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Sample records for cancer patient treated

  1. Metallic taste in cancer patients treated with chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ijpma, I.; Renken, R. J.; ter Horst, G. J.; Reyners, A. K. L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Metallic taste is a taste alteration frequently reported by cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. Attention to this side effect of chemotherapy is limited. This review addresses the definition, assessment methods, prevalence, duration, etiology, and management strategies of metallic

  2. Psychological functioning in cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stiegelis, HE; Ranchor, AV; Sanderman, R

    2004-01-01

    Although many side-effects of radiotherapy (RT) are physical, previous studies have shown that patients, when treated with RT, also experience psychological problems. This review describes the psychological functioning of cancer patients prior to, during, and after RT. Moreover, we examined whether

  3. Psychological distress and intervention in cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Common side effects of treatment with radiation therapy (RT) often cause psychophysical distress in cancer patients. Anxiety, adjustment disorders and depression (which are according to many studies experienced in about half of the oncological population) might originate some serious psychiatric forms of mood disorders and can even culminate in suicide, if not treated appropriately. There are some groups of cancer patients who are especially vulnerable and among them are cancer patients undergoing RT - they should receive special attention from medical staff. The purpose of this review is to present a variety of psychosocial interventions and illustrate some methods that are (or could be) used in psycho-oncology practice. Conclusions. A large body of literature suggests that the first intervention step should be effective screening for patients in distress. In regard to these proposals the development of (computerized) screening programmes is the first measure that ought to be taken. Moreover, further systematical research of traditional, non-traditional and complementary intervention strategies in cancer patients in distress would be necessary in order to provide reliable empirical results about the effectiveness of different approaches. (author)

  4. Hair cortisol measurement in mitotane-treated adrenocortical cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manenschijn, L; Quinkler, M; van Rossum, E F C

    2014-04-01

    The only approved drug for the treatment of adrenocortical cancer (ACC) is mitotane. Mitotane is adrenolytic and therefore, hydrocortisone replacement therapy is necessary. Since mitotane increases cortisol binding globulin (CBG) and induces CYP3A4 activity, high doses of hydrocortisone are thought to be required. Evaluation of hydrocortisone therapy in mitotane-treated patients has been difficult since there is no good marker to evaluate hydrocortisone therapy. Measurement of cortisol in scalp hair is a novel method that offers the opportunity to measure long-term cortisol levels. Our aim was to evaluate whether hair cortisol measurements could be useful in evaluating recent hydrocortisone treatment in mitotane-treated ACC patients. Hair cortisol levels were measured in 15 mitotane-treated ACC patients on hydrocortisone substitution and 96 healthy individuals. Cortisol levels were measured in 3 cm hair segments, corresponding to a period of 3 months. Hair cortisol levels were higher in ACC patients compared to healthy individuals (pcortisol levels above the reference range. None of the patients had hair cortisol levels below normal. In contrast to hydrocortisone doses (β=0.03, p=0.93), hair cortisol levels were associated with BMI (β=0.53, p=0.042). There was no correlation between hair cortisol levels and hydrocortisone doses (β=0.41, p=0.13). Almost half of the ACC patients had high hair cortisol levels, suggesting long-term over-substitution of hydrocortisone in some of the patients, whereas none of the patients was under-substituted. Hair cortisol measurements might be useful in long-term monitoring hydrocortisone treatment in mitotane-treated ACC patients.

  5. Successful management of elderly breast cancer patients treated without radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson John FR

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer in the elderly may follow a less aggressive course. There are data suggesting that radiotherapy (RT following breast conserving surgery (BCS for invasive carcinoma may not be necessary in some elderly patients. The addition of RT to surgery might constitute an imposition to such patients due to age-related factors. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of BCS without adjuvant RT in this group of patients. Patients and methods A retrospective review of 92 elderly (median age 75 years; range: 70 – 87 years patients (analysed as 93 'patients' due to one patient having bilateral cancers managed in a dedicated breast clinic and who underwent BCS for invasive carcinoma was carried out. Eighty-three patients did not receive postoperative RT to the breast (no-RT group whereas the remaining 10 had RT (RT-group. Results The median age in this group was 75 (range 70 – 87 years. The mean tumour size was 18 mm with a median follow-up of 37 (range 6 – 142 months. In the no RT group, adjuvant endocrine therapy with tamoxifen was given to 40/53 patients. No patients in the oestrogen receptor (ER negative group received tamoxifen. The local recurrence (LR rate in this group was 8.4% (2.4% per year, n = 7/83, with median time to LR of 17 months. In this no-RT group LR was correlated to ER status (2/53 ER+, 5/26ER-, p = 0.024 and margins of excision (n = 1/54 >5 mm, 2/17 1–5 mm, 4/12 Conclusion It would appear that omission of RT following successful BCS in elderly patients with ER positive tumours receiving adjuvant tamoxifen may be acceptable. The LR rate as shown in this retrospective study is highly comparable to that of younger patients treated by conventional therapy. This concept is now being evaluated prospectively following a change in treatment practice.

  6. The mechanisms of photodynamic action for treating of cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Akopov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current views on mechanisms of therapeutic effect of photodynamic therapy for treating of cancer patients are represented. The history of formation and development of the method is described. The main requirements for agents used as photosensitizers are listed. Detailed review of main photosensitizers used in clinical practice in Russia and in foreign countries with their chemical structure, main spectral characteristics was performed. Methods of its application, therapeutic dose ranges, indications, specifi c pharmacokinetic properties and side-effects are briefl y outlined. Advantages and disadvantages of the most popular modern photosensitizers, main mechanisms of entry of photosensitizers of different chemical structure into cancer cells are observed. Three main possible component of anti-tumor effect: direct damage of cancer cells, impairment of vascular stroma of tumor and elimination of tumor due to immune cells are shown and closely discussed. Necrosis and apotosis of neovascular net which are main development trends of anti-tumor action for photodynamic therapy are noticed. 

  7. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    Breast Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lung Cancer; Metastatic Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  8. Prevalence and predictors of cognitive dysfunction in opioid-treated patients with cancer: a multinational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, Geana P; Sjøgren, Per; Ekholm, Ola;

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE To identify prevalence and associated factors of cognitive dysfunction in opioid-treated patients with cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS EPOS (European Pharmacogenetic Opioid Study) is a prospective cross-sectional multicenter study in which adult patients with cancer who received treatment wi......-treated patients with cancer had possible or definite cognitive dysfunction. Lung cancer, daily opioid doses of 400 mg or more (oral morphine equivalents), older age, low KPS, shorter time since cancer diagnosis, and absence of BTP were predictors for cognitive dysfunction.......PURPOSE To identify prevalence and associated factors of cognitive dysfunction in opioid-treated patients with cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS EPOS (European Pharmacogenetic Opioid Study) is a prospective cross-sectional multicenter study in which adult patients with cancer who received treatment...... with opioids for moderate or severe pain for at least 3 days were included. Cognitive function was assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). MMSE scores were categorized into definite cognitive dysfunction (scores

  9. Chronic fatigue in cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatigue is one of the most prevalent and profound symptoms related to both malignancy and anti-neoplastic treatment. It is being reported in 60% to 80% of cancer patients. We review the correlation between the cancer-related fatigue syndrome and radiotherapy. In patients undergoing radiotherapy, fatigue is often cumulative and may reach its peak during the last weeks of treatment. The presence of fatigue prior to therapy initiation is the most important predictive factor of the occurrence of radiotherapy-related cancer fatigue syndrome. Occasionally, fatigue persists for a prolonged period of months and even years beyond radiotherapy. Anemia may be one of major causative factors responsible for the development of the cancer-related fatigue syndrome. Fatigue has an enormous physical, mental, emotional, and economic impact on cancer patients, their families and care-providers. The treatment of radiation-related fatigue remains unknown. The initial approach should cover efforts aimed at the correction of potential etiologies, especially anemia. Education concerning fatigue greatly benefits some patients. It seems that exercise may be beneficial in relieving fatigue, bearing in mind that the exercise program for cancer patients should be initiated gradually and significantly individualized. (author)

  10. Light flashes in cancer patients treated with heavy ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schardt, Dieter; Kavatsyuk, Oksana; Krämer, Michael; Durante, Marco

    2013-05-01

    Light flashes (phosphenes) are reported by most of the astronauts during spaceflight and patients treated with radiotherapy for brain tumors. They are induced by cosmic ray traversals, but the target area is unknown. With a correlation analysis of the visual sensation and the position of the beam in patients treated with energetic carbon ions for skull base tumors, we demonstrate here that light flashes are elicited only when the energetic particles hit the retina. PMID:22939278

  11. Mortality of patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with observation for 10 years or longer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, Klaus; Friis, S; Juel, K;

    1999-01-01

    We studied the outcome in patients with early and probably organ confined prostate cancer who were considered candidates for curative therapy and treated expectantly.......We studied the outcome in patients with early and probably organ confined prostate cancer who were considered candidates for curative therapy and treated expectantly....

  12. Understanding and Managing Erectile Dysfunction in Patients Treated for Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annam, Kiran; Voznesensky, Maria; Kreder, Karl J

    2016-04-01

    Cancer can cause sexual adverse effects by direct and indirect pathways. It can involve sexual organs, indirectly affect body image, or cause fatigue or depression with subsequent effects on libido. Erectile dysfunction (ED), the inability to obtain or maintain an erection firm enough for sexual intercourse, can also result from adverse effects of cancer treatment, such as fatigue, pain, or anxiety about therapy. In addition, depressed feelings about having cancer can affect sexuality, causing a range of signs and symptoms that can lead to ED. Chemotherapy, hormone therapy, surgery, and radiation can all cause sexual adverse effects. Additional factors that play a role include patient age and degree of ED before starting cancer treatment. In this article, we discuss how chemotherapy, hormone therapy, surgery, and radiation affect erectile function as well as possible treatment options for ED. PMID:27072383

  13. Motexafin Gadolinium and Doxorubicin in Treating Patients With Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Colorectal Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Leukemia; Lung Cancer; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Diseases; Prostate Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  14. PROMISES FOR TREATING COLON CANCER PATIENTS WITH BRAF GENE MUTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Fedyanin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Colon cancer represents a heterogenous disease group, which differ by cancerogenesis mechanisms, molecular alterations, prognosis and treatment possibilities. In modern clinical practice assessment of KRAS and NRAS genes status is already necessary in order to prescribe anti-EGFR treatment for metastatic disease. A separate poor prognosis group are patients with BRAF mutation. In this review we will focus on biological features of BRAF-mutant colorectal cancer, its epidemiology, clinical features on different stages, treatment choice and promising new treatment possibilities.

  15. External validation of nomograms for predicting cancer-specific mortality in penile cancer patients treated with definitive surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Yao Zhu; Wei-Jie Gu; Ding-Wei Ye; Xu-Dong Yao; Shi-Lin Zhang; Bo Dai; Hai-Liang Zhang; Yi-Jun Shen

    2014-01-01

    Using a population-based cancer registry, Thuret et al. developed 3 nomograms for estimating cancer-specific mortality in men with penile squamous cell carcinoma. In the initial cohort, only 23.0% of the patients were treated with inguinal lymphadenectomy and had pN stage. To generalize the prediction models in clinical practice, we evaluated the performance of the 3 nomograms in a series of penile cancer patients who were treated with definitive surgery. Clinicopathologic information was obt...

  16. Associations between voice quality and swallowing function in patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijn, Marieke J.; Rinkel, Rico N. P. M.; Cnossen, Ingrid C.; Witte, Birgit I.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Leemans, C. Ren; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate associations between voice quality and swallowing function in patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer. Recordings of speech and videofluoroscopy of 51 patients after treatment for oral or oropharyngeal cancer were analysed. Acoustic voice parame

  17. Survival of cancer patients treated with mistletoe extract (Iscador): a systematic literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Büssing Arndt; Raak Christa; Ostermann Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background In Europe, extracts from Viscum album (VA-E), the European white-berry mistletoe, are widely used to treat patients with cancer. Methods We searched several databases such as Cochrane, EMBASE, NCCAM, NLM, DIMDI, CAMbase, and Medline. Inclusion criteria were controlled clinical studies on parameters associated with survival in cancer patients treated with Iscador. Outcome data were extracted as they were given in the publication, and expressed as hazard ratios (HR), their l...

  18. Indium In 111 Pentetreotide in Treating Patients With Refractory Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Childhood Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis; Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Head and Neck Cancer; Intraocular Melanoma; Islet Cell Tumor; Kidney Cancer; Lung Cancer; Melanoma (Skin); Neoplastic Syndrome; Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Pheochromocytoma

  19. Patient profile and treatment outcome of rectal cancer patients treated with multimodality therapy at a regional cancer center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deo Suryanarayana

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Incidence of rectal cancer has wide geographical variation. Disease pattern in developing countries is different from developed countries as majority of the patients present in advanced stage because of delayed referral and lack of uniform treatment practices. AIMS : Present study describes the patient profile and treatment results from a tertiary care cancer center in India. SETTING AND DESIGN : Tertiary care Regional cancer center. Retrospective analysis 89 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma treated between 1995 and 2002 were analyzed. METHODS: Patients with adenocarcinoma rectum were evaluated in a G.I. Oncology clinic and were treated using multimodality protocols involving surgery, radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS : A descriptive analysis of patient and disease profile,treatment patterns and out come was performed. Survival analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS : Mean age of the patients was 45.4 years and majority of them had tumor in lower third of rectum with evidence of extrarectal spread. Seventy five percent of the patients underwent curative resection with abdominoperineal resection being the commonest procedure. Forty seven percent of patients were given short course preoperative radiotherapy and the remaining received postoperative radiotherapy. Sixty four percent of patients could complete planned adjuvant chemotherapy. Operative mortality was 2% and 23% had morbidity. Local recurrence rate was 8.9%. 5-year disease free and overall survival was 54% and 58% respectively. CONCLUSION : Majority of rectal cancer patients present with locally advanced and low rectal growths leading to low sphincter salvage rates. Despite the advanced stage of presentation optimal oncologic results can be obtained by using a good surgical techniques in combination with adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Short course preoperative radiotherapy seems to be more feasible in Indian context

  20. Gemcitabine and capecitabine for heavily pre-treated metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise G; Pallisgaard, Niels; Andersen, Rikke F;

    2014-01-01

    AIM: We investigated the efficacy and safety of capecitabine and gemcitabin (GemCap) in heavily pre-treated, therapy-resistant metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients and the clinical importance of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) measurement. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients' inclusion criteria included...

  1. Sepsis in head and neck cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and radiation: literature review and consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Mirabile; G. Numico; E.G. Russi; P. Bossi; F. Crippa; A. Bacigalupo; V. De Sanctis; S. Musso; A. Merlotti; M.G. Ghi; M.C. Merlano; L. Licitra; F. Moretto; N. Denaro; O. Caspiani; M. Buglione; S. Pergolizzi; A. Cascio; J. Bernier; J. Raber-Durlacher; J.B. Vermorken; B. Murphy; M.V. Ranieri; R.P. Dellinger

    2015-01-01

    The reporting of infection/sepsis in chemo/radiation-treated head and neck cancer patients is sparse and the problem is underestimated. A multidisciplinary group of head and neck cancer specialists from Italy met with the aim of reaching a consensus on a clinical definition and management of infecti

  2. Interventions for treating oral mucositis for patients with cancer receiving treatment.

    OpenAIRE

    Clarkson, Jan E; Worthington, Helen V; Furness, Susan; McCabe, Martin; Khalid, Tasneem; Meyer, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment of cancer is increasingly effective but associated with short and long term side effects. Oral side effects, including oral mucositis (mouth ulceration), remain a major source of illness despite the use of a variety of agents to treat them. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of interventions for treating oral mucositis or its associated pain in patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy or radiotherapy or both. SEARCH STRATEGY: Electronic searches of Cochrane Oral ...

  3. Predictive value of bcl-2 immunoreactivity in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Recent experimental evidence suggests that overexpression of bcl-2, a protein functioning by blocking apoptosis, may influence the treatment outcome in human tumours, including prostate cancer. To test the clinical implications of this hypothesis, tumours from patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy were investigated for bcl-2 immunoreactivity (IR) and correlated with prognosis and treatment outcome. Materials and methods: Bcl-2 IR was evaluated in archival tumour specimens obtained through transurethral resection from 42 patients with localized prostate cancer (T0-T4, N0 and M0). Bcl-2 IR expression was related to stage, grade and cancer-specific survival. Specimens were obtained prior to administrating routine radiotherapy for all patients. Results: Bcl-2 IR was present in 19/42 (45%) tumours. The bcl-2-positive patients had a significantly longer cancer-specific survival than the bcl-2-negative patients (10.3 versus 3.4 years, P<0.04). At follow-up (7-19 years), nine patients were still alive, 26 patients had died of prostate cancer and seven patients had died of other causes. Conclusions: This study indicates that pre-treatment bcl-2 overexpression is related to a favourable outcome in prostate cancer treated with radiotherapy. Low bcl-2 along with a high stage may be a predictor of poor prognosis and these patients might benefit from additional treatment. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  4. Clinical predictors of anticipatory emesis in patients treated with chemotherapy at a tertiary care cancer hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Qureshi, Fawad; Shafi, Azhar; Ali, Sheeraz; Siddiqui, Neelam

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the clinical predictors of anticipatory emesis in patients treated with chemotherapy at a tertiary care cancer hospital. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted on 200 patients undergoing first line chemotherapy with minimum of two cycles at inpatient department and chemotherapy bay of Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre Pakistan. Anticipatory nausea and vomiting develops before administration of chemotherapy. Clinical signs and symp...

  5. Capecitabine and bevacizumab in heavily pre-treated patients with advanced colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Finn Ole; Boisen, Mogens Karsbøl; Fromm, Anne-Lene Gunge;

    2012-01-01

    No standard treatment exists for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who have progressed after treatment with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), oxaliplatin, irinotecan and an anti-EGFR antibody. The efficacy and safety of bevacizumab and capecitabine in heavily pre-treated patients with metastatic...

  6. Higher caseload improves cervical cancer survival in patients treated with brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased caseload has been associated with better patient outcomes in many areas of health care, including high-risk surgery and cancer treatment. However, such a positive volume vs. outcome relationship has not yet been validated for cervical cancer brachytherapy. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between physician caseload and survival rates in cervical cancer treated with brachytherapy using population-based data. Between 2005 and 2010, a total of 818 patients were identified using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Multivariate analysis using a Cox proportional hazards model and propensity scores was used to assess the relationship between 5-year survival rates and physician caseloads. As the caseload of individual physicians increased, unadjusted 5-year survival rates increased (P = 0.005). Using a Cox proportional hazard model, patients treated by high-volume physicians had better survival rates (P = 0.03), after adjusting for comorbidities, hospital type, and treatment modality. When analyzed by propensity score, the adjusted 5-year survival rate differed significantly between patients treated by high/medium-volume physicians vs. patients treated by low/medium-volume physicians (60% vs. 54%, respectively; P = 0.04). Provider caseload affected survival rates in cervical cancer patients treated with brachytherapy. Both Cox proportional hazard model analysis and propensity scores showed association between high/medium volume physicians and improved survival

  7. Reduced Acute Bowel Toxicity in Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuelian, Jason M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Callister, Matthew D., E-mail: Callister.matthew@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Ashman, Jonathan B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Young-Fadok, Tonia M. [Division of Colorectal Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Borad, Mitesh J. [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Gunderson, Leonard L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can reduce dose to small bowel, bladder, and bone marrow compared with three-field conventional radiotherapy (CRT) technique in the treatment of rectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to review our experience using IMRT to treat rectal cancer and report patient clinical outcomes. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of patients with rectal cancer who were treated at Mayo Clinic Arizona with pelvic radiotherapy (RT). Data regarding patient and tumor characteristics, treatment, acute toxicity according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v 3.0, tumor response, and perioperative morbidity were collected. Results: From 2004 to August 2009, 92 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-one (66%) patients were treated with CRT, and 31 (34%) patients were treated with IMRT. All but 2 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. There was no significant difference in median dose (50.4 Gy, CRT; 50 Gy, IMRT), preoperative vs. postoperative treatment, type of concurrent chemotherapy, or history of previous pelvic RT between the CRT and IMRT patient groups. Patients who received IMRT had significantly less gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Sixty-two percent of patients undergoing CRT experienced {>=}Grade 2 acute GI side effects, compared with 32% among IMRT patients (p = 0.006). The reduction in overall GI toxicity was attributable to fewer symptoms from the lower GI tract. Among CRT patients, {>=}Grade 2 diarrhea and enteritis was experienced among 48% and 30% of patients, respectively, compared with 23% (p = 0.02) and 10% (p = 0.015) among IMRT patients. There was no significant difference in hematologic or genitourinary acute toxicity between groups. In addition, pathologic complete response rates and postoperative morbidity between treatment groups did not differ significantly. Conclusions: In the management of rectal cancer, IMRT is associated with a

  8. Breast Retraction Assessment: an objective evaluation of cosmetic results of patients treated conservatively for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast Retraction Assessment (BRA) is an objective evaluation of the amount of cosmetic retraction of the treated breast in comparison to the untreated breast in patients who receive conservative treatment for breast cancer. A clear acrylic sheet supported vertically and marked as a grid at 1 cm intervals is employed to perform the measurements. Average BRA value in 29 control patients without breast cancer was 1.2 cm. Average BRA value in 27 patients treated conservatively for clinical Stage I or II unilateral breast cancer was 3.7 cm. BRA values in breast cancer patients ranged from 0.0 to 8.5 cm. Patients who received a local radiation boost to the primary tumor bed site had statistically significantly less retraction than those who did not receive a boost. Patients who had an extensive primary tumor resection had statistically significantly more retraction than those who underwent a more limited resection. In comparison to qualitative forms of cosmetic analysis, BRA is an objective test that can quantitatively evaluate factors which may be related to cosmetic retraction in patients treated conservatively for breast cancer

  9. Manganese Superoxide Dismtase Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Danish Population-Based Case-Control Study of Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Cyclophosphamide Epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ording, Anne Gulbech; Cronin Fenton, Deirdre; Christensen, Mariann;

    2013-01-01

    Manganese Superoxide Dismtase Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Danish Population-Based Case-Control Study of Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Cyclophosphamide Epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil......Manganese Superoxide Dismtase Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Danish Population-Based Case-Control Study of Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Cyclophosphamide Epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil...

  10. Intracranial hemorrhage in cancer patients treated with anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, Matthew J; Uhlmann, Erik J; Zwicker, Jeffrey I

    2016-04-01

    Both venous thromboembolism and intracranial metastases are common complications in the setting of primary brain tumors and metastatic malignancies. Anticoagulation is indicated in the presence of cancer-associated thrombosis in order to limit the risk of pulmonary embolism; however, there is reluctance to initiate anticoagulation in the setting of intracranial metastatic disease due to potential for intracranial hemorrhage. Recent evidence suggests that therapeutic anticoagulation can be safely administered in the setting of metastatic brain tumors. This review examines the current understanding of the pathophysiology of intracranial hemorrhage in malignancy, describes the incidence of intracranial hemorrhage in the setting of brain tumors with therapeutic anticoagulation, and outlines management strategies relevant to the treatment of intracranial hemorrhage in the setting of anticoagulation. PMID:27067980

  11. Effects of bestatin on the host immunity in patients treated for urogenital cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To examine effects of bestatin on the host immunity of patients with urogenital cancer, 54 patients were randomized into 2 groups: bestatin treated and controls. In each group, the patients were divided into 2 subgroups: one which received basic treatment expected to greatly affect host immunity ('invasive treatment') while the other one received other types of basic treatment ('non-invasive treatment'). Peripheral lymphocyte, OKT 4/8 ratio and purified protein derivative (PPD) skin reaction were used as immunological markers. There were significant differences in the 'invasive' treatment group between bestatin treated patients and controls concerning lymphocyte counts and PPD skin reactions and in the 'non-invasive' group concerning lymphocyte counts and OKT 4/8 ratios. These results suggest that bestatin may potentiate host immunity in patients with urogenital cancer. Further studies on larger materials are, however, needed before more definite conclusions can be drawn. (orig.)

  12. Long-term follow-up of cancer patients treated with gene therapy medicinal products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Maria Cristina

    2012-06-01

    European Union requirements are discussed for the long-term follow-up of advanced therapy medicinal products, as well as how they can be applied to cancer patients treated with gene therapy medicinal products in the context of clinical trials, as described in a specific guideline issued by Gene Therapy Working Party at the European Medicine Agency.

  13. Variation in case-mix between hospitals treating colorectal cancer patients in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolfschoten, N.E.; Marang van de Mheen, P.J.; Gooiker, G.A.; Eddes, E.H.; Kievit, J.; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M.; Wouters, M.W.; Bemelman, W.A.; Busch, O.R.; Dam, R.M. van; Harst, E. van der; Jansen-Landheer, M.L.E.A; Karsten, T.M.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Kuijpers, W.G.T.; Lemmens, V.E.; Manusama, E.R.; Meijerink, W.J.H.J.; Rutten, H.J.; Wiggers, T.; Velde, C.J. van de

    2011-01-01

    AIMS: The purpose of this study was to determine how expected mortality based on case-mix varies between colorectal cancer patients treated in non-teaching, teaching and university hospitals, or high, intermediate and low-volume hospitals in the Netherlands. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We used the databas

  14. XK469R in Treating Patients With Refractory Hematologic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-07

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Younger Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Rhabdomyosarcoma, Wilms Tumor, Liver Cancer, or Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-14

    Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Liver Cancer; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors

  16. Are Cancer Survivors/Patients Knowledgeable about Osteoporosis? Results from a Survey of 285 Chemotherapy-Treated Cancer Patients and Their Companions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKean, Heidi; Looker, Sherry; Hartmann, Lynn C.; Hayman, Suzanne R.; Kaur, Judith S.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Peethambaram, Prema P.; Stahl, Jean F.; Jatoi, Aminah

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed osteoporosis knowledge deficits among cancer patients and their spouses/partners. Design: Single-institution survey (modified version of the Osteoporosis Knowledge Assessment Tool). Setting: The Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Participants: Consecutive chemotherapy-treated cancer patients (n = 285) with their…

  17. Survival of breast cancer patients with meningeal carcinomatosis treated by intrathecal thiotepa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comte, A; Jdid, W; Guilhaume, M N; Kriegel, I; Piperno-Neumann, S; Dieras, V; Dorval, T; Pierga, J Y; Cottu, P H; Mignot, L; Bidard, F C

    2013-12-01

    Treatment of breast cancer meningeal carcinomatosis (MC) relies on intrathecal chemotherapy. Thiotepa is one of the few drugs approved in this setting, although no large cohort has been reported. The aim of our retrospective study is to describe survival and prognostic factors of breast cancer patients treated by intrathecal thiotepa. A search in the electronic database of the Institut Curie was performed and retrieved the patients diagnosed with breast cancer MC from 2000 to 2012 and who received at least one intrathecal injection of thiotepa. The standard regimen was intrathecal thiotepa (10 mg) and methylprednisolone (40 mg), repeated every other week. Clinical data were retrieved from the computerized medical file of each patient. Sixty-six patients have been treated with intrathecal thiotepa either as first line or second line of treatment for breast cancer MC. The median overall survival was 4.5 months (range 0.1-50). There was no significant survival difference between patients treated as first or second line. In multivariate analysis, main adverse prognostic factors at diagnosis were performance status >2 (p = 0.001, RR = 3.4, 95 % CI 1.6-7.2) and history of more than 3 previous systemic chemotherapy lines (p = 0.002, RR = 2.90, 95 % CI 1.50-5.65). After start of the treatment, high primary tumor grade, elevated Cyfra 21-1 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid, and lack of clinical improvement were also independent adverse prognostic factors in multivariate analysis. This is the largest retrospective cohort of breast cancer MC treated by intrathecal thiotepa ever reported. The median overall survival was short but some patients clearly benefited from this treatment, even used as second line. PMID:24043602

  18. Chromosome inversions in lymphocytes of prostate cancer patients treated with X-rays and carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To investigate the cytogenetic damage of the intrachange type in peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients treated for prostate cancer with different radiation qualities. Material and methods: Prostate cancer patients were enrolled in a clinical trial based at the Heidelberg University Hospital and at the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research in 2006. Patients were treated either with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) alone or with a carbon-ion boost followed by IMRT. Blood samples were collected at the end of the therapy and the mBAND technique was used to investigate the cytogenetic damage of the inter and intrachange types. Moreover, the mBAND analysis was performed on healthy donor cells irradiated in vitro with X-rays or C-ions. Results: Our results show no statistically significant differences in the yield and the spectrum of chromosome aberrations among patients treated only with IMRT and patients receiving the combined treatment when similar target volumes and doses to the target are compared. Conclusion: The study suggests that the risks of normal tissue late effects and second malignancies in prostate cancer patients are comparable when heavy ions or IMRT radiotherapy are applied

  19. Pain management of opioid-treated cancer patients in hospital settings in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundorff, L.; Peuckmann, V.; Sjøgren, Per

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the performance and quality of cancer pain management in hospital settings. METHODS: Anaesthesiologists specialised in pain and palliative medicine studied pain management in departments of oncology and surgery. Study days were randomly chosen and patients treated with oral opioids......-treated patients in hospital settings: however, focussing on average pain intensity, the outcome seems favourable compared with other countries. Pain mechanisms were seldom examined and adjuvant drugs were not specifically used for neuropathic pain. Opioid dosing intervals and supplemental opioid doses were most...

  20. Acupuncture in Treating Dry Mouth Caused By Radiation Therapy in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    RATIONALE: Acupuncture may help relieve dry mouth caused by radiation therapy. PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial is studying to see how well one set of acupuncture points work in comparison to a different set of acupuncture points or standard therapy in treating dry mouth caused by radiation therapy in patients with head and neck cancer. |

  1. Scintigraphic study of salivary gland dysfunction in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer treated with radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to determine the degree of scintigraphic salivary gland dysfunction in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer treated with radioiodine. Patients were divided in two groups: null or mild dysfunction (grade I-II), moderate-severe dysfunction (grade III-IV) and statistical Mann-Whitney U test was applied. The radioiodine dose ranged between 80 and 200 mCi. Nineteen patients were found to be less affected (group 1), corresponding to grades I and II, and 11 patients were more affected (group 2), with grade III involvement. The severity of involvement of the salivary glands was not related with the dose of radioiodine used in the treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer and the sex of the patients had no clear influence either. Other factors are possibly related to the severity of salivary gland involvement

  2. Survival of cancer patients treated with mistletoe extract (Iscador: a systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Büssing Arndt

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Europe, extracts from Viscum album (VA-E, the European white-berry mistletoe, are widely used to treat patients with cancer. Methods We searched several databases such as Cochrane, EMBASE, NCCAM, NLM, DIMDI, CAMbase, and Medline. Inclusion criteria were controlled clinical studies on parameters associated with survival in cancer patients treated with Iscador. Outcome data were extracted as they were given in the publication, and expressed as hazard ratios (HR, their logarithm, and the respective standard errors using standard formulas. Results We found 49 publications on the clinical effects of Iscador usage on survival of cancer patients which met our criteria. Among them, 41 studies and strata provided enough data to extract hazard ratios (HR and their standard errors (Iscador versus no extra treatment. The majority of studies reported positive effects in favour of the Iscador application. Heterogeneity of study results was moderate (I2 = 38.3%, p Conclusions Pooled analysis of clinical studies suggests that adjuvant treatment of cancer patients with the mistletoe extract Iscador is associated with a better survival. Despite obvious limitations, and strong hints for a publication bias which limits the evidence found in this meta-analysis, one can not ignore the fact that studies with positive effects of VA-E on survival of cancer patients are accumulating. Future studies evaluating the effects of Iscador should focus on a transparent design and description of endpoints in order to provide greater insight into a treatment often being depreciated as ineffective, but highly valued by cancer patients.

  3. Outcome analysis of 300 prostate cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation and hypofractionated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation and radical radiotherapy is an established treatment for localized prostate carcinoma. This study sought to analyze the outcomes of patients treated with relatively low-dose hypofractionated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Three hundred patients with T1-T3 prostate cancer were treated between 1996 and 2001. Patients were prescribed 3 months of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation before receiving 5250 cGy in 20 fractions. Patients' case notes and the oncology database were used to retrospectively assess outcomes. Median follow-up was 58 months. Results: Patients presented with prostate cancer with poorer prognostic indicators than that reported in other series. At 5 years, the actuarial cause-specific survival rate was 83.2% and the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse rate was 57.3%. Metastatic disease had developed in 23.4% of patients. PSA relapse continued to occur 5 years from treatment in all prognostic groups. Independent prognostic factors for relapse included treatment near the start of the study period, neoadjuvant oral anti-androgen monotherapy rather than neoadjuvant luteinizing hormone releasing hormone therapy, and diagnosis through transurethral resection of the prostate rather than transrectal ultrasound. Conclusion: This is the largest reported series of patients treated with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation and hypofractionated radiotherapy in the United Kingdom. Neoadjuvant hormonal therapy did not appear to adequately compensate for the relatively low effective radiation dose used

  4. External validation of nomograms for predicting cancer-specific mortality in penile cancer patients treated with definitive surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Zhu; Wei-Jie Gu; Ding-Wei Ye; Xu-Dong Yao; Shi-Lin Zhang; Bo Dai; Hai-Liang Zhang; Yi-Jun Shen

    2014-01-01

    Using a population-based cancer registry, Thuret et al. developed 3 nomograms for estimating cancer-specific mortality in men with penile squamous cell carcinoma. In the initial cohort, only 23.0% of the patients were treated with inguinal lymphadenectomy and had pN stage. To generalize the prediction models in clinical practice, we evaluated the performance of the 3 nomograms in a series of penile cancer patients who were treated with definitive surgery. Clinicopathologic information was obtained from 160 M0 penile cancer patients who underwent primary tumor excision and regional lymphadenectomy between 1990 and 2008. The predicted probabilities of cancer-specific mortality were calculated from 3 nomograms that were based on different disease stage definitions and tumor grade. Discrimination, calibration, and clinical usefulness were assessed to compare model performance. The discrimination ability was similar in nomograms using the TNM classification or American Joint Committee on Cancer staging (Harrell’s concordance index = 0.817 and 0.832, respectively), whereas it was inferior for the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results staging (Harrel ’s concordance index = 0.728). Better agreement with the observed cancer-specific mortality was shown for the model consisting of TNM classification and tumor grade, which also achieved favorable clinical net benefit, with a threshold probability in the range of 0 to 42%. The nomogram consisting of TNM classification and tumor grading was shown to have better performance for predicting cancer-specific mortality in penile cancer patients who underwent definitive surgery. Our data support the integration of this model in decision-making and trial design.

  5. Evaluation of Diabetic Patients with Breast Cancer Treated with Metformin during Adjuvant Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Ferro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate acute locoregional toxicity in patients with breast cancer receiving concurrent metformin plus radiation therapy. Methods and Materials. Diabetic breast cancer patients receiving concurrent metformin and radiation therapy were matched with nondiabetic patients and diabetic patients using an alternative diabetes medication. Primary endpoints included the presence of a treatment break and development of dry or moist desquamation. Results. There was a statistically significant increase in treatment breaks for diabetic patients receiving concurrent metformin when compared to the nondiabetic patients (P value = 0.02 and a trend toward significance when compared to diabetic patients receiving an alternate diabetes medication (P value = 0.08. Multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated concurrent metformin use as being associated with a trend toward the predictive value of determining the incidence of developing desquamation in diabetic patients receiving radiation therapy compared to diabetic patients receiving an alternate diabetes medication (P value = 0.06. Conclusions. Diabetic patients treated with concurrent metformin and radiation therapy developed increased acute locoregional toxicity in comparison with diabetic patients receiving an alternate diabetes medication and nondiabetic patients. Further clinical investigation should be conducted to determine the therapeutic ratio of metformin in combination with radiation therapy.

  6. Prognostic value of pretherapy platelet elevation in oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with chemoradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoultz-Henley, Sara; Garden, Adam S; Mohamed, Abdallah S R; Sheu, Tommy; Kroll, Michael H; Rosenthal, David I; Gunn, G Brandon; Hayes, Amos J; French, Chloe; Eichelberger, Hillary; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Smith, Blaine D; Phan, Jack; Ayoub, Zeina; Lai, Stephen Y; Pham, Brian; Kies, Merrill; Gold, Kathryn A; Sturgis, Erich; Fuller, Clifton D

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate potential associations between increased platelets and oncologic outcomes in oropharyngeal cancer patients receiving concurrent chemoradiation. A total of 433 oropharyngeal cancer patients (OPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent chemotherapy between 2002 and 2012 were included under an approved IRB protocol. Complete blood count (CBC) data were extracted. Platelet and hemoglobin from the last phlebotomy (PLTpre-chemoRT, Hgbpre-chemoRT ) before start of treatment were identified. Patients were risk-stratified using Dahlstrom-Sturgis criteria and were tested for association with survival and disease-control outcomes. Locoregional control (LRC), freedom from distant metastasis (FDM) and overall survival (OS) were decreased (p nomograms predicting 3-, 5- and 10-year OS. In conclusion, pretreatment platelet elevation is a promising predictor of prognosis, and further work should be done to elucidate the utility of antiplatelets in modifying risk in OPC patients. PMID:26414107

  7. Pulmonary Function in Patients With Germ Cell Cancer Treated With Bleomycin, Etoposide, and Cisplatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Jakob; Kier, Maria Gry Gundgaard; Bandak, Mikkel;

    2016-01-01

    expiratory volume in 1 second and forced vital capacity remained unchanged after BEP but increased significantly to levels above pretreatment during follow-up. International Germ Cell Cancer Collaborative Group (IGCCCG) prognostic group, mediastinal primary, pulmonary metastases, and smoking all......PURPOSE: For patients with germ cell cancer, various pulmonary toxicity risk factors have been hypothesized for treatment with bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP). Because existing studies have shortcomings, we present a large, unselected cohort of patients who have undergone close monitoring...... of lung function before, during, and after treatment with BEP to disclose valid pulmonary toxicity risk factors. PATIENTS AND METHODS: All patients who were treated with BEP at Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark, from 1984 to 2007, were included. Pulmonary function tests (PFTs) that measured...

  8. Nursing of advanced colorectal cancer patients treated with Cetuximab combined with chemotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoping Zhu; Chunli Wu

    2008-01-01

    Cetuximab is a new medication that has recently been approved for the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer. To date we have had tittle experience in using this targeted agent. Eleven patients in our hospital with advanced colorectal cancer were treated with cetuximab and chemotherapy. Based on the curative effect of this combination therapy, we have concluded that the following nursing practices make an important contribution to the patients' prognosis and wellbeing: to establish a good nurse-patient relationship, to increase patient understanding of the side effects, to standardize the medications, to observe and to deal with the side effects of the medications(for example skin reaction, neutropenia, and diarrhea), and to provide continuous mental health care support and education.

  9. Impact of comorbidity in elderly prostate cancer patients treated with brachytherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Costanza Chiumento; Alba Fiorentino; Mariella Cozzolino; Rocchina Caivano; Stefania Clemente; Piernicola Pedicini; Vincenzo Fusco

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the correlations among comorbidity and overall survival (OS),biochemical progression-free survival (b-PFS) and toxicity in elderly patents with localized prostate cancer treated with 125I brachytherapy.Methods:Elderly men,aged ≥65 years,with low-intermediate risk prostate cancer,were treated with permanent 125I brachytherapy as monotherapy.Comorbidity data were obtained from medical reports using age-adjusted Charlson comorbidity index (a-CCI).The patients were categorized into two age groups (<75and ≥75 years old),and two comorbidity score groups (a-CCI ≤3 and >3).Toxicity was scored with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scale.Results:From June 2003 to October 2009,a total of 92 elderly patients underwent prostate brachytherapy,including 57 men (62%) with low-risk prostate cancer,and 35 men (38%) with intermediate-risk prostate cancer.The median age of patients was 75 years (range,65-87 years).Forty-seven patients (51%) had a-CCI ≤3 and 45 patients (49%) a-CCI >3.With a median follow-up period of 56 months (range,24-103 months),the 5-year actuarial OS and b-PFS were 91.3% and 92.4% respectively,without statistical significance between two Charlson score groups.Toxicity was mild.None of the patients experienced gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity,and only 4 patiens (4%) experienced late genitourinary (GU) grade-3 (G3) toxicity.No correlation between acute GU and GI toxicity and comorbidity was showed (P=0.50 and P=0.70,respectively).Conclusions:Our data suggest that elderly men with low-intermediate risk prostate cancer and comorbidity can be considered for a radical treatment as 125I low-dose rate brachytherapy.

  10. Quality of life of patients with laryngeal cancer treated with radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Hajime; Sawai, Yuka; Inoue, Toshihiko [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Biomedical Research Center; Matayoshi, Yoshinobu; Murayama, Shigeyuki; Kozuka, Takahiro

    1995-09-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is considered as the best treatment for early laryngeal cancer in terms of survival and preservation of voice. Quality of life (QOL) must also be assessed after new treatments, such as laser treatment or laryngomicrosurgery. The QOL after RT was assessed in 61 patients (57 men and 4 women) with histologically proven laryngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer (glottis T1-2, 48 : supraglottis 11 : hypopharynx, 2). Cobalt-60 gamma rays were emitted via lateral opposed portals that included the glottis/larynx area. The delivered dose was 53 to 70 Gy/23 to 35 Fr (median, 60 Gy/30 Fr). Assessment was done by interview of physicians at periodic follow-up examinations of patients. The census period was June to December 1990. Patients` ages ranged from 37 to 82 years (median, 62 years) at treatment and 38 to 88 years (median, 68 years) at QOL assessment. Most patients enjoyed the similar daily activities and job status as before. Thirty-seven of 61 patients felt occasional hoarseness after RT, and 21 refrained from loud speech. All patients could use the telephone easily, except for one patient who had severe hearing loss. Many patients stopped smoking cigarettes, but most drank as before RT. There were no significant differences in lifestyle quality between less than and more than 5 years after RT. This QOL assessment is applicable to patients with laryngeal cancer. One half of patients treated by RT have symptoms compatible with chronic laryngitis. This study confirms that RT yields good QOL and voice quality for patients with laryngeal cancer. (author).

  11. Acetylsalicylic Acid Compared to Placebo in Treating High-Risk Patients With Subsolid Lung Nodules | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    This randomized phase II trial studies acetylsalicylic acid compared to placebo in treating high-risk patients with subsolid lung nodules. A nodule is a growth or lump that may be malignant (cancer) or benign (not cancer). Chemoprevention is the use of drugs to keep cancer from forming or coming back. The use of acetylsalicylic acid may keep cancer from forming in patients with subsolid lung nodules. |

  12. Where do patients treated for oral cancer die? A 20-year cohort study 1992-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamisetty, A; Magennis, P; Mayland, C; Jack, B; Lowe, D; Rogers, S N

    2015-12-01

    Of 1290 consecutive patients treated between 1992 and 2011 for primary squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity at a regional centre, 750 had died by August 2013. About half of them (n=373) died in hospital, 113 (15%) in a hospice, 180 (24%) at home, 57 (8%) in a care home, and 22 (3%) elsewhere. Cancer was the underlying cause of death in 64%, and of them, 56% were oral cancers. The place of death was strongly associated with the age at death and cancer being the underlying cause. The percentage of people who died from cancer at home or in a hospice rose over time across all age groups and, from 2010, accounted for two-thirds. In contrast, less than 1 in 5 who did not die from cancer, died at home or in a hospice, and in this there has been no discernible change over the last 20 years. The percentage of deaths from cancer in hospital and hospice ranged from 32%-38% and 20%-29%, respectively, across age groups. An increase in the number of deaths from cancer in care homes in those aged 75 years and over was mirrored by fewer at home. Most of those who did not die from cancer, died in hospital, two-thirds were under 65 years, 85% were aged 65-84, and 56% were older. This was mirrored by fewer deaths at home in those under 85 and more in care homes in those over 75. In conclusion, our findings suggest that patients' preferences not to die in hospital are being realised. However, at the end of their lives, patients and their carers need more support at home, and more research is required.

  13. Incidences of overall and site specific cancers in TNFα inhibitor treated patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other arthritides - a follow-up study from the DANBIO Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer, Lene; Mellemkjær, Lene; Andersen, Anne Rødgaard;

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the incidence of cancer in arthritis patients treated with or without TNFα inhibitors (TNF-I).......To investigate the incidence of cancer in arthritis patients treated with or without TNFα inhibitors (TNF-I)....

  14. Measurement of radiation exposure in attendants of thyroid cancer patients treated with 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients treated with 131I for differentiated thyroid cancer present radiological risk to relatives, occupational exposed workers and general public. Recently, the IAEA issued document K-9010241, 2010, which recommends that patient discharge from hospital must be based on the particular status of each patient, unlike the current criteria applied in Mexico based on the exposure rate at a 1 m distance. In this work thermoluminescent dosimeters were used during a 15 day period to measure the effective dose received by 40 family caregivers of patients treated with 131I, after their release from hospital 'Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia', Mexico. Relatives were classified in two groups, ambulatory (outpatients) and hospitalized (inpatients), according to the release mode of the patient. Measurements were performed for 20 family caregivers in each group. The effective dose received by all family members of outpatient and inpatient groups was found to be smaller that 5 mSv. In addition, 70 and 90% of inpatient and outpatient groups, respectively, received doses lower than 1 mSv. These data provide information which allow to give recommendations of possible modifications to current regulations in Mexico regarding discharge from hospital of patients treated with radiopharmaceuticals. (Author)

  15. Acute toxicity in prostate cancer patients treated with and without image-guided radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Scott

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT increases the accuracy of treatment delivery through daily target localisation. We report on toxicity symptoms experienced during radiotherapy treatment, with and without IGRT in prostate cancer patients treated radically. Methods Between 2006 and 2009, acute toxicity data for ten symptoms were collected prospectively onto standardized assessment forms. Toxicity was scored during radiotherapy, according to the Common Terminology Criteria Adverse Events V3.0, for 275 prostate cancer patients before and after the implementation of a fiducial marker IGRT program and dose escalation from 74Gy in 37 fractions, to 78Gy in 39 fractions. Margins and planning constraints were maintained the same during the study period. The symptoms scored were urinary frequency, cystitis, bladder spasm, urinary incontinence, urinary retention, diarrhoea, haemorrhoids, proctitis, anal skin discomfort and fatigue. Analysis was conducted for the maximum grade of toxicity and the median number of days from the onset of that toxicity to the end of treatment. Results In the IGRT group, 14228 toxicity scores were analysed from 249 patients. In the non-IGRT group, 1893 toxicity scores were analysed from 26 patients. Urinary frequency ≥G3 affected 23% and 7% in the non-IGRT and IGRT group respectively (p = 0.0188. Diarrhoea ≥G2 affected 15% and 3% of patients in the non-IGRT and IGRT groups (p = 0.0174. Fatigue ≥G2 affected 23% and 8% of patients in the non-IGRT and IGRT groups (p = 0.0271. The median number of days with a toxicity was higher for ≥G2 (p = 0.0179 and ≥G3 frequency (p = 0.0027, ≥G2 diarrhoea (p = 0.0033 and ≥G2 fatigue (p = 0.0088 in the non-IGRT group compared to the IGRT group. Other toxicities were not of significant statistical difference. Conclusions In this study, prostate cancer patients treated radically with IGRT had less severe urinary frequency, diarrhoea and fatigue during treatment

  16. Acute toxicity in prostate cancer patients treated with and without image-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) increases the accuracy of treatment delivery through daily target localisation. We report on toxicity symptoms experienced during radiotherapy treatment, with and without IGRT in prostate cancer patients treated radically. Between 2006 and 2009, acute toxicity data for ten symptoms were collected prospectively onto standardized assessment forms. Toxicity was scored during radiotherapy, according to the Common Terminology Criteria Adverse Events V3.0, for 275 prostate cancer patients before and after the implementation of a fiducial marker IGRT program and dose escalation from 74Gy in 37 fractions, to 78Gy in 39 fractions. Margins and planning constraints were maintained the same during the study period. The symptoms scored were urinary frequency, cystitis, bladder spasm, urinary incontinence, urinary retention, diarrhoea, haemorrhoids, proctitis, anal skin discomfort and fatigue. Analysis was conducted for the maximum grade of toxicity and the median number of days from the onset of that toxicity to the end of treatment. In the IGRT group, 14228 toxicity scores were analysed from 249 patients. In the non-IGRT group, 1893 toxicity scores were analysed from 26 patients. Urinary frequency ≥G3 affected 23% and 7% in the non-IGRT and IGRT group respectively (p = 0.0188). Diarrhoea ≥G2 affected 15% and 3% of patients in the non-IGRT and IGRT groups (p = 0.0174). Fatigue ≥G2 affected 23% and 8% of patients in the non-IGRT and IGRT groups (p = 0.0271). The median number of days with a toxicity was higher for ≥G2 (p = 0.0179) and ≥G3 frequency (p = 0.0027), ≥G2 diarrhoea (p = 0.0033) and ≥G2 fatigue (p = 0.0088) in the non-IGRT group compared to the IGRT group. Other toxicities were not of significant statistical difference. In this study, prostate cancer patients treated radically with IGRT had less severe urinary frequency, diarrhoea and fatigue during treatment compared to patients treated with non-IGRT. Onset of these

  17. Comorbidity-Adjusted Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer Patients Treated with Hypofractionated Proton Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Y. Do

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the influence of comorbidity on survival in early-stage lung cancer patients treated with proton radiotherapy, using the Charlson Comorbidity Index. Study Design and Setting. Fifty-four non-small-cell lung cancer patients, treated prospectively in a phase II clinical trial with hypofractionated proton therapy, were analyzed retrospectively to assess their burden of comorbid disease as expressed by Charlson Comorbidity Index. Using the Charlson Comorbidity Index method, a predicted survival curve based on comorbidity was formulated and compared to the observed mortality from causes other than lung cancer in the study population. Results. The study population had an average age score of 2.8 and an average Charlson Comorbidity Index of 4.7. Predicted survival was calculated to be 67% and 50% at 2 and 4 years, respectively. Actual comorbidity-specific survival at 2 and 4 years was 64% and 45%, respectively. The observed survival fell within the 95% confidence intervals of the predicted survival at all time points up to 5 years. Conclusion. Predicted mortality from concurrent disease, based on Charlson Comorbidity Index, correlated well with observed comorbidity-specific mortality. This helps substantiate the accuracy of the data coding in cause of death and strengthens previously reported disease-specific survival rates.

  18. Common toxicities and objective response rate in metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with irinotecan based regimens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Huang; Xin Liao; Qianqian Yu; Qiang Fu; Kai Qin; Huanlei Wu; Lihong Zhang; Xianglin Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of our study was to investigate if common toxicities are correlated to objective response rate (ORR) in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients treated by irinotecan based regimens. Methods: Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate correlations between common toxicities and binary ORR in 106 mCRC patients from a prospective cohort treated with irinotecan based regimens. Results: The most frequent severe toxicities (Grade 3/4) were as follows: neutropenia (27.4%), diarrhea (16.9%), leucopenia (12.6%), vomiting (3.2%) and thrombocytopenia (2.1%). Thrombocytosis was observed in 25 (26.3%) patients. ORR was 25.3%. Thrombocytopenia (P = 0.014), line of chemotherapy (P = 0.028) and thrombocytosis (P = 0.033) were correlated with ORR in univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, thrombocytopenia (odds ratio [OR] = 8.600, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.705–43.385, P = 0.009) and first line chemotherapy (OR = 5.155, 95% CI = 1.153–23.256, P = 0.032) positively related to ORR. Conclusion: Throm-bocytopenia may be an indicator of ORR in mCRC patients treated by irinotecan plus 5-fluorouracil/capecitabine. Evidence is not strong enough to prove that irinotecan based regimens-induced diarrhea, leucopenia, neutropenia or vomiting is associ-ated with ORR.

  19. Decreasing relapse in colorectal cancer patients treated with cetuximab by using the activating KRAS detection chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming-Yii; Liu, Hsueh-Chiao; Yen, Li-Chen; Chang, Jia-Yuan; Huang, Jian-Jhang; Wang, Jaw-Yuan; Lin, Shiu-Ru

    2014-10-01

    The KRAS oncogene was among the first genetic alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) to be discovered. Moreover, KRAS somatic mutations might be used for predicting the efficiency of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapeutic drugs. Because the KRAS mutations are similar in the primary CRC and/or the CRC metastasis, KRAS mutation testing can be performed on both specimen types. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical advantage of using a KRAS pathway-associated molecule analysis chip to analyze CRC patients treated with cetuximab. Our laboratory developed a KRAS pathway-associated molecule analysis chip and a weighted enzymatic chip array (WEnCA) technique, activating KRAS detection chip, which can detect KRAS mutation status by screening circulating cancer cells in the bloodstream. We prospectively enrolled 210 stage II-III CRC patients who received adjuvant oxaliplatin plus infusional 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin (FOLFOX)-4 chemotherapy with or without cetuximab. We compared the chip results of preoperative blood specimens with disease control status in these patients. Among the 168 CRC patients with negative chip results, 119 were treated with FOLFOX-4 plus cetuximab chemotherapy, and their relapse rate was 35.3 % (42/119). In contrast, the relapse rate was 71.4 % among the patients with negative chip results who received FOLFOX-4 treatment alone (35/49). Negative chip results were significantly correlated with better treatment outcomes in the FOLFOX-4 plus cetuximab group (P chip is a potential tool for predicting clinical outcomes in CRC patients following FOLFOX-4 treatment with or without cetuximab therapy.

  20. Radiation bronchitis in lung cancer patient treated with stereotactic radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a case of chronic radiation bronchitis that developed in a patient with lung cancer treated with fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy. A 73-year-old woman with a medically inoperable T1N0M0 adenocarcinoma of the lung was treated with stereotactic radiation therapy. By using eight non-coplanar ports, 50 Gy/5 fractions was delivered in two weeks. At four weeks, a partial response was obtained with no acute adverse reaction. She developed severe cough at six months. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy revealed thick circumferentially coated bronchial mucosa in close proximity to the tumor site. At 12 months, follow-up study confirmed marked stenotic change in the B6 segmental bronchus without tumor progression. (author)

  1. Dose-volume analysis for respiratory toxicity in intrathoracic esophageal cancer patients treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy using extended fields

    OpenAIRE

    Tanabe, Satoshi; Myojin, Miyako; Shimizu, Shinichi; Fujino, Masaharu; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Shirato, Hiroki; Ito, Yoichi M.; Ishikawa, Masayori; Hosokawa, Masao

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the relationship between dosimetric parameters (DPs) and the incidence of radiation pneumonitis (RP) and investigated the feasibility of a proposed treatment planning technique with the potential of reducing RP in esophageal cancer patients treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy using extended fields. Patients and Methods: A total of 149 patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer were prospectively enrolled for extended-field radiotherapy (EFRT) to three-field r...

  2. Pilot study of bone mineral density in breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headley, J. A.; Theriault, R. L.; LeBlanc, A. D.; Vassilopoulou-Sellin, R.; Hortobagyi, G. N.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to determine lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) in breast cancer patients previously treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. Sixteen of 27 patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy became permanently amenorrheic as a result of chemotherapy. BMD was measured at the lumbar spine using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Chemotherapy drugs and dosages along with a history of risk factors for reduced bone density including activity level, tobacco and/or alcohol use, metabolic bone disease, family history, and hormone exposure were identified. Results showed that women who became permanently amenorrheic as a result of chemotherapy had BMD 14% lower than women who maintained menses after chemotherapy. Chemotherapy-treated women who maintained ovarian function had normal BMD. This study suggests that women who have premature menopause as a result of chemotherapy for breast cancer are at increased risk of bone loss and may be at risk for early development of osteoporosis. Women who maintain menses do not appear to be at risk for accelerated trabecular bone loss.

  3. Early Toxicity in Patients Treated With Postoperative Proton Therapy for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuaron, John J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Chon, Brian; Tsai, Henry; Goenka, Anuj; DeBlois, David [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Ho, Alice; Powell, Simon [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Hug, Eugen [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Cahlon, Oren, E-mail: cahlono@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Procure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: To report dosimetry and early toxicity data in breast cancer patients treated with postoperative proton radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: From March 2013 to April 2014, 30 patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer and no history of prior radiation were treated with proton therapy at a single proton center. Patient characteristics and dosimetry were obtained through chart review. Patients were seen weekly while on treatment, at 1 month after radiation therapy completion, and at 3- to 6-month intervals thereafter. Toxicity was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Frequencies of toxicities were tabulated. Results: Median dose delivered was 50.4 Gy (relative biological equivalent [RBE]) in 5 weeks. Target volumes included the breast/chest wall and regional lymph nodes including the internal mammary lymph nodes (in 93%). No patients required a treatment break. Among patients with >3 months of follow-up (n=28), grade 2 dermatitis occurred in 20 patients (71.4%), with 8 (28.6%) experiencing moist desquamation. Grade 2 esophagitis occurred in 8 patients (28.6%). Grade 3 reconstructive complications occurred in 1 patient. The median planning target volume V95 was 96.43% (range, 79.39%-99.60%). The median mean heart dose was 0.88 Gy (RBE) [range, 0.01-3.20 Gy (RBE)] for all patients, and 1.00 Gy (RBE) among patients with left-sided tumors. The median V20 of the ipsilateral lung was 16.50% (range, 6.1%-30.3%). The median contralateral lung V5 was 0.34% (range, 0%-5.30%). The median maximal point dose to the esophagus was 45.65 Gy (RBE) [range, 0-65.4 Gy (RBE)]. The median contralateral breast mean dose was 0.29 Gy (RBE) [range, 0.03-3.50 Gy (RBE)]. Conclusions: Postoperative proton therapy is well tolerated, with acceptable rates of skin toxicity. Proton therapy favorably spares normal tissue without compromising target coverage. Further follow-up is necessary to assess for clinical outcomes and cardiopulmonary

  4. Prognosis for Mammographically Occult, Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conservation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare mammographically occult (MamOcc) and mammographically positive (MamPos) early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast-conservation therapy (BCT), to analyze differences between the two cohorts. Methods and Materials: Our two cohorts consisted of 214 MamOcc and 2168 MamPos patients treated with BCT. Chart reviews were conducted to assess mammogram reports and method of detection. All clinical-pathologic and outcome parameters were analyzed to detect differences between the two cohorts. Results: Median follow-up was 7 years. There were no differences in final margins, T stage, nodal status, estrogen/progesterone receptor status, or 'triple-negative' status. Significant differences included younger age at diagnosis (p o histology (p < 0.0001). At 10 years, the differences in overall survival, cause-specific survival, and distant relapse between the two groups did not differ significantly. The MamOcc cohort had more breast relapses (15% vs. 8%; p = 0.0357), but on multivariate analysis this difference was not significant (hazard ratio 1.0, 95% confidence interval 0.993-1.007, p = 0.9296). Breast relapses were mammographically occult in 32% of the MamOcc and 12% of the MamPos cohorts (p = 0.0136). Conclusions: Although our study suggests that there are clinical-pathologic variations for the MamOcc cohort vs. MamPos patients that may ultimately affect management, breast relapse after BCT was not significantly different. Breast recurrences were more often mammographically occult in the MamOcc cohort; consideration should be given to closer follow-up and alternative imaging strategies (ultrasound, breast MRI) for routine posttreatment examination. To our knowledge, this represents the largest series addressing the prognostic significance of MamOcc cancers treated with BCT.

  5. Dosimetric predictors of hypothyroidism in oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation to the neck has long been associated with an elevated risk of hypothyroidism development. The goal of the present work is to define dosimetric predictors of hypothyroidism in oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Data for 123 patients, with a median follow up of 4.6 years, were retrospectively analyzed. Patients with elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone levels or with a clinical diagnosis were categorized as hypothyroid. Patient demographic parameters, thyroid volume, mean thyroid dose, the percent of thyroid volume receiving minimum specified dose levels (VxxGy), and the absolute thyroid volume spared from specified dose levels (VSxxGy) were analyzed. Normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) was also calculated using several recently published models. Thyroid volume and many radiation dosimetric parameters were statistically different in the hypothyroid group. For the patients with initial thyroid volumes of 8 cc or greater, several dosimetric parameters were found to define subgroups at statistically significant lower risk of developing hypothyroidism. Patients with VS45 Gy of at least 3 cc, VS50 Gy at least 5 cc, VS50 Gy at least 6 cc, V50 Gy below 45%, V50 Gy below 55%, or mean thyroid dose below 49 Gy had a 28-38% estimated risk of hypothyroidism at 3 years compared to a 55% risk for the entire study group. Patients with a NTCP of less than 0.75 or 0.8, calculated using recently published models, were also observed to have a lower risk of developing hypothyroidism. Based on long-term follow up data for OPC patients treated with IMRT, we recommend plan optimization objectives to reduce the volume of thyroid receiving over 45 Gy to significantly decrease the risk of developing hypothyroidism. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13014-014-0269-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  6. Comparison of mastectomy with tamoxifen for treating elderly patients with operable breast cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Robertson, J. F.; Todd, J. H.; Ellis, I O; Elston, C. W.; Blamey, R. W.

