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Sample records for cancer plasma proteome

  1. Lung Cancer Signatures in Plasma Based on Proteome Profiling of Mouse Tumor Models

    OpenAIRE

    Taguchi, Ayumu; Politi, Katerina; Pitteri, Sharon J.; Lockwood, William W; Faça, Vitor M.; Kelly-Spratt, Karen; Wong, Chee-Hong; Zhang, Qing; Chin, Alice; Park, Kwon-Sik; Goodman, Gary; Gazdar, Adi F.; Sage, Julien; Dinulescu, Daniela M.; Kucherlapati, Raju

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the potential of in-depth quantitative proteomics to reveal plasma protein signatures that reflect lung tumor biology. We compared plasma protein profiles of four mouse models of lung cancer with profiles of models of pancreatic, ovarian, colon, prostate, and breast cancer and two models of inflammation. A protein signature for Titf1/Nkx2-1, a known lineage-survival oncogene in lung cancer, was found in plasmas of mouse models of lung adenocarcinoma. An EGFR signature was foun...

  2. What Is Cancer Proteomics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What is Proteomics? Video Tutorial What is Cancer Proteomics? Print This Page The term "proteome" refers to ... that a cell or organism undergoes. The term "proteomics" is a large-scale comprehensive study of a ...

  3. Low molecular weight blood plasma proteome – a source of differential diagnostic biomarkers of ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ye. Shevchenko

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available At present, there is no screening test for the early detecting of ovarian cancer, one of the most lethal form of gynaecological malignancy in the worldwide. In this study the new methodology for the search of tumor markers of ovarian cancer, involving profiling the low-molecular blood plasma proteomes, is developed, unified and approved. The given approach included three basic components: pre-preparation of samples, matrix-assisted laser desorption / ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and bioinformatics software for mass spectral data processing. Opportunities and prospects of the developed approach for the detection of potential ovarian cancer markers were shown. For search of potential tumor markers, screening of 56 blood plasma samples from ovarian cancer patients and 36 benign ovarian neoplasia samples were carried out.As a result of the present research, peptides / polypeptides which can be used in future for detecting this pathology were found out.

  4. Differential profiling of breast cancer plasma proteome by isotope-coded affinity tagging method reveals biotinidase as a breast cancer biomarker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of women's death worldwide. It is important to discover a reliable biomarker for the detection of breast cancer. Plasma is the most ideal source for cancer biomarker discovery since many cells cross-communicate through the secretion of soluble proteins into blood. Plasma proteomes obtained from 6 breast cancer patients and 6 normal healthy women were analyzed by using the isotope-coded affinity tag (ICAT) labeling approach and tandem mass spectrometry. All the plasma samples used were depleted of highly abundant 6 plasma proteins by immune-affinity column chromatography before ICAT labeling. Several proteins showing differential abundance level were selected based on literature searches and their specificity to the commercially available antibodies, and then verified by immunoblot assays. A total of 155 proteins were identified and quantified by ICAT method. Among them, 33 proteins showed abundance changes by more than 1.5-fold between the plasmas of breast cancer patients and healthy women. We chose 5 proteins for the follow-up confirmation in the individual plasma samples using immunoblot assay. Four proteins, α1-acid glycoprotein 2, monocyte differentiation antigen CD14, biotinidase (BTD), and glutathione peroxidase 3, showed similar abundance ratio to ICAT result. Using a blind set of plasmas obtained from 21 breast cancer patients and 21 normal healthy controls, we confirmed that BTD was significantly down-regulated in breast cancer plasma (Wilcoxon rank-sum test, p = 0.002). BTD levels were lowered in all cancer grades (I-IV) except cancer grade zero. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of BTD was 0.78. Estrogen receptor status (p = 0.940) and progesterone receptor status (p = 0.440) were not associated with the plasma BTD levels. Our study suggests that BTD is a potential serological biomarker for the detection of breast cancer

  5. Plasma Proteomic Profiling in Hereditary Breast Cancer Reveals a BRCA1-Specific Signature: Diagnostic and Functional Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scumaci, Domenica; Tammè, Laura; Fiumara, Claudia Vincenza; Pappaianni, Giusi; Concolino, Antonio; Leone, Emanuela; Faniello, Maria Concetta; Quaresima, Barbara; Ricevuto, Enrico; Costanzo, Francesco Saverio; Cuda, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast cancer (BC) is a leading cause of death among women. Among the major risk factors, an important role is played by familial history of BC. Germ-line mutations in BRCA1/2 genes account for most of the hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancers. Gene expression profiling studies have disclosed specific molecular signatures for BRCA1/2-related breast tumors as compared to sporadic cases, which might help diagnosis and clinical follow-up. Even though, a clear hallmark of BRCA1/2-positive BC is still lacking. Many diseases are correlated with quantitative changes of proteins in body fluids. Plasma potentially carries important information whose knowledge could help to improve early disease detection, prognosis, and response to therapeutic treatments. The aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive approach finalized to improve the recovery of specific biomarkers from plasma samples of subjects affected by hereditary BC. Methods To perform this analysis, we used samples from patients belonging to highly homogeneous population previously reported. Depletion of high abundant plasma proteins, 2D gel analysis, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and bioinformatics analysis were used into an integrated approach to investigate tumor-specific changes in the plasma proteome of BC patients and healthy family members sharing the same BRCA1 gene founder mutation (5083del19), previously reported by our group, with the aim to identify specific signatures. Results The comparative analysis of the experimental results led to the identification of gelsolin as the most promising biomarker. Conclusions Further analyses, performed using a panel of breast cancer cell lines, allowed us to further elucidate the signaling network that might modulate the expression of gelsolin in breast cancer. PMID:26061043

  6. Plasma Proteomic Profiling in Hereditary Breast Cancer Reveals a BRCA1-Specific Signature: Diagnostic and Functional Implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenica Scumaci

    Full Text Available Breast cancer (BC is a leading cause of death among women. Among the major risk factors, an important role is played by familial history of BC. Germ-line mutations in BRCA1/2 genes account for most of the hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancers. Gene expression profiling studies have disclosed specific molecular signatures for BRCA1/2-related breast tumors as compared to sporadic cases, which might help diagnosis and clinical follow-up. Even though, a clear hallmark of BRCA1/2-positive BC is still lacking. Many diseases are correlated with quantitative changes of proteins in body fluids. Plasma potentially carries important information whose knowledge could help to improve early disease detection, prognosis, and response to therapeutic treatments. The aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive approach finalized to improve the recovery of specific biomarkers from plasma samples of subjects affected by hereditary BC.To perform this analysis, we used samples from patients belonging to highly homogeneous population previously reported. Depletion of high abundant plasma proteins, 2D gel analysis, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS and bioinformatics analysis were used into an integrated approach to investigate tumor-specific changes in the plasma proteome of BC patients and healthy family members sharing the same BRCA1 gene founder mutation (5083del19, previously reported by our group, with the aim to identify specific signatures.The comparative analysis of the experimental results led to the identification of gelsolin as the most promising biomarker.Further analyses, performed using a panel of breast cancer cell lines, allowed us to further elucidate the signaling network that might modulate the expression of gelsolin in breast cancer.

  7. Collaborations in Proteomics Research - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI), through the Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR), has signed two Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) in the sharing of proteomics reagents and protocols

  8. Proteomics in Pancreatic Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Ruihui; Li, Zhaoshen; Li, Shude; Gao, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis and deeply affects the life of people. Therefore, the earlier diagnosis and better treatments are urgently needed. In recent years, the proteomic technologies are well established and growing rapidly and have been widely applied in clinical applications, especially in pancreatic cancer research. In this paper, we attempt to discuss the development of current proteomic technologies and the application of proteomics to the field of pancreatic cancer research. This will explore the potential perspective in revealing pathogenesis, making the diagnosis earlier and treatment. PMID:22084685

  9. The proteomics in prostate cancer biomarker discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. Shevchenko

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC represents the second most frequent type of tumor in men worldwide. Proteomics represents a promising approach for the discovery of new biomarkers able to improve the management of PC patients. Markers more specific and sensitive than prostate-specific antigen are needed for PC diagnosis, prognosis and response to treatment. Moreover, proteomics could represent an important tool to identify new molecular targets for PC tailored therapy. Now several possible PC biomarkers sources, each with advantages and limitations, are under investigation, including tissues, urine, serum, plasma and prostatic fluids. Innovative high-throughput proteomic platforms are now identifying and quantifying new specific and sensitive biomarkers for PC detection, stratification and treatment. Nevertheless, many putative biomarkers are still far from being applied in clinical practice.This review aims to discuss the recent advances in PC proteomics, emphasizing biomarker discovery and their application to clinical utility for diagnosis and patient stratification.

  10. Proteomic classification of breast cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kamel, Dalia

    2012-11-01

    Being a significant health problem that affects patients in various age groups, breast cancer has been extensively studied to date. Recently, molecular breast cancer classification has advanced significantly with the availability of genomic profiling technologies. Proteomic technologies have also advanced from traditional protein assays including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry to more comprehensive approaches including mass spectrometry and reverse phase protein lysate arrays (RPPA). The purpose of this manuscript is to review the current protein markers that influence breast cancer prediction and prognosis and to focus on novel advances in proteomic classification of breast cancer.

  11. Proteomics and the dynamic plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprenger, Richard R; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2010-01-01

    plasma membrane is of particular interest, by not only serving as a barrier between the "cell interior" and the external environment, but moreover by organizing and clustering essential components to enable dynamic responses to internal and external stimuli. Defining and characterizing the dynamic plasma...... the challenges in functional proteomic studies of the plasma membrane. We review the recent progress in MS-based plasma membrane proteomics by presenting key examples from eukaryotic systems, including mammals, yeast and plants. We highlight the importance of enrichment and quantification technologies...... required for detailed functional and comparative analysis of the dynamic plasma membrane proteome....

  12. Plasma membrane proteomics and its application in clinical cancer biomarker discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Lund, Rikke; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2010-01-01

    Plasma membrane proteins that are exposed on the cell surface have important biological functions, such as signaling into and out of the cells, ion transport, and cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. The expression level of many of the plasma membrane proteins involved in these key functions i...

  13. Ovarian Cancer Proteomic, Phosphoproteomic, and Glycoproteomic Data Released - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) scientists have just released a comprehensive dataset of the proteomic analysis of high grade serous ovarian tumor samples,

  14. A lectin-coupled, targeted proteomic mass spectrometry (MRM MS) platform for identification of multiple liver cancer biomarkers in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Shin, Park Min; Oh, Na Ree; Park, Gun Wook; Kim, Hoguen; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2012-09-18

    Aberrantly glycosylated proteins related to liver cancer progression were captured with specific lectin and identified from human plasma by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry as multiple biomarkers for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The lectin fractionation for fucosylated protein glycoforms in human plasma was conducted with a fucose-specific aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL). Following tryptic digestion of the lectin-captured fraction, plasma samples from 30 control cases (including 10 healthy, 10 hepatitis B virus [HBV], and 10 cirrhosis cases) and 10 HCC cases were quantitatively analyzed by MRM to identify which glycoproteins are viable HCC biomarkers. A1AG1, AACT, A1AT, and CERU were found to be potent biomarkers to differentiate HCC plasma from control plasmas. The AUROC generated independently from these four biomarker candidates ranged from 0.73 to 0.92. However, the lectin-coupled MRM assay with multiple combinations of biomarker candidates is superior statistically to those generated from the individual candidates with AUROC more than 0.95, which can be an alternative to the immunoassay inevitably requiring tedious development of multiple antibodies against biomarker candidates to be verified. Eventually the lectin-coupled, targeted proteomic mass spectrometry (MRM MS) platform was found to be efficient to identify multiple biomarkers from human plasma according to cancer progression. PMID:22789673

  15. CPTAC Releases Largest-Ever Breast Cancer Proteome Dataset - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) scientists have released a dataset of proteins and phophorylated phosphopeptides identified through deep proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of breast tumor samples, previously genomically analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA).

  16. Breast Cancer Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Data Released - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) scientists have released a dataset of proteins and phophorylated phosphopeptides identified through deep proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of breast tumor samples, previously genomically analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA).

  17. Characterization of the porcine synovial fluid proteome and a comparison to the plasma proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tue Bjerg Bennike

    2015-12-01

    In addition, we analyzed the proteome of human plasma, and compared the proteomes to the obtained porcine synovial fluid proteome. The proteome of the two body fluids were found highly similar, underlining the detected plasma derived nature of many synovial fluid components. The healthy porcine synovial fluid proteomics data, human rheumatoid arthritis synovial fluid proteomics data used in the method optimization, human plasma proteomics data, and search results, have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD000935.

  18. Proteomics analysis of vesicles isolated from plasma and urine of prostate cancer patients using a multiplex, aptamer-based protein array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, Joanne Louise; Brennan, Paul; Gurney, Mark; Webber, Jason Paul; Spary, Lisa Kate; Carton, David Gil; Falcón-Pérez, Juan Manuel; Walton, Sean Peter; Mason, Malcolm David; Tabi, Zsuzsanna; Clayton, Aled

    2016-01-01

    Proteomics analysis of biofluid-derived vesicles holds enormous potential for discovering non-invasive disease markers. Obtaining vesicles of sufficient quality and quantity for profiling studies has, however, been a major problem, as samples are often replete with co-isolated material that can interfere with the identification of genuine low abundance, vesicle components. Here, we used a combination of ultracentrifugation and size-exclusion chromatography to isolate and analyse vesicles of plasma or urine origin. We describe a sample-handling workflow that gives reproducible, quality vesicle isolations sufficient for subsequent protein profiling. Using a semi-quantitative aptamer-based protein array, we identified around 1,000 proteins, of which almost 400 were present at comparable quantities in plasma versus urine vesicles. Significant differences were, however, apparent with elements like HSP90, integrin αVβ5 and Contactin-1 more prevalent in urinary vesicles, while hepatocyte growth factor activator, prostate-specific antigen–antichymotrypsin complex and many others were more abundant in plasma vesicles. This was also applied to a small set of specimens collected from men with metastatic prostate cancer, highlighting several proteins with the potential to indicate treatment refractory disease. The study provides a practical platform for furthering protein profiling of vesicles in prostate cancer, and, hopefully, many other disease scenarios. PMID:27363484

  19. The Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer | About

    Science.gov (United States)

    An objective of the Reagents and Resources component of NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer Initiative is to generate highly characterized monoclonal antibodies to human proteins associated with cancer.

  20. The Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer | Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    An objective of the Reagents and Resources component of NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer Initiative is to generate highly characterized monoclonal antibodies to human proteins associated with cancer.

  1. Human maternal plasma proteomic changes with parturition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Phillips

    2014-12-01

    Significance: Proteomic technology is constantly advancing, and the latest techniques enable gel-free analysis of minimally preprocessed, complex biological samples, enabling simultaneous identification and quantification of many hundreds of proteins. The technique of TMT labelling and Orbitrap mass spectrometry is applicable to the analysis of serial maternal plasma samples in order to identify potential markers of the onset of labour.

  2. Biospecimen Solicitation - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A funding opportunity in support of the National Cancer Institute’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) seeks to prospectively procure tumor samples, collected for proteomics investigation.

  3. Letter from the Director - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI’s Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer (CPTC) initiative is focused on developing a better understanding of cancer biology through the proteomic interrogation of genomically characterized tumors from sources such as The Cancer Genome Atlas.

  4. Proteomics Data on UCSC Genome Browser - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium scientists are working together with the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genomics Institute to provide public access to cancer proteomics data.

  5. Progress through Collaboration - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI), through the Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR), has signed two Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) in the areas of sharing proteomics reagents and protocols and also in regulatory science.

  6. Director's Update - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (NCI-CPTAC) has recently begun the proteomic interrogation of genomically-characterized tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas.

  7. Characterization of the porcine synovial fluid proteome and a comparison to the plasma proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Barnaby, Omar; Steen, Hanno; Stensballe, Allan

    2015-12-01

    Synovial fluid is present in all joint cavities, and protects the articular cartilage surfaces in large by lubricating the joint, thus reducing friction. Several studies have described changes in the protein composition of synovial fluid in patients with joint disease. However, the protein concentration, content, and synovial fluid volume change dramatically during active joint diseases and inflammation, and the proteome composition of healthy synovial fluid is incompletely characterized. We performed a normative proteomics analysis of porcine synovial fluid, and report data from optimizing proteomic methods to investigate the proteome of healthy porcine synovial fluid (Bennike et al., 2014 [1]). We included an evaluation of different proteolytic sample preparation techniques, and an analysis of posttranslational modifications with a focus on glycosylation. We used pig (Sus Scrofa) as a model organism, as the porcine immune system is highly similar to human and the pig genome is sequenced. Furthermore, porcine model systems are commonly used large animal models to study several human diseases. In addition, we analyzed the proteome of human plasma, and compared the proteomes to the obtained porcine synovial fluid proteome. The proteome of the two body fluids were found highly similar, underlining the detected plasma derived nature of many synovial fluid components. The healthy porcine synovial fluid proteomics data, human rheumatoid arthritis synovial fluid proteomics data used in the method optimization, human plasma proteomics data, and search results, have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD000935. PMID:26543887

  8. feature - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    "Cancer is a disease of the genome," noted Lynda Chin, M.D., professor of dermatology, Harvard Medical School and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. "And understanding the impact of genomic changes in the proteome is critically important for converting genomic knowledge into something that a clinician can use on their patients."

  9. Plasma Proteome Profiling to Assess Human Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, Philipp E; Kulak, Nils A; Pichler, Garwin; Holdt, Lesca M; Teupser, Daniel; Mann, Matthias

    2016-03-23

    Proteins in the circulatory system mirror an individual's physiology. In daily clinical practice, protein levels are generally determined using single-protein immunoassays. High-throughput, quantitative analysis using mass-spectrometry-based proteomics of blood, plasma, and serum would be advantageous but is challenging because of the high dynamic range of protein abundances. Here, we introduce a rapid and robust "plasma proteome profiling" pipeline. This single-run shotgun proteomic workflow does not require protein depletion and enables quantitative analysis of hundreds of plasma proteomes from 1 μl single finger pricks with 20 min gradients. The apolipoprotein family, inflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein, gender-related proteins, and >40 FDA-approved biomarkers are reproducibly quantified (CV proteome obtained by simple peptide pre-fractionation. Plasma proteome profiling delivers an informative portrait of a person's health state, and we envision its large-scale use in biomedicine. PMID:27135364

  10. Plasma Proteomic Analysis May Identify New Markers for Radiation-Induced Lung Toxicity in Patients With Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To study whether radiation induces differential changes in plasma proteomics in patients with and without radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT) of Grade ≥2 (RILT2). Methods and Materials: A total of 57 patients with NSCLC received radiation therapy (RT) were eligible. Twenty patients, 6 with RILT2 with tumor stage matched to 14 without RILT2, were enrolled for this analysis. Platelet-poor plasma was obtained before RT, at 2, 4, 6 weeks during RT, and 1 and 3 months after RT. Plasma proteomes were compared using a multiplexed quantitative proteomics approach involving ExacTag labeling, reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and nano-LC electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. Variance components models were used to identify the differential protein expression between patients with and without RILT2. Results: More than 100 proteins were identified and quantified. After excluding proteins for which there were not at least 2 subjects with data for at least two time points, 76 proteins remained for this preliminary analysis. C4b-binding protein alpha chain, Complement C3, and Vitronectin had significantly higher expression levels in patients with RILT2 compared with patients without RILT2, based on both the data sets of RT start to 3 months post-RT (p < 0.01) and RT start to the end of RT (p < 0.01). The expression ratios of patients with RILT2 vs. without RILT2 were 1.60, 1.36, 1.46, and 1.66, 1.34, 1.46, for the above three proteins, respectively. Conclusions: This proteomic approach identified new plasma protein markers for future studies on RILT prediction.

  11. NCI Launches Proteomics Assay Portal - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a paper recently published by the journal Nature Methods, Investigators from the National Cancer Institute’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (NCI-CPTAC) announced the launch of a proteomics Assay Portal for multiple reaction monitoring-mass

  12. Proteomic Approaches for Biomarker Panels in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanase, Cristiana; Albulescu, Radu; Neagu, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Proteomic technologies remain the main backbone of biomarkers discovery in cancer. The continuous development of proteomic technologies also enlarges the bioinformatics domain, thus founding the main pillars of cancer therapy. The main source for diagnostic/prognostic/therapy monitoring biomarker panels are molecules that have a dual role, being both indicators of disease development and therapy targets. Proteomic technologies, such as mass-spectrometry approaches and protein array technologies, represent the main technologies that can depict these biomarkers. Herein, we will illustrate some of the most recent strategies for biomarker discovery in cancer, including the development of immune-markers and the use of cancer stem cells as target therapy. The challenges of proteomic biomarker discovery need new forms of cross-disciplinary conglomerates that will result in increased and tailored access to treatments for patients; diagnostic companies would benefit from the enhanced co-development of companion diagnostics and pharmaceutical companies. In the technology optimization in biomarkers, immune assays are the leaders of discovery machinery. PMID:26565430

  13. Plasma Proteomic Profiling in Hereditary Breast Cancer Reveals a BRCA1-Specific Signature: Diagnostic and Functional Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Domenica Scumaci; Laura Tammè; Claudia Vincenza Fiumara; Giusi Pappaianni; Antonio Concolino; Emanuela Leone; Maria Concetta Faniello; Barbara Quaresima; Enrico Ricevuto; Francesco Saverio Costanzo; Giovanni Cuda

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast cancer (BC) is a leading cause of death among women. Among the major risk factors, an important role is played by familial history of BC. Germ-line mutations in BRCA1/2 genes account for most of the hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancers. Gene expression profiling studies have disclosed specific molecular signatures for BRCA1/2-related breast tumors as compared to sporadic cases, which might help diagnosis and clinical follow-up. Even though, a clear hallmark of BRCA1/2-po...

  14. Characterization of the porcine synovial fluid proteome and a comparison to the plasma proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Barnaby, Omar; Steen, Hanno;

    2015-01-01

    Synovial fluid is present in all joint cavities, and protects the articular cartilage surfaces in large by lubricating the joint, thus reducing friction. Several studies have described changes in the protein composition of synovial fluid in patients with joint disease. However, the protein concen...... proteomics data used in the method optimization, human plasma proteomics data, and search results, have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD000935....

  15. Cancer Proteomics: The State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C. Herrmann

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Now that the human genome has been determined, the field of proteomics is ramping up to tackle the vast protein networks that both control and are controlled by the information encoded by the genome. The study of proteomics should yield an unparalleled understanding of cancer as well as an invaluable new target for therapeutic intervention and markers for early detection. This rapidly expanding field attempts to track the protein interactions responsible for all cellular processes. By careful analysis of these systems, a detailed understanding of the molecular causes and consequences of cancer should emerge. A brief overview of some of the cutting edge technologies employed by this rapidly expanding field is given, along with specific examples of how these technologies are employed. Soon cellular protein networks will be understood at a level that will permit a totally new paradigm of diagnosis and will allow therapy tailored to individual patients and situations.

  16. Advances take stage - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regulatory advances in proteomics will be taking center stage at a Symposia scheduled to occur at the 2011 American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) Annual Meeting. The symposium entitled "Enabling Translational Proteomics with NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer" is scheduled for July 25, 2011 at AACC's annual Meeting.

  17. Tumor Cold Ischemia - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a recently published manuscript in the journal of Molecular and Cellular Proteomics, researchers from the National Cancer Institutes (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) investigated the effect of cold ischemia on the proteome of fresh frozen tumors.

  18. Proteomics of CDK inhibition in cancer cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovářová, Hana; Skalníková, Helena; Halada, Petr; Strnad, M.; Hajdúch, M.

    Olomouc: -, 2007, s. 1-1. [Symposium and Workshop on Molecular Pathology /3./. Olomouc (CZ), 04.05.2007-05.05.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/05/0418; GA MŠk LC07017 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors * cancer * proteomics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  19. Proteomics Analysis for Finding Serum Markers of Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yushan Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A combination of peptide ligand library beads (PLLB and 1D gel liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (1DGel-LC-MS/MS was employed to analyze serum samples from patients with ovarian cancer and from healthy controls. Proteomic analysis identified 1200 serum proteins, among which 57 proteins were upregulated and 10 were downregulated in the sera from cancer patients. Retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4 is highly upregulated in the ovarian cancer serum samples. ELISA was employed to measure plasma concentrations of RBP4 in 80 samples from ovarian cancer patients, healthy individuals, myoma patients, and patients with benign ovarian tumor, respectively. The plasma concentrations of RBP4 ranging from 76.91 to 120.08 ng/mL with the mean value 89.13±1.67 ng/mL in ovarian cancer patients are significantly higher than those in healthy individuals (10.85±2.38 ng/mL. Results were further confirmed with immunohistochemistry, demonstrating that RBP4 expression levels in normal ovarian tissue were lower than those in ovarian cancer tissues. Our results suggested that RBP4 is a potential biomarker for diagnostic of screening ovarian cancer.

  20. A mouse to human search for plasma proteome changes associated with pancreatic tumor development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor M Faca

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The complexity and heterogeneity of the human plasma proteome have presented significant challenges in the identification of protein changes associated with tumor development. Refined genetically engineered mouse (GEM models of human cancer have been shown to faithfully recapitulate the molecular, biological, and clinical features of human disease. Here, we sought to exploit the merits of a well-characterized GEM model of pancreatic cancer to determine whether proteomics technologies allow identification of protein changes associated with tumor development and whether such changes are relevant to human pancreatic cancer. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Plasma was sampled from mice at early and advanced stages of tumor development and from matched controls. Using a proteomic approach based on extensive protein fractionation, we confidently identified 1,442 proteins that were distributed across seven orders of magnitude of abundance in plasma. Analysis of proteins chosen on the basis of increased levels in plasma from tumor-bearing mice and corroborating protein or RNA expression in tissue documented concordance in the blood from 30 newly diagnosed patients with pancreatic cancer relative to 30 control specimens. A panel of five proteins selected on the basis of their increased level at an early stage of tumor development in the mouse was tested in a blinded study in 26 humans from the CARET (Carotene and Retinol Efficacy Trial cohort. The panel discriminated pancreatic cancer cases from matched controls in blood specimens obtained between 7 and 13 mo prior to the development of symptoms and clinical diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that GEM models of cancer, in combination with in-depth proteomic analysis, provide a useful strategy to identify candidate markers applicable to human cancer with potential utility for early detection.

  1. Severe childhood malaria syndromes defined by plasma proteome profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Burté

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cerebral malaria (CM and severe malarial anemia (SMA are the most serious life-threatening clinical syndromes of Plasmodium falciparum infection in childhood. Therefore it is important to understand the pathology underlying the development of CM and SMA, as opposed to uncomplicated malaria (UM. Different host responses to infection are likely to be reflected in plasma proteome-patterns that associate with clinical status and therefore provide indicators of the pathogenesis of these syndromes. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Plasma and comprehensive clinical data for discovery and validation cohorts were obtained as part of a prospective case-control study of severe childhood malaria at the main tertiary hospital of the city of Ibadan, an urban and densely populated holoendemic malaria area in Nigeria. A total of 946 children participated in this study. Plasma was subjected to high-throughput proteomic profiling. Statistical pattern-recognition methods were used to find proteome-patterns that defined disease groups. Plasma proteome-patterns accurately distinguished children with CM and with SMA from those with UM, and from healthy or severely ill malaria-negative children. CONCLUSIONS: We report that an accurate definition of the major childhood malaria syndromes can be achieved using plasma proteome-patterns. Our proteomic data can be exploited to understand the pathogenesis of the different childhood severe malaria syndromes.

  2. Membrane proteomic analysis of pancreatic cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xiaojun

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human tumors due to its high potential of local invasion and metastasis. The aim of this study was to characterize the membrane proteomes of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC cells of primary and metastatic origins, and to identify potential target proteins related to metastasis of pancreatic cancer. Methods Membrane/membrane-associated proteins were isolated from AsPC-1 and BxPC-3 cells and identified with a proteomic approach based on SDS-PAGE, in-gel tryptic digestion and liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. X! Tandem was used for database searching against the SwissProt human protein database. Results We identified 221 & 208 proteins from AsPC-1 and BxPC-3 cells, respectively, most of which are membrane or membrane-associated proteins. A hundred and nine proteins were found in both cell lines while the others were present in either AsPC-1 or BxPC-3 cells. Differentially expressed proteins between two cell lines include modulators of cell adhesion, cell motility or tumor invasion as well as metabolic enzymes involved in glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, or nucleotide/lipid metabolism. Conclusion Membrane proteomes of AsPC-1 (metastatic and BxPC-3 (primary cells are remarkably different. The differentially expressed membrane proteins may serve as potential targets for diagnostic and therapeutic interventions.

  3. Efficient Isolation and Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Cancer Cell Plasma Membrane Proteins for Identification of Metastasis-Associated Cell Surface Markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Rikke; Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Jensen, Ole N; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2009-01-01

    proteins that could be quantified from 40 to 93%. Repeated LC-MS/MS analyses (3-4 times) of each sample increased the number of identified proteins by 60%. The use of Percoll/sucrose density separation allowed subfractionation of membranes leading to enrichment of membrane proteins (66%) and reduction from...... 33% to only 16% of protein from other membranous organelles such as endoplasmatic reticulum, Golgi, and mitochondria. In total, our optimized methods resulted in 1919 protein identifications (corresponding to 826 at similarity level 80% (SL80); 1145 (509 at SL80) were identified by two or more...... peptides of which 622 (300 at SL80) were membrane proteins. The quantitative proteomic analysis identified 16 cell surface proteins as potential markers of the ability of breast cancer cells to form distant metastases....

  4. Proteomic maps of breast cancer subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyanova, Stefka; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Kronqvist, Pauliina; Cox, Juergen; Mann, Matthias; Geiger, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    Systems-wide profiling of breast cancer has almost always entailed RNA and DNA analysis by microarray and sequencing techniques. Marked developments in proteomic technologies now enable very deep profiling of clinical samples, with high identification and quantification accuracy. We analysed 40 oestrogen receptor positive (luminal), Her2 positive and triple negative breast tumours and reached a quantitative depth of >10,000 proteins. These proteomic profiles identified functional differences between breast cancer subtypes, related to energy metabolism, cell growth, mRNA translation and cell-cell communication. Furthermore, we derived a signature of 19 proteins, which differ between the breast cancer subtypes, through support vector machine (SVM)-based classification and feature selection. Remarkably, only three proteins of the signature were associated with gene copy number variations and eleven were also reflected on the mRNA level. These breast cancer features revealed by our work provide novel insights that may ultimately translate to development of subtype-specific therapeutics. PMID:26725330

  5. The Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer | Antibody Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    An objective of the Reagents and Resources component of NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer Initiative is to generate highly characterized monoclonal antibodies to human proteins associated with cancer.

  6. The Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer | Antibody Scientific Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    An objective of the Reagents and Resources component of NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer Initiative is to generate highly characterized monoclonal antibodies to human proteins associated with cancer.

  7. The Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer | Characterization Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    An objective of the Reagents and Resources component of NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer Initiative is to generate highly characterized monoclonal antibodies to human proteins associated with cancer.

  8. The Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer | Reagent Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    An objective of the Reagents and Resources component of NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer Initiative is to generate highly characterized monoclonal antibodies to human proteins associated with cancer.

  9. Proteomics and Mass Spectrometry for Cancer Biomarker Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Lu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteomics is a rapidly advancing field not only in the field of biology but also in translational cancer research. In recent years, mass spectrometry and associated technologies have been explored to identify proteins or a set of proteins specific to a given disease, for the purpose of disease detection and diagnosis. Such biomarkers are being investigated in samples including cells, tissues, serum/plasma, and other types of body fluids. When sufficiently refined, proteomic technologies may pave the way for early detection of cancer or individualized therapy for cancer. Mass spectrometry approaches coupled with bioinformatic tools are being developed for biomarker discovery and validation. Understanding basic concepts and application of such technology by investigators in the field may accelerate the clinical application of protein biomarkers in disease management.Abbreviations: 2DE: two-dimensional gel electrophoresis; ABPP: activity-based protein profiling; CEA: carcinoembryonic antigen; CI: confidence interval; ESI: electrospray ionization; FP: fluorophosphonate; HPLC: high performance liquid chromatography; ICAT: isotope coded affi nitytags; IEF: isoelectric focusing; iTRAQ: isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification; LCMS: combined liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry; LCMSMS: liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry; LOD: limit of detection; m/z: mass to charge ratio; MALDI: matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization; MS: mass spectrometry; MUDPIT: multidimensional protein identification technology; NAF: nipple aspirate fluid; PMF: peptide mass fingerprinting; PSA: prostate specifi c antigen; PTMs: post-translational modifications; RPMA: reverse phase protein microarray; SELDI: surface enhanced laser desorption ionization; TOF: time-of-flight.

  10. Plasma for cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keidar, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Plasma medicine is a relatively new field that grew from research in application of low-temperature (or cold) atmospheric plasmas in bioengineering. One of the most promising applications of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is cancer therapy. Convincing evidence of CAP selectivity towards the cancer cells has been accumulated. This review summarizes the state of the art of this emerging field, presenting various aspects of CAP application in cancer such as the role of reactive species (reactive oxygen and nitrogen), cell cycle modification, in vivo application, CAP interaction with cancer cells in conjunction with nanoparticles, and computational oncology applied to CAP.

  11. Implementation of proteomics for cancer research: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Parisa; Shahrokni, Armin; Ranjbar, Mohammad R Nezami

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of the death, accounts for about 13% of all annual deaths worldwide. Many different fields of science are collaborating together studying cancer to improve our knowledge of this lethal disease, and find better solutions for diagnosis and treatment. Proteomics is one of the most recent and rapidly growing areas in molecular biology that helps understanding cancer from an omics data analysis point of view. The human proteome project was officially initiated in 2008. Proteomics enables the scientists to interrogate a variety of biospecimens for their protein contents and measure the concentrations of these proteins. Current necessary equipment and technologies for cancer proteomics are mass spectrometry, protein microarrays, nanotechnology and bioinformatics. In this paper, we provide a brief review on proteomics and its application in cancer research. After a brief introduction including its definition, we summarize the history of major previous work conducted by researchers, followed by an overview on the role of proteomics in cancer studies. We also provide a list of different utilities in cancer proteomics and investigate their advantages and shortcomings from theoretical and practical angles. Finally, we explore some of the main challenges and conclude the paper with future directions in this field. PMID:24761843

  12. Integration of proteomics into systems biology of cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hanash, S; Schliekelman, M.; Q. Zhang; Taguchi, A

    2012-01-01

    Deciphering the complexity and heterogeneity of cancer benefits from integration of proteomic level data into systems biology efforts. The opportunities available as a result of advances in proteomic technologies, the successes to date and the challenges involved in integrating diverse datasets are addressed in this review.

  13. Application of proteomics in the study of rodent models of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terp, Mikkel Green; Ditzel, Henrik J

    tumor development from highly matched disease cases and controls with identical environmental and genetic backgrounds, thus providing an excellent method for biomarker discovery. Xenograft and genetically engineered mouse models have been widely used to identify proteomic patterns in tumor tissues and...... plasma samples associated with different stages of human cancer, including early cancer detection and development of metastasis. Here, we review proteomic strategies to identify proteins involved in key cancer processes within such animal models as well as biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis, and...... monitoring of cancer progression and treatment response. Central to such studies is the ability to ensure at an early stage that the identified proteins are of clinical relevance by examining relevant specimens from larger cohorts of cancer patients....

  14. Proteomics Funding Opportunity - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    To expand the understanding of how cells sense and respond to changes in their physical environment, the NCI is seeking to perform proteomic assays on the panel of cell lines grown on a variety of substrates. These assays will provide insight into changes in protein levels or phosphorylation changes that could reflect the activity of mechano-transduction pathways.

  15. Plasma proteomics to identify biomarkers - Application to cardiovascular diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Hans Christian; Overgaard, Martin; Melholt Rasmussen, Lars

    , this technology may therefore identify new biomarkers that previously have not been associated with cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we summarize the key challenges and considerations, including strategies, recent discoveries and clinical applications in cardiovascular proteomics that may lead......There is an unmet need for new cardiovascular biomarkers. Despite this only few biomarkers for the diagnosis or screening of cardiovascular diseases have been implemented in the clinic. Thousands of proteins can be analysed in plasma by mass spectrometry-based proteomics technologies. Therefore...

  16. Plasma proteomics to identify biomarkers – application to cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Christian Beck

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an unmet need for new cardiovascular biomarkers. Despite this only few biomarkers for the diagnosis or screening of cardiovascular diseases have been implemented in the clinic. Thousands of proteins can be analysed in plasma by mass spectrometry-based proteomics technologies. Therefore, this technology may therefore identify new biomarkers that previously have not been associated with cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we summarize the key challenges and considerations, including strategies, recent discoveries and clinical applications in cardiovascular proteomics that may lead to the discovery of novel cardiovascular biomarkers.

  17. Computational Omics - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) and the NVIDIA Foundation are pleased to announce funding opportunities in the fight against cancer. Each organization has launched a request for proposals (RFP) that will collectively fund up to $2 million to help to develop a new generation of data-intensive scientific tools to find new ways to treat cancer.

  18. Connecting Genomic Alterations to Cancer Biology with Proteomics: The NCI Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Matthew; Gillette, Michael; Carr, Steven A.; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Townsend, Reid; Kinsinger, Christopher; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Liebler, Daniel

    2013-10-03

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium is applying the latest generation of proteomic technologies to genomically annotated tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program, a joint initiative of the NCI and the National Human Genome Research Institute. By providing a fully integrated accounting of DNA, RNA, and protein abnormalities in individual tumors, these datasets will illuminate the complex relationship between genomic abnormalities and cancer phenotypes, thus producing biologic insights as well as a wave of novel candidate biomarkers and therapeutic targets amenable to verifi cation using targeted mass spectrometry methods.

  19. Mass spectrometry-based serum proteome pattern analysis in molecular diagnostics of early stage breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stobiecki Maciej

    2009-07-01

    .0003 increased level of osteopontin in blood of the group of cancer patients studied (however, the plasma level of osteopontin classified cancer samples with 88% sensitivity but only 28% specificity. Conclusion MALDI-ToF spectrometry of serum has an obvious potential to differentiate samples between early breast cancer patients and healthy controls. Importantly, a classifier built on MS-based serum proteome patterns outperforms available protein biomarkers analyzed in blood by immunoassays.

  20. Automated Sample Preparation Platform for Mass Spectrometry-Based Plasma Proteomics and Biomarker Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilém Guryča

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The identification of novel biomarkers from human plasma remains a critical need in order to develop and monitor drug therapies for nearly all disease areas. The discovery of novel plasma biomarkers is, however, significantly hampered by the complexity and dynamic range of proteins within plasma, as well as the inherent variability in composition from patient to patient. In addition, it is widely accepted that most soluble plasma biomarkers for diseases such as cancer will be represented by tissue leakage products, circulating in plasma at low levels. It is therefore necessary to find approaches with the prerequisite level of sensitivity in such a complex biological matrix. Strategies for fractionating the plasma proteome have been suggested, but improvements in sensitivity are often negated by the resultant process variability. Here we describe an approach using multidimensional chromatography and on-line protein derivatization, which allows for higher sensitivity, whilst minimizing the process variability. In order to evaluate this automated process fully, we demonstrate three levels of processing and compare sensitivity, throughput and reproducibility. We demonstrate that high sensitivity analysis of the human plasma proteome is possible down to the low ng/mL or even high pg/mL level with a high degree of technical reproducibility.

  1. Evaluation of strategy for analyzing mouse liver plasma membrane proteome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Ping; ZHANG; LiJun; LI; XuanWen; WANG; XiE; CAO; Rui; LIU; Zhen; XIONG; JiXian; PENG; Xia; WEI; YingJuan; YING; XingFeng; WANG; XianChun; LIANG; SongPing

    2007-01-01

    Plasma membrane (PM) proteome is one of the major subproteomes present in the cell,and is very important in liver function. In the present work, C57 mouse liver PM was purified by density-gradient centrifugation. The purified PM was verified by electron microscope analysis and Western blotting. The results showed that the PM was enriched by more than 20-fold and the contamination of mitochondria was reduced by 2-fold compared with the homogenization fraction. Proteins were separated by 2DE and 1DE, trypsin-digested and submitted to ESI-Q-TOF and MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectrometry or directly digested in solution and analyzed by LC-ESI ion trap mass spectrometry. In all, 547 non-redundant mouse liver PM proteins were identified, of which 34% contributed to plasma membrane or plasma membrane-related proteins. This study optimized and evaluated the HLPP plasma membrane proteome analysis method and made a systematic analysis on PM proteome.

  2. Biospecimen Core Resource - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this notice is to notify the community that the National Cancer Institute's (NCI’s) Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR) is seeking sources to establish a Biospecimen Core Resource (BCR), capable of receiving, qualifying, processing, and distributing annotated biospecimens.

  3. Facile preparation of salivary extracellular vesicles for cancer proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Xia, Zhijun; Shang, Zhi; Sun, Kaibo; Niu, Xiaomin; Qian, Liqiang; Fan, Liu-Yin; Cao, Cheng-Xi; Xiao, Hua

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are membrane surrounded structures released by cells, which have been increasingly recognized as mediators of intercellular communication. Recent reports indicate that EVs participate in important biological processes and could serve as potential source for cancer biomarkers. As an attractive EVs source with merit of non-invasiveness, human saliva is a unique medium for clinical diagnostics. Thus, we proposed a facile approach to prepare salivary extracellular vesicles (SEVs). Affinity chromatography column combined with filter system (ACCF) was developed to efficiently remove the high abundant proteins and viscous interferences of saliva. Protein profiling in the SEVs obtained by this strategy was compared with conventional centrifugation method, which demonstrated that about 70% more SEVs proteins could be revealed. To explore its utility for cancer proteomics, we analyzed the proteome of SEVs in lung cancer patients and normal controls. Shotgun proteomic analysis illustrated that 113 and 95 proteins have been identified in cancer group and control group, respectively. Among those 63 proteins that have been consistently discovered only in cancer group, 12 proteins are lung cancer related. Our results demonstrated that SEVs prepared through the developed strategy are valuable samples for proteomics and could serve as a promising liquid biopsy for cancer.

  4. Integrating Genomics with Proteomics - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Approximately 60 percent of patients diagnosed with cancer present as early stage disease (Stage I and II). Despite the favorable prognosis associated with treatment intervention of such early stage disease (typically surgical excision), there are a small, but significant, fraction of these cancers that appear to be hardwired for aggressive metastatic behavior and ultimately lethal outcome.

  5. The plasma membrane proteome of germinating barley embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hynek, Radovan; Svensson, Birte; Jensen, O.N.;

    2009-01-01

    amphiphilicity and low abundance of membrane proteins. A fraction enriched in plasma membranes was prepared from embryos dissected from 18 h germinated barley seeds using aqueous two-phase partitioning. Reversed-phase chromatography on C-4 resin performed in micro-spin columns with stepwise elution by 2-propanol......Cereal seed germination involves a complex coordination between different seed tissues. Plasma membranes must play crucial roles in coordination and execution of germination; however, very little is known about seed plasma membrane proteomes due to limited tissue amounts combined with...... was used to reduce soluble protein contamination and enrich for hydrophobic proteins. Sixty-one proteins in 14 SDS-PAGE bands were identified by LC-MS/MS and database searches. The identifications provide new insight into the plasma membrane functions in seed germination....

  6. Multiplexed immunofluorescence delineates proteomic cancer cell states associated with metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Sood, Anup; Miller, Alexandra M.; Brogi, Edi; Sui, Yunxia; Armenia, Joshua; McDonough, Elizabeth; Santamaria-Pang, Alberto; Carlin, Sean; Stamper, Aleksandra; Campos, Carl; Pang, Zhengyu; Li, Qing; Port, Elisa; Graeber, Thomas G.; Schultz, Nikolaus

    2016-01-01

    The phenotypic diversity of cancer results from genetic and nongenetic factors. Most studies of cancer heterogeneity have focused on DNA alterations, as technologies for proteomic measurements in clinical specimen are currently less advanced. Here, we used a multiplexed immunofluorescence staining platform to measure the expression of 27 proteins at the single-cell level in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded samples from treatment-naive stage II/III human breast cancer. Unsupervised cluster...

  7. Proteomics of ovarian cancer: functional insights and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elzek, Mohamed A.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2015-03-01

    In the past decade, there has been an increasing interest in applying proteomics to assist in understanding the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer, elucidating the mechanism of drug resistance, and in the development of biomarkers for early detection of ovarian cancer. Although ovarian cancer is a spectrum of different diseases, the strategies for diagnosis and treatment with surgery and adjuvant therapy are similar across ovarian cancer types, increasing the general applicabil- ity of discoveries made through proteomics research. While proteomic experiments face many difficulties which slow the pace of clinical applications, recent advances in proteomic technology contribute significantly to the identification of aberrant proteins and networks which can serve as targets for biomarker development and individualized therapies. This review provides a summary of the literature on proteomics’ contributions to ovarian cancer research and highlights the current issues, future directions, and challenges. We propose that protein-level characterization of primary lesion in ovarian cancer can decipher the mystery of this disease, improve diagnostic tools, and lead to more effective screening programs.

  8. Onco-proteogenomics: cancer proteomics joins forces with genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro, Javier A; Sinha, Ankit; Kislinger, Thomas; Boutros, Paul C

    2014-11-01

    The complexities of tumor genomes are rapidly being uncovered, but how they are regulated into functional proteomes remains poorly understood. Standard proteomics workflows use databases of known proteins, but these databases do not capture the uniqueness of the cancer transcriptome, with its point mutations, unusual splice variants and gene fusions. Onco-proteogenomics integrates mass spectrometry-generated data with genomic information to identify tumor-specific peptides. Linking tumor-derived DNA, RNA and protein measurements into a central-dogma perspective has the potential to improve our understanding of cancer biology. PMID:25357240

  9. Collaboration - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite great strides in proteomics and the growing number of articles citing the discovery of potential biomarkers, the actual rate of introduction of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved protein analytes has been relatively unchanged over the past 10 years. One of reasons for the lack of new protein-based biomarkers approved has been a lack of information and understanding by the proteomics research community to the regulatory process used by the FDA.

  10. Cardiovascular-related proteins identified in human plasma by the HUPO Plasma Proteome Project pilot phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhane, Beniam T; Zong, Chenggong; Liem, David A; Huang, Aaron; Le, Steven; Edmondson, Ricky D; Jones, Richard C; Qiao, Xin; Whitelegge, Julian P; Ping, Peipei; Vondriska, Thomas M

    2005-08-01

    Proteomic profiling of accessible bodily fluids, such as plasma, has the potential to accelerate biomarker/biosignature development for human diseases. The HUPO Plasma Proteome Project pilot phase examined human plasma with distinct proteomic approaches across multiple laboratories worldwide. Through this effort, we confidently identified 3020 proteins, each requiring a minimum of two high-scoring MS/MS spectra. A critical step subsequent to protein identification is functional annotation, in particular with regard to organ systems and disease. Performing exhaustive literature searches, we have manually annotated a subset of these 3020 proteins that have cardiovascular-related functions on the basis of an existing body of published information. These cardiovascular-related proteins can be organized into eight groups: markers of inflammation and/or cardiovascular disease, vascular and coagulation, signaling, growth and differentiation, cytoskeletal, transcription factors, channels/receptors and heart failure and remodeling. In addition, analysis of the peptide per protein ratio for MS/MS identification reveals group-specific trends. These findings serve as a resource to interrogate the functions of plasma proteins, and moreover, the list of cardiovascular-related proteins in plasma constitutes a baseline proteomic blueprint for the future development of biosignatures for diseases such as myocardial ischemia and atherosclerosis. PMID:16052623

  11. Novel effects of hormonal contraceptive use on the plasma proteome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea R Josse

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hormonal contraceptive (HC use may increase cardiometabolic risk; however, the effect of HC on emerging cardiometabolic and other disease risk factors is not clear. OBJECTIVES: To determine the association between HC use and plasma proteins involved in established and emerging disease risk pathways. METHOD: Concentrations of 54 high-abundance plasma proteins were measured simultaneously by LC-MRM/MS in 783 women from the Toronto Nutrigenomics and Health Study. C-reactive protein (CRP was measured separately. ANCOVA was used to test differences in protein concentrations between users and non-users, and among HC users depending on total hormone dose. Linear regression was used to test the association between duration (years of HC use and plasma protein concentrations. Principal components analysis (PCA was used to identify plasma proteomic profiles in users and non-users. RESULTS: After Bonferroni correction, 19 proteins involved in inflammation, innate immunity, coagulation and blood pressure regulation were significantly different between users and non-users (P<0.0009. These differences were replicated across three distinct ethnocultural groups. Traditional markers of glucose and lipid metabolism were also significantly higher among HC users. Neither hormone dose nor duration of use affected protein concentrations. PCA identified 4 distinct proteomic profiles in users and 3 in non-users. CONCLUSION: HC use was associated with different concentrations of plasma proteins along various disease-related pathways, and these differences were present across different ethnicities. Aside from the known effect of HC on traditional biomarkers of cardiometabolic risk, HC use also affects numerous proteins that may be biomarkers of dysregulation in inflammation, coagulation and blood pressure.

  12. CPTAC Contributes to Healthdata.gov - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, proteomic data generated by the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) funded by National Cancer Institute (NCI) was highlighted to the wider research community at Healthdata.gov. Healthdata.gov aims to make health data more acces

  13. Proteomic analysis of tissue samples in translational breast cancer research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromov, Pavel; Moreira, José; Gromova, Irina

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, many proteomic technologies have been applied, with varying success, to the study of tissue samples of breast carcinoma for protein expression profiling in order to discover protein biomarkers/signatures suitable for: characterization and subtyping of tumors; early diagnosis, ...... translation of basic discoveries into the daily breast cancer clinical practice. In particular, we address major issues in experimental design by reviewing the strengths and weaknesses of current proteomic strategies in the context of the analysis of human breast tissue specimens....

  14. Human Cancer Classification: A Systems Biology- Based Model Integrating Morphology, Cancer Stem Cells, Proteomics, and Genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Halliday A Idikio

    2011-01-01

    Human cancer classification is currently based on the idea of cell of origin, light and electron microscopic attributes of the cancer. What is not yet integrated into cancer classification are the functional attributes of these cancer cells. Recent innovative techniques in biology have provided a wealth of information on the genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic changes in cancer cells. The emergence of the concept of cancer stem cells needs to be included in a classification model to capture...

  15. Plasma proteome analysis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical squamous cell carcinoma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mee Lee Looi; Saiful Anuar Karsani; Mariati Abdul Rahman; Ahmad Zailani Hatta Mohd Dali; Siti Aishah Md Ali; Wan Zurinah Wan Ngah; Yasmin Anum Mohd Yusof

    2009-12-01

    Although cervical cancer is preventable with early detection, it remains the second most common malignancy among women. An understanding of how proteins change in their expression during a particular diseased state such as cervical cancer will contribute to an understanding of how the disease develops and progresses. Potentially, it may also lead to the ability to predict the occurrence of the disease. With this in mind, we aimed to identify differentially expressed proteins in the plasma of cervical cancer patients. Plasma from control, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 3 and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) stage IV subjects was resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and the resulting proteome profiles compared. Differentially expressed protein spots were then identified by mass spectrometry. Eighteen proteins were found to be differentially expressed in the plasma of CIN 3 and SCC stage IV samples when compared with that of controls. Competitive ELISA further validated the expression of cytokeratin 19 and tetranectin. Functional analyses of these differentially expressed proteins will provide further insight into their potential role(s) in cervical cancer-specific monitoring and therapeutics.

  16. New Molecular Features of Colorectal Cancer Identified - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigators from the National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) who comprehensively analyzed 95 human colorectal tumor samples, have determined how gene alterations identified in previous analyses of the same samples

  17. Seminal plasma proteome of electroejaculated Bos indicus bulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rego, J P A; Crisp, J M; Moura, A A; Nouwens, A S; Li, Y; Venus, B; Corbet, N J; Corbet, D H; Burns, B M; Boe-Hansen, G B; McGowan, M R

    2014-07-01

    The present study describes the seminal plasma proteome of Bos indicus bulls. Fifty-six, 24-month old Australian Brahman sires were evaluated and subjected to electroejaculation. Seminal plasma proteins were separated by 2-D SDS-PAGE and identified by mass spectrometry. The percentage of progressively motile and morphologically normal sperm of the bulls were 70.4 ± 2.3 and 64 ± 3.2%, respectively. A total of 108 spots were identified in the 2-D maps, corresponding to 46 proteins. Binder of sperm proteins accounted for 55.8% of all spots detected in the maps and spermadhesins comprised the second most abundant constituents. Other proteins of the Bos indicus seminal plasma include clusterin, albumin, transferrin, metalloproteinase inhibitor 2, osteopontin, epididymal secretory protein E1, apolipoprotein A-1, heat shock 70 kDa protein, glutathione peroxidase 3, cathelicidins, alpha-enolase, tripeptidyl-peptidase 1, zinc-alpha-2-glycoprotein, plasma serine protease inhibitor, beta 2-microglobulin, proteasome subunit beta type-4, actin, cathepsins, nucleobinding-1, protein S100-A9, hemoglobin subunit alpha, cadherin-1, angiogenin-1, fibrinogen alpha and beta chain, ephirin-A1, protein DJ-1, serpin A3-7, alpha-2-macroglobulin, annexin A1, complement factor B, polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, seminal ribonuclease, ribonuclease-4, prostaglandin-H2 d-isomerase, platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, and phosphoglycerate kinase 1. In conclusion, this work uniquely portrays the Bos indicus seminal fluid proteome, based on samples from a large set of animals representing the Brahman cattle of the tropical Northern Australia. Based on putative biochemical attributes, seminal proteins act during sperm maturation, protection, capacitation and fertilization. PMID:24889044

  18. Application of proteomics in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, William C S

    2016-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a heterogeneous disease with diverse pathological features. Clinical proteomics allows the discovery of molecular markers and new therapeutic targets for this most prevalent type of lung cancer. Some of them may be used to detect early lung cancer, while others may serve as predictive markers of resistance to different therapies. Therapeutic targets and prognostic markers in NSCLC have also been discovered. These proteomics biomarkers may help to pair the individual NSCLC patient with the best treatment option. Despite the fact that implementation of these biomarkers in the clinic appears to be scarce, the recently launched Precision Medicine Initiative may encourage their translation into clinical practice. PMID:26577456

  19. Application of Proteomics to Cancer Molecular Diagnostics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sam HANASH

    2009-01-01

    @@ Strategies to achieve personalized medicine and improve public health encompass assessment of an individual's risk for disease, early detection and molecular classification of disease resulting in an informed choice of the most appropriate treatment instituted at an early stage of disease develop- ment. A major contribution of proteomics in this field is the development of blood based tests to achieve the goals of personalized medicine.

  20. Moving forward in colorectal cancer research, what proteomics has to tell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer and is highly fatal. During the last several years, research has been primarily based on the study of expression profiles using microarray technology. But now, investigators are putting into practice proteomic analyses of cancer tissues and cells to identify new diagnostic or therapeutic biomarkers for this cancer. Because the proteome reflects the state of a cell, tissue or organism more accurately, much is expected from proteomics to yield better tumor markers for disease diagnosis and therapy monitoring. This review summarizes the most relevant applications of proteomics the biomarker discovery for colorectal cancer.

  1. Proteomic profiling of urine for the detection of colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wakelam Michael JO

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer is the second most common cause of cancer related death in the developed world. To date, no blood or stool biomarkers with both high sensitivity and specificity for potentially curable early stage disease have been validated for clinical use. SELDI and MALDI profiling are being used increasingly to search for biomarkers in both blood and urine. Both techniques provide information predominantly on the low molecular weight proteome ( Results We collected urine from 67 patients with colorectal cancer and 72 non-cancer control subjects, diluted to a constant protein concentration and generated MALDI and SELDI spectra. The intensities of 19 peaks differed significantly between cancer and non-cancer patients by both t-tests and after adjusting for confounders using multiple linear regressions. Logistic regression classifiers based on peak intensities identified colorectal cancer with up to 78% sensitivity at 87% specificity. We identified and independently quantified 3 of the discriminatory peaks using synthetic stable isotope peptides (an 1885 Da fragment of fibrinogen and hepcidin-20 or ELISA (β2-microglobulin. Conclusion Changes in the urine proteome may aid in the early detection of colorectal cancer.

  2. Comparative proteome analysis of human epithelial ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagné Jean-Philippe

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epithelial ovarian cancer is a devastating disease associated with low survival prognosis mainly because of the lack of early detection markers and the asymptomatic nature of the cancer until late stage. Using two complementary proteomics approaches, a differential protein expression profile was carried out between low and highly transformed epithelial ovarian cancer cell lines which realistically mimic the phenotypic changes observed during evolution of a tumour metastasis. This investigation was aimed at a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying differentiation, proliferation and neoplastic progression of ovarian cancer. Results The quantitative profiling of epithelial ovarian cancer model cell lines TOV-81D and TOV-112D generated using iTRAQ analysis and two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled to liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry revealed some proteins with altered expression levels. Several of these proteins have been the object of interest in cancer research but others were unrecognized as differentially expressed in a context of ovarian cancer. Among these, series of proteins involved in transcriptional activity, cellular metabolism, cell adhesion or motility and cytoskeleton organization were identified, suggesting their possible role in the emergence of oncogenic pathways leading to aggressive cellular behavior. Conclusion The differential protein expression profile generated by the two proteomics approaches combined to complementary characterizations studies will open the way to more exhaustive and systematic representation of the disease and will provide valuable information that may be helpful to uncover the molecular mechanisms related to epithelial ovarian cancer.

  3. Inside human aortic stenosis: a proteomic analysis of plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Dones, Félix; Darde, Verónica M; Alonso-Orgaz, Sergio; Lopez-Almodovar, Luis F; Mourino-Alvarez, Laura; Padial, Luis R; Vivanco, Fernando; Barderas, Maria G

    2012-02-16

    Valvular aortic stenosis (AS) produces a slowly progressive obstruction in left ventricular outflow track. For this reason, aortic valve replacement is warranted when the valvular stenosis is hemodinamically significant, becoming the most common worldwide cause of aortic valve surgery. Recent epidemiologic studies have revealed an association between degenerative AS and cardiovascular risk factors for atherosclerosis, althought reducing the exposure to such factors and statin therapies both fail to delay or reverse the pathology. Hence, a deeper understanding of the pathophysiology of this disease is required to identify appropriate preventive measures. A proteomic analysis of plasma will permit to know and identify the changes in protein expression induced by AS in this tissue. Using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) followed by mass spectrometry (MS), we compared the crude (not pre-fractioned) and pre-fractioned plasma from AS patients and control subjects. We sought to identify plasma proteins whose expression is modified in AS. In addition we investigated if crude plasma presented some alterations in the more abundant proteins since to date, has never been studied before. We also further investigated the link between this disease and atherosclerosis with a view to identifying new potential markers and therapeutic targets. PMID:22178735

  4. High Dynamic Range Characterization of the Trauma Patient Plasma Proteome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Tao; Qian, Weijun; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Kaushal, Amit; Monroe, Matthew E.; Varnum, Susan M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Maier, Ronald V.; Davis, Ronald W.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-06-08

    While human plasma represents an attractive sample for disease biomarker discovery, the extreme complexity and large dynamic range in protein concentrations present significant challenges for characterization, candidate biomarker discovery, and validation. Herein, we describe a strategy that combines immunoaffinity subtraction and chemical fractionation based on cysteinyl peptide and N-glycopeptide captures with 2D-LC-MS/MS to increase the dynamic range of analysis for plasma. Application of this ''divide-and-conquer'' strategy to trauma patient plasma significantly improved the overall dynamic range of detection and resulted in confident identification of 22,267 unique peptides from four different peptide populations (cysteinyl peptides, non-cysteinyl peptides, N-glycopeptides, and non-glycopeptides) that covered 3654 nonredundant proteins. Numerous low-abundance proteins were identified, exemplified by 78 ''classic'' cytokines and cytokine receptors and by 136 human cell differentiation molecules. Additionally, a total of 2910 different N-glycopeptides that correspond to 662 N-glycoproteins and 1553 N-glycosylation sites were identified. A panel of the proteins identified in this study is known to be involved in inflammation and immune responses. This study established an extensive reference protein database for trauma patients, which provides a foundation for future high-throughput quantitative plasma proteomic studies designed to elucidate the mechanisms that underlie systemic inflammatory responses.

  5. The Proteome of Primary Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iglesias-Gato, Diego; Wikström, Pernilla; Tyanova, Stefka;

    2016-01-01

    for disease aggressiveness. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Mass spectrometry was used for genome-scale quantitative proteomic profiling of 28 prostate tumors (Gleason score 6-9) and neighboring nonmalignant tissue in eight cases, obtained from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded prostatectomy samples....... Two independent cohorts of PCa patients (summing 752 cases) managed by expectancy were used for immunohistochemical evaluation of proneuropeptide-Y (pro-NPY) as a prognostic biomarker. RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: Over 9000 proteins were identified as expressed in the human prostate. Tumor tissue...

  6. Tissue proteomics in pancreatic cancer study: discovery, emerging technologies and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Sheng; Brentnall, Teresa A.; Kelly, Kimberly; Chen, Ru

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal disease that is difficult to diagnose and treat. The advances of proteomics technology, especially quantitative proteomics, have stimulated a great interest to apply this technology for pancreatic cancer study. A variety of tissue proteomics approaches have been applied to investigate pancreatic cancer and the associated diseases. These studies were carried out with various goals, aiming to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying pancreatic t...

  7. CPTAC Establishes Formal Relationships with Two Academic Institutions in Taiwan - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) has entered into memorandum of understandings (MOUs) with Chang Gung University and Academia Sinica, in Taipei, Taiwan.

