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Sample records for cancer recurrence risk

  1. Statins and risk of breast cancer recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakellakis M

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Minas Sakellakis,1 Karolina Akinosoglou,1 Anastasia Kostaki,2 Despina Spyropoulou,1 Angelos Koutras,1 1Department of Medicine, Division of Oncology, University Hospital, Patras Medical School, Patras, 2Department of Statistics, Athens University of Economics and Business, Athens, Greece Background: The primary end point of our study was to test whether the concurrent use of a statin is related to a lower risk of recurrence and increased relapse-free survival in patients with early breast cancer. Materials and methods: We reviewed 610 female patients with stage I, II, or III breast cancer who had been surgically treated and who had subsequently received at least adjuvant chemotherapy in order to prevent recurrence. Results: Among the 610 patients with breast cancer, 83 (13.6% were receiving a statin on a chronic basis for other medical purposes. Overall, statin users displayed longer mean relapse-free survival (16.6 vs 10.2 years, P=0.028. After data had been adjusted for patient and disease characteristics, statin users maintained a lower risk of recurrence. This favorable outcome in statin users was particularly evident when we included only younger patients in the analysis (20 vs 10 years, P=0.006. Conclusion: Statins may be linked to a favorable outcome in early breast cancer patients, especially in younger age-groups. Keywords: statins, breast, cancer, adjuvant, recurrence

  2. Beliefs and Behaviors about Breast Cancer Recurrence Risk Reduction among African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Ansa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence suggests that breast cancer recurrence risk is linked to lifestyle behaviors. This study examined correlations between breast cancer recurrence, risk reduction beliefs, and related behaviors among African American breast cancer survivors (AA BCSs. Study participants included 191 AA BCSs, mean age = 56.3 years, who completed a lifestyle assessment tool. Most respondents believed that being overweight (52.7%, lack of physical activity (48.7%, and a high fat diet (63.2% are associated with breast cancer recurrence. Over 65% considered themselves overweight; one third (33.5% agreed that losing weight could prevent recurrence, 33.0% disagreed, while the remaining 33.5% did not know; and nearly half (47.9% believed that recurrence could be prevented by increasing physical activity. Almost 90% survivors with BMI < 25 Kg/M2 reported no recurrence compared to 75.7% with BMI ≥ 25 Kg/M2 (p = 0.06; nearly all of the women (99.2% answered “yes” to seeking professional help to lose weight, 79.7% of which were recurrence-free (p = 0.05. These results provide information about AA BCSs’ beliefs and behaviors protective against breast cancer recurrence. Additional research is warranted to determine the effectiveness of educational interventions for AA BCSs that promote consumption of a healthy diet and engaging in regular physical activity.

  3. Perioperative events influence cancer recurrence risk after surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Jonathan G; Perry, Nicholas J; Poulogiannis, George; Riedel, Bernhard; Sloan, Erica K

    2018-04-01

    Surgery is a mainstay treatment for patients with solid tumours. However, despite surgical resection with a curative intent and numerous advances in the effectiveness of (neo)adjuvant therapies, metastatic disease remains common and carries a high risk of mortality. The biological perturbations that accompany the surgical stress response and the pharmacological effects of anaesthetic drugs, paradoxically, might also promote disease recurrence or the progression of metastatic disease. When cancer cells persist after surgery, either locally or at undiagnosed distant sites, neuroendocrine, immune, and metabolic pathways activated in response to surgery and/or anaesthesia might promote their survival and proliferation. A consequence of this effect is that minimal residual disease might then escape equilibrium and progress to metastatic disease. Herein, we discuss the most promising proposals for the refinement of perioperative care that might address these challenges. We outline the rationale and early evidence for the adaptation of anaesthetic techniques and the strategic use of anti-adrenergic, anti-inflammatory, and/or antithrombotic therapies. Many of these strategies are currently under evaluation in large-cohort trials and hold promise as affordable, readily available interventions that will improve the postoperative recurrence-free survival of patients with cancer.

  4. Validation of the 12-gene colon cancer recurrence score as a predictor of recurrence risk in stage II and III rectal cancer patients.

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    Reimers, Marlies S; Kuppen, Peter J K; Lee, Mark; Lopatin, Margarita; Tezcan, Haluk; Putter, Hein; Clark-Langone, Kim; Liefers, Gerrit Jan; Shak, Steve; van de Velde, Cornelis J H

    2014-11-01

    The 12-gene Recurrence Score assay is a validated predictor of recurrence risk in stage II and III colon cancer patients. We conducted a prospectively designed study to validate this assay for prediction of recurrence risk in stage II and III rectal cancer patients from the Dutch Total Mesorectal Excision (TME) trial. RNA was extracted from fixed paraffin-embedded primary rectal tumor tissue from stage II and III patients randomized to TME surgery alone, without (neo)adjuvant treatment. Recurrence Score was assessed by quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction using previously validated colon cancer genes and algorithm. Data were analysed by Cox proportional hazards regression, adjusting for stage and resection margin status. All statistical tests were two-sided. Recurrence Score predicted risk of recurrence (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.57, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.11 to 2.21, P = .01), risk of distant recurrence (HR = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.04 to 2.17, P = .03), and rectal cancer-specific survival (HR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.15 to 2.34, P = .007). The effect of Recurrence Score was most prominent in stage II patients and attenuated with more advanced stage (P(interaction) ≤ .007 for each endpoint). In stage II, five-year cumulative incidence of recurrence ranged from 11.1% in the predefined low Recurrence Score group (48.5% of patients) to 43.3% in the high Recurrence Score group (23.1% of patients). The 12-gene Recurrence Score is a predictor of recurrence risk and cancer-specific survival in rectal cancer patients treated with surgery alone, suggesting a similar underlying biology in colon and rectal cancers. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Lung Cancer Indicators Recurrence

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    This study describes prognostic factors for lung cancer spread and recurrence, as well as subsequent risk of death from the disease. The investigators observed that regardless of cancer stage, grade, or type of lung cancer, patients in the study were more

  6. Review of guidance on recurrence risk management for general practitioners in breast cancer, colorectal cancer and melanoma guidelines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spronk, I.; Korevaar, J.C.; Burgers, J.S.; Albreht, T.; Schellevis, F.G.

    2017-01-01

    Background. General practitioners (GPs) will face cancer recurrences more frequently due to the rising number of cancer survivors and greater involvement of GPs in the follow-up care. Currently, GPs are uncertain about managing recurrence risks and may need more guidance. Objective. To explore what

  7. [Clinical scores for the risk of recurrent VTED and for the relationship cancer-VTED].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junod, Alain

    2016-02-17

    Clinical scores related to the risk of recurrent venous thromboembolic disease (VTED), to the relationship between cancer and VTED (risk of development of VTED, risk of recurrent VTED, prognosis of pulmonary embolism) and to the risk of cancer following VTED are analysed and commented upon. Although they most often rely on appropriate methodology and are often based on a large number of subjects, they unfortunately provide information that is not necessarily useful for the care of patients. Their use should be considered only when positive impact studies are published.

  8. Recurrence risk perception and quality of life following treatment of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Sarah T; Janz, Nancy K; Griffith, Kent A; Jagsi, Reshma; Friese, Christopher R; Kurian, Allison W; Hamilton, Ann S; Ward, Kevin C; Morrow, Monica; Wallner, Lauren P; Katz, Steven J

    2017-02-01

    Little is known about different ways of assessing risk of distant recurrence following cancer treatment (e.g., numeric or descriptive). We sought to evaluate the association between overestimation of risk of distant recurrence of breast cancer and key patient-reported outcomes, including quality of life and worry. We surveyed a weighted random sample of newly diagnosed patients with early-stage breast cancer identified through SEER registries of Los Angeles County & Georgia (2013-14) ~2 months after surgery (N = 2578, RR = 71%). Actual 10-year risk of distant recurrence after treatment was based on clinical factors for women with DCIS & low-risk invasive cancer (Stg 1A, ER+, HER2-, Gr 1-2). Women reported perceptions of their risk numerically (0-100%), with values ≥10% for DCIS & ≥20% for invasive considered overestimates. Perceptions of "moderate, high or very high" risk were considered descriptive overestimates. In our analytic sample (N = 927), we assessed factors correlated with both types of overestimation and report multivariable associations between overestimation and QoL (PROMIS physical & mental health) and frequent worry. 30.4% of women substantially overestimated their risk of distant recurrence numerically and 14.7% descriptively. Few factors other than family history were significantly associated with either type of overestimation. Both types of overestimation were significantly associated with frequent worry, and lower QoL. Ensuring understanding of systemic recurrence risk, particularly among patients with favorable prognosis, is important. Better risk communication by clinicians may translate to better risk comprehension among patients and to improvements in QoL.

  9. Association between genomic recurrence risk and well-being among breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retèl, Valesca P; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, Catharina GM; Aaronson, Neil K; Brewer, Noel T; Rutgers, Emiel JT; Harten, Wim H van

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression profiling (GEP) is increasingly used in the rapidly evolving field of personalized medicine. We sought to evaluate the association between GEP-assessed of breast cancer recurrence risk and patients’ well-being. Participants were Dutch women from 10 hospitals being treated for early stage breast cancer who were enrolled in the MINDACT trial (Microarray In Node-negative and 1 to 3 positive lymph node Disease may Avoid ChemoTherapy). As part of the trial, they received a disease recurrence risk estimate based on a 70-gene signature and on standard clinical criteria as scored via a modified version of Adjuvant! Online. /Women completed a questionnaire 6–8 weeks after surgery and after their decision regarding adjuvant chemotherapy. The questionnaire assessed perceived understanding, knowledge, risk perception, satisfaction, distress, cancer worry and health-related quality of life (HRQoL), 6–8 weeks after surgery and decision regarding adjuvant chemotherapy. Women (n = 347, response rate 62%) reported high satisfaction with and a good understanding of the GEP information they received. Women with low risk estimates from both the standard and genomic tests reported the lowest distress levels. Distress was higher predominately among patients who had received high genomic risk estimates, who did not receive genomic risk estimates, or who received conflicting estimates based on genomic and clinical criteria. Cancer worry was highest for patients with higher risk perceptions and lower satisfaction. Patients with concordant high-risk profiles and those for whom such profiles were not available reported lower quality of life. Patients were generally satisfied with the information they received about recurrence risk based on genomic testing. Some types of genomic test results were associated with greater distress levels, but not with cancer worry or HRQoL. ISRCTN: http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN18543567/MINDACT

  10. Risk factors for recurrence after conservative treatment in early breast cancer; Preliminary report

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    Suh, C O; Chung, E J; Lee, H D; Lee, K S; Oh, K K; Kim, G E [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    1997-12-01

    To evaluate our experience in the breast-conserving treatment for early breast cancer with special regard to recurrence pattern and related risk factors. Two hundred and sixteen patients with AJC stage I and II beast cancer who received breast conserving treatment between January 1991 and December 1994 were evaluated. Age distribution ranged from 23-80 year old with a median age of 44. One hundred and seventeen patients had T1 lesions and 99 patients had T2 lesions. Axillary lymph nodes were involved in 73 patients. All patients received a breast conserving surgery (wide excision to quadrantectomy) and axillary node dissection followed by radiotherapy. Ninety six patients received chemotherapy before or after radiotherapy. During the follow-up period (3-60 months, median 30 months), local recurrence were noted in six patients (true; 3, elsewhere; 1, skin; 2). Sixteen patients developed distant metastases as the first sign of recurrence at 8-38 months (median 20 months) after surgery. Among them, three patients simultaneously developed local recurrence with distant metastases. Contralateral breast cancer developed in one patient and non-mammary cancers developed in three patients. The actuarial 5 year survival rate was 88.4% (stage I: 96.7%, stage IIa: 95.2%, stage IIb 69.9%). Age, T stage, number of involved axillary lymph nodes, and AJC stage were risk factors for distant metastases in univariate analysis. In the multivariate analysis, the number of involved axillary lymph nodes was the most significant risk factor for metastases. Local recurrence was not common in the early years after radiotherapy. Distant metastases occurred at a steady rate during the first three years and was more common in the patients with larger tumors, higher number of involved axillary nodes, and younger age. (author).

  11. Anxiety and depression in breast cancer patients at low risk of recurrence compared with the general population: a valid comparison?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenvold, M.; Fayers, P. M.; Sprangers, M. A.; Bjorner, J. B.; Klee, M. C.; Aaronson, N. K.; Bech, P.; Mouridsen, H. T.

    1999-01-01

    Breast cancer and its treatment have been associated with psychological morbidity. In this study our aim was to quantify the excess anxiety and depression resulting from breast cancer. We compared 538 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients at low risk of recurrence (87.0% responded) to 872 women

  12. Pharmacokinetic Tumor Heterogeneity as a Prognostic Biomarker for Classifying Breast Cancer Recurrence Risk.

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    Mahrooghy, Majid; Ashraf, Ahmed B; Daye, Dania; McDonald, Elizabeth S; Rosen, Mark; Mies, Carolyn; Feldman, Michael; Kontos, Despina

    2015-06-01

    Heterogeneity in cancer can affect response to therapy and patient prognosis. Histologic measures have classically been used to measure heterogeneity, although a reliable noninvasive measurement is needed both to establish baseline risk of recurrence and monitor response to treatment. Here, we propose using spatiotemporal wavelet kinetic features from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging to quantify intratumor heterogeneity in breast cancer. Tumor pixels are first partitioned into homogeneous subregions using pharmacokinetic measures. Heterogeneity wavelet kinetic (HetWave) features are then extracted from these partitions to obtain spatiotemporal patterns of the wavelet coefficients and the contrast agent uptake. The HetWave features are evaluated in terms of their prognostic value using a logistic regression classifier with genetic algorithm wrapper-based feature selection to classify breast cancer recurrence risk as determined by a validated gene expression assay. Receiver operating characteristic analysis and area under the curve (AUC) are computed to assess classifier performance using leave-one-out cross validation. The HetWave features outperform other commonly used features (AUC = 0.88 HetWave versus 0.70 standard features). The combination of HetWave and standard features further increases classifier performance (AUCs 0.94). The rate of the spatial frequency pattern over the pharmacokinetic partitions can provide valuable prognostic information. HetWave could be a powerful feature extraction approach for characterizing tumor heterogeneity, providing valuable prognostic information.

  13. Recurrent urinary tract infection and risk of bladder cancer in the Nijmegen bladder cancer study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, S.; Hanum, N.; Grotenhuis, A.J.; Castano-Vinyals, G.; Heijden, A.G. van der; Aben, K.K.H.; Mysorekar, I.U.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Controversy exists on whether urinary tract infection (UTI) is a risk factor for urinary bladder cancer (UBC). Here, the association is investigated using data from one of the largest bladder cancer case-control studies worldwide. METHODS: Information on (i) history and age at onset of

  14. Outcomes after inferior vena cava filter placement in cancer patients diagnosed with pulmonary embolism: risk for recurrent venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Catherine; Kuk, Deborah; Devlin, Sean; Siegelbaum, Robert H; Durack, Jeremy C; Parameswaran, Rekha; Mantha, Simon; Deng, Kathy; Soff, Gerald

    2017-11-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common complication in cancer patients and anticoagulation (AC) remains the standard of care for treatment. Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters may also used to reduce the risk of pulmonary embolism, either alone or in addition to AC. Although widely used, data are limited on the safety and efficacy of IVC filters in cancer patients. We performed a retrospective review of outcomes after IVC filter insertion in a database of 1270 consecutive patients with cancer-associated pulmonary embolism (PE) at our institution between 2008 and 2009. Outcomes measured included rate of all recurrent VTE, recurrent PE, and overall survival within 12 months. 317 (25%) of the 1270 patients with PE had IVC filters placed within 30 days of the index PE event or prior to the index PE in the setting of prior DVT. Patients with IVC filters had markedly lower overall survival (7.3 months) than the non-IVC filter patients (13.2 months). Filter patients also had a lower rate of AC use at time of initial PE. There was a trend towards higher recurrent VTE in patients with IVC filters (11.9%) compared to non-filter patients (7.7%), but this was not significant (p = 0.086). The risk of recurrent PE was similar between the IVC filter cohort (3.5%) and non-filter group (3.5%, p = 0.99). Cancer patients receiving IVC filters had a similar risk of recurrent PE, but a trend towards more overall recurrent VTE. The filter patients had poorer overall survival, which may reflect a poorer cancer prognosis, and had greater contraindication to AC; therefore these patients likely had a higher inherent risk for recurrent VTE. A prospective study would be helpful for further clarification on the partial reduction in the recurrent PE risk by IVC filter placement in cancer patients.

  15. Haptoglobin phenotype is not a predictor of recurrence free survival in high-risk primary breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gast, M.C.; van Tinteren, H.; Bontenbal, M.; van Hoesel, R.Q.; Nooij, M.A.; Rodenhuis, S.; Span, P.N.; Tjan-Heijnen, V.C.; de Vries, E.G.; Harris, N.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Schellens, J.H.; Beijnen, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Better breast cancer prognostication may improve selection of patients for adjuvant therapy. We conducted a retrospective follow-up study in which we investigated sera of high-risk primary breast cancer patients, to search for proteins predictive of recurrence free survival. Methods: Two

  16. Haptoglobin phenotype is not a predictor of recurrence free survival in high-risk primary breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C.W. Gast; H. van Tinteren (Harm); M. Bontenbal (Marijke); R.Q.G.C.M. van Hoesel (René); M.A. Nooij; S. Rodenhuis (Sjoerd); P.N. Span (Paul); V.C.G. Tjan-Heijnen (Vivianne); E. de Vries (Esther); N. Harris (Nathan); J.W.R. Twisk (Jos); J.H.M. Schellens (Jan); J.H. Beijnen (Jos)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Better breast cancer prognostication may improve selection of patients for adjuvant therapy. We conducted a retrospective follow-up study in which we investigated sera of high-risk primary breast cancer patients, to search for proteins predictive of recurrence free survival.

  17. Haptoglobin phenotype is not a predictor of recurrence free survival in high-risk primary breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gast, Marie-Christine W.; van Tinteren, Harm; Bontenbal, Marijke; van Hoesel, Rene Q. G. C. M.; Nooij, Marianne A.; Rodenhuis, Sjoerd; Span, Paul N.; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C. G.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Harris, Nathan; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Schellens, Jan H. M.; Beijnen, Jos H.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Better breast cancer prognostication may improve selection of patients for adjuvant therapy. We conducted a retrospective follow-up study in which we investigated sera of high-risk primary breast cancer patients, to search for proteins predictive of recurrence free survival.

  18. Haptoglobin phenotype is not a predictor of recurrence free survival in high-risk primary breast cancer patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gast, M.C.; Tinteren, H. van; Bontenbal, M.; Hoesel, R.Q. van; Nooij, M.A.; Rodenhuis, S.; Span, P.N.; Tjan-Heijnen, V.C.; Vries, E.G.F. de; Harris, N.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Schellens, J.H.; Beijnen, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Better breast cancer prognostication may improve selection of patients for adjuvant therapy. We conducted a retrospective follow-up study in which we investigated sera of high-risk primary breast cancer patients, to search for proteins predictive of recurrence free survival. METHODS: Two

  19. Heterogeneity wavelet kinetics from DCE-MRI for classifying gene expression based breast cancer recurrence risk.

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    Mahrooghy, Majid; Ashraf, Ahmed B; Daye, Dania; Mies, Carolyn; Feldman, Michael; Rosen, Mark; Kontos, Despina

    2013-01-01

    Breast tumors are heterogeneous lesions. Intra-tumor heterogeneity presents a major challenge for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Few studies have worked on capturing tumor heterogeneity from imaging. Most studies to date consider aggregate measures for tumor characterization. In this work we capture tumor heterogeneity by partitioning tumor pixels into subregions and extracting heterogeneity wavelet kinetic (HetWave) features from breast dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) to obtain the spatiotemporal patterns of the wavelet coefficients and contrast agent uptake from each partition. Using a genetic algorithm for feature selection, and a logistic regression classifier with leave one-out cross validation, we tested our proposed HetWave features for the task of classifying breast cancer recurrence risk. The classifier based on our features gave an ROC AUC of 0.78, outperforming previously proposed kinetic, texture, and spatial enhancement variance features which give AUCs of 0.69, 0.64, and 0.65, respectively.

  20. Obesity and Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... hormone therapy and for tumors that express hormone receptors . Obesity is also a risk factor for breast ...

  1. Risk of recurrence, prognosis, and follow-up for Danish women with cervical cancer in 2005-2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taarnhøj, Gry Assam; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Lajer, Henrik

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In developed countries, women attend follow-up after treatment for cervical cancer to detect recurrence. The aim of this study was to describe the Danish population of women with early-stage cervical cancer at risk for recurrence and death due to recurrence. METHODS: Data were extracted...... from 3 nationwide databases to find women diagnosed with stage 1A1 to 1B1 cervical cancer in 2005-2013. Recurrences were determined from data on oncological or surgical treatment more than 3 months after the initial diagnosis and were cross-checked with patient journals. RESULTS: In all, 1523 patients...... were diagnosed with stage 1A1 to 1B1 cervical cancer. Eighty women experienced recurrences: 8 at International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage 1A1, 0 at FIGO stage 1A2, and 72 at FIGO stage 1B1. The 5-year recurrence rate was 6.4%; 67.5% of the women had symptomatic recurrences...

  2. Risk of Recurrence and Chemotherapy Benefit for Patients With Node-Negative, Estrogen Receptor–Positive Breast Cancer: Recurrence Score Alone and Integrated With Pathologic and Clinical Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Gong; Cuzick, Jack; Costantino, Joseph P.; Dowsett, Mitch; Forbes, John F.; Crager, Michael; Mamounas, Eleftherios P.; Shak, Steven; Wolmark, Norman

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The 21-gene breast cancer assay recurrence score (RS) is widely used for assessing recurrence risk and predicting chemotherapy benefit in patients with estrogen receptor (ER) –positive breast cancer. Pathologic and clinical factors such as tumor size, grade, and patient age also provide independent prognostic utility. We developed a formal integration of these measures and evaluated its prognostic and predictive value. Patients and Methods From the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel (NSABP) B-14 and translational research cohort of the Arimidex, Tamoxifen Alone or in Combination (TransATAC) studies, we included patients who received hormonal monotherapy, had ER-positive tumors, and RS and traditional clinicopathologic factors assessed (647 and 1,088, respectively). Individual patient risk assessments from separate Cox models were combined using meta-analysis to form an RS-pathology-clinical (RSPC) assessment of distant recurrence risk. Risk assessments by RS and RSPC were compared in node-negative (N0) patients. RSPC was compared with RS for predicting chemotherapy benefit in NSABP B-20. Results RSPC had significantly more prognostic value for distant recurrence than did RS (P < .001) and showed better separation of risk in the study population. RSPC classified fewer patients as intermediate risk (17.8% v 26.7%, P < .001) and more patients as lower risk (63.8% v 54.2%, P < .001) than did RS among 1,444 N0 ER-positive patients. In B-20, the interaction of RSPC with chemotherapy was not statistically significant (P = .10), in contrast to the previously reported significant interaction of RS with chemotherapy (P = .037). Conclusion RSPC refines the assessment of distant recurrence risk and reduces the number of patients classified as intermediate risk. Adding clinicopathologic measures did not seem to enhance the value of RS alone nor the individual biology RS identifies in predicting chemotherapy benefit. PMID:22010013

  3. Risk of recurrence and chemotherapy benefit for patients with node-negative, estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer: recurrence score alone and integrated with pathologic and clinical factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Gong; Cuzick, Jack; Costantino, Joseph P; Dowsett, Mitch; Forbes, John F; Crager, Michael; Mamounas, Eleftherios P; Shak, Steven; Wolmark, Norman

    2011-11-20

    The 21-gene breast cancer assay recurrence score (RS) is widely used for assessing recurrence risk and predicting chemotherapy benefit in patients with estrogen receptor (ER) -positive breast cancer. Pathologic and clinical factors such as tumor size, grade, and patient age also provide independent prognostic utility. We developed a formal integration of these measures and evaluated its prognostic and predictive value. From the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel (NSABP) B-14 and translational research cohort of the Arimidex, Tamoxifen Alone or in Combination (TransATAC) studies, we included patients who received hormonal monotherapy, had ER-positive tumors, and RS and traditional clinicopathologic factors assessed (647 and 1,088, respectively). Individual patient risk assessments from separate Cox models were combined using meta-analysis to form an RS-pathology-clinical (RSPC) assessment of distant recurrence risk. Risk assessments by RS and RSPC were compared in node-negative (N0) patients. RSPC was compared with RS for predicting chemotherapy benefit in NSABP B-20. RSPC had significantly more prognostic value for distant recurrence than did RS (P < .001) and showed better separation of risk in the study population. RSPC classified fewer patients as intermediate risk (17.8% v 26.7%, P < .001) and more patients as lower risk (63.8% v 54.2%, P < .001) than did RS among 1,444 N0 ER-positive patients. In B-20, the interaction of RSPC with chemotherapy was not statistically significant (P = .10), in contrast to the previously reported significant interaction of RS with chemotherapy (P = .037). RSPC refines the assessment of distant recurrence risk and reduces the number of patients classified as intermediate risk. Adding clinicopathologic measures did not seem to enhance the value of RS alone nor the individual biology RS identifies in predicting chemotherapy benefit.

  4. Risk of biochemical recurrence and positive surgical margins in patients with pT2 prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Martin Andreas; Thomsen, Frederik Birkebæk; Berg, Kasper Drimer

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To investigate risk factors associated with positive surgical margins (PSM) and biochemical recurrence (BR) in organ confined tumors (pT2) after radical prostatectomy (RP) for localized prostate cancer (PCa). METHODS: Between 1995 and 2011, 1,649 patients underwent RP...

  5. Integration of a Radiosensitivity Molecular Signature Into the Assessment of Local Recurrence Risk in Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres-Roca, Javier F.; Fulp, William J.; Caudell, Jimmy J.; Servant, Nicolas; Bollet, Marc A.; Vijver, Marc van de; Naghavi, Arash O.; Harris, Eleanor E.; Eschrich, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Recently, we developed radiosensitivity (RSI), a clinically validated molecular signature that estimates tumor radiosensitivity. In the present study, we tested whether integrating RSI with the molecular subtype refines the classification of local recurrence (LR) risk in breast cancer. Methods and Materials: RSI and molecular subtype were evaluated in 343 patients treated with breast-conserving therapy that included whole-breast radiation therapy with or without a tumor bed boost (dose range 45-72 Gy). The follow-up period for patients without recurrence was 10 years. The clinical endpoint was LR-free survival. Results: Although RSI did not uniformly predict for LR across the entire cohort, combining RSI and the molecular subtype identified a subpopulation with an increased risk of LR: triple negative (TN) and radioresistant (reference TN-radioresistant, hazard ratio [HR] 0.37, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.15-0.92, P=.02). TN patients who were RSI-sensitive/intermediate had LR rates similar to those of luminal (LUM) patients (HR 0.86, 95% CI 0.47-1.57, P=.63). On multivariate analysis, combined RSI and molecular subtype (P=.004) and age (P=.001) were the most significant predictors of LR. In contrast, integrating RSI into the LUM subtype did not identify additional risk groups. We hypothesized that radiation dose escalation was affecting radioresistance in the LUM subtype and serving as a confounder. An increased radiation dose decreased LR only in the luminal-resistant (LUM-R) subset (HR 0.23, 95% CI 0.05-0.98, P=.03). On multivariate analysis, the radiation dose was an independent variable only in the LUMA/B-RR subset (HR 0.025, 95% CI 0.001-0.946, P=.046), along with age (P=.008), T stage (P=.004), and chemotherapy (P=.008). Conclusions: The combined molecular subtype–RSI identified a novel molecular subpopulation (TN and radioresistant) with an increased risk of LR after breast-conserving therapy. We propose that the combination of RSI and

  6. Integration of a Radiosensitivity Molecular Signature Into the Assessment of Local Recurrence Risk in Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres-Roca, Javier F., E-mail: javier.torresroca@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Department of Chemical Biology and Molecular Medicine, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Fulp, William J. [Department of Bioinformatics, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Department of Biostatistics, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Caudell, Jimmy J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Servant, Nicolas [Institut Curie, INSERM U900, Paris (France); Mines ParisTech, Paris (France); Bollet, Marc A. [Institut Curie, INSERM U900, Paris (France); Vijver, Marc van de [Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Naghavi, Arash O. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Harris, Eleanor E. [East Carolina University, Greensborough, North Carolina (United States); Eschrich, Steven A. [Department of Bioinformatics, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Purpose: Recently, we developed radiosensitivity (RSI), a clinically validated molecular signature that estimates tumor radiosensitivity. In the present study, we tested whether integrating RSI with the molecular subtype refines the classification of local recurrence (LR) risk in breast cancer. Methods and Materials: RSI and molecular subtype were evaluated in 343 patients treated with breast-conserving therapy that included whole-breast radiation therapy with or without a tumor bed boost (dose range 45-72 Gy). The follow-up period for patients without recurrence was 10 years. The clinical endpoint was LR-free survival. Results: Although RSI did not uniformly predict for LR across the entire cohort, combining RSI and the molecular subtype identified a subpopulation with an increased risk of LR: triple negative (TN) and radioresistant (reference TN-radioresistant, hazard ratio [HR] 0.37, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.15-0.92, P=.02). TN patients who were RSI-sensitive/intermediate had LR rates similar to those of luminal (LUM) patients (HR 0.86, 95% CI 0.47-1.57, P=.63). On multivariate analysis, combined RSI and molecular subtype (P=.004) and age (P=.001) were the most significant predictors of LR. In contrast, integrating RSI into the LUM subtype did not identify additional risk groups. We hypothesized that radiation dose escalation was affecting radioresistance in the LUM subtype and serving as a confounder. An increased radiation dose decreased LR only in the luminal-resistant (LUM-R) subset (HR 0.23, 95% CI 0.05-0.98, P=.03). On multivariate analysis, the radiation dose was an independent variable only in the LUMA/B-RR subset (HR 0.025, 95% CI 0.001-0.946, P=.046), along with age (P=.008), T stage (P=.004), and chemotherapy (P=.008). Conclusions: The combined molecular subtype–RSI identified a novel molecular subpopulation (TN and radioresistant) with an increased risk of LR after breast-conserving therapy. We propose that the combination of RSI and

  7. Risk of Severe Toxicity According to Site of Recurrence in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, Diane C.; Vargo, John A.; Ferris, Robert L.; Ohr, James; Clump, David A.; Yau, Wai-Ying Wendy; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar; Kim, Seungwon; Johnson, Jonas T.; Bauman, Julie E.; Branstetter, Barton F.; Heron, Dwight E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report a 10-year update of our institutional experience with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for reirradiation of locally recurrent head and neck cancer, focusing on predictors of toxicity. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed on 291 patients treated with SBRT for recurrent, previously irradiated head and neck cancer between April 2002 and March 2013. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify predictors of severe acute and late toxicity. Patients with <3 months of follow-up (n=43) or who died within 3 months of treatment (n=21) were excluded from late toxicity analysis. Results: Median time to death or last clinical follow-up was 9.8 months among the entire cohort and 53.1 months among surviving patients. Overall, 33 patients (11.3%) experienced grade ≥3 acute toxicity and 43 (18.9%) experienced grade ≥3 late toxicity. Compared with larynx/hypopharynx, treatment of nodal recurrence was associated with a lower risk of severe acute toxicity (P=.03), with no significant differences in severe acute toxicity among other sites. Patients treated for a recurrence in the larynx/hypopharynx experienced significantly more severe late toxicity compared with those with oropharyngeal, oral cavity, base of skull/paranasal sinus, salivary gland, or nodal site of recurrence (P<.05 for all). Sixteen patients (50%) with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal recurrence experienced severe late toxicity, compared with 6-20% for other sites. Conclusions: Salvage SBRT is a safe and effective option for most patients with previously irradiated head and neck cancer. However, patients treated to the larynx or hypopharynx experience significantly more late toxicity compared with others and should be carefully selected for treatment, with consideration given to patient performance status, pre-existing organ dysfunction, and goals of care. Treatment toxicity in these patients may be mitigated with more conformal plans to allow for increased

  8. Risk of Severe Toxicity According to Site of Recurrence in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, Diane C.; Vargo, John A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Ferris, Robert L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Ohr, James [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Clump, David A.; Yau, Wai-Ying Wendy [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Duvvuri, Umamaheswar; Kim, Seungwon; Johnson, Jonas T. [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Bauman, Julie E. [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Branstetter, Barton F. [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Heron, Dwight E., E-mail: herond2@umpc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: To report a 10-year update of our institutional experience with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for reirradiation of locally recurrent head and neck cancer, focusing on predictors of toxicity. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed on 291 patients treated with SBRT for recurrent, previously irradiated head and neck cancer between April 2002 and March 2013. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify predictors of severe acute and late toxicity. Patients with <3 months of follow-up (n=43) or who died within 3 months of treatment (n=21) were excluded from late toxicity analysis. Results: Median time to death or last clinical follow-up was 9.8 months among the entire cohort and 53.1 months among surviving patients. Overall, 33 patients (11.3%) experienced grade ≥3 acute toxicity and 43 (18.9%) experienced grade ≥3 late toxicity. Compared with larynx/hypopharynx, treatment of nodal recurrence was associated with a lower risk of severe acute toxicity (P=.03), with no significant differences in severe acute toxicity among other sites. Patients treated for a recurrence in the larynx/hypopharynx experienced significantly more severe late toxicity compared with those with oropharyngeal, oral cavity, base of skull/paranasal sinus, salivary gland, or nodal site of recurrence (P<.05 for all). Sixteen patients (50%) with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal recurrence experienced severe late toxicity, compared with 6-20% for other sites. Conclusions: Salvage SBRT is a safe and effective option for most patients with previously irradiated head and neck cancer. However, patients treated to the larynx or hypopharynx experience significantly more late toxicity compared with others and should be carefully selected for treatment, with consideration given to patient performance status, pre-existing organ dysfunction, and goals of care. Treatment toxicity in these patients may be mitigated with more conformal plans to allow for increased

  9. Intrathoracic anastomotic leakage after gastroesophageal cancer resection is associated with increased risk of recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Steen C; Calatayud, Dan; Jensen, Lone S

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Intrathoracic anastomotic leakage after intended curative resection for cancer in the esophagus or gastroesophageal junction has a negative impact on long-term survival. The aim of this study was to investigate whether an anastomotic leakage was associated with an increased recurrence......]: 1.17-2.29, P = .004) and all-cause mortality (HR = 1.57; 95% CI: 1.23-2.05, P cancer resection....

  10. 20-Year Risks of Breast-Cancer Recurrence after Stopping Endocrine Therapy at 5 Years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pan, Hongchao; Gray, Richard; Braybrooke, Jeremy; Davies, Christina; Taylor, Carolyn; McGale, Paul; Peto, Richard; Pritchard, Kathleen I.; Bergh, Jonas; Dowsett, Mitch; Hayes, Daniel F.; Albain, K.; Anderson, S.; Arriagada, R.; Barlow, W.; Bartlett, J.; Bergsten‐Nordström, E.; Bliss, J.; Boccardo, F.; Bradley, R.; Brain, E.; Cameron, D.; Clarke, M.; Coates, A.; Coleman, R.; Correa, C.; Costantino, J.; Cuzick, J.; Davidson, N.; Dodwell, D.; Di Leo, A.; Ewertz, M.; Forbes, J.; Gelber, R.; Gnant, M.; Goldhirsch, A.; Goodwin, P.; Hill, C.; Ingle, J.; Jagsi, R.; Janni, W.; Loibl, S.; MacKinnon, E.; Martin, M.; Mukai, H.; Norton, L.; Ohashi, Y.; Paik, S.; Perez, E.; Bijker, N.

    2017-01-01

    The administration of endocrine therapy for 5 years substantially reduces recurrence rates during and after treatment in women with early-stage, estrogen-receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer. Extending such therapy beyond 5 years offers further protection but has additional side effects. Obtaining

  11. Joint Estimation of Cardiac Toxicity and Recurrence Risks After Comprehensive Nodal Photon Versus Proton Therapy for Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stick, Line B., E-mail: line.bjerregaard.stick@regionh.dk [Department of Clinical Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Yu, Jen [Maryland Proton Treatment Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Maraldo, Maja V. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Aznar, Marianne C. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Pedersen, Anders N. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Bentzen, Søren M. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Maryland Proton Treatment Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center and Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Vogelius, Ivan R. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: The study aims to perform joint estimation of the risk of recurrence caused by inadequate radiation dose coverage of lymph node targets and the risk of cardiac toxicity caused by radiation exposure to the heart. Delivered photon plans are compared with realistic proton plans, thereby providing evidence-based estimates of the heterogeneity of treatment effects in consecutive cases for the 2 radiation treatment modalities. Methods and Materials: Forty-one patients referred for postlumpectomy comprehensive nodal photon irradiation for left-sided breast cancer were included. Comparative proton plans were optimized by a spot scanning technique with single-field optimization from 2 en face beams. Cardiotoxicity risk was estimated with the model of Darby et al, and risk of recurrence following a compromise of lymph node coverage was estimated by a linear dose-response model fitted to the recurrence data from the recently published EORTC (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer) 22922/10925 and NCIC-CTG (National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group) MA.20 randomized controlled trials. Results: Excess absolute risk of cardiac morbidity was small with photon therapy at an attained age of 80 years, with median values of 1.0% (range, 0.2%-2.9%) and 0.5% (range, 0.03%-1.0%) with and without cardiac risk factors, respectively, but even lower with proton therapy (0.13% [range, 0.02%-0.5%] and 0.06% [range, 0.004%-0.3%], respectively). The median estimated excess absolute risk of breast cancer recurrence after 10 years was 0.10% (range, 0.0%-0.9%) with photons and 0.02% (range, 0.0%-0.07%) with protons. The association between age of the patient and benefit from proton therapy was weak, almost non-existing (Spearman rank correlations of −0.15 and −0.30 with and without cardiac risk factors, respectively). Conclusions: Modern photon therapy yields limited risk of cardiac toxicity in most patients, but proton therapy can reduce the

  12. Multiplex biomarker approach for determining risk of prostate-specific antigen-defined recurrence of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Daniel R; Sanda, Martin G; Otte, Arie P; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Rubin, Mark A

    2003-05-07

    Molecular signatures in cancer tissue may be useful for diagnosis and are associated with survival. We used results from high-density tissue microarrays (TMAs) to define combinations of candidate biomarkers associated with the rate of prostate cancer progression after radical prostatectomy that could identify patients at high risk for recurrence. Fourteen candidate biomarkers for prostate cancer for which antibodies are available included hepsin, pim-1 kinase, E-cadherin (ECAD; cell adhesion molecule), alpha-methylacyl-coenzyme A racemase, and EZH2 (enhancer of zeste homolog 2, a transcriptional repressor). TMAs containing more than 2000 tumor samples from 259 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer were studied with these antibodies. Immunohistochemistry results were evaluated in conjunction with clinical parameters associated with prostate cancer progression, including tumor stage, Gleason score, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level. Recurrence was defined as a postsurgery PSA level of more than 0.2 ng/mL. All statistical tests were two-sided. Moderate or strong expression of EZH2 coupled with at most moderate expression of ECAD (i.e., a positive EZH2:ECAD status) was the biomarker combination that was most strongly associated with the recurrence of prostate cancer. EZH2:ECAD status was statistically significantly associated with prostate cancer recurrence in a training set of 103 patients (relative risk [RR] = 2.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.09 to 5.81; P =.021), in a validation set of 80 patients (RR = 3.72, 95% CI = 1.27 to 10.91; P =.009), and in the combined set of 183 patients (RR = 2.96, 95% CI = 1.56 to 5.61; P<.001). EZH2:ECAD status was statistically significantly associated with disease recurrence even after adjusting for clinical parameters, such as tumor stage, Gleason score, and PSA level (hazard ratio = 3.19, 95% CI = 1.50 to 6.77; P =.003). EZH2:ECAD status was statistically significantly associated

  13. Mortality and recurrence rates among systemically untreated high risk breast cancer patients included in the DBCG 77 trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Maj Britt; Nielsen, Torsten O.; Knoop, Ann S.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Following loco-regional treatment for early breast cancer accurate prognostication is essential for communicating benefits of systemic treatment. The aim of this study was to determine time to recurrence and long-term mortality rates in high risk patients according to patient characte......Background: Following loco-regional treatment for early breast cancer accurate prognostication is essential for communicating benefits of systemic treatment. The aim of this study was to determine time to recurrence and long-term mortality rates in high risk patients according to patient...... and EGFR positive. Multivariate categorical and fractional polynomials (MFP) models were used to construct prognostic subsets by clinicopathologic characteristics. Results: In a multivariate model, mortality rate was significantly associated with age, tumor size, nodal status, invasion, histological type...

  14. Prostate cancer risk and recurrence: the role of nutrition and clinical aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, D.E.G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men in Western countries. Knowledge on prostate cancer aetiology is required for identification of high-risk groups, optimization of treatment strategies, and development of prevention programs. The aim of this thesis

  15. Risk of Recurrence or Contralateral Breast Cancer More than 5 Years After Diagnosis of Hormone Receptor-Positive Early-Stage Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sheridan; Speers, Caroline; Tyldesley, Scott; Chia, Stephen; Kennecke, Hagen; Ellard, Susan; Lohrisch, Caroline

    2016-08-01

    Three large studies have shown a survival benefit from 10 years of adjuvant hormone therapy (AHT). We evaluated the risk of an event 5 years after the initial breast cancer (BC) diagnosis and identified the prognostic factors to assist clinicians considering extended AHT. Patients newly referred to the BC Cancer Agency with stage I to III estrogen receptor-positive BC diagnosed from 1989 to 2004 who had undergone AHT were identified by the BC Cancer Agency's Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit. Cases with recurrence, death, or contralateral BC occurring within the first 5 years were excluded. The 10-year event-free survival (EFS) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. This provided estimates of recurrence risk after the fifth year following the diagnosis. The histopathologic and age variables were examined for prognostic value by univariate analysis. Within our cohort, 6615 women were postmenopausal and 1886 were premenopausal at the BC diagnosis. The median follow-up period was 11 years. The 10-year EFS for women aged cancer (any grade) and for stage II (node-negative and node-positive), grade I cancer. Our data have identified BCs associated with a very low recurrence risk 5 to 10 years after diagnosis, providing women with such cancers confidence about a decision to discontinue AHT after 5 years. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetic Alterations and Their Clinical Implications in High-Recurrence Risk Papillary Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min-Young; Ku, Bo Mi; Kim, Hae Su; Lee, Ji Yun; Lim, Sung Hee; Sun, Jong-Mu; Lee, Se-Hoon; Park, Keunchil; Oh, Young Lyun; Hong, Mineui; Jeong, Han-Sin; Son, Young-Ik; Baek, Chung-Hwan; Ahn, Myung-Ju

    2017-10-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs) frequently involve genetic alterations. The objective of this study was to investigate genetic alterations and further explore the relationships between these genetic alterations and clinicopathological characteristics in a high-recurrence risk (node positive, N1) PTC group. Tumor tissue blocks were obtained from 240 surgically resected patients with histologically confirmed stage III/IV (pT3/4 or N1) PTCs. We screened gene fusions using NanoString's nCounter technology and mutational analysis was performed by direct DNA sequencing. Data describing the clinicopathological characteristics and clinical courses were retrospectively collected. Of the 240 PTC patients, 207 (86.3%) had at least one genetic alteration, including BRAF mutation in 190 patients (79.2%), PIK3CA mutation in 25 patients (10.4%), NTRK1/3 fusion in six patients (2.5%), and RET fusion in 24 patients (10.0%). Concomitant presence of more than two genetic alterations was seen in 36 patients (15%). PTCs harboring BRAF mutation were associated with RET wild-type expression (p=0.001). RET fusion genes have been found to occur with significantly higher frequency in N1b stage patients (p=0.003) or groups of patients aged 45 years or older (p=0.031); however, no significant correlation was found between other genetic alterations. There was no trend toward favorable recurrence-free survival or overall survival among patients lacking genetic alterations. In the selected high-recurrence risk PTC group, most patients had more than one genetic alteration. However, these known alterations could not entirely account for clinicopathological features of high-recurrence risk PTC.

  17. Pak1, adjuvant tamoxifen therapy, and breast cancer recurrence risk in a Danish population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahern, Thomas P; Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P; Lash, Timothy L

    2016-01-01

    -/TAM - group. Pak1 cytoplasmic intensity was not associated with breast cancer recurrence in either group (ER+/TAM + ORadj for strong vs. no cytoplasmic staining = 0.91, 95% CI 0.57, 1.5; ER-/TAM - ORadj for strong vs. no cytoplasmic staining = 0.74, 95% CI 0.39, 1.4). Associations between Pak1 nuclear......Background Adjuvant tamoxifen therapy approximately halves the risk of estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer recurrence, but many women do not respond to therapy. Observational studies nested in clinical trial populations suggest that overexpression or nuclear localization of p21-activated...... by immunohistochemical staining of primary breast tumors from recurrence cases and matched controls from two breast cancer populations; women diagnosed with ER-positive tumors who received at least one year of tamoxifen therapy (ER+/TAM+), and women diagnosed with ER-negative tumors who survived for at least one year...

  18. Opioids and breast cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P; Heide-Jørgensen, Uffe; Ahern, Thomas P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Opioids may alter immune function, thereby potentially affecting cancer recurrence. The authors investigated the association between postdiagnosis opioid use and breast cancer recurrence. METHODS: Patients with incident, early stage breast cancer who were diagnosed during 1996 through...... 2008 in Denmark were identified from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group Registry. Opioid prescriptions were ascertained from the Danish National Prescription Registry. Follow-up began on the date of primary surgery for breast cancer and continued until breast cancer recurrence, death......, emigration, 10 years, or July 31, 2013, whichever occurred first. Cox regression models were used to compute hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals associating breast cancer recurrence with opioid prescription use overall and by opioid type and strength, immunosuppressive effect, chronic use (≥6 months...

  19. Validation study of a quantitative multigene reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay for assessment of recurrence risk in patients with stage II colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Richard G; Quirke, Philip; Handley, Kelly; Lopatin, Margarita; Magill, Laura; Baehner, Frederick L; Beaumont, Claire; Clark-Langone, Kim M; Yoshizawa, Carl N; Lee, Mark; Watson, Drew; Shak, Steven; Kerr, David J

    2011-12-10

    We developed quantitative gene expression assays to assess recurrence risk and benefits from chemotherapy in patients with stage II colon cancer. We sought validation by using RNA extracted from fixed paraffin-embedded primary colon tumor blocks from 1,436 patients with stage II colon cancer in the QUASAR (Quick and Simple and Reliable) study of adjuvant fluoropyrimidine chemotherapy versus surgery alone. A recurrence score (RS) and a treatment score (TS) were calculated from gene expression levels of 13 cancer-related genes (n = 7 recurrence genes and n = 6 treatment benefit genes) and from five reference genes with prespecified algorithms. Cox proportional hazards regression models and log-rank methods were used to analyze the relationship between the RS and risk of recurrence in patients treated with surgery alone and between TS and benefits of chemotherapy. Risk of recurrence was significantly associated with RS (hazard ratio [HR] per interquartile range, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.74; P = .004). Recurrence risks at 3 years were 12%, 18%, and 22% for predefined low, intermediate, and high recurrence risk groups, respectively. T stage (HR, 1.94; P < .001) and mismatch repair (MMR) status (HR, 0.31; P < .001) were the strongest histopathologic prognostic factors. The continuous RS was associated with risk of recurrence (P = .006) beyond these and other covariates. There was no trend for increased benefit from chemotherapy at higher TS (P = .95). The continuous 12-gene RS has been validated in a prospective study for assessment of recurrence risk in patients with stage II colon cancer after surgery and provides prognostic value that complements T stage and MMR. The TS was not predictive of chemotherapy benefit.

  20. Risk of recurrence in patients with colon cancer stage II and III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bockelman, C.; Engelmann, Bodil E.; Kaprio, T.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Adjuvant chemotherapy is established routine therapy for colon cancer (CC) patients with radically resected stage III and 'high-risk' stage II disease. The decision on recommending adjuvant chemotherapy, however, is based on data from older patient cohorts not reflecting improvements...

  1. Haptoglobin phenotype is not a predictor of recurrence free survival in high-risk primary breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Nathan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Better breast cancer prognostication may improve selection of patients for adjuvant therapy. We conducted a retrospective follow-up study in which we investigated sera of high-risk primary breast cancer patients, to search for proteins predictive of recurrence free survival. Methods Two sample sets of high-risk primary breast cancer patients participating in a randomised national trial investigating the effectiveness of high-dose chemotherapy were analysed. Sera in set I (n = 63 were analysed by surface enhanced laser desorption ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS for biomarker finding. Initial results were validated by analysis of sample set II (n = 371, using one-dimensional gel-electrophoresis. Results In sample set I, the expression of a peak at mass-to-charge ratio 9198 (relative intensity ≤ 20 or > 20, identified as haptoglobin (Hp alpha-1 chain, was strongly associated with recurrence free survival (global Log-rank test; p = 0.0014. Haptoglobin is present in three distinct phenotypes (Hp 1-1, Hp 2-1, and Hp 2-2, of which only individuals with phenotype Hp 1-1 or Hp 2-1 express the haptoglobin alpha-1 chain. As the expression of the haptoglobin alpha-1 chain, determined by SELDI-TOF MS, corresponds to the phenotype, initial results were validated by haptoglobin phenotyping of the independent sample set II by native one-dimensional gel-electrophoresis. With the Hp 1-1 phenotype as the reference category, the univariate hazard ratio for recurrence was 0.87 (95% CI: 0.56 – 1.34, p = 0.5221 and 1.03 (95% CI: 0.65 – 1.64, p = 0.8966 for the Hp 2-1 and Hp 2-2 phenotypes, respectively, in sample set II. Conclusion In contrast to our initial results, the haptoglobin phenotype was not identified as a predictor of recurrence free survival in high-risk primary breast cancer in our validation set. Our initial observation in the discovery set was probably the result of a type I error (i.e. false positive

  2. Study shows aspirin reduces the risk and recurrence of prostate cancer in African-American men | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    African-American men who take a daily dose of aspirin experience a significantly lower risk of developing advanced prostate cancer – the aggressive and deadly form of the disease – than African-American men who do not regularly use aspirin, according to a study from the Center for Cancer Research (CCR) Laboratory of Human Carcinogenesis. Learn more...

  3. Risk of First and Recurrent Stroke in Childhood Cancer Survivors Treated With Cranial and Cervical Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Sabine; Sear, Katherine; Hills, Nancy K.; Chettout, Nassim; Afghani, Shervin; Gastelum, Erica; Haas-Kogan, Daphne; Fullerton, Heather J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess, in a retrospective cohort study, rates and predictors of first and recurrent stroke in patients treated with cranial irradiation (CRT) and/or cervical irradiation at ≤18 years of age. Methods and Materials: We performed chart abstraction (n=383) and phone interviews (n=104) to measure first and recurrent stroke in 383 patients who received CRT and/or cervical radiation at a single institution between 1980 and 2009. Stroke was defined as a physician diagnosis and symptoms consistent with stroke. Incidence of first stroke was number of first strokes per person-years of observation after radiation. We used survival analysis techniques to determine cumulative incidence of first and recurrent stroke. Results: Among 325 subjects with sufficient follow-up data, we identified 19 first strokes (13 ischemic, 4 hemorrhagic, 2 unknown subtype) occurring at a median age of 24 years (interquartile range 17-33 years) in patients treated with CRT. Imaging was reviewed when available (n=13), and the stroke was confirmed in 12. Overall rate of first stroke was 625 (95% confidence interval [CI] 378-977) per 100,000 person-years. The cumulative incidence of first stroke was 2% (95% CI 0.01%-5.3%) at 5 years and 4% (95% CI 2.0%-8.4%) at 10 years after irradiation. With each 100-cGy increase in the radiation dose, the stroke hazard increased by 5% (hazard ratio 1.05; 95% CI 1.01-1.09; P=.02). We identified 6 recurrent strokes; 5 had available imaging that confirmed the stroke. Median time to recurrence was 15 months (interquartile range 6 months-3.2 years) after first stroke. The cumulative incidence of recurrent stroke was 38% (95% CI 17%-69%) at 5 years and 59% (95% CI 27%-92%) at 10 years after first stroke. Conclusion: Cranial irradiation puts childhood cancer survivors at high risk of both first and recurrent stroke. Stroke prevention strategies for these survivors are needed

  4. Follicular thyroid cancer in children and adolescents. Clinicopathologic features, long-term survival, and risk factors for recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enomoto, Keisuke; Enomoto, Yukie; Uchino, Shinya; Yamashita, Hiroto; Noguchi, Shiro

    2013-01-01

    Children and adolescents represent 1-1.5% of all patients with thyroid cancer (TC). The vast majority of TC in children and adolescents is papillary TC; follicular TC (FTC) is exceedingly rare. In this study, we evaluate the clinical and pathological features of FTC in children and adolescents. We also report the risk factors for post-operative tumor recurrence and the associated outcomes. Twenty children and adolescents (under 21 years old) with FTC have been treated and followed at Noguchi Thyroid Clinic and Hospital Foundation since 1946. All patients underwent surgery (lobectomy, 11; subtotal thyroidectomy, 8; and total thyroidectomy, 1), and 8 patients received postoperative external beam radiation therapy. The incidence of FTC in children and adolescents was 1.9% among all FTC patients treated in our hospital. Histopathology revealed vascular and capsular invasion in 9 and 20 patients, respectively. The tumor recurrence rate in FTC with vascular invasion is significantly higher than in those without it (p=0.038). No other factors were significant. Patients with recurrences were treated with completion thyroidectomy and 131 I radioactive iodine therapy. There were no significant differences in the rates of disease-free survival or cause-specific survival when pediatric/adolescent FTC patients were compared to adults with FTC. FTC is very rare among children and adolescents, but the outcomes are similar to those observed among adults. Vascular invasion is poor prognostic indicator in pediatric/adolescent FTC patients. (author)

  5. Reproductive History and Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... 4 ). This risk reduction is limited to hormone receptor –positive breast cancer; age at first full-term ...

  6. Association Between the 21-Gene Recurrence Score Assay and Risk of Locoregional Recurrence in Node-Negative, Estrogen Receptor–Positive Breast Cancer: Results From NSABP B-14 and NSABP B-20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamounas, Eleftherios P.; Tang, Gong; Fisher, Bernard; Paik, Soonmyung; Shak, Steven; Costantino, Joseph P.; Watson, Drew; Geyer, Charles E.; Wickerham, D. Lawrence; Wolmark, Norman

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The 21-gene OncotypeDX recurrence score (RS) assay quantifies the risk of distant recurrence in tamoxifen-treated patients with node-negative, estrogen receptor (ER)–positive breast cancer. We investigated the association between RS and risk for locoregional recurrence (LRR) in patients with node-negative, ER-positive breast cancer from two National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) trials (NSABP B-14 and B-20). Patients and Methods RS was available for 895 tamoxifen-treated patients (from both trials), 355 placebo-treated patients (from B-14), and 424 chemotherapy plus tamoxifen-treated patients (from B-20). The primary end point was time to first LRR. Distant metastases, second primary cancers, and deaths before LRR were censored. Results In tamoxifen-treated patients, LRR was significantly associated with RS risk groups (P 30). There were also significant associations between RS and LRR in placebo-treated patients from B-14 (P = .022) and in chemotherapy plus tamoxifen–treated patients from B-20 (P = .028). In multivariate analysis, RS was an independent significant predictor of LRR along with age and type of initial treatment. Conclusion Similar to the association between RS and risk for distant recurrence, a significant association exists between RS and risk for LRR. This information has biologic consequences and potential clinical implications relative to locoregional therapy decisions for patients with node-negative and ER-positive breast cancer. PMID:20065188

  7. Association between the 21-gene recurrence score assay and risk of locoregional recurrence in node-negative, estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer: results from NSABP B-14 and NSABP B-20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamounas, Eleftherios P; Tang, Gong; Fisher, Bernard; Paik, Soonmyung; Shak, Steven; Costantino, Joseph P; Watson, Drew; Geyer, Charles E; Wickerham, D Lawrence; Wolmark, Norman

    2010-04-01

    The 21-gene OncotypeDX recurrence score (RS) assay quantifies the risk of distant recurrence in tamoxifen-treated patients with node-negative, estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer. We investigated the association between RS and risk for locoregional recurrence (LRR) in patients with node-negative, ER-positive breast cancer from two National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) trials (NSABP B-14 and B-20). RS was available for 895 tamoxifen-treated patients (from both trials), 355 placebo-treated patients (from B-14), and 424 chemotherapy plus tamoxifen-treated patients (from B-20). The primary end point was time to first LRR. Distant metastases, second primary cancers, and deaths before LRR were censored. In tamoxifen-treated patients, LRR was significantly associated with RS risk groups (P 30). There were also significant associations between RS and LRR in placebo-treated patients from B-14 (P = .022) and in chemotherapy plus tamoxifen-treated patients from B-20 (P = .028). In multivariate analysis, RS was an independent significant predictor of LRR along with age and type of initial treatment. Similar to the association between RS and risk for distant recurrence, a significant association exists between RS and risk for LRR. This information has biologic consequences and potential clinical implications relative to locoregional therapy decisions for patients with node-negative and ER-positive breast cancer.

  8. Prediction model for recurrence probabilities after intravesical chemotherapy in patients with intermediate-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer, including external validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, R.J.M.; Hendriks, J.C.M.; Rodriguez Faba, O.; Witjes, W.P.J.; Palou, J.; Witjes, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop a model to predict recurrence for patients with intermediate-risk (IR) non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) treated with intravesical chemotherapy which can be challenging because of the heterogeneous characteristics of these patients. METHODS: Data from three Dutch trials

  9. Histological type is not an independent prognostic factor for the risk pattern of breast cancer recurrences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwast, A.B.G.; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, Catharina Gerarda Maria; Grandjean, I.; Ho, V.K.Y.; Voogd, A.C.; Menke-Pluijmers, M.B.E.; Sangen, M.J.C.; Tjan-Heijnen, V.C.G.; Kiemeney, L.A.; Siesling, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    Invasive lobular breast cancer (ILC) is less common than invasive ductal breast cancer (IDC) and appears to have a distinct biology. Inconsistent findings regarding disease-free survival (DFS) are probably due to the fact that histologic type is related to hormone receptor status. This study aims to

  10. The Genomic Grade Assay Compared With Ki67 to Determine Risk of Distant Breast Cancer Recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ignatiadis, Michail; Azim, Hatem A; Desmedt, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Importance: The Genomic Grade Index (GGI) was previously developed, evaluated on frozen tissue, and shown to be prognostic in early breast cancer. To test the GGI in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded breast cancer tumors, a quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay...

  11. Joint Estimation of Cardiac Toxicity and Recurrence Risks After Comprehensive Nodal Photon Versus Proton Therapy for Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stick, Line B; Yu, Jen; Maraldo, Maja V

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The study aims to perform joint estimation of the risk of recurrence caused by inadequate radiation dose coverage of lymph node targets and the risk of cardiac toxicity caused by radiation exposure to the heart. Delivered photon plans are compared with realistic proton plans, thereby pro...

  12. Copy Number Analysis of 24 Oncogenes: MDM4 Identified as a Putative Marker for Low Recurrence Risk in Non Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samanta Salvi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC generally have a high risk of relapsing locally after primary tumor resection. The search for new predictive markers of local recurrence thus represents an important goal for the management of this disease. We studied the copy number variations (CNVs of 24 oncogenes (MDM4, MYCN, ALK, PDGFRA, KIT, KDR, DHFR, EGFR, MET, SMO, FGFR1, MYC, ABL1, RET, CCND1, CCND2, CDK4, MDM2, AURKB, ERBB2, TOP2A, AURKA, AR and BRAF using multiplex ligation probe amplification technique to verify their role as predictive markers of recurrence. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples from 43 patients who underwent transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB were used; 23 patients had relapsed and 20 were disease-free after 5 years. Amplification frequencies were analyzed for all genes and MDM4 was the only gene that showed significantly higher amplification in non recurrent patients than in recurrent ones (0.65 vs. 0.3; Fisher’s test p = 0.023. Recurrence-free survival analysis confirmed the predictive role of MDM4 (log-rank test p = 0.041. Our preliminary results indicate a putative role for the MDM4 gene in predicting local recurrence of bladder cancer. Confirmation of this hypothesis is needed in a larger cohort of NMIBC patients.

  13. NADiA® ProsVue™ PSA Slope Is an Independent Prognostic Marker for Identifying Men at Reduced Risk for Clinical Recurrence of Prostate Cancer after Radical Prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moul, Judd W.; Lilja, Hans; Semmes, O. John; Lance, Raymond S.; Vessella, Robert L.; Fleisher, Martin; Mazzola, Clarisse; Sarno, Mark J.; Stevens, Barbara; Klem, Robert E.; McDermed, Jonathan E.; Triebell, Melissa T.; Adams, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To validate the hypothesis that men displaying serum PSA slopes ≤2.0 pg/mL/month postprostatectomy, measured with a new immuno-PCR diagnostic test (NADiA® ProsVue™) were at a reduced risk of clinical recurrence as determined by positive biopsy, imaging or death due to prostate cancer. Methods From 4 clinical sites, we selected a cohort of 304 men followed up to 17.6 years postprostatectomy for clinical recurrence. We assessed the prognostic value of a PSA slope cutpoint of 2.0 pg/mL/month against established risk factors to identify men at very low risk of clinical recurrence using uni- and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression and Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results The univariate HR (95% CI) of a PSA slope >2.0 pg/mL/month was 18.3 (10.6–31.8), compared to a slope ≤2.0 pg/mL/month (P free survival was 4.8 years versus >10 years in the 2 groups (P <0.0001). Multivariate HR for PSA slope with the covariates of preprostatectomy PSA, pathologic stage and Gleason score was 9.8 (5.4–17.8), an 89.8% risk reduction, for men with PSA slopes ≤2.0 pg/mL/month (P <0.0001). Gleason Score (<7 vs. ≥7) was the only other significant predictor (HR 5.4, 2.1–13.8, P = 0.0004). Conclusions Clinical recurrence following radical prostatectomy is often difficult to predict since established factors do not reliably stratify risk. We demonstrate that a NADiA ProsVue slope ≤2.0 pg/mL/month postprostatectomy is prognostic for reduced risk of prostate cancer recurrence and adds predictive power to established risk factors. PMID:23107099

  14. Postmastectomy radiotherapy improves disease-free survival of high risk of locoregional recurrence breast cancer patients with T1-2 and 1 to 3 positive nodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Yu He

    Full Text Available The indications for post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT with T1-2 breast cancer and 1-3 positive axillary lymph nodes is still controversial. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of PMRT in T1-2 breast cancer with 1-3 positive axillary lymph node.We retrospectively reviewed the file records of 79 patients receiving PMRT and not receiving PMRT (618 patients.The median follow-up was 65 months. Multivariate analysis showed that PMRT was an independent prognostic factor of locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS (P = 0.010. Subgroup analysis of patients who did not undergo PMRT showed that pT stage, number of positive axillary lymph nodes, and molecular subtype were independent prognostic factors of LRFS. PMRT improved LRFS in the entire group (P = 0.005, but did not affect distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS (P = 0.494, disease-free survival (DFS (P = 0.215, and overall survival (OS (P = 0.645. For patients without PMRT, the 5-year LRFS of low-risk patients (0-1 risk factor for locoregional recurrence of 94.5% was significantly higher than that of high-risk patients (2-3 risk factors for locoregional recurrence (80.9%, P < 0.001. PMRT improved LRFS (P = 0.001 and DFS (P = 0.027 in high-risk patients, but did not improve LRFS, DMFS, DFS, and OS in low-risk patients.PMRT is beneficial in patients with high risk of locoregional recurrence breast cancer patients with T1-2 and 1 to 3 positive nodes.

  15. Effectivity of intravescical thermo-chemotherapy prophylaxis for patients with high recurrence and progression risk for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gözen, Ali Serdar; Umari, Paolo; Scheitlin, Walter; Su, Fuat Ernis; Akin, Yigit; Rassweiler, Jens

    2017-06-30

    Background&Aim: High grade non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) is common in urological practice. Most of these cancers are or become refractory to intravesical immunotherapy and chemotherapy. Here we evaluated the efficacy of combined local bladder hyperthermia and intravesical mitomycin-C (MMC) instillation in patients with high-risk recurrent NMIBC. Between February 2014 and December 2015, 18 patients with high risk NMIBC were enrolled. Patients were treated in an outpatient basis with 6 weekly induction sessions followed by monthly maintenance sessions with intravesical MMC in local hyperthermia with bladder wall thermo-chemotherapy (BWT) system (PelvixTT system, Elmedical Ltd., Hod Hasharon, Israel). The follow-up regimen included cystoscopy after the induction cycle and thereafter with regular intervals. Time to disease recurrence was defined as time from the first intravesical treatment to endoscopic or histological documentation of a new bladder tumour. Adverse events were recorded according to CTC 4.0 (Common Toxicity Criteria) score system. Mean age was 72 (32-87) years. 10 patients had multifocal disease, 9 had CIS, 6 had recurrent disease and 2 had highly recurrent disease (> 3 recurrences in a 24 months period). 6 patients underwent previous intravesical chemotherapy with MMC. The average number of maintenance sessions per patient was 7.6. After a mean follow-up of 433 days, 15 patients (83.3%) were recurrence-free. 3 patients had tumour recurrence after a mean period of 248 days without progression. Side effects were limited to grade 1 in 2 patients and grade 2 in 1 patient. BWT seems to be feasible and safe in high grade NMIBC. More studies are needed to identify the subgroup of patients who may benefit more from this treatment.

  16. Effectivity of intravescical thermo-chemotherapy prophylaxis for patients with high recurrence and progression risk for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Serdar Gözen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background&Aim: High grade non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC is common in urological practice. Most of these cancers are or become refractory to intravesical immunotherapy and chemotherapy. Here we evaluated the efficacy of combined local bladder hyperthermia and intravesical mitomycin-C (MMC instillation in patients with high-risk recurrent NMIBC. Materials and methods: Between February 2014 and December 2015, 18 patients with high risk NMIBC were enrolled. Patients were treated in an outpatient basis with 6 weekly induction sessions followed by monthly maintenance sessions with intravesical MMC in local hyperthermia with bladder wall thermo-chemotherapy (BWT system (PelvixTT system, Elmedical Ltd., Hod Hasharon, Israel. The follow-up regimen included cystoscopy after the induction cycle and thereafter with regular intervals. Time to disease recurrence was defined as time from the first intravesical treatment to endoscopic or histological documentation of a new bladder tumour. Adverse events were recorded according to CTC 4.0 (Common Toxicity Criteria score system. Results: Mean age was 72 (32-87 years. 10 patients had multifocal disease, 9 had CIS, 6 had recurrent disease and 2 had highly recurrent disease (> 3 recurrences in a 24 months period. 6 patients underwent previous intravesical chemotherapy with MMC. The average number of maintenance sessions per patient was 7.6. After a mean follow-up of 433 days, 15 patients (83.3% were recurrence-free. 3 patients had tumour recurrence after a mean period of 248 days without progression. Side effects were limited to grade 1 in 2 patients and grade 2 in 1 patient. Conclusions: BWT seems to be feasible and safe in high grade NMIBC. More studies are needed to identify the subgroup of patients who may benefit more from this treatment.