    1988-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--Comparison of tamoxifen and mastectomy in treatment of breast cancer in elderly patients. DESIGN--Randomised trial of treatment of operable breast cancer by wedge mastectomy or tamoxifen, with median follow up 24 and 25 months respectively (range 1-63). SETTING--University hospital; most patients from primary catchment area. PATIENTS--135 consecutive patients with breast cancer aged over 70 with operable tumours (less than 5 cm maximum diameter); 68 were allocated to tamoxife...

  7. Quality of life assessment in advanced cancer patients treated at home, an inpatient unit, and a day care center

    OpenAIRE

    Leppert, Wojciech; Majkowicz, Mikolaj; Forycka, Maria; Mess, Eleonora; Zdun-Ryzewska, Agata

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study To assess quality of life (QoL) in cancer patients treated at home, at an in-patient palliative care unit (PCU), and at a day care center (DCC). Patients and methods QoL was assessed in advanced cancer patients at baseline and after 7 days of symptomatic treatment using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 15-Palliative Care (EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL), the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS), and the Karnofsky Perfor...

  8. Mortality in asymptomatic vs. symptomatic patients surgically treated for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kirsten Riis; Bødtger, Uffe

    Introduction: Compared to incidentally found lung cancer, the presence of symptoms (eg. cough, haemoptysis, pain, weight loss) at diagnosis is associated with a 50% reduction in median survival. In surgically treated patients, it is unknown whether presence of symptoms has prognostic significance....... Aim: We wanted to ascertain if symptoms at time of NSCLC diagnosis lowered 12-months mortality after surgery. Methods: Retrospective analysis of all patients with localised NSCLC referred from our department between 2009-2011 for intended curative surgery Data on age, sex, tobacco pack years, Charlson......, tobacco pack years, or FEV1. Former malignancy was significantly more prevalent among asymptomatic than symptomatic subjects (33 % vs. 11%), with insignificant differences in prevalence of other co-morbidities or in post-surgical TNM (82% vs 85% in stages IA-IIB). 12-months mortality was insignificantly...

  9. Clinical outcome and cosmetics in breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness and the cosmetics result of radiotherapy after conservative surgery for early breast cancer. Methods: Altogether 109 patients were treated by post-operative whole-breast irradiation and a tumor bed boost from May, 1995 to December, 2002. Among them 79 cases received a brachytherapy boost (192Ir HDR implant Nucletron ) of 10-12 Gy(DB) by single plan of implantation with 1.5 cm between the needles for T1 and double plan for T2-4 tumors, and 30 cases received an electron beam boost with 15 Gy. External beam irradiation was applied to the whole breast with 45-52 Gy(mean 48.6 Gy) in 25 fractions over 5 weeks followed or concurrently with chemotherapy (CMF or CEF) and hormonotherapy. The cosmetic result was scored by a doctor and patients via questionnaire. Results: The median follow-up time was 52 months. The actuarial 5-year overall survival rate was 93.8% using Kaplan-Meier method and the within breast recurrence rate was 6.5%. No radiation- induced ulcer in the breast occurred except acute inflammation of skin around the pinholes in 5 patients. Cosmetic results were scored to be good by patients and the doctor (81% and 87%, respectively) for 75 followed-up cases, and good cosmetic rate was reported by the doctor for 82% (39/48) of the cases treated with brachytherapy boost and 85.2%(23/27) for those treated with external beam boost. There was no difference in cosmetic results between these two groups(P>0.05). Conclusion: In patients at high risk for local recurrence, tumor-bed boost with brachytherapy or electron beam carried out after limited surgery and external radiotherapy can provide satisfactory local control without morbidity. Cosmetic result may not be influenced by the boost technique. (authors)

  10. Patient reported outcomes of symptoms and quality of life among cancer patients treated with palliative pelvic radiation: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fosså Sophie D

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is limited high-quality research investigating the efficacy of palliative radiation (PPR with regard to symptoms and quality of life (QOL among cancer patients with pelvic soft tissue tumors. As a result, clinicians are left with mainly retrospective studies, without reliable data on which to base treatment decisions. As a first step of a subsequent analysis of PPR's efficacy, we aimed to determine whether it is feasible to prospectively measure symptoms and QOL among patients treated with PPR. A secondary aim was to explore patients' willingness to answer existential questions in the setting of palliative pelvic radiation. Methods Patients referred for palliative radiation of soft-tissue pelvic tumors were invited to enter the study. Symptoms were scored by study physicians and QOL was assessed by the EORTC QLQ C-30 questionnaire and site specific modules (PR25, CR38 or BL24 prior to start of radiation and 6 and 12 weeks after its completion. In addition, patients answered existential questions at each of the study visits. A radiation therapist was available to participants in order to answer their questions and ensure that questionnaires were completed. Findings Five female and 17 male patients with prostate cancer (14, colorectal cancer (5 and bladder cancer (3 were included in the study. The median age of the participants was 75 years (range 62-90. Twenty patients were still in the study at the 6-week follow-up and 18 patients at the 12-week follow-up. Twenty-one patients had valid responses within all the EORTC QLQ C-30 scales at baseline, 20/20 at the 6-week follow-up and at the 12-week follow-up 17/18 patients still in the study had valid responses within all scales. This level of response was similar in the site-specific modules and among the existential questions. Discussion Among patients with prostate, colorectal and bladder cancer, compliance to questionnaires assessing symptoms, QOL and existential

  11. DNA Damage and Repair Biomarkers in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated with Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy: An Exploratory Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Vici

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer cells commonly harbour a defective G1/S checkpoint owing to the interaction of viral oncoproteins with p53 and retinoblastoma protein. The activation of the G2/M checkpoint may thus become essential for protecting cancer cells from genotoxic insults, such as chemotherapy. In 52 cervical cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, we investigated whether the levels of phosphorylated Wee1 (pWee1, a key G2/M checkpoint kinase, and γ-H2AX, a marker of DNA double-strand breaks, discriminated between patients with a pathological complete response (pCR and those with residual disease. We also tested the association between pWee1 and phosphorylated Chk1 (pChk1, a kinase acting upstream Wee1 in the G2/M checkpoint pathway. pWee1, γ-H2AX and pChk1 were retrospectively assessed in diagnostic biopsies by immunohistochemistry. The degrees of pWee1 and pChk1 expression were defined using three different classification methods, i.e., staining intensity, Allred score, and a multiplicative score. γ-H2AX was analyzed both as continuous and categorical variable. Irrespective of the classification used, elevated levels of pWee1 and γ-H2AX were significantly associated with a lower rate of pCR. In univariate and multivariate analyses, pWee1 and γ-H2AX were both associated with reduced pCR. Internal validation conducted through a re-sampling without replacement procedure confirmed the robustness of the multivariate model. Finally, we found a significant association between pWee1 and pChk1. The message conveyed by the present analysis is that biomarkers of DNA damage and repair may predict the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in cervical cancer. Further studies are warranted to prospectively validate these encouraging findings.

  12. DNA Damage and Repair Biomarkers in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated with Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy: An Exploratory Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vici, Patrizia; Buglioni, Simonetta; Sergi, Domenico; Pizzuti, Laura; Di Lauro, Luigi; Antoniani, Barbara; Sperati, Francesca; Terrenato, Irene; Carosi, Mariantonia; Gamucci, Teresa; Dattilo, Rosanna; Bartucci, Monica; Vincenzoni, Cristina; Mariani, Luciano; Vizza, Enrico; Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Gadducci, Angiolo; Vitale, Ilio; Barba, Maddalena; De Maria, Ruggero; Mottolese, Marcella; Maugeri-Saccà, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer cells commonly harbour a defective G1/S checkpoint owing to the interaction of viral oncoproteins with p53 and retinoblastoma protein. The activation of the G2/M checkpoint may thus become essential for protecting cancer cells from genotoxic insults, such as chemotherapy. In 52 cervical cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, we investigated whether the levels of phosphorylated Wee1 (pWee1), a key G2/M checkpoint kinase, and γ-H2AX, a marker of DNA double-strand breaks, discriminated between patients with a pathological complete response (pCR) and those with residual disease. We also tested the association between pWee1 and phosphorylated Chk1 (pChk1), a kinase acting upstream Wee1 in the G2/M checkpoint pathway. pWee1, γ-H2AX and pChk1 were retrospectively assessed in diagnostic biopsies by immunohistochemistry. The degrees of pWee1 and pChk1 expression were defined using three different classification methods, i.e., staining intensity, Allred score, and a multiplicative score. γ-H2AX was analyzed both as continuous and categorical variable. Irrespective of the classification used, elevated levels of pWee1 and γ-H2AX were significantly associated with a lower rate of pCR. In univariate and multivariate analyses, pWee1 and γ-H2AX were both associated with reduced pCR. Internal validation conducted through a re-sampling without replacement procedure confirmed the robustness of the multivariate model. Finally, we found a significant association between pWee1 and pChk1. The message conveyed by the present analysis is that biomarkers of DNA damage and repair may predict the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in cervical cancer. Further studies are warranted to prospectively validate these encouraging findings. PMID:26930412

  13. Early results of quality of life for curatively treated rectal cancers in Chinese patients with EORTC QLQ-CR29

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the quality of life in curatively treated patients with rectal cancer in a prospectively collected cohort. Patients with stage I-III rectal cancer who were treated curatively in a single institution were accrued prospectively. Quality of life was assessed by use of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer questionnaire module for all cancer patients (QLQ-C30) and for colorectal cancer patients (QLQ-CR29). Quality of life among different treatment modalities and between stoma and nonstoma patients was evaluated in all patients. A total of 154 patients were assessed. The median time of completion for the questionnaires was 10 months after all the treatments. For patients with different treatment modalities, faecal incontinence and diarrhea were significantly higher in radiation group (p = 0.002 and p = 0.001, respectively), and no difference in male or female sexual function was found between radiation group and non-radiation group. For stoma and nonstoma patients, the QLQ-CR29 module found the symptoms of Defaecation and Embarrassment with Bowel Movement were more prominent in stoma patients, while no difference was detected in scales QLQ-C30 module. Our study provided additional information in evaluating QoL of Chinese rectal cancer patients with currently widely used QoL questionnaires. As a supplement to the QLQ-C30, EORTC QLQ-CR29 is a useful questionnaire in evaluating curatively treated patients with rectal cancer. Bowel dysfunction (diarrhea and faecal incontinence) was still the major problem compromising QoL in patients with either pre- or postoperative chemoradiotherapy

  14. Radiation dose to family members of hyperthyroidism and thyroid cancer patients treated with 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD) was used for measuring radiation dose to family members of thyrotoxicosis and thyroid cancer patients treated with 131I using CaSO4:Dy discs. There were 45 family members of thyrotoxicosis patients, who were divided into two groups with 22 in the first and 23 in the second group. Radiation safety instructions were the same for both the groups except in the second group where the patients were advised to use a separate bed at home for the first 3 d of dose administration. An activity ranging from 185 to 500 MBq was administered to these patients. The whole-body dose to family members ranged from 0.4 to 2.4 mSv (mean 1.1 mSv) in the first group and 0-1.9 mSv (mean 0.6 mSv) in the second group. A total of 297 family members of thyroid cancer patients were studied for whole-body dose estimation. An activity ranging from 0.925 to 7.4 GBq was administered to the thyroid cancer patients. The family members were divided into three groups depending upon the mode of transport and facilities available at home to avoid close proximity with the patient. Group A with 25 family members received a dose ranging from 0 to 0.9 mSv (mean 0.4 mSv), group B with 96 family members received a dose ranging from 0 to 8.5 mSv (mean 0.8 mSv) and group C with 176 family members received a dose ranging from 0 to 5.0 mSv (mean 0.8 mSv). The thyroid monitoring was also done in 103 family members who attended the patients in isolation wards for >2 d. Thyroid dose in them ranged from 0 to 2.5 mGy (mean 0.1 mGy). (authors)

  15. KRAS and BRAF mutations in patients with rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: KRAS and BRAF are mutated in 35% and 10% of colorectal cancers, respectively. However, data specifically for locally advanced rectal cancers are scarce, and the frequency of KRAS mutations in codons 61 and 146 remains to be established. Materials and methods: DNA was isolated from pre-therapeutic biopsies of 94 patients who were treated within two phase-III clinical trials receiving preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Mutation status of KRAS exons 1-3 and BRAF exon 15 was established using the ABI PRISM Big Dye Sequencing Kit and subsequently correlated with clinical parameters. Results: Overall, KRAS was mutated in 45 patients (48%). Twenty-nine mutations (64%) were located in codon 12, 10 mutations (22%) in codon 13, and 3 mutations (7%) in codons 61 and 146. No V600E BRAF mutation was detected. The presence of KRAS mutations was correlated neither with tumor response or lymph node status after preoperative chemoradiotherapy nor with overall survival or disease-free survival. When KRAS exon 1 mutations were separated based on the amino-acid exchange, we again failed to detect significant correlations (p = 0.052). However, G12V mutations appeared to be associated with higher rates of tumor regression than G13D mutations (p = 0.012). Conclusion: We are the first to report the mutation status of KRAS and BRAF in pre-therapeutic biopsies from locally advanced rectal cancers. The high number of KRAS mutations in codons 61 and 146 emphasizes the importance to expand current mutation analyses, whereas BRAF mutations are not relevant for rectal carcinogenesis. Although the KRAS mutation status was not correlated with response, the subtle difference between G12V and G13D mutations warrants analysis of a larger patient population.

  16. Predictors of continuous tobacco smoking in a clinical cohort study of Danish laryngeal cancer patients smoking before treated with radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Pia Krause; Tolstrup, Janne S; Olsen, Maja H;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many cancer patients who are smokers when starting cancer therapy continue smoking despite evidence of tobacco smoking as a risk factor for poor treatment response and secondary primary cancers. Small samples and inconsistent results in previous studies warrant further research...... to identify predictors of being a continuous smoker during and after radiotherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the clinical database of the Danish Head and Neck Cancer Group (DAHANCA), we identified 1455 patients diagnosed with laryngeal cancer between 2000 and 2010, who were all smokers at date of diagnosis...... and treated with primary radiotherapy. Information on the socio-economic characteristics of the study cohort was obtained from Statistics Denmark the year prior to diagnosis. Logistic regression analyses were applied. RESULTS: In the cohort of laryngeal cancer patients smoking before starting radiotherapy, 50...

  17. Acute esophagitis for patients with local-regional advanced non small cell lung cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pan, Yi; Brink, Carsten; Knap, Marianne;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Esophagitis is common in patients treated with definitive radiotherapy for local-regional advanced non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The purpose of this study was to estimate the dose-effect relationship using clinical and dosimetric parameters in patients receiving intensity modulated...

  18. A modified radiofrequency ablation approach for treating distant lymph node metastasis in two patients with late-stage cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yun-Fei Yuan; Ya-Di Liao; Ji-Liang Qiu; Qi-Jiong Li; Ru-Hai Zou; An-Hua Li

    2013-01-01

    Patients with late-stage cancer commonly have distant lymph node metastasis; however, poor health often contraindicates surgical treatment. Although the quality of life and overall survival for these patients are low, there is neither a consensus nor a guide for treatment. Ablation technique and surrounding tissue damage are two possible reasons for limited study of radiofrequency ablation in patients with superficial distant lymph node metastasis. Here, we report two patients treated success...

  19. Polymorphisms in the XRCC1 gene modify survival of bladder cancer patients treated with chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sacerdote, C.; Guarrera, S.; Ricceri, F.; Pardini, B.; Polidoro, S.; Allione, A.; Critelli, R.; Russo, A.; Andrew, A.S.; Ye, Y.; Wu, X.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Bosio, A.; Casetta, G.; Cucchiarale, G.; Destefanis, P.; Gontero, P.; Rolle, L.; Zitella, A.; Fontana, D.; Vineis, P.; Matullo, G.

    2013-01-01

    Survival of bladder cancer patients depends on several factors including disease stage and grade at diagnosis, age, health status of the patient and the applied treatment. Several studies investigated the role of DNA repair genetic variants in cancer susceptibility, but only few studies investigated

  20. Is Androgen Deprivation Therapy Necessary in All Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Treated in the Dose Escalation Era?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castle, Katherine O., E-mail: kocastle@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hoffman, Karen E.; Levy, Lawrence B.; Lee, Andrew K.; Choi, Seungtaek; Nguyen, Quynh N.; Frank, Steven J.; Pugh, Thomas J.; McGuire, Sean E.; Kuban, Deborah A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: The benefit of adding androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) to dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT) for men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer is unclear; therefore, we assessed the impact of adding ADT to dose-escalated RT on freedom from failure (FFF). Methods: Three groups of men treated with intensity modulated RT or 3-dimensional conformal RT (75.6-78 Gy) from 1993-2008 for prostate cancer were categorized as (1) 326 intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone, (2) 218 intermediate-risk patients treated with RT and ≤6 months of ADT, and (3) 274 low-risk patients treated with definitive RT. Median follow-up was 58 months. Recursive partitioning analysis based on FFF using Gleason score (GS), T stage, and pretreatment PSA concentration was applied to the intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate 5-year FFF. Results: Based on recursive partitioning analysis, intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone were divided into 3 prognostic groups: (1) 188 favorable patients: GS 6, ≤T2b or GS 3+4, ≤T1c; (2) 71 marginal patients: GS 3+4, T2a-b; and (3) 68 unfavorable patients: GS 4+3 or T2c disease. Hazard ratios (HR) for recurrence in each group were 1.0, 2.1, and 4.6, respectively. When intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone were compared to intermediate-risk patients treated with RT and ADT, the greatest benefit from ADT was seen for the unfavorable intermediate-risk patients (FFF, 74% vs 94%, respectively; P=.005). Favorable intermediate-risk patients had no significant benefit from the addition of ADT to RT (FFF, 94% vs 95%, respectively; P=.85), and FFF for favorable intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone approached that of low-risk patients treated with RT alone (98%). Conclusions: Patients with favorable intermediate-risk prostate cancer did not benefit from the addition of ADT to dose-escalated RT, and their FFF was nearly as good as patients with low-risk disease

  1. Brain metastasis from differentiated thyroid cancer in patients treated with radioiodine for bone and lung lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain metastasis of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) often is detected during treatment of other remote lesions. We examined the prevalence, risk factors and treatment outcome of this disease encountered during nuclear medicine practice. Of the 167 patients with metastasis to lung or bone treated 1-14 times with radioactive iodine (RAI), 9 (5.4%) also had lesions in the brain. Five were males and 4 females, aged 49-84, out of the original population of 49 males and 118 females aged 10-84 (mean 54.7) years. Three of them underwent removal of their brain tumors, 5 received conventional external beam irradiation, and 2 had stereotactic radiosurgery with supervoltage X-ray. None of the brain lesions showed significant uptake of RAI despite demonstrable accumulation in most extracerebral lesions. Seven patients died 4-23 (mean 9.4) months after the discovery of cerebral metastasis, brain damage being the primary or at least a contributing cause. The 8th and 9th patients remained relatively well for more than 42 and 3 months, respectively, without any evidence of intracranial recurrence. Our results confirmed that the brain is a major site of secondary metastasis from DTC. No statistically significant demographic risk factor was detected. Any suspicious neurological symptoms in the course of RAI treatment warrant cerebral computed tomography. As for therapy, from out initial experience, radiosurgery seemed promising as an effective and less invasive alternative to surgical removal. (author)

  2. Difficulties in diagnosing and treating depression in the terminally ill cancer patient

    OpenAIRE

    Lloyd-Williams, M

    2000-01-01

    It is estimated that for a quarter of all patients with advanced metastatic cancer, depression will be significant symptom. However up to 80% of the psychological and psychiatric morbidity which develops in cancer patients goes unrecognised and untreated. One of the main difficulties in establishing a diagnosis of an illness where there are no biological markers, physical signs, or diagnostics tests is deciding what can be called "appropriate sadness" as patients approach the end of life and ...

  3. Dose Constraints to Prevent Radiation-Induced Brachial Plexopathy in Patients Treated for Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amini, Arya [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of California Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, California (United States); Yang Jinzhong; Williamson, Ryan [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); McBurney, Michelle L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Erasmus, Jeremy [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Allen, Pamela K.; Karhade, Mandar; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Gomez, Daniel; Cox, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dong, Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Welsh, James, E-mail: jwelsh@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: As the recommended radiation dose for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) increases, meeting dose constraints for critical structures like the brachial plexus becomes increasingly challenging, particularly for tumors in the superior sulcus. In this retrospective analysis, we compared dose-volume histogram information with the incidence of plexopathy to establish the maximum dose tolerated by the brachial plexus. Methods and Materials: We identified 90 patients with NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation from March 2007 through September 2010, who had received >55 Gy to the brachial plexus. We used a multiatlas segmentation method combined with deformable image registration to delineate the brachial plexus on the original planning CT scans and scored plexopathy according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.03. Results: Median radiation dose to the brachial plexus was 70 Gy (range, 56-87.5 Gy; 1.5-2.5 Gy/fraction). At a median follow-up time of 14.0 months, 14 patients (16%) had brachial plexopathy (8 patients [9%] had Grade 1, and 6 patients [7%] had Grade {>=}2); median time to symptom onset was 6.5 months (range, 1.4-37.4 months). On multivariate analysis, receipt of a median brachial plexus dose of >69 Gy (odds ratio [OR] 10.091; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.512-67.331; p = 0.005), a maximum dose of >75 Gy to 2 cm{sup 3} of the brachial plexus (OR, 4.909; 95% CI, 0.966-24.952; p = 0.038), and the presence of plexopathy before irradiation (OR, 4.722; 95% CI, 1.267-17.606; p = 0.021) were independent predictors of brachial plexopathy. Conclusions: For lung cancers near the apical region, brachial plexopathy is a major concern for high-dose radiation therapy. We developed a computer-assisted image segmentation method that allows us to rapidly and consistently contour the brachial plexus and establish the dose limits to minimize the risk of brachial plexopathy. Our results could be used as a guideline in future prospective

  4. Dose Constraints to Prevent Radiation-Induced Brachial Plexopathy in Patients Treated for Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: As the recommended radiation dose for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) increases, meeting dose constraints for critical structures like the brachial plexus becomes increasingly challenging, particularly for tumors in the superior sulcus. In this retrospective analysis, we compared dose-volume histogram information with the incidence of plexopathy to establish the maximum dose tolerated by the brachial plexus. Methods and Materials: We identified 90 patients with NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation from March 2007 through September 2010, who had received >55 Gy to the brachial plexus. We used a multiatlas segmentation method combined with deformable image registration to delineate the brachial plexus on the original planning CT scans and scored plexopathy according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.03. Results: Median radiation dose to the brachial plexus was 70 Gy (range, 56–87.5 Gy; 1.5–2.5 Gy/fraction). At a median follow-up time of 14.0 months, 14 patients (16%) had brachial plexopathy (8 patients [9%] had Grade 1, and 6 patients [7%] had Grade ≥2); median time to symptom onset was 6.5 months (range, 1.4–37.4 months). On multivariate analysis, receipt of a median brachial plexus dose of >69 Gy (odds ratio [OR] 10.091; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.512–67.331; p = 0.005), a maximum dose of >75 Gy to 2 cm3 of the brachial plexus (OR, 4.909; 95% CI, 0.966–24.952; p = 0.038), and the presence of plexopathy before irradiation (OR, 4.722; 95% CI, 1.267–17.606; p = 0.021) were independent predictors of brachial plexopathy. Conclusions: For lung cancers near the apical region, brachial plexopathy is a major concern for high-dose radiation therapy. We developed a computer-assisted image segmentation method that allows us to rapidly and consistently contour the brachial plexus and establish the dose limits to minimize the risk of brachial plexopathy. Our results could be used as a guideline in future

  5. Constitutive STAT5 Activation Correlates With Better Survival in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Constitutively activated signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) factors, in particular STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5, have been detected in a wide variety of human primary tumors and have been demonstrated to directly contribute to oncogenesis. However, the expression pattern of these STATs in cervical carcinoma is still unknown, as is whether or not they have prognostic significance. This study investigated the expression patterns of STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 in cervical cancer and their associations with clinical outcomes in patients treated with radical radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 165 consecutive patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stages IB to IVA cervical cancer underwent radical radiation therapy, including external beam and/or high-dose-rate brachytherapy between 1989 and 2002. Immunohistochemical studies of their formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues were performed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify and to evaluate the effects of these factors affecting patient survival. Results: Constitutive activations of STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 were observed in 11%, 22%, and 61% of the participants, respectively. While STAT5 activation was associated with significantly better metastasis-free survival (p < 0.01) and overall survival (p = 0.04), STAT1 and STAT3 activation were not. Multivariate analyses showed that STAT5 activation, bulky tumor (≥4 cm), advanced stage (FIGO Stages III and IV), and brachytherapy (yes vs. no) were independent prognostic factors for cause-specific overall survival. None of the STATs was associated with local relapse. STAT5 activation (odds ratio = 0.29, 95% confidence interval = 0.13–0.63) and advanced stage (odds ratio = 2.54; 95% confidence interval = 1.03–6.26) were independent predictors of distant metastasis. Conclusions: This is the first report to provide the overall expression patterns and prognostic significance

  6. Constitutive STAT5 Activation Correlates With Better Survival in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Helen H.W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cheng Kung University, Medical College and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Chou, Cheng-Yang [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, National Cheng Kung University, Medical College and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Wu, Yuan-Hua; Hsueh, Wei-Ting; Hsu, Chiung-Hui [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cheng Kung University, Medical College and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Guo, How-Ran [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, National Cheng Kung University, Medical College and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Lee, Wen-Ying, E-mail: 7707@so-net.net.tw [Department of Pathology, Chi Mei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan (China) and Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Su, Wu-Chou, E-mail: sunnysu@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Internal Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Medical College and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Constitutively activated signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) factors, in particular STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5, have been detected in a wide variety of human primary tumors and have been demonstrated to directly contribute to oncogenesis. However, the expression pattern of these STATs in cervical carcinoma is still unknown, as is whether or not they have prognostic significance. This study investigated the expression patterns of STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 in cervical cancer and their associations with clinical outcomes in patients treated with radical radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 165 consecutive patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stages IB to IVA cervical cancer underwent radical radiation therapy, including external beam and/or high-dose-rate brachytherapy between 1989 and 2002. Immunohistochemical studies of their formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues were performed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify and to evaluate the effects of these factors affecting patient survival. Results: Constitutive activations of STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 were observed in 11%, 22%, and 61% of the participants, respectively. While STAT5 activation was associated with significantly better metastasis-free survival (p < 0.01) and overall survival (p = 0.04), STAT1 and STAT3 activation were not. Multivariate analyses showed that STAT5 activation, bulky tumor ({>=}4 cm), advanced stage (FIGO Stages III and IV), and brachytherapy (yes vs. no) were independent prognostic factors for cause-specific overall survival. None of the STATs was associated with local relapse. STAT5 activation (odds ratio = 0.29, 95% confidence interval = 0.13-0.63) and advanced stage (odds ratio = 2.54; 95% confidence interval = 1.03-6.26) were independent predictors of distant metastasis. Conclusions: This is the first report to provide the overall expression patterns and prognostic significance of

  7. Acute mucosal reactions in patients with advanced head and neck cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We conducted a clinical study to analyze the acute reactions in the oral cavity and the oropharyngeal (OCOPH) mucosa in patients with advanced head and neck cancer (HNC) undergoing a definitive treatment consisted of 3-D conformal radiotherapy combined with concomitant chemotherapy. Twenty nine patients with HNC who were treated between February 2008 and October 2009 were included in the study. The median age was 55 years (range 29-70). The site distribution was as follows: oropharynx, 20.7%; hypopharynx, 41.4%; larynx, 37.9%. The radiation technique used for 3-D conformal radiotherapy was named 'oblique photon fields' technique. The OCOPH mucosa as a critical normal tissue was delineated in every patient. Extraction of planning target volume (PTV50) from the volume of OCOPH mucosa led to formation of an OCOPH mucosa with extracted PTV50 (OCOPHEx mucosa). Acute mucosal reactions were recorded using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grading system. The duration of a maximum grade of reaction was also recorded. A time intensity parameter, so-called Severity-Time Units (STU), quantifying the area under the acute reaction curve, was used to express the intensity of mucositis over time in every patient. Grade 3 acute mucosal reaction was manifested in 19 patients (65.5%). The median duration of confluent mucositis was 21 days (range 14-35). The STU less than 1000 mm2 and the STU more than 1500 mm2 was calculated in equal number of patients (9 patients, or 31.0%). Statistically significant difference in the distribution of the grade 3 reaction was found among patients with different site of the primary tumor (p = 0.003). Statistically significant difference was found between the grade of the acute mucositis and the volume of OCOPHEx mucosa, the dose in 50% of the volume of OCOPHEx (D50%, OCOPHEx) mucosa, and the mean dose to OCOPHEx mucosa (p = 0.02, p = 0.0002, p = 0.00001, respectively). The tested relation between STU and delineated volumes (PTV50 and OCOPHEx

  8. Standardized Method for Quantification of Developing Lymphedema in Patients Treated for Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop a simple and practical formula for quantifying breast cancer-related lymphedema, accounting for both the asymmetry of upper extremities' volumes and their temporal changes. Methods and Materials: We analyzed bilateral perometer measurements of the upper extremity in a series of 677 women who prospectively underwent lymphedema screening during treatment for unilateral breast cancer at Massachusetts General Hospital between August 2005 and November 2008. Four sources of variation were analyzed: between repeated measurements on the same arm at the same session; between both arms at baseline (preoperative) visit; in follow-up measurements; and between patients. Effects of hand dominance, time since diagnosis and surgery, age, weight, and body mass index were also analyzed. Results: The statistical distribution of variation of measurements suggests that the ratio of volume ratios is most appropriate for quantification of both asymmetry and temporal changes. Therefore, we present the formula for relative volume change (RVC): RVC = (A2U1)/(U2A1) - 1, where A1, A2 are arm volumes on the side of the treated breast at two different time points, and U1, U2 are volumes on the contralateral side. Relative volume change is not significantly associated with hand dominance, age, or time since diagnosis. Baseline weight correlates (p = 0.0074) with higher RVC; however, baseline body mass index or weight changes over time do not. Conclusions: We propose the use of the RVC formula to assess the presence and course of breast cancer-related lymphedema in clinical practice and research.

  9. Determination of the risk of a second cancer in patients treated for a first cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A paradoxical effect of radiotherapy and chemotherapy for cancer is that some of these treatments can themselves cause new cancers. Most epidemiologic methods can be applied successfully to the investigation of this problem and this paper reviews various approaches that have already been used by various researchers. The more traditional methods, i.e., cohort and case-control studies are first reviewed and then designs that have been proposed more recently, such as case-cohort studies are described. A distinction is established between internal comparisons, carried out within the study population, and external comparisons, in which a general population external to the population under study is used as the reference category. This presentation is mainly aimed at investigators using tumor registry data. However, the general principles formulated here are easily generalized to contexts other than that of registries

  10. 2q36.3 is associated with prognosis for oestrogen receptor-negative breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jingmei; Lindström, Linda; Foo, Jia; Rafiq, Meena; Schmidt, Marjanka; Pharoah, Paul; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dennis, Joe; Bolla, Manjeet; Wang, Qing; Veer, Laura; Cornelissen, Sten; Rutgers, Emiel; Southey, Melissa; Apicella, Carmel

    2014-01-01

    textabstractLarge population-based registry studies have shown that breast cancer prognosis is inherited. Here we analyse single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes implicated in human immunology and inflammation as candidates for prognostic markers of breast cancer survival involving 1,804 oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative patients treated with chemotherapy (279 events) from 14 European studies in a prior large-scale genotyping experiment, which is part of the Collaborative Oncological G...

  11. Significance of p16 expression in head and neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy and cetuximab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiduschka, Gregor; Thurnher, Dietmar [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Grah, Anja; Kranz, Alexander; Selzer, Edgar [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiotherapy, Vienna (Austria); Oberndorfer, Felicitas; Wrba, Fritz [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Clinical Pathology, Vienna (Austria); Seemann, Rudolf [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Kornek, Gabriela [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Medicine I - Division of Clinical Oncology, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-09-15

    HPV-infection, p16 positivity, and EGFR expression have been correlated with favorable responses of head and neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) with or without chemotherapy. However, a possible correlation of HPV/p16 and EGFR status on the effect of RT in combination with cetuximab has not been sufficiently investigated. We analyzed tumor samples for p16 and EGFR expression and correlated these variables with treatment outcome. Cox-proportional-hazard regression models were applied to compare the risk of death among patients stratified according to risk factors. Survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results were compared with an institutional historical control group treated without cetuximab and with published data. Expression of p16 was predominantly found in oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer patients (OPSCC; 36.6 % positivity; 92 % of all cases), while EGFR was expressed at high levels in all tumor subsites (82 %). p16 expression was associated with improved overall survival in irradiated OPSCC patients (2-year overall survival of 80 % in p16-positive vs. 33 % overall survival in p16-negative patients). In a multivariable analysis covering all tumor sites, nodal stage (> N2a vs. ≤ N2a) and tumor site (OPSSC vs. non-OPSCC) had an impact on overall survival. Our results show that p16 positivity is associated with a favorable outcome in OPSCC patients treated with RT and cetuximab. (orig.) [German] HPV-Infektion, p16-Positivitaet und EGFR-Expression wurden bei Kopf-Hals-Tumorpatienten, die mit einer Strahlentherapie (RT) mit oder ohne Chemotherapie behandelt wurden, mit einem besseren Ergebnis in Verbindung gebracht. Bis jetzt wurde eine solche Korrelation bei Patienten, die mit einer RT in Kombination mit Cetuximab therapiert wurden, nicht untersucht. Es wurden die p16- und die EGFR-Expression in Tumormaterial untersucht und die Daten mit dem Behandlungsergebnissen korreliert. Um die Sterberisiken zu vergleichen, wurden Cox

  12. Evaluating predictive pharmacogenetic signatures of adverse events in colorectal cancer patients treated with fluoropyrimidines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara A Jennings

    Full Text Available The potential clinical utility of genetic markers associated with response to fluoropyrimidine treatment in colorectal cancer patients remains controversial despite extensive study. Our aim was to test the clinical validity of both novel and previously identified markers of adverse events in a broad clinical setting. We have conducted an observational pharmacogenetic study of early adverse events in a cohort study of 254 colorectal cancer patients treated with 5-fluorouracil or capecitabine. Sixteen variants of nine key folate (pharmacodynamic and drug metabolising (pharmacokinetic enzymes have been analysed as individual markers and/or signatures of markers. We found a significant association between TYMP S471L (rs11479 and early dose modifications and/or severe adverse events (adjusted OR = 2.02 [1.03; 4.00], p = 0.042, adjusted OR = 2.70 [1.23; 5.92], p = 0.01 respectively. There was also a significant association between these phenotypes and a signature of DPYD mutations (Adjusted OR = 3.96 [1.17; 13.33], p = 0.03, adjusted OR = 6.76 [1.99; 22.96], p = 0.002 respectively. We did not identify any significant associations between the individual candidate pharmacodynamic markers and toxicity. If a predictive test for early adverse events analysed the TYMP and DPYD variants as a signature, the sensitivity would be 45.5 %, with a positive predictive value of just 33.9 % and thus poor clinical validity. Most studies to date have been under-powered to consider multiple pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic variants simultaneously but this and similar individualised data sets could be pooled in meta-analyses to resolve uncertainties about the potential clinical utility of these markers.

  13. Gene expression alterations associated with outcome in aromatase inhibitor-treated ER+ early-stage breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravgaard Thomsen, Karina Hedelund; Lyng, Maria Bibi; Elias, Daniel;

    2015-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AI), either alone or together with chemotherapy, have become the standard adjuvant treatment for postmenopausal, estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer. Although AIs improve overall survival, resistance is still a major clinical problem, thus additional biomarkers...... predictive of outcome of ER+ breast cancer patients treated with AIs are needed. Global gene expression analysis was performed on ER+ primary breast cancers from patients treated with adjuvant AI monotherapy; half experienced recurrence (median follow-up 6.7 years). Gene expression alterations were validated...... by qRT-PCR, and functional studies evaluating the effect of siRNA-mediated gene knockdown on cell growth were performed. Twenty-six genes, including TFF3, DACH1, RGS5, and GHR, were shown to exhibit altered expression in tumors from patients with recurrence versus non-recurrent (fold change ≥1.5, p

  14. Endurance training improves insulin sensitivity and body composition in prostate cancer patients treated with androgen deprivation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Thine; Winding, Kamilla; Rinnov, Anders;

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance and changes in body composition are side effects of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) given to prostate cancer patients. The present study investigated whether endurance training improves insulin sensitivity and body composition in ADT-treated prostate cancer patients. Nine me...... and magnetic resonance imaging). The secondary endpoint was systemic inflammation. Statistical analysis was carried out using two-way ANOVA. Endurance training increased VO2max (ml(O2)/min per kg) by 11 and 13% in the patients and controls respectively (P...

  15. MALNUTRITION AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN PATIENTS TREATED FOR ORAL OR OROPHARYNGEAL CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager-Wittenaar, Harriet; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Vissink, Arjan; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; van Oort, Rob P.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.

    2011-01-01

    Background. This study assessed whether malnourished patients score lower on quality of life after treatment for oral/oropharyngeal cancer. Methods. Malnutrition (weight loss >= 10% in 6 months/>= 5% in 1 month) and quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality

  16. Quality of life assessment in advanced cancer patients treated at home, an inpatient unit, and a day care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leppert W

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Wojciech Leppert,1 Mikolaj Majkowicz,2 Maria Forycka,1 Eleonora Mess,3 Agata Zdun-Ryzewska2 1Department of Palliative Medicine, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 2Department of Quality of Life Research, Gdansk Medical University, Gdansk, Poland; 3Palliative Care Nursing Department, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland Aim of the study: To assess quality of life (QoL in cancer patients treated at home, at an in-patient palliative care unit (PCU, and at a day care center (DCC. Patients and methods: QoL was assessed in advanced cancer patients at baseline and after 7 days of symptomatic treatment using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 15-Palliative Care (EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL, the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS, and the Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS scale. Results: A total of 129 patients completed the study, with 51 patients treated at home, 51 patients treated at the PCU, and 27 patients at DCC. In the EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL, improvement in functional and symptom scales was observed except in physical functioning and fatigue levels; patients at DCC had a better physical functioning, global QoL, appetite, and fatigue levels. In the ESAS, improvement in all items was found except for drowsiness levels, which was stable in patients treated at DCC and deteriorated in home and PCU patients. Higher activity, better appetite and well-being, and less drowsiness were observed in patients treated at DCC. KPS was better in DCC patients compared to those treated at home and at the PCU; the latter group deteriorated. Conclusions: QoL improved in all patient groups, with better results in DCC patients and similar scores in those staying at home and at the PCU. Along with clinical assessment, baseline age, KPS, physical and emotional functioning may be considered when assigning patients to care at a DCC, PCU, or at home. Keywords: oncology, patient care

  17. Open comparative trial of formestane versus megestrol acetate in postmenopausal patients with advanced breast cancer previously treated with tamoxifen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freue, M; Kjaer, M; Boni, C; Joliver, J; Janicke, F; Willemse, PHB; Coombes, RC; Van Belle, S; Perez-Carrion, R; Zieschang, J; de Palacios, PI; Rose, C

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the trial was to compare efficacy and safety of the aromatase inhibitor formestane (250 mg i.m. given every 2 weeks) with the progestin megestrol acetate (160 mg administered orally once daily), as second-line therapy in postmenopausal patients with advanced breast cancer previously treat

  18. Prognostic cell biological markers in cervical cancer patients primarily treated with (chemo)radiation : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordhuis, Maartje G; Eijsink, Jasper J H; Roossink, Frank; de Graeff, Pauline; Pras, Elisabeth; Schuuring, Ed; Wisman, G Bea A; de Bock, Geertruida H; van der Zee, Ate G J

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review the prognostic and predictive significance of cell biological markers in cervical cancer patients primarily treated with (chemo)radiation. A PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane literature search was performed. Studies describing a relation between a cell b

  19. Secondary oesophageal or gastric cancer in patients treated for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anja Rosenlund; Bjerring, Ole Steen; Godballe, Christian;

    2016-01-01

    SPM. CONCLUSION: In this study, we confirm that there is an elevated risk of developing oesophageal and gastric cancer in the Danish population of patients with a cancer in the supraglottic or hypopharyngeal region. Therefore, we recommend close follow-up of these patients and a low threshold......INTRODUCTION: Patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are at an elevated risk of developing second primary malignancies (SPM). Our objectives were to estimate the excess risk of oesophageal and gastric SPMs in patients with malignancies of the pharynx or larynx and, additionally.......004) and hypopharyngeal (OR = 3.9; p cancer compared with 3.4 years (95% CI: 3.1-4.3; range: 0.04-13.7) for patients without...

  20. Persistence of unstable and stable chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes of cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Giorgio, M.; Vallerga, M.B.; Taja, M.R. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Sardi, M. [Hospital Italiano - Mevaterapia, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2006-07-01

    Background: Radiation-induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes has equal probability of producing both stable or unstable chromosome aberrations (C.A.). Reports of its in vivo persistence show considerable variations. The quantification of unstable C.A. (dicentrics) in peripheral blood lymphocytes (P.B.L.) is the most reliable biological method for estimating whole-body doses of recent overexposures to ionizing radiation. Given that during the division of T cell precursors, proliferative death of cells containing dicentrics reduces the number of such lymphocytes in peripheral blood, dicentric methodology should be modified to account for past exposures. Micronuclei (M.N.) in cytokinesis-blocked human P.B.L. are well established bio markers for assessing radiation damage in vivo. However, persistence of radiation induced M.N. is limited. Unlike dicentrics and M.N., stable C.A. (translocations) identified at present by the FISH technique, seem to be an adequate indicator for the dosimetric evaluation of past exposures, since translocations are not selected against during mitotic division in the haematopoietic stem cells compartment. Nevertheless, for partial -body exposures with high dose there is some evidence that the decline with time of dicentrics causes some reduction in the yield of translocations. Purpose: To assess the persistence along time of dicentrics, M.N. and translocations in lymphocytes of cancer patients after radiotherapy in order to model changes in C.A. frequencies with partial-body exposures. Materials and methods: 22 cancer patients with different tumor sites, treated with radiotherapy, were evaluated through dicentric chromosome, M.N. and FISH techniques with a follow-up time of up to 90 months after the end of radiotherapy. Regression analysis were performed: 1) for dicentric and for M.N. frequencies in relation to time after the end of radiotherapy and total tumor dose; 2) for the percentage of uns table cells in relation to time after the end

  1. Sphincter preservation in patients with low rectal cancer treated with radiation therapy with or without local excision or fulguration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-six patients with small cancers limited to the lower two-thirds of the rectum were treated with conservative surgery and radiation therapy (XRT). In patients treated with local excision or fulguration followed by XRT, there was a 6% local failure rate (one in 17); in 16 of 17 patients receiving radiation doses above 4500 cGy, the local control was complete for follow-up periods of 6 months to 7 years. In nine patients treated with XRT for residual tumor, local failure occurred in five (56%). Serious late complications occurred only if total doses were greater than 6300 cGy. Local excision combined with XRT proved to be a safe alternative to radical surgery in selected patients and resulted in excellent local control while allowing preservation of anal sphincter function

  2. 10-year epidemiological profile changes for cervical and endometrial cancer patients treated by radiotherapy in the Pernambuco state, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Santos, Mariana L.O.; Franca, Elvis J., E-mail: ejfranca@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: marianasantos_ufpe@hotmail.com, E-mail: rebecanuclear@gmail.com [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Pessoa, Juanna G.; Melo, Ana M.M.A.; Amancio, Francisco F., E-mail: amdemelo@hotmail.com, E-mail: amanciobike@gmail.com, E-mail: juannapessoa@gmail.com, E-mail: marianasantos_ufpe@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Biofisica e Radiobiologia; Oliveira Neto, Aristides M.; Melo, Jonathan A., E-mail: aristidesoliveira466@hotmail.com, E-mail: jonathan@truenet.com.br [Centro de Radioterapia de Pernambuco (CERAPE), Santo Amaro, PE (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Cancer is a worldwide public health problem, its prevention and control are included within 16 strategic objectives of the Brazilian Ministry of Health for the period 2011-2015. Cervical cancer is the fourth most common tumor in the female population, being new 15,590 cases estimated for 2014 according to the Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCA). Pernambuco is the fifth state with the highest number of cases of cervical cancer and the seventh in cases of endometrial ones, both estimative for 2014. The understanding of the epidemiological profile of these pathologies corroborates strategies for prevention, control and treatment. As Pernambuco has implemented the radiotherapy for cancer treatment since 1998-1999, this work encompassed the comparison of the 1998-1999 epidemiological profile of patients treated by radiotherapy for cervical and endometrial cancer in the State of Pernambuco, Brazil, with 2008-2009 profile - ten years after. Medical record of 490 patients treated at the Center of Radiotherapy of Pernambuco (CERAPE) were compiled according to the patient origin, the affected uterus region, the staging of disease, the type and cell differentiation of the tumor, the age group, and, finally, the realization of hysterectomy as part of the treatment. More than 90% of the patients were affected by cervical cancer in the two investigated periods. For the interval of 1998-1999 the proportion of patients submitted to hysterectomy was quite higher compared to those after ten years. The results also showed a change in the origin of the patients, in which, in 1999, most of the patients were from the capital and the metropolitan area, while, after ten years, patients were mostly from the interior of the State. There was a predominance of squamous cell type tumors in both periods evaluated. For the 1998-1999 interval, tumors were stage 2, moderately differentiated type. Differently, the tumors were mostly stage 3, not differentiated type, for the 2008-2009 period

  3. Nonmelanoma skin cancer risk awareness in azathioprine-treated myasthenia gravis patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGurgan, Iain J

    2015-10-01

    Increased rates of NMSC (nonmelanoma skin cancer) have recently been reported in people with MG (myasthenia gravis) receiving azathioprine treatment. Guidelines on azathioprine for patients with dermatological and gastrointestinal disorders stress the importance of NMSC risk awareness and prevention. The aim of this study is to assess whether MG patients are being informed of this risk.

  4. Quality of life assessment in advanced cancer patients treated at home, an inpatient unit, and a day care center

    OpenAIRE

    Leppert, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Wojciech Leppert,1 Mikolaj Majkowicz,2 Maria Forycka,1 Eleonora Mess,3 Agata Zdun-Ryzewska2 1Department of Palliative Medicine, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 2Department of Quality of Life Research, Gdansk Medical University, Gdansk, Poland; 3Palliative Care Nursing Department, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland Aim of the study: To assess quality of life (QoL) in cancer patients treated at home, at an in-patient palliative care unit (PCU), and at a day care...

  5. Comparison of PET metabolic indices for the early assessment of tumour response in metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated by polychemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Maisonobe, Jacques-Antoine; Garcia, Camilo A.; Necib, Hatem; Vanderlinden, Bruno; Hendlisz, Alain; Flamen, Patrick; Buvat, Irène

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To compare the performance of eight metabolic indices for the early assessment of tumour response in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) treated with chemotherapy. Methods Forty patients with advanced mCRC underwent two FDG PET/CT scans, at baseline and on day 14 after chemotherapy initiation. For each lesion, eight metabolic indices were calculated: four standardized uptake values (SUV) without correction for the partial volume effect (PVE), two SUV with correction for ...

  6. Analysis of prognostic factors in 1180 patients with oral cavity primary cancer treated with definitive or adjuvant radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murthy V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present study identifies the prognostic factors influencing oral cancers in a large cohort of patients treated at a single institute. Materials and Methods: This is an audit of 1180 patients treated from 1990 to 2004 in the service setting with prospective data collection. Patients were treated with radical radiotherapy or were planned for surgery and post operative radiotherapy (PORT. None of the patients received postoperative concurrent chemoradiation. For analysis, patients were divided into Group 1 and Group 2 based on the oral cavity subsite. Results: Of the entire cohort, 810 patients had tumors of the Gingivo-alveolo-buccal complex, lip and hard palate (Group 1 and 370 patients had primaries in tongue and floor of mouth (Group 2. Three year locoregional control for the entire cohort was 58%. The three year local control (LC, locoregional control (LRC and disease free survival (DFS for PORT group were 74%, 65% and 60%, respectively, with pathological nodal status, perinodal extension and cut margin status showing statistical significance (P <0.001. In the definitive radiotherapy group, the three year LC, LRC and DFS were 34%, 31% and 30%, respectively, with age, T stage, nodal status and stage being significant. Group 1 patients showed significantly better LC, LRC and DFS than Group 2 patients for the entire cohort. Conclusion: The results indicate superior outcomes with PORT particularly in advanced stages of oral cancer and inferior outcomes in tongue and floor of mouth subsites. There is scope for improving outcomes by adopting treatment intensification strategies.

  7. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Danish Population-Based Case-Control Study of Breast Cencer Patients Treated with Cyclophosphamide Epirubicin and 5-Fluororacil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ording, Anne Gulbech; Cronin Fenton, Deirdre; Christensen, Mariann;

    2012-01-01

    Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Danish Population-Based Case-Control Study of Breast Cencer Patients Treated with Cyclophosphamide Epirubicin and 5-Fluororacil......Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Danish Population-Based Case-Control Study of Breast Cencer Patients Treated with Cyclophosphamide Epirubicin and 5-Fluororacil...

  8. Subsequent malignancies in patients treated with 131-iodine for thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I-131 was administered to 298 patients with thyroid cancer, and there has been a follow-up of at least two years. Follow-up periods were: 2.5 to 30 years (median 14.5) in living patients, 2.5 to 15 years (median 5.5) in patients dead of tumour ≥ 2 years after first treatment and 2.5 to 23 years (median nine) in patients dead without tumour. Person-years at risk were (total applied activity of I-131): 1119 (3 to 21 GBq), 1477 (22 to 65 GBq), 521 (61 to 170 Gbq). 33 subsequent malignancies in 31 patients were observed, compared to an expected number of 17. The relative risk of subsequent malignancies is therefore 1.94 with a 95% confidence intervall of 1.15 to 3.05. This increase in the incidence of subsequent malignancies after I-131 treatments is largely due to the significantly increased incidence of leukemia and bladder cancer. Estimated radiation doses to the bone marrow in the patients with leukemia were 301 cGy to 792 cGy and the doses to the bladder in patients with bladder cancer were 2250 cGy to 10, 350 cGy. After a total activity of less than 37 GBq I-131, no cases of bladder cancer or leukemia were observed. The observed number of subsequent malignancies are compared with the expected number according to several dose-effect estimations. (orig.)

  9. Cancer incidence and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with human insulin: a cohort study in Shanghai.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunjuan Gu

    Full Text Available AIM: The aim was to investigate the association between human insulin and cancer incidence and mortality in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: We recruited 8,774 insulin-naïve diabetes patients from the Shanghai Diabetes Registry (SDR. The follow-up rate was 85.4%. All subjects were divided into the insulin use cohort (n = 3,639 and the non-insulin use cohort (n = 5,135. The primary outcome was the first diagnosis of any cancer. The secondary outcome was all-cause mortality. Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the relative risk (RR of cancer and mortality. RESULTS: We observed 98 cancer events in the insulin use cohort and 170 in the non-insulin use cohort. Cancer incidence rates were 78.6 and 74.3 per 10,000 patients per year in the insulin users and the non-insulin users, respectively. No significant difference in cancer risk was observed between the two cohorts (adjusted RR = 1.20, 95% CI 0.89-1.62, P = 0.228. Regarding site-specific cancers, only the risk of liver cancer was significantly higher in the insulin users compared to that in the non-insulin users (adjusted RR = 2.84, 95% CI 1.12-7.17, P = 0.028. The risks of overall mortality (adjusted RR = 1.89, 95% CI 1.47-2.43, P<0.0001 and death from cancer (adjusted RR = 2.16, 95% CI 1.39-3.35, P = 0.001 were all significantly higher in the insulin users than in the non-insulin users. CONCLUSION: There was no excess risk of overall cancer in patients with type 2 diabetes who were treated with human insulin. However, a significantly higher risk of liver cancer was found in these patients. Moreover, insulin users showed higher risks of overall and cancer mortality. Considering that individuals treated with insulin were more likely to be advanced diabetic patients, caution should be used in interpreting these results.

  10. Cancer Incidence and Mortality in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Treated with Human Insulin: A Cohort Study in Shanghai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ying; Hou, Xuhong; Mo, Yifei; Yu, Weihui; Zhang, Lei; Hu, Cheng; Nan, Hairong; Chen, Lei; Li, Jie; Liu, Yuxiang; Huang, Zhezhou; Han, Ming; Bao, Yuqian; Zhong, Weijian; Jia, Weiping

    2013-01-01

    Aim The aim was to investigate the association between human insulin and cancer incidence and mortality in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods We recruited 8,774 insulin-naïve diabetes patients from the Shanghai Diabetes Registry (SDR). The follow-up rate was 85.4%. All subjects were divided into the insulin use cohort (n = 3,639) and the non-insulin use cohort (n = 5,135). The primary outcome was the first diagnosis of any cancer. The secondary outcome was all-cause mortality. Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the relative risk (RR) of cancer and mortality. Results We observed 98 cancer events in the insulin use cohort and 170 in the non-insulin use cohort. Cancer incidence rates were 78.6 and 74.3 per 10,000 patients per year in the insulin users and the non-insulin users, respectively. No significant difference in cancer risk was observed between the two cohorts (adjusted RR = 1.20, 95% CI 0.89–1.62, P = 0.228). Regarding site-specific cancers, only the risk of liver cancer was significantly higher in the insulin users compared to that in the non-insulin users (adjusted RR = 2.84, 95% CI 1.12–7.17, P = 0.028). The risks of overall mortality (adjusted RR = 1.89, 95% CI 1.47–2.43, P<0.0001) and death from cancer (adjusted RR = 2.16, 95% CI 1.39–3.35, P = 0.001) were all significantly higher in the insulin users than in the non-insulin users. Conclusion There was no excess risk of overall cancer in patients with type 2 diabetes who were treated with human insulin. However, a significantly higher risk of liver cancer was found in these patients. Moreover, insulin users showed higher risks of overall and cancer mortality. Considering that individuals treated with insulin were more likely to be advanced diabetic patients, caution should be used in interpreting these results. PMID:23308218

  11. A male patient with acromegaly and breast cancer: treating acromegaly to control tumor progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acromegaly is a rare disease associated with an increased risk of developing cancer. We report the case of a 72-year-old man who was diagnosed with acromegaly (IGF-1 770 ng/ml) and breast cancer. Four years before he suffered from a colon-rectal cancer. Pituitary surgery and octreotide-LAR treatment failed to control acromegaly. Normalization of IGF-1 (97 ng/ml) was obtained with pegvisomant therapy. Four years after breast cancer surgery, 2 pulmonary metastases were detected at chest CT. The patient was started on anastrozole, but, contrary to medical advice, he stopped pegvisomant treatment (IGF-I 453 ng/ml). Four months later, chest CT revealed an increase in size of the metastatic lesion of the left lung. The patient was shifted from anastrozole to tamoxifen and was restarted on pegvisomant, with normalization of serum IGF-1 levels (90 ng/ml). Four months later, a reduction in size of the metastatic lesion of the left lung was detected by CT. Subsequent CT scans throughout a 24-month follow-up showed a further reduction in size and then a stabilization of the metastasis. This is the first report of a male patient with acromegaly and breast cancer. The clinical course of breast cancer was closely related to the metabolic control of acromegaly. The rapid progression of metastatic lesion was temporally related to stopping pegvisomant treatment and paralleled a rise in serum IGF-1 levels. Normalization of IGF-1 after re-starting pegvisomant impressively reduced the progression of metastatic breast lesions. Control of acromegaly is mandatory in acromegalic patients with cancer. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1400-0) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  12. Impact of the care provided by gynecologic oncologists on outcomes of cervical cancer patients treated with radical hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Miao-Fang; Li, Jing; Lu, Huai-Wu; Wang, Li-Juan; Zhang, Bing-Zhong; Lin, Zhong-Qiu

    2016-01-01

    For many malignant diseases, specialized care has been reported to be associated with better outcomes. The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of gynecologic oncologists on treatment outcomes for cervical cancer patients treated by radical hysterectomy. Records of patients who received radical hysterectomy between January 2005 and June 2010 were reviewed. Perioperative morbidity, recurrence-free survival, and cancer-specific survival were assessed. Cox regression model was used to evaluate gynecologic oncologists as an independent predictor of survival. A total of 839 patients were included. Of these patients, 553 were treated by gynecologic oncologists, while 286 were treated by other subspecialties. With regard to operative outcomes, significant differences in favor of operation by gynecologic oncologists were found in number of patients receiving para-aortic node sampling and dissection (P=0.038), compliance with surgical guidelines (P=0.003), operative time (P<0.0001), estimated blood loss (P<0.0001), transfusion rate (P=0.046), number of removed nodes (P=0.033), and incidences of ureteric injury (P=0.027), cystotomy (P=0.038), and fistula formation (P=0.002). Patients who were operated on by gynecologic oncologists had longer recurrence-free survival (P=0.001; hazard ratio [HR] =0.64; 95% confidence interval [CI] [0.48, 0.84]) and cancer-specific survival (P=0.005; HR=0.64; 95% CI [0.47, 0.87]), and this association remained significant in patients with locally advanced disease. Care by gynecologic oncologists was an independent predictor for improved recurrence-free survival (P<0.0001; HR=0.57; 95% CI [0.42, 0.76]) and cancer-specific survival (P=0.001; HR=0.58; 95% CI [0.42, 0.81]), which was still significant among patients with locally advanced cancer. Given the results, we believe for cervical cancer patients receiving radical hysterectomy, operation by gynecologic oncologists results in significantly improved surgical and survival

  13. Radiation Therapy, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-14

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer

  14. Short-term mortality in older patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstock, Aron S; Lei, Xiudong; Tripathy, Debu; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Giordano, Sharon H; Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana

    2016-06-01

    Chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer has lowered cancer recurrence and deaths. However, short-term mortality rates due to cancer or treatment in the general population remain largely unknown. In this study, we evaluate the short-term mortality rate and the determinants of such outcome among a cohort of older breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. This is a population-based study based on the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER)-Medicare and the Texas Cancer Registry (TCR)-Medicare databases. Patients diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer between 2003 and 2011 who were 66 years or older and were treated with adjuvant chemotherapy within 6 months of diagnosis were included. Short-term mortality was defined as death from any cause within one year of breast cancer diagnosis. Descriptive statistics and multivariable logistic regression modeling were used for the analysis. Of the 21,536 patients included, a total of 625 (2.9 %) died within one year of breast cancer diagnosis. In multivariate analysis, older age (using 66-70 as reference category; 71-75 years OR 1.31, 95 % CI 1.05-1.62; 76-80 years OR 1.73, 95 % CI 1.36-2.19; >80 years OR 3.48, 95 % CI 2.7-4.48) and higher comorbidity index (using Charlson score of 0 as a reference, those with score of 1 or >2 had higher risk OR 1.46, 95 % CI 1.19-1.8 and OR 2.98, 95 % CI 2.42-3.67, respectively) were associated with the increased risk of short-term mortality. Other factors significantly associated with the outcome were higher grade and stage, ER-negative status, poor census tract area, and mastectomy. The findings of this study revealed that, in this large cohort of older breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy, 2.9 % of the population died within one year of breast cancer diagnosis. Finally, it was concluded that tumor- and patient-related characteristics were associated with short-term death. Our findings add relevant information that can be

  15. Potential role of pemetrexed in metastatic breast cancer patients pre-treated with anthracycline or taxane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Yan Zhou; Ye-Hui Shi; Yong-Sheng Jia; Zhong-Sheng Tong

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This article reviews pharmacology, pharmacokinetic properties, clinical efficacy, and safety in metastatic breast cancer patients, as well as the predictive biomarkers for outcome of treatment with pemetrexed-based regimens. Methods: PubMed, Embase, OVID, and the Cochrane Library databases were searched from the beginning of each database without any limitations to the date of publication. Search terms were‘‘pemetrexed’’ or‘‘LY231514’’ or“Alimta”,“metastatic breast cancer”, and“advanced breast cancer”. Results: There were 15 studies (n ¼ 1002) meeting our criteria for evaluation. Eight single-agent trials (n ¼ 551) and seven using combinations with other agents (n ¼ 451) were identified that evaluated pemetrexed for use in patients with metastatic breast cancer. Response rates to pemetrexed as a single agent varied from 8%to 31%, and with combination therapy have been reported to be between 15.8% and 55.7%. With routine supplementation of patients with folic acid, dexamethasone, and vitamin B12, the toxicity profile of these patients was mild, including dose-limiting neutropenia and thrombocytopenia, as well as lower grades of reversible hepatotoxicity and gastrointestinal toxicity. Expression of thymidylate synthase (TS) and other biomarkers are associated with the prognosis and sensitivity for pemetrexed in breast cancer. Conclusion: Pemetrexed has shown remarkable activity with acceptable toxicities for treatment of metastatic breast cancer patients. Translational research on pemetrexed in breast cancer identified biomarkers as well as additional genes important to its clinical activity and toxicity. Further research is needed to clarify the role of pemetrexed in breast cancer treatment in order to guide oncologists. Copyright © 2015, Chinese Medical Association Production. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of KeAi Com-munications Co., Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license

  16. Sunitinib Malate in Treating Patients With Iodine-Refractory Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  17. Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Colon, Pancreatic, or Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-27

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer

  18. Ipilimumab After Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Persistent or Progressive Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Disseminated Neuroblastoma; Malignant Neoplasm; Ovarian Choriocarcinoma; Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Ovarian Immature Teratoma; Ovarian Mature Teratoma; Ovarian Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Monodermal and Highly Specialized Teratoma; Ovarian Polyembryoma; Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Stage I Multiple Myeloma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Testicular Choriocarcinoma; Testicular Choriocarcinoma and Embryonal Carcinoma; Testicular Choriocarcinoma and Seminoma; Testicular Choriocarcinoma and Teratoma; Testicular Choriocarcinoma and Yolk Sac Tumor; Testicular Embryonal Carcinoma; Testicular

  19. The changes in complete blood count in thyroid cancer patients treated with radioactive iodine ablation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Bircan Sönmez; İsmail Doğan; Canan Yavruoğlu; Gamze Can; Mehmet Sönmez

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of radioactive iodine (RAI) ablation therapy on the complete blood count (CBC) in thyroid cancer patients. Materials and Methods: One hundred sixty four patients undergoing RAI ablation therapy after total thyroidectomy were included. CBC results were available from the patients’ medical records at the time of ablation and at the 1st, 6th, and 12th months after RAI therapy.Results: Hemoglobin (Hb), white blood cell (WBC) and platelet...