  8. CPTAC Scientific Symposium - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    On behalf of the National Cancer Institute and the Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research, you are invited to the First Annual CPTAC Scientific Symposium on Wednesday, November 13, 2013. The purpose of this symposium, which consists of plenary and poster sessions, is for investigators from CPTAC community and beyond to share and discuss novel biological discoveries, analytical methods, and translational approaches using CPTAC data. All scientists who use, or wish to use CPTAC data are welcome to participate at this free event. The symposium will be held at the Natcher Conference Facility on the main campus of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland.

  9. Impact of proteomics on bladder cancer research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celis, Julio E; Gromova, Irina; Moreira, José Manuel Alfonso;

    2004-01-01

    Detecting bladder cancer at an early stage and predicting how a tumor will behave and act in response to therapy, as well as the identification of new targets for therapeutic intervention, are among the main areas of research that will benefit from the current explosion in the number of powerful ...

  10. Integrative proteomics and tissue microarray profiling indicate the association between overexpressed serum proteins and non-small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yansheng Liu

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Clinically, the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC can be improved by the early detection and risk screening among population. To meet this need, here we describe the application of extensive peptide level fractionation coupled with label free quantitative proteomics for the discovery of potential serum biomarkers for lung cancer, and the usage of Tissue microarray analysis (TMA and Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM assays for the following up validations in the verification phase. Using these state-of-art, currently available clinical proteomic approaches, in the discovery phase we confidently identified 647 serum proteins, and 101 proteins showed a statistically significant association with NSCLC in our 18 discovery samples. This serum proteomic dataset allowed us to discern the differential patterns and abnormal biological processes in the lung cancer blood. Of these proteins, Alpha-1B-glycoprotein (A1BG and Leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein (LRG1, two plasma glycoproteins with previously unknown function were selected as examples for which TMA and MRM verification were performed in a large sample set consisting about 100 patients. We revealed that A1BG and LRG1 were overexpressed in both the blood level and tumor sections, which can be referred to separate lung cancer patients from healthy cases.

  11. Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tølbøll, Trine Højgaard; Danscher, Anne Mette; Andersen, Pia Haubro;

    2012-01-01

    grouped manually to one or more of five major functional groups related to metabolism, cell structure, immunity, apoptosis and angiogenesis. These were chosen to represent basic cell functions and biological processes potentially involved in the pathogenesis of CHD. The LC–MS/MS-based proteomic analysis...... presented here is the largest published survey, so far, of the bovine claw tissue proteome....

  12. The value of proteomics in lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    van der Wekken, Anthonie J.; Hiltermann, Thijo J. N.; Groen, Harry J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have identified the prognostic and predictive value of proteins or peptides in lung cancer but most failed to provide strong evidence for their clinical applicability. The strongest predictive proteins seem to be fatty acid-binding protein heart (H-FABP), and the 8-peak mass spectrography signature of VeriStrat. When focusing on VeriStrat, a ‘VeriStrat good’ profile did not discriminate between chemotherapy and erlotinib. The ‘VeriStrat poor’ profile showed a better outcome to ch...

  13. The value of proteomics in lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiltermann, Thijo J. N.; Groen, Harry J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have identified the prognostic and predictive value of proteins or peptides in lung cancer but most failed to provide strong evidence for their clinical applicability. The strongest predictive proteins seem to be fatty acid-binding protein heart (H-FABP), and the 8-peak mass spectrography signature of VeriStrat. When focusing on VeriStrat, a ‘VeriStrat good’ profile did not discriminate between chemotherapy and erlotinib. The ‘VeriStrat poor’ profile showed a better outcome to chemotherapy than to erlotinib. VeriStrat is a prognostic test and only the “poor profile” discriminates for the type of therapy that should be chosen. Whether it adds useful information in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and wild type EGFR mutations is still doubtful. The position of the VeriStrat test in clinical practice is still not clear and we are waiting for prospective studies where biomarker test are involved in clinical decision. PMID:25815290

  14. A workflow for peptide-based proteomics in a poorly sequenced plant: A case study on the plasma membrane proteome of banana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vertommen, A.; Laurell Blom Møller, Anders; Cordewener, J. H. G.;

    2011-01-01

    membrane proteomics. However, their application in non-model plants demands special precautions to prevent false positive identification of proteins.In the current paper, a workflow for membrane proteomics in banana, a poorly sequenced plant, is proposed. The main steps of this workflow are (i......, integral plasma membrane proteins from banana leaves were successfully identified....

  15. Clinical proteomics-driven precision medicine for targeted cancer therapy: current overview and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Wang, Kui; Li, Qifu; Nice, Edouard C; Zhang, Haiyuan; Huang, Canhua

    2016-04-01

    Cancer is a common disease that is a leading cause of death worldwide. Currently, early detection and novel therapeutic strategies are urgently needed for more effective management of cancer. Importantly, protein profiling using clinical proteomic strategies, with spectacular sensitivity and precision, offer excellent promise for the identification of potential biomarkers that would direct the development of targeted therapeutic anticancer drugs for precision medicine. In particular, clinical sample sources, including tumor tissues and body fluids (blood, feces, urine and saliva), have been widely investigated using modern high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches combined with bioinformatic analysis, to pursue the possibilities of precision medicine for targeted cancer therapy. Discussed in this review are the current advantages and limitations of clinical proteomics, the available strategies of clinical proteomics for the management of precision medicine, as well as the challenges and future perspectives of clinical proteomics-driven precision medicine for targeted cancer therapy. PMID:26923776

  16. Multiplexed immunofluorescence delineates proteomic cancer cell states associated with metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Anup; Miller, Alexandra M.; Brogi, Edi; Sui, Yunxia; Armenia, Joshua; McDonough, Elizabeth; Santamaria-Pang, Alberto; Carlin, Sean; Stamper, Aleksandra; Campos, Carl; Pang, Zhengyu; Li, Qing; Port, Elisa; Graeber, Thomas G.; Schultz, Nikolaus; Ginty, Fiona; Larson, Steven M.; Mellinghoff, Ingo K.

    2016-01-01

    The phenotypic diversity of cancer results from genetic and nongenetic factors. Most studies of cancer heterogeneity have focused on DNA alterations, as technologies for proteomic measurements in clinical specimen are currently less advanced. Here, we used a multiplexed immunofluorescence staining platform to measure the expression of 27 proteins at the single-cell level in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded samples from treatment-naive stage II/III human breast cancer. Unsupervised clustering of protein expression data from 638,577 tumor cells in 26 breast cancers identified 8 clusters of protein coexpression. In about one-third of breast cancers, over 95% of all neoplastic cells expressed a single protein coexpression cluster. The remaining tumors harbored tumor cells representing multiple protein coexpression clusters, either in a regional distribution or intermingled throughout the tumor. Tumor uptake of the radiotracer 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose was associated with protein expression clusters characterized by hormone receptor loss, PTEN alteration, and HER2 gene amplification. Our study demonstrates an approach to generate cellular heterogeneity metrics in routinely collected solid tumor specimens and integrate them with in vivo cancer phenotypes. PMID:27182557

  17. Proteome and Transcriptome Profiles of a Her2/Neu-driven Mouse Model of Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenherr, Regine M.; Kelly-Spratt, Karen S.; Lin, Chen Wei; Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Liu, Tao; Holzman, Ted; Coleman, Ilsa; Feng, Li-Chia; Lorentzen, Travis D.; Krasnoselsky, Alexei L.; Wang, Pei; Liu, Yan; Gurley, Kay E.; Amon, Lynn M.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Chodosh, Lewis A.; Smith, Richard D.; Nelson, Peter S.; McIntosh, Martin; Kemp, Christopher; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2011-04-01

    In recent years, mouse models have proven to be invaluable in expanding our understanding of cancer biology. We have amassed a tremendous amount of proteomics and transcriptomics data profiling blood and tissues from a Her2-driven mouse model of breast cancer that closely recapitulates the pathology and natural history of human breast cancer. The purpose of this report is to make all of these data publicly available in raw and processed forms, as a resource to the community. Importantly, high quality biospecimens from this same mouse model are freely available through a sample repository that we established, so researchers can readily obtain samples to test biological hypotheses without the need of breeding animals and collecting biospecimens. Specifically, six proteomics and six transcriptomics datasets are available, with the former encompassing 841 liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) experiments of both plasma and tissue samples, and the latter including 255 individual microarray analyses of five different tissue types (thymus, spleen, liver, blood cells, and breast ± laser capture microdissection). A total of 18,880 unique peptides were identified with a PeptideProphet error rate ≤1%, with 3884 non-redundant protein groups identified in five plasma datasets, and 1659 non-redundant protein groups in a tissue dataset (4977 non-redundant protein groups in total). We anticipate that these data will be of use to the community for software tool development, investigations of analytical variation in MS/MS data, development of quality control tools (multiple technical replicates are provided for a subset of the data), empirical selection of proteotypic peptides for multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry, and for advancing our understanding of cancer biology.

  18. Inconvenient truth: cancer biomarker development by using proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Tadashi

    2014-05-01

    A biomarker is a crucial tool for measuring the progress of disease and the effects of treatment for better clinical outcomes in cancer patients. Diagnostic, predictive, and prognostic biomarkers are required in various clinical settings. The proteome, a functional translation of the genome, is considered a rich source of biomarkers; therefore, sizable time and funding have been spent in proteomics to develop biomarkers. Although significant progress has been made in technologies toward comprehensive protein expression profiling, and many biomarker candidates published, none of the reported biomarkers have proven to be beneficial for cancer patients. The present deceleration in biomarker research can be attributed to technical limitations. Additional efforts are required to further technical progress; however, there are many examples demonstrating that problems in biomarker research are not so much with the technology but in the study design. In the study of biomarkers for early diagnosis, candidates are screened and validated by comparing cases and controls of similar sample size, and the low prevalence of disease is often ignored. Although it is reasonable to take advantage of multiple rather than single biomarkers when studying diverse disease mechanisms, the annotation of individual components of reported multiple biomarkers does not often explain the variety of molecular events underlying the clinical observations. In tissue biomarker studies, the heterogeneity of disease tissues and pathological observations are often not considered, and tissues are homogenized as a whole for protein extraction. In addition to the challenge of technical limitations, the fundamental aspects of biomarker development in a disease study need to be addressed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biomarkers: A Proteomic Challenge. PMID:23896458

  19. Diagnosis of Pancreatic Cancer Using Serum Proteomic Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudeepa Bhattacharyya

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available In the United States, mortality rates from pancreatic cancer (PCa have not changed significantly over the past 50 years. This is due, in part, to the lack of early detection methods for this particularly aggressive form of cancer. The objective of this study was to use highthroughput protein profiling technology to identify biomarkers in the serum proteome for the early detection of resectable PCa. Using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, protein profiles were generated from sera of 49 PCa patients and 54 unaffected individuals after fractionation on an anion exchange resin. The samples were randomly divided into a training set (69 samples and test set (34 samples, and two multivariate analysis procedures, classification and regression tree and logistic regression, were used to develop classification models from these spectral data that could distinguish PCa from control serum samples. In the test set, both models correctly classified all of the PCa patient serum samples (100% sensitivity. Using the decision tree algorithm, a specificity of 93.5% was obtained, whereas the logistic regression model produced a specificity of 100%. These results suggest that high-throughput proteomics profiling has the capacity to provide new biomarkers for the early detection and diagnosis of PCa.

  20. Additions to the Human Plasma Proteome via a Tandem MARS Depletion iTRAQ-Based Workflow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyun Cao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Robust platforms for determining differentially expressed proteins in biomarker and discovery studies using human plasma are of great interest. While increased depth in proteome coverage is desirable, it is associated with costs of experimental time due to necessary sample fractionation. We evaluated a robust quantitative proteomics workflow for its ability (1 to provide increased depth in plasma proteome coverage and (2 to give statistical insight useful for establishing differentially expressed plasma proteins. The workflow involves dual-stage immunodepletion on a multiple affinity removal system (MARS column, iTRAQ tagging, offline strong-cation exchange chromatography, and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. Independent workflow experiments were performed in triplicate on four plasma samples tagged with iTRAQ 4-plex reagents. After stringent criteria were applied to database searched results, 689 proteins with at least two spectral counts (SC were identified. Depth in proteome coverage was assessed by comparison to the 2010 Human Plasma Proteome Reference Database in which our studies reveal 399 additional proteins which have not been previously reported. Additionally, we report on the technical variation of this quantitative workflow which ranges from ±11 to 30%.

  1. Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Svend; Stougaard, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Proteomics is an efficient tool to identify proteins present in specific tissues, cell types, or organelles. The resulting proteome reference maps and/or comparative analyses provide overviews of regulated proteins between wild type and mutants or between different conditions together with a...... comprehensive list of proteins. Post translation modifications (PTMs), such as glycosylation and phosphorylation, are pivotal for protein stability and function. Several strategies for enrichment of PTMs have been developed where targeted proteomic approaches are used to identify these PTMs. The sequenced and...... annotated Lotus japonicus (Lotus) genome has been essential for obtaining high-quality protein identifications from proteomics studies. Furthermore, additional genomics and transcriptomics studies from several Lotus species/ecotypes support putative gene structures and these can be further supported using...

  2. Quantitative proteomics in resected renal cancer tissue for biomarker discovery and profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Atrih, A; Mudaliar, M A V; Zakikhani, P; Lamont, D J; Huang, J T-J; Bray, S.E.; Barton, G.; Fleming, S; Nabi, G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Proteomics-based approaches for biomarker discovery are promising strategies used in cancer research. We present state-of-art label-free quantitative proteomics method to assess proteome of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) compared with noncancer renal tissues. Methods: Fresh frozen tissue samples from eight primary RCC lesions and autologous adjacent normal renal tissues were obtained from surgically resected tumour-bearing kidneys. Proteins were extracted by complete solubilisation of...

  3. Label-Free Quantitative Proteomics and N-terminal Analysis of Human Metastatic Lung Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Min, Hophil; Han, Dohyun; Kim, Yikwon; Cho, Jee Yeon; Jin, Jonghwa; Kim, Youngsoo

    2014-01-01

    Proteomic analysis is helpful in identifying cancer-associated proteins that are differentially expressed and fragmented that can be annotated as dysregulated networks and pathways during metastasis. To examine meta-static process in lung cancer, we performed a proteomics study by label-free quantitative analysis and N-terminal analysis in 2 human non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines with disparate metastatic potentials—NCI-H1703 (primary cell, stage I) and NCI-H1755 (metastatic cell, stage ...

  4. Plasma Proteome Response to Severe Burn Injury Revealed by 18O-Labeled “Universal” Reference-based Quantitative Proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Qian, Wei-Jun; Petritis, Brianne O.; Kaushal, Amit; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Moldawer, Lyle L; Davis, Ronald W; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Herndon, David N; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    A burn injury represents one of the most severe forms of human trauma and is responsible for significant mortality worldwide. Here, we present the first quantitative proteomics investigation of the blood plasma proteome response to severe burn injury by comparing the plasma protein concentrations of 10 healthy control subjects with those of 15 severe burn patients at two time-points following the injury. The overall analytical strategy for this work integrated immunoaffinity depletion of the ...

  5. Targeted proteomics identifies liquid-biopsy signatures for extracapsular prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yunee; Jeon, Jouhyun; Mejia, Salvador; Yao, Cindy Q; Ignatchenko, Vladimir; Nyalwidhe, Julius O; Gramolini, Anthony O; Lance, Raymond S; Troyer, Dean A; Drake, Richard R; Boutros, Paul C; Semmes, O. John; Kislinger, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers are rapidly gaining importance in personalized medicine. Although numerous molecular signatures have been developed over the past decade, there is a lack of overlap and many biomarkers fail to validate in independent patient cohorts and hence are not useful for clinical application. For these reasons, identification of novel and robust biomarkers remains a formidable challenge. We combine targeted proteomics with computational biology to discover robust proteomic signatures for prostate cancer. Quantitative proteomics conducted in expressed prostatic secretions from men with extraprostatic and organ-confined prostate cancers identified 133 differentially expressed proteins. Using synthetic peptides, we evaluate them by targeted proteomics in a 74-patient cohort of expressed prostatic secretions in urine. We quantify a panel of 34 candidates in an independent 207-patient cohort. We apply machine-learning approaches to develop clinical predictive models for prostate cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Our results demonstrate that computationally guided proteomics can discover highly accurate non-invasive biomarkers. PMID:27350604

  6. Quantitative iTRAQ-Based Proteomic Identification of Candidate Biomarkers for Diabetic Nephropathy in Plasma of Type 1 Diabetic Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Anne Julie; Thingholm, Tine Engberg; Larsen, Martin R;

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: As part of a clinical proteomics programme focused on diabetes and its complications, it was our goal to investigate the proteome of plasma in order to find improved candidate biomarkers to predict diabetic nephropathy. METHODS: Proteins derived from plasma from a cross-sectional co...

  7. CPTAC-EDRN Joint Session - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI)’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) and the Early Detection Research Network (EDRN) will host a session during the 9th US-HUPO annual conference entitled “Highlights from NCI Proteomic Research Programs.”

  8. Comparative Studies of the Proteome, Glycoproteome, and N-Glycome of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Plasma before and after Curative Nephrectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Gbormittah, Francisca O.; Lee, Ling Y.; Taylor, KyOnese; Hancock, William S.; Iliopoulos, Othon

    2014-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma is the most prevalent of all reported kidney cancer cases, and currently there are no markers for early diagnosis. This has stimulated great research interest recently because early detection of the disease can significantly improve the low survival rate. Combining the proteome, glycoproteome, and N-glycome data from clear cell renal cell carcinoma plasma has the potential of identifying candidate markers for early diagnosis and prognosis and/or to monitor dise...

  9. Computational Omics Pre-Awardees - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) is pleased to announce the pre-awardees of the Computational Omics solicitation. Working with NVIDIA Foundation's Compute the Cure initiative and Leidos Biomedical...

  10. Pathway analysis of kidney cancer using proteomics and metabolic profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiehn Oliver

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the sixth leading cause of cancer death and is responsible for 11,000 deaths per year in the US. Approximately one-third of patients present with disease which is already metastatic and for which there is currently no adequate treatment, and no biofluid screening tests exist for RCC. In this study, we have undertaken a comprehensive proteomic analysis and subsequently a pathway and network approach to identify biological processes involved in clear cell RCC (ccRCC. We have used these data to investigate urinary markers of RCC which could be applied to high-risk patients, or to those being followed for recurrence, for early diagnosis and treatment, thereby substantially reducing mortality of this disease. Results Using 2-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometric analysis, we identified 31 proteins which were differentially expressed with a high degree of significance in ccRCC as compared to adjacent non-malignant tissue, and we confirmed some of these by immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry, and comparison to published transcriptomic data. When evaluated by several pathway and biological process analysis programs, these proteins are demonstrated to be involved with a high degree of confidence (p values Conclusion Extensive pathway and network analysis allowed for the discovery of highly significant pathways from a set of clear cell RCC samples. Knowledge of activation of these processes will lead to novel assays identifying their proteomic and/or metabolomic signatures in biofluids of patient at high risk for this disease; we provide pilot data for such a urinary bioassay. Furthermore, we demonstrate how the knowledge of networks, processes, and pathways altered in kidney cancer may be used to influence the choice of optimal therapy.

  11. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics in Molecular Diagnostics: Discovery of Cancer Biomarkers Using Tissue Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Debasish Paul; Avinash Kumar; Akshada Gajbhiye; Santra, Manas K.; Rapole Srikanth

    2013-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis and proper monitoring of cancer patients remain a key obstacle for successful cancer treatment and prevention. Therein comes the need for biomarker discovery, which is crucial to the current oncological and other clinical practices having the potential to impact the diagnosis and prognosis. In fact, most of the biomarkers have been discovered utilizing the proteomics-based approaches. Although high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches like SILAC, 2D-DIGE,...

  12. Proteomic analysis of liver plasma membrane from hepatitis B surface antigen transgenic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾小芳

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the differential liver plasma membrane( PM) proteins that may be related to the occurrence,development and reversal process of hepatitis and to understand the pathogenesis of hepatitis and the new drug targets by performing a comparative proteomics research of liver PM between

  13. Differential quantitative analysis of the plasma membrane proteome of the yeast saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Szopinska, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    The plasma membrane is a lipid bilayer that separates the cells from the external environment. It contains a mixture of polar lipids with proteins inserted into this bilayer. Specialized plasma membrane proteins perform and control different defensive, signaling, metabolic and transport functions. Despite the progress in proteomic research, global analysis of membrane proteins remains a difficult task. Serious limitation in membrane protein studies is their hydrophobicity, which results in lo...

  14. Plasma proteome changes in cardiovascular disease patients: novel isoforms of apolipoprotein A1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oravec Milan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this proteomic study was to look for changes taking place in plasma proteomes of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI, unstable angina pectoris (UAP, and stable angina pectoris (SAP. Methods Depleted plasma proteins were separated by 2D SDS-PAGE (pI 4-7, and proteomes were compared using Progenesis SameSpots statistical software. Proteins were identified by nanoLC-MS/MS. Proteins were quantified using commercial kits. Apolipoprotein A1 was studied using 1D and 2D SDS-PAGE, together with western blotting. Results Reciprocal comparison revealed 46 unique, significantly different spots; proteins in 34 spots were successfully identified and corresponded to 38 different proteins. Discrete comparisons of patient groups showed 45, 41, and 8 significantly different spots when AMI, UAP, and SAP were compared with the control group. On the basis of our proteomic data, plasma levels of two of them, alpha-1 microglobulin and vitamin D-binding protein, were determined. The data, however, failed to prove the proteins to be suitable markers or risk factors in the studied groups. The plasma level and isoform representation of apolipoprotein A1 were also estimated. Using 1D and 2D SDS-PAGE, together with western blotting, we observed extra high-molecular weight apolipoprotein A1 fractions presented only in the patient groups, indicating that the novel high-molecular weight isoforms of apolipoprotein A1 may be potential new markers or possible risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Conclusion The reported data show plasma proteome changes in patients with AMI, UAP, and SAP. We propose some apolipoprotein A1 fractions as a possible new disease-associated marker of cardiovascular disorders.

  15. Proteomics in Cancer Biomarkers Discovery: Challenges and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem M. Sallam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the introduction of recent high-throughput technologies to various fields of science and medicine, it is becoming clear that obtaining large amounts of data is no longer a problem in modern research laboratories. However, coherent study designs, optimal conditions for obtaining high-quality data, and compelling interpretation, in accordance with the evidence-based systems biology, are critical factors in ensuring the emergence of good science out of these recent technologies. This review focuses on the proteomics field and its new perspectives on cancer research. Cornerstone publications that have tremendously helped scientists and clinicians to better understand cancer pathogenesis; to discover novel diagnostic and/or prognostic biomarkers; and to suggest novel therapeutic targets will be presented. The author of this review aims at presenting some of the relevant literature data that helped as a step forward in bridging the gap between bench work results and bedside potentials. Undeniably, this review cannot include all the work that is being produced by expert research groups all over the world.

  16. Plasma proteome coverage is increased by unique peptide recovery from sodium deoxycholate precipitate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Aida; Zhu, Hongbin; Gallart-Palau, Xavier; Park, Jung Eun; Ho, Hee Haw; Tam, James P; Sze, Siu Kwan

    2016-03-01

    The ionic detergent sodium deoxycholate (SDC) is compatible with in-solution tryptic digestion and LC-MS/MS-based shotgun proteomics by virtue of being easy to separate from the peptide products via precipitation in acidic buffers. However, it remains unclear whether unique human peptides co-precipitate with SDC during acid treatment of complex biological samples. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that a large quantity of unique peptides in human blood plasma can be co-precipitated with SDC using an optimized sample preparation method prior to shotgun proteomic analysis. We show that the plasma peptides co-precipitated with SDC can be successfully recovered using a sequential re-solubilization and precipitation procedure, and that this approach is particularly efficient at the extraction of long peptides. Recovery of peptides from the SDC pellet dramatically increased overall proteome coverage (>60 %), thereby improving the identification of low-abundance proteins and enhancing the identification of protein components of membrane-bound organelles. In addition, when we analyzed the physiochemical properties of the co-precipitated peptides, we observed that SDC-based sample preparation improved the identification of mildly hydrophilic/hydrophobic proteins that would otherwise be lost upon discarding the pellet. These data demonstrate that the optimized SDC protocol is superior to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)/urea treatment for identifying plasma biomarkers by shotgun proteomics. PMID:26804737

  17. Proteomic study of cancer cells response to anthracycline anticancer treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tylečková, Jiřina; Hrabáková, Rita; Mairychová, Kateřina; Halada, Petr; Radová, L.; Džubák, P.; Hajduch, M.; Kovářová, Hana

    Berlin : Freie Universität Berlin, 2011. s. 225-225. [Proteomic Forum 2011. 3.4.2011-7.4.2011, Berlin] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07017; GA MŠk MSM6198959216 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : anticancer research * anthracycline * proteomics Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry http://www.proteomic-forum.de/images/stories/pics/proteomic%20forum%202011%20-%20abstract%20book.pdf

  18. Proteomic profile of seminal plasma in adolescents and adults with treated and untreated varicocele

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Mariana; Intasqui, Paula; Bertolla, Ricardo Pimenta

    2016-01-01

    Varicocele, the most important treatable cause of male infertility, is present in 15% of adult males, 35% of men with primary infertility, and 80% of men with secondary infertility. On the other hand, 80% of these men will not present infertility. Therefore, there is a need to differentiate a varicocele that is exerting a deleterious effect that is treatable from a “silent” varicocele. Despite the growing evidence of the cellular effects of varicocele, its underlying molecular mechanisms are still eluding. Proteomics has become a promising area to determine the reproductive biology of semen as well as to improve diagnosis of male infertility. This review aims to discuss the state-of-art in seminal plasma proteomics in patients with varicocele to discuss the challenges in undertaking these studies, as well as the future outlook derived from the growing body of evidence on the seminal proteome. PMID:26643563

  19. Exosomes mediated pentose phosphate pathway in ovarian cancer metastasis: a proteomics analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Huan; Zheng, Xiangqin; Song, Jianrong; Shen, Rongkai; Su, Yanzhao; Lin, Danmei

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancies for readily metastasis. Exosomes have played an influential role in carcinogenicity and cancer progression. Our aim is to discover exosome-related mechanisms in ovarian cancer progress and explore potential diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets of ovarian cancer. We initially presented the proteomic profiles of exosomes derived from two late-stage ovarian cell lines, OVCA429 and HO8910PM. A total of 2940 exosomal ...

  20. Proteome-wide dataset supporting functional study of tyrosine kinases in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicos Angelopoulos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Tyrosine kinases (TKs play an essential role in regulating various cellular activities and dysregulation of TK signaling contributes to oncogenesis. However, less than half of the TKs have been thoroughly studied. Through a combined use of RNAi and stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC-based quantitative proteomics, a global functional proteomic landscape of TKs in breast cancer was recently revealed highlighting a comprehensive and highly integrated signaling network regulated by TKs (Stebbing et al., 2015 [1]. We collate the enormous amount of the proteomic data in an open access platform, providing a valuable resource for studying the function of TKs in cancer and benefiting the science community. Here we present a detailed description related to this study (Stebbing et al., 2015 [1] and the raw data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the identifier http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD002065.

  1. Proteome-wide dataset supporting functional study of tyrosine kinases in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelopoulos, Nicos; Stebbing, Justin; Xu, Yichen; Giamas, Georgios; Zhang, Hua

    2016-06-01

    Tyrosine kinases (TKs) play an essential role in regulating various cellular activities and dysregulation of TK signaling contributes to oncogenesis. However, less than half of the TKs have been thoroughly studied. Through a combined use of RNAi and stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics, a global functional proteomic landscape of TKs in breast cancer was recently revealed highlighting a comprehensive and highly integrated signaling network regulated by TKs (Stebbing et al., 2015) [1]. We collate the enormous amount of the proteomic data in an open access platform, providing a valuable resource for studying the function of TKs in cancer and benefiting the science community. Here we present a detailed description related to this study (Stebbing et al., 2015) [1] and the raw data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the identifier PXD002065. PMID:27054188

  2. Proteome-wide dataset supporting functional study of tyrosine kinases in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Angelopoulos, Nicos; Stebbing, Justin; Xu, Yichen; Giamas, Georgios; Hua ZHANG

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine kinases (TKs) play an essential role in regulating various cellular activities and dysregulation of TK signaling contributes to oncogenesis. However, less than half of the TKs have been thoroughly studied. Through a combined use of RNAi and stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics, a global functional proteomic landscape of TKs in breast cancer was recently revealed highlighting a comprehensive and highly integrated signaling netw...

  3. New methods in mammary gland development and cancer: proteomics, epigenetics, symmetric division and metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Bentires-Alj, Mohamed; GLUKHOVA, Marina; Hynes, Nancy; Vivanco, Maria dM

    2012-01-01

    The European Network for Breast Development and Cancer (ENBDC) meeting on 'Methods in Mammary Gland Development and Cancer' has become an annual international rendezvous for scientists with interests in the normal and neoplastic breast. The fourth meeting in this series, held in April in Weggis, Switzerland, focused on proteomics, epigenetics, symmetric division, and metastasis.

  4. New Funding Opportunity: Biospecimen Core Resource - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this notice is to notify the community that the National Cancer Institute's (NCI’s) Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR) is seeking sources to establish a Biospecimen Core Resource (BCR), capable of receiving, qualifying, processing, and distributing annotated biospecimens.

  5. New Funding Opportunity: Tissue Purchase Order Acquisitions - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is expanding its basic and translational research programs that rely heavily on sufficient availability of high quality, well annotated biospecimens suitable for use in genomic and proteomic studies. The NCI’s overarching goal with such programs is to improve the ability to diagnose, treat, and prevent cancer.

  6. Skyline Reaches Agreement - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The full proteomics analysis of a small tumor sample (similar in mass to a few grains of rice) produces well over 500 megabytes of unprocessed "raw" data when analyzed on a mass spectrometer (MS). Thus, for every proteomics experiment there is a vast amount of raw data that must be analyzed and interrogated in order to extract biological information.

  7. Advances in the proteomic discovery of novel therapeutic targets in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo S

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Shanchun Guo,1 Jin Zou,2 Guangdi Wang3 1Department of Microbiology, Biochemistry, and Immunology, Morehouse School of Medicine, 2Center for Cancer Research and Therapeutic Development, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA, USA; 3Research Centers in Minority Institutions Cancer Research Program, Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans, LA, USA Abstract: Proteomic approaches are continuing to make headways in cancer research by helping to elucidate complex signaling networks that underlie tumorigenesis and disease progression. This review describes recent advances made in the proteomic discovery of drug targets for therapeutic development. A variety of technical and methodological advances are overviewed with a critical assessment of challenges and potentials. A number of potential drug targets, such as baculoviral inhibitor of apoptosis protein repeat-containing protein 6, macrophage inhibitory cytokine 1, phosphoglycerate mutase 1, prohibitin 1, fascin, and pyruvate kinase isozyme 2 were identified in the proteomic analysis of drug-resistant cancer cells, drug action, and differential disease state tissues. Future directions for proteomics-based target identification and validation to be more translation efficient are also discussed. Keywords: proteomics, cancer, therapeutic target, signaling network, tumorigenesis

  8. Clinical proteomics in cancer research-promises and limitations of current two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwadate, Yasuo

    2008-01-01

    Cancer can be defined as a deviated protein network system toward dysregulated cellular proliferation. Alteration in the content and functional state of the proteins with many linkages may shift the equilibrium state of the protein signaling network to enhance a survival advantage of the affected cells. Searching for such hub proteins is the main purpose of the cancer proteomics. Although the progression in the vanguard proteomic technologies would largely contribute to cancer diagnosis and treatment in the future, the technology most frequently used for the analysis of clinical tissue samples is the two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) combined with matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Accumulation of 2DE data has generated many candidate biomarkers with potential clinical value. The identified proteins are restricted to a subset of the predicted human proteome, and ubiquitously exist in all normal cells taking important roles in the basic biological functions. Although these proteins can be used as valuable prognostic markers, the low-abundance proteins which is tissue-specific and useful as diagnostic markers could not easily be found by the standard 2DE technology alone. None of the current proteomic technologies can identify the whole proteome by themselves. Adequate combinations of different approaches not only in proteomics but in immunological methods would be necessary for the tissue specific markers. PMID:18855668

  9. Immunoscreening of the extracellular proteome of colorectal cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The release of proteins from tumors can trigger an immune response in cancer patients involving T lymphocytes and B lymphocytes, which results in the generation of antibodies to tumor-derived proteins. Many studies aim to use humoral immune responses, namely autoantibody profiles, directly, as clinical biomarkers. Alternatively, the antibody immune response as an amplification system for tumor associated alterations may be used to indicate putative protein biomarkers with high sensitivity. Aiming at the latter approach we here have implemented an autoantibody profiling strategy which particularly focuses on proteins released by tumor cells in vitro: the so-called secretome. For immunoscreening, the extracellular proteome of five colorectal cancer cell lines was resolved on 2D gels, immobilized on PVDF membranes and used for serological screening with individual sera from 21 colorectal cancer patients and 24 healthy controls. All of the signals from each blot were assigned to a master map, and autoantigen candidates were defined based of the pattern of immunoreactivities. The corresponding proteins were isolated from preparative gels, identified by MALDI-MS and/or by nano-HPLC/ESI-MS/MS and exemplarily confirmed by duplex Western blotting combining the human serum samples with antibodies directed against the protein(s) of interest. From 281 secretome proteins stained with autoantibodies in total we first defined the 'background patterns' of frequently immunoreactive extracellular proteins in healthy and diseased people. An assignment of these proteins, among them many nominally intracellular proteins, to the subset of exosomal proteins within the secretomes revealed a large overlap. On this basis we defined and consequently confirmed novel biomarker candidates such as the extreme C-terminus of the extracellular matrix protein agrin within the set of cancer-enriched immunorectivities. Our findings suggest, first, that autoantibody responses may be due, in

  10. Proteomics of boar seminal plasma - current studies and possibility of their application in biotechnology of animal reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzeżek, Jerzy; Wysocki, Paweł; Kordan, Władysław; Kuklińska, Magdalena; Mogielnicka, Marzena; Soliwoda, Daniel; Fraser, Leyland

    2005-11-01

    Proteomics is critical to identify the properties and functions of proteins involved in the mechanism regulating the male reproductive tract function. This approach is important in male fertility assessment and clinical diagnosis of the physiological state of individual reproductive organs. Proteomics also provides a tool to understand the interactions of seminal plasma proteins with spermatozoa, which could provide a useful model for studying ligand-cell interaction occurring at the sperm cell surface. This review covers a selection of advances in the realm of functional proteomics of boar seminal plasma proteins and is focused on some fundamental proteomic technologies. Also, this review explores key themes in proteomics and their application in animal reproductive techniques. PMID:16372045

  11. In situ Proteomic Profiling of Curcumin Targets in HCT116 Colon Cancer Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jigang; Zhang, Jianbin; Zhang, Chong-Jing; Wong, Yin Kwan; Lim, Teck Kwang; Hua, Zi-Chun; Liu, Bin; Tannenbaum, Steven R; Shen, Han-Ming; Lin, Qingsong

    2016-01-01

    To date, the exact targets and mechanism of action of curcumin, a natural product with anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties, remain elusive. Here we synthesized a cell permeable curcumin probe (Cur-P) with an alkyne moiety, which can be tagged with biotin for affinity enrichment, or with a fluorescent dye for visualization of the direct-binding protein targets of curcumin in situ. iTRAQ(TM) quantitative proteomics approach was applied to distinguish the specific binding targets from the non-specific ones. In total, 197 proteins were confidently identified as curcumin binding targets from HCT116 colon cancer cell line. Gene Ontology analysis showed that the targets are broadly distributed and enriched in the nucleus, mitochondria and plasma membrane, and they are involved in various biological functions including metabolic process, regulation, response to stimulus and cellular process. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis(TM) (IPA) suggested that curcumin may exert its anticancer effects over multiple critical biological pathways including the EIF2, eIF4/p70S6K, mTOR signaling and mitochondrial dysfunction pathways. Functional validations confirmed that curcumin downregulates cellular protein synthesis, and induces autophagy, lysosomal activation and increased ROS production, thus leading to cell death. PMID:26915414

  12. Application of serum SELDI proteomic patterns in diagnosis of lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou Bin; Zhang Wei; Zhang Li-juan; Zhang Wang-gang; Xiao Xue-yuan; Yang Shuan-ying; Chen Guoan; He Da-cheng

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Currently, no satisfactory biomarkers are available to screen for lung cancer. Surface-Enhanced Laser Desorption/ionization Time-of- Flight Mass Spectrometry ProteinChip system (SELDI-TOF-MS) is one of the currently used techniques to identify biomarkers for cancers. The aim of this study is to explore the application of serum SELDI proteomic patterns to distinguish lung cancer patients from healthy individuals. Methods A total of 208 serum samples, including 158 lung canc...

  13. Current status and prospects of clinical proteomics studies on detection of colorectal cancer: Hopes and fears

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ME de Noo; RAEM Tollenaar; AM Deelder; LH Bouwman

    2006-01-01

    Colorectal adenocarcinoma (CRC) is the third most common type of cancer and the fourth most frequent cause of death due to cancer worldwide. Given the natural history of CRC, early diagnosis appears to be the most appropriate tool to reduce disease-related mortality. A field of recent interest is clinical proteomics, which was reported to lead to high sensitivity and specificities for early detection of several solid tumors. This emerging field uses mass spectrometry-based protein profiles/patterns of easy accessible body fluids to distinguish cancer from non-cancer patients. These discrepancies may be a result of: (1) proteins being abnormally produced or shed and added to the serum proteome, (2) proteins clipped or modified as a consequence of the disease process, or (3) proteins subtracted from the proteome owing to disease-related proteolytic degradation pathways. Therefore, protein pattern diagnostics would provide easy and reliable tools for detection of cancer. This paper focuses on the current status of clinical proteomics research in oncology and in colorectal cancer especially,and will reflect on pitfalls and fears in this relatively new area of clinical medicine, which are reproducibility issues and pre-analytical factors, statistical issues, and identification and nature of discriminating proteins/peptides.

  14. High Dynamic Range Characterization of the Trauma Patient Plasma Proteome

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Tao; Qian, Wei-Jun; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Moldawer, Lyle L; Kaushal, Amit; Monroe, Matthew E.; Susan M Varnum; Moore, Ronald J.; Purvine, Samuel O; Ronald V Maier; Davis, Ronald W; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Camp II, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-01-01

    While human plasma represents an attractive sample for disease biomarker discovery, the extreme complexity and large dynamic range in protein concentrations present significant challenges for characterization, candidate biomarker discovery, and validation. Herein, we describe a strategy that combines immunoaffinity subtraction and subsequent chemical fractionation based on cysteinyl peptide and N-glycopeptide captures with 2D-LC-MS/MS to increase the dynamic range of analysis for plasma. Appl...

  15. ProteoWizard - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ProteoWizard highlight - 2007, Dr. Parag Mallick and Darren Kessner had one idea in mind – how could they develop robust proteomics software that is relatively “easy” to use and transferable between labs.

  16. Integrated proteomic and genomic analysis of colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigators who analyzed 95 human colorectal tumor samples have determined how gene alterations identified in previous analyses of the same samples are expressed at the protein level. The integration of proteomic and genomic data, or proteogenomics, pro

  17. Proteomic Serum Biomarkers and Their Potential Application in Cancer Screening Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André M. Deelder

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Early diagnosis of cancer is of pivotal importance to reduce disease-related mortality. There is great need for non-invasive screening methods, yet current screening protocols have limited sensitivity and specificity. The use of serum biomarkers to discriminate cancer patients from healthy persons might be a tool to improve screening programs. Mass spectrometry based proteomics is widely applied as a technology for mapping and identifying peptides and proteins in body fluids. One commonly used approach in proteomics is peptide and protein profiling. Here, we present an overview of profiling methods that have the potential for implementation in a clinical setting and in national screening programs.

  18. Proteomics, pathway array and signaling network-based medicine in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Hong

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer is a multifaceted disease that results from dysregulated normal cellular signaling networks caused by genetic, genomic and epigenetic alterations at cell or tissue levels. Uncovering the underlying protein signaling network changes, including cell cycle gene networks in cancer, aids in understanding the molecular mechanism of carcinogenesis and identifies the characteristic signaling network signatures unique for different cancers and specific cancer subtypes. The identified signatures can be used for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and personalized treatment. During the past several decades, the available technology to study signaling networks has significantly evolved to include such platforms as genomic microarray (expression array, SNP array, CGH array, etc. and proteomic analysis, which globally assesses genetic, epigenetic, and proteomic alterations in cancer. In this review, we compared Pathway Array analysis with other proteomic approaches in analyzing protein network involved in cancer and its utility serving as cancer biomarkers in diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic target identification. With the advent of bioinformatics, constructing high complexity signaling networks is possible. As the use of signaling network-based cancer diagnosis, prognosis and treatment is anticipated in the near future, medical and scientific communities should be prepared to apply these techniques to further enhance personalized medicine.

  19. A Proteomic Study of the HUPO Plasma Proteome Project's Pilot Samples using an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adkins, Joshua N.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Auberry, Kenneth J.; Shen, Yufeng; Jacobs, Jon M.; Camp, David G.; Vitzthum, Frank; Rodland, Karin D.; Zangar, Richard C.; Smith, Richard D.; Pounds, Joel G.

    2005-08-01

    Characterization of the human blood plasma proteome is critical to the discovery of routinely useful clinical biomarkers. We used an Accurate Mass and Time (AMT) tag strategy with high-resolution mass accuracy capillary liquid chromatography Fourier-Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (cLC-FTICR MS) to perform a global proteomic analysis of pilot study samples as part of the HUPO Plasma Proteome Project. HUPO reference serum and citrated plasma samples from African Americans, Asian Americans, and Caucasian Americans were analyzed, in addition to a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory reference serum and plasma. The AMT tag strategy allowed us to leverage two previously published “shotgun” proteomics experiments to perform global analyses on these samples in triplicate in less than 4 days total analysis time. A total of 722 (22% with multiple peptide identifications) International Protein Index (IPI) redundant proteins, or 377 protein families by ProteinProphet, were identified over the 6 individual HUPO serum and plasma samples. The samples yielded a similar number of identified redundant proteins in the plasma samples (average 446 +/-23) as found in the serum samples (average 440+/-20). These proteins were identified by an average of 956+/-35 unique peptides in plasma and 930+/-11 unique peptides in serum. In addition to this high-throughput analysis, the AMT tag approach was used with a Z-score normalization to compare relative protein abundances. This analysis highlighted both known differences in serum and citrated plasma such as fibrinogens, and reproducible differences in peptide abundances from proteins such as soluble activin receptor-like kinase 7b and glycoprotein m6b. The AMT tag strategy not only improved our sample throughput, and provided a basis for estimated quantitation.

  20. Proteomic profiling of human plasma exosomes identifies PPARγ as an exosome-associated protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exosomes are nanovesicles that are released from cells as a mechanism of cell-free intercellular communication. Only a limited number of proteins have been identified from the plasma exosome proteome. Here, we developed a multi-step fractionation scheme incorporating gel exclusion chromatography, rate zonal centrifugation through continuous sucrose gradients, and high-speed centrifugation to purify exosomes from human plasma. Exosome-associated proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE and 66 proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS, which included both cellular and extracellular proteins. Furthermore, we identified and characterized peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), a nuclear receptor that regulates adipocyte differentiation and proliferation, as well as immune and inflammatory cell functions, as a novel component of plasma-derived exosomes. Given the important role of exosomes as intercellular messengers, the discovery of PPARγ as a component of human plasma exosomes identifies a potential new pathway for the paracrine transfer of nuclear receptors.

  1. Automated Sample Preparation Platform for Mass Spectrometry-Based Plasma Proteomics and Biomarker Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Vilém Guryča; Daniel Roeder; Paolo Piraino; Jens Lamerz; Axel Ducret; Hanno Langen; Paul Cutler

    2014-01-01

    The identification of novel biomarkers from human plasma remains a critical need in order to develop and monitor drug therapies for nearly all disease areas. The discovery of novel plasma biomarkers is, however, significantly hampered by the complexity and dynamic range of proteins within plasma, as well as the inherent variability in composition from patient to patient. In addition, it is widely accepted that most soluble plasma biomarkers for diseases such as cancer will be represented by t...

  2. Plasma proteome analysis in HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stumpf Michael PH

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T lymphotropic virus Type 1 (HTLV-1 causes a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system known as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM which resembles chronic spinal forms of multiple sclerosis (MS. The pathogenesis of HAM remains uncertain. To aid in the differential diagnosis of HAM and to identify pathogenetic mechanisms, we analysed the plasma proteome in asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers (ACs, patients with HAM, uninfected controls, and patients with MS. We used surface-enhanced laser desorption-ionization (SELDI mass spectrometry to analyse the plasma proteome in 68 HTLV-1-infected individuals (in two non-overlapping sets, each comprising 17 patients with HAM and 17 ACs, 16 uninfected controls, and 11 patients with secondary progressive MS. Candidate biomarkers were identified by tandem Q-TOF mass spectrometry. Results The concentrations of three plasma proteins - high [β2-microglobulin], high [Calgranulin B], and low [apolipoprotein A2] - were specifically associated with HAM, independently of proviral load. The plasma [β2-microglobulin] was positively correlated with disease severity. Conclusions The results indicate that monocytes are activated by contact with activated endothelium in HAM. Using β2-microglobulin and Calgranulin B alone we derive a diagnostic algorithm that correctly classified the disease status (presence or absence of HAM in 81% of HTLV-1-infected subjects in the cohort.

  3. An Insight into the Changes in Human Plasma Proteome on Adaptation to Hypobaric Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Yasmin; Sharma, Narendra K.; Garg, Iti; Ahmad, Mohammad Faiz; Sharma, Manish; Bhargava, Kalpana

    2013-01-01

    Adaptation to hypobaric hypoxia is required by animals and human in several physiological and pathological situations. Hypobaric hypoxia is a pathophysiological condition triggering redox status disturbances of cell organization leading, via oxidative stress, to proteins, lipids, and DNA damage. Identifying the molecular variables playing key roles in this process would be of paramount importance to shed light on the mechanisms known to counteract the negative effects of oxygen lack. To obtain a molecular signature, changes in the plasma proteome were studied by using proteomic approach. To enrich the low-abundance proteins in human plasma, two highly abundant proteins, albumin and IgG, were first removed. By comparing the plasma proteins of high altitude natives with those of a normal control group, several proteins with a significant alteration were found. The up-regulated proteins were identified as vitamin D-binding protein, hemopexin, alpha-1–antitrypsin, haptoglobin β-chain, apolipoprotein A1, transthyretin and hemoglobin beta chain. The down-regulated proteins were transferrin, complement C3, serum amyloid, complement component 4A and plasma retinol binding protein. Among these proteins, the alterations of transthyretin and transferrin were further confirmed by ELISA and Western blotting analysis. Since all the up- and down- regulated proteins identified above are well-known inflammation inhibitors and play a positive anti-inflammatory role, these results show that there is some adaptive mechanism that sustains the inflammation balance in high altitude natives exposed to hypobaric hypoxia. PMID:23844025

  4. An insight into the changes in human plasma proteome on adaptation to hypobaric hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmin Ahmad

    Full Text Available Adaptation to hypobaric hypoxia is required by animals and human in several physiological and pathological situations. Hypobaric hypoxia is a pathophysiological condition triggering redox status disturbances of cell organization leading, via oxidative stress, to proteins, lipids, and DNA damage. Identifying the molecular variables playing key roles in this process would be of paramount importance to shed light on the mechanisms known to counteract the negative effects of oxygen lack. To obtain a molecular signature, changes in the plasma proteome were studied by using proteomic approach. To enrich the low-abundance proteins in human plasma, two highly abundant proteins, albumin and IgG, were first removed. By comparing the plasma proteins of high altitude natives with those of a normal control group, several proteins with a significant alteration were found. The up-regulated proteins were identified as vitamin D-binding protein, hemopexin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, haptoglobin β-chain, apolipoprotein A1, transthyretin and hemoglobin beta chain. The down-regulated proteins were transferrin, complement C3, serum amyloid, complement component 4A and plasma retinol binding protein. Among these proteins, the alterations of transthyretin and transferrin were further confirmed by ELISA and Western blotting analysis. Since all the up- and down- regulated proteins identified above are well-known inflammation inhibitors and play a positive anti-inflammatory role, these results show that there is some adaptive mechanism that sustains the inflammation balance in high altitude natives exposed to hypobaric hypoxia.

  5. Effects of retinoic acid isomers on proteomic pattern in human breast cancer MCF-7 cell line

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Flodrová, Dana; Benkovská, Dagmar; Macejová, D.; Bialešová, L.; Bobálová, Janette; Brtko, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 4 (2013), s. 205-209. ISSN 1210-0668 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB12SK151 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : retinoic acid isomers * retinoid * breast cancer * malignant cells * proteomic analysis Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  6. Notice of Pre-Application Webinar - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute will hold a public pre-application webinar on Friday, December 11 at 12:00 p.m. (EST) for the Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs) RFA-CA-15-021, RFA-CA-15-022, RFA-CA-15-023. These are the RFAs for the reissuance of its Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC).

  7. Kinomic and phospho-proteomic analysis of breast cancer stem-like cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Christensen, Anne Geske Lindhard; Ehmsen, Sidse;

    Kinomic and phospho-proteomic analysis of breast cancer stem-like cells Rikke Leth-Larsen1, Anne G Christensen1, Sidse Ehmsen1, Mark Møller1, Giuseppe Palmisano2, Martin R Larsen2, Henrik J Ditzel1,3 1Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark 2Institute of...

  8. A novel proteomic biomarker panel as a diagnostic tool for patients with ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgdall, Claus; Fung, Eric T; Christensen, Ib J;

    2011-01-01

    Previous reports have shown that the proteomic markers apolipoprotein A1, hepcidin, transferrin, inter-alpha trypsin IV internal fragment, transthyretin, connective-tissue activating protein 3 and beta-2 microglobulin may discriminate between a benign pelvic mass and ovarian cancer (OC). The aim...

  9. RNAi-mediated downregulation of poplar plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) changes plasma membrane proteome composition and affects leaf physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Zhen; Merl-Pham, Juliane; Uehlein, Norbert; Zimmer, Ina; Mühlhans, Stefanie; Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel Karl; Kaldenhoff, Ralf; Palme, Klaus; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Block, Katja

    2015-10-14

    Plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) are one subfamily of aquaporins that mediate the transmembrane transport of water. To reveal their function in poplar, we generated transgenic poplar plants in which the translation of PIP genes was downregulated by RNA interference investigated these plants with a comprehensive leaf plasma membrane proteome and physiome analysis. First, inhibition of PIP synthesis strongly altered the leaf plasma membrane protein composition. Strikingly, several signaling components and transporters involved in the regulation of stomatal movement were differentially regulated in transgenic poplars. Furthermore, hormonal crosstalk related to abscisic acid, auxin and brassinosteroids was altered, in addition to cell wall biosynthesis/cutinization, the organization of cellular structures and membrane trafficking. A physiological analysis confirmed the proteomic results. The leaves had wider opened stomata and higher net CO2 assimilation and transpiration rates as well as greater mesophyll conductance for CO2 (gm) and leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf). Based on these results, we conclude that PIP proteins not only play essential roles in whole leaf water and CO2 flux but have important roles in the regulation of stomatal movement. PMID:26248320

  10. Modification-specific proteomics of plasma membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elortza, Felix; Mohammed, Shabaz; Bunkenborg, Jakob;

    2006-01-01

    that phospholipase D (PLD) treatment of human and plant plasma membrane fractions leads to the release of GPI-anchored proteins that were identified and characterized by capillary liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. In contrast to phospholipase C, the PLD enzyme is not affected by structural......-recognized as they are candidate cell surface biomarker molecules with potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications in molecular medicine. GPI-APs have also attracted interest in plant biotechnology because of their role in root development and cell remodeling. Using a shave-and-conquer concept, we demonstrate...

  11. Prostate cancer serum biomarker discovery through proteomic analysis of alpha-2 macroglobulin protein complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Burgess, Earle F.; Ham, Amy-Joan L.; Tabb, David L.; Billheimer, Dean; Roth, Bruce J.; Chang, Sam S.; Cookson, Michael S.; Hinton, Timothy J.; Cheek, Kristin L.; Hill, Salisha; Jennifer A Pietenpol

    2008-01-01

    Alpha-2 macroglobulin (A2M) functions as a universal protease inhibitor in serum and is capable of binding various cytokines and growth factors. In this study, we investigated if immunoaffinity enrichment and proteomic analysis of A2M protein complexes from human serum could improve detection of biologically relevant and novel candidate protein biomarkers in prostate cancer. Serum samples from six patients with androgen-independent, metastatic prostate cancer and six control patients without ...

  12. Proteomic Serum Biomarkers and Their Potential Application in Cancer Screening Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Deelder, André M; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Mertens, Bart J.; Yuri E. M. van der Burgt; Anouck Huijbers; Tim J. A. Dekker; Wilma E. Mesker; Berit Velstra

    2010-01-01

    Early diagnosis of cancer is of pivotal importance to reduce disease-related mortality. There is great need for non-invasive screening methods, yet current screening protocols have limited sensitivity and specificity. The use of serum biomarkers to discriminate cancer patients from healthy persons might be a tool to improve screening programs. Mass spectrometry based proteomics is widely applied as a technology for mapping and identifying peptides and proteins in body fluids. One commonly use...

  13. Comprehensive and quantitative proteomic analyses of zebrafish plasma reveals conserved protein profiles between genders and between zebrafish and human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Caixia; Tan, Xing Fei; Lim, Teck Kwang; Lin, Qingsong; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Omic approaches have been increasingly used in the zebrafish model for holistic understanding of molecular events and mechanisms of tissue functions. However, plasma is rarely used for omic profiling because of the technical challenges in collecting sufficient blood. In this study, we employed two mass spectrometric (MS) approaches for a comprehensive characterization of zebrafish plasma proteome, i.e. conventional shotgun liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for an overview study and quantitative SWATH (Sequential Window Acquisition of all THeoretical fragment-ion spectra) for comparison between genders. 959 proteins were identified in the shotgun profiling with estimated concentrations spanning almost five orders of magnitudes. Other than the presence of a few highly abundant female egg yolk precursor proteins (vitellogenins), the proteomic profiles of male and female plasmas were very similar in both number and abundance and there were basically no other highly gender-biased proteins. The types of plasma proteins based on IPA (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) classification and tissue sources of production were also very similar. Furthermore, the zebrafish plasma proteome shares significant similarities with human plasma proteome, in particular in top abundant proteins including apolipoproteins and complements. Thus, the current study provided a valuable dataset for future evaluation of plasma proteins in zebrafish. PMID:27071722

  14. A novel method for sample preparation of fresh lung cancer tissue for proteomics analysis by tumor cell enrichment and removal of blood contaminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orre Lotta

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In-depth proteomics analyses of tumors are frequently biased by the presence of blood components and stromal contamination, which leads to large experimental variation and decreases the proteome coverage. We have established a reproducible method to prepare freshly collected lung tumors for proteomics analysis, aiming at tumor cell enrichment and reduction of plasma protein contamination. We obtained enriched tumor-cell suspensions (ETS from six lung cancer cases (two adenocarcinomas, two squamous-cell carcinomas, two large-cell carcinomas and from two normal lung samples. The cell content of resulting ETS was evaluated with immunocytological stainings and compared with the histologic pattern of the original specimens. By means of a quantitative mass spectrometry-based method we evaluated the reproducibility of the sample preparation protocol and we assessed the proteome coverage by comparing lysates from ETS samples with the direct lysate of corresponding fresh-frozen samples. Results Cytological analyses on cytospin specimens showed that the percentage of tumoral cells in the ETS samples ranged from 20% to 70%. In the normal lung samples the percentage of epithelial cells was less then 10%. The reproducibility of the sample preparation protocol was very good, with coefficient of variation at the peptide level and at the protein level of 13% and 7%, respectively. Proteomics analysis led to the identification of a significantly higher number of proteins in the ETS samples than in the FF samples (244 vs 109, respectively. Albumin and hemoglobin were among the top 5 most abundant proteins identified in the FF samples, showing a high contamination with blood and plasma proteins, whereas ubiquitin and the mitochondrial ATP synthase 5A1 where among the top 5 most abundant proteins in the ETS samples. Conclusion The method is feasible and reproducible. We could obtain a fair enrichment of cells but the major benefit of the method

  15. Proteomic identification of plasma proteins as markers of growth promoter abuse in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinkead, Ruth A; Elliott, Christopher T; Cannizzo, Francesca T; Biolatti, Bartolomeo; Mooney, Mark H

    2015-06-01

    Growth-promoting agents are continually misused for increasing animal growth and fraudulent gain in the meat industry, yet detection rates from conventional targeted testing for drug residues do not reflect this. This is because testing currently relies on direct detection of drugs or related metabolites and administrators of such compounds can take adaptive measures to avoid detection through the use of endogenous or unknown drugs, and low dose or combined mixtures. New detection methods are needed which focus on the screening of biological responses of an animal to such growth-promoting agents as it has been demonstrated that genomic, proteomic and metabolomics profiles are altered by xenobiotic intake. Therefore, an untargeted proteomics approach using comparative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) was carried out to identify putative proteins altered in plasma after treatment with oestradiol, dexamethasone or prednisolone. Twenty-four male cattle were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 6) for experimental treatment over 40 days, namely a control group of non-treated cattle, and three groups administered 17β-oestradiol-3-benzoate (0.01 mg/kg, intramuscular), dexamethasone sodium phosphate (0.7 mg/day, per os) or prednisolone acetate (15 mg/day, per os), respectively. Plasma collected from each animal at day 25 post study initiation was subjected to proteomic analysis by 2DE for comparison of protein expression between treated and untreated animals. Analysis of acquired gel images revealed 22 plasma proteins which differed in expression by more than 50% (p anabolic practice. PMID:25912459

  16. Systems analysis of endothelial cell plasma membrane proteome of rat lung microvasculature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witkiewicz Halina

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endothelial cells line all blood vessels to form the blood-tissue interface which is critical for maintaining organ homeostasis and facilitates molecular exchange. We recently used tissue subcellular fractionation combined with several multi-dimensional mass spectrometry-based techniques to enhance identification of lipid-embedded proteins for large-scale proteomic mapping of luminal endothelial cell plasma membranes isolated directly from rat lungs in vivo. The biological processes and functions of the proteins expressed at this important blood-tissue interface remain unexplored at a large scale. Results We performed an unbiased systems analysis of the endothelial cell surface proteome containing over 1800 proteins to unravel the major functions and pathways apparent at this interface. As expected, many key functions of plasma membranes in general (i.e., cell surface signaling pathways, cytoskeletal organization, adhesion, membrane trafficking, metabolism, mechanotransduction, membrane fusion, and vesicle-mediated transport and endothelial cells in particular (i.e., blood vessel development and maturation, angiogenesis, regulation of endothelial cell proliferation, protease activity, and endocytosis were significantly overrepresented in this proteome. We found that endothelial cells express multiple proteins that mediate processes previously reported to be restricted to neuronal cells, such as neuronal survival and plasticity, axon growth and regeneration, synaptic vesicle trafficking and neurotransmitter metabolic process. Surprisingly, molecular machinery for protein synthesis was also detected as overrepresented, suggesting that endothelial cells, like neurons, can synthesize proteins locally at the cell surface. Conclusion Our unbiased systems analysis has led to the potential discovery of unexpected functions in normal endothelium. The discovery of the existence of protein synthesis at the plasma membrane in endothelial

  17. The identification of proteomic markers of sperm freezing resilience in ram seminal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, J P; Leahy, T; Soleilhavoup, C; Tsikis, G; Labas, V; Harichaux, G; Lynch, G W; Druart, X; de Graaf, S P

    2015-08-01

    The source and composition of seminal plasma has previously been shown to alter the ability of spermatozoa to survive cryopreservation. In the present study, the ionic and proteomic composition of seminal plasma from rams with high (HSP; n = 3) or low (LSP; n = 3) freezing resilient spermatozoa was assessed. 75 proteins were identified to be more abundant in HSP and 48 proteins were identified to be more abundant in LSP. Individual seminal plasma proteomes were established for each of the six rams examined. For each ram, correlations were conducted between previously recorded freezing resilience [1] and individual spectral counts in order to identify markers of freezing resilience. 26S proteasome complex, acylamino acid releasing enzyme, alpha mannosidase class 2C, heat shock protein 90, tripeptidyl-peptidase 2, TCP-1 complex, sorbitol dehydrogenase and transitional endoplasmic reticulum ATPase were found to be positively correlated (r(2) > 0.7) with freezing resilience. Cystatin, zinc-2-alpha glycoprotein, angiogenin-2-like protein, cartilage acidic protein-1, cathepsin B and ribonuclease 4 isoform 1 were found to be negatively correlated (r(2) > 0.7) with freezing resilience. Several negative markers were found to originate from the accessory sex glands, whereas many positive markers originated from spermatozoa and were part of or associated with the 26S proteasome or CCT complex. PMID:26025878

  18. Cold atmospheric plasma in cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keidar, Michael; Shashurin, Alex; Volotskova, Olga [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, George Washington University, Washington DC 20052 (United States); Ann Stepp, Mary [Medical School, George Washington University, Washington DC 20052 (United States); Srinivasan, Priya; Sandler, Anthony [Childrens National Medical Center, Washington DC 20010 (United States); Trink, Barry [Head and Neck Cancer Research Division, Department of Otolaryngology, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Recent progress in atmospheric plasmas has led to the creation of cold plasmas with ion temperature close to room temperature. This paper outlines recent progress in understanding of cold plasma physics as well as application of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) in cancer therapy. Varieties of novel plasma diagnostic techniques were developed recently in a quest to understand physics of CAP. It was established that the streamer head charge is about 10{sup 8} electrons, the electrical field in the head vicinity is about 10{sup 7} V/m, and the electron density of the streamer column is about 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}. Both in-vitro and in-vivo studies of CAP action on cancer were performed. It was shown that the cold plasma application selectively eradicates cancer cells in-vitro without damaging normal cells and significantly reduces tumor size in-vivo. Studies indicate that the mechanism of action of cold plasma on cancer cells is related to generation of reactive oxygen species with possible induction of the apoptosis pathway. It is also shown that the cancer cells are more susceptible to the effects of CAP because a greater percentage of cells are in the S phase of the cell cycle.

