insurance, 6 % reported problems with obtaining health care insurance, 62 % with life insurance, and 16 % with a mortgage. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, higher age (OR 1.07, CI 1.02-1.11), higher level of fatigue (OR 1.07, CI 1.01-1.14), and lower educational level (OR 3.22, CI 1.46-7.09) were associated with not having employment. Employment was associated with higher quality of life. Many thyroid cancer survivors face problems when obtaining a life insurance, and older, fatigued, and lower educated thyroid cancer survivors may be at risk for not having employment.

  7. [Cancers of the thyroid. Value of a regional registry on 627 patients diagnosed, treated and followed by a multidisciplinary team].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delisle, M J; Schvartz, C; Theobald, S; Maes, B; Vaudrey, C; Pochart, J M

    1996-01-01

    Since 1966, data from 1536 patients with a thyroid carcinoma, living in the French region Champagne-Ardenne, a geographical area with 1,350,000 inhabitants were registered. The creation of a multidisciplinary group and the involvement of the general practitioners, allowed us to reach an exhaustive and continued registration process for the French administrative area of Marne and Ardennes (855,000 inhibitants, 627 patients). The sex-ratio F/M was 3.8 and the median ages were respectively equal to 46 [10-93] and 52 [13-82] in females and males. In the age groups 10-14 and 15-19, 3 cases and 13 cases were respectively registered. An history of external irradiation was noted in 2.9% of the patients. The study of the incidence around the Chooz nuclear plant (Ardennes) did not show an increase of the risk. For the French administrative area Marne and Ardennes, for the period 1975-1979, the incidence rates, standardized on the European population, were equal to 1.75/100,000 in males (SD = 0.15) and 6.38/100,000 (SD = 0.29) in females. These values among the highest from the data published by the other European registries should be explained by a more intensive diagnosis procedure and an improvement in the accuracy of histological diagnosis. An increase of the incidence rate was observed between the periods 1975-1983 and 1984-1992 from 1.04 to 2.05/100,000 and 4.99 to 6.39/100,000 in males and females respectively. This was associated with changes in clinical and histological features and an improvement in survival curves. For patients under the age of 19, we have compared both periods before and after the accident of Chernobyl. The incidence rates increased from 0.13 to 0.45/100,000 and 0.49 to 1.81/100,000 in the age groups 10-14 and 15-19 respectively. This change was at the order of magnitude to this observed in our adults population. We did not found the histological aggressiveness which characterized the Chernobyl-induced thyroid cancer in children. The knowledge of

  8. Lauren subtypes of advanced gastric cancer influence survival and response to chemotherapy: real-world data from the AGAMENON National Cancer Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez Fonseca, Paula; Carmona-Bayonas, Alberto; Hernández, Raquel; Custodio, Ana; Cano, Juana Maria; Lacalle, Alejandra; Echavarria, Isabel; Macias, Ismael; Mangas, Monserrat; Visa, Laura; Buxo, Elvira; Álvarez Manceñido, Felipe; Viudez, Antonio; Pericay, Carles; Azkarate, Aitor; Ramchandani, Avinash; López, Carlos; Martinez de Castro, Eva; Fernández Montes, Ana; Longo, Federico; Sánchez Bayona, Rodrigo; Limón, Maria Luisa; Diaz-Serrano, Asun; Martin Carnicero, Alfonso; Arias, David; Cerdà, Paula; Rivera, Fernando; Vieitez, Jose Maria; Sánchez Cánovas, Manuel; Garrido, M; Gallego, J

    2017-09-05

    The choice of chemotherapy in HER2-negative gastric cancer is based on centre's preferences and adverse effects profile. No schedule is currently accepted as standard, nor are there any factors to predict response, other than HER2 status. We seek to evaluate whether Lauren type influences the efficacy of various chemotherapies and on patient overall survival (OS). We have conducted a multicenter study in 31 hospitals. The eligibility criteria include diagnosis of stomach or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma, HER2 negativity, and chemotherapy containing 2-3 drugs. Cox proportional hazards regression adjusted for confounding factors, with tests of 'treatment-by-histology' interaction, was used to estimate treatment effect. Our registry contains 1303 tumours analysable for OS end points and 730 evaluable for overall response rate (ORR). A decrease in ORR was detected in the presence of a diffuse component: odds ratio 0.719 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.525-0.987), P=0.039. Anthracycline- or docetaxel-containing schedules increased ORR only in the intestinal type. The diffuse type displayed increased mortality with hazard ratio (HR) of 1.201 (95% CI, 1.054-1.368), P=0.0056. Patients receiving chemotherapy with docetaxel exhibited increased OS limited to the intestinal type: HR 0.65 (95% CI, 0.49-0.87), P=0.024, with no increment in OS for the subset having a diffuse component. With respect to progression-free survival (PFS), a significant interaction was seen in the effect of docetaxel-containing schedules, with better PFS limited to the intestinal type subgroup, in the comparison against any other schedule: HR 0.65 (95% CI, 0.50-0.85), P=0.015, and against anthracycline-based regimens: HR 0.64 (95% CI, 0.46-0.88), P=0.046. As a conclusion, in this registry, Lauren classification tumour subtypes predicted survival and responded differently to chemotherapy. Future clinical trials should stratify effect estimations based on histology.

  9. [Is cancer incidence different between type 2 diabetes patients compared to non-diabetics in hemodialysis? A study from the REIN registry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guillou, Aurélie; Pladys, Adelaide; Kihal, Wahida; Siebert, Muriel; Haddj-Elmrabet, Atman; Cernon, Charlotte; Bernard, Anne; Charasse, Christophe; Mandart, Lise; Hamel, Didier; Tanquerel, Tugdual; Strullu, Bernard; Richer, Christine; Siohan, Pascale; Sawadogo, Théophile; Baleynaud, Juliette; Baluta, Simona; Bayat, Sahar; Vigneau, Cécile

    2018-05-01

    In France, diabetes mellitus is now the second cause of end stage renal disease. In a large previous French national study, we observed that dialyzed diabetics have a significant lower risk of death by cancer. This first study was focused on cancer death but did not investigate cancer incidence. In this context, the aim of this second study was to compare the incidence of cancer in diabetic dialyzed patients compared to non-diabetic dialyzed patients in a French region. This epidemiologic multicentric study included 588 diabetic and non-diabetic patients starting hemodialysis between 2002 and 2007 in Bretagne. Data were issued from REIN registry and cancer incidence were individually collected from medical records. Diabetics and non-diabetics were matched one by one on age, sex and year of dialysis initiation. During the follow-up, we observed 28 cancers (9.4%) in diabetic patients and 26 cancers (8.9%) in non-diabetics patients. The cumulative incidence to develop a cancer 2 years after the dialysis start was approximately 6% in both diabetics and non-diabetics patients. In univariate Fine and Gray analysis, BMI, hemoglobin, statin use had P-value<0.2. However, in the adjusted model, these variables were not significantly associated with cancer incidence. This study lead on a little number of dialyzed patients did not show any significant difference on cancer incidence between diabetic and non-diabetic patients after hemodialysis start. Copyright © 2017 Société francophone de néphrologie, dialyse et transplantation. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Perioperative chemotherapy vs. neoadjuvant chemoradiation in gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. A population-based evaluation of the Munich Cancer Registry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muench, Stefan [Technical University Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Habermehl, Daniel; Combs, Stephanie E. [Technical University Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Institute of Innovative Radiotherapy (iRT), Oberschleissheim (Germany); Agha, Ayman [Staedtisches Klinikum Muenchen, Department of Surgery, Klinikum Bogenhausen, Munich (Germany); Belka, Claus [Ludwig-Maximilians-University (LMU), Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Grosshadern, Munich (Germany); Eckel, Renate; Schubert-Fritschle, Gabriele; Engel, Jutta [Munich Cancer Registry (MCR), Munich Tumour Centre (TZM), Department of Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology, Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich (Germany); Friess, Helmut [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Gerbes, Alexander [Ludwig Maximilians University (LMU), Department of Gastroenterology and Endocrinology, Klinikum Grosshadern, Munich (Germany); Nuessler, Natascha C. [Staedtisches Klinikum Muenchen, Department of Surgery, Klinikum Neuperlach, Munich (Germany); Schepp, Wolfgang [Staedtisches Klinikum Muenchen, Department of Gastroenterology, Klinikum Bogenhausen, Munich (Germany); Schmid, Roland M. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Internal Medicine II, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Schmitt, Wolfgang [Staedtisches Klinikum Muenchen, Department of Gastroenterology, Klinikum Neuperlach, Munich (Germany); Weber, Bernhard [Klinik Bad Trissl, Department of Internal Medicine, Oberaudorf (Germany); Werner, Jens [Ludwig Maximilians University (LMU), Department of Surgery, Klinikum Grosshadern, Munich (Germany)

    2018-02-15

    To date, it remains unclear whether locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the gastroesophageal junction (AEG) should be treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation (nCRT), analogous to esophageal cancer, or with perioperative chemotherapy (pCT), analogous to gastric cancer. The purpose of this study was to analyze the data of the Munich Cancer Registry (MCR) and to compare pCT and nCRT in AEG patients. A total of 2,992 AEG patients, treated between 1998 and 2014, were included in the study. Baseline and tumor parameters as well as overall survival (OS) and tumor recurrence were compared between 56 patients undergoing nCRT and 64 patients undergoing pCT with UICC stage II/III cancer. In addition, uni- and multivariate analyses using Cox regression models were performed to evaluate the effect of tumor characteristics and treatment regimens on OS. In patients with UICC stage II/III AEG treated with either nCRT or pCT, no significant differences were seen for baseline and tumor characteristics. While there was a significantly higher cumulative incidence of locoregional treatment failure after pCT (32.8%; 95% CI: 18.0-48.4%) compared with nCRT (7.4%; 95% CI: 2.3-16.5%; p = 0.007), there was no significant difference for distant treatment failure (52.9%; 95% CI: 35.4-67.7% and 38.4%; 95% CI: 23.7-52.9%; p = 0.347). When analyzing the whole cohort, patients who received pCT were younger (58.3 years vs. 63.0 years; p = 0.016), had a higher chance of complete tumor resection (81% vs. 67%; p = 0.033), more resected lymph nodes (p = 0.036), and fewer lymph node metastases (p = 0.038) compared with patients who received nCRT. Nevertheless, there was still a strong trend toward a higher incidence of local treatment failure after pCT (25.8%; 95% CI: 14.7-38.3% vs. 12.6%; 95% CI: 5.5-22.8%; p = 0.053). Comparable to the results for patients with UICC stage II/III, no difference was seen for the incidence of distant treatment failure. When excluding patients with UICC stage IV cancer, no

  11. Pelvic lymphoscintigraphy: contribution to the preoperative staging of rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva José Hyppolito da

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Preservation of the anal sphincter in surgery for cancer of the distal rectum in an attempt to avoid colostomy has been a main concern of colorectal surgeons. Various proposed procedures contradict oncological principles, especially with respect to pelvic lymphadenectomy. Therefore, prior knowledge of pelvic lymph node involvement is an important factor in choosing the operative technique, i.e., radical or conservative resection. Introduction of ultrasound, computerized tomography, and magnetic resonance have made preoperative study of the area possible. Nevertheless, these resources offer information of an anatomical nature only. Lymphoscintigraphy enables the morphological and functional evaluation of the pelvic area and contributes toward complementing the data obtained with the other imaging techniques. The objective of this prospective study is twofold: to standardize the lymphoscintigraphy technique and to use it to differentiate patients with rectal cancer from those with other coloproctologic diseases. CASUISTIC AND METHODS: Sixty patients with various coloproctologic diseases were studied prospectively. Ages ranged from 21 to 96 years (average, 51 and median, 55 years. Twenty-six patients were male and 34 were female. Thirty patients had carcinoma of the distal rectum as diagnosed by proctologic and anatomic-pathologic examinations, 20 patients had hemorrhoids, 5 had chagasic megacolon, 2 had diverticular disease, 2 had neoplasm of the right colon, and 1 had ulcerative colitis as diagnosed by proctologic exam and/or enema. The lymphoscintigraphy method consisted of injecting 0.25 mL of a dextran solution marked with radioactive technetium-99m into the right and left sides of the perianal region and obtaining images with a gamma camera. The results were analyzed statistically with a confidence level of 95% (P < .05 using the following statistical techniques: arithmetic and medium average, Fisher exact test, chi-square test

  12. Clinical Case Registries (CCR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Clinical Case Registries (CCR) replaced the former Immunology Case Registry and the Hepatitis C Case Registry with local and national databases. The CCR:HIV and...

  13. Converged Registries Solution (CRS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Converged Registries platform is a hardware and software architecture designed to host individual patient registries and eliminate duplicative development effort...

  14. Characterizing inflammatory breast cancer among Arab Americans in the California, Detroit and New Jersey Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registries (1988-2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirko, Kelly A; Soliman, Amr S; Banerjee, Mousumi; Ruterbusch, Julie; Harford, Joe B; Chamberlain, Robert M; Graff, John J; Merajver, Sofia D; Schwartz, Kendra

    2013-12-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is characterized by an apparent geographical distribution in incidence, being more common in North Africa than other parts of the world. Despite the rapid growth of immigrants to the United States from Arab nations, little is known about disease patterns among Arab Americans because a racial category is rarely considered for this group. The aim of this study was to advance our understanding of the burden of IBC in Arab ethnic populations by describing the proportion of IBC among different racial groups, including Arab Americans from the Detroit, New Jersey and California Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registries. We utilized a validated Arab surname algorithm to identify women of Arab descent from the SEER registries. Differences in the proportion of IBC out of all breast cancer and IBC characteristics by race and menopausal status were evaluated using chi-square tests for categorical variables, t-tests and ANOVA tests for continuous variables, and log-rank tests for survival data. We modeled the association between race and IBC among all women with breast cancer using hierarchical logistic regression models, adjusting for individual and census tract-level variables. Statistically significant differences in the proportion of IBC out of all breast cancers by race were evident. In a hierarchical model, adjusting for age, estrogen and progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth receptor 2, registry and census-tract level education, Arab-Americans (OR=1.5, 95% CI=1.2,1.9), Hispanics (OR=1.2, 95% CI=1.1,1.3), Non-Hispanic Blacks (OR=1.3, 95% CI=1.2, 1.4), and American Indians/Alaskans (OR=1.9, 95% CI=1.1, 3.4) had increased odds of IBC, while Asians (OR=0.6, 95% CI=0.6, 0.7) had decreased odds of IBC as compared to Non-Hispanic Whites. IBC may be more common among certain minority groups, including Arab American women. Understanding the descriptive epidemiology of IBC by race may generate hypotheses about risk

  15. The potential contribution of dietary factors to breast cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira, Niva

    2017-09-01

    Breast cancer (BC), the leading cancer in women, is increasing in prevalence worldwide, concurrent with western metabolic epidemics, that is, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes, and shares major risk factors with these diseases. The corresponding potential for nutritional contributions toward BC prevention is reviewed and related to critical stages in the life cycle and their implications for carcinogenic and pathometabolic trajectories. BC initiation potentially involves diet-related pro-oxidative, inflammatory, and procarcinogenic processes, that interact through combined lipid/fatty acid peroxidation, estrogen metabolism, and related DNA-adduct/depurination/mutation formation. The pathometabolic trajectory is affected by high estrogen, insulin, and growth factor cascades and resultant accelerated proliferation/progression. Anthropometric risk factors - high birth weight, adult tallness, adiposity/BMI, and weight gain - are often reflective of these trends. A sex-based nutritional approach targets women's specific risk in western obesogenic environments, associated with increasing fatness, estrogen metabolism, n-6 : n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid ratio, and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid conversion to proinflammatory/carcinogenic eicosanoids, and effects of timing of life events, for example, ages at menarche, full-term pregnancy, and menopause. Recent large-scale studies have confirmed the effectiveness of the evidence-based recommendations against BC risk, emphasizing low-energy density diets, highly nutritious plant-based regimes, physical activity, and body/abdominal adiposity management. Better understanding of dietary inter-relationships with BC, as applied to food intake, selection, combination, and processing/preparation, and recommended patterns, for example, Mediterranean, DASH, plant-based, low energy density, and low glycemic load, with high nutrient/phytonutrient density, would increase public motivation and authoritative support for early

  16. Use of general practice, diagnostic investigations and hospital services before and after cancer diagnosis - a population-based nationwide registry study of 127,000 incident adult cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christensen Karina

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of patterns in cancer patients’ health care utilisation around the time of diagnosis may guide health care resource allocation and provide important insights into this groups’ demand for health care services. The health care need of patients with comorbid conditions far exceeds the oncology capacity and it is therefore important to elucidate the role of both primary and secondary care. The aim of this paper is to describe the use of health care services amongst incident cancer patients in Denmark one year before and one year after cancer diagnosis. Methods The present study is a national population-based case–control (1:10 registry study. All incident cancer patients (n = 127,210 diagnosed between 2001 and 2006 aged 40 years or older were identified in the Danish Cancer Registry. Data from national health registries were provided for all cancer patients and for 1,272,100 controls. Monthly consultation frequencies, monthly proportions of persons receiving health services and three-month incidence rate ratios for one year before and one year after the cancer diagnosis were calculated. Data were analysed separately for women and men. Results Three months before their diagnosis, cancer patients had twice as many general practitioner (GP consultations, ten to eleven times more diagnostic investigations and five times more hospital contacts than the reference population. The demand for GP services peaked one month before diagnosis, the demand for diagnostic investigations one month after diagnosis and the number of hospital contacts three months after diagnosis. The proportion of cancer patients receiving each of these three types of health services remained more than 10% above that of the reference population from two months before diagnosis until the end of the study period. Conclusions Cancer patients’ health service utilisation rose dramatically three months before their diagnosis. This increase applied to

  17. The Brazilian Twin Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Paulo H; Oliveira, Vinicius C; Junqueira, Daniela R; Cisneros, Lígia C; Ferreira, Lucas C; Murphy, Kate; Ordoñana, Juan R; Hopper, John L; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci F

    2016-12-01

    The Brazilian Twin Registry (BTR) was established in 2013 and has impelled twin research in South America. The main aim of the initiative was to create a resource that would be accessible to the Brazilian scientific community as well as international researchers interested in the investigation of the contribution of genetic and environmental factors in the development of common diseases, phenotypes, and human behavior traits. The BTR is a joint effort between academic and governmental institutions from Brazil and Australia. The collaboration includes the Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG) in Brazil, the University of Sydney and University of Melbourne in Australia, the Australian Twin Registry, as well as the research foundations CNPq and CAPES in Brazil. The BTR is a member of the International Network of Twin Registries. Recruitment strategies used to register twins have been through participation in a longitudinal study investigating genetic and environmental factors for low back pain occurrence, and from a variety of sources including media campaigns and social networking. Currently, 291 twins are registered in the BTR, with data on demographics, zygosity, anthropometrics, and health history having been collected from 151 twins using a standardized self-reported questionnaire. Future BTR plans include the registration of thousands of Brazilian twins identified from different sources and collaborate nationally and internationally with other research groups interested on twin studies.

  18. Contributing to Tumor Molecular Characterization Projects with a Global Impact | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    My name is Nicholas Griner and I am the Scientific Program Manager for the Cancer Genome Characterization Initiative (CGCI) in the Office of Cancer Genomics (OCG). Until recently, I spent most of my scientific career working in a cancer research laboratory. In my postdoctoral training, my research focused on identifying novel pathways that contribute to both prostate and breast cancers and studying proteins within these pathways that may be targeted with cancer drugs.

  19. Characteristics of incident female breast cancer in Lebanon, 1990-2013: Descriptive study of 612 cases from a hospital tumor registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahine, Georges; El Rassy, Elie; Khazzaka, Aline; Saleh, Khalil; Rassy, Nathalie; Khalife, Nadine; Atallah, David

    2015-06-01

    Despite the fact that breast cancer is a major health issue, very few studies describe its characteristics in the Arab world or the Middle East, particularly in Lebanon. We report in this article a retrospective pilot study of the characteristics of breast cancer in Lebanon. The pathological characteristics of 624 patients diagnosed between 1990 and 2013 randomly chosen from the archives of an oncology clinic affiliated to Hotel Dieu de France Hospital are analyzed. The mean age at diagnosis is 54.6±13.4 years with 43% diagnosed before the age of 50 years. The infiltrative ductal carcinoma represents the major pathological subtype. One third of the tumors had a size of more than 2 cm at diagnosis. Estrogen-receptors are positive in more than 50% of our patients and Her2-neu is overexpresssed in 30%. Luminal A represents 45.5% and the triple negative subgroup constitutes only 8.3%. Breast cancer in Lebanon is evolving to a more indolent disease. Therefore, public awareness and institution of screening programs are required. These programs should be based on national epidemiological data and necessitate the activation of the national cancer registry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Correlates of physical activity among colorectal cancer survivors : Results from the longitudinal population-based profiles registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Putten, Margreet; Husson, O.; Mols, F.; Luyer, Misha D P; van de Poll-Franse, L.V.; Ezendam, N.P.M.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Physical activity can improve health of cancer survivors. To increase physical activity levels among colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors, we need to understand which factors affect physical activity. Therefore, this study examined the longitudinal relationship between symptom-related,

  1. Correlates of physical activity among colorectal cancer survivors: results from the longitudinal population-based profiles registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putten, M van; Husson, O.; Mols, F.; Luyer, M.D.; Poll-Franse, L.V. van de; Ezendam, N.P.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Physical activity can improve health of cancer survivors. To increase physical activity levels among colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors, we need to understand which factors affect physical activity. Therefore, this study examined the longitudinal relationship between symptom-related,

  2. Migrant breast cancer patients and their participation in genetic counseling : results from a registry-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baars, J E; van Dulmen, A M; Velthuizen, M E; Theunissen, E B M; Vrouenraets, B C; Kimmings, A N; van Dalen, T; van Ooijen, B; Witkamp, A J; van der Aa, M A; Ausems, M G E M

    Certain ethnic groups seem to have less access to cancer genetic counseling. Our study was to investigate the participation in cancer genetic counseling among migrant breast cancer patients of Turkish and Moroccan origin. Hospital medical records of Turkish and Moroccan and of a comparative group of

  3. Migrant breast cancer patients and their participation in genetic counseling: results from a registry-based study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baars, J.E.; Dulmen, A.M. van; Velthuizen, M.E.; Theunissen, E.B.M.; Vrouenraets, B.C.; Kimmings, A.N.; Dalen, T. van; Ooijen, B. van; Witkamp, A.J.; Aa, M.A. van der; Ausems, M.G.E.M.

    2016-01-01

    Certain ethnic groups seem to have less access to cancer genetic counseling. Our study was to investigate the participation in cancer genetic counseling among migrant breast cancer patients of Turkish and Moroccan origin. Hospital medical records of Turkish and Moroccan and of a comparative group of

  4. Migrant breast cancer patients and their participation in genetic counseling: results from a registry-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baars, J.E.; Dulmen, A.M. van; Velthuizen, M.E.; Theunissen, E.B.; Vrouenraets, B.C.; Kimmings, A.N.; Dalen, T. van; Ooijen, B. van; Witkamp, A.J.; Aa, M.A. van der; Ausems, M.G.

    2016-01-01

    Certain ethnic groups seem to have less access to cancer genetic counseling. Our study was to investigate the participation in cancer genetic counseling among migrant breast cancer patients of Turkish and Moroccan origin. Hospital medical records of Turkish and Moroccan and of a comparative group of

  5. Living with the physical and mental consequences of an ostomy: a study among 1-10-year rectal cancer survivors from the population-based PROFILES registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mols, Floortje; Lemmens, Valery; Bosscha, Koop; van den Broek, Wim; Thong, Melissa S Y

    2014-09-01

    This study examined the physical and mental consequences of an ostomy among 1-10-year rectal cancer survivors. Patients with rectal cancer diagnosed from 2000 to 2009, as registered in the population-based Eindhoven Cancer Registry, received a questionnaire on quality of life (QOL; EORTC QLQ-C30), disease-specific health status (EORTC QLQ-CR38), depression and anxiety (HADS), illness perceptions (Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire), and health care utilization; 76% (n = 1019) responded. A total of 408 (43%) rectal cancer survivors had an ostomy at survey and they reported a statistically significant and clinically relevant lower physical, role, and social functioning, and global health status/QOL but fewer problems with constipation and diarrhea compared with those without an ostomy. Also, they had a significantly worse body image, more male sexual problems, and fewer gastrointestinal problems although these differences were not clinically relevant. No differences regarding the prevalence of symptoms of anxiety and depression were found. Survivors with an ostomy believed that their illness have significantly more serious consequences, will last longer (clinically relevant), and were more concerned about their illness compared with those without an ostomy. Survivors with an ostomy visited their medical specialist, but not their general practitioner, significantly more often. Also, they more often received additional support after cancer treatment. Rectal cancer survivors with an ostomy have a lower QOL, worse illness perceptions, and a higher health care consumption compared with those without an ostomy 1-10 years after diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Feasibility test of a UK-scalable electronic system for regular collection of patient-reported outcome measures and linkage with clinical cancer registry data: The electronic Patient-reported Outcomes from Cancer Survivors (ePOCS system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velikova Galina

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer survivors can face significant physical and psychosocial challenges; there is a need to identify and predict which survivors experience what sorts of difficulties. As highlighted in the UK National Cancer Survivorship Initiative, routine post-diagnostic collection of patient reported outcome measures (PROMs is required; to be most informative, PROMs must be linked and analysed with patients' diagnostic and treatment information. We have designed and built a potentially cost-efficient UK-scalable electronic system for collecting PROMs via the internet, at regular post-diagnostic time-points, for linking these data with patients' clinical data in cancer registries, and for electronically managing the associated patient monitoring and communications; the electronic Patient-reported Outcomes from Cancer Survivors (ePOCS system. This study aims to test the feasibility of the ePOCS system, by running it for 2 years in two Yorkshire NHS Trusts, and using the Northern and Yorkshire Cancer Registry and Information Service. Methods/Design Non-metastatic breast, colorectal and prostate cancer patients (largest survivor groups, within 6 months post-diagnosis, will be recruited from hospitals in the Yorkshire Cancer Network. Participants will be asked to complete PROMS, assessing a range of health-related quality-of-life outcomes, at three time-points up to 15 months post-diagnosis, and subsequently to provide opinion on the ePOCS system via a feedback questionnaire. Feasibility will be examined primarily in terms of patient recruitment and retention rates, the representativeness of participating patients, the quantity and quality of collected PROMs data, patients' feedback, the success and reliability of the underpinning informatics, and the system running costs. If sufficient data are generated during system testing, these will be analysed to assess the health-related quality-of-life outcomes reported by patients, and to explore

  7. Prostate Cancer Stem-like Cells Contribute to the Development of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Ojo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT has been the standard care for patients with advanced prostate cancer (PC since the 1940s. Although ADT shows clear benefits for many patients, castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC inevitably occurs. In fact, with the two recent FDA-approved second-generation anti-androgens abiraterone and enzalutamide, resistance develops rapidly in patients with CRPC, despite their initial effectiveness. The lack of effective therapeutic solutions towards CRPC largely reflects our limited understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for CRPC development. While persistent androgen receptor (AR signaling under castration levels of serum testosterone (<50 ng/mL contributes to resistance to ADT, it is also clear that CRPC evolves via complex mechanisms. Nevertheless, the physiological impact of individual mechanisms and whether these mechanisms function in a cohesive manner in promoting CRPC are elusive. In spite of these uncertainties, emerging evidence supports a critical role of prostate cancer stem-like cells (PCSLCs in stimulating CRPC evolution and resistance to abiraterone and enzalutamide. In this review, we will discuss the recent evidence supporting the involvement of PCSLC in CRPC acquisition as well as the pathways and factors contributing to PCSLC expansion in response to ADT.

  8. Dietary habits contributing to breast cancer risk among Iranian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobarakeh, Zahra Sheikhi; Mirzaei, Khadijeh; Hatmi, Nadia; Ebrahimi, Mandana; Dabiran, Sohaila; Sotoudeh, Gity

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate demographic features, dietary habits, and some possible risk factors for being susceptible to breast cancer in Iranian women. A study of dietary habits and breast cancer was conducted among 53 Iranian women with histological confirmed disease and 40 matched controls. A dietary habits questionnaire was used to evaluate the pattern of selected food intakes. The risk of cancer was analyzed after adjustment for confounding factors. Age, weight, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, educational status, parity, lactation, marital status, menopause, history of estrogen therapy, and family history of breast disease or cancer were assessed among participants. Special attention was given to the relationship between consumption of high fat meat, milk, yogurt and cheese as well use of frying oils for frying foods, use of olive/liquid oils for cooking, removing fat from meat and poultry, removing chicken skin and not use of mayonnaise as salad dressing and the risk of breast cancer. Moreover, salad, vegetable and fruit consumption, and eating outdoors owere investigated. Our results revealed significant lower education and higher BMI and waist circumference levels in patients with breast cancer. There was significantly increased breast cancer risk in overweight women in comparison with normal weight (OR=2.91, 95%CI 1.24 to 6.82). High intake of fat dairy products including milk and cheese was found to be a statistically significant factor for increasing breast cancer risk in models adjusting for age, BMI and education. Use of olive/liquid oils for cooking and avoidance of mayonnaise as salad dressing are related to lower risk of breast cancer. The frequency of vegetable and fruit consumption was significantly lower in patients with breast cancer compared to healthy women. Dietary habits might be risk factors for breast cancer among Iranian women. Adoption of a prudent diet could be an appropriate strategy for preventing breast

  9. Form of presentation, natural history and course of postoperative venous thromboembolism in patients operated on for pelvic and abdominal cancer. Analysis of the RIETE registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos Merlo, Ana Belén; Arcelus Martínez, Juan Ignacio; Turiño Luque, Jesús Damián; Valero, Beatriz; Villalobos, Aurora; Aibar, Miguel Ángel; Monreal Bosch, Manuel

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) represents a serious complication after oncologic surgery. Recent studies have shown that the risk of VTE persists several weeks after surgery. This study assesses the form of presentation and time course of VTE after abdominal and pelvic cancer surgery. Prospective, multicenter, observational study that analyzes data from an international registry (RIETE) that includes consecutive patients with symptomatic VTE. Our study assesses the form and time of presentation of postoperative VTE, as well as main outcomes, in patients operated for abdominopelvic cancer 8 weeks prior to VTE diagnosis. Variables related to the presentation of VTE after hospital discharge are identified. Out of the 766 analyzed patients with VTE, 395 (52%) presented pulmonary embolism (PE). Most VTE cases (84%) were detected after the first postoperative week, and 38% after one month. Among patients with VTE in the first postoperative week, 70% presented PE. VTE presented after hospital discharge in 54% of cases. Colorectal, urologic, and gynecologic tumors, the use of radiotherapy, and blood hemoglobin levels were independently associated with VTE diagnosis after hospital discharge. Complications (thrombosis recurrence, bleeding, and death) occurred in 34% of patients with VTE detected before hospital discharge, compared to 24% in VTE after hospital discharge (P<0.01). VTE occurs after hospital discharge in most patients, particularly in those operated for colorectal, urologic, and gynecologic cancer. Pulmonary embolism is more frequent in patients who develop early VTE, who also have worse prognosis. Copyright © 2017 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Comprehensive Analysis of the Incidence and Survival Patterns of Lung Cancer by Histologies, Including Rare Subtypes, in the Era of Molecular Medicine and Targeted Therapy: A Nation-Wide Cancer Registry-Based Study From Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jeffrey S; Chen, Li-Tzong; Shan, Yan-Shen; Lin, Sheng-Fung; Hsiao, Sheng-Yen; Tsai, Chia-Rung; Yu, Shu-Jung; Tsai, Hui-Jen

    2015-06-01

    Lung cancer is the third most common cancer in the world and has the highest cancer mortality rate. A worldwide increasing trend of lung adenocarcinoma has been noted. In addition, the identification of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and the introduction of EGFR inhibitors to successfully treat EGFR mutated non-small cell lung cancers are breakthroughs for lung cancer treatment. The current study evaluated the incidence and survival of lung cancer using data collected by the Taiwan Cancer Registry between 1996 and 2008. The results showed that the most common histologic subtype of lung cancer was adenocarcinoma, followed by squamous cell carcinoma, small cell carcinoma, large cell carcinoma, neuroendocrine tumors, lymphoma, and sarcoma. Overall, the incidence of lung cancer in Taiwan increased significantly from 1996 to 2008. An increased incidence was observed for adenocarcinoma, particularly for women, with an annual percentage change of 5.9, whereas the incidence of squamous cell carcinoma decreased. Among the subtypes of lung cancer, the most rapid increase occurred in neuroendocrine tumors with an annual percentage change of 15.5. From 1996-1999 to 2005-2008, the 1-year survival of adenocarcinoma increased by 10% for men, whereas the 1-, 3-, and 5-year survivals of adenocarcinoma for women increased by 18%, 11%, and 5%, respectively. Overall, the incidence of lung cancer has been increasing in Taiwan, although the trends were variable by subtype. The introduction of targeted therapies was associated with a significantly improved survival for lung adenocarcinoma in Taiwan; however, more studies are needed to explain the rising incidence of lung adenocarcinoma. In addition, it is important to investigate the molecular pathogenesis of the various subtypes of lung cancer to develop novel therapeutic agents.

  11. Incidence rate of non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas among males in Saudi Arabia: an observational descriptive epidemiological analysis of data from the Saudi Cancer Registry, 2001–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alghamdi IG

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim G Alghamdi,1,2 Issam I Hussain,1 Mohamed S Alghamdi,3 Ahlam A Dohal,4 Mansour M Alghamdi,4 Mohammed A El-Sheemy5 1School of Life Sciences, University of Lincoln, Lincoln, UK; 2Albaha University, Al Baha city, Saudi Arabia; 3General Directorate of Health Affairs, Ministry of Health, Al Baha, 4King Fahad Specialist Hospital, Dammam, Saudi Arabia; 5Research and Development, Lincoln Hospital, United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHSTrust, Lincoln, UK Background: This study describes epidemiological data of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL diagnosed from 2001 to 2008 among Saudi men. Materials and methods: Retrospective data from all NHL cancer cases among Saudi men recorded in the Saudi Cancer Registry (SCR between January 2001 and December 2008 were used. Descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, Poisson regression, and simple linear regression were also used. Results: In total, 2,555 new cases of NHL were recorded between January 2001 and December 2008. The region of Riyadh, Saudi Arabia had the highest overall age-standardized incidence rate (ASIR at 7.8, followed by the Eastern region at 6.8, and Makkah at 6.1 per 100,000 men; however, Jazan, Hail, and Baha had the lowest average ASIRs at 2.5, 3.7, and 3.9 per 100,000 men, respectively. The incidence-rate ratio for the number of NHL cases was significantly higher in Riyadh (4.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] 4.11–5.32, followed by Makkah (4.47, 95% CI 3.94–5.07, and the Eastern region of Saudi Arabia (3.27, 95% CI 2.90–3.69 than that in the reference region of Jazan. Jouf had the highest changes in the ASIRs of NHL among Saudi men from 2001 and 2008 (5.0 per 100,000 men. Conclusion: A significant increase in the crude incidence rate and ASIR for NHL in Saudi Arabia between 2001 and 2008 was found. Riyadh, the Eastern region, and Makkah had the highest overall ASIR in Saudi Arabia. Jazan, Hail, and Baha had the lowest rates. Additionally, Riyadh, Makkah, and the Eastern region had the

  12. The New York State cardiac registries: history, contributions, limitations, and lessons for future efforts to assess and publicly report healthcare outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Edward L; Cozzens, Kimberly; King, Spencer B; Walford, Gary; Shah, Nirav R

    2012-06-19

    In 1988, the New York State Health Commissioner was confronted with hospital-level data demonstrating very large, multiple-year, interhospital variations in short-term mortality and complications for cardiac surgery. The concern with the extent to which these differences were due to variations in patients' pre-surgical severity of illness versus hospitals' quality of care led to the development of clinical registries for cardiac surgery in 1989 and for percutaneous coronary interventions in 1992 in New York. In 1990, the Department of Health released hospitals' risk-adjusted cardiac surgery mortality rates for the first time, and shortly thereafter, similar data were released for hospitals and physicians for percutaneous coronary interventions, cardiac valve surgery, and pediatric cardiac surgery (only hospital data). This practice is still ongoing. The purpose of this communication is to relate the history of this initiative, including changes or purported changes that have occurred since the public release of cardiac data. These changes include decreases in risk-adjusted mortality, cessation of cardiac surgery in New York by low-volume and high-mortality surgeons, out-of-state referral or avoidance of cardiac surgery/angioplasty for high-risk patients, alteration of contracting choices by insurance companies, and modifications in market share of cardiac hospitals. Evidence related to these impacts is reviewed and critiqued. This communication also includes a summary of numerous studies that used New York's cardiac registries to examine a variety of policy issues regarding the choice and use of cardiac procedures, the comparative effectiveness of competing treatment options, and the examination of the relationship among processes, structures, and outcomes of cardiac care. Copyright © 2012 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The course of fatigue and its correlates in colorectal cancer survivors : A prospective cohort study of the PROFILES registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Husson, O.; Mols, F.; van de Poll-Franse, L.V.; Thong, M.S.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors who remain fatigued during long-term follow-up are at risk for worse health outcomes and need relevant interventions most. The aim of this study is to prospectively assess cancer-related fatigue (CRF) and four categories of CRF correlates (clinical

  14. The course of fatigue and its correlates in colorectal cancer survivors: a prospective cohort study of the PROFILES registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Husson, O.; Mols, F.; Poll-Franse, L.V. van de; Thong, M.S.Y.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors who remain fatigued during long-term follow-up are at risk for worse health outcomes and need relevant interventions most. The aim of this study is to prospectively assess cancer-related fatigue (CRF) and four categories of CRF correlates (clinical

  15. Contribution to the study of radiation induced bone tissue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouet, Monique.

    1975-01-01

    In this work four original observations of more or less long-delayed cancers induced by ionizing radiations are compared with 34 other cases in the literature, after which an attempt is made to establish a general and prognostic synthesis of the results; the indications to emerge are as follows: - Ionizing radiation-induced cancers are very rare, especially when compared with the extensive therapeutic use made of X-rays; - The probability of radio-cancer formation, though no figures are given in the many papers consulted, seems nevertheless to be higher in cases of benign lesion irradiation; - Induced cancers have been observed after treatments with all types of radiation, whether or not the lesion is tumoral or cancerous, whatever the patient's age at the time of irradiations; - As a general rule these neoplasms appear after a variable latency period but usually from the 6th post-radiotherapy year onwards, with a greater frequency range between 6 and 12 years; - These induced cancers are generally epitheliomas or sarcomas, the latter being noticeably more predominant than in the case of spontaneous cancers. Leukoses may also be observed [fr

  16. [Contribution of the Peruvian Multisectorial Coalition against Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinillos-Ashton, Luis; Limache-García, Abel

    2013-03-01

    Cancer is a public health problem due to its high incidence and mortality, its high social and economic cost, and the lack of intra and intersectorial strategies resulting in failure to access information and screening tests. For this reason, it is necessary to address this problem with a comprehensive and sustainable approach. After performing a diagnosis of the human and material resources at the national level, and after having observed the attitude of healthcare decisors, the Multisector Coalition against Cancer was created with the participation of the public and nonpublic sector. A strategic plan was developed, followed by a national plan for strengthening cancer prevention and control. As a result, intersectorial work and health promotion oriented to cancer prevention through information, education and communication were strengthened. Service supply was improved and optimized through decentralization of oncological care.

  17. Interleukin-17 Gene Polymorphisms Contribute to Cancer Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ming Niu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have suggested that interleukin-17 (IL-17 polymorphisms are associated with cancer risk. However, the results of these studies are inconsistent. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to obtain a precise conclusion. Odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were used to assess the association of the IL-17A rs2275913G>A and IL-17F rs763780T>C polymorphisms with cancer risk. Publication bias and sensitivity analyses were performed to ensure the statistical power. Overall, 10 relevant case-control studies involving 4,516 cases and 5,645 controls were included. The pooled ORs with 95% CIs indicated that the IL-17A rs2275913G>A polymorphism was significantly associated with increased cancer risk (for A versus G: OR = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.16–1.41, PC polymorphism was also significantly associated with gastric cancer development. Overall, the present meta-analysis suggests that IL-17 polymorphisms increase the risk of developing cancer, particularly gastric cancer, in the Asian (and Chinese population.

