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Sample records for cancer patients pharmacokinetics

  1. Population pharmacokinetics of bevacizumab in cancer patients with external validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kelong; Peyret, Thomas; Marchand, Mathilde; Quartino, Angelica; Gosselin, Nathalie H; Girish, Sandhya; Allison, David E; Jin, Jin

    2016-08-01

    Bevacizumab is approved for various cancers. This analysis aimed to comprehensively evaluate bevacizumab pharmacokinetics and the influence of patient variables on bevacizumab pharmacokinetics. Rich and sparse bevacizumab serum concentrations were collected from Phase I through IV studies in early and metastatic cancers. Bevacizumab was given intravenously as single agent or in combination with chemotherapy for single- and multiple-dose schedules. Model-building used 8943 bevacizumab concentrations from 1792 patients with colon/colorectal, non-small cell lung, kidney, pancreatic, breast, prostate and brain cancer. Bevacizumab doses ranged from 1 to 20 mg/kg given once every 1, 2 or 3 weeks. A two-compartment model best described the data. The population estimates of clearance (CL), central volume of distribution (V1) and half-life for a typical 70-kg patient were 9.01 mL/h, 2.88 L and 19.6 days. CL and V1 increased with body weight and were higher in males than females by 14 and 18 %, respectively. CL decreased with increasing albumin and decreasing alkaline phosphatase. The final model was externally validated using 1670 concentrations from 146 Japanese patients that were not used for model-building. Mean prediction errors were -2.1, 3.1 and 1.0 % for concentrations, CL and V1, respectively, confirming adequate predictive performance. A robust bevacizumab pharmacokinetic model was developed and externally validated, which may be used to simulate bevacizumab exposure to optimize dosing strategies. Asian and non-Asian patients exhibited similar bevacizumab pharmacokinetics. Given the similarity in pharmacokinetics among monoclonal antibodies, this may inform pharmacokinetic studies in different ethnic groups for other therapeutic antibodies.

  2. Vancomycin pharmacokinetics and predicted dosage requirements in pediatric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Hadi, Ola; Al Omar, Suha; Nazer, Lama H; Mubarak, Sawsan; Le, Jennifer

    2016-06-01

    To determine the pharmacokinetic parameters and compare pharmacodynamic target attainment at different dosing strategies of vancomycin in pediatric cancer patients. Pediatric patients who received vancomycin and had at least two steady-state concentrations taken within the same dosing interval were identified. Vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates from our institution were determined using E-test. The population-based pharmacokinetic modeling was performed using NONMEM 7.2. A one-compartment model with first-order kinetics was used to estimate clearance (CL) and volume of distribution (Vd). Monte Carlo simulations (N = 9800) were performed to compare area-under-the-curve over 24 h (AUC24)/MIC and trough concentration at different doses. Forty-nine patients, with 120 vancomcyin serum concentrations, were included in the analysis, mean age was 6 ± 2.5 (SD) years, mean weight was 19.6 ± 6.9(SD) kg, mean baseline serum creatinine was 0.4 ± 0.11(SD) mg/dl, and mean initial vancomycin dose was 205 mg/day (range 100-460). Final model pharmacokinetic parameters were: CL (L/h) = 0.381 × weight(0.75) and Vd (L) = 0.663 × weight. Mean baseline (±SD) vancomycin CL was 0.20 ± 0.07 L/h/kg and Vd 0.66 ± 0.001 L/kg. . Renal function, sex, age, stay in the intensive care unit, and co-administration of nephrotoxic medications did not have an effect on the calculated parameters. Using Monte Carlo simulation with reported MICs, a dose of 60 mg/kg/day achieved AUC24/MIC ≥400 and trough concentration ≥15 mcg/mL in only 21.5% and 11% of virtual subjects, respectively. Higher than usual vancomycin doses may be required to treat serious MRSA infections in pediatric patients. The currently recommended dose of 60 mg/kg/day is unlikely to achieve the targets in most subjects. The optimal vancomycin dosing in pediatric cancer patients requires further

  3. A clinical pharmacokinetic microdosing study of docetaxel with Japanese patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Ken-ichi; Yoshino, Etsuko; Kawara, Kaori; Maeda, Kazuya; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki; Sugiyama, Yuichi; Yokoyama, Taro; Kaneta, Toshikado; Ishida, Hiroo; Sasaki, Yasutsuna

    2015-10-01

    Whether microdosing studies can be used to evaluate the human pharmacokinetics of new anticancer drugs remains unclear. The disposition of docetaxel in cancer patients is linear in terms of dose proportionality. We examined whether the pharmacokinetics of docetaxel in a clinically relevant therapeutic dose could be predicted from the pharmacokinetics of a microdose of docetaxel in Japanese patients with cancer. A microdose of docetaxel (100 μg/patient) was given by 5-min intravenous infusion on day 1, followed by a therapeutic dose of docetaxel (60-75 mg m(-2)), given by 1-h intravenous infusion on day 8. Plasma docetaxel was analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. A two-compartment pharmacokinetic model was used to calculate the area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time 0 to infinity (AUC0-inf). Nine patients received both a microdose and therapeutic dose of docetaxel. The AUC0-inf after microdosing was 3640 ± 1150 ng h L(-1), while that after therapeutic dosing adjusted to 100 mg/patient was 2230 ± 757 µg h L(-1). The ratio of docetaxel clearance in therapeutic dose to that in microdose was 1.8 (P = 0.0041). Plasma α1-acid glycoprotein concentrations negatively correlated with docetaxel clearance at therapeutic dose, whereas the trend was weak at microdose. Docetaxel clearance showed marginal nonlinearity between microdose and therapeutic dose, presumably because of saturation of plasma protein binding; however, the magnitude was within twofold, allowing practically acceptable extrapolation.

  4. A Population Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Analysis of Abemaciclib in a Phase I Clinical Trial in Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Sonya C; Sykes, Amanda K; Kulanthaivel, Palaniappan; Chan, Edward M; Turner, P Kellie; Cronier, Damien M

    2018-03-01

    Abemaciclib, a dual inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6, has demonstrated clinical activity in a number of different cancer types. The objectives of this study were to characterize the pharmacokinetics of abemaciclib in cancer patients using population pharmacokinetic (popPK) modeling, and to evaluate target engagement at clinically relevant dose levels. A phase I study was conducted in cancer patients which incorporated intensive pharmacokinetic sampling after single and multiple oral doses of abemaciclib. Data were analyzed by popPK modeling, and patient demographics contributing to pharmacokinetic variability were explored. Target engagement was evaluated by combining the clinical popPK model with a previously developed pre-clinical pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model. The pharmacokinetic analysis incorporated 4012 plasma concentrations from 224 patients treated with abemaciclib at doses ranging from 50 to 225 mg every 24 h and 75 to 275 mg every 12 h. A linear one-compartment model with time- and dose-dependent relative bioavailability (F rel ) adequately described the pharmacokinetics of abemaciclib. Serum albumin and alkaline phosphatase were the only significant covariates identified in the model, the inclusion of which reduced inter-individual variability in F rel by 10.3 percentage points. By combining the clinical popPK model with the previously developed pre-clinical pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model, the extent of target engagement in skin in cancer patients was successfully predicted. The proportion of abemaciclib pharmacokinetic variability that can be attributed to patient demographics is negligible, and as such there are currently no dose adjustments recommended for adult patients of different sex, age, or body weight. NCT01394016 (ClinicalTrials.gov).

  5. Clinical efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics of a newly developed controlled release morphine sulphate suppository in patients with cancer pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moolenaar, F.; Meijler, W.J.; Frijlink, H.W.; Visser, Jan; Proost, J.H.

    Objective: To compare the efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics of a newly developed controlled-release suppository (MSR) with MS Contin tablets (MSC) in cancer patients with pain. Methods: In a double-blind, randomised, two-way crossover trial, 25 patients with cancer pain were selected with a

  6. Treatment with subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl: results from a population pharmacokinetic study in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosten, Astrid W; Abrantes, João A; Jönsson, Siv; de Bruijn, Peter; Kuip, Evelien J M; Falcão, Amílcar; van der Rijt, Carin C D; Mathijssen, Ron H J

    2016-04-01

    Transdermal fentanyl is effective for the treatment of moderate to severe cancer-related pain but is unsuitable for fast titration. In this setting, continuous subcutaneous fentanyl may be used. As data on the pharmacokinetics of continuous subcutaneous fentanyl are lacking, we studied the pharmacokinetics of subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl. Furthermore, we evaluated rotations from the subcutaneous to the transdermal route. Fifty-two patients treated with subcutaneous and/or transdermal fentanyl for moderate to severe cancer-related pain participated. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed and evaluated using non-linear mixed-effects modelling. For rotations from subcutaneous to transdermal fentanyl, a 1:1 dose conversion ratio was used while the subcutaneous infusion was continued for 12 h (with a 50 % tapering after 6 h). A 6-h scheme with 50 % tapering after 3 h was simulated using the final model. A one-compartment model with first-order elimination and separate first-order absorption processes for each route adequately described the data. The estimated apparent clearance of fentanyl was 49.6 L/h; the absorption rate constant for subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl was 0.0358 and 0.0135 h(-1), respectively. Moderate to large inter-individual and inter-occasion variability was found. Around rotation from subcutaneous to transdermal fentanyl, measured and simulated plasma fentanyl concentrations rose and increasing side effects were observed. We describe the pharmacokinetics of subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl in one patient cohort and report several findings that are relevant for clinical practice. Further research is warranted to study the optimal scheme for rotations from the subcutaneous to the transdermal route.

  7. A Semi-Physiological Population Model to Quantify the Effect of Hematocrit on Everolimus Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics in Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Erp, Nielka P; van Herpen, Carla M; de Wit, Djoeke; Willemsen, Annelieke; Burger, David M; Huitema, Alwin D R; Kapiteijn, Ellen; Ter Heine, Rob

    2016-11-01

    Everolimus (a drug from the class of mammalian target of rapamycin [mTOR] inhibitors) is associated with frequent toxicity-related dose reductions. Everolimus accumulates in erythrocytes, but the extent to which hematocrit affects everolimus plasma pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics is unknown. We aimed to investigate the everolimus pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics and the influence of hematocrit in cancer patients. A semi-physiological pharmacokinetic model for everolimus was developed from pharmacokinetic data from 73 patients by non-linear mixed-effects modeling. Using a simulation study with a known pharmacodynamic model describing S6K1 (a downstream mTOR effector) inhibition, we investigated the impact of hematocrit. The apparent volume of distribution of the central and peripheral compartment were estimated to be 207 L with a relative standard error (RSE) of 5.0 % and 485 L (RSE 4.2 %), respectively, with an inter-compartmental clearance of 72.1 L/h (RSE 3.2 %). The apparent intrinsic clearance was 198 L/h (RSE 4.3 %). A decrease in hematocrit from 45 % to 20 % resulted in a predicted reduction in whole-blood exposure of ~50 %, but everolimus plasma pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics were not affected. The predicted S6K1 inhibition was at a plateau level in the approved dose of 10 mg once daily. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed for everolimus in cancer patients. Hematocrit influenced whole-blood pharmacokinetics, but not plasma pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics. Everolimus whole-blood concentrations should always be corrected for hematocrit. Since predicted mTOR inhibition was at a plateau level in the approved dose, dose reductions may have only a limited impact on mTOR inhibition.

  8. Influence of amifostine on the pharmacokinetics of cisplatin in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korst, A.E.C.; Sterre, M.L.T. van der; Gall, H.E.; Fichtinger-Schepman, A.M.J.; Vermorken, J.B.; Vijgh, W.J.F. van der

    1998-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of cisplatin was investigated in 13 patients receiving 18 courses of cisplatin alone or in combination with amifostine to investigate the influence of amifostine (WR 2721; Ethyol) on the pharmacokinetics of cisplatin. Cisplatin was administered as a 1-h i.v. infusion, whereas

  9. A review of factors explaining variability in fentanyl pharmacokinetics; focus on implications for cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuip, E.J.M.; Zandvliet, M.L.; Koolen, S.L.; Mathijssen, R.H.; Rijt, C.C. van der

    2017-01-01

    Fentanyl is a strong opioid that is available for various administration routes, and which is widely used to treat cancer-related pain. Many factors influence the fentanyl pharmacokinetics leading to a wide inter- and intrapatient variability. This systematic review summarizes multiple studied

  10. Treatment with subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl: results from a population pharmacokinetic study in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosten, A.W.; Abrantes, J.A.; Jonsson, S.; Bruijn, P. de; Kuip, E.J.M.; Falcao, A.; Rijt, C.C. van der; Mathijssen, R.H.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Transdermal fentanyl is effective for the treatment of moderate to severe cancer-related pain but is unsuitable for fast titration. In this setting, continuous subcutaneous fentanyl may be used. As data on the pharmacokinetics of continuous subcutaneous fentanyl are lacking, we studied the

  11. Treatment with subcutaneous and transdermal fentanyl: Results from a population pharmacokinetic study in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.W. Oosten (Astrid); J.A. Abrantes (João A.); S. Jönsson (Siv); P. de Bruijn (Peter); E.J.M. Kuip (Evelien); A. Falcão (Amílcar); C.C.D. van der Rijt (Carin); A.H.J. Mathijssen (Ron)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Transdermal fentanyl is effective for the treatment of moderate to severe cancer-related pain but is unsuitable for fast titration. In this setting, continuous subcutaneous fentanyl may be used. As data on the pharmacokinetics of continuous subcutaneous fentanyl are lacking, we

  12. Population pharmacokinetics of ifosfamide and its 2-and 3-dechloroethylated and 4-hydroxylated metabolites in resistant small-cell lung cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerbusch, T; vanPutten, JWG; Groen, HJM; Huitema, ADR; Mathot, RAA; Beijnen, JH

    The aim of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model that could describe the pharmacokinetics of ifosfamide, 2- and 3-dechloroethylifosfamide and 4-hydroxyifosfamide, and calculate their plasma exposure and urinary excretion. A group of 14 patients with small-cell lung cancer

  13. Effects of aprepitant on the pharmacokinetics of controlled-release oral oxycodone in cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Fujiwara

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Oxycodone is a µ-opioid receptor agonist widely used in the treatment of cancer pain. The predominant metabolic pathway of oxycodone is CYP3A4-mediated N-demethylation to noroxycodone, while a minor proportion undergoes 3-O-demethylation to oxymorphone by CYP2D6. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the mild CYP3A4 inhibitor aprepitant on the pharmacokinetics of orally administered controlled-release (CR oxycodone. METHOD: This study design was an open-label, single-sequence with two phases in cancer patients with pain who continued to be administered orally with multiple doses of CR oxycodone every 8 or 12 hours. Plasma concentration of oxycodone and its metabolites were measured up to 8 hours after administration as follows: on day 1, CR oxycodone was administered alone; on day 2, CR oxycodone was administered with aprepitant (125 mg, at the same time of oxycodone dosing in the morning. The steady-state trough concentrations (Css were measured from day 1 to day 3. RESULTS: Aprepitant increased the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-8 of oxycodone by 25% (p<0.001 and of oxymorphone by 34% (p<0.001, as well as decreased the AUC0-8 of noroxycodone by 14% (p<0.001. Moreover, aprepitant increased Css of oxycodone by 57% (p = 0.001 and of oxymorphone by 36% (p<0.001 and decreased Css of noroxycodone by 24% (p = 0.02 at day 3 compared to day 1. CONCLUSIONS: The clinical use of aprepitant in patients receiving multiple doses of CR oxycodone for cancer pain significantly altered plasma concentration levels, but would not appear to need modification of the CR oxycodone dose. TRIAL REGISTRATION: UMIN.ac.jp UMIN000003580.

  14. TC > 0.05 as a Pharmacokinetic Parameter of Paclitaxel for Therapeutic Efficacy and Toxicity in Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, D S; Zhou, L; Li, C Z; Zhang, S Q; Huang, H Q; Qiu, G D; Lin, L F; She, Y Q; Zheng, J T; Chen, C; Fang, L; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Zhang, S Y

    2018-03-05

    Paclitaxel (PTX) has remarkable anti-tumor activity, but it causes severe toxicities. There is an urgent need to seek an appropriate pharmacokinetic parameter of PTX to improve treatment efficacy and reduce adverse effects. To evaluate the association of pharmacokinetic parameter TC>0.05 of paclitaxel (PTX) and its therapeutic efficacy and toxicity in patients with solid tumors. A total of 295 patients with ovarian cancer, esophageal cancer, breast cancer, and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), who were admitted to the Tumor Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, China, were recruited for this study. Patients received 3 weeks of PTX chemotherapy. The plasma concentrations of PTX were examined using the MyPaclitaxelTM kit. The patients' PTX TC>0.05 (the time during which PTX plasma concentration exceed 0.05 μmol/L) were calculated based on pharmacokinetic analysis. The results showed that: (1) the concentrations of PTX in these 295 patients ranged from 0.0358-0.127 μmol/L; (2) the PTX TC> 0.05 ranged from 14 to 38 h with a median time of 27 h; (3) among all treatment cycles, there was a statistically significant difference in the PTX TC>0.05 between CR+PR and SD+PD; (4) with the increasing value of TC>0.05, level of leukopenia and leukopenic fever increased; (5) high PTX TC>0.05 led to the occurrence of neutropenia, neutropenic fever, severe anemia, and severe peripheral neurotoxicity. Taken together, our results indicated that the pharmacokinetic parameter PTX TC>0.05 was an effective measure of treatment efficacy and toxicity in patients with solid tumors. Maintaining PTX TC>0.05 at 26 to 30 h could improve its efficacy and reduce the incidence of leukopenia, neutropenia, anemia, and peripheral neurotoxicity in these patients. PTX TC>0.05 is a key pharmacokinetic parameter of PTX which should be monitored to optimize individual treatment in patients with solid tumors. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Vitamin D: Pharmacokinetics and Safety When Used in Conjunction with the Pharmaceutical Drugs Used in Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, Deborah A.; Cooley, Kieran; Skidmore, Becky; Fritz, Heidi; Campbell, Tara; Seely, Dugald

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D has reported anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties modulated through gene transcription and non-genomic signaling cascades. The purpose of this review was to summarize the available research on interactions and pharmacokinetics between vitamin D and the pharmaceutical drugs used in patients with cancer. Hypercalcemia was the most frequently reported side effect that occurred in high dose calcitriol. The half-life of 25(OH)D 3 and/or 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 was found to be impacted by cimetidine; rosuvastatin; prednisone and possibly some chemotherapy drugs. No unusual adverse effects in cancer patients; beyond what is expected from high dose 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 supplementation, were revealed through this review. While sufficient evidence is lacking, supplementation with 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 during chemotherapy appears to have a low risk of interaction. Further interactions with vitamin D 3 have not been studied

  16. An integrated multiple-analyte pharmacokinetic model to characterize trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) clearance pathways and to evaluate reduced pharmacokinetic sampling in patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dan; Joshi, Amita; Wang, Bei; Olsen, Steve; Yi, Joo-Hee; Krop, Ian E; Burris, Howard A; Girish, Sandhya

    2013-08-01

    Trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) is an antibody-drug conjugate recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive metastatic breast cancer previously treated with trastuzumab and taxane chemotherapy. It comprises the microtubule inhibitory cytotoxic agent DM1 conjugated to the HER2-targeted humanized monoclonal antibody trastuzumab via a stable linker. To characterize the pharmacokinetics of T-DM1 in patients with metastatic breast cancer, concentrations of multiple analytes were quantified, including serum concentrations of T-DM1 conjugate and total trastuzumab (the sum of conjugated and unconjugated trastuzumab), as well as plasma concentrations of DM1. The clearance of T-DM1 conjugate is approximately 2 to 3 times faster than its parent antibody, trastuzumab. However, the clearance pathways accounting for this faster clearance rate are unclear. An integrated population pharmacokinetic model that simultaneously fits the pharmacokinetics of T-DM1 conjugate and total trastuzumab can help to elucidate the clearance pathways of T-DM1. The model can also be used to predict total trastuzumab pharmacokinetic profiles based on T-DM1 conjugate pharmacokinetic data and sparse total trastuzumab pharmacokinetic data, thereby reducing the frequency of pharmacokinetic sampling. T-DM1 conjugate and total trastuzumab serum concentration data, including baseline trastuzumab concentrations prior to T-DM1 treatment, from phase I and II studies were used to develop this integrated population pharmacokinetic model. Based on a hypothetical T-DM1 catabolism scheme, two-compartment models for T-DM1 conjugate and trastuzumab were integrated by assuming a one-step deconjugation clearance from T-DM1 conjugate to trastuzumab. The ability of the model to predict the total trastuzumab pharmacokinetic profile based on T-DM1 conjugate pharmacokinetics and various sampling schemes of total trastuzumab

  17. Pharmacokinetics of Gefitinib in a Patient with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Undergoing Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teppei Yamaguchi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A 72-year-old man undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD for chronic renal failure and who had undergone right upper lobectomy for lung adenocarcinoma (pT2aN0M0 2 years ago was admitted for recurrence of lung cancer presenting as multiple brain metastases. An epidermal growth factor receptor mutation analysis of his lung cancer revealed a deletion of 15 nucleotides (E746-A750 in exon 19. After whole-brain radiotherapy, we started daily administration of 250 mg gefitinib under the continuation of CAPD and performed a pharmacokinetic analysis. We speculated that the plasma concentration of gefitinib reached the steady state at least by day 16 after the start of gefitinib (626.6 ng/ml at trough level. On day 46, the plasma concentration was 538.4 ng/ml at trough level and the concentration in the peritoneal dialysis fluid was 34.6 ng/ml, suggesting that CAPD appeared to have little effect on the pharmacokinetics of gefitinib. During gefitinib therapy, there were no significant adverse events except for grade 2 diarrhea. Gefitinib could be safely administered to a patient undergoing CAPD.

  18. Safety, Pharmacokinetics, Immunogenicity, and Biodistribution of (186)Re-Labeled Humanized Monoclonal Antibody BIWA 4 (Bivatuzumab( in Patients with Early-Stage Breast Cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppe, M.; Schaijk, F. van; Roos, J.C.; Leeuwen, P.; Heider, K.H.; Kuthan, H.; Bleichrodt, R.P.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics, immunogenicity, and biodistribution of (186)Re-labeled humanized anti-CD44v6 monoclonal antibody (MAb( BIWA 4 (Bivatuzumab( in 9 patients with early-stage breast cancer. Radioimmunoscintigraphy (RIS( was performed within

  19. Successful empirical antifungal therapy of intravenous itraconazole with pharmacokinetic evidence in pediatric cancer patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyery; Shin, Donghoon; Kang, Hyoung Jin; Yu, Kyung-Sang; Lee, Ji Won; Kim, Sung Jin; Kim, Min Sun; Song, Eun Sun; Jang, Mi Kyoung; Park, June Dong; Jang, In-Jin; Park, Kyung Duk; Shin, Hee Young; Ahn, Hyo Seop

    2015-07-01

    Empirical antifungal therapy prevents invasive fungal infections in patients with cancer. This study assessed the empirical efficacy of intravenous itraconazole in pediatric patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and investigated the pharmacokinetics and clinical implications. Oral itraconazole syrup was started (2.5 mg/kg twice daily) for prophylaxis, and patients with persistent neutropenic fever for more than 2 days were switched to intravenous itraconazole (5 mg/kg twice daily for 2 days for induction and 5 mg/kg daily for maintenance) as empirical treatment. Empirical antifungal efficacy was assessed retrospectively in 159 transplantations, and a full pharmacokinetic study was prospectively conducted in six of these patients. Successful antifungal efficacy was defined as the fulfillment of all components of a five-part composite end point. The overall empirical antifungal success rate fulfilling all criteria was 42.1 %. No death or drug-related serious adverse events occurred during the study. Mean trough plasma concentration of itraconazole after oral prophylaxis and intravenous induction were 577.2 and 1659.7 μg/L, respectively. Mean area under the concentration-time curve of itraconazole and its metabolite at steady state were 42,837 ± 24,746 μg·h/L and 63,094 ± 19,255 μg·h/L. Intravenous itraconazole was effective and safe as an empirical antifungal agent in pediatric patients; this was due to the fast and satisfactory increase in drug concentration by switching from oral to intravenous therapy.

  20. Vitamin D: Pharmacokinetics and Safety When Used in Conjunction with the Pharmaceutical Drugs Used in Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, Deborah A.; Cooley, Kieran; Skidmore, Becky; Fritz, Heidi; Campbell, Tara [Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine, 1255 Sheppard Avenue East, Toronto, Ontario, M2K 1E2 (Canada); Seely, Dugald, E-mail: dseely@ccnm.edu [Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine, 1255 Sheppard Avenue East, Toronto, Ontario, M2K 1E2 (Canada); Ottawa Integrative Cancer Centre, 29 Bayswater Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario, K1Y 2E5 (Canada)

    2013-03-11

    Vitamin D has reported anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties modulated through gene transcription and non-genomic signaling cascades. The purpose of this review was to summarize the available research on interactions and pharmacokinetics between vitamin D and the pharmaceutical drugs used in patients with cancer. Hypercalcemia was the most frequently reported side effect that occurred in high dose calcitriol. The half-life of 25(OH)D{sub 3} and/or 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} was found to be impacted by cimetidine; rosuvastatin; prednisone and possibly some chemotherapy drugs. No unusual adverse effects in cancer patients; beyond what is expected from high dose 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} supplementation, were revealed through this review. While sufficient evidence is lacking, supplementation with 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} during chemotherapy appears to have a low risk of interaction. Further interactions with vitamin D{sub 3} have not been studied.

  1. Randomized pharmacokinetic study comparing subcutaneous and intravenous palonosetron in cancer patients treated with platinum based chemotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belen Sadaba

    Full Text Available Palonosetron is a potent second generation 5- hydroxytryptamine-3 selective antagonist which can be administered by either intravenous (IV or oral routes, but subcutaneous (SC administration of palonosetron has never been studied, even though it could have useful clinical applications. In this study, we evaluate the bioavailability of SC palonosetron.Patients treated with platinum-based chemotherapy were randomized to receive SC or IV palonosetron, followed by the alternative route in a crossover manner, during the first two cycles of chemotherapy. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 10, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 minutes and 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12 and 24 h after palonosetron administration. Urine was collected during 12 hours following palonosetron. We compared pharmacokinetic parameters including AUC0-24h, t1/2, and Cmax observed with each route of administration by analysis of variance (ANOVA.From October 2009 to July 2010, 25 evaluable patients were included. AUC0-24h for IV and SC palonosetron were respectively 14.1 and 12.7 ng × h/ml (p=0.160. Bioavalability of SC palonosetron was 118% (95% IC: 69-168. Cmax was lower with SC than with IV route and was reached 15 minutes following SC administration.Palonosetron bioavailability was similar when administered by either SC or IV route. This new route of administration might be specially useful for outpatient management of emesis and for administration of oral chemotherapy.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01046240.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of radiolabeled monoclonal antibody B6.2 in patients with metastatic breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, D.F.; Zalutsky, M.R.; Kaplan, W.; Noska, M.; Thor, A.; Colcher, D.; Kufe, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    Thirteen patients with metastatic breast carcinoma were given injections of 50-1593 micrograms of 131 I-monoclonal antibody (MAb) B6.2 immunoglobulin G and F(ab')2 for pharmacokinetic evaluation and radioimmunoimaging. Blood clearance of the 131 I-MAb-B6.2 was biphasic. The mean half-times (t 1/2 alpha, t 1/2 beta) for the immunoglobulin G were 3.5 +/- 1.7 and 20.9 +/- 11.0 h, respectively. The t 1/2 alpha for the F(ab')2 was 1.7 +/- 1.3 h, and the t 1/2 beta was 31.0 +/- 5.7 h. The percentage of protein bound 131 I for the immunoglobulin G and for the F(ab')2 at 72 h was 73.7 +/- 11.4% and 58.2 +/- 14.5%, respectively. In vitro reactivity of MAb B6.2 with granulocytes isolated from normal subjects and patients was demonstrated by cytofluorometric and radioimmunoassays. MAb B6.2 was shown to bind with normal cross-reacting antigen, a cell surface antigen known to be expressed on normal human granulocytes. Reactivity with normal cross-reacting antigen on granulocytes is consistent with the skeletal images obtained during immunoscintigraphy of all 13 patients. A specific tumor image was observed in one patient. No toxicity was encountered. In spite of extensive preclinical data suggesting that 131 I-MAb B6.2 would be a useful agent for radioimmunoimaging, the clinical utility of this reagent is probably limited because of the reactivity with granulocytes

  3. Population Pharmacokinetics of Gemcitabine and dFdU in Pancreatic Cancer Patients Using an Optimal Design, Sparse Sampling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serdjebi, Cindy; Gattacceca, Florence; Seitz, Jean-François; Fein, Francine; Gagnière, Johan; François, Eric; Abakar-Mahamat, Abakar; Deplanque, Gael; Rachid, Madani; Lacarelle, Bruno; Ciccolini, Joseph; Dahan, Laetitia

    2017-06-01

    Gemcitabine remains a pillar in pancreatic cancer treatment. However, toxicities are frequently observed. Dose adjustment based on therapeutic drug monitoring might help decrease the occurrence of toxicities. In this context, this work aims at describing the pharmacokinetics (PK) of gemcitabine and its metabolite dFdU in pancreatic cancer patients and at identifying the main sources of their PK variability using a population PK approach, despite a sparse sampled-population and heterogeneous administration and sampling protocols. Data from 38 patients were included in the analysis. The 3 optimal sampling times were determined using KineticPro and the population PK analysis was performed on Monolix. Available patient characteristics, including cytidine deaminase (CDA) status, were tested as covariates. Correlation between PK parameters and occurrence of severe hematological toxicities was also investigated. A two-compartment model best fitted the gemcitabine and dFdU PK data (volume of distribution and clearance for gemcitabine: V1 = 45 L and CL1 = 4.03 L/min; for dFdU: V2 = 36 L and CL2 = 0.226 L/min). Renal function was found to influence gemcitabine clearance, and body surface area to impact the volume of distribution of dFdU. However, neither CDA status nor the occurrence of toxicities was correlated to PK parameters. Despite sparse sampling and heterogeneous administration and sampling protocols, population and individual PK parameters of gemcitabine and dFdU were successfully estimated using Monolix population PK software. The estimated parameters were consistent with previously published results. Surprisingly, CDA activity did not influence gemcitabine PK, which was explained by the absence of CDA-deficient patients enrolled in the study. This work suggests that even sparse data are valuable to estimate population and individual PK parameters in patients, which will be usable to individualize the dose for an optimized benefit to risk ratio.

  4. Correlation of FCGRT genomic structure with serum immunoglobulin, albumin and farletuzumab pharmacokinetics in patients with first relapsed ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shannessy, Daniel J; Bendas, Katie; Schweizer, Charles; Wang, Wenquan; Albone, Earl; Somers, Elizabeth B; Weil, Susan; Meredith, Rhonda K; Wustner, Jason; Grasso, Luigi; Landers, Mark; Nicolaides, Nicholas C

    2017-07-01

    Farletuzumab (FAR) is a humanized monoclonal antibody (mAb) that binds to folate receptor alpha. A Ph3 trial in ovarian cancer patients treated with carboplatin/taxane plus FAR or placebo did not meet the primary statistical endpoint. Subgroup analysis demonstrated that subjects with high FAR exposure levels (Cmin>57.6μg/mL) showed statistically significant improvements in PFS and OS. The neonatal Fc receptor (fcgrt) plays a central role in albumin/IgG stasis and mAb pharmacokinetics (PK). Here we evaluated fcgrt sequence and association of its promoter variable number tandem repeats (VNTR) and coding single nucleotide variants (SNV) with albumin/IgG levels and FAR PK in the Ph3 patients. A statistical correlation existed between high FAR Cmin and AUC in patients with the highest quartile of albumin and lowest quartile of IgG1. Analysis of fcgrt identified 5 different VNTRs in the promoter region and 9 SNVs within the coding region, 4 which are novel. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Pharmacokinetics and Dosimetry Studies for Optimization of Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in CEA-Expressing Advanced Lung Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline eBodet-Milin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. A phase I pretargeted radioimmunotherapy trial (EudractCT 200800603096 was designed in patients with metastatic lung cancer expressing carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA to optimize bispecific antibody and labelled peptide doses, as well as the delay between their injections.Methods. Three cohorts of 3 patients received the anti-CEA x anti-histamine-succinyl-glycine (HSG humanized trivalent bispecific antibody (TF2 and the IMP288 bivalent HSG-peptide. Patients underwent a pre-therapeutic imaging session S1 (44 or 88 nmol/m2 of TF2 followed by 4.4 nmol/m2, 185 MBq, of 111In-labelled IMP288, and, 1-2 weeks later, a therapy session S2 (240 or 480 nmol/m2 of TF2 followed by 24 nmol/m2, 1.1 GBq/m2, 177Lu-labeled IMP288. The pretargeting delay was 24 or 48 hours. The dose schedule was defined based on pre-clinical TF2 pharmacokinetic studies, on our previous clinical data using the previous anti-CEA pretargeting system and on clinical results observed in the first patients injected using the same system in the Netherlands.Results. TF2 pharmacokinetics (PK was represented by a two-compartment model in which the central compartment volume was linearly dependent on the patient's surface area. PK were remarkably similar, with a clearance of 0.33 +/- 0.03 L/h per m2. 111In- and 177Lu-IMP288 PK were also well represented by a two-compartment model. IMP288 PK were faster (clearance 1.4 to 3.3 l/h. The central compartment volume was proportional to body surface area and IMP288clearance depended on the molar ratio of injected IMP288 to circulating TF2 at the time of IMP288 injection. Modelling of image quantification confirmed the dependence of IMP288 kinetics on circulating TF2, but tumour activity PK were variable. Organ absorbed doses were not significantly different in the 3 cohorts, but the tumour dose was significantly higher with the higher molar doses of TF2 (p < 0.002. S1 imaging predicted absorbed doses calculated in S2. Conclusion. The best

  6. Can Saliva and Plasma Methadone Concentrations Be Used for Enantioselective Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Studies in Patients With Advanced Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Rani; Haywood, Alison; Good, Phillip; Hennig, Stefanie; Khan, Sohil; Norris, Ross; Hardy, Janet

    2017-09-01

    Methadone is a potent analgesic used to treat refractory cancer pain. It is administered as a racemic mixture, with the l-enantiomer being primarily a μ-receptor agonist, whereas the d-enantiomer is an N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonist and inhibits serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake. Dose requirements vary greatly among patients to achieve optimal pain control and to avoid the risk of adverse effects. The relationship between plasma and saliva methadone enantiomer concentrations was investigated to determine if saliva could be a substitute for plasma in pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic studies for clinical monitoring and dose optimization of methadone in patients with advanced cancer. Patients with advanced cancer who were prescribed varying doses of oral methadone for pain management were recruited to obtain paired plasma and saliva samples. Pain scores were recorded at the time of sampling. The total and unbound plasma and saliva concentrations of the l- and d-enantiomers of methadone were quantified by using an HPLC-MS/MS method. The relationship between plasma (total and unbound) and saliva concentrations were compared. The saliva-to-plasma concentration ratio was compared versus the dose administered and the time after dosing for both enantiomers. The association of methadone concentrations with reported pain scores was compared by using a Mann-Whitney U test for significance. Fifty patients receiving a mean dose of 11mg/d of methadone provided 151 paired plasma and saliva samples. The median age of the population was 61 years with an interquartile range of 53-71 years with total body weight ranging from 59-88 kg. Median (interquartile) total plasma concentrations for l- and d-methadone were 50.78 ng/mL (30.6-113.0 ng/mL) and 62.0 ng/mL (28.7-116.0 ng/mL), respectively. Median (interquartile range) saliva concentrations for l- and d-methadone were 81.5 ng/mL (28.0-203.2 ng/mL) and 44.2 (16.2-149.7 ng/mL). No relationship could be established between

  7. Population pharmacokinetics of trastuzumab emtansine in previously treated patients with HER2-positive advanced gastric cancer (AGC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shang-Chiung; Kagedal, Matts; Gao, Yuying; Wang, Bei; Harle-Yge, Marie-Laurence; Girish, Sandhya; Jin, Jin; Li, Chunze

    2017-12-01

    Ado-trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) is an antibody-drug conjugate comprising trastuzumab conjugated via a stable thioether linker to DM1, a highly potent cytotoxic agent. A population pharmacokinetics (PK) analysis was performed to characterize T-DM1 PK and evaluate the impact of patient characteristics on T-DM1 PK in previously treated patients with HER2-positive advanced gastric cancer (AGC). Following T-DM1 weekly or every three weeks dosing, T-DM1 concentration measurements (n = 780) were collected from 136 patients in the GATSBY (NCT01641939) study and analyzed using nonlinear mixed effects modeling. The influence of demographic, baseline laboratory, and disease characteristics on T-DM1 PK was examined. T-DM1 PK was best described by a two-compartment model with parallel linear and nonlinear (Michaelis-Menten) elimination from the central compartment. The final population model estimated linear clearance (CL) of 0.79 L/day, volume of distribution in the central compartment (V c ) of 4.48 L, distribution clearance (Q) of 0.62 L/day, volume of distribution in the peripheral compartment (V p ) of 1.49 L, nonlinear CL of 2.06 L/day, and KM of 1.63 μg/mL. Parameter uncertainty was low to moderate for fixed effects, except KM (estimated with poor precision). Patients with high body weight and low baseline trastuzumab concentrations had significantly faster linear CL; those with higher body weight had significantly larger V c . In a HER2-positive AGC population, T-DM1 PK was best described by a two-compartment model with parallel linear and nonlinear elimination. Baseline body weight and trastuzumab concentration were identified as significant covariates for T-DM1 PK in a HER2-positive AGC population.

  8. Phase I clinical and pharmacokinetic study of S-1 plus oral leucovorin in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Takayuki; Hyodo, Ichinosuke; Nishina, Tomohiro; Narahara, Hiroyuki; Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Yoshisue, Kunihiro; Boku, Narikazu

    2017-01-01

    S-1 has shown a response rate of 35% in chemonaïve patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Leucovorin enhances the antitumor activity of 5-fluorouracil, and concurrent oral administration of S-1 and leucovorin may represent a more active treatment option for mCRC. S-1 (35 mg/m 2 ) and leucovorin (25 mg/body) were orally administered twice daily to chemonaïve patients with mCRC. Predefined dose (schedule)-limiting toxicities (DLTs) during the first course and treatment continuity during the first two courses were evaluated during three periods of treatment with S-1 plus leucovorin (level 0, 2 weeks; level 1, 3 weeks; and level 2, 4 weeks), each followed by a 2-week rest. The pharmacokinetics (PK) of S-1 and leucovorin were studied on days 1 and 14 of the first course. Fifteen patients were enrolled. All three patients had DLTs at level 2, and this level was considered the maximum tolerated schedule. Level 0 was designated as the recommended schedule based on the incidences of DLTs and treatment continuity. The main toxic effects were gastrointestinal, such as diarrhea and stomatitis. There was no grade 4 adverse event or treatment-related death. The overall response rate was 67% (95% confidence interval, 38-88%). The PK profiles of S-1 plus leucovorin were similar to those in previous studies. The recommended schedule was 2 weeks of S-1 plus leucovorin followed by a 2-week rest. The increased response and gastrointestinal toxicities of S-1 plus leucovorin as compared with S-1 monotherapy suggest that co-administration of leucovorin enhanced the activity of S-1.

  9. Preliminary Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and Efficacy of Regorafenib, Cisplatin, and Pemetrexed in Patients With Advanced Nonsquamous Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmann, Matthew D; Sturm, Isrid; Trnkova, Zuzana Jirakova; Lettieri, John; Diefenbach, Konstanze; Rizvi, Naiyer A; Gettinger, Scott N

    2015-11-01

    Regorafenib is an oral multitargeted kinase inhibitor with potent antiangiogenic activity. In this phase I trial we evaluated the safety, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of regorafenib with cisplatin and pemetrexed for patients with advanced nonsquamous non-small-cell lung cancers (nsNSCLCs). Nine patients enrolled before premature termination of the study. Five of 9 (56%) patients had a partial response and the median progression-free survival was 7 months (range, 1.5-15.1 months). Regorafenib had acceptable tolerability and minor pharmacokinetic interactions in combination with standard doses of cisplatin and pemetrexed in patients with advanced nsNSCLCs. The combination of bevacizumab, an antiangiogenesis agent, with cytotoxic chemotherapy improves survival in patients with advanced nonsquamous non-small-cell lung cancers (nsNSCLCs). Regorafenib is an oral multitargeted kinase inhibitor with potent antiangiogenic activity that is approved for patients with advanced colorectal cancer and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. In this phase I trial we evaluated the safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and efficacy of regorafenib with cisplatin and pemetrexed for patients with advanced nsNSCLCs. Chemotherapy-naive patients with advanced nsNSCLCs were treated with regorafenib 60 mg/d continuously and cisplatin 75 mg/m(2) with pemetrexed 500 mg/m(2) once every 21 days for up to 6 cycles. Thereafter, regorafenib with or without pemetrexed could be continued as maintenance. Nine patients enrolled before premature termination of the study because of slow recruitment and a change in the development strategy of regorafenib by the study sponsor. Five patients experienced at least 1 treatment-related Grade 3 adverse event. No Grade 4 or 5 toxicity occurred. Five of 9 (56%) patients had a partial response and the median progression-free survival was 7 months (range, 1.5-15.1 months). Minor PK interactions between regorafenib and chemotherapy were observed. Regorafenib had acceptable

  10. Pharmacokinetics and tolerability of cediranib, a potent VEGF signalling inhibitor, in cancer patients with hepatic impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Herpen, Carla M L; Lassen, Ulrik; Desar, Ingrid M E

    2013-01-01

    levels of hepatic impairment classified according to the bilirubin level. Safety, tolerability, multiple-dose PK and PK stratified according to the Child-Pugh criteria were also assessed. Thirty patients received cediranib: 18 with normal-mild hepatic impairment and 12 with moderate hepatic impairment...... not influence PK results in multiple dosing. After continuous once-daily dosing, the geometric least square means ratio was 0.72 (90% CI 0.51-1.03) for AUCSS and 0.67 (90% CI 0.47-0.94) for CSS,max. Similar results were obtained when patients were classified for hepatic impairment according to the Child...

  11. Everolimus pharmacokinetics and its exposure-toxicity relationship in patients with thyroid cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, D.; Schneider, T. C.; Moes, D. J. A. R.; Roozen, C. F. M.; den Hartigh, J.; Gelderblom, H.; Guchelaar, H. J.; van der Hoeven, J. J.; Links, T. P.; Kapiteijn, E.; van Erp, N. P.

    Everolimus is a mTOR inhibitor used for the treatment of different solid malignancies. Many patients treated with the registered fixed 10 mg dose once daily are in need of dose interruptions, reductions or treatment discontinuation due to severe adverse events. This study determined the correlation

  12. Preliminary safety, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of regorafenib, cisplatin, and pemetrexed in patients with advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmann, Matthew D; Sturm, Isrid; Trnkova, Zuzana Jirakova; Lettieri, John; Diefenbach, Konstanze; Rizvi, Naiyer A.; Gettinger, Scott N.

    2016-01-01

    Structured Abstract Purpose The addition of bevacizumab, an anti-angiogenesis agent, to cytotoxic chemotherapy improves survival in patients with advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancers (nsNSCLCs). Regorafenib is an oral multi-targeted kinase inhibitor with potent anti-angiogenic activity that is approved for patients with advanced colorectal cancer and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. This phase I trial evaluated the safety, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of regorafenib with cisplatin and pemetrexed for patients with advanced nsNSCLCs. Methods Chemotherapy-naïve patients with advanced nsNSCLCs were treated with regorafenib 60mg/day continuously and cisplatin 75mg/m2 plus pemetrexed 500mg/m2 once every three weeks for up to six cycles. Thereafter, regorafenib with or without pemetrexed could be continued as maintenance. Results Nine patients enrolled prior to premature termination of the study due to slow recruitment and a change in the development strategy of regorafenib by the study sponsor, partially due to slow enrollment. Five patients experienced at least one treatment-related Grade 3 adverse event. No grade 4–5 toxicity occurred. 5 of 9 (56%) patients had a partial response and the median progression-free survival was 7 months (range 1.5–15.1). Minor pharmacokinetic (PK) interactions between regorafenib and chemotherapy were observed. Conclusions Regorafenib had acceptable tolerability and minor PK interactions in combination with standard doses of cisplatin and pemetrexed in patients with advanced nsNSCLCs. Encouraging activity was appreciated in chemotherapy-naïve patients with advanced nsNSCLCs. However, the small number of patients treated limits conclusions that can be drawn from these results. PMID:26003007

  13. Genetic, pathological and physiological determinants of transdermal fentanyl pharmacokinetics in 620 cancer patients of the EPOS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barratt, Daniel T; Bandak, Benedikte; Klepstad, Pål

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether CYP3A4/5 genetic variants, together with clinical and patient factors, influence serum fentanyl and norfentanyl concentrations and their ratio in cancer pain patients receiving transdermal fentanyl.......This study aimed to investigate whether CYP3A4/5 genetic variants, together with clinical and patient factors, influence serum fentanyl and norfentanyl concentrations and their ratio in cancer pain patients receiving transdermal fentanyl....

  14. [Pharmacokinetics of nitrosomethylurea in oncologic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, D B; Kim, O A; Gor'kov, V A

    1988-01-01

    Kinetics of blood-nitrosomethylurea (NMU) was studied in 68 patients with lung cancer, malignant melanoma and lymphoma who had received NMU-based combination chemotherapy. The results were used for computing main pharmacokinetic parameters such as logarithm of calculated initial concentration, time of half-elimination from blood, area under the kinetic curve of concentration, volume of distribution in the body and clearance. All those values were shown to significantly differ with individual patients. A longer retention of the drug in blood flow (as evidenced by increased time of half-elimination and area under kinetic curve matched by decreased volume of distribution and clearance) was registered in responders than in non-responders, the difference sometimes reaching statistical significance.

  15. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging pharmacokinetic parameters as predictors of treatment response of brain metastases in patients with lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuchcinski, Gregory; Duhal, Romain; Lalisse, Maxime; Dumont, Julien; Lopes, Renaud; Pruvo, Jean-Pierre; Leclerc, Xavier; Delmaire, Christine [University of Lille, CHU Lille, Department of Neuroradiology, Lille (France); Le Rhun, Emilie [University of Lille, CHU Lille, Department of Neurosurgery, Lille (France); Oscar Lambret Center, Department of Medical Oncology, Lille (France); Inserm U1192-PRISM-Laboratoire de Proteomique, Reponse Inflammatoire, Spectrometrie de Masse, Lille (France); Cortot, Alexis B. [University of Lille, CHU Lille, Department of Thoracic Oncology, Lille (France); Drumez, Elodie [University of Lille, CHU Lille, Department of Biostatistics, Lille (France)

    2017-09-15

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of pharmacokinetic parameters measured by dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in predicting the response of brain metastases to antineoplastic therapy in patients with lung cancer. Forty-four consecutive patients with lung cancer, harbouring 123 newly diagnosed brain metastases prospectively underwent conventional 3-T MRI at baseline (within 1 month before treatment), during the early (7-10 weeks) and midterm (5-7 months) post-treatment period. An additional DCE MRI sequence was performed during baseline and early post-treatment MRI to evaluate baseline pharmacokinetic parameters (K{sup trans}, k{sub ep}, v{sub e}, v{sub p}) and their early variation (∇K{sup trans}, ∇k{sub ep}, ∇v{sub e}, ∇v{sub p}). The objective response was judged by the volume variation of each metastasis from baseline to midterm MRI. ROC curve analysis determined the best DCE MRI parameter to predict the objective response. Baseline DCE MRI parameters were not associated with the objective response. Early ∇K{sup trans}, ∇v{sub e} and ∇v{sub p} were significantly associated with the objective response (p = 0.02, p = 0.001 and p = 0.02, respectively). The best predictor of objective response was ∇v{sub e} with an area under the curve of 0.93 [95% CI = 0.87, 0.99]. DCE MRI and early ∇v{sub e} may be a useful tool to predict the objective response of brain metastases in patients with lung cancer. (orig.)

  16. Population pharmacokinetics of oxaliplatin (85 mg/m(2)) in combination with 5-fluorouracil in patients with advanced colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kho, Y.H.; Jansman, F.G.A.; Prins, N.H.; Neef, C.; Brouwers, J.R.B.J.

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) studies of oxaliplatin, using a dose regimen of 85mg/m(2) are lacking. A PK model may be used in future studies to investigate the relationship between pharmacokinetics and dose limiting toxicity. The purpose of this study was to construct a population PK model to describe

  17. Safety, pharmacokinetics, immunogenicity, and biodistribution of (186)Re-labeled humanized monoclonal antibody BIWA 4 (Bivatuzumab) in patients with early-stage breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppe, Manuel; Schaijk, Frank van; Roos, Jan; Leeuwen, Paul van; Heider, Karl-Heinz; Kuthan, Hartmut; Bleichrodt, Robert

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics, immunogenicity, and biodistribution of (186)Re-labeled humanized anti-CD44v6 monoclonal antibody (MAb( BIWA 4 (Bivatuzumab( in 9 patients with early-stage breast cancer. Radioimmunoscintigraphy (RIS( was performed within 1, 24, and 72 hours after administration. BIWA 4 concentration in plasma (ELISA and radioactivity measurements( and the development of human antihuman antibody (HAHA( responses was determined. The biodistribution of (186)Re-BIWA 4 was determined by radioactivity measurements in tumor and normal tissue biopsies obtained during surgery 1 week after administration. Administration of (186)Re-BIWA 4 was well tolerated by all patients and no HAHA responses were observed. The mean t(1/2) in plasma of BIWA 4 (ELISA( was 81 hours (range, 67-97(, whereas the mean radioactivity t(1/2) tended to be longer, at 105 hours (range, 90-114(. RIS unmistakably showed the tumor in 3 patients. Less clear identifications were established in 3 additional patients. In 2 patients, the tumor was wrongly identified in the contralateral breast. Median tumor CD44v6 expression, as determined by immunohistochemistry, was 70% (range, 10-90%). Mean tumor uptake was 2.96% ID/kg (range, 0.92-6.27(, with no apparent correlation with either tumor CD44v6 expression, tumor-cell cellularity, or tumor diameter. Tumor-to-nontumor ratios were unfavorable for blood, bone marrow, mammary gland tissue, and skin. The (186)Re-labeled humanized MAb BIWA 4 can safely be administered to patients with early-stage breast cancer. Tumorto- nontumor ratios were unfavorable, with no apparent correlation with CD44v6 expression, tumor-cell cellularity, or tumor diameter. BIWA 4, therefore, appears to have limitations as a vehicle for radioimmunotherapy in patients with breast cancer.

  18. Pharmacokinetics of erlotinib and its active metabolite OSI-420 in patients with non-small cell lung cancer and chronic renal failure who are undergoing hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togashi, Yosuke; Masago, Katsuhiro; Fukudo, Masahide; Terada, Tomohiro; Ikemi, Yasuaki; Kim, Young Hak; Fujita, Shiro; Irisa, Kaoru; Sakamori, Yuichi; Mio, Tadashi; Inui, Ken-Ichi; Mishima, Michiaki

    2010-05-01

    Although erlotinib, an orally active and selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor, is mainly metabolized in the liver, its effectiveness and safety for patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) undergoing hemodialysis (HD) has not been reported. Thus, we investigated the pharmacokinetics (PK) of erlotinib and its active metabolite OSI-420 in such patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We administered 150 mg erlotinib daily to three patients with NSCLC and CRF undergoing HD (HD group) and five patients with NSCLC and normal organ function (control group) and analyzed the PK of erlotinib and OSI-420. In the HD group, PK analyses were performed on day 1 (off HD), day 8 (off HD), and day 9 (on HD) after starting administration of erlotinib, and in the control group, they were performed on day 1 and day 8. In the HD group, there were little differences in the PK data between day 8 and day 9. The PK data on day 1 and day 8 of the HD group were also similar to those of the control group. There were no serious adverse events in any cases, and one of the HD patients achieved partial response. Erlotinib was hardly affected by renal function and HD, which confirms the effectiveness and safety of erlotinib treatment in patients with NSCLC and CRF undergoing HD. Erlotinib can become one treatment option for such patients.

  19. Phase I dose escalation pharmacokinetic assessment of intravenous humanized anti-MUC1 antibody AS1402 in patients with advanced breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegram, Mark D; Borges, Virginia F; Ibrahim, Nuhad; Fuloria, Jyotsna; Shapiro, Charles; Perez, Susan; Wang, Karen; Schaedli Stark, Franziska; Courtenay Luck, Nigel

    2009-01-01

    MUC1 is a cell-surface glycoprotein that establishes a molecular barrier at the epithelial surface and engages in morphogenetic signal transduction. Alterations in MUC1 glycosylation accompany the development of cancer and influence cellular growth, differentiation, transformation, adhesion, invasion, and immune surveillance. A 20-amino-acid tandem repeat that forms the core protein of MUC1 is overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated in the majority of epithelial tumors. AS1402 (formerly R1550) is a humanized IgG1k monoclonal antibody that binds to PDTR sequences within this tandem repeat that are not exposed in normal cells. AS1402 is a potent inducer of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), specifically against MUC1-expressing tumor cells. The objective of this study was to determine the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic (PK) characteristics of AS1402 monotherapy in patients with locally advanced or metastatic MUC1-positive breast cancer that had progressed after anthracyclines- and taxane-based therapy. Patients received AS1402 over a 1- to 3-hour intravenous (i.v.) infusion at doses between 1 and 16 mg/kg, with repeated dosing every 1 to 3 weeks (based on patient-individualized PK assessment) until disease progression. Serum AS1402 levels were measured at multiple times after i.v. administration. Human anti-human antibody (HAHA) responses were measured to determine the immunogenicity of AS1402. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic parameters were determined and were used to assess dose dependency across the dose range studied. Twenty-six patients were treated. AS1402 was generally well tolerated. Two grade 3/4 drug-related adverse events were reported, both at the 3-mg/kg dose. Neither was observed in expanded or subsequent dosing cohorts. No anti-human antibodies were detected. Plasma concentrations of AS1402 appeared to be proportional to dose within the 1- to 16-mg/kg dose range assessed, with a mean terminal half-life of 115.4 +/- 37.1 hours

  20. Pharmacokinetics of miltefosine in Old World cutaneous leishmaniasis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorlo, Thomas P. C.; van Thiel, Pieter P. A. M.; Huitema, Alwin D. R.; Keizer, Ron J.; de Vries, Henry J. C.; Beijnen, Jos H.; de Vries, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of miltefosine in leishmaniasis patients are, to a great extent, unknown. We examined and characterized the pharmacokinetics of miltefosine in a group of patients with Old World (Leishmania major) cutaneous leishmaniasis. Miltefosine plasma concentrations were determined in

  1. Phase 1 study of the investigational Aurora A kinase inhibitor alisertib (MLN8237) in East Asian cancer patients: pharmacokinetics and recommended phase 2 dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatakrishnan, Karthik; Kim, Tae Min; Lin, Chia-Chi; Thye, Lim Soon; Chng, Wee Joo; Ma, Brigette; Chen, Ming Huang; Zhou, Xiaofei; Liu, Hua; Kelly, Virginia; Kim, Won Seog

    2015-08-01

    This phase 1 study assessed the pharmacokinetics (PK), maximum tolerated dose (MTD)/recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D), safety, and preliminary efficacy of the investigational Aurora A kinase inhibitor, alisertib, in East Asian patients with advanced solid tumors or lymphomas. Patients received alisertib twice-daily (BID) for 7 days in 21-day cycles. Doses were escalated (3 + 3) from 30 mg BID based on cycle 1 dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) until the MTD, followed by expansion for PK/safety characterization. Thirty-six patients (61 % Chinese, 36 % Korean, 3 % Malay) received alisertib (30 mg BID, n = 30; 40 mg BID, n = 6; median, 2.5 cycles). Alisertib exposures increased approximately dose proportionally, and mean half-life was 16 h. Geometric mean apparent oral clearance (2.65 L/h) was 40 % lower than previous estimates in Western patients, resulting in approximately 70 % higher mean dose-normalized, steady-state exposures (735 nM*h/mg) in East Asian patients. Two patients experienced DLTs at 40 mg BID (grade 3 stomatitis; grade 4 neutropenia); the MTD/RP2D was 30 mg BID. Common toxicities (grade ≥3 at RP2D) were neutropenia (50 %), diarrhea (13 %), and stomatitis (10 %). One patient with extranodal T-/NK-cell lymphoma (nasal type) achieved a partial response and 18 (51 %) had stable disease. The MTD/RP2D of alisertib in East Asian patients (30 mg BID) was lower than in Western patients (50 mg BID), consistent with higher systemic exposures in the East Asian population. Alisertib was generally well tolerated and showed signs of antitumor activity in East Asian cancer patients.

  2. Population pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of erlotinib and pharmacogenomic analysis of plasma and cerebrospinal fluid drug concentrations in Japanese patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukudo, Masahide; Ikemi, Yasuaki; Togashi, Yosuke; Masago, Katsuhiro; Kim, Young Hak; Mio, Tadashi; Terada, Tomohiro; Teramukai, Satoshi; Mishima, Michiaki; Inui, Ken-Ichi; Katsura, Toshiya

    2013-07-01

    Erlotinib shows large inter-patient pharmacokinetic variability, but the impact of early drug exposure and genetic variations on the clinical outcomes of erlotinib remains fully investigated. The primary objective of this study was to clarify the population pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of erlotinib in Japanese patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The secondary objective was to identify genetic determinant(s) for the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) permeability of erlotinib and its active metabolite OSI-420. A total of 88 patients treated with erlotinib (150 mg/day) were enrolled, and CSF samples were available from 23 of these patients with leptomeningeal metastases. Plasma and CSF concentrations of erlotinib and OSI-420 were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection. Population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed with the nonlinear mixed-effects modelling program NONMEM. Germline mutations including ABCB1 (1236C>T, 2677G>T/A, 3435C>T), ABCG2 (421C>A), and CYP3A5 (6986A>G) polymorphisms, as well as somatic EGFR activating mutations if available, were examined. Early exposure to erlotinib and its safety/efficacy relationship were evaluated. The apparent clearance of erlotinib and OSI-420 were significantly decreased by 24 and 35 % in patients with the ABCG2 421A allele, respectively (p OSI-420 (p model showed that erlotinib trough (C0) levels on day 8 were an independent risk factor for the development of grade ≥2 diarrhea (p = 0.037) and skin rash (p = 0.031). Interstitial lung disease (ILD)-like events occurred in 3 patients (3.4 %), and the median value of erlotinib C0 levels adjacent to these events was approximately 3 times higher than that in patients who did not develop ILD (3253 versus 1107 ng/mL; p = 0.014). The objective response rate in the EGFR wild-type group was marginally higher in patients achieving higher erlotinib C0 levels (≥1711 ng/mL) than that in patients having lower erlotinib C0

  3. Population Pharmacokinetics and Adverse Events of Erlotinib in Japanese Patients with Non-small-cell Lung Cancer: Impact of Genetic Polymorphisms in Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo-Tsukude, Chihiro; Sasaki, Ji-Ichiro; Saeki, Sho; Iwamoto, Norihiro; Inaba, Megumi; Ushijima, Sunao; Kishi, Hiroto; Fujii, Shinji; Semba, Hiroshi; Kashiwabara, Kosuke; Tsubata, Yukari; Hayashi, Mitsuhiro; Kai, Yuki; Saito, Hideyuki; Isobe, Takeshi; Kohrogi, Hirotsugu; Hamada, Akinobu

    2018-01-01

    Determinants of interindividual variability in erlotinib pharmacokinetics (PK) and adverse events remain to be elucidated. This study with 50 Japanese non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with oral erlotinib at a standard dose of 150 mg aimed to investigate whether genetic polymorphisms affect erlotinib PK and adverse events. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding metabolizing enzymes (CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2D6, CYP3A4, CYP3A5, UGT1A1, UGT2B7, GSTM1, and GSTT1) or efflux transporters (ABCB1, and ABCG2) were analyzed as covariates in a population PK model. The ABCB1 1236C>T (rs1128503) polymorphism, not ABCB1*2 haplotype (1236TT-2677TT-3455TT, rs1128503 TT-rs2032582 TT-rs1045642 TT), was a significant covariate for the apparent clearance (CL/F), with the TT genotype showing a 29.4% decrease in CL/F as compared with the CC and the CT genotypes. A marginally higher incidence of adverse events (mainly skin rash) was observed in the TT genotype group; however, patients with high plasma erlotinib exposure did not always experience skin rash. None of the other SNPs affected PK or adverse events. The ABCB1 genotype is a potential predictor for erlotinib adverse events. Erlotinib might be used with careful monitoring of adverse events in patients with ABCB1 polymorphic variants.

  4. Buspirone pharmacokinetics in patients with cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalhoff, K; Poulsen, H E; Garred, P

    1987-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of buspirone (20 mg) were determined in 12 patients with cirrhosis and 12 normal subjects. The mean AUC of buspirone was 55 +/- 38 s.d. ng ml-1 h in cirrhotics and 3.5 +/- 2.4 s.d. ng ml-1 h in normals. The time until maximum concentration (tmax) attaine...

  5. Evaluation of 5-fluorouracil pharmacokinetics in cancer patients with a c.1905+1G>A mutation in DPYD by means of a Bayesian limited sampling strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kuilenburg, André B P; Häusler, Peter; Schalhorn, Andreas; Tanck, Michael W T; Proost, Johannes H; Terborg, Christoph; Behnke, Detlev; Schwabe, Wolfgang; Jabschinsky, Kati; Maring, Jan Gerard

    2012-03-01

    Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) is the initial enzyme in the catabolism of 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and DPD deficiency is an important pharmacogenetic syndrome. So far, only very limited information is available regarding the pharmacokinetics of 5FU in patients with a (partial) DPD deficiency and no limited sampling models have been developed taking into account the non-linear pharmacokinetic behaviour of 5FU. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of 5FU and to develop a limited sampling strategy to detect decreased 5FU elimination in patients with a c.1905+1G>A-related DPD deficiency. Thirty patients, heterozygous for the c.1905+1G>A mutation in DPYD, and 18 control patients received a dose of 5FU 300 mg/m2 and/or 5FU 450 mg/m2, followed by pharmacokinetic analysis of the 5FU plasma levels. A population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed in order to develop a compartmental pharmacokinetic model suitable for a limited sampling strategy. Clinical aspects of treating DPD-deficient patients with 5FU-based chemotherapy were assessed from the retrospectively collected clinical data. In a two-compartment model with Michaelis-Menten elimination, the mean maximum enzymatic conversion capacity (V(max)) value was 40% lower in DPD-deficient patients compared with controls (p controls at both dose levels (p predictive value and negative predictive value for V(max), calculated from 5FU levels at 60 minutes, were 96% and 88%, respectively, in patients treated with a single dose of 5FU 300 mg/m2. All seven DPD-deficient patients (two males and five females) who had been genotyped prior to initiation of standard 5FU-containing chemotherapy developed grade 3-4 toxicity, with one case of lethal toxicity in a female patient. No grade 4 toxicity or lethal outcome was observed in 13 DPD-deficient patients treated with reduced doses of 5FU. The average dose of 5FU in DPD-deficient patients with mild toxicity (grade ≤2) was 61 ± 16% of the

  6. Safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamic properties of oral DEBIO1143 (AT-406) in patients with advanced cancer: results of a first-in-man study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Herbert I; Smith, David C; Pitot, Henry C; Brill, Jeffrey M; Chugh, Rashmi; Rouits, Elisabeth; Rubin, Joseph; Strickler, John; Vuagniaux, Gregoire; Sorensen, J Mel; Zanna, Claudio

    2015-04-01

    To assess safety/tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), and antitumor activity of DEBIO1143, an antagonist of inhibitor apoptosis proteins. This first-in-man study in patients with advanced cancer used an accelerated dose titration design. DEBIO1143 was given orally once daily on days 1-5 every 2 or 3 weeks until disease progressed or patients dropped out. The starting dose of 5 mg was escalated by 100% in single patients until related grade 2 toxicity occurred. This triggered expansion to cohorts of three and subsequently six patients and reduction in dose increments to 50%. Maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was exceeded when any two patients within the same cohort experienced dose-limiting toxicity (DLT). On days 1 and 5, PK and PD samples were taken. Thirty-one patients received doses from 5 to 900 mg. Only one DLT was reported at 180 mg. No MTD was found. Most common adverse drug reactions were fatigue (26%), nausea (23%), and vomiting (13%). Average t max and T 1/2 was about 1 and 6 h, respectively. Exposure increased proportionally with doses from 80 to 900 mg, without accumulation over 5 days. Plasma CCL2 increased at 3-6 h postdose and epithelial apoptosis marker M30 on day 5; cIAP-1 levels in PBMCs decreased at all doses >80 mg. Five patients (17%) had stable disease as the best treatment response. DEBIO1143 was well tolerated at doses up to 900 mg and elicited PD effects at doses greater 80 mg. Limited antitumor activity may suggest development rather as adjunct treatment.

  7. Evaluation of 5-Fluorouracil Pharmacokinetics in Cancer Patients with a c.1905+1G > A Mutation in DPYD by Means of a Bayesian Limited Sampling Strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kuilenburg, André B. P.; Häusler, Peter; Schalhorn, Andreas; Tanck, Michael W. T.; Proost, Johannes H.; Terborg, Christoph; Behnke, Detlev; Schwabe, Wolfgang; Jabschinsky, Kati; Maring, Jan Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objective: Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) is the initial enzyme in the catabolism of 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and DPD deficiency is an important pharmacogenetic syndrome. So far, only very limited information is available regarding the pharmacokinetics of 5FU in patients with a

  8. Plasma and pleural fluid pharmacokinetics of erlotinib and its active metabolite OSI-420 in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer with pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masago, Katsuhiro; Togashi, Yosuke; Fukudo, Masahide; Terada, Tomohiro; Irisa, Kaoru; Sakamori, Yuichi; Kim, Young Hak; Mio, Tadashi; Inui, Ken-Ichi; Mishima, Michiaki

    2011-09-01

    Erlotinib is orally active and selectively inhibits the tyrosine kinase activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor. The pleural space penetration and exposure of erlotinib is poorly understood. Thus, we investigated the pharmacokinetics (PK) of erlotinib and its active metabolite OSI-420 in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) of malignant pleural effusion (MPE). We analyzed the PK of erlotinib and OSI-420 on days 1 and 8 after beginning erlotinib therapy in 9 patients with MPE. Their concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. Blood samples were obtained five times per day: before administration, and 2, 4, 8, and 24 hours after administration. Pleural effusions were obtained once per day, 2 hours after administration on day 1, and before administration on day 8. The exceptions were cases 2 and 4, which had pleural effusions obtained just before drug administration, and 2, 4, 8, and 24 hours after administration. The mean percentage of penetration from plasma to pleural effusion for erlotinib was 18% on day 1 and 112% on day 8, while these values for OSI-420 were 9.5% on day 1 and 131% on day 8. The area under the drug concentration-time curve of pleural fluid for erlotinib was 28,406 ng-hr/mL for case 2 and 45,906 ng-hr/mL for case 4. There seems to be a significant accumulation of both erlotinib and OSI-420 in MPE with repeated dosing. Although larger studies will be necessary to determine the true impact of erlotinib MPE accumulation on plasma PK and safety, erlotinib can be administered safely to patients with MPE with respect to efficacy and side effects. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. The Effect of Food or Omeprazole on the Pharmacokinetics of Osimertinib in Patients With Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwanathan, Karthick; Dickinson, Paul A; Bui, Khanh; Cassier, Philippe A; Greystoke, Alastair; Lisbon, Eleanor; Moreno, Victor; So, Karen; Thomas, Karen; Weilert, Doris; Yap, Timothy A; Plummer, Ruth

    2018-04-01

    Two phase 1, open-label studies assessed the impact of food or gastric pH modification (omeprazole) on the exposure and safety/tolerability of osimertinib and its metabolites. The food effect study was an open-label, 2-period crossover study in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, randomized into 2 treatment sequences: single-dose osimertinib 80 mg in a fed then fasted state or fasted then fed. The gastric pH study was an open-label, 2-period fixed sequence study assessing the effect of omeprazole on osimertinib exposure in healthy male volunteers. In period 1, volunteers received omeprazole 40 mg (days 1-4), then omeprazole 40 mg plus osimertinib 80 mg (day 5). In period 2, volunteers received osimertinib 80 mg alone (single dose). Blood samples were collected at prespecified time points for pharmacokinetic analyses. Safety/tolerability was also assessed. In the food effect study 38 patients were randomized to fed/fasted (n = 18) or fasted/fed (n = 20) sequences with all patients completing treatment. Coadministration with food did not affect osimertinib exposure (geometric least-squares mean ratios [90% confidence intervals]: 106.05% [94.82%, 118.60%] [area under the plasma concentration time curve from zero to 72 hours] and 92.75% [81.40%, 105.68%] [maximum plasma concentration]). In the gastric pH study (n = 68 received treatment, n = 47 completed the study), coadministration with omeprazole did not affect osimertinib exposure (geometric least-squares mean ratios 106.66% [100.26%, 113.46%] [area under the concentration-time curve], 101.65% [94.65%, 109.16%] [peak concentration]). Osimertinib was well tolerated in both studies. Osimertinib may be administered without regard to food. Dose restriction is not required in patients whose gastric pH may be altered by concomitant agents or medical conditions. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02224053, NCT02163733. © 2017, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  10. Pharmacokinetics of adriamycin vaginal suppository on uterine cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, Tsuneo; Kiyozuka, Yasuhiko; Katakami, Yoshiaki

    1986-01-01

    Vaginal suppositories of Adriamycin (ADM, 5 mg), for reducing the capacity for repair from sublethal damage of X-ray-irradiated cells, were prepared using Wipepsol S-55 as the vehicle, and were intravaginally administered to patients with advanced uterine cervical cancer, and their pharmacokinetics and clinical effects were studied. The ADM concentration in the uterine cervical cancer tissues indicated high levels (17 to 566 μg/g), and migration into the cardinal ligament and regional lymph nodes was noted. However, little ADM was detected in serum (0 to 0.14 μg/g), probably because of its molecular weight and excellent tissue absorbance, and no side effects, such as cardiotoxicity and myelosuppression due to consecutive administration were detected. Histologically, the effect obtained when administered alone was limited, administration in combination with radiotherapy being more effective. Accordingly, radiotherapy of advanced uterine cervical cancer with concomitant administration of ADM vaginal suppositories seems to bring about a more powerful antitumoral effect with fewer systemic side effects. (author)

  11. Buspirone pharmacokinetics in patients with cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalhoff, K; Poulsen, H E; Garred, P

    1987-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of buspirone (20 mg) were determined in 12 patients with cirrhosis and 12 normal subjects. The mean AUC of buspirone was 55 +/- 38 s.d. ng ml-1 h in cirrhotics and 3.5 +/- 2.4 s.d. ng ml-1 h in normals. The time until maximum concentration (tmax) attained...... was similar in the two groups (0.6 vs 0.7 h), but mean maximum concentration Cmax was higher in patients (18.8 +/- 16.3 s.d. ng ml-1) than in normals (1.2 +/- 0.8 s.d. ng ml-1). Mean elimination half-life of buspirone was greater in cirrhotics, but this difference was marginally significant statistically...... (cirrhotics, 6.1 +/- 3.5 s.d. h, normals 3.2 +/- 1.5 s.d. h, P = 0.05). Eight of 12 patients and seven of 12 normal subjects had a second peak in the plasma concentrations of buspirone. In patients this occurred at 10.8 +/- 7.4 s.d. h after the dose, and its mean concentration was 3.1 +/- 6.6 ng ml-1...