  19. Use of proteomics for validation of the isolation process of clotting factor IX from human plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Clifton, James; Huang, Feilei; Gaso-Sokac, Dajana; Brilliant, Kate; Hixson, Douglas; Josic, Djuro

    2009-01-01

    The use of proteomic techniques in the monitoring of different production steps of plasma-derived clotting factor IX (pd F IX) was demonstrated. The first step, solid-phase extraction with a weak anion-exchange resin, fractionates the bulk of human serum albumin (HSA), immunoglobulin G, and other non-binding proteins from F IX. The proteins that strongly bind to the anion-exchange resin are eluted by higher salt concentrations. In the second step, anion-exchange chromatography, residual HSA, ...

  20. HUMAN PLASMA PROTEOME MAPPING IN HEALTH AND CLEAR CELL CARCINOMA OF THE KIDNEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. Shevchenko

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Plasma proteome from patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC and controls underwent mass spectrometric mapping. A total of 247 proteins were identified; the expression of 12 proteins of them increased on transition from the controls to patients with Stages I–II and III–IV RCC. There was decreased expression of 14 proteins in this series. Out of the 26 proteins showing a change in their expressions, 7 proteins belong to acute-phase ones, 3 proteins are associated with the intercellular matrix. These proteins can be potential markers for RCC.

  1. Studying Different Clinical Syndromes Of Paediatric Severe Malaria Using Plasma Proteomics

    KAUST Repository

    Ramaprasad, Abhinay

    2012-08-01

    Background- Severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria remains one of the major causes of childhood morbidity and mortality in Africa. Severe malaria manifests itself as three main clinical syndromes-impaired consciousness (cerebral malaria), respiratory distress and severe malarial anaemia. Cerebral malaria and respiratory distress are major contributors to malaria mortality but their pathophysiology remains unclear. Motivation/Objectives- Most children with severe malaria die within the first 24 hours of admission to a hospital because of their pathophysiological conditions. Thus, along with anti-malarial drugs, various adjuvant therapies such as fluid bolus (for hypovolaemia) and anticonvulsants (for seizures) are given to alleviate the sick child’s condition. But these therapies can sometimes have adverse effects. Hence, a clear understanding of severe malaria pathophysiology is essential for making an informed decision regarding adjuvant therapies. Methodology- We used mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics to study plasma samples from Gambian children with severe malaria. We compared the proteomic profiles of different severe malaria syndromes and generated hypotheses regarding the underlying disease mechanisms. Results/Conclusions- The main challenges of studying the severe malaria syndromes using proteomics were the high complexity and variability among the samples. We hypothesized that hepatic injury and nitric oxide play roles in the pathophysiology of cerebral malaria and respiratory distress.

  2. Plasma protein profiling of Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer’s disease using iTRAQ quantitative proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Fei; Poljak, Anne; Nicole A Kochan; Raftery, Mark; Brodaty, Henry; Smythe, George A.; Perminder S Sachdev

    2014-01-01

    Background With the promise of disease modifying treatments, there is a need for more specific diagnosis and prognosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Plasma biomarkers are likely to be utilised to increase diagnostic accuracy and specificity of AD and cognitive decline. Methods Isobaric tags (iTRAQ) and proteomic methods were used to identify potential plasma biomarkers of MCI and AD. Relative protein expression level changes were quantified in plasma of 411 ...

  3. Proteomic identification of novel differentiation plasma protein markers in hypobaric hypoxia-induced rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmin Ahmad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypobaric hypoxia causes complex changes in the expression of genes, including stress related genes and corresponding proteins that are necessary to maintain homeostasis. Whereas most prior studies focused on single proteins, newer methods allowing the simultaneous study of many proteins could lead to a better understanding of complex and dynamic changes that occur during the hypobaric hypoxia. METHODS: In this study we investigated the temporal plasma protein alterations of rat induced by hypobaric hypoxia at a simulated altitude of 7620 m (25,000 ft, 282 mm Hg in a hypobaric chamber. Total plasma proteins collected at different time points (0, 6, 12 and 24 h, separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE and identified using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF. Biological processes that were enriched in the plasma proteins during hypobaric hypoxia were identified using Gene Ontology (GO analysis. According to their properties and obvious alterations during hypobaric hypoxia, changes of plasma concentrations of Ttr, Prdx-2, Gpx -3, Apo A-I, Hp, Apo-E, Fetub and Nme were selected to be validated by Western blot analysis. RESULTS: Bioinformatics analysis of 25 differentially expressed proteins showed that 23 had corresponding candidates in the database. The expression patterns of the eight selected proteins observed by Western blot were in agreement with 2-DE results, thus confirming the reliability of the proteomic analysis. Most of the proteins identified are related to cellular defense mechanisms involving anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity. Their presence reflects the consequence of serial cascades initiated by hypobaric hypoxia. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides information about the plasma proteome changes induced in response to hypobaric hypoxia and thus identification of the candidate proteins which can act as novel biomarkers.

  4. ASBMB Journal Club - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    On Wednesday, November 12, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM EST, Daniel Liebler, PhD (Vanderbilt University) and Karin Rodland, PhD (Pacific Northwestern National Laboratory) and Ruedi Aebersold, PhD (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology) will share their research insight as part of the ASBMB Journal Club.  Both Doctors Liebler and Rodland are Principal Investigators in the NCI’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium.

  5. Use of proteomics for the early diagnosis fo breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Winden, A.W.J.

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer mortality rates in The Netherlands are among the highest in Europe. To improve breast cancer survival, early detection is of vital importance. The introduction of the national breast cancer screening program has led to an improvement in stage distribution at diagnosis of breast cancer.

  6. Comparative proteomic analysis of differentially expressed proteins in human pancreatic cancer tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Hua Chen; Run-Zhou Ni; Ming-Bing Xiao; Ji-Guang Guo; Jia-Wei Zhou

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Pancreatic cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors. Early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is dififcult because of the latent onset and lack of good biomarkers. This study aimed to look for and identify differentially expressed proteins in tissues of pancreatic cancer and adjacent noncancerous tissues by proteomic approaches so as to provide information about possible pancreatic cancer markers and therapeutic targets. METHODS:Proteins extracted from 3 paired adjacent noncancerous and cancerous pancreatic tissue specimens were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). The protein spots exhibiting statistical alternations between the two groups through computerized image analysis were then identiifed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-lfight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). In addition, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were performed to verify the expression of certain candidate proteins. RESULTS:Twelve proteins were signiifcantly upregulated and 4 were downregulated between cancerous and paired adjacent noncancerous pancreatic tissues. Several proteins (S100A11, Ig gamma-1 chain C region, GSTO1 and peroxiredoxin 4) were found for the ifrst time to be associated with pancreatic cancer. Differential expression of some identiifed proteins was further conifrmed by Western blotting analysis and/or immunohistochemical analysis.CONCLUSIONS:Comparative proteomic analysis using 2-DE and MALDI-TOF-MS is an effective method for identifying differentially expressed proteins that may be the potential diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancer.

  7. Effects of increased CO2 on fish gill and plasma proteome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Bresolin de Souza

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification and warming are both primarily caused by increased levels of atmospheric CO2, and marine organisms are exposed to these two stressors simultaneously. Although the effects of temperature on fish have been investigated over the last century, the long-term effects of moderate CO2 exposure and the combination of both stressors are almost entirely unknown. A proteomics approach was used to assess the adverse physiological and biochemical changes that may occur from the exposure to these two environmental stressors. We analysed gills and blood plasma of Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus exposed to temperatures of 12 °C (control and 18 °C (impaired growth in combination with control (400 µatm or high-CO2 water (1000 µatm for 14 weeks. The proteomic analysis was performed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE followed by Nanoflow LC-MS/MS using a LTQ-Orbitrap. The high-CO2 treatment induced the up-regulation of immune system-related proteins, as indicated by the up-regulation of the plasma proteins complement component C3 and fibrinogen β chain precursor in both temperature treatments. Changes in gill proteome in the high-CO2 (18 °C group were mostly related to increased energy metabolism proteins (ATP synthase, malate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase thermostable, and fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase, possibly coupled to a higher energy demand. Gills from fish exposed to high-CO2 at both temperature treatments showed changes in proteins associated with increased cellular turnover and apoptosis signalling (annexin 5, eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1γ, receptor for protein kinase C, and putative ribosomal protein S27. This study indicates that moderate CO2-driven acidification, alone and combined with high temperature, can elicit biochemical changes that may affect fish health.

  8. Cold Atmosphere Plasma in Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keidar, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Plasma is an ionized gas that is typically generated in high-temperature laboratory conditions. Recent progress in atmospheric plasmas led to the creation of cold plasmas with ion temperature close to room temperature. Areas of potential application of cold atmospheric plasmas (CAP) include dentistry, drug delivery, dermatology, cosmetics, wound healing, cellular modifications, and cancer treatment. Various diagnostic tools have been developed for characterization of CAP including intensified charge-coupled device cameras, optical emission spectroscopy and electrical measurements of the discharge propertied. Recently a new method for temporally resolved measurements of absolute values of plasma density in the plasma column of small-size atmospheric plasma jet utilizing Rayleigh microwave scattering was proposed [1,2]. In this talk we overview state of the art of CAP diagnostics and understanding of the mechanism of plasma action of biological objects. The efficacy of cold plasma in a pre-clinical model of various cancer types (long, bladder, and skin) was recently demonstrated [3]. Both in-vitro and in-vivo studies revealed that cold plasmas selectively kill cancer cells. We showed that: (a) cold plasma application selectively eradicates cancer cells in vitro without damaging normal cells. For instance a strong selective effect was observed; the resulting 60--70% of lung cancer cells were detached from the plate in the zone treated with plasma, whereas no detachment was observed in the treated zone for the normal lung cells under the same treatment conditions. (b) Significantly reduced tumor size in vivo. Cold plasma treatment led to tumor ablation with neighbouring tumors unaffected. These experiments were performed on more than 10 mice with the same outcome. We found that tumors of about 5mm in diameter were ablated after 2 min of single time plasma treatment. The two best known cold plasma effects, plasma-induced apoptosis and the decrease of cell migration

  9. Proteomic Profiling of Nonenzymatically Glycated Proteins in Human Plasma and Erythrocyte Membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qibin; Tang, Ning; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Phillips, Lawrence S.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2008-05-01

    Non-enzymatic glycation of peptides and proteins by D-glucose has important implications in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, particularly in the development of diabetic complications. In this report, a thorough proteomic profiling of glycated proteins was attempted by using phenylboronate affinity chromatography to enrich glycated proteins and glycated, tryptic peptides from human plasma and erythrocyte membranes. Enriched peptides were subsequently analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with electron transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry, and 76 and 31 proteins were confidently identified as glycated from human plasma and erythrocyte membrane, respectively. It was observed that most of the glycated proteins can be identified in samples from individuals with normal glucose tolerance, although samples from individuals with impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus have slightly higher numbers of glycated proteins and more glycation sites identified.

  10. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Serum Proteins from Oral Cancer Patients: Comparison of Two Analytical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Yang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Serum proteomic analysis can be a valuable approach for the discovery of protein biomarkers for early detection or monitoring of a disease. In this study, two analytical methods were compared for quantification of serum proteins in patients with oral cancer. In the first approach, we quantified serum proteins between oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC and healthy control subjects by performing in-solution digestion of serum proteins, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ labeling of the resulting peptides, strong cation exchange (SCX fractionation of labeled peptides and finally capillary liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS analysis of the peptides. In the second approach, we first separated serum proteins with SDS-PAGE. The gel-separated proteins were then digested with trypsin and the resulting peptides were labeled with iTRAQ and analyzed with LC-MS/MS for protein quantification. A total of 319 serum proteins were quantified with the first proteomic approach whereas a total of 281 proteins were quantified by the second proteomic approach. Most of the proteins were identified and quantified by both approaches, suggesting that these methods are similarly effective for serum proteome analysis. This study provides compelling evidence that quantitative serum proteomic analysis of OSCC is a valuable approach for identifying differentially expressed proteins in cancer patients’ circulation systems that may be used as potential biomarkers for disease detection. Further validation in large oral cancer patient populations may lead to a simple and low invasive clinical tool for OSCC diagnosis or monitoring.

  11. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics in Molecular Diagnostics: Discovery of Cancer Biomarkers Using Tissue Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasish Paul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate diagnosis and proper monitoring of cancer patients remain a key obstacle for successful cancer treatment and prevention. Therein comes the need for biomarker discovery, which is crucial to the current oncological and other clinical practices having the potential to impact the diagnosis and prognosis. In fact, most of the biomarkers have been discovered utilizing the proteomics-based approaches. Although high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches like SILAC, 2D-DIGE, and iTRAQ are filling up the pitfalls of the conventional techniques, still serum proteomics importunately poses hurdle in overcoming a wide range of protein concentrations, and also the availability of patient tissue samples is a limitation for the biomarker discovery. Thus, researchers have looked for alternatives, and profiling of candidate biomarkers through tissue culture of tumor cell lines comes up as a promising option. It is a rich source of tumor cell-derived proteins, thereby, representing a wide array of potential biomarkers. Interestingly, most of the clinical biomarkers in use today (CA 125, CA 15.3, CA 19.9, and PSA were discovered through tissue culture-based system and tissue extracts. This paper tries to emphasize the tissue culture-based discovery of candidate biomarkers through various mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches.

  12. Proteomic analysis of plasma membrane and secretory vesicles from human neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Kevin P

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN constitute an essential cellular component of innate host defense against microbial invasion and exhibit a wide array of responses both to particulate and soluble stimuli. As the cells recruited earliest during acute inflammation, PMN respond rapidly and release a variety of potent cytotoxic agents within minutes of exposure to microbes or their products. PMN rely on the redistribution of functionally important proteins, from intracellular compartments to the plasma membrane and phagosome, as the means by which to respond quickly. To determine the range of membrane proteins available for rapid recruitment during PMN activation, we analyzed the proteins in subcellular fractions enriched for plasma membrane and secretory vesicles recovered from the light membrane fraction of resting PMN after Percoll gradient centrifugation and free-flow electrophoresis purification using mass spectrometry-based proteomics methods. Results To identify the proteins light membrane fractions enriched for plasma membrane vesicles and secretory vesicles, we employed a proteomic approach, first using MALDI-TOF (peptide mass fingerprinting and then by HPLC-MS/MS using a 3D ion trap mass spectrometer to analyze the two vesicle populations from resting PMN. We identified several proteins that are functionally important but had not previously been recovered in PMN secretory vesicles. Two such proteins, 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP and dysferlin were further validated by immunoblot analysis. Conclusion Our data demonstrate the broad array of proteins present in secretory vesicles that provides the PMN with the capacity for remarkable and rapid reorganization of its plasma membrane after exposure to proinflammatory agents or stimuli.

  13. Comparative proteomic analysis of plasma membrane proteins between human osteosarcoma and normal osteoblastic cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary malignant tumor of bone in children and adolescents. However, the knowledge in diagnostic modalities has progressed less. To identify new biomarkers for the early diagnosis of OS as well as for potential novel therapeutic candidates, we performed a sub-cellular comparative proteomic research. An osteosarcoma cell line (MG-63) and human osteoblastic cells (hFOB1.19) were used as our comparative model. Plasma membrane (PM) was obtained by aqueous two-phase partition. Proteins were analyzed through iTRAQ-based quantitative differential LC/MS/MS. The location and function of differential proteins were analyzed through GO database. Protein-protein interaction was examined through String software. One of differentially expressed proteins was verified by immunohistochemistry. 342 non-redundant proteins were identified, 68 of which were differentially expressed with 1.5-fold difference, with 25 up-regulated and 43 down-regulated. Among those differential proteins, 69% ware plasma membrane, which are related to the biological processes of binding, cell structure, signal transduction, cell adhesion, etc., and interaction with each other. One protein--CD151 located in net nodes was verified to be over-expressed in osteosarcoma tissue by immunohistochemistry. It is the first time to use plasma membrane proteomics for studying the OS membrane proteins according to our knowledge. We generated preliminary but comprehensive data about membrane protein of osteosarcoma. Among these, CD151 was further validated in patient samples, and this small molecule membrane might be a new target for OS research. The plasma membrane proteins identified in this study may provide new insight into osteosarcoma biology and potential diagnostic and therapeutic biomarkers

  14. Plasma proteomic study in patients with high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-jun LUO

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the differential expressions of protein in the plasma proteome in patients suffering from high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE and their implications. Methods  The plasmas of six HAPE patients and six healthy controls were studied. The high-abundant proteins in the plasma were removed. The low-abundant proteins in the plasma/serum were segregated by 2-DE. MALDI-TOF/MS was adopted to measure the peptide fingerprints after the differential protein spots were digested by enzymes. Comparison and analysis were made in the GenBank. Results  The immunoglobulin K1 light chain, serum transferrin protein precursor, and α-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain-related protein expressions were upregulated in HAPE patients compared with the control group. However the human fibrin glue coagulation protein 3 was down-regulated. Conclusion  The differential expression of the above four proteins in the plasma of HAPE patients may be related to the occurrence of HAPE and can be used as the target point for the prediction of HAPE.

  15. Clinical Assay Development Support - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI’s Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis and the Cancer Diagnosis Program announce a request for applications for the Clinical Assay Development Program (CADP) for investigators seeking clinical assay development and validation resources.

  16. General intelligence is associated with subclinical inflammation in Nepalese children: A population-based plasma proteomics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun Eun; West, Keith P; Cole, Robert N; Schulze, Kerry J; Wu, Lee Shu-Fune; Yager, James D; Groopman, John; Christian, Parul

    2016-08-01

    Improving child cognition in impoverished countries is a public health priority. Yet, biological pathways and associated biomarkers of impaired cognition remain poorly understood and largely unknown, respectively. This study aimed to explore and quantify associations between functional plasma protein biomarkers and childhood intellectual test performance. We applied proteomics to quantify proteins in plasma samples of 249 rural Nepalese children, 6-8years of age who, 1year later at 7-9years of age, were administered the Universal Nonverbal Intelligence Test (UNIT). Among 751 plasma proteins quantified, 22 were associated with UNIT scores, passing a false discovery rate threshold of 5.0% (qAsian child population. Plasma proteomics may offer opportunities to identify functional, antecedent biomarkers of child cognitive development. PMID:27039242

  17. The effects of eating marine- or vegetable-fed farmed trout on the human plasma proteome profiles of healthy men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rentsch, Maria Louise; Lametsch, René; Bügel, Susanne;

    2015-01-01

    present study was to evaluate the impact of regular fish intake on the plasma proteome. We recruited thirty healthy men aged 40 to 70 years, who were randomly allocated to a daily meal of chicken or trout raised on vegetable or marine feeds. Blood samples were collected before and after 8 weeks of...

  18. Synergistic effects of retinoic acid and tamoxifen on human breast cancer cells: Proteomic characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anti-estrogen tamoxifen and vitamin A-related compound, all-trans retinoic acid (RA), in combination act synergistically to inhibit the growth of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. In the present study, we applied two-dimensional gel electrophoresis based proteomic approach to globally analyze this synergistic effect of RA and tamoxifen. Proteomic study revealed that multiple clusters of proteins were involved in RA and tamoxifen-induced apoptosis in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, including post-transcriptional and splicing factors, proteins related to cellular proliferation or differentiation, and proteins related to energy production and internal degradation systems. The negative growth factor-transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) was secreted by RA and/or tamoxifen treatment and was studies as a potential mediator of the synergistic effects of RA and tamoxifen in apoptosis. By comparing protein alterations in treatments of RA and tamoxifen alone or in combination to those of TGFβ treatment, or co-treatment with TGFβ inhibitor SB 431542, proteomic results showed that a number of proteins were involved in TGFβ signaling pathway. These results provide valuable insights into the mechanisms of RA and tamoxifen-induced TGFβ signaling pathway in breast cancer cells

  19. Investigation of Plasma Biomarkers in HIV-1/HCV Mono- and Coinfected Individuals by Multiplex iTRAQ Quantitative Proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Shetty, Vivekananda; Jain, Pooja; Nickens, Zacharie; Sinnathamby, Gomathinayagam; Mehta, Anand; Philip, Ramila

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of plasma samples from HIV-1/HCV mono- and coinfected individuals by quantitative proteomics is an efficient strategy to investigate changes in protein abundances and to characterize the proteins that are the effectors of cellular functions involved in viral pathogenesis. In this study, the infected and healthy plasma samples (in triplicate) were treated with ProteoMiner beads to equalize protein concentrations and subjected to 4-plex iTRAQ labeling and liquid chromatography/mass...

  20. Dataset for the proteomic inventory and quantitative analysis of the breast cancer hypoxic secretome associated with osteotropism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R. Cox

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The cancer secretome includes all of the macromolecules secreted by cells into their microenvironment. Cancer cell secretomes are significantly different to that of normal cells reflecting the changes that normal cells have undergone during their transition to malignancy. More importantly, cancer secretomes are known to be active mediators of both local and distant host cells and play an important role in the progression and dissemination of cancer. Here we have quantitatively profiled both the composition of breast cancer secretomes associated with osteotropism, and their modulation under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. We detect and quantify 162 secretome proteins across all conditions which show differential hypoxic induction and association with osteotropism. Mass Spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the dataset identifier PXD000397 and the complete proteomic, bioinformatic and biological analyses are reported in Cox et al. (2015 [1].

  1. With or without you - Proteomics with or without major plasma/serum proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianazza, Elisabetta; Miller, Ingrid; Palazzolo, Luca; Parravicini, Chiara; Eberini, Ivano

    2016-05-17

    The first sections of this review compile and discuss strategies and protocols for managing plasma/serum as a source of biomarkers relevant to human disease. In many such cases, depletion of abundant protein(s) is a crucial preliminary step to the procedure; specific conceptual and technical approaches, however, make it possible to effectively use to this purpose whole plasma/serum. The final sections focus instead on the complexity associated with each of the major serum/plasma proteins in terms of both, multiple molecular structures (existence of a number of protein species) and of multiple molecular functions (behavior as multifunctional/multitasking/moonlighting proteins). Reviewing evidence in these and some related fields (regulation of the synthetic pattern by proteins and non-protein compounds and its connection with health and disease) prompts the suggestion/recommendation that information on the abundant components of plasma/serum proteome is routinely obtained and processed/mined as a valuable contribution to the characterization of any non-physiological condition and to the understanding of its mechanisms and of its implications/sequels. PMID:27072114

  2. Proteomic Analysis of Stage-II Breast Cancer from Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah Al-Dhabi, Naif; Srigopalram, Srisesharam; Ilavenil, Soundharrajan; Kim, Young Ock; Agastian, Paul; Baaru, Rajasekhar; Balamurugan, Kannan; Choi, Ki Choon; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently occurring disease among women worldwide. The early stage of breast cancer identification is the key challenge in cancer control and prevention procedures. Although gene expression profiling helps to understand the molecular mechanism of diseases or disorder in the living system, gene expression pattern alone is not sufficient to predict the exact mechanisms. Current proteomics tools hold great application for analysis of cancerous conditions. Hence, the generation of differential protein expression profiles has been optimized for breast cancer and normal tissue samples in our organization. Normal and tumor tissues were collected from 20 people from a local hospital. Proteins from the diseased and normal tissues have been investigated by 2D gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF-MS. The peptide mass fingerprint data were fed into various public domains like Mascot, MS-Fit, and Pept-ident against Swiss-Prot protein database and the proteins of interest were identified. Some of the differentially expressed proteins identified were human annexin, glutathione S-transferase, vimentin, enolase-1, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase, Cyclin A1, hormone sensitive lipase, beta catenin, and so forth. Many types of proteins were identified as fundamental steps for developing molecular markers for diagnosis of human breast cancer as well as making a new proteomic database for future research.

  3. Proteomic Analysis of Stage-II Breast Cancer from Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naif Abdullah Al-Dhabi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most frequently occurring disease among women worldwide. The early stage of breast cancer identification is the key challenge in cancer control and prevention procedures. Although gene expression profiling helps to understand the molecular mechanism of diseases or disorder in the living system, gene expression pattern alone is not sufficient to predict the exact mechanisms. Current proteomics tools hold great application for analysis of cancerous conditions. Hence, the generation of differential protein expression profiles has been optimized for breast cancer and normal tissue samples in our organization. Normal and tumor tissues were collected from 20 people from a local hospital. Proteins from the diseased and normal tissues have been investigated by 2D gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF-MS. The peptide mass fingerprint data were fed into various public domains like Mascot, MS-Fit, and Pept-ident against Swiss-Prot protein database and the proteins of interest were identified. Some of the differentially expressed proteins identified were human annexin, glutathione S-transferase, vimentin, enolase-1, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase, Cyclin A1, hormone sensitive lipase, beta catenin, and so forth. Many types of proteins were identified as fundamental steps for developing molecular markers for diagnosis of human breast cancer as well as making a new proteomic database for future research.

  4. Exosomes mediated pentose phosphate pathway in ovarian cancer metastasis: a proteomics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Huan; Zheng, Xiangqin; Song, Jianrong; Shen, Rongkai; Su, Yanzhao; Lin, Danmei

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancies for readily metastasis. Exosomes have played an influential role in carcinogenicity and cancer progression. Our aim is to discover exosome-related mechanisms in ovarian cancer progress and explore potential diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets of ovarian cancer. We initially presented the proteomic profiles of exosomes derived from two late-stage ovarian cell lines, OVCA429 and HO8910PM. A total of 2940 exosomal proteins were recorded by MS. FunRich appropriately processed these exosomal proteins, manifesting some superiority in contrast to Blast2go. Moreover, we demonstrated the pentose phosphate pathway was a dominant mechanism in exosome mediated intracellular communication. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, transketolase and transaldolase 1, three key enzymes regulated pentose phosphate pathway, were all marked in the same exosomal parts of proteins between two ovarian cell lines. Moreover, these key proteins might become diagnostic, prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets of ovarian cancer. PMID:26884841

  5. Identification of cancer protein biomarkers using proteomic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mor, Gil G; Ward, David C; Bray-Ward, Patricia

    2015-03-10

    The claimed invention describes methods to diagnose or aid in the diagnosis of cancer. The claimed methods are based on the identification of biomarkers which are particularly well suited to discriminate between cancer subjects and healthy subjects. These biomarkers were identified using a unique and novel screening method described herein. The biomarkers identified herein can also be used in the prognosis and monitoring of cancer. The invention comprises the use of leptin, prolactin, OPN and IGF-II for diagnosing, prognosis and monitoring of ovarian cancer.

  6. Identification of cancer protein biomarkers using proteomic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mor, Gil G. (Cheshire, CT); Ward, David C. (Las Vegas, NV); Bray-Ward, Patricia (Las Vegas, NV)

    2010-02-23

    The claimed invention describes methods to diagnose or aid in the diagnosis of cancer. The claimed methods are based on the identification of biomarkers which are particularly well suited to discriminate between cancer subjects and healthy subjects. These biomarkers were identified using a unique and novel screening method described herein. The biomarkers identified herein can also be used in the prognosis and monitoring of cancer. The invention comprises the use of leptin, prolactin, OPN and IGF-II for diagnosing, prognosis and monitoring of ovarian cancer.

  7. Impact of cathepsin B on the interstitial fluid proteome of murine breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Auli, Alejandro; Hillebrand, Larissa Elisabeth; Biniossek, Martin Lothar; Peters, Christoph; Reinheckel, Thomas; Schilling, Oliver

    2016-03-01

    Carcinomas establish a molecular cross talk between malignant tumor cells and the activated non-malignant cells of the tumor stroma. This cell-cell communication in tumor-stroma interaction includes soluble, secreted proteins that act in a paracrine or autocrine manner. Proteases are crucial factors in tumor-stroma interaction by degrading or truncating secreted bioactive proteins. The cysteine protease cathepsin B is frequently overexpressed in several cancer types, including breast cancer. Its abundance often correlates with poor prognosis. In the murine polyoma virus middle T oncogene (PyMT) breast cancer model, cathepsin B is equally pro-tumorigenic. In this study, we investigate how cathepsin B shapes the secreted proteome of PyMT breast cancers. We employed a novel strategy to harvest tumor interstitial fluid (IF) in combination with chemical stable isotope tagging for quantitative proteomic comparison of IF stemming from PyMT tumors from wild-type mice, mice lacking cathepsin B, and mice over-expressing human cathepsin B. In three biological replicates, we achieve good proteome coverage (∼1700 proteins), with a large content (>70%) of secreted proteins. This characterizes IF as a robust source for the investigation of cancer secretomes. We also identified a large number of shed ectodomains, thus highlighting the importance of tumor-contextual cell surface proteolysis. Furthermore, IF contained >190 proteases and protease inhibitors, which span the entire range of absolute protein abundances; an observation testifying for an important role of proteolysis in tumor-stroma interaction. The cathepsin B genotype consistently affected proteins including alpha-1B-glycoprotein and major urinary proteins 11 and 8 (MUP8). Our study establishes tumor IF as a rich source for the investigation of secreted proteins in tumor biology and sheds light on complex proteolytic networks in the breast cancer secretome. PMID:26455267

  8. iTRAQ quantitative analysis of plasma proteome changes of cow from pregnancy to lactation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Lu; BU Deng-pan; YANG Yong-xing; YAN Su-mei; WANG Jia-qi

    2015-01-01

    Dairy cows undergo tremendous changes in physiological, metabolism and the immune function from pregnancy to lac-tation that are associated with cows being susceptible to metabolic and infectious diseases. The objective of this study is to investigate the changes of plasma proteome on 21 d before expected calving and 1 d after calving from dairy cows using an integrated proteomic approach consisting of minor abundance protein enrichment by ProteoMiner beads, protein labeling by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantiifcation, and protein identiifcation by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Nineteen proteins were changed around the time of calving. These proteins were asso-ciated with response to stress, including acute-phase response and defense response, based on the proteins annotation. In particular, three up-regulated proteins after calving including factor V,α2-antiplasmin and prothrombin were assigned into the complement and coagulation pathway. These results may provide new information in elucidating host response to lactation and parturition stress, and inlfammatory-like conditions at the protein level. Differential proteins may serve as potential markers to regulate the lactation and parturition stress in periparturient dairy cows.

  9. Opportunities and Challenges for Nutritional Proteomics in Cancer Prevention12

    OpenAIRE

    Romagnolo, Donato F.; Milner, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge gaps persist about the efficacy of cancer prevention strategies based on dietary food components. Adaptations to nutrient supply are executed through tuning of multiple protein networks that include transcription factors, histones, modifying enzymes, translation factors, membrane and nuclear receptors, and secreted proteins. However, the simultaneous quantitative and qualitative measurement of all proteins that regulate cancer processes is not practical using traditional protein met...

  10. The Genomic and Proteomic Content of Cancer Cell-Derived Exosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith C Henderson

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are secreted membrane vesicles that have been proposed as an effective means to detect a variety of disease states, including cancer. The properties of exosomes, including stability in biological fluids, allow for their efficient isolation and make them an ideal vehicle for studies on early disease detection and evaluation. Much data has been collected over recent years regarding the mRNA, miRNA, and protein contents of exosomes. In addition, many studies have described the functional role that exosomes play in disease initiation and progression. Tumor cells have been shown to secrete exosomes, often in increased amounts compared to normal cells, and these exosomes can carry the genomic and proteomic signatures characteristic of the tumor cells from which they were derived. While these unique signatures make exosomes ideal for cancer detection, exosomes derived from cancer cells have also been shown to play a functional role in cancer progression. Here, we review the unique genomic and proteomic contents of exosomes originating from cancer cells as well as their functional effects to promote tumor progression.

  11. Label-free quantitative proteomics of CD133-positive liver cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Sheng-Ta

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD133-positive liver cancer stem cells, which are characterized by their resistance to conventional chemotherapy and their tumor initiation ability at limited dilutions, have been recognized as a critical target in liver cancer therapeutics. In the current work, we developed a label-free quantitative method to investigate the proteome of CD133-positive liver cancer stem cells for the purpose of identifying unique biomarkers that can be utilized for targeting liver cancer stem cells. Label-free quantitation was performed in combination with ID-based Elution time Alignment by Linear regression Quantitation (IDEAL-Q and MaxQuant. Results Initially, IDEAL-Q analysis revealed that 151 proteins were differentially expressed in the CD133-positive hepatoma cells when compared with CD133-negative cells. We then analyzed these 151 differentially expressed proteins by MaxQuant software and identified 10 significantly up-regulated proteins. The results were further validated by RT-PCR, western blot, flow cytometry or immunofluorescent staining which revealed that prominin-1, annexin A1, annexin A3, transgelin, creatine kinase B, vimentin, and EpCAM were indeed highly expressed in the CD133-positive hepatoma cells. Conclusions These findings confirmed that mass spectrometry-based label-free quantitative proteomics can be used to gain insights into liver cancer stem cells.

  12. Plasma proteome profiling of atherosclerotic disease manifestations reveals elevated levels of the cytoskeletal protein vinculin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lars P; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Mickley, Hans; Saaby, Lotte; Diederichsen, Axel Cosmus Pyndt; Lambrechtsen, Jess; Rasmussen, Lars M; Overgaard, Martin

    2014-01-01

    atherosclerotic diseases, and 4) individuals with an acute coronary syndrome. Immunoassays and SRM-MS were used for single patient verification of candidate proteins. Proteins involved in cardiovascular diseases i.e. serum amyloid protein A (SAA), C-reactive protein (CRP), and apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)] displayed...... identify proteins with altered concentrations in plasma samples from four groups: 1) Individuals without cardiovascular symptoms and without the presence of coronary calcium, 2) individuals without cardiovascular symptoms, but with high amounts of coronary calcium, 3) individuals operated because of......Atherosclerosis is a chronic disease of the arterial wall that is recognized as the leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. There is an eminent need for better biomarkers that can aid in patient care before the onset of the first cardiovascular event. We used quantitative proteomics to...

  13. Serum Proteome Signature of Radiation Response: Upregulation of Inflammation-Related Factors and Downregulation of Apolipoproteins and Coagulation Factors in Cancer Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy—A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widlak, Piotr, E-mail: widlak@io.gliwice.pl [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, Gliwice (Poland); Jelonek, Karol; Wojakowska, Anna; Pietrowska, Monika [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, Gliwice (Poland); Polanska, Joanna [Institute of Automatics Control, Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice (Poland); Marczak, Łukasz [Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Poznan (Poland); Miszczyk, Leszek; Składowski, Krzysztof [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, Gliwice (Poland)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Ionizing radiation affects the proteome of irradiated cells and tissue, yet data concerning changes induced during radiation therapy (RT) in human blood are fragmentary and inconclusive. We aimed to identify features of serum proteome and associated processes involved in response to partial body irradiation during cancer treatment. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) and 20 patients with prostate cancer received definitive intensity modulated RT. Blood samples were collected before RT, just after RT, and 1 month after the end of RT. Complete serum proteome was analyzed in individual samples, using a shotgun liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry approach which allowed identification of approximately 450 proteins. Approximately 100 unique proteins were quantified in all samples after exclusion of immunoglobulins, and statistical significance of differences among consecutive samples was assessed. Processes associated with quantified proteins and their functional interactions were predicted using gene ontology tools. Results: RT-induced changes were marked in the HNSCC patient group: 22 upregulated and 33 downregulated proteins were detected in post-RT sera. Most of the changes reversed during follow-up, yet levels of some proteins remained affected 1 month after the end of RT. RT-upregulated proteins were associated with acute phase, inflammatory response, and complement activation. RT-downregulated proteins were associated with transport and metabolism of lipids (plasma apolipoproteins) and blood coagulation. RT-induced changes were much weaker in prostate cancer patients, which corresponded to differences in acute radiation toxicity observed in both groups. Nevertheless, general patterns of RT-induced sera proteome changes were similar in both of the groups of cancer patients. Conclusions: In this pilot study, we proposed to identify a molecular signature of radiation response, based on specific

  14. Serum Proteome Signature of Radiation Response: Upregulation of Inflammation-Related Factors and Downregulation of Apolipoproteins and Coagulation Factors in Cancer Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy—A Pilot Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Ionizing radiation affects the proteome of irradiated cells and tissue, yet data concerning changes induced during radiation therapy (RT) in human blood are fragmentary and inconclusive. We aimed to identify features of serum proteome and associated processes involved in response to partial body irradiation during cancer treatment. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) and 20 patients with prostate cancer received definitive intensity modulated RT. Blood samples were collected before RT, just after RT, and 1 month after the end of RT. Complete serum proteome was analyzed in individual samples, using a shotgun liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry approach which allowed identification of approximately 450 proteins. Approximately 100 unique proteins were quantified in all samples after exclusion of immunoglobulins, and statistical significance of differences among consecutive samples was assessed. Processes associated with quantified proteins and their functional interactions were predicted using gene ontology tools. Results: RT-induced changes were marked in the HNSCC patient group: 22 upregulated and 33 downregulated proteins were detected in post-RT sera. Most of the changes reversed during follow-up, yet levels of some proteins remained affected 1 month after the end of RT. RT-upregulated proteins were associated with acute phase, inflammatory response, and complement activation. RT-downregulated proteins were associated with transport and metabolism of lipids (plasma apolipoproteins) and blood coagulation. RT-induced changes were much weaker in prostate cancer patients, which corresponded to differences in acute radiation toxicity observed in both groups. Nevertheless, general patterns of RT-induced sera proteome changes were similar in both of the groups of cancer patients. Conclusions: In this pilot study, we proposed to identify a molecular signature of radiation response, based on specific

  15. Enrichment and proteomic analysis of plasma membrane from rat dorsal root ganglions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yong

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons are primary sensory neurons that conduct neuronal impulses related to pain, touch and temperature senses. Plasma membrane (PM of DRG cells plays important roles in their functions. PM proteins are main performers of the functions. However, mainly due to the very low amount of DRG that leads to the difficulties in PM sample collection, few proteomic analyses on the PM have been reported and it is a subject that demands further investigation. Results By using aqueous polymer two-phase partition in combination with high salt and high pH washing, PMs were efficiently enriched, demonstrated by western blot analysis. A total of 954 non-redundant proteins were identified from the plasma membrane-enriched preparation with CapLC-MS/MS analysis subsequent to protein separation by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE or shotgun digestion. 205 (21.5% of the identified proteins were unambiguously assigned as PM proteins, including a large number of signal proteins, receptors, ion channel and transporters. Conclusion The aqueous polymer two-phase partition is a simple, rapid and relatively inexpensive method. It is well suitable for the purification of PMs from small amount of tissues. Therefore, it is reasonable for the DRG PM to be enriched by using aqueous two-phase partition as a preferred method. Proteomic analysis showed that DRG PM was rich in proteins involved in the fundamental biological processes including material exchange, energy transformation and information transmission, etc. These data would help to our further understanding of the fundamental DRG functions.

  16. Predicting Ovarian Cancer Patients' Clinical Response to Platinum-Based Chemotherapy by Their Tumor Proteomic Signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kun-Hsing; Levine, Douglas A; Zhang, Hui; Chan, Daniel W; Zhang, Zhen; Snyder, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Ovarian cancer is the deadliest gynecologic malignancy in the United States with most patients diagnosed in the advanced stage of the disease. Platinum-based antineoplastic therapeutics is indispensable to treating advanced ovarian serous carcinoma. However, patients have heterogeneous responses to platinum drugs, and it is difficult to predict these interindividual differences before administering medication. In this study, we investigated the tumor proteomic profiles and clinical characteristics of 130 ovarian serous carcinoma patients analyzed by the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC), predicted the platinum drug response using supervised machine learning methods, and evaluated our prediction models through leave-one-out cross-validation. Our data-driven feature selection approach indicated that tumor proteomics profiles contain information for predicting binarized platinum response (P drug responses as well as provided insights into the biological processes influencing the efficacy of platinum-based therapeutics. Our analytical approach is also extensible to predicting response to other antineoplastic agents or treatment modalities for both ovarian and other cancers. PMID:27312948

  17. Antibody Request - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution.

  18. Mass Spectrometry Based Proteomic Profiling for Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Pawa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States with approximately 34,000 deaths in 2008. Despite advances in understanding the pathogenesis of the disease, the five-year survival remains at 4%, with a majority of patients not surviving longer than one year [1]. As surgical resection remains the only reliable curative method, improving the 5-year survival to approximately 25%, early detection is paramount [2, 3, 4]. Delays in diagnosis are often due to small cancers or the presence of non specific symptoms. Whilst there have been significant developments in the imaging modalities for pancreatic lesions in the last two decades, they have not influenced the overall survival from pancreatic cancer [5].

  19. Integrating proteomic and functional genomic technologies in discovery-driven translational breast cancer research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celis, Julio E; Gromov, Pavel; Gromova, Irina;

    2003-01-01

    . Here we describe the essence of a long-term initiative undertaken by The Danish Centre for Translational Breast Cancer Research and currently underway for cancer biomarker discovery using fresh tissue biopsies and bio-fluids. The Centre is a virtual hub that brings together scientists working......The application of state-of-the-art proteomics and functional genomics technologies to the study of cancer is rapidly shifting toward the analysis of clinically relevant samples derived from patients, as the ultimate aim of translational research is to bring basic discoveries closer to the bedside...... in various areas of basic cancer research such as cell cycle control, invasion and micro-environmental alterations, apoptosis, cell signaling, and immunology, with clinicians (oncologists, surgeons), pathologists, and epidemiologists, with the aim of understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying breast...

  20. Investigation of ovarian cancer associated sialylation changes in N-linked glycopeptides by quantitative proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shetty Vivekananda

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In approximately 80% of patients, ovarian cancer is diagnosed when the patient is already in the advanced stages of the disease. CA125 is currently used as the marker for ovarian cancer; however, it lacks specificity and sensitivity for detecting early stage disease. There is a critical unmet need for sensitive and specific routine screening tests for early diagnosis that can reduce ovarian cancer lethality by reliably detecting the disease at its earliest and treatable stages. Results In this study, we investigated the N-linked sialylated glycopeptides in serum samples from healthy and ovarian cancer patients using Lectin-directed Tandem Labeling (LTL and iTRAQ quantitative proteomics methods. We identified 45 N-linked sialylated glycopeptides containing 46 glycosylation sites. Among those, ten sialylated glycopeptides were significantly up-regulated in ovarian cancer patients’ serum samples. LC-MS/MS analysis of the non-glycosylated peptides from the same samples, western blot data using lectin enriched glycoproteins of various ovarian cancer type samples, and PNGase F (+/− treatment confirmed the sialylation changes in the ovarian cancer samples. Conclusion Herein, we demonstrated that several proteins are aberrantly sialylated in N-linked glycopeptides in ovarian cancer and detection of glycopeptides with abnormal sialylation changes may have the potential to serve as biomarkers for ovarian cancer.

  1. A novel approach to the study of the functional proteome in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennessy, Bryan; Lu, Yiling; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria; Carey, Mark; Myhre, Simen; Ju, Zhenlin; Coombes, Kevin; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Bedrosian, Isabelle; Davies, Michael A.; Siwak, Doris; Agarwal, Roshan; Zhang, Fan; Overgaard, Jens; Alsner, Jan; Neve, Richard M.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Gray, Joe W.; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Mills, Gordon B.

    2008-10-10

    Factors including intratumoral heterogeneity and variability in tissue handling potentially hamper the application of reverse phase protein arrays (RPPA) to study of the solid tumor functional proteome. To address this, RPPA was applied to quantify protein expression and activation in 233 human breast tumors and 52 breast cancer cell lines. Eighty-two antibodies that recognize kinase and steroid signaling events and their effectors were validated for RPPA because of the importance of these proteins to breast carcinogenesis. Reproducibility in replicate lysates was excellent. Intratumoral protein expression was less variable than intertumoral expression, and prognostic biomarkers retained the ability to accurately predict patient outcomes when analyzed in different tumor sites. Although 21/82 total and phosphoproteins demonstrated time-dependent instability in breast tumors that were placed at room temperature after surgical excision for 24 hours prior to freezing, the functional proteomic 'fingerprint' was robust in most tumors until at least 24 hours before tissue freezing. Correlations between RPPA and immunohistochemistry were statistically significant for assessed proteins but RPPA demonstrated a superior dynamic range and detected, for example, an 866-fold difference in estrogen receptor alpha level across breast tumors. Protein and mRNA levels were concordant (at p {le} 0.05) for 41.3% and 61.1% of assayed targets in breast tumors and cell lines, respectively. Several phosphorylation and cleavage products did not correlate with the corresponding transcript levels. In conclusion, the reproducibility of RPPA, the faithfulness with which proteins and the functional proteomic 'fingerprint' are preserved in different sections derived from primary breast tumors, and the surprising stability of this 'fingerprint' with increasing time to freezing all facilitate the application of RPPA to the accurate study of protein biomarkers in non

  2. Prostate cancer serum biomarker discovery through proteomic analysis of alpha-2 macroglobulin protein complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Earle F.; Ham, Amy-Joan L.; Tabb, David L.; Billheimer, Dean; Roth, Bruce J.; Chang, Sam S.; Cookson, Michael S.; Hinton, Timothy J.; Cheek, Kristin L.; Hill, Salisha; Pietenpol, Jennifer A.

    2010-01-01

    Alpha-2 macroglobulin (A2M) functions as a universal protease inhibitor in serum and is capable of binding various cytokines and growth factors. In this study, we investigated if immunoaffinity enrichment and proteomic analysis of A2M protein complexes from human serum could improve detection of biologically relevant and novel candidate protein biomarkers in prostate cancer. Serum samples from six patients with androgen-independent, metastatic prostate cancer and six control patients without malignancy were analyzed by immunoaffinity enrichment of A2M protein complexes and MS identification of associated proteins. Known A2M substrates were reproducibly identified from patient serum in both cohorts, as well as proteins previously undetected in human serum. One example is heat shock protein 90 alpha (HSP90α), which was identified only in the serum of cancer patients in this study. Using an ELISA, the presence of HSP90α in human serum was validated on expanded test cohorts and found to exist in higher median serum concentrations in prostate cancer (n = 18) relative to control (n = 13) patients (median concentrations 50.7 versus 27.6 ng/mL, respectively, p = 0.001). Our results demonstrate the technical feasibility of this approach and support the analysis of A2M protein complexes for proteomic-based serum biomarker discovery. PMID:20107526

  3. Quantitative Analysis of Differential Proteome Expression in Bladder Cancer vs. Normal Bladder Cells Using SILAC Method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganglong Yang

    Full Text Available The best way to increase patient survival rate is to identify patients who are likely to progress to muscle-invasive or metastatic disease upfront and treat them more aggressively. The human cell lines HCV29 (normal bladder epithelia, KK47 (low grade nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer, NMIBC, and YTS1 (metastatic bladder cancer have been widely used in studies of molecular mechanisms and cell signaling during bladder cancer (BC progression. However, little attention has been paid to global quantitative proteome analysis of these three cell lines. We labeled HCV29, KK47, and YTS1 cells by the SILAC method using three stable isotopes each of arginine and lysine. Labeled proteins were analyzed by 2D ultrahigh-resolution liquid chromatography LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometry. Among 3721 unique identified and annotated proteins in KK47 and YTS1 cells, 36 were significantly upregulated and 74 were significantly downregulated with >95% confidence. Differential expression of these proteins was confirmed by western blotting, quantitative RT-PCR, and cell staining with specific antibodies. Gene ontology (GO term and pathway analysis indicated that the differentially regulated proteins were involved in DNA replication and molecular transport, cell growth and proliferation, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, and cell death and survival. These proteins and the advanced proteome techniques described here will be useful for further elucidation of molecular mechanisms in BC and other types of cancer.

  4. Large scale systematic proteomic quantification from non-metastatic to metastatic colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xuefei; Zhang, Yang; Guo, Shaowen; Jin, Hong; Wang, Wenhai; Yang, Pengyuan

    2015-07-01

    A systematic proteomic quantification of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) colorectal cancer tissues from stage I to stage IIIC was performed in large scale. 1017 proteins were identified with 338 proteins in quantitative changes by label free method, while 341 proteins were quantified with significant expression changes among 6294 proteins by iTRAQ method. We found that proteins related to migration expression increased and those for binding and adherent decreased during the colorectal cancer development according to the gene ontology (GO) annotation and ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA). The integrin alpha 5 (ITA5) in integrin family was focused, which was consistent with the metastasis related pathway. The expression level of ITA5 decreased in metastasis tissues and the result has been further verified by Western blotting. Another two cell migration related proteins vitronectin (VTN) and actin-related protein (ARP3) were also proved to be up-regulated by both mass spectrometry (MS) based quantification results and Western blotting. Up to now, our result shows one of the largest dataset in colorectal cancer proteomics research. Our strategy reveals a disease driven omics-pattern for the metastasis colorectal cancer.

  5. Proteome profiling analysis of human ovarian cancer serum samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mass Spectrometry represents a powerful tool in cancer research to discovery of potential bio markers through peak identification from serum profiling. By using high resolution MALDITOF and bioinformatic analysis almost 400 serum sample homogeneously distributed between biopsy confirmed ovarian cancer and high risk serum samples were analyzed. Each serum sample run in duplicate and whole serum sample preparation procedure has been performed by Hamilton Star Robot in order to reduce bias and the replicates with a low Pearson coefficient are removed. After automated reverse phase magnetic beads separation the samples were tested in MALDI-TOF

  6. Comprehensive and Scalable Highly Automated MS-Based Proteomic Workflow for Clinical Biomarker Discovery in Human Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayon, Loïc; Núñez Galindo, Antonio; Corthésy, John; Cominetti, Ornella; Kussmann, Martin

    2014-07-24

    Over the past decade, mass spectrometric performance has greatly improved in terms of sensitivity, dynamic range, and speed. By contrast, only limited progress has been accomplished with regard to automation, throughput, and robustness of the proteomic sample preparation process upstream of mass spectrometry. The present work delivers an optimized analysis of human plasma samples in both small preclinical and large clinical studies, enabled by the development of a highly automated quantitative proteomic workflow. Several iterative evaluation and validation steps were performed before process "design freeze" and development completion. A robotic liquid handling workflow and platform (including reduction, alkylation, digestion, TMT labeling, pooling, and purification) were shown to provide better quantitative trueness and precision than manual operation at the bench. Depletion of the most abundant human plasma proteins and subsequent buffer exchange were also developed and integrated. Finally, 96 identical pooled human plasma samples were prepared in a 96-well plate format, and each sample was individually subjected to our developed workflow. This test revealed increased throughput and robustness compared with to-date published manual or less automated workflows. Our workflow is ready-to-use for future (pre-) clinical studies. We expect our work to facilitate, accelerate, and improve clinical proteomic discovery in human blood plasma. PMID:25058407

  7. Large-scale proteomic identification of S100 proteins in breast cancer tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attempts to reduce morbidity and mortality in breast cancer is based on efforts to identify novel biomarkers to support prognosis and therapeutic choices. The present study has focussed on S100 proteins as a potentially promising group of markers in cancer development and progression. One reason of interest in this family of proteins is because the majority of the S100 genes are clustered on a region of human chromosome 1q21 that is prone to genomic rearrangements. Moreover, there is increasing evidence that S100 proteins are often up-regulated in many cancers, including breast, and this is frequently associated with tumour progression. Samples of breast cancer tissues were obtained during surgical intervention, according to the bioethical recommendations, and cryo-preserved until used. Tissue extracts were submitted to proteomic preparations for 2D-IPG. Protein identification was performed by N-terminal sequencing and/or peptide mass finger printing. The majority of the detected S100 proteins were absent, or present at very low levels, in the non-tumoral tissues adjacent to the primary tumor. This finding strengthens the role of S100 proteins as putative biomarkers. The proteomic screening of 100 cryo-preserved breast cancer tissues showed that some proteins were ubiquitously expressed in almost all patients while others appeared more sporadic. Most, if not all, of the detected S100 members appeared reciprocally correlated. Finally, from the perspective of biomarkers establishment, a promising finding was the observation that patients which developed distant metastases after a three year follow-up showed a general tendency of higher S100 protein expression, compared to the disease-free group. This article reports for the first time the comparative proteomic screening of several S100 protein members among a large group of breast cancer patients. The results obtained strongly support the hypothesis that a significant deregulation of multiple S100 protein members is

  8. Large-scale proteomic identification of S100 proteins in breast cancer tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cancemi Patrizia

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Attempts to reduce morbidity and mortality in breast cancer is based on efforts to identify novel biomarkers to support prognosis and therapeutic choices. The present study has focussed on S100 proteins as a potentially promising group of markers in cancer development and progression. One reason of interest in this family of proteins is because the majority of the S100 genes are clustered on a region of human chromosome 1q21 that is prone to genomic rearrangements. Moreover, there is increasing evidence that S100 proteins are often up-regulated in many cancers, including breast, and this is frequently associated with tumour progression. Methods Samples of breast cancer tissues were obtained during surgical intervention, according to the bioethical recommendations, and cryo-preserved until used. Tissue extracts were submitted to proteomic preparations for 2D-IPG. Protein identification was performed by N-terminal sequencing and/or peptide mass finger printing. Results The majority of the detected S100 proteins were absent, or present at very low levels, in the non-tumoral tissues adjacent to the primary tumor. This finding strengthens the role of S100 proteins as putative biomarkers. The proteomic screening of 100 cryo-preserved breast cancer tissues showed that some proteins were ubiquitously expressed in almost all patients while others appeared more sporadic. Most, if not all, of the detected S100 members appeared reciprocally correlated. Finally, from the perspective of biomarkers establishment, a promising finding was the observation that patients which developed distant metastases after a three year follow-up showed a general tendency of higher S100 protein expression, compared to the disease-free group. Conclusions This article reports for the first time the comparative proteomic screening of several S100 protein members among a large group of breast cancer patients. The results obtained strongly support the hypothesis

  9. Functional proteomic analysis reveals the involvement of KIAA1199 in breast cancer growth, motility and invasiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KIAA1199 is a recently identified novel gene that is up-regulated in human cancer with poor survival. Our proteomic study on signaling polarity in chemotactic cells revealed KIAA1199 as a novel protein target that may be involved in cellular chemotaxis and motility. In the present study, we examined the functional significance of KIAA1199 expression in breast cancer growth, motility and invasiveness. We validated the previous microarray observation by tissue microarray immunohistochemistry using a TMA slide containing 12 breast tumor tissue cores and 12 corresponding normal tissues. We performed the shRNA-mediated knockdown of KIAA1199 in MDA-MB-231 and HS578T cells to study the role of this protein in cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis in vitro. We studied the effects of KIAA1199 knockdown in vivo in two groups of mice (n = 5). We carried out the SILAC LC-MS/MS based proteomic studies on the involvement of KIAA1199 in breast cancer. KIAA1199 mRNA and protein was significantly overexpressed in breast tumor specimens and cell lines as compared with non-neoplastic breast tissues from large-scale microarray and studies of breast cancer cell lines and tumors. To gain deeper insights into the novel role of KIAA1199 in breast cancer, we modulated KIAA1199 expression using shRNA-mediated knockdown in two breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231 and HS578T), expressing higher levels of KIAA1199. The KIAA1199 knockdown cells showed reduced motility and cell proliferation in vitro. Moreover, when the knockdown cells were injected into the mammary fat pads of female athymic nude mice, there was a significant decrease in tumor incidence and growth. In addition, quantitative proteomic analysis revealed that knockdown of KIAA1199 in breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) cells affected a broad range of cellular functions including apoptosis, metabolism and cell motility. Our findings indicate that KIAA1199 may play an important role in breast tumor growth and invasiveness, and that it

  10. Proteome changes in the plasma of Pieris rapae parasitized by the endoparasitoid wasp Pteromalus puparum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-ying ZHU; Qi FANG; Gong-yin YE; Cui HU

    2011-01-01

    Parasitism by the endoparasitoid wasp Pteromalus puparum causes alterations in the plasma proteins of Pieris rapae. Analysis of plasma proteins using a proteomic approach showed that seven proteins were differentially expressed in the host pupae after 24-h parasitism. They were masquerade-like serine proteinase homolog (MSPH),enolase (Eno), bilin-binding protein (BBP), imaginal disc growth factor (IDGF), ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), cellular retinoic acid binding protein (CRABP), and one unknown function protein. The full length cDNA sequences of MSPH,Eno, and BBP were successfully cloned using rapid amplification of cDNA ends-polymerase chain reaction (RACE-PCR). Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis indicated that the transcript levels of MSPH and BBP in the fat bodies of host pupae were inducible in response to the parasitism and their variations were consistent with translational changes of these genes after parasitism, while the transcript levels of Eno and IDGF were not affected by parasitism. This study will contribute to the better understanding of the molecular bases of parasitoid-induced host alterations associated with innate immune responses, detoxification, and energy metabolism.

  11. Proteomic characterization of the interstitial fluid perfusing the breast tumor microenvironment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celis, Julio E; Gromov, Pavel; Cabezón, Teresa;

    2004-01-01

    Clinical cancer proteomics aims at the identification of markers for early detection and predictive purposes, as well as to provide novel targets for drug discovery and therapeutic intervention. Proteomics-based analysis of traditional sources of biomarkers, such as serum, plasma, or tissue lyzat...

  12. Plasma Proteome Response to Severe Burn Injury Revealed by 18O-Labeled “Universal” Reference-based Quantitative Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Wei-Jun; Petritis, Brianne O.; Kaushal, Amit; Finnerty, Celeste C; Jeschke, Marc G; Monroe, Matthew E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Davis, Ronald W.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Herndon, David N.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    A burn injury represents one of the most severe forms of human trauma and is responsible for significant mortality worldwide. Here, we present the first quantitative proteomics investigation of the blood plasma proteome response to severe burn injury by comparing the plasma protein concentrations of 10 healthy control subjects with those of 15 severe burn patients at two time-points following the injury. The overall analytical strategy for this work integrated immunoaffinity depletion of the 12 most abundant plasma proteins with cysteinyl-peptide enrichment-based fractionation prior to LC-MS analyses of individual patient samples. Incorporation of an 18O-labeled “universal” reference among the sample sets enabled precise relative quantification across samples. In total, 313 plasma proteins confidently identified with two or more unique peptides were quantified. Following statistical analysis, 110 proteins exhibited significant abundance changes in response to the burn injury. The observed changes in protein concentrations suggest significant inflammatory and hypermetabolic response to the injury, which is supported by the fact that many of the identified proteins are associated with acute phase response signaling, the complement system, and coagulation system pathways. The regulation of ~35 proteins observed in this study is in agreement with previous results reported for inflammatory or burn response, but approximately 50 potentially novel proteins previously not known to be associated with burn response or inflammation are also found. Elucidating proteins involved in the response to severe burn injury may reveal novel targets for therapeutic interventions, as well as potential predictive biomarkers for patient outcomes such as multiple organ failure. PMID:20698492

  13. Proteomic changes resulting from gene copy number variations in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Geiger

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Along the transformation process, cells accumulate DNA aberrations, including mutations, translocations, amplifications, and deletions. Despite numerous studies, the overall effects of amplifications and deletions on the end point of gene expression--the level of proteins--is generally unknown. Here we use large-scale and high-resolution proteomics combined with gene copy number analysis to investigate in a global manner to what extent these genomic changes have a proteomic output and therefore the ability to affect cellular transformation. We accurately measure expression levels of 6,735 proteins and directly compare them to the gene copy number. We find that the average effect of these alterations on the protein expression is only a few percent. Nevertheless, by using a novel algorithm, we find the combined impact that many of these regional chromosomal aberrations have at the protein level. We show that proteins encoded by amplified oncogenes are often overexpressed, while adjacent amplified genes, which presumably do not promote growth and survival, are attenuated. Furthermore, regulation of biological processes and molecular complexes is independent of general copy number changes. By connecting the primary genome alteration to their proteomic consequences, this approach helps to interpret the data from large-scale cancer genomics efforts.

  14. Proteomic analysis of cervical cancer cells treated with suberonylanilide hydroxamic acid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jianxiong He; Canhua Huang; Aiping Tong; Bin Chen; Zhi Zeng; Peng Zhang; Chunting Wang; Yuquan Wei

    2008-12-01

    Suberonylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is an orally administered histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI) that has shown significant antitumour activity in a variety of tumour cells. To identify proteins involved in its antitumour activity, we utilized a proteomic approach to reveal protein expression changes in the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa following SAHA treatment. Protein expression profiles were analysed by 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and protein identification was performed on a MALDI-Q-TOF MS/MS instrument. As a result, a total of nine differentially expressed proteins were visualized by 2-DE and Coomassie brilliant blue (CBB) staining. Further, all the changed proteins were positively identified via mass spectrometry (MS)/MS analysis. Of these, PGAM1 was significantly downregulated in HeLa cells after treatment with SAHA. Moreover, PGAM1 has been proven to be downregulated in another cervical cancer cell line (CaSki) by western blot analysis. Together, using proteomic tools, we identified several differentially expressed proteins that underwent SAHA-induced apoptosis. These changed proteins may provide some clues to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying SAHA-induced apoptosis in cervical cancer.

