WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer radiation therapy

  1. Radiation Therapy for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation therapy is a type of cancer treatment that uses high doses of radiation to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Learn about the types of radiation, why side effects happen, which ones you might have, and more.

  2. Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is almost always due to smoking. TREATING LUNG CANCER Lung cancer treatment depends on several factors, including the ... org TARGETING CANCER CARE Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer Lung cancer is the second most common cancer in ...

  3. Radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Katsumasa

    2001-01-01

    In Japan, where the mortality rate of prostate cancer is lower than in Western countries, radical prostatectomy or hormonal therapy has been applied more frequently than radiation therapy. However, the number of patients with prostate cancer has been increasing recently and the importance of radiation therapy has rapidly been recognized. Although there have been no randomized trials, results from several institutions in Western countries suggest that similar results of cancer control are achieved with either radiation therapy or radical prostatectomy. For higher-risk cases, conformal high-dose therapy or adjuvant hormonal therapy is more appropriate. In this article, the results of radiation therapy for prostate cancer were reviewed, with a view to the appropriate choice of therapy in Japan. (author)

  4. Internal Radiation Therapy for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    When getting internal radiation therapy, a source of radiation is put inside your body, in either liquid or solid form. It can be used treat different kinds of cancer, including thyroid, head and neck, breast, cervix, prostate, and eye. Learn more about how what to expect when getting internal radiation therapy.

  5. Prostate Cancer (Radiation Therapy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be considered carefully, balancing the advantages against the disadvantages as they relate to the individual man's age, ... therapy with photon or x-rays: Uses advanced technology to tailor the x-ray or photon radiation ...

  6. Radiation Therapy for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can cause pain. Radiation given to shrink a tumor near the esophagus , which can interfere with a patient’s ability to eat and drink. How is radiation therapy planned for an individual ... show the location of a patient’s tumor and the normal areas around it. These scans ...

  7. Radiation therapy of gynecological cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nori, D.; Hilaris, B.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book consists of three parts: General Principles; Clinical Applications; and Special Topics. Some of the papers are: Introduction to Basic Radiobiology; Staging and Work-up Procedures for Patients with Gynecological Cancers; Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Cancer of the Cervix; Role of Interstitial Implantation in Gynecological Cancer; Role of Radiocolloids in Gynecological Cancer; Radiosensitizers and Protectors; and Management of Lymphoma Associated with Pregnancy

  8. Radiation therapy for gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobelbower, R.R.; Bagne, F.; Ajlouni, M.I.; Milligan, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the stomach is a moderately radioresponsive neoplasm. Attempts to treat patients with unresectable disease with external beam radiation therapy alone have generally failed because of problems with tumor localization and adequate dose delivery as well as the inherent radioresponsiveness of the gastric mucosa and the organs intimately related to the stomach. Combining external beam therapy and chemotherapy (acting as a systemic agent and as a radiosensitizer) seems to be of some (albeit limited) benefit in the management of unresectable adenocarcinoma of the stomach. Optimum combinations of radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and radiation sensitizers in this situation remain to be determined. The authors discuss strides which have been made in the treatment of gastric cancer. They also address the unanswered clinical questions which remain regarding the use of radiation therapy in the treatment of this highly lethal disease

  9. Radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Bridget F; Lee, W Robert

    2013-07-01

    Radiation therapy is an effective treatment for newly diagnosed prostate cancer, salvage treatment, or for palliation of advanced disease. Herein we briefly discuss the indications, results, and complications associated with brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy, when used as monotherapy and in combination with each other or androgen deprivation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. External Beam Radiation Therapy for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    External beam radiation therapy is used to treat many types of cancer. it is a local treatment, where a machine aims radiation at your cancer. Learn more about different types of external beam radiation therapy, and what to expect if you're receiving treatment.

  11. Missed Radiation Therapy and Cancer Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients who miss radiation therapy sessions during cancer treatment have an increased risk of their disease returning, even if they eventually complete their course of radiation treatment, according to a new study.

  12. Radiation therapy for prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Akira; Minowada, Shigeru; Tomoishi, Junzo; Kinoshita, Kenji; Matsuda, Tadayoshi

    1983-01-01

    A conformation radiotherapy system with collimators, whose openings can be controlled symmetrically by computerized techniques during rotational irradiation by a linear accelerator, has been developed for routine use in our hospital. Forty-four patients underwent radiation therapy, including this particular modality of radiotherapy, for prostatic cancer during the period of July 1976 through December 1981. Eight patients were classified as stage A, 10 stage B, 10 stage C, and 16 as stage D. Twenty-nine patients underwent conformation radiotherapy, two rotation radiotherapy, eight 2-port opposing technique radiotherapy, one 4-field radiotherapy, and four underwent a combination of 2-port opposing technique and conformation radiotherapy. Transient mild side effects such as diarrhea occurred in seven cases, while severe side effects such as rectal stricture or contracted bladder occurred in three cases. The latter occurred only in one case among 29 of conformation radiotherapy and in two among eight of 2-port opposing technique radiotherapy. The results of the treatment of short intervals in stage B, C, and D are as follows: prostatic size was reduced in 26 cases among 36, serum acid phosphatase level was reduced in 15 among 18 who had showed high acid phosphatase levels before treatment, although almost all cases underwent simultaneous hormonal therapy. The effects of radiotherapy alone were verified in two cases of stage B in which radiotherapy preceded hormonal therapy. Prostatic size and serum acid phosphatase level were reduced by radiotherapy alone. (author)

  13. Targeted Radiation Therapy for Cancer Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-08-2-0174 TITLE: Targeted Radiation Therapy for Cancer Initiative PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dusten Macdonald, MD...for Cancer Initiative 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Dusten Macdonald, MD 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...Cancer Initiative Final Report INTRODUCTION: The full potential of radiation therapy has not been realized due to the inability to locate and

  14. Radiation therapy for operable rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondar, G.V.; Semikoz, N.G.; Bashejev, V.Kh.; Borota, O.V.; Bondarenko, M.V.; Kiyashko, O.Yu.

    2012-01-01

    The authors present a review of the literature on modern tendencies of radiation therapy application to treatment of operable rectal cancer. Many randomized control studies compared the efficacy of combination of radiation therapy (pre-operative or post-operative) and surgery versus surgery only demonstrating various results. Meta-analysis of the data on efficacy of combination of radiation therapy and standard surgery revealed 22 randomized control studies (14 with pre-operative radiation therapy and 8 with post-operative radiation therapy) with total number of 8507 patients (Colorectal Cancer Collaborative Group, 2000). The use of combination treatment reduced the number of isolated locoregional relapses both with pre-operative (22.5 - 12.5 %; p < 0.00001) and post-operative radiation therapy (25.8 - 16.7 %; p - 0.00001). The influence on total survival was not significant (62 % vs. 63 %; p - 0.06).

  15. Nonsurgical treatment for cancer using radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogi, Yasuo

    2012-01-01

    The number of people who are dying from cancer has been increasing in association with population aging. Radiation therapy is now one of the three major cancer treatment methods, along with surgery and chemotherapy. People used to consider radiation therapy only as a ''noninvasive cancer treatment''; however, with the ceaseless effort by medical experts and corporations, different radiation therapy types and techniques including the latest technical advances have come out one after another, and the improvements in radiation therapies have provided treatments that are not only less traumatizing to patients but also as effective and therapeutic as surgery in certain body regions. The importance of radiation therapy has become and will become even greater in the society with more elderly cancer patients who do not have the physical strength to undergo surgery. In this article, the history of radiation therapy, rapidly developed high-precision radiation therapy techniques, and unsolved issues are discussed, and then, ''MHI vero4DRT'', which is the high-precision image-guided radiation therapy equipment developed for solving such issues, is introduced. (author)

  16. Hemostatic radiation therapy in advanced gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novaes, P.E.R.S.; Possik, R.A.; Peres, O.; Abrao, A.

    1987-01-01

    Nine patients with advanced bleeding gastric cancer are treated with 4MVC linear accelerator or cobaltotherapy inparallel opposed fields to epigastric region. The radiation therapy is employed as an hemostatic procedure and the results of treatment are analysed. The doses ranged of 1000 rad to 4000 rad, 150 to 300 rad/day, five days a week. (M.A.C.) [pt

  17. Cancer of the larynx: radiation therapy. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.C.

    1976-01-01

    Radiation therapy is the treatment of choice for a T1 and T2 tumor with normal cord mobility and/or an exophytic lesion. It not only provides excellent control of the disease, but also preserves a good, useful voice in approximately 90 percent of the irradiated patients. For a T2 lesion with impaired cord mobility and/or moderate ulceration, a trial course of radiotherapy is initially given. If the tumor shows good regression and/or a return of normal cord mobility after a dose of 4000 rads, radiation therapy may be continued to a curative dose level, about 6500 rads. Surgery is reserved for treating residual disease six to eight weeks after radiation therapy or for recurrence. A T3 lesion with complete cord fixation and/or deep ulceration with nodes does not respond favorably to radiation therapy, and a planned combination of irradiation and laryngectomy is advised. Disease that extends beyond the larynx, T4, is rarely curable by radiation therapy alone. If the lesion is still operable, a combined approach of radiation and surgery is preferred; if not, palliative radiation therapy is given. Lymph node metastases from laryngeal carcinoma indicate advanced disease and is managed by preoperative irradiation and radical neck dissection. Under a program of therapeutic individualization, two-thirds to three-quarters of patients with cancer of the larynx can be cured by irradiation with preservation of a good, useful voice. In the remainder, the larynx must be sacrificed to save the patient's life. The ultimate control of laryngeal cancer lies in eradicating the extensive primary lesion and metastatic nodes, a common problem in the management of squamous cell carcinoma elsewhere in the body

  18. Radiation Therapy for Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... complete chart of side effects. Side effects of Skin Cancer Treatment OrganSystem General Body • cTo ( i D rme ... scrilineesnr/ desbuaoocrnfettedhh) e( ersatkrrieena) tment HELPFUL WEBSITES ON SKIN CANCER TARG E T I NG C A NC ...

  19. Radiation therapy for cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mileikowsky, C.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes an apparatus for irradiating a patient comprising: a source of a radiation beam directed along a radiation axis; means mounting the source for pivotal movement about a first horizontal axis which intersects the source, is stationary with respect to the apparatus, and extends in a direction substantially normal to the radiation axis, whereby the beam is capable of an angular scan in a vertical plane; table means adapted to support a patient to be irradiated; and suspension means mounted the table means for arcuate movement to any positions angularly spaced about the first horizontal axis and for pivoting movement about a second horizontal axis displacement from and substantially parallel to the first horizontal axis. The suspension means maintain the second horizontal axis in substantially intersecting relation to the radiation axis in each of the positions while maintaining a fixed angular position of the table means with respect to the environment

  20. Urothelial cancers following radiation therapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Seiji; Hasumi, Masaru; Sato, Jin; Mayuzumi, Takuji; Kumasaka, Fuminari; Shimizu, Toshihiro.

    1996-01-01

    Some reports have indicated that bladder cancer is induced by radiation therapy for cervical cancer. We encountered 6 cases of urothelial cancer (5 cases of bladder cancer and 1 case of ureter cancer) following radiation therapy for cervical cancer. Age at the time of diagnosis of cervical cancer ranged from 38 to 66 years, and the average was 51.2±11.0 (S.D.) years old. Age at the time of diagnosis of urothelial cancer ranged from 53 to 83 years, and the average was 67.5±10.3 years old. The interval between the diagnosis of cervical cancer and urothelial cancer ranged from 3 to 25 years, averaging 16.3 years. It is impossible to evaluate the risk of development of urothelial cancer after radiation therapy based on our data. However, it is important to make an effort to diagnose urothelial cancer at an early stage by educating patients (e.g., advising regular urine tests) after the follow-up period to cervical cancer. (author)

  1. Radiation Therapy in Elderly Skin Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hee [Keimyung University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    To evaluate the long term results (local control, survival, failure, and complications) after radiation therapy for skin cancer in elderly patients. The study spanned from January 1990 to October 2002. Fifteen elderly patients with skin cancer were treated by radiotherapy at the Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center. The age distribution of the patients surveyed was 72 to 95 years, with a median age of 78.8 years. The pathologic classification of the 15 patients included squamous cell carcinoma (10 patients), basal cell carcinoma (3 patients), verrucous carcinoma (1 patient) and skin adnexal origin carcinoma (1 patient). The most common tumor location was the head (13 patients). The mean tumor diameter was 4.9 cm (range 2 to 9 cm). The radiation dose was delivered via an electron beam of 6 to 15 MeV. The dose range was adjusted to the tumor diameter and depth of tumor invasion. The total radiation dose ranged from 50{approx}80 Gy (mean: 66 Gy) with a 2 Gy fractional dose prescribed to the 80% isodose line once a day and 5 times a week. One patient with lymph node metastasis was treated with six MV photon beams boosted with electron beams. The length of the follow-up periods ranged from 10 to 120 months with a median follow-up period of 48 months. The local control rates were 100% (15/15). In addition, the five year disease free survival rate (5YDFS) was 80% and twelve patients (80%) had no recurrence and skin cancer recurrence occurred in 3 patients (20%). Three patients have lived an average of 90 months (68{approx}120 months) without recurrence or metastasis. A total of 9 patients who died as a result of other causes had a mean survival time of 55.8 months after radiation therapy. No severe acute or chronic complications were observed after radiation therapy. Only minor complications including radiation dermatitis was treated with supportive care. The results suggest that radiation therapy is an effective and safe treatment method for the treatment of skin

  2. Liver cancer and selective internal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, C.

    2002-01-01

    Liver cancer is the biggest cancer-related killer of adults in the world. Liver cancer can be considered as two types: primary and secondary (metastatic). Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) is a revolutionary treatment for advanced liver cancer that utilises new technologies designed to deliver radiation directly to the site of tumours. SIRT, on the other hand, involves the delivery of millions of microscopic radioactive spheres called SIR-Spheres directly to the site of the liver tumour/s, where they selectively irradiate the tumours. The anti-cancer effect is concentrated in the liver and there is little effect on cancer at other sites such as the lungs or bones. The SIR-Spheres are delivered through a catheter placed in the femoral artery of the upper thigh and threaded through the hepatic artery (the major blood vessel of the liver) to the site of the tumour. The microscopic spheres, each approximately 35 microns (the size of four red blood cells or one-third the diameter of a strand of hair), are bonded to yttrium-90 (Y-90), a pure beta emitter with a physical half-life of 64.1 hours (about 2.67 days). The microspheres are trapped in the tumour's vascular bed, where they destroy the tumour from inside. The average range of the radiation is only 2.5 mm, so it is wholly contained within the patient's body; after 14 days, only 2.5 percent of the radioactive activity remains. The microspheres are suspended in water for injection. The vials are shipped in lead shields for radiation protection. Treatment with SIR-Spheres is generally not regarded as a cure, but has been shown to shrink the cancer more than chemotherapy alone. This can increase life expectancy and improve quality of life. On occasion, patients treated with SIR-Spheres have had such marked shrinkage of the liver cancer that the cancer can be surgically removed at a later date. This has resulted in a long-term cure for some patients. SIRTeX Medical Limited has developed three separate cancer

  3. External beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, Jeffrey D.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The intent of this course is to review the issues involved in the management of non-metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate. -- The value of pre-treatment prognostic factors including stage, grade and PSA value will be presented, and their value in determining therapeutic strategies will be discussed. -- Controversies involving the simulation process and treatment design will be presented. The value of CT scanning, Beams-Eye View, 3-D planning, intravesicle, intraurethral and rectal contrast will be presented. The significance of prostate and patient movement and strategies for dealing with them will be presented. -- The management of low stage, low to intermediate grade prostate cancer will be discussed. The dose, volume and timing of irradiation will be discussed as will the role of neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy, neutron irradiation and brachytherapy. The current status of radical prostatectomy and cryotherapy will be summarized. Treatment of locally advanced, poorly differentiated prostate cancer will be presented including a discussion of neo-adjuvant and adjuvant hormones, dose-escalation and neutron irradiation. -- Strategies for post-radiation failures will be presented including data on cryotherapy, salvage prostatectomy and hormonal therapy (immediate, delayed and/or intermittent). New areas for investigation will be reviewed. -- The management of patients post prostatectomy will be reviewed. Data on adjuvant radiation and therapeutic radiation for biochemical or clinically relapsed patients will be presented. This course hopes to present a realistic and pragmatic overview for treating patients with non-metastatic prostatic cancer

  4. Breast Cancer After Chest Radiation Therapy for Childhood Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Chaya S.; Chou, Joanne F.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Bernstein, Jonine L.; Malhotra, Jyoti; Friedman, Danielle Novetsky; Mubdi, Nidha Z.; Leisenring, Wendy M.; Stovall, Marilyn; Hammond, Sue; Smith, Susan A.; Henderson, Tara O.; Boice, John D.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Diller, Lisa R.; Bhatia, Smita; Kenney, Lisa B.; Neglia, Joseph P.; Begg, Colin B.; Robison, Leslie L.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The risk of breast cancer is high in women treated for a childhood cancer with chest irradiation. We sought to examine variations in risk resulting from irradiation field and radiation dose. Patients and Methods We evaluated cumulative breast cancer risk in 1,230 female childhood cancer survivors treated with chest irradiation who were participants in the CCSS (Childhood Cancer Survivor Study). Results Childhood cancer survivors treated with lower delivered doses of radiation (median, 14 Gy; range, 2 to 20 Gy) to a large volume (whole-lung field) had a high risk of breast cancer (standardized incidence ratio [SIR], 43.6; 95% CI, 27.2 to 70.3), as did survivors treated with high doses of delivered radiation (median, 40 Gy) to the mantle field (SIR, 24.2; 95% CI, 20.7 to 28.3). The cumulative incidence of breast cancer by age 50 years was 30% (95% CI, 25 to 34), with a 35% incidence among Hodgkin lymphoma survivors (95% CI, 29 to 40). Breast cancer–specific mortality at 5 and 10 years was 12% (95% CI, 8 to 18) and 19% (95% CI, 13 to 25), respectively. Conclusion Among women treated for childhood cancer with chest radiation therapy, those treated with whole-lung irradiation have a greater risk of breast cancer than previously recognized, demonstrating the importance of radiation volume. Importantly, mortality associated with breast cancer after childhood cancer is substantial. PMID:24752044

  5. Radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, W.J.; Richardson, G.; Hafermann, M.D.

    1979-01-01

    Since 1965, 401 patients with prostate cancer have received intensive local pelvic radiation therapy at the Virginia Mason Medical Center. Two hundred twenty-one of this series were in the Stage C category. The 36 Stage B cancers were either medically nonoperable, or advanced extent, or had high-grade histopathology. Ten patients each were in diffuse Stage A or Stage D groups, the latter receiving local palliative inensive treatment to the prostate area. The mean age of the patients was 67.6 years. The five year survival of the Stage C group was 57.7%. There was no apparent influence on the survival of irradiated Stage C patients who received estrogen therapy. Current treatment techniques employ 10 megavolt photon beam with whole pelvic nodal fields and bilateral are rotational boost fields. The incidence of reactions and complications is presented

  6. Generalized Morphea after Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Kushi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 69-year-old woman who received external beam radiation for the treatment of breast cancer. Seven months later, she developed generalized morphea involving the area of irradiated skin of the breast as well as distant sites of the groin and distal lower extremity. Postirradiation morphea is an uncommon yet well-documented phenomenon, usually confined to the radiated site and the immediate surrounding tissue. To our knowledge, this is only the fourth reported case of morphea occurring distant from the radiation field. While most cases of postirradiation morphea have been shown to either resolve spontaneously or respond to topical corticosteroids, our patient required systemic therapy with methotrexate, which resulted in clinical improvement. With this paper, we hope to bring further awareness to this phenomenon and demonstrate a successful treatment response with the use of methotrexate in postirradiation generalized morphea.

  7. Radiation therapy for epithelial ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dembo, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    Several principles governing the cure of patients with ovarian cancer by radiotherapy were established during the last decade. The author reviews some of the studies at The Princess Margaret Hospital (PMH), which led to the establishment of the following principles: The entire peritoneal cavity should be encompassed by the treatment field, because once the disease has spread beyond the ovary, the entire peritoneal cavity is at risk for recurrent cancer. The moving-strip and open-field techniques are equally effective in tumor control. Late complications can be kept to a minimum (<5% bowel surgery, <1% radiation hepatitis, < 1% treatment mortality), but their frequency increases with increasing total radiation dosage, increasing fraction size, and possibly the extent of the previous surgical procedures (Dembo 1985a). Optimal selection of patients for radiotherapy compared with other forms of treatment is based on grouping of patients according to prognostic factors, including presenting stage of disease, amount and site of residual tumor, and histophatologic features. The potential exists for abdominopelvic radiation to be applied curatively as consolidation or as salvage therapy for patients whose disease has not been completely eradicated by chemotherapy;however, further study is needed to clarify the magnitude of this benefit, the situations in which radiotherapy is indicated, and factors that determine the toxicity of the combined-modality treatment

  8. DOE Research Contributions to Radiation and Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    dropdown arrow Site Map A-Z Index Menu Synopsis DOE Research Contributions to Radiation and Cancer Therapy Possible: DOE Advanced Biomedical Technology Research, page 10 Over the time span of many years, DOE's research has made many contributions to radiation and cancer therapy, including PEREGRINE and Boron Neutron

  9. Oral care of the cancer patient receiving radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtzhausen, T [Medical Univ. of Southern Africa, Pretoria (South Africa). Dept. of Community Dentistry

    1982-07-01

    Radiation therapy is frequently being used for the patient with oral cancer. The survival rate is increasing, due to more effective treatment technique. The question of whether any teeth should be extracted, the mode of therapy and the side effects of radiation like Xerostomia, caries, stomatitis, trismus and osteo-radionecrosis and also post radiation care are discussed.

  10. Cancer stem cells, cancer cell plasticity and radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlashi, Erina; Pajonk, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Since the first prospective identification of cancer stem cells in solid cancers the cancer stem cell hypothesis has reemerged as a research topic of increasing interest. It postulates that solid cancers are organized hierarchically with a small number of cancer stem cells driving tumor growth, repopulation after injury and metastasis. They give rise to differentiated progeny, which lack these features. The model predicts that for any therapy to provide cure, all cancer stem cells have to be eliminated while the survival of differentiated progeny is less critical. In this review we discuss recent reports challenging the idea of a unidirectional differentiation of cancer cells. These reports provide evidence supporting the idea that non-stem cancer cells exhibit a remarkable degree of plasticity that allows them to re-acquire cancer stem cell traits, especially in the context of radiation therapy. We summarize conditions under which differentiation is reversed and discuss the current knowledge of the underlying mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Experimental frontiers in radiation therapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, H.S.

    1979-01-01

    Eighty years of the history of radiation therapy are reviewed. Discovery of X-ray, radioactivity and radium was made at the end of the 19th Century. The products of nuclear fission reactions such as 60 Co and the high-energy beam generated by megavoltage devices are used as effective tools to ionize beneath the skin surface where cancerous change is present. Development of more selective devices was performed from both the irradiating means and chemically sensitive and selective sensitizers. Differential radioprotection is also a valid means to improve therapeutic gain. The radiosensitivity of mammalian cells is reduced approximately 3-fold when they are irradiated in nitrogen atmosphere rather than in air or in oxygen. As the differential modification of radiosensitivity currently used, the following means are practiced: (a) increased yield of irreversible radiation lesions, (b) increased intrinsic sensitivity of target DNA, (c) inhibition of repair, (d) optimization of dose fractionation schedules and (e) differential radioprotection of normal tumors. With 156 references up to 1978. (Yamashita, S.)

  12. Radiation therapy of early glottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neri, S.

    1987-01-01

    The control of early glottic cancer is equally satisfactory with either surgical resection or radiation therapy; this last method gives the patient good functional results. During the period from 1/1978 to 12/1985, 73 patients with early glottic carcinoma (T1 N0 M0) were treated in the Institute of Radiotherapy L. Galvani, University of Bologna; 45 were stage T1a (tumor limited to one vocal cord) and 28 were stage T1b (tumor of both vocal cords or involving anterior commissure); radiation treatment utilized a 60 Co machine and 5x5 cm fields; the median dose was 67.2 Gy (range 50-76) with conventional fractionation. Ten patients had local recurrence; the median time of recurrence was 13.4 months; 9/10 were treated by surgery and 2/10 died, so the overall control by radiotherapy with surgery in reserve was 100% in T1a tumers and 90.6% in T1b ones. The 5-years disease free survival rate was 93.1% in T1a tumors and 69% in T1b; lesions involving anterior commissure had the worst prognosis, independent of the dose and time-dose factor (3/10 recurrences in the group treated with TDF less than 110 and 4/18 recurrences in the group with TDF more than 110)

  13. State of the art of radiation therapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itasaka, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy has a critical role in the treatment of esophageal cancer. To improve the treatment outcome of radiotherapy, not only strengthening the treatment intensity but also decreasing the long term toxicity is needed. To reduce the long term cardiopulmonary toxicity of chemoradiation, JCOG is now running a clinical trial which combines three dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and mild irradiation dose. New techniques of radiation therapy, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or particle therapy are also promising in both treatment intensity and decreased toxicity. (author)

  14. New modalities in radiation therapy for treatment of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a generic term for a large group of diseases characterized by rapid creation of abnormal cells that grow beyond their usual boundaries, and which can then invade adjoining parts of the body and spread to other organs. Cancer mortality is the second and most common cause of death in the USA and in most European countries. In India, it is the fourth leading disease and the major cause of death. Cancer remains one of the most dreadful disease and approximately ten million cases of cancer occur in the world every year. The course of cancer treatment depends on the type of cancer, its location, and its state of advancement. Cancer is treated with surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormone therapy, biological therapy and targeted therapy. Radiation therapy is an important an affordable modality for cancer treatment with minimal side effects. Radiation kills cancer cells with high-energy rays targeted directly to the tumor. Radiation therapy works by damaging the DNA and preventing its replication: therefore, it preferentially kills cancer cells, which rapidly divides. Radiation therapy is used for cure, control, and palliation of cancers in more than 60% of cancer patients. The goal of radiotherapy is to treat the cancer and spare the normal tissue as much as possible. Advances have been made in radiotherapy that allow delivery of higher doses of radiation to the tumor while sparing a greater amount of surrounding tissue, thus achieving more cures and fewer acute and long-term side effects. Technological advances and research are being continued to result in improvements in the field. Several new devices and techniques are used these days in radiotherapy for accurate treatment of cancer. Teletherapy (external radiation therapy) used focused radiation beams targeting well defined tumor through extremely detailed imaging scans. Conventional external beam radiation therapy (2DXRT) is delivered via two-dimensional beams using linear accelerator machines (X

  15. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in Treating Long-Term Gastrointestinal Adverse Effects Caused by Radiation Therapy in Patients With Pelvic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-14

    Bladder Cancer; Cervical Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Gastrointestinal Complications; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Adults; Ovarian Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Radiation Toxicity; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Vaginal Cancer

  16. Postoperative radiation therapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teshima, Teruki; Chatani, Masashi; Inoue, Toshihiko; Kurokawa, Eiji; Kodama, Ken; Doi, Osamu

    1987-01-01

    From January 1978 through December 1982, a total of 241 cases with lung cancer underwent surgery. Twenty-nine cases (operative death: 7, relative non-curative operation: 13, exploratory thoracotomy: 9) were excluded because they did not receive radiation therapy (RT). The remaining 212 cases were available for this analysis. Forty-two of them were treated with RT postoperatively. Three-year survival rates according to curability in the non-RT and RT groups were 83 % and 71 % (NS) in the curative operation group. In the relatively curative operation group, the corresponding figures were 40 % and 33 % (NS), and in the absolutely non-curative operation group, 3 % and 20 % (p < 0.01), respectively. The analysis of background factors revealed that in the curative operation group the rate of combined resection and in the relatively curative operation group pT3 and combined resection were significantly higher in the RT group than non-RT group. In the absolutely non-curative operation group, the rate of pM1 was significantly lower in RT group than the non-RT group. The pattern of failure of the RT group by histology was analysed. Local and regional failure was most common in the squamous cell carcinoma group and distant failure in the adenocarcinoma group. However, in the adenocarcinoma group local and regional or supraclavicular lymph node failure was also frequently noted. The relationship between the radiation field and local and regional or supraclavicular lymph node failure was analysed. In the squamous cell carcinoma group, in-field failure was most common, whereas in the adenocarcinoma group, outside (marginal) failure was common, especially in the supraclavicular lymph nodes. Concerning squamous cell carcinoma, microscopic or macroscopic residual tumor at the surgical margin, which includes the chest wall, stump (BS or VS) and pericardium was well controlled in each operation group with more than 50 Gy of RT. (J.P.N.)

  17. Planning of radiation therapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Takeo

    1981-01-01

    The esophageal malignant tumors occur mostly at the pulmonary esophagus, whereas such tumors also occur at the cervical and abdominal esophagus. Moreover, histologically, such malignant tumors are mostly carcinoma planocellulare and yet, there are not a few cases of adenomatous carcinoma and indifferentiated carcinoma. X-ray pictures reveal various types, such as infundibular, spiral and serrated forms, which are related to the radioactive therapuetic effects. However, the most difficult condition in radioactive therapies for the esophagus is that this organ is adjacent to important viscera at the surroundings, thus the most irradiating field covers the normal tissues. For such radiating sites, instead of the conventional simple radiation by 2 guns, a further progress was considered by trying to pursue more efficient and effective methods for radiating therapies in classfication by the generating or causing sites of carcinoma, in application of computers. (author)

  18. Radiation-Induced Second Cancer Risk Estimates From Radionuclide Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Bryan; Besemer, Abigail

    2017-09-01

    The use of radionuclide therapy in the clinical setting is expected to increase significantly over the next decade. There is an important need to understand the radiation-induced second cancer risk associated with these procedures. In this study the radiation-induced cancer risk in five radionuclide therapy patients was investigated. These patients underwent serial SPECT imaging scans following injection as part of a clinical trial testing the efficacy of a 131Iodine-labeled radiopharmaceutical. Using these datasets the committed absorbed doses to multiple sensitive structures were calculated using RAPID, which is a novel Monte Carlo-based 3D dosimetry platform developed for personalized dosimetry. The excess relative risk (ERR) for radiation-induced cancer in these structures was then derived from these dose estimates following the recommendations set forth in the BEIR VII report. The radiation-induced leukemia ERR was highest among all sites considered reaching a maximum value of approximately 4.5. The radiation-induced cancer risk in the kidneys, liver and spleen ranged between 0.3 and 1.3. The lifetime attributable risks (LARs) were also calculated, which ranged from 30 to 1700 cancers per 100,000 persons and were highest for leukemia and the liver for both males and females followed by radiation-induced spleen and kidney cancer. The risks associated with radionuclide therapy are similar to the risk associated with external beam radiation therapy.

  19. Guidelines for radiation therapy in clinical research on bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipley, W.U.; VanderSchueren, E.; Kitagawa, T.; Gospodarowicz, M.K.; Frommhold, H.; Magno, L.; Mochizuki, S.; VanderBogaert, W.; VanderWerf-Messing, B.

    1986-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a heterogeneous disease and that there are important tumor characteristics that will predict significant differences in radiation responsiveness. These should in all instances be well documented prospectively in any treatment protocol. However, in this chapter the authors stress a number of factors related to the tumor at presentation as well as the administration of the radiation therapy that can importantly affect the efficacy of the radiation on the patient's tumor, as well as on his or her normal tissues. As Radiation Oncologists, they are most interested in the conducting and reporting of prospective clinical investigations in the use of radiation therapy in the treatment of patients with bladder carcinoma who will be treated with planned preservation of their bladder, but whose radiation therapy may be combined with additional planned bladder-sparing surgery, intraoperative radiation therapy, or chemotherapy

  20. Radiation therapy for head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillette, S.M.; Gillette, E.L.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation therapy may be indicated for larger invasive tumors of the head and neck that may be difficult to surgically excise or for which surgery would be significantly disfiguring. Previous studies of oral squamous cell carcinomas indicate that it should be possible to control approximately 80% of all but the most advanced local or locoregional tumors. Aggressive radiation therapy to total doses of 56 Gy or greater may be required. That can be done by using smaller doses per fraction and gradually reducing the size of the field so that the highest dose is given only to the tumor with a relatively tight margin. Malignant melanomas can be controlled locally apparently with a few large fractions. Metastatic disease limits survival; therefore, some type of systemic therapy seems to be needed to improve survival of those patients. Canine oral fibrosarcomas require a very high dose for a reasonable probability of control. It seems that a dose of 56 Gy given in 3.3 Gy fractions might provide local control of 50% of the tumors. It is likely that a combination of surgery and radiation would significantly improve the probability for control. Oral squamous cell carcinomas of cats must also be treated very aggressively to improve local control. Tumors of the nasal cavity are usually very large and invasive at the time of diagnosis. Radiation therapy has been shown to be effective in some instances. It is possible that with better definition of the tumor through computerized tomography imaging and improved treatment planning, control of these difficult to manage nasal tumors can be improved

  1. Coronary artery calcium in breast cancer survivors after radiation therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takx, Richard A P; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Schoepf, U Joseph; Pilz, Lothar R; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Morris, Pamela B; Henzler, Thomas; Apfaltrer, Paul

    The purpose of the current study is to investigate whether breast cancer survivors after radiation therapy have a higher burden of coronary artery calcium as a potential surrogate of radiation-induced accelerated coronary artery disease. 333 patients were included. 54 patients underwent chest CT ae

  2. Optimization of adaptive radiation therapy in cervical cancer: Solutions for photon and proton therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Schoot, A.J.A.J.

    2016-01-01

    In cervical cancer radiation therapy, an adaptive strategy is required to compensate for interfraction anatomical variations in order to achieve adequate dose delivery. In this thesis, we have aimed at optimizing adaptive radiation therapy in cervical cancer to improve treatment efficiency and

  3. Sexual dysfunctions after prostate cancer radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droupy, S.

    2010-01-01

    Sexual dysfunctions are a quality of life main concern following prostate cancer treatment. After both radiotherapy and brachytherapy, sexual function declines progressively, the onset of occurrence of erectile dysfunction being 12-18 months after both treatments. The pathophysiological pathways by which radiotherapy and brachytherapy cause erectile dysfunction are multi-factorial, as patient co-morbidities, arterial damage, exposure of neurovascular bundle to high levels of radiation, and radiation dose received by the corpora cavernosa at the crurae of the penis may be important in the aetiology of erectile dysfunction. Diagnosis and treatment of postradiation sexual dysfunctions must integrate pre-therapeutic evaluation and information to provide to the patient and his partner a multidisciplinary sexual medicine management. (authors)

  4. Radiation therapy for breast cancer: Literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaji, Karunakaran; Subramanian, Balaji; Yadav, Poonam; Anu Radha, Chandrasekaran; Ramasubramanian, Velayudham

    2016-01-01

    Concave shape with variable size target volume makes treatment planning for the breast/chest wall a challenge. Conventional techniques used for the breast/chest wall cancer treatment provided better sparing of organs at risk (OARs), with poor conformity and uniformity to the target volume. Advanced technologies such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) improve the target coverage at the cost of higher low dose volumes to OARs. Novel hybrid techniques present promising results in breast/chest wall irradiation in terms of target coverage as well as OARs sparing. Several published data compared these technologies for the benefit of the breast/chest wall with or without nodal volumes. The aim of this article is to review relevant data and identify the scope for further research in developing optimal treatment plan for breast/chest wall cancer treatment.

  5. Radiation therapy for breast cancer: Literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balaji, Karunakaran, E-mail: karthik.balaji85@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Global Hospitals, Chennai (India); School of Advanced Sciences, VIT University, Vellore (India); Subramanian, Balaji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Global Hospitals, Chennai (India); Yadav, Poonam [Department of Medical Physics and Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI and Aspirus UW Cancer Center, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States); Anu Radha, Chandrasekaran; Ramasubramanian, Velayudham [School of Advanced Sciences, VIT University, Vellore (India)

    2016-10-01

    Concave shape with variable size target volume makes treatment planning for the breast/chest wall a challenge. Conventional techniques used for the breast/chest wall cancer treatment provided better sparing of organs at risk (OARs), with poor conformity and uniformity to the target volume. Advanced technologies such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) improve the target coverage at the cost of higher low dose volumes to OARs. Novel hybrid techniques present promising results in breast/chest wall irradiation in terms of target coverage as well as OARs sparing. Several published data compared these technologies for the benefit of the breast/chest wall with or without nodal volumes. The aim of this article is to review relevant data and identify the scope for further research in developing optimal treatment plan for breast/chest wall cancer treatment.

  6. Radiation therapy in the management of childhood cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kun, L.E.

    1987-01-01

    Over the past two decades, multimodality treatment regimens have produced significant improvement in survival rates for most types of childhood cancer. The role of radiation therapy has been critically evaluated in prospective clinical trials that established the importance of irradiation in assuring local and regional control of disease central to ultimate survival. Indications for cranial and craniospinal irradiation in acute lymphoblastic leukemia are reviewed, as is difficult technical factors important for successful management. The role of radiation therapy in neuroblastoma and Wilms tumor is reviewed in the context of tumor biology and increasing data from multi-institutional trials. Interactions of irradiation with surgery and chemotherapy are stressed in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma. Current results in the more common central nervous tumors of childhood are presented, including the central role of radiation therapy in medulloblastoma, astrocytoma, and craniopharyngioma. Concerns regarding late effects of radiation therapy are balanced with the importance of achieving disease control

  7. Gene expression profiles in cervical cancer with radiation therapy alone and chemo-radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyu Chan; Kim, Joo Young; Hwang, You Jin; Kim, Meyoung Kon; Choi, Myung Sun; Kim, Chul Young

    2003-01-01

    To analyze the gene expression profiles of uterine cervical cancer, and its variation after radiation therapy, with or without concurrent chemotherapy, using a cDNA microarray. Sixteen patients, 8 with squamous cell carcinomas of the uterine cervix, who were treated with radiation alone, and the other 8 treated with concurrent chemo-radiation, were included in the study. Before the starting of the treatment, tumor biopsies were carried out, and the second time biopsies were performed after a radiation dose of 16.2-27 Gy. Three normal cervix tissues were used as a control group. The microarray experiments were performed with 5 groups of the total RNAs extracted individually and then admixed as control, pre-radiation therapy alone, during-radiation therapy alone, pre-chemoradiation therapy, and during chemoradiation therapy. The 33P-labeled cDNAs were synthesized from the total RNAs of each group, by reverse transcription, and then they were hybridized to the cDNA microarray membrane. The gene expression of each microarrays was captured by the intensity of each spot produced by the radioactive isotopes. The pixels per spot were counted with an Arrayguage, and were exported to Microsoft Excel. The data were normalized by the Z transformation, and the comparisons were performed on the Z-ratio values calculated. The expressions of 15 genes, including integrin linked kinase (ILK), CDC28 protein kinase 2, Spry 2, and ERK 3, were increased with the Z-ratio values of over 2.0 for the cervix cancer tissues compared to those for the normal controls. Those genes were involved in cell growth and proliferation, cell cycle control, or signal transduction. The expressions of the other 6 genes, including G protein coupled receptor kinase 6, were decreased with the Z-ratio values of below -2.0. After the radiation therapy, most of the genes, with a previously increase expressions, represented the decreased expression profiles, and the genes, with the Z-ratio values of over 2.0, were

  8. Once-Daily Radiation Therapy for Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Lindsay; Harmsen, William; Blanchard, Miran; Goetz, Matthew; Jakub, James; Mutter, Robert; Petersen, Ivy; Rooney, Jessica; Stauder, Michael; Yan, Elizabeth; Laack, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare and aggressive breast cancer variant treated with multimodality therapy. A variety of approaches intended to escalate the intensity and efficacy of radiation therapy have been reported, including twice-daily radiation therapy, dose escalation, and aggressive use of bolus. Herein, we examine our outcomes for patients treated with once-daily radiation therapy with aggressive bolus utilization, focusing on treatment technique. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of patients with nonmetastatic IBC treated from January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2010, was performed. Locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS) and predictors thereof were assessed. Results: Fifty-two women with IBC were identified, 49 (94%) of whom were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. All underwent mastectomy followed by adjuvant radiation therapy. Radiation was delivered in once-daily fractions of 1.8 to 2.25 Gy (median, 2 Gy). Patients were typically treated with daily 1-cm bolus throughout treatment, and 33 (63%) received a subsequent boost to the mastectomy scar. Five-year Kaplan Meier survival estimates for LRC, DFS, and OS were 81%, 56%, and 64%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence was associated with poorer OS (P<.001; hazard ratio [HR], 4.1). Extracapsular extension was associated with worse LRC (P=.02), DFS (P=.007), and OS (P=.002). Age greater than 50 years was associated with better DFS (P=.03). Pathologic complete response was associated with a trend toward improved LRC (P=.06). Conclusions: Once-daily radiation therapy with aggressive use of bolus for IBC results in outcomes consistent with previous reports using various intensified radiation therapy regimens. LRC remains a challenge despite modern systemic therapy. Extracapsular extension, age ≤50 years, and lack of complete response to chemotherapy appear to be associated with worse outcomes. Novel strategies are needed in IBC

  9. Role of radiation therapy in the treatment of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, Akos; Kocsis, Bela; Jozsef, Gabor

    1987-01-01

    A brief overview of the techniques, equipment, recent results and application fields of radiation therapy in the treatment of lung cancer is given, based on literature data and on the authors' own experiences. Side effects and patient-doctor relationship are also dealt with. (R.P.)

  10. Where Do Patients With Cancer in Iowa Receive Radiation Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Marcia M.; Ullrich, Fred; Matthews, Kevin; Rushton, Gerard; Tracy, Roger; Goldstein, Michael A.; Bajorin, Dean F.; Kosty, Michael P.; Bruinooge, Suanna S.; Hanley, Amy; Jacobson, Geraldine M.; Lynch, Charles F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Multiple studies have shown survival benefits in patients with cancer treated with radiation therapy, but access to treatment facilities has been found to limit its use. This study was undertaken to examine access issues in Iowa and determine a methodology for conducting a similar national analysis. Patients and Methods: All Iowa residents who received radiation therapy regardless of where they were diagnosed or treated were identified through the Iowa Cancer Registry (ICR). Radiation oncologists were identified through the Iowa Physician Information System (IPIS). Radiation facilities were identified through IPIS and classified using the Commission on Cancer accreditation standard. Results: Between 2004 and 2010, 113,885 invasive cancers in 106,603 patients, 28.5% of whom received radiation treatment, were entered in ICR. Mean and median travel times were 25.8 and 20.1 minutes, respectively, to the nearest facility but 42.4 and 29.1 minutes, respectively, to the patient's chosen treatment facility. Multivariable analysis predicting travel time showed significant relationships for disease site, age, residence location, and facility category. Residents of small and isolated rural towns traveled nearly 3× longer than urban residents to receive radiation therapy, as did patients using certain categories of facilities. Conclusion: Half of Iowa patients could reach their nearest facility in 20 minutes, but instead, they traveled 30 minutes on average to receive treatment. The findings identified certain groups of patients with cancer who chose more distant facilities. However, other groups of patients with cancer, namely those residing in rural areas, had less choice, and some had to travel considerably farther to radiation facilities than urban patients. PMID:24443730

  11. Delayed damage after radiation therapy for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Yoshiyuki [Osaka Dental Univ., Hirakata (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    I investigated radiation damage, including osteoradionecrosis, arising from tooth extraction in fields that had received radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, and evaluated the effectiveness of pilocarpine for xerostomia. Between January 1990 and April 1996, I examined 30 patients for bone changes after tooth extraction in fields irradiated at the Department of Oral Radiology, Osaka Dental University Hospital. Nineteen of the patients had been treated for nasopharyngeal cancer and 11 for oropharyngeal cancer. Between January and April 1996, 4 additional patients were given pilocarpine hydrochloride (3-mg, 6-mg and 9-mg of KSS-694 orally three times a day) for 12 weeks and evaluated every 4 weeks as a base line. One had been treated for nasopharyngeal carcinoma, two for cancer of the cheek and one for an unknown carcinoma. Eighteen of the patients (11 with nasopharyngeal carcinoma and 7 with oropharyngeal carcinoma) had extractions. Use of preoperative and postoperative radiographs indicated that damage to the bone following tooth extraction after radiation exposure was related to whether antibiotics were administered the day before the extraction, whether forceps or elevators were used, and whether the tooth was in the field of radiation. Xerostomia improved in all 4 of the patients who received 6-mg or 9-mg of pilocarpine. It improved saliva production and relieved the symptoms of xerostomia after radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, although there were minor side effects such as fever. This information can be used to improve the oral environment of patients who have received radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, and to better understand their oral environment. (author)

  12. Delayed damage after radiation therapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Yoshiyuki

    2000-01-01

    I investigated radiation damage, including osteoradionecrosis, arising from tooth extraction in fields that had received radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, and evaluated the effectiveness of pilocarpine for xerostomia. Between January 1990 and April 1996, I examined 30 patients for bone changes after tooth extraction in fields irradiated at the Department of Oral Radiology, Osaka Dental University Hospital. Nineteen of the patients had been treated for nasopharyngeal cancer and 11 for oropharyngeal cancer. Between January and April 1996, 4 additional patients were given pilocarpine hydrochloride (3-mg, 6-mg and 9-mg of KSS-694 orally three times a day) for 12 weeks and evaluated every 4 weeks as a base line. One had been treated for nasopharyngeal carcinoma, two for cancer of the cheek and one for an unknown carcinoma. Eighteen of the patients (11 with nasopharyngeal carcinoma and 7 with oropharyngeal carcinoma) had extractions. Use of preoperative and postoperative radiographs indicated that damage to the bone following tooth extraction after radiation exposure was related to whether antibiotics were administered the day before the extraction, whether forceps or elevators were used, and whether the tooth was in the field of radiation. Xerostomia improved in all 4 of the patients who received 6-mg or 9-mg of pilocarpine. It improved saliva production and relieved the symptoms of xerostomia after radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, although there were minor side effects such as fever. This information can be used to improve the oral environment of patients who have received radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, and to better understand their oral environment. (author)

  13. Target volumes in gastric cancer radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caudry, M.; Maire, J.P.; Ratoanina, J.L.; Escarmant, P.

    2001-01-01

    The spread of gastric adenocarcinoma may follow three main patterns: hemato-genic, lymphatic and intraperitoneal. A GTV should be considered in preoperative or exclusive radiation therapy. After non-radical surgery, a 'residual GTV' will be defined with the help of the surgeon. The CTV encompasses three intricated volumes. a) A 'tumor bed' volume. After radical surgery, local recurrences appear as frequent as distant metastases. The risk depends upon the depth of parietal invasion and the nodal status. Parietal infiltration may extend beyond macroscopic limits of the tumor, especially in dinitis plastica. Therefore this volume will include: the tumor and the remaining stomach or their 'bed of resection', a part of the transverse colon, the duodenum, the pancreas and the troncus of the portal vein. In postoperative RT, this CTV also includes the jejuno-gastric or jejuno-esophageal anastomosis. b) A peritoneal volume. For practical purposes, two degrees of spread must be considered: (1) contiguous microscopic extension from deeply invasive T3 and T4 tumors, that remain amenable to local sterilization with doses of 45-50 Gy, delivered in a CTV including the peritoneal cavity at the level of the gastric bed, and under the parietal incision; (2) true 'peritoneal carcinomatosis', with widespread seeds, where chemotherapy (systemic or intraperitoneal) is more appropriate. c) A lymphatic volume including the lymph node groups 1 to 16 of the Japanese classification. This volume must encompass the hepatic pedicle and the splenic hilum. In proximal tumors, it is possible to restrict the lover part of the CTV to the lymphatic volume, and therefore to avoid irradiation of large intestinal and renal volumes. In distal and proximal tumors, involvement of resection margins is of poor prognosis -a radiation boost must be delivered at this level. The CTV in tumors of the cardia should encompass the lover part of the thoracic esophagus and the corresponding posterior mediastinum. In

  14. Modern Radiation Therapy and Cardiac Outcomes in Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boero, Isabel J.; Paravati, Anthony J.; Triplett, Daniel P.; Hwang, Lindsay; Matsuno, Rayna K.; Gillespie, Erin F.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Moiseenko, Vitali; Einck, John P.; Mell, Loren K. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, Moores Cancer Center, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Parikh, Sahil A. [University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Harrington Heart and Vascular Institute, and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Murphy, James D., E-mail: j2murphy@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, Moores Cancer Center, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiation therapy, which has proven benefit against breast cancer, has historically been associated with an increased incidence of ischemic heart disease. Modern techniques have reduced this risk, but a detailed evaluation has not recently been conducted. The present study evaluated the effect of current radiation practices on ischemia-related cardiac events and procedures in a population-based study of older women with nonmetastatic breast cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 29,102 patients diagnosed from 2000 to 2009 were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare database. Medicare claims were used to identify the radiation therapy and cardiac outcomes. Competing risk models were used to assess the effect of radiation on these outcomes. Results: Patients with left-sided breast cancer had a small increase in their risk of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) after radiation therapy—the 10-year cumulative incidence for these patients was 5.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.9%-6.2%) and 4.5% (95% CI 4.0%-5.0%) for right-sided patients. This risk was limited to women with previous cardiac disease. For patients who underwent PCI, those with left-sided breast cancer had a significantly increased risk of cardiac mortality with a subdistribution hazard ratio of 2.02 (95% CI 1.23-3.34). No other outcome, including cardiac mortality for the entire cohort, showed a significant relationship with tumor laterality. Conclusions: For women with a history of cardiac disease, those with left-sided breast cancer who underwent radiation therapy had increased rates of PCI and a survival decrement if treated with PCI. The results of the present study could help cardiologists and radiation oncologists better stratify patients who need more aggressive cardioprotective techniques.

  15. Modern Radiation Therapy and Cardiac Outcomes in Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boero, Isabel J.; Paravati, Anthony J.; Triplett, Daniel P.; Hwang, Lindsay; Matsuno, Rayna K.; Gillespie, Erin F.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Moiseenko, Vitali; Einck, John P.; Mell, Loren K.; Parikh, Sahil A.; Murphy, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiation therapy, which has proven benefit against breast cancer, has historically been associated with an increased incidence of ischemic heart disease. Modern techniques have reduced this risk, but a detailed evaluation has not recently been conducted. The present study evaluated the effect of current radiation practices on ischemia-related cardiac events and procedures in a population-based study of older women with nonmetastatic breast cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 29,102 patients diagnosed from 2000 to 2009 were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare database. Medicare claims were used to identify the radiation therapy and cardiac outcomes. Competing risk models were used to assess the effect of radiation on these outcomes. Results: Patients with left-sided breast cancer had a small increase in their risk of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) after radiation therapy—the 10-year cumulative incidence for these patients was 5.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.9%-6.2%) and 4.5% (95% CI 4.0%-5.0%) for right-sided patients. This risk was limited to women with previous cardiac disease. For patients who underwent PCI, those with left-sided breast cancer had a significantly increased risk of cardiac mortality with a subdistribution hazard ratio of 2.02 (95% CI 1.23-3.34). No other outcome, including cardiac mortality for the entire cohort, showed a significant relationship with tumor laterality. Conclusions: For women with a history of cardiac disease, those with left-sided breast cancer who underwent radiation therapy had increased rates of PCI and a survival decrement if treated with PCI. The results of the present study could help cardiologists and radiation oncologists better stratify patients who need more aggressive cardioprotective techniques.

  16. Thyroid and hypophysial function in radiation therapy of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakimova, T.P.; Lozinskaya, I.N.

    1984-01-01

    In breast cancer a decrease in triiodothyronine concentration was revealed with the normal level of thyroxine that may be associated with the disturbed peripharal metabolism into triiodothyronine. The lowering of thyroid functional activity is noted during radiation therapy of patients at menopause. Administration of thyroidin during radiation therapy to elderly patients with the 3 stage of the disease compensated for hormone deficiency producing a sparing effect on the thyroid, and influenced the therapeutic results favorably. A high level of the somatotropic hormone was observed in patients, of the reproductive age and at menopause, the level of insulin was increased in all the patients

  17. Radiation therapy as definitive treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findlay, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    Like surgery, radiation therapy is a local treatment modality, and also like surgery, the objective of therapy is to eradicate all cancer in the treated area, ensuring no recurrence. In addition, this objective should be achieved with maintenance of a cosmetically intact breast. If these two goals can be attained simultaneously, the ultimate result should be a substantial reduction in the physical and psychologic morbidity of treatment and an improvement in the patients's quality of life. It is to be hoped that by reducing women's fear of potentially disfiguring surgery, they will be encouraged to seek medical attention for breast cancer at an earlier, and hence potentially more curable, stage of the disease

  18. Results of Radiation Therapy in Stage III Uterine Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Chang Woo; Shin, Byung Chul; Yum, Ha Yong; Jeung, Tae Sig; Yoo, Myung Jin [Kosin University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-09-15

    Purpose : The aim of this study is to analyze the survival rate, treatment failure and complication of radiation therapy alone in stage III uterine cervical cancer. Materials and Methods : From January 1980 through December 1985, 227 patients with stage II uterine cervical cancer treated with radiation therapy at Kosin Medical Center were retrospectively studied. Among 227 patients, 72 patients(31.7%) were stage IIIa, and 155 patients(68.3%) were stage IIIb according to FIGO classification. Age distribution was 32-71 years(median: 62 years). Sixty nine patients(95.8%) in stage IIIa and 150 patients(96.8%) in stage IIIb were squamous cell carcinoma. Pelvic lymph node metastasis at initial diagnosis was 8 patients (11.1%) in stage IIIa and 29 patients(18.7%) in stage IIIb. Among 72 patients with stage IIIa, 36 patients(50%) were treated with external radiation therapy alone by conventional technique (180-200 cGy/fr). And 36 patients(50%) were treated with external radiation therapy with intracavitary radiotherapy(ICR) with Cs137 sources, and among 155 patients with stage IIIb, 80 patients(51.6%) were treated with external radiation therapy alone and 75 patients(48.4%) were treated with external radiation therapy with ICR. Total radiation doses of stage IIIa and IIIb were 65-105 Gy(median : 78.5 Gy) and 65-125.5 Gy (median :83.5 Gy). Survival rate was calculated by life-table method. Results : Complete response rates were 58.3% (42 patients) in state IIIa and 56.1%(87 patients) in stage Iiib. Overall 5 year survival rates were 57% in stage IIIa and 40% in stage IIIb. Five year survival rates by radiation technique in stage IIIa and IIIb were 64%, 40% in group treated in combination of external radiation and ICR, and 50%, 40% in the group of external radiation therapy alone(P=NS). Five year survival rates by response of radiation therapy in stage IIIa and IIIb were 90%, 66% in responder group, and 10%, 7% in non-responder group (P<0.01). There were statistically no

  19. Results of Radiation Therapy in Stage III Uterine Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Chang Woo; Shin, Byung Chul; Yum, Ha Yong; Jeung, Tae Sig; Yoo, Myung Jin

    1995-01-01

    Purpose : The aim of this study is to analyze the survival rate, treatment failure and complication of radiation therapy alone in stage III uterine cervical cancer. Materials and Methods : From January 1980 through December 1985, 227 patients with stage II uterine cervical cancer treated with radiation therapy at Kosin Medical Center were retrospectively studied. Among 227 patients, 72 patients(31.7%) were stage IIIa, and 155 patients(68.3%) were stage IIIb according to FIGO classification. Age distribution was 32-71 years(median: 62 years). Sixty nine patients(95.8%) in stage IIIa and 150 patients(96.8%) in stage IIIb were squamous cell carcinoma. Pelvic lymph node metastasis at initial diagnosis was 8 patients (11.1%) in stage IIIa and 29 patients(18.7%) in stage IIIb. Among 72 patients with stage IIIa, 36 patients(50%) were treated with external radiation therapy alone by conventional technique (180-200 cGy/fr). And 36 patients(50%) were treated with external radiation therapy with intracavitary radiotherapy(ICR) with Cs137 sources, and among 155 patients with stage IIIb, 80 patients(51.6%) were treated with external radiation therapy alone and 75 patients(48.4%) were treated with external radiation therapy with ICR. Total radiation doses of stage IIIa and IIIb were 65-105 Gy(median : 78.5 Gy) and 65-125.5 Gy (median :83.5 Gy). Survival rate was calculated by life-table method. Results : Complete response rates were 58.3% (42 patients) in state IIIa and 56.1%(87 patients) in stage Iiib. Overall 5 year survival rates were 57% in stage IIIa and 40% in stage IIIb. Five year survival rates by radiation technique in stage IIIa and IIIb were 64%, 40% in group treated in combination of external radiation and ICR, and 50%, 40% in the group of external radiation therapy alone(P=NS). Five year survival rates by response of radiation therapy in stage IIIa and IIIb were 90%, 66% in responder group, and 10%, 7% in non-responder group (P<0.01). There were statistically no

  20. Radiation biology as a basis for multidisciplinary cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoya, N.

    2017-01-01

    The research field of radiation biology has progressed greatly thanks to the advances in molecular biology. DNA in the cell nucleus is the principal target of radiation. The biological effect of radiation can be determined by how the DNA damage is processed in the cell. In order to prevent deleterious biological effects due to DNA damage, the cells possess a system termed 'DNA damage response'. The DNA damage response finally induces cell cycle arrest, activation of DNA repair pathways, or cell death. If accurately repaired, DNA damage will result in survival of cells with no biological effects. If inaccurately repaired, DNA damage may result in survival of cells exhibiting genetic alterations, which can lead to the development of various diseases including cancer. If unrepaired, fatal DNA damage such as the DNA double-strand break will result in cell depth. Since radiation therapy and chemotherapy are designed to specifically kill cancer cells by inducing DNA double-strand breaks, it is important to take advantage of cancer-specific abnormalities in DNA damage response. In this review, I describe the impact of targeting DNA damage response in cancer therapy and show how progress in radiation biology has contributed to the development of novel therapeutic strategies. (author)

  1. Radiation therapy combined with hyperthermia in advanced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuma, Akiko; Terashima, Hiromi; Torii, Yoshikuni; Nakata, Hajime; Inatomi, Hisato

    1986-01-01

    Radiation therapy combined with radiofrequency (RF) hyperthermia was performed on 5 advanced cancer patients. Included were one each with urinary bladder cancer, hepatoma with left axillary node metastasis, breast cancer, tongue cancer with left cervical metastasis, and mandibular cancer. All had large tumors, which were judged to be uncontrollable by radiotherapy alone. They were treated with irradiation (Linac: 10 MV X-ray 1.8 - 2.0 Gy/day, 5 days/week), followed within an hour by RF hyperthermia once or twice a week. Partial response was obtained in the urinary bladder cancer patient. Surface overheating around the margin of electrodes occurred in all but no severe complications were observed. (author)

  2. Radiation therapy in aged lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtake, Eiji; Tobari, Chitose; Matsui, Kengo; Iio, Masahiro.

    1982-01-01

    The results and problems of radiotherapy were analyzed in 57 lung cancer patients more than 65 years of age (average age: 74.8 years). Of these, 45 (79%) were irradiated with a total dose exceeding 40 Gy. In these patients, the median survival was 13 months for Stages I and II, 6.5 months for Stage III, and 5 months for Stage IV. The results of combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy were better than those of radiotherapy alone. Also, slightly better results were obtained in patients treated with split-course than continuous-course irradiation. In aged lung cancer patients the prognosis was highly influenced by their respiratory function. Double cancers were present in 9 (16%) of the 57 patients. (author)

  3. The contribution of radiation therapy to the cancer in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watari, Tsutomu

    1981-01-01

    Majority of patients with tumors generally are sensitive and very useful of radiotherapy. Major cases in pediatric cancer are leukemia, brain tumor, neuroblastoma, malignant lymphoma, Wilms tumor, retinoblastoma, rhabdomyo-sarcoma, osteosarcoma, testicular tumors et al. Others are hemangioma including Kasabach-Merritt Syndrome. Radiation therapy is indicated to all cases of malignant tumor in children. Recently the treatment results improving with the help of well organized chemotherapy. Cancer in children is almost a speciality on its own. Since the total number of patients in any region is not large, treatment is best concentrated at special oncology centers. Long-term results in the majority of cases are disappointing, and the nursing problems after formidable. Surgery, Radiation and Chemotherapy and all valuable, especially in combination - Multidisciplinary therapy and Multidisciplinary team. (author)

  4. COMPARISON OF HYPOFRACTIONATED RADIATION THERAPY VERSUS CONVENTIONAL RADIATION THERAPY IN POST MASTECTOMY BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhilash

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide and a leading cause of cancer death in females and accounts for 1.8 million new cases and approximately 0.5 million deaths annually. Patients who present with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC require multidisciplinary team approach that incorporates diagnostic imaging, surgery, chemotherapy and histopathological assessment, including molecular-based studies, radiation, and, if indicated, biologic and hormonal therapies. Hypofractionated radiation therapy following mastectomy has been used in many institutions for several decades and have demonstrated equivalent local control, cosmetic and normal tissues between 50 Gy in 25 fractions and various hypofractionated radiotherapy prescriptions employing 13-16 fractions. Evidence suggests that hypofractionated radiotherapy may also be safe and effective for regional nodal disease. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES To compare the local control and side effects of hypofractionated radiation therapy with conventional radiation therapy in post mastectomy carcinoma breast with stage II and III and to compare the tolerability and compliance of both schedules. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study was conducted on 60 histopathologically proven patients of carcinoma of breast, treated surgically with modified radical mastectomy. Group I patients were given external radiation to chest flap and drainage areas, a dose of 39 Gy/13 fractions/3.1 weeks, a daily dose 3 Gy for 13 fractions in 4 days a week schedule and Group II patients were given external radiation to chest flap and drainage areas, a dose of 50 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks, to receive a daily dose 2 Gy for 25 fractions in a 5 days a week schedule. RESULTS The median age at presentation in Group I and II was 48 and 50 years respectively. Locoregional control after completion of radiotherapy in Group I vs. Group II was 26/30 (86.7% vs. 27/30 (90% respectively. Acute reactions and their grades in Group

  5. Radiation safety procedures in radioiodine therapy for thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajashekharrao, B.; Samuel, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    During any administration of radioactive materials, it is imperative to always be conversant with any forbidden radiation health safety practices. This need is amplified when dealing with therapeutic amount of radionuclides. Among all the procedures dealing with the use of radiopharmaceuticals, it is easiest to think of 131 I, since this is the most widely used unsealed source of a radiopharmaceutical for treatment of thyroid cancer and hyperthyroidism and carries with it most of the problems associated with therapy applications

  6. Radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bader, J.L.; Glatstein, E.

    1987-01-01

    The radiation oncologist encounters the critically ill immunosuppressed patient in four settings. First, the newly diagnosed cancer patient presents for initial evaluation and treatment, with immunosuppression from the cancer itself, malnutrition, concomitant infectious disease, prior drug or alcohol abuse or other medical problems. Second, the previously treated cancer patient presents with metastatic or recurrent primary cancer causing local symptoms. Immune dysfunction in this setting may be due to prior chemotherapy and/or radiation as well as any of the original factors. Third, the patient previously treated with radiation presents with a life-threatening problem possibly due to complications of prior therapy. In this setting, the radiation oncologist is asked to evaluate the clinical problem and to suggest whether radiation might be causing part or all of the problem and what can be done to treat these sequelae of radiation. Fourth, the patient with a benign diagnosis (not cancer) is seen with a problem potentially emeliorated by radiation (e.g., kidney transplant rejection, preparation for transplant, or intractable rheumatoid arthritis). This chapter reviews these four issues and presents clinical and radiobiologic principles on which recommendations for therapy are based

  7. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacon, C.; Galli, M.; Meoli, P.; Mariani, L.; Novelli, L.; Gonzalez, G.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Objective: To analyze the feasibility of high dose assessing acute and late toxicities both rectal and genitourinary in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer. Material and methods: Between April 2006 and April 2008 90 patients diagnosed with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with MRT technique in the Department of Radiotherapy. The analysis included 80 patients, 10 of them in treatment. The total dose received was 80 Gy. One patient received 70.2 Gy (because of previous pelvic radiotherapy). Age average: 65 (r 43-85 years). Stage: T1c: 43 p (53.75%), T2: 35 p (43.75%), T3: 1 p (1.25%). Score of Gleason 10 ng/ml and [es

  8. Trends in intensity modulated radiation therapy use for locally advanced rectal cancer at National Comprehensive Cancer Network centers

    OpenAIRE

    Marsha Reyngold, MD, PhD; Joyce Niland, PhD; Anna ter Veer, MS; Tanios Bekaii-Saab, MD; Lily Lai, MD; Joshua E. Meyer, MD; Steven J. Nurkin, MD, MS; Deborah Schrag, MD, MPH; John M. Skibber, MD, FACS; Al B. Benson, MD; Martin R. Weiser, MD; Christopher H. Crane, MD; Karyn A. Goodman, MD, MS

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been rapidly incorporated into clinical practice because of its technological advantages over 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (CRT). We characterized trends in IMRT utilization in trimodality treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer at National Comprehensive Cancer Network cancer centers between 2005 and 2011. Methods and materials: Using the prospective National Comprehensive Cancer Network Colorectal Cancer Database, ...