  18. How comparable are rates of malignancies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis across the world? A comparison of cancer rates, and means to optimise their comparability, in five RA registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askling, Johan; Berglind, Niklas; Franzen, Stefan; Frisell, Thomas; Garwood, Christopher; Greenberg, Jeffrey D; Ho, Meilien; Holmqvist, Marie; Horne, Laura; Inoue, Eisuke; Michaud, Kaleb; Nyberg, Fredrik; Pappas, Dimitrios A; Reed, George; Tanaka, Eiichi; Tran, Trung N; Verstappen, Suzanne M M; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Wesby-van Swaay, Eveline; Symmons, Deborah

    2016-10-01

    The overall incidence of cancer in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is modestly elevated. The extent to which cancer rates in RA vary across clinical cohorts and patient subsets, as defined by disease activity or treatment is less known but critical for understanding the safety of existing and new antirheumatic therapies. We investigated comparability of, and means to harmonise, malignancy rates in five RA registries from four continents. Participating RA registries were Consortium of Rheumatology Researchers of North America (CORRONA) (USA), Swedish Rheumatology Quality of Care Register (SRR) (Sweden), Norfolk Arthritis Register (NOAR) (UK), CORRONA International (several countries) and Institute of Rheumatology, Rheumatoid Arthritis (IORRA) (Japan). Within each registry, we analysed a main cohort of all patients with RA from January 2000 to last available data, and sensitivity analyses of sub-cohorts defined by disease activity, treatment change, prior comorbidities and restricted by calendar time or follow-up, respectively. Malignancy rates with 95% CIs were estimated, and standardised for age and sex, based on the distributions from a typical RA clinical trial programme population (fostamatinib). There was a high consistency in rates for overall malignancy excluding non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), for malignant lymphomas, but not for all skin cancers, across registries, in particular following age/sex standardisation. Standardised rates of overall malignancy excluding NMSC varied from 0.56 to 0.87 per 100 person-years. Within each registry, rates were generally consistent across sensitivity analyses, which differed little from the main analysis. In real-world RA populations, rates of both overall malignancy and of lymphomas are consistent. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. Predictors of prostate cancer specific mortality after radical prostatectomy: 10 year oncologic outcomes from the Victorian Radical Prostatectomy Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Damien M; Papa, Nathan; Ta, Anthony D; Millar, Jeremy; Davidson, Adee-Jonathan; Pedersen, John; Syme, Rodney; Patel, Manish I; Giles, Graham G

    2015-10-01

    To identify the ability of multiple variables to predict prostate cancer specific mortality (PCSM) in a whole of population series of all radical prostatectomies (RP) performed in Victoria, Australia. A total of 2154 open RPs were performed in Victoria between July 1995 and December 2000. Subjects without follow up data, Gleason grade, pathological stage were excluded as were those who had pT4 disease or received neoadjuvant treatment. 1967 cases (91.3% of total) met the inclusion criteria for this study. Tumour characteristics were collated via a central registry. We used competing hazards regression models to investigate associations. At median follow up of 10.3 years pT stage of RP (P pattern at RP in this whole of population study suggests a need to avoid understaging/grading in the process of cancer diagnosis and active surveillance protocols. Multi-modality therapy is likely to have a greater impact on PCSM in higher stage and Gleason grade disease. Identification of increased PCSM with rural residency and with involvement of a trainee urologist, and reduction in PCSM with higher surgeon volume all suggest potential for improved PC outcomes to be achieved with changes to surgical training and service delivery. © 2015 The Authors BJU International © 2015 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Active surveillance for low-risk prostate cancer in Austria: the online registry of the Qualitätspartnerschaft Urologie (QuapU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eredics, Klaus; Dorfinger, Karl; Kramer, Gero; Ponholzer, Anton; Madersbacher, Stephan

    2017-06-01

    Active surveillance (AS) is a well-recognized strategy to reduce the risk of overtreatment in men with low-risk prostate cancer. No data on this approach are available from Austria. The Qualitätspartnerschaft Urologie (QuapU) developed an online database for patients managed with AS in Austria. Principal inclusion/exclusion criteria corresponded to those of the S3 prostate cancer guideline of German urologists: prostate-specific antigen (PSA) 4-10 ng/ml: 85%). The prostate volume averaged 39 ml. The mean time under AS was 17.5 months (12 months: 40%). The AS adherence at 12 months was 85% and at 24 months 76%. To date, a total of 23 patients (17.6%) stopped AS. The most frequent reasons for discontinuing AS were patient wish for active treatment (43.5%) and PSA progression (30.4%). A histological progression was rarely seen (6.1%) and the control biopsy rate was low (19.8%). This study is the first description of AS in Austria and documents the feasibility of an online registry for AS. The data confirm the international experience with this approach with acceptable adherence rates.

  1. A multifactorial likelihood model for MMR gene variant classification incorporating probabilities based on sequence bioinformatics and tumor characteristics: a report from the Colon Cancer Family Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Bryony A; Goldgar, David E; Paterson, Carol; Clendenning, Mark; Walters, Rhiannon; Arnold, Sven; Parsons, Michael T; Michael D, Walsh; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A; Lemarchand, Loic; Lindor, Noralane M; Newcomb, Polly A; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Young, Joanne P; Buchanan, Daniel D; Tavtigian, Sean V; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2013-01-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) gene sequence variants of uncertain clinical significance are often identified in suspected Lynch syndrome families, and this constitutes a challenge for both researchers and clinicians. Multifactorial likelihood model approaches provide a quantitative measure of MMR variant pathogenicity, but first require input of likelihood ratios (LRs) for different MMR variation-associated characteristics from appropriate, well-characterized reference datasets. Microsatellite instability (MSI) and somatic BRAF tumor data for unselected colorectal cancer probands of known pathogenic variant status were used to derive LRs for tumor characteristics using the Colon Cancer Family Registry (CFR) resource. These tumor LRs were combined with variant segregation within families, and estimates of prior probability of pathogenicity based on sequence conservation and position, to analyze 44 unclassified variants identified initially in Australasian Colon CFR families. In addition, in vitro splicing analyses were conducted on the subset of variants based on bioinformatic splicing predictions. The LR in favor of pathogenicity was estimated to be ~12-fold for a colorectal tumor with a BRAF mutation-negative MSI-H phenotype. For 31 of the 44 variants, the posterior probabilities of pathogenicity were such that altered clinical management would be indicated. Our findings provide a working multifactorial likelihood model for classification that carefully considers mode of ascertainment for gene testing. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Identifying specific non-attending groups in breast cancer screening - population-based registry study of participation and socio-demography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Line

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A population-based breast cancer screening programme was implemented in the Central Denmark Region in 2008–09. The objective of this registry-based study was to examine the association between socio-demographic characteristics and screening participation and to examine whether the group of non-participants can be regarded as a homogeneous group of women. Method Participation status was obtained from a regional database for all women invited to the first screening round in the Central Denmark Region in 2008–2009 (n=149,234. Participation data was linked to registries containing socio-demographic information. Distance to screening site was calculated using ArcGIS. Participation was divided into ‘participants’ and ‘non-participants’, and non-participants were further stratified into ‘active non-participants’ and ‘passive non-participants’ based on whether the woman called and cancelled her participation or was a ‘no-show’. Results The screening participation rate was 78.9%. In multivariate analyses, non-participation was associated with older age, immigrant status, low OECD-adjusted household income, high and low level education compared with middle level education, unemployment, being unmarried, distance to screening site >20 km, being a tenant and no access to a vehicle. Active and passive non-participants comprised two distinct groups with different socio-demographic characteristics, with passive non-participants being more socially deprived compared with active non-participants. Conclusion Non-participation was associated with low social status e.g. low income, unemployment, no access to vehicle and status as tenant. Non-participants were also more likely than participants to be older, single, and of non-Danish origin. Compared to active non-participants, passive non-participants were characterized by e.g. lower income and lower educational level. Different interventions might be warranted to increase

  3. Variation in the use of advanced imaging at the time of breast cancer diagnosis in a statewide registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, N Lynn; Braun, Thomas M; Breslin, Tara M; Gorski, David H; Silver, Samuel M; Griggs, Jennifer J

    2017-08-01

    Although national guidelines do not recommend extent of disease imaging for patients with newly diagnosed early stage breast cancer given that the harm outweighs the benefits, high rates of testing have been documented. The 2012 Choosing Wisely guidelines specifically addressed this issue. We examined the change over time in imaging use across a statewide collaborative, as well as the reasons for performing imaging and the impact on cost of care. Clinicopathologic data and use of advanced imaging tests (positron emission tomography, computed tomography, and bone scan) were abstracted from the medical records of patients treated at 25 participating sites in the Michigan Breast Oncology Quality Initiative (MiBOQI). For patients diagnosed in 2014 and 2015, reasons for testing were abstracted from the medical record. Of the 34,078 patients diagnosed with stage 0-II breast cancer between 2008 and 2015 in MiBOQI, 6853 (20.1%) underwent testing with at least 1 imaging modality in the 90 days after diagnosis. There was considerable variability in rates of testing across the 25 sites for all stages of disease. Between 2008 and 2015, testing decreased over time for patients with stage 0-IIA disease (all P diagnosis decreased over time in a large statewide collaborative. Additional interventions are warranted to further reduce rates of unnecessary imaging to improve quality of care for patients with breast cancer. Cancer 2017;123:2975-83. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  4. EMI Registry Design

    CERN Document Server

    Memon, S

    2011-01-01

    Grid services are the fundamental building blocks of today's Distributed Computing Infrastructures (DCI). The discovery of services in the DCI is a primary function that is a precursor to other tasks such as workload and data management. In this context, a service registry can be used to fulfil such a requirement. Existing service registries, such as the ARC Information Index or UNICORE Registry, are examples that have proven themselves in production environments. Such implementations provide a centralized service registry, however, todays DCIs, such as EGI, are based on a federation model. It is therefore necessary for the service registry to mirror such a model in order for it to seamlessly fit into the operational and management requirements - a DCI built using federated approach. This document presents an architecture for a federated service registry and a prototype based on this architecture, the EMI Registry. Special attention is given to how the federated service registry is robust to environment failu...

  5. Hypoxia Induced Tumor Metabolic Switch Contributes to Pancreatic Cancer Aggressiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasseur, Sophie; Tomasini, Richard; Tournaire, Roselyne; Iovanna, Juan L. [INSERM U624, Stress Cellulaire, Parc Scientifique et Technologique de Luminy, 163 Avenue de Luminy, BP 915,13288 Marseille cedex 9 (France)

    2010-12-16

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains one of the most lethal of all solid tumors with an overall five-year survival rate of only 3–5%. Its aggressive biology and resistance to conventional and targeted therapeutic agents lead to a typical clinical presentation of incurable disease once diagnosed. The disease is characterized by the presence of a dense stroma of fibroblasts and inflammatory cells, termed desmoplasia, which limits the oxygen diffusion in the organ, creating a strong hypoxic environment within the tumor. In this review, we argue that hypoxia is responsible for the highly aggressive and metastatic characteristics of this tumor and drives pancreatic cancer cells to oncogenic and metabolic changes facilitating their proliferation. However, the molecular changes leading to metabolic adaptations of pancreatic cancer cells remain unclear. Cachexia is a hallmark of this disease and illustrates that this cancer is a real metabolic disease. Hence, this tumor must harbor metabolic pathways which are probably tied in a complex inter-organ dialog during the development of this cancer. Such a hypothesis would better explain how under fuel source limitation, pancreatic cancer cells are maintained, show a growth advantage, and develop metastasis.

  6. Hypoxia Induced Tumor Metabolic Switch Contributes to Pancreatic Cancer Aggressiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasseur, Sophie; Tomasini, Richard; Tournaire, Roselyne; Iovanna, Juan L.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains one of the most lethal of all solid tumors with an overall five-year survival rate of only 3–5%. Its aggressive biology and resistance to conventional and targeted therapeutic agents lead to a typical clinical presentation of incurable disease once diagnosed. The disease is characterized by the presence of a dense stroma of fibroblasts and inflammatory cells, termed desmoplasia, which limits the oxygen diffusion in the organ, creating a strong hypoxic environment within the tumor. In this review, we argue that hypoxia is responsible for the highly aggressive and metastatic characteristics of this tumor and drives pancreatic cancer cells to oncogenic and metabolic changes facilitating their proliferation. However, the molecular changes leading to metabolic adaptations of pancreatic cancer cells remain unclear. Cachexia is a hallmark of this disease and illustrates that this cancer is a real metabolic disease. Hence, this tumor must harbor metabolic pathways which are probably tied in a complex inter-organ dialog during the development of this cancer. Such a hypothesis would better explain how under fuel source limitation, pancreatic cancer cells are maintained, show a growth advantage, and develop metastasis

  7. Contributions of physical function and satisfaction with social roles to emotional distress in chronic pain: a Collaborative Health Outcomes Information Registry (CHOIR) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgeon, John A; Dixon, Eric A; Darnall, Beth D; Mackey, Sean C

    2015-12-01

    Individuals with chronic pain show greater vulnerability to depression or anger than those without chronic pain, and also show greater interpersonal difficulties and physical disability. The present study examined data from 675 individuals with chronic pain during their initial visits to a tertiary care pain clinic using assessments from Stanford University's Collaborative Health Outcomes Information Registry (CHOIR). Using a path modeling analysis, the mediating roles of Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information Systems (PROMIS) Physical Function and PROMIS Satisfaction with Social Roles and Activities were tested between pain intensity and PROMIS Depression and Anger. Pain intensity significantly predicted both depression and anger, and both physical function and satisfaction with social roles mediated these relationships when modeled in separate 1-mediator models. Notably, however, when modeled together, ratings of satisfaction with social roles mediated the relationship between physical function and both anger and depression. Our results suggest that the process by which chronic pain disrupts emotional well-being involves both physical function and disrupted social functioning. However, the more salient factor in determining pain-related emotional distress seems to be disruption of social relationships, than global physical impairment. These results highlight the particular importance of social factors to pain-related distress, and highlight social functioning as an important target for clinical intervention in chronic pain.

  8. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy for neuroendocrine tumors in Germany: first results of a multi-institutional cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörsch, Dieter; Ezziddin, Samer; Haug, Alexander; Gratz, Klaus Friedrich; Dunkelmann, Simone; Krause, Bernd Joachim; Schümichen, Carl; Bengel, Frank M; Knapp, Wolfram H; Bartenstein, Peter; Biersack, Hans-Jürgen; Plöckinger, Ursula; Schwartz-Fuchs, Sabine; Baum, R P

    2013-01-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy is an effective treatment option for patients with well-differentiated somatostatin receptor-expressing neuroendocrine tumors. However, published data result mainly from retrospective monocentric studies. We initiated a multi-institutional, prospective, board-reviewed registry for patients treated with peptide receptor radionuclide therapy in Germany in 2009. In five centers, 297 patients were registered. Primary tumors were mainly derived from pancreas (117/297) and small intestine (80/297), whereas 56 were of unknown primary. Most tumors were well differentiated with median Ki67 proliferation rate of 5% (range 0.9-70%). Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy was performed using mainly yttrium-90 and/or lutetium-177 as radionuclides in 1-8 cycles. Mean overall survival was estimated at 213 months with follow-up between 1 and 230 months after initial diagnosis, and 87 months with follow-up between 1 and 92 months after start of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy. Median overall survival was not yet reached. Subgroup analysis demonstrated that best results were obtained in neuroendocrine tumors with proliferation rate below 20%. Our results indicate that peptide receptor radionuclide therapy is an effective treatment for well- and moderately differentiated neuroendocrine tumors irrespective of previous therapies and should be regarded as one of the primary treatment options for patients with somatostatin receptor-expressing neuroendocrine tumors.

  9. Barriers to cervical cancer screening faced by immigrants: a registry-based study of 1.4 million women in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinonen, Maarit K; Campbell, Suzanne; Ursin, Giske; Tropé, Ameli; Nygård, Mari

    2017-10-01

    Immigrants from certain low- and middle-income countries are more prone to cancers attributed to viral infections in early life. Cervical cancer is caused by human papillomavirus but is highly preventable by regular screening. We assessed participation among immigrants in a population-based cervical screening programme and identified factors that predicted non-adherence within different immigrant groups. We used data from several nationwide registries. The study population consisted of 208 626 (15%) immigrants and 1 157 223 (85%) native Norwegians. Non-adherence was defined as no eligible screening test in 2008-12. We estimated prevalence ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for factors associated with non-adherence by modified Poisson regression. In total, 52% of immigrants were not screened. All immigrants showed 1.72 times higher non-adherence rates (95% CI 1.71-1.73) compared with native Norwegian women when adjusted for age and parity. The proportion of non-adherent immigrants varied substantially by region of origin and country of origin. Being unemployed or not in the workforce, being unmarried, having low income and having a male general practitioner was associated with non-adherence regardless of region of origin. Living immigrant groups. An increasing proportion of immigrants and low screening participation among them pose new public health challenges in Europe. Immigrants are diverse in terms of their sociodemographic attributes and screening participation. Tailored information and service delivery may be necessary to increase cancer screening among immigrants. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association.

  10. Oxaliplatin/5-fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy as a standard of care for colon cancer in clinical practice: Outcomes of the ACCElox registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young Suk; Ji, Jiafu; Zalcberg, John Raymond; El-Serafi, Mostafa; Buzaid, Antonio; Ghosn, Marwan

    2015-12-01

    The ACCElox registry was set up to assess therapeutic management of early-stage colon cancer with oxaliplatin/5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based regimen and the duration of adjuvant chemotherapy in current clinical practice. This prospective observational study was conducted between 2006 and 2008 in 19 countries on 1548 newly diagnosed patients with stage II/III colon cancer, who had complete resection of the primary tumor and treated with at least one dose of oxaliplatin. The patient/disease characteristics, dose intensity, toxicity management, treatment delay and duration of disease-free survival (DFS)/relapse were assessed. About 73 and 27% of the patients were diagnosed with stage III (Dukes C) and stage II (Dukes B2) colon cancer, respectively. Overall, 74.4% patients completed the prescribed chemotherapy (FOLFOX 88%) and 97.6% patients received at least two cycles of oxaliplatin chemotherapy. The median actual dose intensity of oxaliplatin per cycle was 85 mg/m(2) . Relapse within 3 years occurred in 18.4% of patients with similar rate in all three groups (FOLFOX - 18.1%, FLOX - 19%, XELOX - 18.6%). At 3 years follow-up only 72 deaths were reported. The most common adverse events (AEs) at any cycle were neutropenia (63.9%), thrombocytopenia (23.3%), diarrhea (9.7%), sensory neuropathy (4.5%) and infection (2.6%). Disorders of central and peripheral nervous systems were frequently reported AEs at 6 months (54.3%, grade ≥1) and 12 months (36.4%, grade ≥1) of follow-up. Majority of the patients completed the prescribed oxaliplatin/5-FU regimen. There was no significant difference in the DFS among these regimens. Our results confirm the favorable benefit/risk profile of oxaliplatin/5-FU-based regimens in this setting in clinical practice. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Second generation registry framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellgard, Matthew I; Render, Lee; Radochonski, Maciej; Hunter, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Information management systems are essential to capture data be it for public health and human disease, sustainable agriculture, or plant and animal biosecurity. In public health, the term patient registry is often used to describe information management systems that are used to record and track phenotypic data of patients. Appropriate design, implementation and deployment of patient registries enables rapid decision making and ongoing data mining ultimately leading to improved patient outcomes. A major bottleneck encountered is the static nature of these registries. That is, software developers are required to work with stakeholders to determine requirements, design the system, implement the required data fields and functionality for each patient registry. Additionally, software developer time is required for ongoing maintenance and customisation. It is desirable to deploy a sophisticated registry framework that can allow scientists and registry curators possessing standard computing skills to dynamically construct a complete patient registry from scratch and customise it for their specific needs with little or no need to engage a software developer at any stage. This paper introduces our second generation open source registry framework which builds on our previous rare disease registry framework (RDRF). This second generation RDRF is a new approach as it empowers registry administrators to construct one or more patient registries without software developer effort. New data elements for a diverse range of phenotypic and genotypic measurements can be defined at any time. Defined data elements can then be utilised in any of the created registries. Fine grained, multi-level user and workgroup access can be applied to each data element to ensure appropriate access and data privacy. We introduce the concept of derived data elements to assist the data element standards communities on how they might be best categorised. We introduce the second generation RDRF that

  12. Bone marrow contributes to epithelial cancers in mice and humans as developmental mimicry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogle, Christopher R; Theise, Neil D; Fu, Dongtao; Ucar, Deniz; Lee, Sean; Guthrie, Steven M; Lonergan, Jean; Rybka, Witold; Krause, Diane S; Scott, Edward W

    2007-08-01

    Bone marrow cells have the capacity to contribute to distant organs. We show that marrow also contributes to epithelial neoplasias of the small bowel, colon, and lung, but not the skin. In particular, epithelial neoplasias found in patients after hematopoietic cell transplantations demonstrate that human marrow incorporates into neoplasias by adopting the phenotype of the surrounding neoplastic environment. To more rigorously evaluate marrow contribution to epithelial cancer, we employed mouse models of intestinal and lung neoplasias, which revealed specifically that the hematopoietic stem cell and its progeny incorporate within cancer. Furthermore, this marrow involvement in epithelial cancer does not appear to occur by induction of stable fusion. Whereas previous claims have been made that marrow can serve as a direct source of epithelial neoplasia, our results indicate a more cautionary note, that marrow contributes to cancer as a means of developmental mimicry. Disclosure of Potential Conflicts of Interest is found at the end of this article.

  13. Frederick National Laboratory's Contribution to ATOM | Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    As a founding member organization of ATOM, the Frederick National Laboratory will contribute scientific expertise in precision oncology, computational chemistry and cancer biology, as well as support for open sharing of data sets and predictive model

  14. Prospective evaluation of patient-reported quality of life outcomes after external beam radiation treatment for prostate cancer in Victoria: A cohort study by the Victorian Prostate Cancer Registry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandarage, V.R.K. Patabendi; Billah, Baki; Evans, Sue; Millar, Jeremy L.

    2016-01-01

    External beam radiation treatment (EBRT) for prostate cancer (CaP) can cause adverse effects on bowel, bladder and sexual function. We aimed to use CaP clinical registry data to evaluate variation in patient adverse effects after EBRT in Victoria. Study subjects were men diagnosed with primary CaP between 2009 and 2014, treated with EBRT in metropolitan Melbourne, or in one of three regional integrated cancer service (ICS) regions. Information on change in general and disease-specific health outcome 12 and 24 months after the initial diagnosis were obtained using a modified Expanded CaP index composite (EPIC)-26 survey and there was no variation of follow up between ICSs. The proportion of men with ‘big bother’ (the most troublesome category) was compared between the ICS regions in Victoria (n = 1,825). There was no difference in big bother in urinary and sexual function across the regions at 24 months. However, patients treated in one regional cancer service had a higher proportion with ‘big bother’ (11.1%) compared with the rest of the Victoria (4.8%); (χ2 = 4.85; P = 0.02). The only significant factor for this was the location of EBRT (odds ratio = 2.6; 95% confidence interval: 1.12–6.04; P = 0.02). There was no association over time in that region with change in EBRT technique from 3-D conformal radiation therapy to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (z-test for proportion: 0.77; P: 0.44). A comprehensive clinical cancer registry system, can be used to benchmark outcomes for men diagnosed with CaP and may detect clinically relevant variations that require further detailed evaluation and response.

  15. Pelvic lymphoscintigraphy: contribution to the preoperative staging of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Jose Hyppolito da

    1996-01-01

    Preservation of the lower rectal sphincters has been the main concern of colorectal surgeons in an attempt to avoid colostomy. Various proposed procedures contradict the oncological principles of the operation's radicality, especially pelvic lymphadenectomy. Prior knowledge of this space is therefore, an important factor in choosing the operative technique: radical (amputation), or conservative. The introduction of ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, have provided preoperative information about the anatomic nature of the region. The morphological and functional study supplied by lymphoscintigraphy of this space supplements the data furnished by the other imaging techniques. The objective of this prospective of this prospective study was threefold: to standardize lymphoscintigraphy, to differentiate patients with rectal cancer from those with other coloproctological diseases and to asses the lymphonodal involvement in the former by utilizing the anatomopathological and surgical correlation. The study included 60 patients with various coloproctological diseases seen on the Department of Gastroentorology, Hospital da Clinicas, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, from September 1990 to August 1993. Thirty were cases of rectal cancer and the remainder were other colorectal diseases. The method consisted of injecting 0.5 of a dextran solution market with radioactive technetium in the perineal region and obtaining images by a gamma camera. In the rectal cancer patients, the tracer progresses unilaterally or is absent; in the others, it is bilateral and symmetrical, although its progress may be slow. The statistical data demonstrated that in rectal cancer, lymphoscintigraphy asseses the nodal involvement approximaltely as that obtained by the sun of the anatomapathological and surgical findings. Based on the results, the following conclusioons were possible: lymphoscintigraphy is a standardized, painless and harmless test that can be

  16. The contribution of radiation therapy to the cancer in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watari, Tsutomu

    1981-01-01

    Majority of patients with tumors generally are sensitive and very useful of radiotherapy. Major cases in pediatric cancer are leukemia, brain tumor, neuroblastoma, malignant lymphoma, Wilms tumor, retinoblastoma, rhabdomyo-sarcoma, osteosarcoma, testicular tumors et al. Others are hemangioma including Kasabach-Merritt Syndrome. Radiation therapy is indicated to all cases of malignant tumor in children. Recently the treatment results improving with the help of well organized chemotherapy. Cancer in children is almost a speciality on its own. Since the total number of patients in any region is not large, treatment is best concentrated at special oncology centers. Long-term results in the majority of cases are disappointing, and the nursing problems after formidable. Surgery, Radiation and Chemotherapy and all valuable, especially in combination - Multidisciplinary therapy and Multidisciplinary team. (author)

  17. Education Level Is a Strong Prognosticator in the Subgroup Aged More Than 50 Years Regardless of the Molecular Subtype of Breast Cancer: A Study Based on the Nationwide Korean Breast Cancer Registry Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ki-Tae; Noh, Woochul; Cho, Se-Heon; Yu, Jonghan; Park, Min Ho; Jeong, Joon; Lee, Hyouk Jin; Kim, Jongjin; Oh, Sohee; Kim, Young A

    2017-10-01

    This study investigated the role of the education level (EL) as a prognostic factor for breast cancer and analyzed the relationship between the EL and various confounding factors. The data for 64,129 primary breast cancer patients from the Korean Breast Cancer Registry were analyzed. The EL was classified into two groups according to the education period; the high EL group (≥ 12 years) and low EL group (EL conferred a superior prognosis compared to a low EL in the subgroup aged > 50 years (hazard ratio, 0.626; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.577 to 0.678) but not in the subgroup aged ≤ 50 years (hazard ratio, 0.941; 95% CI, 0.865 to 1.024). The EL was a significant independent factor in the subgroup aged > 50 years according to multivariate analyses. The high EL group showed more favorable clinicopathologic features and a higher proportion of patients in this group received lumpectomy, radiation therapy, and endocrine therapy. In the high EL group, a higher proportion of patients received chemotherapy in the subgroups with unfavorable clinicopathologic features. The EL was a significant prognosticator across all molecular subtypes of breast cancer. The EL is a strong independent prognostic factor for breast cancer in the subgroup aged > 50 years regardless of the molecular subtype, but not in the subgroup aged ≤ 50 years. Favorable clinicopathologic features and active treatments can explain the main causality of the superior prognosis in the high EL group.

  18. Epidermal stem cells: location, potential and contribution to cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambler, C A; Määttä, A

    2009-01-01

    Epidermal stem cells have been classically characterized as slow-cycling, long-lived cells that reside in discrete niches in the skin. Gene expression studies of niche-resident cells have revealed a number of stem cell markers and regulators, including the Wnt/beta-catenin, Notch, p63, c-Myc and Hedgehog pathways. A new study challenges the traditional developmental paradigm of slow-cycling stem cells and rapid-cycling transit amplifying cells in some epidermal regions, and there is mounting evidence to suggest that multi-lineage epidermal progenitors can be isolated from highly proliferative, non-niche regions. Whether there is a unique microenvironment surrounding these progenitors remains to be determined. Interestingly, cancer stem cells derived from epidermal tumours exist independent of the classic skin stem cell niche, yet also have stem cell properties, including multi-lineage differentiation. This review summarizes recent studies identifying the location and regulators of mouse and human epidermal stem cells and highlights the strategies used to identify cancer stem cells, including expression of normal epidermal stem cell markers, expression of cancer stem cell markers identified in other epidermal tumours and characterization of side-population tumour cells.

  19. Smoking and colorectal cancer in Lynch syndrome: Results from the Colon Cancer Family Registry and The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Mala; Lynch, Patrick M.; Hopper, John L.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Gallinger, Steve; Haile, Robert W.; LeMarchand, Loic; Lindor, Noralane M.; Campbell, Peter T.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Potter, John D.; Baron, John A.; Frazier, Marsha L.; Amos, Christopher I.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Lynch syndrome family members with inherited germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes have a high risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) and cases typically have tumors that exhibit a high level of microsatellite instability (MSI). There is some evidence that smoking is a risk factor for CRCs with high MSI, but the association of smoking with CRC among those with Lynch syndrome is unknown. Experimental Design A multicentered retrospective cohort of 752 carriers of pathogenic MMR gene mutations was analyzed, using a weighted Cox regression analysis, adjusting for sex, ascertainment source, the specific mutated gene, year of birth, and familial clustering. Results Compared with never smokers, current smokers had a significantly increased CRC risk (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 1.62; 95% CI, 1.01 – 2.57) and former smokers who had quit smoking for 2 or more years were at decreased risk (HR = 0.53; 95% CI, 0.35 – 0.82). CRC risk did not vary according to age at starting. However, light smoking (Lynch syndrome may be at increased risk of CRC if they smoke regularly. Although our data suggest that former smokers, short-term and light smokers are at decreased CRC risk, these findings need further confirmation, preferably using prospective designs. PMID:20145170

  20. Clinical outcomes in patients with node-negative breast cancer treated based on the recurrence score results: evidence from a large prospectively designed registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemmer, Salomon M; Steiner, Mariana; Rizel, Shulamith; Soussan-Gutman, Lior; Ben-Baruch, Noa; Bareket-Samish, Avital; Geffen, David B; Nisenbaum, Bella; Isaacs, Kevin; Fried, Georgeta; Rosengarten, Ora; Uziely, Beatrice; Svedman, Christer; McCullough, Debbie; Maddala, Tara; Klang, Shmuel H; Zidan, Jamal; Ryvo, Larisa; Kaufman, Bella; Evron, Ella; Karminsky, Natalya; Goldberg, Hadassah; Shak, Steven; Liebermann, Nicky

    2017-01-01

    The 21-gene Recurrence Score® (RS) assay is a validated prognostic/predictive tool in ER + early-stage breast cancer. However, clinical outcome data from prospective studies in RS ≥ 11 patients are lacking, as are relevant real-life clinical practice data. In this retrospective analysis of a prospectively designed registry, we evaluated treatments/clinical outcomes in patients undergoing RS-testing through Clalit Health Services. The analysis included N0 ER + HER2-negative breast cancer patients who were RS-tested from 1/2006 through 12/2010. Medical records were reviewed to verify treatments/recurrences/survival. The cohort included 1801 patients (median follow-up, 6.2 years). Median age was 60 years, 50.4% were grade 2 and 81.1% had invasive ductal carcinoma; 48.9% had RS < 18, 40.7% RS 18-30, and 10.4% RS ≥ 31, with chemotherapy use of 1.4, 23.7, and 87.2%, respectively. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimates for distant recurrence were 0.8, 3.0, and 8.6%, for patients with RS < 18, RS 18-30 and RS ≥ 31, respectively; the corresponding 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimates for breast cancer death were 0.0, 0.9, and 6.2%. Chemotherapy-untreated patients with RS < 11 ( n  = 304) and 11-25 ( n  = 1037) (TAILORx categorizatio n ) had 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimates for distant recurrence risk/breast cancer death of 1.0%/0.0% and 1.3%/0.4%, respectively. Our results extend those of the prospective TAILORx trial: the 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimates for distant recurrence and breast cancer death rate for the RS < 18 patients were very low supporting the use of endocrine therapy alone. Furthermore, in chemotherapy-untreated patients with RS 11-25 (where TAILORx patients were randomized to chemoendocrine or endocrine therapy alone), 5-year distant recurrence rates were also very low, suggesting that chemotherapy would not have conferred clinically meaningful benefit.

  1. Use of a cancer registry is preferable to a direct-to-community approach for recruitment to a cohort study of wellbeing in women newly diagnosed with invasive breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrugia Helen

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer (BC mortality is declining such that the number of survivors of BC in the community is increasing. BC survivors report a range of sequelae from their cancer and its management beyond the period of their immediate treatment. Previous studies to document these have generally been small, clinic-based or commenced years after diagnosis. We have recruited a large cohort of women newly diagnosed with invasive BC from the community who will be followed for five years in order to systematically document the physical, psychological and socio-economic consequences of BC and its treatment. The aim of this manuscript is to describe the issues encountered in the recruitment of this community-based study population. Methods Women residing in the southern Australian state of Victoria newly diagnosed with invasive BC were recruited to this cohort study using two approaches: directly from the community using an advertising campaign and contemporaneously using an invitation to participate from the Victorian Cancer Registry (VCR. Results Over the two and half year recruitment period, 2135 women were recruited and agreed to receive the enrollment questionnaire (EQ. Of these, 1684 women were eligible and completed an EQ, with the majority of participants having been recruited through the VCR (n = 1321. Only 16% of women contacted by the VCR actively refused participation following a letter of invitation and phone follow-up. The age distribution and tumour characteristics of participants are consistent with state-wide data and their residential postcodes include 400 of a possible 699. Recruitment through a direct community awareness program aimed at women with newly diagnosed invasive BC was difficult, labour-intensive and expensive. Barriers to the recruitment process were identified. Conclusion Most of the women in this study were recruited through a state-based cancer registry. Limitations to recruitment occurred because we

  2. Localized prostate cancer in elderly men aged 80-89, findings from a population-based registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatandoust, S; Kichenadasse, G; O'Callaghan, M; Vincent, A D; Kopsaftis, T; Walsh, S; Borg, M; Karapetis, C S; Moretti, K

    2018-03-30

    To investigate the rate of death due to Prostate Cancer (PCa) and disease characteristics in patients diagnosed with Localized Prostate Cancer (LPCa) at age 80-89 years in comparison with men diagnosed at age 70-79. This is a retrospective study of data from the South Australian Prostate Cancer Clinical Outcomes Collaborative (SA-PCCOC). Included were men diagnosed between 2005 and 2014, aged ≥70 with no evidence of metastatic disease at presentation. Propensity score matching and competing risk Fine and Grey regression were used to assess the chance of treatment (curative v non-curative) and treatment effect on PCa specific-mortality. Of the 1951 eligible patients, 1428 (76%) aged 70-79, and 460 (24%) aged 80-89 yr at diagnosis (median age of 74 (IQR=72-76) and 83 (IQR=81-85) respectively). The 80-89 group had higher Gleason scores and PSA values (all pcopyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. The current use of active surveillance in an Australian cohort of men: a pattern of care analysis from the Victorian Prostate Cancer Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerakoon, Mahesha; Papa, Nathan; Lawrentschuk, Nathan; Evans, Sue; Millar, Jeremy; Frydenberg, Mark; Bolton, Damien; Murphy, Declan G

    2015-04-01

    To ascertain the treatment trends and patterns of care, for men with prostate cancer on active surveillance (AS) in Victoria, Australia. De-identified data was obtained for 6424 men from the Victorian Prostate Cancer Registry. Men included in this study were diagnosed with prostate cancer from 2008 to August 2012 with ≥ 12-months of follow-up. Patients were stratified using the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) risk grouping system and those who were not actively treated were identified. Data was acquired to describe the trends and uptake of AS according to public vs private hospital sector, and regional vs metropolitan regions. In all, 1603/6424 (24.9%) men received no treatment with curative intent at 12-months follow-up. This cohort included patients in whom the chosen management plan was recorded as AS (980/1603, 61.1%), watchful waiting (341/1603, 21.3%), or no management plan (282/1603, 17.6%). From this, 980/6424(15.3%) of the patients were recorded as being on AS across all NCCN categories at 12 months after diagnosis. This included 653/1816 (35.9%) of very low- and low-risk men, and 251/2820 (8.9%) of intermediate-risk men. Of our patients on AS, 169/980 (17.2%) progressed onto active treatment after 12 months. This active treatment included radical prostatectomy in 116 (68.6%), 32 (18.9%) undergoing external beam radiation therapy, 12 (7.1%) undergoingt brachytherapy and nine (5.3%) undergoing androgen-deprivation therapy. Overall, 629/979 (64.2%) of the AS patients were notified from a private hospital, with 350/979 (35.7%) of the patients notified from a public hospital (one patient unclassified). Of these, 202/652 (30.9%) of the AS patients with very low-/low-risk disease were managed in the public sector, vs 450/652 (69%) of very low-/low-risk AS patients being managed in the private sector. In our cohort, patients with very low- and low-risk disease, managed in a private hospital, were more likely to be on AS (P = 0.005). AS patients in

  4. Pulmonary metastasectomy in colorectal cancer: a prospective study of demography and clinical characteristics of 543 patients in the Spanish colorectal metastasectomy registry (GECMP-CCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embún, R; Fiorentino, F; Treasure, T; Rivas, J J; Molins, L

    2013-05-28

    To capture an accurate contemporary description of the practice of pulmonary metastasectomy for colorectal carcinoma in one national healthcare system. A national registry set up in Spain by Grupo Español de Cirugía Metástasis Pulmonares de Carcinoma Colo-Rectal (GECMP-CCR). 32 Spanish thoracic units. All patients with one or more histologically proven lung metastasis removed by surgery between March 2008 and February 2010. Pulmonary metastasectomy for one or more pulmonary nodules proven to be metastatic colorectal carcinoma. The age and sex of the patients having this surgery were recorded with the number of metastases removed, the interval between the primary colorectal cancer operation and the pulmonary metastasectomy, and the carcinoembryonic antigen level. Also recorded were the practices with respect to mediastinal lymphadenopathy and coexisting liver metastases. Data were available on 543 patients from 32 units (6-43/unit). They were aged 32-88 (mean 65) years, and 65% were men. In 55% of patients, there was a solitary metastasis. The median interval between the primary cancer resection and metastasectomy was 28 months and the serum carcinoembryonic antigen was low/normal in the majority. Liver metastatic disease was present in 29% of patients at some point prior to pulmonary metastasectomy. Mediastinal lymphadenectomy varied from 9% to 100% of patients. The data represent a prospective comprehensive national data collection on pulmonary metastasectomy. The practice is more conservative than the impression gained when members of the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons were surveyed in 2006/2007 but is more inclusive than would be recommended on the basis of recent outcome analyses. Further analyses on the morbidity associated with this surgery and the correlation between imaging studies and pathological findings are being published separately by GECMP-CCR.