  15. Differential Proteomic Analysis of Human Saliva using Tandem Mass Tags Quantification for Gastric Cancer Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hua; Zhang, Yan; Kim, Yong; Kim, Sung; Kim, Jae Joon; Kim, Kyoung Mee; Yoshizawa, Janice; Fan, Liu-Yin; Cao, Cheng-Xi; Wong, David T W

    2016-01-01

    Novel biomarkers and non-invasive diagnostic methods are urgently needed for the screening of gastric cancer to reduce its high mortality. We employed quantitative proteomics approach to develop discriminatory biomarker signatures from human saliva for the detection of gastric cancer. Salivary proteins were analyzed and compared between gastric cancer patients and matched control subjects by using tandem mass tags (TMT) technology. More than 500 proteins were identified with quantification, and 48 of them showed significant difference expression (p < 0.05) between normal controls and gastric cancer patients, including 7 up-regulated proteins and 41 down-regulated proteins. Five proteins were selected for initial verification by ELISA and three were successfully verified, namely cystatin B (CSTB), triosephosphate isomerase (TPI1), and deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 protein (DMBT1). All three proteins could differentiate gastric cancer patients from normal control subjects, dramatically (p < 0.05). The combination of these three biomarkers could reach 85% sensitivity and 80% specificity for the detection of gastric cancer with accuracy of 0.93. This study provides the proof of concept of salivary biomarkers for the non-invasive detection of gastric cancer. It is highly encouraging to turn these biomarkers into an applicable clinical test after large scale validation. PMID:26911362

  16. Proteomic identification of alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein as a plasma biomarker of hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    TIAN, WEN-DONG; Li, Jun-Zheng; Hu, Shui-Wang; Peng, Xiao-wei; Li, Gang; LIU, Xiong; Chen, Huai-hong; Xu, Xia; Li, Xiang-ping

    2015-01-01

    Hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (HSCC) has very poor prognosis compared with other head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Late-stage diagnosis of HSCC increases mortality. Therefore, more effective biomarkers for early diagnosis of HSCC are necessary. Unfortunately, appropriate biomarkers for clinical diagnosis and prognosis have not been identified yet. However, recent progresses in quantitative proteomics have offered opportunities to identify plasma proteins as biomarkers for HSCC....

  17. Identification of plasma biomarker candidates in glioblastoma using an antibody-array-based proteomic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a brain tumour with a very high patient mortality rate, with a median survival of 47 weeks. This might be improved by the identification of novel diagnostic, prognostic and predictive therapy-response biomarkers, preferentially through the monitoring of the patient blood. The aim of this study was to define the impact of GBM in terms of alterations of the plasma protein levels in these patients. We used a commercially available antibody array that includes 656 antibodies to analyse blood plasma samples from 17 healthy volunteers in comparison with 17 blood plasma samples from patients with GBM. We identified 11 plasma proteins that are statistically most strongly associated with the presence of GBM. These proteins belong to three functional signalling pathways: T-cell signalling and immune responses; cell adhesion and migration; and cell-cycle control and apoptosis. Thus, we can consider this identified set of proteins as potential diagnostic biomarker candidates for GBM. In addition, a set of 16 plasma proteins were significantly associated with the overall survival of these patients with GBM. Guanine nucleotide binding protein alpha (GNAO1) was associated with both GBM presence and survival of patients with GBM. Antibody array analysis represents a useful tool for the screening of plasma samples for potential cancer biomarker candidates in small-scale exploratory experiments; however, clinical validation of these candidates requires their further evaluation in a larger study on an independent cohort of patients

  18. Proteomic Analysis of Colorectal Cancer: Prefractionation Strategies Using two-Dimensional Free-Flow Electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Simpson

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This review deals with the application of a new prefractionation tool, free-flow electrophoresis (FFE, for proteomic analysis of colorectal cancer (CRC. CRC is a leading cause of cancer death in the Western world. Early detection is the single most important factor influencing outcome of CRC patients. If identified while the disease is still localized, CRC is treatable. To improve outcomes for CRC patients there is a pressing need to identify biomarkers for early detection (diagnostic markers, prognosis (prognostic indicators, tumour responses (predictive markers and disease recurrence (monitoring markers. Despite recent advances in the use of genomic analysis for risk assessment, in the area of biomarker identification genomic methods alone have yet to produce reliable candidate markers for CRC. For this reason, attention is being directed towards proteomics as a complementary analytical tool for biomarker identification. Here we describe a proteomics separation tool, which uses a combination of continuous FFE, a liquid-based isoelectric focusing technique, in the first dimension, followed by rapid reversed-phase HPLC (1–6 min/analysis in the second dimension. We have optimized imaging software to present the FFE/RP-HPLC data in a virtual 2D gel-like format. The advantage of this liquid based fractionation system over traditional gel-based fractionation systems is the ability to fractionate large quantity protein samples. Unlike 2D gels, the method is applicable to both high-Mr proteins and small peptides, which are difficult to separate, and in the case of peptides, are not retained in standard 2D gels.

  19. Unique proteome signature of post-chemotherapy ovarian cancer ascites-derived tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Nuzhat; Greening, David; Samardzija, Chantel; Escalona, Ruth M; Chen, Maoshan; Findlay, Jock K; Kannourakis, George

    2016-01-01

    Eighty % of ovarian cancer patients diagnosed at an advanced-stage have complete remission after initial surgery and chemotherapy. However, most patients die within identification of 353 proteins. There were significant differences in proteins encoding for immune surveillance, DNA repair mechanisms, cytoskeleton rearrangement, cell-cell adhesion, cell cycle pathways, cellular transport, and proteins involved with glycine/proline/arginine synthesis in tumor cells isolated from CR relative to CN patients. Pathway analyses revealed enrichment of metabolic pathways, DNA repair mechanisms and energy metabolism pathways in CR tumor cells. In conclusion, this is the first proteomics study to comprehensively analyze ascites-derived tumor cells from CN and CR ovarian cancer patients. PMID:27470985

  20. Proteomic Analysis of Rice Plasma Membrane-associated Proteins in Response to Chitooligosaccharide Elicitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Chen; Qun Li; Zuhua He

    2007-01-01

    Chitooligomers or chitooligosaccharides (COS) are elicitors that bind to the plasma membrane (PM) and elicit various defense responses. However, the PM-bound proteins involved in elicitor-mediated plant defense responses still remain widely unknown. In order to get more information about PM proteins involved in rice defense responses, we conducted PM proteomic analysis of the rice suspension cells elicited by COS. A total of 14 up- or down-regulated protein spots were observed on 2-D gels of PM fractions at 12 h and 24 h after COS incubation. Of them, eight protein spots were successfully identified by MS (mass spectrography) and predicted to be associated to the PM and function in plant defense, including a putative PKN/PRK1 protein kinase, a putative pyruvate kinase isozyme G, a putative zinc finger protein, a putative MAR-binding protein MFP1, and a putative calcium-dependent protein kinase. Interestingly, a COS-induced pM5-like protein was identified for the first time in plants, which is a trans-membrane nodal modulator in transforming growth factor-β(TGFβ) signaling in vertebrates. We also identified two members of a rice polyprotein family, which were up-regulated by COS. Our study would provide a starting point for functionality of PM proteins in the rice basal defense.

  1. Role of DHA in aging-related changes in mouse brain synaptic plasma membrane proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Vishaldeep K; Huang, Bill X; Desai, Abhishek; Kevala, Karl; Kim, Hee-Yong

    2016-05-01

    Aging has been related to diminished cognitive function, which could be a result of ineffective synaptic function. We have previously shown that synaptic plasma membrane proteins supporting synaptic integrity and neurotransmission were downregulated in docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-deprived brains, suggesting an important role of DHA in synaptic function. In this study, we demonstrate aging-induced synaptic proteome changes and DHA-dependent mitigation of such changes using mass spectrometry-based protein quantitation combined with western blot or messenger RNA analysis. We found significant reduction of 15 synaptic plasma membrane proteins in aging brains including fodrin-α, synaptopodin, postsynaptic density protein 95, synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2B, synaptosomal-associated protein 25, synaptosomal-associated protein-α, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit epsilon-2 precursor, AMPA2, AP2, VGluT1, munc18-1, dynamin-1, vesicle-associated membrane protein 2, rab3A, and EAAT1, most of which are involved in synaptic transmission. Notably, the first 9 proteins were further reduced when brain DHA was depleted by diet, indicating that DHA plays an important role in sustaining these synaptic proteins downregulated during aging. Reduction of 2 of these proteins was reversed by raising the brain DHA level by supplementing aged animals with an omega-3 fatty acid sufficient diet for 2 months. The recognition memory compromised in DHA-depleted animals was also improved. Our results suggest a potential role of DHA in alleviating aging-associated cognitive decline by offsetting the loss of neurotransmission-regulating synaptic proteins involved in synaptic function. PMID:27103520

  2. Proteomic analysis of plasma membrane proteins in wheat roots exposed to phenanthrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yu; Du, Jiangxue; Yue, Le; Zhan, Xinhua

    2016-06-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are potentially carcinogenic and toxic to humans through ingestion of contaminated food crops. PAHs can enter crop roots through proton/PAH symporters; however, to date, the symporter remains unclear. Here we reveal, for the first time, the plasma membrane proteome of Triticum aestivum seedling roots in response to phenanthrene (a model PAH) exposure. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled with MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS and protein database search engines were employed to analyze and identify phenanthrene-responsive proteins. Over 192 protein spots are reproducibly detected in each gel, while 8 spots are differentially expressed under phenanthrene treatment. Phenanthrene induces five up-regulated proteins distinguished as 5-methyltetrahydropteroyltriglutamate-homocysteine methyltransferase 2, enolase, heat shock protein 80-2, probable mediator of RNA polymerase II transcription subunit 37e (heat shock 70-kDa protein 1), and lactoylglutathione lyase. Three proteins identified as adenosine kinase 2, 4-hydroxy-7-methoxy-3-oxo-3,4-dihydro-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-2-yl glucoside beta-D-glucosidase 1c, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 3 are down-regulated under exposure to phenanthrene. The up-regulated proteins are related to plant defense response, antioxidant system, and glycolysis. The down-regulated proteins involve the metabolism of high-energy compounds and plant growth. Magnesium, which is able to bind to enolase, can enhance the transport of phenanthrene into wheat roots. Therefore, it is concluded that phenanthrene can induce differential expression of proteins in relation to carbohydrate metabolism, self-defense, and plant growth on wheat root plasma membrane. This study not only provides novel insights into PAH uptake by plant roots and PAH stress responses, but is also a good starting point for further determination and analyses of their functions using genetic and other approaches. PMID:26897580

  3. Effects of Fuzheng Huayu Decoction on plasma proteome in cirrhosis: preliminary experimental study with rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie LIU; Jiyao WANG; Liming WEI; Ye LU; Hong JIN

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the effects of Fuzheng Huayu Decoction on the plasma proteome in cirrhotic rats. Twenty-six male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into three groups: cirrhotic model group (n=10), treated with CCl4 (CCl4/olive oil: v/v=1:1); Fuzheng Huayu Decoction intervention group (n=10), treated with CCl4 + Fuzheng Huayu Decoction; and normal control group (n=6), treated with olive oil only. After 8 weeks, blood samples were collected from the inferior vena cava to undergo bi-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) and analysis by PDQuest 7.3 software. Differential protein spots were cut, enzyme hydrolysis was conducted, and peptide fragments extracted from the mixture underwent mass spectrometry (MS) with MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS. The liver fibrogenesis was assessed using a digital image analysis instrument of Masson's trichrome stained sections. The fibrosis area of the Fuzheng Huayu Decoction was (8.9±3.7)%, significantly smaller than that of the cirrhotic model group [(12.4±4.7)%, P<0.05]. Ten markedly changed protein spots were identified by MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS. Eight of the 10 proteins, including plasma glutathione peroxidase, plasma glutathione peroxidase precursor, prealbumin, haptoglobin, apolipoprotein A-Ⅳ precursor, complement C4, inter-alpha-inhibitor H4 heavy chain, and serine/threonine-protein kinase microtubule-affinity regulating kinase 1 (MARK1) were expressed very lowly in the cirrhotic model group while they were expressed highly in the Fuzheng Huayu Decoction group. The expression of liver regeneration-related protein LRRG03 and vimentin increased in the cirrhotic model group, and reduced in the Fuzheng Huayu Decoction group. Some proteins related to oxidative stress, cell proliferation and transformation have changed in the plasma of cirrhosis induced by CCl4. Fuzheng Huayu Decoction promotes protein synthesis and plays an anti-fibrotic role by anti-oxidation and accommodation of cell proliferation and transformation.

  4. Statistical considerations of optimal study design for human plasma proteomics and biomarker discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Cong; Simpson, Kathryn L; Lancashire, Lee J; Walker, Michael J; Dawson, Martin J; Unwin, Richard D; Rembielak, Agata; Price, Patricia; West, Catharine; Dive, Caroline; Whetton, Anthony D

    2012-04-01

    A mass spectrometry-based plasma biomarker discovery workflow was developed to facilitate biomarker discovery. Plasma from either healthy volunteers or patients with pancreatic cancer was 8-plex iTRAQ labeled, fractionated by 2-dimensional reversed phase chromatography and subjected to MALDI ToF/ToF mass spectrometry. Data were processed using a q-value based statistical approach to maximize protein quantification and identification. Technical (between duplicate samples) and biological variance (between and within individuals) were calculated and power analysis was thereby enabled. An a priori power analysis was carried out using samples from healthy volunteers to define sample sizes required for robust biomarker identification. The result was subsequently validated with a post hoc power analysis using a real clinical setting involving pancreatic cancer patients. This demonstrated that six samples per group (e.g., pre- vs post-treatment) may provide sufficient statistical power for most proteins with changes>2 fold. A reference standard allowed direct comparison of protein expression changes between multiple experiments. Analysis of patient plasma prior to treatment identified 29 proteins with significant changes within individual patient. Changes in Peroxiredoxin II levels were confirmed by Western blot. This q-value based statistical approach in combination with reference standard samples can be applied with confidence in the design and execution of clinical studies for predictive, prognostic, and/or pharmacodynamic biomarker discovery. The power analysis provides information required prior to study initiation. PMID:22338609

  5. IgY14 and SuperMix immunoaffinity separations coupled with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for human plasma proteomic biomarker discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Tujin; Zhou, Jianying; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Hossain, Mahmud; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun

    2012-02-01

    Interest in the application of advanced proteomics technologies to human blood plasma- or serum-based clinical samples for the purpose of discovering disease biomarkers continues to grow; however, the enormous dynamic range of protein concentrations in these types of samples (often >10 orders of magnitude) represents a significant analytical challenge, particularly for detecting low-abundance candidate biomarkers. In response, immunoaffinity separation methods for depleting multiple high- and moderate-abundance proteins have become key tools for enriching low-abundance proteins and enhancing detection of these proteins in plasma proteomics. Herein, we describe IgY14 and tandem IgY14-Supermix separation methods for removing 14 high-abundance and up to 60 moderate-abundance proteins, respectively, from human blood plasma and highlight their utility when combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for interrogating the human plasma proteome.

  6. Anti-cancer efficacy of nonthermal plasma dissolved in a liquid, liquid plasma in heterogeneous cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ngoc Hoan Nguyen; Hyung Jun Park; Sang Sik Yang; Kyeong Sook Choi; Jong-Soo Lee

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of nonthermal plasma for cancer treatment has been reported recently. The heterogeneity of cancer cells need to be addressed to design effective anticancer treatments. Here, we show that treatment with nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasma dissolved in a liquid (liquid plasma) induces oxidative stress in heterogeneous populations of cancer cells and ultimately kills these cells via apoptosis, regardless of genetic status, e.g., mutations in p53 and other DNA-damage-...

  7. Application of serum SELDI proteomic patterns in diagnosis of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, no satisfactory biomarkers are available to screen for lung cancer. Surface-Enhanced Laser Desorption/ionization Time-of- Flight Mass Spectrometry ProteinChip system (SELDI-TOF-MS) is one of the currently used techniques to identify biomarkers for cancers. The aim of this study is to explore the application of serum SELDI proteomic patterns to distinguish lung cancer patients from healthy individuals. A total of 208 serum samples, including 158 lung cancer patients and 50 healthy individuals, were randomly divided into a training set (including 11 sera from patients with stages I/II lung cancer, 63 from patients with stages III/IV lung cancer and 20 from healthy controls) and a blinded test set (including 43 sera from patients with stages I/II lung cancer, 41 from patients with stages III/IV lung cancer and 30 from healthy controls). All samples were analyzed by SELDI technology. The spectra were generated on weak cation exchange (WCX2) chips, and protein peaks clustering and classification analyses were made using Ciphergen Biomarker Wizard and Biomarker Pattern software, respectively. We additionally determined Cyfra21-1 and NSE in the 208 serum samples included in this study using an electrochemiluminescent immunoassay. Five protein peaks at 11493, 6429, 8245, 5335 and 2538 Da were automatically chosen as a biomarker pattern in the training set. When the SELDI marker pattern was tested with the blinded test set, it yielded a sensitivity of 86.9%, a specificity of 80.0% and a positive predictive value of 92.4%. The sensitivities provided by Cyfra21-1 and NSE used individually or in combination were significantly lower than that of the SELDI marker pattern (P < 0.005 or 0.05, respectively). Based on the results of the test set, we found that the SELDI marker pattern showed a sensitivity of 91.4% in the detection of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), which was significantly higher than that in the detection of small cell lung cancers (P < 0.05); The

  8. Proteomics analysis of cancer exosomes using a novel modified aptamer-based array (SOMAscan™) platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Jason; Stone, Timothy C; Katilius, Evaldas; Smith, Breanna C; Gordon, Bridget; Mason, Malcolm D; Tabi, Zsuzsanna; Brewis, Ian A; Clayton, Aled

    2014-04-01

    We have used a novel affinity-based proteomics technology to examine the protein signature of small secreted extracellular vesicles called exosomes. The technology uses a new class of protein binding reagents called SOMAmers® (slow off-rate modified aptamers) and allows the simultaneous precise measurement of over 1000 proteins. Exosomes were highly purified from the Du145 prostate cancer cell line, by pooling selected fractions from a continuous sucrose gradient (within the density range of 1.1 to 1.2 g/ml), and examined under standard conditions or with additional detergent treatment by the SOMAscan™ array (version 3.0). Lysates of Du145 cells were also prepared, and the profiles were compared. Housekeeping proteins such as cyclophilin-A, LDH, and Hsp70 were present in exosomes, and we identified almost 100 proteins that were enriched in exosomes relative to cells. These included proteins of known association with cancer exosomes such as MFG-E8, integrins, and MET, and also those less widely reported as exosomally associated, such as ROR1 and ITIH4. Several proteins with no previously known exosomal association were confirmed as exosomally expressed in experiments using individual SOMAmer® reagents or antibodies in micro-plate assays. Western blotting confirmed the SOMAscan™-identified enrichment of exosomal NOTCH-3, L1CAM, RAC1, and ADAM9. In conclusion, we describe here over 300 proteins of hitherto unknown association with prostate cancer exosomes and suggest that the SOMAmer®-based assay technology is an effective proteomics platform for exosome-associated biomarker discovery in diverse clinical settings. PMID:24505114

  9. A data review and re-assessment of ovarian cancer serum proteomic profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorace James M

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The early detection of ovarian cancer has the potential to dramatically reduce mortality. Recently, the use of mass spectrometry to develop profiles of patient serum proteins, combined with advanced data mining algorithms has been reported as a promising method to achieve this goal. In this report, we analyze the Ovarian Dataset 8-7-02 downloaded from the Clinical Proteomics Program Databank website, using nonparametric statistics and stepwise discriminant analysis to develop rules to diagnose patients, as well as to understand general patterns in the data that may guide future research. Results The mass spectrometry serum profiles derived from cancer and controls exhibited numerous statistical differences. For example, use of the Wilcoxon test in comparing the intensity at each of the 15,154 mass to charge (M/Z values between the cancer and controls, resulted in the detection of 3,591 M/Z values whose intensities differed by a p-value of 10-6 or less. The region containing the M/Z values of greatest statistical difference between cancer and controls occurred at M/Z values less than 500. For example the M/Z values of 2.7921478 and 245.53704 could be used to significantly separate the cancer from control groups. Three other sets of M/Z values were developed using a training set that could distinguish between cancer and control subjects in a test set with 100% sensitivity and specificity. Conclusion The ability to discriminate between cancer and control subjects based on the M/Z values of 2.7921478 and 245.53704 reveals the existence of a significant non-biologic experimental bias between these two groups. This bias may invalidate attempts to use this dataset to find patterns of reproducible diagnostic value. To minimize false discovery, results using mass spectrometry and data mining algorithms should be carefully reviewed and benchmarked with routine statistical methods.

  10. Chemical proteomic and bioinformatic strategies for the identification and quantification of vascular antigens in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassberger, Verena; Fugmann, Tim; Neri, Dario; Roesli, Christoph

    2010-09-10

    One avenue towards the development of more selective anti-cancer drugs consists in the targeted delivery of bioactive molecules to the tumor environment by means of binding molecules specific to tumor-associated markers. In this context, the targeted delivery of therapeutic agents to newly-formed blood vessels ("vascular targeting") is particularly attractive, because of the dependence of tumors on new blood vessels to sustain growth and invasion, and because of the accessibility of neo-vascular structures for therapeutic agents injected intravenously. Ligand-based vascular targeting strategies crucially rely on good-quality vascular tumor markers. Here we describe a number of established technologies for the enrichment of accessible vascular proteins based on the isolation of glycoproteins, the in vivo coating of accessible cell surfaces with colloidal silica and the in vivo perfusion with reactive ester derivatives of biotin. Label-free as well as isotopic labeling based strategies for the subsequent MS-based protein quantification are outlined. Finally, bioinformatic workflows for protein quantification are depicted aiming at assisting in the evaluation of appropriate strategies for individual projects. This review gives an overview of current chemical proteomic strategies for the enrichment and quantification of the accessible vascular proteome and helps in selecting bioinformatic strategies for data analysis and validation. PMID:20538087

  11. Identification of pancreatic cancer invasion-related proteins by proteomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clynes Martin

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Markers of pancreatic cancer invasion were investigated in two clonal populations of the cell line, MiaPaCa-2, Clone #3 (high invasion and Clone #8 (low invasion using proteomic profiling of an in vitro model of pancreatic cancer. Materials and methods Using 2D-DIGE followed by MALDI-TOF MS, two clonal sub-populations of the pancreatic cancer cell line, MiaPaCa-2 with high and low invasive capacities were incubated on matrigel 24 hours prior to analysis to stimulate cell-ECM contact and mimic in vivo interaction with the basement membrane. Results Sixty proteins were identified as being differentially expressed (> 1.2 fold change and p ≤ 0.05 between Clone #3 and Clone #8. Proteins found to have higher abundance levels in the highly invasive Clone #3 compared to the low invasive Clone #8 include members of the chaperone activity proteins and cytoskeleton constituents whereas metabolism-associated and catalytic proteins had lower abundance levels. Differential protein expression levels of ALDH1A1, VIM, STIP1 and KRT18 and GAPDH were confirmed by immunoblot. Using RNAi technology, STIP1 knockdown significantly reduced invasion and proliferation of the highly invasive Clone #3. Knockdown of another target, VIM by siRNA in Clone #3 cells also resulted in decreased invasion abilities of Clone #3. Elevated expression of STIP1 was observed in pancreatic tumour tissue compared to normal pancreas, whereas ALDH1A1 stained at lower levels in pancreatic tumours, as detected by immunohistochemistry. Conclusion Identification of targets which play a role in the highly invasive phenotype of pancreatic cancer may help to understand the biological behaviour, the rapid progression of this cancer and may be of importance in the development of new therapeutic strategies for pancreatic cancer.

  12. Deep Proteomics of Breast Cancer Cells Reveals that Metformin Rewires Signaling Networks Away from a Pro-growth State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, Francesca; Silvestri, Alessandra; Posca, Daniela; Pirrò, Stefano; Gherardini, Pier Federico; Castagnoli, Luisa; Mann, Matthias; Cesareni, Gianni

    2016-03-23

    Metformin is the most frequently prescribed drug for type 2 diabetes. In addition to its hypoglycemic effects, metformin also lowers cancer incidence. This anti-cancer activity is incompletely understood. Here, we profiled the metformin-dependent changes in the proteome and phosphoproteome of breast cancer cells using high-resolution mass spectrometry. In total, we quantified changes of 7,875 proteins and 15,813 phosphosites after metformin changes. To interpret these datasets, we developed a generally applicable strategy that overlays metformin-dependent changes in the proteome and phosphoproteome onto a literature-derived network. This approach suggested that metformin treatment makes cancer cells more sensitive to apoptotic stimuli and less sensitive to pro-growth stimuli. These hypotheses were tested in vivo; as a proof-of-principle, we demonstrated that metformin inhibits the p70S6K-rpS6 axis in a PP2A-phosphatase dependent manner. In conclusion, analysis of deep proteomics reveals both detailed and global mechanisms that contribute to the anti-cancer activity of metformin. PMID:27135362

  13. Application of serum SELDI proteomic patterns in diagnosis of lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Bin

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently, no satisfactory biomarkers are available to screen for lung cancer. Surface-Enhanced Laser Desorption/ionization Time-of- Flight Mass Spectrometry ProteinChip system (SELDI-TOF-MS is one of the currently used techniques to identify biomarkers for cancers. The aim of this study is to explore the application of serum SELDI proteomic patterns to distinguish lung cancer patients from healthy individuals. Methods A total of 208 serum samples, including 158 lung cancer patients and 50 healthy individuals, were randomly divided into a training set (including 11 sera from patients with stages I/II lung cancer, 63 from patients with stages III/IV lung cancer and 20 from healthy controls and a blinded test set (including 43 sera from patients with stages I/II lung cancer, 41 from patients with stages III/IV lung cancer and 30 from healthy controls. All samples were analyzed by SELDI technology. The spectra were generated on weak cation exchange (WCX2 chips, and protein peaks clustering and classification analyses were made using Ciphergen Biomarker Wizard and Biomarker Pattern software, respectively. We additionally determined Cyfra21-1 and NSE in the 208 serum samples included in this study using an electrochemiluminescent immunoassay. Results Five protein peaks at 11493, 6429, 8245, 5335 and 2538 Da were automatically chosen as a biomarker pattern in the training set. When the SELDI marker pattern was tested with the blinded test set, it yielded a sensitivity of 86.9%, a specificity of 80.0% and a positive predictive value of 92.4%. The sensitivities provided by Cyfra21-1 and NSE used individually or in combination were significantly lower than that of the SELDI marker pattern (P P Conclusion These results suggest that serum SELDI protein profiling can distinguish lung cancer patients, especially NSCLC patients, from normal subjects with relatively high sensitivity and specificity, and the SELDI-TOF-MS is a potential tool

  14. Proteome data of whole saliva which are associated with development of oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehmlich, Nico; Stegmaier, Petra; Golatowski, Claas; Salazar, Manuela Gesell; Rischke, Christian; Henke, Michael; Völker, Uwe

    2016-09-01

    Saliva as major human body fluid may act as an indicator of oral disease status. Oral mucositis is a common and often treatment-limiting side effect of radiotherapy for head and neck cancer patients. In this dataset, we provide the complete proteome dataset (raw and search files) of the patients at baseline of radiotherapy treatment in patients undergoing radiotherapy analyzed by nano liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In the data set, 5323 tryptic peptides were identified which can be assigned to 487 distinct proteins (≥2 peptides). The MS data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange ("ProteomeXchange provides globally coordinated proteomics data submission and dissemination" [1]) via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PRIDE: PXD003230. The data are associated with the previously published work, "Differences in the whole saliva baseline proteome profile associated with development of oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy" [2]. PMID:27358911

  15. Proteomics-based Identification of Proapoptotic Caspase Adapter Protein 
as A Novel Serum Marker of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Heng; Chen, Shengxi; Huang, Lingjin

    2012-01-01

    Background and objective Early diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer contribute to a patient’s prolonged survival. Proteomics and tissue culture were used to screen potential serum markers of lung cancer. Methods The differential proteomic technique and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry were used to identify overexpressed proteins from cultured tumor tissues in a conditioned medium. Paired lung tissues in a conditioned medium were used as the contro...

  16. MALDI-MS-Based Profiling of Serum Proteome: Detection of Changes Related to Progression of Cancer and Response to Anticancer Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Monika Pietrowska; Piotr Widłak

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based analyses of the low-molecular-weight fraction of serum proteome allow identifying proteome profiles (signatures) that are potentially useful in detection and classification of cancer. Several published studies have shown that multipeptide signatures selected in numerical tests have potential values for diagnostics of different types of cancer. However due to apparent problems with standardization of methodological details, both experimental and computational, none of t...

  17. The proteomics of colorectal cancer: identification of a protein signature associated with prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna O'Dwyer

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is one of the commonest types of cancer and there is requirement for the identification of prognostic biomarkers. In this study protein expression profiles have been established for colorectal cancer and normal colonic mucosa by proteomics using a combination of two dimensional gel electrophoresis with fresh frozen sections of paired Dukes B colorectal cancer and normal colorectal mucosa (n = 28, gel image analysis and high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Hierarchical cluster analysis and principal components analysis showed that the protein expression profiles of colorectal cancer and normal colonic mucosa clustered into distinct patterns of protein expression. Forty-five proteins were identified as showing at least 1.5 times increased expression in colorectal cancer and the identity of these proteins was confirmed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Fifteen proteins that showed increased expression were validated by immunohistochemistry using a well characterised colorectal cancer tissue microarray containing 515 primary colorectal cancer, 224 lymph node metastasis and 50 normal colonic mucosal samples. The proteins that showed the greatest degree of overexpression in primary colorectal cancer compared with normal colonic mucosa were heat shock protein 60 (p<0.001, S100A9 (p<0.001 and translationally controlled tumour protein (p<0.001. Analysis of proteins individually identified 14-3-3β as a prognostic biomarker (χ² = 6.218, p = 0.013, HR = 0.639, 95%CI 0.448-0.913. Hierarchical cluster analysis identified distinct phenotypes associated with survival and a two-protein signature consisting of 14-3-3β and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 was identified as showing prognostic significance (χ² = 7.306, p = 0.007, HR = 0.504, 95%CI 0.303-0.838 and that remained independently prognostic (p = 0.01, HR = 0.416, 95%CI 0.208-0.829 in a multivariate model.

  18. Proteomics-Based Identification and Analysis of Proteins Associated with Helicobacter pylori in Gastric Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjiang Zhou

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a spiral-shaped Gram-negative bacterium that causes the most common chronic infection in the human stomach. Approximately 1%-3% of infected individuals develop gastric cancer. However, the mechanisms by which H. pylori induces gastric cancer are not completely understood. The available evidence indicates a strong link between the virulence factor of H. pylori, cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA, and gastric cancer. To further characterize H. pylori virulence, we established three cell lines by infecting the gastric cancer cell lines SGC-7901 and AGS with cagA+ H. pylori and transfecting SGC-7901 with a vector carrying the full-length cagA gene. We detected 135 differently expressed proteins from the three cell lines using proteome technology, and 10 differential proteins common to the three cell lines were selected and identified by LC-MS/MS as well as verified by western blot: β-actin, L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLD, pre-mRNA-processing factor 19 homolog (PRPF19, ATP synthase, calmodulin (CaM, p64 CLCP, Ran-specific GTPase-activating protein (RanGAP, P43 and calreticulin. Detection of the expression of these proteins and genes encoding these proteins in human gastric cancer tissues by real-time PCR (RT-qPCR and western blot revealed that the expression of β-ACTIN, LDH, DLD, PRPF19 and CaM genes were up-regulated and RanGAP was down-regulated in gastric cancer tissues and/or metastatic lymph nodes compared to peri-cancerous tissues. High gene expression was observed for H. pylori infection in gastric cancer tissues. Furthermore, the LDH, DLD and CaM genes were demethylated at the promoter -2325, -1885 and -276 sites, respectively, and the RanGAP gene was highly methylated at the promoter -570 and -170 sites in H. pylori-infected and cagA-overexpressing cells. These results provide new insights into the molecular pathogenesis and treatment targets for gastric cancer with H

  19. Open-Access Cancer Genomics - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The completion of the Human Genome Project sparked a revolution in high-throughput genomics applied towards deciphering genetically complex diseases, like cancer. Now, almost 10 years later, we have a mountain of genomics data on many different cancer type

  20. Proteomic Analysis of Circulating Monocytes Identifies Cathepsin D as A Potential Novel Plasma Marker of Acute Coronary Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Vivanco

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We have performed a proteomic analysis of peripheral blood monocytes from ACS patients in comparison with healthy subjects and stable coronary patients in order to search novel biomarkers of ACS in circulating monocytes. Monocytes were isolated from blood of patients with non-ST elevation ACS (n = 27 at day 0, 2 and 6 months, and from patients with stable coronary disease (n = 10 and matched healthy controls (n = 11. The proteomic analysis of monocytes from ACS patients at day 0 showed that cathepsin D is differentially expressed compared to healthy subjects and stable coronary patients. Western blot analysis indicated that the mature form of cathepsin D at day 0 was overexpressed in monocytes of ACS patients in relation to healthy subjects. In contrast, the precursor of this enzyme, absent at day 0 in ACS patients, was highly expressed in monocytes of healthy subjects. Furthermore, the upregulation of the mature form of cathepsin D diminished along the time, while the expression of the precursor increased. ACS patients also showed significantly increased plasma cathepsin D levels on admission compared to healthy subjects and stable patients. Cathepsin D plasma levels diminished at 2 and 6 months to control values. Finally, cathepsin D levels were independent of the existence of coronary risk factors and CRP levels, correlating only with CD40L. Since this protease participates in the genesis and rupture of atherosclerotic plaques, it could represent a potential marker of ACS.

  1. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis of dioscin on human HCT-116 colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Xu, Lina; Yin, Lianhong; Xu, Youwei; Han, Xu; Qi, Yan; Zhao, Yanyan; Liu, Kexin; Peng, Jinyong

    2014-01-01

    Dioscin shows various pharmacological effects. However, its activity on colorectal cancer is still unknown. The present work showed that dioscin significantly inhibited cell proliferation on human HCT-116 colon cancer cells, and affected Ca(2+) release and ROS generation. The content of nitric oxide (NO) and its producer inducible NO synthase (iNOS) associated with DNA damage and aberrant cell signaling were assayed using the kits. DNA damage and cell apoptosis caused by dioscin were also analyzed through single-cell gel electrophoresis and in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling assays. The results showed that dioscin increased the levels of NO and inducible NO synthase. The comet length in dioscin-treated groups was much longer than that of the control group, and the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling positive cells (apoptotic cells) was significantly increased by the compound (p dioscin caused mitochondrial damage and G2/M cell cycle arrest through transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry analysis, respectively. To study the cytotoxic mechanism of dioscin, an iTRAQ-based proteomics approach was used. There were 288 significantly different proteins expressed in response to dioscin, which were connected with each other and were involved in different Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways. Then, some differentially expressed proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation, Wnt, p53, and calcium signaling pathways were validated by Western blotting and quantitative real-time PCR assays. Our work elucidates the molecular mechanism of dioscin-induced cytotoxicity in colon cancer cells, and the identified targets may be useful for treatment of colorectal cancer in future. PMID:24420967

  2. Bioinformatics analysis of differentially expressed proteins in prostate cancer based on proteomics data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen C

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chen Chen,1 Li-Guo Zhang,1 Jian Liu,1 Hui Han,1 Ning Chen,1 An-Liang Yao,1 Shao-San Kang,1 Wei-Xing Gao,1 Hong Shen,2 Long-Jun Zhang,1 Ya-Peng Li,1 Feng-Hong Cao,1 Zhi-Guo Li3 1Department of Urology, North China University of Science and Technology Affiliated Hospital, 2Department of Modern Technology and Education Center, 3Department of Medical Research Center, International Science and Technology Cooperation Base of Geriatric Medicine, North China University of Science and Technology, Tangshan, People’s Republic of China Abstract: We mined the literature for proteomics data to examine the occurrence and metastasis of prostate cancer (PCa through a bioinformatics analysis. We divided the differentially expressed proteins (DEPs into two groups: the group consisting of PCa and benign tissues (P&b and the group presenting both high and low PCa metastatic tendencies (H&L. In the P&b group, we found 320 DEPs, 20 of which were reported more than three times, and DES was the most commonly reported. Among these DEPs, the expression levels of FGG, GSN, SERPINC1, TPM1, and TUBB4B have not yet been correlated with PCa. In the H&L group, we identified 353 DEPs, 13 of which were reported more than three times. Among these DEPs, MDH2 and MYH9 have not yet been correlated with PCa metastasis. We further confirmed that DES was differentially expressed between 30 cancer and 30 benign tissues. In addition, DEPs associated with protein transport, regulation of actin cytoskeleton, and the extracellular matrix (ECM–receptor interaction pathway were prevalent in the H&L group and have not yet been studied in detail in this context. Proteins related to homeostasis, the wound-healing response, focal adhesions, and the complement and coagulation pathways were overrepresented in both groups. Our findings suggest that the repeatedly reported DEPs in the two groups may function as potential biomarkers for detecting PCa and predicting its aggressiveness. Furthermore

  3. Identification of IGFBP2 and IGFBP3 As Compensatory Biomarkers for CA19-9 in Early-Stage Pancreatic Cancer Using a Combination of Antibody-Based and LC-MS/MS-Based Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneyama, Toshihiro; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Honda, Kazufumi; Kobayashi, Makoto; Iwasaki, Motoki; Uchida, Yasuo; Okusaka, Takuji; Nakamori, Shoji; Shimahara, Masashi; Ueno, Takaaki; Tsuchida, Akihiko; Sata, Naohiro; Ioka, Tatsuya; Yasunami, Yohichi; Kosuge, Tomoo; Kaneda, Takashi; Kato, Takao; Yagihara, Kazuhiro; Fujita, Shigeyuki; Huang, Wilber; Yamada, Tesshi; Tachikawa, Masanori; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal tumors, and reliable detection of early-stage pancreatic cancer and risk diseases for pancreatic cancer is essential to improve the prognosis. As 260 genes were previously reported to be upregulated in invasive ductal adenocarcinoma of pancreas (IDACP) cells, quantification of the corresponding proteins in plasma might be useful for IDACP diagnosis. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to identify plasma biomarkers for early detection of IDACP by using two proteomics strategies: antibody-based proteomics and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based proteomics. Among the 260 genes, we focused on 130 encoded proteins with known function for which antibodies were available. Twenty-three proteins showed values of the area under the curve (AUC) of more than 0.8 in receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of reverse-phase protein array (RPPA) data of IDACP patients compared with healthy controls, and these proteins were selected as biomarker candidates. We then used our high-throughput selected reaction monitoring or multiple reaction monitoring (SRM/MRM) methodology, together with an automated sample preparation system, micro LC and auto analysis system, to quantify these candidate proteins in plasma from healthy controls and IDACP patients on a large scale. The results revealed that insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP)2 and IGFBP3 have the ability to discriminate IDACP patients at an early stage from healthy controls, and IGFBP2 appeared to be increased in risk diseases of pancreatic malignancy, such as intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs). Furthermore, diagnosis of IDACP using the combination of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), IGFBP2 and IGFBP3 is significantly more effective than CA19-9 alone. This suggests that IGFBP2 and IGFBP3 may serve as compensatory biomarkers for CA19-9. Early diagnosis with this marker combination may improve the prognosis of

  4. Construction and analysis of protein-protein interaction networks based on proteomics data of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Shen, Hong; Zhang, Li-Guo; Liu, Jian; Cao, Xiao-Ge; Yao, An-Liang; Kang, Shao-San; Gao, Wei-Xing; Han, Hui; Cao, Feng-Hong; Li, Zhi-Guo

    2016-06-01

    Currently, using human prostate cancer (PCa) tissue samples to conduct proteomics research has generated a large amount of data; however, only a very small amount has been thoroughly investigated. In this study, we manually carried out the mining of the full text of proteomics literature that involved comparisons between PCa and normal or benign tissue and identified 41 differentially expressed proteins verified or reported more than 2 times from different research studies. We regarded these proteins as seed proteins to construct a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. The extended network included one giant network, which consisted of 1,264 nodes connected via 1,744 edges, and 3 small separate components. The backbone network was then constructed, which was derived from key nodes and the subnetwork consisting of the shortest path between seed proteins. Topological analyses of these networks were conducted to identify proteins essential for the genesis of PCa. Solute carrier family 2 (facilitated glucose transporter), member 4 (SLC2A4) had the highest closeness centrality located in the center of each network, and the highest betweenness centrality and largest degree in the backbone network. Tubulin, beta 2C (TUBB2C) had the largest degree in the giant network and subnetwork. In addition, using module analysis of the whole PPI network, we obtained a densely connected region. Functional annotation indicated that the Ras protein signal transduction biological process, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), neurotrophin and the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) signaling pathway may play an important role in the genesis and development of PCa. Further investigation of the SLC2A4, TUBB2C proteins, and these biological processes and pathways may therefore provide a potential target for the diagnosis and treatment of PCa. PMID:27121963

  5. Mass spectrometry based translational proteomics for biomarker discovery and application in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hong; Chen, Guilin; Guo, Mingquan

    2016-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Clinically, early detection of the disease is the most effective approach to tackle this tough challenge. Discovery and development of reliable and effective diagnostic tools for the assessment of prognosis and prediction of response to drug therapy are urgently needed for personalized therapies and better treatment outcomes. Among many ongoing efforts in search for potential CRC biomarkers, MS-based translational proteomics provides a unique opportunity for the discovery and application of protein biomarkers toward better CRC early detection and treatment. This review updates most recent studies that use preclinical models and clinical materials for the identification of CRC-related protein markers. Some new advances in the development of CRC protein markers such as CRC stem cell related protein markers, SRM/MRM-MS and MS cytometry approaches are also discussed in order to address future directions and challenges from bench translational research to bedside clinical application of CRC biomarkers. PMID:26616366

  6. Unraveling Molecular Differences of Gastric Cancer by Label-Free Quantitative Proteomics Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Dai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer (GC has significant morbidity and mortality worldwide and especially in China. Its molecular pathogenesis has not been thoroughly elaborated. The acknowledged biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis, recurrence monitoring and treatment are lacking. Proteins from matched pairs of human GC and adjacent tissues were analyzed by a coupled label-free Mass Spectrometry (MS approach, followed by functional annotation with software analysis. Nano-LC-MS/MS, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry were used to validate dysregulated proteins. One hundred forty-six dysregulated proteins with more than twofold expressions were quantified, 22 of which were first reported to be relevant with GC. Most of them were involved in cancers and gastrointestinal disease. The expression of a panel of four upregulated nucleic acid binding proteins, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein hnRNPA2B1, hnRNPD, hnRNPL and Y-box binding protein 1 (YBX-1 were validated by Nano-LC-MS/MS, qRT-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry assays in ten GC patients’ tissues. They were located in the keynotes of a predicted interaction network and might play important roles in abnormal cell growth. The label-free quantitative proteomic approach provides a deeper understanding and novel insight into GC-related molecular changes and possible mechanisms. It also provides some potential biomarkers for clinical diagnosis.

  7. Unraveling Molecular Differences of Gastric Cancer by Label-Free Quantitative Proteomics Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Peng; Wang, Qin; Wang, Weihua; Jing, Ruirui; Wang, Wei; Wang, Fengqin; Azadzoi, Kazem M; Yang, Jing-Hua; Yan, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) has significant morbidity and mortality worldwide and especially in China. Its molecular pathogenesis has not been thoroughly elaborated. The acknowledged biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis, recurrence monitoring and treatment are lacking. Proteins from matched pairs of human GC and adjacent tissues were analyzed by a coupled label-free Mass Spectrometry (MS) approach, followed by functional annotation with software analysis. Nano-LC-MS/MS, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), western blot and immunohistochemistry were used to validate dysregulated proteins. One hundred forty-six dysregulated proteins with more than twofold expressions were quantified, 22 of which were first reported to be relevant with GC. Most of them were involved in cancers and gastrointestinal disease. The expression of a panel of four upregulated nucleic acid binding proteins, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein hnRNPA2B1, hnRNPD, hnRNPL and Y-box binding protein 1 (YBX-1) were validated by Nano-LC-MS/MS, qRT-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry assays in ten GC patients' tissues. They were located in the keynotes of a predicted interaction network and might play important roles in abnormal cell growth. The label-free quantitative proteomic approach provides a deeper understanding and novel insight into GC-related molecular changes and possible mechanisms. It also provides some potential biomarkers for clinical diagnosis. PMID:26805816

  8. Comparative study of proteome between primary cancer and hepatic metastatic tumor in colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Yu; Shi-Yong Li; Ping An; Ying-Nan Zhang; Zhen-Jia Liang; Shu-Jun Yuan; Hui-Yun Cai

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To identify the differential proteins associated with colorectal cancer genesis and hepatic metastasis. METHODS: Hydrophobic protein samples were extracted from normal colorectal mucosa, primary cancer lesion and hepatic metastatic foci of colorectal cancer. With twodimensional electrophoresis and image analysis, differentially expressed protein spots were detected, and the proteins were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry and peptide mass fingerprint analysis.RESULTS: Significant alterations of the proteins in number and expression levels were discovered in primary cancer and hepatic metastatic foci, the expression of a number of proteins was lost in 25-40 ku, but protein spots was increased in 14-21ku, compared with normal mucosa. Nine differentially expressed protein spots were identified. Three proteins expressed in normal mucosa, but lost in primary cancer and hepatic metastasis, were recognized ascalmodulin, ribonuclease 6 precursor and mannosidase-α.Proapolipoprotein was expressed progressively from normal mucosa to primary cancer and hepatic metastasis. The differentially expressed protein of beta-globin was found in normal mucosa and hepatic metastatic tumor, but lost in primary cancer lesion. Cdc 42, a GTP-binding protein, was identified in hepatic metastasis. The protein spots of C4 from primary cancer, M7 and M9 from hepatic metastasis had less homology with the proteins in database. CONCLUSION: Variations of hydrophobic protein expression in colorectal cancer initiation and hepatic metastasis are significant and can be observed with two-dimensionalelectrophoresis. The expression of calmodulin, ribonuclease6 precursor and mannosidase-α is lost but the expression of proapolipoprotein is enhanced which is associated with colorectal cancer genesis and hepatic metastasis. Cdc 42 and beta-globin are expressed abnormally in hepaticmetastasis. Protein C4, M7 and M9 may be associated withcolorectal

  9. Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC modifies the plasma proteome in children undergoing repair of tetralogy of fallot: a randomized controlled trial.

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    Michele Hepponstall

    Full Text Available Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC has been applied in paediatric cardiac surgery. We have demonstrated that RIPC induces a proteomic response in plasma of healthy volunteers. We tested the hypothesis that RIPC modifies the proteomic response in children undergoing Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF repair.Children (n=40 were randomized to RIPC and control groups. Blood was sampled at baseline, after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB and 6, 12 and 24h post-CPB. Plasma was analysed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS in an untargeted approach. Peptides demonstrating differential expression (p<0.01 were subjected to tandem LC-MS/MS and protein identification. Corresponding proteins were identified using the NCBI protein database. There was no difference in age (7.3±3.5vs6.8±3.6 months(p=0.89, weight (7.7±1.8vs7.5±1.9 kg(p=0.71, CPB time (104±7vs94±7 min(p=0.98 or aortic cross-clamp time (83±22vs75±20 min(p=0.36. No peptides were differentially expressed at baseline or immediately after CPB. There were 48 peptides with higher expression in the RIPC group 6h post-CPB. This was no longer evident at 12 or 24h, with one peptide down-regulated in the RIPC group. The proteins identified were: inter-alpha globulin inhibitor (42.0±11.8 vs 820.8±181.1, p=0.006, fibrinogen preproprotein (59.3±11.2 vs 1192.6±278.3, p=0.007, complement-C3 precursor (391.2±160.9 vs 5385.1±689.4, p=0.0005, complement C4B (151.5±17.8 vs 4587.8±799.2, p=0.003, apolipoprotein B100 (53.4±8.3 vs 1364.5±278.2, p=0.005 and urinary proteinase inhibitor (358.6±74.9 vs 5758.1±1343.1, p=0.009. These proteins are involved in metabolism, haemostasis, immunity and inflammation.We provided the first comprehensive analysis of RIPC-induced proteomic changes in children undergoing surgery. The proteomic changes peak 6h post-CPB and return to baseline within 24h of surgery.ACTR.org.au ACTRN12610000496011.

  10. Identification of altered plasma proteins by proteomic study in valvular heart diseases and the potential clinical significance.

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    Ge Gao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little is known about genetic basis and proteomics in valvular heart disease (VHD including rheumatic (RVD and degenerative (DVD valvular disease. The present proteomic study examined the hypothesis that certain proteins may be associated with the pathological changes in the plasma of VHD patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: Differential protein analysis in the plasma identified 18 differentially expressed protein spots and 14 corresponding proteins or polypeptides by two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry in 120 subjects. Two up-regulated (complement C4A and carbonic anhydrase 1 and three down-regulated proteins (serotransferrin, alpha-1-antichymotrypsin, and vitronectin were validated by ELISA in enlarging samples. The plasma levels (n = 40 for each of complement C4A in RVD (715.8±35.6 vs. 594.7±28.2 ng/ml, P = 0.009 and carbonic anhydrase 1 (237.70±15.7 vs. 184.7±10.8 U/L, P = 0.007 in DVD patients were significantly higher and that of serotransferrin (2.36±0.20 vs. 2.93±0.16 mg/ml, P = 0.025 and alpha-1-antichymotrypsin (370.0±13.7 vs. 413.0±11.6 µg/ml, P = 0.019 in RVD patients were significantly lower than those in controls. The plasma vitronectin level in both RVD (281.3±11.0 vs. 323.2±10.0 µg/ml, P = 0.006 and DVD (283.6±11.4 vs. 323.2±10.0 µg/ml, P = 0.011 was significantly lower than those in normal controls. CONCLUSIONS: We have for the first time identified alterations of 14 differential proteins or polypeptides in the plasma of patients with various VHD. The elevation of plasma complement C4A in RVD and carbonic anhydrase 1 in DVD and the decrease of serotransferrin and alpha-1-antichymotrypsin in RVD patients may be useful biomarkers for these valvular diseases. The decreased plasma level of vitronectin - a protein related to the formation of valvular structure - in both RVD and DVD patients might indicate the possible genetic deficiency in these patients.

  11. Proteomic Profiling of Exosomes Leads to the Identification of Novel Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duijvesz, Diederick; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Hoogland, Marije; Vredenbregt-van den Berg, Mirella S.; Willemsen, Rob; Luider, Theo N.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Jenster, Guido

    2013-12-31

    Introduction: Current markers for prostate cancer, such as PSA lack specificity. Therefore, novel biomarkers are needed. Unfortunately, biomarker discovery from body fluids is often hampered by the high abundance of many proteins unrelated to disease. An attractive alternative biomarker discovery approach is the isolation of small vesicles (exosomes, ~100 nm). They contain proteins that are specific to the tissue from which they are derived and therefore can be considered as treasure chests for disease-specific marker discovery. Profiling prostate cancer-derived exosomes could reveal new markers for this malignancy. Materials and Methods: Exosomes were isolated from 2 immortalized primary prostate epithelial cells (PNT2C2 and RWPE-1) and 2 PCa cell lines (PC346C and VCaP) by ultracentrifugation. Proteomic analyses utilized a nanoLC coupled with an LTQ-Orbitrap operated in tandem MS (MS/MS) mode, followed by the Accurate Mass and Time (AMT) tag approach. Exosomal proteins were validated by Western blotting. A Tissue Micro Array, containing 481 different PCa samples (radical prostatectomy), was used to correlate candidate markers with several clinical-pathological parameters such as PSA, Gleason score, biochemical recurrence, and (PCa-related) death. Results: Proteomic characterization resulted in the identification of 263 proteins by at least 2 peptides. Specifically analysis of exosomes from PNT2C2, RWPE-1, PC346C, and VCaP identified 248, 233, 169, and 216 proteins, respectively. Statistical analyses revealed 52 proteins differently expressed between PCa and control cells, 9 of which were more abundant in PCa. Validation by Western blotting confirmed a higher abundance of FASN, XPO1 and PDCD6IP (ALIX) in PCa exosomes. The Tissue Micro 4 Array showed strong correlation of higher Gleason scores and local recurrence with increased cytoplasmic XPO1 (P<0.001). Conclusions: Differentially abundant proteins of cell line-derived exosomes make a clear subdivision between

  12. Plasma membrane proteomics in the maize primary root growth zone: novel insights into root growth adaptation to water stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voothuluru, Priyamvada; Anderson, Jeffrey C; Sharp, Robert E; Peck, Scott C

    2016-09-01

    Previous work on maize (Zea mays L.) primary root growth under water stress showed that cell elongation is maintained in the apical region of the growth zone but progressively inhibited further from the apex. These responses involve spatially differential and coordinated regulation of osmotic adjustment, modification of cell wall extensibility, and other cellular growth processes that are required for root growth under water-stressed conditions. As the interface between the cytoplasm and the apoplast (including the cell wall), the plasma membrane likely plays critical roles in these responses. Using a simplified method for enrichment of plasma membrane proteins, the developmental distribution of plasma membrane proteins was analysed in the growth zone of well-watered and water-stressed maize primary roots. The results identified 432 proteins with differential abundances in well-watered and water-stressed roots. The majority of changes involved region-specific patterns of response, and the identities of the water stress-responsive proteins suggest involvement in diverse biological processes including modification of sugar and nutrient transport, ion homeostasis, lipid metabolism, and cell wall composition. Integration of the distinct, region-specific plasma membrane protein abundance patterns with results from previous physiological, transcriptomic and cell wall proteomic studies reveals novel insights into root growth adaptation to water stress. PMID:27341663

  13. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in...

  14. Comparison of functional proteomic analyses of human breast cancer cell lines T47D and MCF7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliette Adjo Aka

    Full Text Available T47D and MCF7 are two human hormone-dependent breast cancer cell lines which are widely used as experimental models for in vitro and in vivo (tumor xenografts breast cancer studies. Several proteins involved in cancer development were identified in these cell lines by proteomic analyses. Although these studies reported the proteomic profiles of each cell line, until now, their differential protein expression profiles have not been established. Here, we used two-dimensional gel and mass spectrometry analyses to compare the proteomic profiles of the two cell lines, T47D and MCF7. Our data revealed that more than 164 proteins are differentially expressed between them. According to their biological functions, the results showed that proteins involved in cell growth stimulation, anti-apoptosis mechanisms and cancerogenesis are more strongly expressed in T47D than in MCF7. These proteins include G1/S-specific cyclin-D3 and prohibitin. Proteins implicated in transcription repression and apoptosis regulation, including transcriptional repressor NF-X1, nitrilase homolog 2 and interleukin-10, are, on the contrary, more strongly expressed in MCF7 as compared to T47D. Five proteins that were previously described as breast cancer biomarkers, namely cathepsin D, cathepsin B, protein S100-A14, heat shock protein beta-1 (HSP27 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, are found to be differentially expressed in the two cell lines. A list of differentially expressed proteins between T47D and MCF7 was generated, providing useful information for further studies of breast cancer mechanisms with these cell lines as models.

  15. Plasma prolactin and breast cancer risk: a meta- analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minghao; Wu, Xiujuan; Chai, Fan; Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women, and its incidence is on a constant rise. Previous studies suggest that higher levels of plasma prolactin are associated with escalated risk of breast cancer, however, these results are contradictory and inconclusive. PubMed and Medline were used to search and identify published observational studies that assessed the relationship between plasma prolactin levels and the risk of breast cancer. The pooled relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a fixed-effects or random-effects model. A total of 7 studies were included in our analysis. For the highest versus lowest levels of plasma prolactin, the pooled RR (95% CI) of breast cancer were 1.16 (1.04, 1.29). In subgroup analyses, we found a positive association between plasma prolactin levels and the risk of breast cancer among the patients who were postmenopausal, ER(+)/PR(+) or in situ and invasive carcinoma. However, this positive association was not detected in the premenopausal and ER(-)/PR(-) patients. In conclusion, the present study provides evidence supporting a significantly positive association between plasma prolactin levels and the risk of breast cancer. PMID:27184120

  16. Proteomic Study of HPV-Positive Head and Neck Cancers: Preliminary Results

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    Géraldine Descamps

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV was recently recognized as a new risk factor for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. For oropharyngeal cancers, an HPV+ status is associated with better prognosis in a subgroup of nonsmokers and nondrinkers. However, HPV infection is also involved in the biology of head and neck carcinoma (HNC in patients with a history of tobacco use and/or alcohol consumption. Thus, the involvement of HPV infection in HN carcinogenesis remains unclear, and further studies are needed to identify and analyze HPV-specific pathways that are involved in this process. Using a quantitative proteomics-based approach, we compared the protein expression profiles of two HPV+ HNC cell lines and one HPV− HNC cell line. We identified 155 proteins that are differentially expressed (P<0.01 in these three lines. Among the identified proteins, prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA was upregulated and eukaryotic elongation factor 1 alpha (EEF1α was downregulated in the HPV+ cell lines. Immunofluorescence and western blotting analyses confirmed these results. Moreover, PSCA and EEF1α were differentially expressed in two clinical series of 50 HPV+ and 50 HPV− oral cavity carcinomas. Thus, our study reveals for the first time that PSCA and EEF1α are associated with the HPV-status, suggesting that these proteins could be involved in HPV-associated carcinogenesis.

  17. Anti-cancer efficacy of nonthermal plasma dissolved in a liquid, liquid plasma in heterogeneous cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ngoc Hoan; Park, Hyung Jun; Yang, Sang Sik; Choi, Kyeong Sook; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of nonthermal plasma for cancer treatment has been reported recently. The heterogeneity of cancer cells need to be addressed to design effective anticancer treatments. Here, we show that treatment with nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasma dissolved in a liquid (liquid plasma) induces oxidative stress in heterogeneous populations of cancer cells and ultimately kills these cells via apoptosis, regardless of genetic status, e.g., mutations in p53 and other DNA-damage-response genes. We found that liquid plasma markedly increased the concentration of intracellular and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), reflecting an influx from the extracellular milieu. Liquid plasma contributed to mitochondrial accumulation of ROS and depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential with consequent cell death. Healthy normal cells, however, were hardly affected by the liquid-plasma treatment. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine blocked liquid-plasma-induced cell death. A knockdown of CuZn-superoxide dismutase or Mn-SOD enhanced the plasma-induced cell death, whereas expression of exogenous CuZn-SOD, Mn-SOD, or catalase blocked the cell death. These results suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction mediated by ROS production is a key contributor to liquid-plasma-induced apoptotic cell death, regardless of genetic variation. Thus, liquid plasma may have clinical applications, e.g., the development of therapeutic strategies and prevention of disease progression despite tumor heterogeneity. PMID:27364630

  18. Quantitative proteomic study of human prostate cancer cells with different metastatic potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qun; Li, Yilei; Wang, Yanying; Cui, Zheng; Gong, Lulu; Qu, Zhigang; Zhong, Yanping; Zhou, Jun; Zhou, Ying; Gao, Yong; Li, Yulin

    2016-04-01

    Metastatic dissemination is a feature of most cancers including prostate cancer (PCa), and is the main cause of treatment failure and mortality. The aim of the study is to explore the mechanisms of PCa metastasis and to search for potential prognostic markers using proteomics. Two-dimensional fluorescent differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) was used to quantify proteins in normal prostate epithelial cells, bone metastasis-derived PC-3 cells, and visceral metastasis-derived PC-3M cells. Metastatic potential was confirmed by flow cytometry, electron microscopy, proliferating cell nuclear antigen assay, and wound healing assay. Differential protein expression was compared between PCa cells with different metastatic potentials (LNcap, DU145, PC-3 and PC-3M) and normal prostate epithelial cells (RWPE-1). Selected candidate proteins in human prostate tissues were analyzed using GOA, UniProt and GeneCards analyses. Eighty-six proteins were differentially expressed between cell lines (>1.5-fold, P<0.05). Among them, twelve proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS. One protein was upregulated in normal prostate epithelial cells, nine proteins were upregulated in PC-3, and two proteins were upregulated in PC-3M. Proteins were divided into five groups according to their functions. The SETDB1 protein was closely associated with the prognosis of PCa. Bioinformatics suggested that SETDB1 might promote PCa bone metastasis through the WNT pathway. In conclusion, SETDB1 might be associated with the development of bone metastases from PCa. Further study is necessary to assess its exact role in PCa. PMID:26846621

  19. Use of Proteomics Analysis for Molecular Precision Approaches in Cancer Therapy

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    Yuqiao Shen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapidly expanding data sets derived from genomic and transcriptomic analyses have allowed greater understanding of structural and functional network patterns within the genome resulting in a realignment of thinking within a systems biologic framework of cancer. However, insofar as spatially and temporally dynamic differential gene expression at the protein level is the mediate effector of cellular behavior and, in view of extensive post translational modification (PTM, the need for sensitive, quantitative, and high throughput proteomic analytic techniques has emerged. To circumvent the problems of tissue sample heterogeneity, laser capture microdissection (LCM allows for the acquisition of homogeneous cell populations. Using different fl uorescent dyes to label protein samples prior to gel electrophoresis, 2-D DIGE (two- dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis can, with reasonable sensitivity, process three protein samples on the same gel allowing for intragel relative quantification. MudPIT (multidimensional protein identification technology is a non-gel approach exploiting the unique physical properties of charge and hydrophobicity which allows the separation of peptide mixtures as well as direct MS (mass spectrometry and database searching. The introduction of iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification achieves labeling of all peptides by employing an 8-plex set of amine reactive tags to derivatize peptides at the N-terminus and lysine side chains allowing for absolute quantification and assessment of PTM. These and other new laboratory technologies, along with improved bioinformatics tools, have started to make signifi cant contributions in cancer diagnostics and treatments.