  12. A phase I and pharmacokinetic study of OSI-7904L, a liposomal thymidylate synthase inhibitor in combination with oxaliplatin in patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clamp, A R; Schöffski, P; Valle, J W; Wilson, R H; Marreaud, S; Govaerts, A-S; Debois, M; Lacombe, D; Twelves, C; Chick, J; Jayson, G C

    2008-04-01

    OSI-7904L is a liposomal formulation of a potent thymidylate synthase (TS) inhibitor. This phase I study evaluated the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics (PK) of OSI-7904L administered in combination with oxaliplatin every 21 days in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma. A 3+3 study design was utilized at predefined dose levels. Polymorphisms in the TS enhancer region and XPD enzyme were investigated as potential predictors of efficacy and toxicity. Fourteen patients received 76 cycles of treatment. At the highest dose level (OSI-7904L 9 mg/m(2), oxaliplatin 130 mg/m(2)) investigated, one of nine patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity of grade 3 oral mucositis with cycle 1 and five further patients required dose reductions. The toxicity profile of stomatitis, diarrhea, nausea, fatigue, sensory neuropathy and skin rash was consistent with that expected for a TS inhibitor/oxaliplatin combination regimen. PK analysis showed high interpatient variability with no detectable interaction between OSI-7904L and oxaliplatin. Partial radiological responses were documented in two patients. The recommended regimen for further investigation is OSI-7904L 9 mg/m(2) and oxaliplatin 130 mg/m(2).

  13. A cancer research UK pharmacokinetic study of BPA-mannitol in patients with high grade glioma to optimise uptake parameters for clinical trials of BNCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, S.; James, N.D.; Cruickshank, G.S.

    2006-01-01

    This presentation will describe a human pharmacokinetic study which is scheduled to begin recruitment in Summer 2006. The study has been ongoing for approximately 4 years to develop the necessary protocols, validate boron assays and to develop a new formulation of BPA. The study population will be patients with glioblastoma multiforme and the study focuses on the route of infusion (intra venous or intra carotid artery) and in each will assess the effect of administration of mannitol (as a blood-brain barrier disrupter). Mannitol will be administered as a bolus at the beginning of a two hour infusion of BPA. The BPA formulation (BPA - mannitol) is also new and avoids some of the problems of low solubility associated with BPA-fructose as well as the potential risk of fructose intolerance. The approach will include stereotactic biopsy which is necessary to confirm diagnosis. Tissue samples collected will include needle biopsy samples of tumour and brain around tumour for estimation of BPA transporter expression, together with microdialysis catheter collection of extra-cellular fluid and routine collection of blood and urine for BPA levels. Where possible, according to surgical plan and the route of entry, samples of cerebro-spinal will also be collected. These data will be used to develop a pharmacokinetic model following the general approach already established by others in the field. This paper presents initial pre-clinical studies on the BPA-mannitol formulation and some assay validation work together with suggestions for approaches to normalisation of the macroscopic boron assays using simultaneous measurement of Mg levels in tissue. (author)

  14. A phase I/II pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics study of irinotecan combined with S-1 for recurrent/metastatic breast cancer in patients with selected UGT1A1 genotypes (the JBCRG-M01 study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Saji, Shigehira; Nomura, Shogo; Tanaka, Sunao; Ueno, Takayuki; Onoue, Masahide; Iwata, Hiroji; Yamanaka, Takeharu; Sasaki, Yasutsuna; Toi, Masakazu

    2017-12-01

    S-1 and irinotecan combination is attractive for breast cancer refractory to anthracyclines and taxanes. Patients with advanced human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative breast cancer previously treated with anthracyclines and taxanes were eligible. Patients with brain metastases and homozygous for UGT1A1 *6 or *28 or compound heterozygous (*6/*28) were excluded. A dose-escalation design was chosen for the phase I portion (level 1: irinotecan 80 mg/m 2  days 1-8 and S-1 80 mg/m 2  days 1-14 every 3 weeks; level 2: irinotecan 100 mg/m 2 and S-1 80 mg/m 2 ). Study objectives included determination of the recommended dose for phase II, response rate, progression-free survival (PFS), and safety. Pharmacokinetics and CD34 + circulating endothelial cells (CECs) as pharmacodynamics were also analyzed. Thirty-seven patients were included. One patient at each level developed dose-limiting toxicities; therefore, level 2 was the recommended dose for phase II. Diarrhea was more common in patients possessing a *6 or *28 allele compared with wild-type homozygous patients (46% and 25%). Among 29 patients treated at level 2, PFS was longer for UGT1A1 wt/*6 and wt/*28 patients than for wt/wt patients (12 vs. 8 months, P = 0.06). PFS was significantly longer in patients with a larger-than-median SN-38 area under the curve (AUC) than in those with a smaller AUC (P = 0.039). There was an association between clinical benefit and reduction in baseline CD34 + CECs by S-1 (P = 0.047). The combination of irinotecan and S-1 is effective and warrants further investigation. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Cannabinoid Disposition After Human Intraperitoneal Use: An Insight Into Intraperitoneal Pharmacokinetic Properties in Metastatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Catherine J; Galettis, Peter; Song, Shuzhen; Solowij, Nadia; Reuter, Stephanie E; Schneider, Jennifer; Martin, Jennifer H

    2018-01-06

    Medicinal cannabis is prescribed under the provision of a controlled drug in the Australian Poisons Standard. However, multiple laws must be navigated in order for patients to obtain access and imported products can be expensive. Dose-response information for both efficacy and toxicity pertaining to medicinal cannabis is lacking. The pharmacokinetic properties of cannabis administered by traditional routes has been described but to date, there is no literature on the pharmacokinetic properties of an intraperitoneal cannabinoid emulsion. A cachectic 56-year-old female with stage IV ovarian cancer and peritoneal metastases presented to hospital with fevers, abdominal distension and severe pain, vomiting, anorexia, dehydration and confusion. The patient reported receiving an intraperitoneal injection, purported to contain 12 g of mixed cannabinoid (administered by a deregistered medical practitioner) two days prior to presentation. Additionally, cannabis oil oral capsules were administered in the hours prior to hospital admission. THC concentrations were consistent with the clinical state but not with the known pharmacokinetic properties of cannabis nor of intraperitoneal absorption. THC concentrations at the time of presentation were predicted to be ~60 ng/mL. Evidence suggests that blood THC concentrations >5 ng/mL are associated with substantial cognitive and psychomotor impairment. The predicted time for concentrations to drop pharmacokinetic properties of the case suggest that there is a large amount unknown about cannabis pharmacokinetic properties. The pharmacokinetic properties of a large amount of a lipid soluble compound given intraperitoneally gave insights into the absorption and distribution of cannabinoids, particularly in the setting of metastatic malignancy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Vancomycin Pharmacokinetic Parameters in Patients with Hemorrhagic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbitzer, Kathryn A; Jordan, J Dedrick; Sullivan, Kelly A; Durr, Emily A; Olm-Shipman, Casey M; Rhoney, Denise H

    2016-10-01

    Infections are a common medical complication in hemorrhagic stroke patients, with vancomycin commonly used as empiric therapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic parameters of vancomycin in hemorrhagic stroke patients. This was a retrospective study of adult patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) or intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) admitted between May 2010 and February 2015 who received vancomycin. Predicted pharmacokinetic parameters based on population data were compared with calculated pharmacokinetic parameters based on serum trough concentrations. Eighty aSAH patients and 66 ICH patients met inclusion criteria. In the aSAH group, the mean dosing regimen was 17.6 ± 4 mg/kg every 12 (8-12) h. The mean measured trough concentration was lower than the predicted trough concentration (9.9 ± 4.1 vs. 19 ± 8.7 μg/mL; p hemorrhagic stroke exhibited pharmacokinetic alterations favoring increased elimination of vancomycin when compared to predicted pharmacokinetic parameters based on population data. This may result in underexposure to vancomycin, leading to treatment failure and other medical complications.

  17. Pharmacokinetics and Drug Interactions Determine Optimum Combination Strategies in Computational Models of Cancer Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Shaon; Michor, Franziska

    2017-07-15

    The identification of optimal drug administration schedules to battle the emergence of resistance is a major challenge in cancer research. The existence of a multitude of resistance mechanisms necessitates administering drugs in combination, significantly complicating the endeavor of predicting the evolutionary dynamics of cancers and optimal intervention strategies. A thorough understanding of the important determinants of cancer evolution under combination therapies is therefore crucial for correctly predicting treatment outcomes. Here we developed the first computational strategy to explore pharmacokinetic and drug interaction effects in evolutionary models of cancer progression, a crucial step towards making clinically relevant predictions. We found that incorporating these phenomena into our multiscale stochastic modeling framework significantly changes the optimum drug administration schedules identified, often predicting nonintuitive strategies for combination therapies. We applied our approach to an ongoing phase Ib clinical trial (TATTON) administering AZD9291 and selumetinib to EGFR-mutant lung cancer patients. Our results suggest that the schedules used in the three trial arms have almost identical efficacies, but slight modifications in the dosing frequencies of the two drugs can significantly increase tumor cell eradication. Interestingly, we also predict that drug concentrations lower than the MTD are as efficacious, suggesting that lowering the total amount of drug administered could lower toxicities while not compromising on the effectiveness of the drugs. Our approach highlights the fact that quantitative knowledge of pharmacokinetic, drug interaction, and evolutionary processes is essential for identifying best intervention strategies. Our method is applicable to diverse cancer and treatment types and allows for a rational design of clinical trials. Cancer Res; 77(14); 3908-21. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Intraperitoneal radioimmunotherapy for ovarian cancer: pharmacokinetics, toxicity, and efficacy of I-131 labeled monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, J.S.; Hird, V.; Snook, D.; Sullivan, M.; Hooker, G.; Courtenay-Luck, N.; Sivolapenko, G.; Griffiths, M.; Myers, M.J.; Lambert, H.E.

    1989-02-01

    Thirty-six patients with ovarian cancer were treated with intraperitoneal I-131 labeled monoclonal antibodies to tumor associated antigens. The activity of I-131 administered was increased from 20 mCi to 158 mCi and the pharmacokinetics and toxicity evaluated. Five patients who had developed HAMA (Human Antimouse Antibodies) were retreated, and the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of the first and second treatment compared. Patients receiving their first therapy (HAMA negative), had a maximum of 25% (range 19.8-39.8%) of the injected activity in their circulation. This was accompanied by severe marrow suppression at I-131 activities over 120 mCi. The 5 HAMA positive patients had only 5% injected activity in the systemic circulation (range 3.8-6%), with rapid urinary excretion and neglible marrow suppression. In 31 patients with assessable disease there were no responses in 8 patients with gross disease (nodules greater than 2 cms), partial responses in 2 out of 15 patients with nodules less than 2 cms, and complete responses in 3 out of 6 patients with microscopic disease. The non specific radiation dose to the peritoneal cavity was estimated to be less than 500 cGy by lithium fluoride TLD, and could not be expected to account for the responses seen.

  19. Open-label, randomized study of individualized, pharmacokinetically (PK)-guided dosing of paclitaxel combined with carboplatin or cisplatin in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joerger, M; von Pawel, J; Kraff, S; Fischer, J R; Eberhardt, W; Gauler, T C; Mueller, L; Reinmuth, N; Reck, M; Kimmich, M; Mayer, F; Kopp, H-G; Behringer, D M; Ko, Y-D; Hilger, R A; Roessler, M; Kloft, C; Henrich, A; Moritz, B; Miller, M C; Salamone, S J; Jaehde, U

    2016-10-01

    Variable chemotherapy exposure may cause toxicity or lack of efficacy. This study was initiated to validate pharmacokinetically (PK)-guided paclitaxel dosing in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to avoid supra- or subtherapeutic exposure. Patients with newly diagnosed, advanced NSCLC were randomly assigned to receive up to 6 cycles of 3-weekly carboplatin AUC 6 or cisplatin 80 mg/m(2) either with standard paclitaxel at 200 mg/m(2) (arm A) or PK-guided dosing of paclitaxel (arm B). In arm B, initial paclitaxel dose was adjusted to body surface area, age, sex, and subsequent doses were guided by neutropenia and previous-cycle paclitaxel exposure [time above a plasma concentration of 0.05 µM (Tc>0.05)] determined from a single blood sample on day 2. The primary end point was grade 4 neutropenia; secondary end points included neuropathy, radiological response, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Among 365 patients randomly assigned, grade 4 neutropenia was similar in both arms (19% versus 16%; P = 0.10). Neuropathy grade ≥2 (38% versus 23%, P PK-guided dosing of paclitaxel does not improve severe neutropenia, but reduces paclitaxel-associated neuropathy and thereby improves the benefit-risk profile in patients with advanced NSCLC. NCT01326767 (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01326767). © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Ultra-low-dose estriol and Lactobacillus acidophilus vaginal tablets (Gynoflor(®)) for vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal breast cancer patients on aromatase inhibitors: pharmacokinetic, safety, and efficacy phase I clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donders, Gilbert; Neven, Patrick; Moegele, Maximilian; Lintermans, Anneleen; Bellen, Gert; Prasauskas, Valdas; Grob, Philipp; Ortmann, Olaf; Buchholz, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    Phase I pharmacokinetic (PK) study assessed circulating estrogens in breast cancer (BC) patients on a non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor (NSAI) with vaginal atrophy using vaginal ultra-low-dose 0.03 mg estriol (E3) and Lactobacillus combination vaginal tablets (Gynoflor(®)). 16 women on NSAI with severe vaginal atrophy applied a daily vaginal tablet of Gynoflor(®) for 28 days followed by a maintenance therapy of 3 tablets weekly for 8 weeks. Primary outcomes were serum concentrations and PK of E3, estradiol (E2), and estrone (E1) using highly sensitive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Secondary outcomes were clinical measures for efficacy and side effects; microscopic changes in vaginal epithelium and microflora; and changes in serum FSH, LH, and sex hormone-binding globulin. Compared with baseline, serum E1 and E2 did not increase in any of the women at any time following vaginal application. Serum E3 transiently increased after the first application in 15 of 16 women, with a maximum of 168 pg/ml 2-3 h post-insertion. After 4 weeks, serum E3 was slightly increased in 8 women with a maximum of 44 pg/ml. The vaginal atrophy resolved or improved in all women. The product was well tolerated, and discontinuation of therapy was not observed. The low-dose 0.03 mg E3 and Lactobacillus acidophilus vaginal tablets application in postmenopausal BC patients during AI treatment suffering from vaginal atrophy lead to small and transient increases in serum E3, but not E1 or E2, and therefore can be considered as safe and efficacious for treatment of atrophic vaginitis in BC patients taking NSAIs.

  1. Pharmacokinetic study of aldoxorubicin in patients with solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Monica M; Natale, Ronald B; Wolin, Edward M; Laabs, Brenda; Dinh, Hillary; Wieland, Scott; Levitt, Daniel J; Mita, Alain C

    2015-04-01

    Introduction Aldoxorubicin, a prodrug of doxorubicin, binds covalently to serum albumin in the bloodstream and accumulates in tumors. Aldoxorubicin can be administered at doses several-fold higher than doxorubicin can, without associated acute cardiotoxicity. Purpose This study fully evaluated the pharmacokinetic profile of aldoxorubicin (serum and urine). Methods Eighteen patients with advanced solid tumors received aldoxorubicin 230 or 350 mg/m(2) (equivalent in drug load to doxorubicin at doses of 170 or 260 mg/m(2), respectively) once every 21 days. Blood samples were taken in cycle 1 before aldoxorubicin infusion, and at 5, 15, 30, and 60 min, and at 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 24, 48, and 72 h after infusion. Urine samples were taken in cycle 1 at 24, 48, and 72 h after infusion. Limited blood sampling was done in cycle 3, before aldoxorubicin infusion, and at 60 min and at 2, 4, and 8 h after infusion. Results The long mean half-life (20.1-21.1 h), narrow mean volume of distribution (3.96-4.08 L/m(2)), and slow mean clearance rate (0.136-0.152 L/h/m(2)) suggest that aldoxorubicin is stable in circulation and does not accumulate readily in body compartments outside of the bloodstream. Very little doxorubicin and its major metabolite doxorubicinol, which has been implicated in doxorubicin-associated cardiotoxicity, are excreted in urine. This might explain the lack of cardiotoxicity observed thus far with aldoxorubicin. Conclusions Our findings support dosing and administration schemas used in an ongoing phase 3 clinical study of aldoxorubicin in soft tissue sarcoma, and phase 2 clinical studies in small cell lung cancer, glioblastoma, and Kaposi's sarcoma.

  2. Steady-state pharmacokinetics and metabolism of voriconazole in patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Marcus J P; Egerer, Gerlinde; Burhenne, Jürgen; Riedel, Klaus-Dieter; Weiss, Johanna; Mikus, Gerd

    2013-11-01

    Voriconazole exhibits non-linear pharmacokinetics in adults and is said to be mainly metabolized by CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 to voriconazole-N-oxide. The aim of this study was to obtain data on steady-state pharmacokinetics after dosing for at least 14 days in patients taking additional medication and in vivo data on metabolites other than voriconazole-N-oxide. Thirty-one patients receiving voriconazole as regular therapeutic drug treatment during hospitalization participated in this prospective study. Pharmacokinetic profiles were obtained for the 12 h (dosing interval) after the first orally administered dose (400 mg) or (if possible and) after an orally administered maintenance dose (200 mg) following intake for at least 14 days (n = 14 after first dose; n = 23 after maintenance dose). Blood and urine samples were collected and the concentrations of voriconazole and three of its metabolites (the N-oxide, hydroxy-voriconazole and dihydroxy-voriconazole) were determined, as well as the CYP2C19 genotype of the patients. All other drugs taken by the participating patients were evaluated. A high variability of exposure (AUC) after the first dose was slightly reduced during steady-state dosing for voriconazole (82% to 71%) and the N-oxide (86% to 56%), remained high for hydroxy-voriconazole (79%) and even increased for dihydroxy-voriconazole (97% to 127%). In 16 of the 22 steady-state patients, trough plasma concentrations were steady state stayed almost constant. Hydroxylations of voriconazole seem to be quantitatively more important in its metabolism than N-oxidation. High variability in voriconazole exposure, as well as low steady-state trough plasma concentrations, suggest that the suggested steady-state dosage of 200 mg twice a day has to be increased to prevent disease progression. Therapeutic drug monitoring is probably necessary to optimize the voriconazole dose for individual patients.

  3. Treatment of advanced thyroid cancer with axitinib: Phase 2 study with pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic and quality-of-life assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locati, Laura D; Licitra, Lisa; Agate, Laura; Ou, Sai-Hong I; Boucher, Andree; Jarzab, Barbara; Qin, Shukui; Kane, Madeleine A; Wirth, Lori J; Chen, Connie; Kim, Sinil; Ingrosso, Antonella; Pithavala, Yazdi K; Bycott, Paul; Cohen, Ezra E W

    2014-09-01

    In a previous phase 2 trial, axitinib was active and well tolerated in patients with advanced thyroid cancer. In this second phase 2 trial, the efficacy and safety of axitinib were evaluated further in this population, and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationships and patient-reported outcomes were assessed. Patients (N = 52) with metastatic or unresectable, locally advanced medullary or differentiated thyroid cancer that was refractory or not amenable to iodine-131 received a starting dose of axitinib 5 mg twice daily. The primary endpoint was the objective response rate (ORR). Secondary endpoints included progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), safety, pharmacokinetic parameters, and patient-reported outcomes assessed with the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory questionnaire. The overall ORR was 35% (18 partial responses), and 18 patients had stable disease for ≥16 weeks. The median PFS was 16.1 months, and the median OS was 27.2 months. All-causality, grade ≥3 adverse events (>5%) were fatigue, dyspnea, diarrhea, decreased weight, pain in extremity, hypertension, decreased appetite, palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia, hypocalcemia, and myalgia. Patients who had greater axitinib exposure had a longer median PFS. Quality of life was maintained during treatment with axitinib, and no significant deterioration in symptoms or interference in daily life caused by symptoms, assessed on MD Anderson Symptom Inventory subscales, were observed. Axitinib has activity and a manageable safety profile while maintaining quality of life, and it represents an additional treatment option for patients with advanced thyroid cancer. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  4. Population pharmacokinetics of vancomycin in Jordanian patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    injury and gender. Vancomycin volume of distribution was associated with weight and n-acetylcystine administration. Conclusion: The present analysis is a preliminary step toward developing a vancomycin .... datasets using the same variance model used in ..... busulfan in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell.

  5. Pharmacokinetics of paroxetine in patients with cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalhoff, K; Almdal, T P; Bjerrum, K

    1991-01-01

    with cirrhosis experienced nausea during the first two or three days after the first dose, while none of the controls had this symptom. The study showed slower elimination of paroxetine and consequently higher plasma levels in patients with cirrhosis, suggesting that in the latter the dose of paroxetine should...

  6. Epigenetic Therapy Using Belinostat for Patients With Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Multicenter Phase I/II Study With Biomarker and Pharmacokinetic Analysis of Tumors From Patients in the Mayo Phase II Consortium and the Cancer Therapeutics Research Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Winnie; Chung, Hyun C.; Chan, Stephen L.; Wang, Ling Z.; Lim, Robert; Picus, Joel; Boyer, Michael; Mo, Frankie K.F.; Koh, Jane; Rha, Sun Y.; Hui, Edwin P.; Jeung, Hei C.; Roh, Jae K.; Yu, Simon C.H.; To, Ka F.; Tao, Qian; Ma, Brigette B.; Chan, Anthony W.H.; Tong, Joanna H.M.; Erlichman, Charles; Chan, Anthony T.C.; Goh, Boon C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Epigenetic aberrations have been reported in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study of patients with unresectable HCC and chronic liver disease, epigenetic therapy with the histone deacetylase inhibitor belinostat was assessed. The objectives were to determine dose-limiting toxicity and maximum-tolerated dose (MTD), to assess pharmacokinetics in phase I, and to assess activity of and explore potential biomarkers for response in phase II. Patients and Methods Major eligibility criteria included histologically confirmed unresectable HCC, European Cooperative Oncology Group performance score ≤ 2, and adequate organ function. Phase I consisted of 18 patients; belinostat was given intravenously once per day on days 1 to 5 every 3 weeks; dose levels were 600 mg/m2 per day (level 1), 900 mg/m2 per day (level 2), 1,200 mg/m2 per day (level 3), and 1,400 mg/m2 per day (level 4). Phase II consisted of 42 patients. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS), and the main secondary end points were response according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and overall survival (OS). Exploratory analysis was conducted on pretreatment tumor tissues to determine whether HR23B expression is a potential biomarker for response. Results Belinostat pharmacokinetics were linear from 600 to 1,400 mg/m2 without significant accumulation. The MTD was not reached at the maximum dose administered. Dose level 4 was used in phase II. The median number of cycles was two (range, one to 12). The partial response (PR) and stable disease (SD) rates were 2.4% and 45.2%, respectively. The median PFS and OS were 2.64 and 6.60 months, respectively. Exploratory analysis revealed that disease stabilization rate (complete response plus PR plus SD) in tumors having high and low HR23B histoscores were 58% and 14%, respectively (P = .036). Conclusion Epigenetic therapy with belinostat demonstrates tumor stabilization and is generally well-tolerated. HR23B

  7. Deferasirox pharmacokinetic evaluation in β-thalassaemia paediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegra, Sarah; Cusato, Jessica; De Francia, Silvia; Pirro, Elisa; Massano, Davide; Piga, Antonio; D'Avolio, Antonio

    2017-05-01

    Iron chelation in the transfusion-dependent anaemias management is essential to prevent end-organ damage and to improve survival. Deferasirox is a once-daily orally active tridentate selective iron chelator which pharmacokinetic disposition could influence treatment efficacy and toxicity. Therapeutic drug monitoring is an important tool for optimizing drug utilization and doses. A fully validated chromatographic method was used to quantify deferasirox concentration in plasma collected from paediatric patients with β-thalassaemia. Samples obtained after 5 days of washout or in naïve patients before and after 2, 4, 6 and 24 h drug administration were evaluated. Associations between variables were tested using the Pearson test. Twenty paediatric patients were enrolled; they were mainly men (13.65%), with median age of 6.35 years and body mass index of 15.45 kg/m 2 . Concerning pharmacokinetic parameters, a higher interindividual variability was shown. A positive, but not significant, correlation (r = 0.363; P = 0.115) was found between deferasirox area under the concentration curve over 24 h (AUC) and drug dose. Monitoring plasma deferasirox concentrations appears beneficial for guiding appropriate patient treatment, enhancing effectiveness and minimizing toxicity. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  8. Stereoselective pharmacokinetics of methadone in chronic pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, K; Blemmer, T; Angelo, H R

    1996-01-01

    Ten patients with chronic pain were randomized to an open, balanced, crossover study. Each patients received two different preparations of racemic methadone, i.e., tablets and intravenous infusion. The pharmacokinetic parameters of the R- and S-enantiomers of the racemate are reported. The analge......Ten patients with chronic pain were randomized to an open, balanced, crossover study. Each patients received two different preparations of racemic methadone, i.e., tablets and intravenous infusion. The pharmacokinetic parameters of the R- and S-enantiomers of the racemate are reported....... The analgesically active R-methadone has a significantly longer mean elimination half-life than the optical antipode S-methadone (t1/2 = 37.5 and 28.6 h, respectively). The mean total volume of distribution is 496.6 L for R-methadone and 289.1 L for S-methadone. Significant differences in the mean clearance between...... R- and S-methadone are seen (0.158 and 0.129 L/min, respectively). However, the lagtime after oral administration and the bioavailability did not show differences between the isomers. The data suggest that both enantiomers of methadone should be measured if correlations between pharmacodynamics...

  9. Doripenem pharmacokinetics in critically ill patients receiving continuous hemodiafiltration (CHDF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidaka, Seigo; Goto, Koji; Hagiwara, Satoshi; Iwasaka, Hideo; Noguchi, Takayuki

    2010-01-01

    Objectives of the prospective, open-label study were to investigate pharmacokinetics of doripenem and determine appropriate doripenem regimens during continuous hemodiafiltration (CHDF) in critically ill patients with renal failure (creatinine clearance times during one dosing interval were measured in order to calculate pharmacokinetic parameters and clearance via hemodiafiltration. Mean half-life (+/-standard deviation) of doripenem was 7.9+/-3.7 hours. Total body clearance of doripenem was 58.0+/-12.7 ml/min, including clearance of 13.5+/-1.6 ml/min via CHDF. An IV dose of 250 mg of doripenem every 12 hours during CHDF provided adequate plasma concentrations for critically ill patients with renal failure, without resulting in accumulation upon steady-state. Thus, under the conditions tested, CHDF appeared to have little effect on doripenem clearance. Therefore, the blood level of doripenem can be satisfactorily controlled by adjustment of doripenem dose and dosing interval, in accordance with residual renal function in patients receiving CHDF.

  10. Pharmacokinetic study of mycophenolic acid in Iranian kidney transplant patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Rezaee

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study was to characterize the pharmacokinetic parameters of mycophenolic acid (MPA in Iranian kidney transplant patients. Methods: Plasma MPA concentration of mycophenolate mofetile (MMF 1 gram two times a day was measured in 21 Iranian kidney transplant recipients receiving treatment. Patients who entered the study had been transplanted for more than 3 months and their drug level was supposed to be at steady state. MMF concentration was measured with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Results: The plasma MPA concentration-time curve was characterized by an early sharp peak at about 1 hour postdose. The mean Area Under Curve (AUC, Cmax and Tmax were 47.0±18.3 µg.h/ml, 18.6±8.5 µg/ml and 1.0±0.5 hours respectively. Conclusion: The plasma MPA concentration-time curve pattern of Iranian patients was similar and consistent with previously reported profiles in other populations taking the same dose. Keywords: Mycophenolate mofetil, Mycophenolic acid, Pharmacokinetics, Area Under Curve, Kidney transplantation

  11. Pharmacokinetics of vancomycin and dosing recommendations for trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medellín-Garibay, Susanna E; Ortiz-Martín, Belén; Rueda-Naharro, Aída; García, Benito; Romano-Moreno, Silvia; Barcia, Emilia

    2016-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize the population pharmacokinetics of vancomycin in trauma patients and to propose dosing schemes to optimize therapy. Trauma patients from Hospital Universitario Severo Ochoa (Spain) receiving intravenous vancomycin and routine therapeutic drug monitoring were included. Concentrations and time data were retrospectively collected, and population modelling was performed with NONMEM 7.2; internal and external validations were performed to probe the final model. Finally, several simulations were executed to propose dosing guidelines to reach expected vancomycin concentrations. A total of 118 trauma patients were included; the population was 45% males, with a mean age of 77 years (range 37-100 years) and a mean total body weight (TBW) of 72 kg (range 38-110 kg). The pharmacokinetics of vancomycin was best described by a two-compartment open model; creatinine clearance (CLCR) was related to vancomycin clearance (0.49 ± 0.04 L/h), being diminished by the presence of furosemide (0.34 ± 0.05 L/h). TBW influenced both the central volume of distribution (V1 = 0.74 ± 0.1 L/kg) and peripheral volume of distribution (V2 = 5.9 ± 2 L/kg), but patients with age >65 years showed a larger V1 (1.07 ± 0.1 L/kg). Bootstrapping was performed to internally validate the stability of the final model. External validation was developed using an alternate population of 40 patients with the same characteristics. The validated model was compared with population pharmacokinetic models previously published and showed better predictive performance for trauma patients than the current one. This final model allowed us to propose a new practical dose guideline to reach higher trough concentrations (15-20 mg/L) and AUC0-24/MIC ratios of more than 400 after 4 days of vancomycin treatment. A new population model was described for trauma patients to optimize vancomycin therapy, showing precise predictive performance to be applied for therapeutic drug

  12. Pharmacokinetic study of aniracetam in elderly patients with cerebrovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, H; Tajima, T; Yamada, H; Igata, A; Yamamoto, Y; Tsuchida, H; Nakashima, Y; Suzuki, Y; Ikari, H; Iguchi, A

    1997-02-01

    The clinical pharmacokinetics of the cognitive enhancer, aniracetam (200 mg), was studied in elderly patients with cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and compared with those of young healthy volunteers. Six female hospitalized patients (mean age 84.5 years) were used in this study. The serum level of anisic acid and p-methoxyhippuric acid, major metabolites of aniracetam, reached a peak at 2 h after oral administration, and returned to basal level by 6 h. Mean creatinine clearance was 20-30 ml/min. The t1/2 of metabolites was increased by 4- to 7-fold in the elderly patients compared with young volunteers. This study showed that tmax, t1/2, and AUC were enlarged in the elderly; however, no clinical side effects were observed.

  13. Pharmacokinetic analysis and k-means clustering of DCEMR images for radiotherapy outcome prediction of advanced cervical cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Erlend K F; Kristensen, Gunnar B; Lyng, Heidi; Malinen, Eirik

    2011-08-01

    Pharmacokinetic analysis of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance images (DCEMRI) allows for quantitative characterization of vascular properties of tumors. The aim of this study is twofold, first to determine if tumor regions with similar vascularization could be labeled by clustering methods, second to determine if the identified regions can be associated with local cancer relapse. Eighty-one patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy underwent DCEMRI with Gd-DTPA prior to external beam radiotherapy. The median follow-up time after treatment was four years, in which nine patients had primary tumor relapse. By fitting a pharmacokinetic two-compartment model function to the temporal contrast enhancement in the tumor, two pharmacokinetic parameters, K(trans) and ύ(e), were estimated voxel by voxel from the DCEMR-images. Intratumoral regions with similar vascularization were identified by k-means clustering of the two pharmacokinetic parameter estimates over all patients. The volume fraction of each cluster was used to evaluate the prognostic value of the clusters. Three clusters provided a sufficient reduction of the cluster variance to label different vascular properties within the tumors. The corresponding median volume fraction of each cluster was 38%, 46% and 10%. The second cluster was significantly associated with primary tumor control in a log-rank survival test (p-value: 0.042), showing a decreased risk of treatment failure for patients with high volume fraction of voxels. Intratumoral regions showing similar vascular properties could successfully be labeled in three distinct clusters and the volume fraction of one cluster region was associated with primary tumor control.

  14. Pharmacokinetic analysis and k-means clustering of DCEMR images for radiotherapy outcome prediction of advanced cervical cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Erlend K. F.; Kristensen, Gunnar B.; Lyng, Heidi; Malinen, Eirik

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Pharmacokinetic analysis of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance images (DCEMRI) allows for quantitative characterization of vascular properties of tumors. The aim of this study is twofold, first to determine if tumor regions with similar vascularization could be labeled by clustering methods, second to determine if the identified regions can be associated with local cancer relapse. Materials and methods. Eighty-one patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy underwent DCEMRI with Gd-DTPA prior to external beam radiotherapy. The median follow-up time after treatment was four years, in which nine patients had primary tumor relapse. By fitting a pharmacokinetic two-compartment model function to the temporal contrast enhancement in the tumor, two pharmacokinetic parameters, K trans and u e , were estimated voxel by voxel from the DCEMR-images. Intratumoral regions with similar vascularization were identified by k-means clustering of the two pharmacokinetic parameter estimates over all patients. The volume fraction of each cluster was used to evaluate the prognostic value of the clusters. Results. Three clusters provided a sufficient reduction of the cluster variance to label different vascular properties within the tumors. The corresponding median volume fraction of each cluster was 38%, 46% and 10%. The second cluster was significantly associated with primary tumor control in a log-rank survival test (p-value: 0.042), showing a decreased risk of treatment failure for patients with high volume fraction of voxels. Conclusions. Intratumoral regions showing similar vascular properties could successfully be labeled in three distinct clusters and the volume fraction of one cluster region was associated with primary tumor control

  15. Comparison of normal tissue pharmacokinetics with 111In/9Y monoclonal antibody m170 for breast and prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, Joerg; DeNardo, Gerald L.; Yuan, Aina; Shen Sui; O'Donnell, Robert T.; Richman, Carol M.; De Nardo, Sally J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Radioactivity deposition in normal tissues limits the dose deliverable by radiopharmaceuticals (RP) in radioimmunotherapy (RIT). This study investigated the absorbed radiation dose in normal tissues for prostate cancer patients in comparison to breast cancer patients for 2 RPs using the monoclonal antibody (MAb) m170. Methods and Materials: 111 In-DOTA-glycylglycylglycyl-L-p-isothiocyanatophenylalanine amide (GGGF)-m170 and 111 In-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) 2-iminothiolane (2IT)-m170, representing the same MAb and chelate with and without a cleavable linkage, were studied in 13 breast cancer and 26 prostate cancer patients. Dosimetry for 9 Y was calculated using 111 In MAb pharmacokinetics from the initial imaging study for each patient, using reference man- and patient-specific masses. Results: The reference man-specific radiation doses (cGy/MBq) were not significantly different for the breast and the prostate cancer patients for both RPs in all but one tissue-RP combination (liver, DOTA-2IT). The patient-specific doses had differences between the groups most of which can be related to weight differences. Conclusions: Similar normal tissue doses were calculated for two groups of patients having different cancers and genders. This similarity combined with continued careful analysis of the imaging data might allow the use of higher starting doses in early phase RIT studies

  16. A dose-ranging study of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the selective apoptotic antineoplastic drug (SAAND), OSI-461, in patients with advanced cancer, in the fasted and fed state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryant, C L; Lieu, C H; Leong, S; Boinpally, R; Basche, M; Gore, L; Leonardi, K; Schultz, M K; Hariharan, S; Chow, L; Diab, S; Gibbs, A; Eckhardt, S G

    2009-02-01

    To evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics and determine the recommended dose of the selective apoptotic antineoplastic drug, OSI-461 administered on a twice-daily regimen to patients with advanced solid malignancies. In this phase I trial, 33 patients were treated with OSI-461 doses ranging from 400 to 1,200 mg given twice daily in 4-week cycles. Pharmacokinetic studies were performed to characterize the plasma disposition of OSI-461 and the effect of food intake on OSI-461 absorption. Secondary biomarker studies were performed to assess the biologic activity of OSI-461 including the measurement of pGSK-3beta, a PKG substrate, and pharmacogenetic studies to identify polymorphisms of CYP3A that influence drug metabolism and of ABCG2, involved in drug resistance. Thirty-three patients were treated with 86 courses of OSI-461. The dose-limiting toxicities were grade 3 abdominal pain, found in one patient at the 1,000 mg BID fed dose level and all patients at the 1,200 mg BID fed dose level. There was also one episode each of grade 3 fatigue and grade 3 constipation at the 1,000 and 1,200 mg BID fed dose levels, respectively. Other common toxicities included mild to moderate fatigue, nausea, anorexia and mild elevation in bilirubin. Pharmacokinetic studies of OSI-461 revealed approximately a twofold increase in AUC(0-24) when OSI-461 was administered with food. An increase in pGSK-3beta post-dose was seen in the majority of patients and was greater at higher dose levels. No patients exhibited CYP3A4 polymorphisms, while 100% of patients were found to have the CYP3A5*3/CYP3A5*3 polymorphism. Two known polymorphisms of the ABCG2 gene, G34 --> A34 and C421 --> A421, occurred at frequencies of 11.76 and 29%, respectively. Toxicity and pharmacodynamic data show that the recommended oral dose of OSI-461 is 800 mg twice daily administered with food. The drug appears to be well-tolerated, and overall bioavailability appears to be markedly increased when the drug is administered

  17. Deferasirox pharmacokinetics in patients with adequate versus inadequate response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirnomas, Deborah; Smith, Amber Lynn; Braunstein, Jennifer; Finkelstein, Yaron; Pereira, Luis; Bergmann, Anke K.; Grant, Frederick D.; Paley, Carole; Shannon, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Tens of thousands of transfusion-dependent (eg, thalassemia) patients worldwide suffer from chronic iron overload and its potentially fatal complications. The oral iron chelator deferasirox has become commercially available in many countries since 2006. Although this alternative to parenteral deferoxamine has been a major advance for patients with transfusional hemosiderosis, a proportion of patients have suboptimal response to the maximum approved doses (30 mg/kg per day), and do not achieve negative iron balance. We performed a prospective study of oral deferasirox pharmacokinetics (PK), comparing 10 transfused patients with inadequate deferasirox response (rising ferritin trend or rising liver iron on deferasirox doses > 30 mg/kg per day) with control transfusion-dependent patients (n = 5) with adequate response. Subjects were admitted for 4 assessments: deferoxamine infusion and urinary iron measurement to assess readily chelatable iron; quantitative hepatobiliary scintigraphy to assess hepatic uptake and excretion of chelate; a 24-hour deferasirox PK study following a single 35-mg/kg dose of oral deferasirox; and pharmacogenomic analysis. Patients with inadequate response to deferasirox had significantly lower systemic drug exposure compared with control patients (P deferasirox must be determined. This trial has been registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov under identifier NCT00749515. PMID:19724055

  18. Polymorphisms associated with everolimus pharmacokinetics, toxicity and survival in metastatic breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Pascual

    Full Text Available Metastatic breast cancer (MBC progressing after endocrine therapy frequently activates PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway. The BOLERO-2 trial showed that everolimus-exemestane achieves increased progression free survival (PFS compared with exemestane. However, there is great inter-patient variability in toxicity and response to exemestane-everolimus treatment. The objective of this study was to perform an exploratory study analyzing the implication of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs on outcomes from this treatment through a pharmacogenetic analysis.Blood was collected from 90 postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative MBC treated with exemestane-everolimus following progression after prior treatment with a non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor. Everolimus pharmacokinetics was measured in 37 patients. Twelve SNPs in genes involved in everolimus pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics were genotyped and associations assessed with drug plasma levels, clinically relevant toxicities (non-infectious pneumonitis, mucositis, hyperglycemia and hematological toxicities, dose reductions or treatment suspensions due to toxicity, progression free survival (PFS and overall survival.We found that CYP3A4 rs35599367 variant (CYP3A4*22 allele carriers had higher everolimus blood concentration compared to wild type patients (P = 0.019. ABCB1 rs1045642 was associated with risk of mucositis (P = 0.031, while PIK3R1 rs10515074 and RAPTOR rs9906827 were associated with hyperglycemia and non-infectious pneumonitis (P = 0.016 and 0.024, respectively. Furthermore, RAPTOR rs9906827 was associated with PFS (P = 0.006.CYP3A4*22 allele influenced plasma concentration of everolimus and several SNPs in PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway genes were associated with treatment toxicities and prognosis. These results require replication, but suggest that germline variation could influence everolimus outcomes in MBC.

  19. Population pharmacokinetics and pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of bendamustine in pediatric patients with relapsed/refractory acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Mona; Megason, Gail; Bond, Mary; Hellriegel, Edward; Robertson, Philmore; Grasela, Thaddeus; Phillips, Luann

    2014-11-01

    The pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of bendamustine has been characterized in adults with indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), but remains to be elucidated in pediatric patients with hematologic malignancies. This analysis used data from a nonrandomized pediatric study in patients with relapsed/refractory acute lymphocytic leukemia or acute myeloid leukemia. Bendamustine 90 or 120 mg/m(2) (60-minute infusion) was administered on days 1 and 2 of 21 day cycles. The population PK base model was adjusted for body surface area (BSA), and the appropriateness of the final model was evaluated by visual predictive check. A covariate analysis explored PK variability. Bayesian PK parameter estimates and concentration-time profiles for each patient were generated. Bendamustine PK in pediatric patients was compared with that of adults with indolent NHL. PK/pharmacodynamic analyses were conducted for fatigue, nausea, vomiting, and infection. Thirty-eight patients (median age: 7 years; range: 1-19 years) receiving bendamustine 120 mg/m(2) and an additional five patients receiving bendamustine 90 mg/m(2) (median age: 12 years; range: 8-14 years) were included in the population PK analysis. Peak plasma concentrations of bendamustine (Cmax) occurred at the end of infusion (about 1 h). Decline from peak showed a rapid distribution phase (t½α = 0.308 h) and a slower elimination phase (t½β = 1.47 h). Model-predicted mean Cmax and area under the curve values from time 0-24 h were 6806 ng/mL and 8240 ng*h/mL, respectively. When dosed based upon BSA, it appeared that age, body weight, race, mild renal (n = 3) or hepatic (n = 2) dysfunction, cancer type, and cytochrome P450 1A2 inhibitors (n = 17) or inducers (n = 3) did not affect systemic exposure, which was comparable between pediatric and adult patients. Infection was the only adverse event associated with bendamustine Cmax. However, due to the small sample size for some subgroups, the

  20. Pharmacokinetics of antituberculosis drugs in pulmonary tuberculosis patients with type 2 diabetes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruslami, R.; Nijland, H.M.J.; Adhiarta, I.G.; Kariadi, S.H.; Alisjahbana, B.; Aarnoutse, R.E.; Crevel, R. van

    2010-01-01

    Altered pharmacokinetics of antituberculosis drugs may contribute to an increased risk of tuberculosis treatment failure for diabetic patients. We previously found that rifampin exposure was 2-fold lower in diabetic than in nondiabetic tuberculosis patients during the continuation phase of

  1. Influence of the dopamine agonist alpha-dihydroergocryptine on the pharmacokinetics of levodopa in patients with Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minea, D; Varga, [No Value; Falup-Pecurariu, C; de Mey, C; Retzow, A; Althaus, M

    2001-01-01

    This study investigated whether chronic coadministration of alpha -dihydroergocryptine (DHEC) altered the plasma pharmacokinetics of individualized treatments with levodopa in 12 patients with Parkinson's disease. Steady-state pharmacokinetics of plasma levodopa (L-Dopa) under combined treatment

  2. Association of pharmacokinetic and metabolic parameters derived using simultaneous PET/MRI: Initial findings and impact on response evaluation in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, Amarnath; Taneja, Sangeeta; Singh, Aru; Negi, Pradeep; Mehta, Shashi Bhushan; Ahuja, Aashim; Singhal, Manish; Sarin, Ramesh

    2017-07-01

    To study relationships among pharmacokinetic and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) PET parameters obtained through simultaneous PET/MRI in breast cancer patients and evaluate their combined potential for response evaluation. The study included 41 breast cancer patients for correlation study and 9 patients (pre and post therapy) for response evaluation. All patients underwent simultaneous PET/MRI with dedicated breast imaging. Pharmacokinetic parameters and PET parameters for tumor were derived using an in- house developed and vendor provided softwares respectively. Relationships between SUV and pharmacokinetic parameters and clinical as well as histopathologic parameters were evaluated using Spearman correlation analysis. Response to chemotherapy was derived as percentage reduction in size and in parameters post therapy. Significant correlations were observed between SUVmean, max, peak, TLG with K trans (ρ=0.446, 0.417, 0.491, 0.430; p≤0.01); with Kep(ρ=0.303, ρ=0.315, ρ=0.319; p≤0.05); and with iAUC(ρ=0.401, ρ=0.410, ρ=0.379; p≤0.05, p≤0.01). The ratio of ve/iAUC showed significant negative correlation to SUVmean, max, peak and TLG (ρ=0.420, 0.446, 0.443, 0.426; p≤0.01). Ability of SUV as well as pharmacokinetic parameters to predict response to therapy matched the RECIST criteria in 9 out of 11 lesions in 9 patients. Maximum post therapy quantitative reduction was observed in SUVpeak, TLG and K trans . Simultaneous PET/MRI enables illustration of close interactions between glucose metabolism and pharmacokinetic parameters in breast cancer patients and potential of their simultaneity in response assessment to therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Population pharmacokinetics of ticagrelor in patients with acute coronary syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianguo; Tang, Weifeng; Storey, Robert F; Husted, Steen; Teng, Renli

    2016-09-01

    Ticagrelor is an orally administered antiplatelet agent used to reduce thrombotic events in patients with acute coronary syndromes. Data from two studies in patients with acute coronary syndromes with large amounts of pharmacokinetic (PK) data (phase IIb DISPERSE-2 study (n = 609)); phase III PLATO PK substudy (n = 6,381)), along with non-linear mixed effects modeling software, were used to develop population PK models for ticagrelor and its metabolite, AR-C124910XX, and to evaluate the impact of demographic and clinical factors on the PK of ticagrelor and AR-C124910XX. 32 covariates relating to disease history, biomarkers, clinical chemistry, and concomitant medications were assessed. A one-compartment model with population mean PK parameters of firstorder absorption rate constant (0.67/h), apparent systemic clearance (14 L/h), and apparent volume of distribution (221 L) was shown to best describe the PK profile of ticagrelor. Patients co-administered moderate CYP3A inducers or inhibitors increased (by 110%, 95% confidence interval (CI), 52 - 192%) or decreased (by 64%, 95% CI, 39 - 73%) apparent ticagrelor clearance, respectively, while habitual smoking decreased apparent ticagrelor clearance by 22% (95% CI, 19 - 25%). Ticagrelor bioavailability was 21% (95% CI, 19 - 22%) lower at treatment initiation (visit 1) versus subsequent visits. Compared with Caucasian patients, ticagrelor bioavailability was 39% (95% CI, 33 - 46%) higher in Asian patients and 18% (95% CI, 6 - 28%) lower in Black patients. In the current analyses, the population PK models developed for ticagrelor and AR-C124910XX described the data obtained in the DISPERSE-2 and PLATO studies well, and were consistent with previous phase I PK studies.

  4. Curcumin as a clinically-promising anti-cancer agent: pharmacokinetics and drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiwidjaja, Jeffry; McLachlan, Andrew J; Boddy, Alan V

    2017-09-01

    Curcumin has been extensively studied for its anti-cancer properties. While a diverse array of in vitro and preclinical research support the prospect of curcumin use as an anti-cancer therapeutic, most human studies have failed to meet the intended clinical expectation. Poor systemic availability of orally-administered curcumin may account for this disparity. Areas covered: This descriptive review aims to concisely summarise available clinical studies investigating curcumin pharmacokinetics when administered in different formulations. A critical analysis of pharmacokinetic- and pharmacodynamic-based interactions of curcumin with concomitantly administered drugs is also provided. Expert opinion: The encouraging clinical results of curcumin administration are currently limited to people with colorectal cancer, given that sufficient curcumin concentrations persist in colonic mucosa. Higher parent curcumin systemic exposure, which can be achieved by several newer formulations, has important implications for optimal treatment of cancers other than those in gastrointestinal tract. Curcumin-drug pharmacokinetic interactions are also almost exclusively in the enterocytes, owing to extensive first pass metabolism and poor curcumin bioavailability. Greater scope of these interactions, i.e. modulation of the systemic elimination of co-administered drugs, may be expected from more-bioavailable curcumin formulations. Further studies are still warranted, especially with newer formulations to support the inclusion of curcumin in cancer therapy regimens.

  5. A long-term prospective population pharmacokinetic study on imatinib plasma concentrations in GIST patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Eechoute (Karel); M.N. Fransson (Martin); A.K.L. Reyners (Anna); F.A. de Jong (Floris); A. Sparreboom (Alex); W.T.A. van der Graaf (Winette); L.E. Friberg (Lena); G. Schiavon (Gaia); E.A.C. Wiemer (Erik); J. Verweij (Jaap); W.J. Loos (Walter); A.H.J. Mathijssen (Ron); U. de Giorgi (U.)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Imatinib minimal (trough) plasma concentrations after one month of treatment have shown a significant association with clinical benefit in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Considering that a retrospective pharmacokinetic analysis has also suggested that

  6. A Long-term Prospective Population Pharmacokinetic Study on Imatinib Plasma Concentrations in GIST Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eechoute, K.; Fransson, M.N.; Reyners, A.K.; de Jong, F.A.; Sparreboom, A.; van der Graaf, W.T.; Friberg, L.E.; Schiavon, G.; Wiemer, E.A.; Verweij, J.; Loos, W.J.; Mathijssen, R.H.; De Giorgi, U.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Imatinib minimal (trough) plasma concentrations after one month of treatment have shown a significant association with clinical benefit in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Considering that a retrospective pharmacokinetic analysis has also suggested that imatinib

  7. A Long-term Prospective Population Pharmacokinetic Study on Imatinib Plasma Concentrations in GIST Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eechoute, Karel; Fransson, Martin N.; Reyners, An K.; de Jong, Floris A.; Sparreboom, Alex; van der Graaf, Winette T. A.; Friberg, Lena E.; Schiavon, Gaia; Wiemer, Erik A. C.; Verweij, Jaap; Loos, Walter J.; Mathijssen, Ron H. J.; De Giorgi, Ugo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Imatinib minimal (trough) plasma concentrations after one month of treatment have shown a significant association with clinical benefit in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Considering that a retrospective pharmacokinetic analysis has also suggested that imatinib

  8. Methotrexate Dose in Patients With Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Impacts Methotrexate Polyglutamate Pharmacokinetics, Adalimumab Pharmacokinetics, and Efficacy: Pharmacokinetic and Exposure-response Analysis of the CONCERTO Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Sandra L; Klein, Cheri E; Jin, Ziyi; Locke, Charles S; Rodila, Ramona C; Kupper, Hartmut; Burmester, Gerd-Rudiger; Awni, Walid M

    2018-02-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) and adalimumab are well-recognized treatments of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the efficacy of which may be driven by intracellular polyglutamates (PGs). The aim of this analysis was to characterize MTX PG concentrations and adalimumab pharmacokinetics in the CONCERTO trial. In addition, the relationships between MTX dose/pharmacokinetics, adalimumab pharmacokinetics, and efficacy were evaluated. CONCERTO was a double-blind, parallel-arm study in patients with early RA randomized to adalimumab 40 mg SC every other week plus blinded MTX 2.5, 5, 10, or 20 mg PO once weekly, for 26 weeks. Blood samples were obtained through week 26 for the determination of concentrations of MTX PG, adalimumab, and anti-adalimumab antibody (AAA). Clinical outcomes were also assessed. A total of 395 patients were included in the analysis (MTX, 329; adalimumab, 395). The mean time to steady-state MTX PG concentration was increased with MTX dose, from 8 to >26 weeks, depending on PG chain length. Dose proportionality changed with PG chain length. As MTX dose was increased, the percentage of short-chain PGs increased less than dose proportionally, while the percentage of long-chain PGs increased more than dose proportionally. For very-long-chain PGs, dose proportionality could not be assessed due to the nonmeasurable concentrations in the 2.5- and 5-mg MTX dose groups. As MTX dose increased, mean adalimumab concentrations also increased (P < 0.001). The percentage of patients with AAA decreased with increasing MTX dose, and at week 26, AAA + status was significantly correlated with MTX dose level (P = 0.005). In general, rates of response, defined using the 28-joint count disease activity score based on C-reactive protein (DAS28[CRP]; response, <3.2), were greater in the subgroup without AAA. The likelihood of a patient achieving a DAS28(CRP) response was related to the baseline measurement (P < 0.001) and to the concentration of adalimumab (P = 0.001), but not to the MTX

  9. Pharmacokinetic MRI of the prostate. Parameters for differentiating low-grade and high-grade prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franiel, T.; Taupitz, M.; Asbach, P.; Beyersdorff, D.; Luedemann, L.; Rost, J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: to investigate whether pharmacokinetic MRI parameters ''perfusion, blood volume, mean transit time (MTT), interstitial volume, permeability, extraction coefficient, delay, and dispersion'' allow the differentiation of low-grade (Gleason score ≤ 6) and high-grade (Gleason score ≥ 7) prostate cancer. Materials and method: forty-two patients with prostate cancer verified by biopsy (PSA 2.7 to 31.4ng/ml) and scheduled for prostatectomy underwent MRI at 1.5 Tesla using the dynamic contrast-enhanced inversion-prepared dual-contrast gradient echo sequence (temporal resolution, 1.65 s) and a combined endorectal body phased array coil. Parametric maps were computed using a sequential 3-compartment model and the corresponding post-processing algorithms. A total of 41 areas of prostate cancer (15 low-grade, 26 high-grade cancers) in 32 patients were able to be correlated with the prostatectomy specimens and were included in the analysis. Results: low-grade prostate cancers had a higher mean blood volume (1.76% vs. 1.64%, p = 0.039), longer MTT (6.39 s vs. 3.25 s, p -1 vs. 3.86 min -1 , p = 0.011) than high-grade cancers. No statistically significant difference was found for perfusion (p = 0.069), interstitial volume (p = 0.849), extraction coefficient (p = 0.615), delay (p = 0.489), and dispersion (p = 0.306). (orig.)

  10. Population pharmacokinetic modeling of furosemide in patients with hypertension and fluid overload conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodati, Devender; Yellu, Narsimhareddy

    2017-06-01

    Furosemide is a loop diuretic drug frequently indicated in hypertension and fluid overload conditions such as congestive heart failure and hepatic cirrhosis. The purpose of the study was to establish a population pharmacokinetic model for furosemide in Indian hypertensive and fluid overload patients, and to evaluate effects of covariates on the volume of distribution (V/F) and oral clearance (CL/F) of furosemide. A total of 188 furosemide plasma sample concentrations from 63 patients with hypertension or fluid overload conditions were collected in this study. The population pharmacokinetic model for furosemide was built using Phoenix NLME 1.3 software. The covariates included age, sex, body surface area, bodyweight, height and creatinine clearance (CRCL). The pharmacokinetic data of furosemide was adequately explained by a two-compartment linear pharmacokinetic model with first-order absorption and an absorption lag-time. The mean values of CL/F and Vd/F of furosemide in the patients were 15.054Lh -1 and 4.419L, respectively. Analysis of covariates showed that CRCL was significantly influencing the clearance of furosemide. The final population pharmacokinetic model was demonstrated to be appropriate and effective and it can be used to assess the pharmacokinetic parameters of furosemide in Indian patients with hypertension and fluid overload conditions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  11. Pharmacokinetic assessment in patients receiving continuous RRT: perspectives from the Kidney Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolin, Thomas D; Aronoff, George R; Fissell, William H; Jain, Lokesh; Madabushi, Rajnikanth; Reynolds, Kellie; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Shiew Mei; Mehrotra, Rajnish; Flessner, Michael F; Leypoldt, John K; Witcher, Jennifer W; Zineh, Issam; Archdeacon, Patrick; Roy-Chaudhury, Prabir; Goldstein, Stuart L

    2015-01-07

    The effect of AKI and modern continuous RRT (CRRT) methods on drug disposition (pharmacokinetics) and response has been poorly studied. Pharmaceutical manufacturers have little incentive to perform pharmacokinetic studies in patients undergoing CRRT because such studies are neither recommended in existing US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidance documents nor required for new drug approval. Action is urgently needed to address the knowledge deficit. The Kidney Health Initiative has assembled a work group composed of clinicians and scientists representing academia, the FDA, and the pharmaceutical and dialysis industries with expertise related to pharmacokinetics, AKI, and/or CRRT. The work group critically evaluated key considerations in the assessment of pharmacokinetics and drug dosing in CRRT, practical constraints related to conducting pharmacokinetic studies in critically ill patients, and the generalizability of observations made in the context of specific CRRT prescriptions and specific patient populations in order to identify efficient study designs capable of addressing the knowledge deficit without impeding drug development. Considerations for the standardized assessment of pharmacokinetics and development of corresponding drug dosing recommendations in critically ill patients with AKI receiving CRRT are proposed. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  12. Factors affecting the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of PEGylated liposomal irinotecan (IHL-305 in patients with advanced solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu H

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Huali Wu,1 Jeffrey R Infante,2 Vicki L Keedy,3 Suzanne F Jones,2 Emily Chan,3 Johanna C Bendell,2 Wooin Lee,4 Whitney P Kirschbrown,1 Beth A Zamboni,5 Satoshi Ikeda,6 Hiroshi Kodaira,6 Mace L Rothenberg,3 Howard A Burris III,2 William C Zamboni1,7–9 1UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, 2Sarah Cannon Research Institute/Tennessee Oncology, PLLC, 3Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, 4Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 5Department of Mathematics, Carlow University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 6Yakult Honsha Co., Ltd., Medical Development Department, Tokyo, Japan; 7UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, 8UNC Institute for Pharmacogenomics and Individualized Therapy, 9Carolina Center for Cancer Nanotechology Excellence, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA Abstract: IHL-305 is a PEGylated liposomal formulation of irinotecan (CPT-11. The objective of this study was to evaluate the factors associated with interpatient variability in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of IHL-305 in patients with advanced solid tumors. IHL-305 was administered intravenously once every 4 weeks as part of a Phase I study. Pharmacokinetic studies of the liposomal sum total CPT-11, released CPT-11, SN-38, SN-38G, 7-ethyl-10-[4-N-(5-aminopentanoic acid-1-piperidino]-carbonyloxycamptothecin, and 7-ethyl-10-[4-amino-1-piperidino]-carbonyloxycamptothecin in plasma were performed. Noncompartmental and compartmental pharmacokinetic analyses were conducted using pharmacokinetic data for sum total CPT-11. The pharmacokinetic variability of IHL-305 is associated with linear and nonlinear clearance. Patients whose age and body composition (ratio of total body weight to ideal body weight [TBW/IBW] were greater than the median age and TBW/IBW of the study had a 1.7-fold to 2.6-fold higher ratio of released CPT-11 area under the concentration versus time

  13. Ceftaroline pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsky, Emily E; Pereira, Luis M; Sullivan, Keri J; Wong, Alanna; McAdam, Alexander J; Sawicki, Gregory S; Priebe, Gregory P; Goobie, Susan M

    2017-11-02

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a prevalent pathogen in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) associated with increased morbidity. Ceftaroline fosamil is an intravenous (IV) cephalosporin with activity against MRSA. There are minimal data regarding dosing in the CF population. The objective of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of IV ceftaroline in patients with CF. We conducted a single-center prospective study of children and young adults with CF receiving ceftaroline (15mg/kg IV up to 600mg every 8h) as part of treatment for a CF pulmonary exacerbation between June 2016 and April 2017. Seven patients were enrolled for a total of 10 treatment courses. For each treatment course, up to 8 plasma samples were assayed for ceftaroline using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. Maximum plasma concentration, systemic clearance, and elimination half-life were calculated. The area under the curve (AUC) above the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the percent time above the MIC (%fT>MIC) were determined for each subject using MICs of 0.5, 1, and 2μg/mL and the measured MIC if available. The mean (SD) age for the 7 patients was 20.3 (8.0) years. Mean (SD) maximum plasma concentration of ceftaroline was 22.7 (9.6) μg/mL, systemic clearance 7.9 (3.3) L/h, and half-life 1.1 (0.4) hours. Using a MIC of 1 μg/mL, accepted as the MIC 90 of MRSA isolates, AUC above MIC mean (SD) was 53.6 (19.5) μg·h/mL, mean (SD) %fT>MIC was 75.7 (10.4), and all subjects had >60%fT>MIC. In this cohort of CF patients, mean ceftaroline half-life was 1.1h, which is notably lower than the general population. The dosing regimen studied, which exceeds the recommended dosing in the non-CF population, was adequate to achieve >60% time above the MIC in all patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Population Pharmacokinetics of Tenofovir in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients Taking Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Jullien, Vincent; Tréluyer, Jean-Marc; Rey, Elisabeth; Jaffray, Patrick; Krivine, Anne; Moachon, Laurence; Lillo-Le Louet, Agnès; Lescoat, Anne; Dupin, Nicolas; Salmon, Dominique; Pons, Gérard; Urien, Saïk

    2005-01-01

    The influence of renal function on tenofovir pharmacokinetics was investigated in 193 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients by the use of a population approach performed with the nonlinear mixed effects modeling program NONMEM. Tenofovir pharmacokinetics was well described by a two-compartment open model in which the absorption and the distribution rate constants are equal. Typical population estimates of apparent central distribution volume (Vc/F), peripheral distribution volu...

  15. Pemetrexed safety and pharmacokinetics in patients with third-space fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dickgreber, Nicolas J; Sorensen, Jens Benn; Paz-Ares, Luis G

    2010-01-01

    Pemetrexed is established as first-line treatment with cisplatin for malignant pleural mesothelioma and advanced nonsquamous non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and as single-agent second-line treatment for nonsquamous NSCLC. Because the structure and pharmacokinetics of pemetrexed are similar to ...

  16. Pemetrexed safety and pharmacokinetics in patients with third-space fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dickgreber, Nicolas J; Sørensen, Jens Benn; Paz-Ares, Luis G

    2010-01-01

    Pemetrexed is established as first-line treatment with cisplatin for malignant pleural mesothelioma and advanced nonsquamous non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and as single-agent second-line treatment for nonsquamous NSCLC. Because the structure and pharmacokinetics of pemetrexed are similar...

  17. Pharmacokinetics of Chemotherapeutic Drugs in Pediatric Patients With Down Syndrome and Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefti, Erik; Blanco, Javier G

    2016-05-01

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) have a 10- to 30-fold increased risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia or acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Patients with DS and leukemia are treated with the same chemotherapeutic agents as patients without DS. Treatment regimens for pediatric leukemia comprise multiple cytotoxic drugs including methotrexate, doxorubicin, vincristine, cytarabine, and etoposide. There have been reports of increased toxicity, as well as altered therapeutic outcomes in pediatric patients with DS and leukemia. This review is focused on the pharmacokinetics of cytotoxic drugs in pediatric patients with leukemia and DS. The available literature suggests that methotrexate and thioguanine display altered pharmacokinetic parameters in pediatric patients with DS. It has been hypothesized that the variable pharmacokinetics of these drugs may contribute to the increased incidence of treatment-related toxicities seen in DS. Data from a small number of studies suggest that the pharmacokinetics of vincristine, etoposide, doxorubicin, and busulfan are similar between patients with and without DS. Definitive conclusions regarding the pharmacokinetics of cytotoxic drugs in pediatric patients with leukemia and DS are difficult to reach due to limitations in the available studies.

  18. Sunitinib in urothelial cancer: clinical, pharmacokinetic, and immunohistochemical study of predictors of response.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, David J

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Sunitinib has activity in patients with metastatic urothelial cancer (UC), but most patients do not respond. OBJECTIVE: To identify predictors of response to sunitinib. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Seventy-seven patients with advanced UC received sunitinib on one of two schedules at a single institution. Blood pressure (BP), immunohistochemistry (IHC), and pharmacokinetic (PK) results were correlated with response to sunitinib. MEASUREMENTS: BP was assessed on day 1 and 28 of each cycle and on day 14 of cycle 1. IHC was performed on 55 samples from 38 cases using mammalian target of rapamycin and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway marker antibodies. Blood samples for PK analysis were collected from 15 patients at three time points. Response was assessed using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria. RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: Sunitinib-induced hypertension predicted improved response when hypertension was categorized as a discrete (p = 0.02) or continuous variable (p = 0.005 [systolic BP] and p = 0.007 [diastolic BP]). The odds ratio of response was 12.5 (95% confidence interval, 1.95-246.8) for grade 3\\/4 hypertension compared with grade 0. Response was associated with low HIF-1alpha expression in primary (p = 0.07) tissue. A nonstatistically significant trend was seen for an association between greater drug concentration and best response. A correlation between expression markers within the same pathways was identified, phosphorylated-4EBP1 and phosphorylated-S6 (p = 6.5 x 10(-9)), and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and HIF-1alpha (p = 0.008). Results are limited by small numbers. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical and molecular biomarkers of response to sunitinib may have clinical relevance and require prospective validation. There is an urgent need for predictive biomarkers to guide the management of UC.

  19. Population pharmacokinetics of tamsulosin hydrochloride in paediatric patients with neuropathic and non-neuropathic bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Yasuhiro; Tatami, Shinji; Yamamura, Norio; Tadayasu, Yusuke; Sarashina, Akiko; Liesenfeld, Karl-Heinz; Staab, Alexander; Schäfer, Hans-Günter; Ieiri, Ichiro; Higuchi, Shun

    2010-01-01

    AIMS The main objective of this study was to characterize the population pharmacokinetics of tamsulosin hydrochloride (HCl) in paediatric patients with neuropathic and non-neuropathic bladder. A secondary objective was to compare the pharmacokinetics in paediatric patients and adults. METHODS Tamsulosin HCl plasma concentrations in 1082 plasma samples from 189 paediatric patients (age range 2–16 years) were analyzed with NONMEM, applying a one compartment model with first-order absorption. Based on the principles of allometry, body weight was incorporated in the base model, along with fixed allometric exponents. Covariate analysis was performed by means of a stepwise forward inclusion and backward elimination procedure. Simulations based on the final model were used to compare the pharmacokinetics with those in adults. RESULTS Beside the priori-implemented body weight, only α1-acid glycoprotein had an effect on both apparent clearance and apparent volume of distribution. No other investigated covariates, including gender, age, race, patient population and concomitant therapy with anti-cholinergics, significantly affected the pharmacokinetics of tamsulosin HCl (P tamsulosin HCl in paediatric patients was established and it described the data well. There was no major difference in the pharmacokinetics of tamsulosin HCl between paediatric patients (age range 2–16 years) and adults when the effect of body weight was taken into consideration. PMID:20642551

  20. Population pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of cysteamine in nephropathic cystinosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouazza Naïm

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nephropathic cystinosis is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting in an impaired transport of cystine trough the lysosomal membrane causing an accumulation of free cystine in lysosomes. The only specific treatment for nephropathic cystinosis is cysteamine bitartrate. This study was aimed to describe the relationship between cysteamine plasma concentrations and white blood cell cystine levels, and to simulate an optimized administration scheme to improve the management of patients with cystinosis. Methods Cysteamine and cystine concentrations were measured in 69 nephropathic cystinosis patients. A total of 250 cysteamine plasma concentrations and 243 intracellular cystine concentrations were used to perform a population pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analysis. An optimized administration scheme was simulated in order to maintain cystine levels below 1 nmol half-cystine/mg of protein and to investigate the possibility of administrating the treatment less than 4 times a day (QID, recommended. The current dosing recommendations are 1.3 g/m2/day for less than 50 kg BW and 2 g/day thereafter; the maximum dose should not exceed 1.95 g/m2/day. Results Cysteamine concentrations were satisfactorily described by a one-compartment model. Parameter estimates were standardized for a mean standard bodyweight using an allometric model. WBC cystine levels were adequately described by an indirect response model where the first-order removal rate constant is stimulated by the cysteamine concentrations. Conclusions According to simulations, in order to increase the percentage of patient with cystine levels below 1 nmol half-cystine/mg of protein, the current dosages could be changed as follows: 80 mg/kg/day (QID from 10 to 17 kg, 70 mg/kg/day (QID from 17 to 25 kg, 60 mg/kg/day (QID from 25 to 40 kg and 50 mg/kg/day (QID from 40 to 70 kg (these dosages remain under the maximum recommended dose. However an 8-hourly daily treatment (TID

  1. Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Olmesartan, the Active Metabolite of Olmesartan Medoxomil, in Patients with Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodati, Devender; Kotakonda, Harish Kaushik; Yellu, Narsimhareddy

    2017-08-01

    Olmesartan medoxomil is an orally given angiotensin II receptor antagonist indicated for the treatment of hypertension. The aim of the study was to establish a population pharmacokinetic model for olmesartan, the active metabolite of olmesartan medoxomil, in Indian hypertensive patients, and to evaluate effects of covariates on the volume of distribution (V/F) and oral clearance (CL/F) of olmesartan. The population pharmacokinetic model for olmesartan was developed using Phoenix NLME 1.3 with a non-linear mixed-effect model. Bootstrap and visual predictive check were used simultaneously to validate the final population pharmacokinetic models. The covariates included age, sex, body surface area (BSA), bodyweight, height, creatinine clearance (CL CR ) as an index of renal function and liver parameters as indices of hepatic function. A total of 205 olmesartan plasma sample concentrations from 69 patients with hypertension were collected in this study. The pharmacokinetic data of olmesartan was well described by a two-compartment linear pharmacokinetic model with first-order absorption and an absorption lag-time. The mean values of CL/F and V/F of olmesartan in the patients were 0.31565 L/h and 44.5162 L, respectively. Analysis of covariates showed that age and CL CR were factors influencing the clearance of olmesartan and the volume of distribution of olmesartan was dependent on age and BSA. The final population pharmacokinetic model was demonstrated to be appropriate and effective and it can be used to assess the pharmacokinetic parameters of olmesartan in Indian patients with hypertension.

  2. A Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Mifepristone Combined with Enzalutamide in Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0021 TITLE: A Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Mifepristone Combined...Study of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Mifepristone Combined with Enzalutamide in Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER...receptor (AR) targeted therapies, prostate cancer adapts. One way it adapts is by upregulating another hormone receptor, the glucocorticoid receptor

  3. Quantification of metoprolol beta 2-adrenoceptor antagonism in asthmatic patients by pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braat, M. C.; Jonkers, R. E.; van Boxtel, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    An integrated pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model was used to quantify the beta 2-blocking activity of metoprolol in seven asthmatic patients. The patients received a subcutaneous dose of terbutaline on two consecutive days. On day 1 they were pretreated with placebo and on day 2 with metoprolol

  4. Effect of Administration Route on the Pharmacokinetics of Cobalamin in Elderly Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique P.H. Tillemans, PharmD

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: The pharmacokinetics of intranasal and intramuscular cobalamin administration in elderly, cobalamin-deficient patients differ significantly. However, the estimated 2% bioavailability of cobalamin after intranasal administration makes intranasal cobalamin administration a potentially interesting administration route for elderly patients. Netherlands Trial Registry identifier: NTR 3005.

  5. Safety and pharmacokinetics of the neuroprotective drug lubeluzole in patients with ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Keyser, J; Van De Velde, [No Value; Schellens, RLLA; Hantson, L; Tritsmans, L; Gheuens, J; Van Peer, A; Woestenborghs, R; Franke, CL; van Gorp, J

    1997-01-01

    A total of 22 patients with acute ischemic stroke participated in two randomized, single-masked, placebo-controlled studies that evaluated the safety and pharmacokinetics of single escalating intravenous doses of lubeluzole. The first dose of study medication in all patients was given within 6 hours

  6. Anxiety in cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Stark, D P H; House, A

    2000-01-01

    Anxiety is common in cancer patient populations, and must often initially be recognized and managed by cancer care professionals. This article reviews the recent oncology and mental health literature on anxiety. The aim is to help those involved in cancer patient care who are not specialists in mental health to understand the nature of anxiety, and discriminate morbid from normal anxiety. We review recent research into the association of anxiety with events during diagnosis and management of ...