  5. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for centrally located early-stage non-small cell lung cancer or lung metastases from the RSSearch® patient registry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, Joanne N.; Medbery, Clinton; Sharma, Sanjeev; Pablo, John; Kimsey, Frank; Perry, David; Muacevic, Alexander; Mahadevan, Anand

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate treatment patterns and outcomes of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for centrally located primary non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) or lung metastases from the RSSearch ® Patient Registry, an international, multi-center patient registry dedicated to radiosurgery and SBRT. Eligible patients included those with centrally located lung tumors clinically staged T1-T2 N0, M0, biopsy-confirmed NSCLC or lung metastases treated with SBRT between November 2004 and January 2014. Descriptive analysis was used to report patient demographics and treatment patterns. Overall survival (OS) and local control (LC) were determined using Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicity was reported using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. In total, 111 patients with 114 centrally located lung tumors (48 T1-T2,N0,M0 NSCLC and 66 lung metastases) were treated with SBRT at 19 academic and community-based radiotherapy centers in the US and Germany. Median follow-up was 17 months (range, 1–72). Median age was 74 years for primary NSCLC patients and 65 years for lung metastases patients (p < 0.001). SBRT dose varied from 16 – 60 Gy (median 48 Gy) delivered in 1–5 fractions (median 4 fractions). Median dose to centrally located primary NSCLC was 48 Gy compared to 37.5 Gy for lung metastases (p = 0.0001) and median BED 10 was 105.6 Gy for primary NSCLC and 93.6 Gy for lung metastases (p = 0.0005). Two-year OS for T1N0M0 and T2N0M0 NSCLC was 79 and 32.1 %, respectively (p = 0.009) and 2-year OS for lung metastases was 49.6 %. Two-year LC was 76.4 and 69.8 % for primary NSCLC and lung metastases, respectively. Toxicity was low with no Grade 3 or higher acute or late toxicities. Overall, patients with centrally located primary NSCLC were older and received higher doses of SBRT than those with lung metastases. Despite these differences, LC and OS was favorable for patients with central lung tumors treated with SBRT. Reported toxicity

  6. Cancer incidence in adults living in the vicinity of nuclear power plants in France, based on data from the French Network of Cancer Registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbiolles, Alice; Roudier, Candice; Goria, Sarah; Stempfelet, Morgane; Kairo, Cécile; Quintin, Cécile; Bidondo, Marie-Laure; Monnereau, Alain; Vacquier, Blandine

    2018-03-01

    Nuclear power plants (NPPs) release toxic emissions into the environment that may affect neighboring populations. This ecologic study was designed to investigate the possibility of an excess incidence of cancer in the vicinity of French NPPs by examining the incidence by municipality of 12 types of cancer in the population aged 15 years and older during the 1995-2011 period. Population exposure to pollution was estimated on the basis of distance from towns of residence to the NPP. Using regression models, we assessed the risk of cancer in a 20-km zone around NPPs and observed an excess incidence of bladder cancer (Relative Risk (RR), 95% Credibility Interval (95% CI)) in men and women (RR men  = 1.08; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.17 and RR women  = 1.19; 95% CI: 1.02, 1.39). Women living within the 20-km proximity areas had a significantly reduced risk of thyroid cancer (RR women  = 0.86; 95% CI: 0.77, 0.96). No excess risk of hematologic malignancies in either sex was seen. The higher than expected incidence of bladder cancer may be due to an excess incidence localized around the Flamanville NPP and the nearby La Hague nuclear waste treatment center, which is a source of chemical contaminants, many (including arsenic) of them known risk factors for bladder cancer. Differences in medical practices could explain the reduced risk of thyroid cancer. In this first study of adults living near NPPs in France, cancer incidence is significantly higher than in the references populations for one of the cancer types studied: bladder cancer. © 2017 UICC.

  7. Global surveillance of cancer survival 1995-2009: analysis of individual data for 25,676,887 patients from 279 population-based registries in 67 countries (CONCORD-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allemani, Claudia; Weir, Hannah K; Carreira, Helena; Harewood, Rhea; Spika, Devon; Wang, Xiao-Si; Bannon, Finian; Ahn, Jane V; Johnson, Christopher J; Bonaventure, Audrey; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael; Stiller, Charles; Azevedo e Silva, Gulnar; Chen, Wan-Qing; Ogunbiyi, Olufemi J; Rachet, Bernard; Soeberg, Matthew J; You, Hui; Matsuda, Tomohiro; Bielska-Lasota, Magdalena; Storm, Hans; Tucker, Thomas C; Coleman, Michel P

    2015-03-14

    Worldwide data for cancer survival are scarce. We aimed to initiate worldwide surveillance of cancer survival by central analysis of population-based registry data, as a metric of the effectiveness of health systems, and to inform global policy on cancer control. Individual tumour records were submitted by 279 population-based cancer registries in 67 countries for 25·7 million adults (age 15-99 years) and 75,000 children (age 0-14 years) diagnosed with cancer during 1995-2009 and followed up to Dec 31, 2009, or later. We looked at cancers of the stomach, colon, rectum, liver, lung, breast (women), cervix, ovary, and prostate in adults, and adult and childhood leukaemia. Standardised quality control procedures were applied; errors were corrected by the registry concerned. We estimated 5-year net survival, adjusted for background mortality in every country or region by age (single year), sex, and calendar year, and by race or ethnic origin in some countries. Estimates were age-standardised with the International Cancer Survival Standard weights. 5-year survival from colon, rectal, and breast cancers has increased steadily in most developed countries. For patients diagnosed during 2005-09, survival for colon and rectal cancer reached 60% or more in 22 countries around the world; for breast cancer, 5-year survival rose to 85% or higher in 17 countries worldwide. Liver and lung cancer remain lethal in all nations: for both cancers, 5-year survival is below 20% everywhere in Europe, in the range 15-19% in North America, and as low as 7-9% in Mongolia and Thailand. Striking rises in 5-year survival from prostate cancer have occurred in many countries: survival rose by 10-20% between 1995-99 and 2005-09 in 22 countries in South America, Asia, and Europe, but survival still varies widely around the world, from less than 60% in Bulgaria and Thailand to 95% or more in Brazil, Puerto Rico, and the USA. For cervical cancer, national estimates of 5-year survival range from less

  8. Facility Registry Service (FRS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Facility Registry Service (FRS) provides an integrated source of comprehensive (air, water, and waste) environmental information about facilities across EPA,...

  9. Radiological Patterns of Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer Patients : A Subproject of the German Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer (BMBC) Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laakmann, Elena; Witzel, Isabell; Scriba, Verena; Grzyska, Ulrich; zu Eulenburg, Christine; Burchardi, Nicole; Hesse, Tobias; Wuerschmidt, Florian; Fehm, Tanja; Moebus, Volker; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Loibl, Sibylle; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Mueller, Volkmar

    2016-01-01

    Evidence about distribution patterns of brain metastases with regard to breast cancer subtypes and its influence on the prognosis of patients is insufficient. Clinical data, cranial computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of 300 breast cancer patients with brain

  10. Quality of Care for Lung Cancer in Taiwan: A Pattern of Care Based on Core Measures in the Taiwan Cancer Database Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ru Chien

    2008-08-01

    Conclusion: It is very likely that significant variation in QOC for lung cancer in Taiwan exists among different types but not locations of hospitals, at least in the diagnostic domain. The introduction of internal benchmarking (TCDB and core measures was associated with some changes, at least in some diagnostic domains, which may lead to improvement in QOC for lung cancer in Taiwan.

  11. The Danish Neuro-Oncology Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steinbjørn; Nielsen, Jan; Laursen, René J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Danish Neuro-Oncology Registry (DNOR) is a nationwide clinical cancer database that has prospectively registered data on patients with gliomas since January 2009. The purpose of this study was to describe the establishment of the DNOR and further to evaluate the database completen......BACKGROUND: The Danish Neuro-Oncology Registry (DNOR) is a nationwide clinical cancer database that has prospectively registered data on patients with gliomas since January 2009. The purpose of this study was to describe the establishment of the DNOR and further to evaluate the database...

  12. The Contribution of Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 Promoter Genotypes in Taiwan Lung Cancer Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Te-Chun; Chang, Wen-Shin; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Chao, Che-Yi; Lin, Yi-Ting; Hsiao, Chieh-Lun; Hsu, Che-Lun; Chen, Wei-Chun; Hsia, Te-Chun; Bau, DA-Tian

    2018-01-01

    Up-regulation of metallo-proteinase (MMP) proteins has been shown in various types of solid cancers and the genotype of MMP1 has been associated with the risk of solid cancers. The contribution of MMP1 genotype to lung cancer has been investigated in various countries, though, to our knowledge, not in Taiwan. Therefore, in this study, we focused on the contribution of a polymorphism in the promoter region of MMP1 to lung cancer risk in Taiwan population. Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood of 358 patients with lung cancer and 716 healthy individuals (non-cancer patients). MMP1 rs1799750 polymorphic genotypes of each sample were determined using the typical methodology of polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). The percentages of 2G/2G, 1G/2G, and 1G/1G for MMP1 -1607 genotypes were 34.4%, 41.3% and 24.3% in the disease group and 33.9%, 44.0%, and 22.1% in the control group (p trend=0.6298), respectively. The results of carrier comparisons in dominant and recessive models also support the findings that 1G or 2G appears not to be a determinant allelic biomarker for Taiwan lung cancer. The MMP1 -1607 1G allele is a non-significant protective biomarker for lung cancer in Taiwan. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  13. Differential splicing of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in African and Caucasian American populations: contributing factor in prostate cancer disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    populations: contributing factor in prostate cancer disparities? PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Norman H Lee, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: George Washington...splicing of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in African and Caucasian American populations: contributing factor in prostate cancer disparities? 5b...American (AA) versus Caucasian American (CA) prostate cancer (PCa). We focused our efforts on two oncogenes, phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3

  14. Contribution of Arab countries to breast cancer research: comparison with non-Arab Middle Eastern countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweileh, Waleed M; Zyoud, Sa'ed H; Al-Jabi, Samah W; Sawalha, Ansam F

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common types of cancers affecting women worldwide. The main objective of this study was to assess and compare research activity in breast cancer in Arab countries with non-Arab Middle Eastern countries. Publications about "breast cancer" as a research topic were retrieved using the ISI Web of Science database. Analysis was confined to original research and review articles. Research productivity was assessed by assessing number of publications and time trend of these publications, names of journals, citation analysis, top 10 active institutions as well as country contribution to breast cancer research. The quantity and quality of publications from Arab countries in addition to 3 other Middle East countries (Turkey, Iran and Israel) were assessed and compared using the h-index tool. A total of 1658 original research and review articles about "breast cancer" were published from Arab countries. Annual research productivity from Arab countries in the field of "breast cancer" was negligible but showed a significant increase in the last decade. Retrieved documents had relatively high citation parameters as measured by h-index of 61 and average citations of 17.46 per document. The highest research productivity was from Egypt with a total publication of 582 (35.10%). Cairo University with a total of 149 (8.99%) publications had the highest research productivity among institutions in Arab world. Forty four documents (2.65%) of breast cancer documents were published in Saudi Medical Journal. Arab researchers collaborated mostly with researchers from the United States of America (305; 18.40%) in breast cancer research. Compared with other non-Arab Middle Eastern countries, Arab countries had higher research productivity than some countries and lower than others, particularly Israel. The present data reveals a good contribution of some Arab countries to the field of "breast cancer" research. There is a gap between Arab countries and Israel in

  15. Dietary fat, body weight, and cancer: contributions of studies in rodents to understanding these cancer risk factors in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, A E; Sullivan, L M; Hafer, L J

    1999-12-01

    Understanding diet and energy balance as risk factors for breast, colon, and other cancers requires information on the contribution of each factor and of interactions among factors to cancer risk. Rodent models for breast cancer provide extensive data on effects of dietary fat and calories, energy balance, body weight gain, and physical activity on tumor development. Analyses of the combined data from many studies have shown clearly that quality and quantity of dietary fat and energy balance contribute independently to increased mammary gland tumorigenesis. These findings were seen in female rats fed diets high in fat (35-40% of calories) compared to rats fed control diets, with approximately 10% of calories as fat (Fay and Freedman, 1997, Breast Cancer Res. Treat. 46, 215-223). The methods used permit comparison of experimental and epidemiological data, and they may be useful in extrapolating between species and developing public health recommendations. In addition to the contributions of lifetime-diet composition, intake, energy balance, and physical activity to cancer risk, there are questions about the timing and duration of alterations in these factors and about the "dose-response" characteristics of cancer risk to the factors. Endocrine mechanisms may be significant in mammary gland tumor risk, but experimental and epidemiological data indicate that cancers at other sites, such as colon and liver, also are influenced by the factors listed. Other diet and lifestyle factors that influence energy, or specifically fat, metabolism may also affect risk for cancers that are promoted by increased intake of fat and calories. Studies of separate and interactive effects of dietary fat, black tea, weight gain, and mammary gland tumorigenesis (Rogers, et al, 1998, Carcinogenesis 19, 1269-1273) have been analyzed. Using adjustment of carcinogenesis endpoints for body weight, tumor burden, and latency, they were found to be related to weight gain within treatment groups in

  16. Segregation, Jim Crow, Racism, Embodied History & the People’s Health: Implications for Cancer Registries, Research & Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Nancy Krieger is Professor of Social Epidemiology, in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Director of the HSPH Interdisciplinary Concentration on Women, Gender, and Health.  She is an internationally recognized social epidemiologist, with a background in biochemistry, philosophy of science, and the history of public health, combined with over 30 years of activism linking issues involving social justice, science, and health.  In 2004, she became an ISI highly cited scientist (reaffirmed: 2015 ISI update), a group comprising “less than one-half of one percent of all publishing researchers,” and in 2013 was the recipient of the Wade Hampton Frost Award from the Epidemiology Section of the American Public Health Association; in 2015, she was awarded the American Cancer Society Clinical Research Professorship. Dr. Krieger’s work addresses three topics: (1) conceptual frameworks to understand, analyze, and improve the people’s health, including the ecosocial theory of disease distribution she has been developing since 1994 and its focus on embodiment and equity; (2) etiologic research on societal determinants of population health and health inequities; and (3) methodologic research on improving monitoring of health inequities.  She is author of Epidemiology and The People’s Health: Theory and Context (Oxford University Press, 2011), editor of Embodying Inequality: Epidemiologic Perspectives (Baywood Press, 2004) and co-editor, with Glen Margo, of AIDS: The Politics of Survival (Baywood Publishers, 1994), and, with Elizabeth Fee, of Women’s Health, Politics, and Power:  Essays on Sex/Gender, Medicine, and Public Health (Baywood Publishers, 1994).  In 1994, she co-founded, and still chairs, the Spirit of 1848 Caucus of the American Public Health Association, which is concerned with the links between social justice and public health.  Dr. Krieger received her PhD in Epidemiology from the

  17. The Potential Contribution of BRCA Mutations to Early Onset and Familial Breast Cancer in Uzbekistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulla Abdikhakimov

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: This preliminary evidence suggests a potential contribution of BRCA1 5382insC mutation to breast cancer development in Uzbek population. Taking into account a high disease penetrance in carriers of BRCA1 mutation, it seems reasonable to recommend inclusion of the 5382insC mutation test in future research on the development of screening programs for breast cancer prevention in Uzbekistan.

  18. Deprivation and smoking trends among lung cancer patients before and after the Greek economic crisis. Insights from the Cancer Registry of Crete.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitra Sifaki-Pistolla

    2017-05-01

    The increased LC burden after the onset of the economic crisis, along with a changing pattern of LC predictors stress the urgent need of targeted interventions and cancer control programs focusing on the most deprived or vulnerable population groups.

  19. Germline mutations in PMS2 and MLH1 in individuals with solitary loss of PMS2 expression in colorectal carcinomas from the Colon Cancer Family Registry Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosty, Christophe; Clendenning, Mark; Walsh, Michael D; Eriksen, Stine V; Southey, Melissa C; Winship, Ingrid M; Macrae, Finlay A; Boussioutas, Alex; Poplawski, Nicola K; Parry, Susan; Arnold, Julie; Young, Joanne P; Casey, Graham; Haile, Robert W; Gallinger, Steven; Le Marchand, Loïc; Newcomb, Polly A; Potter, John D; DeRycke, Melissa; Lindor, Noralane M; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Baron, John A; Win, Aung Ko; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A; Buchanan, Daniel D

    2016-02-19

    Immunohistochemistry for DNA mismatch repair proteins is used to screen for Lynch syndrome in individuals with colorectal carcinoma (CRC). Although solitary loss of PMS2 expression is indicative of carrying a germline mutation in PMS2, previous studies reported MLH1 mutation in some cases. We determined the prevalence of MLH1 germline mutations in a large cohort of individuals with a CRC demonstrating solitary loss of PMS2 expression. This cohort study included 88 individuals affected with a PMS2-deficient CRC from the Colon Cancer Family Registry Cohort. Germline PMS2 mutation analysis (long-range PCR and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification) was followed by MLH1 mutation testing (Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification). Of the 66 individuals with complete mutation screening, we identified a pathogenic PMS2 mutation in 49 (74%), a pathogenic MLH1 mutation in 8 (12%) and a MLH1 variant of uncertain clinical significance predicted to be damaging by in silico analysis in 3 (4%); 6 (9%) carried variants likely to have no clinical significance. Missense point mutations accounted for most alterations (83%; 9/11) in MLH1. The MLH1 c.113A> G p.Asn38Ser mutation was found in 2 related individuals. One individual who carried the MLH1 intronic mutation c.677+3A>G p.Gln197Argfs*8 leading to the skipping of exon 8, developed 2 tumours, both of which retained MLH1 expression. A substantial proportion of CRCs with solitary loss of PMS2 expression are associated with a deleterious MLH1 germline mutation supporting the screening for MLH1 in individuals with tumours of this immunophenotype, when no PMS2 mutation has been identified. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. EMI Registry Development Plan

    CERN Document Server

    Memon, S.; Szigeti, G.; Field, L.

    2012-01-01

    This documents describes the overall development plan of the EMI Registry product, the plan focuses on the realisation of the EMI Registry specification as defined in the document. It is understood that during the course of the development phase the specification will likely evolve and the changes will be fed into the specification document.

  1. The Qingdao Twin Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duan, Haiping; Ning, Feng; Zhang, Dongfeng

    2013-01-01

    In 1998, the Qingdao Twin Registry was initiated as the main part of the Chinese National Twin Registry. By 2005, a total of 10,655 twin pairs had been recruited. Since then new twin cohorts have been sampled, with one longitudinal cohort of adolescent twins selected to explore determinants of me...

  2. Rural Women's Perceptions About Cancer Disparities and Contributing Factors: a Call to Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Yamile; Zimmermann, Kristine; Carnahan, Leslie R; Paulsey, Ellen; Bigman, Cabral A; Khare, Manorama M; Zahnd, Whitney; Jenkins, Wiley D

    2017-02-27

    Rural cancer disparities are increasingly documented in the USA. Research has identified and begun to address rural residents' cancer knowledge and behaviors, especially among women. Little, however, is known about rural female residents' awareness of cancer inequities and perceived contributing factors affecting them and their families. The purpose of this study was to address these gaps in the literature via a secondary analysis of qualitative needs assessment in Illinois' rural southernmost seven counties, a geographic region with relatively high rates of cancer incidence, morbidity, and mortality. A convenience sample of 202 rural adult female residents was recruited and participated in 26 focus groups, with 3-13 women per group. Inductive content analysis, guided by the principle of constant comparison, was used to analyze the qualitative data. Most respondents indicated their awareness of disproportionate cancer burden in their communities. Individual-level behaviors and environmental toxins were identified as contributing factors. Interestingly, however, environmental toxins were more often discussed as factors contributing to geographic differences, whereas individual-level behaviors were noted as important for overall cancer prevention and control. This study provides important insight into female rural residents' perspectives and offers novel venues for educational programs and research in the context of communication to eliminate disparities.

  3. Toshiba's advanced technologies contributing to heavy-ion radiotherapy for cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iikura, Takahiko

    2013-01-01

    Toshiba has been focusing effects on cancer treatment in the healthcare field, which is likely to continue to expand in the future. Our objective is to offer healthcare processes from early detection by means of regular cancer examinations, through to precise diagnosis, treatment ensuring the quality of life (QOL) appropriate to individual patients, and aftercare. In particular, we are promoting the development of heavy-ion radiotherapy systems incorporating our range of technologies for particle accelerators, irradiation devices, superconducting magnets, and information processing and networks. By offering heathcare processes with advanced heavy-ion radiotherapy systems as a core, our approach is expected to contribute to high-quality cancer treatment. (author)

  4. Fear Arousing Persuasive Communication: The Use of Threat and Coping Appraisal in Breast Cancer Messages

    OpenAIRE

    Karuoya Simon Njoroge; Helen Mberia

    2014-01-01

    At present, breast cancer is having a severe effect in Kenya and it forms a serious threat to Kenyan women. In Kenya, breast cancer is the most common reproductive organ cancer which contributed 23% of all female cancers with one out of every nine women being diagnosed with advanced breast cancer (Neondo, 2006). According to the regional cancer registry at Kenya Medical Research Institute, about 80% of reported cases of cancer in Kenya are diagnosed at advanced stages, when very little can be...

  5. The Contribution of Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 Genotype to Oral Cancer Susceptibility in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kuo-Ting; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Chang, Wen-Shin; Shih, Liang-Chun; Chen, Liang-Yu; Tsai, Ming-Hsiu; Ji, Hong-Xue; Hsiao, Chieh-Lun; Liu, Yu-Cheng; Li, Chi-Yuan; Bau, DA-Tian

    2016-01-01

    Metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of multifunctional proteins which have been shown to be up-regulated in various types of cancer. However, the contribution of MMP1 genotype to oral cancer has not been elucidated. This study aimed to evaluate the contribution of MMP1 promoter 1607 genotype to the risk of oral cancer. In this case-control study, MMP1 genotype and its interaction with consumption of areca, cigarettes, and alcohol in determining oral cancer risk were investigated in 788 patients with oral cancer and 956 gender-matched healthy controls. The distribution of 2G/2G, 1G/2G and 1G/1G for MMP1 promoter 1607 genotype was 36.8%, 40.2% and 23.0% in the oral cancer group and 34.3%, 44.9% and 20.8% in the non-cancer control group, respectively (p for trend=0.1454). We also analyzed the allelic frequency distributions and found that the variant 1G allele of MMP1 promoter 1607 conferred similar oral cancer susceptibility as the wild-type 2G allele (odds ratio=0.99, 95% confidence interval=0.87-1.14, p=0.9199). As for the gene-lifestyle interaction, there was an obvious protective effect of MMP1 promoter 1607 1G/2G genotype on the risk of oral cancer among smokers (odds ratio=0.71, 95% confidence interval=0.55-0.91, p=0.0076), but not non-smokers. There was no interaction between MMP1 promoter 1607 genotype and areca chewing or alcohol drinking habits. The 1G/2G genotype of MMP1 promoter 1607 may have a protective effect on oral cancer risk for smokers. The detailed mechanisms involved in this require further investigation. Copyright © 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  6. Contributions and Limitations of National Cervical Cancer Screening Program in Korea: A Retrospective Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Hyun Lee, MPH

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the contributions and limitations of the cervical cancer screening test with accuracy in Korea. Methods: This was a retrospective observational study. The study population consisted of all participants who underwent cervical cancer screening test from 2009 to 2014. The data were obtained from National Health Information Database (NHID which represents medical use records of most Koreans. As the indices for contributions and limitations of the screening test, crude detection rate, incidence rate of interval cancer, sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value were used. Results: The crude detection rate of screening test per 100,000 participants increased from 100.7 in 2009 to 102.1 in 2014. The incidence rate of interval cancer per 100,000 negatives decreased from 13.0 in 2009 to 10.2 in 2014. The sensitivities of screening test were 88.7% in 2009 and 91.2% in 2014, and the specificities were 98.5% in 2009 and 97.7% in 2014. The positive predictive value of screening decreased from 6.2% in 2009 to 4.3% in 2014. Conclusion: The Korean national cervical cancer screening program has improved in accuracy and has contributed to detection of early stage of cervical cancer over the years. Along with efforts to promote participation in cancer screening programs, quality control over the screening program should be enhanced. Keywords: carcinoma in situ, early detection of cancer, Papanicolaou test, sensitivity and specificity, uterine cervical neoplasms

  7. Advanced glycation end-products: a biological consequence of lifestyle contributing to cancer disparity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, David P

    2015-05-15

    Low income, poor diet, obesity, and a lack of exercise are interrelated lifestyle factors that can profoundly alter our biologic make up to increase cancer risk, growth, and development. We recently reported a potential mechanistic link between carbohydrate-derived metabolites and cancer, which may provide a biologic consequence of lifestyle that can directly affect tumor biology. Advanced glycation end-products (AGE) are reactive metabolites produced as a by-product of sugar metabolism. Failure to remove these highly reactive metabolites can lead to protein damage, aberrant cell signaling, increased stress responses, and decreased genetic fidelity. Critically, AGE accumulation is also directly affected by our lifestyle choices and shows a race-specific, tumor-dependent pattern of accumulation in cancer patients. This review will discuss the contribution of AGEs to the cancer phenotype, with a particular emphasis on their biologic links with the socioeconomic and environmental risk factors that drive cancer disparity. Given the potential benefits of lifestyle changes and the potential biologic role of AGEs in promoting cancer, opportunities exist for collaborations affecting basic, translational, epidemiologic, and cancer prevention initiatives. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. The Potential Contribution of BRCA Mutations to Early Onset and Familial Breast Cancer in Uzbekistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdikhakimov, Abdulla; Tukhtaboeva, Mukaddas; Adilov, Bakhtiyar; Turdikulova, Shahlo

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women and affects approximately 1 out of 8 females in the US. Risk of developing breast cancer is strongly influenced by genetic factors. Germ-line mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with 5-10% of breast cancer incidence. To reduce the risk of developing cancer and to increase the likelihood of early detection, carriers of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations are offered surveillance programs and effective preventive medical interventions. Identification of founder mutations of BRCA1/2 in high risk communities can have a significant impact on the management of hereditary cancer at the level of the national healthcare systems, making genetic testing more affordable and cost-effective. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in breast cancer patients have not been characterized in the Uzbek population. This pilot study aimed to investigate the contribution of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation to early onset and familial cases of breast cancer in Uzbekistan. A total of 67 patients with breast cancer and 103 age-matched disease free controls were included in this study. Utilizing SYBR Green based real-time allele-specific PCR, we have analyzed DNA samples of patients with breast cancer and disease free controls to identify the following BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations: BRCA1 5382insC, BRCA1 4153delA, BRCA1 185delAG, BRCA1 300T>G, BRCA2 6174delT. Three unrelated samples (4.5%) were found to be positive for the heterozygous 5382insCBRCA1 mutation, representing a possible founder mutation in the Uzbek population, supporting the need for larger studies examining the contribution of this mutation to breast cancer incidence in Uzbekistan. We did not find BRCA1 4153delA, BRCA1 185delAG, BRCA1 300T>G, and BRCA2 6174delT mutations. This preliminary evidence suggests a potential contribution of BRCA1 5382insC mutation to breast cancer development in Uzbek population. Taking into account a high disease penetrance in carriers of BRCA1 mutation, it seems

  9. Clinical outcomes in ER+ HER2 -node-positive breast cancer patients who were treated according to the Recurrence Score results: evidence from a large prospectively designed registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemmer, Salomon M; Steiner, Mariana; Rizel, Shulamith; Geffen, David B; Nisenbaum, Bella; Peretz, Tamar; Soussan-Gutman, Lior; Bareket-Samish, Avital; Isaacs, Kevin; Rosengarten, Ora; Fried, Georgeta; McCullough, Debbie; Svedman, Christer; Shak, Steven; Liebermann, Nicky; Ben-Baruch, Noa

    2017-01-01

    The Recurrence Score® is increasingly used in node-positive ER+ HER2-negative breast cancer. This retrospective analysis of a prospectively designed registry evaluated treatments/outcomes in node-positive breast cancer patients who were Recurrence Score-tested through Clalit Health Services from 1/2006 through 12/2011 ( N  = 709). Medical records were reviewed to verify treatments/recurrences/survival. Median follow-up, 5.9 years; median age, 62 years; 53.9% grade 2; 69.8% tumors ≤ 2 cm; 84.5% invasive ductal carcinoma; 42.0% N1mi, and 37.2%/15.5%/5.2% with 1/2/3 positive nodes; 53.4% Recurrence Score < 18, 36.4% Recurrence Score 18-30, and 10.2% Recurrence Score ≥ 31. Overall, 26.9% received adjuvant chemotherapy: 7.1%, 39.5%, and 86.1% in the Recurrence Score < 18, 18-30, and ≥ 31 group, respectively. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimates for distant recurrence were 3.2%, 6.3%, and 16.9% for these respective groups and the corresponding 5-year breast cancer death estimates were 0.5%, 3.4%, and 5.7%. In Recurrence Score < 18 patients, 5-year distant-recurrence rates for N1mi/1 positive node/2-3 positive nodes were 1.2%/4.4%/5.4%. As patients were not randomized to treatment and treatment decision is heavily influenced by Recurrence Score, analysis of 5-year distant recurrence by chemotherapy use was exploratory and should be interpreted cautiously: In Recurrence Score < 18, recurrence rate was 7.7% in chemotherapy-treated ( n  = 27) and 2.9% in chemotherapy-untreated patients ( n  = 352); P  = 0.245. In Recurrence Score 18-30, recurrence rate in chemotherapy-treated patients ( n  = 102) was significantly lower than in untreated patients ( n  = 156) (1.0% vs. 9.7% P  = 0.019); in Recurrence Score ≤ 25 (the RxPONDER study cutoff), recurrence rate was 2.3% in chemotherapy-treated ( n  = 89) and 4.4% in chemotherapy-untreated patients ( n  = 488); P  = 0.521. In conclusion, our findings

  10. Poor Prognosis of Lower Inner Quadrant in Lymph Node-negative Breast Cancer Patients Who Received No Chemotherapy: A Study Based on Nationwide Korean Breast Cancer Registry Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ki-Tae; Kim, Jongjin; Kim, Eun-Kyu; Jung, Sung Hoo; Sohn, Guiyun; Kim, Seung Il; Jeong, Joon; Lee, Hyouk Jin; Park, Jin Hyun; Oh, Sohee

    2017-07-01

    We aimed to investigate the prognostic influence of primary tumor site on the survival of patients with breast cancer. Data of 63,388 patients with primary breast cancer from the Korean Breast Cancer Registry were analyzed. Primary tumor sites were classified into 5 groups: upper outer quadrant, lower outer quadrant, upper inner quadrant, lower inner quadrant (LIQ), and central portion. We analyzed overall survival (OS) and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) according to primary tumor site. Central portion and LIQ showed lower survival rates regarding both OS and BCSS compared with the other 3 quadrants (all P < .05) and hazard ratios were 1.267 (95% CI, 1.180-1.360, P < .001) and 1.215 (95% CI, 1.097-1.345, P < .001), respectively. Although central portion showed more unfavorable clinicopathologic features, LIQ showed more favorable features than the other 3 quadrants. Primary tumor site was a significant factor in univariate and multivariate analyses for OS and BCSS (all P < .001). For lymph node-negative patients, LIQ showed a worse OS than the other primary tumor sites in the subgroup with no chemotherapy (P < .001), but that effect disappeared in the subgroup with chemotherapy (P = .058). LIQ showed a worse prognosis despite having more favorable clinicopathologic features than other tumor locations and it was more prominent for lymph node-negative patients who received no chemotherapy. The hypothesis of possible hidden internal mammary node metastasis could be suggested to play a key role in LIQ lesions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The effect of the time interval between diagnosis of muscle-invasive bladder cancer and radical cystectomy on staging and survival: A Netherlands Cancer Registry analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, H.M.; Aben, K.K.H.; Arends, T.J.; Heijden, A.G. van der; Witjes, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Data from single-center series suggest that a delay in time to radical cystectomy (RC) more than 3 months after diagnosis of muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) is associated with pathological upstaging and decreased survival. However, limited data is available from population-based

  12. [Trauma registry and injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira, S C

    2001-10-01

    The trauma registry network constitutes an essential database in every injury prevention system. In order to rationally estimate the extent of injury in general, and injuries from traffic accidents in particular, the trauma registry systems should contain the most comprehensive and broad database possible, in line with the operational definitions. Ideally, the base of the injury pyramid should also include mild injuries and even "near-misses". The Israeli National Trauma Registry has come a long way in the last few years. The eventual inclusion of all trauma centers in Israel will enable the establishment of a firm base for the allocation of resources by decision-makers.

  13. Nature, Nurture, and Cancer Risks: Genetic and Nutritional Contributions to Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoratou, Evropi; Timofeeva, Maria; Li, Xue; Meng, Xiangrui; Ioannidis, John P A

    2017-08-21

    It is speculated that genetic variants are associated with differential responses to nutrients (known as gene-diet interactions) and that these variations may be linked to different cancer risks. In this review, we critically evaluate the evidence across 314 meta-analyses of observational studies and randomized controlled trials of dietary risk factors and the five most common cancers (breast, lung, prostate, colorectal, and stomach). We also critically evaluate the evidence across 13 meta-analyses of observational studies of gene-diet interactions for the same cancers. Convincing evidence for association was found only for the intake of alcohol and whole grains in relation to colorectal cancer risk. Three nutrient associations had highly suggestive evidence and another 15 associations had suggestive evidence. Among the examined gene-diet interactions, only one had moderately strong evidence.

  14. Internal Mammary Lymph Node Irradiation Contributes to Heart Dose in Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chargari, Cyrus; Castadot, Pierre; MacDermed, Dhara; Vandekerkhove, Christophe; Bourgois, Nicolas; Van Houtte, Paul; Magne, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    We assessed the impact of internal mammary chain radiotherapy (IMC RT) to the radiation dose received by the heart in terms of heart dose-volume histogram (DVH). Thirty-six consecutive breast cancer patients presenting with indications for IMC RT were enrolled in a prospective study. The IMC was treated by a standard conformal RT technique (50 Gy). For each patient, a cardiac DVH was generated by taking into account the sole contribution of IMC RT. Cardiac HDV were compared according to breast cancer laterality and the type of previous surgical procedure, simple mastectomy or breast conservative therapy (BCT). The contribution of IMC RT to the heart dose was significantly greater for patients with left-sided versus right-sided tumors (13.8% and 12.8% for left-sided tumors versus 3.9% and 4.2% for right-sided tumors in the BCT group and the mastectomy group, respectively; p < 0.0001). There was no statistically significant difference in IMC contribution depending on the initial surgical procedure. IMC RT contributes to cardiac dose for both left-sided and right-sided breast cancers, although the relative contribution is greater in patients with left-sided tumors.

  15. Data Element Registry Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data Element Registry Services (DERS) is a resource for information about value lists (aka code sets / pick lists), data dictionaries, data elements, and EPA data...

  16. Danish Hip Arthroscopy Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind-Klavsen, Bjarne; Grønbech Nielsen, Torsten; Maagaard, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Danish Hip Arthroscopy Registry (DHAR) was initiated in 2012 as a web-based prospective registry. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and report the epidemiologic and perioperative data of the first 2000 procedures in a Danish hip arthroscopy population and to describe the development of DHAR...... was 0.65 and HAGOS sub-scores were 51 (pain), 49 (symptoms), 53 (ADL), 35 (sport), 20 (physical activity) and 29, respectively. We conclude that patients undergoing hip arthroscopy report considerable pain, loss of function, reduced level of activity and reduced quality-of-life prior to surgery....... The problems with development and maintaining a large clinical registry are described and further studies are needed to validate data completeness. We consider the development of a national clinical registry for hip arthroscopy as a successful way of developing and maintaining a valuable clinical...

  17. 911 Master PSAP Registry

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Communications Commission — Updated as of 5Oct2017. The Registry lists PSAPs by an FCC assigned identification number, PSAP Name, State, County, City, and provides information on any type of...

  18. Swiss Canine Cancer Registry 1955-2008: Occurrence of the Most Common Tumour Diagnoses and Influence of Age, Breed, Body Size, Sex and Neutering Status on Tumour Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüntzig, K; Graf, R; Boo, G; Guscetti, F; Hässig, M; Axhausen, K W; Fabrikant, S; Welle, M; Meier, D; Folkers, G; Pospischil, A

    2016-01-01

    This study is based on the Swiss Canine Cancer Registry, comprising 121,963 diagnostic records of dogs compiled between 1955 and 2008, in which 63,214 (51.83%) animals were diagnosed with tumour lesions through microscopical investigation. Adenoma/adenocarcinoma (n = 12,293, 18.09%) was the most frequent tumour diagnosis. Other common tumour diagnoses were: mast cell tumour (n = 4,415, 6.50%), lymphoma (n = 2,955, 4.35%), melanocytic tumours (n = 2,466, 3.63%), fibroma/fibrosarcoma (n = 2,309, 3.40%), haemangioma/haemangiosarcoma (n = 1,904, 2.80%), squamous cell carcinoma (n = 1,324, 1.95%) and osteoma/osteosarcoma (n = 842, 1.24%). The relative occurrence over time and the most common body locations of those tumour diagnoses are presented. Analyses of the influence of age, breed, body size, sex and neutering status on tumour development were carried out using multiple logistic regression. In certain breeds/breed categories the odds ratios (ORs) for particular tumours were outstandingly high: the boxer had higher ORs for mast cell tumour and haemangioma/haemangiosarcoma, as did the shepherd group for haemangioma/haemangiosarcoma, the schnauzer for squamous cell carcinoma and the rottweiler for osteoma/osteosarcoma. In small dogs, the risk of developing mammary tumours was three times higher than in large dogs. However, small dogs were less likely to be affected by many other tumour types (e.g. tumours of the skeletal system). Examination of the influence of sex and neutering status on tumour prevalence showed that the results depend on the examination method. In all sampling groups the risk for female dogs of developing adenoma/adenocarcinoma was higher than for male dogs. Females had a lower risk of developing haemangioma/haemangiosarcoma and squamous cell carcinoma than males. Neutered animals were at higher risk of developing specific tumours outside the genital organs than intact animals. The sample size allows detailed insight into the

  19. Factors contributing to delayed diagnosis of cancer among Aboriginal people in Australia: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Shaouli; Teng, Tiew-Hwa Katherine; Bessarab, Dawn; Aoun, Samar; Baxi, Siddhartha; Thompson, Sandra C

    2016-01-01

    Background/objectives Delayed presentation of symptomatic cancer is associated with poorer survival. Aboriginal patients with cancer have higher rates of distant metastases at diagnosis compared with non-Aboriginal Australians. This paper examined factors contributing to delayed diagnosis of cancer among Aboriginal Australians from patient and service providers' perspectives. Methods In-depth, open-ended interviews were conducted in two stages (2006–2007 and 2011). Inductive thematic analysis was assisted by use of NVivo looking around delays in presentation, diagnosis and referral for cancer. Participants Aboriginal patients with cancer/family members (n=30) and health service providers (n=62) were recruited from metropolitan Perth and six rural/remote regions of Western Australia. Results Three broad themes of factors were identified: (1) Contextual factors such as intergenerational impact of colonisation and racism and socioeconomic deprivation have negatively impacted on Aboriginal Australians' trust of the healthcare professionals; (2) health service-related factors included low accessibility to health services, long waiting periods, inadequate numbers of Aboriginal professionals and high staff turnover; (3) patient appraisal of symptoms and decision-making, fear of cancer and denial of symptoms were key reasons patients procrastinated in seeking help. Elements of shame, embarrassment, shyness of seeing the doctor, psychological ‘fear of the whole health system’, attachment to the land and ‘fear of leaving home’ for cancer treatment in metropolitan cities were other deterrents for Aboriginal people. Manifestation of masculinity and the belief that ‘health is women's domain’ emerged as a reason why Aboriginal men were reluctant to receive health checks. Conclusions Solutions to improved Aboriginal cancer outcomes include focusing on the primary care sector encouraging general practitioners to be proactive to suspicion of symptoms with appropriate

  20. PCA-1/ALKBH3 contributes to pancreatic cancer by supporting apoptotic resistance and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamato, Ichiro; Sho, Masayuki; Shimada, Keiji; Hotta, Kiyohiko; Ueda, Yuko; Yasuda, Satoshi; Shigi, Naoko; Konishi, Noboru; Tsujikawa, Kazutake; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki

    2012-09-15

    The PCA-1/ALKBH3 gene implicated in DNA repair is expressed in several human malignancies but its precise contributions to cancer remain mainly unknown. In this study, we have determined its functions and clinical importance in pancreatic cancer. PCA-1/ALKBH3 functions in proliferation, apoptosis and angiogenesis were evaluated in human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Further, PCA-1/ALKBH3 expression in 116 patients with pancreatic cancer was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. siRNA-mediated silencing of PCA-1/ALKBH3 expression induced apoptosis and suppressed cell proliferation. Conversely, overexpression of PCA-1/ALKBH3 increased anchorage-independent growth and invasiveness. In addition, PCA-1/ALKBH3 silencing downregulated VEGF expression and inhibited angiogenesis in vivo. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis showed that PCA-1/ALKBH3 expression was abundant in pancreatic cancer tissues, where it correlated with advanced tumor status, pathological stage and VEGF intensity. Importantly, patients with low positivity of PCA-1/ALKBH3 expression had improved postoperative prognosis compared with those with high positivity. Our results establish PCA-1/ALKBH3 as important gene in pancreatic cancer with potential utility as a therapeutic target in this fatal disease.