  20. Clinical and prognostic significance of plasma fibrinogen in lung cancer

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    Chen YS

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Hyperfibrinogenemia is a common problem associated with various carcinomas. The recent studies have shown that high plasma fibrinogen concentration is associated with invasion, growth and metastases of cancer. Furthermore, the recent studies focus on the prognostic significance of fibrinogen in the patients with advanced NSCLC (stage IIIB -IV. However, the prognostic significance of the plasma fibrinogen levels in early stage NSCLC patients (stage I -IIIA still remains unclear. In addition, it remains unclear whether or not chemotherapy-induced changes in fibrinogen level relate to the prognosis. The aims of this study were to 1 further explore the relationship between the plasma fibrinogen concentration and the stage and metastases of lung cancer 2 evaluate the prognostic significance of the basal plasma fibrinogen level in patients with lung cancer 3 explore the prognostic value of the change in fibrinogen levels between pre and post-chemotherapy. Methods: In this retrospective study, the data from 370 patients with lung cancer were enrolled into this study. The plasma fibrinogen levels were compared with the clinical and prognostic significance of lung cancer. The association between the plasma fibrinogen level and clinical-prognostic characteristics were analyzed using SPSS 17.0 software. Results: 1 The median pre-treatment plasma fibrinogen levels were 4.20g/L. Pre-treatment plasma fibrinogen levels correlated significantly with gender (p = 0.013. A higher plasma fibrinogen concentration was associated with squamous cell carcinoma versus adenocarcinoma (4.83±1.50 g/L versus 4.15±1.30 g/L; P<0.001, there was a significant association between plasma fibrinogen level and metastases of lung cancer, pointing a higher plasma fibrinogen level in lymph nodes or distant organ metastases (p < 0.001. 2 Patients with low plasma fibrinogen concentration demonstrates higher overall survival compared with those with high plasma fibrinogen

  1. Plasma Onco-Immunotherapy: Novel Approach to Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridman, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    Presentation is reviewing the newest results obtained by researchers of A.J. Drexel Plasma Institute on direct application of non-thermal plasma for direct treatment of different types of cancer by means of specific stimulation of immune system in the frameworks of the so-called onco-immunotherapy. Especial attention is paid to analysis of depth of penetration of different plasma-medical effects, from ROS, RNS, and ions to special biological signaling and immune system related processes. General aspects of the plasma-stimulation of immune system are discussed, pointing out specific medical applications. Most of experiments have been carried out using nanosecond pulsed DBD at low power and relatively low level of treatment doses, guaranteeing non-damage no-toxicity treatment regime. The nanosecond pulsed DBD physics is discussed mostly regarding its space uniformity and control of plasma parameters relevant to plasma medical treatment, and especially relevant to depth of penetration of different plasma medical effects. Detailed mechanism of the plasma-induced onco-immunotherapy has been suggested based upon preliminary in-vitro experiments with DBD treatment of different cancer cells. Sub-elements of this mechanism related to activation of macrophages and dendritic cells, specific stressing of cancer cells and the immunogenic cell death (ICD) are to be discussed based on results of corresponding in-vitro experiments. In-vivo experiments focused on the plasma-induced onco-immunotherapy were carried out in collaboration with medical doctors from Jefferson University hospital of Philadelphia. Todays achievements and nearest future prospective of clinical test focused on plasma-controlled cancer treatment are discussed in conclusion.

  2. Metrological sharp shooting for plasma proteins and peptides: The need for reference materials for accurate measurements in clinical proteomics and in vitro diagnostics to generate reliable results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitzthum, Frank; Siest, Gérard; Bunk, David M; Preckel, Tobias; Wenz, Christian; Hoerth, Patric; Schulz-Knappe, Peter; Tammen, Harald; Adamkiewicz, Juergen; Merlini, Giampaolo; Anderson, N Leigh

    2007-09-01

    Reliable study results are necessary for the assessment of discoveries, including those from proteomics. Reliable study results are also crucial to increase the likelihood of making a successful choice of biomarker candidates for verification and subsequent validation studies, a current bottleneck for the transition to in vitro diagnostic (IVD). In this respect, a major need for improvement in proteomics appears to be accuracy of measurements, including both trueness and precision of measurement. Standardization and total quality management systems (TQMS) help to provide accurate measurements and reliable results. Reference materials are an essential part of standardization and TQMS in IVD and are crucial to provide metrological correct measurements and for the overall quality assurance process. In this article we give an overview on how reference materials are defined, prepared and what role they play in standardization and TQMS to support the generation of reliable results. We discuss how proteomics can support the establishment of reference materials and biomarker tests for IVD applications, how current reference materials used in IVD may be beneficially applied in proteomics, and we provide considerations on the establishment of reference materials specific for proteomics. For clarity, we solely focus on reference materials related to serum and plasma. PMID:21136754

  3. Plasma membrane proteome analysis of the early effect of alcohol on liver:implications for alcoholic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lijun Zhang; Ye Zheng; Pengyuan Yang; Zhenghong Yuan; Xiaofang Jia; Yanling Feng; Xia Peng; Zhiyong Zhang; Wenjiang Zhou; Zhanqing Zhang; Fang Ma; Xiaohui Liu

    2011-01-01

    In humans, the over-consumption of alcohol can lead to serious liver disease. To examine the early effects of alcohol on liver disease, rats were given sufficient ethanol to develop liver cirrhosis. Rats before the onset of fibrosis were studied in this work. Plasma membranes (PM) of liver were extracted by twice sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The proteome profiles of PM from ethanol-treated rats and the controls were analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) tech-nology. Ethanol treatment altered the amount of 15 differ-ent liver proteins: 10 of them were detected by 2-DE and 5 by iTRAQ. Keratin 8 was detected by both methods.Gene ontology analysis of these differentially detected proteins indicated that most of them were involved in important cell functions such as binding activity (includ-ing ion, DNA, ATP binding, etc.), cell structure, or enzyme activity. Among these, annexin A2, keratin 8, and keratin 18 were further verified using western blot analy-sis and annexin A2 was verified by immunohistochemis-try. Our results suggested that alcohol has the potential to affect cell structure, adhesion and enzyme activity by altering expression levels of several relevant proteins in the PM. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time to study the effect of alcohol on the liver PM pro-teome and it might be helpful for understanding the poss-ible mechanisms of alcohol-induced liver disease.

  4. Proteins with altered levels in plasma from glioblastoma patients as revealed by iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Gautam

    Full Text Available Glioblastomas (GBMs are the most common and lethal primary tumors of the central nervous system with high level of recurrence despite aggressive therapy. Tumor-associated proteins/peptides may appear in the plasma of these patients as a result of disruption of the blood-brain barrier in them, raising the scope for development of plasma-based tests for diagnosis and monitoring the disease. With this objective, we analyzed the levels of proteins present in the plasma from GBM patients using an iTRAQ based LC-MS/MS approach. Analysis with pooled plasma specimens from the patient and healthy control samples revealed high confidence identification of 296 proteins, of which 61 exhibited a fold-change ≥1.5 in the patient group. Forty-eight of them contained signal sequence. A majority have been reported in the differentially expressed transcript or protein profile of GBM tissues; 6 have been previously studied as plasma biomarkers for GBM and 16 for other types of cancers. Altered levels of three representative proteins-ferritin light chain (FTL, S100A9, and carnosinase 1 (CNDP1-were verified by ELISA in a test set of ten individual plasma specimens. FTL is an inflammation marker also implicated in cancer, S100A9 is an important member of the Ca(2+ signaling cascade reported to be altered in GBM tissue, and CNDP1 has been reported for its role in the regulation of the levels of carnosine, implicated as a potential drug for GBM. These and other proteins in the dataset may form useful starting points for further clinical investigations for the development of plasma-based biomarker panels for GBM.

  5. Unique proteomic signature for radiation sensitive patients; a comparative study between normo-sensitive and radiation sensitive breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skiöld, Sara [Center for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wernner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Azimzadeh, Omid [Institute of Radiation Biology, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Helmholtz Zentrum München (Germany); Merl-Pham, Juliane [Research Unit Protein Science, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Neuherberg (Germany); Naslund, Ingemar; Wersall, Peter; Lidbrink, Elisabet [Division of Radiotherapy, Radiumhemmet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Tapio, Soile [Institute of Radiation Biology, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Helmholtz Zentrum München (Germany); Harms-Ringdahl, Mats [Center for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wernner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Haghdoost, Siamak, E-mail: Siamak.Haghdoost@su.se [Center for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wernner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • The unique protein expression profiles were found that separate radiosensitive from normal sensitive breast cancer patients. • The oxidative stress response, coagulation properties and acute phase response suggested to be the hallmarks of radiation sensitivity. - Abstract: Radiation therapy is a cornerstone of modern cancer treatment. Understanding the mechanisms behind normal tissue sensitivity is essential in order to minimize adverse side effects and yet to prevent local cancer reoccurrence. The aim of this study was to identify biomarkers of radiation sensitivity to enable personalized cancer treatment. To investigate the mechanisms behind radiation sensitivity a pilot study was made where eight radiation-sensitive and nine normo-sensitive patients were selected from a cohort of 2914 breast cancer patients, based on acute tissue reactions after radiation therapy. Whole blood was sampled and irradiated in vitro with 0, 1, or 150 mGy followed by 3 h incubation at 37 °C. The leukocytes of the two groups were isolated, pooled and protein expression profiles were investigated using isotope-coded protein labeling method (ICPL). First, leukocytes from the in vitro irradiated whole blood from normo-sensitive and extremely sensitive patients were compared to the non-irradiated controls. To validate this first study a second ICPL analysis comparing only the non-irradiated samples was conducted. Both approaches showed unique proteomic signatures separating the two groups at the basal level and after doses of 1 and 150 mGy. Pathway analyses of both proteomic approaches suggest that oxidative stress response, coagulation properties and acute phase response are hallmarks of radiation sensitivity supporting our previous study on oxidative stress response. This investigation provides unique characteristics of radiation sensitivity essential for individualized radiation therapy.

  6. Unique proteomic signature for radiation sensitive patients; a comparative study between normo-sensitive and radiation sensitive breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The unique protein expression profiles were found that separate radiosensitive from normal sensitive breast cancer patients. • The oxidative stress response, coagulation properties and acute phase response suggested to be the hallmarks of radiation sensitivity. - Abstract: Radiation therapy is a cornerstone of modern cancer treatment. Understanding the mechanisms behind normal tissue sensitivity is essential in order to minimize adverse side effects and yet to prevent local cancer reoccurrence. The aim of this study was to identify biomarkers of radiation sensitivity to enable personalized cancer treatment. To investigate the mechanisms behind radiation sensitivity a pilot study was made where eight radiation-sensitive and nine normo-sensitive patients were selected from a cohort of 2914 breast cancer patients, based on acute tissue reactions after radiation therapy. Whole blood was sampled and irradiated in vitro with 0, 1, or 150 mGy followed by 3 h incubation at 37 °C. The leukocytes of the two groups were isolated, pooled and protein expression profiles were investigated using isotope-coded protein labeling method (ICPL). First, leukocytes from the in vitro irradiated whole blood from normo-sensitive and extremely sensitive patients were compared to the non-irradiated controls. To validate this first study a second ICPL analysis comparing only the non-irradiated samples was conducted. Both approaches showed unique proteomic signatures separating the two groups at the basal level and after doses of 1 and 150 mGy. Pathway analyses of both proteomic approaches suggest that oxidative stress response, coagulation properties and acute phase response are hallmarks of radiation sensitivity supporting our previous study on oxidative stress response. This investigation provides unique characteristics of radiation sensitivity essential for individualized radiation therapy

  7. A comparative proteomic study of plasma in feline pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis to identify diagnostic biomarkers: A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Meachem, Melissa D.; Snead, Elisabeth R.; Kidney, Beverly A.; Jackson, Marion L.; Dickinson, Ryan; Larson, Victoria; Simko, Elemir

    2015-01-01

    While pancreatitis is now recognized as a common ailment in cats, the diagnosis remains challenging due to discordant results and suboptimal sensitivity of ultrasound and specific feline pancreatic lipase (Spec fPL) assay. Pancreatitis also shares similar clinical features with pancreatic carcinoma, a rare but aggressive disease with a grave prognosis. The objective of this pilot study was to compare the plasma proteomes of normal healthy cats (n = 6), cats with pancreatitis (n = 6), and cats...

  8. Low Temperature Plasma Kills SCaBER Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barekzi, Nazir; van Way, Lucas; Laroussi, Mounir

    2013-09-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder is a rare type of bladder cancer that forms as a result of chronic irritation of the epithelial lining of the bladder. The cell line used in this study is SCaBER (ATCC® HTB-3™) derived from squamous cell carcinoma of the human urinary bladder. Current treatments of bladder cancer include surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. However, the cost of these treatments, the potential toxicity of the chemotherapeutic agents and the systemic side-effects warrant an alternative to current cancer treatment. This paper represents preliminary studies to determine the effects of biologically tolerant plasma (BTP) on a cell line of human bladder cancer cells. Previous work by our group using the plasma pencil revealed the efficacy of BTP on leukemia cells suspended in solution. Based on these earlier findings we hypothesized that the plasma exposure would elicit a similar programmed cell death in the SCaBER cells. Trypan blue exclusion and MTT assays revealed the cell killing after exposure to BTP. Our study indicates that low temperature plasma generated by ionizing helium gas and the reactive species may be a suitable and safe alternative for cancer therapy.

  9. Integrated Proteomic and Glycoproteomic Analyses of Prostate Cancer Cells Reveal Glycoprotein Alteration in Protein Abundance and Glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Punit; Wang, Xiangchun; Yang, Weiming; Toghi Eshghi, Shadi; Sun, Shisheng; Hoti, Naseruddin; Chen, Lijun; Yang, Shuang; Pasay, Jered; Rubin, Abby; Zhang, Hui

    2015-10-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men in the U.S. and worldwide, and androgen-deprivation therapy remains the principal treatment for patients. Although a majority of patients initially respond to androgen-deprivation therapy, most will eventually develop castration resistance. An increased understanding of the mechanisms that underline the pathogenesis of castration resistance is therefore needed to develop novel therapeutics. LNCaP and PC3 prostate cancer cell lines are models for androgen-dependence and androgen-independence, respectively. Herein, we report the comparative analysis of these two prostate cancer cell lines using integrated global proteomics and glycoproteomics. Global proteome profiling of the cell lines using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling and two- dimensional (2D) liquid chromatography-tandem MS (LC-MS/MS) led to the quantification of 8063 proteins. To analyze the glycoproteins, glycosite-containing peptides were isolated from the same iTRAQ-labeled peptides from the cell lines using solid phase extraction followed by LC-MS/MS analysis. Among the 1810 unique N-linked glycosite-containing peptides from 653 identified N-glycoproteins, 176 glycoproteins were observed to be different between the two cell lines. A majority of the altered glycoproteins were also observed with changes in their global protein expression levels. However, alterations in 21 differentially expressed glycoproteins showed no change at the protein abundance level, indicating that the glycosylation site occupancy was different between the two cell lines. To determine the glycosylation heterogeneity at specific glycosylation sites, we further identified and quantified 1145 N-linked glycopeptides with attached glycans in the same iTRAQ-labeled samples. These intact glycopeptides contained 67 glycan compositions and showed increased fucosylation in PC3 cells in several of the examined glycosylation sites. The increase in

  10. Lymph is not a Plasma Ultrafiltrate: A Proteomic Analysis of Injured Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dzieciatkowska, Monika; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Moore, Ernest E; Wohlauer, Max; Banerjee, Anirban; Silliman, Christopher C.; Hansen, Kirk C.

    2014-01-01

    Studies on animal models have documented a role for the water soluble protein fraction of mesenteric lymph as a conduit from hemorrhagic shock to acute lung injury and post-injury multiple organ failure. We hypothesize that mesenteric lymph is not an ultrafiltrate of plasma and contains specific protein mediators that may predispose patients to ALI/MOF. Mesenteric lymph and plasma were collected from critically ill or injured patients and from nine patients with lymphatic injuries, during sem...

  11. Industrial-scale proteomics: from liters of plasma to chemically synthesized proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Keith; Bougueleret, Lydie; Baussant, Thierry; Böhm, Günter; Botti, Paolo; Colinge, Jacques; Cusin, Isabelle; Gaertner, Hubert; Gleizes, Anne; Heller, Manfred; Jimenez, Silvia; Johnson, Andrew; Kussmann, Martin; Menin, Laure; Menzel, Christoph; Ranno, Frederic; Rodriguez-Tomé, Patricia; Rogers, John; Saudrais, Cedric; Villain, Matteo; Wetmore, Diana; Bairoch, Amos; Hochstrasser, Denis

    2004-07-01

    Human blood plasma is a useful source of proteins associated with both health and disease. Analysis of human blood plasma is a challenge due to the large number of peptides and proteins present and the very wide range of concentrations. In order to identify as many proteins as possible for subsequent comparative studies, we developed an industrial-scale (2.5 liter) approach involving sample pooling for the analysis of smaller proteins (M(r) generally < ca. 40 000 and some fragments of very large proteins). Plasma from healthy males was depleted of abundant proteins (albumin and IgG), then smaller proteins and polypeptides were separated into 12 960 fractions by chromatographic techniques. Analysis of proteins and polypeptides was performed by mass spectrometry prior to and after enzymatic digestion. Thousands of peptide identifications were made, permitting the identification of 502 different proteins and polypeptides from a single pool, 405 of which are listed here. The numbers refer to chromatographically separable polypeptide entities present prior to digestion. Combining results from studies with other plasma pools we have identified over 700 different proteins and polypeptides in plasma. Relatively low abundance proteins such as leptin and ghrelin and peptides such as bradykinin, all invisible to two-dimensional gel technology, were clearly identified. Proteins of interest were synthesized by chemical methods for bioassays. We believe that this is the first time that the small proteins in human blood plasma have been separated and analyzed so extensively. PMID:15221774

  12. Proteomic analysis of gastric cancer and immunoblot validation of potential biomarkers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nina Ko(c)evar; Federico Odreman; Alessandro Vindigni; Snje(z)ana Frkovi(c) Grazio; Radovan Komel

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To search for and validate differentially expressed proteins in patients with gastric adenocarcinoma.METHODS:We used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry to search for differentially expressed proteins in patients with gastric adenocarcinoma.A set of proteins was validated with immunoblotting.RESULTS:We identified 30 different proteins involved in various biological processes:metabolism,development,death,response to stress,cell cycle,cell communication,transport,and cell motility.Eight proteinswere chosen for further validation by immunoblotting.Our results show that gastrokine-1,39S ribosomal protein L12 (mitochondrial precursor),plasma cell-induced resident endoplasmic reticulum protein,and glutathione S-transferase mu 3 were significantly underexpressed in gastric adenocarcinoma relative to adjacent non-tumor tissue samples.On the other hand,septin-2,ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 N,and transaldolase were significantly overexpressed.Translationally controlled tumor protein was shown to be differentially expressed only in patients with cancer of the gastric cardia/esophageal border.CONCLUSION:This work presents a set of possible diagnostic biomarkers,validated for the first time.It might contribute to the efforts of understanding gastric cancer carcinogenesis.

  13. Comparative Proteomics Study on Human High-metastatic Large Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines Before and After Transfecting with nm23-H1 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwei GAO

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective As a tumor metastasis suppressor gene, the functions of nm23-H1 gene are still unclear. The aim of this study is to better understand the mechanism of lung cancer metastasis and to find new biomarkers for early diagnosis and new target for therapy by conducting comparative proteomics between the human high-metastatic large cell lung cancer cell lines (L9981 and L9981-nm23-H1 (constructed with transfecting nm23-H1 gene into the L9981 cell line. Methods The total proteins of L9981 and L9981-nm23-H1 were separated by immobilized pH gradient (IPG-based 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE; the significantly differently expressed proteins were examined by mass spectrometry and analyzed by bioinformatics. Results It was observed that nm23-H1 gene transfection caused remarkable changes of the proteome of L9981 compared with L9981-nm23-H1 cells: 5 proteins were deleted, 9 proteins appeared, 16 proteins downregulated, and 12 proteins up-regulated. These proteins are involved in cell framework, signal transduction, metabolism, proliferation and metastasis. Conclusion After nm23-H1 gene is transfected into L9981, proteome in L9981 is remarkably changed. These changes of the proteome could serve as a basis for reversing the invasive and metastatic phenotype in lung cancer and elucidating the machanisms of the metastasis of lung cancer.

  14. Application of Proteomics in the Search for Novel Proteins Associated with the Anti - cancer Effect of the Synthetic Cyclin - dependent Kinases Inhibitor, Bohemine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovářová, Hana; Halada, Petr; Man, P.; Dzubak, P.; Hajduch, M.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 4 (2002), s. 247-256. ISSN 1533-0346 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/02/0475; GA ČR GA303/02/0875; GA AV ČR KSK5052113 Keywords : anti cancer effect * proteomics Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology

  15. Targeting the cancer cell cycle by cold atmospheric plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volotskova, O.; Hawley, T. S.; Stepp, M. A.; Keidar, M.

    2012-09-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP), a technology based on quasi-neutral ionized gas at low temperatures, is currently being evaluated as a new highly selective alternative addition to existing cancer therapies. Here, we present a first attempt to identify the mechanism of CAP action. CAP induced a robust ~2-fold G2/M increase in two different types of cancer cells with different degrees of tumorigenicity. We hypothesize that the increased sensitivity of cancer cells to CAP treatment is caused by differences in the distribution of cancer cells and normal cells within the cell cycle. The expression of γH2A.X (pSer139), an oxidative stress reporter indicating S-phase damage, is enhanced specifically within CAP treated cells in the S phase of the cell cycle. Together with a significant decrease in EdU-incorporation after CAP, these data suggest that tumorigenic cancer cells are more susceptible to CAP treatment.

  16. Proteomics tools reveal startlingly high amounts of oxytocin in plasma and serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandtzaeg, Ole Kristian; Johnsen, Elin; Roberg-Larsen, Hanne; Seip, Knut Fredrik; MacLean, Evan L; Gesquiere, Laurence R; Leknes, Siri; Lundanes, Elsa; Wilson, Steven Ray

    2016-01-01

    The neuropeptide oxytocin (OT) is associated with a plethora of social behaviors, and is a key topic at the intersection of psychology and biology. However, tools for measuring OT are still not fully developed. We describe a robust nano liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS) platform for measuring the total amount of OT in human plasma/serum. OT binds strongly to plasma proteins, but a reduction/alkylation (R/A) procedure breaks this bond, enabling ample detection of total OT. The method (R/A + robust nanoLC-MS) was used to determine total OT plasma/serum levels to startlingly high concentrations (high pg/mL-ng/mL). Similar results were obtained when combining R/A and ELISA. Compared to measuring free OT, measuring total OT can have advantages in e.g. biomarker studies. PMID:27528413

  17. Proteomics tools reveal startlingly high amounts of oxytocin in plasma and serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandtzaeg, Ole Kristian; Johnsen, Elin; Roberg-Larsen, Hanne; Seip, Knut Fredrik; MacLean, Evan L.; Gesquiere, Laurence R.; Leknes, Siri; Lundanes, Elsa; Wilson, Steven Ray

    2016-01-01

    The neuropeptide oxytocin (OT) is associated with a plethora of social behaviors, and is a key topic at the intersection of psychology and biology. However, tools for measuring OT are still not fully developed. We describe a robust nano liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS) platform for measuring the total amount of OT in human plasma/serum. OT binds strongly to plasma proteins, but a reduction/alkylation (R/A) procedure breaks this bond, enabling ample detection of total OT. The method (R/A + robust nanoLC-MS) was used to determine total OT plasma/serum levels to startlingly high concentrations (high pg/mL-ng/mL). Similar results were obtained when combining R/A and ELISA. Compared to measuring free OT, measuring total OT can have advantages in e.g. biomarker studies. PMID:27528413

  18. Evaluating the potential of a novel oral lesion exudate collection method coupled with mass spectrometry-based proteomics for oral cancer biomarker discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kooren Joel A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Early diagnosis of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC increases the survival rate of oral cancer. For early diagnosis, molecular biomarkers contained in samples collected non-invasively and directly from at-risk oral premalignant lesions (OPMLs would be ideal. Methods In this pilot study we evaluated the potential of a novel method using commercial PerioPaper absorbent strips for non-invasive collection of oral lesion exudate material coupled with mass spectrometry-based proteomics for oral cancer biomarker discovery. Results Our evaluation focused on three core issues. First, using an "on-strip" processing method, we found that protein can be isolated from exudate samples in amounts compatible with large-scale mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis. Second, we found that the OPML exudate proteome was distinct from that of whole saliva, while being similar to the OPML epithelial cell proteome, demonstrating the fidelity of our exudate collection method. Third, in a proof-of-principle study, we identified numerous, inflammation-associated proteins showing an expected increase in abundance in OPML exudates compared to healthy oral tissue exudates. These results demonstrate the feasibility of identifying differentially abundant proteins from exudate samples, which is essential for biomarker discovery studies. Conclusions Collectively, our findings demonstrate that our exudate collection method coupled with mass spectrometry-based proteomics has great potential for transforming OSCC biomarker discovery and clinical diagnostics assay development.

  19. Plasma proteomics shows an elevation of the anti-inflammatory protein APOA-IV in chronic equine laminitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steelman Samantha M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Equine laminitis is a devastating disease that causes severe pain in afflicted horses and places a major economic burden on the horse industry. In acute laminitis, the disintegration of the dermal-epidermal junction can cause the third phalanx to detach from the hoof wall, leaving the horse unable to bear weight on the affected limbs. Horses that survive the acute phase transition into a chronic form of laminitis, which is often termed “founder”. Some evidence suggests that chronic laminar inflammation might be associated with alterations in the endocrine and immune systems. We investigated this broad hypothesis by using DIGE to assess global differences in the plasma proteome between horses with chronic laminitis and controls. Results We identified 16 differentially expressed proteins; the majority of these were involved in the interrelated coagulation, clotting, and kininogen cascades. Clinical testing of functional coagulation parameters in foundered horses revealed a slight delay in prothrombin (PT clotting time, although most other indices were within normal ranges. Upregulation of the intestinal apolipoprotein APOA-IV in horses with chronic laminitis was confirmed by western blot. Conclusions Our results support the hypothesis that localized laminar inflammation may be linked to systemic alterations in immune regulation, particularly in the gastrointestinal system. Gastrointestinal inflammation has been implicated in the development of acute laminitis but has not previously been associated with chronic laminitis.

  20. Application of a global proteomic approach to archival precursor lesions: deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 and tissue transglutaminase 2 are upregulated in pancreatic cancer precursors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheung, Wang; Darfler, Marlene M; Alvarez, Hector;

    2008-01-01

    of invasive cancer. Biomarker discovery in precursor lesions has been hampered by the ready availability of fresh specimens, and limited yields of proteins suitable for large scale screening. METHODS: We utilized Liquid Tissue, a novel technique for protein extraction from archival formalin-fixed material...... their overexpression in IPMNs. CONCLUSION: Global proteomics analysis using the Liquid Tissue workflow is a feasible approach for unbiased biomarker discovery in limited archival material, particularly applicable to precursor lesions of cancer....

  1. Plasma alkylresorcinols, biomarkers of whole-grain wheat and rye intake, and incidence of colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyrø, Cecilie; Olsen, Anja; Landberg, Rikard;

    2014-01-01

    between alkylresorcinols, biomarkers of whole-grain rye and wheat intake, and colorectal cancer incidence were investigated using prediagnostic plasma samples from colorectal cancer case patients and matched control subjects nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition...

  2. Proteomic biomarker discovery in 1000 human plasma samples with mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cominetti, Ornella; Núñez Galindo, Antonio; Corthésy, John; Oller Moreno, Sergio; Irincheeva, Irina; Valsesia, Armand; Astrup, Arne; Saris, Wim H M; Hager, Jörg; Kussmann, Martin; Dayon, Loïc

    2016-01-01

    quality of the MS data and provided descriptive statistics. The data set was interrogated for proteins with most stable expression levels in that set of plasma samples. We evaluated standard clinical variables that typically impact forthcoming results and assessed body mass index-associated and gender...

  3. Use of proteomics and HPLC to screen plasma for markers of millimeter wave overexposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent development of commercial and military technologies for communication, automotive, weapon detection, and non-lethal weapon applications has led to wider use of millimeter wave (MMW) generating sources, some of which utilize increasingly higher power outputs. As more of these systems are employed in the field, maintenance technicians and operators may face a greater risk of overexposure. Currently, no known markers exist for diagnosis of MMW exposure, particularly in cases with no overt thermal skin injury. The purpose of this study was to screen plasma proteins to determine the presence of unique markers of MMW heating. Rats were anesthetized and then either sham exposed or exposed to environmental heating (EH) or MMWs at 35-GHz until colonic temperatures reached 42 deg C. Animals were allowed to recover and plasma was collected at 6 and 24 hr after exposure. Plasma proteins were separated using 2-D gel electrophoresis and images of silver stained gels were analyzed manually to identify proteins that were up-regulated following MMW treatment. Comparison of the 2-D gels shows a pattern in which several protein spots increased in intensity at 24 hr post-exposure for MMW heating with the most obvious changes in the range of 30-50 kD. These changes were not observed in plasma from EH treated rats indicating the existence of MMW specific markers and different biological responses to these two forms of heating. In order to detect changes in the 6 hr post-exposure samples, size exclusion chromatography and reverse phase HPLC were also used to separate proteins into fractions ranging from 1-700 kD. Chromatograms show quantitative protein differences, particularly in the ranges of 40-50 kD and 180-200 kD. Final identification of these potential plasma markers is in progress and is expected to allow further development of targets for diagnosis and therapeutic interventions to improve standards for protection and treatment of personnel

  4. Periostin identified as a potential biomarker of prostate cancer by iTRAQ-proteomics analysis of prostate biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Shijun

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteomics may help us better understand the changes of multiple proteins involved in oncogenesis and progression of prostate cancer(PCa and identify more diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. The aim of this study was to screen biomarkers of PCa by the proteomics analysis using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification(iTRAQ. Methods The patients undergoing prostate biopsies were classified into 3 groups according to pathological results: benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH, n = 20, PCa(n = 20 and BPH with local prostatic intraepithelial neoplasm(PIN, n = 10. Then, all the specimens from these patients were analyzed by iTRAQ and two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (2DLC-MS/MS. The Gene Ontology(GO function and the transcription regulation networks of the differentially expressed were analyzed by MetaCore software. Western blotting and Immunohistochemical staining were used to analyze the interesting proteins. Result A total of 760 proteins were identified from 13787 distinct peptides, including two common proteins that enjoy clinical application: prostate specific antigen (PSA and prostatic acid phosphatase(PAP. Proteins that expressed differentially between PCa and BPH group were further analyzed. Compared with BPH, 20 proteins were significantly differentially up-regulated (>1.5-fold while 26 were significantly down-regulated in PCa( Conclusion Our study indicates that the iTRAQ technology is a new strategy for global proteomics analysis of the tissues of PCa. A significant up-regulation of periostin in PCa compared to BPH may provide clues for not only a promising biomarker for the prognosis of PCa but also a potential target for therapeutical intervention.

  5. Proteomics Analysis of Cancer Exosomes Using a Novel Modified Aptamer-based Array (SOMAscanTM) Platform*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Jason; Stone, Timothy C.; Katilius, Evaldas; Smith, Breanna C.; Gordon, Bridget; Mason, Malcolm D.; Tabi, Zsuzsanna; Brewis, Ian A.; Clayton, Aled

    2014-01-01

    We have used a novel affinity-based proteomics technology to examine the protein signature of small secreted extracellular vesicles called exosomes. The technology uses a new class of protein binding reagents called SOMAmers® (slow off-rate modified aptamers) and allows the simultaneous precise measurement of over 1000 proteins. Exosomes were highly purified from the Du145 prostate cancer cell line, by pooling selected fractions from a continuous sucrose gradient (within the density range of 1.1 to 1.2 g/ml), and examined under standard conditions or with additional detergent treatment by the SOMAscanTM array (version 3.0). Lysates of Du145 cells were also prepared, and the profiles were compared. Housekeeping proteins such as cyclophilin-A, LDH, and Hsp70 were present in exosomes, and we identified almost 100 proteins that were enriched in exosomes relative to cells. These included proteins of known association with cancer exosomes such as MFG-E8, integrins, and MET, and also those less widely reported as exosomally associated, such as ROR1 and ITIH4. Several proteins with no previously known exosomal association were confirmed as exosomally expressed in experiments using individual SOMAmer® reagents or antibodies in micro-plate assays. Western blotting confirmed the SOMAscanTM-identified enrichment of exosomal NOTCH-3, L1CAM, RAC1, and ADAM9. In conclusion, we describe here over 300 proteins of hitherto unknown association with prostate cancer exosomes and suggest that the SOMAmer®-based assay technology is an effective proteomics platform for exosome-associated biomarker discovery in diverse clinical settings. PMID:24505114

  6. Selective killing of ovarian cancer cells through induction of apoptosis by nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two independent ovarian cancer cell lines and fibroblast controls were treated with nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP). Most ovarian cancer cells were detached from the culture dish by continuous plasma treatment to a single spot on the dish. Next, the plasma source was applied over the whole dish using a robot arm. In vitro cell proliferation assays showed that plasma treatments significantly decreased proliferation rates of ovarian cancer cells compared to fibroblast cells. Flow cytometry and western blot analysis showed that plasma treatment of ovarian cancer cells induced apoptosis. NEAPP could be a promising tool for therapy for ovarian cancers.

  7. Cold Atmospheric Plasma as an alternative therapy for cancer therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volotskova, Olga; Hawley, Teresa; Stepp, Mary Ann; Keidar, Michael

    2012-10-01

    CAP (cold atmospheric plasma) is a technology, which is based on quasi-neutral ionized gas (plasma at low temperatures), which is being evaluated as an alternative or addition to existing cancer therapies. A recent study shows that CAP treatment can cause a significant reduction in tumor size in vivo. Thus the purpose of this study is to begin to identify the mechanism by which cancer cells are killed by CAP, i.e. to identify the mechanism of CAP action. CAP induced a robust ˜2-fold G2/M increase in two different types of cancer cells with different degrees of tumorigenicity. We hypothesize that the increased sensitivity of cancer cells to CAP treatment is caused by differences in the distribution of cancer cells and normal cells within the cell cycle. The expression of γH2A.X (pSer139), an oxidative stress reporter indicating S-phase damage, is enhanced specifically within CAP treated cells in the S phase of the cell cycle together with significant decrease in EdU-signal of DNA-replicating cells. Our data suggest that more tumorigenic cancer cells are better susceptible to CAP treatment.

  8. Saliva and plasma TIMP-1 in patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holten-Andersen, Lars; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Jensen, Siri Beier;

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims. A prospective cross-sectional study was designed to test if total levels of TIMP-1 in saliva and plasma correlated with the diagnosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) in a population with symptoms consistent with this disease. Materials and methods. Stimulated whole saliva and blood...... plasma to determine total levels of TIMP-1. Results. Fifty-six of the patients (35%) were diagnosed with CRC. Plasma TIMP-1 levels were significantly elevated in CRC patients compared with patients with other, non-malignant diseases and individuals without disease. Significant differences in saliva TIMP......-1 levels between CRC patients and individuals without CRC could not be demonstrated. In addition, no correlation was found between levels of TIMP-1 in plasma and saliva. Conclusion. Total levels of TIMP-1 in saliva do not reflect the presence of CRC, and TIMP-1 saliva measurements thus cannot...

  9. Plasma membrane calcium pumps and their emerging roles in cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarah; J; Roberts-Thomson; Merril; C; Curry; Gregory; R; Monteith

    2010-01-01

    Alterations in calcium signaling and/or the expression of calcium pumps and channels are an increasingly recognized property of some cancer cells.Alterations in the expression of plasma membrane calcium ATPase(PMCA) isoforms have been reported in a variety of cancer types,including those of breast and colon,with some studies of cancer cell line differentiation identifying specific PMCA isoforms,which may be altered in some cancers.Some studies have also begun to assess levels of PMCA isoforms in clinical tumor samples and to address mechanisms of altered PMCA expression in cancers.Both increases and decreases in PMCA expression have been reported in different cancer types and in many cases these alterations are isoform specific.In this review,we provide an overview of studies investigating the expression of PMCA in cancer and discuss how both the overexpression and reduced expression of a PMCA isoform in a cancer cell could bestow a growth advantage,through augmenting responses to proliferative stimuli or reducing sensitivity to apoptosis.

  10. Proteomic Identification of Novel Differentiation Plasma Protein Markers in Hypobaric Hypoxia-Induced Rat Model

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Yasmin; Sharma, Narendra K.; Ahmad, Mohammad Faiz; Sharma, Manish; Garg, Iti; Bhargava, Kalpana

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypobaric hypoxia causes complex changes in the expression of genes, including stress related genes and corresponding proteins that are necessary to maintain homeostasis. Whereas most prior studies focused on single proteins, newer methods allowing the simultaneous study of many proteins could lead to a better understanding of complex and dynamic changes that occur during the hypobaric hypoxia. Methods In this study we investigated the temporal plasma protein alterations of rat ind...

  11. Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantification-based Comparative Proteomics Reveals the Features of Plasma Membrane-Associated Proteomes of Pollen Grains and Pollen Tubes from Lilium davidii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing Han; Sixue Chen; Shaojun Dai; Ning Yang; Tai Wang

    2010-01-01

    Mature pollen grains (PGs) from most plant species are metabolically quiescent. However, once pollinated onto stigma, they quickly hydrate and germinate. APG can give rise to a vegetative cell-derived polarized pollen tube (PT), which represents a specialized polar cell. The polarized PT grows by the tip and requires interaction of different signaling molecules localized in the apical plasma membrane and active membrane trafficking. The mechanisms underlying the interaction and membrane trafficking are not well understood. In this work, we purified PG and PT plasma-membrane vesicles from Lilium davidii Duch. using the aqueous two-phase partition technique, then enriched plasma membrane proteins by using Brij58 and KCl to remove loosely bound contaminants. We identified 223 integral and membrane-associated proteins in the plasma membrane of PGs and PTs by using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) and 2-D high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. More than 68% of the proteins have putative transmembrane domains and/or lipid-modified motifs. Proteins involved in signal transduction, membrane trafficking and transport are predominant in the plasma-membrane proteome. We revealed most components of the clathrin-dependent endocytosis pathway. Statistical analysis revealed 14 proteins differentially expressed in the two development stages: in PTs, six upregulated and eight downregulated are mainly involved in signaling, transport and membrane trafficking. These results provide novel insights into polarized PT growth.

  12. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa [Institute of Innovation for Future Society, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Mizuno, Masaaki [Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Toyokuni, Shinya [Department of Pathology and Biological Responses, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Maruyama, Shoichi [Department of Nephrology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Kodera, Yasuhiro [Department of Gastroenterological Surgery (Surgery II), Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Terasaki, Hiroko [Department of Ophthalmology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Adachi, Tetsuo [Laboratory of Clinical Pharmaceutics, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, 501-1196 Gifu (Japan); Kato, Masashi [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Kikkawa, Fumitaka [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Hori, Masaru [Institute of Innovation for Future Society, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established.

  13. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-12-01

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established.

  14. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established

  15. Towards an animal model of ovarian cancer: cataloging chicken blood proteins using combinatorial peptide ligand libraries coupled with shotgun proteomic analysis for translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yingying; Sun, Zeyu; de Matos, Ricardo; Zhang, Jing; Odunsi, Kunle; Lin, Biaoyang

    2014-05-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most deadly gynecological cancer around the world, with high morbidity in industrialized countries. Early diagnosis is key in reducing its morbidity rate. Yet, robust biomarkers, diagnostics, and animal models are still limited for ovarian cancer. This calls for broader omics and systems science oriented diagnostics strategies. In this vein, the domestic chicken has been used as an ovarian cancer animal model, owing to its high rate of developing spontaneous epithelial ovarian tumors. Chicken blood has thus been considered a surrogate reservoir from which cancer biomarkers can be identified. However, the presence of highly abundant proteins in chicken blood has compromised the applicability of proteomics tools to study chicken blood owing to a lack of immunodepletion methods. Here, we demonstrate that a combinatorial peptide ligand library (CPLL) can efficiently remove highly abundant proteins from chicken blood samples, consequently doubling the number of identified proteins. Using an integrated CPLL-1DGE-LC-MSMS workflow, we identified a catalog of 264 unique proteins. Functional analyses further suggested that most proteins were coagulation and complement factors, blood transport and binding proteins, immune- and defense-related proteins, proteases, protease inhibitors, cellular enzymes, or cell structure and adhesion proteins. Semiquantitative spectral counting analysis identified 10 potential biomarkers from the present chicken ovarian cancer model. Additionally, many human homologs of chicken blood proteins we have identified have been independently suggested as diagnostic biomarkers for ovarian cancer, further triangulating our novel observations reported here. In conclusion, the CPLL-assisted proteomic workflow using the chicken ovarian cancer model provides a feasible platform for translational research to identify ovarian cancer biomarkers and understand ovarian cancer biology. To the best of our knowledge, we report here

  16. Quantitative proteomic analysis by iTRAQ® for the identification of candidate biomarkers in ovarian cancer serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higgins LeeAnn

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy, with the majority of cases diagnosed at an advanced stage when treatments are less successful. Novel serum protein markers are needed to detect ovarian cancer in its earliest stage; when detected early, survival rates are over 90%. The identification of new serum biomarkers is hindered by the presence of a small number of highly abundant proteins that comprise approximately 95% of serum total protein. In this study, we used pooled serum depleted of the most highly abundant proteins to reduce the dynamic range of proteins, and thereby enhance the identification of serum biomarkers using the quantitative proteomic method iTRAQ®. Results Medium and low abundance proteins from 6 serum pools of 10 patients each from women with serous ovarian carcinoma, and 6 non-cancer control pools were labeled with isobaric tags using iTRAQ® to determine the relative abundance of serum proteins identified by MS. A total of 220 unique proteins were identified and fourteen proteins were elevated in ovarian cancer compared to control serum pools, including several novel candidate ovarian cancer biomarkers: extracellular matrix protein-1, leucine-rich alpha-2 glycoprotein-1, lipopolysaccharide binding protein-1, and proteoglycan-4. Western immunoblotting validated the relative increases in serum protein levels for several of the proteins identified. Conclusions This study provides the first analysis of immunodepleted serum in combination with iTRAQ® to measure relative protein expression in ovarian cancer patients for the pursuit of serum biomarkers. Several candidate biomarkers were identified which warrant further development.

  17. Exosomal Proteome Profiling: A Potential Multi-Marker Cellular Phenotyping Tool to Characterize Hypoxia-Induced Radiation Resistance in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefani N. Thomas

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Radiation and drug resistance are significant challenges in the treatment of locally advanced, recurrent and metastatic breast cancer that contribute to mortality. Clinically, radiotherapy requires oxygen to generate cytotoxic free radicals that cause DNA damage and allow that damage to become fixed in the genome rather than repaired. However, approximately 40% of all breast cancers have hypoxic tumor microenvironments that render cancer cells significantly more resistant to irradiation. Hypoxic stimuli trigger changes in the cell death/survival pathway that lead to increased cellular radiation resistance. As a result, the development of noninvasive strategies to assess tumor hypoxia in breast cancer has recently received considerable attention. Exosomes are secreted nanovesicles that have roles in paracrine signaling during breast tumor progression, including tumor-stromal interactions, activation of proliferative pathways and immunosuppression. The recent development of protocols to isolate and purify exosomes, as well as advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics have facilitated the comprehensive analysis of exosome content and function. Using these tools, studies have demonstrated that the proteome profiles of tumor-derived exosomes are indicative of the oxygenation status of patient tumors. They have also demonstrated that exosome signaling pathways are potentially targetable drivers of hypoxia-dependent intercellular signaling during tumorigenesis. This article provides an overview of how proteomic tools can be effectively used to characterize exosomes and elucidate fundamental signaling pathways and survival mechanisms underlying hypoxia-mediated radiation resistance in breast cancer.

  18. Proteomic evaluation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells after treatment with retinoic acid isomers: Preliminary insights

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Flodrová, Dana; Benkovská, Dagmar; Macejová, D.; Bialešová, L.; Brtko, J.; Bobálová, Janette

    Brno: Ústav analytické chemie AV ČR, v. v. i, 2012 - (Foret, F.; Křenková, J.; Guttman, A.; Klepárník, K.; Boček, P.), s. 146-150 ISBN 978-80-904959-1-3. [CECE 2012. International Interdisciplinary Meeting on Bioanalysis /9./. Brno (CZ), 01.11.2012-02.11.2012] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0182; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB12SK151 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : retinoids * breast cancer * proteomic analysis Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation http://hdl.handle.net/11104/0214569

  19. Forecasting individual breast cancer risk using plasma metabolomics and biocontours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro, Rasmus; Kamstrup-Nielsen, Maja Hermann; Engelsen, Søren Balling;

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a major cause of death for women. To improve treatment, current oncology research focuses on discovering and validating new biomarkers for early detection of cancer; so far with limited success. Metabolic profiling of plasma samples and auxiliary lifestyle information was combined...... by chemometric data fusion. It was possible to create a biocontour, which we define as a complex pattern of relevant biological and phenotypic information. While single markers or known risk factors have close to no predictive value, the developed biocontour provides a forecast which, several years before...

  20. Changes in the plasma proteome at asymptomatic and symptomatic stages of autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muenchhoff, Julia; Poljak, Anne; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Gupta, Veer B; Chatterjee, Pratishtha; Raftery, Mark; Masters, Colin L; Morris, John C; Bateman, Randall J; Fagan, Anne M; Martins, Ralph N; Sachdev, Perminder S

    2016-01-01

    The autosomal dominant form of Alzheimer's disease (ADAD) is far less prevalent than late onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD), but enables well-informed prospective studies, since symptom onset is near certain and age of onset is predictable. Our aim was to discover plasma proteins associated with early AD pathology by investigating plasma protein changes at the asymptomatic and symptomatic stages of ADAD. Eighty-one proteins were compared across asymptomatic mutation carriers (aMC, n = 15), symptomatic mutation carriers (sMC, n = 8) and related noncarriers (NC, n = 12). Proteins were also tested for associations with cognitive measures, brain amyloid deposition and glucose metabolism. Fewer changes were observed at the asymptomatic than symptomatic stage with seven and 16 proteins altered significantly in aMC and sMC, respectively. This included complement components C3, C5, C6, apolipoproteins A-I, A-IV, C-I and M, histidine-rich glycoprotein, heparin cofactor II and attractin, which are involved in inflammation, lipid metabolism and vascular health. Proteins involved in lipid metabolism differed only at the symptomatic stage, whereas changes in inflammation and vascular health were evident at asymptomatic and symptomatic stages. Due to increasing evidence supporting the usefulness of ADAD as a model for LOAD, these proteins warrant further investigation into their potential association with early stages of LOAD. PMID:27381087

  1. Plasma oestrogens in postmenopausal women with endometrial cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyholm, H C; Nielsen, Anette Lynge; Lyndrup, J; Dreisler, A; Hagen, C; Haug, E

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study plasma levels of estrogens and androgens, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) in postmenopausal patients with endometrial cancer. DESIGN: Patients and controls were matched for age, body mass index, parity and years since menopause. SETTING...... negatively (P < 0.001) with body mass, while the free fractions of oestradiol and testosterone correlated positively (P < 0.01) with body mass, in both patients and controls. Multiple regression analysis showed that the differences in oestrogen levels between the two groups persisted when controlling for the...... effect of body mass, age, years since menopause, parity, and levels of SHBG and FSH. CONCLUSION: Patients with endometrial cancer exhibit increased plasma levels of oestradiol and oestrone. Speculatively, these oestrogens may result from an increased oestrone conversion from androstenedione, an increased...

  2. Glycosylation of plasma IgG in colorectal cancer prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Evropi Theodoratou; Kujtim Thaçi; Felix Agakov; Timofeeva, Maria N.; Jerko Štambuk; Maja Pučić-Baković; Frano Vučković; Peter Orchard; Anna Agakova; DIN, FARHAT V. N.; Ewan Brown; Rudd, Pauline M; Susan M. Farrington; Dunlop, Malcolm G; Harry Campbell

    2016-01-01

    In this study we demonstrate the potential value of Immunoglobulin G (IgG) glycosylation as a novel prognostic biomarker of colorectal cancer (CRC). We analysed plasma IgG glycans in 1229 CRC patients and correlated with survival outcomes. We assessed the predictive value of clinical algorithms and compared this to algorithms that also included glycan predictors. Decreased galactosylation, decreased sialylation (of fucosylated IgG glycan structures) and increased bisecting GlcNAc in IgG glyca...

  3. Plasma AR and abiraterone-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanel, Alessandro; Gasi Tandefelt, Delila; Conteduca, Vincenza; Jayaram, Anuradha; Casiraghi, Nicola; Wetterskog, Daniel; Salvi, Samanta; Amadori, Dino; Zafeiriou, Zafeiris; Rescigno, Pasquale; Bianchini, Diletta; Gurioli, Giorgia; Casadio, Valentina; Carreira, Suzanne; Goodall, Jane; Wingate, Anna; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Tunariu, Nina; Flohr, Penny; De Giorgi, Ugo; de Bono, Johann S; Demichelis, Francesca; Attard, Gerhardt

    2015-11-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) gene aberrations are rare in prostate cancer before primary hormone treatment but emerge with castration resistance. To determine AR gene status using a minimally invasive assay that could have broad clinical utility, we developed a targeted next-generation sequencing approach amenable to plasma DNA, covering all AR coding bases and genomic regions that are highly informative in prostate cancer. We sequenced 274 plasma samples from 97 castration-resistant prostate cancer patients treated with abiraterone at two institutions. We controlled for normal DNA in patients' circulation and detected a sufficiently high tumor DNA fraction to quantify AR copy number state in 217 samples (80 patients). Detection of AR copy number gain and point mutations in plasma were inversely correlated, supported further by the enrichment of nonsynonymous versus synonymous mutations in AR copy number normal as opposed to AR gain samples. Whereas AR copy number was unchanged from before treatment to progression and no mutant AR alleles showed signal for acquired gain, we observed emergence of T878A or L702H AR amino acid changes in 13% of tumors at progression on abiraterone. Patients with AR gain or T878A or L702H before abiraterone (45%) were 4.9 and 7.8 times less likely to have a ≥50 or ≥90% decline in prostate-specific antigen (PSA), respectively, and had a significantly worse overall [hazard ratio (HR), 7.33; 95% confidence interval (CI), 3.51 to 15.34; P = 1.3 × 10(-9)) and progression-free (HR, 3.73; 95% CI, 2.17 to 6.41; P = 5.6 × 10(-7)) survival. Evaluation of plasma AR by next-generation sequencing could identify cancers with primary resistance to abiraterone. PMID:26537258

  4. Genomics, microRNA, epigenetics, and proteomics for future diagnosis, treatment and monitoring response in upper GI cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brücher, Björn L D M; Li, Yan; Schnabel, Philipp; Daumer, Martin; Wallace, Timothy J; Kube, Rainer; Zilberstein, Bruno; Steele, Scott; Voskuil, Jan L A; Jamall, Ijaz S

    2016-12-01

    One major objective for our evolving understanding in the treatment of cancers will be to address how a combination of diagnosis and treatment strategies can be used to integrate patient and tumor variables with an outcome-oriented approach. Such an approach, in a multimodal therapy setting, could identify those patients (1) who should undergo a defined treatment (personalized therapy) (2) in whom modifications of the multimodal therapy due to observed responses might lead to an improvement of the response and/or prognosis (individualized therapy), (3) who might not benefit from a particular toxic treatment regimen, and (4) who could be identified early on and thereby be spared the morbidity associated with such treatments. These strategies could lead in the direction of precision medicine and there is hope of integrating translational molecular data to improve cancer classifications. In order to achieve these goals, it is necessary to understand the key issues in different aspects of biotechnology to anticipate future directions of personalized and individualized diagnosis and multimodal treatment strategies. Providing an overview of translational data in cancers proved to be a challenge as different methods and techniques used to obtain molecular data are used and studies are based on different tumor entities with different tumor biology and prognoses as well as vastly different therapeutic approaches. The pros and cons of the available methodologies and the potential response data in genomics, microRNA, epigenetics and proteomics with a focus on upper gastrointestinal cancers are considered herein to allow for an understanding of where these technologies stand with respect to cancer diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. PMID:27053248

  5. Proteomic identification of protein targets for 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14-prostaglandin J2 in neuronal plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Yamamoto

    Full Text Available 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14-prostaglandin J(2 (15d-PGJ(2 is one of factors contributed to the neurotoxicity of amyloid β (Aβ, a causative protein of Alzheimer's disease. Type 2 receptor for prostaglandin D(2 (DP2 and peroxysome-proliferator activated receptorγ (PPARγ are identified as the membrane receptor and the nuclear receptor for 15d-PGJ(2, respectively. Previously, we reported that the cytotoxicity of 15d-PGJ(2 was independent of DP2 and PPARγ, and suggested that 15d-PGJ(2 induced apoptosis through the novel specific binding sites of 15d-PGJ(2 different from DP2 and PPARγ. To relate the cytotoxicity of 15d-PGJ(2 to amyloidoses, we performed binding assay [(3H]15d-PGJ(2 and specified targets for 15d-PGJ(2 associated with cytotoxicity. In the various cell lines, there was a close correlation between the susceptibilities to 15d-PGJ(2 and fibrillar Aβ. Specific binding sites of [(3H]15d-PGJ(2 were detected in rat cortical neurons and human bronchial smooth muscle cells. When the binding assay was performed in subcellular fractions of neurons, the specific binding sites of [(3H]15d-PGJ(2 were detected in plasma membrane, nuclear and cytosol, but not in microsome. A proteomic approach was used to identify protein targets for 15d-PGJ(2 in the plasma membrane. By using biotinylated 15d-PGJ(2, eleven proteins were identified as biotin-positive spots and classified into three different functional proteins: glycolytic enzymes (Enolase2, pyruvate kinase M1 (PKM1 and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, molecular chaperones (heat shock protein 8 and T-complex protein 1 subunit α, cytoskeletal proteins (Actin β, F-actin-capping protein, Tubulin β and Internexin α. GAPDH, PKM1 and Tubulin β are Aβ-interacting proteins. Thus, the present study suggested that 15d-PGJ(2 plays an important role in amyloidoses not only in the central nervous system but also in the peripheral tissues.

  6. Proteomic Analysis of Circulating Monocytes Identifies Cathepsin D as A Potential Novel Plasma Marker of Acute Coronary Syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando Vivanco; Jesús Egido; José Tuñón; Lorenzo Lopez-Bescos; Gloria Alvarez-Llamas; Julio Jiménez-Narcher; Luis Miguel Blanco-Colio; Jose Luis Martin-Ventura; Fernando de la Cuesta; Verónica M. Dardé; Maria G Barderas

    2008-01-01

    We have performed a proteomic analysis of peripheral blood monocytes from ACS patients in comparison with healthy subjects and stable coronary patients in order to search novel biomarkers of ACS in circulating monocytes. Monocytes were isolated from blood of patients with non-ST elevation ACS (n = 27) at day 0, 2 and 6 months, and from patients with stable coronary disease (n = 10) and matched healthy controls (n = 11). The proteomic analysis of monocytes from ACS patients at day 0 showed ...

  7. Prediagnostic plasma vitamin B6 (pyridoxal 50-phosphate) and survival in patients with colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher plasma pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) levels are associated with a decreased incidence of colorectal cancer, but the influence of plasma PLP on survival of patients with colorectal cancer is unknown. We prospectively examined whether prediagnostic plasma PLP levels are associated with mortality...

  8. Combining phenotypic and proteomic approaches to identify membrane targets in a ‘triple negative’ breast cancer cell type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rust Steven

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The continued discovery of therapeutic antibodies, which address unmet medical needs, requires the continued discovery of tractable antibody targets. Multiple protein-level target discovery approaches are available and these can be used in combination to extensively survey relevant cell membranomes. In this study, the MDA-MB-231 cell line was selected for membranome survey as it is a ‘triple negative’ breast cancer cell line, which represents a cancer subtype that is aggressive and has few treatment options. Methods The MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cell line was used to explore three membranome target discovery approaches, which were used in parallel to cross-validate the significance of identified antigens. A proteomic approach, which used membrane protein enrichment followed by protein identification by mass spectrometry, was used alongside two phenotypic antibody screening approaches. The first phenotypic screening approach was based on hybridoma technology and the second was based on phage display technology. Antibodies isolated by the phenotypic approaches were tested for cell specificity as well as internalisation and the targets identified were compared to each other as well as those identified by the proteomic approach. An anti-CD73 antibody derived from the phage display-based phenotypic approach was tested for binding to other ‘triple negative’ breast cancer cell lines and tested for tumour growth inhibitory activity in a MDA-MB-231 xenograft model. Results All of the approaches identified multiple cell surface markers, including integrins, CD44, EGFR, CD71, galectin-3, CD73 and BCAM, some of which had been previously confirmed as being tractable to antibody therapy. In total, 40 cell surface markers were identified for further study. In addition to cell surface marker identification, the phenotypic antibody screening approaches provided reagent antibodies for target validation studies. This is illustrated

  9. Proteomic analysis of plasma from cows affected with milk fever using two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, C; Zhang, H Y; Wu, L; Xu, C; Zheng, J S; Yan, Y J; Yang, L J; Shu, S

    2012-10-01

    Milk fever is an important metabolic disorder of dairy cows after calving, and is characterized by hypocalcemia, tetany, lateral recumbency, and eventual coma. To date, there have been many reports about the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of milk fever, but the plasma protein profile in milk fever has not been reported. The aim of our study was to investigate novel pathophysiological changes in the plasma proteome of cows affected with milk fever. Plasma samples were collected from eight Holstein cows with milk fever (T), and eight control Holstein cows without milk fever (C), at an intensive Holstein dairy farm in Heilongjiang province, China. Samples were analyzed by fluorescence two-dimensional (2D) differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE), followed by in-gel digestion, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) for peptide mass fingerprinting of selected protein spots. Eight of the 23 differential protein spots in the plasma of T and C cows were isolated and identified by 2D-DIGE and MALDI-TOF-MS. The protein spots represented five unique proteins, and had significant alterations in spot volume as determined by DeCyder differential in-gel analysis (DIA) software. The upregulated proteins were identified as serpin peptidase inhibitor (angiotensin), which regulates blood pressure and maintains fluid and electrolyte homeostasis, and endopin 2B which is involved in neural regulation. The downregulated proteins were serum albumin, which acts as a transport protein, fibrinogen beta chain which is involved in blood coagulation, and IgG heavy-chain C-region (IgG-C(H)) which participates in the immune response. In conclusion, we were able to use proteomic technologies to identify several novel plasma proteins in cows affected with milk fever. These findings may reveal new pathophysiological changes that occur in cows with milk fever. PMID:22119234

  10. Serum Antibodies in Lung Cancer: A proteomics approach in the NELSON trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. de Costa (Dominique)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractLung cancer is currently one of the most common types of cancer with the highest mortality rate (28%) in the world. Eighty to ninety percent of all lung cancer patients are due to smoking. Only 15% of these patients are diagnosed at an early stage and can be operated. Therefore, it is im

  11. Funding Opportunities Available for Innovative SBIR Development - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Does your small business need early-stage financing to take its cancer research to the next level? The National Cancer Institute Small Business Innovation Research (NCI SBIR) Development Center has released $5 million for new contract funding opportunities to support cancer research and technology development in key emerging areas of need.

  12. Plumbagin elicits differential proteomic responses mainly involving cell cycle, apoptosis, autophagy, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition pathways in human prostate cancer PC-3 and DU145 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qui JX

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Jia-Xuan Qiu,1,2 Zhi-Wei Zhou, 3,4 Zhi-Xu He,4 Ruan Jin Zhao,5 Xueji Zhang,6 Lun Yang,7 Shu-Feng Zhou,3,4 Zong-Fu Mao11School of Public Health, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; 4Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering Research Center and Sino-US Joint Laboratory for Medical Sciences, Guiyang Medical University, Guiyang, Guizhou, People’s Republic of China; 5Center for Traditional Chinese Medicine, Sarasota, FL, USA; 6Research Center for Bioengineering and Sensing Technology, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 7Bio-X Institutes, Key Laboratory for the Genetics of Development and Neuropsychiatric Disorders (Ministry of Education, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: Plumbagin (PLB has exhibited a potent anticancer effect in preclinical studies, but the molecular interactome remains elusive. This study aimed to compare the quantitative proteomic responses to PLB treatment in human prostate cancer PC-3 and DU145 cells using the approach of stable-isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC. The data were finally validated using Western blot assay. First, the bioinformatic analysis predicted that PLB could interact with 78 proteins that were involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis, immunity, and signal transduction. Our quantitative proteomic study using SILAC revealed that there were at least 1,225 and 267 proteins interacting with PLB and there were 341 and 107 signaling pathways and cellular functions potentially regulated by PLB in PC-3 and DU145 cells, respectively. These proteins and pathways played a

  13. Notice of Changes to RFA-CA-15-022 and Pre-Application Webinar - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute will hold a public pre-application webinar on Wednesday, January 13, 2016 at 12:00 p.m. (EST) for the Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) RFA-CA-15-022 entitled “Proteogenomic Translational Research Centers for Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (U01).” A major change for RFA-CA-15-022 is the new application due date (now May 11, 2016).

  14. Effect of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet on human breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirpour, Shahriar; Nikkhah, Maryam; Pirouzmand, Somaye; Ghomi, Hamid Reza

    2012-10-01

    Nowadays, Non-thermal plasma enjoy a wide range of applications in biomedical fields such as Sterilization, Wound healing, Cancer treatment and etc. The aim of this paper is to study the effect of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet on breast cancer (MCF-7) cells. In this regard the effect of plasma on death of the cancer cells are explored experimentally. The plasma in this discharge is created by pulsed dc high voltage power supply with repetition rate of several tens of kilohertz which led to the inductively coupled plasma. The pure helium gas were used for formation of the plasma jet. MTT assay were used for quantification of death cells. The results showed that the cells death rate increase with plasma exposure time. This study confirm that plasma jet have significant effect on treatment of human breast cancer cells.

  15. Biomedical Applications of Low Temperature Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas to Cancerous Cell Treatment and Tooth Bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Koo; Kim, Myoung Soo; Byun, June Ho; Kim, Kyong Tai; Kim, Gyoo Cheon; Park, Gan Young

    2011-08-01

    Low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas have attracted great interests and they have been widely applied to biomedical applications to interact with living tissues, cells, and bacteria due to their non-thermal property. This paper reviews the biomedical applications of low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas to cancerous cell treatment and tooth bleaching. Gold nanoparticles conjugated with cancer-specific antibodies have been introduced to cancerous cells to enhance selective killing of cells, and the mechanism of cell apoptosis induced by plasma has been investigated. Tooth exposed to helium plasma jet with hydrogen peroxide has become brighter and the productions of hydroxyl radicals from hydrogen peroxide have been enhanced by plasma exposure.