  17. Local recurrence risk after previous salvage mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, M; Iwase, T; Okumura, Y; Yoshida, A; Masuda, N; Nakatsukasa, K; Shien, T; Tanaka, S; Komoike, Y; Taguchi, T; Arima, N; Nishimura, R; Inaji, H; Ishitobi, M

    2016-07-01

    Breast-conserving surgery is a standard treatment for early breast cancer. For ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) after breast-conserving surgery, salvage mastectomy is the current standard surgical procedure. However, it is not rare for patients with IBTR who have received salvage mastectomy to develop local recurrence. In this study, we examined the risk factors of local recurrence after salvage mastectomy for IBTR. A total of 118 consecutive patients who had histologically confirmed IBTR without distant metastases and underwent salvage mastectomy without irradiation for IBTR between 1989 and 2008 were included from eight institutions in Japan. The risk factors of local recurrence were assessed. The median follow-up period from salvage mastectomy for IBTR was 4.6 years. Patients with pN2 or higher on diagnosis of the primary tumor showed significantly poorer local recurrence-free survival than those with pN0 or pN1 at primary tumor (p mastectomy for IBTR. Further research and validation studies are needed. (UMIN-CTR number UMIN000008136). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Stress Reduction in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With Recurrent Gynecologic or Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-08

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Fatigue; Leydig Cell Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Pain; Peritoneal Carcinomatosis; Pseudomyxoma Peritonei; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Recurrent Vulvar Cancer

  19. Personalisation of breast cancer follow-up: a time-dependent prognostic nomogram for the estimation of annual risk of locoregional recurrence in early breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveen, Annemieke; Vliegen, Ingrid; Sonke, Gabe S.; Klaase, Joost M.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Siesling, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and validate a time-dependent logistic regression model for prediction of locoregional recurrence (LRR) of breast cancer and a web-based nomogram for clinical decision support. Women first diagnosed with early breast cancer between 2003 and 2006 in all

  20. Growth of breast cancer recurrences assessed by consecutive MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millet, Ingrid; Bouic-Pages, Emmanuelle; Hoa, Denis; Azria, David; Taourel, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Women with a personal history of breast cancer have a high risk of developing an ipsi- or contralateral recurrence. We aimed to compare the growth rate of primary breast cancer and recurrences in women who had undergone prior breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Three hundred and sixty-two women were diagnosed with breast cancer and had undergone breast MRI at the time of diagnosis in our institution (2005 - 2009). Among them, 37 had at least one prior breast MRI with the lesion being visible but not diagnosed as cancer. A linear regression of tumour volume measured on MRI scans and time data was performed using a generalized logistic model to calculate growth rates. The primary objective was to compare the tumour growth rate of patients with either primary breast cancer (no history of breast cancer) or ipsi- or contralateral recurrences of breast cancer. Twenty women had no history of breast cancer and 17 patients were diagnosed as recurrences (7 and 10 were ipsi- and contralateral, respectively). The tumour growth rate was higher in contralateral recurrences than in ipsilateral recurrences (growth rate [10 -3 days -1 ] 3.56 vs 1.38, p < .001) or primary cancer (3.56 vs 2.09, p = 0.01). Differences in tumour growth were not significant for other patient-, tumour- or treatment-related characteristics. These findings suggest that contralateral breast cancer presents accelerated growth compared to ipsilateral recurrences or primary breast events

  1. Therapeutic resistance and cancer recurrence mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cancer recurrence is believed to be one of the major reasons for the failure of cancer treatment strategies. Thisbiological phenomenon could arise from the incomplete eradication of tumour cells after chemo- and radiotherapy.Recent developments in the design of models reflecting cancer recurrence and in vivo imaging ...

  2. Risk prediction scores for recurrence and progression of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer : An international validation in primary tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Vedder (Moniek); M. Márquez (Mirari); E.W. de Bekker-Grob (Esther); M.L. Calle (Malu); L. Dyrskjot (Lars); M. Kogevinas (Manolis); U. Segersten (Ulrika); P.-U. Malmström (Per-Uno); F. Algaba (Ferran); W. Beukers (Willemien); T.F. Orntoft (Torben); E.C. Zwarthoff (Ellen); F.X. Real (Francisco); N. Malats (Núria); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractObjective: We aimed to determine the validity of two risk scores for patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer in different European settings, in patients with primary tumours. Methods: We included 1,892 patients with primary stage Ta or T1 non-muscle invasive bladder cancer who

  3. Delayed radical prostatectomy for intermediate-risk prostate cancer is associated with biochemical recurrence: possible implications for active surveillance from the SEARCH database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abern, Michael R; Aronson, William J; Terris, Martha K; Kane, Christopher J; Presti, Joseph C; Amling, Christopher L; Freedland, Stephen J

    2013-03-01

    Active surveillance (AS) is increasingly accepted as appropriate management for low-risk prostate cancer (PC) patients. It is unknown whether delaying radical prostatectomy (RP) is associated with increased risk of biochemical recurrence (BCR) for men with intermediate-risk PC. We performed a retrospective analysis of 1,561 low and intermediate-risk men from the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) database treated with RP between 1988 and 2011. Patients were stratified by interval between diagnosis and RP (≤ 3, 3-6, 6-9, or >9 months) and by risk using the D'Amico classification. Cox proportional hazard models were used to analyze BCR. Logistic regression was used to analyze positive surgical margins (PSM), extracapsular extension (ECE), and pathologic upgrading. Overall, 813 (52%) men were low-risk, and 748 (48%) intermediate-risk. Median follow-up among men without recurrence was 52.9 months, during which 437 men (38.9%) recurred. For low-risk men, RP delays were unrelated to BCR, ECE, PSM, or upgrading (all P > 0.05). For intermediate-risk men, however, delays >9 months were significantly related to BCR (HR: 2.10, P = 0.01) and PSM (OR: 4.08, P 9 months were associated with BCR in subsets of intermediate-risk men with biopsy Gleason score ≤ 3 + 4 (HR: 2.51, P 9 months predicted greater BCR and PSM risk. If confirmed in future studies, this suggests delayed RP for intermediate-risk PC may compromise outcomes. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Treatment of locally recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kococik, Z.; Kococik, M.

    2007-01-01

    The suggested classifications of locally recurrent rectal cancer are based on the presence of symptoms and the degree of tumour fixation to the pelvic wall, or, otherwise, account for factor T in the TMN system. Although the results of rectal cancer treatment have improved, which may be attributed to total meso rectal excision and application of perioperative radiotherapy and radiochemotherapy, the ratio of cases of locally recurrent rectal cancer still amount from several to over a dozen percent. Among the available diagnostic methods for detecting locally recurrent rectal cancer after anterior rectal resection, endorectal sonography is of special importance. In the estimation of prognostic factors the lack of vascular invasion in recurrent cancer and the long period between the treatment of primary rectal cancer and the development of recurrence are a sign of good prognosis, while pain prior to recurrence treatment and male sex diminish the chances for cure. Locally recurrent rectal cancer impairs the patient's quality of life in all measurable aspects, but even after complete recovery we observe severe disturbances of sexual activity in most patients, and a number of patients require hygiene pads or suffer from chronic pain. Local recurrence of rectal cancer is more commonly qualified for excision after surgical treatment only, than after preoperative radiotherapy. The probability of total recurrent rectal cancer excision increases when the patient is younger, the primary tumours was less advanced and the first operation was sphincter-sparing surgery. Progress in the surgical treatment of recurrent rectal cancer was brought on by the introduction of the composite musculocutaneous flap to compensate the loss of perineal tissue. The application of intraoperative radiotherapy improves treatment results of recurrent rectal cancer, however at the cost of more frequent, serious postoperative complications and intense pain. In inoperable cases high dose regional

  5. Chemoradiotherapy response in recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Stanley K T; Bhangu, Aneel; Tait, Diana M; Tekkis, Paris; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Brown, Gina

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in recurrent versus primary rectal cancer has not been investigated. We compared radiological downsizing between primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT and determined the optimal size reduction threshold for response validated by survival outcomes. The proportional change in tumor length for primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT was compared using the independent sample t-test. Overall survival (OS) was calculated using the Kaplan–Meier product limit method and differences between survival for tumor size reduction thresholds of 30% (response evaluation criteria in solid tumors [RECIST]), 40%, and 50% after CRT in primary and recurrent rectal cancer groups. A total of 385 patients undergoing CRT were analyzed, 99 with recurrent rectal cancer and 286 with primary rectal cancer. The mean proportional reduction in maximum craniocaudal length was significantly higher for primary rectal tumors (33%) compared with recurrent rectal cancer (11%) (P < 0.01). There was no difference in OS for either primary or recurrent rectal cancer when ≤30% or ≤40% definitions were used. However, for both primary and recurrent tumors, significant differences in median 3-year OS were observed when a RECIST cut-off of 50% was used. OS was 99% versus 77% in primary and 100% versus 42% in recurrent rectal cancer (P = 0.002 and P = 0.03, respectively). Only patients that demonstrated >50% size reduction showed a survival benefit. Recurrent rectal cancer appears radioresistant compared with primary tumors for tumor size after CRT. Further investigation into improving/intensifying chemotherapy and radiotherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer is justified

  6. Chemoradiotherapy response in recurrent rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Stanley K T; Bhangu, Aneel; Tait, Diana M; Tekkis, Paris; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Brown, Gina

    2014-02-01

    The efficacy of response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in recurrent versus primary rectal cancer has not been investigated. We compared radiological downsizing between primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT and determined the optimal size reduction threshold for response validated by survival outcomes. The proportional change in tumor length for primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT was compared using the independent sample t-test. Overall survival (OS) was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier product limit method and differences between survival for tumor size reduction thresholds of 30% (response evaluation criteria in solid tumors [RECIST]), 40%, and 50% after CRT in primary and recurrent rectal cancer groups. A total of 385 patients undergoing CRT were analyzed, 99 with recurrent rectal cancer and 286 with primary rectal cancer. The mean proportional reduction in maximum craniocaudal length was significantly higher for primary rectal tumors (33%) compared with recurrent rectal cancer (11%) (P rectal cancer when ≤30% or ≤40% definitions were used. However, for both primary and recurrent tumors, significant differences in median 3-year OS were observed when a RECIST cut-off of 50% was used. OS was 99% versus 77% in primary and 100% versus 42% in recurrent rectal cancer (P = 0.002 and P = 0.03, respectively). Only patients that demonstrated >50% size reduction showed a survival benefit. Recurrent rectal cancer appears radioresistant compared with primary tumors for tumor size after CRT. Further investigation into improving/intensifying chemotherapy and radiotherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer is justified. © 2013 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Impact of Metabolic Diseases, Drugs, and Dietary Factors on Prostate Cancer Risk, Recurrence, and Survival: A Systematic Review by the European Association of Urology Section of Oncological Urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campi, Riccardo; Brookman-May, Sabine D; Subiela Henríquez, Jose Daniel; Akdoğan, Bülent; Brausi, Maurizio; Klatte, Tobias; Langenhuijsen, Johan F; Linares-Espinos, Estefania; Marszalek, Martin; Roupret, Morgan; Stief, Christian G; Volpe, Alessandro; Minervini, Andrea; Rodriguez-Faba, Oscar

    2018-04-13

    To date, established risk factors for prostate cancer (PCa) are limited to age, race, family history, and certain genetic polymorphisms. Despite great research efforts, available evidence on potentially modifiable risk factors is conflicting. Moreover, most studies on PCa risk factors did not consider the impact of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing on PCa diagnosis. To provide a detailed overview of the latest evidence on the role of metabolic diseases, drugs, and dietary factors for risk of PCa incidence, recurrence, and survival in men exposed to PSA testing. A systematic review of the English-language literature was performed using the MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Web of Science databases according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses recommendations. Randomized, case-control, or cohort studies published during the periods 2008-2017 (on drugs and metabolic diseases) and 2003-2017 (on dietary factors), with extensive follow-up (≥8-10yr for studies on PCa risk; ≥2-5yr for studies on PCa recurrence, progression, and survival, depending on the review subtopic) and adjusting of the analyses, beyond established risk factors, for either rate of PSA testing (for risk analyses) or PCa stage and primary treatment (for survival analyses), were eligible for inclusion. Overall, 39 reports from 22 observational studies were included. Studies were heterogeneous regarding definitions of exposure or outcomes, length of follow-up, risk of bias, and confounding. For some risk factors, evidence was insufficient to assess potential effects, while for others there was no evidence of an effect. For selected risk factors, namely metformin, aspirin and statin use, diabetes, obesity, and specific dietary intakes, there was low-quality evidence of modest effects on PCa risk. Current evidence from long-term observational studies evaluating the effect of drugs, metabolic diseases, and dietary factors for PCa risk

  8. High RBM3 expression in prostate cancer independently predicts a reduced risk of biochemical recurrence and disease progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjartell Anders

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High expression of the RNA-binding protein RBM3 has previously been found to be associated with good prognosis in breast cancer, ovarian cancer, malignant melanoma and colorectal cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the prognostic impact of immunohistochemical RBM3 expression in prostate cancer. Findings Immunohistochemical RBM3 expression was examined in a tissue microarray with malignant and benign prostatic specimens from 88 patients treated with radical prostatectomy for localized disease. While rarely expressed in benign prostate gland epithelium, RBM3 was found to be up-regulated in prostate intraepithelial neoplasia and present in various fractions and intensities in invasive prostate cancer. High nuclear RBM3 expression was significantly associated with a prolonged time to biochemical recurrence (BCR (HR 0.56, 95% CI: 0.34-0.93, p = 0.024 and clinical progression (HR 0.09, 95% CI: 0.01-0.71, p = 0.021. These associations remained significant in multivariate analysis, adjusted for preoperative PSA level in blood, pathological Gleason score and presence or absence of extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion and positive surgical margin (HR 0.41, 95% CI: 0.19-0.89, p = 0.024 for BCR and HR 0.06, 95% CI: 0.01-0.50, p = 0.009 for clinical progression. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that high nuclear expression of RBM3 in prostate cancer is associated with a prolonged time to disease progression and, thus, a potential biomarker of favourable prognosis. The value of RBM3 for prognostication, treatment stratification and follow-up of prostate cancer patients should be further validated in larger studies.

  9. Risk factors of recurrent anal sphincter ruptures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jangö, Hanna; Langhoff-Roos, J; Rosthøj, Steen

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Jangö H, Langhoff-Roos J, Rosthøj S, Sakse A. Risk factors of recurrent anal sphincter ruptures: a population-based cohort study. BJOG 2012;00:000-000 DOI: 10.1111/j.1471-0528.2012.03486.x. Objective  To determine the incidence and risk factors of recurrent anal sphincter...... were used to determine risk factors of recurrent ASR. Main outcome measures  The incidence of recurrent ASR and odds ratios for possible risk factors of recurrent ASR: age, body mass index, grade of ASR, birthweight, head circumference, gestational age, presentation, induction of labour, oxytocin...... augmentation, epidural, episiotomy, vacuum extraction, forceps, shoulder dystocia, delivery interval and year of second delivery. Results  Out of 159 446 women, 7336 (4.6%) experienced an ASR at first delivery, and 521 (7.1%) had a recurrent ASR (OR 5.91). The risk factors of recurrent ASR in the multivariate...

  10. HumanMethylation450K Array–Identified Biomarkers Predict Tumour Recurrence/Progression at Initial Diagnosis of High-risk Non-muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark O Kitchen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: High-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (HR-NMIBC is a clinically unpredictable disease. Despite clinical risk estimation tools, many patients are undertreated with intra-vesical therapies alone, whereas others may be over-treated with early radical surgery. Molecular biomarkers, particularly DNA methylation, have been reported as predictive of tumour/patient outcomes in numerous solid organ and haematologic malignancies; however, there are few reports in HR-NMIBC and none using genome-wide array assessment. We therefore sought to identify novel DNA methylation markers of HR-NMIBC clinical outcomes that might predict tumour behaviour at initial diagnosis and help guide patient management. Patients and methods: A total of 21 primary initial diagnosis HR-NMIBC tumours were analysed by Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip arrays and subsequently bisulphite Pyrosequencing. In all, 7 had not recurred at 1 year after resection and 14 had recurred and/or progressed despite intra-vesical BCG. A further independent cohort of 32 HR-NMIBC tumours (17 no recurrence and 15 recurrence and/or progression despite BCG were also assessed by bisulphite Pyrosequencing. Results: Array analyses identified 206 CpG loci that segregated non-recurrent HR-NMIBC tumours from clinically more aggressive recurrence/progression tumours. Hypermethylation of CpG cg11850659 and hypomethylation of CpG cg01149192 in combination predicted HR-NMIBC recurrence and/or progression within 1 year of diagnosis with 83% sensitivity, 79% specificity, and 83% positive and 79% negative predictive values. Conclusions: This is the first genome-wide DNA methylation analysis of a unique HR-NMIBC tumour cohort encompassing known 1-year clinical outcomes. Our analyses identified potential novel epigenetic markers that could help guide individual patient management in this clinically unpredictable disease.

  11. Modified Glasgow Prognostic Score is Associated With Risk of Recurrence in Bladder Cancer Patients After Radical Cystectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Matteo; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Buonerba, Carlo; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Capece, Marco; Bruzzese, Dario; Autorino, Riccardo; Bottero, Danilo; Cioffi, Antonio; Matei, Deliu Victor; Caraglia, Michele; Borghesi, Marco; De Berardinis, Ettore; Busetto, Gian Maria; Giovannone, Riccardo; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Ditonno, Pasquale; Perdonà, Sisto; Bove, Pierluigi; Castaldo, Luigi; Hurle, Rodolfo; Musi, Gennaro; Brescia, Antonio; Olivieri, Michele; Cimmino, Amelia; Altieri, Vincenzo; Damiano, Rocco; Cantiello, Francesco; Serretta, Vincenzo; De Placido, Sabino; Mirone, Vincenzo; Sonpavde, Guru; Terracciano, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recently, many studies explored the role of inflammation parameters in the prognosis of urinary cancers, but the results were not consistent. The modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS), a systemic inflammation marker, is a prognostic marker in various types of cancers. The aim of the present study was to investigate the usefulness of the preoperative mGPS as predictor of recurrence-free (RFS), overall (OS), and cancer-specific (CSS) survivals in a large cohort of urothelial bladder cancer (UBC) patients. A total of 1037 patients with UBC were included in this study with a median follow-up of 22 months (range 3–60 months). An mGPS = 0 was observed in 646 patients (62.3%), mGPS = 1 in 297 patients (28.6 %), and mGPS = 2 in 94 patients (9.1%). In our study cohort, subjects with an mGPS equal to 2 had a significantly shorter median RFS compared with subjects with mGPS equal to 1 (16 vs 19 months, hazard ratio [HR] 1.54, 95% CI 1.31–1.81, P < 0.001) or with subjects with mGPS equal to 0 (16 vs 29 months, HR 2.38, 95% CI 1.86–3.05, P < 0.001). The association between mGPS and RFS was confirmed by weighted multivariate Cox model. Although in univariate analysis higher mGPS was associated with lower OS and CSS, this association disappeared in multivariate analysis where only the presence of lymph node-positive bladder cancer and T4 stage were predictors of worse prognosis for OS and CSS. In conclusion, the mGPS is an easily measured and inexpensive prognostic marker that was significantly associated with RFS in UBC patients. PMID:26496339

  12. Modified Glasgow Prognostic Score is Associated With Risk of Recurrence in Bladder Cancer Patients After Radical Cystectomy: A Multicenter Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Matteo; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Buonerba, Carlo; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Capece, Marco; Bruzzese, Dario; Autorino, Riccardo; Bottero, Danilo; Cioffi, Antonio; Matei, Deliu Victor; Caraglia, Michele; Borghesi, Marco; De Berardinis, Ettore; Busetto, Gian Maria; Giovannone, Riccardo; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Ditonno, Pasquale; Perdonà, Sisto; Bove, Pierluigi; Castaldo, Luigi; Hurle, Rodolfo; Musi, Gennaro; Brescia, Antonio; Olivieri, Michele; Cimmino, Amelia; Altieri, Vincenzo; Damiano, Rocco; Cantiello, Francesco; Serretta, Vincenzo; De Placido, Sabino; Mirone, Vincenzo; Sonpavde, Guru; Terracciano, Daniela

    2015-10-01

    Recently, many studies explored the role of inflammation parameters in the prognosis of urinary cancers, but the results were not consistent. The modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS), a systemic inflammation marker, is a prognostic marker in various types of cancers. The aim of the present study was to investigate the usefulness of the preoperative mGPS as predictor of recurrence-free (RFS), overall (OS), and cancer-specific (CSS) survivals in a large cohort of urothelial bladder cancer (UBC) patients.A total of 1037 patients with UBC were included in this study with a median follow-up of 22 months (range 3-60 months). An mGPS = 0 was observed in 646 patients (62.3%), mGPS = 1 in 297 patients (28.6 %), and mGPS = 2 in 94 patients (9.1%).In our study cohort, subjects with an mGPS equal to 2 had a significantly shorter median RFS compared with subjects with mGPS equal to 1 (16 vs 19 months, hazard ratio [HR] 1.54, 95% CI 1.31-1.81, P < 0.001) or with subjects with mGPS equal to 0 (16 vs 29 months, HR 2.38, 95% CI 1.86-3.05, P < 0.001). The association between mGPS and RFS was confirmed by weighted multivariate Cox model. Although in univariate analysis higher mGPS was associated with lower OS and CSS, this association disappeared in multivariate analysis where only the presence of lymph node-positive bladder cancer and T4 stage were predictors of worse prognosis for OS and CSS.In conclusion, the mGPS is an easily measured and inexpensive prognostic marker that was significantly associated with RFS in UBC patients.

  13. Her-2/neu expression in node-negative breast cancer: direct tissue quantitation by computerized image analysis and association of overexpression with increased risk of recurrent disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Press, M F; Pike, M C; Chazin, V R; Hung, G; Udove, J A; Markowicz, M; Danyluk, J; Godolphin, W; Sliwkowski, M; Akita, R

    1993-10-15

    The HER-2/neu proto-oncogene (also known as c-erb B-2) is homologous with, but distinct from, the epidermal growth factor receptor. Amplification of this gene in node-positive breast cancers has been shown to correlate with both earlier relapse and shorter overall survival. In node-negative breast cancer patients, the subgroup for which accurate prognostic data could make a significant contribution to treatment decisions, the prognostic utility of HER-2/neu amplification and/or overexpression has been controversial. The purpose of this report is to address the issues surrounding this controversy and to evaluate the prognostic utility of overexpression in a carefully followed group of patients using appropriately characterized reagents and methods. In this report we present data from a study of HER-2/neu expression designed specifically to test whether or not overexpression is associated with an increased risk of recurrence in node-negative breast cancers. From a cohort of 704 women with node-negative breast cancer who experienced recurrent disease (relapsed cases) 105 were matched with 105 women with no recurrence (disease-free controls) after the equivalent follow-up period. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess HER-2/neu expression in archival tissue blocks from both relapsed cases and their matched disease-free controls. Importantly, a series of molecularly characterized breast cancer specimens were used to confirm that the antibody used was of sufficient sensitivity and specificity to identify those cancers overexpressing the HER-2/neu protein in this formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue cohort. In addition, a quantitative approach was developed to more accurately assess the amount of HER-2/neu protein identified by immunostaining tumor tissue. This was done using a purified HER-2/neu protein synthesized in a bacterial expression vector and protein lysates derived from a series of cell lines, engineered to express a defined range of HER-2/neu oncoprotein

  14. Severe Obesity Impacts Recurrence-Free Survival of Women with High-Risk Endometrial Cancer: Results of a French Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canlorbe, Geoffroy; Bendifallah, Sofiane; Raimond, Emilie; Graesslin, Olivier; Hudry, Delphine; Coutant, Charles; Touboul, Cyril; Bleu, Géraldine; Collinet, Pierre; Darai, Emile; Ballester, Marcos

    2015-08-01

    Studies focusing on the impact of obesity on survival in endometrial cancer (EC) have reported controversial results and few data exist on the impact of obesity on recurrence rate and recurrence-free survival (RFS). The aim of this study was to assess the impact of obesity on surgical staging and RFS in EC according to the European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) risk groups. Data of 729 women with EC who received primary surgical treatment between January 2000 and December 2012 were abstracted from a multicenter database. RFS distributions according to body mass index (BMI) in each ESMO risk group were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Survival was evaluated using the log-rank test, and the Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine influence of multiple variables. Distribution of the 729 women with EC according to BMI was BMI women with a BMI ≥ 35 (72 %) than for those with a BMI obese women in the low-/intermediate-risk groups, but a BMI ≥ 35 was independently correlated to a poorer RFS (hazard ratio 12.5; 95 % confidence interval 3.1-51.3) for women in the high-risk group. Severe obesity negatively impacts RFS in women with high-risk EC, underlining the importance of complete surgical staging and adapted adjuvant therapies in this subgroup of women.

  15. Ten Years of Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences, Improves Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... Nearly 7,000 women with early-stage, estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer were enrolled in the trial ...

  16. Clinicopathological risk factors for an invasive breast cancer recurrence after ductal carcinoma in situ - A nested case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Lindy L; Elshof, Lotte E; Schaapveld, Michael; Van de Vijver, Koen; Groen, Emma J; Almekinders, Mathilde M; Bierman, Carolien; Van Leeuwen, Flora E; Rutgers, Emiel J T; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Lips, Esther H; Wesseling, Jelle

    2018-04-23

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is treated to prevent progression to invasive breast cancer. Yet, most lesions will never progress, implying that overtreatment exists. Therefore, we aimed to identify factors distinguishing harmless from potentially hazardous DCIS using a nested case-control study. We conducted a case-control study nested in a population-based cohort of DCIS patients treated with breast conserving surgery (BCS) alone (n=2,658) between 1989-2005. We compared clinical, pathological, and immunohistochemical DCIS characteristics of 200 women who subsequently developed ipsilateral invasive breast cancer (iIBC; cases) and 474 women who did not (controls), in a matched setting. Median follow-up time was 12.0 years (interquartile range 9.0-15.3). Conditional logistic regression models, were used to assess associations of various factors with subsequent iIBC risk after primary DCIS. High COX-2 protein expression showed the strongest association with subsequent iIBC (odds ratio [OR]=2.97, 95% confidence interval [95%CI] 1.72-5.10). In addition, HER2 overexpression (OR=1.56, 95%CI 1.05-2.31) and presence of periductal fibrosis (OR=1.44, 95%CI 1.01-2.06) were associated with subsequent iIBC risk. Patients with HER2+/COX-2high DCIS had a 4-fold higher risk of subsequent iIBC (vs. HER2-/COX-2low DCIS), and an estimated 22.8% cumulative risk of developing subsequent iIBC at 15 years. With this unbiased study design and representative group of DCIS patients treated by BCS alone, COX-2, HER2, and periductal fibrosis were revealed as promising markers predicting progression of DCIS into iIBC. Validation will be done in independent data sets. Ultimately, this will aid individual risk stratification of women with primary DCIS. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Mammaglobin B is an independent prognostic marker in epithelial ovarian cancer and its expression is associated with reduced risk of disease recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tassi, Renata A; Todeschini, Paola; Romani, Chiara; Bandiera, Elisabetta; Zanotti, Laura; Pecorelli, Sergio; Santin, Alessandro D; Calza, Stefano; Ravaggi, Antonella; Bignotti, Eliana; Odicino, Franco E; Tognon, Germana; Donzelli, Carla; Falchetti, Marcella; Rossi, Elisa

    2009-01-01

    Traditional prognostic factors in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) are inadequate in predicting recurrence and long-term prognosis, but genome-wide cancer research has recently provided multiple potentially useful biomarkers. The gene codifying for Mammaglobin B (MGB-2) has been selected from our previous microarray analysis performed on 19 serous papillary epithelial ovarian cancers and its expression has been further investigated on multiple histological subtypes, both at mRNA and protein level. Since, to date, there is no information available on the prognostic significance of MGB-2 expression in cancer, the aim of this study was to determine its prognostic potential on survival in a large cohort of well-characterized EOC patients. MGB-2 expression was evaluated by quantitative real time-PCR in fresh-frozen tissue biopsies and was validated by immunohistochemistry in matched formalin fixed-paraffin embedded tissue samples derived from a total of 106 EOC patients and 27 controls. MGB-2 expression was then associated with the clinicopathologic features of the tumors and was correlated with clinical outcome. MGB-2 expression was found significantly elevated in EOC compared to normal ovarian controls, both at mRNA and protein level. A good correlation was detected between MGB-2 expression data obtained by the two different techniques. MGB-2 expressing tumors were significantly associated with several clinicopathologic characteristics defining a less aggressive tumor behavior. Univariate survival analysis revealed a decreased risk for cancer-related death, recurrence and disease progression in MGB-2-expressing patients (p < 0.05). Moreover, multivariate analysis indicated that high expression levels of MGB-2 transcript (HR = 0.25, 95%, 0.08–0.75, p = 0.014) as well as positive immunostaining for the protein (HR = 0.41, 95%CI, 0.17–0.99, p = 0.048) had an independent prognostic value for disease-free survival. This is the first report documenting that MGB-2

  18. The use of automated Ki67 analysis to predict Oncotype DX risk-of-recurrence categories in early-stage breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Satbir Singh; Li, Haocheng; Chan, Angela M Y; Tudor, Roxana; Bigras, Gilbert; Morris, Don; Enwere, Emeka K; Yang, Hua

    2018-01-01

    Ki67 is a commonly used marker of cancer cell proliferation, and has significant prognostic value in breast cancer. In spite of its clinical importance, assessment of Ki67 remains a challenge, as current manual scoring methods have high inter- and intra-user variability. A major reason for this variability is selection bias, in that different observers will score different regions of the same tumor. Here, we developed an automated Ki67 scoring method that eliminates selection bias, by using whole-slide analysis to identify and score the tumor regions with the highest proliferative rates. The Ki67 indices calculated using this method were highly concordant with manual scoring by a pathologist (Pearson's r = 0.909) and between users (Pearson's r = 0.984). We assessed the clinical validity of this method by scoring Ki67 from 328 whole-slide sections of resected early-stage, hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative breast cancer. All patients had Oncotype DX testing performed (Genomic Health) and available Recurrence Scores. High Ki67 indices correlated significantly with several clinico-pathological correlates, including higher tumor grade (1 versus 3, P<0.001), higher mitotic score (1 versus 3, P<0.001), and lower Allred scores for estrogen and progesterone receptors (P = 0.002, 0.008). High Ki67 indices were also significantly correlated with higher Oncotype DX risk-of-recurrence group (low versus high, P<0.001). Ki67 index was the major contributor to a machine learning model which, when trained solely on clinico-pathological data and Ki67 scores, identified Oncotype DX high- and low-risk patients with 97% accuracy, 98% sensitivity and 80% specificity. Automated scoring of Ki67 can thus successfully address issues of consistency, reproducibility and accuracy, in a manner that integrates readily into the workflow of a pathology laboratory. Furthermore, automated Ki67 scores contribute significantly to models that predict risk of

  19. The use of automated Ki67 analysis to predict Oncotype DX risk-of-recurrence categories in early-stage breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satbir Singh Thakur

    Full Text Available Ki67 is a commonly used marker of cancer cell proliferation, and has significant prognostic value in breast cancer. In spite of its clinical importance, assessment of Ki67 remains a challenge, as current manual scoring methods have high inter- and intra-user variability. A major reason for this variability is selection bias, in that different observers will score different regions of the same tumor. Here, we developed an automated Ki67 scoring method that eliminates selection bias, by using whole-slide analysis to identify and score the tumor regions with the highest proliferative rates. The Ki67 indices calculated using this method were highly concordant with manual scoring by a pathologist (Pearson's r = 0.909 and between users (Pearson's r = 0.984. We assessed the clinical validity of this method by scoring Ki67 from 328 whole-slide sections of resected early-stage, hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative breast cancer. All patients had Oncotype DX testing performed (Genomic Health and available Recurrence Scores. High Ki67 indices correlated significantly with several clinico-pathological correlates, including higher tumor grade (1 versus 3, P<0.001, higher mitotic score (1 versus 3, P<0.001, and lower Allred scores for estrogen and progesterone receptors (P = 0.002, 0.008. High Ki67 indices were also significantly correlated with higher Oncotype DX risk-of-recurrence group (low versus high, P<0.001. Ki67 index was the major contributor to a machine learning model which, when trained solely on clinico-pathological data and Ki67 scores, identified Oncotype DX high- and low-risk patients with 97% accuracy, 98% sensitivity and 80% specificity. Automated scoring of Ki67 can thus successfully address issues of consistency, reproducibility and accuracy, in a manner that integrates readily into the workflow of a pathology laboratory. Furthermore, automated Ki67 scores contribute significantly to models that

  20. Risk factors for recurrent spontaneous epistaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrich, Victor; Brozek, Annabelle; Boyle, Timothy R; Chyou, Po-Huang; Yale, Steven H

    2014-12-01

    To identify risk factors associated with spontaneous recurrent epistaxis. This was a retrospective cohort study assessing patients in the Marshfield Clinic system diagnosed as having epistaxis between January 1, 1991, and January 1, 2011. There were 461 cases with at least 2 episodes of spontaneous epistaxis within 3 years and 912 controls with only 1 episode in the same time frame. More than 50 potential risk factors were investigated, including demographic features, substance use, nasal anatomical abnormalities, nasal infectious and inflammatory processes, medical comorbidities, medications, and laboratory values. A Cox proportional hazards regression modeling approach was used to calculate hazard ratios of epistaxis recurrence. Traditional risk factors for epistaxis, including nasal perforation, nasal septum deviation, rhinitis, sinusitis, and upper respiratory tract infection, did not increase the risk of recurrence. Significant risk factors for recurrent epistaxis included congestive heart failure, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and a history of anemia. Warfarin use increased the risk of recurrence, independent of international normalized ratio. Aspirin and clopidogrel were not found to increase the risk of recurrence. Few major adverse cardiovascular events were observed within 30 days of the first epistaxis event. Congestive heart failure is an underappreciated risk factor for recurrent epistaxis. Hypertension and diabetes mellitus may induce atherosclerotic changes in the nasal vessels, making them friable and more at risk for bleeding. Patients with recurrent epistaxis may also be more susceptible to developing anemia. Physicians should promote antiplatelet and antithrombotic medication adherence despite an increased propensity for recurrent epistaxis to prevent major adverse cardiovascular events. Copyright © 2014 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification of Risk Factors for Locoregional Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients with Nodal Stage N0 and N1: Who Could Benefit from Post-Mastectomy Radiotherapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunjin Jwa

    Full Text Available The locoregional recurrence (LRR rate was reported as high as approximately 20% in stage I-II breast cancer following mastectomy. To investigate the risk factors for LRR in pT1-2N0-1 breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy but not radiation, and to define a subgroup of patients at high risk of LRR who may benefit from postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT.In total, 390 patients with pT1-2N0M0 (n = 307 and pT1-2N1M0 (n = 83 breast cancer who underwent total mastectomy without adjuvant radiotherapy from 2002 to 2011 were enrolled in the study.After a median follow-up period of 5.6 years (range, 0.6-11.3 years, 21 patients had 18 systemic relapses and 12 LRRs including six in the chest wall and eight in the regional nodal area. The 5-year LRR-free survival (LRRFS rates were 97.0% in pN0, 98.8% in pN1, and 97.4% in all patients. Multivariate analysis revealed that age < 50 years (Hazard Ratio, 11.4; p = 0.01 and no adjuvant chemotherapy (Hazard Ratio, 10.2; p = 0.04 were independent risk factors for LRR in pN0 patients. Using these factors, the 5-year LRRFS rates were 100% without any risk factors, 96.4% with one risk factor, and 86.7% with two risk factors. In pN1 patients, multivariate analysis revealed that having a hormone receptor negative tumor (Hazard Ratio, 18.3; p = 0.03 was the only independent risk factor for LRR. The 5-year LRRFS rates were 100.0% for luminal type, and 92.3% for non-luminal type cancer.Patients with pT1-2N0-1 breast cancer who underwent total mastectomy without PMRT could be stratified by nodal stage and risk factors for LRR. PMRT may have of value for node negative patients aged less than 50 years and who are not treated with adjuvant chemotherapy, and for non-luminal type patients with one to three positive nodes.

  2. Time latencies of Helicobacter pylori eradication after peptic ulcer and risk of recurrent ulcer, ulcer adverse events, and gastric cancer: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverdén, Emma; Brusselaers, Nele; Wahlin, Karl; Lagergren, Jesper

    2017-12-09

    Helicobacter pylori is associated with peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Therefore we wanted to test how various lengths of delays in H pylori eradication therapy influence the risk of recurrent peptic ulcer, ulcer adverse events, and gastric cancer. This population-based nationwide Swedish cohort study included 29,032 patients receiving H pylori eradication therapy after peptic ulcer disease in 2005 to 2013. Predefined time intervals between date of peptic ulcer diagnosis and date of eradication therapy were analyzed in relation to study outcomes. Cox regression provided hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs), adjusted for age, sex, comorbidity, history of ulcer disease, use of ulcerogenic drugs, and use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Compared with eradication therapy within 7 days of peptic ulcer diagnosis, eradication therapy within 8 to 30, 31 to 60, 61 to 365, and >365 days corresponded with HRs of recurrent ulcer of 1.17 (95% CI, 1.08-1.25), 2.37 (95% CI, 2.16-2.59), 2.96 (95% CI, 2.76-3.16), and 3.55 (95% CI, 3.33-3.79), respectively. The corresponding HRs for complicated ulcer were 1.55 (95% CI, 1.35-1.78), 3.19 (95% CI, 2.69-3.78), 4.00 (95% CI, 3.51-4.55), and 6.14, (95% CI, 5.47-6.89), respectively. For gastric cancer the corresponding HRs were .85 (95% CI, .32-2.23), 1.31 (95% CI, .31-5.54), 3.64 (95% CI, 1.55-8.56), and 4.71 (95% CI, 2.36-9.38), respectively. Delays in H pylori eradication therapy after peptic ulcer diagnosis time-dependently increase the risk of recurrent ulcer, even more so for complicated ulcer, starting from delays of 8 to 30 days. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Radiotherapy of Recurrent Uterine Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Sung Whan; Park, Charn Il; Chai, Kyu Young; Kang, Soon Beom; Lee, Hyo Pyo; Shin, Myon Woo

    1987-01-01

    Forty seven patients with locally recurrent uterine cerival cancer after surgery were treated with radiation during the 6 year period from 1979 through 1984 at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology of Seoul National University Hospital. In 30 out of the 47 patients, recurrence was diagnosed within 2 years after surgery. Site of recurrence was vagina in 19 patients, vagina and parametrium in 21 patients and parametrium only in 7 patients. Complete tumor control was achieved in 35 patients (74.5%) ; the complete response rates were 94.7% (18/19( in vaginal recurrences, 57.1% (12/21) in combined vaginal and parametrial recurrences and 71.4% (5/7) in parametrial recurrences. Overall and disease free survival rates at 4 years were 55.2 and 50.1 percent, respectively, for entire group. Overall 4 year survival rates were 77.0% for vaginal recurrences, 44.1% for vaginal and parametrial recurrences and 42.9% for parametrial recurrences. When the disease extent was classified in the same way as the staging system of FIGO, the 4 year survival was 80.4, 73.0, 25.0 and 0 percent for stage IIa, IIb and IVa, respectively

  4. Recurrence risk of ictal asystole in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, Kevin G; Thijs, Roland D; Elger, Christian E; Surges, Rainer

    2017-08-22

    To determine the recurrence risk of ictal asystole (IA) and its determining factors in people with epilepsy. We performed a systematic review of published cases with IA in 3 databases and additionally searched our local database for patients with multiple seizures simultaneously recorded with ECG and EEG and at least one IA. IA recurrence risk was estimated by including all seizures without knowledge of the chronological order. Various clinical features were assessed by an individual patient data meta-analysis. A random mixed effect logistic regression model was applied to estimate the average recurrence risk of IA. Plausibility of the calculated IA recurrence risk was checked by analyzing the local dataset with available information in chronological order. Eighty patients with 182 IA in 537 seizures were included. Recurrence risk of IA amounted to 40% (95% confidence interval [CI] 32%-50%). None of the clinical factors (age, sex, type and duration of epilepsy, hemispheric lateralization, duration of IA per patient) appeared to have a significant effect on the short-term recurrence risk of IA. When considering the local dataset only, IA recurrence risk was estimated to 30% (95% CI 14%-53%). Information whether IA coincided with symptoms (i.e., syncope) or not was given in 60 patients: 100 out of 142 IAs were symptomatic. Our data suggest that in case of clinically suspected IA, the recording of 1 or 2 seizures is not sufficient to rule out IA. Furthermore, the high short-term recurrence risk favors aggressive treatment, including pacemaker implantation if seizure freedom cannot be achieved. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  5. Selecting breast cancer patients with T1-T2 tumors and one to three positive axillary nodes at high postmastectomy locoregional recurrence risk for adjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truong, Pauline T.; Olivotto, Ivo A.; Kader, Hosam A.; Panades, Miguel; Speers, Caroline H.; Berthelet, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To define the individual factors and combinations of factors associated with increased risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) that may justify postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in patients with T1-T2 breast cancer and one to three positive nodes. Methods and Materials: The study cohort comprised 821 women referred to the British Columbia Cancer Agency between 1989 and 1997 with pathologic T1-T2 breast cancer and one to three positive nodes treated with mastectomy without adjuvant RT. The 10-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of isolated LRR and LRR with or without simultaneous distant recurrence (LRR ± SDR) were analyzed according to age, histologic findings, tumor location, size, and grade, lymphovascular invasion status, estrogen receptor (ER) status, margin status, number of positive nodes, number of nodes removed, percentage of positive nodes, and systemic therapy use. Multivariate analyses were performed using Cox proportional hazards modeling. A risk classification model was developed using combinations of the statistically significant factors identified on multivariate analysis. Results: The median follow-up was 7.7 years. Systemic therapy was used in 94% of patients. Overall, the 10-year Kaplan-Meier isolated LRR and LRR ± SDR rate was 12.7% and 15.9%, respectively. Without PMRT, a 10-year LRR risk of >20% was identified in women with one to three positive nodes plus at least one of the following factors: age 25% of nodes positive (all p 25% of nodes positive, medial tumor location, and ER-negative status were statistically significant predictors of isolated LRR and LRR ± SDR. In the classification model, the first split was according to age ( 25% of nodes positive was associated with a risk of LRR ± SDR of 58.0% compared with 23.8% for those with ≤25% of nodes positive (p = 0.01). Of 698 women >45 years, the presence of >25% of nodes positive also conferred a greater LRR ± SDR risk (26.7%) compared with women with ≤25% of nodes positive (10

  6. The Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment (CAPRA) score predicts biochemical recurrence in intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) dose escalation or low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Vimal; Delouya, Guila; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Larrivée, Sandra; Taussky, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    To study the prognostic value of the University of California, San Francisco Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment (CAPRA) score to predict biochemical failure (bF) after various doses of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and/or permanent seed low-dose rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy (PB). We retrospectively analysed 345 patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer, with PSA levels of 10-20 ng/mL and/or Gleason 7 including 244 EBRT patients (70.2-79.2 Gy) and 101 patients treated with LDR PB. The minimum follow-up was 3 years. No patient received primary androgen-deprivation therapy. bF was defined according to the Phoenix definition. Cox regression analysis was used to estimate the differences between CAPRA groups. The overall bF rate was 13% (45/345). The CAPRA score, as a continuous variable, was statistically significant in multivariate analysis for predicting bF (hazard ratio [HR] 1.37, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.10-1.72, P = 0.006). There was a trend for a lower bF rate in patients treated with LDR PB when compared with those treated by EBRT ≤ 74 Gy (HR 0.234, 95% CI 0.05-1.03, P = 0.055) in multivariate analysis. In the subgroup of patients with a CAPRA score of 3-5, CAPRA remained predictive of bF as a continuous variable (HR 1.51, 95% CI 1.01-2.27, P = 0.047) in multivariate analysis. The CAPRA score is useful for predicting biochemical recurrence in patients treated for intermediate-risk prostate cancer with EBRT or LDR PB. It could help in treatment decisions. © 2013 The Authors. BJU International © 2013 BJU International.

  7. New Diagnostic and Therapeutic Approaches to Eradicating Recurrent Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    barcode vectors, which allows for PCR amplification of barcodes from genomic DNA . To identify and quantify relative abundance of each clonal population...Define tumor cell hallmarks that predict risk of breast cancer recurrence a. Identify human breast cancer barcoded DTCs that convert to malignancy in...xenograft mouse models of metastasis – 100% complete in one model; 40% complete for bone metastasis model b. Identify mouse Her2+ barcoded DTCs that

  8. Management of recurrent or metastatic thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Makoto

    2018-01-01

    Recently, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have become available for the treatment of recurrent or metastatic thyroid cancer. However, a number of clinical challenges that impact the use of VEGFR-targeted TKI in daily clinical practice have arisen. Toxicity is considerable, to the extent that most physicians hesitate to start VEGFR-targeted TKI and prefer to continue a watch-and-wait approach until the patient's disease markedly worsens. This delayed use of VEGFR-targeted TKI leads to a higher incidence of serious adverse events than was reported in clinical trials. Moreover, the watch-and-wait approach has several demerits, including a worsening of quality of life, worsening of outcomes in patients of older age or with follicular thyroid cancer and increased risk of brain metastasis or bleeding. Thus, optimal timing for the start of VEGFR-targeted TKI requires careful consideration. Moreover, management of VEGFR-targeted TKI toxicities requires appropriate supportive care, well-organised infrastructure in the outpatient clinic and patient education. Future treatment will progress to precision medicine based on molecular testing. Promotion of precision medicine requires the establishment of a system of easy access to molecular testing and the promotion of translational research for the development of new drugs.

  9. A Review of Current Machine Learning Methods Used for Cancer Recurrence Modeling and Prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemphill, Geralyn M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-27

    Cancer has been characterized as a heterogeneous disease consisting of many different subtypes. The early diagnosis and prognosis of a cancer type has become a necessity in cancer research. A major challenge in cancer management is the classification of patients into appropriate risk groups for better treatment and follow-up. Such risk assessment is critically important in order to optimize the patient’s health and the use of medical resources, as well as to avoid cancer recurrence. This paper focuses on the application of machine learning methods for predicting the likelihood of a recurrence of cancer. It is not meant to be an extensive review of the literature on the subject of machine learning techniques for cancer recurrence modeling. Other recent papers have performed such a review, and I will rely heavily on the results and outcomes from these papers. The electronic databases that were used for this review include PubMed, Google, and Google Scholar. Query terms used include “cancer recurrence modeling”, “cancer recurrence and machine learning”, “cancer recurrence modeling and machine learning”, and “machine learning for cancer recurrence and prediction”. The most recent and most applicable papers to the topic of this review have been included in the references. It also includes a list of modeling and classification methods to predict cancer recurrence.

  10. Prediction of risk of distant recurrence using the 21-gene recurrence score in node-negative and node-positive postmenopausal patients with breast cancer treated with anastrozole or tamoxifen: a TransATAC study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowsett, Mitch; Cuzick, Jack; Wale, Christopher; Forbes, John; Mallon, Elizabeth A; Salter, Janine; Quinn, Emma; Dunbier, Anita; Baum, Michael; Buzdar, Aman; Howell, Anthony; Bugarini, Roberto; Baehner, Frederick L; Shak, Steven

    2010-04-10

    PURPOSE To determine whether the Recurrence Score (RS) provided independent information on risk of distant recurrence (DR) in the tamoxifen and anastrozole arms of the Arimidex, Tamoxifen, Alone or in Combination (ATAC) Trial. PATIENTS AND METHODS RNA was extracted from 1,372 tumor blocks from postmenopausal patients with hormone receptor-positive primary breast cancer in the monotherapy arms of ATAC. Twenty-one genes were assessed by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and the RS was calculated. Cox proportional hazards models assessed the value of adding RS to a model with clinical variables (age, tumor size, grade, and treatment) in node-negative (N0) and node-positive (N+) women. RESULTS Reportable scores were available from 1,231 evaluable patients (N0, n = 872; N+, n = 306; and node status unknown, n = 53); 72, 74, and six DRs occurred in N0, N+, and node status unknown patients, respectively. For both N0 and N+ patients, RS was significantly associated with time to DR in multivariate analyses (P or = 31) groups were 4%, 12%, and 25%, respectively, in N0 patients and 17%, 28%, and 49%, respectively, in N+ patients. The prognostic value of RS was similar in anastrozole- and tamoxifen-treated patients. CONCLUSION This study confirmed the performance of RS in postmenopausal HR+ patients treated with tamoxifen in a large contemporary population and demonstrated that RS is an independent predictor of DR in N0 and N+ hormone receptor-positive patients treated with anastrozole, adding value to estimates with standard clinicopathologic features.

  11. Fear of cancer recurrence in colorectal cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Custers, J.A.E.; Gielissen, M.F.M.; Janssen, S.H.; Wilt, J.H.W. de; Prins, J.B.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Although long-term colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors generally report a good quality of life, fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) remains an important issue. This study investigated whether the Cancer Worry Scale (CWS) can detect high FCR, the prevalence, and characteristics of FCR in CRC

  12. Current management of locally recurrent rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Bak; Laurberg, Søren; Holm, Thorbjörn

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: A review of the literature was undertaken to provide an overview of the surgical management of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC) after the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME). Method: A systematic literature search was undertaken using PubMed, Embase, Web...

  13. FLUORESCENCE DIAGNOSIS FOR RECURRENT BLADDER CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. V. Ulyanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical case of successful use of local fluorescence spectroscopy combined with fluorescence imaging during cystoscopy for diagnosis of recurrent bladder cancer is represented in the article. Histological study of fluorescent foci confirmed tumor growth (urothelial carcinoma in all areas with high levels of diagnostic parameter. In the fluorescent focus with low diagnostic parameter inflammation was detected.

  14. Is Biological Subtype Prognostic of Locoregional Recurrence Risk in Women With pT1-2N0 Breast Cancer Treated With Mastectomy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truong, Pauline T., E-mail: ptruong@bccancer.bc.ca [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Sadek, Betro T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Lesperance, Maria F. [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Alexander, Cheryl S. [Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Shenouda, Mina; Raad, Rita Abi; Taghian, Alphonse G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To examine locoregional and distant recurrence (LRR and DR) in women with pT1-2N0 breast cancer according to approximated subtype and clinicopathologic characteristics. Methods and Materials: Two independent datasets were pooled and analyzed. The study participants were 1994 patients with pT1-2N0M0 breast cancer, treated with mastectomy without radiation therapy. The patients were classified into 1 of 5 subtypes: luminal A (ER+ or PR+/HER 2−/grade 1-2, n=1202); luminal B (ER+ or PR+/HER 2−/grade 3, n=294); luminal HER 2 (ER+ or PR+/HER 2+, n=221); HER 2 (ER−/PR−/HER 2+, n=105) and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) (ER−/PR−/HER 2−, n=172). Results: The median follow-up time was 4.3 years. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier (KM) LRR were 1.8% in luminal A, 3.1% in luminal B, 1.7% in luminal HER 2, 1.9% in HER 2, and 1.9% in TNBC cohorts (P=.81). The 5-year KM DR was highest among women with TNBC: 1.8% in luminal A, 5.0% in luminal B, 2.4% in luminal HER 2, 1.1% in HER 2, and 9.6% in TNBC cohorts (P<.001). Among 172 women with TNBC, the 5-year KM LRR were 1.3% with clear margins versus 12.5% with close or positive margins (P=.04). On multivariable analysis, factors that conferred higher LRR risk were tumors >2 cm, lobular histology, and close/positive surgical margins. Conclusions: The 5-year risk of LRR in our pT1-2N0 cohort treated with mastectomy was generally low, with no significant differences observed between approximated subtypes. Among the subtypes, TNBC conferred the highest risk of DR and an elevated risk of LRR in the presence of positive or close margins. Our data suggest that although subtype alone cannot be used as the sole criterion to offer postmastectomy radiation therapy, it may reasonably be considered in conjunction with other clinicopathologic factors including tumor size, histology, and margin status. Larger cohorts and longer follow-up times are needed to define which women with node-negative disease have high postmastectomy LRR

  15. Recurrent Shoulder Dystocia: Risk Factors and Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurewitsch Allen, Edith D

    2016-12-01

    A prior history of delivery complicated by shoulder dystocia confers a 6-fold to nearly 30-fold increased risk of shoulder dystocia recurrence in a subsequent vaginal delivery, with most reported rates between 12% and 17%. Whereas prevention of shoulder dystocia in the general population is neither feasible nor cost-effective, directing intervention efforts at the particular subgroup of women with a prior history of shoulder dystocia has merit. Potentially modifiable risk factors and individualized management strategies that may reduce shoulder dystocia recurrence and its associated significant morbidities are reviewed.

  16. Follow-up of patients with thyroglobulin-antibodies : Rising Tg-Ab trend is a risk factor for recurrence of differentiated thyroid cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Meer, Siegrid G A; Vorselaars, Wessel M C M; Kist, Jakob W; Stokkel, Marcel P M; de Keizer, Bart; Valk, Gerlof D; Borel Rinkes, Inne H M; Vriens, Menno R

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Differentiated thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy. Recurrences (5-20%) are the main reason for follow-up. Thyroglobulin (Tg) has proven to be an excellent disease marker, but thyroglobulin-antibodies (Tg-Ab) may interfere with Tg measurement, leading to over or

  17. Towards personalized follow-up : a conditional prediction model and nomogram for risk of locoregional recurrence in early breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveen, Annemieke; Vliegen, Ingrid; Sonke, G.S.; Klaase, J.M.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Siesling, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to develop and validate a conditional logistic regression model for the prediction of locoregional recurrence (LRR) of breast cancer. To make a translation to clinical practice a web based nomogram was made. Methods Women first diagnosed with early breast

  18. Comparison of Oncotype DX® Recurrence Score® with other risk assessment tools including the Nottingham Prognostic Index in the identification of patients with low-risk invasive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Maura Bríd; Dakin, Alex; Maguire, Aoife; Walshe, Janice M; Kennedy, M John; Dunne, Barbara; Riain, Ciarán Ó; Quinn, Cecily M

    2017-09-01

    Oncotype DX® is a gene expression assay that quantifies the risk of distant recurrence in patients with hormone receptor positive early breast cancer, publicly funded in Ireland since 2011. The aim of this study was to correlate Oncotype DX® risk groupings with traditional histopathological parameters and the results of other risk assessment tools including Recurrence Score-Pathology-Clinical (RSPC), Adjuvant Risk Index (Adj RI), Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI) and the Adjuvant! Online 10-year score (AO). Patients were retrospectively identified from the histopathology databases of two Irish hospitals and patient and tumour characteristics collated. Associations between categorical variables were evaluated with Pearson's chi-square test. Correlations were calculated using Spearman's correlation coefficient and concordance using Lin's concordance correlation coefficient. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software, version 22.0.In our 300 patient cohort, Oncotype DX® classified 59.7% (n = 179) as low, 30% (n = 90) as intermediate, and 10.3% (n = 31) as high risk. Overall concordance between the RS and RSPC, Adj RI, NPI, and AO was 67.3% (n = 202), 56.3% (n = 169), 59% (n = 177), and 36.3% (n = 109), respectively. All risk assessment tools classified the majority of patients as low risk apart from the AO 10-year score, with RSPC classifying the highest number of patients as low risk. This study demonstrates that there is good correlation between the RS and scores obtained using alternative risk tools. Concordance with NPI is strong, particularly in the low-risk group. NPI, calculated from traditional clinicopathological characteristics, is a reliable alternative to Oncotype DX® in the identification of low-risk patients who may avoid adjuvant chemotherapy.

  19. Locoregional Recurrence Risk for Patients With T1,2 Breast Cancer With 1-3 Positive Lymph Nodes Treated With Mastectomy and Systemic Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBride, Andrew; Allen, Pamela; Woodward, Wendy; Kim, Michelle; Kuerer, Henry M.; Drinka, Eva Katherine; Sahin, Aysegul; Strom, Eric A.; Buzdar, Aman; Valero, Vicente; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) has been shown to benefit breast cancer patients with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes, but it is unclear how modern changes in management have affected the benefits of PMRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates in 1027 patients with T1,2 breast cancer with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes treated with mastectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy with or without PMRT during an early era (1978-1997) and a later era (2000-2007). These eras were selected because they represented periods before and after the routine use of sentinel lymph node surgery, taxane chemotherapy, and aromatase inhibitors. Results: 19% of 505 patients treated in the early era and 25% of the 522 patients in the later era received PMRT. Patients who received PMRT had significantly higher-risk disease features. PMRT reduced the rate of LRR in the early era cohort, with 5-year rates of 9.5% without PMRT and 3.4% with PMRT (log-rank P=.028) and 15-year rates 14.5% versus 6.1%, respectively; (Cox regression analysis: adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] 0.37, P=.035). However, PMRT did not appear to benefit patients treated in the later cohort, with 5-year LRR rates of 2.8% without PMRT and 4.2% with PMRT (P=.48; Cox analysis: AHR 1.41, P=.48). The most significant factor predictive of LRR for the patients who did not receive PMRT was the era in which the patient was treated (AHR 0.35 for later era, P<.001). Conclusion: The risk of LRR for patients with T1,2 breast cancer with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes treated with mastectomy and systemic treatment is highly dependent on the era of treatment. Modern treatment advances and the selected use of PMRT for those with high-risk features have allowed for identification of a cohort at very low risk for LRR without PMRT

  20. Locoregional Recurrence Risk for Patients With T1,2 Breast Cancer With 1-3 Positive Lymph Nodes Treated With Mastectomy and Systemic Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBride, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of Arizona School of Medicine, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Allen, Pamela; Woodward, Wendy; Kim, Michelle [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kuerer, Henry M. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Drinka, Eva Katherine; Sahin, Aysegul [Department of Pathology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Strom, Eric A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Buzdar, Aman; Valero, Vicente; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hunt, Kelly K. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A., E-mail: tbuchhol@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) has been shown to benefit breast cancer patients with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes, but it is unclear how modern changes in management have affected the benefits of PMRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates in 1027 patients with T1,2 breast cancer with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes treated with mastectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy with or without PMRT during an early era (1978-1997) and a later era (2000-2007). These eras were selected because they represented periods before and after the routine use of sentinel lymph node surgery, taxane chemotherapy, and aromatase inhibitors. Results: 19% of 505 patients treated in the early era and 25% of the 522 patients in the later era received PMRT. Patients who received PMRT had significantly higher-risk disease features. PMRT reduced the rate of LRR in the early era cohort, with 5-year rates of 9.5% without PMRT and 3.4% with PMRT (log-rank P=.028) and 15-year rates 14.5% versus 6.1%, respectively; (Cox regression analysis: adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] 0.37, P=.035). However, PMRT did not appear to benefit patients treated in the later cohort, with 5-year LRR rates of 2.8% without PMRT and 4.2% with PMRT (P=.48; Cox analysis: AHR 1.41, P=.48). The most significant factor predictive of LRR for the patients who did not receive PMRT was the era in which the patient was treated (AHR 0.35 for later era, P<.001). Conclusion: The risk of LRR for patients with T1,2 breast cancer with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes treated with mastectomy and systemic treatment is highly dependent on the era of treatment. Modern treatment advances and the selected use of PMRT for those with high-risk features have allowed for identification of a cohort at very low risk for LRR without PMRT.

  1. Is Biological Subtype Prognostic of Locoregional Recurrence Risk in Women With pT1-2N0 Breast Cancer Treated With Mastectomy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truong, Pauline T.; Sadek, Betro T.; Lesperance, Maria F.; Alexander, Cheryl S.; Shenouda, Mina; Raad, Rita Abi; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To examine locoregional and distant recurrence (LRR and DR) in women with pT1-2N0 breast cancer according to approximated subtype and clinicopathologic characteristics. Methods and Materials: Two independent datasets were pooled and analyzed. The study participants were 1994 patients with pT1-2N0M0 breast cancer, treated with mastectomy without radiation therapy. The patients were classified into 1 of 5 subtypes: luminal A (ER+ or PR+/HER 2−/grade 1-2, n=1202); luminal B (ER+ or PR+/HER 2−/grade 3, n=294); luminal HER 2 (ER+ or PR+/HER 2+, n=221); HER 2 (ER−/PR−/HER 2+, n=105) and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) (ER−/PR−/HER 2−, n=172). Results: The median follow-up time was 4.3 years. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier (KM) LRR were 1.8% in luminal A, 3.1% in luminal B, 1.7% in luminal HER 2, 1.9% in HER 2, and 1.9% in TNBC cohorts (P=.81). The 5-year KM DR was highest among women with TNBC: 1.8% in luminal A, 5.0% in luminal B, 2.4% in luminal HER 2, 1.1% in HER 2, and 9.6% in TNBC cohorts (P 2 cm, lobular histology, and close/positive surgical margins. Conclusions: The 5-year risk of LRR in our pT1-2N0 cohort treated with mastectomy was generally low, with no significant differences observed between approximated subtypes. Among the subtypes, TNBC conferred the highest risk of DR and an elevated risk of LRR in the presence of positive or close margins. Our data suggest that although subtype alone cannot be used as the sole criterion to offer postmastectomy radiation therapy, it may reasonably be considered in conjunction with other clinicopathologic factors including tumor size, histology, and margin status. Larger cohorts and longer follow-up times are needed to define which women with node-negative disease have high postmastectomy LRR risks in contemporary practice

  2. Manganese superoxide dismutase and breast cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P; Christensen, Mariann; Lash, Timothy L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) inhibits oxidative damage and cancer therapy effectiveness. A polymorphism in its encoding gene (SOD2: Val16Ala rs4880) may confer poorer breast cancer survival, but data are inconsistent. We examined the association of SOD2 genotype and breast......-metastatic breast cancer from 1990-2001, received adjuvant Cyclo, and were registered in the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group. We identified 118 patients with BCR and 213 matched breast cancer controls. We genotyped SOD2 and used conditional logistic regression to compute the odds ratio (OR) and associated 95...... cancer recurrence (BCR) among patients treated with cyclophosphamide-based chemotherapy (Cyclo). We compared our findings with published studies using meta-analyses. METHODS: We conducted a population-based case-control study of BCR among women in Jutland, Denmark. Subjects were diagnosed with non...

  3. Prospective Evaluation of Intraprostatic Inflammation and Focal Atrophy as a Predictor of Risk of High-Grade Prostate Cancer and Recurrence after Prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    the risk of cancer (e.g., gastritis -associated stomach cancer, colitis-associated gastric cancer, and hepatitis-associated liver cancer), its effect...Parra R, Rouse S, Waldstreicher J, Epstein JI. Does long-term finasteride therapy affect the histologic features of benign prostatic tissue and

  4. Pelvic Lymph Node Status Assessed by 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Predicts Low-Risk Group for Distant Recurrence in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: A Prospective Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Sokbom; Park, Jung-Yeol; Lim, Myung-Chul; Song, Yong-Joong; Park, Se-Hyun; Kim, Seok-Ki; Chung, Dae-Chul; Seo, Sang-Soo; Kim, Joo-Young; Park, Sang-Yoon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a prediction model to identify a low-risk group for distant recurrence in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated by concurrent chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Prospectively, 62 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were recruited as a training cohort. Clinical variables and parameters obtained from positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging were analyzed by logistic regression. For the test set, 54 patients were recruited independently. To identify the low-risk group, negative likelihood ratio (LR) less than 0.2 was set to be a cutoff. Results: Among the training cohort, multivariate logistic analysis revealed that advanced International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage and a high serum squamous cancer cell (SCC) antigen level were significant risk factors (p = 0.015 and 0.025, respectively). Using the two parameters, criteria to determine a low-risk subset for distant recurrence were postulated: (1) FIGO Stage IIB or less and (2) pretreatment SCC < 2.4 (Model A). Positive pelvic node on PET completely predicted all cases with distant recurrence and thus was considered as another prediction model (Model B). In the test cohort, although Model A did not showed diagnostic performance, Model B completely predicted all cases with distant recurrence and showed a sensitivity of 100% with negative LR of 0. Across the training and test cohort (n = 116), the false negative rate was 0 (95% confidence interval 0%-7.6%). Conclusions: Positive pelvic node on PET is a useful marker in prediction of distant recurrence in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who are treated with concurrent chemoradiation.