  1. HIF1 Contributes to Hypoxia-Induced Pancreatic Cancer Cells Invasion via Promoting QSOX1 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Ye Shi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Quiescin sulfhydryl oxidase 1 (QSOX1, which oxidizes sulfhydryl groups to form disulfide bonds in proteins, is found to be over-expressed in various pancreatic cancer cell lines and patients. QSOX1 promotes invasion of pancreatic cancer cells by activating MMP-2 and MMP-9. However, its regulatory mechanism remains largely undefined. Methods: Real-time PCR and Western blot were employed to detect the expression of QSOX1 in human pancreatic cancer cell lines under hypoxic condition. Luciferase reporter and ChIP assays were used to assess the regulation of QSOX1 by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1. Small interfering RNA (siRNA was applied to knock down endogenous expression of QSOX1. Matrigel-coated invasion chamber essays were conducted to detect the invasion capacity of QSOX1-depleted cells. Results: Both hypoxia and hypoxia mimicking reagent up-regulated the expression of QSOX1 in human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Knockdown of HIF-1α eliminated hypoxia induced QSOX1 expression. HIF-1α was found directly bound to two hypoxia-response elements (HRE of QSOX1 gene, both of which were required for HIF-1 induced QSOX1 expression. Moreover, QSOX1 silencing blocked hypoxia-induced pancreatic cancer cells invasion. Conclusion: QSOX1 is a direct target of HIF-1 and may contribute to hypoxia-induced pancreatic cancer cells invasion.

  2. Appraising the quality of sub-Saharan African cancer registration systems that contributed to GLOBOCAN 2008: a review of the literature and critical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker-Buque, Tim; Pollock, Allyson M

    2015-02-01

    To critically appraise the quality of sub-Saharan African cancer registration systems that submitted data to GLOBOCAN 2008 with respect to population coverage using publicly available information and to show the use of GLOBOCAN statistics in determining global health priorities. Sources of cancer registration data for twenty-six sub-Saharan African cancer registries were identified from GLOBOCAN 2008 factsheets. Additional information was extracted from International Agency for Research on Cancer publications. A literature search was conducted to identify studies that reported additional information on data collection methods and provided 27 studies. The websites of the 10 largest funders of development assistance for health were searched for GLOBOCAN citations. Twenty-six sub-Saharan African cancer registration systems submitting data to GLOBOCAN 2008 in relation to 21 countries. Information on 15 quality variables were extracted and compared with the international gold standard for cancer registration systems. Population coverage of the cancer registries ranged from from 2.3% of the population in Kenya to 100% in The Gambia, with a heavy urban bias in all countries. However, 20 countries (300 million people) had no cancer registration systems. Nineteen of the 26 registries failed to meet more than five of the 15 quality criteria and only one country met more than 10. Seven of the 10 largest funders of development assistance for health cite GLOBOCAN statistics in support of policy priorities. GLOBOCAN 2008 estimates are based on data drawn from poor quality cancer registration systems, with limited or no population registry coverage. It is essential the GLOBOCAN 2012 estimates should provide information on the quality of the data collection and explain the limitations of the estimates. Development organisations and the World Health Organization need to take a more cautious approach when using these data to determine priorities and allocating resources. © The

  3. MicroRNA-203-mediated posttranscriptional deregulation of CPEB4 contributes to colorectal cancer progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Xiaohua; Xiao, Yipin; Chen, Chao; Wei, Xiuwen; Hu, Chen; Ling, Xukun; Liu, Xinbin

    2015-01-01

    Elevated cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding 4 (CPEB4) is aberrantly expressed in several malignant cancers. However, its expression pattern, clinical significance, and biological function in colorectal cancer are still unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that CPEB4 is abundantly overexpressed in colorectal cancers and has the potential to be used for predicting clinical outcomes of colorectal cancer patients. We suppressed CPEB4 expression by small interfering RNA (siRNA) in SW480 and LOVO cells to clarify the role of CPEB4 on the cell apoptosis and proliferation in vitro. Further study revealed that knockdown of CPEB4 decreased the expression of anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-XL), but enhanced the expression of B-cell lymphoma-2-associated X (Bax). In addition, we indicated that CPEB4 is a novel target of miR-203, a tumor suppressive microRNA. Notably, restoration of CPEB4 in SW480 cells inhibited miR-203-induced apoptosis signaling pathway, which in turn enhanced cell proliferation and suppressed cell apoptosis. Taken together, our findings imply that posttranscriptional deregulation of CPEB4 contributes to the inhibited cell proliferation and the enhanced cell apoptosis in colorectal cancer, and directly targeting CPEB4 by miR-203 might be a novel strategy in colorectal cancer treatment. - Highlights: • CPEB4 is aberrantly expressed in human colorectal cancers. • Knockdown of CPEB4 inhibited colorectal cancer cell proliferation and enhanced apoptosis. • CPEB4 is a direct target of miR-203 and inversely correlates with miR-203 expression. • miR-203 inhibited cell growth and enhanced cell apoptosis in CPEB4 dependent manner. • miR-203 is an upstream regulator of the CPEB4-induced apoptosis pathway.

  4. MicroRNA-203-mediated posttranscriptional deregulation of CPEB4 contributes to colorectal cancer progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Xiaohua; Xiao, Yipin; Chen, Chao, E-mail: chenchaopw@126.com; Wei, Xiuwen; Hu, Chen; Ling, Xukun; Liu, Xinbin

    2015-10-16

    Elevated cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding 4 (CPEB4) is aberrantly expressed in several malignant cancers. However, its expression pattern, clinical significance, and biological function in colorectal cancer are still unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that CPEB4 is abundantly overexpressed in colorectal cancers and has the potential to be used for predicting clinical outcomes of colorectal cancer patients. We suppressed CPEB4 expression by small interfering RNA (siRNA) in SW480 and LOVO cells to clarify the role of CPEB4 on the cell apoptosis and proliferation in vitro. Further study revealed that knockdown of CPEB4 decreased the expression of anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-XL), but enhanced the expression of B-cell lymphoma-2-associated X (Bax). In addition, we indicated that CPEB4 is a novel target of miR-203, a tumor suppressive microRNA. Notably, restoration of CPEB4 in SW480 cells inhibited miR-203-induced apoptosis signaling pathway, which in turn enhanced cell proliferation and suppressed cell apoptosis. Taken together, our findings imply that posttranscriptional deregulation of CPEB4 contributes to the inhibited cell proliferation and the enhanced cell apoptosis in colorectal cancer, and directly targeting CPEB4 by miR-203 might be a novel strategy in colorectal cancer treatment. - Highlights: • CPEB4 is aberrantly expressed in human colorectal cancers. • Knockdown of CPEB4 inhibited colorectal cancer cell proliferation and enhanced apoptosis. • CPEB4 is a direct target of miR-203 and inversely correlates with miR-203 expression. • miR-203 inhibited cell growth and enhanced cell apoptosis in CPEB4 dependent manner. • miR-203 is an upstream regulator of the CPEB4-induced apoptosis pathway.

  5. The Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østgård, Lene Sofie Granfeldt; Nørgaard, Jan Maxwell; Raaschou-Jensen, Klas Kræsten

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The main aim of the Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry (DNLR) was to obtain information about the epidemiology of the hematologic cancers acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). STUDY POPULATION: The registry...... was established in January 2000 by the Danish Acute Leukemia Group and has been expanded over the years. It includes adult AML patients diagnosed in Denmark since 2000, ALL patients diagnosed since 2005, and MDS patients diagnosed since 2010. The coverage of leukemia patients exceeds 99%, and the coverage of MDS...... years. To ensure this high coverage, completeness, and quality of data, linkage to the Danish Civil Registration System and the Danish National Registry of Patients, and several programmed data entry checks are used. CONCLUSION: The completeness and positive predictive values of the leukemia data have...

  6. Deformation-driven, lethal damage to cancer cells. Its contribution to metastatic inefficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, L

    1991-04-01

    Direct and indirect, in vivo and in vitro observations are in accord with the hypothesis that as a consequence of their deformation within capillaries, cancer cells undergo sphere-to-cylinder shape-transformations that create a demand for increased surface area. When this demand cannot be met by apparent increases in surface area accomplished by nonlethal, surface "unfolding," the cell surface membrane is stretched; if expansion results in more than a 4% increase in true surface area, the membrane ruptures, resulting in cancer cell death. It is suggested that this deformation-driven process is an important factor in accounting for the rapid death of circulating cancer cells that have been trapped in the microvasculature. Therefore, this mechanism is thought to make a significant contribution to metastatic inefficiency by acting as a potent rate-regulator for hematogenous metastasis.

  7. Sociodemographic differences in fears and mistrust contributing to unwillingness to participate in cancer screenings

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Jenna L.; Bynum, Shalanda A.; Katz, Ralph V.; Buchanan, Kyrel; Green, B. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Effective provider-patient relationships are vital for positive patient health outcomes. This analysis assessed sociodemographic differences in fears and mistrust related to the provider-patient relationship, which may contribute to unwillingness to participate in cancer screenings (CSs). The data are from a stratified, random-digit dial telephone questionnaire of non-institutionalized households in New York, Maryland, and Puerto Rico. Statistically significant results indicate that Hispanics...

  8. Ethical aspects of registry-based research in the Nordic countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludvigsson JF

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Jonas F Ludvigsson,1,2 Siri E Håberg,3 Gun Peggy Knudsen,3 Pierre Lafolie,4,5 Helga Zoega,6 Catharina Sarkkola,7 Stephanie von Kraemer,7 Elisabete Weiderpass,1,7–10 Mette Nørgaard11 1Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, 2Department of Pediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; 3Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway; 4Department of Medicine, Clinical Pharmacology Unit, 5The Stockholm Regional Ethical Review Board, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; 6Center of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland; 7Genetic Epidemiology Group, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland; 8Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, 9The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, 10Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway; 11Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark Abstract: National health care registries in the Nordic countries share many attributes, but different legal and ethical frameworks represent a challenge to promoting effective joint research. Internationally, there is a lack of knowledge about how ethical matters are considered in Nordic registry-based research, and a lack of knowledge about how Nordic ethics committees operate and what is needed to obtain an approval. In this paper, we review ethical aspects of registry-based research, the legal framework, the role of ethics review boards in the Nordic countries, and the structure of the ethics application. We discuss the role of informed consent in registry-based research and how to safeguard the integrity of study participants, including vulnerable subjects and children. Our review also provides information on the different government agencies that contribute registry-based data, and a list of the major health registries in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and

  9. The Danish Heart Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özcan, Cengiz; Juel, Knud; Lassen, Jens Flensted

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The Danish Heart Registry (DHR) seeks to monitor nationwide activity and quality of invasive diagnostic and treatment strategies in patients with ischemic heart disease as well as valvular heart disease and to provide data for research. STUDY POPULATION: All adult (≥15 years) patients...... undergoing coronary angiography (CAG), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), coronary artery bypass grafting, and heart valve surgery performed across all Danish hospitals were included. MAIN VARIABLES: The DHR contains a subset of the data stored in the Eastern and Western Denmark Heart Registries (EDHR...

  10. The Western Denmark Heart Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Morten; Maeng, Michael; Madsen, Morten

    2018-01-01

    The WDHR (Western Denmark Heart Registry) is a seminational, multicenter-based registry with longitudinal registration of detailed patient and procedure data since 1999. The registry includes as of January 1, 2017 approximately 240,000 coronary angiographies, 90,000 percutaneous coronary interven......The WDHR (Western Denmark Heart Registry) is a seminational, multicenter-based registry with longitudinal registration of detailed patient and procedure data since 1999. The registry includes as of January 1, 2017 approximately 240,000 coronary angiographies, 90,000 percutaneous coronary...

  11. Ovarian cancer at young age: the contribution of mismatch-repair defects in a population-based series of epithelial ovarian

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanska, K; Malander, S; Måsbäck, A

    2007-01-01

    age is a hallmark of heredity, and ovarian cancers associated with HNPCC have been demonstrated to develop at a particularly early age. We used the Swedish Cancer Registry to identify a population-based series of 98 invasive epithelial ovarian cancers that developed before 40 years. Mucinous......At least one of ten patients with ovarian cancer is estimated to develop their tumor because of heredity with the breast and ovarian cancer syndrome due to mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) being the major genetic causes. Cancer at young...... and endometrioid cancers were overrepresented and were diagnosed in 27% and 16% of the tumors, respectively. Immunostaining using antibodies against MLH1, PMS2, MSH2, and MSH6 was used to assess the mismatch-repair status and revealed loss of expression of MLH1/PMS2 in two cases, loss of MSH2/MSH6 in one case...

  12. ABCF2, an Nrf2 target gene, contributes to cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Lingjie; Wu, Jianfa; Dodson, Matthew; Rojo de la Vega, Elisa Montserrat; Ning, Yan; Zhang, Zhenbo; Yao, Ming; Zhang, Donna D; Xu, Congjian; Yi, Xiaofang

    2017-06-01

    Previously, we have demonstrated that NRF2 plays a key role in mediating cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer. To further explore the mechanism underlying NRF2-dependent cisplatin resistance, we stably overexpressed or knocked down NRF2 in parental and cisplatin-resistant human ovarian cancer cells, respectively. These two pairs of stable cell lines were then subjected to microarray analysis, where we identified 18 putative NRF2 target genes. Among these genes, ABCF2, a cytosolic member of the ABC superfamily of transporters, has previously been reported to contribute to chemoresistance in clear cell ovarian cancer. A detailed analysis on ABCF2 revealed a functional antioxidant response element (ARE) in its promoter region, establishing ABCF2 as an NRF2 target gene. Next, we investigated the contribution of ABCF2 in NRF2-mediated cisplatin resistance using our stable ovarian cancer cell lines. The NRF2-overexpressing cell line, containing high levels of ABCF2, was more resistant to cisplatin-induced apoptosis compared to its control cell line; whereas the NRF2 knockdown cell line with low levels of ABCF2, was more sensitive to cisplatin treatment than its control cell line. Furthermore, transient overexpression of ABCF2 in the parental cells decreased apoptosis and increased cell viability following cisplatin treatment. Conversely, knockdown of ABCF2 using specific siRNA notably increased apoptosis and decreased cell viability in cisplatin-resistant cells treated with cisplatin. This data indicate that the novel NRF2 target gene, ABCF2, plays a critical role in cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer, and that targeting ABCF2 may be a new strategy to improve chemotherapeutic efficiency. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. ISHKS joint registry: A preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachore, Jawahir A; Vaidya, Shrinand V; Thakkar, Chandrasekhar J; Bhalodia, Haresh Kumar P; Wakankar, Hemant M

    2013-09-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA) are the most widely practiced surgical options for arthritis all over the world and its application is rising in India. Indian Society of Hip and Knee Surgeons (ISHKS) has established a joints registry and has been collecting data for last 6 years. All members of ISHKS are encouraged to actively participate in the registry. A simple two page knee and hip form can be downloaded from the website www.ishks.com. The information collected includes patient demographics, indication for surgery, implant details and in case of revision arthroplasty: the details of implants removed and the cause of failure of primary arthroplasty. These forms are mailed to the central registry office and the data is fed in computerized registry. Data collection started in October 2006. Joint registry is a very important initiative of ISHKS and till date, have data of 34,478 TKAs and 3604 THAs, contributed by 42 surgeons across India. Some important observations have emerged. Data of 34,478 TKAs was assessed: These included 8612 males (25%) and 25,866 females (75%). Average age was 64.4 years (Osteoarthritis range: 45 to 88 years; Rheumatoid arthritis range: 22 to 74 years). Average body mass index was 29.1 (Range: 18.1 to 42.9). The indication for TKA was osteoarthritis in 33,444 (97%) and rheumatoid arthritis in 759 (2.2%). Total of 3604 THA procedures were recorded. These included 2162 (60%) male patients and 1442 (40%) female patients. Average age was 52 years (Range 17 to 85 years) and average BMI was 25.8 (Range: 17.3 to 38.5). The indications for THA was AVN in 49%. The registry will become more meaningful in years to come. Active participation of all arthroplasty surgeons across India is vital for the success of the joints registry.

  14. Danish Hip Arthroscopy Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind-Klavsen, Bjarne; Lund, Bent; Nielsen, Torsten Grønbech

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: Predictors of outcome after femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) surgery are not well-documented. This study presents data from the Danish Hip Arthroscopy Registry (DHAR) for such analyses. The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of poor outcome after FAI surgery in a Danish FAI...

  15. The Danish Twin Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytthe, Axel; Ohm Kyvik, Kirsten; Vilstrup Holm, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The Danish Twin Registry is a unique source for studies of genetic, familial and environmental factors on life events, health conditions and diseases. Content: More than 85,000 twin pairs born 1870-2008 in Denmark. Validity and coverage: Four main ascertainment methods have been emp...

  16. Complement 5a stimulates macrophage polarization and contributes to tumor metastases of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Chunmei; Zhang, Wen-Mei; Li, Tao-Tao; Zhang, Cong-Cong; Qiu, Shulan; Liu, Yan; Liu, Sa; Jin, Ming; Jia, Li-Xin; Song, Wen-Chao; Du, Jie

    2018-05-15

    Inflammatory cells such as macrophages can play a pro-tumorigenic role in the tumor stroma. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) generally display an M2 phenotype with tumor-promoting activity; however, the mechanisms regulating the TAM phenotype remain unclear. Complement 5a (C5a) is a cytokine-like polypeptide that is generated during complement system activation and is known to promote tumor growth. Herein, we investigated the role of C5a on macrophage polarization in colon cancer metastasis in mice. We found that deficiency of the C5a receptor (C5aR) severely impairs the metastatic ability of implanted colon cancer cells. C5aR was expressed on TAMs, which exhibited an M2-like functional profile in colon cancer liver metastatic lesions. Furthermore, C5a mediated macrophage polarization and this process relied substantially on activation of the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway. Finally, analysis of human colon carcinoma indicated that C5aR expression is negatively associated with tumor differentiation grade. Our results demonstrate that C5aR has a central role in regulating the M2 phenotype of TAMs, which in turn, contributes to hepatic metastasis of colon cancer through NF-κB signaling. C5a is a potential novel marker for cancer prognosis and drugs targeting complement system activation, specifically the C5aR pathway, may offer new therapeutic opportunities for colon cancer management. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Overexpressed DNA polymerase iota regulated by JNK/c-Jun contributes to hypermutagenesis in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fang; Xu, Zhigang; Yang, Mingzhen; Wei, Quanfang; Zhang, Yi; Yu, Jin; Zhi, Yi; Liu, Yang; Chen, Zhiwen; Yang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Human DNA polymerase iota (pol ι) possesses high error-prone DNA replication features and performs translesion DNA synthesis. It may be specialized and strictly regulated in normal mammalian cells. Dysregulation of pol ι may contribute to the acquisition of a mutator phenotype. However, there are few reports describing the transcription regulatory mechanism of pol ι, and there is controversy regarding its role in carcinogenesis. In this study, we performed the deletion and point-mutation experiment, EMSA, ChIP, RNA interference and western blot assay to prove that c-Jun activated by c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) regulates the transcription of pol ι in normal and cancer cells. Xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein (XPC) and ataxia-telangiectasia mutated related protein (ATR) promote early JNK activation in response to DNA damage and consequently enhance the expression of pol ι, indicating that the novel role of JNK signal pathway is involved in DNA damage response. Furthermore, associated with elevated c-Jun activity, the overexpression of pol ι is positively correlated with the clinical tumor grade in 97 bladder cancer samples and may contribute to the hypermutagenesis. The overexpressed pol ι-involved mutagenesis is dependent on JNK/c-Jun pathway in bladder cancer cells identifying by the special mutation spectra. Our results support the conclusion that dysregulation of pol ι by JNK/c-Jun is involved in carcinogenesis and offer a novel understanding of the role of pol ι or c-Jun in mutagenesis.

  18. ISHKS joint registry: A preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jawahir A Pachore

    2013-01-01

    form can be downloaded from the website www.ishks.com. The information collected includes patient demographics, indication for surgery, implant details and in case of revision arthroplasty: the details of implants removed and the cause of failure of primary arthroplasty. These forms are mailed to the central registry office and the data is fed in computerized registry. Data collection started in October 2006. Results: Joint registry is a very important initiative of ISHKS and till date, have data of 34,478 TKAs and 3604 THAs, contributed by 42 surgeons across India. Some important observations have emerged. Data of 34,478 TKAs was assessed: These included 8612 males (25% and 25,866 females (75%. Average age was 64.4 years (Osteoarthritis range: 45 to 88 years; Rheumatoid arthritis range: 22 to 74 years. Average body mass index was 29.1 (Range: 18.1 to 42.9. The indication for TKA was osteoarthritis in 33,444 (97% and rheumatoid arthritis in 759 (2.2%. Total of 3604 THA procedures were recorded. These included 2162 (60% male patients and 1442 (40% female patients. Average age was 52 years (Range 17 to 85 years and average BMI was 25.8 (Range: 17.3 to 38.5. The indications for THA was AVN in 49%. Conclusion: The registry will become more meaningful in years to come. Active participation of all arthroplasty surgeons across India is vital for the success of the joints registry.

  19. Social Network Structures of Breast Cancer Patients and the Contributing Role of Patient Navigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Christine M; Parker, Victoria A; Bak, Sharon M; Ko, Naomi; Nelson, Kerrie P; Battaglia, Tracy A

    2017-08-01

    Minority women in the U.S. continue to experience inferior breast cancer outcomes compared with white women, in part due to delays in care delivery. Emerging cancer care delivery models like patient navigation focus on social barriers, but evidence demonstrating how these models increase social capital is lacking. This pilot study describes the social networks of newly diagnosed breast cancer patients and explores the contributing role of patient navigators. Twenty-five women completed a one hour interview about their social networks related to cancer care support. Network metrics identified important structural attributes and influential individuals. Bivariate associations between network metrics, type of network, and whether the network included a navigator were measured. Secondary analyses explored associations between network structures and clinical outcomes. We identified three types of networks: kin-based, role and/or affect-based, or heterogeneous. Network metrics did not vary significantly by network type. There was a low prevalence of navigators included in the support networks (25%). Network density scores were significantly higher in those networks without a navigator. Network metrics were not predictive of clinical outcomes in multivariate models. Patient navigators were not frequently included in support networks, but provided distinctive types of support. If navigators can identify patients with poorly integrated (less dense) social networks, or who have unmet tangible support needs, the intensity of navigation services could be tailored. Services and systems that address gaps and variations in patient social networks should be explored for their potential to reduce cancer health disparities. This study used a new method to identify the breadth and strength of social support following a diagnosis of breast cancer, especially examining the role of patient navigators in providing support. While navigators were only included in one quarter of patient

  20. The EuroMyositis registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lilleker, James B; Vencovsky, Jiri; Wang, Guochun

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: The EuroMyositis Registry facilitates collaboration across the idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIM) research community. This inaugural report examines pooled Registry data. METHODS: Cross-sectional analysis of IIM cases from 11 countries was performed. Associations between clinical subtyp...

  1. Relating cause of death with place of care and healthcare costs in the last year of life for patients who died from cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure and dementia: A descriptive study using registry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Plas, Annicka Gm; Oosterveld-Vlug, Mariska G; Pasman, H Roeline W; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D

    2017-04-01

    The four main diagnostic groups for palliative care provision are cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure and dementia. But comparisons of costs and care in the last year of life are mainly directed at cancer versus non-cancer or within cancer patients. Our aim is to compare the care and expenditures in their last year of life for Dutch patients with cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure or dementia. Data from insurance company Achmea (2009-2010) were linked to information on long-term care at home or in an institution, the National Hospital Registration and Causes of Death-Registry from Statistics Netherlands. For patients who died of cancer ( n = 8658), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease ( n = 1637), heart failure ( n = 1505) or dementia ( n = 3586), frequencies and means were calculated, Lorenz curves were drawn up and logistic regression was used to compare patients with high versus low expenditures. For decedents with cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the highest costs were for hospital admissions. For decedents with heart failure, the highest costs were for the care home (last 360 days) and hospital admissions (last 30 days). For decedents with dementia, the highest costs were for the nursing home. Patients with dementia had the highest expenditures due to nursing home care. The number of dementia patients will double by the year 2030, resulting in even higher economic burdens than presently. Policy regarding patients with chronic conditions should be informed by research on expenditures within the context of preferences and needs of patients and carers.

  2. Ovarian cancer: contribution of radiation therapy to patient management: Erskine Memorial Lecture, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    Ovarian cancer may be treated with radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy, or a combination. To evaluate the contribution of radiation therapy to patient management the cure rate must be estimated; data are presented suggesting that the 5-year survival rate provides a reasonable estimate of the cure rate. A study of patients treated since 1971 showed that stage and postoperative residuum could be used to divide patients into two subgroups, a poor prognosis group and a good prognosis group; a multifactorial grouping of patients in the good prognosis group who were treated postoperatively with radiation therapy only was further able to divide patients into low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk groups. Studies of radiation therapy for different subgroups are discussed; abdominopelvic irradiation has been shown to improve survival for approximately one-third of patients with cancer of the ovary

  3. Supporting cancer patients and their carers: the contribution of art therapy and clinical psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gudrun; Browning, Mary

    2009-11-01

    The value of various types of psychosocial support for people with cancer is now becoming well established. Typically the term 'psychosocial' includes: counselling and psychotherapy, cognitive behaviour therapy, education and information, and social support. The research literature sometimes fails to clarify the exact nature of the different approaches and their relative efficacy. Inevitably, even within a specific type of therapeutic approach, there is variation owing to the professional background and skills of different practitioners. This article describes the relative contributions made by an art psychotherapist and a clinical psychologist working together in a cancer and palliative care service in Wales. The referrals come from the same sources and tend to be for similar types of problem. The assessment and formulation processes are also broadly similar. Interventions, however, are markedly different. These are described in some detail through case study examples.

  4. Amplification of LAPTM4B and YWHAZ contributes to chemotherapy resistance and recurrence of breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szallasi, Zoltan Imre; Li, Yang; Zou, Lihua

    2010-01-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer after surgery has effectively lowered metastatic recurrence rates. However, a considerable proportion of women suffer recurrent cancer at distant metastatic sites despite adjuvant treatment. Identification of the genes crucial for tumor response to specific...... chemotherapy drugs is a challenge but is necessary to improve outcomes. By using integrated genomics, we identified a small number of overexpressed and amplified genes from chromosome 8q22 that were associated with early disease recurrence despite anthracycline-based adjuvant chemotherapy. We confirmed...... that 8q22 amplification and overexpression of LAPTM4B and YWHAZ contribute to de novo chemoresistance to anthracyclines and are permissive for metastatic recurrence. Overexpression of these two genes may predict anthracycline resistance and influence selection of chemotherapy....

  5. Contribution of DNA Repair Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group D Genotype to Gastric Cancer Risk in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hong-Xue; Chang, Wen-Shin; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Wang, Ju-Yu; Huang, Nai-Kuei; Lee, An-Sheng; Shen, Ming-Yi; Chen, Wei-Yu; Chiang, Yao-Chang; Shih, Tzu-Ching; Hsu, Chin-Mu; Bau, Da-Tian

    2015-09-01

    It has been proposed that genetic variations of DNA repair genes confer susceptibility to cancer, and the DNA repair gene xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD), the caretaker of genome stability, is thought to play a major role in the nucleotide excision repair system. We investigated three genotypes of XPD, at promoter -114 (rs3810366), and codon 312 (rs1799793), 751 (rs13181), and their associated with gastric cancer susceptibility in a Taiwanese population. In the present study, 121 patients with gastric cancer and 363 gender- and age-matched healthy controls were recruited and genotyped for XPD by polymerase chain reaction-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) methodology, and the association of XPD genotype with gastric cancer risk was investigated. We found a significant difference in the distribution of A allele-bearing XPD codon 312 genotypes [odds ratio (OR)=1.64, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.20-2.25, p=0.0019], but not in XPD codon 751 or promoter -114 sites, between the gastric cancer and control groups. Those who had G/A or A/A at XPD codon 312 had a 1.83-fold (95% CI=1.14-2.95, p=0.0159) and 1.87-fold (95% CI=1.04-3.34, p=0.0378) increased risk of gastric cancer compared to those with G/G. The risk for G/A and A/A genotypes had synergistic effects with alcohol drinking (OR=11.27, 95% CI=3.72-34.17, p=0.0001), cigarette smoking (OR=23.20, 95% CI=6.24-86.23, p=0.0001) and Helicobacter pylori infection (OR=5.38, 95% CI=2.76-10.52, p=0.0001) on gastric cancer susceptibility. Our findings suggest that the A allele of XPD codon 312 may contribute to gastric carcinogenesis and may be useful for early detection and prevention of gastric cancer. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  6. Doxorubicin-induced mitophagy contributes to drug resistance in cancer stem cells from HCT8 human colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chen; Luo, Lan; Guo, Chang-Ying; Goto, Shinji; Urata, Yoshishige; Shao, Jiang-Hua; Li, Tao-Sheng

    2017-03-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are known to be drug resistant. Mitophagy selectively degrades unnecessary or damaged mitochondria by autophagy during cellular stress. To investigate the potential role of mitophagy in drug resistance in CSCs, we purified CD133 + /CD44 + CSCs from HCT8 human colorectal cancer cells and then exposed to doxorubicin (DXR). Compared with parental cells, CSCs were more resistant to DXR treatment. Although DXR treatment enhanced autophagy levels in both cell types, the inhibition of autophagy by ATG7 silencing significantly increased the toxicity of DXR only in parental cells, not in CSCs. Interestingly, the level of mitochondrial superoxide was detected to be significantly lower in CSCs than in parental cells after DXR treatment. Furthermore, the mitophagy level and expression of BNIP3L, a mitophagy regulator, were significantly higher in CSCs than in parental cells after DXR treatment. Silencing BNIP3L significantly halted mitophagy and enhanced the sensitivity to DXR in CSCs. Our data suggested that mitophagy, but not non-selective autophagy, likely contributes to drug resistance in CSCs isolated from HCT8 cells. Further studies in other cancer cell lines will be needed to confirm our findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Health-related quality of life and disease specific symptoms in long-term thyroid cancer survivors : A study from the population-based PROFILES registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Husson, O.; Haak, H.R.; Buffart, L.M.; Nieuwlaat, W.-A.; Oranje, W.A.; Mols, F.; Kuijpens, J.L.; Coebergh, J.W.W.; van de Poll-Franse, L.V.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Given the longevity of thyroid cancer patients, any impairment in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) during the follow-up period is of considerable concern. Therefore, the first aim of this study was to assess (thyroid cancer specific) HRQoL among long-term thyroid cancer survivors

  8. Hospital variation in 30-day mortality after colorectal cancer surgery in denmark: the contribution of hospital volume and patient characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osler, Merete; Iversen, Lene Hjerrild; Borglykke, Anders

    2011-01-01

    This study examines variation between hospitals in 30-day mortality after surgery for colorectal cancer (CRC) in Denmark and explores whether hospital volume and patient characteristics contribute to any variation between hospitals.......This study examines variation between hospitals in 30-day mortality after surgery for colorectal cancer (CRC) in Denmark and explores whether hospital volume and patient characteristics contribute to any variation between hospitals....

  9. Amplification of PVT1 contributes to the pathophysiology ofovarian and breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, Yinghui; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Stilwell, Jackie; Takano, Hirokuni; Lapuk, Anna; Fridlyand, Jane; Mao, Jian-Hua; Yu, Mami; Ginzinger, David; Gray, Joe W.

    2007-10-09

    Purpose. This study was designed to elucidate the role of amplification at 8q24 in the pathophysiology of ovarian and breast cancer since increased copy number at this locus is one of the most frequent genomic abnormalities in these cancers. Experimental Design. To accomplish this, we assessed the association of amplification at 8q24 with outcome in ovarian cancers using FISH to tissue microarrays and measured responses of ovarian and breast cancer cell lines to specific small interfering RNAs (siRNA) against the oncogene, MYC, and a putative noncoding RNA, PVT1, both of which map to 8q24. Results. Amplification of 8q24 was associated with significantly reduced survival duration. In addition, siRNA-mediated reduction in either PVT1 or MYC expression inhibited proliferation in breast and ovarian cancer cell lines in which they were both amplified and over expressed but not in lines in which they were not amplified/over expressed. Inhibition of PVT1 expression also induced a strong apoptotic response in cell lines in which it was over expressed but not in lines in which it was not amplified/over expressed. Inhibition of MYC, on the other hand, did not induce an apoptotic response in cell lines in which MYC was amplified and over expressed. Conclusions. These results suggest that MYC and PVT1 contribute independently to ovarian and breast pathogenesis when over expressed because of genomic abnormalities. They also suggest that PVT1 mediated inhibition of apoptosis may explain why amplification of 8q24 is associated with reduced survival duration in patients treated with agents that act through apoptotic mechanisms.

  10. Quantification of pancreatic cancer proteome and phosphorylome: indicates molecular events likely contributing to cancer and activity of drug targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Britton

    Full Text Available LC-MS/MS phospho-proteomics is an essential technology to help unravel the complex molecular events that lead to and propagate cancer. We have developed a global phospho-proteomic workflow to determine activity of signaling pathways and drug targets in pancreatic cancer tissue for clinical application.Peptides resulting from tryptic digestion of proteins extracted from frozen tissue of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and background pancreas (n = 12, were labelled with tandem mass tags (TMT 8-plex, separated by strong cation exchange chromatography, then were analysed by LC-MS/MS directly or first enriched for phosphopeptides using IMAC and TiO2, prior to analysis. In-house, commercial and freeware bioinformatic platforms were used to identify relevant biological events from the complex dataset.Of 2,101 proteins identified, 152 demonstrated significant difference in abundance between tumor and non-tumor tissue. They included proteins that are known to be up-regulated in pancreatic cancer (e.g. Mucin-1, but the majority were new candidate markers such as HIPK1 & MLCK. Of the 6,543 unique phosphopeptides identified (6,284 unique phosphorylation sites, 635 showed significant regulation, particularly those from proteins involved in cell migration (Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors & MRCKα and formation of focal adhesions. Activator phosphorylation sites on FYN, AKT1, ERK2, HDAC1 and other drug targets were found to be highly modulated (≥2 fold in different cases highlighting their predictive power.Here we provided critical information enabling us to identify the common and unique molecular events likely contributing to cancer in each case. Such information may be used to help predict more bespoke therapy suitable for an individual case.

  11. Quantification of pancreatic cancer proteome and phosphorylome: indicates molecular events likely contributing to cancer and activity of drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, David; Zen, Yoh; Quaglia, Alberto; Selzer, Stefan; Mitra, Vikram; Löβner, Christopher; Jung, Stephan; Böhm, Gitte; Schmid, Peter; Prefot, Petra; Hoehle, Claudia; Koncarevic, Sasa; Gee, Julia; Nicholson, Robert; Ward, Malcolm; Castellano, Leandro; Stebbing, Justin; Zucht, Hans Dieter; Sarker, Debashis; Heaton, Nigel; Pike, Ian

    2014-01-01

    LC-MS/MS phospho-proteomics is an essential technology to help unravel the complex molecular events that lead to and propagate cancer. We have developed a global phospho-proteomic workflow to determine activity of signaling pathways and drug targets in pancreatic cancer tissue for clinical application. Peptides resulting from tryptic digestion of proteins extracted from frozen tissue of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and background pancreas (n = 12), were labelled with tandem mass tags (TMT 8-plex), separated by strong cation exchange chromatography, then were analysed by LC-MS/MS directly or first enriched for phosphopeptides using IMAC and TiO2, prior to analysis. In-house, commercial and freeware bioinformatic platforms were used to identify relevant biological events from the complex dataset. Of 2,101 proteins identified, 152 demonstrated significant difference in abundance between tumor and non-tumor tissue. They included proteins that are known to be up-regulated in pancreatic cancer (e.g. Mucin-1), but the majority were new candidate markers such as HIPK1 & MLCK. Of the 6,543 unique phosphopeptides identified (6,284 unique phosphorylation sites), 635 showed significant regulation, particularly those from proteins involved in cell migration (Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors & MRCKα) and formation of focal adhesions. Activator phosphorylation sites on FYN, AKT1, ERK2, HDAC1 and other drug targets were found to be highly modulated (≥2 fold) in different cases highlighting their predictive power. Here we provided critical information enabling us to identify the common and unique molecular events likely contributing to cancer in each case. Such information may be used to help predict more bespoke therapy suitable for an individual case.

  12. Occupational risk factors for testicular cancer: a registry-based case-control study in Rhineland Palatinate – Germany [Berufliche Risikofaktoren für Hodenkrebs: eine Register-basierte Fall-Kontroll-Studie in Rheinland-Pfalz – Deutschland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousif, Lamyaa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available [english] Objectives: Testicular cancer affects mainly men below the age of 50. An association with occupation and social status has been suggested but risk factors are not well understood. A registry-based case-control study focusing on occupation was performed in Germany.Methods: All 348 testicular cancer cases with available gainful occupational information registered between 2000 and 2005; as well as uitable controls (from a pool of other cancers were drawn from the Cancer Registry of Rhineland-Palatinate. Unconditional logistic regression was used to compute odds ratios (OR and associated onfidence intervals (CI.Results: Slightly elevated OR were observed for technicians and related professionals (OR 1.62, 95% CI 1.00–2.63 and for clerical support workers (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.14–2.56. This increase was highest in the age group 20–50 for technicians (OR 2.02, 95% CI 1.23–3.33 and clerks (OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.30–3.09, respectively. An association with testicular cancer was observed for no other occupation.Conclusion: An increased risk of testicular cancer was observed for technicians and related professionals and clerical support workers. This could be related to socioeconomic status or sedentary life style, two factors that were identified in previous studies. While the feasibility of a purely registry-based study was shown, missing occupational data and the choice of cancer controls represent challenges to the validity of this approach.[german] Ziele: Hodenkrebs betrifft vor allem junge Männer im Alter von unter 50 Jahren. Ein Zusammenhang zwischen erhöhtem Auftreten von Hodenkrebs und Beruf bzw. sozialem Status wurde untersucht (in Betracht gezogen, aber die Risikofaktoren sind bislang noch nicht umfassend erforscht. Eine Register-basierte Fall-Kontroll-Studie zur Untersuchung eines Zusammenhangs von beruflicher Erwerbstätigkeit und Hodenkrebs wurde in Deutschland durchgeführt.Methoden: 348 Hodenkrebsfälle mit den verf

  13. Aberrant Hypermethylation of SALL3 with HPV Involvement Contributes to the Carcinogenesis of Cervical Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Wei

    HPV-negative tissues (p<0.05.The aberrant hypermethylation of SALL3 together with HPV involvement inactivated its function as a tumor suppressor and contributed to carcinogenesis in cervical cancer.