  9. A Systematic Overview of Radiation Therapy Effects in Oesophageal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ask, Anders; Albertsson, Maria; Jaerhult, Johannes; Cavallin-Staahl, Eva

    2003-01-01

    A systematic review of radiation therapy trials in several tumour types was performed by The Swedish Council of Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU). The procedures for evaluation of the scientific literature are described separately. This synthesis of the literature on radiation therapy for oesophageal cancer is based on data from 42 randomized trials and 2 meta-analyses. A total of 44 scientific articles are included, involving 5,772 patients. The conclusions reached can be summarized as follows: There is fairly strong evidence that preoperative radiotherapy does not improve the survival in patients with potentially resectable oesophageal cancer. There is moderate evidence that preoperative chemo-radiotherapy has no beneficial impact on the survival of patients with potentially resectable oesophageal cancer. There is no scientific evidence that postoperative radiotherapy improves survival in patients with resectable oesophageal cancer. The documentation is, however, poor, consisting of only three randomized trials. There is fairly strong evidence that concomitant (but not sequential) chemo-radiotherapy gives significantly better survival rate than radiotherapy alone in inoperable oesophageal cancer. The results of the reported clinical trials are, however, conflicting, and no solid conclusion can be drawn. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy has been compared with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy in two randomized studies with conflicting results and no firm conclusion can be drawn

  10. Preoperative radiation therapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarashina, Hiromi; Saito, Norio; Nunomura, Masao; Takiguchi, Nobuhiro; Koda, Keishi; Sano, Takahisa; Nakashima, Nobuyuki

    1992-01-01

    Eighty patients with rectal cancer received a total of 30.6 Gy to the whole pelvic cavity and then a 12 Gy boost (4 fractions) especially to the pelvis minor including tumor. Tumor reduction, as found on X-ray film, endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasonography, CT and MRI, was proportional to histological outcome. Pathological effectiveness was reversely associated with tubular infiltration and extramural invasion. Definite cancer invasion into the adventitia, 2 mm or less from the surgical margin, and lymph node metastasis to group II were significantly responsive to irradiation. In these cases, local failure was also controlled by irradiation. The loco-regional occurrence rate was 6.0% in the irradiated group and 28.0% in the non-irradiated group; and the 5-year survival rate was 69.2% in the irradiated group and 56.0% in the non-irradiated group. It was also significantly higher in patients histopathologically judged as effective than the other patients. (N.K.)

  11. Advances in radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Zhengping; Zhang Yangde; Huang Fang; Liang Zhaoyu; Yang Shuren

    2007-01-01

    Modern advances in computers have fueled advances in imaging technologies. The improvements in imaging have in turn allowed a higher level of complexity to be incorporated into radiotherapy treatment planning systems. As a result of these changes, the delivery of radiotherapy evolved from therapy designed based primarily on plain (two dimensional) X-ray images and hand calculations to three-dimensional X-ray based images incorporating increasingly complex computer algorithms. More recently, biologic variables based on differences between tumor metabolism, tumor antigens, and normal tissues have been incorporated into the treatment process. In addition, greater awareness of the challenges to the accuracy of the treatment planning process, such as problems with set-error and organ movement, have begun to be systematically addressed, ushering in an era of socalled four-dimensional radiotherapy. (authors)

  12. Accompanying therapy with melatonin at radiation therapy for uterine body cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokhach, N.E.; Sorochan, P.P.; Gromakova, Yi.A.; Krugova, M.; Sukhyin, V.S.

    2011-01-01

    The results of treatment for uterine body cancer using post-operative radiation therapy (RT) accompanied by melatonin administration are analyzed. Accompanying therapy with melatonin limited negative RT influence on hematological and immune indices and prevented aggravation of quality of life.

  13. Adjuvant radiation therapy versus surgery alone in operable breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutqvist, L.E.; Pettersson, D.; Johansson, H.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents long-term results from a randomized trial of pre- or postoperative megavoltage radiation therapy versus surgery alone in pre- and postmenopausal women with operable breast cancer. Treatment outcome after relapse among patients who developed loco-regional recurrences was also analyzed. A total of 960 patients were included in the trial. The mean follow-up was 16 years (range: 13-19 years). The radiation therapy was individually planned. It included the chest wall (and the breast in the preoperative cases) and the regional lymph nodes. The tumor dose was 45 Gy/5 weeks. No adjuvant systemic therapy was used. The results showed a significant benefit with radiation therapy in terms of recurrence-free survival during the entire follow-up period. There was also an overall survival difference - corresponding to 16% reduction of deaths - in favour of the irradiated patients which, however, was not statistically significant (p=0.09). Among those 169 patients who developed loco-regional recurrences long-term control was only achieved in about one-third of the cases. This figure was similar among those who had received adjuvant radiation therapy (34%) compared to those initially treated with surgery alone (32%). This implied that the overall proportion of patients who eventually developed uncontrolled local disease was significantly higher among those initially allocated to surgery alone (16%) compared to those allocated to pre- or postoperative radiation therapy (6%, p<0.01). These results suggest that local undertreatment may be deleterious in subgroups of patients. (author) 5 tabs

  14. Changes in skin microcirculation during radiation therapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesselaar, Erik; Flejmer, Anna M; Farnebo, Simon; Dasu, Alexandru

    2017-08-01

    The majority of breast cancer patients who receive radiation treatment are affected by acute radiation-induced skin changes. The assessment of these changes is usually done by subjective methods, which complicates the comparison between different treatments or patient groups. This study investigates the feasibility of new robust methods for monitoring skin microcirculation to objectively assess and quantify acute skin reactions during radiation treatment. Laser Doppler flowmetry, laser speckle contrast imaging, and polarized light spectroscopy imaging were used to measure radiation-induced changes in microvascular perfusion and red blood cell concentration (RBC) in the skin of 15 patients undergoing adjuvant radiation therapy for breast cancer. Measurements were made before treatment, once a week during treatment, and directly after the last fraction. In the treated breast, perfusion and RBC concentration were increased after 1-5 fractions (2.66-13.3 Gy) compared to baseline. The largest effects were seen in the areola and the medial area. No changes in perfusion and RBC concentration were seen in the untreated breast. In contrast, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scores were increased only after 2 weeks of treatment, which demonstrates the potential of the proposed methods for early assessment of skin changes. Also, there was a moderate to good correlation between the perfusion (r = 0.52) and RBC concentration (r = 0.59) and the RTOG score given a week later. We conclude that radiation-induced microvascular changes in the skin can be objectively measured using novel camera-based techniques before visual changes in the skin are apparent. Objective measurement of microvascular changes in the skin may be valuable in the comparison of skin reactions between different radiation treatments and possibly in predicting acute skin effects at an earlier stage.

  15. Definitive proton beam radiation therapy for inoperable gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, Susumu; Takase, Yasuhiro; Aoyagi, Hiroyuki; Orii, Kazuo; Sharma, N.; Iwasaki, Yoji; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tsujii, Hiroshi.

    1991-01-01

    Proton beam radiation therapy using 250 MeV protons was carried out on two patients with early gastric cancer (T1, N0, M0). One patient was an 85-year-old man with early gastric cancer of type IIa + IIc. The other one was a 70-year-old man with early gastric cancer of type IIc. In both cases histological examination of biopsy specimens showed differential adenocarcinoma; distant metastasis was not found by other examinations. Both patients were considered inoperable due to their poor cardiac and/or respiratory functions. Therefore, it was decided to treat them by definitive proton irradiation, delivering total doses of 86 Gy and 83 Gy, respectively. In both patients, skin erythema that did not require any special treatment was found in the irradiation field. Hematobiological examinations did not show any abnormality. Although endoscopic examination at two years after irradiation in the former case and at seven months in the latter case showed persistent gastric ulcer at the site of the cancerous lesions, cancer cells were not found histologically. Therefore, we concluded that proton irradiation therapy was useful for inoperable early gastric cancers. (author)

  16. Hyperfractionation radiation therapy in advanced head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Hee; Ye, Ji Won

    2003-01-01

    The effects of hyperfractionation radiation therapy, such as the failure pattern and survival, on the treatment results in advanced stage head and neck cancer were studied. Between September 1990 and October 1998, 24 patients with advanced stage (III, IV) head and neck cancers, were treated using hyperfractionation radiation therapy in the Department at Radiation Oncology at the Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center. The male to female ratio was 7 ; 1, and the age range from 38 to 71 years with the median of 56 years. With regard to the TNM stage, 11 patients were stage III and 13 were stage IV. The sites of primary cancer were the nasopharynx in six, the hypopharynx in 6, the larynx in five, the oropharynx in three, the maxillary sinus in three, and the oral cavity in one patient. The radiotherapy was delivered by 6 MV X-ray, with a fraction size of 1.2 Gy at two fractions a day, with at least 6 hours inter-fractional interval. The mean total radiation doses was 72 Gy, (ranging from 64.4 to 76.8 Gy). Fallow-up periods ranged between 3 and 136 months, with the median of 52 months. The overall survival rates at 3 and 5 years in all patients were 66.7% and 52.4%. The disease-free survival rates at 3 and 5 years (3YDFS, 5YDFS) in all patients Were 66.7% and 47.6%. The 3YDFS and 5YDFS in stage III patients were 81.8% and 63.6%, and those in stage IV patients were 53.8% and 32.3%. Ten patients were alive with no local nor distant failures at the time of analyses. Six patients (25%) died due to distant metastasis and 12.5% died due to local failure. Distant metastasis was the major cause of failure, but 2 patients died due to unknown failures and 3 of other diseases. The distant metastasis sites were the lung (3 patients), the bone (1 patient), and the liver (2 patients). One patient died of second esophageal cancer. There were no severe late complications, with the exception of 1 osteoradionecrosis of the mandible 58 months after treatment. Although this study was

  17. The Role of Radiation Therapy in the Unresectable Rectal Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo Cheol; Seong, Jin Sil; Kim, Gwi Eon

    1995-01-01

    Purpose : Unresectable rectal cancer has a grave prognosis, regardless of the therapy used and median survival is less than 1 year. Also, it is reported by many authors that 50-80% of unresectable lesions were rendered respectable by radiation therapy and the median survival time for the completely resected patients were better than that of the unresected patients. So we analyzed retrospectively our data for the better treatment outcome in these patients. Materials and Methods : From 1980 to 1992, 45 patients with initially unresectable tumors in the rectum were treated with radiation therapy with/without surgery in Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Cancer Center. 10 MV radiation and multiple field technique( box or AP/PA) were used. The total dose was 8-70 Gy and median dose was 48 Gy. We evaluated the lesion status at 45-50 Gy for operability. If the lesions appeared to be respectable, the patients were operated on 4-6 weeks after radiation therapy. But if the lesions were still fixed, the radiation dose was increased to 60-65 Gy. Results : For all patients, the 2-year actuarial survival was 13.3% and median survival was 9.5 months. Of 6 patients who had received less than 45 Gy, only 17% of patients responded, but in the patients who had received more than 45 Gy, 60% of response rate was achieved. Six of the 24 patients(25%) underwent surgical resections following RT. For patients undergoing curative resection, the two-year survival was 50%, but that of the patients without resection was 9.5% (p<0.01). Survival of patients with complete response following RT was 50% at 2 years. Survival of patients with partial response, stable disease and progressive disease after RT was 13.4%, 15.4%, 0% respectively (p<0.05). Conclusion: Our data suggests that the efforts which can increase the response rate and aggressive surgical approach are needed to achieve the better local control and survival in unresectable rectal cancers

  18. Triple primary urogenital cancer. A case of secondary cancers following combination therapy comprising chemotherapy plus radiation therapy for testicular cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iuchi, Hiromichi; Watabe, Yoshihiko; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Kitahara, Katsuyuki; Takeyama, Yoshihiro; Fujita, Shinji

    2012-01-01

    A 68-year-old man was referred to our outpatient clinic with left renal cell cancer and bladder cancer. He had undergone combination therapy comprising chemotherapy plus radiation therapy following radical orchiectomy for testicular cancer at the age of 48 years. The right testis could be felt within the scrotum, however the left testis could not. Blood tests showed no abnormality in regard to testicular tumor markers. Urine cytology was class V. Computed tomography revealed a 3.0 x 3.4 cm mass in the left kidney and a 4.5 x 1.5 cm mass in the left wall of the bladder. We made it a priority to treat the bladder cancer which was strongly suspected to be invasive cancer. At first the patient underwent radical cystectomy. Then left partial nephrectomy was carried out. Our case would appear to be the 24th case of triple primary urogenital cancer in Japan that consisted of left testicular cancer, left renal cancer and bladder cancer. Our case was also thought to be a case of secondary cancer that developed following treatment for testicular cancer. (author)

  19. Primary radiation therapy for early breast cancer: the experience at the joint center for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.R.; Botnick, L.; Bloomer, W.D.; Chaffey, J.T.; Hellman, S.

    1981-01-01

    The results of primary radiation therapy in 176 consecutive patients with clinical State I and II carcinoma of the breast were reviewed. Median follow-up time was 47 months. The overall breast relapse rate was 7%. Patients undergoing interstitial implantation had a significantly lower breast relapse rate (1%) than patients not undergoing implantation (11%). Breast relapse was more common in patients undergoing incisional or needle biopsy (17%), compared to patients treated after excisional biopsy (5%). In patients undergoing excisional biopsy, but not interstitial implantation, breast relapse was related to external beam dose. Twelve percent of the patients who received less than 1600 ret dose relapsed in the breast, compared to none of the 19 patients who received more than 1700 ret dose. These results imply that supplemental irradiation to the primary tumor area is required following excisional biopsy of a primary breast cancer when 4500-5000 rad is delivered to the entire breast

  20. A Systematic Overview of Radiation Therapy Effects in Ovarian Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einhorn, Nina; Trope, Claes; Ridderheim, Mona; Boman, Karin; Sorbe, Bengt; Cavallin-Staahl, Eva

    2003-01-01

    A systematic review of radiation therapy trials in several tumour types was performed by The Swedish Council of Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU). The procedures for evaluation of the scientific literature are described separately. This synthesis of the literature on radiation therapy for ovarian cancer is based on data from six randomized trials. Moreover, data from one prospective study and three retrospective studies were used. In total, 10 scientific articles are included, involving 1,282 patients. The results were compared with those of a similar overview from 1996 including 15,042 patients. The conclusions reached can be summarized in the following points: There is no scientific documentation supporting adjuvant radiotherapy for early-stage, low-risk patients. No studies have been reported where adjuvant radiotherapy has been compared with no adjuvant therapy in early-stage, high-risk patients. Adjuvant radiotherapy, either whole abdominal irradiation or intraperitoneal P32, has been compared with adjuvant chemotherapy in early-stage, high-risk patients. There is no scientific evidence to show that there is a difference in efficacy. There is some evidence to suggest that adjuvant radiotherapy after radical surgery leads to an increase in disease-free survival rate for patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer. There is little documentation on long-term side effects (second malignancy) after adjuvant radiotherapy and no conclusions can be drawn

  1. Delineation of Supraclavicular Target Volumes in Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Lindsay C.; Diehn, Felix E.; Boughey, Judy C.; Childs, Stephanie K.; Park, Sean S.; Yan, Elizabeth S.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Mutter, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To map the location of gross supraclavicular metastases in patients with breast cancer, in order to determine areas at highest risk of harboring subclinical disease. Methods and Materials: Patients with axial imaging of gross supraclavicular disease were identified from an institutional breast cancer registry. Locations of the metastatic lymph nodes were transferred onto representative axial computed tomography images of the supraclavicular region and compared with the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) breast cancer atlas for radiation therapy planning. Results: Sixty-two patients with 161 supraclavicular nodal metastases were eligible for study inclusion. At the time of diagnosis, 117 nodal metastases were present in 44 patients. Forty-four nodal metastases in 18 patients were detected at disease recurrence, 4 of whom had received prior radiation to the supraclavicular fossa. Of the 161 nodal metastases, 95 (59%) were within the RTOG consensus volume, 4 nodal metastases (2%) in 3 patients were marginally within the volume, and 62 nodal metastases (39%) in 30 patients were outside the volume. Supraclavicular disease outside the RTOG consensus volume was located in 3 regions: at the level of the cricoid and thyroid cartilage (superior to the RTOG volume), in the posterolateral supraclavicular fossa (posterolateral to the RTOG volume), and in the lateral low supraclavicular fossa (lateral to the RTOG volume). Only women with multiple supraclavicular metastases had nodal disease that extended superiorly to the level of the thyroid cartilage. Conclusions: For women with risk of harboring subclinical supraclavicular disease warranting the addition of supraclavicular radiation, coverage of the posterior triangle and the lateral low supraclavicular region should be considered. For women with known supraclavicular disease, extension of neck coverage superior to the cricoid cartilage may be warranted

  2. Delineation of Supraclavicular Target Volumes in Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Lindsay C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Diehn, Felix E. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Boughey, Judy C. [Department of Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Childs, Stephanie K.; Park, Sean S.; Yan, Elizabeth S.; Petersen, Ivy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Mutter, Robert W., E-mail: mutter.robert@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: To map the location of gross supraclavicular metastases in patients with breast cancer, in order to determine areas at highest risk of harboring subclinical disease. Methods and Materials: Patients with axial imaging of gross supraclavicular disease were identified from an institutional breast cancer registry. Locations of the metastatic lymph nodes were transferred onto representative axial computed tomography images of the supraclavicular region and compared with the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) breast cancer atlas for radiation therapy planning. Results: Sixty-two patients with 161 supraclavicular nodal metastases were eligible for study inclusion. At the time of diagnosis, 117 nodal metastases were present in 44 patients. Forty-four nodal metastases in 18 patients were detected at disease recurrence, 4 of whom had received prior radiation to the supraclavicular fossa. Of the 161 nodal metastases, 95 (59%) were within the RTOG consensus volume, 4 nodal metastases (2%) in 3 patients were marginally within the volume, and 62 nodal metastases (39%) in 30 patients were outside the volume. Supraclavicular disease outside the RTOG consensus volume was located in 3 regions: at the level of the cricoid and thyroid cartilage (superior to the RTOG volume), in the posterolateral supraclavicular fossa (posterolateral to the RTOG volume), and in the lateral low supraclavicular fossa (lateral to the RTOG volume). Only women with multiple supraclavicular metastases had nodal disease that extended superiorly to the level of the thyroid cartilage. Conclusions: For women with risk of harboring subclinical supraclavicular disease warranting the addition of supraclavicular radiation, coverage of the posterior triangle and the lateral low supraclavicular region should be considered. For women with known supraclavicular disease, extension of neck coverage superior to the cricoid cartilage may be warranted.

  3. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Oligometastatic Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muldermans, Jonathan L. [F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Romak, Lindsay B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Kwon, Eugene D. [Department of Urology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Department of Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Park, Sean S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Olivier, Kenneth R., E-mail: olivier.kenneth@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: To review outcomes of patients with oligometastatic prostate cancer (PCa) treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and to identify variables associated with local failure. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed records of patients treated with SBRT for oligometastatic PCa. Metastasis control (ie, control of the treated lesion, MC), biochemical progression-free survival, distant progression-free survival, and overall survival were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Sixty-six men with 81 metastatic PCa lesions, 50 of which were castrate-resistant, were included in the analysis. Lesions were in bone (n=74), lymph nodes (n=6), or liver (n=1). Stereotactic body radiation therapy was delivered in 1 fraction to 71 lesions (88%), at a median dose of 16 Gy (range, 16-24 Gy). The remaining lesions received 30 Gy in 3 fractions (n=6) or 50 Gy in 5 fractions (n=4). Median follow-up was 16 months (range, 3-49 months). Estimated MC at 2 years was 82%. Biochemical progression-free survival, distant progression-free survival, and overall survival were 54%, 45%, and 83%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, only the dose of SBRT was significantly associated with MC; lesions treated with 16 Gy had 58% MC, and those treated with ≥18 Gy had 95% MC at 2 years (P≤.001). At 2 years, MC for lesions treated with 18 Gy (n=21) was 88%. No patient treated with ≥18 Gy in a single fraction or with any multifraction regimen had local failure. Six patients (9%) had grade 1 pain flare, and 2 (3%) had grade 2 pain flare. No grade 2 or greater late toxicities were reported. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy for patients with oligometastatic prostate cancer provided optimal metastasis control and acceptable toxicity with doses ≥18 Gy. Biochemical progression-free survival was 54% at 16 months with the inclusion of SBRT in the treatment regimen. Stereotactic body radiation therapy should be considered in

  4. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Oligometastatic Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muldermans, Jonathan L.; Romak, Lindsay B.; Kwon, Eugene D.; Park, Sean S.; Olivier, Kenneth R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To review outcomes of patients with oligometastatic prostate cancer (PCa) treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and to identify variables associated with local failure. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed records of patients treated with SBRT for oligometastatic PCa. Metastasis control (ie, control of the treated lesion, MC), biochemical progression-free survival, distant progression-free survival, and overall survival were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Sixty-six men with 81 metastatic PCa lesions, 50 of which were castrate-resistant, were included in the analysis. Lesions were in bone (n=74), lymph nodes (n=6), or liver (n=1). Stereotactic body radiation therapy was delivered in 1 fraction to 71 lesions (88%), at a median dose of 16 Gy (range, 16-24 Gy). The remaining lesions received 30 Gy in 3 fractions (n=6) or 50 Gy in 5 fractions (n=4). Median follow-up was 16 months (range, 3-49 months). Estimated MC at 2 years was 82%. Biochemical progression-free survival, distant progression-free survival, and overall survival were 54%, 45%, and 83%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, only the dose of SBRT was significantly associated with MC; lesions treated with 16 Gy had 58% MC, and those treated with ≥18 Gy had 95% MC at 2 years (P≤.001). At 2 years, MC for lesions treated with 18 Gy (n=21) was 88%. No patient treated with ≥18 Gy in a single fraction or with any multifraction regimen had local failure. Six patients (9%) had grade 1 pain flare, and 2 (3%) had grade 2 pain flare. No grade 2 or greater late toxicities were reported. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy for patients with oligometastatic prostate cancer provided optimal metastasis control and acceptable toxicity with doses ≥18 Gy. Biochemical progression-free survival was 54% at 16 months with the inclusion of SBRT in the treatment regimen. Stereotactic body radiation therapy should be considered in

  5. A case of radiation-induced rectal cancer 21 years after radiation therapy for cancer of the bladder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takada, Jouji; Saitou, Masanobu; Misawa, Kazuhito; Manabe, Kunihiko; Hata, Yoshinobu; Sano, Fumio [Sapporo Social Insurance General Hospital (Japan)

    1998-10-01

    A 74-year-old man was seen at our hospital because of bloody stools who had undergone aggressive radical cystectomy for cancer of the bladder followed by radiation therapy 21 years before. A barium enema showed a rectal tumor, and Mile`s operation was performed. Histological examination revealed radiation colitis and moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma (ss, ly1, v1, n0, stage II). It was inferred that the major etiologic factor in this case may have been irradiation for the first cancer because the first cancer had been cured, the interval between irradiation and the second cancer was long, and rectal tumor was with in the radiation field. (author)

  6. A prospective study of quality of life in breast cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canhua Xiao, PhD, RN

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Radiation therapy did not worsen QOL in breast cancer patients. However, pre-radiation therapy patient characteristics including BMI and perceived stress may be used to identify women who may experience decreased physical and mental function during and up to 1 year after radiation therapy.

  7. Radiation Induced Rib Fractures on Bone Scan after Breast Cancer Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hae Won; Won, Kyoung Sook; Zeon, Seok Kil; Kim, Jin Hee

    2009-01-01

    This study is to evaluate rib fractures on bone scan in breast cancer patients treated with breast cancer surgery and radiation therapy and to evaluate its relation with radiation therapy and operation modality. Two hundred seventy cases that underwent serial bone scan after breast cancer surgery and radiation therapy were enrolled. Bone scan and chest CT findings of rib fracture were analyzed. The rib uptake was seen in 74 of 270 cases (27.4%) on bone scan and 50 cases (18.5%) were confirmed to have rib fracture by chest CT. The rate of modified radical mastectomy in patients with rib fracture was significantly higher than that in patients without rib fracture (66.0% vs. 27.0%, p=0.000). The rate of additional radiation therapy to axillar or supraclavicular regions in patients with rib fracture was significantly higher than that in patients without rib fracture (62.0% vs. 28.6%, p=0.000). Rib fracture was seen most frequently at 1-2 years after radiation therapy (51.9%) and single rib fracture was seen most frequently (55.2%). Of total 106 rib fractures, focal rib uptake was seen in 94 ribs (88.7%) and diffuse rib uptake was seen in 12 ribs (11.3%). On one year follow-up bone scan, complete resolution of rib uptake was seen in 15 ribs (14.2%). On chest CT, the rate of fracture line in ribs with intense uptake was significantly higher than that in ribs with mild or moderate uptake (p=0.000). The rate of presence of fracture line in ribs with focal uptake was significantly higher than that in ribs with diffuse uptake (p=0.001). Rib fracture in breast cancer patients after radiation therapy was related to radiation portal and operation modality. It should be interpreted carefully as a differential diagnosis of bone metastasis

  8. Radiation Induced Rib Fractures on Bone Scan after Breast Cancer Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hae Won; Won, Kyoung Sook; Zeon, Seok Kil; Kim, Jin Hee [Keimyung University, School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    This study is to evaluate rib fractures on bone scan in breast cancer patients treated with breast cancer surgery and radiation therapy and to evaluate its relation with radiation therapy and operation modality. Two hundred seventy cases that underwent serial bone scan after breast cancer surgery and radiation therapy were enrolled. Bone scan and chest CT findings of rib fracture were analyzed. The rib uptake was seen in 74 of 270 cases (27.4%) on bone scan and 50 cases (18.5%) were confirmed to have rib fracture by chest CT. The rate of modified radical mastectomy in patients with rib fracture was significantly higher than that in patients without rib fracture (66.0% vs. 27.0%, p=0.000). The rate of additional radiation therapy to axillar or supraclavicular regions in patients with rib fracture was significantly higher than that in patients without rib fracture (62.0% vs. 28.6%, p=0.000). Rib fracture was seen most frequently at 1-2 years after radiation therapy (51.9%) and single rib fracture was seen most frequently (55.2%). Of total 106 rib fractures, focal rib uptake was seen in 94 ribs (88.7%) and diffuse rib uptake was seen in 12 ribs (11.3%). On one year follow-up bone scan, complete resolution of rib uptake was seen in 15 ribs (14.2%). On chest CT, the rate of fracture line in ribs with intense uptake was significantly higher than that in ribs with mild or moderate uptake (p=0.000). The rate of presence of fracture line in ribs with focal uptake was significantly higher than that in ribs with diffuse uptake (p=0.001). Rib fracture in breast cancer patients after radiation therapy was related to radiation portal and operation modality. It should be interpreted carefully as a differential diagnosis of bone metastasis.

  9. Result of radiation therapy for non-resectable lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Masaaki; Kawamura, Masashi; Kimura, Makoto; Mogami, Hiroshi; Kimura, Yoshiko; Hamamoto, Ken

    1988-01-01

    A total of 122 patients with non-resectable lung cancer, comprising 98 with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and 24 with small cell lung cancer (SCLC), who were treated from November 1976 through December 1985 with definitive radiation therapy (RT), were retrospectively analyzed for the outcome of RT. Overall, the 5-year survival rate was 6 %: it was 8 % for SCLC and 4 % for NSCLC. For NSCLC, survival was significantly better in stages I-III patients than stage IV patients (p < 0.01), although it was independent of histology, the combination of chemotherapy, and fractionation schedule. Local recurrence and distant metastasis were found to be the cause of death in 42 % and 13 %, respectively, in the stages I-II NSCLC group; and in 19 % and 52 %, respectively, in the SCLC group. The SCLC patients tended to have better survival when given chemotherapy before RT. Ten patients surviving for three years or more were characterized by having early stage of NSCLC, less than 100 cm of irradiated field, and a total dose of 60 Gy or more. Twelve patients (10 %) had severe radiation pneumonitis that resulted in death. Acute and fetal pneumonitis tended to be frequent when chemotherapy was combined with RT. (Namekawa, K.)

  10. Stereotactic body radiation therapy versus conventional radiation therapy in patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Stefan Starup; Schytte, Tine; Jensen, Henrik R

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Introduction. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is now an accepted and patient friendly treatment, but still controversy exists about its comparability to conventional radiation therapy (RT). The purpose of this single...... and SBRT predicted improved prognosis. However, staging procedure, confirmation procedure of recurrence and technical improvements of radiation treatment is likely to influence outcomes. However, SBRT seems to be as efficient as conventional RT and is a more convenient treatment for the patients....

  11. Potency preservation following stereotactic body radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obayomi-Davies, Olusola; Pahira, John; McGeagh, Kevin G; Collins, Brian T; Kowalczyk, Keith; Bandi, Gaurav; Kumar, Deepak; Suy, Simeng; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Lynch, John H; Collins, Sean P; Chen, Leonard N; Bhagat, Aditi; Wright, Henry C; Uhm, Sunghae; Kim, Joy S; Yung, Thomas M; Lei, Siyuan; Batipps, Gerald P

    2013-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction after prostate radiation therapy remains an ongoing challenge and critical quality of life issue. Given the higher dose of radiation per fraction using stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) there is concern that post-SBRT impotency would be higher than conventional radiation therapy approaches. This study sought to evaluate potency preservation and sexual function following SBRT for prostate cancer. Between February 2008 and March 2011, 216 men with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated definitively with SBRT monotherapy at Georgetown University Hospital. Potency was defined as the ability to have an erection firm enough for intercourse with or without sexual aids while sexual activity was defined as the ability to have an erection firm enough for masturbation and foreplay. Patients who received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) were excluded from this study. Ninety-seven hormone-naïve men were identified as being potent at the initiation of therapy and were included in this review. All patients were treated to 35–36.25 Gy in 5 fractions delivered with the CyberKnife Radiosurgical System (Accuray). Prostate specific antigen (PSA) and total testosterone levels were obtained pre-treatment, every 3 months for the first year and every 6 months for the subsequent year. Sexual function was assessed with the Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM), the Expanded Prostate Index Composite (EPIC)-26 and Utilization of Sexual Medication/Device questionnaires at baseline and all follow-up visits. Ninety-seven men (43 low-, 50 intermediate- and 4 high-risk) at a median age of 68 years (range, 48–82 years) received SBRT. The median pre-treatment PSA was 5.9 ng/ml and the minimum follow-up was 24 months. The median pre-treatment total serum testosterone level was 11.4 nmol/L (range, 4.4-27.9 nmol/L). The median baseline SHIM was 22 and 36% of patients utilized sexual aids prior to treatment. Although potency rates declined following

  12. Result of radiation therapy for inoperable pancreas cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okawa, Tomohiko; Ikeda, Michio; Tazaki, Eisei; Kaneda, Koichi; Tsuya, Akira.

    1978-01-01

    Twenty cases of the pancreas cancer were treated by means of 60 Co γ or Linac x-rays during the period between 1958 and 1977 at the Cancer Institute Hospital and Tokyo Women's Medical College. 11 were irradiated by external radiation and 9 by intraoperative radiation. Pancreas irradiation was indicated for relief of pain and alleviation of jaundice although the effect was symptomatic. 2500 rad of intraoperative radiation was reasonable dose in about 10 x 10 cm radiation field. Radical curative irradiation for pancreas cancer might be rarely indicated. Radiotherapy of pancreas cancer should be considered in conjunction with multimodal treatment in the future. (author)

  13. A Systematic Overview of Radiation Therapy Effects in Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, Sten; Norlen, Bo Johan; Widmark, Anders

    2004-01-01

    A systematic review of radiation therapy trials in prostate cancer has been performed according to principles adopted by the Swedish Council of Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU). This synthesis of the literature is based on data from one meta-analysis, 30 randomized trials, many dealing with hormonal therapy, 55 prospective trials, and 210 retrospective studies. Totally the studies included 152,614 patients. There is a lack of properly controlled clinical trials in most important aspects of radiation therapy in prostate cancer. The conclusions reached can be summarized as follows: There are no randomized studies that compare the outcome of surgery (radical prostatectomy) with either external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy for patients with clinically localized low-risk prostate cancer. However, with the advent of widely accepted prognostic markers for prostate cancer (pre-treatment PSA, Gleason score, and T-stage), such comparisons have been made possible. There is substantial documentation from large single-institutional and multi-institutional series on patients with this disease category (PSA T2) disease, i.e. patients normally not suited for surgery, benefit from higher than conventional total dose. No overall survival benefit has yet been shown. Dose escalation to patients with intermediate-risk or high-risk disease can be performed with 3D conformal radiotherapy (photon or proton) boost, with Ir-192 high dose rate brachytherapy boost, or brachytherapy boost with permanent seed implantation. Despite an increased risk of urinary tract and/or rectal side effects, dose-escalated therapy can generally be safely delivered with all three techniques. There is some evidence that 3D conformal radiotherapy results in reduced late rectal toxicity and acute anal toxicity compared with radiotherapy administered with non-conformal treatment volumes. There is some evidence that postoperative external beam radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy in patients with

  14. Systemic scleroderma diagnosed after undergoing radiation therapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Tetsuo; Kakei, Masae

    1994-01-01

    A case of systemic scleroderma in which the symptoms became prominent after undergoing radiation therapy for breast cancer is reported. A 68-year-old woman, who had undergone a radical mastectomy for breast carcinoma at the age of 63 and thereafter received radiotherapy at 65, 66 and 67 years of age, visited our clinic complaining of skin sclerosis and Raynaud's phenomenon which she had noticed since the age of 65. The physical examination revealed not only postirradiation fibrosis and pigmentation, but also edematous sclerosis and the pigmentation of her extremities, as well as short frenulum of the tongue and digital pitting scars. She demonstrated serum anti-topoisomerase I antibodies, esophageal dysfunction and lung fibrosis. The histopathology of the forearm skin showed edema of the upper dermis as well as increased and homogenized collagen bundles in the middle and lower dermis. Since similar cases have been reported, it is considerable that radiation therapy may have thus worsened the lesions of scleroderma in this patient as well. (author)

  15. Systemic scleroderma diagnosed after undergoing radiation therapy for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Tetsuo; Kakei, Masae (Yokohama City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1994-10-01

    A case of systemic scleroderma in which the symptoms became prominent after undergoing radiation therapy for breast cancer is reported. A 68-year-old woman, who had undergone a radical mastectomy for breast carcinoma at the age of 63 and thereafter received radiotherapy at 65, 66 and 67 years of age, visited our clinic complaining of skin sclerosis and Raynaud's phenomenon which she had noticed since the age of 65. The physical examination revealed not only postirradiation fibrosis and pigmentation, but also edematous sclerosis and the pigmentation of her extremities, as well as short frenulum of the tongue and digital pitting scars. She demonstrated serum anti-topoisomerase I antibodies, esophageal dysfunction and lung fibrosis. The histopathology of the forearm skin showed edema of the upper dermis as well as increased and homogenized collagen bundles in the middle and lower dermis. Since similar cases have been reported, it is considerable that radiation therapy may have thus worsened the lesions of scleroderma in this patient as well. (author).

  16. Results of conservative surgery and radiation therapy for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osteen, R.T.; Smith, B.L. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    For stage I or II breast cancer, conservative surgery and radiation therapy are as effective as modified radical or radical mastectomy. In most cases, cosmetic considerations and the availability of therapy are the primary concerns. The extent of a surgical resection less than a mastectomy has not been a subject of a randomized trial and is controversial. It appears that removal of a quadrant of the breast for small lesions is safe but excessive. It may be possible to limit the breast resection to gross tumor removal for most patients while using wider resections for patients with an extensive intraductal component or for invasive lobular carcinoma. It also appears that excluding patients from breast conservation on the basis of positive margins on the first attempt at tumor excision may be unnecessarily restrictive. Although patients with an extensive intraductal component or invasive lobular carcinoma should have negative margins, it appears that a patient with predominantly invasive ductal carcinoma can be treated without re-excision if all gross tumor has been resected and there is no reason to suspect extensive microscopic disease. Patients with indeterminate margins should have a re-excision. Axillary dissection provides prognostic information and prevents progression of the disease within the axilla. Axillary dissections limited to level I will accurately identify a substantial number of patients who have pathologically positive but clinically negative nodes. When combined with radiation therapy to the axilla, a level I dissection results in a limited number of patients with progressive axillary disease. Patients with pathologically positive axillas and patients at particularly high risk for systemic disease because of the extent of axillary node involvement can be identified by dissections of levels I and II. 60 references.

  17. Combined cisplatin and radiation therapy for advanced bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Masaharu; Sawamura, Yoshikatsu; Kase, Takahisa

    1991-01-01

    The combined effects of cisplatin and irradiation were investigated in 44 patients with bladder cancer accompanied by the infiltration of T 2 ∼T 4 cells, in a study commencing in September 1985. The antitumor effect and adverse reactions to the therapy were recorded. The majority of these patients had not undergone total bladder excision, for a variety of reasons. Thirty-two patients were male and 12 were female; the average age was 66.7 years, with ranging from 33∼83 years of age. Irradiation was performed using table cobalt 60 or a linear accelerator at a dose of 2 Gy per day, 5 days a week. The total radiation dose ranged from 40 to 70 Gy. Cisplatin was administered systemically at a dose of 20∼30 mg/day for 5 consecutive days during the first and fourth weeks of irradiation. At the time of final assessment of the antitumor effect, 24 out of 40 eligible patients (60%) had achieved complete remission (CR). The duration of CR averaged 18.8 months, with a range of 1∼50 months. The actual survival rates were as follows: 81% at 1 year, 69% at 2 years, and 52% at 3 and 4 years. Regarding adverse reactions, anorexia occurred in 28 patients (70%), nausea and vomiting in 21 (53%), diarrhea in 8 (20%), leukopenia in 16 (40%), mild thrombocytopenia in 5 (13%), and dermatitis in 8 (20%). All of these adverse reactions were mild and were alleviated after completion of the combined therapy. The present investigation demonstrated that combined therapy with cisplatin and irradiation is effective for the regional treatment of invasive bladder cancer. (author)

  18. Radiation-induced myocardial perfusion abnormalities in breast cancer patients following external beam radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhari, Mohammad; Anbiaei, Robabeh; Zamani, Hanie; Fallahi, Babak; Beiki, Davood; Ameri, Ahmad; Emami-Ardekani, Alireza; Fard-Esfahani, Armaghan; Gholamrezanezhad, Ali; Seid Ratki, Kazem Razavi; Roknabadi, Alireza Momen

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy for breast cancer can induce myocardial capillary injury and increase cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. A prospective cohort was conducted to study the prevalence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities following radiation therapy of left-sided breast cancer patients as compared to those with right-sided cancer. To minimize potential confounding factors, only those patients with low 10-year risk of coronary artery disease (based on Framingham risk scoring) were included. All patients were initially treated by modified radical mastectomy and then were managed by postoperative 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy (CRT) to the surgical bed with an additional 1-cm margin, delivered by 46-50 Gy (in 2 Gy daily fractions) over a 5-week course. The same dose-adjusted chemotherapy regimen (including anthracyclines, cyclophosphamide and taxol) was given to all patients. Six months after radiation therapy, all patients underwent cardiac SPECT for the evaluation of myocardial perfusion. A total of 71 patients with a mean age of 45.3±7.2 years [35 patients with leftsided breast cancer (exposed) and 36 patients with right-sided cancer (controls)] were enrolled. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) [showing the percentage of the heart exposed to >50% of radiation] was significantly higher in patients with left-sided breast cancer. Visual interpretation detected perfusion abnormalities in 42.9% of cases and 16.7% of controls (P=0.02, Odds ratio=1.46). In semiquantitative segmental analysis, only apical (28.6% versus 8.3%, P=0.03) and anterolateral (17.1% versus 2.8%, P=0.049) walls showed significantly reduced myocardial perfusion in the exposed group. Summed Stress Score (SSS) of>3 was observed in twelve cases (34.3%), while in five of the controls (13.9%),(Odds ratio=1.3). There was no significant difference between the groups regarding left ventricular ejection fraction. The risk of radiation induced myocardial perfusion abnormality in patients treated with CRT on the

  19. Radiation-induced myocardial perfusion abnormalities in breast cancer patients following external beam radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Eftekhari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Radiation therapy for breast cancer can induce myocardial capillary injury and increase cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. A prospective cohort was conducted to study the prevalence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities following radiation therapy of left-sided breast cancer patients as compared to those with right–sided cancer. Methods: To minimize potential confounding factors, only those patients with low 10-year risk of coronary artery disease (based on Framingham risk scoring were included. All patients were initially treated by modified radical mastectomy and then were managed by postoperative 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy (CRT to the surgical bed with an additional 1-cm margin, delivered by 46-50 Gy (in 2 Gy daily fractions over a 5-week course. The same dose-adjusted chemotherapy regimen (including anthracyclines, cyclophosphamide and taxol was given to all patients. Six months after radiation therapy, all patients underwent cardiac SPECT for the evaluation of myocardial perfusion. Results: A total of 71 patients with a mean age of 45.3±7.2 years [35 patients with leftsided breast cancer (exposed and 36 patients with right-sided cancer (controls] were enrolled. Dose-volume histogram (DVH [showing the percentage of the heart exposed to >50% of radiation] was significantly higher in patients with left-sided breast cancer. Visual interpretation detected perfusion abnormalities in 42.9% of cases and 16.7% of controls (P=0.02, Odds ratio=1.46. In semiquantitative segmental analysis, only apical (28.6% versus 8.3%, P=0.03 and anterolateral (17.1% versus 2.8%, P=0.049 walls showed significantly reduced myocardial perfusion in the exposed group. Summed Stress Score (SSS of>3 was observed in twelve cases (34.3%, while in five of the controls (13.9%,(Odds ratio=1.3. There was no significant difference between the groups regarding left ventricular ejection fraction. Conclusion: The risk of radiation induced myocardial

  20. A study of radiation therapy for the cervical stump cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkawa, Reiko; Arai, Tatsuo; Morita, Shinroku; Takamizawa, Hirokichi.

    1979-01-01

    During a period of 17 years, between 1961 and 1977, 59 cases of the cervical stump cancer were treated at NIRS Hospital. We could not epidemically find the difference between the cervical stump cancer and the cervical cancer. 5-year survival rate of cervical stump cancer was 90% in stage I, 86% in stage II, and 63% in stage III, respectively. These results show higher 5-year survival rates, compared with those of cervical cancer. The frequencies of radiation complication in rectum and bladder were lower in the case of cervical stump cancer than in cervical cancer. It was suggested that the optimal radiation dose for cervical stump cancer was 80 - 90 TDF at point A. (author)

  1. A case of sarcoma of the chest wall after radiation therapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, Junko; Nishi, Tsunehiro; Fukuuchi, Atsushi; Takanashi, Riichiro

    1998-01-01

    A case of radiation-induced sarcoma of the chest wall after radiation therapy for breast cancer is reported. A 69-year-old woman underwent mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection followed by linac therapy of 50 Gy delivered to the left axilla, left supraclavicular area, and parasternal area. During therapy for bone and liver metastases, a tumor was noted in the left chest wall 15 years after radiation therapy. Incisional biopsy was performed. Histological diagnosis was spindle cell sarcoma. Radiation-induced sarcoma was suspected because the tumor developed 15 years after radiation therapy within the same area. Radiation-induced sarcoma is a rare tumor, but radiation therapy following breast-conserving therapy is widely employed. It is important to be aware of the possibility of radiation-induced sarcoma. (author)

  2. Radiation therapy and Koebner effect in cancer patients with psoriasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vexler, A.; Ben-Yosef, R.; Soyfer, V.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation therapy (XRT) may initiate skin side effects that occur more often in patients with skin disorders. One of such diseases is psoriasis - a common disorder in the western communities. In the past Grenz rays and superficial XRT were used to treat psoriatic patients and were reported to initiate the Koebner effect, which is an exacerbation of the underlying disease following a skin trauma. Recently, several case reports revealed a similar response in cancer patients receiving megavoltage XRT. Hence, one may assume that irradiation should be re-considered or re-modified in order to spare the involved skin. To report our experience in radiotherapy of cancer patients with psoriasis. Six patients with prostate adenocarcinoma (3), breast cancer (2) and soft tissue sarcoma (1) suffering from psoriasis were referred for radiotherapy as a part of their anti-cancer treatment. In all patients the irradiation fields included the psoriatic lesions. The irradiation was delivered using linear accelerators operated through 6-8 MV photon and 8 MeV electron beams. The total XRT dose varied from 50 to 70 Gy and the daily fraction was 1.8-2.0 Gy. A close monitoring during and after completion of irradiation was carried out and standard skin care was advised. No change in the irradiated psoriatic lesions as well as in the surrounding area was observed in all patients during the irradiation. Subsequent follow up (up to 24 months) revealed no new skin lesions and no worsening of existing plaques. Megavoltage XRT in a conventional daily fraction has no effect on psoriatic skin lesions

  3. Patterns of care study and evidence based medicine for radiation therapy. Prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Katsumasa; Mitsuhashi, Norio

    2002-01-01

    In Japan, where the mortality rate of prostate cancer is lower than in Western countries, there is little evidence of radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Therefore, we have to refer to the evidence of radiation therapy from Western countries, but we should pay attention to the differences of cultural, racial, or social background between Japan and Western countries. The Patterns of Care Study (PCS) was conducted in Japan and extramural audits were performed for 50 randomly selected institutions. Detailed information of 311 prostate cancer patients without distant metastases and other cancers, who were treated with radiation therapy in 1996-1998, was collected. In this article, the results of PCS for primary prostate cancer were shown, with a review of literature for the appropriate choice of radiation therapy. This study was supported by the Grantin-Aid for Cancer Research from Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (10-17). (author)

  4. A Systematic Overview of Radiation Therapy Effects in Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glimelius, Bengt; Groenberg, Henrik; Jaerhult, Johannes; Wallgren, Arne; Cavallin-Staahl, Eva

    2003-01-01

    A systematic review of radiation therapy trials in several tumour types was performed by The Swedish Council of Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU). The procedures for evaluation of the scientific literature are described separately. This synthesis of the literature on radiation therapy for rectal cancer is based on data from 42 randomized trials and 3 meta-analyses. Moreover, data from 36 prospective studies, 7 retrospective studies and 17 other articles were used. A total of 131 scientific articles are included, involving 25,351 patients. The results were compared with those of a similar overview from 1996 including 15,042 patients. The conclusions reached can be summarized thus: The results after rectal cancer surgery have improved during the past decade. It is likely that local failure rates after 5 years of follow-up at hospitals adopting the TME-concept (TME=total mesorectal excision) have decreased from about 28% to 10-15%. Preoperative radiotherapy at biological effective doses above 30 Gy decreases the relative risk of a local failure by more than half (50-70%). Postoperative radiotherapy decreases the risk by 30-40% at doses that generally are higher than those used preoperatively. There is strong evidence that preoperative radiotherapy is more effective than postoperative. There is moderate evidence that preoperative radiotherapy significantly decreases the local failure rate (from 8% to 2% after 2 years) also with TME. There is strong evidence that preoperative radiotherapy improves survival (by about 10%). There is no evidence that postoperative radiotherapy improves survival. There is some indication that survival is prolonged when postoperative radiotherapy is combined with concomitant chemotherapy. Preoperative radiotherapy at adequate doses can be given with low acute toxicity. Higher, and unacceptable acute toxicity has been seen in some preoperative radiotherapy trials using suboptimal techniques. Postoperative radiotherapy can also be

  5. Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy and Risk of Thromboembolic Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosco, Cecilia, E-mail: Cecilia.t.bosco@kcl.ac.uk [Translational Oncology & Urology Research (TOUR), Division of Cancer Studies, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); Garmo, Hans [Translational Oncology & Urology Research (TOUR), Division of Cancer Studies, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); Regional Cancer Centre, Uppsala, Akademiska Sjukhuset, Uppsala (Sweden); Adolfsson, Jan [CLINTEC Department, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Stattin, Pär [Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology, Umeå University, Umeå (Sweden); Holmberg, Lars [Translational Oncology & Urology Research (TOUR), Division of Cancer Studies, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); Regional Cancer Centre, Uppsala, Akademiska Sjukhuset, Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Nilsson, Per; Gunnlaugsson, Adalsteinn [Department of Hematology, Oncology and Radiation Physics, Skane University Hospital, Lund University, Lund (Sweden); Widmark, Anders [Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology, Umeå University, Umeå (Sweden); Van Hemelrijck, Mieke [Translational Oncology & Urology Research (TOUR), Division of Cancer Studies, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the risk of thromboembolic disease (TED) after radiation therapy (RT) with curative intent for prostate cancer (PCa). Patients and Methods: We identified all men who received RT as curative treatment (n=9410) and grouped according to external beam RT (EBRT) or brachytherapy (BT). By comparing with an age- and county-matched comparison cohort of PCa-free men (n=46,826), we investigated risk of TED after RT using Cox proportional hazard regression models. The model was adjusted for tumor characteristics, demographics, comorbidities, PCa treatments, and known risk factors of TED, such as recent surgery and disease progression. Results: Between 2006 and 2013, 6232 men with PCa received EBRT, and 3178 underwent BT. A statistically significant association was found between EBRT and BT and risk of pulmonary embolism in the crude analysis. However, upon adjusting for known TED risk factors these associations disappeared. No significant associations were found between BT or EBRT and deep venous thrombosis. Conclusion: Curative RT for prostate cancer using contemporary methodologies was not associated with an increased risk of TED.

  6. Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy and Risk of Thromboembolic Events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosco, Cecilia; Garmo, Hans; Adolfsson, Jan; Stattin, Pär; Holmberg, Lars; Nilsson, Per; Gunnlaugsson, Adalsteinn; Widmark, Anders; Van Hemelrijck, Mieke

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the risk of thromboembolic disease (TED) after radiation therapy (RT) with curative intent for prostate cancer (PCa). Patients and Methods: We identified all men who received RT as curative treatment (n=9410) and grouped according to external beam RT (EBRT) or brachytherapy (BT). By comparing with an age- and county-matched comparison cohort of PCa-free men (n=46,826), we investigated risk of TED after RT using Cox proportional hazard regression models. The model was adjusted for tumor characteristics, demographics, comorbidities, PCa treatments, and known risk factors of TED, such as recent surgery and disease progression. Results: Between 2006 and 2013, 6232 men with PCa received EBRT, and 3178 underwent BT. A statistically significant association was found between EBRT and BT and risk of pulmonary embolism in the crude analysis. However, upon adjusting for known TED risk factors these associations disappeared. No significant associations were found between BT or EBRT and deep venous thrombosis. Conclusion: Curative RT for prostate cancer using contemporary methodologies was not associated with an increased risk of TED.

  7. Radiation therapy of penile cancer: six to ten-year follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabstald, H.; Kelley, C.D.

    1980-01-01

    Ten patients with penile cancer were treated with radiation therapy between 1968 and 1973. Nine of ten remain free of disease though in 1 patient a new penile primary developed eight years after the radiation therapy and was treated by partial penectomy. One patient died following surgery for ''bleeding ulcer.'' He was free of penile cancer five years after radiation. The most common complication is urethral stricture and skin telangiectasia

  8. GTV and CTV in radiation therapy: lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mornex, F.; Chapet, O.; Sentenac, I.; Loubeyre, P.; Giraud, P.; Van Houtte, P.; Bonnette, P.

    2001-01-01

    Radiotherapy plays a major role as a curative treatment of various stages non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC): as an exclusive treatment in curative attempt for patients with unresectable stages I and II; as a preoperative treatment, which is often associated with chemotherapy, for patients with surgically stage IIIA NSCLC in clinical trials; in association with chemotherapy for unresectable stages IIIA and IIIB patients. Currently, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy allows for some dose escalation, increasing radiation quality. However, the high inherent conformality of this radiotherapy technique requires a rigorous approach and an optimal quality of the preparation throughout the treatment procedure and specifically of the accurate definition of the safety margins (GTV, CTV...). Different questions remain specific to lung cancers: 1) Despite the absence of randomized trials, the irradiated lymph nodes volume should be only, for the majority of the authors, the visible macroscopically involved lymph nodal regions. However, local control remains low and solid arguments suggest the poor local control is due to an insufficient delivered dose. Therefore the goal of radiotherapy, in this particular location, is to improve local control by increasing the dose until the maximum normal tissue tolerance is achieved, which essentially depends on the dose to the organs at risk (OAR) and specifically for the lung, the esophagus and the spinal cord. For this reason, the irradiated volume should be as tiny as possible, leading to not including the macroscopically uninvolved lymph nodes regions in prophylactic view in the target volume; 2) The lung is one of the rare organs with extensive motion within the body, making lung tumors difficult to treat. This particular point is not specifically considered in the GTV and CTV definitions but it is important enough to be noted; 3) When radiation therapy starts after a good response to chemotherapy, the residual tumoral volume

  9. Definitions of biochemical failure in prostate cancer following radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Jeremy M.G.; Griffith, Kent A.; Sandler, Howard M.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) published a consensus panel definition of biochemical failure following radiation therapy for prostate cancer. In this paper, we develop a series of alternative definitions of biochemical failure. Using data from 688 patients, we evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of the various definitions, with respect to a defined 'clinically meaningful' outcome. Methods and Materials: The ASTRO definition of biochemical failure requires 3 consecutive rises in prostate-specific antigen (PSA). We considered several modifications to the standard definition: to require PSA rises of a certain magnitude, to consider 2 instead of 3 rises, to require the final PSA value to be greater than a fixed cutoff level, and to define biochemical failure based on the slope of PSA over 1, 1.5, or 2 years. A clinically meaningful failure is defined as local recurrence, distant metastases, initiation of unplanned hormonal therapy, unplanned radical prostatectomy, or a PSA>25 later than 6 months after radiation. Results: Requiring the final PSA in a series of consecutive rises to be larger than 1.5 ng/mL increased the specificity of biochemical failure. For a fixed specificity, defining biochemical failure based on 2 consecutive rises, or the slope over the last year, could increase the sensitivity by up to approximately 20%, compared to the ASTRO definition. Using a rule based on the slope over the previous year or 2 rises leads to a slightly earlier detection of biochemical failure than does the ASTRO definition. Even with the best rule, only approximately 20% of true failures are biochemically detected more than 1 year before the clinically meaningful event time. Conclusion: There is potential for improvement in the ASTRO consensus definition of biochemical failure. Further research is needed, in studies with long follow-up times, to evaluate the relationship between various definitions of biochemical failure and

  10. Radiation therapy and arterial infusion chemotherapy for advanced gallbladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hokodate, Hirofumi; Saito, Hiroya; Takeuchi, Shuhei; Horikawa, Masahiro; Takamura, Akio

    2009-01-01

    The standard therapy is not yet established for the unresectable advanced gallbladder cancer (AGC). Here described is the outcome of authors' therapeutic protocol for AGC during the time Jan., 1989-Dec., 2008. Subjects are 73 patients (M 32/F 41, average age 65 y) with AGC of Stage IV. One shot arterial infusion (AI) of EEP regimen (etoposide (VP16)/4'epiadriamycin (EPIR)/cisplatin (CDDP)) is conducted via hepatic artery proper or common at the first angiography and one week later, external radiation therapy (RT), with about 30-50 Gy/6 fractions (actually, 12-61.6 Gy). AI is weekly done with FP regimen (CDDP/5-fluorouracil (FU)) through the reservoir indwelled in the gastroduodenal artery for 6 months where a metal stent for the stegnosis of bile duct is used if necessary after RT, and in recent days, additionally with biweekly CDDP/gemcitabin (GEM) regimen depending on patient's state after FP. As a result, RT is conducted to 62 cases (RT alone 8 cases), AI, 64 (alone, 10), and RT+AI, 54. Response is found to be 49% (CR 7 cases and PR, 28). Survivals 1- and 3-year are 39 and 6%, respectively, and average survival time, 408 days. Survival rate in (RT+AI) is significantly superior to that in AI alone and in RT alone. Prognosis in patients with jaundice, hepatic or duodenal invasion is significantly inferior to those without the symptom, and in non-responded cases, to responded cases. Complications like hepatic abscess are seen in 4 cases at 6 months after treatment. Four actual case-reports are presented in details with their images. Combination of RT+AI is suggested to be of utility for AGC, of which multi-center trial is awaited with addition of newer anti-cancers developed recently. (K.T.)

  11. Radiation therapy for metastatic lesions from breast cancer. Breast cancer metastasis to bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Shinya; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes radiation therapy in the treatment of bone metastases from breast cancer. Bone metastasis occurs in approximately 70% of breast cancer patients, and the goals of radiation therapy for bone metastasis are: palliation of pain, prevention and treatment of neuropathic symptoms, and prevention of pathologic fractures. The prognosis of bone metastasis from breast cancer is known to be better than that of bone metastasis from other solid tumors. Local-field radiation, hemibody (or wide-field) radiation, and systemic radionuclide treatment are the major methods of radiation therapy for pain palliation. Although many studies have shown that breast cancer is more responsive to radiation therapy for pain palliation than other solid tumors, some studies found no significant difference. Local-field radiation therapy, which includes multi-fraction irradiation and single-fraction irradiation, is currently the most generally used method of radiotherapy for pain palliation. Pain palliation has been reported to be achieved in approximately 80% to 90% of patients treated with local-field external beam irradiation. Three types of multi-fraction irradiation therapy are administered depending on the prognosis: high-dose fraction irradiation (36-50 Gy/12-25 Fr/2.4-5 wk), short-course irradiation (20-30 Gy/10-15 Fr/2-3 wk), and ultra-short-course irradiation (15-25 Gy/2-5 Fr/1 wk). The most common irradiation schedule is 30 Gy/10 Fr/2 wk. Although many reports indicate no significant difference in pain palliation according to the dose, the percentage of patients who show a complete cure is significantly higher in those treated with doses of 30 Gy or more, and thus the total irradiation dose should be at least 30 Gy. High-dose fraction irradiation is indicated for patients with an expected survival time of 6 months or more while short-course or single-fraction irradiation is indicated for those with an expected survival time of 3 months or more. Single

  12. Radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Keiichi; Miyoshi, Makoto; Jinguu, Ken-ichi

    1982-01-01

    Of the cases of lung cancer in which radiation therapy was given between 1961 and November 1981, 399 cases for which histological type was confirmed, and irradiated as follows were reviewed. The cases of squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma irradiated with more than 5,000 rad or more, those of undifferentiated carcinoma irradiated with 3,000 rad or more, and those irradiated pre- and post-operatively with 3,000 rad or more. The actual 5 year survival rate for stages I, II, III and IV were 29.6, 9.3, 7.5 and 1.9% respectively, and the survival rate tended to be better for adenocarcinoma than squamous cell carcinoma at stages I, II and III, but not different at stage IV. There was no difference between large cell, small cell and squamous cell carcinomas. Irradiation with 200 rad every other day or 150 rad daily was better than that with 200 rad, and daily irradiation with 150 rad was used since 1976. The therapy of stage III small cell carcinoma at the age of up to 80 years was improved with the combination of anticancer agents, maintenance therapy and immunotherapy, but these combined therapies were not significantly effective for the cancers with other histological types or at other stages. Although there was no significant difference in statistics for resectable cases, clinically, the results were experienced to be better after resection, and surgery was done in combination as much as possible. (Kaihara, S.)

  13. Acupuncture in Treating Dry Mouth Caused By Radiation Therapy in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    RATIONALE: Acupuncture may help relieve dry mouth caused by radiation therapy. PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial is studying to see how well one set of acupuncture points work in comparison to a different set of acupuncture points or standard therapy in treating dry mouth caused by radiation therapy in patients with head and neck cancer. |

  14. Secondary and multiple primary cancers relating radiation therapy for cancer of the oral region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiuchi, Junichi; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Takeda, Masamune; Takagi, Minoru.

    1985-01-01

    Secondary and multiple primary cancers relating radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma (s.c.c.) of the oral region including lip, oral cavity and oropharynx were analyzed. Out of 1,197 patients with s.c.c. treated with radiation during about 30 years from 1955 to 1983 June, 56 patients (4.7 %) were regarded as double or multiple cancer. The multiple cancer (s.c.c.) was observed frequently in the multicentric zone such as hypopharynx, esophagus and bronchus as well as in other sites of the oral cavity; 67.7 % (42 out of 62 sites). Frequency of synchronous double cancers was increased in recent ten years; 47.1 % (16/34). Careful examination to the above mentioned multicentric zone leads to early detection of secondary cancer and could be expected cure of the disease. Although possibility of radiation-induced cancer could not be ruled out as for 17 patients with late recurrence (more than 8 years), different histologic diagnosis from s.c.c. was obtained in only one (malignant fibrous histiocytoma). Therefore, it was difficult to discriminate radiation-induced cancer from late recurrence in the present study. (author)

  15. Role of radiation therapy in bladder cancer in the Saguenay-Lac Saint-Jean area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brochet, F.; Barrette, L.R.

    1998-01-01

    Bladder cancer is more frequent in Quebec, especially in Saguenay-Lac Saint-Jean than in other Canadian provinces and in the USA. From 1983 to 1996, only 78 patients presenting with bladder cancer received external beam radiation therapy. Sixty-eight were treated with curative intent Overall survival rates were 70% at 3 years, 66% at 5 years, and 40% at 10 years. Retrospective analysis of these cases and literature review show that preoperative radiation therapy is useful in the management of bladder cancer, especially in T3 tumors. It is also useful for patients whose tumor objectively responds to radiation therapy, without an increase in morbidity. (authors)

  16. Influence of accompanying immunocorrecting therapy on the quality of life of breast cancer patients at post-operative radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokhach, N.E.

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the influence of accompanying immunotherapy on the parameters of the quality of life of the patients with breast cancer with various profiles of cytokines at post-operative radiation therapy. The study was performed on 30 breast cancer patients at stages of combination therapy

  17. The incidence of other primary cancers in patients with an oral cancer treated with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizutani, Kiminari; Koseki, Yonoshin; Ikeda, Hiroshi

    1992-01-01

    From January 1980 through April 1990, a total of 317 patients with an oral cancer were treated with radiation therapy at Department of Radiology, Osaka University Hospital. Twenty-seven (8.5%) of these 317 patients had other primary cancers. For statistical purposes, the expected number of other primary cancers was estimated by multiplying the age-sex specific incidence rates among Osaka residents with the Person-year at risk figures, based on the Osaka Prefectural Cancer Registry. The observed/expected [0/E] ratios were 16.00 (p<0.01) for the esophagus and 28.42 (p<0.01) for the oropharynx. The present study suggested the necessity of following up oral cancer patients, especially those who have had carcinoma of the mouth floor, in order to enable the early diagnosis of upper digestive tract cancer. (author)

  18. Radiation therapy for metastatic lesions from breast cancer. Breast cancer metastasis to bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Shinya; Hoshi, Hiroaki [Gifu Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-10-01

    This paper summarizes radiation therapy in the treatment of bone metastases from breast cancer. Bone metastasis occurs in approximately 70% of breast cancer patients, and the goals of radiation therapy for bone metastasis are: palliation of pain, prevention and treatment of neuropathic symptoms, and prevention of pathologic fractures. The prognosis of bone metastasis from breast cancer is known to be better than that of bone metastasis from other solid tumors. Local-field radiation, hemibody (or wide-field) radiation, and systemic radionuclide treatment are the major methods of radiation therapy for pain palliation. Although many studies have shown that breast cancer is more responsive to radiation therapy for pain palliation than other solid tumors, some studies found no significant difference. Local-field radiation therapy, which includes multi-fraction irradiation and single-fraction irradiation, is currently the most generally used method of radiotherapy for pain palliation. Pain palliation has been reported to be achieved in approximately 80% to 90% of patients treated with local-field external beam irradiation. Three types of multi-fraction irradiation therapy are administered depending on the prognosis: high-dose fraction irradiation (36-50 Gy/12-25 Fr/2.4-5 wk), short-course irradiation (20-30 Gy/10-15 Fr/2-3 wk), and ultra-short-course irradiation (15-25 Gy/2-5 Fr/1 wk). The most common irradiation schedule is 30 Gy/10 Fr/2 wk. Although many reports indicate no significant difference in pain palliation according to the dose, the percentage of patients who show a complete cure is significantly higher in those treated with doses of 30 Gy or more, and thus the total irradiation dose should be at least 30 Gy. High-dose fraction irradiation is indicated for patients with an expected survival time of 6 months or more while short-course or single-fraction irradiation is indicated for those with an expected survival time of 3 months or more. Single

  19. Risk of Second Cancers According to Radiation Therapy Technique and Modality in Prostate Cancer Survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy, E-mail: berringtona@mail.nih.gov [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Wong, Jeannette; Kleinerman, Ruth; Kim, Clara; Morton, Lindsay [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Bekelman, Justin E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) techniques for prostate cancer are evolving rapidly, but the impact of these changes on risk of second cancers, which are an uncommon but serious consequence of RT, are uncertain. We conducted a comprehensive assessment of risks of second cancer according to RT technique (>10 MV vs ≤10 MV and 3-dimensional [3D] vs 2D RT) and modality (external beam RT, brachytherapy, and combined modes) in a large cohort of prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: The cohort was constructed using the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare database. We included cases of prostate cancer diagnosed in patients 66 to 84 years of age from 1992 to 2004 and followed through 2009. We used Poisson regression analysis to compare rates of second cancer across RT groups with adjustment for age, follow-up, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and comorbidities. Analyses of second solid cancers were based on the number of 5-year survivors (n=38,733), and analyses of leukemia were based on number of 2-year survivors (n=52,515) to account for the minimum latency period for radiation-related cancer. Results: During an average of 4.4 years' follow-up among 5-year prostate cancer survivors (2DRT = 5.5 years; 3DRT = 3.9 years; and brachytherapy = 2.7 years), 2933 second solid cancers were diagnosed. There were no significant differences in second solid cancer rates overall between 3DRT and 2DRT patients (relative risk [RR] = 1.00, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.91-1.09), but second rectal cancer rates were significantly lower after 3DRT (RR = 0.59, 95% CI: 0.40-0.88). Rates of second solid cancers for higher- and lower-energy RT were similar overall (RR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.89-1.06), as were rates for site-specific cancers. There were significant reductions in colon cancer and leukemia rates in the first decade after brachytherapy compared to those after external beam RT. Conclusions: Advanced treatment planning may have reduced rectal

  20. Reversible brachial plexopathy following primary radiation therapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salner, A.L.; Botnick, L.E.; Herzog, A.G.; Goldstein, M.A.; Harris, J.R.; Levene, M.B.; Hellman, S.