  5. Analysis of intravesical recurrence after bladder-preserving therapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozawa, Mizuki; Miyanaga, Naoto; Hinotsu, Shiro

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the pattern of recurrences after bladder-preserving therapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. The subjects were 77 patients with T2-3N0M0 bladder cancer whose bladder was preserved by intra-arterial chemotherapy and radiation. The patterns of the first recurrences were retrospectively analyzed. With a median follow-up of 38.5 months, 17 patients (22.1%) experienced intravesical recurrence without metastasis, 14 (82.4%) of which were cases of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrence and 3 (17.6%) of which were muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrences. Muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurred at the same site as the initial tumor site in all three cases, whereas non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurred at different sites in 64% of the patients in that group. The peak hazard of the non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrence was observed at around a year after treatment. Recurrent non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer was of a significantly lower histological grade with lower Ki-67-labeling indices than the initial muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Twelve (85.7%) of 14 patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrence achieved disease-free status. The multivariate analysis revealed that multiplicity, grade and tumor size were significantly correlated with the recurrence (P=0.0001, 0.0442 and 0.0412, respectively). Most of the recurrences after bladder-preserving therapy were cases of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. The recurrence pattern and characteristics of the tumors did not differ from those of primary non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Patients with high-risk factors would be candidates for prophylactic intravesical therapy for non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrence. (author)

  6. Predictors of 30-day mortality and the risk of recurrent systemic thromboembolism in cancer patients suffering acute ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Woong Nam

    Full Text Available Stroke in cancer patients is not rare but is a devastating event with high mortality. However, the predictors of mortality in stroke patients with cancer have not been well addressed. D-dimer could be a useful predictor because it can reflect both thromboembolic events and advanced stages of cancer.In this study, we evaluate the possibility of D-dimer as a predictor of 30-day mortality in stroke patients with active cancer.We included 210 ischemic stroke patients with active cancer. The 30-day mortality data were collected by reviewing medical records. We also collected follow-up D-dimer levels in 106 (50% participants to evaluate the effects of treatment response on D-dimer levels.Of the 210 participants, 30-day mortality occurred in 28 (13% patients. Higher initial NIHSS scores, D-dimer levels, and CRP levels as well as frequent cryptogenic mechanism, systemic metastasis, multiple vascular territory lesion, hemorrhagic transformation, and larger infarct volume were related to 30-day mortality. In the multivariate analysis, D-dimer [adjusted OR (aOR = 2.19; 95% CI, 1.46-3.28, P < 0.001] predicted 30-day mortality after adjusting for confounders. The initial NIHSS score (aOR = 1.07; 95% CI, 1.00-1.14, P = 0.043 and hemorrhagic transformation (aOR = 3.02; 95% CI, 1.10-8.29, P = 0.032 were also significant independent of D-dimer levels. In the analysis of D-dimer changes after treatment, the mortality group showed no significant decrease in D-dimer levels, despite treatment, while the survivor group showed the opposite response.D-dimer levels may predict 30-day mortality in acute ischemic stroke patients with active cancer.

  7. Predictors of 30-day mortality and the risk of recurrent systemic thromboembolism in cancer patients suffering acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ki-Woong; Kim, Chi Kyung; Kim, Tae Jung; An, Sang Joon; Oh, Kyungmi; Mo, Heejung; Kang, Min Kyoung; Han, Moon-Ku; Demchuk, Andrew M; Ko, Sang-Bae; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2017-01-01

    Stroke in cancer patients is not rare but is a devastating event with high mortality. However, the predictors of mortality in stroke patients with cancer have not been well addressed. D-dimer could be a useful predictor because it can reflect both thromboembolic events and advanced stages of cancer. In this study, we evaluate the possibility of D-dimer as a predictor of 30-day mortality in stroke patients with active cancer. We included 210 ischemic stroke patients with active cancer. The 30-day mortality data were collected by reviewing medical records. We also collected follow-up D-dimer levels in 106 (50%) participants to evaluate the effects of treatment response on D-dimer levels. Of the 210 participants, 30-day mortality occurred in 28 (13%) patients. Higher initial NIHSS scores, D-dimer levels, and CRP levels as well as frequent cryptogenic mechanism, systemic metastasis, multiple vascular territory lesion, hemorrhagic transformation, and larger infarct volume were related to 30-day mortality. In the multivariate analysis, D-dimer [adjusted OR (aOR) = 2.19; 95% CI, 1.46-3.28, P mortality after adjusting for confounders. The initial NIHSS score (aOR = 1.07; 95% CI, 1.00-1.14, P = 0.043) and hemorrhagic transformation (aOR = 3.02; 95% CI, 1.10-8.29, P = 0.032) were also significant independent of D-dimer levels. In the analysis of D-dimer changes after treatment, the mortality group showed no significant decrease in D-dimer levels, despite treatment, while the survivor group showed the opposite response. D-dimer levels may predict 30-day mortality in acute ischemic stroke patients with active cancer.

  8. Prostate tissue metal levels and prostate cancer recurrence in smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Kandegedara, Ashoka; Kryvenko, Oleksandr N; Gupta, Nilesh; Rogers, Craig; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Dou, Q Ping; Mitra, Bharati

    2014-02-01

    Although smoking is not associated with prostate cancer risk overall, smoking is associated with prostate cancer recurrence and mortality. Increased cadmium (Cd) exposure from smoking may play a role in progression of the disease. In this study, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to determine Cd, arsenic (As), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) levels in formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tumor and tumor-adjacent non-neoplastic tissue of never- and ever-smokers with prostate cancer. In smokers, metal levels were also evaluated with regard to biochemical and distant recurrence of disease. Smokers (N = 25) had significantly higher Cd (median ppb, p = 0.03) and lower Zn (p = 0.002) in non-neoplastic tissue than never-smokers (N = 21). Metal levels were not significantly different in tumor tissue of smokers and non-smokers. Among smokers, Cd level did not differ by recurrence status. However, the ratio of Cd ppb to Pb ppb was significantly higher in both tumor and adjacent tissue of cases with distant recurrence when compared with cases without distant recurrence (tumor tissue Cd/Pb, 6.36 vs. 1.19, p = 0.009, adjacent non-neoplastic tissue Cd/Pb, 6.36 vs. 1.02, p = 0.038). Tissue Zn levels were also higher in smokers with distant recurrence (tumor, p = 0.039 and adjacent non-neoplastic, p = 0.028). These initial findings suggest that prostate tissue metal levels may differ in smokers with and without recurrence. If these findings are confirmed in larger studies, additional work will be needed to determine whether variations in metal levels are drivers of disease progression or are simply passengers of the disease process.

  9. Recurrent mutation testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in Asian breast cancer patients identify carriers in those with presumed low risk by family history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Peter Choon Eng; Phuah, Sze Yee; Sivanandan, Kavitta; Kang, In Nee; Thirthagiri, Eswary; Liu, Jian Jun; Hassan, Norhashimah; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Thong, Meow Keong; Hui, Miao; Hartman, Mikael; Yip, Cheng Har; Mohd Taib, Nur Aishah; Teo, Soo Hwang

    2014-04-01

    Although the breast cancer predisposition genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 were discovered more than 20 years ago, there remains a gap in the availability of genetic counselling and genetic testing in Asian countries because of cost, access and inaccurate reporting of family history of cancer. In order to improve access to testing, we developed a rapid test for recurrent mutations in our Asian populations. In this study, we designed a genotyping assay with 55 BRCA1 and 44 BRCA2 mutations previously identified in Asian studies, and validated this assay in 267 individuals who had previously been tested by full sequencing. We tested the prevalence of these mutations in additional breast cancer cases. Using this genotyping approach, we analysed recurrent mutations in 533 Malaysian breast cancer cases with Malays, 3 BRCA1 and 2 BRCA2 mutations in Chinese and 1 BRCA1 mutation in Indians account for 60, 24 and 20 % of carrier families, respectively. By contrast, haplotype analyses suggest that a recurrent BRCA2 mutation (c.262_263delCT) found in 5 unrelated Malay families has at least 3 distinct haplotypes. Taken together, our data suggests that panel testing may help to identify carriers, particularly Asian BRCA2 carriers, who do not present with a priori strong family history characteristics.

  10. Descriptive characteristics of colon and rectal cancer recurrence in a Danish population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Ashley C; Riis, Anders H; Erichsen, Rune; Fedirko, Veronika; Ostenfeld, Eva Bjerre; Vyberg, Mogens; Thorlacius-Ussing, Ole; Lash, Timothy L

    2017-08-01

    Recurrence is a common outcome among patients that have undergone an intended curative resection for colorectal cancer. However, data on factors that influence colorectal cancer recurrence are sparse. We report descriptive characteristics of both colon and rectal cancer recurrence in an unselected population. We identified 21,152 patients with colorectal cancer diagnosed between May 2001 and December 2011 and registered with the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group. Recurrences were identified in 3198 colon and 1838 rectal cancer patients during follow-up. We calculated the frequency, proportion, and incidence rates of colon and rectal cancer recurrence within descriptive categories, and the cumulative five- and ten-year incidences of recurrence, treating death as a competing risk. We used a Cox proportional hazard model to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Recurrence risk was highest in the first three years of follow-up. Patients colon: 7.2 per 100 person-years; 95% CI: 6.5-7.9; rectum: 8.1 per 100 person-years; 95% CI: 7.2-9.0) and patients diagnosed with stage III cancer (colon HR: 5.70; 95% CI: 4.61-7.06; rectal HR: 7.02; 95% CI: 5.58-8.82) had increased risk of recurrence. Patients diagnosed with stage III cancer from 2009 to 2011 had a lower incidence of recurrence than those diagnosed with stage III cancer in the years before. Cumulative incidences of colon and rectal cancer recurrence were similar for both cancer types among each descriptive category. In this population, increases in colorectal cancer recurrence risk were associated with younger age and increasing stage at diagnosis. Cumulative incidence of recurrence did not differ by cancer type. Descriptive characteristics of colon and rectal cancer recurrence may help to inform patient-physician decision-making, and could be used to determine adjuvant therapies or tailor surveillance strategies so that recurrence may be identified early, particularly within the first 3 years of

  11. Reducing Breast Cancer Recurrence: The Role of Dietary Polyphenolics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea J. Braakhuis

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Evidence from numerous observational and clinical studies suggest that polyphenolic phytochemicals such as phenolic acids in olive oil, flavonols in tea, chocolate and grapes, and isoflavones in soy products reduce the risk of breast cancer. A dietary food pattern naturally rich in polyphenols is the Mediterranean diet and evidence suggests those of Mediterranean descent have a lower breast cancer incidence. Whilst dietary polyphenols have been the subject of breast cancer risk-reduction, this review will focus on the clinical effects of polyphenols on reducing recurrence. Overall, we recommend breast cancer patients consume a diet naturally high in flavonol polyphenols including tea, vegetables (onion, broccoli, and fruit (apples, citrus. At least five servings of vegetables and fruit daily appear protective. Moderate soy protein consumption (5–10 g daily and the Mediterranean dietary pattern show the most promise for breast cancer patients. In this review, we present an overview of clinical trials on supplementary polyphenols of dietary patterns rich in polyphenols on breast cancer recurrence, mechanistic data, and novel delivery systems currently being researched.

  12. Detectable end of radiation prostate specific antigen assists in identifying men with unfavorable intermediate-risk prostate cancer at high risk of distant recurrence and cancer-specific mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayman, Jonathan; Phillips, Ryan; Chen, Di; Perin, Jamie; Narang, Amol K; Trieu, Janson; Radwan, Noura; Greco, Stephen; Deville, Curtiland; McNutt, Todd; Song, Daniel Y; DeWeese, Theodore L; Tran, Phuoc T

    2018-06-01

    Undetectable End of Radiation PSA (EOR-PSA) has been shown to predict improved survival in prostate cancer (PCa). While validating the unfavorable intermediate-risk (UIR) and favorable intermediate-risk (FIR) stratifications among Johns Hopkins PCa patients treated with radiotherapy, we examined whether EOR-PSA could further risk stratify UIR men for survival. A total of 302 IR patients were identified in the Johns Hopkins PCa database (178 UIR, 124 FIR). Kaplan-Meier curves and multivariable analysis was performed via Cox regression for biochemical recurrence free survival (bRFS), distant metastasis free survival (DMFS), and overall survival (OS), while a competing risks model was used for PCa specific survival (PCSS). Among the 235 patients with known EOR-PSA values, we then stratified by EOR-PSA and performed the aforementioned analysis. The median follow-up time was 11.5 years (138 months). UIR was predictive of worse DMFS and PCSS (P = 0.008 and P = 0.023) on multivariable analysis (MVA). Increased radiation dose was significant for improved DMFS (P = 0.016) on MVA. EOR-PSA was excluded from the models because it did not trend towards significance as a continuous or binary variable due to interaction with UIR, and we were unable to converge a multivariable model with a variable to control for this interaction. However, when stratifying by detectable versus undetectable EOR-PSA, UIR had worse DMFS and PCSS among detectable EOR-PSA patients, but not undetectable patients. UIR was significant on MVA among detectable EOR-PSA patients for DMFS (P = 0.021) and PCSS (P = 0.033), while RT dose also predicted PCSS (P = 0.013). EOR-PSA can assist in predicting DMFS and PCSS among UIR patients, suggesting a clinically meaningful time point for considering intensification of treatment in clinical trials of intermediate-risk men. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Alone for Localized Prostate Cancer in Patients at Moderate or High Risk of Biochemical Recurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoskin, Peter [Cancer Centre, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Rojas, Ana, E-mail: arc03@btconnect.com [Cancer Centre, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Lowe, Gerry; Bryant, Linda; Ostler, Peter; Hughes, Rob; Milner, Jessica; Cladd, Helen [Cancer Centre, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) morbidity and biochemical control of disease in patients with localized prostate adenocarcinoma treated with escalating doses per fraction of high-dose rate brachytherapy alone. Methods and Materials: A total of 197 patients were treated with 34 Gy in four fractions, 36 Gy in four fractions, 31.5 Gy in three fractions, or 26 Gy in two fractions. Median follow-up times were 60, 54, 36, and 6 months, respectively. Results: Incidence of early Grade {>=} 3 GU morbidity was 3% to 7%, and Grade 4 was 0% to 4%. During the first 12 weeks, the highest mean International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) value was 14, and between 6 months and 5 years it was 8. Grade 3 or 4 early GI morbidity was not observed. The 3-year actuarial rate of Grade 3 GU was 3% to 16%, and was 3% to 7% for strictures requiring surgery (4-year rate). An incidence of 1% Grade 3 GI events was seen at 3 years. Late Grade 4 GU or GI events were not observed. At 3 years, 99% of patients with intermediate-risk and 91% with high-risk disease were free of biochemical relapse (log-rank p = 0.02). Conclusions: There was no significant difference in urinary and rectal morbidity between schedules. Biochemical control of disease in patients with intermediate and high risk of relapse was good.

  14. Cancer immunology and colorectal cancer recurrence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vannucci, Luca

    -, č. 3 (2011), s. 1421-1431 ISSN 1945-0524 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500200917 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : colorectal cancer * inflammation * tumor Subject RIV: EC - Immunology

  15. A lymphocyte spatial distribution graph-based method for automated classification of recurrence risk on lung cancer images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garciá-Arteaga, Juan D.; Corredor, Germán.; Wang, Xiangxue; Velcheti, Vamsidhar; Madabhushi, Anant; Romero, Eduardo

    2017-11-01

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes occurs when various classes of white blood cells migrate from the blood stream towards the tumor, infiltrating it. The presence of TIL is predictive of the response of the patient to therapy. In this paper, we show how the automatic detection of lymphocytes in digital H and E histopathological images and the quantitative evaluation of the global lymphocyte configuration, evaluated through global features extracted from non-parametric graphs, constructed from the lymphocytes' detected positions, can be correlated to the patient's outcome in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The method was assessed on a tissue microarray cohort composed of 63 NSCLC cases. From the evaluated graphs, minimum spanning trees and K-nn showed the highest predictive ability, yielding F1 Scores of 0.75 and 0.72 and accuracies of 0.67 and 0.69, respectively. The predictive power of the proposed methodology indicates that graphs may be used to develop objective measures of the infiltration grade of tumors, which can, in turn, be used by pathologists to improve the decision making and treatment planning processes.

  16. Risk factors for recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janković Slobodan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis is relatively frequent condition, and may have serious health consequences, like chronic vulvovaginal pain syndrome. The aim of our study was to determine possible risk factors for recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis in non-pregnant females within the reproductive age. Methods. The design of our study was of a case-control type. Case and control patients were selected from the gynecological patients at six primary care facilities in Serbia and in Montenegro. The data on the patients' health condition, concomitant therapy and diseases were taken from their records, and the data on habits were obtained by unstructured interview. For potential risk factors crude odds ratios were calculated, and then adjusted by logistic regression. Results. A total of fifty-one patients had four or more episodes of vulvovaginal candidiasis during the last year (cases, and 132 patients with one to three episodes of vulvovaginal candidiasis were sampled as controls, matched by age. The only two significant associations were found between recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis and continual wearing of panty liners during the last year (Odds ratio - ORadjusted: 3.97; confidence interval - CI: 1.57-10.02; p = 0.004, and between recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis and predominant use of vaginal tampons during menstruation in the last year (ORadjusted: 4.25; CI: 1.11-16.27; p = 0.035. The synergistic effect was observed for the concurrent continual wearing of panty liners during the last year and selfmedication with antimycotics. Conclusions. Local factors, like wearing of panty liners or use of tampons during menstruation, may promote recurrence of vulvovaginal candidiasis, especially in patients who practice selfmedication with antimycotics.

  17. Sparse representation of multi parametric DCE-MRI features using K-SVD for classifying gene expression based breast cancer recurrence risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrooghy, Majid; Ashraf, Ahmed B.; Daye, Dania; Mies, Carolyn; Rosen, Mark; Feldman, Michael; Kontos, Despina

    2014-03-01

    We evaluate the prognostic value of sparse representation-based features by applying the K-SVD algorithm on multiparametric kinetic, textural, and morphologic features in breast dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). K-SVD is an iterative dimensionality reduction method that optimally reduces the initial feature space by updating the dictionary columns jointly with the sparse representation coefficients. Therefore, by using K-SVD, we not only provide sparse representation of the features and condense the information in a few coefficients but also we reduce the dimensionality. The extracted K-SVD features are evaluated by a machine learning algorithm including a logistic regression classifier for the task of classifying high versus low breast cancer recurrence risk as determined by a validated gene expression assay. The features are evaluated using ROC curve analysis and leave one-out cross validation for different sparse representation and dimensionality reduction numbers. Optimal sparse representation is obtained when the number of dictionary elements is 4 (K=4) and maximum non-zero coefficients is 2 (L=2). We compare K-SVD with ANOVA based feature selection for the same prognostic features. The ROC results show that the AUC of the K-SVD based (K=4, L=2), the ANOVA based, and the original features (i.e., no dimensionality reduction) are 0.78, 0.71. and 0.68, respectively. From the results, it can be inferred that by using sparse representation of the originally extracted multi-parametric, high-dimensional data, we can condense the information on a few coefficients with the highest predictive value. In addition, the dimensionality reduction introduced by K-SVD can prevent models from over-fitting.

  18. Missed Radiation Therapy and Cancer Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients who miss radiation therapy sessions during cancer treatment have an increased risk of their disease returning, even if they eventually complete their course of radiation treatment, according to a new study.

  19. Recurrent ovary cancer presenting with scleroderma - A rare case report

    OpenAIRE

    Sargin, Betul; Gurer, Gulcan; Bozbas, Gulnur; Noyan, Fatih; Barut, Kayra; Tataroglu, Canten

    2017-01-01

    Scleroderma is a chronic autoimmune multisystem disorder which is characterizedby progressive fibrosis of the skin and internal organs. Ovary cancers with sclerodermahave been reported in the literature. But recurrent ovary cancer with sclerodermahas not been reported before. Here, we report a 65 -year old female patient presentingwith recurrent ovary cancer and subsequently diagnosed with scleroderma. Due toliterature sources, this is the first case of presenting with recurrent ovary cancera...

  20. Local recurrences after laparoscopic resections for renal parenchymal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. G. Alyaev

    2017-01-01

     underwent open surgery.Conclusion. In our opinion, prevention of local recurrences requires careful selection of patients for laparoscopic kidney resections, especially if patients have stage Т1b or higher. Technically  complicated resections for deep tumor invasion into the sinus, as  well as for wide tumor base, are recommended for patients with invariable indications. Nephrectomy is preferable for relative indications for resection. In the preoperative period, the presence  and thickness of tumor pseudocapsule must be evaluated, and  multicenter localization should be ruled out. Good technical  equipment for laparoscopic kidney resection and observation of  oncological principles during surgery decrease renal cancer  recurrence risk. During morphological verification of renal  parenchymal tumors with high oncological potential for progression and in the presence of positive surgical margin and tumor pseudocapsule invasion, control spiral computer tomography of the abdominal organs with intravenous contrast should be performed in the first 3 months after the surgery.

  1. The relationship between the presence and extent of lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) and the risk of local recurrence (LR) in patients with infiltrating cancer of the breast treated with conservative surgery (CS) and radiation therapy (RT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abner, A.; Schnitt, S.; Connolly, J.; Recht, A.; Bornstein, B.; Nixon, A.; Hetelekidis, S.; Silver, B.; Harris, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Lobular carcinoma in situ, when found in an otherwise benign breast biopsy, is associated with an increased risk of developing a subsequent invasive breast cancer. Among patients with an infiltrating cancer resected without margin assessment, the extent of ductal carcinoma in situ is an established risk factor for LR after CS and RT. However, the association between the presence and extent of LCIS and the risk of recurrence in patients treated with CS and RT for infiltrating breast cancer remains at issue. Materials and Methods: Between 1968 and 1986, 1625 patients with clinical stage T1 and T2 invasive breast cancer were treated at the Joint Center for Radiation Therapy with complete gross tumor excision and RT to a total of ≥60 Gy. Of these, 1160 had infiltrating ductal cancer (IDC), infiltrating lobular cancer (ILC), or mixed IDC/ILC (IMC) and sufficient pathologic material for review by the study pathologists (SS and JC) to establish the presence or absence of LCIS and were evaluable at 10 years. LCIS was present adjacent to the invasive cancer in (43(1027)) IDC (4%), and either within or adjacent to the infiltrating tumor in (70(82)) ILC (85%) and (26(51)) IMC (51%). Margins were evaluable in 35% of LCIS-positive patients and 33% of LCIS-negative patients. The median follow-up time was 153 months for surviving patients. Results: The 10-year crude risk of recurrence by first site of failure for all patients was as follows: Furthermore, there was no significant relationship between the extent of the LCIS adjacent to the invasive tumor and the LR risk: The 10-year crude risk of contralateral breast cancer was 7% for the patients with LCIS and 7% for those without LCIS. CONCLUSION: We conclude that neither the presence nor the extent of LCIS is related to the risk of LR in patients with invasive breast cancer treated with CS and RT. Thus, LCIS should not be considered a contraindication to breast conservation with CS and RT

  2. Molecular subtypes in stage II-III colon cancer defined by genomic instability: early recurrence-risk associated with a high copy-number variation and loss of RUNX3 and CDKN2A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Berg

    Full Text Available We sought to investigate various molecular subtypes defined by genomic instability that may be related to early death and recurrence in colon cancer.We sought to investigate various molecular subtypes defined by instability at microsatellites (MSI, changes in methylation patterns (CpG island methylator phenotype, CIMP or copy number variation (CNV in 8 genes. Stage II-III colon cancers (n = 64 were investigated by methylation-specific multiplex ligated probe amplification (MS-MLPA. Correlation of CNV, CIMP and MSI, with mutations in KRAS and BRAFV600E were assessed for overlap in molecular subtypes and early recurrence risk by uni- and multivariate regression.The CIMP phenotype occurred in 34% (22/64 and MSI in 27% (16/60 of the tumors, with noted CIMP/MSI overlap. Among the molecular subtypes, a high CNV phenotype had an associated odds ratio (OR for recurrence of 3.2 (95% CI 1.1-9.3; P = 0.026. Losses of CACNA1G (OR of 2.9, 95% CI 1.4-6.0; P = 0.001, IGF2 (OR of 4.3, 95% CI 1.1-15.8; P = 0.007, CDKN2A (p16 (OR of 2.0, 95% CI 1.1-3.6; P = 0.024, and RUNX3 (OR of 3.4, 95% CI 1.3-8.7; P = 0.002 were associated with early recurrence, while MSI, CIMP, KRAS or BRAF V600E mutations were not. The CNV was significantly higher in deceased patients (CNV in 6 of 8 compared to survivors (CNV in 3 of 8. Only stage and loss of RUNX3 and CDKN2A were significant in the multivariable risk-model for early recurrence.A high copy number variation phenotype is a strong predictor of early recurrence and death, and may indicate a dose-dependent relationship between genetic instability and outcome. Loss of tumor suppressors RUNX3 and CDKN2A were related to recurrence-risk and warrants further investigation.

  3. Risk factors for locoregional disease recurrence after breast-conserving therapy in patients with breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy: An international collaboration and individual patient meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valachis, Antonios; Mamounas, Eleftherios P; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A; Hayashi, Naoki; Ishitobi, Makoto; Natoli, Clara; Fitzal, Florian; Rubio, Isabel T; Tiezzi, Daniel G; Shin, Hee-Chul; Anderson, Stewart J; Hunt, Kelly K; Matsuda, Naoko; Ohsumi, Shozo; Totomi, Athina; Nilsson, Cecilia

    2018-05-03

    Several studies have reported a high risk of local disease recurrence (LR) and locoregional disease recurrence (LRR) in patients with breast cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) and breast-conserving therapy (BCT). The objective of the current study was to identify potential risk factors for LR and LRR after NCT and BCT. Individual patient data sets from 9 studies were pooled. The outcomes of interest were the occurrence of LR and/or LRR. A 1-stage meta-analytic approach was used. Cox proportional hazards regression models were applied to identify factors that were predictive of LR and LRR, respectively. A total of 9 studies (4125 patients) provided their data sets. The 10-year LR rate was 6.5%, whereas the 10-year LRR rate was 10.3%. Four factors were found to be associated with a higher risk of LR: 1) estrogen receptor-negative disease; 2) cN + disease; 3) a lack of pathologic complete response in axilla (pN0); and 4) pN2 to pN3 disease. The predictive score for LR determined 3 risk groups: a low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk group with 10-year LR rates of 4.0%, 7.9%, and 20.4%, respectively. Two additional factors were found to be associated with an increased risk of LRR: cT3 to cT4 disease and a lack of pathologic complete response in the breast. The predictive score for LRR determined 3 risk groups; a low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk group with 10-year LRR rates of 3.2%, 10.1%, and 24.1%, respectively. BCT after NCT appears to be an oncologically safe procedure for a large percentage of patients with breast cancer. Two easy-to-use clinical scores were developed that can help clinicians to identify patients at higher risk of LR and LRR after NCT and BCT and individualize the postoperative treatment plan and follow-up. Cancer 2018. © 2018 American Cancer Society. © 2018 American Cancer Society.

  4. GSTM1 copy number and promoter haplotype as predictors for risk of recurrence and/or second primary tumor in patients with head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang X

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Xuemei Zhang,1 Maosheng Huang,2 Xifeng Wu,2 Susan Kadlubar,1 Jie Lin,2 Xinfeng Yu,1 Chunyang Fan,3 Baitang Ning,4 Fred F Kadlubar1†1University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, 2The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, 3VA hospital, Little Rock, Arkansas, 4National Center for Toxicological Research, US Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, Arkansas, USA†Fred F Kadlubar passed away on December 4, 2010.Abstract: The objective of this study was to determine copy number variant (CNV and promoter genetic variants in glutathione S-transferase Mu class 1 (GSTM1 and the risk of recurrence (REC/second primary tumor (SPT in patients with previously diagnosed early stage head and neck cancer. Among 441 subjects, 133 experienced REC and/or an SPT, while 308 had single primary disease. TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to measure the exact copy number of GSTM1 and direct sequencing was used to determine genetic variants in the GSTM1 promoter region. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was performed to estimate hazard ratios (HRs and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs associated with copy number and genetic variants. REC/SPT-free survival times were compared by constructing Kaplan–Meier curves and differences between curves were tested by logrank test. Results showed a significantly decreased REC/SPT (HR = 0.57; 95% CI = 0.35–0.95 and longer REC/SPT-free survival in subjects with at least two copies of GSTM1 compared with the GSTM1 homozygous deletion, but not in those with one copy of GSTM1. The −498G, −426G, and −339T alleles were significantly associated with REC/SPT, with HRs of 0.11 (0.02–0.85, 0.28 (0.11–0.74 and 2.02 (1.07–3.82, respectively. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis showed that the −498G, −426G, and −339C alleles were also significantly associated with increased REC/SPT-free survival. Further haplotype analysis showed the haplotype P-498G--426G--339

  5. Validation of High-Risk Computed Tomography Features for Detection of Local Recurrence After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peulen, Heike [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Mantel, Frederick [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Guckenberger, Matthias [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Belderbos, José [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Werner-Wasik, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Hope, Andrew; Giuliani, Meredith [Department of Radiation Oncology University of Toronto and Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Grills, Inga [Department of Radiation Oncology Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Sonke, Jan-Jakob, E-mail: j.sonke@nki.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: Fibrotic changes after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are difficult to distinguish from local recurrences (LR), hampering proper patient selection for salvage therapy. This study validates previously reported high-risk computed tomography (CT) features (HRFs) for detection of LR in an independent patient cohort. Methods and Materials: From a multicenter database, 13 patients with biopsy-proven LR were matched 1:2 to 26 non-LR control patients based on dose, planning target volume (PTV), follow-up time, and lung lobe. Tested HRFs were enlarging opacity, sequential enlarging opacity, enlarging opacity after 12 months, bulging margin, linear margin disappearance, loss of air bronchogram, and craniocaudal growth. Additionally, 2 new features were analyzed: the occurrence of new unilateral pleural effusion, and growth based on relative volume, assessed by manual delineation. Results: All HRFs were significantly associated with LR except for loss of air bronchogram. The best performing HRFs were bulging margin, linear margin disappearance, and craniocaudal growth. Receiver operating characteristic analysis of the number of HRFs to detect LR had an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.97 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.9-1.0), which was identical to the performance described in the original report. The best compromise (closest to 100% sensitivity and specificity) was found at ≥4 HRFs, with a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 85%. A model consisting of only 2 HRFs, bulging margin and craniocaudal growth, resulted in a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 100%, with an AUC of 0.96 (95% CI 0.9-1.0) (HRFs ≥2). Pleural effusion and relative growth did not significantly improve the model. Conclusion: We successfully validated CT-based HRFs for detection of LR after SBRT for early-stage NSCLC. As an alternative to number of HRFs, we propose a simplified model with the combination of the 2 best HRFs

  6. NADiA ProsVue prostate-specific antigen slope is an independent prognostic marker for identifying men at reduced risk of clinical recurrence of prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moul, Judd W; Lilja, Hans; Semmes, O John; Lance, Raymond S; Vessella, Robert L; Fleisher, Martin; Mazzola, Clarisse; Sarno, Mark J; Stevens, Barbara; Klem, Robert E; McDermed, Jonathan E; Triebell, Melissa T; Adams, Thomas H

    2012-12-01

    To validate the hypothesis that men displaying serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) slopes ≤ 2.0 pg/mL/mo after prostatectomy, measured using a new immuno-polymerase chain reaction diagnostic test (NADiA ProsVue), have a reduced risk of clinical recurrence as determined by positive biopsy, imaging findings, or death from prostate cancer. From 4 clinical sites, we selected a cohort of 304 men who had been followed up for 17.6 years after prostatectomy for clinical recurrence. We assessed the prognostic value of a PSA slope cutpoint of 2.0 pg/mL/mo against established risk factors to identify men at low risk of clinical recurrence using uni- and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression and Kaplan-Meier analyses. The univariate hazard ratio of a PSA slope >2.0 pg/mL/mo was 18.3 (95% confidence interval 10.6-31.8) compared with a slope ≤ 2.0 pg/mL/mo (P free survival interval was 4.8 years vs >10 years in the 2 groups (P <.0001). The multivariate hazard ratio for PSA slope with the covariates of preprostatectomy PSA, pathologic stage, and Gleason score was 9.8 (95% confidence interval 5.4-17.8), an 89.8% risk reduction for men with PSA slopes ≤ 2.0 pg/mL/mo (P <.0001). The Gleason score (<7 vs ≥ 7) was the only other significant predictor (hazard ratio 5.4, 95% confidence interval 2.1-13.8, P = .0004). Clinical recurrence after radical prostatectomy is difficult to predict using established risk factors. We have demonstrated that a NADiA ProsVue PSA slope of ≤ 2.0 pg/mL/mo after prostatectomy is prognostic for a reduced risk of prostate cancer recurrence and adds predictive power to the established risk factors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Non-apical positive surgical margins after radical prostatectomy for pT2 prostate cancer is associated with the highest risk of recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roder, Martin Andreas; Kawa, Sandra; Scheike, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To investigate how location of positive surgical margins (PSM) in pT2 tumors affect the risk of biochemical recurrence (BR). METHODS: The study includes 1,133 consecutive patients from 1995 until end of 2011, who had organ-confined disease (pT2) following RP. The location...... a 3.1-fold increased risk of BR compared to margin negative patients. Patients with pT2 apical and non-apical PSM had a 5-year biochemical recurrence-free survival of 84.9% (95% CI: 77.6-92.2%) and 78.6% (95% CI: 71.3-85.9%), respectively. In multivariate analysis, pT2 apical and non-apical PSM...... was individually associated with a 2.2- and 3.8-fold increased risk of BR compared to margin negative patients. CONCLUSION: In our cohort the location of pT2 PSM was associated with time to BR, that is, patients with non-apical pT2 PSM endured the highest risk of BR compared to apical PSM. This may indicate...

  8. Basal Subtype of Invasive Breast Cancer Is Associated With a Higher Risk of True Recurrence After Conventional Breast-Conserving Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona A. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wo, Jennifer Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Nguyen, Paul L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Abi Raad, Rita F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sreedhara, Meera [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Freer, Phoebe E. [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Georgian-Smith, Dianne [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bellon, Jennifer R.; Wong, Julia S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Smith, Barbara L. [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harris, Jay R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G., E-mail: ataghian@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether breast cancer subtype is associated with patterns of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), either true recurrence (TR) or elsewhere local recurrence (ELR), among women with pT1-T2 invasive breast cancer (IBC) who receive breast-conserving therapy (BCT). Methods and Materials: From Jan 1998 to Dec 2003, 1,223 women with pT1-T2N0-3 IBC were treated with BCT (lumpectomy plus whole-breast radiation). Ninety percent of patients received adjuvant systemic therapy, but none received trastuzumab. Biologic cancer subtypes were approximated by determining estrogen receptor-positive (ER+), progesterone receptor-positive (PR+), and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-positive (HER-2+) expression, classified as luminal A (ER+ or PR+ and HER-2 negative [HER-2-]), luminal B (ER+ or PR+ and HER-2+), HER-2 (ER- and PR- and HER-2+), and basal (ER- and PR- and HER-2- ) subtypes. Imaging, pathology, and operative reports were reviewed by two physicians independently, including an attending breast radiologist. Readers were blinded to subtype and outcome. TR was defined as IBTR within the same quadrant and within 3 cm of the primary tumor. All others were defined as ELR. Results: At a median follow-up of 70 months, 24 patients developed IBTR (5-year cumulative incidence of 1.6%), including 15 TR and 9 ELR patients. At 5 years, basal (4.4%) and HER-2 (9%) subtypes had a significantly higher incidence of TR than luminal B (1.2%) and luminal A (0.2%) subtypes (p < 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, basal subtype (hazard ratio [HR], 4.8, p = 0.01), younger age at diagnosis (HR, 0.97; p = 0.05), and increasing tumor size (HR, 2.1; p = 0.04) were independent predictors of TR. Only younger age (HR, 0.95; p = 0.01) significantly predicted for ELR. Conclusions: Basal and HER-2 subtypes are significantly associated with higher rates of TR among women with pT1-T2 IBC after BCT. Younger age predicts for both TR and ELR. Strategies to reduce TR in basal

  9. Sentinel Lymph Node Dissection in Locally Recurrent Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uth, Charlotte Caspara; Christensen, Mette Haulund; Oldenbourg, Mette Holmqvist

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate the use of sentinel lymph node dissection (SLND) in the treatment of patients with locally recurrent breast cancer. METHODS: A total of 147 patients with locally recurrent breast cancer were included from five different breast surgery departments...

  10. Associations between metabolic syndrome, breast cancer recurrence, and the 21-gene recurrence score assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, Jeanette; Kidwell, Kelley M; Henry, N Lynn

    2016-06-01

    The 21-gene recurrence score (RS) assay is prognostic in estrogen receptor-positive (HR+), HER2-negative, node-negative breast cancer (BC). The interaction between RS and host factors including metabolic syndrome (MS) is unclear. MS conditions such as obesity have been associated with worse BC prognosis. The aim of this study was to identify associations between presence of MS conditions and RS group or breast cancer recurrence. Demographic, pathologic, and treatment data, MS criteria, and menopausal status were abstracted from medical records of women with stage I-II, HR+, HER2-negative BC evaluated with the RS assay at a single institution since 2005. MS was defined as presence of ≥3 of the following within 2 years of diagnosis: body mass index ≥27.7 kg/m(2); hypertension; impaired fasting glucose; HDL <50 mg/dL; hypertriglyceridemia. Of 533 eligible women, 22 % had MS. MS was more common in post- vs premenopausal women (30 vs 9 %; P < 0.0001). There was no significant association between RS group and overall MS status or any individual criterion, controlling for stage, and no association after stratification by menopausal status. Postmenopausal status was associated with higher RS group (P = 0.039), independent of stage. With 4.2-year median follow-up, no association between disease recurrence and MS was identified. Although MS has been associated with worse BC outcomes, we were unable to identify associations between RS group and MS criteria. Identification of prognostic factors other than RS that underlie this higher risk will be important for optimizing breast cancer treatment decision-making in patients with MS.

  11. The ability of PAM50 risk of recurrence score to predict 10-year distant recurrence in hormone receptor-positive postmenopausal women with special histological subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Jensen, Maj-Britt; Eriksen, Jens Ole

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The Prosigna-PAM50 risk of recurrence (ROR) score has been validated in randomized clinical trials to predict 10-year distant recurrence (DR) in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Here, we examine the ability of Prosigna for predicting DR at 10 years in a subgroup of postmenop...

  12. Quality of Life and Care Needs of Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Peritoneal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-03

    Anxiety; Fatigue; Nausea and Vomiting; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  13. Sugar-sweetened beverage intake and cancer recurrence and survival in CALGB 89803 (Alliance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Fuchs

    Full Text Available In colon cancer patients, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and high dietary glycemic load have been associated with increased risk of cancer recurrence. High sugar-sweetened beverage intake has been associated with obesity, diabetes, and cardio-metabolic diseases, but the influence on colon cancer survival is unknown.We assessed the association between sugar-sweetened beverage consumption on cancer recurrence and mortality in 1,011 stage III colon cancer patients who completed food frequency questionnaires as part of a U.S. National Cancer Institute-sponsored adjuvant chemotherapy trial. Hazard ratios (HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated with Cox proportional hazard models.Patients consuming ≥ 2 servings of sugar-sweetened beverages per day experienced an adjusted HR for disease recurrence or mortality of 1.67 (95% CI, 1.04-2.68, compared with those consuming <2 servings per month (P(trend = 0.02. The association of sugar-sweetened beverages on cancer recurrence or mortality appeared greater among patients who were both overweight (body mass index ≥ 2 5 kg/m(2 and less physically active (metabolic equivalent task-hours per week <18 (HR = 2.22; 95% CI, 1.29-3.81, P(trend = 0.0025.Higher sugar-sweetened beverage intake was associated with a significantly increased risk of cancer recurrence and mortality in stage III colon cancer patients.

  14. Pre-diagnostic alcohol consumption and breast cancer recurrence and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Marianne; Olsen, Anja; Christensen, Jane

    2013-01-01

    The association between pre-diagnostic alcohol consumption and breast cancer recurrence and breast cancer specific mortality was investigated in 1,052 women diagnosed with early breast cancer in a prospective cohort of 29,875 women. Known clinical, lifestyle and socioeconomic risk factors were...... evaluated and adjusted for in multivariate analysis. We found a modest but significant association between pre-diagnostic alcohol consumption and breast cancer recurrence with a median follow-up of six years after date of diagnosis, both when using baseline measures of alcohol intake (HR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1...

  15. Chromosome 1q21.3 amplification is a trackable biomarker and actionable target for breast cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goh, Jian Yuan; Feng, Min; Wang, Wenyu

    2017-01-01

    Tumor recurrence remains the main reason for breast cancer-associated mortality, and there are unmet clinical demands for the discovery of new biomarkers and development of treatment solutions to benefit patients with breast cancer at high risk of recurrence. Here we report the identification of ...

  16. Anastomotic Leak Increases Distant Recurrence and Long-Term Mortality After Curative Resection for Colonic Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Peter-Martin; Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of anastomotic leak (AL) on disease recurrence and long-term mortality in patients alive 120 days after curative resection for colonic cancer. BACKGROUND: There is no solid data as to whether AL after colonic cancer surgery increases the risk of disease...

  17. Associations of Statin Use With Colorectal Cancer Recurrence and Mortality in a Danish Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lash, Timothy L; Riis, Anders H; Ostenfeld, Eva B; Erichsen, Rune; Vyberg, Mogens; Ahern, Thomas P; Thorlacius-Ussing, Ole

    2017-09-15

    In earlier studies of the influence of hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (also known as statins) on colorectal cancer prognosis, investigators reported a reduced rate of cancer-specific mortality. Studies of recurrence are few and small. Using data from Danish registries, we followed 21,152 patients diagnosed with stage I-III colorectal cancer from 2001 to 2011. We estimated the association between statin use in the preceding year and cancer recurrence, cancer-specific mortality, and all-cause mortality rates. We identified 5,036 recurrences, 7,084 deaths from any cause, and 4,066 deaths from colorectal cancer. After adjustment for potential confounders, statin use was not associated with recurrence (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 1.01, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.93, 1.09), but it was associated with death from colorectal cancer (aHR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.65, 0.79) and death from any cause (aHR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.67, 0.76). Statin use in the year preceding recurrence was associated with a reduced risk of cancer-specific mortality (aHR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.74, 0.92) but also a reduced risk of death from any other cause (aHR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.61, 1.00). Statin use was not associated with a reduced rate of colorectal cancer recurrence, but it was associated with a reduced rate of cancer-specific mortality, which suggests that there is no cancer-directed benefit; therefore, there is no basis to prescribe statins to colorectal cancer patients who do not have cardiovascular indications. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Enhancing Breast Cancer Recurrence Algorithms Through Selective Use of Medical Record Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroenke, Candyce H; Chubak, Jessica; Johnson, Lisa; Castillo, Adrienne; Weltzien, Erin; Caan, Bette J

    2016-03-01

    The utility of data-based algorithms in research has been questioned because of errors in identification of cancer recurrences. We adapted previously published breast cancer recurrence algorithms, selectively using medical record (MR) data to improve classification. We evaluated second breast cancer event (SBCE) and recurrence-specific algorithms previously published by Chubak and colleagues in 1535 women from the Life After Cancer Epidemiology (LACE) and 225 women from the Women's Health Initiative cohorts and compared classification statistics to published values. We also sought to improve classification with minimal MR examination. We selected pairs of algorithms-one with high sensitivity/high positive predictive value (PPV) and another with high specificity/high PPV-using MR information to resolve discrepancies between algorithms, properly classifying events based on review; we called this "triangulation." Finally, in LACE, we compared associations between breast cancer survival risk factors and recurrence using MR data, single Chubak algorithms, and triangulation. The SBCE algorithms performed well in identifying SBCE and recurrences. Recurrence-specific algorithms performed more poorly than published except for the high-specificity/high-PPV algorithm, which performed well. The triangulation method (sensitivity = 81.3%, specificity = 99.7%, PPV = 98.1%, NPV = 96.5%) improved recurrence classification over two single algorithms (sensitivity = 57.1%, specificity = 95.5%, PPV = 71.3%, NPV = 91.9%; and sensitivity = 74.6%, specificity = 97.3%, PPV = 84.7%, NPV = 95.1%), with 10.6% MR review. Triangulation performed well in survival risk factor analyses vs analyses using MR-identified recurrences. Use of multiple recurrence algorithms in administrative data, in combination with selective examination of MR data, may improve recurrence data quality and reduce research costs. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For

  19. Statin use and risk of disease recurrence and death after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskiväli, Teemu; Kujala, Paula; Visakorpi, Tapio; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Murtola, Teemu J

    2016-04-01

    Statins have been linked with improved prostate cancer survival and lower risk of recurrence in men treated with radiation therapy. However, the association is unclear for surgically-treated men. We studied the risk of prostate cancer recurrence and death by statin usage after radical prostatectomy in a cohort of prostate cancer patients treated with radical prostatectomy. A cohort of 1,314 men who underwent curative-intent radical prostatectomy at the Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland during 1995-2009 were linked to national prescription database to obtain detailed information on statin purchases. The risk of PSA recurrence and death (overall and prostate cancer-specific) by statin use before and after the surgery were evaluated using Cox regression with model adjustment for tumor characteristics, total cholesterol and simultaneous use of antidiabetic and antihypertensive drugs. Tissue expression of putative prognostic markers were measured from a subgroup of 323 men. During the median follow-up of 8.6 years after surgery 484 men recurred, while 244 men died (32 due to prostate cancer). In general statin use before or after prostatectomy was not associated with risk of disease recurrence or death. Tissue expression of Ki-67 and ERG modified the association between statin use and risk of disease recurrence; the risk estimates were lower in men with Ki-67 expression above the median (P for interaction 0.001 and 0.004 for statin use before and after prostatectomy, respectively) and no ERG expression in the tumor tissue (P for interaction 0.006 and 0.011). Statin use generally did not affect prostate cancer prognosis after prostatectomy. The effect on disease recurrence may depend on tumor properties, such as proliferation activity. Thus possible future prospective studies should recognize and enroll subgroups of prostate cancer patients most likely to benefit from statins. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Biologic determinants of tumor recurrence in stage II colon cancer: validation study of the 12-gene recurrence score in cancer and leukemia group B (CALGB) 9581.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venook, Alan P; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Lopatin, Margarita; Ye, Xing; Lee, Mark; Friedman, Paula N; Frankel, Wendy; Clark-Langone, Kim; Millward, Carl; Shak, Steven; Goldberg, Richard M; Mahmoud, Najjia N; Warren, Robert S; Schilsky, Richard L; Bertagnolli, Monica M

    2013-05-10

    A greater understanding of the biology of tumor recurrence should improve adjuvant treatment decision making. We conducted a validation study of the 12-gene recurrence score (RS), a quantitative assay integrating stromal response and cell cycle gene expression, in tumor specimens from patients enrolled onto Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 9581. CALGB 9581 randomly assigned 1,713 patients with stage II colon cancer to treatment with edrecolomab or observation and found no survival difference. The analysis reported here included all patients with available tissue and recurrence (n = 162) and a random (approximately 1:3) selection of nonrecurring patients. RS was assessed in 690 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor samples with quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction by using prespecified genes and a previously validated algorithm. Association of RS and recurrence was analyzed by weighted Cox proportional hazards regression. Continuous RS was significantly associated with risk of recurrence (P = .013) as was mismatch repair (MMR) gene deficiency (P = .044). In multivariate analyses, RS was the strongest predictor of recurrence (P = .004), independent of T stage, MMR, number of nodes examined, grade, and lymphovascular invasion. In T3 MMR-intact (MMR-I) patients, prespecified low and high RS groups had average 5-year recurrence risks of 13% (95% CI, 10% to 16%) and 21% (95% CI, 16% to 26%), respectively. The 12-gene RS predicts recurrence in stage II colon cancer in CALGB 9581. This is consistent with the importance of stromal response and cell cycle gene expression in colon tumor recurrence. RS appears to be most discerning for patients with T3 MMR-I tumors, although markers such as grade and lymphovascular invasion did not add value in this subset of patients.

  1. Postoperative radiotherapy appeared to improve the disease free survival rate of patients with extrahepatic bile duct cancer at high risk of loco-regional recurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Young; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Yong Hoon [Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Sang Jun [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    To investigate the outcomes of postoperative radiotherapy (RT), in patients with extrahepatic bile duct (EHBD) cancer by comparing the survival rate between patients undergoing surgery alone or surgery plus postoperative RT, and to identify the prognostic factors affecting survival. Between 2000 and 2013, 52 patients with EHBD cancer underwent surgical resection. Of these, 33 patients did not receive postoperative RT (group I), and 19 patients did (group II). R1 resection was significantly more frequent in group II. The median radiation dose was 5,040 cGy. The 3-year overall survival (OS) rate for group I and group II was 38% and 56%, respectively (p = 0.274). The 3-year disease free survival (DFS) rate for group I and group II was 20% and 31%, respectively (p = 0.049), and the 3-year loco-regional recurrence free survival (LRFS) rates were 19% and 58%, respectively (p = 0.002). Multivariate analyses showed that postoperative RT and lymphovascular invasion were independent prognostic factors for DFS and LRFS. Overall, 42 patients (80%) experienced treatment failure. Distant metastasis was the predominant pattern of failure in group II. Postoperative RT after surgical resection appeared to improve the loco-regional control and DFS rate. More effort is needed to reduce distant metastasis, the major pattern of failure, in patients who receive postoperative RT.

  2. FXYD-3 expression in relation to local recurrence of rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loftas, Per; Arbman, Gunnar; Sun, Xiao Feng; Hallbook, Olof [Dept. of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linkoping University, Norrkoping (Sweden); Edler, David [Dept. of Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Syk, Erik [Dept. of Surgery, Ersta Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-03-15

    In a previous study, the transmembrane protein FXYD-3 was suggested as a biomarker for a lower survival rate and reduced radiosensitivity in rectal cancer patients receiving preoperative radiotherapy. The purpose of preoperative irradiation in rectal cancer is to reduce local recurrence. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential role of FXYD-3 as a biomarker for increased risk for local recurrence of rectal cancer. FXYD-3 expression was immunohistochemically examined in surgical specimens from a cohort of patients with rectal cancer who developed local recurrence (n = 48). The cohort was compared to a matched control group without recurrence (n = 81). Weak FXYD-3 expression was found in 106/129 (82%) of the rectal tumors and strong expression in 23/129 (18%). There was no difference in the expression of FXYD-3 between the patients with local recurrence and the control group. Furthermore there was no difference in FXYD-3 expression and time to diagnosis of local recurrence between patients who received preoperative radiotherapy and those without. Previous findings indicated that FXYD-3 expression may be used as a marker of decreased sensitivity to radiotherapy or even overall survival. We were unable to confirm this in a cohort of rectal cancer patients who developed local recurrence.

  3. FXYD-3 expression in relation to local recurrence of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loftas, Per; Arbman, Gunnar; Sun, Xiao Feng; Hallbook, Olof; Edler, David; Syk, Erik

    2016-01-01

    In a previous study, the transmembrane protein FXYD-3 was suggested as a biomarker for a lower survival rate and reduced radiosensitivity in rectal cancer patients receiving preoperative radiotherapy. The purpose of preoperative irradiation in rectal cancer is to reduce local recurrence. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential role of FXYD-3 as a biomarker for increased risk for local recurrence of rectal cancer. FXYD-3 expression was immunohistochemically examined in surgical specimens from a cohort of patients with rectal cancer who developed local recurrence (n = 48). The cohort was compared to a matched control group without recurrence (n = 81). Weak FXYD-3 expression was found in 106/129 (82%) of the rectal tumors and strong expression in 23/129 (18%). There was no difference in the expression of FXYD-3 between the patients with local recurrence and the control group. Furthermore there was no difference in FXYD-3 expression and time to diagnosis of local recurrence between patients who received preoperative radiotherapy and those without. Previous findings indicated that FXYD-3 expression may be used as a marker of decreased sensitivity to radiotherapy or even overall survival. We were unable to confirm this in a cohort of rectal cancer patients who developed local recurrence

  4. Management of recurrent venous thromboembolism in patients with cancer: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piran, Siavash; Schulman, Sam

    2018-04-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) occurs in 10-20%% of patients with cancer and is associated with significant mortality and morbidity in these patients. The current standard of care recommended by international guidelines is to use low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) for 6months for the management of cancer-associated thrombosis (CAT), which is based on evidence from randomized controlled trials demonstrating that LMWH significantly reduced the risk of recurrent VTE compared with vitamin K antagonists. However, patients with CAT have a high risk of VTE recurrence of up to 20% despite receiving anticoagulation. Reasons for recurrent VTE may include non-compliance, temporary cessation of therapy due to bleeding or for procedures, inadequate dosing, cancer progression, and the presence of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. Management of patients with CAT and recurrent VTE is not well defined. Management strategies for recurrent VTE include switching to LMWH if an oral anticoagulant is employed, dose escalation of LMWH, or as a last resort option consider insertion of a vena cava filter. In this review, we discuss the acute, long-term, and extended management of CAT, risk factors for recurrent VTE, and management of recurrent VTE. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Freeze-Dried Black Raspberries in Preventing Oral Cancer Recurrence in High-Risk Appalachian Patients Previously Treated With Surgery For Oral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-04

    Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  6. Risk factors of recurrent hamstring injuries: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.M. de Visser (H.); M. Reijman (Max); M.P. Heijboer (Rien); P.K. Bos (Koen)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground Although recurrent hamstring injury is a frequent problem with a significant impact on athletes, data on factors determining the risk for a recurrent hamstring injury are scarce. Objective To systematically review the literature and provide an overview of risk factors for

  7. Systematic Second-look Surgery Plus HIPEC in Patients Without Evidence of Recurrence, at High Risk of Carcinomatosis After Colorectal Cancer Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano Del Moral, Ángel; Pérez Viejo, Estibalitz; Manzanedo Romero, Israel; Rodríguez Caravaca, Gil; Pereira Pérez, Fernando

    2018-02-01

    To analyze the impact of systematic second-look surgery plus hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) performed 1 year after resection of the primary tumor, in asymptomatic patients at high risk of developing peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC). Between 2012-2016, 33 patients without any sign of peritoneal recurrence on imaging studies were prospectively included in the study and underwent second-look surgery aimed at treating limited PC earlier and were prospectively recorded. They were selected based on 5 primary tumor-associated criteria: resected minimal synchronous macroscopic PC (n = 10), synchronous ovarian metastases (n = 2), positive peritoneal cytology (n = 2), pT4 primary tumors (n = 15) and perforation (n = 4). PC was found and treated by cytoreduction plus HIPEC in 10 of the 33 (30.3%) patients, although it was detected in only 2/15 patients of the pT4 subgroup (13.3%). The patients without PC underwent complete abdominal exploration plus HIPEC. Median follow-up was 14.5 months. One patient died postoperatively at day 55. Severe morbidity rate (Clavien-Dindo III-V) was low (15.2%). The 3-year overall survival rate was 93% and the 3-year disease-free survival rate was 33%. Peritoneal recurrences occurred in 4 patients (12.1%), 2 of whom had macroscopic PC discovered at the second-look (20%), while the other 2 patients had no macroscopic PC (8.7%) (P = .04). The second look + HIPEC strategy in our series of patients at high risk of developing PC, allows its early detection and its treatment in 30.3% of cases, with a very low rate of peritoneal recurrence. It is important to continue evaluating the results to increase the accuracy of the inclusion criteria, especially the pT4 criterion that in this series has a low predictive power for the occurrence of PC. Copyright © 2017 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Incisional Recurrences After Endometrial Cancer Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogani, Giorgio; Dowdy, Sean C; Cliby, William A; Gostout, Bobbie S; Kumar, Sanjeev; Ghezzi, Fabio; Multinu, Francesco; Mariani, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate the incisional recurrence (IR) rate after endometrial cancer (EC) staging surgery and analyze characteristics of affected patients. We retrospectively searched for patients with EC at 2 institutions and analyzed the occurrence of IR after open, laparoscopic, or robotic surgery. Additionally, a review of the literature was performed. Out of 2,636 patients with EC, 1,732 (65.7%), 461 (17.5%), and 443 (16.8%) had open, laparoscopic, and robotic surgery, respectively. Only 3 patients (0.11%) had IR, all after open surgery. Additionally, 38 cases of IR were identified from the literature. Patients with non-isolated IR had worse overall survival than patients with isolated IR (p=0.04). Among this latter group, combined treatments may be associated with improved survival outcome. IR after EC surgery is rare and may occur after minimally-invasive or open operations. Combination of local and systemic treatments may provide favorable outcomes for patients with isolated IR. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  9. Neoadjuvant radiotherapy for primary advanced or locally recurrent breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Hiroaki; Nio, Yoshinori; Inoue, Yasushi; Teramoto, Mutsumi; Nagami, Haruhiko; Yano, Seiji; Sumi, Shoichiro; Tamura, Katsuhiro; Kushima, Takeyuki [Shimane Medical Univ., Izumo (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    Neoadjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer has rarely been reported. In the present study, we investigated the objective response and histopathological effects of neoadjuvant radiotherapy in patients with primary advanced or locally recurrent breast cancer. Between 1992 and 1997, a total of 11 patients with primary or recurrent breast cancer (5 primary advanced and 6 locally recurrent breast cancers) were treated with neoadjuvant radiotherapy before surgery. Six patients received radiotherapy alone and 5 received radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy, and the objective response was assessed according to the criteria of the Japanese Society of Cancer Therapy. After neoadjuvant radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy, all patients underwent surgery or biopsy, and histopathological effects were assessed according to the criteria of the Japanese Research Society for Gastric Cancer Study. The overall objective response was 27% (3PR/11; 2PR in 5 primary cancers and 1PR in 6 recurrent cancers), and histopathological effects included 5 grade-3 or -2 responses (45%; 2 grade-3 and 1 grade-2 in primary cancers and 2 grade-2 in recurrent cancers). There were no correlations between total radiation dose and objective response or histopathological effects. The objective response rates were 40% (2/5) in the radiochemotherapy group and 17% (1/6) in the radiotherapy alone group, histopathological effects higher than grade-2 were seen in 60% (3/5) in the radiochemotherapy group and 33% (2/6) in the radiotherapy alone group, and a grade-3 response was seen only in the radiochemotherapy group. Neoadjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer resulted in a high response rate and was more effective against primary cancer than recurrent cancer. Furthermore, chemotherapy may be beneficial in improving the efficacy of radiotherapy. (author)

  10. Neoadjuvant radiotherapy for primary advanced or locally recurrent breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Hiroaki; Nio, Yoshinori; Inoue, Yasushi; Teramoto, Mutsumi; Nagami, Haruhiko; Yano, Seiji; Sumi, Shoichiro; Tamura, Katsuhiro; Kushima, Takeyuki

    1998-01-01

    Neoadjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer has rarely been reported. In the present study, we investigated the objective response and histopathological effects of neoadjuvant radiotherapy in patients with primary advanced or locally recurrent breast cancer. Between 1992 and 1997, a total of 11 patients with primary or recurrent breast cancer (5 primary advanced and 6 locally recurrent breast cancers) were treated with neoadjuvant radiotherapy before surgery. Six patients received radiotherapy alone and 5 received radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy, and the objective response was assessed according to the criteria of the Japanese Society of Cancer Therapy. After neoadjuvant radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy, all patients underwent surgery or biopsy, and histopathological effects were assessed according to the criteria of the Japanese Research Society for Gastric Cancer Study. The overall objective response was 27% (3PR/11; 2PR in 5 primary cancers and 1PR in 6 recurrent cancers), and histopathological effects included 5 grade-3 or -2 responses (45%; 2 grade-3 and 1 grade-2 in primary cancers and 2 grade-2 in recurrent cancers). There were no correlations between total radiation dose and objective response or histopathological effects. The objective response rates were 40% (2/5) in the radiochemotherapy group and 17% (1/6) in the radiotherapy alone group, histopathological effects higher than grade-2 were seen in 60% (3/5) in the radiochemotherapy group and 33% (2/6) in the radiotherapy alone group, and a grade-3 response was seen only in the radiochemotherapy group. Neoadjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer resulted in a high response rate and was more effective against primary cancer than recurrent cancer. Furthermore, chemotherapy may be beneficial in improving the efficacy of radiotherapy. (author)

  11. Enhancing Well-Being During Breast Cancer Recurrence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coltman, Charles

    2004-01-01

    .... Targeted support services are currently unavailable. This study tests the hypothesis that patients experience greater well-being by participating in an intervention designed for breast cancer patients experiencing a first recurrence...

  12. Surgical management of malignant bowel obstruction in recurrent pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Sun Kim

    2017-01-01

    Discussion and conclusion: Palliative surgery improves quality of life in recurrent pancreatic cancer patients and can continue patient’s palliative management. In selected patients, palliative surgery may effective management for progress of survival and quality of life.

  13. Breast cancer recurrence after reoperation for surgical bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rikke Nørgaard; Bhaskaran, K; Heide-Jørgensen, U

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bleeding activates platelets that can bind tumour cells, potentially promoting metastatic growth in patients with cancer. This study investigated whether reoperation for postoperative bleeding is associated with breast cancer recurrence. METHODS: Using the Danish Breast Cancer Group...... database and the Danish National Patient Register (DNPR), a cohort of women with incident stage I-III breast cancer, who underwent breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy during 1996-2008 was identified. Information on reoperation for bleeding within 14 days of the primary surgery was retrieved from.......i. 0·89 to 1·26). The estimates did not vary by site of breast cancer recurrence. CONCLUSION: In this large cohort study, there was no evidence of an association between reoperation for bleeding and breast cancer recurrence....

  14. Patients at high risk of tuberculosis recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Mirsaeidi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent tuberculosis (TB continues to be a significant problem and is an important indicator of the effectiveness of TB control. Recurrence can occur by relapse or exogenous reinfection. Recurrence of TB is still a major problem in high-burden countries, where there is lack of resources and no special attention is being given to this issue. The rate of recurrence is highly variable and has been estimated to range from 4.9% to 47%. This variability is related to differences in regional epidemiology of recurrence and differences in the definitions used by the TB control programs. In addition to treatment failure from noncompliance, there are several key host factors that are associated with high rates of recurrence. The widely recognized host factors independent of treatment program that predispose to TB recurrence include gender differences, malnutrition; comorbidities such as diabetes, renal failure, and systemic diseases, especially immunosuppressive states such as human immunodeficiency virus; substance abuse; and environmental exposures such as silicosis. With improved understanding of the human genome, proteome, and metabolome, additional host-specific factors that predispose to recurrence are being identified. Information on temporal and geographical trends of TB cases as well as studies with whole-genome sequencing might provide further information to enable us to fully understand TB recurrence and discriminate between reactivation and new infection. The recently launched World Health Organization End TB Strategy emphasizes the importance of integrated, patient-centered TB care. Continued improvement in diagnosis, treatment approaches, and an understanding of host-specific factors are needed to fully understand the clinical epidemiological and social determinants of TB recurrence.

  15. Patients at high risk of tuberculosis recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsaeidi, Mehdi; Sadikot, Ruxana T

    2018-01-01

    Recurrent tuberculosis (TB) continues to be a significant problem and is an important indicator of the effectiveness of TB control. Recurrence can occur by relapse or exogenous reinfection. Recurrence of TB is still a major problem in high-burden countries, where there is lack of resources and no special attention is being given to this issue. The rate of recurrence is highly variable and has been estimated to range from 4.9% to 47%. This variability is related to differences in regional epidemiology of recurrence and differences in the definitions used by the TB control programs. In addition to treatment failure from noncompliance, there are several key host factors that are associated with high rates of recurrence. The widely recognized host factors independent of treatment program that predispose to TB recurrence include gender differences, malnutrition; comorbidities such as diabetes, renal failure, and systemic diseases, especially immunosuppressive states such as human immunodeficiency virus; substance abuse; and environmental exposures such as silicosis. With improved understanding of the human genome, proteome, and metabolome, additional host-specific factors that predispose to recurrence are being identified. Information on temporal and geographical trends of TB cases as well as studies with whole-genome sequencing might provide further information to enable us to fully understand TB recurrence and discriminate between reactivation and new infection. The recently launched World Health Organization End TB Strategy emphasizes the importance of integrated, patient-centered TB care. Continued improvement in diagnosis, treatment approaches, and an understanding of host-specific factors are needed to fully understand the clinical epidemiological and social determinants of TB recurrence.

  16. Risk of biochemical recurrence and timing of radiotherapy in pT3a N0 prostate cancer with positive surgical margin. A single center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegemann, Nina-Sophie; Morcinek, Sebastian; Corradini, Stefanie; Li, Minglun; Belka, Claus; Ganswindt, Ute; Buchner, Alexander; Karl, Alexander; Stief, Christian; Knuechel, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Despite improved biochemical recurrence-free survival rates by the use of immediate adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer, disagreement about the need and timing of RT remains. From 2005-2009, 94 patients presenting with a stage pT3a N0 and microscopic positive resection margin were retrospectively analyzed after radical prostatectomy. Special attention was given to patients' outcome, the frequency of additive RT, and its efficacy. Median follow-up was 80 months. A total of 71 patients had a negative postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level (<0.07 ng/ml). Thirty-six of them did not experience any PSA relapse (subgroup 1). Fourteen of them received additive RT and during follow-up all 36 patients remained PSA negative. Of 71 initially PSA-negative patients, 35 had a biochemical relapse (subgroup 2); 28 patients underwent salvage RT. The median PSA value before salvage RT was 0.24 ng/ml and was subsequently negative (<0.07 ng/ml) in 23 patients after RT. Of the entire cohort, 23 patients had persisting PSA after surgery (subgroup 3). Of these, 18 patients received salvage RT at a median PSA level of 0.4 ng/ml. One patient in subgroup 1, 5 patients in subgroup 2, and 9 patients in subgroup 3 had ongoing androgen deprivation therapy. The present study of 94 pT3a N0 R1 prostate cancer patients provides insight into medical care of this patient cohort and underlines the need for additive RT for the majority of patients to achieve long-term biochemical control. Although immediate adjuvant RT was applied with restraint (20 %), during the observation period 60 of 94 patients (63.8 %) received RT - highlighting the need of postoperative treatment. (orig.) [de

  17. Can pretreatment ADC values predict recurrence of bladder cancer after transurethral resection?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funatsu, Hiroyuki, E-mail: hirofunatsu999@hotmail.com [Division of Diagnostic Imaging, Chiba Cancer Center, 666-2 Nitona-cho, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8717 (Japan); Imamura, Akihiro; Takano, Hideyuki [Division of Diagnostic Imaging, Chiba Cancer Center, 666-2 Nitona-cho, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8717 (Japan); Ueda, Takeshi [Division of Urology, Chiba Cancer Center, 666-2 Nitona-cho, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8717 (Japan); Uno, Takashi [Department of Radiology, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuou-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    Objective: The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the association between the pretreatment apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value and recurrence of bladder cancer after transurethral resection. Methods: Patients with superficial bladder cancer were identified. Mean ADC values of the tumors were compared between patients with and without recurrence following trans-urethral resection. A receiver-operator characteristic curve was used for determining the optimal cutoff ADC value. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to determine the effect of ADC values and other factors. Results: With a mean follow-up period of 25 months, bladder cancer recurred in 14 of 44 patients (32%). The mean ADC value of tumors in patients with recurrence was lower than in those without recurrence (1.08 mm{sup 2}/s vs. 1.28 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s; p = 0.003). The optimal cutoff ADC value for predicting recurrence was determined to be 1.12 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s. A modest and significant negative correlation was observed between the ADC values and tumor size (r = -0.436, p = 0.008). After adjustment for size and risk groups, an ADC value equal to or less than the optimal cutoff remained a significant predictor of recurrence (odds ratio 6.3, 95% CI 1.23-32.2, p = 0.027). Conclusion: Pretreatment ADC values may be an independent predictor of bladder cancer recurrence.

