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Sample records for cancer prognosis programme

  1. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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  4. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... your chances of survival. The estimate of how the disease will go for you is called prognosis. It ... to discuss cancer prognosis (the likely course of the disease). Learn key points about prognosis and how to ...

  5. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... disease will go for you is called prognosis. It can be hard to understand what prognosis means ... prognosis include: The type of cancer and where it is in your body The stage of the ...

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  13. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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  15. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Understanding Cancer Prognosis Oncologist Anthony L. Back, M.D., a national expert on doctor-patient communications, talks with one of his patients about what she'd like to know of her prognosis. Credit: National ...

  16. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... during a certain period of time after diagnosis. Disease-free survival This statistic is the percentage of ... discuss cancer prognosis (the likely course of the disease). Learn key points about prognosis and how to ...

  17. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... doctor may tell you that you have a good prognosis if statistics suggest that your cancer is ... about how to discuss prognosis with their patients. Good communication, he says, is part of providing good ...

  18. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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  19. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... doctor to give you an accurate prognosis. Understanding the Difference Between Cure and Remission Cure means that ... about her colorectal cancer prognosis. Diving Out of the Dark View this video on YouTube. Andrew wants ...

  20. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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  1. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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  2. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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  3. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... our information on Coping With Cancer helpful. Understanding Statistics About Survival Doctors estimate prognosis by using statistics that researchers have collected over many years about ...

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    Full Text Available ... help coping with your prognosis, you may find our information on Coping With Cancer helpful. Understanding Statistics ... comments on this post. All comments must follow our comment policy . National Cancer Institute at the National ...

  7. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... to estimate cancer-specific survival that does not use information about the cause of death. It is ... of finding cancer. So, the statistics your doctor uses to make a prognosis may not be based ...

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    Full Text Available ... on Coping With Cancer helpful. Understanding Statistics About Survival Doctors estimate prognosis by using statistics that researchers ... The most commonly used statistics include: Cancer-specific survival This is the percentage of patients with a ...

  10. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... medical records. Relative survival This statistic is another method used to estimate cancer-specific survival that does ... poor prognosis if the cancer is harder to control. Whatever your doctor tells you, keep in mind ...

  11. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... suggest that your cancer is likely to respond well to treatment. Or, he may tell you that you have a poor prognosis if the cancer is harder to control. Whatever your doctor tells you, keep in mind ...

  12. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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  13. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... with the same type of cancer. Several types of statistics may be used to estimate prognosis. The most ... see the benefit of new treatments and ways of finding cancer. So, the statistics your doctor uses to make a prognosis may ...

  14. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung ... may have questions about how serious your cancer is and your chances of survival. The estimate of how the disease will go for you is called prognosis. It ...

  15. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) ... may have questions about how serious your cancer is and your chances of survival. The estimate of how the disease will go for you is called prognosis. It ...

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  17. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... hard to talk about, even for doctors. Many Factors Can Affect Your Prognosis Some of the factors that affect prognosis include: The type of cancer ... think they are too impersonal to be of value to you. It is up to you to ...

  18. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... to talk about, even for doctors. Many Factors Can Affect Your Prognosis Some of the factors that ... Understanding your cancer and knowing what to expect can help you and your loved ones make decisions. ...

  19. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... respond to treatment Seeking Information About Your Prognosis Is a Personal Decision When you have cancer, you ... the decisions you may face include: Which treatment is best for you If you want treatment How ...

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    Full Text Available ... hard to talk about, even for doctors. Many Factors Can Affect Your Prognosis Some of the factors ... Services Website Linking U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute ...

  1. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... respond to treatment Seeking Information About Your Prognosis Is a Personal Decision When you have cancer, you and ... certain how it will go for you. If You Decide Not to Have Treatment If you decide ...

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    Full Text Available ... to treatment Seeking Information About Your Prognosis Is a Personal Decision When you have cancer, you and ... how long she has to live. For Doctors, a Patient-Centered Approach View this video on YouTube. ...

  5. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... in a clear and supportive way. Two viewer guides are also available: for patients (PDF-210KB) and for provider care teams (PDF-210KB). Understanding Your Cancer Prognosis Video View this video on YouTube. ...

  6. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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  7. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Your Cancer Prognosis Video View this video on YouTube. Three cancer patients and their doctor, Anthony L. ... One Couple's Creative Response View this video on YouTube. Vanessa, an artist, and her husband Roy discover ...

  8. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... it in a clear and supportive way. Two viewer guides are also available: for patients (PDF-210KB) and for provider care teams (PDF-210KB). Understanding Your Cancer Prognosis Video View this video on YouTube. Three cancer patients and their doctor, Anthony L. ...

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  10. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... medical records. Relative survival This statistic is another method used to estimate cancer-specific survival that does ... your prognosis. Survival statistics most often come from studies that compare ... by their creator. In such cases, it is necessary to contact the writer, artists, ...

  11. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... to you. Everyone is different. Treatments and how people respond to treatment can differ greatly. Also, it takes years to see the benefit of new treatments and ways of finding cancer. So, the statistics your doctor uses to make a prognosis may not be based on treatments ...

  12. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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  14. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... about what she'd like to know of her prognosis. Credit: National Cancer Institute If you have ... this video on YouTube. Vanessa, an artist, and her husband Roy discover how to support each other’s ...

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  6. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... chances of survival. The estimate of how the disease will go for you is called prognosis. It can be hard to understand what prognosis means and also hard to talk about, even for doctors. Many Factors Can Affect Your Prognosis Some of the factors that affect ...

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    Full Text Available ... Andrew wants details about the likely outcome of his treatment for non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and has learned to ask until he gets the information he is looking for. From Anger to Acceptance View this video on YouTube. Barbara’s attitude since her diagnosis with pancreatic cancer? No doctor is going to ...

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  17. Prognosis of pregnancy-associated breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Guek Eng; Mayer, Erica L; Partridge, Ann

    2017-06-01

    Conventionally, breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy and within the years following have been referred to collectively as pregnancy-associated breast cancer. However, increasing evidence suggests that breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy is a different entity from that diagnosed postpartum, both in terms of prognosis and biology. Given the increasing number of women who find themselves diagnosed with breast cancer during or following a pregnancy, future research and discussion should separate these two into distinct groups: breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy and breast cancer diagnosed postpartum in an effort to enhance our understanding to inform and improve clinical management and counseling.

  18. Cancer antigen 125 and prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgdall, Estrid Vilma Solyom

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review addresses recently reported progress in cancer antigen 125 as a prognostic marker in patients with ovarian cancer. RECENT FINDINGS: Serum cancer antigen 125 levels measured preoperatively in both early and late stage ovarian cancer may be of prognostic value. Before...... cancer antigen 125 determination may be implemented into clinical practice, cut-off levels must be evaluated and internationally defined. Studies examining serum cancer antigen 125 levels after surgery but before, during, or after treatment confirmed that changes in serum levels are of prognostic value....... Furthermore, recent studies have shown that the level of expression of cancer antigen 125 in tissue may be an independent prognostic indicator in late stage ovarian cancer. SUMMARY: Prognostic markers may potentially help to individualize treatment within subgroups of patients. In a recent study the level...

  19. Prognosis of synchronous bilateral breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Marianne; Tjønneland, Anne; Balslev, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Currently, no consistent evidence-based guidelines for the management of synchronous bilateral breast cancer (SBBC) exist and it is uncertain how presenting with SBBC affects patients' prognosis. We conducted a review of studies analyzing the association between SBBC and prognosis. The studies...... that reported adjusted effect measures were included in meta-analyses of effect of bilaterality on breast cancer mortality. From 57 initially identified records 17 studies from 11 different countries including 8,050 SBBC patients were included. The quality of the studies varied but was generally low with small...

  20. Statins and breast cancer prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahern, Thomas P; Lash, Timothy L; Damkier, Per

    2014-01-01

    Much preclinical and epidemiological evidence supports the anticancer effects of statins. Epidemiological evidence does not suggest an association between statin use and reduced incidence of breast cancer, but does support a protective effect of statins-especially simvastatin-on breast cancer...... recurrence. Here, we argue that the existing evidence base is sufficient to justify a clinical trial of breast cancer adjuvant therapy with statins and we advocate for such a trial to be initiated without delay. If a protective effect of statins on breast cancer recurrence is supported by trial evidence......, then the indications for a safe, well tolerated, and inexpensive treatment can be expanded to improve outcomes for breast cancer survivors. We discuss several trial design opportunities-including candidate predictive biomarkers of statin safety and efficacy-and off er solutions to the key challenges involved...

  1. Endometrial cancer, types, prognosis, female hormones and antihormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, L S G

    2011-01-01

    . Prognosis is also dependent on tumor differentiation and stage, and treatment should be adjusted accordingly. In this paper, the different types of endometrial cancer, staging, prognosis, diagnosis, prevention, treatment and their relationship to estrogen and other female hormones are reviewed....

  2. Tumor Volumes and Prognosis in Laryngeal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad R. Issa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Tumor staging systems for laryngeal cancer (LC have been developed to assist in estimating prognosis after treatment and comparing treatment results across institutions. While the laryngeal TNM system has been shown to have prognostic information, varying cure rates in the literature have suggested concern about the accuracy and effectiveness of the T-classification in particular. To test the hypothesis that tumor volumes are more useful than T classification, we conducted a retrospective review of 78 patients with laryngeal cancer treated with radiation therapy at our institution. Using multivariable analysis, we demonstrate the significant prognostic value of anatomic volumes in patients with previously untreated laryngeal cancer. In this cohort, primary tumor volume (GTVP, composite nodal volumes (GTVN and composite total volume (GTVP + GTVN = GTVC had prognostic value in both univariate and multivariate cox model analysis. Interestingly, when anatomic volumes were measured from CT scans after a single cycle of induction chemotherapy, all significant prognosticating value for measured anatomic volumes was lost. Given the literature findings and the results of this study, the authors advocate the use of tumor anatomic volumes calculated from pretreatment scans to supplement the TNM staging system in subjects with untreated laryngeal cancer. The study found that tumor volume assessment after induction chemotherapy is not of prognostic significance.

  3. Prolonged Nightly Fasting and Breast Cancer Prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinac, Catherine R; Nelson, Sandahl H; Breen, Caitlin I; Hartman, Sheri J; Natarajan, Loki; Pierce, John P; Flatt, Shirley W; Sears, Dorothy D; Patterson, Ruth E

    2016-08-01

    Rodent studies demonstrate that prolonged fasting during the sleep phase positively influences carcinogenesis and metabolic processes that are putatively associated with risk and prognosis of breast cancer. To our knowledge, no studies in humans have examined nightly fasting duration and cancer outcomes. To investigate whether duration of nightly fasting predicted recurrence and mortality among women with early-stage breast cancer and, if so, whether it was associated with risk factors for poor outcomes, including glucoregulation (hemoglobin A1c), chronic inflammation (C-reactive protein), obesity, and sleep. Data were collected from 2413 women with breast cancer but without diabetes mellitus who were aged 27 to 70 years at diagnosis and participated in the prospective Women's Healthy Eating and Living study between March 1, 1995, and May 3, 2007. Data analysis was conducted from May 18 to October 5, 2015. Nightly fasting duration was estimated from 24-hour dietary recalls collected at baseline, year 1, and year 4. Clinical outcomes were invasive breast cancer recurrence and new primary breast tumors during a mean of 7.3 years of study follow-up as well as death from breast cancer or any cause during a mean of 11.4 years of surveillance. Baseline sleep duration was self-reported, and archived blood samples were used to assess concentrations of hemoglobin A1c and C-reactive protein. The cohort of 2413 women (mean [SD] age, 52.4 [8.9] years) reported a mean (SD) fasting duration of 12.5 (1.7) hours per night. In repeated-measures Cox proportional hazards regression models, fasting less than 13 hours per night (lower 2 tertiles of nightly fasting distribution) was associated with an increase in the risk of breast cancer recurrence compared with fasting 13 or more hours per night (hazard ratio, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.05-1.76). Nightly fasting less than 13 hours was not associated with a statistically significant higher risk of breast cancer mortality (hazard ratio, 1.21; 95

  4. Risk Factors for Breast Cancer and Its Prognosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Melbye, Mads

    2000-01-01

    This project investigated the influence of reproductive history on risk of breast cancer and its prognosis by taking advantage of very large linkages between population-based health and demographic registries in Denmark...

  5. Biomarkers of the Metabolic Syndrome and Breast Cancer Prognosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Qiu-Li; Xu, Wang-Hong, E-mail: mtao@buffalo.edu [Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Tao, Meng-Hua, E-mail: mtao@buffalo.edu [Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States)

    2010-04-28

    In spite of its public health importance, our understanding of the mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis and progress is still evolving. The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a constellation of biochemical abnormalities including visceral adiposity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia and high blood pressure. The components of the MS have all been related to late-stage disease and even to a poor prognosis of breast cancer through multiple interacting mechanisms. In this review, we aim to present a summary of recent advances in the understanding of the contribution of the MS to breast cancer with the emphasis on the role of biomarkers of the MS in the prognosis of breast cancer.

  6. Biomarkers of the Metabolic Syndrome and Breast Cancer Prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Hua Tao

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In spite of its public health importance, our understanding of the mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis and progress is still evolving. The metabolic syndrome (MS is a constellation of biochemical abnormalities including visceral adiposity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia and high blood pressure. The components of the MS have all been related to late-stage disease and even to a poor prognosis of breast cancer through multiple interacting mechanisms. In this review, we aim to present a summary of recent advances in the understanding of the contribution of the MS to breast cancer with the emphasis on the role of biomarkers of the MS in the prognosis of breast cancer.

  7. A genetic programming approach to oral cancer prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Mei Sze; Tan, Jing Wei; Chang, Siow-Wee; Yap, Hwa Jen; Abdul Kareem, Sameem; Zain, Rosnah Binti

    2016-01-01

    The potential of genetic programming (GP) on various fields has been attained in recent years. In bio-medical field, many researches in GP are focused on the recognition of cancerous cells and also on gene expression profiling data. In this research, the aim is to study the performance of GP on the survival prediction of a small sample size of oral cancer prognosis dataset, which is the first study in the field of oral cancer prognosis. GP is applied on an oral cancer dataset that contains 31 cases collected from the Malaysia Oral Cancer Database and Tissue Bank System (MOCDTBS). The feature subsets that is automatically selected through GP were noted and the influences of this subset on the results of GP were recorded. In addition, a comparison between the GP performance and that of the Support Vector Machine (SVM) and logistic regression (LR) are also done in order to verify the predictive capabilities of the GP. The result shows that GP performed the best (average accuracy of 83.87% and average AUROC of 0.8341) when the features selected are smoking, drinking, chewing, histological differentiation of SCC, and oncogene p63. In addition, based on the comparison results, we found that the GP outperformed the SVM and LR in oral cancer prognosis. Some of the features in the dataset are found to be statistically co-related. This is because the accuracy of the GP prediction drops when one of the feature in the best feature subset is excluded. Thus, GP provides an automatic feature selection function, which chooses features that are highly correlated to the prognosis of oral cancer. This makes GP an ideal prediction model for cancer clinical and genomic data that can be used to aid physicians in their decision making stage of diagnosis or prognosis.

  8. Prognosis for long-term survivors of cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.L.G. Janssen-Heijnen (Maryska); S. Houterman (Saskia); V.E.P.P. Lemmens (Valery); H. Brenner (Hermann); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); J.W.W. Coebergh (Jan Willem)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Many cancer patients who have already survived some time want to know about their prognosis, given the pre-condition that they are still alive. We described and interpreted population-based conditional 5-year relative survival rates. Patients and methods: The long-standing

  9. Psychological factors and preferences for communicating prognosis in esophageal cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, Sanne J.; Lagarde, Sjoerd M.; van Werven, Jochem R.; Smets, Ellen M. A.; Tran, Khe T. C.; Plukker, John Th. M.; van Lanschot, J. Jan B.; de Haes, Hanneke C. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Discussing prognosis is often confronting and complex for cancer patients. This study investigates bow patients' psychological characteristics relate to their preferences concerning the disclosure of prognosis. Methods: One hundred and seventy-six esophageal cancer patients participated

  10. Validation of Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer Prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Ly M, Mann BF, Marx K, Mechref Y, Meyer B, Moginger U, Neusubeta C, Nilsson J, Novotny MV, Nyalwidhe JO, Packer NH, Pompach P, Reiz B, Resemann A...Immunohistochemistry Assay Is Associated with Worse Recurrence-free Survival in Prostate Cancer Tamara L. Lotana,b,*, Wei Weic, Carlos L. Moraisa, Sarah T...Immunohistochemistry Assay in Prostate Cancer by Comparison to PTEN FISH Tamara L. Lotan1,2, Wei Wei3, Olga Ludkovski4, Carlos L. Morais1, Liana B. Guedes1, Tamara

  11. Recurrent cervical cancer : detection and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duyn, A; Van Eijkeren, M; Kenter, G; Zwinderman, K; Ansink, A

    Background. Only a small proportion of cervical cancer recurrences is detected during routine follow-up. We investigated which percentage of recurrences is detected during follow-up, which diagnostic tools are helpful to detect recurrent disease and which factors are of prognostic significance once

  12. Nuclear volume and prognosis in ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O.; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Bichel, P.

    1992-01-01

    The prognostic value of the volume-weighted mean nuclear volume (MNV) was investigated retrospectively in 100 ovarian cancer patients with FIGO-stage IB-II (n = 51) and stage III-IV (n = 49) serous tumors. No association was demonstrated between the MNV and the survival or between the MNV and two...

  13. Validation of Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer Prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    prostate cancer is the development of biomarkers that predict occult or incipient aggressive disease in the low-risk population. To address this...8-10 vs. <=6 5.13 1.92 13.75 0.001 6. P27 is not significantly associated with RFS after adjusting for clinical predictors (Manuscript in

  14. Breast and cervical cancer screening programme implementation in 16 countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dowling, Emily C; Klabunde, Carrie; Patnick, Julietta

    2010-01-01

    There is a continuing need to monitor and evaluate the impact of organized screening programmes on cancer incidence and mortality. We report results from a programme assessment conducted within the International Cancer Screening Network (ICSN) to understand the characteristics of cervical screening...... programmes within countries that have established population-based breast cancer screening programmes....

  15. The role of metallothionein in oncogenesis and cancer prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mie Ø; Larsen, Agnete; Stoltenberg, Meredin

    2009-01-01

    The antiapoptotic, antioxidant, proliferative, and angiogenic effects of metallothionein (MT)-I+II has resulted in increased focus on their role in oncogenesis, tumor progression, therapy response, and patient prognosis. Studies have reported increased expression of MT-I+II mRNA and protein...... in various human cancers; such as breast, kidney, lung, nasopharynx, ovary, prostate, salivary gland, testes, urinary bladder, cervical, endometrial, skin carcinoma, melanoma, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and pancreatic cancers, where MT-I+II expression is sometimes correlated to higher tumor grade....../stage, chemotherapy/radiation resistance, and poor prognosis. However, MT-I+II are downregulated in other types of tumors (e.g. hepatocellular, gastric, colorectal, central nervous system (CNS), and thyroid cancers) where MT-I+II is either inversely correlated or unrelated to mortality. Large discrepancies exist...

  16. Prognosis of Lung Cancer: Heredity or Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching...existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing this collection of information. Send comments regarding...and sample processing funds to follow-up on preliminary findings in the same African American cohort that COPD is associated with greater lung cancer

  17. Subsequent pregnancy and prognosis in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasum, Miro; Beketić-Orešković, Lidija; Orešković, Slavko

    2014-09-01

    An increase in the incidence of breast cancer in women aged breast cancer in women of childbearing age has significantly improved, they are often concerned whether subsequent pregnancy will alter their risk of disease recurrence. In the modern era, the prognosis of pregnancy-associated breast cancer is comparable to non-pregnancy-associated breast cancer and women can bear children after breast cancer treatment without compromising their survival. Therefore, they should not be discouraged from becoming pregnant, and currently the usual waiting time of at least 2 years after the diagnosis of breast cancer is recommended. However, a small, nonsignificant adverse effect of pregnancy on breast carcinoma prognosis among women who conceive within 12 months of breast cancer diagnosis and a higher risk of relapse in women younger than 35 up to 5 years of the diagnosis may be found. Fortunately, for women with localized disease, earlier conception up to six months after completing their treatment seems unlikely to reduce their survival. Ongoing and future prospective studies evaluating the risks associated with pregnancy in young breast cancer survivors are required.

  18. Model Comparison for Breast Cancer Prognosis Based on Clinical Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabri Boughorbel

    Full Text Available We compared the performance of several prediction techniques for breast cancer prognosis, based on AU-ROC performance (Area Under ROC for different prognosis periods. The analyzed dataset contained 1,981 patients and from an initial 25 variables, the 11 most common clinical predictors were retained. We compared eight models from a wide spectrum of predictive models, namely; Generalized Linear Model (GLM, GLM-Net, Partial Least Square (PLS, Support Vector Machines (SVM, Random Forests (RF, Neural Networks, k-Nearest Neighbors (k-NN and Boosted Trees. In order to compare these models, paired t-test was applied on the model performance differences obtained from data resampling. Random Forests, Boosted Trees, Partial Least Square and GLMNet have superior overall performance, however they are only slightly higher than the other models. The comparative analysis also allowed us to define a relative variable importance as the average of variable importance from the different models. Two sets of variables are identified from this analysis. The first includes number of positive lymph nodes, tumor size, cancer grade and estrogen receptor, all has an important influence on model predictability. The second set incudes variables related to histological parameters and treatment types. The short term vs long term contribution of the clinical variables are also analyzed from the comparative models. From the various cancer treatment plans, the combination of Chemo/Radio therapy leads to the largest impact on cancer prognosis.

  19. Concurrent new drug prescriptions and prognosis of early breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre; Lash, Timothy L; Ahern, Thomas P

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myriad reports suggest that frequently used prescription drugs alter the viability of breast cancer cells in pre-clinical studies. Routine use of these drugs, therefore, may impact breast cancer prognosis, and could have important implications for public health. METHODS: The Danish...... the Danish National Prescription Registry, has facilitated large population-based pharmacoepidemiology studies. A unique advantage of using DBCG data for such studies is the ability to investigate the association of drugs with breast cancer recurrence rather than breast cancer mortality - which may...... be misclassified - or all-cause mortality. Here we summarize findings from pharmacoepidemiological studies, based on DBCG data, on the association between routinely used prescription drugs and risk of breast cancer recurrence. RESULTS: Our findings suggest that concurrent use of glucocorticoids, ACE inhibitors...

  20. Prognosis of breast cancer during pregnancy: evidence for nursing care

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Ana Fátima Carvalho; Santos, Míria Conceição Lavinas; Silva, Tiago Barreto de Castro e; Galvão, Cristina Maria

    2011-01-01

    This integrative review analyzed evidence available in the literature concerning the prognosis of breast cancer during pregnancy. The following databases were used for selecting studies: PubMed, CINAHL and LILACS. A total of 240 primary studies were identified; 13 papers were included in the integrative review’s sample after reading the titles and abstracts and according to the established inclusion and exclusion criteria. There is evidence indicating that pregnancy does not worsen the evolut...

  1. Obesity and prognosis in endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B; Connor, J P; Andrews, J I; Davis, C S; Buller, R E; Sorosky, J I; Benda, J A

    1996-04-01

    We tested the null hypothesis that morbid obesity as measured by the Quetelet index has no influence on survival in endometrial cancer. A retrospective study of 492 women with endometrial carcinoma was performed. Age, height, weight, Quetelet index, stage, cell type, grade, node status, peritoneal cytologic findings, and depth of myometrial invasion were analyzed for influence on survival. Mean Quetelet index was 34 (range 16 to 89). Quetelet index was 40 in 22%. Five percent of those with a Quetelet index > 40 had positive nodes, but 64% of patients with a Quetelet index > 40 did not have lymph node sampling done. Lack of sampling of lymph nodes in the entire group had no adverse effect on survival. In a proportional hazards regression model for time from diagnosis to death from disease, grade, node status, myometrial invasion, and stage had highly significant effects. When Quetelet index was analyzed as a continuous variable, as Quetelet index increased, time to recurrence was significantly increased (p = 0.0136), and significance was approached for survival (p = 0.0645). Quetelet index was strongly related to grade (p = 0.013), depth of myometrial invasion (p = 0.031), negative cytologic findings (p = 0.004), and stage (p = 0.011) with obese patients having better differentiated, less invasive tumors of lower stage with negative washings. Morbid obesity positively affects survival in endometrial carcinoma. This effect is accounted for by the association of obesity with less aggressive disease. Morbid obesity is not associated with increased death from other causes. Lack of sampling of negative lymph nodes does not adversely affect survival.

  2. Delayed breast reconstruction with implants after invasive breast cancer does not impair prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmich, L.R.; During, M.; Henriksen, T.F.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated if delayed breast implant reconstruction after breast cancer impairs prognosis. Using data from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group register, we identified all women......We investigated if delayed breast implant reconstruction after breast cancer impairs prognosis. Using data from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group register, we identified all women...

  3. Obesity and Breast Cancer Prognosis: Evidence, Challenges, and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiralerspong, Sao; Goodwin, Pamela J

    2016-12-10

    Purpose To summarize the evidence of an association between obesity and breast cancer prognosis. Methods We reviewed the literature regarding overweight and obesity and breast cancer survival outcomes, overall and with regard to breast cancer subtypes, breast cancer therapies, biologic mechanisms, and possible interventions. We summarize our findings and provide clinical management recommendations. Results Obesity is associated with a 35% to 40% increased risk of breast cancer recurrence and death and therefore poorer survival outcomes. This is most clearly established for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, with the relationship in triple-negative and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive subtypes less well established. A range of biologic mechanisms that may underlie this association has been identified. Weight loss and lifestyle interventions, as well as metformin and other obesity-targeted therapies, are promising avenues that require further study. Conclusion Obesity is associated with inferior survival in breast cancer. Understanding the nature and mechanisms of this effect provides an important opportunity for interventions to improve the diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes of obese patients with breast cancer.

  4. Applications of Machine Learning in Cancer Prediction and Prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph A. Cruz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Machine learning is a branch of artificial intelligence that employs a variety of statistical, probabilistic and optimization techniques that allows computers to “learn” from past examples and to detect hard-to-discern patterns from large, noisy or complex data sets. This capability is particularly well-suited to medical applications, especially those that depend on complex proteomic and genomic measurements. As a result, machine learning is frequently used in cancer diagnosis and detection. More recently machine learning has been applied to cancer prognosis and prediction. This latter approach is particularly interesting as it is part of a growing trend towards personalized, predictive medicine. In assembling this review we conducted a broad survey of the different types of machine learning methods being used, the types of data being integrated and the performance of these methods in cancer prediction and prognosis. A number of trends are noted, including a growing dependence on protein biomarkers and microarray data, a strong bias towards applications in prostate and breast cancer, and a heavy reliance on “older” technologies such artificial neural networks (ANNs instead of more recently developed or more easily interpretable machine learning methods. A number of published studies also appear to lack an appropriate level of validation or testing. Among the better designed and validated studies it is clear that machine learning methods can be used to substantially (15-25% improve the accuracy of predicting cancer susceptibility, recurrence and mortality. At a more fundamental level, it is also evident that machine learning is also helping to improve our basic understanding of cancer development and progression.

  5. Yin Yang gene expression ratio signature for lung cancer prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Xu

    Full Text Available Many studies have established gene expression-based prognostic signatures for lung cancer. All of these signatures were built from training data sets by learning the correlation of gene expression with the patients' survival time. They require all new sample data to be normalized to the training data, ultimately resulting in common problems of low reproducibility and impracticality. To overcome these problems, we propose a new signature model which does not involve data training. We hypothesize that the imbalance of two opposing effects in lung cancer cells, represented by Yin and Yang genes, determines a patient's prognosis. We selected the Yin and Yang genes by comparing expression data from normal lung and lung cancer tissue samples using both unsupervised clustering and pathways analyses. We calculated the Yin and Yang gene expression mean ratio (YMR as patient risk scores. Thirty-one Yin and thirty-two Yang genes were identified and selected for the signature development. In normal lung tissues, the YMR is less than 1.0; in lung cancer cases, the YMR is greater than 1.0. The YMR was tested for lung cancer prognosis prediction in four independent data sets and it significantly stratified patients into high- and low-risk survival groups (p = 0.02, HR = 2.72; p = 0.01, HR = 2.70; p = 0.007, HR = 2.73; p = 0.005, HR = 2.63. It also showed prediction of the chemotherapy outcomes for stage II & III. In multivariate analysis, the YMR risk factor was more successful at predicting clinical outcomes than other commonly used clinical factors, with the exception of tumor stage. The YMR can be measured in an individual patient in the clinic independent of gene expression platform. This study provided a novel insight into the biology of lung cancer and shed light on the clinical applicability.

  6. Number of tumor foci predicts prognosis in papillary thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Ning; Zhang, Ling; Ji, Qing-hai; Zhu, Yong-xue; Wang, Zhuo-ying; Shen, Qiang; Wang, Yu; Li, Duan-shu

    2014-12-04

    Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) often presents as multifocal. However, the association of multifocality with poor prognosis remains controversial. The aim of this retrospective study was to identify the characteristics of PTC with multiple foci and to evaluate the association between multifocality and prognosis. We reviewed the medical records of 496 patients who underwent total thyroidectomy for PTC. Patients were classified as G1 (1 tumor focus), G2 (2 foci), and G3 (3 or more foci). We analyzed the clinicopathological features and clinical outcomes in each classification. A Cox regression model was used to assess the relationship between multifocality and recurrence or cancer mortality. The G1, G2 and G3 groups included 287, 141 and 68 patients, respectively. The mean age was 47.1±16.1 yr in G1, 41.1±18.4 yr in G2, and 35.5±15.9 yr in G3 and differed significantly among the 3 groups (p=0.001). The proportion of extrathyroidal extension, central lymph node metastasis (CLNM), and lateral lymph node metastasis (LLNM) in the G1 to G3 groups increased with increasing number of tumor foci. The Kaplan-Meier curves revealed that G3 had the shortest recurrence-free survival, and differences were significant among the 3 groups (p=0.001, Log Rank test). Furthermore, cancer-specific survival rates decreased significantly with increasing number of tumor foci (p=0.041). Independent predictors of recurrence by multivariate Cox analysis included >3 tumor foci [HR 2.60, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.53-4.39, p=0.001] and extrathyroidal extension (HR 1.95, CI 1.12-3.38, p=0.018). An increase in the number of tumors is associated with a tendency toward more aggressive features and predicts poor prognosis in PTC.

  7. Machine learning applications in cancer prognosis and prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantina Kourou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer has been characterized as a heterogeneous disease consisting of many different subtypes. The early diagnosis and prognosis of a cancer type have become a necessity in cancer research, as it can facilitate the subsequent clinical management of patients. The importance of classifying cancer patients into high or low risk groups has led many research teams, from the biomedical and the bioinformatics field, to study the application of machine learning (ML methods. Therefore, these techniques have been utilized as an aim to model the progression and treatment of cancerous conditions. In addition, the ability of ML tools to detect key features from complex datasets reveals their importance. A variety of these techniques, including Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs, Bayesian Networks (BNs, Support Vector Machines (SVMs and Decision Trees (DTs have been widely applied in cancer research for the development of predictive models, resulting in effective and accurate decision making. Even though it is evident that the use of ML methods can improve our understanding of cancer progression, an appropriate level of validation is needed in order for these methods to be considered in the everyday clinical practice. In this work, we present a review of recent ML approaches employed in the modeling of cancer progression. The predictive models discussed here are based on various supervised ML techniques as well as on different input features and data samples. Given the growing trend on the application of ML methods in cancer research, we present here the most recent publications that employ these techniques as an aim to model cancer risk or patient outcomes.

  8. Association between Perception of Prognosis and Spiritual Well-being among Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alehe Seyedrasooly

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Disclosure of cancer prognosis is one of the most difficult challenges in caring of cancer patients. An exact effect of prognosis disclosure on spiritual well-being of cancer patient was not completely investigated. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the relationship between perception of prognosis and spiritual well-being among cancer patients. Methods: In this descriptive-correlational study, which conducted in 2013, two hundred cancer patients referred to Shahid Ghazi Hospital and private offices of two oncologists in Tabriz participated with convenience sampling method. Perception of prognosis was investigated by Perception of Prognosis Inventory and spiritual well-being of cancer patients was investigated by Paloutzian and Ellison Inventory. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Pearson correlation test. Results: Participants reported positive perception about the prognosis of their disease (score 11 from 15 and rated their spiritual well-being as high (score 99 from 120. There was a positive correlation between the perception of prognosis and spiritual health among cancer patients.Conclusion: Disclosure of cancer prognosis has negative effects on cancer patients. This result highlights the importance of considering cultural factors in disclosure of cancer prognosis. According to limitations of the present study approving these results need more studies.

  9. Breast cancer prognosis by combinatorial analysis of gene expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexe, Gabriela; Alexe, Sorin; Axelrod, David E; Bonates, Tibérius O; Lozina, Irina I; Reiss, Michael; Hammer, Peter L

    2006-01-01

    The potential of applying data analysis tools to microarray data for diagnosis and prognosis is illustrated on the recent breast cancer dataset of van 't Veer and coworkers. We re-examine that dataset using the novel technique of logical analysis of data (LAD), with the double objective of discovering patterns characteristic for cases with good or poor outcome, using them for accurate and justifiable predictions; and deriving novel information about the role of genes, the existence of special classes of cases, and other factors. Data were analyzed using the combinatorics and optimization-based method of LAD, recently shown to provide highly accurate diagnostic and prognostic systems in cardiology, cancer proteomics, hematology, pulmonology, and other disciplines. LAD identified a subset of 17 of the 25,000 genes, capable of fully distinguishing between patients with poor, respectively good prognoses. An extensive list of 'patterns' or 'combinatorial biomarkers' (that is, combinations of genes and limitations on their expression levels) was generated, and 40 patterns were used to create a prognostic system, shown to have 100% and 92.9% weighted accuracy on the training and test sets, respectively. The prognostic system uses fewer genes than other methods, and has similar or better accuracy than those reported in other studies. Out of the 17 genes identified by LAD, three (respectively, five) were shown to play a significant role in determining poor (respectively, good) prognosis. Two new classes of patients (described by similar sets of covering patterns, gene expression ranges, and clinical features) were discovered. As a by-product of the study, it is shown that the training and the test sets of van 't Veer have differing characteristics. The study shows that LAD provides an accurate and fully explanatory prognostic system for breast cancer using genomic data (that is, a system that, in addition to predicting good or poor prognosis, provides an individualized

  10. Risk and prognosis of endometrial cancer after tamoxifen for breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergman, L; Beelen, MLR; Gallee, MPW; Hollema, H; Benraadt, J; van Leeuwen, FE

    2000-01-01

    Background Tamoxifen increases the risk of endometrial cancer. However, few studies have produced reliable risk estimates by duration, dose, and recency of use, or addressed the prognosis of endometrial cancers in tamoxifen-treated women. Methods We did a nationwide case-control study on the risk

  11. Undertreatment strongly decreases prognosis of breast cancer in elderly women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchardy, Christine; Rapiti, Elisabetta; Fioretta, Gérald; Laissue, Paul; Neyroud-Caspar, Isabelle; Schäfer, Peter; Kurtz, John; Sappino, André-Pascal; Vlastos, Georges

    2003-10-01

    No consensus exists on therapy of elderly cancer patients. Treatments are influenced by unclear standards and are usually less aggressive. This study aims to evaluate determinants and effect of treatment choice on breast cancer prognosis among elderly patients. We reviewed clinical files of 407 breast cancer patients aged >/= 80 years recorded at the Geneva Cancer Registry between 1989 and 1999. Patient and tumor characteristics, general health status, comorbidity, treatment, and cause of death were considered. We evaluated determinants of treatment by logistic regression and effect of treatment on mortality by Cox model, accounting for prognostic factors. Age was independently linked to the type of treatment. Overall, 12% of women (n = 48) had no treatment, 32% (n = 132) received tamoxifen only, 7% (n = 28) had breast-conserving surgery only, 33% (n = 133) had mastectomy, 14% (n = 57) had breast-conserving surgery plus adjuvant therapy, and 2% (n = 9) received miscellaneous treatments. Five-year specific breast cancer survival was 46%, 51%, 82%, and 90% for women with no treatment, tamoxifen alone, mastectomy, and breast-conserving surgery plus adjuvant treatment, respectively. Compared with the nontreated group, the adjusted hazard ratio of breast cancer mortality was 0.4 (95% CI, 0.2 to 0.7) for tamoxifen alone, 0.4 (95% CI, 0.1 to 1.4) for breast-conserving surgery alone, 0.2 (95% CI, 0.1 to 0.7) for mastectomy, and 0.1 (95% CI, 0.03 to 0.4) for breast-conserving surgery plus adjuvant treatment. Half of elderly patients with breast cancer are undertreated, with strongly decreased specific survival as a consequence. Treatments need to be adapted to the patient's health status, but also should offer the best chance of cure.

  12. Prognosis of lung cancer patients with a past history of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Aritoshi; Suzuki, Kenji; Aokage, Keiju; Mimae, Takahiro; Nagai, Kanji; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Okada, Morihito

    2014-11-01

    The prognosis in lung cancer patients with a prior history of extrapulmonary cancer is controversial. In the current multicenter joint research in Japan, we focused on the relationship between a history of colorectal cancer and its prognostic impact in patients with subsequent lung cancer. Between 2000 and 2013, we designed a retrospective multicenter study at three institutes in Japan to evaluate the prognostic factors in lung cancer patients with a previous surgery for colorectal cancer. The cohorts consisted of 123/4431 lung cancer patients with/without a previous history of surgery for colorectal cancer. The median follow-up period was 6.1 years after lung cancer surgery. The 5-year overall survival in lung cancer patients with/without colorectal cancer was not significantly different, regardless of the stage of lung cancer (overall: 71.3 versus 74.7%, P = 0.1426; Stage I lung cancer: 83.3 versus 84.8%, P = 0.3779; Stage II or more lung cancer: 47.7 versus 54.4%, P = 0.1445). Based on multivariate Cox regression analysis in 4554 lung cancer patients, a past history of colorectal cancer was not a significant prognostic factor (P = 0.5335). Among the 123 lung cancer patients with colorectal cancer, age and absence of adjuvant chemotherapy for colorectal cancer were significant prognostic factors based on multivariate analysis (P = 0.0001 and 0.0236). Furthermore, there was no difference in the overall survival of lung cancer patients according to the stage of colorectal cancer (Stage I: 74.7%; Stage II/III: 66.5%, P = 0.7239). A history of antecedent colorectal cancer did not contribute to the prognosis in patients with subsequent lung cancers. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Risk, characteristics, and prognosis of breast cancer after Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veit-Rubin, Nikolaus; Rapiti, Elisabetta; Usel, Massimo; Benhamou, Simone; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Vlastos, Georges; Bouchardy, Christine

    2012-01-01

    To assess breast cancer (BC) risk after Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) and compare characteristics, risk of second BC, and prognosis of patients with these BCs with patients with first primary BC. We considered all 9,620 women with HL recorded in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results dataset in 1973-2007. We calculated age-period standardized incidence ratios of BC. We compared patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics, risk of second BC, and prognosis between patients with BC after HL (n = 316) and patients with other BCs occurring during the same period (n = 450,413) using logistic regression and Cox models adjusted for confounders. HL patients had a 2.4-fold higher risk for developing BC (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.2-2.7) than the general population. Age at HL diagnosis and radiation therapy influenced this risk. Compared with first primary BCs, BCs after HL were diagnosed at a younger age, at an earlier stage, were less frequently hormone receptor positive, were located more frequently in external quadrants, and were less frequently treated using radiotherapy. These patients had a higher risk (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 2.85; 95% CI, 1.79-4.53) for developing a second BC and had a higher BC mortality risk (adjusted HR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.05-1.76). The higher mortality risk was only partly explained by the higher occurrence rate of a second BC. HL survivors have a higher risk for developing BC, their BCs are more aggressive, they have a higher risk for a second BC occurrence, and they have a poorer prognosis. Guidelines of care should be adapted to decrease the impact of BC in these high-risk patients.

  14. 21 CFR 866.6040 - Gene expression profiling test system for breast cancer prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gene expression profiling test system for breast... Associated Antigen immunological Test Systems § 866.6040 Gene expression profiling test system for breast cancer prognosis. (a) Identification. A gene expression profiling test system for breast cancer prognosis...

  15. Evolutionary Origins of Cancer Driver Genes and Implications for Cancer Prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xin-Yi; Jiang, Ling-Han; Zhou, Xiong-Hui; Cui, Ze-Jia; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2017-07-14

    The cancer atavistic theory suggests that carcinogenesis is a reverse evolution process. It is thus of great interest to explore the evolutionary origins of cancer driver genes and the relevant mechanisms underlying the carcinogenesis. Moreover, the evolutionary features of cancer driver genes could be helpful in selecting cancer biomarkers from high-throughput data. In this study, through analyzing the cancer endogenous molecular networks, we revealed that the subnetwork originating from eukaryota could control the unlimited proliferation of cancer cells, and the subnetwork originating from eumetazoa could recapitulate the other hallmarks of cancer. In addition, investigations based on multiple datasets revealed that cancer driver genes were enriched in genes originating from eukaryota, opisthokonta, and eumetazoa. These results have important implications for enhancing the robustness of cancer prognosis models through selecting the gene signatures by the gene age information.

  16. HER family receptor expression and prognosis in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittoni, Alessandro; Mandolesi, Alessandra; Andrikou, Kalliopi; Santoni, Matteo; Alfonsi, Simona; Lanese, Andrea; Loretelli, Cristian; Pellei, Chiara; Piva, Francesco; Scarpelli, Marina; Cascinu, Stefano

    2015-07-22

    HER family receptors play a key role in tumor progression in several malignancies, such as colorectal, lung or breast cancer. The aims of this study were to investigate expression of HER-1, HER-2 and HER-3 in pancreatic cancer (PC) samples and evaluate the association between HER-family receptor expression and patients' clinical outcomes. Tissue samples from 91 PC patients were subjected to immunohistochemical staining to assess the expression of HER-1, HER-2 and HER-3. Semiquantitative scores of zero (no staining or staining in less than 10% of cancer cells), 1+, 2+ or 3+ were assigned to each sample based on the intensity of staining for HER receptors. Scores of 2+ or 3+ were defined as positive staining. HER-1 overexpression was observed in 41 out of 91 samples (45.1%), while HER-2 was not overexpressed in any of the analyzed samples. HER-3 was overexpressed in 37 samples (40.7%) and was found to be associated with advanced TNM stage. In particular, HER-3 was overexpressed in 12 out of 16 stage IV patients (75%) compared with only 33.3% of stage I-III patients (p = 0.02). Among 79 patients with available survival data, the 6 patients with strong HER-3 expression (score 3+) had a shorter survival compared with remaining patients (median overall survival 6.9 months vs. 12.3 months, respectively). HER-1 and HER-3 were found to be expressed in a significant proportion of PC patients. Strong HER-3 expression represents an indicator of poor prognosis in PC patients, being associated with advanced stage and shorter survival.

  17. Association of C-reactive protein (CRP) gene polymorphisms, serum CRP levels and cervical cancer prognosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Polterauer, Stephan; Grimm, Christoph; Zeillinger, Robert; Heinze, Georg; Tempfer, Clemens; Reinthaller, Alexander; Hefler, Lukas

    2011-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is the prototypical biomarker of inflammation. Genetic variations within the CRP gene have been shown to be associated with alterations of CRP expression and prognosis in cancer patients...