    1981-01-01

    Reversible brachial plexopathy has occurred in very low incidence in patients with breast carcinoma treated definitively with radiation therapy. Of 565 patients treated between January 1968 and December 1979 with moderate doses of supervoltage radiation therapy (average axillary dose of 5000 rad in 5 weeks), eight patients (1.4%) developed the characteristic symptoms at a median time of 4.5 months after radiation therapy. This syndrome consists of paresthesias in all patients, with weakness and pain less commonly seen. The symptom complex differs from other previously described brachial plexus syndromes, including paralytic brachial neuritis, radiation-induced injury, and carcinoma. A possible relationship to adjuvant chemotherapy exists, though the etiology is not well-understood. The cases described demonstrate temporal clustering. Resolution is always seen

  1. Dysuria Following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einsley-Marie eJanowski

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dysuria following prostate radiation therapy is a common toxicity that adversely affects patients’ quality of life and may be difficult to manage. Methods: 204 patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT from 2007 to 2010 for localized prostate carcinoma with a minimum follow up of three years were included in this retrospective review of prospectively collected data. All patients were treated to 35-36.25Gy in 5 fractions delivered with robotic SBRT with real time fiducial tracking. Dysuria and other lower urinary tract symptoms were assessed via Question 4b (Pain or burning on urination of the Expanded Prostate Index Composite (EPIC-26 and the American Urological Association (AUA Symptom Score at baseline and at routine follow up. Results: 204 patients (82 low-, 105 intermediate-, and 17 high risk according to the D’Amico classification at a median age of 69 years (range 48-91 received SBRT for their localized prostate cancer with a median follow up of 47 months. Bother associated with dysuria significantly increased from a baseline of 12% to a maximum of 43% at one month (p<0.0001. There were two distinct peaks of moderate to severe dysuria bother at 1 month and at 6-12 months, with 9% of patients experiencing a late transient dysuria flare. While a low level of dysuria was seen through the first two years of follow-up, it returned to below baseline by two years (p=0.91. The median baseline AUA score of 7.5 significantly increased to 11 at 1 month (p<0.0001 and returned to 7 at 3 months (p= 0.54. Patients with dysuria had a statistically higher AUA score at baseline and at all follow-ups up to 30 months. Dysuria significantly correlated with dose and AUA score on multivariate analysis. Frequency and strain significantly correlated with dysuria on stepwise multivariate analysis.Conclusions: The rate and severity of dysuria following SBRT is comparable to patients treated with other radiation modalities.

  2. Approach of combined cancer gene therapy and radiation: response of promoters to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anstett, A.

    2005-09-01

    Gene therapy is an emerging cancer treatment modality. We are interested in developing a radiation-inducible gene therapy system to sensitize the tumor vasculature to the effects of ionizing radiation (IR) treatment. An expression system based on irradiation-inducible promoters will drive the expression of anti-tumor genes in the tumor vasculature. Solid tumors are dependent on angio genesis, a process in which new blood vessels are formed from the pre-existing vasculature. Vascular endothelial cells are un transformed and genetically stable, thus avoiding the problem of resistance to the treatments. Vascular endothelial cells may therefore represent a suitable target for this therapeutic gene therapy strategy.The identification of IR-inducible promoters native to endothelial cells was performed by gene expression profiling using cDNA micro array technology. We describe the genes modified by clinically relevant doses of IR. The extension to high doses aimed at studying the effects of total radiation delivery to the tumor. The radio-inductiveness of the genes selected for promoter study was confirmed by RT-PCR. Analysis of the activity of promoters in response to IR was also assessed in a reporter plasmid. We found that authentic promoters cloned onto a plasmid are not suitable for cancer gene therapy due to their low induction after IR. In contrast, synthetic promoters containing repeated sequence-specific binding sites for IR-activated transcription factors such as NF-κB are potential candidates for gene therapy. The activity of five tandemly repeated TGGGGACTTTCCGC elements for NF-κB binding in a luciferase reporter was increased in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, the response to fractionated low doses was improved in comparison to the total single dose. Thus, we put present evidence that a synthetic promoter for NF-κB specific binding may have application in the radio-therapeutic treatment of cancer. (author)

  3. Three dimensional conformal radiation therapy may improve the therapeutic ratio of radiation therapy after pneumonectomy for lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trouette, R; Causse, N; Elkhadri, M; Caudry, M; Maire, J P; Houlard, J P; Racaldini, L; Demeaux, H

    1995-12-01

    Three dimensional conformal radiation therapy would allow to decrease the normal tissue dose while maintaining the same target dose as standard treatment. To evaluate the feasibility of normal tissue dose reduction for ten patients with pneumonectomy for lung cancer, we determined the dose distribution to the normal tissue with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3-DCRT) and conventional treatment planning (CTP). Dose-volume histograms for target and normal tissue (lung, heart) were used for comparison of the different treatment planning. The mean percentages of lung and heart volumes which received 40 Gy with 3-DCRT were respectively 63% and 37% of the mean percentage of lung and volumes which received the same dose with CTP. These preliminary results suggest that conformal therapy may improve the therapeutic ratio by reducing risk to normal tissue.

  4. Breast conservation therapy for breast cancer. Radiation oncologist's point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, Masahiro; Mitsumori, Michihide; Kokubo, Masaki; Fujishiro, Satsuki

    1998-01-01

    The roles and problems of radiation therapy in breast conserving therapy for breast cancer were presented. The roles of radiation therapy include decrease in breast recurrence, an alternative to axillary dissection for N0 cases, and neo-adjuvant radiation therapy. On the other hand, problems associated with radiation therapy are question of using radiation therapy for all cases, complications and worsening of cosmetics, and relatively high breast recurrence rates for margin-positive cases. The concept of breast conserving therapy is to improve QOL without decreasing treatment outcomes. It is considered that we should be more concentrated on the aspects of QOL because treatment outcomes of breast conserving therapy in Japan demonstrated sofar appear excellent. (author)

  5. Intrafractional baseline drift during free breathing breast cancer radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Christer Andre; Acosta Roa, Ana María; Lund, Jo-Åsmund; Frengen, Jomar

    2017-06-01

    Intrafraction motion in breast cancer radiation therapy (BCRT) has not yet been thoroughly described in the literature. It has been observed that baseline drift occurs as part of the intrafraction motion. This study aims to measure baseline drift and its incidence in free-breathing BCRT patients using an in-house developed laser system for tracking the position of the sternum. Baseline drift was monitored in 20 right-sided breast cancer patients receiving free breathing 3D-conformal RT by using an in-house developed laser system which measures one-dimensional distance in the AP direction. A total of 357 patient respiratory traces from treatment sessions were logged and analysed. Baseline drift was compared to patient positioning error measured from in-field portal imaging. The mean overall baseline drift at end of treatment sessions was -1.3 mm for the patient population. Relatively small baseline drift was observed during the first fraction; however it was clearly detected already at the second fraction. Over 90% of the baseline drift occurs during the first 3 min of each treatment session. The baseline drift rate for the population was -0.5 ± 0.2 mm/min in the posterior direction the first minute after localization. Only 4% of the treatment sessions had a 5 mm or larger baseline drift at 5 min, all towards the posterior direction. Mean baseline drift in the posterior direction in free breathing BCRT was observed in 18 of 20 patients over all treatment sessions. This study shows that there is a substantial baseline drift in free breathing BCRT patients. No clear baseline drift was observed during the first treatment session; however, baseline drift was markedly present at the rest of the sessions. Intrafraction motion due to baseline drift should be accounted for in margin calculations.

  6. Radiation ulcers in patients with cancer of the torgue after 252Cf therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galantseva, G.F.; Guseva, L.I.; Plichko, V.I.

    1984-01-01

    Interstitial therapy with 252 Cf was conducted for 57 patients with cancer of the tongue. It was established that clinical course of radiation tungue ulcers after interstitial therapy with 252 Cf doesn't differ sufficiently from the course of radiation injuries, occurring after γ-radiation application. Radiation ulcers are often observed in patients after the treatment of recurrent and residual tumors with 252 Cf (in 33% of patients); the ulcers appeared in 15% of cases in patients after the treatment of initial ulcers tumors. Conservative treatment provide the cure of radiation tongUe ulcers after interstitial therapy with 252 Cf

  7. Radiation ulcers in patients with cancer of the tongue after /sup 252/Cf therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galantseva, G.F.; Guseva, L.I.; Plichko, V.I. (Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Obninsk. Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Meditsinskoj Radiologii)

    1984-01-01

    Interstitial therapy with /sup 252/Cf was conducted for 57 patients with cancer of the tongue. It was established that clinical course of radiation tungue ulcers after interstitial therapy with /sup 252/Cf doesn't differ sufficiently from the course of radiation injuries, occurring after ..gamma..-radiation application. Radiation ulcers are often observed in patients after the treatment of recurrent and residual tumors with /sup 252/Cf (in 33% of patients); the ulcers appeared in 15% of cases in patients after the treatment of initial ulcers tumors. Conservative treatment provide the cure of radiation tongue ulcers after interstitial therapy with /sup 252/Cf.

  8. The role of radiation therapy in multimodality treatment for renal-cell cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semikoz, N.G.; Kudryashov, O.G.; Ponomar'ov, V.V.; Osipenkov, R.A.; Anyishchenko, A.O.; Kudryashova, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    The authors report the results of multimodality treatment for renal-cell cancer (pT any, N any, M0) using pre- operative large-fraction irradiation. Our findings demonstrate that radiation therapy does not aggravate the conditions for surgery and improves long-term results. The data about efficacy of multimodality treatment (palliative nephrectomy with radiation therapy) in patients with primary metastatic kidney cancer T any, N any, M1) are also reported.

  9. The study of combination therapy for arterial infusion chemotherapy and radiation therapy in unresectable gallbladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Takuma; Saito, Hiroya; Yanagawa, Nobuyuki; Fujinaga, Akihiro; Saito, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated an effective strategy of treatment for unresectable gallbladder cancer (GBC) by the retrospective analysis of prognostic factors and anti-tumor therapies, especially combination therapy of arterial infusion chemotherapy and radiation therapy (AI+PT). Forty-three patients with unresectable GBC were enrolled, and prognostic factors were investigated by multivariate analysis using a proportional hazard model. In addition, we examined the indication and after-therapy by analyzing the each factor cumulative survival rates and anti-tumor effect about the AI + RT group (n=24). AI + RT and the responders to the first-line therapy were significant prognostic factors. In AI + RT group, median survival time, progression-free survival and the 1-year survival rate, the response and disease control rates was 15.5 months, 7.1 months, 62.5%. 54.2% and 95.8%, respectively; which suggested prolonged survival and high anti-tumor effect. Cumulative survival rate was significantly shorter in cases with distant metastasis except liver metastases, and has been tendency to extend in the group who underwent systemic chemotherapy as after-therapy. The treatment strategy, using the Al + RT as first-line with the systemic chemotherapy as after-therapy, suggested contribute to the prolonged survival in locally advanced and liver metastases cases of GBC. (author)

  10. Two cases of colorectal cancer developed more than 30 years after pelvic radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minami, Mituaki; Aoki, Youzou; Uesaka, Kazunobu; Enomoto, Katuhiko; Shimamoto, Tetuya; Hirabayashi, Naoki [Hashimoto Municipal Hospital, Wakayama (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    We experienced two cases of advanced colorectal cancer developed after radiation therapy. One case was a 66-year old female who had received irradiation for her uterine cancer 35 years before. She was treated for a radiation colitis and a radiation dermatitis 6 years ago. Sigmoid colon cancer was pointed out by barium enema and colonoscopy, and Hartmann's operation was performed. The other case was a 68-year old man who had received irradiation for left malignant orchionous 30 years before. He had the radiation dermatitis in both inguinal region, and had received skin graft for the left inguinal dermatitis. He complained of anal bleeding, and rectal cancer was found out by the colonoscopy. Low anterior resection was performed. Their pathological findings showed mucinous adenocarcinoma. In a review of the Japanese literature, colorectal cancers developed more than 30 years after pelvic radiation therapy have been reported in only 8 cases including these two cases. (author)

  11. Two cases of colorectal cancer developed more than 30 years after pelvic radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, Mituaki; Aoki, Youzou; Uesaka, Kazunobu; Enomoto, Katuhiko; Shimamoto, Tetuya; Hirabayashi, Naoki

    2000-01-01

    We experienced two cases of advanced colorectal cancer developed after radiation therapy. One case was a 66-year old female who had received irradiation for her uterine cancer 35 years before. She was treated for a radiation colitis and a radiation dermatitis 6 years ago. Sigmoid colon cancer was pointed out by barium enema and colonoscopy, and Hartmann's operation was performed. The other case was a 68-year old man who had received irradiation for left malignant orchionous 30 years before. He had the radiation dermatitis in both inguinal region, and had received skin graft for the left inguinal dermatitis. He complained of anal bleeding, and rectal cancer was found out by the colonoscopy. Low anterior resection was performed. Their pathological findings showed mucinous adenocarcinoma. In a review of the Japanese literature, colorectal cancers developed more than 30 years after pelvic radiation therapy have been reported in only 8 cases including these two cases. (author)

  12. Molecular strategies targeting the host component of cancer to enhance tumor response to radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Huamani, Jessica; Fu, Allie; Hallahan, Dennis E.

    2006-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment, in particular, the tumor vasculature, as an important target for the cytotoxic effects of radiation therapy is an established paradigm for cancer therapy. We review the evidence that the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway is activated in endothelial cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR) and is a molecular target for the development of novel radiation sensitizing agents. On the basis of this premise, several promising preclinical studies that targeted the inhibition of the PI3K/Akt activation as a potential method of sensitizing the tumor vasculature to the cytotoxic effects of IR have been conducted. An innovative strategy to guide cytotoxic therapy in tumors treated with radiation and PI3K/Akt inhibitors is presented. The evidence supports a need for further investigation of combined-modality therapy that involves radiation therapy and inhibitors of PI3K/Akt pathway as a promising strategy for improving the treatment of patients with cancer

  13. Analysis of radiation pneumonitis outside the radiation field in breast conserving therapy for early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogo, Etsuyo; Fujimoto, Kiminori; Hayabuchi, Naofumi

    2002-01-01

    In a retrospective study of radiation-induced pulmonary changes for patients with breast conserving therapy for early breast cancer, we sent questionnaires to the main hospitals in Japan. In this study, we analyzed pulmonary changes after tangential whole-breast irradiation. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and risk factors for radiation pneumonitis outside the radiation field. The questionnaires included patients data, therapy data, and lung injury information between August 1999 and May 2000. On the first questionnaires, answer letters were received from 107 institutions out of 158 (67.7%). On the second questionnaires, response rate (hospitals which had radiation pneumonitis outside the radiation field) was 21.7% (23/106). We could find no risk factors of this type of pneumonitis. We suggested that lung irradiation might trigger this type of pneumonitis which is clinically similar to BOOP (bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia). It developed in 1.5-2.1% among the patients with breast conserving surgery and tangential whole-breast irradiation. And it is likely appeared within 6 months after radiotherapy. (author)

  14. Usefulness of radiation treatment planning allpied respiration factor for streotatic body radiation therapy in the lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Sung Pil; Kim, Tae Hyung; So, Woon Young; Back, Geum Mun [Dept. of Medical Health Science, Graduate School, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    We are evaluated the usefulness of radiation treatment planning applied respiration factor for stereotactic body radiation therapy in the lung cancer. Four dimensional computed tomography images were obtained in 10 patients with lung cancer. The radiation treatment plans were established total lung volume according to respiration images (new method) and conventional method. We was analyzed in the lung volume, radiation absorbed dose of lung and main organs (ribs, tracheobronchus, esophagus, spinal cord) around the tumor, respectively. We were confirmed that lung volume and radiation absorbed dose of lung and main organs around the tumor deference according to applied respiration. In conclusion, radiation treatment planning applied respiration factor seems to be useful for stereotactic body radiation therapy in the lung cancer.

  15. Risk of secondary malignancies after radiation therapy for breast cancer: Comprehensive results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Lindsay M; Ying, Jian; Poppe, Matthew M; Suneja, Gita; Gaffney, David K

    2017-10-01

    To assess risks of secondary malignancies in breast cancer patients who received radiation therapy compared to patients who did not. The SEER database was used to identify females with a primary diagnosis of breast cancer as their first malignancy, during 1973-2008. We excluded patients with metastatic disease, age breast cancer recurrence, or who developed a secondary malignancy within 1 year of diagnosis. Standardized incidence ratios and absolute excess risk were calculated using SEER*Stat, version 8.2.1 and SAS, version 9.4. There were 374,993 patients meeting the inclusion criteria, with 154,697 who received radiation therapy. With a median follow-up of 8.9 years, 13% of patients (49,867) developed a secondary malignancy. The rate of secondary malignancies was significantly greater than the endemic rate in breast cancer patients treated without radiation therapy, (O/E 1.2, 95% CI 1.19-1.22) and with radiation therapy (O/E 1.33, 95% CI 1.31-1.35). Approximately 3.4% of secondary malignancies were attributable to radiation therapy. The increased risk of secondary malignancies in breast cancer patients treated with radiation therapy compared to those without was significant regardless of age at breast cancer diagnosis (p breast cancer patients both with and without radiation therapy compared to the general population. There was an increased risk in specific sites for patients treated with radiation therapy. This risk was most evident in young patients and who had longer latency periods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.S.

    1987-01-01

    The success of radiotherapy in dealing with cancer of the cervix lies in the understanding of its natural history and staging as well as the major forms of treatment. It is, therefore, imperative that all gynecological and radiation oncologists have at their command a thorough understanding of carcinoma of the cervix

  17. Percutaneous radiation therapy for localized and generalized stages of prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, R.P.; Schnepper, E.; Castrup, W.

    1981-01-01

    Eighty-three patients with prostatic cancer, who underwent megavoltage therapy of the carcinoma or of its metastases, are reported. The majority of the patients had advanced disease (Stage C or D according to Flocks) when they came to be treated, and thus the general prognosis was bad. Radiation therapy, however, represents on the whole an important constituent of therapy in prostatic cancer, with regard to the practicability as well as to palliative treatment of metastases to the skeleton. (orig.) [de

  18. Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Treatment Time Impacts Overall Survival in Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMillan, Matthew T.; Ojerholm, Eric; Roses, Robert E.; Plastaras, John P.; Metz, James M.; Mamtani, Ronac; Karakousis, Giorgos C.; Fraker, Douglas L.; Drebin, Jeffrey A.; Stripp, Diana; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Datta, Jashodeep

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Prolonged radiation therapy treatment time (RTT) is associated with worse survival in several tumor types. This study investigated whether delays during adjuvant radiation therapy impact overall survival (OS) in gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Data Base was queried for patients with resected gastric cancer who received adjuvant radiation therapy with National Comprehensive Cancer Network–recommended doses (45 or 50.4 Gy) between 1998 and 2006. RTT was classified as standard (45 Gy: 33-36 days, 50.4 Gy: 38-41 days) or prolonged (45 Gy: >36 days, 50.4 Gy: >41 days). Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the association between the following factors and OS: RTT, interval from surgery to radiation therapy initiation, interval from surgery to radiation therapy completion, radiation therapy dose, demographic/pathologic and operative factors, and other elements of adjuvant multimodality therapy. Results: Of 1591 patients, RTT was delayed in 732 (46%). Factors associated with prolonged RTT were non-private health insurance (OR 1.3, P=.005) and treatment at non-academic facilities (OR 1.2, P=.045). Median OS and 5-year actuarial survival were significantly worse in patients with prolonged RTT compared with standard RTT (36 vs 51 months, P=.001; 39 vs 47%, P=.005); OS worsened with each cumulative week of delay (P<.0004). On multivariable analysis, prolonged RTT was associated with inferior OS (hazard ratio 1.2, P=.002); the intervals from surgery to radiation therapy initiation or completion were not. Prolonged RTT was particularly detrimental in patients with node positivity, inadequate nodal staging (<15 nodes examined), and those undergoing a cycle of chemotherapy before chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: Delays during adjuvant radiation therapy appear to negatively impact survival in gastric cancer. Efforts to minimize cumulative interruptions to <7 days should be considered

  19. Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Treatment Time Impacts Overall Survival in Gastric Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMillan, Matthew T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ojerholm, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Roses, Robert E., E-mail: Robert.Roses@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Plastaras, John P.; Metz, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Mamtani, Ronac [Department of Hematology/Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Karakousis, Giorgos C.; Fraker, Douglas L.; Drebin, Jeffrey A. [Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Stripp, Diana; Ben-Josef, Edgar [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Datta, Jashodeep [Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Prolonged radiation therapy treatment time (RTT) is associated with worse survival in several tumor types. This study investigated whether delays during adjuvant radiation therapy impact overall survival (OS) in gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Data Base was queried for patients with resected gastric cancer who received adjuvant radiation therapy with National Comprehensive Cancer Network–recommended doses (45 or 50.4 Gy) between 1998 and 2006. RTT was classified as standard (45 Gy: 33-36 days, 50.4 Gy: 38-41 days) or prolonged (45 Gy: >36 days, 50.4 Gy: >41 days). Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the association between the following factors and OS: RTT, interval from surgery to radiation therapy initiation, interval from surgery to radiation therapy completion, radiation therapy dose, demographic/pathologic and operative factors, and other elements of adjuvant multimodality therapy. Results: Of 1591 patients, RTT was delayed in 732 (46%). Factors associated with prolonged RTT were non-private health insurance (OR 1.3, P=.005) and treatment at non-academic facilities (OR 1.2, P=.045). Median OS and 5-year actuarial survival were significantly worse in patients with prolonged RTT compared with standard RTT (36 vs 51 months, P=.001; 39 vs 47%, P=.005); OS worsened with each cumulative week of delay (P<.0004). On multivariable analysis, prolonged RTT was associated with inferior OS (hazard ratio 1.2, P=.002); the intervals from surgery to radiation therapy initiation or completion were not. Prolonged RTT was particularly detrimental in patients with node positivity, inadequate nodal staging (<15 nodes examined), and those undergoing a cycle of chemotherapy before chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: Delays during adjuvant radiation therapy appear to negatively impact survival in gastric cancer. Efforts to minimize cumulative interruptions to <7 days should be considered.

  20. Adjuvant radiation therapy for pancreatic cancer: a 15-year experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobelbower, Ralph R.; Merrick, Hollis W.; Khuder, Sadik; Battle, Joyce A.; Herron, Lisa M.; Pawlicki, Todd

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective analysis to determine differences in survival of patients with pancreatic aden carcinoma treated by radical surgery with and without adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1980 and 1995, 249 patients with pancreatic tumors were identified at the Medical College of Ohio. Forty-four of these patients underwent radical surgical procedures with curative intent. These patients were divided into four groups according to treatment: surgery alone (n = 14), surgery plus intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) (n = 6), surgery plus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) (n = 14), or surgery plus both IORT and EBRT (n = 10). Outcome and survival were analyzed among the four groups. Results: The median survival time of patients treated with radical surgery alone was 6.5 months. The median survival time for the surgery plus IORT group was 9 months; however, 33.3% (two of six) of these patients survived longer than 5 years. This survival pattern was borderline significantly better than that for the surgery alone group (p = 0.0765). The surgery plus EBRT and the surgery plus IORT and EBRT groups had median survival times of 14.5 and 17.5 months, respectively. These were significantly better than that of the surgery alone group (p = 0.0004 and p = 0.0002, respectively). The addition of radiation therapy did not affect the treatment complication rate. Conclusion: The survival of patients who were treated with radical surgery alone was significantly poorer than that of patients who received adjuvant radiation therapy. These results are consistent with other studies in the literature. Patients treated with all three modalities (surgery, IORT, and EBRT) displayed the best median survival time

  1. A combination therapy of selective intraarterial anti-cancer drug infusion and radiation therapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, Yumiko; Zaitsu, Masayoshi; Mikami, Koji; Takeuchi, Takumi; Matsuda, Izuru; Arahira, Satoko

    2017-01-01

    The gold standard for the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer Without metastasis is radical cystectomy. However, there increase patients very elderly and with serious complications. They are not good candidates for invasive surgical operation. Intraarterial infusion of 70 mg/m"2 of cisplatin and 30 mg/m"2 of pirarubicin into bilateral bladder arteries was conducted for 5 patients diagnosed with muscle invasive bladder cancers without distant metastasis. Right and left distribution of anti-cancer drugs was determined based on the location of bladder tumor(s). External beam radiation therapy was commenced immediately following intraarterial infusion. The patients were followed up with clinical and radiographic investigations and bladderbiopsy was performed as needed. Patients were all males who are smoking or with smoking history ranging from 73 to 85 years of age (median 82). The duration between transurethral resection of bladder tumors (TUR-Bt) and intraarterial infusion of anti-cancer drugs was 47.4 days (range 26-68), the median follow-up period after intraarterial infusion was 21.5 months (range 87-547) without death. Total radiation dose was 59.2 ±3.0 Gy. Complete remission was accomplished in all cases. One patient showed intravesical recurrence of non muscle-invasive tumors 45.8 months following intraarterial infusion and underwent TUR-Bt. Two cases underwent bladder biopsies showing no tumors. All patients but one case with bladder recurrence were free of tumor recurrence with radiographic investigation. For adverse events, acute renal failure was in one case and leukocytopenia was in all 5 cases, Grade 2 for one and Grade 3 for 4 cases. Follow-up periods are not long enough, but early results of a combination therapy of selective intraarterial anti-cancer drug infusion and radiation therapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer were good. (author)

  2. Prevalence of complementary and alternative therapy use by cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Grace V; Aherne, Noel J; Horsley, Patrick J; Benjamin, Linus C; McLachlan, Craig S; McKay, Michael J; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2014-12-01

    The use of complementary and alternative therapies (CAT) in oncology patients is increasing in incidence, with calls to routinely screen for their use. We introduced a screening tool as part of clinical care to identify CAT use. We evaluated all patients who attended the radiation oncology outpatient clinic between December 2011 and July 2012, who had filled out the CAT screening tool, and evaluated types of CAT use, reasons for use and predictors of CAT usage. A total of 639 patients completed the CAT screening tool, which was 75% of eligible patients. There were 464 (72.6%) men and 175 (27.4%) women, with a mean age of 69.9 years (range 27-94 years). Prostate cancer was the predominant diagnosis (53.1%), followed by breast cancer (17.5%) and skin cancer (14.7%). Of these, 530 patients (82.9%) had used at least one therapy. Of the 530 patients using CAT, the most quoted reasons for use were to improve quality of life (42.6%), to boost the immune system and general health (33.6%), to increase energy levels (32.6%) and to live longer (28.9%). Of the 530 users, only 112 patients (21.1%) took CAT to help cure their cancer. Women were significantly more likely to use CAT, as were patients with breast cancer. The use of CAT in patients with cancer is prevalent and more frequent in our population than in other published studies. Few patients use CAT to improve their cancer cure, but rather use CAT for other reasons. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Salvage radiation therapy for residual superficial esophageal cancer after endoscopic mucosal resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemoto, Kenji; Takai, Kenji; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Sakayauchi, Toru; Sugawara, Toshiyuki; Jingu, Ken-ichi; Wada, Hitoshi; Takai, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Shogo

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the outcomes of radiation therapy for patients with residual superficial esophageal cancer (rSEC) after endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR). Methods and Materials: From May 1996 to October 2002, a total of 30 rSEC patients without lymph node metastasis received radiation therapy at Tohoku University Hospital and associated hospitals. The time interval from EMR to start of radiation therapy ranged from 9 to 73 days (median interval, 40 days). Radiation doses ranged from 60 Gy to 70 Gy (mean dose, 66 Gy). Chemotherapy was used in 9 of 30 patients (30%). Results: The 2-year, 3-year, and 5-year overall survival rates and cause-specific survival rates were 91%, 82%, and 51%, respectively, and 95%, 85%, and 73%, respectively. The 2-year, 3-year, and 5-year local control rates for mucosal cancer were 91%, 91%, and 91%, respectively, and those for submucosal cancer were 89%, 89%, and 47%, respectively. These differences in survival rates for patients with two types of cancer were not statistically significant. Local recurrence and lymph node recurrence were more frequent in patients with submucosal cancer than in patients with mucosal cancer (p = 0.38 and p 0.08, respectively). Esophageal stenosis that required balloon dilatation developed in 3 of the 30 patients, and radiation pneumonitis that required steroid therapy developed in 1 patient. Conclusions: Radiation therapy is useful for preventing local recurrence after incomplete EMR

  4. Hormonal therapy with external radiation therapy for metastatic spinal cord compression from newly diagnosed prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, So; Hozumi, Takahiro; Yamakawa, Kiyofumi; Higashikawa, Akiro; Goto, Takahiro; Shinohara, Mitsuru; Kondo, Taiji

    2013-01-01

    Although hormonal therapy is effective for treatment of prostate cancer, its effect in the treatment of metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) has not been established. The objective of this study was to clarify the efficacy of conservative treatment of MSCC-induced paralysis resulting from prostate cancer for patients without a previous treatment history. We reviewed data from 38 patients with MSCC-induced paralysis from newly diagnosed prostate cancer who presented to our service between 1984 and 2010. Conservative treatment consisted of hormonal therapy with external radiation therapy (ERT). Patient demographic data, treatment details, involved spine MRI images, complications, and the course of neurologic recovery were investigated. Twenty-five patients were treated conservatively. Mean follow-up period was 36.8 months. Sixteen patients (two with Frankel B, 14 with Frankel C) were unable to walk at initial presentation. After initiating conservative treatment, 75% (12 of 16) of these patients regained the ability to walk within 1 month, 88% (14 in 16) did so within 3 months, and all non-ambulatory patients did so within 6 months. No one had morbid complications. Four patients who did not regain the ability to walk at 1 month were found to have progressed to paraplegia rapidly, and tended to have severe compression as visualized on MRI, with a delay in the start of treatment in comparison with those who did so within 1 month (21.0 vs. 7.8 days). Hormonal therapy associated with ERT is an important option for treatment of MSCC resulting from newly diagnosed prostate cancer. (author)

  5. A Patterns of Care Study of the Various Radiation Therapies for Prostate Cancer among Korean Radiation Oncologists in 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Jae Sung; Ha, Sung Whan

    2008-01-01

    To conduct a nationwide academic hospital patterns of the practice status and principles of radiotherapy for prostate cancer. The survey will help develop the framework of a database of Korean in Patterns of Case Study. A questionnaire about radiation treatment status and principles was sent to radiation oncologists in charge of prostate cancer treatment at thirteen academic hospitals in Korea. The data was analyzed to find treatment principles among the radiation oncologists when treating prostate cancer. The number of patients with prostate cancer and treated with radiation ranged from 60 to 150 per academic hospital in Seoul City and 10 to 15 outside of Seoul City in 2006. The primary diagnostic methods of prostate cancer included the ultrasound guided biopsy on 6 to 12 prostate sites (mean=9), followed by magnetic resonance imaging and a whole body bone scan. Internal and external immobilizations were used in 61.5% and 76.9%, respectively, with diverse radiation targets. Whole pelvis radiation therapy (dose ranging from 45.0 to 50.4 Gy) was performed in 76.9%, followed by the irradiation of seminal vesicles (54.0∼73.8 Gy) in 92.3%. The definitive radiotherapy doses were increased as a function of risk group, but the range of radiation doses was wide (60.0 to 78.5 Gy). Intensity modulated radiation therapy using doses greater than 70 Gy, were performed in 53.8% of academic hospitals. In addition, the simultaneous intra-factional boost (SIB) technique was used in three hospitals; however, the target volume and radiation dose were diverse. Radiation therapy to biochemical recurrence after a radical prostatectomy was performed in 84.6%; however, the radiation dose was variable and the radiation field ranged from whole pelvis to prostate bed. The results of this study suggest that a nationwide Korean Patterns of Care Study is necessary for the recommendation of radiation therapy guidelines of prostate cancer

  6. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Locally Progressive and Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer after Prior Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Sutera

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionPancreatic adenocarcinoma is an aggressive malignancy that has consistently demonstrated poor outcomes despite aggressive treatments. Despite multimodal treatment, local disease progression and local recurrence are common. Management of recurrent or progressive pancreatic carcinomas proves a further challenge. In patients previously treated with radiation therapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT is a promising modality capable of delivering high dose to the tumor while limiting dose to critical structures. We aimed to determine the feasibility and tolerability of SBRT for recurrent or local pancreatic cancer in patients previously treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT.Materials and methodsPatients treated with EBRT who developed recurrent or local pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma treated with SBRT reirradiation at our institution, from 2004 to 2014 were reviewed. Our primary endpoints included overall survival (OS, local control, regional control, and late grade 3+ radiation toxicity. Endpoints were analyzed with the Kaplan–Meier method. The association of these survival endpoints with risk factors was studied with univariate Cox proportional hazards models.ResultsWe identified 38 patients with recurrent/progressive pancreatic cancer treated with SBRT following prior radiation therapy. Prior radiation was delivered to a median dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. SBRT was delivered to a median dose of 24.5 Gy in 1–3 fractions. Surgical resection was performed on 55.3% of all patients. Within a median follow-up of 24.4 months (inter-quartile range, 14.9–32.7 months, the median OS from diagnosis for the entire cohort was 26.6 months (95% CI: 20.3–29.8 with 2-year OS of 53.0%. Median survival from SBRT was 9.7 months (95% CI, 5.5–13.8. The 2-year freedom from local progression and regional progression was 58 and 82%, respectively. For the entire cohort, 18.4 and 10.5% experienced late grade 2

  7. Hypothyroidism following surgery and radiation therapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, I. K.; Kim, J. C.

    1997-01-01

    Radiation therapy in combination with surgery has an important role in the therapy of the head and neck cancer. We conducted a prospective study for patients with head and neck cancer treated with surgery and radiation to evaluate the effect of therapies on the thyroid gland, and to identify the factors that might influence the development of hypothyroidism. From September 1986 through December 1994, 71 patients with head and cancer treated with surgery and radiation were included in this prospective study. Patients' age ranged from 32 to 73 years with a median age of 58 years. There were 12 women and 59 men. Total laryngectomy with neck dissection was carried out in 45 patients and neck dissection alone in 26 patients. All patients were serially monitored for thyroid function before and after radiation therapy. Radiation dose to the thyroid gland ranged from 40.6Gy to 60Gy with a median dose of 50Gy. The follow-up duration was 3 to 80 months. The overall incidence of hypothyroidism was 56.3% (40/71); 7 out of 71 patients (9.9%) developed clinical hypothyroidism and 33 patients (46.4%) developed subclinical hypothyroidism. No thyroid nodules, thyroid cancers, or hyperthyroidism was detected. The risk factor that significantly influenced the incidence of hypothyroidism was a combination of surgery (total laryngectomy with neck dissection) and radiation therapy (P=0.0000). Four of 26 patients (15.4%) with neck dissection alone developed hypothyroidism while 36 of 45 patients (80%) with laryngectomy and neck dissection developed hypothyroidism. The hypothyroidism following surgery and radiation therapy was a relatively common complication. The factor that significantly influenced the incidence of hypothyroidism was combination of surgery and radiation therapy. Evaluation of thyroid function before and after radiation therapy with periodic thyroid function tests is recommended for an early detection of hypothyroidism and thyroid hormone replacement therapy is

  8. Hypothyroidism following surgery and radiation therapy for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, I. K.; Kim, J. C. [Kyungpook National Univ., Taegu (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    1997-09-01

    Radiation therapy in combination with surgery has an important role in the therapy of the head and neck cancer. We conducted a prospective study for patients with head and neck cancer treated with surgery and radiation to evaluate the effect of therapies on the thyroid gland, and to identify the factors that might influence the development of hypothyroidism. From September 1986 through December 1994, 71 patients with head and cancer treated with surgery and radiation were included in this prospective study. Patients` age ranged from 32 to 73 years with a median age of 58 years. There were 12 women and 59 men. Total laryngectomy with neck dissection was carried out in 45 patients and neck dissection alone in 26 patients. All patients were serially monitored for thyroid function before and after radiation therapy. Radiation dose to the thyroid gland ranged from 40.6Gy to 60Gy with a median dose of 50Gy. The follow-up duration was 3 to 80 months. The overall incidence of hypothyroidism was 56.3% (40/71); 7 out of 71 patients (9.9%) developed clinical hypothyroidism and 33 patients (46.4%) developed subclinical hypothyroidism. No thyroid nodules, thyroid cancers, or hyperthyroidism was detected. The risk factor that significantly influenced the incidence of hypothyroidism was a combination of surgery (total laryngectomy with neck dissection) and radiation therapy (P=0.0000). Four of 26 patients (15.4%) with neck dissection alone developed hypothyroidism while 36 of 45 patients (80%) with laryngectomy and neck dissection developed hypothyroidism. The hypothyroidism following surgery and radiation therapy was a relatively common complication. The factor that significantly influenced the incidence of hypothyroidism was combination of surgery and radiation therapy. Evaluation of thyroid function before and after radiation therapy with periodic thyroid function tests is recommended for an early detection of hypothyroidism and thyroid hormone replacement therapy is

  9. Anatomic, functional and molecular imaging in lung cancer precision radiation therapy: treatment response assessment and radiation therapy personalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everitt, Sarah; Schimek-Jasch, Tanja; Li, X. Allen; Nestle, Ursula; Kong, Feng-Ming (Spring)

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews key imaging modalities for lung cancer patients treated with radiation therapy (RT) and considers their actual or potential contributions to critical decision-making. An international group of researchers with expertise in imaging in lung cancer patients treated with RT considered the relevant literature on modalities, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). These perspectives were coordinated to summarize the current status of imaging in lung cancer and flag developments with future implications. Although there are no useful randomized trials of different imaging modalities in lung cancer, multiple prospective studies indicate that management decisions are frequently impacted by the use of complementary imaging modalities, leading both to more appropriate treatments and better outcomes. This is especially true of 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG)-PET/CT which is widely accepted to be the standard imaging modality for staging of lung cancer patients, for selection for potentially curative RT and for treatment planning. PET is also more accurate than CT for predicting survival after RT. PET imaging during RT is also correlated with survival and makes response-adapted therapies possible. PET tracers other than FDG have potential for imaging important biological process in tumors, including hypoxia and proliferation. MRI has superior accuracy in soft tissue imaging and the MRI Linac is a rapidly developing technology with great potential for online monitoring and modification of treatment. The role of imaging in RT-treated lung cancer patients is evolving rapidly and will allow increasing personalization of therapy according to the biology of both the tumor and dose limiting normal tissues. PMID:29218270

  10. Age Disparity in Palliative Radiation Therapy Among Patients With Advanced Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Jonathan [University of Hawaii, John A. Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu, Hawaii (United States); Xu, Beibei [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Moores Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Yeung, Heidi N.; Roeland, Eric J. [Moores Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Division of Palliative Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Martinez, Maria Elena [Moores Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Mell, Loren K. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Moores Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Murphy, James D., E-mail: j2murphy@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Moores Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose/Objective: Palliative radiation therapy represents an important treatment option among patients with advanced cancer, although research shows decreased use among older patients. This study evaluated age-related patterns of palliative radiation use among an elderly Medicare population. Methods and Materials: We identified 63,221 patients with metastatic lung, breast, prostate, or colorectal cancer diagnosed between 2000 and 2007 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Receipt of palliative radiation therapy was extracted from Medicare claims. Multivariate Poisson regression analysis determined residual age-related disparity in the receipt of palliative radiation therapy after controlling for confounding covariates including age-related differences in patient and demographic covariates, length of life, and patient preferences for aggressive cancer therapy. Results: The use of radiation decreased steadily with increasing patient age. Forty-two percent of patients aged 66 to 69 received palliative radiation therapy. Rates of palliative radiation decreased to 38%, 32%, 24%, and 14% among patients aged 70 to 74, 75 to 79, 80 to 84, and over 85, respectively. Multivariate analysis found that confounding covariates attenuated these findings, although the decreased relative rate of palliative radiation therapy among the elderly remained clinically and statistically significant. On multivariate analysis, compared to patients 66 to 69 years old, those aged 70 to 74, 75 to 79, 80 to 84, and over 85 had a 7%, 15%, 25%, and 44% decreased rate of receiving palliative radiation, respectively (all P<.0001). Conclusions: Age disparity with palliative radiation therapy exists among older cancer patients. Further research should strive to identify barriers to palliative radiation among the elderly, and extra effort should be made to give older patients the opportunity to receive this quality of life-enhancing treatment at the end

  11. Stroke After Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer: What Is the Risk?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthurs, Erin [Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Hanna, Timothy P. [Division of Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Oncology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Zaza, Khaled [Department of Oncology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Peng, Yingwei [Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Hall, Stephen F., E-mail: sfh@queensu.ca [Division of Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Otolaryngology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-11-01

    Purpose: A retrospective population-based cohort study was conducted to determine the risk of ischemic stroke with respect to time, associated with curative radiation therapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: On the basis of data from the Ontario Cancer Registry and regional cancer treatment centers, 14,069 patients were identified with diagnoses of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, larynx, and pharynx who were treated for cure between 1990 and 2010. Hazards of stroke and time to stroke were examined, accounting for the competing risk of death. Stroke risk factors identified through diagnostic and procedural administrative codes were adjusted for in the comparison between treatment regimens, which included surgery alone versus radiation therapy alone and surgery alone versus any exposure to radiation therapy. Results: Overall, 6% of patients experienced an ischemic stroke after treatment, with 5% experiencing a stroke after surgery, 8% after radiation therapy alone, and 6% after any exposure to radiation therapy. The cause-specific hazard ratios of ischemic stroke after radiation therapy alone and after any exposure to radiation therapy compared with surgery were 1.70 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.41-2.05) and 1.46 (95% CI: 1.23-1.73), respectively, after adjustment for stroke risk factors, patient factors, and disease-related factors. Conclusions: Radiation therapy was associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke compared with surgery alone: for both radiation therapy alone and after all treatment modalities that included any radiation treatment were combined. Because of a shift toward a younger HNSCC patient population, our results speak to the need for adequate follow-up and survivorship care among patients who have been treated with radiation therapy. Advances in treatment that minimize chronic morbidity also require further evaluation.

  12. Postoperative radiation therapy for major salivary gland cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Fumio; Yahara, Katsuya; Ohguri, Takayuki

    2003-01-01

    A retrospective study was performed on 29 patients with major salivary gland cancer treated with postoperative irradiation between 1981 and 2002. Univariate and multivariate analyses of age, gender, cancer grade, T stage, N stage, surgical resectability, concomitant chemotherapy, and neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy were performed for disease-free survival. The 5-year survival rates and 5-year disease-free survival rate were 61.6% and 41.4%, respectively. Both univariate and multivariate analyses showed that cancer grade and surgical resectability influenced survival rates. Chemotherapy did not influence the disease-free survival. The total dose of postoperative radiation was 47.6±8.8 Gy in the complete excision group as planned, but was 56.1±7.9 Gy in the incomplete excision group, which may be insufficient and lead to poor treatment outcome. (author)

  13. Radiation therapy for unresectable locally advanced breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horikawa, Noriko; Inoue, Masayoshi; Uehara, Tomoko; Miyasaka, T.; Miyasaka, M.; Tabata, Yoji; Sakamoto, Nobuyuki; Nakagawa, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Thirteen cases of inoperable advanced breast cancer were treated with radiotherapy between 2002 to 2012 at Nara Prefectural Hospital. All cases were treated by radiotherapy and chemo-endocrine therapy. Patients received 60-81 Gy (median 60 Gy) to the primary breast tumor. Response of the breast tumors were complete response in 3 cases (23%), partial response in 8 cases (62%) and stable disease in 2 cases (15%) (response rate: 85%). All breast tumors had been controlled and skin troubles were reduced. Radiotherapy for breast cancer is useful for primary tumor control and improved quality of life (QOL). Radiotherapy should be considered to be useful modality in the treatment of advanced breast cancer. (author)

  14. Radiation therapy and patient age in the survival from early-stage breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joslyn, Sue A.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the use of radiation therapy following local excision of invasive localized breast cancer and subsequent survival by 5-year age category. Methods: Data for 27,399 women diagnosed with localized stage of breast cancer and treated with local excision surgery from 1983 through 1992 were collected and provided by the national Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program. Use of radiation therapy was analyzed by race, ethnic background, geographic location, and age at diagnosis. Survival for women treated with local excision plus radiation therapy was compared to that of women treated with local excision alone for each 5-year age category. Results: Subjects in older age groups were significantly less likely (p < 0.001) to receive radiation following local excision compared to younger age groups. Statistically significant survival advantages were conferred on women receiving radiation therapy in each 5-year age category from age 35 to 84 years (ranging from p = 0.02 to p < 0.0001). Conclusion: While the use of radiation therapy following local excision of early-stage breast tumors drops significantly in older age groups, women aged 35-84 years receiving radiation therapy had significant reductions in mortality. These results did not appear to be influenced by the presence of mortal comorbid conditions. These results strongly suggest the need to consider carefully patient characteristics other than age in deciding the course of treatment for early-stage breast cancer

  15. MR imaging of endometrial cancer that occurs after radiation therapy for cervix cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Youn Jeong; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Lim, Nam Yeol; Ko, Seok Wan; Kim, Bo Hyun

    2007-01-01

    We wanted to describe the MR imaging findings of endometrial cancer in patients with a history of prior radiation therapy for cervical cancer (ECRT) and we compare them to the MR imaging findings of patients with spontaneously occurring endometrial cancer (SEC). Twenty-two patients with endometrial cancer that was diagnosed by operation or endometrial biopsy were included in the study. The patients were divided into two groups according to the presence of past RT for cervical cancer: ECRT (n = 4) and SEC (n = 18). The MR images were retrospectively analyzed by consensus of two experienced radiologists. The MR imaging findings were analyzed by the size, shape and signal intensity of the mass, distension of the uterine cavity, the presence of cervical stenosis and the nature of the fluid collection. For the mass shape, all the ECRT lesions were polypoid masses. However, the SEC patients had 5 polypoid masses and 13 wall thickenings. The maximal diameter, signal intensity and enhancement pattern of the masses were not different between the ECRT and SEC patients. The width of the endometrial cavity varied between 3.9 cm in the ECRT patients and 0.4 cm in the SEC patients (ρ = 0.002). All the ECRT patients had cervical stenosis. However, none of the SEC patients had cervical stenosis. MR imaging of ECRT patients demonstrated prominent distension of their uterine cavity and cervical stenosis, which may be the result of radiation fibrosis in the uterus

  16. National Cancer Database Analysis of Proton Versus Photon Radiation Therapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, Kristin A., E-mail: kristin.higgins@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); O' Connell, Kelli [Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Liu, Yuan [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Gillespie, Theresa W. [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Department of Surgery, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); McDonald, Mark W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Pillai, Rathi N. [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Patel, Kirtesh R.; Patel, Pretesh R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Robinson, Clifford G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Simone, Charles B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Owonikoko, Taofeek K. [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Belani, Chandra P. [Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute, Pennsylvania University, Hershey, Pennsylvania (United States); and others

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze outcomes and predictors associated with proton radiation therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the National Cancer Database. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Database was queried to capture patients with stage I-IV NSCLC treated with thoracic radiation from 2004 to 2012. A logistic regression model was used to determine the predictors for utilization of proton radiation therapy. The univariate and multivariable association with overall survival were assessed by Cox proportional hazards models along with log–rank tests. A propensity score matching method was implemented to balance baseline covariates and eliminate selection bias. Results: A total of 243,822 patients (photon radiation therapy: 243,474; proton radiation therapy: 348) were included in the analysis. Patients in a ZIP code with a median income of <$46,000 per year were less likely to receive proton treatment, with the income cohort of $30,000 to $35,999 least likely to receive proton therapy (odds ratio 0.63 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.44-0.90]; P=.011). On multivariate analysis of all patients, non-proton therapy was associated with significantly worse survival compared with proton therapy (hazard ratio 1.21 [95% CI 1.06-1.39]; P<.01). On propensity matched analysis, proton radiation therapy (n=309) was associated with better 5-year overall survival compared with non-proton radiation therapy (n=1549), 22% versus 16% (P=.025). For stage II and III patients, non-proton radiation therapy was associated with worse survival compared with proton radiation therapy (hazard ratio 1.35 [95% CI 1.10-1.64], P<.01). Conclusions: Thoracic radiation with protons is associated with better survival in this retrospective analysis; further validation in the randomized setting is needed to account for any imbalances in patient characteristics, including positron emission tomography–computed tomography staging.

  17. Radiation Therapy Side Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation therapy has side effects because it not only kills or slows the growth of cancer cells, it can also affect nearby healthy cells. Many people who get radiation therapy experience fatigue. Other side effects depend on the part of the body that is being treated. Learn more about possible side effects.

  18. Development of system technology for radiation cancer therapy with the dexterous auto lesions tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seungho; Jeong, Kyungmin; Jung, Seungho; Lee, Namho

    2013-01-01

    The project objectives are to establish the fundamental core technologies for precise auto lesions tracking radiation cancer therapy and developing related system technology as well. Radiation cancer therapy apparatus should be domestically produced to reduce medical expenses, hence advanced technologies are suggested and developed to make cost down medical expenses and save expenditure for importing 10 million dollars/set from overseas. To achieve these targets, we have carried out reviewing of domestic and foreign technology trend. Based on review of state-of-the-art technology, radiation sensory system is studied. 3m high precise image processing technique and intelligent therapy planning software are developed. Also precedent study on the redundant robot for dexterous motion control system has been performed for developing of radiation cancel therapy robot system

  19. Ovarian cancer: contribution of radiation therapy to patient management: Erskine Memorial Lecture, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    Ovarian cancer may be treated with radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy, or a combination. To evaluate the contribution of radiation therapy to patient management the cure rate must be estimated; data are presented suggesting that the 5-year survival rate provides a reasonable estimate of the cure rate. A study of patients treated since 1971 showed that stage and postoperative residuum could be used to divide patients into two subgroups, a poor prognosis group and a good prognosis group; a multifactorial grouping of patients in the good prognosis group who were treated postoperatively with radiation therapy only was further able to divide patients into low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk groups. Studies of radiation therapy for different subgroups are discussed; abdominopelvic irradiation has been shown to improve survival for approximately one-third of patients with cancer of the ovary

  20. External radiation therapy in early stage prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandler, Howard M.

    1996-01-01

    Optimal therapy for adenocarcinoma of the prostate is controversial. Numerous options are available, however, comparison of results is difficult in view of the insufficiency of phase III randomized trials comparing alternative treatment strategies. These options include such strategies as no curative therapy (so-called watchful waiting), radiotherapy (external and/or internal), cryotherapy, or radical prostatectomy. Clearly, a broad spectrum of clinical approaches. When reported experiences involving radiation therapy and radical prostatectomy are compared, surgical patients tend to be younger, of earlier stage, of higher performance status, and have lower pre-therapy PSA. These prognostic factors influence the probability of disease control, and since patient selection can have a profound impact on results reporting, these issues need to be carefully controlled. A review of patients who are potentially candidates for surgery at the University of Michigan treated with conformal therapy external beam treatment, indicates that these relatively early patients are doing well. These issues will be elaborated upon further during the presentation

  1. Conservative treatment of rectal cancer with local excision and postoperative radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minsky, B.D.

    1995-01-01

    The conventional surgical treatment for patients with potentially curable transmural and/or node positive rectal cancer is a low anterior resection or abdominoperineal resection. Recently, there has been increasing interest in the use of local excision and postoperative radiation therapy as primary therapy for selected rectal cancers. The limited data suggest that the approach of local excision and postoperative radiation therapy should be limited to patients with either T 1 tumours with adverse pathological factors or T 2 tumours. Transmural tumours, which have a 24% local failure rate, are treated more effectively with standard surgery and pre- or postoperative therapy. The results of local excision and postoperative radiation therapy are encouraging, but more experience is needed to determine if this approach ultimately has similar local control and survival rates as standard surgery. (author)

  2. Impact of prognostic factors for postmastectomy radiation therapy of breast cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonov, K. A.; Startseva, Zh. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Velikaya, V. V.

    2017-09-01

    The study included 196 breast cancer patients with stages T1-3N0-3M0. The comprehensive therapy for breast cancer included surgical operation, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Multivariate analysis showed that multifocality growth of tumor (p = 0.004), high grade III (p = 0.008), two metastatic lymph nodes (p = 0.02) were associated with an increased risk of regional node failure in the patients with one to three positive lymph nodes. The prognostic models describing the probability of local recurrences of breast cancer were developed for individualization of the radiation therapy tactics. Postmastectomy radiation therapy in the patients with high-risk breast cancer treated with modified radical mastectomy improves locoregional control, breast cancer-specific survival, does not increase late toxicity.

  3. Outcome of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for inoperable locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Ningning; Jin Jing; Li Yexiong; Yu Zihao; Liu Xinfan; Wang Weihu; Wang Shulian; Song Yongwen; Liu Yuping

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the outcome of radiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods: From January 2000 to December 2007, 41 patients with inoperable locally advanced (stage III) pancreatic cancer were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy(3DCRT) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Among these patients, 30 received concurrent radio-chemo-therapy. Results: The median survival time(MST) and 1-year overall survival were 9.2 months and 23%. Patients with pretreatment KPS ≥ 80, no regional lymph nodes metastasis, and CR/PR after radiotherapy had better prognosis. The corresponding MSTs were 11.1 months vs 5.8 months (χ 2 =7.50, P=0.006), 10.8 months vs 6.5 months(χ 2 =5.67, P=0.017), and 19.5 months vs 9.1 months (χ 2 =7.28, P=0.007), respectively. Concurrent radio-chemotherapy tended to improve the overall survival(χ 2 =3.25, P=0.072). After radiotherapy, 18 patients had clinical benefit response, mainly being abdominal pain relief. Neither grade 4 hematologic nor grade 3 non-hematologic toxicities were observed. Conclusions: For patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer, both 3DCRT and IMRT are effective in alleviation of disease-related symptoms. Patients with better performance status before treatment, no regional lymph nodes metastasis, and better response to radiotherapy may have better prognosis. Concurrent radio-chemotherapy trend to improve overall survival when compared with radiotherapy alone. (authors)

  4. Decompressive radiation therapy in gastric cancer metastase in hilus of liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novaes, P.E.R.S.; Possik, R.A.; Peres, O.; Abrao, A.

    1988-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of patients with cancer of stomach attended from January 1970 to January 1981 is done. Twelve patients were submitted to radiation therapy and the average survival was of 258 days. The external megavoltage radiation as an useful modality of treatment for extra hepatic biliary obstruction secondary to gastric cancer is reported and good results increasing the time and life quality of patients are presented. (M.A.C.) [pt

  5. Risk of second bone sarcoma following childhood cancer: role of radiation therapy treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, Boris; Benadjaoud, Mohamed Amine; Clero, Enora; Haddy, Nadia; El-Fayech, Chiraz; Guibout, Catherine; Teinturier, Cecile; Oberlin, Odile; Veres, Cristina; Pacquement, Helene; Munzer, Martine; Tan Dat N'Guyen; Bondiau, Pierre-Yves; Berchery, Delphine; Laprie, Anne

    2014-01-01

    International audience; : Bone sarcoma as a second malignancy is rare but highly fatal. The present knowledge about radiation-absorbed organ dose-response is insufficient to predict the risks induced by radiation therapy techniques. The objective of the present study was to assess the treatment-induced risk for bone sarcoma following a childhood cancer and particularly the related risk of radiotherapy. Therefore, a retrospective cohort of 4,171 survivors of a solid childhood cancer treated be...

  6. Combined preoperative therapy for oral cancer with nedaplatin and radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Masatoshi; Shibata, Akihiko; Hayashi, Munehiro [Nippon Dental Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Hospital] (and others)

    2002-03-01

    We performed preoperative combined therapy using nedaplatin (CDGP) and radiation in 12 patients with squamous cell carcinoma originating from the oral cavity and maxillary sinus, and examined for any adverse events that may have occurred during this therapeutic regimen. Regarding the irradiation, external irradiation utilizing a 6 MV linac (linear accelerator) at a dose of 2.0 Gy/day was performed 5 times a week, with the target total radiation dose set at 40 Gy. In addition, CDGP was intravenously administered 30 minutes before irradiation at a dose of 5 mg/m{sup 2}/day. Mucositis was observed in all 12 subjects, however, the severity was observed to be grade 1-2 with no major differences in comparison to the patients given standard radiation monotherapy. Two subjects developed grade 3 leucopenia and were thus given granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). In addition, grade 2 and grade 3 thrombocytopenia were both observed in one subject each. The subject with grade 3 thrombocytopenia required a platelet transfusion during surgery. No marked changes in serum creatinine levels were noted. These findings are therefore considered to provide evidence supporting the safety of this combination therapy. (author)

  7. T2-weighted endorectal magnetic resonance imaging of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westphalen, Antonio C.; Kurhanewicz, John; Cunha, Rui M.G.; Hsu, I-Chow; Kornak, John; Zhao, Shoujun; Coakley, Fergus V.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively determine the accuracy of T2-weighted endorectal MR imaging in the detection of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy and to investigate the relationship between imaging accuracy and time since therapy. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained and the study was HIPPA compliant. We identified 59 patients who underwent 1.5 Tesla endorectal MR imaging of the prostate between 1999 and 2006 after definitive external beam radiation therapy for biopsy-proven prostate cancer. Two readers recorded the presence or absence of tumor on T2-weighted images. Logistic regression and Fisher's exact tests for 2x2 tables were used to determine the accuracy of imaging and investigate if accuracy differed between those imaged within 3 years of therapy (n = 25) and those imaged more than 3 years after therapy (n = 34). Transrectal biopsy was used as the standard of reference for the presence or absence of recurrent cancer. Results: Thirty-four of 59 patients (58%) had recurrent prostate cancer detected on biopsy. The overall accuracy of T2-weighted MR imaging in the detection cancer after external beam radiation therapy was 63% (37/59) for reader 1 and 71% for reader 2 (42/59). For both readers, logistic regression showed no difference in accuracy between those imaged within 3 years of therapy and those imaged more than 3 years after therapy (p = 0.86 for reader 1 and 0.44 for reader 2). Conclusion: T2-weighted endorectal MR imaging has low accuracy in the detection of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy, irrespective of the time since therapy. (author)

  8. Effectiveness of Cepharanthin in decreasing interruptions during radiation therapy for oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, Yuka; Murakami, Shumei; Kamimoto, Naoya; Nakatani, Atsutoshi; Furukawa, Souhei

    2005-01-01

    The objectives of this study was to examine the effectiveness of Cepharanthin (Kakensyoyaku, Tokyo, Japan) at decreasing side effects during radiation therapy for oral cancer and thereby allowing the completion of radiation therapy without interruption. Two hundred fifteen patients diagnosed with oral cancers were assigned to either Cepharanthin or control groups and underwent external beam irradiation. The completion of the course of radiation therapy and the occurrence of side effects such as mucositis, dysgeusia, and xerostomia during the radiation therapy were evaluated and compared. The completion rate was 87.4% for the Cepharanthin group versus 67.0% for the control group, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.01). Mucositis did not appear in 58 of 127 cases (45.7%) in the Cepharanthin group or in 21 of 88 cases (23.9%) in the control group. Mucositis developed in 24.6% of the Cepharanthin group and 53.7% of the control group within 2 weeks of irradiation. There were significant relationships between the use of Cepharanthin and the development and timing of mucositis (both P<0.01). Cepharanthin improved the completion of radiation therapy without interruption and reduced or delayed the development of mucositis during radiation therapy for oral cancer. (author)

  9. Results of primary radiation therapy in early vocal cord cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, S.A.; Sarkar, S.; Mehta, M.S.; Marfatia, P.T.; Choudhary, A.J.; Mehta, A.R.

    1991-01-01

    Results of 74 patients treated by primary radiation therapy with curative intent at the Tata Memorial Hospital between January 1980 and December 1984 are reported. Thirty three (44.6%) were classified as TlaNO, twenty five (33.8%) as TlbNO, ten (13.5%) as T2NO and six(8.1%) as TisNO. The 5-year actuarial survival was 92% and disease-free survival was 85%. Thirteen patients (17.5%) failed locally, seven (53.8%) of whom were salvaged by surgery. Radiation side-effects were minimal and there were no long term complications. Anterior commissure involvement did not affect the local recurrence rates. (author). 19 refs., 1 tabs

  10. Role of radiation therapy in patients with resectable pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palta, Manisha; Willett, Christopher; Czito, Brian

    2011-07-01

    The 5-year overall survival of patients with pancreatic cancer is approximately 5%, with potentially resectable disease representing the curable minority. Although surgical resection remains the cornerstone of treatment, local and distant failure rates are high after complete resection, and debate continues as to the appropriate adjuvant therapy. Many oncologists advocate for adjuvant chemotherapy alone, given that high rates of systemic metastases are the primary cause of patient mortality. Others, however, view locoregional failure as a significant contributor to morbidity and mortality, thereby justifying the use of adjuvant chemoradiation. As in other gastrointestinal malignancies, neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy offers potential advantages in resectable patients, and clinical investigation of this approach has shown promising results; however, phase III data are lacking. Further therapeutic advances and prospective trials are needed to better define the optimal role of adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatment in patients with resectable pancreatic cancer.

  11. Autopsy findings in 40 cases of esophageal cancer treated with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakawa, Michitaka; Shiojima, Kazumi; Hasegawa, Masatoshi

    1995-01-01

    We analyzed local control, lymph node metastases and distant metastases for autopsy cases of esophageal cancer treated with radiation therapy alone. Thirty-eight patients had squamous cell carcinoma, one had adenosquamous carcinoma and one had undifferentiated carcinoma. Sixteen patients received a total dose less than 60 Gy and 24 received 60 Gy or more. The 1-year, 3-year, 5-year overall survival rates by Kaplan-Meier method were 45.8%, 16.7%, 8.3%, respectively. Four patients (10%) were free of tumors, and another six (15%) had no primary tumor but metastases. Thirty patients had persistent or recurrent primary tumors. Local tumor control rates were 25% for all patients and 34% for patients who survived more than 3 months and 33% for patients irradiated with 60 Gy or more. Tumor type, tumor length and survival times were significantly related with tumor control rates. Perforations into neighboring organs were observed in eighteen patients (45%); 12 were perforated into respiratory systems, 4 into vascular systems, 1 into the mediastinum and 1 into the pleural cavity. Thirty-two patients (80%) had lymph node metastases. Twenty-seven patients (68%) had distant metastases; 20 in the lung, 19 in the liver, 10 in the stomach, 8 in the pancreas and the adrenal gland, 7 in the pleura, 6 in the bone and the heart and the diaphragm. Concurrent double cancer was observed at autopsy in six patients; 2 early gastric cancers, 2 latent hepatomas, 1 lung cancer, 1 latent thyroid cancer. Three patients had a history of resection of other cancer before radiation therapy to esophageal cancer; 2 had gastric cancer and 1 had submandibular cancer. One patient who had another esophageal cancer apart from the first esophageal cancer received radiation therapy 12 years ago. In conclusion, the local control rate was 33% for autopsy cases of esophageal cancer treated with radiation therapy of 60 Gy or more. (J.P.N.)