  7. Depression in Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beyhan Bag

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It is not enough to consider treatment and care depression in the oncology that is the most common psychiatric illness in cancer patient affects of cancer treatment and the patient`s quality of life negatively, which is determined through researches in the field. With development of psycho-oncology it has been demonstrated to establish an important link between the cancer patient`s treatment as well as psycho-social support for the patient and psychiatric treatment and care for the if it is needed. With this connection between them it has been proposed to use of bio-psycho-social-model in cancer patient to improve their care. To achieve this goal, it is expected from medical personnel to realize patients psychosocial need und if he/she has a psychiatric disorders or syndromes. For the medical personnel that work in oncology services, it is inevitable to organize in order to raise the awareness of depression in the cancer patients. In the present study, it is focused on raising the awareness of depression in cancer patient for the medical personnel. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(2.000: 186-198

  8. Pharmacokinetically based estimation of patient compliance with oral anticancer chemotherapies: in silico evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hénin, Emilie; Tod, Michel; Trillet-Lenoir, Véronique; Rioufol, Catherine; Tranchand, Brigitte; Girard, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    More and more anticancer chemotherapies are now available as oral formulations. This relatively new route of administration in oncology leads to problems with patient education and non-compliance. The aim of this study was to explore the performances of the 'inverse problem', namely, estimation of compliance from pharmacokinetics. For this purpose, we developed and evaluated a method to estimate patient compliance with an oral chemotherapy in silico (i) from an a priori population pharmacokinetic model; (ii) with limited optimal pharmacokinetic information collected on day 1; and (iii) from a single pharmacokinetic sample collected after multiple doses. Population pharmacokinetic models, including estimation of all fixed and random effects estimated on a prior dataset, and sparse samples taken after the first dose, were combined to provide the individual POSTHOC Bayesian pharmacokinetic parameter estimates. Sampling times on day 1 were chosen according to a D-optimal design. Individual pharmacokinetic profiles were simulated according to various dose-taking scenarios. To characterize compliance over the n previous dosing times (supposedly known without error), 2n different compliance scenarios of doses taken/not taken were considered. The observed concentration value was compared with concentrations predicted from the model and each compliance scenario. To discriminate between different compliance profiles, we used the Euclidean distance between the observed pharmacokinetic values and the predicted values simulated without residual errors. This approach was evaluated in silico and applied to imatinib and capecitabine, the pharmacokinetics of which are described in the literature, and which have quite different pharmacokinetic characteristics (imatinib has an elimination half-life of 17 hours, and alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine [FBAL], the metabolite of capecitabine, has an elimination half-life of 3 hours). 1000 parameter sets were drawn according to population

  9. A population pharmacokinetic model of valproic acid in pediatric patients with epilepsy: a non-linear pharmacokinetic model based on protein-binding saturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Junjie; Wang, Yi; Lin, Weiwei; Wang, Changlian; Zhao, Limei; Li, Xingang; Zhao, Zhigang; Miao, Liyan; Jiao, Zheng

    2015-03-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) follows a non-linear pharmacokinetic profile in terms of protein-binding saturation. The total daily dose regarding VPA clearance is a simple power function, which may partially explain the non-linearity of the pharmacokinetic profile; however, it may be confounded by the therapeutic drug monitoring effect. The aim of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model for VPA based on protein-binding saturation in pediatric patients with epilepsy. A total of 1,107 VPA serum trough concentrations at steady state were collected from 902 epileptic pediatric patients aged from 3 weeks to 14 years at three hospitals. The population pharmacokinetic model was developed using NONMEM(®) software. The ability of three candidate models (the simple power exponent model, the dose-dependent maximum effect [DDE] model, and the protein-binding model) to describe the non-linear pharmacokinetic profile of VPA was investigated, and potential covariates were screened using a stepwise approach. Bootstrap, normalized prediction distribution errors and external evaluations from two independent studies were performed to determine the stability and predictive performance of the candidate models. The age-dependent exponent model described the effects of body weight and age on the clearance well. Co-medication with carbamazepine was identified as a significant covariate. The DDE model best fitted the aim of this study, although there were no obvious differences in the predictive performances. The condition number was less than 500, and the precision of the parameter estimates was less than 30 %, indicating stability and validity of the final model. The DDE model successfully described the non-linear pharmacokinetics of VPA. Furthermore, the proposed population pharmacokinetic model of VPA can be used to design rational dosage regimens to achieve desirable serum concentrations.

  10. Quinine pharmacokinetics: ototoxic and cardiotoxic effects in healthy Caucasian subjects and in patients with falciparum malaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessen, F. A.; van Boxtel, C. J.; Perenboom, R. M.; Tange, R. A.; Wetsteijn, J. C.; Kager, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    To study the pharmacokinetic behaviour of quinine in Caucasians with and without malaria. Quinine-dihydrochloride was administered intravenously as a single dose of 300 mg to 12 healthy subjects and as multiple doses of 600 mg in 4 h every 8 h in 10 patients with falciparum malaria. Plasma quinine

  11. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of propofol : Changes in patients with frontal brain tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sahinovic, M. M.; Eleveld, D. J.; Miyabe-Nishiwaki, T.; Struys, M. M. R. F.; Absalom, A. R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Models of propofol pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics developed in patients without brain pathology are widely used for target-controlled infusion (TCI) during brain tumour excision operations. The goal of this study was to determine if the presence of a frontal brain tumour

  12. Efficacy and pharmacokinetics of intravenous paracetamol in the critically ill patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samson, A.D.; Hunfeld, N.G.; Touw, D.J.; Melief, P.H.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Paracetamol (PCM) is a drug with analgesic and antipyretic properties. Despite its frequent use, little is known about its efficacy and pharmacokinetics (PK) when intravenously administered in the critically ill patient. A previous study suggests that therapeutic concentrations are not

  13. Pharmacokinetically guided sunitinib dosing: a feasibility study in patients with advanced solid tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lankheet, N.; Kloth, J.S.; Gadellaa-van Hooijdonk, C.G.M.; Cirkel, G.A.; Mathijssen, R.H.; Lolkema, M.P.; Schellens, J.H.; Voest, E.E.; Sleijfer, S.; Jonge, M.J. de; Haanen, J.B.; Beijnen, J.H.; Huitema, A.D.; Steeghs, N.

    2014-01-01

    Background:Plasma exposure of sunitinib shows large inter-individual variation. Therefore, a pharmacokinetic (PK) study was performed to determine safety and feasibility of sunitinib dosing based on PK levels.Methods:Patients were treated with sunitinib 37.5 mg once daily. At days 15 and 29 of

  14. Pharmacokinetics of doripenem in infected patients treated within and outside the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalodi, Amira A; Keel, Rebecca A; Quintiliani, Richard; Lodise, Thomas P; Nicolau, David P; Kuti, Joseph L

    2013-05-01

    Doripenem often is used in the intensive care unit (ICU) to treat serious infections. However, pharmacokinetics in this population often are altered by various physiologic changes. Current pharmacokinetic data in critically ill patients receiving doripenem are limited. To determine the pharmacokinetics of doripenem in patients treated in the ICU versus outside the ICU. A total of 3-4 serum samples were collected from 25 infected patients receiving doripenem. A 2-compartment model was fit to serum pharmacokinetic data with nonparametric adaptive grid with adaptive γ. In the structural pharmacokinetic model, clearance (Cl) was made proportional to creatinine clearance (CrCl) and an intercept term. Bayesian pharmacokinetic parameters were compared between the 2 populations. A 5000-patient Monte Carlo simulation was performed for various CrCl ranges. The probability of pharmacodynamic target attainment was calculated over a range of minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs), assuming a target of 35% of the dosing interval that unbound drug concentrations remain above the MIC. Mean (range) age, body mass index, and CrCl were 61 (31-90) years, 31.2 (15.1-55.5) kg/m(2), and 86 (15-221) mL/min, respectively. After the Bayesian step, r(2), bias, and precision were 0.97, 0.04, and 1.44 μg/mL, respectively. Mean (SD) parameters for ICU (n = 13) and non-ICU (n = 12) patients were not significantly different (p > 0.05): volume of central compartment (17.3 [11.2] vs 18.5 [11.7] L), Cl (10.1 [10.2] vs 15.5 [16.9] L/h), k12 (4.7 [4.7] vs 4.7 [4.8] h(-1)), and k21 (7.1 [5.5] vs 5.7 [5.3] h(-1)), respectively. Optimal target attainments were obtained for patients with normal renal function up to MICs of 2 μg/mL with a dose of 500 mg every 8 hours as 1-hour and 4-hour infusions. Doripenem pharmacokinetics were similar between ICU and non-ICU patients in this population. Optimal dosing regimens should be selected based on underlying renal function and suspected MIC of the infecting

  15. A population pharmacokinetic analysis of the influence of nutritional status of digoxin in hospitalized Korean patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo An; Yun, Hwi-yeol; Lee, Eun Sook; Shin, Wan Gyoon

    2014-03-01

    Safe and effective use of digoxin in hospitalized populations requires information about the drug's pharmacokinetics and the influence of various factors on drug disposition. However, no attempts have been made to link an individual's digoxin requirements with nutritional status. The main goal of this study was to estimate the population pharmacokinetics of digoxin and to identify the nutritional status that explains pharmacokinetic variability in hospitalized Korean patients. Routine therapeutic drug-monitoring data from 106 patients who received oral digoxin at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital were retrospectively collected. The pharmacokinetics of digoxin were analyzed with a 1-compartment, open-label pharmacokinetic model by using a nonlinear mixed-effects modeling tool (NONMEM) and a multiple trough screening approach. The effect of demographic characteristics and biochemical and nutritional indices were explored. Estimates generated by using NONMEM indicated that the CL/F of digoxin was influenced by renal function, serum potassium, age, and percentage of ideal body weight (PIBW). These influences could be modeled by following the equation CL/F (L/h) = 1.36 × (creatinine clearance/50)(1.580) × K(0.835) × 0.055 × (age/65) × (PIBW/100)(0.403). The interindividual %CV for CL/F was 34.3%, and the residual variability (SD) between observed and predicted concentrations was 0.225 μg/L. The median estimates from a bootstrap procedure were comparable and within 5% of the estimates from NONMEM. Correlation analysis with the validation group showed a linear correlation between observed and predicted values. The use of this model in routine therapeutic drug monitoring requires that certain conditions be met which are consistent with the conditions of the subpopulations in the present study. Therefore, further studies are needed to clarify the effects of nutritional status on digoxin pharmacokinetics. The present study established important sources of

  16. Phase I, pharmacokinetic and biological correlative study of OSI-7904L, a novel liposomal thymidylate synthase inhibitor, and cisplatin in patients with solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricart, Alejandro D; Berlin, Jordan D; Papadopoulos, Kyriakos P; Syed, Samira; Drolet, Daniel W; Quaratino-Baker, Charlotte; Horan, Julie; Chick, Jon; Vermeulen, Wendy; Tolcher, Anthony W; Rowinsky, Eric K; Rothenberg, Mace L

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate the safety and describe the pharmacokinetic profile of OSI-7904L, a novel liposomal thymidylate synthase inhibitor, in combination with cisplatin (CDDP) in adults with advanced solid tumors. CDDP was administered as a 2-h intravenous infusion followed by OSI-7904L intravenously over 30 min, both given every 3 weeks. Doses of each drug were escalated in separate cohorts of patients. Five dose levels of CDDP/OSI-7904L were explored: 60/6, 60/9, 60/12, 60/7.5, and 75/7.5 mg/m2. Pharmacokinetic samples, baseline plasma homocysteine, and genotype polymorphisms were evaluated. Twenty-seven patients were treated with 101 total courses of CDDP/OSI-7904L. Dose-limiting toxicity was observed in 2 patients in the CDDP/OSI-7904L 60/12 mg/m2 cohort. One patient experienced rash, stomatitis, dehydration, renal failure, hyperbilirubinemia, and fatal neutropenic sepsis, whereas the other patient experienced grade 3 nausea, vomiting, and ileus. Therefore, the CDDP/OSI-7904L 60/9 mg/m2 cohort was expanded, with 2 of 6 patients reporting significant fatigue. Other toxicities were mild or moderate. Intermediate dose levels of 60/7.5 and 75/7.5 mg/m2 were evaluated, and the latter was identified as the recommended dose for phase II studies. No major pharmacokinetic interactions between CDDP and OSI-7904L were observed. Three patients had partial responses (gastric adenocarcinoma and heavily pretreated breast cancer). There was no significant relationship between baseline homocysteine and toxicity. The recommended doses for CDDP and OSI-7904L administered once every 3 weeks are 75 and 7.5 mg/m2, respectively. Pharmacokinetic interaction between the agents was not apparent. Preliminary clinical activity was observed in breast and gastric cancer.

  17. Pharmacokinetics of metformin in patients with gastrointestinal intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mccreight, Laura J.; Stage, Tore B.; Connelly, Paul

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: Metformin intolerance symptoms are gastrointestinal in nature, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to assess potential causes of metformin intolerance including: altered metformin uptake from the intestine; increased anaerobic glucose utilisation...... and subsequent lactate production; altered serotonin uptake; and altered bile acid pool. METHODS: This pharmacokinetic study recruited ten severely intolerant and ten tolerant individuals matched for age, sex and BMI. A single 500mg dose of metformin was administered, with blood sampling at eleven time points...... over 24 hours. Blood samples were analysed for metformin, lactate, serotonin, and bile acid concentrations and compared across the phenotypes. RESULTS: The intolerant individuals were severely intolerant to 500mg metformin. No significant difference was identified between tolerant and intolerant...

  18. Population Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Meropenem in Nonobese, Obese, and Morbidly Obese Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eun Kyoung; Cheatham, S Christian; Fleming, Megan R; Healy, Daniel P; Kays, Michael B

    2017-03-01

    The study objective was to evaluate meropenem population pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in nonobese, obese, and morbidly obese patients. Forty adult patients-11 nonobese (body mass index [BMI] calculate probability of target attainment (PTA) for 5 dosing regimens, infused over 0.5 and 3 hours, using fT>MIC of 40%, 54%, and 100% of the dosing interval. A 2-compartment linear-elimination model best described the serum concentration-time data, and creatinine clearance was significantly associated with systemic clearance. Pharmacokinetic parameters were not significantly different among patient groups. In patients with creatinine clearances ≥50 mL/min, all simulated dosing regimens achieved >90% PTA at 40% fT>MIC in all patient groups at MICs ≤2 mg/L. Only 500 mg q8h, infused over 0.5 hour, did not achieve >90% PTA at 54% fT>MIC in nonobese and morbidly obese patients. At 100% fT>MIC, 1 g q6h and 2 g q8h, infused over 3 hours, reliably achieved >90% PTA in all patient groups. Meropenem pharmacokinetics are comparable among nonobese, obese, and morbidly obese patients. Standard dosing regimens provide adequate pharmacodynamic exposures for susceptible pathogens at 40% and 54% fT>MIC, but prolonged infusions of larger doses are needed for adequate exposures at 100% fT>MIC. Dosage adjustments based solely on body weight are unnecessary. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  19. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of In-111-labeled Stealth{reg_sign} liposomes in patients with solid tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, K.J.; Peters, A.M.; Mohammadtaghi, S. [Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    The use of liposomal doxorubicin yields response rates of up to 70-80% in patients with AIDS-related Kaposi`s sarcoma with favourable alteration of the toxicity profile of the drug. Liposomal delivery of therapy in patients with solid cancers is currently under investigation. Our aim is to determine the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of In-111-labeled Stealth{reg_sign} liposomes (SEQUUS{trademark}) liposomes (SEQUUS{trademark} Pharmaceuticals Inc., Menlo Park, USA) in patients with advanced solid malignant tumours. Ten patients (4 male, 6 female) with a median age of 59 (range 43 - 75) received 100 MBq of In-111-labeled Stealth{reg_sign} liposomes. Four had breast cancer, 3 head and neck tumours, 2 lung and 1 cervical cancer. Blood samples and whole body gamma camera images were obtained at 0.5, 4, 24, 48, 72, 96 and 240 hours after injection and sequential 24 hour urine collections were performed for the first 96 h. SPECT imaging was performed when indicated. High definition images of tumours were obtained in 9 patients (3/4 breast, 3/3 head and neck, 2/2 lung and 1/1 cervix cancers). One patient (breast cancer) had negative images. The median cumulative urinary excretion of In-111 over the first 96 h was 17.8 (range 3.5-21.3) % of the injected dose. The uptake of liposomes in various tissues was estimated from regions of interest on the whole body images. Prominent uptake was seen in the liver (10-15% of injected dose), lungs (4-9%) and spleen (2-8%). Tumour uptake in the first 96 h varied form 0.5-4% of the injected dose. This is approximately 10 fold higher than might be expected from experience with other targeting methods (eg monoclonal antibodies). These data confirm that Stealth liposomes have a prolonged circulation half-life and localise to solid tumour tissue.

  20. [Depression in cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperner-Unterweger, Barbara

    2015-08-01

    Cancer patients often suffer from major depression or depressive syndromes. Although it is well known that depressive symptoms can appear at any time during the course of an oncological disease, certain periods for instance time after diagnosis carry a higher risk. Reported prevalence rates differ widely (up to 60%), reflecting also diagnostic difficulties. Oncologists recognize depression in their patients only in 15 to 50% and the percentage of patients who receive adequate therapy is even lower. Consequently, this leads to a reduced quality of life. Furthermore, impaired compliance/adherence and consequently a poorer prognosis of the oncological disease are discussed in this context. It should be also emphasized, that concomitant depression increases the risk of suicide in cancer patients. Although the number of clinical trials using either psychotherapy or antidepressant medication for the therapy of depression in cancer patients is limited, good therapeutic options are available.

  1. Comparison of pharmacokinetic MRI and [{sup 18}F] fluorodeoxyglucose PET in the diagnosis of breast cancer: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brix, G. [Research Program ' ' Radiological Diagnostics and Therapy' ' , German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Dept. of Medical Radiation Hygiene, Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Henze, M. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Knopp, M.V.; Doll, J.; Hawighorst, H. [Research Program ' ' Radiological Diagnostics and Therapy' ' , German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Lucht, R. [Dept. of Medical Radiation Hygiene, Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Junkermann, H. [Dept. of Gynaecological Radiology, Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany); Haberkorn, U. [Research Program ' ' Radiological Diagnostics and Therapy' ' , German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    It was the aim of this methodology-oriented clinical pilot study to compare the potential of dynamic MRI and 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) for the detection and characterization of breast cancer. Fourteen women with suspicious breast lesions were examined. The MRI data were acquired with a turbo fast low-angle shot sequence and analyzed using a pharmacokinetic model. Emission data were detected in the sensitive 3D modus, iteratively reconstructed, and superimposed onto corresponding transmission images. In the 14 patients, 13 breast masses with a suspicious contrast enhancement and FDG uptake were detected. For these lesions, no statistically significant correlation between evaluated MR and PET parameters was found. Of the 9 histologically confirmed carcinomas, 8 were correctly characterized with MRI and PET. Two inflammatory lesions were concordantly classified as cancer. Moreover, dynamic MRI yielded another false-positive finding. In 6 patients, PET detected occult lymph node and/or distant metastases. Although both functional imaging techniques provide independent tissue information, the results concerning the diagnosis of primary breast lesions were almost identical. An advantage of PET, however, is its ability to localize lymph node involvement and distant metastases as an integral part of the examination. (orig.)

  2. Comparison of pharmacokinetic MRI and [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose PET in the diagnosis of breast cancer: initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brix, G.; Henze, M.; Knopp, M.V.; Doll, J.; Hawighorst, H.; Lucht, R.; Junkermann, H.; Haberkorn, U.

    2001-01-01

    It was the aim of this methodology-oriented clinical pilot study to compare the potential of dynamic MRI and 2-[ 18 F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) for the detection and characterization of breast cancer. Fourteen women with suspicious breast lesions were examined. The MRI data were acquired with a turbo fast low-angle shot sequence and analyzed using a pharmacokinetic model. Emission data were detected in the sensitive 3D modus, iteratively reconstructed, and superimposed onto corresponding transmission images. In the 14 patients, 13 breast masses with a suspicious contrast enhancement and FDG uptake were detected. For these lesions, no statistically significant correlation between evaluated MR and PET parameters was found. Of the 9 histologically confirmed carcinomas, 8 were correctly characterized with MRI and PET. Two inflammatory lesions were concordantly classified as cancer. Moreover, dynamic MRI yielded another false-positive finding. In 6 patients, PET detected occult lymph node and/or distant metastases. Although both functional imaging techniques provide independent tissue information, the results concerning the diagnosis of primary breast lesions were almost identical. An advantage of PET, however, is its ability to localize lymph node involvement and distant metastases as an integral part of the examination. (orig.)

  3. Population Pharmacokinetics of an Indian F(ab')2 Snake Antivenom in Patients with Russell's Viper (Daboia russelii) Bites

    OpenAIRE

    Isbister, Geoffrey K.; Maduwage, Kalana; Saiao, Ana; Buckley, Nicholas A.; Jayamanne, Shaluka F.; Seyed, Shahmy; Mohamed, Fahim; Chathuranga, Umesh; Alexandre, Mendes; Abeysinghe, Chandana; Karunathilake, Harinda; Gawarammana, Indika; Lalloo, David; Janaka de Silva, H.

    2015-01-01

    Background\\ud \\ud There is limited information on antivenom pharmacokinetics. This study aimed to investigate the pharmacokinetics of an Indian snake antivenom in humans with Russell’s viper bites.\\ud \\ud Methods/Principal Findings\\ud \\ud Patient data and serial blood samples were collected from patients with Russell’s viper (Daboia russelii) envenoming in Sri Lanka. All patients received Indian F(ab’)2 snake antivenom manufactured by VINS Bioproducts Ltd. Antivenom concentrations were measur...

  4. Mefloquine pharmacokinetics and mefloquine-artesunate effectiveness in Peruvian patients with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quezada Wilmer

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT is recommended as a means of prolonging the effectiveness of first-line malaria treatment regimens. Different brands of mefloquine (MQ have been reported to be non-bioequivalent; this could result in sub-therapeutic levels of mefloquine with decreased efficacy. In 2002, mefloquine-artesunate (MQ-AS combination therapy was adopted as the first-line treatment for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in the Amazon region of Peru. Although MQ resistance has yet to be reported from the Peruvian Amazon, it has been reported from other countries in the Amazon Region. Therefore, continuous monitoring is warranted to ensure that the first-line therapy remains efficacious. This study examines the in vivo efficacy and pharmacokinetic parameters through Day 56 of three commercial formulations of MQ (Lariam®, Mephaquin®, and Mefloquina-AC® Farma given in combination with artesunate. Methods Thirty-nine non-pregnant adults with P. falciparum mono-infection were randomly assigned to receive artesunate in combination with either (1 Lariam, (2 Mephaquin, or (3 Mefloquina AC. Patients were assessed on Day 0 (with blood samples for pharmacokinetics at 0, 2, 4, and 8 hours, 1, 2, 3, 7, and then weekly until day 56. Clinical and parasitological outcomes were based on the standardized WHO protocol. Whole blood mefloquine concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography and pharmacokinetic parameters were determined using non-compartmental analysis of concentration versus time data. Results By day 3, all patients had cleared parasitaemia except for one patient in the AC Farma arm; this patient cleared by day 4. No recurrences of parasitaemia were seen in any of the 34 patients. All three MQ formulations had a terminal half-life of 14–15 days and time to maximum plasma concentration of 45–52 hours. The maximal concentration (Cmax and interquartile range was 2,820 ng

  5. ZD0473 pharmacokinetics in Japanese patients: a Phase I dose-escalation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, H; Tamura, T; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, N; Ueda, Y; Shimoyama, T; Saijo, N

    2002-12-01

    ZD0473 is new platinum agent that was rationally designed to circumvent platinum resistance and reduce the potential for nephro-and neurotoxicity. This Phase I dose-escalating study investigated the pharmacokinetics, tolerability and efficacy of ZD0473 in Japanese patients with solid, refractory tumours. ZD0473 was administered as a 1-h intravenous infusion every 3 weeks. Nine patients received a total of 16 cycles of ZD0473 (median 1 cycle/patient), with 3 patients treated at each of 3 doses (60, 90, 120 mg/m2). The maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) and the area under the concentration-time curve to infinity (AUC(0-infinity)) increased with dose in a linear fashion for both total platinum and ZD0473 in plasma ultrafiltrate, suggesting that the pharmacokinetics of ZD0473 are linear. Haematological and non-haematological toxicities such as nausea and vomiting were mild (grade 1 or 2) and transient. No clinically significant nephro-, oto- or neurotoxicity was observed. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was not observed and the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was not identified. ZD0473 treatment showed evidence of disease stabilisation in 3 patients (33%). In conclusion, ZD0473 appears to have linear pharmacokinetics, and an acceptable tolerability profile at doses up to 120 mg/m2 in Japanese patients with refractory solid malignancies. Following evaluation of the data from all the Western trials, the ZD0473 development programme changed and this Japanese trial was stopped.

  6. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of propofol: changes in patients with frontal brain tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahinovic, M M; Eleveld, D J; Miyabe-Nishiwaki, T; Struys, M M R F; Absalom, A R

    2017-06-01

    Models of propofol pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics developed in patients without brain pathology are widely used for target-controlled infusion (TCI) during brain tumour excision operations. The goal of this study was to determine if the presence of a frontal brain tumour influences propofol pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and existing PK-PD model performance. Twenty patients with a frontal brain tumour and 20 control patients received a propofol infusion to achieve an induction-emergence-induction anaesthetic sequence. Propofol plasma concentration was measured every 4 min and at each transition of the conscious state. Bispectral index (BIS) values were continuously recorded. We used non-linear mixed-effects modelling to analyse the effects of the presence of a brain tumour on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of propofol. Subsequently we calculated the predictive performance of Marsh, Schnider, and Eleveld models in terms of median prediction error (MdPE) and median absolute prediction error (MdAPE). Patients with brain tumours showed 40% higher propofol clearance than control patients. Performance of the Schnider model (MdPEpk -20.0%, MdAPEpk 23.4%) and Eleveld volunteer model (MdPEpk -8.58%, MdAPEpk 21.6%) were good. The Marsh model performed less well (MdPEpk -14.3%, MdAPEpk 41.4%), as did the Eleveld patient model (MdPEpk -30.8%, MdAPEpk 32.1%). Brain tumours might alter the pharmacokinetics of propofol. Caution should be exerted when using propofol TCI in patients with frontal brain tumours due to higher clearance. NCT01060631. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  7. Pharmacokinetics and efficacy of PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin in an intracranial model of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carey K Anders

    Full Text Available Breast cancer brain metastases (BCBM are a challenging consequence of advanced BC. Nanoparticle agents, including liposomes, have shown enhanced delivery to solid tumors and brain. We compared pharmacokinetics (PK and efficacy of PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD with non-liposomal doxorubicin (NonL-doxo in an intracranial model of BC.Athymic mice were inoculated intracerebrally with MDA-MB-231-BR-luciferase-expressing cells. Tumor-bearing mice were administered PLD or NonL-doxo at 6 mg/kg IV × 1 and were euthanized prior to and 0.083, 1, 3, 6, 24, 72 and 96 h post-treatment. Samples were processed to measure sum total doxorubicin via HPLC. PLD and NonL-doxo were administered IV weekly as single agents (6 mg/kg or in combination (4.5 mg/kg with the PARP inhibitor, ABT-888, PO 25 mg/kg/day. Efficacy was assessed by survival and bioluminescence.Treatment with PLD resulted in approximately 1,500-fold higher plasma and 20-fold higher intracranial tumor sum total doxorubicin AUC compared with NonL-doxo. PLD was detected at 96 h; NonL-doxo was undetectable after 24 h in plasma and tumor. Median survival of PLD-treated animals was 32 days (d, [CI] 31-38, which was significantly longer than controls (26d [CI 25-28]; p = 0.0012 or NonL-doxo treatment (23.5d [CI 18-28], p = 0.0002. Combination treatment with PLD/ABT-888 yielded improved survival compared to NonL-doxo/ABT-888 (35d [CI 31-38] versus 29.5d [CI 25-34]; p = 0.006.PLD provides both PK and efficacy advantage over NonL-doxo in the treatment of an in vivo model of BCBM. The results provide preclinical rationale to translate findings into early phase trials of PLD, with or without ABT-888, for patients with BCBM.

  8. Nalmefene to prevent epidural narcotic side effects in pediatric patients: a pharmacokinetic and safety study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, D A; Morris, J L; Rosen, K R; Nelson, E R; Steelman, R J; Gustafson, R A; Wilhelm, J A; Chang, C T; Thackara, J W; Frye, R F

    2000-07-01

    To determine the pharmacokinetics and preliminary efficacy of nalmefene in children in preventing epidural-induced narcotic side effects. Double-blind, placebo-controlled study. University-affiliated children's hospital. Thirty-four children (aged 2-12 yrs) undergoing cardiothoracic surgery with epidural anesthesia. Patients were randomized to receive intravenous bolus nalmefene 1 microg/kg or placebo. Six blood samples (one before nalmefene administration and five from 13 randomly designated time points) from each patient were assayed to determine plasma nalmefene concentrations. Patients were assessed for pain, nausea, vomiting, and urinary retention for 24 hours after administration. Concentration-time data were analyzed by a limited sampling strategy with adult pharmacokinetic parameters used as Bayesian priors. A two-compartment, first-order model was fitted to the data using ADAPT II. Pharmacokinetic parameter estimates in these patients were similar to values reported in adults. The initial disposition half-life (t(1/2alpha)) was 0.36+/-0.11 hour, the terminal elimination half-life (t(1/2beta)) 8.7+/-2.3 hours, clearance 0.729+/-0.172 L/kg/hr, and steady-state volume of distribution 7.21+/-2.49 L/kg. Ability to prevent epidural narcotic-induced side effects could not be documented at the 1-microg/kg dose. No statistically significant differences were noted between study and placebo groups with regard to pain, nausea, vomiting, or urinary retention. Nalmefene has similar pharmacokinetics in children as in adults. It was administered safely to these patients and did not produce unmanageable pain.

  9. Pharmacokinetics of Peramivir in an Adolescent Patient Receiving Continuous Venovenous Hemodiafiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Ryan C; Witcher, Robert; Cies, Jeffrey J; Moore, Wayne S; Chopra, Arun

    2017-01-01

    Critically ill patients requiring renal replacement therapy commonly experience pharmacokinetic alterations. This case report describes the pharmacokinetics of peramivir (Rapivab, BioCryst Pharmaceuticals, Inc, Durham, NC), the first US Food and Drug Administration-approved intravenous neuraminidase inhibitor for the treatment of influenza, in an adolescent patient receiving continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). A 49.5-kg, 17-year-old Caucasian female presented with fever, cough, and persistent hypoxia. She quickly progressed to acute respiratory and renal failure in the setting of viral septic shock as a result of a severe influenza H1N1 infection. On hospital day 3, therapy was switched from oseltamivir (Tamiflu, Roche Laboratories Inc, Nutley, NJ) to peramivir owing to the concern for inadequate enteral absorption. On the third day of peramivir treatment, at a dose of 200 mg daily, peramivir serum concentrations revealed a smaller peak concentration, larger volumes of distribution, similar 24-hour area under the curve, and a shorter half-life as compared to adult patients with normal renal function. This illustrated the significant differences in pharmacokinetics when administered in the setting of CRRT. The patient had resolution of viral infection as evidenced by negative respiratory viral panel polymerase chain reaction at hospital day 14 and was eventually discharged at her baseline.

  10. [Physiotherapy of cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Izabella; Szekanecz, Éva; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Bender, Tamás

    2016-07-01

    Physiotherapy of cancer patients is one of the most controversial issues in our country. Malignant diseases are firstly mentioned as a contraindication of physiotherapy. Until now, physiotherapy was not suggested (or only in limited accessibility) for those patients who had malignant disease in medical history. International medical practice was less restrictive in managing this topic. The development of imaging techniques put this question in a new light. On the basis of evidence, the majority of articles have reported beneficial effects of physiotherapy in cancer patients, and only few articles mentioned it as harmful. Of course, each patient requires an individual assessment, however, if we exclude the possibility of tumor recurrence and metastasis, most of physiotherapy procedures can be used safely. One of the aims of this review is to support the physicians' decisions when to prescribe treatments, in such a way, that more patients could receive physiotherapy. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(31), 1224-1231.

  11. Pharmacokinetics of Isoniazid, Pyrazinamide, and Ethambutol in newly diagnosed pulmonary TB patients in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denti, Paolo; Jeremiah, Kidola; Chigutsa, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to lower-than-therapeutic levels of anti-tuberculosis drugs is likely to cause selection of resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and treatment failure. The first-line anti-tuberculosis (TB) regimen consists of rifampicin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol, and correct...... management reduces risk of TB relapse and development of drug resistance. In this study we aimed to investigate the effect of standard of care plus nutritional supplementation versus standard care on the pharmacokinetics of isoniazid, pyrazinamide and ethambutol among sputum smear positive TB patients...... with and without HIV. In a clinical trial in 100 Tanzanian TB patients, with or without HIV infection, drug concentrations were determined at 1 week and 2 months post initiation of anti-TB medication. Data was analysed using population pharmacokinetic modelling. The effect of body size was described using...

  12. Pharmacokinetic study of anidulafungin in ICU patients with intra-abdominal candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, H; Massias, L; Jung, B; Ammenouche, N; Montravers, P

    2017-05-01

    Only limited pharmacokinetic data are available for anidulafungin in ICU patients, especially in patients treated for severe intra-abdominal infection (IAI). This was a prospective multicentre observational study in ICU patients with suspected yeast IAI. All patients received an intravenous loading dose of 200 mg of anidulafungin, followed by 100 mg/day. Thirteen blood samples were drawn between day 1 and day 5 for pharmacokinetic analysis. Samples were analysed by an HPLC-tandem MS method. Demographics and SAPS2 and SOFA scores were recorded. Fourteen patients with a median age (IQR) of 62 years (48-70) and with a mean BMI of 30.5 kg/m 2 were included from three centres; 57.1% were women. Their median (IQR) SAPS2 score was 54 (45-67) and their median (IQR) SOFA score was 8 (7-12). Six patients with community-acquired IAI and eight patients with nosocomial-acquired IAI were included. Twelve yeasts were isolated: six Candida albicans , two Candida glabrata , two Candida tropicalis , one Candida parapsilosis and one Candida krusei . Pharmacokinetic parameters were as follows [mean (% coefficient of variation)]: C max (mg/L) = 6.0 (29%); T max (h) = 1.6 (25.8%); C min (mg/L) = 3.2 (36.8%); AUC 0-24 (mg·h/L) = 88.9 (38.6%); t 1/2 (h) = 42.1 (68.2%); CL (L/h) = 1.2 (42.3%); and V (L) = 72.8 (87.8%). A two-compartment model best described the anidulafungin concentrations in the population pharmacokinetic study. The pharmacokinetic parameters of anidulafungin in critically ill ICU patients with complicated IAI are similar to those observed in the literature. However, an increased V and a longer t 1/2 were observed in this study. (EudraCT No. 2010-018695-25). © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Safety, pharmacokinetics, and antitumor properties of anlotinib, an oral multi-target tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in patients with advanced refractory solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongkun Sun

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anlotinib is a novel multi-target tyrosine kinase inhibitor that is designed to primarily inhibit VEGFR2/3, FGFR1-4, PDGFR α/β, c-Kit, and Ret. We aimed to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics, and antitumor activity of anlotinib in patients with advanced refractory solid tumors. Methods Anlotinib (5–16 mg was orally administered in patients with solid tumor once a day on two schedules: (1 four consecutive weeks (4/0 or (2 2-week on/1-week off (2/1. Pharmacokinetic sampling was performed in all patients. Twenty-one patients were further enrolled in an expanded cohort study on the recommended dose and schedule. Preliminary tumor response was also assessed. Results On the 4/0 schedule, dose-limiting toxicity (DLT was grade 3 hypertension at 10 mg. On the 2/1 schedule, DLT was grade 3 hypertension and grade 3 fatigue at 16 mg. Pharmacokinetic assessment indicated that anlotinib had long elimination half-lives and significant accumulation during multiple oral doses. The 2/1 schedule was selected, with 12 mg once daily as the maximum tolerated dose for the expanding study. Twenty of the 21 patients (with colon adenocarcinoma, non-small cell lung cancer, renal clear cell cancer, medullary thyroid carcinoma, and soft tissue sarcoma were assessable for antitumor activity of anlotinib: 3 patients had partial response, 14 patients had stable disease including 12 tumor burden shrinkage, and 3 had disease progression. The main serious adverse effects were hypertension, triglyceride elevation, hand-foot skin reaction, and lipase elevation. Conclusions At the dose of 12 mg once daily at the 2/1 schedule, anlotinib displayed manageable toxicity, long circulation, and broad-spectrum antitumor potential, justifying the conduct of further studies.

  14. Population Pharmacokinetics of Valproic Acid in Patients with Mania: Implication for Individualized Dosing Regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methaneethorn, Janthima

    2017-06-01

    This study characterized the population pharmacokinetic properties of valproic acid in patients with mania and determined potential factors that affect the pharmacokinetic properties of valproic acid in this population. Routine therapeutic drug monitoring of valproic acid concentrations, demographic data, and concomitant medications from 206 hospitalized patients with mania were retrospectively collected from Somdet Chaopraya Institute of Psychiatry and Srithanya Hospital, Thailand. Nonlinear mixed-effect modeling was used for data analysis. Covariate model building was conducted using stepwise forward addition and stepwise backward elimination. The final model was evaluated using bootstrap analysis and normalized prediction distribution error. The results were compared with those previously reported in patients with epilepsy given that there is an evidence of a difference in valproic acid clearance between patients with mania and those with epilepsy. Valproic acid data were adequately described by a 1-compartment model. Significant predictors for valproic acid clearance included valproic acid dose and weight. The population estimates for valproic acid CL/F and V/F were 0.464 L/h and 23.3 L, respectively. Valproic acid clearance obtained from this study did not seem to be significantly different from that of patients with epilepsy. A qualified population pharmacokinetic model for valproic acid in patients with mania was developed. This model could be used to optimize valproic acid therapy in patients with mania. Valproic acid clearance could be predicted from valproic acid dose and weight of patients. This predicted clearance can subsequently be used for individualization of optimum valproic acid maintenance dose. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Phase I Population Pharmacokinetic Assessment of the Oral Bromodomain Inhibitor OTX015 in Patients with Haematologic Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odore, Elodie; Lokiec, François; Cvitkovic, Esteban; Bekradda, Mohamed; Herait, Patrice; Bourdel, Fabrice; Kahatt, Carmen; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Stathis, Anastasios; Thieblemont, Catherine; Quesnel, Bruno; Cunningham, David; Riveiro, Maria E; Rezaï, Keyvan

    2016-03-01

    OTX015 (MK-8628) is a novel inhibitor of the bromodomain and extraterminal (BET)-bromodomain (BRD) protein family, binding specifically to bromodomains BRD2/3/4 and impacting the epigenetic regulation of several oncogenes. We characterized the pharmacokinetics of this first-in-class BET-BRD inhibitor administered as a single agent, including population pharmacokinetic modelling. A dose-escalation, phase Ib study was performed with oral OTX015 in patients with haematologic malignancies, at doses starting from 10 mg once daily (QD) with continuous or discontinuous schedules. Five or eight blood samples were collected per patient for pharmacokinetic analysis. OTX015 plasma concentrations were determined using validated ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) and analysed using a nonlinear mixed-effects modelling software program. A population pharmacokinetic model was fitted to the data, and patient demographics and clinical chemistry parameters were tested as predictive covariates on the model parameters. Blood samples were analysed from 81 patients treated with OTX015 at doses ranging from 10 to 160 mg QD or 40 mg twice daily (BID), and 633 time-plasma concentrations were available for analysis. A one-compartment open model with linear elimination adequately described OTX015 pharmacokinetics. The most significant covariate was lean body mass (LBM), which decreased the between-subject variability in apparent total body clearance (CL) and the volume of distribution (V). The estimated pharmacokinetic parameters were the absorption rate constant (k a) = 0.731 h(-1), V = 71.4 L and CL = 8.47 L·h(-1). The pharmacokinetics of oral OTX015 in patients with haematologic malignancies can be described with a one-compartment model. Population pharmacokinetic modelling of OTX015 plasma concentrations showed that LBM influences V and CL. These findings do not suggest the need for dose adjustment.

  16. Population pharmacokinetics of orally administered mefloquine in healthy volunteers and patients with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Stephanie E; Upton, Richard N; Evans, Allan M; Navaratnam, Visweswaran; Olliaro, Piero L

    2015-03-01

    The determination of dosing regimens for the treatment of malaria is largely empirical and thus a better understanding of the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties of antimalarial agents is required to assess the adequacy of current treatment regimens and identify sources of suboptimal dosing that could select for drug-resistant parasites. Mefloquine is a widely used antimalarial, commonly given in combination with artesunate. Mefloquine pharmacokinetics was assessed in 24 healthy adults and 43 patients with Plasmodium falciparum malaria administered mefloquine in combination with artesunate. Population pharmacokinetic modelling was conducted using NONMEM. A two-compartment model with a single transit compartment and first-order elimination from the central compartment most adequately described mefloquine concentration-time data. The model incorporated population parameter variability for clearance (CL/F), central volume of distribution (VC/F) and absorption rate constant (KA) and identified, in addition to body weight, malaria infection as a covariate for VC/F (but not CL/F). Monte Carlo simulations predict that falciparum malaria infection is associated with a shorter elimination half-life (407 versus 566 h) and T>MIC (766 versus 893 h). This is the first known population pharmacokinetic study to show falciparum malaria to influence mefloquine disposition. Protein binding, anaemia and other factors may contribute to differences between healthy individuals and patients. As VC/F is related to the earlier portion of the concentration-time profiles, which occurs during acute malaria, and CL/F is more related to the terminal phase during convalescence after treatment, this may explain why malaria was found to be a covariate for VC/F but not CL/F. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Rehabilitation of cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandey M

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available With the developments in cancer treatment, more and more patients are surviving their disease. However, very little emphasis is being placed to rehabilitate these cancer survivors. Ignorance, social structure, stigma attached in seeking psychological help, and poor communication skills of oncology staff all contribute to poor rehabilitative efforts. The priority of governmental agencies and health efforts to fight rampant communicable diseases, malnutrition, maternal health, and the frequent natural calamities, puts rehabilitation movements in the back seat. Treatment and prevention of disability and its rehabilitation requires comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach. There is an urgent need to promote physical and psychological rehabilitation.

  18. Effect of obesity on the pharmacokinetics of antimicrobials in critically ill patients: A structured review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alobaid, Abdulaziz S; Hites, Maya; Lipman, Jeffrey; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Roberts, Jason A

    2016-04-01

    The increased prevalence of obesity presents challenges for clinicians aiming to provide optimised antimicrobial dosing in the intensive care unit. Obesity is likely to exacerbate the alterations to antimicrobial pharmacokinetics when the chronic diseases associated with obesity exist with the acute pathophysiological changes associated with critical illness. The purpose of this paper is to review the potential pharmacokinetic (PK) changes of antimicrobials in obese critically ill patients and the implications for appropriate dosing. We found that hydrophilic antimicrobials (e.g. β-lactams, vancomycin, daptomycin) were more likely to manifest altered pharmacokinetics in critically ill patients who are obese. In particular for β-lactam antibiotics, obesity is associated with a larger volume of distribution (V(d)). In obese critically ill patients, piperacillin is also associated with a lower drug clearance (CL). For doripenem, these PK changes have been associated with reduced achievement of pharmacodynamic (PD) targets when standard drug doses are used. For vancomycin, increases in Vd are associated with increasing total body weight (TBW), meaning that the loading dose should be based on TBW even in obese patients. For daptomycin, an increased Vd is not considered to be clinically relevant. For antifungals, little data exist in obese critically ill patients; during fluconazole therapy, an obese patient had a lower V(d) and higher CL than non-obese comparators. Overall, most studies suggested that standard dosage regimens of most commonly used antimicrobials are sufficient to achieve PD targets. However, it is likely that larger doses would be required for pathogens with higher minimum inhibitory concentrations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  19. Cost-effectiveness analysis of pharmacokinetic-driven prophylaxis vs. standard prophylaxis in patients with severe haemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannazzo, Sergio; Cortesi, Paolo A; Crea, Roberto; Steinitz, Katharina; Mantovani, Lorenzo G; Gringeri, Alessandro

    2017-09-01

    : The objective of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of pharmacokinetic-driven prophylaxis in severe haemophilia A patients. A microsimulation model was developed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of pharmacokinetic-driven prophylaxis vs. standard prophylaxis and estimate cost, annual joint bleed rate (AJBR), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio over a 1-year time horizon for a hypothetical population of 10 000 severe haemophilia A patients. A dose of 30 IU/kg per 48 h was assumed for standard prophylaxis. Pharmacokinetic prophylaxis was individually adjusted to maintain trough levels at least 1 and 5 IU/dl or less. AJBR was estimated on the relationship between factor VIII (FVIII) levels and bleeding rate reported in the literature. Sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the stability of the model and the reliability of results. The FVIII dose was reduced in the 27.8% of patients with a trough level more than 5 IU/dl on standard prophylaxis, with a negligible impact on AJBR (+0.1 bleed/year). The FVIII dose was increased in the 10.6% of patients with trough levels less than 1 IU/dl on standard prophylaxis, with a significant reduction of AJBR (-1.9 bleeds/year). On average, overall, pharmacokinetic-driven prophylaxis was shown to decrease the AJBR from 1.012 to 0.845 with a slight reduction of the infusion dose of 0.36 IU/kg, with total saving of 5 197&OV0556; per patient-year. Pharmacokinetic-driven prophylaxis was preferable (i.e. more effective and less costly) compared with standard prophylaxis, with savings of 31 205&OV0556; per bleed avoided. Pharmacokinetic-driven prophylaxis, accounting for patients' individual pharmacokinetic variability, appears to be a promising strategy to improve outcomes with efficient use of available resources in severe haemophilia A patients.

  20. Phase I and pharmacokinetic study of combined treatment with perifosine and radiation in patients with advanced solid tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vink, Stefan R.; Schellens, Jan H.M.; Beijnen, Jos H.; Sindermann, Herbert; Engel, Juergen; Dubbelman, Ria; Moppi, Gemi; Hillebrand, Michel J.X.; Bartelink, Harry; Verheij, Marcel

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Perifosine is an orally applicable, membrane-targeted alkylphosphocholine analogue with antitumour activity and radiosensitising properties in preclinical models. The purpose of this phase I study was to determine the feasibility and tolerability of concurrent daily perifosine and radiation in patients with advanced cancer. Patients and methods: Starting dose of perifosine was 50 mg/day; dose escalation was in steps of 50 mg. Daily administration commenced 2 days before radiotherapy and was continued throughout the radiation treatment. At least three patients were entered at each dose level; at the 150 mg/day level 10 patients were included. Pharmacokinetic sampling was performed weekly pre-dosing. Twenty-one patients were entered. Tumour types included NSCLC (n = 17), prostate, oesophageal, colon and bladder cancer. Most patients (16/21) had received prior chemotherapy; none radiotherapy. Median number of daily perifosine administrations was 31 (range 24-53). Mean radiation dose (BED 1 ) was 59.8 Gy (range 50.7-87.5 Gy in 13-28 fractions). Results: Major drug-related toxicities according to CTC criteria were nausea in 57%, fatigue in 48%, vomiting in 38%, diarrhoea in 38% and anorexia in 19%. No bone marrow toxicity was observed. DLT (nausea/vomiting) was encountered in two of five patients at the 200 mg/day dose level. Dose-dependent steady-state plasma levels were reached after 1 week. Major radiotherapy-related acute toxicity consisted of dysphagia in 38% and pneumonitis in 29%. Conclusion: Perifosine can be safely combined with fractionated radiotherapy. A dosage of 150 mg/day, to be started at least 1 week prior to radiotherapy, is recommended for phase II evaluation

  1. Pharmacokinetics of oral artesunate in thai patients with uncomplicated falciparum malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbwang, J; Na-Bangchang, K; Congpoung, K; Thanavibul, A; Harinasuta, T

    1998-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of artesunate and its major plasma metabolite, dihydroartemisinin, were investigated in 11 Thai male patients with acute uncomplicated falciparum malaria during the acute and recovery phases. Patients were given an oral dose of 200mg artesunate (Guilin Pharmaceutical) on the first day, followed by 100mg 12 hours later, then 100mg daily for another 4 days (total dose of 700mg). All the patients showed a rapid initial response with median (range) parasite and fever clearance times of 30 (18 to 60) and 24 (4 to 94) hours, respectively; no patients showed reappearance of parasites during the 28-day follow-up period. No significant clinical adverse effects were detected in any patient. Acute phase malaria infection significantly influenced the pharmacokinetics of artesunate and its active metabolite, dihydroartemisinin. Maximum plasma drug concentration (C(max)), absorption half-life (t((1/2)a)), area under the plasma concentration-time curve from zero to the last observed time (AUC) and terminal elimination half-life (t((1/2)z)) of artesunate were decreased, while apparent total body clearance (CL/f) was increased during the acute phase, compared with the recovery phase. In addition, a decrease in the C(max) and an increase in the AUC(DHA/ARS ) ratio were found. Optimisation of therapy with oral artesunate should therefore be based on the kinetics of the drug and dihydroartemisinin in malaria patients with acute phase infection.

  2. Protein binding characteristics and pharmacokinetics of ceftriaxone in intensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleibinger, Michael; Steinbach, Cathérine L; Töpper, Christoph; Kratzer, Alexander; Liebchen, Uwe; Kees, Frieder; Salzberger, Bernd; Kees, Martin G

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the pharmacokinetics of total and unbound ceftriaxone in intensive care unit (ICU) patients and its protein binding characteristics. Twenty patients (m/f 15/5, age 25-86 years, body weight 60-121 kg, APACHE II 7-40, estimated glomerular filtration rate 19-157 ml min(-1) , albumin 11.7-30.1 g l(-1) , total bilirubin ICU patients (33.0%; 20.2-44.5%) than reported in healthy volunteers, particularly when renal impairment or severe hyperbilirubinaemia was present. In all patients, unbound concentrations during treatment with ceftriaxone 2 g once daily remained above the EUCAST susceptibility breakpoint (≤1 mg l(-1) ) throughout the whole dosing interval. Protein binding of ceftriaxone is reduced and variable in ICU patients due to hypoalbuminaemia, but also to altered binding characteristics. Despite these changes, the pharmacokinetics of unbound ceftriaxone is governed by renal function. For patients with normal or reduced renal function, standard doses are sufficient. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  3. Population pharmacokinetic modelling of doxorubicin and doxorubicinol in children with cancer: is there a relationship with cardiac troponin profiles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunarajah, Kuhan; Hennig, Stefanie; Norris, Ross L G; Lobb, Michael; Charles, Bruce G; Pinkerton, Ross; Moore, Andrew S

    2017-07-01

    Anthracyclines are a mainstay of the treatment of several childhood malignancies, but their utility is limited by dose-related cardiotoxicity. This study is aimed to explore the link between exposure of paediatric cancer patients to doxorubicin and its metabolite doxorubicinol, and cardiac troponin I (cTnI). In a prospective pilot study plasma doxorubicin, doxorubicinol, and cTnI concentrations were measured in samples from children undergoing cancer chemotherapy. A mixed-effects population pharmacokinetic model for doxorubicin and doxorubicinol and in combination with a turn-over model for cTnI were developed. Seventeen patients, aged 3.4-14.7 year, treated for a variety of cancers had 99 doxorubicin and 119 doxorubicinol concentrations analysed from samples drawn between 0.5 and 336 h after the start of the infusion. Eleven patients had received previous doses of anthracyclines, with a median cumulative prior dose of 90 mg/m 2 (range 0-225 mg/m 2 ). The median administered doxorubicin dose was 30 mg/m 2 (range 25-75 mg/m 2 ). Doxorubicin disposition was described by a three-compartment model with first-order elimination and metabolism to doxorubicinol. Body surface area was related to all clearance and distribution parameters and age further influenced clearance (CL, 58.7 L/h/1.8 m 2 for an average 8.4-year-old patient). Combined doxorubicin and metabolite exposure stimulated a temporary increase in cTnI in plasma, with a concentration of 11.8 µg/L required to achieve half-maximal effect. Prior cumulative anthracycline dosage received by patients was predictive of an increased cTnI baseline prior to a new doxorubicin dose. Prior anthracycline exposure increased baseline cTnI in a dose-dependent manner, consistent with the known cumulative risk of anthracycline exposure-induced cardiotoxicity.

  4. The pharmacokinetics of artemisinin suppositories in Vietnamese patients with malaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, R.; Duc, D. D.; Kager, P. A.; Khanh, N. X.; Dien, T. K.; de Vries, P. J.; van Boxtel, C. J.

    1998-01-01

    Eight male Vietnamese malaria patients received 600 mg of artemisinin in a single dose of 3 suppositories containing 200 mg each; 24 h later they received a single oral dose of mefloquine, 15 mg/kg. Plasma artemisinin concentrations were measured until 24 h after dosing, and parasites were counted

  5. Evaluation of the pharmacokinetic drug interaction potential of tivantinib (ARQ 197) using cocktail probes in patients with advanced solid tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Masaya; Papadopoulos, Kyriakos P; Strickler, John H; Puzanov, Igor; Gajee, Roohi; Wang, Yibin; Zahir, Hamim

    2018-01-01

    This phase 1, open-label, crossover study sought to evaluate drug-drug interactions between tivantinib and cytochrome P450 (CYP) substrates and tivantinib and P-glycoprotein. The effect of tivantinib doses on the pharmacokinetics of the probe drugs for CYP1A2 (caffeine), CYP2C9 (S-warfarin), CYP2C19 (omeprazole), and CYP3A4 (midazolam), and for P-glycoprotein (digoxin) was investigated in 28 patients with advanced cancer using a cocktail probe approach. Patients received single doses of probe drugs alone and, after 5 days of treatment, with tivantinib 360 mg twice daily. The ratios of geometric least squares mean (90% confidence interval) for the area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to the last quantifiable concentration in the presence/absence of tivantinib were 0.97 (0.89-1.05) for caffeine, 0.88 (0.76-1.02) for S-warfarin, 0.89 (0.60-1.31) for omeprazole, 0.83 (0.67-1.02) for midazolam, and 0.69 (0.51-0.94) for digoxin. Similar effects were observed for maximum plasma concentrations; the ratio for digoxin in the presence/absence of tivantinib was 0.75 (0.60-0.95). The data suggest that tivantinib 360 mg twice daily has either a minimal or no effect on the pharmacokinetics of probe drugs for CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 substrates, and decreases the systemic exposure of P-glycoprotein substrates when administered with tivantinib. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. Population pharmacokinetics of proguanil in patients with acute P. falciparum malaria after combined therapy with atovaquone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Z; Eaves, C J; Hutchinson, D B; Canfield, C J

    1996-11-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics of proguanil were evaluated in patients with acute P. falciparum malaria receiving concomitantly proguanil hydrochloride and atovaquone. The population consisted of 203 Blacks, 112 Orientals and 55 Malays; 274 males and 96 females. Of the 370 patients, 114 and 256 patients were classified as 'poor' and 'extensive' metabolizers of proguanil, respectively. Body weight and age ranged between 11-110 kg and 3-65 years, respectively. 2. A one compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination was fitted to proguanil plasma concentration-time profiles, using non-linear mixed effect modelling (NONMEM). 3. Oral clearance (CLo) showed a 0.785 power relationship with body weight and was 13% higher in Orientals than Blacks and Malays and 17% lower in 'poor' than 'extensive' metabolizers. According to the mean weight of each population, the final population estimates of CLo in Blacks, Orientals and Malays who are 'extensive' metabolizers were 54.0, 61.5 and 64.3 l h-1, respectively. Age, gender and dose had no significant effects on CLo. 4. Apparent volume of distribution (V/F) showed a 0.88 power relationship with body weight. The final population estimates were 562 and 1629 l in children ( 15 years, respectively, who had a mean body weight of 22.6 and 54.8 kg, respectively. The effect of other covariates on V/F was not examined. 5. The final magnitudes of interpatient variability in CLo and V/F were relatively low at 22.5 and 17.0%, respectively. 6. Population pharmacokinetic parameter estimates in Black, Oriental and Malay patients with acute P. falciparum malaria are in good agreement with results of pharmacokinetic studies in healthy Caucasian volunteers. In view of the 30-50% residual variability in proguanil plasma concentrations, the slight effects of Orientals and 'poor' metabolizers on CLo are unlikely to be clinically significant. Hence, dose recommendation will be solely based on body weight.

  7. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic study of dexmedetomidine in elderly patients during spinal anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Yun; Zhang, Ran-Ran; Pei, Qi; Tan, Hong-Yi; Guo, Cheng-Xian; Huang, Jie; Xiang, Yu-Xia; Ouyang, Wen; Duan, Kai-Ming; Wang, Sai-Ying; Yang, Guo-Ping

    2015-12-01

    The application of dexmedetomidine in patient sedation is generally accepted, though its clinical application is limited because of the lack of information detailing the specific properties among diverse populations of patients. The aim of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of dexmedetomidine between elderly and young patients during spinal anesthesia. 34 subjects (elderly group: n = 15; young group: n = 19) with spinal anesthesia were enrolled in the present study following the inclusion/exclusion criteria detailed below. All subjects received intravenous infusion of dexmedetomidine with a loading dose of 0.5 µg x kg⁻¹ for 10 minutes and a maintenance dose of 0.5 µg x kg⁻¹ x h⁻¹ for 50 minutes. Plasma concentrations of dexmedetomidine were detected by the HPLC-MS/MS method and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using WinNolin software. There was no significant difference between the elderly and young subjects in major pharmacokinetic parameters. There was a marked gender difference in the Cmax (peak plasma concentration) and tmax (time to reach Cmax) between genders in elderly subjects, though in this cohort the other pharmacokinetic parameters were not significantly different. In the young subjects there were no noteworthy variations between genders in pharmacokinetic parameters. There was no significant difference between the two groups in BISAUC(0-t) (the area under the bispectral index-time curve from time 0 to t hours), BISmin (the minimum value of the bispectral index after drug delivery), and or tmin-BIS (bispectral index for the minimum value of time). SBP (systolic blood pressure), DBP (diastolic blood pressure), HR (heart rate), and SpO₂(pulse oxygen saturation) developed substantive differences in a time-dependent manner, but there were no statistically significant differences in these four indicators in the time*group at three time points (1 hour, 2 hours, and 3 hours after drug

  8. Cancer patients' evaluation of communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Lone; Petersen, Morten Aagaard; Johnsen, Anna Thit

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess how communication with health care staff is perceived by Danish cancer patients and to characterise those patients who report problems in communication.......The aims of this study were to assess how communication with health care staff is perceived by Danish cancer patients and to characterise those patients who report problems in communication....

  9. Lung cancer in younger patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbasowa, Leda; Madsen, Poul Henning

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Lung cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-related death. The incidence increases with age and the occurrence in young patients is relatively low. The clinicopathological features of lung cancer in younger patients have not been fully explored previously. METHODS: To assess the age...... differences in the clinical characteristics of lung cancer, we conducted a retrospective analysis comparing young patients ≤ 65 years of age with an elderly group > 65 years of age. Among 1,232 patients evaluated due to suspicion of lung cancer in our fast-track setting from January-December 2013, 312 newly...... diagnosed lung cancer patients were included. RESULTS: Patients ≤ 65 years had a significantly higher representation of females (p = 0.0021), more frequent familial cancer aggregation (p = 0.028) and a lower incidence of squamous cell carcinoma (p = 0.0133). When excluding pure carcinoid tumours...

  10. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, tolerability, and safety of exenatide in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothare, Prajakti A; Linnebjerg, Helle; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Uenaka, Kazunori; Yamamura, Ayuko; Yeo, Kwee Poo; de la Peña, Amparo; Teng, Choo Hua; Mace, Kenneth; Fineman, Mark; Shigeta, Hirofumi; Sakata, Yukikuni; Irie, Shin

    2008-12-01

    In this single-blind, parallel, placebo-controlled study, the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, tolerability, and safety of subcutaneous exenatide were evaluated in 40 Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients were allocated to 4 groups and randomized to receive exenatide (n = 8/group) or placebo (n = 2/group), with all receiving placebo on day 1. On day 2, patients received single-dose exenatide (2.5 microg [group A] or 5 microg [groups B, C, and D]) or placebo and then bid on days 3 to 5. On days 6 to 10, groups A and B continued on 2.5 and 5 microg bid; groups C and D received 10 and 15 microg bid, respectively. The last dose was given on the morning of day 10. All adverse events were mild or moderate in severity. Exenatide was generally well tolerated up to 10 microg. Exenatide was well absorbed with a median t(max) of 1.5 hours and mean t((1/2)) of 1.6 hours; exposure increased with dose. Up to 10 microg, exenatide reduced postprandial glucose concentrations in a dose-dependent fashion compared with placebo; decreases were similar for 10 and 15 microg. An E(max) model demonstrated that doses higher than 2.5 microg were necessary for adequate glycemic response. Based on tolerability and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationships, 5 and 10 microg exenatide may be considered for further clinical development in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes.

  11. Steady-state pharmacokinetics of sirolimus in stable adult Chinese renal transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huifen Faye; Qiu, Feng; Wu, Xiongfe; Fang, Juanzhi; Crownover, Penelope; Korth-Bradley, Joan; Schulman, Seth

    2014-05-01

    This open-label, nonrandomized study was conducted to evaluate the steady-state pharmacokinetics of sirolimus in 24 stable Chinese renal transplant patients receiving daily oral maintenance doses of sirolimus (1-4 mg). Repeated trough and serial whole blood sirolimus concentrations over a 24-hour dosing interval were collected and assayed using high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS). Non-compartmental analysis (NCA) was employed to calculate sirolimus pharmacokinetic parameters. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A5 genotyping was performed. Cyclosporine (CsA) levels were determined for patients who took concomitant CsA. Mean (±SD) sirolimus maximum concentration (Cmax ), area under the concentration-time curve within a dosing interval of τ (AUCτ ), oral clearance (CL/F), and trough concentration (Ctrough ) at steady state were: 14.1 ± 13.4 ng/mL, 199 ± 210 ng · h/mL, 10.1 ± 4.4 L/h, and 5.9 ± 6.3 ng/mL, respectively. Median tmax (range) was 2.49 hours (1-12 hours). A strong correlation was observed between Ctrough and AUCτ . Pharmacokinetics of sirolimus in patients with and without concomitant CsA were comparable. Allele frequency of CYP3A5*3 was 70.9% and a trend of higher oral clearance was observed in CYP3A5 expressers compared with non-expressers although the number of subjects in each genotype was small. © 2014, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  12. An integrated disease/pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model suggests improved interleukin-21 regimens validated prospectively for mouse solid cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moran Elishmereni

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin (IL-21 is an attractive antitumor agent with potent immunomodulatory functions. Yet thus far, the cytokine has yielded only partial responses in solid cancer patients, and conditions for beneficial IL-21 immunotherapy remain elusive. The current work aims to identify clinically-relevant IL-21 regimens with enhanced efficacy, based on mathematical modeling of long-term antitumor responses. For this purpose, pharmacokinetic (PK and pharmacodynamic (PD data were acquired from a preclinical study applying systemic IL-21 therapy in murine solid cancers. We developed an integrated disease/PK/PD model for the IL-21 anticancer response, and calibrated it using selected "training" data. The accuracy of the model was verified retrospectively under diverse IL-21 treatment settings, by comparing its predictions to independent "validation" data in melanoma and renal cell carcinoma-challenged mice (R(2>0.90. Simulations of the verified model surfaced important therapeutic insights: (1 Fractionating the standard daily regimen (50 µg/dose into a twice daily schedule (25 µg/dose is advantageous, yielding a significantly lower tumor mass (45% decrease; (2 A low-dose (12 µg/day regimen exerts a response similar to that obtained under the 50 µg/day treatment, suggestive of an equally efficacious dose with potentially reduced toxicity. Subsequent experiments in melanoma-bearing mice corroborated both of these predictions with high precision (R(2>0.89, thus validating the model also prospectively in vivo. Thus, the confirmed PK/PD model rationalizes IL-21 therapy, and pinpoints improved clinically-feasible treatment schedules. Our analysis demonstrates the value of employing mathematical modeling and in silico-guided design of solid tumor immunotherapy in the clinic.

  13. Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Once-Daily Tacrolimus in Solid-Organ Transplant Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staatz, Christine E; Tett, Susan E

    2015-10-01

    Tacrolimus is a pivotal immunosuppressant agent used in solid-organ transplantation. It was originally formulated for oral administration as Prograf(®), a twice-daily immediate-release capsule. In an attempt to improve patient adherence, retain manufacturer market share and/or reduce health care costs, newer once-daily prolonged-release formulations of tacrolimus (Advagraf(®) and Envarsus(®) XR) and various generic versions of Prograf(®) are becoming available. Tacrolimus has a narrow therapeutic index. Small variations in drug exposure due to formulation differences can have a significant impact on patient outcomes. The aim of this review is to critically analyse the published data on the clinical pharmacokinetics of once-daily tacrolimus in solid-organ transplant patients. Forty-three traditional (non-compartmental) and five population pharmacokinetic studies were identified and evaluated. On the basis of the stricter criteria for narrow-therapeutic-index drugs, Prograf(®), Advagraf(®) and Envarsus(®) XR are not bioequivalent [in terms of the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC0-24) or the minimum concentration (C min)]. Patients may require a daily dosage increase if converted from Prograf(®) to Advagraf(®), while a daily dosage reduction appears necessary for conversion from Prograf(®) to Envarsus(®) XR. Prograf(®) itself, or generic immediate-release tacrolimus, can be administered in a once-daily regimen with a lower than double daily dose being reported to give 24-h exposure equivalent to that of a twice-daily regimen. Intense clinical and concentration monitoring is prudent in the first few months after any conversion to once-daily tacrolimus dosing; however, there is no guarantee that therapeutic drug monitoring strategies applicable to one formulation (or twice-daily dosing) will be equally applicable to another. The correlation between the tacrolimus AUC0-24 and C min is variable and not strong for all three

  14. Pharmacokinetic Interaction Between Tacrolimus and Fentanyl in Patients Receiving Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazawa, Fumiaki; Fuchida, Shin-Ichi; Kado, Yoko; Ueda, Kumi; Kokufu, Takatoshi; Okano, Akira; Hatsuse, Mayumi; Murakami, Satoshi; Nakayama, Yuko; Takara, Kohji; Shimazaki, Chihiro

    2017-09-26

    BACKGROUND Tacrolimus and fentanyl are well-known cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 substrates with a narrow therapeutic range. However, the pharmacokinetic interaction between tacrolimus and fentanyl is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine whether drug interaction exists between tacrolimus and fentanyl. MATERIAL AND METHODS A retrospective study was performed in 6 patients who had received allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation between April 2010 and March 2015. The patients received continuous intravenous infusion of fentanyl with concomitant use of tacrolimus, and the blood concentrations of tacrolimus were evaluated using fluorescence polarization immunoassay. RESULTS The clearance (CL) of tacrolimus decreased significantly from 1.28 to 0.68 mL/min/kg with concomitant use of fentanyl. The CL changed with time and dose of fentanyl administration. In addition, the CL of tacrolimus was reverted by stopping fentanyl infusion. Horn's drug interaction probability scale indicated a probable category or possible category, suggesting a drug interaction between tacrolimus and fentanyl. No patient showed a difference in hepatic or renal function before and after fentanyl administration. No additional administration of other CYP3A4 inhibitors was observed, suggesting that the drug interaction was mediated by CYP3A4. CONCLUSIONS The influence of fentanyl on the pharmacokinetics of tacrolimus was demonstrated to be of clinical importance. It is proposed that the dose of tacrolimus be reduced by 40% when used in combination with fentanyl.

  15. Effect of Itraconazole and Rifampin on the Pharmacokinetics of Olaparib in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirix, Luc; Swaisland, Helen; Verheul, Henk M W

    2016-01-01

    ) and inducer (rifampin) to alter the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of olaparib following single oral tablet doses. METHODS: Two Phase I, open-label, non-randomized trials were conducted in patients with advanced solid tumors. In Study 7, patients received olaparib alone and co-administered with itraconazole......; in Study 8, a separate group of patients received olaparib alone and co-administered with rifampin. No interaction between itraconazole and olaparib was concluded if two-sided 90% CIs for the treatment ratios of AUC and/or AUC0-t and Cmax fell within the bioequivalence range of 0.80-1.25. An interaction...... between rifampin and olaparib was concluded if the lower limit of the 90% CI for the treatment ratios was 50% decrease in olaparib AUC or Cmax in the presence of rifampin compared with olaparib alone). FINDINGS: In Study 7 (N = 59; 17 male, 42 female), 56 and 53 patients were evaluable for PK...

  16. Pharmacokinetics of Deferiprone in Patients with β-Thalassaemia : Impact of Splenectomy and Iron Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limenta, Lie Michael George; Jirasomprasert, Totsapol; Jittangprasert, Piyada; Wilairat, Prapin; Yamanont, Praveena; Chantharaksri, Udom; Fucharoen, Suthat; Morales, Noppawan Phumala

    2011-01-01

    Iron-rich transfusions and/or a compensatory increase in iron absorption ultimately result in iron loading in patients with β-thalassaemia. Hence, without iron chelation, iron accumulates relentlessly. Deferiprone has been shown to be capable of reducing the iron burden in patients with b-thalassaemia. However, there is wide interpatient variation in deferiprone-induced urinary iron excretion (UIE). We hypothesized that splenectomy and iron status might influence the pharmacokinetic profiles of deferiprone in patients with β-thalassaemia/haemoglobin E, and the present study was aimed at examining this hypothesis. Thirty-one patients with β-thalassaemia/haemoglobin E (20 splenecto-mized and 11 non-splenectomized patients) were enrolled in the study. After an overnight fast, the subjects received a single oral dose of deferiprone 25 mg/kg of body weight. Blood samples were collected pre-dosing and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 180, 240, 300, 360 and 480 minutes after dosing. Urine output was pooled and collected at 0-2, 2-4, 4-8, 8-12 and 12-24 hour intervals. Serum and urine concentrations of deferiprone and its metabolite deferiprone glucuronide were determined using a validated high-performance liquid chromatography method. Serum deferiprone-chelated iron and UIE were determined using a validated colourimetric method. No significant difference in the pharmacokinetic parameters of non-conjugated deferiprone was observed between splenectomized and non-splenectomized patients. However, the maximum serum concentration (C max ) and the area under the serum concentration-time curve (AUC) from time zero to infinity (AUC∞) values of deferiprone glucuronide were significantly lower (both p values of serum deferiprone-chelated iron, as well as UIE, were significantly higher (p values 7.1 µmol/L, 1645 mmol · min/L and 77.1 mmol, respectively) than in non-splenectomized patients (median values 3.1 µmol/L, 545 mmol · min/L and 12.5 µmol, respectively). Urinary

  17. Use of nanotechnology for improved pharmacokinetics and activity of immunogenic cell death inducers used in cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicka, Martyna; Gubernator, Jerzy

    2017-09-01

    Immunogenic cell death inducers (ICD inducers) are a diverse group of therapeutic molecules capable of eliciting an adaptive immune response against the antigens present on the surface of dying cancer cells. Most of these molecules suffer from low bioavailability, high toxicity and poor pharmacokinetics which limit their application. It is believed that nanotechnology, in particular nano-sized nanocarriers, can address most of the issues that limit the use of ICD inducers. Area covered: The mechanism of action of ICD inducers and their limitations is discussed. In addition, we cover the novel possibilities arising from the use of nanotechnology to improve delivery of ICD inducers to the target tissue as well as the restrictions of modern nanotechnology. Expert opinion: At present, nanocarrier formulations suffer from low bioavailability, poor pharmacokinetics and stability issues. Nonetheless, there is a tremendous future for combinatorial immune-pharmacological treatments of human tumors based on nanocarrier delivery of ICD inducers.

  18. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of mivacurium in young adult and elderly patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Doris; Viby-Mogensen, Jørgen; Pedersen, N.A.

    2002-01-01

    age factors; butyrylcholinesterase; cholinesterase; dose-response curves; enzymes; metabolites; mivacurium; neuromuscular relaxants; pharmacodynamics; pharmacokinetics; pharmacology; pseudocholinesterase; stereoisomers...

  19. The safety and pharmacokinetics of a reverse transcriptase inhibitor, 3TC, in patients with HIV infection: a phase I study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, R.; Lange, J. M.; Hussey, E. K.; Donn, K. H.; Hall, S. T.; Harker, A. J.; Jonker, P.; Danner, S. A.