  16. Peroxiredoxin 2: a potential biomarker for early diagnosis of Hepatitis B Virus related liver fibrosis identified by proteomic analysis of the plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Haijian

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Liver fibrosis is a middle stage in the course of chronic Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection, which will develop into cirrhosis and eventually hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC if not treated at the early stage. Considering the limitations and patients' reluctance to undergo liver biopsy, a reliable, noninvasive diagnostic system to predict and assess treatment and prognosis of liver fibrosis is needed. The aim of this study was to identify biomarkers for early diagnosis of HBV related liver fibrosis. Method Plasma samples from 7 healthy volunteers and 27 HBV infected patients with different stages of fibrosis were selected for 2-DIGE proteomic screening. One-way ANOVA analysis was used to assess differences in protein expression among all groups. The alteration was further confirmed by western blotting. Plasma levels of 25 serological variables in 42 healthy volunteers and 68 patients were measured to establish a decision tree for the detection of various stages fibrosis. Result The up-regulated proteins along with fibrosis progress included fibrinogen, collagen, macroglobulin, hemopexin, antitrypsin, prealbumin and thioredoxin peroxidase. The down-regulated proteins included haptoglobin, serotransferrin, CD5 antigen like protein, clusterin, apolipoprotein and leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein. For the discrimination of milder stage fibrosis, the area under curve for Prx II was the highest. Four variables (PT, Pre, HA and Prx II were selected from the 25 variables to construct the decision tree. In a training group, the correct prediction percentage for normal control, milder fibrosis, significant fibrosis and early cirrhosis was 100%, 88.9%, 95.2% and 100%, respectively, with an overall correct percent of 95.9%. Conclusion This study showed that 2-D DIGE-based proteomic analysis of the plasma was helpful in screening for new plasma biomarkers for liver disease. The significant up-expression of Prx II could be used in the early

  17. Genomic instability influences the transcriptome and proteome in endometrial cancer subtypes

    OpenAIRE

    Habermann Jens K; Bündgen Nana K; Gemoll Timo; Hautaniemi Sampsa; Lundgren Caroline; Wangsa Danny; Doering Jana; Bruch Hans-Peter; Nordstroem Britta; Roblick Uwe J; Jörnvall Hans; Auer Gert; Ried Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background In addition to clinical characteristics, DNA aneuploidy has been identified as a prognostic factor in epithelial malignancies in general and in endometrial cancers in particular. We mapped ploidy-associated chromosomal aberrations and identified corresponding gene and protein expression changes in endometrial cancers of different prognostic subgroups. Methods DNA image cytometry classified 25 endometrioid cancers to be either diploid (n = 16) or aneuploid (n = 9), and all ...

  18. Proteomic biomarkers predicting lymph node involvement in serum of cervical cancer patients. Limitations of SELDI-TOF MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Gorp Toon

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lymph node status is not part of the staging system for cervical cancer, but provides important information for prognosis and treatment. We investigated whether lymph node status can be predicted with proteomic profiling. Material & methods Serum samples of 60 cervical cancer patients (FIGO I/II were obtained before primary treatment. Samples were run through a HPLC depletion column, eliminating the 14 most abundant proteins ubiquitously present in serum. Unbound fractions were concentrated with spin filters. Fractions were spotted onto CM10 and IMAC30 surfaces and analyzed with surface-enhanced laser desorption time of flight (SELDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS. Unsupervised peak detection and peak clustering was performed using MASDA software. Leave-one-out (LOO validation for weighted Least Squares Support Vector Machines (LSSVM was used for prediction of lymph node involvement. Other outcomes were histological type, lymphvascular space involvement (LVSI and recurrent disease. Results LSSVM models were able to determine LN status with a LOO area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC of 0.95, based on peaks with m/z values 2,698.9, 3,953.2, and 15,254.8. Furthermore, we were able to predict LVSI (AUC 0.81, to predict recurrence (AUC 0.92, and to differentiate between squamous carcinomas and adenocarcinomas (AUC 0.88, between squamous and adenosquamous carcinomas (AUC 0.85, and between adenocarcinomas and adenosquamous carcinomas (AUC 0.94. Conclusions Potential markers related with lymph node involvement were detected, and protein/peptide profiling support differentiation between various subtypes of cervical cancer. However, identification of the potential biomarkers was hampered by the technical limitations of SELDI-TOF MS.

  19. Plasma metabolomics and proteomics profiling after a postprandial challenge reveal subtle diet effects on human metabolic status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pellis, L.; Erk, M.J. van; Ommen, B. van; Bakker, G.C.M.; Hendriks, H.F.J.; Cnubben, N.H.P.; Kleemann, R.; Someren, E.P. van; Bobeldijk, I.; Rubingh, C.M.; Wopereis, S.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce the metabolomics and proteomics based Postprandial Challenge Test (PCT) to quantify the postprandial response of multiple metabolic processes in humans in a standardized manner. The PCT comprised consumption of a standardized 500 ml dairy shake containing respectively 59, 30 and 12 ener

  20. Quantitative proteomics reveals middle infrared radiation-interfered networks in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsin-Yi; Li, Ming-Hua; Huang, Tsui-Chin; Hsu, Chia-Lang; Tsai, Shang-Ru; Lee, Si-Chen; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng; Juan, Hsueh-Fen

    2015-02-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading cancer-related causes of death worldwide. Treatment of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is complex and challenging, especially when metastasis has developed. In this study, we applied infrared radiation as an alternative approach for the treatment of TNBC. We used middle infrared (MIR) with a wavelength range of 3-5 μm to irradiate breast cancer cells. MIR significantly inhibited cell proliferation in several breast cancer cells but did not affect the growth of normal breast epithelial cells. We performed iTRAQ-coupled LC-MS/MS analysis to investigate the MIR-triggered molecular mechanisms in breast cancer cells. A total of 1749 proteins were identified, quantified, and subjected to functional enrichment analysis. From the constructed functionally enriched network, we confirmed that MIR caused G2/M cell cycle arrest, remodeled the microtubule network to an astral pole arrangement, altered the actin filament formation and focal adhesion molecule localization, and reduced cell migration activity and invasion ability. Our results reveal the coordinative effects of MIR-regulated physiological responses in concentrated networks, demonstrating the potential implementation of infrared radiation in breast cancer therapy. PMID:25556991

  1. A Serum Biomarker Model to Diagnose Pancreatic Cancer Using Proteomic Fingerprint Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunlin Ge; Ning Ma; Dianbo Yao; Fengming Luan; Chaojun Hu; Yongzhe Li; Yongfeng Liu

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To establish a serum protein pattern model for screening pancreatic cancer.METHODS Twenty-nine serum samples from patients with pancreatic cancer were collected before surgery,and an additional 57 serum samples from age and sex-matched individuals without cancer were used as controls.WCX magnetic beans and a PBS Ⅱ-C protein chip reader(Ciphergen Biosystems Inc)were employed to detect the protein fingerprint expression of all serum samples.The resulting profiles comparing serum from cancer and normal patients were analyzed with the Biomarker Wizard system,to establish a model using the Biomarker Pattern system software.A double-blind test was used to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the model.RESULTS A group of 4 biomarkers (relative molecular weights were 5,705 Da,4,935 Da,5,318 Da,3,243 Da)were selected to set up a decision tree to produce the classification model to effectively screen pancreatic cancer patients.The results yielded a sensitivitv of 100%(20/20),specificity of 97.4%(37/38).The ROC curve was 99.7%.A double-blind test used to challenge the model resulted in a sensitivity of 88.9% and a specifcity of 89.5%.CONCLUSION New serum biomarkers of pancreatic cancer have been identified.The pattern of combined markers provides a powerful and reliable diagnostic method for pancreatic cancer with high sensitivity and specificity.

  2. Proteomic analysis of changes in the protein composition of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells induced by all-trans retinoic acid, 9-cis retinoic acid, and their combination

    OpenAIRE

    Flodrová, D. (Dana); Benkovská, D. (Dagmar); Macejová, D.; Bialesova, L.; Hunakova, L.; Brtko, J.; Bobálová, J. (Janette)

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid (all-trans and 9-cis) isomers represent important therapeutic agents for many types of cancers, including human breast cancer. Changes in protein composition of the MCF-7 human breast cancer cells were induced by all-trans retinoic acid, 9-cis retinoic acid, and their combination and subsequently proteomic strategies based on bottom-up method were applied. Proposed approach was used for the analysis of proteins extracted from MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line utilizing a ...

  3. DETECTION AND CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF THROMBOMODULIN IN BOTH PLASMA AND TISSUE EXTRACTS OF CANCER PATIENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许晓华; 卢兴国; 徐根波; 朱蕾; 黄连生

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes of thrombomodulin (TM) in both plasma and tissue extracts of cancer patients for evaluating its clinical significance. Methods: Plasma TM levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in both plasma of 188 cancer patients and 24 cancer tissue extracts including their adjacent non-cancer tissues. Results: The plasma TM levels both in cancer patients and in metastasis patients were significantly higher than that in controls [(33.47±14.25)μg/L, (41.68±16.96)μg/L, vs(20.40±7.22)μg/L,P0.05). The TM levels in cancer tissue extracts were significantly lower than that in their adjacent non-cancer tissue extracts [(647.71±317.51)μg/L vs (1455.63±772.22)μg/L, P<0.01]. On the contrary, the plasma TM levels in these cancers were significantly higher than that in controls. Conclusion: The rise of plasma TM levels in cancer patients was associated with metastasis and diffusion of cancers. The TM levels can be served as an sensitive index for judging progression and metastasis of cancers.

  4. Plasma testosterone in the general population, cancer prognosis and cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orsted, D D; Nordestgaard, B G; Bojesen, S E

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Testosterone is an important anabolic hormone in humans and in vitro testosterone stimulates growth of lung and colon cancer cells. We tested the hypothesis that plasma testosterone associate with increased risk of cancer and with increased risk of early death after cancer. MATERIALS...... developed cancer. For risk of early death after cancer, for men, after adjustment for age at diagnosis, tumour stage at diagnosis, and time since blood-sampling, the hazard ratio was 1.30 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.65] for the 2nd quintile, 1.31 (1.02-1.67) for the 3rd quintile, 1.52 (1.......19-1.93) for the 4th quintile, and 1.52 (1.20-1.91) for the 5th quintile, versus the 1st quintile. For women, corresponding hazard ratios were 1.09 (0.81-1.46), 1.17 (0.86-1.59), 1.03 (0.76-1.39), and 1.80 (1.32-2.46). For risk of cancer, multifactorially adjusted hazard ratios for risk of any cancer were 1...

  5. NCI Requests Targets for Monoclonal Antibody Production and Characterization - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution.

  6. Proteomics Analysis of HRAS-Mediated Oncogenic Transformation in a Genetically Defined Human Ovarian Cancer Model*

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Travis; Mei, Fang; Liu, Jinsong; Bast, Robert C.; Kurosky, Alexander; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2005-01-01

    Ras is a small GTP binding protein mutated in approximately 30% human cancer. Despite its important role in the initiation and progression of human cancer, the underlying mechamism of RAS-induced human epithelial transformation remains elusive. In this study, we probe the cellular and molecular mechanisms of RAS-mediated transformation, by profiling two human ovarian epithelial cell lines. One cell line was immortalized with SV40 T/t antigens and the human catalytic subunit of telomerase (T29...

  7. Large-scale proteomic identification of S100 proteins in breast cancer tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Cancemi, Patrizia; Di Cara, Gianluca; Albanese, Nadia Ninfa; Costantini, Francesca; Marabeti, Maria Rita; Musso, Rosa; Lupo, Carmelo; Roz, Elena; Pucci-Minafra, Ida

    2010-01-01

    Background Attempts to reduce morbidity and mortality in breast cancer is based on efforts to identify novel biomarkers to support prognosis and therapeutic choices. The present study has focussed on S100 proteins as a potentially promising group of markers in cancer development and progression. One reason of interest in this family of proteins is because the majority of the S100 genes are clustered on a region of human chromosome 1q21 that is prone to genomic rearrangements. Moreover, there ...

  8. Large-scale proteomic identification of S100 proteins in breast cancer tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Cancemi Patrizia; Di Cara Gianluca; Albanese Nadia; Costantini Francesca; Marabeti Maria; Musso Rosa; Lupo Carmelo; Roz Elena; Pucci-Minafra Ida

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Attempts to reduce morbidity and mortality in breast cancer is based on efforts to identify novel biomarkers to support prognosis and therapeutic choices. The present study has focussed on S100 proteins as a potentially promising group of markers in cancer development and progression. One reason of interest in this family of proteins is because the majority of the S100 genes are clustered on a region of human chromosome 1q21 that is prone to genomic rearrangements. Moreove...

  9. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Ovarian Cancer Cells Identified Mitochondrial Proteins Associated with Paclitaxel Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Yuan; Tan, Aik-Choon; Sun, Xiaer; Olson, Matthew T.; Xie, Zhi; Jinawath, Natini; Chan, Daniel W; Shih, Ie-Ming; Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Hui

    2009-01-01

    Paclitaxel has been widely used as an anti-mitotic agent in chemotherapy for a variety of cancers and adds substantial efficacy as the first-line chemotherapeutic regimen for ovarian cancers. However, the frequent occurrence of paclitaxel resistance limits its function in long-term management. Despite abundant clinical and cellular demonstration of paclitaxel resistant tumors, the molecular mechanisms leading to paclitaxel resistance are poorly understood. Using genomic approaches, we have pr...

  10. Genomic instability influences the transcriptome and proteome in endometrial cancer subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habermann Jens K

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In addition to clinical characteristics, DNA aneuploidy has been identified as a prognostic factor in epithelial malignancies in general and in endometrial cancers in particular. We mapped ploidy-associated chromosomal aberrations and identified corresponding gene and protein expression changes in endometrial cancers of different prognostic subgroups. Methods DNA image cytometry classified 25 endometrioid cancers to be either diploid (n = 16 or aneuploid (n = 9, and all uterine papillary serous cancers (UPSC to be aneuploid (n = 8. All samples were subjected to comparative genomic hybridization and gene expression profiling. Identified genes were subjected to Ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA and were correlated to protein expression changes. Results Comparative genomic hybridization revealed ploidy-associated specific, recurrent genomic imbalances. Gene expression analysis identified 54 genes between diploid and aneuploid endometrioid carcinomas, 39 genes between aneuploid endometrioid cancer and UPSC, and 76 genes between diploid endometrioid and aneuploid UPSC to be differentially expressed. Protein profiling identified AKR7A2 and ANXA2 to show translational alterations consistent with the transcriptional changes. The majority of differentially expressed genes and proteins belonged to identical molecular functions, foremost Cancer, Cell Death, and Cellular Assembly and Organization. Conclusions We conclude that the grade of genomic instability rather than the histopathological subtype correlates with specific gene and protein expression changes. The identified genes and proteins might be useful as molecular targets for improved diagnostic and therapeutic intervention and merit prospective validation.

  11. Elevated plasma vitamin B12 levels and cancer prognosis: A population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendt, Johan Frederik Håkonsen; Farkas, Dora Kormendine; Pedersen, Lars;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Elevated plasma vitamin B12 levels (cobalamin, Cbl) are associated with increased short-term cancer risk among patients referred for this laboratory measurement. We aimed to assess prognosis in cancer patients with elevated plasma Cbl. METHODS: We conducted a population-based cohort...

  12. Biological variations in plasma VEGF and VEGFR-1 may compromise their biomarker value in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Mads N.; Brunner, Nils; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Ytting, Henriette; Bentsen, Camilla; Lomholt, Anne F.; Nielsen, Hans J.

    2010-01-01

    Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) plays a prominent role in tumor angiogenesis and plasma VEGF concentration may carry prognostic information in colorectal cancer. The VEGF receptor 1 (VEGFR-1) is a regulatory receptor which is shredded into plasma of patients with colorectal cancer. For ...

  13. Histone deacetylase inhibitor-induced cell death in bladder cancer is associated with chromatin modification and modifying protein expression: A proteomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingdi Quentin; Hao, Jian-Jiang; Zhang, Zheng; Hsu, Iawen; Liu, Yi; Tao, Zhen; Lewi, Keidren; Metwalli, Adam R; Agarwal, Piyush K

    2016-06-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project recently identified the importance of mutations in chromatin remodeling genes in human carcinomas. These findings imply that epigenetic modulators might have a therapeutic role in urothelial cancers. To exploit histone deacetylases (HDACs) as targets for cancer therapy, we investigated the HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs) romidepsin, trichostatin A, and vorinostat as potential chemotherapeutic agents for bladder cancer. We demonstrate that the three HDACIs suppressed cell growth and induced cell death in the bladder cancer cell line 5637. To identify potential mechanisms associated with the anti-proliferative and cytotoxic effects of the HDACIs, we used quantitative proteomics to determine the proteins potentially involved in these processes. Our proteome studies identified a total of 6003 unique proteins. Of these, 2472 proteins were upregulated and 2049 proteins were downregulated in response to HDACI exposure compared to the untreated controls (P<0.05). Bioinformatic analysis further revealed that those differentially expressed proteins were involved in multiple biological functions and enzyme-regulated pathways, including cell cycle progression, apoptosis, autophagy, free radical generation and DNA damage repair. HDACIs also altered the acetylation status of histones and non-histone proteins, as well as the levels of chromatin modification proteins, suggesting that HDACIs exert multiple cytotoxic actions in bladder cancer cells by inhibiting HDAC activity or altering the structure of chromatin. We conclude that HDACIs are effective in the inhibition of cell proliferation and the induction of apoptosis in the 5637 bladder cancer cells through multiple cell death-associated pathways. These observations support the notion that HDACIs provide new therapeutic options for bladder cancer treatment and thus warrant further preclinical exploration. PMID:27082124

  14. Quantitative proteomics of fractionated membrane and lumen exosome proteins from isogenic metastatic and nonmetastatic bladder cancer cells reveal differential expression of EMT factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Nawrocki, Arkadiusz; Jensen, Steffen Grann;

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells secrete soluble factors and various extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, into their tissue microenvironment. The secretion of exosomes is speculated to facilitate local invasion and metastatic spread. Here, we used an in vivo metastasis model of human bladder carcinoma cell line...... T24 without metastatic capacity and its two isogenic derivate cell lines SLT4 and FL3, which form metastases in the lungs and liver of mice, respectively. Cultivation in CLAD1000 bioreactors rather than conventional culture flasks resulted in a 13-16-fold increased exosome yield and facilitated...... quantitative proteomics of fractionated exosomes. Exosomes from T24, SLT4, and FL3 cells were partitioned into membrane and luminal fractions and changes in protein abundance related to the gain of metastatic capacity were identified by quantitative iTRAQ- proteomics. We identified several proteins linked...

  15. A Technical Assessment of the Utility of Reverse Phase Protein Arrays for the Study of the Functional Proteome in Non-microdissected Human Breast Cancers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hennessy, Bryan T

    2010-12-01

    INTRODUCTION: The lack of large panels of validated antibodies, tissue handling variability, and intratumoral heterogeneity potentially hamper comprehensive study of the functional proteome in non-microdissected solid tumors. The purpose of this study was to address these concerns and to demonstrate clinical utility for the functional analysis of proteins in non-microdissected breast tumors using reverse phase protein arrays (RPPA). METHODS: Herein, 82 antibodies that recognize kinase and steroid signaling proteins and effectors were validated for RPPA. Intraslide and interslide coefficients of variability were <15%. Multiple sites in non-microdissected breast tumors were analyzed using RPPA after intervals of up to 24 h on the benchtop at room temperature following surgical resection. RESULTS: Twenty-one of 82 total and phosphoproteins demonstrated time-dependent instability at room temperature with most variability occurring at later time points between 6 and 24 h. However, the 82-protein functional proteomic "fingerprint" was robust in most tumors even when maintained at room temperature for 24 h before freezing. In repeat samples from each tumor, intratumoral protein levels were markedly less variable than intertumoral levels. Indeed, an independent analysis of prognostic biomarkers in tissue from multiple tumor sites accurately and reproducibly predicted patient outcomes. Significant correlations were observed between RPPA and immunohistochemistry. However, RPPA demonstrated a superior dynamic range. Classification of 128 breast cancers using RPPA identified six subgroups with markedly different patient outcomes that demonstrated a significant correlation with breast cancer subtypes identified by transcriptional profiling. CONCLUSION: Thus, the robustness of RPPA and stability of the functional proteomic "fingerprint" facilitate the study of the functional proteome in non-microdissected breast tumors.

  16. mutation3D: Cancer Gene Prediction Through Atomic Clustering of Coding Variants in the Structural Proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael J; Lapcevic, Ryan; Romero, Alfonso E; Yoon, Mark; Das, Jishnu; Beltrán, Juan Felipe; Mort, Matthew; Stenson, Peter D; Cooper, David N; Paccanaro, Alberto; Yu, Haiyuan

    2016-05-01

    A new algorithm and Web server, mutation3D (http://mutation3d.org), proposes driver genes in cancer by identifying clusters of amino acid substitutions within tertiary protein structures. We demonstrate the feasibility of using a 3D clustering approach to implicate proteins in cancer based on explorations of single proteins using the mutation3D Web interface. On a large scale, we show that clustering with mutation3D is able to separate functional from nonfunctional mutations by analyzing a combination of 8,869 known inherited disease mutations and 2,004 SNPs overlaid together upon the same sets of crystal structures and homology models. Further, we present a systematic analysis of whole-genome and whole-exome cancer datasets to demonstrate that mutation3D identifies many known cancer genes as well as previously underexplored target genes. The mutation3D Web interface allows users to analyze their own mutation data in a variety of popular formats and provides seamless access to explore mutation clusters derived from over 975,000 somatic mutations reported by 6,811 cancer sequencing studies. The mutation3D Web interface is freely available with all major browsers supported. PMID:26841357

  17. Blood-based lung cancer biomarkers identified through proteomic discovery in cancer tissues, cell lines and conditioned medium

    OpenAIRE

    Birse, Charles E; Lagier, Robert J.; Fitzhugh, William; Harvey I Pass; Rom, William N.; Eric S. Edell; Aaron O. Bungum; Maldonado, Fabien; Jett, James R.; Mesri, Mehdi; Sult, Erin; Joseloff, Elizabeth; Li, Aiqun; Heidbrink, Jenny; Dhariwal, Gulshan

    2015-01-01

    Background Support for early detection of lung cancer has emerged from the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), in which low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening reduced lung cancer mortality by 20 % relative to chest x-ray. The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recently recommended annual screening for the high-risk population, concluding that the benefits (life years gained) outweighed harms (false positive findings, abortive biopsy/surgery, radiation exposure). In making the...

  18. Quantitative and comparative proteomics analysis of radiosensitivity for colorectal cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To identify the related proteins about radiosensitivity (RS) of colorectal cancers,as well as make the personal therapeutics for patients, the specimen of transplanted tumor raised by the colorectal cancer cells, LOVO and SW480 with different radiosensitivity, were examined by the fluorescence differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE) after labeled with CyDye DIGE fluors Cy3, Cy5 and Cy2. As the result, intensity changes of 35 spots were detected with statistical significance. 18 protein spots of them are up-regulated in tumor specimen of LOVO, otherwise 17 are up-regulated in specimen of SW480. And 27 of them were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS successfully including 17 in LOVO and 15 in SW480. These differential expressed proteins may become the mocular markers and have a key role in predicting the RS of colorectal cancer. (authors)

  19. Changes in plasma TIMP-1 levels after resection for primary colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, C.; Lomholt, A.F.; Davis, G.J.;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increased plasma levels of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP-1) are associated with poor outcome in colorectal cancer (CRC), however postoperative changes in plasma TIMP-1 levels after resections for CRC have not been thoroughly evaluated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Plasma samp...

  20. Metabolic Signatures of Lung Cancer in Biofluids: NMR-Based Metabonomics of Blood Plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha, Cláudia M.; Carrola, Joana; Barros, António S.; Gil, Ana M; Goodfellow, Brian J; Carreira, Isabel M; Bernardo, Joao; Gomes, Ana; Sousa, Vitor; Carvalho, Lina; Duarte, Iola F.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the variations in the metabolic profile of blood plasma from lung cancer patients and healthy controls were investigated through NMR-based metabonomics, to assess the potential of this approach for lung cancer screening and diagnosis. PLS-DA modeling of CPMG spectra from plasma, subjected to Monte Carlo Cross Validation, allowed cancer patients to be discriminated from controls with sensitivity and specificity levels of about 90%. Relatively lower HDL and higher VLDL + LDL in th...

  1. Proteomic profiling of exosomes leads to the identification of novel biomarkers for prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Duijvesz (Diederick); K.E. Burnum-Johnson (Kristin); M.A. Gritsenko (Marina); A.M. Hoogland (Marije); M.S. Vredenbregt-van den Berg (Mirella); R. Willemsen (Rob); T.M. Luider (Theo); L. Paša-Tolić (Ljiljana); G.W. Jenster (Guido)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Current markers for prostate cancer, such as PSA lack specificity. Therefore, novel biomarkers are needed. Unfortunately, the complexity of body fluids often hampers biomarker discovery. An attractive alternative approach is the isolation of small vesicles, i.e. exosomes, ∼10

  2. Proteomic biomarkers for overall and progression-free survival in ovarian cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgdall, Estrid; Fung, Eric T; Christensen, Ib Jarle;

    2010-01-01

    To determine if the level of apolipoprotein A1, hepcidin, transferrin, inter-a trypsin IV internal fragment, transthyretin (TT), connective-tissue activating protein 3 (CTAP3), serum amyloid A1, ß-2 microglobulin (B2M) might have impact on overall and progression-free survival for ovarian cancer...

  3. Proteomic biomarkers for overall and progression-free survival in ovarian cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgdall, Estrid; Fung, Eric T; Christensen, Ib Jarle;

    2010-01-01

    To determine if the level of apolipoprotein A1, hepcidin, transferrin, inter-α trypsin IV internal fragment, transthyretin (TT), connective-tissue activating protein 3 (CTAP3), serum amyloid A1, β-2 microglobulin (B2M) might have impact on overall and progression-free survival for ovarian cancer...

  4. Comparison of proteomic biomarker panels in urine and serum for ovarian cancer diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petri, Anette Lykke; Simonsen, Anja Hviid; Høgdall, Estrid; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Yip, Christine; Risum, Signe Normann; Pedersen, Anette Tønnes; Hartwell, Dorte; Fung, Eric T; Høgdall, Claus

    2010-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to confirm previously found candidate epithelial ovarian cancer biomarkers in urine and to compare a paired serum biomarker panel and a urine biomarker panel from the same study cohort with regard to the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) area under the ...

  5. Transplantation proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Traum, Avram Z.; Schachter, Asher D.

    2005-01-01

    The field of proteomics is developing at a rapid pace in the post-genome era. Translational proteomics investigations aim to apply a combination of established methods and new technologies to learn about protein expression profiles predictive of clinical events, therapeutic response, and underlying mechanisms. However, in contrast to genetic studies and in parallel with gene expression studies, the dynamic nature of the proteome in conjunction with the challenges of accounting for post-transl...

  6. Proteomics in uveal melanoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ramasamy, Pathma

    2014-01-01

    Uveal melanoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in adults, with an incidence of 5-7 per million per year. It is associated with the development of metastasis in about 50% of cases, and 40% of patients with uveal melanoma die of metastatic disease despite successful treatment of the primary tumour. The survival rates at 5, 10 and 15 years are 65%, 50% and 45% respectively. Unlike progress made in many other areas of cancer, uveal melanoma is still poorly understood and survival rates have remained similar over the past 25 years. Recently, advances made in molecular genetics have improved our understanding of this disease and stratification of patients into low risk and high risk for developing metastasis. However, only a limited number of studies have been performed using proteomic methods. This review will give an overview of various proteomic technologies currently employed in life sciences research, and discuss proteomic studies of uveal melanoma.

  7. Evaluation of reverse phase protein array (RPPA)-based pathway-activation profiling in 84 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines as platform for cancer proteomics and biomarker discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ummanni, Ramesh; Mannsperger, Heiko A; Sonntag, Johanna; Oswald, Marcus; Sharma, Ashwini K; König, Rainer; Korf, Ulrike

    2014-05-01

    The reverse phase protein array (RPPA) approach was employed for a quantitative analysis of 71 cancer-relevant proteins and phosphoproteins in 84 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines and by monitoring the activation state of selected receptor tyrosine kinases, PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK1/2 signaling, cell cycle control, apoptosis, and DNA damage. Additional information on NSCLC cell lines such as that of transcriptomic data, genomic aberrations, and drug sensitivity was analyzed in the context of proteomic data using supervised and non-supervised approaches for data analysis. First, the unsupervised analysis of proteomic data indicated that proteins clustering closely together reflect well-known signaling modules, e.g. PI3K/AKT- and RAS/RAF/ERK-signaling, cell cycle regulation, and apoptosis. However, mutations of EGFR, ERBB2, RAF, RAS, TP53, and PI3K were found dispersed across different signaling pathway clusters. Merely cell lines with an amplification of EGFR and/or ERBB2 clustered closely together on the proteomic, but not on the transcriptomic level. Secondly, supervised data analysis revealed that sensitivity towards anti-EGFR drugs generally correlated better with high level EGFR phosphorylation than with EGFR abundance itself. High level phosphorylation of RB and high abundance of AURKA were identified as candidates that can potentially predict sensitivity towards the aurora kinase inhibitor VX680. Examples shown demonstrate that the RPPA approach presents a useful platform for targeted proteomics with high potential for biomarker discovery. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biomarkers: A Proteomic Challenge. PMID:24361481

  8. Quantification of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 2 in plasma from healthy donors and cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, M. B.; Stephens, R. W.; Brünner, Nils;

    2005-01-01

    median value of 160 ng/ml, only slightly higher but statistically distinguishable from the level found in citrate plasma from the healthy donors. In addition, the TIMP-2 concentration in EDTA plasma from colorectal cancer patients revealed a significantly higher level in plasma from patients with Dukes...... optimized for measurement of TIMP-2 in plasma. The capturing antibody in the ELISA was a monoclonal, while the detecting antibody was a chicken polyclonal antibody recognizing the native form of human TIMP-2. The levels of TIMP-2 were measured in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and citrate plasma...... from healthy donors. The median values were determined as 163 ng/ml (n = 186) with a range of 109-253 ng/ml for EDTA plasma and 139 ng/ml (n = 77) with a range of 95-223 ng/ml for citrate plasma. The TIMP-2 concentration in citrate plasma from 15 patients with advanced, stage IV breast cancer had a...

  9. Proteomic dataset for altered glycoprotein expression upon GALNT3 knockdown in ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheta, Razan; Roux-Dalvai, Florence; Woo, Christina M; Fournier, Frédéric; Bourassa, Sylvie; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; Droit, Arnaud; Bachvarov, Dimcho

    2016-09-01

    This article contains raw and processed data related to research published in "Role of the polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 3 in ovarian cancer progression: possible implications in abnormal mucin O-glycosylation" [1]. The data presented here was obtained with the application of a bioorthogonal chemical reporter strategy analyzing differential glycoprotein expression following the knock-down (KD) of the GALNT3 gene in the epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cell line A2780s. LC-MS/MS mass spectrometry analysis was then performed and the processed data related to the identified glycoproteins show that several hundred proteins are differentially expressed between control and GALNT3 KD A2780s cells. The obtained data also uncover numerous novel glycoproteins; some of which could represent new potential EOC biomarkers and/or therapeutic targets. PMID:27331112

  10. The Genomic and Proteomic Content of Cancer Cell-Derived Exosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, Meredith C.; Azorsa, David O.

    2012-01-01

    Exosomes are secreted membrane vesicles that have been proposed as an effective means to detect a variety of disease states, including cancer. The properties of exosomes, including stability in biological fluids, allow for their efficient isolation and make them an ideal vehicle for studies on early disease detection and evaluation. Much data has been collected over recent years regarding the messenger RNA, microRNA, and protein contents of exosomes. In addition, many studies have described t...

  11. Proteomic profiling of the hypothalamus in a mouse model of cancer-induced anorexia-cachexia

    OpenAIRE

    Ihnatko, Robert; Post, Claes; Blomqvist, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Background: Anorexia-cachexia is a common and severe cancer-related complication but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, using a mouse model for tumour-induced anorexia-cachexia, we screened for proteins that are differentially expressed in the hypothalamus, the brain’s metabolic control centre. Methods: The hypothalamus of tumour-bearing mice with implanted methylcholanthrene-induced sarcoma (MCG 101) displaying anorexia and their sham-implanted pair-fed or free-fed litterma...

  12. Proteomic analysis of pathways involved in estrogen-induced growth and apoptosis of breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang-Zhi Hu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Estrogen is a known growth promoter for estrogen receptor (ER-positive breast cancer cells. Paradoxically, in breast cancer cells that have been chronically deprived of estrogen stimulation, re-introduction of the hormone can induce apoptosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we sought to identify signaling networks that are triggered by estradiol (E2 in isogenic MCF-7 breast cancer cells that undergo apoptosis (MCF-7:5C versus cells that proliferate upon exposure to E2 (MCF-7. The nuclear receptor co-activator AIB1 (Amplified in Breast Cancer-1 is known to be rate-limiting for E2-induced cell survival responses in MCF-7 cells and was found here to also be required for the induction of apoptosis by E2 in the MCF-7:5C cells. Proteins that interact with AIB1 as well as complexes that contain tyrosine phosphorylated proteins were isolated by immunoprecipitation and identified by mass spectrometry (MS at baseline and after a brief exposure to E2 for two hours. Bioinformatic network analyses of the identified protein interactions were then used to analyze E2 signaling pathways that trigger apoptosis versus survival. Comparison of MS data with a computationally-predicted AIB1 interaction network showed that 26 proteins identified in this study are within this network, and are involved in signal transduction, transcription, cell cycle regulation and protein degradation. CONCLUSIONS: G-protein-coupled receptors, PI3 kinase, Wnt and Notch signaling pathways were most strongly associated with E2-induced proliferation or apoptosis and are integrated here into a global AIB1 signaling network that controls qualitatively distinct responses to estrogen.

  13. Quantification of circulating cell-free DNA in the plasma of cancer patients during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell-free plasma DNA is elevated in cancer patients and decreases in response to effective treatments. Consequently, these nucleic acids have potential as new tumor markers. In our current study, we investigated whether the plasma DNA concentrations in patients with cancer are altered during the course of radiation therapy. To first determine the origin of cell-free plasma DNA, plasma samples from mice bearing transplanted human tumors were analyzed for human-specific and mouse-specific cell-free DNA. Human-specific DNA was detectable only in plasma from tumor-bearing mice. However, mouse-specific plasma DNA was significantly higher in tumor-bearing mice than in normal mice, suggesting that cell-free plasma DNA originated from both tumor and normal cells. We measured the total cell-free plasma DNA levels by quantitative polymerase chain reaction in 15 cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy and compared these values with healthy control subjects. The cancer patients showed higher pretreatment plasma DNA concentrations than the healthy controls. Eleven of these patients showed a transient increase of up to eightfold in their cell-free plasma DNA concentrations during the first or second week of radiation therapy, followed by decreasing concentrations toward the end of treatment. In two other cancer patients, the cell-free plasma DNA concentrations only decreased over the course of the treatment. The total cell-free plasma DNA levels in cancer patients thus show dynamic changes associated with the progression of radiation therapy. Additional prospective studies will be required to elucidate the potential clinical utility and biological implications of dynamic changes in cell-free plasma DNA during radiation therapy. (author)

  14. Identification of phosphorylated MYL12B as a potential plasma biomarker for septic acute kidney injury using a quantitative proteomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fan; Dong, Xiu-Juan; Li, Yan-Yan; Zhao, Yan; Xu, Qiu-Lin; Su, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and increasingly encountered complication in hospitalized patients with critical illness in intensive care units (ICU). According to the etiology, Sepsis-induced AKI (SAKI) is a leading contributor to AKI and significantly has very poor prognosis, which might be related to the late detection when the elevation of BUN and serum creatinine (SCr) is used. Many genes are up-regulated in the damaged kidney with the corresponding protein products appearing in plasma and urine. Some of these are candidate biomarkers for more timely diagnosis of SAKI. Therefore, extensive research efforts over this past decade have been directed at the discovery and validation of novel SAKI biomarkers to detect injury prior to changes in kidney function, a number of serum and urinary proteins, including NGAL, KIM-1, cystatin-C, IL-18, and L-FABP, have been identified for predicting SAKI before a rise in BUN and serum creatinine in several experimental and clinical trainings. Unfortunately, an ideal biomarker of SAKI with highly sensitivity and specificity has not been identified yet. Recent progresses in quantitative proteomics have offered opportunities to discover biomarkers for SAKI. In the present study, kidney tissue samples from SAKI mice were analyzed by two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), and 4 up-regulated proteins, which were actin (ACTB), myosin regulatory light chain 12B (MYL12B), myosin regulatory light polypeptide 9 (MYL9), and myosin regulatory light chain 12A (MYL12A) were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS). Among all the varied proteins, MYL12B was validated by western blot. Interestingly, there was no change between the SAKI and control kidney tissues, however, phosphorylated MYL12B was detected to be consistent with the proteomics data. Furthermore, phosphorylated MYL12B was found similarly to be increased in SAKI plasma

  15. Low Temperature Plasma: A Novel Focal Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Adam M.; Frame, Fiona M.; Maitland, Norman J.; O'Connell, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable advances in recent years for the focal treatment of localized prostate cancer, high recurrence rates and detrimental side effects are still a cause for concern. In this review, we compare current focal therapies to a potentially novel approach for the treatment of early onset prostate cancer: low temperature plasma. The rapidly evolving plasma technology has the potential to deliver a wide range of promising medical applications via the delivery of plasma-induced reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Studies assessing the effect of low temperature plasma on cell lines and xenografts have demonstrated DNA damage leading to apoptosis and reduction in cell viability. However, there have been no studies on prostate cancer, which is an obvious candidate for this novel therapy. We present here the potential of low temperature plasma as a focal therapy for prostate cancer. PMID:24738076

  16. Low Temperature Plasma: A Novel Focal Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M. Hirst

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite considerable advances in recent years for the focal treatment of localized prostate cancer, high recurrence rates and detrimental side effects are still a cause for concern. In this review, we compare current focal therapies to a potentially novel approach for the treatment of early onset prostate cancer: low temperature plasma. The rapidly evolving plasma technology has the potential to deliver a wide range of promising medical applications via the delivery of plasma-induced reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Studies assessing the effect of low temperature plasma on cell lines and xenografts have demonstrated DNA damage leading to apoptosis and reduction in cell viability. However, there have been no studies on prostate cancer, which is an obvious candidate for this novel therapy. We present here the potential of low temperature plasma as a focal therapy for prostate cancer.

  17. Quantification of plasma DNA as a screening tool for lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢广顺; 侯爱荣; 李龙芸; 高燕宁; 程书钧

    2004-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest that circulating DNA may be a potential tumor marker for lung cancer, but most of these studies are conducted between healthy controls and lung cancer patients, with few or no benign lung disease patients included. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of plasma DNA quantification in discriminating lung cancer from the healthy and benign lung disease.Results Plasma DNA values were significantly increased in lung cancer patients, especially in those with metastases, and in benign lung disease patients compared with that in the healthy individuals (P<0.001, respectively). The values in lung cancer patients were significantly increased compared with that in the benign lung disease patients (P<0.001). The area under the curve was 0.96 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.92-0.99] for the healthy versus lung cancer, 0.73 (95% CI 0.64-0.83) for lung cancer versus benign lung disease, and 0.86 (95% CI 0.80-0.91) for lung cancer versus the healthy and benign lung disease.Conclusions Plasma DNA quantification has a strong power to discriminate lung cancer from the healthy and from the healthy and benign lung disease, less power to discriminate lung cancer from benign lung disease. Plasma DNA quantification may be useful as a screening tool for lung cancer.

  18. Apolipoprotein e genotype, plasma cholesterol, and cancer: a Mendelian randomization study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Trompet, Stella

    2009-12-01

    Observational studies have shown an association between low plasma cholesterol levels and increased risk of cancer, whereas most randomized clinical trials involving cholesterol-lowering medications have not shown this association. Between 1997 and 2002, the authors assessed the association between plasma cholesterol levels and cancer risk, free from confounding and reverse causality, in a Mendelian randomization study using apolipoprotein E (ApoE) genotype. ApoE genotype, plasma cholesterol levels, and cancer incidence and mortality were measured during a 3-year follow-up period among 2,913 participants in the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk. Subjects within the lowest third of plasma cholesterol level at baseline had increased risks of cancer incidence (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.90, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.34, 2.70) and cancer mortality (HR = 2.03, 95% CI: 1.23, 3.34) relative to subjects within the highest third of plasma cholesterol. However, carriers of the ApoE2 genotype (n = 332), who had 9% lower plasma cholesterol levels than carriers of the ApoE4 genotype (n = 635), did not have increased risk of cancer incidence (HR = 0.86, 95% CI: 0.50, 1.47) or cancer mortality (HR = 0.70, 95% CI: 0.30, 1.60) compared with ApoE4 carriers. These findings suggest that low cholesterol levels are not causally related to increased cancer risk.

  19. Evaluation of the effects of a plasma activated medium on cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohades, S.; Laroussi, M., E-mail: mlarouss@odu.edu; Sears, J.; Barekzi, N.; Razavi, H. [Plasma Engineering and Medicine Institute, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia 23529 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    The interaction of low temperature plasma with liquids is a relevant topic of study to the field of plasma medicine. This is because cells and tissues are normally surrounded or covered by biological fluids. Therefore, the chemistry induced by the plasma in the aqueous state becomes crucial and usually dictates the biological outcomes. This process became even more important after the discovery that plasma activated media can be useful in killing various cancer cell lines. Here, we report on the measurements of concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, a species known to have strong biological effects, produced by application of plasma to a minimum essential culture medium. The activated medium is then used to treat SCaBER cancer cells. Results indicate that the plasma activated medium can kill the cancer cells in a dose dependent manner, retain its killing effect for several hours, and is as effective as apoptosis inducing drugs.

  20. Evaluation of the effects of a plasma activated medium on cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohades, S.; Laroussi, M.; Sears, J.; Barekzi, N.; Razavi, H.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of low temperature plasma with liquids is a relevant topic of study to the field of plasma medicine. This is because cells and tissues are normally surrounded or covered by biological fluids. Therefore, the chemistry induced by the plasma in the aqueous state becomes crucial and usually dictates the biological outcomes. This process became even more important after the discovery that plasma activated media can be useful in killing various cancer cell lines. Here, we report on the measurements of concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, a species known to have strong biological effects, produced by application of plasma to a minimum essential culture medium. The activated medium is then used to treat SCaBER cancer cells. Results indicate that the plasma activated medium can kill the cancer cells in a dose dependent manner, retain its killing effect for several hours, and is as effective as apoptosis inducing drugs.

  1. Evaluation of the effects of a plasma activated medium on cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of low temperature plasma with liquids is a relevant topic of study to the field of plasma medicine. This is because cells and tissues are normally surrounded or covered by biological fluids. Therefore, the chemistry induced by the plasma in the aqueous state becomes crucial and usually dictates the biological outcomes. This process became even more important after the discovery that plasma activated media can be useful in killing various cancer cell lines. Here, we report on the measurements of concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, a species known to have strong biological effects, produced by application of plasma to a minimum essential culture medium. The activated medium is then used to treat SCaBER cancer cells. Results indicate that the plasma activated medium can kill the cancer cells in a dose dependent manner, retain its killing effect for several hours, and is as effective as apoptosis inducing drugs

  2. Proteomic profiling of human colon cancer cells treated with the histone deacetylase inhibitor belinostat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Hans Christian; Petersen, Jørgen; Nielsen, Søren Jensby; Morsczeck, Christian; Morszeck, Christian; Jensen, Peter B; Sehested, Maxwell; Grauslund, Morten

    2010-01-01

    the human colon cancer cell line HCT116. Protein extracts from untreated HCT116 cells, and cells grown for 24 h in the presence of 1 and 10 muM belinostat were analysed by 2-D gel electrophoresis. Proteins were visualized by colloidal Coomassie blue staining and quantitative analysis of gel images...... HSP90B that all were related to the proto-oncogene proteins p53, Myc, activator protein 1, and c-fos protein. The modulation of these proteins is consistent with the observations that belinostat is able to inhibit clonogenic cell growth of HCT116 cells and the biological role of these proteins will be...

  3. Micronucleus formation induced by dielectric barrier discharge plasma exposure in brain cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Nagendra K.; Uhm, Hansup; Ha Choi, Eun

    2012-02-01

    Induction of micronucleus formation (cytogenetic damage) in brain cancer cells upon exposure of dielectric barrier discharge plasma has been investigated. We have investigated the influence of exposure and incubation times on T98G brain cancer cells by using growth kinetic, clonogenic, and micronucleus formation assay. We found that micronucleus formation rate directly depends on the plasma exposure time. It is also shown that colony formation capacity of cells has been inhibited by the treatment of plasma at all doses. Cell death and micronucleus formation are shown to be significantly elevated by 120 and 240 s exposure of dielectric barrier discharge plasma.

  4. Plasma Protein Carbonyls and Breast Cancer Risk in Sisters Discordant for Breast Cancer from the New York Site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry

    OpenAIRE

    Zipprich, Jennifer; Terry, Mary Beth; Liao, Yuyan; Agrawal, Meenakshi; Gurvich, Irina; Senie, Ruby; Santella, Regina M.

    2009-01-01

    Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) are important in the pathogenesis of many diseases, including breast cancer. Several population-based case-control studies have demonstrated that various biomarkers of oxidative stress are associated with an increase in breast cancer risk. We selected sisters discordant for breast cancer (n=645) from the New York site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry to explore factors that contribute to variation in plasma protein carbonyls, and to determine whether this bio...

  5. Development of micro immunosensors to study genomic and proteomic biomarkers related to cancer and Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhulkar, Shradha

    A report from the National Institutes of Health defines a disease biomarker as a "characteristic that is objectively measured and evaluated as an indicator of normal biologic processes, pathogenic processes, or pharmacologic responses to a therapeutic intervention." Early diagnosis is a crucial factor for incurable disease such as cancer and Alzheimer's disease (AD). During the last decade researchers have discovered that biochemical changes caused by a disease can be detected considerably earlier as compared to physical manifestations/symptoms. In this dissertation electrochemical detection was utilized as the detection strategy as it offers high sensitivity/specificity, ease of operation, and capability of miniaturization and multiplexed detection. Electrochemical detection of biological analytes is an established field, and has matured at a rapid pace during the last 50 years and adapted itself to advances in micro/nanofabrication procedures. Carbon fiber microelectrodes were utilized as the platform sensor due to their high signal to noise ratio, ease and low-cost of fabrication, biocompatibility, and active carbon surface which allows conjugation with biorecognition moieties. This dissertation specifically focuses on the detection of 3 extensively validated biomarkers for cancer and AD. Firstly, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) a cancer biomarker was detected using a one-step, reagentless immunosensing strategy. The immunosensing strategy allowed a rapid and sensitive means of VEGF detection with a detection limit of about 38 pg/mL with a linear dynamic range of 0--100 pg/mL. Direct detection of AD-related biomarker amyloid beta (Abeta) was achieved by exploiting its inherent electroactivity. The quantification of the ratio of Abeta1-40/42 (or Abeta ratio) has been established as a reliable test to diagnose AD through human clinical trials. Triple barrel carbon fiber microelectrodes were used to simultaneously detect Abeta1-40 and Abeta1-42 in

  6. Intracellular effects of atmospheric-pressure plasmas on melanoma cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishaq, M., E-mail: ishaqmusarat@gmail.com [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC 3002 (Australia); Comonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Bazaka, K. [Institute for Health and Biomedical Innovation, School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia); Ostrikov, K. [Comonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Institute for Health and Biomedical Innovation, School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia)

    2015-12-15

    Gas discharge plasmas formed at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature have recently been shown as a promising tool for cancer treatment. The mechanism of the plasma action is attributed to generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, electric fields, charges, and photons. The relative importance of different modes of action of atmospheric-pressure plasmas depends on the process parameters and specific treatment objects. Hence, an in-depth understanding of biological mechanisms that underpin plasma-induced death in cancer cells is required to optimise plasma processing conditions. Here, the intracellular factors involved in the observed anti-cancer activity in melanoma Mel007 cells are studied, focusing on the effect of the plasma treatment dose on the expression of tumour suppressor protein TP73. Over-expression of TP73 causes cell growth arrest and/or apoptosis, and hence can potentially be targeted to enhance killing efficacy and selectivity of the plasma treatment. It is shown that the plasma treatment induces dose-dependent up-regulation of TP73 gene expression, resulting in significantly elevated levels of TP73 RNA and protein in plasma-treated melanoma cells. Silencing of TP73 expression by means of RNA interference inhibited the anticancer effects of the plasma, similar to the effect of caspase inhibitor z-VAD or ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine. These results confirm the role of TP73 protein in dose-dependent regulation of anticancer activity of atmospheric-pressure plasmas.

  7. Intracellular effects of atmospheric-pressure plasmas on melanoma cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishaq, M.; Bazaka, K.; Ostrikov, K.

    2015-12-01

    Gas discharge plasmas formed at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature have recently been shown as a promising tool for cancer treatment. The mechanism of the plasma action is attributed to generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, electric fields, charges, and photons. The relative importance of different modes of action of atmospheric-pressure plasmas depends on the process parameters and specific treatment objects. Hence, an in-depth understanding of biological mechanisms that underpin plasma-induced death in cancer cells is required to optimise plasma processing conditions. Here, the intracellular factors involved in the observed anti-cancer activity in melanoma Mel007 cells are studied, focusing on the effect of the plasma treatment dose on the expression of tumour suppressor protein TP73. Over-expression of TP73 causes cell growth arrest and/or apoptosis, and hence can potentially be targeted to enhance killing efficacy and selectivity of the plasma treatment. It is shown that the plasma treatment induces dose-dependent up-regulation of TP73 gene expression, resulting in significantly elevated levels of TP73 RNA and protein in plasma-treated melanoma cells. Silencing of TP73 expression by means of RNA interference inhibited the anticancer effects of the plasma, similar to the effect of caspase inhibitor z-VAD or ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine. These results confirm the role of TP73 protein in dose-dependent regulation of anticancer activity of atmospheric-pressure plasmas.

  8. Intracellular effects of atmospheric-pressure plasmas on melanoma cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas discharge plasmas formed at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature have recently been shown as a promising tool for cancer treatment. The mechanism of the plasma action is attributed to generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, electric fields, charges, and photons. The relative importance of different modes of action of atmospheric-pressure plasmas depends on the process parameters and specific treatment objects. Hence, an in-depth understanding of biological mechanisms that underpin plasma-induced death in cancer cells is required to optimise plasma processing conditions. Here, the intracellular factors involved in the observed anti-cancer activity in melanoma Mel007 cells are studied, focusing on the effect of the plasma treatment dose on the expression of tumour suppressor protein TP73. Over-expression of TP73 causes cell growth arrest and/or apoptosis, and hence can potentially be targeted to enhance killing efficacy and selectivity of the plasma treatment. It is shown that the plasma treatment induces dose-dependent up-regulation of TP73 gene expression, resulting in significantly elevated levels of TP73 RNA and protein in plasma-treated melanoma cells. Silencing of TP73 expression by means of RNA interference inhibited the anticancer effects of the plasma, similar to the effect of caspase inhibitor z-VAD or ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine. These results confirm the role of TP73 protein in dose-dependent regulation of anticancer activity of atmospheric-pressure plasmas

  9. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis of plasma reveals abnormalities in lipid metabolism proteins in chronic kidney disease-related atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luczak, Magdalena; Formanowicz, Dorota; Marczak, Łukasz; Suszyńska-Zajczyk, Joanna; Pawliczak, Elżbieta; Wanic-Kossowska, Maria; Stobiecki, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a considerably higher risk of death due to cardiovascular causes. Using an iTRAQ MS/MS approach, we investigated the alterations in plasma protein accumulation in patients with CKD and classical cardiovascular disease (CVD) without CKD. The proteomic analysis led to the identification of 130 differentially expressed proteins among CVD and CKD patients and healthy volunteers. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that 29 differentially expressed proteins were involved in lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis, 20 of which were apolipoproteins and constituents of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Although dyslipidemia is common in CKD patients, we found that significant changes in apolipoproteins were not strictly associated with changes in plasma lipid levels. A lack of correlation between apoB and LDL concentration and an inverse relationship of some proteins with the HDL level were revealed. An increased level of apolipoprotein AIV, adiponectin, or apolipoprotein C, despite their anti-atherogenic properties, was not associated with a decrease in cardiovascular event risk in CKD patients. The presence of the distinctive pattern of apolipoproteins demonstrated in this study may suggest that lipid abnormalities in CKD are characterized by more qualitative abnormalities and may be related to HDL function rather than HDL deficiency. PMID:27600335

  10. Integrated transcriptomic and proteomic analysis identifies protein kinase CK2 as a key signaling node in an inflammatory cytokine network in ovarian cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulbe, Hagen; Iorio, Francesco; Chakravarty, Probir; Milagre, Carla S.; Moore, Robert; Thompson, Richard G.; Everitt, Gemma; Canosa, Monica; Montoya, Alexander; Drygin, Denis; Braicu, Ioana; Sehouli, Jalid; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Cutillas, Pedro R.; Balkwill, Frances R.

    2016-01-01

    We previously showed how key pathways in cancer-related inflammation and Notch signaling are part of an autocrine malignant cell network in ovarian cancer. This network, which we named the “TNF network”, has paracrine actions within the tumor microenvironment, influencing angiogenesis and the immune cell infiltrate. The aim of this study was to identify critical regulators in the signaling pathways of the TNF network in ovarian cancer cells that might be therapeutic targets. To achieve our aim, we used a systems biology approach, combining data from phospho-proteomic mass spectrometry and gene expression array analysis. Among the potential therapeutic kinase targets identified was the protein kinase Casein kinase II (CK2). Knockdown of CK2 expression in malignant cells by siRNA or treatment with the specific CK2 inhibitor CX-4945 significantly decreased Notch signaling and reduced constitutive cytokine release in ovarian cancer cell lines that expressed the TNF network as well as malignant cells isolated from high grade serous ovarian cancer ascites. The expression of the same cytokines was also inhibited after treatment with CX-4945 in a 3D organotypic model. CK2 inhibition was associated with concomitant inhibition of proliferative activity, reduced angiogenesis and experimental peritoneal ovarian tumor growth. In conclusion, we have identified kinases, particularly CK2, associated with the TNF network that may play a central role in sustaining the cytokine network and/or mediating its effects in ovarian cancer. PMID:26871292

  11. Serum proteomic profile of cutaneous malignant melanoma and relation to cancer progression: association to tumor derived alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Marilena; Mitri, Marianna De; Chiriacò, Fernanda; Leo, Giuseppe; Brienza, Ettore; Maffia, Michele

    2009-10-01

    Currently clinical outcome in melanoma is not predictable by known serum biomarkers. The only reliable tool for the diagnosis of this tumor is the histopathological assay after surgical removing. We used a proteomic approach in order to identify novel non-invasive serum biomarkers of melanoma. Serum proteomic maps showed different patterns in relation to the presence and progression of the tumor in five regions of the map. Differently expressed spots were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Significant increases of expression were found for transthyretin (TTR) and angiotensinogen (AGT) while vitamin D binding protein (DBP) expression was decreased in presence of melanoma. Interestingly, protein expression came back to control values in stages I and II of the disease after 1 month since surgical removal of suspected melanoma. We related the decrease of DBP spot to the impaired immune response of cancer patients. In fact cancer cells release the alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase that can deglycosylate DBP thus interfering with the immune cascade response in which DBP is involved, leading to immunosuppression in melanoma patients. Specific enzymatic activity of serum alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase was significantly increased in stage III melanoma patients, but not in early stages. This enzymatic assay may provide a non-invasive way of evaluation of melanoma severity. PMID:19394758

  12. Effects of cold atmospheric plasma generated in DI water on Cancer cells

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Zhitong; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Gjika, Eda; Keidar, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) has been shown to affect cells not only directly, but also by means of indirect treatment with previously prepared plasma stimulated solution. The objective of this study is to reveal the effects of plasma-stimulated media (PSM) on breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) and gastric cancer cells (NCl-N87). In our experiments, cold atmospheric plasma is generated in water using helium as carrier gas. The plasma generated in DI water during a 30-minute treatment had the strongest affect in inducing apoptosis in cultured human breast and gastric cancer cells. This result can be attributed to the presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) produced in water during treatment.

  13. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Generated in Water and its Potential Use in Cancer Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Zhitong; Lin, Li; Keidar, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) has been emerged as a novel technology for cancer treatment. CAP can directly treat cells and tissue but such direct application is limited to skin or can be invoked as a supplement during open surgery. In this letter we report indirect plasma treatment using CAP produced in a water using three gases as carrier (argon, helium and nitrogen). Plasma stimulated water was applied to human breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231). MTT assays tests showed that using argon plasma had the strongest effect on inducing apoptosis in cultured human breast cancer cells. This result is attributed to the elevated production of the reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species in water in the case of argon plasma.

  14. Proteomics-Based Analysis of Protein Complexes in Pluripotent Stem Cells and Cancer Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhir, Putty-Reddy; Chen, Chung-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    A protein complex consists of two or more proteins that are linked together through protein-protein interactions. The proteins show stable/transient and direct/indirect interactions within the protein complex or between the protein complexes. Protein complexes are involved in regulation of most of the cellular processes and molecular functions. The delineation of protein complexes is important to expand our knowledge on proteins functional roles in physiological and pathological conditions. The genetic yeast-2-hybrid method has been extensively used to characterize protein-protein interactions. Alternatively, a biochemical-based affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry (AP-MS) approach has been widely used to characterize the protein complexes. In the AP-MS method, a protein complex of a target protein of interest is purified using a specific antibody or an affinity tag (e.g., DYKDDDDK peptide (FLAG) and polyhistidine (His)) and is subsequently analyzed by means of MS. Tandem affinity purification, a two-step purification system, coupled with MS has been widely used mainly to reduce the contaminants. We review here a general principle for AP-MS-based characterization of protein complexes and we explore several protein complexes identified in pluripotent stem cell biology and cancer biology as examples. PMID:27011181

  15. Proteomics of the Lysosome

    OpenAIRE

    Lübke, Torben; Lobel, Peter; Sleat, David

    2008-01-01

    Defects in lysosomal function have been associated with numerous monogenic human diseases typically classified as lysosomal storage diseases. However, there is increasing evidence that lysosomal proteins are also involved in more widespread human diseases including cancer and Alzheimer disease. Thus, there is a continuing interest in understanding the cellular functions of the lysosome and an emerging approach to this is the identification of its constituent proteins by proteomic analyses. To...

  16. Measurement of plasma-generated RONS in the cancer cells exposed by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joh, Hea Min; Baek, Eun Jeong; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, Tae Hun

    2015-09-01

    The plasma-induced reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) could result in cellular responses including DNA damages and apoptotic cell death. These chemical species, O, O2-,OH, NO, and NO2-,exhibit strong oxidative stress and/or trigger signaling pathways in biological cells. Each plasma-generated chemical species having biological implication should be identified and quantitatively measured. For quantitative measurement of RONS, this study is divided into three stages; plasma diagnostics, plasma-liquid interactions, plasma-liquid-cell interactions. First, the optical characteristics of the discharges were obtained by optical emission spectroscopy to identify various excited plasma species. And the characteristics of voltage-current waveforms, gas temperature, and plume length with varying control parameters were measured. Next, atmospheric pressure plasma jet was applied on the liquid. The estimated OH radical densities were obtained by ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy at the liquid surface. And NO2-is detected by Griess test and compared between the pure liquid and the cell-containing liquid. Finally, bio-assays were performed on plasma treated human lung cancer cells (A549). Intracellular ROS production was measured using DCF-DA. Among these RONS, productions of NO and OH within cells were measured by DAF-2DA and APF, respectively. The data are very suggestive that there is a strong correlation among the production of RONS in the plasmas, liquids, and cells.

  17. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry for in situ proteomic analysis of preneoplastic lesions in pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara M Grüner

    Full Text Available The identification of new biomarkers for preneoplastic pancreatic lesions (PanINs, IPMNs and early pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is crucial due to the diseases high mortality rate upon late detection. To address this task we used the novel technique of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (IMS on genetically engineered mouse models (GEM of pancreatic cancer. Various GEM were analyzed with MALDI IMS to investigate the peptide/protein-expression pattern of precursor lesions in comparison to normal pancreas and PDAC with cellular resolution. Statistical analysis revealed several discriminative m/z-species between normal and diseased tissue. Intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN could be distinguished from normal pancreatic tissue and PDAC by 26 significant m/z-species. Among these m/z-species, we identified Albumin and Thymosin-beta 4 by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS, which were further validated by immunohistochemistry, western blot, quantitative RT-PCR and ELISA in both murine and human tissue. Thymosin-beta 4 was found significantly increased in sera of mice with PanIN lesions. Upregulated PanIN expression of Albumin was accompanied by increased expression of liver-restricted genes suggesting a hepatic transdifferentiation program of preneoplastic cells. In conclusion we show that GEM of endogenous PDAC are a suitable model system for MALDI-IMS and subsequent LC-MS/MS analysis, allowing in situ analysis of small precursor lesions and identification of differentially expressed peptides and proteins.

  18. DETECTION OF p53 GENE MUTATION IN PLASMA OF PATIENTS WITH GASTRIC CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏鹏程; 李子禹; 张连海; 万文徽; 任晖; 张桂国; 王怡; 邓国仁; 季加孚

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigated p53 gene mutation in plasma of gastric cancer patients. Methods: DNA extracted from plasma and matched tumor and tumor-adjacent non-cancerous tissues of 96 gastric cancer patients, and DNA from 20 healthy volunteers were studied. Exon 5, 6, 7, and 8 of p53 were amplified by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). The mutation status was analyzed by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC), followed by direct sequencing of cases with aberrant chromatographic patterns. Results: Heterozygous mutations of p53 gene were detected in 19.9% (19/96) of primary tumor tissues and 5.2% (5/96) of corresponding plasma. All p53 gene mutations detected in plasma DNA consisted with mutations in the matched primary tumor samples. Neither the tumor-adjacent gastric mucosa tissues nor control plasma from healthy volunteers showed p53 gene mutation. No correlation was found between p53 mutation status and clinicopathological features of gastric cancer patients. Conclusion: p53 gene mutation in plasma can be detected in tissues and plasma of gastric cancer patients, which could be applied in screening and surveillance of this disease.