  12. Quantitative comparison between treatment results for uterine cervix cancer by radiation therapy and surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iinuma, Takeshi; Fukuhisa, Kenjiro; Arai, Tatsuo

    1983-01-01

    Treatment results for uterine cervix cancer were evaluated using a new concept named ''Effective Survival Rate''. This rate was calculated by subtracting the weighted sum of incidence rates of various complications from the 5-year survival rate. The numerical values for various complications were assigned as follows: surgical death, 1.0; severe complications, such as fistula ureterovaginalis and ileus, 0.5; mild complications, such as rectum and urinary bladder complications, 0.3 and 0.2. These values were determined with reference to the Karnofsky index of performance status. The effective survival rate was calculated for patients with satage 2 and 3 uterine cervix cancer treated by radiation therapy and surgery, and compared as a function of age between 30 and 70 years. We concluded that the effective survival rate was comparable for radiation therapy and surgery for stage 2 uterine cervix cancer. However, in patients with stage 3, radiation therapy was superior. (author)

  13. An analysis of the incidence and related factors for radiation dermatitis in breast cancer patients who receive radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sun Young; Kwon, Hyoung Cheol; Kim, Jung Soo; Lee, Heui Kwan

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the incidence and related factors of radiation dermatitis; at first, to recognize whether a decrease in radiation dermatitis is possible or not in breast cancer patients who received radiation therapy. Of 338 patients, 284 with invasive breast cancer who received breast conservation surgery with radiotherapy at Chonbuk National University Hospital from January 2007 to June 2009 were evaluated. Patients who also underwent bolus, previous contralateral breast irradiation and irradiation on both breasts were excluded. For patients who appeared to have greater than moderate radiation dermatitis, the incidence and relating factors for radiation dermatitis were analyzed retrospectively. A total of 207 and 77 patients appeared to have RTOG grade 0/1 or above RTOG grade 2 radiation dermatitis, respectively. The factors found to be statistically significant for the 77 patients who appeared to have greater than moderate radiation dermatitis include the presence of lymphocele due to the stasis of lymph and lymph edema which affect the healing disturbance of radiation dermatitis (p=0.003, p=0.001). Moreover, an allergic reaction to plaster due to the immune cells of skin and the activation of cytokine and concomitant hormonal therapy were also statistically significant factors (p=0.001, p=0.025). Most of the breast cancer patients who received radiation therapy appeared to have a greater than mild case of radiation dermatitis. Lymphocele, lymphedema, an allergy to plaster and concomitant hormonal therapy which affect radiation dermatitis were found to be significant factors. Consequently, we should eliminate lymphocele prior to radiation treatment for patients who appear to have an allergic reaction to plaster. We should also instruct patients of methods to maintain skin moisture if they appear to have a greater than moderate case of radiation dermatitis.

  14. Late adverse effects of radiation therapy for rectal cancer - a systematic overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birgisson, Helgi; Paahlman, Lars; Gunnarsson, Ulf; Glimelius, Bengt

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. The use of radiation therapy (RT) together with improvement in the surgical treatment of rectal cancer improves survival and reduces the risk for local recurrences. Despite these benefits, the adverse effects of radiation therapy limit its use. The aim of this review was to present a comprehensive overview of published studies on late adverse effects related to the RT for rectal cancer. Methods. Meta-analyses, reviews, randomised clinical trials, cohort studies and case-control studies on late adverse effects, due to pre- or postoperative radiation therapy and chemo-radiotherapy for rectal cancer, were systematically searched. Most information was obtained from the randomised trials, especially those comparing preoperative short-course 5x5 Gy radiation therapy with surgery alone. Results. The late adverse effects due to RT were bowel obstructions; bowel dysfunction presented as faecal incontinence to gas, loose or solid stools, evacuation problems or urgency; and sexual dysfunction. However, fewer late adverse effects were reported in recent studies, which generally used smaller irradiated volumes and better irradiation techniques; although, one study revealed an increased risk for secondary cancers in irradiated patients. Conclusions. These results stress the importance of careful patient selection for RT for rectal cancer. Improvements in the radiation technique should further be developed and the long-term follow-up of the randomised trials is the most important source of information on late adverse effects and should therefore be continued

  15. Late adverse effects of radiation therapy for rectal cancer - a systematic overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birgisson, Helgi; Paahlman, Lars; Gunnarsson, Ulf [Dept. of Surgery, Univ. Hospital, Univ. of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden); Glimelius, Bengt [Dept. of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Univ. Hospital, Univ. of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden); Dept. of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-05-15

    Purpose. The use of radiation therapy (RT) together with improvement in the surgical treatment of rectal cancer improves survival and reduces the risk for local recurrences. Despite these benefits, the adverse effects of radiation therapy limit its use. The aim of this review was to present a comprehensive overview of published studies on late adverse effects related to the RT for rectal cancer. Methods. Meta-analyses, reviews, randomised clinical trials, cohort studies and case-control studies on late adverse effects, due to pre- or postoperative radiation therapy and chemo-radiotherapy for rectal cancer, were systematically searched. Most information was obtained from the randomised trials, especially those comparing preoperative short-course 5x5 Gy radiation therapy with surgery alone. Results. The late adverse effects due to RT were bowel obstructions; bowel dysfunction presented as faecal incontinence to gas, loose or solid stools, evacuation problems or urgency; and sexual dysfunction. However, fewer late adverse effects were reported in recent studies, which generally used smaller irradiated volumes and better irradiation techniques; although, one study revealed an increased risk for secondary cancers in irradiated patients. Conclusions. These results stress the importance of careful patient selection for RT for rectal cancer. Improvements in the radiation technique should further be developed and the long-term follow-up of the randomised trials is the most important source of information on late adverse effects and should therefore be continued.

  16. Preliminary results of the use of photon-magnetic therapy in prevention and treatment of skin radiation reactions of patients with breast cancer with adjuvant radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syimonova, L.Yi.; Gertman, V.Z.; Byilogurova, L.V.; Kulyinyich, G.V.; Lavrik, V.P.

    2012-01-01

    The authors report preliminary findings of the investigation of the effect of combination photon-magnetic therapy with successive application of red and blue light to the skin of breast cancer patients during the course of post-operative radiation therapy. It was established that photonmagnetic therapy positively influenced the state of the skin in the irradiated areas. Addition of the magnetic factor significantly improved the efficacy of phototherapy. The patients receiving photon-magnetic therapy finished the course of radiation therapy with almost unchanged skin.

  17. Current concepts in F18 FDG PET/CT-based Radiation Therapy planning for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Percy eLee

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is an important component of cancer therapy for early stage as well as locally advanced lung cancer. The use of F18 FDG PET/CT has come to the forefront of lung cancer staging and overall treatment decision-making. FDG PET/CT parameters such as standard uptake value and metabolic tumor volume provide important prognostic and predictive information in lung cancer. Importantly, FDG PET/CT for radiation planning has added biological information in defining the gross tumor volume as well as involved nodal disease. For example, accurate target delineation between tumor and atelectasis is facilitated by utilizing PET and CT imaging. Furthermore, there has been meaningful progress in incorporating metabolic information from FDG PET/CT imaging in radiation treatment planning strategies such as radiation dose escalation based on standard uptake value thresholds as well as using respiratory gated PET and CT planning for improved target delineation of moving targets. In addition, PET/CT based follow-up after radiation therapy has provided the possibility of early detection of local as well as distant recurrences after treatment. More research is needed to incorporate other biomarkers such as proliferative and hypoxia biomarkers in PET as well as integrating metabolic information in adaptive, patient-centered, tailored radiation therapy.

  18. Evaluation of multimodality treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer. Special reference to intraoperative vs. external radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakasugi, Hideyuki; Funakoshi, Akihiro; Seo, Yousuke; Iguchi, Haruo; Wada, Susumu

    1999-01-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT)+postoperative external beam radiation therapy (ERT) with chemotherapy and ERT alone with chemotherapy have been performed in our hospital for unresectable, especially locally advanced, pancreatic cancer. We compared the former method with the latter. Chemotherapy was performed together with radiation, using 5-FU, CDDP, and MMC. IORT+ERT was successful in only half of the treated patients, while ERT alone was successful in almost all of the patients. As a result, the doses of radiation were often shorter in patients treated by the former method compared to the latter method. Both methods, when completed for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (stage IVa), produced good effects on tumor markers, tumor size and pain. Furthermore, the latter method was better than the former in improving the survival time and quality of life (QOL). Therefore, ERT is a practical and useful method for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. (author)

  19. A comparison of robotic arm versus gantry linear accelerator stereotactic body radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avkshtol, Vladimir; Dong, Yanqun; Hayes, Shelly B; Hallman, Mark A; Price, Robert A; Sobczak, Mark L; Horwitz, Eric M; Zaorsky, Nicholas G

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most prevalent cancer diagnosed in men in the United States besides skin cancer. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT; 6-15 Gy per fraction, up to 45 minutes per fraction, delivered in five fractions or less, over the course of approximately 2 weeks) is emerging as a popular treatment option for prostate cancer. The American Society for Radiation Oncology now recognizes SBRT for select low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients. SBRT grew from the notion that high doses of radiation typical of brachytherapy could be delivered noninvasively using modern external-beam radiation therapy planning and delivery methods. SBRT is most commonly delivered using either a traditional gantry-mounted linear accelerator or a robotic arm-mounted linear accelerator. In this systematic review article, we compare and contrast the current clinical evidence supporting a gantry vs robotic arm SBRT for prostate cancer. The data for SBRT show encouraging and comparable results in terms of freedom from biochemical failure (>90% for low and intermediate risk at 5-7 years) and acute and late toxicity (6 MV). Finally, SBRT (particularly on a gantry) may also be more cost-effective than conventionally fractionated external-beam radiation therapy. Randomized controlled trials of SBRT using both technologies are underway.

  20. Surgeons' Knowledge and Practices Regarding the Role of Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jessica [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hawley, Sarah T.; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Janz, Nancy K. [Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sabel, Michael S. [Department of Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Katz, Steven J. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Jagsi, Reshma, E-mail: rjagsi@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Population-based studies suggest underuse of radiation therapy, especially after mastectomy. Because radiation oncology is a referral-based specialty, knowledge and attitudes of upstream providers, specifically surgeons, may influence patients' decisions regarding radiation, including whether it is even considered. Therefore, we sought to evaluate surgeons' knowledge of pertinent risk information, their patterns of referral, and the correlates of surgeon knowledge and referral in specific breast cancer scenarios. Methods and Materials: We surveyed a national sample of 750 surgeons, with a 67% response rate. We analyzed responses from those who had seen at least 1 breast cancer patient in the past year (n=403), using logistic regression models to identify correlates of knowledge and appropriate referral. Results: Overall, 87% of respondents were general surgeons, and 64% saw >10 breast cancer patients in the previous year. In a scenario involving a 45-year-old undergoing lumpectomy, only 45% correctly estimated the risk of locoregional recurrence without radiation therapy, but 97% would refer to radiation oncology. In a patient with 2 of 20 nodes involved after mastectomy, 30% would neither refer to radiation oncology nor provide accurate information to make radiation decisions. In a patient with 4 of 20 nodes involved after mastectomy, 9% would not refer to radiation oncology. Fewer than half knew that the Oxford meta-analysis revealed a survival benefit from radiation therapy after lumpectomy (45%) or mastectomy (32%). Only 16% passed a 7-item knowledge test; female and more-experienced surgeons were more likely to pass. Factors significantly associated with appropriate referral to radiation oncology included breast cancer volume, tumor board participation, and knowledge. Conclusions: Many surgeons have inadequate knowledge regarding the role of radiation in breast cancer management, especially after mastectomy. Targeted educational

  1. Radiation or chemoradiation: initial utility study of selected therapy for local advanced stadium cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramitasari, D. A.; Gondhowiardjo, S.; Nuranna, L.

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to compare radiation only or chemo radiation treatment of local advanced cervical cancers by examining the initial response of tumors and acute side effects. An initial assessment employed value based medicine (VBM) by obtaining utility values for both types of therapy. The incidences of acute lower gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and hematology side effects in patients undergoing chemoradiation did not differ significantly from those undergoing radiation alone. Utility values for patients who underwent radiation alone were higher compared to those who underwent chemoradiation. It was concluded that the complete response of patients who underwent chemoradiation did not differ significantly from those who underwent radiation alone.

  2. Second Solid Cancers After Radiation Therapy: A Systematic Review of the Epidemiologic Studies of the Radiation Dose-Response Relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy, E-mail: berringtona@mail.nih.gov [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Gilbert, Ethel; Curtis, Rochelle; Inskip, Peter; Kleinerman, Ruth; Morton, Lindsay; Rajaraman, Preetha; Little, Mark P. [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Rapid innovations in radiation therapy techniques have resulted in an urgent need for risk projection models for second cancer risks from high-dose radiation exposure, because direct observation of the late effects of newer treatments will require patient follow-up for a decade or more. However, the patterns of cancer risk after fractionated high-dose radiation are much less well understood than those after lower-dose exposures (0.1-5 Gy). In particular, there is uncertainty about the shape of the dose-response curve at high doses and about the magnitude of the second cancer risk per unit dose. We reviewed the available evidence from epidemiologic studies of second solid cancers in organs that received high-dose exposure (>5 Gy) from radiation therapy where dose-response curves were estimated from individual organ-specific doses. We included 28 eligible studies with 3434 second cancer patients across 11 second solid cancers. Overall, there was little evidence that the dose-response curve was nonlinear in the direction of a downturn in risk, even at organ doses of ≥60 Gy. Thyroid cancer was the only exception, with evidence of a downturn after 20 Gy. Generally the excess relative risk per Gray, taking account of age and sex, was 5 to 10 times lower than the risk from acute exposures of <2 Gy among the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. However, the magnitude of the reduction in risk varied according to the second cancer. The results of our review provide insights into radiation carcinogenesis from fractionated high-dose exposures and are generally consistent with current theoretical models. The results can be used to refine the development of second solid cancer risk projection models for novel radiation therapy techniques.

  3. Result of radiation therapy of sino-nasal cancers using partial attenuation filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Ok Bae; Choi, Tae Jin [Keimyung University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    This study was to evaluate the survival and pattern of failure after radiation therapy of sino-nasal cancer using partial attenuation filer and wedged beams and to help radiotherapy planning of sino-nasal cancer. Between February 1992 and March 2003, 17 patients with sino-nasal cancers underwent radiation therapy using partial attenuation filter at Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung university. There were 9 male and 8 female patients. Patients' age ranged from 40 to 75 years (median 59 years). There were 10 patients of maxillary sinus cancer, 7 patients of nasal cancer. The histologic type was squamous cell carcinoma in 11, adenoid cystic carcinoma in 4 and olfactory neuroblastoma in 2. The distribution of clinical stage by the AJCC system was 3 for stage II, 7 for III and 6 for IV. The five patients were treated with radiation alone and 12 patients were treated with surgery and postoperative radiation therapy. The range of total radiation dose delivered to the primary tumor was from 44 to 76 Gy (median 60 Gy). The follow-up period ranged from 3 to 173 months with median of 78 months. The overall 2 year survival rate and disease free survival rate was 76.4%. The 5 year and 10 year survival rate were 76.4% and 45.6% and the 5 year and 10 year disease free survival rate was 70.6%. The 5 year disease free survival rate by treatment modality was 91.6% for postoperative radiation group and 20% for radiation alone group, statistical significance was found by treatment modality ({rho} = 0.006). There were no differences in survival by pathology and stage. There were local failure in 5 patients (29%) but no distant failure and no severe complication required surgical intervention. Radiation therapy of sino-nasal cancer using partial attenuation filter was safe and effective. Combined modality with conservative surgery and radiation therapy was more advisable to achieve loco-regional control in sino-nasal cancer. Also we considered high precision radiation therapy with

  4. Radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peschel, R.E; Fisher, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    The new insights and controversies concerning the radiobiological properties of malignant melanoma and how these relate to new clinical approaches are reviewed. The recent clinical experience with large individual fraction sizes is analyzed. The treatment of malignant melanoma in certain specialized sites is also described. An attempt is made to place in perspective the usefulness of radiation therapy in the treatment of this complex disease. Finally, certain new applications for radiation therapy both alone and in combustion with other treatment modalities are proposed that may ultimately prove appropriate for clinical trials

  5. Tobacco Smoking During Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer Is Associated With Unfavorable Outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Allen M.; Chen, Leon M.; Vaughan, Andrew; Sreeraman, Radhika; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Lau, Derick H.; Stuart, Kerri; Purdy, James A.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of continued cigarette smoking among patients undergoing radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer by comparing the clinical outcomes among active smokers and quitters. Methods and Materials: A review of medical records identified 101 patients with newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck who continued to smoke during radiation therapy. Each active smoker was matched to a control patient who had quit smoking before initiation of radiation therapy. Matching was based on tobacco history (pack-years), primary site, age, sex, Karnofsky Performance Status, disease stage, radiation dose, chemotherapy use, year of treatment, and whether surgical resection was performed. Outcomes were compared by use of Kaplan-Meier analysis. Normal tissue effects were graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for the Treatment of Cancer toxicity criteria. Results: With a median follow-up of 49 months, active smokers had significantly inferior 5-year overall survival (23% vs. 55%), locoregional control (58% vs. 69%), and disease-free survival (42% vs. 65%) compared with the former smokers who had quit before radiation therapy (p < 0.05 for all). These differences remained statistically significant when patients treated by postoperative or definitive radiation therapy were analyzed separately. The incidence of Grade 3 or greater late complications was also significantly increased among active smokers compared with former smokers (49% vs. 31%, p = 0.01). Conclusions: Tobacco smoking during radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer is associated with unfavorable outcomes. Further studies analyzing the biologic and molecular reasons underlying these differences are planned.

  6. Radical radiation therapy for prostate cancer in Japan. A patterns of care study report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Katsumasa; Mitsuhashi, Norio

    2003-01-01

    The patterns of radical radiation therapy for prostate cancer are unclear in Japan. A Patterns of Care Study was performed throughout Japan to examine the patterns of radiation therapy for prostate cancer. From 1999 to 2000, extramural audits were performed on 50 randomly selected institutions (∼7% of all institutions in Japan). Detailed information was collected on a total of 311 prostate cancer patients without evidence of distant metastases, who were treated by radiation therapy between 1996 and 1998. Of these 311 patients, 162 treated radically using photon beams were analyzed in this study. Eighty percent of the patients had high-risk diseases defined as T3 or T4 tumors, a pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng/ml or poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Androgen ablation was performed in 85.8% of patients and the median duration of hormonal therapy before and after radiation therapy was 5.3 and 21.4 months, respectively. The median total dose of radiation therapy to the prostate was 65.0 Gy (range: 20-74 Gy). The 3-year overall and biochemical relapse-free survival rates were 86.7 and 86.1%, respectively. Late toxicity was mild, with only nine patients (5.6%) exhibiting grade 2 late morbidity. The majority of the patients who received radical radiation therapy in Japan have high-risk disease. Androgen ablation plus radiation therapy was commonly used to treat these patients and resulted in high rates of initial control with a low risk of complications. (author)

  7. Uterine cervical cancer. Usefulness of MR imaging after the initial radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monzen, Yoshio; Mori, Hiromu; Matsumoto, Akira; Yoshida, Shintaro; Wakisaka, Masaki; Komatsu, Eiji; Tashiro, Makoto; Hori, Yuko.

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing residual or recurrent tumors of cervical cancer after radiation therapy, we investigated the time difference between MRI and gynecologic findings in the diagnosis of residual or recurrent tumor in 12 patients with invasive cervical cancer. We defined a positive finding for residual or recurrent tumor as an uterine cervical mass isointense to muscle on T1-weighted images and hyperintense on T2-weighted images, and when a positive biopsy specimen was obtained. Two patients were diagnosed as having a residual or recurrent tumor by MRI. Positivity was demonstrated four and seven months later, respectively. MRI was more useful in the earlier diagnosis of residual or recurrent tumor of cervical cancer after radiation therapy than uterine biopsy. There was one patient whose differentiation from residual tumor or radiation-induced necrosis or inflammation on MRI was difficult. MRI and gynecologic check-up at a regular interval after radiation therapy was needed to distinguish them. One patient was diagnosed as having a recurrent tumor by gynecologic finding three months earlier than by MRI. Follow-up MRI examinations at a regular interval in addition to gynecologic examination is necessary for the early detection of recurrent cervical cancer after radiation therapy. (author)

  8. Psychology and quality of life in cancer patients on radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jong Chul; Chung, Woong Ki [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-15

    The object of this study is to investigate sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, psychology, self-esteem and quality of life in cancer patients on radiation therapy and to provide useful information for therapeutic approach to cancer patients on radiation therapy. The subjects were 36 patients who had been treated with radiation therapy and 20 normal people. Sociodemographic information and clinical characteristics of cancer patients on radiation therapy were investigated, and symptom checklist-90-revised, Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale for self esteem, World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment Instrument for quality of life were administered to subjects. And Spearman's correlation analysis was used among these. The tendency of somatization, depression, anxiety and hostility in cancer group were significantly higher than normal group. Self esteem and quality of life in cancer group were significantly lower than normal group. No significant difference was found in comparison of psychology, self esteem and quality of life according to sociodemographic variables. Among clinical characteristics, in the presence of metastasis in cancer patients, the scores of anxiety, phobia and paranoid ideation were higher. In patients with pain, the score of somatization was higher. And in case of weight loss, the score of somatization was higher. The higher score of depression, anxiety and hostility were significantly associated with lower self-esteem. And higher score of somatization, depression, anxiety and hostility were significantly associated with lower quality of life. Understanding and management of psychological symptoms, such as somatization, depression, anxiety, and hostility, and pain control are necessary to improve quality of life in cancer patients on radiation therapy.

  9. Psychology and quality of life in cancer patients on radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jong Chul; Chung, Woong Ki

    2004-01-01

    The object of this study is to investigate sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, psychology, self-esteem and quality of life in cancer patients on radiation therapy and to provide useful information for therapeutic approach to cancer patients on radiation therapy. The subjects were 36 patients who had been treated with radiation therapy and 20 normal people. Sociodemographic information and clinical characteristics of cancer patients on radiation therapy were investigated, and symptom checklist-90-revised, Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale for self esteem, World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment Instrument for quality of life were administered to subjects. And Spearman's correlation analysis was used among these. The tendency of somatization, depression, anxiety and hostility in cancer group were significantly higher than normal group. Self esteem and quality of life in cancer group were significantly lower than normal group. No significant difference was found in comparison of psychology, self esteem and quality of life according to sociodemographic variables. Among clinical characteristics, in the presence of metastasis in cancer patients, the scores of anxiety, phobia and paranoid ideation were higher. In patients with pain, the score of somatization was higher. And in case of weight loss, the score of somatization was higher. The higher score of depression, anxiety and hostility were significantly associated with lower self-esteem. And higher score of somatization, depression, anxiety and hostility were significantly associated with lower quality of life. Understanding and management of psychological symptoms, such as somatization, depression, anxiety, and hostility, and pain control are necessary to improve quality of life in cancer patients on radiation therapy

  10. A current perspective on stereotactic body radiation therapy for pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong JC

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Julian C Hong, Brian G Czito, Christopher G Willett, Manisha Palta Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: Pancreatic cancer is a formidable malignancy with poor outcomes. The majority of patients are unable to undergo resection, which remains the only potentially curative treatment option. The management of locally advanced (unresectable pancreatic cancer is controversial; however, treatment with either chemotherapy or chemoradiation is associated with high rates of local tumor progression and metastases development, resulting in low survival rates. An emerging local modality is stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT, which uses image-guided, conformal, high-dose radiation. SBRT has demonstrated promising local control rates and resultant quality of life with acceptable rates of toxicity. Over the past decade, increasing clinical experience and data have supported SBRT as a local treatment modality. Nevertheless, additional research is required to further evaluate the role of SBRT and improve upon the persistently poor outcomes associated with pancreatic cancer. This review discusses the existing clinical experience and technical implementation of SBRT for pancreatic cancer and highlights the directions for ongoing and future studies. Keywords: pancreatic cancer, stereotactic body radiation therapy, SBRT, radiation therapy

  11. Decreased sexual capacity after external radiation therapy for prostate cancer impairs quality of life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helgason, Asgeir R.; Fredrikson, Mats; Adolfsson, Jan; Steineck, Gunnar

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess to what extent patients treated with radiation therapy for prostate cancer experience change in sexual functioning and to what extent this effects quality of life. Methods and Materials: Information was provided by 53 men treated with radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer. Assessment was made with the ''Radiumhemmets Scale of Sexual Functioning,'' which measures sexual desire, erectile capacity, orgasm, and to what extent a decrease in any of these aspects of sexual functioning affects quality of life. Function before treatment was assessed retrospectively. Results: Sexual desire diminished among 77% after treatment. The erection stiffness decreased in 77%. Before external radiation therapy, 66% had an erection usually sufficient for intercourse. Half of the men lost this ability after treatment. Of those retaining orgasm after treatment, 47% reported a decreased orgasmic pleasure and 91% a reduced ejaculation volume. Of all men, 50% reported that quality of life had decreased much or very much due to a decline in the erectile capacity following external radiation therapy. Conclusion: The results of the present study indicate that external radiation therapy for prostate cancer is associated with a reduction in sexual desire, erectile capacity, and orgasm functions. In a majority of patients this reduces quality of life. Previously, we may have underestimated the importance an intact sexual function has for the quality of life in this patient category of elderly men

  12. Radiation therapy induced changes in male sex hormone levels in rectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dueland, Svein; Groenlie Guren, Marianne; Rune Olsen, Dag; Poulsen, Jan Peter; Magne Tveit, Kjell

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose:To determine the effect of curative radiation therapy (46-50 Gy) on the sex hormone levels in male rectal cancer patients. Materials and methods:Twenty-five male rectal cancer patients (mean age 65 years), receiving pelvic radiation therapy (2 Gyx23-25 fractions in 5 weeks) were included. Serum testosterone, FSH and LH were determined before start of treatment, at the 10th and 25th fractions, and 4-6 weeks after completed radiotherapy. The testicular dose was determined by thermoluminescent dosimetry. Results:Five weeks of radiation therapy (46-50 Gy) resulted in a 100% increase in serum FSH, a 70% increase in LH, and a 25% reduction in testosterone levels. After treatment, 35% of the patients had serum testosterone levels below lower limit of reference. The mean radiation dose to the testicles was 8.4 Gy. A reduction in testosterone values was observed already after a mean dose of 3.3 Gy (10th fraction). Conclusion:Radiation therapy (46-50 Gy) for rectal cancer resulted in a significant increase in serum FSH and LH and a significant decrease in testosterone levels, indicating that sex hormone production is sensitive to radiation exposure in patients with a mean age of 65 years

  13. Overall Survival Benefit From Postoperative Radiation Therapy for Organ-Confined, Margin-Positive Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillman, Robert O.; Hafer, Russell; Cox, Craig; McClure, Stephanie E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Radical prostatectomy for invasive prostate cancer is associated with positive margin rates in 10% to 50% of resected specimens. Postoperative radiation therapy may benefit patients who have organ-confined prostate cancer with positive margins. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective analysis to examine whether adjunctive radiation therapy enhanced long-term survival for prostate cancer patients who underwent prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer but with positive margins. We used the Hoag Cancer Center database to identify patients diagnosed with invasive prostate cancer. Relative and overall survival rates were calculated. Results: Among 1,474 patients diagnosed with localized invasive prostate cancer during the years 1990 to 2006 and undergoing prostatectomy, 113 (7.7%) were identified who had positive margins and did not have local extension of disease, positive lymph nodes, or distant metastases. A total of 17 patients received adjunctive radiation therapy (Group A), whereas 96 did not (Group B; 3 received hormonal therapy). Both groups had a median age of 64 years and median follow-up of 7.5 years. In Group A, no patients have died as of last follow-up, but in Group B, 18 have died. Estimated 10-year and 15-year overall survival rates were both 100% for Group A compared with 85% and 57% respectively for Group B (p 2 = 0.050, log rank). Relative 10- and 15 year survival rates were both 100% for Group A compared with 100% and 79% respectively for Group B. Conclusions: This retrospective analysis suggests that prostate cancer patients with localized disease but positive margins do derive a survival benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy.

  14. Clinical benefit of palliative radiation therapy in advanced gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Michelle M.; Rana, Vishal; Janjan, Nora A. (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (US)) (and others)

    2008-03-15

    Background. Local progression of advanced gastric cancer often manifests as bleeding, dysphagia/obstruction, or pain. We evaluated the magnitude and durability of palliation with radiotherapy (RT). Material and methods. From 1996 to 2004, 37 gastric cancer patients were treated with palliative RT (median dose 35Gy in 14 fractions). Nearly two-thirds of all patients received concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Index pre-treatment symptoms were gastric bleeding, dysphagia/obstruction, and pain in 54%, 43%, and 19% of patients, respectively. Results. The rates of control for bleeding, dysphagia/obstruction, and pain were 70% (14/20), 81% (13/16), and 86% (6/7), respectively. These symptoms were controlled without additional interventions for a median of 70%, 81%, and 49% of the patient's remaining life, respectively. Patients receiving CRT had a trend towards better median overall survival than those receiving RT alone (6.7 vs. 2.4 months, p=0.08). Lower (<41 Gy) biologically effective dose (BED, assuming an alpha/beta ratio of 10 for early responding tissues) predicted for poorer local control (6-month local control 70% vs. 100%, p=0.05) while T4 tumors had a trend towards inferior local control (6-month LC 56% vs. 100%, p=0.06). Discussion. Palliative RT controls symptoms for most of the remaining life in the majority of gastric cancer patients. The role of a higher dose of RT (BED >= 41 Gy), especially in patients with T4 tumors, remains to be established. In order to accurately define the role for radiotherapy in palliation of these symptoms, prospective randomized studies need to be conducted.

  15. Clinical benefit of palliative radiation therapy in advanced gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Michelle M.; Rana, Vishal; Janjan, Nora A.

    2008-01-01

    Background. Local progression of advanced gastric cancer often manifests as bleeding, dysphagia/obstruction, or pain. We evaluated the magnitude and durability of palliation with radiotherapy (RT). Material and methods. From 1996 to 2004, 37 gastric cancer patients were treated with palliative RT (median dose 35Gy in 14 fractions). Nearly two-thirds of all patients received concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Index pre-treatment symptoms were gastric bleeding, dysphagia/obstruction, and pain in 54%, 43%, and 19% of patients, respectively. Results. The rates of control for bleeding, dysphagia/obstruction, and pain were 70% (14/20), 81% (13/16), and 86% (6/7), respectively. These symptoms were controlled without additional interventions for a median of 70%, 81%, and 49% of the patient's remaining life, respectively. Patients receiving CRT had a trend towards better median overall survival than those receiving RT alone (6.7 vs. 2.4 months, p=0.08). Lower (<41 Gy) biologically effective dose (BED, assuming an alpha/beta ratio of 10 for early responding tissues) predicted for poorer local control (6-month local control 70% vs. 100%, p=0.05) while T4 tumors had a trend towards inferior local control (6-month LC 56% vs. 100%, p=0.06). Discussion. Palliative RT controls symptoms for most of the remaining life in the majority of gastric cancer patients. The role of a higher dose of RT (BED ≥ 41 Gy), especially in patients with T4 tumors, remains to be established. In order to accurately define the role for radiotherapy in palliation of these symptoms, prospective randomized studies need to be conducted

  16. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy for Anal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodges, Joseph C., E-mail: joseph.hodges@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Beg, Muhammad S. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Das, Prajnan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Meyer, Jeffrey [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To compare the cost-effectiveness of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for anal cancer and determine disease, patient, and treatment parameters that influence the result. Methods and Materials: A Markov decision model was designed with the various disease states for the base case of a 65-year-old patient with anal cancer treated with either IMRT or 3D-CRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Health states accounting for rates of local failure, colostomy failure, treatment breaks, patient prognosis, acute and late toxicities, and the utility of toxicities were informed by existing literature and analyzed with deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analysis. Results: In the base case, mean costs and quality-adjusted life expectancy in years (QALY) for IMRT and 3D-CRT were $32,291 (4.81) and $28,444 (4.78), respectively, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $128,233/QALY for IMRT compared with 3D-CRT. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis found that IMRT was cost-effective in 22%, 47%, and 65% of iterations at willingness-to-pay thresholds of $50,000, $100,000, and $150,000 per QALY, respectively. Conclusions: In our base model, IMRT was a cost-ineffective strategy despite the reduced acute treatment toxicities and their associated costs of management. The model outcome was sensitive to variations in local and colostomy failure rates, as well as patient-reported utilities relating to acute toxicities.

  17. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy for Anal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodges, Joseph C.; Beg, Muhammad S.; Das, Prajnan; Meyer, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the cost-effectiveness of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for anal cancer and determine disease, patient, and treatment parameters that influence the result. Methods and Materials: A Markov decision model was designed with the various disease states for the base case of a 65-year-old patient with anal cancer treated with either IMRT or 3D-CRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Health states accounting for rates of local failure, colostomy failure, treatment breaks, patient prognosis, acute and late toxicities, and the utility of toxicities were informed by existing literature and analyzed with deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analysis. Results: In the base case, mean costs and quality-adjusted life expectancy in years (QALY) for IMRT and 3D-CRT were $32,291 (4.81) and $28,444 (4.78), respectively, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $128,233/QALY for IMRT compared with 3D-CRT. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis found that IMRT was cost-effective in 22%, 47%, and 65% of iterations at willingness-to-pay thresholds of $50,000, $100,000, and $150,000 per QALY, respectively. Conclusions: In our base model, IMRT was a cost-ineffective strategy despite the reduced acute treatment toxicities and their associated costs of management. The model outcome was sensitive to variations in local and colostomy failure rates, as well as patient-reported utilities relating to acute toxicities

  18. Decision Regret in Men Undergoing Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steer, Anna N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Aherne, Noel J., E-mail: noel.aherne@ncahs.health.nsw.gov.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Rural Clinical School Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Gorzynska, Karen; Hoffman, Matthew; Last, Andrew; Hill, Jacques [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Shakespeare, Thomas P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Rural Clinical School Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Coffs Harbour (Australia)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: Decision regret (DR) is a negative emotion associated with medical treatment decisions, and it is an important patient-centered outcome after therapy for localized prostate cancer. DR has been found to occur in up to 53% of patients treated for localized prostate cancer, and it may vary depending on treatment modality. DR after modern dose-escalated radiation therapy (DE-RT) has not been investigated previously, to our knowledge. Our primary aim was to evaluate DR in a cohort of patients treated with DE-RT. Methods and Materials: We surveyed 257 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer who had previously received DE-RT, by means of a validated questionnaire. Results: There were 220 responses (85.6% response rate). Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy was given in 85.0% of patients and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy in 15.0%. Doses received included 73.8 Gy (34.5% patients), 74 Gy (53.6%), and 76 Gy (10.9%). Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation (AD) was given in 51.8% of patients and both neoadjuvant and adjuvant AD in 34.5%. The median follow-up time was 23 months (range, 12-67 months). In all, 3.8% of patients expressed DR for their choice of treatment. When asked whether they would choose DE-RT or AD again, only 0.5% probably or definitely would not choose DE-RT again, compared with 8.4% for AD (P<.01). Conclusion: Few patients treated with modern DE-RT express DR, with regret appearing to be lower than in previously published reports of patients treated with radical prostatectomy or older radiation therapy techniques. Patients experienced more regret with the AD component of treatment than with the radiation therapy component, with implications for informed consent. Further research should investigate regret associated with individual components of modern therapy, including AD, radiation therapy and surgery.

  19. Decision Regret in Men Undergoing Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steer, Anna N.; Aherne, Noel J.; Gorzynska, Karen; Hoffman, Matthew; Last, Andrew; Hill, Jacques; Shakespeare, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Decision regret (DR) is a negative emotion associated with medical treatment decisions, and it is an important patient-centered outcome after therapy for localized prostate cancer. DR has been found to occur in up to 53% of patients treated for localized prostate cancer, and it may vary depending on treatment modality. DR after modern dose-escalated radiation therapy (DE-RT) has not been investigated previously, to our knowledge. Our primary aim was to evaluate DR in a cohort of patients treated with DE-RT. Methods and Materials: We surveyed 257 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer who had previously received DE-RT, by means of a validated questionnaire. Results: There were 220 responses (85.6% response rate). Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy was given in 85.0% of patients and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy in 15.0%. Doses received included 73.8 Gy (34.5% patients), 74 Gy (53.6%), and 76 Gy (10.9%). Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation (AD) was given in 51.8% of patients and both neoadjuvant and adjuvant AD in 34.5%. The median follow-up time was 23 months (range, 12-67 months). In all, 3.8% of patients expressed DR for their choice of treatment. When asked whether they would choose DE-RT or AD again, only 0.5% probably or definitely would not choose DE-RT again, compared with 8.4% for AD (P<.01). Conclusion: Few patients treated with modern DE-RT express DR, with regret appearing to be lower than in previously published reports of patients treated with radical prostatectomy or older radiation therapy techniques. Patients experienced more regret with the AD component of treatment than with the radiation therapy component, with implications for informed consent. Further research should investigate regret associated with individual components of modern therapy, including AD, radiation therapy and surgery

  20. Decision regret in men undergoing dose-escalated radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steer, Anna N; Aherne, Noel J; Gorzynska, Karen; Hoffman, Matthew; Last, Andrew; Hill, Jacques; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2013-07-15

    Decision regret (DR) is a negative emotion associated with medical treatment decisions, and it is an important patient-centered outcome after therapy for localized prostate cancer. DR has been found to occur in up to 53% of patients treated for localized prostate cancer, and it may vary depending on treatment modality. DR after modern dose-escalated radiation therapy (DE-RT) has not been investigated previously, to our knowledge. Our primary aim was to evaluate DR in a cohort of patients treated with DE-RT. We surveyed 257 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer who had previously received DE-RT, by means of a validated questionnaire. There were 220 responses (85.6% response rate). Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy was given in 85.0% of patients and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy in 15.0%. Doses received included 73.8 Gy (34.5% patients), 74 Gy (53.6%), and 76 Gy (10.9%). Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation (AD) was given in 51.8% of patients and both neoadjuvant and adjuvant AD in 34.5%. The median follow-up time was 23 months (range, 12-67 months). In all, 3.8% of patients expressed DR for their choice of treatment. When asked whether they would choose DE-RT or AD again, only 0.5% probably or definitely would not choose DE-RT again, compared with 8.4% for AD (P<.01). Few patients treated with modern DE-RT express DR, with regret appearing to be lower than in previously published reports of patients treated with radical prostatectomy or older radiation therapy techniques. Patients experienced more regret with the AD component of treatment than with the radiation therapy component, with implications for informed consent. Further research should investigate regret associated with individual components of modern therapy, including AD, radiation therapy and surgery. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Radiation-Induced Cancers From Modern Radiotherapy Techniques: Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Kim, Jinsung; Shin, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Yong; Lee, Se Byeong; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess and compare secondary cancer risk resulting from intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and proton therapy in patients with prostate and head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy and proton therapy in the scattering mode were planned for 5 prostate caner patients and 5 head-and-neck cancer patients. The secondary doses during irradiation were measured using ion chamber and CR-39 detectors for IMRT and proton therapy, respectively. Organ-specific radiation-induced cancer risk was estimated by applying organ equivalent dose to dose distributions. Results: The average secondary doses of proton therapy for prostate cancer patients, measured 20-60cm from the isocenter, ranged from 0.4 mSv/Gy to 0.1 mSv/Gy. The average secondary doses of IMRT for prostate patients, however, ranged between 3 mSv/Gy and 1 mSv/Gy, approximately one order of magnitude higher than for proton therapy. Although the average secondary doses of IMRT were higher than those of proton therapy for head-and-neck cancers, these differences were not significant. Organ equivalent dose calculations showed that, for prostate cancer patients, the risk of secondary cancers in out-of-field organs, such as the stomach, lungs, and thyroid, was at least 5 times higher for IMRT than for proton therapy, whereas the difference was lower for head-and-neck cancer patients. Conclusions: Comparisons of organ-specific organ equivalent dose showed that the estimated secondary cancer risk using scattering mode in proton therapy is either significantly lower than the cases in IMRT treatment or, at least, does not exceed the risk induced by conventional IMRT treatment.

  2. Radiation therapy for cancer in elderly patients over 80 years of age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, Miwako; Murakami, Yuko; Furuta, Masaya; Izawa, Yasuyuki; Iwasaki, Naoya

    1998-01-01

    The elderly population has recently increased, and the need for cancer care and treatment for the elderly is likely to grow. We report on radiation therapy for cancer in elderly patients over 80 years of age. During the period from 1985 to 1996, 90 elderly patients (54 men, 36 women) aged over 80 years were treated with radiation therapy. Many patients had primary tumors of the esophagus, head and neck, and lungs, in that order of frequency. Fifty-seven percent of the patients were treated with radical radiotherapy, and 70% were treated with radiotherapy alone. The rate of completion of radiation therapy was 90%, and the response rate was 82%. Radiation therapy played an important role in the treatment of the patients over 80 years of age. The half of our patients had concurrent medical problems, and were dependent on their home physicians both before and after radiation therapy. We consider that radiation oncologists should make an effort to form a good relationship with home physicians. (author)

  3. The role of intraoperative radiation therapy in patients with pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palta, Manisha; Willett, Christopher; Czito, Brian

    2014-04-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) techniques allow for the delivery of high doses of radiation therapy while excluding part or all of the nearby dose-limiting sensitive structures. Therefore, the effective radiation dose is increased and local tumor control potentially improved. This is pertinent in the case of pancreatic cancer because local failure rates are as high as 50%-80% in patients with resected and locally advanced disease. Available data in patients receiving IORT after pancreaticoduodenectomy reveal an improvement in local control, though overall survival benefit is unclear. Series of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer also suggest pain relief, and in select studies, improved survival associated with the inclusion of IORT. At present, no phase III data clearly supports the use of IORT in the management of pancreatic cancer. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Comparison of acute and subacute genitourinary and gastrointestinal adverse events of radiotherapy for prostate cancer using intensity-modulated radiation therapy, three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, permanent implant brachytherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morimoto, Masahiro; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Konishi, Koji; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Teshima, Teruki; Bijl, Henk P; van der Schaaf, Arjen; Langendijk, Johannes A; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    AIMS AND BACKGROUND: To examine acute and subacute urinary and rectal toxicity in patients with localized prostate cancer monotherapeutically treated with the following four radiotherapeutic techniques: intensity-modulated radiation therapy, three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy,

  5. A study on lung cancer cases treated with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, W.T.

    1983-01-01

    This study was carried out on 468 cases among total 4347 cancer cases which was confirmly diagnosed as malignant neoplasms at Yonsei Center Hospital, appended to Yonsei University, during 10 years from January 1, 1971 to December 31, 1980. The results of this study are as follows: 1. Total malignant neoplasm cases treated with radiation were 4347, 1685 of whom were males, and 2662 females (male to female ratio was 1:1.58). 2. Lung cancer were 10.8% of total malignant neoplasm cases(468 cases), 391 cases for the male and 77 cases for the female. So, average the male to female ratio was 8:1 and cases of the male were much more. 3. The age distribution of lung cancer cases was from 27 to 82 years old. The highest age distribution was 50-59 for males (37.9%) and 60-69 for females (41.6%); 77.1% of total lung cancer cases were over 50 years old. 4. In regard to stages, the distribution of the third stage was highest (49.3%). That of the first stage was much higher during the last period (11.8%) than the first period (2.7%), and that of the fourth stage was much lower during the last period (7.8%) than the first period (21.1%). 5. In regard to pathological type, the distribution was 51.3% for squamous cell carcinoma, 29.3% for undifferentiated cell carcinoma, 12.2% for adenocarcinoma, and 7.2% for bronchoalveolar cell carcinoma in order of frequency. In regard to adenocarcinoma, the male ratio was 1:3.7 and cases of the female were much more. 6. In regard to tumor location,the distribution of tumor location in the right-left lobe was 59.1% in the right lobe, 33.6% in the left lobe, and 7.3% in the both lobes in order of frequency. And that of tumor location in the upper and lower lobes was all higher in the upper in the upper lobe; especially, that of the right upper lobe was highest (31.2% of total cases). 7. For the main symptom, coughing was highest (64%), 50% for hemoptysis, and 41% for dyspnea. (Author)

  6. Geographic access to radiation therapy facilities and disparities of early-stage breast cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Lin

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Few studies of breast cancer treatment have focused on the Northern Plains of the United States, an area with a high mastectomy rate. This study examined the association between geographic access to radiation therapy facilities and receipt of breast cancer treatments among early-stage breast cancer patients in South Dakota. Based on 4,209 early-stage breast cancer patients diagnosed between 2001 and 2012 in South Dakota, the study measured geographic proximity to radiation therapy facilities using the shortest travel time for patients to the closest radiation therapy facility. Two-level logistic regression models were used to estimate for early stage cases i the odds of mastectomy versus breast conserving surgery (BCS; ii the odds of not receiving radiation therapy after BCS versus receiving follow-up radiation therapy. Covariates included race/ethnicity, age at diagnosis, tumour grade, tumour sequence, year of diagnosis, census tract-level poverty rate and urban/rural residence. The spatial scan statistic method was used to identify geographic areas with significantly higher likelihood of experiencing mastectomy. The study found that geographic accessibility to radiation therapy facilities was negatively associated with the likelihood of receiving mastectomy after adjustment for other covariates, but not associated with radiation therapy use among patients receiving BCS. Compared with patients travelling less than 30 minutes to a radiation therapy facility, patients travelling more than 90 minutes were about 1.5 times more likely to receive mastectomy (odds ratio, 1.51; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-2.11 and patients travelling more than 120 minutes were 1.7 times more likely to receive mastectomy (odds ratio, 1.70; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-2.42. The study also identified a statistically significant cluster of patients receiving mastectomy who were located in south-eastern South Dakota, after adjustment for other factors. Because

  7. Difference of protein 53 expression based on radiation therapy response in cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasaribu, H. P.; Lubis, L. I.; Dina, S.; Simanjuntak, R. Y.; Siregar, H. S.; Rivany, R.

    2018-03-01

    Cervical cancer is one of most common gynecological cancer in women and the leading cause of death in developing countries. An analytic study with the case-control design was conducted to determine the difference of p53 expression based on radiation therapy response in cervical cancer. The study was performed in Obstetric and Gynecology Department and Pathology Department of Adam Malik General Hospital Medan from January to February 2017. 15 paraffin blocks of acervical cancer patient with incomplete response were obtained as study samples, and 15 paraffin blocks of acervical cancer patient with complete response were obtained as control samples, The samples were collected by consecutive sampling, andan immunohistochemical assessment of p53 expression was done to assessapoptosis count and radiation response. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis with confidence interval 83.5% and pcervical cancer.

  8. Information Needs of Older Women With Early-Stage Breast Cancer When Making Radiation Therapy Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shi-Yi; Kelly, Gabrielle; Gross, Cary; Killelea, Brigid K; Mougalian, Sarah; Presley, Carolyn; Fraenkel, Liana; Evans, Suzanne B

    2017-07-15

    To identify the information older women with early-stage breast cancer need when making radiation therapy decisions, and who patients identify as the main decision maker. We surveyed (through face-to-face interview, telephone, or mail) women aged ≥65 years who received lumpectomy and were considering or receiving adjuvant radiation therapy for early-stage breast cancer. The survey instrument was constructed with input from patient and professional advisory committees, including breast cancer survivors, advocates of breast cancer care and aging, clinicians, and researchers. Participants rated the importance (on a 4-point scale) of 24 statements describing the benefits, side effects, impact on daily life, and other issues of radiation therapy in relation to radiation therapy decision making. Participants also designated who was considered the key decision maker. The response rate was 56.4% (93 of 165). Mean age was 72.5 years, ranging from 65 to 93 years. More than 96% of participants indicated they were the main decision maker on receiving radiation therapy. There was wide variation in information needs regarding radiation therapy decision making. Participants rated a mean of 18 (range, 3-24) items as "essential." Participants rated items related to benefits highest, followed by side effects. Participants who were older than 75 years rated 13.9 questions as essential, whereas participants aged ≤74 years rated 18.7 as essential (P=.018). Older women desire information and have more agency and input in the decision-making process than prior literature would suggest. The variation in information needs indicates that future decision support tools should provide options to select what information would be of interest to the participants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Increased risk of breast cancer in splenectomized patients undergoing radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Chung T.; Bogart, Jeffrey A.; Adams, James F.; Sagerman, Robert H.; Numann, Patricia J.; Tassiopoulos, Apostolos; Duggan, David B.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Second malignancies have been reported among patients who were treated by radiation therapy or chemotherapy alone or in combination. Studies have implied an increased risk of breast cancer in women who received radiotherapy as part of their treatment for Hodgkin's disease. This review was performed to determine if there is an association between splenectomy and subsequent breast cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred and thirty-six female patients with histologically proven Hodgkin's disease were seen in the Division of Radiation Oncology between 1962 and 1985. All patients received mantle or mediastinal irradiation as part of their therapy. The risk of breast cancer was assessed and multiple linear regression analysis was performed on the following variables: patient age, stage, dose and extent of radiation field, time after completing radiation therapy, splenectomy, and chemotheraphy. Results: Breast cancer was observed in 11 of 74 splenectomized patients and in none of 62 patients not splenectomized. The mean follow-up was 13 years in splenectomized patients and 16 years, 7 months in nonsplenectomized patients. Nine patients developed invasive breast cancer and two developed ductal carcinoma in situ. Splenectomy was the only variable independently associated with an increased risk of breast cancer (p < 0.005) in multiple linear regression analysis; age, latency, and splenectomy considered together were also associated with an increased risk of breast cancer (p < 0.01). Conclusion: Our data show an increased risk of breast cancer in splenectomized patients who had treatment for Hodgkin's disease. A multiinstitutional survey may better define the influence of splenectomy relative to developing breast cancer in patients treated for Hodgkin's disease. The risk of breast cancer should be considered when recommending staging laparotomy, and we recommend close follow-up examination including routine mammograms for female patients successfully treated for

  10. Radiation therapy of newly diagnosed, advanced prostatic cancer and hormonally relapsed prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Minoru; Fujiwara, Kazuhisa; Hayakawa, Katsumi; Hida, Shuichi

    1994-01-01

    Ten patients with newly diagnosed, advanced prostatic cancer were treated with radiotherapy and hormone therapy to improve tumor control and survival. Eight patients with hormonally relapsed prostatic cancer were treated with radiotherapy to improve their quality of life. Local control of the tumor was achieved in 9 of 10 patients with newly diagnosed, advanced prostatic cancer. Five of eight patients with hormonally relapsed prostatic cancer obtained improved quality of life. Combined radiotherapy and hormone therapy were effective in the treatment of newly diagnosed, advanced prostatic cancer, and radiotherapy was useful for improving the quality of life of patients with hormonally relapsed prostatic cancer. (author)

  11. Comparative evaluation of skin cancer therapy with impulse laser radiation and surgical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskalik, K.G.; Kozlov, A.P.

    1980-01-01

    Altogether 324 patients with skin basilomas, 559 with recurrent basiloma and 38 with squamous-cell carcinoma of the skin were treated by means of impulse neodymium laser radiation. A follow-up period was up to 7 years. It was shown that impulse laser radiation is a highly effective means of treating skin cancer, having a number of advantages over the radiation and surgical methods. Laser radiation is also highly effective in the treatment of basiloma relapses. If relapses accounted for by the development of a radioresistant tumour occur at the sites where surgical eXcision yields an unstatisfactory cosmetic effect, laser therapy should be considered a method of choice

  12. Evaluation of conditions of radiation protection of medical personnel in intracavitary neutron therapy of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostromina, K.N.; Korenkov, I.P.; Bocharov, A.L.; Gladkikh, N.N.

    1991-01-01

    Combined radiation therapy was provided to cervical cancer patients. Working conditions of personnel were examined, the rate of exposure doses and flows of neutrons at working places were measured, dose exposures of the personnel were evaluated. It has been concluded that occupational conditions for the medical personnel are considered to be relatively safe

  13. Does tadalafil prevent erectile dysfunction in patients undergoing radiation therapy for prostate cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Incrocci (Luca)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractA recently published paper addressed the interesting topic of prevention of erectile dysfunction (ED) with tadalafil, a phosphodiesterase-type 5 inhibitor (PDE5i) in patients undergoing radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer. [1]Tadalafil 5 mg or placebo was

  14. First clinical implementation of audiovisual biofeedback in liver cancer stereotactic body radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollock, Sean; Tse, Regina; Martin, Darren

    2015-01-01

    This case report details a clinical trial's first recruited liver cancer patient who underwent a course of stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment utilising audiovisual biofeedback breathing guidance. Breathing motion results for both abdominal wall motion and tumour motion are included. Patient 1 demonstrated improved breathing motion regularity with audiovisual biofeedback. A training effect was also observed.

  15. Breast Cancer Risk After Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma : Influence of Gonadal Hormone Exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krul, Inge M; Opstal-van Winden, Annemieke W J; Aleman, Berthe M P; Janus, Cécile P M; van Eggermond, Anna M; De Bruin, Marie L; Hauptmann, Michael; Krol, Augustinus D G; Schaapveld, Michael; Broeks, Annegien; Kooijman, Karen R; Fase, Sandra; Lybeert, Marnix L; Zijlstra, Josée M; van der Maazen, Richard W M; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Diallo, Ibrahima; de Vathaire, Florent; Russell, Nicola S; van Leeuwen, Flora E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Young women treated with chest radiation therapy (RT) for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) experience a strongly increased risk of breast cancer (BC). It is unknown whether endogenous and exogenous gonadal hormones affect RT-associated BC risk. METHODS: We conducted a nested case-control study

  16. The breast cancer patient's experience of making radiation therapy treatment decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halkett, Georgia; Scutter, Sheila; Arbon, Paul; Borg, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Women who are diagnosed with breast cancer have many decisions to make during the course of their treatment. The aims of this paper are to describe the women's experience of making radiation therapy treatment decisions for early breast cancer and to explore how women feel about receiving radiation therapy. An in-depth understanding of the women's experience was developed using a qualitative research approach underpinned by hermeneutic phenomenology. In-depth interviews were conducted with 18 women who had completed treatment for early breast cancer. The themes that emerged from the data were: being challenged, getting ready, beyond control, regaining a sense of control and getting through it. This study provides health professionals with an initial understanding of the women's perspective of the experience of making radiation therapy treatment decisions for early breast cancer. This study concludes by suggesting that further research needs to be conducted to gain an understanding of how other patients feel about treatment decision making and radiation therapy. Copyright (2005) Australian Institute of Radiography

  17. Radiation therapy in the management of locally advanced and disseminated breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, F.C.H.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation theraoy should be fully used in the management of advanced breast cancer. Locally advanced primary or recurrent carcinoma, with limited extent, should be treated aggressively, aimed at permanent control. Palliative treatment of incurable or metastatic lesions relieves symptoms and improves patient's quality of survival. Some metastatic lesions involving vital structures may create emergencies. Prompt institution of radiation therapy may reverse the serious complication and save the patient's life

  18. Primary Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer in the Setting of Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Emily A.; Guiou, Michael; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Lau, Derick H.; Stuart, Kerri; Vaughan, Andrew; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Chen, Allen M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze outcomes after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer among a cohort of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Methods and Materials: The medical records of 12 patients with serologic evidence of HIV who subsequently underwent radiation therapy to a median dose of 68 Gy (range, 64-72 Gy) for newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were reviewed. Six patients (50%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was used in 6 cases (50%). All patients had a Karnofsky performance status of 80 or 90. Nine patients (75%) were receiving antiretroviral therapies at the time of treatment, and the median CD4 count was 460 (range, 266-800). Toxicity was graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group / European Organization for the Treatment of Cancer toxicity criteria. Results: The 3-year estimates of overall survival and local-regional control were 78% and 92%, respectively. Acute Grade 3+ toxicity occurred in 7 patients (58%), the most common being confluent mucositis (5 patients) and moist skin desquamation (4 patients). Two patients experienced greater than 10% weight loss, and none experienced more than 15% weight loss from baseline. Five patients (42%) experienced treatment breaks in excess of 10 cumulative days, although none required hospitalization. There were no treatment-related fatalities. Conclusions: Radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer seems to be relatively well tolerated among appropriately selected patients with HIV. The observed rates of toxicity were comparable to historical controls without HIV.

  19. Late rectal symptoms and quality of life after conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geinitz, Hans; Zimmermann, Frank B.; Thamm, Reinhard; Erber, Caroline; Mueller, Tobias; Keller, Monika; Busch, Raymonde; Molls, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: This study was carried out in order to analyze the prevalence of late rectal and anal symptoms after conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer and to assess their association with quality of life. Patients and methods: Two-hundred and forty nine patients were interviewed at 24-111 months after definitive conformal radiation therapy of localized prostate cancer with a median dose of 70 Gy. Rectal symptoms and fecal incontinence were evaluated with standardized questionnaires. Quality of life was assessed with the EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire-C30 and the prostate cancer module PR25. Results: Rectal symptoms were mostly intermittent. Daily symptoms occurred in ≤5% of the patients. Incontinence was mostly mild with only 3% of the patients reporting daily incontinence episodes. Quality of life was comparable to that of the male German general population except that cognitive functioning and diarrhea were worse in the study population and pain was worse in the reference population. Global quality of life was associated with fecal incontinence, fecal urge, tenesmus, therapy for rectal symptoms and hormonal therapy for biochemical/clinical recurrence. Conclusions: Rectal symptoms and fecal incontinence after conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer are mostly intermittent. Fecal incontinence, fecal urge and tenesmus are associated with lower global quality of life levels

  20. Intra-operative radiation therapy in cancer of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubois, J.B.; Gu, S.D.; Saint-Aubert, B.; Joyeux, H.; Solassol, C.; Pujol, H.

    1991-01-01

    We report our experience concerning 22 pancreatic carcinoma bearing patients treated with intra-operative radiation therapy (IORT) after complete surgical excision: duodenopancreatectomy: 15 patients; isthmic and caudal pancreatectomy: 2 patients; total pancreatectomy: 5 patients. The dose delivered to the tumor bed was 20 Gy in 12 patients, 18 Gy in 3 patients and 15 Gy in 7 patients. Three patients died within the 1st month post-surgery from intercurrent diseases. Post-operative morbidity was not significantly modified by IORT as compared to purely surgical treated patients. Out of 19 evaluable patients, we observed local control in 16 patients (79.4%). Causes of death (15/19 patients) were: distant metastases with local control: 7 patients; in situ local failure: 3 patients; regional recurrence outside of the IORT fields: 2 patients; intercurrent diseases: 3 patients. Four patients are still alive without evolutive disease. The median overall survival is 6 months. The mean overall survival is 10.56 months. Excluding patients who died from complications and intercurrent diseases, the median survival is 10 mths and the mean survival 14.5 mths. These results emphasize the improvement in local control with IORT, but without significant improvement in survival which is dependent on local evolution and also systemic disease [fr

  1. Adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy for resectable rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minsky, B.D.; Cohen, A.M.; Enker, W.E.; Kelsen, D.; Kemeny, N.; Sigurdson, E.

    1991-01-01

    Following potentially curative surgery for resectable adenocarcinoma of the rectum, the incidence of local failure is 15% to 35% in stages T 3 N 0 and T 1 N 1-2 and 45% to 65% in stages T 4 N 0 , T 3 N 1-2 , and T 4 N 1-2 . In order to determine the impact of pelvic radiation therapy±chemotherapy on local failure and survival, we present a prospective analysis of our results of 25 patients treated with this approach. The median follow-up was 30 months (range: 10 to 48 months). For the total patients group the 3-year actuarial survival was 74%. In order to more accurately analyze the patterns of failure, actuarial calculations were performed. The actuarial incidence of local failure as a component of failure was 17%. For patients with node positive disesse (T 1-4 N 1-2 ), the overall survival was 80%, and the actuarial incidence of local failure as a component of failure was 15%. Complications were acceptable and the incidence of small bowel obstruction requiring surgery was 8%. (author)

  2. The effect of radiation therapy for bone metastasis in urinary organ cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chikazawa, Ippei; Inoue, Shinya; Nakazawa, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Bone metastasis symptoms are complications that greatly reduce the quality of life (QOL) of cancer patients. We report a retrospective study on the efficacy of radiation therapy for patients with bone metastasis in urinary organ cancer. (Subjects and methods) Subjects are comprised of 17 patients; total irradiated areas consist of 25 sites. There are 5 patients diagnosed with renal cell carcinoma, 1 patient with bladder cancer and 11 patients with prostatic cancer. All of them have undergone radiation therapy for bone metastasis in urinary organ cancer between April 2007 and March 2014 in the Department of Urology, Kanazawa Medical University. The mean age of the patients was 66.7 years old. We looked at irradiated areas, exposure dose and changes of symptom in all patients. Irradiated areas are thoracolumbar vertebrae (14 sites), cranial base (2 sites), pubic bone (1 site), ilium bone (2 sites), sacral bone (1 site), rib bone (1 site) and hip joint (1 site). The mean exposure dose of one area is 37.5 Gy (13.5-60). 19 irradiated sites which were previously reported to have sharp pain have gained improvement at 16 sites. These 16 sites have comparatively lesser pain or no pain. 8 cases in acknowledgment of walk difficulty, it was with 7 cases walking alone possibility again. This study showed that radiation therapy have significant improvement in terms of symptoms and QOL for the patients with bone metastasis in urinary organ cancer. (author)

  3. Refusal of Curative Radiation Therapy and Surgery Among Patients With Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aizer, Ayal A., E-mail: aaaizer@partners.org [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chen, Ming-Hui [Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut (United States); Parekh, Arti [Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Choueiri, Toni K. [Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hoffman, Karen E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kim, Simon P. [Department of Urology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Martin, Neil E. [Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hu, Jim C. [Department of Urology, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Trinh, Quoc-Dien [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Nguyen, Paul L. [Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Surgery and radiation therapy represent the only curative options for many patients with solid malignancies. However, despite the recommendations of their physicians, some patients refuse these therapies. This study characterized factors associated with refusal of surgical or radiation therapy as well as the impact of refusal of recommended therapy on patients with localized malignancies. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program to identify a population-based sample of 925,127 patients who had diagnoses of 1 of 8 common malignancies for which surgery and/or radiation are believed to confer a survival benefit between 1995 and 2008. Refusal of oncologic therapy, as documented in the SEER database, was the primary outcome measure. Multivariable logistic regression was used to investigate factors associated with refusal. The impact of refusal of therapy on cancer-specific mortality was assessed with Fine and Gray's competing risks regression. Results: In total, 2441 of 692,938 patients (0.4%) refused surgery, and 2113 of 232,189 patients (0.9%) refused radiation, despite the recommendations of their physicians. On multivariable analysis, advancing age, decreasing annual income, nonwhite race, and unmarried status were associated with refusal of surgery, whereas advancing age, decreasing annual income, Asian American race, and unmarried status were associated with refusal of radiation (P<.001 in all cases). Refusal of surgery and radiation were associated with increased estimates of cancer-specific mortality for all malignancies evaluated (hazard ratio [HR], 2.80, 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.59-3.03; P<.001 and HR 1.97 [95% CI, 1.78-2.18]; P<.001, respectively). Conclusions: Nonwhite, less affluent, and unmarried patients are more likely to refuse curative surgical and/or radiation-based oncologic therapy, raising concern that socioeconomic factors may drive some patients to forego potentially life

  4. Refusal of Curative Radiation Therapy and Surgery Among Patients With Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizer, Ayal A.; Chen, Ming-Hui; Parekh, Arti; Choueiri, Toni K.; Hoffman, Karen E.; Kim, Simon P.; Martin, Neil E.; Hu, Jim C.; Trinh, Quoc-Dien; Nguyen, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Surgery and radiation therapy represent the only curative options for many patients with solid malignancies. However, despite the recommendations of their physicians, some patients refuse these therapies. This study characterized factors associated with refusal of surgical or radiation therapy as well as the impact of refusal of recommended therapy on patients with localized malignancies. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program to identify a population-based sample of 925,127 patients who had diagnoses of 1 of 8 common malignancies for which surgery and/or radiation are believed to confer a survival benefit between 1995 and 2008. Refusal of oncologic therapy, as documented in the SEER database, was the primary outcome measure. Multivariable logistic regression was used to investigate factors associated with refusal. The impact of refusal of therapy on cancer-specific mortality was assessed with Fine and Gray's competing risks regression. Results: In total, 2441 of 692,938 patients (0.4%) refused surgery, and 2113 of 232,189 patients (0.9%) refused radiation, despite the recommendations of their physicians. On multivariable analysis, advancing age, decreasing annual income, nonwhite race, and unmarried status were associated with refusal of surgery, whereas advancing age, decreasing annual income, Asian American race, and unmarried status were associated with refusal of radiation (P<.001 in all cases). Refusal of surgery and radiation were associated with increased estimates of cancer-specific mortality for all malignancies evaluated (hazard ratio [HR], 2.80, 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.59-3.03; P<.001 and HR 1.97 [95% CI, 1.78-2.18]; P<.001, respectively). Conclusions: Nonwhite, less affluent, and unmarried patients are more likely to refuse curative surgical and/or radiation-based oncologic therapy, raising concern that socioeconomic factors may drive some patients to forego potentially life

  5. Refusal of curative radiation therapy and surgery among patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizer, Ayal A; Chen, Ming-Hui; Parekh, Arti; Choueiri, Toni K; Hoffman, Karen E; Kim, Simon P; Martin, Neil E; Hu, Jim C; Trinh, Quoc-Dien; Nguyen, Paul L

    2014-07-15

    Surgery and radiation therapy represent the only curative options for many patients with solid malignancies. However, despite the recommendations of their physicians, some patients refuse these therapies. This study characterized factors associated with refusal of surgical or radiation therapy as well as the impact of refusal of recommended therapy on patients with localized malignancies. We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program to identify a population-based sample of 925,127 patients who had diagnoses of 1 of 8 common malignancies for which surgery and/or radiation are believed to confer a survival benefit between 1995 and 2008. Refusal of oncologic therapy, as documented in the SEER database, was the primary outcome measure. Multivariable logistic regression was used to investigate factors associated with refusal. The impact of refusal of therapy on cancer-specific mortality was assessed with Fine and Gray's competing risks regression. In total, 2441 of 692,938 patients (0.4%) refused surgery, and 2113 of 232,189 patients (0.9%) refused radiation, despite the recommendations of their physicians. On multivariable analysis, advancing age, decreasing annual income, nonwhite race, and unmarried status were associated with refusal of surgery, whereas advancing age, decreasing annual income, Asian American race, and unmarried status were associated with refusal of radiation (PRefusal of surgery and radiation were associated with increased estimates of cancer-specific mortality for all malignancies evaluated (hazard ratio [HR], 2.80, 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.59-3.03; Prefuse curative surgical and/or radiation-based oncologic therapy, raising concern that socioeconomic factors may drive some patients to forego potentially life-saving care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Packing effects on the intracavitary radiation therapy of the uterine cervix cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jung Kun; Lee, Du Hyun; Si, Chang Kun; Choi, Yoon Kyung; Kim, Tae Yoon

    2004-01-01

    Purpose of the radio-therapy is maximize the radiation dose to the tumor while minimizing the dose to the critical organ. Carcinoma of the uterine cervix treatment are external irradiation or an interstitial brachytherapy make use of isotope. Brachytherapy is a method of radiotherapy in advantage to achieve better local control with minimum radiation toxicity in comparison with external irradiation because radiation dose is distributed according to the inverse square low of gamma-ray emitted from the implanted sources. Authors make use of the patients data which 192 Ir gives medical treatment intracavity. Intracavitary radiation of the uterine cervix cancer, critical organ take 20% below than exposure dose of A point in the ICRU report. None the less of the advice, Radiation proctitis and radiation cystitis are frequent and problematic early complications in patients treated with radiation for the uterine cervix cancer. In brachytherapy of uterine cervical cancer using a high dose rate remote afterloading system, it is of prime importance to deliver a accurate dose in each fractionated treatment by minimizing the difference between the pre-treatment planned and post-treatment calculated doses. Use of packing to reduce late complications intracavitary radiation of the uterine cervix cancer. Bladder and rectum changes exposure dose rate by radiotherapy make use of packing.