  14. Regorafenib in the Real-Life Clinical Practice: Data from the Czech Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeckova, Katerina; Buchler, Tomas; Bortlicek, Zbynek; Hejduk, Karel; Chloupkova, Renata; Melichar, Bohuslav; Pokorna, Petra; Tomasek, Jiri; Linke, Zdenek; Petruzelka, Lubos; Kiss, Igor; Prausova, Jana

    2017-02-01

    To describe the use of regorafenib for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) in clinical practice in the Czech Republic, and to describe the clinical outcomes of patients in terms of safety and survival. The data of patients treated with regorafenib were extracted from the national CORECT registry. The CORECT registry is a non-interventional post-marketing database, gathering information about patients with CRC and treated with targeted agents. Twenty oncology centres in the Czech Republic contributed to this registry. Collected data included patients' characteristics, disease history, cancer treatments, response to treatments and safety. A total of 148 patients treated with regorafenib in clinical practice were analysed. At regorafenib initiation, almost all patients were fully active or slightly restricted in physical activity. Regorafenib was not administered as first-line treatment in any patient. Median progression-free survival was 3.5 months and median overall survival was 9.3 months. One-year survival rate was 44.6 %. Four partial responses were observed and 51 stable diseases. Progression was observed in 66 patients (44.6 %). The main reported adverse events were skin toxicity (5.4 %) and fatigue (2.0 %). Regorafenib is a well-established treatment for pretreated patients with mCRC, however real-life data are scarce. Our results demonstrated slightly better efficacy of regorafenib and better safety profile in patients with mCRC compared to the randomised trials.

  15. Does Embarrassment Contribute to Delay in Seeking Medical Care for Breast Cancer? A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamadreza Neishaboury

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Embarrassment and shame of visiting a doctor for a breast disease are among psychosocial factors that potentially contribute to delay in seeking medical advice. The purpose of this study is to review the published literature to determine if embarrassment regarding breast examination, diagnosis and treatment is associated with patient delay.Methods: We searched PubMed with the following key terms: patient acceptance of health care (MeSH, breast neoplasms/psychology (MeSH, shame (MeSH, embarrassment, delayed diagnosis, to find relevant literature published before August 2015.Results: The studies that explicitly assessed the association between embarrassment and delay for seeking medical advice for breast cancer were very limited. Among these studies, only 2 were quantitative studies, 4 were based on qualitative research and 4 were reviews. Other studies assessed attitudes in population-based surveys or included patients (females and males suffering from different types of cancer.Conclusions: Women should be educated that diseases of the breast need to be cared for as health issues in other parts of the body. They should be informed that embarrassment in this regard is not related to grace and integrity but can be potentially life-threatening. Further research is necessary to quantify the association of embarrassment or shame with delay in seeking diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. More research can elucidate the ways that the negative impact of shame/embarrassment can be minimized in different ethnic groups.

  16. The contribution of ultrasonography to the differential diagnosis of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciatto, S; Rosselli del Turco, M; Catarzi, S; Morrone, D [Center for Cancer Study and Prevention, 50131 Florence (Italy)

    1994-12-31

    Overall consecutive breast abnormalities (259 carcinomas, 1820 benign) examined with breast ultrasonography (US) are reported US sensitive, specificity and positive predictive values were 67.6, 97.7 and 81.0 %, resp. (the corresponding values were 57.9, 97.9 and 77.2 % for palpation, 79.9, 93.5 and 73.7 % for mammography, and 97.6, 92.6 and 87.6 % for cytology). US sensitivity was unaffected by age, whereas it was strongly influenced by tumor size (pT1 - 76.1 %; pT2 - 87.1 %) and histologic type (intra-ductal - 7.4 %; invasive ductal lobular - 83.4 %; invasive special types -64.1%). The features of the lesions at US were significance associated with cancer (irregular margins, posterior acoustic shadowing) or benign lesions (anechoic structure, lateral shadowing, posterior acoustic enhancement) but had a limited diagnostic accuracy. Overall US visualized 174 (benign - 24, suspicious - 150) of 188 palpable, and 32 (benign - 7, suspicious - 25) of 71 nonpalpable cancers, US contribution was determinant to final diagnosis in 4 of 7 cancers, missed at palpation and mammography, but was at least partially, responsible for 8 unnecessary biopsies of benign lesions. A negative/benign US report contributed to avoid unnecessary biopsy in 71 suspicious cases at palpation/mammography. Routine US examination of clinical/mammographic abnormalities is recommended for the advantages of US-guided aspiration and to reduce the frequency of unnecessary biopsies. (author) 4 tabs., 21 refs.

  17. The contribution of DNA apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease genotype and smoking habit to Taiwan lung cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Chun; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Hsia, Te-Chun; Chang, Wen-Shin; Lin, Liang-Yi; Liang, Shinn-Jye; Tu, Chih-Yen; Cheng, Wei-Erh; Chen, Hung-Jen; Wang, Shu-Ming; Bau, da-Tian

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the association and interaction of genotypic polymorphism the gene for DNA-apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APEX1) with personal smoking habit and lung cancer risk in Taiwan, the polymorphic variants of APEX1, Asp(148)Glu (rs1130409), were analyzed in association with lung cancer risk, and their joint effect with personal smoking habits on lung cancer susceptibility was discussed. In this hospital-based case-control study, 358 patients with lung cancer and 716 cancer-free controls, frequency-matched by age and sex, were recruited and genotyped by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). The results showed that the percentages of TT, TG and GG APEX1 Asp(148)Glu genotypes were not significantly different at 43.0%, 41.1% and 15.9% in the lung cancer patient group and 39.9%, 46.1% and 14.0% in non-cancer control group, respectively. We further analyzed the genetic-lifestyle effects on lung cancer risk and found the contribution of APEX1 Asp(148)Glu genotypes to lung cancer susceptibility was neither enhanced in the cigarette smokers nor in the non-smokers (p=0.3550 and 0.8019, respectively). Our results provide evidence that the non-synonymous polymorphism of APEX1 Asp(148)Glu may not be directly associated with lung cancer risk, nor enhance the effects of smoking habit on lung cancer development.

  18. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy and its impact on health-related quality of life among ovarian cancer survivors : Results from the population-based PROFILES registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ezendam, N.P.M.; Pijlman, B.M.; Bhugwandass, C.; Pruijt, J.F.; Mols, F.; Vos, M.C.; Pijnenborg, J.M.; van de Poll-Franse, L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study assessed the prevalence and risk factors of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, and its impact on health-related quality of life among ovarian cancer survivors, 2–12 years after diagnosis. Methods Women (n = 348) diagnosed with ovarian cancer between 2000 and 2010, as

  19. Designing exposure registries for improved tracking of occupational exposure and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrandale, Victoria H; Bornstein, Stephen; King, Andrew; Takaro, Timothy K; Demers, Paul A

    2016-06-27

    Registries are one strategy for collecting information on occupational exposure and disease in populations. Recently leaders in the Canadian occupational health and safety community have shown an interest in the use of occupational exposure registries. The primary goal of this study was to review a series of Canadian exposure registries to identify their strengths and weaknesses as a tool for tracking occupational exposure and disease in Canada. A secondary goal was to identify the features of an exposure registry needed to specifically contribute to prevention, including the identification of new exposure-disease relationships. A documentary review of five exposure registries from Canada was completed. Strengths and limitations of the registries were compared and key considerations for designing new registries were identified. The goals and structure of the exposure registries varied considerably. Most of the reviewed registries had voluntary registration, which presents challenges for the use of the data for either surveillance or epidemiology. It is recommended that eight key issues be addressed when planning new registries: clear registry goal(s), a definition of exposure, data to be collected (and how it will be used), whether enrolment will be mandatory, as well as ethical, privacy and logistical considerations. When well constructed, an exposure registry can be a valuable tool for surveillance, epidemiology and ultimately the prevention of occupational disease. However, exposure registries also have a number of actual and potential limitations that need to be considered.

  20. The survival of patients with Stage III Colon Cancer is improved in HNPCC compared with sporadic cases. A Danish registry based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brixen, Line Merrild; Bernstein, Inge Thomsen; Bülow, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    AIM: Patients with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) seem to have a better prognosis than those with sporadic colon cancer (CC)s. The aim was to compare survival after stage III CC in patients with HNPCC with those having sporadic CC. METHOD: 230 patients with hereditary cancer...... from The Danish HNPCC-Register and 3557 patients with sporadic CC from The Danish Colorectal Cancer Database, diagnosed during May 2001-December 2008 were included. HNPCC patients were classified according to Mismatch Repair mutation status and family pedigree. Sporadic cases had no known family...... history of cancer. Patient characteristics, geographic differences and survival data were analyzed. RESULTS: The overall survival (OS) was better in HNPCC patients compared to sporadic CC after stratification for sex and age (p=0.02; CI 1.04-1.7). The 5-year survival was 70% in HNPCC patients compared...

  1. The Danish Schizophrenia Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Lone; Cerqueira, Charlotte; Haller, Lea

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database: To systematically monitor and improve the quality of treatment and care of patients with schizophrenia in Denmark. In addition, the database is accessible as a resource for research. Study population: Patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and receiving mental health care...... to the data for use in specific research projects by applying to the steering committee. Conclusion: The Danish Schizophrenia Registry represents a valuable source of informative data to monitor and improve the quality of care of patients with schizophrenia in Denmark. However, continuous resources and time...

  2. Contextualized B2B Registries

    OpenAIRE

    Radetzki, U; Boniface, M.J.; Surridge, M.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract. Service discovery is a fundamental concept underpinning the move towards dynamic service-oriented business partnerships. The business process for integrating service discovery and underlying registry technologies into busi-ness relationships, procurement and project management functions has not been examined and hence existing Web Service registries lack capabilities required by business today. In this paper we present a novel contextualized B2B registry that supports dynamic regist...

  3. Elevated β-catenin activity contributes to carboplatin resistance in A2780cp ovarian cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barghout, Samir H. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Zepeda, Nubia; Xu, Zhihua [Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Steed, Helen [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Lee, Cheng-Han [Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Fu, YangXin, E-mail: yangxin@ualberta.ca [Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2015-12-04

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related mortalities in women. Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) represents approximately 90% of all ovarian malignancies. Most EOC patients are diagnosed at advanced stages and current chemotherapy regimens are ineffective against advanced EOC due to the development of chemoresistance. It is important to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying acquired resistance to effectively manage this disease. In this study, we examined the expression of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling components in the paired cisplatin-sensitive (A2780s) and cisplatin-resistant (A2780cp) EOC cell lines. Our results showed that several negative regulators of Wnt signaling are downregulated, whereas a few Wnt ligands and known Wnt/β-catenin target genes are upregulated in A2780cp cells compared to A2780s cells, suggesting that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is more active in A2780cp cells. Further analysis revealed nuclear localization of β-catenin and higher β-catenin transcriptional activity in A2780cp cells compared to A2780s cells. Finally, we demonstrated that chemical inhibition of β-catenin transcriptional activity by its inhibitor CCT036477 sensitized A2780cp cells to carboplatin, supporting a role for β-catenin in carboplatin resistance in A2780cp cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that increased Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity contributes to carboplatin resistance in A2780cp cells. - Highlights: • Wnt ligands and target genes are upregulated in cisplatin resistant A2780cp cells. • Negative regulators of Wnt signaling are down-regulated in A2780cp cells. • β-catenin transcriptional activity is higher in A2780cp cells compared to A2780s cells. • Inhibition of β-catenin activity increases carboplatin cytotoxicity in A2780cp cells.

  4. Elevated β-catenin activity contributes to carboplatin resistance in A2780cp ovarian cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barghout, Samir H.; Zepeda, Nubia; Xu, Zhihua; Steed, Helen; Lee, Cheng-Han; Fu, YangXin

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related mortalities in women. Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) represents approximately 90% of all ovarian malignancies. Most EOC patients are diagnosed at advanced stages and current chemotherapy regimens are ineffective against advanced EOC due to the development of chemoresistance. It is important to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying acquired resistance to effectively manage this disease. In this study, we examined the expression of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling components in the paired cisplatin-sensitive (A2780s) and cisplatin-resistant (A2780cp) EOC cell lines. Our results showed that several negative regulators of Wnt signaling are downregulated, whereas a few Wnt ligands and known Wnt/β-catenin target genes are upregulated in A2780cp cells compared to A2780s cells, suggesting that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is more active in A2780cp cells. Further analysis revealed nuclear localization of β-catenin and higher β-catenin transcriptional activity in A2780cp cells compared to A2780s cells. Finally, we demonstrated that chemical inhibition of β-catenin transcriptional activity by its inhibitor CCT036477 sensitized A2780cp cells to carboplatin, supporting a role for β-catenin in carboplatin resistance in A2780cp cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that increased Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity contributes to carboplatin resistance in A2780cp cells. - Highlights: • Wnt ligands and target genes are upregulated in cisplatin resistant A2780cp cells. • Negative regulators of Wnt signaling are down-regulated in A2780cp cells. • β-catenin transcriptional activity is higher in A2780cp cells compared to A2780s cells. • Inhibition of β-catenin activity increases carboplatin cytotoxicity in A2780cp cells.

  5. Development of ipilimumab: contribution to a new paradigm for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoos, Axel; Ibrahim, Ramy; Korman, Alan; Abdallah, Kald; Berman, David; Shahabi, Vafa; Chin, Kevin; Canetta, Renzo; Humphrey, Rachel

    2010-10-01

    Identification of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) as a key negative regulator of T-cell activity led to development of the fully human, monoclonal antibody ipilimumab to block CTLA-4 and potentiate antitumor T-cell responses. Animal studies first provided insight into the ability of an anti-CTLA-4 antibody to cause tumor regression, particularly in combination regimens. Early clinical studies defined ipilimumab pharmacokinetics and possibilities for combinability. Phase II trials of ipilimumab in advanced melanoma showed objective responses, but a greater number of patients had disease stabilization. In a phase III trial, ipilimumab was the first agent to demonstrate an improvement in overall survival in patients with previously treated, advanced melanoma. The adverse event profile associated with ipilimumab was primarily immune-related. Adverse events can be severe and life-threatening, but most were reversible using treatment guidelines. Ipilimumab monotherapy exhibits conventional and new patterns of activity in advanced melanoma, with a delayed separation of Kaplan-Meier survival curves. The observation of some new response patterns with ipilimumab, which are not captured by standard response criteria, led to novel criteria for the evaluation of immunotherapy in solid tumors. Overall, lessons from the development of ipilimumab contributed to a new clinical paradigm for cancer immunotherapy evolved by the Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Do female cancer patients display better survival rates compared with males? Analysis of the Korean National Registry data, 2005-2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu-Won Jung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sex differences have been reported in the prognosis of certain cancers. In this study, we investigated whether Korean females display better survival rates compared with male patients for solid tumor sites. METHODS: We analyzed data from the Korean National Cancer Incidence Database from 599,288 adult patients diagnosed with solid cancers between 2005 and 2009. Patients were followed until December 2010. We applied a relative excess risk (RER model adjusting for year of follow-up, age at diagnosis, and stage at diagnosis. RESULTS: For all solid cancer sites combined, women displayed an 11% lower risk of death compared to men (RER 0.89; 95% CI 0.88-0.90 after adjusting for year of follow-up, age, stage, and case mix. Women showed significantly lower RERs for the following sites: head/neck, esophagus, small intestine, liver, nasal cavities, lung, bone/cartilages, melanoma of skin, soft tissue, brain and CNS, and thyroid. In contrast, women displayed a poorer prognosis than did men for colorectal, laryngeal, kidney and bladder cancer. However, the survival gaps between men and women narrowed by increase in age; female patients over 75 years of age displayed a 3% higher RER of death compared with males in this age group. CONCLUSIONS: Female cancer patients display an improved survival for the majority of solid tumor sites, even after adjustment for age and stage. Age at diagnosis was the major contributor to the women's survival advantage.

  7. Resilience and positive affect contribute to lower cancer-related fatigue among Chinese patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Guiyuan; Li, Ye; Xu, Ruicai; Li, Ping

    2018-04-01

    To investigate the prevalence of cancer-related fatigue and explore the relationship between resilience, positive affect, and fatigue among Chinese patients with gastric cancer. Cancer-related fatigue is the most distressing symptom reported frequently by cancer patients during both treatment and survival phases. Resilience and positive affect as vital protective factors against cancer-related fatigue have been examined, but the underlying psychological mechanisms are not well understood. A cross-sectional study. Two hundred and three gastric cancer patients were enrolled from three hospitals in China. The Cancer Fatigue Scale, the positive affect subscale of the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule and the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC10) were administered. Hierarchical linear regression modelling was conducted to examine the association between resilience and cancer-related fatigue, and the mediating effect of positive affect. The incidence of clinically relevant fatigue among patients with gastric cancer was 91.6%. Regression analysis showed that resilience was negatively associated with cancer-related fatigue, explaining 15.4% of variance in cancer-related fatigue. Mediation analysis showed that high resilience was associated with increased positive affect, which was associated with decreased cancer-related fatigue. Cancer-related fatigue is prevalent among patients with gastric cancer. Positive affect may mediate the relationship between resilience and cancer-related fatigue. Interventions that attend to resilience training and promotion of positive affect may be the focus for future clinical and research endeavours. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Cancer and Chemotherapy Contribute to Muscle Loss by Activating Common Signaling Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Rafael; Mandili, Giorgia; Witzmann, Frank A.; Novelli, Francesco; Zimmers, Teresa A.; Bonetto, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Cachexia represents one of the primary complications of colorectal cancer due to its effects on depletion of muscle and fat. Evidence suggests that chemotherapeutic regimens, such as Folfiri, contribute to cachexia-related symptoms. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the cachexia signature in different conditions associated with severe muscle wasting, namely Colon-26 (C26) and Folfiri-associated cachexia. Using a quantitative LC-MS/MS approach, we identified significant changes in 386 proteins in the quadriceps muscle of Folfiri-treated mice, and 269 proteins differentially expressed in the C26 hosts (p < 0.05; −1.5 ≥ fold change ≥ +1.5). Comparative analysis isolated 240 proteins that were modulated in common, with a large majority (218) that were down-regulated in both experimental settings. Interestingly, metabolic (47.08%) and structural (21.25%) proteins were the most represented. Pathway analysis revealed mitochondrial dysfunctions in both experimental conditions, also consistent with reduced expression of mediators of mitochondrial fusion (OPA-1, mitofusin-2), fission (DRP-1) and biogenesis (Cytochrome C, PGC-1α). Alterations of oxidative phosphorylation within the TCA cycle, fatty acid metabolism, and Ca2+ signaling were also detected. Overall, the proteomic signature in the presence of both chemotherapy and cancer suggests the activation of mechanisms associated with movement disorders, necrosis, muscle cell death, muscle weakness and muscle damage. Conversely, this is consistent with the inhibition of pathways that regulate nucleotide and fatty acid metabolism, synthesis of ATP, muscle and heart function, as well as ROS scavenging. Interestingly, strong up-regulation of pro-inflammatory acute-phase proteins and a more coordinated modulation of mitochondrial and lipidic metabolisms were observed in the muscle of the C26 hosts that were different from the Folfiri-treated animals. In conclusion, our results suggest that both cancer

  9. eRegistries: Electronic registries for maternal and child health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frøen, J Frederik; Myhre, Sonja L; Frost, Michael J; Chou, Doris; Mehl, Garrett; Say, Lale; Cheng, Socheat; Fjeldheim, Ingvild; Friberg, Ingrid K; French, Steve; Jani, Jagrati V; Kaye, Jane; Lewis, John; Lunde, Ane; Mørkrid, Kjersti; Nankabirwa, Victoria; Nyanchoka, Linda; Stone, Hollie; Venkateswaran, Mahima; Wojcieszek, Aleena M; Temmerman, Marleen; Flenady, Vicki J

    2016-01-19

    The Global Roadmap for Health Measurement and Accountability sees integrated systems for health information as key to obtaining seamless, sustainable, and secure information exchanges at all levels of health systems. The Global Strategy for Women's, Children's and Adolescent's Health aims to achieve a continuum of quality of care with effective coverage of interventions. The WHO and World Bank recommend that countries focus on intervention coverage to monitor programs and progress for universal health coverage. Electronic health registries - eRegistries - represent integrated systems that secure a triple return on investments: First, effective single data collection for health workers to seamlessly follow individuals along the continuum of care and across disconnected cadres of care providers. Second, real-time public health surveillance and monitoring of intervention coverage, and third, feedback of information to individuals, care providers and the public for transparent accountability. This series on eRegistries presents frameworks and tools to facilitate the development and secure operation of eRegistries for maternal and child health. In this first paper of the eRegistries Series we have used WHO frameworks and taxonomy to map how eRegistries can support commonly used electronic and mobile applications to alleviate health systems constraints in maternal and child health. A web-based survey of public health officials in 64 low- and middle-income countries, and a systematic search of literature from 2005-2015, aimed to assess country capacities by the current status, quality and use of data in reproductive health registries. eRegistries can offer support for the 12 most commonly used electronic and mobile applications for health. Countries are implementing health registries in various forms, the majority in transition from paper-based data collection to electronic systems, but very few have eRegistries that can act as an integrating backbone for health

  10. Testicular cancer incidence to rise by 25% by 2025 in Europe? Model-based predictions in 40 countries using population-based registry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Cornet, Charlotte; Lortet-Tieulent, Joannie; Forman, David; Béranger, Rémi; Flechon, Aude; Fervers, Béatrice; Schüz, Joachim; Bray, Freddie

    2014-03-01

    Testicular cancer mainly affects White Caucasian populations, accounts for 1% of all male cancers, and is frequently the most common malignancy among young adult men. In light of the escalating rates of testicular cancer incidence in Europe, and in support of future planning to ensure optimal care of patients with what can be a curable disease, we predict the future burden in 40 European countries around 2025. Current observed trends were extrapolated with the NORDPRED model to estimate the future burden of testicular cancer in the context of changes in risk versus changes in demographics. Despite substantial heterogeneity in the rates, the vast majority of European countries will see an increasing burden over the next two decades. We estimate there will be 23,000 new cases of testicular cancer annually in Europe by 2025, a rise of 24% from 2005. Some of the most rapid increases in testicular cancer are observed in Croatia, Slovenia, Italy and Spain, and a transition is underway, whereby recent attenuations and declines in rates in certain high-risk countries in Northern Europe contrast with the increasing trends and escalating burden in Southern Europe. According to our estimates for 2025, around one in 100 men will be diagnosed with the disease annually in the highest risk countries of Europe (Croatia, Slovenia and Norway). Elucidating the key determinants of testicular cancer and the equitable provision of optimal care for patients across Europe are priorities given the steady rise in the number of patients by 2025, and an absence of primary prevention opportunities. None. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Differences in cancer awareness and beliefs between Australia, Canada, Denmark, Norway, Sweden and the UK (the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership): do they contribute to differences in cancer survival?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, L J L; Simon, A E; Warburton, F; Boniface, D; Brain, K E; Dessaix, A; Donnelly, C; Haynes, K; Hvidberg, L; Lagerlund, M; Lockwood, G; Tishelman, C; Vedsted, P; Vigmostad, M N; Ramirez, A J; Wardle, J

    2013-01-01

    Background: There are wide international differences in 1-year cancer survival. The UK and Denmark perform poorly compared with other high-income countries with similar health care systems: Australia, Canada and Sweden have good cancer survival rates, Norway intermediate survival rates. The objective of this study was to examine the pattern of differences in cancer awareness and beliefs across these countries to identify where these might contribute to the pattern of survival. Methods: We carried out a population-based telephone interview survey of 19 079 men and women aged ⩾50 years in Australia, Canada, Denmark, Norway, Sweden and the UK using the Awareness and Beliefs about Cancer measure. Results: Awareness that the risk of cancer increased with age was lower in the UK (14%), Canada (13%) and Australia (16%) but was higher in Denmark (25%), Norway (29%) and Sweden (38%). Symptom awareness was no lower in the UK and Denmark than other countries. Perceived barriers to symptomatic presentation were highest in the UK, in particular being worried about wasting the doctor's time (UK 34% Canada 21% Australia 14% Denmark 12% Norway 11% Sweden 9%). Conclusion: The UK had low awareness of age-related risk and the highest perceived barriers to symptomatic presentation, but symptom awareness in the UK did not differ from other countries. Denmark had higher awareness of age-related risk and few perceived barriers to symptomatic presentation. This suggests that other factors must be involved in explaining Denmark's poor survival rates. In the UK, interventions that address barriers to prompt presentation in primary care should be developed and evaluated. PMID:23370208

  12. Obesity Contributes to Ovarian Cancer Metastatic Success Through Increased Lipogenesis, Enhanced Vascularity, and Decreased Infiltration of M1 Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yueying; Metzinger, Matthew N.; Lewellen, Kyle A.; Cripps, Stephanie N.; Carey, Kyle D.; Harper, Elizabeth I.; Shi, Zonggao; Tarwater, Laura; Grisoli, Annie; Lee, Eric; Slusarz, Ania; Yang, Jing; Loughran, Elizabeth A.; Conley, Kaitlyn; Johnson, Jeff J.; Klymenko, Yuliya; Bruney, Lana; Liang, Zhong; Dovichi, Norman J.; Cheatham, Bentley; Leevy, W. Matthew; Stack, M. Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy, with high mortality attributable to widespread intra-peritoneal (i.p.) metastases. Recent meta-analyses report an association between obesity, ovarian cancer incidence, and ovarian cancer survival, but the effect of obesity on metastasis has not been evaluated. The objective of this study was to use an integrative approach combining in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo studies to test the hypothesis that obesity contributes to ovarian cancer metastatic success. Initial in vitro studies using three-dimensional meso-mimetic cultures showed enhanced cell-cell adhesion to the lipid-loaded mesothelium. Furthermore, in an ex vivo colonization assay, ovarian cancer cells exhibited increased adhesion to mesothelial explants excised from mice modeling diet-induced obesity (DIO), in which they were fed a "Western" diet. Examination of mesothelial ultrastructure revealed a substantial increase in the density of microvilli in DIO mice. Moreover, enhanced i.p. tumor burden was observed in overweight or obese animals in three distinct in vivo models. Further histological analyses suggested that alterations in lipid regulatory factors, enhanced vascularity, and decreased M1/M2 macrophage ratios may account for the enhanced tumorigenicity. Together, these findings show that obesity potently impacts ovarian cancer metastatic success, which likely contributes to the negative correlation between obesity and ovarian cancer survival. PMID:26573796

  13. Statistical aspects of tumor registries, Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, M

    1961-02-24

    Statistical considerations are presented on the tumor registries established for purpose of studying radiation induced carcinoma in Hiroshima and Nagasaki by observing tumors developing in the survivors of these cities. In addition to describing the background and purpose of the tumor registries the report consists of two parts: (1) accuracy of reported tumor cases and (2) statistical aspects of the incidence of tumors based both on a current population and on a fixed sample. Under the heading background, discussion includes the difficulties in attaining complete registration; the various problems associated with the tumor registries; and the special characteristics of tumor registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Beye's a posteriori probability formula was applied to the Type I and Type II errors in the autopsy data of Hiroshima ABCC. (Type I, diagnosis of what is not cancer as cancer; Type II, diagnosis of what is cancer as noncancer.) Finally, the report discussed the difficulties in estimating a current population of survivors; the advantages and disadvantages of analyses based on a fixed sample and on an estimated current population; the comparison of incidence rates based on these populations using the 20 months' data of the tumor registry in Hiroshima; and the sample size required for studying radiation induced carcinoma. 10 references, 1 figure, 8 tables.

  14. Danish National Lymphoma Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arboe, Bente; Josefsson, Pär; Jørgensen, Judit

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish National Lymphoma Registry (LYFO) was established in order to monitor and improve the diagnostic evaluation and the quality of treatment of all lymphoma patients in Denmark. STUDY POPULATION: The LYFO database was established in 1982 as a seminational database including...... all lymphoma patients referred to the departments of hematology. The database became nationwide on January 1, 2000. MAIN VARIABLES: The main variables include both clinical and paraclinical variables as well as details of treatment and treatment evaluation. Up to four forms are completed for each......-100 years) and a male/female ratio of 1.23:1. Patients can be registered with any of 42 different subtypes according to the World Health Organization classifications. CONCLUSION: LYFO is a nationwide database for all lymphoma patients in Denmark and includes detailed information. This information is used...

  15. Contribution of HIV infection to mortality among cancer patients in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coghill, Anna E; Newcomb, Polly A; Madeleine, Margaret M; Richardson, Barbra A; Mutyaba, Innocent; Okuku, Fred; Phipps, Warren; Wabinga, Henry; Orem, Jackson; Casper, Corey

    2013-11-28

    HIV infection is associated with cancer risk. This relationship has resulted in a growing cancer burden, especially in resource-limited countries where HIV is highly prevalent. Little is known, however, about how HIV affects cancer survival in these settings. We therefore investigated the role of HIV in cancer survival in Uganda. Retrospective cohort (N = 802). Eligible cancer patients were residents of Kyadondo County, at least 18 years of age at cancer diagnosis, and diagnosed between 2003 and 2010 with one of the following: breast cancer, cervical cancer, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, Hodgkin's lymphoma, or esophageal cancer. Patients were classified as HIV-infected at cancer diagnosis based on a documented positive HIV antibody test, medical history indicating HIV infection, or an HIV clinic referral letter. The primary outcome, vital status at 1 year following cancer diagnosis, was abstracted from the medical record or determined through linkage to the national hospice database. The risk of death during the year after cancer diagnosis was compared between cancer patients with and without evidence of HIV infection using Cox proportional hazards regression. HIV-infected cancer patients in Uganda experienced a more than two-fold increased risk of death during the year following cancer diagnosis compared to HIV-uninfected cancer patients [hazard ratio 2.28; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.61-3.23]. This association between HIV and 1-year cancer survival was observed for both cancers with (hazard ratio 1.56; 95% CI 1.04-2.34) and without (hazard ratio 2.68; 95% CI 1.20-5.99) an infectious cause. This study demonstrates the role of HIV in cancer survival for both cancers with and without an infectious cause in a resource-limited, HIV-endemic setting.

  16. Evaluation of an ICD-10 algorithm to detect osteonecrosis of the jaw among cancer patients in the Danish National Registry of Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrenstein, Vera; Gammelager, Henrik; Schiødt, Morten

    2015-01-01

    recorded in 2005-2010 among cancer patients at the hospital Departments of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (DOMS) in three Danish regions, using a set of codes from the International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision (ICD-10). We abstracted DOMS charts of the potential cases, had the ONJ status...

  17. The impact of body mass index and waist circumference on healt related quality of life among colorectal cancer survivors : Resultes from the PROFILES registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, P.A.J.; Martucci, R.B.; Mols, F.; Bours, M.J.; Winkels, R.M.; Kampman, E.; Weijenberg, M.P.; van de Poll-Franse, L.V.; Beijer, S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: We aimed to assess the association of waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI) with health-related quality of life (HRQL) among colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors. Methods: CRC survivors diagnosed between 2000 and 2009 completed questionnaires in August 2013 (with self-reported

  18. Treatment-related differences in health related quality of life and disease specific symptoms among colon cancer survivors : Results from the population-based PROFILES registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaar, S.; Vissers, P.A.J.; Maas, H.; van de Poll-Franse, L.V.; van Erning, F.N.; Mols, F.

    2015-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to compare health related quality of life (HRQoL) and disease-specific symptoms between colon cancer patients treated with surgery only (SU) and surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy (SU + adjCT). Results were stratified for those aged <70 and ⩾70 years. HRQoL of

  19. Nonverbal communication and conversational contribution in breast cancer genetic counseling: are counselors' nonverbal communication and conversational contribution associated with counselees' satisfaction, needs fulfillment and state anxiety in breast cancer genetic counseling?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, H.; Albada, A.; Klöckner Cronauer, C.; Ausems, M.G.E.M.; Dulmen, S. van

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The current study aimed to examine how counselors’ nonverbal communication (i.e. nonverbal encouragements and counselee-directed eye gaze) and conversational contribution (i.e. verbal dominance and interactivity) during the final visit within breast cancer genetic counseling relate to

  20. KIF14 Promotes AKT Phosphorylation and Contributes to Chemoresistance in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stina M. Singel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite evidence that kinesin family member 14 (KIF14 can serve as a prognostic biomarker in various solid tumors, how it contributes to tumorigenesis remains unclear. We observed that experimental decrease in KIF14 expression increases docetaxel chemosensitivity in estrogen receptor–negative/progesterone receptor–negative/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative, “triple-negative” breast cancers (TNBC. To investigate the oncogenic role of KIF14, we used noncancerous human mammary epithelial cells and ectopically expressed KIF14 and found increased proliferative capacity, increased anchorage-independent grown in vitro, and increased resistance to docetaxel but not to doxorubicin, carboplatin, or gemcitabine. Seventeen benign breast biopsies of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers showed increased KIF14 mRNA expression by fluorescence in situ hybridization compared to controls with no known mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2, suggesting increased KIF14 expression as a biomarker of high-risk breast tissue. Evaluation of 34 cases of locally advanced TNBC showed that KIF14 expression significantly correlates with chemotherapy-resistant breast cancer. KIF14 knockdown also correlates with decreased AKT phosphorylation and activity. Live-cell imaging confirmed an insulin-induced temporal colocalization of KIF14 and AKT at the plasma membrane, suggesting a potential role of KIF14 in promoting activation of AKT. An experimental small-molecule inhibitor of KIF14 was then used to evaluate the potential anticancer benefits of downregulating KIF14 activity. Inhibition of KIF14 shows a chemosensitizing effect and correlates with decreasing activation of AKT. Together, these findings show an early and critical role for KIF14 in the tumorigenic potential of TNBC, and therapeutic targeting of KIF14 is feasible and effective for TNBC.

  1. The SystHERs registry: an observational cohort study of treatment patterns and outcomes in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2–positive metastatic breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathy, Debu; Lai, Catherine; Masaquel, Anthony; Hurvitz, Sara; Rugo, Hope S; Kaufman, Peter A; Swain, Sandra; O’Shaughnessy, Joyce; Jahanzeb, Mohammad; Mason, Ginny; Beattie, Mary; Yoo, Bongin

    2014-01-01

    Amplification of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) gene occurs in approximately 20% of invasive breast cancer cases and is associated with a more aggressive disease course than HER2-negative breast cancer. HER2-targeted therapies have altered the natural history of HER2-positive breast cancer, a trend that will likely further improve with the recent approval of new agents. A prospective, observational cohort study was designed and initiated to provide real-world insights into current treatment patterns, long-term survival, and patients’ experiences with initial and subsequent treatments for HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC). The Systematic Therapies for HER2-positive Metastatic Breast Cancer Study (SystHERs) is a US-based prospective observational cohort study enrolling patients ≥18 years of age with recently diagnosed HER2-positive MBC not previously treated with systemic therapy in the metastatic setting. The primary objective of the study is to identify treatment patterns and clinical outcomes in recently diagnosed patients in a variety of practice settings. Secondary objectives include comparative efficacy, safety, and patient-reported outcomes (PROs). Healthcare resource utilization is an exploratory end point. Tumor tissue and blood sample collection is optional. The SystHERs registry will enroll approximately 1000 patients over a 3-year period, after which the study will continue for ≥5 years, allowing for a maximum follow-up of 8 years. The treating physician will determine all care and the frequency of visits. PRO measures will be completed at study enrollment and every 90 days. Clinical data will be abstracted quarterly from patient records. The first patient was enrolled in June 2012, and preliminary descriptive data based on 25% to 30% of the final study population are expected at the end of 2013, and as of April 25, 2014, 386 patients are enrolled. SystHERs is expected to provide in-depth data on demographic

  2. HIF-1 and NDRG2 contribute to hypoxia-induced radioresistance of cervical cancer Hela cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Junye; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Xiaowu; Li, Yan; Chen, Yongbin; Li, Kangchu; Zhang, Jian; Yao, Libo; Guo, Guozhen

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1), the key mediator of hypoxia signaling pathways, has been shown involved in hypoxia-induced radioresistance. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The present study demonstrated that both hypoxia and hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride could increase the radioresistance of human cervical cancer Hela cells. Meanwhile, ectopic expression of HIF-1 could enhance the resistance of Hela cells to radiation, whereas knocking-down of HIF-1 could increase the sensitivity of Hela cells to radiation in the presence of hypoxia. N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2), a new HIF-1 target gene identified in our lab, was found to be upregulated by hypoxia and radiation in a HIF-1-dependent manner. Overexpression of NDRG2 resulted in decreased sensitivity of Hela cells to radiation while silencing NDRG2 led to radiosensitization. Moreover, NDRG2 was proved to protect Hela cells from radiation-induced apoptosis and abolish radiation-induced upregulation of Bax. Taken together, these data suggest that both HIF-1 and NDRG2 contribute to hypoxia-induced tumor radioresistance and that NDRG2 acts downstream of HIF-1 to promote radioresistance through suppressing radiation-induced Bax expression. It would be meaningful to further explore the clinical application potential of HIF-1 and NDRG2 blockade as radiosensitizer for tumor therapy.

  3. Utility of an Australasian registry for children undergoing radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahern, Verity

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of an Australasian registry ('the Registry') for children undergoing radiation treatment (RT). Children under the age of 16years who received a course of radiation between January 1997 and December 2010 and were enrolled on the Registry form the subjects of this study. A total of 2232 courses of RT were delivered, predominantly with radical intent (87%). Registrations fluctuated over time, but around one-half of children diagnosed with cancer undergo a course of RT. The most prevalent age range at time of RT was 10–15years, and the most common diagnoses were central nervous system tumours (34%) and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (20%). The Registry provides a reflection of the patterns of care of children undergoing RT in Australia and a mechanism for determining the resources necessary to manage children by RT (human, facilities and emerging technologies, such as proton therapy). It lacks the detail to provide information on radiotherapy quality and disease outcomes which should be the subject of separate audit studies. The utility of the Registry has been hampered by its voluntary nature and varying needs for consent. Completion of registry forms is a logical requirement for inclusion in the definition of a subspecialist in paediatric radiation oncology.

  4. Danish Hip Arthroscopy Registry (DHAR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Bent; Mygind-Klavsen, Bjarne; Grønbech Nielsen, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    The Danish Hip Arthroscopy Registry (DHAR) was initiated in January 2012 as a web-based prospective registry. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and report the first registry based outcome data of a national population with radiological and clinical femoroacetabular impingement (FAI......) data from DHAR between January 2012 and November 2015 were extracted. Radiological pincer-type FAI was defined as LCE > 35° and cam FAI as alpha-angle > 55°. These data were combined with FAI surgical data such as osteochondroplasty and labral repair or resection. PROMs consisting of HAGOS, EQ-5 D...