  19. From DNA repair to proteome protection: new molecular insights for preventing non-melanoma skin cancers and skin aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuele, Enzo; Spencer, James M; Braun, Martin

    2014-03-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC) are the most common human neoplasms and continue to represent an important public health issue with greater than one million cases diagnosed each year. The primary factor contributing to the molecular pathogenesis of NMSC is unprotected skin exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, ie, UVA (wavelength: 315-400 nm) and UVB rays (wavelength: 280-315 nm) with additional albeit less damaging factors of infrared radiation (wavelength: ~750 nm-1 mm) and environmental pollutants. Skin carcinogenesis by DNA damage is the current predominant paradigm of UV toxicity, which may be caused by direct damaging effects of energy deposited by photons or indirect oxidative action of short-lived reactive oxygen species (ROS) formed from water that reacts with biomacromolecules. UV rays are capable to induce direct both DNA damages, mainly consisting in the formation of helix-distorting photoproducts such as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), as well as oxidative damage to DNA bases, including the formation of 8-oxo-7, 8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8OHdG). Growing evidence also suggests that the efficiency of DNA repair after exposure to UV radiation is crucially dependent on the levels of oxidative protein damage, including but not limited to DNA repair proteins. Besides DNA lesions, UV-induced oxidative stress can indeed result in carbonylation of proteins, a major form of irreversible protein damage that inactivates their biological function. Interestingly, microorganisms characterized by extreme resistance to UV rays have an intrinsic capacity to protect their proteome, rather than genome, from radiation-induced damage, suggesting that protein carbonylation (PC) may serve as a reliable and innovative biomarker of UV photodamage. This review discusses the main DNA and protein markers of UV-induced damage (eg, CPDs, 8OHdG, and PC) and their relationship and importance to the current understanding of skin carcinogenesis. The identification of key DNA

  20. Combined perioperative plasma endoglin and VEGF-A assessment in colorectal cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogusław Kedra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer growth and spread is absolutely dependent on angiogenesis with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF being the most important cytokine involved in the process. Endoglin, a membrane co-receptor for TGF-beta, has recently emerged as a sensitive index of cancer stage. There is now sufficient evidence indicating that microvessel density assessed by endoglin-immunostaining correlates with stage of colorectal cancer and patient survival. An association of a soluble form of endoglin with lymph node and distant metastases has recently been reported in two studies. Both of them used local elaborated immunoassays for endoglin assessment. The aim of our study was to determine the efficacy of plasma endoglin, assessed using a commercial kit, as a marker of tumor spread and distant metastases in colorectal cancer patients. We studied 48 colorectal cancer patients, compared with 22 healthy subjects, using ELISA. We observed that colorectal cancer patients had increased plasma VEGF-A, but not endoglin levels. However, we found an association of plasma endoglin with the stage of malignancy. Endoglin levels were increased in metastasis-positive patients when compared to both metastasis-negative patients and healthy volunteers. Plasma endoglin correlated with VEGF-A, CEA and CA19.9. Endoglin assessment in plasma does not seem useful as a maker of colorectal cancer. Our observations indicate however that it might be helpful in selecting patients with metastatic disease.

  1. Combined perioperative plasma endoglin and VEGF--a assessment in colorectal cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Pawlak

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer growth and spread is absolutely dependent on angiogenesis with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF being the most important cytokine involved in the process. Endoglin, a membrane co-receptor for TGF-beta, has recently emerged as a sensitive index of cancer stage. There is now sufficient evidence indicating that microvessel density assessed by endoglin-immunostaining can correlate with stage of colorectal cancer and patient survival. An association of a soluble form of endoglin with lymph node and distant metastases has recently been reported in two studies. Both of them used local elaborated immunoassays for endoglin assessment. The aim of our study was to determine the efficacy of plasma endoglin, assessed using a commercial kit, as a marker of tumor spread and distant metastases in colorectal cancer patients. We studied 48 colorectal cancer patients, compared with 22 healthy subjects, using ELISA. We observed that colorectal cancer patients had increased plasma VEGF-A, but not endoglin levels. However, we found an association of plasma endoglin with the stage of malignancy. Endoglin levels were increased in metastasis-positive patients when compared to both metastasis-negative patients and healthy volunteers. Plasma endoglin correlated with VEGF-A, CEA and CA19.9. Endoglin assessment in plasma does not seem useful as a maker of colorectal cancer. Our observations indicate however that it might be helpful in selecting patients with metastatic disease.

  2. Applications of proteomics in hepatic diseases research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN; Wei; HE; Fuchu

    2004-01-01

    Proteomics has become an important part in the leading research area and been widely used in the disease-associated study. In hepatic research field, proteomics could be applied in study of hepatic diseases including liver cancer, cirrhosis and hepatotoxicities, etc. Significant proteins could be identified as biomarkers, drug targets and clues for pathogenesis illumination.

  3. Proteomic patterns analysis with multivariate calculations as a promising tool for prompt differentiation of early stage lung tissue with cancer and unchanged tissue material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grodzki Tomasz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancer diagnosis in tissue material with commonly used histological techniques is sometimes inconvenient and in a number of cases leads to ambiguous conclusions. Frequently advanced immunostaining techniques have to be employed, yet they are both time consuming and limited. In this study a proteomic approach is presented which may help provide unambiguous pathologic diagnosis of tissue material. Methods Lung tissue material found to be pathologically changed was prepared to isolate proteome with fast and non selective procedure. Isolated peptides and proteins in ranging from 3.5 to 20 kDa were analysed directly using high resolution mass spectrometer (MALDI-TOF/TOF with sinapic acid as a matrix. Recorded complex spectra of a single run were then analyzed with multivariate statistical analysis algorithms (principle component analysis, classification methods. In the applied protocol we focused on obtaining the spectra richest in protein signals constituting a pattern of change within the sample containing detailed information about its protein composition. Advanced statistical methods were to indicate differences between examined groups. Results Obtained results indicate changes in proteome profiles of changed tissues in comparison to physiologically unchanged material (control group which were reflected in the result of principle component analysis (PCA. Points representing spectra of control group were located in different areas of multidimensional space and were less diffused in comparison to cancer tissues. Three different classification algorithms showed recognition capability of 100% regarding classification of examined material into an appropriate group. Conclusion The application of the presented protocol and method enabled finding pathological changes in tissue material regardless of localization and size of abnormalities in the sample volume. Proteomic profile as a complex, rich in signals spectrum of proteins

  4. Preoperative plasma TIMP-1 is an independent prognostic indicator in patients with primary colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birgisson, Helgi; Nielsen, Hans J.; Christensen, Ib Jarle;

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested plasma tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) as a stage independent prognostic marker in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. The aim was to validate plasma TIMP-1 and serum carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA) levels as prognostic indicators in an independent...... population-based cohort of patients with CRC....

  5. Role of Proteomics in the Development of Personalized Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Kewal K

    2016-01-01

    Advances in proteomic technologies have made import contribution to the development of personalized medicine by facilitating detection of protein biomarkers, proteomics-based molecular diagnostics, as well as protein biochips and pharmacoproteomics. Application of nanobiotechnology in proteomics, nanoproteomics, has further enhanced applications in personalized medicine. Proteomics-based molecular diagnostics will have an important role in the diagnosis of certain conditions and understanding the pathomechanism of disease. Proteomics will be a good bridge between diagnostics and therapeutics; the integration of these will be important for advancing personalized medicine. Use of proteomic biomarkers and combination of pharmacoproteomics with pharmacogenomics will enable stratification of clinical trials and improve monitoring of patients for development of personalized therapies. Proteomics is an important component of several interacting technologies used for development of personalized medicine, which is depicted graphically. Finally, cancer is a good example of applications of proteomic technologies for personalized management of cancer. PMID:26827601

  6. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Air plasma coupled with antibody-conjugated nanoparticles: a new weapon against cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, G. C.; Kim, G. J.; Park, S. R.; Jeon, S. M.; Seo, H. J.; Iza, F.; Lee, J. K.

    2009-02-01

    Ambient air plasmas have been known to kill cancer cells. To enhance selectivity we have used antibody-conjugated nanoparticles. We achieved five times enhancement of melanoma cell death over the case of the plasma alone by using an air plasma with gold nanoparticles bound to anti-FAK antibodies. Our results show that this new interdisciplinary technique has enormous potential for use as a complement to conventional therapies.

  7. Quantitative proteomic analysis of human lung tumor xenografts treated with the ectopic ATP synthase inhibitor citreoviridin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsuan Wu

    Full Text Available ATP synthase is present on the plasma membrane of several types of cancer cells. Citreoviridin, an ATP synthase inhibitor, selectively suppresses the proliferation and growth of lung cancer without affecting normal cells. However, the global effects of targeting ectopic ATP synthase in vivo have not been well defined. In this study, we performed quantitative proteomic analysis using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ and provided a comprehensive insight into the complicated regulation by citreoviridin in a lung cancer xenograft model. With high reproducibility of the quantitation, we obtained quantitative proteomic profiling with 2,659 proteins identified. Bioinformatics analysis of the 141 differentially expressed proteins selected by their relative abundance revealed that citreoviridin induces alterations in the expression of glucose metabolism-related enzymes in lung cancer. The up-regulation of enzymes involved in gluconeogenesis and storage of glucose indicated that citreoviridin may reduce the glycolytic intermediates for macromolecule synthesis and inhibit cell proliferation. Using comprehensive proteomics, the results identify metabolic aspects that help explain the antitumorigenic effect of citreoviridin in lung cancer, which may lead to a better understanding of the links between metabolism and tumorigenesis in cancer therapy.

  8. Plasma enterolactone and incidence of endometrial cancer in a case-cohort study of Danish women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Julie; Kyrø, Cecilie; Knudsen, Knud E B; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Christensen, Jane; Kristensen, Mette; Würtz, Anne M L; Johnsen, Nina Føns; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja

    2013-01-01

    The phyto-oestrogen enterolactone has been hypothesised to protect against hormone-dependent cancers, probably through its anti-oestrogenic potential. We investigated whether a higher level of plasma enterolactone was associated with a lower incidence of endometrial cancer in a case-cohort study in...

  9. Plasma levels of trefoil factors are increased in patients with advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, E.M.; Borregaard, Michael Krabbe; Poulsen, Steen Seier;

    2006-01-01

    Through cDNA array analyses and immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays, trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) was recently shown to be overexpressed in prostate cancer. The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of using the levels of trefoil factors as a plasma marker for prostate cancer....

  10. Principles of using Cold Atmospheric Plasma Stimulated Media for Cancer Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Dayun Yan; Annie Talbot; Niki Nourmohammadi; Xiaoqian Cheng; Jerome Canady; Jonathan Sherman; Michael Keidar

    2015-01-01

    To date, the significant anti-cancer capacity of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) on dozens of cancer cell lines has been demonstrated in vitro and in mice models. Conventionally, CAP was directly applied to irradiate cancer cells or tumor tissue. Over past three years, the CAP irradiated media was also found to kill cancer cells as effectively as the direct CAP treatment. As a novel strategy, using the CAP stimulated (CAPs) media has become a promising anti-cancer tool. In this study, we demons...

  11. Impact of elective resection on plasma TIMP-1 levels in patients with colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, J. H.; Basse, L.; Svedsen, M. N.; Werther, K.; Brünner, N.; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    -1 measurements. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Consecutively, 48 patients with colon cancer (CC) and 12 patients with nonmalignant colonic disease were randomised to undergo elective laparoscopically assisted or open resection followed by fast track recovery. Plasma samples were collected just before and 1......OBJECTIVE: Pre- and post-operative plasma tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) levels have a prognostic impact on patients with colorectal cancer. However, the surgical trauma may play an essential role in regulation of plasma TIMP-1 levels, which in turn may influence subsequent TIMP...

  12. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Generated in Water and its Potential Use in Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Zhitong; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Li LIN; Keidar, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) has been emerged as a novel technology for cancer treatment. CAP can directly treat cells and tissue but such direct application is limited to skin or can be invoked as a supplement during open surgery. In this letter we report indirect plasma treatment using CAP produced in a water using three gases as carrier (argon, helium and nitrogen). Plasma stimulated water was applied to human breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231). MTT assays tests showed that using argon ...

  13. Increased plasma soluble uPAR level is a risk marker of respiratory cancer in initially cancer-free individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkilde, Anne A; Ladelund, Steen; Andersen, Ove;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is a stable plasma biomarker associated with inflammation and disease. This study tested the association between suPAR levels and incident respiratory, gastrointestinal or other types of cancer in initially cancer-free individuals...... from a general population-based prospective study.METHODS: Baseline plasma samples, baseline characteristics, and follow-up data were available from 2656 individuals from the population-based Danish MONICA10 study, followed for a median of 12.6 years. Cancer was diagnosed according to ICD-8 and ICD-10...... codes and suPAR levels were measured using a commercially available ELISA. The association of suPAR levels with incident cancer during follow-up was analyzed using Cox regression, adjusted for established risk factors and the inflammatory markers C-reactive protein (CRP) and leukocyte numbers...

  14. Exploring the Human Seminal Plasma Proteome: An Unexplored Gold Mine of Biomarker for Male Infertility and Male Reproduction Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Gilany, Kambiz; Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Savadi-Shiraz, Elham; Rezadoost, Hassan; Lakpour, Niknam

    2015-01-01

    Background The human seminal fluid is a complex body fluid. It is not known how many proteins are expressed in the seminal plasma; however in analog with the blood it is possible up to 10,000 proteins are expressed in the seminal plasma. The human seminal fluid is a rich source of potential biomarkers for male infertility and reproduction disorder. Methods In this review, the ongoing list of proteins identified from the human seminal fluid was collected. To date, 4188 redundant proteins of th...

  15. Variable susceptibility of ovarian cancer cells to non-thermal plasma-activated medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsumi, Fumi; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Nakamura, Kae; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Toyokuni, Shinnya; Hori, Masaru; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2016-06-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma has been widely studied in recent years in many fields, including cancer treatment. However, its efficiency for inducing apoptosis sometimes varies depending on the cell species and experimental conditions. The aim of this study was to elucidate what causes these differences in responses to plasma treatment. Using four ovarian cancer cell lines, the cell density had a markedly negative impact on the proliferation inhibition rate (PIR) and it was more obvious in OVCAR-3 and NOS2 cells. Furthermore, TOV21G and ES-2 cells were drastically sensitive to plasma‑activated medium (PAM) compared with the other two cell lines. We demonstrated that the proportion of reactive oxygen species and cell number had a marked impact on the effect of PAM against ovarian cancer cells. Additionally it was suggested that the morphological features of cells were also closely related to the sensitivity of cancer cells to the plasma treatment. PMID:27035127

  16. Changes in the Plasma Proteome of Manduca sexta Larvae in Relation to the Transcriptome Variations after an Immune Challenge: Evidence for High Molecular Weight Immune Complex Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yan; Cao, Xiaolong; Zhang, Shuguang; Rogers, Janet; Hartson, Steve; Jiang, Haobo

    2016-04-01

    Manduca sextais a lepidopteran model widely used to study insect physiological processes, including innate immunity. In this study, we explored the proteomes of cell-free hemolymph from larvae injected with a sterile buffer (C for control) or a mixture of bacteria (I for induced). Of the 654 proteins identified, 70 showed 1.67 to >200-fold abundance increases after the immune challenge; 51 decreased to 0-60% of the control levels. While there was no strong parallel between plasma protein levels and their transcript levels in hemocytes or fat body, the mRNA level changes (i.e.I/C ratios of normalized read numbers) in the tissues concurred with their protein level changes (i.e.I/C ratios of normalized spectral counts) with correlation coefficients of 0.44 and 0.57, respectively. Better correlations support that fat body contributes a more significant portion of the plasma proteins involved in various aspects of innate immunity. Consistently, ratios of mRNA and protein levels were better correlated for immunity-related proteins than unrelated ones. There is a set of proteins whose apparent molecular masses differ considerably from the calculatedMr's, suggestive of posttranslational modifications. In addition, some lowMrproteins were detected in the range of 80 to >300 kDa on a reducing SDS-polyacrylamide gel, indicating the existence of highMrcovalent complexes. We identified 30 serine proteases and their homologs, 11 of which are known members of an extracellular immune signaling network. Along with our quantitative transcriptome data, the protein identification, inducibility, and association provide leads toward a focused exploration of humoral immunity inM. sexta. PMID:26811355

  17. Alterations in plasma lipid profile patterns in head and neck cancer and oral precancerous conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Prabhudas

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : The changes in lipid profile have long been associated with cancer because lipids play a key role in maintenance of cell integrity. AIMS : The present study evaluated alterations in plasma lipid profile in untreated head and neck cancer patients as well as patients with oral precancerous conditions (OPC and its association with habit of tobacco consumption. MATERIAL AND METHODS : This hospital-based case control study included 184 head and neck cancer patients, 153 patients with OPC and 52 controls. Plasma lipids including: (i Total cholesterol, (ii LDL cholesterol (LDLC, (iii HDL cholesterol (HDLC (iv VLDL cholesterol (VLDLC and (v triglycerides were analysed by spectrophotometric kits. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED : Student′s t-test was performed to compare mean values of the parameters. RESULTS : A significant decrease in plasma total cholesterol and HDLC was observed in cancer patients (P=0.008 and P=0.000 respectively as well as in patients with OPC (P=0.014 and P=0.000, respectively as compared to the controls. The plasma VLDL and triglycerides levels were significantly lower in cancer patients as compared to the patients with OPC (P=0.04 and controls (P=0.059. The tobacco habituates showed lower plasma lipid levels than the non-habituates. Our data strengthen the evidence of an inverse relationship between plasma lipid levels and head and neck malignancies as well as OPC. CONCLUSION :The lower levels of plasma cholesterol and other lipid constituents in patients might be due to their increased utilization by neoplastic cells for new membrane biogenesis. The findings strongly warrant an in-depth study of alterations in plasma lipid profile in head neck cancer patients.

  18. Comprehensive Proteomic Study of the Antiproliferative Activity of a Polyphenol-Enriched Rosemary Extract on Colon Cancer Cells Using Nanoliquid Chromatography-Orbitrap MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés, Alberto; Artemenko, Konstantin A; Bergquist, Jonas; García-Cañas, Virginia; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2016-06-01

    In this work, a proteomics strategy based on nanoliquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nano-LC-MS/MS) using an Orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometer together with stable isotope dimethyl labeling (DML) is applied to quantitatively examine relative changes in the protein fraction of HT-29 human colon cancer cells treated with different concentrations of a polyphenol-enriched rosemary extract over the time. The major objective of this study was to gain insights into the antiproliferative mechanisms induced by rosemary polyphenols. Using this methodology, 1909 and 698 proteins were identified and quantified in cell extracts. The polyphenol-enriched rosemary extract treatment changed the expression of several proteins in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Most of the altered proteins are implicated in the activation of Nrf2 transcription factor and the unfolded protein response. In conclusion, rosemary polyphenols induced proteomic changes that were related to the attenuation of aggresome formation and activation of autophagy to alleviate cellular stress. PMID:27103343

  19. DNA damage in oral cancer cells induced by nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xu; Klas, Matej; Liu, Yueying; Stack, M. Sharon; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2013-09-01

    The nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) has been shown to effectively induce DNA double strand breaks in SCC-25 oral cancer cells. The APPJ source constructed in our laboratory consists of two external electrodes wrapping around a quartz tube and nitrogen as a feed gas and operates based on dielectric barrier gas discharge. Generally, it is more challenging to ignite plasma in N2 atmosphere than in noble gases. However, this design provides additional advantages such as lower costs compared to the noble gases for future clinical operation. Different parameters of the APPJ configuration were tested in order to determine radiation dosage. To explore the effects of delayed damage and cell self-repairing, various incubation times of cells after plasma treatment were also performed. Reactive species generated in plasma jet and in liquid environment are essential to be identified and quantified, with the aim of unfolding the mystery of detailed mechanisms for plasma-induced cell apoptosis. Moreover, from the comparison of plasma treatment effect on normal oral cells OKF6T, an insight to the selectivity for cancer treatment by APPJ can be explored. All of these studies are critical to better understand the damage responses of normal and abnormal cellular systems to plasma radiation, which are useful for the development of advanced plasma therapy for cancer treatment at a later stage.

  20. Precedent Research on Compact Laser-plasma based Gantry for Cancer Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the precedent R and D to develop the technology of next generation compact particle cancer treatment system based on laser-plasma interaction and to deduce a big project. The subject of this project are the survey of application technology of laser-plasma based particle beam and the design of compact laser-plasma based gantry. The survey of characteristic of particle beam for cancer therapy and present status can be adapted to develop new system. The comparison between particle beams from the existing system and new one based on laser-plasma acceleration will be important to new design and design optimization. The project includes design of multi-dimensional laser transfer beamline, minimization of laser-plasma acceleration chamber, design of effective energy separation/selection system, and radiation safety and local shielding

  1. Comprehensive proteomic analysis of human pancreatic juice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønborg, Mads; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Kristiansen, Troels Zakarias;

    2004-01-01

    chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). A total of 170 unique proteins were identified including known pancreatic cancer tumor markers (e.g., CEA, MUC1) and proteins overexpressed in pancreatic cancers (e.g., hepatocarcinoma-intestine-pancreas/pancreatitis-associated protein (HIP/PAP) and lipocalin 2......Proteomic technologies provide an excellent means for analysis of body fluids for cataloging protein constituents and identifying biomarkers for early detection of cancers. The biomarkers currently available for pancreatic cancer, such as CA19-9, lack adequate sensitivity and specificity...... in this study could be directly assessed for their potential as biomarkers for pancreatic cancer by quantitative proteomics methods or immunoassays....

  2. Impact of elective resection on plasma TIMP-1 levels in patients with colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, J. H.; Basse, L.; Svedsen, M. N.; Werther, K.; Brünner, N.; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Pre- and post-operative plasma tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) levels have a prognostic impact on patients with colorectal cancer. However, the surgical trauma may play an essential role in regulation of plasma TIMP-1 levels, which in turn may influence subsequent TIMP...... preoperative levels 30 days after surgery. Patients undergoing laparoscopically assisted or open resection had similar TIMP-1 levels at each time point. CONCLUSIONS: Major surgery has considerable impact on plasma TIMP-1 levels. Intra- and post-operative changes of plasma TIMP-1 levels are independent of the...

  3. Treatment of gastric cancer cells with non-thermal atmospheric plasma generated in water

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Zhitong; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Gjika, Eda; Keidar, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric plasma (NTAP) can be applied to living tissues and cells as a novel technology for cancer therapy. Even though studies report on the successful use of NTAP to directly irradiate cancer cells, this technology can cause cell death only in the upper 3-5 cell layers. We report on a NTAP argon solution generated in DI water for treating human gastric cancer cells (NCl-N87). Our findings showed that the plasma generated in DI water during a 30-minute treatment had the strongest affect in inducing apoptosis in cultured human gastric cancer cells. This result can be attributed to presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) produced in water during treatment. Furthermore, the data showed that elevated levels of RNS may play an even more significant role than ROS in the rate of apoptosis in gastric cancer cells.

  4. Principles of using Cold Atmospheric Plasma Stimulated Media for Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dayun; Talbot, Annie; Nourmohammadi, Niki; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Canady, Jerome; Sherman, Jonathan; Keidar, Michael

    2015-01-01

    To date, the significant anti-cancer capacity of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) on dozens of cancer cell lines has been demonstrated in vitro and in mice models. Conventionally, CAP was directly applied to irradiate cancer cells or tumor tissue. Over past three years, the CAP irradiated media was also found to kill cancer cells as effectively as the direct CAP treatment. As a novel strategy, using the CAP stimulated (CAPs) media has become a promising anti-cancer tool. In this study, we demonstrated several principles to optimize the anti-cancer capacity of the CAPs media on glioblastoma cells and breast cancer cells. Specifically, using larger wells on a multi-well plate, smaller gaps between the plasma source and the media, and smaller media volume enabled us to obtain a stronger anti-cancer CAPs media composition without increasing the treatment time. Furthermore, cysteine was the main target of effective reactive species in the CAPs media. Glioblastoma cells were more resistant to the CAPs media than breast cancer cells. Glioblastoma cells consumed the effective reactive species faster than breast cancer cells did. In contrast to nitric oxide, hydrogen peroxide was more likely to be the effective reactive species. PMID:26677750

  5. Principles of using Cold Atmospheric Plasma Stimulated Media for Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dayun; Talbot, Annie; Nourmohammadi, Niki; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Canady, Jerome; Sherman, Jonathan; Keidar, Michael

    2015-12-01

    To date, the significant anti-cancer capacity of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) on dozens of cancer cell lines has been demonstrated in vitro and in mice models. Conventionally, CAP was directly applied to irradiate cancer cells or tumor tissue. Over past three years, the CAP irradiated media was also found to kill cancer cells as effectively as the direct CAP treatment. As a novel strategy, using the CAP stimulated (CAPs) media has become a promising anti-cancer tool. In this study, we demonstrated several principles to optimize the anti-cancer capacity of the CAPs media on glioblastoma cells and breast cancer cells. Specifically, using larger wells on a multi-well plate, smaller gaps between the plasma source and the media, and smaller media volume enabled us to obtain a stronger anti-cancer CAPs media composition without increasing the treatment time. Furthermore, cysteine was the main target of effective reactive species in the CAPs media. Glioblastoma cells were more resistant to the CAPs media than breast cancer cells. Glioblastoma cells consumed the effective reactive species faster than breast cancer cells did. In contrast to nitric oxide, hydrogen peroxide was more likely to be the effective reactive species.

  6. Resveratrol suppresses human colon cancer cell proliferation and induces apoptosis via targeting the pentose phosphate and the talin-FAK signaling pathways-A proteomic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddivari Lavanya

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We and others have previously reported that resveratrol (RSV suppresses colon cancer cell proliferation and elevates apoptosis in vitro and/or in vivo, however molecular mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Particularly, little information is available on RSV's effects on metabolic pathways and the cell-extra cellular matrix (ECM communication that are critical for cancer cell growth. To identify important targets of RSV, we analyzed whole protein fractions from HT-29 advanced human colon cancer cell line treated with solvent control, IGF-1 (10 nM and RSV (150 μM using LC/MS/MS-Mud PIT (Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology. Results Pentose phosphate pathway (PPP, a vital metabolic pathway for cell cycle progression, was elevated and suppressed by IGF-1 and RSV, respectively in the HT-29 cell line. Enzymatic assays confirmed RSV suppression of glucose-6 phosphate dehydrogenase (rate limiting and transketolase, key enzymes of the PPP. RSV (150 μM suppressed, whereas IGF-1 (10 nM elevated focal adhesion complex (FAC proteins, talin and pFAK, critical for the cell-ECM communication. Western blotting analyses confirmed the suppression or elevation of these proteins in HT-29 cancer cells treated with RSV or IGF-1, respectively. Conclusions Proteomic analysis enabled us to establish PPP and the talin-pFAK as targets of RSV which suppress cancer cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in the colon cancer cell line HT-29. RSV (150 μM suppressed these pathways in the presence and absence of IGF-1, suggesting its role as a chemo-preventive agent even in obese condition.

  7. Treatment of oral cancer cells with nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurkovich, James; Han, Xu; Coffey, Benjamin; Klas, Matej; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2012-10-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas are specialized types of plasma that are proposed as a new agent to induce death in cancer cells. The experimental phase of this study will test the application of such plasma to SCC-25 oral cancer cells to determine if it is possible to induce apoptosis or necrosis. Different sources are used on the cells to find a configuration which kills cancer cells but has no effect on normal cells. The sources have been developed based on the dielectric barrier discharge between two external electrodes surrounding a dielectric tube; such a configuration has been shown to induce breaks in DNA strands. Each configuration is characterized using an optical emission spectrophotometer and iCCD camera to determine the optimal conditions for inducing cell death. The cells are incubated after irradiation with plasma, and cell death is determined using microscopy imaging to identify antibody interaction within the cells. These studies are important for better understanding of plasma species interactions with cancer cells and mechanisms of DNA damage and at latter stage they will be useful for the development of advanced cancer therapy.

  8. Analysis of non-thermal plasma-induced cell injury in human lung cancer cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurita, Hirofumi; Sano, Kaori; Wada, Motoi; Mizuno, Kazue; Ono, Ryo; Yasuda, Hachiro; Takashima, Kazunori; Mizuno, Akira

    2015-09-01

    Recent progress of biomedical application of atmospheric pressure plasma shows that the biological effects are mainly due to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in liquid produced by the plasma exposure. To elucidate the cellular responses induced by exposure to the plasma, we focused on identification and quantification of reactive chemical species in plasma-exposed cell culture medium, and cell injury in mammalian cells after treatment of the plasma-exposed medium. In this study, we examined human lung cancer cell lines. The contribution of H2O2 to the cellular responses was considered. Here, an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) sustained by a pulsed power supply in argon was used. After APPJ exposure to cell culture medium, RONS detection in liquid was conducted. It showed that OH radical, ONOO-, NO2-, NO3-, and H2O2 were produced in the plasma-exposed medium. Cellular responses of human lung cancer cell lines to the plasma-exposed medium in a concentration-dependence manner were also studied. It showed that the plasma-exposed medium and the H2O2 treatment gave similar reduction in viability and induction of apoptosis. This work was partly supported by MEXT KAKENHI Grant Number 24108005 and JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26390096.

  9. Data from a comparative proteomic analysis of tumor-derived lung-cancer CD105(+) endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hongwei; Cheng, Xiao; Pei, Yihua; Fu, Jianguo; Lyu, Zhi; Peng, Huifang; Yao, Qin; Jiang, Yu; Luo, Lianzhong; Zhuo, Huiqin

    2016-06-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that tumor-derived endothelial cells (TECs) are more relevant for the study of tumor angiogenesis and for screening antiangiogenic drugs than normal ECs (NECs). In this data article, high-purity (>98%) primary CD105(+) NECs and TECs purified from a mouse Lewis lung carcinoma model bearing 0.5 cm tumors were identified using 2D-PAGE and Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS/MS). All the identified proteins were categorized functionally by Gene Ontology (GO) analysis, and gene-pathway annotated by Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). Finally, protein-protein interaction networks were also built. The proteomics and bioinformatics data presented here provide novel insights into the molecular characteristics and the early modulation of the TEC proteome in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27081670

  10. Comparison of the characteristics of atmospheric pressure plasma jets using different working gases and applications to plasma-cancer cell interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hea Min Joh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric pressure plasma jets employing nitrogen, helium, or argon gases driven by low-frequency (several tens of kilohertz ac voltage and pulsed dc voltage were fabricated and characterized. The changes in discharge current, optical emission intensities from reactive radicals, gas temperature, and plume length of plasma jets with the control parameters were measured and compared. The control parameters include applied voltage, working gas, and gas flow rate. As an application to plasma-cancer cell interactions, the effects of atmospheric pressure plasma jet on the morphology and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS level of human lung adenocarcinoma cell (A549 and human bladder cancer cell (EJ were explored. The experimental results show that the plasma can effectively control the intracellular concentrations of ROS. Although there exist slight differences in the production of ROS, helium, argon, or nitrogen plasma jets are found to be useful in enhancing the intracellular ROS concentrations in cancer cells.

  11. Protection Against Lung Cancer Patient Plasma-Induced Lymphocyte Suppression by Ganoderma Lucidum Polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Xin Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study was conducted to determine the potential of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides (Gl-PS in protection against lung cancer patient plasma-induced suppression of lymphocytes. Lung cancer is a major cause of disease and loss of life in the United States and worldwide. Cancer cells release immunosuppressive mediators, such as PGE2, TGF-β, IL-10, and VEGF, to inhibit the immune response to escape from immune surveillance. Gl-PS has been shown to counteract this immune inhibition in an animal cell culture model, and thus to facilitate tumor control. The present study explored whether or not such an effect could also be demonstrated in human lung cancer patients. Methods: Immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, MTT, immunocytochemistry, and western blot analysis were used to assess lymphocyte activation with PHA. Results: The plasma of lung cancer patients suppressed proliferation, CD69 expression, and perforin and granzyme B production in lymphocytes upon activation by PHA, effects that were partially of fully reversed by Gl-PS. Conclusion: Lung cancer patient plasma-induced suppression of lymphocyte activation by phytohemagglutinin may be antagonized fully or partially by Gl-PS, an observation suggesting the potential of Gl-PS in cancer therapy.

  12. Comparative Proteomics of Ovarian Cancer Aggregate Formation Reveals an Increased Expression of Calcium-activated Chloride Channel Regulator 1 (CLCA1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musrap, Natasha; Tuccitto, Alessandra; Karagiannis, George S; Saraon, Punit; Batruch, Ihor; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2015-07-10

    Ovarian cancer is a lethal gynecological disease that is characterized by peritoneal metastasis and increased resistance to conventional chemotherapies. This increased resistance and the ability to spread is often attributed to the formation of multicellular aggregates or spheroids in the peritoneal cavity, which seed abdominal surfaces and organs. Given that the presence of metastatic implants is a predictor of poor survival, a better understanding of how spheroids form is critical to improving patient outcome, and may result in the identification of novel therapeutic targets. Thus, we attempted to gain insight into the proteomic changes that occur during anchorage-independent cancer cell aggregation. As such, an ovarian cancer cell line, OV-90, was cultured in adherent and non-adherent conditions using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). Anchorage-dependent cells (OV-90AD) were grown in tissue culture flasks, whereas anchorage-independent cells (OV-90AI) were grown in suspension using the hanging-drop method. Cellular proteins from both conditions were then identified using LC-MS/MS, which resulted in the quantification of 1533 proteins. Of these, 13 and 6 proteins were up-regulated and down-regulated, respectively, in aggregate-forming cells compared with cells grown as monolayers. Relative gene expression and protein expression of candidates were examined in other cell line models of aggregate formation (TOV-112D and ES-2), which revealed an increased expression of calcium-activated chloride channel regulator 1 (CLCA1). Moreover, inhibitor and siRNA transfection studies demonstrated an apparent effect of CLCA1 on cancer cell aggregation. Further elucidation of the role of CLCA1 in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is warranted. PMID:26004777

  13. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet characterization and applications on melanoma cancer treatment (B/16-F10)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashayekh, Shahriar [Physics Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, 19839-63113 Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rajaee, Hajar; Hassan, Zuhir M. [Imonology Department, Faculty of Medical Science, Tarbiat Modarres University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akhlaghi, Morteza [Laser-Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, 19839-63113 Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokri, Babak [Physics Department and Laser-Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, 19839-63113 Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    A new approach in medicine is the use of cold plasma for various applications such as sterilization blood coagulation and cancer cell treatment. In this paper, a pin-to-hole plasma jet for biological applications has been designed and manufactured and characterized. The characterization includes power consumption via Lissajous method, thermal behavior of atmospheric-pressure plasma jet by using Infra-red camera as a novel method and using Speicair software to determine vibrational and transitional temperatures, and optical emission spectroscopy to determine the generated species. Treatment of Melanoma cancer cells (B16/F10) was also implemented, and tetrazolium salt dye (MTT assay) and flow cytometry were used to evaluate viability. Effect of ultraviolet photons on cancerous cells was also observed using an MgF{sub 2} crystal with MTT assay. Finally, in-vivo studies on C57 type mice were also done in order to have a better understanding of the effects in real conditions.

  14. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet characterization and applications on melanoma cancer treatment (B/16-F10)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashayekh, Shahriar; Rajaee, Hajar; Akhlaghi, Morteza; Shokri, Babak; Hassan, Zuhir M.

    2015-09-01

    A new approach in medicine is the use of cold plasma for various applications such as sterilization blood coagulation and cancer cell treatment. In this paper, a pin-to-hole plasma jet for biological applications has been designed and manufactured and characterized. The characterization includes power consumption via Lissajous method, thermal behavior of atmospheric-pressure plasma jet by using Infra-red camera as a novel method and using Speicair software to determine vibrational and transitional temperatures, and optical emission spectroscopy to determine the generated species. Treatment of Melanoma cancer cells (B16/F10) was also implemented, and tetrazolium salt dye (MTT assay) and flow cytometry were used to evaluate viability. Effect of ultraviolet photons on cancerous cells was also observed using an MgF2 crystal with MTT assay. Finally, in-vivo studies on C57 type mice were also done in order to have a better understanding of the effects in real conditions.

  15. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet characterization and applications on melanoma cancer treatment (B/16-F10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new approach in medicine is the use of cold plasma for various applications such as sterilization blood coagulation and cancer cell treatment. In this paper, a pin-to-hole plasma jet for biological applications has been designed and manufactured and characterized. The characterization includes power consumption via Lissajous method, thermal behavior of atmospheric-pressure plasma jet by using Infra-red camera as a novel method and using Speicair software to determine vibrational and transitional temperatures, and optical emission spectroscopy to determine the generated species. Treatment of Melanoma cancer cells (B16/F10) was also implemented, and tetrazolium salt dye (MTT assay) and flow cytometry were used to evaluate viability. Effect of ultraviolet photons on cancerous cells was also observed using an MgF2 crystal with MTT assay. Finally, in-vivo studies on C57 type mice were also done in order to have a better understanding of the effects in real conditions

  16. Proteomic profiling of mammary carcinomas identifies C7orf24, a gamma-glutamyl cyclotransferase, as a potential cancer biomarker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromov, Pavel; Gromova, Irina; Friis, Esbern;

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in women today and is the most common cancer (excluding skin cancers) among women in the Western world. Although cancers detected by screening mammography are significantly smaller than nonscreening ones, noninvasive biomarkers for detection...... found in other cancer types. Four of these were investigated in greater detail, and we found that a proportion of tumors (58% in cervical, 38% in lung, 72% in colon, and 46% in breast cancer) expressed C7orf24 at levels exceeding those seen in normal samples. The observed overexpression of this protein...... in different types of cancer suggests deregulation of C7orf24 to be a general event in epithelial carcinogenesis, indicating that this protein may play an important role in cancer cell biology and thus constitute a novel therapeutic target. Furthermore, as C7orf24 is externalized to the tissue extracellular...

  17. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet

    OpenAIRE

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased wi...

  18. Changes in the plasma proteome at asymptomatic and symptomatic stages of autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muenchhoff, Julia; Poljak, Anne; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Gupta, Veer B.; Chatterjee, Pratishtha; Raftery, Mark; Masters, Colin L.; Morris, John C.; Bateman, Randall J.; Fagan, Anne M.; Martins, Ralph N.; Sachdev, Perminder S.

    2016-01-01

    The autosomal dominant form of Alzheimer’s disease (ADAD) is far less prevalent than late onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD), but enables well-informed prospective studies, since symptom onset is near certain and age of onset is predictable. Our aim was to discover plasma proteins associated with early AD pathology by investigating plasma protein changes at the asymptomatic and symptomatic stages of ADAD. Eighty-one proteins were compared across asymptomatic mutation carriers (aMC, n = 15), symptomatic mutation carriers (sMC, n = 8) and related noncarriers (NC, n = 12). Proteins were also tested for associations with cognitive measures, brain amyloid deposition and glucose metabolism. Fewer changes were observed at the asymptomatic than symptomatic stage with seven and 16 proteins altered significantly in aMC and sMC, respectively. This included complement components C3, C5, C6, apolipoproteins A-I, A-IV, C-I and M, histidine-rich glycoprotein, heparin cofactor II and attractin, which are involved in inflammation, lipid metabolism and vascular health. Proteins involved in lipid metabolism differed only at the symptomatic stage, whereas changes in inflammation and vascular health were evident at asymptomatic and symptomatic stages. Due to increasing evidence supporting the usefulness of ADAD as a model for LOAD, these proteins warrant further investigation into their potential association with early stages of LOAD. PMID:27381087

  19. Drop coating deposition Raman spectroscopy of blood plasma for the detection of colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengpeng; Chen, Changshui; Deng, Xiaoyuan; Mao, Hua; Jin, Shaoqin

    2015-03-01

    We have recently applied the technique of drop coating deposition Raman (DCDR) spectroscopy for colorectal cancer (CRC) detection using blood plasma. The aim of this study was to develop a more convenient and stable method based on blood plasma for noninvasive CRC detection. Significant differences are observed in DCDR spectra between healthy (n=105) and cancer (n=75) plasma from 15 CRC patients and 21 volunteers, particularly in the spectra that are related to proteins, nucleic acids, and β-carotene. The multivariate analysis principal components analysis and the linear discriminate analysis, together with leave-one-out, cross validation were used on DCDR spectra and yielded a sensitivity of 100% (75/75) and specificity of 98.1% (103/105) for detection of CRC. This study demonstrates that DCDR spectroscopy of blood plasma associated with multivariate statistical algorithms has the potential for the noninvasive detection of CRC.

  20. The effect of plasma jet on morphology of the apoptosis cancer cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirpour, Shahriar; Nikkhah, Maryam; Pirouzmand, Somaye; Ghomi, Hamid Reza

    2012-10-01

    In recent years, many studies have been carried out to understand the effect of non-thermal plasma on cancer cells. The previous studies showed that non-thermal plasma has apoptosis effect on cancer cells. Also they discovered that after plasma treatment three distinct regions (Death cells, Void zone and live cells) were observed in wells treated [1]. The aim of this paper is to study the effect of plasma jet on these three regions. For this purpose a variable voltage power supply with 20 kHz frequency are used experimentally. The results showed the detached cells rate were increased by increasing the voltage. [4pt] [1] A. Shashurin, M. Keidar, S. Bronnikov, R. A. Jurjus, and M. A. Stepp, Appl. Phys. Lett. 93, 181501 (2008), DOI:10.1063/1.3020223

  1. Comparative proteomics of root plasma membrane proteins reveals the involvement of calcium signalling in NaCl-facilitated nitrate uptake in Salicornia europaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Lingling; Feng, Juanjuan; Fan, Pengxiang; Chen, Xianyang; Guo, Jie; Lv, Sulian; Bao, Hexigeduleng; Jia, Weitao; Tai, Fang; Jiang, Ping; Wang, Jinhui; Li, Yinxin

    2015-08-01

    Improving crop nitrogen (N) use efficiency under salinity is essential for the development of sustainable agriculture in marginal lands. Salicornia europaea is a succulent euhalophyte that can survive under high salinity and N-deficient habitat conditions, implying that a special N assimilation mechanism may exist in this plant. In this study, phenotypic and physiological changes of S. europaea were investigated under different nitrate and NaCl levels. The results showed that NaCl had a synergetic effect with nitrate on the growth of S. europaea. In addition, the shoot nitrate concentration and nitrate uptake rate of S. europaea were increased by NaCl treatment under both low N and high N conditions, suggesting that nitrate uptake in S. europaea was NaCl facilitated. Comparative proteomic analysis of root plasma membrane (PM) proteins revealed 81 proteins, whose abundance changed significantly in response to NaCl and nitrate. These proteins are involved in metabolism, cell signalling, transport, protein folding, membrane trafficking, and cell structure. Among them, eight proteins were calcium signalling components, and the accumulation of seven of the above-mentioned proteins was significantly elevated by NaCl treatment. Furthermore, cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) was significantly elevated in S. europaea under NaCl treatment. The application of the Ca(2+) channel blocker LaCl3 not only caused a decrease in nitrate uptake rate, but also attenuated the promoting effects of NaCl on nitrate uptake rates. Based on these results, a possible regulatory network of NaCl-facilitated nitrate uptake in S. europaea focusing on the involvement of Ca(2+) signalling was proposed. PMID:25956883

  2. Plasma levels of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 correlate with histological grade in breast cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    VASATURO, FORTUNATA; SOLAI, FABIANA; Malacrino, Carolina; Nardo, Tiziana; Vincenzi, Bruno; Modesti, Mauro; SCARPA, SUSANNA

    2012-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are proteolytic enzymes involved in the process of tumor invasion and metastasis that are found throughout tissues and also in the plasma. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the evaluation of plasma concentrations of MMPs 2, 3 and 9 may have clinical significance in breast cancer. Therefore, sera obtained from 80 patients with breast neoplasia (50 carcinomas and 30 fibroadenomas) were collected before and 96 h after surgery and the concentrations...

  3. Treatment of prostate cancer cell lines and primary cells using low temperature plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Deborah; Hirst, Adam; Frame, Fiona F.; Maitland, Norman J.

    2014-10-01

    The mechanisms of cell death after plasma treatment of both benign and cancerous prostate epithelial cells are investigated. Prostate cancer tissue was obtained with patient consent from targeted needle core biopsies following radical prostatectomy. Primary cells were cultured from cancer tissue and plated onto a chamber slide at a density of 10,000 cells per well in 200 microliter of stem cell media (SCM). The treated sample was previously identified as Gleason grade 7 cancer through tissue histo-pathology. A dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) jet configuration, with helium as a carrier gas, and 0.3% O2 admixture was used for treating the cells. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) produced by the plasma are believed to be the main mediators of the plasma-cell interaction and response. We found the concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced inside the cells increased with plasma exposure. Exposure to the plasma for >3 minutes showed high levels of DNA damage compared to untreated and hydrogen peroxide controls. Cell viability and cellular recovery are also investigated and will be presented. All findings were common to both cell lines, suggesting the potential of LTP therapy for both benign and malignant disease.

  4. Metabolic signatures of lung cancer in biofluids: NMR-based metabonomics of blood plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Cláudia M; Carrola, Joana; Barros, António S; Gil, Ana M; Goodfellow, Brian J; Carreira, Isabel M; Bernardo, João; Gomes, Ana; Sousa, Vitor; Carvalho, Lina; Duarte, Iola F

    2011-09-01

    In this work, the variations in the metabolic profile of blood plasma from lung cancer patients and healthy controls were investigated through NMR-based metabonomics, to assess the potential of this approach for lung cancer screening and diagnosis. PLS-DA modeling of CPMG spectra from plasma, subjected to Monte Carlo Cross Validation, allowed cancer patients to be discriminated from controls with sensitivity and specificity levels of about 90%. Relatively lower HDL and higher VLDL + LDL in the patients' plasma, together with increased lactate and pyruvate and decreased levels of glucose, citrate, formate, acetate, several amino acids (alanine, glutamine, histidine, tyrosine, valine), and methanol, could be detected. These changes were found to be present at initial disease stages and could be related to known cancer biochemical hallmarks, such as enhanced glycolysis, glutaminolysis, and gluconeogenesis, together with suppressed Krebs cycle and reduced lipid catabolism, thus supporting the hypothesis of a systemic metabolic signature for lung cancer. Despite the possible confounding influence of age, smoking habits, and other uncontrolled factors, these results indicate that NMR-based metabonomics of blood plasma can be useful as a screening tool to identify suspicious cases for subsequent, more specific radiological tests, thus contributing to improved disease management. PMID:21744875

  5. Observational and genetic plasma YKL-40 and cancer in 96,099 individuals from the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, Alisa D; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Johansen, Julia S;

    2015-01-01

    Plasma YKL-40 is high in patients with cancer and in individuals who later develop cancer. Whether YKL-40 is only a marker or indeed a cause of cancer is presently unknown. We tested the hypothesis that observationally and genetically, high plasma YKL-40 is associated with high risk of cancer. For...... cancer, 913 developed lung cancer, 2,863 women developed breast cancer, 1,557 men developed prostate cancer and 5,146 individuals developed other cancer. Follow-up was 100% complete. Multifactorially and CRP adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for gastrointestinal cancer was 1.82 (95%CI, 1.16-2.86) for 96......-100% versus 0-33% YKL-40 percentile category. Corresponding HR were 1.71 (0.95-3.07) for lung cancer, but insignificant for breast cancer, prostate cancer and other cancers. CHI3L1 rs4950928 genotype was associated with plasmaYKL-40 levels, but not with risk of any cancer category. For gastrointestinal cancer...

  6. Low-temperature plasma needle effects on cultured metastatic breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Sean; Bilen, Sven; Micci, Michael; Brubaker, Timothy; Wilson, Michael; Cook, Ian; Czesak, Nicholas; Hipkins, Garret

    2015-11-01

    The Penn State Low-Temperature Plasma group is presently investigating the applications of low-temperature plasma for biomedical applications, including the effects on MDA-MB-231 metastatic breast cancer cells. A plasma needle system has been designed and constructed that consists of a 22-gauge stainless steel syringe needle, which acts as the high-voltage electrode, covered with PEEK tubing as the dielectric with a ring ground electrode on the outside. The system is driven by a low-frequency AC voltage amplifier, with typical operating conditions of 2-5 kV peak voltage at 5 kHz. Helium is used as the working fluid and produces a plasma jet with ~ cm's visible extent. Cultured breast cancer cells were provided by our collaborator and exposed to the plasma needle for varying doses and detachment of cells was observed. The effects are attributed to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation and transport through the cell culture medium. Plasma needle characterization and the results of the breast cancer experiments will be presented.

  7. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D and premenopausal breast cancer risk in a German case-control study.

    OpenAIRE

    Abbas, Sascha; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Linseisen, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory and epidemiological data have linked vitamin D to breast cancer prevention. Beside dietary intake, endogenous production of vitamin D substantially contributes to a subject's vitamin D status. Most studies, however, have assessed dietary intake only. Although differential effects of vitamin D on premenopausal and postmenopausal breast cancer have been discussed, this is the first study to investigate the association of plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], as indicator of the overa...

  8. Application of proteome technology in screening biomarkers associated with gastric cancer%蛋白质组技术在胃癌相关标志物筛查中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chibo Liu; Yong Liang; Haibao Wang; Chunqin Pan

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To initially explore the application of proteome technologies in study of serum,to establish two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) profiles of human gastric cancer serum and paired normal serum,and to screen and identify differentially expressed proteins in poorly-differentiated gastric cancer serum and paired normal serum,in which try to find out significant biomarker candidates for gastric cancer.Methods:2-DE was adopted to separate the total proteins of poorly-differentiated gastric cancer serum and paired normal serum.After staining and analyzing by ImageMaster 2D Elite software,the differentially expressed proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight- mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS).Results:2-DE serum profiles with high resolution were obtained.Five protein spots were found as differentially-expressed proteins and identified as Serpin B6 (Placental thrombin inhibitor) Cytoplasmic antiproteinase (CAP)(Protease inhibitor6) (P1-6),Septin-1 (LARP) (Serologically defined breast cancer antigen NY-BR-24),Kallikrein-6 precursor (Protease M) (Neurosin) (Zyme) (SP59),Hemoglobin beta chain,Hemoglobin beta chain and Beta-defensin 108 precursor (Beta-defensin 8) (DEFB-8).Conclusion:The differential proteins were demonstrated to present in poorly-differentiated gastric cancer serum and paired normal serum.The molecular biomarkers associated with poorly differentiated gastric cancer could be possibly identified by the high throughput screening proteome technology.

  9. S100A11 is required for efficient plasma membrane repair and survival of invasive cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaiswal, Jyoti K; Lauritzen, Stine Prehn; Scheffer, Luana; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Simon, Sanford M; Kallunki, Tuula; Jäättelä, Marja; Nylandsted, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Cell migration and invasion require increased plasma membrane dynamics and ability to navigate through dense stroma, thereby exposing plasma membrane to tremendous physical stress. Yet, it is largely unknown how metastatic cancer cells acquire an ability to cope with such stress. Here we show that...... S100A11, a calcium-binding protein upregulated in a variety of metastatic cancers, is essential for efficient plasma membrane repair and survival of highly motile cancer cells. Plasma membrane injury-induced entry of calcium into the cell triggers recruitment of S100A11 and Annexin A2 to the site of...

  10. Differential Epigenetic Effects of Atmospheric Cold Plasma on MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 Breast Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sung-Bin Park; Byungtak Kim; Hansol Bae; Hyunkyung Lee; Seungyeon Lee; Eun H. Choi; Sun Jung Kim

    2015-01-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (plasma) has emerged as a novel tool for a cancer treatment option, having been successfully applied to a few types of cancer cells, as well as tissues. However, to date, no studies have been performed to examine the effect of plasma on epigenetic alterations, including CpG methylation. In this study, the effects of plasma on DNA methylation changes in breast cancer cells were examined by treating cultured MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, representing estrogen-positive and ...

  11. Label-free and spike-in standard-free mass spectrometry in the proteomic analysis of plasma membrane proteins and membrane-associated protein networks

    OpenAIRE

    Niehage, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is the primary technology of proteomics. For the analysis of complex proteomes, protein identities and quantities are inferred from their peptides that are generated by cleaving all proteins with the endopeptidase trypsin. But there is one major disadvantage that is due to biophysical differences, different peptides cause different intensities. Miscellaneous approaches have been developed to circumvent this problem based on the chemical or metabolic introduction of heavy sta...

  12. Plasma levels of α-tocopherol, -tocopherol and selenium in patients with prostate cancer in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Famurewa AC

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evidence suggests that essential trace metals and vitamins play crucial roles in slowing down the initiation and progression stages of many cancers, but the plausible role of selenium and vitamin E, especially the gamma-tocopherol (-tocopherol, against prostate cancer is yet to be ascertained. Aim: To compare levels of selenium, alpha-tocopherol (α-tocopherol and -tocopherol between prostate cancer (PCa and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH patients. Methods: Twenty (20 prostate cancer (PCa patients and 25 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH recruited from Urology Clinic of the Department of Surgery, University College Hospital (UCH, Ibadan acted as case and control subjects, respectively. Informed consent was obtained from all participants. The plasma levels of selenium, α-tocopherol and -tocopherol were determined by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS and High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC, respectively. Results: -tocopherol levels were significantly higher in BPH patients (control when compared with PCa patients. Selenium and -tocopherol levels were lower in PCa patients, but not significant. Conclusion: Plasma low level of -tocopherol in PCa patients was statistically significant. This may be a risk factor among adult Nigerian men for the development of prostate cancer. Increased plasma level of -tocopherol through diet or supplementation may reduce the risk and progression of prostate cancer.

  13. Cold Atmospheric Plasma: A Promising Complementary Therapy for Squamous Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welz, Christian; Emmert, Steffen; Canis, Martin; Becker, Sven; Baumeister, Philipp; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Morfill, Gregor E; Harréus, Uli; Zimmermann, Julia L

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) is the 7th most common cancer worldwide. Despite the development of new therapeutic agents such as monoclonal antibodies, prognosis did not change for the last decades. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) presents the most promising new technology in cancer treatment. In this study the efficacy of a surface micro discharging (SMD) plasma device against two head and neck cancer cell lines was proved. Effects on the cell viability, DNA fragmentation and apoptosis induction were evaluated with the MTT assay, alkaline microgel electrophoresis (comet assay) and Annexin-V/PI staining. MTT assay revealed that the CAP treatment markedly decreases the cell viability for all tested treatment times (30, 60, 90, 120 and 180 s). IC 50 was reached within maximal 120 seconds of CAP treatment. Comet assay analysis showed a dose dependent high DNA fragmentation being one of the key players in anti-cancer activity of CAP. Annexin-V/PI staining revealed induction of apoptosis in CAP treated HNSCC cell lines but no significant dose dependency was seen. Thus, we confirmed that SMD Plasma technology is definitely a promising new approach on cancer treatment. PMID:26588072

  14. Cold Atmospheric Plasma: A Promising Complementary Therapy for Squamous Head and Neck Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Welz

    Full Text Available Head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC is the 7th most common cancer worldwide. Despite the development of new therapeutic agents such as monoclonal antibodies, prognosis did not change for the last decades. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP presents the most promising new technology in cancer treatment. In this study the efficacy of a surface micro discharging (SMD plasma device against two head and neck cancer cell lines was proved. Effects on the cell viability, DNA fragmentation and apoptosis induction were evaluated with the MTT assay, alkaline microgel electrophoresis (comet assay and Annexin-V/PI staining. MTT assay revealed that the CAP treatment markedly decreases the cell viability for all tested treatment times (30, 60, 90, 120 and 180 s. IC 50 was reached within maximal 120 seconds of CAP treatment. Comet assay analysis showed a dose dependent high DNA fragmentation being one of the key players in anti-cancer activity of CAP. Annexin-V/PI staining revealed induction of apoptosis in CAP treated HNSCC cell lines but no significant dose dependency was seen. Thus, we confirmed that SMD Plasma technology is definitely a promising new approach on cancer treatment.

  15. Cold Atmospheric Plasma: A Promising Complementary Therapy for Squamous Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welz, Christian; Emmert, Steffen; Canis, Martin; Becker, Sven; Baumeister, Philipp; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Morfill, Gregor E.; Harréus, Uli; Zimmermann, Julia L.

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) is the 7th most common cancer worldwide. Despite the development of new therapeutic agents such as monoclonal antibodies, prognosis did not change for the last decades. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) presents the most promising new technology in cancer treatment. In this study the efficacy of a surface micro discharging (SMD) plasma device against two head and neck cancer cell lines was proved. Effects on the cell viability, DNA fragmentation and apoptosis induction were evaluated with the MTT assay, alkaline microgel electrophoresis (comet assay) and Annexin-V/PI staining. MTT assay revealed that the CAP treatment markedly decreases the cell viability for all tested treatment times (30, 60, 90, 120 and 180 s). IC 50 was reached within maximal 120 seconds of CAP treatment. Comet assay analysis showed a dose dependent high DNA fragmentation being one of the key players in anti-cancer activity of CAP. Annexin-V/PI staining revealed induction of apoptosis in CAP treated HNSCC cell lines but no significant dose dependency was seen. Thus, we confirmed that SMD Plasma technology is definitely a promising new approach on cancer treatment. PMID:26588072

  16. Aberrant reduction of telomere repetitive sequences in plasma cell-free DNA for early breast cancer detection

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xi; Tanaka, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Excessive telomere shortening is observed in breast cancer lesions when compared to adjacent non-cancerous tissues, suggesting that telomere length may represent a key biomarker for early cancer detection. Because tumor-derived, cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is often released from cancer cells and circulates in the bloodstream, we hypothesized that breast cancer development is associated with changes in the amount of telomeric cfDNA that can be detected in the plasma. To test this hypothesis, we devi...

  17. DNA damage in oral cancer cells induced by nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Xu; Ptasinska, Sylwia [Radiation Laboratory, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Klas, Matej [Radiation Laboratory, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Liu, Yueying [Harper Cancer Research Institute, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Sharon Stack, M. [Harper Cancer Research Institute, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    The nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was applied to induce DNA damage of SCC-25 oral cancer cells. Optical emission spectra were taken to characterize the reactive species produced in APPJ. In order to explore the spatial distribution of plasma effects, cells were placed onto photo-etched grid slides and the antibody H2A.X was used to locate double strand breaks of DNA inside nuclei using an immunofluorescence assay. The number of cells with double strand breaks in DNA was observed to be varied due to the distance from the irradiation center and duration of plasma treatment.

  18. DNA damage in oral cancer cells induced by nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was applied to induce DNA damage of SCC-25 oral cancer cells. Optical emission spectra were taken to characterize the reactive species produced in APPJ. In order to explore the spatial distribution of plasma effects, cells were placed onto photo-etched grid slides and the antibody H2A.X was used to locate double strand breaks of DNA inside nuclei using an immunofluorescence assay. The number of cells with double strand breaks in DNA was observed to be varied due to the distance from the irradiation center and duration of plasma treatment.