  7. The Results and Prognostic Factors of Postoperative Radiation Therapy in the Early Stages of Endometrial Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung Ja

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the results and prognostic factors for postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy in patients at stages I and II of endometrial cancer. Materials and Methods: Between January 1991 and December 2006, 35 patients with FIGO stages I and II disease, who received adjuvant radiation therapy following surgery for endometrial cancer at Ewha Womans University Hospital, were enrolled in this study. A total of 17 patients received postoperative pelvic external beam radiation therapy; whereas, 12 patients received vaginal brachytherapy alone, and 6 patients received both pelvic radiation therapy and vaginal brachytherapy. Results: The median follow-up period for all patients was 54 months. The 5-yr overall survival and disease-free survival rates for all patients were 91.4% and 81.7%, respectively. The 5-yr overall survival rates for low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk groups were 100%, 100% and 55.6%, respectively. In addition, the 5-yr disease-free survival rates were 100%, 70.0%, and 45.7%, respectively. Although no locoregional relapses were identified, distant metastases were observed in 5 patients (14%). The most common site of distant metastases was the lung, followed by bone, liver, adrenal gland, and peritoneum. A univariate analysis revealed a significant correlation between distant metastases and risk-group (p=0.018), pathology type (p=0.001), and grade (p=0.019). A multivariate analysis also revealed that distant metastases were correlated with pathology type (p=0.009). Papillary, serous and clear cell carcinoma cases demonstrated a poor patient survival rate compared to cases of endometrioid adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous carcinoma. The most common complication of pelvic external beam radiation therapy was enteritis (30%), followed by proctitis, leucopenia, and lymphedema. All these complications were of RTOG grades 1 and 2; no grades 3 and 4 were observed. Conclusion: For the low-risk and intermediate-risk groups (stages 1 and 2) endometrial

  8. Fludeoxyglucose F-18-PET in Planning Lung Cancer Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-19

    Stage I Lung Cancer; Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage II Lung Cancer; Stage II Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IIB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma AJCC v7

  9. Treatment of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: The Role of Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johung, Kimberly; Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Chang, Bryan W.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains associated with an extremely poor prognosis. Surgical resection can be curative, but the majority of patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Treatment for patients with locally advanced disease is controversial. Therapeutic options include systemic therapy alone, concurrent chemoradiation, or induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation. We review the evidence to date regarding the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), as well as evolving strategies including the emerging role of targeted therapies. We propose that if radiation is used for patients with LAPC, it should be delivered with concurrent chemotherapy and following a period of induction chemotherapy.

  10. Excellent local tumor response after fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy for locally recurrent nasopharynx cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Y. C.; Lim, D. H.; Choi, D. R.; Kim, D. K.; Kim, D. Y.; Huh, S. J.; Baek, C. H.; Chu, K. C.; Yoon, S. S.; Park, K. C.

    1997-01-01

    This study is to report experience with Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy (FSRT) for locally recurrent nasopharynx cancer after curative conventional radiation therapy. Three patients with locally recurrent and symptomatic nasopharynx cancer were given FSRT as reirradiation method between the period of September of 1995 and August of 1996. For two patients, application of FSRT is their third radiation therapy directed to the nasopharynx. Two patients were given low dose chemotherapy as radiation sensitizer concurrently with FSRT. Authors used 3-dimensional coordinate system by individually made, relocatable Gill-Thomas-Cosman (GTC) stereotactic frame and multiple non-coplanar arc therapy dose planning was done using XKnife-3. Total of 45 Gy/18 fractions or 50 Gy/20 fractions were given. Authors observed satisfactory symptomatic improvement and remarkable objective tumor size decrease by follow-up MR images taken 1 month post-FSRT in all three patients, while no neurologic side effect attributable to reirradiation was noticed. Two died at 7 and 9 months with loco-regional and distant seeding outside FSRT field, while one patient is living for 4 month. Authors experienced satisfactory therapeutic effectiveness and safety of FSRT as reirradiation method for locally recurrent nasopharynx cancer. Development of more effective systemic chemotherapeutic regimen is desired for distant metastasis. (author)

  11. Effect of radiation therapy on lipid peroxidation and total antioxidant capacity of blood and saliva in oral cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobo, Aswin D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation therapy is reported to induce oxidative stress in oral cancer patients. Saliva as a diagnostic tool has received increasing attention in recent years. Saliva analysis is proposed to be a noninvasive, sensitive tool for the evaluation of biological effects of radiation therapy in oral cancer. We aimed to assess the effect of radiation therapy on malondialdehyde, the marker of lipid peroxidation, and total antioxidant capacity in blood and saliva of oral cancer patients. We also aimed to assess the correlation between blood and saliva with respect to malonaldehyde (MDA) level and total antioxidant capacity (TAC). Thirty, clinically diagnosed oral cancer patients visiting the Oncology Department were the subjects. Thirty age- and sex-matched normal, healthy controls were included. Blood and saliva samples were collected from controls, and from oral cancer patients before and after radiation therapy. The samples were analyzed for MDA and TAC by standard spectrophotometric methods. Oral cancer patients showed significantly higher MDA level and lower TAC in blood and saliva when compared to controls. One week after radiation therapy, there was significant increase in MDA and decrease in TAC in oral cancer patients. After the completion of radiation therapy of six weeks, MDA level decreased and TAC increased, restoring the values near-to-controls. The pattern of change in MDA and TAC was similar between blood and saliva. There was significant correlation between blood and saliva with respect to MDA and TAC in oral cancer patients. Oral cancer patients showed increased oxidative stress and impaired antioxidant capacity. After radiation therapy of one week, oxidative stress increased further, and after six weeks of radiation therapy there was amelioration of antioxidant status. Saliva could be a sensitive and convenient laboratory tool for diagnosis of oral cancer and evaluation of biological effects of radiation therapy. (author)

  12. Role of the Technical Aspects of Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy Treatment of Prostate Cancer: A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemente, Stefania, E-mail: clemente_stefania@libero.it [Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico Centro di Riferimento Oncologico della Basilicata Rionero in Vulture, Potenza (Italy); Nigro, Roberta [Azienda Sanitaria Locale Rieti, Roma (Italy); Oliviero, Caterina [Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico Centro di Riferimento Oncologico della Basilicata Rionero in Vulture, Potenza (Italy); Marchioni, Chiara [Azienda Sanitaria Locale Rieti, Roma (Italy); Esposito, Marco [Azienda Sanitaria, Firenze (Italy); Giglioli, Francesca Romana [Azienda Ospedaliera Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, Torino (Italy); Mancosu, Pietro [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Rozzano, Milano (Italy); Marino, Carmelo [Humanitas Centro Catanese di Oncologia, Catania (Italy); Russo, Serenella [Azienda Sanitaria, Firenze (Italy); Stasi, Michele [Azienda Ospedaliera Ordine Mauriziano di Torino, Torino (Italy); Strigari, Lidia [Istituto Nazionale Tumori Regina Elena, Roma (Italy); Veronese, Ivan [Universita' degli Studi di Milano, Milano (Italy); Landoni, Valeria [Istituto Nazionale Tumori Regina Elena, Roma (Italy)

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of moderate (<35 fractions) and extreme (<5 fractions) hypofractionated radiation therapy in prostate cancer is yielding favorable results, both in terms of maintained biochemical response and toxicity. Several hypofractionation (HF) schemes for the treatment of prostate cancer are available, although there is considerable variability in the techniques used to manage intra-/interfraction motion and deliver radiation doses. We performed a review of the published studies on HF regimens as a topic of interest for the Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy working group, which is part of the Italian Association of Medical Physics. Aspects of organ motion management (imaging for contouring, target volume definition, and rectum/bladder preparation) and treatment delivery (prostate localization, image guided radiation therapy strategy and frequency) were evaluated and categorized to assess outcome relative to disease control and toxicity. Despite the heterogeneity of the data, some interesting trends that emerged from the review might be useful in identifying an optimum HF strategy.

  13. The Results of Radiation Therapy Alone vs Radiation Plus Chemotherapy of Uterine Cervix Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myung Za; Choi, Suk Young; Chun, Ha Jeong

    1995-01-01

    Purpose : Radiation therapy(RT) is conventionally standard treatment for locally advanced stage for uterine cervix cancer. Recently to improve treatment results, combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy was tried. We retrospectively analysed our experience of 122 patients. Comparison of the results in 45 patients treated with RT alone and 77 patients treated with RT plus chemotherapy was made. Materials and Methods : from January 1985 to December 1991, 122 patients with cervix cancer were treated with whole pelvic external RT and ICR(34 1 ICR, 77 2 ICR, 11 high dose rate ICR) in our department. Forty five patients were treated with RT alone, and 77 patients were treated with combined plus chemotherapy. Mean age was 58 years(range:29-81). Histologic types were 111 squamous cell carcinoma, large cell carcinoma, 3 adenocarcinoma, and 2 adenosquamous cell carcinoma. According to the FIGO stage 6 had stage IA94.9%, 11 had IIA(9.0%), 37 had IIB(30.3%), 3 had IIA(2.5%), 63 had IIB(51.6%), and 2 had stage IV(1.6%). In 77 patients with RT plus chemotherapy, 36 patients were treated with VBP(vinblastin, bleoycin, cisplainum), 39 patients with cisplatinum plus 5-FU and 2 patients with 5-FU. Results : Complete response after external RT(3960cGy-5500cGy)was achieved in 61 patients(50%). He actuarial 5 year and 9 year survival rate was 57.8% and 53.9%, respectively. Five year actuarial survival rate was 63.1% with RT alone(n=45) and 55.9% with RT plus chemotherapy(n=77). Their 5 year survival rate was 35.5% for 1 course of ICR and 67% for 2 courses of ICR. There was statistically significant advantage of survival with RT alone group who were treated with 2 coursed of ICR and dose to the A point≥8000cGy(4/25 died). In RT plus chemotherapy group, dose response was not seen and there was no difference in 5 year survival between 1 course and 2 course of ICR(50% vs 56.8%), and dose to point A less than 8000cGy and more than 8000 cGy(55.6% vs 55.7%). There was no significant

  14. A case of pyoderma gangrenosum involving the prostate gland after radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Toru; Ito, Masaaki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kawase, Norio; Taki, Yoji

    2002-01-01

    A 76-year-old man complained of difficulty in urination and miction pain with abacterial pyuria after radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Transurethral resection of the prostate was performed and histopathologically widespread necrosis was observed in the prostate. Thereafter retention of urine and fever occurred and computed tomography scan revealed an abscess of the penile corpus. The abscess was drained, but the fever continued. He developed an abacterial lung abscess and abacterial necrotic ulcerating lesions on his back, his left leg and his lower abdomen. Macroscopic findings demonstrated typical features of pyoderma gangrenosum. Steroid treatment was initiated and the response to steroid therapy was dramatic. Finally urinary diversion using an ileal conduit was performed. We found few cases of pyoderma gangrenosum involving lesions other than those of the skin in the literature. This is the first report of pyoderma gangrenosum involving the prostate gland after radiation therapy for prostate cancer. (author)

  15. A case of pyoderma gangrenosum involving the prostate gland after radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanno, Toru; Ito, Masaaki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kawase, Norio; Taki, Yoji [Toyooka Hospital, Hyogo (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    A 76-year-old man complained of difficulty in urination and miction pain with abacterial pyuria after radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Transurethral resection of the prostate was performed and histopathologically widespread necrosis was observed in the prostate. Thereafter retention of urine and fever occurred and computed tomography scan revealed an abscess of the penile corpus. The abscess was drained, but the fever continued. He developed an abacterial lung abscess and abacterial necrotic ulcerating lesions on his back, his left leg and his lower abdomen. Macroscopic findings demonstrated typical features of pyoderma gangrenosum. Steroid treatment was initiated and the response to steroid therapy was dramatic. Finally urinary diversion using an ileal conduit was performed. We found few cases of pyoderma gangrenosum involving lesions other than those of the skin in the literature. This is the first report of pyoderma gangrenosum involving the prostate gland after radiation therapy for prostate cancer. (author)

  16. Resveratrol imparts photoprotection of normal cells and enhances the efficacy of radiation therapy in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reagan-Shaw, Shannon; Mukhtar, Hasan; Ahmad, Nihal

    2008-01-01

    Solar radiation spans a whole range of electromagnetic spectrum including UV radiation, which are potentially harmful to normal cells as well as ionizing radiations which are therapeutically beneficial towards the killing of cancer cells. UV radiation is an established cause of a majority of skin cancers as well as precancerous conditions such as actinic keratosis. However, despite efforts to educate people about the use of sunscreens and protective clothing as preventive strategies, the incidence of skin cancer and other skin-related disorders are on the rise. This has generated an enormous interest towards finding alternative approaches for management of UV-mediated damages. Chemoprevention via nontoxic agents, especially botanical antioxidants, is one such approach that is being considered as a plausible strategy for prevention of photodamages including photocarcinogenesis. In this review, we have discussed the photoprotective effects of resveratrol, an antioxidant found in grapes and red wine, against UVB exposure-mediated damages in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we have also discussed studies showing that resveratrol can act as a sensitizer to enhance the therapeutic effects of ionizing radiation against cancer cells. Based on available literature, we suggest that resveratrol may be useful for (1) prevention of UVB-mediated damages including skin cancer and (2) enhancing the response of radiation therapies against hyperproliferative, precancerous and neoplastic conditions.

  17. Effects of Voice Rehabilitation After Radiation Therapy for Laryngeal Cancer: A Randomized Controlled Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuomi, Lisa; Andréll, Paulin; Finizia, Caterina

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients treated with radiation therapy for laryngeal cancer often experience voice problems. The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to assess the efficacy of voice rehabilitation for laryngeal cancer patients after having undergone radiation therapy and to investigate whether differences between different tumor localizations with regard to rehabilitation outcomes exist. Methods and Materials: Sixty-nine male patients irradiated for laryngeal cancer participated. Voice recordings and self-assessments of communicative dysfunction were performed 1 and 6 months after radiation therapy. Thirty-three patients were randomized to structured voice rehabilitation with a speech-language pathologist and 36 to a control group. Furthermore, comparisons with 23 healthy control individuals were made. Acoustic analyses were performed for all patients, including the healthy control individuals. The Swedish version of the Self Evaluation of Communication Experiences after Laryngeal Cancer and self-ratings of voice function were used to assess vocal and communicative function. Results: The patients who received vocal rehabilitation experienced improved self-rated vocal function after rehabilitation. Patients with supraglottic tumors who received voice rehabilitation had statistically significant improvements in voice quality and self-rated vocal function, whereas the control group did not. Conclusion: Voice rehabilitation for male patients with laryngeal cancer is efficacious regarding patient-reported outcome measurements. The patients experienced better voice function after rehabilitation. Patients with supraglottic tumors also showed an improvement in terms of acoustic voice outcomes. Rehabilitation with a speech-language pathologist is recommended for laryngeal cancer patients after radiation therapy, particularly for patients with supraglottic tumors

  18. Effects of Voice Rehabilitation After Radiation Therapy for Laryngeal Cancer: A Randomized Controlled Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuomi, Lisa, E-mail: lisa.tuomi@vgregion.se [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Andréll, Paulin [Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine/Multidisciplinary Pain Center, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Finizia, Caterina [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2014-08-01

    Background: Patients treated with radiation therapy for laryngeal cancer often experience voice problems. The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to assess the efficacy of voice rehabilitation for laryngeal cancer patients after having undergone radiation therapy and to investigate whether differences between different tumor localizations with regard to rehabilitation outcomes exist. Methods and Materials: Sixty-nine male patients irradiated for laryngeal cancer participated. Voice recordings and self-assessments of communicative dysfunction were performed 1 and 6 months after radiation therapy. Thirty-three patients were randomized to structured voice rehabilitation with a speech-language pathologist and 36 to a control group. Furthermore, comparisons with 23 healthy control individuals were made. Acoustic analyses were performed for all patients, including the healthy control individuals. The Swedish version of the Self Evaluation of Communication Experiences after Laryngeal Cancer and self-ratings of voice function were used to assess vocal and communicative function. Results: The patients who received vocal rehabilitation experienced improved self-rated vocal function after rehabilitation. Patients with supraglottic tumors who received voice rehabilitation had statistically significant improvements in voice quality and self-rated vocal function, whereas the control group did not. Conclusion: Voice rehabilitation for male patients with laryngeal cancer is efficacious regarding patient-reported outcome measurements. The patients experienced better voice function after rehabilitation. Patients with supraglottic tumors also showed an improvement in terms of acoustic voice outcomes. Rehabilitation with a speech-language pathologist is recommended for laryngeal cancer patients after radiation therapy, particularly for patients with supraglottic tumors.

  19. Dental problems of the patients with head and neck cancer after radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizutani, Kimishige; Koseki, Yonoshin [Osaka Dental Univ. (Japan); Inoue, Toshihiko [and others

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate dental problems such as changes of saliva flow rates (ml/min), taste sensation and DMF-teeth (D: decay, M: missing, F: filling) after radiation therapy for the patients with head and neck cancer. Between January 1990 and April 1995, a total of 56 patients with head and neck cancer after radiation therapy was reviewed to demonstrate dental problems at the Department of Oral Radiology, Osaka Dental University Hospital. The results were as follows. In the case of 7 inpatients with head and neck cancer (nasopharynx: 3, mouth floor: 2, tongue: 2), non-stimulating saliva flow rates for 5 minutes was nearly equal to 0 ml at the level of 60 Gy/6 weeks to 80 Gy/8 weeks. In the scoring system of the taste sensation after radiation therapy for 23 patients with oral cancer (tongue: 18, mouth floor: 5), distribution of the patients with 3 points (3 points stand for patients feel good as well as pretreatment) was 91% for sweetness, 78% for sharpness, 96% for bitterness and 96% for acidity, respectively. Concerning DMF-teeth after radiation therapy for 26 patients with head and neck cancer (nasopharynx: 10, oropharynx: 8, tongue: 8), changes of DMF-Teeth of the group of nasopharynx and oropharynx was more higher than that of the group of tongue comparing to report on the survey of dental diseases in Japan, 1993 as control. We emphasize that these data are more effective to improve their oral environments and to up their recognition for oral cavity in the patients with head and neck cancer pre or post-irradiation. (author).

  20. Dental problems of the patients with head and neck cancer after radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizutani, Kimishige; Koseki, Yonoshin; Inoue, Toshihiko

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate dental problems such as changes of saliva flow rates (ml/min), taste sensation and DMF-teeth (D: decay, M: missing, F: filling) after radiation therapy for the patients with head and neck cancer. Between January 1990 and April 1995, a total of 56 patients with head and neck cancer after radiation therapy was reviewed to demonstrate dental problems at the Department of Oral Radiology, Osaka Dental University Hospital. The results were as follows. In the case of 7 inpatients with head and neck cancer (nasopharynx: 3, mouth floor: 2, tongue: 2), non-stimulating saliva flow rates for 5 minutes was nearly equal to 0 ml at the level of 60 Gy/6 weeks to 80 Gy/8 weeks. In the scoring system of the taste sensation after radiation therapy for 23 patients with oral cancer (tongue: 18, mouth floor: 5), distribution of the patients with 3 points (3 points stand for patients feel good as well as pretreatment) was 91% for sweetness, 78% for sharpness, 96% for bitterness and 96% for acidity, respectively. Concerning DMF-teeth after radiation therapy for 26 patients with head and neck cancer (nasopharynx: 10, oropharynx: 8, tongue: 8), changes of DMF-Teeth of the group of nasopharynx and oropharynx was more higher than that of the group of tongue comparing to report on the survey of dental diseases in Japan, 1993 as control. We emphasize that these data are more effective to improve their oral environments and to up their recognition for oral cavity in the patients with head and neck cancer pre or post-irradiation. (author)

  1. Targeted therapies and radiation for the treatment of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gwi Eon

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide an update on novel radiation treatments for head and neck cancer. Despite the remarkable advances in chemotherapy and radiotherapy techniques, the management of advanced head and neck cancer remains challenging. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is an appealing target for novel therapies in head and neck cancer because not only EGFR activation stimulates many important signaling pathways associated with cancer development and progression, and importantly, resistance to radiation. Furthermore, EGFR overexpression is known to be portended for a worse outcome in patients with advanced head and neck cancer. Two categories of compounds designed to abrogate EGFR signaling, such as monoclonal antibodies (Cetuximab) and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (ZD1839 and OSI-774) have been assessed and have been most extensively studied in preclinical models and clinical trials. Additional TKIs in clinical trials include a reversible agent, Cl-1033, which blocks activation of all erbB receptors. Encouraging preclinical data for head and neck cancers resulted in rapid translation into the clinic. Results from initial clinical trials show rather surprisingly that only minority of patients benefited from EGFR inhibition as monotherapy or in combination with chemotherapy. In this review, we begin with a brief summary of erbB-mediated signal transduction. Subsequently, we present data on prognostic-predictive value of erbB receptor expression in HNC followed by preclinical and clinical data on the role of EGFR antagonists alone or in combination with radiation in the treatment of HNC. Finally, we discuss the emerging thoughts on resistance to EGFR blockade and efforts in the development of multiple-targeted therapy for combination with chemotherapy or radiation. Current challenges for investigators are to determine (1) who will benefit from targeted agents and which agents are most appropriate to combine with radiation and/or chemotherapy, (2

  2. Propensity Score Matched Comparison of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy vs Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: A Survival Analysis from the National Cancer Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Ricco

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available PurposeNo direct comparisons between extreme hypofractionation and conventional fractionation have been reported in randomized trials for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. The goal of this study is to use a propensity score matched (PSM analysis with the National Cancer Database (NCDB for the comparison of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT for organ confined prostate cancer.MethodsMen with localized prostate cancer treated with radiation dose ≥72 Gy for IMRT and ≥35 Gy for SBRT to the prostate only were abstracted from the NCDB. Men treated with previous surgery, brachytherapy, or proton therapy were excluded. Matching was performed to eliminate confounding variables via PSM. Simple 1–1 nearest neighbor matching resulted in a matched sample of 5,430 (2,715 in each group. Subset analyses of men with prostate-specific antigen (PSA > 10, GS = 7, and GS > 7 yielded matched samples of 1,020, 2,194, and 247, respectively.ResultsNo difference in survival was noted between IMRT and SBRT at 8 years (p = 0.65. Subset analyses of higher risk men with PSA > 10 or GS = 7 histology or GS > 7 histology revealed no difference in survival between IMRT and SBRT (p = 0.58, p = 0.68, and p = 0.62, respectively. Variables significant for survival for the matched group included: age (p < 0.0001, primary payor (p = 0.0001, Charlson/Deyo Score (p = 0.0002, PSA (p = 0.0013, Gleason score (p < 0.0001, and use of hormone therapy (p = 0.02.ConclusionUtilizing the NCDB, there is no difference in survival at 8 years comparing IMRT to SBRT in the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Subset analysis confirmed no difference in survival even for intermediate- and high-risk patients based on Gleason Score and PSA.

  3. Adaptive Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Planning for Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Yujiao; Zhang, Fan; Yoo, David S.; Kelsey, Chris R.; Yin, Fang-Fang; Cai, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric effects of adaptive planning on lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Forty of 66 consecutive lung SBRT patients were selected for a retrospective adaptive planning study. CBCT images acquired at each fraction were used for treatment planning. Adaptive plans were created using the same planning parameters as the original CT-based plan, with the goal to achieve comparable comformality index (CI). For each patient, 2 cumulative plans, nonadaptive plan (P NON ) and adaptive plan (P ADP ), were generated and compared for the following organs-at-risks (OARs): cord, esophagus, chest wall, and the lungs. Dosimetric comparison was performed between P NON and P ADP for all 40 patients. Correlations were evaluated between changes in dosimetric metrics induced by adaptive planning and potential impacting factors, including tumor-to-OAR distances (d T-OAR ), initial internal target volume (ITV 1 ), ITV change (ΔITV), and effective ITV diameter change (Δd ITV ). Results: 34 (85%) patients showed ITV decrease and 6 (15%) patients showed ITV increase throughout the course of lung SBRT. Percentage ITV change ranged from −59.6% to 13.0%, with a mean (±SD) of −21.0% (±21.4%). On average of all patients, P ADP resulted in significantly (P=0 to .045) lower values for all dosimetric metrics. Δd ITV /d T-OAR was found to correlate with changes in dose to 5 cc (ΔD5cc) of esophagus (r=0.61) and dose to 30 cc (ΔD30cc) of chest wall (r=0.81). Stronger correlations between Δd ITV /d T-OAR and ΔD30cc of chest wall were discovered for peripheral (r=0.81) and central (r=0.84) tumors, respectively. Conclusions: Dosimetric effects of adaptive lung SBRT planning depend upon target volume changes and tumor-to-OAR distances. Adaptive lung SBRT can potentially reduce dose to adjacent OARs if patients present large tumor volume shrinkage during the treatment

  4. Adaptive Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Planning for Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Yujiao [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Zhang, Fan [Occupational and Environmental Safety Office, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Yoo, David S.; Kelsey, Chris R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Yin, Fang-Fang [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Cai, Jing, E-mail: jing.cai@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric effects of adaptive planning on lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Forty of 66 consecutive lung SBRT patients were selected for a retrospective adaptive planning study. CBCT images acquired at each fraction were used for treatment planning. Adaptive plans were created using the same planning parameters as the original CT-based plan, with the goal to achieve comparable comformality index (CI). For each patient, 2 cumulative plans, nonadaptive plan (P{sub NON}) and adaptive plan (P{sub ADP}), were generated and compared for the following organs-at-risks (OARs): cord, esophagus, chest wall, and the lungs. Dosimetric comparison was performed between P{sub NON} and P{sub ADP} for all 40 patients. Correlations were evaluated between changes in dosimetric metrics induced by adaptive planning and potential impacting factors, including tumor-to-OAR distances (d{sub T-OAR}), initial internal target volume (ITV{sub 1}), ITV change (ΔITV), and effective ITV diameter change (Δd{sub ITV}). Results: 34 (85%) patients showed ITV decrease and 6 (15%) patients showed ITV increase throughout the course of lung SBRT. Percentage ITV change ranged from −59.6% to 13.0%, with a mean (±SD) of −21.0% (±21.4%). On average of all patients, P{sub ADP} resulted in significantly (P=0 to .045) lower values for all dosimetric metrics. Δd{sub ITV}/d{sub T-OAR} was found to correlate with changes in dose to 5 cc (ΔD5cc) of esophagus (r=0.61) and dose to 30 cc (ΔD30cc) of chest wall (r=0.81). Stronger correlations between Δd{sub ITV}/d{sub T-OAR} and ΔD30cc of chest wall were discovered for peripheral (r=0.81) and central (r=0.84) tumors, respectively. Conclusions: Dosimetric effects of adaptive lung SBRT planning depend upon target volume changes and tumor-to-OAR distances. Adaptive lung SBRT can potentially reduce dose to adjacent OARs if patients present large tumor volume shrinkage during the treatment.

  5. The long term effect and outcome of preoperative chemotherapy combined with radiation therapy for bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasu, Takahito; Nakane, Hiroshi; Kamata, Seiji; Mitsui, Hiroshi; Hayashida, Shigeaki; Shinohara, Youichi.

    1996-01-01

    The object of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of preoperative chemotherapy combined with radiation therapy for bladder cancer. A total of 44 patients with bladder cancer were treated by preoperative chemotherapy combined with radiation therapy between October, 1981 and December, 1986. Clinical stages included 4 patients in Ta, 25 in T1, 11 in T2, and 4 in T3. Each patient was treated twice with 15 gray of radiation to the small pelvic cavity and a chemotherapy combination of adriamycin, cis-platinum, tegaful, and peplomycin. The average observation time after the therapy was 83 month, with the maximum being 146 months. Complete remission was included in 5 patients, partial remission in 27, and no change in 12. Thus, the overall effective rate was 72.8%. Operations, selected by the results of the preoperative therapy, included transurethral resection on 28 patients, transurethral fulguration on 2, partial cystectomy on 4, resection of tumor on 4, and total cystectomy on 3. Operations were not performed on 2 patients and not allowed on 1 patient. The outcome during the long-term follow-up included cancer related deaths in 4 patients, and death resulting from other disorders in 9. The 5-year survival rates for superficial and invasive bladder cancer were 92.4%, and 83.9%, respectively. The 10-year survival rates for superficial and invasive bladder cancer were also 92.4% and 83.9%, respectively. The 3-year and 5-year non-recurrence rates for superficial bladder cancer were 75.8%, and 66.9% respectively, according to the Kaplan-Meier method. On the other hand, the 3-year and 5-year non-recurrence rates for invasive bladder cancer were both 73.8%. During the follow-up between 9 and 11 years, 3 upper tract tumor were diagnosed (2 ureteral cancer, and 1 renal pelvic cancer). We concluded that preoperative chemotherapy combined with radiation therapy may be effective for the treatment of bladder cancer. (author)

  6. A current perspective on stereotactic body radiation therapy for pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Julian C; Czito, Brian G; Willett, Christopher G; Palta, Manisha

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a formidable malignancy with poor outcomes. The majority of patients are unable to undergo resection, which remains the only potentially curative treatment option. The management of locally advanced (unresectable) pancreatic cancer is controversial; however, treatment with either chemotherapy or chemoradiation is associated with high rates of local tumor progression and metastases development, resulting in low survival rates. An emerging local modality is stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), which uses image-guided, conformal, high-dose radiation. SBRT has demonstrated promising local control rates and resultant quality of life with acceptable rates of toxicity. Over the past decade, increasing clinical experience and data have supported SBRT as a local treatment modality. Nevertheless, additional research is required to further evaluate the role of SBRT and improve upon the persistently poor outcomes associated with pancreatic cancer. This review discusses the existing clinical experience and technical implementation of SBRT for pancreatic cancer and highlights the directions for ongoing and future studies.

  7. Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy: Maximizing Investments in Radiation Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enwerem-Bromson, N.; Nitzsche-Bell, A.

    2015-01-01

    In the presentation, Ms Nelly Enwerem-Bromson will present her work as Director of the Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT) and the crucial role of nuclear techniques in cancer control. She will review the key drivers for increasing demand for technical support on cancer control from low and middle income (LMI) Member States to the UN system in general, and the IAEA in particular. She will further elaborate on IAEA’s Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT) main products and services and how they are having a positive impact on assessing national capacities and needs, supporting Member States in identifying key priority interventions and translating them into action through the IAEA Technical Cooperation Programme. Ms Enwerem-Bromson will also address innovative approaches on distance learning and international collaboration to increase the quantity and quality of oncology related human resources as well as in the establishment of sustainable radiation medicines services in LMI countries. (author)

  8. Radiation therapy for the cervical and upper thoracic esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatani, Masashi; Teshima, Teruki; Inoue, Toshihiko

    1990-01-01

    This is a retrospective analysis of 19 patients with carcinoma of the cervical esophagus (Ce) and 36 of the upper thoracic esophagus (Iu) treated with radiotherapy between September 1977 and December 1987. Three-year survival rates by Kaplan-Meier method were 18% in Ce cancer and 7% in Iu cancer. Two-year local tumor control was obtained in 3 Ce and 4 Iu cancer. Concerning the treatment methods for the above 7 patients, 3 patients with carcinoma of the Ce were treated with double wedged technique and 4 of Iu were treated with box-technique (2 patients), rotation technique (1) and double wedge technique (1). There were no 2-year local tumor control in patients who received less than 60 Gy of the tumor dose or whose tumor exceeded more than 10 cm in length. Double wedge technique is suitable for radiotherapy of Ce cancer, while further investigation of dose and compensation is necessary for Iu cancer. (author)

  9. Debate: Pro intraoperative radiation therapy in breast cancer; Debat: pour la radiotherapie peroperatoire dans le cancer du sein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubois, J.B.; Lemanski, C.; Azria, D. [Departement de radiotherapie, CRLC Val-d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, 208, rue des Apothicaires, 34298 Montpellier cedex 5 (France); Gutowski, M.; Rouanet, P.; Saint-Aubert, B. [Departement de chirurgie, CRLC Val-d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, 208, rue des Apothicaires, 34298 Montpellier cedex 5 (France)

    2011-10-15

    The use of intraoperative radiation therapy in breast cancer patients started about 20 years ago. Several retrospective and prospective studies have been published. Intraoperative radiation therapy was initially given as a boost to the tumour bed, followed by whole-breast irradiation. These studies have demonstrated the feasibility of the technique, with local control rates and cosmetic results similar to those obtained with standard treatments. Accelerated partial breast irradiation yields local recurrence rates as low as those observed after whole-breast irradiation. Intraoperative radiation therapy as a single irradiation modality with a unique dose has been investigated in recent prospective studies showing satisfactory local results. Intraoperative radiation therapy can be proposed either as a boost or as a unique treatment in selected cases (tumour size, nodal and hormonal status, patient's age). Intraoperative radiation therapy can be delivered by orthovoltage (50 kV) X-rays from mobile generators, or by electrons from linear accelerators, mobile or fixed, dedicated or not to intraoperative radiation therapy. (authors)

  10. Acute Toxicity After Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Compared to 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy in Prostate Cancer Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wortel, Ruud C.; Incrocci, Luca; Pos, Floris J.; Lebesque, Joos V.; Witte, Marnix G.; van der Heide, Uulke A.; van Herk, Marcel; Heemsbergen, Wilma D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) allows significant dose reductions to organs at risk in prostate cancer patients. However, clinical data identifying the benefits of IG-IMRT in daily practice are scarce. The purpose of this study was to compare dose distributions

  11. Occurrence of chronic esophageal ulcer after high dose rate intraluminal radiation therapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soejima, Toshinori; Hirota, Saeko; Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Obayashi, Kayoko; Takada, Yoshiki

    1995-01-01

    Ninety-eight patients with esophageal cancer were treated by high dose rate intraluminal radiation therapy at the Department of Radiology of the Hyogo Medical Center for Adults between January 1982 and December 1993. Twenty patients with complete response after intraluminal radiation therapy, who were followed up with esophageal fiberscopy in our institute, were reviewed. The one-year cumulative rate of occurrence of esophageal ulcers was 81%, and in 69% of the cases the ulcers occurred from 4 to 8 months after completion of intraluminal radiation therapy. We graded esophageal ulcer by fiberscopic findings. Grade 0 was defined as no ulcer, grade 1 as superficial ulcer, grade 2 as deep ulcer, grade 3 as circumferencial ulcer, and severe stenosis. Factors related to grade were studied, and shorter distances from the source to the surface of the mucosa and lower surface doses of intraluminal radiation therapy appear to reduce the severity as graded on the above scale, of the esophageal ulcer. Four of the five 2-year recurrence-free patients suffered esophageal ulcers, which were cured from 15 to 22 months after intraluminal radiation therapy. However ulcers recurred in two patients, ong term care was thought to be necessary. (author)

  12. Ozone Therapy in the Management of Persistent Radiation-Induced Rectal Bleeding in Prostate Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardino Clavo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Persistent radiation-induced proctitis and rectal bleeding are debilitating complications with limited therapeutic options. We present our experience with ozone therapy in the management of such refractory rectal bleeding. Methods. Patients (n=12 previously irradiated for prostate cancer with persistent or severe rectal bleeding without response to conventional treatment were enrolled to receive ozone therapy via rectal insufflations and/or topical application of ozonized-oil. Ten (83% patients had Grade 3 or Grade 4 toxicity. Median follow-up after ozone therapy was 104 months (range: 52–119. Results. Following ozone therapy, the median grade of toxicity improved from 3 to 1 (p<0.001 and the number of endoscopy treatments from 37 to 4 (p=0.032. Hemoglobin levels changed from 11.1 (7–14 g/dL to 13 (10–15 g/dL, before and after ozone therapy, respectively (p=0.008. Ozone therapy was well tolerated and no adverse effects were noted, except soft and temporary flatulence for some hours after each session. Conclusions. Ozone therapy was effective in radiation-induced rectal bleeding in prostate cancer patients without serious adverse events. It proved useful in the management of rectal bleeding and merits further evaluation.

  13. Postoperative Radiation Therapy in Resected N2 Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Geol

    1993-01-01

    A total of forty patients with resected N2 stage non-small cell lung cancer treated with postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy between Jan. 1975 and Dec. 1990 at the Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Yonsei Cancer Center were retrospectively analysed to evaluate whether postoperative radiation therapy improves survival. Patterns of failure and prognostic factors affecting survival were also analysed. The 5 year overall and disease free survival rate were 26.3%, 27.3% and median survival 23.5 months. The 5 year survival rates by T-stage were T1 66.7%, T2 25.6% and T3 12.5%. Loco-regional failure rate was 14.3% and distant metastasis rate was 42.9% and both 2.9%. Statistically significant factor affecting distant failure rate was number of positive lymph nodes(>= 4). This retrospective study suggests that postoperative radiation therapy in resected N2 stage non-small cell lung cancer can reduce loco-regional recurrence and may improve survival rate as compared with other studies which were treated by surgery alone. Further study of systemic control is also needed due to high rate of distant metastasis

  14. Evaluation of QOL in cancer patients treated with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Takeo; Machida, Kikuo; Honda, Norinari; Hosono, Makoto; Murata, Osamu; Osada, Hisato; Omichi, Masahide

    2002-01-01

    Evaluation of quality of life (QOL) in cancer patients is an important theme. However, we do not have an established method to assess QOL in cancer patients during radiotherapy in Japan. We evaluated both the changes of QOL and the factors affecting QOL in radiotherapy patients. Three hundred fifty-five cancer patients, who filled in a questionnaire at the beginning, middle, and end of radiotherapy between 1998 and 2001, were studied. We used The QOL Questionnaire for Cancer Patients Treated with Anticancer Drugs (QOL-ACD)'' devised by Kurihara et al, the Ministry of Health and Welfare. The QOL Questionnaire had five categories: physical activity, physical condition, mental state, social interaction, and face scale. The total score, sum of the score of five categories, were established synthetically (maximum score is 110). The mean of total QOL scores were 75.8, 77.6, and 78.2 at the beginning, middle, and end of radiotherapy respectively. Patients with symptoms related to cancer had apparent improvement of QOL score. Patients receiving chemotherapy had a decreased QOL score at the end of radiotherapy. The score of physical condition was reduced improvement. It was suggested that radiotherapy could be performed without losing QOL of cancer patients, including older patients. However, patients receiving chemotherapy and those with head and neck cancer may lose their QOL, therefore, we should treat such patients carefully. (author)

  15. P53 overexpression and outcome of radiation therapy in head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Ah; Choi, Ihl Bhong; Kang, Ki Mun; Jang, Ji Young; Kim, Kyung Mi; Park, Kyung Shin; Kim, Young Shin; Kang, Chang Suk; Cho, Seung Ho; Kim, Hyung Tae

    1999-01-01

    Experimental studies have implicated the wild type p53 in cellular response to radiation. Whether altered p53 function can lead to changes in clinical radiocurability remains an area of ongoing study. This study was performed to investigate whether any correlation between change of p53 and outcome of curative radiation therapy in patients with head and neck cancers. Immunohistochemical analysis with a mouse monoclonal antibody (D0-7) specific for human p53 was used to detect to overexpression of protein in formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor sample from 55 head and neck cancer patients treated with curative radiation therapy (median dose of 7020 cGy) from February 1988 to March 1996 at St. Mary's Hospital. Overexpression of p53 was correlated with locoregional control and survival using Kaplan-Meier method. A Cox regression multivariate analysis was performed that included all clinical variables and status of p53 expression. Thirty-seven (67.2%) patients showed overexpression of p53 by immunohistochemical staining in their tumor. One hundred percent of oral cavity, 76% of laryngeal, 66.7% of oropharyngeal, 66.7% of hypopharyngeal cancer showed p53 overexpression (p=0.05). The status of p53 had significant relationship with stage of disease (p=0.03) and history of smoking (p=0.001). The overexpression of p53 was not predictive of response rate to radiation therapy. The locoregional control was not significantly affected by p53 status. Overexpression of p53 didn't have any prognostic implication for disease free survival and overall survival. Primary site and stage of disease were significant prognostic factors for survival. The p53 overexpression as detected by immunohistochemical staining had significant correlation with stage, primary site of disease and smoking habit of patients. The p53 overexpression didn't have any predictive value for outcome of curative radiation therapy in a group of head and neck cancers

  16. P53 overexpression and outcome of radiation therapy in head and neck cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Ah; Choi, Ihl Bhong; Kang, Ki Mun; Jang, Ji Young; Kim, Kyung Mi; Park, Kyung Shin; Kim, Young Shin; Kang, Chang Suk; Cho, Seung Ho; Kim, Hyung Tae [College of Medicine, The Catholic Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-01

    Experimental studies have implicated the wild type p53 in cellular response to radiation. Whether altered p53 function can lead to changes in clinical radiocurability remains an area of ongoing study. This study was performed to investigate whether any correlation between change of p53 and outcome of curative radiation therapy in patients with head and neck cancers. Immunohistochemical analysis with a mouse monoclonal antibody (D0-7) specific for human p53 was used to detect to overexpression of protein in formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor sample from 55 head and neck cancer patients treated with curative radiation therapy (median dose of 7020 cGy) from February 1988 to March 1996 at St. Mary's Hospital. Overexpression of p53 was correlated with locoregional control and survival using Kaplan-Meier method. A Cox regression multivariate analysis was performed that included all clinical variables and status of p53 expression. Thirty-seven (67.2%) patients showed overexpression of p53 by immunohistochemical staining in their tumor. One hundred percent of oral cavity, 76% of laryngeal, 66.7% of oropharyngeal, 66.7% of hypopharyngeal cancer showed p53 overexpression (p=0.05). The status of p53 had significant relationship with stage of disease (p=0.03) and history of smoking (p=0.001). The overexpression of p53 was not predictive of response rate to radiation therapy. The locoregional control was not significantly affected by p53 status. Overexpression of p53 didn't have any prognostic implication for disease free survival and overall survival. Primary site and stage of disease were significant prognostic factors for survival. The p53 overexpression as detected by immunohistochemical staining had significant correlation with stage, primary site of disease and smoking habit of patients. The p53 overexpression didn't have any predictive value for outcome of curative radiation therapy in a group of head and neck cancers.

  17. Multiple Aperture Radiation Therapy (MART) for Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Tianfang

    2006-01-01

    Conventional breast radiotherapy utilizes two opposed tangential fields (OTF) can result in high radiation dose to lung and heart and inhomogeneous dose distribution in the target for large-size breast...

  18. Increasing Use of Dose-Escalated External Beam Radiation Therapy for Men With Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swisher-McClure, Samuel; Mitra, Nandita; Woo, Kaitlin; Smaldone, Marc; Uzzo, Robert; Bekelman, Justin E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To examine recent practice patterns, using a large national cancer registry, to understand the extent to which dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) has been incorporated into routine clinical practice for men with prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective observational cohort study using the National Cancer Data Base, a nationwide oncology outcomes database in the United States. We identified 98,755 men diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer between 2006 and 2011 who received definitive EBRT and classified patients into National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) risk groups. We defined dose-escalated EBRT as total prescribed dose of ≥75.6 Gy. Using multivariable logistic regression, we examined the association of patient, clinical, and demographic characteristics with the use of dose-escalated EBRT. Results: Overall, 81.6% of men received dose-escalated EBRT during the study period. The use of dose-escalated EBRT did not vary substantially by NCCN risk group. Use of dose-escalated EBRT increased from 70.7% of patients receiving treatment in 2006 to 89.8% of patients receiving treatment in 2011. On multivariable analysis, year of diagnosis and use of intensity modulated radiation therapy were significantly associated with receipt of dose-escalated EBRT. Conclusions: Our study results indicate that dose-escalated EBRT has been widely adopted by radiation oncologists treating prostate cancer in the United States. The proportion of patients receiving dose-escalated EBRT increased nearly 20% between 2006 and 2011. We observed high utilization rates of dose-escalated EBRT within all disease risk groups. Adoption of intensity modulated radiation therapy was strongly associated with use of dose-escalated treatment

  19. Radiation induced degradation of DNA in photodynamic therapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion, Rodica; Scarlat, F.; Niculescu, V.I.R.; Scarlat, Fl.; Gunaydin, Keriman

    2001-01-01

    DNA is a critical cellular target for oxidative processes induced by physical and chemical stresses. It is known that the direct effect of ionizing radiation on DNA results mainly in base ionization and may lead to mutation, carcinogenesis and cell death. The degradation of DNA induced by laser and ionizing radiation (electron and photon beam) is analyzed in this paper. The ionizing radiation degradation of DNA is a radical process. A series of lesions among the major base degradation product has been measured in isolated DNA exposed to gamma radiation in aerated aqueous solution. Degradation can be accounted for by the formation of hydroxyl radicals upon radiolysis of water (indirect effect). The production of DNA damage by ionizing radiation involves two mechanisms, direct and indirect effects. Direct effect leads to ionization and excitation of DNA molecules, while indirect effect is due to the interaction of reactive species, in particular of OH radicals produced by water radiolysis, with targets in DNA. The relative contribution of the two mechanisms in damaging DNA depends on the type of radiation. Single strand breaks and base damage seem to be mainly produced by the attack of hydroxyl radicals on DNA, whereas double strand breaks result predominantly of direct energy deposition. The four bases are degraded in high yield. Direct effect has been mimicked by photo-induced electron abstraction from the bases producing their radical cation. The base damage may also occur from the formation of radical cation of purine and pyrimidine components. When DNA is irradiated in solution, single strand breaks are mainly due to the abstraction of an H atom from the 4 ' position of 2 ' -deoxyribose by the attack of OH radicals produced by water radiolysis. Quantification of the modified bases showed the guanine is the preferential target. Ionizing radiation induces several types of DNA modifications, including chain breaks, DNA-protein cross-links, oxidized DNA bases

  20. Radiation therapy for endometrial cancer in patients treated for postoperative recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, Kimberly B.; Han, Ihn; Shamsa, Falah; Court, Wayne S.; Chuba, Paul; Deppe, Gunter; Malone, John; Christensen, Carl; Porter, Arthur T.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the outcome and risk factors in patients treated with radiation for endometrial cancer at time of recurrence. Materials and Methods: Three hundred ninety-nine women were treated with radiation therapy for endometrial cancer at KCI/WSU from January 1980 to December 1994. Of these, 26 patients treated primarily with surgery received radiation therapy at the time of recurrence. Median time to recurrence after surgery was 8 months, with all recurrences occurring within 24 months. Twenty-four patients had recurrences in the vaginal cuff, vagina, or pelvis. These patients received external-beam radiation to the pelvis (45.00-50.40 Gy) and periaortic lymph nodes (45.00-50.00 Gy), along with a boost given by external-beam radiation or brachytherapy (16.00-30.00 Gy). Mean follow-up was 15 months (range 1-85 months). Results: The 2-year survival was 50% and median survival was 16 months (survival range 1-85 months). Of 26 patients, 54% (14) failed locally following radiation therapy. Factors indicative of poor survival included histology (sarcoma, poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma), grade, and lymph node positivity. Histological differentiation influenced local control; lymphovascular space invasion was of borderline significance with regard to local control. Conclusion: Local control and survival for surgically treated endometrial cancer patients who receive radiation at the time of recurrence are poor, with the exception of those patients with recurrent disease limited to the vagina. Early detection of recurrence may improve outcome. Pathologic risk factors may identify those patients at risk for extrapelvic recurrence. Alternative treatment modalities need to be developed for this high-risk group of patients

  1. Accuracy of Real-time Couch Tracking During 3-dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy, Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy, and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilbert, Juergen; Baier, Kurt; Hermann, Christian; Flentje, Michael; Guckenberger, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of real-time couch tracking for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Intrafractional motion trajectories of 15 prostate cancer patients were the basis for this phantom study; prostate motion had been monitored with the Calypso System. An industrial robot moved a phantom along these trajectories, motion was detected via an infrared camera system, and the robotic HexaPOD couch was used for real-time counter-steering. Residual phantom motion during real-time tracking was measured with the infrared camera system. Film dosimetry was performed during delivery of 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Results: Motion of the prostate was largest in the anterior–posterior direction, with systematic (∑) and random (σ) errors of 2.3 mm and 2.9 mm, respectively; the prostate was outside a threshold of 5 mm (3D vector) for 25.0%±19.8% of treatment time. Real-time tracking reduced prostate motion to ∑=0.01 mm and σ = 0.55 mm in the anterior–posterior direction; the prostate remained within a 1-mm and 5-mm threshold for 93.9%±4.6% and 99.7%±0.4% of the time, respectively. Without real-time tracking, pass rates based on a γ index of 2%/2 mm in film dosimetry ranged between 66% and 72% for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT, on average. Real-time tracking increased pass rates to minimum 98% on average for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT. Conclusions: Real-time couch tracking resulted in submillimeter accuracy for prostate cancer, which transferred into high dosimetric accuracy independently of whether 3D-CRT, IMRT, or VMAT was used.

  2. Radiation therapy for digestive tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piedbois, P.; Levy, E.; Thirion, P.; Martin, L.; Calitchi, E.; Otmezguine, Y.; Le Bourgeois, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    This brief review of radiation therapy of digestive tumors in 1994 seeks to provide practical answers to the most commonly asked questions: What is the place of radiation therapy versus chemotherapy for the treatment of these patients ? What are the approved indications of radiation therapy and which avenues of research are being explored ? Radiation therapy is used in over two-thirds of patients referred to an oncology department for a gastrointestinal tract tumor. The main indications are reviewed: cancer of the rectum and anal canal and, to a lesser extent, cancer of the esophagus and pancreas. The main focuses of current research include radiation therapy-chemotherapy combinations, intraoperative radiation therapy, and radiation therapy of hepatobiliary tumors. (authors). 23 refs., 1 fig

  3. Association Between Geographic Access to Cancer Care and Receipt of Radiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun Chieh; Bruinooge, Suanna S; Kirkwood, M Kelsey; Hershman, Dawn L; Jemal, Ahmedin; Guadagnolo, B Ashleigh; Yu, James B; Hopkins, Shane; Goldstein, Michael; Bajorin, Dean; Giordano, Sharon H; Kosty, Michael; Arnone, Anna; Hanley, Amy; Stevens, Stephanie; Olsen, Christine

    2016-03-15

    Trimodality therapy (chemoradiation and surgery) is the standard of care for stage II/III rectal cancer but nearly one third of patients do not receive radiation therapy (RT). We examined the relationship between the density of radiation oncologists and the travel distance to receipt of RT. A retrospective study based on the National Cancer Data Base identified 26,845 patients aged 18 to 80 years with stage II/III rectal cancer diagnosed from 2007 to 2010. Radiation oncologists were identified through the Physician Compare dataset. Generalized estimating equations clustering by hospital service area was used to examine the association between geographic access and receipt of RT, controlling for patient sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Of the 26,845 patients, 70% received RT within 180 days of diagnosis or within 90 days of surgery. Compared with a travel distance of traveled ≥50 miles had a decreased likelihood of receipt of RT (50-249 miles, adjusted odds ratio 0.75, Ptravel burden was associated with a decreased likelihood of receiving RT for patients with stage II/III rectal cancer, all else being equal; however, radiation oncologist density was not. Further research of geographic access and establishing transportation assistance programs or lodging services for patients with an unmet need might help decrease geographic barriers and improve the quality of rectal cancer care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Survival and failure types after radiation therapy of vulvar cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorbeck, Christina Steen; Vogelius, Ivan Richter; Banner-Voigt, Marie Louise Vorndran Cøln

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose: Describe the survival rates and distribution of events on competing failure types in vulvar carcinoma after treatment with chemoradiation (CRT) or radiation (RT) alone. Material and methods: We included patients with vulvar carcinoma treated with CRT or RT between 2009...

  5. Prospective Study of Local Control and Late Radiation Toxicity After Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Boost for Early Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, David W.; Marvelde, Luc te; Chua, Boon H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To report the local recurrence rate and late toxicity of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) boost to the tumor bed using the Intrabeam System followed by external-beam whole-breast irradiation (WBI) in women with early-stage breast cancer in a prospective single-institution study. Methods and Materials: Women with breast cancer ≤3 cm were recruited between February 2003 and May 2005. After breast-conserving surgery, a single dose of 5 Gy IORT boost was delivered using 50-kV x-rays to a depth of 10 mm from the applicator surface. This was followed by WBI to a total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions. Patients were reviewed at regular, predefined intervals. Late toxicities were recorded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring systems. Results: Fifty-five patients completed both IORT boost and external-beam WBI. Median follow-up was 3.3 years (range, 1.4-4.1 years). There was no reported locoregional recurrence or death. One patient developed distant metastases. Grade 2 and 3 subcutaneous fibrosis was detected in 29 (53%) and 8 patients (15%), respectively. Conclusions: The use of IORT as a tumor bed boost using kV x-rays in breast-conserving therapy was associated with good local control but a clinically significant rate of grade 2 and 3 subcutaneous fibrosis

  6. Radiation therapy of cancer of the oral cavity, pharynx, paranasal sinuses and larynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skolyszewski, J.

    1980-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present the principles of radiation therapy of cancer of the oral cavity, pharynx, paranasal sinuses and larynx, according to the experience of the Institute of Oncology in Krakow. The text was designed primarily for the radiotherapists involved in the treatment of those neoplasms, and may be used as an auxiliary textbook for those preparing for the examination in radiotherapy. (author)

  7. Complications of combined radical hysterectomy-postoperative radiation therapy in women with early stage cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barter, J.F.; Soong, S.J.; Shingleton, H.M.; Hatch, K.D.; Orr, J.W. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Fifty patients with cervical cancer were treated with radical hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy followed by postoperative radiation therapy for high risk factors (nodal metastases, lymphvascular space invasion, close or involved margins) at the University of Alabama at Birmingham Medical Center from 1969 to 1984. Fifteen (30%) of the patients treated had serious complications, 8 (16%) requiring an operation, and 1 (2%) dying as a result of treatment-related problems. This combined modality approach is associated with significant complications

  8. Androgen Induces Adaptation to Oxidative Stress in Prostate Cancer: Implications for Treatment with Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jehonathan H. Pinthus

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is a standard treatment for prostate cancer (PC. The postulated mechanism of action for radiation therapy is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Adjuvant androgen deprivation (AD therapy has been shown to confer a survival advantage over radiation alone in high-risk localized PC. However, the mechanism of this interaction is unclear. We hypothesize that androgens modify the radioresponsiveness of PC through the regulation of cellular oxidative homeostasis. Using androgen receptor (AR+ 22rv1 and AR− PC3 human PC cell lines, we demonstrated that testosterone increased basal reactive oxygen species (bROS levels, resulting in dose-dependent activation of phospho-p38 and pAKT, increased expression of clusterin, catalase, manganese superoxide dismutase. Similar data were obtained in three human PC xenografts; WISH-PC14, WISH-PC23, CWR22, growing in testosterone-supplemented or castrated SCID mice. These effects were reversible through AD or through incubation with a reducing agent. Moreover, testosterone increased the activity of catalase, superoxide dismutases, glutathione reductase. Consequently, AD significantly facilitated the response of AR+ cells to oxidative stress challenge. Thus, testosterone induces a preset cellular adaptation to radiation through the generation of elevated bROS, which is modified by AD. These findings provide a rational for combined hormonal and radiation therapy for localized PC.

  9. Efficacy and toxicity of rectal cancer reirradiation using IMRT for patients who have received prior pelvic radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fady F. Youssef, MS

    2016-04-01

    Conclusions: Rectal cancer reirradiation using IMRT is well-tolerated in the setting of prior pelvic radiation therapy. Given significant risk of local progression, further dose escalation may be warranted for patients with life expectancy exceeding 1 year.

  10. Carbon-Ion Radiation Therapy for Pelvic Recurrence of Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Shigeru, E-mail: s_yamada@nirs.go.jp [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Kamada, Tadashi [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Ebner, Daniel K. [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Brown University Alpert Medical School, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Shinoto, Makoto [Ion Beam Therapy Center, SAGA HIMAT Foundation, Saga (Japan); Terashima, Kotaro [Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Isozaki, Yuka; Yasuda, Shigeo; Makishima, Hirokazu; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Tsujii, Hirohiko [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Isozaki, Tetsuro; Endo, Satoshi [Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Takahashi, Keiichi [Tokyo Metropolitan Cancer and Infectious Disease Center, Komagome, Tokyo (Japan); Sekimoto, Mitsugu [National Hospital Organization Osaka National Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Saito, Norio [National Cancer Center Hospital East, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Matsubara, Hisahiro [Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: Investigation of the treatment potential of carbon-ion radiation therapy in pelvic recurrence of rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A phase 1/2 dose escalation study was performed. One hundred eighty patients (186 lesions) with locally recurrent rectal cancer were treated with carbon-ion radiation therapy (CIRT) (phase 1/2: 37 and 143 patients, respectively). The relapse locations were 71 in the presacral region, 82 in the pelvic sidewalls, 28 in the perineum, and 5 near the colorectal anastomosis. A 16-fraction in 4 weeks dose regimen was used, with total dose ranging from 67.2 to 73.6 Gy(RBE); RBE-weighted absorbed dose: 4.2 to 4.6 Gy(RBE)/fraction. Results: During phase 1, the highest total dose, 73.6 Gy(RBE), resulted in no grade >3 acute reactions in the 13 patients treated at that dose. Dose escalation was halted at this level, and this dose was used for phase 2, with no other grade >3 acute reactions observed. At 5 years, the local control and survival rates at 73.6 Gy(RBE) were 88% (95% confidence interval [CI], 80%-93%) and 59% (95% CI, 50%-68%), respectively. Conclusion: Carbon-ion radiation therapy may be a safe and effective treatment option for locally recurrent rectal cancer and may serve as an alternative to surgery.

  11. Radiation therapy for head and neck cancers a case-based review

    CERN Document Server

    Beyzadeoglu, Murat; Selek, Ugur

    2014-01-01

    This evidence-based guide to the current management of cancer cases at all head and neck sites will assist in the appropriate selection and delineation of tumor volumes/fields for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), including volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Each tumor site-related chapter presents, from the perspective of an academic expert, several actual cases at different stages in order to clarify specific clinical concepts. The coverage includes case presentation, a case-related literature review, patient preparation, simulation, contouring, treatment planning, treatment delivery, and follow-up. The text is accompanied by illustrations ranging from slice-by-slice delineations on planning CT images to finalized plan evaluations based on detailed acceptance criteria. The book will be of value for residents, fellows, practicing radiation oncologists, and medical physicists interested in clinical radiation oncology.

  12. Design of radiation shielding for the proton therapy facility at the National Cancer Center in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. W.; Kwon, J. W.; Lee, J.

    2005-01-01

    The design of radiation shielding was evaluated for a proton therapy facility being established at the National Cancer Center in Korea. The proton beam energy from a 230 MeV cyclotron is varied for therapy using a graphite target. This energy variation process produces high radiation and thus thick shielding walls surround the region. The evaluation was first carried out using analytical expressions at selected locations. Further detailed evaluations have been performed using the Monte Carlo method. Dose equivalent values were calculated to be compared with analytical results. The analytical method generally yielded more conservative values. With consideration of adequate occupancy factors annual dose equivalent rates are kept -1 in all areas. Construction of the building is expected to be completed near the end of 2004 and the installation of therapy equipments will begin a few months later. (authors)

  13. Combined intraarterial cisplatin infusion and radiation therapy for invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizoguchi, Hiroaki; Nomura, Yoshio; Terada, Katsuhiko; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Ogata, Jiro

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-three patients with invasive bladder cancer (T2 in 17, T3 in 6) were treated initially with combined intraarterial cisplatin infusion and radiation therapy. Cisplatin (50 mg) was infused into the internal iliac artery through a subcutaneous reservoir twice a week over three weeks while concurrent radiation therapy with 30 Gy, delivered in 15 fractions, was given. In 23 patients, 6 received additional cisplatin infusion and the other 17 had transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT). Two of the patients undergoing total cystectomy exhibited a complete response (CR). Thus overall response rate was 87% (CR in 13 and partial response in 7). CR was achieved in 53% for T2 patients and 67% for T3 patients. CR was slightly higher in patients with non-papillary cancer than those with papillary one. Toxic reaction included a decrease in bladder capacity in 2 patients and severe diarrhea due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colitis in one. The other toxicities, including nausea, vomiting, neurotoxicity and myelosuppression, were tolerable. All except for one are alive. Seven patients had a local recurrence of bladder cancer. One patient developed invasive bladder cancer reaching the prostatic urethra. One other patient had recurrence at the same site as the previous tumor. Five others had superficial bladder cancer and were managed by TURBT. Bladder function was preserved in 65% at a mean follow-up of 29 months. In conclusion, the combined intraarterial cisplatin infusion and radiation therapy is useful for the initial treatment of invasive bladder cancer. (N.K.)