  20. Taxpas: Epidemiological and Survival Data in Breast Cancer Patients Treated with a Docetaxel-Based Chemotherapy Regimen in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun Devan Moodley

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the leading cancer among South African women. There is limited South African epidemiological data on triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC. Taxpas was a nonrandomized observational survey conducted in multiple centres in South Africa from April 2004 to December 2010. 1632 female patients diagnosed with breast cancer, with a median age of 51 years, were enrolled in the survey. Patients were treated on a docetaxel-based chemotherapy regimen. The objective of the study was to assess epidemiological data and survival data. The incidence of TNBC was 14%. The one-year survival rate for the total cohort was 84%. The one-year survival rate for patients with early stage and metastatic breast cancer was recorded as 94% and 65%, respectively. Patients with TNBC stage III (all ages and stage IV (≤50 years had statistically significant worse 1-year survival rate compared to N-TNBC patients of the same age and stages. Conclusion. The incidence of TNBC in South Africa which is 14% is comparable to global incidence. The 1-year survival data for certain subgroups supports the literature saying that TNBC carries a worse prognosis compared to N-TNBC. Women ≤50 years diagnosed with late stage TNBC carried the worst prognosis in this survey.

  1. European Laryngological Society : ELS recommendations for the follow-up of patients treated for laryngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simo, Ricard; Bradley, Patrick; Chevalier, Dominique; Dikkers, Frederik; Eckel, Hans; Matar, Nayla; Peretti, Giorgio; Piazza, Cesare; Remacle, Mark; Quer, Miquel

    2014-01-01

    It is accepted that the follow-up of patients who had treatment for laryngeal cancer is a fundamental part of their care. The reasons of post-treatment follow-up include evaluation of treatment response, early identification of recurrence, early detection of new primary tumours, monitoring and manag

  2. Plasma TIMP-1 levels and treatment outcome in patients treated with XELOX for metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, C.; Qvortrup, C.; Christensen, I.J.;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim was to evaluate the association between plasma tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) and serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels and outcome in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) receiving XELOX (combination chemotherapy with capecitabine and oxal...

  3. Objective Acoustic-Phonetic Speech Analysis in Patients Treated for Oral or Oropharyngeal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijn, Marieke J.; ten Bosch, Louis; Kuik, Dirk J.; Quene, Hugo; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Leemans, C. Rene; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Speech impairment often occurs in patients after treatment for head and neck cancer. New treatment modalities such as surgical reconstruction or (chemo) radiation techniques aim at sparing anatomical structures that are correlated with speech and swallowing. In randomized trials investiga

  4. Incidence of cancer in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients treated 25 years previously

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simony, Ane; Hansen, Emil Jesper; Christensen, Steen Bach;

    2016-01-01

    of cancer was determined through chart review and follow-up interviews. Using the original radiographic log file that included patient position, mAs, kV and the total number of X-rays taken, a radiation physicist calculated the total radiation dose during treatment and follow-up adjusted for BMI and sex...

  5. Risk of non-melanoma skin cancer in myasthenia patients treated with azathioprine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, E G; Pottegård, A; Hallas, J;

    2014-01-01

    The association between use of azathioprine and risk of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) in patients with myasthenia was evaluated in a nationwide setting. Treatment of autoimmune myasthenia frequently involves long-term exposure to immunosuppressants, including azathioprine. Use of azathioprine...

  6. Association between adjuvant regional radiotherapy and cognitive function in breast cancer patients treated with conservation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although protracted cognitive impairment has been reported to occur after radiotherapy even when such therapy is not directed to brain areas, the mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated whether breast cancer patients exposed to local radiotherapy showed lower cognitive function mediated by higher plasma interleukin (IL)-6 levels than those unexposed. We performed the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R) and measured plasma IL-6 levels for 105 breast cancer surgical patients within 1 year after the initial therapy. The group differences in each of the indices of WMS-R were investigated between cancer patients exposed to adjuvant regional radiotherapy (n = 51) and those unexposed (n = 54) using analysis of covariance. We further investigated a mediation effect by plasma IL-6 levels on the relationship between radiotherapy and the indices of WMS-R using the bootstrapping method. The radiotherapy group showed significantly lower Immediate Verbal Memory Index and Delayed Recall Index (P = 0.001, P = 0.008, respectively). Radiotherapy exerted an indirect effect on the lower Delayed Recall Index of WMS-R through elevation of plasma IL-6 levels (bootstrap 95% confidence interval = −2.6626 to −0.0402). This study showed that breast cancer patients exposed to adjuvant regional radiotherapy in conservation therapy might have cognitive impairment even several months after their treatment. The relationship between the therapy and the cognitive impairment could be partially mediated by elevation of plasma IL-6 levels

  7. Periodontal infection in cancer patients treated with high-dose chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raber-Durlacher, JE; Epstein, JB; Raber, J; van Dissel, JT; van Winkelhoff, AJ; Guiot, HFL; van der Velden, U

    2002-01-01

    The infected and inflamed periodontium can act as a focus for systemic infection in neutropenic cancer patients. The incidence of these oral infections is unknown, but probably underestimated. Periodontal infections can easily be overlooked, primarily because symptoms of gingival inflammation may be

  8. Skin cancer in patients with psoriasis treated with coal tar. A 25-year follow-up study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pittelkow, M.R.; Perry, H.O.; Muller, S.A.; Maughan, W.Z.; O' Brien, P.C.

    1981-08-01

    For many years, crude coal tar has been used for the treatment of psoriasis. The possible carcinogenic effect of crude coal tar and ultraviolet (UV) radiation (Goeckerman regimen), considered individually or in combination, has been of some concern to physicians. A 25-year follow-up study was completed on 280 patients with psoriasis who were hospitalized and treated with crude coal tar and UV radiation at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn, during the years 1950 through 1954. The results of this study suggest that the incidence of skin cancer is not appreciably increased above the expected incidence for the general population when patients are treated with coal tar ointments. It seems that the Goeckerman regimen (topical crude coal tar combined with UV radiation) can be used with minimal risk for skin cancer in the treatment of psoriasis.

  9. Successful Chemotherapy with Nab-Paclitaxel in a Heavily Treated Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patient: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikiko Ishihara

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC accounts for the majority of all lung cancers. A 69-year-old female with postoperatively recurrent NSCLC was treated weekly with nanoparticle-albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel monotherapy every 4 weeks as a tenth line chemotherapy, and stable disease was achieved by seven cycles of this regimen. The patient developed grade 4 neutropenia and grade 3 leukopenia, but none of the other toxicities, including febrile neutropenia and peripheral neuropathy, were severe, and thus she was able to tolerate this salvage chemotherapy. To our knowledge this is the first report of the efficacy of nab-paclitaxel monotherapy in a heavily treated NSCLC patient.

  10. Comparison of Survival Rate in Primary Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Among Elderly Patients Treated With Radiofrequency Ablation, Surgery, or Chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We retrospectively compared the survival rate in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with radiofrequency ablation (RFA), surgery, or chemotherapy according to lung cancer staging. Materials and Methods: From 2000 to 2004, 77 NSCLC patients, all of whom had WHO performance status 0–2 and were >60 years old, were enrolled in a cancer registry and retrospectively evaluated. RFA was performed on patients who had medical contraindications to surgery/unsuitability for surgery, such as advanced lung cancer or refusal of surgery. In the RFA group, 40 patients with inoperable NSCLC underwent RFA under computed tomography (CT) guidance. These included 16 patients with stage I to II cancer and 24 patients with stage III to IV cancer who underwent RFA in an adjuvant setting. In the comparison group (n = 37), 13 patients with stage I to II cancer underwent surgery; 18 patients with stage III to IV cancer underwent chemotherapy; and 6 patients with stage III to IV cancer were not actively treated. The survival curves for RFA, surgery, and chemotherapy in these patients were calculated using Kaplan–Meier method. Results: Median survival times for patients treated with (1) surgery alone and (2) RFA alone for stage I to II lung cancer were 33.8 and 28.2 months, respectively (P = 0.426). Median survival times for patients treated with (1) chemotherapy alone and (2) RFA with chemotherapy for stage III to IV cancer were 29 and 42 months, respectively (P = 0.03). Conclusion: RFA can be used as an alternative treatment to surgery for older NSCLC patients with stage I to II inoperable cancer and can play a role as adjuvant therapy with chemotherapy for patients with stage III to IV lung cancer.

  11. Biomarkers in Tissue Samples From Patients With Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer Treated With Zoledronic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-12

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  12. PRIMARY PALLIATIVE CARE? - Treating terminally ill cancer patients in the primary care sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Mette Asbjørn; Jensen, Anders Bonde; Olesen, Frede;

    sectors.METHOD. A number of focus group interviews were conducted with three types of subgroups: 1) Bereaved relatives, 2) GPs and 3) Various health-care-professionals, namely community nurses, hospital physicians and GPs. The interviews were transcribed and analysed according to a phenomenological......BACKGROUND. Palliative care for cancer patients is an important part of a GP's work. Although every GP is frequently involved in care for terminally ill cancer patients, only little is known about how these palliative efforts are perceived by the patients and their families, a knowledge...... approach.RESULTS. The analyses revealed several key areas, e.g.: 1) How to take, give and maintain professional responsibility for palliative home care. 2) A need for transparent communication both among primary care professionals and among professionals across the primary/secondary interface. 3...

  13. A modified radiofrequency ablation approach for treating distant lymph node metastasis in two patients with late-stage cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Fei Yuan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients with late-stage cancer commonly have distant lymph node metastasis; however, poor health often contraindicates surgical treatment. Although the quality of life and overall survival for these patients are low, there is neither a consensus nor a guide for treatment. Ablation technique and surrounding tissue damage are two possible reasons for limited study of radiofrequency ablation in patients with superficial distant lymph node metastasis. Here, we report two patients treated successfully with ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation for superficial distant lymph node metastasis. In these patients, deionized water was injected to the surrounding tissues of the lymph node to decrease heat injury. Results from these patients suggest that radiofrequency ablation may play an important role in the treatment of patients with distant lymph node metastasis.

  14. Incidence of Second Malignancies in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and Radical Prostatectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, Sarah Nicole; Tyldesley, Scott [Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Hamm, Jeremy [Department of Population Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Jiang, Wei Ning [Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Keyes, Mira; Pickles, Tom [Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Lapointe, Vince [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Kahnamelli, Adam [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); McKenzie, Michael [Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Miller, Stacy [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Centre for the North, Prince George, British Columbia (Canada); Morris, W. James, E-mail: jmorris@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To compare the second malignancy incidence in prostate cancer patients treated with brachytherapy (BT) relative to radical prostatectomy (RP) and to compare both groups with the cancer incidence in the general population. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2010, 2418 patients were treated with Iodine 125 prostate BT monotherapy at the British Columbia Cancer Agency, and 4015 referred patients were treated with RP. Cancer incidence was compared with the age-matched general population using standardized incidence ratios (SIRs). Pelvic malignancies included invasive and noninvasive bladder cancer and rectal cancer. Cox multivariable analysis was performed with adjustment for covariates to determine whether treatment (RP vs BT) was associated with second malignancy risk. Results: The median age at BT was 66 years and at RP 62 years. The SIR comparing BT patients with the general population was 1.06 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.91-1.22) for second malignancy and was 1.53 (95% CI 1.12-2.04) for pelvic malignancy. The SIR comparing RP patients with the general population was 1.11 (95% CI 0.98-1.25) for second malignancy and was 1.11 (95% CI 0.82-1.48) for pelvic malignancy. On multivariable analysis, older age (hazard ratio [HR] 1.05) and smoking (HR 1.65) were associated with increased second malignancy risk (P<.0001). Radical prostatectomy was not associated with a decreased second malignancy risk relative to BT (HR 0.90, P=.43), even when excluding patients who received postprostatectomy external beam radiation therapy (HR 1.13, P=.25). Older age (HR 1.09, P<.0001) and smoking (HR 2.17, P=.0009) were associated with increased pelvic malignancy risk. Radical prostatectomy was not associated with a decreased pelvic malignancy risk compared with BT (HR 0.57, P=.082), even when excluding postprostatectomy external beam radiation therapy patients (HR 0.87, P=.56). Conclusions: After adjustment for covariates, BT patients did not have an increased second

  15. Incidence of Second Malignancies in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and Radical Prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare the second malignancy incidence in prostate cancer patients treated with brachytherapy (BT) relative to radical prostatectomy (RP) and to compare both groups with the cancer incidence in the general population. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2010, 2418 patients were treated with Iodine 125 prostate BT monotherapy at the British Columbia Cancer Agency, and 4015 referred patients were treated with RP. Cancer incidence was compared with the age-matched general population using standardized incidence ratios (SIRs). Pelvic malignancies included invasive and noninvasive bladder cancer and rectal cancer. Cox multivariable analysis was performed with adjustment for covariates to determine whether treatment (RP vs BT) was associated with second malignancy risk. Results: The median age at BT was 66 years and at RP 62 years. The SIR comparing BT patients with the general population was 1.06 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.91-1.22) for second malignancy and was 1.53 (95% CI 1.12-2.04) for pelvic malignancy. The SIR comparing RP patients with the general population was 1.11 (95% CI 0.98-1.25) for second malignancy and was 1.11 (95% CI 0.82-1.48) for pelvic malignancy. On multivariable analysis, older age (hazard ratio [HR] 1.05) and smoking (HR 1.65) were associated with increased second malignancy risk (P<.0001). Radical prostatectomy was not associated with a decreased second malignancy risk relative to BT (HR 0.90, P=.43), even when excluding patients who received postprostatectomy external beam radiation therapy (HR 1.13, P=.25). Older age (HR 1.09, P<.0001) and smoking (HR 2.17, P=.0009) were associated with increased pelvic malignancy risk. Radical prostatectomy was not associated with a decreased pelvic malignancy risk compared with BT (HR 0.57, P=.082), even when excluding postprostatectomy external beam radiation therapy patients (HR 0.87, P=.56). Conclusions: After adjustment for covariates, BT patients did not have an increased second

  16. Combination Chemotherapy Followed by Bone Marrow Transplantation in Treating Patients With Rare Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-20

    Childhood Germ Cell Tumor; Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Head and Neck Cancer; Kidney Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lymphoma; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Retinoblastoma; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  17. The prevalence of thyroid cancers in surgically treated patients with nodular goiter in Şırnak city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevda Sert Bektaş

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Iodine deficiency is still considered to be the major etiological factor for endemic goiter. The pathogenesis of the goiter in iodine deficient area caries different characteristics. The aim of this study investigate the prevalence of thyroid cancers and type of thyroid cancers in surgically treated patients with nodular goiter in Şırnak city where is iodine deficiency region.Materials and methods: Thyroid surgical materials which were sent to our department were screened retrospectively from the archives between the years 2009-2010. Thyroid resection was performed on 241 patients with nodular goiter in one year. We evaluated patients who received the diagnosis of thyroid carcinoma with histhopatological examination.Results: 222 of our patients (92.1% female and 19 (7.9% were male. The youngest patient 16 and the oldest patient was 80 years old and the average age is 40.9 ± 12.8. Histopathological examination of 197 (81.7% cases of nodular goiter, 31 (12.9% cases lymphocytic thyroiditis, 13 (5.4% patients had thyroid tumors. The three tumors on the 2 cases (0.8% benign, 11 (4.6% were malignant. As a type of cancer 1 (0.4% patients, follicular carcinoma-oncocytic variant, 10 (4.2% cases were papillary carcinoma.Conclusions: Iodine deficiency area in the province of Şırnak in patients with nodular goiter who underwent surgery for thyroid cancer rate of 4.6%, and most cancers is seen as a type of thyroid papillary carcinoma.

  18. Role of capecitabine in treating metastatic colorectal cancer in Chinese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang F

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Feng Wang,* Feng-Hua Wang,* Long Bai, Rui-Hua XuDepartment of Medical Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: The China Food and Drug Administration approved the use of capecitabine in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC in 2004. This paper reviews the available information of capecitabine in Chinese patients with mCRC, focusing on its effectiveness and safety against mCRC. Identification of all eligible studies was made by searching the PubMed and Wanfang database from 2000 to 2013. Published data examining various aspects of clinical response and tolerability with capecitabine alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic or biological agents for first- and second-line mCRC were examined. Capecitabine and its combination displayed high efficacy in Chinese patients with mCRC. Toxicities are generally manageable, and elderly patients can tolerate capecitabine well.Keywords: capecitabine, metastatic colorectal cancer, Chinese

  19. Treating patients with ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer: latest evidence and management strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Bin-Chi; Lin, Chia-Chi; Shih, Jin-Yuan; Yang, James Chih-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    Rearrangements in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene and echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4) gene were first described in a small portion of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in 2007. Fluorescence in situ hybridization is used as the diagnostic test for detecting an EML4–ALK rearrangement. Crizotinib, an ALK inhibitor, is effective in treating advanced ALK-positive NSCLC, and the US Food and Drug Administration approved it for treating ALK-positive NSCLC ...

  20. Importance of the initial volume of parotid glands in xerostomia for patients with head and neck cancers treated with IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our aim was to evaluate predictors of xerostomia in patients with head and neck cancers treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Thirty-three patients with pharyngeal cancer were evaluated for xerostomia after having been treated with IMRT. All patients were treated with whole-neck irradiation of 46-50 Gy by IMRT, followed by boost IMRT to the high-risk clinical target volume to a total dose of 56-70 Gy in 28-35 fractions (median, 68 Gy). For boost IMRT, a second computed tomography (CT-2) scan was done in the third to fourth week of IMRT. Xerostomia was scored 3-4 months after the start of IMRT. The mean doses to the contralateral and ipsilateral parotid glands were 24.0±6.2 and 30.3±6.6 Gy, respectively. Among the 33 patients, xerostomia of grades 0, 1, 2 and 3 was noted in one, 18, 12 and two patients, respectively. Although the mean dose to the parotid glands was not correlated with the grade of xerostomia, the initial volume of the parotid glands was correlated with the grade of xerostomia (P=0.04). Of 17 patients with small parotid glands (≤38.8 ml) on initial CT (CT-1), 11 (65%) showed grade 2 or grade 3 xerostomia, whereas only three (19%) of 16 patients with larger parotid glands showed grade 2 xerostomia (P<0.05). The mean volume of the parotid glands on CT-1 was 43.1±15.2 ml, but decreased significantly to 32.0±11.4 ml (74%) on CT-2 (P<0.0001). Initial volumes of the parotid glands are significantly correlated with the grade of xerostomia in patients treated with IMRT. The volume of the parotid glands decreased significantly during the course of IMRT. (author)

  1. Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Stage IIIB or Stage IV Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-04

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  2. Combination Chemotherapy Plus Amifostine in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-06

    Bladder Cancer; Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Carcinoma of Unknown Primary; Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Head and Neck Cancer; Kidney Cancer; Lung Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  3. A Case Report of Sanguis Draconis for Treating a Patient With Refractory Wound Dehiscence After Breast Cancer Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guizhen; Hua, Yafang; Jin, Xueqin; Yan, Chunmei

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common female malignant tumors. According to data statistics, the incidence of breast cancer was 7% to 10% for a variety of malignant tumors, being only lower than that of uterine cancer. The methods of treating breast cancer are given priority over operative treatment and combined with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However, exosmosis of chemotherapeutic drugs is a common complication of chemotherapy. Exosmosis of drugs can stimulate local organs to induce acute inflammatory reaction and necrosis, which finally lead to wound infection and difficulty in healing. In December 2013, a patient with full-thickness wound (an area of 5 × 3 cm) dehiscence at the completion of the second phase of chemotherapy for left breast cancer after radical operation was admitted to our department. Her wound had healed after radical operation. The patient followed an integrative therapy treatment protocol that consisted of an external application of a phytomedicine called Sanguis Draconis and combined with a series of conventional treatments, including 3M Transparent Dressing moist therapy, increase in nutrition, and prevention therapies for infection. The patient's integrative treatment program resulted in complete wound healing, and the successful completion of the late 6 courses of chemotherapy. The article describes the nursing experiences associated with this case study.

  4. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Metastatic Papillary Thyroid Cancer or Follicular Thyroid Cancer Unresponsive to Iodine I 131

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-20

    Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Papillary Thyroid Cancer

  5. Perfusion lymphoscintigraphy using sup 99m Tc-human serum albumin in patients with treated uterine cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kataoka, Masaaki; Kawamura, Masashi; Nishiyama, Yasuyuki; Itoh, Hisao; Hamamoto, Ken; Hamada, Katsuyuki; Matsuura, Shumpei (Ehime Univ., Shigenobu (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1991-07-01

    Perfusion lymphoscintigraphy was performed by subcutaneous injection of 7.4 MBq (0.2 mCi) {sup 99m}Tc-human serum albumin ({sup 99m}Tc-HSA) in 25 patients with uterine cancer treated by operation and/or irradiation. Radioactivity at the injection site was counted for 3 min at 10 min (a) and at 3 hr (b) after injection, and the clearance of {sup 99m}Tc-HSA was defined as (1-(b)/(a))x100(%) ((a) and (b) were corrected for decay of the isotope). The clearance in legs with lymphedema was significantly more delayed than those in legs without lymphedema in patients treated with both operation and irradiation (16.6{+-}7.7% vs 34.9{+-}9.3%; p<0.01) and in patients treated with radiation therapy alone (33.1{+-}7.4 vs 48.0{+-}5.6; p<0.01). The clearances in edematous legs in a case which had developed venous occulusion after operation were 44.2% and 41.7%, which were almost the same as those in the non-edematous patients treated with operation alone. Clearance in patients treated with both operation and irradiation were significantly more delayed than those in patients treated with a single modality of operation or irradiation (30.1{+-}11.4% vs 41.9{+-}8.9%, 42.0{+-}9.7%, respectively; p<0.01). Radiation doses at points B were well correlated with clearance of {sup 99m}Tc-HSA (p<0.05). These data suggest that perfusion lymphoscintigraphy using {sup 99m}Tc-HSA is useful for evaluating the patients with lymphedema and for differentiating it from the edema caused by the other mechanisms. It is also suggested that radiation dose is one of factors in the occurrence of lymphedema. (author).

  6. Gene expression alterations associated with outcome in aromatase inhibitor-treated ER+ early-stage breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Karina G; Lyng, Maria B; Elias, Daniel; Vever, Henriette; Knoop, Ann S; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E; Lænkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2015-12-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AI), either alone or together with chemotherapy, have become the standard adjuvant treatment for postmenopausal, estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer. Although AIs improve overall survival, resistance is still a major clinical problem, thus additional biomarkers predictive of outcome of ER+ breast cancer patients treated with AIs are needed. Global gene expression analysis was performed on ER+ primary breast cancers from patients treated with adjuvant AI monotherapy; half experienced recurrence (median follow-up 6.7 years). Gene expression alterations were validated by qRT-PCR, and functional studies evaluating the effect of siRNA-mediated gene knockdown on cell growth were performed. Twenty-six genes, including TFF3, DACH1, RGS5, and GHR, were shown to exhibit altered expression in tumors from patients with recurrence versus non-recurrent (fold change ≥1.5, p proliferation, growth, and development. TFF3, which encodes for trefoil factor 3 and is an estrogen-responsive oncogene shown to play a functional role in tamoxifen resistance and metastasis of ER+ breast cancer, was also shown to be upregulated in an AI-resistant cell line model, and reduction of TFF3 levels using TFF3-specific siRNAs decreased the growth of both the AI-resistant and -sensitive parental cell lines. Moreover, overexpression of TFF3 in parental AI-sensitive MCF-7/S0.5 cells resulted in reduced sensitivity to the AI exemestane, whereas TFF3 overexpression had no effect on growth in the absence of exemestane, indicating that TFF3 mediates growth and survival signals that abrogate the growth inhibitory effect of exemestane. We identified a panel of 26 genes exhibiting altered expression associated with disease recurrence in patients treated with adjuvant AI monotherapy, including TFF3, which was shown to exhibit a growth- and survival-promoting effect in the context of AI treatment.

  7. Nanoparticle Albumin-Bound Rapamycin in Treating Patients With Advanced Cancer With mTOR Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-18

    Advanced Malignant Neoplasm; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Carcinoma; Malignant Uterine Neoplasm; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Malignant Neoplasm; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IVA Bladder Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Bladder Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  8. Effect of Family History on Outcomes in Patients Treated With Definitive Brachytherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the impact familial prostate cancer has on prognosis in men treated with brachytherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 1,738 consecutive patients with prostate cancer (cT1-3, N0/X, M0) received low-dose-rate brachytherapy alone or in combination with external beam radiation therapy or hormone ablation from 1992 to 2005. The primary end-point was freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF) using the Phoenix definition. Minimum follow-up was 2 years and the median follow-up was 60 months (range, 24-197 months). Results: A total of 187 of 1,738 men (11%) had a family history of prostate cancer in a first-degree relative. For the low-risk patients, both groups had similar actuarial 5-year FFBF (97.2% vs. 95.5%, p = 0.516). For intermediate-risk patients, there was a trend toward improved biochemical control in men positive for family history (5-yr FFBF 100% vs. 93.6%, p = 0.076). For the high-risk patients, men with a positive family history had similar 5-year FFBF (92.8% vs. 85.2%, p = 0.124). On multivariate analysis, family history was not significant; use of hormones, high biologic effective dose, initial prostate-specific antigen value, and Gleason score were the significant variables predicting biochemical control. Conclusions: This is the first study to examine the relationship of familial prostate cancer and outcomed in men treated with brachytherapy alone or in combination therapy. Men with a positive family history have clinicopathologic characteristics and biochemical outcomes similar to those with sporadic disease

  9. The changes in complete blood count in thyroid cancer patients treated with radioactive iodine ablation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bircan Sönmez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of radioactive iodine (RAI ablation therapy on the complete blood count (CBC in thyroid cancer patients. Materials and Methods: One hundred sixty four patients undergoing RAI ablation therapy after total thyroidectomy were included. CBC results were available from the patients’ medical records at the time of ablation and at the 1st, 6th, and 12th months after RAI therapy.Results: Hemoglobin (Hb, white blood cell (WBC and platelet (Plt values were significantly lower than baseline at 1 month after treatment (p<0.0001. Hb and WBC values were increased at the 6th month and at the 1st year. Plt values increased at the 6th month but had decreased again at the 1st year. The values were usually in normal ranges except in the patients with low pretreatment Hb and WBC values.Conclusion: RAI ablation therapy in thyroid cancer patients is a safe treatment modality without any serious or persistent hematological side effects.

  10. Interleukin-12 in Treating Patients With Hematologic Cancers or Solid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-09

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Kidney Cancer; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  11. Lymphocyte Infusion in Treating Patients With Relapsed Cancer After Bone Marrow or Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Kidney Cancer; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  12. Biological Therapy Following Chemotherapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-25

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Kidney Cancer; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  13. Renal function and symptoms/adverse effects in opioid-treated patients with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, G P; Lundström, S; Sjøgren, P;

    2015-01-01

    and cognitive dysfunction were assessed (EORTC QLQ-C30). Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was estimated using Cockcroft-Gault (CG), Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD), and Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI Creatinine) equations. RESULTS: Mild to severe low GFR was observed...... among 40-54% of patients. CG equation showed that patients with mild and moderate/severe low GFR on morphine treatment had higher odds of having severe constipation (P GFR. In addition, patients with moderate/severe low GFR on morphine treatment were more likely to have...... loss of appetite (P = 0.04). No other significant associations were found. CONCLUSION: Only severe constipation and loss of appetite were associated with low GFR in patients treated with morphine. Oxycodone and fentanyl, in relation to the symptoms studied, seem to be safe as used and titrated...

  14. Natural history of postural instability in breast cancer patients treated with taxane-based chemotherapy: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfort, Scott M; Pan, Xueliang; Patrick, Robyn; Singaravelu, Janani; Loprinzi, Charles L; Lustberg, Maryam B; Chaudhari, Ajit M W

    2016-07-01

    Over 230,000 new cases of breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed in the United States in 2015. Taxane-based chemotherapy is often an effective treatment, but can also cause adverse symptoms in patients due to neurotoxicity. These side effects can impair postural control in patients; however, this instability has scarcely been quantified. The purpose of this pilot study was to gain insight into the natural history of postural instability in breast cancer patients being treated with taxane-based chemotherapy. Thirty-two breast cancer patients (31 female/1 male; 47.6±11.2 year; 16 stage II/16 stage III) completed eyes open and eyes closed quiet standing trials in the oncology clinic where they were being treated. These trials were collected at five timepoints throughout their chemotherapy treatment: (1) before initiating chemotherapy to provide a baseline, (2-4) before starting subsequent chemotherapy cycles, and (5) 1-3 months after receiving their last taxane infusion. After the first chemotherapy cycle, patients demonstrated increases in 95% confidence ellipse area of center of pressure (CoP) [45.2%, p=0.01] and root mean squared CoP excursion [18%, p=0.006] compared to baseline values for the eyes closed condition. These balance deficiencies progressed with cumulative taxane exposure. Postural instability persisted 1-3 months after completing chemotherapy with increases in 95% CoP ellipse area [86.8%, p=0.002], root mean squared CoP excursion [32.6%, p=0.001], and mean CoP velocity [30.4%, p=0.024]. The balance impairments demonstrated by patients in this study appear to be clinically relevant when compared to balance impairments previously reported in other patient populations. PMID:27341530

  15. Quantitative mathematical modeling of PSA dynamics of prostate cancer patients treated with intermittent androgen suppression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoshito Hirata; Koichiro Akakura; Celestia S.Higano; Nicholas Bruchovsky; Kazuyuki Aihara

    2012-01-01

    If a mathematical model is to be used in the diagnosis,treatment,or prognosis of a disease,it must describe the inherent quantitative dynamics of the state.An ideal candidate disease is prostate cancer owing to the fact that it is characterized by an excellent biomarker,prostate-specific antigen (PSA),and also by a predictable response to treatment in the form of androgen suppression therapy.Despite a high initial response rate,the cancer will often relapse to a state of androgen independence which no longer responds to manipulations of the hormonal environment.In this paper,we present relevant background information and a quantitative mathematical model that potentially can be used in the optimal management of patients to cope with biochemical relapse as indicated by a rising PSA.

  16. Locoregional Failure in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Radical Mastectomy and Adjuvant Systemic Therapy: Which Patients Benefit From Postmastectomy Irradiation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trovo, Marco, E-mail: marcotrovo33@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Durofil, Elena [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Polesel, Jerry [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Roncadin, Mario [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Perin, Tiziana [Department of Pathology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Mileto, Mario; Piccoli, Erica [Department of Surgery, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Quitadamo, Daniela [Scientific Direction, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Massarut, Samuele [Department of Surgery, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Carbone, Antonino [Department of Pathology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Trovo, Mauro G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the locoregional failure in patients with Stage I-II breast cancer treated with radical mastectomy and to evaluate whether a subset of these patients might be at sufficiently high risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) to benefit from postmastectomy irradiation (PMRT). Methods and Materials: Stage I-II breast cancer patients (n = 150) treated with radical mastectomy without adjuvant irradiation between 1999 and 2005 were analyzed. The pattern of LRR was reported. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to calculate rates of LRR, and Cox proportional hazards methods were used to evaluate potential risk factors. Results: Median follow-up was 75 months. Mean patient age was 56 years. One-hundred forty-three (95%) patients received adjuvant systemic therapy: 85 (57%) hormonal therapy alone, 14 (9%) chemotherapy alone, and 44 (29%) both chemotherapy and hormonal therapy. Statistically significant factors associated with increased risk of LRR were premenopausal status (p = 0.004), estrogen receptor negative cancer (p = 0.02), pathologic grade 3 (p = 0.02), and lymphovascular invasion (p = 0.001). T and N stage were not associated with increased risk of regional recurrence. The 5-year LRR rate for patients with zero or one, two, three, and four risk factors was 1%, 10.3%, 24.2%, and 75%, respectively. Conclusions: A subset of patients with early-stage breast cancer is at high risk of LRR, and therefore PMRT might be beneficial.

  17. Vaccine Therapy With or Without Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-24

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Male Breast Cancer; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Paget Disease of the Breast With Intraductal Carcinoma; Paget Disease of the Breast With Invasive Ductal Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Stage II Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  18. HSP90 Inhibitor AT13387 and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Advanced Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-08

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  19. Treatment and outcome in cancer cervix patients treated between 1979 and 1994: A single institutional experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyamkishore Shrivastava

    2013-01-01

    Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study of 6234 patients with carcinoma of the cervix treated with radical intent between 1979 and 1994. All the work-up, staging investigations, treatment details, radiation protocols, outcomes, and toxicities were noted, compiled, and analyzed. Results: With a mean age of 46 years (range: 18-90 years; median: 45 years, 669 (11% patients were in stage Ib, 284 (5% were in stage IIa, 1891 (30% were in stage IIb, 69 (1% were in stage IIIa, and 3321 (53% were in stage IIIb. With a median follow-up of 68 months (57-79 months for the entire group, there was no significant difference in the outcome of 953 patients with international federation of gynecology and obstetrics (FIGO Ib-IIa treated after radical surgery, pre-operative radiation therapy (pre-op RT + Sx or after radical radiation; their disease-free survival (DFS was 60-62% at 8 years. In our series of 1891 patients with stage IIb and 3321 with stage IIIb, a respective DFS of 56% and 40% was achieved at 8 years. Conclusion: Over the last two decades, with the acquisition of newer facilities and inception of Joint Clinics, there has been a significant refinement in the treatment protocols and outcome. Improving radiation strategies to improve therapeutic ratio is the key to success.

  20. Comparative study of transvaginal ultrasonographic and diagnostic hysteroscopic findings in postmenopausal breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Wan-li; ZHANG Lu-ping; FENG Li-min

    2011-01-01

    Background There is an association between postmenopausal tamoxifen therapy and endometrial pathologies. We investigated the usefulness of diagnostic hysteroscopy and transvaginal ultrasonography (TVS) and estimated whether diagnostic hysteroscopy improves detection of endometrial pathologies in postmenopausal breast cancer patients on tamoxifen. Methods Ninety-seven postmenopausal breast cancer patients who had been taking tamoxifen 20 mg/d for ≥6 months went through TVS, diagnostic hysteroscopy, and endometrial biopsy examinations. The presence of endometrial histopathologic features with abnormal TVS and diagnostic hysteroscopic findings were correlated. Results No endometrial cancer was found in any of the 97 patients. Fifty-three patients (54.6%) developed endometrial polyps as diagnosed histopathologically. Fifty-nine patients (60.8%) tested positive in TVS exams, of whom 43 had polyps, four had hyperplasia, and 12 atrophy. Thirty-eight patients (39.2%) tested negative in TVS exams, of whom 10had polyps, three hyperplasia, and 25 atrophy. TVS exams presented 63.6% specificity, 81.8% sensitivity, 72.9%positive-predictive value, and 73.7% negative-predictive value, whereas the corresponding values of diagnostic hysteroscopy were 100%, 98.1%, 100%, and 97.8% respectively. The correct ratio of hysteroscopy was significantly higher than that of TVS (P=0.000). Conclusions In postmenopausal breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen, TVS alone is not sufficient for the detection of endometrial pathologies. Additional use of diagnostic hysteroscopy considerably improves the detection of polyps, thus significantly reducing the rate of false-negative findings of endometrial pathologies.

  1. Effect of Recombinant Human Deoxyribonuclease on Oropharyngeal Secretions in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancers Treated With Radiochemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittal, Bharat B., E-mail: bmittal@nmh.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Wang, Edward [Department of Surgery, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Sejpal, Samir [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Agulnik, Mark [Section of Medical Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Mittal, Amit [Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Harris, Kirk [Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: The current study examined the effect of recombinant human deoxyribonuclease (rhDNase) on quality of life (QOL) measures, clinical improvement, and DNA content of thick oropharyngeal secretions (OPS) in patients with head-and-neck (H and N) cancers. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six patients with local-regional advanced H and N cancer receiving chemoradiationtherapy (CRT) were randomized to receive either placebo or rhDNase. Endpoints included MD Anderson Symptom Inventory-Head and Neck (MDASI-HN) and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy–Head and Neck (FACT-NH) scores, along with clinical assessment and DNA concentration of OPS. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in patients' QOL outcomes over the study period. Both groups showed an increase in symptom and interference scores, although patients in the rhDNase group showed a greater decline in both scores during the 3 months posttreatment. Similarly, both groups showed a decline in physical and functional well being but recovered in the 3 months posttreatment follow-up, with the rhDNase group exhibiting speedier recovery. Patients in the rhDNase group exhibited significant clinical improvement in OPS, blindly assessed by a physician, compared with the placebo group (67% vs 27%, respectively; P=.046). The rhDNase group showed no change in OPS-DNA concentration, although the placebo group showed a significant increase in DNA concentration during the drug trial (P=.045). There was no differences in acute toxicities between the 2 groups. Conclusions: Our preliminary data suggest that rhDNase did not significantly improve study primary endpoints of QOL measures compared with the placebo group. However, there was a significant improvement in secondary endpoints of clinically assessed OPS and DNA concentration compared with placebo in H and N cancer patients treated with CRT. Further investigation in larger numbers of patients is warranted.

  2. Which prognostic factors influence the outcome of patients with surgically staged endometrial cancer treated with adjuvant radiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Despite the fact that retrospective reviews have documented pelvic failure rates ranging from 15-20% in patients with high-risk uterine-confined endometrial cancer who have received no or 'inadequate' RT, the role of RT has been questioned. We sought to analyze pelvic control and disease-free survival for a large data base of women with corpus cancers managed with initial surgery followed by adjuvant irradiation. Methods and Materials: Between 1983 and 1993, 294 patients received adjuvant postoperative RT from one of three academic radiation practices. RT consisted of vaginal brachytherapy alone in 28 patients, pelvic RT in 173 patients, pelvic RT with vaginal brachytherapy in 97 patients, and whole abdominal RT in 2 patients. Lymph nodes were evaluated in 49%. The median number of pelvic and periaortic LN in the pathology specimen were 6 and 4, respectively. Median follow up was 63 months. Results: 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate and pelvic control rates were 86 and 95%, respectively. Patient-related, treatment-related, and tumor-related characteristics were assessed for the effect on time to relapse. Unfavorable histology, older age, and capillary space invasion were univariately associated with decreased DFS and pelvic control. Pathologic Stage II patients had significantly worse DFS than Stage I patients. Multivariate analysis revealed that age, capillary space invasion, and histology were jointly predictive of disease free survival. Conclusion: The excellent pelvic control and disease-free survival of patients with uterine-confined disease in this series suggest that adjuvant RT should continue for patients with high risk disease. This analysis of a large group of postoperatively treated patients will provide a basis for determining alternative treatment strategies for patients who have an increased risk of disease recurrence despite RT

  3. Perfusion lymphoscintigraphy using sup 99m Tc-human serum albumin in patients with treated uterine cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kataoka, Masaaki; Hamada, Katsuyuki; Hamamoto, Ken; Takeda, Yasunari; Matsuura, Shumpei (Ehime Univ., Matsuyama (Japan). School of Medicine); Kawamura, Masashi

    1990-09-01

    Perfusion lymphoscintigraphy was performed by subcutaneous injection of 7.4 MBq (0.2mCi) {sup 99m}Tc-human serum albumin ({sup 99m}Tc-HSA) on 18 patients with uterine cancer treated by operation and/or irradiation. Radioactivity at the injection site was counted for 3 min at 10 min (a) and at 3 hr (b) after injection, and the clearance of {sup 99m}Tc-HSA was defined as (1-(b)/(a)) x 100(%) ((a) and (b) were corrected for decay of the isotope). The clearance in 6 legs with lymphedema was significantly more delayed than that in 16 legs without lymphedema in the patients treated with both surgery and irradiation (16.6 +- 7.7% vs 34.9 +- 9.3%: P< 0.01). The clearances in edematous legs in a case which had developed a venous occulusion after operation were 44.2% and 41.7%, which were almost the same as those in the non-edematous patients treated with surgery alone. The clearance in patients treated with both operation and irradiation was significantly more delayed than that in patients treated with the signle modality of operation or irradiation (29.7 +- 11.9% vs 41.1 +- 7.2%, 44.5 +- 7.7%, respectively: P< 0.01). These data suggest that perfusion lymphoscintigraphy using {sup 99m}Tc-HSA is useful for evaluating patients with lymphedema and for differentiating it from edema caused by other mechanisms. (author).

  4. Low radiation dose to relatives after discharge of thyroid cancer patients treated with I-131

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remy, H.; Camps, E. [Pharmacy, Institut de Cancerologie Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Ricard, M.; Lavielle, F.; Coulot, J. [Medical Physics, Institut de Cancerologie Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Borget, I. [Health Economics, Institut de Cancerologie Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Schhumberger, M. [Nuclear Medicine, Institut de Cancerologie Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); University Paris-sud, Bicetre (France)

    2012-07-01

    Patients treated with I-131 for thyroid carcinoma are potential source of radiation exposure for other individuals. In order to provide more reliable information to patients and relatives, this study evaluated the radiation dose received by family members after discharge from the hospital. Three main observations can be drawn. First, rhTSH (recombinant human Thyrotropin) stimulation leads to lower irradiation when mean rate is considered (cumulated irradiation divided by time contact) 1.4 {mu}Sv per hour compared to 1.6 {mu}Sv with withdrawal. However, this had no impact on the radiation dose received by relatives, because of a longer time spent close to the patient when rhTSH is used. Secondly, the mean cumulated radiation dose delivered to the relatives during the 7 days following discharge was similar with either rhTSH (58 {mu}Sv) or withdrawal patients (49.6 {mu}Sv). Thirdly, in euthyroid patients after rhTSH, the whole body retention of I-131 after three days of hospitalization is significantly lower than in hypothyroid patients after withdrawal. The hospital stay can be shortened when rhTSH is used

  5. Assessing, Counseling, and Treating Patients at High Risk for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Edward; Hughes, Kevin S; Roberts, Maegan; Pirzadeh-Miller, Sara; McLaughlin, Sarah A

    2016-10-01

    Identifying patients at high risk of carrying pathogenic variants in genes is a crucial part of providing both accurate counseling and evidence-based treatment recommendations. Current risk assessment models have strengths and weaknesses that may limit their applicability to specific clinical circumstances. Clinicians must have knowledge regarding variations in available models, how they should be used, and what data they can expect from specific models. In addition, indications for genetic testing are expanding, and the adoption of next-generation sequencing has allowed the creation of multigene testing panels. Complex consequences of panel testing have included an increase in the incidence of identifying variants of uncertain significance and the identification of pathogenic variants in genes for which treatment guidelines are not available. Women diagnosed with breast cancer who carry pathogenic variants in genes with proven associations with breast cancer (BRCA1/2) or highly likely associations (PTEN, PALB2) require additional risk assessment to facilitate treatment decisions that will limit in-breast tumor recurrence and contralateral breast cancer. PMID:27401444

  6. Safety of plasma-derived protein C for treating disseminated intravascular coagulation in adult patients with active cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malato, Alessandra; Saccullo, Giorgia; Coco, Lucio Lo; Caracciolo, Clementina; Raso, Simona; Santoro, Marco; Zammit, Valentina; Siragusa, Sergio

    2012-02-01

    Cancer-related disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a life-threatening condition for which no effective treatment is currently available. Protein C (PC), a modulator of coagulation as well as the inflammatory system, has been successfully tested (in its activated recombinant form [a-rPC]) in sepsis-related coagulopathy, but with an increased risk for major bleeding. Plasma-derived PC (pd-PC) is more suitable than a-rPC in patients at high risk from bleeding due to its self-limiting process. We carried out a single-arm study evaluating the role of pd-PC in adult cancer patients with overt DIC. Over a period of 3 years, we treated 19 patients with overt DIC and a PC plasma concentration coagulation, haematological tests, and the DIC score were recorded after 12, 24, 48 hr, 7 and 10 days, while clinical outcomes (bleeding, thrombosis and mortality) were recorded up to 28 days. Within 48 hr of starting pd-PC therapy, laboratory tests as well as the DIC score improved in all patients. At 28-days follow-up, no bleeding or thrombosis was observed. This is the first study to investigate the use of pd- PC for treatment of cancer-related overt DIC.

  7. Survival Analysis of 121 Stage N2-IIIa Non-small Cell Lung Cancer PatientsTreated with Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heli YANG

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has still been controversial to treat N2-IIIa non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients by surgery or non-surgery. We retrospectively analysed the survival of 121 stage N2-IIIa NSCLC patients treated with surgery and explored their postoperatively long-term prognostic factors. Methods All of 1,290 patients in Beijing Cancer Hospital underwent resection by single-surgeon-team, among which 121 cases with stage N2-IIIa were enrolled in the study. We retrospectively analysed the impact of gender, age, smoking, perioperative chemotherapy, incision, histological type, vascular tumor emboli, pTstage and tumor size on survival of stage N2-IIIa patients, and compared the survival between patients with single-and multi-station N2 metastasis, and between intraoperatively or postoperatively pathological N2 (IIIa1/a2 and preoperative N2 (IIIa3/a4. Univariate analysis was conducted by Kaplan-Meier curve, and significance test was performed by Log-rank test and Cox regression factor analysis was applicated for multivariate analysis. Results The 5-yr of all the 121 cases was 43.6%, with a median survival time being 50.3 mo. Univariate analysis showed the 5-year survival rate in patients with single- and multi- station N2 metastasis were 58.3% and 25.5%, respectively (P=0.001, 5-year survival rate in patients with stage IIIa1/a2 and stag IIIa3/a4 were 52.7% and 38.4%, respectively (P=0.020. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that only single station N2 (HR=0.326, 95%CI: 0.186-0.572, P<0.001 and IIIa1/a2 (HR=0.494, 95%CI: 0.259-0.941, P=0.032 were independent prognostic factors for stage N2-IIIa lung cancer patients. Conclusion The prognosis of stage N2-IIIa NSCLC patients with single-station N2 metastasis were better than those with multi-station N2 metastasis. Besides, IIIa1/a2 patients had a better survival compared with stage IIIa3/a4 patients. A multi-disciplinary comprehensive treatment based on surgery may allow patients with

  8. Real-life experience using trabectedin plus pegylated liposomal doxorubicin combination to treat patients with relapsed ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Tahir

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of recurrent ovarian cancer (ROC treatment is no longer just palliation, but prolonging survival. This is usually through administering a new line of chemotherapy at each relapse. A novel treatment sequencing strategy to achieve this is through the intercalation of an effective non-platinum alternative, in between platinum-based therapies. Trabectedin in combination with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD has been fully available privately in the UK since 2009 for treating patients with ROC. A single institution's experience with the trabectedin + PLD combination, as a non-platinum/non-taxane alternative, to intercalate between platinum-based therapies is reported here. To date 6 patients have been successfully treated with trabectedin + PLD at Broomfield Hospital, Chelmsford, Essex. Here we describe a new, practice-changing treatment approach in a real-life case study of a heavily-treated patient with advanced ROC treated with trabectedin + PLD at fourth-line and then subsequently rechallenged at seventh-line; with treatment continuing until disease progression.

  9. Assessment of quality of life in patients with rectal cancer treated by preoperative radiotherapy: A longitudinal prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess prospectively the quality of life (QOL) of patients treated by preoperative radiotherapy (RT) and surgery for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and materials: We studied 53 patients treated with bi-fractionated RT (50 Gy in 40 fractions within 4 weeks) followed at a median interval of 45 days by abdominoperineal resection in 11 patients and low anterior resection in 42 patients. Their QOL was assessed using two self-rating questionnaires developed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC): one was cancer specific (EORTC QLQ-C30) and one was site specific (EORTC QLQ-C38). The questionnaires were completed before RT and 12-16 months after RT, at which time 17 patients had undergone colostomy. We hypothesized that at least some scores of the various scales would vary between the two analyses. Results: Compared with the pre-RT scores, at 1 year, patients reported statistically significant improvement in their emotional state (median 75 vs. 100, p <0.0001), perspective of the future (67 vs. 100, p = 0.0004), and their global QOL (75 vs. 83, p = 0.0008), as well as a decrease in GI symptoms (13 vs. 0, p = 0.002). However, the sexual dysfunction score increased significantly, particularly in men (17 vs. 83, p = 0.0045), and a trend toward a lower body image score was observed (100 vs. 89, p = 0.068). At 1 year, patients with colostomies reported similar or significantly improved symptom scores for fatigue, pain, GI problems, and sleep disturbance, but no such improvements were observed in patients without stomas. Conclusion: One year after combined treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer, patients exhibited statistically significant improvement in some important QOL outcomes, including global QOL, despite a decrease in sexual function and body image. Any additional improvement in QOL outcome may require refinements in the RT and surgical techniques to reduce late sequelae, particularly sexual dysfunction. Our

  10. Association of genetic variants in VEGF-A with clinical recurrence in prostate cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), a key regulator of tumor-induced angiogenesis, is critical for tumor growth and metastasization. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the prognostic value of VEGF single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes for clinical recurrence after definitive radiotherapy for prostate cancer. The association of seven VEGF-A polymorphisms and their haplotypes with clinical recurrence (defined as the occurrence of local recurrence and/or distant metastases) in 496 prostate cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy were investigated. Genotypes were determined by 5'-nuclease (TaqMan) assays; haplotypes were analyzed using the Haploview program. Within a median follow-up time of 80 months, 44 patients (9%) developed clinical recurrences. Haplotype analysis showed two separate blocks of high-linkage disequilibrium, formed by five polymorphisms (-2578C > A, -2489C > T, -1498C > T, -634G > C, -7C > T) upstream of the coding sequence (CCCCC, ATTGC, CCCGC, ATTGT) and two polymorphisms (936C > T, 1612G > A) downstream of the coding sequence (CA, CG, TG). Carriers of at least 1 copy of the ATTGC haplotype were at higher risk of recurrence (hazard ratio [HR] 3.83; 95%CI 1.48-9.90, p=0.006); for carriers of 2 copies, the HR was 4.85 (95%CI 1.72-13.6; p=0.003). In multivariate analysis, patients harboring at least one copy of the ATTGC haplotype remained at increased risk of recurrence (HR 3.63, 95%CI 1.38-9.55, p=0.009); in patients carrying 2 copies, the HR was 4.72 (95%CI 1.64-13.6, p=0.004). Our findings indicate that the VEGF-A ATTGC haplotype may predict clinical recurrence in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. (orig.)

  11. Association of genetic variants in VEGF-A with clinical recurrence in prostate cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langsenlehner, T.; Thurner, E.M.; Kapp, K.S. [Medical University of Graz, Department of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, Graz (Austria); Renner, W. [Medical University of Graz, Clinical Institute of Medical and Chemical Laboratory Diagnostics, Graz (Austria); Gerger, A. [Medical University of Graz, Division of Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Graz (Austria); Langsenlehner, U. [GKK Outpatient Department, Division of Internal Medicine, Graz (Austria)

    2014-04-15

    Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), a key regulator of tumor-induced angiogenesis, is critical for tumor growth and metastasization. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the prognostic value of VEGF single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes for clinical recurrence after definitive radiotherapy for prostate cancer. The association of seven VEGF-A polymorphisms and their haplotypes with clinical recurrence (defined as the occurrence of local recurrence and/or distant metastases) in 496 prostate cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy were investigated. Genotypes were determined by 5'-nuclease (TaqMan) assays; haplotypes were analyzed using the Haploview program. Within a median follow-up time of 80 months, 44 patients (9%) developed clinical recurrences. Haplotype analysis showed two separate blocks of high-linkage disequilibrium, formed by five polymorphisms (-2578C > A, -2489C > T, -1498C > T, -634G > C, -7C > T) upstream of the coding sequence (CCCCC, ATTGC, CCCGC, ATTGT) and two polymorphisms (936C > T, 1612G > A) downstream of the coding sequence (CA, CG, TG). Carriers of at least 1 copy of the ATTGC haplotype were at higher risk of recurrence (hazard ratio [HR] 3.83; 95%CI 1.48-9.90, p=0.006); for carriers of 2 copies, the HR was 4.85 (95%CI 1.72-13.6; p=0.003). In multivariate analysis, patients harboring at least one copy of the ATTGC haplotype remained at increased risk of recurrence (HR 3.63, 95%CI 1.38-9.55, p=0.009); in patients carrying 2 copies, the HR was 4.72 (95%CI 1.64-13.6, p=0.004). Our findings indicate that the VEGF-A ATTGC haplotype may predict clinical recurrence in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. (orig.)

  12. Development of breast cancer-related lymphedema. Is it dependent on the patient, the tumor or the treating physicians?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer-related lymphedema (LE) is relatively common. The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors involved in the development of this complication. This was a cross-sectional study of breast cancer patients treated at our Center between 2004 and 2009. A total of 515 patients were included. Lymphedema was defined as a mid-arm or forearm circumference difference between both limbs of 2 cm or more. The incidence of LE in this population was 21.4%. Patients with a BMI of 25 or higher had a significantly higher risk of LE (p=0.002). The presence of lymphovascular invasion (LVI) (p=0.05) and the number of positive lymph nodes (LN) (p=0.001) were both associated with LE. Patients who underwent axillary dissection (AD) had a significantly higher incidence of LE than patients who had a sentinel LN biopsy (25 vs. 4.5%). Adjuvant radiotherapy was also a significant risk factor in patients who had a mastectomy (p=0.003). There are multiple risk factors for LE. Most of those factors can be influenced by early tumor detection. Early tumors are smaller with no LVI or axillary LN metastasis. They do not usually require AD or axillary radiotherapy, which are the strongest factors associated with the development of LE. (author)

  13. Gastric cancer patients treated by a general or gastric cancer surgical team: a comparative study Estudo comparativo entre cirurgia geral e cirurgia especializada no tratamento de pacientes com câncer gástrico

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando O. Souza; Dalnei V. Pereira; Luís H. Santos; Luis Antunes; Juarez Chiesa

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although gastric cancer has been decreasing in incidence in many countries, it is still the second most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Its prognosis is poor and depends, among other factors, on early diagnosis as well as on surgeon expertise. AIM: To compare the outcomes of gastric cancer patients treated at a university hospital by a general surgical team and later on by a gastric cancer surgical team. METHODS: Gastric cancer patients were separated into two groups acco...

  14. Pemetrexed in Previously Treated Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patients with Poor Performance Status

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun YoungJUNG; Su JinYOO; Ji Young SHIN; Ji Won PARK; Jeong Eun LEE; Hee Sun PARK; Ju Ock KIM; Sun Young KIM

    2011-01-01

    Background and objective Pemetrexed have been approved for the treatment of patients affected by advanced non-small cell lung cancner (NSCLC) in progression after first-line chemotherapy. We evaluated the activity and feasibility of pemetrexed in previously treated NSCLC.Methods Patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed NSCLC were evaluated from April 2007 to March 2009. The patients had relapsed or progressed after prior chemotherapy treatment. Pemetrexed (500 mg/m2) was administered intravenously once every 3 weeks after progression to prior chemotherapy. The tumor response was evaluated according to RECIST criteria by chest CT at every 2 cycles of chemotherapy.Results A total 61 patients were eligible for analysis. Performance status of them (100%) was over 2. The response rate and disease control rate were 14.7% and 37.7% respectively. Non-squamous cell carcinoma histology was significantly associated with a superior response rate (P=0.045) and disease control rate (P=0.008). The median survival time and the median progression free survival (PFS) time were 6.11 months and 2.17 months, respectively. Comparing the efficacy of pemetrexed in these two settings [second-line versus (12/61) more than third (49/61)], there was no significant difference in regard to median survival (11.18 months vs 11.46 months, P=0.922,S), but PFS was more longer in third- or further-line groups than second-line group (1.39 months vs 2.25 months, P=0.015,3).Conclusion Pemetrexed is a feasible regimen in previously treated NSCLC with poor performance status.

  15. Activated HER-receptors in predicting outcome of ER-positive breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant endocrine therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mathilde Skaarup; Bjerre, Karsten; Lykkesfeldt, Anne Elisabeth;

    2012-01-01

    The four human epidermal growth factor receptors (HER1-4) are involved in growth stimulation and may play a role in endocrine resistance. The receptors form dimers, leading to activation by mutual phosphorylation. Our purpose was to explore the role of the activated receptors (pHER1, pHER2, pHER3......) in endocrine treated breast cancer in terms of co-expression and association with disease-free survival (DFS) in 1062 patients with ER-positive tumors. Furthermore, HER2 amplification was evaluated. We found positive associations between the phosphorylated receptors. pHER1 and pHER3 were co-expressed with one...

  16. Relationship between two year PSA nadir and biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer patients treated with iodine-125 brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Antônio da Silva Franca

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the relationship between two year PSA nadir (PSAn after brachytherapy and biochemical recurrence rates in prostate cancer patients. Materials and Methods In the period from January 1998 to August 2007, 120 patients were treated with iodine-125 brachytherapy alone. The results analysis was based on the definition of biochemical recurrence according to the Phoenix Consensus. Results Biochemical control was observed in 86 patients (71.7%, and biochemical recurrence, in 34 (28.3%. Mean PSAn was 0.53 ng/ml. The mean follow-up was 98 months. The patients were divided into two groups: group 1, with two year PSAn < 0.5 ng/ml after brachytherapy (74 patients; 61.7%, and group 2, with two year PSAn ≥ 0.5 ng/ml after brachytherapy (46 patients; 38.3%. Group 1 presented biochemical recurrence in 15 patients (20.3%, and group 2, in 19 patients (43.2% (p < 0.02. The analysis of biochemical disease-free survival at seven years, stratified by the two groups, showed values of 80% and 64% (p < 0.02, respectively. Conclusion Levels of two year PSAn ≥ 0.5 ng/ml after brachytherapy are strongly correlated with a poor prognosis. This fact may help to identify patients at risk for disease recurrence.