  18. Disparities in prognosis communication among parents of children with cancer: The impact of race and ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilowite, Maya F; Cronin, Angel M; Kang, Tammy I; Mack, Jennifer W

    2017-10-15

    Most parents of children with cancer say they want detailed information about their child's prognosis. However, prior work has been conducted in populations of limited diversity. The authors sought to evaluate the impact of parental race/ethnicity on prognosis communication experiences among parents of children with cancer. In total, 357 parents of children with cancer and the children's physicians were surveyed at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Boston Children's Hospital and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Outcome measures were parental preferences for prognostic information, physician beliefs about parental preferences, prognosis communication processes, and communication outcomes. Associations were assessed by logistic regression with generalized estimating equations to correct for physician clustering. Two hundred eighty-one parents (79%) were white, 23 (6%) were black, 29 (8%) were Hispanic, and 24 (7%) were Asian/other. Eighty-seven percent of parents wanted as much detail as possible about their child's prognosis, with no significant differences by race/ethnicity (P = .75). However, physician beliefs about parental preferences for prognosis communication varied based on parent race/ethnicity, with physicians considering black and Hispanic parents less interested in details about prognosis than whites (P = .003). Accurate understanding of a less favorable prognosis was greater among white (49%) versus nonwhite parents (range, 20%-29%), although this difference was not statistically significant (P = .14). Most parents, regardless of racial and ethnic background, want detailed prognostic information about their child's cancer. However, physicians underestimate the information needs of black and Hispanic parents. To meet parents' information needs, physicians should ask about parents' information preferences before prognosis discussions. Cancer 2017;123:3995-4003. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  19. Does buccal cancer have worse prognosis than other oral cavity cancers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilon, P Ryan; Stokes, William A; Fuller, Colin W; Nguyen, Shaun A; Lentsch, Eric J

    2014-06-01

    To determine whether buccal squamous cell carcinoma has worse overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) than cancers in the rest of the oral cavity. Retrospective analysis of a large population database. We began with a Kaplan-Meier analysis of OS and DSS for buccal versus nonbuccal tumors with unmatched data, followed by an analysis of cases matched for race, age at diagnosis, stage at diagnosis, and treatment modality. This was supported by a univariate Cox regression comparing buccal cancer to nonbuccal cancer, followed by a multivariate Cox regression that included all significant variables studied. With unmatched data, buccal cancer had significantly lesser OS and DSS values than cancers in the rest of the oral cavity (P cancer versus nonbuccal oral cancer were no longer significant. Univariate Cox regression models with respect to OS and DSS showed a significant difference between buccal cancer and nonbuccal cancer. However, with multivariate analysis, buccal hazard ratios for OS and DSS were not significant. With the largest series of buccal carcinoma to date, our study concludes that the OS and DSS of buccal cancer are similar to those of cancers in other oral cavity sites once age at diagnosis, tumor stage, treatment, and race are taken into consideration. The previously perceived poor prognosis of buccal carcinoma may be due to variations in tumor presentation, such as later stage and older patient age. 2b. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  20. Prognosis of women with stage I endometrioid endometrial cancer and synchronous stage I endometrioid ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Koji; Machida, Hiroko; Frimer, Marina; Marcus, Jenna Z; Pejovic, Tanja; Roman, Lynda D; Wright, Jason D

    2017-12-01

    Synchronous endometrial and ovarian cancer with endometrioid histology at two cancer sites typically presents with early-stage disease and is thought to have a good prognosis. We examined the survival of women with early-stage endometrioid endometrial cancer who had synchronous early-stage endometrioid ovarian cancer. This is a retrospective case-control study examining the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Result Program between 1973 and 2013. Survival of women with stage I endometrioid endometrial cancer with stage I endometrioid ovarian cancer (n=839) were compared to women with stage I endometrioid endometrial cancer without synchronous ovarian cancer (n=123,692) after propensity score matching. Women with synchronous stage I endometrioid ovarian cancer were more likely to be diagnosed recently, be younger, have stage IA disease, grade 1 tumors, to have undergone lymphadenectomy, and were less likely to receive radiotherapy compared to those without synchronous ovarian cancer (all, Pendometrial cancer-specific survival (10-year rates 96.0% versus 95.3%, P=0.97) or overall survival (85.6% versus 87.2%, P=0.10). Among tumors with concordant grades at the two cancer sites, survival was similar regardless of presence of synchronous ovarian tumors (grade 1 tumors, 10-year rate for overall survival, 88.2% versus 89.1%, P=0.40; and grade 2 tumors, 84.0% versus 85.8%, P=0.78). Women with stage I endometrioid endometrial cancer with synchronous stage I endometrioid ovarian cancer have a survival outcome similar to those with stage I endometrioid endometrial cancer without synchronous ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Oligosaccharide Markers for Prognosis of Low-Risk Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pettijohn, David

    1999-01-01

    The general goal of this study was to determine if there are specific combinations of oligosaccharide markers on ductal breast carcinoma cells that are useful in predicting the post surgical prognosis...

  2. TP53 mutations in human cancers: functional selection and impact on cancer prognosis and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitjean, A; Achatz, M I W; Borresen-Dale, A L; Hainaut, P; Olivier, M

    2007-04-02

    A large amount of data is available on the functional impact of missense mutations in TP53 and on mutation patterns in many different cancers. New data on mutant p53 protein function, cancer phenotype and prognosis have recently been integrated in the International Agency for Research on Cancer TP53 database (http://www-p53.iarc.fr/). Based on these data, we summarize here current knowledge on the respective roles of mutagenesis and biological selection of mutations with specific functional characteristic in shaping the patterns and phenotypes of mutations observed in human cancers. The main conclusion is that intrinsic mutagenicity rates, loss of transactivation activities, and to a lesser extent, dominant-negative activities are the main driving forces that determine TP53 mutation patterns and influence tumor phenotype. In contrast, current experimental data on the acquisition of oncogenic activities (gain of function) by p53 mutants are too scarce and heterogenous to assess whether this property has an impact on tumor development and outcome. In the case of inherited TP53 mutations causing Li-Fraumeni and related syndromes, the age at onset of some tumor types is in direct relation with the degree of loss of transactivation capacity of missense mutations. Finally, studies on large case series demonstrate that TP53 mutations are independent markers of bad prognosis in breast and several other cancers, and that the exact type and position of the mutation influences disease outcome. Further studies are needed to determine how TP53 haplotypes or loss of alleles interact with mutations to modulate their impact on cancer development and prognosis.

  3. Integrative analysis of cancer prognosis data with multiple subtypes using regularized gradient descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shuangge; Zhang, Yawei; Huang, Jian; Huang, Yuan; Lan, Qing; Rothman, Nathaniel; Zheng, Tongzhang

    2012-12-01

    In cancer research, high-throughput profiling studies have been extensively conducted, searching for genes/single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with prognosis. Despite seemingly significant differences, different subtypes of the same cancer (or different types of cancers) may share common susceptibility genes. In this study, we analyze prognosis data on multiple subtypes of the same cancer but note that the proposed approach is directly applicable to the analysis of data on multiple types of cancers. We describe the genetic basis of multiple subtypes using the heterogeneity model that allows overlapping but different sets of susceptibility genes/SNPs for different subtypes. An accelerated failure time (AFT) model is adopted to describe prognosis. We develop a regularized gradient descent approach that conducts gene-level analysis and identifies genes that contain important SNPs associated with prognosis. The proposed approach belongs to the family of gradient descent approaches, is intuitively reasonable, and has affordable computational cost. Simulation study shows that when prognosis-associated SNPs are clustered in a small number of genes, the proposed approach outperforms alternatives with significantly more true positives and fewer false positives. We analyze an NHL (non-Hodgkin lymphoma) prognosis study with SNP measurements and identify genes associated with the three major subtypes of NHL, namely, DLBCL, FL, and CLL/SLL. The proposed approach identifies genes different from using alternative approaches and has the best prediction performance. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. [The effectiveness of population-based breast cancer screening programme].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szynglarewicz, Bartłomiej; Matkowski, Rafał; Kasprzak, Piotr; Kotowska, Jolanta; Forgacz, Józef; Pudełko, Marek; Kornafel, Jan

    2009-02-01

    Well-organised mammography screening programme can significantly reduce the breast cancer mortality However, changes in mortality rates take a long time thus some early indicators are usually used to monitor the effectiveness of the programme. If these operational objectives are accomplished then the programme can replicate the mortality reduction achieved in randomised trials. To evaluate the quality of breast cancer screening programme in the region of Lower Silesia during the first year of its operating. Centrally organised breast cancer screening has been introduced since the beginning of the year 2007. This population-based programme is designed for women aged 50-69. Females undergoing treatment or being followed-up due to breast cancer are not invited. Screen-film two-view mammography without clinical examination is used as a screening test which is to be performed every two years. The second level diagnostic tools are breast clinical examination and additional imaging (mammography and ultrasound). Following further assessment women are referred to the examination at the routine round length of the programme, at the less interval (short-term recall) or biopsy procedures. Quality assessment was done via early indicators according to the European guidelines. The attendance rate was 41% (79,143 women screened within 192,613 eligible population for one year). Technical repeat rate, further assessment rate, and short-term recall rate were: 0.26%, 6.85%, and 0.91%, respectively. Pathologically confirmed breast cancer was revealed in 364 women giving the detection rate 4.59 for 1000. Cancer detection rate to expected incidence ratio was 3.35. Mammography service performed during the first year of breast cancer screening programme in the region of Lower Silesia conforms to quality assessment parameters recommended by the European guidelines at the acceptable level. The main problem at the start of this programme is too low coverage. Invitation process must be

  5. Computer-aided prognosis on breast cancer with hematoxylin and eosin histopathology images: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia-Mei; Li, Yan; Xu, Jun; Gong, Lei; Wang, Lin-Wei; Liu, Wen-Lou; Liu, Juan

    2017-03-01

    With the advance of digital pathology, image analysis has begun to show its advantages in information analysis of hematoxylin and eosin histopathology images. Generally, histological features in hematoxylin and eosin images are measured to evaluate tumor grade and prognosis for breast cancer. This review summarized recent works in image analysis of hematoxylin and eosin histopathology images for breast cancer prognosis. First, prognostic factors for breast cancer based on hematoxylin and eosin histopathology images were summarized. Then, usual procedures of image analysis for breast cancer prognosis were systematically reviewed, including image acquisition, image preprocessing, image detection and segmentation, and feature extraction. Finally, the prognostic value of image features and image feature-based prognostic models was evaluated. Moreover, we discussed the issues of current analysis, and some directions for future research.

  6. Tumor-infiltrating immune cells and prognosis: the potential link between conventional cancer therapy and immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochems, Caroline; Schlom, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Numerous studies have now documented a link between the immune infiltrate in several human carcinoma types and prognosis and response to therapy. The most comprehensive of these studies were in colorectal cancer with similar conclusions by numerous groups. Analyses of immune infiltrate of several other carcinoma types also showed general correlations between immune infiltrate and prognosis, but with some conflicting results. This review will attempt to summarize the current state of this field and point out what factors may be responsible for some of the conflicting findings. Nonetheless, the breadth of reports drawing similar conclusions for some cancer cell types leads one to more seriously consider the link between immune cell infiltrate and tumor prognosis and/or response to therapy, and the potential for combining conventional cancer therapy with active immunotherapy employing therapeutic cancer vaccines. PMID:21486861

  7. Prognosis of women with primary breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy: Results from an international collaborative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Amant (Frédéric); G. von Minckwitz (G.); S.N. Han (Sileny); M. Bontenbal (Marijke); A. Ring (Alistair); J. Giermek (Jerzy); H. Wildiers (Hans); T. Fehm (Tanja); S.C. Linn (Sabine); B. Schlehe (Bettina); P. Neven (Patrick); P. Westenend (Pieter); V. Müller (Volkmar); K. van Calsteren (Kristel); B. Rack (Brigitte); V. Nekljudova (Valentina); N. Harbeck (Nadia); M. Untch (Michael); P.O. Witteveen (Petronella); K. Schwedler (Kathrin); C. Thomssen (Christoph); B. Van Calster (Ben); S. Loibl (Sibylle)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: We aimed to determine the prognosis of patients with breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy (BCP). Patients and Methods: In this cohort study, a multicentric registry of patients with BCP (from Cancer in Pregnancy, Leuven, Belgium, and GBG 29/BIG 02-03) compiled pro- and

  8. BMI and breast cancer prognosis benefit: mammography screening reveals differences between normal weight and overweight women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispo, Anna; Grimaldi, Maria; D'Aiuto, Massimiliano; Rinaldo, Massimo; Capasso, Immacolata; Amore, Alfonso; D'Aiuto, Giuseppe; Giudice, Aldo; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Montella, Maurizio

    2015-02-01

    Few studies are available on the potential impact of body weight on breast cancer prognosis in screen-detected patients. Moreover, it is not known whether body mass index (BMI) could have a different prognostic impact in screen-detected versus symptomatic breast cancer patients. To investigate these unsolved issues, we carried out a retrospective study evaluating the effect of BMI on breast cancer prognosis in screen-detected vs symptomatic breast cancer patients. We conducted a follow-up study on 448 women diagnosed with incident, histologically-confirmed breast cancer. Patients were categorized according to their BMI as normal weight, overweight and obese. Disease free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and BMI curves were compared according to mode of cancer detection. Among screen-detected patients, higher BMI was associated with a significant lower DFS, whereas no significant difference was observed among symptomatic patients. OS showed similar results. In the multivariate analysis adjusting for age, education, tumor size, nodal status, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and menopausal status, the risk for high level of BMI among screen-detected patients did not reach the statistical significance for either recurrence or survival. Our study highlights the potential impact of high bodyweight in breast cancer prognosis, the findings confirm that obesity plays a role in women breast cancer prognosis independently from diagnosis mode. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Elevated C-reactive protein in the diagnosis, prognosis, and cause of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allin, Kristine H; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2011-01-01

    -phase response, chronic inflammation, the molecular biology, function and measurement of CRP, circulating levels of CRP in health and disease, the principle of Mendelian randomization, the association between circulating levels of CRP and cancer prognosis, and cancer biomarkers. In the Copenhagen General...

  10. The Role of Lifestyle Factors in Ovarian Cancer Prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Nothing to report. What was the impact on society beyond science and technology ? Nothing to report. 5. CHANGES/PROBLEMS: Changes in...prevalence of participation in these lifestyle behaviours among ovarian cancer patients. Over the last year, our efforts were concentrated on commencing... behaviours in ovarian cancer patients. In this study we include women diagnosed with ovarian cancer at three Montreal hospital centers with specialized

  11. An assessment of oral cancer curricula in dental hygiene programmes: implications for cancer control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, K K; Kaste, L M; Homsi, K D; LeHew, C W

    2016-11-01

    To assess oral cancer prevention and early detection curricula in Illinois associate-degree dental hygiene programmes and highlight global health applications. An email invitation was sent to each Illinois associate-degree granting dental hygiene programme's oral cancer contact to participate in a survey via a SurveyMonkey™ link to a 21-item questionnaire. Questions elicited background information on each programme and inquired about curriculum and methods used for teaching oral cancer prevention and early detection. Eight of the 12 (67%) programmes responded. Three (37.5%) reported having a specific oral cancer curriculum. Five (62.5%) require students to perform examinations for signs and symptoms of oral cancer at each clinic visit. Variations exist across the programmes in the number of patients each student sees annually and the number of oral cancer examinations each student performs before graduation. Seven programmes (87.5%) conduct early detection screening in community settings. All programmes included risk assessment associated with tobacco. All other risk factors measured were treated inconsistently. Significant differences in training and experience were reported across Illinois dental hygiene programmes. Training is neither standardized nor uniformly comprehensive. Students' preparation for delivering prevention and early detection services to their patients could be strengthened to ensure competence including reflection of risk factors and behaviours in a global context. Regular review of curricular guidelines and programme content would help dental hygienists meet the expectations of the Crete Declaration on Oral Cancer Prevention. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. DACH1: its role as a classifier of long term good prognosis in luminal breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desmond G Powe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oestrogen receptor (ER positive (luminal tumours account for the largest proportion of females with breast cancer. Theirs is a heterogeneous disease presenting clinical challenges in managing their treatment. Three main biological luminal groups have been identified but clinically these can be distilled into two prognostic groups in which Luminal A are accorded good prognosis and Luminal B correlate with poor prognosis. Further biomarkers are needed to attain classification consensus. Machine learning approaches like Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs have been used for classification and identification of biomarkers in breast cancer using high throughput data. In this study, we have used an artificial neural network (ANN approach to identify DACH1 as a candidate luminal marker and its role in predicting clinical outcome in breast cancer is assessed. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A reiterative ANN approach incorporating a network inferencing algorithm was used to identify ER-associated biomarkers in a publically available cDNA microarray dataset. DACH1 was identified in having a strong influence on ER associated markers and a positive association with ER. Its clinical relevance in predicting breast cancer specific survival was investigated by statistically assessing protein expression levels after immunohistochemistry in a series of unselected breast cancers, formatted as a tissue microarray. RESULTS: Strong nuclear DACH1 staining is more prevalent in tubular and lobular breast cancer. Its expression correlated with ER-alpha positive tumours expressing PgR, epithelial cytokeratins (CK18/19 and 'luminal-like' markers of good prognosis including FOXA1 and RERG (p<0.05. DACH1 is increased in patients showing longer cancer specific survival and disease free interval and reduced metastasis formation (p<0.001. Nuclear DACH1 showed a negative association with markers of aggressive growth and poor prognosis. CONCLUSION: Nuclear DACH1 expression

  13. Human breast cancer: its genetics, biology and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Riaz (Muhammad)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractCancer is a major public health problem, being the second leading cause of death, after cardiovascular diseases1. Among women, breast cancer is the first neoplasm for incidence and the second for mortality all over the world. World-wide, an incidence of 1.4 million new cases and

  14. Prognosis of Colorectal Cancer Patients with Elevated Endothelin-1 Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maqsood M. Elahi

    2004-01-01

    Conclusion: Preoperative plasma big ET-1 concentrations may be useful in predicting overall survival in patients with colorectal cancer. Plasma big ET-1 concentrations may be useful in the selection of high-risk, lymph node-negative patients with colorectal cancer for adjuvant therapy.

  15. Are Early Relapses in Advanced-Stage Ovarian Cancer Doomed to a Poor Prognosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien Vidal

    Full Text Available Early recurrence (ER after completion of therapeutic regimen in advanced-stage ovarian cancer is a challenging clinical situation. Patients are perceived as invariably having a poor prognosis. We investigated the possibility of defining different prognostic subgroups and the parameters implicated in prognosis of ER patients.We analyzed a multi-centric database of 527 FIGO stage IIIC and IV ovarian cancer patients. We defined patients relapsing within 12 months as ER and investigated using Cox logistic regression the prognostic factors in ER group. We subsequently divided ER patients into good and poor prognosis groups according to a lower or higher overall survival (OS at 12 months after relapse and determined parameters associated to poor prognosis.The median follow up was 49 months. One hundred and thirty eight patients recurred within 12 months. OS and Disease Free Survival (DFS were 24.6 and 8.6 months, respectively, in this group of patients. Among the ER patients, 73 had a poor prognosis with an OS after relapse below 12 months (mean OS = 5.2 months and 65 survived after one year (mean OS = 26.9 months. Residual disease (RD after debulking surgery and mucinous histological subtype negatively impacted prognosis (HR = 1.758, p = 0.017 and HR = 8.641, p = 0.001 respectively. The relative risk of death within 12 months following relapse in ER patients was 1.61 according to RD status. However, RD did not affect DFS (HR = 0.889, p = 0.5.ER in advanced-stage ovarian cancer does not inevitably portend a short-term poor prognosis. RD status after initial cytoreduction strongly modulates OS, that gives additional support to the concept of maximum surgical effort even in patients who will experience early recurrence. The heterogeneity in outcomes within the ER group suggests a role for tumor biology in addition to classical clinical parameters.

  16. HER-2 positive and p53 negative breast cancers are associated with poor prognosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    p53 and HER-2 coexpression in breast cancer has been controversial. These markers were tested using immunohistochemistry and HercepTest. HER-2 expression is related to reduced breast cancer survival (p = .02) . p53 expression relates to HER-2 expression (p = .029). Coexpression between p53 and HER-2 has no relation to prognosis. On univariate and multivariate analysis, combination of HER-2 positive and p53 negative expression was associated with a poor prognosis (p = .018 and p = .027, respectively), while the combination of HER-2 negative and p53 positive expression was associated with a favorable prognosis (p = .022 and p = .010, respectively). Therefore the expression of these markers should be considered collectively.

  17. HER-2 positive and p53 negative breast cancers are associated with poor prognosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-06-01

    p53 and HER-2 coexpression in breast cancer has been controversial. These markers were tested using immunohistochemistry and HercepTest. HER-2 expression is related to reduced breast cancer survival (p = .02) . p53 expression relates to HER-2 expression (p = .029). Coexpression between p53 and HER-2 has no relation to prognosis. On univariate and multivariate analysis, combination of HER-2 positive and p53 negative expression was associated with a poor prognosis (p = .018 and p = .027, respectively), while the combination of HER-2 negative and p53 positive expression was associated with a favorable prognosis (p = .022 and p = .010, respectively). Therefore the expression of these markers should be considered collectively.

  18. Breast cancer screening programme: experience from Eastern province, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Mulhim, F A; Syed, A; Bagatadah, W A; Al Muhanna, A F

    2015-04-02

    Programmes for early diagnosis of breast cancer are lacking in most countries in the Eastern Mediterranean Region. This paper reviews a nongovernmental screening programme launched in October 2009 in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia, in which 14 health centres were covered by 2 mobile mammography machines. Annual screening was offered to all women aged 40 years and above. Up to February 2014 a total of 8061 women were screened, an uptake rate of 15.0%. The recall rate was 7.9%. The number of cancers detected was 47, a cancer detection rate of 5.83 per 1000 women screened; 70.2% of the cancers detected had either no mass or the lesions were smaller than 2 cm. The mean age of women with cancer was 50.4 (SD 7.6) years. The screening parameters of our study correlated well with international standards. Despite the controversies regarding universal breast cancer screening, a national breast cancer screening programme for Saudi Arabia is needed.

  19. Preoperative mannan-binding lectin pathway and prognosis in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ytting, Henriette; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Jensenius, Jens Christian

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: Deficiency of the mannan-binding lectin (MBL) pathway of innate immunity is associated with increased susceptibility to infections. In patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), postoperative infection is associated with poor prognosis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate (1...

  20. Stonin 2 Overexpression is Correlated with Unfavorable Prognosis and Tumor Invasion in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoying Sun

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Stonin 2 (STON2, which functions in adjusting endocytotic complexes, is probably involved in the monitoring of the internalization of dopamine D2 receptors which have an inhibitory action of dopamine on tumor progression. However, its clinical significance in tumor progression and prognosis remains unclear. We explored the association between STON2 and the clinicopathological characteristics of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC. The STON2 levels in ovarian cancer and normal cell lines and tissues were detected by real-time PCR and Western blot analyses. STON2 protein expression was also detected by an immunohistochemical analysis. The clinical significance of STON2 expression in ovarian cancer was statistically analyzed. STON2 significantly increased in the ovarian cancer cell lines and tissues compared to the normal ones. In the 89 EOC samples tested, STON2 expression was significantly correlated with intraperitoneal metastasis, intestinal metastasis, intraperitoneal recurrence, ascites containing tumor cells, and CA153 level. Moreover, patients with STON2 protein overexpression were more likely to exhibit platinum resistance and to have undergone neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Patients with high STON2 protein expression had a tendency to have a shorter overall survival and a poor prognosis. A multivariate analysis showed that STON2 was an independent prognostic predictor for EOC patients. In conclusion, STON2 plays an important role in the progression and prognosis of ovarian carcinoma, especially in platinum resistance, intraperitoneal metastasis, and recurrence. STON2 can be a novel antitumor drug target and biomarker which predicts an unfavorable prognosis for EOC patients.

  1. The differential impact of microsatellite instability as a marker of prognosis and tumour response between colon cancer and rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung Pil; Min, Byung So; Kim, Tae Il; Cheon, Jae Hee; Kim, Nam Kyu; Kim, Hoguen; Kim, Won Ho

    2012-05-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) is a distinct molecular phenotype of colorectal cancer related to prognosis and tumour response to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy. We investigated the differential impact of MSI between colon and rectal cancers as a marker of prognosis and chemotherapeutic response. PCR-based MSI assay was performed on 1125 patients. Six hundred and sixty patients (58.7%) had colon cancer and 465 patients (41.3%) had rectal cancer. Among 1125 patients, 106 (9.4%) had high-frequency MSI (MSI-H) tumours. MSI-H colon cancers (13%) had distinct phenotypes including young age at diagnosis, family history of colorectal cancer, early Tumor, Node, Metastasis (TNM) stage, proximal location, poor differentiation, and high level of baseline carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), while MSI-H rectal cancers (4.3%) showed similar clinicopathological characteristics to MSS/MSI-L tumours except for family history of colorectal cancer. MSI-H tumours were strongly correlated with longer disease free survival (DFS) (P=0.005) and overall survival (OS) (P=0.009) than MSS/MSI-L tumours in colon cancer, while these positive correlations were not observed in rectal cancers. The patients with MSS/MSI-L tumours receiving 5-FU-based chemotherapy showed good prognosis (P=0.013), but this positive association was not observed in MSI-H (P=0.104). These results support the use of MSI status as a marker of prognosis and response to 5-FU-based chemotherapy in patients with colon cancers. Further study is mandatory to evaluate the precise role of MSI in patients with rectal cancers and the effect of 5-FU-based chemotherapy in MSI-H tumours. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Interval cancer rates in the Irish national breast screening programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Katie M; Dwane, Fiona; Kelleher, Tracy; Sharp, Linda; Comber, Harry

    2015-09-01

    To compare interval cancer rates from the Irish breast screening programme, BreastCheck, for the period 2000-2007 with those from other European countries. Data from BreastCheck was linked to National Cancer Registry breast cancer registrations, to calculate numbers of women screened, screen-detected cancers, and interval cancers, by year of screening, in the first and second years after screening, and by initial or subsequent screen. Estimated underlying cancer incidence from the period 1996-1999 inclusive was used to calculate proportionate incidence. We calculated the interval cancer ratio as an alternative measure of the burden of interval cancers. There were 372,658 screening records for 178,147 women in the period 2000-2007. The overall interval rate was 9.6 per 10,000 screens. In the first year after screening, the interval cancer rate was 5.8 per 10,000 screens and this increased to 13.4 in the second year after screening. The screen detection rate for the period was 53.6 per 10,000 screened for all screens combined. Initial screens produced a higher detection rate at 66.9 per 10,000 screened compared with subsequent screens with a screen-detected rate of 41.4 per 10,000 screens. Interval breast cancer rates for the first years of the programme are within acceptable limits and are comparable with those in other European programmes. Nationwide roll-out together with the adoption of digital mammography may have an impact on interval cancer rates in future years. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Global histone post-translational modifications and cancer: Biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shafqat Ali; Reddy, Divya; Gupta, Sanjay

    2015-11-26

    Global alterations in epigenetic landscape are now recognized as a hallmark of cancer. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modifications, nucleosome positioning and non-coding RNAs are proven to have strong association with cancer. In particular, covalent post-translational modifications of histone proteins are known to play an important role in chromatin remodeling and thereby in regulation of gene expression. Further, histone modifications have also been associated with different aspects of carcinogenesis and have been studied for their role in the better management of cancer patients. In this review, we will explore and discuss how histone modifications are involved in cancer diagnosis, prognosis and treatment.

  4. Correlations of EZH2 and SMDY3 Gene Polymorphisms with Breast Cancer Susceptibility and Prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shao-Jun; Liu, Yan-Mei; Zhang, Yue-Lang; Chen, Ming-Wei; Cao, Wei

    2017-10-31

    To investigate the correlation of EZH2 and SMYD3 gene polymorphisms with breast cancer susceptibility and prognosis. A total of 712 patients with breast cancer and 783 healthy individuals were selected. Normal breast epithelial cells MCF-10A and breast cancer cells MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, T47D and Bcap-37 were cultured. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method was applied for genotyping. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting were used to EZH2 and SMYD3 expression in breast cancer tissues and cells. The risk factors and prognostic factors for breast cancer were estimated. The C allele of EZH2 rs12670401 (odds ratio (OR) = 1.255, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.085~1.452), T allele of EZH2 rs6464926 (OR = 1.240, 95% CI: 1.071~1.435) and 3 allele of SMYD3 VNTR (OR = 1.305, 95% CI: 1.097~1.552) could increase susceptibility to breast cancer. Combined genotypes of EZH2 rs12670401 (TC + CC) and EZH2 rs6464926 (CT + TT) were associated with breast cancer susceptibility. Breast cancer tissues had higher EZH2 and SMYD3 expression. EZH2 rs12670401, EZH2 rs6464926, age of menarche and menopausal status were associated with breast cancer susceptibility. Patients with TT genotype of EZH2 rs12670401 or with CC genotype of EZH2 rs6464926 had higher overall survival. EZH2 rs12670401, EZH2 rs6464926 and clinical staging were independent prognostic factors for breast cancer. SMYD3 VNTR polymorphism exhibited no association with susceptibility and prognosis. EZH2 rs12670401 and rs6464926 polymorphisms, EZH2 and SMYD3 expression, clinical staging, lymph node metastasis, HER2 status and metastasis may be correlated with breast cancer susceptibility and prognosis. ©2017 The Author(s).

  5. Evaluation of The Netherlands breast cancer screening programme.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, A.L.M.; Broeders, M.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    The Netherlands breast cancer screening programme for women aged 50-75 years was gradually implemented during 1989-1997. Short-term indicators for this mammography screening are 80% attendance (800 000 examinations yearly), and for the subsequent screening examinations 7.4 referrals for clinical

  6. Prognosis and Survival in patients with Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schaik, P.M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to investigate the outcome after colorectal surgery and to try to find possible ways to improve staging and treatment, especially in patients with stage I and II colonic cancer. The first part of this thesis describes the outcome and quality of life in patients with

  7. Discovery of Genomic Breakpoints Affecting Breast Cancer Progression and Prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON USAMRMC a. REPORT U b. ABSTRACT U c. THIS PAGE U UU 34 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code...Predki, P., Martin, C., Wernick , M., et al. 2001. Comprehensive genome sequence analysis of a breast cancer amplicon. Genome Res. 11: 1034–1042. Hahn, Y

  8. Implications of microRNAs in Colorectal Cancer Development, Diagnosis, Prognosis and Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan eZhai

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of non-coding small RNAs with critical regulatory functions as post-transcriptional regulators. Due to the fundamental importance and broad impact of miRNAs on multiple genes and pathways, dysregulated miRNAs have been associated with human diseases, including cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC is among the most deadly diseases, and miRNAs offer a new frontier for target discovery and novel biomarkers for both diagnosis and prognosis. In this review, we summarize the recent advancement of miRNA research in CRC, in particular, the roles of miRNAs in colorectal cancer stem cells, EMT, chemoresistance, therapeutics, diagnosis and prognosis.

  9. Integrative analysis of multiple cancer prognosis studies with gene expression measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shuangge; Huang, Jian; Wei, Fengrong; Xie, Yang; Fang, Kuangnan

    2012-01-01

    Although in cancer research microarray gene profiling studies have been successful in identifying genetic variants predisposing to the development and progression of cancer, the identified markers from analysis of single datasets often suffer low reproducibility. Among multiple possible causes, the most important one is the small sample size hence the lack of power of single studies. Integrative analysis jointly considers multiple heterogeneous studies, has a significantly larger sample size, and can improve reproducibility. In this article, we focus on cancer prognosis studies, where the response variables are progression-free, overall, or other types of survival. A group minimax concave penalty (GMCP) penalized integrative analysis approach is proposed for analyzing multiple heterogeneous cancer prognosis studies with microarray gene expression measurements. An efficient group coordinate descent algorithm is developed. The GMCP can automatically accommodate the heterogeneity across multiple datasets, and the identified markers have consistent effects across multiple studies. Simulation studies show that the GMCP provides significantly improved selection results as compared with the existing meta-analysis approaches, intensity approaches, and group Lasso penalized integrative analysis. We apply the GMCP to four microarray studies and identify genes associated with the prognosis of breast cancer. PMID:22105693

  10. Women's perceptions of breast cancer screening. Spanish screening programme survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baena-Cañada, José M; Rosado-Varela, Petra; Expósito-Álvarez, Inmaculada; González-Guerrero, Macarena; Nieto-Vera, Juan; Benítez-Rodríguez, Encarnación

    2014-12-01

    Participants in breast cancer screening programmes may benefit from early detection but may also be exposed to the risks of overdiagnosis and false positives. We surveyed a sample of Spanish women to assess knowledge, information sources, attitudes and psychosocial impact. A total of 434 breast cancer screening programme participants aged 45-69 years were administered questionnaires regarding knowledge, information sources, attitudes and psychosocial impact. Scores of 5 or more (out of 10) and 12 or less (out of 24) were established as indicating adequate knowledge and a positive attitude, respectively. Psychosocial impact was measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Cancer Worry Scale. Only 42 women (9.7%) had adequate knowledge. The mean (SD) knowledge score was 2.97 (1.16). Better educated women and women without previous false positives had higher scores. The main sources of information were television, press, Andalusian Health Service documentation and family and friends. Most participants (99.1%) had a positive attitude, with a mean (SD) score of 3.21 (2.66). Mean (SD) scores for anxiety, depression and cancer worry were 1.86 (3.26), 0.72 (1.99) and 9.4 (3.04), respectively. Women have a very positive attitude to breast cancer screening, but are poorly informed and use television as their main information source. They experience no negative psychosocial impact from participation in such programmes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Establishing a Cancer Genetics Programme in Asia - the Singapore Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieng Wei-Shieng

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer genetics is now an established oncology subspecialty with the primary prevention role of identifying high-risk individuals through genetic information for enrolment into screening and preventive programmes. Integrated into major Western centres since the late 1990s, such a programme has been established in Singapore since 2001. Our programme has evaluated 367 index patients comprising mainly breast and colorectal cancer cases. Cancer patients were receptive to genetic counselling, but cost posed a major barrier to genetic testing. However, when the cost barrier was removed through government subsidy plans, more than half of high-risk patients still declined testing. The major barriers were reluctance to involve family members, perception that the information would not change management, and fears of negative feelings. Confirmed mutation carriers were compliant to screening and receptive to prophylactic surgery. Uptake of predictive testing among cancer-free family members has been low, possibly arising from the stigma associated with cancer in our Asian culture. These potential barriers are being addressed through government subsidy plans, continuing education to increase awareness, and being culturally sensitive when dealing with the Asian family.

  12. The application of data mining techniques to oral cancer prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Wan-Ting; Chiang, Wei-Fan; Liu, Shyun-Yeu; Roan, Jinsheng; Lin, Chun-Nan

    2015-05-01

    This study adopted an integrated procedure that combines the clustering and classification features of data mining technology to determine the differences between the symptoms shown in past cases where patients died from or survived oral cancer. Two data mining tools, namely decision tree and artificial neural network, were used to analyze the historical cases of oral cancer, and their performance was compared with that of logistic regression, the popular statistical analysis tool. Both decision tree and artificial neural network models showed superiority to the traditional statistical model. However, as to clinician, the trees created by the decision tree models are relatively easier to interpret compared to that of the artificial neural network models. Cluster analysis also discovers that those stage 4 patients whose also possess the following four characteristics are having an extremely low survival rate: pN is N2b, level of RLNM is level I-III, AJCC-T is T4, and cells mutate situation (G) is moderate.

  13. Risk factors and prognosis of pulmonary embolism in patients with lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Wen, Zhongguang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Malignant tumors are often complicated with venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism (PE), particularly in lung cancer. However, owing to the limited data regarding the clinical course about PE in lung cancer patients, the aim of this study is to analyze the risk factors and prognosis of patients with PE and lung cancer. We performed a retrospective case–control study, the clinical data of 90 patients in the First Affiliated Hospital of People's Liberation Army General Hospital between Jan 2010 and Jan 2015 were analyzed, including 30 lung cancer patients with PE (PE group), 60 lung cancer patients without PE (non-PE group), treated during the same period. Logistic regression analysis was applied to explore risk factors of PE. Patient survival was also compared with matched controls via a log-rank test. The multivariate analysis revealed that adenocarcinoma, stage III to IV, high D-dimer, and low PaO2 were independent risk factors. The survival time in patients with PE was remarkably lower than that in patients without PE (P < .0005). Adenocarcinoma, stage III to IV, high D-dimer and low PaO2 are important risk factors for lung cancer patients with PE. PE suggested a poor prognosis in lung cancer patients. PMID:28422863

  14. Circulating carnosine dipeptidase 1 associates with weight loss and poor prognosis in gastrointestinal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Arner

    Full Text Available Cancer cachexia (CC is linked to poor prognosis. Although the mechanisms promoting this condition are not known, several circulating proteins have been proposed to contribute. We analyzed the plasma proteome in cancer subjects in order to identify factors associated with cachexia.Plasma was obtained from a screening cohort of 59 patients, newly diagnosed with suspected gastrointestinal cancer, with (n = 32 or without (n = 27 cachexia. Samples were subjected to proteomic profiling using 760 antibodies (targeting 698 individual proteins from the Human Protein Atlas project. The main findings were validated in a cohort of 93 patients with verified and advanced pancreas cancer.Only six proteins displayed differential plasma levels in the screening cohort. Among these, Carnosine Dipeptidase 1 (CNDP1 was confirmed by sandwich immunoassay to be lower in CC (p = 0.008. In both cohorts, low CNDP1 levels were associated with markers of poor prognosis including weight loss, malnutrition, lipid breakdown, low circulating albumin/IGF1 levels and poor quality of life. Eleven of the subjects in the discovery cohort were finally diagnosed with non-malignant disease but omitting these subjects from the analyses did not have any major influence on the results.In gastrointestinal cancer, reduced plasma levels of CNDP1 associate with signs of catabolism and poor outcome. These results, together with recently published data demonstrating lower circulating CNDP1 in subjects with glioblastoma and metastatic prostate cancer, suggest that CNDP1 may constitute a marker of aggressive cancer and CC.

  15. Evaluation of educational programmes for paediatric cancer nursing in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Linda; Long, Tony; Hale, Claire

    2004-06-01

    The results of part of a larger study to evaluate educational provision for paediatric oncology and palliative care nursing in England are presented here. Mapping of cancer care provision, based upon the English National Board 240 programme, was undertaken by analysis of relevant curriculum documents. Prescribed programme outcomes were reviewed against expected course outcomes proposed by the European Oncology Nursing Society. Particular attention was also paid to expected processes of assessment of clinical practice, consideration of adolescent patients, and opportunities for shared learning. Widespread compliance with the European Oncology Nursing Society standard was found, with only two of the 19 areas substantially neglected. These related to the prevention and early detection of cancer (less relevant in paediatric cancer than for adults), and understanding the principles of cancer clinical trials (probably due to lack of explicit statement in curriculum documents rather than actual failure to address the topic). A range of prescribed assessment practices were noted, but the degree to which direct observation was involved was variable, and indirect measures appeared to predominate. There was little specific recognition of adolescence as a discrete topic to be addressed in the programmes. Shared learning tended to be introduced for logistical reasons of small class numbers rather than for any perceived intrinsic value.

  16. Oncology nurses' narratives about ethical dilemmas and prognosis-related communication in advanced cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLennon, Susan M; Uhrich, Margaret; Lasiter, Sue; Chamness, Amy R; Helft, Paul R

    2013-01-01

    Oncology nurses routinely encounter ethical dilemmas when caring for advanced cancer patients, particularly concerning prognosis-related communications. Nurses experience uncertainty and barriers to providing quality end-of-life care; thus, more information is needed about recognizing and managing these dilemmas and to clarify their role in these situations. The purposes of this study were to (1) describe the frequency and types of ethical dilemmas experienced by oncology nurses caring for advanced cancer patients and (2) to summarize their written comments about prognosis-related communications. This was a content analysis of narrative comments provided by 137 oncology nurses who completed a mailed national survey of members of the Oncology Nursing Society. The most frequently reported ethical dilemmas encompassed uncertainties and barriers to truth telling, familial and cultural conflict, and futility. Physician-nurse teams were considered optimal for delivering prognosis-related information. Nurses offered strategies for facilitating these communications. They also expressed the need for more education about how to engage in prognosis-related discussions and for better methods for relaying this information among team members to avoid "working in the dark." Oncology nurses routinely experience ethical dilemmas, and there is a need for clarification of their role in these circumstances. Healthcare providers would benefit from interdisciplinary education about prognosis-related discussions. Attention to managing familial conflict and understanding cultural variations associated with illness, death, and dying is also needed. Findings reveal new information about ethical dilemmas encountered by nurses and strategies for improving end-of-life communications with advanced cancer patients.

  17. Radiomics-based Prognosis Analysis for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yucheng; Oikonomou, Anastasia; Wong, Alexander; Haider, Masoom A.; Khalvati, Farzad

    2017-04-01

    Radiomics characterizes tumor phenotypes by extracting large numbers of quantitative features from radiological images. Radiomic features have been shown to provide prognostic value in predicting clinical outcomes in several studies. However, several challenges including feature redundancy, unbalanced data, and small sample sizes have led to relatively low predictive accuracy. In this study, we explore different strategies for overcoming these challenges and improving predictive performance of radiomics-based prognosis for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). CT images of 112 patients (mean age 75 years) with NSCLC who underwent stereotactic body radiotherapy were used to predict recurrence, death, and recurrence-free survival using a comprehensive radiomics analysis. Different feature selection and predictive modeling techniques were used to determine the optimal configuration of prognosis analysis. To address feature redundancy, comprehensive analysis indicated that Random Forest models and Principal Component Analysis were optimum predictive modeling and feature selection methods, respectively, for achieving high prognosis performance. To address unbalanced data, Synthetic Minority Over-sampling technique was found to significantly increase predictive accuracy. A full analysis of variance showed that data endpoints, feature selection techniques, and classifiers were significant factors in affecting predictive accuracy, suggesting that these factors must be investigated when building radiomics-based predictive models for cancer prognosis.

  18. Clinical nature and prognosis of locally recurrent rectal cancer after total mesorectal excision with or without preoperative radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Brink, M.; Stiggelbout, AM; van den Hout, WB; Kievit, J; Kranenbarg, EK; Marijnen, CAM; Nagtegaal, ID; Rutten, HJT; Wiggers, T; van de Velde, CJH

    2004-01-01

    Purpose To document the clinical nature and prognosis of locally. recurrent rectal cancer after total mesorectal excision (TME) with or without 5 X 5 Gy preoperative radiotherapy (PRT) and to identify patient-, disease-, and treatment-related factors associated with differences in prognosis after

  19. Clinical nature and prognosis of locally recurrent rectal cancer after total mesorectal excision with or without preoperative radiotherapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, M.; Stiggelbout, A.M.; Hout, W.B. van den; Kievit, J.; Meershoek-Klein Kranenbarg, E.; Marijnen, C.A.; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Rutten, H.J.; Wiggers, T.; Velde, C.J. van de

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: To document the clinical nature and prognosis of locally recurrent rectal cancer after total mesorectal excision (TME) with or without 5 x 5 Gy preoperative radiotherapy (PRT) and to identify patient-, disease-, and treatment-related factors associated with differences in prognosis after

  20. Prognosis of breast cancer is associated with one-carbon metabolism related nutrients among Korean women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yunhee; Lee, Sang-Ah; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Song, Minkyo; Sung, Hyuna; Jeon, Sujee; Park, Sue K; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Kang, Daehee

    2012-08-28

    The 5-year survival rate for breast cancer among Korean women has increased steadily; however, breast cancer remains the leading cause of cancer mortality among women. One-carbon metabolism, which requires an adequate supply of methyl group donors and B vitamins, may affect the prognosis of breast cancer. This aim of this study was to investigate the associations of dietary intake of vitamin B2, vitamin B6 and folate before diagnosis on the prognosis of breast cancer. We assessed the dietary intake using a food frequency questionnaire with 980 women who were newly diagnosed and histopathologically confirmed to have primary breast cancer from hospitals in Korea, and 141 disease progression events occurred. Cox's proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) adjusting for age, education, recruitment sites, TNM stage, hormone status, nuclear grade and total calorie. There was no significant association between any one-carbon metabolism related nutrients (vitamin B2, B6 and folate) and the progression of breast cancer overall. However, one-carbon metabolism related nutrients were associated with disease progression in breast cancer patients stratified by subtypes. In ER + and/or PR + breast cancers, no association was observed; however, in ER-/PR- breast cancers, a high intake of vitamin B2 and folate statistically elevated the HR of breast cancer progression (HR = 2.28; 95% CI, 1.20-4.35, HR = 1.84; 95% CI, 1.02-3.32, respectively) compared to a low intake. This positive association between the ER/PR status and progression of the disease was profound when the nutrient intakes were categorized in a combined score (Pinteraction = 0.018). In ER-/PR- breast cancers, high combined scores were associated with a significantly poor DFS compared to those belonging to the low score group (HR = 3.84; 95% CI, 1.70-8.71). In conclusion, our results suggest that one-carbon related nutrients have a role in the

  1. High copy number of mitochondrial DNA predicts poor prognosis in patients with advanced stage colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; He, Shuixiang; Zhu, Xingmei; Qiao, Wei; Zhang, Juan

    2016-12-23

    The aim of this investigation was to determine whether alterations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number in colon cancer were associated with clinicopathological parameters and postsurgical outcome. By quantitative real-time PCR assay, the mtDNA copy number was detected in a cohort of colon cancer and matched adjacent colon tissues (n = 162). The majority of patients had higher mtDNA content in colon cancer tissues than matched adjacent colon tissues. Moreover, high mtDNA content in tumor tissues was associated with larger tumor size, higher serum CEA level, advanced TNM stage, vascular emboli, and liver metastases. Further survival curve analysis showed that high mtDNA content was related to the worst survival in patients with colon cancer at advanced TNM stage. High mtDNA content is a potential effective factor of poor prognosis in patients with advanced stage colon cancer.