  14. Primary radiation therapy in the treatment of localized prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joensuu, T.K.; Blomqvist, C.P.; Kajanti, M.J.

    1995-01-01

    Prostatic carcinoma is one of the leading causes of male cancer deaths. However, the routine diagnostic and therapeutic strategies have not yet been established. Although the outcome of surgical and radiotherapeutical approaches has frequently been reported to be comparable, the profile of side effects is different. This could offer the basis for selecting the treatment of choice in individual cases. During the last decade the radiotherapeutical technique has markedly improved, in part due to the achievements in the field of computer assisted tomography planning and conformal technique; the outcome of side-effects has decreased with concurrent increase in the rate of local control. The prescribing, recording and reporting of irradiation have also recently developed, as well as the staging of the disease. Therefore we consider it timely to review progress in this subject and to emphasize the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of localized prostatic cancer. (orig.)

  15. Complication of Intraoperative Radiation Therapy (IORT) in Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myung Se; Kim, Sung Kyu; Song, Sung Kyo; Kim, Hong Jin; Kwan, Koing Bo; Kim, Heung Dae

    1992-01-01

    Local control is the important prognostic factor in cancer treatment because local control decrease the relative risk of metastatic spread and increase distant metastasis free survival. IORT is the modality which could increase local control without increasing complication, combined with curative operation. Even though we could achieve significant decreased local failure by IORT and curative resection, it should not be committed as a main treatment modality without proving acceptable complications. Therapeutic Radiology Department of Yeungnam University Medical Center have tried 58 IORT from June 15, 1988, and performed 53 IORT in patients with gastric cancer. No local failure has been report? by regular follow up so far. Nine cases(17%) of treatment related complication were reported including intestinal obstruction, hemorrhage, sepsis, and bone marrow depression. These complications could be comparable to Jo 25.2% (chemotherapy + operation), Kim 18% (chemotherapy only in inoperable patients), because our treatment regimen is consisted of IORT (1500 cGy), external irradiation(--4500 cGy) and extensive chemotherapy (FAM, 5FU+MMC, BACOP). Our data encouraged us to re-inforce further IORT in stomach cancer treatment

  16. Complication of Intraoperative Radiation Therapy (IORT) in Gastric Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myung Se; Kim, Sung Kyu; Song, Sung Kyo; Kim, Hong Jin; Kwan, Koing Bo; Kim, Heung Dae [Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-12-15

    Local control is the important prognostic factor in cancer treatment because local control decrease the relative risk of metastatic spread and increase distant metastasis free survival. IORT is the modality which could increase local control without increasing complication, combined with curative operation. Even though we could achieve significant decreased local failure by IORT and curative resection, it should not be committed as a main treatment modality without proving acceptable complications. Therapeutic Radiology Department of Yeungnam University Medical Center have tried 58 IORT from June 15, 1988, and performed 53 IORT in patients with gastric cancer. No local failure has been report? by regular follow up so far. Nine cases(17%) of treatment related complication were reported including intestinal obstruction, hemorrhage, sepsis, and bone marrow depression. These complications could be comparable to Jo 25.2% (chemotherapy + operation), Kim 18% (chemotherapy only in inoperable patients), because our treatment regimen is consisted of IORT (1500 cGy), external irradiation(--4500 cGy) and extensive chemotherapy (FAM, 5FU+MMC, BACOP). Our data encouraged us to re-inforce further IORT in stomach cancer treatment.

  17. Four-Week Course of Radiation for Breast Cancer Using Hypofractionated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With an Incorporated Boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedman, Gary M.; Anderson, Penny R.; Goldstein, Lori J.; Ma Changming; Li Jinsheng; Swaby, Ramona F.; Litwin, Samuel; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Morrow, Monica

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Standard radiation for early breast cancer requires daily treatment for 6 to 7 weeks. This is an inconvenience to many women, and for some a barrier for breast conservation. We present the acute toxicity of a 4-week course of hypofractionated radiation. Methods and Materials: A total of 75 patients completed radiation on a Phase II trial approved by the hospital institutional review board. Eligibility criteria were broad to include any patient normally eligible for standard radiation: age ≥18 years, invasive or in situ cancer, American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage 0 to II, breast-conserving surgery, and any systemic therapy not given concurrently. The median age was 52 years (range, 31-81 years). Of the patients, 15% had ductal carcinoma in situ, 67% T1, and 19% T2; 71% were N0, 17% N1, and 12% NX. Chemotherapy was given before radiation in 44%. Using photon intensity-modulated radiation therapy and incorporated electron beam boost, the whole breast received 45 Gy and the lumpectomy bed 56 Gy in 20 treatments over 4 weeks. Results: The maximum acute skin toxicity by the end of treatment was Grade 0 in 9 patients (12%), Grade 1 in 49 (65%) and Grade 2 in 17 (23%). There was no Grade 3 or higher skin toxicity. After radiation, all Grade 2 toxicity had resolved by 6 weeks. Hematologic toxicity was Grade 0 in most patients except for Grade 1 neutropenia in 2 patients, and Grade 1 anemia in 11 patients. There were no significant differences in baseline vs. 6-week posttreatment patient-reported or physician-reported cosmetic scores. Conclusions: This 4-week course of postoperative radiation using intensity-modulated radiation therapy is feasible and is associated with acceptable acute skin toxicity and quality of life. Long-term follow-up data are needed. This radiation schedule may represent an alternative both to longer 6-week to 7-week standard whole-breast radiation and more radically shortened 1-week, partial-breast treatment schedules

  18. Relationship between social support and the nutritional status of patients receiving radiation therapy for cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulliam, L.W.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive, correlational study was to ascertain if there is a relationship between social support and the nutritional status of patients receiving radiation therapy for cancer. The data collection instruments used included the Norbeck Social Support Questionnaire (NSSQ), the Personal Characteristics Form, the abbreviated Health History, the Flow Sheet for Nutritional Data, and the Interview Schedule. For the analysis of data descriptive statistics were utilized to provide a profile of subjects, and correlational statistics were used to ascertain if there were relationships among the indicators of nutritional status and the social support variables. A convenience sample was comprised of 50 cancer patients deemed curable by radiation therapy. Findings included significant decreases in anthropometric measurements and biochemical tests during therapy. Serial assessments of nutritional status, therefore, are recommended for all cancer patients during therapy in order to plan and implement strategies for meeting the self-care requisites for food and water. No statistically significant relationships were found between the social support variables as measured by the NSSQ and the indicators of nutritional status. This suggests that nurses can assist patients by fostering support from actual and potential nutritional confidants

  19. Changes in the Submandibular Gland in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer After Radiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uchiyama, Y.; Kreiborg, Sven; Murakami, Shumei

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to assess the impairment of the submandibular gland, in terms of changes in volume by computed tomography (CT) and CT value, which was the mean pixel value at a region of interest, in a group of patients with head and neck cancer treated with radiation therapy (RT......). Patients and Methods: Eleven patients treated with RT, where the effective radiation dose to the submandibular gland was known, were included in the study. CT scanning was performed both before and after RT. The average follow-up period after RT was 555 days (range=107-1231 days). Results: The mean volume...

  20. Combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy in limited disease small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Moon Kyung; Ahn, Yong Chan; Park, Keun Chil; Lim Do Hoon; Huh, Seung Jae; Kim, Dae Yong; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Kyu Chan; Kwon, O Jung [College of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-01

    This is a retrospective study to evaluate the response rate, acute toxicity, and survival rate of a combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy in limited disease small cell lung cancer. Forty six patients with limited disease small-cell lung cancer who underwent combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy between October 1994 and April 1998 were evaluated. Six cycles of chemotherapy were planned either using a VIP regimen (etoposide, ifosfamide, and cis-platin) or a EP regimen (etoposide and cis-platin). Thoracic radiation therapy was planned to deliver 44 Gy using 10MV X-ray, starting concurrently with chemotherapy. Response was evaluated 4 weeks after the completion of the planned chemotherapy and radiation therapy, and the prophylactic cranial irradiation was planned only for the patients with complete responses. Acute toxicity was evaluated using the SWOG toxicity criteria, and the overall survival and disease-free survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier Method. The median follow-up period was 16 months (range:2 to 41 months). Complete response was achieved in 30 (65%) patients, of which 22 patients received prophylactic cranial irradiations. Acute toxicities over grade III were granulocytopenia in 23 (50%), anemia in 17 (37%), thrombo-cytopenia in nine (20%), alopecia in nine (20%), nausea/vomiting in five (11%), and peripheral neuropathy in one (2%). Chemotherapy was delayed in one patient, and the chemotherapy doses were reduced in 58 (24%) out of the total 246 cycles. No radiation esophagitis over grade III was observed, while interruption during radiation therapy for a mean of 8.3 days occurred in 21 patients. The local recurrences were observed in 8 patients and local progressions were in 6 patients, and the distant metastases in 17 patients. Among these, four patients had both the local relapse and the distant metastasis. Brain was the most common metastatic site (10 patients), followed by the liver as the next common site (4 patients). The

  1. Combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy in limited disease small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Moon Kyung; Ahn, Yong Chan; Park, Keun Chil; Lim Do Hoon; Huh, Seung Jae; Kim, Dae Yong; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Kyu Chan; Kwon, O Jung

    1999-01-01

    This is a retrospective study to evaluate the response rate, acute toxicity, and survival rate of a combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy in limited disease small cell lung cancer. Forty six patients with limited disease small-cell lung cancer who underwent combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy between October 1994 and April 1998 were evaluated. Six cycles of chemotherapy were planned either using a VIP regimen (etoposide, ifosfamide, and cis-platin) or a EP regimen (etoposide and cis-platin). Thoracic radiation therapy was planned to deliver 44 Gy using 10MV X-ray, starting concurrently with chemotherapy. Response was evaluated 4 weeks after the completion of the planned chemotherapy and radiation therapy, and the prophylactic cranial irradiation was planned only for the patients with complete responses. Acute toxicity was evaluated using the SWOG toxicity criteria, and the overall survival and disease-free survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier Method. The median follow-up period was 16 months (range:2 to 41 months). Complete response was achieved in 30 (65%) patients, of which 22 patients received prophylactic cranial irradiations. Acute toxicities over grade III were granulocytopenia in 23 (50%), anemia in 17 (37%), thrombo-cytopenia in nine (20%), alopecia in nine (20%), nausea/vomiting in five (11%), and peripheral neuropathy in one (2%). Chemotherapy was delayed in one patient, and the chemotherapy doses were reduced in 58 (24%) out of the total 246 cycles. No radiation esophagitis over grade III was observed, while interruption during radiation therapy for a mean of 8.3 days occurred in 21 patients. The local recurrences were observed in 8 patients and local progressions were in 6 patients, and the distant metastases in 17 patients. Among these, four patients had both the local relapse and the distant metastasis. Brain was the most common metastatic site (10 patients), followed by the liver as the next common site (4 patients). The

  2. 3D conformal radiation therapy and hormonal therapy for localized prostate cancer: Is age a limiting factor?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, A.; Negrea, T.; Lechevallier, E.; Coulange, C.; Murraciole, X.; Jouvea, E.; Sambuca, R.; Cowen, D.

    2011-01-01

    No study on side effects had showed that conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer is more harmful in patients older than 70 years to patients younger. The aim of this study was to evaluate acute and late toxicities of conformal radiotherapy, with high dose for localized prostate cancer in patients older than 70 years and compared to patients younger than 70 years. Between 1996 and 2009, 104 patients were treated with radiation therapy and hormonal therapy for localized cancer prostate. Median follow-up was 105 months (9 300). Acute (occurred at ≤ three months) and late side effects of 55 patients older than 70 years (median age: 75 [71 92]) were graded according to the CTCAE 3.0 criteria and compared to the younger population. Median dose to the prostate was 75.6 Gy (67 80) in both groups. There were no significant differences in acute and late side effects between age groups. For patients above 70 years, the incidence of grade II or higher acute and late side effects were respectively 27 and 22% for urologic symptoms and 13 and 16% for rectal symptoms. The frequency of grade III late symptoms was low and ranged between 0 and 6% for the evaluated symptoms, irrespective of age group. Older patients had a better biochemical recurrence-free survival than younger patients (86 versus 77% at four years, P ≡ ns). High dose 3D conformal radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer was well tolerated in patients older than 70 years. Age is not a limiting factor for conformal radiation therapy and hormonotherapy for older patients. (authors)

  3. Laser-radiation therapy for T2N0M0 laryngeal-glottic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Gen; Hayabuchi, Naofumi; Toda, Yukihiro; Suefuji, Hiroaki; Ogo, Etuyo; Nakajima, Tadashi [Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the laser-radiation combined therapy for T2N0M0 laryngeal-glottic cancer in order to preserve the larynx. The subjects consisted of 52 patients with T2N0M0 laryngeal-glottic cancer treated with laser-radiation combined therapy between 1980 and 1999. Patients ranged in age from 40-88 years, with a median of 70 years, and included 51 men and one woman. During this period, treatment was administered with different radiation devices ({sup 60}Co or 4 MV-X ray), and 40-72 Gy (median, 60Gy) of radiation therapy were administered. Tumor and treatment characteristics were correlated with local control at a median follow-up of 61 months (range 12-210 months). Concurrent chemotherapy was administered to 32 patients; 29 were treated with 5-FU and vitamin A (FAR), and 3 were treated with low-dose CDDP. Post treatment vocal function was examined in 37 patients. The voice was evaluated in terms of four parameters: maximum phonation time (MPT), mean air flow rate during phonation over a comfortable duration (MFR), fundamental frequency range of phonation (F0 range), and sound pressure level range of phonation (SPL range). The five-year cause-specific-survival rate was 98.0%, and the local control rate was 91.8%. Three of 4 patients who had locally relapsed were administered total laryngectomy as salvage therapy. One patient was administered the tracheostomy for late complication. The actuarial laryngeal preservation rate was 92.3%. We did not find any significant relationship between local relapse and extent of disease, subglottic extension, or anterior commissure involvement. Concurrent chemotherapy was not a significant prognostic factor. Laser debulking followed by radiation therapy did not change the voice significantly except the F0 range. We conclude that the laser-radiation combined therapy for T2N0M0 laryngeal-glottic cancer was effective therapy for not only preservation of the voice but also for vocal function. (author)

  4. Laser-radiation therapy for T2N0M0 laryngeal-glottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Gen; Hayabuchi, Naofumi; Toda, Yukihiro; Suefuji, Hiroaki; Ogo, Etuyo; Nakajima, Tadashi

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the laser-radiation combined therapy for T2N0M0 laryngeal-glottic cancer in order to preserve the larynx. The subjects consisted of 52 patients with T2N0M0 laryngeal-glottic cancer treated with laser-radiation combined therapy between 1980 and 1999. Patients ranged in age from 40-88 years, with a median of 70 years, and included 51 men and one woman. During this period, treatment was administered with different radiation devices ( 60 Co or 4 MV-X ray), and 40-72 Gy (median, 60Gy) of radiation therapy were administered. Tumor and treatment characteristics were correlated with local control at a median follow-up of 61 months (range 12-210 months). Concurrent chemotherapy was administered to 32 patients; 29 were treated with 5-FU and vitamin A (FAR), and 3 were treated with low-dose CDDP. Post treatment vocal function was examined in 37 patients. The voice was evaluated in terms of four parameters: maximum phonation time (MPT), mean air flow rate during phonation over a comfortable duration (MFR), fundamental frequency range of phonation (F0 range), and sound pressure level range of phonation (SPL range). The five-year cause-specific-survival rate was 98.0%, and the local control rate was 91.8%. Three of 4 patients who had locally relapsed were administered total laryngectomy as salvage therapy. One patient was administered the tracheostomy for late complication. The actuarial laryngeal preservation rate was 92.3%. We did not find any significant relationship between local relapse and extent of disease, subglottic extension, or anterior commissure involvement. Concurrent chemotherapy was not a significant prognostic factor. Laser debulking followed by radiation therapy did not change the voice significantly except the F0 range. We conclude that the laser-radiation combined therapy for T2N0M0 laryngeal-glottic cancer was effective therapy for not only preservation of the voice but also for vocal function. (author)

  5. Risk Factors for Pelvic Insufficiency Fractures in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Following Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramlov, Anne; Pedersen, Erik Morre; Røhl, Lisbeth

    2017-01-01

    and underwent external beam radiation therapy with 45 Gy in 25 fractions (node-negative patients) or 50 Gy in 25 fractions with a simultaneous integrated boost of 60 Gy in 30 fractions (node-positive patients). Pulsed dose rate magnetic resonance imaging guided adaptive brachytherapy was given in addition......PURPOSE: To investigate the incidence of and risk factors for pelvic insufficiency fracture (PIF) after definitive chemoradiation therapy for locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC). METHODS AND MATERIALS: We analyzed 101 patients with LACC treated from 2008-2014. Patients received weekly cisplatin...

  6. The potential of proton beam radiation therapy in lung cancer (including mesothelioma)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjelkengren, Goeran [Univ. Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology; Glimelius, Bengt [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology and Pathology; Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology

    2005-12-01

    A Swedish group of oncologists and hospital physicists have estimated the number of patients in Sweden suitable for proton beam therapy. The estimations have been based on current statistics of tumour incidence, number of patients potentially eligible for radiation treatment, scientific support from clinical trials and model dose planning studies and knowledge of the dose-response relations of different tumours and normal tissues. It is estimated that about 350 patients with lung cancer and about 20 patients with mesothelioma annually may benefit from proton beam therapy.

  7. Elective Clinical Target Volumes for Conformal Therapy in Anorectal Cancer: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Contouring Atlas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myerson, Robert J.; Garofalo, Michael C.; El Naqa, Issam; Abrams, Ross A.; Apte, Aditya; Bosch, Walter R.; Das, Prajnan; Gunderson, Leonard L.; Hong, Theodore S.; Kim, J.J. John; Willett, Christopher G.; Kachnic, Lisa A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) atlas of the elective clinical target volume (CTV) definitions to be used for planning pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for anal and rectal cancers. Methods and Materials: The Gastrointestinal Committee of the RTOG established a task group (the nine physician co-authors) to develop this atlas. They responded to a questionnaire concerning three elective CTVs (CTVA: internal iliac, presacral, and perirectal nodal regions for both anal and rectal case planning; CTVB: external iliac nodal region for anal case planning and for selected rectal cases; CTVC: inguinal nodal region for anal case planning and for select rectal cases), and to outline these areas on individual computed tomographic images. The imaging files were shared via the Advanced Technology Consortium. A program developed by one of the co-authors (I.E.N.) used binomial maximum-likelihood estimates to generate a 95% group consensus contour. The computer-estimated consensus contours were then reviewed by the group and modified to provide a final contouring consensus atlas. Results: The panel achieved consensus CTV definitions to be used as guidelines for the adjuvant therapy of rectal cancer and definitive therapy for anal cancer. The most important difference from similar atlases for gynecologic or genitourinary cancer is mesorectal coverage. Detailed target volume contouring guidelines and images are discussed. Conclusion: This report serves as a template for the definition of the elective CTVs to be used in IMRT planning for anal and rectal cancers, as part of prospective RTOG trials.

  8. Postoperative Radiation Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Thymic Malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Daniel R.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2012-01-01

    For many thoracic malignancies, surgery, when feasible, is the preferred upfront modality for local control. However, adjuvant radiation plays an important role in minimizing the risk of locoregional recurrence. Tumors in the thoracic category include certain subgroups of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as well as thymic malignancies. The indications, radiation doses, and treatment fields vary amongst subtypes of thoracic tumors, as does the level of data supporting the use of radiation. For example, in the setting of NSCLC, postoperative radiation is typically reserved for close/positive margins or N2/N3 disease, although such diseases as superior sulcus tumors present unique cases in which the role of neoadjuvant vs. adjuvant treatment is still being elucidated. In contrast, for thymic malignancies, postoperative radiation therapy is often used for initially resected Masaoka stage III or higher disease, with its use for stage II disease remaining controversial. This review provides an overview of postoperative radiation therapy for thoracic tumors, with a separate focus on superior sulcus tumors and thymoma, including a discussion of acceptable radiation approaches and an assessment of the current controversies involved in its use

  9. Adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy following simple hysterectomy and radical hysterectomy in stage IB cancer of the cervix: Analysis of risk factors and patterns of failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, R.Y.; Weppelmann, B.; Sanford, S.P.; Salter, M.M.; Brascho, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    Between 1969 and 1980, 242 cases of stage IB cancer of the cervix were referred to the department of radiation oncology for curative radiation therapy. In 186 cases treatment was with radiation therapy alone. In 56 cases treatment included adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy; a minimum follow-up of 5 years has been carried out in this group. In 17 cases radiation therapy followed a simple hysterectomy for an unexpected stage IB cancer of the cervix. In 39 cases radiation therapy was given after a radical hysterectomy for stage IB cancer of the cervix because of positive margins and/or positive pelvic lymph nodes

  10. Radiation binary targeted therapy for HER-2 positive breast cancers: assumptions, theoretical assessment and future directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mundy, Daniel W [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47909 (United States); Harb, Wael [Horizon Oncology, The Care Group, Unity Medical Center, Lafayette, IN 47901 (United States); Jevremovic, Tatjana [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47909 (United States)

    2006-03-21

    A novel radiation targeted therapy is investigated for HER-2 positive breast cancers. The proposed concept combines two known approaches, but never used together for the treatment of advanced, relapsed or metastasized HER-2 positive breast cancers. The proposed radiation binary targeted concept is based on the anti HER-2 monoclonal antibodies (MABs) that would be used as vehicles to transport the nontoxic agent to cancer cells. The anti HER-2 MABs have been successful in targeting HER-2 positive breast cancers with high affinity. The proposed concept would utilize a neutral nontoxic boron-10 predicting that anti HER-2 MABs would assure its selective delivery to cancer cells. MABs against HER-2 have been a widely researched strategy in the clinical setting. The most promising antibody is Trastuzumab (Herceptin (registered) ). Targeting HER-2 with the MAB Trastuzumab has been proven to be a successful strategy in inducing tumour regression and improving patient survival. Unfortunately, these tumours become resistant and afflicted women succumb to breast cancer. In the proposed concept, when the tumour region is loaded with boron-10 it is irradiated with neutrons (treatment used for head and neck cancers, melanoma and glioblastoma for over 40 years in Japan and Europe). The irradiation process takes less than an hour producing minimal side effects. This paper summarizes our recent theoretical assessments of radiation binary targeted therapy for HER-2 positive breast cancers on: the effective drug delivery mechanism, the numerical model to evaluate the targeted radiation delivery and the survey study to find the neutron facility in the world that might be capable of producing the radiation effect as needed. A novel method of drug delivery utilizing Trastuzumab is described, followed by the description of a computational Monte Carlo based breast model used to determine radiation dose distributions. The total flux and neutron energy spectra of five currently available

  11. Historical Trends in the Use of Radiation Therapy for Pediatric Cancers: 1973-2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jairam, Vikram; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Yu, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to assess historical trends in the use of radiation therapy (RT) for pediatric cancers over the past 4 decades. Methods: The National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database of the 9 original tumor registries (SEER-9) was queried to identify patients aged 0 to 19 years with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, bone and joint cancer, cancer of the brain and nervous system, Hodgkin lymphoma, neuroblastoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, soft tissue cancer, Wilms tumor, or retinoblastoma from 1973 to 2008. Patients were grouped into 4-year time epochs. The number and percentage of patients who received RT as part of their initial treatment were calculated per epoch by each diagnosis group from 1973 to 2008. Results: RT use for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and retinoblastoma declined sharply from 57%, 57%, and 30% in 1973 to 1976 to 11%, 15%, and 2%, respectively, in 2005 to 2008. Similarly, smaller declines in RT use were also seen in brain cancer (70%-39%), bone cancer (41%-21%), Wilms tumor (75%-53%), and neuroblastoma (60%-25%). RT use curves for Wilms tumor and neuroblastoma were nonlinear with nadirs in 1993 to 1996 at 39% and 19%, respectively. There were minimal changes in RT use for Hodgkin lymphoma, soft tissue cancer, or acute myeloid leukemia, roughly stable at 72%, 40%, and 11%, respectively. Almost all patients treated with RT were given external beam RT exclusively. However, from 1985 to 2008, treatments involving brachytherapy, radioisotopes, or combination therapy increased in frequency, comprising 1.8%, 4.6%, and 11.9% of RT treatments in brain cancer, soft tissue cancer, and retinoblastoma, respectively. Conclusions: The use of RT is declining over time in 7 of 10 pediatric cancer categories. A limitation of this study is a potential under-ascertainment of RT use in the SEER-9 database including the delayed use of RT

  12. Historical Trends in the Use of Radiation Therapy for Pediatric Cancers: 1973-2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jairam, Vikram [Yale School of Medicine, Department of Therapeutic Radiology, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Roberts, Kenneth B. [Yale School of Medicine, Department of Therapeutic Radiology, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center at Yale, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Yu, James B., E-mail: james.b.yu@yale.edu [Yale School of Medicine, Department of Therapeutic Radiology, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center at Yale, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to assess historical trends in the use of radiation therapy (RT) for pediatric cancers over the past 4 decades. Methods: The National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database of the 9 original tumor registries (SEER-9) was queried to identify patients aged 0 to 19 years with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, bone and joint cancer, cancer of the brain and nervous system, Hodgkin lymphoma, neuroblastoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, soft tissue cancer, Wilms tumor, or retinoblastoma from 1973 to 2008. Patients were grouped into 4-year time epochs. The number and percentage of patients who received RT as part of their initial treatment were calculated per epoch by each diagnosis group from 1973 to 2008. Results: RT use for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and retinoblastoma declined sharply from 57%, 57%, and 30% in 1973 to 1976 to 11%, 15%, and 2%, respectively, in 2005 to 2008. Similarly, smaller declines in RT use were also seen in brain cancer (70%-39%), bone cancer (41%-21%), Wilms tumor (75%-53%), and neuroblastoma (60%-25%). RT use curves for Wilms tumor and neuroblastoma were nonlinear with nadirs in 1993 to 1996 at 39% and 19%, respectively. There were minimal changes in RT use for Hodgkin lymphoma, soft tissue cancer, or acute myeloid leukemia, roughly stable at 72%, 40%, and 11%, respectively. Almost all patients treated with RT were given external beam RT exclusively. However, from 1985 to 2008, treatments involving brachytherapy, radioisotopes, or combination therapy increased in frequency, comprising 1.8%, 4.6%, and 11.9% of RT treatments in brain cancer, soft tissue cancer, and retinoblastoma, respectively. Conclusions: The use of RT is declining over time in 7 of 10 pediatric cancer categories. A limitation of this study is a potential under-ascertainment of RT use in the SEER-9 database including the delayed use of RT.

  13. Historical trends in the use of radiation therapy for pediatric cancers: 1973-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jairam, Vikram; Roberts, Kenneth B; Yu, James B

    2013-03-01

    This study was undertaken to assess historical trends in the use of radiation therapy (RT) for pediatric cancers over the past 4 decades. The National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database of the 9 original tumor registries (SEER-9) was queried to identify patients aged 0 to 19 years with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, bone and joint cancer, cancer of the brain and nervous system, Hodgkin lymphoma, neuroblastoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, soft tissue cancer, Wilms tumor, or retinoblastoma from 1973 to 2008. Patients were grouped into 4-year time epochs. The number and percentage of patients who received RT as part of their initial treatment were calculated per epoch by each diagnosis group from 1973 to 2008. RT use for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and retinoblastoma declined sharply from 57%, 57%, and 30% in 1973 to 1976 to 11%, 15%, and 2%, respectively, in 2005 to 2008. Similarly, smaller declines in RT use were also seen in brain cancer (70%-39%), bone cancer (41%-21%), Wilms tumor (75%-53%), and neuroblastoma (60%-25%). RT use curves for Wilms tumor and neuroblastoma were nonlinear with nadirs in 1993 to 1996 at 39% and 19%, respectively. There were minimal changes in RT use for Hodgkin lymphoma, soft tissue cancer, or acute myeloid leukemia, roughly stable at 72%, 40%, and 11%, respectively. Almost all patients treated with RT were given external beam RT exclusively. However, from 1985 to 2008, treatments involving brachytherapy, radioisotopes, or combination therapy increased in frequency, comprising 1.8%, 4.6%, and 11.9% of RT treatments in brain cancer, soft tissue cancer, and retinoblastoma, respectively. The use of RT is declining over time in 7 of 10 pediatric cancer categories. A limitation of this study is a potential under-ascertainment of RT use in the SEER-9 database including the delayed use of RT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Assessing Adverse Events of Postprostatectomy Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Evaluation of Outcomes in the Regione Emilia-Romagna, Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Showalter, Timothy N.; Hegarty, Sarah E.; Rabinowitz, Carol; Maio, Vittorio; Hyslop, Terry; Dicker, Adam P.; Louis, Daniel Z.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Although the likelihood of radiation-related adverse events influences treatment decisions regarding radiation therapy after prostatectomy for eligible patients, the data available to inform decisions are limited. This study was designed to evaluate the genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and sexual adverse events associated with postprostatectomy radiation therapy and to assess the influence of radiation timing on the risk of adverse events. Methods: The Regione Emilia-Romagna Italian Longitudinal Health Care Utilization Database was queried to identify a cohort of men who received radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer during 2003 to 2009, including patients who received postprostatectomy radiation therapy. Patients with prior radiation therapy were excluded. Outcome measures were genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and sexual adverse events after prostatectomy. Rates of adverse events were compared between the cohorts who did and did not receive postoperative radiation therapy. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were developed for each class of adverse events, including models with radiation therapy as a time-varying covariate. Results: A total of 9876 men were included in the analyses: 2176 (22%) who received radiation therapy and 7700 (78%) treated with prostatectomy alone. In multivariable Cox proportional hazards models, the additional exposure to radiation therapy after prostatectomy was associated with increased rates of gastrointestinal (rate ratio [RR] 1.81; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.44-2.27; P<.001) and urinary nonincontinence events (RR 1.83; 95% CI 1.83-2.80; P<.001) but not urinary incontinence events or erectile dysfunction. The addition of the time from prostatectomy to radiation therapy interaction term was not significant for any of the adverse event outcomes (P>.1 for all outcomes). Conclusion: Radiation therapy after prostatectomy is associated with an increase in gastrointestinal and genitourinary adverse events. However

  15. Assessing Adverse Events of Postprostatectomy Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Evaluation of Outcomes in the Regione Emilia-Romagna, Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Showalter, Timothy N., E-mail: tns3b@virginia.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Hegarty, Sarah E. [Center for Research in Medical Education and Health Care, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Division of Biostatistics, Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Rabinowitz, Carol [Center for Research in Medical Education and Health Care, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Maio, Vittorio [Jefferson School of Population Health, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Hyslop, Terry [Department of Biostatistics & Bioinformatics, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center & Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Louis, Daniel Z. [Center for Research in Medical Education and Health Care, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Although the likelihood of radiation-related adverse events influences treatment decisions regarding radiation therapy after prostatectomy for eligible patients, the data available to inform decisions are limited. This study was designed to evaluate the genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and sexual adverse events associated with postprostatectomy radiation therapy and to assess the influence of radiation timing on the risk of adverse events. Methods: The Regione Emilia-Romagna Italian Longitudinal Health Care Utilization Database was queried to identify a cohort of men who received radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer during 2003 to 2009, including patients who received postprostatectomy radiation therapy. Patients with prior radiation therapy were excluded. Outcome measures were genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and sexual adverse events after prostatectomy. Rates of adverse events were compared between the cohorts who did and did not receive postoperative radiation therapy. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were developed for each class of adverse events, including models with radiation therapy as a time-varying covariate. Results: A total of 9876 men were included in the analyses: 2176 (22%) who received radiation therapy and 7700 (78%) treated with prostatectomy alone. In multivariable Cox proportional hazards models, the additional exposure to radiation therapy after prostatectomy was associated with increased rates of gastrointestinal (rate ratio [RR] 1.81; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.44-2.27; P<.001) and urinary nonincontinence events (RR 1.83; 95% CI 1.83-2.80; P<.001) but not urinary incontinence events or erectile dysfunction. The addition of the time from prostatectomy to radiation therapy interaction term was not significant for any of the adverse event outcomes (P>.1 for all outcomes). Conclusion: Radiation therapy after prostatectomy is associated with an increase in gastrointestinal and genitourinary adverse events. However

  16. Definitive radiation therapy for selected cancers of the rectum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sischy, B.; Hinson, E.J.; Wilkinson, D.R.

    1988-09-01

    During the last 15 years, over 400 patients with adenocarcinoma of the rectum have undergone a course of endocavitary irradiation for cure or palliation of Dukes' A and B disease. This treatment method makes use of an unconventional fractionation scheme, by which the tumour receives 10000-12000 cGy in approximately four fractions over a period of about 60 days. The treatments are separated by an interval of 2 or 3 weeks. This method of definitive irradiation allows suitable patients to avoid abdominoperineal resection and its drawbacks. Hospitalization is avoided and the patients maintain a normal daily life. Approximately 15-20% of all rectal cancer patients may be expected to fulfil the criteria for selection, which are sufficiently strict that the local control (95%) and 5-year survival rates (94%) can exceed those of surgery for comparable disease.

  17. Radiation therapy in the management of patients with breast cancer: why, where, and when

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webber, B.M.; Giicksman, A.S.

    1974-01-01

    The applications of radiaition therapy in the management of all stages of breast cancer has been reviewed. It is obvious that, as the disease progresses through its spectrum from early subclinical cancer to far-advanced incurable disease, the uses of radiation vary. In the very early case irradiation is a valuable primary therapeutic method and when properly administered, offers the probability of long-term local control which is equivalent to that offered by radical surgery. It is advised that radiation treatment be reserved for those who ultimately manifest evidences of local tumor recurrence on the chest wall or in the regional node-bearing areas. When such manifestations occur, intensive radiation to the appropriate areas is indicated and has a high probability of eradicating the local tumor. In patients in whom the disease is moderately advanced so that they are essentially inoperable by reasonable standards, radiation therapy can play an important role in preparing the local field for surgical intervention. A combination of preoperative irradiation and mastectomy in these patients offers the highest probability of permanent local control of tumor. It is postulated that the addition of prolonged chemotherapeutic management in such patients may be of value in reducing the tumor burden within the inevitable metastatic deposits which are present. Whether or not treatment of this sort can completely eliminate these metastases remains to be seen. In the patient with far-advanced metastatic disease, radiation therapy is a valuable local method of palliation, offering an excellent therapy controlling symptoms in such areas as the eye and the central nervous system. Tumor which recurs on the chest wall following prior treatment with supervoltage irradiation can often be well managed by re-irradiation with the electron beam. (U.S.)

  18. Reverse-Contrast Imaging and Targeted Radiation Therapy of Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorek, Daniel L.J., E-mail: dthorek1@jhmi.edu [Division of Nuclear Medicine, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Kramer, Robin M. [Tri-Institutional Training Program in Laboratory Animal Medicine and Science, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), Weill Cornell Medical College, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY (United States); Chen, Qing; Jeong, Jeho; Lupu, Mihaela E. [Department of Medical Physics, MSKCC, New York, NY (United States); Lee, Alycia M.; Moynahan, Mary E.; Lowery, Maeve [Department of Medicine, MSKCC, New York, NY (United States); Ulmert, David [Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry Program, MSKCC, New York, NY (United States); Department of Surgery (Urology), Skåne University Hospital, Malmö (Sweden); Zanzonico, Pat; Deasy, Joseph O.; Humm, John L. [Department of Medical Physics, MSKCC, New York, NY (United States); Russell, James, E-mail: russellj@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, MSKCC, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of delivering experimental radiation therapy to tumors in the mouse pancreas. Imaging and treatment were performed using combined CT (computed tomography)/orthovoltage treatment with a rotating gantry. Methods and Materials: After intraperitoneal administration of radiopaque iodinated contrast, abdominal organ delineation was performed by x-ray CT. With this technique we delineated the pancreas and both orthotopic xenografts and genetically engineered disease. Computed tomographic imaging was validated by comparison with magnetic resonance imaging. Therapeutic radiation was delivered via a 1-cm diameter field. Selective x-ray radiation therapy of the noninvasively defined orthotopic mass was confirmed using γH2AX staining. Mice could tolerate a dose of 15 Gy when the field was centered on the pancreas tail, and treatment was delivered as a continuous 360° arc. This strategy was then used for radiation therapy planning for selective delivery of therapeutic x-ray radiation therapy to orthotopic tumors. Results: Tumor growth delay after 15 Gy was monitored, using CT and ultrasound to determine the tumor volume at various times after treatment. Our strategy enables the use of clinical radiation oncology approaches to treat experimental tumors in the pancreas of small animals for the first time. We demonstrate that delivery of 15 Gy from a rotating gantry minimizes background healthy tissue damage and significantly retards tumor growth. Conclusions: This advance permits evaluation of radiation planning and dosing parameters. Accurate noninvasive longitudinal imaging and monitoring of tumor progression and therapeutic response in preclinical models is now possible and can be expected to more effectively evaluate pancreatic cancer disease and therapeutic response.

  19. Reverse-Contrast Imaging and Targeted Radiation Therapy of Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorek, Daniel L.J.; Kramer, Robin M.; Chen, Qing; Jeong, Jeho; Lupu, Mihaela E.; Lee, Alycia M.; Moynahan, Mary E.; Lowery, Maeve; Ulmert, David; Zanzonico, Pat; Deasy, Joseph O.; Humm, John L.; Russell, James

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of delivering experimental radiation therapy to tumors in the mouse pancreas. Imaging and treatment were performed using combined CT (computed tomography)/orthovoltage treatment with a rotating gantry. Methods and Materials: After intraperitoneal administration of radiopaque iodinated contrast, abdominal organ delineation was performed by x-ray CT. With this technique we delineated the pancreas and both orthotopic xenografts and genetically engineered disease. Computed tomographic imaging was validated by comparison with magnetic resonance imaging. Therapeutic radiation was delivered via a 1-cm diameter field. Selective x-ray radiation therapy of the noninvasively defined orthotopic mass was confirmed using γH2AX staining. Mice could tolerate a dose of 15 Gy when the field was centered on the pancreas tail, and treatment was delivered as a continuous 360° arc. This strategy was then used for radiation therapy planning for selective delivery of therapeutic x-ray radiation therapy to orthotopic tumors. Results: Tumor growth delay after 15 Gy was monitored, using CT and ultrasound to determine the tumor volume at various times after treatment. Our strategy enables the use of clinical radiation oncology approaches to treat experimental tumors in the pancreas of small animals for the first time. We demonstrate that delivery of 15 Gy from a rotating gantry minimizes background healthy tissue damage and significantly retards tumor growth. Conclusions: This advance permits evaluation of radiation planning and dosing parameters. Accurate noninvasive longitudinal imaging and monitoring of tumor progression and therapeutic response in preclinical models is now possible and can be expected to more effectively evaluate pancreatic cancer disease and therapeutic response

  20. Postoperative Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Comparison of Conventional Versus Hypofractionated Radiation Regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandberg, Daniel J; Oyekunle, Taofik; Lee, W Robert; Wu, Yuan; Salama, Joseph K; Koontz, Bridget F

    2018-06-01

    To compare acute/late toxicity and biochemical control in contemporaneous prostate cancer patient cohorts treated with hypofractionated postprostatectomy radiation therapy (hypoPORT) or conventional PORT (coPORT). Consecutive patients treated with intensity modulated hypoPORT (2.5 Gy per fraction, median cumulative dose 65 Gy [range, 57.5-70 Gy]) or coPORT (1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction, median cumulative dose 66 Gy [range, 60-74 Gy]) between 2005 and 2016 at 2 institutions constituted the study cohort. Acute toxicity and cumulative late grade 2 and ≥3 genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity incidences were calculated for all patients using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared between cohorts. Biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS) was calculated in patients with ≥12 months' follow-up. Median follow-up for all 461 patients was 38.6 months. Of the 461 patients, 167 (36%) received hypoPORT, and 294 (64%) patients received coPORT. The hypoPORT cohort had significantly worse baseline urinary incontinence. Acute grade ≥2 GU toxicity was more common after hypoPORT (22% vs 8%) (P = .0001). Late grade ≥3 GU toxicity cumulative incidence at 6 years was 11% (hypoPORT) and 4% (coPORT) (P = .0081). However, hypoPORT was not associated with late grade ≥2 GU toxicity on multivariate analysis (hazard ratio 1.39, 95% confidence interval 0.86-2.34) (P = .18). There was no difference in acute or late GI toxicity. In the subset of patients with ≥12 month's follow-up (n = 364, median follow-up 52 months), 4-year bPFS was 78% (95% CI 69.4-85.0) after hypoPORT (P = .0038) and 65% (95% CI 57.6-71.1) after coPORT. HypoPORT was not significant for bPFS on multivariate analysis (hazard ratio 0.64, 95% CI 0.41-1.02, P = .059). HypoPORT shows promising early biochemical control. After controlling for baseline urinary function, hypoPORT was not associated with greater GU toxicity than coPORT. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All

  1. DMF-T index in patients undergoing radiation therapy with LINAC X-ray radiation for head and neck cancer at Department of Radiotherapy, Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sabrina

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy for head and neck cancer frequently caused severe salivary gland dysfunction. The salivary gland dysfunction possibly decreased the protective function of saliva and caused dental caries. The purpose of this study was to obtain an illustration about DMF-T index in patient undergoing radiation therapy with LINAC X-ray radiation for head and neck cancer at Department of Radiotherapy, Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital in January-February 2007. The study was a simple descriptive. The study was conducted on 7 males and 9 females undergoing radiation therapy with LINAC X-ray radiation for head and neck cancer. The ages of patient are between 37 years and 77 years. The severity of caries was measured by DMF-T index. DMF-T index in 16 patient undergoing radiation therapy with LINAC X-ray radiation for head and neck cancer at Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital is 10.6 as the result of this study. The conclusion of this study showed that the DMF-T index in 16 patient undergoing radiation therapy with LINAC X-ray radiation for head and neck cancer at Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital had very high grade based on WHO classification, which the value was over 6.6.

  2. Expert Consensus Contouring Guidelines for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Esophageal and Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Abraham J.; Bosch, Walter R.; Chang, Daniel T.; Hong, Theodore S.; Jabbour, Salma K.; Kleinberg, Lawrence R.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Thomas, Charles R.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): Current guidelines for esophageal cancer contouring are derived from traditional 2-dimensional fields based on bony landmarks, and they do not provide sufficient anatomic detail to ensure consistent contouring for more conformal radiation therapy techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Therefore, we convened an expert panel with the specific aim to derive contouring guidelines and generate an atlas for the clinical target volume (CTV) in esophageal or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Methods and Materials: Eight expert academically based gastrointestinal radiation oncologists participated. Three sample cases were chosen: a GEJ cancer, a distal esophageal cancer, and a mid-upper esophageal cancer. Uniform computed tomographic (CT) simulation datasets and accompanying diagnostic positron emission tomographic/CT images were distributed to each expert, and the expert was instructed to generate gross tumor volume (GTV) and CTV contours for each case. All contours were aggregated and subjected to quantitative analysis to assess the degree of concordance between experts and to generate draft consensus contours. The panel then refined these contours to generate the contouring atlas. Results: The κ statistics indicated substantial agreement between panelists for each of the 3 test cases. A consensus CTV atlas was generated for the 3 test cases, each representing common anatomic presentations of esophageal cancer. The panel agreed on guidelines and principles to facilitate the generalizability of the atlas to individual cases. Conclusions: This expert panel successfully reached agreement on contouring guidelines for esophageal and GEJ IMRT and generated a reference CTV atlas. This atlas will serve as a reference for IMRT contours for clinical practice and prospective trial design. Subsequent patterns of failure analyses of clinical datasets using these guidelines may require modification in the future

  3. Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiation Therapy for Octogenarians With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Atsuya; Sanuki, Naoko; Eriguchi, Takahisa [Radiation Oncology Center, Ofuna Chuo Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan); Kaneko, Takeshi [Respiratory Disease Center, Yokohama City University Medical Center, Kanagawa (Japan); Department of Respirology, Ofuna Chuo Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan); Morita, Satoshi [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama City University, Kanagawa (Japan); Handa, Hiroshi [Respiratory Disease Center, Yokohama City University Medical Center, Kanagawa (Japan); Division of Respiratory and Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan); Aoki, Yousuke; Oku, Yohei [Radiation Oncology Center, Ofuna Chuo Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan); Kunieda, Etsuo, E-mail: kunieda-mi@umin.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokai University, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively investigate treatment outcomes of stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy (SABR) for octogenarians with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2012, 109 patients aged ≥80 years with T1-2N0M0 NSCLC were treated with SABR: 47 patients had histology-unproven lung cancer; 62 patients had pathologically proven NSCLC. The prescribed doses were either 50 Gy/5 fractions for peripheral tumors or 40 Gy/5 fractions for centrally located tumors. The treatment outcomes, toxicities, and the correlating factors for overall survival (OS) were evaluated. Results: The median follow-up duration after SABR was 24.2 (range, 3.0-64.6) months. Only limited toxicities were observed, except for 1 grade 5 radiation pneumonitis. The 3-year local, regional, and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 82.3%, 90.1%, and 76.8%, respectively. The OS and lung cancer-specific survival rates were 53.7% and 70.8%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that medically inoperable, low body mass index, high T stage, and high C-reactive protein were the predictors for short OS. The OS for the operable octogenarians was significantly better than that for inoperable (P<.01). Conclusions: Stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy for octogenarians was feasible, with excellent OS. Multivariate analysis revealed that operability was one of the predictors for OS. For medically operable octogenarians with early-stage NSCLC, SABR should be prospectively compared with resection.

  4. Salivary gland function of nasopharyngeal cancer patients treated by simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qi; Li Huanbin; Wang Ling

    2007-01-01

    The work was to study protective effect of simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy (SMART) on salivary function of nasopharyngeal cancer patients. Forty-six patients were treated by SMART with 2.5Gy/fraction at gross tumor volume to a total does of 70 Gy, and 2.0 Gy/fraction at the clinical treatment volume to a total does of 56 Gy. The SMART was practiced in step-and-shoot mode, one time a day, and five times each week. Fourteen patients were treated by conventional radiation therapy. All the patients received salivary gland function imaging for their uptake index, excretive index and excretive speed, so as to evaluate their degree of salivary function injury. Meanwhile, the dry discomfort in mouth of the patients was recorded and classified. The results showed that the functional indexes of the SMART group were significantly higher than those of the conventional radiation therapy group (P 2 =23.52, P<0.005). Therefore, SMART can play a key role in protecting salivary gland function of naso- pharyngeal cancer patients. (authors)

  5. Probiotics for Rectal Volume Variation During Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ki, Yongkan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Wontaek, E-mail: rokwt@hanmail.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Jiho; Kim, Donghyun; Lee, Juhye; Park, Dahl; Jeon, Hosang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Honggu; Kim, Taenam [Department of Urology, Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dongwon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of the probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus on the percentage volume change of the rectum (PVC{sub R}), a crucial factor of prostate movement. Methods and Materials: Prostate cancer patients managed with tomotherapy as a radical treatment were enrolled in the study to take a probiotic capsule containing 1.0 × 10{sup 8} colony-forming units of L acidophilus or a placebo capsule twice daily. Radiation therapy was performed at a dose of 78 Gy in 39 fractions. The PVC{sub R}, defined as the difference in rectal volume between the planning computed tomographic (CT) and daily megavoltage CT images, was analyzed. Results: Forty patients were randomized into 2 groups. The L acidophilus group showed significantly lower median rectal volume and median PVC{sub R} values than the placebo group. L acidophilus showed a significant reduction effect on the PVC{sub R} (P<.001). However, the radiation therapy fraction number did not significantly influence the PVC{sub R}. Conclusions: L acidophilus was useful in reducing the PVC{sub R}, which is the most important determining factor of prostate position, during radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

  6. Effect of radiation combined with p53 gene therapy and endostatin on mouse prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Min; Ren Jun; Xu Bo; Gao Xianshu; He Zhisong; He Xiaoming; Zhang Ming; Liu Chaoxing; He Xinyong; Cao Guangming; Zhang Shaolong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that p53 gene therapy combined with endostatin can enhance tumor response to radiation therapy of RM-1 mouse xenograft prostate cancer and to investigate its mechanism. Methods: A mouse prostate cancer model was established. Then mice with xenograft tumor were randomly divided into group A (control), B (radiation), C (radiation and rAdp53), D (radiation and rh-endostatin) and E (radiation and rAdp53 and rhendostatin). On day 1, rAdp53 was injected intra-tumorously with 1 x 10 10 vp per animal to group C and E. From day 1 to 14, rh-endostatin was given 15 mg/kg intraperitoneally daily to group D and E. On day 4 single fraction of 15 Gy was given to tumors in groups B, C, D and E. Normal saline was injected intra-tumorously or intraperitoneaUy accordingly as control. No treatment was done to group A. Tumor volume was measured daily. Samples were collected on Days 5, 10 and 15. Ki67, CD31, p53 and VEGF were detected by means of immunohistochemistry. Results: (1) Radiation alone, radiation combined with intra-tumorous injection of Adp53 and/or intraperitoneal injection of rhendostatin resulted in tumor growth arrest of RM-1 cells in vivo (P = 0.000). Radiation combined with both rAdp53 and rhendostatin was the most effective treatment (P < 0.05). (2) All the four treatment groups had a decreased expression of mutant type P53 (P = 0.000). The expression of Ki67 in groups B and C were equal (P 0.05) and increasing (P = 0.000), respectively. Group D had a up-down-up curve (P < 0.05), but group E had a up-down one. On day 5 the expresion of VEGF in group E was the lowest (P < 0.05). An increased expression of MVD compared with the control was shown, and MVD in groups C, D and E were always higher than that in the control (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The limitation of radiotherapy could be overcome by combination with beth p53 gene therapy and endostatin on the growth of mouse prostate cancer cell. Radiation, rAdp53 and endostatin have their

  7. Microbeam radiation therapy. Physical and biological aspects of a new cancer therapy and development of a treatment planning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartzsch, Stefan

    2014-11-05

    Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) is a novel treatment strategy against cancer. Highly brilliant synchrotron radiation is collimated to parallel, a few micrometre wide, planar beams and used to irradiate malignant tissues with high doses. The applied peak doses are considerably higher than in conventional radiotherapy, but valley doses between the beams remain underneath the established tissue tolerance. Previous research has shown that these beam geometries spare normal tissue, while being effective in tumour ablation. In this work physical and biological aspects of the therapy were investigated. A therapy planning system was developed for the first clinical treatments at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble (France) and a dosimetry method based on radiochromic films was created to validate planned doses with measurements on a micrometre scale. Finally, experiments were carried out on a cellular level in order to correlate the physically planned doses with the biological damage caused in the tissue. The differences between Monte Carlo dose and dosimetry are less than 10% in the valley and 5% in the peak regions. Developed alternative faster dose calculation methods deviate from the computational intensive MC simulations by less than 15% and are able to determine the dose within a few minutes. The experiments in cell biology revealed an significant influence of intercellular signalling on the survival of cells close to radiation boundaries. These observations may not only be important for MRT but also for conventional radiotherapy.

  8. Hypothyroidism after Radiation Therapy for Childhood Cancer: A Report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inskip, Peter D; Veiga, Lene H S; Brenner, Alina V; Sigurdson, Alice J; Ostroumova, Evgenia; Chow, Eric J; Stovall, Marilyn; Smith, Susan A; Weathers, Rita E; Leisenring, Wendy; Robison, Leslie L; Armstrong, Gregory T; Sklar, Charles A; Lubin, Jay H

    2018-05-15

    While thyroid cancer risks from exposure to ionizing radiation early in life are well characterized quantitatively, the association of radiation with nonmalignant, functional thyroid disorders has been less studied. Here, we report on a risk analysis study of hypothyroidism with radiation dose to the thyroid gland and the hypothalamic-pituitary axis among survivors of childhood cancer. Utilizing data from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, a cohort of 14,364 five-year survivors of childhood cancer diagnosed at 26 hospitals in the U.S. and Canada between 1970 and 1986 and followed through 2009, the occurrence of hypothyroidism was ascertained among 12,015 survivors through serial questionnaires. Radiation doses to the thyroid gland and pituitary gland were estimated from radiotherapy records. Binary outcome regression was used to estimate prevalence odds ratios for hypothyroidism at five years from diagnosis of childhood cancer and Poisson regression to model incidence rate ratios (RR) after the first five years. A total of 1,193 cases of hypothyroidism were observed, 777 (65%) of which occurred five or more years after cancer diagnosis. The cumulative proportion affected with hypothyroidism (prevalence at five years after cancer diagnosis plus incidence through 30 years after cancer diagnosis) was highest among five-year survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma (32.3%; 95% CI: 29.5-34.9) and cancers of the central nervous system (17.7%; 95% CI: 15.2-20.4). The incidence rate was significantly associated with radiation dose to the thyroid and pituitary. The joint association of hypothyroidism with thyroid and pituitary dose was sub-additive for pituitary doses greater than 16 Gy. In particular, a very strong thyroid radiation dose dependence at low-to-moderate pituitary/hypothalamic doses was diminished at high pituitary doses. Radiation-related risks were higher in males than females and inversely associated with age at exposure and time since exposure but remained elevated

  9. Spontaneous pneumothorax after radiation therapy for breast cancer. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuboshima, Kenji; Kishimoto, Koji; Oda, Teiji

    2010-01-01

    A 41-year-old asymptomatic woman was referred to our hospital for a right pneumothorax noted incidentally on a chest radiograph. She had undergone surgery, radiation at a total dose of 60 Gy, and adjuvant chemotherapy therapy for right breast cancer 14 months previously. A chest tube was inserted into the right pleural cavity. Although the right lung expanded immediately, air leakage increased gradually and the right lung collapsed again three days after drainage. Computed tomography (CT) revealed the thickening of the frontal pleura of the right lower lobe, which resulted from radiation therapy, with chest tube compression and no blebs. We selected video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). The thoracoscopic view showed air leakage from the pleural fissures compressed by the chest tube. Plication was performed for this lesion and air leakage was stopped. No findings of recurrence have been noted since the operation. (author)

  10. Postoperative radiation therapy and adjuvant chemoimmunotherapy in breast cancer. Aspects of timing and immune competence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klefstroem, P.; Nuortio, L.; Taskinen, E.

    The effects of radiation therapy and adjuvant chemoimmunotherapy on the immune competence of patients with breast cancer were investigated. The tests performed included intradermal tuberculin tests, T- and B-lymphocyte counts, and lymphocyte blast transformation tests; phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (ConA) and pokeweed mitogen (PMW) were used as mitogens. Enhancement in lymphocyte proliferative response to mitogenic stimulation by PHA and PMW was seen in patients after 3 courses of chemotherapy + levamisole, whereas irradiation given after chemotherapy caused long-lasting depression in response to PHA and PWM (not significant). T-lymphocyte counts were also lower after irradiation than after chemoimmunotherapy. Clinically, the 16 patients treated with radiation therapy after chemotherapy exhibited a higher recurrence rate than the 24 patients treated first by irradiation. Enhanced reactivity to tuberculin tests occurred generally in patients receiving a planned treatment including irradiation, chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide) and levamisole. Enhancement of reactivity was seen more often in patients who had not relapsed.

  11. Low Incidence of Fatigue after Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiranjeev eDash

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fatigue is a common side-effect of conventional prostate cancer radiation therapy. The increased delivery precision necessitated by the high dose per fraction of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT offers the potential of reduce target volumes and hence the exposure of normal tissues to high radiation doses. Herein, we examine the level of fatigue associated with SBRT treatment.Methods: Forty patients with localized prostate cancer treated with hypofractionated SBRT, and a minimum of 12 months follow-up were included in this analysis. Self-reported fatigue and other quality of life measures were assessed at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months post-SBRT.Results: Mean levels of fatigue were elevated at 1 month post-SBRT compared to baseline values (p=0.02. Fatigue at the 3-month follow-up and later were higher but not statistically significantly different compared to baseline. African-American patients reported higher fatigue post-SBRT than Caucasian patients. Fatigue was correlated with hormonal symptoms as measured by the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC quality of life questionnaire, but not with urinary, bowel, or sexual symptoms. Age, co-morbidities, smoking, prostate specific antigen (PSA levels, testosterone levels, and tumor stage were not associated with fatigue. Conclusion: This is the first study to investigate fatigue as a side-effect of SBRT. In contrast to standard radiation therapy, results suggest SBRT-related fatigue is short-term rather than a long-term side effect of SBRT. These results also suggest post-SBRT fatigue to be a more frequent complication in African-Americans than Caucasians.

  12. Intraoperative radiation therapy in gynecologic cancer: update of the experience at a single institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garton, Graciela R.; Gunderson, Leonard L.; Webb, Maurice J.; Wilson, Timothy O.; Cha, Stephen S.; Podratz, Karl C.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To update the Mayo Clinic experience with intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) in patients with gynecologic cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 1983 and June 1991, 39 patients with recurrent or locally advanced gynecologic malignancies received intraoperative radiation therapy with electrons. The anatomical area treated was pelvis (side walls or presacrum) or periaortic nodes or a combination of both. In addition to intraoperative radiation therapy, 28 patients received external beam irradiation (median dose, 45 Gy; range, 0.9 to 65.7 Gy), and 13 received chemotherapy preoperatively. At the time of intraoperative radiation therapy and after maximum debulking operation, 23 patients had microscopic residual disease and 16 had gross residual disease up to 5 cm in thickness. Median follow-up for surviving patients was 43.4 months (range, 27.1 to 125.4 months). Results: The 5-year actuarial local control with or without central control was 67.4%, and the control within the IORT field (central control) was 81%. The risk of distant metastases at 5 years was 52% (82% in patients with gross residual disease and 33% in patients with only microscopic disease postoperatively). Actuarial 5-year overall survival and disease-free survival was 31.5 and 40.5%, respectively. Patients with microscopic disease had 5-year disease-free and overall survival of 55 and 50%, respectively. Grade 3 toxicity was directly associated with IORT in six patients (15%). Conclusion: Patients with local, regionally recurrent gynecologic cancer may benefit from maximal surgical debulking and IORT with or without external beam irradiation, especially those with microscopic residual disease

  13. Combination therapy with hormonal, radiation and chemotherapy for stage C prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasawa, Toshihisa; Matsumoto, Hidetsugu

    1996-01-01

    To improve the effectiveness of treatment for patients with stage C prostate cancer, therapy in combination with hormonal, radiation and chemotherapy was given for the initial period, and there after, hormonal therapy was continuously administered to 18 patients with chemotherapy and three patients without it. At the Social Health Insurance Medical Center, between May 1988 and August 1991, 21 patients were diagnosed to have stage C histologically confirmed adenocarcinoma of the prostate. The average age of the patients was 69.0 years. The tumor was well, moderate and poorly differentiated in 5, 6 and 10 patients, respectively. As hormonal therapy, orchiectomy was performed on 19 of the 21 patients. Furthermore, 11 patients were administered estramustine phosphate, 9 chlormadinone acetate, and one diethylstilbesterol diphosphate. As, radiation therapy, all patients were treated with AP-PA parallel opposing technique to small pelvis with a 12 cm x 12 cm treatment field (44-45 Gy) combined with conformation radiotherapy to prostate (20-26 Gy). Chemotherapy was performed using either one or a combination of the following; cis-diamminedichloroplatinum, adriamycin, cyclophosphamide, 5-fluorouracil, methotrexate and etoposide. The observation period was 54.5 months on the average. Recurrence was observed in 3 patients, for all of which the sites were at bone. The 5-year non-recurrence rate was 90.4% by Kaplan-Meier's method. There were 4 deaths, three were due to prostate cancer and one to gastric cancer. The 5-year cumulative survival rate by Kaplan-Meier's method was 90.5%. In conclusion, this treatment was effective for stage C cases of prostate cancer. (author)

  14. ESTRO consensus guideline on target volume delineation for elective radiation therapy of early stage breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Offersen, Birgitte V.; Boersma, Liesbeth J.; Kirkove, Carine; Hol, Sandra; Aznar, Marianne C.; Biete Sola, Albert; Kirova, Youlia M.; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Remouchamps, Vincent; Verhoeven, Karolien; Weltens, Caroline; Arenas, Meritxell; Gabrys, Dorota; Kopek, Neil; Krause, Mechthild; Lundstedt, Dan; Marinko, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: Delineation of clinical target volumes (CTVs) is a weak link in radiation therapy (RT), and large inter-observer variation is seen in breast cancer patients. Several guidelines have been proposed, but most result in larger CTVs than based on conventional simulator-based RT. The aim was to develop a delineation guideline obtained by consensus between a broad European group of radiation oncologists. Material and methods: During ESTRO teaching courses on breast cancer, teachers sought consensus on delineation of CTV through dialogue based on cases. One teacher delineated CTV on CT scans of 2 patients, followed by discussion and adaptation of the delineation. The consensus established between teachers was sent to other teams working in the same field, both locally and on a national level, for their input. This was followed by developing a broad consensus based on discussions. Results: Borders of the CTV encompassing a 5 mm margin around the large veins, running through the regional lymph node levels were agreed, and for the breast/thoracic wall other vessels were pointed out to guide delineation, with comments on margins for patients with advanced breast cancer. Conclusion: The ESTRO consensus on CTV for elective RT of breast cancer, endorsed by a broad base of the radiation oncology community, is presented to improve consistency

  15. Sentinel lymph node imaging guided IMRT for prostate cancer: Individualized pelvic radiation therapy versus RTOG guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien P. Chen, MD, PhD

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: SLN-guided pelvic radiation therapy can be used to either treat the most critical nodes only or as an addition to RTOG guided pelvic radiation therapy to ensure that the most important nodes are included.

  16. The incidence of breast cancer following mantle field radiation therapy as a function of dose and technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinger, Alfred; Wasserman, Todd H.; Klein, Eric E.; Miller, Elizabeth A.; Roberts, Tracy; Piephoff, James V.; Kucik, Nancy A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: There is an increased incidence of breast cancer following mantle field radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease (HD). We reviewed the experience at the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (MIR) for radiation factors related to the development of breast cancer after mantle field radiation therapy for HD. Methods: The radiation therapy records of 152 women treated with mantle field irradiation for HD at MIR between 1966-1985 were reviewed for the development of breast cancer and treatment-related factors. All patients had a minimum of 5 years of follow-up. The treatment era (1966-1974 vs. 1975-1985), stage of HD, mediastinal dose, axillary dose, maximum dose from the anterior field (anterior d max dose), the anterior-posterior:posterior-anterior (AP:PA) ratio, age at the time of treatment, length of follow-up, and history of splenectomy were analyzed as possible contributing factors for the development of breast cancer. The observed number of breast cancers was compared to the expected number based on age-adjusted incidences from the Connecticut Tumor Registry. Results: Ten breast cancers occurred in the population. Eight involved an upper outer quadrant. In a multivariate analysis, the development of breast cancer was significantly associated with axillary dose. Patients in the early treatment era were at an increased risk for the development of breast cancer due to high anterior d max and breast doses from weighting the fields anteriorly on a low energy linear accelerator. The use of current radiation therapy techniques was not related to an increased risk of breast cancer with a median follow-up of 13 years. Conclusions: A high dose to the axilla and the anterior d max point is significantly associated with the development of breast cancer after mantle field irradiation for HD. Efforts to protect the breast from high doses will likely lessen the increased risk of breast cancer in women treated with radiation therapy for HD

  17. Intrafraction Motion in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Maddalena M.G.; Peulen, Heike M.U.; Belderbos, Josè S.A.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob, E-mail: j.sonke@nki.nl

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early-stage inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients delivers high doses that require high-precision treatment. Typically, image guidance is used to minimize day-to-day target displacement, but intrafraction position variability is often not corrected. Currently, volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is replacing intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in many departments because of its shorter delivery time. This study aimed to evaluate whether intrafraction variation in VMAT patients is reduced in comparison with patients treated with IMRT. Methods and Materials: NSCLC patients (197 IMRT and 112 VMAT) treated with a frameless SBRT technique to a prescribed dose of 3 × 18 Gy were evaluated. Image guidance for both techniques was identical: pretreatment cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) (CBCT{sub precorr}) for setup correction followed immediately before treatment by postcorrection CBCT (CBCT{sub postcorr}) for verification. Then, after either a noncoplanar IMRT technique or a VMAT technique, a posttreatment (CBCT{sub postRT}) scan was acquired. The CBCT{sub postRT} and CBCT{sub postcorr} scans were then used to evaluate intrafraction motion. Treatment delivery times, systematic (Σ) and random (σ) intrafraction variations, and associated planning target volume (PTV) margins were calculated. Results: The median treatment delivery time was significantly reduced by 20 minutes (range, 32-12 minutes) using VMAT compared with noncoplanar IMRT. Intrafraction tumor motion was significantly larger for IMRT in all directions up to 0.5 mm systematic (Σ) and 0.7 mm random (σ). The required PTV margins for IMRT and VMAT differed by less than 0.3 mm. Conclusion: VMAT-based SBRT for NSCLC was associated with significantly shorter delivery times and correspondingly smaller intrafraction motion compared with noncoplanar IMRT. However, the impact on the required PTV margin was small.