    1992-01-01

    To determine the safety and pharmacokinetics of the nucleoside analogue, 3TC. A Phase I, open-label, single-centre study. Twenty asymptomatic, HIV-infected male patients with CD4 lymphocyte counts < 500 x 10(6)/l who had not received previous antiretroviral therapy completed the study. Each patient

  20. Ticagrelor pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in patients with NSTEMI after a 180-mg loading dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Manne; Tornvall, Per; Westerberg, Julia; Rihan Hye, Shaym; van der Linden, Jan

    2017-11-01

    The pharmacokinetics after a 180-mg loading dose (LD) of ticagrelor has not been thoroughly investigated in NSTEMI patients. We aimed to compare the ticagrelor uptake and on-treatment platelet reactivity between non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) patients and a control group of patients with stable coronary artery disease (SCAD) undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention. We performed an observational, prospective, single-center study including 40 NSTEMI patients and 20 SCAD controls. Key exclusion criteria included ongoing opioid treatment. Both groups received a 180-mg ticagrelor LD, and blood samples were taken pre-dose and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 hours post-LD. Plasma concentrations of ticagrelor and its active metabolite AR-C124910XX were determined by validated methods. Platelet aggregation was tested using ADP-induced multiple electrode aggregometry. The primary endpoint was the time to maximal ticagrelor concentration (T max ). Clinical trial registration identifier number: NCT02292277. None of the pharmacokinetic variables differed significantly between the groups, including the T max of ticagrelor (2.0h [1.0-3.0] versus 2.0h [2.0-3.0], p = 0.393) and the active metabolite AR-C124910XX (3.0 [2.0-4.0] versus 3.0 [2.5-4.0], p = 0.289). High on-treatment platelet reactivity (HPR) was defined as > 46 aggregation units and was at one hour seen in 15% of the NSTEMI patients versus 10% of the controls (p = 1.0). At two hours post the 180-mg ticagrelor LD, 3% of the NSTEMI patients had HPR compared with none of the controls (p = 1.0). In conclusion, the uptake of ticagrelor was not significantly slower in NSTEMI patients not receiving opioids compared with the SCAD controls, leading to adequate onset of platelet inhibition in both groups.

  1. Population Pharmacokinetic and Exposure-Response Analysis of Weekly Teriparatide in Osteoporosis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ose, Atsushi; Serada, Masashi; Yamashita, Keiko; Tsurui, Kazuyuki; Tanigawara, Yusuke

    2017-12-01

    Teriparatide is a potent therapeutic agent for the treatment of osteoporosis. One of the aims of this analysis was to develop a population pharmacokinetic (PPK) model to understand the pharmacokinetic characteristics of the once-weekly formulation of teriparatide. Another aim was to develop an exposure-response model to describe the relationship between change in bone mineral density (BMD) and teriparatide exposure after weekly subcutaneous administration. The PPK analysis showed that apparent total body clearance was significantly influenced by estimated creatinine clearance and the presence of osteoporosis. A data set consisting of lumbar spine BMD values for 513 osteoporosis patients whose area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of teriparatide acetate was estimated by the developed PPK model was then compiled. Exposure-response analysis showed that the percentage change from baseline of BMD was well described by a function of the AUC of teriparatide acetate, time, and coadministration of alfacalcidol and a calcium preparation. The analysis indicated that AUC is an important parameter for predicting BMD response to once-weekly teriparatide in osteoporosis patients. © 2017, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  2. Population Pharmacokinetics of Meropenem in Plasma and Subcutis in Patients on Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanberg, Pelle; Öbrink-Hansen, Kristina; Thorsted, Anders

    2018-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe meropenem pharmacokinetics (PK) in plasma and/or subcutaneous adipose tissue (SCT) in critically ill patients receiving ECMO treatment, and to develop a population PK model to simulate alternative dosing regimens and modes of administration. We...... conducted a prospective observational study. Ten patients on ECMO treatment received meropenem (1 or 2 g) intravenously over 5 min every 8 hours. Serial SCT concentrations were determined using microdialysis and compared with plasma concentrations. A population PK model of SCT and plasma data was developed...... infusion would be needed for 100%fT>MIC and 100%fT>4xMIC to be obtained. Meropenem plasma and SCT concentrations were associated with estimated creatinine-clearance (eCLCr). Simulations showed that in patients with increased eCLCr, dose increment or continuous infusion may be needed to obtain therapeutic...

  3. A Bayesian Approach for Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Pegylated Interferon α-2a in Hepatitis C Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Mohammad I

    2017-11-01

    Pegylated interferon α-2a (PEG-IFN-α-2a) is an antiviral drug used for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. This study describes the population pharmacokinetics of PEG-IFN-α-2a in hepatitis C patients using a Bayesian approach. A possible association between patient characteristics and pharmacokinetic parameters is also explored. A Bayesian population pharmacokinetic modeling approach, using WinBUGS version 1.4.3, was applied to a cohort of patients (n = 292) with chronic HCV infection. Data were obtained from two phase III studies sponsored by Hoffmann-La Roche. Demographic and clinical information were evaluated as possible predictors of pharmacokinetic parameters during model development. A one-compartment model with an additive error best fitted the data, and a total of 2271 PEG-IFN-α-2a measurements from 292 subjects were analyzed using the proposed population pharmacokinetic model. Sex was identified as a predictor of PEG-IFN-α-2a clearance, and hemoglobin baseline level was identified as a predictor of PEG-IFN-α-2a volume of distribution. A population pharmacokinetic model of PEG-IFN-α-2a in patients with chronic HCV infection was presented in this study. The proposed model can be used to optimize PEG-IFN-α-2a dosing in patients with chronic HCV infection. Optimal PEG-IFN-α-2a selection is important to maximize response and/or to avoid potential side effects such as thrombocytopenia and neutropenia. NV15942 and NV15801.

  4. Impact of Hypoalbuminemia on Voriconazole Pharmacokinetics in Critically Ill Adult Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauters, Joost; Vercammen, Ine; de Loor, Henriette; Maertens, Johan; Lagrou, Katrien; Annaert, Pieter; Spriet, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Setting the adequate dose for voriconazole is challenging due to its variable pharmacokinetics. We investigated the impact of hypoalbuminemia (voriconazole pharmacokinetics in adult intensive care unit (ICU) patients treated with voriconazole (20 samples in 13 patients) as well as in plasma samples from ICU patients that had been spiked with voriconazole at concentrations of 1.5 mg/liter, 2.9 mg/liter, and 9.0 mg/liter (66 samples from 22 patients). Plasma albumin concentrations ranged from 13.8 to 38.7 g/liter. Total voriconazole concentrations in adult ICU patients treated with voriconazole ranged from 0.5 to 8.7 mg/liter. Unbound and bound voriconazole concentrations were separated using high-throughput equilibrium dialysis followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MSMS). Multivariate analysis revealed a positive relationship between voriconazole plasma protein binding and plasma albumin concentrations (P voriconazole concentrations with decreasing albumin concentrations. The correlation is more pronounced in the presence of elevated bilirubin concentrations (P = 0.05). We therefore propose to adjust the measured total voriconazole concentrations in patients with abnormal plasma albumin and total serum bilirubin plasma concentrations who show adverse events potentially related to voriconazole via a formula that we developed. Assuming 50% protein binding on average and an upper limit of 5.5 mg/liter for total voriconazole concentrations, the upper limit for unbound voriconazole concentrations is 2.75 mg/liter. Alterations in voriconazole unbound concentrations caused by hypoalbuminemia and/or elevated bilirubin plasma concentrations cannot be countered immediately, due to the adult saturated hepatic metabolism. Consequently, increased unbound voriconazole concentrations can possibly cause adverse events, even when total voriconazole concentrations are within the reference range. PMID:25182655

  5. Population Pharmacokinetics of Artesunate and Dihydroartemisinin following Intra-Rectal Dosing of Artesunate in Malaria Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Julie A; Agbenyega, Tsiri; Barnes, Karen I; Perri, Gianni Di; Folb, Peter; Gomes, Melba; Krishna, Sanjeev; Krudsood, Srivicha; Looareesuwan, Sornchai; Mansor, Sharif; McIlleron, Helen; Miller, Raymond; Molyneux, Malcolm; Mwenechanya, James; Navaratnam, Visweswaran; Nosten, Francois; Olliaro, Piero; Pang, Lorrin; Ribeiro, Isabela; Tembo, Madalitso; van Vugt, Michele; Ward, Steve; Weerasuriya, Kris; Win, Kyaw; White, Nicholas J

    2006-01-01

    Background Intra-rectal artesunate has been developed as a potentially life-saving treatment of severe malaria in rural village settings where administration of parenteral antimalarial drugs is not possible. We studied the population pharmacokinetics of intra-rectal artesunate and the relationship with parasitological responses in patients with moderately severe falciparum malaria. Methods and Findings Adults and children in Africa and Southeast Asia with moderately severe malaria were recruited in two Phase II studies (12 adults from Southeast Asia and 11 children from Africa) with intensive sampling protocols, and three Phase III studies (44 children from Southeast Asia, and 86 children and 26 adults from Africa) with sparse sampling. All patients received 10 mg/kg artesunate as a single intra-rectal dose of suppositories. Venous blood samples were taken during a period of 24 h following dosing. Plasma artesunate and dihydroartemisinin (DHA, the main biologically active metabolite) concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. The pharmacokinetic properties of DHA were determined using nonlinear mixed-effects modelling. Artesunate is rapidly hydrolysed in vivo to DHA, and this contributes the majority of antimalarial activity. For DHA, a one-compartment model assuming complete conversion from artesunate and first-order appearance and elimination kinetics gave the best fit to the data. The mean population estimate of apparent clearance (CL/F) was 2.64 (l/kg/h) with 66% inter-individual variability. The apparent volume of distribution (V/F) was 2.75 (l/kg) with 96% inter-individual variability. The estimated DHA population mean elimination half-life was 43 min. Gender was associated with increased mean CL/F by 1.14 (95% CI: 0.36–1.92) (l/kg/h) for a male compared with a female, and weight was positively associated with V/F. Larger V/Fs were observed for the patients requiring early rescue treatment compared

  6. Population pharmacokinetics of artesunate and dihydroartemisinin following intra-rectal dosing of artesunate in malaria patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A Simpson

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Intra-rectal artesunate has been developed as a potentially life-saving treatment of severe malaria in rural village settings where administration of parenteral antimalarial drugs is not possible. We studied the population pharmacokinetics of intra-rectal artesunate and the relationship with parasitological responses in patients with moderately severe falciparum malaria.Adults and children in Africa and Southeast Asia with moderately severe malaria were recruited in two Phase II studies (12 adults from Southeast Asia and 11 children from Africa with intensive sampling protocols, and three Phase III studies (44 children from Southeast Asia, and 86 children and 26 adults from Africa with sparse sampling. All patients received 10 mg/kg artesunate as a single intra-rectal dose of suppositories. Venous blood samples were taken during a period of 24 h following dosing. Plasma artesunate and dihydroartemisinin (DHA, the main biologically active metabolite concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. The pharmacokinetic properties of DHA were determined using nonlinear mixed-effects modelling. Artesunate is rapidly hydrolysed in vivo to DHA, and this contributes the majority of antimalarial activity. For DHA, a one-compartment model assuming complete conversion from artesunate and first-order appearance and elimination kinetics gave the best fit to the data. The mean population estimate of apparent clearance (CL/F was 2.64 (l/kg/h with 66% inter-individual variability. The apparent volume of distribution (V/F was 2.75 (l/kg with 96% inter-individual variability. The estimated DHA population mean elimination half-life was 43 min. Gender was associated with increased mean CL/F by 1.14 (95% CI: 0.36-1.92 (l/kg/h for a male compared with a female, and weight was positively associated with V/F. Larger V/Fs were observed for the patients requiring early rescue treatment compared with the remainder

  7. Population pharmacokinetics of artesunate and dihydroartemisinin following intra-rectal dosing of artesunate in malaria patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Julie A; Agbenyega, Tsiri; Barnes, Karen I; Di Perri, Gianni; Folb, Peter; Gomes, Melba; Krishna, Sanjeev; Krudsood, Srivicha; Looareesuwan, Sornchai; Mansor, Sharif; McIlleron, Helen; Miller, Raymond; Molyneux, Malcolm; Mwenechanya, James; Navaratnam, Visweswaran; Nosten, Francois; Olliaro, Piero; Pang, Lorrin; Ribeiro, Isabela; Tembo, Madalitso; van Vugt, Michele; Ward, Steve; Weerasuriya, Kris; Win, Kyaw; White, Nicholas J

    2006-11-01

    Intra-rectal artesunate has been developed as a potentially life-saving treatment of severe malaria in rural village settings where administration of parenteral antimalarial drugs is not possible. We studied the population pharmacokinetics of intra-rectal artesunate and the relationship with parasitological responses in patients with moderately severe falciparum malaria. Adults and children in Africa and Southeast Asia with moderately severe malaria were recruited in two Phase II studies (12 adults from Southeast Asia and 11 children from Africa) with intensive sampling protocols, and three Phase III studies (44 children from Southeast Asia, and 86 children and 26 adults from Africa) with sparse sampling. All patients received 10 mg/kg artesunate as a single intra-rectal dose of suppositories. Venous blood samples were taken during a period of 24 h following dosing. Plasma artesunate and dihydroartemisinin (DHA, the main biologically active metabolite) concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. The pharmacokinetic properties of DHA were determined using nonlinear mixed-effects modelling. Artesunate is rapidly hydrolysed in vivo to DHA, and this contributes the majority of antimalarial activity. For DHA, a one-compartment model assuming complete conversion from artesunate and first-order appearance and elimination kinetics gave the best fit to the data. The mean population estimate of apparent clearance (CL/F) was 2.64 (l/kg/h) with 66% inter-individual variability. The apparent volume of distribution (V/F) was 2.75 (l/kg) with 96% inter-individual variability. The estimated DHA population mean elimination half-life was 43 min. Gender was associated with increased mean CL/F by 1.14 (95% CI: 0.36-1.92) (l/kg/h) for a male compared with a female, and weight was positively associated with V/F. Larger V/Fs were observed for the patients requiring early rescue treatment compared with the remainder, independent

  8. Integrated Two‐Analyte Population Pharmacokinetic Model for Antibody–Drug Conjugates in Patients: Implications for Reducing Pharmacokinetic Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibiansky, L; Agarwal, P; Dere, RC; Li, C; Chu, Y‐W; Hirata, J; Joshi, A; Jin, JY; Girish, S

    2016-01-01

    An integrated pharmacokinetics (PK) model that simultaneously describes concentrations of total antibody (Tab) and antibody‐conjugated monomethyl auristatin E (acMMAE) following administration of monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE)‐containing antibody–drug conjugates (ADCs) was developed based on phase I PK data with extensive sampling for two ADCs. Two linear two‐compartment models that shared all parameters were used to describe the PK of Tab and acMMAE, except that the deconjugation rate was an additional clearance pathway included in the acMMAE PK model compared to Tab. Further, the model demonstrated its ability to predict Tab concentrations and PK parameters based on observed acMMAE PK and various reduced or eliminated Tab PK sampling schemes of phase II data. Thus, this integrated model allows for the reduction of Tab PK sampling in late‐phase clinical development without compromising Tab PK characterization. PMID:27863168

  9. Preference for subcutaneous or intravenous administration of trastuzumab in patients with HER2-positive early breast cancer (PrefHer)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pivot, Xavier; Gligorov, Joseph; Müller, Volkmar

    2013-01-01

    Subcutaneous trastuzumab has shown non-inferior efficacy and a similar pharmacokinetic and safety profile when compared with intravenous trastuzumab in patients with HER2-positive early breast cancer. We assessed patient preference for either subcutaneous or intravenous trastuzumab in the interna...

  10. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of a telodendrimer micellar paclitaxel nanoformulation in a mouse xenograft model of ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao W

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Wenwu Xiao1, Juntao Luo2, Teesta Jain3, John Riggs3, Harry P Tseng1, Paul T Henderson3, Simon R Cherry4, Douglas Rowland4, Kit S Lam1,31Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, UC Davis Cancer Center, University of California Davis, Sacramento, CA; 2Department of Pharmacology, SUNY Upstate Cancer Research Institute, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY; 3Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, 4Department of Biomedical Engineering, UC Davis Cancer Center, University of California Davis, Davis, CABackground: A multifunctional telodendrimer-based micelle system was characterized for delivery of imaging and chemotherapy agents to mouse tumor xenografts. Previous optical imaging studies demonstrated qualitatively that these classes of nanoparticles, called nanomicelles, preferentially accumulate at tumor sites in mice. The research reported herein describes the detailed quantitative imaging and biodistribution profiling of nanomicelles loaded with a cargo of paclitaxel.Methods: The telodendrimer was covalently labeled with 125I and the nanomicelles were loaded with 14C-paclitaxel, which allowed measurement of pharmacokinetics and biodistribution in the mice using microSPECT/CT imaging and liquid scintillation counting, respectively.Results: The radio imaging data showed preferential accumulation of nanomicelles at the tumor site along with a slower clearance rate than paclitaxel formulated in Cremophor EL (Taxol®. Liquid scintillation counting confirmed that 14C-labeled paclitaxel sequestered in nanomicelles had increased uptake by tumor tissue and slower pharmacokinetics than Taxol.Conclusion: Overall, the results indicate that nanomicelle-formulated paclitaxel is a potentially superior formulation compared with Taxol in terms of water solubility, pharmacokinetics, and tumor accumulation, and may be clinically useful for both tumor imaging and improved chemotherapy applications

  11. Population pharmacokinetics of tranexamic acid in paediatric patients undergoing craniosynostosis surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goobie, Susan M; Meier, Petra M; Sethna, Navil F; Soriano, Sulpicio G; Zurakowski, David; Samant, Snehal; Pereira, Luis M

    2013-04-01

    Tranexamic acid (TXA) effectively reduces blood loss and transfusion requirements during craniofacial surgery. The pharmacokinetics of TXA have not been fully characterized in paediatric patients and dosing regimens remain diverse in practice. A mixed-effects population analysis would characterize patient variability and guide dosing practices. The objective of this study was to conduct a population pharmacokinetic analysis and develop a model to predict an effective TXA dosing regimen for children with craniosynostosis undergoing cranial remodelling procedures. The treatment arm of a previously reported placebo-controlled efficacy trial was analysed. Twenty-three patients with a mean age 23 ± 19 months received a TXA loading dose of 50 mg/kg over 15 min at a constant rate, followed by a 5 mg/kg/h maintenance infusion during surgery. TXA plasma concentrations were measured and modelled with a non-linear mixed-effects strategy using Monolix 4.1 and NONMEM(®) 7.2. TXA pharmacokinetics were adequately described by a two-compartment open model with systemic clearance (CL) depending on bodyweight (WT) and age. The apparent volume of distribution of the central compartment (V1) was also dependent on bodyweight. Both the inter-compartmental clearance (Q) and the apparent volume of distribution of the peripheral compartment (V2) were independent of any covariate. The final model may be summarized as: CL (L/h) = [2.3 × (WT/12)(1.59) × AGE(-0.0934)] × e(η1), V1 (L) = [2.34 × (WT/12)(1.4)] × e(η2), Q (L/h) = 2.77 × e(η3) and V2 (L) = 1.53 × e(η4), where each η corresponds to the inter-patient variability for each parameter. No significant correlation was found between blood volume loss and steady-state TXA concentrations. Based on this model and simulations, lower loading doses than used in the clinical study should produce significantly lower peak concentrations while maintaining similar steady-state concentrations. A two-compartment model with covariates

  12. A pharmacokinetic approach to model-guided design of infliximab schedules in ulcerative colitis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Pérez-Pitarch

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infliximab, an anti-tumour necrosis factor approved for treatment of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, is administered at predefined interdose-intervals. On insufficient response or loss of response, treatment can be intensified. The lack or loss of response is likely related to complex pharmacokinetics of infliximab. Aims: To explore optimal dosing strategies of infliximab in treatment-naïve patients with ulcerative colitis through predictive Monte Carlo simulations based on a validated population PK model. Methods: A population of 2,000 treatment-naïve patients was generated by Montecarlo simulation. Six dosing strategies for maintenance therapy were simulated on this population. Strategies 1 and 2 consisted on 5 mg/kg and 6 mg/kg doses, respectively, and 8 weeks inter-dose interval. Strategies 3 and 4 used Individualized doses, adjusted to albumin level, sex and body weight, and a fix inter-dose interval of 8 weeks to achieve a target trough concentration of 5 mg/L or 6 mg/L, respectively. Strategies 5 and 6 used a fix dose of 5 mg/kg and individualized inter-dose intervals, adjusted to the same covariates, to achieve a target concentration, of 5 mg/L or 6 mg/L, respectively. Results: Strategies 2-6 reached trough levels statistically higher than strategy 1 (p < 0.05. Strategy 5 proved to be the best dosing strategy. It was associated with a higher proportion of responder patients than strategy 1 (62 % vs. 40 % without reaching higher peak concentrations. Conclusions: Optimization of maintenance treatment of colitis with infliximab by a pharmacokinetic approach could benefit infliximab-naive patients with ulcerative colitis.

  13. Revisiting Dosing Regimen Using Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Mathematical Modeling: Densification and Intensification of Combination Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meille, Christophe; Barbolosi, Dominique; Ciccolini, Joseph; Freyer, Gilles; Iliadis, Athanassios

    2016-08-01

    Controlling effects of drugs administered in combination is particularly challenging with a densified regimen because of life-threatening hematological toxicities. We have developed a mathematical model to optimize drug dosing regimens and to redesign the dose intensification-dose escalation process, using densified cycles of combined anticancer drugs. A generic mathematical model was developed to describe the main components of the real process, including pharmacokinetics, safety and efficacy pharmacodynamics, and non-hematological toxicity risk. This model allowed for computing the distribution of the total drug amount of each drug in combination, for each escalation dose level, in order to minimize the average tumor mass for each cycle. This was achieved while complying with absolute neutrophil count clinical constraints and without exceeding a fixed risk of non-hematological dose-limiting toxicity. The innovative part of this work was the development of densifying and intensifying designs in a unified procedure. This model enabled us to determine the appropriate regimen in a pilot phase I/II study in metastatic breast patients for a 2-week-cycle treatment of docetaxel plus epirubicin doublet, and to propose a new dose-ranging process. In addition to the present application, this method can be further used to achieve optimization of any combination therapy, thus improving the efficacy versus toxicity balance of such a regimen.

  14. Pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of APF530 (extended-release granisetron in patients receiving moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy: results of two Phase II trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrail N

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nashat Gabrail,1 Ronald Yanagihara,2 Marek Spaczyński,3 William Cooper,4 Erin O'Boyle,5 Carrie Smith,1 Ralph Boccia6 1Gabrail Cancer Center, Canton, OH, USA; 2St Louise Regional Hospital, Gilroy, CA, USA; 3Department of Gynecology, Obstetrics and Gynecologic Oncology, University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 4TFS International, Flemington, NJ, USA; 5FibroGen, Inc., San Francisco, CA, USA; 6Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, Bethesda, MD, USA Background: Despite advances with new therapies, a significant proportion of patients (>30% suffer delayed-onset chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV despite use of antiemetics. APF530 is a sustained-release subcutaneous (SC formulation of granisetron for preventing CINV. APF530 pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy were studied in two open-label, single-dose Phase II trials (C2005-01 and C2007-01, respectively in patients receiving moderately emetogenic chemotherapy or highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Methods: In C2005-01, 45 patients received APF530 250, 500, or 750 mg SC (granisetron 5, 10, or 15 mg, respectively. In C2007-01, 35 patients were randomized to APF530 250 or 500 mg SC. Injections were given 30 to 60 minutes before single-day moderately emetogenic chemotherapy or highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Plasma granisetron was measured from predose to 168 hours after study drug administration. Safety and efficacy were also evaluated. Results: APF530 pharmacokinetics were dose proportional, with slow absorption and elimination of granisetron after a single SC dose. Median time to maximum plasma concentration and half-life were similar for APF530 250 and 500 mg in both trials, with no differences between the groups receiving moderately and highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Exposure to granisetron was maintained at a therapeutic level over the delayed-onset phase, at least 168 hours. Adverse events in both trials were as expected for granisetron; injection site reactions (eg, erythema

  15. An Evaluation of Ciprofloxacin Pharmacokinetics in Critically Ill Patients undergoing Continuous Veno-venous Haemodiafiltration

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Spooner, Almath M

    2011-08-04

    Abstract Background The study aimed to investigate the pharmacokinetics of intravenous ciprofloxacin and the adequacy of 400 mg every 12 hours in critically ill Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients on continuous veno-venous haemodiafiltration (CVVHDF) with particular reference to the effect of achieved flow rates on drug clearance. Methods This was an open prospective study conducted in the intensive care unit and research unit of a university teaching hospital. The study population was seven critically ill patients with sepsis requiring CVVHDF. Blood and ultrafiltrate samples were collected and assayed for ciprofloxacin by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) to calculate the model independent pharmacokinetic parameters; total body clearance (TBC), half-life (t1\\/2) and volume of distribution (Vd). CVVHDF was performed at prescribed dialysate rates of 1 or 2 L\\/hr and ultrafiltration rate of 2 L\\/hr. The blood flow rate was 200 ml\\/min, achieved using a Gambro blood pump and Hospal AN69HF haemofilter. Results Seventeen profiles were obtained. CVVHDF resulted in a median ciprofloxacin t1\\/2 of 13.8 (range 5.15-39.4) hr, median TBC of 9.90 (range 3.10-13.2) L\\/hr, a median Vdss of 125 (range 79.5-554) L, a CVVHDF clearance of 2.47+\\/-0.29 L\\/hr and a clearance of creatinine (Clcr) of 2.66+\\/-0.25 L\\/hr. Thus CVVHDF, at an average flow rate of ~3.5 L\\/hr, was responsible for removing 26% of ciprofloxacin cleared. At the dose rate of 400 mg every 12 hr, the median estimated Cpmax\\/MIC and AUC0-24\\/MIC ratios were 10.3 and 161 respectively (for a MIC of 0.5 mg\\/L) and exceed the proposed criteria of >10 for Cpmax\\/MIC and > 100 for AUC0-24\\/MIC. There was a suggestion towards increased ciprofloxacin clearance by CVVHDF with increasing effluent flow rate. Conclusions Given the growing microbial resistance to ciprofloxacin our results suggest that a dose rate of 400 mg every 12 hr, may be necessary to achieve the desired pharmacokinetic

  16. Levodopa pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling and 6-[F-18]levodopa positron emission tomography in patients with Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietz, M; Harder, S; Graff, J; Kunig, G; Vontobel, P; Leenders, KL; Baas, H

    Objective: Parameters of a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model of levodopa have been claimed to reflect the magnitude of the dopaminergic deficit in patients with Parkinson's disease. The aim of this study was to correlate such parameters with positron emission tomography (PET) with

  17. Influence of breathing pattern on pulmonary aerosol deposition in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF): A pharmacokinetic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Velzen, A.J.; Uges, J.W.F.; Le Brun, P.P.H.; Shahbabai, P.; Touw, D.J.; Heijerman, H.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic effect of inhaled antibiotics on lung infection in CF patients is dependent on the aerosol deposition achieved in the lungs. Objectives: To evaluate the influence of two breathing patterns on pulmonary aerosol deposition using pharmacokinetic parameters as surrogate for deposition.

  18. Pharmacokinetics of azithromycin in plasma, blood, polymorphonuclear neutrophils and sputum during long-term therapy in patients with cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilms, E B; Touw, D J; Heijerman, H G M

    Chronic therapy with the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM) is widely practiced in the treatment of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Azithromycin dosage is variable, based on published studies, and not supported by pharmacokinetic data.

  19. Pharmacokinetics of piperacillin and tazobactam in critically ill patients with renal failure, treated with continuous veno-venous hemofiltration (CVVH)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanderWerf, TS; Mulder, POM; Zijlstra, JG; Uges, DRA; Stegeman, CA

    Objective: Kinetics of piperacillin (pip), in combination with the beta-lactamase inhibitor tazobactam (taz) have been studied in volunteers and patients in relatively stable conditions. The fixed drug preparation appeared to have ideal pharmacokinetic properties if renal function was normal or

  20. Total and unbound ceftriaxone pharmacokinetics in critically ill Australian Indigenous patients with severe sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Danny; Stewart, Penelope; Goud, Rajendra; Gourley, Stephen; Hewagama, Saliya; Krishnaswamy, Sushena; Wallis, Steven C; Lipman, Jeffrey; Roberts, Jason A

    2016-12-01

    In the absence of specific data to guide optimal dosing, this study aimed to describe the pharmacokinetics of ceftriaxone in severely septic Australian Indigenous patients and to assess achievement of the pharmacodynamic target of the regimens prescribed. A pharmacokinetic study was conducted in a remote hospital intensive care unit in patients receiving ceftriaxone dosing of 1 g every 12 h (q12h). Serial blood and urine samples were collected over one dosing interval on two consecutive days. Samples were assayed using a validated chromatography method for total and unbound concentrations. Concentration-time data collected were analysed with a non-compartmental approach. A total of 100 plasma samples were collected from five subjects. Ceftriaxone clearance, volume of distribution at steady-state, elimination half-life and elimination rate constant estimates were 0.9 (0.6-1.5) L/h, 11.2 (7.6-13.4) L, 9.5 (3.2-10.2) h and 0.07 (0.07-0.21) h -1 , respectively. The unbound fraction of ceftriaxone ranged between 14% and 43%, with a higher unbound fraction present at higher total concentrations. The unbound concentrations at 720 min from the initiation of infusion for the first and second dosing intervals were 7.2 (4.8-10.7) mg/L and 7.8 (4.7-12.1) mg/L respectively, which exceeds the minimum inhibitory concentration of all typical target pathogens. In conclusion, the regimen of ceftriaxone 1 g q12h is adequate for critically ill Australian Indigenous patients with severe sepsis caused by non-resistant pathogens. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Fever in Patients With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasikhova, Yanina; Ludlow, Steven; Baluch, Aliyah

    2017-04-01

    The definition of fever is flexible and depends on the clinical context. Fever is frequently observed in patients with cancer. Infectious and noninfectious causes of fever in patients with various oncological and hematological malignancies and the usefulness of biomarkers are discussed. To treat patients in a timely manner and to minimize morbidity and mortality, it is paramount that health care professionals determine the cause of fever. The usefulness of biomarkers in febrile patients with cancer continues to be controversial. Fever is frequently seen in patients with cancer and can be associated with a variety of infectious and noninfectious causes. The utility of acute-phase reactants, such as erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and procalcitonin, along with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug challenge should be further evaluated as adjunct tools for the workup of fever in patients with cancer.

  2. Comparative Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Midodrine and Its Active Metabolite Desglymidodrine in Cirrhotic Patients with Tense Ascites Versus Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ahmed; Farid, Samar; Amin, Mona; Kassem, Mohamed; Al-Garem, Nouman; Al-Ghobashy, Medhat

    2016-02-01

    Midodrine is an α-agonist prodrug of desglymidodrine used for the management of hypotension, and can also be used for hepatorenal syndrome and cirrhotic patients with tense ascites. The objective of the present work was to study the clinical pharmacokinetic parameters of midodrine and its active metabolite desglymidodrine in cirrhotic patients with tense ascites, which may help in dose selection and improve treatment outcome. This was a prospective, open-label, single-dose, parallel-group study. At first, a pilot study was performed on one healthy volunteer by taking serial blood samples at scheduled time intervals to validate the method of analysis and sampling times. The full study was then conducted by selecting 12 cirrhotic patients with tense ascites in one group and taking nine blood samples. We also selected five healthy volunteers as the control group and took 11 blood samples. Statistically significant differences were observed between the healthy volunteer group and the patients group in the area under the concentration versus time curve (AUC0-t) and maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) values of midodrine and desglymidodrine. Based on the results of the pharmacokinetic analysis, the patient group was further subdivided into those receiving the interacting drug ranitidine (five patients) and those not receiving the interacting drug (seven patients). Pharmacokinetic parameters of midodrine can differ significantly in cirrhotic patients with tense ascites from those in healthy individuals. Drug monitoring, dose adjustments, and drug-drug interactions should all be considered during therapy in this vulnerable patient group.

  3. Pharmacokinetics analysis of sustained release hGH biodegradable implantable tablets using a mouse model of human ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoveña, Ana; Fariña, José B; Llabrés, Matías; Zhu, Yonglian; Dannies, Priscilla

    2010-03-30

    This paper presents the pharmacokinetic of human growth hormone (hGH) implantable tablets tested on a human ovarian cancer mouse model. In order to obtain a sustained release device which permits to administer a high dose of the hormone that keeps its integrity and stability, three different formulations of hGH-poly (d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) were elaborated by direct compression method varying hormone load, PLGA content and compactation time. In vitro studies showed that drug release was mainly controlled by hormone load. Pharmacokinetic studies were conducted by using immunodeficient female mice. Four days before the insertion of hGH implantable tablets in the peritoneal cavity, every mouse received 5x10(6) human ovarian cancer cells (SKOV3.ip1). Hormone serum levels were monitored through bleeding from eye orbital vessels. The population pharmacokinetic model used was based on the in series tank model and model parameters were estimated using the maximum likelihood method. The null hypothesis test about differences between formulations leads us to the conclusion that the three formulations showed the same kinetic behavior except for the hGH load. The hormone release was extended all over 2 weeks but no increase or decrease in survival time was observed. These results suggest that hGH serum levels do not facilitate tumoral cells proliferation, an expected effect of hGH and this could explain why survival times of mice treated with implantable tablets are not shorter than those treated with the control ones. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A Review on Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Tamsulosin in Patients with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolou Ghamari

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Context Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH that disturbs aged males is described as the abundant, chronic progressive disorder usually associated with lower urinary tract symptoms. The alpha 1A-adrenergic receptor antagonist, tamsulosin (Flomax®/Omnic®, seems to be an appropriate management from the view point of urological surgeons. The current review aimed to evaluate the clinical pharmacological properties of tamsulosin in prostate disorders. Evidence Acquisition United States national library of medicine (PubMed, NLM were searched from April 1991 to March 2016. The Mesh terms were: tamsulosin, tamsulosin pharmacokinetics in urology, tamsulosin in BPH and clinical pharmacokinetics of tamsulosin in BPH. Published clinical trials and review articles applicable to pharmacotherapy of tamsulosin in BPH were reviewed. Results In patients with mild international prostate symptom score (< 8 to moderate symptoms of BPH, initial treatment with an alpha 1-adrenergic antagonist monotherapy were useful. With a half-life of 9 - 13 hours, the oral bioavailability of drug was reported 100%. The drug is metabolized by liver. Excretion through renal was reported 76%. Initial dose of drug was 0.4 mg/day and the maximum dose was reported 0.8 mg/day. The drug could cause dizziness, sever drowsiness and problems in thinking, driving and many other complications. Other serious adverse reactions could be mentioned as hives, rash, itching, and difficulty in breathing, swelling of face, lips, tongue and throat. Tamsulosin therapy should be stopped in patients who experience hypotension. Conclusions To treat BPH therapeutically, it is necessary to stabilize severities of the patient’s symptoms with potential side effects of the treatment. Tamsulosin blocks alpha 1-receptors in smooth muscles both in the bladder neck and prostate, which leads to relaxation and subsequently less resistance to urinary flow. By advancement of tamsulosin, pharmacotherapy strategies could

  5. Prediction of chemotherapeutic response in bladder cancer using k-means clustering of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huyen T.; Jia, Guang; Shah, Zarine K.; Pohar, Kamal; Mortazavi, Amir; Zynger, Debra L.; Wei, Lai; Yang, Xiangyu; Clark, Daniel; Knopp, Michael V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To apply k-means clustering of two pharmacokinetic parameters derived from 3T DCE-MRI to predict chemotherapeutic response in bladder cancer at the mid-cycle time-point. Materials and Methods With the pre-determined number of 3 clusters, k-means clustering was performed on non-dimensionalized Amp and kep estimates of each bladder tumor. Three cluster volume fractions (VFs) were calculated for each tumor at baseline and mid-cycle. The changes of three cluster VFs from baseline to mid-cycle were correlated with the tumor’s chemotherapeutic response. Receiver-operating-characteristics curve analysis was used to evaluate the performance of each cluster VF change as a biomarker of chemotherapeutic response in bladder cancer. Results k-means clustering partitioned each bladder tumor into cluster 1 (low kep and low Amp), cluster 2 (low kep and high Amp), cluster 3 (high kep and low Amp). The changes of all three cluster VFs were found to be associated with bladder tumor response to chemotherapy. The VF change of cluster 2 presented with the highest area-under-the-curve value (0.96) and the highest sensitivity/specificity/accuracy (96%/100%/97%) with a selected cutoff value. Conclusion k-means clustering of the two DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters can characterize the complex microcirculatory changes within a bladder tumor to enable early prediction of the tumor’s chemotherapeutic response. PMID:24943272

  6. Alterations in Hydrocortisone Pharmacokinetics in a Patient With Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Following Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallappa, Ashwini; Nella, Aikaterini A; Kumar, Parag; Brooks, Kristina M; Perritt, Ashley F; Ling, Alexander; Liu, Chia-Ying; Merke, Deborah P

    2017-07-01

    Management of adult patients with classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is challenging and often complicated by obesity, metabolic syndrome, and adverse cardiovascular risk. Alterations in weight can influence cortisol kinetics. A 19-year-old woman with classic CAH and morbid obesity experienced persistent elevations of androgen levels while receiving oral glucocorticoid therapy. Control of adrenal androgens was improved with continuous subcutaneous hydrocortisone infusion therapy, but obesity-related comorbidities persisted. After undergoing sleeve gastrectomy, the patient experienced dramatic weight loss, with improvement in insulin sensitivity and fatty liver in the postbariatric period. Cortisol clearance studies performed to evaluate changes in hydrocortisone dose requirements showed marked alternations in cortisol pharmacokinetics with decreases in volume of distribution and cortisol clearance, along with an increase in area under the curve for cortisol. Hydrocortisone dose was subsequently decreased 34% by 15 months after surgery. Effective control of androgen excess on this lower hydrocortisone dose was achieved and continues 27 months after surgery. This case highlights obesity-related complications of glucocorticoid replacement therapy in the management of CAH. Individual patient factors, such as fatty liver disease and insulin resistance, can have a clinically important effect on cortisol metabolism. Bariatric surgery was a safe and effective treatment of obesity in this patient with CAH and should be considered for patients with CAH and multiple obesity-related comorbidities.

  7. Chronic diseases among older cancer patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Deckx, L.D.; Akker, M.A. van der; Metsemakers, J.M.; Knottnerus, A.K.; Schellevis, F.G.; Buntinx, F.B.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: With the growing number of older cancer patients, the burden of chronic diseases among older cancer patients will become increasingly important. Chronic diseases often interfere with treatment decisions and prognosis for cancer patients. However, little is known about the occurrence of chronic diseases among older cancer patients. Aim: We aim to examine the frequency of pre-existing and subsequent chronic diseases among cancer patients above age 60 in comparison with non-cancer ...

  8. Assessment of nutritional status in cancer--the relationship between body composition and pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Carla M M; Maia, Yara L M; Ormsbee, Michael; Sawyer, Michael B; Baracos, Vickie E

    2013-10-01

    Several nutritional assessment tools have been used in oncology settings to monitor nutritional status and its associated prognostic significance. Body composition is fundamental for the assessment of nutritional status. Recently, the use of accurate and precise body composition tools has significantly added to the value of nutritional assessment in this clinical setting. Computerized tomography (CT) is an example of a technique which provides state-of-the-art assessment of body composition. With use of CT images, a great variability in body composition of cancer patients has been identified even in people with identical body weight or body mass index. Severe muscle depletion (sarcopenia) has emerged as a prevalent body composition phenotype which is predictive of poor functional status, shorter time to tumor progression, shorter survival, and higher incidence of dose-limiting toxicity. Variability in body composition of cancer patients may be a source of disparities in the metabolism of cytotoxic agents. Future clinical trials investigating dose reductions in patients with sarcopenia and dose-escalating studies based on pre-treatment body composition assessment have the potential to alter cancer treatment paradigms.

  9. Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Properties of Oral Voriconazole in Patients with Invasive Fungal Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Taotao; Xie, Jiao; Wang, Yan; Zheng, Xiaowei; Lei, Jin'e; Wang, Xue; Dong, Haiyan; Yang, Qianting; Chen, Limei; Xing, Jianfeng; Dong, Yalin

    2015-09-01

    To assess the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) properties of voriconazole and to investigate the relationship between PK/PD parameters and the efficacy of a fixed-dose oral regimen in the treatment of invasive fungal infections (IFIs). Prospective and observational PK/PD study. A university-affiliated medical center. Fifteen hospitalized patients with proven IFIs who were treated with oral voriconazole for at least 2 weeks. We investigated the PK/PD properties of voriconazole using a noncompartmental analysis in 15 patients. Marked interpatient variation in voriconazole pharmacokinetic properties was noted including peak plasma concentrations (median 2.31 mg/L, range 1.06-4.01 mg/L), 12-hour area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUCτ ) (median 21.18 hr mg/L, range 7.71-42.07 hr mg/L), ratio of the unbound drug AUC over 24 hours (fAUC24 ) divided by the minimum inhibitory concentration (fAUC24 :MIC; median 62.61, range 6.48-415.30), and the free trough plasma concentration (Cmin ) divided by the MIC (fCmin :MIC; median 1.81, range 0.46-15.52). There was a good correlation between voriconazole Cmin and AUCτ (R(2)  = 0.805). Voriconazole therapy was effective in 66.7% of patients (10/15). No significant difference was observed with regard to successful clinical response between the patients with a fAUC24 :MIC and fCmin :MIC values higher than 25 and higher than 1 (10/12 vs 10/13, respectively; χ(2)  = 1.61, p=0.688). There is substantial interpatient variability in the PK/PD properties of voriconazole. fAUC24 :MIC values higher than 25 and fCmin :MIC values higher than 1 may predict clinical response in patients with IFIs. Designing an optimal dosage regimen based on individual PK/PD properties will improve the efficacy in patients with IFIs. © 2015 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  10. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic correlation of imipenem in pediatric burn patients using a bioanalytical liquid chromatographic method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Regina Cavani Jorge Santos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A bioanalytical method was developed and applied to quantify the free imipenem concentrations for pharmacokinetics and PK/PD correlation studies of the dose adjustments required to maintain antimicrobial effectiveness in pediatric burn patients. A reverse-phase Supelcosil LC18 column (250 x 4.6 mm 5 micra, binary mobile phase consisting of 0.01 M, pH 7.0 phosphate buffer and acetonitrile (99:1, v/v, flow rate of 0.8 mL/min, was applied. The method showed good absolute recovery (above 90%, good linearity (0.25-100.0 µg/mL, r2=0.999, good sensitivity (LLOQ: 0.25 µg/mL; LLOD: 0.12 µg/mL and acceptable stability. Inter/intraday precision values were 7.3/5.9%, and mean accuracy was 92.9%. A bioanalytical method was applied to quantify free drug concentrations in children with burns. Six pediatric burn patients (median 7.0 years old, 27.5 kg, normal renal function, and 33% total burn surface area were prospectively investigated; inhalation injuries were present in 4/6 (67% of the patients. Plasma monitoring and PK assessments were performed using a serial blood sample collection for each set, totaling 10 sets. The PK/PD target attained (40%T>MIC for each minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC: 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 mg/L occurred at a percentage higher than 80% of the sets investigated and 100% after dose adjustment. In conclusion, the purification of plasma samples using an ultrafiltration technique followed by quantification of imipenem plasma measurements using the LC method is quite simple, useful, and requires small volumes for blood sampling. In addition, a small amount of plasma (0.25 mL is needed to guarantee drug effectiveness in pediatric burn patients. There is also a low risk of neurotoxicity, which is important because pharmacokinetics are unpredictable in these critical patients with severe hospital infection. Finally, the PK/PD target was attained for imipenem in the control of sepsis in pediatric patients with burns.

  11. Pharmacokinetics of dexmedetomidine administered to patients with end-stage renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism undergoing general anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, W; Zhang, Y; Zhang, M-Z; Huang, X-H; Li, Y; Li, R; Liu, Q-W

    2017-12-16

    The primary objective of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetics of dexmedetomidine in patients with end-stage renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism with those in normal individuals. Fifteen patients with end-stage renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism (Renal-failure Group) and 8 patients with normal renal and parathyroid gland function (Control Group) received intravenous 0.6 μg/kg dexmedetomidine for 10 minutes before anaesthesia induction. Arterial blood samples for plasma dexmedetomidine concentration analysis were drawn at regular intervals after the infusion was stopped. The pharmacokinetics were analysed using a nonlinear mixed-effect model with NONMEM software. The statistical significance of covariates was examined using the objective function (-2 log likelihood). In the forward inclusion and backward deletion, covariates (age, weight, sex, height, lean body mass [LBM], body surface area [BSA], body mass index [BMI], plasma albumin and grouping factor [renal failure or not]) were tested for significant effects on pharmacokinetic parameters. The validity of our population model was also evaluated using bootstrap simulations. The dexmedetomidine concentration-time curves fitted best with the principles of a two-compartmental pharmacokinetic model. No covariate of systemic clearance further improved the model. The final pharmacokinetic parameter values were as follows: V 1  = 60.6 L, V 2  = 222 L, Cl 1  = 0.825 L/min and Cl 2  = 4.48 L/min. There was no influence of age, weight, sex, height, LBM, BSA, BMI, plasma albumin and grouping factor (renal failure or not) on pharmacokinetic parameters. Although the plasma albumin concentrations (35.46 ± 4.13 vs 44.10 ± 1.12 mmol/L, respectively, P Renal-failure Group than in the Control Group (81.68 ± 18.08 vs 63.07 ± 13.45 μg/kg/min, respectively, P renal failure and hyperparathyroidism were similar to those in patients with normal renal function. Further

  12. Population pharmacokinetics of exendin-(9-39) and clinical dose selection in patients with congenital hyperinsulinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chee M; Tang, Fei; Seeholzer, Steven H; Zou, Yixuan; De León, Diva D

    2018-03-01

    Congenital hyperinsulinism (HI) is the most common cause of persistent hypoglycaemia in infants and children. Exendin-(9-39), an inverse glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) agonist, is a novel therapeutic agent for HI that has demonstrated glucose-raising effect. We report the first population pharmacokinetic (PopPK) model of the exendin-(9-39) in patients with HI and propose the optimal dosing regimen for future clinical trials in neonates with HI. A total of 182 pharmacokinetic (PK) observations from 26 subjects in three clinical studies were included for constructing the PopPK model using first order conditional estimation (FOCE) with interaction method in nonlinear mixed-effects modelling (NONMEM). Exposure metrics (area under the curve [AUC] and maximum plasma concentration [C max ]) at no observed adverse effect levels (NOAELs) in rats and dogs were determined in toxicology studies. Observed concentration-time profiles of exendin-(9-39) were described by a linear two-compartmental PK model. Following allometric scaling of PK parameters, age and creatinine clearance did not significantly affect clearance. The calculated clearance and elimination half-life for adult subjects with median weight of 69 kg were 11.8 l h -1 and 1.81 h, respectively. The maximum recommended starting dose determined from modelling and simulation based on the AUC 0-last at the NOAEL and predicted AUC 0-inf using the PopPK model was 27 mg kg -1  day -1 intravenously. This is the first study to investigate the PopPK of exendin-(9-39) in humans. The final PopPK model was successfully used with preclinical toxicology findings to propose the optimal dosing regimen of exendin-(9-39) for clinical studies in neonates with HI, allowing for a more targeted dosing approach to achieve desired glycaemic response. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  13. Gap analysis of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in burn patients: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Amanda N; Grimsrud, Kristin N; Sen, Soman; Palmieri, Tina L; Greenhalgh, David G; Tran, Nam K

    2015-01-01

    Severe burn injury results in a multifaceted physiological response that significantly alters drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (PK/PD). This response includes hypovolemia, increased vascular permeability, increased interstitial hydrostatic pressure, vasodilation, and hypermetabolism. These physiologic alterations impact drug distribution and excretion-thus varying the drug therapeutic effect on the body or microorganism. To this end, in order to optimize critical care for the burn population it is essential to understand how burn injury alters PK/PD parameters. The purpose of this article is to describe the relationship between burn injury and drug PK/PD. We conducted a literature review via PubMed and Google to identify burn-related PK/PD studies. Search parameters included "pharmacokinetics," "pharmacodynamics," and "burns." Based on our search parameters, we located 38 articles that studied PK/PD parameters specifically in burns. Twenty-seven articles investigated PK/PD of antibiotics, 10 assessed analgesics and sedatives, and one article researched an antacid. Out of the 37 articles, there were 19 different software programs used and eight different control groups. The mechanisms behind alterations in PK/PD in burns remain poorly understood. Dosing techniques must be adapted based on burn injury-related changes in PK/PD parameters in order to ensure drug efficacy. Although several PK/PD studies have been undertaken in the burn population, there is wide variation in the analytical techniques, software, and study sample sizes used. In order to refine dosing techniques in burns and consequently improve patient outcomes, there must be harmonization among PK/PD analyses.

  14. Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Voriconazole Intravenous-to-Oral Switch Regimens in Immunocompromised Japanese Pediatric Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Ryoji; Kato, Koji; Maeda, Naoko; Fukushima, Keitaro; Goto, Hiroaki; Inoue, Masami; Muto, Chieko; Okayama, Akifumi; Watanabe, Kenichi; Liu, Ping

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of voriconazole following intravenous-to-oral switch regimens used with immunocompromised Japanese pediatric subjects (age 2 to voriconazole every 12 h (q12h), and 9 mg/kg (maximum, 350 mg) of oral voriconazole q12h (for patients age 2 to voriconazole q12h and 200 mg of oral voriconazole q12h (for patients age 12 to voriconazole exposures were comparable between these two groups due to large interindividual variability. The exposures in the 2 cytochrome P450 2C19 poor metabolizers were among the highest. Voriconazole was well tolerated. The most common treatment-related adverse events were photophobia and abnormal hepatic function. These recommended doses derived from the modeling appear to be appropriate for Japanese pediatric patients, showing no additional safety risks compared to those with adult patients. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01383993.) PMID:25451051

  15. Therapeutic equivalence and pharmacokinetics of generic tacrolimus formulation in de novo kidney transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Sang-Il; Ha, Jongwon; Kim, Yon Su; Ahn, Sang Hyun; Park, Taejin; Park, Dae Do; Kim, Suh Min; Min, Seung-Kee; Hong, Hyejin; Ahn, Curie; Kim, Sang Joon

    2013-12-01

    There is a growing concern about the therapeutic equivalence of the generic tacrolimus formulation (GEN Tacrolimus) to the reference tacrolimus (REF Tacrolimus) in solid organ transplantation. A prospective, randomized study of 126 de novo renal transplant patients was conducted to compare the efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles between GEN tacrolimus (n = 63) and REF tacrolimus (n = 63). The PK of tacrolimus was evaluated on Day 10 and 6 months under steady-state condition. Crossover study was carried out in 66 patients at 6 months. On Day 10, 117 patients completed PK profiles (54 GEN tacrolimus and 63 REF tacrolimus) and GEN tacrolimus showed comparable C(0) (9.8 ± 2.5 versus 9.7 ± 3.0 ng/mL, P = 0.80) but significantly higher dose-normalized C(max) (309.1 ± 191.9 versus 192.5 ± 95.2 ng/mL/mg/kg, P PK profiles evaluated at 9 months showed that generic substitution also resulted in an 'early and high C(max)'. Efficacy and safety data were comparable over the 9-month study period. Therapeutic equivalence and the PK of GEN tacrolimus should be evaluated in patients undergoing de novo renal transplantation.

  16. Bone health in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coleman, R; Body, J J; Aapro, M

    2014-01-01

    There are three distinct areas of cancer management that make bone health in cancer patients of increasing clinical importance. First, bone metastases are common in many solid tumours, notably those arising from the breast, prostate and lung, as well as multiple myeloma, and may cause major...... morbidity including fractures, severe pain, nerve compression and hypercalcaemia. Through optimum multidisciplinary management of patients with bone metastases, including the use of bone-targeted treatments such as potent bisphosphonates or denosumab, it has been possible to transform the course of advanced...... cancer for many patients resulting in a major reduction in skeletal complications, reduced bone pain and improved quality of life. Secondly, many of the treatments we use to treat cancer patients have effects on reproductive hormones, which are critical for the maintenance of normal bone remodelling...

  17. Preradiation preparation of cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Il'in, V.I.

    1991-01-01

    The main stages in preradiation preparation of cancer patients were defined. Immediate preparation must include both clinical and psychological aspects. It was shown that in preradiation preparation of cancer patients it was necessary to make a plan of radiotherapy. The plan of radiotherapy was made of three processes: determination of tumor nature and localization, choice of the corresponding irradiation conditions, definition of degree of radiation complications rick

  18. Cancer patients and mass media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Rajer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTBACKGROUNDNowadays cancer patients tend to be more involved in the medical decision process. Active participation improves health outcomes and patient satisfaction. To participate effectively patients require a huge amount of information, but time limits make it impossible to satisfy all information needs at clinics. We tried to find out which kind of media cancer patients use when searching for information and how often. Lastly, we try to find out how popular the Internet is in this regard.METODSIn this research we invited cancer patients, who had regular clinic examinations at the Oncology Institute between 21st and 25th May in 2012. We carried out a prospective research by anonymous questionnaires. We were investigating which media were used and how often. We analysed results with descriptive statistics, ANOVA, the χ²-Test and the t-test.RESULTS478 of 919 questionnaires distributed among cancer patients were returned. Mean age was 59.9 years. 61 % of responders were female, and the most common level of education was high school (33 %. Most common cancer type was breast cancer (33 %, followed by gastrointestinal and lung cancer. Patients search for information most often on television (81.4% responders, followed by specialized brochures (78%, internet (70.8% and newspapers (67.6%. Patients who do not use media for information searching are older than average (62.5 years vs. 59.9 years; p<0,000.CONCLUSIONSAccording to our results patients search for information most often on television, followed by brochures, internet and newspapers. Older patients less often search for information. This data might help doctors in everyday clinical practice.

  19. Population Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Analysis of Belimumab Administered Subcutaneously in Healthy Volunteers and Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struemper, Herbert; Thapar, Mita; Roth, David

    2017-09-08

    Intravenous belimumab 10 mg/kg every 4 weeks is indicated in patients with active, autoantibody-positive systemic lupus erythematosus receiving standard systemic lupus erythematosus care. Subcutaneous 200-mg weekly administration, which may prove more convenient for patients and improve adherence, is currently under investigation. The objective of this study was to characterize the population pharmacokinetics and exposure-efficacy response of subcutaneous belimumab in a pooled analysis of pharmacokinetic data [phase I: BEL114448 (NCT01583530) and BEL116119 (NCT01516450) in healthy subjects (n = 134); phase III: BEL112341 (NCT01484496) in adults with systemic lupus erythematosus (n = 554)] and pharmacodynamic data [BEL112341 in adults with systemic lupus erythematosus (n = 833)]. Non-linear mixed-effects modeling (NONMEM®) was used to develop a population pharmacokinetic model and perform a covariate analysis. Subsequently, exploratory exposure-response analysis and logistic regression modeling was performed based on the individual parameter estimates of the population pharmacokinetic model. Population-pharmacokinetic parameters for subcutaneous belimumab were consistent with those for intravenous belimumab and other immunoglobulin G1 monoclonal antibodies. Pharmacokinetic parameters and subcutaneous belimumab exposure were consistent between healthy subjects and patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, and no evidence for target-mediated disposition of belimumab was found. Subcutaneous belimumab steady-state exposure was achieved after ~11 weeks; subcutaneous belimumab steady-state minimum concentration exceeded that of intravenous belimumab after <4 weeks, and average steady-state concentration was similar to that achieved following intravenous administration. In patients with moderate-to-severe systemic lupus erythematosus, subcutaneous belimumab 200 mg once weekly plus standard of care significantly improved the systemic lupus erythematosus

  20. The metabolism and pharmacokinetics of isotretinoin in patients with acne and rosacea are not influenced by ethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønhøj Larsen, F; Jakobsen, P; Grønhøj Larsen, C

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Isotretinoin is effective in the treatment of severe acne and rosacea. Both parent drug and its main metabolite 4-oxo-isotretinoin are potentially teratogenic compounds and contain a carboxylic acid moiety. In the presence of ethanol, naturally occurring as well as synthetic retinoids......-RA), and other possible metabolites in the presence or absence of ethanol are converted to their corresponding ethyl derivatives in patients with severe acne or rosacea after multiple isotretinoin dosing. In addition, pharmacokinetic parameters of the parent drug and its 4-oxo metabolite were determined....... PATIENTS/METHODS: Eleven patients with severe acne or rosacea were treated with isotretinoin daily for 3 months and investigated pharmacokinetically during 24 h after 1 month of treatment and for up to 28 days after discontinuation of therapy. A possible influence of ethanol was evaluated using a simple...

  1. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interaction between allopurinol and probenecid in patients with gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Sophie L; Graham, Garry G; McLachlan, Andrew J; Williams, Kenneth M; Day, Richard O

    2011-05-01

    To investigate the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interaction between probenecid and oxypurinol (the active metabolite of allopurinol) in patients with gout. This was an open-label observational clinical study. Blood and urine samples were collected to measure oxypurinol and urate concentrations. We examined the effects of adding probenecid to allopurinol therapy upon plasma concentrations and renal clearances of urate and oxypurinol. Twenty patients taking allopurinol 100-400 mg daily completed the study. Maximum coadministered doses of probenecid were 250 mg/day (n = 1), 500 mg/day (n = 19), 1000 mg/day (n = 7), 1500 mg/day (n = 3), and 2000 mg/day (n = 1). All doses except the 250 mg daily dose were divided and dosing was twice daily. Estimated creatinine clearances ranged from 28 to 113 ml/min. Addition of probenecid 500 mg/day to allopurinol therapy decreased plasma urate concentrations by 25%, from mean 0.37 mmol/l (95% CI 0.33-0.41) to mean 0.28 mmol/l (95% CI 0.24-0.32) (p probenecid 500 mg/day appeared to be lower in patients with renal impairment. Coadministration of allopurinol with probenecid had a significantly greater hypouricemic effect than allopurinol alone despite an associated reduction of plasma oxypurinol concentrations. Australian Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN012606000276550.

  2. A pharmacokinetic interpretation of increasing concentrations of DEHP in haemodialysed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dine, T; Luyckx, M; Gressier, B; Brunet, C; Souhait, J; Nogarede, S; Vanpoucke, J; Courbon, F; Plusquellec, Y; Houin, G

    2000-04-01

    The degree of exposure to DEHP was assessed in 11 patients with chronic renal failure undergoing maintenance haemodialysis. The amount of DEHP leached from the dialyser during a 4-h dialysis session was estimated by monitoring the DEHP blood concentration using a HPLC method. When a patient undergoes a dialysis treatment, the concentration of di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) in venous blood is increased when the blood crosses through the dialysis apparatus. This increase may be explained either because DEHP is not extracted by the dialyser or because DEHP comes from the dialysis bath due to contact of blood against plasticized pipes. To explain the increasing concentration of DEHP during treatment of renal failure using plasticized tubing, we propose a pharmacokinetic compartmental model in order to fit raw data obtained from dialysed patients and to get the amount of DEHP which enters the body by AUC calculations. Results obtained after HPLC analysis show a high degree of interpatient variability in DEHP retained. This amount can reach a toxicity level because of repetitive dialysis treatments over prolonged periods of time. In the coming years, it seems necessary to reconsider the use of DEHP as a plasticizer in medical devices. Highly unacceptable amounts of DEHP leached during the dialysis session could be easily avoided by careful selection of haemodialysis tubing.

  3. Pharmacokinetic disposition of 14C-glyburide in patients with varying renal function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, J.G.; Antal, E.J.; Raehl, C.L.; Gorsch, H.K.; Craig, W.A.; Albert, K.S.; Welling, P.G.

    1986-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of 14C-labeled glyburide were studied in 13 men with varying degrees of renal impairment. Patients received a single, 5 mg oral dose of glyburide as a solution (10 microCi/ml/mg) after a high-carbohydrate breakfast. Serial plasma and breath samples were collected for 48 hours and urine and feces were collected for 5 to 7 days. Patients with normal to moderately impaired renal function (creatinine clearance [CLCR] of 29 to 131 ml/min/1.7 m2) had glyburide plasma t1/2 values of 2.0 to 5.0 hours, with no relationship between CLCR and glyburide clearance. One subject with severe renal impairment (CLCR = 5 ml/min/1.7 m2) had decreased glyburide clearance that resulted in a t1/2 of 11 hours. The elimination of metabolites was more dependent on renal status but was only significantly affected in the patient with severe renal impairment

  4. Accounting for Pharmacokinetic Variability of Certolizumab Pegol in Patients with Crohn's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vande Casteele, Niels; Mould, Diane R; Coarse, Jason; Hasan, Iram; Gils, Ann; Feagan, Brian; Sandborn, William J

    2017-12-01

    Certolizumab pegol is an effective biologic for patients with Crohn's disease (CD). Individual differences in certolizumab pegol apparent clearance (CL/F) affect exposure and possibly efficacy. A previously developed population pharmacokinetic (PK) model did not account for dynamic changes in clinical parameters during therapy. The aim of this study was to refine the existing PK model to capture the time-varying influence of covariates. Data collected from 2157 Crohn's disease patients in nine studies were analyzed using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling software (NONMEM). Certolizumab pegol concentration-time data were described by a one-compartment PK model with first-order absorption, and one-compartment disposition with linear, time-dependent elimination using antidrug antibody (ADAb) concentration as a continuous variable. The final dataset consisted of 12,926 analyzable records. Parameter estimates were absorption rate constant 1.83/day, CL/F 0.527 L/day, and apparent volume of distribution (V/F) 8.33 L. ADAb concentration (2.5-214 units/mL) increased the median CL/F by 142-174%. For a typical patient, body weight (46.8-100.5 kg) increased the median CL/F and V/F from 82 to 120%. Albumin (32-48 g/L) decreased and C-reactive protein (0.5-54.0 mg/L) increased the median CL/F from 123 to 85% and from 83 to 113%, respectively. Between-patient variability of CL/F was 19.6%. By incorporating time-varying covariates, this population PK model reduces between-patient variability on CL/F estimates, and the relative influence of ADAb can now be assessed. As Crohn's disease patient covariates are often time-dependent, this model is more reflective of patient drug exposure with sustained treatment.

  5. Pharmacokinetics and Dosing of Ceftobiprole Medocaril for the Treatment of Hospital- and Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Different Patient Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Antonio; Mouton, Johan Willem; Pea, Federico

    2016-12-01

    Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) are among the most common infections treated in the hospital setting, and together they place a significant burden on healthcare systems. Successful management of HAP and CAP depends on rapid initiation of empirical antibiotic therapy with broad-spectrum antibiotics. Ceftobiprole is a new-generation, broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotic for the treatment of HAP (excluding ventilator-associated pneumonia) and CAP. It displays potent in vitro activity against a broad range of pathogens important in pneumonia. This review summarizes the pharmacokinetic profile of ceftobiprole, and considers the pharmacokinetic parameters and pharmacodynamics underlying the choice of dosing regimen. Ceftobiprole shows linear pharmacokinetics after single and multiple doses and is eliminated predominantly through the kidneys. Ceftobiprole is administered as a 500 mg intravenous infusion over 2 h every 8 h, and steady-state concentrations are reached on the first day of dosing. Dose adjustment is recommended for patients with moderate or severe renal impairment and for those with end-stage renal disease. Extending the infusion time of ceftobiprole to 4 h is recommended to optimize drug exposure in critically ill patients with augmented renal clearance. However, there is no need for dose adjustments based on age, sex or ethnicity, or for patients with severe obesity. Population pharmacokinetic modelling and Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine the optimal dosing regimen for ceftobiprole in special patient populations, including paediatric patients. Future studies of ceftobiprole in patients with HAP and CAP would be of interest.

  6. Muscle dysfunction in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jesper Frank; Jones, L W; Andersen, J L

    2014-01-01

    dysfunction in cancer patients lies in the correlation to vital clinical end points such as cancer-specific and all-cause mortality, therapy complications and quality of life (QoL). Such associations strongly emphasize the need for effective therapeutic countermeasures to be developed and implemented......BACKGROUND: Muscle dysfunction is a prevalent phenomenon in the oncology setting where patients across a wide range of diagnoses are subject to impaired muscle function regardless of tumor stage and nutritional state. Here, we review the current evidence describing the degree, causes and clinical...... dysfunction is evident across all stages of the cancer trajectory. The causes of cancer-related muscle dysfunction are complex, but may involve a wide range of tumor-, therapy- and/or lifestyle-related factors, depending on the clinical setting of the individual patient. The main importance of muscle...

  7. Psychological aspects of cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graça Cardoso

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is accompanied by important psychological distress experienced by both patient and family. From the moment of the diagnosis on, the patient has to develop a great number of mechanisms and tasks of adjustment to the illness and its circumstances. The high prevalence of anxiety and depressive disorders during the course of cancer increases in the end stage disea‐ se. Therefore, a global plan of intervention integrating somatic and psychological/ psychiatric care throughout all the phases of the illness is crucial in the treatment of these patients. Health professionals working on this field can also experience emotional reactions to their patients’ suffering. They should be aware of the emotional aspects involved and develop training to help them intervene adequately with the patient and the family. The articulation between oncologists, palliative care professionals, and mental health care teams can be of great help in providing good quality of care to cancer patients.

  8. Social comparisons in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham P. Buunk

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Social comparison refers to relating one ́s own characteristics to those of other individuals. Due to the enhanced degree of physical distress, depression, and uncertainty, cancer patients tend to compare themselves often with other patients, especially when they are high in social comparison orientation, i.e. in the dispositional tendency to compare themselves with others. Downward comparison, i.e. with others who are worse- off, may contribute to the well-being of cancer patients when it is interpreted as a contrast, i.e. when it is emphased how much better-off one is oneself. Nevertheless, cancer patients tend to prefer information about other patients who are better-off, and such upward comparison may improve coping and contribute to well-being. 

  9. Hope in Patients with Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Turan Kavradim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer, which is one of the major health problems leading to despair, uncertainty, pain and suffering, is perceived as a serious and chronic disease. Cancer negatively affects individuals' quality of life due to the physical, psychological, and socio-economic problems. Today, despite inspiring advances in diagnosis and treatment of cancer and increase in survival rates of patients, appearance of physical and psycho-social disorders during cancer course disrupts the adaptation mechanisms of patients and undermines expectations for the future. Most of the time in clinical practice, clinicians focus on physical assessments and treatment planning of cancer patients primarily, ignoring social, psychological, economic and cultural factors related with the disease. This approach definitely influences patients' hope levels and their effective dealing with the disease. The aim of this article is to guide medical staff and increase awareness about the concept of hope in patients with cancer. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(2.000: 154-164

  10. Azithromycin maintenance therapy in patients with cystic fibrosis : A dose advice based on a review of pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and side effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilms, Erik B.; Touw, Daniel J.; Heijerman, Harry G.M.; Van Der Ent, Cornelis K.

    Azithromycin maintenance therapy results in improvement of respiratory function in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). In azithromycin maintenance therapy, several dosing schemes are applied. In this review, we combine current knowledge about azithromycin pharmacokinetics with the dosing schedules

  11. Pharmacokinetics, antitumor and cardioprotective effects of liposome-encapsulated phenylaminoethyl selenide in human prostate cancer rodent models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jeong Yeon; Eggert, Mathew; Mouli, Shravanthi; Aljuffali, Ibrahim; Fu, Xiaoyu; Nie, Ben; Sheil, Amy; Waddey, Kendall; Oldham, Charlie D; May, Sheldon W; Amin, Rajesh; Arnold, Robert D

    2015-03-01

    Cardiotoxicity associated with the use of doxorubicin (DOX), and other chemotherapeutics, limits their clinical potential. This study determined the pharmacokinetics and antitumor and cardioprotective activity of free and liposome encapsulated phenyl-2-aminoethyl-selenide (PAESe). The pharmacokinetics of free PAESe and PAESe encapsulated in liposomes (SSL-PAESe) were determined in rats using liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry. The antitumor and cardioprotective effects were determined in a mouse xenograft model of human prostate (PC-3) cancer and cardiomyocytes (H9C2). The encapsulation of PAESe in liposomes increased the circulation half-life and area under the drug concentration time profile, and decreased total systemic clearance significantly compared to free PAESe. Free- and SSL-PAESe improved survival, decreased weight-loss and prevented cardiac hypertrophy significantly in tumor bearing and healthy mice following treatment with DOX at 5 and 12.5 mg/kg. In vitro studies revealed PAESe treatment altered formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), cardiac hypertrophy and gene expression, i.e., atrial natriuretic peptide and myosin heavy chain complex beta, in H9C2 cells. Treatment with free and SSL-PAESe exhibited antitumor activity in a prostate xenograft model and mitigated DOX-mediated cardiotoxicity.

  12. The pharmacokinetics of cefazolin in patients undergoing elective & semi-elective abdominal aortic aneurysm open repair surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Michael S

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical site infections are common, so effective antibiotic concentrations at the sites of infection are required. Surgery can lead to physiological changes influencing the pharmacokinetics of antibiotics. The aim of the study is to evaluate contemporary peri-operative prophylactic dosing of cefazolin by determining plasma and subcutaneous interstitial fluid concentrations in patients undergoing elective of semi-elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA open repair surgery. Methods/Design This is an observational pharmacokinetic study of patients undergoing AAA open repair surgery at the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital. All patients will be administered 2-g cefazolin by intravenous injection within 30-minutes of the procedure. Participants will have samples from blood and urine, collected at different intervals. Patients will also have a microdialysis catheter inserted into subcutaneous tissue to measure interstitial fluid penetration by cefazolin. Participants will be administered indocyanine green and sodium bromide as well as have cardiac output monitoring performed and tetrapolar bioimpedance to determine physiological changes occurring during surgery. Analysis of samples will be performed using validated liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic analysis will be performed using non-linear mixed effects modeling to determine individual and population pharmacokinetic parameters and the effect of peri-operative physiological changes on cefazolin disposition. Discussion The study will describe cefazolin levels in plasma and the interstitial fluid of tissues during AAA open repair surgery. The effect of physiological changes to the patient mediated by surgery will also be determined. The results of this study will guide clinicians and pharmacists to effectively dose cefazolin in order to maximize the concentration of antibiotics in the tissues which are the most common site of surgical site infections.

  13. Pharmacokinetic interaction between bedaquiline and clofazimine in patients with drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maartens, G; Brill, M J E; Pandie, M; Svensson, E M

    2018-01-01

    Bedaquiline (BDQ) and clofazimine (CFZ) are both recommended for treating drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB). As CFZ is an inhibitor of the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme 3A4 (CYP3A4) in vitro, and BDQ a substrate of CYP3A4, there is a potential for pharmacokinetic (PK) drug-drug interaction that may result in increased BDQ exposure when co-administered with CFZ, which could increase the toxicity of BDQ. We assessed the effect of co-administered CFZ on BDQ bioavailability, or on clearance of BDQ and its N-monodesmethyl metabolite (M2), in patients with DR-TB using a population PK model developed from data of patients with DR-TB. This was a secondary analysis of a study designed to explore drug-drug interactions between BDQ and antiretrovirals. Of 46 participants, 30 were on concomitant CFZ when intensive PK sampling of BDQ was done. CFZ did not have a statistically significant effect on BDQ bioavailability (-9.1%, 90%CI -22.8 to +7.1; P = 0.19) or on BDQ and M2 clearance (+12.2%, 90%CI -13.7 to +38; P = 0.32). We did not find a statistically significant PK drug-drug interaction between BDQ and CFZ, but cannot exclude a potentially clinically relevant interaction due to the wide confidence intervals of the estimated interaction effects.