  17. Quality of care indicators and their related outcomes: A population-based study in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: We describe variations across the regional cancer centres in Ontario, Canada for five prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT) quality indicators: incomplete pre-treatment assessment, follow-up care, leg immobilization, bladder filling, and portal film target localization. Along with cancer centre volume, we examined each indicator’s association with relevant outcomes: long-term cause-specific survival, urinary incontinence, and gastrointestinal and genitourinary late morbidities. Materials and methods: We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study of 924 prostate cancer patients diagnosed between 1990 and 1998 who received RT within 9 months of diagnosis. Data sources included treating charts and registry and administrative data. The associations between indicators and outcomes were analysed using regression techniques to control for potential confounders. Results: Practice patterns varied across the regional cancer centres for all indicators (p < 0.0001). Incomplete pre-treatment assessment was associated with worse cause-specific survival although this result was not significant when adjusted for confounding (adjusted RR = 1.78, 95% CI = 0.79–3.98). Treatment without leg immobilization (adjusted RR = 1.72, 95% CI = 1.16–2.56) and with an empty bladder (adjusted RR = 1.98, 95% CI = 1.08–3.63) was associated with genitourinary late morbidities. Treatment without leg immobilization was also associated with urinary incontinence (adjusted RR = 2.18, 95% CI = 1.23–3.87). Conclusions: We documented wide variations in practice patterns. We demonstrated that measures of quality of care can be shown to be associated with clinically relevant outcomes in a population-based sample of prostate cancer patients

  18. Epidermal growth factor receptor as a prognostic factor in locally advanced rectal-cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We investigated the prognostic value of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression in pretreatment biopsy specimens from patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Pretreatment biopsy specimens from 92 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were examined for EGFR expression by immunohistochemistry. EGFR expression was assessed by immunoreactive score (IRS). The prognostic value of EGFR expression was evaluated according to the level of EGFR expression. Results: Epidermal growth factor receptor expression was positive in 65 patients (71%). EGFR expression levels were low (IRS 0 to 5) in 83 patients (90%) and high (IRS 6 to 7) in 9 patients (10%). A high level of EGFR expression was statistically significant for shorter overall survival (p = 0.013), disease-free survival (p = 0.002), and distant metastasis-free survival (p = 0.003), as compared with a low level of expression in univariate analysis. Grouping based on positive or negative EGFR expression did not represent prognostic significance for survival. In multivariate analysis, high EGFR expression was an independent prognostic factor for decreased disease-free survival (relative risk 2.4, p = 0.041) and distant metastasis-free survival (relative risk 2.6, p = 0.04). Conclusions: Our results suggest that high level of EGFR expression in a pretreatment biopsy specimen may be a significant adverse prognostic factor for disease-free survival and distant metastasis-free survival

  19. Charlson Comorbidity Index predicts patient outcome, in cases of inoperable non-small cell lung cancer treated with radiofrequency ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Tracey G.; Beland, Michael D. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Rhode Island Hospital/The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, 593 Eddy Street, Providence, RI 02903 (United States); Machan, Jason T. [Department of Research Administration/Biostatistics, Rhode Island Hospital/The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, 593 Eddy Street, Providence, RI 02903 (United States); DiPetrillo, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital/The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, 593 Eddy Street, Providence, RI 02903 (United States); Dupuy, Damian E., E-mail: ddupuy@lifespan.org [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Rhode Island Hospital/The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, 593 Eddy Street, Providence, RI 02903 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: The Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) has been shown to be a significant prognostic indicator in the treatment of many types of cancer. The aim of this study is to evaluate the degree to which the CCI predicts survival in patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Materials and methods: Eighty-two (34 men, 48 women) consecutive RFA treatments for medically inoperable NSCLC were performed at our institution from 1/1/2000 to 1/30/2009. With institutional IRB approval and in full HIPAA compliance, the medical records of these patients were examined for data relating to pre-treatment comorbid conditions, and a retrospective analysis was conducted. Survival curves were estimated by the Kaplan–Meier method. Risk factors for mortality were determined by single-factor comparisons of curves using Wilcoxon-weighted chi-square and multiple Cox regressions. Results: The patients ranged in age from 59 to 91 years (mean: 75.5). Eighty-eight percent (72 patients) were tumor stage IA or IB. Patients were followed for a total of five years; three-year overall survival was 50.6%. Hospital mortality was 0%. Gender, stage, histology and CCI score were each associated with significantly impaired survival (p < 0.001 in all cases). After covarying for age, tumor stage > IB, squamous histology and gender, multiple Cox regressions showed that an increasing CCI score was significantly associated with an increased risk of death (HR 1.3, 95% CI 25.5, 58.2). Conclusions: The CCI is validated as an important, independent predictor of patient survival, in cases of inoperable NSCLC treated with RFA.

  20. Effect of Amifostine on Locally Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated with Radiotherapy: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Shengye; Zhang, Yiping; Zhang, Suzhan; Ma, Shenglin

    2012-01-01

    Background and objective Controversy exists on whether amifostine can reduce the efficacy and decrease the side effects of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated by radiotherapy. The aim of this meta-analysis is to evaluate the efficacy and side effects of amifostine in NSCLC patients treated with radiotherapy. Methods Open published randomized controlled trials on the efficacy and side effects of amifostine in NSCLC patients treated with radiotherapy were collected from Medline, Cochrane...

  1. Prognostic Impact of the 6th and 7th American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM Staging Systems on Esophageal Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The new 7th edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM staging system is based on pathologic data from esophageal cancers treated by surgery alone. There is no information available on evaluation of the new staging system with regard to prognosis of patients treated with chemoradiotherapy (CRT). The objective of this study was to evaluate the prognostic impact of the new staging system on esophageal cancer patients treated with CRT. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed on 301 consecutive esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients treated with CRT. Comparisons were made of the prognostic impacts of the 6th and 7th staging systems and the prognostic impacts of stage and prognostic groups, which were newly defined in the 7th edition. Results: There were significant differences between Stages I and III (p < 0.01) according to both editions. However, the 7th edition poorly distinguishes the prognoses of Stages III and IV (p = 0.36 by multivariate analysis) in comparison to the 6th edition (p = 0.08 by multivariate analysis), although these differences were not significant. For all patients, T, M, and gender were independent prognostic factors by multivariate analysis (p < 0.05). For the Stage I and II prognostic groups, survival curves showed a stepwise decrease with increase in stage, except for Stage IIA. However, there were no significant differences seen between each prognostic stage. Conclusions: Our study indicates there are several problems with the 7th TNM staging system regarding prognostic factors in patients undergoing CRT.

  2. Prognostic Impact of the 6th and 7th American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM Staging Systems on Esophageal Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, Motoo, E-mail: excell@hkg.odn.ne.jp [Department of Clinical Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital (Japan); Shitara, Kohei [Department of Clinical Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital (Japan); Kodaira, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital (Japan); Hatooka, Shunzo [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital (Japan); Mizota, Ayako; Kondoh, Chihiro; Yokota, Tomoya; Takahari, Daisuke; Ura, Takashi; Muro, Kei [Department of Clinical Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital (Japan)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: The new 7th edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM staging system is based on pathologic data from esophageal cancers treated by surgery alone. There is no information available on evaluation of the new staging system with regard to prognosis of patients treated with chemoradiotherapy (CRT). The objective of this study was to evaluate the prognostic impact of the new staging system on esophageal cancer patients treated with CRT. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed on 301 consecutive esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients treated with CRT. Comparisons were made of the prognostic impacts of the 6th and 7th staging systems and the prognostic impacts of stage and prognostic groups, which were newly defined in the 7th edition. Results: There were significant differences between Stages I and III (p < 0.01) according to both editions. However, the 7th edition poorly distinguishes the prognoses of Stages III and IV (p = 0.36 by multivariate analysis) in comparison to the 6th edition (p = 0.08 by multivariate analysis), although these differences were not significant. For all patients, T, M, and gender were independent prognostic factors by multivariate analysis (p < 0.05). For the Stage I and II prognostic groups, survival curves showed a stepwise decrease with increase in stage, except for Stage IIA. However, there were no significant differences seen between each prognostic stage. Conclusions: Our study indicates there are several problems with the 7th TNM staging system regarding prognostic factors in patients undergoing CRT.

  3. Local failure in patients treated with radiotherapy and multidrug chemotherapy for small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifty-three patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung were treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, 40 Gy in the chest tumor. Intrathoracic failure occurred in 89% of the cases with extensive disease and in 60% of those with limited disease. Since 86% of all failures were localized within the target volume, one can conclude that in most cases the radiation dose was too low for eradication of the tumour. The treatment technique resulted in dose inhomogeneities of more than ±5% in 45% of the cases. The high local failure rate might indicate the need of improved radiotherapy, in the first place higher radiation dose. However, 82% of the patients with limited disease and local failure and 50% of those without local failure also developed distant metastases. This might indicate that the curative potential of improved thoracic radiotherapy probably is limited. Besides, lethal treatment toxicity affected particularly patients in whom local cure had been achieved, indicating the difficulty of increasing the treatment intensity without increasing the lethal toxicity in potentially curable cases. (orig.)

  4. Percentage of Cancer Volume in Biopsy Cores Is Prognostic for Prostate Cancer Death and Overall Survival in Patients Treated With Dose-Escalated External Beam Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic utility of the percentage of cancer volume (PCV) in needle biopsy specimens for prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The outcomes were analyzed for 599 men treated for localized prostate cancer with external beam radiotherapy to a minimal planning target volume dose of 75 Gy (range, 75–79.2). We assessed the effect of PCV and the pretreatment and treatment-related factors on the freedom from biochemical failure, freedom from metastasis, cause-specific survival, and overall survival. Results: The median number of biopsy cores was 7 (interquartile range, 6–12), median PCV was 10% (interquartile range, 2.5–25%), and median follow-up was 62 months. The PCV correlated with the National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group and individual risk features, including T stage, prostate-specific antigen level, Gleason score, and percentage of positive biopsy cores. On log–rank analysis, the PCV stratified by quartile was prognostic for all endpoints, including overall survival. In addition, the PCV was a stronger prognostic factor than the percentage of positive biopsy cores when the two metrics were analyzed together. On multivariate analysis, the PCV predicted a worse outcome for all endpoints, including freedom from biochemical failure, (hazard ratio, 1.9; p = .0035), freedom from metastasis (hazard ratio, 1.7, p = .09), cause-specific survival (hazard ratio, 3.9, p = .014), and overall survival (hazard ratio, 1.8, p = .02). Conclusions: For patients treated with dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy, the volume of cancer in the biopsy specimen adds prognostic value for clinically relevant endpoints, particularly in intermediate- and high-risk patients. Although the PCV determination is more arduous than the percentage of positive biopsy cores, it provides superior risk stratification.

  5. Estimation of effective dose at thyroid cancer patients treated with I131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows. Radioiodine therapy for thyroid cancer patients and hyperthyroid patients at the Institute of Pathophysiology and nuclear medicine is performed in a form of capsules. During the oral application it is reasonable to presume that 15 minutes in stomach is long enough to make additional exposure to stomach as well to other organs nearby. It is almost impossible to perform direct measurements to estimate internal doses of organs, so it is rather recommended to estimate the dose by calculation. Absorbed energy per unit transformation in stomach and surrounding organs has been calculated. The dose equivalents in several internal organs have been calculated in aim to determine the effective doses using appropriate tissue weighting factor values. The MCNP-4b model was used for this calculation. The phantom model was created using three major sections: - an elliptical cylinder representing the trunk and arms - two truncated circular cones representing the legs and feet - a circular cylinder on which sits an elliptical cylinder capped by half an ellipsoid representing the neck and head. The stomach wall is represented by the volume between two concentric ellipsoids and the contents by the volume within the inner ellipsoid. Also TLD measurements were performed over gastric region for limited time of 15 minutes. Estimated effective dose was highest in stomach 7,43*10-02 Sv. The estimated values for other organs like colon, liver, lungs, ovary and bone surface was less than the estimated effective dose of stomach. (authors)

  6. Treating advanced non-small-cell lung cancer in Chinese patients: focus on icotinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang JL

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Jun-Li Liang,1 Xiao-Cang Ren,2 Qiang Lin2 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Hebei Medical University Fourth Hospital, Shijiazhuang, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Oncology, North China Petroleum Bureau General Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Renqiu, Hebei Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Icotinib hydrochloride is an orally administered small-molecule reversible tyrosine kinase inhibitor that has been independently researched and developed and has independent intellectual property rights in the People’s Republic of China. Clinical trials have demonstrated that the response to icotinib among advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients who received at least one platinum-based chemotherapy regimen was not inferior to gefitinib. Since being launched August 2011 in the People’s Republic of China, icotinib has been widely used in clinics, and has become an important treatment option for Chinese patients with advanced NSCLC. The present study presents the Phase I, II, and III clinical trials of icotinib and discusses current clinical applications in the People’s Republic of China and future research directions. Keywords: targeted therapy, EGFR-TKI, NSCLC

  7. Comparison of EORTC criteria and PERCIST for PET/CT response evaluation of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with irinotecan and cetuximab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skougaard, Kristin; Nielsen, Dorte; Jensen, Benny Vittrup;

    2013-01-01

    The study aim was to compare European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria with PET Response Criteria in Solid Tumors (PERCIST) for response evaluation of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with a combination of the chemotherapeutic drug irinotecan an...... and the monoclonal antibody cetuximab....

  8. Vaccine Therapy and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Hormone-Resistant, Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-22

    Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  9. 2q36.3 is associated with prognosis for oestrogen receptor-negative breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingmei; Lindström, Linda S.; Foo, Jia N.; Rafiq, Sajjad; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dennis, Joe; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Van ‘t Veer, Laura J.; Cornelissen, Sten; Rutgers, Emiel; Southey, Melissa C.; Apicella, Carmel; Dite, Gillian S.; Hopper, John L.; Fasching, Peter A.; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Blomqvist, Carl; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Kataja, Vesa; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Investigators, kConFab; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; McLachlan, Sue-Anne; Lambrechts, Diether; Thienpont, Bernard; Smeets, Ann; Wildiers, Hans; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Seibold, Petra; Rudolph, Anja; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Kristensen, Vessela; Alnæs, Grethe I. Grenaker; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Nord, Silje; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert; Seynaeve, Caroline; Hooning, Maartje; Kriege, Mieke; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans; Li, Yi; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Ulmer, Hans U.; Rüdiger, Thomas; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Chen, Shou-Tung; Teo, Soo Hwang; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Har Yip, Cheng; Fuang Ho, Gwo; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K.; Yoo, Keun-Young; Maishman, Tom; Tapper, William J.; Dunning, Alison; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Brown, Judith; Chuen Khor, Chiea; Eccles, Diana M.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Easton, Douglas; Humphreys, Keith; Liu, Jianjun; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila

    2014-01-01

    Large population-based registry studies have shown that breast cancer prognosis is inherited. Here we analyse single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes implicated in human immunology and inflammation as candidates for prognostic markers of breast cancer survival involving 1,804 oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative patients treated with chemotherapy (279 events) from 14 European studies in a prior large-scale genotyping experiment, which is part of the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS) initiative. We carry out replication using Asian COGS samples (n=522, 53 events) and the Prospective Study of Outcomes in Sporadic versus Hereditary breast cancer (POSH) study (n=315, 108 events). Rs4458204_A near CCL20 (2q36.3) is found to be associated with breast cancer-specific death at a genome-wide significant level (n=2,641, 440 events, combined allelic hazard ratio (HR)=1.81 (1.49–2.19); P for trend=1.90 × 10−9). Such survival-associated variants can represent ideal targets for tailored therapeutics, and may also enhance our current prognostic prediction capabilities. PMID:24937182

  10. Clinical Study on Early Post-operational Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy and Salviae in Treating Patients of Gastric Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于庆生; 王炜; 汪小明; 王汉明; 帅剑峰

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety, feasibility and short-term efficacy of early post-operational intraperitoneal chemotherapy (EPIC) combined with Salviae miltiorrhizae (SM) in treating patients with gastric cancer. Methods: The 136 patients enrolled were divided into 3 groups: the EPIC group, the EPVC group and the control group. The former two groups were treated with SM plus 5-FU started from the second or third day after operation for 5 continuous days by intraperitoneal infusion or intravenous dripping respectively, and the control group was untreated but conventional chemotherapy was given 3 weeks after surgical operation. Toxic and adverse effects of chemotherapy, post-operational complications, short-term survival rate and intra-abdominal tumor recurrence rate were observed and compared.Results: (1) Toxic adverse effects of chemotherapy that occurred in the EPIC group were less than those in the EPVC group significantly (P<0.05-0.01). (2) Occurrence of serious complications in the EPIC group was not higher than that in the other two groups. (3) The 1- and 2-year survival rate in the EPIC group was higher than those in the other two groups respectively (P<0.01), while the post-operational intra-abdominal recurrence rate in EPIC group was significantly lower than that in the other two groups (P<0.05). Conclusions: Combined therapy of SM and 5-FU in treating patients with gastric cancer by intraperitoneal infusion is not only safe and feasible with mild toxic and side effect, but also produces a more beneficial effects, including less intra-abdominal recurrence and satisfactory short-term survival rate .

  11. Motion mitigation for lung cancer patients treated with active scanning proton therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassberger, Clemens, E-mail: Grassberger.Clemens@mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 and Center for Proton Radiotherapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen-PSI 5232 (Switzerland); Dowdell, Stephen; Sharp, Greg; Paganetti, Harald [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Motion interplay can affect the tumor dose in scanned proton beam therapy. This study assesses the ability of rescanning and gating to mitigate interplay effects during lung treatments. Methods: The treatments of five lung cancer patients [48 Gy(RBE)/4fx] with varying tumor size (21.1–82.3 cm{sup 3}) and motion amplitude (2.9–30.6 mm) were simulated employing 4D Monte Carlo. The authors investigated two spot sizes (σ ∼ 12 and ∼3 mm), three rescanning techniques (layered, volumetric, breath-sampled volumetric) and respiratory gating with a 30% duty cycle. Results: For 4/5 patients, layered rescanning 6/2 times (for the small/large spot size) maintains equivalent uniform dose within the target >98% for a single fraction. Breath sampling the timing of rescanning is ∼2 times more effective than the same number of continuous rescans. Volumetric rescanning is sensitive to synchronization effects, which was observed in 3/5 patients, though not for layered rescanning. For the large spot size, rescanning compared favorably with gating in terms of time requirements, i.e., 2x-rescanning is on average a factor ∼2.6 faster than gating for this scenario. For the small spot size however, 6x-rescanning takes on average 65% longer compared to gating. Rescanning has no effect on normal lung V{sub 20} and mean lung dose (MLD), though it reduces the maximum lung dose by on average 6.9 ± 2.4/16.7 ± 12.2 Gy(RBE) for the large and small spot sizes, respectively. Gating leads to a similar reduction in maximum dose and additionally reduces V{sub 20} and MLD. Breath-sampled rescanning is most successful in reducing the maximum dose to the normal lung. Conclusions: Both rescanning (2–6 times, depending on the beam size) as well as gating was able to mitigate interplay effects in the target for 4/5 patients studied. Layered rescanning is superior to volumetric rescanning, as the latter suffers from synchronization effects in 3/5 patients studied. Gating minimizes the

  12. Prognostic Factors for Survival and Resection in Patients With Initial Nonresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Treated With Chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjerregaard, Jon K., E-mail: jon.bjerregaard@ouh.regionsyddanmark.dk [Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark); Mortensen, Michael B. [Department of Surgery, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Jensen, Helle A.; Nielsen, Morten [Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Pfeiffer, Per [Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark)

    2012-07-01

    Background and Purpose: Controversies regarding the optimal therapy for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) exist. Although the prognosis as a whole remains dismal, subgroups are known to benefit from intensive therapy, including chemoradiotherapy (CRT). We describe the results in 178 patients treated from 2001 to 2010 and have developed a prognostic model for both survival and the possibility of a subsequent resection in these patients. Methods and Materials: From 2001 until 2010, 178 consecutive patients with LAPC were treated and included in the present study, with CRT consisting of 50 Gy in 27 fractions combined with tegafur-uracil(UFT)/folinic acid(FA). Results: The median survival from diagnosis was 11.5 months. Adverse events of Grade 3 or above were seen in 36% of the patients. Ninety-three percent of the patients completed all fractions. A Cox regression model for survival demonstrated resection (hazard ratio [HR] 0.12; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.1-0.3) and pre-CRT gemcitabine-based therapy (HR 0.57; 95% CI, 0.4-0.9) as being associated with a favorable outcome, increasing gross tumor volume (HR 1.14; 95% CI, 1.0-1.3) was associated with shorter survival. A logistic regression model showed Stage III disease (odds ratio [OR] 0.16; 95% CI, 0.0-1.1) and abnormal hemoglobin (OR 0.26; 95% CI, 0.0-1.2) as being associated with lower odds of resection. Conclusion: This study confirms the favorable prognosis for patients receiving gemcitabine therapy before CRT and the poor prognosis associated with increasing tumor volume. In addition, CRT in patients with abnormal hemoglobin and Stage III disease rarely induced tumor shrinkage allowing subsequent resection.

  13. Prognostic Factors for Survival and Resection in Patients With Initial Nonresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Treated With Chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and Purpose: Controversies regarding the optimal therapy for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) exist. Although the prognosis as a whole remains dismal, subgroups are known to benefit from intensive therapy, including chemoradiotherapy (CRT). We describe the results in 178 patients treated from 2001 to 2010 and have developed a prognostic model for both survival and the possibility of a subsequent resection in these patients. Methods and Materials: From 2001 until 2010, 178 consecutive patients with LAPC were treated and included in the present study, with CRT consisting of 50 Gy in 27 fractions combined with tegafur-uracil(UFT)/folinic acid(FA). Results: The median survival from diagnosis was 11.5 months. Adverse events of Grade 3 or above were seen in 36% of the patients. Ninety-three percent of the patients completed all fractions. A Cox regression model for survival demonstrated resection (hazard ratio [HR] 0.12; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.1–0.3) and pre-CRT gemcitabine-based therapy (HR 0.57; 95% CI, 0.4–0.9) as being associated with a favorable outcome, increasing gross tumor volume (HR 1.14; 95% CI, 1.0–1.3) was associated with shorter survival. A logistic regression model showed Stage III disease (odds ratio [OR] 0.16; 95% CI, 0.0–1.1) and abnormal hemoglobin (OR 0.26; 95% CI, 0.0–1.2) as being associated with lower odds of resection. Conclusion: This study confirms the favorable prognosis for patients receiving gemcitabine therapy before CRT and the poor prognosis associated with increasing tumor volume. In addition, CRT in patients with abnormal hemoglobin and Stage III disease rarely induced tumor shrinkage allowing subsequent resection.

  14. Acute and late toxicity in prostate cancer patients treated by dose escalated intensity modulated radiation therapy and organ tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrensmeier Frank

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report acute and late toxicity in prostate cancer patients treated by dose escalated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT and organ tracking. Methods From 06/2004 to 12/2005 39 men were treated by 80 Gy IMRT along with organ tracking. Median age was 69 years, risk of recurrence was low 18%, intermediate 21% and high in 61% patients. Hormone therapy (HT was received by 74% of patients. Toxicity was scored according to the CTC scale version 3.0. Median follow-up (FU was 29 months. Results Acute and maximal late grade 2 gastrointestinal (GI toxicity was 3% and 8%, late grade 2 GI toxicity dropped to 0% at the end of FU. No acute or late grade 3 GI toxicity was observed. Grade 2 and 3 pre-treatment genitourinary (GU morbidity (PGUM was 20% and 5%. Acute and maximal late grade 2 GU toxicity was 56% and 28% and late grade 2 GU toxicity decreased to 15% of patients at the end of FU. Acute and maximal late grade 3 GU toxicity was 8% and 3%, respectively. Decreased late ≥ grade 2 GU toxicity free survival was associated with higher age (P = .025, absence of HT (P = .016 and higher PGUM (P Discussion GI toxicity rates after IMRT and organ tracking are excellent, GU toxicity rates are strongly related to PGUM.

  15. Contralateral axillary disease in patients with previously treated breast cancer: manifestation of distant metastases or occult primary in contralateral breast?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contralateral axillary lymphadenopathy is occasionally seen in patients following disease in the ipsilateral breast. The aim of the study was to find out whether it might be a manifestation of an occult primary in the contralateral breast or manifestation of distant metastases from the previously treated carcinoma. A review of the records of 1331 breast cancer patients presented with recurrent disease and treated with surgery, radio-, chemo- or combined therapy showed that 36 patients presented with disease in the contralateral axilla during follow up. In 21 (1.6%) of them contralateral lymphadenopathy was the only symptom of the disease. 16 of them developed disease in the contralateral breast: in all cases the disease was locally advanced in nature indicative of diffuse involvement of the whole breast. In almost all 36 cases systemic disease developed soon after contralateral axillary disease was noted. These observations as well as pathological analysis suggested that contralateral axillary disease in our patients was an indication of metastases from the ipsilateral breast rather than manifestation of occult primary in the contralateral breast. (author)

  16. Metastasis-Induced Acute Pancreatitis Successfully Treated with Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy in a Patient with Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerem Okutur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although involvement of pancreas is a common finding in small cell lung cancer (SCLC, metastasis-induced acute pancreatitis (MIAP is very rare. A 50-year-old female with SCLC who had limited disease and achieved full response after treatment presented with acute pancreatitis during her follow-up. The radiologic studies revealed a small area causing obliteration of the pancreatic duct without mass in the pancreatic neck, and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA confirmed the metastasis of SCLC. The patient was treated successfully with systemic chemotherapy and radiotherapy delivered to pancreatic field. In SCLC, cases of MIAP can be encountered with conventional computed tomography with no mass image, and positron emission tomography and EUS-FNA can be useful for diagnosis of such cases. Aggressive systemic and local treatment can prolong survival, especially in patients with good performance status.

  17. Patterns of Radiation Therapy Practice for Patients Treated for Intact Cervical Cancer in 2005 to 2007: A Quality Research in Radiation Oncology Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess practice patterns and compliance with clinical performance measures for radiation therapy (RT) for patients with intact carcinoma of the cervix. Methods and Materials: Trained research associates reviewed the records of 261 randomly selected patients who received RT for cervix carcinoma between 2005 and 2007 from 45 facilities randomly selected after stratification by practice type. National estimates of patient and treatment characteristics were calculated from survey data using SUDAAN statistical software. Results: From the survey data, we estimated that only 8% of US facilities treated on average more than 3 eligible patients per year. No small or medium nonacademic facilities in the survey treated more than 3 eligible patients per year. Approximately 65.5% of patients began treatment in a facility that treated 3 or fewer eligible patients per year. Although 87.5% of patients had brachytherapy as part of their treatment, the proportion treated with external beam RT only was about double that estimated from the 1996 to 1999 survey. The use of high-dose-rate brachytherapy sharply increased, particularly in small nonacademic facilities. Overall, patients treated in nonacademic facilities were more likely to have incomplete or protracted treatment; 43% of patients treated in small nonacademic facilities did not have treatment completed within 10 weeks. Also, patients treated in facilities that treated 3 or fewer eligible patients per year were significantly less likely to receive concurrent chemotherapy than were patients treated in other facilities. Conclusion: Survey results indicate a disturbingly high rate of noncompliance with established criteria for high-quality care of patients with cervical cancer. Noncompliance rates are particularly high in nonacademic facilities, especially those that treat relatively few patients with intact cervical cancer

  18. PD-L1 Expression and Survival among Patients with Advanced Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Filskov Sorensen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent clinical trial results have suggested that programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1 expression measured by immunohistochemistry may predict response to anti–programmed cell death 1 (PD-1 therapy. Results on the association between PD-L1 expression and survival among patients with advanced non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC treated with chemotherapy are inconsistent. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We evaluated the relationship between PD-L1 expression and overall survival (OS among 204 patients with advanced NSCLC treated at Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark, from 2007 to 2012. PD-L1 expression was measured using a prototype immunohistochemistry assay with the anti–PD-L1 22C3 antibody (Merck. PD-L1 strong positivity and weak positivity were defined to be traceable to the clinical trial version of the assay. RESULTS: Twenty-five percent of patients had PD-L1 strong-positive tumors, and 50% had PD-L1 weak-positive tumors. No statistically significant association was found between PD-L1 expression and survival; adjusted hazard ratio of 1.34 (95% confidence interval, 0.88-2.03; median OS, 9.0 months for the PD-L1 strong-positive group and 1.07 (0.74-1.55; median OS, 9.8 months for the PD-L1 weak-positive group compared with the PD-L1–negative group (median OS, 7.5 months. No association was seen between PD-L1 expression and OS when PD-L1 expression levels were stratified by median or tertiles. CONCLUSIONS: In concordance with previous studies, we found PD-L1 measured by immunohistochemistry to be frequently expressed in patients with advanced NSCLC. However, PD-L1 expression is not a strong prognostic marker in patients with advanced NSCLC treated with chemotherapy.

  19. Docetaxel does not impair cardiac autonomic function in breast cancer patients previously treated with anthracyclines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekholm, Eeva; Rantanen, Virpi; Syvänen, Kari; Jalonen, Jarmo; Antila, Kari; Salminen, Eeva

    2002-04-01

    The effects of docetaxel treatment on autonomic cardiac function was studied with 24-h ECG recordings in breast cancer patients pretreated with anthracyclines. Twenty-four women were evaluated before docetaxel treatment and after 3-4 courses of docetaxel 100 mg/m(2). The heart rate, cardiac extrasystoles and heart rate variability (HRV) in both the time and frequency domain were assessed from 24-h ECG recordings. The acute effects of docetaxel were calculated from 1-h recordings immediately prior to, during and after infusion. Long-term effects were evaluated from 24-h recordings performed before treatment and after 3-4 courses of docetaxel. There was no increase in the number of cardiac extrasystoles during docetaxel infusion. The number of ventricular extrasystoles decreased from 14 (23) to 7 (14) during and 5 (10) after the first infusion (p=0.02). The heart rate, HRV and extrasystoles were similar before and after 3-4 courses of docetaxel. The treatment did not abolish circadian variability of the heart rate. Docetaxel did not deteriorate autonomic cardiac function. In conclusion, our findings suggest that docetaxel does not have harmful cumulative effects on autonomic control of the heart and is therefore unlikely to be cardiotoxic.

  20. A case report of monitoring PSA level changes in two prostate cancer patients treated with Mountain Ginseng Pharmacopuncture and Sweet Bee Venom along with western anticancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeonhee Lee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this report is to find out how Mountain Ginseng Pharmacopuncture(MGP and Sweet Bee Venom(SBV treatments are effective on prostate cancer patients by monitoring Prostate specific antigen(PSA values. Methods: We treated two prostate cancer patients with MGP and SBV from October 2008 to April 2011. One patient had localized prostate cancer, the other was in the terminal stage of prostate cancer with lung and bone metastasis and both had been receiving western anticancer therapy. We had monitored the changes of PSA value. Results: In case 1, MGP and SBV treatments seemed to be helpful in preventing the recurrence of localized prostate cancer. In case 2, PSA value was decreased by MGP treatment. Conclusions: It is conceivable that MGP and SBV are effective treatments for patients with prostate cancer.

  1. Urinary fibronectin levels in patients treated with intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guérin for superficial bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danişman, A; Bulut, K; Kukul, E; Ozen, I; Sevük, M

    2000-01-01

    Intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has been shown to be an effective treatment for superficial transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder, but the precise mechanism of action of BCG remains poorly understood. Fibronectin (FN), an important component of the extracellular matrix, has been found to play a role in BCG therapy. Some studies have shown that the soluble form of FN can compete efficiently with the matrix form of binding to the specific receptors on the bacteria and could consequently diminish the effect of BCG treatment. To evaluate a possible correlation between the urinary levels of FN and the efficacy of BCG therapy, we determined prospectively the urinary FN levels in 38 patients with TCC of the bladder and in 25 control subjects without malignancy matched for age and sex. All TCC patients were treated with transurethral tumor resection plus 6 weekly intravesical BCG instillations. After an average follow-up of 30 months, 8 patients (21.1%) had recurrent tumors, while 30 (78.9%) were free of tumor after intravesical BCG therapy. Urinary levels of FN in cancer patients have been shown to be significantly higher than controls (p 0. 05). It was also found that the mean urinary FN levels were not statistically significant between patients with recurrence and complete remission. The data suggest that BCG-bladder tumor cell binding is not influenced by soluble fibronectin and urinary FN may not be a ideal marker for selecting patients to BCG therapy.

  2. A new angiographic imaging platform reduces radiation exposure for patients with liver cancer treated with transarterial chemoembolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schernthaner, Ruediger E.; Duran, Rafael; Chapiro, Julius; Wang, Zhijun; Geschwind, Jean-Francois H. [The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Lin, MingDe [Ultrasound Imaging and and Interventions (UII), Philips Research North America, Briarcliff Manor, NY (United States)

    2015-11-15

    To quantify the reduction of radiation liver cancer patients are exposed to during transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), while maintaining diagnostic image quality, using a new C-arm imaging platform. In this prospective, HIPAA-compliant, IRB-approved, two-arm trial, 78 consecutive patients with primary or secondary liver cancer were treated with TACE on a C-arm imaging platform before and after an upgrade incorporating optimized acquisition parameters and advanced real-time image processing algorithms. Dose area product (DAP) and radiation time of each digital fluoroscopy (DF), digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and cone beam CT (CBCT) were recorded. DSA image quality was assessed by two blinded and independent readers on a four-rank scale. Both cohorts showed no significant differences with regard to patient characteristics and tumour burden. The new system resulted in a statistically significant reduction of cumulative DAP of 66 % compared to the old platform (median 132.9 vs. 395.8 Gy cm{sup 2}). Individually, DAP of DF, DSA and CBCT decreased by 52 %, 79 % and 15 % (p < 0.01, p < 0.01, p = 0.51), respectively. No statistically significant differences in DSA image quality were found between the two imaging platforms. The new imaging platform significantly reduced radiation exposure for TACE procedures without increased radiation time or negative impact on DSA image quality. (orig.)

  3. Late toxicity and biochemical control in 554 prostate cancer patients treated with and without dose escalated image guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To compare rates of late gastrointestinal toxicity, late genitourinary toxicity and biochemical failure between patients treated for prostate cancer with implanted fiducial marker image guided radiotherapy (FMIGRT), and those treated without FMIGRT. Methods and materials: We performed a single institution retrospective study comparing all 311 patients who received 74 Gy without fiducial markers in 2006 versus all 243 patients who received our updated regimen of 78 Gy with FMIGRT in 2008. Patient records were reviewed 27 months after completing radiotherapy. Biochemical failure was defined using the Phoenix definition. Details of late gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicities were graded according to CTCAEv4. Moderate/severe toxicity was defined as a grade 2 or higher toxicity. Cumulative incidence and prevalence curves for moderate/severe toxicity were constructed and compared using multistate modeling while biochemical failure free survival was compared using the log rank test. A Cox regression model was developed to correct for confounding factors. Results: Median follow-up time for both groups was 22 months. The hazard ratio for moderate/severe late gastrointestinal toxicity in the non-FMIGRT group was 3.66 [95% CI (1.63–8.23), p = 0.003] compared to patients in the FMIGRT group. There was no difference in the hazard ratio of moderate/severe late genitourinary toxicity between the two groups (0.44 [95% CI (0.19–1.00)]), but patients treated with FMIGRT did have a quicker recovery from their genitourinary toxicities HR = 0.24 [95% CI (0.10–0.59)]. We were unable to detect any differences in biochemical failure free survival between the cohorts HR = 0.60 [95% CI (0.30–1.20), p = 0.143]. Conclusion: Despite dose escalation, the use of FMIGRT in radical radiotherapy for prostate cancer significantly reduces the incidence of gastrointestinal toxicity and the duration of late genitourinary toxicity when compared to conventional non

  4. Sunitinib Malate in Treating HIV-Positive Patients With Cancer Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-14

    -transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Primary Systemic Amyloidosis; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  5. Pembrolizumab and Docetaxel or Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients Urothelial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-31

    Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Regional Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage III Urethral Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Urethral Cancer; Urethral Urothelial Carcinoma

  6. Dosimetric impact of setup errors in head and neck cancer patients treated by image-guided radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Inderjit; Rawat, Sheh; Ahlawat, Parveen; Kakria, Anjali; Gupta, Gourav; Saxena, Upasna; Mishra, Manindra Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    To assess and analyze the impact of setup uncertainties on target volume coverage and doses to organs at risk (OAR) in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients treated by image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Translational setup errors in 25 HNC patients were observed by kilovoltage cone beam computed tomography (kV CBCT). Two plans were generated. Plan one - the original plan which was the initially optimized and approved plan of the patient. All patients were treated according to their respective approved plans at a defined isocenter. Plan two - the plan sum which was the sum of all plans recalculated at a different isocenter according to setup errors in x, y, and z-direction. Plan sum was created to evaluate doses that would have been received by planning target volume (PTV) and OARs if setup errors were not corrected. These 2 plans were analyzed and compared in terms of target volume coverage and doses to OARs. A total 503 kV CBCT images were acquired for evaluation of setup errors in 25 HNC patients. The systematic (mean) and random errors (standard deviation) combined for 25 patients in x, y, and z directions were 0.15 cm, 0.21 cm, and 0.19 cm and 0.09 cm, 0.12 cm, and 0.09 cm, respectively. The study showed that there was a significant difference in PTV coverage between 2 plans. The doses to various OARs showed a nonsignificant increase in the plan sum. The correction of translational setup errors is essential for IGRT treatment in terms of delivery of planned optimal doses to target volume. PMID:27217627

  7. Dosimetric impact of setup errors in head and neck cancer patients treated by image-guided radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inderjit Kaur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To assess and analyze the impact of setup uncertainties on target volume coverage and doses to organs at risk (OAR in head and neck cancer (HNC patients treated by image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT. Translational setup errors in 25 HNC patients were observed by kilovoltage cone beam computed tomography (kV CBCT. Two plans were generated. Plan one – the original plan which was the initially optimized and approved plan of the patient. All patients were treated according to their respective approved plans at a defined isocenter. Plan two – the plan sum which was the sum of all plans recalculated at a different isocenter according to setup errors in x, y, and z-direction. Plan sum was created to evaluate doses that would have been received by planning target volume (PTV and OARs if setup errors were not corrected. These 2 plans were analyzed and compared in terms of target volume coverage and doses to OARs. A total 503 kV CBCT images were acquired for evaluation of setup errors in 25 HNC patients. The systematic (mean and random errors (standard deviation combined for 25 patients in x, y, and z directions were 0.15 cm, 0.21 cm, and 0.19 cm and 0.09 cm, 0.12 cm, and 0.09 cm, respectively. The study showed that there was a significant difference in PTV coverage between 2 plans. The doses to various OARs showed a nonsignificant increase in the plan sum. The correction of translational setup errors is essential for IGRT treatment in terms of delivery of planned optimal doses to target volume.

  8. A Prognostic Volumetric Threshold of Gross Tumor Volume in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Treated With Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romesser, Paul B.; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Subramaniam, Rathan M.; Sakai, Osamu; Jalisi, Scharukh; Truong, Minh T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine the prognostic utility of a volumetric threshold for gross tumor volume (GTV) of the primary and nodal disease when accounting for the TNM classification in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients treated with definitive radiotherapy (RT). Materials and Methods From 2004 to 2011, 79 HNC patients were treated to a median dose of 70 Gy, using intensity-modulated RT in 78.5% and 3-dimensional conformal RT in 21.5% with 83.5% receiving concurrent chemotherapy. Primary (GTV-P) and nodal (GTV-N) GTVs were derived from computed tomography (CT)-based contours for RT planning, of which 89.7% were aided by positron emission tomography-computed tomography. Local (LC), nodal (NC), distant (DC) control, and overall survival (OS) were assessed using the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method. Results With a median follow-up of 27.1 months GTV-P, threshold of <32.9 mL (mean value) compared with ≥32.9 mL, correlated with improved 2-year LC (96.2% vs. 63.9%, P < 0.0001), NC (100% vs. 69.2%, P < 0.0001), DC (87.9% vs. 64.2%, P = 0.001), and OS (88.4% vs. 58.6%, P = 0.001). GTV-P demonstrated its prognostic utility in multivariate analyses when adjusted for tumor category, cancer site, and chemotherapy regimen. Nodal GTV (mean, 34.0 mL) was not predictive of nodal control and survival. Conclusions A volumetric threshold of the primary tumor may be used as an independent prognostic factor in patients with HNC undergoing definitive RT. PMID:23211218

  9. Bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as third- or later-line therapy in patients with heavily treated metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Q

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Qiong Yang,1–4,* Chenxi Yin,1,3,4,* Fangxin Liao,1,3,4 Yuanyuan Huang,1,3,4 Wenzhuo He,1,3,4 Chang Jiang,1,3,4 Guifang Guo,1,3,4 Bei Zhang,1,3,4 Liangping Xia1,3,41VIP Region, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Oncology, Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China; 3State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China; 4Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Currently available third- or later-line therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC is limited in its efficacy, with a weak survival benefit in patients who progressed after two or more lines of standard therapy. Our retrospective study aimed to explore the value of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy in this setting.Methods: Patients with mCRC who received fluoropyrimidine, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan as first- and second-line chemotherapy were selected for inclusion. Treatment consisted of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy. Chemotherapy consisted mainly of oxaliplatin, irinotecan, and fluoropyrimidine.Results: Between February 2010 and December 2012, 35 consecutive patients with mCRC were treated with bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as a third- or later-line treatment. No complete responses, seven partial responses (20%, 22 stable disease responses (62.9%, and six progressive disease responses (17.1% were obtained, producing an objective response rate of 20% and a disease control rate of 82.9%. With a median follow-up of 11.3 months (range: 0.7–48.0 months, the median progression-free survival was 5.98 months (95% confidence interval: 4.76–7.2 months, and the median overall survival was 14.77 months (95% confidence interval: 11.45–18.1 months. In the univariate analysis

  10. A Novel Dose Constraint to Reduce Xerostomia in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the predictors of incidence and duration of xerostomia (XT) based on parotid glands (PG), submandibular glands (SMG), and both glands taken as a whole organ (TG) in head-and-neck cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A prospective study was initiated in May 2003. Sixty-three head-and-neck patients (44 with nasopharynx cancer) were included in the analysis. Using the dose-volume histogram the PG, SMG, and TG mean doses were calculated. Unstimulated and stimulated salivary flow were measured and XT-related questionnaires were compiled before and at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after radiotherapy. Salivary gland toxicity was evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale, and Grade ≥3 toxicity was used as the endpoint. The XT incidence was investigated according to descriptive statistics and univariate and multivariate analysis. The Bonferroni method was used for multiple comparison adjustment. Results: After a reduced flow at 3 months after radiotherapy, recovery of salivary flow was observed over time. Primary site and salivary gland mean doses and volumes were identified in univariate analysis as prognostic factors. Multivariate analysis confirmed that TG mean dose (p = 0.00066) and pretreatment stimulated salivary flow (p = 0.00420) are independent factors for predicting XT. Conclusion: The TG mean dose correlates with XT as assessed by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria, salivary output, and XT-related questionnaires. Our results suggest that TG mean dose is a candidate dose constraint for reducing XT, requiring considerably more validation in non-nasopharyngeal cancer patients.

  11. A retrospective quality of life analysis using the lung cancer symptom scale in patients treated with palliative radiotherapy for advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To measure symptom palliation in patients treated with radiation therapy for advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Five hundred thirty patients with NSCLC were treated at the Medical College of Virginia between 1988 and 1993. Sixty-three patients with the least favorable prognostic features received palliative radiation to 30 Gy in 10 or 12 fractions for symptoms related to the presence of intrathoracic tumor. The observer portion of the Lung Cancer Symptom Scale (LCSS) was employed in a retrospective chart review, scoring measures of appetite, fatigue, cough, dyspnea, hemoptysis, and pain. Results: In 54 evaluable patients, median survival was 4 months and was independent of age, stage, performance status, or histology. Ninety-six percent of the patients had at least one LCSS symptom at presentation. Fatigue was unaffected by therapy. Improvements in appetite (p = 0.68) and pain (p = 0.61) were not statistically significant. There was, however, a statistically significant reduction in cough (p = 0.01), hemoptysis (p = 0.001), and dyspnea (p 0.0003). Self-limiting acute side effects included transient esophagitis in 37% of patients, though no severe toxicities were noted. Conclusions: These results suggest symptomatic benefit from radiotherapy even in those NSCLC patients with advanced disease and a limited life expectancy. Treatment should be given to patients whose symptoms are most amenable to palliation. A site-specific quality of life instrument such as the LCSS should be included within any future clinical trial of NSCLC management so that symptom control may be scored as a treatment outcome in addition to disease-free survival

  12. Risk factors of radiation-induced acute esophagitis in non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with concomitant chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyze the clinical and dosimetric risk factors of acute esophagitis (AE) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with concomitant chemoradiotherapy. Seventy-six NSCLC patients treated with concomitant chemoradiotherapy were retrospectively analyzed. Forty-one patients received concomitant chemoradiotherapy with vinorelbine/cisplatin (VC), 35 with docetaxel/cisplatin (DC). AE was graded according to criteria of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). The following clinical and dosimetric parameters were analyzed: gender, age, clinical stage, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), pretreatment weight loss, concomitant chemotherapy agents (CCA) (VC vs. DC), percentage of esophagus volume treated to ≥20 (V20), ≥30 (V30), ≥40 (V40), ≥50 (V50) and ≥60 Gy (V60), and the maximum (Dmax) and mean doses (Dmean) delivered to esophagus. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis were used to test the association between the different factors and AE. Seventy patients developed AE (Grade 1, 19 patients; Grade 2, 36 patients; and Grade 3, 15 patients). By multivariate logistic regression analysis, V40 was the only statistically significant factor associated with Grade ≥2 AE (p<0.001, OR = 1.159). A V40 of <23% had a 33.3% (10/30) risk of Grade ≥2 AE, which increased to 89.1% (41/46) with a V40 of ≥23% (p<0.001). CCA (p =0.01; OR = 9.686) and V50 (p<0.001; OR = 1.122) were most significantly correlated with grade 3 AE. A V50 of <26.5% had a 6.7% (3/45) risk of Grade 3 AE, which increased to 38.7% (12/31) with a V50 of ≥26.5% (p = 0.001). On the linear regression analysis, V50 and CCA were significant independent factors affecting AE duration. Patients who received concomitant chemotherapy with VC had a decreased risk of grade 3 AE and shorter duration compared with DC. Concomitant chemotherapy agents have potential influence on AE. Concomitant chemotherapy with VC led to lower risk of AE compared with that using DC. V40 and V50

  13. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study to assess QTc interval prolongation of standard dose aflibercept in cancer patients treated with docetaxel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maison-Blanche, Pierre; Vermorken, Jan B; Goksel, Tuncay;

    2013-01-01

    : The effect of repeated doses of aflibercept on ventricular repolarization in cancer patients was evaluated in an intensive electrocardiogram trial. This randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial was conducted in 87 treated solid tumor patients. Treatment was with 6 mg/kg aflibercept, 1...

  14. Plasma YKL-40 in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treated with First Line Oxaliplatin-Based Regimen with or without Cetuximab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarpgaard, Line S; Guren, Tormod K; Glimelius, Bengt;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We aim to test the hypothesis that high plasma YKL-40 is associated with short progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) treated with first-line oxaliplatin and 5-flourouracil with or without cetuximab. PATIENTS AND ...

  15. The course of health-related quality of life in head and neck cancer patients treated with chemoradiation : A prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M.; Buffart, Laurien M.; Heymans, Martijn W.; Rietveld, Derek H.; Doornaert, Patricia; de Bree, Remco; Buter, Jan; Aaronson, Neil K.; Slotman, Ben J.; Leemans, C. Rene; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the course of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) from diagnosis to 2 years follow-up in patients with head and neck cancer (HNSCC) treated with chemoradiation (CRT). Materials and methods: 164 patients completed the EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-H&N35 questionnaires 1

  16. Effect of long-term music therapy intervention on autonomic function in anthracycline-treated breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Chih-Yuan; Han, Wei-Ru; Li, Pei-Chun; Song, Mi-Yun; Young, Shuenn-Tsong

    2011-12-01

    Anthracyclines are potent antineoplastic agents associated with cardiotoxicity, which may lead to congestive heart failure, causing impairment of autonomic cardiovascular function as assessed by heart rate variability (HRV). This decreases survival rates. This study aimed to determine whether music therapy intervention improves autonomic function in anthracycline-treated breast cancer patients, and if so, whether such improvements persist after cessation of the intervention. Participants were 12 women with breast cancer who had undergone mastectomy or breast-conserving treatment and adjuvant chemotherapy; they attended 8 weekly music therapy sessions, each lasting 2 hours. Electrocardiogram traces (5 minutes) for HRV analysis were recorded 4 times: prior to the first music session, T1; after the fourth music session, T2; after the eighth music session, T3; and 4 weeks after the completion of music therapy, T4. HRV parameters were subjected to a nonparametric Friedman test on the differences between T1 and T2, T3, and T4. The standard deviation of normal intervals and the total power of HRV parameters, related to global autonomic function, were significantly higher at T3 than at T1. The root-mean-square differences of successive normal R-R intervals and high-frequency (HF) HRV parameters, related to parasympathetic activity, were significantly increased, but no change was seen in the LF/HF ratio of HRV parameters (which is related to sympathetic activity) during the music therapy. Global autonomic function and parasympathetic activity had not changed significantly at T4 relative to T1. The authors provide preliminary evidence of the benefits of music therapy for anthracycline-treated breast cancer survivors. PMID:21382955

  17. CLINICAL FEATURES AND CLINICAL OUTCOME OF ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA PATIENTS TREATED AT CAIRO NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE IN EGYPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer M Fouad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available

    The current study reports the clinical features and treatment outcome of 67 patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL presented to National Cancer Institute (NCI-Cairo, in Egypt from January 2007 to January 2011. The median follow-up time was 36 months. All patients were treated with the simultaneous administration of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA and anthracyclin. The treatment protocol was modified due to resource limitations at the NCI-Cairo by replacing of idarubicin with doxorubicin in most of the cases and the inclusion of cytarbine during the consolidation phase only in pediatric patients. All patients who achieved molecular complete remission (CRm after consolidation received two-year maintenance treatment with low dose chemotherapy composed of 6 mercaptopurine, methotrexate and intermittent ATRA courses. The median age at presentation was 29 years. There was a slight male predominance (53%.  Bleeding was the most common presenting symptom (79%. Most patients had an intermediate risk Sanz score (49% and 34% had a high risk score.  All patients achieved molecular CR at end of consolidation therapy with a median duration of 100 days. The main therapeutic complications during the induction phase were febrile neutropenia (42%, bleeding (18% and differentiation syndrome (11%. Five patients died at diagnosis due to bleeding, three died during induction chemotherapy due to febrile neutropenia (n=2 and bleeding (n=1 and one patient died during consolidation therapy due to febrile neutropenia.  The 3-year OS was 89% and relapse rate was 3%. Adapting standard AIDA treatment protocols to limited resources by reducing dose-intensity during treatment consolidation, using ATRA in the consolidation phase and alternative anthracyclin (doxorubicin may be a valid treatment option in developing countries. In spite of the increased incidence of high and intermediate risk score APL in our sample, we reported an acceptable CR rate

  18. CLINICAL FEATURES AND CLINICAL OUTCOME OF ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA PATIENTS TREATED AT CAIRO NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE IN EGYPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola Khorshid

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The current study reports the clinical features and treatment outcome of 67 patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL presented to National Cancer Institute (NCI-Cairo, in Egypt from January 2007 to January 2011. The median follow-up time was 36 months. All patients were treated with the simultaneous administration of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA and anthracyclin. The treatment protocol was modified due to resource limitations at the NCI-Cairo by replacing of idarubicin with doxorubicin in most of the cases and the inclusion of cytarbine during the consolidation phase only in pediatric patients. All patients who achieved molecular complete remission (CRm after consolidation received two-year maintenance treatment with low dose chemotherapy composed of 6 mercaptopurine, methotrexate and intermittent ATRA courses. The median age at presentation was 29 years. There was a slight male predominance (53%.  Bleeding was the most common presenting symptom (79%. Most patients had an intermediate risk Sanz score (49% and 34% had a high risk score.  All patients achieved molecular CR at end of consolidation therapy with a median duration of 100 days. The main therapeutic complications during the induction phase were febrile neutropenia (42%, bleeding (18% and differentiation syndrome (11%. Five patients died at diagnosis due to bleeding, three died during induction chemotherapy due to febrile neutropenia (n=2 and bleeding (n=1 and one patient died during consolidation therapy due to febrile neutropenia.  The 3-year OS was 89% and relapse rate was 3%. Adapting standard AIDA treatment protocols to limited resources by reducing dose-intensity during treatment consolidation, using ATRA in the consolidation phase and alternative anthracyclin (doxorubicin may be a valid treatment option in developing countries. In spite of the increased incidence of high and intermediate risk score APL in our sample, we reported an acceptable CR rate, toxicity and OS.

  19. Differences in treatment patterns among patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer treated by oncologists versus urologists in a US managed care population

    OpenAIRE

    Alemayehu,

    2011-01-01

    Nicole M Engel-Nitz1, Berhanu Alemayehu2, David Parry3, Faith Nathan21Innovus, Eden Prairie, MN, USA; 2AstraZeneca, Wilmington, DE, USA; 3AstraZeneca UK, London, UKObjective: Differences in treatment patterns, health care resource utilization, and costs between patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) treated by oncologists and those treated by urologists were examined.Methods: Patients aged ≥40 with CRPC were identified using claims from a large US managed health care...

  20. Predictors of Severe Acute and Late Toxicities in Patients With Localized Head-and-Neck Cancer Treated With Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Francois, E-mail: francois.meyer@chuq.qc.ca [Laval University Cancer Research Center, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec - L' Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Fortin, Andre; Wang, Chang Shu [Radiation Therapy Department, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec - L' Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Liu, Geoffrey [Applied Molecular Oncology, Ontario Cancer Institute/Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Bairati, Isabelle [Laval University Cancer Research Center, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec - L' Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) causes acute and late toxicities that affect various organs and functions. In a large cohort of patients treated with RT for localized head and neck cancer (HNC), we prospectively assessed the occurrence of RT-induced acute and late toxicities and identified characteristics that predicted these toxicities. Methods and Materials: We conducted a randomized trial among 540 patients treated with RT for localized HNC to assess whether vitamin E supplementation could improve disease outcomes. Adverse effects of RT were assessed using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Acute Radiation Morbidity Criteria during RT and one month after RT, and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Scheme at six and 12 months after RT. The most severe adverse effect among the organs/tissues was selected as an overall measure of either acute or late toxicity. Grade 3 and 4 toxicities were considered as severe. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify all independent predictors (p < 0.05) of acute or late toxicity and to estimate odds ratios (OR) for severe toxicity with their 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Grade 3 or 4 toxicity was observed in 23% and 4% of patients, respectively, for acute and late toxicity. Four independent predictors of severe acute toxicity were identified: sex (female vs. male: OR = 1.72, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06-2.80), Karnofsky Performance Status (OR = 0.67 for a 10-point increment, 95% CI: 0.52-0.88), body mass index (above 25 vs. below: OR = 1.88, 95% CI: 1.22-2.90), TNM stage (Stage II vs. I: OR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.25-2.92). Two independent predictors were found for severe late toxicity: female sex (OR = 3.96, 95% CI: 1.41-11.08) and weight loss during RT (OR = 1.26 for a 1 kg increment, 95% CI: 1.12-1.41). Conclusions: Knowledge of these predictors easily collected in a clinical setting could help

  1. Predictors of Severe Acute and Late Toxicities in Patients With Localized Head-and-Neck Cancer Treated With Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) causes acute and late toxicities that affect various organs and functions. In a large cohort of patients treated with RT for localized head and neck cancer (HNC), we prospectively assessed the occurrence of RT-induced acute and late toxicities and identified characteristics that predicted these toxicities. Methods and Materials: We conducted a randomized trial among 540 patients treated with RT for localized HNC to assess whether vitamin E supplementation could improve disease outcomes. Adverse effects of RT were assessed using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Acute Radiation Morbidity Criteria during RT and one month after RT, and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Scheme at six and 12 months after RT. The most severe adverse effect among the organs/tissues was selected as an overall measure of either acute or late toxicity. Grade 3 and 4 toxicities were considered as severe. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify all independent predictors (p < 0.05) of acute or late toxicity and to estimate odds ratios (OR) for severe toxicity with their 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Grade 3 or 4 toxicity was observed in 23% and 4% of patients, respectively, for acute and late toxicity. Four independent predictors of severe acute toxicity were identified: sex (female vs. male: OR = 1.72, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06–2.80), Karnofsky Performance Status (OR = 0.67 for a 10-point increment, 95% CI: 0.52–0.88), body mass index (above 25 vs. below: OR = 1.88, 95% CI: 1.22–2.90), TNM stage (Stage II vs. I: OR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.25–2.92). Two independent predictors were found for severe late toxicity: female sex (OR = 3.96, 95% CI: 1.41–11.08) and weight loss during RT (OR = 1.26 for a 1 kg increment, 95% CI: 1.12–1.41). Conclusions: Knowledge of these predictors easily collected in a clinical

  2. Plasmacytoid variant of bladder cancer defines patients with poor prognosis if treated with cystectomy and adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keck Bastian

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the definition of different histologic subtypes of urothelial carcinomas by the World Health Organization (WHO 2004 classification, description of molecular features and clinical behavior of these variants has gained more attention. Methods We reviewed 205 tumor samples of patients with locally advanced bladder cancer mainly treated within the randomized AUO-AB05/95 trial with radical cystectomy and adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy for histologic subtypes. 178 UC, 18 plasmacytoid (PUC and 9 micropapillary (MPC carcinomas of the bladder were identified. Kaplan Meier analysis and backward multivariate Cox’s proportional hazards regression analysis were performed to compare overall survival between the three histologic subtypes. Results Patients suffering from PUC have the worst clinical outcome regarding overall survival compared to conventional UC and MPC of the bladder that in turn seem have to best clinical outcome (27.4 months, 62.6 months, and 64.2 months, respectively; p=0.013 by Kaplan Meier analysis. Backward multivariate Cox´s proportional hazards regression analysis (adjusted to relevant clinicopathological parameters showed a hazard ratio of 3.2 (p=0.045 for PUC in contrast to patients suffering from MPC. Conclusions Histopathological diagnosis of rare variants of urothelial carcinoma can identify patients with poor prognosis.

  3. Plasmacytoid variant of bladder cancer defines patients with poor prognosis if treated with cystectomy and adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the definition of different histologic subtypes of urothelial carcinomas by the World Health Organization (WHO) 2004 classification, description of molecular features and clinical behavior of these variants has gained more attention. We reviewed 205 tumor samples of patients with locally advanced bladder cancer mainly treated within the randomized AUO-AB05/95 trial with radical cystectomy and adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy for histologic subtypes. 178 UC, 18 plasmacytoid (PUC) and 9 micropapillary (MPC) carcinomas of the bladder were identified. Kaplan Meier analysis and backward multivariate Cox’s proportional hazards regression analysis were performed to compare overall survival between the three histologic subtypes. Patients suffering from PUC have the worst clinical outcome regarding overall survival compared to conventional UC and MPC of the bladder that in turn seem have to best clinical outcome (27.4 months, 62.6 months, and 64.2 months, respectively; p=0.013 by Kaplan Meier analysis). Backward multivariate Cox´s proportional hazards regression analysis (adjusted to relevant clinicopathological parameters) showed a hazard ratio of 3.2 (p=0.045) for PUC in contrast to patients suffering from MPC. Histopathological diagnosis of rare variants of urothelial carcinoma can identify patients with poor prognosis

  4. Biweekly cetuximab and irinotecan as second-line therapy in patients with gastro-esophageal cancer previously treated with platinum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoennemann, Katrine R; Bjerregaard, Jon K; Hansen, Tine P;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Until recently there has been no proven second-line therapy for patients with advanced gastro-esophageal cancer (GEC). Since 2004, Denmark has had a national health program where non-proven therapy can be offered to patients with advanced cancer, after approval by an expert panel...

  5. Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, or Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Anal Cancer; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  6. Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His ... Read More "Prostate Cancer" Articles Progress Against Prostate Cancer / Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His ...