  5. Sirolimus use and cancer incidence among US kidney transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanik, E L; Gustafson, S K; Kasiske, B L; Israni, A K; Snyder, J J; Hess, G P; Engels, E A; Segev, D L

    2015-01-01

    Sirolimus has anti-carcinogenic properties and can be included in maintenance immunosuppressive therapy following kidney transplantation. We investigated sirolimus effects on cancer incidence among kidney recipients. The US transplant registry was linked with 15 population-based cancer registries and national pharmacy claims. Recipients contributed sirolimus-exposed time when sirolimus claims were filled, and unexposed time when other immunosuppressant claims were filled without sirolimus. Cox regression was used to estimate associations with overall and specific cancer incidence, excluding nonmelanoma skin cancers (not captured in cancer registries). We included 32,604 kidney transplants (5687 sirolimus-exposed). Overall, cancer incidence was suggestively lower during sirolimus use (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.88, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.70-1.11). Prostate cancer incidence was higher during sirolimus use (HR = 1.86, 95% CI = 1.15-3.02). Incidence of other cancers was similar or lower with sirolimus use, with a 26% decrease overall (HR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.57-0.96, excluding prostate cancer). Results were similar after adjustment for demographic and clinical characteristics. This modest association does not provide strong evidence that sirolimus prevents posttransplant cancer, but it may be advantageous among kidney recipients with high cancer risk. Increased prostate cancer diagnoses may result from sirolimus effects on screen detection. © Copyright 2014 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  6. The relative contributions of function, perceived psychological burden and partner support to cognitive distress in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyes, Susan M; Bond, Malcolm J; Harrington, Ann; Belan, Ingrid

    2016-09-01

    Bladder cancer is a genitourinary disease of increasing incidence. Despite improvements in treatment, outcomes remain equivocal with high recurrence rates. It is associated with poor psychosocial outcomes due to reduced functioning of the genitourinary system. The objective of these analyses was to query whether reported loss of function or the perception of psychological burden caused by this functional impedance was the key to understanding psychosocial outcomes. The sample comprised 119 participants with a confirmed diagnosis of bladder cancer. They completed a self-report questionnaire comprising the Bladder Cancer Index, Mini-mental Adjustment to Cancer Scale, Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale and standard sociodemographic details. Simple mediation and serial mediation were used to explore the potential for psychological burden to mediate associations between loss of function and cognitive distress, and the potential additional contribution of positive partner support on these relationships. Age and duration of cancer were considered as covariates. Simple mediation demonstrated that the association between function and cognitive distress was fully mediated by perceived psychological burden. Serial mediation, which allowed for the addition of partner support, again demonstrated full mediation, with partner support being the key predictive variable. These analyses emphasise the importance of an appreciation of individuals' interpretation of the burden occasioned by bladder cancer and the role of a supportive partner. The implications for management discussions and support services in alleviating negative psychological outcomes in bladder cancer are highlighted. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Contribution of DNA repair xeroderma pigmentosum group D genotypes to pancreatic cancer risk in the Chinese Han population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Yan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to determine the association between the polymorphisms and haplotypes in the xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD gene and the risk of pancreatic cancer in the Chinese Han population. SNaPshot was used for genotyping six SNP sites of the XPD gene. Comparisons of the correlations between different genotypes in combination with smoking and the susceptibility to pancreatic cancer were performed. Individual pancreatic cancer risk in patients who carry mutant C alleles (AC, CC, and AC+CC at rs13181 increased (p < 0.05. Taking non-smoking individuals who carry the AA genotype as a reference, and non-smoking individuals who carry mutant allele C (AC+CC, the risk of pancreatic cancer increased by 3.343 times in individuals who smoked ≥ 20 cigarettes daily, 3.309 times in individuals who smoked ≥ 14 packs per year, 5.011 times in individuals who smoked ≥ 24 packs per year, and 4.013 times in the individuals who smoked ≥ 37 packs per year (P < 0.05. In addition, haplotype analysis revealed that haplotype AGG, which comprised rs13181, rs3916874 and rs238415, was associated with a 1.401-fold increase in pancreatic cancer risk (p < 0.05. We conclude that the polymorphism of XPD Lys751Gln (rs13181 in combination with smoking contributes to increased risk of pancreatic cancer in the Chinese Han population. Haplotype AGG might be a susceptibility haplotype for pancreatic cancer.

  8. Increased incidence of myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia following breast cancer treatment with radiation alone or combined with chemotherapy: a registry cohort analysis 1990-2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, Henry G; Malmgren, Judith A; Atwood, Mary K

    2011-01-01

    Our objective was to measure myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) risk associated with radiation and/or chemotherapy breast cancer (BC) treatment. Our study cohort was composed of BC patients diagnosed from 1990 to 2005 and followed up for blood disorders, mean length of follow up = 7.17 years, range 2-18 years. 5790 TNM stage 0-III patients treated with surgery alone, radiation and/or chemotherapy were included. Patients without surgery (n = 111), with stem cell transplantation (n = 98), unknown or non-standard chemotherapy regimens (n = 94), lost to follow up (n = 66) or 'cancer status unknown' (n = 67) were excluded. Rates observed at our community based cancer care institution were compared to SEER incidence data for rate ratio (RR) calculations. 17 cases of MDS/AML (10 MDS/7 AML) occurred during the follow up period, crude rate .29% (95% CI = .17, .47), SEER comparison RR = 3.94 (95% CI = 2.34, 6.15). The RR of MDS in patients age < 65 comparing our cohort incidence to SEER incidence data was 10.88 (95% CI = 3.84, 24.03) and the RR of AML in patients age < 65 was 5.32 (95% CI = 1.31, 14.04). No significant increased risk of MDS or AML was observed in women ≥ 65 or the surgery/chemotherapy-only group. A RR of 3.32 (95% CI = 1.42, 6.45) was observed in the surgery/radiation-only group and a RR of 6.32 (95% CI = 3.03, 11.45) in the surgery/radiation/chemotherapy group. 3 out of 10 MDS cases died of disease at an average 3.8 months post diagnosis and five of seven AML cases died at an average 9 months post diagnosis. An elevated rate of MDS and AML was observed among breast cancer patients < 65, those treated with radiation and those treated with radiation and chemotherapy compared to available population incidence data. Although a small number of patients are affected, leukemia risk associated with treatment and younger age is significant

  9. Prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in long-term survivors of childhood cancer: 16 years follow up from a prospective registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicetti, Francesco; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Moretti, Claudio; Corrias, Andrea; Omedè, Pierluigi; Marra, Walter Grosso; Arvat, Emanuela; Fagioli, Franca; Brignardello, Enrico; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2015-06-01

    Childhood cancer survivors (CCSs) have an increased risk of overweight and dyslipidaemia, but the distribution and the potential relationships between anticancer therapies and cardiovascular risk factors have been heterogeneously and not prospectively described. All consecutive CCSs with primary cancer diagnosed between 1973-2007 and subsequently referred to our outpatient clinic were enrolled. Hypercholesterolaemia (total cholesterol >200 and/or low density lipoprotein (LDL)>160 mg/dl) was the primary end point, hypertriglyceridaemia (triglycerides >200 mg/dl) and body mass index >30 kg/m(2) the secondary end points. Cox multivariate adjustments were performed to account for differences in cancer and treatments. A total of 340 patients were included (197 male, 143 female; mean age at last follow-up 24.1 ± 3.2). The most common diagnosis were haematological malignancies (n = 227) and brain tumours (n = 51). After a median follow-up of 16.1 years, hypercholesterolaemia was diagnosed in 67 CCSs (20%), hypertriglyceridaemia in 20 CCSs (6%) and obesity in 28 CCSs (8%). Total body irradiation and growth hormone deficiency increased the risk of both hypercholesterolaemia (hazard ratio (HR) = 2.7; confidence interval (CI) 1.2-4.4 and HR = 2.3; CI 1.1-4.9; all p < 0.05) and hypertriglyceridaemia (HR = 6.5; CI 1.4-31 and HR = 7.2; CI 1.1-43; all p < 0.05). The risk of hypercholesterolaemia was also higher in CCSs who underwent autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HR = 3.2; CI 1.7-5.9; p < 0.001) or platinum-based chemotherapy (HR = 2.7; CI 1.5-4.9; p < 0.001), whereas a previous diagnosis of brain tumour (HR = 10; CI 1.2-45; p < 0.05) and anthracyclines exposure (HR = 1.3; CI 1.2-26; p < 0.05) significantly predicted obesity. CCSs show a high and variable risk for developing dyslipidaemia and obesity, depending on cancer diagnosis and treatments. Therefore, they need accurate and tailored control of their cardiovascular risk profile. © The European Society

  10. Contribution of SPECT/CT for sentinel node localization in patients with ipsilateral breast cancer relapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrelli, Pablo [Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hospital La Fe, Nuclear Medicine, Medical Imaging Clinical Area, Valencia (Spain); Donswijk, Maarten L.; Stokkel, Marcel P.; Teixeira, Suzana C. [Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Tinteren, Harm van [Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Biometrics, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rutgers, Emiel J.T. [Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Surgery, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Valdes Olmos, Renato A. [Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Leiden University Medical Centre, Nuclear Medicine Section and Interventional Molecular Imaging Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2017-04-15

    In recent years repeat sentinel node (SN) biopsy has been proven to be feasible in local breast cancer recurrence (LBCR). However, in these patients SNs outside the ipsilateral axilla are frequently observed. This study evaluates the contribution of SPECT/CT for SN localization and surgical adjustment in LBCR patients. SN biopsy was performed in 122 LBCR patients (median age 60.5 years, range 24-87), enrolled from August 2006 to July 2015. Median disease-free time lapse was 109.5 months (range 9-365). Axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) had previously been performed in 55 patients, SN biopsy in 44, both techniques in 13 and fine-needle aspiration in 10. Primary breast cancer treatment included radiotherapy in 104 patients (85.3 %) and chemotherapy in 40 (32.8 %). Preoperative lymphatic mapping, using planar scintigraphy (PS) and SPECT/CT included report of SN location according to lymph node territory. In case of a territorial PS-SPECT/CT mismatch, surgery was adjusted according to SPECT/CT findings. SPECT/CT SN visualization rate was higher than PS (53.3 % vs. 43.4 %, p n.s.) with, in total, 19 additional SN (118 vs. 99, p n.s.). PS-SPECT/CT territory mismatch, found in 60 % (39/65) of patients with SN visualization, led to surgical adjustment in 21.3 % (26/122) of patients. The SN procedure was finally performed in 104 patients resulting in a 65.7 % surgical retrieval rate with a total of 132 removed SNs (1.86/patient). SN metastases were found in 17/71 patients (23.9 %), in 16 of them (94 %) in ipsilateral basins outside the axilla or in the contralateral axilla. Using SPECT/CT there is a trend to visualize more SNs in LBCR, providing at the same time important anatomical information to adjust intraoperative SN procedures. The addition of SPECT/CT to the standard imaging protocol may lead to better staging mainly in patients presenting drainage outside the ipsilateral axilla. (orig.)

  11. Increased diacylglycerol kinase ζ expression in human metastatic colon cancer cells augments Rho GTPase activity and contributes to enhanced invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Kun; Mulatz, Kirk; Ard, Ryan; Nguyen, Thanh; Gee, Stephen H

    2014-01-01

    Unraveling the signaling pathways responsible for the establishment of a metastatic phenotype in carcinoma cells is critically important for understanding the pathology of cancer. The acquisition of cell motility is a key property of metastatic tumor cells and is a prerequisite for invasion. Rho GTPases regulate actin cytoskeleton reorganization and the cellular responses required for cell motility and invasion. Diacylglycerol kinase ζ (DGKζ), an enzyme that phosphorylates diacylglycerol to yield phosphatidic acid, regulates the activity of the Rho GTPases Rac1 and RhoA. DGKζ mRNA is highly expressed in several different colon cancer cell lines, as well as in colon cancer tissue relative to normal colonic epithelium, and thus may contribute to the metastatic process. To investigate potential roles of DGKζ in cancer metastasis, a cellular, isogenic model of human colorectal cancer metastatic transition was used. DGKζ protein levels, Rac1 and RhoA activity, and PAK phosphorylation were measured in the non-metastatic SW480 adenocarcinoma cell line and its highly metastatic variant, the SW620 line. The effect of DGKζ silencing on Rho GTPase activity and invasion through Matrigel-coated Transwell inserts was studied in SW620 cells. Invasiveness was also measured in PC-3 prostate cancer and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells depleted of DGKζ. DGKζ protein levels were elevated approximately 3-fold in SW620 cells compared to SW480 cells. There was a concomitant increase in active Rac1 in SW620 cells, as well as substantial increases in the expression and phosphorylation of the Rac1 effector PAK1. Similarly, RhoA activity and expression were increased in SW620 cells. Knockdown of DGKζ expression in SW620 cells by shRNA-mediated silencing significantly reduced Rac1 and RhoA activity and attenuated the invasiveness of SW620 cells in vitro. DGKζ silencing in highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and PC-3 prostate cancer cells also significantly attenuated

  12. Genetic Variations in SLCO Transporter Genes Contributing to Racial Disparity in Aggressiveness of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Overlap: None Title: Prostate Cancer : Transition to Androgen Independence, Project 1: Interference with the Androgen Receptor and Its Ligands...apoptotic markers in prostate cancer . This study will investigate the underlying mechanisms by which glutamate receptor antagonist down regulates...Title: Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 1 in African American Prostate Cancer (1R21CA183892-01) Time Commitment: 0.30 Calendar Months (PI

  13. Contribution of DNA double-strand break repair gene XRCC3 genotypes to oral cancer susceptibility in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Wen; Chang, Wen-Shin; Liu, Juhn-Cherng; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Bau, Da-Tian

    2014-06-01

    The DNA repair gene X-ray repair cross complementing protein 3 (XRCC3) is thought to play a major role in double-strand break repair and in maintaining genomic stability. Very possibly, defective double-strand break repair of cells can lead to carcinogenesis. Therefore, a case-control study was performed to reveal the contribution of XRCC3 genotypes to individual oral cancer susceptibility. In this hospital-based research, the association of XRCC3 rs1799794, rs45603942, rs861530, rs3212057, rs1799796, rs861539, rs28903081 genotypes with oral cancer risk in a Taiwanese population was investigated. In total, 788 patients with oral cancer and 956 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were genotyped. The results showed that there was significant differential distribution among oral cancer and controls in the genotypic (p=0.001428) and allelic (p=0.0013) frequencies of XRCC3 rs861539. As for the other polymorphisms, there was no difference between case and control groups. In gene-lifestyle interaction analysis, we have provided the first evidence showing that there is an obvious joint effect of XRCC3 rs861539 genotype with individual areca chewing habits on oral cancer risk. In conclusion, the T allele of XRCC3 rs861539, which has an interaction with areca chewing habit in oral carcinogenesis, may be an early marker for oral cancer in Taiwanese. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  14. Review of patient registries in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMarco, Gabriella; Hill, Dane; Feldman, Steven R

    2016-10-01

    Patient registries are datasets containing information on patients with a particular disease or patients who are undergoing a specific treatment. Our objective was to search for and catalog the types of registries being used in dermatology and investigate their characteristics and uses. We searched Google, the Registry of Patient Registries, Orphanet, and ClinicalTrials.gov to compile a list of dermatology disease registries. We also conducted a literature review on the uses of dermatology registries using PubMed. We identified 48 dermatology patient registries, with 23 distinct diseases represented. We also identified 11 registries used for postmarketing surveillance of skin disease. Our search was limited to registries in English. Registries are commonly used for the study of rare dermatologic diseases and for postsurveillance monitoring of systemic therapies in more common dermatologic diseases, such as psoriasis. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Quality of Life in Second-Line Treatment of Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Using Cabazitaxel or Other Therapies After Previous Docetaxel Chemotherapy: Swiss Observational Treatment Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, Frank; Rothschild, Sacha I; Betticher, Daniel; Caspar, Clemens; Morant, Rudolf; Popescu, Razvan; Rauch, Daniel; Huber, Urs; Zenhäusern, Reinhard; Rentsch, Cyrill; Cathomas, Richard

    2017-08-24

    The aim was to evaluate quality of life (QoL), pain, and fatigue in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) treated with different regimens after first-line docetaxel, as well as disease progression. Patients with mCRPC having received first-line chemotherapy with docetaxel were eligible. Second-line treatment choice was at the discretion of the local investigator. All patients had regular assessments of QoL with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate (FACT-P) questionnaire, of fatigue with the Brief Fatigue Inventory, and of pain with the McGill Pain Questionnaire-Short Form. The primary end point was QoL maintenance defined as having a maximum decrease in 2 functional domains of the FACT-P. One hundred thirty-eight patients were included in 36 oncology centers across Switzerland. QoL analysis was available for all patients (59 who received cabazitaxel; 79 who received other therapy [OT] including 75 who received abiraterone). No significant differences for any of the end points were found between groups. A numerically higher number of patients had QoL maintenance with OT (25 of 79 patients, 32%) compared with cabazitaxel (8 of 59 patients, 14%). QoL improvement was found in 20% of patients (12 of 59) who received cabazitaxel and 24% (19 of 79) who received OT. Mean FACT-P score did not change in a clinically relevant manner over time in either group. Pain was present in 70% of patients (96 of 138), and a pain response to treatment was noted in 22% (13 of 59) who received cabazitaxel and 29% (23 of 79) who received OT. A similar but minor improvement of fatigue was noted in both groups. Some degree of QoL decrease was seen in most patients regardless of second-line treatment. No significant differences in QoL parameters between cabazitaxel or other second line treatments were found. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Assessing the underlying breast cancer risk of Chinese females contributed by dietary intake of residual DDT from agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mengling; Zhao, Meirong; Zhou, Shanshan; Chen, Kun; Zhang, Chunlong; Liu, Weiping

    2014-12-01

    The greatest concern over DDT exposure in China arose since the early 1990s for the rising breast cancer incidence, and the cause still remains to be elucidated. An extensive survey of DDT background in agricultural soils, covered the entire region of China, was conducted. DDT at concentrations greater than 100 ng/g (the China's Farmland Environmental Quality Evaluation Standards for Edible Agricultural Products) was found to impact 42.3 million Chinese population. Considering the geographical differences with diverse DDT contributions and different diet products and habits, the average daily dietary intake was modeled and estimated to be 0.34 μg/kg p,p'-DDE (the main bioactive constituent in DDT). Population attributable fraction derived from a case-control study from 78 women with breast cancer and 72 controls was used to assess the DDT exposure risk to breast cancer. Based on the estimated population attributable fraction with a median value of 0.6% (IQR 0.23-2.11%), the excess annual breast cancer incidence rate attributable to p,p'-DDE exposure averaged 0.06×10(-5) with significant spatial variations varying from 0.00021×10(-5) to 11.05×10(-5) in Chinese females. Exposure to DDT is a contributor to breast cancer, but the overall limited relative risk and population attributable fraction imply confounding factors for breast cancer in Chinese females. Exposure risk in a regional scale helps understand the cause and prevention of breast cancer. Our mapping and modeling method could be used to assess other environmental carcinogens and related cancer diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The contribution of cholesterol and epigenetic changes to the pathophysiology of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, Maliha T; Ponce, Christopher; Powell, Catherine A; Tarafdar, Kaiser; Yanagita, Teru; Choudhury, Mahua; Gollahon, Lauren S; Rahman, Shaikh M

    2018-05-04

    Breast cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in women. Accumulating evidence suggests that cholesterol plays an important role in the development of breast cancer. Even though the mechanistic link between these two factors is not well understood, one possibility is that dysregulated cholesterol metabolism may affect lipid raft and membrane fluidity and can promote tumor development. Current studies have shown oxysterol 27-hydroxycholesterol (27-HC) as a critical regulator of cholesterol and breast cancer pathogenesis. This is supported by the significantly higher expression of CYP27A1 (cytochrome P450, family 27, subfamily A, polypeptide 1) in breast cancers. This enzyme is responsible for 27-HC synthesis from cholesterol. It has been shown that 27-HC can not only increase the proliferation of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer cells but also stimulate tumor growth and metastasis in several breast cancer models. This phenomenon is surprising since 27-HC and other oxysterols generally reduce intracellular cholesterol levels by activating the liver X receptors (LXRs). Resolving this paradox will elucidate molecular pathways by which cholesterol, ER, and LXR are connected to breast cancer. These findings will also provide the rationale for evaluating pharmaceutical approaches that manipulate cholesterol or 27-HC synthesis in order to mitigate the impact of cholesterol on breast cancer pathophysiology. In addition to cholesterol, epigenetic changes including non-coding RNAs, and microRNAs, DNA methylation, and histone modifications, have all been shown to control tumorigenesis. The purpose of this review is to discuss the link between altered cholesterol metabolism and epigenetic modification during breast cancer progression. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. A descriptive study of the characteristics of differentiated thyroid cancer in Catalonia during the period 1998-2012. The CECaT registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafon, Carles; Puig-Domingo, Manel; Biarnés, Josefina; Halperin, Irene; Bella, Maria Rosa; Castells, Ignasi; González, Cintia; Megía, Ana; Santos, Lola; García-Pascual, Luís; Reverter, Jordi Lluís; Pizarro, Eduarda; Mauricio, Dídac

    2015-01-01

    The consortium for the study of thyroid cancer (CECaT), including 20 hospitals and one research institute, was recently created in Catalonia (Spain). One of the first initiatives of the group was to perform a descriptive analysis of the characteristics of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). The cohort included 1,855 patients from 11 hospitals treated over a period of 15 years (1998-2012). In this series, 1.470 (79.2%) patients were women. Mean age was 47.7 (15.7) years old. Age was significantly higher in male than in female patients, 49.3 (15) versus 47.3 (15.8); p=0.02. Papillary thyroid carcinoma accounted for 88.9% of cases. Mean tumor size was 21.5 (16) mm, and was significantly lower in females than in males, 20.1 (14.5) mm and 26.6 (20.3) mm respectively (p<0.001). After a follow-up period of 5.5 (3.7) years, information was available for 1,355 patient, of whom 1065 (78.6%) were free of disease, 239 (17.6%) had no tumor persistence, and 51 (3.8) % had died. The risk of persistent or recurrent disease was significantly associated to older age at diagnosis, male gender, larger tumor size, lymph node metastases at surgery, no signs of thyroiditis in the remaining thyroid tissue, and presence of vascular and/or extraglandular invasion. Patient characteristics analyzed are similar to those reported in other parts of the world. Copyright © 2015 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. The apoptosis linked gene ALG-2 is dysregulated in tumors of various origin and contributes to cancer cell viability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Jonas; Høj, Berit Rahbek; Mollerup, Jens

    2008-01-01

    microarrays we analysed the expression of ALG-2 in 7371 tumor tissue samples of various origin as well as in 749 normal tissue samples. Most notably, ALG-2 was upregulated in mesenchymal tumors. No correlation was found between ALG-2 staining intensity and survival of patients with lung, breast or colon...... cancer. siRNA mediated ALG-2 downregulation led to a significant reduction in viability of HeLa cells indicating that ALG-2 may contribute to tumor development and expansion....

  20. Polarization of ILC2s in Peripheral Blood Might Contribute to Immunosuppressive Microenvironment in Patients with Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingli Bie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Newly identified nuocytes or group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s play an important role in Th2 cell mediated immunity such as protective immune responses to helminth parasites, allergic asthma, and chronic rhinosinusitis. However, the contributions of ILC2s in the occurrence and development of cancer remain unknown. Our previous study found that there was a predominant Th2 phenotype in patients with gastric cancer. In this study, the ILC2s related genes or molecules in PBMC from patients with gastric cancer were measured, and the potential correlation between them was analyzed. The expression levels of RORα, GATA3, T1/ST2, IL-17RB, CRTH2, IL-33, IL-5, and IL-4 mRNA were significantly increased in patients, but no significant changes were found in ICOS, CD45, and IL-13 expression, and there was a positive correlation between RORα or IL-13 and other related factors, such as ICOS and CD45. The increased frequency of ILC2s was also found in PBMC of patients by flow cytometry. In addition, the mRNA of Arg1 and iNOS were also significantly increased in patients. These results suggested that there are polarized ILC2s in gastric cancer patients which might contribute to immunosuppressive microenvironment and closely related to the upregulation of MDSCs and M2 macrophages.

  1. Mechanisms that contribute to the tendency to continue chemotherapy in patients with advanced cancer. Qualitative observations in the clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brom, Linda; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D; Widdershoven, Guy A M; Pasman, H Roeline W

    2016-03-01

    The study aims to describe mechanisms that contribute to the tendency towards continuing chemotherapy in patients with advanced cancer. The study conducted qualitative observations of outpatient clinic visits of 28 patients with advanced cancer (glioblastoma and metastatic colorectal cancer). We uncovered four mechanisms in daily oncology practice that can contribute to the tendency towards continuing chemotherapy in patients with advanced cancer: (1) "presenting the full therapy sets the standard"--patients seemed to base their justification for continuing chemotherapy on the "standard" therapy with the maximum number of cycles as presented by the physician at the start of the treatment; (2) "focus on standard evaluation moments hampers evaluation of care goals"--whether or not to continue the treatment was mostly only considered at standard evaluation moments; (3) "opening question guides towards focus on symptoms"--most patients gave an update of their physical symptoms in answer to the opening question of "How are you doing?" Physicians consequently discussed how to deal with this at length, which often took up most of the visit; (4) "treatment is perceived as the only option"--patients mostly wanted to continue with chemotherapy because they felt that they had to try every available option the physician offered. Physicians also often seemed to focus on treatment as the only option. Discussing care goals more regularly with the patient, facilitated for instance by implementing early palliative care, might help counter the mechanisms and enable a more well-considered decision. This could be either stopping or continuing chemotherapy.

  2. Age at Birth of First Child and Fecundity of Women Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (1987-2007): A Study of the Childhood Cancer Registry of the Rhône-Alpes Region in France (ARCERRA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freycon, Fernand; Trombert-Paviot, Béatrice; Casagranda, Léonie; Berlier, Pascale; Bertrand, Yves; Plantaz, Dominique; Stephan, Jean-Louis; Berger, Claire

    2015-05-01

    We studied the fecundity of 174 successive ALL (1987-2007) in females of the Childhood Cancer Registry of the Rhône-Alpes Region (ARCERRA) with a median age at follow-up of 25.6 years (18.0-37.4). We distinguished five treatment groups: Group Ia, chemotherapy only (n = 130); Ib, chemotherapy with cranial radiotherapy (n = 10); II, TBI conditioning allograft (n = 27); III, chemotherapy conditioning allograft (n = 4); IV, TBI conditioning autograft (n = 3). Twenty-three women had their first child at the mean age of 25.8 ±3.0 years, i.e., 2.0 ±2.9 years earlier than the general population of the Rhône-Alpes region (P = 0.003). The standardized fertility ratio (SFR), expressed as the number of actual births observed (O) to the number that would be expected in women of the same age in the general population (E) (SFR = O/E) was decreased for Group Ia (0.62; 95%CI, 0.52-0.74) and collapsed in Group II (0.17; 0.11-0.25). In univariate analysis, TBI (P = 0.013) and alkylating agents (P = 0.01) were negatively correlated with fecundity, but not with the age at diagnosis or the anthracyclines doses. In multivariate analysis including TBI and alkylating agents, we still found a negative correlation between TBI (P = 0.035), as well as alkylating agents (P = 0.028), and fecundity. More precisely, fecundity was negatively correlated with cumulative cyclophosphamide equivalent dose (P = 0.001), with a fecundity decreased for ≥1g/m(2), but without any dose effect; results not found in the Group Ia. Age at first child seems younger but the young median age of the cohort not allows concluding; fecundity is collapsed after fractionated total body irradiation and decreased after chemotherapy without any demonstrable cause. A delay of fertility is not excluded.

  3. The value of trauma registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Lynne; Clark, David E

    2008-06-01

    Trauma registries are databases that document acute care delivered to patients hospitalised with injuries. They are designed to provide information that can be used to improve the efficiency and quality of trauma care. Indeed, the combination of trauma registry data at regional or national levels can produce very large databases that allow unprecedented opportunities for the evaluation of patient outcomes and inter-hospital comparisons. However, the creation and upkeep of trauma registries requires a substantial investment of money, time and effort, data quality is an important challenge and aggregated trauma data sets rarely represent a population-based sample of trauma. In addition, trauma hospitalisations are already routinely documented in administrative hospital discharge databases. The present review aims to provide evidence that trauma registry data can be used to improve the care dispensed to victims of injury in ways that could not be achieved with information from administrative databases alone. In addition, we will define the structure and purpose of contemporary trauma registries, acknowledge their limitations, and discuss possible ways to make them more useful.

  4. Outcomes of Node-positive Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Via Multicatheter Interstitial Brachytherapy: The Pooled Registry of Multicatheter Interstitial Sites (PROMIS) Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamrava, Mitchell; Kuske, Robert R; Anderson, Bethany; Chen, Peter; Hayes, John; Quiet, Coral; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Veruttipong, Darlene; Snyder, Margaret; Demanes, David J

    2018-06-01

    To report outcomes for breast-conserving therapy using adjuvant accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with interstitial multicatheter brachytherapy in node-positive compared with node-negative patients. From 1992 to 2013, 1351 patients (1369 breast cancers) were treated with breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant APBI using interstitial multicatheter brachytherapy. A total of 907 patients (835 node negative, 59 N1a, and 13 N1mic) had >1 year of data available and nodal status information and are the subject of this analysis. Median age (range) was 59 years old (22 to 90 y). T stage was 90% T1 and ER/PR/Her2 was positive in 87%, 71%, and 7%. Mean number of axillary nodes removed was 12 (SD, 6). Cox multivariate analysis for local/regional control was performed using age, nodal stage, ER/PR/Her2 receptor status, tumor size, grade, margin, and adjuvant chemotherapy/antiestrogen therapy. The mean (SD) follow-up was 7.5 years (4.6). The 5-year actuarial local control (95% confidence interval) in node-negative versus node-positive patients was 96.3% (94.5-97.5) versus 95.8% (87.6-98.6) (P=0.62). The 5-year actuarial regional control in node-negative versus node-positive patients was 98.5% (97.3-99.2) versus 96.7% (87.4-99.2) (P=0.33). The 5-year actuarial freedom from distant metastasis and cause-specific survival were significantly lower in node-positive versus node-negative patients at 92.3% (82.4-96.7) versus 97.8% (96.3-98.7) (P=0.006) and 91.3% (80.2-96.3) versus 98.7% (97.3-99.3) (P=0.0001). Overall survival was not significantly different. On multivariate analysis age 50 years and below, Her2 positive, positive margin status, and not receiving chemotherapy or antiestrogen therapy were associated with a higher risk of local/regional recurrence. Patients who have had an axillary lymph node dissection and limited node-positive disease may be candidates for treatment with APBI. Further research is ultimately needed to better define specific criteria for APBI

  5. Increased Cancer Mortality Risk for NASA's ISS Astronauts: The Contribution of Diagnostic Radiological Examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, C.W.; Picco, C. E.; Gonzalez, S. M.; Johnston, S. L.; Van Baalen, M.; Shavers, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the radiation exposures and risks associated with long-term spaceflight on the International Space Station. NASA's risk model of cancer mortality is also presented.

  6. Contribution of problem-solving skills to fear of recurrence in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akechi, Tatuo; Momino, Kanae; Yamashita, Toshinari; Fujita, Takashi; Hayashi, Hironori; Tsunoda, Nobuyuki; Iwata, Hiroji

    2014-05-01

    Although fear of recurrence is a major concern among breast cancer survivors after surgery, no standard strategies exist that alleviate their distress. This study examined the association of patients' problem-solving skills and fear of recurrence and psychological distress among breast cancer survivors. Randomly selected, ambulatory, female patients with breast cancer participated in this study. They were asked to complete the Concerns about Recurrence Scale (CARS) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine their associations. Data were obtained from 317 patients. Patients' problem-solving skills were significantly associated with all subscales of fear of recurrence and overall worries measured by the CARS. In addition, patients' problem-solving skills were significantly associated with both their anxiety and depression. Our findings warrant clinical trials to investigate effectiveness of psychosocial intervention program, including enhancing patients' problem-solving skills and reducing fear of recurrence among breast cancer survivors.

  7. Advanced glycation end-products: a biological consequence of lifestyle contributing to cancer disparity

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Low income, poor diet, obesity and a lack of exercise are inter-related lifestyle factors that can profoundly alter our biological make-up to increase cancer risk, growth and development. We recently reported a potential mechanistic link between carbohydrate derived metabolites and cancer which may provide a biological consequence of lifestyle that can directly impact tumor biology. Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are reactive metabolites produced as a by-product of sugar metabolism. F...

  8. The contribution of tumour-derived exosomes to the hallmarks of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Katie; Vella, Laura J

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are small, biologically active extracellular vesicles and over the last decade, both stromal and tumour-derived exosomes (TDE) have been implicated in cancer onset, progression and metastases. Cancer is a complex disease that is underpinned by several "cancer hallmarks", originally described by Hanahan and Weinberg in 2000 and then revised in 2011. The hallmarks of cancer comprise six biological capabilities, along with two emerging hallmarks and two enabling characteristics that facilitate tumour growth and metastatic dissemination. Ample evidence supports a clear role for TDE in four of the original biological hallmarks (sustaining proliferative signalling, resisting cell death, inducing angiogenesis and activating invasion and metastases). A less-defined role exists for TDE in evading growth suppressors, and currently, there is no evidence to suggest a role for TDE in enabling replicative immortality. TDE are intimately involved in the newly defined hallmarks of cancer and enabling characteristics, most evidently in immune inhibition and tumour-promoting inflammation, which ultimately enable escape from immune destruction and tumour progression. Herein, we discuss the role of TDE in the context of the hallmarks and enabling characteristics of cancer as defined by Hanahan and Weinberg.

  9. Danish Hip Arthroscopy Registry (DHAR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Bent; Mygind-Klavsen, Bjarne; Grønbech Nielsen, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    The Danish Hip Arthroscopy Registry (DHAR) was initiated in January 2012 as a web-based prospective registry. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and report the first registry based outcome data of a national population with radiological and clinical femoroacetabular impingement (FAI......) undergoing hip arthroscopic treatment. Our primary hypothesis was that patients undergoing hip arthroscopy would improve significantly in pain, quality of life and sports related outcome measurements in Patient Related Outcome Measures (PROM). Peri-operative data and Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROM......-5 D demonstrated improvement after 1 and 2 years from 0.66 pre-op to 0.78 at 2 years. HSAS improved significantly from 2.5 to 3.3. Pain score data demonstrated improvement in NRS-rest 39 to 17 and NRS Walk 49 to 22 at follow-up. We conclude that patients with FAI undergoing hip arthroscopy...

  10. Contribution of germline TP53 variants and assessment of HER-2 status among young breast cancer patients in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao Yan Lau

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Li-Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS is caused by a mutation in the TP53 tumour suppressor gene. This rare hereditary condition predisposes individuals to an increased risk of cancers including breast cancer in women at a relatively young age, which accounts for nearly 25%–30% of all LFS‑associated cancers. Studies have shown that breast tumours in women with a germline TP53 deleterious variants are associated with a human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2-positive phenotype. Taken together, this study aimed to investigate the contribution of germline TP53 variants and its association with tumour HER-2 status in a cohort of young women with breast cancer. Methods: From 2002 to 2017, 4048 women with breast cancer treated at University Malaya Medical Centre or Sime Darby Medical Centre participated in the Malaysian Breast Cancer Genetics Study. Of which, 87 patients were diagnosed before 30 years of age. All patients were analysed for germline TP53 single nucleotide variants, small insertions or deletions by amplicon‑based targeted sequencing and validated by Sanger sequencing. DNA from patients who tested negative for sequencing were subsequently evaluated for the presence of TP53 exon deletions or duplications by multiplex ligation‑dependent probe amplification. HER-2 status of breast tumours was defined by immunohistochemistry, fluorescence in situ hybridisation and/or silver in situ hybridisation. Results: 5 distinct TP53 variants were detected in 5 individuals. 3 out of 5 TP53 variants were classified as frameshift mutations, one nonsense mutation and one in-frame duplication. Variants in other genes were detected in 17 individuals. No large genomic rearrangements were detected in the remaining 65 sequencing-negative patients. The assessment of HER-2 status will be presented. Conclusions: Our results suggest that alterations in TP53 gene were identified in approximately 5.7% (5/87 of this cohort of young women with breast

  11. The Three Mile Island Population Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhaber, M K; Tokuhata, G K; Digon, E; Caldwell, G G; Stein, G F; Lutz, G; Gur, D

    1983-01-01

    Shortly after the March 28, 1979, accident at the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear plant outside Harrisburg, Pa., the Pennsylvania Department of Health, in conjunction with the Centers for Disease Control and the U.S. Bureau of the Census, conducted a census of the 35,930 persons residing within 5 miles of the plant. With the help of 150 enumerators, demographic and health-related information was collected on each person to provide baseline data for future short- and long-term epidemiologic studies of the effects of the accident. Individual radiation doses were estimated on the basis of residential location and the amount of time each person spent in the 5-mile area during the 10 days after the accident. Health and behavioral resurveys of the population will be conducted approximately every 5 years. Population-mobility, morbidity, and mortality will be studied yearly by matching the TMI Population Registry with postal records, cancer registry records, and death certificate data. Because the radiation dose from TMI was extremely small, any increase in morbidity or mortality attributable to the accident would be so small as not to be measurable by present methods; however, adverse health effects as a result of psychological stress may occur. Also, a temporary increase in reporting of disease could occur because of increased surveillance and attention to health.

  12. Differences in Breast Cancer Survival between Public and Private Care in New Zealand: Which Factors Contribute?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tin Tin, Sandar; Elwood, J Mark; Lawrenson, Ross; Campbell, Ian; Harvey, Vernon; Seneviratne, Sanjeewa

    2016-01-01

    Patients who received private health care appear to have better survival from breast cancer compared to those who received public care. This study investigated if this applied to New Zealand women and identified factors that could explain such disparities. This study involved all women who were diagnosed with primary breast cancer in two health regions in New Zealand, covering about 40% of the national population, between June 2000 and May 2013. Patients who received public care for primary treatment, mostly surgical treatment, were compared with those who received private care in terms of demographics, mode of presentation, disease factors, comorbidity index and treatment factors. Cox regression modelling was performed with stepwise adjustments, and hazards of breast cancer specific mortality associated with the type of health care received was assessed. Of the 14,468 patients, 8,916 (61.6%) received public care. Compared to patients treated in private care facilities, they were older, more likely to be Māori, Pacifika or Asian and to reside in deprived neighbourhoods and rural areas, and less likely to be diagnosed with early staged cancer and to receive timely cancer treatments. They had a higher risk of mortality from breast cancer (hazard ratio: 1.95; 95% CI: 1.75, 2.17), of which 80% (95% CI: 63%, 100%) was explained by baseline differences, particularly related to ethnicity, stage at diagnosis and type of loco-regional therapy. After controlling for these demographic, disease and treatment factors, the risk of mortality was still 14% higher in the public sector patients. Ethnicity, stage at diagnosis and type of loco-regional therapy were the three key contributors to survival disparities between patients treated in public and private health care facilities in New Zealand. The findings underscore the need for more efforts to improve the quality, timeliness and equitability of public cancer care services.

  13. The lncRNA PVT1 Contributes to the Cervical Cancer Phenotype and Associates with Poor Patient Prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marissa Iden

    Full Text Available The plasmacytoma variant translocation 1 gene (PVT1 is an lncRNA that has been designated as an oncogene due to its contribution to the phenotype of multiple cancers. Although the mechanism by which PVT1 influences disease processes has been studied in multiple cancer types, its role in cervical tumorigenesis remains unknown. Thus, the present study was designed to investigate the role of PVT1 in cervical cancer in vitro and in vivo. PVT1 expression was measured by quantitative PCR (qPCR in 121 invasive cervical carcinoma (ICC samples, 30 normal cervix samples, and cervical cell lines. Functional assays were carried out using both siRNA and LNA-mediated knockdown to examine PVT1's effects on cervical cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion, apoptosis, and cisplatin resistance. Our results demonstrate that PVT1 expression is significantly increased in ICC tissue versus normal cervix and that higher expression of PVT1 correlates with poorer overall survival. In cervical cancer cell lines, PVT1 knockdown resulted in significantly decreased cell proliferation, migration and invasion, while apoptosis and cisplatin cytotoxicity were significantly increased in these cells. Finally, we show that PVT1 expression is augmented in response to hypoxia and immune response stimulation and that this lncRNA associates with the multifunctional and stress-responsive protein, Nucleolin. Collectively, our results provide strong evidence for an oncogenic role of PVT1 in cervical cancer and lend insight into potential mechanisms by which PVT1 overexpression helps drive cervical carcinogenesis.

  14. Spinal high-mobility group box 1 contributes to mechanical allodynia in a rat model of bone cancer pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, Wei; Wang, Wei; Huang, Jing; Ren, Ning; Wu, Sheng-Xi; Li, Yong-Qi

    2010-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying bone cancer-induced pain are largely unknown. Previous studies indicate that neuroinflammation in the spinal dorsal horn is especially involved. Being first reported as a nonhistone chromosomal protein, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is now implicated as a mediator of inflammation. We hypothesized that HMGB1 could trigger the release of cytokines in the spinal dorsal horn and contribute to bone cancer pain. To test this hypothesis, we first built a bone cancer pain model induced by intratibal injection of Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma cells. The structural damage to the tibia was monitored by radiological analysis. The mechanical allodynia was measured and the expression of spinal HMGB1 and IL-1β was evaluated. We observed that inoculation of cancer cells, but not heat-killed cells, induced progressive bone destruction from 9 d to 21 d post inoculation. Behavioral tests demonstrated that the significant nociceptive response in the cancer cells-injected rats emerged on day 9 and this kind of mechanical allodynia lasted at least 21 d following inoculation. Tumor cells inoculation significantly increased HMGB1 expression in the spinal dorsal horn, while intrathecal injecting a neutralizing antibody against HMGB1 showed an effective and reliable anti-allodynia effect with a dose-dependent manner. IL-1β was significantly increased in caner pain rats while intrathecally administration of anti-HMGB1 could decrease IL-1β. Together with previous reports, we predict that bone cancer induces HMGB1 production, enhancing spinal IL-1β expression and thus modulating spinal excitatory synaptic transmission and pain response.