  18. Emerging Therapies for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameera S. Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The current standard of care for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC includes radiation, chemotherapy, and surgery in certain individualized cases. In unresectable NSCLC, chemoradiation has been the standard of care for the past three decades. Local and distant failure remains high in this group of patients, so dose escalation has been studied in both single institution and national clinical trials. Though initial studies showed a benefit to dose escalation, phase III studies examining dose escalation using standard fractionation or hyperfractionation have failed to show a benefit. Over the last 17 years, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT has shown a high degree of safety and local control for stage I lung cancers and other localized malignancies. More recently, phase I/II studies using SBRT for dose escalation after conventional chemoradiation in locally advanced NSCLC have been promising with good apparent safety. Immunotherapy also offers opportunities to address distant disease and preclinical data suggest immunotherapy in tandem with SBRT may be a rational way to induce an “abscopal effect” although there are little clinical data as yet. By building on the proven concept of conventional chemoradiation for patients with locally advanced NSCLC with a subsequent radiation dose intensification to residual disease with SBRT concurrent with immunotherapy, we hope address the issues of metastatic and local failures. This “quadmodality” approach is still in its infancy but appears to be a safe and rational approach to the improving the outcome of NSCLC therapy.

  19. The clinical effect of combination therapy for oral cancer with S-1, superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy, and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Chika; Yoshikawa, Hiromasa; Fukumoto, Shunsuke; Higuchi, Takashi; Yoshida, Masanori; Yasumori, Koutarou; Horinouchi, Yasufumi; Uehara, Satoru

    2011-01-01

    Combination therapy with S-1, superselective intra-arterial infusion of carboplatin (CBDCA) and radiation therapy has been used to treat patients with oral cancer since 2005. In this study, the histopathological effects and toxicities following concurrent chemoradiotherapy were examined. The subjects consisted of 15 patients (10 men and 5 women) who were treated with S-1 (60-80 mg/day, 4 weeks), superselective intra-arterial infusion of CBDCA (300 mg/body) and radiation therapy (total dose 30-36 Gy) in our department from 2005 to 2009. Nine patients, showed T2 disease, 3 showed T3 disease, and another 3 showed T4 diseases. The primary cancer sites were the tongue (6 cases), buccal mucosa (4 cases), mandible gingival (3 cases), maxillary gingival (1 case), and the floor of the mouth (1 case). The histopathological effects were evaluated according to Oboshi-Shimosato classification. Grade IV was shown in 10 cases (66.7%), grade III in 1 case (6.7%), II bin 3 cases (20.0%), and II a in 1 case (6.7%). All patients completed the treatment. The pathological response of the resected tumor was grade IIb or higher in 14 cases (93.3%). While good histological effects were noted, there was one patient for whom viable tumor cells remained in the central part of the tumor. The present study indicates that further investigation is needed to determine the best dosing and dosing schedule. (author)

  20. Stereotactic radiation therapy: a second gold standard in the treatment of early-stage lung cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santini B, Alejandro; Valdez C, Cristian; Sepulveda A, Veronica; Baeza L, Ricardo; Bustos, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is still the leading cause of cancer death in the world. Although in Chile this is not the case, the northern regions of the country show higher incidence and mortality rates than the other Chilean regions. In recent years screening guides for lung cancer with low-dose scanner have begun to be established, and most of the medical societies involved in this subject have already settled the selection criteria. At the same time new techniques of treatment for these patients have developed, with highly sophisticated radiotherapy such as SBRT (Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy) and SBART (Stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy) that are revealing extremely encouraging results and augur significant changes in the coming years. In the present review we analyze the current work, their results, and the future of this treatment modality

  1. Cancer pain management by radiotherapists: a survey of radiation therapy oncology group physicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleeland, Charles S.; Janjan, Nora A.; Scott, Charles B.; Seiferheld, Wendy F.; Curran, Walter J.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) physicians were surveyed to determine their approach to and attitudes toward cancer pain management. Methods and Materials: Physicians completed a questionnaire assessing their estimates of the magnitude of pain as a specific problem for cancer patients, their perceptions of the adequacy of pain management, and their report of how they manage pain in their own practice setting. Results: Eighty-three percent believed the majority of cancer patients with pain were undermedicated. Forty percent reported that pain relief in their own practice setting was poor or fair. Assessing a case scenario, 23% would wait until the patient's prognosis was 6 months or less before starting maximal analgesia. Adjuvants and prophylactic side effect management were underutilized in the treatment plan. Barriers to pain management included poor pain assessment (77%), patient reluctance to report pain (60%), patient reluctance to take analgesics (72%), and staff reluctance to prescribe opioids (41%). Conclusions: Physicians' perceptions of barriers to cancer pain management remain quite stable over time, and physicians continue to report inadequate pain treatment education. Future educational efforts should target radiation oncologists as an important resource for the treatment of cancer pain

  2. Association of Fatigue Intensification with Cognitive Impairment during Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Li Rebekah; Espina, Alexandra; Saligan, Leorey N

    2018-01-01

    Cancer-related fatigue is a common complaint during cancer treatment and is often associated with cognitive impairment. This study examined cognitive deficits that were associated with fatigue symptoms during external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in men with localized prostate cancer. A total of 36 participants were enrolled and followed up at baseline, 24 h, 7 days, 14 days after EBRT initiation, at midpoint, and at completion of EBRT. Fatigue was measured by self-report using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - Fatigue (FACT-F), and cognitive impairment by the Computer Assessment of Mild Cognitive Impairment (CAMCI®). Subjects with increased fatigue during EBRT reported a significant decline in cognitive function and had difficulties with CAMCI®'s route finding and item recall tasks during EBRT. Increased fatigue during EBRT was associated with perceived cognitive difficulties in executive function and recognition memory, but not with attention or verbal memory. Our results suggest that there might be specific cognitive domains that are associated with increased fatigue during EBRT. These findings will provide important information for targeting specific cognitive domains using pharmacotherapy or behavioral interventions. CAMCI® is a valuable tool for psycho social providers to detect subtle cognitive impairment in fatigued cancer patients in a clinical setting. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. A Systematic Overview of Radiation Therapy Effects in Cervical Cancer (Cervix Uteri)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einhorn, Nina [Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology; Trope, Claes; Ridderheim, Mona; Boman, Karin; Sorbe, Bengt; Cavallin-Staahl, Eva

    2003-09-01

    A systematic review of radiation therapy trials in several tumour types was performed by The Swedish Council of Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU). The procedures for evaluation of the scientific literature are described separately. This synthesis of the literature on radiation therapy for cervical cancer is based on data from 1 meta-analysis and 34 randomized trials. In total, 35 scientific articles are included, involving 7,952 patients. The results were compared with those of a similar overview from 1996 including 34,024 patients. The conclusions reached can be summarized in these points: There are limited scientific data supporting that postoperative pelvic radiotherapy improves disease-free survival in early cervical cancer. No firm conclusion can be drawn. There is moderate scientific evidence that external beam radiotherapy combined with brachytherapy gives a similar disease-free and overall survival rate as radical hysterectomy in early cervical cancer. There is strong scientific evidence that concomitant radiochemotherapy improves disease-free and overall survival compared to radiotherapy alone in early cervical cancer. The NCI has recently published an announcement stating that cisplantin-based chemotherapy should be used concomitantly with radiotherapy in cervical cancer. No solid documentation for this statement can be found concerning locally advanced stages (>IIB). There is a strong scientific evidence that cisplatin-based chemotherapy given concomitantly with radiotherapy is superior to concomitant chemotherapy with hydroxyurea. There is no scientific evidence to show that neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy improves disease-free or overall survival compared to radiotherapy alone in patients with localized cervical cancer. There is moderate scientific evidence that high-dose-rate brachytherapy gives the same local control rate as low-dose-rate brachytherapy but with fewer rectal complications.

  4. High-dose rate intra-operative radiation therapy for local advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, L.B.; Mychalczak, B.; Enker, W.; Anderson, L.; Cohen, A.E.; Minsky, B.

    1996-01-01

    In an effort to improve the local control for advanced and recurrent cancers of the rectum, we have integrated high-dose rate intra-operative radiation therapy (HDR-IORT) into the treatment program. Between 11/92 and 10/95, 47 patients (pts) were treated. There were 26 males and 21 females whose ages ranged from 30-80 (median = 62) years. There were 19 pts with primary unresectable rectal cancer, and 28 pts who were treated for recurrent rectal cancer. Histology was adenocarcinoma - 45 pts, squamous cancer - 2 pts. The range of follow-up is 1-34 months (median = 14 months). The majority of primary unresectable pts received pre-operative radiation therapy (4500-5040 cGy) with chemotherapy (5-FU with Leucovorin) 4-6 weeks later, they underwent resection + HDR-IORT (1200 cGy). For the 28 pts with recurrent cancer, the majority received surgery and HDR-IORT alone because they had received prior RT. For the pts with primary unresectable disease, actuarial 2-year local control was 77%, actuarial distant metastasis-free survival was 71%, disease free survival was 66%, and overall survival was 84%. For those pts with recurrent disease, actuarial 2-year local control rate was 65%, distant metastasis-free survival was 65%, disease free survival was 47%, and overall survival was 61%. Complications occurred in 36%. There were no cases where the anatomical distribution of disease, or technical limitations prevented the adequate delivery of HDR-IORT. We conclude that this technique was most versatile, and enabled all appropriate pts to receive IORT. The preliminary data in terms of local control are encouraging, even for the poor prognostic sub-group of pts with recurrent cancer

  5. A Systematic Overview of Radiation Therapy Effects in Cervical Cancer (Cervix Uteri)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einhorn, Nina; Trope, Claes; Ridderheim, Mona; Boman, Karin; Sorbe, Bengt; Cavallin-Staahl, Eva

    2003-01-01

    A systematic review of radiation therapy trials in several tumour types was performed by The Swedish Council of Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU). The procedures for evaluation of the scientific literature are described separately. This synthesis of the literature on radiation therapy for cervical cancer is based on data from 1 meta-analysis and 34 randomized trials. In total, 35 scientific articles are included, involving 7,952 patients. The results were compared with those of a similar overview from 1996 including 34,024 patients. The conclusions reached can be summarized in these points: There are limited scientific data supporting that postoperative pelvic radiotherapy improves disease-free survival in early cervical cancer. No firm conclusion can be drawn. There is moderate scientific evidence that external beam radiotherapy combined with brachytherapy gives a similar disease-free and overall survival rate as radical hysterectomy in early cervical cancer. There is strong scientific evidence that concomitant radiochemotherapy improves disease-free and overall survival compared to radiotherapy alone in early cervical cancer. The NCI has recently published an announcement stating that cisplantin-based chemotherapy should be used concomitantly with radiotherapy in cervical cancer. No solid documentation for this statement can be found concerning locally advanced stages (>IIB). There is a strong scientific evidence that cisplatin-based chemotherapy given concomitantly with radiotherapy is superior to concomitant chemotherapy with hydroxyurea. There is no scientific evidence to show that neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy improves disease-free or overall survival compared to radiotherapy alone in patients with localized cervical cancer. There is moderate scientific evidence that high-dose-rate brachytherapy gives the same local control rate as low-dose-rate brachytherapy but with fewer rectal complications

  6. Who Benefits From Adjuvant Radiation Therapy for Gastric Cancer? A Meta-Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohri, Nitin; Garg, Madhur K.; Aparo, Santiago; Kaubisch, Andreas; Tome, Wolfgang; Kennedy, Timothy J.; Kalnicki, Shalom; Guha, Chandan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Large randomized trials have demonstrated significant survival benefits with the use of adjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiation therapy for gastric cancer. The importance of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) remains unclear. We performed an up-to-date meta-analysis of randomized trials testing the use of RT for resectable gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for randomized trials testing adjuvant (including neoadjuvant) RT for resectable gastric cancer. Hazard ratios describing the impact of adjuvant RT on overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were extracted directly from the original studies or calculated from survival curves. Pooled estimates were obtained using the inverse variance method. Subgroup analyses were performed to determine whether the efficacy of RT varies with chemotherapy use, RT timing, geographic region, type of nodal dissection performed, or lymph node status. Results: Thirteen studies met all inclusion criteria and were used for this analysis. Adjuvant RT was associated with a significant improvement in both OS (HR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.70-0.86, P<.001) and DFS (HR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.63-0.80, P<.001). In the 5 studies that tested adjuvant chemoradiation therapy against adjuvant chemotherapy, similar effects were seen for OS (HR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.67-1.03, P=.087) and DFS (HR = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.91-0.65, P=.002). Available data did not reveal any subgroup of patients that does not benefit from adjuvant RT. Conclusion: In randomized trials for resectable gastric cancer, adjuvant RT provides an approximately 20% improvement in both DFS and OS. Available data do not reveal a subgroup of patients that does not benefit from adjuvant RT. Further study is required to optimize the implementation of adjuvant RT for gastric cancer with regard to patient selection and integration with systemic therapy

  7. A comprehensive dosimetric study of pancreatic cancer treatment using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric-modulated radiation therapy (VMAT), and passive-scattering and modulated-scanning proton therapy (PT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Xuanfeng; Dionisi, Francesco; Tang, Shikui; Ingram, Mark; Hung, Chun-Yu; Prionas, Evangelos; Lichtenwalner, Phil; Butterwick, Ian; Zhai, Huifang; Yin, Lingshu; Lin, Haibo; Kassaee, Alireza; Avery, Stephen, E-mail: stephen.avery@uphs.upenn.edu

    2014-07-01

    With traditional photon therapy to treat large postoperative pancreatic target volume, it often leads to poor tolerance of the therapy delivered and may contribute to interrupted treatment course. This study was performed to evaluate the potential advantage of using passive-scattering (PS) and modulated-scanning (MS) proton therapy (PT) to reduce normal tissue exposure in postoperative pancreatic cancer treatment. A total of 11 patients with postoperative pancreatic cancer who had been previously treated with PS PT in University of Pennsylvania Roberts Proton Therapy Center from 2010 to 2013 were identified. The clinical target volume (CTV) includes the pancreatic tumor bed as well as the adjacent high-risk nodal areas. Internal (iCTV) was generated from 4-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT), taking into account target motion from breathing cycle. Three-field and 4-field 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy, 2-arc volumetric-modulated radiation therapy, and 2-field PS and MS PT were created on the patients’ average CT. All the plans delivered 50.4 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). Overall, 98% of PTV was covered by 95% of the prescription dose and 99% of iCTV received 98% prescription dose. The results show that all the proton plans offer significant lower doses to the left kidney (mean and V{sub 18} {sub Gy}), stomach (mean and V{sub 20} {sub Gy}), and cord (maximum dose) compared with all the photon plans, except 3-field 3DCRT in cord maximum dose. In addition, MS PT also provides lower doses to the right kidney (mean and V{sub 18} {sub Gy}), liver (mean dose), total bowel (V{sub 20} {sub Gy} and mean dose), and small bowel (V{sub 15} {sub Gy} absolute volume ratio) compared with all the photon plans and PS PT. The dosimetric advantage of PT points to the possibility of treating tumor bed and comprehensive nodal areas while providing a more tolerable treatment course that could be used for dose

  8. A comprehensive dosimetric study of pancreatic cancer treatment using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric-modulated radiation therapy (VMAT), and passive-scattering and modulated-scanning proton therapy (PT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Xuanfeng; Dionisi, Francesco; Tang, Shikui; Ingram, Mark; Hung, Chun-Yu; Prionas, Evangelos; Lichtenwalner, Phil; Butterwick, Ian; Zhai, Huifang; Yin, Lingshu; Lin, Haibo; Kassaee, Alireza; Avery, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    With traditional photon therapy to treat large postoperative pancreatic target volume, it often leads to poor tolerance of the therapy delivered and may contribute to interrupted treatment course. This study was performed to evaluate the potential advantage of using passive-scattering (PS) and modulated-scanning (MS) proton therapy (PT) to reduce normal tissue exposure in postoperative pancreatic cancer treatment. A total of 11 patients with postoperative pancreatic cancer who had been previously treated with PS PT in University of Pennsylvania Roberts Proton Therapy Center from 2010 to 2013 were identified. The clinical target volume (CTV) includes the pancreatic tumor bed as well as the adjacent high-risk nodal areas. Internal (iCTV) was generated from 4-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT), taking into account target motion from breathing cycle. Three-field and 4-field 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy, 2-arc volumetric-modulated radiation therapy, and 2-field PS and MS PT were created on the patients’ average CT. All the plans delivered 50.4 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). Overall, 98% of PTV was covered by 95% of the prescription dose and 99% of iCTV received 98% prescription dose. The results show that all the proton plans offer significant lower doses to the left kidney (mean and V 18 Gy ), stomach (mean and V 20 Gy ), and cord (maximum dose) compared with all the photon plans, except 3-field 3DCRT in cord maximum dose. In addition, MS PT also provides lower doses to the right kidney (mean and V 18 Gy ), liver (mean dose), total bowel (V 20 Gy and mean dose), and small bowel (V 15 Gy absolute volume ratio) compared with all the photon plans and PS PT. The dosimetric advantage of PT points to the possibility of treating tumor bed and comprehensive nodal areas while providing a more tolerable treatment course that could be used for dose escalation and combining with radiosensitizing

  9. Overall Survival After Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy for Intracerebral Metastases from Testicular Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rades, Dirk; Dziggel, Liesa; Veninga, Theo; Bajrovic, Amira; Schild, Steven E

    2016-09-01

    To identify predictors and develop a score for overall survival of patients with intracerebral metastasis from testicular cancer. Whole-brain radiation therapy program, age, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), number of intracerebral metastases, number of other metastatic sites and time between testicular cancer diagnosis and radiation therapy were analyzed for their association with overall survival in eight patients. KPS of 80-90% was significantly associated with better overall survival (p=0.006), one or no other metastatic sites showed a trend for a better outcome (p=0.10). The following scores were assigned: KPS 60-70%=0 points, KPS 80-90%=1 point, ≥2 other metastatic sites=0 points, 0-1 other metastatic sites=1 point. Two groups, with 0 and with 1-2 points, were formed. Overall survival rates were 33% vs. 100% at 6 months and 0% vs. 100% at 12 months (p=0.006), respectively. A simple instrument enabling physicians to judge the overall survival of patients with intracerebral metastasis from testicular cancer is provided. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of cradle immobilization on setup reproducibility during external beam radiation therapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentel, Gunilla C.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Krishnamurthy, Rupa

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the setup accuracy during fractionated radiation therapy for two patient groups with lung cancer treated with and without an immobilization cradle. Methods: Three hundred ninety-seven port films from 30 patients immobilized in the Alpha Cradle TM1 were compared with 329 port films from 30 patients who were not immobilized with the cradle. All patients were treated with curative intent for nonmetastatic lung cancer. The frequency of physician-requested isocenter shifts were compared in the two groups using a two-tailed chi-square test. Initial port films taken on the first day of treatment, routine films taken usually weekly during radiation therapy, and requested films taken after a requested shift were considered separately. The immobilization device consisted of a custom-made foam cradle that extended from above the head to the knees. Patients were generally treated with their arms above their heads, and treatment setup marks in the immobilized patients were placed on both the patients' skin and the immobilization cradle. For the noncradle patients, setup marks were placed only on the patients' skin. Results: For the routine films, the frequency of physician-requested isocenter shifts was lower in immobilized patients than in the nonimmobilized group (p = 0.139). Most of this reduction was seen on oblique fields (p = 0.038). No benefits were seen among initial or requested films. The two groups were well balanced with regard to stage, age, field size, and total dose. Conclusions: The use of aggressive immobilization improves the setup reproducibility in patients receiving external beam radiation therapy for lung cancer, especially during treatment with oblique fields. This improvement in treatment accuracy might improve the therapeutic ratio

  11. Review of Real-Time 3-Dimensional Image Guided Radiation Therapy on Standard-Equipped Cancer Radiation Therapy Systems: Are We at the Tipping Point for the Era of Real-Time Radiation Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keall, Paul J; Nguyen, Doan Trang; O'Brien, Ricky; Zhang, Pengpeng; Happersett, Laura; Bertholet, Jenny; Poulsen, Per R

    2018-04-14

    To review real-time 3-dimensional (3D) image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) on standard-equipped cancer radiation therapy systems, focusing on clinically implemented solutions. Three groups in 3 continents have clinically implemented novel real-time 3D IGRT solutions on standard-equipped linear accelerators. These technologies encompass kilovoltage, combined megavoltage-kilovoltage, and combined kilovoltage-optical imaging. The cancer sites treated span pelvic and abdominal tumors for which respiratory motion is present. For each method the 3D-measured motion during treatment is reported. After treatment, dose reconstruction was used to assess the treatment quality in the presence of motion with and without real-time 3D IGRT. The geometric accuracy was quantified through phantom experiments. A literature search was conducted to identify additional real-time 3D IGRT methods that could be clinically implemented in the near future. The real-time 3D IGRT methods were successfully clinically implemented and have been used to treat more than 200 patients. Systematic target position shifts were observed using all 3 methods. Dose reconstruction demonstrated that the delivered dose is closer to the planned dose with real-time 3D IGRT than without real-time 3D IGRT. In addition, compromised target dose coverage and variable normal tissue doses were found without real-time 3D IGRT. The geometric accuracy results with real-time 3D IGRT had a mean error of real-time 3D IGRT methods using standard-equipped radiation therapy systems that could also be clinically implemented. Multiple clinical implementations of real-time 3D IGRT on standard-equipped cancer radiation therapy systems have been demonstrated. Many more approaches that could be implemented were identified. These solutions provide a pathway for the broader adoption of methods to make radiation therapy more accurate, impacting tumor and normal tissue dose, margins, and ultimately patient outcomes. Copyright © 2018

  12. Risk of second bone sarcoma following childhood cancer: role of radiation therapy treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Boris; Benadjaoud, Mohamed Amine; Cléro, Enora; Haddy, Nadia; El-Fayech, Chiraz; Guibout, Catherine; Teinturier, Cécile; Oberlin, Odile; Veres, Cristina; Pacquement, Hélène; Munzer, Martine; N'guyen, Tan Dat; Bondiau, Pierre-Yves; Berchery, Delphine; Laprie, Anne; Hawkins, Mike; Winter, David; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Chavaudra, Jean; Rubino, Carole; Diallo, Ibrahima; Bénichou, Jacques; de Vathaire, Florent

    2014-05-01

    Bone sarcoma as a second malignancy is rare but highly fatal. The present knowledge about radiation-absorbed organ dose-response is insufficient to predict the risks induced by radiation therapy techniques. The objective of the present study was to assess the treatment-induced risk for bone sarcoma following a childhood cancer and particularly the related risk of radiotherapy. Therefore, a retrospective cohort of 4,171 survivors of a solid childhood cancer treated between 1942 and 1986 in France and Britain has been followed prospectively. We collected detailed information on treatments received during childhood cancer. Additionally, an innovative methodology has been developed to evaluate the dose-response relationship between bone sarcoma and radiation dose throughout this cohort. The median follow-up was 26 years, and 39 patients had developed bone sarcoma. It was found that the overall incidence was 45-fold higher [standardized incidence ratio 44.8, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 31.0-59.8] than expected from the general population, and the absolute excess risk was 35.1 per 100,000 person-years (95 % CI 24.0-47.1). The risk of bone sarcoma increased slowly up to a cumulative radiation organ absorbed dose of 15 Gy [hazard ratio (HR) = 8.2, 95 % CI 1.6-42.9] and then strongly increased for higher radiation doses (HR for 30 Gy or more 117.9, 95 % CI 36.5-380.6), compared with patients not treated with radiotherapy. A linear model with an excess relative risk per Gy of 1.77 (95 % CI 0.6213-5.935) provided a close fit to the data. These findings have important therapeutic implications: Lowering the radiation dose to the bones should reduce the incidence of secondary bone sarcomas. Other therapeutic solutions should be preferred to radiotherapy in bone sarcoma-sensitive areas.

  13. Application of intensity modulated radiation therapy for the cancer patients treatment in Bach Mai Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mai Trong Khoa; Tran Dinh Ha; Le Chinh Dai; Nguyen Quang Hung; Vu Huu Khiem

    2011-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is one of the modern techniques in cancer treatment, in which dose is delivered optimally into the shape of the tumor and minimally in surround benign tissues. In developed countries, this technique has been performed routinely by Linacs with MLC for tumors at the critical areas. In Vietnam, because of the wet climate, the use of Linacs with MLC is difficult to operate and maintain. However, IMRT can be implemented by Linacs without MLC via independent jaws, Jaws-only IMRT (JO-IMRT), in which beams are separated into many segments with different weights to optimize highest dose in the tumor and lowest dose in the surrounding health organs. Methods: We describe the new treatment technic application and compare it with normal radiotherapy method (3D-CRT). Results: From 7/2008, the Dep of Nuclear Medicine and Oncology at Bach Mai Hospital has been conducting JO-IMRT to treat cancer patients. Up to now, we have 81 cases treated by IMRT including head and neck cancers (NPC, larynx cancer, maxillary sinus cancer, brain tumor), cancers in the thorax (esophagus cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer), cancers in the pelvis (prostate cancer, cervical cancer, rectal cancer). On the average, beam number is from 5 to 9 and 5-9 segments per beam. Treatment time for a fraction is from 6 to 12 minutes with 2.25 Gy for CTV1 per day. Discrepancies of doses were below 3% (0.15 to 2.84%) between planning and practice. In plan, the preeminences with IMRT are clearly superior to 3D radiation therapy. In clinical, almost patients had good respond, whereas side effects were quite less than conventional radiotherapy. Conclusions: JO-IMRT is a modern technic with more advantage than normal 3D-CRT. It help radiation dose to concentrate maximally in treatment target while influence minimally for sensitive surrounding tissues. Another, it is a high technic to appropriate with the climatic condition in Vietnam. (author)

  14. Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancers: Surgery Alone Versus Surgery Plus Postoperative Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwak, Hee Keun; Kim, Woo Chul; Kim, Hun Jung; Park, Jeong Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to determine the role of radiotherapy after curative-intent surgery in the management of extrahepatic bile duct (EHBD) cancers. Methods and Materials: From 1997 through 2005, 78 patients with EHBD cancer were surgically staged. These patients were stratified by the absence of adjuvant radiation (n = 47, group I) versus radiation (n = 31, group II) after resection. Pathology examination showed 27 cases in group I and 20 cases in group II had microscopically positive resection margins. The patients in group II received 45 to 54 Gy of external beam radiotherapy. The primary endpoints of this study were overall survival, disease-free survival, and prognostic factors. Results: There were no differences between the 5-year overall survival rates for the two groups (11.6% in group I vs. 21% in group II). However, the patients with microscopically positive resection margins who received adjuvant radiation therapy had higher median disease-free survival rates than those who underwent surgery alone (21 months vs. 10 months, respectively, p = 0.042). Decreasing local failure was found in patients who received postoperative radiotherapy (61.7% in group I and 35.6% in group II, p = 0.02). Outcomes of the patients with a positive resection margin and lymph node metastasis who received postoperative radiation therapy were doubled compared to those of patients without adjuvant radiotherapy. Resection margin status, lymph node metastasis, and pathology differentiation were significant prognostic factors in disease-free survival. Conclusions: Adjuvant radiotherapy might be useful in patients with EHBD cancer, especially for those patients with microscopic residual tumors and positive lymph nodes after resection for increasing local control.

  15. XRCC1 Polymorphism Associated With Late Toxicity After Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seibold, Petra; Behrens, Sabine [Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Schmezer, Peter [Division of Epigenomics and Cancer Risk Factors, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Helmbold, Irmgard [Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Barnett, Gillian; Coles, Charlotte [Department of Oncology, Oncology Centre, Cambridge University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, United Kingdom (UK) (United Kingdom); Yarnold, John [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Talbot, Christopher J. [Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); Imai, Takashi [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Azria, David [Department of Radiation Oncology and Medical Physics, I.C.M. – Institut regional du Cancer Montpellier, Montpellier (France); Koch, C. Anne [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Dunning, Alison M. [Centre for Cancer Genetic Epidemiology, University of Cambridge, Strangeways Research Laboratory, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Burnet, Neil [Department of Oncology, Oncology Centre, Cambridge University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Bliss, Judith M. [The Institute of Cancer Research, Clinical Trials and Statistics Unit, Sutton (United Kingdom); Symonds, R. Paul; Rattay, Tim [Department of Cancer Studies and Molecular Medicine, University of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); Suga, Tomo [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Kerns, Sarah L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NH (United States); and others

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in oxidative stress–related genes associated with risk of late toxicities in breast cancer patients receiving radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Using a 2-stage design, 305 SNPs in 59 candidate genes were investigated in the discovery phase in 753 breast cancer patients from 2 prospective cohorts from Germany. The 10 most promising SNPs in 4 genes were evaluated in the replication phase in up to 1883 breast cancer patients from 6 cohorts identified through the Radiogenomics Consortium. Outcomes of interest were late skin toxicity and fibrosis of the breast, as well as an overall toxicity score (Standardized Total Average Toxicity). Multivariable logistic and linear regression models were used to assess associations between SNPs and late toxicity. A meta-analysis approach was used to summarize evidence. Results: The association of a genetic variant in the base excision repair gene XRCC1, rs2682585, with normal tissue late radiation toxicity was replicated in all tested studies. In the combined analysis of discovery and replication cohorts, carrying the rare allele was associated with a significantly lower risk of skin toxicities (multivariate odds ratio 0.77, 95% confidence interval 0.61-0.96, P=.02) and a decrease in Standardized Total Average Toxicity scores (−0.08, 95% confidence interval −0.15 to −0.02, P=.016). Conclusions: Using a stage design with replication, we identified a variant allele in the base excision repair gene XRCC1 that could be used in combination with additional variants for developing a test to predict late toxicities after radiation therapy in breast cancer patients.

  16. XRCC1 Polymorphism Associated With Late Toxicity After Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seibold, Petra; Behrens, Sabine; Schmezer, Peter; Helmbold, Irmgard; Barnett, Gillian; Coles, Charlotte; Yarnold, John; Talbot, Christopher J.; Imai, Takashi; Azria, David; Koch, C. Anne; Dunning, Alison M.; Burnet, Neil; Bliss, Judith M.; Symonds, R. Paul; Rattay, Tim; Suga, Tomo; Kerns, Sarah L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in oxidative stress–related genes associated with risk of late toxicities in breast cancer patients receiving radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Using a 2-stage design, 305 SNPs in 59 candidate genes were investigated in the discovery phase in 753 breast cancer patients from 2 prospective cohorts from Germany. The 10 most promising SNPs in 4 genes were evaluated in the replication phase in up to 1883 breast cancer patients from 6 cohorts identified through the Radiogenomics Consortium. Outcomes of interest were late skin toxicity and fibrosis of the breast, as well as an overall toxicity score (Standardized Total Average Toxicity). Multivariable logistic and linear regression models were used to assess associations between SNPs and late toxicity. A meta-analysis approach was used to summarize evidence. Results: The association of a genetic variant in the base excision repair gene XRCC1, rs2682585, with normal tissue late radiation toxicity was replicated in all tested studies. In the combined analysis of discovery and replication cohorts, carrying the rare allele was associated with a significantly lower risk of skin toxicities (multivariate odds ratio 0.77, 95% confidence interval 0.61-0.96, P=.02) and a decrease in Standardized Total Average Toxicity scores (−0.08, 95% confidence interval −0.15 to −0.02, P=.016). Conclusions: Using a stage design with replication, we identified a variant allele in the base excision repair gene XRCC1 that could be used in combination with additional variants for developing a test to predict late toxicities after radiation therapy in breast cancer patients

  17. Disparities in the Use of Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy for Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loveland-Jones, Catherine [MD Anderson Cancer Center at Cooper, Camden, New Jersey (United States); Lin, Heather; Shen, Yu; Bedrosian, Isabelle; Shaitelman, Simona; Kuerer, Henry [University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Woodward, Wendy; Ueno, Naoto; Valero, Vicente [University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); MD Anderson Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Research Program and Clinic, Houston, Texas (United States); Babiera, Gildy, E-mail: gvbabiera@mdanderson.org [University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); MD Anderson Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Research Program and Clinic, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: Although radiation therapy improves locoregional control and survival for inflammatory breast cancer (IBC), it is underused in this population. The purpose of this study was to identify variables associated with the underuse of postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) for IBC. Methods and Materials: Using the 1998 to 2011 National Cancer Data Base, we identified 8273 women who underwent mastectomy for nonmetastatic IBC. We used logistic regression modeling to determine the demographic, tumor, and treatment variables associated with the underuse of PMRT. Results: Although the use of PMRT increased over time, a total of 30.3% of our cohort did not receive PMRT. On multivariate analysis, variables associated with the underuse of PMRT for IBC included the following (all P<.05): Medicare insurance (odds ratio [OR] = 0.70), annual income <$34,999 (<$30,000: OR=0.79; $30,000-$34,999: OR=0.82), cN2 and cN0 disease (cN2: OR=0.71; cN0: OR=0.63), failure to receive chemotherapy and hormone therapy (chemotherapy: OR=0.15; hormone therapy: OR=0.35), treatment at lower-volume centers (OR=0.83), and treatment in the South and West (South: OR=0.73; West: OR=0.80). Greater distance between patient's residence and radiation facility was also associated with the underuse of PMRT (P=.0001). Conclusions: Although the use of PMRT for IBC has increased over time, it continues to be underused. Disparities related to a variety of variables impact which IBC patients receive PMRT. A concerted effort must be made to address these disparities in order to optimize the outcomes for IBC.

  18. What Aspects of Personal Care Are Most Important to Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, Kimberley A.; Feldman-Stewart, Deb; Groome, Patti A.; Brundage, Michael D.; McArdle, Siobhan; Wallace, David; Peng, Yingwei; Mackillop, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The overall quality of patient care is a function of the quality of both its technical and its nontechnical components. The purpose of this study was to identify the elements of nontechnical (personal) care that are most important to patients undergoing radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the literature and interviewed patients and health professionals to identify elements of personal care pertinent to patients undergoing radiation therapy for prostate cancer. We identified 143 individual elements relating to 10 aspects of personal care. Patients undergoing radical radiation therapy for prostate cancer completed a self-administered questionnaire in which they rated the importance of each element. The overall importance of each element was measured by the percentage of respondents who rated it as “very important.” The importance of each aspect of personal care was measured by the mean importance of its elements. Results: One hundred eight patients completed the questionnaire. The percentage of patients who rated each element “very important” ranged from 7% to 95% (mean 61%). The mean importance rating of the elements of each aspect of care varied significantly: “perceived competence of caregivers,” 80%; “empathy and respectfulness of caregivers,” 67%; “adequacy of information sharing,” 67%; “patient centeredness,” 59%; “accessibility of caregivers,” 57%; “continuity of care,” 51%; “privacy,” 51%; “convenience,” 45%; “comprehensiveness of services,” 44%; and “treatment environment,” 30% (P<.0001). Neither age nor education was associated with importance ratings, but the patient's health status was associated with the rating of some elements of care. Conclusions: Many different elements of personal care are important to patients undergoing radiation therapy for prostate cancer, but the 3 aspects of care that most believe are most important are these: the perceived

  19. Rectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease: natural history and implications for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Sheryl; Stock, Richard; Greenstein, Adrian

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSES/OBJECTIVE: There exists little information concerning the natural history of rectal cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. In addition, the tolerance of pelvic irradiation in these patients is unknown. We analyzed the largest series of patients with inflammatory bowel disease and rectal cancer in order to determine the natural history of the disease as well as the effect and tolerance of pelvic irradiation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 47 patients with inflammatory bowel disease and rectal cancer treated over a 34 year period (1960-1994) was performed. Thirty five patients had Ulcerative Colitis and 12 patients had Crohn's Disease. There were 31 male patients and 16 female patients. The stage (AJC) distribution was as follows: stage 0 in 5 patients, stage I in 13 patients, stage II in 7 patients, stage III in 13 patients and stage IV in 9 patients. Surgical resection was performed in 44 patients. In 2 of these patients, preoperative pelvic irradiation was given followed by surgery. Twenty of these patients underwent post-operative adjuvant therapy (12 were treated with chemotherapy and pelvic irradiation and 8 with chemotherapy alone). Three patients were found to have unresectable disease and were treated with chemotherapy alone (2 patients) or chemotherapy and radiation therapy (1 patient). Radiation complications were graded using the RTOG acute and late effects scoring criteria. Follow up ranged from 4 to 250 months (median - 24 months). RESULTS: The 5 year actuarial results revealed an overall survival (OS) of 42%, a disease free survival (DFS) of 43%, a pelvic control rate (PC) of 67% and a freedom from distant failure (FFDF) of 47%. DFS decreased with increasing T stage with a 5 year rate of 86% for patients with Tis - T2 disease compared to 10% for patients with T3-T4 disease (p ) were noted in 3 patients (20%) receiving radiation therapy and these included two cases of grade 3 skin reactions and one case of grade

  20. What Aspects of Personal Care Are Most Important to Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, Kimberley A. [Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen' s Cancer Research Institute, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Feldman-Stewart, Deb [Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen' s Cancer Research Institute, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Oncology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Groome, Patti A. [Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen' s Cancer Research Institute, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Brundage, Michael D. [Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen' s Cancer Research Institute, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Oncology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Cancer Centre of Southeastern Ontario, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); McArdle, Siobhan [Cancer Centre of Southeastern Ontario, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Wallace, David [Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen' s Cancer Research Institute, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Peng, Yingwei [Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen' s Cancer Research Institute, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Mackillop, William J., E-mail: William.mackillop@krcc.on.ca [Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen' s Cancer Research Institute, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Oncology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Cancer Centre of Southeastern Ontario, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-02-01

    Purpose/Objective: The overall quality of patient care is a function of the quality of both its technical and its nontechnical components. The purpose of this study was to identify the elements of nontechnical (personal) care that are most important to patients undergoing radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the literature and interviewed patients and health professionals to identify elements of personal care pertinent to patients undergoing radiation therapy for prostate cancer. We identified 143 individual elements relating to 10 aspects of personal care. Patients undergoing radical radiation therapy for prostate cancer completed a self-administered questionnaire in which they rated the importance of each element. The overall importance of each element was measured by the percentage of respondents who rated it as “very important.” The importance of each aspect of personal care was measured by the mean importance of its elements. Results: One hundred eight patients completed the questionnaire. The percentage of patients who rated each element “very important” ranged from 7% to 95% (mean 61%). The mean importance rating of the elements of each aspect of care varied significantly: “perceived competence of caregivers,” 80%; “empathy and respectfulness of caregivers,” 67%; “adequacy of information sharing,” 67%; “patient centeredness,” 59%; “accessibility of caregivers,” 57%; “continuity of care,” 51%; “privacy,” 51%; “convenience,” 45%; “comprehensiveness of services,” 44%; and “treatment environment,” 30% (P<.0001). Neither age nor education was associated with importance ratings, but the patient's health status was associated with the rating of some elements of care. Conclusions: Many different elements of personal care are important to patients undergoing radiation therapy for prostate cancer, but the 3 aspects of care that most believe are most important are these: the

  1. The results of palliative radiation therapy in patients with unresectable advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Mi Ryeong; Yoon, Sei Chul; Kim, Yeon Sil; Chung, Su Mi

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the treatment results and prognostic factors of palliative radiation therapy in the patients with unresectable advanced pancreatic cancer. Thirty-seven evaluable patients with unresectable advanced pancreatic cancer who were treated by palliative radiation therapy for pain relief at the Department of Radiation Oncology, Kangnam St. Mary's hospital, the Catholic University of Korea between March 1984 and February 2005 were analysed retrospectively. There were 22 men and 15 women. Age at diagnosis ranged from 30 to 80 (median 57) years. Twelve patients (32.4%) had liver metastases and 22 patients (59.5%) had lymph node metastases. Radiation therapy was delivered to primary tumor and regional lymph nodes with 1 ∼ 2 cm margin, and total dose was 3,240 ∼ 5,580 cGy (median 5,040 cGy). Chemotherapy with radiotherapy was delivered in 30 patients (81%) with 5-FU alone (21 patients) or gemcitabine (9 patients). The follow-up period ranged from 1 to 44 months. Survival and prognostic factors were analysed using Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test respectively. Overall mean and median survival were 11 and 8 months and 1-year survival rate was 20%. Among 33 patients who were amenable for response evaluation, 7 patients had good response and 22 patients had fail response with overall response rate of 87.9%. Mild to moderate toxicity were observed in 14 patients with nausea, vomiting, and indigestion, but severe toxicity requiring interruption of treatment were not observed. Chemotherapy didn't influence the survival and symptomatic palliation, but the group containing gemcitabine showed a tendency of longer survival (median 12 months) than 5-FU alone group (median 5.5 months) without statistical significance (ρ > 0.05). The significant prognostic factors were Karnofsky performance status and liver metastasis (ρ 0.05). Radiation therapy was effective for symptomatic palliation in the patients with unresectable advanced pancreatic cancer and would play an

  2. Bladder volume variations of cervical cancer patient in radiation therapy using ultrasonography

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    Gong, Jong Ho [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The bladder volume change was measured using ultrasonography for helping decrease the side effects and other organ variations in the location of radiation therapy for cervical cancer patients. An experiment was performed targeting patients who were treated with radiation therapy at PNUH within the period from September to December 2015. To maintain the bladder volume, each patient was instructed to drink 500 cc water before and after CT simulation, 60 minutes before the dry run. Also, the bladder volume was measured in each patient CT scan, and a 3D conformal therapy plan was designed. The bladder volumes measured before and after the CT simulation, dry run, and radiation treatment planning were compared and analyzed. The average volume and average error of the bladder that were obtained from the measurement based on the CT scan images had the lowest standard deviation in the CT simulation. This means that the values that were obtained before and after the CT simulation were statistically relevant and correlative. Moreover, the bladder volume measured via ultrasonography was larger size, the average volume in the CT scan. But the values that were obtained Dry run and after the CT simulation were not statistically relevant. Drinking a certain amount of water helps a patient maintain his/her bladder volume for a dry run. Even then, it is difficult to maintain the bladder volume for the dry run. Also, whether or not the patients followed the directions for the dry run correctly is important.

  3. National Cancer Data Base Analysis of Radiation Therapy Consolidation Modality for Cervical Cancer: The Impact of New Technological Advancements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, Beant S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Lin, Jeff F. [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Krivak, Thomas C. [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Western Pennsylvania Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Sukumvanich, Paniti; Laskey, Robin A.; Ross, Malcolm S.; Lesnock, Jamie L. [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Beriwal, Sushil, E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To utilize the National Cancer Data Base to evaluate trends in brachytherapy and alternative radiation therapy utilization in the treatment of cervical cancer, to identify associations with outcomes between the various radiation therapy modalities. Methods and Materials: Patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IIB-IVA cervical cancer in the National Cancer Data Base who received treatment from January 2004 to December 2011 were analyzed. Overall survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed to identify factors associated with type of boost radiation modality used and its impact on survival. Results: A total of 7654 patients had information regarding boost modality. A predominant proportion of patients were Caucasian (76.2%), had stage IIIB (48.9%) disease with squamous (82.0%) histology, were treated at academic/research centers (47.7%) in the South (34.8%), and lived 0 to 5 miles (27.9%) from the treating facility. A majority received brachytherapy (90.3%). From 2004 to 2011, brachytherapy use decreased from 96.7% to 86.1%, whereas intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) use increased from 3.3% to 13.9% in the same period (P<.01). Factors associated with decreased brachytherapy utilization included older age, stage IVA disease, smaller tumor size, later year of diagnosis, lower-volume treatment centers, and facility type. After controlling for significant factors from survival analyses, IMRT or SBRT boost resulted in inferior overall survival (hazard ratio, 1.86; 95% confidence interval, 1.35-2.55; P<.01) as compared with brachytherapy. In fact, the survival detriment associated with IMRT or SBRT boost was stronger than that associated with excluding chemotherapy (hazard ratio, 1.61′ 95% confidence interval, 1.27-2.04′ P<.01). Conclusions: Consolidation brachytherapy is a critical treatment component for

  4. Present status of radiation therapy in the conservative management of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papillon, J.

    1990-01-01

    Conservative treatment of rectal cancer may be a valid alternative to radical surgery in cases selected with regard to their very low probability of lymphatic spread. Beside the surgical modalities of local treatment, radiation therapy has gained a substantial place thaks to the use of intracavitary irradiation. In series of 310 cases of T 1 -T 2 tumors followed more than 5 years, the rate of death of cancer is 7.7% and the rate of local failures is 5%. The protocol is based on a short but intensive course of external beam irradiation (30 Gy over 12 days) followed 2 months later by intracavitary irradiation directed to the tumor bed. In a series of 71 patients (mean age 74 years) with selected T 2 or T 3 tumors larger than 4 cm, followed more than 3 years, the rate of death of cancer is 11% and the rate of death of intercurrent disease is 22%. At 5 years the rate of death of cancer is 16%. It is emphasized the necessity of a strict selection of cases by clinical means and endorectal sonography. This strategy must only be conceived as a teamwork of radiation therapists and sureons. (author). 36 refs.; 6 tabs

  5. Radiation Dose-Response Model for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer After Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appelt, Ane L.; Pløen, John; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Bentzen, Søren M.; Jakobsen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is part of the standard treatment of locally advanced rectal cancers. Tumor regression at the time of operation is desirable, but not much is known about the relationship between radiation dose and tumor regression. In the present study we estimated radiation dose-response curves for various grades of tumor regression after preoperative CRT. Methods and Materials: A total of 222 patients, treated with consistent chemotherapy and radiation therapy techniques, were considered for the analysis. Radiation therapy consisted of a combination of external-beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy. Response at the time of operation was evaluated from the histopathologic specimen and graded on a 5-point scale (TRG1-5). The probability of achieving complete, major, and partial response was analyzed by ordinal logistic regression, and the effect of including clinical parameters in the model was examined. The radiation dose-response relationship for a specific grade of histopathologic tumor regression was parameterized in terms of the dose required for 50% response, D 50,i , and the normalized dose-response gradient, γ 50,i . Results: A highly significant dose-response relationship was found (P=.002). For complete response (TRG1), the dose-response parameters were D 50,TRG1 = 92.0 Gy (95% confidence interval [CI] 79.3-144.9 Gy), γ 50,TRG1 = 0.982 (CI 0.533-1.429), and for major response (TRG1-2) D 50,TRG1 and 2 = 72.1 Gy (CI 65.3-94.0 Gy), γ 50,TRG1 and 2 = 0.770 (CI 0.338-1.201). Tumor size and N category both had a significant effect on the dose-response relationships. Conclusions: This study demonstrated a significant dose-response relationship for tumor regression after preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer for tumor dose levels in the range of 50.4-70 Gy, which is higher than the dose range usually considered.

  6. Preoperative Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Capecitabine, Bevacizumab, and Erlotinib for Rectal Cancer: A Phase 1 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Prajnan, E-mail: PrajDas@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Eng, Cathy [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Chang, George J.; Skibber, John M.; You, Y. Nancy [Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Maru, Dipen M. [Department of Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Munsell, Mark F. [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Clemons, Marilyn V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kopetz, Scott E.; Garrett, Christopher R.; Shureiqi, Imad [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Delclos, Marc E.; Krishnan, Sunil; Crane, Christopher H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: The goal of this phase 1 trial was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of concurrent capecitabine, bevacizumab, and erlotinib with preoperative radiation therapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with clinical stage II to III rectal adenocarcinoma, within 12 cm from the anal verge, were treated in 4 escalating dose levels, using the continual reassessment method. Patients received preoperative radiation therapy with concurrent bevacizumab (5 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks), erlotinib, and capecitabine. Capecitabine dose was increased from 650 mg/m{sup 2} to 825 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily on the days of radiation therapy; erlotinib dose was increased from 50 mg orally daily in weeks 1 to 3, to 50 mg daily in weeks 1 to 6, to 100 mg daily in weeks 1 to 6. Patients underwent surgery at least 9 weeks after the last dose of bevacizumab. Results: A total of 19 patients were enrolled, and 18 patients were considered evaluable. No patient had grade 4 acute toxicity, and 1 patient had grade 3 acute toxicity (hypertension). The MTD was not reached. All 18 evaluable patients underwent surgery, with low anterior resection in 7 (39%), proctectomy with coloanal anastomosis in 4 patients (22%), posterior pelvic exenteration in 1 (6%), and abdominoperineal resection in 6 (33%). Of the 18 patients, 8 (44%) had pathologic complete response, and 1 had complete response of the primary tumor with positive nodes. Three patients (17%) had grade 3 postoperative complications (ileus, small bowel obstruction, and infection). With a median follow-up of 34 months, 1 patient developed distant metastasis, and no patient had local recurrence or died. The 3-year disease-free survival was 94%. Conclusions: The combination of preoperative radiation therapy with concurrent capecitabine, bevacizumab, and erlotinib was well tolerated. The pathologic complete response rate appears promising and may warrant further investigation.

  7. Cost Analysis of Complex Radiation Therapy for Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrier, Lionel; Morelle, Magali [Univ Lyon, GATE-Unité Mixte de Recherche 5824-Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Lyon (France); Department of Clinical Research and Innovation, Leon Berard Cancer Centre, Lyon (France); Pommier, Pascal [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leon Berard Cancer Centre, Lyon (France); Boisselier, Pierre [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montpellier Cancer Institute, Montpellier (France); Coche-Dequeant, Bernard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oscar Lambret Cancer Centre, Lille (France); Gallocher, Olivier [Department of Radiation Oncology, Clinique Pasteur, Toulouse (France); Alfonsi, Marc [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sainte Catherine Institute, Avignon (France); Bardet, Etienne [Department of Radiation Oncology, René Gauducheau Cancer Centre, Saint Herblain (France); Rives, Michel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Claudius Regaud Institute, Toulouse (France); Calugaru, Valentin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Curie Institute, Paris (France); Chajon, Enrique [Department of Radiation Oncology, Eugène Marquis Cancer Centre, Rennes (France); Noel, Georges [Department of Radiation Oncology, Paul Strauss Cancer Centre, Strasbourg (France); Mecellem, Hinda [Lorraine Institute of Oncology, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Pérol, David; Dussart, Sophie [Department of Clinical Research and Innovation, Leon Berard Cancer Centre, Lyon (France); Giraud, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.giraud@aphp.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Paris Descartes University, Paris Sorbonne Cité, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, Paris (France)

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: This cost analysis aimed to prospectively assess differences in costs between TomoTherapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in patients with head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Economic data were gathered from a multicenter study. However, randomization was not possible due to the availability of equipment. Costs were calculated using the microcosting technique from the hospital's perspective (in 2013 euros), and the time horizon was radiation therapy. Only resources that entered the hospital production process and which were likely to vary between the strategies being compared were considered. Acute adverse events observed within the time horizon were also assessed. Results: The cost analysis was based on a total of 173 patient treatments given between 2010 and 2012 in 14 French cancer centers: 73 patients were treated with TomoTherapy, 92 with VMAT RapidArc, and 8 with VMAT SmartArc. Estimated costs of SmartArc were removed from the comparison due to the small sample size. The mean ± SD cost per patient of the treatment planning phase was €314 (±€214) for TomoTherapy and €511 (±€590) for RapidArc. Mean costs ± SD per patient of irradiation reached €3144 (±€565) for TomoTherapy and €1350 (±€299) for RapidArc. The most sensitive parameter of irradiation was the annual operating time of accelerators. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals for the mean costs of irradiation were €3016 to €3272 for TomoTherapy and €1281 to €1408 for RapidArc. The number of acute adverse events during radiation therapy was not significantly different between strategies. Conclusions: TomoTherapy appeared to be more expensive than RapidArc mainly due to the higher price of the accelerator, the higher costs of maintenance, and the longer duration of treatment sessions. Because strategies were not significantly different in clinical effect, RapidArc appeared to be the strategy to be recommended at this stage of knowledge.

  8. SU-C-303-01: Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Confers Cancer Resistance to Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, S; La Count, S; Liu, J; Bai, X; Lu, L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To study the role of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) in malignant cell resistance to radiation therapy. Methods: We first developed several small devices that could be used to adopt radiation beams from clinical high dose rate brachy therapy (HDR) or linac-based megavoltage machines to perform pre-clinical cell and mouse experiments. Then we used these devices to deliver radiation to AID-positive and AID-silenced cancer cells or tumors formed by these cells in mice. Cells and mice bearing tumors received the same dose under the same experimental conditions. For cells, we observed the apoptosis and the cell survival rate over time. For mice bearing tumors, we measured and recorded the tumor sizes every other day for 4 weeks. Results: For cell experiments, we found that the AID-positive cells underwent much less apoptosis compared with AID-silenced cells upon radiation. And for mouse experiments, we found that AID-positive tumors grew significantly faster than the AID-silenced tumors despite of receiving the same doses of radiation. Conclusion: Our study suggests that AID may confer cancer resistance to radiation therapy, and AID may be a significant biomarker predicting cancer resistance to radiation therapy for certain cancer types

  9. Radiation therapy induces circulating serum Hsp72 in patients with prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurwitz, Mark D.; Kaur, Punit; Nagaraja, Ganachari M.; Bausero, Maria A.; Manola, Judith; Asea, Alexzander

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Hsp72 found in the extracellular milieu has been shown to play an important role in immune regulation. The impact of common cancer therapies on extracellular release of Hsp72 however, has been to date undefined. Materials and methods: Serum from 13 patients undergoing radiation therapy (XRT) for prostate cancer with or without hormonal therapy (ADT) was measured for levels of circulating serum Hsp72 and pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-α) using the classical sandwich ELISA technique and the relative expression of CD8 + T lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells was measured using flow cytometry. Mouse orthotopic xenograft of human prostate cancer tumors (DU-145 and PC-3) were used to validate and further characterize the response noted in the clinical setting. The biological significance of tumor released Hsp72 was studied in human dendritic cells (DC) in vitro. Results: Circulating serum Hsp72 levels increased an average of 3.5-fold (median per patient 4.8-fold) with XRT but not with ADT (p = 0.0002). Increases in IL-6 (3.3-fold), TNF-α (1.8-fold), CD8 + CTL (2.1-fold) and NK cells (3.2-fold) also occurred. Using PC-3 and DU-145 human prostate cancer xenograft models in mice, we confirmed that XRT induces Hsp72 release primarily from implanted tumors. In vitro studies using supernatant recovered from irradiated human prostate cancer cells point to exosomes containing Hsp72 as a possible stimulator of pro-inflammatory cytokine production and costimulatory molecules expression in human DC. Conclusions: The current study confirms for the first time in an actual clinical setting elevation of circulating serum Hsp72 with XRT. The accompanying studies in mice and in vitro identify the released exosomes containing Hsp72 as playing a pivotal role in stimulating pro-inflammatory immune responses. These findings, if validated, may lead to new treatment paradigms for common human malignancies.

  10. Radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer: evaluation of complications and influence of radiation timing on outcomes in a large, population-based cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Hegarty

    Full Text Available To evaluate the influence of timing of salvage and adjuvant radiation therapy on outcomes after prostatectomy for prostate cancer.Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare linked database, we identified prostate cancer patients diagnosed during 1995-2007 who had one or more adverse pathological features after prostatectomy. The final cohort of 6,137 eligible patients included men who received prostatectomy alone (n = 4,509 or with adjuvant (n = 894 or salvage (n = 734 radiation therapy. Primary outcomes were genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and erectile dysfunction events and survival after treatment(s.Radiation therapy after prostatectomy was associated with higher rates of gastrointestinal and genitourinary events, but not erectile dysfunction. In adjusted models, earlier treatment with adjuvant radiation therapy was not associated with increased rates of genitourinary or erectile dysfunction events compared to delayed salvage radiation therapy. Early adjuvant radiation therapy was associated with lower rates of gastrointestinal events that salvage radiation therapy, with hazard ratios of 0.80 (95% CI, 0.67-0.95 for procedure-defined and 0.70 (95% CI, 0.59, 0.83 for diagnosis-defined events. There was no significant difference between ART and non-ART groups (SRT or RP alone for overall survival (HR = 1.13 95% CI = (0.96, 1.34 p = 0.148.Radiation therapy after prostatectomy is associated with increased rates of gastrointestinal and genitourinary events. However, earlier radiation therapy is not associated with higher rates of gastrointestinal, genitourinary or sexual events. These findings oppose the conventional belief that delaying radiation therapy reduces the risk of radiation-related complications.

  11. The Adoption of New Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Modalities Among Medicare Beneficiaries With Breast Cancer: Clinical Correlates and Cost Implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Kenneth B. [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center and Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Soulos, Pamela R. [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center and Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Herrin, Jeph [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center and Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Health Research and Educational Trust, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Yu, James B. [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center and Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Long, Jessica B. [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center and Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Dostaler, Edward [Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); and others

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: New radiation therapy modalities have broadened treatment options for older women with breast cancer, but it is unclear how clinical factors, geographic region, and physician preference affect the choice of radiation therapy modality. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database to identify women diagnosed with stage I-III breast cancer from 1998 to 2007 who underwent breast-conserving surgery. We assessed the temporal trends in, and costs of, the adoption of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and brachytherapy. Using hierarchical logistic regression, we evaluated the relationship between the use of these new modalities and patient and regional characteristics. Results: Of 35,060 patients, 69.9% received conventional external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Although overall radiation therapy use remained constant, the use of IMRT increased from 0.0% to 12.6% from 1998 to 2007, and brachytherapy increased from 0.7% to 9.0%. The statistical variation in brachytherapy use attributable to the radiation oncologist and geographic region was 41.4% and 9.5%, respectively (for IMRT: 23.8% and 22.1%, respectively). Women undergoing treatment at a free-standing radiation facility were significantly more likely to receive IMRT than were women treated at a hospital-based facility (odds ratio for IMRT vs EBRT: 3.89 [95% confidence interval, 2.78-5.45]). No such association was seen for brachytherapy. The median radiation therapy cost per treated patient increased from $5389 in 2001 to $8539 in 2007. Conclusions: IMRT and brachytherapy use increased substantially from 1998 to 2007; overall, radiation therapy costs increased by more than 50%. Radiation oncologists played an important role in treatment choice for both types of radiation therapy, whereas geographic region played a bigger role in the use of IMRT than brachytherapy.

  12. The Adoption of New Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Modalities Among Medicare Beneficiaries With Breast Cancer: Clinical Correlates and Cost Implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, Kenneth B.; Soulos, Pamela R.; Herrin, Jeph; Yu, James B.; Long, Jessica B.; Dostaler, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: New radiation therapy modalities have broadened treatment options for older women with breast cancer, but it is unclear how clinical factors, geographic region, and physician preference affect the choice of radiation therapy modality. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database to identify women diagnosed with stage I-III breast cancer from 1998 to 2007 who underwent breast-conserving surgery. We assessed the temporal trends in, and costs of, the adoption of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and brachytherapy. Using hierarchical logistic regression, we evaluated the relationship between the use of these new modalities and patient and regional characteristics. Results: Of 35,060 patients, 69.9% received conventional external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Although overall radiation therapy use remained constant, the use of IMRT increased from 0.0% to 12.6% from 1998 to 2007, and brachytherapy increased from 0.7% to 9.0%. The statistical variation in brachytherapy use attributable to the radiation oncologist and geographic region was 41.4% and 9.5%, respectively (for IMRT: 23.8% and 22.1%, respectively). Women undergoing treatment at a free-standing radiation facility were significantly more likely to receive IMRT than were women treated at a hospital-based facility (odds ratio for IMRT vs EBRT: 3.89 [95% confidence interval, 2.78-5.45]). No such association was seen for brachytherapy. The median radiation therapy cost per treated patient increased from $5389 in 2001 to $8539 in 2007. Conclusions: IMRT and brachytherapy use increased substantially from 1998 to 2007; overall, radiation therapy costs increased by more than 50%. Radiation oncologists played an important role in treatment choice for both types of radiation therapy, whereas geographic region played a bigger role in the use of IMRT than brachytherapy

  13. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for tips on how to help with this situation. Many camps, support groups, and other activities are available to teens with cancer. Your nurse or hospital social worker can help you find these. Who knows? Your ...

  14. Antiproton Cancer Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels

    An essential part in cancer radiotherapy, is to direct a sufficiently high dose towards the tumour, without damaging the surrounding tissue. Different techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy and proton therapy have been developed, in order to reduce the dose to the normal tissue...

  15. Evaluation of Online/Offline Image Guidance/Adaptation Approaches for Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, An; Sun, Ying; Liang, Jian; Yan, Di

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate online/offline image-guided/adaptive treatment techniques for prostate cancer radiation therapy with daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging. Methods and Materials: Three treatment techniques were evaluated retrospectively using daily pre- and posttreatment CBCT images on 22 prostate cancer patients. Prostate, seminal vesicles (SV), rectal wall, and bladder were delineated on all CBCT images. For each patient, a pretreatment intensity modulated radiation therapy plan with clinical target volume (CTV) = prostate + SV and planning target volume (PTV) = CTV + 3 mm was created. The 3 treatment techniques were as follows: (1) Daily Correction: The pretreatment intensity modulated radiation therapy plan was delivered after online CBCT imaging, and position correction; (2) Online Planning: Daily online inverse plans with 3-mm CTV-to-PTV margin were created using online CBCT images, and delivered; and (3) Hybrid Adaption: Daily Correction plus an offline adaptive inverse planning performed after the first week of treatment. The adaptive plan was delivered for all remaining 15 fractions. Treatment dose for each technique was constructed using the daily posttreatment CBCT images via deformable image registration. Evaluation was performed using treatment dose distribution in target and critical organs. Results: Treatment equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for the CTV was within [85.6%, 100.8%] of the pretreatment planned target EUD for Daily Correction; [98.7%, 103.0%] for Online Planning; and [99.2%, 103.4%] for Hybrid Adaptation. Eighteen percent of the 22 patients in Daily Correction had a target dose deficiency >5%. For rectal wall, the mean ± SD of the normalized EUD was 102.6% ± 2.7% for Daily Correction, 99.9% ± 2.5% for Online Planning, and 100.6% ± 2.1% for Hybrid Adaptation. The mean ± SD of the normalized bladder EUD was 108.7% ± 8.2% for Daily Correction, 92.7% ± 8.6% for Online Planning, and 89.4% ± 10.8% for Hybrid

  16. Hematuria following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for clinically localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurka, Marie K; Chen, Leonard N; Bhagat, Aditi; Moures, Rudy; Kim, Joy S; Yung, Thomas; Lei, Siyuan; Collins, Brian T; Krishnan, Pranay; Suy, Simeng; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Lynch, John H; Collins, Sean P

    2015-01-01

    Hematuria following prostate radiotherapy is a known toxicity that may adversely affect a patient’s quality of life. Given the higher dose of radiation per fraction using stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) there is concern that post-SBRT hematuria would be more common than with alternative radiation therapy approaches. Herein, we describe the incidence and severity of hematuria following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for prostate cancer at our institution. Two hundred and eight consecutive patients with prostate cancer treated with SBRT monotherapy with at least three years of follow-up were included in this retrospective analysis. Treatment was delivered using the CyberKnife® (Accuray) to doses of 35–36.25 Gy in 5 fractions. Toxicities were scored using the CTCAE v.4. Hematuria was counted at the highest grade it occurred in the acute and late setting for each patient. Cystoscopy findings were retrospectively reviewed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Hematuria-associated bother was assessed via the Expanded Prostate Index Composite (EPIC)-26. The median age was 69 years with a median prostate volume of 39 cc. With a median follow-up of 48 months, 38 patients (18.3%) experienced at least one episode of hematuria. Median time to hematuria was 13.5 months. In the late period, there were three grade 3 events and five grade 2 events. There were no grade 4 or 5 events. The 3-year actuarial incidence of late hematuria ≥ grade 2 was 2.4%. On univariate analysis, prostate volume (p = 0.022) and history of prior procedure(s) for benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) (p = 0.002) were significantly associated with hematuria. On multivariate analysis, history of prior procedure(s) for BPH (p < 0.0001) and α 1A antagonist use (p = 0.008) were significantly associated with the development of hematuria. SBRT for prostate cancer was well tolerated with hematuria rates comparable to other radiation modalities. Patients factors

  17. Lymphocyte-Sparing Effect of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Patients With Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wild, Aaron T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Herman, Joseph M.; Dholakia, Avani S.; Moningi, Shalini [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Lu, Yao [Department of Oncology Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Rosati, Lauren M.; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Assadi, Ryan K.; Saeed, Ali M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Pawlik, Timothy M. [Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Jaffee, Elizabeth M.; Laheru, Daniel A. [Department of Medical Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Tran, Phuoc T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Weiss, Matthew J.; Wolfgang, Christopher L. [Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Ford, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Grossman, Stuart A. [Department of Medical Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Ye, Xiaobu [Department of Oncology Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Ellsworth, Susannah G., E-mail: sbatkoy2@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced lymphopenia (RIL) is associated with inferior survival in patients with glioblastoma, lung cancer, and pancreatic cancer. We asked whether stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) decreases severity of RIL compared to conventional chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Methods and Materials: Serial total lymphocyte counts (TLCs) from patients enrolled in a prospective trial of SBRT for LAPC were compared to TLCs from an existing database of LAPC patients undergoing definitive CRT. SBRT patients received 33 Gy (6.6 Gy × 5 fractions). CRT patients received a median dose of 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy × 28 fractions) with concurrent 5-fluorouracil (77%) or gemcitabine (23%) therapy. Univariate and multivariate analyses (MVA) were used to identify associations between clinical factors and post-treatment TLC and between TLC and survival. Results: Thirty-two patients received SBRT and 101 received CRT. Median planning target volume (PTV) was smaller in SBRT (88.7 cm{sup 3}) than in CRT (344.6 cm{sup 3}; P<.001); median tumor diameter was larger for SBRT (4.6 cm) than for CRT (3.6 cm; P=.01). SBRT and CRT groups had similar median baseline TLCs. One month after starting radiation, 71.7% of CRT patients had severe lymphopenia (ie, TLC <500 cells/mm{sup 3} vs 13.8% of SBRT patients; P<.001). At 2 months, 46.0% of CRT patients remained severely lymphopenic compared with 13.6% of SBRT patients (P=.007). MVA demonstrated that treatment technique and baseline TLCs were significantly associated with post-treatment TLC at 1 but not 2 months after treatment. Higher post-treatment TLC was associated with improved survival regardless of treatment technique (hazard ratio [HR] for death: 2.059; 95% confidence interval: 1.310-3.237; P=.002). Conclusions: SBRT is associated with significantly less severe RIL than CRT at 1 month in LAPC, suggesting that radiation technique affects RIL and supporting previous modeling

  18. Vestibular apparatus disorders after external radiation therapy for head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriele, P.; Orecchia, R.; Sannazzari, G.L.; Magnano, M.; Albera, R.