  7. Gefitinib in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Head and Neck Cancer or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-11

    Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer; Insular Thyroid Cancer; Metastatic Parathyroid Cancer; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Parathyroid Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage III Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IVA Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus

  8. Role of Principal Component Analysis in Predicting Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine if principal component analysis (PCA) and standard parameters of rectal and bladder wall dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of prostate cancer patients treated with hypofractionated image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (hypo-IMRT) can predict acute and late gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-one patients underwent hypo-IMRT at 3 Gy/fraction, 5 days/week to either 60 Gy or 66 Gy, with daily online image guidance. Acute and late GI and genitourinary (GU) toxicity were recorded weekly during treatment and at each follow-up. All Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria toxicity scores were dichotomized as <2 and ≥2. Standard dosimetric parameters and the first five to six principal components (PCs) of bladder and rectal wall DVHs were tested for association with the dichotomized toxicity outcomes, using logistic regression. Results: Median follow-up of all patients was 47 months (60 Gy cohort= 52 months; 66 Gy cohort= 31 months). The incidence rates of ≥2 acute GI and GU toxicity were 14% and 29%, respectively, with no Grade ≥3 acute GU toxicity. Late GI and GU toxicity scores ≥2 were 16% and 15%, respectively. There was a significant difference in late GI toxicity ≥2 when comparing the 66 Gy to the 60 Gy cohort (38% vs. 8%, respectively, p = 0.0003). The first PC of the rectal DVH was associated with late GI toxicity (odds ratio [OR], 6.91; p < 0.001), though it was not significantly stronger than standard DVH parameters such as Dmax (OR, 6.9; p < 0.001) or percentage of the organ receiving a 50% dose (V50) (OR, 5.95; p = 0 .001). Conclusions: Hypofractionated treatment with 60 Gy in 3 Gy fractions is well tolerated. There is a steep dose response curve between 60 Gy and 66 Gy for RTOG Grade ≥2 GI effects with the dose constraints employed. Although PCA can predict late GI toxicity for patients treated with hypo-IMRT for prostate cancer, it provides no additional information over

  9. Role of Principal Component Analysis in Predicting Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vesprini, Danny [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Center, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sia, Michael [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Lockwood, Gina [Department of Clinical Study Co-ordination and Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Moseley, Douglas; Rosewall, Tara; Bayley, Andrew; Bristow, Robert; Chung, Peter; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Warde, Padraig [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Catton, Charles, E-mail: charles.catton@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To determine if principal component analysis (PCA) and standard parameters of rectal and bladder wall dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of prostate cancer patients treated with hypofractionated image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (hypo-IMRT) can predict acute and late gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-one patients underwent hypo-IMRT at 3 Gy/fraction, 5 days/week to either 60 Gy or 66 Gy, with daily online image guidance. Acute and late GI and genitourinary (GU) toxicity were recorded weekly during treatment and at each follow-up. All Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria toxicity scores were dichotomized as <2 and {>=}2. Standard dosimetric parameters and the first five to six principal components (PCs) of bladder and rectal wall DVHs were tested for association with the dichotomized toxicity outcomes, using logistic regression. Results: Median follow-up of all patients was 47 months (60 Gy cohort= 52 months; 66 Gy cohort= 31 months). The incidence rates of {>=}2 acute GI and GU toxicity were 14% and 29%, respectively, with no Grade {>=}3 acute GU toxicity. Late GI and GU toxicity scores {>=}2 were 16% and 15%, respectively. There was a significant difference in late GI toxicity {>=}2 when comparing the 66 Gy to the 60 Gy cohort (38% vs. 8%, respectively, p = 0.0003). The first PC of the rectal DVH was associated with late GI toxicity (odds ratio [OR], 6.91; p < 0.001), though it was not significantly stronger than standard DVH parameters such as Dmax (OR, 6.9; p < 0.001) or percentage of the organ receiving a 50% dose (V50) (OR, 5.95; p = 0 .001). Conclusions: Hypofractionated treatment with 60 Gy in 3 Gy fractions is well tolerated. There is a steep dose response curve between 60 Gy and 66 Gy for RTOG Grade {>=}2 GI effects with the dose constraints employed. Although PCA can predict late GI toxicity for patients treated with hypo-IMRT for prostate cancer, it provides no additional information

  10. Photodynamic Therapy Using Temoporfin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Recurrent Oral Cavity or Oropharyngeal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-02

    Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  11. A feasibility study of thyroid cancer among patients treated with I-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examined the feasibility of conducting a Canada-wide follow-up study of persons receiving I-131 before 1970, to see if current estimates of induction of thyroid cancer are well founded. It is concluded that such a study is not feasible due to the widespread destruction of old records, and the limited quantity of personal identifying information on those records that do still exist

  12. Contemporary risks of local and regional recurrence and contralateral breast cancer in patients treated for primary breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalders, K. C.; Van Bommel, A. C M; Van Dalen, T.; Sonke, G. S.; Van Diest, P. J.; Boersma, L. J.; Van Der Heiden-Van Der Loo, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer treatment has evolved extensively over the past two decades with a shift towards less invasive local treatment and increased systemic treatment. The present study aimed to investigate the rates of local (LR) and regional (RR) recurrence and contralateral breast cancer (CBC

  13. Brain Connectivity and Neuropsychological Functioning in Recently Treated Testicular Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amidi, Ali; Agerbæk, Mads; Leemans, Alexander;

    neuropsychological functioning. Cisplatin-based chemotherapy has well-known neurotoxic side effects and neural populations such as progenitor cells, oligodendrocytes, and hippocampal neurons are exceptionally vulnerable to even small concentrations of cisplatin. The aim of the present study was to investigate...... the possible adverse effects of BEP on brain white matter connectivity and neuropsychological functioning in recently treated men with TC....

  14. A trial of nonspecific immunotherapy using systemic C. parvum in treated patients with Dukes B and C colorectal cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Souter, R. G.; Gill, P. G.; Morris, P.J.

    1982-01-01

    In view of the relatively poor prognosis for patients after surgery for locally invasive colorectal cancer a trial of repeated systemic infusions of Corynebacterium parvum (CP) has been carried out. It is in this group of patients, with a high risk of recurrence from small residues of cancer left by the surgeon, that immunotherapy should have its optimum chance of success. A total of 92 patients were included in a randomized controlled study. The two groups were comparable in terms of tumour ...

  15. Polymorphisms of homologous recombination genes and clinical outcomes of non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Yin

    Full Text Available The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs is the major mechanism to maintain genomic stability in response to irradiation. We hypothesized that genetic polymorphisms in DSB repair genes may affect clinical outcomes among non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients treated with definitive radio(chemotherapy. We genotyped six potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs (i.e., RAD51 -135G>C/rs1801320 and -172G>T/rs1801321, XRCC2 4234G>C/rs3218384 and R188H/rs3218536 G>A, XRCC3 T241M/rs861539 and NBN E185Q/rs1805794 and estimated their associations with overall survival (OS and radiation pneumonitis (RP in 228 NSCLC patients. We found a predictive role of RAD51 -135G>C SNP in RP development (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.52, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.31-0.86, P = 0.010 for CG/CC vs. GG. We also found that RAD51 -135G>C and XRCC2 R188H SNPs were independent prognostic factors for overall survival (adjusted HR = 1.70, 95% CI, 1.14-2.62, P = 0.009 for CG/CC vs. GG; and adjusted HR = 1.70; 95% CI, 1.02-2.85, P = 0.043 for AG vs. GG, respectively and that the SNP-survival association was most pronounced in the presence of RP. Our study suggests that HR genetic polymorphisms, particularly RAD51 -135G>C, may influence overall survival and radiation pneumonitis in NSCLC patients treated with definitive radio(chemotherapy. Large studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  16. Analysis of Formant Frequencies in Patients with Oral or Oropharyngeal Cancers Treated by Glossectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazi, Rehan; Prasad, Vyas M. N.; Kanagalingam, Jeeve; Georgalas, Christos; Venkitaraman, Ramachandran; Nutting, Christopher M.; Clarke, Peter; Rhys-Evans, Peter; Harrington, Kevin J.

    2007-01-01

    Aims: To compare voice quality as defined by formant analysis using a sustained vowel in patients who have undergone a partial glossectomy with a group of normal subjects. Methods & Procedures: The design consisted of a single centre, cross-sectional cohort study. The setting was an Adult Tertiary Referral Unit. A total of 26 patients (19 males)…

  17. {sup 11}C-Choline PET/CT in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients treated with docetaxel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceci, Francesco [University of Bologna, Service of Nuclear Medicine, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, UO Medicina Nucleare PAD. 30, Bologna (Italy); Castellucci, Paolo; Graziani, Tiziano; Renzi, Riccardo; Fanti, Stefano [University of Bologna, Service of Nuclear Medicine, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Schiavina, Riccardo; Borghesi, Marco; Brunocilla, Eugenio [University of Bologna, Department of Urology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Di Tullio, Piergiorgio; Ardizzoni, Andrea [University of Bologna, Department of Oncology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna (Italy)

    2016-01-15

    To investigate the role of {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT for evaluating the response to treatment in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) treated with docetaxel in comparison with PSA response. Inclusion criteria were (a) proven mCRPC, (b) docetaxel as first line of chemotherapy (docetaxel 75 mg/m{sup 2} + prednisone 5 mg), and (c) {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT and PSA values assessed before and after docetaxel administration. A total of 61 patients were retrospectively enrolled (mean age 68.9 years, range 57 - 84 years). {sup 11}C-Choline PET/CT was performed at baseline before docetaxel treatment (PET1) and after the end of treatment (PET2). PSA values were measured before treatment (PSA1) and after treatment (PSA2). PET2 was reported as complete response (CR), partial response (PR) or stable disease (SD). Progressive disease (PD) was considered if a new lesion was seen. PSA trend was calculated from the change in absolute values between PSA1 and PSA2. A decrease of ≥50 % between PSA1 and PSA2 was considered a PSA response. Clinical, radiological and laboratory follow-up ranged from 6 to 53 months (mean 13.5 months). Of the 61 patients, 40 (65.5 %) showed PD on PET2, 13 (21.3 %) showed SD, 2 (3.4 %) showed PR, and 6 (9.8 %) showed CR. An increasing PSA trend was seen in 29 patients (47.5 %) and a decreasing PSA trend in 32 patients (52.5 %). A PSA response of ≥50 % was seen in 25 patients (41 %). Radiological PD was seen in 23 of the 29 patients (79.3 %) with an increasing PSA trend, in 16 of the 32 patients (50 %) with a decreasing PSA trend, and in 11 of the 25 patients (44 %) with a PSA response of ≥50 %. In the multivariate statistical analysis, the presence of more than ten bone lesions detected on PET1 was significantly associated with an increased probability of PD on PET2. No association was observed between PSA level and PD on PET2. Our results suggest that an increasing PSA trend measured after docetaxel treatment could be

  18. Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Cyclophosphamide, and Filgrastim Followed By Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-07

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  19. Evaluation of the Clinical Relevance of Body Composition Parameters in Patients with Cancer Metastatic to the Liver Treated with Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Parsons, Henrique A.; Apostolia M Tsimberidou; Pontikos, Michael; Fu, Siqing; Hong, David; Wen, Sijin; Baracos, Vickie E; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2012-01-01

    The association between body composition parameters and toxicity associated with hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) chemotherapy regimens has not been analyzed. We analyzed data from patients with advanced cancer and liver metastases treated on a clinical trial of HAI oxaliplatin combination regimen. Patient characteristics, response and toxicities were analyzed in relevance with body composition data from CT images. Forty-eight of 57 patients (mean age 57 years; 60% women) had available CT scan...

  20. Addition of sunitinib to cetuximab and irinotecan in patients with heavily pre-treated advanced colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvortrup, Camilla; Jensen, Benny Vittrup; Jørgensen, Trine Lembrecht;

    2010-01-01

    Results of continuous sunitinib, in combination with cetuximab and irinotecan every other week (SIC) for compassionate use in heavily pre-treated patients with mCRC are presented.......Results of continuous sunitinib, in combination with cetuximab and irinotecan every other week (SIC) for compassionate use in heavily pre-treated patients with mCRC are presented....

  1. Ondansetron in Treating Patients With Advanced Cancer and Chronic Nausea and Vomiting Not Caused by Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Nausea and Vomiting; Precancerous Condition; Small Intestine Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  2. Evaluation of local hospital discharge for thyroid cancer patients treated with Iodine-131; comparison with internationally accepted release criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Aim: Patients with Thyroid Cancer treated with I-131 in our institution, stay in a shielded room for two days, or until they emit less than 40 μSv/hr at 1m, based on the Cyprus legislation for radiation protection. Other countries have different regulations and public dose limits, and their hospital discharge guidelines vary accordingly. The purpose of this study is to evaluate local hospital discharge regulations, make a comparison with other countries' accepted release criteria, and find where improvements can be made. Methods: 267 patients were treated with I-131 (activity 1.8-8.9GBq) from September 2001 to April 2007. The dose equivalent rate (DER) was measured within 30 min of the administration at a distance of 1 m from the patient. Measurements at 1m were also obtained before the release of the patient. For a group of these patients, measurements were also carried out a week after the treatment with I-131. The doses given to members of the public, from each of the above patients, were calculated using the Total Effective Dose Equivalent (TEDE) concept, which is based on the line source model. For 10% of these patients, measurements of the dose emitted to surroundings were taken, using two different methods. (a) Doses were measured with TLD dosimeters placed at specific points of the room during the two day restriction of the patient in the shielded room. These points were at bedside, at 1 m from the patient's bed, at 3m from the patient's bed, in the shower area, and at the side of the toilet. (b) On the day of release, personal dosimeters were given to a member of the immediate family (carer) of the patient for a minimum of five days. The skin dose and dose at approximately 10cm depth were measured by the National personnel monitoring for radiation protection authority of Cyprus. Results: Our calculation of the TEDE values indicated that, had the patients been released just after the administration of the radiopharmaceutical, members of the

  3. Molecular Evidence Demonstrating Local Treatment Failure is the Source of Distant Metastases in Some Patients Treated for Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine the clonality relationships among initial invasive breast carcinoma (IBC), ipsilateral breast failure (IBF), and distant metastasis (DM) to determine the effect of local tumor recurrence on the development of DMs. Methods and Materials: A total of 18 patients treated with breast-conserving therapy who developed an IBF followed by DMs were studied using a 20 informative-marker, polymerase chain reaction-based allelic imbalance clonality assay. Results: Four relationships were identified. First, in 7 cases, the IBF and DMs were clonally related to the initial IBC as one progressively genetic unstable process. Second, in 3 cases, the IBF and DMs were each clonally related to the IBC but clonally distinct from each other. Third, in 3 cases, the IBC and the IBF were clonally related and the DMs were clonally related to the IBFs, with a weak relationship to the initial IBC. Finally, in 5 cases, the IBF was clonally distinct from the initial IBC (new second primary) and the DMs were clonally related to the IBF and clonally distinct from the initial IBC. Conclusion: These findings provide molecular evidence demonstrating that some DMs can directly develop from IBFs and support the importance of local tumor control in the overall treatment of breast cancer patients

  4. Appropriate posture of cancer patients treated with PICC to prevent internal jugular vein ectopic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaoyan Liu

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to study the appropriate posture of peripheraly inserted central catheter (PICC) patients, to reduce the incidence of internal jugular vein heterotopia.Methods:From 2009 to 2013, a total of 290 cases with PICC were enroled in our study. They were divided into two groups. The patients in control group took regular position, which mean pros-tration, upper limb of tube side was abduction 90°, head moved to puncture side in order to block the internal jugular vein. On the basis of conventional body position putting, posture of patients in observation group was improved, the head remain neu-tral, and had 180° angle with trunk longitudinal axis, not favor any side. After ensuring the upper limb abduction, had 90° angle with the trunk, then catheter was inserted slowly. The jugular venous catheter heterotopia rate was judged by X-ray results. Results: The jugular venous catheter heterotopia rate of control group and observation was 12.8% and 0.68%, respectively. The diference between two groups was statisticaly significant (P < 0.01).Conclusion: The body posture improvement can prevent discomfort of patients and reduce the jugular venous catheter heterotopia rate of PICC.

  5. Cetuximab and Everolimus in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Colon Cancer or Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Colon

  6. Correlation of hypertension and proteinuria with outcome in elderly bevacizumab-treated patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Feliu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies suggest a relationship between hypertension and outcome in bevacizumab-treated patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC. We performed a retrospective analysis of two phase II studies (BECA and BECOX to determine if hypertension and proteinuria predict outcome in elderly patients with mCRC treated with bevacizumab. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients ≥ 70 years of age received either capecitabine 1250 mg/m(2 bid days 1-14 + bevacizumab 7.5 mg/kg day 1 every 21 days (BECA study or capecitabine 1000 mg/m(2 bid days 1-14 with bevacizumab 7.5 mg/kg and oxaliplatin 130 mg/m(2 day 1 (BECOX study. The primary objective was to correlate hypertension and proteinuria with overall response rate (ORR, time to progression (TTP and overall survival (OS. Secondary objectives included identification of risk factors associated with the development of hypertension and proteinuria and determining whether development of hypertension or proteinuria in the first 2 cycles was related to ORR, disease-control rate (DCR, TTP or OS. RESULTS: In total, 127 patients (median age 75.5 years were included in the study. Hypertension correlated with DCR and OS; proteinuria correlated with ORR and DCR. Proteinuria or hypertension in the first 2 cycles did not correlate with efficacy. Risk factors for hypertension were female gender (odds ratio [OR] 0.241; P = 0.011 and more bevacizumab cycles (OR 1.112; P = 0.002; risk factors for proteinuria were diabetes (OR 3.869; P = 0.006 and more bevacizumab cycles (OR 1.181; P<0.0001. Multivariate analysis identified as having prognostic value: baseline lactate dehydrogenase, haemoglobin, number of metastatic lesions and DCR. CONCLUSION: This analysis of two phase II studies suggests that hypertension is significantly correlated with OS but not with ORR and TTP, whereas proteinuria is correlated with ORR but not with OS and TTP. Both hypertension and proteinuria are associated with the duration of bevacizumab

  7. Prognostic Factors for Survival and Resection in Patients with Initial Nonresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Treated with Chemoradiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Jon K; Mortensen, Michael B; Jensen, Helle A;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Controversies regarding the optimal therapy for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) exist. Although the prognosis as a whole remains dismal, subgroups are known to benefit from intensive therapy, including chemoradiotherapy (CRT). We describe the results...

  8. Multivariable normal-tissue complication modeling of acute esophageal toxicity in advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated (chemo-)radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijsman, R.; Dankers, F.; Troost, E.G.; Hoffman, A.L.; Heijden, E. van der; Geus-Oei, L.F. de; Bussink, J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The majority of normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) models for acute esophageal toxicity (AET) in advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (AS-NSCLC) patients treated with (chemo-)radiotherapy are based on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Due to d

  9. Genetic variation and cognitive dysfunction in opioid-treated patients with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, Geana Paula; Ekholm, Ola; Kaasa, Stein;

    2016-01-01

    by Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Analyses: SNPs were rejected if violation of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P ... observed in the discovery sample, but the replication in the validation sample did not confirm it. Associations between MMSE scores among patients receiving ≥400 mg morphine equivalent dose/day and SNPs in TNFRSF1B,TLR5,HTR2A, and ADRA2A were observed, but they could not be confirmed in the validation...

  10. Differences in treatment patterns among patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer treated by oncologists versus urologists in a US managed care population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differences in treatment patterns, health care resource utilization, and costs between patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) treated by oncologists and those treated by urologists were examined. Patients aged ≥40 with CRPC were identified using claims from a large US managed health care plan between July 2001 and December 2007. A 6-month baseline period was used to assess patient characteristics. Patients with visits to an urologist, without visits to an oncologist, were assigned to the urology cohort, and patients with visits to an oncologist, with or without visits to an urologist, were assigned to the oncology cohort. Treatment patterns, health care resource utilization, and costs during a variable follow-up period were compared between cohorts using descriptive statistics and Lin’s regression. The urology cohort had fewer comorbid illnesses (P < 0.001) and patients were less likely to have other cancers during baseline (P < 0.001) or to die during follow-up (P = 0.004) compared with the oncology cohort. The oncology cohort patients were significantly more likely to have a claim for hormones (74.5% vs 61.1%; P < 0.001), chemotherapy (46.9% vs 10.2%, P < 0.001), and radiation (22.3% vs 3.7%, P < 0.0001) over follow-up. Mean unadjusted health care costs were higher in the oncology vs the urology cohort (US$31,896 vs US$15,318, respectively; P < 0.001). At 6 years follow-up, cumulative adjusted CRPC-specific costs were significantly higher among patients treated by oncologists with chemotherapy than among patients treated by urologists. CRPC patients treated by oncologists had greater use of hormones, chemotherapy, and radiation; higher percentages of patients with inpatient stays, emergency room, and ambulatory visits; and higher health care costs, than patients treated by urologists

  11. Prospective Longitudinal Assessment of Quality of Life for Liver Cancer Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Jonathan, E-mail: jonathan.klein@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Dawson, Laura A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Jiang, Haiyan [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kim, John; Dinniwell, Rob; Brierley, James; Wong, Rebecca [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Lockwood, Gina [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ringash, Jolie [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate quality of life (QoL), an important outcome owing to poor long-term survival, after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to the liver. Methods and Materials: Patients (n=222) with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), liver metastases, or intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and Child-Pugh A liver function received 24-60 Gy of 6-fraction image-guided SBRT. Prospective QoL assessment was completed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core-30 (QLQ-C30) and/or Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Hepatobiliary (FACT-Hep, version 4) questionnaires at baseline and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment. Ten HCC patients with Child-Pugh B liver function were also treated. Results: The QLQ-C30 was available for 205 patients, and 196 completed the FACT-Hep. No difference in baseline QoL (P=.17) or overall survival (P=.088) was seen between the HCC, liver metastases, and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma patients. Appetite loss and fatigue measured by the QLQ-C30 clinically and statistically worsened by 1 month after treatment but recovered by 3 months. At 3 and 12 months after treatment, respectively, the FACT-Hep score had improved relative to baseline in 13%/19%, worsened in 36%/27%, and remained stable in 51%/54%. Using the QLQ-C30 Global Health score, QoL improved in 16%/23%, worsened in 34%/39%, and remained stable in 50%/38% at 3 and 12 months, respectively. Median survival was 17.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 12.3-19.8 months). Higher baseline scores on both FACT-Hep and QLQ-C30 Global Health were associated with improved survival. Hazard ratios for death, per 10-unit decrease in QoL, were 0.90 (95% CI 0.83-0.98; P=.001) and 0.88 (95% CI 0.82-0.95; P=.001), respectively. Tumor size was inversely correlated with survival. Conclusions: Liver SBRT temporarily worsens appetite and fatigue, but not overall QoL. Stereotactic body radiation therapy is well tolerated and warrants

  12. Prospective Longitudinal Assessment of Quality of Life for Liver Cancer Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate quality of life (QoL), an important outcome owing to poor long-term survival, after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to the liver. Methods and Materials: Patients (n=222) with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), liver metastases, or intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and Child-Pugh A liver function received 24-60 Gy of 6-fraction image-guided SBRT. Prospective QoL assessment was completed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core-30 (QLQ-C30) and/or Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Hepatobiliary (FACT-Hep, version 4) questionnaires at baseline and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment. Ten HCC patients with Child-Pugh B liver function were also treated. Results: The QLQ-C30 was available for 205 patients, and 196 completed the FACT-Hep. No difference in baseline QoL (P=.17) or overall survival (P=.088) was seen between the HCC, liver metastases, and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma patients. Appetite loss and fatigue measured by the QLQ-C30 clinically and statistically worsened by 1 month after treatment but recovered by 3 months. At 3 and 12 months after treatment, respectively, the FACT-Hep score had improved relative to baseline in 13%/19%, worsened in 36%/27%, and remained stable in 51%/54%. Using the QLQ-C30 Global Health score, QoL improved in 16%/23%, worsened in 34%/39%, and remained stable in 50%/38% at 3 and 12 months, respectively. Median survival was 17.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 12.3-19.8 months). Higher baseline scores on both FACT-Hep and QLQ-C30 Global Health were associated with improved survival. Hazard ratios for death, per 10-unit decrease in QoL, were 0.90 (95% CI 0.83-0.98; P=.001) and 0.88 (95% CI 0.82-0.95; P=.001), respectively. Tumor size was inversely correlated with survival. Conclusions: Liver SBRT temporarily worsens appetite and fatigue, but not overall QoL. Stereotactic body radiation therapy is well tolerated and warrants

  13. Experience of Southern Chinese: new challenges in treating young female breast cancer patients at child-bearing age--a call for multi-disciplinary collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Ava; Chu, Annie Tsz-Wai

    2012-01-01

    Compared with western populations, Southern Chinese, especially those residing in Hong Kong, are experiencing increasing breast cancer incidence and also a younger onset of breast cancer. Combating this problem and treating young women with breast cancer poses specific challenges and complicated considerations. With reference to the postponement in the age of marriage and reproduction in modern societies, the issue of fertility after breast cancer, especially for high-risk young patients, is one significant quality of life concern that cannot be underestimated as a secondary medical topic. While the issue has its significance and is confronting front-line breast cancer care teams of different disciplines, related research is mostly on Caucasians. In cultures where the traditional expectation on women for child-bearing is still prominent, young breast cancer patients may endure significant distress over fertility options after breast cancer. There is a lack of related data on Asian breast cancer survivors at child-bearing age, which calls for a pressing need to encourage qualitative groundwork, case reports, and cohort experiences in hope for providing insight and arouse research interest. In order to provide a long-term comprehensive multidisciplinary management service with encouragement to encompass prospects for a positive future among young breast cancer survivors, relevant disciplines need to collaborate and work efficaciously together both on clinical and research aspects of cancer-related fertility issues. PMID:22994790

  14. Favorable outcomes in locally advanced and node positive prostate cancer patients treated with combined pelvic IMRT and androgen deprivation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most appropriate treatment for men with prostate cancer and positive pelvic nodes, N+, is an area of active controversy. We report our 5-years outcomes in men with locally advanced prostate cancer (T1-T4N0-N1M0) treated with definitive radiotherapy encompassing the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes (intensity modulated radiotherapy, IMRT) and long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Of the 138 consecutive eligible men all living patients have been followed up to almost 5 years. Survival endpoints for 5-year biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS), relapse-free survival (RFS), prostate cancer-specific survival (PCSS), and overall survival (OS) were assessed by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression proportional hazards models were constructed for all survival endpoints. The RTOG morbidity grading system for physician rated toxicity was applied. Patients with locally advanced T3-T4 tumors (35 %) and N1 (51 %) have favorable outcome when long-term ADT is combined with definitive radiotherapy encompassing pelvic lymph nodes. The 5-year BFFS, RFS, PCSS and OS were 71.4, 76.2, 94.5 and 89.0 %, respectively. High Gleason sum (9–10) had a strong independent prognostic impact on BFFS, RFS and OS (p = 0.001, <0.001, and 0.005 respectively). The duration of ADT (= > 28 months) showed a significant independent association with improved PCSS (p = 0.02) and OS (p = 0.001). Lymph node involvement was not associated with survival endpoints in the multivariate analysis. The radiotherapy induced toxicity seen in our study population was moderate with rare Grade 3 GI side effects and up to 11 % for Grade 3 GU consisting mainly of urgency and frequency. Pelvic IMRT in combination with long-term ADT can achieve long-lasting disease control in men with N+ disease and unfavorable prognostic factors. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13014-015-0540-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  15. Gefitinib Plus Interleukin-2 in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Previously Treated with Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Bersanelli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The activation of lymphocytes by gefitinib treatment has been described. In this phase II pilot trial, we explored the possible synergism between IL-2 and gefitinib for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC treatment. From September, 2003, to November, 2006, 70 consecutive patients with advanced, progressive NSCLC, previously treated with chemotherapy, received oral gefitinib 250 mg daily. The first 39 patients received gefitinib alone (G group. The other 31 also received subcutaneous IL-2 (GIL-2 group: 1 MIU/m2 (Million International Unit/m2twice a day on Days 1 and 2, once a day on Days 3, 4, 5 every week for four consecutive weeks with a four-week rest period. Median follow-up was 25.2 months. Grade 3–4 toxicity of gefitinib was represented by skin rash (7%, asthenia/anorexia (6% and diarrhea (7%; patients treated with IL-2 showed grade 2–3 fever (46%, fatigue (21% and arthralgia (13%. In the GIL-2 group and G-group, we respectively observed: an overall response rate of 16.1% (6.4% complete response and 5.1% (only partial response; a disease control rate of 41.9% and 41%; a median time to progression of 3.5 (CI 95% = 3.2–3.8 and 4.1 (CI 95% = 2.6–5.7 months; a median overall survival of 20.1 (CI 95% = 5.1–35.1 and 6.9 (CI 95% = 4.9–8.9 months (p = 0.002; and an actuarial one-year survival rate of 54% and 30%. Skin toxicity (p < 0.001; HR = 0.29; CI 95% = 0.16–0.54 and use of IL-2 (p < 0.001; HR = 0.33; CI 95% = 0.18–0.60 were independently associated with improvement of survival. In this consecutive, non-randomized, series of advanced NSCLC patients, the use of IL-2 increased the efficacy of gefitinib.

  16. Gefitinib Plus Interleukin-2 in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Previously Treated with Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bersanelli, Melissa, E-mail: melissa.bersanelli@alice.it; Buti, Sebastiano; Camisa, Roberta [Oncology Unit, University Hospital of Parma, Via Gramsci, 14, 43126 Parma (Italy); Brighenti, Matteo; Lazzarelli, Silvia [Oncology Unit, Azienda Istituti Ospitalieri di Cremona, Largo Priori, 1, 26100 Cremona (Italy); Mazza, Giancarlo [Radiology Division, Spedali Civili di Brescia, P.le Spedali Civili,1, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Passalacqua, Rodolfo, E-mail: melissa.bersanelli@alice.it [1Oncology Unit, University Hospital of Parma, Via Gramsci, 14, 43126 Parma (Italy)

    2014-09-30

    The activation of lymphocytes by gefitinib treatment has been described. In this phase II pilot trial, we explored the possible synergism between IL-2 and gefitinib for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment. From September, 2003, to November, 2006, 70 consecutive patients with advanced, progressive NSCLC, previously treated with chemotherapy, received oral gefitinib 250 mg daily. The first 39 patients received gefitinib alone (G group). The other 31 also received subcutaneous IL-2 (GIL-2 group): 1 MIU/m{sup 2} (Million International Unit/m{sup 2})twice a day on Days 1 and 2, once a day on Days 3, 4, 5 every week for four consecutive weeks with a four-week rest period. Median follow-up was 25.2 months. Grade 3–4 toxicity of gefitinib was represented by skin rash (7%), asthenia/anorexia (6%) and diarrhea (7%); patients treated with IL-2 showed grade 2–3 fever (46%), fatigue (21%) and arthralgia (13%). In the GIL-2 group and G-group, we respectively observed: an overall response rate of 16.1% (6.4% complete response) and 5.1% (only partial response); a disease control rate of 41.9% and 41%; a median time to progression of 3.5 (CI 95% = 3.2–3.8) and 4.1 (CI 95% = 2.6–5.7) months; a median overall survival of 20.1 (CI 95% = 5.1–35.1) and 6.9 (CI 95% = 4.9–8.9) months (p = 0.002); and an actuarial one-year survival rate of 54% and 30%. Skin toxicity (p < 0.001; HR = 0.29; CI 95% = 0.16–0.54) and use of IL-2 (p < 0.001; HR = 0.33; CI 95% = 0.18–0.60) were independently associated with improvement of survival. In this consecutive, non-randomized, series of advanced NSCLC patients, the use of IL-2 increased the efficacy of gefitinib.

  17. Cancer risks in thyroid cancer patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, P.; Holm, L E; Lundell, G.; Bjelkengren, G.; Larsson, L. G.; Lindberg, S.; Tennvall, J.; Wicklund, H.; Boice, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    Cancer risks were studied in 834 thyroid cancer patients given 131I (4,551 MBq, average) and in 1,121 patients treated by other means in Sweden between 1950 and 1975. Record-linkage with the Swedish Cancer Register identified 99 new cancers more than 2 years after 131I therapy [standardised incidence ratio (SIR) = 1.43; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.17-1.75] vs 122 (SIR = 1.19; 95% CI 0.88-1.42) in patients not receiving 131I. In females treated with 131I overall SIR was 1.45 (95% CI 1.14-1....

  18. Long-term outcomes in breast cancer patients with ten or more positive axillary nodes treated with combined-modality therapy: The importance of radiation field selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the long-term outcome of a consistent treatment approach with electron beam postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) in breast cancer patients with ≥10 positive nodes treated with combined-modality therapy. Methods and Materials: TSixty-three breast cancer patients with ≥10 positive lymph nodes were treated with combined-modality therapy using an electron beam en face technique for PMRT at University of Florida. Patterns of recurrence were studied for correlation with radiation fields. Potential clinical and treatment variables were tested for possible association with local-regional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: TAt 5, 10, and 15 years, OS rates were 57%, 36%, and 27%, respectively; DFS rates were 46%, 37%, and 34%; and LRC rates were 87%, 87%, and 87%. No clinical or treatment variables were associated with OS or DFS. The use of supplemental axillary radiation (SART) (p = 0.012) and pathologic N stage (p = 0.053) were associated with improved LRC. Patients who received SART had a higher rate of LRC than those who did not. Moderate to severe arm edema developed in 17% of patients receiving SART compared with 7% in patients not treated with SART (p = 0.28). Conclusions: TA substantial percentage of patients with ≥10 positive lymph nodes survive breast cancer. The 10-year overall survival in these patients was 36%. The addition of SART was associated with better LRC

  19. A Case of Erythrocytosis in a Patient Treated with an Aromatase Inhibitor for Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhinav Iyengar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A previously healthy 79-year-old female was referred to hematology for further evaluation of erythrocytosis. Two years earlier she had been diagnosed with ER/PR-positive ductal carcinoma of the breast and was receiving hormonal therapy with exemestane. No secondary cause of erythrocytosis was identified. Serum erythropoietin (EPO level was normal, and molecular testing for the JAK2 V617F and exon 12 mutations was negative. A bone marrow biopsy showed a mild increase in erythropoiesis, and no spontaneous erythroid colonies were demonstrated. Erythrocytosis is common reason for referral to a hematologist. The myeloproliferative disorder, polycythemia vera, and the rare congenital polycythemias represent primary erythrocytosis. Common secondary causes include smoking, obstructive sleep apnea, and other pulmonary diseases. Erythrocytosis is well described with certain classes of drugs, including androgens. We hypothesize that exemestane contributed to the development of erythrocytosis in our patient. To our knowledge, erythrocytosis has not been previously described in association with aromatase inhibitors. These drugs prevent the conversion of androstenedione and testosterone to estrogen; thus the physiologic mechanisms may be similar to those responsible for erythrocytosis seen with exogenous androgens. These mechanisms are not well understood, but may include altered iron metabolism by a reduction in hepcidin levels.

  20. Radiation Therapy Risk Factors for Development of Lymphedema in Patients Treated With Regional Lymph Node Irradiation for Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We previously evaluated the risk of breast cancer-related lymphedema (LE) with the addition of regional lymph node irradiation (RLNR) and found an increased risk when RLNR is used. Here we analyze the association of technical radiation therapy (RT) factors in RLNR patients with the risk of LE development. Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2012, we prospectively screened 1476 women for LE who underwent surgery for breast cancer. Among 1507 breasts treated, 172 received RLNR and had complete technical data for analysis. RLNR was delivered as supraclavicular (SC) irradiation (69% [118 of 172 patients]) or SC plus posterior axillary boost (PAB) (31% [54 of 172]). Bilateral arm volume measurements were performed pre- and postoperatively. Patients' RT plans were analyzed for SC field lateral border (relative to the humeral head), total dose to SC, RT fraction size, beam energy, and type of tangent (normal vs wide). Cox proportional hazards models were used to analyze associated risk factors for LE. Results: Median postoperative follow-up was 29.3 months (range: 4.9-74.1 months). The 2-year cumulative incidence of LE was 22% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 15%-32%) for SC and 20% (95% CI: 11%-37%) for SC plus PAB (SC+PAB). None of the analyzed variables was significantly associated with LE risk (extent of humeral head: P=.74 for <1/3 vs >2/3, P=.41 for 1/3 to 2/3 vs >2/3; P=.40 for fraction size of 1.8 Gy vs 2.0 Gy; P=.57 for beam energy 6 MV vs 10 MV; P=.74 for tangent type wide vs regular; P=.66 for SC vs SC+PAB). Only pretreatment body mass index (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.04-1.15, P=.0007) and the use of axillary lymph node dissection (HR: 7.08, 95% CI: 0.98-51.40, P=.05) were associated with risk of subsequent LE development. Conclusions: Of the RT parameters tested, none was associated with an increased risk of LE development. This study underscores the need for future work investigating alternative RLNR risk factors for LE

  1. Radiation Therapy Risk Factors for Development of Lymphedema in Patients Treated With Regional Lymph Node Irradiation for Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, Ravi A. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Miller, Cynthia L. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Skolny, Melissa N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Warren, Laura E.G. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Horick, Nora [Department of Biostatistics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Jammallo, Lauren S.; Sadek, Betro T.; Shenouda, Mina N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); O' Toole, Jean [Department of Physical and Occupational Therapy, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Specht, Michelle C. [Division of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G., E-mail: ataghian@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: We previously evaluated the risk of breast cancer-related lymphedema (LE) with the addition of regional lymph node irradiation (RLNR) and found an increased risk when RLNR is used. Here we analyze the association of technical radiation therapy (RT) factors in RLNR patients with the risk of LE development. Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2012, we prospectively screened 1476 women for LE who underwent surgery for breast cancer. Among 1507 breasts treated, 172 received RLNR and had complete technical data for analysis. RLNR was delivered as supraclavicular (SC) irradiation (69% [118 of 172 patients]) or SC plus posterior axillary boost (PAB) (31% [54 of 172]). Bilateral arm volume measurements were performed pre- and postoperatively. Patients' RT plans were analyzed for SC field lateral border (relative to the humeral head), total dose to SC, RT fraction size, beam energy, and type of tangent (normal vs wide). Cox proportional hazards models were used to analyze associated risk factors for LE. Results: Median postoperative follow-up was 29.3 months (range: 4.9-74.1 months). The 2-year cumulative incidence of LE was 22% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 15%-32%) for SC and 20% (95% CI: 11%-37%) for SC plus PAB (SC+PAB). None of the analyzed variables was significantly associated with LE risk (extent of humeral head: P=.74 for <1/3 vs >2/3, P=.41 for 1/3 to 2/3 vs >2/3; P=.40 for fraction size of 1.8 Gy vs 2.0 Gy; P=.57 for beam energy 6 MV vs 10 MV; P=.74 for tangent type wide vs regular; P=.66 for SC vs SC+PAB). Only pretreatment body mass index (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.04-1.15, P=.0007) and the use of axillary lymph node dissection (HR: 7.08, 95% CI: 0.98-51.40, P=.05) were associated with risk of subsequent LE development. Conclusions: Of the RT parameters tested, none was associated with an increased risk of LE development. This study underscores the need for future work investigating alternative RLNR risk factors for LE.

  2. Maximum mouth opening and trismus in 143 patients treated for oral cancer: A 1-year prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetzels, J.G.H.; Merkx, M.A.W.; Haan, A.F.J. de; Koole, R.; Speksnijder, C.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with oral cancer can develop restricted mouth opening (trismus) because of the oncologic treatment. METHODS: Maximum mouth opening (MMO) was measured in 143 patients shortly before treatment and 0, 6, and 12 months posttreatment, and the results were analyzed using a linear mixe

  3. Incidence of breast cancer in the five-year period (2001-2006 in patients treated surgically in the Cantonal Hospital in Zenica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Drljević

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is currently one of the most common malignant tumors of human race and at the same it is the most frequent cancer of female population. The war and post-war migrations of population have significantlychanged the demographic and age structure in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Absence of a National Cancer Register and a unique database on malignant diseases makes monitoring of breast cancer even more difficult.Theobjectiveof this retrospective study was to analyze the incidence of breast cancer in Zenica-Doboj Canton, to conduct a survey based on the age of patients in the five-year period starting from 1 January 2001 until 30 November 2005 and results of the study have been compared with 1990. All the patients were treated surgically with pre-surgical clinical examination, ultra-sound examination and mamography, and pathohistological verification of cancer and pathologically determined size of tumor. A total of 297 patients were treated out of the series of 583 breast surgeries.During this five-year survey a continuous increase of breast cancers in Zenica-Doboj Canton was noted.Therehas been an increased incidence of breast cancer in women aged 30-45, the average size of tumor has decreased, and there has been no change in the relationship between the pathohistological types of tumors and tendencies in surgical treatments to use breast conserving surgical methods. The program of early detection of breast cancer or screening of healthy women and search for “small” cancers (screening programs will enable a wider use of breast conserving surgical methods and it requires a more active involvement of the state and society.

  4. Combined detection of preoperative serum CEA, CA19-9 and CA242 improve prognostic prediction of surgically treated colorectal cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jingtao; Xiao WANG; Yu, Fudong; Chen, Jian; Zhao, Senlin; Zhang, Dongyuan; YU, Yang; Liu, Xisheng; Tang, Huamei; Peng, Zhihai

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the prognostic significance of preoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) and carbohydrate antigen 242 (CA242) levels in surgically treated colorectal cancer patients. The relationship of preoperative serum CEA, CA19-9 and CA242 levels with disease characteristics was investigated in 310 patients. Correlation between tumor markers was investigated using Pearson correlation test. Univariate and multivariate survival analyses were used to s...

  5. Paradoxal metabolic flare detected by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in a patient with metastatic breast cancer treated with aromatase inhibitor and biphosphonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with estrogen-receptor-positive advanced breast cancer are treated with endocrine therapy. The majority of breast cancer localizations show 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake at positron emission tomography (PET) examination. In these patients, the metabolic flare after therapy is common and was proposed as an index of therapy efficacy. Nevertheless, prolonged persistence of flare can lead to misinterpretation. We describe a case of a patient with invasive ductal breast cancer with bone metastases at bone scintigraphy and FDG PET scan and with expression of estrogen receptors. Initially, the patient underwent endocrine therapy in addition to a biphosfonate. Owing to progression observed in a bone scan, Tamoxifen was substituted with aromatase inhibitors. Successive bone scan examinations showed stabilization with a marked clinical improvement. A second FDG PET was performed 28 months after the first examination and showed a metabolic flare phenomenon with concomitant partial calcification of osteolitic lesions. This is an unusual case of prolonged metabolic flare

  6. Barriers to cancer pain management in danish and lithuanian patients treated in pain and palliative care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Ramune; Samsanaviciene, Jurgita; Liubarskiene, Zita;

    2014-01-01

    adherence were better in Denmark, and the country of origin significantly explained the difference in the regression models for these outcomes. In conclusion, interventions in emotional distress and patient attitudes toward opioid analgesics may result in better pain management outcomes generally, whereas......The prevalence of cancer-related pain is high despite available guidelines for the effective assessment and management of that pain. Barriers to the use of opioid analgesics partially cause undertreatment of cancer pain. The aim of this study was to compare pain management outcomes and patient......, the Specific Questionnaire On Pain Communication, and the Medication Adherence Report Scale. Emotional distress and patient attitudes toward opioid analgesics in cancer patient samples from both countries explained pain management outcomes in the multivariate regression models. Pain relief and pain medication...

  7. Incidence and risk of QTc interval prolongation among cancer patients treated with vandetanib: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiajie Zang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vandetanib is a multikinase inhibitor that is under assessment for the treatment of various cancers. QTc interval prolongation is one of the major adverse effects of this drug, but the reported incidence varies substantially among clinical trials. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to obtain a better understanding in the risk of QTc interval prolongation among cancer patients administered vandetanib. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Eligible studies were phase II and III prospective clinical trials that involved cancer patients who were prescribed vandetanib 300 mg/d and that included data on QTc interval prolongation. The overall incidence and risk of QTc interval prolongation were calculated using random-effects or fixed-effects models, depending on the heterogeneity of the included studies. Nine trials with 2,188 patients were included for the meta-analysis. The overall incidence of all-grade and high-grade QTc interval prolongation was 16.4% (95% CI, 8.1-30.4% and 3.7% (8.1-30.4%, respectively, among non-thyroid cancer patients, and 18.0% (10.7-28.6% and 12.0% (4.5-28.0%, respectively, among thyroid cancer patients. Patients with thyroid cancer who had longer treatment duration also had a higher incidence of high-grade events, with a relative risk of 3.24 (1.57-6.71, than patients who had non-thyroid cancer. Vandetanib was associated with a significantly increased risk of all-grade QTc interval prolongation with overall Peto odds ratios of 7.26 (4.36-12.09 and 5.70 (3.09-10.53 among patients with non-thyroid cancer and thyroid cancer, respectively, compared to the controls. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Treatment with vandetanib is associated with a significant increase in the overall incidence and risk of QTc interval prolongation. Different cancer types and treatment durations may affect the risk of developing high-grade QTc interval prolongation.

  8. Effects of exercise on swallowing and tongue strength in patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer treated with primary radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, C L; Husaini, H; Falciglia, D; DeLacure, M; Branski, R C; Kraus, D; Lee, N; Ho, M; Ganz, C; Smith, B; Sanfilippo, N

    2014-05-01

    Tongue strength is reduced in patients treated with chemoradiotherapy for oral/oropharyngeal cancer. Tongue strengthening protocols have resulted in improved lingual strength and swallowing in healthy individuals, as well as in patients following a neurological event. However, no studies have examined the efficacy of tongue strengthening exercises on tongue strength, swallowing, and quality of life (QOL; Head and Neck Cancer Inventory) in patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. A randomized clinical trial examined the effects of a tongue strengthening programme paired with traditional exercises vs. traditional exercises alone. Dependent variables included tongue strength, swallowing, and QOL in a group of patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer treated with primary radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. Differences with regard to tongue strength and oropharyngeal swallow efficiency (OPSE) were not observed within or between groups. QOL in the eating and speech domains improved following treatment in both groups. However, the experimental group demonstrated greater impairment in QOL in the social disruption domain following treatment, whereas the control group demonstrated a slight improvement in functioning. Tongue strengthening did not yield a statistically significant improvement in either tongue strength or swallowing measures in this patient cohort. Patient compliance and treatment timing may be factors underlying these outcomes.

  9. Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Older Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-09

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  10. Intensity modulated radiotherapy as neoadjuvant chemoradiation for the treatment of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Outcome analysis and comparison with a 3D-treated patient cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, S.E.; Habermehl, D.; Kessel, K.; Brecht, I. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Bergmann, F.; Schirmacher, P. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Pathology; Werner, J.; Buechler, M.W. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Surgery; Jaeger, D. [National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, J. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Clinical Cooperation Unit Radiation Oncology

    2013-09-15

    Background: To evaluate outcome after intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared to 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-RT) as neoadjuvant treatment in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Materials and methods: In total, 57 patients with LAPC were treated with IMRT and chemotherapy. A median total dose of 45 Gy to the PTV {sub baseplan} and 54 Gy to the PTV {sub boost} in single doses of 1.8 Gy for the PTV {sub baseplan} and median single doses of 2.2 Gy in the PTV {sub boost} were applied. Outcomes were evaluated and compared to a large cohort of patients treated with 3D-RT. Results: Overall treatment was well tolerated in all patients and IMRT could be completed without interruptions. Median overall survival was 11 months (range 5-37.5 months). Actuarial overall survival at 12 and 24 months was 36 % and 8 %, respectively. A significant impact on overall survival could only be observed for a decrease in CA 19-9 during treatment, patients with less pre-treatment CA 19-9 than the median, as well as weight loss during treatment. Local progression-free survival was 79 % after 6 months, 39 % after 12 months, and 13 % after 24 months. No factors significantly influencing local progression-free survival could be identified. There was no difference in overall and progression-free survival between 3D-RT and IMRT. Secondary resectability was similar in both groups (26 % vs. 28 %). Toxicity was comparable and consisted mainly of hematological toxicity due to chemotherapy. Conclusion: IMRT leads to a comparable outcome compared to 3D-RT in patients with LAPC. In the future, the improved dose distribution, as well as advances in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) techniques, may improve the use of IMRT in local dose escalation strategies to potentially improve outcome. (orig.)

  11. Effect of Whole Pelvic Radiotherapy for Patients With Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy and Long-Term Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantini, Giovanna [Department of Radiotherapy, Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Tagliaferri, Luca, E-mail: luca.tagliaferri@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Radiotherapy, Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Balducci, Mario; Frascino, Vincenzo; Dinapoli, Nicola [Department of Radiotherapy, Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Di Gesu, Cinzia; Ippolito, Edy; Morganti, Alessio G. [Department of Radiotherapy, John Paul II Center for High Technology Research and Education in Biomedical Sciences, Catholic University, Campobasso (Italy); Cellini, Numa [Department of Radiotherapy, Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Catholic University, Rome (Italy)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) in prostate cancer patients treated with RT and long-term (>1 year) androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Methods and materials: Prostate cancer patients with high-risk features (Stage T3-T4 and/or Gleason score {>=}7 and/or prostate-specific antigen level {>=}20 ng/mL) who had undergone RT and long-term ADT were included in the present analysis. Patients with bowel inflammatory disease, colon diverticula, and colon diverticulitis were excluded from WPRT and treated with prostate-only radiotherapy (PORT). Patients were grouped according to nodal risk involvement as assessed by the Roach formula using different cutoff levels (15%, 20%, 25%, and 30%). Biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) was analyzed in each group according to the RT type (WPRT or PORT). Results: A total of 358 patients treated between 1994 and 2007 were included in the analysis (46.9% with WPRT and 53.1% with PORT). The median duration of ADT was 24 months (range, 12-38). With a median follow-up of 52 months (range, 20-150), the overall 4-year bDFS rate was 90.5%. The 4-year bDFS rate was similar between the patients who had undergone WPRT or PORT (90.4% vs. 90.5%; p = NS). However, in the group of patients with the greatest nodal risk (>30%), a significant bDFS improvement was recorded for the patients who had undergone WPRT (p = .03). No differences were seen in acute toxicity among the patients treated with WPRT or PORT. The late gastrointestinal toxicity was similar in patients treated with PORT or WPRT (p = NS). Conclusions: Our analysis has supported the use of WPRT in association with long-term ADT for patients with high-risk nodal involvement (>30%), although a definitive recommendation should be confirmed by a randomized trial.

  12. Effect of Whole Pelvic Radiotherapy for Patients With Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy and Long-Term Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) in prostate cancer patients treated with RT and long-term (>1 year) androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Methods and materials: Prostate cancer patients with high-risk features (Stage T3-T4 and/or Gleason score ≥7 and/or prostate-specific antigen level ≥20 ng/mL) who had undergone RT and long-term ADT were included in the present analysis. Patients with bowel inflammatory disease, colon diverticula, and colon diverticulitis were excluded from WPRT and treated with prostate-only radiotherapy (PORT). Patients were grouped according to nodal risk involvement as assessed by the Roach formula using different cutoff levels (15%, 20%, 25%, and 30%). Biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) was analyzed in each group according to the RT type (WPRT or PORT). Results: A total of 358 patients treated between 1994 and 2007 were included in the analysis (46.9% with WPRT and 53.1% with PORT). The median duration of ADT was 24 months (range, 12–38). With a median follow-up of 52 months (range, 20–150), the overall 4-year bDFS rate was 90.5%. The 4-year bDFS rate was similar between the patients who had undergone WPRT or PORT (90.4% vs. 90.5%; p = NS). However, in the group of patients with the greatest nodal risk (>30%), a significant bDFS improvement was recorded for the patients who had undergone WPRT (p = .03). No differences were seen in acute toxicity among the patients treated with WPRT or PORT. The late gastrointestinal toxicity was similar in patients treated with PORT or WPRT (p = NS). Conclusions: Our analysis has supported the use of WPRT in association with long-term ADT for patients with high-risk nodal involvement (>30%), although a definitive recommendation should be confirmed by a randomized trial.

  13. Prognostic significance of miR-181b and miR-21 in gastric cancer patients treated with S-1/Oxaliplatin or Doxifluridine/Oxaliplatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingting Jiang

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of S-1/Oxaliplatin vs. Doxifluridine/Oxaliplatin regimen and to identify miRNAs as potential prognostic biomarkers in gastric cancer patients. The expression of candidate miRNAs was quantified from fifty-five late stage gastric cancer FFPE specimens.Gastric cancer patients with KPS>70 were recruited for the trial. The control group was treated with 400 mg/twice/day Doxifluridine plus i.v. with Oxaliplatin at 130 mg/m(2/first day/4 week cycle. The testing group was treated with S-1 at 40 mg/twice/day/4 week cycle plus i.v. with Oxaliplatin at 130 mg/m(2/first day/4 week cycle. Total RNAs were extracted from normal and gastric tumor specimens. The levels of miRNAs were quantified using real time qRT-PCR expression analysis.The overall objective response rate (CR+PR of patients treated with S-1/Oxaliplatin was 33.3% (CR+PR vs. 17.6% (CR+PR with Doxifluridine/Oxaliplatin for advanced stage gastric cancer patients. The average overall survival for patients treated with S-1/Oxaliplatin was 7.80 month vs. 7.30 month with patients treated with Doxifluridine/Oxaliplatin. The expression of miR-181b (P = 0.022 and miR-21 (P = 0.0029 was significantly overexpressed in gastric tumors compared to normal gastric tissues. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that low levels of miR-21 expression (Log rank test, hazard ratio: 0.17, CI = 0.06-0.45; P = 0.0004 and miR-181b (Log rank test, hazard ratio: 0.37, CI = 0.16-0.87; P = 0.018 are closely associated with better patient's overall survival for both S-1 and Doxifluridine based regimens.Patients treated with S-1/Oxaliplatin had a better response than those treated with Doxifluridine/Oxaliplatin. miR-21 and miR-181b hold great potential as prognostic biomarkers in late stage gastric cancer.

  14. G-8 indicates overall and quality-adjusted survival in older head and neck cancer patients treated with curative radiochemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Pottel, Lies; Lycke, Michelle; Boterberg, Tom; Pottel, Hans; Goethals, Laurence; Duprez, Fréderic; Rottey, Sylvie; Lievens, Yolande; Van Den Noortgate, Nele; Geldhof, Kurt; Buyse, Véronique; Kargar-Samani, Khalil; Ghekiere, Véronique; Debruyne, Philip R

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence-based guidelines concerning the older head and neck cancer (HNCA) patient are lacking. Accurate patient selection for optimal care management is therefore challenging. We examined if geriatric assessment is indicative of long-term health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and overall survival in this unique population. Methods All HNCA patients, aged ≥65 years, eligible for curative radio(chemo)therapy were evaluated with the Geriatric-8 (G-8) questionnaire and a comprehensiv...

  15. Pertuzumab, Trastuzumab, and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Patients With HER2-Positive Advanced Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-23

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Breast Adenocarcinoma; Inflammatory Breast Carcinoma

  16. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in Treating Long-Term Gastrointestinal Adverse Effects Caused by Radiation Therapy in Patients With Pelvic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-14

    Bladder Cancer; Cervical Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Gastrointestinal Complications; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Adults; Ovarian Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Radiation Toxicity; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Vaginal Cancer

  17. Epidermal growth factor receptor as a predictor of tumor downstaging in locally advanced rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine retrospectively whether levels of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression can predict tumor downstaging after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 183 patients with rectal cancer (cT3-T4 or N+) were enrolled in this study. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy consisted of 50.4 Gy of pelvic radiation with concurrent 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin bolus intravenous chemotherapy in 94 patients or oral capecitabine and leucovorin in 89 patients. EGFR expression in pretreatment paraffin-embedded tumor biopsy specimens was assessed by immunohistochemistry. EGFR expression was determined from the intensity and extent of staining. Tumor downstaging was defined as a reduction of at least one T-stage level. Results: Tumor downstaging occurred in 97 patients (53%), and the tumors showed a pathologic complete response in 27 patients (15%). Positive EGFR expression was observed in 140 (76%) of 183 patients. EGFR expression levels were low in 113 patients (62%) and high in 70 patients (38%). On logistic regression analysis, the significant predictive factor for increased tumor downstaging was a low level of EGFR expression and preoperative chemotherapy using oral capecitabine (odds ratio, 0.437; p 0.012 vs. odds ratio, 3.235; p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusion: A high level of EGFR expression may be a significant predictive molecular marker for decreased tumor downstaging after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

  18. Pan FGFR Kinase Inhibitor BGJ398 and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Untreated Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-19

    Colon Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  19. [Three-year follow-up of 12 patients with prostate cancer treated with monthly degarelix in a phase II clinical trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Senji; Hayashi, Natsuho; Yagi, Mayu; Ookubo, Teppei; Muto, Akinori; Sugano, Osamu; Numahata, Kenji; Bilim, Vladimir; Hoshi, Kiyotugu; Sasagawa, Isoji

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of degarelix, a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone(LH-RH)antagonist, in patients with prostate cancer(PCa)were evaluated in a phase II, open-label, multicenter clinical trial. In this trial, a total of 13 patients were accrued at the Yamagata Prefectural Central Hospital from 2007 to 2008. The median age was 80 years(range, 65-85 years), and clinical stages were T1c, T2, T3, and T4 in 1, 4, 6, and 2 patients, respectively. Nodal(N)status was N0 in 9 patients and N1 in 4 patients. Distant metastases were absent(M0)in 12 patients and present(M1b)in 1 patient. The median prostate- specific antigen(PSA)level was 29.1 ng/mL(range, 6.3-427 ng/mL). All but one patient, who died of an unrelated cause, received a monthly dose(80 or 160mg)of degarelix for 12 months and were followed-up for 3 years. The PSA level declined in all patients. One patient died of an unrelated cause during the phase II trial. After completion of the phase II trial, 5 patients were treated with combined and rogen blockade(CAB)(leuprolide plus anti-androgen therapy), 2 patients were treated with single-agent leuprolide, 2 patients received single-agent bicalutamide, and 1 patient was followed-up without additional treatment. Radical prostatectomy was performed in 2 patients. Among the 5 patients treated with CAB, 2 died of metastatic cancer. CAB was effective in suppressing PSA levels in 3 patients. In 1 patient with T3aN1M1b PCa, colon cancer with lung metastases was detected during the follow-up period. Treatment with chemotherapy for colon cancer was effective in suppressing PSA levels for 12 months. In 1 patient with cT3aN1M0 PCa, the PSA level declined to size of the prostate gland and metastatic lymph nodes was observed. This effect persisted for 3.5 years after the completion of the 12-month degarelix regimen, and no additional treatment was required.

  20. Screening for EGFR Mutations in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer Treated with Gefitinib on a Compassionate-Use Program: A Hellenic Cooperative Oncology Group Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Murray

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim. EGFR is commonly expressed in cancers of the head and neck (H and N, and anti-EGFR agents have demonstrated improvements in outcomes (TTP and OS. The aim of this study was to determine EGFR gene status in H and N cancer patients treated with gefitinib and to correlate mutational status with clinico-pathological data and response. Patients and Methods. Patients with histologically confirmed H and N cancer having failed prior treatment for advanced disease entered this compassionate-use-program. Nineteen patients received gefitinib. EGFR expression was assessed by IHC, gene copy number by FISH, and mutation analysis was conducted for EGFR (18-21, KRAS, BRAF (V600E, and HER-2 exon 20. An additional TKI naive cohort of 73 patients was also screened. Results. Mutations were detected in 6/19 patients (3× EGFR, 1× KRAS, and 2× HER2-exon 20. There were no significant differences in TTP or OS for patients with somatic EGFR mutations. No BRAF mutations were detected. Conclusions. The incidence of EGFR mutations in H and N cancer in this study was 5.3%. No statistically relevant correlations between mutation or gene gain and response or survival were observed. Due to the limited number of patients and low incidence of genetic aberrations in the genes analyzed, additional studies are warranted.