  18. Can pretreatment ADC values predict recurrence of bladder cancer after transurethral resection?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funatsu, Hiroyuki; Imamura, Akihiro; Takano, Hideyuki; Ueda, Takeshi; Uno, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the association between the pretreatment apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value and recurrence of bladder cancer after transurethral resection. Methods: Patients with superficial bladder cancer were identified. Mean ADC values of the tumors were compared between patients with and without recurrence following trans-urethral resection. A receiver–operator characteristic curve was used for determining the optimal cutoff ADC value. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to determine the effect of ADC values and other factors. Results: With a mean follow-up period of 25 months, bladder cancer recurred in 14 of 44 patients (32%). The mean ADC value of tumors in patients with recurrence was lower than in those without recurrence (1.08 mm 2 /s vs. 1.28 × 10 −3 mm 2 /s; p = 0.003). The optimal cutoff ADC value for predicting recurrence was determined to be 1.12 × 10 −3 mm 2 /s. A modest and significant negative correlation was observed between the ADC values and tumor size (r = −0.436, p = 0.008). After adjustment for size and risk groups, an ADC value equal to or less than the optimal cutoff remained a significant predictor of recurrence (odds ratio 6.3, 95% CI 1.23–32.2, p = 0.027). Conclusion: Pretreatment ADC values may be an independent predictor of bladder cancer recurrence.

  19. Salvage Re-Irradiation for Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Nancy; Chan, Kelvin; Bekelman, Justin E.; Zhung, Joanne; Mechalakos, James; Narayana, Ashwatha; Wolden, Suzanne; Venkatraman, Ennapadam S.; Pfister, David; Kraus, Dennis; Shah, Jatin; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To present a retrospective review of treatment outcomes for recurrent head and neck (HN) cancer patients treated with re-irradiation (re-RT) at a single medical center. Methods and Materials: From July 1996-September 2005, 105 patients with recurrent HN cancer underwent re-RT at our institution. Sites included were: the neck (n = 21), nasopharynx (n 21), paranasal sinus (n = 18), oropharynx (n = 16), oral cavity (n = 9), larynx (n = 10), parotid (n = 6), and hypopharynx (n = 4). The median prior RT dose was 62 Gy. Seventy-five patients received chemotherapy with their re-RT (platinum-based in the majority of cases). The median re-RT dose was 59.4 Gy. In 74 (70%), re-RT utilized intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Results: With a median follow-up of 35 months, 18 patients were alive with no evidence of disease. The 2-year loco-regional progression-free survival (LRPFS) and overall survival rates were 42% and 37%, respectively. Patients who underwent IMRT, compared to those who did not, had a better 2-year LRPF (52% vs. 20%, p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, non-nasopharynx and non-IMRT were associated with an increased risk of loco-regional (LR) failure. Patients with LR progression-free disease had better 2-year overall survival vs. those with LR failure (56% vs. 21%, p < 0.001). Acute and late Grade 3-4 toxicities were reported in 23% and 15% of patients. Severe Grade 3-4 late complications were observed in 12 patients, with a median time to development of 6 months after re-RT. Conclusions: Based on our data, achieving LR control is crucial for improved overall survival in this patient population. The use of IMRT predicted better LR tumor control. Future aggressive efforts in maximizing tumor control in the recurrent setting, including dose escalation with IMRT and improved chemotherapy, are warranted

  20. Radiation therapy for endometrial cancer in patients treated for postoperative recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, Kimberly B.; Han, Ihn; Shamsa, Falah; Court, Wayne S.; Chuba, Paul; Deppe, Gunter; Malone, John; Christensen, Carl; Porter, Arthur T.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the outcome and risk factors in patients treated with radiation for endometrial cancer at time of recurrence. Materials and Methods: Three hundred ninety-nine women were treated with radiation therapy for endometrial cancer at KCI/WSU from January 1980 to December 1994. Of these, 26 patients treated primarily with surgery received radiation therapy at the time of recurrence. Median time to recurrence after surgery was 8 months, with all recurrences occurring within 24 months. Twenty-four patients had recurrences in the vaginal cuff, vagina, or pelvis. These patients received external-beam radiation to the pelvis (45.00-50.40 Gy) and periaortic lymph nodes (45.00-50.00 Gy), along with a boost given by external-beam radiation or brachytherapy (16.00-30.00 Gy). Mean follow-up was 15 months (range 1-85 months). Results: The 2-year survival was 50% and median survival was 16 months (survival range 1-85 months). Of 26 patients, 54% (14) failed locally following radiation therapy. Factors indicative of poor survival included histology (sarcoma, poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma), grade, and lymph node positivity. Histological differentiation influenced local control; lymphovascular space invasion was of borderline significance with regard to local control. Conclusion: Local control and survival for surgically treated endometrial cancer patients who receive radiation at the time of recurrence are poor, with the exception of those patients with recurrent disease limited to the vagina. Early detection of recurrence may improve outcome. Pathologic risk factors may identify those patients at risk for extrapelvic recurrence. Alternative treatment modalities need to be developed for this high-risk group of patients

  1. Determinants of recurrence after intended curative resection for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhelmsen, Michael; Kring, Thomas; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2014-01-01

    Despite intended curative resection, colorectal cancer will recur in ∼45% of the patients. Results of meta-analyses conclude that frequent follow-up does not lead to early detection of recurrence, but improves overall survival. The present literature shows that several factors play important roles...... in development of recurrence. It is well established that emergency surgery is a major determinant of recurrence. Moreover, anastomotic leakages, postoperative bacterial infections, and blood transfusions increase the recurrence rates although the exact mechanisms still remain obscure. From pathology studies...

  2. Pattern of distant recurrence according to the molecular subtypes in Korean women with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Hyung Seok

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Distant recurrence is one of the most important risk factors in overall survival, and distant recurrence is related to a complex biologic interaction of seed and soil factors. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between the molecular subtypes and patterns of distant recurrence in patients with breast cancer. Methods In an investigation of 313 women with breast cancer who underwent surgery from 1994 and 2000, the expressions of estrogen and progestrone receptor (ER/PR, and human epithelial receptor-2 (HER2 were evaluated. The subtypes were defined as luminal-A, luminal-HER2, HER2-enriched, and triple negative breast cancer (TNBC according to ER, PR, and HER2 status. Results Bone was the most common site of distant recurrence. The incidence of first distant recurrence site was significantly different among the subtypes. Brain metastasis was more frequent in the luminal-HER2 and TNBC subtypes. In subgroup analysis, overall survival in patients with distant recurrence after 24 months after surgery was significantly different among the subtypes. Conclusions Organ-specific metastasis may depend on the molecular subtype of breast cancer. Tailored strategies against distant metastasis concerning the molecular subtypes in breast cancer may be considered.

  3. Relationship between Topoisomerase 2A RNA Expression and Recurrence after Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparano, Joseph A; Goldstein, Lori J; Childs, Barrett H; Shak, Steven; Brassard, Diana; Badve, Sunil; Baehner, Frederick L; Bugarini, Roberto; Rowley, Steve; Perez, Edith; Shulman, Lawrence N; Martino, Silvana; Davidson, Nancy E; Sledge, George W; Gray, Robert

    2009-12-15

    PURPOSE: To perform an exploratory analysis of the relationship between gene expression and recurrence in operable hormone receptor (HR)-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-normal breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant doxorubicin-containing chemotherapy. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: RNA was extracted from archived tumor samples derived from 378 patients with stage I to III HR-positive, HER2-normal breast cancer and analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR for a panel of 374 genes, including the 21-gene recurrence score (RS). Patients were randomized to receive adjuvant doxorubicin plus cyclophosphamide or docetaxel in trial E2197, with no difference in recurrence seen in the treatment arms. All available recurrent cases were selected plus a nonrecurrent cohort. Cox proportional hazard models were used to identify relationships between gene expression and recurrence. RESULTS: TOP2A expression exhibited the strongest association with increased recurrence risk (P = 0.01), and was significantly associated with recurrence (P = 0.008) in a multivariate analysis adjusted for clinicopathologic features. Elevated TOP2A expression above the median was associated with a 2.6-fold increase (95% confidence interval, 1.3-5.2; P = 0.008) in risk of recurrence if the RS was <18, and a 2.0-fold increase (95% confidence interval, 1.2-3.2, P = 0.003) if there was an intermediate RS of 18 to 30. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with HR-positive, HER2-normal breast cancer, a population known to have a low incidence of TOP2A gene alterations thought to be predictive of anthracycline benefit, there is a range of TOP2A RNA expression that is strongly associated with recurrence after adjuvant anthracyclines, which provides information complementary to RS, indicating that it merits further evaluation as a prognostic and predictive marker. (Clin Cancer Res 2009;15(24):7693-700).

  4. p53 Status correlates with the risk of recurrence in non-muscle invasive bladder cancers treated with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Zhou

    Full Text Available Published studies have yielded inconsistent results on the relationship between p53 status and the prognosis of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC treated with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG intravesical therapy. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the prognostic value of p53 in NMIBC treated with BCG.We systematically searched for relevant literature in PubMed, EMBASE, CNKI, and Chinese Wanfang databases. Hazard ratios (HRs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were combined as the effect size (ES across studies for recurrence-free survival (RFS and progression-free survival (PFS.A total of 11 studies, consisting of 1,049 participants, met the criteria. Overall, there was no clear relationship between p53 status and RFS or PFS for NMIBC patients treated with BCG (HR: 1.40, 95% CI: 0.91-2.16; HR: 1.37, 95% CI: 0.90-2.09, respectively. Obvious heterogeneity was observed across the studies (I2 = 69.5%, P = 0.001; I2 = 44.7%, P = 0.081, respectively. In stratified analysis by region, p53 overexpression was a predictor of poor RFS in Asian populations (HR: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.08-2.27. In addition, after excluding the studies that possibly contributed to the heterogeneity by the Galbraith plot, the overall association for RFS became statistically significant (HR: 1.38 95% CI: 1.08-1.77 without evidence of heterogeneity (I2 = 0.0%, P = 0.499.This meta-analysis suggests that p53 overexpression in NMIBC patients treated with BCG may be associated with RFS, especially in Asian populations. Because of the heterogeneity and other limitations, further studies with rigid criteria and large populations are still warranted to confirm our findings.

  5. A Framework for Treatment Decision Making at Prostate Cancer Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Jane M; Trock, Bruce J; Gulati, Roman; Etzioni, Ruth

    2017-11-01

    Of the 50,000 men in the US who elect for radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer, 24% to 40% will have a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) recurrence (PSA-R) within 10 years. Deciding whether to administer salvage therapy (ST) at PSA-R presents challenges, as treatment reduces the risk of progression to clinical metastasis but incurs unnecessary side effects should the man die before metastasis. We have developed a new harm-benefit framework using a clinical cohort to inform shared decision making between patients and physicians at PSA-R. Records of 1,045 Johns Hopkins University Hospital patients diagnosed between 1984 and 2013 who had PSA-R following radical prostatectomy were analyzed using marginal structural models to estimate the baseline risk of metastasis and the effect of ST (radiation therapy with or without hormone therapy) while accounting for selection into ST on the basis of PSA growth. The estimated model predicts the harm-benefit tradeoffs of ST within patient subgroups. The benefit of ST is the absolute reduction in the risk of metastasis within 10 years; the harm is the frequency of cancers that would not have metastasized in the patient's lifetime in the absence of ST (overtreatment). The adjusted hazard ratio associated with ST was 0.41 (95% CI, 0.31 to 0.55). Providing ST to all men at PSA-R reduced the risk of metastasis from 43% to 23% but led to 31% of men being overtreated (harm/benefit = 31/(43-23) = 1.6). Providing ST to men with Gleason score >7 reduced the risk of metastasis from 67% to 39%, with 13% of men being overtreated (harm/benefit = 13/(67-39) = 0.5). A quantitative framework that evaluates primary harms and benefits of ST after PSA-R will facilitate informed decision making. Immediate ST may be more appropriate in patient subgroups at elevated risk of metastasis.

  6. Prophylactic lower para-aortic irradiation using intensity-modulated radiotherapy mitigates the risk of para-aortic recurrence in locally advanced cervical cancer: A 10-year institutional experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jie; Lin, Jhen-Bin; Chang, Chih-Long; Jan, Ya-Ting; Sun, Fang-Ju; Wu, Meng-Hao; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the effects of prophylactic sub-renal vein radiotherapy (SRVRT) using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for cervical cancer. A total of 206 patients with FIGO stage IB2-IVA cervical cancer and negative para-aortic lymph nodes (PALNs) who underwent pelvic IMRT (PRT) or SRVRT between 2004 and 2013 at our institution were reviewed. SRVRT cranially extended the PRT field for PALNs up to the left renal vein level. The prescribed dose was consistent 50.4Gy in 28 fractions. Overall, 110 and 96 patients underwent PRT and SRVRT, respectively. The SRVRT group had more advanced disease based on FIGO stage and positive pelvic lymph nodes (PLNs). The median follow-up time was 60months (range, 7-143). For the total study population, the 5-year PALN recurrence-free survival (PARFS) and overall survival (OS) for PRT vs. SRVRT were 87.6% vs. 97.9% (p=0.03) and 74.5% vs. 87.8% (p=0.04), respectively. In patients with FIGO III-IVA or positive PLNs, the 5-year PARFS and OS for PRT vs. SRVRT were 80.1% vs. 96.4% (p=0.02) and 58.1% vs. 83.5% (p=0.012), respectively. However, there were no significant differences in these outcomes for patients with FIGO IB-IIB and negative PLNs. In a multivariate analysis, only SRVRT was associated with better PARFS (HR, 0.21; 95% CI, 0.06-0.78; p=0.02). The SRVRT did not significantly increase severe late toxicities. Prophylactic SRVRT using IMRT reduced PALN recurrence with tolerable toxicities, supporting the application of risk-based radiation fields for cervical cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Advanced age is a risk factor for proximal adenoma recurrence following colonoscopy and polypectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, H C; Burcharth, J; Rosenberg, J.

    2016-01-01

    a randomized clinical trial that showed no effect of aspirin-calcitriol-calcium treatment on colorectal adenoma recurrence. Patients at high risk of colorectal cancer who had one or more sporadic colorectal adenomas removed during colonoscopy were followed up for 3 years. Independent risk factors associated...... with recurrence and characteristics of recurrent adenomas were investigated in a generalized linear model. Results After 3 years, the recurrence rate was 25·8 per cent in 427 patients. For younger subjects (aged 50 years or less), the recurrence rate was 19 per cent; 18 of 20 recurrent adenomas were located...... in the distal part of the colon. For older subjects (aged over 70 years), the recurrence rate was 35 per cent, and 16 of 25 recurrent adenomas were in the proximal colon. Age (odds ratio (OR) 1·04, 95 per cent c.i. 1·01 to 1·07) and number of adenomas (OR 1·27, 1·11 to 1·46) at the time of inclusion...

  8. Risk factors for recurrent laryngeal nerve neuropraxia postthyroidectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sheahan, Patrick

    2012-06-01

    Despite preservation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN), transient vocal cord paralysis (VCP) occurs after 1.2% to 10.9% of thyroidectomies. The objective of this study was to study risk factors for transient VCP after thyroidectomy.

  9. Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... interactions of pregnancy-related mammotrophic factors, ligands, and receptors? What is the time course of pregnancy-related ...

  10. Different risk-increasing drugs in recurrent versus single fallers: are recurrent fallers a distinct population?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Askari, Marjan; Eslami, Saied; Scheffer, Alice C.; Medlock, Stephanie; de Rooij, Sophia E.; van der Velde, Nathalie; Abu-Hanna, Ameen

    2013-01-01

    Polypharmacy, and specifically the use of multiple fall-risk-increasing drugs (FRID), have been associated with increased risk of falling in older age. However, it is not yet clear whether the known set of FRIDs can be extrapolated to recurrent fallers, since they form a distinct group of more

  11. Rib fractures after reirradiation plus hyperthermia for recurrent breast cancer: Predictive factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenborg, Sabine; Valk, Christel; van Os, Rob; Oei, Bing; Venselaar, Jack; Vörding, Paul Zum Vörde Sive; van Randen, Adriënne; Crezee, Hans; van Tienhoven, Geertjan; Rasch, Coen

    2016-01-01

    Combining reirradiation (reRT) and hyperthermia (HT) has shown high therapeutic value for patients with locoregional recurrent breast cancer (LR). However, additional toxicity of reirradiation (e.g., rib fractures) may occur. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of potential risk factors

  12. Ex vivo metabolic fingerprinting identifies biomarkers predictive of prostate cancer recurrence following radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braadland, Peder R; Giskeødegård, Guro; Sandsmark, Elise; Bertilsson, Helena; Euceda, Leslie R; Hansen, Ailin F; Guldvik, Ingrid J; Selnæs, Kirsten M; Grytli, Helene H; Katz, Betina; Svindland, Aud; Bathen, Tone F; Eri, Lars M; Nygård, Ståle; Berge, Viktor; Taskén, Kristin A; Tessem, May-Britt

    2017-11-21

    Robust biomarkers that identify prostate cancer patients with high risk of recurrence will improve personalised cancer care. In this study, we investigated whether tissue metabolites detectable by high-resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR-MAS MRS) were associated with recurrence following radical prostatectomy. We performed a retrospective ex vivo study using HR-MAS MRS on tissue samples from 110 radical prostatectomy specimens obtained from three different Norwegian cohorts collected between 2002 and 2010. At the time of analysis, 50 patients had experienced prostate cancer recurrence. Associations between metabolites, clinicopathological variables, and recurrence-free survival were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards regression modelling, Kaplan-Meier survival analyses and concordance index (C-index). High intratumoural spermine and citrate concentrations were associated with longer recurrence-free survival, whereas high (total-choline+creatine)/spermine (tChoCre/Spm) and higher (total-choline+creatine)/citrate (tChoCre/Cit) ratios were associated with shorter time to recurrence. Spermine concentration and tChoCre/Spm were independently associated with recurrence in multivariate Cox proportional hazards modelling after adjusting for clinically relevant risk factors (C-index: 0.769; HR: 0.72; P=0.016 and C-index: 0.765; HR: 1.43; P=0.014, respectively). Spermine concentration and tChoCre/Spm ratio in prostatectomy specimens were independent prognostic markers of recurrence. These metabolites can be noninvasively measured in vivo and may thus offer predictive value to establish preoperative risk assessment nomograms.

  13. Prognostic Impact of the Combination of Recurrence Score and Quantitative Estrogen Receptor Expression (ESR1) on Predicting Late Distant Recurrence Risk in Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer After 5 Years of Tamoxifen: Results From NRG Oncology/National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B-28 and B-14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolmark, Norman; Mamounas, Eleftherios P; Baehner, Frederick L; Butler, Steven M; Tang, Gong; Jamshidian, Farid; Sing, Amy P; Shak, Steven; Paik, Soonmyung

    2016-07-10

    We determined the utility of the 21-Gene Recurrence Score (RS) in predicting late (> 5 years) distant recurrence (LDR) in stage I and II breast cancer within high and low-ESR1-expressing groups. RS was assessed in chemotherapy/tamoxifen-treated, estrogen receptor (ER) -positive, node-positive National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B-28 patients and tamoxifen-treated, ER-positive, node-negative B-14 patients. The association of the RS with risk of distant recurrence (DR) 0 to 5 years and those at risk > 5 years was assessed. An ESR1 expression cut point was optimized in B-28 and tested in B-14. Median follow-up was 11.2 years for B-28 and 13.9 years for B-14. Of 1,065 B-28 patients, 36% had low ( 5 to 10 years (log-rank P = .02) regardless of ESR1 expression. An ESR1 expression cut point of 9.1 CT was identified in B-28. It was validated in B-14 patients for whom the RS was associated with DR in years 5 to 15: 6.8% (95% CI, 4.4% to 10.6%) versus 11.2% (95% CI, 6.2% to 19.9%) versus 16.4% (95% CI, 10.2% to 25.7%) for RS < 18, RS 18 to 30, and RS ≥ 31, respectively (log-rank P = .01). For LDR, RS is strongly prognostic in patients with higher quantitative ESR1. Risk of LDR is relatively low for patients with low RS. These results suggest the value of extended tamoxifen therapy merits evaluation in patients with intermediate and high RS with higher ESR1 expression at initial diagnosis. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  14. Prognostic Impact of the Combination of Recurrence Score and Quantitative Estrogen Receptor Expression (ESR1) on Predicting Late Distant Recurrence Risk in Estrogen Receptor–Positive Breast Cancer After 5 Years of Tamoxifen: Results From NRG Oncology/National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B-28 and B-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolmark, Norman; Baehner, Frederick L.; Butler, Steven M.; Tang, Gong; Jamshidian, Farid; Sing, Amy P.; Shak, Steven; Paik, Soonmyung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We determined the utility of the 21-Gene Recurrence Score (RS) in predicting late (> 5 years) distant recurrence (LDR) in stage I and II breast cancer within high and low-ESR1–expressing groups. Patients and Methods RS was assessed in chemotherapy/tamoxifen-treated, estrogen receptor (ER) –positive, node-positive National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B-28 patients and tamoxifen-treated, ER-positive, node-negative B-14 patients. The association of the RS with risk of distant recurrence (DR) 0 to 5 years and those at risk > 5 years was assessed. An ESR1 expression cut point was optimized in B-28 and tested in B-14. Results Median follow-up was 11.2 years for B-28 and 13.9 years for B-14. Of 1,065 B-28 patients, 36% had low ( 5 to 10 years (log-rank P = .02) regardless of ESR1 expression. An ESR1 expression cut point of 9.1 CT was identified in B-28. It was validated in B-14 patients for whom the RS was associated with DR in years 5 to 15: 6.8% (95% CI, 4.4% to 10.6%) versus 11.2% (95% CI, 6.2% to 19.9%) versus 16.4% (95% CI, 10.2% to 25.7%) for RS < 18, RS 18 to 30, and RS ≥ 31, respectively (log-rank P = .01). Conclusion For LDR, RS is strongly prognostic in patients with higher quantitative ESR1. Risk of LDR is relatively low for patients with low RS. These results suggest the value of extended tamoxifen therapy merits evaluation in patients with intermediate and high RS with higher ESR1 expression at initial diagnosis. PMID:27217450

  15. Internal mammary lymph node recurrence: rare but characteristic metastasis site in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Lei; Gu, Yajia; Leaw, Shiangjiin; Wang, Zhonghua; Wang, Peihua; Hu, Xichun; Chen, Jiayi; Lu, Jingsong; Shao, Zhimin

    2010-01-01

    To assess the frequency of IMLN recurrence, its associated risk factors with disease-free interval (DFI) and its predicting factors on overall survival time. 133 cases of breast cancer IMLN recurrence were identified via the computerized CT reporting system between February 2003 and June 2008, during which chest CT for patients with breast cancer (n = 8867) were performed consecutively at Cancer Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China. Patients' charts were retrieved and patients' characteristics, disease characteristics, and treatments after recurrence were collected for analysis. The frequency was 1.5% (133/8867). IMLN recurrence was presented as the first metastatic site in 121 (91%) patients while 88 (66.2%) had other concurrent metastases. Typical chest CT images included swelling of the IMLN at the ipsilateral side with local lump and sternal erosion located mostly between the second and third intercostal space. The median disease-free interval (DFI) of IMLN recurrence was 38 months. The independent factors that could delay the IMLN recurrence were small tumor size (HR 0.5 95%CI: 0.4 - 0.8; p = 0.002), and positive ER/PR disease (HR 0.6, 95% CI: 0.4 - 0.9; p = 0.006). The median survival time after IMLN recurrence was 42 months, with a 5-year survival rate of 30%. Univariate analysis showed four variables significantly influenced the survival time: DFI of IMLN recurrence (p = 0.001), no concurrent distant metastasis (p = 0.024), endocrine therapy for patients with positive ER/PR (p = 0.000), radiotherapy (p = 0.040). The independent factors that reduced the death risk were no concurrent distant metastases (HR: 0.7, 95% CI: 0.4 - 0.9; p = 0.031), endocrine therapy for patients with positive ER/PR status (HR: 0.2, 95% CI: 0.1 - 0.5; p = 0.001) and palliative radiotherapy (HR: 0.3, 95% CI: 0.1- 0.9; p = 0.026). The risk of IMLN recurrence is low and there are certain characteristics features on CT images. ER/PR status is both a risk factor for DFI

  16. Prospective single-arm study of intraoperative radiotherapy for locally advanced or recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Jennifer; Hui, Andrew C; Heriot, Alexander G.; Mackay, Jack; Lynch, A. Craig; Van Dyk, Sylvia; Bressel, Mathias; Fox, Chris D.; Leong, Trevor; Ngan, Samuel Y.

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the feasibility and outcomes of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) using high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for locally advanced or recurrent rectal cancers. Despite preoperative chemoradiation, patients with locally advanced or recurrent rectal cancers undergoing surgery remain at high risk of local recurrence. Intensification of radiation with IORT may improve local control. This is a prospective non-randomised study. Eligible patients were those with T4 rectal cancer or pelvic recurrence, deemed suitable for radical surgery but at high risk of positive resection margins, without evidence of metastasis. Chemoradiation was followed by radical surgery. Ten gray (Gy) was delivered to tumour bed via an IORT applicator at time of surgery. There were 15% primary and 85% recurrent cancers. The 71% received preoperative chemoradiation. R0, R1 and R2 resections were 70%, 22% and 7%, respectively. IORT was successfully delivered in 27 of 30 registered patients (90% (95% confidence interval (CI)=73–98)) at a median reported time of 12 weeks (interquartile range (IQR)=10–16) after chemoradiation. Mean IORT procedure and delivery times were 63 minutes (range 22–105 minutes). Ten patients (37% (95% CI=19–58)) experienced grade 3 or 4 toxicities (three wound, four abscesses, three soft tissue, three bowel obstructions, three ureteric obstructions and two sensory neuropathies). Local recurrence-free, failure-free and overall survival rates at 2.5 years were 68% (95% CI=52–89), 37% (95% CI=23–61) and 82% (95% CI=68–98), respectively. The addition of IORT to radical surgery for T4 or recurrent rectal cancer is feasible. It can be delivered safely with low morbidity and good tumour outcomes.

  17. Radiotherapy for Locoregional Recurrent Cervix Cancer after Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Mi Gyoung

    1994-01-01

    Purpose: The role of radiotherapy in the management of patients with locoregional recurrent cervix cancer after radical surgery were retrospectively analyzed. Methods and materials: Twenty-eight patients treated with radiotherapy for locoregional recurrence after primary surgery for carcinoma of the cervix between 1989 and 1993 were analyzed. The median follow-up of survivors was 15 months (ranged 7-43 months). Eight patients had their disease confined to the vagina and 19 patients(68%) had pelvic mass as part of their locoregional recurrent disease. Within 24 months after the initial surgery, 82% of recurrences manifested themselves. All patients had whole pelvic irradiation with or without intracavitary radiotherapy(ICR). Results: Complete response(CR) was achieved in 18 patients(64%). Five of eighteen patients(28%) with initial CR developed second locoregional recurrence. Response to radiotherapy correlated strongly with tumor volume, site of recurrence and total radiation dose. The overall 2 year survival rate was 43% and the disease free survival was 31%. Survival rate was significantly influenced by the factors of interval from operation to recurrence, size and site of recurrent tumor, radiation dose, response of radiotherapy, lymph node status as initial presentation. The principal cause of death was lung metastasis(36%). Conclusion: Radiotherapy is an excellent modality for control of locoregional recurrent cervix cancer. To improve local control and survival rate, whole pelvic external radiotherapy in addition to ICR with more than 75.0Gy at the depth of 1.0cm from vaginal mucosa is needed and frequent follow up and early detection of recurrence is suggested as well

  18. Predicted vitamin D status and colon cancer recurrence and mortality in CALGB 89803 (Alliance).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, M A; Yuan, C; Sato, K; Niedzwiecki, D; Ye, X; Saltz, L B; Mayer, R J; Mowat, R B; Whittom, R; Hantel, A; Benson, A; Atienza, D; Messino, M; Kindler, H; Venook, A; Innocenti, F; Warren, R S; Bertagnolli, M M; Ogino, S; Giovannucci, E L; Horvath, E; Meyerhardt, J A; Ng, K

    2017-06-01

    Observational studies suggest that higher levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D) are associated with a reduced risk of colorectal cancer and improved survival of colorectal cancer patients. However, the influence of vitamin D status on cancer recurrence and survival of patients with stage III colon cancer is unknown. We prospectively examined the influence of post-diagnosis predicted plasma 25(OH)D on outcome among 1016 patients with stage III colon cancer who were enrolled in a National Cancer Institute-sponsored adjuvant therapy trial (CALGB 89803). Predicted 25(OH)D scores were computed using validated regression models. We examined the influence of predicted 25(OH)D scores on cancer recurrence and mortality (disease-free survival; DFS) using Cox proportional hazards. Patients in the highest quintile of predicted 25(OH)D score had an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for colon cancer recurrence or mortality (DFS) of 0.62 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.44-0.86), compared with those in the lowest quintile (Ptrend = 0.005). Higher predicted 25(OH)D score was also associated with a significant improvement in recurrence-free survival and overall survival (Ptrend = 0.01 and 0.0004, respectively). The benefit associated with higher predicted 25(OH)D score appeared consistent across predictors of cancer outcome and strata of molecular tumor characteristics, including microsatellite instability and KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, and TP53 mutation status. Higher predicted 25(OH)D levels after a diagnosis of stage III colon cancer may be associated with decreased recurrence and improved survival. Clinical trials assessing the benefit of vitamin D supplementation in the adjuvant setting are warranted. NCT00003835. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. A multigene assay to predict recurrence of tamoxifen-treated, node-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Soonmyung; Shak, Steven; Tang, Gong; Kim, Chungyeul; Baker, Joffre; Cronin, Maureen; Baehner, Frederick L; Walker, Michael G; Watson, Drew; Park, Taesung; Hiller, William; Fisher, Edwin R; Wickerham, D Lawrence; Bryant, John; Wolmark, Norman

    2004-12-30

    The likelihood of distant recurrence in patients with breast cancer who have no involved lymph nodes and estrogen-receptor-positive tumors is poorly defined by clinical and histopathological measures. We tested whether the results of a reverse-transcriptase-polymerase-chain-reaction (RT-PCR) assay of 21 prospectively selected genes in paraffin-embedded tumor tissue would correlate with the likelihood of distant recurrence in patients with node-negative, tamoxifen-treated breast cancer who were enrolled in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project clinical trial B-14. The levels of expression of 16 cancer-related genes and 5 reference genes were used in a prospectively defined algorithm to calculate a recurrence score and to determine a risk group (low, intermediate, or high) for each patient. Adequate RT-PCR profiles were obtained in 668 of 675 tumor blocks. The proportions of patients categorized as having a low, intermediate, or high risk by the RT-PCR assay were 51, 22, and 27 percent, respectively. The Kaplan-Meier estimates of the rates of distant recurrence at 10 years in the low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk groups were 6.8 percent (95 percent confidence interval, 4.0 to 9.6), 14.3 percent (95 percent confidence interval, 8.3 to 20.3), and 30.5 percent (95 percent confidence interval, 23.6 to 37.4). The rate in the low-risk group was significantly lower than that in the high-risk group (P<0.001). In a multivariate Cox model, the recurrence score provided significant predictive power that was independent of age and tumor size (P<0.001). The recurrence score was also predictive of overall survival (P<0.001) and could be used as a continuous function to predict distant recurrence in individual patients. The recurrence score has been validated as quantifying the likelihood of distant recurrence in tamoxifen-treated patients with node-negative, estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer. Copyright 2004 Massachusetts Medical Society.

  20. Prediction of Bladder Cancer Recurrences Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulueta Guerrero, Ekaitz; Garay, Naiara Telleria; Lopez-Guede, Jose Manuel; Vilches, Borja Ayerdi; Iragorri, Eider Egilegor; Castaños, David Lecumberri; de La Hoz Rastrollo, Ana Belén; Peña, Carlos Pertusa

    Even if considerable advances have been made in the field of early diagnosis, there is no simple, cheap and non-invasive method that can be applied to the clinical monitorisation of bladder cancer patients. Moreover, bladder cancer recurrences or the reappearance of the tumour after its surgical resection cannot be predicted in the current clinical setting. In this study, Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) were used to assess how different combinations of classical clinical parameters (stage-grade and age) and two urinary markers (growth factor and pro-inflammatory mediator) could predict post surgical recurrences in bladder cancer patients. Different ANN methods, input parameter combinations and recurrence related output variables were used and the resulting positive and negative prediction rates compared. MultiLayer Perceptron (MLP) was selected as the most predictive model and urinary markers showed the highest sensitivity, predicting correctly 50% of the patients that would recur in a 2 year follow-up period.

  1. Interventional therapy of advanced and/or recurrent breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiliang; Fan Ye; Cao Jun; Yan Liping; Yang Ya

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of intraarterial infusion chemotherapy in patients with advanced and/or recurrent breast cancer. Methods: From February 2000 to March 2003, 18 patients with advanced and/or recurrent breast cancer were treated with interaarterial chemotherapy (IAC). The Seldinger's technique was used in all patients. IAC was administered for 2-3 courses every 3-4 weeks for each patient. Results: The procedure was successfully performed in all 18 patients including one with a complete response, 12 of a partial response, none in 3, and with progression in 2. The overall response rate was 72.2%. The frequent adverse effects were fever, leukopenia, nausea, and vomiting but no severe complication occurred. Conclusion: Intraarterial infusion chemotherapy is a safe, simple, complication-free and effective in the patients with advanced and/or recurrent breast cancer. (authors)

  2. Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 11/12/2014 Risk Calculator About the Tool Colorectal Cancer Risk Factors Download SAS and Gauss Code Page ... Rectal Cancer: Prevention, Genetics, Causes Tests to Detect Colorectal Cancer and Polyps Cancer Risk Prediction Resources Update November ...

  3. Recurrent rates and risk factors associated with recurrent painful bullous keratopathy after primary phototherapeutic keratectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasetsuwan N

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ngamjit Kasetsuwan, Kanokorn Sakpisuttivanit, Usanee Reinprayoon, Vilavun Puangsricharern Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University and King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand Objective: To assess the recurrent rate, mean survival time, and risk factors associated with recurrent painful bullous keratopathy (BK after primary treatment with phototherapeutic keratectomy.Methods: Medical records from 72 patients (72 eyes who had phototherapeutic keratectomy for painful BK were evaluated. Data for sex, age, duration of BK, associated ocular and systemic diseases (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart disease, asthma, dyslipidemia, and rheumatoid arthritis, frequency and degree of pain (grade 1–3, visual acuity, corneal thickness, intraocular pressure, and laser setting were extracted and analyzed.Results: The mean age of the patients was 64.2±11.4 years. The mean preoperative duration of BK was 15.0±11.0 months. Most patients had pseudophakic BK (69.40%. Majority of the cases had grade 3 degree of pain (48.60%. Glaucoma and hypertension were markedly found among these patients (51.40% and 19.40%, respectively. Preoperative mean intraocular pressure and corneal thickness were 13.70±4.95 mmHg and 734.1±83.80 µm, respectively. The mean laser diameter and depth were 8.36±1.22 mm and 38.89±8.81 µm, respectively. Systemic disease was significantly associated with the risk for developing recurrent painful BK (P=0.022, hazard ratio [HR] 1.673, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.08–2.58. The overall recurrent rate was 51%. The average duration time of recurrent painful BK was 17.3±12.9 months (range 1–50 months. The median survival time before recurrence was 29.0±6.6 months.Conclusion: Systemic disease was found to be the only risk factor significantly associated with the development of recurrent painful BK. Low recurrent rate and long mean survival time showed that phototherapeutic

  4. Risk factors for child maltreatment recurrence: An updated systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Oliver G; Hindley, Nick; Jones, David P H

    2015-10-01

    Children who have been maltreated are at increased risk of further maltreatment. Identification of those at highest risk of further maltreatment is a priority for professionals working in child protection services. The current study is intended to consolidate and expand on previous work on recurrence of child maltreatment. It has sought to identify risk factors for maltreatment recurrence in the recent literature in the expectation that this may help in the practical identification of children at risk. We conducted a systematic review of cohort studies published between 2003 and 2009, identifying factors associated with maltreatment recurrence in children. Studies included demonstrated differing levels of substantiation of maltreatment. Fifteen studies met inclusion criteria but showed significant heterogeneity, varying in setting, recruitment of subjects, types of maltreatment considered and length of follow-up. Previous findings were replicated and expanded in the current study in relation to a range of factors, including rates of maltreatment recurrence, maltreatment types, frequency of previous episodes of maltreatment, child and family considerations, home environment and service provision. Factors were identified irrespective of level of maltreatment substantiation. This study provides further systematic evidence of the existence of a number of factors associated with child maltreatment recurrence. It points to the possibility of practical application of its findings within the wider context of decision making in child protection services, with the ultimate aim of reducing recurrence of maltreatment in individual cases. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Eliminating Late Recurrence to Eradicate Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Ranganathan AC, et al. Computational identification of a p38SAPK-regulated transcription factor network required for tumor cell quiescence. Cancer Res. 2009...environment. Cancer Res. 2010; 70:5706– 5716. [PubMed: 20570886] 30. Ranganathan AC, Ojha S, Kourtidis A, Conklin DS, Aguirre-Ghiso JA. Dual function of...pancreatic endoplasmic reticulum kinase in tumor cell growth arrest and survival. Cancer Res. 2008; 68:3260–3268. [PubMed: 18451152] 31. Ranganathan AC

  6. Risks of Skin Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors increase or decrease the risk of skin cancer. Skin cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) ... following PDQ summaries for more information about skin cancer: Skin Cancer Prevention Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Genetics ...

  7. Impact of Screening and Risk Factors for Local Recurrence and Survival After Conservative Surgery and Radiotherapy for Early Breast Cancer: Results From a Large Series With Long-Term Follow-Up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunkler, Ian H., E-mail: I.Kunkler@ed.ac.uk [Edinburgh Cancer Centre, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Kerr, Gillian R. [Edinburgh Cancer Centre, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Thomas, Jeremy S. [Department of Pathology, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Jack, Wilma J.L. [Edinburgh Breast Unit, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Bartlett, John M.S. [Edinburgh Cancer Research Centre, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Pedersen, Hans C. [DAKO (Denmark); Cameron, David A. [Edinburgh Cancer Centre, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Dixon, J. Michael; Chetty, Udi [Edinburgh Breast Unit, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate conventional prognostic factors for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), distant metastasis (DM), and survival after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) in screen-detected and symptomatic cases on surveillance up to 25 years. Patients and Methods: A total of 1812 consecutive patients in three cohorts (1981-1989, 1990-1992, and 1993-1998) with T12N01M0 invasive breast cancer were treated with BCT (median follow-up, 14 years). Tumor type and grade were reviewed by a single pathologist. Hormone receptor status was measured by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess independent prognostic variables for relapse and survival. Results: A total of 205 IBTR occurred, with 5-, 10-, 15-, and 20-year actuarial relapse rates of 4.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.35-5.5%), 8.4% (95% CI 7.1-9.8%), 14.1% (95% CI 12.0-16%), and 17.4% (95% CI 14.5-20.2%). Number of nodes, young age, pathologic tumor size, and multifocality were significant factors for IBTR. Three hundred seventy-eight patients developed DM. The actuarial metastatic rate was 12% at 5 years and 17.9% at 10 years. Young age, number of positive nodes, pathologic tumor size, and tumor grade were significant factors for DM relapse. When conventional prognostic indices were taken into account screen-detected cancers showed no improvement in overall relapse or survival rate compared with symptomatic cases but did show a reduced risk of DM after IBTR. After 10 years IBTR relapse continued at a constant rate of 0.87% per annum. Conclusions: The Edinburgh BCT series has shown that screen-detected invasive breast cancers do not have significantly different clinical outcomes compared with symptomatic cases when pathologic risk factors are taken into account. This suggests that these patients be managed in a similar way.

  8. Impact of Screening and Risk Factors for Local Recurrence and Survival After Conservative Surgery and Radiotherapy for Early Breast Cancer: Results From a Large Series With Long-Term Follow-Up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunkler, Ian H.; Kerr, Gillian R.; Thomas, Jeremy S.; Jack, Wilma J.L.; Bartlett, John M.S.; Pedersen, Hans C.; Cameron, David A.; Dixon, J. Michael; Chetty, Udi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate conventional prognostic factors for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), distant metastasis (DM), and survival after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) in screen-detected and symptomatic cases on surveillance up to 25 years. Patients and Methods: A total of 1812 consecutive patients in three cohorts (1981–1989, 1990–1992, and 1993–1998) with T12N01M0 invasive breast cancer were treated with BCT (median follow-up, 14 years). Tumor type and grade were reviewed by a single pathologist. Hormone receptor status was measured by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess independent prognostic variables for relapse and survival. Results: A total of 205 IBTR occurred, with 5-, 10-, 15-, and 20-year actuarial relapse rates of 4.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.35–5.5%), 8.4% (95% CI 7.1–9.8%), 14.1% (95% CI 12.0–16%), and 17.4% (95% CI 14.5–20.2%). Number of nodes, young age, pathologic tumor size, and multifocality were significant factors for IBTR. Three hundred seventy-eight patients developed DM. The actuarial metastatic rate was 12% at 5 years and 17.9% at 10 years. Young age, number of positive nodes, pathologic tumor size, and tumor grade were significant factors for DM relapse. When conventional prognostic indices were taken into account screen-detected cancers showed no improvement in overall relapse or survival rate compared with symptomatic cases but did show a reduced risk of DM after IBTR. After 10 years IBTR relapse continued at a constant rate of 0.87% per annum. Conclusions: The Edinburgh BCT series has shown that screen-detected invasive breast cancers do not have significantly different clinical outcomes compared with symptomatic cases when pathologic risk factors are taken into account. This suggests that these patients be managed in a similar way.

  9. Bolus electron conformal therapy for the treatment of recurrent inflammatory breast cancer: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Michelle M., E-mail: mmkim@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Kanke, James E.; Zhang, Sean; Perkins, George H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The treatment of locoregionally recurrent breast cancer in patients who have previously undergone radiation therapy is challenging. Special techniques are often required that both eradicate the disease and minimize the risks of retreatment. We report the case of a patient with an early-stage left breast cancer who developed inflammatory-type recurrence requiring re-irradiation of the chest wall using bolus electron conformal therapy with image-guided treatment delivery. The patient was a 51-year-old woman who had undergone lumpectomy, axillary lymph node dissection, and adjuvant whole-breast radiation therapy for a stage I left breast cancer in June 1998. In March 2009, she presented at our institution with biopsy-proven recurrent inflammatory carcinoma and was aggressively treated with multi-agent chemotherapy followed by mastectomy that left a positive surgical margin. Given the patient's prior irradiation and irregular chest wall anatomy, bolus electron conformal therapy was used to treat her chest wall and draining lymphatics while sparing the underlying soft tissue. The patient still had no evidence of disease 21 months after treatment. Our results indicate that bolus electron conformal therapy is an accessible, effective radiation treatment approach for recurrent breast cancer in patients with irregular chest wall anatomy as a result of surgery. This approach may complement standard techniques used to reduce locoregional recurrence in the postmastectomy setting.

  10. Tumor Volume Changes on 1.5 Tesla Endorectal MRI During Neoadjuvant Androgen Suppression Therapy for Higher-Risk Prostate Cancer and Recurrence in Men Treated Using Radiation Therapy Results of the Phase II CALGB 9682 Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Amico, Anthony V.; Halabi, Susan; Tempany, Clare; Titelbaum, David; Philips, George K.; Loffredo, Marian; McMahon, Elizabeth; Sanford, Ben; Vogelzang, Nicholas J.; Small, Eric J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We prospectively determined whether the change in tumor volume (TV) during 2 months of neoadjuvant androgen suppression therapy (nAST) measured using conventional 1.5 Tesla endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (eMRI) was associated with the risk of recurrence after radiation (RT) and 6 months of AST. Patients and Methods: Between 1997 and 2001, 180 men with clinical stage T1c-T3cN0M0 adenocarcinoma of the prostate were registered. Fifteen were found to be ineligible and the institutional MR radiologist could not assess the TV in 32, leaving 133 for analysis. Multivariable Cox regression analysis was used to assess whether a significant association existed between eMRI-defined TV progression during nAST and time to recurrence adjusting for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, Gleason score (8 to 10 or 7 vs. 6 or less) and stage (T3 vs. T1-2). Results: After a median follow up of 6.7 years and adjusting for known prognostic factors, there was a significant increase in the risk of PSA failure (HR, 2.3 [95% CI, 1.1-4.5; p = 0.025) in men with eMRI-defined TV progression during nAST. Specifically, adjusted estimates of PSA failure were significantly higher (p = 0.032) in men with, compared with men without, eMRI-defined TV progression reaching 38% vs. 19%, respectively, by 5 years. Conclusion: Eradicating intraprostatic hormone refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) by maximizing local control and randomized trials assessing whether survival is improved when agents active against HRPC are combined with maximal local therapy are needed in men who progress based on eMRI during nAST

  11. Breast cancer recurrence after reoperation for surgical bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rikke Nørgaard; Bhaskaran, K; Heide-Jørgensen, U

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bleeding activates platelets that can bind tumour cells, potentially promoting metastatic growth in patients with cancer. This study investigated whether reoperation for postoperative bleeding is associated with breast cancer recurrence. METHODS: Using the Danish Breast Cancer Group...... database and the Danish National Patient Register (DNPR), a cohort of women with incident stage I-III breast cancer, who underwent breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy during 1996-2008 was identified. Information on reoperation for bleeding within 14 days of the primary surgery was retrieved from...

  12. Imaging of prostate cancer local recurrences: why and how?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouviere, Olivier; Lyonnet, Denis; Vitry, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    Because prostate cancer local recurrences can be efficiently treated by salvage therapies, it becomes critical to detect them early. The first alert is the rise of the prostate specific antigen (PSA) level after the post-treatment nadir, which can correspond to a distant recurrence, a local recurrence or both. This so-called biochemical failure (BF) is defined as PSA level >0.2 ng/ml after radical prostatectomy (RP) and PSA level > nadir+2 ng/ml after radiotherapy. There is no consensual definition of BF after cryotherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation or brachytherapy. Local recurrences after RP are treated by radiotherapy, those after radiotherapy by RP, cryotherapy, brachytherapy or HIFU ablation. Recurrences after cryotherapy or HIFU ablation can be treated by a second session or radiotherapy. Recurrences after brachytherapy are difficult to treat. In patients with BF, MRI can detect local recurrences, whatever the initial treatment was. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI seems particularly accurate. The role of spectroscopy remains controversial. Ultrasound-based techniques are less accurate, but this may change with the advent of ultrasonic contrast media. These recent advances in imaging may improve the outcome of salvage therapies (by improving patient selection and treatment targeting) and should open the way to focal salvage treatments in the near future. (orig.)

  13. Imaging of prostate cancer local recurrences: why and how?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouviere, Olivier; Lyonnet, Denis [Universite de Lyon, Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1, Faculte de Medecine Lyon Nord (France); Service d' Imagerie Urinaire et Vasculaire, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Hopital Edouard Herriot, Lyon (France); INSERM U 556, Lyon (France); Vitry, Thierry [Service d' Imagerie Urinaire et Vasculaire, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Hopital Edouard Herriot, Lyon (France)

    2010-05-15

    Because prostate cancer local recurrences can be efficiently treated by salvage therapies, it becomes critical to detect them early. The first alert is the rise of the prostate specific antigen (PSA) level after the post-treatment nadir, which can correspond to a distant recurrence, a local recurrence or both. This so-called biochemical failure (BF) is defined as PSA level >0.2 ng/ml after radical prostatectomy (RP) and PSA level > nadir+2 ng/ml after radiotherapy. There is no consensual definition of BF after cryotherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation or brachytherapy. Local recurrences after RP are treated by radiotherapy, those after radiotherapy by RP, cryotherapy, brachytherapy or HIFU ablation. Recurrences after cryotherapy or HIFU ablation can be treated by a second session or radiotherapy. Recurrences after brachytherapy are difficult to treat. In patients with BF, MRI can detect local recurrences, whatever the initial treatment was. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI seems particularly accurate. The role of spectroscopy remains controversial. Ultrasound-based techniques are less accurate, but this may change with the advent of ultrasonic contrast media. These recent advances in imaging may improve the outcome of salvage therapies (by improving patient selection and treatment targeting) and should open the way to focal salvage treatments in the near future. (orig.)

  14. The recurrence risk of placenta accreta following uterine conserving management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, K M; Anwar, A; Lindow, S W

    2015-01-01

    Placenta accreta is a condition of abnormal placental attachment that was usually treated by hysterectomy. Techniques to conserve the uterus are now commonly used and series of subsequent pregnancy outcomes have been reported. The recurrence risk of placenta accreta is now a relevant detail and is currently not known. This work was performed to calculate the recurrence risk by reviewing the published literature. A literature search using the terms "placenta accreta", "placenta percreta", "placenta increta", "abnormal placental attachment" and "placental attachment disorder" followed by hand-searching identified 6 papers that contained data concerning recurrence of placenta accreta in subsequent pregnancies following initial conservative treatment. Overall 407 pregnancies were recorded and 85.7% of women reported achieved a subsequent pregnancy following conservative treatment. The risk of recurrence of placental attachment disorder in a subsequent pregnancy was 19.9% (weighted mean, 95% CI 12.2-27.7). The recurrence risk of placental attachment disorder following uterine conservation treatments is 20% . This risk should be discussed with women with an antenatal diagnosis of a placental attachment disorder who may be considering uterine conservation in order to retain the option of a future pregnancy.

  15. Convolutional neural networks for prostate cancer recurrence prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Neeraj; Verma, Ruchika; Arora, Ashish; Kumar, Abhay; Gupta, Sanchit; Sethi, Amit; Gann, Peter H.

    2017-03-01

    Accurate prediction of the treatment outcome is important for cancer treatment planning. We present an approach to predict prostate cancer (PCa) recurrence after radical prostatectomy using tissue images. We used a cohort whose case vs. control (recurrent vs. non-recurrent) status had been determined using post-treatment follow up. Further, to aid the development of novel biomarkers of PCa recurrence, cases and controls were paired based on matching of other predictive clinical variables such as Gleason grade, stage, age, and race. For this cohort, tissue resection microarray with up to four cores per patient was available. The proposed approach is based on deep learning, and its novelty lies in the use of two separate convolutional neural networks (CNNs) - one to detect individual nuclei even in the crowded areas, and the other to classify them. To detect nuclear centers in an image, the first CNN predicts distance transform of the underlying (but unknown) multi-nuclear map from the input HE image. The second CNN classifies the patches centered at nuclear centers into those belonging to cases or controls. Voting across patches extracted from image(s) of a patient yields the probability of recurrence for the patient. The proposed approach gave 0.81 AUC for a sample of 30 recurrent cases and 30 non-recurrent controls, after being trained on an independent set of 80 case-controls pairs. If validated further, such an approach might help in choosing between a combination of treatment options such as active surveillance, radical prostatectomy, radiation, and hormone therapy. It can also generalize to the prediction of treatment outcomes in other cancers.

  16. The Impact of Exercise on Cancer Mortality, Recurrence, and Treatment-Related Adverse Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormie, Prue; Zopf, Eva M; Zhang, Xiaochen; Schmitz, Kathryn H

    2017-01-01

    The combination of an increasing number of new cancer cases and improving survival rates has led to a large and rapidly growing population with unique health-care requirements. Exercise has been proposed as a strategy to help address the issues faced by cancer patients. Supported by a growing body of research, major health organizations commonly identify the importance of incorporating exercise in cancer care and advise patients to be physically active. This systematic review comprehensively summarizes the available epidemiologic and randomized controlled trial evidence investigating the role of exercise in the management of cancer. Literature searches focused on determining the potential impact of exercise on 1) cancer mortality and recurrence and 2) adverse effects of cancer and its treatment. A total of 100 studies were reviewed involving thousands of individual patients whose exercise behavior was assessed following the diagnosis of any type of cancer. Compared with patients who performed no/less exercise, patients who exercised following a diagnosis of cancer were observed to have a lower relative risk of cancer mortality and recurrence and experienced fewer/less severe adverse effects. The findings of this review support the view that exercise is an important adjunct therapy in the management of cancer. Implications on cancer care policy and practice are discussed. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. [Ultrasound semiotics in recurrent ovarian cancer after optimal cytoreductive surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baklanova, N S; Kolomiets, L A; Frolova, I G; Viatkina, N V; Krasil'nikov, S É

    2014-01-01

    Features of ultrasound picture of morphologically verified recurrence of ovarian cancer in 21 patients are presented, who received combined treatment including cytoreductive surgery in the form of hysterectomy with oophorectomy, resection of the greater omentum and 6 courses of chemotherapy CAP for ovarian cancer stage III (FIGO). In all patients cytoreductive surgery was optimal--without residual tumor. Recurrence of the disease was detected in 12-48 months in 80.9% of the cases. Three variants of recurrence was revealed by ultrasonography: isolated peritoneal dissemination, in 14.2% of the cases, which was mainly detected during the first 12 months; single entities in the projection of the small pelvis (61.9%) and mixed form (local lesions of small pelvis and peritoneal dissemination) in 23.8% of the cases.

  18. Systemic treatment of advanced, persistent or recurrent cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reckova, M.

    2015-01-01

    The cervical cancer is the third most common malignancy in women in the world. Despite advances in screening and treatment there are a relatively large number of patients who are diagnosed with advanced stage of disease, or who have inoperable recurrence. In this group of patients, the main aim of a treatment is palliative intent. The main cytotoxic agent is cisplatin, but the responses are also observed with other chemotherapy agents. Improved therapeutic results are observed with combined platinum-based chemotherapy regimens as compared to cisplatin monotherapy. Overall, however, the treatment results in advanced, persistent and recurrent cervical cancer are unfavorable and disease is considered to be relatively chemo resistant. The new treatment approaches are searched and a significant therapeutic benefit, as far as progression-free and overall survival, has been recently demonstrated when adding bevacizumab to systemic chemotherapy. The current article is a review of systemic treatment in advanced, persistent and recurrent metastatic carcinoma of the cervix. (author)

  19. Decision Making of Women with Recurrent Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    Loomes & Sugden, 1982; Zeelenberg , 1999) that a certain proportion of women would experience decisional regret at the time of recurrence, these data...breast cancer (e.g., Bell, 1982; Zeelenberg , 1999). REPORTABLE OUTCOMES: • Peer-reviewed Oral Presentations a. Looking Ahead – Looking

  20. Increased fear of progression in cancer patients with recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Eun-Jung; Shin, Yong-Wook; Oh, Do-Youn; Hahm, Bong-Jin

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the fear of progression (FoP) in cancer patients and the discriminant ability of the Fear of Progression Questionnaire (FoP-Q) against the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), while also examining relationships between FoP, satisfaction outcomes and supportive needs. The FoP-Q and HADS were administered to 112 cancer patients in Korea during June and July 2006. The FoP-Q totals and subscales, and the HADS scores were compared across three groups (patients with recurrence, patients with metastases and controls experiencing neither). Comparison of the FoP-Q total score to HADS anxiety (HADS-A) and depression (HADS-D) scores showed higher FoP in the recurrence group compared to the control group (P=.009). Subscale score comparisons revealed a heightened "affective reaction" (P=.003) to cancer progression and fear of "loss of autonomy" (P=.011) in recurrence patients. FoP-Q score showed a moderate association with HADS-A (r=.54, P=.000) and a significant association with treatment satisfaction (r=-.26, P=.007), medical staff and communication (r=-.31, P=.001), and supportive needs (r=.41, P=.000). The importance of providing supportive interventions tailored to the specific emotional concerns of cancer patients, assessed via appropriate, disease-specific instruments, and the need to pay special attention to the concerns of recurrence patients are suggested. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Drug combination may be highly effective in recurrent ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Significant improvement with the use of a combination drug therapy for recurrent ovarian cancer was reported at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting in Chicago. The trial compared the activity of a combination of the dru

  2. Peritumoral eosinophils predict recurrence in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbaum, Lars; Pollheimer, Marion J; Kornprat, Peter; Lindtner, Richard A; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Langner, Cord

    2015-03-01

    In colorectal cancer, the presence and extent of eosinophil granulocyte infiltration may render important prognostic information. However, it remains unclear whether an increasing number of eosinophils might simply be linked to the overall inflammatory cell reaction or represent a self-contained, antitumoral mechanism that needs to be documented and promoted therapeutically. Peri- and intratumoral eosinophil counts were retrospectively assessed in 381 primary colorectal cancers from randomly selected patients. Tumors were diagnosed in American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC)/Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (UICC) stage I in 21%, stage II in 32%, stage III in 33%, and stage IV in 14%. Presence and extent of eosinophils was related to various histopathological parameters as well as patients' outcome. Overall, peri- and intratumoral eosinophils were observed in 86 and 75% cancer specimens. The peritumoral eosinophil count correlated strongly with the intratumoral eosinophil count (R=0.69; Peosinophil counts were significantly associated with lower T and N classification, better tumor differentiation, absence of vascular invasion, as well as improved progression-free and cancer-specific survival. However, only peritumoral eosinophils, but not intratumoral, were an independent prognosticator of favorable progression-free (hazard ratio 0.75; 95% confidence interval 0.58-0.98; P=0.04) and cancer-specific survival (hazard ratio 0.7; 95% confidence interval 0.52-0.93; P=0.01)-independent of the intensity of overall inflammatory cell reaction. This was also found for patients with AJCC/UICC stage II disease, wherein the presence of peritumoral eosinophils was significantly associated with favorable outcome. In conclusion, the number of peritumoral eosinophils had a significant favorable impact on prognosis of colorectal cancer patients independent of the overall tumor-associated inflammatory response. Evaluation of peritumoral eosinophils represents a promising

  3. Risk factors for recurrent otitis media with effusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baljošević Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Otitis media with effusion (OME is a common disease among the children aged from 6 months to 4 years, but recurrences are common after the extraction of ventilation tubes. The aim of the study was to determine the risk factors for recurrent OME after extraction of ventilation tubes. Methods. The research was a prospective study with 305 children aged 0 to 10 years with OME. Forty three (14% of them had recurrent OME. We analyzed the factors that could lead to the redevelopment of the disease after extrusion of the tubes. Results. It was found that the majority of children with recurrent disease was between the ages of 5 to 7 years (56% and had allergy in significantly higher rate than children without recurrence. In most cases (37.7%, the retention time of ventilating tube was above 10 months and the recurrent disease was diagnosed in 46.5% cases within a period of 10 to 12 months after extrusion of tubes. Conclusion. Children with OME and after ventilation tube extrusion need to be followed up for 1 year after the removal of tubes. It is necessary to inform the parents that the disease can recur. Children in the kindergarten, in preschool age and with a respiratory allergy had higher possibility for recurrent OME.

  4. PAM50 Risk of Recurrence Score Predicts 10-Year Distant Recurrence in a Comprehensive Danish Cohort of Postmenopausal Women Allocated to 5 Years of Endocrine Therapy for Hormone Receptor–Positive Early Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lænkholm, Anne Vibeke; Jensen, M.B.; Eriksen, J O

    2018-01-01

    with hormone receptor-positive early breast cancer treated with 5 years of endocrine therapy alone. Patients and Methods Using the population-based Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group database, follow-up data were collected on all patients diagnosed from 2000 through 2003 who, by nationwide guidelines, were...... treated with endocrine therapy for 5 years. Primary tumor blocks from 2,740 patients were tested with Prosigna and, after determination of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status, data from 2,558 hormone receptor-positive/HER2-negative samples were analyzed, including 1,395 node...

  5. Risk factors and prognosis of intravesical recurrence after surgical management of upper tract urothelial carcinoma: A 30-year single centre experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mohamed Elawdy

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: In our present series, bladder cancer recurrence of urothelial malignancy occurred in nearly half of the patients after surgical management of UTUC. Ureteric tumour was the only identifiable risk factor, thus patients with ureteric tumours may benefit from prophylactic intravesical chemoimmunotherapy. Bladder recurrence does not appear to affect the cancer-specific survival after surgical management of UTUC.

  6. Why do younger women have higher breast cancer recurrence rates after breast-conserving surgery?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Reiki; Matsuda, Masakazu; Miyayama, Haruhiko; Okazaki, Shinji; Kai, Chiharu; Ozaki, N.

    2003-01-01

    Preventing breast cancer recurrence after breast-conserving surgery is an important issue. The main factors contributing to such recurrence are positive margins, absence of radiotherapy and young age. To investigate the clinical significance of age in breast-conserving surgery, we examined the relationship between clinicopathological findings or outcome and age, especially young age. The cases were divided into three groups by age; 35 years old or less, 36-50y.o. and 51y.o. or higher. Between April 1989 and March 2003, 743 patients were treated with breast-conserving surgery. There were 49 patients aged 35 years old or less (6.6%). Younger age significantly correlated with positive surgical margin, lymph node metastases, higher proliferative activity, negative estrogen receptor (ER) or progesterone receptor (PgR), larger tumor size, and shorter nipple-tumor distances. Although younger patients had a higher recurrence rate irrespective of radiotherapy, margin status had an impact on recurrence rate. Thus, the reason young age was a significant factor for breast recurrence after breast-conserving surgery was that young patients frequently had numerous risk factors such as positive margin, higher proliferative activity, positive nodes, negative ER/PgR and larger tumor. However, negative surgical margins could reduce recurrence rates even in young women. These results suggest that more suitable criteria and strategies may be needed for young patients with breast cancer. (author)

  7. Smoking and Breast Cancer Recurrence after Breast Conservation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer D. Bishop

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Prior studies have shown earlier recurrence and decreased survival in patients with head and neck cancer who smoked while undergoing radiation therapy. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether smoking status at the time of partial mastectomy and radiation therapy for breast cancer affected recurrence or survival. Method. A single institution retrospective chart review was performed to correlate smoking status with patient demographics, tumor characteristics, and outcomes for patients undergoing partial mastectomy and radiation therapy. Results. There were 624 patients who underwent breast conservation surgery between 2002 and 2010 for whom smoking history and follow-up data were available. Smoking status was associated with race, patient age, and tumor stage, but not with grade, histology, or receptor status. African American women were more likely to be current smokers (22% versus 7%, P<0.001. With a mean follow-up of 45 months, recurrence was significantly higher in current smokers compared to former or never smokers (P=0.039. In a multivariate model adjusted for race and tumor stage, recurrence among current smokers was 6.7 times that of never smokers (CI 2.0–22.4. Conclusions. Although the numbers are small, this study suggests that smoking may negatively influence recurrence rates after partial mastectomy and radiation therapy. A larger study is needed to confirm these observations.

  8. Treatment of breast cancer recurrence with fast electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gremilov, V A; Svistunova, T M; Migmanova, N Sh [Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Leningrad. Inst. Onkologii

    1978-01-01

    Feasibility of treating mammary gland cancer recurrences by means of fast electron is investigated. Local recurrences and metastases were inradiated with 10 MeV fast electrons, and regional ones - with 15 MeV fast electrons. The irradiation technique used permitted the occurence of early and late local radiation responses as well as complications to be avoided. The treatment effect resulted from a value, form and clinical course of recurrence, as well as from cumulative dose with optimum value of 5000-6000 rad. The direct and nearest treatment results in respect of local criterion of the effect are recognized as satisfactory. Taking into consideration, that local and regional recurrences and metastases in the most part of patients are the beginning of clinical manifestation of tumor process generalization, it is assumed, that local treatment of local and regional recurrences and metastases of mammary gland cancer is not reliable therapeutic measure and must be combined with general treatment (chemo- and hormonotherapy) and specific measures enhancing the total resistance of the body.

  9. Prognostic Aspects of DCE-MRI in Recurrent Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gollub, M.J.; Gultekin, D.H.; Sohn, M. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Cao, K. [Peking University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Kuk, D.; Gonen, M. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, New York, NY (United States); Schwartz, L.H. [Columbia University Medical Center/New York Presbyterian Hospital, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Weiser, M.R.; Temple, L.K.; Nash, G.M.; Guillem, J.G.; Garcia-Aguilar, J.; Paty, P.B. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Wang, M. [Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Colorectal Surgery, Shanghai (China); Goodman, K. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, New York, NY (United States)

    2013-12-15

    To explore whether pre-reoperative dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI findings correlate with clinical outcome in patients who undergo surgical treatment for recurrent rectal carcinoma. A retrospective study of DCE-MRI in patients with recurrent rectal cancer was performed after obtaining an IRB waiver. We queried our PACS from 1998 to 2012 for examinations performed for recurrent disease. Two radiologists in consensus outlined tumour regions of interest on perfusion images. We explored the correlation between K{sup trans}, K{sub ep}, V{sub e}, AUC90 and AUC180 with time to re-recurrence of tumour, overall survival and resection margin status. Univariate Cox PH models were used for survival, while univariate logistic regression was used for margin status. Among 58 patients with pre-treatment DCE-MRI who underwent resection, 36 went directly to surgery and 18 had positive margins. K{sup trans} (0.55, P = 0.012) and K{sub ep} (0.93, P = 0.04) were inversely correlated with positive margins. No significant correlations were noted between K{sup trans}, K{sub ep}, V{sub e}, AUC90 and AUC180 and overall survival or time to re-recurrence of tumour. K{sup trans} and K{sub ep} were significantly associated with clear resection margins; however overall survival and time to re-recurrence were not predicted. Such information might be helpful for treatment individualisation and deserves further investigation. (orig.)

  10. Prognostic Aspects of DCE-MRI in Recurrent Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gollub, M.J.; Gultekin, D.H.; Sohn, M.; Cao, K.; Kuk, D.; Gonen, M.; Schwartz, L.H.; Weiser, M.R.; Temple, L.K.; Nash, G.M.; Guillem, J.G.; Garcia-Aguilar, J.; Paty, P.B.; Wang, M.; Goodman, K.

    2013-01-01

    To explore whether pre-reoperative dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI findings correlate with clinical outcome in patients who undergo surgical treatment for recurrent rectal carcinoma. A retrospective study of DCE-MRI in patients with recurrent rectal cancer was performed after obtaining an IRB waiver. We queried our PACS from 1998 to 2012 for examinations performed for recurrent disease. Two radiologists in consensus outlined tumour regions of interest on perfusion images. We explored the correlation between K trans , K ep , V e , AUC90 and AUC180 with time to re-recurrence of tumour, overall survival and resection margin status. Univariate Cox PH models were used for survival, while univariate logistic regression was used for margin status. Among 58 patients with pre-treatment DCE-MRI who underwent resection, 36 went directly to surgery and 18 had positive margins. K trans (0.55, P = 0.012) and K ep (0.93, P = 0.04) were inversely correlated with positive margins. No significant correlations were noted between K trans , K ep , V e , AUC90 and AUC180 and overall survival or time to re-recurrence of tumour. K trans and K ep were significantly associated with clear resection margins; however overall survival and time to re-recurrence were not predicted. Such information might be helpful for treatment individualisation and deserves further investigation. (orig.)