  14. Treatment of pain in fibromyalgia patients with testosterone gel: Pharmacokinetics and clinical response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Hillary D; Brown, Lin A J; Gyurik, Robert J; Manganiello, Paul D; Robinson, Thomas D; Hallock, Linda S; Lewis, Lionel D; Yeo, Kiang-Teck J

    2015-08-01

    To test our hypothesis that testosterone deficiency plays an important role in chronic pain, a Phase I/II pilot study was initiated with 12 fibromyalgia patients to verify that a daily dose for 28days with transdermal testosterone gel would 1) significantly and safely increase mean serum testosterone concentrations from low baseline levels to mid/high-normal levels, and 2) effectively treat the pain and fatigue symptoms of fibromyalgia. Pharmacokinetic data confirmed that serum free testosterone concentrations were raised significantly above baseline levels, by assessment of maximum hormone concentration (Cmax) and area under the curve (AUC) parameters: free testosterone Cmax was significantly raised from a mean of 2.64pg/mL to 3.91pg/mL (pfibromyalgia by patient questionnaire and tender point exam demonstrated significant change in: decreased muscle pain, stiffness, and fatigue, and increased libido during study treatment. These results are consistent with the hypothesized ability of testosterone to relieve the symptoms of fibromyalgia. Symptoms not tightly related to fibromyalgia were not improved. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Population Modeling of Selexipag Pharmacokinetics and Clinical Response Parameters in Patients With Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machacek, M; Lott, D; Hurst, N; Bruderer, S; Dingemanse, J

    2017-01-01

    Selexipag (Uptravi) is an oral selective IP prostacyclin receptor agonist approved for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The pivotal GRIPHON study was the largest clinical study ever conducted in PAH patients, providing long‐term data from 1,156 patients. PAH comedication did not affect exposure to selexipag, while exposure to its active metabolite ACT‐333679 was reduced by 30% when taken in combination, clinically not relevant in the context of individual dose up‐titration. Using log‐linear regression models linking model‐predicted steady‐state exposure to pharmacodynamics (PD), exposure to selexipag and ACT‐333679 showed some statistically significant, albeit not clinically relevant, effects on exercise capacity, laboratory values, and the occurrence of prostacyclin‐related adverse events, but not on vital signs or adverse events denoting hemorrhage. Using suitable modeling techniques, the GRIPHON study yielded clinically relevant data with limited burden of pharmacokinetics (PK) blood sampling, demonstrating that PK/PD modeling enables firm conclusions even with sparse PK and PD sampling. PMID:28556581

  16. Pharmacokinetic profile after multiple deltoid or gluteal intramuscular injections of paliperidone palmitate in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossenu, Stefaan; Cleton, Adriaan; Hough, David; Crauwels, Herta; Vandebosch, An; Berwaerts, Joris; Eerdekens, Marielle; Herben, Virginie; De Meulder, Marc; Remmerie, Bart; Francetic, Igor

    2015-07-01

    Paliperidone palmitate (PP) is a once-monthly long-acting injectable antipsychotic approved for the treatment of schizophrenia in many countries. To evaluate the different injection-site options, we compared the pharmacokinetic profile of paliperidone after multiple injections of PP 100 mg eq. (156 mg of PP, equivalent to 100 mg of paliperidone) on days 1, 8, 36, and 64 into the deltoid (n = 24) or gluteal muscle (n = 25) in patients with schizophrenia. After four injections in the deltoid muscle, paliperidone exposure was higher for AUCτ and Cmax , compared with the gluteal muscle (geometric mean AUCτ -based ratio: 120% [90% CI: 93.1-154.7%], and geometric mean Cmax -based ratio: 130% [90% CI: 100.6-168.9%]). The mean [SD] fluctuation index was higher, with a larger interpatient variability, after deltoid-injections (75.9% [30.9%]) than gluteal-injections (58.5% [14.3%]). The median tmax was similar for both sites. PP was generally tolerable in patients, with more favorable local-site tolerability for gluteal-injection. In conclusion, to achieve therapeutic-concentrations quickly, the first-two injections of PP are best administered into the deltoid muscle, whereas thereafter maintenance-injections can be administered either in the deltoid or gluteal muscle. © 2014, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  17. Dissociative symptomatology in cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civilotti, Cristina; Castelli, Lorys; Binaschi, Luca; Cussino, Martina; Tesio, Valentina; Di Fini, Giulia; Veglia, Fabio; Torta, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The utilization of the post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnostic spectrum is currently being debated to categorize psychological adjustment in cancer patients. The aims of this study were to: (1) evaluate the presence of cancer-related traumatic dissociative symptomatology in a sample of cancer patients; (2) examine the correlation of cancer-related dissociation and sociodemographic and medical variables, anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress symptomatology; (3) investigate the predictors of cancer-related dissociation. Methods: Ninety-two mixed cancer patients (mean age: 58.94, ds = 10.13) recruited from two hospitals in northern Italy were administered a questionnaire on sociodemographic and medical characteristics, the Karnofsky Scale to measure the level of patient activity and medical care requirements, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) to evaluate the presence of anxiety and depression, the Impact of Event Scale Revised (IES-R) to assess the severity of intrusion, avoidance, and hypervigilance, and the Peritraumatic Dissociative Experiences Questionnaire (PDEQ) to quantify the traumatic dissociative symptomatology. Results: 31.5% of participants report a PDEQ score above the cutoff. The results indicated that dissociative symptomatology was positively correlated with HADS scores (HADS-Anxiety: r = 0.476, p dissociative symptomatology. The results converged on a three predictor model revealing that IES-R-Intrusion, IES-R-Avoidance, and IES-R-Hyperarousal accounted for 53.9% of the explained variance. Conclusion: These findings allow us to hypothesize a specific psychological reaction which may be ascribed to the traumatic spectrum within the context of cancer, emphasizing the close relationship between the origin of dissociative constituents which, according to the scientific literature, compose the traumatic experience. Our results have implications for understanding dissociative symptomatology in a cancer

  18. Population Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Analysis of Voriconazole and Anidulafungin in Adult Patients with Invasive Aspergillosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mould, Diane R.

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the exposure-response relationships for efficacy and safety of voriconazole and anidulafungin in adult patients with invasive aspergillosis (IA), a population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) analysis was performed with data from a phase 3, prospective, double-blind, comparative study evaluating voriconazole and anidulafungin combination therapy versus voriconazole (and placebo) monotherapy. Anidulafungin/placebo treatment duration was 2 to 4 weeks, and voriconazole treatment duration was 6 weeks. Efficacy (6-week all-causality mortality and 6-week global response [n = 176]) and safety (hepatic [n = 238], visual [n = 199], and psychiatric [n = 183] adverse events [AEs]) endpoints were analyzed separately using a binary logistic regression model. In IA patients receiving voriconazole monotherapy, no positive associations between voriconazole exposure and efficacy or safety were identified. In IA patients receiving combination therapy, no positive associations between voriconazole or anidulafungin exposures and efficacy were identified. The 6-week survival rate tended to increase as anidulafungin treatment duration increased; this finding should be considered with caution. Additionally, in IA patients receiving combination therapy, a positive association between voriconazole and anidulafungin exposures (area under the curve [AUC] and trough concentration [Cmin]) and hepatic AEs was established; a weak positive association between voriconazole exposure (AUC and Cmin) and psychiatric AEs was also established, but no association between voriconazole exposure and visual AEs was identified. Besides the drug exposures, no other covariates (i.e., CYP2C19 genotype status, age, weight, body mass index, sex, race, or neutropenia status) were identified as significant predictors of the efficacy and safety endpoints in IA patients. This study was registered on ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00531479). PMID:24914120

  19. Population pharmacokinetics of recombinant human C1 inhibitor in patients with hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Colm; Hayes, Siobhan; Relan, Anurag; van Amersfoort, Edwin S; Pijpstra, Rienk; Hack, C Erik

    2013-12-01

    To characterize the pharmacokinetics (PK) of recombinant human C1 inhibitor (rhC1INH) in healthy volunteers and hereditary angioedema (HAE) patients. Plasma levels of C1INH following 294 administrations of rhC1INH in 133 subjects were fitted using nonlinear mixed-effects modelling. The model was used to simulate maximal C1INH levels for the proposed dosing scheme. A one-compartment model with Michaelis-Menten elimination kinetics described the data. Baseline C1INH levels were 0.901 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.839-0.968] and 0.176 U ml(-1) (95% CI: 0.154-0.200) in healthy volunteers and HAE patients, respectively. The volume of distribution of rhC1INH was 2.86 l (95% CI: 2.68-3.03). The maximal rate of elimination and the concentration corresponding to half this maximal rate were 1.63 U ml(-1) h(-1) (95% CI: 1.41-1.88) and 1.60 U ml(-1) (95% CI: 1.14-2.24), respectively, for healthy volunteers and symptomatic HAE patients. The maximal elimination rate was 36% lower in asymptomatic HAE patients. Peak C1INH levels did not change upon repeated administration of rhC1INH. Bodyweight was found to be an important predictor of the volume of distribution. Simulations of the proposed dosing scheme predicted peak C1INH concentrations above the lower level of the normal range (0.7 U ml(-1)) for at least 94% of all patients. The population PK model for C1INH supports a dosing scheme on a 50 U kg(-1) basis up to 84 kg, with a fixed dose of 4200 U above 84 kg. The PK of rhC1INH following repeat administration are consistent with the PK following the first administration. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  20. Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Paclitaxel Monotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stage, Tore B; Bergmann, Troels K; Kroetz, Deanna L

    2018-01-01

    Paclitaxel is an anticancer agent efficacious in the treatment of ovarian, breast, and lung cancer. Due to a strong link between the pharmacokinetics and therapeutic efficacy of paclitaxel, we reviewed the literature on paclitaxel pharmacokinetics. Systematic data mining was performed to extract ...

  1. Study of Pharmacodynamic and Pharmacokinetic Interaction of Bojungikki-Tang with Aspirin in Healthy Subjects and Ischemic Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Jung-Hwa Yoo; Sung-Vin Yim; Byung-Cheol Lee

    2018-01-01

    Background. Bojungikki-tang (BJIKT) is a widely used traditional herbal formula in China, Japan, and Korea. There have been reports that several herbs among BJIKT have interactions with antiplatelet drugs, such as aspirin. This study aimed to assess whether BJIKT interacts with aspirin in terms of pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) in healthy subjects and ischemic stroke patients. Methods. The phase I interaction trial was a randomized, open-label, crossover study of 10 healthy m...

  2. Treatment of poor-prognosis extensive disease small-cell lung cancer with an all-oral regimen of etoposide and cyclophosphamide - a Southwest Oncology Group clinical and pharmacokinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunberg, S M; Crowley, J; Hande, K R; Giroux, D; Munshi, N; Lau, D H; Schroder, L E; Zangmeister, M H; Balcerzak, S P; Hynes, H E; Gandara, D R

    1999-01-01

    An all-oral regimen of etoposide and cyclophosphamide was developed for use in poor-prognosis extensive disease small-cell lung cancer. Limited pharmacokinetic sampling was used to derive a pharmacodynamic model predictive of myelosuppression early in the course of therapy. Eligible patients were chemotherapy-naive and had extensive disease small-cell lung cancer with either SWOG performance status 2 or serum albumin /=1.49 microg/ml. Oral etoposide and oral cyclophosphamide given days 1-14 every 28 days is well tolerated and results in an acceptable response rate and median survival in poor-prognosis (poor performance status or low serum albumin) extensive disease small-cell lung cancer. A trough etoposide level obtained within 24 h of starting therapy can predict severe granulocytopenia.

  3. The hamster cheek pouch (HCP) as an experimental model of oral cancer for BNCT: biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of BPA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreimann, E.; Itoiz, M.E.; Dagrosa, A.; Garavaglia, R.; Farias, S.; Batistoni, D.; Schwint, A.E. [National Atomic Energy Commission (Argentina)

    2000-10-01

    We propose and validate the HCP model of oral cancer for BNCT studies. This model serves to explore new applications of the technique, study the biology of BNCT and assess Boron uptake in clinically relevant oral tissues. Tumors are induced by a process that mimics spontaneous malignant transformation instead of by the growth of implanted tumor cells. Syrian hamsters were submitted to tumor induction with a chemical carcinogenesis protocol and then used for biodistribution and pharmacokinetic studies of BPA. The data reveal selective uptake by tumor and, to a lesser degree, by precancerous tissue. Boron concentration in oral tissues and skin was higher than in blood, an issue of clinical relevance given that these tissues may be dose-limiting. Absolute and relative values of Boron concentration would be potentially therapeutic. Boron concentration exhibited a linear relationship with percentage of viable tissue in HCP tumors. The HCP model would provide a novel, contributory approach to BNCT research. (author)

  4. Population Pharmacokinetic Analysis of Voriconazole and Anidulafungin in Adult Patients with Invasive Aspergillosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mould, Diane R.

    2014-01-01

    To assess the pharmacokinetics (PK) of voriconazole and anidulafungin in patients with invasive aspergillosis (IA) in comparison with other populations, sparse PK data were obtained for 305 adults from a prospective phase 3 study comparing voriconazole and anidulafungin in combination versus voriconazole monotherapy (voriconazole, 6 mg/kg intravenously [IV] every 12 h [q12h] for 24 h followed by 4 mg/kg IV q12h, switched to 300 mg orally q12h as appropriate; with placebo or anidulafungin IV, a 200-mg loading dose followed by 100 mg q24h). Voriconazole PK was described by a two-compartment model with first-order absorption and mixed linear and time-dependent nonlinear (Michaelis-Menten) elimination; anidulafungin PK was described by a two-compartment model with first-order elimination. For voriconazole, the normal inverse Wishart prior approach was implemented to stabilize the model. Compared to previous models, no new covariates were identified for voriconazole or anidulafungin. PK parameter estimates of voriconazole and anidulafungin are in agreement with those reported previously except for voriconazole clearance (the nonlinear clearance component became minimal). At a 4-mg/kg IV dose, voriconazole exposure tended to increase slightly as age, weight, or body mass index increased, but the difference was not considered clinically relevant. Estimated voriconazole exposures in IA patients at 4 mg/kg IV were higher than those reported for healthy adults (e.g., the average area under the curve over a 12-hour dosing interval [AUC0–12] at steady state was 46% higher); while it is not definitive, age and concomitant medications may impact this difference. Estimated anidulafungin exposures in IA patients were comparable to those reported for the general patient population. This study was approved by the appropriate institutional review boards or ethics committees and registered on ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00531479). PMID:24913161

  5. COMPARISON OF PHARMACOKINETICS AND PHARMACODYNAMICS OF THE ORIGINAL AND GENERIC ENALAPRIL IN THE ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. P. Bobrova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and pharmacoeconomic parameters of the original and generic enalaprils in the treatment of the elderly patients with hypertension (HT. Material and Methods. Patients (n=40 75–90 years with HT were included in the open randomized comparative study. Patients were randomized into two groups. Patients of the group 1 received generic enalapril, patients of the group 2 — the original enalapril consisting of combined therapy. Pharmacokinetic single-dose study of original and generic enalapril were carried out with high-performance liquid chromatography. Pharmacodynamic study was carried out in single-dose administration as well as after 2 and 4 weeks of treatment with original and generic enalapril. Pharmacoeconomic evaluation of antihypertensive drugs was carried out on the basis of cost minimization analysis. Results. Original enalapril dose necessary to achieve the target blood pressure (BP was 10 mg/day as a part of two-component therapy. This for generic enalapril was 20 mg/day consisting of three- or four-component therapy. Both drugs have shown an acceptable safety profile. Pharmacokinetic differences were revealed between original and generic enalapril: area under pharmacokinetic curve 204.14 (202.25–206.05 vs 136.23 (134.17–137.65 ng*h/ml, respectively; time of the drug retention in the blood plasma 5.42 (5.26–5.76 vs 4.88 (4.86–4.94 hours, respectively; p<0.001. Original enalapril demonstrated more stable 24-hour antihypertensive effect in once daily administration in comparison with this in generic enalapril: trough/peak ratio 78.67% (47.61–91.35% vs 44.96% (32.44–55.49%, respectively , p<0.01. The average daily cost of combined therapy containing generic enalapril was 15.91 rubles per patient, while this in combined therapy containing original enalapril — 13.78 rubles per patient. Conclusion. Medicines on the basis of original and generic enalapril have pharmacokinetic

  6. Targeting anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 by AT-101 to increase radiation efficacy: data from in vitro and clinical pharmacokinetic studies in head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerp, Shuraila F.; Stoter, T. Rianne; Hoebers, Frank J. P.; Brekel, Michiel W. M. van den; Dubbelman, Ria; Kuipers, Gitta K.; Lafleur, M. Vincent M.; Slotman, Ben J.; Verheij, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Pro-survival Bcl-2 family members can promote cancer development and contribute to treatment resistance. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is frequently characterized by overexpression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members. Increased levels of these anti-apoptotic proteins have been associated with radio- and chemoresistance and poor clinical outcome. Inhibition of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members therefore represents an appealing strategy to overcome resistance to anti-cancer therapies. The aim of this study was to evaluate combined effects of radiation and the pan-Bcl-2 inhibitor AT-101 in HNSCC in vitro. In addition, we determined human plasma levels of AT-101 obtained from a phase I/II trial, and compared these with the effective in vitro concentrations to substantiate therapeutic opportunities. We examined the effect of AT-101, radiation and the combination on apoptosis induction and clonogenic survival in two HNSCC cell lines that express the target proteins. Apoptosis was assessed by bis-benzimide staining to detect morphological nuclear changes and/or by propidium iodide staining and flow-cytometry analysis to quantify sub-diploid apoptotic nuclei. The type of interaction between AT-101 and radiation was evaluated by calculating the Combination Index (CI) and by performing isobolographic analysis. For the pharmacokinetic analysis, plasma AT-101 levels were measured by HPLC in blood samples collected from patients enrolled in our clinical phase I/II study. These patients with locally advanced HNSCC were treated with standard cisplatin-based chemoradiotherapy and received dose-escalating oral AT-101 in a 2-weeks daily schedule every 3 weeks. In vitro results showed that AT-101 enhances radiation-induced apoptosis with CI’s below 1.0, indicating synergy. This effect was sequence-dependent. Clonogenic survival assays demonstrated a radiosensitizing effect with a DEF 37 of 1.3 at sub-apoptotic concentrations of AT-101. Pharmacokinetic analysis

  7. A first-in-human phase I and pharmacokinetic study of CP-4126 (CO-101), a nucleoside analogue, in patients with advanced solid tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, B; Awada, A; Evans, T R J; Dueland, S; Hendlisz, A; Rasch, W; Hernes, K; Hagen, S; Aamdal, S

    2015-10-01

    CP-4126 (gemcitabine elaidate, previously CO-101) is a lipid-drug conjugate of gemcitabine designed to circumvent human equilibrative nucleoside transporter1-related resistance to gemcitabine. The purpose of this study was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and the recommended phase II dose (RP2D) of CP-4126, and to describe its pharmacokinetic profile. Eligible patients with advanced refractory solid tumours, and adequate performance status, haematological, renal and hepatic function, were treated with one of escalating doses of CP-4126 administered by a 30-min intravenous infusion on days 1, 8 and 15 of a 28-day cycle. Blood and urine samples were collected to determine the pharmacokinetics (PKs) of CP-4126. Forty-three patients, median age 59 years (range 18-76; male = 27, female = 16), received one of ten dose levels (30-1600 mg/m(2)). Dose-limiting toxicities included grade 3 anaemia, grade 3 fatigue and grade 3 elevation of transaminases. The MTD and RP2D were 1250 mg/m(2) on basis of the toxicity and PK data. CP-4126 followed dose-dependent kinetics and maximum plasma concentrations occurred at the end of CP-4126 infusion. Seven patients achieved stable disease sustained for ≥3 months, including two patients with pancreatic cancer who had progressed on or after gemcitabine exposure. CP-4126 was well tolerated with comparable toxicity profile to gemcitabine. Future studies are required to determine its anti-tumour efficacy, either alone or in combination with other cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens.

  8. Steady-state pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and tolerability of donepezil hydrochloride in hepatically impaired patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Josephine F; Vargas, Ramon; Kumar, Dinesh; Cullen, Edward I; Perdomo, Carlos A; Pratt, Raymond D

    2004-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), tolerability and safety of donepezil HCl 5 mg following oral doses for 1 and 24 days in hepatically impaired patients compared with healthy controls under steady-state, multiple-dose conditions. Methods In this single-centre, multiple-dose, open-label study, patients with impaired hepatic function (Child–Pugh grade A or B) and healthy controls (matched by gender, age and weight to the hepatically impaired patients) received a single 5 mg dose of donepezil on day 1 and then donepezil HCl 5 mg once daily from days 6 to 29. PK and PD (determination of erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase inhibition) parameters were evaluated on days 1 and 29. Treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs), vital signs, physical examination and clinical laboratory test parameters were monitored throughout the study. Results A total of 35 subjects (18 patients with hepatic impairment and 17 healthy controls) were enrolled and 32 subjects (16 in each group) completed the study. On day 1 (following a single dose) hepatically impaired patients showed a significant decrease in Tmax, while t½ and AUC0–∞ were significantly increased compared with the healthy controls. On day 29 (following multiple doses), AUC0–24 h, Cmax, t½, CSS, and RA were significantly increased in hepatically impaired patients compared with healthy controls. AUC0–24 h increased by 47.6% in the patients with hepatic impairment compared with the healthy controls. There were no significant differences in PD between the groups, although at steady state, the mean AChE inhibition was 16.2% higher in the hepatically impaired patients. No serious AEs were reported and no subject withdrew from the study due to AEs. The most common AEs in both groups were headache and diarrhoea. No clinically significant changes from baseline were observed in vital signs, physical examination findings or electrocardiograms. There was a significant difference in the number of

  9. Hypertension in Patients with Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Vinicius Barbosa de; Silva, Eduardo Nani; Ribeiro, Mario Luiz; Martins, Wolney de Andrade, E-mail: wolney@cardiol.br [Curso de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Cardiovasculares da Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-03-15

    There is a known association between chemotherapy and radiotherapy for treatment of cancer patients and development or worsening of hypertension. The aim of this article is to review this association. A literature search was conducted for articles reporting this association on the databases PubMed, SciELO and LILACS between 1993 and 2013. There was a high coprevalence of hypertension and cancer, since both diseases share the same risk factors, such as sedentary lifestyle, obesity, smoking, unhealthy diet and alcohol abuse. The use of chemotherapy and adjuvant drugs effective in the treatment of cancer increased the survival rate of these patients and, consequently, increased the incidence of hypertension. We described the association between the use of angiogenesis inhibitors (bevacizumab, sorafenib and sunitinib), corticosteroids, erythropoietin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with the development of hypertension. We also described the relationship between hypertension and carotid baroreceptor injury secondary to cervical radiotherapy. Morbidity and mortality increased in patients with cancer and hypertension without proper antihypertensive treatment. We concluded that there is need for early diagnosis, effective monitoring and treatment strategies for hypertension in cancer patients in order to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  10. Hypertension in Patients with Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Vinicius Barbosa de; Silva, Eduardo Nani; Ribeiro, Mario Luiz; Martins, Wolney de Andrade

    2015-01-01

    There is a known association between chemotherapy and radiotherapy for treatment of cancer patients and development or worsening of hypertension. The aim of this article is to review this association. A literature search was conducted for articles reporting this association on the databases PubMed, SciELO and LILACS between 1993 and 2013. There was a high coprevalence of hypertension and cancer, since both diseases share the same risk factors, such as sedentary lifestyle, obesity, smoking, unhealthy diet and alcohol abuse. The use of chemotherapy and adjuvant drugs effective in the treatment of cancer increased the survival rate of these patients and, consequently, increased the incidence of hypertension. We described the association between the use of angiogenesis inhibitors (bevacizumab, sorafenib and sunitinib), corticosteroids, erythropoietin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with the development of hypertension. We also described the relationship between hypertension and carotid baroreceptor injury secondary to cervical radiotherapy. Morbidity and mortality increased in patients with cancer and hypertension without proper antihypertensive treatment. We concluded that there is need for early diagnosis, effective monitoring and treatment strategies for hypertension in cancer patients in order to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality

  11. Needs and preferences of patients with cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels-Wynia, H.

    2010-01-01

    What do patients prefer in cancer care and does gender matter? Introduction: To provide patient-centred care for cancer patients it is important to have insight into the patients' specific preferences for health care. To gain such insight we have developed a questionnaire based on cancer patients’

  12. "The relationship between pharmacokinetic variables and pharmacodynamic profiles of bolus versus continuous infusion of furosemide in critically ill patients"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Mojtaba Mojtahedzadeh

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, the pharmacokinetic variables of continuous infusion and intermittent bolus injection of furosemide and the possible relationship between its pharmacokinetic characteristics and pharmacodynamic profile among intensive care unit (ICU patients were studied. In this prospective, randomized, clinical trial, twelve patients received IV bolus of 20 mg of the drug during 3 hours period and, the drug dose was doubled, when the urine output was less than 1 ml/kg/h (group 1. The other nine patients received a continuous intravenous furosemide infusion at the rate of 0.1 mg/kg/h (group 2. The amount of furosemide in serum was measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Results showed a positive correlation between plasma clearance of furosemide and its diuretic activity (P=0.01. The pharmacokinetic parameters such as Vd (l, CL (ml/min, Ke (min-1 and t½ (min in continuous infusion patients were not significantly differed from the bolus patients (P-values 0.5, 0.9, 0.9,0.9, respectively. Nevertheless the observed plasma clearance of drug in the continuous infusion group was clinically higher than bolus injection group and as a result the cumulative urine output per hour per mg of furosemide in a continuous infusion was observed to be higher than bolus(P=0.2. Changes in serum sodium and potassium were similar for both groups, but bolus injection patients were associated with higher potassium depletion (P=0.001. Therefore, continuous infusion seems to be better means of diuretic therapy in critically ill patients.

  13. Labeled OK-432, immunomodulator of streptococcus preparation, in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toki, Hironobu; Ishikawa, Morihiro; Fujii, Masashi; Yumoto, Yasuhiro; Ishimitsu, Tetsusaburo

    1982-01-01

    We investigated the pharmacokinetics of OK-432, an immunomodulator of streptococcus preparation which, is used in cancer patients for active nonspecific immunotherapy. First, OK-432 was labeled with sup(99m)Technetium in vitro. Four patients with malignancy were studied. By the method of scintigraphy using gamma camera, OK-432 administered intravenously was found to be distributed in the liver, lung and spleen, by the decreasing grade. When OK-432 was administered subcutaneously or intramuscularly in the buttocks, most of the radioactivity of sup(99m)Technetium remained locally at the injected site. These results suggested that OK-432 given intravenously was effectively phagocytized by cells of reticuloendothelial system (RES). Compared with other routes of administration, the intravenous route of OK-432 administration is thus considered more effective in order to stimulate RES, which is responsible for the first step of immune reaction. (author)

  14. Pharmacokinetics of nalbuphine hydrochloride extended release tablets in hemodialysis patients with exploratory effect on pruritus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawi, Amale; Alcorn, Harry; Berg, Jolene; Hines, Carey; Hait, Howard; Sciascia, Thomas

    2015-04-08

    Uremic pruritus is a common and deleterious condition among hemodialysis (HD) patients. Central gating of μ/κ opiate circuitry plays an important role in mediating and countering pruritogenic sensation. The objective of this study was to assess the safety and pharmacokinetics (PK) of the mixed μ-antagonist/κ-agonist nalbuphine, administered orally as nalbuphine HCl extended release (ER) tablets in HD patients, and explore its effect on pruritus. In this open-label multiple escalating dose study, 15 HD patients with pruritus and 9 matched healthy subjects were enrolled. Nalbuphine HCl ER dose was escalated from 30 mg QD to 240 mg BID over 15 days. A full PK profile was obtained under dialysis and non-dialysis conditions as a function of dose. Clearance during dialysis was determined by sampling dialysate and arterial/venous blood during dialysis. Pruritus severity was assessed twice daily using a Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Safety monitoring included extensive monitoring of EKG, blood pressure, and pulse oximetry. In HD patients, nalbuphine concentration peaked within 4-9 hours and attained steady state within 2-3 days, with no significant accumulation. Mean half-life was 14.2 hours, mean Cmax and AUCtau ranged between 13 and 83 ng/mL and 118 and 761 ng∙h/mL, respectively, with exposure increasing in a nearly dose-proportional fashion. Exposure in HD patients was about 2-fold higher than in healthy subjects. There was no meaningful difference between exposure on dialysis and non-dialysis days with 1% or less of the dose removed by dialysis. Nalbuphine suppressed itch in a dose-dependent manner, reducing mean VAS score from 4.0 to 1.2 at 180 mg and 0.4 at 240 mg. Nalbuphine HCl ER tablets can be safely administered to HD patients without dose adjustment up to 240 mg BID and may hold promise in treating uremic pruritus.

  15. A pharmacokinetic analysis of diclofenac potassium soft-gelatin capsule in patients after bunionectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Mark; Stoker, Douglas G; Bon, Charles; Moore, Keith A; Boesing, Stephen E

    2010-01-01

    The clinical utility of diclofenac potassium, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, may be lessened by inconsistent gastrointestinal absorption. Diclofenac potassium liquid filled soft-gelatin capsule (DPSGC) is an investigational formulation that uses ProSorb dispersion technology to facilitate rapid and consistent gastrointestinal absorption. In this study, the pharmacokinetic (PK) properties of DPSGC are investigated and compared with a commercially available oral diclofenac potassium tablet in patients after primary unilateral first metatarsal bunionectomy. In an open-label, randomized study, 53 patients received ProSorb-D 12.5 mg (the liquid equivalent of DPSGC), DPSGC 25 mg, DPSGC 50 mg, or immediate-release diclofenac potassium 50-mg tablet administered every 8 hours for a 24-hour inpatient period followed by 7 days of outpatient dosing. Diclofenac steady-state PK was evaluated over an 8-hour sampling period 4 days after surgery. Delayed and/or multiple peaks in the diclofenac plasma concentration-time course profiles occurred more frequently with the commercially available oral diclofenac potassium 50-mg tablet than with the other DPSGC formulations. PK data for ProSorb-D 12.5-mg liquid, DPSGC 25 mg, DPSGC 50 mg, and diclofenac potassium 50-mg tablet revealed mean peak plasma concentrations (Cmax) of 302, 749, 1006, and 902 ng/mL, respectively, whereas area under the plasma concentration curve values were 316, 595, 1029, and 1166 ng-hour/mL, respectively. Mean times to Cmax (tmax) were 0.49, 0.63, 0.95, and 1.26 h, respectively. When compared with absorption characteristics of diclofenac potassium 50-mg tablet, DPSGC was more rapidly and consistently absorbed after bunionectomy. These characteristics should be advantageous when rapid pain relief is desired.

  16. "THE EVALUATION OF THE POSSIBLE EFFECT OF POSITIVE END EXPIRATORY PRESSURE (PEEP) ON PHARMACOKINETICS OF PHENYTOIN IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE BRAIN INJURY UNDER MECHANICAL VENTILATION."

    OpenAIRE

    "Elham Hadidi; Mojtaba Mojtahedzadeh; Mohammad Reza Rouini; Behzad Eftekhar; Mohammad Abdollahi; Atabak Najafi; Mohammad R. Khajavi; Saeed Rezaee; Reza Ghaffari; Minoo Afshar"

    2005-01-01

    Positive ventilation has shown to have an influence on pharmacokinetic and disposition of some drugs.Beacause phenytoin with a narrow therapautic range, is the most commonly used drug for prophylaxis and treatment of early seizures after acute brain injuries, in the present study the effect of short term PEEP (5-10 cm H2O for at least 8 hours) on phenytoin serum concentration and pharmacokinetic parameters such as Vmax and clearance in brain injured patients under mechanical ventilation was e...

  17. Sarcopenia predicts early dose-limiting toxicities and pharmacokinetics of sorafenib in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Mir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sorafenib induces frequent dose limiting toxicities (DLT in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Sarcopenia has been associated with poor performance status and shortened survival in cancer patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The characteristics of Child Pugh A cirrhotic patients with HCC receiving sorafenib in our institution were retrospectively analyzed. Sorafenib plasma concentrations were determined at each visit. Toxicities were recorded during the first month of treatment, and sarcopenia was determined from baseline CT-scans. RESULTS: Forty patients (30 males were included. Eleven (27.5% were sarcopenic. Eighteen patients (45% experienced a DLT during the first month of treatment. Sarcopenic patients experienced significantly more DLTs than non-sarcopenic patients did (82% versus 31%, p = 0.005. Grade 3 diarrhea was significantly more frequent in sarcopenic patients than in non-sarcopenic patients (45.5% versus 6.9%, p = 0.01, but not grade 3 hand foot syndrome reaction (9% versus 17.2%, p = 1. On day 28, median sorafenib AUC (n = 17 was significantly higher in sarcopenic patients (102.4 mg/l.h versus 53.7 mg/l.h, p = 0.013. CONCLUSIONS: Among cirrhotic Child Pugh A patients with advanced HCC, sarcopenia predicts sorafenib exposure and the occurrence of DLT within the first month of treatment.

  18. Pharmacokinetics of Snake Venom

    OpenAIRE

    Suchaya Sanhajariya; Stephen B. Duffull; Geoffrey K. Isbister

    2018-01-01

    Understanding snake venom pharmacokinetics is essential for developing risk assessment strategies and determining the optimal dose and timing of antivenom required to bind all venom in snakebite patients. This review aims to explore the current knowledge of snake venom pharmacokinetics in animals and humans. Literature searches were conducted using EMBASE (1974–present) and Medline (1946–present). For animals, 12 out of 520 initially identified studies met the inclusion criteria. In general, ...

  19. Patient delay in cancer studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke Sand; Vedsted, Peter; Olesen, Frede

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is no validated way of measuring the prevalence and duration of patient delay, and we do not know how people perceive and define the time intervals they are asked to report in patient delay studies. This lack of a validated measure hampers research in patient delay...... as symptoms related to a specific cancer diagnosis is embedded within a social and cultural context. We therefore cannot assume that respondents define delay periods in identical ways. SUMMARY: In order to improve the validity of patient delay studies, it is suggested that research be strengthened on three...

  20. Phase II study of safety and efficacy of motesanib in patients with progressive or symptomatic, advanced or metastatic medullary thyroid cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlumberger, Martin J; Elisei, Rossella; Bastholt, Lars

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: This phase II study investigated the efficacy and tolerability of motesanib, an investigational, highly selective inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1, 2, and 3; platelet-derived growth factor receptor; and Kit in advanced medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). PATIENTS......%), hypertension (27%), and anorexia (27%). In pharmacokinetic analyses, motesanib trough concentrations were lower compared with differentiated thyroid cancer patients from the same study. CONCLUSION: Although the objective response rate was low, a significant proportion of MTC patients (81%) achieved stable...

  1. Single and repeated dose pharmacokinetics of dexketoprofen trometamol in patients with impaired liver function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valles, J; Artigas, R; Bertolotti, M; Crea, A; Muller, F; Paredes, I; Capriati, A

    2006-06-01

    Dexketoprofen trometamol, a high water-soluble salt of the active enantiomer of rac-ketoprofen, is a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) used for pain relief. This study compared the pharmacokinetics of dexketoprofen in patients with impaired liver function and normal subjects following single and repeated oral dosing. Subjects with normal liver function (n = 6) and with Child-Pugh A (n = 7) or Child-Pugh B (n = 5) hepatic impairment scores completed this open-label and parallel study. They received 25 mg dexketoprofen (equivalent to 37 mg of its tromethamine salt) as a single (day 1) and a 3-day repeated dose (1 dose every 8 hours for a total of 10 doses). Dexketoprofen concentrations were determined in plasma and urine by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Model-independent pharmacokinetic parameters were obtained. All subjects completed the study. No serious adverse events were recorded. Following the single dose, mean (+/- SEM) Cmax were 3027.7 +/- 429.3 ng/ml (healthy subjects), 2856.3 +/- 340.3 ng/ml (Child-Pugh A) and 1937.2 +/- 328.0 ng/ml (Child-Pugh B). Median tmax were 0.49 h (0.33-0.68) h, 0.50 h (0.33-0.67) h and 0.67 h (0.33-1.50) h. AUC0-x averaged 3778.0 +/- 439.0 ng.h/ml, 4890.4 +/- 539.1 ng.h/ml and 3985.0 +/- 712.0 ng.h/ml. Mean CL/F were 101.1 +/- 11.3 ml/h/kg, 73.3 +/- 9.9 ml/h/kg and 88.8 +/- 15.5 ml/h/kg and V/F averaged 0.192 +/- 0.018 l/kg, 0.162 +/- 0.006 l/kg and 0.214 +/- 0.044 l/kg. Following the repeated administration, similar results were obtained showing no drug accumulation. As related to the administered dose, median excretions of unchanged and conjugated dexketoprofen in urine were 2.1% and 67.1% in healthy subjects, 2.8% and 60.9% in Child-Pugh A subjects and 4.4% and 47.7% in Child-Pugh B volunteers. A trend towards a reduced urinary excretion of conjugated dexketoprofen in hepatic patients, more evident in the Child-Pugh B than in the Child-Pugh A groups, was observed when compared with healthy

  2. Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Rifampin in Patients with Tuberculosis and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Association with Biochemical and Immunological Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medellín-Garibay, S E; Cortez-Espinosa, N; Milán-Segovia, R C; Magaña-Aquino, M; Vargas-Morales, J M; González-Amaro, R; Portales-Pérez, D P; Romano-Moreno, S

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major public health issue due to the increasing incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), which exacerbates the clinical course of TB and increases the risk of poor long-term outcomes. The aim of this study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics of rifampin (RIF) and its relationship with biochemical and immunological parameters in patients with TB and T2DM. The biochemical and immunological parameters were assessed on the same day that the pharmacokinetic evaluation of RIF was performed. Factors related to the metabolic syndrome that is characteristic of T2DM patients were not detected in the TB-T2DM group (where predominant malnutrition was present) or in the TB group. Percentages of CD8(+) T lymphocytes and NK cells were diminished in the TB and TB-T2DM patients, who had high tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and low interleukin-17 (IL-17) levels compared to healthy volunteers. Delayed RIF absorption was observed in the TB and TB-T2DM patients; absorption was poor and slower in the latter group due to poor glycemic control. RIF clearance was also slower in the diabetic patients, thereby prolonging the mean residence time of RIF. There was a significant association between glycemic control, increased TNF-α serum concentrations, and RIF pharmacokinetics in the TB-T2DM patients. These altered metabolic and immune conditions may be factors to be considered in anti-TB therapy management when TB and T2DM are concurrently present. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Pegfilgrastim in pediatric cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poele , te Esther; Kamps, WA; Tamminga, RYJ; Leew, JA; Postma, A; de Bont, ESJM

    2005-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia is a major dose-limiting side effect of intensive chemotherapy in cancer patients. Recently, pegfilgrastim (a product with a long half-life, resulting in once-per-cycle dosage) was introduced to prevent neutropenia in adults. The authors report 32 episodes of

  4. Swallowing dysfunction in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raber-Durlacher, Judith E.; Brennan, Mike T.; Leeuw, Irma M. Verdonck-de; Gibson, Rachel J.; Eilers, June G.; Waltimo, Tuomas; Bots, Casper P.; Michelet, Marisol; Sollecito, Thomas P.; Rouleau, Tanya S.; Sewnaik, Aniel; Bensadoun, Rene-Jean; Fliedner, Monica C.; Silverman, Sol; Spijkervet, Fred K. L.

    Purpose Dysphagia (swallowing dysfunction) is a debilitating, depressing, and potentially life-threatening complication in cancer patients that is likely underreported. The present paper is aimed to review relevant dysphagia literature between 1990 and 2010 with a focus on assessment tools,

  5. Swallowing dysfunction in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raber-Durlacher, J.E.; Brennan, M.T.; Verdonck- de Leeuw, I.M.; Gibson, R.J.; Eilers, J.G.; Waltimo, T.; Bots, C.P.; Michelet, M.; Sollecito, T.P.; Rouleau, T.S.; Sewnaik, A.; Bensadoun, R.J.; Fliedner, M.C.; Silverman, S.; Spijkervet, F.K.L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Dysphagia (swallowing dysfunction) is a debilitating, depressing, and potentially life-threatening complication in cancer patients that is likely underreported. The present paper is aimed to review relevant dysphagia literature between 1990 and 2010 with a focus on assessment tools,

  6. Swallowing dysfunction in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raber-Durlacher, J.E.; Brennan, M.T.; de Leeuw, I.M.; Gibson, R.J.; Eilers, J.G.; Waltimo, T.; Bots, C.P.; Michelet, M.; Sollecito, T.P.; Rouleau, T.S.; Sewnaik, A.; Bensadoun, R.J.; Fliedner, M.C.; Silverman, S.; Spijkervet, F.K.L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Dysphagia (swallowing dysfunction) is a debilitating, depressing, and potentially life-threatening complication in cancer patients that is likely underreported. The present paper is aimed to review relevant dysphagia literature between 1990 and 2010 with a focus on assessment tools,

  7. Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Tapentadol Extended Release (ER) in Healthy Subjects and Patients with Moderate or Severe Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntjens, Dymphy R; Liefaard, Lia C; Nandy, Partha; Drenth, Henk-Jan; Vermeulen, An

    2016-03-01

    Tapentadol is a centrally acting analgesic with two mechanisms of action, µ-opioid receptor agonism and noradrenaline reuptake inhibition. The objectives were to describe the pharmacokinetic behavior of tapentadol after oral administration of an extended-release (ER) formulation in healthy subjects and patients with chronic pain and to evaluate covariate effects. Data were obtained from 2276 subjects enrolled in five phase I and nine phase II and III studies. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling was conducted using NONMEM. The population estimates of apparent oral clearance and apparent central volume of distribution were 257 L/h and 1870 L, respectively. The complex absorption was described with a transit compartment for the first input. The second input function embraces saturable "binding" in the "absorption compartment", and a time-varying rate constant. Covariate evaluation demonstrated that age, aspartate aminotransferase, and health (painful diabetic neuropathy or not) had a statistically significant effect on apparent clearance, and bioavailability appeared to be dependent on body weight. The pcVPC indicted that the model provided a robust and unbiased fit to the data. A one-compartment disposition model with two input functions and first-order elimination adequately described the pharmacokinetics of tapentadol ER. The dose-dependency in the pharmacokinetics of tapentadol ER is adequately described by the absorption model. None of the covariates were considered as clinically relevant factors that warrant dose adjustments.

  8. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of fenoldopam mesylate for blood pressure control in pediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaster Myron

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fenoldopam mesylate, a selective dopamine1-receptor agonist, is used by intravenous infusion to treat hypertension in adults. Fenoldopam is not approved by the FDA for use in children; reports describing its use in pediatrics are limited. In a multi-institutional, placebo controlled, double-blind, multi-dose trial we determined the pharmacokinetic (PK and pharmacodynamic (PD characteristics and side-effect profile of fenoldopam in children. Methods Seventy seven (77 children from 3 weeks to 12 years of age scheduled for surgery in which deliberate hypotension would be induced were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to one of five, blinded treatment groups (placebo or fenoldopam 0.05, 0.2, 0.8, or 3.2 mcg/kg/min iv for a 30-minute interval after stabilization of anesthesia and placement of vascular catheters. Following the 30-minute blinded interval, investigators adjusted the fenoldopam dose to achieve a target mean arterial pressure in the open-label period until deliberate hypotension was no longer indicated (e.g., muscle-layer closure. Mean arterial pressure and heart rate were continuously monitored and were the primary endpoints. Results Seventy-six children completed the trial. Fenoldopam at doses of 0.8 and 3.2 mcg/kg/min significantly reduced blood pressure (p Conclusion Fenoldopam is a rapid-acting, effective agent for intravenous control of blood pressure in children. The effective dose range is significantly higher in children undergoing anesthesia and surgery (0.8–1.2 mcg/kg/min than as labeled for adults (0.05–0.3 mcg/kg/min. The PK and side-effect profiles for children and adults are similar.

  9. SU-F-R-34: Quantitative Perfusion Measurement in Rectal Cancer Using Three Different Pharmacokinetic Models: Implications for Prospective Study Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, K; Yue, N; Jabbour, S; Kim, S [Rutgers-Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson Medical, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Mao, T; Shi, L; Hu, X; Qian, L; Sun, X; Niu, T [Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, Institute of Translational Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare three different pharmacokinetic models for analysis of dynamic-contrast-enhanced (DCE)-CT data with respect to different acquisition times and location of region of interest. Methods: Eight rectal cancer patients with pre-treatment DCE-CTs were included. The dynamic sequence started 4–10seconds(s) after the injection of contrast agent. The scan included a 110s acquisition with intervals of 40×1s+15×3s+4×6s. An experienced oncologist outlined the tumor region. Hotspots with top-5%-enhancement were also identified. Pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using three different models: deconvolution method, Patlak model, and modified Toft’s model. Perfusion parameters as blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT), permeability-surface-area-product (PS), volume transfer constant (Ktrans), and flux rate constant (Kep), were compared with respect to different acquisition times of 45s, 65s, 85s and 105s. Both hotspot and whole-volume variances were also assessed. The differences were compared using the Wilcoxon matched-pairs test and Bland-Altman plots. Results: Moderate correlation was observed for various perfusion parameters (r=0.56–0.72, p<0.0001) but the Wilcoxon test revealed a significant difference among the three models (P < .001). Significant differences in PS were noted between acquisitions of 45s versus longer time of 85s or 105s (p<0.05) using Patlak but not with the deconvolution method. In addition, measurements varied substantially between whole-volume vs. hotspot analysis. Conclusion: The radiation dose of DCE-CT was on average 1.5 times of an abdomen/pelvic CT, which is not insubstantial. To take the DCE-CT forward as a biomarker in oncology, prospective studies should be carefully designed with the optimal image acquisition and analysis technique. Our study suggested that: (1) different kinetic models are not interchangeable; (2) a 45s acquisition might not be sufficient for reliable permeability measurement

  10. Elimination of ascorbic acid after high-dose infusion in prostate cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Kjær; Højgaard, Martin; Andersen, Jon Thor Trærup

    2015-01-01

    Treatment with high-dose intravenous (IV) ascorbic acid (AA) is used in complementary and alternative medicine for various conditions including cancer. Cytotoxicity to cancer cell lines has been observed with millimolar concentrations of AA. Little is known about the pharmacokinetics of high dose...... infusion stop in prostate cancer patients with normal kidney function. We propose a regimen with a bolus loading followed by a maintenance infusion based on the calculated clearance.......Treatment with high-dose intravenous (IV) ascorbic acid (AA) is used in complementary and alternative medicine for various conditions including cancer. Cytotoxicity to cancer cell lines has been observed with millimolar concentrations of AA. Little is known about the pharmacokinetics of high dose...... IV AA. The purpose of the present study was to assess the basic kinetic variables in human beings over a relevant AA dosing interval for proper design of future clinical trials. Ten patients with metastatic prostate cancer were treated for four weeks with fixed AA doses of 5, 30 and 60 g. AA...

  11. Chronic diseases among older cancer patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deckx, L.D.; Akker, M.A. van der; Metsemakers, J.M.; Knottnerus, A.K.; Schellevis, F.G.; Buntinx, F.B.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: With the growing number of older cancer patients, the burden of chronic diseases among older cancer patients will become increasingly important. Chronic diseases often interfere with treatment decisions and prognosis for cancer patients. However, little is known about the occurrence of

  12. Population pharmacokinetics of ceftaroline in patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections or community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wart, Scott A; Forrest, Alan; Khariton, Tatiana; Rubino, Christopher M; Bhavnani, Sujata M; Reynolds, Daniel K; Riccobene, Todd; Ambrose, Paul G

    2013-11-01

    Ceftaroline, the active form of ceftaroline fosamil, is a broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotic. A population pharmacokinetic (PPK) model for ceftaroline was developed in NONMEM® using data from 185 healthy subjects and 92 patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection (ABSSSI). Data from 128 patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) were used for external model validation. Healthy subjects received 50-2,000 mg ceftaroline fosamil via intravenous (IV) infusion over 1 hour or intramuscular (IM) injection q12h or q24h. ABSSSI and CABP patients received 600 mg of ceftaroline fosamil IV over 1 hour q12h. A three-compartment model with zero-order IV or parallel first-order IM input and first-order elimination described ceftaroline fosamil PK. A two-compartment model with first-order conversion of prodrug to ceftaroline and parallel linear and saturable elimination described ceftaroline PK. Creatinine clearance was the primary determinant of ceftaroline exposure. Good agreement between the observed data and both population (r(2)  = 0.93) and individual post-hoc (r(2)  = 0.98) predictions suggests the PPK model can adequately approximate ceftaroline PK using covariate information. Such a PPK model can evaluate dose adjustments for patients with renal impairment and generate ceftaroline exposures for use in pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic assessments of efficacy in patients with ABSSSI or CABP. © 2013, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  13. Population Pharmacokinetics of an Indian F(ab'2 Snake Antivenom in Patients with Russell's Viper (Daboia russelii Bites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey K Isbister

    Full Text Available There is limited information on antivenom pharmacokinetics. This study aimed to investigate the pharmacokinetics of an Indian snake antivenom in humans with Russell's viper bites.Patient data and serial blood samples were collected from patients with Russell's viper (Daboia russelii envenoming in Sri Lanka. All patients received Indian F(ab'2 snake antivenom manufactured by VINS Bioproducts Ltd. Antivenom concentrations were measured with sandwich enzyme immunoassays. Timed antivenom concentrations were analysed using MONOLIXvs4.2. One, two and three compartment models with zero order input and first order elimination kinetics were assessed. Models were parameterized with clearance (CL, intercompartmental clearance (Q, central compartment volume (V and peripheral compartment volume (VP. Between-subject-variability (BSV on relative bioavailability (F was included to account for dose variations. Covariates effects (age, sex, weight, antivenom batch, pre-antivenom concentrations were explored by visual inspection and in model building. There were 75 patients, median age 57 years (40-70 y and 64 (85% were male. 411 antivenom concentration data points were analysed. A two compartment model with zero order input, linear elimination kinetics and a combined error model best described the data. Inclusion of BSV on F and weight as a covariate on V improved the model. Inclusion of pre-antivenom concentrations or different batches on BSV of F did not. Final model parameter estimates were CL,0.078 L h(-1, V,2.2L, Q,0.178 L h(-1 and VP,8.33L. The median half-life of distribution was 4.6 h (10-90%iles:2.6-7.1 h and half-life of elimination, 140 h (10th-90th percentilesx:95-223h.Indian F(ab'2 snake antivenom displayed biexponential disposition pharmacokinetics, with a rapid distribution half-life and more prolonged elimination half-life.

  14. A phase 1, open label, dose escalation study to investigate the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of MG1102 (apolipoprotein(a) Kringle V) in patients with solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gun Min; Reid, Tony; Shin, Sang Joon; Rha, Sun Young; Ahn, Joong Bae; Lee, Sung Sil; Chung, Hyun Cheol

    2017-12-01

    Purpose MG1102 is a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis in both in vitro and in vivo models. The purpose of the study was to investigate the safety and tolerability, pharmacokinetic (PK) profile, and preliminary antitumor efficacy of MG1102. Methods Patients with refractory solid tumors were eligible. Each patient received 1 dose of MG1102 followed by a 6-day rest period, during which they underwent PK assessments and safety monitoring. If the initial dose was tolerated, the patient continued with the 21-day treatment of MG1102 (5 days on, 2 days off for 3 weeks). Dose escalation was planned in 6 cohorts (6, 12, 24, 48, 96, and 192 mg/m 2 ). Primary objectives included safety and maximum tolerated dose (MTD) assessment. Secondary objectives included assessment of PK, pharmacodynamics, and efficacy. Results A total of 16 patients were enrolled and 12 (75%) completed the study. The most common cancer type was colorectal cancer (n = 10). There was no dose limiting toxicity and the MTD was not reached at 192 mg/m 2 . The most frequent treatment-emergent adverse events were gastrointestinal disorders, including nausea (30.8%), abdominal pain (23.1%), constipation (23.1%), and dyspepsia (23.1%). The PK of MG1102 was slightly less than dose proportional from Cohorts 3 to 6. Among 13 response-evaluable patients, 1 unconfirmed partial response (PR) was seen (in the 48 mg/m 2 cohort) and 4 patients had stable disease. Conclusions The safety profile of MG1102 was generally manageable and the toxicities resolved quickly. Potential antitumor activity was observed with 1 unconfirmed PR (60% size reduction).

  15. A Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Mifepristone Combined with Enzalutamide in Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0021 TITLE: A Pharmacokinetic /Pharmacodynamic Study of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Mifepristone Combined...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER A Pharmacokinetic /Pharmacodynamic Study of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Mifepristone Combined...dose limiting toxicities. Based on safety and pharmacokinetics it is anticipated this will be the recommended phase II dose, and that the phase II

  16. Population pharmacokinetics of artesunate and dihydroartemisinin following intra-rectal dosing of artesunate in malaria patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simpson, Julie A.; Agbenyega, Tsiri; Barnes, Karen I.; Di Perri, Gianni; Folb, Peter; Gomes, Melba; Krishna, Sanjeev; Krudsood, Srivicha; Looareesuwan, Sornchai; Mansor, Sharif; McIlleron, Helen; Miller, Raymond; Molyneux, Malcolm; Mwenechanya, James; Navaratnam, Visweswaran; Nosten, Francois; Olliaro, Piero; Pang, Lorrin; Ribeiro, Isabela; Tembo, Madalitso; van Vugt, Michele; Ward, Steve; Weerasuriya, Kris; Win, Kyaw; White, Nicholas J.

    2006-01-01

    Intra-rectal artesunate has been developed as a potentially life-saving treatment of severe malaria in rural village settings where administration of parenteral antimalarial drugs is not possible. We studied the population pharmacokinetics of intra-rectal artesunate and the relationship with

  17. A pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model for intrathecal baclofen in patients with severe spasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heetla, H. W.; Proost, J. H.; Molmans, B. H.; Staal, M. J.; van Laar, T.

    AimsIntrathecal baclofen (ITB) has proven to be an effective and safe treatment for severe spasticity. However, although ITB is used extensively, clinical decisions are based on very scarce pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) data. The aim of this study was to measure baclofen CSF concentrations

  18. receIvIng In patIents pharmacokinetic approach Quantifying non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-02-02

    Feb 2, 1991 ... pharmacokinetic approach. Quantifying non-compliance digoxin a. I. C. WISEMAN, R. MILLER. Summary. Non-compliance has a major influence on the successful outcome of a therapeutic regimen. It also unnecessarily increases the costs of health care. In a study involving 137 outpatients receiving ...

  19. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of vildagliptin in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Yan-Ling; Serra, Denise; Wang, Yibin

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vildagliptin is a dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-4) inhibitor currently under development for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. OBJECTIVES: To assess the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics and tolerability of vildagliptin at doses of 10 mg, 25 mg and 100 mg twi...

  20. Pharmacokinetic profile of voriconazole in a critically ill patient on therapeutic plasma exchange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spriet, I.; Bruggemann, R.J.M.; Annaert, P.; Meersseman, P.; Wijngaerden, E. van; Lagrou, K.; Willems, L.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Extracorporeal removal of drugs during therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) can lead to decreased efficacy, as shown in several reports discussing altered pharmacokinetics (PKs) of antibiotics during TPE. In particular, drugs with a low volume of distribution or a high protein binding are

  1. Influence of Erroneous Patient Records on Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling and Individual Bayesian Estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Aize Franciscus; Touw, Daniel J.; Marcus, Marco A. E.; Neef, Cornelis; Proost, Johannes H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Observational data sets can be used for population pharmacokinetic (PK) modeling. However, these data sets are generally less precisely recorded than experimental data sets. This article aims to investigate the influence of erroneous records on population PK modeling and individual

  2. Iron deficiency in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Augusto Naoum

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Anemia is a frequent complication in cancer patients, both at diagnosis and during treatment, with a multifactorial etiology in most cases. Iron deficiency is among the most common causes of anemia in this setting and can develop in nearly half of patients with solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. Surprisingly, this fact is usually neglected by the attending physician in a way that proper and prompt investigation of the iron status is either not performed or postponed. In cancer patients, functional iron deficiency is the predominant mechanism, in which iron availability is reduced due to disease or the therapy-related inflammatory process. Hence, serum ferritin is not reliable in detecting iron deficiency in this setting, whereas transferrin saturation seems more appropriate for this purpose. Besides, lack of bioavailable iron can be further worsened by the use of erythropoiesis stimulating agents that increase iron utilization in the bone marrow. Iron deficiency can cause anemia or worsen pre-existing anemia, leading to a decline in performance status and adherence to treatment, with possible implications in clinical outcome. Due to its frequency and importance, treatment of this condition is already recommended in many specialty guidelines and should be performed preferably with intravenous iron. The evidences regarding the efficacy of this treatment are solid, with response gain when combined with erythropoiesis stimulating agents and significant increments in hemoglobin as monotherapy. Among intravenous iron formulations, slow release preparations present more favorable pharmacological characteristics and efficacy in cancer patients.

  3. Acute kidney injury in the cancer patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, G Adam; Hu, Daniel; Okusa, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent and significant complication of cancer and cancer therapy. Cancer patients frequently encounter risk factors for AKI including older age, CKD, prerenal conditions, sepsis, exposure to nephrotoxins, and obstructive physiology. AKI can also be secondary to paraneoplastic conditions, including glomerulonephritis and microangiopathic processes. This complication can have significant consequences, including effects on patients' ability to continue to receive therapy for their malignancy. This review will serve to summarize potential etiologies of AKI that present in patients with cancer as well as to highlight specific patient populations, such as the critically ill cancer patient. Copyright © 2014 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics modeling of lonafarnib in patients with chronic hepatitis delta virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canini, Laetitia; Koh, Christopher; Cotler, Scott J; Uprichard, Susan L; Winters, Mark A; Han, Ma Ai Thanda; Kleiner, David E; Idilman, Ramazan; Yurdaydin, Cihan; Glenn, Jeffrey S; Heller, Theo; Dahari, Harel

    2017-06-01

    The prenylation inhibitor lonafarnib (LNF) is a potent antiviral agent providing a breakthrough for the treatment of hepatitis delta virus (HDV). The current study used a maximum likelihood approach to model LNF pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) parameters and predict the dose needed to achieve 99% efficacy using data from 12 patients chronically infected with HDV and treated with LNF 100 mg twice daily (bid) (group 1) or 200 mg bid (group 2) for 28 days. The LNF-PK model predicted average steady-state LNF concentrations of 860 ng/mL and 1,734 ng/mL in groups 1 and 2, respectively, with an LNF absorption rate k a = 0.43/hour and elimination rate k e = 0.045/hour. The PK/PD model identified an average delay of 0.56 hours and an LNF concentration that decreases HDV production by 50%, EC50 = 227 ng/mL, with a Hill factor h = 1.48. The HDV half-life in blood was 1.87 days, and the average steady-state LNF efficacy in blocking HDV production was ɛ = 87.7% for group 1 and ɛ = 95.2% for group 2. A biphasic HDV decline with an average phase 1 decline (0.9 log 10 IU/mL and 1.32 log 10 IU/mL) was observed in groups 1 and 2, respectively. Phase 2 was not significantly ( P = 0.94) different between the two groups, with an average slope of -0.06 log IU/mL/day. The model suggests an LNF dose of ∼610 mg bid would achieve ɛ = 99%. Conclusion : The first PK/PD modeling study in patients with chronic HDV indicates that a ∼3-fold increase in LNF dose (∼610 mg bid) would achieve 99% antiviral efficacy. A ritonavir-boosted LNF combination may provide a means to increase LNF efficacy with minimal side effects. The modeling findings provide an important advance in understanding HDV dynamics and the basis to optimize LNF therapy for hepatitis D. ( Hepatology Communications 2017;1:288-292).

  5. Modeling of pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and hemodynamic effects of macitentan in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Andreas; Zisowsky, Jochen; Dingemanse, Jasper

    2018-04-01

    Macitentan is the first endothelin receptor antagonist with demonstrated efficacy on morbidity and mortality in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in the pivotal study SERAPHIN. The pharmacokinetics (PK) of macitentan and its active metabolite, ACT-132577, were characterized in a population model. Efficacy and hemodynamics (pharmacodynamics, PD) were related to PK based on PK/PD modeling. Sex, age, and body weight influenced the PK to a statistically significant extent. Model-based simulations showed that these variables are clinically not relevant. Concomitant use of PAH medication (PDE-5 inhibitors) did not influence macitentan trough concentration to a relevant extent. Efficacy and hemodynamics showed clear differences from placebo for macitentan concentrations on 3 and 10 mg with consistent superior effects for 10 mg. After 6 months, PAH patients showed model-predicted 6-min walk distance (6-MWD) improvements of 1.0 m on placebo compared to 29.8 and 34.1 m on 3 and 10 mg of macitentan, respectively. Higher macitentan concentrations were associated with reductions in pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), mean right atrial and pulmonary arterial pressure, and total pulmonary resistance (TPR) and increases in cardiac index (CI) and mixed venous oxygen saturation. Statistical significance was determined for PVR, TPR, and CI but not for 6-MWD. In addition, PVR showed more pronounced differences between active treatment and placebo than 6-MWD. Modeling identified statistically significant inter-patient differences; simulations to assess the magnitude of the effects permitted clinical judgment. The same approach will allow for extrapolation to children. Hemodynamic markers might be better markers of treatment effects than 6-MWD. The SERAPHIN study and its open-label extension are registered with ClinicalTrials.gov with identifiers NCT00660179 (https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00660179) and NCT00667823 (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show

  6. Impact of the CYP3A5*1 Allele on the Pharmacokinetics of Tacrolimus in Japanese Heart Transplant Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Takaya; Wada, Kyoichi; Matsuda, Sachi; Terada, Yuka; Oita, Akira; Kawase, Atsushi; Takada, Mitsutaka

    2018-04-24

    Tacrolimus, a major immunosuppressant used after transplantation, is associated with large interindividual variation involving genetic polymorphisms in metabolic processes. A common variant of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A5 gene, CYP3A5*3, affects blood concentrations of tacrolimus. However, tacrolimus pharmacokinetics at the early stage of transplantation have not been adequately studied in heart transplantation. We retrospectively examined the impact of the CYP3A5 genotype on tacrolimus pharmacokinetics at the early stage of heart transplantation. The tacrolimus pharmacokinetic profile was obtained from 65 patients during the first 5 weeks after heart transplantation. Differences in the patients' characteristics and tacrolimus pharmacokinetic parameters between the CYP3A5 expresser (*1/*1 or *1/*3 genotypes) and non-expresser (*3/*3 genotype) groups were assessed by the Chi-square test, Student's t test, or Mann-Whitney U test. The CYP3A5 *1/*1, *1/*3, and *3/*3 genotypes were detected in 5, 22, and 38 patients, respectively. All patients started clotrimazole therapy approximately 1 week after starting tacrolimus. Apparent clearance and dose/weight to reach the target trough concentration (C 0 ) were significantly higher in the expresser group than in the non-expresser group (0.32 vs. 0.19 L/h/kg, p = 0.0003; 0.052 vs. 0.034 mg/kg/day, p = 0.0002); there were no significant differences in the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 12 h (AUC 0-12 ) and concentrations at any sampling time point between the two groups. Similar concentration-time curves for tacrolimus were obtained in the expresser and non-expresser groups by dose adjustment based on therapeutic drug monitoring. These results demonstrate the importance of the CYP3A5 genotype in tacrolimus dose optimization based on therapeutic drug monitoring after heart transplantation.

  7. Oral complications in cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl, W.

    1983-02-01

    Ionizing radiation used in treating the head and neck area produces oral side effects such as mucositis, salivary changes, trismus and radiation caries. Sequelae of cancer chemotherapy often include oral stomatitis, myelosuppression and immunosuppression. Infections of dental origin in compromised patients are potentially lethal. Specific programs to eliminate dental pathology before radiation and chemotherapy, and to maintain oral hygiene during and after therapy, will minimize these complications.

  8. Oral complications in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carl, W.

    1983-01-01

    Ionizing radiation used in treating the head and neck area produces oral side effects such as mucositis, salivary changes, trismus and radiation caries. Sequelae of cancer chemotherapy often include oral stomatitis, myelosuppression and immunosuppression. Infections of dental origin in compromised patients are potentially lethal. Specific programs to eliminate dental pathology before radiation and chemotherapy, and to maintain oral hygiene during and after therapy, will minimize these complications

  9. Comparative Population Plasma and Tissue Pharmacokinetics of Micafungin in Critically Ill Patients with Severe Burn Injuries and Patients with Complicated Intra-Abdominal Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-de-Lorenzo, A.; Grau, S.; Agrifoglio, A.; Cachafeiro, L.; Herrero, E.; Asensio, M. J.; Sánchez, S. M.; Roberts, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Severely burned patients have altered drug pharmacokinetics (PKs), but it is unclear how different they are from those in other critically ill patient groups. The aim of the present study was to compare the population pharmacokinetics of micafungin in the plasma and burn eschar of severely burned patients with those of micafungin in the plasma and peritoneal fluid of postsurgical critically ill patients with intra-abdominal infection. Fifteen burn patients were compared with 10 patients with intra-abdominal infection; all patients were treated with 100 to 150 mg/day of micafungin. Micafungin concentrations in serial blood, peritoneal fluid, and burn tissue samples were determined and were subjected to a population pharmacokinetic analysis. The probability of target attainment was calculated using area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h/MIC cutoffs of 285 for Candida parapsilosis and 3,000 for non-parapsilosis Candida spp. by Monte Carlo simulations. Twenty-five patients (18 males; median age, 50 years; age range, 38 to 67 years; median total body surface area burned, 50%; range of total body surface area burned, 35 to 65%) were included. A three-compartment model described the data, and only the rate constant for the drug distribution from the tissue fluid to the central compartment was statistically significantly different between the burn and intra-abdominal infection patients (0.47 ± 0.47 versus 0.15 ± 0.06 h−1, respectively; P burn patients and intra-abdominal infection patients. After the first dose, micafungin at 100 mg/day achieved the PK/PD targets in plasma for MIC values of ≤0.008 mg/liter and ≤0.064 mg/liter for non-parapsilosis Candida spp. and Candida parapsilosis species, respectively. PMID:27458229

  10. Evaluation of Alpha-Therapy with Radium-223-Dichloride in Castration Resistant Metastatic Prostate Cancer-the Role of Gamma Scintigraphy in Dosimetry and Pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kairemo, Kalevi; Joensuu, Timo; Rasulova, Nigora; Kiljunen, Timo; Kangasmäki, Aki

    2015-07-30

    Radium-223-dichloride ((223)RaCl₂) is a new bone-seeking calcium analogue alpha-emitter, which has obtained marketing authorization for the treatment skeletal metastases of hormone-refractory prostate cancer. The current treatment regimen is based on six consecutive doses of (223)RaCl₂ at 4 week intervals and the administered activity dose, 50 kBq/kg per cycle is based on patient weight. We analyzed two patients using quantitative serial gamma imaging to estimate dosimetry in tumors and see possible pharmacokinetic differences in the treatment cycles. The lesions were rather well visualized in gamma scintigraphy in spite of low gamma activity (2.0-fold (1.8 vs. 3.6). Of these patients, patient 1 demonstrated a serum PSA response, whereas there was no PSA response in patient 2. From our data, there were maximally up to 4.0-fold differences (62.1 vs. 246.6 ) between the relative absorbed radiation doses between patients as calculated from the quantitative standardized imaging to be delivered in only two lesions, and in the same lesion the maximum difference in the cycles was up to 2.3-fold (107.4 vs. 246.6). Our recommendation based on statistical simulation analysis, is serial measurement at days 0-8 at least 3 times, this improve the accuracy significantly to study the lesion activities, half-lives or calculated relative absorbed radiation doses as calculated from the imaging. Both our patients had originally two metastatic sites in the imaging field; the former patient demonstrated a serum PSA response and the latter demonstrated no PSA response. In these two patients there was no significant difference in the lesion activities, half-lives or calculated relative absorbed radiation doses as calculated from the quantitative imaging. Our results, although preliminary, suggest that dose monitoring can be included as a part of this treatment modality. On the other hand, from the absorbed radiation doses, the response cannot be predicted because with very similar

  11. Access to Cancer Services for Rural Colorectal Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Cai, Yong; Larson, Eric H.; Dobie, Sharon A.; Wright, George E.; Goodman, David C.; Matthews, Barbara; Hart, L. Gary

    2008-01-01

    Context: Cancer care requires specialty surgical and medical resources that are less likely to be found in rural areas. Purpose: To examine the travel patterns and distances of rural and urban colorectal cancer (CRC) patients to 3 types of specialty cancer care services--surgery, medical oncology consultation, and radiation oncology consultation.…

  12. Population pharmacokinetic modelling of the changes in atazanavir plasma clearance caused by ritonavir plasma concentrations in HIV‐1 infected patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moltó, José; Estévez, Javier A.; Miranda, Cristina; Cedeño, Samandhy; Clotet, Bonaventura

    2016-01-01

    Aims The aim of the present study was to develop a simultaneous population pharmacokinetic model for atazanavir (ATV) incorporating the effect of ritonavir (RTV) on clearance to predict ATV concentrations under different dosing regimens in HIV‐1‐infected patients. Methods A Cross‐sectional study was carried out in 83 HIV‐1‐infected adults taking ATV 400 mg or ATV 300 mg/RTV 100 mg once daily. Demographic and clinical characteristics were registered and blood samples collected to measure drug concentrations. A population pharmacokinetic model was constructed using nonlinear mixed‐effects modelling and used to simulate six dosing scenarios. Results The selected one‐compartmental model described the pharmacokinetics of RTV and ATV simultaneously, showing exponential, direct inhibition of ATV clearance according to the RTV plasma concentration, which explained 17.5% of the variability. A mean RTV plasma concentration of 0.63 mg l–1 predicted an 18% decrease in ATV clearance. The percentages of patients with an end‐of‐dose‐interval concentration of ATV below or above the minimum and maximum target concentrations of 0.15 mg l–1 and 0.85 mg l–1 favoured the selection of the simulated ATV/RTV once‐daily regimens (ATV 400 mg, ATV 300 mg/RTV 100 mg, ATV 300 mg/RTV 50 mg, ATV 200/RTV 100 mg) over the unboosted twice‐daily regimens (ATV 300 mg, ATV 200 mg). Conclusions A one‐compartment simultaneous model can describe the pharmacokinetics of RTV and ATV, including the effect of RTV plasma concentrations on ATV clearance. This model is promising for predicting individuals' ATV concentrations in clinical scenarios, and supports further clinical trials of once‐daily doses of ATV 300 mg/RTV 50 mg or ATV 200 mg/RTV 100 mg to confirm efficacy and safety. PMID:27447851

  13. Doxorubicin-Loaded QuadraSphere Microspheres: Plasma Pharmacokinetics and Intratumoral Drug Concentration in an Animal Model of Liver Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kwang-Hun; Liapi, Eleni A.; Cornell, Curt; Reb, Philippe; Buijs, Manon; Vossen, Josephina A.; Ventura, Veronica Prieto; Geschwind, Jean-Francois H.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate, in vitro and in vivo, doxorubicin-loaded poly (vinyl alcohol-sodium acrylate) copolymer microspheres [QuadraSphere microspheres (QSMs)] for transcatheter arterial delivery in an animal model of liver cancer. Doxorubicin loading efficiency and release profile were first tested in vitro. In vivo, 15 rabbits, implanted with a Vx-2 tumor in the liver, were divided into three groups of five rabbits each, based on the time of euthanasia. Twenty-five milligrams of QSMs was diluted in 10 ml of a 10 mg/ml doxorubicin solution and 10 ml of nonionic contrast medium for a total volume of 20 ml. One milliliter of a drug-loaded QSM solution containing 5 mg of doxorubicin was injected into the tumor feeding artery. Plasma doxorubicin and doxorubicinol concentrations, and intratumoral and peritumoral doxorubicin tissue concentrations, were measured. Tumor specimens were pathologically evaluated to record tumor necrosis. As a control, one animal was blandly embolized with plain QSMs in each group. In vitro testing of QSM doxorubicin loadability and release over time showed 82-94% doxorubicin loadability within 2 h and 6% release within the first 6 h after loading, followed by a slow release pattern. In vivo, the doxorubicin plasma concentration declined at 40 min. The peak doxorubicin intratumoral concentration was observed at 3 days and remained detectable till the study's end point (7 days). Mean percentage tumor cell death in the doxorubicin QSM group was 90% at 7 days and 60% in the bland QSM embolization group. In conclusion, QSMs can be efficiently loaded with doxorubicin. Initial experiments with doxorubicin-loaded QSMs show a safe pharmacokinetic profile and effective tumor killing in an animal model of liver cancer.