  1. High-dose OxyContin to treat pain associated with bone metastasis in patients with small-cell lung cancer: a case study report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Xia; Dong, Yan; Zhuang, Feifei; Jiang, Fengquan; Yu, Jinming; Zhang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Pain management is an important topic that has received extensive attention from clinical practitioners. Nearly all patients with malignant tumors suffer pain at the advanced stage of their disease. Oxycodone is a first-line choice for treating moderate-to-severe cancer-related pain, and OxyContin, a controlled-release oxycodone hydrochloride tablet, is internationally recognized as a safe and effective opioid analgesic. OxyContin has the characteristics of both immediate release and sustained release, with a time to onset and peak similar to those of immediate-release morphine. It acts on both μ and κ receptors and has been shown to be effective in treating different types of pain, especially neuropathic pain, theoretically without a dose cap. However, the dose is limited in clinical applications due to various factors that are likely to affect its analgesic effect and reduce patient quality of life. Cooperation with a patient's family members is required during the treatment of cancer pain. Chronic cancer pain has a long disease course, which could easily cause complex psychological symptoms due to their important role in the pain experience. Pain is controllable, and patients have a right to not experience pain. An optimal living state can be achieved through collaboration between physicians and patients. Rational personalized treatment of cancer pain can improve patient quality of life, relieve pain, and help prolong patient survival. This article reports the treatment procedure and adverse reactions in a patient who was treated with high-dose OxyContin, with the aim of providing a reference for other clinical practitioners. PMID:26855563

  2. Does radiation dose to the salivary glands and oral cavity predict patient-rated xerostomia and sticky saliva in head and neck cancer patients treated with curative radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and Purpose: To investigate the association between the mean salivary gland and oral cavity dose, with patient-rated moderate and severe xerostomia and sticky saliva. Patients and methods: One hundred and fifty-seven patients treated with bilateral irradiation for head and neck cancer were included. The parotid and submandibular glands and the oral cavity were delineated on plannings-CT scans. At baseline and 6 and 12 months self-reported xerostomia and sticky saliva were assessed using the EORTC QLQ-H and N35 questionnaire. Results: At 6 months a significant association between the mean parotid (MDpar) and mean submandibular dose (MDsubm) and xerostomia was observed (OR-MDpar: 1.17; P=0.002 and OR-MDsubm: 1.08; P=0.02). Between MDpar and MDsubm, a significant interaction term was present. No significant association was found with the oral cavity dose. Xerostomia was reversible depending on MDpar and MDsubm. Considering Sticky saliva, a significant association was found at 6 and 12 months with MDsubm (OR: 1.03; Ppar and MDsubm influence the risk of xerostomia in irradiated patients at 6 months. This probability as a function of the mean parotid dose significantly depended on the mean dose in the submandibular glands. Sticky saliva mainly depends on MDsubm

  3. Usefulness of J-CAPRA score for high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with carbon ion radiotherapy plus androgen deprivation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel risk assessment method, Japan Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment, has been developed based on database of patients receiving primary androgen deprivation therapy. To investigate the usefulness of Japan Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment for non-metastatic, high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with carbon ion radio-therapy plus androgen deprivation therapy. Patients with non-metastatic, high-risk prostate cancer (T3, initial prostate specific antigen level ≥20 ng/ml, and/or Gleason score ≥8) were included. The patients were treated with carbon ion radiotherapy (the total dose from 57.6 Gy (relative biological effectiveness)/16 fractions to 66.0 Gy (relative biological effectiveness)/20 fractions), and neoadjuvant as well as adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy for at least 24 months. Four hundred and twenty-six patients were included with the median follow-up of 68.1 months. Of 426, 210 (49.3%), 270 (63.4%) and 251 (58.9%) had Gleason 8-10, prostate specific antigen ≥20 ng/ml and T3, respectively. The 10-year progression-free and cause-specific survival rates in Japan Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment 1-2 group (76.5 and 98.9%) were significantly better than those in Japan Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment 3-6 group (52.6 and 93.1%), (P < 0.001 and P=0.044, respectively). The median progression-free survivals in the Japan Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment 1-2 and 3-6 groups were 158.9 months and 125.9 months (95% confidence interval: 108.6-143.2 months), respectively. For non-metastatic, high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with carbon ion radiotherapy plus androgen deprivation therapy, Japan Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment score was useful for predicting the progression-free and cause-specific survivals. (author)

  4. Sexual Functioning Among Endometrial Cancer Patients Treated With Adjuvant High-Dose-Rate Intra-Vaginal Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damast, Shari, E-mail: shari.damast@yale.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Alektiar, Kaled M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goldfarb, Shari [Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Eaton, Anne; Patil, Sujata [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Mosenkis, Jeffrey [Department of Comparative Human Development, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Bennett, Antonia [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Atkinson, Thomas [Department of Psychiatry, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Jewell, Elizabeth; Leitao, Mario; Barakat, Richard; Carter, Jeanne [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Basch, Ethan [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: We used the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) to investigate the prevalence of sexual dysfunction (SD) and factors associated with diminished sexual functioning in early stage endometrial cancer (EC) patients treated with simple hysterectomy and adjuvant brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 104 patients followed in a radiation oncology clinic completed questionnaires to quantify current levels of sexual functioning. The time interval between hysterectomy and questionnaire completion ranged from <6 months to >5 years. Multivariate regression was performed using the FSFI as a continuous variable (score range, 1.2-35.4). SD was defined as an FSFI score of <26, based on the published validation study. Results: SD was reported by 81% of respondents. The mean ({+-} standard deviation) domain scores in order of highest-to-lowest functioning were: satisfaction, 2.9 ({+-}2.0); orgasm, 2.5 ({+-}2.4); desire, 2.4 ({+-}1.3); arousal, 2.2 ({+-}2.0); dryness, 2.1 ({+-}2.1); and pain, 1.9 ({+-}2.3). Compared to the index population in which the FSFI cut-score was validated (healthy women ages 18-74), all scores were low. Compared to published scores of a postmenopausal population, scores were not statistically different. Multivariate analysis isolated factors associated with lower FSFI scores, including having laparotomy as opposed to minimally invasive surgery (effect size, -7.1 points; 95% CI, -11.2 to -3.1; P<.001), lack of vaginal lubricant use (effect size, -4.4 points; 95% CI, -8.7 to -0.2, P=.040), and short time interval (<6 months) from hysterectomy to questionnaire completion (effect size, -4.6 points; 95% CI, -9.3-0.2; P=.059). Conclusions: The rate of SD, as defined by an FSFI score <26, was prevalent. The postmenopausal status of EC patients alone is a known risk factor for SD. Additional factors associated with poor sexual functioning following treatment for EC included receipt of laparotomy and lack of vaginal lubricant use.

  5. Innate Immune Signalling Genetics of Pain, Cognitive Dysfunction and Sickness Symptoms in Cancer Pain Patients Treated with Transdermal Fentanyl.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T Barratt

    Full Text Available Common adverse symptoms of cancer and chemotherapy are a major health burden; chief among these is pain, with opioids including transdermal fentanyl the mainstay of treatment. Innate immune activation has been implicated generally in pain, opioid analgesia, cognitive dysfunction, and sickness type symptoms reported by cancer patients. We aimed to determine if genetic polymorphisms in neuroimmune activation pathways alter the serum fentanyl concentration-response relationships for pain control, cognitive dysfunction, and other adverse symptoms, in cancer pain patients. Cancer pain patients (468 receiving transdermal fentanyl were genotyped for 31 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 19 genes: CASP1, BDNF, CRP, LY96, IL6, IL1B, TGFB1, TNF, IL10, IL2, TLR2, TLR4, MYD88, IL6R, OPRM1, ARRB2, COMT, STAT6 and ABCB1. Lasso and backward stepwise generalised linear regression were used to identify non-genetic and genetic predictors, respectively, of pain control (average Brief Pain Inventory < 4, cognitive dysfunction (Mini-Mental State Examination ≤ 23, sickness response and opioid adverse event complaint. Serum fentanyl concentrations did not predict between-patient variability in these outcomes, nor did genetic factors predict pain control, sickness response or opioid adverse event complaint. Carriers of the MYD88 rs6853 variant were half as likely to have cognitive dysfunction (11/111 than wild-type patients (69/325, with a relative risk of 0.45 (95% CI: 0.27 to 0.76 when accounting for major non-genetic predictors (age, Karnofsky functional score. This supports the involvement of innate immune signalling in cognitive dysfunction, and identifies MyD88 signalling pathways as a potential focus for predicting and reducing the burden of cognitive dysfunction in cancer pain patients.

  6. Reproductive function and biological dosimetry prospective study of young thyroid differentiated cancer patients treated with I-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The administration of I-131 in the management of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is a well established practice. As the spermatogonia is highly sensitive to radiation, large doses of internal radiation could result in adverse effects on reproductive function such as oligo/azoospermia and infertility. During spermiogenesis, mammalian chromatin undergoes replacement of nuclear histones by protamines, which yields a DNA sixfold more highly condensed in spermatozoa than in mitotic chromosomes. The structure of this highly packaged chromatin shows a low binding capacity for several fluoro chromes and dyes such as chromo mycin A3 (CMA3). The aim of this study is to assess the correlation between reproductive function (endocrine and exocrine testicular function, and levels of CMA3 stainability) and biological dosimetry in a prospective study of 4 young DTC patients treated with I-131. In this context, a background level of CMA3 binding in mature human sperm was established. It revealed a variable accessibility of CMA3 to the DNA that is dependant on packaging quality and thus, indicative of protamine deficiency. The identification of altered stainability suggests DNA damage as well as epigenetic effects, which may be indicators of male infertility. Transient impairment of spermatogenesis associated with an increase in FSH, an altered spermiogram and even azoospermia was observed after the administration of cumulative activities. Overall, testosterone levels were preserved, except in one case, which presented a drastically diminished value associated with an increase in LH level. As peripheral blood lymphocytes and spermatogonia have equivalent radiosensitivity (interphase death) we hypothesize that the knowledge of DNA damage recovery in peripheral lymphocytes could correlate with spermatogonia recovery and with FSH evolution. Therefore, a prospective study on the decline of unstable chromosome aberrations is being conducted, considering the damage induced

  7. Reproductive function and biological dosimetry prospective study of young thyroid differentiated cancer patients treated with I-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The administration of I-131 in the management of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is a well established practice. As the spermatogonia is highly sensitive to radiation, large doses of internal radiation could result in adverse effects on reproductive function such as oligo/azoospermia and infertility. During spermiogenesis, mammalian chromatin undergoes replacement of nuclear histones by protamines, which yields a DNA sixfold more highly condensed in spermatozoa than in mitotic chromosomes. The structure of this highly packaged chromatin shows a low binding capacity for several fluorochromes and dyes such as chromomycin A3 (CMA3). The aim of this study is to assess the correlation between reproductive function (endocrine and exocrine testicular function, and levels of CMA3 stainability) and biological dosimetry in a prospective study of 4 young DTC patients treated with I-131. In this context, a background level of CMA3 binding in mature human sperm was established. It revealed a variable accessibility of CMA3 to the DNA that is dependant on packaging quality and thus, indicative of protamine deficiency. The identification of altered stainability suggests DNA damage as well as epigenetic effects, which may be indicators of male infertility. Transient impairment of spermatogenesis associated with an increase in FSH, an altered spermiogram and even azoospermia was observed after the administration of cumulative activities. Overall, testosterone levels were preserved, except in one case, which presented a drastically diminished value associated with an increase in LH level. As peripheral blood lymphocytes and spermatogonia have equivalent radiosensitivity (interphase death) we hypothesize that the knowledge of DNA damage recovery in peripheral lymphocytes could correlate with spermatogonia recovery and with FSH evolution. (authors)

  8. Breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapy reports more unmet supportive care needs in the early treatment phase, than patients treated only with radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen-Johansen, Mikael Birkelund; Meldgaard, Anette; Henriksen, Jette;

    2015-01-01

    & information-, physical & daily living-, patient care & support-, and sexuality needs. Analysis: The subscales of the SCNS revealed good reliability (Cronbach’s alpha: .79 - .96) and the summated scores were skewed and therefore log-transformed. An independent samples t-test was conducted to compare the need...

  9. Analysis of Japanese Patients Treated with or without Long-Term Epirubicin Plus Ara-C Intravesical Instillation Therapy for Low-Grade Superficial Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomonori Kato

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The high incidence of tumor recurrence following transurethral resection (TUR represents a major problem encountered in the management of bladder cancer. This study examined the efficacy of intravesical chemotherapy in superficial bladder cancer. We retrospectively analyzed 90 Japanese cases with low-grade superficial transitional cell carcinoma (stage T1, grades 1 and 2 who were rendered tumor-free by TURBT (TUR of bladder tumor and who thereafter were treated with or without intravesical chemotherapy. Among them, instillation was terminated in 2 patients due to adverse effects (severe but reversible chemical cystitis. Remaining 88 patients were divided into 2 groups according to therapy: the TURBT-only group (n=46, defined as patients treated with TURBT alone, and the Instillation group (n=42, defined as patients treated with weekly intravesical instillation therapies using epirubicin plus Ara-C. Recurrence-free rate was significantly higher in the Instillation group than in the TURBT-only group (p=0.02, HR = 0.457. The 5-year recurrence-free rate was 58.5% for the Instillation group and 38.6% for the TURBT-only group. Our instillation schedule represents the most intensive regimen among previously reported therapies and resulted in a 54.3% decrease in incidence of tumor recurrence. We believe that the results of this study could provide useful information on management of bladder cancer.

  10. Markers for EGFR pathway activation as predictor of outcome in metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with or without cetuximab.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, J.; Dijkstra, J.R.; Klomp, M.; Teerenstra, S.; Dommerholt, M.; Vink-Borger, M.E.; Cleef, P.H. van; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Punt, C.J.A.; Nagtegaal, I.D.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) treatment are only effective in patients with KRAS wild type tumours. Here we assess the predictive value of other potential relevant markers involved in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling pathways

  11. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Cisplatin or High-Dose Methotrexate, Vinblastine, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Urothelial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-27

    Anterior Urethral Cancer; Localized Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Posterior Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Ureter Cancer; Urethral Cancer Associated With Invasive Bladder Cancer

  12. The impact of race on biochemical disease-free survival in early-stage prostate cancer patients treated with surgery or radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the impact of race on biochemical freedom from recurrence in patients with early-stage prostate cancer treated either by radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy. Methods: Between July 1989 and December 1994, 693 patients with early-stage prostate cancer were treated with radiation (302 patients) or by radical prostatectomy (391 patients) at Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute/Wayne State University. Stage, Gleason score, race, pretreatment PSA, and follow-up PSA values were abstracted. There were 387 Caucasian males (CM) and 306 African-American males (AAM). None of the patients received hormone therapy. Radiation therapy was delivered using photon irradiation (249 patients, median dose 69 Gy) or mixed neutron/photon irradiation (53 patients, median dose 10 NGy + 38 PGy). Median follow-up was 36 months (range 2-70) for CM and 35 months (range 1-70) for AAM. Results: Thirty-seven percent of patients treated surgically were AAM, compared to 53% in the radiation group (p = 0.0001). AAM had a higher median prostate-specific antigen (PSA) than CM (9.78 ng/ml vs. 8.0 ng/ml, p = 0.01). Thirty-three percent of AAM had a pretreatment PSA greater than 15 ng/ml compared to 20% of CM (p = 0.00001). Disease-free survival (DFS) by race was equivalent at 36 months, 81% for CM and 77% for AAM (p = NS). For patients with PSA ≤ 15, DFS rates were 87% and 85% for CM and AAM, respectively. DFS rates for patients with PSA > 15 were 61% for CM and 64% for AAM (p NS). Significant prognostic factors on multivariate analysis included pretreatment PSA (p = 0.0001) and Gleason score (p = 0.0001). Conclusion: Race does not appear to adversely affect biochemical disease-free survival in males treated for early-stage prostate cancer. African-American males with early-stage prostate cancer should expect similar biochemical disease-free survival rates to those seen in Caucasian males

  13. Triapine With Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With IB2-IVA Cervical or Vulvar Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-28

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vulvar Cancer; Vulvar Adenocarcinoma; Vulvar Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  14. PIK3CA mutations, PTEN, and pHER2 expression and impact on outcome in HER2-positive early-stage breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy and trastuzumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J D; Knoop, Ann; Laenkholm, A V;

    2012-01-01

    -stage breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy and trastuzumab. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Two hundred and forty HER2-positive early-stage breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant treatment (cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m(2), epirubicin 60 mg/m(2), and fluorouracil 600 mg/m(2)) before administration...

  15. Can dosimetric parameters predict acute hematologic toxicity in rectal cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated pelvic radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To identify dosimetric parameters associated with acute hematologic toxicity (HT) in rectal cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated pelvic radiotherapy. Ninety-three rectal cancer patients receiving concurrent capecitabine and pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) were analyzed. Pelvic bone marrow (PBM) was contoured for each patient and divided into three subsites: lumbosacral spine (LSS), ilium, and lower pelvis (LP). The volume of each site receiving 5–40 Gy (V 5, V10, V15, V20, V30, and V40, respectively) as well as patient baseline clinical characteristics was calculated. The endpoint for hematologic toxicity was grade ≥ 2 (HT2+) leukopenia, neutropenia, anemia or thrombocytopenia. Logistic regression was used to analyze correlation between dosimetric parameters and grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity. Twenty-four in ninety-three patients experienced grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity. Only the dosimetric parameter V40 of lumbosacral spine was correlated with grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity. Increased pelvic lumbosacral spine V40 (LSS-V40) was associated with an increased grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity (p = 0.041). Patients with LSS-V40 ≥ 60 % had higher rates of grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity than did patients with lumbosacral spine V40 < 60 % (38.3 %, 18/47 vs.13 %, 6/46, p =0.005). On univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis, lumbosacral spine V40 and gender was also the variable associated with grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity. Female patients were observed more likely to have grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity than male ones (46.9 %, 15/32 vs 14.8 %, 9/61, p =0.001). Lumbosacral spine -V40 was associated with clinically significant grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity. Keeping the lumbosacral spine -V40 < 60 % was associated with a 13 % risk of grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity in rectal cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy

  16. Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid in Treating Patients With Metastatic and/or Locally Advanced or Locally Recurrent Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-23

    Insular Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage II Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage II Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  17. Temsirolimus With or Without Megestrol Acetate and Tamoxifen Citrate in Treating Patients With Advanced, Persistent, or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-26

    Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC1 Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC2 Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  18. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy Followed by Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-16

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  19. Can UGT1A1 genotyping reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with irinotecan? An evidence-based review

    OpenAIRE

    Palomaki, Glenn E; Bradley, Linda A.; Douglas, Michael P.; Kolor, Katherine; Dotson, W. David

    2009-01-01

    This evidence-based review addresses the question of whether testing for UGT1A1 mutations in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with irinotecan leads to improvement in outcomes (e.g., irinotecan toxicity, response to treatment, morbidity, and mortality), when compared with no testing. No studies were identified that addressed this question directly. The quality of evidence on the analytic validity of current UGT1A1 genetic testing methods is adequate (scale: convincing, adequa...

  20. Penile primary melanoma: analysis of 6 patients treated at Brazilian national cancer institute in the last eight years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Ruschi Bechara

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To describe our experience in treating penile melanoma in 06 patients followed at our institution. Materials and Methods Between 2004 and 2012 six consecutive patients with penile melanoma were treated at our Institution. Stage of the disease was classified according to the 2002 AJCC pathologic system. Melanoma in situ (TIS was diagnosed in one patient. One patient was staged as T1b, two patients as T2b and two patients as T4b. The clinical and pathological findings were evaluated. Immunohistochemical tests were performed for Melan-A, HNB-45, S-100 and C-KIT. All histological specimens were examined by the same pathologist (ABSS. The patients with Cis, stages T1b and one patient T2b underwent only local excision. One patient T2b underwent local excision and sentinel lymph node dissection. Two patients with melanoma stage T4b underwent partial penile amputation. One of these last patients had palpable inguinal lymph nodes at diagnosis and underwent bilateral inguinal lymphadenectomy and received systemic chemotherapy (dacarbazine, 30 cycles. Results Mean follow-up was 36.3 months. One patient, with stage T2b, died after 12 months due to disease recurrence with bilateral inguinal involvement. The patient who underwent chemotherapy progressed with lung metastases and died after 14 months of follow up. The disease-free survival at five years was 33.3%. Conclusion: Penile melanoma is a disease with poor prognosis in most cases. Local excision or partial penile amputation may have effective control for stages T1 and T2 lesions. Patients who have clinically proven metastases died despite surgical and adjuvant chemotherapy.

  1. Results of treatment of patients with advanced stomach cancer treated by combination of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) and other methods: ten-year experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, V. A.

    2000-06-01

    In 1988 we started our investigation on the influence of low-level laser on oncologic patient. Now we have an experience of application of LLLT on more than 700 patients with the confirmed diagnosis of cancer at different stage. We used LLLT on 112 with stomach cancer 4th stage before and after operation and on patients without operating interference. LLLT investigations, with a wavelength of 890 nm, have shown that the laser therapy before operation is most effective. Laser therapy activates the immune system by increasing T-active rosette-formed cells and T-helpers and by decreasing T-suppressor cells. Application of LLLT decreases postoperative complications by 11.86 percent after palliative operations; by 9.63 percent after non-radical operations. It also promotes more rapid restorations of the motility and improves general status of patients by 58.69 percent. Investigations of low-level radiation have shown that the life-span of patients with 4th stage stomach cancer who were treated by laser therapy before surgery was increased by 2.03 percent; for those who were treated by LLLT after surgery it was increased by 1.81 times and by 3.03 times in those who took LLLT without surgery.

  2. Prognostic significance of several histological features in intermediate and high-risk endometrial cancer patients treated with curative intent using surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The purpose of the present study was to explore the prognostic significance of several histological features with respect to lymph node metastasis, failure-free survival (FeS), and overall survival (Os) in intermediate and high-risk endometrial cancer patients treated with curative intent. One hundred and eighty patients with endometrial cancer were treated with hysterectomy with or without lymphadenectomy and received external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). The mean follow-up period was 4.25 years (range 0.44-10.45 years). In multifactor analysis, fractional myometrial invasion (MI) (P = 0.047), histology (P < 0.001) and lymph-vascular space invasion (LVSI) (P = 0.025) were significant predictors for FFS when nodal status was not included. When lymph node status was known, histology (P - 0.007) and LVSI (P = 0.014) remained significant factors for FFS. For OS, histology (P < 0.001) and fractional MI (P = 0.004) were the significant factors. Lymph node status could be predicted by tumour grading (P = 0.016) and absolute MI (P 0.002). Histology type and the presence of LVSI were the most important prognostic factors in high-risk endometrial cancer patients treated by surgery and postoperative radiotherapy. Absolute MI and tumour grading were useful predictors of nodal spread.

  3. Recombinant Interleukin-15 in Treating Patients With Advanced Melanoma, Kidney Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-05

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  4. A Pilot Study Evaluating Steroid-Induced Diabetes after Antiemetic Dexamethasone Therapy in Chemotherapy-Treated Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yusook; Han, Hye Sook; Lee, Hyo Duk; Yang, Jiyoul; Jeong, Jiwon; Choi, Moon Ki; Kwon, Jihyun; Jeon, Hyun-Jung; Oh, Tae-Keun; Lee, Ki Hyeong; Kim, Seung Taik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Dexamethasone is a mainstay antiemetic regimen for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. The aim of this pilot study was to assess the incidence of and factors associated with steroid-induced diabetes in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy with dexamethasone as an antiemetic. Materials and Methods Non-diabetic patients with newly diagnosed gastrointestinal cancer who received at least three cycles of highly or moderately emetogenic chemotherapy with dexamethasone as an antiemetic were enrolled. Fasting plasma glucose levels, 2-hour postprandial glucose levels, and hemoglobin A1C tests for the diagnosis of diabetes were performed before chemotherapy and at 3 and 6 months after the start of chemotherapy. The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was used as an index for measurement of insulin resistance, defined as a HOMA-IR ≥ 2.5. Results Between January 2012 and November 2013, 101 patients with no history of diabetes underwent laboratory tests for assessment of eligibility; 77 of these patients were included in the analysis. Forty-five patients (58.4%) were insulin resistant and 17 (22.1%) developed steroid-induced diabetes at 3 or 6 months after the first chemotherapy, which included dexamethasone as an antiemetic. Multivariate analysis showed significant association of the incidence of steroid-induced diabetes with the cumulative dose of dexamethasone (p=0.049). Conclusion We suggest that development of steroid-induced diabetes after antiemetic dexamethasone therapy occurs in approximately 20% of non-diabetic cancer patients; this is particularly significant for patients receiving high doses of dexamethasone. PMID:26987397

  5. Development of a nomogram model predicting current bone scan positivity in patients treated with androgen-deprivation therapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eKattan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To develop a nomogram predictive of current bone scan positivity in patients receiving androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT for advanced prostate cancer; to augment clinical judgment and highlight patients in need of additional imaging investigations.Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart review of bone scan records (conventional 99mTc-scintigraphy of 1,293 patients who received ADT at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center from 2000 to 2011. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify variables suitable for inclusion in the nomogram. The probability of current bone scan positivity was determined using these variables and the predictive accuracy of the nomogram was quantified by concordance index.Results: In total, 2,681 bone scan records were analyzed and 636 patients had a positive result. Overall, the median pre-scan prostate-specific antigen (PSA level was 2.4 ng/ml; median PSA doubling time (PSADT was 5.8 months. At the time of a positive scan, median PSA level was 8.2 ng/ml; 53% of patients had PSA <10 ng/ml; median PSADT was 4.0 months. Five variables were included in the nomogram: number of previous negative bone scans after initiating ADT, PSA level, Gleason grade sum, and history of radical prostatectomy and radiotherapy. A concordance index value of 0.721 was calculated for the nomogram. This was a retrospective study based on limited data in patients treated in a large cancer centre who underwent conventional 99mTc bone scans, which themselves have inherent limitations. Conclusions: This is the first nomogram to predict current bone scan positivity in ADT-treated prostate cancer patients, providing high predictive accuracy.

  6. Differences in treatment patterns among patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer treated by oncologists versus urologists in a US managed care population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engel-Nitz NM

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Nicole M Engel-Nitz1, Berhanu Alemayehu2, David Parry3, Faith Nathan21Innovus, Eden Prairie, MN, USA; 2AstraZeneca, Wilmington, DE, USA; 3AstraZeneca UK, London, UKObjective: Differences in treatment patterns, health care resource utilization, and costs between patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC treated by oncologists and those treated by urologists were examined.Methods: Patients aged ≥40 with CRPC were identified using claims from a large US managed health care plan between July 2001 and December 2007. A 6-month baseline period was used to assess patient characteristics. Patients with visits to an urologist, without visits to an oncologist, were assigned to the urology cohort, and patients with visits to an oncologist, with or without visits to an urologist, were assigned to the oncology cohort. Treatment patterns, health care resource utilization, and costs during a variable follow-up period were compared between cohorts using descriptive statistics and Lin's regression.Results: The urology cohort had fewer comorbid illnesses (P < 0.001 and patients were less likely to have other cancers during baseline (P < 0.001 or to die during follow-up (P = 0.004 compared with the oncology cohort. The oncology cohort patients were significantly more likely to have a claim for hormones (74.5% vs 61.1%; P < 0.001, chemotherapy (46.9% vs 10.2%, P < 0.001, and radiation (22.3% vs 3.7%, P < 0.0001 over follow-up. Mean unadjusted health care costs were higher in the oncology vs the urology cohort (US$31,896 vs US$15,318, respectively; P < 0.001. At 6 years follow-up, cumulative adjusted CRPC-specific costs were significantly higher among patients treated by oncologists with chemotherapy than among patients treated by urologists.Conclusion: CRPC patients treated by oncologists had greater use of hormones, chemotherapy, and radiation; higher percentages of patients with inpatient stays, emergency room, and ambulatory visits; and higher

  7. The effectiveness of the Screening Inventory of Psychosocial Problems (SIPP in cancer patients treated with radiotherapy: design of a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eekers Daniëlle

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Screening Inventory of Psychosocial Problems (SIPP is a short, validated self-reported questionnaire to identify psychosocial problems in Dutch cancer patients. The one-page 24-item questionnaire assesses physical complaints, psychological complaints and social and sexual problems. Very little is known about the effects of using the SIPP in consultation settings. Our study aims are to test the hypotheses that using the SIPP (a may contribute to adequate referral to relevant psychosocial caregivers, (b should facilitate communication between radiotherapists and cancer patients about psychosocial distress and (c may prevent underdiagnosis of early symptoms reflecting psychosocial problems. This paper presents the design of a cluster randomised controlled trial (CRCT evaluating the effectiveness of using the SIPP in cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. Methods/Design A CRCT is developed using a Solomon four-group design (two intervention and two control groups to evaluate the effects of using the SIPP. Radiotherapists, instead of cancer patients, are randomly allocated to the experimental or control groups. Within these groups, all included cancer patients are randomised into two subgroups: with and without pre-measurement. Self-reported assessments are conducted at four times: a pre-test at baseline before the first consultation and a post-test directly following the first consultation, and three and 12 months after baseline measurement. The primary outcome measures are the number and types of referrals of cancer patients with psychosocial problems to relevant (psychosocial caregivers. The secondary outcome measures are patients' satisfaction with the radiotherapist-patient communication, psychosocial distress and quality of life. Furthermore, a process evaluation will be carried out. Data of the effect-evaluation will be analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle and data regarding the types of referrals

  8. The effectiveness of the Screening Inventory of Psychosocial Problems (SIPP) in cancer patients treated with radiotherapy: design of a cluster randomised controlled trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Screening Inventory of Psychosocial Problems (SIPP) is a short, validated self-reported questionnaire to identify psychosocial problems in Dutch cancer patients. The one-page 24-item questionnaire assesses physical complaints, psychological complaints and social and sexual problems. Very little is known about the effects of using the SIPP in consultation settings. Our study aims are to test the hypotheses that using the SIPP (a) may contribute to adequate referral to relevant psychosocial caregivers, (b) should facilitate communication between radiotherapists and cancer patients about psychosocial distress and (c) may prevent underdiagnosis of early symptoms reflecting psychosocial problems. This paper presents the design of a cluster randomised controlled trial (CRCT) evaluating the effectiveness of using the SIPP in cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. A CRCT is developed using a Solomon four-group design (two intervention and two control groups) to evaluate the effects of using the SIPP. Radiotherapists, instead of cancer patients, are randomly allocated to the experimental or control groups. Within these groups, all included cancer patients are randomised into two subgroups: with and without pre-measurement. Self-reported assessments are conducted at four times: a pre-test at baseline before the first consultation and a post-test directly following the first consultation, and three and 12 months after baseline measurement. The primary outcome measures are the number and types of referrals of cancer patients with psychosocial problems to relevant (psychosocial) caregivers. The secondary outcome measures are patients' satisfaction with the radiotherapist-patient communication, psychosocial distress and quality of life. Furthermore, a process evaluation will be carried out. Data of the effect-evaluation will be analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle and data regarding the types of referrals to health care providers and patient

  9. Three-dimensional verification of prostate cancer patients treated with VMAT by Matrixx detector and COMPASS software IBA; Verificacion tridimensional de pacientes con cancer de prostata tratados con VMAT mediante el detector Matrixx y software COMPASS de IBA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mateos, J. C.; Luis, F. J.; Cabrera, P.; Carrasco, M.; Sanchez, G.; Herrador, M.

    2011-07-01

    Described in this paper the verification of prostate cancer patients treated with VMAT planned in our hospital, with a prescribed dose of 76 Gy. The ability to simultaneously analyze the patient by any plane COMPASS software (IBA, Germany), together with the detector array Matrixx-Evolution, this system gives a particularly interesting feature. The aim of this paper is to describe the operation of this equipment and validated for patient dosimetry in IMRT and VMAT treatments.

  10. Cetuximab, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IB, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-29

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  11. Trastuzumab Emtansine in Treating Older Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-04

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2 Positive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  12. Triciribine Phosphate, Paclitaxel, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Stage IIB-IV Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-13

    Breast Adenocarcinoma; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  13. SPIDER: Managing Clinical Data of Cancer Patients Treated through a Multidisciplinary Approach by a Palm Based System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Valentini

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: The complexity of modern oncology, based on multi-disciplinary management of cancer patients, results in critical amounts of data, leading to problems in managing and sharing information.

    Methods: Spider is a multi-user system, based on integrated palm technology, created to facilitate data recording, managing and sharing, through Intra-Internet connection. By palms or PCs, data are collected directly at the place where information is generated. Every health professional can edit, modify and display all of the patient's data according to his/her operational level. A powerful engine enables Spider’s users to create series of cancer patients’ appointments linked to one another by specified time intervals and save them as “Protocols”. Applying a protocol to the patient, the system schedules a wave of appointments and alerts keeping the correlation with time intervals previously specified by specialists. XML technology is integrated with traditional RDBMS technology to build the Electronic Patient File (EPF updated during each patient’s admission or consultation, including any new diagnostic/therapeutic events and collective decisions. The system automatically produces all clinical documents routinely in use (discharge letters, exams’ requests, etc..

    Results: Spider’s different archives include 4387 patients (Prostate, n=849; Lung, n=1596; Rectum, n=1541; Head & Neck, n=291; Cervix, n=110. The EPF includes specific modules: staging, surgery, chemotherapy, hormonotherapy, radiotherapy, toxicity, pathology, follow-up and clinical summary. Spider Hospitalization displays the ward map and important details of patients occupying each single bed.

    Conclusions: Spider makes data capture easier and accurate. The availability of large amounts of information accelerates outcome analysis and improves cancer research.

  14. High-dose OxyContin to treat pain associated with bone metastasis in patients with small-cell lung cancer: a case study report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou T

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tao Zhou,1,* Xia Zhang,2,* Yan Dong,1 Feifei Zhuang,1 Fengquan Jiang,3 Jinming Yu,4 Bin Zhang1,4 1Department of Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian, 2Department of Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Shandong University, Jinan, 3Laboratory of Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian, Liaoning, 4Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Pain management is an important topic that has received extensive attention from clinical practitioners. Nearly all patients with malignant tumors suffer pain at the advanced stage of their disease. Oxycodone is a first-line choice for treating moderate-to-severe cancer-related pain, and OxyContin, a controlled-release oxycodone hydrochloride tablet, is internationally recognized as a safe and effective opioid analgesic. OxyContin has the characteristics of both immediate release and sustained release, with a time to onset and peak similar to those of immediate-release morphine. It acts on both µ and κ receptors and has been shown to be effective in treating different types of pain, especially neuropathic pain, theoretically without a dose cap. However, the dose is limited in clinical applications due to various factors that are likely to affect its analgesic effect and reduce patient quality of life. Cooperation with a patient’s family members is required during the treatment of cancer pain. Chronic cancer pain has a long disease course, which could easily cause complex psychological symptoms due to their important role in the pain experience. Pain is controllable, and patients have a right to not experience pain. An optimal living state can be achieved through collaboration between physicians and patients. Rational personalized treatment of cancer pain can improve

  15. Interleukin-12 and Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Cancer That Has High Levels of HER2/Neu

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer; Bone Metastases; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Distal Urethral Cancer; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Insulinoma; Liver Metastases; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Lung Metastases; Male Breast Cancer; Malignant Pericardial Effusion; Malignant Pleural Effusion; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Parathyroid Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Newly Diagnosed Carcinoma of Unknown Primary; Occult Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Proximal Urethral Cancer; Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adrenocortical Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Carcinoma of Unknown Primary; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Parathyroid Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Vaginal

  16. Ten-Year Survival of a Patient Treated with Stereotactic Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases from Colon Cancer with Ovarian and Lymph Node Metastases: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuhiro Morinaga

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Brain metastasis from colorectal cancer is infrequent and carries a poor prognosis. Herein, we present a patient alive 10 years after the identification of a first brain metastasis from sigmoid colon cancer. A 39-year-old woman underwent sigmoidectomy for sigmoid colon cancer during an emergency operation for pelvic peritonitis. The pathological finding was moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Eleven months after the sigmoidectomy, a metastatic lesion was identified in the left ovary. Despite local radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy, the left ovarian lesion grew, so resection of the uterus and bilateral ovaries was performed. Adjuvant chemotherapy with tegafur-uracil (UFT/calcium folinate (leucovorin, LV was initiated. Seven months after resection of the ovarian lesion, brain metastases appeared in the bilateral frontal lobes and were treated with stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Cervical and mediastinal lymph node metastases were also diagnosed, and irradiation of these lesions was performed. After radiotherapy, 10 courses of oxaliplatin and infused fluorouracil plus leucovorin (FOLFOX were administered. During FOLFOX administration, recurrent left frontal lobe brain metastasis was diagnosed and treated with stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery. In this case, the brain metastases were well treated with stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery, and the systemic disease arising from sigmoid colon cancer has been kept under control with chemotherapies, surgical resection, and radiotherapy.

  17. Locoregional Recurrence Risk for Patients With T1,2 Breast Cancer With 1-3 Positive Lymph Nodes Treated With Mastectomy and Systemic Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBride, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of Arizona School of Medicine, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Allen, Pamela; Woodward, Wendy; Kim, Michelle [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kuerer, Henry M. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Drinka, Eva Katherine; Sahin, Aysegul [Department of Pathology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Strom, Eric A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Buzdar, Aman; Valero, Vicente; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hunt, Kelly K. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A., E-mail: tbuchhol@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) has been shown to benefit breast cancer patients with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes, but it is unclear how modern changes in management have affected the benefits of PMRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates in 1027 patients with T1,2 breast cancer with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes treated with mastectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy with or without PMRT during an early era (1978-1997) and a later era (2000-2007). These eras were selected because they represented periods before and after the routine use of sentinel lymph node surgery, taxane chemotherapy, and aromatase inhibitors. Results: 19% of 505 patients treated in the early era and 25% of the 522 patients in the later era received PMRT. Patients who received PMRT had significantly higher-risk disease features. PMRT reduced the rate of LRR in the early era cohort, with 5-year rates of 9.5% without PMRT and 3.4% with PMRT (log-rank P=.028) and 15-year rates 14.5% versus 6.1%, respectively; (Cox regression analysis: adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] 0.37, P=.035). However, PMRT did not appear to benefit patients treated in the later cohort, with 5-year LRR rates of 2.8% without PMRT and 4.2% with PMRT (P=.48; Cox analysis: AHR 1.41, P=.48). The most significant factor predictive of LRR for the patients who did not receive PMRT was the era in which the patient was treated (AHR 0.35 for later era, P<.001). Conclusion: The risk of LRR for patients with T1,2 breast cancer with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes treated with mastectomy and systemic treatment is highly dependent on the era of treatment. Modern treatment advances and the selected use of PMRT for those with high-risk features have allowed for identification of a cohort at very low risk for LRR without PMRT.

  18. Clinical Effects for Patients with Recurrent Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Icotinib Hydrochloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingying NONG

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Icotinib hydrochloride is the third single target EGFR-TKI used in clinical treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Clinical research reports on its efficacy and survival in patients with Recurrent Advanced NSCLC are still little.The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and survival of Icotinib hydrochloride for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer who failed to previous chemotherapy and explore the association of clinical features with the efficacy and survival. Methods The clinical data of 60 NSCLC patients referred to the Beijing Chest Hospital, Capital Medical University from March 2009 to July 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. Results The overall response rate (ORR was 45.0% and the disease control rate (DCR was 80.0%. The median progression-free survival (PFS time was 6.7 months. RR and PFS in female were superior to male (P=0.014, 0.013, respectively. RR, DCR in 2nd-line subgroup were superior to ≥3rd-line subgroup (P=0.020, 0.024, respectively. RR, DCR and PFS in EGFR mutation carriers were significantly superior to wild-type patients (P=0.006, <0.001, 0.002, respectively . There was no statistical difference in RR and PFS between those age <65 and ≥65 or PS<2 and PS≥2. There was no statistical difference in RR and DCR between exon 19 deletion and exon 21 mutations, while the former had much longer PFS (P=0.020. EGFR mutation and exon 19 deletion are the independent prognostic factors to significantly improve the PFS (P=0.009, 0.012, respectively. The side effects were generally mild and consisted of rash and diarrhea. Conclusion Icotinib hydrochloride is effective especially in EGFR mutation carriers and well tolerated in patients with recurrent advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

  19. Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  20. Radiation Therapy, Chemotherapy, and Soy Isoflavones in Treating Patients With Stage IIIA-IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-08

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  1. Constitutive gene expression profile segregates toxicity in locally advanced breast cancer patients treated with high-dose hyperfractionated radical radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer patients show a wide variation in normal tissue reactions after radiotherapy. The individual sensitivity to x-rays limits the efficiency of the therapy. Prediction of individual sensitivity to radiotherapy could help to select the radiation protocol and to improve treatment results. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between gene expression profiles of ex vivo un-irradiated and irradiated lymphocytes and the development of toxicity due to high-dose hyperfractionated radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. Raw data from microarray experiments were uploaded to the Gene Expression Omnibus Database http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/ (GEO accession GSE15341). We obtained a small group of 81 genes significantly regulated by radiotherapy, lumped in 50 relevant pathways. Using ANOVA and t-test statistical tools we found 20 and 26 constitutive genes (0 Gy) that segregate patients with and without acute and late toxicity, respectively. Non-supervised hierarchical clustering was used for the visualization of results. Six and 9 pathways were significantly regulated respectively. Concerning to irradiated lymphocytes (2 Gy), we founded 29 genes that separate patients with acute toxicity and without it. Those genes were gathered in 4 significant pathways. We could not identify a set of genes that segregates patients with and without late toxicity. In conclusion, we have found an association between the constitutive gene expression profile of peripheral blood lymphocytes and the development of acute and late toxicity in consecutive, unselected patients. These observations suggest the possibility of predicting normal tissue response to irradiation in high-dose non-conventional radiation therapy regimens. Prospective studies with higher number of patients are needed to validate these preliminary results

  2. Stress associated gene expression in blood cells is related to outcome in radiotherapy treated head and neck cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bøhn Siv K

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously observed that a radiotherapy-induced biochemical response in plasma was associated with favourable outcome in head and neck squamous carcinoma cancer (HNSCC patients. The aim of the present study was to compare stress associated blood cell gene expression between two sub-groups of HNSCC patients with different biochemical responses to radiotherapy. Methods Out of 87 patients (histologically verified, 10 biochemical ‘responders’ having a high relative increase in plasma oxidative damage and a concomitant decrease in plasma antioxidants during radiotherapy and 10 ‘poor-responders’ were selected for gene-expression analysis and compared using gene set enrichment analysis. Results There was a significant induction of stress-relevant gene-sets in the responders following radiotherapy compared to the poor-responders. The relevance of the involvement of similar stress associated gene expression for HNSCC cancer and radioresistance was verified using two publicly available data sets of 42 HNSCC cases and 14 controls (GEO GSE6791, and radiation resistant and radiation sensitive HNSCC xenografts (E-GEOD-9716. Conclusions Radiotherapy induces a systemic stress response, as revealed by induction of stress relevant gene expression in blood cells, which is associated to favourable outcome in a cohort of 87 HNSCC patients. Whether these changes in gene expression reflects a systemic effect or are biomarkers of the tumour micro-environmental status needs further study. Trial registration Raw data are available at ArrayExpress under accession number E-MEXP-2460.

  3. [A case of an elderly patient with gastric cancer successfully treated with TS-1 considering impaired renal function caused by aging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Tomono; Imamura, Hiroshi; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Kazuyoshi; Miyazaki, Yasuhiro; Ohshiro, Ryouta; Ohta, Katsuya; Nakata, Yasuyuki; Kamigaki, Shunji; Kondo, Motoi; Takemoto, Hiroyoshi; Fujimi, Satoshi; Nakayama, Takahiro; Fukunaga, Mutsumi; Ohsato, Hiroki; Tatsuta, Masayuki

    2006-11-01

    A 75-year-old female patient with impaired renal function caused by aging was treated with TS 1 for gastric cancer with extensive multiple liver metastases. TS-1 contains CDHP, which inhibits DPD activity and maintains a high blood concentration of 5-FU. Because CDHP is excreted from the kidney, a careful TS-1 administration is necessary for patients with impaired renal function considering an occurrence of severe adverse events. Based on the result previously reported by us about pharmacokinetic study and recommended administration dosage of TS-1 for patients with impaired renal function, we administered 50 mg/day of TS-1 for four weeks followed by two weeks rest per one course for this patient. The patient's creatinine clearance calculated by the Cockcroft-Gault method was 38 ml/min, and we reduced the administration dosage in consideration of her impaired renal function, although normal dosage of TS-1 calculated from body surface area for this patient was 100 mg/day. As this patient underwent TS-1 treatment, sizes of multiple liver metastases and the blood concentration level of CEA were gradually reduced, and the reductive rate of the former was more than 90% and the level of the latter fell to a normal range after 12 courses of TS 1 treatment. Through all the treatment courses, relative drug intensity was 100% and the performance status of this patient was kept 0 without any grade 3 or more adverse events under ambulatory treatment. A successful treatment for this patient might indicate that it was important to consider the appropriate reduction of the dosage of TS-1 administration for elderly patients with gastric cancer, because there is a reverse correlation between aging and renal function. To clarify this problem, a multicenter prospective phase II study about TS-1 reductive administration depending on the renal function for elderly patients with gastric cancer (OGSG0404) is ongoing in our clinical study group (OGSG; Osaka Gastrointestinal Chemotherapy

  4. Physical status of human papillomavirus integration in cervical cancer is associated with treatment outcome of the patients treated with radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Jin Shin

    Full Text Available Integration of human papillomavirus (HPV DNA into the host genome is a critical aetiological event in the progression from normal cervix to intraepithelial neoplasm, and finally to invasive cervical cancer. However, there has been little work on how HPV integration status relates to treatment outcome for cervical carcinomas. In the current study, HPV E2 and E6 gene copy numbers were measured in 111 cervical cancer tissues using real-time QPCR. Integration patterns were divided into four groups: single copy-integrated with episomal components (group 1, single copy-integrated without episomal components (group 2, multicopy tandem repetition-integrated (group 3, and low HPV (group 4 groups. A relapse-predicting model was constructed using multivariable Cox proportional hazards model to classify patients into different risk groups for disease-free survival (DFS. The model was internally validated using bootstrap resampling. Oligonucleotide microarray analysis was performed to evaluate gene expression patterns in relation to the different integration groups. DFS rate was inferior in the order of the patients in group 4, group 2/3, and group 1. Multivariate analysis showed that histologic grade, clinical stage group, and integration pattern were significant prognostic factors for poor DFS. The current prognostic model accurately predicted the risk of relapse, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC of 0.74 (bootstrap corrected, 0.71. In conclusion, these data suggest that HPV integration pattern is a potent prognostic factor for tailored treatment of cervical cancer.

  5. The role of the maximum involvement of biopsy core in predicting outcome for patients treated with dose-escalated radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murgic Jure

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate the influence of the maximum involvement of biopsy core (MIBC on outcome for prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT. Methods and materials The outcomes of 590 men with localized prostate cancer treated with EBRT (≥75 Gy at a single institution were retrospectively analyzed. The influence of MIBC on freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF, freedom from metastasis (FFM, cause-specific survival (CSS, and overall survival (OS was compared to other surrogates for biopsy tumor volume, including the percentage of positive biopsy cores (PPC and the total percentage of cancer volume (PCV. Results MIBC correlated with PSA, T-stage, Gleason score, NCCN risk group, PPC, PCV, and treatment related factors. On univariate analysis, MIBC was prognostic for all endpoints except OS; with greatest impact in those with Gleason scores of 8–10. However, on multivariate analysis, MIBC was only prognostic for FFBF (hazard ratio [HR] 1.9, p = 0.008, but not for FFM (p = 0.19, CSS (p = 0.16, and OS (p = 0.99. Conclusions In patients undergoing dose-escalated EBRT, MIBC had the greatest influence in those with Gleason scores of 8–10 but provided no additional prognostic data as compared to PPC and PCV, which remain the preferable prognostic variables in this patient population.

  6. Polymorphisms of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase gene and clinical outcomes of gastric cancer patients treated with fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy in Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiao-ping; LU Zu-hong; TONG Na; ZHANG Zheng-dong; XU Pei-pei; PENG Miao-xin; ZHANG Wen-jing; WANG Shuai; BAI Zhi-bin; CHEN Bao-an; FENG Ji-feng; YAN Feng; JIANG Zhi; ZHONG Yue-jiao; WU Jian-zhong; CHEN Lu

    2012-01-01

    Background Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD),a key enzyme involved in the catabolism of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU),is the attractive candidate for pharmacogenetic research on efficacies and toxicities of 5-FU.The aim of this study is to explore the association between polymorphisms of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase gene (DPYD) and clinical outcomes of gastric cancer patients treated with fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy in the Chinese population.Methods Three hundred and sixty-two patients with gastric cancer in the Chinese population were treated with fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy.The single nucleotide polymorphic genotypes of DPYD were determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) using DNA samples isolated from peripheral blood collected before treatment.Results The average response rate for chemotherapy was 46.7%.A significantly different distribution of the rs1801159 (x2=8.76,P=0.012) genotypes was observed.Homozygous genotype rs1801159A/A was over-represented in responsive patients.Conversely,carriers of the rs1801159A/G genotype were prevalent in non-responsive patients.In the haplotype association analysis,there was significant difference in global haplotype distribution between the groups (x2=3.96,P=0.0465).Conclusions These results suggest that polymorphisms of rs1801159 in DPYD may be used as valuable predictors of the response to fluorouracil-based chemotherapy for gastric cancer patients in the Chinese population.Well-designed,comprehensive,and prospective studies on determining these polymorphisms of DPYD as predictive markers for gastric cancer in response to fluorouracil-based therapies are warranted.

  7. Long-term Survival and Toxicity in Patients Treated With High-Dose Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spratt, Daniel E.; Pei, Xin; Yamada, Josh; Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Cox, Brett [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Zelefsky, Michael J., E-mail: zelefskm@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To report long-term survival and toxicity outcomes with the use of high-dose intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to 86.4 Gy for patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between August 1997 and December 2008, 1002 patients were treated to a dose of 86.4 Gy using a 5-7 field IMRT technique. Patients were stratified by prognostic risk group based on National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk classification criteria. A total of 587 patients (59%) were treated with neoadjuvant and concurrent androgen deprivation therapy. The median follow-up for the entire cohort was 5.5 years (range, 1-14 years). Results: For low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups, 7-year biochemical relapse-free survival outcomes were 98.8%, 85.6%, and 67.9%, respectively (P<.001), and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 99.4%, 94.1%, and 82.0% (P<.001), respectively. On multivariate analysis, T stage (P<.001), Gleason score (P<.001), and >50% of initial biopsy positive core (P=.001) were predictive for distant mestastases. No prostate cancer-related deaths were observed in the low-risk group. The 7-year prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) rates, using competing risk analysis for intermediate- and high-risk groups, were 3.3% and 8.1%, respectively (P=.008). On multivariate analysis, Gleason score (P=.004), percentage of biopsy core positivity (P=.003), and T-stage (P=.033) were predictive for PCSM. Actuarial 7-year grade 2 or higher late gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicities were 4.4% and 21.1%, respectively. Late grade 3 gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity was experienced by 7 patients (0.7%) and 22 patients (2.2%), respectively. Of the 427 men with full potency at baseline, 317 men (74%) retained sexual function at time of last follow-up. Conclusions: This study represents the largest cohort of patients treated with high-dose radiation to 86.4 Gy, using IMRT for localized prostate cancer, with the longest follow-up to date

  8. Transition probabilities of HER2-positive and HER2-negative breast cancer patients treated with Trastuzumab obtained from a clinical cancer registry dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pobiruchin, Monika; Bochum, Sylvia; Martens, Uwe M; Kieser, Meinhard; Schramm, Wendelin

    2016-06-01

    Records of female breast cancer patients were selected from a clinical cancer registry and separated into three cohorts according to HER2-status (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) and treatment with or without Trastuzumab (a humanized monoclonal antibody). Propensity score matching was used to balance the cohorts. Afterwards, documented information about disease events (recurrence of cancer, metastases, remission of local/regional recurrences, remission of metastases and death) found in the dataset was leveraged to calculate the annual transition probabilities for every cohort. PMID:27054173

  9. Prognostic factors for disease-free survival in patients with T-4 or N+ rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiation therapy, surgery, and intraoperative irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Fluoropyrimidine-radiosensitizing agents in conjunction with preoperative radiotherapy have proven to induce tumor and nodal downstaging effects, sphincter preservation promotion, and mid-term favorable survival rates. Intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy may improve pelvic control in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer stages. Potential predictive factors for response and disease-free survival, with intense local multidisciplinary approach, are analyzed. Methods and Materials: One hundred fifteen patients with rectal cancer were treated with oral 5-fluorouracil or Tegafur with preoperative radiotherapy, surgery, and intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy to identify potential pre- and on-treatment characteristics that might be of prognostic value for disease outcome. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Results: Older patients and those treated with Tegafur were more likely to achieve a major histologic response, categorized as persistence of minimal residual microscopic disease foci in the surgical specimen ('mic' response). Factors unfavorably associated with disease-free survival in the multivariate model were male gender and persistence of macroscopic disease in the rectal wall ('mac' response). Accordingly, 3-year disease-free survival rates in the groups of patients with 0, 1, or 2 of these risk factors were 100%, 81%, and 53%, respectively (p mic residue) to preoperative chemoradiotherapy have an excellent 3-year disease-free survival. This information might be of interest for stratification of patients in the development of adjuvant treatment trials

  10. Venous thromboembolism in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Fuat Eren

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism (VTE is a major complication of cancer and represents an important cause of morbidity and mortality. The incidence of VTE is 0.6-7.8% in patients with cancer more than double the incidence of VTE in patients without cancer. The risk of VTE which includes deep venous thrombosis (DVT and pulmonary embolism (PE is increased two to seven fold in patients with cancer. VTE risk is especially high among certain groups such as hospitalized patients with cancer and those receiving active antineoplastic therapy. Also cancer patients, who undergoing major surgery, are increased risk of VTE. Trauma, long-haul travel, increased age, obesity, previous VTE and genetic component are also predisposing factors for VTE. Patients with cancer who develop VTE should be managed multidisciplinary treatment guidelines. The primary goal of thromboprophylaxis in patients with cancer is to prevent VTE. The large majority of cancer patients should be treated with therapeutic doses of unfractioned heparin (UFH or low molecular weight heparin (LMWH. Prophylaxis should include cancer patients who underwent major surgery for cancer and patients with a history of VTE.

  11. Irradiation of the tumor bed alone after lumpectomy in selected patients with early stage breast cancer treated with breast conserving therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We present the initial findings of our in-house protocol treating the tumor bed alone after lumpectomy with low dose rate (LDR) interstitial brachytherapy in selected patients with early stage breast cancer treated with breast conserving therapy (BCT). Materials and Methods: Since 1/1/93, 50 women with early stage breast cancer were entered into a protocol of tumor bed irradiation alone using an interstitial LDR implant. Patients were eligible if their tumor was an infiltrating ductal carcinoma ≤ 3 cm in maximum diameter, pathologic margins were clear by at least 2 mm, the tumor did not contain an extensive intraductal component, the axilla was surgically staged with ≤ 3 nodes involved with cancer, and a postoperative mammogram was performed. Implants were positioned using a template guide delivering 50 Gy over 96 hours to the lumpectomy bed plus a 1-2 cm margin. Local control, cosmetic outcome, and complications were assessed. Results: Patients ranged in age from 40 to 84 years (median 65). The median tumor size was 10 mm (range, 1-25). Seventeen patients (34%) had well differentiated tumors, 22 (4%) had moderately differentiated tumors, and in 11 (22%) the tumor was poorly differentiated. Forty-five patients (90%) were node negative while 5 (10%) had 1-3 positive nodes. A total of 23 (46%) patients were placed on tamoxifen and 3 (6%) received adjuvant systemic chemotherapy. No patient was lost to follow-up. The median follow-up is 40 months (range 29-50). No patient has experienced a local, regional, or distant failure. One patient died from colorectal carcinoma with no evidence of recurrent breast cancer. Good-to-excellent cosmetic results have been observed in all 50 patients (median cosmetic follow-up 36 months). No patient has experienced significant sequelae related to their implant. Conclusions: Early results with treatment of the tumor bed alone with a LDR interstitial implant appear promising. Long-term follow-up of these patients will be

  12. Cryotherapy in Treating Patients With Lung Cancer That Has Spread to the Other Lung or Parts of the Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    Advanced Malignant Mesothelioma; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Lung Metastases; Recurrent Malignant Mesothelioma; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  13. A technique to re-establish dose distributions for previously treated brain cancer patients in external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor recurrences or new tumors may develop after irradiation of local lesion(s) in the brain, and additional radiotherapy treatments are often needed for previously treated patients. It is critical to re-establish the dose distributions delivered during the previous treatment in the current patient geometry, so that the previous dose distributions can be accurately taken into consideration in the design of the current treatment plan. The difficulty in re-establishing the previous treatment dose distributions in the current patient geometry arises from the fact that the patient position at the time of reirradiation is different from that at the previous treatment session. Simple re-entry of the previous isocenter coordinates, gantry, and couch and collimator angles into the new treatment plan would result in incorrect beam orientations relative to the new patient anatomy, and therefore incorrect display of the previous dose distributions on the current patient anatomy. To address this issue, a method has been developed so that the previous dose distributions can be accurately re-established in the framework of the current brain treatment. The method involves 3 matrix transformations: (1) transformation of beams from machine coordinate system to patient coordinate system in the previous treatment; (2) transformation of beams from patient coordinate system in the previous treatment to patient coordinate system in the current treatment; and (3) transformation of beams from patient coordinate system in the current treatment to machine coordinate system. The transformation matrices used in the second transformation are determined by registration using a mutual information-based algorithm with which the old and new computed tomography (CT) scan sets are registered automatically without human interpretation. A series of transformation matrices are derived to calculate the isocenter coordinates, the gantry, couch, and collimator angles of the beams for the previous

  14. Irinotecan-Eluting Beads in Treating Patients With Refractory Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer That Has Spread to the Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-22

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  15. Patients with brain metastases from gastrointestinal tract cancer treated with whole brain radiation therapy:Prognostic factors and survival

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Susanne Bartelt; Felix Momm; Christian Weissenberger; Johannes Lutterbach

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To identify the prognostic factors with regard to survival for patients with brain metastasis from primary tumors of the gastrointestinal tract.METHODS: Nine hundred and sixteen patients with brain metastases, treated with whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) between January 1985 and December 2000 at the Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Freiburg, were analyzed retrospectively.RESULTS: Fifty-seven patients presented with a primary tumor of the gastrointestinal tract (esophagus: n = 0, stomach:n = 10, colorectal: n = 47). Twenty-six patients had a solitary brain metastasis, 31 patients presented with multiple brain metastases. Surgical resection was performed in 25 patients.WBRTwas applied with daily fractions of 2 Gray (Gy) or 3 Gy to a total dose of 50 Gy or 30 Gy, respectively. The interval between diagnoses of the primary tumors and brain metastases was 22.6 mo vs8.0 mo for patients with primary tumors of the colon/rectum vs other primary tumors,respectively (P<0.01, log-rank). Median overall survival for all patients with brain metastases (n = 916) was 3.4 mo and 3.2 mo for patients with gastrointestinal neoplasms.Patients with gastrointestinal primary tumors presented significantly more often with a solitary brain metastasis than patients with other primary tumors (P<0.05, log-rank). In patients with gastrointestinal neoplasms (n = 57), the median overall survival was 5.8 mo for patients with solitary brain metastasis vs 2.7 mo for patients with multiple brain metastases (P<0.01, log-rank). The median overall survival for patients with a Karnofsky performance status (KPS) ≥70was 5.5 mo vs2.1 mo for patients with KPS <70 (P<0.01,log-rank). At multivariate analysis (Cox Model) the performance status and the number of brain metastases were identified as independent prognostic factors for overall survival.CONCLUSION: Brain metastases occur late in the course of gastrointestinal tumors. Pretherapeutic variables like KPS and the

  16. Metformin Hydrochloride and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-18

    Brenner Tumor; Malignant Ascites; Malignant Pleural Effusion; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  17. The Significance of Tumoral ERCC1 Status in Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy: A Multicenter Clinicopathologic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doll, Corinne M., E-mail: Corinne.Doll@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada); Aquino-Parsons, Christina [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Pintilie, Melania [Department of Biostatistics, Ontario Cancer Institute/Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Klimowicz, Alexander C. [Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada); Petrillo, Stephanie K. [Department of Pathology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada); Milosevic, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Craighead, Peter S. [Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada); Clarke, Blaise [Department of Pathology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Lees-Miller, Susan P. [Departments of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada); Fyles, Anthony W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Magliocco, Anthony M. [Department of Pathology, Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: ERCC1 (excision repair cross-complementation group 1) expression has been shown to be a molecular marker of cisplatin resistance in many tumor sites, but has not been well studied in cervical cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to measure tumoral ERCC1 in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in a large multicenter cohort, and to correlate expression with clinical outcome parameters. Methods and Materials: A total of 264 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, treated with curative-intent radical CRT from 3 major Canadian cancer centers were evaluated. Pretreatment formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor specimens were retrieved, and tissue microarrays were constructed. Tumoral ERCC1 (FL297 antibody) was measured using AQUA (R) technology. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the significance of clinical factors and ERCC1 status with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) at 5 years. Results: The majority of patients had International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage II disease (n=119, 45%); median tumor size was 5 cm. OS was associated with tumor size (HR 1.16, P=.018), pretreatment hemoglobin status (HR 2.33, P=.00027), and FIGO stage. In addition, tumoral ERCC1 status (nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio) was associated with PFS (HR 2.33 [1.05-5.18], P=.038) and OS (HR 3.13 [1.27-7.71], P=.013). ERCC1 status was not significant on multivariate analysis when the model was adjusted for the clinical factors: for PFS (HR 1.49 [0.61-3.6], P=.38); for OS (HR 2.42 [0.94-6.24] P=.067). Conclusions: In this large multicenter cohort of locally advanced cervical cancer patients treated with radical CRT, stage, tumor size, and pretreatment hemoglobin status were significantly associated with PFS and OS. ERCC1 status appears to have prognostic impact on univariate analysis in these patients, but was not independently associated with outcome on

  18. Patterns and Risk Factors of Locoregional Recurrence in T1-T2 Node Negative Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Mastectomy: Implications for Postmastectomy Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) can reduce locoregional recurrences (LRR) in high-risk patients, but its role in the treatment of lymph node negative (LN-) breast cancer remains unclear. The aim of this study was to identify a subgroup of T1-T2 breast cancer patients with LN- who might benefit from PMRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 1,136 node-negative T1-T2 breast cancer cases treated with mastectomy without PMRT at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 1980 and 2004. We estimated cumulative incidence rates for LRR overall and in specific subgroups, and used Cox proportional hazards models to identify potential risk factors. Results: Median follow-up was 9 years. The 10-year cumulative incidence of LRR was 5.2% (95% CI: 3.9-6.7%). Chest wall was the most common (73%) site of LRR. Tumor size, margin, patient age, systemic therapy, and lymphovascular invasion (LVI) were significantly associated with LRR on multivariate analysis. These five variables were subsequently used as risk factors for stratified analysis. The 10-year cumulative incidence of LRR for patients with no risk factors was 2.0% (95% CI: 0.5-5.2%), whereas the incidence for patients with three or more risk factors was 19.7% (95% CI: 12.2-28.6%). Conclusion: It has been suggested that patients with T1-T2N0 breast cancer who undergo mastectomy represent a favorable group for which PMRT renders little benefit. However, this study suggests that select patients with multiple risk factors including LVI, tumor size ≥2 cm, close or positive margin, age ≤50, and no systemic therapy are at higher risk of LRR and may benefit from PMRT.