  15. Centrosome Dysfunction Contributes To Chromosome Instability, Chromoanagenesis And Genome Reprograming In Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    German A Pihan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The unique ability of centrosomes to nucleate and organize microtubules makes them unrivaled conductors of important interphase processes, such as intracellular payload traffic, cell polarity, cell locomotion, and organization of the immunologic synapse. But it is in mitosis that centrosomes loom large, for they orchestrate, with clockmaker’s precision, the assembly and functioning of the mitotic spindle, ensuring the equal partitioning of the replicated genome into daughter cells. Centrosome dysfunction is inextricably linked to aneuploidy and chromosome instability, both hallmarks of cancer cells. Several aspects of centrosome function in normal and cancer cells have been molecularly characterized during the last two decades, greatly enhancing our mechanistic understanding of this tiny organelle. Whether centrosome defects alone can cause cancer, remains unanswered. Until recently, the aggregate of the evidence had suggested that centrosome dysfunction, by deregulating the fidelity of chromosome segregation, promotes and accelerates the characteristic Darwinian evolution of the cancer genome enabled by increased mutational load and/or decreased DNA repair. Very recent experimental work has shown that missegreated chromosomes resulting from centrosome dysfunction may experience extensive DNA damage, suggesting additional dimensions to the role of centrosomes in cancer. Centrosome dysfunction is particularly prevalent in tumors in which the genome has undergone extensive structural rearrangements and chromosome domain reshuffling. Ongoing gene reshuffling reprograms the genome for continuous growth, survival, and evasion of the immune system. Manipulation of molecular networks controlling centrosome function may soon become a viable target for specific therapeutic intervention in cancer, particularly since normal cells, which lack centrosome alterations, may be spared the toxicity of such therapies.

  16. Potential contribution of the uterine microbiome in the development of endometrial cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina R. S. Walther-António

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endometrial cancer studies have led to a number of well-defined but mechanistically unconnected genetic and environmental risk factors. One of the emerging modulators between environmental triggers and genetic expression is the microbiome. We set out to inquire about the composition of the uterine microbiome and its putative role in endometrial cancer. Methods We undertook a study of the microbiome in samples taken from different locations along the female reproductive tract in patients with endometrial cancer (n = 17, patients with endometrial hyperplasia (endometrial cancer precursor, n = 4, and patients afflicted with benign uterine conditions (n = 10. Vaginal, cervical, Fallopian, ovarian, peritoneal, and urine samples were collected aseptically both in the operating room and the pathology laboratory. DNA extraction was followed by amplification and high-throughput next generation sequencing (MiSeq of the 16S rDNA V3-V5 region to identify the microbiota present. Microbiota data were summarized using both α-diversity to reflect species richness and evenness within bacterial populations and β-diversity to reflect the shared diversity between bacterial populations. Statistical significance was determined through the use of multiple testing, including the generalized mixed-effects model. Results The microbiome sequencing (16S rDNA V3-V5 region revealed that the microbiomes of all organs (vagina, cervix, Fallopian tubes, and ovaries are significantly correlated (p 4.5. Conclusions Our results suggest that the detection of A. vaginae and the identified Porphyromonas sp. in the gynecologic tract combined with a high vaginal pH is statistically associated with the presence of endometrial cancer. Given the documented association of the identified microorganisms with other pathologies, these findings raise the possibility of a microbiome role in the manifestation, etiology, or progression of endometrial cancer that

  17. Quality of life in pediatric cancer survivors: contributions of parental distress and psychosocial family risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racine, N M; Khu, M; Reynolds, K; Guilcher, G M T; Schulte, F S M

    2018-02-01

    Pediatric survivors of childhood cancer are at increased risk of poor quality of life and social-emotional outcomes following treatment. The relationship between parent psychological distress and child adjustment in pediatric cancer survivors has been well established. However, limited research has examined the factors that may buffer this association. The current study examined the associations between psychosocial family risk factors, parental psychological distress, and health-related quality of life (hrql) in pediatric cancer survivors. Fifty-two pediatric cancer survivors (34 males, 18 females, mean age = 11.92) and their parents were recruited from a long-term cancer survivor clinic. Children and their parents who consented to participate completed the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0. Parents completed a demographic information form, the Psychosocial Assessment Tool (pat 2.0) and the Brief Symptom Inventory (bsi). The Intensity of Treatment Rating (itr-3) was evaluated by the research team. Multiple regression analyses revealed that parental psychological distress negatively predicted parent-reported hrql, while treatment intensity, gender, and psychosocial risk negatively predicted parent and child-reported hrql. Psychosocial risk moderated the association between parent psychological distress and parent-reported child hrql ( p = 0.03), whereby parents with high psychological distress but low levels of psychosocial risk reported their children to have higher hrql. Low levels of family psychosocial risk buffer the impact of parent psychological distress on child hrql in pediatric cancer survivors. The findings highlight the importance of identifying parents and families with at-risk psychological distress and psychosocial risk in order to provide targeted support interventions to mitigate the impact on hrql.

  18. Chemotherapy-induced Fatigue among Jordanian Cancer Patients: What are the Contributing Factors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kholoud Abu Obead

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purposes of this study were to examine the impact of chemotherapy treatment on Jordanian cancer patients’ fatigue and to correlate their fatigue with selected sociodemographic variables at the beginning of treatment and after four weeks of treatment. Methods: This was a single group quasi-experimental correlational design study that enrolled 43 patients diagnosed with cancer who required chemotherapy treatment. Fatigue was measured according to the Piper Fatigue Scale (PFS before starting chemotherapy treatment and after four weeks of receiving the first dose of chemotherapy. Data were collected over a period of four weeks and analyzed with descriptive statistics, the paired-sample t-test, and Pearson product-moment correlation. Results: The study included 17 (39.5% males and 26 (60.5% females with a mean age of 45.98 years. Most (n=17 were diagnosed with breast cancer. Obesity was present in about 64.4% of patients. The majority (46% received an anthracycline-based regimen. There were statistically significant differences between respondents’ total mean scores of fatigue pre-treatment and four weeks following chemotherapy treatment (t= -2.31, df=42, P<0.05. In addition, significant differences were found in the scores for behavioral, affective, sensory, and cognitive dimensions subscales (t= -2.24, -2.19, - 2.4, -2.4, df=42, P<0.05 between pre-treatment and four weeks after receiving the first dose of chemotherapy treatment. We observed a significant negative relationship between fatigue scores and hemoglobin levels (r= -0.04, P<0.01. Conclusion: Cancer-related fatigue is common among cancer patients who received chemotherapy and result in substantial adverse physical, behavioral, cognitive and affective consequences for patient. Given the impact of fatigue, treatment options should be routinely considered in the care of patients with cancer.

  19. Environmental Agents Service (EAS) Registry System of Records

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Environmental Agent Service (EAS) Registries is the information system encompassing the Ionizing Radiation Registry (IRR), the Agent Orange Registry (AOR), and...

  20. A Dutch Nationwide Bariatric Quality Registry: DATO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelemeijer, Youri Q M; Liem, Ronald S L; Nienhuijs, Simon W

    2017-12-22

    In the Netherlands, the number of bariatric procedures increased exponentially in the 90s. To ensure and improve the quality of bariatric surgery, the nationwide Dutch Audit for Treatment of Obesity (DATO) was established in 2014. The audit was coordinated by the Dutch Institute for Clinical Auditing (DICA). This article provides a review of the aforementioned process in establishing a nationwide registry in the Netherlands. In collaboration with the DATO's scientific committee and other stakeholders, an annual list of several external quality indicators was formulated. This list consists of volume, process, and outcome indicators. In addition to the annual external indicators, the database permits individual hospitals to analyze their own data. The dashboard provides several standardized reports and detailed quality indicators, which are updated on a weekly base. Since the start, all 18 Dutch bariatric centers participated in the nationwide audit. A total of 21,941 cases were registered between 2015 and 2016. By 2016, the required variables were registered in 94.3% of all cases. A severe complicated course was seen in 2.87%, and mortality in 0.05% in 2016. The first-year follow-up shows a > 20% TWL in 86.1% of the registered cases. The DATO has become rapidly a mature registry. The well-organized structure of the national audit institution DICA and governmental funding were essential. However, most important were the bariatric teams themselves. The authors believe reporting the results from the registry has already contributed to more knowledge and acceptance by other health care providers.

  1. Tumor suppressor genes that escape from X-inactivation contribute to cancer sex bias

    OpenAIRE

    Dunford, Andrew; Weinstock, David M.; Savova, Virginia; Schumacher, Steven E.; Cleary, John P.; Yoda, Akinori; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Hess, Julian M.; Gimelbrant, Alexander A.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Lawrence, Michael S.; Getz, Gad; Lane, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    There is a striking and unexplained male predominance across many cancer types. A subset of X chromosome (chrX) genes can escape X-inactivation, which would protect females from complete functional loss by a single mutation. To identify putative “Escape from X-Inactivation Tumor Suppressor” (EXITS) genes, we compared somatic alterations from >4100 cancers across 21 tumor types for sex bias. Six of 783 non-pseudoautosomal region (PAR) chrX genes (ATRX, CNKSR2, DDX3X, KDM5C, KDM6A, and MAGEC3) ...

  2. PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism contributes to cancer susceptibility: evidence from meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shangqian; Cao, Qiang; Wang, Xiaoxiang; Li, Bingjie; Tang, Min; Yuan, Wanqing; Fang, Jianzheng; Qian, Jian; Qin, Chao; Zhang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is expressed in many cancer cell types and allows the modulation of cancer growth, invasion and angiogenesis. To date, studies investigated the association between a functional polymorphism in PAI-1 (4G/5G) and risk of cancer have shown inclusive results. A meta-analysis based on 25 case-control studies was performed to address this issue. Odds ratios (OR) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the association. The statistical heterogeneity across studies was examined with I(2) test. Overall, a significant increased risk of cancer was associated with the PAI-1 4G/4G polymorphism for the allele contrast (4G vs. 5G: OR = 1.10, CI = 1.03-1.18, I(2) = 49.5%), the additive genetic model (4G/4G vs. 5G/5G: OR = 1.21, CI = 1.06-1.39, I(2) = 51.9%), the recessive genetic model (4G/4G vs. 4G/5G+5G/5G: OR = 1.11, CI = 1.04-1.18, I(2) = 20.8%). In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity, the results indicated that individuals with 4G/4G genotype had a significantly higher cancer risk among Caucasians (4G/4G vs. 5G/5G: OR = 1.31, 95%CI = 1.09-1.59, I(2) = 59.6%; 4G/4G vs. 4G/5G: OR = 1.12, 95%CI = 1.04-1.21, I(2) = 3.6%; recessive model: OR = 1.12, 95%CI = 1.05-1.21, I(2) = 25.3%). The results of the present meta-analysis support an association between the PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism and increasing cancer risk, especially among Caucasians, and those with 4G allele have a high risk to develop colorectal cancer and endometrial cancer.

  3. Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer is predicted to contribute towards colorectal cancer in young South African blacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ramsay

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A disproportionately large number of young (<50 years black patients present with colorectal cancer (CRC in South Africa. Although a phenomenon previously described elsewhere in Africa, its specificmolecular basis,whether sporadic or hereditary, has not been established. Molecular analysis of these tumours could link them to the features known to be associated with specific types of hereditary colorectal cancer, specifically through examination of levels of microsatellite instability, promoter methylation and the presence or absence of KRAS and BRAF mutations. The molecular features of cancer tissue samples from 44 CRC cases of black and white patients in South Africa were accordingly retrospectively analysed without knowledge of family history. Compared with samples from older blacks (>50 years, those from young black patients presented more often with a low methylation phenotype (CIMP-L and high levels of microsatellite instability (MSI-H. Furthermore, as determined by real-time PCR using probe technology, the tissues from35%of young blacks showed mutations within exon 1 of the KRAS gene. The BRAF-V600E mutation was only evident in the case of a single young black patient. Based on these results it seems likely that a proportion of CRC cases in young black patients from South Africa develop through the accumulation of mutations resulting in a mismatch repair deficiency linked to MSI-H and, possibly, germline mutations in the mismatch repair genes. The features in these patients are consistent with a diagnosis of the Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC syndrome. This finding has important implications for patient management and suggests that family members may be at high risk for CRC.

  4. CIRSE Vascular Closure Device Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reekers, Jim A.; Müller-Hülsbeck, Stefan; Libicher, Martin; Atar, Eli; Trentmann, Jens; Goffette, Pierre; Borggrefe, Jan; Zeleňák, Kamil; Hooijboer, Pieter; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2011-01-01

    Vascular closure devices are routinely used after many vascular interventional radiology procedures. However, there have been no major multicenter studies to assess the safety and effectiveness of the routine use of closure devices in interventional radiology. The CIRSE registry of closure devices

  5. The danish multiple sclerosis registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Stenager, Egon

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The Danish Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Registry was established in 1956. Content: The register comprises data on all Danes who had MS in 1949 or who have been diagnosed since. Data on new cases and updated information on persons with an MS diagnosis already notified are continuously...

  6. Genetic Variations in SLCO Transporter Genes Contributing to Racial Disparity in Aggressiveness of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    result was that the expression of SLCO2A1 did not preside in cancer cells or epithelial cells, instead, the transporter was expressed in stromal...Receptor Axis Drives Failure of Medical Therapy in Human Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (Matusik) Time Commitments: 0.30 calendar months Supporting

  7. Tumor suppressor genes that escape from X-inactivation contribute to cancer sex bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunford, Andrew; Weinstock, David M.; Savova, Virginia; Schumacher, Steven E.; Cleary, John P.; Yoda, Akinori; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Hess, Julian M.; Gimelbrant, Alexander A.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Lawrence, Michael S.; Getz, Gad; Lane, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    There is a striking and unexplained male predominance across many cancer types. A subset of X chromosome (chrX) genes can escape X-inactivation, which would protect females from complete functional loss by a single mutation. To identify putative “Escape from X-Inactivation Tumor Suppressor” (EXITS) genes, we compared somatic alterations from >4100 cancers across 21 tumor types for sex bias. Six of 783 non-pseudoautosomal region (PAR) chrX genes (ATRX, CNKSR2, DDX3X, KDM5C, KDM6A, and MAGEC3) more frequently harbored loss-of-function mutations in males (based on false discovery rate <0.1), compared to zero of 18,055 autosomal and PAR genes (P<0.0001). Male-biased mutations in genes that escape X-inactivation were observed in combined analysis across many cancers and in several individual tumor types, suggesting a generalized phenomenon. We conclude that biallelic expression of EXITS genes in females explains a portion of the reduced cancer incidence compared to males across a variety of tumor types. PMID:27869828

  8. Tumor-suppressor genes that escape from X-inactivation contribute to cancer sex bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunford, Andrew; Weinstock, David M; Savova, Virginia; Schumacher, Steven E; Cleary, John P; Yoda, Akinori; Sullivan, Timothy J; Hess, Julian M; Gimelbrant, Alexander A; Beroukhim, Rameen; Lawrence, Michael S; Getz, Gad; Lane, Andrew A

    2017-01-01

    There is a striking and unexplained male predominance across many cancer types. A subset of X-chromosome genes can escape X-inactivation, which would protect females from complete functional loss by a single mutation. To identify putative 'escape from X-inactivation tumor-suppressor' (EXITS) genes, we examined somatic alterations from >4,100 cancers across 21 tumor types for sex bias. Six of 783 non-pseudoautosomal region (PAR) X-chromosome genes (ATRX, CNKSR2, DDX3X, KDM5C, KDM6A, and MAGEC3) harbored loss-of-function mutations more frequently in males (based on a false discovery rate < 0.1), in comparison to zero of 18,055 autosomal and PAR genes (Fisher's exact P < 0.0001). Male-biased mutations in genes that escape X-inactivation were observed in combined analysis across many cancers and in several individual tumor types, suggesting a generalized phenomenon. We conclude that biallelic expression of EXITS genes in females explains a portion of the reduced cancer incidence in females as compared to males across a variety of tumor types.

  9. Contribution of screening and survival differences to racial disparities in colorectal cancer rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Lansdorp-Vogelaar (Iris); K.M. Kuntz (Karen); A.B. Knudsen (Amy); M. van Ballegooijen (Marjolein); A. Zauber (Ann); A. Jemal (Ahmedin)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Considerable disparities exist in colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality rates between blacks and whites in the United States. We estimated how much of these disparities could be explained by differences in CRC screening and stage-specific relative CRC survival.

  10. Diagnosis of breast cancer: contribution of US as an adjunct to mammography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zonderland, H. M.; Coerkamp, E. G.; Hermans, J.; van de Vijver, M. J.; van Voorthuisen, A. E.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the value of ultrasonography (US) as an adjunct to mammography for the diagnosis of breast cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a 2-year prospective study, 4,811 mammograms were classified according to level of suspicion of malignancy. Targeted US was performed to analyze (a)

  11. Dissecting the Contributions of Cooperating Gene Mutations to Cancer Phenotypes and Drug Responses with Patient-Derived iPSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Jung Chang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Connecting specific cancer genotypes with phenotypes and drug responses constitutes the central premise of precision oncology but is hindered by the genetic complexity and heterogeneity of primary cancer cells. Here, we use patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs and CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to dissect the individual contributions of two recurrent genetic lesions, the splicing factor SRSF2 P95L mutation and the chromosome 7q deletion, to the development of myeloid malignancy. Using a comprehensive panel of isogenic iPSCs—with none, one, or both genetic lesions—we characterize their relative phenotypic contributions and identify drug sensitivities specific to each one through a candidate drug approach and an unbiased large-scale small-molecule screen. To facilitate drug testing and discovery, we also derive SRSF2-mutant and isogenic normal expandable hematopoietic progenitor cells. We thus describe here an approach to dissect the individual effects of two cooperating mutations to clinically relevant features of malignant diseases. : Papapetrou and colleagues develop a comprehensive panel of isogenic iPSC lines with SRSF2 P95L mutation and chr7q deletion. They use these cells to identify cellular phenotypes contributed by each genetic lesion and therapeutic vulnerabilities specific to each one and develop expandable hematopoietic progenitor cell lines to facilitate drug discovery. Keywords: induced pluripotent stem cells, myelodysplastic syndrome, CRISPR/Cas9, gene editing, mutational cooperation, splicing factor mutations, spliceosomal mutations, SRSF2, chr7q deletion

  12. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Z # Search Form Controls Search The CDC submit Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry Note: Javascript ... gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) , based ...

  13. Registries Help Moms Measure Medication Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the case of the North American Antiepileptic Drug Pregnancy Registry, which studies the effects of drugs for ... is taking. For example, the North American Antiepileptic Drug Pregnancy Registry website lists more than 30 medications being ...

  14. Breast-related stereotype threat contributes to a symptom cluster in women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Gao, Wei; Yu, Li-Xiang; Zhu, Song-Ying; Cao, Feng-Lin

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the prevalence of breast-related stereotype threat and its effects on a symptom cluster consisting of anxiety, depression and fatigue and on each symptom. The stereotype that breasts are a sign of women's femininity results in patients with breast cancer fearing diminished femininity and rejection, which may induce psychological problems that co-occur as a symptom cluster. Cross-sectional study. A total of 131 patients with breast cancer postmastectomy completed the study. A question measuring breast-related stereotype threat, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue Scale were used to assess their breast-related stereotype threat and symptoms of anxiety, depression and fatigue. Of the 131 patients who answered the breast-related stereotype threat question, 86 (65·6%) reported breast-related stereotype threat. They did not differ significantly in social and clinical characteristics compared with those without the stereotype, but did report significantly higher levels of the symptom cluster and each symptom (anxiety, depression and fatigue). The odds ratios of the stereotype were significant for the symptom cluster, depression and fatigue (odds ratios = 2·52-3·98, p stereotype threat was common in patients with breast cancer. There was about a twofold increase in their risk of experiencing the symptom cluster and symptoms of depression and fatigue. In clinical practice, breast-related stereotype threat should be measured together with prevalent symptoms (e.g. anxiety, depression and fatigue) in patients with breast cancer. Our findings will aid the development of interventions for improving the mental health of women with breast cancer. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Registries in European post-marketing surveillance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouvy, Jacoline C; Blake, Kevin; Slattery, Jim

    2017-01-01

    at gaining further insight into the European Medicines Agency's (EMA) requests for new registries and registry studies using existing registries and to review the experience gained in their conduct. METHODS: European Public Assessment Reports were consulted to identify products for which a request...

  16. The neurotensin receptor-1 pathway contributes to human ductal breast cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupouy, Sandra; Viardot-Foucault, Véronique; Alifano, Marco; Souazé, Frédérique; Plu-Bureau, Geneviève; Chaouat, Marc; Lavaur, Anne; Hugol, Danielle; Gespach, Christian; Gompel, Anne; Forgez, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    The neurotensin (NTS) and its specific high affinity G protein coupled receptor, the NT1 receptor (NTSR1), are considered to be a good candidate for one of the factors implicated in neoplastic progression. In breast cancer cells, functionally expressed NT1 receptor coordinates a series of transforming functions including cellular migration and invasion. we investigated the expression of NTS and NTSR1 in normal human breast tissue and in invasive ductal breast carcinomas (IDCs) by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. NTS is expressed and up-regulated by estrogen in normal epithelial breast cells. NTS is also found expressed in the ductal and invasive components of IDCs. The high expression of NTSR1 is associated with the SBR grade, the size of the tumor, and the number of metastatic lymph nodes. Furthermore, the NTSR1 high expression is an independent factor of prognosis associated with the death of patients. these data support the activation of neurotensinergic deleterious pathways in breast cancer progression.

  17. Conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer: contribution of pelvic immobilization and new fiducial markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, R.; Oozeer, R.; Le Thanh, H.; Chauvet, B.; Toy, B.J.; Reboul, F.

    1997-01-01

    To reduce errors in the positioning of patients treated with external conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer, we evaluated both the use of an immobilization device and new fiducial markers. The immobilization device consisted of an individual mold made of polyurethane foam. Two sets of skin markers located on the anterior tibial surfaces were used to identify the pelvic isocenter. The patient's position was evaluated by orthogonal port film which were then compared with the original simulation film. Results are presented with respect to orthogonal axes. Comparison with classic procedures without immobilization showed that use of the mold and new fiducial markers led to a decrease in set-up errors which were less than 5 mm. With the use of an immobilization device and optimized techniques for patients' positioning, conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer is more accurate. (authors)

  18. [Cancer Disease Trajectory and the Contribution of Artistic Outreach Activity to Palliative Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshiro, Hisako; Oshiro, Tatsuo; Tanimizu, Masahito

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to show some unintentional aspects of palliative supports offered by the community. The activities of the Opera Ehime, an amateur opera group, play an important role in palliative and grief care. This community is also committed to providing supportive care for home hospice cancer patients through an outreach music program that offers patients connection with others and reduces isolation. Assessment by the coordinator includes determiningthe patients' preferences and the relevance of music throughout their lives. Then, the coordinator predicts the cancer trajectory and invites patients to participate in the home hospice concert at any stage of their illness. These activities are an effective form of supportingcancer care for patients to promote wellness and improve physical and emotional well-being, as well as quality of life.

  19. Decreased Expression of the Early Mitotic Gene, CHFR, Contributes to the Acquisition of Breast Cancer Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    A composite image of two separate Western blots. Whole-cell lysate from the MCF10A IHMEC line was used as a control on both blots in the composite ...which the nucleolus is depicted as a dark spot within the nucleus. Parental (far left ) and scramble shRNA controls (middle ) normally contain one or... Chemistry of Life Processes” Cumulative GPA: 3.97/4.0 Honors and Awards: University of Michigan Department of Defense Breast Cancer

  20. Lactoferrin- Endothelin-1 Axis Contributes to the Development and Invasiveness of Triple Negative Breast Cancer Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Ngoc-Han; Nair, Vasudha; Reddy, Divijendra Natha Sirigiri; Mudvari, Prakriti; Ohshiro, Kazufumi; Ghanta, Krishna Sumanth; Pakala, Suresh B.; Li, Da-Qiang; Costa, Luis; Lipton, Allan; Badwe, Rajendra A.; Fuqua, Suzanne; Wallon, Margaretha; Prendergast, George C.; Kumar, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is characterized by the lack of expression of ERα, PR and HER-2 receptors and the pathway(s) responsible for this downregulation and thus aggressiveness, remains unknown. Here we discovered that lactoferrin (Lf) efficiently downregulates the levels of ERα, PR and HER-2 receptors in a proteasome-dependent manner in breast cancer cells, and accounts for the loss of responsiveness to ER- or HER-2- targeted therapies. Further we found that Lf increases migration and invasiveness of both non-TNBC and TNBC cell lines. We discovered that Lf directly stimulates the transcription of endothelin-1 (ET-1), a secreted pro-invasive polypeptide that acts through a specific receptor ET(A)R, leading to secretion of bioactive ET-1 peptide. Interestingly, a therapeutic ET-1 receptor antagonist drug completely blocked Lf-dependent motility and invasiveness of breast cancer cells. Physiologic significance of this newly discovered Lf-ET-1 axis in the manifestation of TNBC phenotypes is revealed by elevated plasma and tissue Lf and ET-1 levels in TNBC patients as compared to those in ER+ cases. These findings describe the first physiologically relevant polypeptide as a functional determinant of downregulating all three therapeutic receptors in breast cancer which utilizes another secreted ET-1 system to confer invasiveness. Results presented here provide proof-of-principle evidence in support of therapeutic effectiveness of ET-1 receptor antagonist to completely block the Lf-induced motility and invasiveness of the TNBC as well as non-TBNC cells, and thus, opening a remarkable opportunity to treat TNBC by targeting the Lf-ET-1 axis using an approved developmental drug. PMID:22006997

  1. FOXO3-mediated up-regulation of Bim contributes to rhein-induced cancer cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiao; Liu, Shu; Yin, Yancun; Li, Mingjin; Wang, Bo; Yang, Li; Jiang, Yangfu

    2015-03-01

    The anthraquinone compound rhein is a natural agent in the traditional Chinese medicine rhubarb. Preclinical studies demonstrate that rhein has anticancer activity. Treatment of a variety of cancer cells with rhein may induce apoptosis. Here, we report that rhein induces atypical unfolded protein response in breast cancer MCF-7 cells and hepatoma HepG2 cells. Rhein induces CHOP expression, eIF2α phosphorylation and caspase cleavage, while it does not induce glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) expression in both MCF-7 and HepG2 cells. Meanwhile, rhein inhibits thapsigargin-induced GRP78 expression and X box-binding protein 1 splicing. In addition, rhein inhibits Akt phosphorylation and stimulates FOXO transactivation activity. Rhein induces Bim expression in MCF-7 and HepG2 cells, which can be abrogated by FOXO3a knockdown. Knockdown of FOXO3a or Bim abrogates rhein-induced caspase cleavage and apoptosis. The chemical chaperone 4-phenylbutyrate acid antagonizes the induction of FOXO activation, Bim expression and caspase cleavage by rhein, indicating that protein misfolding may be involved in triggering these deleterious effects. We conclude that FOXO3a-mediated up-regulation of Bim is a key mechanism underlying rhein-induced cancer cells apoptosis.

  2. A Breast Tissue Protein Expression Profile Contributing to Early Parity-Induced Protection Against Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Marie Gutierrez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Early parity reduces breast cancer risk, whereas, late parity and nulliparity increase breast cancer risk. Despite substantial efforts to understand the protective effects of early parity, the precise molecular circuitry responsible for these changes is not yet fully defined. Methods: Here, we have conducted the first study assessing protein expression profiles in normal breast tissue of healthy early parous, late parous, and nulliparous women. Breast tissue biopsies were obtained from 132 healthy parous and nulliparous volunteers. These samples were subjected to global protein expression profiling and immunohistochemistry. GeneSpring and MetaCore bioinformatics analysis software were used to identify protein expression profiles associated with early parity (low risk versus late/nulliparity (high risk. Results: Early parity reduces expression of key proteins involved in mitogenic signaling pathways in breast tissue through down regulation of EGFR1/3, ESR1, AKT1, ATF, Fos, and SRC. Early parity is also characterized by greater genomic stability and reduced tissue inflammation based on differential expression of aurora kinases, p53, RAD52, BRCA1, MAPKAPK-2, ATF-1, ICAM1, and NF-kappaB compared to late and nulli parity. Conclusions: Early parity reduces basal cell proliferation in breast tissue, which translates to enhanced genomic stability, reduced cellular stress/inflammation, and thus reduced breast cancer risk.

  3. Contribution of the sentinel lymph node detection in oral cavity and oropharynx cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comte, F.; Barge, M.L.; Chevalier, J.; Rossi, M.; Zanca, M.; Alovisetti, C.; Garrel, R.; Guerrier, B.; Costes, V.

    2004-01-01

    The histopathological features of lymph nodes removal in head and neck cancer bring major prognostic information. Molecular biology or immuno histological techniques allow a far better detection sensitivity while underlining micrometastases. However, due to the great number of removed lymph nodes, an exhaustive histological analysis is impossible and an efficient targeting is desirable. The aim of this study was to establish the feasibility of the gamma probe directed biopsy of the sentinel lymph node in oral and oropharyngeal carcinoma. Up to date, 13 patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancers (T1pNO) were included. The sentinel lymph node was detected during surgery and selectively resected before traditional neck lymph dissection. The sentinel lymph node (SLN) was detected in 92 % of patients. In one case, the immunohistochemical analysis of the SLN showed a micro-metastatic involvement while the classical histological analysis remained negative.The preliminary analysis of our study attests the SLN radio-localization efficiency in head and neck cancers and allows the systematic detection of micro-metastatic involvement. The pursuit of this study will continue to confirm these results from a larger population and to precise the prognostic value of the micro-metastatic stage. (author)

  4. Do pre-diagnosis primary care consultation patterns explain deprivation-specific differences in net survival among women with breast cancer? An examination of individually-linked data from the UK West Midlands cancer registry, national screening programme and Clinical Practice Research Datalink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, M; Woods, L M; Bhaskaran, K; Rachet, B

    2017-02-23

    In England and Wales breast cancer survival is higher among more affluent women. Our aim was to investigate the potential of pre-diagnostic factors for explaining deprivation-related differences in survival. Individually-linked data from women aged 50-70 in the West Midlands region of England, diagnosed with breast cancer 1989-2006 and continuously eligible for screening, was retrieved from the cancer registry, screening service and Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Follow-up was to the end of July 2012. Deprivation was measured at small area level, based on the quintiles of the income domain of the English indices of deprivation. Consultation rates per woman per week, time from last breast-related GP consultation to diagnosis, and from diagnosis to first surgery were calculated. We estimated net survival using the non-parametric Pohar-Perme estimator. The rate of primary care consultations was similar during the 18 months prior to diagnosis in each deprivation group for breast and non-breast symptoms. Survival was lower for more deprived women from 4 years after diagnosis. Lower net survival was associated with more advanced extent of disease and being non-screen-detected. There was a persistent trend of lower net survival for more deprived women, irrespective of the woman's obesity, alcohol, smoking or comorbidity status. There was no significant variation in time from last breast symptom to diagnosis by deprivation. However, women in more deprived categories experienced significantly longer periods between cancer diagnosis and first surgery (mean = 21.5 vs. 28.4 days, p = 0.03). Those whose surgery occurred more than 12 weeks following their cancer diagnosis had substantially lower net survival. Our data suggest that although more deprived women with breast cancer display lifestyle factors associated with poorer outcomes, their consultation frequency, comorbidities and the breast cancer symptoms they present with are similar. We found weak

  5. Tcf3 and cell cycle factors contribute to butyrate resistance in colorectal cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiaro, Christopher, E-mail: cchiaro@tcmedc.org [Department of Basic Sciences, The Commonwealth Medical College, 525 Pine Street, Scranton, PA 18509 (United States); Lazarova, Darina L., E-mail: dlazarova@tcmedc.org [Department of Basic Sciences, The Commonwealth Medical College, 525 Pine Street, Scranton, PA 18509 (United States); Bordonaro, Michael, E-mail: mbordonaro@tcmedc.org [Department of Basic Sciences, The Commonwealth Medical College, 525 Pine Street, Scranton, PA 18509 (United States)

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate mechanisms responsible for butyrate resistance in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tcf3 modulates butyrate's effects on Wnt activity and cell growth in resistant cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tcf3 modulation of butyrate's effects differ by cell context. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell cycle factors are overexpressed in the resistant cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reversal of altered gene expression can enhance the anti-cancer effects of butyrate. -- Abstract: Butyrate, a fermentation product of dietary fiber, inhibits clonal growth in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells dependent upon the fold induction of Wnt activity. We have developed a CRC cell line (HCT-R) that, unlike its parental cell line, HCT-116, does not respond to butyrate exposure with hyperactivation of Wnt signaling and suppressed clonal growth. PCR array analyses revealed Wnt pathway-related genes, the expression of which differs between butyrate-sensitive HCT-116 CRC cells and their butyrate-resistant HCT-R cell counterparts. We identified overexpression of Tcf3 as being partially responsible for the butyrate-resistant phenotype, as this DNA-binding protein suppresses the hyperinduction of Wnt activity by butyrate. Consequently, Tcf3 knockdown in HCT-R cells restores their sensitivity to the effects of butyrate on Wnt activity and clonal cell growth. Interestingly, the effects of overexpressed Tcf3 differ between HCT-116 and HCT-R cells; thus, in HCT-116 cells Tcf3 suppresses proliferation without rendering the cells resistant to butyrate. In HCT-R cells, however, the overexpression of Tcf3 inhibits Wnt activity, and the cells are still able to proliferate due to the higher expression levels of cell cycle factors, particularly those driving the G{sub 1} to S transition. Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms determining the variable sensitivity of CRC cells to butyrate may assist in developing approaches that

  6. Tcf3 and cell cycle factors contribute to butyrate resistance in colorectal cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiaro, Christopher; Lazarova, Darina L.; Bordonaro, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We investigate mechanisms responsible for butyrate resistance in colon cancer cells. ► Tcf3 modulates butyrate’s effects on Wnt activity and cell growth in resistant cells. ► Tcf3 modulation of butyrate’s effects differ by cell context. ► Cell cycle factors are overexpressed in the resistant cells. ► Reversal of altered gene expression can enhance the anti-cancer effects of butyrate. -- Abstract: Butyrate, a fermentation product of dietary fiber, inhibits clonal growth in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells dependent upon the fold induction of Wnt activity. We have developed a CRC cell line (HCT-R) that, unlike its parental cell line, HCT-116, does not respond to butyrate exposure with hyperactivation of Wnt signaling and suppressed clonal growth. PCR array analyses revealed Wnt pathway-related genes, the expression of which differs between butyrate-sensitive HCT-116 CRC cells and their butyrate-resistant HCT-R cell counterparts. We identified overexpression of Tcf3 as being partially responsible for the butyrate-resistant phenotype, as this DNA-binding protein suppresses the hyperinduction of Wnt activity by butyrate. Consequently, Tcf3 knockdown in HCT-R cells restores their sensitivity to the effects of butyrate on Wnt activity and clonal cell growth. Interestingly, the effects of overexpressed Tcf3 differ between HCT-116 and HCT-R cells; thus, in HCT-116 cells Tcf3 suppresses proliferation without rendering the cells resistant to butyrate. In HCT-R cells, however, the overexpression of Tcf3 inhibits Wnt activity, and the cells are still able to proliferate due to the higher expression levels of cell cycle factors, particularly those driving the G 1 to S transition. Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms determining the variable sensitivity of CRC cells to butyrate may assist in developing approaches that prevent or reverse butyrate resistance.

  7. Alterations of the Bone Marrow Microenvironment Contribute to Prostate Cancer Skeletal Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    clinical S. I. Park : F. N. Soki : L. K. McCauley (*) Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, The University of Michigan School of Dentistry, 1011 N... chronic angiogenesis. Am J Pathol 174(5):1972–1980. doi:10.2353/ ajpath.2009.080819 90. Shojaei F, Zhong C, Wu X, Yu L, Ferrara N (2008) Role of...anoikis in prostate cancer cells Serk In Park1 and Laurie K McCauley1,2 1Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, University of Michigan School of

  8. Quality of trauma care and trauma registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino Sánchez, F I; Ballesteros Sanz, M A; Cordero Lorenzana, L; Guerrero López, F

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic disease is a major public health concern. Monitoring the quality of services provided is essential for the maintenance and improvement thereof. Assessing and monitoring the quality of care in trauma patient through quality indicators would allow identifying opportunities for improvement whose implementation would improve outcomes in hospital mortality, functional outcomes and quality of life of survivors. Many quality indicators have been used in this condition, although very few ones have a solid level of scientific evidence to recommend their routine use. The information contained in the trauma registries, spread around the world in recent decades, is essential to know the current health care reality, identify opportunities for improvement and contribute to the clinical and epidemiological research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  9. CIRSE Vascular Closure Device Registry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reekers, Jim A.; Müller-Hülsbeck, Stefan; Libicher, Martin; Atar, Eli; Trentmann, Jens; Goffette, Pierre; Borggrefe, Jan; Zeleňák, Kamil; Hooijboer, Pieter; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Vascular closure devices are routinely used after many vascular interventional radiology procedures. However, there have been no major multicenter studies to assess the safety and effectiveness of the routine use of closure devices in interventional radiology. Methods: The CIRSE registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug started in January 2009 and ended in August 2009. A total of 1,107 patients were included in the registry. Results: Deployment success was 97.2%. Deployment failure specified to access type was 8.8% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 5.0–14.5] for antegrade access and 1.8% (95% CI 1.1–2.9) for retrograde access (P = 0.001). There was no difference in deployment failure related to local PVD at the access site. Calcification was a reason for deployment failure in only 5.9 cm, and two vessel occlusions. Conclusion: The conclusion of this registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug is that the use of this device in interventional radiology procedures is safe, with a low incidence of serious access site complications. There seems to be no difference in complications between antegrade and retrograde access and other parameters.