  11. ABO blood groups as a prognostic factor for recurrence in ovarian and vulvar cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montavon Sartorius, Céline; Schoetzau, Andreas; Kettelhack, Henriette; Fink, Daniel; Hacker, Neville F; Fedier, André; Jacob, Francis; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola

    2018-01-01

    The relationship between ABO blood groups (BG) and risk of incidence in cancers including gynecological cancers has been widely studied, showing increased incidence risk for BG A patients. As available data are inconsistent we investigated whether BG and their anti-glycan antibodies (anti-A and anti-B) have prognostic values in gynecological cancers. We retrospectively evaluated 974 patients with gynecological cancers in three cancer centers (Switzerland and Australia) between 1974 and 2014 regarding the relationships between clinico-pathological findings and the BG. Time to disease recurrence was significantly influenced by BG in patients with ovarian (n = 282) and vulvar (n = 67) cancer. BG O or B patients showed a significantly increased risk for ovarian cancer relapse compared to A, 59% and 82%, respectively (p = 0.045; HR O vs A = 1.59 (CI 1.01-2.51) and (p = 0.036; HR A vs B = 0.55 (CI 0.32-0.96). Median time to relapse for advanced stage (n = 126) ovarian cancer patients was 18.2 months for BG O and 32.2 for A (p = 0.031; HR O vs A = 2.07 (CI 1.07-4.02)). BG also significantly influenced relapse-free survival in patients with vulvar cancer (p = 0.002), with BG O tending to have increased relapse risk compared to A (p = 0.089). Blood groups hence associate with recurrence in ovarian and vulvar cancer: women with BG O seem to have a lower ovarian cancer incidence, however are more likely to relapse earlier. The significance of the BG status as a prognostic value is evident and may be helpful to oncologists in prognosticating disease outcome and selecting the appropriate therapy.

  12. Risk Factors for Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection and Renal Scarring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren, Ron; Shaikh, Nader; Pohl, Hans; Gravens-Mueller, Lisa; Ivanova, Anastasia; Zaoutis, Lisa; Patel, Melissa; deBerardinis, Rachel; Parker, Allison; Bhatnagar, Sonika; Haralam, Mary Ann; Pope, Marcia; Kearney, Diana; Sprague, Bruce; Barrera, Raquel; Viteri, Bernarda; Egigueron, Martina; Shah, Neha; Hoberman, Alejandro

    2015-07-01

    To identify risk factors for recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI) and renal scarring in children who have had 1 or 2 febrile or symptomatic UTIs and received no antimicrobial prophylaxis. This 2-year, multisite prospective cohort study included 305 children aged 2 to 71 months with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) receiving placebo in the RIVUR (Randomized Intervention for Vesicoureteral Reflux) study and 195 children with no VUR observed in the CUTIE (Careful Urinary Tract Infection Evaluation) study. Primary exposure was presence of VUR; secondary exposures included bladder and bowel dysfunction (BBD), age, and race. Outcomes were recurrent febrile or symptomatic urinary tract infection (F/SUTI) and renal scarring. Children with VUR had higher 2-year rates of recurrent F/SUTI (Kaplan-Meier estimate 25.4% compared with 17.3% for VUR and no VUR, respectively). Other factors associated with recurrent F/SUTI included presence of BBD at baseline (adjusted hazard ratio: 2.07 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.09-3.93]) and presence of renal scarring on the baseline (99m)Tc-labeled dimercaptosuccinic acid scan (adjusted hazard ratio: 2.88 [95% CI: 1.22-6.80]). Children with BBD and any degree of VUR had the highest risk of recurrent F/SUTI (56%). At the end of the 2-year follow-up period, 8 (5.6%) children in the no VUR group and 24 (10.2%) in the VUR group had renal scars, but the difference was not statistically significant (adjusted odds ratio: 2.05 [95% CI: 0.86-4.87]). VUR and BBD are risk factors for recurrent UTI, especially when they appear in combination. Strategies for preventing recurrent UTI include antimicrobial prophylaxis and treatment of BBD. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  13. [Role of angiotensin II receptor type 2 in predicting biochemical recurrence in the treatment of prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibichyan, M B; Kogan, M I; Chernogubova, E A; Pavlenko, I A; Matishov, D G

    2016-12-01

    To identify markers for predicting aggressive forms of prostate cancer. The study retrospectively evaluated expression of angiotensin II type 2 receptors (AT2-R) in prostate needle biopsy tissue from patients with and without biochemical recurrence after combined hormone and radiation therapy. The study findings showed that low expression of AT2-R in prostate tissue was associated with a high risk of biochemical recurrence. The data on the nature of AT2-R expression in prostate tissue of prostate cancer patients may be considered as a tool for predicting biochemical recurrence after combined hormone and radiation therapy. The test has a sensitivity of 87.5% and specificity of 85.71%.

  14. Ovarian cancer mimicking recurrence at colorectal anastomosis: report of a case.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reardon, C M

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: The aim of this article is to emphasize the increased risk of developing metachronous ovarian tumors after resection of rectal cancer. METHOD AND RESULTS: We report the case of a postmenopausal female patient who, five years after anterior resection, developed a primary ovarian malignancy that invaded a rectal anastomosis and in so doing mimicked a recurrence of a Dukes A rectal cancer. To our knowledge, such an occurrence has not been described previously in the literature. CONCLUSION: This case illustrates the possible benefits of routine prophylactic oophorectomy at the time of colorectal cancer resection.

  15. Effect of Tailored Dose-Dense Chemotherapy vs Standard 3-Weekly Adjuvant Chemotherapy on Recurrence-Free Survival Among Women With High-Risk Early Breast Cancer: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foukakis, Theodoros; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Bengtsson, Nils-Olof; Brandberg, Yvonne; Wallberg, Birgitta; Fornander, Tommy; Mlineritsch, Brigitte; Schmatloch, Sabine; Singer, Christian F; Steger, Günther; Egle, Daniel; Karlsson, Eva; Carlsson, Lena; Loibl, Sibylle; Untch, Michael; Hellström, Mats; Johansson, Hemming; Anderson, Harald; Malmström, Per; Gnant, Michael; Greil, Richard; Möbus, Volker; Bergh, Jonas

    2016-11-08

    Standard dosing of chemotherapy based on body surface area results in marked interpatient variation in pharmacokinetics, toxic effects, and efficacy. Whether tailored dosing can improve outcomes is unknown, as is the role of dose-dense adjuvant chemotherapy. To determine whether tailored dose-dense adjuvant chemotherapy improves the outcomes of early breast cancer compared with a standard 3-weekly chemotherapy schedule. A randomized, open-label, phase 3 trial of women aged 65 years and younger who had surgery for nonmetastatic node-positive or high-risk node-negative breast cancer at 86 sites in Sweden, Germany, and Austria between February 20, 2007, and September 14, 2011. Patients were randomized 1:1 either to 4 cycles of leukocyte nadir-based tailored and dose-dense adjuvant epirubicin and cyclophosphamide every 2 weeks followed by 4 cycles of tailored dose-dense docetaxel every 2 weeks, or to standard-interval chemotherapy with 3 cycles of fluorouracil and epirubicin-cyclophosphamide every 3 weeks followed by 3 cycles of docetaxel every 3 weeks. The primary end point was breast cancer recurrence-free survival (BCRFS). Secondary end points included 5-year event-free survival (EFS), distant disease-free survival (DDFS), overall survival (OS), and rates of grade 3 or 4 toxic effects. Among 2017 randomized patients (1006 in the tailored dose-dense group and 1011 in the control group; median [IQR] age, 51 [45-58] years; 80% with hormone receptor-positive tumors; 97% with node-positive disease), 2000 received study treatment (≥1 cycle of chemotherapy; 1001 in the tailored dose-dense group and 999 in the control group). After a median follow-up of 5.3 years (IQR, 4.5-6.1 years), 269 BCRFS events were reported, 118 in the tailored dose-dense group and 151 in the control group (HR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.61-1.01; log-rank P = .06; 5-year BCRFS, 88.7% vs 85.0%). The tailored dose-dense group had significantly better EFS than the control group (HR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0

  16. Economic evaluation of diagnostic localization following biochemical prostate cancer recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barocas, Daniel A; Bensink, Mark E; Berry, Kristin; Musa, Zahra; Bodnar, Carolyn; Dann, Robert; Ramsey, Scott D

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess potential cost-effectiveness of using a prostate cancer specific functional imaging technology capable of identifying residual localized disease versus small volume metastatic disease for asymptomatic men with low but detectable prostate specific antigen (PSA) elevation following radical prostatectomy. Markov modeling was used to estimate the incremental impact on healthcare system costs (2012 USD) and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) of two alternative strategies: (i) using the new diagnostic to guide therapy versus (ii) current usual care-using a combination of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and bone scan to guide therapy. Costs were based on estimates from literature and Medicare reimbursement. Prostate cancer progression, survival, utilities, and background risk of all-cause mortality were obtained from literature. Base-case diagnostic sensitivity (75 percent), specificity (90 percent), and cost (USD 2,500) were provided by our industry partner GE Healthcare. The new diagnostic strategy provided an average gain of 1.83 (95 percent uncertainty interval [UI]: 1.24-2.64) QALYs with added costs of USD 15,595 (95 percent UI: USD -6,330-44,402) over 35 years. The resulting incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was USD 8,516/QALY (95 percent UI: USD -2,947-22,372). RESULTS were most influenced by the utility discounting rate and test performance characteristics; however, the new diagnostic provided clinical benefits over a wide range of sensitivity and specificity. This analysis suggests a diagnostic technology capable of identifying whether men with biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy have localized versus metastatic disease would be a cost-effective alternative to current standard work-up. The results support additional investment in development and validation of such a diagnostic.

  17. [Identifying clinical risk factors in recurrent idiopathic deep venous thrombosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Río Solá, M Lourdes; González Fajardo, José Antonio; Vaquero Puerta, Carlos

    2016-03-18

    Oral anticoagulant therapy for more than 6 months in patients with an episode of idiopathic thromboembolic disease is controversial. The objective was to determine predictive clinical signs that identify patients at increased risk of thromboembolic recurrence after stopping anticoagulant therapy for 6 months after an episode of idiopathic deep vein thrombosis (DVT). A prospective study which included 306 consecutive patients with a first episode of idiopathic DVT from June 2012 to June 2014. Predictor variables of recurrent thromboembolic disease and episodes of recurrence during follow-up of the patients (28.42 months) were collected. We performed a multivariate analysis to analyze possible predictors (Pthrombus (P=.001) in males, and persistence of residual thrombus in women (P=.046). The mean recurrence-free survival was shorter in both groups. The presence of echogenic thrombus in men and the existence of residual DVT in women were 2 clinical signs associated with increased risk of thromboembolic recurrence after stopping anticoagulant therapy for 6 months after an episode of idiopathic DVT in our study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Statin treatment and risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Cu Dinh; Andersson, Charlotte; Jensen, Thomas Bo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Statins may decrease the risk of primary venous thromboembolism (VTE), that is, deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) but the effect of statins in preventing recurrent VTE is less clear. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the association between statin ...

  19. Risk factors for locoregional recurrence in patients with resected N1 non-small cell lung cancer: a retrospective study to identify patterns of failure and implications for adjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Chengcheng; Gao, Shugeng; Hui, Zhouguang; Liang, Jun; Lv, Jima; Wang, Xiaozhen; He, Jie; Wang, Luhua

    2013-01-01

    Meta-analysis of randomized trials has shown that postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) had a detrimental effect on overall survival (OS) in patients with resected N1 non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Conversely, the locoregional recurrence (LR) rate is reported to be high without adjuvant PORT in these patients. We have evaluated the pattern of failure, actuarial risk and risk factors for LR in order to identify the subset of N1 NSCLC patients with the highest risk of LR. These patients could potentially benefit from PORT. We conducted a retrospective study on 199 patients with pathologically confirmed T1–3N1M0 NSCLC who underwent surgery. None of the patients had positive surgical margins or received preoperative therapy or PORT. The median follow-up was 53.8 months. Complete mediastinal lymph node (MLN) dissection and examination was defined as ≥3 dissected and examined MLN stations; incomplete MLN dissection or examination (IMD) was defined as <3 dissected or examined MLN stations. The primary end point of this study was freedom from LR (FFLR). Differences between patient groups were compared and risk factors for LR were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. LR was identified in 41 (20.6%) patients, distant metastasis (DM) was identified in 79 (39.7%) patients and concurrent LR and DM was identified in 25 (12.6%) patients. The 3- and 5-year OS rates in patients with resected N1 NSCLC were 78.4% and 65.6%, respectively. The corresponding FFLR rates were 80.8% and 77.3%, respectively. Univariate analyses identified that nonsmokers, ≤23 dissected lymph nodes, visceral pleural invasion and lymph node ratio >10% were significantly associated with lower FFLR rates (P < 0.05). Multivariate analyses further confirmed positive lymph nodes at station 10 and IMD as risk factors for LR (P < 0.05). The 5-year LR rate was highest in patients with both these risk factors (48%). The incidence of LR in patients with surgically resected T1–3N1M0 NSCLC is

  20. Value of dual time point F-18 FDG-PET/CT imaging for the evaluation of prognosis and risk factors for recurrence in patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Yoko, E-mail: pecampecam@yahoo.co.jp [PET Center, Kofu Neurosurgical Hospital, ZIP Code 400-0805, Sakaori 1-16-18, Kofu city, Yamanashi Prefecture (Japan); Nambu, Atsushi, E-mail: nambu-a@gray.plala.or.jp [Department of Radiology, University of Yamanashi, ZIP Code 409-3898, Yamanashi University Faculty of Medicine, Shimokato 1110, Chuo City, Yamanashi Prefecture (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi, E-mail: honishi@yamanashi.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, University of Yamanashi, ZIP Code 409-3898, Yamanashi University Faculty of Medicine, Shimokato 1110, Chuo City, Yamanashi Prefecture (Japan); Sawada, Eiichi, E-mail: e_sawaday_61674@ybb.ne.jp [Department of Radiology, University of Yamanashi, ZIP Code 409-3898, Yamanashi University Faculty of Medicine, Shimokato 1110, Chuo City, Yamanashi Prefecture (Japan); Tominaga, Licht, E-mail: lichtt@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, University of Yamanashi, ZIP Code 409-3898, Yamanashi University Faculty of Medicine, Shimokato 1110, Chuo City, Yamanashi Prefecture (Japan); Kuriyama, Kengo, E-mail: kuriyama@yamanashi.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, University of Yamanashi, ZIP Code 409-3898, Yamanashi University Faculty of Medicine, Shimokato 1110, Chuo City, Yamanashi Prefecture (Japan); Komiyama, Takafumi, E-mail: takafumi-ymu@umin.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kofu Municipal Hospital, ZIP Code 400-0832, Masutsubo-cho 366, Kofu City, Yamanashi Prefecture (Japan); Marino, Kan, E-mail: marino-akrf@ych.pref.yamanashi.jp [Department of Radiology, Yamanashi Prefectural Hospital, ZIP Code 400-8506, Fujimi 1-1-1, Kofu City, Yamanashi Prefecture (Japan); Aoki, Shinichi, E-mail: aokis@yamanashi.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, University of Yamanashi, ZIP Code 409-3898, Yamanashi University Faculty of Medicine, Shimokato 1110, Chuo City, Yamanashi Prefecture (Japan); and others

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate prognostic and risk factors for recurrence after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in patients with stage I non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), focusing on dual time point [18]F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET). Materials and methods: We prospectively evaluated 57 patients with stage I NSCLC (45 T1N0M0 and 12 T2N0M0) who had undergone pretreatment FDG-PET/CT and were subsequently treated with SBRT. All patients received a whole-body PET/CT scan at 60 min and a whole-lung at 120 min after the injection. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) and retention index (RI) of the lesions were calculated. Local recurrence, regional lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, and the recurrence pattern were evaluated. Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were performed to evaluate prognostic factors or risk factors of recurrence. Results: During the median follow-up period of 27 months, local recurrence, regional lymph node metastasis, and distant metastasis were seen in 17 (30%), 12 (21%), and 17 (30%) of the 57 patients, respectively. The 3-year overall survival rate was 63.4%. SUV{sub max} did not affect any recurrence, DFS, OS, or CSS. RI significantly predicted higher distant metastasis (HR 47.546, p = 0.026). In contrast, RI tended to predict lower local recurrence (HR 0.175, p = 0.246) and regional lymph node metastasis (HR 0.109, p = 0.115). Conclusions: SUV{sub max} at staging FDG-PET does not predict any recurrence, DFS, OS or CSS. In contrast, higher RI predicts higher distant metastasis and tended to predict lower local or regional lymph node metastasis.

  1. Eliminating Late Recurrence to Eradicate Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    reviewer, Integration Panel 2010 - French National Research Agency External grant reviewer 2010 - New Jersey Cancer Commission Program project reviewer...pathologists.     In   2013,   I   began   service   as  Associate  Director   ( Basic   Science)  for  the  “Molecular  and...to confl uence in 3.5-cm dishes and incubated overnight in assay media lacking EGF for MCF10A cells or DMEM + 2% FBS for MDA-MB-231 cells. Wound

  2. Brachial plexopathy: recurrent cancer or radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lederman, R.J.; Wilbourn, A.J.

    1984-01-01

    We reviewed clinical and electrodiagnostic features of 16 patients with neoplastic brachial plexopathy (NBP) and 17 patients with radiation-induced plexopathy (RBP). The groups were similar in symptom-free interval after cancer diagnosis and location of the plexus lesions. NBP patients had pain and Horner's syndrome; RBP patients had paresthesias, but rarely Horner's. NBP patients presented earlier after symptom onset and had a shorter course. RBP patients more frequently had abnormal sensory and normal motor nerve conduction studies and characteristically had fasciculations or myokymia on EMG

  3. Selective Attention and Fear of Cancer Recurrence in Breast Cancer Survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Custers, J. A. E.; Becker, E. S.; Gielissen, M. F. M.; van Laarhoven, H. W. M.; Rinck, M.; Prins, J. B.

    2015-01-01

    Anxious people show an attentional bias towards threatening information. It was investigated whether an attentional bias exists for cancer-related stimuli in breast cancer survivors and if different levels of fear of cancer recurrence would lead to different patterns of selective attention. Breast

  4. High-dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB) for primary or recurrent cancer in the vagina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beriwal, Sushil; Heron, Dwight E; Mogus, Robert; Edwards, Robert P; Kelley, Joseph L; Sukumvanich, Paniti

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of HDR brachytherapy for primary or recurrent vaginal cancer. Between the years 2000 to 2006, 18 patients with primary or recurrent vaginal cancer were treated with brachytherapy (HDRB). Six patients had primary vaginal cancer (stage II to IVA) while 12 were treated for isolated vaginal recurrence (primary cervix = 4, vulva = 1 and endometrium = 7). Five patients had previous pelvic radiation therapy. All except one patient received external beam radiation therapy to a median dose of 45 Gy (range 31.2–55.8 Gy). The HDRB was intracavitary using a vaginal cylinder in 5 patients and interstitial using a modified Syed-Nesblett template in 13 patients. The dose of interstitial brachytherapy was 18.75 Gy in 5 fractions delivered twice daily. The median follow-up was 18 months (range 6–66 months). Complete response (CR) was achieved in all but one patient (94%). Of these 17 patients achieving a CR, 1 had local recurrence and 3 had systemic recurrence at a median time of 6 months (range 6–22 months). The 2-year actuarial local control and cause-specific survival for the entire group were 88% and 82.5%, respectively. In subset analysis, the crude local control was 100% for primary vaginal cancer, 100% for the group with recurrence without any prior radiation and 67% for group with recurrence and prior radiation therapy. Two patients had late grade 3 or higher morbidity (rectovaginal fistula in one patient and chronic vaginal ulcer resulting in bleeding in one patient). Both these patients had prior radiation therapy. Our small series suggests that HDRB is efficacious for primary or recurrent vaginal cancer. Patients treated with primary disease and those with recurrent disease without prior irradiation have the greatest benefit from HDRB in this setting. The salvage rate for patients with prior radiation therapy is lower with a higher risk of significant complications. Additional patients and follow-up are ongoing

  5. Stenting Prior to Cystectomy is an Independent Risk Factor for Upper Urinary Tract Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Bernhard; Furrer, Marc A; Wuethrich, Patrick Y; Burkhard, Fiona C; Thalmann, George N; Roth, Beat

    2017-12-01

    Patients with bladder cancer who present with hydronephrosis may require drainage of the affected kidney before receiving further cancer treatment. Drainage can be done by retrograde stenting or percutaneously. However, retrograde stenting carries the risk of tumor cell spillage to the upper urinary tract. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether patients with bladder cancer are at higher risk for upper urinary tract recurrence if retrograde stenting has been performed prior to radical cystectomy. We retrospectively analyzed the records of 1,005 consecutive patients with bladder cancer who underwent radical cystectomy at our department between January 2000 and June 2016. Negative intraoperative ureteral margins were mandatory for study inclusion. Patients received regular followup according to our institutional protocol, including imaging of the upper urinary tract and urine cytology. Preoperative drainage of the upper urinary tract was performed in 114 of the 1,005 patients (11%), including in 53 (46%) by Double-J® stenting and in 61 (54%) by percutaneous nephrostomy. Recurrence developed in the upper urinary tract in 31 patients (3%) at a median of 17 months after cystectomy, including 7 of 53 (13%) in the Double-J group, 0% in the nephrostomy group and 24 of 891 (3%) in the no drainage group. Multivariate regression analysis revealed a higher risk of upper urinary tract recurrence if patients underwent Double-J stenting (HR 4.54, 95% CI 1.43-14.38, p = 0.01) and preoperative intravesical instillations (HR 2.94, 95% CI 1.40-6.16, p = 0.004). Patients who undergo Double-J stenting prior to radical cystectomy are at higher risk for upper urinary tract recurrence. If preoperative upper urinary tract drainage is required, percutaneous drainage might be recommended. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Patients' experience with cancer recurrence: a meta-ethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanat, Marta; Boulton, Mary; Watson, Eila

    2016-03-01

    Recurrence is a difficult stage in the cancer journey as it brings to the fore the life-threatening nature of the illness. This meta-ethnography examines and synthesises the findings of qualitative research regarding patients' experience of cancer recurrence. A systematic search of the qualitative studies published between January 1994 to April 2014 was undertaken. Seventeen relevant papers were identified, and a meta-ethnography was conducted. Six third-order concepts were developed to capture patients' experiences: experiencing emotional turmoil following diagnosis, which described the emotional impact of diagnosis and the influence of previous experiences on how the news were received; experiencing otherness, encompassing changed relationships; seeking support in the health care system, describing the extent of information needs and the importance of the relationship with health care professionals; adjusting to a new prognosis and uncertain future, highlighting the changes associated with uncertainty; finding strategies to deal with recurrence, describing ways of maintaining emotional well-being and regaining a sense of control over cancer; and facing mortality, describing the difficulties in facing death-related concerns and associated consequences. This meta-ethnography clarifies the fundamental aspects of patients' experience of recurrence. It suggests that health care professionals can promote a positive experience of care and help lessen the psychosocial impact of recurrence by providing information in an approachable way and being sensitive to their changing needs. It also points to the importance of supporting patients in adopting strategies to regain a sense of control and to address their potential mortality and its impact on loved ones. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. The Impact of Liver Graft Injury on Cancer Recurrence Posttransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chang-Xian; Man, Kwan; Lo, Chung-Mau

    2017-11-01

    Liver transplantation is the most effective treatment for selected patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. However, cancer recurrence, posttransplantation, remains to be the critical issue that affects the long-term outcome of hepatocellular carcinoma recipients. In addition to tumor biology itself, increasing evidence demonstrates that acute-phase liver graft injury is a result of hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury (which is an inevitable consequence during liver transplantation) and may promote cancer recurrence at late phase posttransplantation. The liver grafts from living donors, donors after cardiac death, and steatotic donors have been considered as promising sources of organs for liver transplantation and are associated with high incidence of liver graft injury. The acute-phase liver graft injury will trigger a series of inflammatory cascades, which may not only activate the cell signaling pathways regulating the tumor cell invasion and migration but also mobilize the circulating progenitor and immune cells to facilitate tumor recurrence and metastasis. The injured liver graft may also provide the favorable microenvironment for tumor cell growth, migration, and invasion through the disturbance of microcirculatory barrier function, induction of hypoxia and angiogenesis. This review aims to summarize the latest findings about the role and mechanisms of liver graft injury resulted from hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury on tumor recurrence posttransplantation, both in clinical and animal cohorts.

  8. Primary Hyperaldosteronism As A Risk Factor For Recurrent Nephrolithiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekamol Tantisattamo

    2012-06-01

    Hyperaldosteronism can cause hypercalciuria, phosphaturia, and hypocitraturia, all of which are risk factors for nephrolithiasis. Additionally, hyperaldosteronism and deoxycorticosterone mediated hypertension have been associated with hypocalcemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Our case augments earlier literature suggesting increased risk for nephrolithiasis in patients with hyperaldosteronism and suggests that hyperaldosteronism should be considered as a risk factor for patient with nephrolithiasis. It remains unclear if both primary and secondary hyperaldosteronism increase the relative risk for nephrolithiasis and the role of aldosterone receptor antagonist therapy for recurrent nephrolithiasis associated with hyperaldosteronism.

  9. Risk factors for treatment failure and recurrence of anisometropic amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirandi, Ece Uzun; Akar, Serpil; Gokyigit, Birsen; Onmez, Funda Ebru Aksoy; Oto, Sibel

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with failed vision improvement and recurrence following occlusion therapy for anisometropic amblyopia in children aged 7-9 years. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 64 children aged 7-9 years who had been diagnosed as having anisometropic amblyopia and were treated with patching. Functional treatment failure was defined as final visual acuity in the amblyopic eye of worse than 20/32. Improvement of fewer than two logMAR lines was considered relative treatment failure. Recurrence was defined as the reduction of at least two logMAR levels of visual acuity after decreased or discontinued patching. Functional and relative success rates were 51.6 and 62.5 %, respectively. The most important factor for functional treatment failure [adjusted odds ratio (OR) (95 % confidence interval, CI) 11.57 (1.4-95.74)] and the only risk factor for recurrence [adjusted OR (95 % CI) 3.04 (1.13-8.12)] were the same: high spherical equivalent (SE) of the amblyopic eye. A large interocular difference in the best-corrected visual acuity was found to be a risk factor for both functional and relative failure. High SE of the amblyopic eye was the most influential risk factor for treatment failure and recurrence in compliant children aged 7-9 years.

  10. Isopropanolic black cohosh extract and recurrence-free survival after breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneicke-von Zepelin, H H; Meden, H; Kostev, K; Schröder-Bernhardi, D; Stammwitz, U; Becher, H

    2007-03-01

    To investigate the influence of an isopropanolic Cimicifuga racemosa extract (iCR) on recurrence-free survival after breast cancer, including estrogen-dependent tumors. This pharmacoepidemiologic observational retrospective cohort study examined breast cancer patients treated at general, gynecological and internal facilities linked to a medical database in Germany. The main endpoint was disease-free survival following a diagnosis of breast cancer. The impact of treatment with iCR following diagnosis was analyzed by Cox-proportional hazards models, controlling for age and other confounders. Of 18,861 patients, a total of 1,102 had received an iCR therapy. The mean overall observation time was 3.6 years. Results showed that iCR was not associated with an increase in the risk of recurrence but associated with prolonged disease-free survival. After 2 years following initial diagnosis, 14% of the control group had developed a recurrence, while the iCR group reached this proportion after 6.5 years. The primary Cox regression model controlling for age, tamoxifen use and other confounders demonstrated a protractive effect of iCR on the rate of recurrence (hazard ratio 0.83, 95% confidence interval 0.69 0.99). This effect remained consistent throughout all variations of the statistical model, including subgroup analyses. TNM status was unknown but did not bias the iCR treatment decision as investigated separately. Hence, it was assumed to be equally distributed between treatment groups. Correlation analyses showed good internal and external validity of the database. An increase in the risk of breast cancer recurrence for women having had iCR treatment, compared to women not treated with iCR is unlikely.

  11. Analysis of risk factors and risk assessment for ischemic stroke recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-ying LONG

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To screen the risk factors for recurrence of ischemic stroke and to assess the risk of recurrence. Methods Essen Stroke Risk Score (ESRS was used to evaluate the risk of recurrence in 176 patients with ischemic stroke (96 cases of first onset and 80 cases of recurrence. Univariate and multivariate stepwise Logistic regression analysis was used to screen risk factors for recurrence of ischemic stroke.  Results There were significant differences between first onset group and recurrence group on age, the proportion of > 75 years old, hypertension, diabetes, coronary heart disease, peripheral angiopathy, transient ischemic attack (TIA or ischemic stroke, drinking and ESRS score (P < 0.05, for all. First onset group included one case of ESRS 0 (1.04%, 8 cases of 1 (8.33%, 39 cases of 2 (40.63%, 44 cases of 3 (45.83%, 4 cases of 4 (4.17%. Recurrence group included 2 cases of ESRS 3 (2.50%, 20 cases of 4 (25% , 37 cases of 5 (46.25% , 18 cases of 6 (22.50% , 3 cases of 7 (3.75% . There was significant difference between 2 groups (Z = -11.376, P = 0.000. Logistic regression analysis showed ESRS > 3 score was independent risk factor for recurrence of ischemic stroke (OR = 31.324, 95%CI: 3.934-249.430; P = 0.001.  Conclusions ESRS > 3 score is the independent risk factor for recurrence of ischemic stroke. It is important to strengthen risk assessment of recurrence of ischemic stroke. To screen and control risk factors is the key to secondary prevention of ischemic stroke. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.07.011

  12. Differentiated thyroid cancer: reclassification of the risk of recurrence based on the response to initial treatment; Carcinoma diferenciado de tiroides: reclasificación del riesgo de recurrencia según la respuesta al tratamiento inicial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez, M. P.; Lozano Bullrich, M. P.; Rey, M.; Ridruejo, M. C.; Bomarito, M. J.; Claus Hermberg, H.; Pozzo, M.J., E-mail: mpazmartinez@yahoo.com [Hospital Alemán, Servicio de Endocrinología, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is the most frequent endocrine tumor generally showing a favourable outcome. The American Thyroid Association (ATA) classification system is not only useful to assess the risk of recurrence but also guides tumor follow-up. However, this system shows a static image of the patient at the beginning of treatment based on clinical and pathological features, and it has not been designed to be modified along the clinical course of disease. Therefore, the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MS-KCC) has designed a reclassification system after 2 years of the initial treatment (IT) thus providing a dynamic perspective of each patient. Objective: to report our experience with the MS-KCC risk of recurrence reclassification system on DTC patients. Materials and methods: retrospective observational descriptive study of the results of the reclassification system of the DCT patients after two years of IT with surgery and radioiodine ablation, between October 2004 and April 2011. Data was obtained by reviewing the charts of patients. All surgeries, laboratory determinations and nuclear medicine procedures took place at our Hospital. Patients were classified according to initial risk of recurrence based on the ATA system and they were reclassified following the system proposed by the MS-KCC 2 years after IT. Patients with antithyroglobulin antibodies > 12 IU/ml were excluded due to interference with thyroglobulin determination. Results: we reviewed data of 31 patients diagnosed with DTC. They were classified according to the ATA system as: low risk 17 (54.8 %), intermediate risk 13 (42 %) and high risk 1 (3.2 %) and they were reclassified following the MS-KCC system as having: excellent response 25 (80.6 %), acceptable response 6 (19.4 %) and incomplete response 0 (0 %). An excellent response was observed in 14 (82.4 %) and an acceptable response was observed in 3 (17.6 %) of the low-risk classified patients; an excellent

  13. Second conservative radiosurgical treatment for ipsilateral breast cancer recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelli, J.; Courdi, A.; Hannoun-Levi, J.M.; Figl, A.; Raoust, I.; Lallement, M.; Flipo, B.; Ettore, F.; Chapelier, C.; Ferrero, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. - Currently, radical mastectomy represents the gold standard for ipsilateral breast cancer recurrence. However, we already showed that a second conservative treatment was feasible combining lumpectomy plus low-dose rate interstitial brachytherapy. In this study, we reported the preliminary results of a second conservative treatment using a high-dose rate brachytherapy. Patients and methods. - From June 2005 to July 2009, 42 patients presenting with an ipsilateral breast cancer recurrence underwent a second conservative treatment. Plastic tubes were implanted intraoperatively at the time of the lumpectomy. After a post-implant CT scan, a total dose of 34 Gy in 10 fractions over 5 consecutive days was delivered through an ambulatory procedure. The toxicity evaluation used the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0. Results. - The median follow-up was 21 months (6-50 months), median age at the time of the local recurrence was 65 years (30-85 years). The median delay between the primary and the recurrence was 11 years (1-35 years). The location of the recurrence was in the tumor bed for 22 patients (52.4%), in the same quadrant for 14 patients (33.3%) and unknown for six patients (14.3%). The median tumor size of the recurrence was 12 mm (2-30 mm). The median number of plastic tubes and plans were nine (5-12) and two (1-3) respectively. The median CTV was 68 cm 3 (31.2-146 cm 3 ). The rate of second local control was 97%. Twenty-two patients (60%) experienced complications. The most frequent side effect consisted in cutaneous and sub-cutaneous fibrosis (72% of all the observed complications). Conclusion. - A second conservative treatment for ipsilateral breast cancer recurrence using high-dose rate brachytherapy appears feasible leading to encouraging results in terms of second local control with an acceptable toxicity. Considering that a non-inferiority randomized trial comparing mastectomy versus second conservative treatment could be difficult

  14. Cancer risks and prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vessey, M.P.; Gray, M.

    1985-01-01

    A series of essays in honour of Sir Richard Doll is presented. Chapters cover the preventability of cancer, geography, smoking, diet, occupation, radiation, infections and immune impairment, exogenous and endogenous hormones, other drugs, prevention through legislation and by education and cancer risks and prevention in the Third World. The chapter on radiation has been indexed separately. (UK)

  15. Surgeon Experience is Strongly Associated with Biochemical Recurrence after Radical Prostatectomy for all Preoperative Risk Categories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Eric A; Bianco, Fernando J; Serio, Angel M; Eastham, James A; Kattan, Michael W; Pontes, J. Edson; Vickers, Andrew J; Scardino, Peter T

    2013-01-01

    Background We have previously demonstrated that there is a learning curve for open radical prostatectomy. In this study we sought to determine whether the effects of the learning curve are modified by patient risk as defined by preoperative tumor characteristics. Methods The study included 7,683 eligible prostate cancer patients treated with open radical prostatectomy by one of 72 surgeons. Surgeon experience was coded as the total prior number of radical prostatectomies conducted by the surgeon prior to a patient’s surgery. Multivariable survival-time regression models were used to evaluate the association between surgeon experience and biochemical recurrence, separately for each preoperative risk group. Results We saw no evidence that patient risk affects the learning curve: there was a statistically significant association between biochemical recurrence and surgeon experience in all analyses. The absolute risk difference for a patient receiving treatment from a surgeon with 10 compared to 250 prior radical prostatectomies was 6.6% (95% C.I. 3.4%, 10.3%), 12.0% (6.9%, 18.2%) and 9.7% (1.2%, 18.2%) for patients at low, medium and high preoperative risk patients. Recurrence-free probability for patients with low risk disease approached 100% for the most experienced surgeons Conclusions Cancer control after radical prostatectomy improves with increasing surgeon experience irrespective of patient risk. Excellent rates of cancer control for patients with low risk disease treated by the most experienced surgeons suggests that the primary reason such patients recur is inadequate surgical technique. The results have significant implications for clinical care. PMID:18423716

  16. Predictors of Regional Lymph Node Recurrence after Initial Thyroidectomy in Patients with Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirsina Sharifi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Regional lymph node recurrence (RLNR is common in patients with thyroid cancer but clinicopathological predictors are unclear. We aimed to clarify these predictors and identify patients who would benefit from prophylactic lymph node dissection the most. Method. 343 patients with different types of thyroid cancer were analyzed retrospectively. All patients underwent total thyroidectomy between 2007 and 2013. Results. The median ± interquartile range of patients’ age was 40 ± 25 years. 245 (71.4% patients were female. Regarding the risk of regional lymph node recurrence, we found that male gender, age ≥45 years, non-PTC (i.e., medullary, follicular, and anaplastic types histopathology, T3 (i.e., tumor size >4 cm in the greatest dimension limited to the thyroid or any tumor with minimal extrathyroid extension, stage IVa, and isolated cervical lymphadenopathy as initial manifestation (ICL are significant risk factors. T3 (p < 0.001; odds ratio = 156.41, 95% CI [55.72–439.1] and ICL (p < 0.001; odds ratio = 77.79, 95% CI [31.55–191.81] were the strongest predictors of regional lymph node recurrence. Conclusion. We found easily achievable risk factors for RLNR in thyroid cancers patients. We suggested that patients with specific clinicopathological features like male gender, age ≥45 years, larger tumor size, and extrathyroidal extension be considered as prophylactic lymphadenectomy candidates.

  17. DEGRO practical guidelines for radiotherapy of breast cancer VI: therapy of locoregional breast cancer recurrences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harms, Wolfgang [St. Claraspital, Abteilung fuer Radioonkologie, Basel (Switzerland); Budach, W. [Heinrich-Heine-University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Dunst, J. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany); Feyer, P. [Vivantes Hospital Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany); Fietkau, R.; Sauer, R. [University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Krug, D. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Piroth, M.D. [Witten/Herdecke University, HELIOS-Hospital Wuppertal, Wuppertal (Germany); Sautter-Bihl, M.L. [Municipal Hospital, Karlsruhe (Germany); Sedlmayer, F. [Paracelsus Medical University Hospital, Salzburg (Austria); Wenz, F. [University of Heidelberg, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Haase, W.; Souchon, R.; Collaboration: Breast Cancer Expert Panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO)

    2016-04-15

    To update the practical guidelines for radiotherapy of patients with locoregional breast cancer recurrences based on the current German interdisciplinary S3 guidelines 2012. A comprehensive survey of the literature using the search phrases ''locoregional breast cancer recurrence'', ''chest wall recurrence'', ''local recurrence'', ''regional recurrence'', and ''breast cancer'' was performed, using the limits ''clinical trials'', ''randomized trials'', ''meta-analysis'', ''systematic review'', and ''guidelines''. Patients with isolated in-breast or regional breast cancer recurrences should be treated with curative intent. Mastectomy is the standard of care for patients with ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence. In a subset of patients, a second breast conservation followed by partial breast irradiation (PBI) is an appropriate alternative to mastectomy. If a second breast conservation is performed, additional irradiation should be mandatory. The largest reirradiation experience base exists for multicatheter brachytherapy; however, prospective clinical trials are needed to clearly define selection criteria, long-term local control, and toxicity. Following primary mastectomy, patients with resectable locoregional breast cancer recurrences should receive multimodality therapy including systemic therapy, surgery, and radiation +/- hyperthermia. This approach results in high local control rates and long-term survival is achieved in a subset of patients. In radiation-naive patients with unresectable locoregional recurrences, radiation therapy is mandatory. In previously irradiated patients with a high risk of a second local recurrence after surgical resection or in patients with unresectable recurrences, reirradiation should be strongly considered. Indication and dose concepts

  18. Contralateral breast cancer risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unnithan, Jaya; Macklis, Roger M.

    2001-01-01

    The use of breast-conserving treatment approaches for breast cancer has now become a standard option for early stage disease. Numerous randomized studies have shown medical equivalence when mastectomy is compared to lumpectomy followed by radiotherapy for the local management of this common problem. With an increased emphasis on patient involvement in the therapeutic decision making process, it is important to identify and quantify any unforeseen risks of the conservation approach. One concern that has been raised is the question of radiation- related contralateral breast cancer after breast radiotherapy. Although most studies do not show statistically significant evidence that patients treated with breast radiotherapy are at increased risk of developing contralateral breast cancer when compared to control groups treated with mastectomy alone, there are clear data showing the amount of scattered radiation absorbed by the contralateral breast during a routine course of breast radiotherapy is considerable (several Gy) and is therefore within the range where one might be concerned about radiogenic contralateral tumors. While radiation related risks of contralateral breast cancer appear to be small enough to be statistically insignificant for the majority of patients, there may exist a smaller subset which, for genetic or environmental reasons, is at special risk for scatter related second tumors. If such a group could be predicted, it would seem appropriate to offer either special counselling or special prevention procedures aimed at mitigating this second tumor risk. The use of genetic testing, detailed analysis of breast cancer family history, and the identification of patients who acquired their first breast cancer at a very early age may all be candidate screening procedures useful in identifying such at- risk groups. Since some risk mitigation strategies are convenient and easy to utilize, it makes sense to follow the classic 'ALARA' (as low as reasonably

  19. Pancreatic cancer risk in hereditary pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Ulrich Weiss

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is part of the body’s immune response in order to remove harmful stimuli – like pathogens, irritants or damaged cells - and start the healing process. Recurrent or chronic inflammation on the other side seems a predisposing factor for carcinogenesis and has been found associated with cancer development. In chronic pancreatitis mutations of the cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1 gene have been identified as risk factors of the disease. Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare cause of chronic pancreatic inflammation with an early onset, mostly during childhood. Hereditary pancreatitis often starts with recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis and the clinical phenotype is not very much different from other etiologies of the disease. The long-lasting inflammation however generates a tumor promoting environment and represents a major risk factor for tumor development This review will reflect our knowledge concerning the specific risk of hereditary pancreatitis patients to develop pancreatic cancer.

  20. Salvage cryotherapy for local recurrence after radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvorning Ternov, Klara; Krag Jakobsen, Ane; Bratt, Ola; Ahlgren, Göran

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to present the outcome of patients treated with salvage cryotherapy after radiotherapy for prostate cancer at one institution. Consecutive patients treated between 2007 and 2013 with transperineal cryotherapy for biopsy-verified local recurrence after radiotherapy were investigated. An external reviewer retrieved outcome data retrospectively from medical records. Complications were graded according to the Clavien classification. One patient with less than 1 year of follow-up was excluded from the analysis of side-effects. Thirty patients were included, 29 of whom had a follow-up of at least 1 year. The median follow-up was 2.7 years (range 1-6.5 years). Eleven of the 23 patients without hormonal treatment at the time of cryotherapy reached a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir of less than 0.5 ng/ml. At the end of follow-up five of these 23 patients still had a PSA below 0.5 ng/ml and 10 were free from recurrence according to the Phoenix definition. Clinical recurrence (verified with imaging or biopsies) was detected in 13 patients, six of which were local. One patient died from prostate cancer. Eleven patients had urinary incontinence grade 1-2 and three had grade 3-4, seven had pelvic pain, three had severe but transitory tissue sloughing, three developed a urethral stricture or had prolonged urinary retention, and one developed a urinary fistula 4.5 years after cryotherapy. Salvage cryotherapy should be considered as an alternative to hormonal treatment and surgery for local recurrence after radiotherapy for prostate cancer. The results compare well to those reported from centres with longer experience.

  1. Risk factors for recurrent nerve palsy after thyroid surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godballe, Christian; Madsen, Anders Rørbæk; Sørensen, Christian Hjort

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury is a well-known and serious complication to thyroid surgery. The objective was to estimate the frequency of post-thyroidectomy RLN palsy and to identify possible risk factors. Based on the Danish national thyroid surgery database, 6,859 patients treated...... predominant risk factors with a relative risk (RR) of 5.4 and 5.8, respectively. In benign cases previous performed thyroid surgery had a RR of 10.4. High volume departments with more than 150 thyroid procedures per year seem to perform significantly better. Malignant histology, neck dissection and previous...

  2. Recurrence risk in de novo structural chromosomal rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röthlisberger, Benno; Kotzot, Dieter

    2007-08-01

    According to the textbook of Gardner and Sutherland [2004], the standard on genetic counseling for chromosome abnormalities, the recurrence risk of de novo structural or combined structural and numeric chromosome rearrangements is less than 0.5-2% and takes into account recurrence by chance, gonadal mosaicism, and somatic-gonadal mosaicism. However, these figures are roughly estimated and neither any systematic study nor exact or evidence-based risk calculations are available. To address this question, an extensive literature search was performed and surprisingly only 29 case reports of recurrence of de novo structural or combined structural and numeric chromosomal rearrangements were found. Thirteen of them were with a trisomy 21 due to an i(21q) replacing one normal chromosome 21. In eight of them low-level mosaicism in one of the parents was found either in fibroblasts or in blood or in both. As a consequence of the low number of cases and theoretical considerations (clinical consequences, mechanisms of formation, etc.), the recurrence risk should be reduced to less than 1% for a de novo i(21q) and to even less than 0.3% for all other de novo structural or combined structural and numeric chromosomal rearrangements. As the latter is lower than the commonly accepted risk of approximately 0.3% for indicating an invasive prenatal diagnosis and as the risk of abortion of a healthy fetus after chorionic villous sampling or amniocentesis is higher than approximately 0.5%, invasive prenatal investigation in most cases is not indicated and should only be performed if explicitly asked by the parents subsequent to appropriate genetic counseling. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Network perturbation by recurrent regulatory variants in cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiwon Jang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer driving genes have been identified as recurrently affected by variants that alter protein-coding sequences. However, a majority of cancer variants arise in noncoding regions, and some of them are thought to play a critical role through transcriptional perturbation. Here we identified putative transcriptional driver genes based on combinatorial variant recurrence in cis-regulatory regions. The identified genes showed high connectivity in the cancer type-specific transcription regulatory network, with high outdegree and many downstream genes, highlighting their causative role during tumorigenesis. In the protein interactome, the identified transcriptional drivers were not as highly connected as coding driver genes but appeared to form a network module centered on the coding drivers. The coding and regulatory variants associated via these interactions between the coding and transcriptional drivers showed exclusive and complementary occurrence patterns across tumor samples. Transcriptional cancer drivers may act through an extensive perturbation of the regulatory network and by altering protein network modules through interactions with coding driver genes.

  4. Src controls castration recurrence of CWR22 prostate cancer xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Bing; Gillard, Bryan; Gao, Lingqiu; Eng, Kevin H; Gelman, Irwin H

    2013-01-01

    Recurrence of prostate cancer (CaP) after androgen-deprivation therapy continues to have the greatest impact on patient survival. Castration-recurrent (CR)-CaP is likely driven by the activation of androgen receptor (AR) through multiple mechanisms including induction of AR coregulators, AR mutants or splice variants, and AR posttranslational modification such as phosphorylation by Src-family and Ack1 tyrosine kinases. Here, we address whether Src is required for the CR growth of human CWR22 CaP xenografts. The shRNA-mediated Src knockdown or treatment with the Src inhibitors, dasatinib or KXO1, reduced CaP recurrence over controls and increased time-to-recurrence following castration. Moreover, CR-CaP [Src-shRNA] tumors that recurred had similar Src protein and activation levels as those of parental cells, strengthening the notion that Src activity is required for progression to CR-CaP. In contrast, the ability of dasatinib or KXO1 to inhibit Src kinase activity in vitro did not correlate with their ability to inhibit serum-driven in vitro proliferation of CR and androgen-dependent stable cell lines derived from CWR22 tumors (CWR22Rv1 and CWR22PC, respectively), suggesting that the in vitro proliferation of these CaP lines is Src independent. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that Src is a potent and specific therapeutic target for CR-CaP progression

  5. The COLON study: Colorectal cancer: Longitudinal, Observational study on Nutritional and lifestyle factors that may influence colorectal tumour recurrence, survival and quality of life

    OpenAIRE

    Winkels, R.M.; Heine-Bröring, R.C.; Zutphen, van, M.; Harten-Gerritsen, van, A.S.; Kok, D.E.G.; Duijnhoven, van, F.J.B.; Kampman, E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is clear evidence that nutrition and lifestyle can modify colorectal cancer risk. However, it is not clear if those factors can affect colorectal cancer treatment, recurrence, survival and quality of life. This paper describes the background and design of the "COlorectal cancer: Longitudinal, Observational study on Nutritional and lifestyle factors that may influence colorectal tumour recurrence, survival and quality of life" - COLON - study. The main aim of this study is to...

  6. Niraparib Maintenance Therapy in Platinum-Sensitive, Recurrent Ovarian Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Mansoor R; Monk, Bradley J; Herrstedt, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    Background Niraparib is an oral poly(adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1/2 inhibitor that has shown clinical activity in patients with ovarian cancer. We sought to evaluate the efficacy of niraparib versus placebo as maintenance treatment for patients with platinum-sensitive, ......Background Niraparib is an oral poly(adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1/2 inhibitor that has shown clinical activity in patients with ovarian cancer. We sought to evaluate the efficacy of niraparib versus placebo as maintenance treatment for patients with platinum...... or 4 adverse events that were reported in the niraparib group were thrombocytopenia (in 33.8%), anemia (in 25.3%), and neutropenia (in 19.6%), which were managed with dose modifications. Conclusions Among patients with platinum-sensitive, recurrent ovarian cancer, the median duration of progression...

  7. Highlights on recurrence after surgery for cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Katrine

    Objective After surgery due to cervical cancer women are offered to attend a follow-up program 10 times during five years with the purpose for early diagnosis of recurrence. The aim of this study is to evaluate the follow-up program, which has remained unchanged for 20 years even though reminding...... and concerning women, who we consider healthy after surgery. Methods A retrospective longitudinal study of women attending follow-up program after surgery due to cervical cancer at the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Aarhus University Hospital. 524 patients were identified from 1996 to 2011...... with the diagnosis of cervical cancer combined with a surgical procedure. From the national pathological database and patient files information was extracted. Information was stored in Epidata. Associations were calculated using stratified analysis and logistic regression. Results 133(25%) women of 524 needed...

  8. Resection of recurrent neck cancer with carotid artery replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Giulio; Schneider, Fabrice; Minni, Antonio; Calio, Francesco G; Pizzardi, Giulia; Ricco, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-05-01

    The management of patients with recurrent neck cancer invading the carotid artery is controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate overall survival rate, primary patency of vascular reconstructions, and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) after en bloc resection of the carotid artery and tumor with in-line polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) carotid grafting, followed by radiotherapy. From 2000 to 2014, 31 consecutive patients with recurrent neck cancer invading the carotid artery underwent en bloc resection and simultaneous carotid artery reconstruction with a PTFE graft, which was associated in 18 cases with a myocutaneous flap. The primary tumor was a squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx in 17 patients and of the hypopharynx in 7, an undifferentiated carcinoma of unknown origin in 4, and an anaplastic carcinoma of the thyroid in 3. All of the patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy (50-70 Gy), and 10 of them also underwent chemotherapy (doxorubicin and cisplatin). None of the patients died or sustained a stroke during the first 30 days after the index procedure. Postoperative morbidity consisted of 6 transitory dysphagias, 3 vocal cord palsies, 2 wound dehiscences, 1 transitory mandibular claudication, and 1 partial myocutaneous flap necrosis. No graft infection occurred during follow-up. Fifteen patients (48%) died from metastatic cancer during a mean follow-up of 45.4 months (range, 8-175 months). None of the patients showed evidence of local recurrence, stroke, or thrombosis of the carotid reconstruction. The 5-year survival rate was 49 ± 10%. The overall number of QALYs was 3.12 (95% confidence interval, 1.87-4.37) with a significant difference between patients without metastasis at the time of redo surgery (n = 26; QALYs, 3.74) and those with metastasis (n = 5; QALYs, 0.56; P = .005). QALYs were also significantly improved in patients with cancer of the larynx (n = 17; QALYs, 4.69) compared to patients presenting with other types of

  9. Breast cancer risks and risk prediction models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Christoph; Fischer, Christine

    2015-02-01

    BRCA1/2 mutation carriers have a considerably increased risk to develop breast and ovarian cancer. The personalized clinical management of carriers and other at-risk individuals depends on precise knowledge of the cancer risks. In this report, we give an overview of the present literature on empirical cancer risks, and we describe risk prediction models that are currently used for individual risk assessment in clinical practice. Cancer risks show large variability between studies. Breast cancer risks are at 40-87% for BRCA1 mutation carriers and 18-88% for BRCA2 mutation carriers. For ovarian cancer, the risk estimates are in the range of 22-65% for BRCA1 and 10-35% for BRCA2. The contralateral breast cancer risk is high (10-year risk after first cancer 27% for BRCA1 and 19% for BRCA2). Risk prediction models have been proposed to provide more individualized risk prediction, using additional knowledge on family history, mode of inheritance of major genes, and other genetic and non-genetic risk factors. User-friendly software tools have been developed that serve as basis for decision-making in family counseling units. In conclusion, further assessment of cancer risks and model validation is needed, ideally based on prospective cohort studies. To obtain such data, clinical management of carriers and other at-risk individuals should always be accompanied by standardized scientific documentation.

  10. Construction of a novel multi-gene assay (42-gene classifier) for prediction of late recurrence in ER-positive breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunashima, Ryo; Naoi, Yasuto; Shimazu, Kenzo; Kagara, Naofumi; Shimoda, Masashi; Tanei, Tomonori; Miyake, Tomohiro; Kim, Seung Jin; Noguchi, Shinzaburo

    2018-05-04

    Prediction models for late (> 5 years) recurrence in ER-positive breast cancer need to be developed for the accurate selection of patients for extended hormonal therapy. We attempted to develop such a prediction model focusing on the differences in gene expression between breast cancers with early and late recurrence. For the training set, 779 ER-positive breast cancers treated with tamoxifen alone for 5 years were selected from the databases (GSE6532, GSE12093, GSE17705, and GSE26971). For the validation set, 221 ER-positive breast cancers treated with adjuvant hormonal therapy for 5 years with or without chemotherapy at our hospital were included. Gene expression was assayed by DNA microarray analysis (Affymetrix U133 plus 2.0). With the 42 genes differentially expressed in early and late recurrence breast cancers in the training set, a prediction model (42GC) for late recurrence was constructed. The patients classified by 42GC into the late recurrence-like group showed a significantly (P = 0.006) higher late recurrence rate as expected but a significantly (P = 1.62 × E-13) lower rate for early recurrence than non-late recurrence-like group. These observations were confirmed for the validation set, i.e., P = 0.020 for late recurrence and P = 5.70 × E-5 for early recurrence. We developed a unique prediction model (42GC) for late recurrence by focusing on the biological differences between breast cancers with early and late recurrence. Interestingly, patients in the late recurrence-like group by 42GC were at low risk for early recurrence.

  11. Human papillomavirus (HPV) persistence and HPV 31 predict the risk of recurrence in high-grade vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogani, Giorgio; Martinelli, Fabio; Ditto, Antonino; Taverna, Francesca; Lombardo, Claudia; Signorelli, Mauro; Chiappa, Valentina; Leone Roberti Maggiore, Umberto; Fontanella, Caterina; Sabatucci, Ilaria; Borghi, Chiara; Recalcati, Dario; Indini, Alice; Lorusso, Domenica; Raspagliesi, Francesco

    2017-03-01

    High-grade vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (vaginal HSIL) represents an uncommon entity. Here, we sought to identify predictors for recurrence and risk factor for developing genital cancers after primary treatment for vaginal HSIL. Data of consecutive 5104 women who had human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA test were searched for identify women with histological confirmed vaginal HSIL. Disease-free interval and the risk of developing HPV-related gynecological cancers were assessed using Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazard models. Overall, 77 patients were included. After a mean (SD) follow-up of 69.3 (33.0) months, 11 (14%) and 4 (5%) patients experienced vaginal HSIL recurrence and the occurrence of HPV-related gynecological cancers, respectively. Via multivariate analysis factors predicting for vaginal HSIL recurrence were infection from HPV31 at diagnosis (HR: 5.0 (95%CI:1.17, 21.3); p=0.03) and persistence of HPV infection after treatment (HR: 7.0 (95%CI:1.54, 31.6); p=0.01). Additionally, patients who had LASER ablation experienced a trend toward a lower risk of recurrence in comparison to medical treatment (HR: 0.20 (95%CI:0.03, 1.09); p=0.06). Considering the occurrence of HPV-related gynecological cancers, we observed that no factors independently correlated with this risk; while, a trend towards higher risk was observed for women with HIV infection (HR:16.4 (95%CI:0.90, 300.1); p=0.06) and persistence of HPV infection (HR: 13.3 (95%CI:0.76, 230.2); p=0.07). Patients affected by vaginal HSIL experienced a relatively high risk of recurrence. Persistence of HPV after treatment and pretreatment HPV-31 infection predicts for high-grade vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia recurrence. Further investigations are warranted in order to corroborate our data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. EARLY RECURRENCE OF WELL-DIFFERENTIATED ENDOMETRIAL CANCER (A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. E. Levchrnko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial cancer is the 6-th most common malignancy in women worldwide, accounting for about 4.8 % of all female cancers. The treatment of recurrent endometrial cancer remains a major challenge. Some endometrial cancer recurrences, for example vaginal stump recurrence, are reported to be effectively treated with surgical resection and radiation therapy. Early recurrence of early-stage well-differentiated endometrial cancer is uncommon. Case report. Herein we report a rare case of recurrent well-differentiated endometrial cancer in a 65-year-old woman. The patient had recurrence 10 months after laparoscopic hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Recurrent endometrial tumor with extension into the rectosigmoid colon, urinary bladder and the right ureter manifested itself clinically with severe pain requiring the use of opioids. The recurrent tumor was removed. Resection of the bladder, left ureter and upper ampular rectum was followed by anastomosis. The patient received multiple cycles of chemotherapy. Conclusion. Compliance with the principles of ablastics during the laparoscopic or laparotomic surgery helps to avoid recurrence in patients with prognostically favorable cancer. In case of recurrence, combined operations are the only possible chance of improving survival of patients with locally advanced or recurrent tumors, which are insensitive to chemoradiotherapy.

  13. Can anaesthetic and analgesic techniques affect cancer recurrence or metastasis?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Heaney, A

    2012-12-01

    Summary Cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and the ratio of incidence is increasing. Mortality usually results from recurrence or metastases. Surgical removal of the primary tumour is the mainstay of treatment, but this is associated with inadvertent dispersal of neoplastic cells into the blood and lymphatic systems. The fate of the dispersed cells depends on the balance of perioperative factors promoting tumour survival and growth (including surgery per se, many anaesthetics per se, acute postoperative pain, and opioid analgesics) together with the perioperative immune status of the patient. Available evidence from experimental cell culture and live animal data on these factors are summarized, together with clinical evidence from retrospective studies. Taken together, current data are sufficient only to generate a hypothesis that an anaesthetic technique during primary cancer surgery could affect recurrence or metastases, but a causal link can only be proved by prospective, randomized, clinical trials. Many are ongoing, but definitive results might not emerge for a further 5 yr or longer. Meanwhile, there is no hard evidence to support altering anaesthetic technique in cancer patients, pending the outcome of the ongoing clinical trials.

  14. Risks of cancer - All sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    This chapter describes the BEIR Committee's radiation risk models and the total risks of cancer following whole body exposure. This report focuses on the data from A-bomb survivors since this cohort contains persons of all ages at exposure. Because of large statistical uncertainties, it was not possible for the committee to provide risk estimates for cancers at all specific sites of interest. Estimates were made for risk of leukemia, breast cancer, thyroid cancer, and cancers of the respiratory and digestive systems. To obtain an estimate of the total risk of mortality from all cancers, the committee also modeled cancers other than those listed above as a group

  15. Rupture of an expander prosthesis mimics axillary cancer recurrence.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ismael, T

    2005-10-01

    Regional silicone gel migration from a ruptured breast implant has been reported at different locations including the upper extremity, chest wall muscles, axilla and back. We report a patient who presented with an axillary mass that mimicked a regional recurrence 5 years after breast cancer reconstruction with a latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap and silicon gel expander-prosthesis. Surgical exploration revealed that the mass contained silicone gel around the port of the breast expander that had ruptured. The mass was confluent with an intracapsular silicone leak through a tract along the tube of the expander port.

  16. The COLON study: Colorectal cancer: Longitudinal, Observational study on Nutritional and lifestyle factors that may influence colorectal tumour recurrence, survival and quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkels, R.M.; Heine-Bröring, R.C.; Zutphen, van M.; Harten-Gerritsen, van A.S.; Kok, D.E.G.; Duijnhoven, van F.J.B.; Kampman, E.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is clear evidence that nutrition and lifestyle can modify colorectal cancer risk. However, it is not clear if those factors can affect colorectal cancer treatment, recurrence, survival and quality of life. This paper describes the background and design of the “COlorectal cancer:

  17. The COLON study: Colorectal cancer: Longitudinal, Observational study on Nutritional and lifestyle factors that may influence colorectal tumour recurrence, survival and quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkels, R.M.; Heine-Broring, R.C.; Zutphen, M. van; Harten-Gerritsen, S. van; Kok, D.E.; Duijnhoven, F.J.B. van; Kampman, E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is clear evidence that nutrition and lifestyle can modify colorectal cancer risk. However, it is not clear if those factors can affect colorectal cancer treatment, recurrence, survival and quality of life. This paper describes the background and design of the "COlorectal cancer:

  18. Pancreatic cancer risk in hereditary pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, Frank U.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is part of the body’s immune response in order to remove harmful stimuli – like pathogens, irritants or damaged cells - and start the healing process. Recurrent or chronic inflammation on the other side seems a predisposing factor for carcinogenesis and has been found associated with cancer development. In chronic pancreatitis mutations of the cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene have been identified as risk factors of the disease. Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare cause of chronic...

  19. Definitive radiotherapy for primary vaginal cancer. Correlation between treatment patterns and recurrence rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanayama, Naoyuki; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the outcomes and optimal practice patterns of definitive radiotherapy for primary vaginal cancer. Between 1993 and 2012, 49 patients were treated with definitive radiotherapy for primary vaginal cancer in three hospitals. Of these, 15 patients (31%) had clinically positive regional lymph node metastasis. A total of 34 patients (70%) received external beam radiotherapy with high-dose-rate brachytherapy (interstitial or intracavitary), and 8 (16%) (with small superficial Stage I tumors) were treated with local radiotherapy. The median follow-up was 33 months (range: 1–169 months). The 3-year overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and loco-regional control (LRC) rates were 83%, 59% and 71%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, the histological type (P = 0.044) was significant risk factors for LRC. In Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stage I cases, 3 of 8 patients (38%) who did not undergo prophylactic lymph node irradiation had lymph node recurrence, compared with 2 of 12 patients (17%) who underwent prophylactic pelvic irradiation. For Stage III–IV tumors, the local recurrence rate was 50% and the lymph node recurrence rate was 40%. Patients with FIGO Stage I/II or clinical Stage N1 had a higher recurrence rate with treatment using a single modality compared with the recurrence rate using combined modalities. In conclusion, our treatment outcomes for vaginal cancer were acceptable, but external beam radiotherapy with brachytherapy (interstitial or intracavitary) was needed regardless of FIGO stage. Improvement of treatment outcomes in cases of FIGO Stage III or IV remains a significant challenge. (author)

  20. Cancer risk from inorganics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swierenga, S.H.; Gilman, J.P.; McLean, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Inorganic metals and minerals for which there is evidence of carcinogenicity are identified. The risk of cancer from contact with them in the work place, the general environment, and under conditions of clinical (medical) exposure is discussed. The evidence indicates that minerals and metals most often influence cancer development through their action as cocarcinogens. The relationship between the physical form of mineral fibers, smoking and carcinogenic risk is emphasized. Metals are categorized as established (As, Be, Cr, Ni), suspected (Cd, Pb) and possible carcinogens, based on the existing in vitro, animal experimental and human epidemiological data. Cancer risk and possible modes of action of elements in each class are discussed. Views on mechanisms that may be responsible for the carcinogenicity of metals are updated and analysed. Some specific examples of cancer risks associated with the clinical use of potentially carcinogenic metals and from radioactive pharmaceuticals used in therapy and diagnosis are presented. Questions are raised as to the effectiveness of conventional dosimetry in accurately measuring risk from radiopharmaceuticals. 302 references

  1. Prognostic factors of tumor recurrence in completely resected non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tantraworasin, Apichat; Saeteng, Somcharoen; Lertprasertsuke, Nirush; Arreyakajohn, Nuttapon; Kasemsarn, Choosak; Patumanond, Jayanton

    2013-01-01

    Patients with completely resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have an excellent outcome; however tumor recurs in 30%–77% of patients. This study retrospectively analyzed the clinicopathologic features of patients with any operable stage of NSCLC to identify the prognostic factors that influence tumor recurrence, including intratumoral blood vessel invasion (IVI), tumor size, tumor necrosis, and intratumoral lymphatic invasion. From January 2002 to December 2011, 227 consecutive patients were enrolled in this study. They were divided into two groups: the “no recurrence” group and the “recurrence” group. Recurrence-free survival was analyzed by multivariable Cox regression analysis, stratified by tumor staging, chemotherapy, and nodal involvement. IVI, tumor necrosis, tumor diameter more than 5 cm, and nodal involvement were identified as independent prognostic factors of tumor recurrence. The hazard ratio (HR) of patients with IVI was 2.1 times higher than that of patients without IVI (95% confident interval [CI]: 1.4–3.2) (P = 0.001).The HR of patients with tumor necrosis was 2.1 times higher than that of patients without tumor necrosis (95% CI: 1.3–3.4) (P = 0.001). Patients who had a maximum tumor diameter greater than 5 cm had significantly higher risk of recurrence than patients who had a maximum tumor diameter of less than 5 cm (HR 1.9, 95% CI: 1.0–3.5) (P = 0.033). IVI, tumor diameter more than 5 cm, and tumor necrosis are prognostic factors of tumor recurrence in completely resected NSCLC. Therefore, NSCLC patients, with or without nodal involvement, who have one or more prognostic factors of tumor recurrence may benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy for prevention of tumor recurrence

  2. Effect of radiotherapy after mastectomy and axillary surgery on 10-year recurrence and 20-year breast cancer mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGale, P; Taylor, C; Correa, C

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postmastectomy radiotherapy was shown in previous meta-analyses to reduce the risks of both recurrence and breast cancer mortality in all women with node-positive disease considered together. However, the benefit in women with only one to three positive lymph nodes is uncertain. We ai...