  14. Ceftolozane/tazobactam pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic‐derived dose justification for phase 3 studies in patients with nosocomial pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Benjamin W.; Huntington, Jennifer A.; Nicolau, David P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ceftolozane/tazobactam is an antipseudomonal antibacterial approved for the treatment of complicated urinary tract infections (cUTIs) and complicated intra‐abdominal infections (cIAIs) and in phase 3 clinical development for treatment of nosocomial pneumonia. A population pharmacokinetic (PK) model with the plasma‐to‐epithelial lining fluid (ELF) kinetics of ceftolozane/tazobactam was used to justify dosing regimens for patients with nosocomial pneumonia in phase 3 studies. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to determine ceftolozane/tazobactam dosing regimens with a >90% probability of target attainment (PTA) for a range of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic targets at relevant minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for key pathogens in nosocomial pneumonia. With a plasma‐to‐ELF penetration ratio of approximately 50%, as observed from an ELF PK study, a doubling of the current dose regimens for different renal functions that are approved for cUTIs and cIAIs is needed to achieve >90% PTA for nosocomial pneumonia. For example, a 3‐g dose of ceftolozane/tazobactam for nosocomial pneumonia patients with normal renal function is needed to achieve a >90% PTA (actual 98%) for the 1‐log kill target against pathogens with an MIC of ≤8 mg/L in ELF, compared with the 1.5‐g dose approved for cIAIs and cUTIs. PMID:26096377

  15. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of samarium-153-labelled OC125 antibody coupled to CITCDTPA in a xenograft model of ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraeber-Bodéré, F; Mishra, A; Thédrez, P; Faivre-Chauvet, A; Bardiès, M; Imai, S; Le Boterff, J; Chatal, J F

    1996-05-01

    The use of samarium-153 in the context of radioimmunotherapy of cancers has been limited by the instability of antibody labelling, which produces high uptake concentrations in liver and bone. This study compares the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of 153Sm-labelled OC125 monoclonal antibody, in whole or F(ab')2 fragment form and with diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid (DTPA) or 6-p-isothiocyanatobenzyl diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid (CITCDTPA) coupling, in nude mice grafted subcutaneously with an ovarian adenocarcinoma line (SHIN-3) expressing CA125 antigen. The specific activity of the immunoconjugates was 18.5-55.5 MBq/mg, and their immunoreactivity exceeded 65%. With 153Sm-DTPA-OC125F(ab')2, the stability study in serum indicated that 50% of the metal remained bound to the antibody. The pharmacokinetic study showed a retention half-life of 25.1 h and blood clearance of 0.72 ml/h. The biodistribution study indicated tumour uptake of 4.53%+/-0.49% of injected activity per gram (%ID/g) at 24 h and tumour-to-liver and tumour-to-bone ratios of 0.23+/-0.02 and 1.54+/-0.49 respectively at 24 h. With 153Sm-CITCDTPA-OC125F(ab')2, serum stability was greater (87% of the metal remaining bound to the antibody), retention half-life was 22.25 h and blood clearance was 2.23 ml/h. Tumour was better targeted (8.30%+/-3.56%ID/g at 24 h), and tumour-to-liver and tumour-to-bone ratios were 1.17+/-0.36 and 7.08+/-3.09 respectively at 24 h. However, renal retention remained elevated (29.76%+/-9. 41%ID/g at 24 h). With intact IgG, renal uptake decreased (1.41%+/-0. 49%ID/g at 24 h), but tumour uptake was lower than with fragments (1. 46%+/-0.58%ID/g at 24 h). Liver uptake was higher (tumour-to-liver ratio 0.10+/-0.05), and blood clearance was slower. The stability and distribution of 153Sm-CITCDTPA were more favourable than those of 153Sm-DTPA for application in radioimmunotherapy. Quantitative analysis performed using digitized images obtained by conventional

  16. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic analyses for efficacy of ceftaroline fosamil in patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavnani, Sujata M; Hammel, Jeffrey P; Van Wart, Scott A; Rubino, Christopher M; Reynolds, Daniel K; Forrest, Alan; Khariton, Tatiana; Friedland, H David; Riccobene, Todd A; Ambrose, Paul G

    2013-12-01

    Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) analyses for efficacy using phase III trial data from patients treated with a ceftaroline fosamil dosing regimen of 600 mg intravenously (i.v.) every 12 h (q12h) for 5 to 7 days for community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) were conducted. High clinical and microbiological success rates (84.7 and 86.3%, respectively) and percentages of time during the dosing interval that free-drug steady-state concentrations remained above the MIC (f%T>MIC) (98.4% had f%T>MIC values of ≥63.3) were observed among 124 microbiologically evaluable patients. As a result, significant PK-PD relationships could not be identified. These data provide support for the use of a ceftaroline fosamil dosing regimen of 600 mg i.v. q12h to treat patients with CABP.

  17. Modelling the Effect of Exercise on Insulin Pharmacokinetics in "Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion" Treated Type 1 Diabetes Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine; Juhl, Rune; Schmidt, Signe

    to the realization of the artificial pancreas is the effect of exercise on the insulin and plasma glucose dynamics. In this report, we take the first step towards a population model of exercise effects in type 1 diabetes. We focus on the effect on the insulin pharmacokinetics in continuous subcutaneous insulin...... of the measurement variance. Conclusion: A model to predict the insulin appearance in plasma during exercise in CSII treated patients is identified. Further clinical studies are needed to confirm the increase in insulin plasma concentration during exercise in type 1 diabetes patients. These studies should include......Introduction: The artificial pancreas is believed to ease the burden of constant management of type 1 diabetes for the patients substantially. An important aspect of the artificial pancreas development is the mathematical models used for control, prediction or simulation. A major challenge...

  18. Pharmacokinetics in Mouse and Comparative Effects of Frondosides in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasem Al Shemaili

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The frondosides are triterpenoid glycosides from the Atlantic sea cucumber Cucumaria frondosa. Frondoside A inhibits growth, invasion, metastases and angiogenesis and induces apoptosis in diverse cancer types, including pancreatic cancer. We compared the growth inhibitory effects of three frondosides and their aglycone and related this to the pharmocokinetics and route of administration. Frondoside A potently inhibited growth of pancreatic cancer cells with an EC50 of ~1 µM. Frondoside B was less potent (EC50 ~2.5 µM. Frondoside C and the aglycone had no effect. At 100 µg/kg, frondoside A administered to CD2F1 mice as an i.v. bolus, the Cpmax was 129 nM, Cltb was 6.35 mL/min/m2, and half-life was 510 min. With i.p. administration the Cpmax was 18.3 nM, Cltb was 127 mL/min/m2 and half-life was 840 min. Oral dosing was ineffective. Frondoside A (100 µg/kg/day i.p. markedly inhibited growth cancer xenografts in nude mice. The same dose delivered by oral gavage had no effect. No evidence of acute toxicity was seen with frondoside A. Frondoside A is more potent inhibitor of cancer growth than other frondosides. The glycoside component is essential for bioactivity. Frondoside A is only effective when administered systemically. Based on the current and previous studies, frondoside A appears safe and may be valuable in the treatment of cancer.

  19. The mechanisms of photodynamic action for treating of cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Akopov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current views on mechanisms of therapeutic effect of photodynamic therapy for treating of cancer patients are represented. The history of formation and development of the method is described. The main requirements for agents used as photosensitizers are listed. Detailed review of main photosensitizers used in clinical practice in Russia and in foreign countries with their chemical structure, main spectral characteristics was performed. Methods of its application, therapeutic dose ranges, indications, specifi c pharmacokinetic properties and side-effects are briefl y outlined. Advantages and disadvantages of the most popular modern photosensitizers, main mechanisms of entry of photosensitizers of different chemical structure into cancer cells are observed. Three main possible component of anti-tumor effect: direct damage of cancer cells, impairment of vascular stroma of tumor and elimination of tumor due to immune cells are shown and closely discussed. Necrosis and apotosis of neovascular net which are main development trends of anti-tumor action for photodynamic therapy are noticed. 

  20. Single-dose pharmacokinetics and tolerability of oral delta-9- tetrahydrocannabinol in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joerger, Markus; Wilkins, Justin; Fagagnini, Stefania; Baldinger, Reto; Brenneisen, Rudolf; Schneider, Ursula; Goldman, Bea; Weber, Markus

    2012-06-01

    Cannabinoids exert neuroprotective and symptomatic effects in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We assessed the pharmacokinetics (PK) and tolerability of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in ALS patients. Nine patients received THC single oral doses of 5mg and 10mg, separated by a wash-out period of two weeks. Blood samples for the determination of THC, 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THC-COOH) and hydroxy-THC (THC-OH) were taken up to 8 hours after intake. Adverse events were assessed by visual analogue scales (VAS). Plasma concentrations of the active metabolite THC-OH were submitted to sequential pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic population modeling on individual heart rate as a proxy for THC's cardiovasculatory effects. Drowsiness, euphoria, orthostasis, sleepiness, vertigo and weakness were significantly more frequent in patients receiving 10mg compared to 5 mg THC. A marked interindividual variability was found for the absorption of oral THC (84%) and elimination of THC-COOH (45%). PK data did not support any clinically relevant deviation from linear PK in the investigated range of concentrations. Plasma concentrations of THC-OH were positively correlated with the individual heart rate. An E(max-model) was successfully fitted to individual heart rate, with a THC-OH plasma concentration of 3.2 x 10(-4) μmol/L for EC(50) and an E(max) of 93 bpm for heart rate. The higher 10mg dose of THC was dose-limiting in patients with ALS. High interindividual PK variability requires individuell titration of THC for potential therapeutic use in patients with ALS.

  1. Staphylococcal Blood Stream Infections in Cancer Patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cancer Patients. Dear Sir,. Cancer patients are at an increased risk of the blood stream infections (BSI) due to their immune-compromised status, repeated ... Table 1: Details of the Staphylococci isolated from BSI. Staphylococcal isolates. Number. (%). Number of methicillin resistant isolates (%). Number of patients who.

  2. Nutritional status assessment in colorectal cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Joana Pedro Lopes; Paula Manuela de Castro Cardoso Pereira; Ana Filipa dos Reis Baltazar Vicente; Alexandra Bernardo; María Fernanda de Mesquita

    2013-01-01

    The present study intended to evaluate the nutritional status of Portuguese colorectal patients and associated it with surgery type as well as quality of life outcomes. Malnutrition can affect up to 85% of cancer patients and specifically 30-60% in colorectal cancer and can significantly influence health outcomes. A sample of 50 colorectal cancer patients was evaluated in what refers to several anthropometric measures, food intake, clinical history, complications rate before and after surgery...

  3. Pharmacokinetics of Rolapitant in Patients With Mild to Moderate Hepatic Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Zhi-Yi; Arora, Sujata; Lu, Sharon; Kansra, Vikram

    2018-01-12

    Rolapitant is a selective and long-acting neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist approved in an oral formulation in combination with other antiemetic agents for the prevention of delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in adults. This was a phase 1 open-label, parallel-group pharmacokinetic and safety study of a single oral dose of 180 mg of rolapitant and its major active metabolite, M19, in subjects with mild and moderate hepatic impairment compared with healthy matched controls. Pharmacokinetics were assessed by a mixed-model analysis of variance of log-transformed values for maximum observed plasma concentration (C max ), observed time at C max (t max ), area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) from time 0 to the time of the last quantifiable concentration (AUC 0-t ), and AUC from time 0 to 120 hours (AUC 0-120 ), with hepatic group as a fixed effect. Mean rolapitant C max , AUC 0-t , and AUC 0-120 were similar in the mild hepatic impairment and healthy control groups. In subjects with moderate hepatic impairment, AUC 0-t was similar and C max was 25% lower than in healthy controls. Mean M19 C max and AUC 0-t were similar in the mild hepatic impairment group and healthy controls, but impairment versus healthy controls. Fraction of unbound rolapitant was comparable in all groups for rolapitant and M19. Rolapitant was well tolerated in all groups, without serious adverse events. Pharmacokinetic differences between healthy subjects and those with mild or moderate hepatic impairment are unlikely to pose a safety risk and do not warrant predefined dosage adjustment in the presence of hepatic impairment. © 2018, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  4. Population pharmacokinetics of extended-release injectable naltrexone (XR-NTX) in patients with alcohol dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Joi L; Turncliff, Ryan Z; Hayes, Siobhan C; Farrell, Colm B

    2007-11-01

    Injectable extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX; Vivitrol) has recently been approved for the treatment of alcohol dependence. A population pharmacokinetic (PPK) analysis examined the possibility of altered pharmacokinetics for naltrexone and its primary metabolite, 6beta-naltrexol, in subpopulations with a potential for alcohol-dependence treatment. Data from four clinical studies of XR-NTX were pooled. Absorption was modeled as a sequential release in three phases. The pharmacokinetics of naltrexone and 6beta-naltrexol were modeled as one-compartment disposition submodels, parameterized in terms of clearance (CL) and volume of distribution (V). The impact of age, weight, gender, race, hepatic function, renal function, smoking, and alcohol/opioid dependence on PPK parameter estimates was analyzed. Plasma concentrations were available from 453 subjects. More than half of the subjects (59%) were alcohol dependent, and 27% were dependent on both alcohol and opioids. Naltrexone CL (140 L/h) and V (38,300 L) were dependent on weight (changes of 0.548 L/h/kg and 0.655 L/kg, respectively) and were 23% and 35% higher, respectively, in subjects with alcohol and/or opioid dependence than in healthy subjects. Naltrexone CL also was dependent on age (-0.108 L/h/year); 6beta-naltrexol CL (65.1 L/h) was dependent on creatinine CL (0.229 L/h/ml/minute) and alkaline phosphatase (-0.130 L/h/IU/L), and was increased by 18% in smokers and in alcohol- and/or opioid-dependent subjects. Although statistically significant covariate-parameter relationships were identified, they were not considered clinically meaningful, suggesting that dosing adjustments of XR-NTX based on weight, age, gender, health status, smoking status, creatinine CL, and hepatic function differences should not be necessary.

  5. A phase IB dose-escalation study of the safety and pharmacokinetics of pictilisib in combination with either paclitaxel and carboplatin (with or without bevacizumab) or pemetrexed and cisplatin (with or without bevacizumab) in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Jean-Charles; Adjei, Alex A; Bahleda, Rastilav; Besse, Benjamin; Ferte, Charles; Planchard, David; Zhou, Jing; Ware, Joseph; Morrissey, Kari; Shankar, Geetha; Lin, Wei; Schutzman, Jennifer L; Dy, Grace K; Groen, Harry J M

    2017-11-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway is a potential therapeutic target in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This study aimed to evaluate the pan-PI3K inhibitor pictilisib in combination with first-line treatment regimens that were the standard of care at the time of study, in patients with NSCLC. A 3 + 3 dose-escalation study was performed using a starting daily dose of 60 mg pictilisib on days 1-14 of a 21-day cycle. Depending on bevacizumab eligibility and NSCLC histology, patients also received either paclitaxel + carboplatin or pemetrexed + cisplatin, ± bevacizumab every 3 weeks. The primary objectives of the study were to assess safety and tolerability and to identify dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs), the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and a recommended phase II dose (RP2D), for each combination. All 66 treated patients experienced at least one adverse event (AE). Grade ≥III AEs, serious AEs and deaths occurred in 57 (86.4%), 56 (84.8%) and 9 (13.6%) patients, respectively. Three patients reported DLTs across the four arms of the study. The MTD was not reached in any arm and the RP2D of pictilisib was determined to be 330 mg (capsules) or 340 mg (tablets) on a '14 days on, 7 days off' schedule. The best confirmed response was partial response in 29 (43.9%) patients and stable disease in 20 (30.9%) patients. Combining pictilisib with various standard-of-care first-line treatment regimens is feasible from a safety perspective in patients with NSCLC, and encouraging preliminary anti-tumour activity was observed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Troubleshooting PEG-hGH detection supporting pharmacokinetic evaluation in growth hormone deficient patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myler, Heather A; McVay, Sami; Kratzsch, Juergen

    2010-01-01

    The ability to quantify systemic concentrations of protein therapeutics is complicated by the presence of endogenous analyte, specific binding proteins, and nonspecific matrix components in biological matrices (Lee & Ma, 2007). Further complications can be introduced following pegylation whereby polyethylene glycol (PEG) impedes epitope recognition. Due to substantial interference from high affinity binding proteins and the inability to measure systemic drug concentrations under normal conditions, acid dissociation was implemented to facilitate the pharmacokinetic evaluation of clinical samples containing pegylated human growth hormone (PEG-hGH). A sandwich electrochemiluminescent immunosorbent assay (ECLA) was employed using an anti-PEG capture, anti-hGH detection format, thereby eliminating cross-reactivity with endogenous compound. Samples were acid treated with glycine buffered hydrochloric acid (approximately pH 2.0) to dissociate PEG-hGH from serum resident growth hormone binding protein (GHBP; 3). After neutralization with a HEPES-based neutralizing buffer, samples were diluted in a casein-based assay buffer containing 0.2% I-block, 0.1% Tween-20, 2M NaCl, and 10% normal mouse serum to eliminate nonspecific matrix effects. Meso Scale Discovery (MSD) technology was employed to achieve sensitivity requirements. The drug detection assay was validated in the presence and absence of acid dissociation. Validation parameters included: intra- and inter-assay accuracy and precision, selectivity (>60 lots of normal and growth hormone deficient human serum), cross-reactivity/specificity (Genotropin, hemoglobin, lipid, and bilirubin), dilutional linearity and stability (DeSilva et al., 2003; Shah et al., 1992; Smolec et al., 2005 Viswanathan et al., 2007; Food and Drug Administration, 2001). A 10-fold molar excess of GHBP was found to decrease PEG-hGH detection by >90% while acid dissociation was shown to recover >80% of the analyte. PEG-hGH clinical pharmacokinetic

  7. Pregnancy and abortion in breast cancer patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breast cancer in pregnancy is by itself not an indication for abortion. We document the case histories of 2 patients with breast cancer (recurrent or advanced) who elected to carry pregnancies to term. Pregnancy concurrent with or subsequent to breast cancer is not associated with a worse prognosis than would be observed ...

  8. Guidelines Urge Exercise for Cancer Patients, Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    The benefits of exercise are well documented in a number of cancers. A panel of experts in cancer, fitness, obesity, and exercise training convened by the American College of Sports Medicine is spreading what they believe to be one of the most important messages for cancer patients and survivors: Avoid inactivity.

  9. Regorafenib-induced retinal and gastrointestinal hemorrhage in a metastatic colorectal cancer patient with liver dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchihashi, Kenji; Shimokawa, Hozumi; Takayoshi, Kotoe; Nio, Kenta; Aikawa, Tomomi; Matsushita, Yuzo; Wada, Iori; Arita, Shuji; Ariyama, Hiroshi; Kusaba, Hitoshi; Sonoda, Koh-Hei; Akashi, Koichi; Baba, Eishi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Regorafenib is effective for metastatic colorectal cancer but its toxicity such as hemorrhage should be considered. The safety of regorafenib for the patient with the liver disease is not known. Patient concerns: Seventy-one-year old man of colon cancer had myodesopsia and blood stool after 14 days from the initiation of regorafenib administration with 50% dose reduction due to liver dysfunction. Diagnoses: Fundus examination revealed hemorrhage of the retinal vein. Interventions: Regorafenib treatment was discontinued and observational therapy was pursued. Outcomes: Retinal and gastrointestinal hemorrhage resolved in 1 week. Lessons: Retinal hemorrhage should be considered as the differential diagnosis of myodesopsia in the patient treated by regorafenib. Safety and pharmacokinetic of continuous regorafenib administration for patients with liver dysfunction remains to be clarified. PMID:29049226

  10. THE PHARMACODYNAMICS AND PHARMACOKINETICS OF ORG-9426, A NEW NONDEPOLARIZING NEUROMUSCULAR BLOCKING-AGENT, IN PATIENTS ANESTHETIZED WITH NITROUS-OXIDE, HALOTHANE AND FENTANYL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIERDA, JMKH; KLEEF, UW; LAMBALK, LM; KLOPPENBURG, WD; AGOSTON, S

    The pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of a new non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agent, Org 9426, were investigated. Ten patients undergoing elective head and neck surgery and anaesthetized with nitrous oxide, halothane and fentanyl, received a bolus dose of Org 9426 (1 mg.kg-1, 3 x ED90).

  11. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of high doses of pharmaceutically prepared heroin, by intravenous or by inhalation route in opioid-dependent patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rook, Elisabeth J.; van Ree, Jan M.; van den Brink, Wim; Hillebrand, Michel J. X.; Huitema, Alwin D. R.; Hendriks, Vincent M.; Beijnen, Jos H.

    2006-01-01

    A pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic study was performed in opioid-dependent patients in the Netherlands, who were currently treated with high doses of pharmaceutically prepared heroin on medical prescription. Besides intravenous heroin, heroin was prescribed for inhalation by "chasing the dragon"

  12. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of saruplase, an unglycosylated single-chain urokinase-type plasminogen activator, in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, R. W.; Cohen, A. F.; Hopkins, G. R.; Beier, H.; Günzler, W. A.; van der Wouw, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    We examined in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) the pharmacokinetics of saruplase, an unglycosylated, single chain, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (rscu-PA) by measuring urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) antigen and total u-PA activity, its conversion to active

  13. Psychosocial coping strategies in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprah, L.; Sostaric, M.

    2004-01-01

    Background. The aim of this review is to present common psychosocial problems in cancer patients and their possible coping strategies. Cancer patients are occupied with many psychosocial problems, which are only partially related to their health state and medical treatments. They are faced with a high social pressure, based on prejudices and stereotypes of this illness. The review presents the process of confrontation with the cancer diagnosis and of managing the psychological consequences of cancer. The effects of specific coping styles, psychosocial interventions and a social support on initiation, progression and recurrence of cancer are also described. Conclusions. Although some recent meta-analysis could not provide scientific evidence for the association between coping strategies and the cancer initiation, the progression or the recurrence (neither have studies rejected the thesis of association), the therapeutic window for the psychosocial intervention is still wide and shows an important effect on the quality of lives of many cancer patients. (author)

  14. Pharmacokinetic study of oxaliplatin iv chronomodulated infusion combined with 5-fluorouracil iv continuous infusion in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattel, Luigi; La Grotta, Giovanni; Infante, Lucia; Passera, Roberto; Arpicco, Silvia; Brusa, Paola; Bumma, Cesare

    2003-12-01

    We investigated the pharmacokinetics (PK), preliminary clinical results and toxicity of chronomodulated oxaliplatin (OHP) plus 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) without folinic acid (FA) in 13 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. 5-FU (200 mg/m2/day as 14-day continuous iv infusion for six cycles) plus OHP at increasing doses (25-30-35 mg/m2/day, as 12 h chronomodulated iv infusion on days 1-2-3-4, every 14 days for six cycles) were administered to reach maximum tolerated dose (MTD). At MTD (30 mg/m2/day), a PK study of 5-FU and OHP (in total and ultrafiltered-UF plasma) was performed. 5-FU plasma levels were fairly stable, below that reported in similar studies and closely related to the lack of the most typical 5-FU toxicities. OHP Cmax occurred 7 h after infusion start; a progressive accumulation of free Pt and ultrafiltered Pt (UF-OHP) through cycles 1-6 was noted. A marked difference between total plasma and UF Pt was seen in the elimination phase. OHP plasma clearance decrease was related to Vz (volume of distribution of late elimination phase), whereas in UF-OHP was due to a change in Ke or t1/2. In conclusion, the association of 5-FU with chronomodulated OHP do not seem to influence PK parameters of either drugs. Toxicity was modest/acceptable and clinical efficacy good: preliminary data showed a threshold neurotoxicity at total plasma Pt concentrations >1500 ng/ml and UF plasma Pt concentrations >150 ng/ml.

  15. Role of pharmacokinetic parameters derived with high temporal resolution DCE MRI using simultaneous PET/MRI system in breast cancer: A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jena, Amarnath, E-mail: drjena2002@gmail.com [Department of Molecular Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals, Sarita Vihar, Delhi–Mathura Road, New Delhi 110076 (India); Taneja, Sangeeta; Singh, Aru; Negi, Pradeep; Mehta, Shashi Bhushan [Department of Molecular Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals, Sarita Vihar, Delhi–Mathura Road, New Delhi 110076 (India); Sarin, Ramesh [Department of Surgical Oncology, Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals, Sarita Vihar, Delhi–Mathura Road, New Delhi 110076 (India)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Simultaneous PET/MRI (with 3T MRI in the core) for quantitative pharmacokinetics. • Diagnostic accuracy of pharmacokinetic parameters like K{sup trans}, K{sub ep} and v{sub e} acquired through this system. • Incorporating high temporal resolution sequence with short acquisition time of 60 s within the routine DCE MRI in a simultaneous PET/MRI system. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the reliability of pharmacokinetic parameters like K{sup trans}, Kep and v{sub e} derived through DCE MRI breast protocol using 3 T Simultaneous PET/MRI (3 Tesla Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging) system in distinguishing benign and malignant lesions. Materials and methods: High temporal resolution DCE (Dynamic Contrast Enhancement) MRI performed as routine breast MRI for diagnosis or as a part of PET/MRI for cancer staging using a 3 T simultaneous PET/MRI system in 98 women having 109 breast lesions were analyzed for calculation of pharmacokinetic parameters (K{sup trans}, v{sub e}, and Kep) at 60 s time point using an in-house developed computation scheme. Results: Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis revealed a cut off value for K{sup trans}, Kep, v{sub e} as 0.50, 2.59, 0.15 respectively which reliably distinguished benign and malignant breast lesions. Data analysis revealed an overall accuracy of 94.50%, 79.82% and 87.16% for K{sup trans}, Kep, v{sub e} respectively. Introduction of native T1 normalization with an externally placed phantom showed a higher accuracy (94.50%) than without native T1 normalization (93.50%) with an increase in specificity of 87% vs 84%. Conclusion: Overall the results indicate that reliable measurement of pharmacokinetic parameters with reduced acquisition time is feasible in a 3TMRI embedded PET/MRI system with reasonable accuracy and application may be extended to exploit the potential of simultaneous PET/MRI in further work on breast cancer.

  16. A Prospective Study of the Efficacy, Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Enteral Moxifloxacin in the Treatment of Hemodialysis Patients with Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokimatsu, Issei; Shigemura, Katsumi; Kotaki, Tomohiro; Yoshikawa, Hiroki; Yamamichi, Fukashi; Tomo, Tadashi; Arakawa, Soichi; Fujisawa, Masato; Kadota, Jun-Ichi

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the efficacy of oral moxifloxacin (MFLX) as a treatment for pneumonia in hemodialysis (HD) patients and the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of MFLX after oral administration. Methods Thirteen adult patients who required HD due to chronic renal failure were enrolled in the present study, which was performed to investigate the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia in HD patients. A standard dose of MFLX (400 mg, once daily) was administered. The therapy was continued, discontinued, or switched to another antibiotic depending on the response of the pneumonia to MFLX. A population PK model was developed using the post-hoc method. Results In total, 13 HD patients with pneumonia (male, n=7; female, n=6) were enrolled in the present study. The evaluation on the 3rd day showed that treatment was successful in 11 patients (84.6%) and that 10 patients were cured (76.9%). In the one case in which MFLX treatment failed, the patient was cured by switching to ceftriaxone (CTRX) (2 g, intravenously) plus levofloxacin (LVFX) (250 mg, orally). The causative bacterium in this male patient was P. aeruginosa. It did not display resistance to fluoroquinolones. One patient had liver dysfunction due to MFLX. The estimated PK parameters of MFLX were as follows: AUC 0→24 , 61.04±17.74 μg h/mL; C max , 5.25±1.12 μg/mL; and C trough , 1.15±0.45 μg/mL. The PK parameters of MFLX among the patients in whom adverse events occurred or in whom a cure was not achieved did not differ from those of the other patients to a statistically significant extent. Conclusion MFLX showed good efficacy and safety in HD patients with community-acquired pneumonia and the results of the PK analysis were favorable. Further prospective studies with larger numbers of patients will be needed to draw definitive conclusions.

  17. Depression and Resilience in Breast Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ristevska-Dimitrovska, Gordana; Stefanovski, Petar; Smichkoska, Snezhana; Raleva, Marija; Dejanova, Beti

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A significant number of breast cancer patients, during their life with the diagnosis, experience emotional distress in the form of depression and anxiety. Psychological resilience is the ability of a person to protect his/her mental health when faced with adverse circumstances such as the cancer diagnosis. This study aims to assess the resilience in breast cancer patients and to explore whether depression affects the resilience. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Two hundred eighteen (218) ...

  18. Taste and smell changes in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJpma, Irene

    2017-01-01

    Patients with cancer often experience changes in taste and smell perception during chemotherapy. The aim of this dissertation was to investigate taste and smell changes and short- and long-term effects of chemotherapy in a homogeneous population of testicular cancer patients treated with

  19. Fostering hope in the patient with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichwala, Rebecca

    2014-06-01

    When a patient is diagnosed with cancer, feelings such as fear, anxiety, and hopelessness can negatively affect a person's frame of mind. Hope can help a patient decrease anxiety and increase quality of life. Nurses should assess hope, provide interventions, be empathetic, listen, and treat patients with dignity to help improve hope and quality of life. This article features how hope can have a positive impact and provides specific information about how nurses can promote and foster hope in patients with cancer.

  20. The pharmacokinetics of valganciclovir prophylaxis in pediatric solid organ transplant patients at risk for Epstein–Barr virus disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather E Vezina

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Heather E Vezina1,2, Richard C Brundage2, Thomas E Nevins3, Henry H Balfour Jr1,31Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, 2Department of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology, 3Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USAAbstract: Antiviral prophylaxis with valganciclovir is used frequently in pediatric solid organ transplant patients to prevent Epstein–Barr virus (EBV-induced infections and tissue-invasive disease including post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD. This approach is untested in clinical trials and valganciclovir dosing strategies in children are highly variable. Our objective was to characterize the pharmacokinetics of ganciclovir in the plasma of pediatric kidney and liver transplant patients taking valganciclovir for EBV prophylaxis. Virologic response was also evaluated. Ganciclovir was measured by liquid chromatography/ultraviolet detection. EBV DNA was quantified by TaqMan® polymerase chain reaction. NONMEM® VI was used for data analysis. Ganciclovir plasma profiles were consistent with a one-compartment model. Final model estimates of apparent oral clearance (L/h, apparent volume of distribution (L, and absorption rate constant were 7.33, 35.1, and 0.85, respectively. There was evidence of lower bioavailability in children younger than three years. All eight subjects achieved ganciclovir plasma concentrations above reported in vitro concentrations needed to inhibit EBV replication by 50%. However, four subjects had detectable EBV DNA with a median (range of 18,300 (4,400 to 54,900 copies/mL of whole blood. These findings support the need for further studies of the clinical pharmacology and efficacy of valganciclovir for EBV prophylaxis.Keywords: valganciclovir, ganciclovir, pharmacokinetics, Epstein–Barr virus, pediatrics, solid organ transplantation

  1. Pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of empagliflozin, a sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor, in patients with hepatic impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macha, S; Rose, P; Mattheus, M; Cinca, R; Pinnetti, S; Broedl, U C; Woerle, H J

    2014-02-01

    This open-label, parallel-group study investigated the effect of various degrees of hepatic impairment on the pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of the sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor empagliflozin. Thirty-six subjects [8 each with mild, moderate or severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh classification), and 12 matched controls with normal hepatic function] received a single 50 mg dose of empagliflozin. Empagliflozin was rapidly absorbed. After reaching peak levels, plasma drug concentrations declined in a biphasic fashion. Compared with subjects with normal hepatic function, geometric mean ratios (90% confidence interval) of AUC(0-∞) and C(max) were 123.15% (98.89-153.36) and 103.81% (82.29-130.95), respectively, in patients with mild hepatic impairment, 146.97% (118.02-183.02) and 123.31% (97.74-155.55), respectively, in patients with moderate hepatic impairment, and 174.70% (140.29-217.55) and 148.41% (117.65-187.23), respectively, in patients with severe hepatic impairment. Adverse events, all mild or moderate in intensity, were reported in three subjects with moderate hepatic impairment, two subjects with severe hepatic impairment and six subjects with normal hepatic function. Empagliflozin was well tolerated in subjects with hepatic impairment. Increases in empagliflozin exposure were less than twofold in patients with hepatic impairment; therefore no dose adjustment of empagliflozin is required in patients with hepatic impairment. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Phase I evaluation of the effects of ketoconazole and rifampicin on cediranib pharmacokinetics in patients with solid tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, U; Miller, W H; Hotte, S

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate any effect of a CYP3A4 inhibitor (ketoconazole) or inducer (rifampicin) on cediranib steady-state pharmacokinetics in patients with advanced solid tumours. METHODS: In two Phase I, open-label trials, patients received once-daily oral doses of cediranib alone [20 mg...... (ketoconazole study); 45 mg (rifampicin study)] for 7 days followed by cediranib at the same dose with ketoconazole 400 mg/day for 3 days or once-daily rifampicin 600 mg/day for 7 days, respectively. Patients then continued to receive once-daily cediranib. RESULTS: In the ketoconazole study, 46 patients were...... dosed; 38 were evaluable for C (ss,max), 36 for AUC(ss). gMean AUC(ss) and C (ss,max) for cediranib 20 mg increased by 21 % (94 % CI 9-35 %) and 26 % (94 % CI 10-43 %), respectively, in the presence of ketoconazole. In the rifampicin study, 64 patients were dosed; 44 were evaluable for C (ss,max) and 41...

  3. Population pharmacokinetics of mefloquine, administered as a fixed-dose combination of artesunate-mefloquine in Indian patients for the treatment of acute uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jullien, Vincent; Valecha, Neena; Srivastava, Bina; Sharma, Bhawna; Kiechel, Jean-René

    2014-05-23

    Fixed-dose combinations of artemisinin combination therapy are strongly recommended to facilitate drug administration and compliance. New fixed-dose combinations must nevertheless be evaluated in relevant populations in terms of efficacy and pharmacokinetics. A single-arm, open-label, clinical trial was performed in Indian patients with acute uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria to investigate the efficacy and the pharmacokinetics of mefloquine when combined with artesunate in a fixed-dose combination (400/200 mg of mefloquine base/artesunate). The pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using a population approach. Seventy-seven patients were included in the study. Mefloquine pharmacokinetics obeys a two-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination. Mean parameter estimates (% inter-individual variability) were as follows: 0.16 h(-1) (75%) for the absorption rate constant, 1.13 L/h (30%) for the apparent plasma clearance, 271 L (21%) for the apparent central distribution volume, 344 L (54%) for the apparent peripheral distribution volume, and 1.43 L/h for the apparent distribution clearance. These values were consistent with the pharmacokinetic results described in Thai patients. No significant covariate was found for clearance. Body weight explained the inter-individual variability of the apparent central and peripheral distribution volumes. The PCR-adjusted efficacy of the treatment was 100%. The lack of significant covariate explaining the inter-individual variability of mefloquine clearance, combined with the excellent efficacy, supports the use of the standard 200/400 mg of artesunate-mefloquine fixed-dose combination in Indian patients with uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria. ISRCTN70618692.

  4. The Therapeutic use of human albumin in cancer patients' management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moujaess, Elissar; Fakhoury, May; Assi, Tarek; Elias, Hanine; El Karak, Fadi; Ghosn, Marwan; Kattan, Joseph

    2017-12-01

    Human albumin (HA) has been widely used in clinical practice due to its unique physiological characteristics and pharmacokinetics. However, with the absence of clear institutional recommendations, its uncontrolled prescription remains largely controversial. An extensive review on the albumin chemistry, pharmacology, physiology and pathology was performed, and data on commercially available HA, its cost, medical usage and the related available guidelines, particularly in oncology patients were gathered. Studies assessing the appropriate use and safety of HA in cancer patients are lacking. A retrospective survey of the appropriateness of HA infusions according to the SIMTI guidelines (2009) was performed in our department. Among 53 patients who received HA infusions, only 5.7% of the indications were appropriate for HA administration. Occasionally appropriate and inappropriate indications were considered in 10% and 84.3% of the prescriptions respectively with a relatively high cost. The adoption of strict guidelines may substantially reduce the inappropriate use and the subsequent healthcare costs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Misonidazole as a radiosensitizer in the radiotherapy of glioblastomas and oesophageal cancer. Pharmacokinetic and clinical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamulevicius, P.; Streffer, C.; Bamberg, M.; Scherer, E.

    1981-01-01

    Since May 1978 the hypoxic-cell radiosensitizer, misonidazole (MIS), has been under clinical investigation in a phase III trial with multiple doses of the drug in 11 patients with brain tumours (seven glioblastomas, four recurrent brain tumours) and three patients with oesophageal carcinoma. The doses of MIS administered were usually well tolerated but the principal toxicities observed were peripheral neuropathy as well as nausea and vomiting in the glioblastoma patients. The neuropathy was completely reversible. The incidence of neuropathy was not related to the pharmacological parameters of plasma level or half-life. Pharmacological assessment by high-pressure liquid chromatography included assays of plasma, urine and cerebrospinal fluid. The demethylated product, Ro-05-9963, was detected as the major metabolite. Peak plasma levels were obtained one to four hours after administration of MIS, with a half-life of five to ten hours. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of MIS correlated well with those of the plasma. MIS was mainly excreted as the demethylated metabolite, but less than 40% of the given dose could be recovered. The results obtained suggest that the present MIS dosage for glioblastoma patients results in a low plasma level with no observable therapeutic effect. (author)

  6. Development of Liposomal Formulation for Delivering Anticancer Drug to Breast Cancer Stem-Cell-Like Cells and its Pharmacokinetics in an Animal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Ajaz; Mondal, Sujan Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Banerjee, Rajkumar; Alkharfy, Khalid M

    2016-03-07

    The objective of the present study is to develop a liposomal formulation for delivering anticancer drug to breast cancer stem-cell-like cells, ANV-1, and evaluate its pharmacokinetics in an animal model. The anticancer drug ESC8 was used in dexamethasone (Dex)-associated liposome (DX) to form ESC8-entrapped liposome named DXE. ANV-1 cells showed high-level expression of NRP-1. To enhance tumor regression, we additionally adapted to codeliver the NRP-1 shRNA-encoded plasmid using the established DXE liposome. In vivo efficacy of DXE-NRP-1 was carried out in mice bearing ANV-1 cells as xenograft tumors and the extent of tumor growth inhibition was evaluated by tumor-size measurement. A significant difference in tumor volume started to reveal between DXE-NRP-1 group and DXE-Control group. DXE-NRP-1 group showed ∼4 folds and ∼2.5 folds smaller tumor volume than exhibited by untreated and DXE-Control-treated groups, respectively. DXE disposition was evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats following an intraperitoneal dose (3.67 mg/kg of ESC8 in DXE). The plasma concentrations of ESC8 in the DXE formulation were measured by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry and pharmacokinetic parameters were determined using a noncompartmental analysis. ESC8 had a half-life of 11.01 ± 0.29 h, clearance of 2.10 ± 3.63 L/kg/h, and volume of distribution of 33.42 ± 0.83 L/kg. This suggests that the DXE liposome formulation could be administered once or twice daily for therapeutic efficacy. In overall, we developed a potent liposomal formulation with favorable pharmacokinetic and tumor regressing profile that could sensitize and kill highly aggressive and drug-resistive cancer stem-cell-like cells.

  7. Adverse events in hospitalised cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haukland, Ellinor; von Plessen, Christian; Nieder, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    ) compared to a general hospital population. Material and methods: A total of 6720 patient records were retrospectively reviewed comparing AEs in hospitalised cancer patients to a general hospital population in Norway, using the IHI Global Trigger Tool method. Results: 24.2 percent of admissions for cancer...... patients had an AE compared to 17.4% of admissions of other patients (pvs. 36.0 (p¼.65, rr 0.94, 95% CI 0.90–1.18). No particular cancer category is at higher...

  8. Population pharmacokinetics of recombinant coagulation factor VIII-SingleChain in patients with severe hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Roberts, J; Tortorici, M; Veldman, A; St Ledger, K; Feussner, A; Sidhu, J

    2017-06-01

    Essentials rVIII-SingleChain is a unique recombinant factor VIII (FVIII) molecule. A population pharmacokinetic model was based on FVIII activity of severe hemophilia A patients. The model was used to simulate factor VIII activity-time profiles for various dosing scenarios. The model supports prolonged dosing of rVIII-SingleChain with intervals of up to twice per week. Background Single-chain recombinant coagulation factor VIII (rVIII-SingleChain) is a unique recombinant coagulation factor VIII molecule. Objectives To: (i) characterize the population pharmacokinetics (PK) of rVIII-SingleChain in patients with severe hemophilia A; (ii) identify correlates of variability in rVIII-SingleChain PK; and (iii) simulate various dosing scenarios of rVIII-SingleChain. Patients/Methods A population PK model was developed, based on FVIII activity levels of 130 patients with severe hemophilia A (n = 91 for ≥ 12-65 years; n = 39 for  85% and > 93% of patients were predicted to maintain FVIII activity level above 1 IU dL -1 , at all times with three-times-weekly dosing (given on days 0, 2, and 4.5) at the lowest (20 IU kg -1 ) and highest (50 IU kg -1 ) doses, respectively. For twice weekly dosing (days 0 and 3.5) of 50 IU kg -1 rVIII-SingleChain, 62-80% of patients across all ages were predicted to maintain a FVIII activity level above 1 IU dL -1 at day 7. Conclusions The population PK model adequately characterized rVIII-SingleChain PK, and the model can be utilized to simulate FVIII activity-time profiles for various dosing scenarios. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  9. Cancer in Patients With Gabapentin (GPRD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-06

    Pain, Neuropathic; Epilepsy; Renal Pelvis Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Breast Cancer; Nervous System Cancer; Chronic Pancreatitis; Stomach Cancer; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Diabetes; Bladder Cancer; Bone and Joint Cancer; Penis Cancer; Anal Cancer; Cancer; Renal Cancer

  10. Survival of ovarian cancer patients in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Hellen McKinnon; Noer, Mette Calundann; Sperling, Cecilie Dyg

    2016-01-01

    linked via the patients' personal identification number and the analyses included data on cancer stage, age, survival, surgery status and comorbidity. The computed outcome measures were age-adjusted mortality rates and age-adjusted overall and relative survival rates for one and five years. RESULTS: We......BACKGROUND: Ovarian cancer has a high mortality rate, especially in Denmark where mortality rates have been reported higher than in adjacent countries with similar demographics. This study therefore examined recent survival and mortality among Danish ovarian cancer patients over an 18-year study...... period. METHODS: This nationwide registry-based observational study used data from the Danish Gynecology Cancer Database, Danish Pathology Registry, and Danish National Patient Registry. All patients with ovarian cancer diagnosed between 1995 and 2012 were included in the study. The data sources were...

  11. Why Cancer Patients Seek Islamic Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhami, Norhasmilia; Muhamad, Mazanah Bt; Krauss, Steven Eric

    2016-10-01

    Islamic healing is frequently referred to as the treatment of choice by many Muslim cancer patients in Malaysia. Despite its widespread use, there is limited information relating to patients' healing preferences. With rising cancer rates in the country, this issue has become a concern to public health policy makers. The purpose of this study was to understand why cancer patients seek Islamic healing. This qualitative study utilized in-depth interviews with 18 cancer patients. The findings indicate three main reasons: (1) recommendations from family, friends and doctors; (2) belief in Islamic healing and (3) the perceived ineffectiveness and dissatisfaction with conventional treatments. Islamic healing will likely continue to be popular complementary cancer treatment in Malaysia as it is grounded in strong cultural and religious beliefs.

  12. Psychosocial Intervention In Prostate Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potočníková Jana

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide for males, and the fifth most common cancer overall. Using of autogenic training could reduce the influence of ADT and raise quality of prostate cancer patients. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of autogenic training in patients with prostate cancer. Patients were divided to experimental and control group. Experimental group participated in fourteen weeks long autogenic training program. Control group performed usual daily activities. Every subject of research performed input and output diagnostics which monitored psychical states of patients by psychological standardized tests - Differential questionnaire of depression (DDF and Questionnaire of anxiety (STAI X1. Our data showed autogenic training program significant improved depressions symptoms and anxiety in experimental research group (p ≤ 0.05, however there was no main change of depression symptoms and anxiety values for control group (p = n.s..

  13. GYNECOLOGICAL STATUS OF PATIENTS WITH COLORECTAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Solodky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to identify risk factors for colorectal cancer on the basis of retrospective analysis of gynecological history and status of 183 patients with colon adenocarcinoma treated at the Russian X-Ray Radiology Research Center between 1996 and 2011. Evaluation of gynecological status was based on findings  of gynecological, transvaginal and ultrasound examinations of the genitals, as well as on cytological cervical screening and colposcopy. Hysteroscopy and separate diagnostic curettage were performed if necessary. Gynecological status of patients with colorectal cancer was characterized by ovarian hypofunction and high incidence of benign non-inflammatory (78.1 % and inflammatory (88.0 % disorders of genital tract. In most cases (63.9 % polyneoplasia in patients with colorectal cancer combined with breast, endometrial and ovarian cancers. Considering younger age of the onset of benign disease of the genital tract, this group of patients should be followed up carefully for the development of colon cancer.

  14. Prediction of chemotherapeutic response in bladder cancer using K-means clustering of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huyen T; Jia, Guang; Shah, Zarine K; Pohar, Kamal; Mortazavi, Amir; Zynger, Debra L; Wei, Lai; Yang, Xiangyu; Clark, Daniel; Knopp, Michael V

    2015-05-01

    To apply k-means clustering of two pharmacokinetic parameters derived from 3T dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) to predict the chemotherapeutic response in bladder cancer at the mid-cycle timepoint. With the predetermined number of three clusters, k-means clustering was performed on nondimensionalized Amp and kep estimates of each bladder tumor. Three cluster volume fractions (VFs) were calculated for each tumor at baseline and mid-cycle. The changes of three cluster VFs from baseline to mid-cycle were correlated with the tumor's chemotherapeutic response. Receiver-operating-characteristics curve analysis was used to evaluate the performance of each cluster VF change as a biomarker of chemotherapeutic response in bladder cancer. The k-means clustering partitioned each bladder tumor into cluster 1 (low kep and low Amp), cluster 2 (low kep and high Amp), cluster 3 (high kep and low Amp). The changes of all three cluster VFs were found to be associated with bladder tumor response to chemotherapy. The VF change of cluster 2 presented with the highest area-under-the-curve value (0.96) and the highest sensitivity/specificity/accuracy (96%/100%/97%) with a selected cutoff value. The k-means clustering of the two DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters can characterize the complex microcirculatory changes within a bladder tumor to enable early prediction of the tumor's chemotherapeutic response. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Optimization of voriconazole dosage regimen to improve the efficacy in patients with invasive fungal disease by pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lu; Wang, Taotao; Wang, Yan; Yang, Qianting; Xie, Jiao; Li, Ying; Lei, Jin'e; Wang, Xue; Xing, Jianfeng; Dong, Yalin; Dong, Haiyan

    2016-10-01

    Invasive fungal disease (IFD) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. To maximize the efficacy of voriconazole treatment, the study established the relationship between voriconazole pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) and probability of response and optimized voriconazole dosage regimen in patients with IFD based on Monte Carlo simulation. Forty-four patients proven with IFD were involved in this study. Among them, the overall cure rate was 75% (33/44) and there was a significant difference between Cmin /MIC values in patients with lack of response (n = 11) and those with successful response (n = 33) (mean value: 1.91 vs. 11.33; P voriconazole Cmin /MIC ratio and clinical response (P = 0.044, OR = 1.349). According to Monte Carlo simulation results under different voriconazole dosing regimens, we could draw a conclusion that 200 mg voriconazole administered intravenously or orally twice daily for Candida infections and 300 mg administered orally or with 200 mg administered intravenously twice daily for Aspergillus infections were rational, which could achieve a value of the cumulative fraction of response >90%. This study built the relationship between voriconazole PK/PD and clinical response and obtained the reasonable empirical dosage regimen, which can be used to customize individual dosage regimen and improve the efficacy of voriconazole treatment. © 2016 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  16. Population pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of rivaroxaban in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation: results from ROCKET AF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girgis, I G; Patel, M R; Peters, G R; Moore, K T; Mahaffey, K W; Nessel, C C; Halperin, J L; Califf, R M; Fox, K A A; Becker, R C

    2014-08-01

    Two once-daily rivaroxaban dosing regimens were compared with warfarin for stroke prevention in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation in ROCKET AF: 20 mg for patients with normal/mildly impaired renal function and 15 mg for patients with moderate renal impairment. Rivaroxaban population pharmacokinetic (PK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) modeling data from ROCKET AF patients (n = 161) are reported and are used to confirm established rivaroxaban PK and PK/PD models and to re-estimate values of the models' parameters for the current AF population. An oral one-compartment model with first-order absorption adequately described rivaroxaban PK. Age, renal function, and lean body mass influenced the PK model. Prothrombin time and prothrombinase-induced clotting time exhibited a near-linear relationship with rivaroxaban plasma concentration; inhibitory effects were observed through to 24 hours post-dose. Rivaroxaban plasma concentration and factor Xa activity had an inhibitory maximum-effect (Emax ) relationship. Renal function (on prothrombin time; prothrombinase-induced clotting time) and age (on factor Xa activity) had moderate effects on PK/PD models. PK and PK/PD models were shown to be adequate for describing the current dataset. These findings confirm the modeling and empirical results that led to the selection of doses tested against warfarin in ROCKET AF. © 2014, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  17. Visceral leishmaniasis relapse hazard is linked to reduced miltefosine exposure in patients from Eastern Africa: a population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorlo, Thomas P C; Kip, Anke E; Younis, Brima M; Ellis, Sally J; Alves, Fabiana; Beijnen, Jos H; Njenga, Simon; Kirigi, George; Hailu, Asrat; Olobo, Joseph; Musa, Ahmed M; Balasegaram, Manica; Wasunna, Monique; Karlsson, Mats O; Khalil, Eltahir A G

    2017-11-01

    Low efficacy of miltefosine in the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis was recently observed in Eastern Africa. To describe the pharmacokinetics and establish a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationship for miltefosine in Eastern African patients with visceral leishmaniasis, using a time-to-event approach to model relapse of disease. Miltefosine plasma concentrations from 95 patients (48 monotherapy versus 47 combination therapy) were included in the population pharmacokinetic model using non-linear mixed effects modelling. Subsequently a time-to-event model was developed to model the time of clinical relapse. Various summary pharmacokinetic parameters (various AUCs, Time > EC50, Time > EC90), normalized within each treatment arm to allow simultaneous analysis, were evaluated as relapse hazard-changing covariates. A two-compartment population model with first-order absorption fitted the miltefosine pharmacokinetic data adequately. Relative bioavailability was reduced (-74%, relative standard error 4.7%) during the first week of treatment of the monotherapy arm but only the first day of the shorter combination regimen. Time to the relapse of infection could be described using a constant baseline hazard (baseline 1.8 relapses/year, relative standard error 72.7%). Miltefosine Time > EC90 improved the model significantly when added in a maximum effect function on the baseline hazard (half maximal effect with Time > EC90 6.97 days for monotherapy). Miltefosine drug exposure was found to be decreased in Eastern African patients with visceral leishmaniasis, due to a (transient) initial lower bioavailability. Relapse hazard was inversely linked to miltefosine exposure. Significantly lower miltefosine exposure was observed in children compared with adults, further urging the need for implementation of dose adaptations for children. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

  18. [Touching cancer: shiatsu as complementary treatment to support cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argash, Oz; Caspi, Opher

    2008-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increase in the interest of cancer patients in receiving complementary medicine therapies as supportive measures to cure the disease. In response, medical units that combine conventional and complementary medicine (integrative medicine) have been established in leading cancer centers worldwide. In Israel, a special integrative medicine unit that combines mind-body, Chinese medicine, nutrition, herbs, supplements, and manual therapies (such as shiatsu) before, during and after conventional anti-cancer therapies has been established as an integral part of the Davidoff Comprehensive Cancer Center in 2006. Shiatsu represents a group of manual therapeutic techniques, including acupressure. Shiatsu offers cancer patients a non-pharmacologic method to relieve symptoms and improve quality of life throughout the course of illness. Research indicates that acupressure is relatively effective and safe for common cancer-related symptoms such as nausea, vomiting and insomnia. In our experience, shiatsu is also relatively effective and safe for other common symptoms such as fatigue, muscular pain and body image dissatisfaction. Yet, insufficient evidence exists to delineate the best means by which shiatsu and other manual therapies could or should be integrated into routine cancer care. The purpose of the present paper is to describe what is currently known about this topic in order to support decision-making that is based on facts, rather than on myths and misconceptions. We call for more research that examines the effectiveness and safety of shiatsu and other manual therapies in the care of cancer patients.

  19. Randomized pharmacokinetic evaluation of different rifabutin doses in African HIV- infected tuberculosis patients on lopinavir/ritonavir-based antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naiker, Suhashni; Connolly, Cathy; Wiesner, Lubbe; Kellerman, Tracey; Reddy, Tarylee; Harries, Anthony; McIlleron, Helen; Lienhardt, Christian; Pym, Alexander

    2014-11-19

    Pharmacokinetic interactions between rifampicin and protease inhibitors (PIs) complicate the management of HIV-associated tuberculosis. Rifabutin is an alternative rifamycin, for patients requiring PIs. Recently some international guidelines have recommended a higher dose of rifabutin (150 mg daily) in combination with boosted lopinavir (LPV/r), than the previous dose of rifabutin (150 mg three times weekly {tiw}). But there are limited pharmacokinetic data evaluating the higher dose of rifabutin in combination with LPV/r. Sub-optimal dosing can lead to acquired rifamycin resistance (ARR). The plasma concentration of 25-O-desacetylrifabutin (d-RBT), the metabolite of rifabutin, increases in the presence of PIs and may lead to toxicity. Sixteen patients with TB-HIV co-infection received rifabutin 300 mg QD in combination with tuberculosis chemotherapy (initially pyrazinamide, isoniazid and ethambutol then only isoniazid), and were then randomized to receive isoniazid and LPV/r based ART with rifabutin 150 mg tiw or rifabutin 150 mg daily. The rifabutin dose with ART was switched after 1 month. Serial rifabutin and d-RBT concentrations were measured after 4 weeks of each treatment. The median AUC0-48 and Cmax of rifabutin in patients taking 150 mg rifabutin tiw was significantly reduced compared to the other treatment arms. Geometric mean ratio (90% CI) for AUC0-48 and Cmax was 0.6 (0.5-0.7) and 0.5 (0.4-0.6) for RBT 150 mg tiw compared with RBT 300 mg and 0.4 (0.4-0.4) and 0.5 (0.5-0.6) for RBT 150 mg tiw compared with 150 mg daily. 86% of patients on the tiw rifabutin arm had an AUC0-24 ART, and grade 3 neutropenia (asymptomatic) was reported in 4 patients. These events were not associated with increases in rifabutin or metabolite concentrations. A daily 150 mg dose of rifabutin in combination with LPV/r safely maintained rifabutin plasma concentrations in line with those shown to prevent ARR. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00640887.

  20. CLINICAL AND PHARMACOKINETIC EQUIVALENCE OF ORIGINAL AND GENERIC AMLODIPINE IN PATIENTS WITH MILD-TO-MODERATE ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Belolipetskiy

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study clinical equivalence of two amlodipines under the control of their plasma levels and evaluate their pharmacoeconomical efficacy in patients with arterial hypertension (AH.Material and methods. 31 patient with AH were included in the study (14 men and 17 women. 21 (66 % patients had AH of 1 stage and 10 (34 % patients had AH of 2 stage. All patients were 39-81 y.o. (average - 60 y.o. with AH duration 0,5-43 years (average - 17,9 years. Antihypertensive effect of Amlorus (Synthesis, Russia and Norvasc (Pfizer, USA was evaluated in the study. Blood pressure (BP, amlodipine plasma levels (by liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry and side effects were registered before and after 2, 4 and 6 weeks of therapy. Hydrochlorothiazide 25 mg/d was added if the monotherapy with amlodipine10 mg/d had not been efficient. Therapy with the second studied amlodipine followed the therapy with the first drug.Results. Both drugs provided similar plasma amlodipine concentrations with significant BP reduction. 96,6 % and 90 % of patients reached BP target level (<140/90 mm Hg after 6 weeks of Amlorus and Norvasc therapy, respectively. Hydrochlorothiazide was needed in 23,3 % and 26,7 % of patients taking Amlorus and Norvasc, respectively. Cost of Amlorus therapy per patient was 221 rbl/month in comparison with cost of 727 rbl/month for Norvasc therapy.Conclusion. Generic Amlorus showed clinical and pharmacokinetic equivalency with an original amlodipine Norvasc and lower cost of therapy.

  1. CLINICAL AND PHARMACOKINETIC EQUIVALENCE OF ORIGINAL AND GENERIC AMLODIPINE IN PATIENTS WITH MILD-TO-MODERATE ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Belolipetskiy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study clinical equivalence of two amlodipines under the control of their plasma levels and evaluate their pharmacoeconomical efficacy in patients with arterial hypertension (AH.Material and methods. 31 patient with AH were included in the study (14 men and 17 women. 21 (66 % patients had AH of 1 stage and 10 (34 % patients had AH of 2 stage. All patients were 39-81 y.o. (average - 60 y.o. with AH duration 0,5-43 years (average - 17,9 years. Antihypertensive effect of Amlorus (Synthesis, Russia and Norvasc (Pfizer, USA was evaluated in the study. Blood pressure (BP, amlodipine plasma levels (by liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry and side effects were registered before and after 2, 4 and 6 weeks of therapy. Hydrochlorothiazide 25 mg/d was added if the monotherapy with amlodipine10 mg/d had not been efficient. Therapy with the second studied amlodipine followed the therapy with the first drug.Results. Both drugs provided similar plasma amlodipine concentrations with significant BP reduction. 96,6 % and 90 % of patients reached BP target level (<140/90 mm Hg after 6 weeks of Amlorus and Norvasc therapy, respectively. Hydrochlorothiazide was needed in 23,3 % and 26,7 % of patients taking Amlorus and Norvasc, respectively. Cost of Amlorus therapy per patient was 221 rbl/month in comparison with cost of 727 rbl/month for Norvasc therapy.Conclusion. Generic Amlorus showed clinical and pharmacokinetic equivalency with an original amlodipine Norvasc and lower cost of therapy.

  2. Efficacy and Safety of Abemaciclib, an Inhibitor of CDK4 and CDK6, for Patients with Breast Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, and Other Solid Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Amita; Rosen, Lee S; Tolaney, Sara M; Tolcher, Anthony W; Goldman, Jonathan W; Gandhi, Leena; Papadopoulos, Kyriakos P; Beeram, Muralidhar; Rasco, Drew W; Hilton, John F; Nasir, Aejaz; Beckmann, Richard P; Schade, Andrew E; Fulford, Angie D; Nguyen, Tuan S; Martinez, Ricardo; Kulanthaivel, Palaniappan; Li, Lily Q; Frenzel, Martin; Cronier, Damien M; Chan, Edward M; Flaherty, Keith T; Wen, Patrick Y; Shapiro, Geoffrey I

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated the safety, pharmacokinetic profile, pharmacodynamic effects, and antitumor activity of abemaciclib, an orally bioavailable inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) 4 and 6, in a multicenter study including phase I dose escalation followed by tumor-specific cohorts for breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), glioblastoma, melanoma, and colorectal cancer. A total of 225 patients were enrolled: 33 in dose escalation and 192 in tumor-specific cohorts. Dose-limiting toxicity was grade 3 fatigue. The maximum tolerated dose was 200 mg every 12 hours. The most common possibly related treatment-emergent adverse events involved fatigue and the gastrointestinal, renal, or hematopoietic systems. Plasma concentrations increased with dose, and pharmacodynamic effects were observed in proliferating keratinocytes and tumors. Radiographic responses were achieved in previously treated patients with breast cancer, NSCLC, and melanoma. For hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, the overall response rate was 31%; moreover, 61% of patients achieved either response or stable disease lasting ≥6 months. Abemaciclib represents the first selective inhibitor of CDK4 and CDK6 with a safety profile allowing continuous dosing to achieve sustained target inhibition. This first-in-human experience demonstrates single-agent activity for patients with advanced breast cancer, NSCLC, and other solid tumors. Cancer Discov; 6(7); 740-53. ©2016 AACR.See related commentary by Lim et al., p. 697This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 681. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Researching the experience of kidney cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, K

    2002-09-01

    The author's personal experience as a kidney cancer patient, researcher and founder of a kidney cancer support group forms the basis for consideration of the challenges involved in researching patients' experiences. The researcher needs to understand the variability of those experiences in both clinical and psychological-emotional terms, and in relation to the personal, familial and social contexts of the patient. It is also essential to define the purpose of the research and to show how an understanding of personal experiences of cancer can be used to enhance the quality of care for cancer patients. The research encounter with a patient is also in some respects a therapeutic encounter requiring a considerable degree of sensitivity on the part of the researcher. The person-centred approach of Carl Rogers is of value in supporting such an encounter.

  4. Supportive care needs of Iranian cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azad Rahmani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A supportive needs assessment is an essential component of any care program. There is no research evidence regarding the supportive care needs of cancer patients in Iran or other Middle Eastern countries. Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the supportive care needs of Iranian cancer patients. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was conducted in a referral medical center in the northwest of Iran. A total of 274 cancer patients completed the Supportive Care Needs Survey (SCNS-59. Descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. Results: In 18 items of the SCNS, more than 50% of the participants reported that their needs were unmet. Most frequently, unmet needs were related to the health system, information, physical, and daily living domains, and most met needs were related to sexuality, patient care, and support domains. Conclusions: Iranian cancer patients experience many unmet needs and there is an urgent need for establishing additional supportive care services in Iran.

  5. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic analysis for efficacy of ceftaroline fosamil in patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavnani, Sujata M; Hammel, Jeffrey P; Van Wart, Scott A; Rubino, Christopher M; Reynolds, Daniel K; Forrest, Alan; Drusano, George L; Khariton, Tatiana; Friedland, H David; Riccobene, Todd A; Ambrose, Paul G

    2015-01-01

    Ceftaroline is a cephalosporin with broad-spectrum in vitro activity against pathogens commonly associated with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI), including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Ceftaroline fosamil, the prodrug of ceftaroline, is approved for the treatment of patients with ABSSSI. Using data from the microbiologically evaluable population from two phase 2 and two phase 3 randomized, multicenter, double-blind studies of patients with ABSSSI, an analysis examining the relationship between drug exposure, as measured by the percentage of time during the dosing interval that free-drug steady-state concentrations remain above the MIC (f%T>MIC), and clinical and microbiological responses was undertaken. The analysis population included 526 patients, of whom 423 had infections associated with S. aureus. Clinical and microbiological success percentages were 94.7 and 94.5%, respectively, among all of the patients and 95.3 and 95.7%, respectively, among those with S. aureus infections. Univariable analysis based on data from all of the patients and those with S. aureus infections demonstrated significant relationships between f%T>MIC and microbiological response (P MIC to be significant predictors of microbiological response, including age and infection type for all of the patients evaluated and age, infection type, and the presence of diabetes mellitus for patients with S. aureus infections. Results of these analyses confirm that a ceftaroline fosamil dosing regimen of 600 mg every 12 h provides exposures associated with the upper plateau of the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship for efficacy. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Pharmacokinetic Modelling to Predict FVIII:C Response to Desmopressin and Its Reproducibility in Nonsevere Haemophilia A Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütte, Lisette M; van Hest, Reinier M; Stoof, Sara C M; Leebeek, Frank W G; Cnossen, Marjon H; Kruip, Marieke J H A; Mathôt, Ron A A

    2018-04-01

     Nonsevere haemophilia A (HA) patients can be treated with desmopressin. Response of factor VIII activity (FVIII:C) differs between patients and is difficult to predict.  Our aims were to describe FVIII:C response after desmopressin and its reproducibility by population pharmacokinetic (PK) modelling.  Retrospective data of 128 nonsevere HA patients (age 7-75 years) receiving an intravenous or intranasal dose of desmopressin were used. PK modelling of FVIII:C was performed by nonlinear mixed effect modelling. Reproducibility of FVIII:C response was defined as less than 25% difference in peak FVIII:C between administrations.  A total of 623 FVIII:C measurements from 142 desmopressin administrations were available; 14 patients had received two administrations at different occasions. The FVIII:C time profile was best described by a two-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination. Interindividual variability of the estimated baseline FVIII:C, central volume of distribution and clearance were 37, 43 and 50%, respectively. The most recently measured FVIII:C (FVIII-recent) was significantly associated with FVIII:C response to desmopressin ( p  C increase of 0.47 IU/mL (median, interquartile range: 0.32-0.65 IU/mL, n  = 142). C response was reproducible in 6 out of 14 patients receiving two desmopressin administrations.  FVIII:C response to desmopressin in nonsevere HA patients was adequately described by a population PK model. Large variability in FVIII:C response was observed, which could only partially be explained by FVIII-recent. C response was not reproducible in a small subset of patients. Therefore, monitoring FVIII:C around surgeries or bleeding might be considered. Research is needed to study this further. Schattauer Stuttgart.

  7. Classification of neuropathic pain in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunelli, Cinzia; Bennett, Michael I; Kaasa, Stein

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) in cancer patients lacks standards for diagnosis. This study is aimed at reaching consensus on the application of the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) special interest group for neuropathic pain (NeuPSIG) criteria to the diagnosis of NP in cancer patients...... was found on the statement "the pathophysiology of NP due to cancer can be different from non-cancer NP" (MED=9, IQR=2). Satisfactory consensus was reached for the first 3 NeuPSIG criteria (pain distribution, history, and sensory findings; MEDs⩾8, IQRs⩽3), but not for the fourth one (diagnostic test....../imaging; MED=6, IQR=3). Agreement was also reached on clinical examination by soft brush or pin stimulation (MEDs⩾7 and IQRs⩽3) and on the use of PRO descriptors for NP screening (MED=8, IQR=3). Based on the study results, a clinical algorithm for NP diagnostic criteria in cancer patients with pain...

  8. Fertility preservation for female cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Miyuki; Osuga, Yutaka

    2018-03-03

    An improvement in the survival rates of cancer patients and recent advancements in assisted reproductive technologies have led to remarkable progress in oncofertility and fertility preservation treatments. Currently, for adults and postpubertal girls, oocyte or embryo cryopreservation is an established method. If their cancer treatment cannot be postponed for 2 weeks, ovarian tissue cryopreservation is offered as an experimental technique. For prepubertal girls, ovarian tissue cryopreservation is the only option. As for ovarian protection, there is insufficient evidence regarding the effectiveness of GnRH agonist in fertility preservation. In the past decade, the concept of fertility preservation for cancer patients has been rapidly spreading, but at present only a small part of young cancer patients receive fertility preservation services. It is partly because of the lack of adequate provision of information on fertility preservation and the lack of referral from oncology to the fertility clinic. In Japan, the clinical practice guidelines for fertility preservation in childhood, adolescent and young adult cancer patients was issued last year by the Japan Society of Clinical Oncology (JSCO). It would help Japanese health care providers, including oncologists and reproductive specialists, to increase their knowledge on fertility preservation for cancer patients and move forward the fertility preservation services. For further progress, it is also needed to establish a national registration system of fertility preservation for cancer patients to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the current management.

  9. Pharmacokinetics and long-term tolerance to ribavirin in asymptomatic patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertora, J J; Rege, A B; Lacour, J T; Ferencz, N; George, W J; VanDyke, R B; Agrawal, K C; Hyslop, N E

    1991-10-01

    Single-dose and steady-state pharmacokinetics of the antiviral agent ribavirin were studied in seven male, asymptomatic, human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive subjects. After a single 400 mg intravenous infusion, mean terminal plasma half-life (t1/2) was 27.1 hours, mean volume of distribution was 802 L, and mean total plasma clearance was 26.1 L/hr. Renal clearance was 39% of total clearance and it exceeded creatinine clearance. Oral bioavailability was 44.6%. With long-term dosing (400 mg orally twice a day) ribavirin accumulated, reaching steady state in 2 to 4 weeks in plasma and red blood cells. Red blood cell concentrations greatly exceeded plasma concentrations (60:1). Plasma concentrations at steady state (trough) were 10- to 14-fold higher than the corresponding single-dose concentrations. The terminal t1/2 (washout) after 16 weeks greatly exceeded the t1/2 observed after a single oral dose (151 versus 29.6 hours). Ribavirin-induced reductions in hemoglobin ranging from 0.8 to 3.5 gm/dl were well tolerated. There was no significant reduction in CD4 lymphocytes during treatment with ribavirin for 16 weeks in subjects who had more than 200 CD4 cells at entry and who also remained free of opportunistic infections during 24 weeks of observation.

  10. Systemic pharmacokinetics and cerebrospinal fluid uptake of intravenous ceftriaxone in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanli; Cudkowicz, Merit E; Shefner, Jeremy M; Krivickas, Lisa; David, William S; Vriesendorp, Francine; Pestronk, Alan; Caress, James B; Katz, Jonathan; Simpson, Ericka; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Pascuzzi, Robert; Glass, Jonathan; Rezania, Kourosh; Harmatz, Jerold S; Schoenfeld, David; Greenblatt, David J

    2014-10-01

    The cephalosporin antibiotic ceftriaxone was evaluated as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The pharmacokinetics (PK) of ceftriaxone in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were investigated in 66 participants in a previously reported clinical trial. Their mean age was 51 years, and 65% were male. Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups receiving intravenous infusions (mean duration: 25 minutes) every 12 hours of either: placebo and placebo; 2 g ceftriaxone and placebo; or 2 g ceftriaxone twice. Mean steady-state plasma PK variables were: volume of distribution, 14 L (0.17 L/kg); elimination half-life, 8-9 h; total clearance, 17-21 mL/min (0.22-0.25 mL/min/kg). Values were not different between dosage groups. CSF PK analysis, determined through sparse CSF sampling, indicated apparent entry and elimination half-life values of 1.0 and 34 hours, respectively. With both dosage regimens, CSF concentrations were maintained above the target threshold of 1.0 µM (0.55 µg/mL) as determined from in vitro models. The plasma and CSF PK profiles of ceftriaxone were used as a basis for planning the Phase 3 clinical trial of ceftriaxone in ALS. © 2014, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  11. Second cancers in patients with neuroendocrine tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Jen Tsai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Second cancers have been reported to occur in 10-20% of patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs. However, most published studies used data from a single institution or focused only on specific sites of NETs. In addition, most of these studies included second cancers diagnosed concurrently with NETs, making it difficult to assess the temporality and determine the exact incidence of second cancers. In this nationwide population-based study, we used data recorded by the Taiwan Cancer Registry (TCR to analyze the incidence and distribution of second cancers after the diagnosis of NETs. METHODS: NET cases diagnosed from January 1, 1996 to December 31, 2006 were identified from the TCR. The data on the occurrence of second cancers were ascertained up to December 31, 2008. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs of second cancers were calculated based on the cancer incidence rates of the general population. Cox-proportional hazards regression analysis was performed to estimate the hazard ratio (HR and 95% confidence interval (CI for the risk of second cancers associated with sex, age, and primary NET sites. RESULTS: A total of 1,350 newly diagnosed NET cases were identified according to the selection criteria. Among the 1,350 NET patients, 49 (3.63% developed a second cancer >3 months after the diagnosis of NET. The risk of second cancer following NETs was increased compared to the general population (SIR = 1.48, 95% CI: 1.09-1.96, especially among those diagnosed at age 70 or older (HR = 5.08, 95% CI = 1.69-15.22. There appeared to be no preference of second cancer type according to the primary sites of NETs. CONCLUSIONS: Our study showed that the risk of second cancer following NETs is increased, especially among those diagnosed at age 70 or older. Close monitoring for the occurrence of second cancers after the diagnosis of NETs is warranted.

  12. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling of an antagonist (SM-406/AT-406) of multiple inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) in a mouse xenograft model of human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Li, Yanyan; Zou, Peng; Yu, Jing-yu; McEachern, Donna; Wang, Shaomeng; Sun, Duxin

    2013-09-01

    The inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) are a class of key apoptosis regulators overexpressed or dysregulated in cancer. SM-406/AT-406 is a potent and selective small molecule mimetic of Smac that antagonizes the inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs). A physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK-PD) model was developed to predict the tissue concentration-time profiles of SM-406, the related onco-protein levels in tumor, and the tumor growth inhibition in a mouse model bearing human breast cancer xenograft. In the whole body physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for pharmacokinetics characterization, a well stirred (perfusion rate-limited) model was used to describe SM-406 pharmacokinetics in the lung, heart, kidney, intestine, liver and spleen, and a diffusion rate-limited (permeability limited) model was used for tumor. Pharmacodynamic (PD) models were developed to correlate the SM-406 concentration in tumor to the cIAP1 degradation, pro-caspase 8 decrease, CL-PARP accumulation and tumor growth inhibition. The PBPK-PD model well described the experimental pharmacokinetic data, the pharmacodynamic biomarker responses and tumor growth. This model may be helpful to predict tumor and plasma SM-406 concentrations in the clinic. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Ischemic Stroke and Cancer: Stroke Severely Impacts Cancer Patients, While Cancer Increases the Number of Strokes

    OpenAIRE

    Bang, Oh Young; Seok, Jin Myoung; Kim, Seon Gyeong; Hong, Ji Man; Kim, Hahn Young; Lee, Jun; Chung, Pil-Wook; Park, Kwang-Yeol; Kim, Gyeong-Moon; Chung, Chin-Sang; Lee, Kwang Ho

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer and ischemic stroke are two of the most common causes of death among the elderly, and associations between them have been reported. However, the main pathomechanisms of stroke in cancer patients are not well known, and can only be established based on accurate knowledge of the characteristics of cancer-related strokes. We review herein recent studies concerning the clinical, laboratory, and radiological features of patients with cancer-related stroke. Main Contents This revi...