  2. Pretreatment circulating monocyte count associated with poor prognosis in patients with oral cavity cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yu-Duan; Wang, Chao-Ping; Chen, Chih-Yu; Lin, Li-Wen; Hwang, Tzer-Zen; Lu, Li-Fen; Hsu, Hsia-Fen; Chung, Fu-Mei; Lee, Yau-Jiunn; Houng, Jer-Yiing

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the pretreatment total and differential leukocyte counts can predict the prognosis of patients with oral cavity cancer. In a retrospective analysis of patients treated between 2004 and 2011, medical records of 202 patients with oral cavity cancer were evaluated. Patients with oral cavity cancer, the peripheral total white blood cell (WBC) count, monocyte, and neutrophil counts and neutrophil lymphocyte ratio increased with the advancement of clinical stage. In contrast, the lymphocyte count decreased. Further, total WBC, monocyte, and neutrophil counts were increased in those with pathologic stage T4 and poor tumor differentiation, and the monocyte count was also increased in those with lymph node metastasis. Moreover, the pretreatment circulating monocyte count was an independent prognostic factor for cancer-specific survival. A higher pretreatment circulating monocyte count can be considered as a useful prognostic marker in patients with oral cavity cancer. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Prognosis and Early Diagnosis of Ductal and Lobular Type in Breast Cancer Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehtemam, Houriyeh; Montazeri, Mitra; Khajouei, Reza; Hosseini, Raziyeh; Nemati, Ali; Maazed, Vahid

    2017-11-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers with a high mortality rate among women. Prognosis and early diagnosis of breast cancer among women society reduce considerable rate of their mortality. Nowadays, due to this illness, try to be setting up intelligent systems, which can predict and early diagnose this cancer, and reduce mortality of women society. Overall, 208 samples were collected from 2014 to 2015 from two oncologist offices and Javadalaemeh Clinic in Kerman, southeastern Iran. Data source was medical records of patients, then 64 data mining models in MATLAB and WEKA software were used, eventually these measured precision and accuracy of data mining models. Among 64 data mining models, Bayes-Net model had 95.67% of accuracy and 95.70% of precision; therefore, was introduced as the best model for prognosis and diagnosis of breast cancer. Intelligent and reliable data mining models are proposed. Hence, these models are recommended as a useful tool for breast cancer prediction as well as medical decision-making.

  4. Improved breast cancer prognosis through the combination of clinical and genetic markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yijun; Goodison, Steve; Li, Jian; Liu, Li; Farmerie, William

    2007-01-01

    Accurate prognosis of breast cancer can spare a significant number of breast cancer patients from receiving unnecessary adjuvant systemic treatment and its related expensive medical costs. Recent studies have demonstrated the potential value of gene expression signatures in assessing the risk of post-surgical disease recurrence. However, these studies all attempt to develop genetic marker-based prognostic systems to replace the existing clinical criteria, while ignoring the rich information contained in established clinical markers. Given the complexity of breast cancer prognosis, a more practical strategy would be to utilize both clinical and genetic marker information that may be complementary. A computational study is performed on publicly available microarray data, which has spawned a 70-gene prognostic signature. The recently proposed I-RELIEF algorithm is used to identify a hybrid signature through the combination of both genetic and clinical markers. A rigorous experimental protocol is used to estimate the prognostic performance of the hybrid signature and other prognostic approaches. Survival data analyses is performed to compare different prognostic approaches. The hybrid signature performs significantly better than other methods, including the 70-gene signature, clinical makers alone and the St. Gallen consensus criterion. At the 90% sensitivity level, the hybrid signature achieves 67% specificity, as compared to 47% for the 70-gene signature and 48% for the clinical makers. The odds ratio of the hybrid signature for developing distant metastases within five years between the patients with a good prognosis signature and the patients with a bad prognosis is 21.0 (95% CI:6.5-68.3), far higher than either genetic or clinical markers alone. The breast cancer dataset is available at www.nature.com and Matlab codes are available upon request.

  5. Wild-type APC predicts poor prognosis in microsatellite-stable proximal colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorissen, Robert N; Christie, Michael; Mouradov, Dmitri; Sakthianandeswaren, Anuratha; Li, Shan; Love, Christopher; Xu, Zheng-Zhou; Molloy, Peter L; Jones, Ian T; McLaughlin, Stephen; Ward, Robyn L; Hawkins, Nicholas J; Ruszkiewicz, Andrew R; Moore, James; Burgess, Antony W; Busam, Dana; Zhao, Qi; Strausberg, Robert L; Lipton, Lara; Desai, Jayesh; Gibbs, Peter; Sieber, Oliver M

    2015-09-15

    APC mutations (APC-mt) occur in ∼70% of colorectal cancers (CRCs), but their relationship to prognosis is unclear. APC prognostic value was evaluated in 746 stage I-IV CRC patients, stratifying for tumour location and microsatellite instability (MSI). Microarrays were used to identify a gene signature that could classify APC mutation status, and classifier ability to predict prognosis was examined in an independent cohort. Wild-type APC microsatellite stable (APC-wt/MSS) tumours from the proximal colon showed poorer overall and recurrence-free survival (OS, RFS) than APC-mt/MSS proximal, APC-wt/MSS distal and APC-mt/MSS distal tumours (OS HR⩾1.79, P⩽0.015; RFS HR⩾1.88, P⩽0.026). APC was a stronger prognostic indicator than BRAF, KRAS, PIK3CA, TP53, CpG island methylator phenotype or chromosomal instability status (P⩽0.036). Microarray analysis similarly revealed poorer survival in MSS proximal cancers with an APC-wt-like signature (P=0.019). APC status did not affect outcomes in MSI tumours. In a validation on 206 patients with proximal colon cancer, APC-wt-like signature MSS cases showed poorer survival than APC-mt-like signature MSS or MSI cases (OS HR⩾2.50, P⩽0.010; RFS HR⩾2.14, P⩽0.025). Poor prognosis APC-wt/MSS proximal tumours exhibited features of the sessile serrated neoplasia pathway (P⩽0.016). APC-wt status is a marker of poor prognosis in MSS proximal colon cancer.

  6. Estradiol metabolites as biomarkers of endometrial cancer prognosis after surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audet-Delage, Yannick; Grégoire, Jean; Caron, Patrick; Turcotte, Véronique; Plante, Marie; Ayotte, Pierre; Simonyan, David; Villeneuve, Lyne; Guillemette, Chantal

    2017-10-29

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is the most common gynecologic malignancy prevailing after menopause. Defining steroid profiles may help predict the risk of recurrence after hysterectomy, which remains limited due to the lack of reliable markers. Adrenal precursors, androgens, parent estrogens and catechol estrogen metabolites were measured by mass spectrometry (MS) in preoperative serums and those collected one month after hysterectomy from 246 newly diagnosed postmenopausal EC cases. We also examined the associations between steroid hormones and EC status by including 110 healthy postmenopausal women. Steroid concentrations were analyzed in relation to clinicopathological features, recurrence and overall survival (OS). The mean follow-up time was 65.5 months and 26 patients experienced relapse after surgery for a recurrence incidence of 10.6% (6.4% Type I and 29.5% Type II). Recurrence and OS were related to a more aggressive disease but not linked to body mass index. Preoperative levels of estriol (E3) and estrone-sulfate (E1-S) were inversely associated with recurrence in a multivariate logistic regression analysis (Hazard ratios (HRs) of 0.31, P=0.039 and 3.01, P=0.024; respectively). All circulating steroids declined considerably after surgery almost reaching those of healthy women, except 4-methoxy-E2 (4MeO-E2) for which postoperative levels increased by 35% and were associated to a 68% decreased risk of recurrence (HR=0.32, P=0.015). Women diagnosed with both histological types of EC present significantly higher levels of steroids, in support of their mitogenic effects. The estrogen precursor E1-S, the anticancer metabolite 4MeO-E2, and E3 that exert mixed antagonist and agonist estrogenic activities and immunological effects, are potential independent prognostic factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessing the role of IL-35 in colorectal cancer progression and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jin-Cheng; Zhang, Zhi; Li, Tian-Yu; Liang, Yan-Fang; Wang, Hong-Mei; Bao, Jing-Jing; Zhang, Jun-Ai; Wang, Wan-Dang; Xiang, Wen-Yu; Kong, Bin; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Wu, Bin-Hua; Chen, Xiao-Dong; He, Long; Zhang, Shu; Wang, Cong-Yi; Xu, Jun-Fa

    2013-01-01

    Despite the recent realization of Interleukin (IL)-35 in tumorigenesis, its exact impact on colorectal cancer (CRC) progression and prognosis, however, is yet to be elucidated clearly. We thus in the present report conducted comparative analysis of IL-35 levels between CRC patients and matched control subjects. IL-35 is highly expressed in all CRC tissues, which can be detected in vast majority of colorectal cancer cells. IL-35 levels in CRC lysates and serum samples are highly correlated to the severity of malignancy and the clinical stage of tumor. Particularly, a significant reduction for serum IL-35 was noted in patients after surgical resection, indicating that IL-35 promotes CRC progression associated with poor prognosis. Mechanistic study demonstrated a significant correlation between serum IL-35 levels and the number of peripheral regulatory T (Treg) cells in CRC patients, suggesting that IL-35 implicates in CRC pathogenesis probably by inducing Treg cells, while cancer cell-derived IL-35 may also recruit Treg cells into the tumor microenvironment in favor of tumor growth. Together, our data support that IL-35 could be a valuable biomarker for assessing CRC progression and prognosis in clinical settings.

  8. Glandular object based tumor morphometry in H&E biopsy samples for prostate cancer prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarasi, Stephen I.; Khan, Faisal M.; Pang, Ho-Yuen H.; Mesa-Tejada, Ricardo; Donovan, Michael J.; Fernandez, Gerardo

    2011-03-01

    Morphological and architectural characteristics of primary prostate tissue compartments, such as epithelial nuclei (EN) and cytoplasm, provide critical information for cancer diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic response prediction. The subjective and variable Gleason grade assessed by expert pathologists in Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stained specimens has been the standard for prostate cancer diagnosis and prognosis. We propose a novel morphometric, glandular object-oriented image analysis approach for the robust quantification of H&E prostate biopsy images. We demonstrate the utility of features extracted through the proposed method in predicting disease progression post treatment in a multi-institution cohort of 1027 patients. The biopsy based features were univariately predictive for clinical response post therapy; with concordance indexes (CI) = 0.6. In multivariate analysis, a glandular object feature quantifying tumor epithelial cells not directly associated with an intact tumor gland was selected in a model incorporating preoperative clinical data, protein biomarker and morphological imaging features. The model achieved a CI of 0.73 in validation, which was significantly higher than a CI of 0.69 for the standard multivariate model based solely on clinical features currently used in clinical practice. This work presents one of the first demonstrations of glandular object based morphological features in the H&E stained biopsy specimen to predict disease progression post primary treatment. Additionally, it is the largest scale study of the efficacy and robustness of the proposed features in prostate cancer prognosis.

  9. [Attendance in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Programme].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebuødegård, Sofie; Sagstad, Silje; Hofvind, Solveig

    2016-09-01

    A high rate of attendance among women invited to the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Programme (NBCSP) is essential to achieve optimal effect, including reduction in breast cancer mortality. This article describes attendance in the programme by county, period and women’s age at invitation. All women in the age group 50 – 69 years who are registered in the National Population Register are invited to attend the NBCSP every second year. In the study period 2007 – 2014, 2 142 369 invitations were sent, and 1 600 293 screening examinations were performed for 710 169 women. Use of the data is pursuant to the Cancer Registry Regulations. Altogether 84 % of the women invited attended at least once in the study period. The average attendance rate per screening round was 75 %. In Rogaland, Nordland and Sogn og Fjordane counties more than 80 % attended, while in Oslo the figure was 62 %. The highest rate of attendance recorded was for women in the age group 62 – 67 years. The attendance in the prior screening round was of influence for reattendance. The mammography screening programme has a high level of acceptance among women in the target group. Possible reasons for the variation in attendance among the county districts should be identified.

  10. Overexpression of ezrin and galectin-3 as predictors of poor prognosis of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Li

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore the correlation of ezrin and galectin-3 expressions with prognosis in cervical cancer. The immunohistochemical method was applied to detect ezrin and galectin-3 expressions in normal cervix tissues (n=30, cervicitis tissues (n=28, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN tissues (classified as I-III, n=89, and cervical carcinoma tissues (n=84. Follow-up was conducted for 5 to 78 months to analyze the correlation of protein expressions with prognosis. Ezrin and galectin-3 expressions in cervical cancer were significantly higher than in normal cervix, cervicitis and CIN (all P<0.05, and expressions in CIN were significantly higher than in normal cervix and cervicitis (both P<0.05. The expressions of ezrin and galectin-3 were both related with histological grade, deep myometrial invasion and lymph node metastasis (all P<0.05. Spearman analysis showed that ezrin expression was positively correlated with galectin-3 expression in cervical cancer (r=0.355, P<0.05. The survival rate of patients with high expressions of ezrin and galectin-3 was significantly lower than those with low expressions of proteins (both P<0.05. The expressions of ezrin and galectin-3, histological grade, depth of stromal invasion, and lymph node metastasis are risk factors affecting the survival rate of patients with cervical cancer. The expressions of ezrin and galectin-3 were correlated with the development of cervical cancer, and overexpressions of those proteins were indicative of poor prognosis in patients with cervical cancer.

  11. Programmer Analyst | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Advanced Biomedical Computing Center (ABCC) provides technology development, scientific consultation, collaboration, data analysis and training to the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and National Institutes of Health (NIH) scientists and staff. The Core Infrastructure and Systems Biology (CISB) group in ABCC strives to streamline and provide innovative solutions for the NCI/NIH community to access and use biological information collected across different sources and formats. Integrating diverse data sources to enable disease agnostic access and analysis, variant impact annotation, identifier conversions across species, and merging clinical and research data enables translation from basic to the goal of precision medicine. CISB is looking for an experienced analyst to support the database and application management efforts at the NCI’s Molecular Targets Program (MTP). KEY ROLES/RESPONSIBILITIES Provide data management and analysis support Maintain scientific applications and databases on single-user personal computer through the multi-user, multi-processor large memory mainframe Communicate with the experts in the MTP, gather requirements and provide support Provide training to researchers on a variety of platforms and applications Evaluate and develop methodologies to allow utilization of new software tools and generate the information required by MTP researchers Determine methods and procedures on new assignments Document approaches and mechanisms clearly and comprehensively

  12. Differences in parent-provider concordance regarding prognosis and goals of care among children with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Abby R; Orellana, Liliana; Kang, Tammy I; Geyer, J Russell; Feudtner, Chris; Dussel, Veronica; Wolfe, Joanne

    2014-09-20

    Concordance between parents of children with advanced cancer and health care providers has not been described. We aimed to describe parent-provider concordance regarding prognosis and goals of care, including differences by cancer type. A total of 104 pediatric patients with recurrent or refractory cancer were enrolled at three large children’s hospitals. On enrollment, their parents and providers were invited to complete a survey assessing perceived prognosis and goals of care. Patients’ survival status was retrospectively abstracted from medical records. Concordance was assessed via discrepancies in perceived prognosis, statistics, and McNemar’s test. Distribution of categorical variables and survival rates across cancer type were compared with Fisher’s exact and log-rank tests, respectively. Data were available from 77 dyads (74% of enrolled). Parent-provider agreement regarding prognosis and goals of care was poor (kappa, 0.12 to 0.30). Parents were more likely to report cure was likely (P < .001). The frequency of perceived likelihood of cure and the goal of cure varied by cancer type for both parents and providers (P < .001 to .004). Relatively optimistic responses were more common among parents and providers of patients with hematologic malignancies, although there were no differences in survival. Parent-provider concordance regarding prognosis and goals in advanced pediatric cancer is generally poor. Perceptions of prognosis and goals of care vary by cancer type. Understanding these differences may inform parent-provider communication and decision making.

  13. Comprehensive Analysis of Cancer-Proteogenome to Identify Biomarkers for the Early Diagnosis and Prognosis of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hem D. Shukla

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available During the past century, our understanding of cancer diagnosis and treatment has been based on a monogenic approach, and as a consequence our knowledge of the clinical genetic underpinnings of cancer is incomplete. Since the completion of the human genome in 2003, it has steered us into therapeutic target discovery, enabling us to mine the genome using cutting edge proteogenomics tools. A number of novel and promising cancer targets have emerged from the genome project for diagnostics, therapeutics, and prognostic markers, which are being used to monitor response to cancer treatment. The heterogeneous nature of cancer has hindered progress in understanding the underlying mechanisms that lead to abnormal cellular growth. Since, the start of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA, and the International Genome consortium projects, there has been tremendous progress in genome sequencing and immense numbers of cancer genomes have been completed, and this approach has transformed our understanding of the diagnosis and treatment of different types of cancers. By employing Genomics and proteomics technologies, an immense amount of genomic data is being generated on clinical tumors, which has transformed the cancer landscape and has the potential to transform cancer diagnosis and prognosis. A complete molecular view of the cancer landscape is necessary for understanding the underlying mechanisms of cancer initiation to improve diagnosis and prognosis, which ultimately will lead to personalized treatment. Interestingly, cancer proteome analysis has also allowed us to identify biomarkers to monitor drug and radiation resistance in patients undergoing cancer treatment. Further, TCGA-funded studies have allowed for the genomic and transcriptomic characterization of targeted cancers, this analysis aiding the development of targeted therapies for highly lethal malignancy. High-throughput technologies, such as complete proteome, epigenome, protein–protein interaction

  14. Guanine nucleotide binding protein-like 3 is a potential prognosis indicator of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Dong, Shuang; Hu, Jiangfeng; Duan, Bensong; Yao, Jian; Zhang, Ruiyun; Zhou, Hongmei; Sheng, Haihui; Gao, Hengjun; Li, Shunlong; Zhang, Xianwen

    2015-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide binding protein-like 3 (GNL3) is a GIP-binding nuclear protein that has been reported to be involved in various biological processes, including cell proliferation, cellular senescence and tumorigenesis. This study aimed to investigate the expression level of GNL3 in gastric cancer and to evaluate the relationship between its expression and clinical variables and overall survival of gastric cancer patients. The expression level of GNL3 was examined in 89 human gastric cancer samples using immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining. GNL3 in gastric cancer tissues was significantly upregulated compared with paracancerous tissues. GNL3 expression in adjacent non-cancerous tissues was associated with sex and tumor size. Survival analyses showed that GNL3 expression in both gastric cancer and adjacent non-cancerous tissues were not related to overall survival. However, in the subgroup of patients with larger tumor size (≥ 6 cm), a close association was found between GNL3 expression in gastric cancer tissues and overall survival. GNL3-positive patients had a shorter survival than GNL3-negative patients. Our study suggests that GNL3 might play an important role in the progression of gastric cancer and serve as a biomarker for poor prognosis in gastric cancer patients.

  15. MicroRNAs in the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violaine Havelange

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that regulate critical cell processes such as cell proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation by modulating gene expression. MiRNAs deregulation has been observed extensively in cancer. Elegant studies have demonstrated that miRNAs are involved in the initiation and progression of several malignancies. In this review we will address the role of miRNAs in the diagnosis and prognosis of cancer. The development of new drugs mimicking or blocking miRNAs will be discussed.

  16. Elevated C-reactive protein in the diagnosis, prognosis, and cause of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allin, Kristine H; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2011-01-01

    -phase response, chronic inflammation, the molecular biology, function and measurement of CRP, circulating levels of CRP in health and disease, the principle of Mendelian randomization, the association between circulating levels of CRP and cancer prognosis, and cancer biomarkers. In the Copenhagen General...... Population Study of approximately 63,500 individuals, the distribution of circulating levels of CRP was markedly skewed to the right with 97% of the participants having CRP levels3¿mg/L) had an 80% greater risk of early death compared with those with low CRP levels (3¿mg/L at diagnosis had a 1.7-fold...

  17. Application of a two-stage fuzzy neural network to a prostate cancer prognosis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ren-Jieh; Huang, Man-Hsin; Cheng, Wei-Che; Lin, Chih-Chieh; Wu, Yung-Hung

    2015-02-01

    This study intends to develop a two-stage fuzzy neural network (FNN) for prognoses of prostate cancer. Due to the difficulty of making prognoses of prostate cancer, this study proposes a two-stage FNN for prediction. The initial membership function parameters of FNN are determined by cluster analysis. Then, an integration of the optimization version of an artificial immune network (Opt-aiNET) and a particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is developed to investigate the relationship between the inputs and outputs. The evaluation results for three benchmark functions show that the proposed two-stage FNN has better performance than the other algorithms. In addition, model evaluation results indicate that the proposed algorithm really can predict prognoses of prostate cancer more accurately. The proposed two-stage FNN is able to learn the relationship between the clinical features and the prognosis of prostate cancer. Once the clinical data are known, the prognosis of prostate cancer patient can be predicted. Furthermore, unlike artificial neural networks, it is much easier to interpret the training results of the proposed network since they are in the form of fuzzy IF-THEN rules. These rules are very important for medical doctors. This can dramatically assist medical doctors to make decisions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Mediastinal Lymph Node Metastases in Thyroid Cancer: Characteristics, Predictive Factors, and Prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-ting Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Mediastinal lymph node metastases (MLNM have not been extensively studied. The aim of this study is to investigate the characteristics, predictive factors, and prognosis of MLNM in thyroid cancer. Methods. This is a retrospective study based on the thyroid cancer patients with MLNM at our institution from 2008 to 2015. Results. In total, 73 thyroid cancer patients with positive MLNM were included in this study. It contained sixty patients (82.2% with papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC, twelve (16.4% with medullary thyroid carcinoma, and one (1.4% with anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. Forty-eight patients had the surgery as initial treatment. Fifty-three (72.6% patients remained disease-free, and fifteen (20.5% developed a regional recurrence. Distant metastases occurred in four (5.5% patients and five (6.8% patients died. Five-year overall survival rate and disease-free survival (DFS rate of the PTC patients for initial treatment are 95.4% and 77.2%, respectively. Extrathyroidal extension and multiple lymph nodes involved were associated with DFS in PTC patients. Conclusions. Initial therapeutic control is very important for the thyroid cancer patients. Extrathyroidal extension and multiple mediastinal lymph nodes involved were the influence factors of prognosis in the thyroid cancer patients with MLNM.

  19. The role of red cell distribution width in the prognosis of patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Pinar; Demir, Uygar; Bozkurt, Emre; Isil, Gurhan R; Mihmanli, Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    Although the red cell distribution width (RDW) has been reported as a reliable predictor of prognosis in several types of cancer, to our knowledge the prognostic value of RDW in gastric carcinoma has not been studied, so far. We aimed to investigate the role of red cell distribution width (RDW) in predicting prognosis in gastric cancer patients. All gastric cancer patients who underwent curative surgery (n= 172, 110M/62F) over a five-year study period were evaluated. Data on demographics, preoperative RDW levels, tumor characteristics (early stage: I and II, advanced stage: IIIA-B-C), disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were classified as high RDW group (RDW ≥ 16, n= 62) or low RDW group (RDW < 16, n= 110). Overall mortality and postoperative 60-day mortality in both groups were 55% and 14%, respectively. A borderline significant association between RDW (0.063) and mortality was noted. Preoperative RDW levels were significantly higher in patients with short-term mortality (17.9 ± 4.3 vs. 16 ± 3.2, p= 0.015). In high RDW group, the incidence of advanced gastric cancer was significantly higher (75 vs. 51%, p= 0.002), whereas DFS (0.035) and OS (p= 0.04) were lower. The frequency of advanced cancer was high in patients with high RDWvalues. High RDW values were strongly associated with short-term mortality although only a borderline relationship with overall survival was observed.

  20. Understanding of prognosis and goals of care among couples whose child died of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Kelly E; Neville, Bridget A; Cook, Earl F; Aldridge, Sarah H; Dussel, Veronica; Wolfe, Joanne

    2008-03-10

    Little is known about how couples care for the terminally ill child with cancer. We assessed both parents' understanding of prognosis and treatment goals for children with cancer and explored whether sex mediates these views. We also investigated whether discordance within couples regarding treatment goals was related to parental perception of the child's end-of-life (EOL) experience. We surveyed mothers and fathers of children who died of cancer and were cared for at Children's Hospital (Boston, MA) and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (Boston, MA) between 2000 and 2004. Our sample included 38 couples (response rate, 56%). Willingness to participate did not differ by sex. At diagnosis, fathers and mothers held a similar understanding of the child's prognosis, and 58% of couples agreed on the goal of cure. During the EOL period, a majority of fathers and mothers reported lessening suffering as the primary goal. However, within couples there was poor agreement about the primary goal of care (kappa = 0.07). When parents did not agree on the primary goal of lessening suffering, both parents were more likely to report that the child suffered significantly from cancer-directed treatment (P = .03). Though parent goals are often concurrent at diagnosis, they frequently differ during the EOL period. Parent disagreement about the goal of lessening suffering at the EOL appears to impact how parents describe their child's experience of suffering. Creating opportunities for parents to work through their goals together may lead to improvements in the child's EOL experience.

  1. Bilaterality weighs more than unilateral multifocality in predicting prognosis in papillary thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Ning; Zhang, Ling; Wu, Wei-Li; Ji, Qing-Hai; Lu, Zhong-Wu; Zhu, Yong-Xue; Lin, Dao-Zhe

    2016-07-01

    Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) often presents as multifocal tumor;, however, whether multifocality is associated with poor prognosis remains controversial. The aims of this retrospective study were to identify the characteristics of PTC with multifocal tumors and evaluate the association between the location and prognosis. We reviewed the medical records of 496 patients who underwent total thyroidectomy for PTC. Patients were classified as three groups: N1 (solitary tumor), N2 (2 or more foci within unilateral lobe of thyroid), and N3 (bilateral tumors, at least one tumor focus for each lobe of thyroid). We analyzed the differences of clinicopathologic features and clinical outcomes among the three groups. Cox regression model was used to assess the relation between the different locations of multifocal tumors and prognosis. Although the differences of clinicopathologic features such as the size of tumor, extrathyroidal extension, and cervical lymph node metastasis were not significant among the three groups, the bilateral-multifocality was proved to be an independent risk factor for neck recurrence (hazard ratio (HR) = 4.052, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 2.070-7.933), distant metastasis (HR = 3.860, 95 % CI 1.507-9.884), and cancer death (HR = 7.252, 95 % 2.189-24.025). In addition, extrathyroidal extension (HR = 2.291, 95 % CI 1.185-4.427) and older age >45 years (HR = 6.721, 95 % CI 2.300-19.637) were also significant predictors for neck recurrence and cancer death, respectively. Therefore, bilateral-multifocality as an indicator for more extensive tumor location could be used to assess the risk of recurrence and mortality in PTC. Given the poor prognosis associated with bilateral-multifocality and other risk factors, aggressive therapy and intensive follow-up were recommended for PTC patients with them.

  2. The expression and prognosis of FOXO3a and Skp2 in human ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Mudan; Zhao, Yueming; Xu, Fei; Wang, Yong; Xiang, Jingying; Chen, Daozhen

    2012-12-01

    The forkhead box proteins (FOXO proteins) comprise a large family of functionally diverse transcription factors involved in cellular proliferation, transformation, differentiation and longevity. Recently, ubiquitination and proteasome degradation of FOXO3a have been reported. In this study, we investigated the role of FOXO3a and Skp2 in human ovarian cancer. We detected the expression of FOXO3a and Skp2 in ovarian cancer by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and analyzed the relationship of FOXO3a and Skp2 with clinicopathological parameters, including prognosis. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed on formalin-fixed paraffin sections of 46 specimens in vivo. We found that the expression of FOXO3a was negatively related to Skp2 expression (r = -0.743; p ovarian cancer (p ovarian cancer.

  3. A coupling approach of a predictor and a descriptor for breast cancer prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyunjung; Nam, Yonghyun

    2014-01-01

    In cancer prognosis research, diverse machine learning models have applied to the problems of cancer susceptibility (risk assessment), cancer recurrence (redevelopment of cancer after resolution), and cancer survivability, regarding an accuracy (or an AUC--the area under the ROC curve) as a primary measurement for the performance evaluation of the models. However, in order to help medical specialists to establish a treatment plan by using the predicted output of a model, it is more pragmatic to elucidate which variables (markers) have most significantly influenced to the resulting outcome of cancer or which patients show similar patterns. In this study, a coupling approach of two sub-modules--a predictor and a descriptor--is proposed. The predictor module generates the predicted output for the cancer outcome. Semi-supervised learning co-training algorithm is employed as a predictor. On the other hand, the descriptor module post-processes the results of the predictor module, mainly focusing on which variables are more highly or less significantly ranked when describing the results of the prediction, and how patients are segmented into several groups according to the trait of common patterns among them. Decision trees are used as a descriptor. The proposed approach, 'predictor-descriptor,' was tested on the breast cancer survivability problem based on the surveillance, epidemiology, and end results database for breast cancer (SEER). The results present the performance comparison among the established machine leaning algorithms, the ranks of the prognosis elements for breast cancer, and patient segmentation. In the performance comparison among the predictor candidates, Semi-supervised learning co-training algorithm showed best performance, producing an average AUC of 0.81. Later, the descriptor module found the top-tier prognosis markers which significantly affect to the classification results on survived/dead patients: 'lymph node involvement', 'stage', 'site

  4. [Colorectal cancer screening programme in Aragon (Spain): preliminary results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé Llop, Mª Esther; Cano Del Pozo, Mabel; García Montero, José-Ignacio; Carrera-Lasfuentes, Patricia; Lanas, Ángel

    2017-08-04

    To describe preliminary findings from the colorectal cancer screening programme in Aragon (Spain) to evaluate its implementation. We have collected data from the first year of the program (2014) based on faecal occult blood immunochemical (FOBTi) test in patients 60-69 years old. We report "indicators" defined by the "Red Nacional de Cribado". Invited population after exclusions: 12,518. Program participation rate: 45.28% (95%CI: 44.41-46.15). Inadequate tests: 0.21% (95%CI: 0.12-0.37); positive FOBTi test 10.75% (95%CI: 9.97-11.58) and colonoscopy acceptance 95.07% (95%CI: 93.04-96.52). Colonoscopy was appropriate and complete in 97.58% (95%CI: 95.98-98.55) of cases. The high- and low-risk adenoma detection rates were 14.7‰ (95%CI: 11.9-18.2) and 5.55‰ (95%CI: 3.9-7.8) respectively. The positive predictive value for any adenoma was 58.55% (95%CI: 54.49-62.49) and for invasive cancer was 5.36% (95%CI: 3.8-7.51). The indicator analysis of the ongoing programme suggests the programme is being implemented correctly in our community. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Diagnosis delay and follow-up strategies in colorectal cancer. Prognosis implications: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pita Fernández, Salvador; Pértega Díaz, Sonia; López Calviño, Beatriz; González Santamaría, Paloma; Seoane Pillado, Teresa; Arnal Monreal, Francisco; Maciá, Francesc; Sánchez Calavera, María Antonia; Espí Macías, Alejandro; Valladares Ayerbes, Manuel; Pazos, Alejandro; Reboredo López, Margarita; González Saez, Luis; Montserrat, María Ramos; Segura Noguera, Josep María; Monreal Aliaga, Isabel; González Luján, Luis; Martín Rabadán, María; Murta Nascimento, Cristiane; Pueyo, Olga; Boscá Watts, Marta Maia; Cabeza Irigoyen, Elena; Casmitjana Abella, Montserrat; Pinilla, Marina; Costa Alcaraz, Ana; Ruiz Torrejón, Amador; Burón Pust, Andrea; García Aranda, Concepción; de Lluc Bennasar, María; Lafita Mainz, Sergio; Novella, Maite; Manzano, Hermini; Vadell, Catalina; Falcó, Esther; Esteva, Magdalena

    2010-10-05

    Controversy exists with regard to the impact that the different components of diagnosis delay may have on the degree of invasion and prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer. The follow-up strategies after treatment also vary considerably. The aims of this study are: a) to determine if the symptoms-to-diagnosis interval and the treatment delay modify the survival of patients with colorectal cancer, and b) to determine if different follow-up strategies are associated with a higher survival rate. Multi-centre study with prospective follow-up in five regions in Spain (Galicia, Balearic Islands, Catalonia, Aragón and Valencia) during the period 2010-2012. Incident cases are included with anatomopathological confirmation of colorectal cancer (International Classification of Diseases 9th revision codes 153-154) that formed a part of a previous study (n = 953).At the time of diagnosis, each patient was given a structured interview. Their clinical records will be reviewed during the follow-up period in order to obtain information on the explorations and tests carried out after treatment, and the progress of these patients.Symptoms-to-diagnosis interval is defined as the time calculated from the diagnosis of cancer and the first symptoms attributed to cancer. Treatment delay is defined as the time elapsed between diagnosis and treatment. In non-metastatic patients treated with curative intention, information will be obtained during the follow-up period on consultations performed in the digestive, surgery and oncology departments, as well as the endoscopies, tumour markers and imaging procedures carried out.Local recurrence, development of metastases in the follow-up, appearance of a new tumour and mortality will be included as outcome variables.Actuarial survival analysis with Kaplan-Meier curves, Cox regression and competitive risk survival analysis will be performed. This study will make it possible to verify if the different components of delay have an impact on

  6. Diagnosis delay and follow-up strategies in colorectal cancer. Prognosis implications: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aranda Concepción

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Controversy exists with regard to the impact that the different components of diagnosis delay may have on the degree of invasion and prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer. The follow-up strategies after treatment also vary considerably. The aims of this study are: a to determine if the symptoms-to-diagnosis interval and the treatment delay modify the survival of patients with colorectal cancer, and b to determine if different follow-up strategies are associated with a higher survival rate. Methods/Design Multi-centre study with prospective follow-up in five regions in Spain (Galicia, Balearic Islands, Catalonia, Aragón and Valencia during the period 2010-2012. Incident cases are included with anatomopathological confirmation of colorectal cancer (International Classification of Diseases 9th revision codes 153-154 that formed a part of a previous study (n = 953. At the time of diagnosis, each patient was given a structured interview. Their clinical records will be reviewed during the follow-up period in order to obtain information on the explorations and tests carried out after treatment, and the progress of these patients. Symptoms-to-diagnosis interval is defined as the time calculated from the diagnosis of cancer and the first symptoms attributed to cancer. Treatment delay is defined as the time elapsed between diagnosis and treatment. In non-metastatic patients treated with curative intention, information will be obtained during the follow-up period on consultations performed in the digestive, surgery and oncology departments, as well as the endoscopies, tumour markers and imaging procedures carried out. Local recurrence, development of metastases in the follow-up, appearance of a new tumour and mortality will be included as outcome variables. Actuarial survival analysis with Kaplan-Meier curves, Cox regression and competitive risk survival analysis will be performed. Discussion This study will make it possible to

  7. Impact of Body Mass Index on Prognosis for Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Tan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the impact of body mass index (BMI on the prognosis for patients with breast cancer within the context of race (African-American versus Caucasian and ethnicity (Hispanic versus Non-Hispanic. Overall, this study included 1,368 female breast cancer patients diagnosed between 2007 and 2010 with electronic medical record data accrued from a large Florida hospital network. Non-Hispanic black patients comprised 8.77% of the cohort and Hispanic patients made up 7.56%. Multivariate analysis revealed that breast cancer death rate was increased over 2.6-fold for underweight patients ubiquitously, regardless of race or ethnicity. Patients overweight or obese did not have an increased hazard rate compared to those of normal weight. Importantly, the mechanism for the poorer prognosis for underweight patients needs to be defined. We suggest the use of a low BMI as a high-risk factor for breast-cancer mortality in all racial and ethnic populations.

  8. Pregnancy after treatment of breast cancer in young women does not adversely affect the prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba, Octavi; Bellet, Meritxell; Vidal, Xavier; Cortés, Javier; Llurba, Elisa; Rubio, Isabel T; Xercavins, Jordi

    2012-06-01

    We assessed whether pregnancy after breast cancer in patients younger than 36 years of age affects the prognosis. Of 115 women with breast cancer followed for a mean of 6 years, 18 became pregnant (median time between diagnosis and the first pregnancy 44.5 months). Voluntary interruption of pregnancy was decided by 8 (44.4%) women. Significant differences in prognostic factors between pregnant and non-pregnant women were not observed. Pregnant women showed a lower frequency of positive estrogen receptors (41%) than non-pregnant (64%) (P=0.06). At 5 years of follow-up, 100% of women in the pregnant group and 80% in the non-pregnant group were alive. The percentages of disease-free women were 94% and 64%, respectively (P=0.009). Breast cancer patients presented a high number of unwanted pregnancies. Pregnancy after breast cancer not only did not adversely affect prognosis of the neoplasm but also may have a protective effect. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Preoperative controlling nutritional status (CONUT) is useful to estimate the prognosis after esophagectomy for esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Naoya; Harada, Kazuto; Baba, Yoshifumi; Kosumi, Keisuke; Iwatsuki, Masaaki; Kinoshita, Koichi; Nakamura, Kenichi; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Miyamoto, Yuji; Karashima, Ryuichi; Mima, Kosuke; Sawayama, Hiroshi; Ohuchi, Mayuko; Chikamoto, Akira; Imamura, Yu; Watanabe, Masayuki; Baba, Hideo

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study is to confirm the predictive value of controlling nutritional status (CONUT), as a postoperative prognostic marker for esophageal cancer patients undergoing esophagectomy. We retrospectively analyzed 373 patients who underwent three-incision esophagectomy with 2- or 3-field lymphadenectomy for esophageal cancer between April 2005 and March 2016. The patients were divided into three groups based on the degree of preoperative malnutrition as assessed by CONUT: normal, light malnutrition, and moderate or severe malnutrition. The patients with moderate or severe malnutrition experienced a significantly higher frequency of reoperation (normal or light malnutrition, 6.3%; moderate or severe malnutrition, 18.2%; P = 0.033) and a higher tendency for respiratory morbidities (normal or light malnutrition, 14.0%; moderate or severe malnutrition, 27.3%; P = 0.088). Cox regression analysis identified a significantly poor prognosis, in both overall survival (hazard ratio (HR), 3.56; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.714-7.390; P cancer-specific survival (HR, 3.41; 95% CI, 1.790-6.516; P = 0.046). CONUT is convenient and useful for preoperatively assessing malnutrition and prognosis of esophageal cancer patients who underwent surgery.

  10. Clinical value of prognosis gene expression signatures in colorectal cancer: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Sanz-Pamplona

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The traditional staging system is inadequate to identify those patients with stage II colorectal cancer (CRC at high risk of recurrence or with stage III CRC at low risk. A number of gene expression signatures to predict CRC prognosis have been proposed, but none is routinely used in the clinic. The aim of this work was to assess the prediction ability and potential clinical usefulness of these signatures in a series of independent datasets. METHODS: A literature review identified 31 gene expression signatures that used gene expression data to predict prognosis in CRC tissue. The search was based on the PubMed database and was restricted to papers published from January 2004 to December 2011. Eleven CRC gene expression datasets with outcome information were identified and downloaded from public repositories. Random Forest classifier was used to build predictors from the gene lists. Matthews correlation coefficient was chosen as a measure of classification accuracy and its associated p-value was used to assess association with prognosis. For clinical usefulness evaluation, positive and negative post-tests probabilities were computed in stage II and III samples. RESULTS: Five gene signatures showed significant association with prognosis and provided reasonable prediction accuracy in their own training datasets. Nevertheless, all signatures showed low reproducibility in independent data. Stratified analyses by stage or microsatellite instability status showed significant association but limited discrimination ability, especially in stage II tumors. From a clinical perspective, the most predictive signatures showed a minor but significant improvement over the classical staging system. CONCLUSIONS: The published signatures show low prediction accuracy but moderate clinical usefulness. Although gene expression data may inform prognosis, better strategies for signature validation are needed to encourage their widespread use in the clinic.

  11. Notch3 expression correlates with thyroid cancer differentiation, induces apoptosis, and predicts disease prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somnay, Yash R; Yu, Xiao-Min; Lloyd, Ricardo V; Leverson, Glen; Aburjania, Zviadi; Jang, Samuel; Jaskula-Sztul, Renata; Chen, Herbert

    2017-03-01

    Thyroid tumorigenesis is characterized by a progressive loss of differentiation exhibited by a range of disease variants. The Notch receptor family (1-4) regulates developmental progression in both normal and cancerous tissues. This study sought to characterize the third Notch isoform (Notch3) across the various differentiated states of thyroid cancer, and determine its clinical impact. Notch3 expression was analyzed in a tissue microarray of normal and pathologic thyroid biopsies from 155 patients. The functional role of Notch3 was then investigated by upregulating its expression in a follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) cell line. Notch3 expression regressed across decreasingly differentiated, increasingly malignant thyroid specimens, correlated with clinicopathological attributes reflecting poor prognosis, and independently predicted survival following univariate and multivariate analyses. Overexpression of the active Notch3 intracellular domain (NICD3) in a gain-of-function FTC line led to functional activation of centromere-binding protein 1, while increasing thyroid-specific gene transcription. NICD3 induction also reduced tumor burden in vivo and initiated the intrinsic apoptotic cascade, alongside suppressing cyclin and B-cell lymphoma 2 family expression. Loss of Notch3 expression may be fundamental to the process of dedifferentiation that accompanies thyroid oncogenesis. Conversely, activation of Notch3 in thyroid cancer exerts an antiproliferative effect and restores elements of a differentiated phenotype. These findings provide preclinical rationale for evaluating Notch3 as a disease prognosticator and therapeutic target in advanced thyroid cancer. Cancer 2017;123:769-82. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  12. Stage-specific associations between beta blocker use and prognosis after colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Lina; Hoffmeister, Michael; Arndt, Volker; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Brenner, Hermann

    2014-04-15

    Recent observational studies have suggested that the use of beta blockers might be associated with better prognosis after cancer. Because evidence is limited for colorectal cancer (CRC), the association of beta blocker use and prognosis was investigated in a large population-based cohort of patients with CRC. Between 2003 and 2007, information on beta blocker use at diagnosis and potential confounders was collected by personal interviews for 1975 patients with CRC. Vital status, cause of death, and recurrence status were assessed during a median follow-up time of 5.0 years. The associations of beta blocker use and overall, CRC-specific, and recurrence-free survival were estimated by Cox proportional hazard regression. In addition, beta blocker subgroup, site, and stage-specific analyses were performed. After adjustment for covariates including sociodemographic, cancer-related, and lifestyle factors and comorbidity and medications, no significant association between beta blocker use at diagnosis and prognosis was observed for all stages combined. However, in stage-specific analyses, beta blocker use was associated with longer overall survival (hazard ratio = 0.50; 95% confidence interval = 0.33-0.78) and CRC-specific survival (hazard ratio = 0.47; 95% confidence interval = 0.30-0.75) in stage IV patients. For these patients, median overall survival was 18 months longer and CRC-specific survival was 17 months longer for beta blocker users than for nonusers (38 versus 20 months and 37 versus 20 months, respectively). These results suggest that beta blocker use might be associated with longer survival in patients with stage IV CRC. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  13. Role of human epididymis protein 4 in chemoresistance and prognosis of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungho; Choi, Seowon; Lee, Yookyung; Chung, Donghae; Hong, Suntaek; Park, Nohhyun

    2017-01-01

    Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) is a novel biomarker for epithelial ovarian cancer. This study was designed to evaluate the role of HE4 in chemo-response against anti-cancer drugs and prognosis of epithelial ovarian cancer. HE4-depleted cells and HE4-overexpressing cells were generated. The effect of HE4 gene silencing and overexpression was examined using a cell viability assay after exposure to chemotherapeutic agents and the signaling pathway. We studied the expression of HE4 in ovarian cancer tissue and the prognostic significance. Cytoplasmic staining was graded for intensity and percentage of positive cells. The grades were multiplied to determine an H-score. Knockdown of HE4 in OVCAR-3 cells resulted in reduction in cell growth and increased sensitivity to paclitaxel and cisplatin compared to control cells. This effect originated from the decreased activation of cell-growth-related signaling, such as AKT and Erk mediated by epidermal growth factor (EGF), while overexpression of HE4 resulted in enhanced cell growth and suppressed the anti-tumorigenic activity of paclitaxel. Activation of AKT and Erk pathways was enhanced in HE4-overexpressing cells compared to control cells. Based on the results of multivariate analysis, the risk of death was significantly higher in patients with an H-score > 4. HE4 induces chemoresistance against anti-cancer drugs and activates the AKT and Erk pathways to enhance tumor survival. HE4 expression in ovarian cancer tissue is associated with a worse prognosis for epithelial ovarian cancer patients. © 2016 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  14. Stem cell-like gene expression in ovarian cancer predicts type II subtype and prognosis.