  3. Expression and lymphatic microvessel density in primary tumors of node-neagtive colorectal cancer patients predict disease recurrence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doekhie, F.S.; Morreau, H.; de Bock, G.H.; Speetjens, F.M.; Dekker-Ensink, N.G.; Putter, H.; vand e Velde, C.J.H.; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M.; Kuppen, P.J.K.; Sialyl lewis, X.

    2008-01-01

    Up to 30% of curatively resected colorectal cancer patients with tumor-negative lymph nodes, show disease recurrence. We assessed whether these high-risk patients can be identified by examining primary tumors for the following blood and lymphatic vasculature markers: A) sialyl Lewis X (sLeX),

  4. Arthroscopic Bankart repair and capsular shift for recurrent anterior shoulder instability: functional outcomes and identification of risk factors for recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Issaq; Ashton, Fiona; Robinson, Christopher Michael

    2012-07-18

    Arthroscopic Bankart repair and capsular shift is a well-established technique for the treatment of anterior shoulder instability. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes following arthroscopic Bankart repair and capsular shift and to identify risk factors that are predictive of recurrence of glenohumeral instability. We performed a retrospective review of a prospectively collected database consisting of 302 patients who had undergone arthroscopic Bankart repair and capsular shift for the treatment of recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability. The prevalence of patient and injury-related risk factors for recurrence was assessed. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the predicted probability of recurrence within two years. The chief outcome measures were the risk of recurrence and the two-year functional outcomes assessed with the Western Ontario shoulder instability index (WOSI) and disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) scores. The rate of recurrent glenohumeral instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair and capsular shift was 13.2%. The median time to recurrence was twelve months, and this complication developed within one year in 55% of these patients. The risk of recurrence was independently predicted by the patient's age at surgery, the severity of glenoid bone loss, and the presence of an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion (all p surgery. Varying the cutoff level for the predicted probability of recurrence in the model from 50% to lower values increased the sensitivity of the model to detect recurrences but decreased the positive predictive value of the model to correctly predict failed repairs. There was a significant improvement in the mean WOSI and DASH scores at two years postoperatively (both p instability and individualizing treatment options for particular groups of patients. Prognostic level I. See Instructions for authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  5. Salvage High-intensity Focused Ultrasound for the Recurrent Prostate Cancer after Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, S.; Nakano, M.; Omata, T.; Harano, Y.; Nagata, Y.; Uchida, T.; Usui, Y.; Terachi, T.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the use of minimally invasive high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) as a salvage therapy in men with localized prostate cancer recurrence following external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), brachytherapy or proton therapy. A review of 20 cases treated using the Sonablate registered 500 HIFU device, between August 28, 2002 and September 1, 2009, was carried out. All men had presumed organ-confined, histologically confirmed recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma following radiation therapy. All men with presumed, organ-confined, recurrent disease following EBRT in 8 patients, brachytherapy in 7 patients or proton therapy in 5 patients treated with salvage HIFU were included. The patients were followed for a mean (range) of 16.0 (3-80) months. Biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) rates in patients with low-intermediate and high risk groups were 86% and 50%, respectively. Side-effects included urethral stricture in 2 of the 16 patients (13%), urinary tract infection or dysuria syndrome in eight (26%), and urinary incontinence in one (6%). Recto-urethral fistula occurred in one patient (6%). Transrectal HIFU is an effective treatment for recurrence after radiotherapy especially in patients with low- and intermediate risk groups.

  6. [PMU therapy of recurrent gastric cancer. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, S; Yonemura, Y; Matsuki, N; Miyata, R; Noto, H; Sakuma, H; Yagi, M; Sawa, T; Ogino, S; Miyazaka, I

    1986-03-01

    A 56-year-old woman with recurrent gastric cancer treated with PMU therapy, combined CDDP 75 mg/m2 i.v. MMC 10 mg/body i.v. and UFT 400mg/body/2 alpha/day p.o., was reported. She was admitted because of cervical lymph node swelling and abdominal tumor (para-aorta lymph node swelling). She was treated two times with this therapy and induced into complete remission. The serum CEA level, more than 500 ng/ml before the treatment, was reduced to 6.7 ng/ml after treatment. She has currently been free of disease for more than four weeks. We conclude that this PMU therapy is extremely effective for indurable gastric cancer.

  7. Management of Biochemical Recurrence after Primary Localized Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darwish, Oussama M.; Raj, Ganesh V.

    2012-01-01

    Clinically localized prostate cancer is typically managed by well established therapies like radical prostatectomy, brachytherapy, and external beam radiation therapy. While many patients can be cured with definitive local therapy, some will have biochemical recurrence (BCR) of disease detected by a rising serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Management of these patients is nuanced and controversial. The natural history indicates that a majority of patients with BCR will not die from prostate cancer but from other causes. Despite this, a vast majority of patients with BCR are empirically treated with non-curable systemic androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), with its myriad of real and potential side effects. In this review article, we examined the very definition of BCR after definitive local therapy, the current status of imaging studies in its evaluation, the need for additional therapies, and the factors involved in the decision making in the choice of additional therapies. This review aims to help clinicians with the management of patients with BCR. The assessment of prognostic factors including absolute PSA level, time to recurrence, PSA kinetics, multivariable nomograms, imaging, and biopsy of the prostatic bed may help stratify the patients into localized or systemic recurrence. Patients with low-risk of systemic disease may be cured by a salvage local therapy, while those with higher risk of systemic disease may be offered the option of ADT or a clinical trial. An algorithm incorporating these factors is presented.

  8. BRCA1 and BRCA2: Cancer Risk and Genetic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... the breast cancer cells do not have estrogen receptors, progesterone receptors, or large amounts of HER2/neu ...

  9. Validation of the 12-gene colon cancer recurrence score in NSABP C-07 as a predictor of recurrence in patients with stage II and III colon cancer treated with fluorouracil and leucovorin (FU/LV) and FU/LV plus oxaliplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yothers, Greg; O'Connell, Michael J; Lee, Mark; Lopatin, Margarita; Clark-Langone, Kim M; Millward, Carl; Paik, Soonmyung; Sharif, Saima; Shak, Steven; Wolmark, Norman

    2013-12-20

    Accurate assessments of recurrence risk and absolute treatment benefit are needed to inform colon cancer adjuvant therapy. The 12-gene Recurrence Score assay has been validated in patients with stage II colon cancer from the Cancer and Leukemia Group B 9581 and Quick and Simple and Reliable (QUASAR) trials. We conducted an independent, prospectively designed clinical validation study of Recurrence Score, with prespecified end points and analysis plan, in archival specimens from patients with stage II and III colon cancer randomly assigned to fluorouracil (FU) or FU plus oxaliplatin in National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project C-07. Recurrence Score was assessed in 892 fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor specimens (randomly selected 50% of patients with tissue). Data were analyzed by Cox regression adjusting for stage and treatment. Continuous Recurrence Score predicted recurrence (hazard ratio for a 25-unit increase in score, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.50 to 2.55; P < .001), as well as disease-free and overall survival (both P < .001). Recurrence Score predicted recurrence risk (P = .001) after adjustment for stage, mismatch repair, nodes examined, grade, and treatment. Recurrence Score did not have significant interaction with stage (P = .90) or age (P = .76). Relative benefit of oxaliplatin was similar across the range of Recurrence Score (interaction P = .48); accordingly, absolute benefit of oxaliplatin increased with higher scores, most notably in patients with stage II and IIIA/B disease. The 12-gene Recurrence Score predicts recurrence risk in stage II and stage III colon cancer and provides additional information beyond conventional clinical and pathologic factors. Incorporating Recurrence Score into the clinical context may better inform adjuvant therapy decisions in stage III as well as stage II colon cancer.

  10. Symptoms of Knee Instability as Risk Factors for Recurrent Falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevitt, Michael C; Tolstykh, Irina; Shakoor, Najia; Nguyen, Uyen-Sa D T; Segal, Neil A; Lewis, Cora; Felson, David T

    2016-08-01

    Whether knee instability contributes to the increased risk of falls and fractures observed in persons with knee osteoarthritis (OA) has not been studied. We examined the association of knee buckling with the risk of falling and fall-related consequences in older adults with, or at high risk for, knee OA. At the 60-month visit of the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study, men and women ages 55-84 years were asked about knee buckling in the past 3 months and whether they fell when a knee buckled. Falls and fall-related injuries in the past 12 months and balance confidence were assessed at 60 and 84 months. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the association of knee buckling with falls and their consequences. A total of 1,842 subjects (59% women, mean ± SD age 66.9 ± 7.8 years, and body mass index 30.3 ± 5.7) were included. At 60 months 16.8% reported buckling and at 84 months 14.1% had recurrent (≥2) falls. Bucklers at 60 months had a 1.6- to 2.5-fold greater odds of recurrent falls, fear of falling, and poor balance confidence at 84 months. Those who fell when a knee buckled at baseline had a 4.5-fold, 2-fold, and 3-fold increased odds 2 years later of recurrent falls, significant fall injuries, and fall injuries that limited activity, respectively, and were 4 times more likely to have poor balance confidence. Interventions that reduce knee buckling may help prevent falls, fall-related injuries, and adverse psychological consequences of falls in persons with knee OA. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  11. Symptoms of Knee Instability are Risk Factors for Recurrent Falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevitt, Michael C; Tolstykh, Irina; Shakoor, Najia; Nguyen, Uyen-Sa D.T.; Segal, Neil A; Lewis, Cora; Felson, David T

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Whether knee instability contributes to the increased risk of falls and fractures observed in persons with knee osteoarthritis (OA) has not been studied. We examined the association of knee buckling with the risk of falling and fall-related consequences in older adults with, or at high risk for, knee OA. Methods At the 60 month visit of the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study, men and women ages 55 to 84 were asked about knee buckling in the past 3 months and whether they fell when a knee buckled. Falls and fall-related injuries in the past 12 months and balance confidence were assessed at 60 and 84 months. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the association of knee buckling with falls and their consequences. Results 1,842 subjects (59% women, mean [SD] age= 66.9 [7.8] and BMI= 30.3 [5.7]) were included. At 60 months 16.8% reported buckling and at 84 months 14.1% had recurrent (≥2) falls. Bucklers at 60 months had a 1.6 to 2.5-fold greater odds of recurrent falls, fear of falling and poor balance confidence at 84 months. Those who fell when a knee buckled at baseline had a 4.5-fold, 2-fold and 3-fold increased odds two years later of recurrent falls, significant fall injuries and fall injuries that limited activity, respectively, and were 4 times more likely to have poor balance confidence. Conclusion Interventions that reduce knee buckling may help prevent falls, fall-related injuries and adverse psychological consequences of falls in persons with knee OA. PMID:26853236

  12. Thyroid Cancer Risk Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    The R package thyroid implements a risk prediction model developed by NCI researchers to calculate the absolute risk of developing a second primary thyroid cancer (SPTC) in individuals who were diagnosed with a cancer during their childhood.

  13. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is small. Different factors increase or decrease the risk of breast cancer. Anything that increases your chance ... magnetic resonance imaging) in women with a high risk of breast cancer MRI is a procedure that ...

  14. Risks of Lung Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in women. Different factors increase or decrease the risk of lung cancer. Anything that increases your chance ... been studied to see if they decrease the risk of dying from lung cancer. The following screening ...

  15. Risks of Endometrial Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health history and certain medicines can affect the risk of developing endometrial cancer. Anything that increases your ... have abnormal vaginal bleeding, check with your doctor. Risks of Endometrial Cancer Screening Key Points Screening tests ...

  16. Risks of Esophageal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... alcohol use, and Barrett esophagus can affect the risk of developing esophageal cancer. Anything that increases the ... tissue gives off less light than normal tissue. Risks of Esophageal Cancer Screening Key Points Screening tests ...

  17. Risks of Cervical Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... women. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the major risk factor for cervical cancer. Although most women with ... clinical trials is available from the NCI website . Risks of Cervical Cancer Screening Key Points Screening tests ...

  18. Diet and breast cancer: understanding risks and benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Cynthia A

    2012-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women in the United States. Extensive research has been completed to evaluate the relationship between dietary factors and breast cancer risk and survival after breast cancer; however, a summary report with clinical inference is needed. Materials and This review summarizes the current epidemiological and clinical trial evidence relating diet to breast cancer incidence, recurrence, survival, and mortality. The review includes emerging epidemiological studies that assess risk within breast cancer subtypes as well as a summary of previous and ongoing dietary intervention trials designed to modify breast cancer risk. The available literature suggests that both low-fat and high-fiber diets may be weakly protective against breast cancer, whereas total energy intake and alcohol appear to be positively associated. Fiber may be weakly protective possibly through modulation of estrogen, whereas fruit and vegetable intake is not clearly associated with risk. Obesity is a risk factor for postmenopausal disease, and adult weight gain should be avoided to reduce risk. In survivors, diet has the greatest potential influence on overall mortality rather than breast cancer-specific events. Diet is modestly associated with breast cancer risk; associations appear more pronounced for postmenopausal disease, and healthy choices after diagnosis and treatment likely support longevity more so than reduced risk for recurrent disease.

  19. Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Human Papilloma Virus-Related Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-23

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Human Papillomavirus Infection; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7

  20. Usefulness of F 18 FDG PET/CT In Assessment of Recurrence of Cervical Cancer After Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Minkyung; Lee, Yukyung; Hwang, Kyung Hoon; Park, Chan Youg; Choe, Wonsick

    2011-01-01

    Until now, serum tumor markers, physical examination, and conventional imaging modalities, such as CT of MRI, have been used in assessment of recurrence of cervical cancer after treatment. However, CT and MRI provide only anatomical data, which makes analysis of post treatment change difficult. This study aims to explore the effectiveness of PET/CT, a new scanning device that combines PET and CT, in evaluation of cervical cancer lesions in patients with suspected recurrence. We studied 51 patients suspected of recurrence among those who underwent F 18 FDG PET/CT for cervical cancer follow up at Gachon University Gil Hospital between June 2006 and August 2009. Patients were considered to be at risk for recurrence if they reported symptoms that were clinically suggestive of recurrence, or if physical examination showed abnormalities, serum tumor marker levels rose, or follow up images revealed changes, such as new lesions or swelling of previous sites. Sensitivity, accuracy, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of PET/CT were measured. A total of 37 patients were confirmed with recurrence or metastasis, 13 of whom were diagnosed histologically. Measured across all patients, PET/CT scored 97.3% on sensitivity, 71.4% on specificity, a positive predictive value of 90%, a negative predictive value of 90.9%, and an accuracy of 90.2%. PET/CT yielded only one false negative diagnosis and four false positives. As F 18 FDG PET/CT has high sensitivity and negative predictive value in diagnosis of recurrent cervical cancers, it is expected that it will be useful for clinical determination of recurrence and prevention of unnecessary additional treatments. The hope is that a future study on a larger scale will contribute further to determination of the efficacy of PET/CT

  1. Principles of management of recurrence of breast cancer after tamoxifen therapy (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasool, I.

    1999-01-01

    The management of recurrence of breast cancer after Tamoxifen therapy needs special attention. The recurrence can be local or distant. The patient, should be thoroughly investigated to find out exact sites of recurrences. Local recurrence is managed by excision, skin grafting or various types of flaps. If extensive radiation is administrated or if not given previously. The distant recurrence in patients who have had adjuvant menopausal status, sites of recurrence while life threatening or not and previous response. The patients who are post menopausal have responded to previous Tamoxifen therapy, long DFI and soft tissues and bony metastasis are best managed by Aromatase inhibitors i.e. Letrozole. (author)

  2. Identification of a Genomic Signature Predicting for Recurrence in Early Stage Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    do it. Thus, instead of simply sequencing all the FFPE samples, we used 10 tumor samples (5 recurrent and 5 non recurrent ) to test sequencing and...Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0521 TITLE: Identification of a Genomic Signature Predicting for Recurrence in Early-Stage Ovarian Cancer PRINCIPAL...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0521 Identification of a Genomic Signature Predicting for Recurrence in

  3. Recurrent Venous Thromboembolism as the Initial Clinical Presentation of Gastric Cancer: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Rezaeetalab

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE is a clinically critical disease, misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis of which can lead to increased rate of mortality. For prevention of recurrence of PTE, recognition of its risk factors or underlying diseases is of great importance. PTE is common in patients with cancer and has high morbidity and mortality rates. Although cancer is a lethal condition, PTE accelerates death in these patients. In the current study, we reported the case of a 50-year-old male presenting with dyspnea, pleuritic chest pain, and non-massive hemoptysis indicating pulmonary embolism. Anticoagulant therapy was initiated, but after 12 days of treatment, new deep vein thromboses in the left upper and right lower limbs were diagnosed. However, no specific risk factors or laboratory abnormalities were detected. History of weight loss during the recent months encouraged further investigation for ruling out malignancy, which led a diagnosis of gastric adenocarcinoma. He did not have any complaints of gastrointestinal disorders.

  4. Radioimmunoassay for determination of tumor markers in the diagnosis of rectal cancer recurrences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozhiganov, E.L.; Kuznetsova, L.F.

    1991-01-01

    The levels of tumor markers were determined in patients with rectal cancer recurrences by radioimmunoassay. An increase in a CEA level was observed most frequently. An increase in the levels of α-fetoprotein, ferritin and β 2 -microglobulin was observed. It was shown that the most specific and effective diagnostic test of rectal cancer recurrences was the determination of a CEA level

  5. Clinical review: surgical management of locally advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Courtney, D

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent and locally advanced colorectal cancers frequently require en bloc resection of involved organs to achieve negative margins. The aim of this review is to evaluate the most current literature related to the surgical management of locally advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer.

  6. Dual-time FDG-PET/CT in patients with potential breast cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baun, Christina; Falch Braas, Kirsten; Gerke, Oke

    Dual-time FDG-PET/CT in patients with potential breast cancer recurrence: head-to-head comparison with CT and bonescintigraphy......Dual-time FDG-PET/CT in patients with potential breast cancer recurrence: head-to-head comparison with CT and bonescintigraphy...

  7. Use of magnetic resonance imaging in detection of breast cancer recurrence: a systematic review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, Edel Marie

    2012-09-01

    Diagnosis of breast cancer recurrence can be difficult as a result of the presence of scar tissue in the breast. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be superior to traditional imaging in diagnosis of recurrence because of its ability to differentiate malignancy from scarring. Current guidelines on investigation of suspected breast cancer recurrence recommend MRI when other investigations have equivocal findings. We performed the first systematic review on this topic.

  8. cDNA Clones with Rare and Recurrent Mutations Found in Cancers | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CTD2 Center at UT- MD Anderson Cancer Center has developed High-Throughput Mutagenesis and Molecular Barcoding (HiTMMoB)1,2 pipeline to construct mutant alleles open reading frame expression clones that are either recurrent or rare in cancers. These barcoded genes can be used for context-specific functional validation, detection of novel biomarkers (pathway activation) and targets (drug sensitivity).

  9. Anastomotic Recurrence of Sigmoid Colon Cancer over Five Years after Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Yamauchi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of anastomotic recurrence after curative resection of colorectal cancer is relatively low compared to that of other types of recurrence, such as hepatic, lung and local recurrence. However, almost all cases of anastomotic recurrence of colorectal cancer occur within 3 years after surgery. We experienced a rare case of anastomotic recurrence in whom colonoscopy revealed no signs of recurrence 3 years after surgery; however, anastomotic recurrence was detected over 5 years after surgery. A 60-year-old female with a history of surgery for cancer of the cecum in her forties underwent sigmoidectomy and right colectomy with D3 lymph node dissection for both stage IIA sigmoid colon cancer and stage IIA transverse colon cancer. Computed tomography and colonoscopy revealed no signs of recurrence 3 years after surgery; however, 5 years and 4 months after surgery, colonoscopy demonstrated surrounding flaring and swelling in the anastomotic area of the sigmoid colon, and a biopsy revealed an adenocarcinoma. Under the diagnosis of anastomotic recurrence over 5 years after surgery, lower anterior resection was performed. The patient has exhibited no other signs of recurrence in the 2 years since the last operation.

  10. Does fear of cancer recurrence differ between cancer types? A study from the population-based PROFILES registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, M.A. van de; Poll-Franse, L. van de; Prins, J.B.; Gielissen, M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Knowledge of factors associated with fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) may inform intervention development and improve patient care. The aims were (1) to compare FCR severity between cancer types and (2) to identify associations between FCR, demographics, medical characteristics,

  11. Immunomodulatory therapy in refractory/recurrent ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao-Yu; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Yang, Lan-Yan; Tang, Yun-Hsin; Chou, Hung-Hsueh; Chang, Chee-Jen; Lin, Cheng-Tao

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the efficacy and toxicity of immunomodulatory therapy (IMT) alone or as an add-on to palliative/salvage chemotherapy in patients with refractory/recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). We retrospectively analyzed the efficacy and toxicity of IMT in 15 patients with refractory/recurrent EOC who had previously received multiple chemotherapy regimens. The median age of the patients was 56 years (range, 41-75 years). Three patients were platinum-sensitive, two were platinum-resistant, and the remaining 10 patients were refractory to platinum-based front-line chemotherapy. IMT consisted of picibanil (OK-432) on Day 1, interleukin-2 and/or interferon-α on Day 2 administered by subcutaneous injection (every week or 2-weekly). Five patients never received metronomic oral cyclophosphamide. After IMT, three patients achieved partial remission (PR, lasting for 11 months, ≥ 12 months, and 16 months), and six patients had stable disease (SD). The disease stabilizing rate (PR+SD) was 60% (3/3 in platinum-sensitive and 6/12 in platinum-resistant/refractory patients). The absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) at 1 month after IMT was significantly higher in the PR+SD group (median 1242.0/μL) than in the progression group (median 325.0/μL) (p = 0.012). No ≥ Grade 3 toxicities were observed. The median post-IMT survival time was 12 months (range, 2-39 months). IMT alone or add-on to palliative/salvage chemotherapy for refractory/recurrent EOC achieves a substantial disease stabilizing rate without severe toxicity, which might be a potential option in selected patients. The ALC 1 month after IMT could be an early indicator to disease stabilization. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. PCOS and cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz Issat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS affects approximately 5 to 10% of women of reproductive age. It is the most common reason of anovulation in infertile women. PCOS is accompanied by such conditions as oligo- or anovulation, hipertestosteronism, lower cell sensitivity to insulin, type II diabetes, hyperlipidemia and obesity. Each of the above-mentioned conditions is an approved risk factor proved to predispose towards cancer. However, PCOS is also a disease entity which differs in its clinical manifestation. For example not all patients suffer from obesity or hipertestosteronism related symptoms. From the analysis of literature it is possible to draw conclusions, that there is a possible correlation between PCOS and endometrial cancer, which emerges from clinical trials or research focused on molecular changes in endometrium patients with PCOS. On the other hand, correlation between PCOS and breast or ovary cancer is not so strong, in spite of single papers which are showing the link. The main problem in researching the correlation between PCOS and any cancer risk, is there is a very small group of women or the trial is imperfect (e.g. no control group. There is no meta-analysis focused on this correlation in literature. The change of criteria of PCOS in the past is also a big problem, because there was a number of definitions of PCOS, which results in inconsistent PCOS diagnoses over time. In this paper we would like to provide a description of studies that aimed at showing correlation between PCOS and cancer risk and underlying theoretical assumptions.

  13. Reirradiation of locally recurrent rectal cancer: A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guren, Marianne Grønlie; Undseth, Christine; Rekstad, Bernt Louni; Brændengen, Morten; Dueland, Svein; Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Glynne-Jones, Rob; Tveit, Kjell Magne

    2014-01-01

    Background: Many patients with rectal cancer receive radiotherapy as a component of primary multimodality treatment. Although local recurrence is infrequent, reirradiation may be needed to improve resectability and outcomes. This systematic review investigated the effects of reirradiation in terms of feasibility, toxicity, and long-term outcomes. Methods: A Medline, Embase and Cochrane search resulted in 353 titles/abstracts. Ten publications describing seven prospective or retrospective studies were included, presenting results of 375 patients reirradiated for rectal cancer. Results: Median initial radiation dose was 50.4 Gy, median 8–30 months before reirradiation. Reirradiation was mostly administered using hyperfractionated (1.2–1.5 Gy twice-daily) or 1.8 Gy once-daily chemoradiotherapy. Median total dose was 30–40 Gy to the gross tumour volume with 2–4 cm margins. Median survival was 39–60 months in resected patients and 12–16 months in palliative patients. Good symptomatic relief was reported in 82–100%. Acute toxicity with diarrhoea was reported in 9–20%, late toxicity was insufficiently reported. Conclusions: Reirradiation of rectal cancer to limited volumes is feasible. When curative resection is possible, the goal is radical resection and long-term survival, and hyperfractionated chemoradiotherapy should be preferred to limit late toxicity. Reirradiation yielded good symptomatic relief in palliative treatment

  14. PCOS and cancer risk.

    OpenAIRE

    Tadeusz Issat; Artur J Jakimiuk

    2010-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects approximately 5 to 10% of women of reproductive age. It is the most common reason of anovulation in infertile women. PCOS is accompanied by such conditions as oligo- or anovulation, hipertestosteronism, lower cell sensitivity to insulin, type II diabetes, hyperlipidemia and obesity. Each of the above-mentioned conditions is an approved risk factor proved to predispose towards cancer. However, PCOS is also a disease entity which differs in its clinical ...

  15. Risk factors for cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyman, G.H.

    1992-01-01

    It is no longer reasonable to divide cancers into those that are genetic in origin and those that are environmental in origin. With rare exception, carcinogenesis involves environmental factors that directly or indirectly exert a change in the cell's genome. Virtually all causes of cancer are multifactorial, sometimes involving an inherited predisposition to the carcinogenic effects of environmental factors, which include chemicals, ionizing radiation, and oncogenic virus. Carcinogenesis is a multistep process including induction, promotion, and progression. Initiation requires an irreversible change in the cellular genome, whereas promotion is commonly associated with prolonged and reversible exposure. Tumor progression results in genotypic and phenotypic changes associated with tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Most information on human cancer risk is based on epidemiologic studies involving both exposed and unexposed individuals. The quality of such studies depends on their ability to assess the strength of any association of exposure and disease and careful attention to any potential bias. Few cancers are inherited in a Mendelian fashion. Several preneoplastic conditions, however, are clearly inherited and several malignancies demonstrate weak familial patterns. Environmental factors may exert their effect on DNA in a random fashion, but certain consistent changes, including specific translocations of genetic information, are often found. Currently, there is great interest in the close proximity of certain oncogenes governing growth control to the consistent chromosomal changes observed. Such changes may represent a final common pathway of action for environmental carcinogens. Sufficient laboratory and epidemiologic evidence exists to establish a causal association of several chemical agents with cancer

  16. Diabetes, insulin and cancer risk

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xi-Lin; Chan, Juliana CN

    2012-01-01

    There is a consensus that both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are associated with a spectrum of cancers but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. On the other hand, there are ongoing debates about the risk association of insulin use with cancer. We have briefly reviewed recent related research on exploration of risk factors for cancer and pharmacoepidemiological investigations into drug use in diabetes on the risk of cancer, as well as the current understanding of metabolic pathways impl...

  17. Genetic and Epigenetic Biomarkers for Recurrent Prostate Cancer After Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    several distinct advantages over surgical treatment, such as no complications from surgery, and a low risk of urinary incontinence , RT treatment takes...Khorana, Tissue factor and VEGF expression in prostate carcinoma: a tissue microarray study. Cancer Invest, 2009. 27(4): p. 430-4. 7. Crawford, E.D

  18. Study protocol to investigate the effect of a lifestyle intervention on body weight, psychological health status and risk factors associated with disease recurrence in women recovering from breast cancer treatment [ISRCTN08045231

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutrie Nanette

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer survivors often encounter physiological and psychological problems related to their diagnosis and treatment that can influence long-term prognosis. The aim of this research is to investigate the effects of a lifestyle intervention on body weight and psychological well-being in women recovering from breast cancer treatment, and to determine the relationship between changes in these variables and biomarkers associated with disease recurrence and survival. Methods/design Following ethical approval, a total of 100 patients will be randomly assigned to a lifestyle intervention (incorporating dietary energy restriction in conjunction with aerobic exercise training or normal care control group. Patients randomised to the dietary and exercise intervention will be given individualised healthy eating dietary advice and written information and attend moderate intensity aerobic exercise sessions on three to five days per week for a period of 24 weeks. The aim of this strategy is to induce a steady weight loss of up to 0.5 Kg each week. In addition, the overall quality of the diet will be examined with a view to (i reducing the dietary intake of fat to ~25% of the total calories, (ii eating at least 5 portions of fruit and vegetables a day, (iii increasing the intake of fibre and reducing refined carbohydrates, and (iv taking moderate amounts of alcohol. Outcome measures will include body weight and body composition, psychological health status (stress and depression, cardiorespiratory fitness and quality of life. In addition, biomarkers associated with disease recurrence, including stress hormones, estrogen status, inflammatory markers and indices of innate and adaptive immune function will be monitored. Discussion This research will provide valuable information on the effectiveness of a practical, easily implemented lifestyle intervention for evoking positive effects on body weight and psychological well-being, two

  19. Influence of surgery-radiotherapy interval on recurrence in breast-conserving treatment of small breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourquet, A.; Dreyfus, H.; Maher, M.; Gozy, M.; Campana, F.; Vilcoq, J. R.; Colombani, H.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the possible influence of surgery-radiotherapy interval (SRI) on breast recurrence in patients (pts.) with small breast cancers who had a breast-conserving treatment. Materials and Methods: Between January 1981 and December 1988, of 2012 pts. with stage I-II breast cancers treated with wide excision, axillary node dissection and breast irradiation, 1839 (91%) did not received adjuvant chemotherapy and were included in this study. Median age was 51 yrs. [23-88]. Mean tumor size was 2.1 cm [0.5-5]. Median tumor bed irradiation dose was 65 Gy [50-90]. The median SRI was 32 days [5-137]. Pts. were distributed among three SRI groups: 56 days (61 pts). Breast recurrence risk and survival were determined by Kaplan-Meier estimates. The following prognostic factors were evaluated for their possible influence on breast recurrence: age, tumor size, node involvement, estrogen receptor levels, Bloom and Richardson grading (SBR). Therapeutic factors were also analyzed: place of surgery (inside or outside the institution), breast and tumor bed radiation dose, and SRI as a time-dependent variable. A multivariate analysis of breast recurrence risk was performed to adjust for the various confounding factors. A prognostic index was established and the influence of SRI on recurrence was determined within the various prognostic groups. Results: Median follow-up for living pts. was 78 months [3-158]. Breast recurrence rate at 7 years was 11 % [10-13]. The 7-year survival rate was 89 % [88-91]. The 7-year breast recurrence risks in the three SRI groups were 12 %, 9 %, and 18%, respectively (p=0.045). The relative risk (RR) of breast failure was significantly lower in the 35-56 days SRI group compared with the 56 days) were also associated with a higher risk of recurrence, though not statistically significant because of the small numbers. The effect of SRI was time-dependent, i. e. influencing early recurrences and disappearing after 5 years. It was

  20. Assessing the risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism – a practical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrni, Jennifer; Husmann, Marc; Gretener, Silvia B; Keo, Hong H

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. This risk is lowered by anticoagulation, with a large effect in the initial phase following the venous thromboembolic event, and with a smaller effect in terms of secondary prevention of recurrence when extended anticoagulation is performed. On the other hand, extended anticoagulation is associated with an increased risk of major bleeding and thus leads to morbidity and mortality. Therefore, it is necessary to assess the risk of recurrence for VTE on an individual basis, and a recommendation for secondary prophylaxis should be specifically based on risk calculation of recurrence of VTE and bleeding. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of relevant risk factors for recurrent VTE and a practical approach for assessing the risk of recurrence in daily practice. PMID:26316770

  1. Assessing the risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism--a practical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrni, Jennifer; Husmann, Marc; Gretener, Silvia B; Keo, Hong H

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. This risk is lowered by anticoagulation, with a large effect in the initial phase following the venous thromboembolic event, and with a smaller effect in terms of secondary prevention of recurrence when extended anticoagulation is performed. On the other hand, extended anticoagulation is associated with an increased risk of major bleeding and thus leads to morbidity and mortality. Therefore, it is necessary to assess the risk of recurrence for VTE on an individual basis, and a recommendation for secondary prophylaxis should be specifically based on risk calculation of recurrence of VTE and bleeding. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of relevant risk factors for recurrent VTE and a practical approach for assessing the risk of recurrence in daily practice.

  2. Recurrent Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Jon; Galen, Benjamin T

    2017-07-01

    Recurrent meningitis is a rare clinical scenario that can be self-limiting or life threatening depending on the underlying etiology. This review describes the causes, risk factors, treatment, and prognosis for recurrent meningitis. As a general overview of a broad topic, the aim of this review is to provide clinicians with a comprehensive differential diagnosis to aide in the evaluation and management of a patient with recurrent meningitis. New developments related to understanding the pathophysiology of recurrent meningitis are as scarce as studies evaluating the treatment and prevention of this rare disorder. A trial evaluating oral valacyclovir suppression after HSV-2 meningitis did not demonstrate a benefit in preventing recurrences. The data on prophylactic antibiotics after basilar skull fractures do not support their use. Intrathecal trastuzumab has shown promise in treating leptomeningeal carcinomatosis from HER-2 positive breast cancer. Monoclonal antibodies used to treat cancer and autoimmune diseases are new potential causes of drug-induced aseptic meningitis. Despite their potential for causing recurrent meningitis, the clinical entities reviewed herein are not frequently discussed together given that they are a heterogeneous collection of unrelated, rare diseases. Epidemiologic data on recurrent meningitis are lacking. The syndrome of recurrent benign lymphocytic meningitis described by Mollaret in 1944 was later found to be closely related to HSV-2 reactivation, but HSV-2 is by no means the only etiology of recurrent aseptic meningitis. While the mainstay of treatment for recurrent meningitis is supportive care, it is paramount to ensure that reversible and treatable causes have been addressed for further prevention.

  3. The impact of lymph vascular space invasion on recurrence and survival in patients with early stage endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizzi, V; Cormio, G; Lorusso, M; Latorre, D; Falagario, M; Demitri, P; Scardigno, D; Selvaggi, L E

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine impact of lymph vascular space involvement (LVSI) on recurrence and survival in early stage of endometrial cancer. From 1991 through 2010, all endometrial cancer patients at University Hospital of Bari, Italy were identified. The Log-rank test and Kaplan-Meyer methods were used for time-to-event analysis to evaluate the effects of on lymph vascular space involvement recurrence rate and survival time. Of the 560 endometrial cancer patients, 525 underwent primary surgery. Of those, 399 had early stage disease. Three hundred and forty women were not found to have LVSI, whereas 59 were found to have lymph vascular space involvement. Forty-nine (12%) patients developed a recurrence and 20 of them showed lymph vascular space involvement. The statistical analysis demonstrated that LVSI was strongly associated with a poor survival (P < 0.0001). Lymph vascular space involvement is associated with a high risk of recurrence and poor overall survival in early stage of endometrial cancer; therefore, the clinical decision to decide whether or not a patient with early stage endometrial cancer should receive adjuvant therapy should be included the evaluation of lymph vascular space involvement. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Local Recurrence After Complete Clinical Response and Watch and Wait in Rectal Cancer After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation: Impact of Salvage Therapy on Local Disease Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habr-Gama, Angelita; Gama-Rodrigues, Joaquim; São Julião, Guilherme P.; Proscurshim, Igor; Sabbagh, Charles; Lynn, Patricio B.; Perez, Rodrigo O.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To review the risk of local recurrence and impact of salvage therapy after Watch and Wait for rectal cancer with complete clinical response (cCR) after chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Patients with cT2-4N0-2M0 distal rectal cancer treated with CRT (50.4-54 Gy + 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy) and cCR at 8 weeks were included. Patients with cCR were enrolled in a strict follow-up program with no immediate surgery (Watch and Wait). Local recurrence-free survival was compared while taking into account Watch and Wait strategy alone and Watch and Wait plus salvage. Results: 90 of 183 patients experienced cCR at initial assessment after CRT (49%). When early tumor regrowths (up to and including the initial 12 months of follow-up) and late recurrences were considered together, 28 patients (31%) experienced local recurrence (median follow-up time, 60 months). Of those, 26 patients underwent salvage therapy, and 2 patients were not amenable to salvage. In 4 patients, local re-recurrence developed after Watch and Wait plus salvage. The overall salvage rate for local recurrence was 93%. Local recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 69% (all local recurrences) and 94% (after salvage procedures). Thirteen patients (14%) experienced systemic recurrence. The 5-year cancer-specific overall survival and disease-free survival for all patients (including all recurrences) were 91% and 68%, respectively. Conclusions: Local recurrence may develop in 31% of patients with initial cCR when early regrowths (≤12 months) and late recurrences are grouped together. More than half of these recurrences develop within 12 months of follow-up. Salvage therapy is possible in ≥90% of recurrences, leading to 94% local disease control, with 78% organ preservation

  5. Local Recurrence After Complete Clinical Response and Watch and Wait in Rectal Cancer After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation: Impact of Salvage Therapy on Local Disease Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habr-Gama, Angelita, E-mail: gamange@uol.com.br [Angelita and Joaquim Gama Institute, São Paulo (Brazil); University of São Paulo School of Medicine, São Paulo (Brazil); Gama-Rodrigues, Joaquim [Angelita and Joaquim Gama Institute, São Paulo (Brazil); University of São Paulo School of Medicine, São Paulo (Brazil); São Julião, Guilherme P. [Angelita and Joaquim Gama Institute, São Paulo (Brazil); Colorectal Surgery Division, University of São Paulo School of Medicine, São Paulo (Brazil); Proscurshim, Igor; Sabbagh, Charles; Lynn, Patricio B. [Angelita and Joaquim Gama Institute, São Paulo (Brazil); Perez, Rodrigo O. [Angelita and Joaquim Gama Institute, São Paulo (Brazil); Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, São Paulo Branch (Brazil)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To review the risk of local recurrence and impact of salvage therapy after Watch and Wait for rectal cancer with complete clinical response (cCR) after chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Patients with cT2-4N0-2M0 distal rectal cancer treated with CRT (50.4-54 Gy + 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy) and cCR at 8 weeks were included. Patients with cCR were enrolled in a strict follow-up program with no immediate surgery (Watch and Wait). Local recurrence-free survival was compared while taking into account Watch and Wait strategy alone and Watch and Wait plus salvage. Results: 90 of 183 patients experienced cCR at initial assessment after CRT (49%). When early tumor regrowths (up to and including the initial 12 months of follow-up) and late recurrences were considered together, 28 patients (31%) experienced local recurrence (median follow-up time, 60 months). Of those, 26 patients underwent salvage therapy, and 2 patients were not amenable to salvage. In 4 patients, local re-recurrence developed after Watch and Wait plus salvage. The overall salvage rate for local recurrence was 93%. Local recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 69% (all local recurrences) and 94% (after salvage procedures). Thirteen patients (14%) experienced systemic recurrence. The 5-year cancer-specific overall survival and disease-free survival for all patients (including all recurrences) were 91% and 68%, respectively. Conclusions: Local recurrence may develop in 31% of patients with initial cCR when early regrowths (≤12 months) and late recurrences are grouped together. More than half of these recurrences develop within 12 months of follow-up. Salvage therapy is possible in ≥90% of recurrences, leading to 94% local disease control, with 78% organ preservation.

  6. 18F-deoxyglucose-PET in the detection of recurrence in head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yingrui; Li Weixiong; Gu Meixin; Xie Songxi

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate 18 F-deoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in the detection of suspicious recurrence in head and neck cancers, as compared with CT/MRI imaging. Methods: Thirty-seven patients with clinically suspicious recurrences in head and neck cancers underwent FDG-PET, with 34 checked with CT/MRI imaging. The final diagnosis of recurrence were proved by pathology or clinical following-up. Results: FDG-PET detected recurrence successfully in 32 of 37 (86.5%) patients with 3 false positives and 2 false negatives. The FDG-PET sensitivity, specificity and accuracy in defining local recurrence were 91.7%, 76.9%, 86.5%, respectively; and those of CT/MRI were 68.2%, 75.0%, 61.8%, respectively. Conclusion: In comparison with CT/MRI, FDG-PET possesses a high accuracy in detecting recurrence in head and neck cancers

  7. The association between smoking cessation before and after diagnosis and non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrence: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Osch, Frits H M; Jochems, Sylvia H J; Reulen, Raoul C; Pirrie, Sarah J; Nekeman, Duncan; Wesselius, Anke; James, Nicholas D; Wallace, D Michael A; Cheng, K K; van Schooten, Frederik J; Bryan, Richard T; Zeegers, Maurice P

    2018-07-01

    Smoking is a major risk factor for bladder cancer, but the relationship between smoking cessation after initial treatment and bladder cancer recurrence has been investigated less frequently and not prospectively yet. 722 non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) patients (pTa, pT1, and CIS) from the prospective Bladder Cancer Prognosis Programme (BCPP) cohort, selected in the UK between 2005 and 2011, provided complete data on smoking behavior before and up to 5 years after diagnosis. The impact of smoking behavior on NMIBC recurrence was explored by multivariable Cox regression models investigating time-to-first NMIBC recurrence. Over a median follow-up period of 4.21 years, 403 pathologically confirmed NMIBC recurrences occurred in 210 patients. Only 25 current smokers at diagnosis quit smoking (14%) during follow-up and smoking cessation after diagnosis did not decrease risk of recurrence compared to continuing smokers (p = 0.352). Although quitting smoking after diagnosis might reduce the risk of recurrence based on retrospective evidence, this is not confirmed in this prospective study because the number of NMIBC patients quitting smoking before their first recurrence was too low. Nevertheless, this indicates an important role for urologists and other health care professionals in promoting smoking cessation in NMIBC.

  8. GRECOS Project (Genotyping Recurrence Risk of Stroke): The Use of Genetics to Predict the Vascular Recurrence After Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Cadenas, Israel; Mendióroz, Maite; Giralt, Dolors; Nafria, Cristina; Garcia, Elena; Carrera, Caty; Gallego-Fabrega, Cristina; Domingues-Montanari, Sophie; Delgado, Pilar; Ribó, Marc; Castellanos, Mar; Martínez, Sergi; Freijo, Marimar; Jiménez-Conde, Jordi; Rubiera, Marta; Alvarez-Sabín, José; Molina, Carlos A; Font, Maria Angels; Grau Olivares, Marta; Palomeras, Ernest; Perez de la Ossa, Natalia; Martinez-Zabaleta, Maite; Masjuan, Jaime; Moniche, Francisco; Canovas, David; Piñana, Carlos; Purroy, Francisco; Cocho, Dolores; Navas, Inma; Tejero, Carlos; Aymerich, Nuria; Cullell, Natalia; Muiño, Elena; Serena, Joaquín; Rubio, Francisco; Davalos, Antoni; Roquer, Jaume; Arenillas, Juan Francisco; Martí-Fábregas, Joan; Keene, Keith; Chen, Wei-Min; Worrall, Bradford; Sale, Michele; Arboix, Adrià; Krupinski, Jerzy; Montaner, Joan

    2017-05-01

    Vascular recurrence occurs in 11% of patients during the first year after ischemic stroke (IS) or transient ischemic attack. Clinical scores do not predict the whole vascular recurrence risk; therefore, we aimed to find genetic variants associated with recurrence that might improve the clinical predictive models in IS. We analyzed 256 polymorphisms from 115 candidate genes in 3 patient cohorts comprising 4482 IS or transient ischemic attack patients. The discovery cohort was prospectively recruited and included 1494 patients, 6.2% of them developed a new IS during the first year of follow-up. Replication analysis was performed in 2988 patients using SNPlex or HumanOmni1-Quad technology. We generated a predictive model using Cox regression (GRECOS score [Genotyping Reurrence Risk of Stroke]) and generated risk groups using a classification tree method. The analyses revealed that rs1800801 in the MGP gene (hazard ratio, 1.33; P =9×10 - 03 ), a gene related to artery calcification, was associated with new IS during the first year of follow-up. This polymorphism was replicated in a Spanish cohort (n=1.305); however, it was not significantly associated in a North American cohort (n=1.683). The GRECOS score predicted new IS ( P =3.2×10 - 09 ) and could classify patients, from low risk of stroke recurrence (1.9%) to high risk (12.6%). Moreover, the addition of genetic risk factors to the GRECOS score improves the prediction compared with previous Stroke Prognosis Instrument-II score ( P =0.03). The use of genetics could be useful to estimate vascular recurrence risk after IS. Genetic variability in the MGP gene was associated with vascular recurrence in the Spanish population. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Association of genetic variants in VEGF-A with clinical recurrence in prostate cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langsenlehner, T.; Thurner, E.M.; Kapp, K.S. [Medical University of Graz, Department of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, Graz (Austria); Renner, W. [Medical University of Graz, Clinical Institute of Medical and Chemical Laboratory Diagnostics, Graz (Austria); Gerger, A. [Medical University of Graz, Division of Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Graz (Austria); Langsenlehner, U. [GKK Outpatient Department, Division of Internal Medicine, Graz (Austria)

    2014-04-15

    Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), a key regulator of tumor-induced angiogenesis, is critical for tumor growth and metastasization. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the prognostic value of VEGF single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes for clinical recurrence after definitive radiotherapy for prostate cancer. The association of seven VEGF-A polymorphisms and their haplotypes with clinical recurrence (defined as the occurrence of local recurrence and/or distant metastases) in 496 prostate cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy were investigated. Genotypes were determined by 5'-nuclease (TaqMan) assays; haplotypes were analyzed using the Haploview program. Within a median follow-up time of 80 months, 44 patients (9%) developed clinical recurrences. Haplotype analysis showed two separate blocks of high-linkage disequilibrium, formed by five polymorphisms (-2578C > A, -2489C > T, -1498C > T, -634G > C, -7C > T) upstream of the coding sequence (CCCCC, ATTGC, CCCGC, ATTGT) and two polymorphisms (936C > T, 1612G > A) downstream of the coding sequence (CA, CG, TG). Carriers of at least 1 copy of the ATTGC haplotype were at higher risk of recurrence (hazard ratio [HR] 3.83; 95%CI 1.48-9.90, p=0.006); for carriers of 2 copies, the HR was 4.85 (95%CI 1.72-13.6; p=0.003). In multivariate analysis, patients harboring at least one copy of the ATTGC haplotype remained at increased risk of recurrence (HR 3.63, 95%CI 1.38-9.55, p=0.009); in patients carrying 2 copies, the HR was 4.72 (95%CI 1.64-13.6, p=0.004). Our findings indicate that the VEGF-A ATTGC haplotype may predict clinical recurrence in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. (orig.)

  10. Bricklayers and lung cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The article ‘Lung cancer risk among bricklayers in a pooled analysis of case–control studies’ in the International Journal of Cancer publishes findings of an epidemiological study (in the frame of a SYNERGY-project) dedicated to the lung cancer risk among bricklayers. The authors conclude that a

  11. HIV Infection and Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... same age ( 1 ). The general term for these cancers is "HIV-associated cancers." Three of these cancers are known as " acquired ... also have an increased cumulative risk of developing HIV-associated cancers. What can people infected with HIV do to ...

  12. Prognostic factors of tumor recurrence in completely resected non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tantraworasin A

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Apichat Tantraworasin,1 Somcharean Seateang,1 Nirush Lertprasertsuke,2 Nuttapon Arreyakajohn,3 Choosak Kasemsarn,4 Jayanton Patumanond5 1General Thoracic Unit, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University Hospital, Chiang Mai, Thailand; 2Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University Hospital, Chiang Mai, Thailand; 3Cardiovascular Thoracic Unit, Department of Surgery, Lampang Hospital, Lampang, Thailand; 4Cardiovascular Thoracic Unit, Department of Surgery, Chest Institute, Nonthaburi, Thailand; 5Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University Hospital, Chiang Mai, Thailand Background: Patients with completely resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC have an excellent outcome; however tumor recurs in 30%-77% of patients. This study retrospectively analyzed the clinicopathologic features of patients with any operable stage of NSCLC to identify the prognostic factors that influence tumor recurrence, including intratumoral blood vessel invasion (IVI, tumor size, tumor necrosis, and nodal involvement. Methods: From January 2002 to December 2011, 227 consecutive patients were enrolled in this study. They were divided into two groups: the “no recurrence” group and the “recurrence” group. Recurrence-free survival was analyzed by multivariable Cox regression analysis, stratified by tumor staging, chemotherapy, and lymphatic invasion. Results: IVI, tumor necrosis, tumor diameter more than 5 cm, and nodal involvement were identified as independent prognostic factors of tumor recurrence. The hazard ratio (HR of patients with IVI was 2.1 times higher than that of patients without IVI (95% confident interval [CI]: 1.4–3.2 (P = 0.001.The HR of patients with tumor necrosis was 2.1 times higher than that of patients without tumor necrosis (95% CI: 1.3–3.4 (P = 0.001. Patients who had a maximum tumor diameter greater than 5 cm had significantly higher risk of recurrence than

  13. Breast Cancer Risk in American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Risk in American Women On This Page What ... risk of developing the disease. Personal history of breast cancer : Women who have had breast cancer are more ...

  14. Environmental cancer risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Peter M.

    In a long-awaited report (‘Assessment of Technologies for Determining Cancer Risks From the Environment’), the U.S. Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) has evaluated the role of environmental factors in cancer diseases. Environment is interpreted broadly as encompassing anything that interacts with humans, including the natural environment, food, radiation, the workplace, etc. Geologic factors range from geographic location to radiation and specific minerals. The report, however, is based on an inadequate data base in most instances, and its major recommendations are related to the establishment of a national cancer registry to record cancer statistics, as is done for many other diseases. Presently, hard statistics are lacking in the establishment of some association between the cause-effect relationship of most environmental factors and most carcinogens. Of particular interest, but unfortunately based on unreliable data, are the effects of mineral substances such as ‘asbestos.’ USGS mineralogist Malcolm Ross will review asbestos and its effects on human health in the forthcoming Mineralogical Society of America's Short Course on the Amphiboles (Reviews in Mineralogy, 9, in press, 1981).

  15. The usefulness of FDG-PET for diagnosis of locally recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimoto, Mitsugu; Ikeda, Masataka; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Nomura, Masaya; Takemasa, Ichiro; Fukunaga, Hiroki; Higuchi, Ichiro; Monden, Morito

    2006-01-01

    The local recurrence is the most frequently encountered recurrent pattern after radical resection of rectal cancer. We show the results of our study evaluating the usefulness of FDGPET (PET) and fusion image of PET and CT for the diagnosis of local recurrence of rectal cancer. Forty-two patients with a suspicious local recurrence after curative resection of rectal cancer were prospectively recruited and underwent PET and CT. The fusion image yielded a correct diagnosis in 39 (93%) of 42 patients, whereas CT alone and PET alone did so in 33 (79%) and 37 (88%) patients, respectively. The fusion image had better diagnostic accuracy than CT alone (P=.0138) and PET alone (P=.0156), and altered patient management in 11 (26.2%) cases on the basis of additional information. Fusion image had a potential clinical value in the treatment of suspected local recurrence of rectal cancer. (author)

  16. Contribution of problem-solving skills to fear of recurrence in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akechi, Tatuo; Momino, Kanae; Yamashita, Toshinari; Fujita, Takashi; Hayashi, Hironori; Tsunoda, Nobuyuki; Iwata, Hiroji

    2014-05-01

    Although fear of recurrence is a major concern among breast cancer survivors after surgery, no standard strategies exist that alleviate their distress. This study examined the association of patients' problem-solving skills and fear of recurrence and psychological distress among breast cancer survivors. Randomly selected, ambulatory, female patients with breast cancer participated in this study. They were asked to complete the Concerns about Recurrence Scale (CARS) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine their associations. Data were obtained from 317 patients. Patients' problem-solving skills were significantly associated with all subscales of fear of recurrence and overall worries measured by the CARS. In addition, patients' problem-solving skills were significantly associated with both their anxiety and depression. Our findings warrant clinical trials to investigate effectiveness of psychosocial intervention program, including enhancing patients' problem-solving skills and reducing fear of recurrence among breast cancer survivors.

  17. A predictive model for recurrence in patients with glottic cancer implemented in a mobile application for Android.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jover-Esplá, Ana Gabriela; Palazón-Bru, Antonio; Folgado-de la Rosa, David Manuel; Severá-Ferrándiz, Guillermo; Sancho-Mestre, Manuela; de Juan-Herrero, Joaquín; Gil-Guillén, Vicente Francisco

    2018-05-01

    The existing predictive models of laryngeal cancer recurrence present limitations for clinical practice. Therefore, we constructed, internally validated and implemented in a mobile application (Android) a new model based on a points system taking into account the internationally recommended statistical methodology. This longitudinal prospective study included 189 patients with glottic cancer in 2004-2016 in a Spanish region. The main variable was time-to-recurrence, and its potential predictors were: age, gender, TNM classification, stage, smoking, alcohol consumption, and histology. A points system was developed to predict five-year risk of recurrence based on a Cox model. This was validated internally by bootstrapping, determining discrimination (C-statistics) and calibration (smooth curves). A total of 77 patients presented recurrence (40.7%) in a mean follow-up period of 3.4 ± 3.0 years. The factors in the model were: age, lymph node stage, alcohol consumption and stage. Discrimination and calibration were satisfactory. A points system was developed to obtain the probability of recurrence of laryngeal glottic cancer in five years, using five clinical variables. Our system should be validated externally in other geographical areas. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Vaginal vault recurrences of endometrial cancer in non-irradiated patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hardarson, Hordur Alexander; Nyhøj Heidemann, Lene; Christensen, René dePont

    2015-01-01

    are few and limited to previously irradiated patients or patients with advanced disease. Investigation of surgical treatment for isolated vaginal vault recurrence is practically nonexistent. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of RT and ST in a non-irradiated group with recurrent endometrial...... cancer limited to the vaginal vault. METHODS: Patients treated for recurrent endometrial cancer at Odense University Hospital, Denmark between 2003 and 2012 were identified, n = 118. Thirty-three patients had an isolated vaginal vault recurrence and were treated with either RT, ST or both. Re...

  19. Knowledge of Stroke Risk Factors and Warning Signs in Patients with Recurrent Stroke or Recurrent Transient Ischaemic Attack in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jittima Saengsuwan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a global burden. It is not known whether patients who are most at risk of stroke (recurrent stroke or recurrent transient ischaemic attack have enough knowledge of stroke risk factors and warning signs. The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge of stroke risk factors and warning signs in this high-risk population. We performed a cross-sectional questionnaire-based study of patients with recurrent stroke or recurrent TIA admitted to Srinagarind Hospital and Khon Kaen Hospital, Thailand. A total of 140 patients were included in the study (age 65.6±11.3 years [mean ± SD], 62 females. Using an open-ended questionnaire, nearly one-third of patients (31.4% could not name any risk factors for stroke. The most commonly recognized risk factors were hypertension (35%, dyslipidemia (28.6%, and diabetes (22.9%. Regarding stroke warning signs, the most commonly recognized warning signs were sudden unilateral weakness (61.4%, sudden trouble with speaking (25.7%, and sudden trouble with walking, loss of balance, or dizziness (21.4%. Nineteen patients (13.6% could not identify any warning signs. The results showed that knowledge of stroke obtained from open-ended questionnaires is still unsatisfactory. The healthcare provider should provide structured interventions to increase knowledge and awareness of stroke in these patients.

  20. Early detection of lung cancer recurrence after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy: radiomics system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammak, Salma; Palma, David; Mattonen, Sarah; Senan, Suresh; Ward, Aaron D.

    2018-02-01

    Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is the standard treatment recommendation for Stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients who are inoperable or who refuse surgery. This option is well tolerated by even unfit patients and has a low recurrence risk post-treatment. However, SABR induces changes in the lung parenchyma that can appear similar to those of recurrence, and the difference between the two at an early follow-up time point is not easily distinguishable for an expert physician. We hypothesized that a radiomics signature derived from standard-of-care computed tomography (CT) imaging can detect cancer recurrence within six months of SABR treatment. This study reports on the design phase of our work, with external validation planned in future work. In this study, we performed cross-validation experiments with four feature selection approaches and seven classifiers on an 81-patient data set. We extracted 104 radiomics features from the consolidative and the peri-consolidative regions on the follow-up CT scans. The best results were achieved using the sum of estimated Mahalanobis distances (Maha) for supervised forward feature selection and a trainable automatic radial basis support vector classifier (RBSVC). This system produced an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.84, an error rate of 16.4%, a false negative rate of 12.7%, and a false positive rate of 20.0% for leaveone patient out cross-validation. This suggests that once validated on an external data set, radiomics could reliably detect post-SABR recurrence and form the basis of a tool assisting physicians in making salvage treatment decisions.

  1. Recurrent candidiasis and early-onset gastric cancer in a patient with a genetically defined partial MYD88 defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelaar, Ingrid P; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; van der Post, Rachel S; de Voer, Richarda M; Kets, C Marleen; Jansen, Trees J G; Jacobs, Liesbeth; Schreibelt, Gerty; de Vries, I Jolanda M; Netea, Mihai G; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline

    2016-04-01

    Gastric cancer is caused by both genetic and environmental factors. A woman who suffered from recurrent candidiasis throughout her life developed diffuse-type gastric cancer at the age of 23 years. Using whole-exome sequencing we identified a germline homozygous missense variant in MYD88. Immunological assays on peripheral blood mononuclear cells revealed an impaired immune response upon stimulation with Candida albicans, characterized by a defective production of the cytokine interleukin-17. Our data suggest that a genetic defect in MYD88 results in an impaired immune response and may increase gastric cancer risk.

  2. Risk of Local Recurrence of Benign and Borderline Phyllodes Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borhani-Khomani, Kaveh; Talman, Maj-Lis Møller; Kroman, Niels

    2016-01-01

    women aged 18 years or older, operated from 1999 to 2014, with resected benign or borderline PTs. Information on age, size of primary tumor and recurrence, histological grade, surgical treatment, margin size, and local recurrence were collected from the national Danish Pathology Register. RESULTS.......1-192). We identified 30 local recurrences, i.e., a recurrence rate of 6.3 %. Twenty-three recurrences had similar or lower histological grading than the primary tumor, one primary benign PT recurred as a tumor with unclear diagnosis, and one primary borderline PT recurred as malignant. The number...

  3. Distribution of Estimated 10-Year Risk of Recurrent Vascular Events and Residual Risk in a Secondary Prevention Population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaasenbrood, Lotte; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Ray, Kausik K.; Peters, Ron J. G.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Amarenco, Pierre; LaRosa, John C.; Cramer, Maarten J. M.; Westerink, Jan; Kappelle, L. Jaap; de Borst, Gert J.; Visseren, Frank L. J.

    2016-01-01

    Among patients with clinically manifest vascular disease, the risk of recurrent vascular events is likely to vary. We assessed the distribution of estimated 10-year risk of recurrent vascular events in a secondary prevention population. We also estimated the potential risk reduction and residual

  4. Distribution of Estimated 10-Year Risk of Recurrent Vascular Events and Residual Risk in a Secondary Prevention Population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaasenbrood, Lotte; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Van Der Graaf, Yolanda; Ray, Kausik K.; Peters, Ron J G; Kastelein, John J P; Amarenco, Pierre; Larosa, John C.; Cramer, Maarten J M; Westerink, Jan; Kappelle, L. Jaap; De Borst, Gert J.; Visseren, Frank L J

    2016-01-01

    Background: Among patients with clinically manifest vascular disease, the risk of recurrent vascular events is likely to vary. We assessed the distribution of estimated 10-year risk of recurrent vascular events in a secondary prevention population. We also estimated the potential risk reduction and

  5. Pathologic margin involvement and the risk of recurrence in patients treated with breast-conserving therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gage, Irene; Nixon, Asa J.; Schnitt, Stuart J.; Recht, Abram; Gelman, Rebecca; Silver, Barbara; Connolly, James L.; Harris, Jay R.

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the relationship between microscopic margin status and recurrence after breast-conserving therapy for tumors with or without an extensive intraductal component (EIC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: During the years 1968 to 1986, 1865 women with unilateral clinical stage I or II breast cancer were treated with radiation therapy for breast conservation. Of these, 340 received ≥60 Gy to the tumor bed and had margins that were evaluable on review of their pathologic slides; these constitute the study population. The median follow-up was 109 months. All available slides were reviewed by one of the study pathologists (SS, JC). Final radial margins of excision were classified as negative >1 mm (no invasive or ductal carcinoma in-situ within 1 mm of the inked margin), negative ≤1 mm (any carcinoma ≤1 mm of the inked margin but not at ink) or positive (any carcinoma at the inked margin). A focally positive margin was defined as any invasive or in-situ carcinoma at the margin in ≤3 LPF. The extent of positivity was not evaluable in 2 patients and the distance of the tumor from the margin was not evaluable in 48 patients with a negative margin. Thirty-nine percent of EIC-negative and 46% of EIC-positive patients underwent a re-excision and, for these, the final margin analyzed was from the re-excised specimen. The median dose to the tumor bed was 63 Gy for patients with positive margins and 62 Gy for patients with negative margins. Recurrent disease was classified as ipsilateral breast recurrence (IBR) or distant metastasis/regional nodal failure (DM/RNF). RESULTS: Five year crude rates for the first site of recurrence were calculated for 340 patients evaluable at 5 years. Results were tabulated separately for all patients, EIC-negative and EIC-positive. All p-values tested for differences in the distribution of sites of first failure. CONCLUSIONS: The risk of ipsilateral breast recurrence is equally low for patients with close (≤1 mm) or negative (>1 mm

  6. Correlation of breast recurrence (inflammatory type or not) after breast conserving surgery with radiation therapy and clinicopathological factors in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Reiki; Koyama, Hiroki

    1998-01-01

    To clarify risk factors for breast recurrence of inflammatory type after breast conserving therapy, we examined clinicopathological findings and therapies given after initial surgery. Nine cases of inflammatory breast recurrence out of 133 recurrent cases collected from a collaborative group supported by a grant-in-aid for Cancer Research by Japanese Ministry of Health and Welfare (7-24, Chairman: H. Koyama) were analyzed by a case control study. And forty-three recurrent cases in Kumamoto City Hospital were also analyzed similarly. Inflammatory breast recurrence after breast conserving surgery is characterized as follows: Most cases have negative surgical margin and may be unresponsive to radiation therapy, unlike non-inflammatory breast recurrence. Lymph node metastasis is involved in recurrence, but the difference in patients with only distant metastasis was positive lymphatic invasion. Distant metastasis coexisted at the time of recurrence, and secondary surgery was impossible in most cases. The prognosis after recurrence was unfavorable. These findings suggest that inflammatory recurrence is manifestation of so-called ''occult'' inflammatory breast cancer. (author)

  7. Correlation of breast recurrence (inflammatory type or not) after breast conserving surgery with radiation therapy and clinicopathological factors in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Reiki [Kumamoto City Hospital (Japan); Koyama, Hiroki

    1998-09-01

    To clarify risk factors for breast recurrence of inflammatory type after breast conserving therapy, we examined clinicopathological findings and therapies given after initial surgery. Nine cases of inflammatory breast recurrence out of 133 recurrent cases collected from a collaborative group supported by a grant-in-aid for Cancer Research by Japanese Ministry of Health and Welfare (7-24, Chairman: H. Koyama) were analyzed by a case control study. And forty-three recurrent cases in Kumamoto City Hospital were also analyzed similarly. Inflammatory breast recurrence after breast conserving surgery is characterized as follows: Most cases have negative surgical margin and may be unresponsive to radiation therapy, unlike non-inflammatory breast recurrence. Lymph node metastasis is involved in recurrence, but the difference in patients with only distant metastasis was positive lymphatic invasion. Distant metastasis coexisted at the time of recurrence, and secondary surgery was impossible in most cases. The prognosis after recurrence was unfavorable. These findings suggest that inflammatory recurrence is manifestation of so-called ``occult`` inflammatory breast cancer. (author)

  8. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Locally Progressive and Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer after Prior Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Sutera

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionPancreatic adenocarcinoma is an aggressive malignancy that has consistently demonstrated poor outcomes despite aggressive treatments. Despite multimodal treatment, local disease progression and local recurrence are common. Management of recurrent or progressive pancreatic carcinomas proves a further challenge. In patients previously treated with radiation therapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT is a promising modality capable of delivering high dose to the tumor while limiting dose to critical structures. We aimed to determine the feasibility and tolerability of SBRT for recurrent or local pancreatic cancer in patients previously treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT.Materials and methodsPatients treated with EBRT who developed recurrent or local pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma treated with SBRT reirradiation at our institution, from 2004 to 2014 were reviewed. Our primary endpoints included overall survival (OS, local control, regional control, and late grade 3+ radiation toxicity. Endpoints were analyzed with the Kaplan–Meier method. The association of these survival endpoints with risk factors was studied with univariate Cox proportional hazards models.ResultsWe identified 38 patients with recurrent/progressive pancreatic cancer treated with SBRT following prior radiation therapy. Prior radiation was delivered to a median dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. SBRT was delivered to a median dose of 24.5 Gy in 1–3 fractions. Surgical resection was performed on 55.3% of all patients. Within a median follow-up of 24.4 months (inter-quartile range, 14.9–32.7 months, the median OS from diagnosis for the entire cohort was 26.6 months (95% CI: 20.3–29.8 with 2-year OS of 53.0%. Median survival from SBRT was 9.7 months (95% CI, 5.5–13.8. The 2-year freedom from local progression and regional progression was 58 and 82%, respectively. For the entire cohort, 18.4 and 10.5% experienced late grade 2

  9. Influence of margin status and radiation on recurrence after radical hysterectomy in Stage IB cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Lee, Hang; Hanson, Emily; Berkowitz, Ross S.; Crum, Christopher P.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the relationship between margin status and local recurrence (LR) or any recurrence after radical hysterectomy (RH) in women treated with or without radiotherapy (RT) for Stage IB cervical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: This study included 284 patients after RH with assessable margins between 1980 and 2000. Each margin was scored as negative (≥1 cm), close (>0 and <1 cm), or positive. The outcomes measured were any recurrence, LR, and relapse-free survival. Results: The crude rate for any recurrence was 11%, 20%, and 38% for patients with negative, close, and positive margins, respectively. The crude rate for LR was 10%, 11%, and 38%, respectively. Postoperative RT decreased the rate of LR from 10% to 0% for negative, 17% to 0% for close, and 50% to 25% for positive margins. The significant predictors of decreased relapse-free survival on univariate analysis were the depth of tumor invasion (hazard ratio [HR] 2.14/cm increase, p = 0.007), positive margins (HR 3.92, p = 0.02), tumor size (HR 1.3/cm increase, p = 0.02), lymphovascular invasion (HR 2.19, p = 0.03), and margin status (HR 0.002/increasing millimeter from cancer for those with close margins, p = 0.03). Long-term side effects occurred in 8% after RH and 19% after RH and RT. Conclusion: The use of postoperative RT may decrease the risk of LR in patients with close paracervical margins. Patients with other adverse prognostic factors and close margins may also benefit from the use of postoperative RT. However, RT after RH may increase the risk of long-term side effects

  10. Radiotherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer treated with surgery alone as the initial treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Hidekazu; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Hachiya, Kae; Okada, Sunaho; Kitahara, Masashi; Matsuyama, Katsuya; Matsuo, Masayuki [Gifu University, Gifu (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    Although the technical developments of radiotherapy have been remarkable, there are currently few reports on the treatment results of radiotherapy for local recurrence of rectal cancer treated with surgery alone as initial treatment in this three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy era. Thus, we retrospectively evaluated the treatment results of radiotherapy for local recurrence of rectal cancer treated with surgery alone as the initial treatment. Thirty-two patients who underwent radiotherapy were enrolled in this study. The dose per fraction was 2.0–3.5 Gy. Because the treatment schedule was variable, the biological effective dose (BED) was calculated. Local control (LC) and overall survival (OS) rates from the completion of radiotherapy were calculated. The 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-year LC rates were 51.5%, 24.5%, 19.6%, 19.6%, and 13.1%, respectively. LC rates were significantly higher for the high BED group (≥75 Gy10) than for the lower BED group (<75 Gy10). All patients who reported pain achieved pain relief. The duration of pain relief was significantly higher for the high BED group than for the lower BED group. The 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-year OS rates were 82.6%, 56.5%, 45.2%, 38.7%, and 23.2%, respectively. There was a trend toward higher OS rates in with higher BED group compared to lower BED group. For patients with unresectable locally recurrent rectal cancer treated with surgery alone, radiotherapy is effective treatment. The prescribed BED should be more than 75 Gy10, if the dose to the organ at risk is within acceptable levels.