  19. High resolution computed tomography findings on the lung of early breast-cancer patients treated by postoperative breast irradiation with a hypofractionated radiotherapy schedule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plataniotis G

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Hypofractionated breast radiotherapy (RT, although convenient for patients and health care systems, could have a negative impact on normal tissues such as lung. Aims: To evaluate radiation-induced lung toxicity in early breast-cancer patients treated by hypofractionated RT. Settings and Design: We have been using the 42.5 Gy/16 fractions RT schedule since May 2003. As large fraction size is related to increased normal tissue toxicity we intended to investigate the possible radiation-induced lung toxicity to these patients, by performing high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT 6 months after the completion of the treatment. Methods and Material: A group of 30 consecutive early breast cancer patients (T1-2N0M0 have been treated by the above-mentioned RT schedule, using a pair of opposing tangential fields. The impact of chemotherapy and hormonotherapy and various breast size-related parameters on HRCT lung changes were investigated. Acute skin and breast tissue reactions were also recorded. Statistical analysis: used Correlation of numerical variables was investigated by Pearson correlation coefficient. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate correlation between HRCT findings (present vs absent with other variables. Results: Minimal HRCT findings were evident in 15/30 patients. These included small septal lines, linear and subpleural opacities and to a lesser extend, focal-ground glass opacification. The HRCT findings were positively correlated only to field separation (distance between the entrance points of the tangential beams on the breast (H.R.=1.33, 95% CI: 1.013-1.75. Conclusions: The short 16-fraction RT schedule for early breast-cancer patients appears to have a minor effect on the underlying lung parenchyma.

  20. Prognostic Importance of Gleason 7 Disease Among Patients Treated With External Beam Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Results of a Detailed Biopsy Core Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spratt, Daniel E.; Zumsteg, Zach; Ghadjar, Pirus; Pangasa, Misha; Pei, Xin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Fine, Samson W. [Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yamada, Yoshiya; Kollmeier, Marisa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Zelefsky, Michael J., E-mail: zelefskm@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of primary Gleason (pG) grade among a large cohort of Gleason 7 prostate cancer patients treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: From May 1989 to January 2011, 1190 Gleason 7 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with EBRT at a single institution. Of these patients, 613 had a Gleason 7 with a minimum of a sextant biopsy with nonfragmented cores and full biopsy core details available, including number of cores of cancer involved, percentage individual core involvement, location of disease, bilaterality, and presence of perineural invasion. Median follow-up was 6 years (range, 1-16 years). The prognostic implication for the following outcomes was analyzed: biochemical recurrence-free survival (bRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). Results: The 8-year bRFS rate for pG3 versus pG4 was 77.6% versus 61.3% (P<.0001), DMFS was 96.8% versus 84.3% (P<.0001), and PCSM was 3.7% versus 8.1% (P=.002). On multivariate analysis, pG4 predicted for significantly worse outcome in all parameters. Location of disease (apex, base, mid-gland), perineural involvement, maximum individual core involvement, and the number of Gleason 3+3, 3+4, or 4+3 cores did not predict for distant metastases. Conclusions: Primary Gleason grade 4 independently predicts for worse bRFS, DMFS, and PCSM among Gleason 7 patients. Using complete core information can allow clinicians to utilize pG grade as a prognostic factor, despite not having the full pathologic details from a prostatectomy specimen. Future staging and risk grouping should investigate the incorporation of primary Gleason grade when complete biopsy core information is used.

  1. Evaluation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor as a Prognostic Marker for Local Relapse in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, Meena S., E-mail: meena.moran@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Yang Qifeng [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Robert Wood Johnson School of Medicine and the Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Department of Breast Surgery, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, People' s Republic of China (China); Goyal, Sharad [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Robert Wood Johnson School of Medicine and the Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Harris, Lyndsay; Chung, Gina [Department of Medical Oncology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Robert Wood Johnson School of Medicine and the Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an important protein involved in the process of angiogenesis that has been found to correlate with relapse-free and overall survival in breast cancer, predominantly in locally advanced and metastatic disease. A paucity of data is available on the prognostic implications of VEGF in early-stage breast cancer; specifically, its prognostic value for local relapse after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) is largely unknown. The purpose of our study was to assess VEGF expression in a cohort of early-stage breast cancer patients treated with BCT and to correlate the clinical and pathologic features and outcomes with overexpression of VEGF. Methods and Materials: After obtaining institutional review board approval, the paraffin specimens of 368 patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with BCT between 1975 and 2005 were constructed into tissue microarrays with twofold redundancy. The tissue microarrays were stained for VEGF and read by a trained pathologist, who was unaware of the clinical details, as positive or negative according the standard guidelines. The clinical and pathologic data, long-term outcomes, and results of VEGF staining were analyzed. Results: The median follow-up for the entire cohort was 6.5 years. VEGF expression was positive in 56 (15%) of the 368 patients. Although VEGF expression did not correlate with age at diagnosis, tumor size, nodal status, histologic type, family history, estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor status, or HER-2 status, a trend was seen toward increased VEGF expression in the black cohort (26% black vs. 13% white, p = .068). Within the margin-negative cohort, VEGF did not predict for local relapse-free survival (RFS) (96% vs. 95%), nodal RFS (100% vs. 100%), distant metastasis-free survival (91% vs. 92%), overall survival (92% vs. 97%), respectively (all p >.05). Subset analysis revealed that VEGF was highly predictive of local RFS in node-positive, margin

  2. Locoregional Outcomes of Inflammatory Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Standard Fractionation Radiation and Daily Skin Bolus in the Taxane Era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess locoregional outcomes of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) patients who received standard fractionation radiation with daily skin bolus and taxanes as part of combined-modality therapy (CMT). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 107 patients diagnosed with IBC between January 1995 and March 2006 who presented to our department for adjuvant radiation therapy (RT). Results: All patients received chemotherapy (95% anthracycline and 95% taxane), modified radical mastectomy, and RT to the chest wall and regional lymphatics using standard fractionation to 50 Gy and daily skin bolus. The RT to the chest wall was delivered via electrons (55%) or photons (45%) in daily fractions of 180 cGy (73%) or 200 cGy (27%). Scar boost was performed in 11%. A majority (84%) of patients completed the prescribed treatment. Median follow-up was 47 months (range, 10-134 months). Locoregional control (LRC) at 3 years and 5 years was 90% and 87%, respectively. Distant metastases-free survival (DMFS) at 3 years and 5 years was 61% and 47%, respectively. Conclusions: Excellent locoregional control was observed in this population of IBC patients who received standard fractionation radiation with daily skin bolus and taxanes as part of combined-modality therapy. Distant metastases-free survival remains a significant therapeutic challenge.

  3. Bone fractures among postmenopausal patients with endocrine-responsive early breast cancer treated with 5 years of letrozole or tamoxifen in the BIG 1-98 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabaglio, M; Sun, Z; Price, K N;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To compare the incidence and timing of bone fractures in postmenopausal women treated with 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen or letrozole for endocrine-responsive early breast cancer in the Breast International Group (BIG) 1-98 trial. METHODS: We evaluated 4895 patients allocated to 5 years...... of letrozole or tamoxifen in the BIG 1-98 trial who received at least some study medication (median follow-up 60.3 months). Bone fracture information (grade, cause, site) was collected every 6 months during trial treatment. RESULTS: The incidence of bone fractures was higher among patients treated...... with letrozole [228 of 2448 women (9.3%)] versus tamoxifen [160 of 2447 women (6.5%)]. The wrist was the most common site of fracture in both treatment groups. Statistically significant risk factors for bone fractures during treatment included age, smoking history, osteoporosis at baseline, previous bone...

  4. Predictive value of skin invasion in recurrent head and neck cancer patients treated by hypofractionated stereotactic re-irradiation using a cyberknife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aimed to elucidate the influence of skin invasion in patients with recurrent head and neck cancer treated with re-irradiation using stereotactic radiotherapy. We reviewed 104 patients treated using CyberKnife in four institutions. Nine cases of skin invasion were recognized (8.6 %). Larger tumors tended to exhibit skin invasion. The skin invasion (+) group showed a lower response rate (0/9, 0 %) than the skin invasion (−) group (56/95, 59 %) (p = 0.002). The skin invasion (+) group showed lower local control (LC) and progression free survival (PFS) rates, both 0 % at 6 months, than the skin invasion (−) group, which had a LC of 69 % (p = 0.0001) and a PFS of 48 % at 1 year (p = 0.0157). Median survival time and one-year survival rates for the skin invasion (+) and (−) groups were 6.6 vs. 15.3 months and 14 % vs. 59 % (p = 0.0005), respectively. No patient with skin invasion survived more than 14.4 months. The percentage of patients who developed grade 3 or higher toxicity was 44 % in the skin invasion (+) group and 18 % in the skin invasion (−) group (p = 0.14). Skin invasion is an important predictor of poor prognosis in recurrent head and neck cancer after re-irradiation with stereotactic radiation therapy

  5. Analysis of dose-volume parameters predicting radiation pneumonitis in patients with esophageal cancer treated with 3D-conformal radiation therapy or IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multimodality therapy for esophageal cancer can cause various kinds of treatment-related sequelae, especially pulmonary toxicities. This prospective study aims to investigate the clinical and dosimetric parameters predicting lung injury in patients undergoing radiation therapy for esophageal cancer. Forty-five esophageal cancer patients were prospectively analyzed. The pulmonary toxicities (or sequelae) were evaluated by comparing chest X-ray films, pulmonary function tests and symptoms caused by pulmonary damage before and after treatment. All patients were treated with either three-dimensional radiotherapy (3DCRT) or with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The planning dose volume histogram was used to compute the lung volumes receiving more than 5, 10, 20 and 30 Gy (V5, V10, V20, V30) and mean lung dose. V20 was larger in the IMRT group than in the 3DCRT group (p=0.002). V20 (>15%) and V30 (>20%) resulted in a statistically significant increase in the occurrence of chronic pneumonitis (p=0.03) and acute pneumonitis (p=0.007), respectively. The study signifies that a larger volume of lung receives lower doses because of multiple beam arrangement and a smaller volume of lung receives higher doses because of better dose conformity in IMRT plans. Acute pneumonitis correlates more with V30 values, whereas chronic pneumonitis was predominantly seen in patients with higher V20 values. (author)

  6. Sirolimus and Gold Sodium Thiomalate in Treating Patients With Advanced Squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  7. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Triapine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer or Stage II-IVA Vaginal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-25

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Vaginal Adenocarcinoma; Vaginal Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Vaginal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  8. Predictive Immunohistochemical Markers Related to Drug Selection for Patients Treated with Sunitinib or Sorafenib for Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin; Wang, Lei; Li, Hongzhao; Zhang, Yu; Gao, Yu; Guo, Gang; Liu, Kan; Meng, Qingyu; Zhao, Chaofei; Wang, Dianjun; Song, Zhigang; Zhang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Targeted drug decisions in metastatic renal cell carcinoma are exclusively made on the basis of clinical criteria. We investigated whether these biomarkers (HIF-1α, HIF-2α, CAIX, VEGF, VEGFR1, VEGFR2, VEGFR3, PDGFB, PDGFRA, PDGFRB, CD31, CD44, bcl-xL, KIT, p21, CXCR4, PTEN, (CSF)-1R, RET, and FLT-3) can predictive the different effects between sunitinib and sorafenib treatments and are available to guide targeted drug selection. We enrolled all patients who underwent nephrectomy with postoperative sunitinib- or sorafenib-treatment at our institution from 2007 to 2012. Immunohistochemical approach was applied to assess the potential differential effects of immunostainings between sunitinib- and sorafenib-treated groups. We found that patients with high HIF-2α, CD31 expression showed greater relative PFS and OS benefit and patients with high CAIX expression presented greater relative OS benefit from sunitinib than from sorafenib, patients with high VEGFR1 or PDGFRB expression levels exhibited worse relative PFS benefit from sunitinib than from sorafenib. Namely high HIF-2α, CD31, and CAIX expression levels along with low VEGFR1 and PDGFRB expression levels improved the benefit of sunitinib treatment compared with sorafenib treatment. These results can identify whether patients can benefit more from sunitinib or sorafenib for drug selection guidance, eventually with precision medicine. PMID:27488093

  9. A primary care, multi-disciplinary disease management program for opioid-treated patients with chronic non-cancer pain and a high burden of psychiatric comorbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malone Robert M

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic non-cancer pain is a common problem that is often accompanied by psychiatric comorbidity and disability. The effectiveness of a multi-disciplinary pain management program was tested in a 3 month before and after trial. Methods Providers in an academic general medicine clinic referred patients with chronic non-cancer pain for participation in a program that combined the skills of internists, clinical pharmacists, and a psychiatrist. Patients were either receiving opioids or being considered for opioid therapy. The intervention consisted of structured clinical assessments, monthly follow-up, pain contracts, medication titration, and psychiatric consultation. Pain, mood, and function were assessed at baseline and 3 months using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI, the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale scale (CESD and the Pain Disability Index (PDI. Patients were monitored for substance misuse. Results Eighty-five patients were enrolled. Mean age was 51 years, 60% were male, 78% were Caucasian, and 93% were receiving opioids. Baseline average pain was 6.5 on an 11 point scale. The average CESD score was 24.0, and the mean PDI score was 47.0. Sixty-three patients (73% completed 3 month follow-up. Fifteen withdrew from the program after identification of substance misuse. Among those completing 3 month follow-up, the average pain score improved to 5.5 (p = 0.003. The mean PDI score improved to 39.3 (p Conclusions A primary care disease management program improved pain, depression, and disability scores over three months in a cohort of opioid-treated patients with chronic non-cancer pain. Substance misuse and depression were common, and many patients who had substance misuse identified left the program when they were no longer prescribed opioids. Effective care of patients with chronic pain should include rigorous assessment and treatment of these comorbid disorders and intensive efforts to insure follow up.

  10. Association of GWAS-identified lung cancer susceptibility loci with survival length in patients with small-cell lung cancer treated with platinum-based chemotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Li

    Full Text Available Genetic variants have been shown to affect length of survival in cancer patients. This study explored the association between lung cancer susceptibility loci tagged by single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs identified in the genome-wide association studies and length of survival in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC. Eighteen SNPs were genotyped among 874 SCLC patients and Cox proportional hazards regression was used to examine the effects of genotype on survival length under an additive model with age, sex, smoking status and clinical stage as covariates. We identified 3 loci, 20q13.2 (rs4809957G >A, 22q12.2 (rs36600C >T and 5p15.33 (rs401681C >T, significantly associated with the survival time of SCLC patients. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR for patients with the rs4809957 GA or AA genotype was 0.80 (95% CI, 0.66-0.96; P = 0.0187 and 0.73 (95% CI, 0.55-0.96; P = 0.0263 compared with the GG genotype. Using the dominant model, the adjusted HR for patients carrying at least one T allele at rs36600 or rs401681 was 0.78 (95% CI, 0.63-0.96; P = 0.0199 and 1.29 (95% CI, 1.08-1.55; P = 0.0047, respectively, compared with the CC genotype. Stratification analyses showed that the significant associations of these 3 loci were only seen in smokers and male patients. The rs4809957 SNP was only significantly associated with length of survival of patients with extensive-stage but not limited-stage tumor. These results suggest that some of the lung cancer susceptibility loci might also affect the prognosis of SCLC.

  11. Lapatinib plus capecitabine in treating HER2-positive advanced breast cancer: efficacy, safety, and biomarker results from Chinese patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing-He Xu; Beth Newstat; Alka Preston; Anne-Marie Martin; Hai-Dong Chi; Li Wang; Ze-Fei Jiang; Daniel Chua; Zhi-Min Shao; Rong-Cheng Luo; Xiao-Jia Wang; Dong-Geng Liu; Winnie Yeo; Shi-Ying Yu

    2011-01-01

    Overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) in metastatic breast cancer (MBC) is associated with poor prognosis. This single-arm open-label trial (EGF109491; NCT00508274) was designed to confirm the efficacy and safety of lapatinib in combination with capecitabine in 52 heavily pretreated Chinese patients with HER2-positive MBC. The primary endpoint was clinical benefit rate (CBR). Secondary endpoints included progression-free survival (PFS), time to response (TTR), duration of response (DoR), central nervous system (CNS) as first site of relapse, and safety. The results showed that there were 23 patients with partial responses and 7 patients with stable disease, resulting in a CBR of 57.7%. The median PFS was 6.34 months (95% confidence interval, 4.93-9.82 months). The median TTR and DoR were 4.07 months (range, 0.03-14.78 months) and 6.93 months (range, 1.45-9.72 months), respectively. Thirteen (25.0%) patients had new lesions as disease progression. Among them, 2 (3.8%) patients had CNS disease reported as the first relapse. The most common toxicities were palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia (59.6%), diarrhea (48.1%), rash (48.1%), hyperbilirubinemia (34.6%), and fatigue (30.8%). Exploratory analyses of oncogenic mutations of PIK3CA suggested that of 38 patients providing a tumor sample, baseline PIK3CA mutation status was not associated with CBR (P = 0.639) or PFS (P = 0.989). These data confirm that the lapatinib plus capecitabine combination is an effective and well-tolerated treatment option for Chinese women with heavily pretreated MBC, irrespective of PIK3CA status.

  12. Psychodynamic Psychotherapy for Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Straker, Norman

    1998-01-01

    Psychodynamic psychotherapy is effective as an approach to understanding the psychological conflicts and the psychiatric symptoms of cancer patients as well as to planning useful psychological interventions. The author recommends that the psychotherapist who treats cancer patients be familiar with the following: 1) the natural course and treatment of the illness, 2) a flexible approach in accord with the medical status of the patient, 3) a common sense approach to defenses, 4) a concern with ...

  13. AGXT and ERCC2 polymorphisms are associated with clinical outcome in metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with 5-FU/oxaliplatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjersem, J B; Thomsen, M; Guren, T;

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate whether specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with influence on drug transport, biotransformation and repair mechanisms are associated with treatment outcome and toxicity in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We genotyped blood samples fro...... as markers of clinical outcome in oxaliplatin-treated mCRC patients. If validated in other studies, they could improve the selection of therapy in mCRC.The Pharmacogenomics Journal advance online publication, 11 August 2015; doi:10.1038/tpj.2015.54....

  14. Pathologic tumor size and lymph node status predict for different rates of locoregional recurrence after mastectomy for breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant versus adjuvant chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare the pathologic factors associated with postmastectomy locoregional recurrence (LRR) in breast cancer patients not receiving radiation who were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NEO) vs. adjuvant chemotherapy (ADJ). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the rates of LRR of subsets of women treated in prospective trials who underwent mastectomy and received chemotherapy but not radiation. These trials were designed to answer chemotherapy questions. There were 150 patients in the NEO group and 1031 patients in the ADJ group. In the NEO group, 55% had clinical Stage IIIA or higher vs. 9% in the ADJ group (p5 cm (46% vs. 28%, p=0.028). The risk of LRR by the number of +LNs was similar in the NEO and ADJ groups, except for the subset of patients with ≥4 +LNs (53% vs. 23%, p5 cm, or clinical Stage IIIA or greater disease, regardless of whether they receive neoadjuvant or postoperative chemotherapy. The information assessing LRR rates in patients with clinical Stage II disease who receive neoadjuvant chemotherapy, particularly if 1-3 lymph nodes remain pathologically involved, is insufficient to determine whether these patients should receive radiotherapy

  15. Effect of Amifostine on Locally Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated with Radiotherapy: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengye WANG

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Controversy exists on whether amifostine can reduce the efficacy and decrease the side effects of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC treated by radiotherapy. The aim of this meta-analysis is to evaluate the efficacy and side effects of amifostine in NSCLC patients treated with radiotherapy. Methods Open published randomized controlled trials on the efficacy and side effects of amifostine in NSCLC patients treated with radiotherapy were collected from Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBSE, CBM, CNKI, WANFANG, American Society of Clinical Oncology, and European Society of Medical Oncology databases. The pooled efficacy and side effects of amifostine in these patients were calculated using the statistics software Stata 11.0. Results Nine trials that included 769 (381 and 388 in each arm patients were analyzed. The pooled relative risk of complete, partial, and objective responses were 1.16 (95%CI: 0.90-1.50, Z=1.07, P=0.29, 1.02 (95%CI: 0.87-1.19, Z=0.21, P=0.83 and 1.06 (95%CI: 0.97-1.17, Z=1.31, P=0.20, respectively. The side effects in seven trials including 738 (367 and 371 in each arm patients were analyzed. The pooled relative risk of developing grades 3 to 4 esophagitis and pneumonitis were 0.51 (95%CI: 0.37-0.72, Z=3.88, P<0.001 and 0.51 (95%CI: 0.26-0.99, Z=1.98, P=0.04, respectively. Conclusion Amifostine can significantly decrease the risk of developing serious esophagitis and pneumonitis without reducing the response rate in NSCLC patients treated by radiotherapy.

  16. Role of Adjuvant Chemotherapy in ypT0-2N0 Patients Treated with Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy and Radical Resection for Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, In Ja [Department of Colon and Rectal Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine and Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Yong [Center for Colorectal Cancer, National Cancer Center, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee Cheol [Department of Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Nam Kyu [Section of Colon and Rectal Surgery, Department of Surgery, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyeong-Rok [Department of Surgery, Chonnam National University Hwansun Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Sung-Bum [Department of Surgery, Seoul National University Bungdang Hospital, Bundang (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Gyu-Seog [Division of Colorectal Cancer Center, Kyungpook National University Medical Center, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kang Young [Department of Surgery, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seon-Hahn [Department of Surgery, Korea University Anam Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Seung Taek [Department of Surgery, Seoul St. Mary Hospital, Catholic University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Jin Cheon [Department of Colon and Rectal Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine and Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sun Young [Center for Colorectal Cancer, National Cancer Center, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Woo Yong [Department of Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Bok [Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Ulsan College of Medicine and Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Chang Sik, E-mail: csyu@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Colon and Rectal Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine and Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-01

    Objective: To explore the role of adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with ypT0-2N0 rectal cancer treated by preoperative chemoradiation therapy (PCRT) and radical resection. Patients and Methods: A national consortium of 10 institutions was formed, and patients with ypT0-2N0 mid- and low-rectal cancer after PCRT and radical resection from 2004 to 2009 were included. Patients were categorized into 2 groups according to receipt of additional adjuvant chemotherapy: Adj CTx (+) versus Adj CTx (−). Propensity scores were calculated and used to perform matched and adjusted analyses comparing relapse-free survival (RFS) between treatment groups while controlling for potential confounding. Results: A total of 1016 patients, who met the selection criteria, were evaluated. Of these, 106 (10.4%) did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. There was no overall improvement in 5-year RFS as a result of adjuvant chemotherapy [91.6% for Adj CTx (+) vs 87.5% for Adj CTx (−), P=.18]. There were no differences in 5-year local recurrence and distant metastasis rate between the 2 groups. In patients who show moderate, minimal, or no regression in tumor regression grade, however, possible association of adjuvant chemotherapy with RFS would be considered (hazard ratio 0.35; 95% confidence interval 0.14-0.88; P=.03). Cox regression analysis after propensity score matching failed to show that addition of adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with improved RFS (hazard ratio 0.81; 95% confidence interval 0.39-1.70; P=.58). Conclusions: Adjuvant chemotherapy seemed to not influence the RFS of patients with ypT0-2N0 rectal cancer after PCRT followed by radical resection. Thus, the addition of adjuvant chemotherapy needs to be weighed against its oncologic benefits.

  17. Role of Adjuvant Chemotherapy in ypT0-2N0 Patients Treated with Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy and Radical Resection for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the role of adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with ypT0-2N0 rectal cancer treated by preoperative chemoradiation therapy (PCRT) and radical resection. Patients and Methods: A national consortium of 10 institutions was formed, and patients with ypT0-2N0 mid- and low-rectal cancer after PCRT and radical resection from 2004 to 2009 were included. Patients were categorized into 2 groups according to receipt of additional adjuvant chemotherapy: Adj CTx (+) versus Adj CTx (−). Propensity scores were calculated and used to perform matched and adjusted analyses comparing relapse-free survival (RFS) between treatment groups while controlling for potential confounding. Results: A total of 1016 patients, who met the selection criteria, were evaluated. Of these, 106 (10.4%) did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. There was no overall improvement in 5-year RFS as a result of adjuvant chemotherapy [91.6% for Adj CTx (+) vs 87.5% for Adj CTx (−), P=.18]. There were no differences in 5-year local recurrence and distant metastasis rate between the 2 groups. In patients who show moderate, minimal, or no regression in tumor regression grade, however, possible association of adjuvant chemotherapy with RFS would be considered (hazard ratio 0.35; 95% confidence interval 0.14-0.88; P=.03). Cox regression analysis after propensity score matching failed to show that addition of adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with improved RFS (hazard ratio 0.81; 95% confidence interval 0.39-1.70; P=.58). Conclusions: Adjuvant chemotherapy seemed to not influence the RFS of patients with ypT0-2N0 rectal cancer after PCRT followed by radical resection. Thus, the addition of adjuvant chemotherapy needs to be weighed against its oncologic benefits

  18. The course of health-related quality of life in head and neck cancer patients treated with chemoradiation: A prospective cohort study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the course of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) from diagnosis to 2 years follow-up in patients with head and neck cancer (HNSCC) treated with chemoradiation (CRT). Materials and methods: 164 patients completed the EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-H and N35 questionnaires 1 week before and 6 weeks and 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after CRT. Patients were compared to a reference group. A linear mixed-model analysis was used to assess changes in HRQOL over time, and whether this was associated with age, gender, comorbidity, and tumor sublocation. Results: Significant differences for the majority of HRQOL scales were observed between patient and reference group at baseline, and follow-up. The course of HRQOL was different for survivors compared to non-survivors. In survivors, improvement over time was observed (in global quality of life, physical, role, and social function, fatigue, pain, swallowing, speech, social eating, and social contacts), while in non-survivors the pattern over time was either no changes in HRQOL or a deterioration (in physical function, social eating and contacts). In both survivors and non-survivors, emotional functioning improved after treatment, but deteriorated in the longer term. Patients with comorbidity reported worse physical function, and patients with oral/oropharyngeal cancer (compared to hypopharyngeal/laryngeal cancer) reported more oral pain and sexual problems, but fewer speech problems. Conclusions: The course of HRQOL of HNSCC patients during the first 2 years after CRT is different for survivors compared to non-survivors and is associated with comorbidity and tumor subsite

  19. Preventing the acute skin side effects in patients treated with radiotherapy for breast cancer: the use of corneometry in order to evaluate the protective effect of moisturizing creams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to add, to the objective evaluation, an instrumental assessment of the skin damage induced by radiation therapy. A group of 100 patients affected by breast cancer was recruited in the study over one year. Patients were divided into five groups of 20 patients. For each group it was prescribed a different topical treatment. The following products were used: Betaglucan, sodium hyaluronate (Neoviderm®), Vitis vinifera A. s-I-M.t-O.dij (Ixoderm®), Alga Atlantica plus Ethylbisiminomethylguaicolo and Manganese Cloruro (Radioskin1®) and Metal Esculetina plus Ginko Biloba and Aloe vera (Radioskin 2®); Natural triglycerides-fitosterols (Xderit®); Selectiose plus thermal water of Avene (Trixera+®). All hydrating creams were applied twice a day starting 15 days before and one month after treatment with radiations. Before and during treatment patients underwent weekly skin assessments and corneometry to evaluate the symptoms related to skin toxicity and state of hydration. Evaluation of acute cutaneous toxicity was defined according to the RTOG scale. All patients completed radiotherapy; 72% of patients presented a G1 cutaneous toxicity, 18% developed a G2 cutaneous toxicity, 10% developed a G3 toxicity, no one presented G4 toxicity. The corneometry study confirmed the protective role of effective creams used in radiation therapy of breast cancer and showed its usefulness to identify radiation-induced dermatitis in a very early stage. The preventive use of topic products reduces the incidence of skin side effects in patients treated with radiotherapy for breast cancer. An instrumental evaluation of skin hydration can help the radiation oncologist to use strategies that prevent the onset of toxicity of high degree. All moisturizing creams used in this study were equally valid in the treatment of skin damage induced by radiotherapy

  20. Is thyroid gland an organ at risk in breast cancer patients treated with locoregional radiotherapy? Results of a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutahir Ali Tunio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aim was to evaluate the dose distribution within the thyroid gland its association with hypothyroidism in breast cancer (BC patients receiving supraclavicular (SC radiation therapy (RT. Materials and Methods: Consecutive 40 BC patients with baseline normal thyroid function tests (TFTs, were randomized into two groups: (a Adjuvant chest wall/breast with SC-RT (20 patients and (b control group (adjuvant chest wall/breast RT only; 20 patients. The thyroid gland was contoured for each patient. Each patient′s dose volume histogram (DVH, mean thyroid volume, the volume percentages of the thyroid absorbing respectively 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 Gy (V5, V10, V20, V30, V40, and V50, and D mean (average dose in whole volume of thyroid were then estimated. TFTs were performed at the time of the last follow-up and compared. Results: Mean thyroid volume of cohort was 19.6 cm 3 (4.02-93.52 and D mean of thyroid gland in SC-RT and control group was 25.8 Gy (16.4-52.2 and 5.6 Gy (0.7-12.8, respectively. Median values of V5, V10, V20, V30, V40, and V50 were 54%, 51%, 42.8%, 30.8%, 27.8%, and 7.64%, respectively, in SC-RT as compared to control group (V5;4.9%, V10;2.4%, V20;1.75%, V301%, V40;0%, and V50;0%, respectively with P 50% and the risk can be minimized by thyroid gland shielding during RT.

  1. Study of forty-three patients treated with HDR or LDR pre-operative brachytherapy for IIb cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied 43 patients with IIB cervical cancer who were underwent to pre-operatory treatment. The biological effects between both modalities of treatment were analysed. All patient received EBRT to a total dose of 45Gy - fx 1,8Gy plus brachytherapy. EBRT was performed with a Linac 4MV, in box arrangement. The Brachytherapy was performed through Fletcher Colpostats in association with intrauterine tamdens, in both arms. Brachytherapy starts in HDR group after ten days of the beginning of the treatment. The scheme was the following: 1-HDR - 2 weekly insertions of 6,0Gy at point A 2-LDR - one insertiont of 15Gy at point A. Four to six weeks after the end of the irradiation course, we performed the surgical procedure with Total Hysterectomy and Salpingoforectomy (Piver second level). Results: - HDR - No residual tumor - 21/35 -60% Residual tumor - 14/35 - 40% Negative linph. - 29/35 - 83% Positive linph.- 05/35 - 14% LDR - No residual tumor - 05/08 - 62.5% Residual tumor - 03/08 - 37.5% Negative linph. - 06/08 - 75% Positive linph. - 02/08 - 25% Conclusions - This avaliation showed that local control and survival in HDR and LDR are similar. Treatment with HDR devices are safer for patients and staff, with no need of anesthesia

  2. Prognostic role of apoptosis-related gene functional variants in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with first-line platinum-based chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao KY

    2015-01-01

    >T polymorphisms are potential independent prognostic factors in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. Keywords: lung cancer, FAS −670 A>G, survivin 9386 C>T, polymorphism, chemotherapy response

  3. Dose-volume modeling of the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications among esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of radiation dose distribution in the lung on the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications among esophageal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: We analyzed data from 110 patients with esophageal cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery at our institution from 1998 to 2003. The endpoint for analysis was postsurgical pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) and dose-mass histograms (DMHs) for the whole lung were used to fit normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) models, and the quality of fits were compared using bootstrap analysis. Results: Normal-tissue complication probability modeling identified that the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications was most significantly associated with small absolute volumes of lung spared from doses ≥5 Gy (VS5), that is, exposed to doses 5 = 17.5 Gy (9.4 Gy, 102 Gy). Conclusions: In this cohort of esophageal cancer patients, several dosimetric parameters including mean lung dose, effective dose, and absolute volume of lung receiving <5 Gy provided similar descriptions of the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications as a function of Radiation dose distribution in the lung

  4. Differences in outcome for positive margins in a large cohort of breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobsen, Jan J; Van Der Palen, Job; Ong, Francisca; Meerwaldt, Jacobus H

    2007-01-01

    A study of the possible difference in outcome for positive margins for invasive carcinoma (IC) versus ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and with regard to different age categories in a large prospective cohort of patients with invasive breast cancer. A total of 2 291 BCT were analyzed. Margins were positive for IC in 8.7% and for DCIS in 4.6%. The median follow-up was 83 months. The 10-year local recurrence-free survival for negative margins vs. positive margins for IC vs. positive for DCIS for women 40 years 94.7% vs. 92.6% vs. 82.6% (HR4.2). The 10-year distant disease-free survival for negative margins vs. positive margins for IC vs. positive for DCIS women 40 years.

  5. Effects of Different Operative Procedures on the Digestive and Nutritional Status of Patients Treated with a Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Liang; Xishan Hao

    2006-01-01

    Postgastrectomy syndromes evoked by the loss of several gastric functions after total or subtotal gastrectomy are very common. Different kinds of reconstruction have been developed to overcome the problem. Patients with preservation of a duodenal passage and jejunal interposition with or without a pouch show a better quality of life and minimal symptoms postoperatively. A jejunal interposition with or without a pouch after proximal or distal subtotal gastrictomy seems to improve the nutritional condition and quality of life. The prognostic nutritional index (PNI), Visick score, Spitzer index and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) questionnaire (QLQ-C30) are available to evaluate the quality of life and nutritional status after gastrectomy.

  6. Improvement in toxicity in high risk prostate cancer patients treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy compared to 3D conformal radiotherapy without daily image guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) facilitates the delivery of a very precise radiation dose. In this study we compare the toxicity and biochemical progression-free survival between patients treated with daily image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) without daily image guidance for high risk prostate cancer (PCa). A total of 503 high risk PCa patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) and endocrine treatment between 2000 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. 115 patients were treated with 3DCRT, and 388 patients were treated with IG-IMRT. 3DCRT patients were treated to 76 Gy and without daily image guidance and with 1–2 cm PTV margins. IG-IMRT patients were treated to 78 Gy based on daily image guidance of fiducial markers, and the PTV margins were 5–7 mm. Furthermore, the dose-volume constraints to both the rectum and bladder were changed with the introduction of IG-IMRT. The 2-year actuarial likelihood of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity following RT was 57.3% in 3DCRT patients and 5.8% in IG-IMRT patients (p < 0.001). For GU toxicity the numbers were 41.8% and 29.7%, respectively (p = 0.011). On multivariate analysis, 3DCRT was associated with a significantly increased risk of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity compared to IG-IMRT (p < 0.001, HR = 11.59 [CI: 6.67-20.14]). 3DCRT was also associated with an increased risk of developing GU toxicity compared to IG-IMRT. The 3-year actuarial biochemical progression-free survival probability was 86.0% for 3DCRT and 90.3% for IG-IMRT (p = 0.386). On multivariate analysis there was no difference in biochemical progression-free survival between 3DCRT and IG-IMRT. The difference in toxicity can be attributed to the combination of the IMRT technique with reduced dose to organs-at-risk, daily image guidance and margin reduction

  7. Post-radiation mucocele in two patients treated for nasopharyngeal cancer; Mucocele apres radiotherapie chez deux patients traites pour cancer du nasopharynx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mnejja, M.; Hammami, B.; Achour, I.; Chakroun, A.; Charfeddine, I.; Ghorbel, A. [Service ORL et chirurgie cervico-faciale, CHU Habib-Bourguiba, 3029 Sfax (Tunisia); Frikha, M. [Service de carcinologie, CHU Habib-Bourguiba, 3029 Sfax (Tunisia); Daoud, J. [Service de radiotherapie, CHU Habib-Bourguiba, 3029 Sfax (Tunisia)

    2011-06-15

    A 30-year-old woman, with a history of nasopharyngeal carcinoma, which was treated by radiotherapy nine years previously, presented with occasional diplopia and recent headaches. A nasopharyngeal biopsy showed no recurrence. The imaging revealed a sphenoidal sinus mucocele. Endoscopic marsupialization of the mucocele allowed clinical improvement. A 56-year-old woman presented, five years after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma, with a fronto-orbital mass. CT-scan revealed a fronto-ethmoidal mucocele. Nasopharyngeal biopsy showed tumour recurrence. Marsupialization of mucocele was performed. Recurrence of the carcinoma was treated by radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Sphenoidal sinus mucocele developing after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma has rarely been reported. CT scan and MRI are useful tools in making the diagnosis. Biopsy is required to diagnose recurrence or associated radio-induced tumor. Endoscopic approach gives good results. (authors)

  8. Pain, PSA flare, and bone scan response in a patient with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated with radium-223, a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radium-223 has been shown to improve overall survival in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer with symptomatic bone metastases. The bone scan response to radium-223 has only been described in one single center trial of 14 patients, none of whom achieved the outstanding bone scan response presented in the current case. In this case report, we describe a 75 year-old white man with extensively pre-treated metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and symptomatic bone metastases who experienced a flare in pain and prostate-specific antigen, followed by dramatic clinical (pain), biochemical (prostate-specific antigen), and imaging (bone scan) response. The flare phenomena and bone scan response we observed have not previously been described with radium-223. This case suggests that the degree and duration of bone scan response may be predictive of overall survival benefit

  9. Intensity Modulated Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Before Surgery in Treating Older Patients With Hormone Responsive Stage 0-I Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-04

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Predominant Intraductal Component; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  10. Long-term outcome with interstitial brachytherapy in the management of patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We reviewed our institution's experience with interstitial implant boosts to determine their long-term impact on local control and cosmetic results. Methods and Materials: Between January 1, 1980 and December 31, 1987, 390 women with 400 cases of Stage I and II breast cancer were managed with breast-conserving therapy (BCT) at William Beaumont Hospital. All patients were treated with an excisional biopsy and 253 (63%) underwent reexcision. Radiation consisted of 45-50 Gy external beam irradiation to the whole breast followed by a boost to the tumor bed to at least 60 Gy using either electrons [108], photons [15], or an interstitial implant [277] with either 192Ir [190] or 125I [87]. Long-term local control and cosmetic outcome were assessed and contrasted between patients boosted with either interstitial implants, electrons, or photons. Results: With a median follow-up of 81 months, 25 patients have recurred in the treated breast for a 5- and 8-year actuarial rate of local recurrence of 4 and 8%, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in the 5- or 8-year actuarial rates of local recurrence using either electrons, photons, or an interstitial implant. Greater than 90% of patients obtained a good or excellent cosmetic result, and no statistically significant differences in cosmetic outcome were seen whether electrons, photons, or implants were used. Conclusions: We conclude that patients with Stage I and II breast cancer undergoing BCT and judged to be candidates for boosts can be effectively managed with LDR interstitial brachytherapy. Long-term local control and cosmetic outcome are excellent and similar to patients boosted with either electrons or photons

  11. Low p53 Binding Protein 1 (53BP1) Expression Is Associated With Increased Local Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neboori, Hanmanth J.R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Haffty, Bruce G., E-mail: hafftybg@umdnj.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Cancer Institute of New Jersey and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Wu Hao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Yang Qifeng [Department of Breast Surgery, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Ji' nan (China); Aly, Amal [Division of Medical Oncology, The Cancer Institute of New Jersey and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Goyal, Sharad; Schiff, Devora [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Moran, Meena S. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Golhar, Ryan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Chen Chunxia; Moore, Dirk [Department of Biostatistics, The Cancer Institute of New Jersey and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); and others

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the expression of p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) has prognostic significance in a cohort of early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy (BCS+RT). Methods and Materials: A tissue microarray of early-stage breast cancer treated with BCS+RT from a cohort of 514 women was assayed for 53BP1, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry. Through log-rank tests and univariate and multivariate models, the staining profile of each tumor was correlated with clinical endpoints, including ipsilateral breast recurrence-free survival (IBRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: Of the 477 (93%) evaluable tumors, 63 (13%) were scored as low. Low expression of 53BP1 was associated with worse outcomes for all endpoints studied, including 10-year IBRFS (76.8% vs. 90.5%; P=.01), OS (66.4% vs. 81.7%; P=.02), CSS (66.0% vs. 87.4%; P<.01), DMFS (55.9% vs. 87.0%; P<.01), and RFS (45.2% vs. 80.6%; P<.01). Multivariate analysis incorporating various clinico-pathologic markers and 53BP1 expression found that 53BP1 expression was again an independent predictor of all endpoints (IBRFS: P=.0254; OS: P=.0094; CSS: P=.0033; DMFS: P=.0006; RFS: P=.0002). Low 53BP1 expression was also found to correlate with triple-negative (TN) phenotype (P<.01). Furthermore, in subset analysis of all TN breast cancer, negative 53BP1 expression trended for lower IBRFS (72.3% vs. 93.9%; P=.0361) and was significant for worse DMFS (48.2% vs. 86.8%; P=.0035) and RFS (37.8% vs. 83.7%; P=.0014). Conclusion: Our data indicate that low 53BP1 expression is an independent prognostic indicator for local relapse among other endpoints in early-stage breast cancer and TN breast cancer patients treated with BCS+RT. These results should be verified in larger cohorts of patients to validate their clinical

  12. Lack of benefit from a short course of androgen deprivation for unfavorable prostate cancer patients treated with an accelerated hypofractionated regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: High-dose radiotherapy, delivered in an accelerated hypofractionated course, was utilized to treat prostate cancer. Therapy consisted of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided conformally modulated high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The purpose of this report is (1) to assess long-term comparative outcomes from three trials using similar accelerated hypofractionated regimes; and (2) to examine the long-term survival impact of a short course of ≤6 months adjuvant/concurrent androgen deprivation when a very high radiation dose was delivered. Methods and Materials: Between 1986 and 2000, 1,260 patients were treated at three institutions with pelvic EBRT (36-50 Gy) integrated with HDR prostate brachytherapy. The total dose including brachytherapy was given over 5 weeks. The biologic equivalent EBRT dose ranged between 90 and 123 Gy (median, 102 Gy) using an α /β of 1.2. Patient eligibility criteria included a pretreatment prostate-specific antigen ≥10, Gleason score ≥7, or clinical stage ≥T2b. A total of 1,260 patients were treated, and 934 meet the criteria. Kiel University Hospital treated 198 patients; William Beaumont Hospital, 315; and California Endocurietherapy Cancer Center, 459 patients. Brachytherapy dose regimes were somewhat different between centers and the dose was escalated from 5.5 x 3 to 15 Gy x 2 Gy. Patients were divided for analysis between the 406 who received up to 6 months of androgen deprivation therapy and the 528 patients who did not. All patients had a minimum follow-up of 18 months (3 times the exposure to androgen deprivation therapy). The American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology biochemical failure definition was used. Results: Mean age was 69 years. Median follow-up time was 4.4 years (range, 1.5-14.5); 4 years for androgen deprivation therapy patients and 4.9 for radiation alone. There was no difference at 5 and 8 years in overall survival, cause-specific survival, or

  13. A retrospective comparative exploratory study on two Methylentetrahydrofolate Reductase (MTHFR) polymorphisms in esophagogastric cancer: the A1298C MTHFR polymorphism is an independent prognostic factor only in neoadjuvantly treated gastric cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methylentetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) plays a major role in folate metabolism and consequently could be an important factor for the efficacy of a treatment with 5-fluorouracil. Our aim was to evaluate the prognostic and predictive value of two well characterized constitutional MTHFR gene polymorphisms for primarily resected and neoadjuvantly treated esophagogastric adenocarcinomas. 569 patients from two centers were analyzed (gastric cancer: 218, carcinoma of the esophagogastric junction (AEG II, III): 208 and esophagus (AEG I): 143). 369 patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery, 200 patients were resected without preoperative treatment. The MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms were determined in DNA from peripheral blood lymphozytes. Associations with prognosis, response and clinicopathological factors were analyzed retrospectively within a prospective database (chi-square, log-rank, cox regression). Only the MTHFR A1298C polymorphisms had prognostic relevance in neoadjuvantly treated patients but it was not a predictor for response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The AC genotype of the MTHFR A1298C polymorphisms was significantly associated with worse outcome (p = 0.02, HR 1.47 (1.06-2.04). If neoadjuvantly treated patients were analyzed based on their tumor localization, the AC genotype of the MTHFR A1298C polymorphisms was a significant negative prognostic factor in patients with gastric cancer according to UICC 6th edition (gastric cancer including AEG type II, III: HR 2.0, 95% CI 1.3-2.0, p = 0.001) and 7th edition (gastric cancer without AEG II, III: HR 2.8, 95% CI 1.5-5.7, p = 0.003), not for AEG I. For both definitions of gastric cancer the AC genotype was confirmed as an independent negative prognostic factor in cox regression analysis. In primarily resected patients neither the MTHFR A1298C nor the MTHFR C677T polymorphisms had prognostic impact. The MTHFR A1298C polymorphisms was an independent prognostic factor in patients with

  14. The Impact of Skin-Sparing Mastectomy With Immediate Reconstruction in Patients With Stage III Breast Cancer Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Postmastectomy Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhu, Roshan; Godette, Karen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Carlson, Grant; Losken, Albert; Gabram, Sheryl [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Department of Surgery, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Fasola, Carolina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); O' Regan, Ruth; Zelnak, Amelia [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Torres, Mylin, E-mail: matorre@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: The safety and efficacy of skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) with immediate reconstruction (IR) in patients with locally advanced breast cancer are unclear. The purpose of this study is to compare the outcomes of women with noninflammatory Stage III SSM with IR vs. non-SSM-treated women who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy and adjuvant radiation therapy (XRT). Methods and Materials: Between October 1997 and March 2010, 100 consecutive patients (40 SSM with IR vs. 60 non-SSM) with Stage III breast cancer received anthracycline- and/or taxane-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy, mastectomy, and adjuvant XRT. Clinical stage (SSM with IR vs. for non-SSM) was IIIA (75% vs. 67%), IIIB (8% vs. 18%), and IIIC (8% vs. 8%). Tumors greater than 5 cm were found in 74% vs. 69%; 97% of patients in both groups were clinically node positive; and 8% vs. 18% had T4b disease. Results: The time from initial biopsy to XRT was prolonged for SSM-IR patients (274 vs. 254 days, p = 0.04), and there was a trend toward XRT delay of more than 8 weeks (52% vs. 31%, p = 0.07) after surgery. The rate of complications requiring surgical intervention was higher in the SSM-IR group (37.5% vs. 5%, p < 0.001). The 2-year actuarial locoregional control, breast cancer-specific survival, and overall survival rates for SSM with IR vs. non-SSM were 94.7% vs. 97.4%, 91.5% vs. 86.3%, and 87.4% vs. 84.8%, respectively (p = not significant). Conclusions: In our small study with limited follow-up, SSM with IR prolonged overall cancer treatment time and trended toward delaying XRT but did not impair oncologic outcomes. Complication rates were significantly higher in this group. Longer follow-up is needed.

  15. Monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to assess the current status of in-vivo use of monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer. Publications appearing between 1980 and 1988 were identified by computer searches using MEDLINE and CANCERLIT, by reviewing the table of contents of recently published journals, and by searching bibliographies of identified books and articles. More than 700 articles, including peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, were identified and selected for analysis. The literature was reviewed and 235 articles were selected as relevant and representative of the current issues and future applications for in-vivo monoclonal antibodies for cancer therapy and of the toxicity and efficacy which has been associated with clinical trials. Approaches include using antibody alone (interacting with complement or effector cells or binding directly with certain cell receptors) and immunoconjugates (antibody coupled to radioisotopes, drugs, toxins, or other biologicals). Most experience has been with murine antibodies. Trials of antibody alone and radiolabeled antibodies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and the in-vivo trafficking of antibodies to tumor cells. However, tumor cell heterogeneity, lack of cytotoxicity, and the development of human antimouse antibodies have limited clinical efficacy. Although the immunoconjugates are very promising, heterogeneity and the antimouse immune response have hampered this approach as has the additional challenge of chemically or genetically coupling antibody to cytotoxic agents. As a therapeutic modality, monoclonal antibodies are still promising but their general use will be delayed for several years. New approaches using human antibodies and reducing the human antiglobulin response should facilitate treatment. 235 references

  16. Factors of influence on acute skin toxicity of breast cancer patients treated with standard three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) after breast conserving surgery (BCS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standard 3D-CRT after BCS may cause skin toxicity with a wide range of intensity including acute effects like erythema or late effects. In order to reduce these side effects it is mandatory to identify potential factors of influence in breast cancer patients undergoing standard three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) of the breast and modern systemic therapy. Between 2006 and 2010 a total of 211 breast cancer patients (median age 52,4 years, range 24–77) after BCS consecutively treated in our institution with 3D-CRT (50 Gy whole breast photon radiotherapy followed by 16 Gy electron boost to the tumorbed) were evaluated with special focus on documented skin toxicity at the end of the 50 Gy-course. Standardized photodocumentation of the treated breast was done in each patient lying on the linac table with arms elevated. Skin toxicity was documented according to the common toxicity criteria (CTC)-score. Potential influencing factors were classified in three groups: patient-specific (smoking, age, breast size, body mass index = BMI, allergies), tumor-specific (tumorsize) and treatment-specific factors (antihormonal therapy with tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors, chemotherapy). Uni- and multivariate statistical analyses were done using IBM SPSS version 19. After 50 Gy 3D-CRT to the whole breast 28.9% of all 211 patients had no erythema, 62.2% showed erythema grade 1 (G1) and 8.5% erythema grade 2. None of the patients had grade 3/4 (G3/4) erythema. In univariate analyses a significant influence or trend on the development of acute skin toxicities (erythema G0 versus G1 versus G2) was observed for larger breast volumes (p=0,004), smoking during radiation therapy (p=0,064) and absence of allergies (p=0,014) as well as larger tumorsize (p=0,009) and antihormonal therapy (p=0.005). Neither patient age, BMI nor choice of chemotherapy showed any significant effect on higher grade toxicity. In the multivariate analysis, factors associated with higher grade

  17. Absorbed dose distributions in patients with bone metastases from hormone refractory prostate cancer treated with Re-186 HEDP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows. Aim: intravenous administration of Re-186 hydroxyethylidene-diphosphonate (HEDP) is used for metastatic bone pain palliation in hormone refractory prostate cancer patients. Dosimetry for bone seeking radionuclides is challenging due to the complex structure with osteoblastic, osteolytic and mixed lesions. The aim of this study was to perform image-based patient-specific 3D convolution dosimetry to obtain a distribution of the absorbed doses to each lesion and estimate inter- and intra-patient variations. Materials and methods: 28 patients received a fixed 5 GBq activity of Re-186 HEDP followed by peripheral blood stem cell rescue at 14 days in a phase II trial. A FORTE dual-headed gamma camera was used to acquire sequential Single-Photon-Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) data of the thorax and pelvis area at 1, 4, 24, 48 and 72 hours following administration. The projection data were reconstructed using filtered-back projection and were corrected for attenuation and scatter. Voxelised cumulated activity distributions were obtained with two different methods. First, the scans were co-registered and the time-activity curves were obtained on a voxel-by-voxel basis. Second, the clearance curve was obtained from the mean number of counts in each individual lesion and used to scale the uptake distribution taken at 24 hours. The calibration factors required for image quantification were obtained from a phantom experiment. An in-house developed EGSnrc Monte Carlo code was used for the calculation of dose voxel kernels for soft-tissue and cortical/trabecular bone used to perform convolution dosimetry. Cumulative dose-volume histograms were produced and mean absorbed doses calculated for each spinal and pelvic lesion. Results: preliminary results show that the lesion mean absorbed doses ranged from 25 to 55 Gy when the medium was soft tissue and decreased by 40% if bone was considered. The use of the cumulated activity distribution

  18. Efficacy and tolerability of high dose "ethinylestradiol" in post-menopausal advanced breast cancer patients heavily pre-treated with endocrine agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson John FR

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High dose estrogens (HDEs were frequently used as endocrine agents prior to the introduction of tamoxifen which carries fewer side effects. Due to the development of resistance to available endocrine agents in almost all women with metastatic breast cancer, interest has renewed in the use of HDEs as yet another endocrine option that may have activity. We report our experience with one of the HDEs ("ethinylestradiol" 1 mg daily in advanced breast cancer (locally advanced and metastatic in post-menopausal women who had progressed on multiple endocrine agents. Patients and methods According to a database of advanced breast cancer patients seen in our Unit since 1998, those who had complete set of information and fulfilled the following criteria were studied: (1 patients in whom further endocrine therapy was deemed appropriate i.e., patients who have had clinical benefit with previous endocrine agents or were not fit or unwilling to receive chemotherapy in the presence of potentially life-threatening visceral metastases; (2 disease was assessable by UICC criteria; (3 were treated with "ethinylestradiol" until they were withdrawn from treatment due to adverse events or disease progression. Results Twelve patients with a median age of 75.1 years (49.1 – 85 years were identified. Majority (N = 8 had bony disease. They had ethinylestradiol as 3rd to 7th line endocrine therapy. One patient (8% came off treatment early due to hepato-renal syndrome. Clinical benefit (objective response or durable stable disease for ≥ 6 months was seen in 4 patients (33.3% with a median duration of response of 10+ (7–36 months. The time to treatment failure was 4 (0.5–36 months. Conclusion Yet unreported, high dose "ethinylestradiol" is another viable therapeutic strategy in heavily pre-treated patients when further endocrine therapy is deemed appropriate. Although it tends to carry more side effects, they may not be comparable to those of other

  19. Features of nursing care provided for breast cancer patients treated with radiotherapy following breast-conserving surgery. Comparison of nursing practices between certified nurses in breast cancer nursing and non-specialist nurses working with breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aimed to identifying features of nursing care provided for breast cancer patients during the course of radiotherapy following breast-conserving surgery and improve the quality of nursing care. Subjects were certified nurses in breast cancer nursing (CN) and non-specialist nurses working with breast cancer patients (NS). An anonymous survey questionnaire on nursing care and other practices provided before, during, and after radiotherapy was conducted by postal mail and the results were compared between CN and NS. Valid responses were obtained from 40 CN (41.2%) and 102 NS (56.7%). Significant differences between CN and NS were observed for 15 of 27 (55.6%) care items before radiotherapy, 18 of 18 (100%) items during radiotherapy, and 9 of 20 (45.0%) items after radiotherapy. Among the items with significant differences, significantly more NS than CN performed all nursing care items during the course of radiotherapy, except for one item provided before radiotherapy. These results demonstrate that it is necessary to facilitate enhanced collaboration and coordination between CN and NS providing nursing care for breast cancer patients in order to improve the quality of nursing care delivered to patients. (author)

  20. Factors important for efficacy of stereotactic body radiotherapy of medically inoperable stage I lung cancer. A retrospective analysis of patients treated in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumann, Pia; Nyman, Jan; Lax, Ingmar;

    2006-01-01

    We reviewed results of SBRT treatment of 138 patients with medically inoperable stage I NSCLC treated during 1996-2003 at five different centres in Sweden and Denmark. Mean age was 74 years (range 56-90) with 69 men and 72 women. SBRT was delivered using a 3D conformal multifield technique...... and a stereotactic body frame. Doses delivered were 30-48 Gy (65% isodose at the periphery of planning target volume, PTV) in 2-4 fractions. Equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) was in the range of 50-100 Gy. Mean gross tumour volume (GTV) was 39 cm3 (2-436), and planning target volume was 101 cm3 (11...... proximity. Distant metastases occurred in 25% (35/138) of the patients. Ninety-one (65%) patients died during follow-up of which 55 patients (60%) died of other causes than lung cancer. Three- and 5-year overall survival was 52 and 26% respectively. Lung cancer specific 3- and 5-year overall survival was 66...

  1. ATM Polymorphisms Predict Severe Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Huihua [Department of Oncology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1095 Jiefang Avenue, Wuhan (China); Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing, E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liu, Zhensheng [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Xu, Ting [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Qiming; Liu, Hongliang [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko; Gomez, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Li-E [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wei, Qingyi, E-mail: qwei@mdanderson.org [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: The ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene mediates detection and repair of DNA damage. We investigated associations between ATM polymorphisms and severe radiation-induced pneumonitis (RP). Methods and Materials: We genotyped 3 potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of ATM (rs1801516 [D1853N/5557G>A], rs189037 [-111G>A] and rs228590) in 362 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), who received definitive (chemo)radiation therapy. The cumulative severe RP probabilities by genotypes were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier analysis. The associations between severe RP risk and genotypes were assessed by both logistic regression analysis and Cox proportional hazard model with time to event considered. Results: Of 362 patients (72.4% of non-Hispanic whites), 56 (15.5%) experienced grade ≥3 RP. Patients carrying ATM rs189037 AG/GG or rs228590 TT/CT genotypes or rs189037G/rs228590T/rs1801516G (G-T-G) haplotype had a lower risk of severe RP (rs189037: GG/AG vs AA, adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.49, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.29-0.83, P=.009; rs228590: TT/CT vs CC, HR=0.57, 95% CI, 0.33-0.97, P=.036; haplotype: G-T-G vs A-C-G, HR=0.52, 95% CI, 0.35-0.79, P=.002). Such positive findings remained in non-Hispanic whites. Conclusions: ATM polymorphisms may serve as biomarkers for susceptibility to severe RP in non-Hispanic whites. Large prospective studies are required to confirm our findings.

  2. HER2 and TOP2A in high-risk early breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant epirubicin-based dose-dense sequential chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fountzilas George

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HER2 and TOP2A parameters (gene status, mRNA and protein expression have individually been associated with the outcome of patients treated with anthracyclines. The aim of this study was to comprehensively evaluate the prognostic/predictive significance of the above parameters in early, high-risk breast cancer patients treated with epirubicin-based, dose-dense sequential adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods In a series of 352 breast carcinoma tissues from patients that had been post-operatively treated with epirubicin-CMF with or without paclitaxel, we assessed HER2 and TOP2A gene status (chromogenic in situ hybridization, mRNA expression (quantitative reverse transcription PCR, as well as HER2 and TopoIIa protein expression (immunohistochemistry. Results HER2 and TOP2A amplification did not share the same effects on their downstream molecules, with consistent patterns observed in HER2 mRNA and protein expression according to HER2 amplification (all parameters strongly inter-related, p values Conclusions This study confirms the favorable prognostic value of HER2/TOP2A co-amplification and the adverse prognostic value of high TOP2A mRNA expression extending it to the adjuvant treatment setting in early high-risk breast cancer. The strong adverse prognostic impact of high HER2/TOP2A mRNA co-expression needs further validation in studies designed to evaluate markers predictive for anthracyclines. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12611000506998.

  3. Long-term survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer and synchronous brain metastasis treated with whole-brain radiotherapy and thoracic chemoradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain metastases occur in 30-50% of Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and confer a worse prognosis and quality of life. These patients are usually treated with Whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) followed by systemic therapy. Few studies have evaluated the role of chemoradiotherapy to the primary tumor after WBRT as definitive treatment in the management of these patients. We reviewed the outcome of 30 patients with primary NSCLC and brain metastasis at diagnosis without evidence of other metastatic sites. Patients were treated with WBRT and after induction chemotherapy with paclitaxel and cisplatin for two cycles. In the absence of progression, concurrent chemoradiotherapy for the primary tumor with weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin was indicated, with a total effective dose of 60 Gy. If disease progression was ruled out, four chemotherapy cycles followed. Median Progression-free survival (PFS) and Overall survival (OS) were 8.43 ± 1.5 and 31.8 ± 15.8 months, respectively. PFS was 39.5% at 1 year and 24.7% at 2 years. The 1- and 2-year OS rates were 71.1 and 60.2%, respectively. Three-year OS was significantly superior for patients with N0-N1 stage disease vs. N2-N3 (60 vs. 24%, respectively; Response rate [RR], 0.03; p= 0.038). Patients with NSCLC and brain metastasis might benefit from treatment with WBRT and concurrent thoracic chemoradiotherapy. The subgroup of N0-N1 patients appears to achieve the greatest benefit. The result of this study warrants a prospective trial to confirm the benefit of this treatment

  4. Using machine learning to predict radiation pneumonitis in patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, Gilmer; Solberg, Timothy D; Heskel, Marina; Ungar, Lyle; Simone, Charles B

    2016-08-21

    To develop a patient-specific 'big data' clinical decision tool to predict pneumonitis in stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). 61 features were recorded for 201 consecutive patients with stage I NSCLC treated with SBRT, in whom 8 (4.0%) developed radiation pneumonitis. Pneumonitis thresholds were found for each feature individually using decision stumps. The performance of three different algorithms (Decision Trees, Random Forests, RUSBoost) was evaluated. Learning curves were developed and the training error analyzed and compared to the testing error in order to evaluate the factors needed to obtain a cross-validated error smaller than 0.1. These included the addition of new features, increasing the complexity of the algorithm and enlarging the sample size and number of events. In the univariate analysis, the most important feature selected was the diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO adj%). On multivariate analysis, the three most important features selected were the dose to 15 cc of the heart, dose to 4 cc of the trachea or bronchus, and race. Higher accuracy could be achieved if the RUSBoost algorithm was used with regularization. To predict radiation pneumonitis within an error smaller than 10%, we estimate that a sample size of 800 patients is required. Clinically relevant thresholds that put patients at risk of developing radiation pneumonitis were determined in a cohort of 201 stage I NSCLC patients treated with SBRT. The consistency of these thresholds can provide radiation oncologists with an estimate of their reliability and may inform treatment planning and patient counseling. The accuracy of the classification is limited by the number of patients in the study and not by the features gathered or the complexity of the algorithm. PMID:27461154

  5. Using machine learning to predict radiation pneumonitis in patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, Gilmer; Solberg, Timothy D.; Heskel, Marina; Ungar, Lyle; Simone, Charles B., II

    2016-08-01

    To develop a patient-specific ‘big data’ clinical decision tool to predict pneumonitis in stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). 61 features were recorded for 201 consecutive patients with stage I NSCLC treated with SBRT, in whom 8 (4.0%) developed radiation pneumonitis. Pneumonitis thresholds were found for each feature individually using decision stumps. The performance of three different algorithms (Decision Trees, Random Forests, RUSBoost) was evaluated. Learning curves were developed and the training error analyzed and compared to the testing error in order to evaluate the factors needed to obtain a cross-validated error smaller than 0.1. These included the addition of new features, increasing the complexity of the algorithm and enlarging the sample size and number of events. In the univariate analysis, the most important feature selected was the diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO adj%). On multivariate analysis, the three most important features selected were the dose to 15 cc of the heart, dose to 4 cc of the trachea or bronchus, and race. Higher accuracy could be achieved if the RUSBoost algorithm was used with regularization. To predict radiation pneumonitis within an error smaller than 10%, we estimate that a sample size of 800 patients is required. Clinically relevant thresholds that put patients at risk of developing radiation pneumonitis were determined in a cohort of 201 stage I NSCLC patients treated with SBRT. The consistency of these thresholds can provide radiation oncologists with an estimate of their reliability and may inform treatment planning and patient counseling. The accuracy of the classification is limited by the number of patients in the study and not by the features gathered or the complexity of the algorithm.