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    Matthew Schwede

    Full Text Available Although ovarian cancer is often initially chemotherapy-sensitive, the vast majority of tumors eventually relapse and patients die of increasingly aggressive disease. Cancer stem cells are believed to have properties that allow them to survive therapy and may drive recurrent tumor growth. Cancer stem cells or cancer-initiating cells are a rare cell population and difficult to isolate experimentally. Genes that are expressed by stem cells may characterize a subset of less differentiated tumors and aid in prognostic classification of ovarian cancer. The purpose of this study was the genomic identification and characterization of a subtype of ovarian cancer that has stem cell-like gene expression. Using human and mouse gene signatures of embryonic, adult, or cancer stem cells, we performed an unsupervised bipartition class discovery on expression profiles from 145 serous ovarian tumors to identify a stem-like and more differentiated subgroup. Subtypes were reproducible and were further characterized in four independent, heterogeneous ovarian cancer datasets. We identified a stem-like subtype characterized by a 51-gene signature, which is significantly enriched in tumors with properties of Type II ovarian cancer; high grade, serous tumors, and poor survival. Conversely, the differentiated tumors share properties with Type I, including lower grade and mixed histological subtypes. The stem cell-like signature was prognostic within high-stage serous ovarian cancer, classifying a small subset of high-stage tumors with better prognosis, in the differentiated subtype. In multivariate models that adjusted for common clinical factors (including grade, stage, age, the subtype classification was still a significant predictor of relapse. The prognostic stem-like gene signature yields new insights into prognostic differences in ovarian cancer, provides a genomic context for defining Type I/II subtypes, and potential gene targets which following further

  15. Cancer Care Coordinators to Improve Tamoxifen Persistence in Breast Cancer: How Heterogeneity in Baseline Prognosis Impacts on Cost-Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Nisha; Kvizhinadze, Giorgi; Blakely, Tony

    2016-12-01

    To assess the cost-effectiveness of a cancer care coordinator (CCC) in helping women with estrogen receptor positive (ER+) early breast cancer persist with tamoxifen for 5 years. We investigated the cost-effectiveness of a CCC across eight breast cancer subtypes, defined by progesterone receptor (PR) status, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status, and local/regional spread. These subtypes range from excellent to poorer prognoses. The CCC helped in improving tamoxifen persistence by providing information, checking-in by phone, and "troubleshooting" concerns. We constructed a Markov macrosimulation model to estimate health gain (in quality-adjusted life-years or QALYs) and health system costs in New Zealand, compared with no CCC. Participants were modeled until death or till the age of 110 years. Some input parameters (e.g., the impact of a CCC on tamoxifen persistence) had sparse evidence. Therefore, we used estimates with generous uncertainty and conducted sensitivity analyses. The cost-effectiveness of a CCC for regional ER+/PR-/HER2+ breast cancer (worst prognosis) was NZ $23,400 (US $15,800) per QALY gained, compared with NZ $368,500 (US $248,800) for local ER+/PR+/HER2- breast cancer (best prognosis). Using a cost-effectiveness threshold of NZ $45,000 (US $30,400) per QALY, a CCC would be cost-effective only in the four subtypes with the worst prognoses. There is value in investigating cost-effectiveness by different subtypes within a disease. In this example of breast cancer, the poorer the prognosis, the greater the health gains from a CCC and the better the cost-effectiveness. Incorporating heterogeneity in a cost-utility analysis is important and can inform resource allocation decisions. It is also feasible to undertake in practice. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Altered mitochondrial genome content signals worse pathology and prognosis in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalsbeek, Anton M F; Chan, Eva K F; Grogan, Judith; Petersen, Desiree C; Jaratlerdsiri, Weerachai; Gupta, Ruta; Lyons, Ruth J; Haynes, Anne-Maree; Horvath, Lisa G; Kench, James G; Stricker, Phillip D; Hayes, Vanessa M

    2018-01-01

    Mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) content is depleted in many cancers. In prostate cancer, there is intra-glandular as well as inter-patient mtDNA copy number variation. In this study, we determine if mtDNA content can be used as a predictor for prostate cancer staging and outcomes. Fresh prostate cancer biopsies from 115 patients were obtained at time of surgery. All cores underwent pathological review, followed by isolation of cancer and normal tissue. DNA was extracted and qPCR performed to quantify the total amount of mtDNA as a ratio to genomic DNA. Differences in mtDNA content were compared for prostate cancer pathology features and disease outcomes. We showed a significantly reduced mtDNA content in prostate cancer compared with normal adjacent prostate tissue (mean difference 1.73-fold, P-value Prostate cancer with increased mtDNA content showed unfavorable pathologic characteristics including, higher disease stage (PT2 vs PT3 P-value = 0.018), extracapsular extension (P-value = 0.02) and a trend toward an increased Gleason score (P-value = 0.064). No significant association was observed between changes in mtDNA content and biochemical recurrence (median follow up of 107 months). Contrary to other cancer types, prostate cancer tissue shows no universally depleted mtDNA content. Rather, the change in mtDNA content is highly variable, mirroring known prostate cancer genome heterogeneity. Patients with high mtDNA content have an unfavorable pathology, while a high mtDNA content in normal adjacent prostate tissue is associated with worse prognosis. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Impact of Body Weight and Body Composition on Ovarian Cancer Prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Sarah A; Elliott, Sarah A; Kroenke, Candyce H; Sawyer, Michael B; Prado, Carla M

    2016-02-01

    Measures of body weight and anthropometrics such as body mass index (BMI) are commonly used to assess nutritional status in clinical conditions including cancer. Extensive research has evaluated associations between body weight and prognosis in ovarian cancer patients, yet little is known about the potential impact of body composition (fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM)) in these patients. Thus, the purpose of this publication was to review the literature (using PubMed and EMBASE) evaluating the impact of body weight and particularly body composition on surgical complications, morbidity, chemotherapy dosing and toxicity (as predictors of prognosis), and survival in ovarian cancer patients. Body weight is rarely associated with intra-operative complications, but obesity predicts higher rates of venous thromboembolism and wound complications post-operatively in ovarian cancer patients. Low levels of FM and FFM are superior predictors of length of hospital stay compared to measures of body weight alone, but the role of body composition on other surgical morbidities is unknown. Obesity complicates chemotherapy dosing due to altered pharmacokinetics, imprecise dosing strategies, and wide variability in FM and FFM. Measurement of body composition has the potential to reduce toxicity if the results are incorporated into chemotherapy dosing calculations. Some findings suggest that excess body weight adversely affects survival, while others find no such association. Limited studies indicate that FM is a better predictor of survival than body weight in ovarian cancer patients, but the direction of this relationship has not been determined. In conclusion, body composition as an indicator of nutritional status is a better prognostic tool than body weight or BMI alone in ovarian cancer patients.

  18. Growth Factor Receptors and Apoptosis Regulators: Signaling Pathways, Prognosis, Chemosensitivity and Treatment Outcomes of Breast Cancer

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    Siddik Sarkar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers of breast cancer are necessary for prognosis and prediction to chemotherapy. Prognostic biomarkers provide information regarding outcome irrespective of therapy, while predictive biomarkers provide information regarding response to therapy. Candidate prognostic biomarkers for breast cancers are growth factor receptors, steroid receptors, Ki-67, cyclins, urokinase plasminogen activator, p53, p21, pro- and anti-apoptotic factors, BRCA1 and BRCA2. But currently, the predictive markers are Estrogen and Progesterone receptors responding to endocrine therapy, and HER-2 responding to herceptin. But there are numerous breast cancer cases, where tamoxifen is ineffective even after estrogen receptor positivity. This lead to search of new prognostic and predictive markers and the number of potential markers is constantly increasing due to proteomics and genomics studies. However, most biomarkers individually have poor sensitivity or specificity, or other clinical value. It can be resolved by studying various biomarkers simultaneously, which will help in better prognosis and increasing sensitivity for chemotherapeutic agents. This review is focusing on growth factor receptors, apoptosis markers, signaling cascades, and their correlation with other associated biomarkers in breast cancers. As our knowledge regarding molecular biomarkers for breast cancer increases, prognostic indices will be developed that combine the predictive power of individual molecular biomarkers with specific clinical and pathologic factors. Rigorous comparison of these existing as well as emerging markers with current treatment selection is likely to see an escalation in an era of personalized medicines to ensure the breast cancer patients receive optimal treatment. This will also solve the treatment modalities and complications related to chemotherapeutic regimens.

  19. Menopausal symptoms among breast cancer patients: a potential indicator of favorable prognosis.

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    Yong Chen

    Full Text Available Menopausal symptoms have been suggested to be an indicator of better prognosis among patients treated for breast cancer, because women who experience these symptoms usually have a lower level of estrogen. We tested this hypothesis in a population-based, prospective cohort study involving 4,842 women with stage 0 to III primary breast cancer who were enrolled in the Shanghai Breast Cancer Survival Study between March 2002 and April 2006, were aged 20 to 75 years, and were recruited 6 months post-diagnosis. They were followed-up by in-person surveys and record linkages with the vital statistics registry. Cox regression analysis was used to evaluate the association of menopausal symptoms at baseline with breast cancer recurrence. Approximately 56% of patients experienced at least one menopausal symptom, including hot flashes, night sweats, and/or vaginal dryness at baseline. During a median follow-up period of 5.3 years, 720 women had a recurrence. Experiencing hot flashes or having ≥2 menopausal symptoms was associated with lower risk of recurrence among premenopausal women (hazard ratio [HR]=0.77, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.62-0.96 for hot flashes; 0.73, 0.56-0.96 for ≥2 menopausal symptoms. Lower recurrence risk in relation to hot flashes was also observed among women who were not overweight/obese (HR=0.78, 95% CI: 0.64-0.99, those with relatively low waist-to-hip ratio (WHR (HR=0.77, 95% CI: 0.61-0.97, and those who used tamoxifen (HR=0.75, 95% CI: 0.58-0.98. Consistently experiencing multiple menopausal symptoms was associated with lower recurrence risk among women with low WHR or who used tamoxifen. This large, population-based cohort study of women with breast cancer confirms that experiencing menopausal symptoms is an indicator of favorable breast cancer prognosis.

  20. Adjusting breast cancer patient prognosis with non-HER2-gene patterns on chromosome 17.

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    Vassiliki Kotoula

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HER2 and TOP2A gene status are assessed for diagnostic and research purposes in breast cancer with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. However, FISH probes do not target only the annotated gene, while chromosome 17 (chr17 is among the most unstable chromosomes in breast cancer. Here we asked whether the status of specifically targeted genes on chr17 might help in refining prognosis of early high-risk breast cancer patients. METHODS: Copy numbers (CN for 14 genes on chr17, 4 of which were within and 10 outside the core HER2 amplicon (HER2- and non-HER2-genes, respectively were assessed with qPCR in 485 paraffin-embedded tumor tissue samples from breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy in the frame of two randomized phase III trials. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HER2-genes CN strongly correlated to each other (Spearman's rho >0.6 and were concordant with FISH HER2 status (Kappa 0.6697 for ERBB2 CN. TOP2A CN were not concordant with TOP2A FISH status (Kappa 0.1154. CN hierarchical clustering revealed distinct patterns of gains, losses and complex alterations in HER2- and non-HER2-genes associated with IHC4 breast cancer subtypes. Upon multivariate analysis, non-HER2-gene gains independently predicted for shorter disease-free survival (DFS and overall survival (OS in patients with triple-negative cancer, as compared to luminal and HER2-positive tumors (interaction p = 0.007 for DFS and p = 0.011 for OS. Similarly, non-HER2-gene gains were associated with worse prognosis in patients who had undergone breast-conserving surgery as compared to modified radical mastectomy (p = 0.004 for both DFS and OS. Non-HER2-gene losses were unfavorable prognosticators in patients with 1-3 metastatic nodes, as compared to those with 4 or more nodes (p = 0.017 for DFS and p = 0.001 for OS. CONCLUSIONS: TOP2A FISH and qPCR may not identify the same pathology on chr17q. Non-HER2 chr17 CN patterns may further predict outcome in breast cancer

  1. CD44 Splice Variant v8-10 as a Marker of Serous Ovarian Cancer Prognosis.

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    Amanda Sosulski

    Full Text Available CD44 is a transmembrane hyaluronic acid receptor gene that encodes over 100 different tissue-specific protein isoforms. The most ubiquitous, CD44 standard, has been used as a cancer stem cell marker in ovarian and other cancers. Expression of the epithelial CD44 variant containing exons v8-10 (CD44v8-10 has been associated with more chemoresistant and metastatic tumors in gastrointestinal and breast cancers, but its role in ovarian cancer is unknown; we therefore investigated its use as a prognostic marker in this disease. The gene expression profiles of 254 tumor samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas RNAseqV2 were analyzed for the presence of CD44 isoforms. A trend for longer survival was observed in patients with high expression of CD44 isoforms that include exons v8-10. Immunohistochemical (IHC analysis of tumors for presence of CD44v8-10 was performed on an independent cohort of 210 patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer using a tumor tissue microarray. Patient stratification based on software analysis of staining revealed a statistically significant increase in survival in patients with the highest levels of transmembrane protein expression (top 10 or 20% compared to those with the lowest expression (bottom 10 and 20% (p = 0.0181, p = 0.0262 respectively. Expression of CD44v8-10 in primary ovarian cancer cell lines was correlated with a predominantly epithelial phenotype characterized by high expression of epithelial markers and low expression of mesenchymal markers by qPCR, Western blot, and IHC. Conversely, detection of proteolytically cleaved and soluble extracellular domain of CD44v8-10 in patient ascites samples was correlated with significantly worse prognosis (p<0.05. Therefore, presence of transmembrane CD44v8-10 on the surface of primary tumor cells may be a marker of a highly epithelial tumor with better prognosis while enzymatic cleavage of CD44v8-10, as detected by presence of the soluble extracellular domain in ascites

  2. CD44 Splice Variant v8-10 as a Marker of Serous Ovarian Cancer Prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosulski, Amanda; Horn, Heiko; Zhang, Lihua; Coletti, Caroline; Vathipadiekal, Vinod; Castro, Cesar M; Birrer, Michael J; Nagano, Osamu; Saya, Hideyuki; Lage, Kasper; Donahoe, Patricia K; Pépin, David

    2016-01-01

    CD44 is a transmembrane hyaluronic acid receptor gene that encodes over 100 different tissue-specific protein isoforms. The most ubiquitous, CD44 standard, has been used as a cancer stem cell marker in ovarian and other cancers. Expression of the epithelial CD44 variant containing exons v8-10 (CD44v8-10) has been associated with more chemoresistant and metastatic tumors in gastrointestinal and breast cancers, but its role in ovarian cancer is unknown; we therefore investigated its use as a prognostic marker in this disease. The gene expression profiles of 254 tumor samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas RNAseqV2 were analyzed for the presence of CD44 isoforms. A trend for longer survival was observed in patients with high expression of CD44 isoforms that include exons v8-10. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of tumors for presence of CD44v8-10 was performed on an independent cohort of 210 patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer using a tumor tissue microarray. Patient stratification based on software analysis of staining revealed a statistically significant increase in survival in patients with the highest levels of transmembrane protein expression (top 10 or 20%) compared to those with the lowest expression (bottom 10 and 20%) (p = 0.0181, p = 0.0262 respectively). Expression of CD44v8-10 in primary ovarian cancer cell lines was correlated with a predominantly epithelial phenotype characterized by high expression of epithelial markers and low expression of mesenchymal markers by qPCR, Western blot, and IHC. Conversely, detection of proteolytically cleaved and soluble extracellular domain of CD44v8-10 in patient ascites samples was correlated with significantly worse prognosis (p<0.05). Therefore, presence of transmembrane CD44v8-10 on the surface of primary tumor cells may be a marker of a highly epithelial tumor with better prognosis while enzymatic cleavage of CD44v8-10, as detected by presence of the soluble extracellular domain in ascites fluid, may be

  3. Prognosis of lung cancer resection in patients with previous extra-respiratory solid malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagès, Pierre Benoit; Mordant, Pierre; Cazes, Aurélie; Grand, Bertrand; Foucault, Christophe; Dujon, Antoine; Le Pimpec Barthes, Françoise; Riquet, Marc

    2013-09-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) following pulmonary or pharyngolaryngeal malignancies has been widely studied, but only a few articles have focussed on lung cancers following other solid malignancies. Our purpose was to compare the characteristics and prognosis of patients with NSCLC according to the medical history of the extra-pulmonary and extra-pharyngolaryngeal solid malignancy. Patients who underwent surgery for NSCLC from January 1980 to December 2009 in two French thoracic centres were reviewed. We compared patients with no history of cancer (Group 1) and patients with a history of extra-pulmonary and extra-pharyngolaryngeal solid malignancy (Group 2). There were 4992 patients: 4603 (92%) in Group 1 and 389 (8%) in Group 2. In comparison with Group 1, Group 2 showed an increasing incidence over the last 3 decades (2-8%), an older population (65.9 vs 61 years, P < 0.001), a higher proportion of women (34 vs 18%, P < 0.001), non-smokers (20 vs 10%, P < 0.001), adenocarcinomas (53 vs 40%, P < 0.001), T1 (16 vs 14%, P = 0.047) and second nodule in the same lobe (4 vs 2%, P < 0.001). The overall survival was not significantly different between the two groups (P = 0.09). In multivariate analysis, older age, male gender, pneumonectomy, higher T, higher N, incomplete resection and history of extra pulmonary-extra pharyngolaryngeal solid malignancy were significantly associated with a worse prognosis. Despite an earlier diagnosis, a history of extra-pulmonary and extra-pharyngolaryngeal solid malignancy is associated with a worse prognosis in patients with NSCLC undergoing surgical resection. Overall survival is particularly low after a history of bladder and upper gastrointestinal malignancies.

  4. T-box transcription factor 21 expression in breast cancer and its relationship with prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haiming; Yang, Junlan; Jiao, Shunchang; Li, Ying; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Jiandong

    2014-01-01

    T-box transcription factor 21 (T-bet) is a key lineage-defining transcription factor. The purpose of this study was to verify the relationship between expression in primary tumors and prognosis of breast cancer. T-protein expression was immunohistochemically detected on surgically-obtained tumor samples of 130 (stage I-III) invasive breast carcinomas from Chinese subjects, who were followed up for a mean time of 112 months. T-bet was expressed in the nuclei and cytoplasm of both tumor cells and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. In LOG-RANK analysis, higher density of interstitial T-bet+ interstitial lymphocytes was related with longer distant disease-free survival (DDFS) (P = 0.047); higher tumor nuclei T-bet expression was related with shorter DFS (P = 0.021) and DDFS (P = 0.026). Cox multivariate analysis showed that density of interstitial T-bet+ interstitial lymphocytes was an independent positive prognostic factor for DFS (HR = 0.474, P = 0.051) and DDFS (HR = 0.414, P = 0.030); tumor nuclei CTLA-4 expression was an independent adverse prognostic factor for DFS (HR = 3.007, P = 0.003), DDFS (HR = 2.931, P = 0.005) and OS (HR = 2.352, P = 0.029). This study found that, high tumor nuclei T-bet expression in primary tumors of breast cancer was correlated with poor prognosis and high density of T-bet+ interstitial lymphocytes in primary tumors of breast cancer were correlated with favorable prognosis.

  5. Preoperative mannan-binding lectin pathway and prognosis in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ytting, Henriette; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Jensenius, Jens Christian

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: Deficiency of the mannan-binding lectin (MBL) pathway of innate immunity is associated with increased susceptibility to infections. In patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), postoperative infection is associated with poor prognosis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate (1......) the relation between the MBL pathway and postoperative infectious complications and survival of patients resected for CRC, and (2) the role of MBL in acute phase response compared to C-reactive protein (CRP). METHODS: Preoperative MBL concentration, MBL-associated serine protease (MBL/MASP) activity and CRP...

  6. Upregulation of CENP-H in tongue cancer correlates with poor prognosis and progression

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    Weng Gui-Xiang

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Centromere protein H (CENP-H is one of the fundamental components of the human active kinetochore. Recently, CENP-H was identified to be associated with tumorigenesis. This study was aimed to investigate the clinicopathologic significance of CENP-H in tongue cancer. Methods RT-PCR, real time RT-PCR and Western blot were used to examine the expression of CENP-H in tongue cancer cell lines and biopsies. CENP-H protein level in paraffin-embedded tongue cancer tissues were tested by immunohistochemical staining and undergone statistical analysis. CENP-H-knockdown stable cell line was established by infecting cells with a retroviral vector pSuper-retro-CENP-H-siRNA. The biological function of CENP-H was tested by MTT assay, colony formation assay, and Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU incorporation assay. Results CENP-H expression was higher in tongue cancer cell lines and cancer tissues (T than that in normal cell and adjacent noncancerous tongue tissues (N, respectively. It was overexpressed in 55.95% (94/168 of the paraffin-embedded tongue cancer tissues, and there was a strong correlation between CENP-H expression and clinical stage, as well as T classification. CENP-H can predict the prognosis of tongue cancer patients especially those in early stage. Depletion of CENP-H can inhibit the proliferation of tongue cancer cells (Tca8113 and downregulate the expression of Survivin. Conclusion These findings suggested that CENP-H involves in the development and progression of tongue cancer. CENP-H might be a valuable prognostic indicator for tongue cancer patients within early stage.

  7. Improvement of prognosis in breast cancer in Denmark 1977-2006, based on the nationwide reporting to the DBCG Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouridsen, H.T.; Bjerre, K.D.; Christiansen, Peter

    2008-01-01

    were registered in the DBCG Database. Since 1977 the prognosis has improved significantly, thus 5 year survival for the total population of patients with primary breast cancer has increased from 65 to 81%. DISCUSSION: According to the present analysis diagnosis at an earlier stage in the natural course......INTRODUCTION: Since 30 years DBCG (Danish Breast Cancer Coperative Group) has maintained, on a nation-wide basis, a clinical database of diagnostic procedures, therapeutic interventions, and clinical outcome in patients with primary breast cancer. The present analysis was undertaken to evaluate...... the development of the prognosis since 1977, and to analyse factors potentially contributing to the change of the prognosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All cases of invasive breast cancer reported to DBCG during the period 1977-2006 were included in the present analysis. RESULTS: A total of close to 80 000 patients...

  8. Comparison in pathological behaviours & prognosis of gastric cancers from general hospitals between China & Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Miao; Zheng, Hua-chuan; Xia, Pu; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Masuda, Shinji; Takano, Yasuo; Xu, Hui-mian

    2010-09-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths after lung carcinoma. The aim of this study was to understand the difference in clinicopathological behaviours and prognosis of gastric cancer in patients from China and Japan. Paraffin-fixed tissue samples of gastric cancer were collected retrospectively from two hospitals between 1993 to 2006 in Japan (n=2063) and during 1980-2003 in China (n=2496) respectively, and staging was done by TNM system and typing by Japanese Endoscopy Society criteria or Borrmann's classification. The histological architecture of the tumours was expressed according to Lauren's classification. Compared to Japan, the occurrence of gastric cancer was more common in younger Chinese population and prone to invasion and metastasis in muscularis propia, lymphatic, lymph node, liver, peritoneal parts, and exhibited large tumour size and high TNM staging in both the sexes and in different age groups (PJapan. To reduce incidence and to improve treatment facilities, it is necessary to have a systematic screening system.

  9. 2q36.3 is associated with prognosis for oestrogen receptor-negative breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Li (Jingmei); L.S. Lindström (Linda); J.N. Foo (Jia); M. Rafiq (Meena); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); J. Dennis (Joe); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); L.J. van 't Veer (Laura); S. Cornelissen (Sten); E.J.T. Rutgers (Emiel); M.C. Southey (Melissa); C. Apicella (Carmel); G.S. Dite (Gillian); J.L. Hopper (John); P.A. Fasching (Peter); L. Haeberle (Lothar); A.B. Ekici (Arif); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); C. Blomqvist (Carl); T.A. Muranen (Taru); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); A. Lindblom (Annika); S. Margolin (Sara); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J. Hartikainen (Jaana); V. Kataja (Vesa); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); K. Investigators (Kconfab); K.-A. Phillips (Kelly-Anne); S.-A. McLachlan (Sue-Anne); D. Lambrechts (Diether); B. Thienpont (Bernard); A. Smeets (Ann); H. Wildiers (Hans); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); P. Seibold (Petra); A. Rudolph (Anja); G.G. Giles (Graham); L. Baglietto (Laura); G. Severi (Gianluca); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); B.E. Henderson (Brian); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick); L. Le Marchand (Loic); V. Kristensen (Vessela); G.G. Alnæs (Grethe); A.-L. Borresen-Dale (Anne-Lise); S. Nord (Silje); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia); G. Glendon (Gord); S. Tchatchou (Sandrine); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); M. Kriege (Mieke); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); Y. Li (Yi); U. Hamann (Ute); D. Torres (Diana); H.U. Ulmer (Hans); T. Rüdiger (Thomas); C-Y. Shen (Chen-Yang); C.-N. Hsiung (Chia-Ni); P.-E. Wu (Pei-Ei); S.-T. Chen (Shou-Tung); S.-H. Teo; N.A.M. Taib (Nur Aishah Mohd); C. Har Yip (Cheng); G. Fuang Ho (Gwo); K. Matsuo (Keitaro); H. Ito (Hidemi); H. Iwata (Hisato); K. Tajima (Kazuo); D. Kang (Daehee); J.-Y. Choi (Ji-Yeob); S.K. Park (Sue); K-Y. Yoo (Keun-Young); T. Maishman (Tom); W. Tapper (William); A.M. Dunning (Alison); M. Shah (Mitul); R.N. Luben (Robert); J. Brown (Judith); C. Chuen Khor (Chiea); D. Eccles (Diana); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); D.F. Easton (Douglas); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); J. Liu (Jianjun); P. Hall (Per); K. Czene (Kamila)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractLarge population-based registry studies have shown that breast cancer prognosis is inherited. Here we analyse single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes implicated in human immunology and inflammation as candidates for prognostic markers of breast cancer survival involving 1,804

  10. Information about diagnosis and prognosis related to anxiety and depression in children with cancer aged 8-16 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Last, B. F.; van Veldhuizen, A. M.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that being openly informed about the diagnosis and prognosis benefits the emotional well-being of children with cancer. A stratified sample of 56 children with cancer aged 8-16 years and their parents participated. The parents were interviewed about

  11. Dietary Fiber, Carbohydrates, Glycemic Index, and Glycemic Load in Relation to Breast Cancer Prognosis in the HEAL Cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belle, F.N.; Kampman, E.; McTiernan, A.; Bernstein, L.; Baumgartner, K.; Baumgartner, R.; Ambs, A.; Ballard-Barbash, R.; Neuhouser, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Dietary intake of fiber, carbohydrate, glycemic index (GI), and glycemic load (GL) may influence breast cancer survival, but consistent and convincing evidence is lacking. Methods: We investigated associations of dietary fiber, carbohydrates, GI, and GL with breast cancer prognosis among

  12. Dietary fiber, carbohydrates, glycemic index, and glycemic load in relation to breast cancer prognosis in the HEAL cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belle, F.N.; Kampman, E.; McTiernan, A.; Bernstein, L.; Baumgartner, K.; Baumgartner, R.; Ambs, A.; Ballard-Barbash, R.; Neuhouser, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dietary intake of fiber, carbohydrate, glycemic index (GI), and glycemic load (GL) may influence breast cancer survival, but consistent and convincing evidence is lacking. METHODS: We investigated associations of dietary fiber, carbohydrates, GI, and GL with breast cancer prognosis among

  13. Impact of Sulfatase-2 on cancer progression and prognosis in patients with renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Shin; Ishibashi, Kei; Kataoka, Masao; Oguro, Toshiki; Kiko, Yuichirou; Yanagida, Tomohiko; Aikawa, Ken; Kojima, Yoshiyuki

    2016-11-01

    Heparan sulfate-specific endosulfatase-2 (SULF-2) can modulate the signaling of heparan sulfate proteoglycan-binding proteins. The involvement of SULF-2 in cancer growth varies by cancer type. The roles of SULF-2 expression in the progression and prognosis of renal cell carcinomas (RCC) have not yet been fully clarified. In the present study, the expression levels of SULF-2 mRNA and protein in 49 clinical RCC samples were determined by RT-PCR and immunostaining. The existence of RCC with higher SULF-2 expression and lower SULF-2 expression compared to the adjacent normal kidney tissues was suggested. High SULF-2 expression was correlated with an early clinical stage and less invasive pathological factors. Low SULF-2 expression was correlated with an advanced stage and higher invasive factors. Three-year cancer-specific survival (CSS) for high SULF-2 RCC and low SULF-2 RCC were 100% and 71.4%, respectively (log-rank P = 0.0019), with a significantly shorter CSS observed in low SULF-2 RCC patients. The influence of SULF-2 expression level on Wnt/VEGF/FGF signaling, cell viability and invasive properties was examined in three RCC cell lines, Caki-2, ACHN and 786-O, using a SULF-2 suppression model involving siRNA or a SULF-2 overexpression model involving a plasmid vector. High SULF-2 expression enhanced Wnt signaling and Wnt-induced cell viability, but not cell invasion. In contrast, low levels of SULF-2 expression significantly enhanced both cell invasion and viability through the activation of VEGF/FGF pathways. RCC with lower SULF-2 expression might have a higher potential for cell invasion and proliferation, leading to a poorer prognosis via the activation of VEGF and/or FGF signaling. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  14. Functional proteomics can define prognosis and predict pathologic complete response in patients with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez-Angulo Ana M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To determine whether functional proteomics improves breast cancer classification and prognostication and can predict pathological complete response (pCR in patients receiving neoadjuvant taxane and anthracycline-taxane-based systemic therapy (NST. Methods Reverse phase protein array (RPPA using 146 antibodies to proteins relevant to breast cancer was applied to three independent tumor sets. Supervised clustering to identify subgroups and prognosis in surgical excision specimens from a training set (n = 712 was validated on a test set (n = 168 in two cohorts of patients with primary breast cancer. A score was constructed using ordinal logistic regression to quantify the probability of recurrence in the training set and tested in the test set. The score was then evaluated on 132 FNA biopsies of patients treated with NST to determine ability to predict pCR. Results Six breast cancer subgroups were identified by a 10-protein biomarker panel in the 712 tumor training set. They were associated with different recurrence-free survival (RFS (log-rank p = 8.8 E-10. The structure and ability of the six subgroups to predict RFS was confirmed in the test set (log-rank p = 0.0013. A prognosis score constructed using the 10 proteins in the training set was associated with RFS in both training and test sets (p = 3.2E-13, for test set. There was a significant association between the prognostic score and likelihood of pCR to NST in the FNA set (p = 0.0021. Conclusion We developed a 10-protein biomarker panel that classifies breast cancer into prognostic groups that may have potential utility in the management of patients who receive anthracycline-taxane-based NST.

  15. Clinicopathological Features and Prognosis of Metaplastic Breast Carcinoma: Experience of a Major Chinese Cancer Center.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiqian Zhang

    Full Text Available Metaplastic breast carcinoma (MBC is a rare heterogeneous group of primary breast malignancies, with low hormone receptor expression and poor outcomes. To date, no prognostic markers for this tumor have been validated. The current study was undertaken to evaluate the clinicopathologic characteristics, the response to various therapeutic regimens and the prognosis of MBCs in a large cohort of patients from Tianjin Medical University Cancer Hospital in China. Ninety cases of MBCs diagnosed in our hospital between January 2000 and September 2014 were retrieved from the archives. In general, MBCs presented with larger size, a lower rate of lymph node metastasis, and demonstrated more frequent local recurrence/distant metastasis than 1,090 stage-matched cases of invasive carcinoma of no specific type (IDC-NST, independent of the status of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 expressions. The five-year disease-free survival (DFS of MBC was significantly worse than IDC-NST. Using univariate analysis, lymph node metastasis, advanced clinical stage at diagnosis, high tumor proliferation rate assessed by Ki-67 labeling, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR overexpression/gene amplification were associated significantly with reduced DFS, while decreased OS was associated significantly with lymph node metastasis and EGFR overexpression/gene amplification. With multivariate analysis, lymph node status was an independent predictor for DFS, and lymph node status and EGFR overexpression/gene amplification were independent predictors for OS. Histologic subtyping and molecular subgrouping of MBCs were not significant factors in prognosis. We also found that MBCs were insensitive to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, routine chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. This study indicates that MBC is an aggressive type of breast cancer with poor prognosis, and that identification and optimization of an effective comprehensive

  16. Discovery of dachshund 2 protein as a novel biomarker of poor prognosis in epithelial ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nodin Björn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Dachshund homolog 2 (DACH2 gene has been implicated in development of the female genital tract in mouse models and premature ovarian failure syndrome, but to date, its expression in human normal and cancerous tissue remains unexplored. Using the Human Protein Atlas as a tool for cancer biomarker discovery, DACH2 protein was found to be differentially expressed in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC. Here, the expression and prognostic significance of DACH2 was further evaluated in ovarian cancer cell lines and human EOC samples. Methods Immunohistochemical expression of DACH2 was examined in tissue microarrays with 143 incident EOC cases from two prospective, population-based cohorts, including a subset of benign-appearing fallopian tubes (n = 32. A nuclear score (NS, i.e. multiplier of staining fraction and intensity, was calculated. For survival analyses, cases were dichotomized into low (NS 3 using classification and regression tree analysis. Kaplan Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modelling were used to assess the impact of DACH2 expression on survival. DACH2 expression was analysed in the cisplatin sensitive ovarian cancer cell line A2780 and its cisplatin resistant derivative A2780-Cp70. The specificity of the DACH2 antibody was tested using siRNA-mediated silencing of DACH2 in A2780-Cp70 cells. Results DACH2 expression was considerably higher in the cisplatin resistant A2780-Cp70 cells compared to the cisplatin-sensitive A2780 cells. While present in all sampled fallopian tubes, DACH2 expression ranged from negative to strong in EOC. In EOC, DACH2 expression correlated with several proteins involved in DNA integrity and repair, and proliferation. DACH2 expression was significantly higher in carcinoma of the serous subtype compared to non-serous carcinoma. In the full cohort, high DACH2 expression was significantly associated with poor prognosis in univariable analysis, and in carcinoma of the serous subtype

  17. Low expression of a few genes indicates good prognosis in estrogen receptor positive breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buechler Steven

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many breast cancer patients remain free of distant metastasis even without adjuvant chemotherapy. While standard histopathological tests fail to identify these good prognosis patients with adequate precision, analyses of gene expression patterns in primary tumors have resulted in more successful diagnostic tests. These tests use continuous measurements of the mRNA concentrations of numerous genes to determine a risk of metastasis in lymph node negative breast cancer patients with other clinical traits. Methods A survival model is constructed from genes that are both connected with relapse and have expression patterns that define distinct subtypes, suggestive of different cellular states. This in silico study uses publicly available microarray databases generated with Affymetrix GeneChip technology. The genes in our model, as represented by array probes, have distinctive distributions in a patient cohort, consisting of a large normal component of low expression values; and a long right tail of high expression values. The cutoff between low and high expression of a probe is determined from the distribution using the theory of mixture models. The good prognosis group in our model consists of the samples in the low expression component of multiple genes. Results Here, we define a novel test for risk of metastasis in estrogen receptor positive (ER+ breast cancer patients, using four probes that determine distinct subtypes. The good prognosis group in this test, denoted AP4-, consists of the samples with low expression of each of the four probes. Two probes target MKI67, antigen identified by monoclonal antibody Ki-67, one targets CDC6, cell division cycle 6 homolog (S. cerevisiae, and a fourth targets SPAG5, sperm associated antigen 5. The long-term metastasis-free survival probability for samples in AP4- is sufficiently high to render chemotherapy of questionable benefit. Conclusion A breast cancer subtype defined by low

  18. Identification and targeting of a TACE-dependent autocrine loopwhich predicts poor prognosis in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenny, Paraic A.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2005-06-15

    The ability to proliferate independently of signals from other cell types is a fundamental characteristic of tumor cells. Using a 3D culture model of human breast cancer progression, we have delineated a protease-dependent autocrine loop which provides an oncogenic stimulus in the absence of proto-oncogene mutation. Inhibition of this protease, TACE/ADAM17, reverts the malignant phenotype by preventing mobilization of two crucial growth factors, Amphiregulin and TGF{alpha}. We show further that the efficacy of EGFR inhibitors is overcome by physiological levels of growth factors and that successful EGFR inhibition is dependent on reducing ligand bioavailability. Using existing patient outcome data, we demonstrate a strong correlation between TACE and TGF{alpha} expression in human breast cancers that is predictive of poor prognosis.

  19. Status and prognosis of lymph node metastasis in patients with cardia cancer – A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okholm, Cecilie; Svendsen, Lars Bo; Achiam, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    . Therefore, the optimal treatment of cardia cancer remains controversial. A systematic review of English publications dealing with adenocarcinoma of the cardia was conducted to elucidate patterns of nodal spread and prognostic implications. METHODS: A systematic literature search based on PRISMA guidelines...... identifying relevant studies describing lymph node metastasis and the associated prognosis. Lymph node stations were classified according to the Japanese Gastric Cancer Association guidelines. RESULTS: The highest incidence of metastasis is seen in the nearest regional lymph nodes, station no. 1......-3 and additionally in no. 7, 9 and 11. Correspondingly the best survival is seen when metastasis remain in the most locoregional nodes and survival equally tends to decrease as the metastasis become more distant. Furthermore, the presence of lymph node metastasis significantly correlates to the TNM-stage. Incidences...

  20. Neural Analyses Validate and Emphasize the Role of Progesterone Receptor in Breast Cancer Progression and Prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caronongan, Arturo; Venturini, Barbara; Canuti, Debora; Dlay, Satnam; Naguib, Raouf N G; Sherbet, Gajanan V

    2016-04-01

    Oestrogen receptor (ER) expression is routinely measured in breast cancer management, but the clinical merits of measuring progesterone receptor (PR) expression have remained controversial. Hence the major objective of this study was to assess the potential of PR as a predictor of response to endocrine therapy. We report on analyses of the relative importance of ER and PR for predicting prognosis using robust multilayer perceptron artificial neural networks. Receptor determinations use immunohistochemical (IHC) methods or radioactive ligand binding assays (LBA). In view of the heterogeneity of intratumoral receptor distribution, we examined the relative merits of the IHC and LBA methods. Our analyses reveal a more significant correlation of IHC-determined PR than ER with both nodal status and 5-year disease-free survival (DFS). In LBA, PR displayed higher correlation with survival and ER with nodal status. There was concordance of correlation of PR with DFS by both IHC and LBA. This study suggests a clear distinction between PR and ER, with PR displaying greater correlation than ER with disease progression and prognosis, and emphasizes the marked superiority of the IHC method over LBA. These findings may be valuable in the management of patients with breast cancer. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  1. Increased PTOV1 expression is related to poor prognosis in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fei; Feng, Liu; Hu, Ji-Long; Wang, Mei-Ling; Luo, Peng; Zhong, Xiao-Ming; Deng, An-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Altered expression of prostate tumor overexpressed-1 (PTOV1) is observed in various types of human cancers. However, the role of PTOV1 in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) remains unclear. PTOV1 messenger (m)RNA expression in EOC patients was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). PTOV1 protein expression was also analyzed in archived paraffin-embedded EOC tissues using immunohistochemistry (IHC), and its association with overall survival of patients was analyzed by statistical analysis. Results from qRT-PCR analysis show that the expression level of PTOV1 mRNA was significantly higher in tumor tissues of EOC, compared to that in adjacent noncancerous tissues (P IHC staining showed that high expression of PTOV1 was detected in 57.2 % (87/152) of EOC cases. High expression of PTOV1 was significantly associated with pathological grade (P = 0.029) and clinical stage (P = 0.001). Moreover, the results of Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that a high expression level of PTOV1 resulted in a significantly poor prognosis of EOC patients. Multivariate analysis showed that high expression of PTOV1 was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (P < 0.001). In conclusion, PTOV1 protein abnormal expression might contribute to the malignant progression of EOC. High expression of PTOV1 predicts poor prognosis in patients with EOC.

  2. Use of immunohistochemical markers can refine prognosis in triple negative breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheang Maggie CU

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Basal-like breast cancer has been extensively characterized on the basis of gene expression profiles, but it is becoming increasingly common for these tumors to be defined on the basis of immunohistochemical (IHC staining patterns, particularly in retrospective studies where material for expression profiling may not be available. The IHC pattern that best defines basal-like tumors is under investigation and various combinations of ER, PR, HER2-, CK5/6+ and EGFR+ have been tested. Methods Using datasets from two different hospitals we describe how using different combinations of immunohistochemical patterns has different effects on estimating prognosis at different time intervals after diagnosis. As our baseline, we used two IHC patterns ER-/PR-/HER2-("triple negative phenotype", TNP and ER-/HER2-/CK5/6+ and/or EGFR+ ("core basal phenotype", CBP. Results There was no overall difference in survival between the two hospital-based series, but there was a difference between the TNP and non-TNP groups which was most marked at 3 years (76.8% vs 93.5%, p Conclusion Our findings suggests that CK5/6 and/or EGFR expressing tumor types have a persistently poorer prognosis over the longer term, an observation that may have important therapeutic implications as drugs that target the EGFR are currently being evaluated in breast cancer.

  3. REG4 independently predicts better prognosis in non-mucinous colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuomas Kaprio

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the world's three most common cancers and its incidence is rising. To identify patients who benefit from adjuvant therapy requires novel biomarkers. The regenerating islet-derived gene (REG 4 belongs to a group of small secretory proteins involved in cell proliferation and regeneration. Its up-regulated expression occurs in inflammatory bowel diseases also in gastrointestinal cancers. Reports on the association of REG4 expression with CRC prognosis have been mixed. Our aim was to investigate tumor REG4 expression in CRC patients and its coexpression with other intestinal markers. METHODS: Tumor expression of REG4 was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in 840 consecutive surgically treated CRC patients at Helsinki University Central Hospital. Expression of MUC1, MUC2, MUC5AC, synapthophysin, and chromogranin was evaluated in a subgroup of 220 consecutively operated CRC patients. REG4 expression with clinicopathological parameters, other intestinal markers, and the impact of REG4 expression on survival were assessed. RESULTS: REG4 expression associated with favorable clinicopathological parameters and with higher overall survival from non-mucinous CRC (p = 0.019. For such patients under 65, its expression was an independent marker of lower risk of death within 5 years that cancer; univariable hazard ratio (HR = 0.57; 95% confidence interval (CI (0.34-0.94; multivariable HR = 0.55; 95% CI (0.33-0.92. In non-mucinous CRC, REG4 associated with positive MUC2, MUC4, and MUC5AC expression. CONCLUSION: We show, to our knowledge for the first time, that REG4 IHC expression to be an independent marker of favorable prognosis in non-mucinous CRC. Our results contradict those from studies based on quantification of REG4 mRNA levels, a discrepancy warranting further studies.