  11. Utilization of health care services in cancer patients with elevated fear of cancer recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Alexandra; Ivers, Hans; Savard, Josée

    2018-05-02

    Cancer patients commonly report experiencing fear of cancer recurrence (FCR), which may lead to several negative consequences. This study aimed at examining whether clinical levels of FCR are linked to a greater use of health care services. This is a secondary analysis of a longitudinal study of 962 cancer patients on the epidemiology of cancer-related insomnia. They completed the Fear of Cancer Recurrence Inventory-Short form (FCRI-SF) and reported information on their consultations (medical, psychosocial, and complementary and alternative medicine [CAM]) and medication usage (anxiolytics/hypnotics and antidepressants) at 6 time points over an 18-month period. Results indicated that clinical FCR at baseline was associated with greater consultation rates of medical and psychosocial professionals and a greater usage of anxiolytics/hypnotics and antidepressants. No significant association was found between the FCR level and use of CAM services. While consultation rates of medical and CAM professionals and usage of antidepressants generally increased over time, consultation rates of psychosocial professionals and usage of anxiolytics/hypnotics tended to decrease. Cancer patients with clinical levels of FCR are more likely to consult health care providers and to use psychotropic medications, which may translate into significant costs for society and the patients themselves. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET and PET-CT in early detection of cancer recurrent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Yan; Zhao Jinhua

    2007-01-01

    Early detection of recurrent can improve prognosis and survival of patients with cancer. 18 F- fluorodeoxyglucose( 18 F-FDG) PET can detect metabolic changes before structural changes. The fused imaging provided by PET-CT can precisely localize the foci and demonstrate the complementary roles of functional and anatomic assessments in the diagnosis of cancer recurrence. In addition to the accurate diagnosis and definition of the whole extent of recurrent cancer, 18 F-FDG PET and PET-CT can impact patients management. (authors)

  13. Diagnosis and treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer (remains, recurrences and metastases) with "1"3"1I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sánchez, V.

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine cancer. The incidence worldwide has increased exponentially at the expense of papillary type tumors. In recent years emerged the concept that a patient with low risk of mortality may have a high risk of recurrence of the disease, so the classification according to the risk of recurrence is one of the most important steps to establish what will be the probability that the patient is in remission or present structural disease tracking. The American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) has designated a staging system based on the TNM classification, which allows good mortality risk stratification. It must keep track short and long term patient, being that approximately 30% of all cases have recurrencies. The use of "1"3"1I falls into one of three categories: a) ablation, b) adjuvant and c) therapeutic. The diagnostic body scan provides information on the existence of iodine avid thyroid tissue, although it is not recommended for routine, can be performed in special cases. The postoperative body scan is usually performed to visualize metastasis previously not found. Persistent disease diagnosis is made by imaging studies such as ultrasound or body scan. The preferred treatment management of metastatic distant disease (in order), is surgical excision, iodine therapy, radiotherapy, observation and experimental studies. It is noteworthy that iodine treatment has harmful effects (early and late), so it should be applied only if you will gain a clear benefit for the patient. (author) [es

  14. Safety of bevacizumab in clinical practice for recurrent ovarian cancer: A retrospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    SELLE, FRÉDÉRIC; EMILE, GEORGE; PAUTIER, PATRICIA; ASMANE, IRÈNE; SOARES, DANIELE G.; KHALIL, AHMED; ALEXANDRE, JEROME; LHOMMÉ, CATHERINE; RAY-COQUARD, ISABELLE; LOTZ, JEAN-PIERRE; GOLDWASSER, FRANÇOIS; TAZI, YOUSSEF; HEUDEL, PIERRE; PUJADE-LAURAINE, ERIC; GOUY, SÉBASTIEN; TREDAN, OLIVIER; BARBAZA, MARIE O.; ADY-VAGO, NORA; DUBOT, CORALINE

    2016-01-01

    The poor outcome of patients with recurrent ovarian cancer constitutes a continuous challenge for decision-making in clinical practice. In this setting, molecular targets have recently been identified, and novel compounds are now available. Bevacizumab has been introduced for the treatment of patients with ovarian cancer and is, to date, the most extensively investigated targeted therapy in this setting. However, potential toxicities are associated with the use of this monoclonal antibody. These toxicities have been reported in clinical trials, and can also be observed outside of trials. As limited data is currently available regarding the safety of bevacizumab treatment in daily clinical practice, the current retrospective study was designed to evaluate this. Data from 156 patients with recurrent ovarian cancer who had received bevacizumab treatment between January 2006 and June 2009 were retrospectively identified from the institutional records of five French centers. In contrast to clinical trials, the patients in the present study were not selected and had a heterogeneous profile according to their prior medical history, lines of treatment prior to bevacizumab introduction and number of relapses. The results first confirm the effect of heavy pretreatment on the occurrence of serious and fatal adverse events in clinical practice, as previously reported for clinical trials and for other retrospective cohort studies. Importantly, the data also demonstrates, for the first time, that medical history of hypertension is an independent predictive risk factor for the development of high-grade hypertension during bevacizumab treatment. These results thus suggest that treating physicians must consider all risk factors for managing bevacizumab toxicity prior to its introduction. Such risk factors include the time of bevacizumab introduction, a patient's history of hypertension and a low incidence of pre-existing obstructive disease. PMID:26998090

  15. True Local Recurrences after Breast Conserving Surgery have Poor Prognosis in Patients with Early Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarsenov, Dauren; Ilgun, Serkan; Ordu, Cetin; Alco, Gul; Bozdogan, Atilla; Elbuken, Filiz; Nur Pilanci, Kezban; Agacayak, Filiz; Erdogan, Zeynep; Eralp, Yesim; Dincer, Maktav

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study was aimed at investigating clinical and histopathologic features of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences (IBTR) and their effects on survival after breast conservation therapy. Methods: 1,400 patients who were treated between 1998 and 2007 and had breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for early breast cancer (cT1-2/N0-1/M0) were evaluated. Demographic and pathologic parameters, radiologic data, treatment, and follow-up related features of the patients were recorded. Results: 53 patients (3.8%) had IBTR after BCS within a median follow-up of 70 months. The mean age was 45.7 years (range, 27-87 years), and 22 patients (41.5%) were younger than 40 years. 33 patients (62.3%) had true recurrence (TR) and 20 were classified as new primary (NP). The median time to recurrence was shorter in TR group than in NP group (37.0 (6-216) and 47.5 (11-192) months respectively; p = 0.338). Progesterone receptor positivity was significantly higher in the NP group (p = 0.005). The overall 5-year survival rate in the NP group (95.0%) was significantly higher than that of the TR group (74.7%, p 20 mm), high grade tumor and triple-negative molecular phenotype along with developing TR negatively affected overall survival (hazard ratios were 4.2 (CI 0.98-22.76), 4.6 (CI 1.07-13.03), 4.0 (CI 0.68-46.10), 6.5 (CI 0.03-0.68), and 6.5 (CI 0.02- 0.80) respectively, p 2 cm), high grade, triple negative phenotype, and having true recurrence were identified as independent prognostic factors with a negative impact on overall survival in this dataset of patients with recurrent breast cancer. In conjunction with a more intensive follow-up program, the role of adjuvant therapy strategies should be explored further in young patients with large and high-risk tumors to reduce the risk of TR. PMID:27158571

  16. Locoregional Recurrent or Second Primary Head and Neck Cancer: Management Strategies and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Stuart J; Heron, Dwight E; Stenson, Kerstin; Ling, Diane C; Vargo, John A

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of patients with locoregional recurrent or second primary head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) has been guided by well-reasoned principles and informed by carefully tested chemotherapy and radiation regimens. However, clinical decision making for this population is complicated by many factors. Although surgery is generally considered the treatment of choice for patients with HNSCC with recurrent disease or new second primary disease in a previously irradiated field, operability of cases is not always straightforward. Postoperative treatment is frequently warranted but carries significant risk. In addition, the rapid rise in the incidence of HPV-associated HNSCC raises the question of whether established treatment paradigms should be re-examined in this population of patients with a much better prognosis than the non-HPV population. Furthermore, new radiation techniques and new systemic agents show early promising results in recent clinical studies, suggesting potential for practice-changing effects in the future management of this disease. This article examines each of the treatment modalities used in the care of patients with HNSCC with recurrent or new second primary disease and provides a perspective to aid clinicians in the management of this disease.

  17. Photodynamic Therapy Using Temoporfin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Recurrent Oral Cavity or Oropharyngeal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-02

    Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  18. An Examination of the Association between FOXA1 Staining Level and Biochemical Recurrence following Salvage Radiation Therapy for Recurrent Prostate Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G Heckman

    Full Text Available Standardly collected clinical and pathological patient information has demonstrated only moderate ability to predict risk of biochemical recurrence (BCR of prostate cancer in men undergoing salvage radiation therapy (SRT for a rising PSA after radical prostatectomy (RP. Although elevated FOXA1 staining has been associated with poor patient outcomes following RP, it has not been studied in the specific setting of SRT after RP. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between FOXA1 staining level and BCR after SRT for recurrent prostate cancer.A total of 141 men who underwent SRT at our institution were included. FOXA1 staining levels in primary tumor samples were detected using immunohistochemistry. FOXA1 staining percentage and intensity were measured and multiplied together to obtain a FOXA1 H-score (range 0-12 which was our primary staining measure. P-values ≤ 0.0056 were considered as statistically significant after applying a Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons.There was not a significant association between FOXA1 H-score and risk of BCR when considering H-score as an ordinal variable or as a categorical variable (all P ≥ 0.090. Similarly, no significant associations with BCR were observed for FOXA1 staining percentage or staining intensity (all P ≥ 0.14.FOXA1 staining level does not appear to have a major impact on risk of BCR after SRT.

  19. Hyperfractionated stereotactic reirradiation for recurrent head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvek, Jakub; Knybel, Lukas; Skacelikova, Eva; Otahal, Bretislav; Molenda, Lukas; Feltl, David [University Hospital Ostrava, Department of Oncology, Ostrava (Czech Republic); Stransky, Jiri; Res, Oldrich [University Hospital Ostrava, Department of Maxilofacial Surgery, Ostrava (Czech Republic); Matousek, Petr; Zelenik, Karol [University Hospital Ostrava, Department of Otolaryngology, Ostrava (Czech Republic)

    2016-01-15

    The goal of this work was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of hyperfractionated stereotactic reirradiation (re-RT) as a treatment for inoperable, recurrent, or second primary head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) that is not suitable for systemic treatment. Forty patients with recurrent or second primary HNSCC were included in this study. The patients had a median gross tumor volume of 76 ml (range 14-193 ml) and a previous radiotherapy dose greater than 60 Gy. Treatment was designed to cover 95 % of the planning target volume (PTV, defined as gross tumor volume [GTV] + 3 mm to account for microscopic spreading, with no additional set-up margin) with the prescribed dose (48 Gy in 16 fractions b.i.d.). Treatment was administered twice daily with a minimum 6 h gap. Uninvolved lymph nodes were not irradiated. Treatment was completed as planned for all patients (with median duration of 11 days, range 9-14 days). Acute toxicity was evaluated using the RTOG/EORTC scale. A 37 % incidence of grade 3 mucositis was observed, with recovery time of ≤ 4 weeks for all of these patients. Acute skin toxicity was never observed to be higher than grade 2. Late toxicity was also evaluated according to the RTOG/EORTC scale. Mandible radionecrosis was seen in 4 cases (10 %); however, neither carotid blowout syndrome nor other grade 4 late toxicity occurred. One-year overall survival (OS) and local progression-free survival (L-PFS) were found to be 33 and 44 %, respectively. Performance status and GTV proved to be significant prognostic factors regarding local control and survival. Hyperfractionated stereotactic re-RT is a reasonable treatment option for patients with recurrent/second primary HNSCC who were previously exposed to high-dose irradiation and who are not candidates for systemic treatment or hypofractionation. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Studie war es, die Effektivitaet und Toxizitaet der hyperfraktionierten akzelerierten stereotaktischen Wiederbestrahlung (re

  20. Fear of cancer recurrence and its predictive factors among Iranian cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Mohajjel Aghdam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Fear of cancer recurrence (FOCR is one of the most important psychological problems among cancer patients. In extensive review of related literature there were no articles on FOCR among Iranian cancer patients. Aim: The aim of present study was to investigation FOCR and its predictive factors among Iranian cancer patients. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive-correlational study 129 cancer patients participated. For data collection, the demographic checklist and short form of fear of progression questionnaire was used. Logistic regression was used to determine predictive factors of FOCR. Result: Mean score of FOCR among participants was 44.8 and about 50% of them had high level of FOCR. The most important worries of participants were about their family and the future of their children and their lesser worries were about the physical symptoms and fear of physical damage because of cancer treatments. Also, women, breast cancer patient, and patients with lower level of education have more FOCR. Discussion: There is immediate need for supportive care program designed for Iranian cancer patients aimed at decreasing their FOCR. Especially, breast cancer patients and the patient with low educational level need more attention.

  1. From normal response to clinical problem: definition and clinical features of fear of cancer recurrence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebel, S.; Ozakinci, G.; Humphris, G.; Mutsaers, B.; Thewes, B.; Prins, J.B.; Dinkel, A.; Butow, P.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Research to date on fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) shows that moderate to high FCR affects 22-87 % of cancer survivors and is associated with higher psychological morbidity (Simard et al J Cancer Surviv 7:300-322, 2013). Despite growing research interest in FCR, the lack of consensus on

  2. Recurrence risk of low Apgar score among term singletons: a population-based cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ensing, Sabine; Schaaf, Jelle M.; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Mol, Ben W. J.; Ravelli, Anita C. J.

    2014-01-01

    To examine the risk of recurrence of low Apgar score in a subsequent term singleton pregnancy. Population-based cohort study. The Netherlands. A total of 190,725 women with two subsequent singleton term live births between 1999 and 2007. We calculated the recurrence risk of low Apgar score after

  3. Chemotherapy for isolated locoregional recurrence of breast cancer (CALOR): a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aebi, Stefan; Gelber, Shari; Anderson, Stewart J; Láng, István; Robidoux, André; Martín, Miguel; Nortier, Johan W R; Paterson, Alexander H G; Rimawi, Mothaffar F; Cañada, José Manuel Baena; Thürlimann, Beat; Murray, Elizabeth; Mamounas, Eleftherios P; Geyer, Charles E; Price, Karen N; Coates, Alan S; Gelber, Richard D; Rastogi, Priya; Wolmark, Norman; Wapnir, Irene L

    2014-02-01

    Patients with isolated locoregional recurrences (ILRR) of breast cancer have a high risk of distant metastasis and death from breast cancer. We aimed to establish whether adjuvant chemotherapy improves the outcome of such patients. The CALOR trial was a pragmatic, open-label, randomised trial that accrued patients with histologically proven and completely excised ILRR after unilateral breast cancer who had undergone a mastectomy or lumpectomy with clear surgical margins. Eligible patients were enrolled from hospitals worldwide and were centrally randomised (1:1) to chemotherapy (type selected by the investigator; multidrug for at least four courses recommended) or no chemotherapy, using permuted blocks, and stratified by previous chemotherapy, oestrogen-receptor and progesterone-receptor status, and location of ILRR. Patients with oestrogen-receptor-positive ILRR received adjuvant endocrine therapy, radiation therapy was mandated for patients with microscopically involved surgical margins, and anti-HER2 therapy was optional. The primary endpoint was disease-free survival. All analyses were by intention to treat. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00074152. From Aug 22, 2003, to Jan 31, 2010, 85 patients were randomly assigned to receive chemotherapy and 77 were assigned to no chemotherapy. At a median follow-up of 4·9 years (IQR 3·6-6 ·0), 24 (28%) patients had disease-free survival events in the chemotherapy group compared with 34 (44%) in the no chemotherapy group. 5-year disease-free survival was 69% (95% CI 56-79) with chemotherapy versus 57% (44-67) without chemotherapy (hazard ratio 0·59 [95% CI 0·35-0·99]; p=0·046). Adjuvant chemotherapy was significantly more effective for women with oestrogen-receptor-negative ILRR (pinteraction=0·046), but analyses of disease-free survival according to the oestrogen-receptor status of the primary tumour were not statistically significant (pinteraction=0·43). Of the 81 patients who

  4. Cancer risks: Strategies for elimination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannasch, P.

    1987-01-01

    This book deals with the possibilities for identifying and eliminating cancer risk factors. The current state of knowledge on the detection, assessment and elimination of chemical, physical (radiation), and biological (viruses) risk factors are comprehensively presented in 15 contributions. Chemical risk factors resulting from smoking and environmental contamination are given special attention. The coverage of cancer risks by radiation includes some of the consequences of the Chernobyl disaster. Finally, the discussion of the possible risks that certain viruses hold for cancer in man is intended to further the development of vaccinations against these viral infections. The information is directed not only at specialists, but also at a wider interested audience. Its primary aim is to convey established findings that are already being used for cancer prevention. Furthermore, the book aims to promote more intense research in the field of primary cancer prevention. Contents: General aspects; chemical carcinogens: Risk assessment; chemical carcinogens: Primary prevention; physical carcinogens - Oncogenic viruses and subject index

  5. FDG-PET improves the staging and selection of patients with recurrent colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lonneux, Max; Reffad, Abdel-Malek; Pauwels, Stanislas; Detry, Roger; Kartheuser, Alex; Gigot, Jean-Francois

    2002-01-01

    Whole-body fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has proved effective in the diagnosis and staging of recurrent colorectal cancer. In this study, we analysed how PET affects the management of patients with recurrent colorectal cancer by permitting more accurate selection of candidates for curative resection. The data of 79 patients with known or suspected recurrent colorectal cancer were analysed. Conventional imaging modalities (CIM) and PET results were compared with regard to their accuracy in determining the extent and the resectability of tumour recurrence. Recurrence was demonstrated in 68 of the 79 patients. The data indicate that PET was superior to CIM for detection of recurrence at all sites except the liver. Based on the CIM+PET staging, surgery with curative intent was proposed in 39 patients and was indeed achieved in 31 of them (80%). PET was more accurate than CIM alone in predicting the resectability or non-resectability of the recurrence (82% vs 68%, P=0.02). It is concluded that whole-body FDG-PET is highly sensitive for both the diagnosis and the staging of patients with recurrent colorectal cancer. Its use in conjunction with conventional imaging procedures results in a more accurate selection of patients for surgical treatment with curative intent. (orig.)

  6. Integrative gene network construction to analyze cancer recurrence using semi-supervised learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chihyun; Ahn, Jaegyoon; Kim, Hyunjin; Park, Sanghyun

    2014-01-01

    The prognosis of cancer recurrence is an important research area in bioinformatics and is challenging due to the small sample sizes compared to the vast number of genes. There have been several attempts to predict cancer recurrence. Most studies employed a supervised approach, which uses only a few labeled samples. Semi-supervised learning can be a great alternative to solve this problem. There have been few attempts based on manifold assumptions to reveal the detailed roles of identified cancer genes in recurrence. In order to predict cancer recurrence, we proposed a novel semi-supervised learning algorithm based on a graph regularization approach. We transformed the gene expression data into a graph structure for semi-supervised learning and integrated protein interaction data with the gene expression data to select functionally-related gene pairs. Then, we predicted the recurrence of cancer by applying a regularization approach to the constructed graph containing both labeled and unlabeled nodes. The average improvement rate of accuracy for three different cancer datasets was 24.9% compared to existing supervised and semi-supervised methods. We performed functional enrichment on the gene networks used for learning. We identified that those gene networks are significantly associated with cancer-recurrence-related biological functions. Our algorithm was developed with standard C++ and is available in Linux and MS Windows formats in the STL library. The executable program is freely available at: http://embio.yonsei.ac.kr/~Park/ssl.php.

  7. Integrative gene network construction to analyze cancer recurrence using semi-supervised learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chihyun Park

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The prognosis of cancer recurrence is an important research area in bioinformatics and is challenging due to the small sample sizes compared to the vast number of genes. There have been several attempts to predict cancer recurrence. Most studies employed a supervised approach, which uses only a few labeled samples. Semi-supervised learning can be a great alternative to solve this problem. There have been few attempts based on manifold assumptions to reveal the detailed roles of identified cancer genes in recurrence. RESULTS: In order to predict cancer recurrence, we proposed a novel semi-supervised learning algorithm based on a graph regularization approach. We transformed the gene expression data into a graph structure for semi-supervised learning and integrated protein interaction data with the gene expression data to select functionally-related gene pairs. Then, we predicted the recurrence of cancer by applying a regularization approach to the constructed graph containing both labeled and unlabeled nodes. CONCLUSIONS: The average improvement rate of accuracy for three different cancer datasets was 24.9% compared to existing supervised and semi-supervised methods. We performed functional enrichment on the gene networks used for learning. We identified that those gene networks are significantly associated with cancer-recurrence-related biological functions. Our algorithm was developed with standard C++ and is available in Linux and MS Windows formats in the STL library. The executable program is freely available at: http://embio.yonsei.ac.kr/~Park/ssl.php.

  8. Docosahexaenoic Acid in Preventing Recurrence in Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-20

    Benign Breast Neoplasm; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Paget Disease of the Breast; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  9. Ipilimumab and Local Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Melanoma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Colon, or Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-12

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  10. Vaginal vault recurrences of endometrial cancer in non-irradiated patients — Radiotherapy or surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hordur Alexander Hardarson

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: This study indicates that ST is an appropriate treatment for locally recurrent endometrial cancer. Our study involves a limited number of patients and is made retrospectively, therefore prospective and ideally randomized trials evaluating both survival and complications are warranted.

  11. Role of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT in Recurrent Ovary Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O, Joo Hyun; Yoo, Ie Ryung; Choi, Woo Hee; Lee, Won Hyoung; Kim, Sung Hoon; Chung, Soo Kyo [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    To date, anatomical imaging modalities of the pelvis and tumor markers have been the mainstay of surveillance for recurrent ovary cancer. This study aimed to assess the role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in evaluation of ovary cancer recurrences, especially in comparison with enhanced CT and tumor marker CA 125. 73 patients who had PET/CT scan for restaging of confirmed ovary cancer, and additional imaging with enhanced CT of the pelvis within one month were included. CA 125 level was available in all patients. From the PET/CT images, maximum standard uptake values (SUVmax) of suspected recurrence sites were recorded. Confirmation was available through re-operation or biopsy in 26 cases, and clinical assessment with series of follow-up images in 47. PET/CT had 93% sensitivity and 88% specificity for detecting recurrent ovary cancer. Enhanced CT of pelvis had sensitivity and specificity of 83% and 88%, and CA 125 50% and 95%. PET/CT has higher sensitivity for detecting recurrent ovary cancer compared to enhanced CT though the differences were not significant. PET/CT has significantly higher sensitivity than CA 125. However, the three tests all agreed in only 43% of the recurrence cases, and recurrence should be suspected when any of the tests, especially PET/CT, show positive findings.

  12. Role of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT in Recurrent Ovary Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O, Joo Hyun; Yoo, Ie Ryung; Choi, Woo Hee; Lee, Won Hyoung; Kim, Sung Hoon; Chung, Soo Kyo

    2008-01-01

    To date, anatomical imaging modalities of the pelvis and tumor markers have been the mainstay of surveillance for recurrent ovary cancer. This study aimed to assess the role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in evaluation of ovary cancer recurrences, especially in comparison with enhanced CT and tumor marker CA 125. 73 patients who had PET/CT scan for restaging of confirmed ovary cancer, and additional imaging with enhanced CT of the pelvis within one month were included. CA 125 level was available in all patients. From the PET/CT images, maximum standard uptake values (SUVmax) of suspected recurrence sites were recorded. Confirmation was available through re-operation or biopsy in 26 cases, and clinical assessment with series of follow-up images in 47. PET/CT had 93% sensitivity and 88% specificity for detecting recurrent ovary cancer. Enhanced CT of pelvis had sensitivity and specificity of 83% and 88%, and CA 125 50% and 95%. PET/CT has higher sensitivity for detecting recurrent ovary cancer compared to enhanced CT though the differences were not significant. PET/CT has significantly higher sensitivity than CA 125. However, the three tests all agreed in only 43% of the recurrence cases, and recurrence should be suspected when any of the tests, especially PET/CT, show positive findings

  13. Treatment of locally advanced/locally recurrent breast cancer and inflammatory breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Masao

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes the treatment of locally advanced breast cancer, inflammatory breast cancer, and locally recurrent breast cancer. A multidisciplinary approach considering subclinical distant metastases is needed to treat these types of breast cancer. Subclinical distant metastasis is observed in about 80% of case of locally advanced cancer, and treatment of subclinical distant metastases, e.g., by endocrinotherapy and chemotherapy, is therefore essential to improving the prognosis. The standard therapy for unresectable locally advanced breast cancer consists of induction chemotherapy with anthracyclines and local treatment with mastectomy or irradiation. Previous reports have stated that induction chemotherapy was effective in 60-80% of the primary lesions or lymph node metastasis, and the CR rates were in the 10-20% range. Combination therapy with induction chemotherapy clearly improved the outcome over local treatment alone. The usual irradiation dose is 50 to 60 Gy/5 to 7 weeks to the whole breast or the thoracic wall. Boost irradiation at a dose of 10 to 25 Gy is performed in unresectable cases. The boost irradiation dose to the lymph node area is usually 45 to 50 Gy/5 to 6 weeks in cases without gross lesions and 10 to 15 Gy in cases with gross lesions. Combination therapy consisting of conservative pectoral mastectomy and postoperative adjuvant chemo- endocrino-therapy (i.e., adjuvant therapy) has become the standard regimen for treating resectable locally advanced breast cancer, because it significantly improves the recurrence rate and survival rate compared to local treatment alone. Some clinical have studies indicated that neoadjuvant therapy (i.e., induction chemotherapy + surgery/radiation therapy) is comparable or superior to adjuvant therapy in terms of improving the prognosis. However, the efficacy and most appropriate method of breast-conserving therapy after induction chemotherapy are still unclear. More clinical trials are needed. It has been

  14. Abacavir use and risk of recurrent myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabin, Caroline A.; Ryom, Lene; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Hatleberg, Camilla I.; Pradier, Christian; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Kirk, Ole; Weber, Rainer; Phillips, Andrew N.; Mocroft, Amanda; Bonnet, Fabrice; Law, Matthew; de Wit, Stephane; Reiss, Peter; Lundgren, Jens D.

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the association between abacavir (ABC) use and recurrent myocardial infarction (MI) among HIV-positive people with a prior MI. International multicohort collaboration with follow-up from 1999 to 2016. The rate of recurrent MI was described among D:A:D participants who experienced an

  15. Prostate Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing prostate cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  16. Colorectal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing colorectal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  17. Esophageal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing esophageal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  18. Bladder Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing bladder cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  19. Lung Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing lung cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  20. Breast Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing breast cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  1. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing pancreatic cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  2. Ovarian Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing ovarian cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  3. Liver Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing liver cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  4. Testicular Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of testicular cervical cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  5. Cervical Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing cervical cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  6. Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Skin Cancer Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table ... Articles Skin Cancer Can Strike Anyone / Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment / Timely Healthcare Checkup Catches Melanoma ...

  7. Legal termination of a pregnancy resulting from transplanted cryopreserved ovarian tissue due to cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Emil Hagen; Offersen, Birgitte Vrou; Andersen, Claus Yding

    2013-01-01

    To report on a woman who conceived naturally and had a normal intrauterine pregnancy following transplantation of frozen/thawed ovarian tissue but decided to have an early abortion due to recurrence of breast cancer.......To report on a woman who conceived naturally and had a normal intrauterine pregnancy following transplantation of frozen/thawed ovarian tissue but decided to have an early abortion due to recurrence of breast cancer....

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging guided reirradiation of recurrent and second primary head and neck cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Allen M.; Cao, Minsong; Hsu, Sophia; Lamb, James; Mikaeilian, Argin; Yang, Yingli; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Low, Daniel A.; Steinberg, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To report a single-institutional experience using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided radiation therapy for the reirradiation of recurrent and second cancers of the head and neck. Methods and materials: Between October 2014 and August 2016, 13 consecutive patients with recurrent or new primary cancers of the head and neck that occurred in a previously irradiated field were prospectively enrolled in an institutional registry trial to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of ...

  9. Texture analysis of automatic graph cuts segmentations for detection of lung cancer recurrence after stereotactic radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattonen, Sarah A.; Palma, David A.; Haasbeek, Cornelis J. A.; Senan, Suresh; Ward, Aaron D.

    2015-03-01

    Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is a treatment for early-stage lung cancer with local control rates comparable to surgery. After SABR, benign radiation induced lung injury (RILI) results in tumour-mimicking changes on computed tomography (CT) imaging. Distinguishing recurrence from RILI is a critical clinical decision determining the need for potentially life-saving salvage therapies whose high risks in this population dictate their use only for true recurrences. Current approaches do not reliably detect recurrence within a year post-SABR. We measured the detection accuracy of texture features within automatically determined regions of interest, with the only operator input being the single line segment measuring tumour diameter, normally taken during the clinical workflow. Our leave-one-out cross validation on images taken 2-5 months post-SABR showed robustness of the entropy measure, with classification error of 26% and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.77 using automatic segmentation; the results using manual segmentation were 24% and 0.75, respectively. AUCs for this feature increased to 0.82 and 0.93 at 8-14 months and 14-20 months post SABR, respectively, suggesting even better performance nearer to the date of clinical diagnosis of recurrence; thus this system could also be used to support and reinforce the physician's decision at that time. Based on our ongoing validation of this automatic approach on a larger sample, we aim to develop a computer-aided diagnosis system which will support the physician's decision to apply timely salvage therapies and prevent patients with RILI from undergoing invasive and risky procedures.

  10. Evaluation of the recurrence pattern of gastric cancer after laparoscopic gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Yuichiro; Satoh, Seiji; Umeki, Yusuke; Ishida, Yoshinori; Suda, Koichi; Uyama, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the oncological aspects of gastric cancer following laparoscopic gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy (LG-D2). We retrospectively evaluated the long-term outcomes of 354 patients who underwent LG-D2 for primary gastric cancer. Recurrence patterns and predictors of peritoneal metastasis were analyzed. Median follow-up time was 43.8 months. Five-year overall survival rates for yp/pStages I, II, and III gastric cancer were 93.7, 78.5, and 42.2 %, respectively. Recurrence was observed in 86 patients. Peritoneal metastasis was the most frequent recurrence pattern (n = 51), followed by hepatic metastasis (n = 17). Lymphatic recurrence at distant sites was observed in 10 patients. No locoregional lymph node metastasis or local recurrence was seen. Nine of 51 cases of peritoneal recurrence were detected by probe laparoscopy. Peritoneal recurrence rates were significantly higher in yp/pT4 and yp/pN3 diseases compared with yp/pT ≤ 3 and yp/pN ≤ 2 diseases. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that yp/pT4, yp/pN3, tumor size ≥70 mm, vascular invasion, and undifferentiated tumors were predictors of peritoneal recurrence following LG-D2. Long-term outcomes of gastric cancer following LG-D2, including recurrence patterns and predictors of peritoneal metastasis, were comparable to those following open D2 gastrectomy. LG-D2 showed good local control. Probe laparoscopy after LG may be effective in detecting peritoneal recurrence, which is not determined with less invasive examinations, including a CT scan. Future large-scale prospective studies are desirable to evaluate not only surgical but also oncological benefits and safety of LG-D2 for advanced gastric cancer.

  11. Identifying patients at high risk of tuberculosis recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruxana T Sadikot

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have been done in relation to recurrence of tuberculosis (TB following completion of treatment. However, recurrence of TB is still a major problem from a public health perspective in high-burden countries, where no special attention is being given to this issue. Disease recurrence is an important indicator of the efficacy of antituberculosis treatment. The rate of recurrence is highly variable and has been estimated to range from 4.9% to 25%. This variability is not only a reflection of regional epidemiology of recurrence but differences in the definitions used by the TB control programs. In addition to treatment failure related to medication adherence, there are several key host factors that are associated with high rates of recurrence. The widely recognized host factors independent of treatment program that predispose to TB recurrence include: malnutrition; human immunodeficiency virus; substance abuse including tobacco use; comorbidity such as diabetes, renal failure and systemic diseases, especially immunosuppressive states; and environmental exposure such as silicosis. With improved understanding of the human genome, proteome, and metabolome, additional host-specific factors that predispose to recurrence are being discovered. Information on temporal and geographical trends of TB cases as well as genotyping might provide further information to enable us to fully understand TB recurrence and discriminate between reactivation and new infection. The recently launched World Health Organization End TB Strategy emphasizes the importance of integrated, patient-centered TB care. Continued improvement in diagnosis, treatment approaches, and defining host-specific factors are needed to fully understand the clinical epidemiological and social determinants of TB recurrence.

  12. Identifying patients at high risk of tuberculosis recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadikot, Ruxana T

    2016-12-01

    Several studies have been done in relation to recurrence of tuberculosis (TB) following completion of treatment. However, recurrence of TB is still a major problem from a public health perspective in high-burden countries, where no special attention is being given to this issue. Disease recurrence is an important indicator of the efficacy of antituberculosis treatment. The rate of recurrence is highly variable and has been estimated to range from 4.9% to 25%. This variability is not only a reflection of regional epidemiology of recurrence but differences in the definitions used by the TB control programs. In addition to treatment failure related to medication adherence, there are several key host factors that are associated with high rates of recurrence. The widely recognized host factors independent of treatment program that predispose to TB recurrence include: malnutrition; human immunodeficiency virus; substance abuse including tobacco use; comorbidity such as diabetes, renal failure and systemic diseases, especially immunosuppressive states; and environmental exposure such as silicosis. With improved understanding of the human genome, proteome, and metabolome, additional host-specific factors that predispose to recurrence are being discovered. Information on temporal and geographical trends of TB cases as well as genotyping might provide further information to enable us to fully understand TB recurrence and discriminate between reactivation and new infection. The recently launched World Health Organization End TB Strategy emphasizes the importance of integrated, patient-centered TB care. Continued improvement in diagnosis, treatment approaches, and defining host-specific factors are needed to fully understand the clinical epidemiological and social determinants of TB recurrence. Copyright © 2016.

  13. Identification of Metabolomic Biomarkers for Endometrial Cancer and Its Recurrence after Surgery in Postmenopausal Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Audet-Delage

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial cancer (EC is the most frequent gynecological cancer in developed countries. Most EC occurs after menopause and is diagnosed as endometrioid (type I carcinomas, which exhibit a favorable prognosis. In contrast, non-endometrioid (type II carcinomas such as serous tumors have a poor prognosis. Our goal was to identify novel blood-based markers associated with EC subtypes and recurrence after surgery in postmenopausal women. Using mass spectrometry-based untargeted metabolomics, we examined preoperative serum metabolites among control women (n = 18 and those with non-recurrent (NR and recurrent (R cases of type I endometrioid (n = 24 and type II serous (n = 12 carcinomas. R and NR cases were similar with respect to pathological characteristics, body mass index, and age. A total of 1,592 compounds were analyzed including 14 different lipid classes. When we compared EC cases with controls, 137 metabolites were significantly different. A combination of spermine and isovalerate resulted in an age-adjusted area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUCadj of 0.914 (P < 0.001 for EC detection. The combination of 2-oleoylglycerol and TAG42:2-FA12:0 allowed the distinction of R cases from NR cases with an AUCadj of 0.901 (P < 0.001. Type I R cases were also characterized by much lower levels of bile acids and elevated concentrations of phosphorylated fibrinogen cleavage peptide, whereas type II R cases displayed higher levels of ceramides. The findings from our pilot study provide a detailed metabolomics study of EC and identify putative serum biomarkers for defining clinically relevant risk groups.

  14. Re-irradiation and hyperthermia after surgery for recurrent breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linthorst, Marianne; Geel, Albert N. van; Baaijens, Margreet; Ameziane, Ali; Ghidey, Wendim; Rhoon, Gerard C. van; Zee, Jacoba van der

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluation of efficacy and side effects of combined re-irradiation and hyperthermia electively or for subclinical disease in the management of locoregional recurrent breast cancer. Methods and materials: Records of 198 patients with recurrent breast cancer treated with re-irradiation and hyperthermia from 1993 to 2010 were reviewed. Prior treatments included surgery (100%), radiotherapy (100%), chemotherapy (42%), and hormonal therapy (57%). Ninety-one patients were treated for microscopic residual disease following resection or systemic therapy and 107 patients were treated electively for areas at high risk for local recurrences. All patients were re-irradiated to 28–36 Gy (median 32) and treated with 3–8 hyperthermia treatments (mean 4.36). Forty percent of the patients received concurrent hormonal therapy. Patient and tumor characteristics predictive for actuarial local control (LC) and toxicity were studied in univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: The median follow-up was 42 months. Three and 5 year LC-rates were 83% and 78%. Mean of T90 (tenth percentile of temperature distribution), maximum and average temperatures were 39.8 °C, 43.6 °C, and 41.2 °C, respectively. Mean of the cumulative equivalent minutes (CEM43) at T90 was 4.58 min. Number of previous chemotherapy and surgical procedures were most predictive for LC. Cumulative incidence of grade 3 and 4 late toxicity at 5 years was 11.9%. The number of thermometry sensors and depth of treatment volume were associated with acute hyperthermia toxicity. Conclusions: The combination of re-irradiation and hyperthermia results in a high LC-rate with acceptable toxicity

  15. [The role of colonoscopy in early diagnosis of intraluminal recurrences in patients already treated for colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barillari, P; Manetti, G; Bovino, A; Puce, Y; Piovanello, P; Cioè, I; Sammartino, P; Stipa, V

    1996-11-01

    It is a common opinion that the more often and the more rigorously the colon is examined, the more lesions will be discovered and diagnosed. However it has not been shown which methods of colonic examination and which regimen of surveillance should be used. Chart review was conducted on 481 patients who underwent curative resection for colorectal cancer between 1980 and 1990. Colonoscopy was performed preoperatively, after 12-15 months from surgical treatment, and then at an interval of 12-24 months, or when symptoms appeared. About ten percent of patients developed intraluminal recurrences, and more than 25% adenomatous polyps. More than one half of the metachronous lesions arise within the first 24 months. The median time to diagnosis was 25 months for intraluminal recurrences and 22 months for adenomatous polyps. Patients with left sited tumor at an advanced stage run a higher risk of developing recurrent intraluminal disease, and patients who presented associated polyps at the time of the operation for the index cancer have a higher risk of developing new polyps. About 50% of recurrences were detected when patients were asymptomatic. Colonoscopy must be performed within the first 12-15 months after operation, while an interval of 24 months between each examination seems sufficient to guarantee an early detection of metachronous lesion. Asymptomatic patients are more frequently reoperated for cure and thus have a better survival rate.

  16. Socioeconomic status is an independent predictor of biochemical recurrence among patients with prostate cancer who undergo radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Srougi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Socioeconomic status (SES may influence cancer characteristics and behavior in several aspects. We analyzed PCa characteristics and behavior among low income uninsured men, and compare them to high income patients with health insurance in a developing country. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective case-control study was performed on 934 patients with clinically localized PCa who underwent radical prostatectomy between March, 1999 and July, 2009. Patients were divided in two groups, according to their SES. In group 1 (n=380, all had low income, low educational levels and couldn't afford medical insurance. In group 2 (n=554, all had higher income, higher education and had medical insurance. RESULTS: Patients from group 1 were older, had higher Gleason scores, higher rates of seminal vesicle and bladder neck involvement. The Kaplan Meier disease-free survival curve demonstrated that after a follow-up of four years, about 50% of uninsured patients had biochemical recurrence, versus 21% of insured patients (Log rank test: p < 0.001. A multivariate Cox regression analysis for the risk of disease recurrence demonstrated that only PSA levels, Gleason score, seminal vesicle involvement and SES were statistically significant variables. Patients with a low SES presented 1.8 times the risk of recurrence as compared to patients with a high SES. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with low SES were older, presented more aggressive PCa characteristics and a high rate of disease recurrence. A low SES constituted an independent predictor for disease recurrence.

  17. Patient and tumor characteristics associated with breast cancer recurrence after complete pathological response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Na Rae; Jeffe, Donna B; Keune, Jason; Aft, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer patients whose tumors achieve a pathological complete response (pCR) with neoadjuvant chemotherapy have a prognosis which is better than that predicted for the stage of their disease. However, within this subgroup of patients, recurrences have been observed. We sought to examine factors associated with recurrence in a population of breast cancer patients who achieved a pCR with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. A retrospective chart review was conducted of all patients with unilateral breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2010 at one comprehensive cancer center. A pCR was defined as no residual invasive cancer in the breast in the surgical specimen following neoadjuvant therapy. Recurrence was defined as visceral or bony reappearance of cancer after completion of all therapy. Of 818 patients who completed neoadjuvant chemotherapy, 144 (17.6 %) had pCR; six with bilateral breast cancer were excluded from further analysis. The mean time to follow-up was 47.2 months. Among the 138 patients with unilateral breast cancer, there were 14 recurrences (10.1 %). Using a binary multiple logistic regression model, examining types of chemotherapy and surgery, race, lymph node assessment, and lymph node status, breast cancer side, triple-negative status, and radiation receipt, only African-American patients (OR: 5.827, 95 % CI: 1.280-26.525; p = 0.023) were more likely to develop distant recurrence. The mean time to recurrence was 31.9 months. In our study, race was the only independent predictor of recurrence after achieving pCR with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The reasons for this observation require further study.

  18. Recurrences in well-differentiated cancer of Thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadena Enrique

    2000-01-01

    The paper analyzes epidemic data on the relapses as well as of the advantages of the complementary handling of the well differentiated carcinoma of thyroid, the diagnostic methods are commented and the treatment of the same ones, the article includes topics like epidemiology, prevention, recurrences detection, recurrences handling and clinical case

  19. The risk factors for recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Shigeo; Kinoshita, Yu; Nakagawa, Toru; Murakami, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common disease in the elderly, and the recurrence rate of CSDH is reported to range from 2.3 to 33%. We performed a retrospective review of a number of CSDH cases and the potential factors associated with CSDH recurrence. The patient population comprised 112 men and 65 women with a mean age of 74.7 years. We analyzed the following factors: age, sex, antiplatelet and anticoagulant use, hematoma laterality, hematoma thickness, degree of midline shift and internal architecture of the hematoma in the preoperative CT films, use of irrigation, direction of the drainage tube, width of the subdural space, and degree of midline shift and the presence of a massive subdural air collection in the postoperative CT films. Univariate analysis revealed that there was a trend for different rates of recurrence among the different types of hematomas. The presence of a postoperative massive subdural air collection tended to be associated with the recurrence of hematoma. Multivariate analysis revealed that separated hematomas were significantly associated with CSDH recurrence, whereas the presence of postoperative massive subdural air collection tended to be associated with hematoma recurrence. Neither univariate nor multivariate analysis could demonstrate an association between the direction of the drainage tube and the recurrence of CSDH.

  20. Surgical resection of late solitary locoregional gastric cancer recurrence in stomach bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masanori; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Maejima, Kentaro; Komine, Osamu; Mizutani, Satoshi; Yoshino, Masanori; Bo, Hideki; Kitayama, Yasuhiko; Uchida, Eiji

    2012-07-01

    Late-onset and solitary recurrence of gastric signet ring cell (SRC) carcinoma is rare. We report a successful surgical resection of late solitary locoregional recurrence after curative gastrectomy for gastric SRC carcinoma. The patient underwent total gastrectomy for advanced gastric carcinoma at age 52. Seven years after the primary operation, he visited us again with sudden onset of abdominal pain and vomiting. We finally decided to perform an operation, based on a diagnosis of colon obstruction due to the recurrence of gastric cancer by clinical findings and instrumental examinations. The laparotomic intra-abdominal findings showed that the recurrent tumor existed in the region surrounded by the left diaphragm, colon of splenic flexure, and pancreas tail. There was no evidence of peritoneal dissemination, and peritoneal lavage fluid cytology was negative. We performed complete resection of the recurrent tumor with partial colectomy, distal pancreatectomy, and partial diaphragmectomy. Histological examination of the resected specimen revealed SRC carcinoma, identical in appearance to the previously resected gastric cancer. We confirmed that the intra-abdominal tumor was a locoregional gastric cancer recurrence in the stomach bed. The patient showed a long-term survival of 27 months after the second operation. In the absence of effective alternative treatment for recurrent gastric carcinoma, surgical options should be pursued, especially for late and solitary recurrence.

  1. Role and impact of [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in recurrent breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grahek, D.; Montravers, F.; Aide, N.; Kerrou, K.; Talbot, J.N.

    2004-01-01

    [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography is widely used in oncology to detect malignant tissue, assess the extent of the disease and follow up treatment. In breast cancer, recurrence detection seems to be the leading indication of [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. This review, including recent publications, aims to evaluate its role to detect the recurrent malignant. tissue when tumour marker levels are isolatedly rising and to evaluate the extent of-the disease. The first impact studies reveal its important role in the management of the patients suspected of breast cancer recurrence. (author)

  2. Infective Endocarditis and Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li-Min; Wu, Jung-Nan; Lin, Cheng-Li; Day, Jen-Der; Liang, Ji-An; Liou, Li-Ren; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study investigated the possible relationship between endocarditis and overall and individual cancer risk among study participants in Taiwan. We used data from the National Health Insurance program of Taiwan to conduct a population-based, observational, and retrospective cohort study. The case group consisted of 14,534 patients who were diagnosed with endocarditis between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2010. For the control group, 4 patients without endocarditis were frequency matched to each endocarditis patient according to age, sex, and index year. Competing risks regression analysis was conducted to determine the effect of endocarditis on cancer risk. A large difference was noted in Charlson comorbidity index between endocarditis and nonendocarditis patients. In patients with endocarditis, the risk for developing overall cancer was significant and 119% higher than in patients without endocarditis (adjusted subhazard ratio = 2.19, 95% confidence interval = 1.98–2.42). Regarding individual cancers, in addition to head and neck, uterus, female breast and hematological malignancies, the risks of developing colorectal cancer, and some digestive tract cancers were significantly higher. Additional analyses determined that the association of cancer with endocarditis is stronger within the 1st 5 years after endocarditis diagnosis. This population-based cohort study found that patients with endocarditis are at a higher risk for colorectal cancer and other cancers in Taiwan. The risk was even higher within the 1st 5 years after endocarditis diagnosis. It suggested that endocarditis is an early marker of colorectal cancer and other cancers. The underlying mechanisms must still be explored and may account for a shared risk factor of infection in both endocarditis and malignancy. PMID:27015220

  3. Reirradiation + hyperthermia for recurrent breast cancer en cuirasse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenborg, Sabine; Rasch, Coen R.N.; Os, Rob van; Kusumanto, Yoka H.; Voerde Sive Voerding, Paul J. zum; Crezee, Hans; Tienhoven, Geertjan van [University of Amsterdam (AMC), Department of Radiation Oncology, Z1-215, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Oei, Bing S.; Venselaar, Jack L. [Institute Verbeeten (BVI), Department of Radiation Oncology, Tilburg (Netherlands); Heymans, Martijn W. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2018-03-15

    Patients with irresectable locoregional recurrent breast cancer en cuirasse (BCEC) do not have effective curative treatment options. Hyperthermia, the elevation of tumor temperature to 40-45 C, is a well-established radio- and chemotherapy sensitizer. A total of 196 patients were treated with reirradiation and hyperthermia (reRT+HT) at two Dutch institutes from 1982-2005. The palliative effect was evaluated in terms of clinical outcome and toxicity. All patients received previous irradiation to a median dose of 50 Gy. In all, 75% of patients received 1-6 treatment modalities for previous tumor recurrences. ReRT consisted of 8 x 4 Gy given twice a week or 12 x 3 Gy given four times a week. Superficial hyperthermia was added once or twice a week. Tumor area comprised ≥1/2 of the ipsilateral chest wall. Overall clinical response rate was 72% (complete response [CR] 30%, partial response [PR] 42%, stable disease [SD] 22%, progressive disease [PD] 6%). The local progression-free rate at 1 year was 24%. Median survival was 6.9 months. Forty-three percent of our patients with CR, PR, SD after treatment remained infield progression-free until death or last follow-up. Acute ≥grade 3 toxicity occurred in 33% of patients, while late ≥grade 3 toxicity was recorded in 14% of patients. Tumor ulceration prior to treatment had a negative impact on both clinical outcome and toxicity. ReRT+HT provides sustainable palliative tumor control, despite refractory, extensive tumor growth. Compared to currently available systemic treatment options, reRT+HT is more effective with less toxicity. (orig.) [German] Fuer Patienten mit inoperablen lokoregionalen Rueckfaellen von Brustkrebs in Form eines Cancer en cuirasse (BCEC) gibt es keine effektiven kurativen Behandlungsoptionen. Die Hyperthermie, bei der die Tumortemperatur auf 40-45 C erhoeht wird, ist eine etablierte Methode zur Radio- und Chemotherapiesensibilisierung. Insgesamt 161 Patientinnen wurden in zwei niederlaendischen

  4. [Circulating miR-152 helps early prediction of postoperative biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun-Feng; Liao, Yu-Feng; Ma, Jian-Bo; Mao, Qi-Feng; Jia, Guang-Cheng; Dong, Xue-Jun

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the value of circulating miR-152 in the early prediction of postoperative biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer. Sixty-six cases of prostate cancer were included in this study, 35 with and 31 without biochemical recurrence within two years postoperatively, and another 31 healthy individuals were enrolled as normal controls. The relative expression levels of circulating miR-152 in the serum of the subjects were detected by qRT-PCR, its value in the early diagnosis of postoperative biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer was assessed by ROC curve analysis, and the correlation of its expression level with the clinicopathological parameters of the patients were analyzed. The expression of circulating miR-152 was significantly lower in the serum of the prostate cancer patients than in the normal controls (t = -5.212, P = 0.001), and so was it in the patients with than in those without postoperative biochemical recurrence (t = -5.727, P = 0.001). The ROC curve for the value of miR-152 in the early prediction of postoperative biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer showed the area under the curve (AUC) to be 0.906 (95% CI: 0.809-0.964), with a sensitivity of 91.4% and a specificity of 80.6%. The expression level of miR-152 was correlated with the Gleason score, clinical stage of prostate cancer, biochemical recurrence, and bone metastasis (P 0.05). The expression level of circulating miR-152 is significantly reduced in prostate cancer patients with biochemical recurrence after prostatectomy and could be a biomarker in the early prediction of postoperative biochemical recurrence of the malignancy.

  5. Outcome and risk factors of recurrence after thoracoscopic bullectomy in young adults with primary spontaneous pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Takashi; Takahashi, Yusuke; Uehara, Hirofumi; Matsutani, Noriyuki; Kawamura, Masafumi

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the risk factors of recurrence of pneumothorax following thoracoscopic bullectomy in young adults. Between January, 2005 and September, 2015, 167 patients aged ≤40 years underwent initial thoracoscopic bullectomy for primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) at our hospital. Recurrence-free probability was calculated from the date of surgery to recurrence or last follow-up, using the Kaplan-Meier method. Sixteen (9.6%) of the 167 patients suffered a recurrence (collective total, 16 recurrences). The recurrence-free intervals were 3-107 months (median 25.8 months), and the 5-year recurrence-free probability was 85.9%. Multivariate Cox analysis demonstrated that age ≤23 years (p = 0.029) and a history of ipsilateral pneumothorax before surgery (p = 0.029) were significantly associated with higher risk of recurrence. The 5-year recurrence-free probability was 72.3% for patients aged ≤23 years and a history of ipsilateral pneumothorax before surgery and 94.1% for those with neither of these factors (p = 0.001). Recurrence developed within 3 years after surgery in 14 of the 16 patients. Patients ≤23 years of age with a history of ipsilateral pneumothorax before surgery are at significantly high risk of its recurrence, frequently within 3 years; thus, the risk of postoperative recurrence of a pneumothorax must be kept in mind.

  6. Myastenia and risk of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Emil Arnspang; Pottegård, Anton; Hallas, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To evaluate the association between having non-thymoma myasthenia and the risk of extra-thymic cancer in a population-based setting. METHODS: A nationwide case-control study was conducted in Denmark based on medical registries. The study included all cases with a first time...... diagnosis of cancer during 2000-2009. Each case was matched by birth year and gender with eight population controls using risk set sampling. Subjects with myasthenia were identified through a validated register-based algorithm. Conditional logistic regression was used to compute crude and adjusted odds...... risk of overall cancer (OR 1.1; 95% CI 0.9-1.4). Adjusted ORs for major cancer sites were also close to unity, whereas an elevated risk of lymphomas was observed (OR 2.0; 95% CI 0.8-5.5). Early-onset myasthenia was associated with a slightly increased OR for overall cancer (1.5; 95% CI 1...

  7. Recursive partition analysis of peritoneal and systemic recurrence in patients with gastric cancer who underwent D2 gastrectomy: Implications for neoadjuvant therapy consideration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jee Suk; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Keum, Ki Chang; Noh, Sung Hoon; Lim, Joon Seok; Kim, Hyo Song; Rha, Sun Young; Lee, Yong Chan; Hyung, Woo Jin; Koom, Woong Sub

    2016-12-01

    To classify patients with nonmetastatic advanced gastric cancer who underwent D2-gastrectomy into prognostic groups based on peritoneal and systemic recurrence risks. Between 2004 and 2007, 1,090 patients with T3-4 or N+ gastric cancer were identified from our registry. Recurrence rates were estimated using a competing-risk analysis. Different prognostic groups were defined using recursive partitioning analysis (RPA). Median follow-up was 7 years. In the RPA-model for peritoneal recurrence risk, the initial node was split by T stage, indicating that differences between patients with T1-3 and T4 cancer were the greatest. The 5-year peritoneal recurrence rates for patients with T4 (n = 627) and T1-3 (n = 463) disease were 34.3% and 9.1%, respectively. N stage and neural invasion had an additive impact on high-risk patients. The RPA model for systemic relapse incorporated N stage alone and gave two terminal nodes: N0-2 (n = 721) and N3 (n = 369). The 5-year cumulative incidences were 7.7% and 24.5%, respectively. We proposed risk stratification models of peritoneal and systemic recurrence in patients undergoing D2-gastrectomy. This classification could be used for stratification protocols in future studies evaluating adjuvant therapies such as preoperative chemoradiotherapy. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;114:859-864. © 2016 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Examining Fall Recurrence Risk of Homebound Hispanic Older Adults Receiving Home Care Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, Guillermina R; Champion, Jane Dimmitt

    2017-03-01

    Unintentional falls and injuries is a major problem among older adults and the fourth cause of death in the United States. A previous fall event doubles the risk of recurrence and lessens the person's quality of life. Hispanic older adults have higher rates of disability and lower independent functioning due to poor medical health and risk for fall recurrence. Most fall studies focus on fall risk with few studies on fall recurrence in older adults receiving home health care services unrelated to fall incident. A descriptive pilot study of 30 homebound Hispanic older adults receiving home care services who reported a fall within 3 months was conducted by a multidisciplinary team to evaluate risk of fall recurrence. A heightened risk for fall recurrence was identified with high number of chronic illnesses, high intake of medications, vision problems, and prevalence of urinary incontinence. Findings highlight significant number of intrinsic factors for fall risk recurrence and injuries in a Hispanic older adults population that is homebound and receiving home care services. A multidisciplinary evaluation and culturally appropriate interventions to lessen the risk of fall recurrence are recommended.

  9. Effecst of Patho- Biological Factors on the Survival of Recurrent Breast Cancer Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Mohammad Esmaeil; Rohani- Rasaf, Marzieh; Nafissi, Nahid; Akbari, Atieh; Shojaee, Leyla

    2018-04-25

    Background: Recurrence of breast cancer after treatment is generally due to loco-regional invasion or distant metastasis. Although patients with metastasis are considered incurable, existing treatments might prolong a patient’s life while also improving its quality. Choice of approach for individual patients requires identification of relevant survival factors. This study concerns factors influencing survival after recurrence in Iranian breast cancer patients. Methods: This study was performed on 442 recurrent breast cancer patients referred to the Cancer Research Center of Shahid Beheshti University between 1985 and 2015. After confirming recurrence as a distant metastasis or loco-regional invasion, the effects of demographic, clinic-pathologic, biological, type of surgery and type of adjuvant treatment on survival were evaluated using univariate and multivariate stratified Cox models. Results: The mean survival after recurrence was 18 months (5 days to 13 years), 219 patients (70.42%) survived two years, 75 patients (24.12%) survived from 2 to 5 years, and 17 patients (5.47%) survived more than 5 years. In this study, it was found through univariate analysis that the factors of age, lymph node status, DFI, place of recurrence and nodal ratio demonstrated greatest influence on survival after recurrence. On multivariate analysis, the most important factors influencing survival were the place of recurrence and the lymph node status. Conclusion: The results of this study enhance our knowledge of effects of different factors on survival of patients after breast cancer recurrence. Thus, they may be used to inform treatment choice. Creative Commons Attribution License

  10. Impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on postoperative recurrence in patients with resected non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang GL

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Guangliang Qiang, Chaoyang Liang, Fei Xiao, Qiduo Yu, Huanshun Wen, Zhiyi Song, Yanchu Tian, Bin Shi, Yongqing Guo, Deruo Liu Department of Thoracic Surgery, China–Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Purpose: This study aimed to determine whether the severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD affects recurrence-free survival in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients after surgical resection.Patients and methods: A retrospective study was performed on 421 consecutive patients who had undergone lobectomy for NSCLC from January 2008 to June 2011. Classification of COPD severity was based on guidelines of the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD. Characteristics among the three subgroups were compared and recurrence-free survivals were analyzed.Results: A total of 172 patients were diagnosed with COPD (124 as GOLD-1, 46 as GOLD-2, and two as GOLD-3. The frequencies of recurrence were significantly higher in patients with higher COPD grades (P<0.001. Recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 78.1%, 70.4%, and 46.4% in non-COPD, mild COPD, and moderate/severe COPD groups, respectively (P<0.001. By univariate analysis, the age, sex, smoking history, COPD severity, tumor size, histology, and pathological stage were associated with recurrence-free survival. Multivariate analysis showed that older age, male, moderate/severe COPD, and advanced stage were independent risk factors associated with recurrence-free survival.Conclusion: NSCLC patients with COPD are at high risk for postoperative recurrence, and moderate/severe COPD is an independent unfavorable prognostic factor. Keywords: lung neoplasms, surgery, pulmonary function test, prognosis

  11. Recurrent endometrial cancer: patterns of recurrent disease and assessment of prognosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohaib, S.A. [Department of Radiology, Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Houghton, S.L. [Department of Radiology, Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Meroni, R. [Department of Academic Radiology, St Bartholomew' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Rockall, A.G. [Department of Academic Radiology, St Bartholomew' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Blake, P. [Department of Gynaecological Oncology, Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Reznek, R.H. [Department of Academic Radiology, St Bartholomew' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-01-15

    Aim: To evaluate patterns of disease and identify factors predicting outcome in patients presenting with recurrent endometrial adenocarcinoma following primary surgery. Materials and methods: A retrospective review was performed of the imaging and clinical data in 86 patients (median age 66 years, range 42-88 years) presenting with recurrent endometrial adenocarcinoma following primary surgery. Results: Following primary surgery recurrent disease occurred within 2 years in 64% and within 3 years in 87%. Relapse was seen within lymph nodes in 41 (46%), the vagina in 36 (42%) the peritoneum in 24 (28%) and the lung in 21 (24%). Unusual sites of disease included spleen, pancreas, rectum, muscle and brain. Univariate survival analysis showed the factors significant for poor outcome were: multiple sites of disease, liver and splenic disease, haematogenous, peritoneal and nodal spread, poorly differentiated tumour, and early relapse. The presence of disease within the vagina, bladder or lung was not associated with poor prognosis. Multivariate analysis identified multiple sites of disease, liver and splenic metastases to be independent predictors of poor outcome. Conclusion: The most frequently observed sites of relapse are: lymph nodes, vagina, peritoneum and lung. Significant predictors of poor outcome in recurrent disease are multiple sites of disease and liver and splenic metastases.

  12. Prognostic factors of patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer after radical resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaobin; Yuan Zhiyong; You Jinqiang; Zhang Bailin; Zhu Li; Zhao Peng; Liu Jianzhong; Wang Ping

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the prognostic factors and the clinical outcome of locally recurrent rectal cancer after radical resection. Methods: From April 2000 to April 2004, 105 patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer after radical resection were re-treated in Tianjin cancer hospital. Thirty-four patients were re-treated with surgery combined with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (group 1), 35 with surgery alone (group 2), and 36 with chemoradiotherapy (group 3). The impact of 17 clinico pathological factors and treatment modalities on the survival was analyzed. Results: The follow-up rate was 95. 2%. The median survival time was 23 months. The 1-, 3-and 5-year survival rates of patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer were 63% ,34% and 19%, respectively. The 1-, 3-and 5-year survival rates were 79%, 55% and 32% in group 1 ; 68%, 40% and 14% in group 2; and 64%, 36% and 11% in group 3; respectively (χ 2 =7. 96, P =0. 019). The univariate analysis showed that the degree of differentiation, depth of tumor invasion, number of metastatic lymph nodes, initial TNM stage, recurrent location, time to recurrence, and surgery combined with adjuvant therapy were significant prognostic factors, with the last 4 being the independent prognostic factors. Conclusions: Surgery combined with chemoradiotherapy may improve the survival of patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer. (authors)

  13. Gender Differences in Risk Factors for Single and Recurrent Falls Among the Community-Dwelling Elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Yu Mei O; Fatima El Fakiri

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify gender differences in risk factors of fall accidents among older people, and whether these factors differ between single and recurrent fallers. A total of 4,426 individuals aged ≥65 years from two large-scale health surveys provided data. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify risk factors and to determine the risk model for falling and recurrent falling in men and ...

  14. Psychological stress as a risk factor for postoperative keloid recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Fabianne; Hochman, Bernardo; Farber, Paulo Luiz; Muller, Marisa Campio; Hayashi, Lilian Fukusima; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2012-04-01

    To investigate psychological stress on the prognosis of the postoperative recurrence of keloids. Patients with keloids (n=25), candidates for surgical resection and postoperative radiotherapy, had their psychological stress evaluated on the day before the surgical procedure. The parameters evaluated were pain and itching (Visual Numerical Scale), quality of life (Questionnaire QualiFibro/Cirurgia Plástica-UNIFESP), perceived stress (Perceived Stress Scale), depression and anxiety (Hospital Depression and Anxiety Scale), salivary cortisol and minimum and maximum galvanic skin responses (GSR) at rest and under stress (i.e., while the questionnaires were being filled out). Patients were evaluated during the 3rd, 6th, 9th and 12th months of postoperative care. During each return visit, two experts classified the lesions as non-recurrent and recurrent. The recurrence group presented the greatest values in GSR during a stressful situation. The chance of recurrence increased by 34% at each increase of 1000 arbitrary units in maximum GSR during stress. Psychological stress influenced the recurrence of keloids. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Image-defined Risk Factors Correlate with Surgical Radicality and Local Recurrence in Patients with Neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, A; Erichsen, M; Stehr, M; Hubertus, J; Bergmann, F; Kammer, B; von Schweinitz, D

    2016-04-01

    Neuroblastoma is the second most common solid pediatric tumor and the most common cancer to be detected in children younger than 12 months of age. To date, 2 different staging systems describe the extent of the disease: the International Neuroblastoma Staging System (INSS) and the International Neuroblastoma Risk Group Staging System (INRGSS). The INRGSS-system is characterized by the presence or absence of so called image-defined risk factors (IDRFs), which are described as surgical risk factors. We hypothesized that IDRFs correlate with surgical complications, surgical radicality, local recurrence and overall survival (OS). Between 2003 and 2010, 102 patients had neuroblastoma surgery performed in our department. We analyzed medical records for IDRF-status and above named data. 16 patients were IDRF-negative, whereas 86 patients showed one or more IDRF. Intra- or postoperative complications have been reported in 21 patients (21%). 19 of them showed one or more IDRF and 2 patients were IDRF-negative (p=n.s.). Patients who suffered from intra- or postoperative complications demonstrated a decreased OS (p=0.011). Statistical analysis revealed an inverse correlation between the extent of macroscopical removal and IDRF-status (p=0.001). Furthermore, the number of IDRFs were associated with a decreased likelihood of radical tumor resection (p<0.001). 19 patients had local recurrence; all of them were IDRF-positive (p=0.037). Pediatric surgeons should consider IDRFs as a useful tool for risk assessment and therefore planning for neuroblastoma surgery. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Kidney Cancer Risk Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NCI Cancer Information A to Z Treatment Roles Cancer Types Bladder Brain/Spine Breast Cervical Colorectal Esophageal Gallbladder Head/Neck Kidney Leukemia Liver Lung Lymphoma Multiple Myeloma Ovarian Pancreatic ...