  19. Enhanced detection of metastatic prostate cancer cells in human plasma with lipid bodies staining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reprogramming of energy metabolism of malignant cancer cells confers competitive advantage in growth environments with limited resources. However, not every process of cancer development is associated with competition for resources. During hematogenous transport, cancer cells are exposed to high levels of oxygen and nutrients. Does energy metabolism of cancer cells change as a function of exposure to the bloodstream? Could such changes be exploited to improve the detection of circulating tumor cells (CTC)? These questions have clinical significance, but have not yet been sufficiently examined. The energy metabolism was examined as a function of incubation in nutrient-rich plasma in prostate metastatic cancer cells LNCaP and non-transformed prostate epithelial cells RWPE1. Uptake kinetics of a fluorescent glucose analog (2-NBD) and lipophilic dyes (DiD & Bodipy) were measured in both cell lines, as well as in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). LNCaP cells exhibited hyper-acetylation of low molecular weight proteins compared to RWPE1 cells. Following plasma incubation, protein lysine acetylation profile was unchanged for LNCaP cells while significantly altered for RWPE1 cells. O-linked glycosylated protein profiles were different between LNCaP and RWPE1 cells and varied in both cell lines with plasma incubation. Maximal respiration or glycolytic capacities was unchanged in LNCaP cells and impaired in RWPE1 cells following plasma incubation. However, the uptake rates of 2-NBD and DiD were insufficient for discrimination of LNCaP, or RWPE1 cells from PBMC. On the other hand, both RWPE1 and LNCaP cells exhibited intracellular lipid bodies following plasma incubation; whereas, PBMC did not. The presence of lipid bodies in LNCaP cells permitted retention of Bodipy dye and allowed discrimination of LNCaP cells from PBMC with flow cytometry. Despite clear differences in energy metabolism, metastatic prostate cancer cells could not be efficiently distinguished from

  20. Identification of radioresistance-related molecules in laryngeal cancer cells using proteomic and EST data mining approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Sung; Hong, Eun Hee; Yoon, Hong Sik; Yang, Kyung Mi; Hwang, Sang Gu [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    Laryngeal cancer is the largest subgroup of head and neck cancer which is the sixth most prevalent cancer in the world. Radiotherapy is known as a major treatment modality of laryngeal caner in conjunction with surgery and chemotherapy. Clinical radiotherapy is generally based on the treatment of fractionated radiation (commonly 2 Gy daily to total 60-70 Gy) to the cancer. This chronic treatment can trigger tumor-adaptive radioresistance contributing cancer recurrence following radiotherapy. Unfortunately, approximately 15 % of laryngeal cancers after radiotherapy acquire radioresistance. However, little is known about the molecular markers and mechanisms underlying tumor-adaptive radioresistance. In the present study, we established the radioresistant model system using HEp-2 cell line and identified radioresistance-related molecules by using the analysis of laryngeal cancer expressed sequence tag (EST) data bases and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE)

  1. Identification of radioresistance-related molecules in laryngeal cancer cells using proteomic and EST data mining approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laryngeal cancer is the largest subgroup of head and neck cancer which is the sixth most prevalent cancer in the world. Radiotherapy is known as a major treatment modality of laryngeal caner in conjunction with surgery and chemotherapy. Clinical radiotherapy is generally based on the treatment of fractionated radiation (commonly 2 Gy daily to total 60-70 Gy) to the cancer. This chronic treatment can trigger tumor-adaptive radioresistance contributing cancer recurrence following radiotherapy. Unfortunately, approximately 15 % of laryngeal cancers after radiotherapy acquire radioresistance. However, little is known about the molecular markers and mechanisms underlying tumor-adaptive radioresistance. In the present study, we established the radioresistant model system using HEp-2 cell line and identified radioresistance-related molecules by using the analysis of laryngeal cancer expressed sequence tag (EST) data bases and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE)

  2. Limitations in SELDI-TOF MS whole serum proteomic profiling with IMAC surface to specifically detect colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface enhanced laser desorption and ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS) analysis on serum samples was reported to be able to detect colorectal cancer (CRC) from normal or control patients. We carried out a validation study of a SELDI-TOF MS approach with IMAC surface sample processing to identify CRC. A retrospective cohort of 338 serum samples including 154 CRCs, 67 control cancers and 117 non-cancerous conditions was profiled using SELDI-TOF-MS. No CRC 'specific' classifier was found. However, a classifier consisting of two protein peaks separates cancer from non-cancerous conditions with high accuracy. In this study, the SELDI-TOF-MS-based protein expression profiling approach did not perform to identify CRC. However, this technique is promising in distinguishing patients with cancer from a non-cancerous population; it may be useful for monitoring recurrence of CRC after treatment

  3. Functional proteomics identifies miRNAs to target a p27/Myc/phospho-Rb signature in breast and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seviour, E G; Sehgal, V; Lu, Y; Luo, Z; Moss, T; Zhang, F; Hill, S M; Liu, W; Maiti, S N; Cooper, L; Azencot, R; Lopez-Berestein, G; Rodriguez-Aguayo, C; Roopaimoole, R; Pecot, C; Sood, A K; Mukherjee, S; Gray, J W; Mills, G B; Ram, P T

    2016-02-11

    The myc oncogene is overexpressed in almost half of all breast and ovarian cancers, but attempts at therapeutic interventions against myc have proven to be challenging. Myc regulates multiple biological processes, including the cell cycle, and as such is associated with cell proliferation and tumor progression. We identified a protein signature of high myc, low p27 and high phospho-Rb significantly correlated with poor patient survival in breast and ovarian cancers. Screening of a miRNA library by functional proteomics in multiple cell lines and integration of data from patient tumors revealed a panel of five microRNAs (miRNAs) (miR-124, miR-365, miR-34b*, miR-18a and miR-506) as potential tumor suppressors capable of reversing the p27/myc/phospho-Rb protein signature. Mechanistic studies revealed an RNA-activation function of miR-124 resulting in direct induction of p27 protein levels by binding to and inducing transcription on the p27 promoter region leading to a subsequent G1 arrest. Additionally, in vivo studies utilizing a xenograft model demonstrated that nanoparticle-mediated delivery of miR-124 could reduce tumor growth and sensitize cells to etoposide, suggesting a clinical application of miRNAs as therapeutics to target the functional effect of myc on tumor growth. PMID:25639871

  4. Refractory cachexia is associated with increased plasma concentrations of fentanyl in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suno M

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Manabu Suno,1,* Yuriko Endo,1,* Hiroyuki Nishie,2 Makoto Kajizono,3 Toshiaki Sendo,3 Junji Matsuoka4 1Department of Oncology Pharmaceutical Care and Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Resuscitology, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, 3Department of Pharmacy, Okayama University Hospital, 4Faculty of Health Sciences, Okayama University Medical School, Okayama, Japan *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: An appropriate plasma concentration of fentanyl is the key to achieving good pain control in cancer patients. Cachexia, a multifactorial syndrome, is known to affect drug-metabolizing enzymes. However, the fentanyl concentrations in the blood of patients with cachexia have not been analyzed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of cancer cachexia on dose-adjusted plasma fentanyl concentrations in cancer patients.Methods: Blood was collected from 21 Japanese cancer patients treated with a 24-hour transdermal fentanyl patch during the steady state of fentanyl plasma concentration. Plasma fentanyl concentrations were analyzed using liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS, and the levels were adjusted with the dose of fentanyl. Laboratory data were collected, and the cachexia stage was determined, based on study by Fearon et al. Multiple regression analysis was performed to identify the factors that affected fentanyl plasma concentrations.Results: Eight patients were classified as precachexia, nine as cachexia, and four as refractory cachexia, and the median dose-adjusted fentanyl concentrations (ng/mL per mg/kg/day were 27.5, 34.4, and 44.5, respectively. The dose-adjusted fentanyl concentration in patients with refractory cachexia was higher than that in patients with precachexia (Kruskal–Wallis test and post hoc Mann–Whitney U-test, P<0.01. The factors that

  5. Plasma 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Risk of Non-Melanoma and Melanoma Skin Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzal, Shoaib; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Bojesen, Stig E

    2013-01-01

    Sun exposure is a major risk factor for skin cancer and is also an important source of vitamin D. We tested the hypothesis that elevated plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH-vitD) associates with increased risk of non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancer in the general population. We measured plasma 25......-OH-vitD in 10,060 white individuals from the Danish general population. During 28 years of follow-up, 590 individuals developed non-melanoma skin cancer and 78 developed melanoma skin cancer. Increasing 25-OH-vitD levels, by clinical categories or by seasonally adjusted tertiles, were associated with...... increasing cumulative incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer (trend P=2 × 10(-15) and P=3 × 10(-17)) and melanoma skin cancer (P=0.003 and P=0.001). Multivariable adjusted hazard ratios of non-melanoma skin cancer were 5.04 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.78-9.16) for 25-OH-vitD 50 vs. 60 years, 25-OH...

  6. Proteome Sci.

    OpenAIRE

    Mann Matthias; Poustka Albert J; Mann Karlheinz

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Sea urchin is a major model organism for developmental biology and biomineralization research. However, identification of proteins involved in larval skeleton formation and mineralization processes in the embryo and adult, and the molecular characterization of such proteins, has just gained momentum with the sequencing of the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome and the introduction of high-throughput proteomics into the field. Results The present report contains the deter...

  7. A prospective study of plasma vitamin D metabolites, vitamin D receptor polymorphisms, and prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haojie Li

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vitamin D insufficiency is a common public health problem nationwide. Circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25[OH]D, the most commonly used index of vitamin D status, is converted to the active hormone 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25[OH]2D, which, operating through the vitamin D receptor (VDR, inhibits in vitro cell proliferation, induces differentiation and apoptosis, and may protect against prostate cancer. Despite intriguing results from laboratory studies, previous epidemiological studies showed inconsistent associations of circulating levels of 25(OHD, 1,25(OH2D, and several VDR polymorphisms with prostate cancer risk. Few studies have explored the joint association of circulating vitamin D levels with VDR polymorphisms. METHODS AND FINDINGS: During 18 y of follow-up of 14,916 men initially free of diagnosed cancer, we identified 1,066 men with incident prostate cancer (including 496 with aggressive disease, defined as stage C or D, Gleason 7-10, metastatic, and fatal prostate cancer and 1,618 cancer-free, age- and smoking-matched control participants in the Physicians' Health Study. We examined the associations of prediagnostic plasma levels of 25(OHD and 1,25(OH2D, individually and jointly, with total and aggressive disease, and explored whether relations between vitamin D metabolites and prostate cancer were modified by the functional VDR FokI polymorphism, using conditional logistic regression. Among these US physicians, the median plasma 25(OHD levels were 25 ng/ml in the blood samples collected during the winter or spring and 32 ng/ml in samples collected during the summer or fall. Nearly 13% (summer/fall to 36% (winter/spring of the control participants were deficient in 25(OHD (<20 ng/ml and 51% (summer/fall and 77% (winter/spring had insufficient plasma 25(OHD levels (<32 ng/ml. Plasma levels of 1,25(OH2D did not vary by season. Men whose levels for both 25(OHD and 1,25(OH2D were below (versus above the median had a

  8. The Detection of Ionizing Radiation by Plasma Panel Sensors: Cosmic Muons, Ion Beams and Cancer Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Peter S; Chapman, J W; Ferretti, Claudio; Levin, Daniel S; Weaverdyck, Curtis; Zhou, Bing; Benhammou, Yan; Etzion, Erez; Guttman, Nir; Moshe, M Ben; Silver, Yiftah; Beene, James R; Varner, Robert L

    2012-01-01

    The plasma panel sensor is an ionizing photon and particle radiation detector derived from PDP technology with high gain and nanosecond response. Experimental results in detecting cosmic ray muons and beta particles from radioactive sources are described along with applications including high energy and nuclear physics, homeland security and cancer therapeutics

  9. Plasma HER2 amplification in cell-free DNA during neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Troels; Andersen, Rikke Fredslund; Pallisgaard, Niels;

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) gene amplification in cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is an evolving technique in breast cancer, enabling liquid biopsies and treatment monitoring. The present study investigated the dynamics of plasma HER2 gene copy number and amplification in...... cfDNA during neoadjuvant chemotherapy....

  10. Plasma Fetuin-A concentration, genetic variation in the AHSG gene and risk of colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nimptsch, Katharina; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Boeing, Heiner;

    2015-01-01

    women, 1.13 (1.00-1.27) for colon cancer and 1.12 (0.94-1.32) for rectal cancer. To improve causal inference in a Mendelian Randomization approach, five tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms of the AHSG gene were genotyped in a subset of 456 case-control pairs. The AHSG allele-score explained 21% of...... the interindividual variation in plasma fetuin-A concentrations. In instrumental variable analysis, genetically raised fetuin-A was not associated with colorectal cancer risk (relative risk per 40 µg/mL genetically determined higher fetuin-A was 0.98, 95% confidence interval: 0.73-1.33). The findings...... of our study indicate a modest linear association between fetuin-A concentrations and risk of colorectal cancer but suggest that fetuin-A may not be causally related to colorectal cancer development....

  11. Rikkunshito Ameliorates Cancer Cachexia Partly through Elevation of Glucarate in Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuya Ohbuchi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cachexia, which is characterized by decreased food intake, weight loss and systemic inflammation, increases patient’s morbidity and mortality. We previously showed that rikkunshito (RKT, a Japanese traditional herbal medicine (Kampo, ameliorated the symptoms of cancer cachexia through ghrelin signaling-dependent and independent pathways. To investigate other mechanisms of RKT action in cancer cachexia, we performed metabolome analysis of plasma in a rat model bearing the Yoshida AH-130 hepatoma. A total of 110 metabolites were detected in plasma and RKT treatment significantly altered levels of 23 of those metabolites in cachexia model rats. Among them, glucarate, which is known to have anticarcinogenic activity through detoxification of carcinogens via inhibition of β-glucuronidase, was increased in plasma following administration of RKT. In our AH-130 ascites-induced cachexia rat model, administration of glucarate delayed onset of weight loss, improved muscle atrophy, and reduced ascites content. Additionally, glucarate reduced levels of plasma interferon-γ (IFN-γ in tumor-bearing rats and was also found to suppress LPS-induced IFN-γ expression in splenocytes in vitro. These results suggest that glucarate has anti-inflammatory activity via a direct effect on immune host cells and suggest that RKT may also ameliorate inflammation partly through the elevation of glucarate in plasma.

  12. DNA damage in oral cancer and normal cells induced by nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xu; Kapaldo, James; Liu, Yueying; Stack, M. Sharon; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2015-09-01

    Nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) have been shown to effectively induce DNA double strand breaks in SCC25 oral cancer cells. The APPJ source constructed in our laboratory operates based on dielectric barrier discharge. It consists of two copper electrodes alternatively wrapping around a fused silica tube with nitrogen as a feed gas. It is generally more challenging to ignite plasma in N2 atmosphere than in noble gases. However, N2 provides additional advantages such as lower costs compared to noble gases, thus this design can be beneficial for the future long-term clinical use. To compare the effects of plasma on cancer cells (SCC25) and normal cells (OKF), the cells from both types were treated at the same experimental condition for various treatment times. The effective area with different damage levels after the treatment was visualized as 3D maps. The delayed damage effects were also explored by varying the incubation times after the treatment. All of these studies are critical for a better understanding of the damage responses of cellular systems exposed to the plasma radiation, thus are useful for the development of the advanced plasma cancer therapy. The research described herein was supported by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences, Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, United States Department of Energy through Grant No. DE-FC02-04ER15533.

  13. Candidate serum biomarkers for early intestinal cancer using 15N metabolic labeling and quantitative proteomics in the Apcmin/+ mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Ivancic, Melanie M.; Huttlin, Edward L.; Chen, Xiaodi; Pleiman, Jennifer K; Irving, Amy A; Hegeman, Adrian D.; Dove, William F.; Sussman, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Current screening procedures for colorectal cancer are imperfect, highly invasive and result in increased mortality rates due to low compliance. The goal of the experiments reported herein is to identify potential blood-based biomarkers indicative of early-stage intestinal cancers using the ApcMin/+ mouse model of intestinal cancer as an experimental system. Serum proteins from tumor-bearing ApcMin/+ mice were quantitatively compared to tumor-free Apc+/+ wild-type mice via in anima metabolic ...

  14. Assessment of Circulating microRNAs in Plasma of Lung Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orazio Fortunato

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide and numerous ongoing research efforts are directed to identify new strategies for its early detection. The development of non-invasive blood-based biomarkers for cancer detection in its preclinical phases is crucial to improve the outcome of this deadly disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a new promising class of circulating biomarkers for cancer detection and prognosis definition, but lack of consensus on data normalization methods for circulating miRNAs and the critical issue of haemolysis, has affected the identification of circulating miRNAs with diagnostic potential. We describe here an interesting approach for profiling circulating miRNAs in plasma samples based on the evaluation of reciprocal miRNA levels measured by quantitative Real-Time PCR. By monitoring changes of plasma miRNA-ratios, it is possible to assess the deregulation of tumor-related miRNAs and identify signatures with diagnostic and prognostic value. In addition, to avoid bias due to the release of miRNAs from blood cells, a miRNA-ratios signature distinguishing haemolyzed samples was identified. The method described was validated in plasma samples of lung cancer patients, but given its reproducibility and reliability, could be potentially applied for the identification of diagnostic circulating miRNAs in other diseases.

  15. Method for breast cancer diagnosis by phase spectrophotometry of human blood plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintser, Ozar P.; Oliinychenko, B. P.

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of breast cancer diagnostics by means of phase structure measurements of laser radiation transformed by human blood plasma samples. The theoretical fundamentals of polarization filtration method for direct phase shifts measurements of microscopic images are provided. The optical model of polycrystalline networks of blood plasma proteins is suggested. The results of investigating the interrelation between the values of statistical (statistical moments of the 1st-4th order), correlation (correlation area, asymmetry coefficient and autocorrelation function excess) and fractal (dispersion of logarithmic dependencies of power spectra) parameters are presented. They characterize the coordinate distributions of phase shifts between the orthogonal components of the amplitude in the points of laser images of blood plasma smears and pathological changes in the mammary gland tissue. The diagnostic criteria of breast cancer nascency are determined.

  16. Development of the laser-plasma ion source for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hadronic cancer therapy is more attractive than the surgery for localized tumor. However, the hadronic radiotherapy seems not to be easily spread out, because it needs huge capital investments as well as running cost, including an accelerator, gantries and a building for such a radiotherapy system. On the other hand, a laser-plasma ion source will potentially bring us much smaller accelerator system for the hadronic radio-therapy. The laser-plasma ion source is currently developed as an injector for a conventional accelerator or as an advanced accelerator for direct cancer therapy. In this report, we describe present status of radiotherapy system and researches on laser plasma ion sources for radiotherapy. (author)

  17. Elevated Plasma Vitamin B12 Levels as a Marker for Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendt, Johan Frederik Berg; Pedersen, Lars; Nexo, Ebba;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A substantial proportion of patients referred for plasma vitamin B12 (cobalamin [Cbl]) measurement present with high Cbl levels, which have been reported in patients with different cancer types. However, the cancer risk among patients with newly diagnosed high Cbl levels has not been...... adequately examined. METHODS: We conducted this cohort study using population-based Danish medical registries. Patients referred for Cbl measurement with levels greater than the lower reference limit (≥200 pmol/L) were identified from the population of Northern Denmark during the period of 1998 to 2009 using...... ratios (SIRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), stratified by plasma Cbl levels. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: We identified 333 667 persons without prevalent cancer and not receiving Cbl treatment. Six percent had Cbl levels greater than the upper reference limit (≥601 pmol...

  18. Proteomic analysis of novel targets associated with the enhancement of TrkA-induced SK-N-MC cancer cell death caused by NGF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Eun Joo; Chung, Ky Hyun; Bae, Dong-Won; Kim, Choong Won

    2016-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is known to regulate both cancer cell survival and death signaling, depending on the cellular circumstances, in various cell types. In this study, we showed that NGF strongly upregulated the protein level of tropomyosin-related kinase A (TrkA) in TrkA-inducible SK-N-MC cancer cells, resulting in increases in various TrkA-dependent cellular processes, including the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and caspase-8 cleavage. In addition, NGF enhanced TrkA-induced morphological changes and cell death, and this effect was significantly suppressed by the JNK inhibitor SP600125, but not by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor wortmannin. To investigate novel targets associated with the enhancement of TrkA-induced SK-N-MC cell death caused by NGF, we performed Coomassie Brilliant Blue staining and two-dimensional (2D) proteomic analysis in TrkA-inducible SK-N-MC cells. We identified 31 protein spots that were either greatly upregulated or downregulated by TrkA during NGF treatment using matrix-associated laser desorption/ionization time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry, and we analyzed the effects of SP600125 and wortmannin on the spots. Interestingly, 11 protein spots, including heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K), lamin B1 and TAR DNA-binding protein (TDP43), were significantly influenced by SP600125, but not by wortmannin. Moreover, the NGF/TrkA-dependent inhibition of cell viability was significantly enhanced by knockdown of hnRNP K using small interfering RNA, demonstrating that hnRNP K is a novel target associated with the regulation of TrkA-dependent SK-N-MC cancer cell death enhanced by NGF. PMID:27229480

  19. Comparative proteomic analysis implicates eEF2 as a novel target of PI3Kγ in the MDA-MB-231 metastatic breast cancer cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niu Meizhi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer cell migration is fundamentally required for breast tumour invasion and metastasis. The insulin-like growth factor 1 tyrosine kinase receptor (IGF-1R and the chemokine G-protein coupled receptor, CXCR4 have been shown to play an important role in breast cancer metastasis. Our previous study has shown that IGF-1R can transactivate CXCR4 via a physical association in the human MDA-MB-231 metastatic breast cancer cell line and that this plays a key role in IGF-I-induced migration of these cells. In the present study we used pharmacological inhibition and RNAi to identify PI3Kγ as an important migration signalling molecule downstream of receptor transactivation in MDA-MB-231 cells. To identify PI3Kγ-regulated proteins upon transactivation of CXCR4 by IGF-I, we undertook a comparative proteomics approach using 2-D- Fluorescence Difference Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE and identified the proteins by mass spectrometry. Results These experiments identified eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2 as a novel downstream target of PI3Kγ after activation of the IGF-1R-CXCR4 heterodimer by IGF-I. Further analysis demonstrated that eEF2 is phosphorylated in MDA-MB-231 cells in response to IGF-I and that this is dependent on PI3Kγ activity. Conclusions Our data imply a novel role for PI3Kγ in facilitating cell migration by regulating phosphorylation of eEF2.

  20. Application of Laser Induced Plasma Spectroscopy on Breast Cancer Diagnoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Alfattah, A.; Eldakrouri, A. A.; Emam, H.; Azzouz, I. M.

    2013-03-01

    Worldwide, millions of breast cancer cases appear each year. It ranked as the first malignant tumors in Egypt. Breast cancer patients are at increased risk of developing malignant melanoma and cancers of the ovary, endometrium, colon, thyroid, and salivary glands because of similar hormonal and genetic factors. Therefore, early diagnosis by a quick and accurate method may have a great affect on healing. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of using LIPS as a simple, technique to diagnose breast cancer by measuring the concentration of trace elements in breast tissues. The accuracy of LIPS measurements was confirmed by carrying out another elemental analysis via atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) technique. The results obtained via these two techniques showed that the concentration of Ca, Cu, Fe, Zn and Mn in the malignant tissue cells are significantly enhanced. A voting algorithm was built for instantaneous decision of the diagnostic technique (normal or malignant). This study instigates developing a new diagnostic tool with potential use in vivo.

  1. Serum/plasma DNA methylation pattern and early detection of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arootin Gharibiyan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. With its fatality rate reduced significantly if diagnosed early, developing cost-effective, noninvasive methods of early detection is highly investigated. Currently, mammography with magnetic resonance imaging is considered the optimal method of early detection in women who are at a significantly raised risk of developing breast cancer. Due to environmental effects and life-style changes in recent years, elevation of the risk of cancer incidents in lower risk populations is observed and therefore, the development of a relatively easy-performed and low-cost method for early detection of cancer in general and breast cancer in particular is needed. Serum-based analysis techniques have been quite popular subject of research recently as they can be performed with low technical knowledge, become automated and are cheap. In the present article, we have reviewed the literature related to the use of DNA methylation-detection based techniques for diagnosis of early-stage breast cancer using serum or plasma circulating tumor DNA and their power as a future biomarker. A reference to all genes that is reported to be differentially methylated in breast cancer accompanies the article.

  2. Plasma retinol, beta-carotene and vitamin E levels in relation to the future risk of breast cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Wald, N J; Boreham, J.; Hayward, J L; Bulbrook, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    In a prospective study of 5,004 women in Guernsey, plasma samples were collected and stored. Retinol, beta-carotene and vitamin E levels were later measured in the samples from 39 women who subsequently developed breast cancer and from 78 controls who did not develop cancer. Plasma retinol levels were not related to the risk of breast cancer, mean levels among cases and controls being 485 micrograms l-1 and 479 micrograms l-1 respectively. Plasma vitamin E levels showed a clear association, l...

  3. Plasma Proteins Interaction with Curcumin Nanoparticles: Implications in Cancer Therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Yallapu, Murali M.; Ebeling, Mara C.; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C.

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin, a natural bioactive polyphenol, has been widely investigated as a conventional medicine for centuries. Over the past two decades, major pre-clinical and clinical trials have demonstrated its safe therapeutic profile but clinical translation has been hampered due to rapid degradation, poor water solubility, bioavailability and pharmaco-kinetics. To overcome such translational issues, many laboratories have focused on developing curcumin nanoformulations for cancer therapeutics. In th...

  4. Clinical significance of plasma lysophosphatidic acid levels in the differential diagnosis of ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Jie Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the value of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA in the diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Materials and Methods: We first performed a hospital-based, case-control study involving 123 ovarian cancer patients and 101 benign ovarian tumor patients, and then conducted a meta-analysis with 19 case-control studies to assess the correlation between ovarian cancer and plasma LPA levels. Results: The case-control study results demonstrated that ovarian cancer patients have increased LPA and cancer antigen (CA-125 levels compared to patients with benign ovarian tumor (LPA: Ovarian cancer vs benign ovarian tumor: 5.28 ± 1.52 vs 1.82 ± 0.77 μmol/L; CA-125: Ovarian cancer vs benign ovarian tumor: 87.17 ± 45.81 vs. 14.03 ± 10.14 U/mL, which showed statistically significant differences (both P < 0.05. LPA with advanced sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy rate of diagnosis excelled CA-125 in the diagnosis of ovarian cancer (both P < 0.05. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve in the diagnosis of ovarian cancer (LPA: 0.983; CA-125: 0.910 were statistically significant compared with the reference (both P < 0.001 and the difference of the areas of ROC curve between LPA and CA-125 in the diagnosis of ovarian cancer showed statistically significant difference (P < 0.05. The meta-analysis results suggested that plasma LPA levels were higher in ovarian cancer tissues than in benign tissues (standardized mean difference (SMD =2.36, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.61-3.11, P < 0.001 and normal tissues (SMD = 2.32, 95% CI: 1.77-2.87, P < 0.001. Conclusion: LPA shows greater value in the diagnosis of ovarian cancer compared to CA-125 and may be employed as a biological index to diagnose ovarian cancer.

  5. Proteomic profiling of mammary carcinomas identifies C7orf24, a gamma-glutamyl cyclotransferase, as a potential cancer biomarker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromov, Pavel; Gromova, Irina; Friis, Esbern;

    2010-01-01

    found in other cancer types. Four of these were investigated in greater detail, and we found that a proportion of tumors (58% in cervical, 38% in lung, 72% in colon, and 46% in breast cancer) expressed C7orf24 at levels exceeding those seen in normal samples. The observed overexpression of this protein...... breast cancer as early as possible are an urgent need as the risk of recurrence and subsequent death is closely related to the stage of the disease at the time of primary surgery. A set of 123 primary breast tumors and matched normal tissue was analyzed by two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis, and a...... sample set (123 samples) and in an independent large TMA validation data set (2197 samples) of clinically annotated breast cancer specimens, respectively. Survival analysis showed that C7orf24 overexpression defines a subgroup of breast tumors with poor clinical outcome. Up-regulation of C7orf24 was also...

  6. Increasing in activity and plasma concentration of matrix metalloproteinase-9 in metastatic breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Sadeghi1

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available (Received 30 March, 2009 ; Accepted 22 July, 2009AbstractBackground and purpose: Matrix metalloproteinase are a family of proteolytic enzymes that have specific functions in digestion of cells cohesive extra cellular matrix and also, increasing metastasis behavior of acute human tumors. It has been reported that MMPs in two forms, namely proenzyme and active enzyme in biological samples. It is distinguished that among this family, (MMP-9 Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 has function in both initiation and invasion steps of breast cancer. In our previous study, we reported a correlation between C/T polymorphism at promoter region of this gene and metastasis step of breast cancer.Considering few findings regarding the relationship between the active form of this enzyme and occurrence of cancer, and also the correlation between active form and allelic genotype of persons, in this study we decided to do a parallel study on measurement of active plasma MMP-9 and its relationship with allelic genotype of breast cancer patients.Materials and methods: After analysis of data, we found that concentration of active MMP-9 has a significant difference in breast cancer patients in comparison with control group, as the concentration of active form of this enzyme was less in control group than the breast cancer patients group (0.7 ng and 1.7 ng respectively. Thus, the level of active MMP-9 showed a significant increase in persons with CT and TT genotypes in comparison with CC genotype (1.5 folds.Results: The present data suggest the concentration of active MMP-9 in breast cancer patients has significantly increased in comparison with the control group and the increased in plasma level of this enzyme is related with the existence of T allele at this gene promoter and also in progression of breast cancer in these patients. We can use the active plasma level of this enzyme or the existence of T allele as a diagnostic tool for discriminating subgroups of breast cancer

  7. Plasma-derived exosomal survivin, a plausible biomarker for early detection of prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma Khan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Survivin is expressed in prostate cancer (PCa, and its downregulation sensitizes PCa cells to chemotherapeutic agents in vitro and in vivo. Small membrane-bound vesicles called exosomes, secreted from the endosomal membrane compartment, contain RNA and protein that they readily transport via exosome internalization into recipient cells. Recent progress has shown that tumor-derived exosomes play multiple roles in tumor growth and metastasis and may produce these functions via immune escape, tumor invasion and angiogenesis. Furthermore, exosome analysis may provide novel biomarkers to diagnose or monitor PCa treatment. METHODS: Exosomes were purified from the plasma and serum from 39 PCa patients, 20 BPH patients, 8 prostate cancer recurrent and 16 healthy controls using ultracentrifugation and their quantities and qualities were quantified and visualized from both the plasma and the purified exosomes using ELISA and Western blotting, respectively. RESULTS: Survivin was significantly increased in the tumor-derived samples, compared to those from BPH and controls with virtually no difference in the quantity of Survivin detected in exosomes collected from newly diagnosed patients exhibiting low (six or high (nine Gleason scores. Exosome Survivin levels were also higher in patients that had relapsed on chemotherapy compared to controls. CONCLUSIONS: These studies demonstrate that Survivin exists in plasma exosomes from both normal, BPH and PCa subjects. The relative amounts of exosomal Survivin in PCa plasma was significantly higher than in those with pre-inflammatory BPH and control plasma. This differential expression of exosomal Survivin was seen with both newly diagnosed and advanced PCa subjects with high or low-grade cancers. Analysis of plasma exosomal Survivin levels may offer a convenient tool for diagnosing or monitoring PCa and may, as it is elevated in low as well as high Gleason scored samples, be used for early detection.

  8. Fluvastatin mediated breast cancer cell death: a proteomic approach to identify differentially regulated proteins in MDA-MB-231 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anantha Koteswararao Kanugula

    Full Text Available Statins are increasingly being recognized as anti-cancer agents against various cancers including breast cancer. To understand the molecular pathways targeted by fluvastatin and its differential sensitivity against metastatic breast cancer cells, we analyzed protein alterations in MDA-MB-231 cells treated with fluvastatin using 2-DE in combination with LC-MS/MS. Results revealed dys-regulation of 39 protein spots corresponding to 35 different proteins. To determine the relevance of altered protein profiles with breast cancer cell death, we mapped these proteins to major pathways involved in the regulation of cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, cell cycle, Rho GDI and proteasomal pathways using IPA analysis. Highly interconnected sub networks showed that vimentin and ERK1/2 proteins play a central role in controlling the expression of altered proteins. Fluvastatin treatment caused proteolysis of vimentin, a marker of epithelial to mesenchymal transition. This effect of fluvastatin was reversed in the presence of mevalonate, a downstream product of HMG-CoA and caspase-3 inhibitor. Interestingly, fluvastatin neither caused an appreciable cell death nor did modulate vimentin expression in normal mammary epithelial cells. In conclusion, fluvastatin alters levels of cytoskeletal proteins, primarily targeting vimentin through increased caspase-3- mediated proteolysis, thereby suggesting a role for vimentin in statin-induced breast cancer cell death.

  9. Proteomic Investigations into Hemodialysis Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Bonomini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The retention of a number of solutes that may cause adverse biochemical/biological effects, called uremic toxins, characterizes uremic syndrome. Uremia therapy is based on renal replacement therapy, hemodialysis being the most commonly used modality. The membrane contained in the hemodialyzer represents the ultimate determinant of the success and quality of hemodialysis therapy. Membrane’s performance can be evaluated in terms of removal efficiency for unwanted solutes and excess fluid, and minimization of negative interactions between the membrane material and blood components that define the membrane’s bio(incompatibility. Given the high concentration of plasma proteins and the complexity of structural functional relationships of this class of molecules, the performance of a membrane is highly influenced by its interaction with the plasma protein repertoire. Proteomic investigations have been increasingly applied to describe the protein uremic milieu, to compare the blood purification efficiency of different dialyzer membranes or different extracorporeal techniques, and to evaluate the adsorption of plasma proteins onto hemodialysis membranes. In this article, we aim to highlight investigations in the hemodialysis setting making use of recent developments in proteomic technologies. Examples are presented of why proteomics may be helpful to nephrology and may possibly affect future directions in renal research.

  10. Microsatellite instability and the association with plasma homocysteine and thymidylate synthase in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Henrik; Lindebjerg, Jan; Crüger, Dorthe G.;

    2008-01-01

    The possible associations between microsatellite instability, homocysteine and thymidylate synthase were investigated in tumors and plasma from 130 patients with colorectal cancer. Other analyses included thymidylate synthase and 5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase gene polymorphisms......, carcinoembryonic antigen, vitamin B12, and folate. Microsatellite instability of tumors was associated with higher levels of plasma homocysteine (p = 0.008) and higher protein expression of thymidylate synthase (p ... factors. CEA was not associated with neither homocysteine nor microsatellite instability. The data suggests that there is a more pronounced methyl unit deficiency in microsatellite instable tumors....

  11. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Metastasis-Inhibitory Mechanism of miR-193a-3p in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Deng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: microRNAs can repress the expression of target genes by destabilizing their mRNAs or by inhibiting their translation. Our previous findings suggested that miR-193a-3p inhibited the progression of NSCLC both in vitro and in vivo. However, the biological processes and molecular pathways through which this miRNA exerts its positive effects are unknown. Methods: To explore the molecular mechanisms by which miR-193a-3p inhibited NSCLC metastasis, we investigated the changes in the protein profile of SPC-A-1sci (highly metastatic cells in response to the up-regulation of miR-193a-3p expression using a proteomics approach (iTRAQ combined with NanoLC-MS/MS. Changes in the profiles of the expressed proteins were verified using western blotting and were analyzed using the DAVID and STRING programs. Results: In the two replicated experiments, 4962/4946 proteins were identified, and the levels of expression of 4923/4902 proteins were quantified. In total, 112 of these proteins were differentially expressed. Among them, the up-regulated levels of expression of two of the 62 proteins with up-regulated expression (PPP2R2A and GSN and the down-regulated levels of expression four of the 50 proteins with down-regulated expression (LMNB2, UHRF1, G3BP1, and HNRNPU were verified using western blotting. The bioinformatics analysis revealed the interactions and signaling networks of these differentially expressed proteins. Conclusion: miR-193a-3p inhibited the metastasis of lung cancer cells by deregulating the expression of tumor-related proteins. These findings may improve the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the metastatic-inhibitory effect of miR-193a-3p on lung cancer cells.

  12. CONTRIBUTION OF PLASMA IN PHYSIOLOGICAL SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Sushil kumar ,; Yadav, A K

    2016-01-01

    The human plasma proteome holds the promise of a revolution in disease diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring provided that major challenges in proteomics and related disciplines can be addressed . Plasma is not only the primary clinical specimen but also represents the largest and deepest version of the human proteome present in any sample: in addition to the classical “plasma proteins” .A major part plasma membrane function is conducted by proteins, both integral and peripheral. Peripheral me...

  13. An integrative genomic and proteomic analysis of PIK3CA, PTEN and AKT mutations in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stemke-Hale, Katherine; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria; Lluch, Ana; Neve, Richard M.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Davies, Michael; Carey, Mark; Hu, Zhi; Guan, Yinghui; Sahin, Aysegul; Symmans, W. Fraser; Pusztai, Lajos; Nolden, Laura K.; Horlings, Hugo; Berns, Katrien; Hung, Mien-Chie; van de Vijver, Marc J.; Valero, Vicente; Gray, Joe W.; Bernards, Rene; Mills, Gordon B.; Hennessy, Bryan T.

    2008-05-06

    Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway aberrations are common in cancer. By applying mass spectroscopy-based sequencing and reverse phase protein arrays to 547 human breast cancers and 41 cell lines, we determined the subtype specificity and signaling effects of PIK3CA, AKT and PTEN mutations, and the effects of PIK3CA mutations on responsiveness to PI3K inhibition in-vitro and on outcome after adjuvant tamoxifen. PIK3CA mutations were more common in hormone receptor positive (33.8%) and HER2-positive (24.6%) than in basal-like tumors (8.3%). AKT1 (1.4%) and PTEN (2.3%) mutations were restricted to hormone receptor-positive cancers with PTEN protein levels also being significantly lower in hormone receptor-positive cancers. Unlike AKT1 mutations, PIK3CA (39%) and PTEN (20%) mutations were more common in cell lines than tumors, suggesting a selection for these but not AKT1 mutations during adaptation to culture. PIK3CA mutations did not have a significant impact on outcome in 166 hormone receptor-positive breast cancer patients after adjuvant tamoxifen. PIK3CA mutations, in comparison with PTEN loss and AKT1 mutations, were associated with significantly less and indeed inconsistent activation of AKT and of downstream PI3K/AKT signaling in tumors and cell lines, and PTEN loss and PIK3CA mutation were frequently concordant, suggesting different contributions to pathophysiology. PTEN loss but not PIK3CA mutations rendered cells sensitive to growth inhibition by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Thus, PI3K pathway aberrations likely play a distinct role in the pathogenesis of different breast cancer subtypes. The specific aberration may have implications for the selection of PI3K-targeted therapies in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer.

  14. Plasma acid and alkaline phosphatase in patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, M; Bonneterre, J; Hecquet, B; Desoize, B; Demaille, A

    1991-01-01

    Acid and alkaline phosphatase were determined in 107 breast cancer patients to study their potential value in case of bone metastases. The patients were divided into 4 groups: A, patients without metastases (n = 34); B, metastatic patients without bone lesions (n = 37); C, patients with metastases in and outside of bones (n = 24), D, patients with bone-only metastases (n = 12). Tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TR-ACP), and bone alkaline phosphatase (bone-ALP) were significantly higher in patients with metastases than in patients without. However, no difference in TR-ACP was observed between subgroups of metastatic patients. PMID:2064338

  15. Plasma levels of the MMP-9:TIMP-1 complex as prognostic biomarker in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Stine Buch; Christensen, Sarah Louise T; Würtz, Sidse Ørnbjerg;

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide more than one million women are annually diagnosed with breast cancer. A considerable fraction of these women receive systemic adjuvant therapy; however, some are cured by primary surgery and radiotherapy alone. Prognostic biomarkers guide stratification of patients into different risk...... groups and hence improve management of breast cancer patients. Plasma levels of Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and its natural inhibitor Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) have previously been associated with poor patient outcome and resistance to certain forms of chemotherapy. To...

  16. Prognostic associations of preoperative plasma levels of fibrinogen and D-dimer after curative resection in patients with colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王俊锋

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the associations of preoperative plasma levels of fibrinogen and D-dimer with clinico-pathologic parameters and overall survival in colorectal cancer patients after curative resection.Methods From

  17. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 levels in plasma from tumour arteries and veins of patients with rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, C.; Lykke, J.; Christensen, I.J.; Brünner, Nils; Nielsen, H.J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective . Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) plays a major role in the regulation of tissue growth, including cancer growth. The TIMP-1 protein can be determined in plasma, and increased plasma levels of TIMP-1 are associated with a poor prognosis of colorectal cancer patients. The...... aim of the present study was to evaluate whether tumour tissue release of the TIMP-1 protein contributes to the increased plasma levels of TIMP-1 observed in patients with colorectal cancer. Material and methods . Preoperative blood samples from a peripheral vein and intraoperative blood samples from...... a tumour artery, a tumour vein and from a peripheral vein were drawn from 24 patients undergoing elective, intended curative surgery for primary rectal cancer. TIMP-1 levels were determined concurrently in plasma from all samples using a validated ELISA method. Counts of white blood cells and...

  18. Identification of Hypoxia-Regulated Proteins Using MALDI-Mass Spectrometry Imaging Combined with Quantitative Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djidja, Marie-Claude; Chang, Joan; Hadjiprocopis, Andreas;

    2014-01-01

    quantitative proteomics combined with MALDI-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI). Here we present a comprehensive hypoxic proteome study and are the first to investigate changes in situ using tumor samples. In vitro quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of the hypoxic proteome was performed on breast cancer...

  19. MAPU: Max-Planck Unified database of organellar, cellular, tissue and body fluid proteomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yanling; Zhang, Yong; Adachi, Jun;

    2007-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics has become a powerful technology to map the protein composition of organelles, cell types and tissues. In our department, a large-scale effort to map these proteomes is complemented by the Max-Planck Unified (MAPU) proteome database. MAPU contains several...... body fluid proteomes; including plasma, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid. Cell lines have been mapped to a depth of several thousand proteins and the red blood cell proteome has also been analyzed in depth. The liver proteome is represented with 3200 proteins. By employing high resolution MS and......://www.mapuproteome.com using a clickable interface of cell or body parts. Proteome data can be queried across proteomes by protein name, accession number, sequence similarity, peptide sequence and annotation information. More than 4500 mouse and 2500 human proteins have already been identified in at least one proteome. Basic...

  20. Proteomic Biomarkers of Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natacha Diaz-Prieto

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers provide a powerful approach to understanding the spectrum of cardiovascular diseases. They have application in screening, diagnostic, prognostication, prediction of recurrences and monitoring of therapy. The “omics” tool are becoming very useful in the development of new biomarkers in cardiovascular diseases. Among them, proteomics is especially fitted to look for new proteins in health and disease and is playing a significant role in the development of new diagnostic tools in cardiovascular diagnosis and prognosis. This review provides an overview of progress in applying proteomics to atherosclerosis. First, we describe novel proteins identified analysing atherosclerotic plaques directly. Careful analysis of proteins within the atherosclerotic vascular tissue can provide a repertoire of proteins involved in vascular remodelling and atherogenesis. Second, we discuss recent data concerning proteins secreted by atherosclerotic plaques. The definition of the atheroma plaque secretome resides in that proteins secreted by arteries can be very good candidates of novel biomarkers. Finally we describe proteins that have been differentially expressed (versus controls by individual cells which constitute atheroma plaques (endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, macrophages and foam cells as well as by circulating cells (monocytes, platelets or novel biomarkers present in plasma.

  1. Proteomic Biomarkers of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivanco, F; Padial, L R; Darde, V M; de la Cuesta, F; Alvarez-Llamas, G; Diaz-Prieto, Natacha; Barderas, M G

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY: Biomarkers provide a powerful approach to understanding the spectrum of cardiovascular diseases. They have application in screening, diagnostic, prognostication, prediction of recurrences and monitoring of therapy. The "omics" tool are becoming very useful in the development of new biomarkers in cardiovascular diseases. Among them, proteomics is especially fitted to look for new proteins in health and disease and is playing a significant role in the development of new diagnostic tools in cardiovascular diagnosis and prognosis. This review provides an overview of progress in applying proteomics to atherosclerosis. First, we describe novel proteins identified analysing atherosclerotic plaques directly. Careful analysis of proteins within the atherosclerotic vascular tissue can provide a repertoire of proteins involved in vascular remodelling and atherogenesis. Second, we discuss recent data concerning proteins secreted by atherosclerotic plaques. The definition of the atheroma plaque secretome resides in that proteins secreted by arteries can be very good candidates of novel biomarkers. Finally we describe proteins that have been differentially expressed (versus controls) by individual cells which constitute atheroma plaques (endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, macrophages and foam cells) as well as by circulating cells (monocytes, platelets) or novel biomarkers present in plasma. PMID:19578499

  2. Estimation of plasma lipids and its significance on histopathological grades in oral cancer: Prognostic significance an original research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia J Sherubin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Objectives: Alterations in the lipid profile have long been associated with various cancers because lipids play a key role in maintenance of cell integrity. This study was to estimate the plasma lipid levels in patients with oral cancer and to correlate the values with the histopathological grades. Materials and Methods: The study group included 50 patients with oral cancer aged between 20 and 60 years who had visited the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology during the period of September 2005 to July 2007. After the histotopathological confirmation, their plasma lipid levels were estimated using auto analyzer and the data was statistically analyzed. Results: The study revealed a significant decrease in the total plasma lipid levels in patients with oral cancer in comparison with the standard values. Comparing the plasma lipid levels with the histopathological grades, we observed a significant variation in the levels of total cholesterol, very low density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein and triglycerides Conclusion: The variation in the levels of plasma cholesterol and other lipid constituents in patients with cancer might be due to their increased utilization by neoplastic cells for new membrane biosynthesis. This study was an attempt to estimate the plasma lipids in oral cancer patients and its significance on histopathological grades. We observed a relationship between lower plasma lipids and oral cancer. The result of our study strongly warrants an in-depth research with larger samples and a longer follow-up to consider the low plasma lipid status in oral cancer patients as a useful indicator to assess the course and prognosis of the disease.

  3. Actionable mutations in plasma cell-free DNA in patients with advanced cancers referred for experimental targeted therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Janku, Filip; Angenendt, Philipp; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M.; Fu, Siqing; Naing, Aung; Falchook, Gerald S.; David S Hong; Holley, Veronica R.; Cabrilo, Goran; Jennifer J Wheler; Piha-Paul, Sarina A.; Zinner, Ralph G.; Bedikian, Agop Y.; Overman, Michael J.; Kee, Bryan K.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-free (cf) DNA in the plasma of cancer patients offers an easily obtainable source of biologic material for mutation analysis. Plasma samples from 157 patients with advanced cancers who progressed on systemic therapy were tested for 21 mutations in BRAF, EGFR, KRAS, and PIK3CA using the BEAMing method and results were compared to mutation analysis of archival tumor tissue from a CLIA-certified laboratory obtained as standard of care from diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. Results were ...

  4. Proteomic Upregulation of Fatty Acid Synthase and Fatty Acid Binding Protein 5 and Identification of Cancer- and Race-Specific Pathway Associations in Human Prostate Cancer Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Jennifer S.; von Lersner, Ariana K.; Sang, Qing-Xiang Amy

    2016-01-01

    Protein profiling studies of prostate cancer have been widely used to characterize molecular differences between diseased and non-diseased tissues. When combined with pathway analysis, profiling approaches are able to identify molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer, group patients by cancer subtype, and predict prognosis. This strategy can also be implemented to study prostate cancer in very specific populations, such as African Americans who have higher rates of prostate cancer incidence and mortality than other racial groups in the United States. In this study, age-, stage-, and Gleason score-matched prostate tumor specimen from African American and Caucasian American men, along with non-malignant adjacent prostate tissue from these same patients, were compared. Protein expression changes and altered pathway associations were identified in prostate cancer generally and in African American prostate cancer specifically. In comparing tumor to non-malignant samples, 45 proteins were significantly cancer-associated and 3 proteins were significantly downregulated in tumor samples. Notably, fatty acid synthase (FASN) and epidermal fatty acid-binding protein (FABP5) were upregulated in human prostate cancer tissues, consistent with their known functions in prostate cancer progression. Aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1 member A3 (ALDH1A3) was also upregulated in tumor samples. The Metastasis Associated Protein 3 (MTA3) pathway was significantly enriched in tumor samples compared to non-malignant samples. While the current experiment was unable to detect statistically significant differences in protein expression between African American and Caucasian American samples, differences in overrepresentation and pathway enrichment were found. Structural components (Cytoskeletal Proteins and Extracellular Matrix Protein protein classes, and Biological Adhesion Gene Ontology (GO) annotation) were overrepresented in African American but not Caucasian American tumors. Additionally, 5

  5. The characterization of exosome from blood plasma of patients with colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunusova, N. V.; Tamkovich, S. N.; Stakheeva, M. N.; Afanas'ev, S. G.; Frolova, A. Y.; Kondakova, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    Exosomes are extracellular membrane structures involved in many physiological and pathological processes including cancerogenesis and metastasis. The clarification of the criteria for exosome isolating and identifying is the purpose of this study. Exosome samples from the plasma of patients with colorectal cancer and healthy donors were examined using transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry in accordance with the minimum requirements of "International Society for Extracellular Vesicles". The choice of the method for isolation of exosomes from the blood plasma by ultrafiltration and ultracentrifugation allowed obtaining highly purified samples of exosomes, in which all the structural components were clearly seen. The results obtained with flow cytometry suggest that exosomes of blood plasma from patients with colorectal cancer can be produced by epithelial cells. Moreover, cells produce different types of exosomes, which correspond to different mechanisms in sorting macromolecules in the membrane of multivesicular bodies. Determination of significant differences in the expression of specific exosomal proteins from colorectal cancer patients compared to healthy donors suggests a high diagnostic potential significance of circulating exosomes.

  6. Low temperature plasmas as emerging cancer therapeutics: the state of play and thoughts for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Adam M; Frame, Fiona M; Arya, Manit; Maitland, Norman J; O'Connell, Deborah

    2016-06-01

    The field of plasma medicine has seen substantial advances over the last decade, with applications developed for bacterial sterilisation, wound healing and cancer treatment. Low temperature plasmas (LTPs) are particularly suited for medical purposes since they are operated in the laboratory at atmospheric pressure and room temperature, providing a rich source of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS). A great deal of research has been conducted into the role of reactive species in both the growth and treatment of cancer, where long-established radio- and chemo-therapies exploit their ability to induce potent cytopathic effects. In addition to producing a plethora of RONS, LTPs can also create strong electroporative fields. From an application perspective, it has been shown that LTPs can be applied precisely to a small target area. On this basis, LTPs have been proposed as a promising future strategy to accurately and effectively control and eradicate tumours. This review aims to evaluate the current state of the literature in the field of plasma oncology and highlight the potential for the use of LTPs in combination therapy. We also present novel data on the effect of LTPs on cancer stem cells, and speculatively outline how LTPs could circumvent treatment resistance encountered with existing therapeutics. PMID:26888782

  7. Application of serum surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization proteomic patterns in distinguishing lung cancer patients from healthy people

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Shuan-ying; XIAO Xue-yuan; ZHANG Wang-gang; SUN Xiu-zhen; ZHANG Li-juan; ZHANG Wei; ZHOU Bin; CHEN Guo-an; HE Da-cheng

    2005-01-01

    @@ Screening and early diagnosis of lung cancer relies mainly on chest X-ray, low-dose computed tomography, bronchoscopy, sputum cytology, and measurement of tumor markers such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cytokeratin-19 fragments (Cyfra21-1), and neuron-specific enolase (NSE).

  8. Proteomic evaluation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells after treatment with retinoic acid isomers: Preliminary insights

    OpenAIRE

    Flodrová, Dana

    2012-01-01

    The effects of 9-cis retinoic acid and all-trans retinoic acid in human MCF-7 breast cancer line have been investigated. The total cell proteins were extracted and separated on 1D SDS-PAGE. The proteins were subsequently in-gel digested by trypsin and identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF.

  9. Developing a discrimination rule between breast cancer patients and controls using proteomics mass spectrometric data: A three-step approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heidema, A.G.; Nagelkerke, N.

    2008-01-01

    To discriminate between breast cancer patients and controls, we used a three-step approach to obtain our decision rule. First, we ranked the mass/charge values using random forests, because it generates importance indices that take possible interactions into account. We observed that the top ranked

  10. Single- and Double-Headed Chemical Probes for Detection of Active Cathepsin D in a Cancer Cell Proteome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nussbaumerová, Martina; Srp, Jaroslav; Máša, Martin; Hradilek, Martin; Šanda, Miloslav; Reiniš, Milan; Horn, Martin; Mareš, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 11 (2010), s. 1538-1541. ISSN 1439-4227 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400550705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : cathepsin D * cancer * activity-based probes Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.945, year: 2010

  11. Carbohydrate-based chemical probes for the proteomic profiling of glucosidases and the emerging cancer marker galectin-3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Scherpenzeel, M.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes the synthesis of carbohydrate-based chemical probes to either profile glucosidases, or specifically label the emerging cancer marker galectin-3 in cell lysates. In general, chemical probe based methods can tag certain classes of proteins, and covalently label a protein or a pro

  12. Diagnosis of breast cancer by polarization cartography of human blood plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintser, Ozar P.; Oliinychenko, B. P.

    2012-01-01

    The possibilities of polarization-optical diagnostics of plasma protein structures changes, which are connected with the breast pathologies, were investigated. As the main investigation object it has been used the coordinate structure of polarization states distributions of blood plasma images. The results were obtained by means of novel technique of digital polarimetry. The results of investigating the interrelation between the values of correlation (correlation area, asymmetry coefficient and autocorrelation function excess) and fractal (dispersion of logarithmic dependencies of power spectra) parameters are presented. They characterize the coordinate distributions of polarization azimuth of laser images of blood plasma smears and pathological state of the organism. The diagnostic criteria of breast cancer nascency are determined.

  13. Plasma TIMP-1 levels and treatment outcome in patients treated with XELOX for metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, C.; Qvortrup, C.; Christensen, I.J.; Glimelius, B.; Berglund, Å.; Jensen, B.V.; Nielsen, S.E.; Keldsen, N.; Nielsen, H.J.; Brunner, Nils; Pfeiffer, P.

    2011-01-01

    associations between baseline TIMP-1 or CEA levels and best response to treatment or progression-free survival (PFS) could be demonstrated. In contrast, high baseline plasma TIMP-1 levels were associated with poor overall survival (OS), P = 0.008, hazard ratio (HR) = 1.80 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1......BACKGROUND: The aim was to evaluate the association between plasma tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) and serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels and outcome in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) receiving XELOX (combination chemotherapy with capecitabine and...... oxaliplatin) as first-line treatment. PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred and twenty patients were included. Blood samples were collected before treatment and 3 weeks later before the next treatment cycle. Plasma TIMP-1 and serum CEA levels were correlated to treatment outcome. RESULTS: No significant...

  14. Plasma levels of OLFM4 in normals and patients with gastrointestinal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Stine N; Glenthøj, Anders J; Heebøll, Sara;

    2015-01-01

    epithelial cells and in some carcinoma cells. We developed an Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay for OLFM4 and investigated whether plasma levels of OLFM4 reflect colorectal malignancies, but were unable to see any such association. Instead, we observed two populations of individuals with respect to OLFM4...... levels in plasma, the majority with OLFM4 in plasma between 0 and 0.1 μg/ml, mean 0.028 μg/ml while 10% of both normals and patients with cancers had OLFM4 between 4 and 60 μg/ml, mean 15 μg/ml. The levels were constant over time. The background for this high plasma level is not known, but must be taken......Olfactomedin 4 (OLFM4) is a secreted glycoprotein predominantly expressed in bone marrow and gastrointestinal tissues. Aberrant expression of OLFM4 has been shown in several cancers. However, the clinical significance hereof is currently controversial. OLFM4 has been proposed as a candidate...

  15. High heterogeneity of plasma membrane microfluidity in multidrug-resistant cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Céline; Roche, Yann; Millot, Christine; Deturche, Régis; Royer, Pascal; Manfait, Michel; Plain, Jérôme; Jeannesson, Pierre; Millot, Jean-Marc; Jaffiol, Rodolphe

    2009-05-01

    Diffusion-time distribution analysis (DDA) has been used to explore the plasma membrane fluidity of multidrug-resistant cancer cells (LR73 carcinoma cells) and also to characterize the influence of various membrane agents present in the extracellular medium. DDA is a recent single-molecule technique, based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), well suited to retrieve local organization of cell membrane. The method was conducted on a large number of living cells, which enabled us to get a detailed overview of plasma membrane microviscosity, and plasma membrane micro-organization, between the cells of the same line. Thus, we clearly reveal the higher heterogeneity of plasma membrane in multidrug-resistant cancer cells in comparison with the nonresistant ones (denoted sensitive cells). We also display distinct modifications related to a membrane fluidity modulator, benzyl alcohol, and two revertants of multidrug resistance, verapamil and cyclosporin-A. A relation between the distribution of the diffusion-time values and the modification of membrane lateral heterogeneities is proposed.

  16. MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-IMS―Application of Spatial Proteomics for Ovarian Cancer Classification and Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan O. R. Gustafsson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS allows acquisition of mass data for metabolites, lipids, peptides and proteins directly from tissue sections. IMS is typically performed either as a multiple spot profiling experiment to generate tissue specific mass profiles, or a high resolution imaging experiment where relative spatial abundance for potentially hundreds of analytes across virtually any tissue section can be measured. Crucially, imaging can be achieved without prior knowledge of tissue composition and without the use of antibodies. In effect MALDI-IMS allows generation of molecular data which complement and expand upon the information provided by histology including immuno-histochemistry, making its application valuable to both cancer biomarker research and diagnostics. The current state of MALDI-IMS, key biological applications to ovarian cancer research and practical considerations for analysis of peptides and proteins on ovarian tissue are presented in this review.

  17. Scanning the cell surface proteome of cancer cells and identification of metastasis-associated proteins using a subtractive immunization strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Nicolaj; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2009-01-01

    and technologically challenging, and no ideal method is currently available. Here, we describe a strategy that allows scanning of the entire cell surface and identification of molecules that exhibit altered expression between two cell types. Concurrently, this method gives rise to valuable reagents...... for further characterization of the identified proteins. The strategy is based on subtractive immunization of mice, and we used the two isogenic cell lines, NM-2C5 and M-4A4, derived from the MDA-MB-435 cancer cell line, as a model system. Although the two cell lines are equally tumorigenic, only M-4A...... neuroendocrine tumors while exhibiting no or very weak reactivity with normal tissues. mAb 15C7 stained a variety of cancers as well as some normal lymphoid organs and was subsequently identified to react with HLA-DR-beta. A third mAb, 31D7, that also specifically recognized HLA-DR-beta was capable of inhibiting...

  18. Tissue Tolerable Plasma (TTP) induces apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rate of microscopic incomplete resections of gastrointestinal cancers including pancreatic cancer has not changed considerably over the past years. Future intra-operative applications of tissue tolerable plasmas (TTP) could help to address this problem. Plasma is generated by feeding energy, like electrical discharges, to gases. The development of non-thermal atmospheric plasmas displaying spectra of temperature within or just above physiological ranges allows biological or medical applications of plasmas. We have investigated the effects of tissue tolerable plasmas (TTP) on the human pancreatic cancer cell line Colo-357 and PaTu8988T and the murine cell line 6606PDA in vitro (Annexin-V-FITC/DAPI-Assay and propidium iodide DNA staining assay) as well as in the in vivo tumour chorio-allantoic membrane (TUM-CAM) assay using Colo-357. TTP of 20 seconds (s) induced a mild elevation of an experimental surface temperature of 23.7 degree Celsius up to 26.63+/−0.40 degree Celsius. In vitro TTP significantly (p=0.0003) decreased cell viability showing the strongest effects after 20s TTP. Also, TTP effects increased over time levelling off after 72 hours (30.1+/−4.4% of dead cells (untreated control) versus 78.0+/−9.6% (20s TTP)). However, analyzing these cells for apoptosis 10s TTP revealed the largest proportion of apoptotic cells (34.8+/−7.2%, p=0.0009 versus 12.3+/−6.6%, 20s TTP) suggesting non-apoptotic cell death in the majority of cells after 20s TTP. Using solid Colo-357 tumours in the TUM-CAM model TUNEL-staining showed TTP-induced apoptosis up to a depth of tissue penetration (DETiP) of 48.8+/−12.3μm (20s TTP, p<0.0001). This was mirrored by a significant (p<0.0001) reduction of Ki-67+ proliferating cells (80.9+/−13.2% versus 37.7+/−14.6%, p<0.0001) in the top cell layers as well as typical changes on HE specimens. The bottom cell layers were not affected by TTP. Our data suggest possible future intra-operative applications of TTP to reduce

  19. Correlations between plasma endothelin-1 levels and breakthrough pain in patients with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan XB

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Xue-bin Yan, Tuo-chao Peng, Dong Huang Department of Anesthesiologist, The Third Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha, Hunan Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Endothelin-1 (ET-1 may be involved in driving pain in patients with advanced cancer. However, a few studies focus on the role of ET-1 in breakthrough pain (BP. The aim of this pivotal study was to explore the correlation between the plasma (ET-1 level and BP intensity. A total of 40 patients were enrolled in the study, and they were divided into two groups: BP group and non-BP group. Moreover, 20 healthy adults were used as the normal control group. Pain intensity was measured using visual analog scale (VAS scores of 1–10. Plasma ET-1 levels were detected by an ET radioimmunoassay kit. Subsequently, the correlation of ET-1 level with the VAS score and cancer types was analyzed by Pearson’s correlation coefficient. The plasma ET-1 level in the BP group (35.31±8.02 pg/mL was higher than that in the non-BP group (29.51±6.78 pg/mL and the normal control group (24.77±10.10 pg/mL, P<0.05. In addition, the VAS score in the BP group (7.45±0.82 was higher than that in the non-BP group (2.80±1.23, P<0.05. The plasma ET-1 level was positively correlated with the VAS score of the BP group (Pearson’s r=0.42. There was no significant correlation between the plasma ET-1 level and VAS score of the non-BP group (Pearson’s r=–0.22 or/and cancer types (P>0.05. The elevated plasma ET-1 levels were positively related to BP, and targeting ET-1 may provide a novel pain-reducing therapeutic treatment in BP. Keywords: visual analog scale, correlation, cancer types, background pain

  20. Proteomic profiling reveals that resveratrol inhibits HSP27 expression and sensitizes breast cancer cells to doxorubicin therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Díaz-Chávez

    Full Text Available The use of chemopreventive natural compounds represents a promising strategy in the search for novel therapeutic agents in cancer. Resveratrol (3,4',5-trans-trihydroxystilbilene is a dietary polyphenol found in fruits, vegetables and medicinal plants that exhibits chemopreventive and antitumor effects. In this study, we searched for modulated proteins with preventive or therapeutic potential in MCF-7 breast cancer cells exposed to resveratrol. Using two-dimensional electrophoresis we found significant changes (FC >2.0; p≤0.05 in the expression of 16 proteins in resveratrol-treated MCF-7 cells. Six down-regulated proteins were identified by tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS as heat shock protein 27 (HSP27, translationally-controlled tumor protein, peroxiredoxin-6, stress-induced-phosphoprotein-1, pyridoxine-5'-phosphate oxidase-1 and hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase; whereas one up-regulated protein was identified as triosephosphate isomerase. Particularly, HSP27 overexpression has been associated to apoptosis inhibition and resistance of human cancer cells to therapy. Consistently, we demonstrated that resveratrol induces apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. Apoptosis was associated with a significant increase in mitochondrial permeability transition, cytochrome c release in cytoplasm, and caspases -3 and -9 independent cell death. Then, we evaluated the chemosensitization effect of increasing concentrations of resveratrol in combination with doxorubicin anti-neoplastic agent in vitro. We found that resveratrol effectively sensitize MCF-7 cells to cytotoxic therapy. Next, we evaluated the relevance of HSP27 targeted inhibition in therapy effectiveness. Results evidenced that HSP27 inhibition using RNA interference enhances the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin. In conclusion, our data indicate that resveratrol may improve the therapeutic effects of doxorubicin in part by cell death induction. We propose that potential modulation of HSP27