  14. Effect of high-fat meal intake on the pharmacokinetic profile of ivermectin in Japanese patients with scabies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, Atsushi; Hirota, Takashi; Sugioka, Akihito; Fukuzawa, Masao; Sekine, Mari; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Yoshimasu, Takashi; Kigure, Akira; Anata, Taichi; Noguchi, Wataru; Akagi, Keita; Komoda, Masayo

    2016-09-01

    Ivermectin (IVM) is used as an anthelmintic agent in many countries. To evaluate the effect of high-fat (HF) meal intake on the pharmacokinetics of IVM, a clinical trial was conducted in Japanese patients with scabies. The patients were administrated Stromectol(®) tablets in the fasted state, and after 1 week they were also administrated it after a HF meal (fed state). After the administration, IVM concentrations in plasma and the stratum corneum were determined. The geometric mean of fed/fasted ratio of area under IVM concentration-time curve (AUC) in plasma was 1.25 (90% confidence interval, 1.09-1.43), suggesting the tendency to increased absorption after a HF meal. The fed/fasted ratio of the maximum IVM concentration in the stratum corneum was well correlated with that in plasma. In addition, no serious adverse events were observed during the trial, while a mild increase of aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase activity in plasma was observed under the fed state in two patients. The mean AUC of IVM in plasma of those two patients were approximately threefold higher than that of the other patients at that time. On the other hand, the treatment success rate was 76.9% at 7 days after the second administration, which was comparable with the expected level. The present study not only demonstrates that HF meal intake increases the IVM concentration in plasma and the stratum corneum in Japanese patients with scabies, but also suggests the possibility that HF meals increase the risk of hepatic dysfunction by the increased exposure of IVM. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  15. Population pharmacokinetics of pomalidomide in patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma with various degrees of impaired renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Wang, Xiaomin; O'Mara, Edward; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Sonneveld, Pieter; Weisel, Katja C; Matous, Jeffrey; Siegel, David S; Shah, Jatin J; Kueenburg, Elisabeth; Sternas, Lars; Cavanaugh, Chloe; Zaki, Mohamed; Palmisano, Maria; Zhou, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Pomalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug for treatment of relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma (rrMM) in patients who often have comorbid renal conditions. To assess the impact of renal impairment on pomalidomide exposure, a population pharmacokinetics (PPK) model of pomalidomide in rrMM patients with various degrees of impaired renal function was developed. Intensive and sparse pomalidomide concentration data collected from two clinical studies in rrMM patients with normal renal function, moderately impaired renal function, severely impaired renal function not requiring dialysis, and with severely impaired renal function requiring dialysis were pooled over the dose range of 2 to 4 mg, to assess specifically the influence of the impaired renal function as a categorical variable and a continuous variable on pomalidomide clearance and plasma exposure. In addition, pomalidomide concentration data collected on dialysis days from both the withdrawal (arterial) side and from the returning (venous) side of the dialyzer, from rrMM patients with severely impaired renal function requiring dialysis, were used to assess the extent to which dialysis contributes to the removal of pomalidomide from blood circulation. PPK analyses demonstrated that moderate to severe renal impairment not requiring dialysis has no influence on pomalidomide clearance or plasma exposure, as compared to those patients with normal renal function, while pomalidomide exposure increased approximately 35% in patients with severe renal impairment requiring dialysis on nondialysis days. In addition, dialysis increased total body pomalidomide clearance from 5 L/h to 12 L/h, indicating that dialysis will significantly remove pomalidomide from the blood circulation. Thus, pomalidomide should be administered post-dialysis on the days of dialysis.

  16. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Soylu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive behavioral therapy is one of the structured but flexible psychosocial interventions that could be applied to patients with cancer. In many studies the positive effects of cognitive behavioral therapy in reducing psychological morbidity and improving the quality of life of cancer patients have been shown. In this article, the contents and techniques of adapted cognitive behavioral therapy for patients with cancer and its effectiveness in commonly seen psychiatric disorders have been reviewed. The aim of this article is to contribute positively to physicians and nurses in Turkey for early detection of psychological distress and referral to the therapist that would clearly increase the quality of life of cancer patients. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(3.000: 257-270

  17. History of Depression in Lung Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iachina, M; Brønserud, M M; Jakobsen, E

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: To examine the influence of a history of depression in the process of diagnostic evaluation and the choice of treatment in lung cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The analysis was based on all patients with non-small cell lung cancer who were registered in 2008-2014; in total, 27 234 patients....... To estimate the effect of depression on the diagnostic process and the choice of treatment in lung cancer we fitted a logistic regression model and a Cox regression model adjusting for age, gender, resection and stage. RESULTS: Depression in a patient's anamnesis had no significant effect on the delay...... that patients with a history of periodic depression need special attention when diagnosed with lung cancer....

  18. Cancer Patients' Informational Needs: Qualitative Content Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Haydeh; Mardani-Hamooleh, Marjan

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the informational needs of cancer patients is a requirement to plan any educative care program for them. The aim of this study was to identify Iranian cancer patients' perceptions of informational needs. The study took a qualitative approach. Semi-structured interviews were held with 25 cancer patients in two teaching hospitals in Iran. Transcripts of the interviews underwent conventional content analysis, and categories were extracted. The results came under two main categories: disease-related informational needs and information needs related to daily life. Disease-related informational needs had two subcategories: obtaining information about the nature of disease and obtaining information about disease prognosis. Information needs related to daily life also had two subcategories: obtaining information about healthy lifestyle and obtaining information about regular activities of daily life. The findings provide deep understanding of cancer patients' informational needs in Iran.

  19. High-dose intravenous vitamin C combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy in patients with advanced cancer: a phase I-II clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L John Hoffer

    Full Text Available Biological and some clinical evidence suggest that high-dose intravenous vitamin C (IVC could increase the effectiveness of cancer chemotherapy. IVC is widely used by integrative and complementary cancer therapists, but rigorous data are lacking as to its safety and which cancers and chemotherapy regimens would be the most promising to investigate in detail.We carried out a phase I-II safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic and efficacy trial of IVC combined with chemotherapy in patients whose treating oncologist judged that standard-of-care or off-label chemotherapy offered less than a 33% likelihood of a meaningful response. We documented adverse events and toxicity associated with IVC infusions, determined pre- and post-chemotherapy vitamin C and oxalic acid pharmacokinetic profiles, and monitored objective clinical responses, mood and quality of life. Fourteen patients were enrolled. IVC was safe and generally well tolerated, although some patients experienced transient adverse events during or after IVC infusions. The pre- and post-chemotherapy pharmacokinetic profiles suggested that tissue uptake of vitamin C increases after chemotherapy, with no increase in urinary oxalic acid excretion. Three patients with different types of cancer experienced unexpected transient stable disease, increased energy and functional improvement.Despite IVC's biological and clinical plausibility, career cancer investigators currently ignore it while integrative cancer therapists use it widely but without reporting the kind of clinical data that is normally gathered in cancer drug development. The present study neither proves nor disproves IVC's value in cancer therapy, but it provides practical information, and indicates a feasible way to evaluate this plausible but unproven therapy in an academic environment that is currently uninterested in it. If carried out in sufficient numbers, simple studies like this one could identify specific clusters of cancer type

  20. Management of patients with advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillessen, S; Omlin, A; Attard, G

    2015-01-01

    The first St Gallen Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) Expert Panel identified and reviewed the available evidence for the ten most important areas of controversy in advanced prostate cancer (APC) management. The successful registration of several drugs for castration......-resistant prostate cancer and the recent studies of chemo-hormonal therapy in men with castration-naïve prostate cancer have led to considerable uncertainty as to the best treatment choices, sequence of treatment options and appropriate patient selection. Management recommendations based on expert opinion...

  1. Co-administration of vismodegib with rosiglitazone or combined oral contraceptive in patients with locally advanced or metastatic solid tumors: a pharmacokinetic assessment of drug-drug interaction potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoRusso, Patricia M; Piha-Paul, Sarina A; Mita, Monica; Colevas, A Dimitrios; Malhi, Vikram; Colburn, Dawn; Yin, Ming; Low, Jennifer A; Graham, Richard A

    2013-01-01

    Vismodegib, a first-in-class oral hedgehog pathway inhibitor, is an effective treatment for advanced basal cell carcinoma. Based on in vitro data, a clinical drug-drug interaction (DDI) assessment of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C8 was necessary; vismodegib's teratogenic potential warranted a DDI study with oral contraceptives (OCs). This single-arm, open-label study included two cohorts of patients with locally advanced or metastatic solid malignancies [Cohort 1: rosiglitazone 4 mg (selective CYP2C8 probe); Cohort 2: OC (norethindrone 1 mg/ethinyl estradiol 35 μg; CYP3A4 substrate)]. On Day 1, patients received rosiglitazone or OC. On Days 2-7, patients received vismodegib 150 mg/day. On Day 8, patients received vismodegib plus rosiglitazone or OC. The effect of vismodegib on rosiglitazone and OC pharmacokinetic parameters (primary objective) was evaluated through pharmacokinetic sampling over a 24-h period (Days 1 and 8). The mean ± SD vismodegib steady-state plasma concentration (Day 8, N = 51) was 20.6 ± 9.72 μM (range 7.93-62.4 μM). Rosiglitazone AUC(0-inf) and C(max) were similar with concomitant vismodegib [≤8% change in geometric mean ratios (GMRs); N = 24]. Concomitant vismodegib with OC did not affect ethinyl estradiol AUC(0-inf) and C(max) (≤5% change in GMRs; N = 27); norethindrone C(max) and AUC(0-inf) GMRs were higher (12 and 23%, respectively) with concomitant vismodegib. This DDI study in patients with cancer demonstrated that systemic exposure of rosiglitazone (a CYP2C8 substrate) or OC (ethinyl estradiol/norethindrone) is not altered with concomitant vismodegib. Overall, there appears to be a low potential for DDIs when vismodegib is co-administered with other medications.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of serelaxin in patients with hepatic impairment: a single-dose, open-label, parallel group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobalava, Zhanna; Villevalde, Svetlana; Kotovskaya, Yulia; Hinrichsen, Holger; Petersen-Sylla, Marc; Zaehringer, Andreas; Pang, Yinuo; Rajman, Iris; Canadi, Jasna; Dahlke, Marion; Lloyd, Peter; Halabi, Atef

    2015-06-01

    Serelaxin is a recombinant form of human relaxin-2 in development for treatment of acute heart failure. This study aimed to evaluate the pharmacokinetics (PK) of serelaxin in patients with hepatic impairment. Secondary objectives included evaluation of immunogenicity, safety and tolerability of serelaxin. This was an open-label, parallel group study (NCT01433458) comparing the PK of serelaxin following a single 24 h intravenous (i.v.) infusion (30 μg kg(-1)  day(-1) ) between patients with mild, moderate or severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh class A, B, C) and healthy matched controls. Blood sampling and standard safety assessments were conducted. Primary non-compartmental PK parameters [including area under the serum concentration-time curve AUC(0-48 h) and AUC(0-∞) and serum concentration at 24 h post-dose (C24h )] were compared between each hepatic impairment group and healthy controls. A total of 49 subjects (including 25 patients with hepatic impairment) were enrolled, of which 48 subjects completed the study. In all groups, the serum concentration of serelaxin increased over the first few hours of infusion, reached steady-state at 12-24 h and then declined following completion of infusion, with a mean terminal half-life of 7-8 h. All PK parameter estimates were comparable between each group of patients with hepatic impairment and healthy controls. No serious adverse events, discontinuations due to adverse events or deaths were reported. No serelaxin treatment-related antibodies developed during this study. The PK and safety profile of serelaxin were not affected by hepatic impairment. No dose adjustment is needed for serelaxin treatment of 48 h i.v. infusion in patients with hepatic impairment. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  3. Reduced 5-FU clearance in a patient with low DPD activity due to heterozygosity for a mutant allele of the DPYD gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maring, JG; van Kuilenburg, ABP; Haasjes, J; Piersma, H; Groen, HJM; Uges, DRA; Van Gennip, AH; De Vries, EGE

    2002-01-01

    5-fluorouracil pharmacokinetics, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase-activity and DNA sequence analysis were compared between a patient with extreme 5-fluorouracl induced toxicity and six control patients with normal 5-fluorouracil related symptoms. Patients were treated for colorectal cancer and

  4. Steady-state kinetics and dynamics of morphine in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christrup, Lona Louring; Sjøgren, P; Jensen, N H

    1999-01-01

    Eighteen patients suffering from chronic pain due to cancer completed a balanced, double-blind, double-dummy, two period cross-over trial comparing the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of morphine and its metabolites, morphine-3-glucuronide and morphine-6-glucuronide, after...... to analgesia and side effects, and there was no difference in the patients' overall impression of the two treatments. More important, there was no difference between the Tmax and the time to peak sedation after administration of IR tablets (P = 0.63). However, due to the relatively small number of patients...... administration of morphine given as controlled-release (CR) tablets (every 12 h) and immediate-release (IR) tablets (every 6 h). The same total daily dose of morphine was given in both study periods. Patients received both test formulations for 4 days and on the final day of each period, peripheral venous blood...

  5. Treatment options for metastatic colorectal cancer in patients with liver dysfunction due to malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faugeras, L; Dili, A; Druez, A; Krug, B; Decoster, C; D'Hondt, L

    2017-07-01

    The survival of colorectal cancer patients is frequently determined by the extent of metastatic invasion to the liver; in cases of major involvement, therapeutic strategies are limited because the liver is necessary for drug metabolism. We have reviewed articles about the pharmacokinetic profiles of each drug used in colorectal cancer patients with hepatic dysfunction to determine which of these treatments are most feasible. Some drugs appear to be feasible options for patients with hepatic insufficiency. Agents such as 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin, as well as monoclonal antibodies such as bevacizumab, cetuximab, and panitumumab, can potentially be used in these cases. On the other hand, irinotecan and regorafenib cannot be recommended because of the risk of increased toxicity. Treatment of patients with colorectal cancer and liver dysfunction represents a major challenge because the prognosis is usually very poor and alteration of liver function is normally an exclusion criterion in clinical trials. In this review, we present evidence regarding the use of each drug in patients with colorectal cancer and hepatic impairment. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A phase 1 study of 131I-CLR1404 in patients with relapsed or refractory advanced solid tumors: dosimetry, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and safety.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph J Grudzinski

    Full Text Available (131I-CLR1404 is a small molecule that combines a tumor-targeting moiety with a therapeutic radioisotope. The primary aim of this phase 1 study was to determine the administered radioactivity expected to deliver 400 mSv to the bone marrow. The secondary aims were to determine the pharmacokinetic (PK and safety profiles of (131I-CLR1404.Eight subjects with refractory or relapsed advanced solid tumors were treated with a single injection of 370 MBq of (131I-CLR1404. Whole body planar nuclear medicine scans were performed at 15-35 minutes, 4-6, 18-24, 48, 72, 144 hours, and 14 days post injection. Optional single photon emission computed tomography imaging was performed on two patients 6 days post injection. Clinical laboratory parameters were evaluated in blood and urine. Plasma PK was evaluated on (127I-CLR1404 mass measurements. To evaluate renal clearance of (131I-CLR1404, urine was collected for 14 days post injection. Absorbed dose estimates for target organs were determined using the RADAR method with OLINDA/EXM software.Single administrations of 370 MBq of (131I-CLR1404 were well tolerated by all subjects. No severe adverse events were reported and no adverse event was dose-limiting. Plasma (127I-CLR1404 concentrations declined in a bi-exponential manner with a mean t½ value of 822 hours. Mean Cmax and AUC(0-t values were 72.2 ng/mL and 15753 ng • hr/mL, respectively. An administered activity of approximately 740 MBq is predicted to deliver 400 mSv to marrow.Preliminary data suggest that (131I-CLR1404 is well tolerated and may have unique potential as an anti-cancer agent.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00925275.

  7. Phase I study of TP300 in patients with advanced solid tumors with pharmacokinetic, pharmacogenetic and pharmacodynamic analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthoney D

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A Phase I dose escalation first in man study assessed maximum tolerated dose (MTD, dose-limiting toxicity (DLT and recommended Phase II dose of TP300, a water soluble prodrug of the Topo-1 inhibitor TP3076, and active metabolite, TP3011. Methods Eligible patients with refractory advanced solid tumors, adequate performance status, haematologic, renal, and hepatic function. TP300 was given as a 1-hour i.v. infusion 3-weekly and pharmacokinetic (PK profiles of TP300, TP3076 and TP3011 were analysed. Polymorphisms in CYP2D6, AOX1 and UGT1A1 were studied and DNA strand-breaks measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. Results 32 patients received TP300 at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 mg/m2. MTD was 10 mg/m2; DLTs at 12 (2/4 patients and 10 mg/m2 (3/12 included thrombocytopenia and febrile neutropenia; diarrhoea was uncommon. Six patients (five had received irinotecan, had stable disease for 1.5-5 months. TP3076 showed dose proportionality in AUC and Cmax from 1–10 mg/m2. Genetic polymorphisms had no apparent influence on exposure. DNA strand-breaks were detected after TP300 infusion. Conclusions TP300 had predictable hematologic toxicity, and diarrhoea was uncommon. AUC at MTD is substantially greater than for SN38. TP3076 and TP3011 are equi-potent with SN38, suggesting a PK advantage. Trial registration EU-CTR2006-001345-33

  8. Cancer patients' coping styles and doctor-patient communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ong, L. M.; Visser, M. R.; van Zuuren, F. J.; Rietbroek, R. C.; Lammes, F. B.; de Haes, J. C.

    1999-01-01

    Monitoring and blunting styles have become relevant concepts regarding their potential impact on patients' and doctors' behaviors. The present study aimed at investigating the relation between cancer patients' coping styles and doctor-patient communication and global affect. Coping styles were

  9. In Silico Evaluation of Pharmacokinetic Optimization for Antimitogram-Based Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haviari, Skerdi; You, Benoît; Tod, Michel

    2018-04-01

    Antimitograms are prototype in vitro tests for evaluating chemotherapeutic efficacy using patient-derived primary cancer cells. These tests might help optimize treatment from a pharmacodynamic standpoint by guiding treatment selection. However, they are technically challenging and require refinements and trials to demonstrate benefit to be widely used. In this study, we performed simulations aimed at exploring how to validate antimitograms and how to complement them by pharmacokinetic optimization. A generic model of advanced cancer, including pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic monitoring, was used to link dosing schedules with progression-free survival (PFS), as built from previously validated modules. This model was used to explore different possible situations in terms of pharmacokinetic variability, pharmacodynamic variability, and antimitogram performance. The model recapitulated tumor dynamics and standalone therapeutic drug monitoring efficacy consistent with published clinical results. Simulations showed that combining pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic optimization should increase PFS in a synergistic fashion. Simulated data were then used to compute required clinical trial sizes, which were 30% to 90% smaller when pharmacokinetic optimization was added to pharmacodynamic optimization. This improvement was observed even when pharmacokinetic optimization alone exhibited only modest benefit. Overall, our work illustrates the synergy derived from combining antimitograms with therapeutic drug monitoring, permitting a disproportionate reduction of the trial size required to prove a benefit on PFS. Accordingly, we suggest that strategies with benefits too small for standalone clinical trials could be validated in combination in a similar manner. Significance: This work offers a method to reduce the number of patients needed for a clinical trial to prove the hypothesized benefit of a drug to progression-free survival, possibly easing opportunities to evaluate

  10. Nursing Students' Perspectives on Assisting Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapucu, Sevgisun; Bulut, Hulya Deniz

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the experiences of student nurses who have provided care to cancer patients. A mixed method approach consisting of semistructured focus groups ( n = 61) and a survey questionnaire ( n = 129) was used in the study. Student nurses were first interviewed, and then, a questionnaire was developed for them to answer. Following the content analysis, three themes and 19 subthemes were identified. Frequency and percent were used for qualitative data. Among the student nurses, 80.6% reported that working with cancer patients was "difficult." Difficulties experienced by the student nurses included patients rejecting their care, a large number of problems cases encountered when providing care to cancer patients, communication problems (38.0%), working with patients and attendants who fear death, and problems arising from family attendants who obstruct care. The majority of students experienced patients fearing death (28.7%) and felt feelings such as pity (71.1%), sadness (50.0%), and fear of cancer (41.9%) during their internships in oncology clinics. Students should be supported by instructors and oncology nurses, and nursing curricula should contain topics on how to best approach cancer patients.

  11. Nursing students' perspectives on assisting cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevgisun Kapucu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to examine the experiences of student nurses who have provided care to cancer patients. Methods: A mixed method approach consisting of semistructured focus groups (n = 61 and a survey questionnaire (n = 129 was used in the study. Student nurses were first interviewed, and then, a questionnaire was developed for them to answer. Following the content analysis, three themes and 19 subthemes were identified. Frequency and percent were used for qualitative data. Results: Among the student nurses, 80.6% reported that working with cancer patients was “difficult.” Difficulties experienced by the student nurses included patients rejecting their care, a large number of problems cases encountered when providing care to cancer patients, communication problems (38.0%, working with patients and attendants who fear death, and problems arising from family attendants who obstruct care. The majority of students experienced patients fearing death (28.7% and felt feelings such as pity (71.1%, sadness (50.0%, and fear of cancer (41.9% during their internships in oncology clinics. Conclusions: Students should be supported by instructors and oncology nurses, and nursing curricula should contain topics on how to best approach cancer patients.

  12. Nursing Students’ Perspectives on Assisting Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapucu, Sevgisun; Bulut, Hulya Deniz

    2018-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to examine the experiences of student nurses who have provided care to cancer patients. Methods: A mixed method approach consisting of semistructured focus groups (n = 61) and a survey questionnaire (n = 129) was used in the study. Student nurses were first interviewed, and then, a questionnaire was developed for them to answer. Following the content analysis, three themes and 19 subthemes were identified. Frequency and percent were used for qualitative data. Results: Among the student nurses, 80.6% reported that working with cancer patients was “difficult.” Difficulties experienced by the student nurses included patients rejecting their care, a large number of problems cases encountered when providing care to cancer patients, communication problems (38.0%), working with patients and attendants who fear death, and problems arising from family attendants who obstruct care. The majority of students experienced patients fearing death (28.7%) and felt feelings such as pity (71.1%), sadness (50.0%), and fear of cancer (41.9%) during their internships in oncology clinics. Conclusions: Students should be supported by instructors and oncology nurses, and nursing curricula should contain topics on how to best approach cancer patients. PMID:29379841

  13. Individual pharmacokinetic variation leads to underdosing of ciprofloxacin in some cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Anders Nikolai Ørsted; Høiby, N; Nielsen, X C

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ciprofloxacin (CIP) is frequently used when treating cystic fibrose (CF) patients with intermittent Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) lung colonization. However, approximately 20% of the patients progress to chronic infection despite early intervention. The aim of this study, was...

  14. Melanosis coli in patients with colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Biernacka-Wawrzonek

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Intoduction: Melanosis coli is a benign lesion affecting the mucosa of the large intestine. There is a relationship between the presence of melanosis and anthraquinone laxative use. Melanosis coli is also observed in patients with colon cancer, but there is doubt whether these two conditions are related. Aim : To analyze the correlation between melanosis and colon cancer. Material and methods: We analyzed retrospectively 436 patients undergoing colon cancer surgery. There were 246 women and 190 men. Patients were divided into three age groups: under 50 years, between 51 and 65 years, and over 66 years. We analyzed sections of the cancer and intestinal mucosa from the tumor’s proximal (2–5 cm and distal (8–10 cm zone. Results : Melanosis coli was present in 52 patients, which represents 11.9% of patients with colon cancer. More often it was present in women. The most common location of melanosis and colon cancer was the terminal part of the large intestine. In patients below 50 years of age in both sexes melanosis coli did not occur. In men, melanosis was more common in the age group over 66 years. Intensity of pigmentation was higher in the tumor’s distal zone. Conclusions : The incidence of melanosis coli increases with age, similar to that of colon cancer. Melanosis was not present inside tumors, in almost half of the cases it was not present in the proximal zone, and the degree of pigmentation increased in distal zone. The cause-effect relationship between melanosis coli and colon cancer remains uncertain.

  15. Population Pharmacokinetics and Optimal Sampling Strategy for Model-Based Precision Dosing of Melphalan in Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Kana; Dong, Min; Fukuda, Tsuyoshi; Chandra, Sharat; Mehta, Parinda A; McConnell, Scott; Anaissie, Elias J; Vinks, Alexander A

    2018-05-01

    High-dose melphalan is an important component of conditioning regimens for patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The current dosing strategy based on body surface area results in a high incidence of oral mucositis and gastrointestinal and liver toxicity. Pharmacokinetically guided dosing will individualize exposure and help minimize overexposure-related toxicity. The purpose of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model and optimal sampling strategy. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed with NONMEM using 98 observations collected from 15 adult patients given the standard dose of 140 or 200 mg/m 2 by intravenous infusion. The determinant-optimal sampling strategy was explored with PopED software. Individual area under the curve estimates were generated by Bayesian estimation using full and the proposed sparse sampling data. The predictive performance of the optimal sampling strategy was evaluated based on bias and precision estimates. The feasibility of the optimal sampling strategy was tested using pharmacokinetic data from five pediatric patients. A two-compartment model best described the data. The final model included body weight and creatinine clearance as predictors of clearance. The determinant-optimal sampling strategies (and windows) were identified at 0.08 (0.08-0.19), 0.61 (0.33-0.90), 2.0 (1.3-2.7), and 4.0 (3.6-4.0) h post-infusion. An excellent correlation was observed between area under the curve estimates obtained with the full and the proposed four-sample strategy (R 2  = 0.98; p strategy promises to achieve the target area under the curve as part of precision dosing.

  16. Population pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of hydroxyurea in sickle cell anemia patients, a basis for optimizing the dosing regimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galactéros Frédéric

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hydroxyurea (HU is the first approved pharmacological treatment of sickle cell anemia (SCA. The objectives of this study were to develop population pharmacokinetic(PK-pharmacodynamic(PD models for HU in order to characterize the exposure-efficacy relationships and their variability, compare two dosing regimens by simulations and develop some recommendations for monitoring the treatment. Methods The models were built using population modelling software NONMEM VII based on data from two clinical studies of SCA adult patients receiving 500-2000 mg of HU once daily. Fetal hemoglobin percentage (HbF% and mean corpuscular volume (MCV were used as biomarkers for response. A sequential modelling approach was applied. Models were evaluated using simulation-based techniques. Comparisons of two dosing regimens were performed by simulating 10000 patients in each arm during 12 months. Results The PK profiles were described by a bicompartmental model. The median (and interindividual coefficient of variation (CV of clearance was 11.6 L/h (30%, the central volume was 45.3 L (35%. PK steady-state was reached in about 35 days. For a given dosing regimen, HU exposure varied approximately fivefold among patients. The dynamics of HbF% and MCV were described by turnover models with inhibition of elimination of response. In the studied range of drug exposures, the effect of HU on HbF% was at its maximum (median Imax was 0.57, CV was 27%; the effect on MCV was close to its maximum, with median value of 0.14 and CV of 49%. Simulations showed that 95% of the steady-state levels of HbF% and MCV need 26 months and 3 months to be reached, respectively. The CV of the steady-state value of HbF% was about 7 times larger than that of MCV. Simulations with two different dosing regimens showed that continuous dosing led to a stronger HbF% increase in some patients. Conclusions The high variability of response to HU was related in part to pharmacokinetics and

  17. Clinical Characteristics of Patients with Sporadic Colorectal Cancer and Primary Cancers of Other Organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Yu Kan

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Most cancer patients often neglect the possibility of secondary cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third leading cause of cancer death in Taiwan. It is important to be aware of the clinical characteristics of double cancer in CRC patients for early diagnosis and treatment. We retrospectively analyzed 1,031 CRC patients who underwent surgical treatment at the Department of Surgery of Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital between January 1998 and December 2004. Among these patients, CRC was accompanied by cancer of other organs in 17 patients (1.65%, either synchronously or metachronously. Therefore, we describe our experience regarding the location of CRC, the clinical symptoms and signs of these patients, the TNM stage, histology, phase, association with other malignancies, interval between cancers and clinical outcomes. Of the 17 patients in whom CRC was accompanied by primary cancer of other organs, there were four synchronous and 13 metachronous multiple cancer patients. Our patient group comprised six men and 11 women with ages ranging from 47 to 88 years (median age, 66 years. The most common location of CRC was the sigmoid colon. Six gastric cancers (35.2% and six breast cancers (35.2% were associated with primary CRC. The remaining six second primary cancers were one lung cancer, one thyroid cancer, one cervical cancer, one ovarian cancer, one skin cancer, and one urinary bladder cancer. Of the 13 metachronous multiple cancer patients, eight patients developed subsequent CRC after primary cancers of other organs, whereas two patients developed a subsequent second primary cancer after CRC. The intervals between the development of metachronous multiple cancers ranged from 2 to 19 years. In this retrospective analysis, breast and gastric cancer patients were at increased risk of developing subsequent secondary CRC. Careful attention should always be paid to the possibility of secondary CRC in treating these cancer patients. Cancer

  18. Effects of type 2 diabetes mellitus on the population pharmacokinetics of rifampin in tuberculosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Min Jung; Chae, Jung-Woo; Yun, Hwi-Yeol; Lee, Jangik I; Choi, Hye Duck; Kim, Jihye; Park, Jong Sun; Cho, Young-Jae; Yoon, Ho Il; Lee, Choon-Taek; Shin, Wan Gyoon; Lee, Jae-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a well-known risk factor to develop tuberculosis (TB). Some reports indicate the serum concentrations of anti-TB drugs are lower in patients with TB and DM than those with TB only. Therefore, we developed a nonlinear mixed-effects model (NONMEM) to determine the population PK parameters of rifampin and assessed the effects of DM status in patients with TB. One-compartment linear modeling with first-order absorption was evaluated using the 206 plasma samples of rifampin from 54 patients with DM. Based on the final model, DM affected the absorption rate constant (ka) and the volume of distribution (Vd) of rifampin. The body mass index (BMI) of the patients affected rifampin clearance (CL). The ka of rifampin in patients with TB and DM was greater than that in patients with TB only. Further, the predicted Vd in patients with DM was greater than that in patients without DM. As Vd is inversely correlated with plasma concentrations, the rifampin concentrations were predicted to be lower in the patients with DM. The authors recommend administering the greater doses of rifampin for the treatment of TB in patients with DM compared with the doses for the patients without DM to prevent treatment failure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Trismus release in oral cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yao-Chou; Wong, Tung-Yiu; Shieh, Shyh-Jou; Lee, Jing-Wei

    2012-12-01

    Trismus is a common problem among oral cancer patients. This report aimed to study the inciting factors of trismus and to find out the rationale of trismus release. Between 1996 and 2008, 61 oral cancer patients with retrievable records of interincisor distance (IID) were analyzed by retrospective chart review. The IID decreased from 31.4 (12.4) to 24.9 (12.0) mm in 36 patients undergoing cancer ablation only (P = 0.001). Other variables prompting trismus include buccal cancer (P = 0.017), radiotherapy (P = 0.008), and recurrence (P = 0.001). In contrast, the IID improved from 11.7 (7.1) to 22.7 (11.9) mm in 25 patients receiving cancer ablative and trismus releasing surgeries (P = 0.000). The improvement fared better in individuals with IID less than 15 mm than the others (P = 0.037). In conclusion, involvement of buccal region, ablative surgery, radiotherapy, and recurrence are provocative factors of trismus. Patients with IID less than 15 mm will benefit from releasing surgery significantly. Others may better be handled with conservative managements firstly, and enrolled as candidates of surgical release only until the patients entertained a 28-month period of disease-free interval, by which time the risk of recurrence would be markedly reduced.

  20. Haemorheological changes in cancer patients on chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omoti, C.E.; Osime, E.

    2007-01-01

    To assess the rheological changes in haematological and non-haematological cancer patients pre and post chemotherapy. It is a prospective study of 50 patients comprising 16(32%) haematological and 34(68%) non-haematological cancers of various types from March to December 2005 at University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. Rheologic parameters estimated by the various specific diagnostic methods were determined in cancer patient's pre and post chemotherapy. The rheological tests estimated were relative plasma viscosity (RPV) measured by means of a capillary viscometer, whole blood viscosity (WBV), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and plasma fibrinogen concentration (PFC) estimated by the Ingram's Clot weight method. The RPV in pre chemotherapy (p=0.006) and WBV in post chemotherapy (p=0.0231) patients measured revealed a significant difference when compared to controls. The fibrinogen concentration (P<0.0001) and ESR values (P<0.0001) were significantly increased in cancer patients when compared to controls. We conclude that total reduction of hyperviscosity and hyperfibrinogenaemia may contribute to effective treatment strategies in cancer patients. (author)

  1. Dental implications in oral cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escoda-Francolí, Jaume; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Araceli; Pérez-García, Silvia; Gargallo-Albiol, Jordi; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2011-07-01

    A study is made of the dental implications of oral cancer, with a view to avoiding the complications that appear once oncological treatment is started. The study comprised a total of 22 patients diagnosed with oral cancer according to clinical and histological criteria in the Service of Maxillofacial Surgery (Dental Clinic of the University of Barcelona, Spain) during the period 1996-2005, and posteriorly treated in different hospital centers in Barcelona. Of the 22 patients diagnosed with oral cancer in our Service, the present study finally analyzed the 12 subjects who reported for the dental controls. As regards the remaining 10 patients, 5 had died and 5 could not be located; these subjects were thus excluded from the analysis. All of the smokers had abandoned the habit. The most common tumor location was the lateral margin of the tongue. None of the patients visited the dentist regularly before the diagnosis of oral cancer. T1N0M0 was the most common tumor stage. Surgery was carried out in 50% of the cases, while 8.4% of the patients received radiotherapy and 41.6% underwent surgery with postoperative radiotherapy. In turn, 66.6% of the patients reported treatment sequelae such as dysgeusia, xerostomia or speech difficulties, and one patient suffered osteoradionecrosis. Forty-one percent of the patients did not undergo regular dental controls after cancer treatment. As regards oral and dental health, 16.6% presented caries, and 50% had active periodontal disease. Protocols are available for preventing the complications of oral cancer treatment, and thus for improving patient quality of life. However, important shortcomings in the application of such protocols on the part of the public health authorities make it difficult to reach these objectives.

  2. Depression and Resilience in Breast Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristevska-Dimitrovska, Gordana; Stefanovski, Petar; Smichkoska, Snezhana; Raleva, Marija; Dejanova, Beti

    2015-12-15

    A significant number of breast cancer patients, during their life with the diagnosis, experience emotional distress in the form of depression and anxiety. Psychological resilience is the ability of a person to protect his/her mental health when faced with adverse circumstances such as the cancer diagnosis. This study aims to assess the resilience in breast cancer patients and to explore whether depression affects the resilience. Two hundred eighteen (218) women, treated for early breast cancer responded to Connor - Davidson Resilience Scale and Hospital Depression and Anxiety Scale, in order to assess the level of psychological resilience and the level of depression. There is a significant negative correlation between depression and resilience in our sample (r = - 0.562, p resilience. There is no statistically significant correlation between the ages of the participants; time passed since diagnosis, cancer stage and resilience levels. This study shows that patients who are less depressed have higher levels of resilience and that psychological resilience may independently contribute to lower levels of depression among breast cancer patients. The level of psychological resilience may be a protective factor for depression and psychological distress.

  3. Pharmacokinetics of digoxin cross-reacting substances in patients with acute yellow Oleander (Thevetia peruviana) poisoning, including the effect of activated charcoal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Darren M; Southcott, Emma; Potter, Julia M; Roberts, Michael S; Eddleston, Michael; Buckley, Nick A

    2006-12-01

    Intentional self-poisonings with seeds from the yellow oleander tree (Thevetia peruviana) are widely reported. Activated charcoal has been suggested to benefit patients with yellow oleander poisoning by reducing absorption and/or facilitating elimination. Two recent randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the efficacy of activated charcoal yielded conflicting outcomes in terms of mortality. The effect of activated charcoal on the pharmacokinetics of Thevetia cardenolides has not been assessed. This information may be useful for determining whether further studies are necessary. Serial blood samples were obtained from patients enrolled in an RCT assessing the relative efficacy of single-dose and multiple-dose activated charcoal (SDAC and MDAC, respectively) compared with no activated charcoal (NoAC). The concentration of Thevetia cardenolides was estimated with a digoxin immunoassay. The effect of activated charcoal on cardenolide pharmacokinetics was compared between treatment groups by determining the area under the curve for each patient in the 24 hours following admission, the 24-hour mean residence time, and regression lines obtained from serial concentration points, adjusted for exposure. Erratic and prolonged absorption patterns were noted in each patient group. The apparent terminal half-life was highly variable, with a median time of 42.9 hours. There was a reduction in 24-hour mean residence time and in the apparent terminal half-life estimated from linear regression in patients administered activated charcoal, versus the control group (NoAC). This effect was approximately equal in patients administered MDAC or SDAC. Activated charcoal appears to favorably influence the pharmacokinetic profile of Thevetia cardenolides in patients with acute self-poisoning and may have clinical benefits. Given the conflicting clinical outcomes noted in previous RCTs, these mechanistic data support the need for further studies to determine whether a particular subgroup

  4. A review of body composition and pharmacokinetics in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Jessica J; Sawyer, Michael B

    2017-09-01

    Body surface area dosing of chemotherapeutic agents is based on limited scientific data, and often results in unpredictable plasma drug levels. Cross-sectional computed tomography (CT) imaging provides an accurate measurement of lean mass. This review summarizes emerging roles of lean mass in predicting pharmacokinetics and drug toxicities in cancer patients. Areas covered: A concise review of body composition measurement with CT cross-sectional imaging and its relationship to drug pharmacokinetics and toxicities. A comprehensive review of the predictive value of low lean mass (sarcopenia) in dose-limiting toxicities is also included. Expert commentary: Drug dosing in medical oncology faces many challenges, including heterogeneous body composition profiles. The emerging role of sarcopenia in predicting lean mass may provide the tool needed to more accurately dose patients and prevent dose-limiting toxicities.

  5. A Comparative Oncology Study of Iniparib Defines Its Pharmacokinetic Profile and Biological Activity in a Naturally-Occurring Canine Cancer Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey Saba

    Full Text Available Development of iniparib as an anti-cancer agent was hindered in part by lingering questions regarding its mechanism of action, the activity of its metabolites, and their potential accumulation in tumors. Due to strong similarities in metabolism of iniparib between humans and dogs, a veterinary clinical trial in pet dogs with spontaneous cancers was designed to answer specific questions pertaining to pharmacokinetic exposures and tolerability of iniparib. Dogs were treated with iniparib alone and in combination with carboplatin chemotherapy. Iniparib doses ranged between 10-70 mg/kg intravenously (IV. Plasma, tumor and normal tissue samples were collected before and at various time points scheduled after exposure for pharmacokinetic and biologic analysis. The primary endpoints included characterization of dose-limiting toxicities (DLT and determination of the drug exposures that could be achieved in both normal and tumor tissues. Nineteen dogs were treated. DLT included fever, anorexia, diarrhea, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia; most effects were attributable to carboplatin based on the timing of adverse event onset. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD of iniparib was not identified. Moderate to high variability in plasma exposure was noted for iniparib and all metabolites between animals. When quantifiable, iniparib and metabolite plasma:tumor ratios were < 0.088 and <1.7, respectively. In this study, iniparib was well tolerated as a single agent and in combination with carboplatin over a range of doses. However, clinically relevant concentrations of the parent drug and selected metabolites were not detectable in canine tumor tissues at any studied dose, thus eliminating expectations for clinical responses in dogs or humans. Negative clinical trials in humans, and the uncertainties of its mechanism of action, ultimately led to the decision to stop clinical development of the drug. Nevertheless, the questions that can be asked and answered within

  6. Depression and Resilience in Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordana Ristevska-Dimitrоvska

    2015-11-01

    CONCLUSION: This study shows that patients who are less depressed have higher levels of resilience and that psychological resilience may independently contribute to lower levels of depression among breast cancer patients. The level of psychological resilience may be a protective factor for depression and psychological distress.

  7. Symptom attributions in patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Line Flytkjær; Hvidberg, Line; Pedersen, Anette Fischer

    2015-01-01

    Størstedelen af kolorektal cancere opdages gennem patienters symptomatiske henvendelse i almen praksis. Man ved dog ikke meget om, hvordan patienter selv oplever deres symptomer. Formålet med studiet var, at undersøge om symptom attributioner er associeret med hvilket symptom man oplevede før...

  8. Levomilnacipran Pharmacokinetics in Healthy Volunteers Versus Patients with Major Depressive Disorder and Implications for Norepinephrine and Serotonin Reuptake Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Laishun; Greenberg, William M; Gommoll, Carl; O'Connor, Joann; Zukin, Stephen R; Periclou, Antonia; Ghahramani, Parviz

    2015-09-01

    Levomilnacipran, a selective serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE) reuptake inhibitor, is approved for the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults. The objectives of this investigation were to characterize the pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of levomilnacipran in healthy subjects and in patients with MDD and to compare the plasma concentrations observed at clinically effective doses (40-120 mg daily) in MDD patients versus in vitro inhibitory concentration values for NE and 5-HT transporters. Data from 2 trials were analyzed: a Phase I trial (healthy volunteers received a single dose of levomilnacipran extended-release capsule [ER; 25, 50, or 100 mg], escalating multiple doses of levomilnacipran ER [25-300 mg once daily], or placebo); and a Phase III trial (adults with MDD received a fixed dose of levomilnacipran ER [40, 80, or 120 mg once daily for 8 weeks]). Plasma samples of participants were assayed to determine levomilnacipran concentrations, and PK analyses were performed. Unbound plasma concentrations of levomilnacipran in MDD patients were estimated, and inhibitory concentration values were determined by curve fitting of the in vitro data. Cmax and AUC were dose proportional after single dosing (25-100 mg) and multiple dosing (across the 25-300 mg dose range) of levomilnacipran ER in healthy subjects. Dose-proportional steady-state Cmax (93, 180, and 297 ng/mL) and AUC0-τ (1520, 2935, and 4799 ng*h/mL) were also observed in patients with MDD who received levomilnacipran ER (40, 80, and 120 mg daily). Tmax was ~6 hours and was similar after single and multiple oral doses of levomilnacipran ER. Estimates of levomilnacipran concentration at 50%, 80%, and 90% inhibition were 19, 91, and 237 nM, respectively, for the 5-HT transporter, and 10, 41, and 92 nM for the NE transporter. Average unbound plasma concentrations for levomilnacipran in MDD patients treated with levomilnacipran ER 40, 80, or 120 mg daily exceeded the estimated

  9. Vancomycin pharmacokinetic parameters in patients with acute brain injury undergoing controlled normothermia, therapeutic hypothermia, or pentobarbital infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbitzer, Kathryn A; Jordan, J Dedrick; Rhoney, Denise H

    2015-04-01

    Therapeutic strategies that cause an alteration in patient temperature, such as controlled normothermia (CN), therapeutic hypothermia (TH), and pentobarbital infusion (PI), are often used to manage complications caused by acute brain injury. The purpose of this study was to evaluate pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of vancomycin in patients with acute brain injury undergoing temperature modulation. This was a retrospective cohort study of adult patients with acute brain injury admitted between May 2010 and March 2014 who underwent CN, TH, or PI and received vancomycin. Predicted PK parameters based on population data were compared with calculated PK parameters based on serum concentrations. Seventeen CN patients and 10 TH/PI patients met inclusion criteria. Traumatic brain injury and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage accounted for the majority of admitting diagnoses. In the CN group, the median dose was 16.7 (15.5-18.4) mg/kg. The median calculated elimination rate constant [0.155 (0.108-0.17) vs. 0.103 (0.08-0.142) hr(-1); p = 0.04] was significantly higher than the predicted value. The median measured trough concentration [8.9 (7.7-11.1) vs. 17.1 (10.8-22.3) υg/mL; p = 0.004] was significantly lower than predicted. In the TH/PI group, the median dose was 15.4 (14.7-17.2) mg/kg. No significant differences were found between the median calculated and predicted elimination rate constant [0.107 (0.097-0.109) vs. 0.112 (0.102-0.127) hr(-1); p = 0.41] and median measured and predicted trough concentration [14.2 (12.7-17.1) vs. 13.1 (11-17.8) υg/mL; p = 0.71]. Patients who underwent TH/PI did not exhibit PK alterations when compared to predicted PK parameters based on population data, while patients who underwent CN experienced PK alterations favoring an increased elimination of vancomycin.

  10. Clinical pharmacokinetics of melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Nathja Groth; Andersen, Lars Peter Holst; Gögenur, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of the review was to provide an overview of studies investigating the pharmacokinetics of exogenous melatonin in humans and if possible, to provide recommendations for clinical use. METHODS: The review was conducted in accordance to PRISMA guidelines. A systematic literature search......), and bioavailability. RESULTS: The literature search identified 392 records. Twenty-two studies were included in the review. Melatonin dosages varied between 0.3 and 100 mg and were administered either orally or intravenously. Cmax ranged from 72.1 (10 ml/h; 0.02 mg, IV) to 101,163 pg/ml (100 mg, oral). Tmax ranged......) and 1602 L (4 mg, oral). Bioavailability of oral melatonin ranged from 9 to 33%. Pharmacokinetics was affected by age, caffeine, smoking, oral contraceptives, feeding status, and fluvoxamine. Critically ill patients displayed accelerated absorption and compromised elimination. CONCLUSIONS: Despite...

  11. Safety, pharmacokinetics and efficacy findings in an open-label, single-arm study of weekly paclitaxel plus lapatinib as first-line therapy for Japanese women with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Kenichi; Kuroi, Katsumasa; Shimizu, Satoru; Rai, Yoshiaki; Aogi, Kenjiro; Masuda, Norikazu; Nakayama, Takahiro; Iwata, Hiroji; Nishimura, Yuichiro; Armour, Alison; Sasaki, Yasutsuna

    2015-12-01

    Lapatinib is the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) targeting agent approved globally for HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC). The efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics (PK) of lapatinib combined with paclitaxel (L+P) were investigated in this study, to establish clear evidence regarding the combination in Japanese patients. In this two-part, single-arm, open-label study, the tolerability of L+P as first-line treatment in Japanese patients with HER2-positive MBC was evaluated in six patients in the first part, and the safety, efficacy and PK were evaluated in a further six patients (making a total of twelve patients) in the second part. Eligible women were enrolled and received lapatinib 1500 mg once daily and paclitaxel 80 mg/m(2) weekly for at least 6 cycles. The only dose-limiting toxicity reported was Grade 3 diarrhea in one patient. The systemic exposure to maximum plasma concentration and area under the plasma concentration curve (AUC) for lapatinib, as well as the AUC of paclitaxel, were increased when combined. The most common adverse events (AEs) related to the study treatment were alopecia, diarrhea and decreased hemoglobin. The majority of drug-related AEs were Grade 1 or 2. The median overall survival was 35.6 months (95 % confidence interval 23.9, not reached). The response rate and clinical benefit rate were both 83 % (95 % confidence interval 51.6, 97.9). The L+P treatment was well tolerated in Japanese patients with HER2-positive MBC. Although the PK profiles of lapatinib and paclitaxel influenced each other, the magnitudes were not greatly different from those in non-Japanese patients.

  12. PET/MRI in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Andreas; Loft, Annika; Law, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Combined PET/MRI systems are now commercially available and are expected to change the medical imaging field by providing combined anato-metabolic image information. We believe this will be of particular relevance in imaging of cancer patients. At the Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear...... described include brain tumors, pediatric oncology as well as lung, abdominal and pelvic cancer. In general the cases show that PET/MRI performs well in all these types of cancer when compared to PET/CT. However, future large-scale clinical studies are needed to establish when to use PET/MRI. We envision...... that PET/MRI in oncology will prove to become a valuable addition to PET/CT in diagnosing, tailoring and monitoring cancer therapy in selected patient populations....

  13. Splitting of high oral dose methotrexate improves bioavailability : A pharmacokinetic study in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, M; Haagsma, CJ; Neef, C; Proost, JH; Knuif, A; Van De Laar, MAFJ

    Background: In patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the bioavailability of higher oral dose methotrexate (MTX) administered in a single dose, is limited. Objectives: To study the bioavailability of a divided higher oral methotrexate (MTX) dose, in comparison to a single dose, in adult patients

  14. Effects of Strong CYP3A Inhibition and Induction on the Pharmacokinetics of Ixazomib, an Oral Proteasome Inhibitor: Results of Drug-Drug Interaction Studies in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma and a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Neeraj; Hanley, Michael J; Venkatakrishnan, Karthik; Bessudo, Alberto; Rasco, Drew W; Sharma, Sunil; O'Neil, Bert H; Wang, Bingxia; Liu, Guohui; Ke, Alice; Patel, Chirag; Rowland Yeo, Karen; Xia, Cindy; Zhang, Xiaoquan; Esseltine, Dixie-Lee; Nemunaitis, John

    2018-02-01

    At clinically relevant ixazomib concentrations, in vitro studies demonstrated that no specific cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme predominantly contributes to ixazomib metabolism. However, at higher than clinical concentrations, ixazomib was metabolized by multiple CYP isoforms, with the estimated relative contribution being highest for CYP3A at 42%. This multiarm phase 1 study (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01454076) investigated the effect of the strong CYP3A inhibitors ketoconazole and clarithromycin and the strong CYP3A inducer rifampin on the pharmacokinetics of ixazomib. Eighty-eight patients were enrolled across the 3 drug-drug interaction studies; the ixazomib toxicity profile was consistent with previous studies. Ketoconazole and clarithromycin had no clinically meaningful effects on the pharmacokinetics of ixazomib. The geometric least-squares mean area under the plasma concentration-time curve from 0 to 264 hours postdose ratio (90%CI) with vs without ketoconazole coadministration was 1.09 (0.91-1.31) and was 1.11 (0.86-1.43) with vs without clarithromycin coadministration. Reduced plasma exposures of ixazomib were observed following coadministration with rifampin. Ixazomib area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time 0 to the time of the last quantifiable concentration was reduced by 74% (geometric least-squares mean ratio of 0.26 [90%CI 0.18-0.37]), and maximum observed plasma concentration was reduced by 54% (geometric least-squares mean ratio of 0.46 [90%CI 0.29-0.73]) in the presence of rifampin. The clinical drug-drug interaction study results were reconciled well by a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model that incorporated a minor contribution of CYP3A to overall ixazomib clearance and quantitatively considered the strength of induction of CYP3A and intestinal P-glycoprotein by rifampin. On the basis of these study results, the ixazomib prescribing information recommends that patients should avoid concomitant administration of

  15. Statistical study on cancer patients of cancer research hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Yun Sang; Choi, Soo Yong; Kim, Ki Wha; Kang, Sung Mok

    1993-01-01

    The total number of malignant neoplasms included in this study 15,737 cases(11.8%) among 133,251 cases for 3 years. On sex, females with 52.9% were much more than males with 47.1%. The highest proportion of cancer patients by age was 33.7% in males and 28.5% in females, respectivelty for 50-59 age group. The most frequent primary site among males was found to be stomach with 35.5%, followed by liver(14.7%), lung(13.0%), esophagus(5.4%) and colon (3.2%). In females, the first order was uterine cervix with 40.6%, followed by stomach(17.2%), breast(14.4), rectum(3.7%) and lung(3.4%). The most common type of morphology of malignant neoplasms was adenocarcinoma(47.4%) in males an squamous cell carcinoma(58.0%) in females. Among the cancer patients initially diagnosed in this hospital, the proportion of malignant neoplasms by the exent of disease was 2.5% for patient with carcinoma-in-situ, 54.1% for patients with localized involvement, 13.3% for patients with regional involvement and 8.5% for patients with distant involvement. Among the cancer patients initially treatment in this hospital, the proportion of malignant neoplasms by the method of treatment was 23.6% for surgery, 25.3% for radiotherapy and 30.3% for chemotherapy. Among the cancer patients confirmed by medical records, 7.7% was traced more than 5 years. (Author)

  16. Gastric cancer surgery in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gretschel, Stephen; Estevez-Schwarz, Lope; Hünerbein, Michael; Schneider, Ulrike; Schlag, Peter M

    2006-08-01

    To investigate the value of individual risk-adapted therapy in geriatric patients, we performed a consecutive analysis of 363 patients undergoing potentially curative surgery for gastric cancer. All patients underwent extensive preoperative workup to assess surgical risk. The following criteria were evaluated in 3 age groups (75 years): comorbidity, tumor characteristics, type of resection, postoperative morbidity and mortality, recurrence rate, overall survival, and disease-free survival. There was an increased rate of comorbidity in the higher age groups (51% vs 76% vs 83%; PPatient selection and risk-adapted surgery in elderly patients can result in acceptable therapeutic results comparable to younger patients. Limited surgery in elderly gastric cancer patients with high comorbidity does not necessarily compromise oncological outcome.

  17. A one-year prospective study of the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of the highest available dose of paliperidone palmitate in patients with schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background There are no previous reports of paliperidone palmitate's (PP) long term tolerability or pharmacokinetics of the highest dose in patients with schizophrenia. This study evaluates safety and tolerability, as well as pharmacokinetics, of the highest marketed dose of PP (150 mg eq. [234 mg]) in stable patients with schizophrenia over a 1-year period. Methods In this 1-year prospective study, eligible patients (aged 18-65 years; Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale's total score ≤ 70) received an initial deltoid injection of PP 150 mg eq. The second injection one week later and subsequent once-monthly injections were deltoid or gluteal. All injections were to be PP 150 mg eq. Patients willing to participate in intensive pharmacokinetic sampling were classified as Treatment A. Patients unwilling to undergo intensive pharmacokinetic sampling or unable to tolerate the 150 mg eq. dose (consequently receiving flexible doses of 50, 100 or 150 mg eq.) were classified as Treatment B. Results Of the 212 patients (safety analysis set), 73% were men; 45% white; 20% black; 34% Asians; mean (SD) age 41 (10.2) years, and mean (SD) baseline Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale total score 54.9 (9.03). A total of 53% (n = 113) patients completed the study and 104 received PP 150 mg eq. throughout. Mean (SD) mode dose of PP was 144.8 (19.58) mg eq. The dosing initiation regimen resulted in rapidly achieved and maintained therapeutic paliperidone levels over the study (average concentrations during the dosing interval were 34.7, 40.0, and 47.8 ng/mL after the 2nd, 8th, and 14th injection respectively). Most frequent (≥ 10%) treatment-emergent adverse events were nasopharyngitis (n = 37), insomnia (n = 32), injection-site pain (n = 32), headache (n = 28), and tachycardia (n = 27). Akathisia (n = 19) and tremor (n = 11) were the most common extrapyramidal adverse events. 33 patients had an SAE and 27 discontinued due to treatment-emergent adverse events. No deaths were

  18. Characteristics and outcome of spontaneous bacterial meningitis in patients with cancer compared to patients without cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomar, Virginia; Benito, Natividad; López-Contreras, Joaquin; Coll, Pere; Gurguí, Mercedes; Domingo, Pere

    2017-05-01

    In cancer patients, who are frequently immunocompromised, bacterial meningitis (BM) can be a severe complication, with a different presentation, etiology, and course, compared to patients without cancer. Our objective is to compare the characteristics and outcomes of BM in patients with and without cancer. A single-center, prospective observational cohort study, conducted between 1982 and 2012, in a tertiary university hospital in Barcelona (Spain). The main outcome measure is in-hospital mortality. We evaluated 659 episodes of BM; 97 (15%) had active cancer. Patients with malignancies were older (median 63 (interquartile range [IQR] 24) vs 52 [IQR 42] years, P < .001) and more often had a Charlson comorbidity score of ≥3 (51% vs 11%, P < .001). The classic meningitis triad (35% vs 50%, P = .05), fever (91% vs 96%, P = .03), neck stiffness (58% vs 78%, P < .001), headache (63% vs 77%) P = .003), and rash (7% vs 30%, P < .001) were less frequent. There was a longer interval between admission and antibiotic therapy (median 5 [IQR 14] vs 3 [IQR 6] hours, P < .001). Listeria meningitis was the commonest cause of BM (29%) and was more frequent in cancer than noncancer (8%, P < .001) patients, whereas meningococcal meningitis was much less frequent (4% vs 36%, P < .001). Overall mortality was higher in patients with cancer (31% vs 16%, P < .001), although cancer was not associated with an unfavorable outcome in the multivariate analysis (odds ratio 1.825, P = .07). Patients with meningitis and cancer are older and have more subtle clinical manifestations than patients without cancer. Listeria monocytogenes is the predominant pathogen and mortality is higher in cancer patients.

  19. Pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of APF530 (extended-release granisetron) in patients receiving moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy: results of two Phase II trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabrail, Nashat; Yanagihara, Ronald; Spaczyński, Marek; Cooper, William; O’Boyle, Erin; Smith, Carrie; Boccia, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances with new therapies, a significant proportion of patients (>30%) suffer delayed-onset chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) despite use of antiemetics. APF530 is a sustained-release subcutaneous (SC) formulation of granisetron for preventing CINV. APF530 pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy were studied in two open-label, single-dose Phase II trials (C2005-01 and C2007-01, respectively) in patients receiving moderately emetogenic chemotherapy or highly emetogenic chemotherapy. In C2005-01, 45 patients received APF530 250, 500, or 750 mg SC (granisetron 5, 10, or 15 mg, respectively). In C2007-01, 35 patients were randomized to APF530 250 or 500 mg SC. Injections were given 30 to 60 minutes before single-day moderately emetogenic chemotherapy or highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Plasma granisetron was measured from predose to 168 hours after study drug administration. Safety and efficacy were also evaluated. APF530 pharmacokinetics were dose proportional, with slow absorption and elimination of granisetron after a single SC dose. Median time to maximum plasma concentration and half-life were similar for APF530 250 and 500 mg in both trials, with no differences between the groups receiving moderately and highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Exposure to granisetron was maintained at a therapeutic level over the delayed-onset phase, at least 168 hours. Adverse events in both trials were as expected for granisetron; injection site reactions (eg, erythema and induration) were predominantly mild and seen in ≤20% of patients. Complete responses (no emesis, with no rescue medication) were obtained in the acute, delayed, and overall phases in ≥80% and ≥75% of patients in both trials with the 250 and 500 mg doses, respectively. After a single injection of APF530, there were dose-proportional pharmacokinetics and sustained concentrations of granisetron over 168 hours. The 250 and 500 mg doses were well tolerated and maintained therapeutic granisetron

  20. Dose study of the multikinase inhibitor, LY2457546, in patients with relapsed acute myeloid leukemia to assess safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wacheck, Volker; Lahn, Michael; Dickinson, Gemma; Füreder, Wolfgang; Meyer, Renata; Herndlhofer, Susanne; Füreder, Thorsten; Dorfner, Georg; Pillay, Sada; André, Valérie; Burkholder, Timothy P; Akunda, Jacqueline K; Flye-Blakemore, Leann; Van Bockstaele, Dirk; Schlenk, Richard F; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Valent, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a life-threatening malignancy with limited treatment options in chemotherapy-refractory patients. A first-in-human dose study was designed to investigate a safe and biologically effective dose range for LY2457546, a novel multikinase inhibitor, in patients with relapsed AML. In this nonrandomized, open-label, dose escalation Phase I study, LY2457546 was administered orally once a day. Safety, pharmacokinetics, changes in phosphorylation of target kinases in AML blasts, and risk of drug–drug interactions (DDI) were assessed. Five patients were treated at the starting and predicted minimal biologically effective dose of 50 mg/day. The most commonly observed adverse events were febrile neutropenia, epistaxis, petechiae, and headache. The majority of adverse events (81%) were Grade 1 or 2. One patient had generalized muscle weakness (Grade 3), which was deemed to be a dose-limiting toxicity. Notably, the pharmacokinetic profile of LY2457546 showed virtually no elimination of LY2457546 within 24 hours, and thus prevented further dose escalation. No significant DDI were observed. Ex vivo flow cytometry studies showed downregulation of the phosphoproteins, pcKIT, pFLT3, and pS6, in AML blasts after LY2457546 administration. No medically relevant responses were observed in the five treated patients. No biologically effective dose could be established for LY2457546 in chemotherapy-resistant AML patients. Lack of drug clearance prevented safe dose escalation, and the study was terminated early. Future efforts should be made to develop derivatives with a more favorable pharmacokinetic profile

  1. Individual Psychological Support for Cancer Patients: Utilisation and Patient Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellbom, Maria; Brandberg, Yvonne; Glimelius, Bengt; Sjoden, Per-Olow

    1998-01-01

    Evaluates a short-term, problem-focused Individual Psychological Support (IPS intervention in a study with cancer patients (N=527). Results show that a majority of responding patients stated that their problems were addressed to a great extent, that the number of contacts was adequate, and the IPS came at the right time. (Author/MKA)

  2. Population pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling of high-dose intermittent ticarcillin-clavulanate administration in pediatric cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobell, Jeffery T; Stockmann, Chris; Young, David C; Cash, Jared; McDowell, Brittany J; Korgenski, Kent; Sherwin, Catherine M T; Spigarelli, Michael; Chatfield, Barbara A; Ampofo, Krow

    2011-11-01

    The Intermountain Cystic Fibrosis Pediatric Center utilizes ticarcillin-clavulanate 400 mg/kg/d divided every 6 hours, (maximum 24 g/d). This dosing strategy is higher than the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved package labeling. We evaluated the microbiologic efficacy of this dosing regimen. The primary study objective was to predict the pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) MIC breakpoints (the highest MIC with a probability of target attainment [PTA] of at least 90%) for the bacteriostatic and bactericidal targets of ticarcillin activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa using the study dosing regimen. A secondary objective was to evaluate the tolerability profile of the higher ticarcillin-clavulanate dosing regimen in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). This was a population-based PK-PD modeling study of pediatric CF patients admitted from January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2009 who received the dosing regimen for at least 7 days. Population PK and PD models were used to estimate PK and PD parameters for 127 clinically evaluable patients. A 10,000-patient Monte Carlo simulation was performed to estimate the target time in which free drug concentrations exceeded the MIC of the infecting organism. The 2 PK-PD targets of microbiologic efficacy included ≥30% for bacteriostasis and ≥50% for bactericidal effects of ticarcillin-clavulanate at higher than FDA-approved doses. A total of 127 patients (age, 0-19 years) met inclusion criteria. Serum concentration levels were modeled in this patient population using published PK parameters with intermittent ticarcillin peak concentrations reaching 288 (93.4) mg/L. The model predicted the PTA of the MICs for P. aeruginosa with a near-maximal bactericidal PK-PD MIC breakpoint of 16 μg/mL and a bacteriostasis PK-PD MIC breakpoint of 32 μg/mL. The results of our simulation suggest that in this select pediatric population, higher than FDA-approved doses of ticarcillin-clavulanate were effective in achieving

  3. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Pharmacokinetic Modeling: Initial Experience in Patients With Early Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maijer, Karen I; van der Leij, Christiaan; de Hair, Maria J H; Tas, Sander W; Maas, Mario; Gerlag, Daniëlle M; Tak, Paul P; Lavini, Cristina

    2016-03-01

    Analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) using pharmacokinetic modeling (PKM) provides quantitative measures that mirror microvessel integrity and can be used as an objective marker of the level of synovial inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the PKM parameters K(trans) , kep , and ve in a prospective cohort of disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD)-naive patients with early arthritis, and to validate the results by assessing their correlation with the number of synovial endothelial cells (ECs). Forty-seven patients with early arthritis (arthritis duration arthritis, 22 with unclassified arthritis, 6 with spondyloarthritis [SpA], and 5 with other arthritides) were included. At baseline, DCE-MRI was performed on an inflamed knee joint of each patient. These images were used to calculate the K(trans) (volume transfer constant between the plasma and extracellular extravascular space [EES]), the kep (transfer constant between the EES and plasma), and the ve (fractional volume of the EES). Second, markers of disease activity were collected. Finally, vascularity was evaluated by immunohistochemical analysis of synovial tissue samples obtained from the inflamed knee joints, using antibodies to detect von Willebrand factor (vWF), a marker of ECs. The 3 PKM parameters differed significantly between diagnostic groups at baseline, with the highest K(trans) value being observed in patients with SpA (median 0.050/minute, interquartile range [IQR] 0.041- 0.069). Furthermore, the K(trans) , kep , and ve values correlated significantly with markers of disease activity. Finally, the PKM parameters K(trans) and kep , but not ve , correlated significantly with synovial expression of vWF (r = 0.647, P = 0.004 for K(trans) ; r = 0.614, P = 0.007 for kep ; r = 0.398, P = 0.102 for ve ). These results suggest that the K(trans) , kep , and ve can be used to detect synovial inflammation in patients with

  4. Skin cancer in patients with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, A; Thyssen, J P; Gislason, G H

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that is commonly treated with ultraviolet phototherapy and systemic immunosuppressant drugs, which may confer a risk of skin cancer. Previous studies on the risk of skin cancer in patients with psoriasis have shown conflicting results....... OBJECTIVES: We investigated the risk of new-onset melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), respectively, in a large cohort of patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. METHODS: Data on all Danish individuals aged ≥18 years between 1 January 1997 and 31 December 2012 were linked at individual......-level in nationwide registers. Incidence rates per 10 000 person-years were calculated, and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were estimated by Poisson regression models. RESULTS: The study comprised 5 559 420 individuals with a maximum follow-up time of 16 years. There were 75 410 patients with psoriasis, and 25 087...

  5. Patients' preference to hear cancer diagnosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Arbabi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bad news disclosure is one of the complex communication tasks of the physicians. Bad news is defined as:" any news that adversely and seriously affects an individual's view of his or her future". Recent studies indicate that the patients' and physicians' attitudes toward disclosure of bad news have been changed since few years ago. The evidence of breaking bad news is also different across different cultures. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the patients' prospect about breaking bad news and to provide a clinical guidance for Iranian patients and those patients in countries with a similar cultural background.A cross sectional descriptive study was conducted on a sample of 200 cancer patients at a cancer institute in Tehran. The patients' demographic characteristics and their attitudes toward the manner of disclosing the diagnosis were registered in a research based questionnaire.In this study, 165 patients (82.5% claimed to be aware of the diagnosis; however, only 121 patients (73% were aware of the actual diagnosis of their disease. Most patients tended to know the diagnosis (n = 186, 93% and accepted patient as the first person to be informed (n = 151, 75.5% by their physician (n = 174, 87%. The preference of being alone or with a family member when exposed to bad news was almost the same. Most patients (n = 169, 84.5% believed that physicians should consult the patients to make treatment decisions. Treatment options (n = 140, 70% and life expectancy (n = 121, 60.5% were the most desirable topics to be discussed. Most patients (n = 144, 72% agreed upon allowing them to express their emotional feelings.According to the patients' preferences about being fully informed about the diagnosis, it is suggested that the disclosure of cancer diagnosis be done by a physician and in the presence of a family member. It is also recommended that physicians consult the patients about treatment options.

  6. Platelet transfusion for patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Craig H; DomBourian, Melkon G; Millward, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Platelet transfusion is a critical and often necessary aspect of managing cancer. Low platelet counts frequently lead to bleeding complications; however, the drugs used to combat malignancy commonly lead to decreased production and destruction of the very cell whose function is essential to stop bleeding. The transfusion of allogeneic platelet products helps to promote hemostasis, but alloimmunization may make it difficult to manage other complications associated with cancer. The literature relating to platelet transfusion in patients with cancer was reviewed. Platelet storage, dosing, transfusion indications, and transfusion response are essential topics for health care professionals to understand because many patients with cancer will require platelet transfusions during the course of treatment. The workup and differentiation of non-immune-mediated compared with immune-mediated platelet refractoriness are vital because platelet management is different between types of refractoriness. A combination of appropriate utilization of platelet inventory and laboratory testing coupled with communication between those caring for patients with cancer and those providing blood products is essential for effective patient care.

  7. COPING STRATEGIES IN PATIENTS WITH PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Gardanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnostics of psycho-emotional disorders of patients with malignant diseases of the prostate is not doubt, because timely correction contributes to the shortening of rehabilitation period and restoration of the quality of life of patients after treatment. Detection and diagnosis of prostate cancer for many patients is stressful and causes changes in the affective sphere, and manifests itself in increased levels of anxiety and depression in men. To cope with stress is possible due to the used coping strategies.Purpose. Studying the coping mechanisms in prostate cancer patients.Materials and methods. 56 men treated in FGBU "LRTS" Russian Ministry of Health. The average age was 65.7 ± 6.1 years. The average duration of the disease prostate cancer is 3 ± 2 months. All men were subjected to the standard algorithm for the evaluation of hormonal status, the PSA, taking a history, inspection and physical examination, magnetic resonance imaging and scintigraphy of bones of a skeleton. All the patients underwent laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Psychological testing with the use of the method of "Coping test" the scale of reactive and personal anxiety for the differentiated evaluation of anxiety. Results. The most common for prostate cancer revealed constructive coping strategies are "planning solve", "selfcontrol" and "search of social support". According to the scale Spielberg–Hanin a high level of situational anxiety was revealed.Conclusion. According to the results of the research, patients with prostate cancer are likely to use constructive coping strategies, that leads to stabilization of psycho-emotional state of men and promotes more effective adaptation in the terms of stress, that is caused by treatment of prostate cancer.

  8. A phase I multicenter study of antroquinonol in patients with metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer who have received at least two prior systemic treatment regimens, including one platinum-based chemotherapy regimen

    OpenAIRE

    LEE, YU-CHIN; HO, CHING-LIANG; KAO, WOEI-YAU; CHEN, YUH-MIN

    2015-01-01

    Antroquinonol is isolated from Antrodia camphorata, a camphor tree mushroom, and is a valuable traditional Chinese herbal medicine that exhibits pharmacological activities against several diseases, including cancer. This first-in-human phase I study of antroquinonol included patients with metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer who had received at least two prior systemic treatment regimens. An open-label, dose escalation, pharmacokinetic (PK) study was conducted to determine the maximum tolera...

  9. Depression Screening and Patient Outcomes in Cancer : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Anna; Roseman, Michelle; Milette, Katherine; Coyne, James C.; Stefanek, Michael E.; Ziegelstein, Roy C.; Arthurs, Erin; Leavens, Allison; Palmer, Steven C.; Stewart, Donna E.; de Jonge, Peter; Thombs, Brett D.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Several practice guidelines recommend screening for depression in cancer care, but no systematic reviews have examined whether there is evidence that depression screening benefits cancer patients. The objective was to evaluate the potential benefits of depression screening in cancer

  10. Financial distress in patients with advanced cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Barbaret

    Full Text Available We examined the frequency and severity of financial distress (FD and its association with quality of life (QOL and symptoms among patients with advanced cancer in France.In this cross-sectional study, 143 patients with advanced cancer were enrolled. QOL was assessed using the Functional Assessment of Cancer General (FACT-G and symptoms assessed using Edmonton Assessment System (ESAS and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. FD was assessed using a self-rated numeric scale from 0 to 10.Seventy-three (51% patients reported having FD. Patients reported having FD were most likely to be younger (53.8 (16,7SD versus 62 (10.5SD, p<0.001, single (33 (62% versus 40(44%, p = 0.03 and had a breast cancer (26 (36%, p = 0.024. Patients with FD had a lower FACT-G score (59 versus 70, p = 0.005. FD decreased physical (14 versus 18, p = 0.008, emotional (14 versus 16, p = 0.008, social wellbeing (17 versus 19, p = 0.04. Patients with FD had higher HADS-D (8 versus 6 p = 0.007 and HADS-A (9 versus 7, p = 0.009 scores. FD was linked to increased ESAS score (59 (18SD versus 67 (18SD, p = 0.005 and spiritual suffering (22(29SD versus 13(23SD, p = 0.045.The high rate of patient-reported FD was unexpected in our studied population, as the French National Health Insurance covers specific cancer treatments. The FD was associated with a poorer quality of life. Having a systematic assessment, with a simple tool, should lead to future research on interventions that will increase patients' QOL.