  17. Recurrence of Subdural Haematoma in a Population-Based Cohort - Risks and Predictive Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Linnea; Gørtz, Sanne; Wohlfahrt, Jan

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate the risks of and identify predictors for recurrent subdural haematoma in surgically and conservatively treated patients. METHODS: The cohort comprised all individuals diagnosed with a first-time subdural hematoma in Denmark 1996-2011. Information on potential predictors...... was retrieved from the Danish health registers. Cumulative recurrence risks were estimated using the Aalen-Johansen estimator. Rate ratios (RR) were estimated using Poisson regression. RESULTS: Among 10,158 individuals with a subdural hematoma, 1,555 had a recurrent event. The cumulative risk of recurrent...... subdural hematoma was 9% at 4 weeks after the primary bleeding, increasing to and stabilising at 14% after one year. Predictors associated with recurrence were: Male sex (RR 1.60, 95% CI:1.43-1.80), older age (>70 years compared to 20-49 years; RR 1.41, 95% CI: 1.21-1.65), alcohol addiction (RR 1.20, 95...

  18. When fear of cancer recurrence becomes a clinical issue: a qualitative analysis of features associated with clinical fear of cancer recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutsaers, Brittany; Jones, Georden; Rutkowski, Nicole; Tomei, Christina; Séguin Leclair, Caroline; Petricone-Westwood, Danielle; Simard, Sébastien; Lebel, Sophie

    2016-10-01

    Fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) is a common experience for cancer survivors. However, it remains unclear what characteristics differentiate non-clinical from clinical levels of FCR. The goal of this study was to investigate the potential hallmarks of clinical FCR. A convenience sample of 40 participants (n = 19 female) was drawn from another study (Lebel et al. in Qual Life Res 25:311-321. doi: 10.1007/s11136-015-1088-2 , 2016). The semi-structured interview for fear of cancer recurrence (Simard and Savard in J Cancer Surviv 9:481-491. doi: 10.1007/s11764-015-0424-4 , 2015) was used to identify participants with non-clinical and clinical FCR and qualitative analysis of these interviews was performed. Individuals with clinical FCR reported the following features: death-related thoughts, feeling alone, belief that the cancer would return, experiencing intolerance of uncertainty, having cancer-related thoughts and imagery that were difficult to control, daily and recurrent, lasted 30 minutes or more, increased over time, caused distress and impacted their daily life. Triggers of FCR and coping strategies did not appear to be features of clinical FCR as they were reported by participants with a range of FCR scores. While features of clinical FCR found in this analysis such as intrusive thoughts, distress and impact on functioning confirmed previous FCR research, other features spontaneously emerged from the interviews including "death-related thoughts," "feeling alone," and "belief that the cancer will return." The participants' descriptions of cancer-specific fear and worry suggest that FCR is a distinct phenomenon related to cancer survivorship, despite similarities with psychological disorders (e.g., Anxiety Disorders). Future research investigating the construct of FCR, and the distinguishing features of clinical FCR across a range of cancer types and gender is required.

  19. Smoking, not human papilloma virus infection, is a risk factor for recurrence of sinonasal inverted papilloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Hwan-Jung; Mun, Sue Jean; Cho, Kyu-Sup; Hong, Sung-Lyong

    2016-01-01

    The recurrence rate of sinonasal inverted papillomas (SNIP) is 15-20%. However, few studies have investigated patient-dependent factors related to recurrence of SNIPs. To analyze risk factors, including human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and smoking, as well as other factors, for recurrence of SNIPs. Fifty-four patients who were diagnosed with SNIP and underwent surgery were enrolled: 39 men and 15 women, with the mean age of 54.0 years. Their mean follow-up was 40.6 months. Demographics and information about the history of smoking, previous surgery, tumor extent, follow-up, and recurrence were reviewed retrospectively. Those patients whose tumors were associated with malignant transformation were excluded in this study. HPV detection and genotyping in the tumor specimens were performed with the HPV DNA chip, a polymerase chain reaction-based DNA microarray system. Seven patients (13.0%) had recurrence, with a mean time to recurrence of 39.8 months. Recurrence rates in T1, T2, T3, and T4 of the Krouse staging system were 0% (0/4), 8.3% (2/24), 17.4% (4/23), and 33.3% (1/3), respectively (p > 0.5). Eight patients (14.8%) were positive for HPV DNA. All of these patients belonged to the group without recurrence (p > 0.5). However, recurrence rates according to HPV DNA positivity were not statistically different (0% versus 15.2%). Three (42.9%) in the group with recurrence and four (8.5%) in the group without recurrence were smokers (p < 0.5). Smoking was associated with recurrence of SNIP. However, HPV infection is not a recurrence of SNIP risk factor.

  20. Dietary patterns and colorectal cancer recurrence and survival: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yun; Wu, Hao; Wang, Peizhong Peter; Savas, Sevtap; Woodrow, Jennifer; Wish, Tyler; Jin, Rong; Green, Roger; Woods, Michael; Roebothan, Barbara; Buehler, Sharon; Dicks, Elizabeth; McLaughlin, John R; Campbell, Peter T; Parfrey, Patrick S

    2013-01-01

    To examine the association between dietary patterns and colorectal cancer (CRC) survival. Cohort study. A familial CRC registry in Newfoundland. 529 newly diagnosed CRC patients from Newfoundland. They were recruited from 1999 to 2003 and followed up until April 2010. Participants reported their dietary intake using a food frequency questionnaire. Dietary patterns were identified with factor analysis. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were employed to estimate HR and 95% CI for association of dietary patterns with CRC recurrence and death from all causes, after controlling for covariates. Disease-free survival (DFS) among CRC patients was significantly worsened among patients with a high processed meat dietary pattern (the highest vs the lowest quartile HR 1.82, 95% CI 1.07 to 3.09). No associations were observed with the prudent vegetable or the high-sugar patterns and DFS. The association between the processed meat pattern and DFS was restricted to patients diagnosed with colon cancer (the highest vs the lowest quartile: HR 2.29, 95% CI 1.19 to 4.40) whereas the relationship between overall survival (OS) and this pattern was observed among patients with colon cancer only (the highest vs the lowest quartile: HR 2.13, 95% CI 1.03 to 4.43). Potential effect modification was noted for sex (p value for interaction 0.04, HR 3.85 for women and 1.22 for men). The processed meat dietary pattern prior to diagnosis is associated with higher risk of tumour recurrence, metastasis and death among patients with CRC.

  1. Risk factors for plantar foot ulcer recurrence in neuropathic diabetic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waaijman, Roelof; de Haart, Mirjam; Arts, Mark L. J.; Wever, Daniel; Verlouw, Anke J. W. E.; Nollet, Frans; Bus, Sicco A.

    2014-01-01

    Recurrence of plantar foot ulcers is a common and major problem in diabetes but not well understood. Foot biomechanics and patient behavior may be important. The aim was to identify risk factors for ulcer recurrence and to establish targets for ulcer prevention. As part of a footwear trial, 171

  2. Long-term risk of recurrent vascular events after young stroke: The FUTURE study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten-Jacobs, L.C.A.; Maaijwee, N.A.M.M.; Arntz, R.M.; Schoonderwaldt, H.C.; Dorresteijn, L.D.A.; Vlugt, M.J. van der; Dijk, E.J. van; Leeuw, F.E. de

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Long-term data on recurrent vascular events after young stroke are limited. Our objective was to examine the long-term risk of recurrent vascular events after young stroke. METHODS: We prospectively included 724 consecutive patients with a first-ever transient ischemic attack (TIA),

  3. Risk Factors for Recurrence of Symptomatic Common Bile Duct Stones after Cholecystectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Hyun Oak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The recurrence of CBD stone is still observed in a considerable number of patients. The study was to evaluate the risk factors for recurrence of symptomatic CBD stone in patients who underwent cholecystectomy after the removal of CBD stone. Methods. The medical records of patients who underwent removal of CBD stone with subsequent cholecystectomy were reviewed. The risk factors for the recurrence of symptomatic CBD stone were compared between the recurrence and the nonrecurrence group. Results. The mean follow-up period was 40.6 months. The recurrence of symptomatic CBD stones was defined as the detection of bile duct stones no sooner than 6 months after complete clearance of CBD stones, based on symptoms or signs of biliary complication. 144 patients (68 males, 47.2% were finally enrolled and their mean age was 59.8 (range: 26~86 years. The recurrence of CBD stone occurred in 15 patients (10.4%. The mean period until first recurrence was 25.9 months. The presence of type 1 or 2 periampullary diverticulum and multiple CBD stones were the independent risk factors. Conclusion. For the patients with type 1 or 2 periampullary diverticulum or multiple CBD stones, careful followup is needed for the risk in recurrence of symptomatic CBD stone.

  4. Maximum tumor diameter is not an independent prognostic factor in high-risk localized prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oort, van I.M.; Witjes, J.A.; Kok, D.E.G.; Kiemeney, L.A.; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that maximum tumor diameter (MTD) is a predictor of recurrence in prostate cancer (PC). This study investigates the prognostic value of MTD for biochemical recurrence (BCR) in patients with PC, after radical prostatectomy (RP), with emphasis on high-risk localized prostate

  5. Anxiety and Fear of Recurrence Despite a Good Prognosis: An Interview Study with Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, Christel; Strang, Peter; Djärv, Therese; Widberg, Ida; Lundgren, Catharina Ihre

    2017-11-01

    Despite a good prognosis, fear of recurrence is prevalent, even several years after a diagnosis of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). For this reason, the aim of this study was to make an in-depth exploration of anxiety, sources of anxiety, and protective strategies. In order to capture a broad description of the phenomenon, a purposeful, maximum variation sampling strategy regarding age, sex, stage of disease, educational level, and time since diagnosis was used. In total, 21 patients were included in the study. Semi-structured interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed with a qualitative content analysis. Patients with and without recurrences narrated a picture indicating anxiety related to their current situation; future risks and threats were central to this picture. However, they initially minimized or even denied having anxiety, but subsequently described it as a major problem at the end of the interviews. Anxiety was related to risk of recurrence and the risk of developing other cancers, but also to fears of a future situation where no further treatment options were available. Previous experiences of delayed investigations added to these fears. In order to cope, patients developed protective strategies in order to keep evasive and frightening thoughts away. Everyday life, distractions, and focusing on "the small things in life" were examples of such strategies. Anxiety is a common, although partially hidden, problem in DTC survivors, as they tended to deny it early in the dialogues. As anxiety is clearly related to follow-up routines, these should therefore be revaluated.

  6. Perineal recurrence of prostate cancer six years after trans-perineal brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eppinga, Wietse; Vijverberg, Peter; Moerland, Rien; Brand, Eric; van der Voort van Zyp, Jochem; Noteboom, Juus; van Vulpen, Marco

    We report a case of perineal recurrence of prostate cancer 6 years after low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. The most common approach to treat such perineal masses, including those occurring after prior biopsy or surgery, is local excision. We report the use of

  7. A clinical assessment of laser surgery for recurrent tongue cancer following radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Junnosuke; Fujita, Kunio; Komatsubara, Hideki; Umeda, Masahiro; Komori, Takahide

    2004-01-01

    Laser surgery can control intraoperative hemorrhaging and enable lesions to be accurately removed since, unlike an electrotome, it does not effect electrocontractility. It can also reduce postoperative pain and dysfunction. This study investigated the efficacy of laser surgery in recurrent tongue cancer following radiotherapy. Of the total of 105 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue (T1, T2N0) who underwent radiotherapy at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, at some point between 1980 and 1998, 24 (22.9%) experienced local recurrence. Sixteen of these patients underwent surgical removal of the tumor. Of these 16 patients, 8 (4 early- and 4 late-stage recurrence) had partial glossectomy by laser surgery. Following laser surgery, 2 (1 early- and 1 late-stage recurrence) of the 8 patients died from neck metastasis and another 2 (early-stage recurrence) died from other diseases. The primary and neck tumors are both under control in 3 (late-stage recurrence) of the remaining 4 patients. Laser surgery for late-stage recurrent tongue cancer following radiotherapy appears to be a suitable treatment, although comprehensive glossectomy with/without radical neck dissection is necessary for early-stage recurrent cases after radiotherapy. (author)

  8. Factors influencing survival and recurrence-free intervals after treatment of primary breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Higgins, N.; Brady, H.R.; Clark, C.G.

    1984-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of 739 patients with breast cancer is presented. Factors influencing overall survival, recurrence-free interval and survival after first recurrence are analysed and discussed. None of the factors was affected by age or menopausal status at the time of presentation. Overall survival and recurrence-free intervals varied significantly with tumour size, extent of nodal spread and tumour site. Medially situated tumours, large tumours and extensive nodal spread were associated with earlier first recurrence and poor prognosis. No difference in survival or recurrence-free interval was observed between different surgical operations. Although overall survival was longer in patients who received post-operative radiotherapy, no significant differences in survival or disease-free intervals were noted when patients were standardised for operation or tumour stage. Survival after local recurrence was longer than survival after distant metastases, although the time of onset of local and distant disease followed an identical pattern. These results suggest that the tumour characteristics of size, site and nodal spread are important determinants of survival and recurrence-free interval in primary breast cancer. Local recurrence should be regarded as a manifestation of systemic disease. (author)

  9. Investigation of Prognostic Factors and Survival without Recurrence in Patients with Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Abdollahi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the major consequences of breast cancer is the recurrence of the disease. The objective of present study was to estimate the 7-year survival without recurrence as well as the effective prognostic factors in recurrence. Materials and Methods: This historical cohort survival analysis was conducted on 1329 patients diagnosed with breast cancer in Motahari Breast Clinic, Shiraz, Iran between 2004 and 2011. We estimated the rate of survival without recurrence through the Kaplan–Meier method and the difference between the survival curves was investigated using the log-rank test. Furthermore, Cox regression model was used to model the effective factors in local recurrence as well as metastasis. Results: The mean age of the patients was 54.8 ± 11.4 years. Estrogen receptor positive, progesterone receptor positive, and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 positive were observed in 70.6%, 66.6%, and 34.4% of the cases, respectively. The mean of the follow-up period was 3.7 ± 1.8 years in all patients. The results of the Kaplan–Meier method revealed 1-, 3-, 5-, and 7-year rate of survival without recurrence as 96.4%, 78.4%, 66.3%, and 54.8%, respectively. There was a significant relationship between survival without recurrence and histology grade (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.66, P = 0.009, neural invasion (HR = 1.74, P = 0.006, and progesterone receptors (HR = 0.69, P = 0.031. Conclusion: In this study, the rate of survival without recurrence in breast cancer was 54.8%. Among factors, histology grade and neural involvement at the time of diagnosis increased the chance of recurrence and progesterone receptors caused a longer interval between diagnosis and recurrence.

  10. Combined Treatment of Residual, Recurrent and Unresectable Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Hoon Sik

    1990-01-01

    A series of 25 patients with residual, recurrent, and unresectable gastric cancer received various combination of surgery, radiotherapy (RT), chemotherapy (CT), and hyperthermia (HT). They were placed INTO 7 categories; 1) CT and HT-14 patients; 2) RT and HT-15 patients; 3) surgery, RT and HT-2 patients; 4) surgery, RT, HT and CT-1 patient; 5) RT, HT and CT-1 patient; 6) RT and CT-1 patient; 7) RT alone-1 patient. Three patients had curative resection. 21 patients received irradiation with tightly contoured portals to spare as much small bowel, kidney and marrow as possible. Hyperthermia was applied regionally once or twice a week for 23 patients using 8 MHz radiofrequency capacitive heating device (Thermotron RF-8). HT was given approximately 30 min after RT. 7 patients were treated with CT: 4 patients received HT and concomitant Mitomycin-C; 3 patients received HT and sequential 5-FU+Adriamycin+Mitomycin-C. There was not any treatment related deaths. There was also no evidence of treatment related problems with liver, kidney, stomach, or spinal cord except only one case of transient diabetic ketoacidosis. The tumor response was evaluable in 22 patients. None achieved complete remission. 11(50%) achieved partial remission. The response rate was correlated with total radiation dose and achieved maximum temperature. 9 of 14 (64%) received more than 4000 cGy showed partial remission; especially, all 3 patients received more than 5500 cGy achieved partial response. 8 of the 12 patients (67%) who achieved maximal temperature more than 41 .deg. C showed partial response in comparing with 25% (2 of 8 patients, below 41 .deg. C). The numbers of HT, however, was not correlated with the response. 3 of the 25 patients (12%) remain alive. The one who was surgically unresectable and underwent irradiation alone is in progression of the disease with distant metastases. The remaining two patients with curative resection are alive with free of disease, 24 and 35 months

  11. Understanding your colon cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for women and 2 drinks per day for men DO NOT smoke You can also have genetic testing done to assess your risk for colon cancer. If you have a strong family history of the disease, talk with your ...

  12. Hair Dyes and Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... http://www.fda.gov/aboutfda/centersoffices/officeoffoods/cfsan/default.htm . Selected References Huncharek M, Kupelnick B. Personal use of hair dyes and the risk of bladder cancer: results of a meta-analysis. ...

  13. Relationship between two year PSA nadir and biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer patients treated with iodine-125 brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Antônio da Silva Franca

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the relationship between two year PSA nadir (PSAn after brachytherapy and biochemical recurrence rates in prostate cancer patients. Materials and Methods In the period from January 1998 to August 2007, 120 patients were treated with iodine-125 brachytherapy alone. The results analysis was based on the definition of biochemical recurrence according to the Phoenix Consensus. Results Biochemical control was observed in 86 patients (71.7%, and biochemical recurrence, in 34 (28.3%. Mean PSAn was 0.53 ng/ml. The mean follow-up was 98 months. The patients were divided into two groups: group 1, with two year PSAn < 0.5 ng/ml after brachytherapy (74 patients; 61.7%, and group 2, with two year PSAn ≥ 0.5 ng/ml after brachytherapy (46 patients; 38.3%. Group 1 presented biochemical recurrence in 15 patients (20.3%, and group 2, in 19 patients (43.2% (p < 0.02. The analysis of biochemical disease-free survival at seven years, stratified by the two groups, showed values of 80% and 64% (p < 0.02, respectively. Conclusion Levels of two year PSAn ≥ 0.5 ng/ml after brachytherapy are strongly correlated with a poor prognosis. This fact may help to identify patients at risk for disease recurrence.

  14. Surveillance of colorectal cancer: effectiveness of early detection of intraluminal recurrences on prognosis and survival of patients treated for cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barillari, P; Ramacciato, G; Manetti, G; Bovino, A; Sammartino, P; Stipa, V

    1996-04-01

    The authors evaluate the effectiveness of routine colonoscopy and marker evaluation in diagnosis of intraluminal recurrent cancer. Chart review was conducted on 481 patients who underwent curative resection for colorectal cancer between 1980 and 1990. Clinical visits were scheduled and carcinoembryonic antigen evaluation was performed every three months, and colonoscopy was performed preoperatively, 12 to 15 months after surgical treatment, and then with intervals of 12 to 24 months or when symptoms appeared. About 10 percent of patients developed intraluminal recurrences. More than one-half of metachronous lesions arose within the first 24 months, and median time to diagnosis was 25 months. Patients with left-sited tumors in the advanced stage had a higher risk of developing recurrent intraluminal disease. Twenty-nine patients underwent a second surgical operation, of which 17 cases were radical. In this group, the five-year survival was 70.6 percent, although no nonradically treated or nonresected patients survived longer than 31 months. Twenty-two patients were asymptomatic at time of diagnosis of recurrence, and of these, 12 patients underwent radical operation; on the other hand, of the 24 symptomatic patients, only 5 were treated radically. Carcinoembryonic antigen was the first sign of recurrence in eight cases. Colonoscopy must be performed within the first 12 to 15 months after operation, whereas an interval of 24 months between examinations seems sufficient to guarantee early detection of metachronous lesions. Serial tumor marker evaluation is of help in earlier diagnosis of local recurrences. Asymptomatic patients more frequently undergo another operation for cure and thus have a better survival rate.

  15. Cancer risk in systemic lupus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernatsky, Sasha; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Labrecque, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To update estimates of cancer risk in SLE relative to the general population. METHODS: A multisite international SLE cohort was linked with regional tumor registries. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated as the ratio of observed to expected cancers. RESULTS: Across 30 c...

  16. Cancer risks after radiation exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voelz, G.L.

    1980-01-01

    A general overview of the effects of ionizing radiation on cancer induction is presented. The relationship between the degree of risk and absorbed dose is examined. Mortality from radiation-induced cancer in the US is estimated and percentages attributable to various sources are given

  17. Assessing the risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism – a practical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahrni J

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer Fahrni,1 Marc Husmann,2 Silvia B Gretener,3 Hong H Keo1 1Division of Angiology, Medical University Clinic, Kantonsspital Aarau AG, Aarau, Switzerland; 2Clinic for Angiology, University Hospital, University of Zurich, Zürich, Switzerland; 3Clinic for Angiology Oberaargau, Langenthal, Switzerland Abstract: Recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. This risk is lowered by anticoagulation, with a large effect in the initial phase following the venous thromboembolic event, and with a smaller effect in terms of secondary prevention of recurrence when extended anticoagulation is performed. On the other hand, extended anticoagulation is associated with an increased risk of major bleeding and thus leads to morbidity and mortality. Therefore, it is necessary to assess the risk of recurrence for VTE on an individual basis, and a recommendation for secondary prophylaxis should be specifically based on risk calculation of recurrence of VTE and bleeding. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of relevant risk factors for recurrent VTE and a practical approach for assessing the risk of recurrence in daily practice. Keywords: thrombosis, hemorrhage, risk assessment 

  18. Obesity and risk of recurrence or death after adjuvant endocrine therapy with letrozole or tamoxifen in the breast international group 1-98 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewertz, Marianne; Gray, Kathryn P; Regan, Meredith M

    2012-01-01

    To examine the association of baseline body mass index (BMI) with the risk of recurrence or death in postmenopausal women with early-stage breast cancer receiving adjuvant tamoxifen or letrozole in the Breast International Group (BIG) 1-98 trial at 8.7 years of median follow-up....

  19. Potential role of miR-9 and miR-223 in recurrent ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGuinness Eamonn

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small, noncoding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression by binding to target mRNAs. miRNAs have not been comprehensively studied in recurrent ovarian cancer, yet an incurable disease. Results Using real-time RT-PCR, we obtained distinct miRNA expression profiles between primary and recurrent serous papillary ovarian adenocarcinomas (n = 6 in a subset of samples previously used in a transcriptome approach. Expression levels of top dysregulated miRNA genes, miR-223 and miR-9, were examined using TaqMan PCR in independent cohorts of fresh frozen (n = 18 and FFPE serous ovarian tumours (n = 22. Concordance was observed on TaqMan analysis for miR-223 and miR-9 between the training cohort and the independent test cohorts. Target prediction analysis for the above miRNA "recurrent metastatic signature" identified genes previously validated in our transcriptome study. Common biological pathways well characterised in ovarian cancer were shared by miR-9 and miR-223 lists of predicted target genes. We provide strong evidence that miR-9 acts as a putative tumour suppressor gene in recurrent ovarian cancer. Components of the miRNA processing machinery, such as Dicer and Drosha are not responsible for miRNA deregulation in recurrent ovarian cancer, as deluded by TaqMan and immunohistochemistry. Conclusion We propose a miRNA model for the molecular pathogenesis of recurrent ovarian cancer. Some of the differentially deregulated miRNAs identified correlate with our previous transcriptome findings. Based on integrated transcriptome and miRNA analysis, miR-9 and miR-223 can be of potential importance as biomarkers in recurrent ovarian cancer.

  20. Does endoscopic ultrasound improve detection of locally recurrent anal squamous-cell cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Carrie Y; Weiser, Martin R; Paty, Philip B; Guillem, Jose G; Nash, Garrett M; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio; Patil, Sujata; Temple, Larissa K

    2015-02-01

    Evaluating patients for recurrent anal cancer after primary treatment can be difficult owing to distorted anatomy and scarring. Many institutions incorporate endoscopic ultrasound to improve detection, but the effectiveness is unknown. The aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of digital rectal examination and endoscopic ultrasound in detecting locally recurrent disease during routine follow-up of patients with anal cancer. This study is a retrospective, single-institution review. This study was conducted at an oncologic tertiary referral center. Included were 175 patients with nonmetastatic anal squamous-cell cancer, without persistent disease after primary chemoradiotherapy, who had at least 1 posttreatment ultrasound and examination by a colorectal surgeon. The primary outcomes measured were the first modality to detect local recurrence, concordance, crude cancer detection rate, sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value. Eight hundred fifty-five endoscopic ultrasounds and 873 digital rectal examinations were performed during 35 months median follow-up. Overall, ultrasound detected 7 (0.8%) mesorectal and 32 (3.7%) anal canal abnormalities; digital examination detected 69 (7.9%) anal canal abnormalities. Locally recurrent disease was found on biopsy in 8 patients, all detected first or only with digital examination. Four patients did not have an ultrasound at the time of diagnosis of recurrence. The concordance of ultrasound and digital examination in detecting recurrent disease was fair at 0.37 (SE, 0.08; 95% CI, 0.21-0.54), and there was no difference in crude cancer detection rate, sensitivity, specificity, and negative or positive predictive values. The heterogeneity of follow-up timing and examinations is not standardized in this study but is reflective of general practice. Endoscopic ultrasound did not provide any advantage over digital rectal examination in identifying locally recurrent anal cancer, and should not be recommended for

  1. Recurrent Tricuspid Insufficiency: Is the Surgical Repair Technique a Risk Factor?

    OpenAIRE

    Kara, Ibrahim; Koksal, Cengiz; Cakalagaoglu, Canturk; Sahin, Muslum; Yanartas, Mehmet; Ay, Yasin; Demir, Serdar

    2013-01-01

    This study compares the medium-term results of De Vega, modified De Vega, and ring annuloplasty techniques for the correction of tricuspid insufficiency and investigates the risk factors for recurrent grades 3 and 4 tricuspid insufficiency after repair.

  2. Designing the selenium and bladder cancer trial (SELEBLAT, a phase lll randomized chemoprevention study with selenium on recurrence of bladder cancer in Belgium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goossens Maria E

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Belgium, bladder cancer is the fifth most common cancer in males (5.2% and the sixth most frequent cause of death from cancer in males (3.8%. Previous epidemiological studies have consistently reported that selenium concentrations were inversely associated with the risk of bladder cancer. This suggests that selenium may also be suitable for chemoprevention of recurrence. Method The SELEBLAT study opened in September 2009 and is still recruiting all patients with non-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder on TURB operation in 15 Belgian hospitals. Recruitment progress can be monitored live at http://www.seleblat.org. Patients are randomly assigned to selenium yeast (200 μg/day supplementation for 3 years or matching placebo, in addition to standard care. The objective is to determine the effect of selenium on the recurrence of bladder cancer. Randomization is stratified by treatment centre. A computerized algorithm randomly assigns the patients to a treatment arm. All study personnel and participants are blinded to treatment assignment for the duration of the study. Design The SELEnium and BLAdder cancer Trial (SELEBLAT is a phase III randomized, placebo-controlled, academic, double-blind superior trial. Discussion This is the first report on a selenium randomized trial in bladder cancer patients. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00729287

  3. Pathological Predictors for Site of Local Recurrence After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, Supriya [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Toi, Ants [Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Taback, Nathan [Division of Biostatistics, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Evans, Andrew [Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Department of Pathology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Haider, Masoom A. [Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto (Canada); Milosevic, Michael; Bristow, Robert G.; Chung, Peter; Bayley, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Morton, Gerard; Vesprini, Danny [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Odette Cancer Center, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto (Canada); Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Menard, Cynthia, E-mail: Cynthia.Menard@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Rational design of targeted radiotherapy (RT) in prostate cancer (Pca) hinges on a better understanding of spatial patterns of recurrence. We sought to identify pathological factors predictive for site of local recurrence (LR) after external beam RT. Methods and Materials: Prospective databases were reviewed to identify men with LR after RT from 1997 through 2009. Patients with biochemical failure and biopsy-confirmed Pca more than 2 years after RT were evaluated. Prediction for site of recurrence based on the following pretreatment factors was determined on independent and cluster-sextant basis: presence of malignancy, dominant vs. nondominant percentage core length (PCL) involvement, PCL {>=} or <40%, and Gleason score. Sites of dominant PCL were defined as sextants with peak PCL involvement minus 10%, and >5% for each patient. Results: Forty-one patients with low-intermediate risk Pca constituted the study cohort. Median time to biopsy after RT was 51 months (range, 24-145). Of 246 sextants, 74 were involved with tumor at baseline. When sextants are treated as independent observations the presence of malignancy (77% vs. 22%, p = 0.0001), dominant PCL (90% vs. 46%, p = 0.0001), and PCL {>=}40% (89% vs. 68 %, p = 0.04) were found to be significant predictors for LR, although PCL {>=}40% did not retain statistical significance if sextants were considered correlated. The vast majority of patients (95%) recurred at the original site of dominant PCL or PCL {>=}40%, and 44% also recurred in regions of nondominant PCL <40% (n = 8) and/or benign sampling (n = 14) at baseline. Conclusions: LR after RT predominantly occurs in regions bearing higher histological tumor burden but are not isolated to these sites. Our data highlights the value of spatially resolved baseline pathological sampling and may assist in the design of clinical trials tailoring RT dose prescriptions to subregions of the prostate gland.

  4. Sensitivity of enhanced MRI for the detection of breast cancer: new, multicentric, residual, and recurrent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, P.L.; McCarty, K.S. Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast brings the advantages of high resolution cross-sectional imaging to breast cancer diagnosis, treatment and research: improved cancer detection, staging, selection of therapy, evaluation of therapeutic response in vivo, detection of recurrence, and even the development of new therapies. Until now breast cancer treatment and research has been impeded by the limited means of evaluating the breast cancer in vivo: primarily clinical palpation and mammography of the breast tumor. A review of the initial studies shows that with the use of paramagnetic contrast agents, MRI has a sensitivity of 96 % for detecting breast cancers. MRI detects multicentric disease with a sensitivity of 98 %, superior to any other modality. The ability of MRI to detect recurrent local breast cancer in the conservatively treated breast is nearly 100 %. MRI is capable of monitoring tumor response to chemotherapy and actually guiding therapeutic interventions such as interstitial laser photocoagulation. (orig.)

  5. Does fear of cancer recurrence differ between cancer types? : A study from the population-based PROFILES registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wal, M.A.; van de Poll-Franse, L.V.; Prins, J.; Gielissen, M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Knowledge of factors associated with fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) may inform intervention development and improve patient care. The aims were (1) to compare FCR severity between cancer types and (2) to identify associations between FCR, demographics, medical characteristics, information

  6. Bevacizumab with metronomic chemotherapy of low-dose oral cyclophosphamide in recurrent cervical cancer: Four cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Isono-Nakata

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Standard chemotherapy for women with advanced or recurrent cervical cancer involves a combination of paclitaxel, platinum, and bevacizumab. However, for patients who experience anaphylaxis in response to paclitaxel or platinum, have permanent peripheral neuropathy, or develop early recurrence or progressive disease during first-line chemotherapy, the development of a non-taxane non-platinum regimen is mandatory. Clinical trials using anti-angiogenic treatment demonstrated favorable outcomes in cases of highly vascularized cervical cancer. Metronomic chemotherapy has been considered an anti-angiogenic treatment, although its use in combination with bevacizumab has not been studied in cervical cancer. We treated four patients with recurrent cervical cancer with 50 mg of oral cyclophosphamide daily and 15 mg/kg of intravenous bevacizumab every 3 weeks (CFA-BEV. One patient experienced disease progression after 4 months, whereas the other three patients continued the regimen until their last follow-up at 13, 14, and 15 months, respectively. One patient suffered from grade 3 neutropenia; however, no grade 2 or higher non-hematological toxicities were observed. These cases demonstrate the use of CFA-BEV with minimal toxicity and expected anti-cancer activity and indicate that this regimen should be considered for second-line chemotherapy in advanced recurrent cervical cancer. Keywords: Cervical cancer, Metronomic chemotherapy, Bevacizumab

  7. Risks of Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer. Having hepatitis or cirrhosis can increase the risk of developing liver cancer. Anything that increases the ... clinical trials is available from the NCI website . Risks of Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Screening Key Points Screening ...

  8. Work stress and risk of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heikkilä, Katriina; Nyberg, Solja T; Theorell, Töres

    2013-01-01

    To investigate whether work related stress, measured and defined as job strain, is associated with the overall risk of cancer and the risk of colorectal, lung, breast, or prostate cancers.......To investigate whether work related stress, measured and defined as job strain, is associated with the overall risk of cancer and the risk of colorectal, lung, breast, or prostate cancers....

  9. Amplification of LAPTM4B and YWHAZ contributes to chemotherapy resistance and recurrence of breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szallasi, Zoltan Imre; Li, Yang; Zou, Lihua

    2010-01-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer after surgery has effectively lowered metastatic recurrence rates. However, a considerable proportion of women suffer recurrent cancer at distant metastatic sites despite adjuvant treatment. Identification of the genes crucial for tumor response to specific...... chemotherapy drugs is a challenge but is necessary to improve outcomes. By using integrated genomics, we identified a small number of overexpressed and amplified genes from chromosome 8q22 that were associated with early disease recurrence despite anthracycline-based adjuvant chemotherapy. We confirmed...... that 8q22 amplification and overexpression of LAPTM4B and YWHAZ contribute to de novo chemoresistance to anthracyclines and are permissive for metastatic recurrence. Overexpression of these two genes may predict anthracycline resistance and influence selection of chemotherapy....

  10. Radiotherapy of the chest wall following mastectomy for early-stage breast cancer: impact on local recurrence and overall survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janni, Wolfgang; Dimpfl, Thomas; Braun, Stephan; Knobbe, Angelika; Peschers, Ursula; Rjosk, Dorothea; Lampe, Bjoern; Genz, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Introduction: Recent studies have renewed an old controversy about the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy following mastectomy for breast cancer. Radiotherapy is usually recommended for advanced disease, but whether or not to use it in pT1-T2 pN0 situations is still being debated. This study was designed to clarify whether or not routine radiotherapy of the chest wall following mastectomy reduces the risk of local recurrence and if it influences the overall survival rate. Methods: Retrospective analysis of patients treated with mastectomy for pT1-T2 pN0 tumors and no systemic treatment. Patients treated with radiotherapy of the chest wall following mastectomy (Group A) are compared with those treated with mastectomy alone (Group B). Results: A total of 918 patients underwent mastectomy. Patients who received adjuvant radiotherapy after mastectomy (n = 114) had a significantly lower risk for local recurrence. Ten years after the primary diagnosis, 98.1% of the patients with radiotherapy were disease free compared to 86.4% of the patients without radiotherapy. The average time interval from primary diagnosis until local recurrence was 8.9 years in Group A and 2.8 years in Group B. The Cox regression analysis including radiotherapy, tumor size and tumor grading found the highest risk for local recurrence for patients without radiotherapy (p < 0.0004). In terms of overall survival however, the Kaplan-Meier analysis showed no difference between the two groups (p = 0.8787) and the Cox regression analysis failed to show any impact on overall survival. Conclusion: With observation spanning over 35 years, this study shows that adjuvant radiotherapy of the chest wall following mastectomy reduces the risk for local recurrence in node-negative patients with pT1-T2 tumors but has no impact on the overall survival rate

  11. Recurrence risk of congenital anomalies - the impact of paternal, social, and environmental factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basso, Olga; Olsen, Jørn; Christensen, Kaare

    1999-01-01

    was associated with a lower recurrence risk (OR = 0.67, 95% CI 0.45, 0.99, for the middle status group and OR = 0.49, 95% CI 0.30, 0.81, for the highest status group), independently of partner change. A rise in social status between the two births was marginally associated with a decline in the recurrence risk...

  12. Risk Factors for the Postoperative Recurrence of Instability After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair in Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Nakagawa, Shigeto; Mae, Tatsuo; Sato, Seira; Okimura, Shinichiro; Kuroda, Miki

    2017-01-01

    Background: Several risk factors for the postoperative recurrence of instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair have been reported, but there have been few detailed investigations of the specific risk factors in relation to the type of sport. Purpose: This study investigated the postoperative recurrence of instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair without additional reinforcement procedures in competitive athletes, including athletes with a large glenoid defect. The purpose of this stu...

  13. Intra-abdominal recurrence of colorectal cancer detected by radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS system)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sardi, A.; Workman, M.; Mojzisik, C.; Hinkle, G.; Nieroda, C.; Martin, E.W. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Since 1986, 32 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer have undergone second-look radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS system). The primary tumor was located in the right and transverse colon in 11 patients, left and sigmoid colon in 16, and rectum in five. The carcinoembryonic antigen level was elevated in 30 patients (94%); all patients underwent a computed tomographic scan of the abdomen and pelvis. The overall sensitivity of the computed tomographic scan was 41% (abdomen other than liver, 27%; liver, 58%; and pelvis, 22%). The RIGS system identified recurrent tumor in 81% of the patients. The most common site of metastasis was the liver (41%), independent of the primary location. Local/regional recurrences alone accounted for 40% of all recurrences. In six patients (18%), recurrent tumor was found only with the RIGS system. The RIGS system is more dependable in localizing clinically obscure metastases than other methods, and carcinoembryonic antigen testing remains the most accurate preoperative method to indicate suspected recurrences

  14. Diagnosis of recurrent gastric cancer at the surgical anastomosis with endoscopic US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lightdale, C.J.; Botet, J.F.; Brennan, M.F.; Coit, D.G.; Knapper, W.H.; Bains, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    Endoscopic US was used to examine 40 patients following resection of gastric cancer, all with CT scans negative for recurrence in the area of the surgical anastomosis. Endoscopic US was performed with the Olympus GF-UM2/EU-M2 7.5-MHz system. There were 24 patients proved by endoscopy (n = 18) or surgery (n = six) to have anastomotic recurrence and 16 without recurrence (follow-up, 6-11 months). Endoscopic US correctly identified 23 of 24 patients with anastomotic recurrence, with one false-negative study, and absence of recurrence in 13 of 16, with three false-positive studies. The sensitivity was 95%, the specificity 80%, the positive accuracy 88%, and the negative predictive accuracy 92%

  15. Structural genomic variation as risk factor for idiopathic recurrent miscarriage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagirnaja, Liina; Palta, Priit; Kasak, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent miscarriage (RM) is a multifactorial disorder with acknowledged genetic heritability that affects ∼3% of couples aiming at childbirth. As copy number variants (CNVs) have been shown to contribute to reproductive disease susceptibility, we aimed to describe genome-wide profile of CNVs an...

  16. Reducing recurrence in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer using photodynamic diagnosis and immediate post-transurethral resection of the bladder chemoprophylaxis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risager, Malene Bøg; Nielsen, Tommy Kjærgaard; Zieger, Karsten Egbert Arnold

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of fluorescence cystoscopy and immediate post-transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB) chemoprophylaxis on the risk of recurrence of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) under routine clinical conditions. Materials...

  17. Prognostic Impact of 21-Gene Recurrence Score in Patients With Stage IV Breast Cancer: TBCRC 013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Tari A; Lyman, Jaclyn P; Gonen, Mithat; Voci, Amy; De Brot, Marina; Boafo, Camilla; Sing, Amy Pratt; Hwang, E Shelley; Alvarado, Michael D; Liu, Minetta C; Boughey, Judy C; McGuire, Kandace P; Van Poznak, Catherine H; Jacobs, Lisa K; Meszoely, Ingrid M; Krontiras, Helen; Babiera, Gildy V; Norton, Larry; Morrow, Monica; Hudis, Clifford A

    2016-07-10

    The objective of this study was to determine whether the 21-gene Recurrence Score (RS) provides clinically meaningful information in patients with de novo stage IV breast cancer enrolled in the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC) 013. TBCRC 013 was a multicenter prospective registry that evaluated the role of surgery of the primary tumor in patients with de novo stage IV breast cancer. From July 2009 to April 2012, 127 patients from 14 sites were enrolled; 109 (86%) patients had pretreatment primary tumor samples suitable for 21-gene RS analysis. Clinical variables, time to first progression (TTP), and 2-year overall survival (OS) were correlated with the 21-gene RS by using log-rank, Kaplan-Meier, and Cox regression. Median patient age was 52 years (21 to 79 years); the majority had hormone receptor-positive/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative (72 [66%]) or hormone receptor-positive/HER2-positive (20 [18%]) breast cancer. At a median follow-up of 29 months, median TTP was 20 months (95% CI, 16 to 26 months), and median survival was 49 months (95% CI, 40 months to not reached). An RS was generated for 101 (93%) primary tumor samples: 22 (23%) low risk (< 18), 29 (28%) intermediate risk (18 to 30); and 50 (49%) high risk (≥ 31). For all patients, RS was associated with TTP (P = .01) and 2-year OS (P = .04). In multivariable Cox regression models among 69 patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive/HER2-negative cancer, RS was independently prognostic for TTP (hazard ratio, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.05 to 1.86; P = .02) and 2-year OS (hazard ratio, 1.83; 95% CI, 1.14 to 2.95; P = .013). The 21-gene RS is independently prognostic for both TTP and 2-year OS in ER-positive/HER2-negative de novo stage IV breast cancer. Prospective validation is needed to determine the potential role for this assay in the clinical management of this patient subset. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  18. Local recurrences and distant metastases after breast-conservative treatments in a population at very low risk of recurrence are very dependent events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowen, Didier; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Houvenaeghel, Gilles; Viens, Patrice; Maraninchi, Dominique; Puig, Brigitte; Bardou, Valerie-Jeanne; Resbeut, Michel

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: Assessment of the relative merits of individual factors influencing the risks of loco-regional failure (LRF) and metastases (M) after breast-preserving treatments is made difficult by the marked inhomogeneities within the published series: short follow-up, use of chemotherapy, nodal status, margins of resection. We therefore selected a very homogenous population with an expected low-risk of recurrence to identify high-risk subgroups which may need more aggressive treatments. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between 1980 and 1995, 3697 women with breast cancer were referred to Paoli-Calmettes Cancer Center, Marseille. Patients included in the study had undergone axillary dissection and were node negative (n=1840), were treated with conservative surgery (usually lumpectomy) and standard radiotherapy (n=1241), had histological tumor sizes ≤ 50 mm, received no chemotherapy (n=1024), and had negative margins of resection (n=756). Hormonal therapy was given to 238 women (31.5%): castration for premenopausal women (n=92), tamoxifen for postmenopausal women (n=146). The following factors were entered in the univariate analysis: age (≤ 40 yrs. vs > 40 yrs.), menopausal status, hormonal treatment, peritumoral vessel invasion (PVI), histologic multifocality (HM), extensive intraductal component (EIC), estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status, SBR grade (I vs II vs III) and histological size (≤20 mm vs >20 mm). Factors statistically significant (p + and 72.1% PR + tumors. PVI was found in 184 tumors and EIC only in 30 tumors whereas HM was found in 106 cases. There were 53 local recurrences, 8 locoregional failures and 65 metastases as first event. The yearly conditional event probability for LRF and M was 1.8% and 1.6% respectively, constant over the years. Five and ten-year freedom from recurrence rates were 92.7% [90.4%-94.9%] and 81.6% [76.2%-86.9%] respectively for LRFs, and 91.6% [89.2%-94%] and 83.6% [79%-88.1%] respectively for M. Patients with

  19. Relationship Between Quantitative GRB7 RNA Expression and Recurrence after Adjuvant Anthracycline Chemotherapy in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparano, Joseph A.; Goldstein, Lori J.; Childs, Barrett H.; Shak, Steven; Brassard, Diana; Badve, Sunil; Baehner, Frederick L.; Bugarini, Roberto; Rowley, Steve; Perez, Edith; Shulman, Lawrence N.; Martino, Silvana; Davidson, Nancy E.; Kenny, Paraic A.; Sledge, George W.; Gray, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To perform an exploratory analysis of the relationship between gene expression and recurrence in patients with operable triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) treated with adjuvant doxorubicin-containing chemotherapy. Experimental design RNA was extracted from archived tumor samples derived from 246 patients with stage I-III TNBC treated with adjuvant doxorubicin-containing chemotherapy, and was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR for a panel of 374 genes. The relationship between gene expression and recurrence was evaluated using weighted Cox proportional hazards model score tests. Results GRB7 was the only gene for which higher expression was significantly associated with increased recurrence in TNBC (Korn’s adjusted p value=0.04). In a Cox proportional hazards model adjusted for clinicopathologic features, higher GRB7 expression was associated with an increased recurrence risk (HR 2.31, p=0.04 using the median as the split). The 5-year recurrence rates were 10.5% (95% confidence intervals [CI] 7.8%, 14.1%) in the low and 20.4% (95% CI 16.5%, 25.0%) in the high GRB7 groups. External validation in other datasets indicated that GRB7 expression was not prognostic in two adjuvant trials including variable systemic therapy, but in two other trials showed that high GBR7 expression was associated with resistance to neoadjuvant doxorubicin and taxane therapy. Conclusions GRB7 was associated with an increased risk of recurrence in TNBC, suggesting that GRB7 or GRB7-dependent pathways may serve as potential biomarkers for therapeutic targets. Therapeutic targeting of one or more factors identified which function as interaction nodes or effectors should also be considered. PMID:21933890

  20. Relationship between quantitative GRB7 RNA expression and recurrence after adjuvant anthracycline chemotherapy in triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparano, Joseph A; Goldstein, Lori J; Childs, Barrett H; Shak, Steven; Brassard, Diana; Badve, Sunil; Baehner, Frederick L; Bugarini, Roberto; Rowley, Steve; Perez, Edith A; Shulman, Lawrence N; Martino, Silvana; Davidson, Nancy E; Kenny, Paraic A; Sledge, George W; Gray, Robert

    2011-11-15

    To conduct an exploratory analysis of the relationship between gene expression and recurrence in patients with operable triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) treated with adjuvant doxorubicin-containing chemotherapy. RNA was extracted from archived tumor samples derived from 246 patients with stage I-III TNBC treated with adjuvant doxorubicin-containing chemotherapy, and was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR for a panel of 374 genes. The relationship between gene expression and recurrence was evaluated using weighted Cox proportional hazards model score tests. Growth factor receptor bound protein 7 (GRB7) was the only gene for which higher expression was significantly associated with increased recurrence in TNBC (Korn's adjusted P value = 0.04). In a Cox proportional hazards model adjusted for clinicopathologic features, higher GRB7 expression was associated with an increased recurrence risk (HR = 2.31; P = 0.04 using the median as the split). The 5-year recurrence rates were 10.5% [95% confidence intervals (CI), 7.8-14.1] in the low and 20.4% (95% CI, 16.5-25.0) in the high GRB7 groups. External validation in other datasets indicated that GRB7 expression was not prognostic in two adjuvant trials including variable systemic therapy, but in two other trials showed that high GBR7 expression was associated with resistance to neoadjuvant doxorubicin and taxane therapy. GRB7 was associated with an increased risk of recurrence in TNBC, suggesting that GRB7 or GRB7-dependent pathways may serve as potential biomarkers for therapeutic targets. Therapeutic targeting of one or more factors identified which function as interaction nodes or effectors should also be considered.

  1. Gender Differences in Risk Factors for Single and Recurrent Falls Among the Community-Dwelling Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Mei O

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify gender differences in risk factors of fall accidents among older people, and whether these factors differ between single and recurrent fallers. A total of 4,426 individuals aged ≥65 years from two large-scale health surveys provided data. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify risk factors and to determine the risk model for falling and recurrent falling in men and women separately. Three major risk factors for falling regardless of gender or fall history are fear of falling, limitations in activities of daily living (ADL, and age ≥75 years. Fear of falling remains one of the common modifiable risk factors. Among those without a fall history, the use of sedatives or tranquilizers increases the risk of falling. Regarding gender differences, ADL limitations and fear of falling appear to be stronger fall risk factors for men than for women. Among women, alcohol use and educational level are significant risk factors for falling, while loneliness is associated with recurrent falling. Men with fear of falling or ADL limitations are at higher risk to have a recurrent fall accident than women with these conditions. Having a visual impairment or living with someone is associated with recurrent falling among men. Our findings emphasize the importance of multifactorial fall interventions, taking into account a variety of subgroup characteristics such as gender and fall history.

  2. 21-Gene Recurrence Score and Locoregional Recurrence in Node-Positive/ER-Positive Breast Cancer Treated With Chemo-Endocrine Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamounas, Eleftherios P; Liu, Qing; Paik, Soonmyung; Baehner, Frederick L; Tang, Gong; Jeong, Jong-Hyeon; Kim, S Rim; Butler, Steven M; Jamshidian, Farid; Cherbavaz, Diana B; Sing, Amy P; Shak, Steven; Julian, Thomas B; Lembersky, Barry C; Wickerham, D Lawrence; Costantino, Joseph P; Wolmark, Norman

    2017-01-01

    The 21-gene recurrence score (RS) predicts risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) in node-negative, estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer. We evaluated the association between RS and LRR in node-positive, ER-positive patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy plus tamoxifen in National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B-28. B-28 compared doxorubicin/cyclophosphamide (AC X 4) with AC X 4 followed by paclitaxel X 4. Tamoxifen was given to patients age 50 years or older and those younger than age 50 years with ER-positive and/or progesterone receptor-positive tumors. Lumpectomy patients received breast radiotherapy. Mastectomy patients received no radiotherapy. The present study includes 1065 ER-positive, tamoxifen-treated patients with RS assessment. Cumulative incidence functions and subdistribution hazard regression models were used for LRR to account for competing risks including distant recurrence, second primary cancers, and death from other causes. Median follow-up was 11.2 years. All statistical tests were one-sided. There were 80 LRRs (7.5%) as first events (68% local/32% regional). RS was low: 36.2%; intermediate: 34.2%; and high: 29.6%. RS was a statistically significant predictor of LRR in univariate analyses (10-year cumulative incidence of LRR = 3.3%, 7.2%, and 12.2% for low, intermediate, and high RS, respectively, P < .001). In multivariable regression analysis, RS remained an independent predictor of LRR (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.59, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.28 to 5.26, for a 50-point difference, P = .008) along with pathologic nodal status (HR = 1.91, 95% CI = 1.20 to 3.03, for four or more vs one to three positive nodes, P = .006) and tumor size (HR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.05 to 1.55, for a 1 cm difference, P = .02). RS statistically significantly predicts risk of LRR in node-positive, ER-positive breast cancer patients after adjuvant chemotherapy plus tamoxifen. These findings can help in the selection of

  3. Can the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio be used to predict recurrence and progression of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebahattin Albayrak

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to evaluate whether neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR is a predictor of disease progression and recurrence in patients with primary non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC. This was a prospective study of 86 patients with newly diagnosed NMIBC. The patients were classified by the number of points assigned by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer risk tables. The correlation between progression score, recurrence score, age, mean platelet volume, red blood cell distribution width and NLR was assessed statistically. The same parameters were compared between the risk groups. A significant difference in NLR and age values was observed between recurrence and progression risk score groups. The relationships between NLR and recurrence and progression risk scores were no longer significant after correcting for the statistical effect of age on scores. Age was significantly different between groups after adjusting for NLR. Our study revealed that NLR and age were associated with patient age and bladder tumor progression and recurrence risk scores. After correcting for age, the significant relationship with NLR was lost, in contrast to some previous studies. We recommend that patient age should be corrected to avoid misleading results in NLR studies.

  4. Menopausal status dependence of the timing of breast cancer recurrence after surgical removal of the primary tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demicheli, Romano; Bonadonna, Gianni; Hrushesky, William JM; Retsky, Michael W; Valagussa, Pinuccia

    2004-01-01

    Information on the metastasis process in breast cancer patients undergoing primary tumour removal may be extracted from an analysis of the timing of clinical recurrence. The hazard rate for local-regional and/or distant recurrence as the first event during the first 4 years after surgery was studied in 1173 patients undergoing mastectomy alone as primary treatment for operable breast cancer. Subset analyses were performed according to tumour size, axillary nodal status and menopausal status. A sharp two-peaked hazard function was observed for node-positive pre-menopausal patients, whereas results from node-positive post-menopausal women always displayed a single broad peak. The first narrow peak among pre-menopausal women showed a very steep rise to a maximum about 8–10 months after mastectomy. The second peak was considerably broader, reaching its maximum at 28–30 months. Post-menopausal patients displayed a wide, nearly symmetrical peak with maximum risk at about 18–20 months. Peaks displayed increasing height with increasing axillary lymph node involvement. No multi-peaked pattern was evident for either pre-menopausal or post-menopausal node-negative patients; however, this finding should be considered cautiously because of the limited number of events. Tumour size influenced recurrence risk but not its timing. Findings resulting from the different subsets of patients were remarkably coherent and each observed peak maintained the same position on the time axis in all analysed subsets. The risk of early recurrence for node positive patients is dependent on menopausal status. The amount of axillary nodal involvement and the tumour size modulate the risk value at any given time. For pre-menopausal node-positive patients, the abrupt increase of the first narrow peak of the recurrence risk suggests a triggering event that synchronises early risk. We suggest that this event is the surgical removal of the primary tumour. The later, broader, more symmetrical risk

  5. Complex pattern of colon cancer recurrence including a kidney metastasis: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Waleczek, Helfried; Wente, Moritz N; Kozianka, Jürgen

    2005-01-01

    We report a case of a 77-year-old female with a local recurrence of cancer after right hemicolectomy which infiltrated the pancreatic head affording pancrea-toduodenectomy, who developed 3 years later recurrent tumor masses localized in the mesentery of the jejunum and in the lower pole of the left kidney. Partial nephrectomy and a segment resection of the small bowel were performed. Histological examination of both specimens revealed a necrotic metastasis of the primary carcinoma of the colo...

  6. Mechanisms driving local breast cancer recurrence in a model of breast-conserving surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smith, Myles J

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to identify mechanisms driving local recurrence in a model of breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for breast cancer. BACKGROUND: Breast cancer recurrence after BCS remains a clinically significant, but poorly understood problem. We have previously reported that recurrent colorectal tumours demonstrate altered growth dynamics, increased metastatic burden and resistance to apoptosis, mediated by upregulation of phosphoinositide-3-kinase\\/Akt (PI3K\\/Akt). We investigated whether similar characteristics were evident in a model of locally recurrent breast cancer. METHODS: Tumours were generated by orthotopic inoculation of 4T1 cells in two groups of female Balb\\/c mice and cytoreductive surgery performed when mean tumour size was above 150 mm(3). Local recurrence was observed and gene expression was examined using Affymetrix GeneChips in primary and recurrent tumours. Differential expression was confirmed with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Phosphorylation of Akt was assessed using Western immunoblotting. An ex vivo heat shock protein (HSP)-loaded dendritic cell vaccine was administered in the perioperative period. RESULTS: We observed a significant difference in the recurrent 4T1 tumour volume and growth rate (p < 0.05). Gene expression studies suggested roles for the PI3K\\/Akt system and local immunosuppression driving the altered growth kinetics. We demonstrated that perioperative vaccination with an ex vivo HSP-loaded dendritic cell vaccine abrogated recurrent tumour growth in vivo (p = 0.003 at day 15). CONCLUSION: Investigating therapies which target tumour survival pathways such as PI3K\\/Akt and boost immune surveillance in the perioperative period may be useful adjuncts to contemporary breast cancer treatment.

  7. Obesity and colorectal cancer risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hano Garcia, Olga Marina; Wood Rodriguez, Lisette; Villa Jimenez, Oscar Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic and multifactor disease characterized by presence of excess body fat harmful for health. Several studies have been conducted to assess the possible risk character of different factors for colorectal cancer including the following modifying factors: a diet rich in saturated fats, a diet low in vegetables, physical inactivity, alcohol consumption and obesity. A case-control study was conducted to include 276 adult patients (93 cases and 184 controls) consecutively seen from May, 2008 to May, 2009 in the Institute of Gastroenterology determining a possible association between obesity as risk factor and colorectal cancer. Variables measures included: sex, age, skin color, body mass index, hip-waist circumference and endoscopic location of cancer. We conclude that the colorectal cancer with predominance in female sex and in white people in both groups. Obesity according to a great relation hip-waist had an strong relation with colorectal cancer, which had predominance towards distal colon in both sexes

  8. Height and Breast Cancer Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Ben; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Delahanty, Ryan J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies have linked adult height with breast cancer risk in women. However, the magnitude of the association, particularly by subtypes of breast cancer, has not been established. Furthermore, the mechanisms of the association remain unclear. METHODS: We performed a meta......-analysis to investigate associations between height and breast cancer risk using data from 159 prospective cohorts totaling 5216302 women, including 113178 events. In a consortium with individual-level data from 46325 case patients and 42482 control patients, we conducted a Mendelian randomization analysis using...... a genetic score that comprised 168 height-associated variants as an instrument. This association was further evaluated in a second consortium using summary statistics data from 16003 case patients and 41335 control patients. RESULTS: The pooled relative risk of breast cancer was 1.17 (95% confidence...

  9. Salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy for local prostate cancer recurrence after radical radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Solodkiy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies salvage interstitial radiation therapy for recurrent prostate cancer, launched at the end of the XX century. In recent years, more and more attention is paid to high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT as a method of treating local recurrence.The purpose of research – preliminary clinical results of salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy applied in cases of suspected local recurrence or of residual tumour after radiotherapy.Preliminary findings indicate the possibility of using HDR-BT, achieving local tumor control with low genitourinary toxicity.

  10. Local Recurrence in Rectal Cancer: Anatomic Localization and Effect on Radiation Target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syk, Erik; Torkzad, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Lennart; Nilsson, Per J.; Glimelius, Bengt

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the sites of local recurrence after total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer in an effort to optimize the radiation target. Methods and Materials: A total of 155 patients with recurrence after abdominal resection for rectal cancer were identified from a population-based consecutive cohort of 2,315 patients who had undergone surgery by surgeons trained in the total mesorectal excision procedure. A total of 99 cross-sectional imaging studies were retrieved and re-examined by one radiologist. The clinical records were examined for the remaining patients. Results: Evidence of residual mesorectal fat was identified in 50 of the 99 patients. In 83 patients, local recurrence was identified on the imaging studies. All recurrences were within the irradiated volume if the patients had undergone preoperative radiotherapy or within the same volume if they had not. The site of recurrence was in the lower 75% of the pelvis, anatomically below the S1-S2 interspace for all patients. Only 5 of the 44 recurrences in patients with primary tumors >5 cm from the anal verge were in the lowest 20% of the pelvis. Six recurrences involved the lateral lymph nodes. Conclusion: These data suggest that a lowering of the upper limit of the clinical target volume could be introduced. The anal sphincter complex with surrounding tissue could also be excluded in patients with primary tumors >5 cm from the anal verge

  11. Compliance of patients concerning recommended radiotherapy in breast cancer. Association with recurrence, age, and hormonal therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winzer, K.J.; Gruber, C.; Badakhshi, H.; Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin; Hinkelbein, M.; Denkert, C.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: In this study, we investigated how often guidelines for radiation therapy in patients with breast cancer are not complied with, which patient group is mostly affected, and how this influences local recurrence. Patients and methods: All patients (n = 1,903) diagnosed between November 2003 and December 2008 with primary invasive or intraductal breast cancer in the interdisciplinary breast center of the Charite Hospital Berlin were included and followed for a median 2.18 years. Results: Patients who, in contrast to the recommendation of the interdisciplinary tumor board, did not undergo postoperative radiation experienced a fivefold higher local recurrence rate (p < 0.0005), corresponding to a 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival of 74.5% in this group. The 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival of patients following the recommendations was 93.3%. Guideline compliance was dependent on age of patients, acceptance of adjuvant hormonal treatment or chemotherapy, and increased diameter of the primary tumor. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed an association between compliance and age or hormonal therapy. Conclusion: In order to avoid local recurrence patients should be motivated to comply with guideline driven therapy. Since a higher number of local recurrences is observed in health services research compared to clinical research, studies on the value of adjuvant treatment following local recurrence should be performed. (orig.)

  12. MRI surveillance for the detection of local recurrence in rectal cancer after transanal endoscopic microsurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupkens, Britt J.P.; Martens, Milou H. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maas, Monique [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Deserno, Willem M.L.L.G. [Laurentius Hospital, Department of Radiology, Roermond (Netherlands); Leijtens, Jeroen W.A. [Laurentius Hospital, Department of Surgery, Roermond (Netherlands); Nelemans, Patty J. [Maastricht University, Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Bakers, Frans C.H. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Lambregts, Doenja M.J. [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Beets, Geerard L. [GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Department of Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Beets-Tan, Regina G.H. [GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-12-15

    To evaluate diagnostic performance of follow-up MRI for detection of local recurrence of rectal cancer after transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM). Between January 2006 and February 2014, 81 patients who underwent TEM were included. Two expert readers (R1 and R2), independently evaluated T2-weighted (T2W) MRI and diffusion-weighted (DWI) MRI for the detection of local recurrence, retrospectively, and recorded confidence on a five-point scale. Diagnostic performance of follow-up MRI was assessed using ROC-curve analysis and kappa statistics for the reproducibility between readers. 293 MRIs were performed, 203 included DWI. 18 (22%) patients developed a local recurrence: luminal 11, nodal two and both five. Areas under the curve (AUCs) for local recurrence detection were 0.72 (R1) and 0.80 (R2) for T2W-MRI. For DWI, AUCs were 0.70 (R1) and 0.89 (R2). For nodal recurrence AUCs were 0.72 (R1) and 0.80 (R2) for T2W-MRI. Reproducibility was good for T2W-MRI (κ0.68 for luminal and κ0.71 for nodal recurrence) and moderate for DWI (κ0.57). AUCs and reproducibility for recurrence detection increased during follow-up. Follow-up with MRI after TEM for rectal cancer is feasible. Postoperative changes can be confusing at the first postoperative MRI, but during follow-up diagnostic performance and reproducibility increase. (orig.)

  13. MRI surveillance for the detection of local recurrence in rectal cancer after transanal endoscopic microsurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hupkens, Britt J.P.; Martens, Milou H.; Maas, Monique; Deserno, Willem M.L.L.G.; Leijtens, Jeroen W.A.; Nelemans, Patty J.; Bakers, Frans C.H.; Lambregts, Doenja M.J.; Beets, Geerard L.; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate diagnostic performance of follow-up MRI for detection of local recurrence of rectal cancer after transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM). Between January 2006 and February 2014, 81 patients who underwent TEM were included. Two expert readers (R1 and R2), independently evaluated T2-weighted (T2W) MRI and diffusion-weighted (DWI) MRI for the detection of local recurrence, retrospectively, and recorded confidence on a five-point scale. Diagnostic performance of follow-up MRI was assessed using ROC-curve analysis and kappa statistics for the reproducibility between readers. 293 MRIs were performed, 203 included DWI. 18 (22%) patients developed a local recurrence: luminal 11, nodal two and both five. Areas under the curve (AUCs) for local recurrence detection were 0.72 (R1) and 0.80 (R2) for T2W-MRI. For DWI, AUCs were 0.70 (R1) and 0.89 (R2). For nodal recurrence AUCs were 0.72 (R1) and 0.80 (R2) for T2W-MRI. Reproducibility was good for T2W-MRI (κ0.68 for luminal and κ0.71 for nodal recurrence) and moderate for DWI (κ0.57). AUCs and reproducibility for recurrence detection increased during follow-up. Follow-up with MRI after TEM for rectal cancer is feasible. Postoperative changes can be confusing at the first postoperative MRI, but during follow-up diagnostic performance and reproducibility increase. (orig.)

  14. Recurrence of Subdural Haematoma in a Population-Based Cohort - Risks and Predictive Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linnea Schmidt

    Full Text Available To estimate the risks of and identify predictors for recurrent subdural haematoma in surgically and conservatively treated patients.The cohort comprised all individuals diagnosed with a first-time subdural hematoma in Denmark 1996-2011. Information on potential predictors was retrieved from the Danish health registers. Cumulative recurrence risks were estimated using the Aalen-Johansen estimator. Rate ratios (RR were estimated using Poisson regression.Among 10,158 individuals with a subdural hematoma, 1,555 had a recurrent event. The cumulative risk of recurrent subdural hematoma was 9% at 4 weeks after the primary bleeding, increasing to and stabilising at 14% after one year. Predictors associated with recurrence were: Male sex (RR 1.60, 95% CI:1.43-1.80, older age (>70 years compared to 20-49 years; RR 1.41, 95% CI: 1.21-1.65, alcohol addiction (RR 1.20, 95% CI:1.04-1.37, surgical treatment (RR 1.76, 95% CI:1.58-1.96, trauma diagnoses (RR 1.14, 95% CI:1.03-1.27, and diabetes mellitus (RR 1.40, 95% CI:1.11-1.74. Out of a selected combination of risk factors, the highest cumulative 1-year recurrence risks for subdural hematoma of 25% (compared to 14% for all patients was found in surgically treated males with diabetes mellitus.The recurrence risk of subdural hematoma is largely limited to the first year. Patient characteristics including co-morbidities greatly influence the recurrence risk of SDH, suggesting that individualized prognostic guidance and follow-up is needed.

  15. Recurrence of Subdural Haematoma in a Population-Based Cohort – Risks and Predictive Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Linnea; Gørtz, Sanne; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Melbye, Mads; Munch, Tina Noergaard

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the risks of and identify predictors for recurrent subdural haematoma in surgically and conservatively treated patients. Methods The cohort comprised all individuals diagnosed with a first-time subdural hematoma in Denmark 1996–2011. Information on potential predictors was retrieved from the Danish health registers. Cumulative recurrence risks were estimated using the Aalen-Johansen estimator. Rate ratios (RR) were estimated using Poisson regression. Results Among 10,158 individuals with a subdural hematoma, 1,555 had a recurrent event. The cumulative risk of recurrent subdural hematoma was 9% at 4 weeks after the primary bleeding, increasing to and stabilising at 14% after one year. Predictors associated with recurrence were: Male sex (RR 1.60, 95% CI:1.43–1.80), older age (>70 years compared to 20–49 years; RR 1.41, 95% CI: 1.21–1.65), alcohol addiction (RR 1.20, 95% CI:1.04–1.37), surgical treatment (RR 1.76, 95% CI:1.58–1.96), trauma diagnoses (RR 1.14, 95% CI:1.03–1.27), and diabetes mellitus (RR 1.40, 95% CI:1.11–1.74). Out of a selected combination of risk factors, the highest cumulative 1-year recurrence risks for subdural hematoma of 25% (compared to 14% for all patients) was found in surgically treated males with diabetes mellitus. Conclusions The recurrence risk of subdural hematoma is largely limited to the first year. Patient characteristics including co-morbidities greatly influence the recurrence