  4. Endosomal gene expression: a new indicator for prostate cancer patient prognosis?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Johnson, Ian R D

    2015-11-10

    Prostate cancer continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality in men, but a method for accurate prognosis in these patients is yet to be developed. The recent discovery of altered endosomal biogenesis in prostate cancer has identified a fundamental change in the cell biology of this cancer, which holds great promise for the identification of novel biomarkers that can predict disease outcomes. Here we have identified significantly altered expression of endosomal genes in prostate cancer compared to non-malignant tissue in mRNA microarrays and confirmed these findings by qRT-PCR on fresh-frozen tissue. Importantly, we identified endosomal gene expression patterns that were predictive of patient outcomes. Two endosomal tri-gene signatures were identified from a previously published microarray cohort and had a significant capacity to stratify patient outcomes. The expression of APPL1, RAB5A, EEA1, PDCD6IP, NOX4 and SORT1 were altered in malignant patient tissue, when compared to indolent and normal prostate tissue. These findings support the initiation of a case-control study using larger cohorts of prostate tissue, with documented patient outcomes, to determine if different combinations of these new biomarkers can accurately predict disease status and clinical progression in prostate cancer patients.

  5. G388R mutation of the FGFR4 gene is not relevant to breast cancer prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jézéquel, P; Campion, L; Joalland, M-P; Millour, M; Dravet, F; Classe, J-M; Delecroix, V; Deporte, R; Fumoleau, P; Ricolleau, G

    2004-01-12

    This study screened large cohorts of node-positive and node-negative breast cancer patients to determine whether the G388R mutation of the FGFR4 gene is a useful prognostic marker for breast cancer as reported by Bange et al in 2002. Node-positive (n=139) and node-negative (n=95) breast cancer cohorts selected for mutation screening were followed up for median periods of 89 and 87 months, respectively. PCR - RFLP analysis was modified to facilitate molecular screening. Curves for disease-free survival were plotted according to the Kaplan - Meier method, and a log-rank test was used for comparisons between groups. Three other nonparametric linear rank-tests particularly suitable for investigating possible relations between G388R mutation and early cancer progression were also used. Kaplan - Meier analysis based on any of the four nonparametric linear rank tests performed for node-positive and node-negative patients was not indicative of disease-free survival time. G388R mutation of the FGFR4 gene is not relevant for breast cancer prognosis.

  6. [The prognosis and clinicopathological characteristics of 70 gastric cancer patients with elevated serum AFP].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y K; Shen, L; Zhang, X T

    2017-07-23

    Objective: This study aimed to review the clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis of advanced gastric cancer patients with elevated serum Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). Methods: From August 2006 to May 2016, 70patients with advanced gastric cancer were enrolled retrospectively. All these patients had pathologically confirmed gastric adenocarcinoma, had a serum AFP level of more than 20 ng/ml, and received at least first-line treatment. The clinicopathological data and follow-up data were collected for analysis. Results: Liver metastasis was more common in patients with AFP≥1 000 ng/ml, compared with AFPAFP level decreased ≥50% after first-line chemotherapy, the disease control rate and overall survival were both better than those in patients with AFP decreased AFP-elevated gastric cancer is a special subtype of gastric cancer. It's a heterogeneous cancer with different clinical outcomes. The extent of decrease of serum AFP level during follow-up may be a sensitive prognostic and predictive biomarker. Liver metastasis were more common in these patients, and combined treatment may improve survival.

  7. Skin invasion and prognosis in node negative breast cancer: a retrospective study

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    Horii Rie

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The impact of skin invasion in node negative breast cancer is uncertain. Methods We determined the prognosis in 97 node negative breast cancer patients (case group who had tumors with skin invasion. Then we compared these patients with 4500 node negative invasive breast cancer patients treated surgically in the same period. Results Patients with skin invasion tended to be older, had more invasive lobular carcinoma and larger tumor size, and were less likely to have breast conserving surgery than those in the control group. The 5-year disease-free survival rate in the case group was 94.0%. There was no significant difference in the 10-year disease-specific overall survival rates in terms of skin invasion in node negative patients (90.7% in the case group, 92.9% in the control group; p = 0.2032. Conclusion Results suggest that skin invasion has no impact on survival in node negative invasive breast cancer patients. The adjuvant regimens which the individual institute applies for node negative breast cancer should be used regardless of skin invasion.

  8. Transcription Factor EB Expression in Early Breast Cancer Relates to Lysosomal/Autophagosomal Markers and Prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Sivridis, Efthimios; Kalamida, Dimitra; Koukourakis, Michael I

    2017-06-01

    Disrupting the autophagic balance to trigger autophagic death may open new strategies for cancer therapy. Transcription factor EB (TFEB) is a master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis and may play a role in cancer biology and clinical behavior. The expression of TFEB and the lysosomal cancer cell content (expression of lysosomal associated membrane protein 2a [LAMP2a] and cathepsin D) was studied in a series of 100 T1-stage breast carcinomas. Expression patterns were correlated with autophagy/hypoxia-related proteins, angiogenesis, and clinical outcome. The effect of hypoxic/acidic conditions on TFEB kinetics was studied in the MCF-7 cancer cell line. Overexpression of TFEB in cancer cell cytoplasm and the perinuclear/nuclear area was noted in 23 (23%) of 100 cases. High LAMP2a and cathepsin D expression was noted in 30 (30%) of 100 and 28 (28%) of 100 cases, respectively. TFEB expression was directly linked with LAMP2a (P breast carcinomas, define poor prognosis. Tumor acidity is among the microenvironmental conditions that trigger TFEB overactivity. TFEB is a sound target for the development of lysosomal targeting therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A tissue microRNA signature that predicts the prognosis of breast cancer in young women.

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    Ai Hironaka-Mitsuhashi

    Full Text Available Since breast cancers in young women are generally aggressive, young patients tend to be intensively treated with anti-cancer drugs. To optimize the strategy for treatment, particularly in young women, prognostic biomarkers are urgently required. The objective of this study was to identify a tissue microRNA (miRNA signature that predicts prognosis in young breast cancer patients. Total RNA from 45 breast cancer patients aged 0.7. Five of the miRNAs were validated by qRT-PCR, and the expression levels of three of those five (miR-183-5p, miR-194-5p, and miR-1285-5p, both alone and in combination, were associated with OS. In conclusion, we identified three candidate miRNAs that could be used separately or in combination as prognostic biomarkers in young breast cancer patients. This miRNA signature may enable selection of better treatment choices for young women with this disease.

  10. Breast cancer prognosis is inherited independently of patient, tumor and treatment characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkooijen, Helena M; Hartman, Mikael; Usel, Massimo; Benhamou, Simone; Neyroud-Caspar, Isabelle; Czene, Kamila; Vlastos, Georges; Chappuis, Pierre O; Bouchardy, Christine; Rapiti, Elisabetta

    2012-05-01

    Population-based studies have shown a concordance of breast cancer survival among first-degree relatives (FDRs), suggesting a heritable component. Reasons for such heritability remain to be elucidated. We aimed to determine whether association of breast cancer survival among FDRs is linked to shared patient and tumor characteristics or type of treatment. At the population-based Geneva Breast Cancer Registry, we identified 162 FDR pairs diagnosed with breast cancer. We categorized FDRs into poor, medium and good familial survival risk groups according to breast cancer-specific survival of their proband (mother or sister). We compared patient, tumor and treatment characteristics between categories and calculated standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) and adjusted disease-specific mortality for each group. Breast cancer patients in the poor familial survival risk group were more likely to be diagnosed at later stages than those in the good familial survival risk group. Similarly, they had higher SMRs than those in the medium and good survival risk groups (18.7, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 9.4-33.5 vs. 16.5, 95% CI: 7.5-31.3 and 9.4, 95% CI: 3.4-20.4, respectively). After adjustment for patient and tumor characteristics and type of treatment, women in the poor familial survival risk group were almost five times more likely to die of breast cancer than those in the good familial survival risk group (adjusted hazard ratio 4.8, 95% CI: 1.4-16.4). Our study shows that breast cancer prognosis clusters within families and suggests that the hereditary component is independent of patient and tumor characteristics and type of treatment. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  11. HP1β is a biomarker for breast cancer prognosis and PARP inhibitor therapy.

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    Young-Ho Lee

    Full Text Available Members of the heterochromatin protein 1 family (HP1α, β and γ are mostly associated with heterochromatin and play important roles in gene regulation and DNA damage response. Altered expression of individual HP1 subtype has profound impacts on cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. We analyzed the expression profile of HP1 family by data mining using a published microarray data set coupled with retrospective immunohistochemistry analyses of archived breast cancer biospecimens. We found that the patient group overexpressing HP1β mRNA is associated with poorly differentiated breast tumors and with a significantly lower survival rate. Immunohistochemical staining against HP1α, HP1β and HP1γ shows that respective HP1 expression level is frequently altered in breast cancers. 57.4-60.1% of samples examined showed high HP1β expression and 39.9-42.6 % of examined tumors showed no or low expression of each HP1 subtype. Interestingly, comparative analysis on HP1 expression profile and breast cancer markers revealed a positive correlation between the respective expression level of all three HP1 subtypes and Ki-67, a cell proliferation and well-known breast cancer marker. To explore the effect of individual HP1 on PARP inhibitor therapy for breast cancer, MCF7 breast cancer cells and individually HP1-depleted MCF7 cells were treated with PARP inhibitor ABT-888 with or without carboplatin. Notably, HP1β-knockdown cells are hypersensitive to the PARP inhibitor ABT-888 alone and its combination with carboplatin. In summary, while increased HP1β expression is associated with the poor prognosis in breast cancer, compromised HP1β abundance may serve as a useful predictive marker for chemotherapy, including PARP inhibitors against breast cancer.

  12. Expression of RUNX1 correlates with poor patient prognosis in triple negative breast cancer.

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    Nicola Ferrari

    Full Text Available The RUNX1 transcription factor is widely recognised for its tumour suppressor effects in leukaemia. Recently a putative link to breast cancer has started to emerge, however the function of RUNX1 in breast cancer is still unknown. To investigate if RUNX1 expression was important to clinical outcome in primary breast tumours a tissue microarray (TMA containing biopsies from 483 patients with primary operable invasive ductal breast cancer was stained by immunohistochemistry. RUNX1 was associated with progesterone receptor (PR-positive tumours (P<0.05, more tumour CD4+(P<0.05 and CD8+(P<0.01 T-lymphocytic infiltrate, increased tumour CD138+plasma cell (P<0.01 and more CD68+macrophage infiltrate (P<0.001. RUNX1 expression did not influence outcome of oestrogen receptor (ER-positive or HER2-positive disease, however on univariate analysis a high RUNX1 protein was significantly associated with poorer cancer-specific survival in patients with ER-negative (P<0.05 and with triple negative (TN invasive breast cancer (P<0.05. Furthermore, multivariate Cox regression analysis of cancer-specific survival showed a trend towards significance in ER-negative patients (P<0.1 and was significant in triple negative patients (P<0.05. Of relevance, triple negative breast cancer currently lacks good biomarkers and patients with this subtype do not benefit from the option of targeted therapy unlike patients with ER-positive or HER2-positive disease. Using multivariate analysis RUNX1 was identified as an independent prognostic marker in the triple negative subgroup. Overall, our study identifies RUNX1 as a new prognostic indicator correlating with poor prognosis specifically in the triple negative subtype of human breast cancer.

  13. Thyroid Hormone Receptors Predict Prognosis in BRCA1 Associated Breast Cancer in Opposing Ways

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    Heublein, Sabine; Mayr, Doris; Meindl, Alfons; Angele, Martin; Gallwas, Julia; Jeschke, Udo; Ditsch, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Since BRCA1 associated breast cancers are frequently classified as hormone receptor negative or even triple negative, the application of endocrine therapies is rather limited in these patients. Like hormone receptors that bind to estrogen or progesterone, thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. TRs might be interesting biomarkers - especially in the absence of classical hormone receptors. The current study aimed to investigate whether TRs may be specifically expressed in BRCA1 associated cancer cases and whether they are of prognostic significance in these patients as compared to sporadic breast cancer cases. This study analyzed TRα and TRβ immunopositivity in BRCA1 associated (n = 38) and sporadic breast cancer (n = 86). Further, TRs were studied in MCF7 (BRCA1 wildtype) and HCC3153 (BRCA1 mutated) cells. TRβ positivity rate was significantly higher in BRCA1 associated as compared to sporadic breast cancers (p = 0.001). The latter observation remained to be significant when cases that had been matched for clinicopathological criteria were compared (p = 0.037). Regarding BRCA1 associated breast cancer cases TRβ positivity turned out to be a positive prognostic factor for five-year (p = 0.007) and overall survival (p = 0.026) while TRα positivity predicted reduced five-year survival (p = 0.030). Activation of TRβ resulted in down-modulation of CTNNB1 while TRα inhibition reduced cell viability in HCC3153. However, only BRCA1 wildtype MCF7 cells were capable of rapidly degrading TRα1 in response to T3 stimulation. Significantly, this study identified TRβ to be up-regulated in BRCA1 associated breast cancer and revealed TRs to be associated with patients’ prognosis. TRs were also found to be expressed in triple negative BRCA1 associated breast cancer. Further studies need to be done in order to evaluate whether TRs may become interesting targets of endocrine therapeutic approaches, especially when tumors are

  14. Thyroid Hormone Receptors Predict Prognosis in BRCA1 Associated Breast Cancer in Opposing Ways.

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    Sabine Heublein

    Full Text Available Since BRCA1 associated breast cancers are frequently classified as hormone receptor negative or even triple negative, the application of endocrine therapies is rather limited in these patients. Like hormone receptors that bind to estrogen or progesterone, thyroid hormone receptors (TRs are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. TRs might be interesting biomarkers - especially in the absence of classical hormone receptors. The current study aimed to investigate whether TRs may be specifically expressed in BRCA1 associated cancer cases and whether they are of prognostic significance in these patients as compared to sporadic breast cancer cases. This study analyzed TRα and TRβ immunopositivity in BRCA1 associated (n = 38 and sporadic breast cancer (n = 86. Further, TRs were studied in MCF7 (BRCA1 wildtype and HCC3153 (BRCA1 mutated cells. TRβ positivity rate was significantly higher in BRCA1 associated as compared to sporadic breast cancers (p = 0.001. The latter observation remained to be significant when cases that had been matched for clinicopathological criteria were compared (p = 0.037. Regarding BRCA1 associated breast cancer cases TRβ positivity turned out to be a positive prognostic factor for five-year (p = 0.007 and overall survival (p = 0.026 while TRα positivity predicted reduced five-year survival (p = 0.030. Activation of TRβ resulted in down-modulation of CTNNB1 while TRα inhibition reduced cell viability in HCC3153. However, only BRCA1 wildtype MCF7 cells were capable of rapidly degrading TRα1 in response to T3 stimulation. Significantly, this study identified TRβ to be up-regulated in BRCA1 associated breast cancer and revealed TRs to be associated with patients' prognosis. TRs were also found to be expressed in triple negative BRCA1 associated breast cancer. Further studies need to be done in order to evaluate whether TRs may become interesting targets of endocrine therapeutic approaches, especially when

  15. Lung cancer associated hypercalcemia: An analysis of factors influencing survival and prognosis in 34 cases

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    Su-jie ZHANG

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives  To explore the factors influencing survival time in lung cancer associated hypercalcemia patients. Methods  Thirty-four patients with pathologically confirmed lung cancer complicated with hypercalcemia, who were treated at the Department of Oncology in General Hospital of PLA from Jan. 2001 to Dec. 2010, were enrolled in this study. The clinical data analyzed included sex, age, pathological type of the malignancies, organ metastasis (bone, lung, liver, kidney, brain, number of distal metastatic site, mental status, interval between final diagnosis of lung cancer and of hypercalcemia, peak value of blood calcium during the disease course, treatment methods and so on. Survival analysis was performed with the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox analysis with statistic software SPSS 18.0 to identify the potential prognostic factors. Results  The highest blood calcium level ranged from 2.77 to 4.87mmol/L, and the median value was 2.94mmol/L. The patients' survival time after diagnosis of hypercalcemia varied from 1 day to 1067 days, and the median survival time was 92 days. With the log-rank test, age above 50 years old, hypercalcemia occurring over 90 days after diagnosis of cancer, central nervous system symptoms and renal metastasis were predictors for poor survival (P=0.048, P=0.001, P=0.000, P=0.003. In the COX proportional hazard model analysis, age above 50 years old, hypercalcemia occurring over 90 days after cancer diagnosis, central nervous system symptoms and renal metastasis were significant prognostic factors for poor survival (HR=11.483, P=0.006; HR=4.371, P=0.002; HR=6.064, P=0.026; HR=8.502, P=0.011. Conclusions  Patients with lung cancer associated hypercalcemia have a shorter survival time and poor prognosis. Age above 50 years old, hypercalcemia occurring over 90 days after cancer diagnosis, central nervous system symptoms and renal metastasis are significant factors of poor prognosis.

  16. High Expression of PHGDH Predicts Poor Prognosis in Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer

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    Jinhong Zhu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Tumors have exceptionally high demands for energy and anabolism because of their rapid growth. The de novo serine synthesis pathway initiated by phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH has been recognized as a hallmark of metabolic adaption in carcinogenesis. The oncogenic role and prognostic value of PHGDH have been investigated in multiple cancer types, including breast cancer, melanoma, cervical cancer, and colon cancer. Due to the importance of PHGDH in cancer, we attempted to determine the clinical significance of PHGDH in 319 patients with non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. We evaluated the mRNA and protein expression levels of PHGDH gene, using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and tissue array–based immunohistochemistry, respectively. Significantly increased PHGDH expression in mRNA and protein levels was identified in tumor tissues versus matched adjacent nontumor tissues. More interestingly, immunohistochemical expression of PHGDH was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis (P = .021 and TNM stage (P = .016. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis indicated that NSCLC patients with low levels of PHGDH outperformed patients with high levels of PHGDH regarding 5-year overall survival. Significantly longer survival in the former suggested the prognostic implication of PHGDH in NSCLC. Multivariate survival analysis using Cox regression model demonstrated that high PHGDH levels and advanced TNM stage (III + IV were independent predictors of prognosis in NSCLC. Moreover, bioinformatics analysis confirmed the increase in PHGDH transcripts (data from The Cancer Genome Atlas and its prognostic value (Kaplan-Meier plotter in NSCLC. In conclusion, this study suggested the clinical implication of PHGDH in NSCLC. PHGDH may be a promising therapeutic target in NSCLC.

  17. Fasting blood glucose level and prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Juhua; Chen, Yea-Jyh; Chang, Li-Jung

    2012-05-01

    Diabetes has been consistently linked to many forms of cancers, such as liver, colorectal, pancreatic, and breast cancer, however, the role of diabetes in outcome among cancer patients remains unclear. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed electronic medical records of 342 inpatients newly diagnosed with NSCLC referred by a teaching hospital cancer center in southern Taiwan between 2005 and 2007 to examine the effects of fasting glucose levels at time of cancer diagnosis on overall survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). All patients were followed up until the end of 2010. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to compare survival curves for patients with and without diabetes. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate hazard ratios for the association between diabetes, other prognostic factors and patient survival. We observed that significant prognostic factors for poor overall survival in patients with NSCLC included older age, smoking, poor performance status, advanced stage (stage IIIB or IV), and no cancer-directed surgery treatment. Particularly, we identified that diabetic state defined by fasting blood glucose level ≥126 mg/dl was another independent prognostic factor for these patients. Compared with those who had normal range of fasting glucose level (70-99 mg/dl), patients with high fasting glucose level (≥126 mg/dl) had 69% excess risk of all-cause mortality in patients with NSCLC. Diabetes as indicated by elevated fasting blood glucose was independently associated with a significantly higher risk of all-cause mortality in patients with NSCLC, indicating that diabetes or hyperglycemia effectively controlled may present an opportunity for improving prognosis in NSCLS patients with abnormal glucose level. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The cervical cancer prevention programme in Costa Rica

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    Rojas, Ileana Quirós

    2015-01-01

    Cervical and uterine cancer continues to be an important issue for women around the world, although neoplasia has the greatest demonstrated potential for prevention. Costa Rica has achieved important advances in the reduction of the incidence and mortality of these cancers since the last century. This is the result of a series of policies, programmes, and plans, not only at the level of the health care system, but also in other areas. Increased access for women to care in health centres, fundamentally at the primary level, has been vital, as has ensuring the quality of cytology readings and access to diagnosis and treatment for precursor lesions for in situ and invasive cancers. Despite all of these achievements, there are still challenges to be overcome, which are widespread in many countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. It is important to learn from the experiences of other countries in order to improve women’s health not only as a health objective, but also as an ethical imperative to promote the exercise of women’s rights to life and health. PMID:26557876

  19. Oral cancer prognosis based on clinicopathologic and genomic markers using a hybrid of feature selection and machine learning methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Machine learning techniques are becoming useful as an alternative approach to conventional medical diagnosis or prognosis as they are good for handling noisy and incomplete data, and significant results can be attained despite a small sample size. Traditionally, clinicians make prognostic decisions based on clinicopathologic markers. However, it is not easy for the most skilful clinician to come out with an accurate prognosis by using these markers alone. Thus, there is a need to use genomic markers to improve the accuracy of prognosis. The main aim of this research is to apply a hybrid of feature selection and machine learning methods in oral cancer prognosis based on the parameters of the correlation of clinicopathologic and genomic markers. Results In the first stage of this research, five feature selection methods have been proposed and experimented on the oral cancer prognosis dataset. In the second stage, the model with the features selected from each feature selection methods are tested on the proposed classifiers. Four types of classifiers are chosen; these are namely, ANFIS, artificial neural network, support vector machine and logistic regression. A k-fold cross-validation is implemented on all types of classifiers due to the small sample size. The hybrid model of ReliefF-GA-ANFIS with 3-input features of drink, invasion and p63 achieved the best accuracy (accuracy = 93.81%; AUC = 0.90) for the oral cancer prognosis. Conclusions The results revealed that the prognosis is superior with the presence of both clinicopathologic and genomic markers. The selected features can be investigated further to validate the potential of becoming as significant prognostic signature in the oral cancer studies. PMID:23725313

  20. Clinicopathological features and prognosis of pregnancy associated breast cancer - a matched case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaras, Lilla; Kovács, Kristóf Attila; Szász, Attila Marcell; Kenessey, István; Tőkés, Anna-Mária; Székely, Borbála; Baranyák, Zsuzsanna; Kiss, Orsolya; Dank, Magdolna; Kulka, Janina

    2014-07-01

    Pregnancy Associated Breast Cancer (PABC) manifests during pregnancy or within a year following delivery. We sought to investigate differences in management, outcome, clinical, histopathology and immunohistochemistry (IHC) characteristics of PABC and matched controls in a retrospective case control study. PABC and control patients were selected from breast cancer cases of women ≤45 years, diagnosed in the 2nd Department of Pathology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary between 1998 and 2012. Histopathology information on tumor type, grade, size, T, N, lympho-vascular invasion (LVI), Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI), associated in situ lesions and IHC charcteristics: ER, PgR, HER2, Ki67, p53 were recorded, IHC-based subtype was assessed, clinical, management and outcome data were analysed. Thirty-one breast cancer cases were pregnancy related. Clinical management data did not differ in cases and controls. Histopathology of disease at presentation was not significantly different, but NPI assessed the PABC group as having poor, whereas controls as having intermediate prognosis. Associated in situ lesion was more often high grade Extensive Intraductal Carcinoma Component (EIC) in PABC. Triple negative and LuminalB prol tumors predominated in PABC. Disease-free and overall survival was inferior compared to controls. PABC patients with LuminalB prol and Triple negative tumors had inferior outcomes. On multivariate analysis inferior prognosis of PABC was associated with pregnancy. Our study has demonstrated inferior outcome of PABC. Difference in tumor biology is reflected by the predominance of triple negative and LuminalB tumors in PABC. The strength of the study is the analysis of complete pathology and IHC data.

  1. Human papilloma virus (HPV) status associated with prognosis of cervical cancer after radiotherapy

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    Harima, Yoko; Miyazaki, Yuki; Imamura, Masahiro; Sougawa, Mitsuharu; Sawada, Satoshi [Kansai Medical Univ., Moriguchi, Osaka (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    Our study explored whether the HPV status of tumors is associated with the outcome of radiotherapy in patients with cervical cancer. A total of 84 patients with cervical cancer (6 stage I, 10 stage II, 49 stage III, and 19 stage IV) who underwent definitive radiotherapy between January 1995 and June 2000 were included in this study. Tumor samples were obtained from all patients by punch biopsy prior to radiotherapy. The presence of HPV and its type were analyzed by PCR-based assay using the consensus primers for E6 and L1 regions. Actuarial methods were used to calculate overall survival, and disease-free survival. A total of 42 patients (50%) had cancer recurrence after radiotherapy. HPV-positive tumors were found in 76.2% (64 cases) of the patients. HPV-negative patients survived significantly shorter compared to the HPV-positive patients in the overall survival (p=0.007) and the disease-free survival (p=0.005). According to multivariate analysis, HPV status is a significant predictor of both overall (p=0.02) and disease-free survival time (p=0.005). These results of this study suggest that HPV-negative patients with cervical carcinoma are have a significantly poorer prognosis after radiotherapy, and may be used as a marker in order to optimize the treatment of patients with this type of cancer. (author)

  2. Papillary Thyroid Cancer, Macrofollicular Variant: The Follow-Up and Analysis of Prognosis of 5 Patients

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    Varlık Erol

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The main aim of this study was to comparatively analyze the recurrence and prognosis of this rare variant with the literature by analyzing the follow-up data of 5 patients diagnosed with papillary cancer macrofollicular variant. Methods. The demographic data, radiological and pathological data, and prognostic data of 5 patients who underwent surgery for thyroid cancer and were diagnosed with papillary cancer macrofollicular variant pathologically were retrospectively analyzed. Results. The mean age of patients whose mean follow-up period was determined as 7.2 years was 41, and the male/female ratio was 4/1. All patients underwent total thyroidectomy. The pathology report of 2 patients (40% revealed macrofollicular variant of papillary microcancer, and 3 patients papillary cancer macrofollicular variant. Central dissection was performed in one patient (20% due to macroscopic pathologic lymph node and 4 metastatic lymph nodes were reported. Also, locoregional recurrence was present in 3 out of 5 patients (60%. Conclusions. Although an impression of earlier and increased risk of recurrence in papillary carcinoma with macrofollicular variant has been documented, more studies with extensive follow-up times and large populations are required.

  3. Communication preferences of pediatric cancer patients: talking about prognosis and their future life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Sarah R; Fasciano, Karen; Mack, Jennifer W

    2017-03-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that healthcare providers communicate information to patients in a truthful and developmentally appropriate manner. However, there is limited guidance about how to translate these recommendations into clinical practice. The aim of this study was to explore how young cancer patients experienced communication around their illness, especially communication about possible outcomes from disease or treatment. Participants included young people ages 8 to under 18 years with cancer (N = 16). Semi-structured interviews focused on their expectations about the future, the process of information exchange, and their preferences for communication within the pediatric oncology setting. Overall, participants wanted medical information to be provided to them by their healthcare providers and wanted to be direct participants in medical conversations. However, many participants displayed some ambivalence or conveyed conflicting wishes for prognostic information. For example, some participants reported that they were satisfied with what they knew, but later raised lingering questions. While not the focus of the study, almost every participant discussed social concerns as a key concern for their present and future life. While most pediatric cancer patients want to be involved in conversations about their cancer care, including conversations about prognosis, this is an individual and sometimes fluctuating decision, and healthcare providers should be encouraged to discuss preferences for involvement with patients and families. This study highlights the importance of understanding the developmental factors that make pediatric patients unique, especially with regard to their patterns of communication.

  4. [Meta-analysis of relationship between extranodal tumor deposits and prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianxiang; Shao, Shihong; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Maoshen; Lu, Yun

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the relationship between extranodal tumor deposits and prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer. The literatures on extranodal tumor deposits and postoperative survival rate in patients with colorectal cancer published at home and abroad from 1990 to 2014 were retrieved in 15 English literature databases such as MEDLINE/PubMed, Web of Science, Directory of Open Access Journals(DOAJ), SpringerLink and Chinese literature databases such as Chinese Biomedical Literature Database CD-ROM, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) Database with the internet platform of Yonsei University Library. After screening for inclusion, data extraction and quality assessment, meta-analysis was conducted by the Review Manager 5.3 software. There were 10 studies meeting the inclusion criteria for meta-analysis. The total sample size of the studies was 4 068 cases with ENTD(+) 727 cases, while ENTD(-) 3 341 cases. Meta analysis showed that 5-year overall survival rate and 5-year relapse-free survival rate were significantly lower in ENTD(+) group than those in ENTD(-) group (OR 0.27, 0.23; 95% CI:0.18 to 0.43, 0.16 to 0.34 respectively, both P=0.000); the 5-year overall survival rates were both significantly lower in ENTD(+) group as compared to ENTD(-) group for patients with N0 and N(+) colorectal cancer (both P<0.05). Extranodal tumor deposits is a poor prognostic factor of patients with colorectal cancer.

  5. Significance of age and comorbidity on treatment modality, treatment adherence, and prognosis in elderly ovarian cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Trine Lembrecht; Teiblum, Sandra; Paludan, Merete

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Age is associated with poor prognosis in ovarian cancer patients. Reasons could be increased comorbidity, more advanced stage, or nonoptimal surgery or chemotherapy. Objectives of this study were to evaluate the significance of comorbidity and age ≥70years on receiving cytoreductive...... surgery, standard combination chemotherapy (TC), adherence to TC treatment, and prognosis. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study of all women registered in a nation-wide database with ovarian or peritoneal cancer in 2005-2006. Logistic regression was employed for determining the predictive value of age...

  6. Microscopic residual disease after resection for lung cancer: a multifaceted but poor factor of prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riquet, Marc; Achour, Karima; Foucault, Christophe; Le Pimpec Barthes, Françoise; Dujon, Antoine; Cazes, Aurélie

    2010-03-01

    Many studies focus on bronchial microscopic residual disease (R1) after resection for lung cancer, although R1 also concerns vascular and soft tissues. Our purpose was to study the R1 prognosis at different resection margins and to compare it with the prognosis for those having complete resection (R0). We reviewed the clinical records of 4,026 patients from two centers who underwent surgery in view of cure. Despite perioperative frozen section, 216 patients (5.4%) proved R1 and were classified into seven types according to R1 anatomic site: bronchus, peribronchus, great vessels and atrium, mediastinum and pericardium, chest wall, lung tissue, and lymph nodes. Patients who were classified as R0 and R1 were compared, and R1 patients were further studied according to R1 margins. Frequency of R1 increased with the T and N values and type of resection (lobectomies, 3.3% [70 of 2,041 patients]; pneumonectomies, 8.8% [126 of 1,308 patients]; p < 10(-6)). Five-year survival rates for R1 patients were lower than those for R0 patients (20% versus 46%; p < 10(-6)), and were not modified by the degree of T and N involvement or adjuvant therapy, but were better in bronchial and peribronchial (48.4% of R1 patients) than in extrabronchial R1 (26.3% versus 15.6%; p = 0.023). Multivariate analysis confirmed R1 to be an independent factor of poor prognosis (p = 0.0008), after N, T, and age. Long-term survival is possible in case of an R1 margin, but 5-year survival rates are jeopardized. Poor efficacy of adjuvant therapy and global outcome indicate advanced disease or reflect tumor cell aggressiveness, rather than surgical insufficiency, when prevention of R1 margins is guided by frozen-section examination and scrupulously respected. 2010 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. EMAST is associated with a poor prognosis in microsatellite instable metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Venderbosch

    Full Text Available To determine the frequency and prognostic value of elevated microsatellite alterations at selected tetranucleotide repeats (EMAST in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC patients in relation to microsatellite instability (MSI status and MSH3 protein expression.The frequency of EMAST was evaluated in mCRC patients with MSI tumors and microsatellite stable (MSS tumors. A literature overview was performed to compare the frequency of EMAST in our study with existing data. Immunohistochemistry for MSH3 was compared with EMAST status. Outcome was studied in terms of overall survival (OS of mCRC patients with MSI and MSS tumors.EMAST was evaluated in 89 patients with MSI tumors (including 39 patients with Lynch syndrome and 94 patients with MSS tumors. EMAST was observed in 45.9% (84 out of 183 of patients, with an increased frequency in MSI tumors (79.8% versus 13.8%, p < 0.001. We found no correlation between EMAST and MSH3 protein expression. There was no effect of EMAST on prognosis in patients with MSS tumors, but patients with MSI / non-EMAST tumors had a significantly better prognosis than patients with MSI / EMAST tumors (OS: HR 3.22, 95% CI 1.25-8.30.Frequency of EMAST was increased in mCRC patients with MSI tumors, compared to MSS tumors. Our data suggest that the presence of EMAST correlates with worse OS in these patients. There was no effect of EMAST on the prognosis of patients with MSS tumors. A limitation of our study is the small number of patients in our subgroup analysis.

  8. EMAST is associated with a poor prognosis in microsatellite instable metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venderbosch, Sabine; van Lent-van Vliet, Shannon; de Haan, Anton F J; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J; Goossens, Monique; Punt, Cornelis J A; Koopman, Miriam; Nagtegaal, Iris D

    2015-01-01

    To determine the frequency and prognostic value of elevated microsatellite alterations at selected tetranucleotide repeats (EMAST) in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients in relation to microsatellite instability (MSI) status and MSH3 protein expression. The frequency of EMAST was evaluated in mCRC patients with MSI tumors and microsatellite stable (MSS) tumors. A literature overview was performed to compare the frequency of EMAST in our study with existing data. Immunohistochemistry for MSH3 was compared with EMAST status. Outcome was studied in terms of overall survival (OS) of mCRC patients with MSI and MSS tumors. EMAST was evaluated in 89 patients with MSI tumors (including 39 patients with Lynch syndrome) and 94 patients with MSS tumors. EMAST was observed in 45.9% (84 out of 183) of patients, with an increased frequency in MSI tumors (79.8% versus 13.8%, p < 0.001). We found no correlation between EMAST and MSH3 protein expression. There was no effect of EMAST on prognosis in patients with MSS tumors, but patients with MSI / non-EMAST tumors had a significantly better prognosis than patients with MSI / EMAST tumors (OS: HR 3.22, 95% CI 1.25-8.30). Frequency of EMAST was increased in mCRC patients with MSI tumors, compared to MSS tumors. Our data suggest that the presence of EMAST correlates with worse OS in these patients. There was no effect of EMAST on the prognosis of patients with MSS tumors. A limitation of our study is the small number of patients in our subgroup analysis.

  9. programme

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aid for AIDS (AfA) is a disease management programme (DIVIPI available to beneficiaries and employees of contracted medical funds and ... the challenges alluded to in the first article, including late enrolment and the measurement of survival, especially in patients with ... I the HIV prevalence and incidence (new infections].

  10. Impact of extranodal extension on prognosis in lymph node-positive gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I-S; Park, Y-S; Ryu, M-H; Song, M J; Yook, J-H; Oh, S-T; Kim, B-S

    2014-11-01

    The TNM classification system is used widely for tumour staging, and directs the treatment and prognosis of patients with cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic value of extranodal extension (ENE) in patients with early gastric cancer. All patients who underwent gastrectomy with lymphadenectomy for primary gastric cancer with lymph node metastases between January 2003 and June 2006 were reviewed. Histological slides of metastatic nodes were reviewed by two gastrointestinal pathologists. The association of ENE with clinicopathological characteristics was assessed. The disease-specific survival rate was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and a multivariable Cox regression model was used to identify independent prognostic factors. Some 1143 patients were included. ENE was associated with advanced pT and pN category, larger tumour size and lymphovascular/perineural invasion. In multivariable analysis, pT category, pN category, ENE, lymphovascular invasion and perineural invasion were found to be independent prognostic factors in node-positive gastric carcinoma. The 5-year survival rate of patients with ENE was 48·1 per cent, compared with 78·2 per cent for patients without ENE (P < 0·001). In the subgroup of patients with early gastric cancer, ENE was associated with a worse 5-year survival rate in patients with early (T1) gastric cancer: 75 per cent in patients with ENE versus 96·9 per cent in those without (P < 0·001). ENE is an independent prognostic factor in patients with early and advanced gastric cancer. © 2014 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. A novel model to combine clinical and pathway-based transcriptomic information for the prognosis prediction of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sijia Huang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women worldwide. With the increasing awareness of heterogeneity in breast cancers, better prediction of breast cancer prognosis is much needed for more personalized treatment and disease management. Towards this goal, we have developed a novel computational model for breast cancer prognosis by combining the Pathway Deregulation Score (PDS based pathifier algorithm, Cox regression and L1-LASSO penalization method. We trained the model on a set of 236 patients with gene expression data and clinical information, and validated the performance on three diversified testing data sets of 606 patients. To evaluate the performance of the model, we conducted survival analysis of the dichotomized groups, and compared the areas under the curve based on the binary classification. The resulting prognosis genomic model is composed of fifteen pathways (e.g., P53 pathway that had previously reported cancer relevance, and it successfully differentiated relapse in the training set (log rank p-value = 6.25e-12 and three testing data sets (log rank p-value < 0.0005. Moreover, the pathway-based genomic models consistently performed better than gene-based models on all four data sets. We also find strong evidence that combining genomic information with clinical information improved the p-values of prognosis prediction by at least three orders of magnitude in comparison to using either genomic or clinical information alone. In summary, we propose a novel prognosis model that harnesses the pathway-based dysregulation as well as valuable clinical information. The selected pathways in our prognosis model are promising targets for therapeutic intervention.

  12. Determinants of successful implementation of population-based cancer screening programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Törnberg, Sven; von Karsa, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    consider when planning, implementing and running population based cancer screening programmes. The list is general and is applicable to breast, cervical and colorectal cancer screening. It is based on evidence presented in the three European Union guidelines on quality assurance in cancer screening......) piloting or trial implementation, (5) scaling up from pilot to service, (6) running of full-scale programme, and (7) sustainability. For each phase, a substantial number of specified conditions have to be met. Successful implementation of a cancer screening programme requires societal acceptance and local...

  13. FOXP3 Transcription Factor: A Candidate Marker for Susceptibility and Prognosis in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

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    Leandra Fiori Lopes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC is a relevant subgroup of neoplasia which presents negative phenotype of estrogen and progesterone receptors and has no overexpression of the human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2. FOXP3 (forkhead transcription factor 3 is a marker of regulatory T cells (Tregs, whose expression may be increased in tumor cells. This study aimed to investigate a polymorphism (rs3761548 and the protein expression of FOXP3 for a possible involvement in TNBC susceptibility and prognosis. Genetic polymorphism was evaluated in 50 patients and in 115 controls by allele-specific PCR (polymerase chain reaction. Protein expression was evaluated in 38 patients by immunohistochemistry. It was observed a positive association for homozygous AA (OR = 3.78; 95% CI = 1.02–14.06 in relation to TNBC susceptibility. Most of the patients (83% showed a strong staining for FOXP3 protein in the tumor cells. In relation to FOXP3-positive infiltrate, 47% and 58% of patients had a moderate or intense intratumoral and peritumoral mononuclear infiltrate cells, respectively. Tumor size was positively correlated to intratumoral FOXP3-positive infiltrate (P=0.026. In conclusion, since FOXP3 was positively associated with TNBC susceptibility and prognosis, it seems to be a promising candidate for further investigation in larger TNBC samples.

  14. The Prognosis of Small Cell Lung Cancer in Patients with Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yoko; Ohara, Sayaka; Furukawa, Ryutaro; Usui, Kazuhiro

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prognosis of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) based on the underlying pulmonary disease. A total of 204 patients with SCLC were reviewed and categorized into three groups: normal, emphysema and fibrosis. The median overall survival duration (OS) in patients with normal lungs (n=57), with emphysema (n=105) and fibrosis (n=42) was 21.3, 16.4 and 10.8 months (p=0.063). In limited-stage disease (LD), the median OS in patients with fibrosis (7.4 months) was shorter than normal (52.7 months) or emphysema patients (26.4 months) (p=0.034). In extensive-stage disease (ED), the median OS in patients with fibrosis (12.7 months) was not significantly different from normal (11.4 months) or emphysema patients (13.5 months) (p=0.600). Patients with fibrosis had a poorer prognosis than normal or emphysema patients in LD-SCLC, but the coexistence of pulmonary fibrosis did not affect the prognostic outcomes in ED-SCLC. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  15. Prostate Cancer Detection and Prognosis: From Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA to Exosomal Biomarkers

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    Xavier Filella

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Prostate specific antigen (PSA remains the most used biomarker in the management of early prostate cancer (PCa, in spite of the problems related to false positive results and overdiagnosis. New biomarkers have been proposed in recent years with the aim of increasing specificity and distinguishing aggressive from non-aggressive PCa. The emerging role of the prostate health index and the 4Kscore is reviewed in this article. Both are blood-based tests related to the aggressiveness of the tumor, which provide the risk of suffering PCa and avoiding negative biopsies. Furthermore, the use of urine has emerged as a non-invasive way to identify new biomarkers in recent years, including the PCA3 and TMPRSS2:ERG fusion gene. Available results about the PCA3 score showed its usefulness to decide the repetition of biopsy in patients with a previous negative result, although its relationship with the aggressiveness of the tumor is controversial. More recently, aberrant microRNA expression in PCa has been reported by different authors. Preliminary results suggest the utility of circulating and urinary microRNAs in the detection and prognosis of PCa. Although several of these new biomarkers have been recommended by different guidelines, large prospective and comparative studies are necessary to establish their value in PCa detection and prognosis.

  16. Value of audits in breast cancer screening quality assurance programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geertse, Tanya D; Holland, Roland; Timmers, Janine M H; Paap, Ellen; Pijnappel, Ruud M; Broeders, Mireille J M; den Heeten, Gerard J

    2015-11-01

    Our aim was to retrospectively evaluate the results of all audits performed in the past and to assess their value in the quality assurance of the Dutch breast cancer screening programme. The audit team of the Dutch Reference Centre for Screening (LRCB) conducts triennial audits of all 17 reading units. During audits, screening outcomes like recall rates and detection rates are assessed and a radiological review is performed. This study investigates and compares the results of four audit series: 1996-2000, 2001-2005, 2003-2007 and 2010-2013. The analysis shows increased recall rates (from 0.66%, 1.07%, 1.22% to 1.58%), increased detection rates (from 3.3, 4.5, 4.8 to 5.4 per 1000) and increased sensitivity (from 64.5%, 68.7%, 70.5% to 71.6%), over the four audit series. The percentage of 'missed cancers' among interval cancers and advanced screen-detected cancers did not change (p = 0.4). Our audits not only provide an opportunity for assessing screening outcomes, but also provide moments of self-reflection with peers. For radiologists, an accurate understanding of their performance is essential to identify points of improvement. We therefore recommend a radiological review of screening examinations and immediate feedback as part of an audit. • Radiological review and immediate feedback are recommended as part of an audit. • For breast screening radiologists, audits provide moments of self-reflection with peers. • Radiological review of screening examinations provides insights in recall behaviour. • Accurate understanding of radiologists' performance is essential to identify points of improvement.

  17. Molecular Biomarkers in Bladder Cancer: Novel Potential Indicators of Prognosis and Treatment Outcomes

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    Masayoshi Nagata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although many clinical and molecular markers for predicting outcomes in bladder cancer (BC have been reported, their application in clinical practice remains unclear. Bladder carcinogenesis has two distinct molecular pathways that direct the development of BC. FGFR3 mutations are common in low-grade BC, while TP53 mutation or loss of RB1 is associated with muscle-invasive BC. However, no tissue-based gene markers confirmed by prospective large-scale trials in BC have been used in clinical practice. Micro-RNA analyses of BC tissue revealed that miR-145 and miR-29c⁎ function as tumor suppressors, whereas miR-183 and miR-17-5p function as oncogenic miRNAs. In liquid biopsy, circulating tumor cells (CTC, exosomes, or cell-free RNA is extracted from the peripheral blood samples of cancer patients to analyze cancer prognosis. It was reported that detection of CTC was associated with poor prognostic factors. However, application of liquid biopsy in BC treatment is yet to be explored. Although several cell-free RNAs, such as miR-497 in plasma or miR-214 in urine, could be promising novel circulating biomarkers, they are used only for diagnosing BC as the case that now stands. Here, we discuss the application of novel biomarkers in evaluating and measuring BC outcomes.