    1992-01-01

    External irradiation of different head and neck cancers may involve parts of the ear. The vestibular function of 25 patients in which the inner ear was comprised in the irradiated volume was investigated by electronystagmography (ENG). Doses administered (3/5 with vertigo) showed vestibular abnormalities to ENG (44% of the total). Altered responses to specific test were as follows : 6 patients to the bithermal caloric stimulation, to pendular-sinusoidal 2, and the other 3 to both of them. Patients were evaluated 3 and 6 months after ending of the radiation therapy course. At the 1st evaluation, abnormalities to caloric test were noted in 3 patients (12%) and to sinusoidal rotary test in 1 patient (4%). At the second rates of abnormal response increased to 36 and 20% respectively. Vestibular disorders seemed to be scantely related to total radiation dose. Data of literature are discussed in order to identify possible implications on treatment planning. (author). 33 refs., 3 tabs

  19. Parenteral nutrition in radiation therapy and combined treatment of patients with esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudzhyan, A.V.; Buzovkina, L.P.; Biletov, B.V.; Breusenko, E.Ya.; Krasnova, A.I.; Tsaryuk, V.F.

    1980-01-01

    Results obtained while studying 165 patients with esophageal cancer are presented. It is shown that radiation therapy and combined treatment result in the body mass loss, in the increase of katabolic processes in organism, in the negative nitrogen balance. Weaken patients, being under starvation conditions, are subjected more often to reaction changes and complications developing during the treatment. A comparison characteristics of two methods providing the organism with nutrition is given, i.e. gastrostomy and parenteral nutrition. Shown is the advantage of the adequate parenteral nutrition preventing the appearence of reaction changes and complications, improving the subjective state of patients, homeostasis indices, promoting the elimination of esophagitis phenomena, general radiation response and reaction to chemical preparations; resulting in the increase of quantity of leucocytes at leukopenia

  20. Significance of cytology in the evaluation of radiation therapy for cancer of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukahara, Yoshiharu; Kato, Junzo; Nakayama, Akiko; Fukamatsu, Yoshito; Shiozawa, Isao; Tomita, Kazuhiko; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Fukuta, Toru.

    1986-01-01

    Cytologic and histologic diagnoses were made on 184 patients with cancer of the uterine cervix treated with radiation therapy. In 125 patients examined at the 8th day after completion of external irradiation, 73 and 52 patients were cytologically positive and negative, respectively, for persistent cancer. Histologically, 74 and 51 patients were positive and negative, respectively. Fifty-eight and 36 patients showed an agreement between the two procedures for positive and negative findings, respectively. In 159 patients examined at the 8th day after both external and intracavitary irradiation, 17 were cytologically diagnosed as positive and 142 as negative: histologically, 53 were positive and 106 were negative. Thirteen and 102 patients showed an agreement between the procedures for positive and negative findings, respectively. Using histological findings as the standard, false negative cases of cytology increased after doing intracavitary irradiation than after external irradiation (25 % vs 13 %). (Namekawa, K.)

  1. Effectiveness of postoperative radiation therapy in stage IB cervical cancer with residual disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, J.; Perez-Tamayo, C.; Komaki, R.U.; Terada, K.; Roberts, J.A.; Morley, G.W.; Greenberg, M.; Mattingly, R.; Hopkins, M.

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-one patients with stage IB cervical cancer were treated with radical hysterectomy, pelvic lymph node dissection, and pelvic radiation therapy to approximately 5,090 rad. Patients were divided into two groups: group I, nine patients with involved parametria or positive margins at surgery; group II, 12 patients with metastatic pelvic lymph nodes. Patients in group I had an actuarial survival of 40% at 5 years and 20% at 10 years; patients in group II had an actuarial survival of 67% at 5 and 10 years (.01 < P < .05). The overall actuarial survival was 55% at 5 years and 43% at 10 years. Thus, patients with stage IB disease and involved parametrium or surgical margins do poorly. Alternative forms of therapy should be considered when this disease picture is clinically suspected preoperatively

  2. The Prevalence of Xerostomia Occurrence after Doing Radiation Therapy in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barunawaty Yunus

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Xerostomia is one side effect of radiation therapy that most commonly affects head and neck. This situation is a symptom and not a disease which is generally associated with reduced saliva. For patients this situation is not pleasant and for dentist, this symptom is considered as a challenging case. This research intended to know the prevalence of xerostomia after radiation therapy in cancer patients with head and neck area. The subjects of this study were patients with head and neck area cancer who underwent radiotherapy treatment at Hasanuddin University teaching hospital, subjects were then taken saliva before and after given a total dose of 20 Gy and a total dose of 40 Gy. The analysis of the data processed by the computer program and the Wilcoxon test significance level is accepted when p<0.05. The mean bulk saliva before radiotherapy was higher than average rainfall saliva after radiotherapy total dose of 20 Gy and 40 Gy. Radiotherapy of the head and neck area total dose of 20 Gy and 40 Gy may affect rainfall saliva so that patients feel the symptoms of xerostomia.

  3. The study of parotid function with radionuclide imaging after radiation therapy in nasopharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Huanbin; Zhang Qi; Wang Ling; Wu Shixiu; Xie Congying

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the uptake and excretion function of parotid by radionuclide imaging after simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy (SMART) in nasopharyngeal cancer. Methods: Forty-eight nasopharyngeal cancer cases, 38 of them were treated by SMART with 2.5 Gy/fraction at tumor and enlarged lymph node to a total dose of 70 Gy, and 2.0 Gy/fraction at subclinical foci and prophy laxtic area volume to a total dose of 56 Gy in 38 d. The other 10 cases were treated by traditional radiation therapy (RT). After treatment, all patients performed parotid imaging and both uptake index (UI) and excretion index (EI) after acid stimulation were calculated. Clinical manifestation such as grade of mouth dryness was also analyzed. Results: Average UI and EI in SMART group decreased 21.9% and 37.3% respectively, with 12 cases moderate and severe mouth dryness, whereas in traditional RT group, mean UI and El decreased 56.1% and 96.1% respectively, with 9 cases moderate and severe mouth dryness. There was significant difference between them (P<0.05). Conclusion: Parotid imaging is sensitive for monitoring parotid function, and it is also reliable to evaluate the safety of SMART to parotid.. (authors)

  4. Proton therapy radiation pneumonitis local dose–response in esophagus cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echeverria, Alfredo E.; McCurdy, Matthew; Castillo, Richard; Bernard, Vincent; Ramos, Natalia Velez; Buckley, William; Castillo, Edward; Liu, Ping; Martinez, Josue; Guerrero, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study quantifies pulmonary radiation toxicity in patients who received proton therapy for esophagus cancer. Materials/methods: We retrospectively studied 100 esophagus cancer patients treated with proton therapy. The linearity of the enhanced FDG uptake vs. proton dose was evaluated using the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). Pneumonitis symptoms (RP) were assessed using the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 (CTCAEv4). The interaction of the imaging response with dosimetric parameters and symptoms was evaluated. Results: The RP scores were: 0 grade 4/5, 7 grade 3, 20 grade 2, 37 grade 1, and 36 grade 0. Each dosimetric parameter was significantly higher for the symptomatic group. The AIC winning models were 30 linear, 52 linear quadratic, and 18 linear logarithmic. There was no significant difference in the linear coefficient between models. The slope of the FDG vs. proton dose response was 0.022 for the symptomatic and 0.012 for the asymptomatic (p = 0.014). Combining dosimetric parameters with the slope did not improve the sensitivity or accuracy in identifying symptomatic cases. Conclusions: The proton radiation dose response on FDG PET/CT imaging exhibited a predominantly linear dose response on modeling. Symptomatic patients had a higher dose response slope

  5. Validation of an educative manual for patients with head and neck cancer submitted to radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Oliveira de Almeida Marques da Cruz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: develop the content and face validation of an educative manual for patients with head and neck cancer submitted to radiation therapy. Method: descriptive methodological research. The Theory of Psychometrics was used for the validation process, developed by 15 experts in the theme area of the educative manual and by two language and publicity professionals. A minimum agreement level of 80% was considered to guarantee the validity of the material. Results: the items addressed in the assessment tool of the educative manual were divided in three blocks: objectives, structure and format, and relevance. Only one item, related to the sociocultural level of the target public, obtained an agreement rate <80%, and was reformulated based on the participants' suggestions. All other items were considered appropriate and/or complete appropriate in the three blocks proposed: objectives - 92.38%, structure and form - 89.74%, and relevance - 94.44%. Conclusion: the face and content validation of the educative manual proposed were attended to. This can contribute to the understanding of the therapeutic process the head and neck cancer patient is submitted to during the radiation therapy, besides supporting clinical practice through the nursing consultation.

  6. Probiotics for Rectal Volume Variation During Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ki, Yongkan; Kim, Wontaek; Nam, Jiho; Kim, Donghyun; Lee, Juhye; Park, Dahl; Jeon, Hosang; Ha, Honggu; Kim, Taenam; Kim, Dongwon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of the probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus on the percentage volume change of the rectum (PVC R ), a crucial factor of prostate movement. Methods and Materials: Prostate cancer patients managed with tomotherapy as a radical treatment were enrolled in the study to take a probiotic capsule containing 1.0 × 10 8 colony-forming units of L acidophilus or a placebo capsule twice daily. Radiation therapy was performed at a dose of 78 Gy in 39 fractions. The PVC R , defined as the difference in rectal volume between the planning computed tomographic (CT) and daily megavoltage CT images, was analyzed. Results: Forty patients were randomized into 2 groups. The L acidophilus group showed significantly lower median rectal volume and median PVC R values than the placebo group. L acidophilus showed a significant reduction effect on the PVC R (P R . Conclusions: L acidophilus was useful in reducing the PVC R , which is the most important determining factor of prostate position, during radiation therapy for prostate cancer

  7. Image Guided Hypofractionated Postprostatectomy Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Stephen L.; Patel, Pretesh; Song, Haijun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Freedland, Stephen J. [Surgery Section, Durham Veterans Administration, and Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Bynum, Sigrun; Oh, Daniel; Palta, Manisha; Yoo, David; Oleson, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Salama, Joseph K., E-mail: joseph.salama@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiation therapy (RT) has promising long-term biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) with comparable toxicity for definitive treatment of prostate cancer. However, data reporting outcomes after adjuvant and salvage postprostatectomy hypofractionated RT are sparse. Therefore, we report the toxicity and clinical outcomes after postprostatectomy hypofractionated RT. Methods and Materials: From a prospectively maintained database, men receiving image guided hypofractionated intensity modulated RT (HIMRT) with 2.5-Gy fractions constituted our study population. Androgen deprivation therapy was used at the discretion of the radiation oncologist. Acute toxicities were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Late toxicities were scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer scale. Biochemical recurrence was defined as an increase of 0.1 in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) from posttreatment nadir or an increase in PSA despite treatment. The Kaplan-Meier method was used for the time-to-event outcomes. Results: Between April 2008 and April 2012, 56 men received postoperative HIMRT. The median follow-up time was 48 months (range, 21-67 months). Thirty percent had pre-RT PSA <0.1; the median pre-RT detectable PSA was 0.32 ng/mL. The median RT dose was 65 Gy (range, 57.5-65 Gy). Ten patients received neoadjuvant and concurrent hormone therapy. Posttreatment acute urinary toxicity was limited. There was no acute grade 3 toxicity. Late genitourinary (GU) toxicity of any grade was noted in 52% of patients, 40% of whom had pre-RT urinary incontinence. The 4-year actuarial rate of late grade 3 GU toxicity (exclusively gross hematuria) was 28% (95% confidence interval [CI], 16%-41%). Most grade 3 GU toxicity resolved; only 7% had persistent grade ≥3 toxicity at the last follow-up visit. Fourteen patients experienced biochemical recurrence at a

  8. Lipiodol as a Fiducial Marker for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freilich, Jessica M.; Spiess, Philippe E.; Biagioli, Matthew C.; Fernandez, Daniel C.; Shi, Ellen J.; Hunt, Dylan C.; Gupta, Shilpa; Wilder, Richard B., E-mail: richard.wilder@moffitt.org [Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate Lipiodol as a liquid, radio-opaque fiducial marker for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for bladder cancer; Materials and Methods: Between 2011 and 2012, 5 clinical T2a-T3b N0 M0 stage II-III bladder cancer patients were treated with maximal transurethral resection of a bladder tumor (TURBT) and image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) to 64.8 Gy in 36 fractions ± concurrent weekly cisplatin-based or gemcitabine chemotherapy. Ten to 15mL Lipiodol, using 0.5mL per injection, was injected into bladder submucosa circumferentially around the entire periphery of the tumor bed immediately following maximal TURBT. The authors looked at inter-observer variability regarding the size and location of the tumor bed (CTVboost) on computed tomography scans with versus without Lipiodol. Results: Median follow-up was 18 months. Lipiodol was visible on every orthogonal two-dimensional kV portal image throughout the entire, 7-week course of IGRT. There was a trend towards improved inter-observer agreement on the CTVboost with Lipiodol (p = 0.06). In 2 of 5 patients, the tumor bed based upon Lipiodol extended outside a planning target volume that would have been treated with a radiation boost based upon a cystoscopy report and an enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan for staging. There was no toxicity attributable to Lipiodol: Conclusions: Lipiodol constitutes a safe and effective fiducial marker that an urologist can use to demarcate a tumor bed immediately following maximal TURBT. Lipiodol decreases inter-observer variability in the definition of the extent and location of a tumor bed on a treatment planning CT scan for a radiation boost. (author)

  9. Lipiodol as a Fiducial Marker for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M. Freilich

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To evaluate Lipiodol as a liquid, radio-opaque fiducial marker for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT for bladder cancer.Materials and Methods Between 2011 and 2012, 5 clinical T2a-T3b N0 M0 stage II-III bladder cancer patients were treated with maximal transurethral resection of a bladder tumor (TURBT and image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT to 64.8 Gy in 36 fractions ± concurrent weekly cisplatin-based or gemcitabine chemotherapy. Ten to 15mL Lipiodol, using 0.5mL per injection, was injected into bladder submucosa circumferentially around the entire periphery of the tumor bed immediately following maximal TURBT. The authors looked at inter-observer variability regarding the size and location of the tumor bed (CTVboost on computed tomography scans with versus without Lipiodol.Results Median follow-up was 18 months. Lipiodol was visible on every orthogonal two-dimensional kV portal image throughout the entire, 7-week course of IGRT. There was a trend towards improved inter-observer agreement on the CTVboost with Lipiodol (p = 0.06. In 2 of 5 patients, the tumor bed based upon Lipiodol extended outside a planning target volume that would have been treated with a radiation boost based upon a cystoscopy report and an enhanced computed tomography (CT scan for staging. There was no toxicity attributable to Lipiodol.Conclusions Lipiodol constitutes a safe and effective fiducial marker that an urologist can use to demarcate a tumor bed immediately following maximal TURBT. Lipiodol decreases inter-observer variability in the definition of the extent and location of a tumor bed on a treatment planning CT scan for a radiation boost.

  10. Adoption of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy For Early-Stage Breast Cancer From 2004 Through 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Elyn H. [Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Mougalian, Sarah S. [Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Soulos, Pamela R. [Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Internal Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Smith, Benjamin D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Gross, Cary P. [Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Internal Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Yu, James B., E-mail: james.b.yu@yale.edu [Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a newer method of radiation therapy (RT) that has been increasingly adopted as an adjuvant treatment after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). IMRT may result in improved cosmesis compared to standard RT, although at greater expense. To investigate the adoption of IMRT, we examined trends and factors associated with IMRT in women under the age of 65 with early stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective study of early stage breast cancer patients treated with BCS followed by whole-breast irradiation (WBI) who were ≤65 years old in the National Cancer Data Base from 2004 to 2011. We used logistic regression to identify factors associated with receipt of IMRT (vs standard RT). Results: We identified 11,089 women with early breast cancer (9.6%) who were treated with IMRT and 104,448 (90.4%) who were treated with standard RT, after BCS. The proportion of WBI patients receiving IMRT increased yearly from 2004 to 2009, with 5.3% of WBI patients receiving IMRT in 2004 and 11.6% receiving IMRT in 2009. Further use of IMRT declined afterward, with the proportion remaining steady at 11.0% and 10.7% in 2010 and 2011, respectively. Patients treated in nonacademic community centers were more likely to receive IMRT (odds ratio [OR], 1.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.30-1.43 for nonacademic vs academic center). Compared to privately insured patients, the uninsured patients (OR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.70-0.95) and those with Medicaid insurance (OR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.79-0.95) were less likely to receive IMRT. Conclusions: The use of IMRT rose from 2004 to 2009 and then stabilized. Important nonclinical factors associated with IMRT use included facility type and insurance status.

  11. Adoption of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy For Early-Stage Breast Cancer From 2004 Through 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Elyn H.; Mougalian, Sarah S.; Soulos, Pamela R.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Gross, Cary P.; Yu, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a newer method of radiation therapy (RT) that has been increasingly adopted as an adjuvant treatment after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). IMRT may result in improved cosmesis compared to standard RT, although at greater expense. To investigate the adoption of IMRT, we examined trends and factors associated with IMRT in women under the age of 65 with early stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective study of early stage breast cancer patients treated with BCS followed by whole-breast irradiation (WBI) who were ≤65 years old in the National Cancer Data Base from 2004 to 2011. We used logistic regression to identify factors associated with receipt of IMRT (vs standard RT). Results: We identified 11,089 women with early breast cancer (9.6%) who were treated with IMRT and 104,448 (90.4%) who were treated with standard RT, after BCS. The proportion of WBI patients receiving IMRT increased yearly from 2004 to 2009, with 5.3% of WBI patients receiving IMRT in 2004 and 11.6% receiving IMRT in 2009. Further use of IMRT declined afterward, with the proportion remaining steady at 11.0% and 10.7% in 2010 and 2011, respectively. Patients treated in nonacademic community centers were more likely to receive IMRT (odds ratio [OR], 1.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.30-1.43 for nonacademic vs academic center). Compared to privately insured patients, the uninsured patients (OR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.70-0.95) and those with Medicaid insurance (OR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.79-0.95) were less likely to receive IMRT. Conclusions: The use of IMRT rose from 2004 to 2009 and then stabilized. Important nonclinical factors associated with IMRT use included facility type and insurance status

  12. Potential risk and benefit of the combination of trastuzumab to chemotherapy and radiation therapy in non-metastatic breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkacemi, Y.; Laharie-Mineur, H.; Gligorov, J.; Azria, D.

    2007-01-01

    Trastuzumab (Herceptin) is the first humanized monoclonal antibody targeting the HER2 antigen in breast cancer. HER2 receptor has been individualised 20 years ago. During the past 10 years, trastuzumab administration has radically modified the prognosis of the patients that are treated for HER2 positive breast cancer. Its efficacy has been demonstrated in the metastatic and adjuvant settings. While, trastuzumab based-regimens became the standard of care in the treatment of HER2/neu positive breast cancer, the optimal combination (concurrently or sequentially) to chemotherapy and radiation therapy is still unknown. Indeed, while the concurrent administration of trastuzumab and anthracyclines is not recommended because of a high risk of cardiac toxicity, there is no published data on the best sequence of trastuzumab and radiation therapy administration, particularly when internal mammary chain is involved. The benefit/risk ratio of the concurrent and sequential administration of trastuzumab with chemotherapy and radiation therapy will be discussed in this review. (authors)

  13. Estimated risk for secondary cancer in the contra-lateral breast following radiation therapy of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, Safora; Danielsen, Turi; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2008-01-01

    Purpose. To facilitate a discussion about the impact of dose heterogeneity on the risk for secondary contralateral breast (CB) cancer predicted with linear and non linear models associated with primary breast irradiation. Methods and materials. Dose volume statistics of the CB calculated for eight patients using a collapsed cone algorithm were used to predict the excess relative risk (ERR) for cancer induction in CB. Both linear and non-linear models were employed. A sensitivity analysis demonstrating the impact of different parameter values on calculated ERR for the eight patients was also included in this study. Results. A proportionality assumption was established to make the calculations with a linear and non-linear model comparable. ERR of secondary cancer predicted by the linear model varied considerably between the patients, while the predicted ERR for the same patients using the non-linear model showed very small variation. The predicted ERRs by the two models were indistinguishable for small doses, i.e. below ∼3 Gy. The sensitivity analysis showed that the quadratic component of the radiation-induction pre-malignant cell term is negligible for lower dose level. The ERR is highly sensitive to the value of agr1 and agr2. Conclusions. Optimization of breast cancer radiation therapy, where also the risk for radiation induced secondary malignancies in the contralateral breast is taken into account, requires robust and valid risk assessment. The linear dose-risk model does not account for the complexity in the mechanisms underlying the development of secondary malignancies following exposure to radiation; this is particularly important when estimating risk associated with highly heterogeneous dose distributions as is the case in the contralateral breast of women receiving breast cancer irradiation

  14. Sexual dysfunctions after prostate cancer radiation therapy; Dysfonctions sexuelles apres irradiation pour cancer de la prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droupy, S. [Service d' urologie-andrologie, CHU Caremeau, 30 - Nimes (France)

    2010-10-15

    Sexual dysfunctions are a quality of life main concern following prostate cancer treatment. After both radiotherapy and brachytherapy, sexual function declines progressively, the onset of occurrence of erectile dysfunction being 12-18 months after both treatments. The pathophysiological pathways by which radiotherapy and brachytherapy cause erectile dysfunction are multi-factorial, as patient co-morbidities, arterial damage, exposure of neurovascular bundle to high levels of radiation, and radiation dose received by the corpora cavernosa at the crurae of the penis may be important in the aetiology of erectile dysfunction. Diagnosis and treatment of postradiation sexual dysfunctions must integrate pre-therapeutic evaluation and information to provide to the patient and his partner a multidisciplinary sexual medicine management. (authors)

  15. Stereotactic body radiation therapy planning with duodenal sparing using volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer: A dosimetric analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rachit; Wild, Aaron T.; Ziegler, Mark A.; Hooker, Ted K.; Dah, Samson D.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Kang, Jun; Smith, Koren; Zeng, Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Pawlik, Timothy M. [Department of Surgery, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Tryggestad, Erik [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Ford, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Herman, Joseph M., E-mail: jherma15@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) achieves excellent local control for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), but may increase late duodenal toxicity. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivers intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a rotating gantry rather than multiple fixed beams. This study dosimetrically evaluates the feasibility of implementing duodenal constraints for SBRT using VMAT vs IMRT. Non–duodenal sparing (NS) and duodenal-sparing (DS) VMAT and IMRT plans delivering 25 Gy in 1 fraction were generated for 15 patients with LAPC. DS plans were constrained to duodenal D{sub max} of<30 Gy at any point. VMAT used 1 360° coplanar arc with 4° spacing between control points, whereas IMRT used 9 coplanar beams with fixed gantry positions at 40° angles. Dosimetric parameters for target volumes and organs at risk were compared for DS planning vs NS planning and VMAT vs IMRT using paired-sample Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Both DS VMAT and DS IMRT achieved significantly reduced duodenal D{sub mean}, D{sub max}, D{sub 1cc}, D{sub 4%}, and V{sub 20} {sub Gy} compared with NS plans (all p≤0.002). DS constraints compromised target coverage for IMRT as demonstrated by reduced V{sub 95%} (p = 0.01) and D{sub mean} (p = 0.02), but not for VMAT. DS constraints resulted in increased dose to right kidney, spinal cord, stomach, and liver for VMAT. Direct comparison of DS VMAT and DS IMRT revealed that VMAT was superior in sparing the left kidney (p<0.001) and the spinal cord (p<0.001), whereas IMRT was superior in sparing the stomach (p = 0.05) and the liver (p = 0.003). DS VMAT required 21% fewer monitor units (p<0.001) and delivered treatment 2.4 minutes faster (p<0.001) than DS IMRT. Implementing DS constraints during SBRT planning for LAPC can significantly reduce duodenal point or volumetric dose parameters for both VMAT and IMRT. The primary consequence of implementing DS constraints for VMAT is increased dose to other organs at

  16. Cancer of the breast: Conservation surgery and curative radiation therapy - Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, L.W.; Bedwinek, J.M.; Markoe, A.M.; Micaily, B.; Damsker, J.I.; Karlsson, U.L.

    1987-01-01

    Current evidence strongly suggests that radiation therapy following conservation surgery in the primary local management of stage I and stage II breast cancer can achieve survival and local-regional control rates that are comparable to those obtained by radical and modified radical mastectomy. Since primary radiation therapy has the benefit of leaving the patient with intact and cosmetically acceptable breasts, it should be considered as a viable and reasonable alternative to radical mastectomy. An analysis of current series of primary radiation data suggests that total excision of the tumor should be carried out. An axillary node sampling or dissection including level 1 and level 2 axillary nodes (those lying beneath and lateral to the pectoralis minor muscle) should be carried out in addition to tumor excision since knowledge of the axillary nodal status serves as a prognostic indicator and facilitates the intelligent selection of those patients for adjuvant hormonal or chemotherapy. Technique then becomes a critical and important part of the management of the patient. No effort should be spared to insure that the volumes irradiated are properly chosen, receive the appropriate dose to maximize the potential for local-regional control and done within the context of minimization of complication from the treatment program. It is only under these circumstances that the best in terms of long-term survival and cosmetic can be achieved

  17. Age-adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index predicts prognosis of laryngopharyngeal cancer treated with radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Kazuya; Takenaka, Yukinori; Ashida, Naoki; Shimizu, Kotaro; Oya, Ryohei; Kitamura, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Yoshifumi; Uno, Atsuhiko

    2017-12-01

    To examine the ability of comorbidity indices to predict the prognosis of laryngopharyngeal cancer and their association with treatment modalities. This retrospective study included 198 patients with laryngeal, hypopharyngeal, and oropharyngeal cancers. The effect of comorbidity indices on overall survival between surgery and (chemo)-radiation therapy ((C)RT) groups was analyzed. The cumulative incidence rates for cancer mortality and other mortalities according to the age-adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index (ACCI) and Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) were compared. Univariate survival analyses showed a significant association between the ACCI and overall survival in the (C)RT group, but not in the surgery group. The association between the CCI and overall survival was not significant in either group. In multivariate analyses, a high ACCI score was an independent prognostic factor in the (C)RT group (HR 2.89, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.28-6.49), but not in the surgery group (HR 1.39, 95%CI 0.27-5.43). The higher ACCI group had increased mortality from other causes compared with the lower ACCI group (5-year cumulative incidence, 8.5% and 17.8%, respectively, p = .003). The ACCI was a better prognostic factor than the CCI. Surgery may be more beneficial than radiation for patients with a high ACCI.

  18. Reassessment of radiation therapy for the management of lung cancer in patients with chronic pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, N.; Weinstein, H.

    1983-01-01

    Surgery has remained the mainstay of definitive treatment for lung cancer. Radiation therapy has been advocated when the location of the lung cancer precludes resection or the severity or the cardiopulmonary impairment indicates that the patient cannot withstand the proposed resection. Extended field irradiation has been shown to improve tumor control and survival. However, in patients with chronic pulmonary disease, extended field irradiation may exacerbate pulmonary insufficiency and compromise survival. Between 1975 and 1980, 29 patients with lung cancer and chronic pulmonary disease were treated by involved field irradiation (IFR). This was compared to the experience of 41 patients who had been treated prior to 1975 by extended field irradiation (EFR). The frequency of subjective response and tumor control were comparable in each group. One patient treated by IFR developed a marginal recurrence. Radiation pneumonitis was observed in 7/41 (17%) EFR patients versus 2/29 (7%) IFR. Treatment related death occurred in 2/41 (5%) EFR versus 1/29 (3.3%) IFR. One year disease free survival was 8/41 (19%) EFR versus 12/29 (41%) IFR. Two of 14 (14%) IFR patients at risk five years are alive without evidence of disease

  19. Delayed esophageal perforation from stereotactic body radiation therapy for locally recurrent central nonsmall cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Sainathan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT is a novel form of external beam radiation therapy. It is used to treat early and locally recurrent nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSLC in medically inoperable patients. It uses high dose, hypofractionated radiotherapy, with targeting of the tumor by precise spatial localization, thus minimizing injury to surrounding tissues. It can be safely used to ablate NSLC in both central and peripheral locations. We present two cases of delayed esophageal perforation after SBRT for locally recurrent central NSLC. The perforations occurred several months after the therapy. They were treated with covered esophageal stents, with mortality, due to the perforation in one of the patients. SBRT should be judiciously used to ablate centrally located NSLC and patients who develop episodes of esophagitis during or after SBRT, need to be closely followed with endoscopy to look for esophageal ulcerations. These ulcers should be closely followed for healing as these may degenerate into full thickness perforations several months after SBRT.

  20. A study of the radiobiological modeling of the conformal radiation therapy in cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyakuryal, Anil Prasad

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of mortalities in the world. The precise diagnosis of the disease helps the patients to select the appropriate modality of the treatments such as surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The physics of X-radiation and the advanced imaging technologies such as positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) plays an important role in the efficient diagnosis and therapeutic treatments in cancer. However, the accuracy of the measurements of the metabolic target volumes (MTVs) in the PET/CT dual-imaging modality is always limited. Similarly the external beam radiation therapy (XRT) such as 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is the most common modality in the radiotherapy treatment. These treatments are simulated and evaluated using the XRT plans and the standard methodologies in the commercial planning system. However, the normal organs are always susceptible to the radiation toxicity in these treatments due to lack of knowledge of the appropriate radiobiological models to estimate the clinical outcomes. We explored several methodologies to estimate MTVs by reviewing various techniques of the target volume delineation using the static phantoms in the PET scans. The review suggests that the more precise and practical method of delineating PET MTV should be an intermediate volume between the volume coverage for the standardized uptake value (SUV; 2.5) of glucose and the 50% (40%) threshold of the maximum SUV for the smaller (larger) volume delineations in the radiotherapy applications. Similarly various types of optimal XRT plans were designed using the CT and PET/CT scans for the treatment of various types of cancer patients. The qualities of these plans were assessed using the universal plan-indices. The dose-volume criteria were also examined in the targets and organs by analyzing the conventional dose-volume histograms (DVHs). The biological models such as tumor

  1. New combined therapy of radiation and local administration of OK-432 for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Minoru; Morita, Shinroku; Tsunemoto, Hiroshi

    1990-01-01

    We devised new combination therapy of radiation and local administration of OK-432 and performed for 26 patients with esophageal cancer between March, 1987 and December, 1988 as a pilot study. The average age was 73 years. Among 26 patients, males were 20 and females were six. Patients were irradiated at the schedule of under 2 Gy/day and the dose of TDF (time, dose and fractionation factor) 100 totally. OK-432, 10KE was endoscopically administered around cancer lesion at the beginning of the radiotherapy, and two weeks later, 5KE was given in the same manner. Complete response was obtained in 20 out of 26 cases (77%) and partial response was obtained in the remaining six cases (23%). All six patients with tumor length less than five cm showed complete response. All 16 patients who could not eat food orally before treatment, became to take food enough orally after the treatment and could discharge in good condition. One year and two years survival rate of 26 patients by Kaplan Meier method were 67.4% and 47.2%, respectively. Six patients with tumor length less than five cm, are all alive without a sign of recurrence. This combination therapy will improve not only the response rate and the survival rate, but also the quality of life of patients with esophageal cancer. (author)

  2. Assess results of PET/CT in cancer diagnosis, follow up treatment and simulation for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mai Trong Khoa; Tran Dinh Ha; Tran Hai Binh

    2015-01-01

    PET/CT (Positron Emission Computed Tomography) has been studied and established as routine at the Nuclear Medicine and Oncology Center, Bach Mai hospital. From 8/2009 to 5/2015, 6223 patients have been undergone PET/CT scan. Among them, diagnostic and simulation PET/CT scan for cancer patients accounted to 5833 (93.8%). Researches about value of PET/CT for most common cancers have been done. Results: PET/CT can help the primary tumor diagnosis, metastases detection, staging, simulation for radiation therapy, response to treatment assessment, and relapses after treatment identification. Percentage accordance between PET / CT and histopathology was 96% (esophagus cancer), 94.7% (lung cancer). Average maxSUV value of primary tumor of the esophagus cancer, colorectal cancer, nasopharynx cancer, lung cancer, and NHL respectively 9.50, 9.78, 11.08, 9.17, 10.21. MaxSUV value increased with histological grade and tumor size. After undergone PET / CT, stage of disease changed in 28% esophagus cancer; 22.7% colorectal cancer; stage of disease increased in 23.5% of NHL, 32.0% of lung cancer, and 25.0% of nasopharynx cancer. PET / CT simulation for radiation therapy target volume reduced in 28% of nasopharynx cancer, which helped the radioactive dose concentrate exactly in the target lesions, minimize effect to healthy tissues, improved the effectiveness of treatment and reduced complications. (author)

  3. Saw Palmetto for Symptom Management During Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Gwen K; Sikorskii, Alla; Safikhani, Abolfazl; McVary, Kevin T; Herman, James

    2016-06-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTSs) affect 75%-80% of men undergoing radiation therapy (RT) for prostate cancer. To determine the safety, maximum tolerated dose (MTD), and preliminary efficacy of Serenoa repens commonly known as saw palmetto (SP) for management of LUTS during RT for prostate cancer. The dose finding phase used the time-to-event continual reassessment method to evaluate safety of three doses (320, 640, and 960 mg) of SP. Dose-limiting toxicities were assessed for 22 weeks using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events for nausea, gastritis, and anorexia. The exploratory randomized controlled trial phase assessed preliminary efficacy of the MTD against placebo. The primary outcome of LUTS was measured over 22 weeks using the International Prostate Symptom Score. Additional longitudinal assessments included quality of life measured with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate. The dose finding phase was completed by 27 men who reported no dose-limiting toxicities and with 20 participants at the MTD of 960 mg daily. The exploratory randomized controlled trial phase included 21 men, and no statistically significant differences in the International Prostate Symptom Score were observed. The prostate-specific concerns score of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate improved in the SP group (P = 0.03). Of 11 men in the placebo group, two received physician-prescribed medications to manage LUTS compared with none of the 10 men in the SP group. SP at 960 mg may be a safe herbal supplement, but its efficacy in managing LUTS during RT needs further investigation. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Brachial Plexus-Associated Neuropathy After High-Dose Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Allen M.; Hall, William H.; Li, Judy; Beckett, Laurel; Farwell, D. Gregory; Lau, Derick H.; Purdy, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To identify clinical and treatment-related predictors of brachial plexus–associated neuropathies after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Three hundred thirty patients who had previously completed radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer were prospectively screened using a standardized instrument for symptoms of neuropathy thought to be related to brachial plexus injury. All patients were disease-free at the time of screening. The median time from completion of radiation therapy was 56 months (range, 6–135 months). One-hundred fifty-five patients (47%) were treated by definitive radiation therapy, and 175 (53%) were treated postoperatively. Radiation doses ranged from 50 to 74 Gy (median, 66 Gy). Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was used in 62% of cases, and 133 patients (40%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Forty patients (12%) reported neuropathic symptoms, with the most common being ipsilateral pain (50%), numbness/tingling (40%), motor weakness, and/or muscle atrophy (25%). When patients with <5 years of follow-up were excluded, the rate of positive symptoms increased to 22%. On univariate analysis, the following factors were significantly associated with brachial plexus symptoms: prior neck dissection (p = 0.01), concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), and radiation maximum dose (p < 0.001). Cox regression analysis confirmed that both neck dissection (p < 0.001) and radiation maximum dose (p < 0.001) were independently predictive of symptoms. Conclusion: The incidence of brachial plexus–associated neuropathies after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer may be underreported. In view of the dose–response relationship identified, limiting radiation dose to the brachial plexus should be considered when possible.

  5. Exposure of the Heart in Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy: A Systematic Review of Heart Doses Published During 2003 to 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Carolyn W.; Wang, Zhe; Macaulay, Elizabeth; Jagsi, Reshma; Duane, Frances; Darby, Sarah C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Breast cancer radiation therapy cures many women, but where the heart is exposed, it can cause heart disease. We report a systematic review of heart doses from breast cancer radiation therapy that were published during 2003 to 2013. Methods and Materials: Eligible studies were those reporting whole-heart dose (ie, dose averaged over the whole heart). Analyses considered the arithmetic mean of the whole-heart doses for the CT plans for each regimen in each study. We termed this “mean heart dose.” Results: In left-sided breast cancer, mean heart dose averaged over all 398 regimens reported in 149 studies from 28 countries was 5.4 Gy (range, <0.1-28.6 Gy). In regimens that did not include the internal mammary chain (IMC), average mean heart dose was 4.2 Gy and varied with the target tissues irradiated. The lowest average mean heart doses were from tangential radiation therapy with either breathing control (1.3 Gy; range, 0.4-2.5 Gy) or treatment in the lateral decubitus position (1.2 Gy; range, 0.8-1.7 Gy), or from proton radiation therapy (0.5 Gy; range, 0.1-0.8 Gy). For intensity modulated radiation therapy mean heart dose was 5.6 Gy (range, <0.1-23.0 Gy). Where the IMC was irradiated, average mean heart dose was around 8 Gy and varied little according to which other targets were irradiated. Proton radiation therapy delivered the lowest average mean heart dose (2.6 Gy, range, 1.0-6.0 Gy), and tangential radiation therapy with a separate IMC field the highest (9.2 Gy, range, 1.9-21.0 Gy). In right-sided breast cancer, the average mean heart dose was 3.3 Gy based on 45 regimens in 23 studies. Conclusions: Recent estimates of typical heart doses from left breast cancer radiation therapy vary widely between studies, even for apparently similar regimens. Maneuvers to reduce heart dose in left tangential radiation therapy were successful. Proton radiation therapy delivered the lowest doses. Inclusion of the IMC doubled typical heart dose.

  6. MO-FG-BRB-02: Uniform Access to Radiation Therapy by 2035: Global Task Force on Radiotherapy for Cancer Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffray, D.

    2015-01-01

    The global burden of cancer is growing rapidly with an estimated 15 million new cases per year worldwide in 2015, growing to 19 million by 2025 and 24 million by 2035. The largest component of this growth will occur in low-to-middle income countries (LMICs). About half of these cases will require radiation treatment. The gap for available cancer treatment, including radiation therapy, between high-income countries (HICs) and LMICs is enormous. Accurate data and quantitative models to project the needs and the benefits of cancer treatment are a critical first step in closing the large cancer divide between LMICs and HICs. In this context, the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) has developed a Global Task Force on Radiotherapy for Cancer Control (GTFRCC) with a charge to answer the question as to what it will take to close the gap between what exists today and reasonable access to radiation therapy globally by 2035 and what the potential clinical and economic benefits are for doing this. The Task Force has determined the projections of cancer incidence and the infrastructure required to provide access to radiation therapy globally. Furthermore it has shown that appropriate investment not only yields improved clinical outcomes for millions of patients but that it also provides an overall economic gain throughout all the income settings where this investment is made. This symposium will summarize the facets associated with this global cancer challenge by reviewing the cancer burden, looking at the requirements for radiation therapy, reviewing the benefits of providing such therapy both from a clinical and economic perspective and finally by looking at what approaches can be used to aid in the alleviation of this global cancer challenge. The speakers are world renowned experts in global public health issues (R. Atun), medical physics (D. Jaffray) and radiation oncology (N. Coleman). Learning Objectives: To describe the global cancer challenge and the

  7. MO-FG-BRB-02: Uniform Access to Radiation Therapy by 2035: Global Task Force on Radiotherapy for Cancer Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaffray, D. [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    The global burden of cancer is growing rapidly with an estimated 15 million new cases per year worldwide in 2015, growing to 19 million by 2025 and 24 million by 2035. The largest component of this growth will occur in low-to-middle income countries (LMICs). About half of these cases will require radiation treatment. The gap for available cancer treatment, including radiation therapy, between high-income countries (HICs) and LMICs is enormous. Accurate data and quantitative models to project the needs and the benefits of cancer treatment are a critical first step in closing the large cancer divide between LMICs and HICs. In this context, the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) has developed a Global Task Force on Radiotherapy for Cancer Control (GTFRCC) with a charge to answer the question as to what it will take to close the gap between what exists today and reasonable access to radiation therapy globally by 2035 and what the potential clinical and economic benefits are for doing this. The Task Force has determined the projections of cancer incidence and the infrastructure required to provide access to radiation therapy globally. Furthermore it has shown that appropriate investment not only yields improved clinical outcomes for millions of patients but that it also provides an overall economic gain throughout all the income settings where this investment is made. This symposium will summarize the facets associated with this global cancer challenge by reviewing the cancer burden, looking at the requirements for radiation therapy, reviewing the benefits of providing such therapy both from a clinical and economic perspective and finally by looking at what approaches can be used to aid in the alleviation of this global cancer challenge. The speakers are world renowned experts in global public health issues (R. Atun), medical physics (D. Jaffray) and radiation oncology (N. Coleman). Learning Objectives: To describe the global cancer challenge and the

  8. Trends in primary surgical and radiation therapy for localized breast cancer in the detroit metropolitan area 1973-1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuba, Paul J.; Simon, Michael S.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this report is to describe trends in primary surgical and radiation therapy for localized breast cancer from 1973 through 1992 among residents of the Detroit Metropolitan area. Methods and Materials: Data on surgical and radiation therapy procedures for women with local stage breast cancer were obtained from the population-based Metropolitan Detroit Cancer Surveillance System (MDCSS). Results: Women age 75 years and older were treated less aggressively than younger women (< age 75) as evidenced by higher rates of simple mastectomy or no treatment among older women. Younger women (< age 75) were more likely to have had optimal breast conservation therapy which consisted of partial mastectomy, axillary lymph node dissection (ALND), and radiation therapy, than were women who were older than 75. Partial mastectomy has increased proportionally from 4% of all breast cancer surgeries in the time period 1973 to 1977, to 39% of all surgeries from 1988 through 1992. Conclusion: A marked difference in surgical treatment of breast cancer exists for younger vs. older women. Despite changes in surgical treatment trends for breast cancer, a large proportion of women who are candidates for conservative therapy continue to undergo mastectomy

  9. Palliative Short-Course Radiation Therapy in Rectal Cancer: A Phase 2 Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picardi, Vincenzo; Deodato, Francesco [Department of Radiotherapy, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura “Giovanni Paolo II,” Campobasso (Italy); Guido, Alessandra; Giaccherini, Lucia [Radiation Oncology Center, Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine (DIMES), University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Macchia, Gabriella, E-mail: gmacchia@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Radiotherapy, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura “Giovanni Paolo II,” Campobasso (Italy); Frazzoni, Leonardo; Farioli, Andrea; Cuicchi, Dajana [Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Cilla, Savino [Department of Radiotherapy, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura “Giovanni Paolo II,” Campobasso (Italy); Cellini, Francesco [Radiation Oncology Department, Policlinico Universitario Campus Bio-Medico, Rome (Italy); Uddin, A.F.M. Kamal [Department of Radiation Oncology, United Hospital Limited, Dhaka (Bangladesh); Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta [Department of Radiotherapy, Policlinico Universitario “A. Gemelli,” Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome (Italy); Buwenge, Milly [Radiation Oncology Center, Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine (DIMES), University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Ardizzoni, Andrea [Medical Oncology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy); Poggioli, Gilberto [Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Valentini, Vincenzo [Department of Radiotherapy, Policlinico Universitario “A. Gemelli,” Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome (Italy); and others

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: The management of patients with symptomatic rectal cancer not amenable to curative treatment may be challenging. The aim of this phase 2 study was to evaluate the efficacy of short-course radiation therapy in patients with obstructing rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients who were not candidates for surgical resection because of synchronous metastases, age, and/or comorbidities were considered eligible. The sample size was calculated based on the 2-stage design of Simon. Short-course radiation therapy was delivered with an isocentric 4-field box technique (total, 25 Gy; 5 fractions in 5 days). Chemotherapy was suspended during radiation treatment. Clinical outcome measures were symptomatic response rate, toxicity, colostomy-free survival, and overall survival. Results: From October 2003 to November 2012, 18 patients (median age, 77.5 years) were enrolled. The median follow-up was 11.5 months (range, 3-36 months). Four weeks after treatment, a complete response (ie, complete symptom resolution) was observed in 38.9% of patients and a partial response in 50.0% cases, whereas 11.1% had no response. The rates of reduction or resolution of pain and bleeding were 87.5% and 100%, respectively. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year colostomy-free survival rates were 100%, 71.4%, and 47.6%, respectively (median, 30 months). The 1-, 2-, and 3-year cumulative overall survival rates were 85.2%, 53%, and 39.8%, respectively (median, 25 months). No patients stopped treatment because of gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicities: 38.9% of patients had grade 1 to 2 toxicity, and 16.7% had grade 3 toxicity. Only 1 patient had hematologic grade 2 toxicity, and 2 patients had grade 2 skin toxicity. Conclusions: Short-course radiation therapy may represent a safe and effective alternative treatment option in patients with obstructing rectal cancer not eligible for curative treatment, allowing colostomy to be avoided in a substantial proportion of patients.

  10. Survival After Conservative Management Versus External Beam Radiation Therapy in Elderly Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dell' Oglio, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.delloglio@gmail.com [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Department of Urology and Division of Experimental Oncology, Urological Research Institute, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Boehm, Katharina [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Martini-Clinic, Prostate Cancer Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Trudeau, Vincent [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Department of Urology, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Tian, Zhe [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Larcher, Alessandro [Department of Urology and Division of Experimental Oncology, Urological Research Institute, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Leyh-Bannurah, Sami-Ramzi [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Martini-Clinic, Prostate Cancer Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Moschini, Marco; Capitanio, Umberto [Department of Urology and Division of Experimental Oncology, Urological Research Institute, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Shariat, Shahrokh F. [Department of Urology, Medical University of Vienna and General Hospital, Vienna (Austria); and others

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: To compare survival in elderly men with clinically localized prostate cancer (PCa) according to treatment type, defined as radiation therapy (RT) with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) versus conservative management (observation). Methods and Materials: In the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)–Medicare linked database, we identified 23,790 patients aged 80 years or more with clinically localized PCa treated with either RT or observation between 1991 and 2009. Competing risks analyses focused on cancer-specific mortality and other-cause mortality, after accounting for confounders. All analyses were repeated after stratification according to grade (well-differentiated vs moderately differentiated vs poorly differentiated disease), race, and United States region, in patients with no comorbidities and in patients with at least 1 comorbidity. Analyses were repeated within most contemporary patients, namely those treated between 2001 and 2009. Results: Radiation therapy was associated with more favorable cancer-specific mortality rates than observation in patients with moderately differentiated disease (hazard ratio [HR] 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.66-0.94; P=.009) and in patients with poorly differentiated disease (HR 0.58; 95% CI 0.49-0.69; P<.001). Conversely, the benefit of RT was not observed in well-differentiated disease. The benefit of RT was confirmed in black men (HR 0.54; 95% CI 0.35-0.83; P=.004), across all United States regions (all P≤.004), in the subgroups of the healthiest patients (HR 0.67; 95% CI 0.57-0.78; P<.001), in patients with at least 1 comorbidity (HR 0.69; 95% CI 0.56-0.83; P<.001), and in most contemporary patients (HR 0.55; 95% CI 0.46-0.66; P<.001). Conclusions: Radiation therapy seems to be associated with a reduction in the risk of death from PCa relative to observation in elderly patients with clinically localized PCa, except for those with well-differentiated disease.

  11. Survival After Conservative Management Versus External Beam Radiation Therapy in Elderly Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell'Oglio, Paolo; Boehm, Katharina; Trudeau, Vincent; Tian, Zhe; Larcher, Alessandro; Leyh-Bannurah, Sami-Ramzi; Moschini, Marco; Capitanio, Umberto; Shariat, Shahrokh F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare survival in elderly men with clinically localized prostate cancer (PCa) according to treatment type, defined as radiation therapy (RT) with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) versus conservative management (observation). Methods and Materials: In the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)–Medicare linked database, we identified 23,790 patients aged 80 years or more with clinically localized PCa treated with either RT or observation between 1991 and 2009. Competing risks analyses focused on cancer-specific mortality and other-cause mortality, after accounting for confounders. All analyses were repeated after stratification according to grade (well-differentiated vs moderately differentiated vs poorly differentiated disease), race, and United States region, in patients with no comorbidities and in patients with at least 1 comorbidity. Analyses were repeated within most contemporary patients, namely those treated between 2001 and 2009. Results: Radiation therapy was associated with more favorable cancer-specific mortality rates than observation in patients with moderately differentiated disease (hazard ratio [HR] 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.66-0.94; P=.009) and in patients with poorly differentiated disease (HR 0.58; 95% CI 0.49-0.69; P<.001). Conversely, the benefit of RT was not observed in well-differentiated disease. The benefit of RT was confirmed in black men (HR 0.54; 95% CI 0.35-0.83; P=.004), across all United States regions (all P≤.004), in the subgroups of the healthiest patients (HR 0.67; 95% CI 0.57-0.78; P<.001), in patients with at least 1 comorbidity (HR 0.69; 95% CI 0.56-0.83; P<.001), and in most contemporary patients (HR 0.55; 95% CI 0.46-0.66; P<.001). Conclusions: Radiation therapy seems to be associated with a reduction in the risk of death from PCa relative to observation in elderly patients with clinically localized PCa, except for those with well-differentiated disease.

  12. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank ... Accelerator Prostate Cancer Treatment Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Introduction to Cancer Therapy (Radiation Oncology) ...

  13. Rectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease: natural history and implications for radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Sheryl; Stock, Richard; Greenstein, Adrian

    1995-07-01

    PURPOSES/OBJECTIVE: There exists little information concerning the natural history of rectal cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. In addition, the tolerance of pelvic irradiation in these patients is unknown. We analyzed the largest series of patients with inflammatory bowel disease and rectal cancer in order to determine the natural history of the disease as well as the effect and tolerance of pelvic irradiation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 47 patients with inflammatory bowel disease and rectal cancer treated over a 34 year period (1960-1994) was performed. Thirty five patients had Ulcerative Colitis and 12 patients had Crohn's Disease. There were 31 male patients and 16 female patients. The stage (AJC) distribution was as follows: stage 0 in 5 patients, stage I in 13 patients, stage II in 7 patients, stage III in 13 patients and stage IV in 9 patients. Surgical resection was performed in 44 patients. In 2 of these patients, preoperative pelvic irradiation was given followed by surgery. Twenty of these patients underwent post-operative adjuvant therapy (12 were treated with chemotherapy and pelvic irradiation and 8 with chemotherapy alone). Three patients were found to have unresectable disease and were treated with chemotherapy alone (2 patients) or chemotherapy and radiation therapy (1 patient). Radiation complications were graded using the RTOG acute and late effects scoring criteria. Follow up ranged from 4 to 250 months (median - 24 months). RESULTS: The 5 year actuarial results revealed an overall survival (OS) of 42%, a disease free survival (DFS) of 43%, a pelvic control rate (PC) of 67% and a freedom from distant failure (FFDF) of 47%. DFS decreased with increasing T stage with a 5 year rate of 86% for patients with Tis - T2 disease compared to 10% for patients with T3-T4 disease (p < 0.0001). The presence of lymph node metastases also resulted in a decrease in DFS with a 5 year rate of 67% for patients with N0 disease

  14. Cancer risk estimates from radiation therapy for heterotopic ossification prophylaxis after total hip arthroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazonakis, Michalis; Berris, Theoharris; Damilakis, John [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, 71003 Iraklion, Crete (Greece); Lyraraki, Efrossyni [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, University Hospital of Iraklion, 71110 Iraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a frequent complication following total hip arthroplasty. This study was conducted to calculate the radiation dose to organs-at-risk and estimate the probability of cancer induction from radiotherapy for HO prophylaxis.Methods: Hip irradiation for HO with a 6 MV photon beam was simulated with the aid of a Monte Carlo model. A realistic humanoid phantom representing an average adult patient was implemented in Monte Carlo environment for dosimetric calculations. The average out-of-field radiation dose to stomach, liver, lung, prostate, bladder, thyroid, breast, uterus, and ovary was calculated. The organ-equivalent-dose to colon, that was partly included within the treatment field, was also determined. Organ dose calculations were carried out using three different field sizes. The dependence of organ doses upon the block insertion into primary beam for shielding colon and prosthesis was investigated. The lifetime attributable risk for cancer development was estimated using organ, age, and gender-specific risk coefficients.Results: For a typical target dose of 7 Gy, organ doses varied from 1.0 to 741.1 mGy by the field dimensions and organ location relative to the field edge. Blocked field irradiations resulted in a dose range of 1.4–146.3 mGy. The most probable detriment from open field treatment of male patients was colon cancer with a high risk of 564.3 × 10{sup −5} to 837.4 × 10{sup −5} depending upon the organ dose magnitude and the patient's age. The corresponding colon cancer risk for female patients was (372.2–541.0) × 10{sup −5}. The probability of bladder cancer development was more than 113.7 × 10{sup −5} and 110.3 × 10{sup −5} for males and females, respectively. The cancer risk range to other individual organs was reduced to (0.003–68.5) × 10{sup −5}.Conclusions: The risk for cancer induction from radiation therapy for HO prophylaxis after total hip arthroplasty varies considerably by

  15. Cancer risk estimates from radiation therapy for heterotopic ossification prophylaxis after total hip arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazonakis, Michalis; Berris, Theoharris; Damilakis, John; Lyraraki, Efrossyni

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a frequent complication following total hip arthroplasty. This study was conducted to calculate the radiation dose to organs-at-risk and estimate the probability of cancer induction from radiotherapy for HO prophylaxis.Methods: Hip irradiation for HO with a 6 MV photon beam was simulated with the aid of a Monte Carlo model. A realistic humanoid phantom representing an average adult patient was implemented in Monte Carlo environment for dosimetric calculations. The average out-of-field radiation dose to stomach, liver, lung, prostate, bladder, thyroid, breast, uterus, and ovary was calculated. The organ-equivalent-dose to colon, that was partly included within the treatment field, was also determined. Organ dose calculations were carried out using three different field sizes. The dependence of organ doses upon the block insertion into primary beam for shielding colon and prosthesis was investigated. The lifetime attributable risk for cancer development was estimated using organ, age, and gender-specific risk coefficients.Results: For a typical target dose of 7 Gy, organ doses varied from 1.0 to 741.1 mGy by the field dimensions and organ location relative to the field edge. Blocked field irradiations resulted in a dose range of 1.4–146.3 mGy. The most probable detriment from open field treatment of male patients was colon cancer with a high risk of 564.3 × 10 −5 to 837.4 × 10 −5 depending upon the organ dose magnitude and the patient's age. The corresponding colon cancer risk for female patients was (372.2–541.0) × 10 −5 . The probability of bladder cancer development was more than 113.7 × 10 −5 and 110.3 × 10 −5 for males and females, respectively. The cancer risk range to other individual organs was reduced to (0.003–68.5) × 10 −5 .Conclusions: The risk for cancer induction from radiation therapy for HO prophylaxis after total hip arthroplasty varies considerably by the treatment parameters, organ

  16. Association Between Geographic Access to Cancer Care and Receipt of Radiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun Chieh, E-mail: anna.lin@cancer.org [American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Bruinooge, Suanna S.; Kirkwood, M. Kelsey [American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, Virginia (United States); Hershman, Dawn L. [Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Jemal, Ahmedin [American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Yu, James B. [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Hopkins, Shane [William R. Bliss Cancer Center, Ames, Iowa (United States); Goldstein, Michael [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bajorin, Dean [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Giordano, Sharon H. [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kosty, Michael [Scripps Clinic, San Diego, California (United States); Arnone, Anna [American Society for Radiation Oncology, Fairfax, Virginia (United States); Hanley, Amy [American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, Virginia (United States); Stevens, Stephanie [American Society for Radiation Oncology, Fairfax, Virginia (United States); Olsen, Christine [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: Trimodality therapy (chemoradiation and surgery) is the standard of care for stage II/III rectal cancer but nearly one third of patients do not receive radiation therapy (RT). We examined the relationship between the density of radiation oncologists and the travel distance to receipt of RT. Methods and Materials: A retrospective study based on the National Cancer Data Base identified 26,845 patients aged 18 to 80 years with stage II/III rectal cancer diagnosed from 2007 to 2010. Radiation oncologists were identified through the Physician Compare dataset. Generalized estimating equations clustering by hospital service area was used to examine the association between geographic access and receipt of RT, controlling for patient sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Results: Of the 26,845 patients, 70% received RT within 180 days of diagnosis or within 90 days of surgery. Compared with a travel distance of <12.5 miles, patients diagnosed at a reporting facility who traveled ≥50 miles had a decreased likelihood of receipt of RT (50-249 miles, adjusted odds ratio 0.75, P<.001; ≥250 miles, adjusted odds ratio 0.46; P=.002), all else being equal. The density level of radiation oncologists was not significantly associated with the receipt of RT. Patients who were female, nonwhite, and aged ≥50 years and had comorbidities were less likely to receive RT (P<.05). Patients who were uninsured but self-paid for their medical services, initially diagnosed elsewhere but treated at a reporting facility, and resided in Midwest had an increased the likelihood of receipt of RT (P<.05). Conclusions: An increased travel burden was associated with a decreased likelihood of receiving RT for patients with stage II/III rectal cancer, all else being equal; however, radiation oncologist density was not. Further research of geographic access and establishing transportation assistance programs or lodging services for patients with an unmet need might help decrease

  17. Association Between Geographic Access to Cancer Care and Receipt of Radiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chun Chieh; Bruinooge, Suanna S.; Kirkwood, M. Kelsey; Hershman, Dawn L.; Jemal, Ahmedin; Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh; Yu, James B.; Hopkins, Shane; Goldstein, Michael; Bajorin, Dean; Giordano, Sharon H.; Kosty, Michael; Arnone, Anna; Hanley, Amy; Stevens, Stephanie; Olsen, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Trimodality therapy (chemoradiation and surgery) is the standard of care for stage II/III rectal cancer but nearly one third of patients do not receive radiation therapy (RT). We examined the relationship between the density of radiation oncologists and the travel distance to receipt of RT. Methods and Materials: A retrospective study based on the National Cancer Data Base identified 26,845 patients aged 18 to 80 years with stage II/III rectal cancer diagnosed from 2007 to 2010. Radiation oncologists were identified through the Physician Compare dataset. Generalized estimating equations clustering by hospital service area was used to examine the association between geographic access and receipt of RT, controlling for patient sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Results: Of the 26,845 patients, 70% received RT within 180 days of diagnosis or within 90 days of surgery. Compared with a travel distance of <12.5 miles, patients diagnosed at a reporting facility who traveled ≥50 miles had a decreased likelihood of receipt of RT (50-249 miles, adjusted odds ratio 0.75, P<.001; ≥250 miles, adjusted odds ratio 0.46; P=.002), all else being equal. The density level of radiation oncologists was not significantly associated with the receipt of RT. Patients who were female, nonwhite, and aged ≥50 years and had comorbidities were less likely to receive RT (P<.05). Patients who were uninsured but self-paid for their medical services, initially diagnosed elsewhere but treated at a reporting facility, and resided in Midwest had an increased the likelihood of receipt of RT (P<.05). Conclusions: An increased travel burden was associated with a decreased likelihood of receiving RT for patients with stage II/III rectal cancer, all else being equal; however, radiation oncologist density was not. Further research of geographic access and establishing transportation assistance programs or lodging services for patients with an unmet need might help decrease

  18. Australian and New Zealand three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy consensus guidelines for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skala, M.; Berry, M.; Kneebone, A.; Gogna, K.; Turner, S.; Rolfo, A.; Haworth, A.

    2004-01-01

    Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) has been shown to reduce normal tissue toxicity and allow dose escalation in the curative treatment of prostate cancer. The Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group initiated a consensus process to generate evidence-based guidelines for the safe and effective implementation of 3DCRT. All radiation oncology departments in Australia and New Zealand were invited to complete a survey of their prostate practice and to send representatives to a consensus workshop. After a review of the evidence, key issues were identified and debated. If agreement was not reached, working parties were formed to make recommendations. Draft guidelines were circulated to workshop participants for approval prior to publication. Where possible, evidence-based recommendations have been made with regard to patient selection, risk stratification, simulation, planning, treatment delivery and toxicity reporting. This is the first time a group of radiation therapists, physicists and oncologists representing professional radiotherapy practice across Australia and New Zealand have worked together to develop best-practice guidelines. These guidelines should serve as a baseline for prospective clinical trials, outcome research and quality assurance. Copyright (2004) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  19. Outcome of self-expanding metal stenting followed by radiation therapy for unresectable extrahepatic bile duct cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Jing; Gao Li; Yu Zihao; Han Jianzhu; Zhai Renyou

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively analyze the efficacy for self-expanding metal stenting followed by radiation therapy for unresectable extrahepatic bile duct cancer. Methods: From Jan 1996 to Sep 2002, 17 patients were treated with self-expanding metal stenting followed by Ir 192 high dose brachytherapy (brachytherapy group, n=5)and by external beam radiation therapy(external radiation therapy group, n=9). Brachytherapy was delivered on the same day or the following day after stenting with the total dose of DT 20- 30 Gy, twice daily, for 2-3 days. The median total dosage of external radiation therapy was 48 Gy (14-66 Gy), 2 Gy/fraction. Results: Jaundice was released after metal stenting from 71.4% to 14.3% (P=0.001), showing no significant difference between brachytherapy and external radiation therapy in terms of jaundice release(χ 2 =0.21, P=0.65). The median survival period(5-35 months)for whole groups was 12 months 1-, 2-year survival rates were 40.8% and 8.16%, respectively. No significant difference was shown for patients received either brachytherapy or external radiation therapy for 8 months, but with 1,2 year survival rate as 40.0%, 13.3%, respectively (χ 2 =1.10, P=0.29). Conclusions: Self-expanding metal stenting is able to release jaundice significantly and followed by high dose radiation therapy may further prolong the survival. (authors)

  20. Phase 1 Trial of Neoadjuvant Radiation Therapy Before Prostatectomy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koontz, Bridget F.; Quaranta, Brian P.; Pura, John A.; Lee, W.R.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Gerber, Leah; Haake, Michael; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Robertson, Cary N.; Polascik, Thomas J.; Moul, Judd W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a phase 1 study, the safety of neoadjuvant whole-pelvis radiation therapy (RT) administered immediately before radical prostatectomy in men with high-risk prostate