  11. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of pemetrexed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2011-01-01

    correlates with renal function and it may be safely used with vitamin supplementation in patients with creatinine clearance ≥ 45 ml/min. The pharmacokinetics of pemetrexed is also largely unchanged in third-space fluids and can be feasibly and safely administered in combination with several other cytotoxic...... or targeted agents. It is the author's opinion that pemetrexed is already a valuable cytotoxic agent which has proved useful in several malignancies. However, future trials might expand on the combined use of pemetrexed with other targeted agents that could be beneficial to other selected patients harboring...

  12. EXPRESSING DISTRESS IN PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura Gabriela FELEA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Negative emotions (distress are recognized as part of the psychological profile of patients diagnosed with advanced stage cancer. However, most patients are not accustomed to verbalize feelings towards their physician, and generally towards family and medical care personnel. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the expression of emotions by patients in advanced stages of cancer, respectively the means by which they get to express emotions. To this respect, we identified the most common types of emotions expressed, or metaphors used by patients to describe their emotions and topics that trigger emotions. Words and phrases most commonly used are in relation to: fear, anxiety, depression, guilt, negligence, concern. They are uttered in order to depict the network created between disclosed emotions and topics on health status, symptoms, adverse effects and therapeutic choice, patient privacy, and social and family issues.

  13. Pharmacokinetic properties of micafungin in critically ill patients diagnosed with invasive candidiasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, J M; van der Elst, K C; Veringa, A; Jongedijk, E M; Brüggemann, R J; Koster, R A; Kampinga, G A; Kosterink, J G; van der Werf, T S; Zijlstra, J G; Touw, D J; Alffenaar, J W C

    2017-01-01

    Background: The estimated attributable mortality rate for invasive candidiasis (IC) in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) setting varies from 30-40%. Physiological changes in critically ill patients may affect the distribution and elimination of micafungin and therefore dosing adjustments might be

  14. Functional dynamic MR imaging and pharmacokinetics of Gd-DTPA in patients with renal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krestin, G.P.; Neufang, K.F.R.; Friedmann, G.; Clauss, W.; Schuhmann-Giampieri, G.; Stoeckl, B.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports excretion of Gd-DTPA analyzed in 20 patients with renal parenchymal disease and decreased creatinine clearance (20-80 mL/min) and compared with excretion in five patients with normal renal function. All 25 underwent a dynamic MR study that employed fast gradient-echo sequences with single images during breath holding. The time between appearance of the contrast agent in the renal cortex and signal intensity drop in the medulla was an indicator of glomerular filtration rate and correlated well with creatinine clearance values. Fractionate urine collection and serum analysis up to 120 hours showed a prolonged but complete (98%) elimination of Gd-DTPA. Renal functional parameters did not change after administration of Gd-DTPA, and no nephrotoxic effects were observed. Thus, MR imaging provides a good quantitative evaluation of the glomerular filtration rate; moreover, administration of Gd-DTPA in patients with renal failure does not impair excretory function and can therefore be safely applied in patients with reduced excretory function

  15. Clinical studies to investigate pharmacokinetics of antimicrobial agents in critically ill patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.L.C.E. Buijk (Steven)

    2003-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The intensive care unit (ICU) is an essential part of the surgical department, providing an environment for surveillance and treatment of the critically ill. Patients are admitted either with a life threatening condition due to a critical illness or they need

  16. Pharmacokinetics of Antibiotics in Sub-Saharan African Patient Populations: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Jeannet C.; van Hest, Reinier M.; Prins, Jan M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: In sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), severe febrile illness accounts for a large majority of medical admissions. SSA patients may also suffer from cachexia and organ dysfunction resulting from tuberculosis, hepatitis B, and hypertension. It is hard to tell how these conditions influence the

  17. Glucose-lowering drugs in patients with chronic kidney disease : a narrative review on pharmacokinetic properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnouts, Paul; Bolignano, Davide; Nistor, Ionut; Bilo, Henk; Gnudi, Luigi; Heaf, James; van Biesen, Wim

    The achievement of a good glycaemic control is one of the cornerstones for preventing and delaying progression of microvascular and macrovascular complications in patients with both diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD). As for other drugs, the presence of an impaired renal function may

  18. Pharmacokinetics, Safety, and Efficacy of Chemoembolization with Doxorubicin-Loaded Tightly Calibrated Small Microspheres in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malagari, Katerina, E-mail: kmalag@otenet.gr; Kiakidis, Theodoros; Pomoni, Maria; Moschouris, Hippokratis; Emmanouil, Emmanouil; Spiridopoulos, Themis; Sotirchos, Vlasios; Tandeles, Savvas; Koundouras, Dimitrios; Kelekis, Alexios; Filippiadis, Dimitrios; Charokopakis, Angelos; Bouma, Evanthia; Chatziioannou, Achilles [National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Medical School, Evgenidion Hospital, 2nd and 1st Department of Radiology (Greece); Dourakis, Spyridon; Koskinas, John [National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Medical School, Hippokration General Hospital, 2nd Department of Internal Medicine, Hepatology (Greece); Karampelas, Theodoros; Tamvakopoulos, Konstantinos [Foundation Biomedical Research of Academy of Athens (FBRA) (Greece); Kelekis, Nikolaos; Kelekis, Dimitrios [National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Medical School, Evgenidion Hospital, 2nd and 1st Department of Radiology (Greece)

    2016-10-15

    PurposeThis study examines safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of chemoembolization with loadable microspheres ≤100 μm for hepatocellular carcinoma.Materials and MethodsA pilot safety study was performed in 19 patients with size and dose escalation and then 52 patients were enrolled prospectively and randomly assigned to chemoembolization with TANDEM™ loaded with 150 or 100 mg of doxorubicin.ResultsThe mean diameter of the tumors was 7.28 ± 2.09 cm (range 4–12) and distribution dominant/multiple 51.9/48.1 %. Child A/B distribution was 32/20 (61.5/38.5 %) and etiology HBV/HCV/HBV/HCV-hemochromatosis was 61.6/9.6/9.6/15.4 %. Twenty-five patients were assigned in the low and 27 in the high loading group. There was 1.92 % thirty-day mortality due to lesion rupture. Biliary damage was seen in 3 patients (5.7 %) in the high loading. Mean maximum plasma concentration of doxorubicin C{sub max} ± SD was 284.9 ± 276.2 ng/mL for the high and 108.5 ± 77.6 ng/mL for the low loading (p < 0.001). According to m-RECIST overall objective response after two sessions reached 61.22 and 63.82 % at 6 months. Notably, complete target lesion response (CR) after the second session was observed in 28.57 % and maintained in 23.40 % at 6 months. No statistical differences in the local response rates were observed between the two loading groups. Overall survival (OS) at 6 months, 1 , 2, and 3 years was 98.08, 92.3, 88.46, and 82.6 %, respectively. OS and Progression-Free Survival did not demonstrate statistical significance between the two loading groups.ConclusionInitial evidence shows that (a) TANDEM™ achieves high rates of local response and mid-term survival, (b) high loading provides no clinical benefit and is associated with biliary toxicity.

  19. Renal cancer in kidney transplanted patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frascà, Giovanni M; Sandrini, Silvio; Cosmai, Laura; Porta, Camillo; Asch, William; Santoni, Matteo; Salviani, Chiara; D'Errico, Antonia; Malvi, Deborah; Balestra, Emilio; Gallieni, Maurizio

    2015-12-01

    Renal cancer occurs more frequently in renal transplanted patients than in the general population, affecting native kidneys in 90% of cases and the graft in 10 %. In addition to general risk factors, malignancy susceptibility may be influenced by immunosuppressive therapy, the use of calcineurin inhibitors (CNI) as compared with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, and the length of dialysis treatment. Acquired cystic kidney disease may increase the risk for renal cancer after transplantation, while autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease does not seem to predispose to cancer development. Annual ultrasound evaluation seems appropriate in patients with congenital or acquired cystic disease or even a single cyst in native kidneys, and every 2 years in patients older than 60 years if they were on dialysis for more than 5 years before transplantation. Immunosuppression should be lowered in patients who develop renal cancer, by reduction or withdrawal of CNI. Although more evidence is still needed, it seems reasonable to shift patients from CNI to everolimus or sirolimus if not already treated with one of these drugs, with due caution in subjects with chronic allograft nephropathy.

  20. Cancer patients' understanding of prognostic information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Laura A; Dumenci, Levent; Siminoff, Laura A; Matsuyama, Robin K

    2014-06-01

    Prognostic information is necessary for cancer patients to be fully informed about the likely course of their disease. This information is needed for practical planning and treatment decisions. This study sought to examine how cancer patients understand the prognosis information available to them. The setting is an urban safety net hospital. Six focus groups with cancer patients (N = 39) were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim then analyzed using phases of content analysis. Participants in all groups discussed the prognosis almost exclusively in terms of mortality and reported that their physicians and nurses mostly provided prognostic information in terms of months or years for survival. This finding held across all cancer types and stages. Patients tend to think of prognosis information as being only estimated limited survival and find the idea upsetting. Due to this view on prognosis, patients need further explanation regarding where the prognosis information comes from and what prognostic information can tell them in order to make use of it.

  1. Anemia, tumor hypoxemia, and the cancer patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varlotto, John; Stevenson, Mary Ann

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To review the impact of anemia/tumor hypoxemia on the quality of life and survival in cancer patients, and to assess the problems associated with the correction of this difficulty. Methods: MEDLINE searches were performed to find relevant literature regarding anemia and/or tumor hypoxia in cancer patients. Articles were evaluated in order to assess the epidemiology, adverse patient effects, anemia correction guidelines, and mechanisms of hypoxia-induced cancer cell growth and/or therapeutic resistance. Past and current clinical studies of radiosensitization via tumor oxygenation/hypoxic cell sensitization were reviewed. All clinical studies using multi-variate analysis were analyzed to show whether or not anemia and/or tumor hypoxemia affected tumor control and patient survival. Articles dealing with the correction of anemia via transfusion and/or erythropoietin were reviewed in order to show the impact of the rectification on the quality of life and survival of cancer patients. Results: Approximately 40-64% of patients presenting for cancer therapy are anemic. The rate of anemia rises with the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy for prostate cancer. Anemia is associated with reductions both in quality of life and survival. Tumor hypoxemia has been hypothesized to lead to tumor growth and resistance to therapy because it leads to angiogenesis, genetic mutations, resistance to apoptosis, and a resistance to free radicals from chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Nineteen clinical studies of anemia and eight clinical studies of tumor hypoxemia were found that used multi-variate analysis to determine the effect of these conditions on the local control and/or survival of cancer patients. Despite differing definitions of anemia and hypoxemia, all studies have shown a correlation between low hemoglobin levels and/or higher amounts of tumor hypoxia with poorer prognosis. Radiosensitization through improvements in tumor oxygenation/hypoxic cell

  2. Lung cancer patients frequently visit the emergency room for cancer-related and -unrelated issues

    OpenAIRE

    KOTAJIMA, FUTOSHI; KOBAYASHI, KUNIHIKO; SAKAGUCHI, HIROZO; NEMOTO, MANABU

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer patients visit the emergency room (ER) for cancer-related and -unrelated reasons more often compared to patients with other types of cancer. This results in increased admissions and deaths in the ER. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed the characteristics of lung cancer patients visiting the ER in order to optimize the utilization of emergency medical services and improve the patients’ quality of life. Lung cancer patients visiting the ER of a single institution over a 2-ye...

  3. Steady-state kinetics and dynamics of morphine in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christrup, Lona Louring; Sjøgren, P; Jensen, N H

    1999-01-01

    Eighteen patients suffering from chronic pain due to cancer completed a balanced, double-blind, double-dummy, two period cross-over trial comparing the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of morphine and its metabolites, morphine-3-glucuronide and morphine-6-glucuronide, after...... administration of morphine given as controlled-release (CR) tablets (every 12 h) and immediate-release (IR) tablets (every 6 h). The same total daily dose of morphine was given in both study periods. Patients received both test formulations for 4 days and on the final day of each period, peripheral venous blood...... samples for analysis of morphine, morphine-3-glucuronide, and morphine-6-glucuronide were obtained. Pain intensity, sedation, and continuous reaction time (CRT) were assessed. No significant differences could be demonstrated in AUC/dose, Cmin, Cmax or fluctuation index values between the two treatments...

  4. Fertility preservation in young patients with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virender Suhag

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Infertility can arise as a consequence of treatment of oncological conditions. The parallel and continued improvement in both the management of oncology and fertility cases in recent times has brought to the forefront the potential for fertility preservation in patients being treated for cancer. Many survivors will maintain their reproductive potential after the successful completion of treatment for cancer. However total body irradiation, radiation to the gonads, and certain high dose chemotherapy regimens can place women at risk for acute ovarian failure or premature menopause and men at risk for temporary or permanent azoospermia. Providing information about risk of infertility and possible interventions to maintain reproductive potential are critical for the adolescent and young adult population at the time of diagnosis. There are established means of preserving fertility before cancer treatment; specifically, sperm cryopreservation for men and in vitro fertilization and embryo cryopreservation for women. Several innovative techniques are being actively investigated, including oocyte and ovarian follicle cryopreservation, ovarian tissue transplantation, and in vitro follicle maturation, which may expand the number of fertility preservation choices for young cancer patients. Fertility preservation may also require some modification of cancer therapy; thus, patients' wishes regarding future fertility and available fertility preservation alternatives should be discussed before initiation of therapy.

  5. Interest in screening examinations among cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humeniuk Ewa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine the influence of socio-demographic variables on attendance rate at screening examinations in cancer patients. Material and methods. The research group comprised of 100 cancer patients. The method applied in the research was a diagnostic survey. The research instrument was the authors‘ own questionnaire specially compiled to measure cancer patients‘ interest in screening examinations. The research material was analysed with the statistical packet STATISTICA 12 and Microsoft Office Excel software. Significance level was assumed at p<0.05 to determine statistically significant differences and dependencies. A Chi2 test was used in the research. Results. The surveyed patients mostly did not participate in screening examinations aimed at diagnosing cancer (66%. Their Age (p=0.05, gender (p=0.003 and place of residence (p=0.04 determined their participation rate in screening tests. The patients‘ marital status (p=0.47, education (p=0.85 and economic status (p=0.13 did not affect their willingness to attend screening examinations. Conclusions. The process of cancer incidence and death rate limitation requires greater participation of the population in prevention programmes.

  6. New resilience instrument for patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zeng Jie; Liang, Mu Zi; Li, Peng Fei; Sun, Zhe; Chen, Peng; Hu, Guang Yun; Yu, Yuan Liang; Wang, Shu Ni; Qiu, Hong Zhong

    2018-02-01

    Resilience is an important concept in the cancer literature and is a salient indicator of cancer survivorship. The aim of this study is to develop and validate a new resilience instrument that is specific to patients with cancer diagnosis (RS-SC) in Mainland China. First, a resilience framework was constructed for patients with cancer diagnosis. Second, items were formulated based on the framework to reflect different aspects of resilience. Third, two rounds of expert panel discussion were performed to select important and relevant items. Finally, two cross-sectional studies were conducted to evaluate the psychometric properties of this instrument. Fifty-one items were generated based on the resilience framework and the final 25-item RS-SC resulted in a five-factor solution including Generic Elements, Benefit Finding, Support and Coping, Hope for the Future and Meaning for Existence, accounting for 64.72% of the variance. The Cronbach's α of the RS-SC was 0.825 and the test-retest reliability was 0.874. The RS-SC is a brief and specific self-report resilience instrument for Chinese patients with cancer and shows sound psychometric properties in this study. The RS-SC has potential applications in both clinical practice and research with strength-based resiliency interventions.

  7. Anxiety in Terminally Ill Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolva, Elissa; Rosenfeld, Barry; Pessin, Hayley; Breitbart, William; Brescia, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Context Anxiety in terminal cancer is linked to diminished quality of life, yet overall it is poorly understood with regard to prevalence and relationship to other aspects of psychological distress. Objectives This study examines anxiety in terminally ill cancer patients, including the prevalence of anxiety symptoms, the relationship between anxiety and depression, differences in anxiety between participants receiving inpatient palliative care and those receiving outpatient care, and characteristics that distinguish highly anxious from less anxious patients. Methods Participants were 194 patients with terminal cancer. Approximately half (n = 103) were receiving inpatient care in a palliative care facility and half (n = 91) were receiving outpatient care in a tertiary care cancer center. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was used to assess anxiety and depression, and was administered along with measures of hopelessness, desire for hastened death, and social support. Results Moderately elevated anxiety symptoms were found in 18.6% of participants (n = 36) and 12.4% (n = 24) had clinically significant anxiety symptoms. Level of anxiety did not differ between the two treatment settings. However, participants receiving palliative care reported significantly higher levels of depression and desire for hastened death. A multivariate prediction model indicated that belief in an afterlife, social support, and anxiolytic and antidepressant use were unique, significant predictors of anxiety. Conclusion Severity of anxiety symptoms did not differ between the study sites, suggesting that anxiety may differ from depression and desire for hastened death in the course that it takes over the duration of terminal cancer. PMID:21565460

  8. Alterations in Hydrocortisone Pharmacokinetics in a Patient With Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Following Bariatric Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Mallappa, Ashwini; Nella, Aikaterini A.; Kumar, Parag; Brooks, Kristina M.; Perritt, Ashley F.; Ling, Alexander; Liu, Chia-Ying; Merke, Deborah P.

    2017-01-01

    Management of adult patients with classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is challenging and often complicated by obesity, metabolic syndrome, and adverse cardiovascular risk. Alterations in weight can influence cortisol kinetics. A 19-year-old woman with classic CAH and morbid obesity experienced persistent elevations of androgen levels while receiving oral glucocorticoid therapy. Control of adrenal androgens was improved with continuous subcutaneous hydrocortisone infusion therapy, but...

  9. Pharmacokinetics of ceftriaxone in plasma and bone of patients undergoing hip or knee surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergs, Ulrich; Clauss, Tobias; Ihlefeld, Dorothea; Weiss, Michael; Pönicke, Klaus; Hofmann, Gunther O; Neumann, Joachim

    2014-11-01

    Patients undergoing hip or knee replacement therapy are routinely pretreated with antibiotics before surgery. It is controversial in which antibiotic is the treatment of choice for this purpose. One possibility is the cephalosporin ceftriaxone. Here, we wanted to know if effective tissue concentrations are reached. We studied plasma and bone kinetics of ceftriaxone in orthopaedic patients (n = 22) treated with ceftriaxone (2 g) immediately prior operation. Plasma samples were withdrawn before and at three time points after ceftriaxone infusion. After bone replacement, extracts from cancellous bone or cortical bone were obtained, and ceftriaxone was quantified using column chromatography. The plasma kinetics of ceftriaxone and distribution into bone were analysed using a population approach (ADAPT 5). The population mean of the area under the curve (AUC) was 140 mg h/l. A cancellous bone to plasma concentration ratio of 1.12 ± 1.29 was achieved 5 h after start of infusion. The half-life of uptake into the cortical bone was less (8.4 h) than into cancellous bone (12.1 h, P ceftriaxone in cancellous and cortical bone should be adequate to protect the patients against usual ceftriaxone-sensitive nosocomial infections and are substantially lower than the plasma concentrations. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  10. Patient Delay in Colorectal Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anette Fischer; Hansen, Rikke P; Vedsted, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Blødning fra endetarmen ses normalt som et alarmsymptom på kolorektalkræft. Alligevel vælger mange patienter at lade være med at opsøge lægen. Denne artikel ser nærmere på sammenhængen mellem et alarmsymptom (rektal blødning), forsinkelser i patientforløbet og tanker om kræft. Resultaterne viser,...

  11. An Open-label, Single-dose, Pharmacokinetic Study of Factor VIII Activity After Administration of Moroctocog Alfa (AF-CC) in Male Chinese Patients With Hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongzhong; Wu, Runhui; Hu, Pei; Sun, Feifei; Xu, Lihong; Liang, Yali; Nepal, Sunil; Qu, Peng Roger; Huard, Francois; Korth-Bradley, Joan M

    2017-07-01

    Hemophilia A represents up to 80% of all hemophilia cases in China. In patients with this condition, bleeding can be prevented and controlled by administering clotting factor VIII (FVIII). Since their initial availability, recombinant FVIII products have undergone several iterations to enhance their safety. Moroctocog alfa albumin-free cell culture (AF-CC) is among the third generation of recombinant FVIII products and received regulatory approval in China in August 2012. The present study characterizes the single-dose pharmacokinetic parameters of FVIII activity (FVIII:C) after administration of moroctocog alfa (AF-CC) in male Chinese patients with hemophilia A. This multicenter, open-label, single-dose study enrolled 13 male Chinese patients diagnosed with severe hemophilia A (FVIII:C hemophilia A. The pharmacokinetic profile in older patients was similar to that previously reported with recombinant FVIII products in studies with a predominantly white population; younger patients had reduced exposure to FVIII:C. The single doses of moroctocog alfa (AF-CC) were well tolerated; 2 cases of transient, low-titer FVIII inhibitor development were observed. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02461992. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. "THE EVALUATION OF THE POSSIBLE EFFECT OF POSITIVE END EXPIRATORY PRESSURE (PEEP ON PHARMACOKINETICS OF PHENYTOIN IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE BRAIN INJURY UNDER MECHANICAL VENTILATION."

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Elham Hadidi

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Positive ventilation has shown to have an influence on pharmacokinetic and disposition of some drugs.Beacause phenytoin with a narrow therapautic range, is the most commonly used drug for prophylaxis and treatment of early seizures after acute brain injuries, in the present study the effect of short term PEEP (5-10 cm H2O for at least 8 hours on phenytoin serum concentration and pharmacokinetic parameters such as Vmax and clearance in brain injured patients under mechanical ventilation was examined. Ten patients with moderate to severe acute brain injury who were placed on mechanical ventilation with an initial PEEP level of 0-5 cm H2O were included in the study. Patients received phenytoin loading dose of 15 mg/kg followed by a maintenance daily dose of 3-7 mg/kg initiated within 12 hours of loading dose. Sampels were taken on two different occasions before and after PEEP elevation. Total phenytoin serum concentrations were determined by HPLC method. A time invarient Michaelis-Menten pharmacokinetic model was used to calculate Vmax and clearance for each patient.Derrived variables were calculated as follows: Vmax, 3.5-6.8 and 3.7-8.2 mg/kg/day; Clearance, 0.1-0.7 and 0.1-1.2 l/kg/day (before and after PEEP elevation, respectively. Our data have shown a wide range of variability (2.6-32.5 mg/l in phenytoin serum concentrations. There were no statistically significant differences in the measured total concentrations (p=0.721 and calculated Vmax and clearance (p=0.285before and after PEEP elevation. Administration of fluid and inotropic agents, limitation in application of higher levels of PEEP and drug interactions, shall be considered as possible explanations for these findings.

  13. Phase 1 safety, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic study of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor dinaciclib administered every three weeks in patients with advanced malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Monica M; Mita, Alain C; Moseley, Jennifer L; Poon, Jennifer; Small, Karen A; Jou, Ying-Ming; Kirschmeier, Paul; Zhang, Da; Zhu, Yali; Statkevich, Paul; Sankhala, Kamelesh K; Sarantopoulos, John; Cleary, James M; Chirieac, Lucian R; Rodig, Scott J; Bannerji, Rajat; Shapiro, Geoffrey I

    2017-10-24

    Dinaciclib is a potent inhibitor of cell cycle and transcriptional cyclin-dependent kinases. This Phase 1 study evaluated the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of various dosing schedules of dinaciclib in advanced solid tumour patients and assessed pharmacodynamic and preliminary anti-tumour activity. In part 1, patients were enrolled in escalating cohorts of 2-h infusions administered once every 3 weeks, utilising an accelerated titration design until a recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) was defined. In part 2, 8- and 24-h infusions were evaluated. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined for all schedules. Pharmacodynamic effects were assessed with an ex vivo stimulated lymphocyte proliferation assay performed in whole blood.Effects of dinaciclib on retinoblastoma (Rb) phosphorylation and other CDK targets were evaluated in skin and tumour biopsies. In addition to tumour size, metabolic response was evaluated by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography. Sixty-one patients were enrolled to parts 1 and 2. The RP2Ds were 50, 7.4 and 10.4 mg m -2 as 2- 8- and 24-hour infusions, respectively. Dose-limiting toxicities included pancytopenia, neutropenic fever, elevated transaminases, hyperuricemia and hypotension. Pharmacokinetics demonstrated rapid distribution and a short plasma half-life. Dinaciclib suppressed proliferation of stimulated lymphocytes. In skin and tumour biopsies, dinaciclib reduced Rb phosphorylation at CDK2 phospho-sites and modulated expression of cyclin D1 and p53, suggestive of CDK9 inhibition. Although there were no RECIST responses, eight patients had prolonged stable disease and received between 6 and 30 cycles. Early metabolic responses occurred. Dinaciclib is tolerable at doses demonstrating target engagement in surrogate and tumour tissue.

  14. Role of UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 in the Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics of Silymarin Flavonolignans in Patients with HCV and NAFLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Xie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Silymarin is the most commonly used herbal medicine by patients with chronic liver disease. Silymarin flavonolignans undergo rapid first-pass metabolism primarily by glucuronidation. The aims of this investigation were: (1 to determine the association of UGT1A1*28 polymorphism with the area under the plasma concentration-time curves (AUCs for silybin A (SA and silybin B (SB; (2 to evaluate the effect of UGT1A1*28 polymorphism on the profile of flavonolignan glucuronide conjugates found in the plasma; and (3 to investigate the role of UGT1A1 enzyme kinetics on the pharmacokinetics of SA and SB. AUCs and metabolic ratios for thirty-three patients with chronic liver disease administered oral doses of silymarin were compared between different UGT1A1*28 genotypes. The AUCs, metabolic ratios, and the profiles of major SA and SB glucuronides did not differ significantly among the three UGT1A1 genotypes. In contrast, an increase in the proportion of sulfated flavonolignan conjugates in plasma was observed in subjects with UGT1A1*28/*28 genotype compared to subjects carrying wild type alleles. Differences in SA and SB in vitro intrinsic clearance estimates for UGTIA1 correlated inversely with SA and SB exposures observed in vivo indicating a major role for UGT1A1 in silymarin metabolism. In addition, a significant difference in the metabolic ratio observed between patients with NAFLD and HCV suggests that any effect of UGT1A1 polymorphism may be obscured by a greater effect of liver disease on the pharmacokinetics of silymarin. Taken together, these results suggest the presence of the UGT1A1*28 allele does not contribute significantly to a large inter-subject variability in the pharmacokinetics of silybin A and silybin B which may obscure the ability to detect beneficial effects of silymarin in patients with liver disease.

  15. Efficacy and pharmacokinetic activity of frovatriptan compared to rizatriptan in patients with moderate-to-severe migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savi L

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Lidia Savi,1 Selene Mogavero,2 Colin Gerard Egan21Department of Neuroscience, University of Turin, Turin, Italy; 2Primula Multimedia SRL, Pisa, ItalyBackground: Migraine is a painful neurological disorder that affects over 10% of the general population. Frovatriptan and rizatriptan are antimigraine agents belonging to the triptan class. Although previous studies have independently compared the efficacy of these agents, contemporaneous data examining both pharmacokinetic (PK properties and efficacy in parallel have not previously been available.Materials and methods: In this single-center double-blind study, 18 subjects (ten female were treated for a single migraine attack with frovatriptan 2.5 mg or rizatriptan 10 mg. Plasma concentrations were measured predose and at 2, 4, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours after drug administration. The primary end point of this study was to evaluate the association between PK parameters and efficacy measures and recurrence rate. Secondary end points were pain-free and pain-relief episodes at 2 and 4 hours, recurrent episodes within 48 hours, and cumulative hazard of recurrence within 72 hours.Results: At baseline, approximately 17% of patients had mild migraine, while 83% had moderate–severe migraine. Although the time to maximum concentration was similar for both drugs (2.7 versus 2.3 hours, the terminal half-life for frovatriptan was longer than rizatriptan (29.3 versus 3.2 hours, P<0.0001. The proportion of patients who were pain-free at 4 hours without rescue medication was higher in the frovatriptan-treated group, (38.9 versus 5.6%, P=0.045. The cumulative hazard of recurrence over 72 h was reduced by frovatriptan compared to rizatriptan-treated patients (log-rank test, P=0.04. Pain-free and pain-relief episodes for the study period were positively correlated with the concentration:maximum concentration (Cmax ratio for frovatriptan (r=0.52, P=0.028, but not rizatriptan. Recurrence rate was negatively

  16. Isoflavone pharmacokinetics and metabolism after consumption of a standardized soy and soy-almond bread in men with asymptomatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn-Jarvis, Jennifer H; Clinton, Steven K; Grainger, Elizabeth M; Riedl, Kenneth M; Schwartz, Steven J; Lee, Mei-Ling T; Cruz-Cano, Raul; Young, Gregory S; Lesinski, Gregory B; Vodovotz, Yael

    2015-11-01

    Epidemiologic associations suggest that populations consuming substantial amounts of dietary soy exhibit a lower risk of prostate cancer. A 20-week randomized, phase II, crossover trial was conducted in 32 men with asymptomatic prostate cancer. The crossover involved 8 weeks each of soy bread (SB) and soy-almond bread (SAB). The primary objective was to investigate isoflavone bioavailability and metabolite profile. Secondary objectives include safety, compliance, and assessment of biomarkers linked to prostate carcinogenesis. Two distinct SBs were formulated to deliver approximately 60 mg aglycone equivalents of isoflavones per day. The isoflavones were present as aglycones (∼78% as aglycones) in the SAB whereas in the standard SB predominantly as glucosides (18% total isoflavones as aglycones). Compliance to SB (97% ± 4%) and SAB (92% ± 18%) was excellent; toxicity was rare and limited to grade 1 gastrointestinal complaints. Pharmacokinetic studies between SB and SAB showed modest differences. Peak serum concentration time (Tmax) was significantly faster with SAB meal compared with SB in some isoflavonoids, and AUC0 to 24 h of dihydrodaidzein and O-desmethylangolensin was significantly greater after an SB meal. An exploratory cluster analysis was used to identify four isoflavone-metabolizing phenotypes. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein increased significantly by 41% (P = 0.024) with soy intervention. Findings from this study provide the necessary framework to study isoflavone-metabolizing phenotypes as a strategy for identification of individuals that might benefit or show resistance to cancer preventive strategies using dietary soy. A standardized SB used for future large-scale randomized clinical trials to affect human prostate carcinogenesis is feasible. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Behandlingsresultater hos patienter med cancer i papilla Vateri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Sune; Bendixen, Morten; Fristrup, Claus Wilki

    2010-01-01

    Cancer of the papilla of Vater is a relatively rare disease. It is difficult to separate from other periampullary tumours at the time of diagnosis. Recent studies have shown that patients with cancer of the papilla tend survive longer than patients with pancreatic cancer and cancers of biliary...

  18. Variations of blood glucose in cancer patients during chemotherapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-05-23

    May 23, 2016 ... Purpose: The aim of this study was to analyze the blood glucose (BG) variations in cancer patients during chemotherapy ... Materials and Methods: Patients were examined from the Department of Medical Oncology of Cancer Hospital and .... 68 (LC, 20.5%), colon cancer 63 (CC, 19.0%), rectal cancer.

  19. Herpes simplex encephalitis in patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graber, Jerome J; Rosenblum, Marc K; DeAngelis, Lisa M

    2011-11-01

    Case reports and animal models suggest that chemotherapy, corticosteroids and radiotherapy (RT) may increase the risk of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE). We retrospectively examined cases of HSE at an academic hospital devoted to cancer care. Patients were identified by positive herpes simplex virus (HSV) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or by brain pathology. There were seven patients with HSE over a 12 year period, four of whom had received cranial RT. During this time, a total of 997 patients were treated with cranial RT, suggesting a greater incidence than the expected risk of two to four cases per million people per year in the general population. Five patients had recently received chemotherapy and three were on dexamethasone. MRI findings were typical; four patients had bilateral anterior temporal lesions and three had unilateral-temporal lesions. Four patients had a normal CSF white blood cell count, three of whom had prior RT and dexamethasone. Four patients were positive for HSV-1, and two for HSV-2. One patient had a negative CSF PCR for HSV, but autopsy confirmed active HSE. Though still rare, the risk of HSE may be increased in patients with cancer, especially in those receiving cranial RT. MRI findings were typical, but CSF white blood cell count was normal in four patients and one had negative CSF testing, suggesting that CSF results may be misleading in this population.

  20. Pharmacokinetics of [14C]methylglyoxal-bis-guanylhydrazone) in patients with leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, M G; Keating, M J; Yap, B S; Loo, T L

    1981-05-01

    Methylglyoxal-bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG; NSC 32946), a competitive inhibitor of S-adenosyl-L-methionine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.50), currently being reevaluated for its clinical antileukemic activity. MGBG labeled with 14C in the guanylhydrazone moiety was administered i.v. (150 microCi; specific activity, 1.9 microCi/mumol; 20 mg total) to six patients with leukemia. All patients in the study had normal renal and hepatic function. [14C]MGBG underwent no in vivo metabolism; it disappeared from the plasma with an average terminal t 1/2 of 4.1 hr. The 72-hr cumulative urinary excretion was only 14.5 +/- 2.2% (S.E.M.) of the total radioactive dose. The apparent volume of distribution was 661 ml/kg and the total clearance rate was 21.2 ml/kg/min. The low urinary excretion rate and the relatively rapid plasma clearance suggest that MGBG may be sequestered in the body. Therefore, if MGBG is administered by a frequent treatment schedule, the prolonged biological half-life in humans may significantly contribute to its clinical toxicity.

  1. Hair loss in cancer chemotherapeutic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadha V

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The hair loss in 8 cancer patients aged between 18 and 60 years on chemotherapy was studied. All had diffuce moderate alopecio within 1 month of starting treatment. Of the 8, 3 had only telogen hairs and 3 had high dystrophic hair count. Both anagen and telogen effluvium are implicated.

  2. Systemic therapy for patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeiffer, Per; Qvortrup, Camilla; Tabernero, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Recent modalities and strategies have increased the complexity of treatment choice in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), and therefore all cases should be assessed at a multidisciplinary conference. Adjuvant chemotherapy for 6 months increases the chance of cure by absolutely 5 % in stage II...

  3. Haemorheological Changes in African Breast Cancer Patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    elearning

    important component of blood that influences its flow through capillaries.3 It is well established that the principal determinant of plasma viscosity is plasma fibrinogen concentration and red blood cell concentration. Various abnormalities of coagulation factors and fibrinolysis in the cancer patient have been reported but none ...

  4. MANAGEMENT OF CANCER IN PATIENTS WITH HIV

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    populations of patients with HIV infection that a causal relationship is difficult to exclude. These cancers are associated with declining immune function and are considered to be ... the chemotherapy or radiotherapy is strongly associated with response rates. ... organ dysfunction such as hepatitis, renal failure and respiratory ...

  5. Haemorheological Changes in African Breast Cancer Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several Studies have indicated the existence of thrombo-embolic complications in cancer patients and that this could be associated with changes in heamorheological parameters. Packed cell volume (PCV), heamoglobin (Hb), relative plasma viscosity (RPV) and plasma Fibrinogen concentration (PFC) were measured in ...

  6. Mechanism of the pharmacokinetic interaction between methotrexate and benzimidazoles: potential role for breast cancer resistance protein in clinical drug-drug interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breedveld, Pauline; Zelcer, Noam; Pluim, Dick; Sönmezer, Ozgür; Tibben, Matthijs M.; Beijnen, Jos H.; Schinkel, Alfred H.; van Tellingen, Olaf; Borst, Piet; Schellens, Jan H. M.

    2004-01-01

    The antifolate drug methotrexate (MTX) is transported by breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; ABCG2) and multidrug resistance-associated protein1-4 (MRP1-4; ABCC1-4). In cancer patients, coadministration of benzimidazoles and MTX can result in profound MTX-induced toxicity coinciding with an

  7. Pharmacokinetic interaction between rifampin and the combination of indinavir and low-dose ritonavir in HIV-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, U S; Andersen, A B; Klitgaard, N A

    2004-01-01

    of indinavir (800 mg) and ritonavir (100 mg) twice a day was performed to evaluate whether the inducing effect of rifampin on the drug-metabolizing enzyme cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 could be overcome by the inhibitory effect of ritonavir. Pharmacokinetic evaluations of steady-state concentrations of indinavir...

  8. Regorafenib-induced retinal and gastrointestinal hemorrhage in a metastatic colorectal cancer patient with liver dysfunction: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchihashi, Kenji; Shimokawa, Hozumi; Takayoshi, Kotoe; Nio, Kenta; Aikawa, Tomomi; Matsushita, Yuzo; Wada, Iori; Arita, Shuji; Ariyama, Hiroshi; Kusaba, Hitoshi; Sonoda, Koh-Hei; Akashi, Koichi; Baba, Eishi

    2017-10-01

    Regorafenib is effective for metastatic colorectal cancer but its toxicity such as hemorrhage should be considered. The safety of regorafenib for the patient with the liver disease is not known. Seventy-one-year old man of colon cancer had myodesopsia and blood stool after 14 days from the initiation of regorafenib administration with 50% dose reduction due to liver dysfunction. Fundus examination revealed hemorrhage of the retinal vein. Regorafenib treatment was discontinued and observational therapy was pursued. Retinal and gastrointestinal hemorrhage resolved in 1 week. Retinal hemorrhage should be considered as the differential diagnosis of myodesopsia in the patient treated by regorafenib. Safety and pharmacokinetic of continuous regorafenib administration for patients with liver dysfunction remains to be clarified.

  9. Pharmacokinetic interaction between zidovudine and valproic acid in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertora, J J; Rege, A B; Greenspan, D L; Akula, S; George, W J; Hyslop, N E; Agrawal, K C

    1994-09-01

    Zidovudine is metabolized to an inactive 5'-glucuronide and has a short plasma half-life requiring frequent dosing. The present study in six patients without symptoms who were infected with human immunodeficiency virus was undertaken to determine if coadministration of valproic acid which, like zidovudine, is metabolized by glucuronidation, would alter zidovudine disposition. Under steady-state conditions for both drugs, the plasma area under the curve for zidovudine increased twofold with a corresponding decline in its oral clearance when given with valproic acid. The mean 5'-glucuronide/zidovudine urinary excretion ratio was reduced by more than 50%, and the amount of unconjugated zidovudine recovered in urine increased by more than twofold. There was no significant increase in the plasma half-life of zidovudine. The effects of valproic acid on zidovudine glucuronidation were related to plasma valproic acid concentrations. Valproic acid inhibits glucuronidation of zidovudine and increases its oral bioavailability.

  10. Pharmacokinetics of hedgehog pathway inhibitor vismodegib (GDC-0449) in patients with locally advanced or metastatic solid tumors: the role of alpha-1-acid glycoprotein binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Richard A; Lum, Bert L; Cheeti, Sravanthi; Jin, Jin Yan; Jorga, Karin; Von Hoff, Daniel D; Rudin, Charles M; Reddy, Josina C; Low, Jennifer A; Lorusso, Patricia M

    2011-04-15

    In a phase I trial for patients with refractory solid tumors, hedgehog pathway inhibitor vismodegib (GDC-0449) showed little decline in plasma concentrations over 7 days after a single oral dose and nonlinearity with respect to dose and time after single and multiple dosing. We studied the role of GDC-0449 binding to plasma protein alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AAG) to better understand these unusual pharmacokinetics. Sixty-eight patients received GDC-0449 at 150 (n = 41), 270 (n = 23), or 540 (n = 4) mg/d, with pharmacokinetic (PK) sampling at multiple time points. Total and unbound (dialyzed) GDC-0449 plasma concentrations were assessed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, binding kinetics by surface plasmon resonance-based microsensor, and AAG levels by ELISA. A linear relationship between total GDC-0449 and AAG plasma concentrations was observed across dose groups (R(2) = 0.73). In several patients, GDC-0449 levels varied with fluctuations in AAG levels over time. Steady-state, unbound GDC-0449 levels were less than 1% of total, independent of dose or total plasma concentration. In vitro, GDC-0449 binds AAG strongly and reversibly (K(D) = 13 μmol/L) and human serum albumin less strongly (K(D) = 120 μmol/L). Simulations from a derived mechanistic PK model suggest that GDC-0449 pharmacokinetics are mediated by AAG binding, solubility-limited absorption, and slow metabolic elimination. GDC-0449 levels strongly correlated with AAG levels, showing parallel fluctuations of AAG and total drug over time and consistently low, unbound drug levels, different from previously reported AAG-binding drugs. This PK profile is due to high-affinity, reversible binding to AAG and binding to albumin, in addition to solubility-limited absorption and slow metabolic elimination properties. ©2011 AACR.

  11. Primary Patient-Derived Cancer Cells and Their Potential for Personalized Cancer Patient Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P. Kodack

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Personalized cancer therapy is based on a patient’s tumor lineage, histopathology, expression analyses, and/or tumor DNA or RNA analysis. Here, we aim to develop an in vitro functional assay of a patient’s living cancer cells that could complement these approaches. We present methods for developing cell cultures from tumor biopsies and identify the types of samples and culture conditions associated with higher efficiency of model establishment. Toward the application of patient-derived cell cultures for personalized care, we established an immunofluorescence-based functional assay that quantifies cancer cell responses to targeted therapy in mixed cell cultures. Assaying patient-derived lung cancer cultures with this method showed promise in modeling patient response for diagnostic use. This platform should allow for the development of co-clinical trial studies to prospectively test the value of drug profiling on tumor-biopsy-derived cultures to direct patient care.

  12. Inadequate Nutritional Status of Hospitalized Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Alkan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In oncology practice, nutrition and also metabolic activity are essential to support the nutritional status and prevent malignant cachexia. It is important to evaluate the patients and plan the maneuvers at the start of the therapy. The primary objective of the study is to define the nutritional status of hospitalized patients and the factors affecting it in order to define the most susceptible patients and maneuvers for better nutritional support. Methods: Patients hospitalized in oncology clinic for therapy were evaluated for food intake and nutritional status through structured interviews. The clinical properties, medical therapies, elements of nutritional support were noted and predictors of inadequate nutritional status (INS were analyzed. Results: Four hundred twenty three patients, between 16-82 years old (median: 52 were evaluated. Nearly half of the patients (185, 43% reported a better appetite at home than in hospital and declared that hospitalization is an important cause of loss of appetite (140/185, 75.6%. Presence of nausea/vomiting (N/V, depression, age less than 65 and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs were associated with increased risk of INS in hospitalized cancer patients. On the contrary, steroid medication showed a positive impact on nutritional status of cancer patients. Conclusion: N/V, younger age, presence of depression and NSAIDs medication were associated with INS in hospitalized cancer patients. Clinicians should pay more attention to this group of patients. In addition, unnecessary hospitalizations and medications that may disturb oral intake must be avoided. Corticosteroids are important tools for managing anorexia and INS.

  13. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis of teicoplanin in patients with MRSA infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsumoto K

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Kazuaki Matsumoto,1 Erika Watanabe,1 Naoko Kanazawa,1 Tomohide Fukamizu,1 Akari Shigemi,1 Yuta Yokoyama,1,2 Kazuro Ikawa,2 Norifumi Morikawa,2 Yasuo Takeda1 1Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima, 2Department of Clinical Pharmacotherapy, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan Background: Teicoplanin is a glycopeptide antibiotic that has been used to treat serious, invasive infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria. The area under the drug concentration–time curve (AUC/minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC was identified as a pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic (PK–PD parameter of glycopeptide antibiotics that correlated with bacteriological responses and clinical outcomes. Although optimized dosing regimens based on PK–PD are needed, a PK–PD analysis of teicoplanin against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infections has not yet been performed. Thus, this study examined patients with MRSA infections, who were administered with teicoplanin in order to determine the target AUC/MIC ratio. Methods: This study retrospectively assessed data obtained as part of our routine therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM of teicoplanin therapy in 46 patients with MRSA infections at Kagoshima University Hospital. Serum concentrations of teicoplanin were determined using a fluorescence polarization immunoassay system and used for a Bayesian PK estimation to estimate AUC for 24 hours (AUC24. The MIC value for teicoplanin was determined using a standardized agar dilution method. The effects of teicoplanin were evaluated in terms of bacteriological responses by a quantitative assessment. Results: The estimated AUC24/MIC ratios with and without bacteriological responses were 926.6±425.2 µg·h/mL (n=34 and 642.2±193.9 µg·h/mL, respectively (n=12; P<0.05. On the basis of a logistic regression analysis, AUC24/MIC ratios of 500 µg·h/mL, 700 µg·h/mL, and

  14. The pharmacokinetic profile of plasma-derived mannan-binding lectin in healthy adult volunteers and patients with Staphylococcus aureus septicaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Peter; Laursen, Inga; Thornberg, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    is distributed into a median volume of 3.4 l similar to the plasma volume, and the elimination in septicaemic patients was within the range of the controls. Due to the large individual variation in T(1/2), we recommend that MBL therapy, with respect to dose and infusion intervals, is based on the chosen......Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) is a member of the innate immune system, and MBL-deficiency affects 10-15% of Caucasians. With development of a plasma-derived MBL, substitution has become a therapeutic option in diseases associated with MBL insufficiency. The pharmacokinetics of injected MBL is weakly...

  15. The pharmacokinetic profile of plasma-derived mannan-binding lectin in healthy adult volunteers and patients with Staphylococcus aureus septicaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, P.; Laursen, I.; Thornberg, K.

    2008-01-01

    is distributed into a median volume of 3.41 similar to the plasma volume, and the elimination in septicaemic patients was within the range of the controls. Due to the large individual variation in T-1/2, we recommend that MBL therapy, with respect to dose and infusion intervals, is based on the chosen......Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) is a member of the innate immune system, and MBL-deficiency affects 10-15% of Caucasians. With development of a plasma-derived MBL, substitution has become a therapeutic option in diseases associated with MBL insufficiency. The pharmacokinetics of injected MBL is weakly...

  16. Risk Factors and Biomarkers of Ischemic Stroke in Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kwangsoo; Lee, Ji-Hun

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Stroke is common among cancer patients. However, risk factors and biomarkers of stroke in cancer patients are not well established. This study aimed to investigate risk factors and biomarkers as well as etiology of ischemic stroke in cancer patients. Methods A retrospective review was conducted in cancer patients with ischemic stroke who were admitted to a general hospital in Busan, Korea, between January 2003 and December 2012. The risk factors and biomarkers for strok...

  17. Nutritional support in patients with oesophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzetti, Federico

    2010-05-01

    Obesity and overweight are risk factors for developing an oesophageal cancer, especially the adenocarcinoma in the distal oesophagus or at the gastroesophageal junction, and many patients still are overweight at the clinical presentation even if they are losing weight. Main mechanisms involved in weight loss are a decreased nutrients' intake and an alteration in metabolism due to a cytokine-driven inflammatory status. Malnutrition is a risk factor for a poor compliance to chemotherapy and radiation therapy and finally for the oncologic outcome. There is scientific evidence that frequently both conditions exist but in the advanced stages of disease metabolic alterations play a major role and are responsible for the poor response to nutritional support. The literature about the nutritional support in patients with cancer of the oesophagus has been reviewed with special emphasis on randomised clinical trials whenever available. In surgical patients, both overweight and weight loss increase the risk of postoperative complications. In non-dysphagic patients receiving a neo-adjuvant oncologic treatment, the simple use of oral nutritional supplements is little effective in ameliorating the nutritional status, in contrast, an intensive dietetic surveillance associated with oral supplements can lead to better nutritional status, improved quality of life and better compliance with therapy. In dysphagic patients, many comparative non-randomised clinical studies have shown clinical benefits from tube feeding on the nutritional status and compliance with therapy. There is no apparent difference on the metabolic efficacy of the enteral versus parenteral nutrition. Studies on peri-operative nutrition in oesophagectomy patients were often underpowered and, hence, inconclusive, but the large experience on the nutritional support in patients with gastrointestinal cancer undergoing major abdominal surgery has clearly shown the benefits of the enteral nutrition. Both the American and

  18. Patient representatives' views on patient information in clinical cancer trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellson, Pia; Nilbert, Mef; Carlsson, Christina

    2016-01-01

    responses. Subthemes related to the former included individual preferences and perceptions of effect, while subthemes related to the latter were comprehensibility and layout. Based on these observations the patient representatives provided suggestions for improvement, which largely included development......BACKGROUND: Patient enrolment into clinical trials is based on oral information and informed consent, which includes an information sheet and a consent certificate. The written information should be complete, but at the same time risks being so complex that it may be questioned if a fully informed...... consent is possible to provide. We explored patient representatives' views and perceptions on the written trial information used in clinical cancer trials. METHODS: Written patient information leaflets used in four clinical trials for colorectal cancer were used for the study. The trials included phase I...

  19. Patient Beliefs About Colon Cancer Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, John W; Levy, Barcey T; Daly, Jeanette; Xu, Yinghui

    2016-03-01

    Only about half of eligible individuals undergo colon cancer screening. We have limited knowledge about the patient beliefs that adversely affect screening decisions and about which beliefs might be amenable to change through education. As part of a clinical trial, 641 rural Iowans, aged 52 to 79 years, reported their beliefs about colon cancer screening in response to a mailed questionnaire. Consenting subjects were randomized into four groups, which were distinguished by four levels of increasingly intensive efforts to promote screening. Two of the groups received mailed educational materials and completed a follow-up questionnaire, which allowed us to determine whether their beliefs about screening changed following the education. We also completed a factor analysis to identify underlying (latent) factors that might explain the responses to 33 questions about readiness, attitudes, and perceived barriers related to colon cancer screening. The strongest predictors of a patient's stated readiness to be screened were a physician's recommendation to be screened (1 point difference on 10-point Likert scale, 95 % confidence interval [CI], 0.5 to 1.6 point difference), a family history of colon cancer (0.85-point Likert scale difference, 95 % CI, 0.1 to 1.6), and a belief that health-care decisions should be mostly left to physicians rather than patients (Spearman correlation coefficient 0.21, P < .001). Of the 33 questionnaire items about screening beliefs, 11 (33 %) changed favorably following the educational intervention. In the factor analysis, the 33 items were reduced to 8 underlying factors, such as being too busy to undergo screening and worries about screening procedures. We found a limited number of underlying factors that may help explain patient resistance to colon cancer screening.

  20. Ofloxacin pharmacokinetics in renal failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Fillastre, J P; Leroy, A; Humbert, G

    1987-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of ofloxacin were investigated in 12 normal subjects and 21 uremic patients after the administration of a single oral 200-mg dose. An open three-compartment body model was used to calculate ofloxacin pharmacokinetic parameters. In healthy subjects, the peak plasma level averaged 2.24 +/- 0.90 micrograms/ml and was obtained at 0.83 +/- 0.31 h. The absorption rate constant was 4.22 +/- 1.64 h-1. The terminal half-life was 7.86 +/- 1.81 h. The apparent volume of distribution...

  1. Spiritual Care Communication in Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Lee; Billitteri, Jacob; Reblin, Maija; Clayton, Margaret F

    2017-12-01

    To provide a definition of spirituality, define the scope and nature of spiritual care communication, describe how to initiate communication about, and elicit, a spiritual history, and introduce the AMEN protocol to support patient/family hopes for a miracle. Literature review. Spiritual communication is important throughout cancer care. Nurses can assess and integrate patient and family caregivers' spiritual needs in clinical care by practicing self-awareness and engaging in spiritual care communication strategies. Spirituality is recognized as an essential component of quality care. Spiritual conversations can increase patients' satisfaction with care and improve well-being. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of Intrapulmonary and Systemic Pharmacokinetics of Colistin Methanesulfonate (CMS) and Colistin after Aerosol Delivery and Intravenous Administration of CMS in Critically Ill Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisson, Matthieu; Jacobs, Matthieu; Grégoire, Nicolas; Gobin, Patrice; Marchand, Sandrine; Mimoz, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Colistin is an old antibiotic that has recently gained a considerable renewal of interest for the treatment of pulmonary infections due to multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Nebulization seems to be a promising form of administration, but colistin is administered as an inactive prodrug, colistin methanesulfonate (CMS); however, differences between the intrapulmonary concentrations of the active moiety as a function of the route of administration in critically ill patients have not been precisely documented. In this study, CMS and colistin concentrations were measured on two separate occasions within the plasma and epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of critically ill patients (n = 12) who had received 2 million international units (MIU) of CMS by aerosol delivery and then intravenous administration. The pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted using a population approach and completed by pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) modeling and simulations. The ELF colistin concentrations varied considerably (9.53 to 1,137 mg/liter), but they were much higher than those in plasma (0.15 to 0.73 mg/liter) after aerosol delivery but not after intravenous administration of CMS. Following CMS aerosol delivery, typically, 9% of the CMS dose reached the ELF, and only 1.4% was presystemically converted into colistin. PK-PD analysis concluded that there was much higher antimicrobial efficacy after CMS aerosol delivery than after intravenous administration. These new data seem to support the use of aerosol delivery of CMS for the treatment of pulmonary infections in critical care patients. PMID:25267660

  3. Radiation therapy for cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mileikowsky, C.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes an apparatus for irradiating a patient comprising: a source of a radiation beam directed along a radiation axis; means mounting the source for pivotal movement about a first horizontal axis which intersects the source, is stationary with respect to the apparatus, and extends in a direction substantially normal to the radiation axis, whereby the beam is capable of an angular scan in a vertical plane; table means adapted to support a patient to be irradiated; and suspension means mounted the table means for arcuate movement to any positions angularly spaced about the first horizontal axis and for pivoting movement about a second horizontal axis displacement from and substantially parallel to the first horizontal axis. The suspension means maintain the second horizontal axis in substantially intersecting relation to the radiation axis in each of the positions while maintaining a fixed angular position of the table means with respect to the environment

  4. PET/MRI in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Andreas; Loft, Annika; Law, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Combined PET/MRI systems are now commercially available and are expected to change the medical imaging field by providing combined anato-metabolic image information. We believe this will be of particular relevance in imaging of cancer patients. At the Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear...... Medicine & PET at Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen we installed an integrated PET/MRI in December 2011. Here, we describe our first clinical PET/MR cases and discuss some of the areas within oncology where we envision promising future application of integrated PET/MR imaging in clinical routine. Cases...... described include brain tumors, pediatric oncology as well as lung, abdominal and pelvic cancer. In general the cases show that PET/MRI performs well in all these types of cancer when compared to PET/CT. However, future large-scale clinical studies are needed to establish when to use PET/MRI. We envision...

  5. [Assessment of nutritional status in patients with primary lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chermiti Ben Abdallah, Fatma; Ben Saïd, Hanène; Chamkhi, Najiba; Ferchichi, Marwa; Chtourou, Amel; Taktak, Sofia; Ben Kheder, Ali

    2013-10-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Malnutrition is a common problem among patients with cancer, affecting up to 85% of patients with certain cancers and represents a risk factor for poor prognosis. aim: evaluate nutritional status in patients with lung cancer before and during treatment using nutritional risk index. it's a prospective study conducted in pneumology IV department in Abderahman Mami hospital, from January to May 2011. 30 male patients with a lung cancer were included. Nutritional status was assessed before and during treatment based on anthropometric measures, biological markers and nutritional risk index (NRI). Mean age of patients was 58 ± 12 years, ranging from 19 to 82 years. 29 patients had non small cell lung cancer and one patient had small cell cancer. Malnutrition was noted in 14 patients (47%) before treatment according to the NRI. It was noted in 23 patients (77%) after three cycles of chemotherapy with severe malnutrition in 8 patients. Relationship between body mass index (BMI) and the NRI was linear, but NRI tends to evaluate more objectively risk of malnutrition in patients with lung cancer. Nutritional assessment in patient with lung cancer should be performed systematically, early and repeatedly. Several markers can be used such as BMI and NRI. Nutritional support will reduce morbidity and improve quality of life in patients with lung cancer.

  6. Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Once-Daily Dapsone Gel, 7.5% in Patients With Moderate Acne Vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarratt, Michael T; Jones, Terry M; Chang-Lin, Joan-En; Tong, Warren; Berk, David R; Lin, Vince; Kaoukhov, Alexandre

    2016-10-01

    Reducing the dosing frequency of topical acne treatments to once daily may improve adherence. Evaluate pharmacokinetics (PK), safety, and tolerability of 3 formulations of once-daily dapsone gel, 7.5% and of twice-daily dapsone gel, 5% over 28 days in patients with moderate acne vulgaris. This phase 1, multicenter, parallel-group study randomized males and females aged 16 to 35 years to 1 of 3 dapsone gel, 7.5% formulations (DAP-11078, DAP-11079, or DAP-11080 double-blind; applied once daily) or to dapsone gel, 5% (investigator-blinded only, applied twice-daily). Blood samples were collected for PK assessments of dapsone and its metabolites, N-acetyl dapsone (NAD) and dapsone hydroxylamine (DHA), before the morning dose on days 1, 7, 14, 18, 21, 26, 27, and 28, and at several follow-up time points (days 29-32). Safety profile assessments included adverse events (AEs), physical examinations, laboratory tests, and local tolerability assessments. Steady-state dapsone, NAD, and DHA concentrations were reached within 7 days of the first dose in all treatment groups. Daily systemic exposures of the 3 dapsone gel, 7.5% formulations were approximately 25% to 40% lower than that for dapsone gel, 5%, and these differences were statistically significant. Among the 3 dapsone gel, 7.5% formulations, the highest daily exposure of dapsone (per the AUC) was observed with DAP-11080, with respective Cmax and AUC0-24 being approximately 28.6% and 28.7% lower relative to dapsone gel, 5%. Most AEs were mild to moderate in intensity. The safety profiles for all 3 formulations of once-daily dapsone, 7.5% gel and twice-daily dapsone gel, 5% were similar following 28 days of topical administration. All 4 dapsone formulations were well tolerated. This study demonstrated lower systemic exposure with all 3 once-daily dapsone gel, 7.5% formulations than with twice-daily dapsone gel, 5%. All 4 formulations were well tolerated and demonstrated similar safety profiles. J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(10):1250-1259.

  7. The methodology and pharmacokinetics study of intraventricular administration of vancomycin in patients with intracranial infections after craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai; Wu, Yuanxin; Wang, Qiang; Wang, Jiaqing; Li, Xingang; Zhao, Zhigang; Zhou, Jianxin

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of combined intravenous (i.v.) and intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) vancomycin for patients with intracranial infections after craniotomy and to provide the basis for establishing the intracranial local administration criterion. Fourteen postoperative intracranial infection cases with surgical cavity/ventricular drainages were given vancomycin (1.0 g, i.v. drip for 2 hours, quaque 12 h, and a simultaneous i.c.v. injection of 10 mg). Their blood and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) specimens were collected at each time point before and after administrations. The concentrations and biochemical properties were measured. The 1-hour serum vancomycin concentration reached a peak of 46.38 ± 33.39 mg/L; the trough concentration of 48 hours was 8.10 ± 7.11 mg/L; the CSF vancomycin concentration reached a peak of 382.17 ± 421.00 mg/L at 0.25 hours, and the 48-hour trough concentration was 30.82 ± 29.53 mg/L. The inhibitory quotient was calculated at 15.4 by the minimum inhibitory concentration 2 mg/L of target bacteria and had reached the range of 10 to 20 recommended by Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines. The pH value and osmotic pressure of CSF were found to have no significant changes before and after administration. There was no increasement of seizures and ototoxicity in our study. Before the drug administration and 1 week later, the changes of creatine had no statistically significant, with P > .05. The combined i.v. and i.c.v. administration may improve CSF vancomycin concentrations without side effects at the same dosage. Our finding suggests that it can be an option for the treatment of severe intracranial infections after craniotomy; however, its safety and effectiveness need to be confirmed by further large-scale studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Prostate cancer in the elderly patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Chunkit; Dale, William; Mohile, Supriya Gupta

    2014-08-20

    Treatment for prostate cancer (PCa) has evolved significantly over the last decade. PCa is the most prevalent non-skin cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in men, and it has an increased incidence and prevalence in older men. As a result, physicians and patients are faced with the challenge of identifying optimal treatment strategies for localized, biochemical recurrent, and advanced PCa in the older population. When older patients are appropriately selected, treatment for PCa results in survival benefits and toxicity profiles similar to those experienced in younger patients. However, underlying health status and age-related changes can have an impact on tolerance of hormonal therapy and chemotherapy in men with advanced disease. Therefore, the heterogeneity of the elderly population necessitates a multidimensional assessment to maximize the benefit of medical and/or surgical options. Providing clinicians with the requisite health status data on which to base treatment decisions would help ensure that older patients with PCa receive optimal therapy if it will benefit them and/or active surveillance or best supportive care if it will not. We provide a review of the existing evidence to date on the management of PCa in the older population.

  9. Bladder Cancer Patient Advocacy: A Global Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quale, Diane Zipursky; Bangs, Rick; Smith, Monica; Guttman, David; Northam, Tammy; Winterbottom, Andrew; Necchi, Andrea; Fiorini, Edoardo; Demkiw, Stephanie

    2015-10-26

    Over the past 20 years, cancer patient advocacy groups have demonstrated that patient engagement in cancer care is essential to improving patient quality of life and outcomes. Bladder cancer patient advocacy only began 10 years ago in the United States, but is now expanding around the globe with non-profit organizations established in Canada, the United Kingdom and Italy, and efforts underway in Australia. These organizations, at different levels of maturity, are raising awareness of bladder cancer and providing essential information and resources to bladder cancer patients and their families. The patient advocacy organizations are also helping to advance research efforts by funding research proposals and facilitating research collaborations. Strong partnerships between these patient advocates and the bladder cancer medical community are essential to ensuringsustainability for these advocacy organizations, increasing funding to support advances in bladder cancer treatment, and improving patient outcomes.

  10. Outcomes of colon resection in patients with metastatic colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadamyeghaneh, Zhobin; Hanna, Mark H; Hwang, Grace; Mills, Steven; Pigazzi, Alessio; Stamos, Michael J; Carmichael, Joseph C

    2016-08-01

    Patients with advanced colorectal cancer have a high incidence of postoperative complications. We sought to identify outcomes of patients who underwent resection for colon cancer by cancer stage. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was used to evaluate all patients who underwent colon resection with a diagnosis of colon cancer from 2012 to 2014. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate patient outcomes by cancer stage. A total of 7,786 colon cancer patients who underwent colon resection were identified. Of these, 10.8% had metastasis at the time of operation. Patients with metastatic disease had significantly increased risks of perioperative morbidity (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 1.44, P = .01) and mortality (AOR: 3.72, P = .01). Patients with metastatic disease were significantly younger (AOR: .99, P colon cancer have metastatic disease. Postoperative morbidity and mortality are significantly higher than in patients with localized disease. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. MLN3897 plus methotrexate in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: Safety, efficacy, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of an oral CCR1 antagonist in a phase IIa, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, proof-of-concept study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergunst, Clarissa E.; Gerlag, Danielle M.; von Moltke, Lisa; Karol, Michael; Wyant, Tim; Chi, Xuedong; Matzkin, Ellen; Leach, Timothy; Tak, Paul P.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy, safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of the CC chemokine receptor CCR1 antagonist MLN3897 in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) receiving methotrexate (MTX). METHODS: In this phase IIa, proof-of-concept study, patients meeting the American College of

  12. High incidence of thyroid cancer among patients with acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaldrymidis, Dimitrios; Papadakis, Georgios; Tsakonas, Georgios; Kaldrymidis, Philippos; Flaskas, Theofanis; Seretis, Andreas; Pantazi, Eleni; Kostoglou-Athanassiou, Ifigenia; Peppa, Melpomeni; Roussou, Paraskevi; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that patients with acromegaly have an increased risk of thyroid, colorectal, breast and prostate cancers. In this study we determined the prevalence of malignant neoplasms in patients with acromegaly. Cancer risk was evaluated in a cohort of 110 patients (M/F 48/62, age 58.63±13.8 years, range 30-86) with acromegaly. Mean age at diagnosis of acromegaly was 46.37±13.11 years. Mean period of time since diagnosis of acromegaly was 12.26+9.6 years. From 110 patients, cancer was diagnosed in 26 (23.6%) patients. Thyroid cancer was the most common cancer and was diagnosed in 13 patients (11.8%); other cancers encountered were gastric cancer (N=2), endometrial cancer (N-2), and breast cancer, colon cancer, prostate cancer (N-2), myelodysplastic syndrome, renal cell carcinoma, lung cancer and pancreatic carcinoma, one case each. Age, gender, age at the time of diagnosis of acromegaly, tumor size of pituitary adenoma and duration of disease were not associated with cancer development. This study suggests that patients with acromegaly have an increased risk of thyroid cancer and therefore they should undergo regular screening with hormonal and ultrasound evaluation of the thyroid and FNAB when required.

  13. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of samarium-153-labelled OC125 antibody coupled to CITCDTPA in a xenograft model of ovarian cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraeber-Bodere, F. [INSERM Research, Nantes (France); Mishra, A. [INSERM Research, Nantes (France); Thedrez, P. [INSERM Research, Nantes (France); Faivre-Chauvet, A. [INSERM Research, Nantes (France); Bardies, M. [INSERM Research, Nantes (France); Imai, S. [Nara Medical Univ. (Japan); Le Boterff, J. [INSERM Research, Nantes (France); Chatal, J.F. [INSERM Research, Nantes (France)

    1996-05-01

    This study compares the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of {sup 153}Sm-labelled OC125 monoclonal antibody, in whole or F(ab`){sub 2} fragment form and with diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid (DTPA) or 6-p-isothiocyanatobenzyl diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid (CITCDTPA) coupling, in nude mice grafted subcutaneously with an ovarian adenocarcinoma line (SHIN-3) expression CA125 antigen. The specific activity of the immunoconjugates was 18.5-55.5 MBq/mg, and their immunoreactivity exceeded 65%. With {sup 153}Sm-DTPA-OC125F(ab`){sub 2}, the stability study in serum indicated that 50% of the metal remained bound to the antibody. The pharmacokinetic study showed a retention half-life of 25.1 h and blood clearance of 0.72 ml/h. The biodistribution study indicated tumour uptake of 4.53%{+-}0.49% of injected activity per gram (%ID/g) at 24 h and tumour-to-liver and tumour-to-bone ratios of 0.23{+-}0.02 and 1.54{+-}0.49 resp. at 24 h. With {sup 153}Sm-CITCDTPA-OC125F(ab`){sub 2}, serum stability was greater (87% of the metal remaining bound to the antibody), retention half-life was 22.25 h and blood clearance was 2.23 ml/h. Tumor was better targeted (8.30%{+-}3.56%ID/g at 24 h), and tumour-to-liver and tumour-to-bone ratios were 1.17{+-}0.36 and 7.08{+-}3.09 resp. at 24 h. Renal retention remained elevated (29.76%{+-}9.41%ID/g at 24 h). With intact IgG, renal uptake decreased (1.41%{+-}0.49%ID/g at 24 h), but tumour uptake was lower than with fragments (1.46%{+-}0.58%ID/g at 24 h). Liver uptake was higher (tumour-to-liver ratio 0.10{+-}0.05), and blood clearance was slower. The stability and distribution of {sup 153}Sm-CITCDTPA were more favourable than those of {sup 153}Sm-DTPA for application in radioimmunotherapy. Quantitative analysis performed using digitized images obtained by conventional autoradiography and the imaging plate system indicated that the latter system is suitable for biodistribution studies of immunoconjugates. (orig./MG)

  14. Cost concerns of patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stump, Tammy K; Eghan, Naa; Egleston, Brian L; Hamilton, Olivia; Pirollo, Melanie; Schwartz, J Sanford; Armstrong, Katrina; Beck, J Robert; Meropol, Neal J; Wong, Yu-Ning

    2013-09-01

    Health care providers are accustomed to identifying populations for whom cost-related concerns may be a significant barrier, such as the poor, but few empiric data have been collected to substantiate such assumptions, particularly among insured patients. Patients with cancer from academic and community hospitals completed a questionnaire that included closed-ended items concerning demographic variables, optimism, numeracy, and concerns about present and future medical costs. In addition, they answered open-ended questions regarding cost concerns and medical expenses. Nearly all (99%) participants were insured. In response to the closed-ended questions, 30.3% of patients reported concern about paying for their cancer treatment, 22.3% reported that their family had made sacrifices to pay for their care, and 8.3% stated that their insurance adequately covered their current health care costs, and 17.3% reported concerns about coverage for their costs in the future. On open-ended questions, 35.3% reported additional expenses, and 47.5% reported concerns about health care costs. None of the assessed patient characteristics proved to be a robust predictor across all cost-related concerns. There was a strong association between the identification of concerns or expenses on the open-ended questions and concerns on closed-ended questions. Cost concerns are common among patients with cancer who have health insurance. Health care providers may alleviate concerns by discussing cost-related concerns with all patients, not only those of lower socioeconomic status or those without insurance. A closed-ended screening question may help to initiate these conversations. This may identify potential resources, lower distress, and enable patients to make optimal treatment decisions.

  15. Efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics of sugammadex 4 mg kg-1 for reversal of deep neuromuscular blockade in patients with severe renal impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panhuizen, I F; Gold, S J A; Buerkle, C; Snoeck, M M J; Harper, N J N; Kaspers, M J G H; van den Heuvel, M W; Hollmann, M W

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated efficacy and safety of sugammadex 4 mg kg(-1) for deep neuromuscular blockade (NMB) reversal in patients with severe renal impairment (creatinine clearance [CLCR] renal function (CLCR ≥80 ml min(-1)). Sugammadex 4 mg kg(-1) was administered at 1-2 post-tetanic counts for reversal of rocuronium NMB. Primary efficacy variable was time from sugammadex to recovery to train-of-four (T4/T1) ratio 0.9. Equivalence between groups was demonstrated if two-sided 95% CI for difference in recovery times was within -1 to +1 min interval. Pharmacokinetics of rocuronium and overall safety were assessed. The intent-to-treat group comprised 67 patients (renal n=35; control n=32). Median (95% CI) time from sugammadex to recovery to T4/T1 ratio 0.9 was 3.1 (2.4-4.6) and 1.9 (1.6-2.8) min for renal patients vs controls. Estimated median (95% CI) difference between groups was 1.3 (0.6-2.4) min; thus equivalence bounds were not met. One control patient experienced acceleromyography-determined NMB recurrence, possibly as a result of premature sugammadex (4 mg kg(-1)) administration, with no clinical evidence of NMB recurrence observed. Rocuronium, encapsulated by Sugammadex, was detectable in plasma at day 7 in 6 patients. Bioanalytical data for sugammadex were collected but could not be used for pharmacokinetics. Sugammadex 4 mg kg(-1) provided rapid reversal of deep rocuronium-induced NMB in renal and control patients. However, considering the prolonged sugammadex-rocuronium complex exposure in patients with severe renal impairment, current safety experience is insufficient to support recommended use of sugammadex in this population. NCT00702715. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of multiple doses of BG00010, a neurotrophic factor with anti-hyperalgesic effects, in patients with sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okkerse, Pieter; Hay, Justin L; Versage, Eve; Tang, Yongqiang; Galluppi, Gerald; Ravina, Bernard; Verma, Ajay; Williams, Leslie; Aycardi, Ernesto; Groeneveld, Geert Jan

    2016-07-01

    BG00010 is a protein in the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family. It is a selective ligand for the GDNF family receptor alpha-3 (GFRα3) co-receptor that normalizes cellular changes resulting from damage or disease, and potentially alleviates neuropathic pain. The main objectives of this study were to evaluate the pharmacokinetic and safety profiles and to determine the effects on pain of ascending doses of intravenous injections of BG00010 in patients with sciatica. This was a randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled multiple-dose study in subjects with sciatica. In Part I (16 patients), four IV dose levels were examined (50, 150, 400, 800 μg kg(-1) ) and in Part II (12 patients), three dose levels were examined (400, 600 and 1200 μg kg(-1) ). Safety and efficacy assessments were used as endpoints. The BG00010 concentration-time data indicated relatively low inter-patient variability and there was a dose-dependent (not dose-proportional) increase in serum exposure from 150 to 1200 μg kg(-1) . The effective half-life was between 40 and 60 h. The most frequently occurring adverse events (AEs) reported by patients receiving BG00010 were headache (67-83%), feeling hot (50-100%), and pruritus (42-67%). Most AEs were mild; no serious AEs or AEs leading to discontinuation occurred. Higher dose regimens of BG00010 resulted in greater pain reduction than placebo or lower dose regimens, although a clear dose-response relationship was not seen. The pharmacokinetic profile of BG00010 was characterized by low intra-patient variability. These data from a small sample suggest that BG00010 may have a benefit for patients with sciatica. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.