  18. Putative risk factors for postoperative pneumonia which affects poor prognosis in patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuchi, Jun; Komatsu, Shuhei; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Kosuga, Toshiyuki; Okamoto, Kazuma; Konishi, Hirotaka; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Yasuda, Tomoyo; Otsuji, Eigo

    2016-10-01

    Several recent studies identified that postoperative infectious complications contribute to recurrence and poor outcome in patients with gastric cancer. This study was designed to investigate the prognostic impact of postoperative pneumonia, and to identify the putative risk factors for its occurrence. We retrospectively analyzed 1,415 consecutive patients who underwent curative gastrectomy for gastric cancer between 1997 and 2013. A total of 31 (2.2 %) patients developed postoperative pneumonia (Clavien-Dindo classification ≥II). Patients with postoperative pneumonia showed a significantly poorer prognosis than patients without (P pneumonia, univariate and multivariate analyses identified older age (≥65 years; P = 0.010; odds ratio [OR] 3.59), lower nutritious status (albumin pneumonia was shown to be associated with long-term poor outcome in patients with gastric cancer. Care should be taken for patients with clinical factors such as older age, lower nutritional status, advanced stage, concurrent hypertension, and total gastrectomy.

  19. MicroRNAs as Biomarkers for Diagnosis, Prognosis and Theranostics in Prostate Cancer

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    Gloria Bertoli

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC includes several phenotypes, from indolent to highly aggressive cancer. Actual diagnostic and prognostic tools have several limitations, and there is a need for new biomarkers to stratify patients and assign them optimal therapies by taking into account potential genetic and epigenetic differences. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small sequences of non-coding RNA regulating specific genes involved in the onset and development of PC. Stable miRNAs have been found in biofluids, such as serum and plasma; thus, the measurement of PC-associated miRNAs is emerging as a non-invasive tool for PC detection and monitoring. In this study, we conduct an in-depth literature review focusing on miRNAs that may contribute to the diagnosis and prognosis of PC. The role of miRNAs as a potential theranostic tool in PC is discussed. Using a meta-analysis approach, we found a group of 29 miRNAs with diagnostic properties and a group of seven miRNAs with prognostic properties, which were found already expressed in both biofluids and PC tissues. We tested the two miRNA groups on The Cancer Genome Atlas dataset of PC tissue samples with a machine-learning approach. Our results suggest that these 29 miRNAs should be considered as potential panel of biomarkers for the diagnosis of PC, both as in vivo non-invasive test and ex vivo confirmation test.

  20. Prognosis Prediction for Postoperative Esophageal Cancer Patients Using Onodera's Prognostic Nutritional Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hideo; Okamoto, Yuko; Kawai, Akimasa; Ueno, Daisuke; Kubota, Hisako; Murakami, Haruaki; Higashida, Masaharu; Hirai, Toshihiro

    2017-01-01

    Preoperative nutritional status may impact surgical outcome and prognosis. We evaluated the predictive value of Onodera's prognostic nutritional index (O's-PNI) of surgical outcome following esophagectomy in esophageal cancer patients. In total, 144 patients undergoing esophagectomy for esophageal cancer from April 2010 to May 2015 were evaluated, retrospectively. Eighty-four patients were enrolled in this study. O's-PNIs were calculated before surgery, discharge, and 1, 2, and 6 mo after discharge. The relationship between O's-PNI and occurrence of complications as classified by the Clavien-Dindo (C-D) classification, length of hospital stay, and survival time was investigated. The mean O's-PNI for patients with complications of more than Grade 2 by the C-D classification was 37.4, which was significantly lower than that for Grades 0 or 1 (40.5, P = 0.0094). A negative correlation was obtained between O's-PNI and hospital stay length (P = 0.0006), whereas a positive correlation was obtained for O's-PNI at 6 mo postsurgery and overall survival (P = 0.0171, P = 0.0201). O's-PNI may represent a useful indicator of the occurrence of complications and length of hospital stay, and may influence overall survival at 6 mo postsurgery. Nutritional management during the perioperative period could therefore contribute to satisfactory outcomes following esophagectomy in esophageal cancer patients.

  1. Expression of HER2 in Colorectal Cancer Does Not Correlate with Prognosis

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    Wiesław Janusz Kruszewski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Estimation of HER2 membranous expression is routinely used in breast and gastric cancers, as both a prognostic and a predictive factor. To date there is no evidence for similar application of HER2 expression in colorectal cancer (CRC cells. In CRC, HER2 is sometimes overexpressed in the cell membrane and very often in the cytoplasm. This study was conducted to determine possible correlations between both membranous and cytoplasmatic expression of HER2 in CRC cells and the outcome of the disease. The prognostic significance of combined staining intensity in the cell membrane and cytoplasm in the entire CRC cell was also investigated. HER2 expression in resectable colorectal adenocarcinoma cells was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in specimens taken from 202 patients. The percentage of cancer cells with membranous or cytoplasmatic reactions and the staining intensity of the reaction in the whole cell were recorded. A membranous reaction was present in 27% of cases, and cytoplasmatic reaction in 66% of cases. The total staining intensity in the entire cell was evaluated as moderate (2+ in 32% of cases and strong (3+ staining in 15%. There was no correlation found between either membranous or cytoplasmatic HER2 expression and survival. Furthermore combined staining intensity did not provide any prognostic information. We conclude that HER2 expression in CRC does not correlate with prognosis.

  2. Obesity is associated with a poorer prognosis in women with hormone receptor positive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Penelope J; Bell, Robin J; Davis, Susan R

    2014-11-01

    Whether moderate to severe obesity (body mass index (BMI)≥30 to obesity on time to either local or distant recurrence or new breast cancer, or death due to breast cancer was determined by Cox regression. Women in the most extreme categories of BMI (age, 58.4±11.6 years, 53.8% had Stage 1 disease and 88.9% received oral adjuvant endocrine therapy (OAET) within 2 years of diagnosis. The likelihood of an event was significantly associated with moderate to severe obesity (HR=1.71, 95%CI, 1.12-2.62, p=0.014), disease beyond Stage 1 (HR=2.87, 95% CI 1.73-4.75, pobesity (HR 3.23, 95%CI 1.48-7.03, p=0.003) and OAET use (HR 0.41, 95%CI 0.17-0.98, p=0.046) were significantly associated with an event. Moderate to severe obesity is associated with a poorer invasive breast cancer prognosis; this is also true for women with Stage 1 disease, and is independent of age and treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Impact of perioperative blood transfusion on immune function and prognosis in colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Li; Wang, Dao-Rong; Zhang, Xiang-Yun; Gao, Shan; Li, Xiao-Xia; Sun, Gong-Ping; Lu, Xiao-Bo

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the impacts of perioperative blood transfusion on the immune function and prognosis in colorectal cancer (CC) patients. A retrospective analysis was conducted in 1404 CC patients, including 1223 sporadic colorectal cancer (SCC) patients and 181 hereditary colorectal cancer (HCC) patients. Among them, 701 SCC and 102 HCC patients received perioperative blood transfusion. The amount of T lymphocyte subsets and natural killer (NK) cells was measured. All patients received a 10-year follow-up and relapse, metastasis and curative conditions were recorded. In SCC group, mortality, local recurrence and distant metastasis rate of transfused patients were significantly higher than non-transfused patients (all P transfused patients than non-transfused patients (P = 0.002). SCC patients transfused with ≥3 U of blood had significantly higher mortality than patients transfused with blood transfusion in SCC and HCC patients (all P blood transfusion (P blood transfusion had markedly lower 10-year survival rates as compared with those who did not receive (both P transfused with ≥3 U of blood had remarkably lower survival rates compared with SCC patients transfused with blood transfusion could impact immune function, increased postoperative mortality, local recurrence rate and distant metastasis rate in CC patients; and survival rate of CC patients is negatively related to blood transfusion volume. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Overexpression of long noncoding RNA HOTTIP promotes tumor invasion and predicts poor prognosis in gastric cancer

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    Ye H

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Heng Ye,1 Kun Liu,2 Keqing Qian1 1Department of Oncology, 2Department of General Surgery, The Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Changzhou No 2 People’s Hospital, Changzhou, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China Purpose: Long noncoding RNAs have been proved to play important roles in the tumorigenesis and development of human gastric cancer (GC. Our study aims to investigate the expression and function of Homeobox A transcript at the distal tip (HOTTIP in GC.Methods: HOTTIP expression was detected in GC tissues and cell lines by using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Association between HOTTIP levels and clinicopathological factors and patient prognosis was also analyzed. MTT, flow cytometry, and transwell invasion and migration assays were used to investigate the role of HOTTIP in the regulation of biological behaviors of GC cells.Results: HOTTIP expression was remarkably increased in GC tissues and cell lines compared with that in the normal control. Clinicopathologic analysis revealed that high HOTTIP expression correlated with larger tumor size, deeper invasion depth, positive lymph node metastasis, advanced TNM stage, and shorter overall survival. Multivariate regression analysis identified HOTTIP overexpression as an independent unfavorable prognostic factor in GC patients. Moreover, HOTTIP downregulation by si-HOTTIP transfection impaired GC cell proliferation, promoted cell apoptosis, and reduced cell invasion and migration.Conclusion: These findings suggested that HOTTIP may contribute to GC initiation and progression, and would be not only a novel prognostic marker but also a potential therapeutic target for this disease. Keywords: long noncoding RNA, HOTTIP, gastric cancer, prognosis

  5. Early prognosis of metastasis risk in inflammatory breast cancer by texture analysis of tumour microscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolarevic, Daniela; Tomasevic, Zorica; Dzodic, Radan; Kanjer, Ksenija; Vukosavljevic, Dragica Nikolic; Radulovic, Marko

    2015-10-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare and aggressive type of locally advanced breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine the value of microscopic tumour histomorphology texture for prognosis of local and systemic recurrence at the time of initial IBC diagnosis. This retrospective study included a group of 52 patients selected on the basis of non-metastatic IBC diagnosis, stage IIIB. Gray-Level-Co-Occurrence-Matrix (GLCM) texture analysis was performed on digital images of primary tumour tissue sections stained with haematoxylin/eosin. Obtained values were categorized by use of both data- and outcome-based methods. All five acquired GLCM texture features significantly associated with metastasis outcome. By accuracies of 69-81% and AUCs of 0.71-0.81, prognostic performance of GLCM parameters exceeded that of standard major IBC clinical prognosticators such as tumour grade and response to induction chemotherapy. Furthermore, a composite score consisting of tumour grade, contrast and correlation as independent features resulted in further enhancement of prognostic performance by accuracy of 89%, discrimination efficiency by AUC of 0.93 and an outstanding hazard ratio of 71.6 (95%CI, 41.7-148.4). Internal validation was successfully performed by bootstrap and split-sample cross-validation, suggesting that the model is generalizable. This study indicates for the first time the potential use of primary breast tumour histology texture as a highly accurate, simple and cost-effective prognostic indicator of metastasis risk in IBC. Clinical relevance of the obtained results rests on the role of prognosis in decisions on induction chemotherapy and the resulting impact on quality of life and survival.

  6. Validation of the prognosis in palliative care study predictor models in terminal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Shin; Lee, Jung-Kwon; Kim, Mi-Hyun; Noh, Hye-Mi; Jin, Yeong-Hyeon

    2014-11-01

    Prognosis in Palliative Care Study (PiPS) predictor models were developed in 2011 to estimate the survival of terminal cancer patients in the United Kingdom. The aim of this study was to validate the PiPS model for terminal cancer patients in Korea, and evaluate its value in clinical practice. This study included 202 advanced cancer patients who were admitted to the cancer hospital's palliative care ward from November 2011 to February 2013. On admission, physicians recorded the PiPS-A, PiPS-B, and doctor's survival estimates in inpatients. The median survival across PiPS-A categories was 9, 28, and 33 days, and the median survival across PiPS-B was 9.5, 27, and 43 days. The median actual survival was 25 days; overall accuracy between the PiPS-A, PiPS-B, doctor's estimates of survival, and actual survival was 52.0%, 49.5%, and 46.5%, respectively. The PiPS-A and PiPS-B groups for survival in 'days' showed a sensitivity of 48.4% and 64.1%, and specificity of 87.7%, and 77.5%, respectively. The PiPS-A and PiPS-B groups for survival in 'weeks' showed a sensitivity of 59.2%, and 44.7%, and specificity of 61.6%, and 64.7%, respectively. The PiPS-A and PiPS-B 'months' group showed a sensitivity of 37.1% and 37.1%, and specificity of 74.9% and 78.4%, respectively. The 'weeks' and 'months' groups showed significantly prolonged survival rates than 'days' group did in both PiPS-A and PiPS-B, by the Kaplan-Meier method. The PiPS predictor models effectively predicted the survival ≥14 days in terminal cancer patients, and were superior to doctor's estimates.

  7. Topoisomerase 1(TOP1) gene copy number in stage III colorectal cancer patients and its relation to prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rømer, Maria Unni Koefoed; Nygård, Sune Boris; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2013-01-01

    A Topoisomerase 1 (Top1) poison is frequently included in the treatment regimens for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, no predictive biomarkers for Top1 poisons are available. We here report a study on the TOP1 gene copy number in CRC patients and its association with patient prognosis...

  8. High Expression of CCR7 Predicts Lymph Node Metastasis and Good Prognosis in Triple Negative Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuelu; Sun, Siwen; Li, Ning; Gao, Jiyue; Yu, Jing; Zhao, Jinbo; Li, Man; Zhao, Zuowei

    2017-01-01

    Previous preclinical and clinical studies have reported a positive correlation between the expression of the C-C chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) and the incidence of lymph node metastasis in breast cancer. However, the prognostic relevance of CCR7 expression in breast cancer remains contradictory till now. The aim of this study is to assess the correlation of the CCR7 expression with other clinicopathological features and prognosis in breast cancer. The CCR7 gene amplification and mRNA expression levels from approximately 3,000 patients were retrieved from human breast cancer databases and analyzed. Furthermore, a total of 188 primary triple negative breast cancer patients were enrolled in this study (diagnosed since January 2009 to January 2013 from the Second Hospital of Dalian Medical University). The protein levels of CCR7 were examined by immunohistochemistry using paraffin-embedded tumor tissues. The analysis of gene amplification and mRNA levels showed the expression of CCR7 in breast cancer correlated with better prognosis. When we compared the CCR7 expressions in different subtypes, the basal-like group showed the highest expression of CCR7 and exhibited a better prognosis. Consistently, Kaplan-Meier analysis of 188 triple negative breast cancer patients showed that the prognosis of patients with positive CCR7 expression was significantly better than those with negative expression (HR=0.642, p=0.0275). Additionally, we also observed a positive correlation between lymph node metastasis and the CCR7 expression (p=0.0096). Our results indicated that elevated CCR7 expression as a marker for increased lymph node metastasis, in addition to serve as an independent prognostic indicator for better overall survival in triple negative breast cancer patients. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. High Expression of CCR7 Predicts Lymph Node Metastasis and Good Prognosis in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

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    Xuelu Li

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Previous preclinical and clinical studies have reported a positive correlation between the expression of the C-C chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7 and the incidence of lymph node metastasis in breast cancer. However, the prognostic relevance of CCR7 expression in breast cancer remains contradictory till now. The aim of this study is to assess the correlation of the CCR7 expression with other clinicopathological features and prognosis in breast cancer. Methods: The CCR7 gene amplification and mRNA expression levels from approximately 3,000 patients were retrieved from human breast cancer databases and analyzed. Furthermore, a total of 188 primary triple negative breast cancer patients were enrolled in this study (diagnosed since January 2009 to January 2013 from the Second Hospital of Dalian Medical University. The protein levels of CCR7 were examined by immunohistochemistry using paraffin-embedded tumor tissues. Results: The analysis of gene amplification and mRNA levels showed the expression of CCR7 in breast cancer correlated with better prognosis. When we compared the CCR7 expressions in different subtypes, the basal-like group showed the highest expression of CCR7 and exhibited a better prognosis. Consistently, Kaplan–Meier analysis of 188 triple negative breast cancer patients showed that the prognosis of patients with positive CCR7 expression was significantly better than those with negative expression (HR=0.642, p=0.0275. Additionally, we also observed a positive correlation between lymph node metastasis and the CCR7 expression (p=0.0096. Conclusions: Our results indicated that elevated CCR7 expression as a marker for increased lymph node metastasis, in addition to serve as an independent prognostic indicator for better overall survival in triple negative breast cancer patients.

  10. Plasma testosterone in the general population, cancer prognosis and cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orsted, D D; Nordestgaard, B G; Bojesen, S E

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Testosterone is an important anabolic hormone in humans and in vitro testosterone stimulates growth of lung and colon cancer cells. We tested the hypothesis that plasma testosterone associate with increased risk of cancer and with increased risk of early death after cancer. MATERIALS...... years, increased levels of testosterone were associated with a 30%-80% increased risk of early death after cancer, but unchanged risk of incident cancer....... AND METHODS: Plasma testosterone was measured in 8771 20- to 94-year-old men and women who participated in a prospective study of the general population. Participants were included in 1981-1983 and followed for a median of 22 years (range: 0-30 years). RESULTS: During follow-up, 1140 men and 809 women...

  11. Phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase is a novel predictor for poor prognosis in gastric cancer

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    Xian Y

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Yun Xian,1,* Shu Zhang,2,* Xudong Wang,3 Jin Qin,2 Wei Wang,2 Han Wu4 1School of Public Health, Nantong University, 2Department of Pathology, 3Department of Laboratory Medicine, 4Department of General Surgery, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: Phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH acts as a key metabolic enzyme in the rate-limiting step in serine biosynthesis and plays an important role in metastasis of several cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of PHGDH in gastric cancer (GC. Methods: The messenger RNA expression of PHGDH was determined in 20 pairs of cancerous and adjacent nontumor tissues by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Immunohistochemistry of PHGDH was performed on tissue microarray, composed of 482 GC and 64 matched adjacent nontumor tissues acquired from surgery, 20 chronic gastritis, 18 intestinal metaplasia, and 31 low-grade and 66 high-grade intraepithelial neoplasias acquired through gastric endoscopic biopsy. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard models were used to perform survival analyses. Results: Both PHGDH messenger RNA and protein product exhibited GC tissue-preferred expression, when compared with benign tissues. The high PHGDH expression was significantly correlated with histological type (P=0.011, tumor stage (P=0.014, and preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen (P<0.001. A negative correlation was found between PHGDH expression and the 5-year survival rate of patients with GC. Furthermore, multivariate analysis indicated that PHGDH was an independent prognostic factor for outcome in GC. Conclusion: PHGDH is important in predicting patient outcomes and is a potential target for the development of therapeutic approaches to GC. Keywords: metabolism, gastric cancer, prognosis, serine biosynthesis

  12. High YKL-40 serum concentration is correlated with prognosis of Chinese patients with breast cancer.

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    Dong Wang

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the association between serum YKL-40 and prognosis of breast cancer in a Chinese population. Expression of YKL-40 of 120 Chinese patients with breast cancer and 30 controls (benign breast lesions was measured in tumor tissue by immunohistochemistry and in serum by ELISA. Differences in YKL-40 positivity grouped by specific patients' characteristics were compared using Pearson Chi-square test for rates of intratumoral staining, one-way ANOVA with a Bonferroni post-hoc comparison, or two-sample t-test for mean YKL-40 serum concentrations. Factors associated with overall survival were identified by univariate and multivariate cox-regression analyses. YKL-40 was elevated in approximately 75% of Chinese patients with breast cancer. A significantly higher percentage of patients with YKL-40 positive tumors had larger tumor size, higher TNM stage, and/or lymph node metastasis. Significantly higher mean YKL-40 serum concentrations were observed in patient subgroups with invasive lobular carcinoma (P<0.0167, higher TNM stage (P<0.001, and positive lymph node metastasis (P<0.001. The estimated mean survival time of patients with YKL-40 positive tumors was significantly shorter than for patients with YKL-40 negative tumors (55.13 months vs 65.78 months, P = 0.017. Multivariable Cox-regression analysis identified a significant association of overall survival time with YKL-40 serum concentration. Patients with YKL-40 positive tumors had significantly shorter disease free survival times than those with YKL-40 negative tumors. We propose that the potential utility of YKL-40 intratumoral staining or serum concentration as a biomarker for breast cancer is greatest within 5 years of diagnosis.

  13. Evaluation of correlation between CT image features and ERCC1 protein expression in assessing lung cancer prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Maxine; Emaminejad, Nastaran; Qian, Wei; Sun, Shenshen; Kang, Yan; Guan, Yubao; Lure, Fleming; Zheng, Bin

    2014-03-01

    Stage I non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLC) usually have favorable prognosis. However, high percentage of NSCLC patients have cancer relapse after surgery. Accurately predicting cancer prognosis is important to optimally treat and manage the patients to minimize the risk of cancer relapse. Studies have shown that an excision repair crosscomplementing 1 (ERCC1) gene was a potentially useful genetic biomarker to predict prognosis of NSCLC patients. Meanwhile, studies also found that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was highly associated with lung cancer prognosis. In this study, we investigated and evaluated the correlations between COPD image features and ERCC1 gene expression. A database involving 106 NSCLC patients was used. Each patient had a thoracic CT examination and ERCC1 genetic test. We applied a computer-aided detection scheme to segment and quantify COPD image features. A logistic regression method and a multilayer perceptron network were applied to analyze the correlation between the computed COPD image features and ERCC1 protein expression. A multilayer perceptron network (MPN) was also developed to test performance of using COPD-related image features to predict ERCC1 protein expression. A nine feature based logistic regression analysis showed the average COPD feature values in the low and high ERCC1 protein expression groups are significantly different (p < 0.01). Using a five-fold cross validation method, the MPN yielded an area under ROC curve (AUC = 0.669±0.053) in classifying between the low and high ERCC1 expression cases. The study indicates that CT phenotype features are associated with the genetic tests, which may provide supplementary information to help improve accuracy in assessing prognosis of NSCLC patients.

  14. NR2F6 Expression Correlates with Pelvic Lymph Node Metastasis and Poor Prognosis in Early-Stage Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhao Niu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is an abnormal expression of nuclear receptor subfamily 2 group F member 6 (NR2F6 in human cancers such as breast cancer, colon cancer, and acute myelogenous leukemia. However, its clinical significance in cervical cancer has not been established. We explored NR2F6 expression and its clinicopathological significance in early-stage cervical cancer. Methods: NR2F6 expression in cervical cancer cell lines and cervical cancer tissues was determined by Western blotting, real-time PCR, and immunochemistry (IHC. NR2F6 expression in 189 human early-stage cervical cancer tissue samples was evaluated using IHC. The relevance between NR2F6 expression and early-stage cervical cancer prognosis and clinicopathological features was determined. Results: There was marked NR2F6 mRNA and protein overexpression in the cervical cancer cells and clinical tissues compared with an immortalized squamous cell line and adjacent noncancerous cervical tissues, respectively. In the 189 cervical cancer samples, NR2F6 expression was positively related to International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO stage (p = 0.006, squamous cell carcinoma antigen (p = 0.006, vital status (p < 0.001, tumor recurrence (p = 0.001, chemotherapy (p = 0.039, and lymph node metastasis (p < 0.001. Overall and disease-free survival was shorter in patients with early-stage cervical cancer and higher NR2F6 levels than in patients with lower levels of NR2F6. Univariate and multivariate analysis determined that NR2F6 was an independent prognostic factor of survival in early-stage cervical cancer. Conclusions: Taken together, our findings suggest that high NR2F6 expression predicts pelvic lymph node metastasis, tumor recurrence and poor prognosis in early-stage cervical cancer. NR2F6 might be a novel prognostic biomarker and potential therapeutic target of cervical cancer.

  15. Downregulated Ku70 and ATM associated to poor prognosis in colorectal cancer among Chinese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu YF

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Yuanfang Lu,1,2 Jingyan Gao,1,3 Yuanming Lu,1 1Department of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Guilin Medical University, Guangxi, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Clinical Research Center, Affiliated 2nd Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People's Republic of China; 3Department of Human Anatomy and Histo-Embryology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China Background: Double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs are a key factor in carcinogenesis. The necessary repair of DSBs is pivotal in maintaining normal cell division. To address the relationship between altered expression of DSB repair of proteins Ku70 and ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM in colorectal cancer (CRC, we examined the expression levels and patterns of Ku70 and ATM in CRC samples. Methods: Expression and coexpression of Ku70 and ATM were investigated by using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays and confirmed further with fluorescent immunohistochemistry in CRC and pericancerous samples from 112 Chinese patients. Results: Downexpression patterns for both Ku70 and ATM were found in the CRC samples and were significantly associated with advanced tumor node metastasis stage and decreased 5-year overall survival rate. Conclusion: Downregulated Ku70 and ATM were associated with poor disease-free survival. Loss of Ku70 and ATM expression might act as a biomarker to predict poor prognosis in patients with CRC. Keywords: DNA double-strand breaks, ataxia-telangiectasia mutated, Ku70, colorectal cancer

  16. Epigenetic modulation associated with carcinogenesis and prognosis of human gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonohara, Fuminori; Inokawa, Yoshikuni; Hayashi, Masamichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Nomoto, Shuji

    2017-05-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is a leading cause of cancer-related death, particularly in Asia. Epidemiological and other clinical studies have identified an association between a number of risk factors, including Helicobacter pylori, and GC. A number of studies have also examined genetic changes associated with the development and progression of GC. When considering the clinical significance of the expression of a specific gene, its epigenetic modulation should be considered. Epigenetic modulation appears to be a primary driver of changes in gastric tissue that promotes carcinogenesis and progression of GC and other neoplasms. The role of epigenetic modulation in GC carcinogenesis and progression has been widely studied in recent years. In the present review, recent results of epigenetic modulation associated with GC and their effects on clinical outcome are examined, with particular respect to DNA methylation, histone modulation and non-coding RNA. A number of studies indicate that epigenetic changes in the expression of specific genes critically affect their clinical significance and further study may reveal epigenetic changes as the basis for targeted molecular therapy or novel biomarkers that predict GC prognosis or extension of this often fatal disease.

  17. Snail and serpinA1 promote tumor progression and predict prognosis in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Chae Hwa; Park, Hye Ji; Choi, Jin Hwa; Lee, Ja Rang; Kim, Hye Kyung; Jo, Hong-Jae; Kim, Hyun Sung; Oh, Nahmgun; Song, Geun Am; Park, Do Youn

    2015-08-21

    The role of Snail and serpin peptidase inhibitor clade A member 1 (serpinA1) in tumorigenesis has been previously identified. However, the exact role and mechanism of these proteins in progression of colorectal cancer (CRC) are controversial. In this study, we investigated the role of Snail and serpinA1 in colorectal cancer (CRC) and examined the mechanisms through which these proteins mediate CRC progression. Immunohistochemical analysis of 528 samples from patients with CRC showed that elevated expression of Snail or serpinA1 was correlated with advanced stage, lymph node metastasis, and poor prognosis. Moreover, we detected a correlation between Snail and serpinA1 expression. Functional studies performed using the CRC cell lines DLD-1 and SW-480 showed that overexpression of Snail or serpinA1 significantly increased CRC cell invasion and migration. Conversely, knockdown of Snail or serpinA1 expression suppressed CRC cell invasion and migration. ChIP analysis revealed that Snail regulated serpinA1 by binding to its promoter. In addition, fibronectin mediated Snail and serpinA1 signaling was involved in CRC cell invasion and migration. Taken together, our data showed that Snail and serpinA1 promoted CRC progression through fibronectin. These findings suggested that Snail and serpinA1 were novel prognostic biomarkers and candidate therapeutic targets in CRC.

  18. Girdin protein: A potential metastasis predictor associated with prognosis in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhaoyang; Yang, Fang; Zhang, Yingli; Wang, Xin; Shi, Jiong; Wei, Hongjiao; Sun, Fengwei; Yu, Yan

    2018-03-01

    The present study explored the relationship between Girdin protein expression and the survival rate of patients with lung carcinoma. A total of 334 lung cancer specimens, 20 benign lung disease tissue sections and 24 fresh tissues from patients with lung carcinoma were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and western blotting. Girdin protein was expressed in 130/334 (38.93%) of the cases examined. Girdin protein expression was correlated with tumor/node/metastasis stage (P<0.001), lymph node metastasis (P=0.001), distant metastasis (P<0.001) and specimen sites (P=0.034). Girdin expression was also correlated with signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) expression (P<0.001). Patients with high Girdin and STAT3 expression had a significantly poorer prognosis compared with those with low/high, high/low or low/low expression (P<0.001). In summary, Girdin may be a prognostic marker of lung cancer and serve as a biomarker for metastasis.

  19. Cancer stem cells: a systems biology view of their role in prognosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertins, Susan D

    2014-04-01

    Evidence has accumulated that characterizes highly tumorigenic cancer cells residing in heterogeneous populations. The accepted term for such a subpopulation is cancer stem cells (CSCs). While many questions still remain about their precise role in the origin, progression, and drug resistance of tumors, it is clear they exist. In this review, a current understanding of the nature of CSC, their potential usefulness in prognosis, and the need to target them will be discussed. In particular, separate studies now suggest that the CSC is plastic in its phenotype, toggling between tumorigenic and nontumorigenic states depending on both intrinsic and extrinsic conditions. Because of this, a static view of gene and protein levels defined by correlations may not be sufficient to either predict disease progression or aid in the discovery and development of drugs to molecular targets leading to cures. Quantitative dynamic modeling, a bottom up systems biology approach whereby signal transduction pathways are described by differential equations, may offer a novel means to overcome the challenges of oncology today. In conclusion, the complexity of CSCs can be captured in mathematical models that may be useful for selecting molecular targets, defining drug action, and predicting sensitivity or resistance pathways for improved patient outcomes.

  20. Identification of CEACAM5 as a Biomarker for Prewarning and Prognosis in Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jinfeng; Fan, Xing; Chen, Ning; Zhou, Fenli; Dong, Jiaqiang; Nie, Yongzhan; Fan, Daiming

    2015-12-01

    MGd1, a monoclonal antibody raised against gastric cancer cells, possesses a high degree of specificity for gastric cancer (GC). Here we identified that the antigen of MGd1 is CEACAM5, and used MGd1 to investigate the expression of CEACAM5 in non-GC and GC tissues (N=643), as a biomarker for prewarning and prognosis. The expression of CEACAM5 was detected by immunohistochemistry in numerous tissues; its clinicopathological correlation was statistically analyzed. CEACAM5 expression was increased progressively from normal gastric mucosa to chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia and finally to GC (pgastric precancerous lesions (intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia), CEACAM5-positive patients had a higher risk of developing GC as compared with CEACAM5-negative patients (OR = 12.68, pgastric adenocarcinoma (p<0.001). In survival analysis, CEACAM5 was demonstrated to be an independent prognostic predictor for patients with GC of clinical stage IIIA/IV (p=0.033). Our results demonstrate that CEACAM5 is a promising biomarker for GC prewarning and prognostic evaluation. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Stroma-associated master regulators of molecular subtypes predict patient prognosis in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengzhe; Jing, Ying; Zhang, Meiying; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Ma, Pengfei; Peng, Huixin; Shi, Kaixuan; Gao, Wei-Qiang; Zhuang, Guanglei

    2015-11-04

    High-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGS-OvCa) has the lowest survival rate among all gynecologic cancers and is hallmarked by a high degree of heterogeneity. The Cancer Genome Atlas network has described a gene expression-based molecular classification of HGS-OvCa into Differentiated, Mesenchymal, Immunoreactive and Proliferative subtypes. However, the biological underpinnings and regulatory mechanisms underlying the distinct molecular subtypes are largely unknown. Here we showed that tumor-infiltrating stromal cells significantly contributed to the assignments of Mesenchymal and Immunoreactive clusters. Using reverse engineering and an unbiased interrogation of subtype regulatory networks, we identified the transcriptional modules containing master regulators that drive gene expression of Mesenchymal and Immunoreactive HGS-OvCa. Mesenchymal master regulators were associated with poor prognosis, while Immunoreactive master regulators positively correlated with overall survival. Meta-analysis of 749 HGS-OvCa expression profiles confirmed that master regulators as a prognostic signature were able to predict patient outcome. Our data unraveled master regulatory programs of HGS-OvCa subtypes with prognostic and potentially therapeutic relevance, and suggested that the unique transcriptional and clinical characteristics of ovarian Mesenchymal and Immunoreactive subtypes could be, at least partially, ascribed to tumor microenvironment.

  2. Predictive gene lists for breast cancer prognosis: A topographic visualisation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaraksa, Mingmanas; Lowe, David

    2008-01-01

    Background The controversy surrounding the non-uniqueness of predictive gene lists (PGL) of small selected subsets of genes from very large potential candidates as available in DNA microarray experiments is now widely acknowledged [1]. Many of these studies have focused on constructing discriminative semi-parametric models and as such are also subject to the issue of random correlations of sparse model selection in high dimensional spaces. In this work we outline a different approach based around an unsupervised patient-specific nonlinear topographic projection in predictive gene lists. Methods We construct nonlinear topographic projection maps based on inter-patient gene-list relative dissimilarities. The Neuroscale, the Stochastic Neighbor Embedding(SNE) and the Locally Linear Embedding(LLE) techniques have been used to construct two-dimensional projective visualisation plots of 70 dimensional PGLs per patient, classifiers are also constructed to identify the prognosis indicator of each patient using the resulting projections from those visualisation techniques and investigate whether a-posteriori two prognosis groups are separable on the evidence of the gene lists. A literature-proposed predictive gene list for breast cancer is benchmarked against a separate gene list using the above methods. Generalisation ability is investigated by using the mapping capability of Neuroscale to visualise the follow-up study, but based on the projections derived from the original dataset. Results The results indicate that small subsets of patient-specific PGLs have insufficient prognostic dissimilarity to permit a distinction between two prognosis patients. Uncertainty and diversity across multiple gene expressions prevents unambiguous or even confident patient grouping. Comparative projections across different PGLs provide similar results. Conclusion The random correlation effect to an arbitrary outcome induced by small subset selection from very high dimensional interrelated

  3. Expression of THOP1 and its relationship to prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Qi

    Full Text Available The study was designed to detect the expression level of thimet oligopeptidase (THOP1 protein in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and investigate its correlation with clinicopathologic features and prognosis.Immunohistochemical staining was used to determine the expression of THOP1 protein in 120 NSCLC specimens and 53 distant normal lung tissues. Quantitative real-time PCR and western blotting were employed to measure the expression of THOP1 in 16 pairs of primary NSCLC and corresponding normal tissues.Analysis of immunohistochemical staining suggested low THOP1 expression was found in 71 (59.2% of the 120 NSCLC specimens and significantly correlated with positive lymph node metastasis (P = 0.048. However, low THOP1 expression was found in 22 (41.5% of the 53 normal lung tissues. Chi-square test suggested that the expression of THOP1 was significantly higher in the normal lung tissues than that in the NSCLC specimens (P = 0.032. Real-Time PCR and western blotting showed that NSCLC specimens had decreased THOP1 mRNA and protein expression compared to corresponding normal tissues. Univariate analysis demonstrated that low THOP1 expression significantly predicted decreased 5-year disease-free survival (P = 0.038 and overall survival (P = 0.017. In addition, positive lymph node metastasis (P = 0.025 and advanced TNM stage (P = 0.009 significantly predicted decreased 5-year overall survival. However, multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that only low THOP1 expression retained its significance as an independent prognostic factor for unfavorable 5-year disease-free survival (P = 0.046 and overall survival (P = 0.021.THOP1 may have clinical potentials to be employed as a promising biomarker to identify individuals with better prognosis and a novel antitumor agent for therapy of patients with NSCLC.

  4. Fasting blood glucose and long-term prognosis of non-metastatic breast cancer: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contiero, Paolo; Berrino, Franco; Tagliabue, Giovanna; Mastroianni, Antonio; Di Mauro, Maria Gaetana; Fabiano, Sabrina; Annulli, Monica; Muti, Paola

    2013-04-01

    High circulating glucose has been associated with increased risk of breast cancer (BC). There may also be a link between serum glucose and prognosis in women treated for BC. We assessed the effect of peridiagnostic fasting blood glucose and body mass index (BMI) on long-term BC prognosis. We retrospectively investigated 1,261 women diagnosed and treated for stage I-III BC at the National Cancer Institute, Milan, in 1996, 1999 and 2000. Data on blood tests and follow-up were obtained by linking electronic archives, with follow-up to end of 2009. Multivariate Cox modelling estimated hazard ratios (HR) with 95 % confidence intervals (CI) for distant metastasis, recurrence and death (all causes) in relation to categorized peridiagnostic fasting blood glucose and BMI. Mediation analysis investigated whether blood glucose mediated the BMI-breast cancer prognosis association. The risks of distant metastasis were significantly higher for all other quintiles compared to the lowest glucose quintile (reference fasting glucose and obesity predict worsened short- and long-term outcomes in BC patients. Maintaining healthy blood glucose levels and normal weight may improve prognosis.

  5. Positive diagnostic values and histological detection ratios from the Rotterdam cervical cancer screening programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.A. Kreuger; H. Beerman (Henk); H.G. Nijs (Huub); M. van Ballegooijen (Marjolein)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: In organized screening programmes for cervical cancer, pre-cancerous lesions are detected by cervical smears. However, during follow-up after a positive smear these pre-cancerous lesions are not always found. The purpose of the study is to

  6. Measuring the burden of interval cancers in long-standing screening mammography programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sune Bangsbøll; Törnberg, Sven; Kilpeläinen, Sini

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Mammography screening programme sensitivity is evaluated by comparing the interval cancer rate (ICR) with the expected breast cancer incidence without screening, ie. the proportional interval cancer rate (PICR). The PICR is usually found by extrapolating pre-screening incidence rates...

  7. Exercise Intervention in Targeting Adiposity and Inflammation With Movement to Improve Prognosis in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-18

    Cancer Survivor; Central Obesity; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Postmenopausal; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  8. Prognosis for patients diagnosed with pregnancy-associated breast cancer: a paired case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Wagner Brant; Brandão, Eduardo Carvalho; Soares, Aleida Nazareth; Lucena, Clécio Enio Murta de; Antunes, Carlos Maurício Figueiredo

    2010-05-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the occurrence of pregnancy concomitantly with a diagnosis of breast cancer may affect the evolution of the neoplasia. The present study aimed to compare pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) patients with non-pregnant cancer patients (controls) in relation to the time taken to diagnose the disease, tumor characteristics and mortality. A retrospective, paired case-control study was conducted at the Hospital da Santa Casa de Misericórdia and Centro de Quimioterapia Antiblástica e Imunoterapia in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. The study involved 87 PABC and 252 control patients. The influence of covariables (interval between first symptoms and diagnosis, tumor histology, size of primary tumor, distant metastasis, grade of malignancy, hormone receptor status and axillary lymph node involvement) and the pregnancy variable on overall survival was investigated using univariate and multivariate analyses. The median overall survival for PABC patients of 30.1 months (95% confidence interval, CI: 19.4-40.9 months) was significantly different (P = 0.005) from that of the control group (53.1 months; 95% CI: 35.1-71.0 months). The cumulative overall survivals after five and ten years were, respectively, 29.7 and 19.2% for PABC patients, and 47.3 and 34.8% for control patients (P = 0.005). Tumor size, grade of malignancy, distant metastasis and pregnancy were independent factors that significantly modified disease prognosis. Pregnancy was an independent prognostic factor. The overall survival of PABC patients was shorter than that of non-pregnant patients.

  9. Prognosis for patients diagnosed with pregnancy-associated breast cancer: a paired case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Brant Moreira

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Previous studies have suggested that the occurrence of pregnancy concomitantly with a diagnosis of breast cancer may affect the evolution of the neoplasia. The present study aimed to compare pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC patients with non-pregnant cancer patients (controls in relation to the time taken to diagnose the disease, tumor characteristics and mortality. DESIGN AND SETTING: A retrospective, paired case-control study was conducted at the Hospital da Santa Casa de Misericórdia and Centro de Quimioterapia Antiblástica e Imunoterapia in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. METHODS: The study involved 87 PABC and 252 control patients. The influence of covariables (interval between first symptoms and diagnosis, tumor histology, size of primary tumor, distant metastasis, grade of malignancy, hormone receptor status and axillary lymph node involvement and the pregnancy variable on overall survival was investigated using univariate and multivariate analyses. RESULTS: The median overall survival for PABC patients of 30.1 months (95% confidence interval, CI: 19.4-40.9 months was significantly different (P = 0.005 from that of the control group (53.1 months; 95% CI: 35.1-71.0 months. The cumulative overall survivals after five and ten years were, respectively, 29.7 and 19.2% for PABC patients, and 47.3 and 34.8% for control patients (P = 0.005. Tumor size, grade of malignancy, distant metastasis and pregnancy were independent factors that significantly modified disease prognosis. CONCLUSIONS: Pregnancy was an independent prognostic factor. The overall survival of PABC patients was shorter than that of non-pregnant patients.

  10. Correlation of MMP-9 and p53 protein expression with prognosis in metastatic spinal tumor of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuquan; Wu, Minfei; Zhao, Yi; Gu, Rui; Peng, Chuangang; Liu, Jiabei; Zhu, Qingsan; Li, Ye

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the protein expression of MMP-9 and p53 and examine their correlation with prognosis in lung cancer metastatic spinal tumor. Tissue samples were obtained from 30 cases of para-cancerous tissue (group I), 75 cases of non-metastatic lung cancer tissue (group II) and 100 cases of metastatic spinal tumor tissue of lung cancer (group III). The protein expression of MMP-9 and p53 was detected by immunohistochemistry and was present in all three groups. The positive rate for MMP-9 was 20, 67 and 83%, respectively. There was a significant difference among the three groups (pp53 was 16.7, 78.7 and 92%, respectively. There was a highly significant difference among the three groups (pp53 (Spearman's correlation coefficient r=0.351, pp53 proteins in metastatic spinal tumors of lung cancer showed increasing trends, and the expression of MMP-9 and p53 proteins was significantly higher compared to non-metastatic lung cancer tissue and para-cancerous tissue samples. This likely was associated with the invasion and metastasis of lung cancer to the spine. Survival analysis suggested that the overexpression of p53 and MMP-9 were correlated with poor prognosis.

  11. Exercise Programme in Endometrial Cancer; Protocol of the Feasibility and Acceptability Survivorship Trial (EPEC-FAST)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, A.; Lopes, A.; Das, N.; Bekkers, R.L.M.; Massuger, L.F.; Galaal, K.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Obesity has been associated with impaired quality of life and poorer outcomes in endometrial cancer survivors. Lifestyle interventions promoting exercise and weight reduction have been proposed for survivorship care. However, studies evaluating exercise programmes for endometrial

  12. The development of an evidence-based physical self-management rehabilitation programme for cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Weert, Ellen; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette E. H. M.; May, Anne M.; Korstjens, Irene; Ros, Wynand J. G.; van der Schans, Cees P.

    Objective: This paper describes the development of a physical training programme for cancer patients. Four related but conceptually and empirically distinct physical problems are described: decreased aerobic capacity, decreased muscle strength, fatigue and impaired role physical functioning. The

  13. Prevention of breast cancer in the context of a national breast screening programme

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Howell, A; Astley, S; Warwick, J; Stavrinos, P; Sahin, S; Ingham, S; McBurney, H; Eckersley, B; Harvie, M; Wilson, M; Beetles, U; Warren, R; Hufton, A; Sergeant, J; Newman, W; Buchan, I; Cuzick, J; Evans, D. G

    2012-01-01

    ...; and Cambridge Breast Unit, Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge; UK). Prevention of breast cancer in the context of a national breast screening programme (Review). J Intern Med 2012; 271 : 321–330...