  10. CIRSE Vascular Closure Device Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Hülsbeck, Stefan; Libicher, Martin; Atar, Eli; Trentmann, Jens; Goffette, Pierre; Borggrefe, Jan; Zeleňák, Kamil; Hooijboer, Pieter; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Vascular closure devices are routinely used after many vascular interventional radiology procedures. However, there have been no major multicenter studies to assess the safety and effectiveness of the routine use of closure devices in interventional radiology. Methods The CIRSE registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug started in January 2009 and ended in August 2009. A total of 1,107 patients were included in the registry. Results Deployment success was 97.2%. Deployment failure specified to access type was 8.8% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 5.0–14.5] for antegrade access and 1.8% (95% CI 1.1–2.9) for retrograde access (P = 0.001). There was no difference in deployment failure related to local PVD at the access site. Calcification was a reason for deployment failure in only 5.9 cm, and two vessel occlusions. Conclusion The conclusion of this registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug is that the use of this device in interventional radiology procedures is safe, with a low incidence of serious access site complications. There seems to be no difference in complications between antegrade and retrograde access and other parameters. PMID:20981425

  11. The varied contribution of significant others to Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) uptake by men with cancer: a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klafke, Nadja; Eliott, Jaklin A; Olver, Ian N; Wittert, Gary A

    2014-06-01

    To explore how men's Significant Others (SOs), including family members and close friends, contribute to the uptake and maintenance of specific CAM therapies. This study was the second, qualitative phase of a mixed-methods project investigating the use of CAM in an Australian male cancer population. Male participants were purposefully selected from a pool of 403 patients who answered a survey in the first quantitative phase (94% response rate and 86% consent rate for follow-up interview). Then semi-structured interviews among 26 men with a variety of cancers and 24 SOs were conducted. All 43 interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analysed thematically. Men used CAM/Natural products to cope with physical concerns, and this was actively supported by men's SOs who contributed to the uptake and maintenance of these CAMs. The shared CAM preparation and consumption functioned to strengthen the bond between men and their SOs, and also helped men's SOs to cope with uncertainty and regain control. In contrast, men practiced CAM/Mind-body medicine to receive emotional benefits, and only rarely shared this practice with their SOs, indicating a need for coping with emotions in a private way. Men's CAM use is a multifaceted process that can be better understood by considering CAM categories separately. CAM/Natural products help men to cope with physical concerns, while CAM/Mind-body medicine assist men to cope with their emotions in a private way. Oncology professionals can use this information to better promote and implement integrative cancer care services. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. CD133+ cells contribute to radioresistance via altered regulation of DNA repair genes in human lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, Amar; Webb, Bryan; Gerson, Stanton L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Radioresistance in human tumors has been linked in part to a subset of cells termed cancer stem cells (CSCs). The prominin 1 (CD133) cell surface protein is proposed to be a marker enriching for CSCs. We explore the importance of DNA repair in contributing to radioresistance in CD133+ lung cancer cells. Materials and methods: A549 and H1299 lung cancer cell lines were used. Sorted CD133+ cells were exposed to either single 4 Gy or 8 Gy doses and clonogenic survival measured. ϒ-H2AX immunofluorescence and quantitative real time PCR was performed on sorted CD133+ cells both in the absence of IR and after two single 4 Gy doses. Lentiviral shRNA was used to silence repair genes. Results: A549 but not H1299 cells expand their CD133+ population after single 4 Gy exposure, and isolated A549 CD133+ cells demonstrate IR resistance. This resistance corresponded with enhanced repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and upregulated expression of DSB repair genes in A549 cells. Prior IR exposure of two single 4 Gy doses resulted in acquired DNA repair upregulation and improved repair proficiency in both A549 and H1299. Finally Exo1 and Rad51 silencing in A549 cells abrogated the CD133+ IR expansion phenotype and induced IR sensitivity in sorted CD133+ cells. Conclusions: CD133 identifies a population of cells within specific tumor types containing altered expression of DNA repair genes that are inducible upon exposure to chemotherapy. This altered gene expression contributes to enhanced DSB resolution and the radioresistance phenotype of these cells. We also identify DNA repair genes which may serve as promising therapeutic targets to confer radiosensitivity to CSCs

  13. Decreased Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Content Contributes to Increased Survival in Human Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Oraldi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Among diet components, some fatty acids are known to affect several stages of colon carcinogenesis, whereas others are probably helpful in preventing tumors. In light of this, our aim was to determine the composition of fatty acids and the possible correlation with apoptosis in human colon carcinoma specimens at different Duke's stages and to evaluate the effect of enriching human colon cancer cell line with the possible reduced fatty acid(s. Specimens of carcinoma were compared with the corresponding non-neoplastic mucosa: a significant decrease of arachidonic acid, PPARα, Bad, and Bax and a significant increase of COX-2, Bcl-2, and pBad were found. The importance of arachidonic acid in apoptosis was demonstrated by enriching a Caco-2 cell line with this fatty acid. It induced apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner via induction of PPARα that, in turn, decreased COX-2. In conclusion, the reduced content of arachidonic acid is likely related to carcinogenic process decreasing the susceptibility of cancer cells to apoptosis.

  14. The neurotensin receptor-1 pathway contributes to human ductal breast cancer progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Dupouy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The neurotensin (NTS and its specific high affinity G protein coupled receptor, the NT1 receptor (NTSR1, are considered to be a good candidate for one of the factors implicated in neoplastic progression. In breast cancer cells, functionally expressed NT1 receptor coordinates a series of transforming functions including cellular migration and invasion. METHODS AND RESULTS: we investigated the expression of NTS and NTSR1 in normal human breast tissue and in invasive ductal breast carcinomas (IDCs by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. NTS is expressed and up-regulated by estrogen in normal epithelial breast cells. NTS is also found expressed in the ductal and invasive components of IDCs. The high expression of NTSR1 is associated with the SBR grade, the size of the tumor, and the number of metastatic lymph nodes. Furthermore, the NTSR1 high expression is an independent factor of prognosis associated with the death of patients. CONCLUSION: these data support the activation of neurotensinergic deleterious pathways in breast cancer progression.

  15. Contributing Factors to Colorectal Cancer Screening among Chinese People: A Review of Quantitative Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Y. P. Leung

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is a major health problem in Asia. It has been reported that the Chinese are more susceptible to CRC than many other ethnic groups. Screening for CRC is a cost-effective prevention and control strategy; however, the screening rates among the Chinese are sub-optimal. We conducted a review to identify the factors associated with CRC screening participation among Chinese people. Twenty-two studies that examined the factors related to CRC screening behaviors among the Chinese were identified through five databases. Seven factors were consistently reported to influence CRC screening behaviors in at least one of the studies: socio-demographic characteristics (educational level, health insurance, and knowledge about CRC and its screening; psychological factors (perceived severity of CRC, susceptibility of having CRC, and barriers to screening; and contact with medical provider (physician recommendation. The evidence base for many of these relationships is quite limited. Furthermore, the associations of many factors, including age, gender, income, cancer worry/fear, and self-efficacy with CRC screening behaviors, were mixed or inconsistent across these studies, thereby indicating that more studies are needed in this area.

  16. Brainstem GLP-1 signalling contributes to cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borner, Tito; Liberini, Claudia G; Lutz, Thomas A; Riediger, Thomas

    2018-03-15

    The cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome (CACS) is a frequent and severe condition in cancer patients. Currently, no pharmacological treatment is approved for the therapy of CACS. Centrally, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is expressed in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) and is implicated in malaise, nausea and food aversion. The NTS is reciprocally connected to brain sites implicated in the control of energy balance including the area postrema (AP), which mediates CACS in certain tumour models. Given the role of GLP-1 as a mediator of anorexia under acute sickness conditions, we hypothesized that brainstem GLP-1 signalling might play a role in the mediation of CACS. Using hepatoma tumour-bearing (TB) rats, we first tested whether the chronic delivery of the GLP-1R antagonist exendin-9 (Ex-9) into the fourth ventricle attenuates CACS. Second, we investigated whether a genetic knockdown of GLP-1 expression in the NTS ameliorates CACS. Ex-9 attenuated anorexia, body weight loss, muscle and fat depletion compared to TB controls. Similarly, TB animals with a knockdown of GLP-1 expression in the NTS had higher food intake, reduced body weight loss, and higher lean and fat mass compared to TB controls. Our study identifies brainstem GLP-1 as crucial mediator of CACS in hepatoma TB rats. The GLP-1R represents a promising target against CACS and possibly other forms of disease-related anorexia/cachexia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Shared decision-making in medical encounters regarding breast cancer treatment: the contribution of methodological triangulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durif-Bruckert, C; Roux, P; Morelle, M; Mignotte, H; Faure, C; Moumjid-Ferdjaoui, N

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study on shared decision-making in the doctor-patient encounter about surgical treatment for early-stage breast cancer, conducted in a regional cancer centre in France, was to further the understanding of patient perceptions on shared decision-making. The study used methodological triangulation to collect data (both quantitative and qualitative) about patient preferences in the context of a clinical consultation in which surgeons followed a shared decision-making protocol. Data were analysed from a multi-disciplinary research perspective (social psychology and health economics). The triangulated data collection methods were questionnaires (n = 132), longitudinal interviews (n = 47) and observations of consultations (n = 26). Methodological triangulation revealed levels of divergence and complementarity between qualitative and quantitative results that suggest new perspectives on the three inter-related notions of decision-making, participation and information. Patients' responses revealed important differences between shared decision-making and participation per se. The authors note that subjecting patients to a normative behavioural model of shared decision-making in an era when paradigms of medical authority are shifting may undermine the patient's quest for what he or she believes is a more important right: a guarantee of the best care available. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Inherited variants affecting RNA editing may contribute to ovarian cancer susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Permuth, Jennifer B; Reid, Brett; Earp, Madalene

    2016-01-01

    RNA editing in mammals is a form of post-transcriptional modification in which adenosine is converted to inosine by the adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADAR) family of enzymes. Based on evidence of altered ADAR expression in epithelial ovarian cancers (EOC), we hypothesized that single nucleo......, including rs1127313 (G/A), a SNP in the 3' untranslated region. In summary, germline variation involving RNA editing genes may influence EOC susceptibility, warranting further investigation of inherited and acquired alterations affecting RNA editing.......RNA editing in mammals is a form of post-transcriptional modification in which adenosine is converted to inosine by the adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADAR) family of enzymes. Based on evidence of altered ADAR expression in epithelial ovarian cancers (EOC), we hypothesized that single...... nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ADAR genes modify EOC susceptibility, potentially by altering ovarian tissue gene expression. Using directly genotyped and imputed data from 10,891 invasive EOC cases and 21,693 controls, we evaluated the associations of 5,303 SNPs in ADAD1, ADAR, ADAR2, ADAR3, and SND1...

  19. A contribution to improved radiotherapy for muscle invading urinary bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muren, Ludvig PAul

    2002-07-01

    Cystectomy has traditionally been regarded the treatment of choice for muscle invading urinary bladder cancer in most countries. Radiotherapy has been offered patients considered unfit for cystectomy. Since the contraindications of surgery are frequent among bladder cancer patients, a substantial amount of patients with muscle invading bladder cancer (typically 50%) are still managed primarily with radiation. Recently, a tri-modality, organsparing treatment (trans-urethral resection and radio-chemotherapy) has been proposed for bladder cancer, like in the management of a range of other common malignancies. This approach may provide as high control rates as cystectomy yet maintain a higher quality of life for selected patient groups. In both the radical radiotherapy and the combined modality approach, high radiation doses are needed to improve local disease control. Radiation dose escalation requires improved conformation of dose distributions. This PhD programme aimed to develop improved conformal radiotherapy procedures in the management of patients with muscle invading urinary bladder cancer. In the initial phase of this work, computer-controlled movement of the linear accelerator collimator jaws during beam delivery was applied to shape so-called partially wedged beams (PWBs), that were designed specifically to tailor the dose distribution in bladder irradiation closer to the defined bladder target. The dosimetric verification and treatment planning implementation of this beam delivery concept were addressed, and we documented that these dynamic beams were delivered as accurately as standard beams. Particular attention was given to the BMS-96 diode array system, as it was adapted to dynamic beam dosimetry. Next, the potential clinical impact of these beams was analysed. In a retrospectively study of a set of urinary bladder treatment plans, the PWBs were seen to improve the dose homogeneity inside the bladder target as well as to reduce normal tissue (small

  20. A contribution to improved radiotherapy for muscle invading urinary bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muren, Ludvig PAul

    2002-01-01

    Cystectomy has traditionally been regarded the treatment of choice for muscle invading urinary bladder cancer in most countries. Radiotherapy has been offered patients considered unfit for cystectomy. Since the contraindications of surgery are frequent among bladder cancer patients, a substantial amount of patients with muscle invading bladder cancer (typically 50%) are still managed primarily with radiation. Recently, a tri-modality, organsparing treatment (trans-urethral resection and radio-chemotherapy) has been proposed for bladder cancer, like in the management of a range of other common malignancies. This approach may provide as high control rates as cystectomy yet maintain a higher quality of life for selected patient groups. In both the radical radiotherapy and the combined modality approach, high radiation doses are needed to improve local disease control. Radiation dose escalation requires improved conformation of dose distributions. This PhD programme aimed to develop improved conformal radiotherapy procedures in the management of patients with muscle invading urinary bladder cancer. In the initial phase of this work, computer-controlled movement of the linear accelerator collimator jaws during beam delivery was applied to shape so-called partially wedged beams (PWBs), that were designed specifically to tailor the dose distribution in bladder irradiation closer to the defined bladder target. The dosimetric verification and treatment planning implementation of this beam delivery concept were addressed, and we documented that these dynamic beams were delivered as accurately as standard beams. Particular attention was given to the BMS-96 diode array system, as it was adapted to dynamic beam dosimetry. Next, the potential clinical impact of these beams was analysed. In a retrospectively study of a set of urinary bladder treatment plans, the PWBs were seen to improve the dose homogeneity inside the bladder target as well as to reduce normal tissue (small

  1. Use of general practice, diagnostic investigations and hospital services before and after cancer diagnosis - a population-based nationwide registry study of 127,000 incident adult cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Karina Garnier; Fenger-Grøn, Morten; Flarup, Kaare Rud

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knowledge of patterns in cancer patients' health care utilisation around the time of diagnosis may guide health care resource allocation and provide important insights into this groups' demand for health care services. The health care need of patients with comorbid conditions far...... demand for GP services one year after their diagnosis highlights the importance of close coordination and communication between the primary and the secondary healthcare sector....

  2. TGFβ1-induced down-regulation of microRNA-138 contributes to epithelial-mesenchymal transition in primary lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang; Li, Tiepeng; Han, Lu; Qin, Peng; Wu, Zhao; Xu, Benling; Gao, Quanli; Song, Yongping

    2018-02-19

    The existence of cancer stem cells within the tumor could lead to cancer therapy resistance. TGFβ1 is considered as one of the most powerful players in the generation of CSCs through induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition in different types of cancer including lung cancer, however, the detailed mechanisms by which TGFβ1 contribute to EMT induction and CSC maintenance remains unclear. Here, we showed primary lung cancer cells treated by TGFβ1 exhibit mesenchymal features, including morphology and expression of mesenchymal marker in a time-dependent manner. We also observed long-term TGFβ1 exposure leads to an enrichment of a sub-population of CD44 + CD90 + cells which represent CSCs in lung cancer cells. Moreover, the differential expression microRNAs between CSCs and non-CSCs were identified using next-generation sequencing to screen key miRNAs which might contribute to TGFβ1-induced EMT and CSCs generation. Among those differentially expressed miRNAs, the expression of microRNA-138 was time-dependently down-regulated by TGFβ1 treatment. We further demonstrated primary lung cancer cells, in which we knockdown the expression of miR-138, exhibit mesenchymal phenotypes and stem cell properties. Taken together, these findings indicate TGFβ1-induced down-regulation of microRNA-138 contributes to EMT in primary lung cancer cells, and suggest that miR-138 might serve as a potential therapeutic target. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Human Papilloma Virus prevalence and type-specific relative contribution in invasive cervical cancer specimens from Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lloveras Belén

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cervical cancer represents an important global public health problem. It is the 2nd most common cancer among women worldwide. Human Papillomavirus (HPV infection is now well-established as a necessary cause of invasive cervical cancer (ICC development. Only a few studies on HPV prevalence and type-specific distribution in ICC have been conducted in Italy. Aim To describe the prevalence of HPV and the HPV type-specific distribution in ICC cases identified in Rome, Italy. Methods 140 paraffin embedded tissue blocks of primary ICC diagnosed between 2001 and 2006 were identified at the Regina Elena Cancer Institute in Rome (Italy. HPV was detected through amplification of HPV DNA using SPF-10 HPV broad-spectrum primers followed by DEIA and then genotyping by LiPA25 (version 1. Results 134 cases were considered suitable for HPV DNA detection after histological evaluation; and overall, 90.3% (121/134 HPV prevalence was detected. 111 cases had a single HPV type, 4 cases had an uncharacterized type (HPVX and 6 cases had multiple HPV infections. The five most common single HPV types among positive cases were: HPV16 (71/121; 58.7%, HPV18 (12/121; 9.9%, HPV31, HPV45 and HPV58 (5/121; 4.1% each. 2 (1.5% of the single infections and 2 (1.5% of the multiple infections contained low risk types. Statistically significant differences in the relative contribution of HPV18 were found when comparing squamous cell carcinomas with adenocarcinomas. Conclusions HPV16 and HPV18 accounted for almost 70% of all the HPV positive ICC cases. The study provides baseline information for further evaluation on the impact of recently introduced HPV vaccines in Italy.

  4. Contribution of customised dosimetry for small animal to the treatments of cancers by metabolic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutaleb, Samir

    2010-01-01

    This research thesis first reports a bibliographical study which addressed the use of ionizing radiations in cancer therapy (evolution from ionizing radiation to metabolic radiotherapy, biological and physical parameters, and absorbed dose in metabolic radiotherapy) and the role imagery has in customised dosimetry (absorbed dose calculation methods, determination of cumulative activity, dosimetric models for S factor calculation). Then, the author presents a software which has been specifically developed for the creation of dosimetric models, and reports its validation. He reports the comparison between different dosimetric models in the case of mice. He highlights two applications of the developed tool: radio-immunotherapy and metabolic radiotherapy. He finally proposes a general discussion on the impact of small animal dosimetry on metabolic radiotherapy [fr

  5. Profiling Invasiveness in Head and Neck Cancer: Recent Contributions of Genomic and Transcriptomic Approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisa, Lluís; Aebersold, Daniel Matthias; Giger, Roland; Caversaccio, Marco Domenico; Borner, Urs; Medová, Michaela; Zimmer, Yitzhak

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput molecular profiling approaches have emerged as precious research tools in the field of head and neck translational oncology. Such approaches have identified and/or confirmed the role of several genes or pathways in the acquisition/maintenance of an invasive phenotype and the execution of cellular programs related to cell invasion. Recently published new-generation sequencing studies in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) have unveiled prominent roles in carcinogenesis and cell invasion of mutations involving NOTCH1 and PI3K-patwhay components. Gene-expression profiling studies combined with systems biology approaches have allowed identifying and gaining further mechanistic understanding into pathways commonly enriched in invasive HNSCC. These pathways include antigen-presenting and leucocyte adhesion molecules, as well as genes involved in cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Here we review the major insights into invasiveness in head and neck cancer provided by high-throughput molecular profiling approaches

  6. Profiling Invasiveness in Head and Neck Cancer: Recent Contributions of Genomic and Transcriptomic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluís Nisa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available High-throughput molecular profiling approaches have emerged as precious research tools in the field of head and neck translational oncology. Such approaches have identified and/or confirmed the role of several genes or pathways in the acquisition/maintenance of an invasive phenotype and the execution of cellular programs related to cell invasion. Recently published new-generation sequencing studies in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC have unveiled prominent roles in carcinogenesis and cell invasion of mutations involving NOTCH1 and PI3K-patwhay components. Gene-expression profiling studies combined with systems biology approaches have allowed identifying and gaining further mechanistic understanding into pathways commonly enriched in invasive HNSCC. These pathways include antigen-presenting and leucocyte adhesion molecules, as well as genes involved in cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Here we review the major insights into invasiveness in head and neck cancer provided by high-throughput molecular profiling approaches.

  7. Contribution of radioisotopic techniques to identify sentinel lymph-nodes (SLN) in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarlenga, Ana C.; Katz, Lidia; Armesto, Amparo; Noblia, Cristina; Gorostidi, Susana; Perez, Juan; Parma, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    The SLN (one or several) is the first to receive lymph from a tumor. When a cancer cell comes off the tumor and circulates along the outgoing lymph, it meets a barrier, the SLN that intercepts and destroys it. If not, the cancer cell can stay and reproduce in the SLN making a metastasis which can affect other nodes in the same way. It has been shown that if the original tumor is small there is little chance that the SLN could be invaded and therefore little chance of dissemination to other lymph-nodes. Nowadays due to early detection, breast tumors are smaller than one cm, therefore with such size there is little chance of axillary lymph-nodes being affected. If it is confirmed by histological study that the SLN is free of metastasis, it is not necessary to perform a axillary emptying. This identification of SLNs has been achieved because of the advances of Radioisotopic Techniques, which has been carried out in our Hospital since 1997. We have been adapting this technique to the national supply of equipment and radio compounds always under a reliable and secure way. The aim of this presentation is to highlight the radioisotopic identification of SLNs in clinical investigation in 'Angel H. Roffo Institute', and its daily practice compare with Positron Emission Tomography (PET). By combining Radioisotopic Lymphography, Lymphochromography and intra surgical detection of the SN with Gamma Probe, we have obtained a true negative value of 95% of the SN, with 5% false negative. Due to this method we have included SN study in daily practice breast tumor patients with tumor up to 5 cm of diameter. Comparing this methods result (5% false negative), with the PET results, using 18 F-FDG, that has 33% false negatives, we conclude that a negative result can not replace this method of SN detection. (author)

  8. EMT transcription factors snail and slug directly contribute to cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haslehurst, Alexandria M; Weberpals, Johanne; Davey, Scott; Squire, Jeremy; Park, Paul C; Feilotter, Harriet; Koti, Madhuri; Dharsee, Moyez; Nuin, Paulo; Evans, Ken; Geraci, Joseph; Childs, Timothy; Chen, Jian; Li, Jieran

    2012-01-01

    The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a molecular process through which an epithelial cell undergoes transdifferentiation into a mesenchymal phenotype. The role of EMT in embryogenesis is well-characterized and increasing evidence suggests that elements of the transition may be important in other processes, including metastasis and drug resistance in various different cancers. Agilent 4 × 44 K whole human genome arrays and selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry were used to investigate mRNA and protein expression in A2780 cisplatin sensitive and resistant cell lines. Invasion and migration were assessed using Boyden chamber assays. Gene knockdown of snail and slug was done using targeted siRNA. Clinical relevance of the EMT pathway was assessed in a cohort of primary ovarian tumours using data from Affymetrix GeneChip Human Genome U133 plus 2.0 arrays. Morphological and phenotypic hallmarks of EMT were identified in the chemoresistant cells. Subsequent gene expression profiling revealed upregulation of EMT-related transcription factors including snail, slug, twist2 and zeb2. Proteomic analysis demonstrated up regulation of Snail and Slug as well as the mesenchymal marker Vimentin, and down regulation of E-cadherin, an epithelial marker. By reducing expression of snail and slug, the mesenchymal phenotype was largely reversed and cells were resensitized to cisplatin. Finally, gene expression data from primary tumours mirrored the finding that an EMT-like pathway is activated in resistant tumours relative to sensitive tumours, suggesting that the involvement of this transition may not be limited to in vitro drug effects. This work strongly suggests that genes associated with EMT may play a significant role in cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer, therefore potentially leading to the development of predictive biomarkers of drug response or novel therapeutic strategies for overcoming drug resistance

  9. EMT transcription factors snail and slug directly contribute to cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haslehurst Alexandria M

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT is a molecular process through which an epithelial cell undergoes transdifferentiation into a mesenchymal phenotype. The role of EMT in embryogenesis is well-characterized and increasing evidence suggests that elements of the transition may be important in other processes, including metastasis and drug resistance in various different cancers. Methods Agilent 4 × 44 K whole human genome arrays and selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry were used to investigate mRNA and protein expression in A2780 cisplatin sensitive and resistant cell lines. Invasion and migration were assessed using Boyden chamber assays. Gene knockdown of snail and slug was done using targeted siRNA. Clinical relevance of the EMT pathway was assessed in a cohort of primary ovarian tumours using data from Affymetrix GeneChip Human Genome U133 plus 2.0 arrays. Results Morphological and phenotypic hallmarks of EMT were identified in the chemoresistant cells. Subsequent gene expression profiling revealed upregulation of EMT-related transcription factors including snail, slug, twist2 and zeb2. Proteomic analysis demonstrated up regulation of Snail and Slug as well as the mesenchymal marker Vimentin, and down regulation of E-cadherin, an epithelial marker. By reducing expression of snail and slug, the mesenchymal phenotype was largely reversed and cells were resensitized to cisplatin. Finally, gene expression data from primary tumours mirrored the finding that an EMT-like pathway is activated in resistant tumours relative to sensitive tumours, suggesting that the involvement of this transition may not be limited to in vitro drug effects. Conclusions This work strongly suggests that genes associated with EMT may play a significant role in cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer, therefore potentially leading to the development of predictive biomarkers of drug response or novel therapeutic strategies for

  10. Cancer prevention in Africa: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busolo, David S; Woodgate, Roberta L

    2015-06-01

    Cancer is an emerging crisis in Africa. Cancer was the seventh leading cause of death in 2004. If not controlled, cancer incidence in Africa is expected to reach 1.28 million cases annually and claim 970,000 lives yearly by 2030. This paper presents a review of the literature on current cancer prevention approaches in Africa, and consists of cancer prevention studies conducted in African countries (e.g. South Africa and Nigeria) from PubMed, Scopus, and CINAHL databases. Common female cancers in Africa are breast and cervical cancer while prostate cancer is the most common neoplasm among African males. Other common cancers are liver, colorectal, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Mortality related to these cancers comes as a result of delays in screening and treatment, unfamiliarity with cancer and cancer prevention, inaccessibility and unaffordability of care, and inefficiency of healthcare systems. Cancer prevention efforts are deficient because many governments lack cancer prevention and control policies. Also contributing to the lack of cancer prevention and control policies are low levels of awareness, scarce human and financial resources, and inadequacy of cancer registries. Overall, governments grapple with limited funds and competing healthcare priorities. As cancer continues to increase in Africa, the need for rigorous interdisciplinary research on cancer etiology and monitoring in Africa has never been timelier. Cost-effective cancer prevention programs, coordination of donor funding, advocacy, and education should be aggressively pursued. The call for more collaborative approaches in research and policy is urgently needed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Breast Cancer in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tessier Cloutier, B; Clarke, A E; Ramsey-Goldman, R

    2013-01-01

    Evidence points to a decreased breast cancer risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We analyzed data from a large multisite SLE cohort, linked to cancer registries.......Evidence points to a decreased breast cancer risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We analyzed data from a large multisite SLE cohort, linked to cancer registries....

  12. Shear-wave elastography contributes to accurate tumour size estimation when assessing small breast cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullen, R.; Thompson, J.M.; Moussa, O.; Vinnicombe, S.; Evans, A.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To assess whether the size of peritumoural stiffness (PTS) on shear-wave elastography (SWE) for small primary breast cancers (≤15 mm) was associated with size discrepancies between grey-scale ultrasound (GSUS) and final histological size and whether the addition of PTS size to GSUS size might result in more accurate tumour size estimation when compared to final histological size. Materials and methods: A retrospective analysis of 86 consecutive patients between August 2011 and February 2013 who underwent breast-conserving surgery for tumours of size ≤15 mm at ultrasound was carried out. The size of PTS stiffness was compared to mean GSUS size, mean histological size, and the extent of size discrepancy between GSUS and histology. PTS size and GSUS were combined and compared to the final histological size. Results: PTS of >3 mm was associated with a larger mean final histological size (16 versus 11.3 mm, p < 0.001). PTS size of >3 mm was associated with a higher frequency of underestimation of final histological size by GSUS of >5 mm (63% versus 18%, p < 0.001). The combination of PTS and GSUS size led to accurate estimation of the final histological size (p = 0.03). The size of PTS was not associated with margin involvement (p = 0.27). Conclusion: PTS extending beyond 3 mm from the grey-scale abnormality is significantly associated with underestimation of tumour size of >5 mm for small invasive breast cancers. Taking into account the size of PTS also led to accurate estimation of the final histological size. Further studies are required to assess the relationship of the extent of SWE stiffness and margin status. - Highlights: • Peritumoural stiffness of greater than 3 mm was associated with larger tumour size. • Underestimation of tumour size by ultrasound was associated with peri-tumoural stiffness size. • Combining peri-tumoural stiffness size to ultrasound produced accurate tumour size estimation

  13. The contributions of breast density and common genetic variation to breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachon, Celine M; Pankratz, V Shane; Scott, Christopher G; Haeberle, Lothar; Ziv, Elad; Jensen, Matthew R; Brandt, Kathleen R; Whaley, Dana H; Olson, Janet E; Heusinger, Katharina; Hack, Carolin C; Jud, Sebastian M; Beckmann, Matthias W; Schulz-Wendtland, Ruediger; Tice, Jeffrey A; Norman, Aaron D; Cunningham, Julie M; Purrington, Kristen S; Easton, Douglas F; Sellers, Thomas A; Kerlikowske, Karla; Fasching, Peter A; Couch, Fergus J

    2015-05-01

    We evaluated whether a 76-locus polygenic risk score (PRS) and Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) breast density were independent risk factors within three studies (1643 case patients, 2397 control patients) using logistic regression models. We incorporated the PRS odds ratio (OR) into the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) risk-prediction model while accounting for its attributable risk and compared five-year absolute risk predictions between models using area under the curve (AUC) statistics. All statistical tests were two-sided. BI-RADS density and PRS were independent risk factors across all three studies (P interaction = .23). Relative to those with scattered fibroglandular densities and average PRS (2(nd) quartile), women with extreme density and highest quartile PRS had 2.7-fold (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.74 to 4.12) increased risk, while those with low density and PRS had reduced risk (OR = 0.30, 95% CI = 0.18 to 0.51). PRS added independent information (P Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. The GEOSS Component and Service Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, L.; Bai, Y.; Shen, D.; Shao, Y.; Shrestha, R.; Wang, H.; Nebert, D. D.

    2011-12-01

    Petabytes of Earth science data have been accumulated through space- and air-borne Earth observation programs during the last several decades. The data are valuable both scientifically and socioeconomically. The value of these data could be further increased significantly if the data from these programs can be easily discovered, accessed, integrated, and analyzed. The Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) is addressing this need. Coordinated by the Group on Earth Observations (or GEO), a voluntary partnership of 86 governments, the European Commission, and 61 intergovernmental, international, and regional organizations has been working on implementing GEOSS for a number of years. After four years of international collaboration, the GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI) has been established. GCI consists of the Standards and Interoperability Registry (SIR), the Component and Service Registry (CSR), the GEO clearinghouse, and the GEO Portal. The SIR maintains the list of the public standards recognized by the GEO. CSR provides a centralized registry for available Earth Observation resources. The GEO clearinghouse works as a single search facility for GEOSS-wide resources and the GEO Portal provides an integrated Web-based interfaces for users. Since January 2007, researchers at CSISS, GMU have collaborated with officials from the Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) on designing, implementing, maintaining, and upgrading CSR. Currently CSR provides the following capabilities for data providers: user registration, resource registration, and service interface registration. The CSR clients can discover the resources registered in CSR through OGC Catalog for Web (CSW), UUDI, and other standard interfaces. During the resource registration process, providers may define detailed descriptive information for their resources, in particular, the targeted societal benefit area and sub-areas of focus, and the targeted critical Earth Observations. The service

  15. Uncertain added value of Global Trigger Tool for monitoring of patient safety in cancer care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lipczak, Henriette; Neckelmann, Kirsten; Steding-Jessen, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring patient safety is a challenging task. The lack of a golden standard has contributed to the recommendation and introduction of several methods. In 2000 the Danish Lung Cancer Registry (DLCR) was established to monitor the clinical management of lung cancer. In 2008 the Global Trigger Tool...... (GTT) was recommended in Denmark as a tool for the monitoring of patient safety. Ideally, the recommendation of a new tool should be preceded by a critical assessment of its added value....

  16. Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for STAT3β Reveal Its Contribution to Constitutive STAT3 Phosphorylation in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uddalak Bharadwaj

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Since its discovery in mice and humans 19 years ago, the contribution of alternatively spliced Stat3, Stat3β, to the overall functions of Stat3 has been controversial. Tyrosine-phosphorylated (p Stat3β homodimers are more stable, bind DNA more avidly, are less susceptible to dephosphorylation, and exhibit distinct intracellular dynamics, most notably markedly prolonged nuclear retention, compared to pStat3α homodimers. Overexpression of one or the other isoform in cell lines demonstrated that Stat3β acted as a dominant-negative of Stat3α in transformation assays; however, studies with mouse strains deficient in one or the other isoform indicated distinct contributions of Stat3 isoforms to inflammation. Current immunological reagents cannot differentiate Stat3β proteins derived from alternative splicing vs. proteolytic cleavage of Stat3α. We developed monoclonal antibodies that recognize the 7 C-terminal amino acids unique to Stat3β (CT7 and do not cross-react with Stat3α. Immunoblotting studies revealed that levels of Stat3β protein, but not Stat3α, in breast cancer cell lines positively correlated with overall pStat3 levels, suggesting that Stat3β may contribute to constitutive Stat3 activation in this tumor system. The ability to unambiguously discriminate splice alternative Stat3β from proteolytic Stat3β and Stat3α will provide new insights into the contribution of Stat3β vs. Stat3α to oncogenesis, as well as other biological and pathological processes.

  17. Surveillance of rare cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwan, Johannes Martinus

    2016-01-01

    The widespread incidence and effects of cancer have led to a growing development in cancer prevention in the form of screening and research programs and cancer registries. Because of the low number of patients with rare cancers this improvement is not applied to the same extent to all cancer

  18. The Danish Heart Failure Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjødt, Inge; Nakano, Anne; Egstrup, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the Danish Heart Failure Registry (DHFR) is to monitor and improve the care of patients with incident heart failure (HF) in Denmark. STUDY POPULATION: The DHFR includes inpatients and outpatients (≥18 years) with incident HF. Reporting to the DHFR is mandatory......: The main variables recorded in the DHFR are related to the indicators for quality of care in patients with incident HF: performance of echocardiography, functional capacity (New York Heart Association functional classification), pharmacological therapy (angiotensin converting enzyme/angiotensin II...

  19. The Danish National Prescription Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildemoes, Helle Wallach; Toft Sørensen, Henrik; Hallas, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Individual-level data on all prescription drugs sold in Danish community pharmacies has since 1994 been recorded in the Register of Medicinal Products Statistics of the Danish Medicines Agency. Content: The register subset, termed the Danish National Prescription Registry (DNPR......), contains information on dispensed prescriptions, including variables at the level of the drug user, the prescriber, and the pharmacy. Validity and coverage: Reimbursement-driven record keeping, with automated bar-code-based data entry provides data of high quality, including detailed information...

  20. Overexpression of HOXA4 and HOXA9 genes promotes self-renewal and contributes to colon cancer stem cell overpopulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatlekar, Seema; Viswanathan, Vignesh; Fields, Jeremy Z; Boman, Bruce M

    2018-02-01

    Because HOX genes encode master regulatory transcription factors that regulate stem cells (SCs) during development and aberrant expression of HOX genes occurs in various cancers, our goal was to determine if dysregulation of HOX genes is involved in the SC origin of colorectal cancer (CRC). We previously reported that HOXA4 and HOXD10 are expressed in the colonic SC niche and are overexpressed in CRC. HOX gene expression was studied in SCs from human colon tissue and CRC cells (CSCs) using qPCR and immunostaining. siRNA-mediated knockdown of HOX expression was used to evaluate the role of HOX genes in modulating cancer SC (CSC) phenotype at the level of proliferation, SC marker expression, and sphere formation. All-trans-retinoic-acid (ATRA), a differentiation-inducing agent was evaluated for its effects on HOX expression and CSC growth. We found that HOXA4 and HOXA9 are up-regulated in CRC SCs. siRNA knockdown of HOXA4 and HOXA9 reduced: (i) proliferation and sphere-formation and (ii) gene expression of known SC markers (ALDH1, CD166, LGR5). These results indicate that proliferation and self-renewal ability of CRC SCs are reduced in HOXA4 and HOXA9 knockdown cells. ATRA decreased HOXA4, HOXA9, and HOXD10 expression in parallel with reduction in ALDH1 expression, self-renewal, and proliferation. Overall, our findings indicate that overexpression of HOXA4 and HOXA9 contributes to self-renewal and overpopulation of SCs in CRC. Strategies designed to modulate HOX expression may provide ways to target malignant SCs and to develop more effective therapies for CRC. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Smoking cessation programmes in radon affected areas: can they make a significant contribution to reducing radon-induced lung cancers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denman, A.R.; Groves-Kirkby, C.J.; Timson, K.; Shield, G.; Rogers, S.; Phillips, P.S.

    2008-01-01

    Domestic radon levels in parts of the UK are sufficiently high to increase the risk of lung cancer in the occupants. Public health campaigns in Northamptonshire, a designated radon affected area with 6.3% of homes having average radon levels over the UK action level of 200 Bq m -3 , have encouraged householders to test for radon and then to carry out remediation in their homes, but have been only partially successful. Only 40% of Northamptonshire houses have been tested, and only 15% of householders finding raised levels proceed to remediate. Of those who did remediate, only 9% smoked, compared to a countywide average of 28.8%. This is unfortunate, since radon and smoking combine to place the individual at higher risk by a factor of around 4, and suggests that current strategies to reduce domestic radon exposure are not reaching those most at risk. During 2004-5, the NHS Stop Smoking Services in Northamptonshire assisted 2,808 smokers to quit to the 4-week stage, with some 30% of 4-week quitters remaining quitters at 1 year. We consider whether smoking cessation campaigns make significant contributions to radon risk reduction on their own, by assessing individual occupants' risk of developing lung cancer from knowledge of their age, gender, and smoking habits, together with he radon level in their house. The results demonstrate that smoking cessation programmes have significant added value in radon affected areas, and contribute a greater health benefit than reducing radon levels in the smokers' homes, whilst they remain smokers. Additionally, results are presented from a questionnaire-based survey of quitters, addressing their reasons for seeking help in quitting smoking, and whether knowledge of radon risks influenced this decision. The impact of these findings on future public health campaigns to reduce the impact of radon and smoking are discussed. (author)

  2. Putative contribution of CD56 positive cells in cetuximab treatment efficacy in first-line metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maréchal, Raphaël; De Schutter, Jef; Nagy, Nathalie; Demetter, Pieter; Lemmers, Arnaud; Devière, Jacques; Salmon, Isabelle; Tejpar, Sabine; Van Laethem, Jean-Luc

    2010-01-01

    Activity of cetuximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor, is largely attributed to its direct antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects. Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) could be another possible mechanism of cetuximab antitumor effects and its specific contribution on the clinical activity of cetuximab is unknown. We assessed immune cells infiltrate (CD56, CD68, CD3, CD4, CD8, Foxp3) in the primary tumor of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients treated with a first-line cetuximab-based chemotherapy in the framework of prospective trials (treatment group) and in a matched group of mCRC patients who received the same chemotherapy regimen without cetuximab (control group). The relationship between intra-tumoral immune effector cells, the K-ras status and the efficacy of the treatment were investigated. We also evaluated in vitro, the ADCC activity in healthy donors and chemonaive mCRC patients and the specific contribution of CD56 + cells. ADCC activity against DLD1 CRC cell line is maintained in cancer patients and significantly declined after CD56 + cells depletion. In multivariate analysis, K-ras wild-type (HR: 4.7 (95% CI 1.8-12.3), p = 0.001) and tumor infiltrating CD56 + cells (HR: 2.6, (95%CI:1.14-6.0), p = 0.019) were independent favourable prognostic factors for PFS and response only in the cetuximab treatment group. By contrast CD56 + cells failed to predict PFS and response in the control group. CD56 + cells, mainly NK cells, may be the major effector of ADCC related-cetuximab activity. Assessment of CD56 + cells infiltrate in primary colorectal adenocarcinoma may provide additional information to K-ras status in predicting response and PFS in mCRC patients treated with first-line cetuximab-based chemotherapy

  3. Cisplatin-induced mesenchymal stromal cells-mediated mechanism contributing to decreased antitumor effect in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolekova, Svetlana; Matuskova, Miroslava; Bohac, Martin; Toro, Lenka; Durinikova, Erika; Tyciakova, Silvia; Demkova, Lucia; Gursky, Jan; Kucerova, Lucia

    2016-01-12

    Cells of the tumor microenvironment are recognized as important determinants of the tumor biology. The adjacent non-malignant cells can regulate drug responses of the cancer cells by secreted paracrine factors and direct interactions with tumor cells. Human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) actively contribute to tumor microenvironment. Here we focused on their response to chemotherapy as during the treatment these cells become affected. We have shown that the secretory phenotype and behavior of mesenchymal stromal cells influenced by cisplatin differs from the naïve MSC. MSC were more resistant to the concentrations of cisplatin, which was cytotoxic for tumor cells. They did not undergo apoptosis, but a part of MSC population underwent senescence. However, MSC pretreatment with cisplatin led to changes in phosphorylation profiles of many kinases and also increased secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 cytokines. These changes in cytokine and phosphorylation profile of MSC led to increased chemoresistance and stemness of breast cancer cells. Taken together here we suggest that the exposure of the chemoresistant cells in the tumor microenvironment leads to substantial alterations and might lead to promotion of acquired microenvironment-mediated chemoresistance and stemness.

  4. Quality of life among pediatric patients with cancer: Contributions of time since diagnosis and parental chronic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamner, Taralee; Latzman, Robert D; Latzman, Natasha E; Elkin, T David; Majumdar, Suvankar

    2015-07-01

    Pediatric cancer