  14. Identification of MicroRNAs as Breast Cancer Prognosis Markers through the Cancer Genome Atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jeremy T-H; Wang, Fan; Chapin, William; Huang, R Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second-most common cancer and second-leading cause of cancer mortality in American women. The dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) plays a key role in almost all cancers, including breast cancer. We comprehensively analyzed miRNA expression, global gene expression, and patient survival from the Cancer Genomes Atlas (TCGA) to identify clinically relevant miRNAs and their potential gene targets in breast tumors. In our analysis, we found that increased expression of 12 mature miRNAs-hsa-miR-320a, hsa-miR-361-5p, hsa-miR-103a-3p, hsa-miR-21-5p, hsa-miR-374b-5p, hsa-miR-140-3p, hsa-miR-25-3p, hsa-miR-651-5p, hsa-miR-200c-3p, hsa-miR-30a-5p, hsa-miR-30c-5p, and hsa-let-7i-5p -each predicted improved breast cancer survival. Of the 12 miRNAs, miR-320a, miR-361-5p, miR-21-5p, miR-103a-3p were selected for further analysis. By correlating global gene expression with miRNA expression and then employing miRNA target prediction analysis, we suggest that the four miRNAs may exert protective phenotypes by targeting breast oncogenes that contribute to patient survival. We propose that miR-320a targets the survival-associated genes RAD51, RRP1B, and TDG; miR-361-5p targets ARCN1; and miR-21-5p targets MSH2, RMND5A, STAG2, and UBE2D3. The results of our stringent bioinformatics approach for identifying clinically relevant miRNAs and their targets indicate that miR-320a, miR-361-5p, and miR-21-5p may contribute to breast cancer survival.

  15. Loss of constitutive ABCB1 expression in breast cancer associated with worse prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delou, João Marcos de Azevedo; Vignal, Giselle Maria; Índio-do-Brasil, Vanessa; Accioly, Maria Theresa de Souza; da Silva, Taiana Sousa Lopes; Piranda, Diogo Nascimento; Sobral-Leite, Marcelo; de Carvalho, Marcelo Alex; Capella, Márcia Alves Marques; Vianna-Jorge, Rosane

    2017-01-01

    breast cancer, especially in triple-negative tumors, seems to indicate a subgroup of worse prognosis. PMID:28670140

  16. Liver Cancer Cell of Origin, Molecular Class, and Effects on Patient Prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sia, Daniela; Villanueva, Augusto; Friedman, Scott L; Llovet, Josep M

    2017-03-01

    Primary liver cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide and therefore a major public health challenge. We review hypotheses of the cell of origin of liver tumorigenesis and clarify the classes of liver cancer based on molecular features and how they affect patient prognosis. Primary liver cancer comprises hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (iCCA), and other rare tumors, notably fibrolamellar carcinoma and hepatoblastoma. The molecular and clinical features of HCC versus iCCA are distinct, but these conditions have overlapping risk factors and pathways of oncogenesis. A better understanding of the cell types originating liver cancer can aid in exploring molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis and therapeutic options. Molecular studies have identified adult hepatocytes as the cell of origin. These cells have been proposed to transform directly into HCC cells (via a sequence of genetic alterations), to dedifferentiate into hepatocyte precursor cells (which then become HCC cells that express progenitor cell markers), or to transdifferentiate into biliary-like cells (which give rise to iCCA). Alternatively, progenitor cells also give rise to HCCs and iCCAs with markers of progenitor cells. Advances in genome profiling and next-generation sequencing have led to the classification of HCCs based on molecular features and assigned them to categories such as proliferation-progenitor, proliferation-transforming growth factor β, and Wnt-catenin β1. iCCAs have been assigned to categories of proliferation and inflammation. Overall, proliferation subclasses are associated with a more aggressive phenotype and poor outcome of patients, although more specific signatures have refined our prognostic abilities. Analyses of genetic alterations have identified those that might be targeted therapeutically, such as fusions in the FGFR2 gene and mutations in genes encoding isocitrate dehydrogenases (in approximately 60% of iCCAs) or

  17. Prevalence of molecular subtypes and prognosis of invasive breast cancer in north-east of Morocco: retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennis Sanae

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast carcinoma is known as a heterogeneous disease because gene expression analyses identify several subtypes and the molecular profiles are prognostic and predictive for patients. Our aim, in this study, is to estimate the prevalence of breast cancer subtypes and to determine the relationship between clinico-pathological characteristics, overall survival (OS and disease free survival (DFS for patients coming from north-east of Morocco. Methods We reviewed 366 cases of breast cancer diagnosed between January 2007 to June 2010 at the Department of pathology. Age, size tumor, metastatic profile, node involvement profile, OS and DFS were analyzed on 181 patients. These last parameters were estimated by Kaplan-Meier analysis and log-rank test to estimate outcome differences among subgroups. Results The average age was 45 years, our patients were diagnosed late (57% stage III, 17.5% stage IV with a high average tumor size. Luminal A subtype was more prevalent (53.6% associated with favorable clinic-pathological characteristics, followed by luminal B (16.4%, Her2-overexpressing (12.6%, basal-like (12.6% and unclassified subtype (4.9%. Survival analysis showed a significant difference between subtypes. The triple negative tumors were associated with poor prognosis (49% OS, 39% DFS, whereas the luminal A were associated with a better prognosis (88% OS, 59% DFS. The luminal B and the Her2-overexpressing subtypes were associated with an intermediate prognosis (77% and 75% OS, and 41% and 38% DFS respectively. Conclusion This study showed that molecular classification by immunohistochemistry was necessary for therapeutic decision and prognosis of breast carcinoma. The luminal A subtype was associated with favorable biological characteristics and a better prognosis than triple negative tumors that were associated with a poor prognosis and unfavorable clinic-pathological characteristics.

  18. [Association of peripheral nerve invasion with clinicopathological factors and prognosis of colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dong; Wei, Ying; Wang, Xidi; Wang, Geng; Chen, Yinggang

    2017-01-25

    To investigate the association of peripheral nerve invasion (PNI) with clinicopathological factors and prognosis of colorectal cancer. Clinicopathological data and Surgical specimens of 372 colorectal cancer patients who underwent radical resection from January 2011 to June 2012 in The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University were collected. Histopathological evaluation of tissue samples was conducted with hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections. PNI was considered positive when cancer cells were observed inside the nerve sheath, or when at least 33% of the nerve periphery was surrounded by cancer cells. The relationship between PNI and clinicopathological factors of colorectal cancer was analyzed by χ2 test or Fisher's exact test. Three-year overall survivals of PNI positive and negative patients were determined using the Kaplan-Meier method. Detection results were compared using log-rank test. Of 372 colorectal cancer patients, 133 (35.8%) were PNI positive. Among the PNI positive patients, 63 cases were male and 70 cases female; 76 cases were more than 60 years old and 57 cases less than 60 years old; tumors of 6 cases located in the ileocecal colon, of 33 cases in the ascending colon, of 7 cases in the transverse colon, of 8 cases in the descending colon, of 22 cases in the sigmoid colon, and of 57 cases in the rectum; tumor diameter was greater than 4 cm in 83 cases, and less than 4 cm in 50 cases; tumors of 48 cases were moderately or highly differentiated, and of 85 cases poorly-differentiation; tumor invasion depth in 2 cases, T2 in 7 cases, T3 in 93 cases, T4 in 31 cases; lymphatic metastasis was N0 phase in 56 cases, N1 in 41 cases, and N2 in 36 cases; tumors were stage I( in 2 cases, stage II( in 40 cases, of stage III( in 75 cases and stage IIII( in 16 cases. The positive rate of PNI was significantly associated with tumor location (χ2=11.20, P=0.048), tumor size (χ2=21.80, P=0.000), differentiation (χ2=60.90, P=0.000), depth of

  19. The Effect of Diabetes Mellitus on Lung Cancer Prognosis: A PRISMA-compliant Meta-analysis of Cohort Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Linhai; Cao, Hongxin; Zhang, Tiehong; Shen, Hongchang; Dong, Wei; Wang, Liguang; Du, Jiajun

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies suggested that diabetes mellitus (DM) was associated with risk and mortality of cancer, but studies investigating the correlation between DM and lung cancer prognosis remain controversial. Herein, a meta-analysis was performed to derive a more precise estimate of the prognostic role of DM in lung cancer.Medline and Embase were searched for eligible articles from inception to October 25, 2015. The pooled hazard ratio (HR) with its 95% confidence interval (95% CI) was calculated to evaluate the correlation between DM and lung cancer prognosis. Subgroup meta-analysis was performed based on the histology and the treatment methods.A total of 20 cohort studies from 12 articles were included in the meta-analysis. Also, 16 studies investigated the overall survival (OS) and 4 studies investigated the progression-free survival (PFS). DM was significantly associated with the inferior OS of lung cancer with the pooled HR 1.28 (95% CI: 1.10-1.49, P = 0.001). The association was prominent in the nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) subgroup (HR 1.35, 95%CI: 1.14-1.60, P = 0.002), whereas the association was not significant in the small cell lung cancer (SCLC) subgroup (HR 1.33, 95% CI: 0.87-2.03, P = 0.18). When NSCLC patients were further stratified by treatment methods, DM had more influence on the surgically treated subgroup than the nonsurgically treated subgroup. There was no obvious evidence for publication bias by Begg's and Egger's test.The results of this meta-analysis exhibit an association of DM with inferior prognosis amongst lung cancer patients, especially the surgically treated NSCLC patients. Given the small number of studies included in this meta-analysis, the present conclusion should be consolidated with more high-quality prospective cohort studies or randomized controlled trials.

  20. Pan-Cancer Analyses Reveal Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNAs Relevant to Tumor Diagnosis, Subtyping and Prognosis

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    Travers Ching

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs are a relatively new class of non-coding RNAs that have the potential as cancer biomarkers. To seek a panel of lincRNAs as pan-cancer biomarkers, we have analyzed transcriptomes from over 3300 cancer samples with clinical information. Compared to mRNA, lincRNAs exhibit significantly higher tissue specificities that are then diminished in cancer tissues. Moreover, lincRNA clustering results accurately classify tumor subtypes. Using RNA-Seq data from thousands of paired tumor and adjacent normal samples in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA, we identify six lincRNAs as potential pan-cancer diagnostic biomarkers (PCAN-1 to PCAN-6. These lincRNAs are robustly validated using cancer samples from four independent RNA-Seq data sets, and are verified by qPCR in both primary breast cancers and MCF-7 cell line. Interestingly, the expression levels of these six lincRNAs are also associated with prognosis in various cancers. We further experimentally explored the growth and migration dependence of breast and colon cancer cell lines on two of the identified lncRNAs. In summary, our study highlights the emerging role of lincRNAs as potentially powerful and biologically functional pan-cancer biomarkers and represents a significant leap forward in understanding the biological and clinical functions of lincRNAs in cancers.

  1. Impact of immunohistological subtypes on the long-term prognosis of patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kokoro; Ito, Yoshinori; Matsuura, Masaaki; Fukada, Ippei; Horii, Rie; Takahashi, Shunji; Akiyama, Futoshi; Iwase, Takuji; Hozumi, Yasuo; Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Hatake, Kiyohiko

    2016-07-01

    Although improved long-term prognoses for patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) have been demonstrated, few reports address overall survival (OS) with sufficient follow-up. Furthermore, the relevance of immunohistological subtypes to OS in MBC has not been clarified. We evaluated, retrospectively, the OS of patients who had been initiated on systemic therapy for MBC between 2000 and 2008. The subjects of this study were 527 patients with MBC treated by systemic therapy. The median survival time (MST) was 55.5 months. The MST for each immunohistological subtype was as follows: luminal, 59.9 months; luminal-HER2, not reached; triple-negative, 18.6 months; and HER2-enriched, 49.9 months. According to multivariate analysis, metastasis-free intervals of ≥2 years and treatment with anthracycline for MBC were predictive of better OS. The predictors of shorter OS included disease progression after first-line treatment for MBC, triple-negative, and all histological factors, except papillotubular carcinoma, with liver metastasis, and having three or more initial metastatic sites. The prognosis of the patients with MBC in this series was better than that reported before 2000, which is probably attributable to the use of novel, improved pharmacological agents. For example, luminal-HER2 tumors can be treated using both aromatase inhibitors and trastuzumab. Because of the lower toxicities, it is now possible to administer these agents for longer periods, resulting in better prognoses.

  2. Elevated expression of Thoc1 is associated with aggressive phenotype and poor prognosis in colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chenchen; Yue, Ben; Yuan, Chenwei; Zhao, Senlin; Fang, Changyi; Yu, Yang; Yan, Dongwang, E-mail: yandw70@163.com

    2015-12-04

    The THO complex 1 (Thoc1) is a nuclear matrix protein playing vital roles in transcription elongation and mRNA export. Recently, aberrant expression of Thoc1 has been reported in an increasing array of tumor types. However, the clinical significance of Thoc1 expression in colorectal cancer (CRC) is still unknown. The present study aimed to characterize the expression of Thoc1 in human CRC and evaluate its clinical significance. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting analyses showed that the mRNA and protein expression of Thoc1 in CRC specimens was significantly higher than that in adjacent normal colon mucosae. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was conducted to characterize the expression pattern of Thoc1 in 185 archived paraffin-embedded CRC specimens. Statistical analyses revealed that high levels of Thoc1 expression were associated with the clinical stages and tumor differentiation. CRC patients with high levels of Thoc1 expression had poorer overall-survival and disease-free survival, whereas those with lower levels of Thoc1 expression survived longer. Furthermore, multivariate Cox regression analyses demonstrated that Thoc1 expression remained an independent prognostic factor for increased disease recurrence and decreased survival. Our results suggest for the first time that Thoc1 is involved in the development and progression of CRC, and elevated expression of Thoc1 is associated with aggressive phenotype and poor prognosis in CRC. These findings may prove to be clinically useful for developing a new therapeutic target of CRC treatment.

  3. Increased angiogenesis and FGFR protein expression indicate a favourable prognosis in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertz, Simone; Abeé, Christine; Schwarz-Furlan, Stephan; Alfer, Joachim; Hofstädter, Ferdinand; Stoehr, Robert; Hartmann, Arndt; Gaumann, Andreas K A

    2014-12-01

    Compared to other members of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) family, only few studies investigate FGFR3 in tumour angiogenesis. We investigated the connection between angiogenesis and FGF/FGFR expression including FGFR3 mutation status in urothelial carcinomas. Immunohistochemistry was performed in invasive and non-invasive urothelial cancers of 61 patients. Protein expression of CD31, factor VIII (FVIII), FGF-1/2, FGFR1, FGFR3 and FGFR4 and FGFR3 mutation status were evaluated. Morphometric assessment of angiogenesis including microvessel count (MVC) and vascular surface area (VSA) was analysed. Correlation and survival analyses (overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS)) with univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. CD31 values (MVC and VSA) significantly correlated with OS and DFS. OS and DFS were significantly better in patients with FGFR3 overexpression. Multivariate analysis revealed FGFR3 protein expression and tumour grading (WHO classification 2004) as independent prognostic factors of OS and VSA of CD31 and FGFR3 protein expression of DFS. FGFR3 mutation status was correlated with VSA measured by FVIII. FGFR3 may be able to induce a pro-angiogenic phenotype in urothelial carcinomas and significantly influence prognosis. Consequently, FGFR3 is a potential therapeutic target also from the angiogenesis perspective.

  4. Data mining and medical world: breast cancers' diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskouei, Rozita Jamili; Kor, Nasroallah Moradi; Maleki, Saeid Abbasi

    2017-01-01

    The amount of data in electronic and real world is constantly on the rise. Therefore, extracting useful knowledge from the total available data is very important and time consuming task. Data mining has various techniques for extracting valuable information or knowledge from data. These techniques are applicable for all data that are collected inall fields of science. Several research investigations are published about applications of data mining in various fields of sciences such as defense, banking, insurances, education, telecommunications, medicine and etc. This investigation attempts to provide a comprehensive survey about applications of data mining techniques in breast cancer diagnosis, treatment & prognosis till now. Further, the main challenges in these area is presented in this investigation. Since several research studies currently are going on in this issues, therefore, it is necessary to have a complete survey about all researches which are completed up to now, along with the results of those studies and important challenges which are currently exist in this area for helping young researchers and presenting to them the main problems that are still exist in this area.

  5. [Influence of Body Mass Index on management and prognosis of women with endometrial cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, S; Duquesne, M; Marret, H; Body, G; Ouldamer, L

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of surgery, postoperative morbidity and prognosis of patients with endometrial cancer in function of the body mass index (BMI). The study cohort consisted of consecutive women undergoing surgery for endometrial cancer in our institution between January 2000, and September 2012. Individual records of all patients were reviewed and analyzed. Patient BMI was categorized as underweight, normal, overweight and obese. A total of 192 patients were evaluated. Patients were followed for one to 153months with a mean of 52.56months. The mean BMI and the range of each of the BMI categories were 16.97kg/m(2) (14-18), 22.97kg/m(2) (20-24.9), 27.61kg/m(2) (25.7-29.4), 37.34kg/m(2) (30-71). Women with higher BMI were more frequently affected by hypertension (8.3%, 31.43%, 58.13% and 59.7% respectively, Pobese group there were significantly higher peroperative blood loss (P=0.01), more wound abces (P=0.05), more eventration (P=0.02) and more reinterventions for complications (P=0.03). Patients had the same protocols of treatment (surgery and adjuvant treatment) and histological characteristics were the same between groups but obese patients had much less positive lymph nodes (P=0.03). There were no statistically significant difference in overall 5-years survival between groups (P=0.54) DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrate a survival equivalency for obese and non-obese women even though obese women showed less positive lymph nodes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Variant histology: role in management and prognosis of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porten, Sima P; Willis, Daniel; Kamat, Ashish M

    2014-09-01

    The true clinical significance of variant histology is controversial and diagnosis is challenging, especially in the setting of nonmuscle invasive (NMI) disease. If the presence of variant architecture in NMI identifies a high-risk population with a worse prognosis and better suited for early aggressive intervention (i.e., radical cystectomy), then treatment recommendations should reflect this notion. This review outlines the current evidence and determines whether histologic variants should change management of patients with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. Patients with high-risk NMI tumors and variant histology should be offered early cystectomy, especially if harboring pure squamous, adenocarcinoma, sarcomatoid, plasmacytoid, or micropapillary disease. In patients with small cell disease, systemic primary chemotherapy is the ideal option followed by local therapy for primary tumor control. For squamous/glandular differentiation, nested variant, and other rare variants, intravesical therapy is an option based on standard risk stratification in patients with NMI disease. Diligence is needed in the presence of variant histology to minimize the risk of understaging as well as close surveillance to not compromise the opportunity of cure. The management of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer with variant histology is challenging, largely in part to the high risk of understaging and the background of already existing controversy regarding the management of high-risk NMI disease for standard urothelial cell carcinoma (early cystectomy vs. intravesical therapy). Future studies should be focused identifying if variant architecture confers different tumor biology than that of pure urothelial carcinoma, and if this difference translates into innovations in bladder sparing therapies.

  7. Neural network cascade optimizes microRNA biomarker selection for nasopharyngeal cancer prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenliang Zhu

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs have been shown to be promising biomarkers in predicting cancer prognosis. However, inappropriate or poorly optimized processing and modeling of miRNA expression data can negatively affect prediction performance. Here, we propose a holistic solution for miRNA biomarker selection and prediction model building. This work introduces the use of a neural network cascade, a cascaded constitution of small artificial neural network units, for evaluating miRNA expression and patient outcome. A miRNA microarray dataset of nasopharyngeal carcinoma was retrieved from Gene Expression Omnibus to illustrate the methodology. Results indicated a nonlinear relationship between miRNA expression and patient death risk, implying that direct comparison of expression values is inappropriate. However, this method performs transformation of miRNA expression values into a miRNA score, which linearly measures death risk. Spearman correlation was calculated between miRNA scores and survival status for each miRNA. Finally, a nine-miRNA signature was optimized to predict death risk after nasopharyngeal carcinoma by establishing a neural network cascade consisting of 13 artificial neural network units. Area under the ROC was 0.951 for the internal validation set and had a prediction accuracy of 83% for the external validation set. In particular, the established neural network cascade was found to have strong immunity against noise interference that disturbs miRNA expression values. This study provides an efficient and easy-to-use method that aims to maximize clinical application of miRNAs in prognostic risk assessment of patients with cancer.

  8. Downregulation of ALDOB is associated with poor prognosis of patients with gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He J

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Jun He,1 Yi Jin,1 Yuan Chen,2 Hai-Bo Yao,1 Ying-Jie Xia,3 Ying-Yu Ma,4 Wei Wang,2 Qin-Shu Shao1 1Department of Gastroenterology and Pancreatic Surgery, 2Department of Pathology, 3Key Laboratory of Gastroenterology of Zhejiang Province, 4Clinic Research Institute, Zhejiang Provincial People’s Hospital, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China Objectives: To examine the expression of ALDOB in gastric cancer (GC tissue and to reveal its potential clinicopathological and prognostic significance.Materials and methods: We screened for genes that were differentially expressed between GC and nontumor tissues using a microarray, specifically the Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 Array platform. We then verified the transcriptional and translational levels of ALDOB by performing quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC. In addition, a merged data set based on the Gene Expression Omnibus was generated and a survival analysis performed.Results: The microarray analysis revealed that ALDOB was downregulated (more than sevenfold in GC compared with nontumor tissue. Both qRT-PCR and IHC validated the decrease of ALDOB in GC tissue. Moreover, we found that the expression of ALDOB was significantly related to tumor-invasion depth, lymph-node metastasis, distant metastasis, and TNM stage. The survival analysis, based on the IHC and merged data set, indicated that the overall survival was better in patients with high ALDOB expression. The Cox regression analysis showed that ALDOB expression was an independent prognostic factor for GC.Conclusion: The expression of ALDOB in GC tissue was significantly related to the clinicopathological features and prognosis of the disease, thus suggesting that ALDOB could act as a novel molecular marker for GC. Keywords: ALDOB, gastric cancer, microarray analysis, molecular marker

  9. Bone morphogenetic protein and Notch signalling crosstalk in poor-prognosis, mesenchymal-subtype colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irshad, Shazia; Bansal, Mukesh; Guarnieri, Paolo; Davis, Hayley; Al Haj Zen, Ayman; Baran, Brygida; Pinna, Claudia Maria Assunta; Rahman, Haseeb; Biswas, Sujata; Bardella, Chiara; Jeffery, Rosemary; Wang, Lai Mun; East, James Edward; Tomlinson, Ian; Lewis, Annabelle; Leedham, Simon John

    2017-06-01

    The functional role of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling in colorectal cancer (CRC) is poorly defined, with contradictory results in cancer cell line models reflecting the inherent difficulties of assessing a signalling pathway that is context-dependent and subject to genetic constraints. By assessing the transcriptional response of a diploid human colonic epithelial cell line to BMP ligand stimulation, we generated a prognostic BMP signalling signature, which was applied to multiple CRC datasets to investigate BMP heterogeneity across CRC molecular subtypes. We linked BMP and Notch signalling pathway activity and function in human colonic epithelial cells, and normal and neoplastic tissue. BMP induced Notch through a γ-secretase-independent interaction, regulated by the SMAD proteins. In homeostasis, BMP/Notch co-localization was restricted to cells at the top of the intestinal crypt, with more widespread interaction in some human CRC samples. BMP signalling was downregulated in the majority of CRCs, but was conserved specifically in mesenchymal-subtype tumours, where it interacts with Notch to induce an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype. In intestinal homeostasis, BMP-Notch pathway crosstalk is restricted to differentiating cells through stringent pathway segregation. Conserved BMP activity and loss of signalling stringency in mesenchymal-subtype tumours promotes a synergistic BMP-Notch interaction, and this correlates with poor patient prognosis. BMP signalling heterogeneity across CRC subtypes and cell lines can account for previous experimental contradictions. Crosstalk between the BMP and Notch pathways will render mesenchymal-subtype CRC insensitive to γ-secretase inhibition unless BMP activation is concomitantly addressed. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley

  10. Round one of the Adelaide and Meath Hospital/Trinity College Colorectal Cancer Screening Programme: programme report and analysis based on established international key performance indices.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNamara, D

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: In Ireland, colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most frequently diagnosed cancer in men, after prostate cancer, and the second most frequently diagnosed cancer in women, after breast cancer. By 2020, the number of new cases diagnosed annually in Ireland is projected to have increased by 79% in men and 56% in women. Organised screening for CRC is already underway or is in the process of being rolled out in several European countries, either at a regional or national level. The Adelaide and Meath Hospital\\/ Trinity College Dublin Colorectal Cancer Screening Programme (TTC-CRC-SP) is Ireland\\'s first pilot population based bowel screening programme. METHOD: Based on a biennial test model the pilot aimed to assess the accuracy of FIT and to evaluate the whole programme based on established international key performance indices. RESULTS: To date 9,993 individuals aged 50-74 years have been invited to participate in the TTC-CRC-SP with over 5,000 FIT\\'s analysed. Overall uptake was 51% and FIT positivity was 10%. The programme has undertaken over 400 screening colonoscopies and detected 154 precancerous adenomas and 38 cancerous lesions. CONCLUSIONS: The first round of The Adelaide and Meath Hospital Tallaght\\/Trinity College Dublin Colorectal Cancer Screening Programme has been highly successful and confirmed that there is an advantage for FIT based two stage bowel cancer screening programmes.

  11. Round one of the Adelaide and Meath Hospital/Trinity College Colorectal Cancer Screening Programme: programme report and analysis based on established international key performance indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, D; Qasim, A; Lee, N; Condon, C; O'Morain, C

    2011-06-01

    In Ireland, colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most frequently diagnosed cancer in men, after prostate cancer, and the second most frequently diagnosed cancer in women, after breast cancer. By 2020, the number of new cases diagnosed annually in Ireland is projected to have increased by 79% in men and 56% in women. Organised screening for CRC is already underway or is in the process of being rolled out in several European countries, either at a regional or national level. The Adelaide and Meath Hospital/ Trinity College Dublin Colorectal Cancer Screening Programme (TTC-CRC-SP) is Ireland's first pilot population based bowel screening programme. Based on a biennial test model the pilot aimed to assess the accuracy of FIT and to evaluate the whole programme based on established international key performance indices. To date 9,993 individuals aged 50-74 years have been invited to participate in the TTC-CRC-SP with over 5,000 FIT's analysed. Overall uptake was 51% and FIT positivity was 10%. The programme has undertaken over 400 screening colonoscopies and detected 154 precancerous adenomas and 38 cancerous lesions. The first round of The Adelaide and Meath Hospital Tallaght/Trinity College Dublin Colorectal Cancer Screening Programme has been highly successful and confirmed that there is an advantage for FIT based two stage bowel cancer screening programmes.

  12. A Genetic Polymorphism (rs17251221 in the Calcium-Sensing Receptor is Associated with Breast Cancer Susceptibility and Prognosis

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    Xiaoyan Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR is a typical G protein coupled receptor. The rs17251221 SNP is located in an intron of the CaSR gene, and the G allele is considered a gain of function mutation. Previous studies revealed that rs17251221 polymorphisms contribute to the risk of developing certain types of cancers. This study investigated the rs17251221 SNP in breast cancer by analyzing the correlation of the rs17251221 genotype with breast cancer susceptibility, clinicopathological features and prognosis. Methods: A TaqMan assay was used to genotype the rs17251221 SNP in a case-control study. The expression levels of CaSR in breast cancer tissues were determined using quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR and western blot analysis. The association of the rs17251221 genotype and the clinicopathological characteristics, as well as the prognosis of the breast cancer patient, was assessed statistically. Results: We found that the AG and GG genotypes were associated with lower mRNA and protein levels of CaSR compared to the AA genotype in breast cancer tissues. We also found that the AG and GG genotypes were associated with breast cancer susceptibility, the patient's age at diagnosis, tumor size, lymph node metastasis and estrogen receptor status of breast cancer tissue. More importantly, we found that the genotypes were prognostic markers for both disease-free survival and overall survival of breast cancer. Conclusion: The rs17251221 SNP is a risk factor associated with breast cancer susceptibility, as well as a prognostic indicator. Our data suggest that rs17251221 may be a potential therapeutic target in breast cancer.

  13. Psychological effects of a cosmetic education programme in patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H Y; Kim, J H; Choi, S; Kang, E; Oh, S; Kim, J Y; Kim, S W

    2015-07-01

    Treatments for breast cancer often include interventions related to psychosocial issues such as negative body image, loss of femininity, and low self-esteem. We identified the psychological effects of a cosmetics education programme in patients with breast cancer. Cosmetic programme is a specific care designed to help patients handle appearance-related side effects. Thirty-one women with breast cancer at a university hospital in South Korea who received a cosmetics education programme were compared with 29 subjects in a control group who received the treatment as usual. Psychological factors including distress, self-esteem, and sexual functioning were assessed three times (before and after the programme, and at the 1-month follow-up). After the programme, patients in the treatment group were significantly less likely than those in the control group to rely on distress (P = 0.038) and avoidance coping (P cosmetics education programme for reducing distress and reliance on negative coping strategies. Implementing a cosmetics programme for patients with breast cancer may encourage patients to control negative psychological factors. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Loss of constitutive ABCB1 expression in breast cancer associated with worse prognosis

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    Delou JM

    2017-06-01

    histopathological variables was also evaluated. The Kaplan–Meier curves and multivariate Cox regression analyses were conducted to identify independent predictors of disease-free survival of patients with breast cancer. ABCB1 was detected in 86.3% (656 of breast tumors, 98.8% (606 of nonmalignant mammary tissue adjacent to tumors, and 100% (28 of benign lesions. Reduced ABCB1 protein levels in breast tumors was associated with triple-negative subtype (adjusted odds ratio [ORadj] =0.24; 95% confidence interval [CI] =0.13–0.45, lymph node status < pN2 (ORadj =0.27; 95% CI =0.10–0.71, tumor size >2 cm (ORadj =0.55; 95% CI =0.32–0.93, and hypertensive status (ORadj =0.42; 95% CI =0.24–0.73, and it was significantly associated with shorter disease-free survival, either for all breast cancer patients (p log-rank =0.012; hazard ratio [HR] =3.46; 95% CI =1.21–9.91 or for those with triple-negative tumors (p log-rank =0.007; HR =11.41; 95% CI =1.29–100.67. The loss of constitutive ABCB1 expression in breast cancer, especially in triple-negative tumors, seems to indicate a subgroup of worse prognosis. Keywords: multidrug resistance, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, immunohistochemistry, disease-free survival, triple-negative breast cancer, hypertension

  15. ColoGuideEx: a robust gene classifier specific for stage II colorectal cancer prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agesen, Trude H; Sveen, Anita; Merok, Marianne A; Lind, Guro E; Nesbakken, Arild; Skotheim, Rolf I; Lothe, Ragnhild A

    2012-11-01

    Several clinical factors have an impact on prognosis in stage II colorectal cancer (CRC), but as yet they are inadequate for risk assessment. The present study aimed to develop a gene expression classifier for improved risk stratification of patients with stage II CRC. 315 CRC samples were included in the study. Gene expression measurements from 207 CRC samples (stage I-IV) from two independent Norwegian clinical series were obtained using Affymetrix exon-level microarrays. Differentially expressed genes between stage I and stage IV samples from the test series were identified and used as input for L1 (lasso) penalised Cox proportional hazards analyses of patients with stage II CRC from the same series. A second validation was performed in 108 stage II CRC samples from other populations (USA and Australia). An optimal 13-gene expression classifier (PIGR, CXCL13, MMP3, TUBA1B, SESN1, AZGP1, KLK6, EPHA7, SEMA3A, DSC3, CXCL10, ENPP3, BNIP3) for prediction of relapse among patients with stage II CRC was developed using a consecutive Norwegian test series from patients treated according to current standard protocols (n=44, p<0.001, HR=18.2), and its predictive value was successfully validated for patients with stage II CRC in a second Norwegian CRC series collected two decades previously (n=52, p=0.02, HR=3.6). Further validation of the classifier was obtained in a recent external dataset of patients with stage II CRC from other populations (n=108, p=0.001, HR=6.5). Multivariate Cox regression analyses, including all three sample series and various clinicopathological variables, confirmed the independent prognostic value of the classifier (p≤0.004). The classifier was shown to be specific to stage II CRC and does not provide prognostic stratification of patients with stage III CRC. This study presents the development and validation of a 13-gene expression classifier, ColoGuideEx, for prognosis prediction specific to patients with stage II CRC. The robustness was shown

  16. [Discovery and verification of matrix gla protein, a TNM staging and prognosis-related biomarker for gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lei; Guo, Xiao-bo; Jiang, Jin-ling; Zhang, Jia-nian; Ji, Jun; Liu, Bing-ya; Zhu, Zheng-gang; Yu, Ying-yan

    2010-07-01

    To analyze microarray datasets deposited in the public database and to identify TNM associated genes in gastric cancers. Microarray datasets of gastric cancer were selected from GEO database. Differentially expressed genes related to TNM staging were evaluated by significant analysis of the microarray using MultiExperiment Viewer (MEV) platform. Candidate gene expressions in gastric cancer tissues and cell lines were verified by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), quantitative RT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry. GES4007 dataset was re-analyzed leading to the identification of 14 genes associated with TNM staging. Over-expression of matrix gla protein (MGP) was confirmed in gastric cancer cell lines and tumor tissues by quantitative RT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Increased MGP expression was found in 22 of 54 cases of (40.7%) gastric cancer specimens compared to the normal gastric tissues. The up-regulation of MGP mRNA expression closely correlated with TNM stage (P = 0.001) and prognosis (P = 0.006). Public databases of microarray studies are the valuable resources for data mining. MGP has been identified and confirmed as a novel biomarker for the TNM stage and prognosis of gastric cancer.

  17. The GADD45A (1506T>C Polymorphism Is Associated with Ovarian Cancer Susceptibility and Prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunzhong Yuan

    Full Text Available GADD45A (growth arrest and DNA damage 45 A is the first stress-inducible gene identified to be a target of p53. However, no studies to date have assessed variants of the GADD45 gene and their potential relationship to tumor susceptibility. We investigated the association of the GADD45A (1506T>C polymorphism with ovarian cancer development in 258 ovarian cancer patients and 332 age-matched healthy women as controls using sequence analysis. We found a statistically significant difference in the GADD45A (1506T>C genotype distributions between the case and control groups (TT vs. TC vs. CC, P = 0.0021 and found that variant 1506T>C was significantly associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer (PC polymorphism is associated with ovarian cancer susceptibility and prognosis. These data suggest that GADD45A (1506T>C is a new tumor susceptibility gene and could be a useful molecular marker for assessing ovarian cancer risk and for predicting ovarian cancer patient prognosis.

  18. Effect of endoscopy screening on stage at gastric cancer diagnosis: results of the National Cancer Screening Programme in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, K S; Jun, J K; Suh, M; Park, B; Noh, D K; Song, S H; Jung, K W; Lee, H-Y; Choi, I J; Park, E-C

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although gastric cancer screening is common among countries with a high prevalence of gastric cancer, there is little data to support the effectiveness of this screening. This study was designed to determine the differences in stage at diagnosis of gastric cancer according to the screening history and screening method (upper gastrointestinal series (UGIS) vs endoscopy). Methods: The study population was derived from the National Cancer Screening Programme (NCSP), a nationwide orga...

  19. The relationship between positive peritoneal cytology and the prognosis of patients with FIGO stage I/II uterine cervical cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kuji, Shiho; Hirashima, Yasuyuki; Komeda, Satomi; Tanaka, Aki; Abe, Masakazu; Takahashi, Nobutaka; Takekuma, Munetaka

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to assess whether peritoneal cytology has prognostic significance in uterine cervical cancer. Methods Peritoneal cytology was obtained in 228 patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics [FIGO] stages IB1-IIB) between October 2002 and August 2010. All patients were negative for intraperitoneal disease at the time of their radical hysterectomy. The pathological features and clinical prognosis of cas...

  20. Family history of cancer other than breast or ovarian cancer in first-degree relatives is associated with poor breast cancer prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jun-Long; Chen, Chuang; Yuan, Jing-Ping; Li, Juan-Juan; Sun, Sheng-Rong

    2017-04-01

    Whether a first-degree family history of others cancers (FHOC) than breast or ovarian cancer (BOC) is associated with breast cancer prognosis remains unknown. Thus, the aim of the present study was to clarify this issue. Women who were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer at the Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University from 2010 to 2013 were included in the study. The demographic and clinicopathological characteristics of these patients were extracted. FHOC was considered positive for any patient who had a relative who had been diagnosed with cancer other than BOC. Disease-free survival (DFS) was calculated based on the date of diagnosis. DFS was analyzed using the Cox proportional hazards model. A total of 434 breast cancer patients were included in this study. Among these patients, 61 (14.06%) had a positive FHOC in first-degree relatives. Patients with a positive FHOC tended to have HER2-positive breast cancer (p = 0.03). In the survival analysis, FHOC was associated with poor DFS in both univariate (HR = 2.21 (1.28-3.83), 95% CI: 1.28-3.83, p breast cancer patients with FHOC, especially in patients with luminal A subtype. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Aurora-A identifies early recurrence and poor prognosis and promises a potential therapeutic target in triple negative breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Xu

    Full Text Available Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC acquires an unfavorable prognosis, emerging as a major challenge for the treatment of breast cancer. In the present study, 122 TNBC patients were subjected to analysis of Aurora-A (Aur-A expression and survival prognosis. We found that Aur-A high expression was positively associated with initial clinical stage (P = 0.025, the proliferation marker Ki-67 (P = 0.001, and the recurrence rate of TNBC patients (P<0.001. In TNBC patients with Aur-A high expression, the risk of distant recurrence peaked at the first 3 years and declined rapidly thereafter, whereas patients with Aur-A low expression showed a relatively constant risk of recurrence during the entire follow-up period. Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that overexpression of Aur-A predicted poor overall survival (P = 0.002 and progression-free survival (P = 0.012 in TNBC. Furthermore, overexpression of Aur-A, associated with high Ki-67, predicted an inferior prognosis compared with low expression of both Aur-A and Ki-67. Importantly, we further found that Aur-A was overexpressed in TNBC cells, and inhibition of this kinase inhibited cell proliferation and prevented cell migration in TNBC. Our findings demonstrated that Aur-A was a potential therapeutic target for TNBC and inhibition of Aur-A kinase was a promising regimen for TNBC cancer therapy.

  2. Prediction of the prognosis of breast cancer in routine histologic specimens using a simplified, low-cost gene expression signature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcell, S.A.; Balazs, A.; Emese, A.

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of the prognosis of breast cancer in routine histologic specimens using a simplified, low-cost gene expression signature Background: Grade 2 breast carcinomas do not form a uniform prognostic group. Aim: To extend the number of patients and the investigated genes of a previously...... identified prognostic signature described by the authors that reflect chromosomal instability in order to refine characterization of grade 2 breast cancers and identify driver genes. Methods: Using publicly available databases, the authors selected 9 target and 3 housekeeping genes that are capable to divide...

  3. A high level of estrogen-stimulated proteins selects breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant endocrine therapy with good prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    L H Weischenfeldt, Katrine; Kirkegaard, Tove; Rasmussen, Birgitte B

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adjuvant endocrine therapy has significantly improved survival of estrogen receptor α (ER)-positive breast cancer patients, but around 20% relapse within 10 years. High expression of ER-stimulated proteins like progesterone receptor (PR), Bcl-2 and insulin-like growth factor receptor I...... (IGF-IR) is a marker for estrogen-driven cell growth. Therefore, patients with high tumor levels of these proteins may have particularly good prognosis following adjuvant endocrine therapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Archival tumor tissue was available from 1323 of 1396 Danish breast cancer patients...

  4. Assessment of variation in immunosuppressive pathway genes reveals TGFBR2 to be associated with prognosis of estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer after chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Lei (Jieping); A. Rudolph (Anja); K.B. Moysich (Kirsten); M. Rafiq (Meena); T.W. Behrens (Timothy); E.L. Goode (Ellen); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); P. Seibold (Petra); P.A. Fasching (Peter); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); V. Kristensen (Vessela); F.J. Couch (Fergus); U. Hamann (Ute); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); U. Eilber (Ursula); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); J. Dennis (Joe); Q. Wang (Qing); A. Lindblom (Annika); A. Mannermaa (Arto); D. Lambrechts (Diether); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); P. Hall (Per); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); M. Shah (Mitul); R.N. Luben (Robert); L. Haeberle (Lothar); A.B. Ekici (Arif); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); J.A. Knight (Julia); G. Glendon (Gord); S. Tchatchou (Sandrine); G.G. Alnæs (Grethe); A.-L. Borresen-Dale (Anne-Lise); S. Nord (Silje); J.E. Olson (Janet); B. Hallberg (Boubou); C. Vachon (Celine); D. Torres (Diana); H.U. Ulmer (Hans); T. Rud̈iger (Thomas); A. Jager (Agnes); C.H.M. van Deurzen (Carolien); M.M.A. Tilanus-Linthorst (Madeleine); T.A. Muranen (Taru); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C. Blomqvist (Carl); S. Margolin (Sara); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J.M. Hartikainen (J.); V. Kataja (Vesa); S. Hatse (Sigrid); H. Wildiers (Hans); A. Smeets (Ann); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); J. Lissowska (Jolanta); J. Li (Jingmei); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); K.-A. Phillips (Kelly-Anne); S.C. Linn (Sabine); S. Cornelissen (Sten); S.A.J. van den Broek (Sandra Alexandra); D. Kang (Daehee); J.-Y. Choi (J.); S.K. Park (Sue); K.Y. Yoo; C.-N. Hsiung (Chia-Ni); P.-E. Wu (Pei-Ei); M.-F. Hou (Ming-Feng); C-Y. Shen (Chen-Yang); S.-H. Teo; N.A.M. Taib (Nur Aishah Mohd); C.-H. Yip (Cheng-Har); G.F. Ho (Gwo Fuang); K. Matsuo (Keitaro); H. Ito (Hidemi); H. Iwata (Hisato); K. Tajima (Kazuo); A.M. Dunning (Alison); J. Benítez (Javier); K. Czene (Kamila); L. Sucheston (Lara); T. Maishman (Tom); W. Tapper (William); D. Eccles (Diana); D.F. Easton (Douglas); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Tumor lymphocyte infiltration is associated with clinical response to chemotherapy in estrogen receptor (ER) negative breast cancer. To identify variants in immunosuppressive pathway genes associated with prognosis after adjuvant chemotherapy for ER-negative patients, we

  5. Natural history of breast cancers detected in the Swedish mammography screening programme: a cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahl, Per-Henrik; Gøtzsche, Peter C; Mæhlen, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The natural history of screen-detected breast cancers is not well understood. A previous analysis of the incidence change during the introduction of the Norwegian screening programme in the late 1990s suggested that the natural history of many screen-detected invasive breast cancers is to regress...

  6. The impact of a breast cancer screening programme on quality-adjusted life-years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haes, J. C.; de Koning, H. J.; van Oortmarssen, G. J.; van Agt, H. M.; de Bruyn, A. E.; van der Maas, P. J.

    1991-01-01

    Trials have shown that breast cancer screening is effective in reducing breast cancer mortality and gaining life-years. The question is whether taking into account the impact of a screening programme on quality of life would lead to a less positive view. Screening may have effects on quality of life

  7. Association between raf kinase inhibitor protein loss and prognosis in cancers of the digestive system: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Min; Wang, Qian; Ding, Jiang-Wu; Yang, Zhen; Xie, Chuan; Lu, Nong-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Loss of Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) may contribute to metastasis in a variety of human cancers. Many studies have evaluated whether loss of RKIP expression is a prognostic factor for survival in cancers of the digestive system, however, its predictive value remains controversial. Thus, we performed a meta-analysis to obtain a more comprehensive estimate of the prognostic value of RKIP expression in digestive system cancers. Studies were identified by searching multiple electronic databases through December 12, 2013, and by reviewing reference lists of obtained articles. Studies reported hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between RKIP and overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) in cancers of the digestive system were eligible, including esophageal cancer, gastric cancer, colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer. Nineteen studies involving approximately 3700 participants were included in the final analysis. The pooled results suggested that loss of RKIP expression was associated with unfavorable OS (HR 0.55, 95% CI 0.46-0.65) and DFS (HR 0.46, 95% CI 0.30-0.62) among patients with digestive system cancers, whereas the difference was not statistically significant in pancreatic cancer specifically (OS, HR 0.76; 95% CI 0.51-1.01; DFS, HR 0.71; 95% CI 0.28-1.13). Loss of RKIP expression might be an independent indicator of poor prognosis in patients with digestive tract cancers, which includes esophageal cancer, gastric cancer and colorectal cancer. More studies are needed to further clarify the prognostic value of RKIP in pancreatic cancer. Future studies, preferably large prospective studies utilizing formal marker assessment processes, are needed to establish the prognostic value of RKIP before these results can be clinically applied.

  8. Serum pleiotrophin could be an early indicator for diagnosis and prognosis of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zi-Yan; Shi, Min-Hua; Ji, Cheng-Hong; Yu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN), an angiogenic factor, is associated with various types of cancer, including lung cancer. Our aim was to investigate the possibility of using serum PTN as an early indicator regarding disease diagnosis, classification and prognosis, for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Significant differences among PTN levels in patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC, n=40), NSCLC (n=136), and control subjects with benign pulmonary lesions (n=21), as well as patients with different pathological subtypes of NSCLC were observed. A serum level of PTN of 300.1 ng/ml, was determined as the cutoff value differentiating lung cancer patients and controls, with a sensitivity and specificity of 78.4% and 66.7%, respectively. Negative correlations between serum PTN level and pathological differentiation level, stage, and survival time were observed in our cohort of patients with NSCLC. In addition, specific elevation of PTN levels in pulmonary tissue in and around NSCLC lesions in comparison to normal pulmonary tissue obtained from the same subjects was also observed (n=2). This study suggests that the serum PTN level of patients with NSCLC could be an early indicator for diagnosis and prognosis. This conclusion should be further assessed in randomized clinical trials.

  9. Role of family history and tumor location on prognosis of patients with colorectal cancer and synchronous metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuseppe, Colloca; Antonella, Venturino

    2017-07-01

    Family history of colorectal cancer and tumor location along colon-rectum have been reported as prognostic factors. The aim of the current study is to analyze the role of both on overall survival in a series of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer with synchronous metastases. A retrospective mono-institutional analysis has been performed on patients, who received chemotherapy from 2004 to 2008. A Cox proportional-hazards regression was used to calculate hazard ratio (HR) for death, after adjustment for other variables (tumor metastasectomy, number of organs involved with metastases, number of anti-neoplastic drugs, age, sex, tumor grade, baseline CEA). Two hundred and seven patients were included in the study. Only tumor metastasectomy was related with a better overall survival (HR 4.995; P history was associated with a poor prognosis (HR 0.386; P = 0.021). After exclusion of rectal tumors, the negative prognostic effect of a positive family history appeared limited to patients with a left-sided colon cancer (HR 0.183; P = 0.036). Family history for colorectal cancer in a first-degree relative, and not tumor location, has a significant relationship with the prognosis of patients with a colorectal cancer and synchronous metastases.

  10. Nestin expression associates with poor prognosis and triple negative phenotype in locally advanced (T4 breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Piras

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Nestin, an intermediate filament protein, has traditionally been noted for its importance as a neural stem cell marker. However, in recent years, expression of nestin has shown to be associated with general proliferation of progenitor cell populations within neoplasms. There is no reported study addressing nestin expression in T4 breast cancer patients. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate, through immunohistochemistry, the expression and distribution of nestin in T4 breast cancer, in order to determine its association with clinical and pathological parameters as well as with patients’ outcome. Nestin was detectable in tumoral cells and in endothelial cells of blood microvessels, and it is significantly expressed in triple-negative and in inflammatory breast cancer (IBC subgroups of T4 breast tumours. The Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the presence of nestin in tumoral cells significantly predicted poor prognosis at 5-years survival (P=0.02 and with borderline significance at 10-years of survival (P=0.05 in T4 breast cancer patients. On the basis of these observations, we speculate that nestin expression may characterize tumours with an aggressive clinical behavior, suggesting that the presence of nestin in tumoral cells and vessels may be considered an important factor that leads to a poor prognosis. Further studies are awaited to define the biological role of nestin in the etiology of these subgroups of breast cancers.

  11. Cervical cancer screening in Europe: Quality assurance and organisation of programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfström, K Miriam; Arnheim-Dahlström, Lisen; von Karsa, Lawrence; Dillner, Joakim

    2015-05-01

    Cervical screening programmes have reduced cervical cancer incidence and mortality but the level of success is highly variable between countries. Organisation of programmes is essential for equity and cost-effectiveness. However, there are differences in effectiveness, also among organised programmes. In order to identify the key organisational components that determine effectiveness, we performed a Europe-wide survey on the current status of organisation and organised quality assurance (QA) measures in cervical cancer prevention programmes, as well as organisation-associated costs. A comprehensive questionnaire was developed through systematic review of literature and existing guidelines. The survey was sent to programme organisers, Ministries of Health and experts in 34 European Union (EU) and European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) countries. Detailed aspects of programme organisation, quality assurance, monitoring, evaluation and corresponding line-item costs were recorded. Documentation of programme guidelines, protocols and publications was requested. Twenty-nine of 34 countries responded. The results showed that organised efforts for QA, monitoring and evaluation were carried out to a differing extent and were not standardised, making it difficult to compare the cost-effectiveness of organisation and QA strategies. Most countries found it hard to estimate the costs associated with launching and operating the organised programme. To our knowledge, this is the first questionnaire to request detailed information on the actual organisation and QA of programmes. The results of this survey can be used as a basis for further development of standardised guidelines on organisation and QA of cervical cancer screening programmes in Europe. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Randomized phase III study comparing paclitaxel-bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP) to standard BEP in intermediate-prognosis germ-cell cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Wit, Ronald; Skoneczna, Iwona; Daugaard, Gedske

    2012-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of four cycles of paclitaxel-bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (T-BEP) to four cycles of bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP) in previously untreated patients with intermediate-prognosis germ-cell cancer (GCC).......To compare the efficacy of four cycles of paclitaxel-bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (T-BEP) to four cycles of bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP) in previously untreated patients with intermediate-prognosis germ-cell cancer (GCC)....

  13. Decreased expression of the ATM gene linked to poor prognosis for gastric cancer of different nationalities in Xinjiang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Mei; Ma, Lanying; Qu, Yanli; Tang, Yong

    2017-08-01

    To explore the clinicopathological significance of ATM gene in the occurrence and prognosis of gastric cancer (GC) from different nationalities in Xinjiang. The expression of ATM in 385 patients with GC (including 98 Uygurs, 231 Hans and 56 Kazaks) and its corresponding adjacent tissues were examined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry assay to, analyze its correlations with clinicopathological features and prognosis of GC. The ATM expression in GC tissues was significantly decreased when compared to that in adjacent normal tissues of Uygur, Han and Kazak patients in Xinjiang, while Uygurs and Kazaks were much lower than Hans in the ATM expression of GC tissues (all PATM-negative tumors had a markedly lower survival rate than patients in Hans (P=0.028), and GC patients with ATM negative expression presented more unfavorable overall survival rate than those with positive expression among the three different nationalities (all PATM expression, TNM staging, depth of invasion, and lymph node metastasis were independent factors affecting the prognosis of GC patients in Xinjiang (all PATM was downregulated in GC patients in Xinjiang, especially for Uygurs and Kazaks, which suggested ATM to be an independent indicator of prognosis for GC therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinico-Pathologic Subtypes of Breast Cancer Primary Tumors Are Related to Prognosis after Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Cesar; Camus, Mauricio; Medina, Lidia; Oddo, David; Artigas, Rocío; Pérez Sepúlveda, Alejandra; Domínguez, Francisco; Razmilic, Dravna; Navarro, María Elena; Galindo, Hector; Acevedo, Francisco

    2016-12-01

    Background: Pathological factors, based mainly on immunohistochemistry (IHC) and histological differentiation, are mostly used to differentiate breast cancer (BC) subtypes. Our present aim was to describe the characteristics and survival of a relapsing BC patient cohort based on clinico-pathologic subtypes determined for the primary tumors. Methods: We used a clinico- pathological definition of BC subtypes based on histological grade (HG), estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR),and epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) expression assessed by IHC. We determined variables associated with loco-regional recurrence (LRR), second primaries (SP), systemic recurrence (SR) and post-recurrence survival (PRS). Results: Out of 1,702 patients, 240 (14%) had an event defined as recurrence. Those with recurrent disease were significantly younger than those without,and were initially diagnosed at more advanced stages, with larger tumors, greater lymph nodal involvement and higher HG. With a median follow up of 61 months (1-250), 4.6% of patients without recurrence and 56.6% of patients with an event defined as recurrence had died. The median PRS for the LRR group was 77 months; 75 months for those who developed a SP and 22 months for patients with an SR (p <0.0001). In SR cases, the median PRS was shorter for ER- tumors than for ER+ tumors (15 vs. 26 months, respectively; p = 0.0019, HR 0.44; CI: 0.25-0.44). Conclusions: Subtype, defined through classic histopathologic parameters determined for primary tumors, was found to eb related to type of recurrence and also to prognosis after relapse. Creative Commons Attribution License

  15. Attending the breast screening programme after breast cancer treatment: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Munck, Linda; Kwast, Annemiek; Reiding, Dick; de Bock, Geertruida H; Otter, Renée; Willemse, Pax H B; Siesling, Sabine

    2013-12-01

    In the Netherlands, breast cancer patients are treated and followed at least 5 years after diagnosis. Furthermore, all women aged 50-74 are invited biennially for mammography by the nationwide screening programme. The relation between the outpatient follow-up (follow-up visits in the outpatient clinic for 5 years after treatment) and the screening programme is not well established and attending the screening programme as well as outpatient follow-up is considered undesirable. This study evaluates potential factors influencing women to attend the screening programme during their outpatient follow-up (overlap) and the (re-)attendance to the screening programme after 5 years of outpatient follow-up. Data of breast cancer patients aged 50-74 years, treated for primary breast cancer between 1996 and 2007 were selected from the Netherlands Cancer Registry and linked to the National Breast Cancer Screening Programme in the Northern region. Cox regression analyses were used to study women (re-)attending the screening programme over time, possible overlap with the outpatient follow-up and factors influencing this. In total 11227 breast cancer patients were included, of whom 19% attended the screening programme after breast cancer treatment, 4.4% within 5 years and 15.4% after more than 5 years. Factors that independently influenced attendance within 5 years as well as more than 5 years after treatment were: interval tumours (HR 0.77; 95%CI 0.61-0.97 and HR 0.69; 95%CI 0.53-0.88, ref: screen-detected tumours), receiving adjuvant radiotherapy (HR 0.65; 95%CI 0.47-0.90 and HR 0.66; 95%CI 0.47-0.93; ref: none) and diagnosis of in situ tumours (HR 1.67; 95%CI 1.25-2.23 and HR 1.39; 95%CI 1.05-1.85; ref: stage I tumours). Non-screen related tumours (HR 0.41; 95%CI 0.29-0.58) and recent diagnosis (HR 0.89 per year; 95%CI 0.86-0.92) were only associated with attendance within 5 years after treatment. The interrelation between outpatient follow-up and screening should be improved to

  16. Immortal time bias in pharmacoepidemiological studies on cancer patient survival: empirical illustration for beta-blocker use in four cancers with different prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weberpals, Janick; Jansen, Lina; van Herk-Sukel, Myrthe P P; Kuiper, Josephina G; Aarts, Mieke J; Vissers, Pauline A J; Brenner, Hermann

    2017-11-01

    Immortal time bias (ITB) is still seen frequently in medical literature. However, not much is known about this bias in the field of cancer (pharmaco-)epidemiology. In context of a hypothetical beneficial beta-blocker use among cancer patients, we aimed to demonstrate the magnitude of ITB among 9876 prostate, colorectal, lung and pancreatic cancer patients diagnosed between 1998 and 2011, which were selected from a database linkage of the Netherlands Cancer Registry and the PHARMO Database Network. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals from three ITB scenarios, defining exposure at a defined point after diagnosis (model 1), at any point after diagnosis (model 2) and as multiple exposures after diagnosis (model 3), were calculated to investigate the association between beta-blockers and cancer prognosis using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results were compared to unbiased estimates derived from the Mantel-Byar model. Ignoring ITB led to substantial smaller HRs for beta-blocker use proposing a significant protective association in all cancer types [e.g. HR 0.18 (0.07-0.43) for pancreatic cancer in model 1], whereas estimates derived from the Mantel-Byar model were mainly suggesting no association [e.g. HR 1.10 (0.84-1.44)]. The magnitude of bias was consistently larger among cancer types with worse prognosis [overall median HR differences between all scenarios in model 1 and Mantel-Byar model of 0.56 (prostate), 0.72 (colorectal), 0.77 (lung) and 0.85 (pancreas)]. In conclusion, ITB led to spurious beneficial associations of beta-blocker use among cancer patients. The magnitude of ITB depends on the duration of excluded immortal time and the prognosis of each cancer.

  17. Age at diagnosis in women with non-metastatic breast cancer: Is it related to prognosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelly H. Alieldin

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: Young women were not found to have poorer prognosis, yet they presented with more ER negative tumors. Most of women presented with advanced stage and young women had higher recurrence rates.

  18. Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio Predicts Prognosis in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Patients Who Received Cabazitaxel Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Uemura

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Objectives. An elevated neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR has been suggested to be associated with a poor prognosis in several cancers. We evaluated the utility of an elevated NLR as a biomarker to predict the prognosis of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC patients treated with cabazitaxel (CBZ. Methods. We analyzed 47 patients who received CBZ chemotherapy for mCRPC in our institutions. The NLR was calculated using the neutrophil and lymphocyte counts before CBZ chemotherapy. We determined the NLR cut-off value based on the sensitivity and specificity levels derived from area under the receiver operator characteristic curves for death. A multivariate analysis was performed to investigate the association between the NLR and the prognosis. Results. The median overall survival (OS after CBZ was 10.0 months (range: 6.3–13.2. The median OS was shorter in patients with a high NLR (≥3.83 than in those with a low NLR (<3.83 (5.8 versus 13.2 months, p=0.018. In the multivariate analysis, the NLR, patient age, and lymph node (LN metastasis were independent predictors of the OS (hazard ratio 3.01, p=0.030; hazard ratio 3.10, p=0.029; hazard ratio 12.38, p=0.001, resp.. Conclusions. NLR might be a useful prognostic biomarker in mCRPC patients treated with CBZ.

  19. Screen-detected versus interval cancers: Effect of imaging modality and breast density in the Flemish Breast Cancer Screening Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmermans, Lore; Bacher, Klaus; Thierens, Hubert [Ghent University, Department of Basic Medical Sciences, QCC-Gent, Ghent (Belgium); Bleyen, Luc; Herck, Koen van [Ghent University, Centrum voor Preventie en Vroegtijdige Opsporing van Kanker, Ghent (Belgium); Lemmens, Kim; Ongeval, Chantal van; Steen, Andre van [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Martens, Patrick [Centrum voor Kankeropsporing, Bruges (Belgium); Brabander, Isabel de [Belgian Cancer Registry, Brussels (Belgium); Goossens, Mathieu [UZ Brussel, Dienst Kankerpreventie, Brussels (Belgium)

    2017-09-15

    To investigate if direct radiography (DR) performs better than screen-film mammography (SF) and computed radiography (CR) in dense breasts in a decentralized organised Breast Cancer Screening Programme. To this end, screen-detected versus interval cancers were studied in different BI-RADS density classes for these imaging modalities. The study cohort consisted of 351,532 women who participated in the Flemish Breast Cancer Screening Programme in 2009 and 2010. Information on screen-detected and interval cancers, breast density scores of radiologist second readers, and imaging modality was obtained by linkage of the databases of the Centre of Cancer Detection and the Belgian Cancer Registry. Overall, 67% of occurring breast cancers are screen detected and 33% are interval cancers, with DR performing better than SF and CR. The interval cancer rate increases gradually with breast density, regardless of modality. In the high-density class, the interval cancer rate exceeds the cancer detection rate for SF and CR, but not for DR. DR is superior to SF and CR with respect to cancer detection rates for high-density breasts. To reduce the high interval cancer rate in dense breasts, use of an additional imaging technique in screening can be taken into consideration. (orig.)

  20. Automated Information Extraction on Treatment and Prognosis for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Radiotherapy Patients: Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shuai; Jabbour, Salma K; O'Reilly, Shannon E; Lu, James J; Dong, Lihua; Ding, Lijuan; Xiao, Ying; Yue, Ning; Wang, Fusheng; Zou, Wei

    2018-02-01

    In outcome studies of oncology patients undergoing radiation, researchers extract valuable information from medical records generated before, during, and after radiotherapy visits, such as survival data, toxicities, and complications. Clinical studies rely heavily on these data to correlate the treatment regimen with the prognosis to develop evidence-based radiation therapy paradigms. These data are available mainly in forms of narrative texts or table formats with heterogeneous vocabularies. Manual extraction of the related information from these data can be time consuming and labor intensive, which is not ideal for large studies. The objective of this study was to adapt the interactive information extraction platform Information and Data Extraction using Adaptive Learning (IDEAL-X) to extract treatment and prognosis data for patients with locally advanced or inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We transformed patient treatment and prognosis documents into normalized structured forms using the IDEAL-X system for easy data navigation. The adaptive learning and user-customized controlled toxicity vocabularies were applied to extract categorized treatment and prognosis data, so as to generate structured output. In total, we extracted data from 261 treatment and prognosis documents relating to 50 patients, with overall precision and recall more than 93% and 83%, respectively. For toxicity information extractions, which are important to study patient posttreatment side effects and quality of life, the precision and recall achieved 95.7% and 94.5% respectively. The IDEAL-X system is capable of extracting study data regarding NSCLC chemoradiation patients with significant accuracy and effectiveness, and therefore can be used in large-scale radiotherapy clinical data studies.

  1. Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia and the prognosis of colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis of cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, XiangZhou; Wen, QiaoCheng; Wang, Ran; Chen, ZhiKang

    2017-11-01

    Recently, there has been a controversial discussion about the prognostic value of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia (CIN) in colorectal cancer patients. Thus, a meta-analysis was conducted to determine the relationship between CIN and the prognosis of colorectal cancer patients. We searched the PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane library databases to identify studies evaluating the association between CIN and colorectal cancer prognosis. Pooled random/fixed effect models were used to calculate pooled hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to assess the association. Eight studies were selected for the meta-analysis, for a total of 2,745 patients. There was significant improved survival among colorectal cancer patients with CIN (HR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.47-0.76). However, significant heterogeneity was found (p = 0.000, Ι2 = 75.0%). Through subgroup analysis, we could greatly eliminate the heterogeneity and found that neutropenia was associated with better survival in stage IV colorectal cancer patients, no matter the HR calculated by overall survival (OS) or progression-free survival (PFS). Meanwhile, the prognostic value of neutropenia in stage II/III colorectal cancer can be found when the HR is calculated by disease-free survival (DFS). Additionally, we observed significant differences after stratification according to various tumor stages, endpoints, and the use of G-CSF. Our results which, based on a cohort study, indicate that CIN is associated with improved survival in patients with colorectal cancer. However, further randomized controlled trials are warranted.

  2. The GADD45A (1506T>C) Polymorphism Is Associated with Ovarian Cancer Susceptibility and Prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Cunzhong; Liu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Xiaolin; Yang, Ning; Liu, Zhenping; Yan, Shi; Shen, Keng; Kong, Beihua

    2015-01-01

    GADD45A (growth arrest and DNA damage 45 A) is the first stress-inducible gene identified to be a target of p53. However, no studies to date have assessed variants of the GADD45 gene and their potential relationship to tumor susceptibility. We investigated the association of the GADD45A (1506T>C) polymorphism with ovarian cancer development in 258 ovarian cancer patients and 332 age-matched healthy women as controls using sequence analysis. We found a statistically significant difference in the GADD45A (1506T>C) genotype distributions between the case and control groups (TT vs. TC vs. CC, P = 0.0021) and found that variant 1506T>C was significantly associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer (Phistology (P = 0.032) and CA125 status (P = 0.021). Carrying the C allele (TC+CC) was associated with an increased risk of positive CA125 (OR = 3.20, 95% CI [1.15-8.71). Carrying the T allele (TT+TC) showed a significant correlation with both higher GADD45A mRNA expression and longer ovarian cancer RFS (relapse-free survival) and OS (overall survival). We are the first group to demonstrate that the GADD45A (1506T>C) polymorphism is associated with ovarian cancer susceptibility and prognosis. These data suggest that GADD45A (1506T>C) is a new tumor susceptibility gene and could be a useful molecular marker for assessing ovarian cancer risk and for predicting ovarian cancer patient prognosis.

  3. Combination of IL-6, IL-10, and MCP-1 with traditional serum tumor markers in lung cancer diagnosis and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y W; Zhou, Z G; Wang, M; Dong, J Q; Du, K P; Li, S; Liu, Y L; Lv, P J; Gao, J B

    2016-11-03

    Early detection and treatment is critically important for lung cancer patients. Inflammatory mediators such as IL-6, IL-10, and MCP-1 participate in lung cancer regulation. CEA, CA125, and ProGRP are commonly used serum tumor markers for lung cancer. In this study, we assessed the sensitivity and specificity of CEA, CA125, and ProGRP when used in combination with IL-6, IL-10, and MCP in lung cancer diagnosis. Serum from three different groups (healthy controls, individuals with high risk for lung cancer, and lung cancer patients) was collected. Electrochemiluminescence was used to detect expressions of CEA, CA125, and ProGRP; ELISA was used to examine serum levels of IL-6, IL-10, and MCP-1. Specificity and sensitivity of single as well as combination markers in lung cancer diagnosis were determined. Results indicated that CEA, CA125, ProGRP, and MCP-1 were significantly up-regulated in lung cancer patients as compared to those in controls and high risk individuals. Higher IL-6 and IL-10 levels were observed in both lung cancer patients and high-risk individuals as compared to those in controls. Highest sensitivity (95.2%) in cancer diagnosis was achieved when all six markers were used. This was followed by a combination of IL-6, IL-10, CEA, CA125, and ProGRP (92.6%). The most sensitive (88.6%). Four-marker combination was composed of IL-6, CEA, CA125, and ProGRP. As the combined usage of CEA, CA125, ProGRP, IL-6, IL-10, and MCP-1 significantly improved sensitivity of lung cancer detection; this biomarker arrangement may be beneficial for early diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of lung cancer.

  4. Integrating palliative care across settings: A retrospective cohort study of a hospice home care programme for cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Woan Shin; Lee, Angel; Yang, Sze Yee; Chan, Susan; Wu, Huei Yaw; Ng, Charis Wei Ling; Heng, Bee Hoon

    2016-07-01

    Terminally ill patients at the end-of-life do transit between care settings due to their complex care needs. Problems of care fragmentation could result in poor quality of care. We aimed to evaluate the impact of an integrated hospice home care programme on acute care service usage and on the share of home deaths. The retrospective study cohort comprised patients who were diagnosed with cancer, had an expected prognosis of 1 year or less, and were referred to a home hospice. The intervention group comprised deceased patients enrolled in the integrated hospice home care programme between September 2012 and June 2014. The historical comparison group comprised deceased patients who were referred to other home hospices between January 2007 and January 2011. There were 321 cases and 593 comparator subjects. Relative to the comparator group, the share of hospital deaths was significantly lower for programme participants (12.1% versus 42.7%). After adjusting for differences at baseline, the intervention group had statistically significantly lower emergency department visits at 30 days (incidence rate ratio: 0.38; 95% confidence interval: 0.31-0.47), 60 days (incidence rate ratio: 0.61; 95% confidence interval: 0.54-0.69) and 90 days (incidence rate ratio: 0.69; 95% confidence interval: 0.62-0.77) prior to death. Similar results held for the number of hospitalisations at 30 days (incidence rate ratio: 0.48; 95% confidence interval: 0.40-0.58), 60 days (incidence rate ratio: 0.71; 95% confidence interval: 0.62-0.82) and 90 days (incidence rate ratio: 0.77; 95% confidence interval: 0.68-0.88) prior to death. Our results demonstrated that by integrating services between acute care and home hospice care, a reduction in acute care service usage could occur. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Co-expression of HER3 and MUC1 is associated with a favourable prognosis in patients with bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Trine O; Borre, Michael; Nexo, Ebba

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the functional impact of the interaction of MUC1 with the epidermal growth factor receptors HER3 and HER4 in patients with bladder cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we examined MUC1 expression in 82 bladder...... the prognostic value of MUC1 (P = 0.488). MUC1 expression had no correlation with survival, tumour stage or grade, or to the prognostic value of HER4. CONCLUSIONS: A high MUC1 expression was associated with a favourable prognosis in patients with bladder cancer when the expression of HER3 was also high....... This suggests an involvement of HER3 in MUC1 function in bladder cancer....

  6. Overexpression of CD47 predicts poor prognosis and promotes cancer cell invasion in high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinuo; Lu, Shuhua; Xu, Ying; Qiu, Chunping; Jin, Chengjuan; Wang, Yuqiong; Liu, Zhaojian; Kong, Beihua

    2017-01-01

    CD47 is an antiphagocytic signal that cancer cells employ to inhibit macrophage-mediated destruction. CD47 is overexpressed in various human malignancies. However, the expression and functional significance of CD47 in high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSOC) has not been completely understood. In this study, we reported that CD47 was commonly overexpressed in HGSOC. Higher CD47 expression was significantly correlated with poor prognosis of HGSOC patients. Functional investigations revealed that CD47 overexpression in ovarian cancer cells significantly promoted migration and invasion. Moreover, CD47 induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through modulating E-cadherin and N-cadherin. Our findings suggest that up-regulation of CD47 is correlated with ovarian cancer progression and it might be a potential biomarker for predicting clinical outcomes. PMID:28670378

  7. STAT3 signaling drives EZH2 transcriptional activation and mediates poor prognosis in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuan-Ming; Wang, Cheng-Gang; Zhu, Min; Xing, Rui; Cui, Jian-Tao; Li, Wen-Mei; Yu, De-Dong; Wang, Shu-Bin; Zhu, Wei; Ye, Ying-Jiang; Wu, Yun; Wang, Shan; Lu, You-Yong

    2016-12-09

    STAT3 signaling plays the pivotal role in tumorigenesis through EZH2 epigenetic modification, which enhanced STAT3 activity by increased tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3. Here, another possible feedback mechanism and clinical significance of EZH2 and STAT3 were investigated in gastric cancer (GC). STAT3, p-STAT3 (Tyr 705) and EZH2 expression were examined in 63 GC specimens with matched normal tissues by IHC staining. EZH2 and STAT3 were also identified in five GC cell lines using RT-PCR and western blot analyses. p-STAT3 protein was detected by western blotting. In order to investigate whether EZH2 expression was directly regulated by STAT3, EZH2 expression was further detected using siRNA for STAT3 or IL-6 stimulation, with dual luciferase reporter analyses, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. The clinical significance of STAT3, p-STAT3 and EZH2 expression was evaluated by multi-factor COX regression and Kaplan-Meier analyses. Hyper-activation of STAT3, p-STAT3 and EZH2 expression were observed in GC cells and tissues. STAT3 signaling was correlated with EZH2 expression in GC (R = 0.373, P = 0.003), which was consistent with our data showing that STAT3 as the transcriptional factor enhanced EZH2 transcriptional activity by binding the relative promoter region (-214 ~ -206). STAT3 was an independent signature for poor survival (P = 0.002). Patients with STAT3(+)/EZH2(+) or p-STAT3(+)/EZH2(+) had a worse outcome than others (P EZH2 was associated with advanced TNM staging (P = 0.017). Moreover, treatment with a combination of siSTAT3 and EZH2-specific inhibitor, 3-deazaneplanocin A (DZNEP), increased the apoptotic ratio of cells. It is benefit for targeting STAT3-EZH2 interplay in GC treatment. Our results indicate that STAT3 status mediated EZH2 upregulation, associated with advanced TNM stage and poor prognosis, suggesting that combination with knockdown of STAT3 and EZH2 inhibitor

  8. Expression of claudin-11, -23 in different gastric tissues and its relationship with the risk and prognosis of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Youzhu; Jing, Jingjing; Sun, Liping; Gong, Yuehua; Chen, Moye; Wang, Zeyang; Sun, Mingjun; Yuan, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Claudins play an important role in regulating the permeability of epithelial and endothelial cells and in the maintenance of cell polarity. We aimed to investigate expression of claudin-11, -23 in different gastric tissues and its relationship with clinicopathologic parameters and prognosis of gastric cancer. We compared their expression levels in the paired cancerous tissues versus those in the adjacent noncancerous tissues by real-time PCR, western blotting and immunohistochemistry. The results showed that the expression of claudin-11, -23 was greatly increased in paracancerous gastric tissue compared with cancerous tissue. We also compared their expression levels of tissues from gastric cancer, superficial gastritis, and atrophic gastritis by immunohistochemistry. The results indicated that the expression of claudin-11 and 23 was significantly higher in superficial gastritis than that in atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer. The expression of claudin-23 was significantly lower in atrophic gastritis than that in gastric cancer, but no obviously difference was observed for claudin-11. As for analysis of clinicopathologic parameters of gastric cancer, logistic multiple regression indicated that claudin-11 was significantly associated with sex, smoking, alcohol, H. pylori infection and Borrmann classification while claudin-23 was significantly associated with vessel cancer embolus. Cox multivariate survival analysis indicated that gastric cancer patients with negative claudin-23 expression had significantly longer overall survival. In conclusion, the expression of claudin-11, -23 was remarkably downregulated in gastric cancer. Abnormal expression of these proteins was significantly correlated with some clinicopathologic parameters. In particular, claudin-23 positive expression was associated with poor prognostic outcomes of gastric cancer patients and may therefore serve as an independent prognosticator of patient survival.

  9. Hair dye use, regular exercise, and the risk and prognosis of prostate cancer: multicenter case?control and case-only studies

    OpenAIRE

    Tai, Shu-Yu; Hsieh, Hui-Min; Huang, Shu-Pin; Wu, Ming-Tsang

    2016-01-01

    Background This study investigated the effects that hair dye use and regular exercise exert on the risk and prognosis of prostate cancer. Methods We studied 296 cases of histologically confirmed prostate cancer and 296 age- (in 2-y bands), ethnicity-, and hospital-matched controls in Taiwan between August 2000 and December 2008. To determine the rate of prostate cancer survival, another 608 incident prostate cancer cases occurring between August 2000 and December 2007 were investigated. Infor...

  10. Measuring the burden of interval cancers in long-standing screening mammography programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Sune Bangsbøll; Törnberg, Sven; Kilpeläinen, Sini; Lynge, Elsebeth; Njor, Sisse Helle; Von Euler-Chelpin, My

    2015-06-01

    Mammography screening programme sensitivity is evaluated by comparing the interval cancer rate (ICR) with the expected breast cancer incidence without screening, ie. the proportional interval cancer rate (PICR). The PICR is usually found by extrapolating pre-screening incidence rates, whereas ICR is calculated from data available in the screening programmes. As there is no consensus regarding estimation of background incidence, we seek to validate the ICR measure against the PICR. Screening data from the three mammography screening programmes of Stockholm, Copenhagen, and Funen in the period 1989-2011 provided data to calculate the ICR. The most commonly described methods of extrapolating pre-screening incidence rates to calculate the PICR were illustrated and PICRs were calculated by year and programme using these different methods and compared with the ICRs. PICRs varied greatly, reaching a difference of 32-34% in Stockholm, 79% in Copenhagen, and 100-106% in Funen between the highest and the lowest value, depending on which method was applied. PICRs exhibited large variations yearly and from programme to programme. ICRs did not vary to the same extent, ranging on average from 0.100 to 0.136 in the first 12-months and between 0.201 and 0.225 in the last 12-months of the two-year period after a negative screen across the three programmes. The value of the PICR is hugely influenced by which method is applied, whereas the ICR is calculated purely on data available within programmes. We find that the PICR, the establishing indicator for sensitivity, could preferably be replaced by the ICR. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  11. Association of Preoperative Nutritional Status with Prognosis in Patients with Esophageal Cancer Undergoing Salvage Esophagectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Makoto; Sohda, Makoto; Miyazaki, Tatsuya; Yoshida, Tomonori; Kumakura, Yuji; Honjo, Hiroaki; Hara, Keigo; Ozawa, Daigo; Suzuki, Shigemasa; Tanaka, Naritaka; Yokobori, Takehiko; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2018-02-01

    To investigate whether malnutrition is associated with poor prognosis of patients who undergo salvage esophagectomy. We examined the association between the preoperative prognostic nutritional index (PNI) and prognosis of patients who undergo salvage esophagectomy. We conducted a single-center retrospective study and reviewed hospital patient records for tumor characteristics and patient outcomes. Univariate and multivariate survival analyses were carried out using the Cox proportional hazards regression model. Thirty-two patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) who underwent salvage esophagectomy between 1998 and 2015 at our Institute were included in this study. Univariate analysis revealed that clinical response (p=0.045), preoperative PNI (pnutritional status is associated with the prognosis of patients undergoing salvage esophagectomy. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  12. Pattern of Tumor Shrinkage during Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Is Associated with Prognosis in Low-Grade Luminal Early Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukada, Ippei; Araki, Kazuhiro; Kobayashi, Kokoro; Shibayama, Tomoko; Takahashi, Shunji; Gomi, Naoya; Kokubu, Yumi; Oikado, Katsunori; Horii, Rie; Akiyama, Futoshi; Iwase, Takuji; Ohno, Shinji; Hatake, Kiyohiko; Sata, Naohiro; Ito, Yoshinori

    2018-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the association between tumor shrinkage patterns shown with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging during neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and prognosis in patients with low-grade luminal breast cancer. Materials and Methods This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board and informed consent was obtained from all subjects. The low-grade luminal breast cancer was defined as hormone receptor-positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative with nuclear grades 1 or 2. The patterns of tumor shrinkage as revealed at MR imaging were categorized into two types: concentric shrinkage (CS) and non-CS. Among 854 patients who had received NAC in a single institution from January 2000 to December 2009, 183 patients with low-grade luminal breast cancer were retrospectively evaluated for the development set. Another data set from 292 patients who had received NAC in the same institution between January 2010 and December 2012 was used for the validation set. Among these 292 patients, 121 patients with low-grade luminal breast cancer were retrospectively evaluated. Results In the development set, the median observation period was 67.9 months. Recurrence was observed in 31 patients, and 16 deaths were related to breast cancer. There were statistically significant differences in both the disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates between patterns of tumor shrinkage (P breast cancer. DFS rate was significantly longer in patients with the CS pattern (72.8 months; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 69.9, 75.6 months) than in those with the non-CS pattern (56.0 months; 95% CI: 49.1, 62.9 months; P ≤ .001). The CS pattern was associated with an excellent prognosis (median OS, 80.6 months; 95% CI: 79.3, 81.8 months vs 65.0 months; 95% CI: 60.1, 69.8 months; P = .004). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the CS pattern had the only significant independent association with DFS (P = .007) and OS (P = .037) rates. Conclusion

  13. Up-Regulation of RFC3 Promotes Triple Negative Breast Cancer Metastasis and is Associated With Poor Prognosis Via EMT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Yu He

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC was regarded as the most aggressive and mortal subtype of breast cancer (BC since the molecular subtype system has been established. Abundant studies have revealed that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT played a pivotal role during breast cancer metastasis and progression, especially in TNBC. Herein, we showed that inhibition the expression of replication factor C subunit 3 (RFC3 significantly attenuated TNBC metastasis and progression, which was associated with EMT signal pathway. In TNBC cells, knockdown of RFC3 can down-regulate mesenchymal markers and up-regulate epithelial markers, significantly attenuated cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Additionally, silencing RFC3 expression can decrease nude mice tumor volume, weight and relieve lung metastasis in vivo. Furthermore, we also demonstrated that overexpression of RFC3 in TNBC showed increased metastasis, progression and poor prognosis. We confirmed all of these results by immunohistochemistry analysis in 127 human TNBC tissues and found that RFC3 expression was significantly associated with poor prognosis in TNBC. Taken all these findings into consideration, we can conclude that up-regulation of RFC3 promotes TNBC progression through EMT signal pathway. Therefore, RFC3 could be an independent prognostic factor and therapeutic target for TNBC.

  14. Human voltage-gated proton channel hv1: a new potential biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis of colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifan Wang

    Full Text Available Solid tumors exist in a hypoxic microenvironment, and possess high-glycolytic metabolites. To avoid the acidosis, tumor cells must exhibit a dynamic cytosolic pH regulation mechanism(s. The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 mediates NADPH oxidase function by compensating cellular loss of electrons with protons. Here, we showed for the first time, that Hv1 expression is increased in colorectal tumor tissues and cell lines, associated with poor prognosis. Immunohistochemistry showed that Hv1 is strongly expressed in adenocarcinomas but not or lowly expressed in normal colorectal or hyperplastic polyps. Hv1 expression in colorectal cancer is significantly associated with the tumor size, tumor classification, lymph node status, clinical stage and p53 status. High Hv1 expression is associated significantly with shorter overall and recurrence-free survival. Furthermore, real-time RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry showed that Hv1 is highly expressed in colorectal cancer cell lines, SW620, HT29, LS174T and Colo205, but not in SW480. Inhibitions of Hv1 expression and activity in the highly metastatic SW620 cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA and Zn(2+ respectively, markedly decrease the cell invasion and migration, restraint proton extrusion and the intracellular pH recovery. Our results suggest that Hv1 may be used as a potential biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis of colorectal carcinoma, and a potential target for anticancer drugs in colorectal cancer therapy.

  15. Influence of aspirin and non-aspirin NSAID use on ovarian and endometrial cancer: Summary of epidemiologic evidence of cancer risk and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdoodt, F; Kjaer, S K; Friis, S

    2017-06-01

    Increasing evidence supports a role for aspirin use in reducing the incidence and mortality of several cancer types. This has spurred a new wave of interest in this widely used drug. In this review, we present and evaluate the epidemiologic evidence of the association between the use of aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and the incidence and prognosis of ovarian and endometrial cancer. The evidence of a preventive effect of NSAID use on risk of ovarian or endometrial cancer is based primarily on results from observational studies and, consequently, is only suggestive. Overall, observational studies indicate modest reductions in risk of ovarian and endometrial cancer with aspirin use, whereas the results for non-aspirin NSAID use are equivocal. The strongest inverse associations have been reported for long-term consistent aspirin use, notably among subgroups of users (e.g., those with high body mass index). Few studies have evaluated the influence of NSAID use on the mortality of ovarian or endometrial cancer, and substantial heterogeneity of study characteristics and results preclude any conclusions. Additional studies of aspirin and non-aspirin NSAID use and ovarian or endometrial cancer risk and prognosis are warranted. In the present review, we discuss the importance of comprehensive exposure definitions (i.e., duration, timing, consistency and intensity/dose) and evaluation of potential effect modification according to user characteristics, with the aim of identifying women who may experience the largest benefit of aspirin or non-aspirin NSAID use on risk or prognosis of ovarian and endometrial cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Chalkley estimates of angiogenesis in early breast cancer--relevance to prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Offersen, Birgitte V; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Yilmaz, Mette

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether Chalkley estimates of angiogenesis add new knowledge regarding prediction of prognosis in 455 consecutive early breast carcinomas, both node-positive (52%) and node-negative (48%). Median follow-up was 101 months. Intense vascularization indicated......, high malignancy grade, negative oestrogen receptor, and increasing Chalkley counts (both tertiles and continuous) were independent markers of disease-specific death. Thus, in a univariate analysis it was found that high Chalkley estimates of angiogenesis indicated a poor prognosis, but high Chalkley...

  17. Stratification of Prognosis of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Patients Using Combinatorial Biomarkers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Yue

    Full Text Available Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC is highly diverse group of cancers, and generally considered an aggressive disease associated with poor survival. Stratification of TNBC is highly desired for both prognosis and treatment decisions to identify patients who may benefit from less aggressive therapy.This study retrieved 192 consecutive non-metastasis TNBC patients who had undergone a resection of a primary tumor from 2008 to 2012. All samples were negative for ER, PR, and HER2/neu. Disease-free-survival (DFS and overall-survival (OS were evaluated for expression of immunohistochemical biomarkers (P53, Ki-67, CK5/6 and EGFR, as well as clinicopathological variables including age, tumor size, grade, lymph node status, pathologic tumor and nodal stages. The cutoff values of the basal biomarkers, EGFR and CK5/6, were estimated by time-dependent ROC curves. The prognostic values of combinatorial variables were identified by univariate and multivariate Cox analysis. Patients were stratified into different risk groups based on expression status of identified prognostic variables.Median age was 57 years (range, 28-92 years. Patients' tumor stage and nodal stage were significantly associated with OS and DFS. EGFR and CK5/6 were significant prognostic variables at cutoff points of 15% (p = 0.001, AUC = 0.723, and 50% (p = 0.006, AUC = 0.675, respectively. Multivariate Cox analysis identified five significant variables: EGFR (p = 0.016, CK5/6 (p = 0.018, Ki-67 (p = 0.048, tumor stage (p = 0.010, and nodal stage (p = 0.003. Patients were stratified into low basal (EGFR≤15% and CK5/6≤50% and high basal (EGFR>15% and/or CK5/6>50% expression groups. In the low basal expression group, patients with low expressions of Ki-67, low tumor and nodal stage had significantly better survival than those with high expressions/stages of three variables, log-rank p = 0.015 (100% vs 68% at 50 months. In the high basal expression group, patient with high basal expression

  18. A Monte Carlo tool to simulate breast cancer screening programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forastero, C.; Zamora, L. I.; Guirado, D.; Lallena, A. M.

    2010-09-01

    A Monte Carlo tool which permits the simulation of screening mammography programmes is developed. Various statistical distributions describing different parameters involved in the problem are used: the characteristics of the population under study, a tumour growth model and a model for tumour detection based on parameters such as sensitivity and specificity which depends on the woman's age. We reproduce results of different actual programmes. The model enables us to find out the configuration (the age of the women who attend the screening trials and screening frequency) which produces maximum benefits with minimum risks. In addition, the model has permitted us to validate some of the assumed hypothesis, such as the probability distribution of the tumour detection as a function of the tumour size, the frequency of the histological types and the transition probability between different histological types.

  19. A study on the effect of IL-6 gene polymorphism on the prognosis of non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia W

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Wei Jia, Guang-He Fei, Jie-Gui Hu, Xian-Wei Hu Pulmonary Department, First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Hefei, People’s Republic of China Background: Lung cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed clinical diseases. IL-6 is a multifunctional cytokine that is related to chemotactic factors and tumor biological regulation. -174G/C polymorphism in the promoter region of the IL-6 gene single-nucleotide polymorphism is the -174 position change from G to C. However, the relationship between the IL-6 gene polymorphism and prognosis of lung cancer is elusive. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of -174G/C polymorphism on the prognosis of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC.Methods: DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood of 434 cases diagnosed with NSCLC by cytologic or histologic examination. Polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism (NlaIII was used to detect the genotype of -174G/C. Based on the functional activity of the IL-6 gene polymorphism, genotypes were divided into G vector (CG/GG (high yield and CC genotype (low yield. Prognosis of patients was analyzed and independent risk factors evaluated. A quantitative analysis of the degree of pain after diagnosis was performed to evaluate the correlations between gene polymorphisms and the degree of pain and use of analgesics.Results: Survival analysis showed that survival of the patients carrying the G allele (CG/GG was significantly lower than that of patients with CC genotype (42.31 versus 62.79 months; P=0.032. The IL-6 gene promoter region revealed the presence of polymorphic variants, which may be associated with changes in the gene transcription process that affect the level of serum cytokines. IL-6 -174G/C gene polymorphism is associated with a significant morphine equivalent daily dose (IL-6 GG, 69.61; GC, 73.17; CC, 181.67; P=0.004. Homozygous IL-6 -174C/C genotype carriers required higher doses of

  20. The intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (icam-1) in lung cancer: implications for disease progression and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotteas, Elias A; Boulas, Panagiotis; Gkiozos, Ioannis; Tsagkouli, Sofia; Tsoukalas, George; Syrigos, Konstantinos N

    2014-09-01

    The intercellular cell-adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is a transmembrane molecule and a distinguished member of the Immunoglobulin superfamily of proteins that participates in many important processes, including leukocyte endothelial transmigration, cell signaling, cell-cell interaction, cell polarity and tissue stability. ICAM-1and its soluble part are highly expressed in inflammatory conditions, chronic diseases and a number of malignancies. In the present article we present the implications of ICAM-1 in the progression and prognosis of one of the major global killers of our era: lung cancer. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.