  6. Vaccine Therapy With Sargramostim (GM-CSF) in Treating Patients With Her-2 Positive Stage III-IV Breast Cancer or Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-02

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor

  7. OA01.13. An evaluation on mutra taila bindu pariksha with a modified device in LAS01 (a herbo-mineral compound) treated cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vinamra; Tiwari, Anoop; Tripathi, Rajesh; Srivastava, Ashok; Saxena, R C; Trivedi, V. P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Ashtavidh rogi pariksha one of the main diagnostic methods described in Ayurveda includes Mutra Taila Bindu Pariksha (MTBP), which is simple and cost effective. Modern diagnostic investigations of tumor markers and radiological procedures are costly and usual tests for recording different stages of cancer. MTBP is also used at Lavanya Ayurvedic Hospital in Cancer patients as diagnostic and prognostic parameters. Test depends on pattern of spreading of oil drop over surface of patient's urine. Method: This procedure was modified keeping all parameters fixed like distance at which sesame oil falls and procedure of collection of urine sample. This equipment was attached with a photographic device. 50 randomly selected cases were divided into two groups. Group I consisted of 10 healthy volunteers and group II consisted of 40 pre diagnosed cases of different types of cancer. Patients were made to sleep at 9 PM. On next morning (5 AM) mid stream urine of the first urination was collected in a standard sized beaker of 250 ml. Sample beaker was kept in a specifically designed glass and fibre cabinet, which was devoid of air. A 10 ml glass burette filled with Tila taila (Sesame oil) was fixed over beaker containing urine. One drop of sesame oil was dropped over the stable surface of urine from a distance of 2 cm. The oil drop dispersal pattern on the surface of collected urine sample was recorded photographically. It was analysed periodically at monthly intervals for three times. Result: The results of oil spreading nature, direction and shape over urine surface were compared with modern biochemical, haematological and radiological parameters in different stages of cancer. Conclusion: The pattern of dispersal of sesame oil was progressively changed in relation to the improvement in subjective and bjective parameters in LAS01 treated cases.

  8. Role of radiotherapy and prognostic factors in breast cancer patients at high-risk of recurrence treated with modified radical mastectomy and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To analyze the outcome and prognostic factors in breast cancer at high-risk of recurrence and evaluate the role of radiotherapy. Methods: 381 breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy and axillary dissection were retrospectively analyzed. The including criterias were pathologic diagnosis of invasive breast cancer, T3-T4 and/or four or more positive axillary nodes. The survival rates was calculated by Kaplan-Meier method, and compared by Logrank test. Cox regression model was used to select potential prognostic variables. Results: The median follow up was 48 months. The 5-year overall survival (OS) and locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS) rates were 76.8% and 89.7%, respectively. Radiotherapy significantly improved the OS (80.9% vs. 62.3%, χ2=15.47, P=0.001) and LRFS (93.4% vs. 77.1%, χ2=19.95, P=0.000). The use of ipsilateral chest wall and supraclavicular nodal radiation was associated with increased 5-year chest wall recurrence free survival (96.8%: 86.2%, χ2=12.66, P= 0.001) and 5-year supraclavicular node recurrence free survival (97.7% :90.7%, χ2=9.98, P=0.002). However, axillary irradiation had no impact on 5-year axillary recurrence free survival (98.4%:96.1%, χ=0.74, P=0.389). In multivariate analysis, absence of radiotherapy (χ2=14.42, P=0.000), 10 or more positive axillary nodes (χ2=21.60, P=0.000), and T4 stage (χ2=10.79, P=0.001) were independent unfavorable prognostic factors for overall survival. Conclusions: Radiotherapy improves the overall survival of breast cancer patients with T3, T4 and/or four or more positive axillary nodes. The chest wall and supraclavicular nodal radiation should be given to this group of patients. (authors)

  9. A Phase III trial of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with invasive bladder cancer treated with selective bladder preservation by combined radiation therapy and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the long term efficacy of neoadjuvant MCV (Methotrexate, Cisplatin, Vinblastine) chemotherapy in patients with muscle invading bladder cancer treated by combined modality therapy with selection for consolidation by either cystectomy or Cisplatin and radiation (XRT) based on initial response. Patients and Methods: From 1990 through 1993, 126 patients (median age 68 years, range39 to 83 years) with clinical stage T2-T4aNXM0 bladder cancer were randomized following a thorough transurethral resection (TURBT), if possible, to receive (Arm 1, N=62) or not (Arm 2, N=64) 2 cycles of MCV prior to 39.6Gy pelvic irradiation with concurrent Cisplatin (100mg/M2) 2 courses, 3 weeks apart. Tumor response was scored as a clinical CR when the tumor-site biopsy and urine cytology were negative. The CR patients were treated with consolidation of an additional 25.2Gy to a total of 64.8Gy with 1 additional cycle of Cisplatin. Those with less than a CR were advised prompt cystectomy as were those with a subsequent invasive recurrence. The median follow up of surviving patients is 44 months. Results: 72% of patients completed the protocol with no or minor deviations; 62% on Arm 1 and 82% on Arm 2. The actuarial 5 year overall survival is 47%; 42% in Arm 1 and 50% in Arm 2. 40% of the patients had evidence of distant metastases at 5 years; 35% in Arm 1 and 43% in Arm 2. The 5 year survival with a functioning bladder is 36%, 32% in Arm 1, 39% in Arm 2. Among the 72 CR patients (60% CR in Arm 1 and 55% CR in Arm 2) 13% have had evidence of an invasive tumor relapse at 5 years. Six patients died during treatment; 5 in Arm 1, 1 in Arm 2. No patient required a cystectomy for treatment-related bladder morbidity. Conclusions: Two cycles of MCV neoadjuvant chemotherapy was not shown to provide an improved rate of CR to induction therapy or freedom from metastatic disease, or in five year overall survival. This absence of benefit in any of these endpoints may have resulted more

  10. SU-E-J-21: Setup Variability of Colorectal Cancer Patients Treated in the Prone Position and Dosimetric Comparison with the Supine Position

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, A; Foster, J; Chu, W; Karotki, A [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre/Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Many cancer centers treat colorectal patients in the prone position on a belly board to minimize dose to the small bowel. That may potentially Result in patient setup instability with corresponding impact on dose delivery accuracy for highly conformal techniques such as IMRT/VMAT. Two aims of this work are 1) to investigate setup accuracy of rectum patients treated in the prone position on a belly board using CBCT and 2) to evaluate dosimetric impact on bladder and small bowel of treating rectum patients in supine vs. prone position. Methods: For the setup accuracy study, 10 patients were selected. Weekly CBCTs were acquired and matched to bone. The CBCT-determined shifts were recorded. For the dosimetric study, 7 prone-setup patients and 7 supine-setup patients were randomly selected from our clinical database. Various clinically relevant dose volume histogram values were recorded for the small bowel and bladder. Results: The CBCT-determined rotational shifts had a wide variation. For the dataset acquired at the time of this writing, the ranges of rotational setup errors for pitch, roll, and yaw were [−3.6° 4.7°], [−4.3° 3.2°], and [−1.4° 1.4°]. For the dosimetric study: the small bowel V(45Gy) and mean dose for the prone position was 5.6±12.1% and 18.4±6.2Gy (ranges indicate standard deviations); for the supine position the corresponding dose values were 12.9±15.8% and 24.7±8.8Gy. For the bladder, the V(30Gy) and mean dose for prone position were 68.7±12.7% and 38.4±3.3Gy; for supine position these dose values were 77.1±13.7% and 40.7±3.1Gy. Conclusion: There is evidence of significant rotational instability in the prone position. The OAR dosimetry study indicates that there are some patients that may still benefit from the prone position, though many patients can be safely treated supine.

  11. A Case Series of Survival Outcomes in Patients with Advanced-stage IIIb/IV Non-small-cell Lung Cancer Treated with HangAm-Plus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bang Sun-Hwi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC represents approximately 80% of all lung cancers. Unfortunately, at their time of diagnosis, most patients have advanced to unresectable disease with a very poor prognosis. The oriental herbal medicine HangAm-Plus (HAP has been developed for antitumor purposes, and several previous studies have reported its therapeutic effects. In this study, the efficacy of HAP was evaluated as a third-line treatment for advanced-stage IIIb/IV NSCLC. Methods: The study involved six patients treated at the East- West Cancer Center (EWCC from April 2010 to October 2011. Inoperable advanced-stage IIIb/IV NSCLC patients received 3,000 or 6,000 mg of HAP on a daily basis over a 12-week period. Computed tomography (CT scans were obtained from the patients at the time of the initial administration and after 12 weeks of treatment. We observed and analyzed the patients overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS. Results: Of the six patients, three expired during the study, and the three remaining patients were alive as of October 31, 2011. The OS ranged from 234 to 512 days, with a median survival of 397 days and a one-year survival rate of 66.7%. In the 12-week-interval chest CT assessment, three patients showed stable disease (SD, and the other three showed progressive disease (PD. The PFS of patients ranged from 88 to 512 days, the median PFS being 96 days. Longer OS and PFS were correlated with SD. Although not directly comparable, the OS and the PFS of this study were greater than those of the docetaxel or the best supportive care group in other studies. Conclusion: HAP may prolong the OS and the PFS of inoperable stage IIIb/IV NSCLC patients without significant adverse effects. In the future, more controlled clinical trials with larger samples from multi-centers should be conducted to evaluate the efficacy and the safety of HAP.

  12. Quality of Life and Related Dimensions in Cancer Patients Treated with Mistletoe Extract (Iscador: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arndt Büssing

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine the effectiveness of the fermented plant extract Iscador, produced from the white-berry European mistletoe, in the treatment of patients with cancer with respect to quality-of-life- (QoL- associated measures. Methods. We searched databases such as PubMed/Medline, Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE, CAMbase, and other for controlled clinical studies on parameters associated with QoL. Outcome data were extracted and converted into standardized mean differences and their standard errors. Results. Thirteen prospective and controlled studies which met the inclusion/exclusion criteria reported positive effects in favor of the Iscador application. A random-effect meta-analysis estimated the overall treatment effect at standardized mean difference =0.56 (CI: 0.41 to 0.71, P<.0001. However, the methodological quality of the studies was poor. Conclusions. The analyzed studies give some evidence that Iscador treatment might have beneficial short-time effects on QoL-associated dimensions and psychosomatic self-regulation.

  13. The Impact of Skin-Sparing Mastectomy With Immediate Reconstruction in Patients With Stage III Breast Cancer Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Postmastectomy Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The safety and efficacy of skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) with immediate reconstruction (IR) in patients with locally advanced breast cancer are unclear. The purpose of this study is to compare the outcomes of women with noninflammatory Stage III SSM with IR vs. non–SSM-treated women who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy and adjuvant radiation therapy (XRT). Methods and Materials: Between October 1997 and March 2010, 100 consecutive patients (40 SSM with IR vs. 60 non-SSM) with Stage III breast cancer received anthracycline- and/or taxane-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy, mastectomy, and adjuvant XRT. Clinical stage (SSM with IR vs. for non-SSM) was IIIA (75% vs. 67%), IIIB (8% vs. 18%), and IIIC (8% vs. 8%). Tumors greater than 5 cm were found in 74% vs. 69%; 97% of patients in both groups were clinically node positive; and 8% vs. 18% had T4b disease. Results: The time from initial biopsy to XRT was prolonged for SSM–IR patients (274 vs. 254 days, p = 0.04), and there was a trend toward XRT delay of more than 8 weeks (52% vs. 31%, p = 0.07) after surgery. The rate of complications requiring surgical intervention was higher in the SSM–IR group (37.5% vs. 5%, p < 0.001). The 2-year actuarial locoregional control, breast cancer–specific survival, and overall survival rates for SSM with IR vs. non-SSM were 94.7% vs. 97.4%, 91.5% vs. 86.3%, and 87.4% vs. 84.8%, respectively (p = not significant). Conclusions: In our small study with limited follow-up, SSM with IR prolonged overall cancer treatment time and trended toward delaying XRT but did not impair oncologic outcomes. Complication rates were significantly higher in this group. Longer follow-up is needed.

  14. The Impact of Extent and Location of Mediastinal Lymph Node Involvement on Survival in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Definitive Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Annemarie T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mitra, Nandita [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Xanthopoulos, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Evans, Tracey; Stevenson, James; Langer, Corey [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Kucharczuk, John C. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Lin, Lilie; Rengan, Ramesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Several surgical series have identified subcarinal, contralateral, and multilevel nodal involvement as predictors of poor overall survival in patients with Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with definitive resection. This retrospective study evaluates the impact of extent and location of mediastinal lymph node (LN) involvement on survival in patients with Stage III NSCLC treated with definitive radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 106 consecutive patients with T1-4 N2-3 Stage III NSCLC treated with definitive radiotherapy at University of Pennsylvania between January 2003 and February 2009. For this analysis, mediastinal LN stations were divided into four mutually exclusive groups: supraclavicular, ipsilateral mediastinum, contralateral mediastinum, and subcarinal. Patients' conditions were then analyzed according to the extent of involvement and location of mediastinal LN stations. Results: The majority (88%) of patients received sequential or concurrent chemotherapy. The median follow-up time for survivors was 32.6 months. By multivariable Cox modeling, chemotherapy use (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.21 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.07-0.63]) was associated with improved overall survival. Increasing primary tumor [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose avidity (HR: 1.11 [CI: 1.06-1.19]), and subcarinal involvement (HR: 2.29 [CI: 1.11-4.73]) were significant negative predictors of overall survival. On univariate analysis, contralateral nodal involvement (HR: 0.70 [CI: 0.33-1.47]), supraclavicular nodal involvement (HR: 0.78 [CI: 0.38-1.67]), multilevel nodal involvement (HR: 0.97 [CI: 0.58-1.61]), and tumor size (HR: 1.04 [CI: 0.94-1.14]) did not predict for overall survival. Patients with subcarinal involvement also had lower rates of 2-year nodal control (51.2% vs. 74.9%, p = 0.047) and 2-year distant control (28.4% vs. 61.2%, p = 0.043). Conclusions: These data suggest that the factors that determine oncologic outcome in Stage III

  15. A dosimetric study of polyethylene glycol hydrogel in 200 prostate cancer patients treated with high-dose rate brachytherapy ± intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: We sought to analyze the effect of polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogel on rectal doses in prostate cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Materials and methods: Between July 2009 and April 2013, we treated 200 clinically localized prostate cancer patients with high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy ± intensity modulated radiation therapy. Half of the patients received a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided transperineal injection of 10 mL PEG hydrogel (DuraSeal™ Spinal Sealant System; Covidien, Mansfield, MA) in their anterior perirectal fat immediately prior to the first HDR brachytherapy treatment and 5 mL PEG hydrogel prior to the second HDR brachytherapy treatment. Prostate, rectal, and bladder doses and prostate–rectal distances were calculated based upon treatment planning CT scans. Results: There was a success rate of 100% (100/100) with PEG hydrogel implantation. PEG hydrogel significantly increased the prostate–rectal separation (mean ± SD, 12 ± 4 mm with gel vs. 4 ± 2 mm without gel, p < 0.001) and significantly decreased the mean rectal D2 mL (47 ± 9% with gel vs. 60 ± 8% without gel, p < 0.001). Gel decreased rectal doses regardless of body mass index (BMI). Conclusions: PEG hydrogel temporarily displaced the rectum away from the prostate by an average of 12 mm and led to a significant reduction in rectal radiation doses, regardless of BMI

  16. {sup 18}F-Fluorocholine PET/CT for early response assessment in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated with enzalutamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Giorgi, Ugo; Conteduca, Vincenza; Burgio, Salvatore Luca; Menna, Cecilia; Rossi, Lorena; Amadori, Dino [Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Department of Medical Oncology, Meldola (Italy); Caroli, Paola; Paganelli, Giovanni; Matteucci, Federica [Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Diagnostic Nuclear Medicine Unit, Meldola (Italy); Scarpi, Emanuela [Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Unit of Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Meldola (Italy); Moretti, Andrea; Galassi, Riccardo [Morgagni-Pierantoni Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Forli (Italy)

    2015-07-15

    We investigated the role of {sup 18}F-methylcholine (FCH) PET/CT in the early evaluation of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) treated with enzalutamide. The study group comprised 36 patients with a median age of 72 years (range 48-90 years) who were treated with enzalutamide 160 mg once daily after at least one chemotherapeutic regimen with docetaxel. Patients were evaluated monthly for serological prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response. FCH PET/CT was performed at baseline and repeated after 3-6 weeks. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression models addressed potential predictors of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). At a median follow-up of 24.2 months (range 1.8-27.3 months), 34 patients were evaluable for early FCH PET/CT evaluation of response, and of these 17 showed progressive disease (PD) and 17 had stable disease or a partial response. A decrease in PSA level of more than 50 % was observed in 21 patients. Early FCH PET/CT PD predicted radiological PD 3 months in advance of CT in 12 of 18 patients (66 %) and was discordant with the decrease in PSA level in 13 patients. In 6 of these, biochemical PD was confirmed in 2 months. In multivariate analysis, only decrease in PSA level and FCH PET/CT were significant predictors of PFS (p = 0.0005 and p = 0.029, respectively), whereas decrease in PSA level alone was predictive of OS (p = 0.007). This is one of the first studies to evaluate the role of FCH PET/CT as an early predictor of outcome in mCRPC patients treated with enzalutamide. Our preliminary results suggest that the combination of FCH PET/CT and decrease in PSA level could be a valid tool to predict PFS in mCRPC patients. PSA remains the single most important prognostic factor, while FCH PET/CT does not add more information on OS beyond that obtained from PSA. Further studies in larger populations are needed to confirm these data and to clarify the role of FCH PET/CT in predicting response

  17. Psychological and behavioral intervention improves the quality of life and mental health of patients suffering from differentiated thyroid cancer treated with postoperative radioactive iodine-131

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu HX

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hong-Xia Wu,1,* Hua Zhong,2,3,* Yue-Dong Xu,1 Cui-Ping Xu,4 Ying Zhang,5 Wei Zhang1 1Department of Endocrinology, Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital, Shandong University, 2Department of Oncology, Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 3Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital, Shandong University, 4Department of Nursing, Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, 5Department of Nursing, Tianjin Chest Hospital, Tianjing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: We examined the effects of psychological and behavioral intervention on health-related quality of life and mental health among patients suffering from differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC treated with postoperative radioactive iodine-131 (RAI.Methods: Sixty patients with DTC, undergoing RAI, were randomly assigned to receive either conventional nursing (n=30 or a 1-year psychological and behavioral intervention based on conventional nursing (n=30. Health-related quality of life and mental health issues, depression, and anxiety were measured using the Quality of Life Core Questionnaire, Self-rating Depression Scale, and Self-rating Anxiety Score, respectively.Results: After RAI treatment, patients in both groups showed improved functional capacities (ie, physical, role, cognitive, emotional, and social and global quality of life, along with reduced depression and anxiety (P<0.05. At 1-year follow-up, compared with patients in the routine nursing group, those in the psychological and behavioral intervention group demonstrated greater improvements in functional capacities, global quality of life, and depression and anxiety symptoms (P<0.05.Conclusion: Psychological and behavioral interventions for patients with DTC undergoing RAI facilitated positive outcomes, suggesting that nursing care models that include psychological and behavioral interventions

  18. Bone health in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coleman, R; Body, J J; Aapro, M;

    2014-01-01

    cancer for many patients resulting in a major reduction in skeletal complications, reduced bone pain and improved quality of life. Secondly, many of the treatments we use to treat cancer patients have effects on reproductive hormones, which are critical for the maintenance of normal bone remodelling...... in the metastatic processes required for cancer dissemination, and there are emerging data showing that, at least in some clinical situations, the use of bone-targeted treatments can reduce metastasis to bone and has potential impact on patient survival.......There are three distinct areas of cancer management that make bone health in cancer patients of increasing clinical importance. First, bone metastases are common in many solid tumours, notably those arising from the breast, prostate and lung, as well as multiple myeloma, and may cause major...

  19. Significance of ERBB2 Overexpression in Therapeutic Resistance and Cancer-Specific Survival in Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiation-Based Selective Bladder-Sparing Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Masaharu [Department of Urology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Graduate School, Tokyo (Japan); Koga, Fumitaka, E-mail: f-koga@cick.jp [Department of Urology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Graduate School, Tokyo (Japan); Yoshida, Soichiro [Department of Urology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Graduate School, Tokyo (Japan); Tamura, Tomoki [Department of Pathology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Graduate School, Tokyo (Japan); Fujii, Yasuhisa [Department of Urology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Graduate School, Tokyo (Japan); Ito, Eisaku [Department of Pathology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Graduate School, Tokyo (Japan); Kihara, Kazunori [Department of Urology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Graduate School, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate the associations of ERBB 2 overexpression with chemoradiation therapy (CRT) resistance and cancer-specific survival (CSS) in muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) patients treated with the CRT-based bladder-sparing protocol. Methods and Materials: From 1997 to 2012, 201 patients with cT2-4aN0M0 bladder cancer were treated with CRT (40 Gy with concurrent cisplatin) following transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT). Basically, patients with tumors that showed good CRT response and were amenable to segmental resection underwent partial cystectomy (PC) with pelvic lymph node dissection for bladder preservation; otherwise, radical cystectomy (RC) was recommended. Included in this study were 119 patients in whom TURBT specimens were available for immunohistochemical analysis of ERBB 2 expression. Following CRT, 30 and 65 patients underwent PC or RC, respectively; the remaining 24 patients did not undergo cystectomy. Tumors were defined as CRT-resistant when patients did not achieve complete response after CRT. Associations of ERBB 2 overexpression with CRT resistance and CSS were evaluated. Results: CRT resistance was observed clinically in 56% (67 of 119 patients) and pathologically (in cystectomy specimens) in 55% (52 of 95 patients). ERBB 2 overexpression was observed in 45 patients (38%). On multivariate analysis, ERBB 2 overexpression was an independent predictor for CRT resistance clinically (odds ratio, 3.6; P=.002) and pathologically (odds ratio, 2.9; P=.031). ERBB 2 overexpression was associated with shorter CSS (5-year CSS rates, 56% vs 87% for the ERBB 2 overexpression group vs the others; P=.001). ERBB 2 overexpression was also an independent risk factor for bladder cancer death at all time points of our bladder-sparing protocol (pre-CRT, post-CRT, and post-cystectomy). Conclusions: ERBB 2 overexpression appears relevant to CRT resistance and unfavorable CSS in MIBC patients treated with the CRT-based bladder

  20. Severe acute interstitial lung disease in a patient with anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangement-positive non-small cell lung cancer treated with alectinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yuzo; Okamoto, Isamu; Otsubo, Kohei; Iwama, Eiji; Hamada, Naoki; Harada, Taishi; Takayama, Koichi; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2015-10-01

    Alectinib, the second generation anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor, has significant potency in patients with ALK rearrangement positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and its toxicity is generally well tolerable. We report a patient who developed severe acute interstitial lung disease after alectinib treatment. An 86-year-old woman with stage IV lung adenocarcinoma positive for rearrangement of ALK gene was treated with alectinib. On the 215th day after initiation of alectinib administration, she was admitted to our hospital with the symptom of progressive dyspnea. Computed tomography (CT) revealed diffuse ground glass opacities and consolidations in both lungs, and analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid revealed pronounced lymphocytosis. There was no evidence of infection or other specific causes of her condition, and she was therefore diagnosed with interstitial lung disease induced by alectinib. Her CT findings and respiratory condition improved after steroid pulse therapy. As far as we are aware, this is the first reported case of alectinib-induced severe interstitial lung disease (ILD). We should be aware of the possibility of such a severe adverse event and should therefore carefully monitor patients treated with this drug.

  1. Pharmacogenetic Study in Rectal Cancer Patients Treated With Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy: Polymorphisms in Thymidylate Synthase, Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor, GSTP1, and DNA Repair Genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paez, David, E-mail: dpaez@santpau.cat [Department of Medical Oncology, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Salazar, Juliana; Pare, Laia [Centre for Biomedical Network Research on Rare Diseases, Barcelona (Spain); Department of Genetics, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Pertriz, Lourdes [Department of Radiotherapy, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Targarona, Eduardo [Department of Surgery, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Rio, Elisabeth del [Centre for Biomedical Network Research on Rare Diseases, Barcelona (Spain); Department of Genetics, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Barnadas, Agusti; Marcuello, Eugenio [Department of Medical Oncology, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Baiget, Montserrat [Centre for Biomedical Network Research on Rare Diseases, Barcelona (Spain); Department of Genetics, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Several studies have been performed to evaluate the usefulness of neoadjuvant treatment using oxaliplatin and fluoropyrimidines for locally advanced rectal cancer. However, preoperative biomarkers of outcome are lacking. We studied the polymorphisms in thymidylate synthase, epidermal growth factor receptor, glutathione S-transferase pi 1 (GSTP1), and several DNA repair genes to evaluate their usefulness as pharmacogenetic markers in a cohort of 128 rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Blood samples were obtained from 128 patients with Stage II-III rectal cancer. DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood nucleated cells, and the genotypes were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction amplification and automated sequencing techniques or using a 48.48 dynamic array on the BioMark system. The germline polymorphisms studied were thymidylate synthase, (VNTR/5 Prime UTR, 2R G>C single nucleotide polymorphism [SNP], 3R G>C SNP), epidermal growth factor receptor (Arg497Lys), GSTP1 (Ile105val), excision repair cross-complementing 1 (Asn118Asn, 8092C>A, 19716G>C), X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) (Arg194Trp, Arg280His, Arg399Gln), and xeroderma pigmentosum group D (Lys751Gln). The pathologic response, pathologic regression, progression-free survival, and overall survival were evaluated according to each genotype. Results: The Asterisk-Operator 3/ Asterisk-Operator 3 thymidylate synthase genotype was associated with a greater response rate (pathologic complete remission and microfoci residual tumor, 59% in Asterisk-Operator 3/ Asterisk-Operator 3 vs. 35% in Asterisk-Operator 2/ Asterisk-Operator 2 and Asterisk-Operator 2/ Asterisk-Operator 3; p = .013). For the thymidylate synthase genotype, the median progression-free survival was 103 months for the Asterisk-Operator 3/ Asterisk-Operator 3 patients and 84 months for the Asterisk-Operator 2/ Asterisk-Operator 2 and Asterisk-Operator 2/ Asterisk

  2. Pharmacogenetic Study in Rectal Cancer Patients Treated With Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy: Polymorphisms in Thymidylate Synthase, Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor, GSTP1, and DNA Repair Genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Several studies have been performed to evaluate the usefulness of neoadjuvant treatment using oxaliplatin and fluoropyrimidines for locally advanced rectal cancer. However, preoperative biomarkers of outcome are lacking. We studied the polymorphisms in thymidylate synthase, epidermal growth factor receptor, glutathione S-transferase pi 1 (GSTP1), and several DNA repair genes to evaluate their usefulness as pharmacogenetic markers in a cohort of 128 rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Blood samples were obtained from 128 patients with Stage II-III rectal cancer. DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood nucleated cells, and the genotypes were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction amplification and automated sequencing techniques or using a 48.48 dynamic array on the BioMark system. The germline polymorphisms studied were thymidylate synthase, (VNTR/5′UTR, 2R G>C single nucleotide polymorphism [SNP], 3R G>C SNP), epidermal growth factor receptor (Arg497Lys), GSTP1 (Ile105val), excision repair cross-complementing 1 (Asn118Asn, 8092C>A, 19716G>C), X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) (Arg194Trp, Arg280His, Arg399Gln), and xeroderma pigmentosum group D (Lys751Gln). The pathologic response, pathologic regression, progression-free survival, and overall survival were evaluated according to each genotype. Results: The ∗3/∗3 thymidylate synthase genotype was associated with a greater response rate (pathologic complete remission and microfoci residual tumor, 59% in ∗3/∗3 vs. 35% in ∗2/∗2 and ∗2/∗3; p = .013). For the thymidylate synthase genotype, the median progression-free survival was 103 months for the ∗3/∗3 patients and 84 months for the ∗2/∗2 and ∗2/∗3 patients (p = .039). For XRCC1 Arg399Gln SNP, the median progression-free survival was 101 months for the G/G, 78 months for the G/A, and 31 months for the A/A patients (p = .048). Conclusions: The thymidylate

  3. The Impact of Extent and Location of Mediastinal Lymph Node Involvement on Survival in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Definitive Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Several surgical series have identified subcarinal, contralateral, and multilevel nodal involvement as predictors of poor overall survival in patients with Stage III non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with definitive resection. This retrospective study evaluates the impact of extent and location of mediastinal lymph node (LN) involvement on survival in patients with Stage III NSCLC treated with definitive radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 106 consecutive patients with T1–4 N2–3 Stage III NSCLC treated with definitive radiotherapy at University of Pennsylvania between January 2003 and February 2009. For this analysis, mediastinal LN stations were divided into four mutually exclusive groups: supraclavicular, ipsilateral mediastinum, contralateral mediastinum, and subcarinal. Patients’ conditions were then analyzed according to the extent of involvement and location of mediastinal LN stations. Results: The majority (88%) of patients received sequential or concurrent chemotherapy. The median follow-up time for survivors was 32.6 months. By multivariable Cox modeling, chemotherapy use (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.21 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.07–0.63]) was associated with improved overall survival. Increasing primary tumor [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose avidity (HR: 1.11 [CI: 1.06–1.19]), and subcarinal involvement (HR: 2.29 [CI: 1.11–4.73]) were significant negative predictors of overall survival. On univariate analysis, contralateral nodal involvement (HR: 0.70 [CI: 0.33–1.47]), supraclavicular nodal involvement (HR: 0.78 [CI: 0.38–1.67]), multilevel nodal involvement (HR: 0.97 [CI: 0.58–1.61]), and tumor size (HR: 1.04 [CI: 0.94–1.14]) did not predict for overall survival. Patients with subcarinal involvement also had lower rates of 2-year nodal control (51.2% vs. 74.9%, p = 0.047) and 2-year distant control (28.4% vs. 61.2%, p = 0.043). Conclusions: These data suggest that the factors that determine oncologic

  4. The prognostic impact of soluble and vesicular HLA-G and its relationship to circulating tumor cells in neoadjuvant treated breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Lisa; Kasimir-Bauer, Sabine; Hoffmann, Oliver; Bittner, Ann-Kathrin; Wagner, Bettina; Manvailer, Luis Felipe Santos; Schramm, Sabine; Bankfalvi, Agnes; Giebel, Bernd; Kimmig, Rainer; Horn, Peter A; Rebmann, Vera

    2016-09-01

    The non-classical human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G) molecule and its soluble forms exert multiple immune suppressive regulatory functions in malignancy and in stem cells contributing to immune escape mechanisms. HLA-G can be secreted as free soluble HLA-G molecules or via extracellular vesicles (EVs). Here we evaluated these soluble HLA-G forms as prognostic marker for prediction of the clinical outcome of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) treated breast cancer (BC) patients. Plasma samples of BC patients procured before (n=142) and after (n=154) NACT were quantified for total soluble HLA-G (sHLA-Gtot) and HLA-G levels in ExoQuick™ derived EV fractions (sHLA-GEV) by ELISA. The corresponding increments were specified as free sHLA-G (sHLA-Gfree). Total and free sHLA-G were significantly increased in NACT treated BC patients compared to healthy controls (n=16). High sHLA-Gfree levels were exclusively associated to estrogen receptor expression before NACT. Importantly, high sHLA-GEV levels before NACT were related to disease progression and the detection of stem cell-like circulating tumor cells, but high sHLA-Gfree levels indicated an improved clinical outcome. Thus, this study demonstrates for the first time that the different sHLA-G subcomponents represent dissimilar qualitative prognostic impacts on the clinical outcome of NACT treated BC patients, whereas the total sHLA-G levels without separating into subcomponents are not related to clinical outcome.

  5. Randomized Phase III Trial of Ixabepilone Plus Capecitabine Versus Capecitabine in Patients With Metastatic Breast Cancer Previously Treated With an Anthracycline and a Taxane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparano, Joseph A.; Vrdoljak, Eduard; Rixe, Oliver; Xu, Binghe; Manikhas, Alexey; Medina, Carlos; Ventilari Da Costa, Susanne Crocamo; Ro, Jungsil; Rubio, Gonzalo; Rondinon, Monica; Perez Manga, Gumersindo; Peck, Ronald; Poulart, Valerie; Conte, Pierfranco

    2010-01-01

    Purpose We sought to determine whether the combination of ixabepilone plus capecitabine improved overall survival (OS) compared with capecitabine alone in patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) previously treated with anthracyclines and taxanes. Patients and Methods A total of 1,221 patients with MBC previously treated with anthracycline and taxanes were randomly assigned to ixabepilone (40 mg/m2 intravenously on day 1) plus capecitabine (2,000 mg/m2 orally on days 1 through 14) or capecitabine alone (2,500 mg/m2 on the same schedule) given every 21 days. The trial was powered to detect a 20% reduction in the hazard ratio (HR) for death. Results There was no significant difference in OS between the combination and capecitabine monotherapy arm, the primary end point (median, 16.4 v 15.6 months; HR = 0.9; 95% CI, 078 to 1.03; P = .1162). The arms were well balanced with the exception of a higher prevalence of impaired performance status (Karnofsky performance status 70% to 80%) in the combination arm (32% v 25%). In a secondary Cox regression analysis adjusted for performance status and other prognostic factors, OS was improved for the combination (HR = 0.85; 95% CI, 0.75 to 0.98; P = .0231). In 79% of patients with measurable disease, the combination significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS; median, 6.2 v 4.2 months; HR = 0.79; P = .0005) and response rate (43% v 29%; P < .0001). Grade 3 to 4 neuropathy occurred in 24% treated with the combination, but was reversible. Conclusion This study confirmed a previous trial demonstrating improved PFS and response for the ixabepilone-capecitabine combination compared with capecitabine alone, although this did not result in improved survival. PMID:20530276

  6. 2q36.3 is associated with prognosis for oestrogen receptor-negative breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Li (Jingmei); L.S. Lindström (Linda); J.N. Foo (Jia); M. Rafiq (Meena); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); J. Dennis (Joe); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); L.J. van 't Veer (Laura); S. Cornelissen (Sten); E.J.T. Rutgers (Emiel); M.C. Southey (Melissa); C. Apicella (Carmel); G.S. Dite (Gillian); J.L. Hopper (John); P.A. Fasching (Peter); L. Haeberle (Lothar); A.B. Ekici (Arif); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); C. Blomqvist (Carl); T.A. Muranen (Taru); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); A. Lindblom (Annika); S. Margolin (Sara); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J. Hartikainen (Jaana); V. Kataja (Vesa); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); K. Investigators (Kconfab); K.-A. Phillips (Kelly-Anne); S.-A. McLachlan (Sue-Anne); D. Lambrechts (Diether); B. Thienpont (Bernard); A. Smeets (Ann); H. Wildiers (Hans); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); P. Seibold (Petra); A. Rudolph (Anja); G.G. Giles (Graham); L. Baglietto (Laura); G. Severi (Gianluca); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); B.E. Henderson (Brian); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick); L. Le Marchand (Loic); V. Kristensen (Vessela); G.G. Alnæs (Grethe); A.-L. Borresen-Dale (Anne-Lise); S. Nord (Silje); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia); G. Glendon (Gord); S. Tchatchou (Sandrine); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); M. Kriege (Mieke); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); Y. Li (Yi); U. Hamann (Ute); D. Torres (Diana); H.U. Ulmer (Hans); T. Rüdiger (Thomas); C-Y. Shen (Chen-Yang); C.-N. Hsiung (Chia-Ni); P.-E. Wu (Pei-Ei); S.-T. Chen (Shou-Tung); S.-H. Teo; N.A.M. Taib (Nur Aishah Mohd); C. Har Yip (Cheng); G. Fuang Ho (Gwo); K. Matsuo (Keitaro); H. Ito (Hidemi); H. Iwata (Hisato); K. Tajima (Kazuo); D. Kang (Daehee); J.-Y. Choi (Ji-Yeob); S.K. Park (Sue); K-Y. Yoo (Keun-Young); T. Maishman (Tom); W. Tapper (William); A.M. Dunning (Alison); M. Shah (Mitul); R.N. Luben (Robert); J. Brown (Judith); C. Chuen Khor (Chiea); D. Eccles (Diana); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); D.F. Easton (Douglas); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); J. Liu (Jianjun); P. Hall (Per); K. Czene (Kamila)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractLarge population-based registry studies have shown that breast cancer prognosis is inherited. Here we analyse single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes implicated in human immunology and inflammation as candidates for prognostic markers of breast cancer survival involving 1,804 oes

  7. ABCB1 and ABCC2 and the risk of distant metastasis in Thai breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sensorn I

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Insee Sensorn,1,* Chonlaphat Sukasem,2,* Ekaphop Sirachainan,3 Montri Chamnanphon,2 Ekawat Pasomsub,4 Narumol Trachu,5 Porntip Supavilai,1 Darawan Pinthong,1 Sansanee Wongwaisayawan6 1Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, 2Division of Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine, Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, 3Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, 4Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, 5Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, 6Division of Anatomical Pathology, Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Genetic polymorphisms of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters have been extensively studied with regard to tamoxifen treatment outcomes. However, the results are inconclusive. Analysis of organ-specific metastasis may reveal the association of these pharmacogenetic factors. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of CYP3A5, CYP2D6, ABCB1, and ABCC2 polymorphisms on the risk of all distant and organ-specific metastases in Thai patients who received tamoxifen adjuvant therapy. Methods: Genomic DNA was extracted from blood samples of 73 patients with breast cancer who received tamoxifen adjuvant therapy. CYP3A5 (6986A>G, CYP2D6 (100C>T, ABCB1 (3435C>T, and ABCC2 (-24C>T were genotyped using allelic discrimination real-time polymerase chain reaction assays. The impacts of prognostic clinical factors and genetic variants on disease-free survival were analyzed using the Kaplan–Meier method and Cox regression analysis. Results: In the univariate analysis, primary tumor size >5 cm was significantly associated with increased risk of distant metastasis (P=0

  8. Are there efficacious treatments for treating the fatigue–sleep disturbance–depression symptom cluster in breast cancer patients? A Rapid Evidence Assessment of the Literature (REAL©

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain S

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Shamini Jain,1 Courtney Boyd,2 Lavinia Fiorentino,1 Raheleh Khorsan,3 Cindy Crawford2 1Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA; 2Samueli Institute, Alexandria, VA, USA; 3Samueli Institute, Corona Del Mar, CA, USA Purpose: While fatigue, sleep disturbance, and depression often co-occur in breast cancer patients, treatment efficacy for this symptom cluster is unknown. A systematic review was conducted to determine whether there are specific interventions (ie, medical, pharmacological, behavioral, psychological, and complementary medicine approaches that are effective in mitigating the fatigue–sleep disturbance–depression symptom cluster in breast cancer patients, using the Rapid Evidence Assessment of the Literature (REAL© process. Methods: Peer-reviewed literature was searched across multiple databases; from database inception – October 2011, using keywords pre-identified to capture randomized controlled trials (RCT relevant to the research question. Methodological bias was assessed using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN 50 checklist. Confidence in the estimate of effect and assessment of safety were also evaluated across the categories of included interventions via the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluations (GRADE methodology. Results: The initial search yielded 531 citations, of which 41 met the inclusion criteria. Of these, twelve RCTs reported on all three symptoms, and eight of these were able to be included in the GRADE analysis. The remaining 29 RCTs reported on two symptoms. Studies were of mixed quality and many were underpowered. Overall, results suggest that there is: 1 promising evidence for the effectiveness of various treatment types in mitigating sleep disturbance in breast cancer patients; 2 mixed evidence for fatigue; 3 little evidence for treating depression; and 4 no clear evidence that treatment of one symptom results in effective

  9. Evaluation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor as a Prognostic Marker for Local Relapse in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an important protein involved in the process of angiogenesis that has been found to correlate with relapse-free and overall survival in breast cancer, predominantly in locally advanced and metastatic disease. A paucity of data is available on the prognostic implications of VEGF in early-stage breast cancer; specifically, its prognostic value for local relapse after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) is largely unknown. The purpose of our study was to assess VEGF expression in a cohort of early-stage breast cancer patients treated with BCT and to correlate the clinical and pathologic features and outcomes with overexpression of VEGF. Methods and Materials: After obtaining institutional review board approval, the paraffin specimens of 368 patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with BCT between 1975 and 2005 were constructed into tissue microarrays with twofold redundancy. The tissue microarrays were stained for VEGF and read by a trained pathologist, who was unaware of the clinical details, as positive or negative according the standard guidelines. The clinical and pathologic data, long-term outcomes, and results of VEGF staining were analyzed. Results: The median follow-up for the entire cohort was 6.5 years. VEGF expression was positive in 56 (15%) of the 368 patients. Although VEGF expression did not correlate with age at diagnosis, tumor size, nodal status, histologic type, family history, estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor status, or HER-2 status, a trend was seen toward increased VEGF expression in the black cohort (26% black vs. 13% white, p = .068). Within the margin-negative cohort, VEGF did not predict for local relapse-free survival (RFS) (96% vs. 95%), nodal RFS (100% vs. 100%), distant metastasis-free survival (91% vs. 92%), overall survival (92% vs. 97%), respectively (all p >.05). Subset analysis revealed that VEGF was highly predictive of local RFS in node-positive, margin

  10. Prognostic significance of race on biochemical control in patients with localized prostate cancer treated with permanent brachytherapy: multivariate and matched-pair analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare PSA relapse-free survival (PSA-RFS) between African-American (AA) and white American (WA) males treated with permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) for clinically localized prostate cancer. Methods and materials: One thousand eighty-one consecutive patients, including 246 African-Americans, underwent PPB with 103Pd or 125I, alone or with external beam radiation therapy between September 1992 and September 1999. Computer-generated matching was performed to create two identical cohorts of WA and AA males, based on the use of neoadjuvant androgen ablation (NAAD), pretreatment PSA, and Gleason score. Presenting characteristics were used to define risk groups, as follows: Low risk had PSA ≤10 and Gleason score ≤6, intermediate risk had PSA >10 or Gleason score ≥7, and high risk had PSA >10 and Gleason score ≥7. PSA-RFS was calculated using the Kattan modification of the ASTRO definition, and the log-rank test was used to compare Kaplan-Meier PSA-RFS curves. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine predictors of PSA-RFS. Results: Overall, univariate analysis revealed that AA males at presentation had lower disease stage (p=0.01), had lower Gleason scores (p=0.017), were younger (p=0.001), and were more likely to receive NAAD (p=0.001) than their WA counterparts. There were no differences in pretreatment PSA, isotope selection, use of external beam radiation therapy, median follow-up, or risk group classification between AA and WA males. Pretreatment PSA and Gleason score were significant predictors of PSA-RFS in multivariate analysis, and race was not significant. There was no significant difference between the 5-year PSA-RFS for AA males (84.0%) and the matched cohort of WA males (81.2%) (p=0.384). Race was not a predictor of 5-year PSA-RFS among patients treated with or without NAAD and within low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups. Conclusion: Race is not an independent predictor of 5-year PSA-RFS in patients with

  11. Interstitial lung disease in gefitinib-treated Japanese patients with non-small cell lung cancer – a retrospective analysis: JMTO LC03-02

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    Tada Harue

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Japan, high incidences of interstitial lung disease (ILD and ILD-related deaths have been reported among gefitinib-treated patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. We investigated the efficacy of gefitinib, the incidence of ILD and risk factors for ILD in these patients. Findings We obtained patient data retrospectively using questionnaires sent to 22 institutions. We asked for demographic and clinical data on NSCLC patients for whom gefitinib treatment had begun between July 2002 and February 2003. Data from a total of 526 patients were analyzed. The patient characteristics were as follows: 64% male, 69% with adenocarcinoma, 61% with a performance score of 0–1, and 5% with concurrent interstitial pneumonitis. The objective response proportion was 80/439 (18.2%; 95% CI: 14.7–22.0. ILD developed in 17 patients (3.2%; 95% CI 1.9–5.1%, of whom 7 died. According to multivariate analysis, female sex, history of prior chemotherapy, low absolute neutrophil count before gefitinib treatment, and adenocarcinoma histology were associated with response to gefitinib treatment. None of the factors we evaluated were associated with the development of ILD. Conclusion The results of this study are consistent with previously published values for treatment response proportions and incidence of ILD during gefitinib treatment in Japanese patients. Future studies should be aimed at identifying factors indicating that a patient has a high probability of receiving benefit from gefitinib and a low risk of developing ILD.

  12. Significance of PIK3CA Mutations in Patients with Early Breast Cancer Treated with Adjuvant Chemotherapy: A Hellenic Cooperative Oncology Group (HeCOG Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Papaxoinis

    Full Text Available The PI3K-AKT pathway is frequently activated in breast cancer. PIK3CA mutations are most frequently found in the helical (exon 9 and kinase (exon 20 domains of this protein. The aim of the present study was to examine the role of different types of PIK3CA mutations in combination with molecular biomarkers related to PI3K-AKT signaling in patients with early breast cancer.Tumor tissue samples from 1008 early breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy in two similar randomized trials of HeCOG were examined. Tumors were subtyped with immunohistochemistry (IHC and FISH for ER, PgR, Ki67, HER2 and androgen receptor (AR. PIK3CA mutations were analyzed by Sanger sequencing (exon 20 and qPCR (exon 9 (Sanger/qPCR mutations. In 610 cases, next generation sequencing (NGS PIK3CA mutation data were also available. PIK3CA mutations and PTEN protein expression (IHC were analyzed in luminal tumors (ER and/or PgR positive, molecular apocrine carcinomas (MAC; ER/PgR negative / AR positive and hormone receptor (ER/PgR/AR negative tumors.PIK3CA mutations were detected in 235/1008 tumors (23% with Sanger/qPCR and in 149/610 tumors (24% with NGS. Concordance between the two methods was good with a Kappa coefficient of 0.76 (95% CI 0.69-0.82. Lobular histology, low tumor grade and luminal A tumors were associated with helical domain mutations (PIK3CAhel, while luminal B with kinase domain mutations (PIK3CAkin. The overall incidence of PIK3CA mutations was higher in luminal as compared to MAC and hormone receptor negative tumors (p = 0.004. Disease-free and overall survival did not significantly differ with respect to PIK3CA mutation presence and type. However, a statistically significant interaction between PIK3CA mutation status and PTEN low protein expression with regard to prognosis was identified.The present study did not show any prognostic significance of specific PIK3CA mutations in a large group of predominantly lymph-node positive breast cancer

  13. Continued Benefit to Androgen Deprivation Therapy for Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy Across Multiple Definitions of High-Risk Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To analyze prognostic factors in patients with high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and androgen deprivation (ADT). Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2008 at University of Michigan Medical Center, 718 men were consecutively treated with EBRT to at least 75 Gy. Seven definitions of high-risk prostate cancer, applying to 11–33% of patients, were evaluated. Biochemical failure (BF), salvage ADT use, metastatic progression, and prostate cancer–specific mortality (PCSM) were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards regression. Results: Each high-risk definition was associated with increased BF (hazard ratio [HR] 2.8–3.9, p < 0.0001), salvage ADT use (HR 3.9–6.3, p < 0.0001), metastasis (HR 3.7–6.6, p < 0.0001), and PCSM (HR 3.7–16.2, p < 0.0001). Furthermore, an increasing number of high-risk features predicted worse outcome. Adjuvant ADT yielded significant reductions in both metastases (HR 0.19–0.38, p < 0.001) and PCSM (HR 0.38–0.50, p < 0.05) for all high-risk definitions (with the exception of clinical Stage T3–4 disease) but improved BF only for those with elevated Gleason scores (p < 0.03, HR 0.25–0.48). When treated with ADT and dose-escalated EBRT, patients with Gleason scores 8 to 10, without other high-risk features, had 8-year freedom from BF of 74%, freedom from distant metastases of 93%, and cause-specific survival of 92%, with salvage ADT used in 16% of patients. Conclusion: Adjuvant ADT results in a significant improvement in clinical progression and PCSM across multiple definitions of high-risk disease even with dose-escalated EBRT. There is a subset of patients, characterized by multiple high-risk features or the presence of Gleason Pattern 5, who remain at significant risk for metastasis and PCSM despite current treatment.

  14. Using the lymph nodal ratio to predict the risk of locoregional recurrence in lymph node-positive breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy without radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the prognostic value of axillary lymph node ratio (LNR) as compared to the number of involved nodes (pN stage) in patients with axillary lymph node-positive breast cancer treated with mastectomy without radiation. We performed a retrospective analysis of the clinical data of patients with stage II-III node-positive breast cancer (N=1068) between 1998 and 2007. Locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS) and overall survival (OS) were compared based on the LNR and pN staging. A total of 780 cases were classified as pN1, 183 as pN2, and 105 as pN3. With respect to LNR, 690 cases had a LNR from 0.01-0.20, 269 cases a LNR from 0.21-0.65, and 109 cases a LNR > 0.65. The median follow-up time was 62 months. Univariate analysis showed that both LNR and pN stage were prognostic factors of LRFS and OS (p<0.05). Multivariate analysis indicated that LNR was an independent prognostic factor of LRFS and OS (p<0.05). pN stage had no significant effect on LRFS or OS (p>0.05). In subgroup analysis, the LNR identified groups of patients with different survival rates based on pN stage. LNR is superior to pN staging as a prognostic factor in lymph node-positive breast cancer after mastectomy, and should be used as one of the indications for adjuvant radiation therapy

  15. Comparison of the micronucleus and chromosome aberration techniques for the documentation of cytogenetic damage in radiochemotherapy-treated patients with rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The goal of the interdisciplinary Clinical Research Unit KFO179 (Biological Basis of Individual Tumor Response in Patients with Rectal Cancer) is to develop an individual Response and Toxicity Score for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy. The aim of the present study was to find a reliable and sensitive method with easy scoring criteria and high numbers of cell counts in a short period of time in order to analyze DNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Thus, the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay and the chromosome aberration technique (CAT) were tested. Materials and Methods: Peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from 22 patients with rectal cancer before (0 Gy), during (21.6 Gy), and after (50.4 Gy) radiochemotherapy were stimulated in vitro by phytohemagglutinin (PHA); the cultures were then processed for the CBMN assay and the CAT to compare the two methods. Results: A significant increase of chromosomal damage was observed in the course of radiochemotherapy parallel to increasing radiation doses, but independent of the chemotherapy applied. The equivalence of both methods was shown by Westlake's equivalence test. Conclusion: The results show that the CBMN assay and the CAT are equivalent. For further investigations, we prefer the CBMN assay, because it is simpler through easy scoring criteria, allows high numbers of cell counts in less time, is reliable, sensitive, and has higher statistical power. In the future, we plan to integrate cytogenetic damage during radiochemotherapy into the planned Response and Toxicity Score within our interdisciplinary Clinical Research Unit. (orig.)

  16. Importance of Local Control in Early-Stage Prostate Cancer: Outcomes of Patients With Positive Post-Radiation Therapy Biopsy Results Treated in RTOG 9408

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, Daniel J., E-mail: dkrauss@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Hu, Chen [NRG Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bahary, Jean-Paul [Centre Hospitalier de l' Université de Montréal-Notre Dame, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Souhami, Luis [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Gore, Elizabeth M. [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Chafe, Susan Maria Jacinta [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Leibenhaut, Mark H. [Sutter General Hospital, Sacramento, California (United States); Narayan, Samir [Michigan Cancer Research Consortium CCOP (United States); Torres-Roca, Javier [H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Michalski, Jeff [Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Zeitzer, Kenneth L. [Albert Einstein Medical Center, Bronx, New York, New York (United States); Donavanik, Viroon [Christiana Care Health Services Inc CCOP, Newark, Delaware (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); McGowan, David G. [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Jones, Christopher U. [Sutter General Hospital, Sacramento, California (United States); Shipley, William U. [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the association between positive post-radiation therapy (RT) biopsy results and subsequent clinical outcomes in males with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group study 94-08 analyzed 1979 males with prostate cancer, stage T1b-T2b and prostate-specific antigen concentrations of ≤20 ng/dL, to investigate whether 4 months of total androgen suppression (TAS) added to RT improved survival compared to RT alone. Patients randomized to receive TAS received flutamide with luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist. According to protocol, patients without evidence of clinical recurrence or initiation of additional endocrine therapy underwent repeat prostate biopsy 2 years after RT completion. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the impact of positive post-RT biopsy results on clinical outcomes. Results: A total of 831 patients underwent post-RT biopsy, 398 were treated with RT alone and 433 with RT plus TAS. Patients with positive post-RT biopsy results had higher rates of biochemical failure (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.7; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.3-2.1) and distant metastasis (HR = 2.4; 95% CI = 1.3-4.4) and inferior disease-specific survival (HR = 3.8; 95% CI = 1.9-7.5). Positive biopsy results remained predictive of such outcomes after correction for potential confounders such as Gleason score, tumor stage, and TAS administration. Prior TAS therapy did not prevent elevated risk of adverse outcome in the setting of post-RT positive biopsy results. Patients with Gleason score ≥7 with a positive biopsy result additionally had inferior overall survival compared to those with a negative biopsy result (HR = 1.56; 95% CI = 1.04-2.35). Conclusions: Positive post-RT biopsy is associated with increased rates of distant metastases and inferior disease-specific survival in patients treated with definitive RT and was associated with inferior overall

  17. Analysis of long-term survival in patients treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the prognostic factors of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) treated with three dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT). Methods: In 106 patients with stage IIIa/IIIb NSCLC treated with 3DCRT from Nov 2000 to Mar 2004, 46 of them were treated with radiotherapy alone, 41 by concurrent chemoradiation, and 19 by sequential chemoradiation. The influence of related prognostic factors on survival was evaluated by univariate and multivariate analysis. The treatment outcome was analyzed by prognostic index model. Results: The 1-, 3- and 5- year overall survival rate was 50.0%, 22.2% and 15.5%, respectively, and the median survival time was 12 months. The univariate analysis showed that the following factors were significantly associated with the longer survival: female, good kamofsky performance status (KPS), squamous cell carcinoma, absence of supraclavicular lymph nodes, no smoking history, hemoglobin ≥130 g/L before treatment, N stage, the maximum diameter of tumor ≤5 cm, the volume of tumor ≤90 cm3, GTV ≤150 cm3 and the radiotherapy efficacy. However, multivariate analysis revealed that no smoking history, hemoglobin ≥130 g/L and GTV ≤150 cm3 were the independent risk factors for predicting the survival. Conclusions: Three dimensional conformal radiation therapy could be effective in the treatment of locally advanced NSCLC. No smoking history, hemoglobin ≥130 g/L and GTV ≤150 cm3 might be the independent risk factors for predicting the survival. Prognostic index model could improve the potential of multivariate analysis in predicting the survival of patients treated with radiotherapy for NSCLC. (authors)

  18. Impact of radiotherapy technique on the outcome of early breast cancer treated with conservative surgery: A multicenter observational study on 1,176 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To quantify the impact of radiotherapy technique on cosmetic outcome and on 5-year local control rate of early breast cancer treated with conservative surgery and adjuvant radiation. Methods and MaterialsPurpose: A total of 1,176 patients irradiated to the breast in 1997 were entered by eight centers into a prospective, observational study. Surgical procedure was quadrantectomy in 97% of patients, with axillary dissection performed in 96%; pT-stage was T1 in 81% and T2 in 19% of cases; pN-stage was N0 in 71%, N + (1-3) in 21%, and N + (>3) in 8% of cases. An immobilization device was used in 17% of patients; external contour-based and computed tomography-based treatment planning were performed in 20% and 72% of cases, respectively; 37% of patients were treated with a telecobalt unit and 63% with a linear accelerator; portal verification was used in 55% of patients; a boost dose to the tumor bed was delivered in 60% of cases. Results: With a median follow-up of 6.2 years, local, regional, and distant control rates at 5 years are 98%, 99%, and 92%, respectively. Use of less sophisticated treatment technique was associated with a less favorable cosmetic outcome. Local control was comparable between centers despite substantial technical differences. In a multivariate analysis including clinical and technical factors, only older age and prescription of medical adjuvant treatment significantly predicted for better local control, whereas use of portal verification was of borderline significance. Conclusions: Radiation technical factors impacted negatively on cosmetic outcome, but had relatively small effects on local control compared with other clinical factors

  19. Early treatment volume reduction rate as a prognostic factor in patients treated with chemoradiotherapy for limited stage small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joo Hwan; Lee, Jeong Shin; Lee, Chang Geol; Cho, Jae Ho [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jin Hyun; Kim, Jun Won [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    To investigate the relationship between early treatment response to definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and survival outcome in patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC). We retrospectively reviewed 47 patients with LS-SCLC who received definitive CRT between January 2009 and December 2012. Patients were treated with systemic chemotherapy regimen of etoposide/carboplatin (n = 15) or etoposide/cisplatin (n = 32) and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy at a median dose of 54 Gy (range, 46 to 64 Gy). Early treatment volume reduction rate (ETVRR) was defined as the percentage change in gross tumor volume between diagnostic computed tomography (CT) and simulation CT for adaptive RT planning and was used as a parameter for early treatment response. The median dose at adaptive RT planning was 36 Gy (range, 30 to 43 Gy), and adaptive CT was performed in 30 patients (63.8%). With a median follow-up of 27.7 months (range, 5.9 to 75.8 months), the 2-year locoregional progression-free survival (LRPFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 74.2% and 56.5%, respectively. The mean diagnostic and adaptive gross tumor volumes were 117.9 mL (range, 5.9 to 447 mL) and 36.8 mL (range, 0.3 to 230.6 mL), respectively. The median ETVRR was 71.4% (range, 30 to 97.6%) and the ETVRR >45% group showed significantly better OS (p < 0.0001) and LRPFS (p = 0.009) than the other group. ETVRR as a parameter for early treatment response may be a useful prognostic factor to predict treatment outcome in LS-SCLC patients treated with CRT.

  20. Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation and Carboplatin Followed By Chemoradiation in Treating Patients With Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-30

    Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Cancer

  1. Dose-Volume Analysis of Lung and Heart according to Respiration in Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Breast Conserving Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Shim, Jae-Goo; Kim, Jeong-Koo; Park, Won; Seo, Jeong-Min; Hong, Chae-Sun; Song, Ki-Won; Lim, Cheong-Hwan; Jung, Hong-Ryang; Kim, Chan-Hyeong

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Adjuvant radiotherapy of breast cancer using a photon tangential field incurs a risk of late heart and lung toxicity. The use of free breathing (FB), expiration breath hold (EBH), and deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) during tangential breast radiotherapy as a means of reducing irradiated lung and heart volume was evaluated. Methods In 10 women with left-sided breast cancer (mean age, 44 years) post-operative computed tomography (CT) scanning was done under different respiratory con...

  2. Paclitaxel, Polyglutamate Paclitaxel, or Observation in Treating Patients With Stage III or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Peritoneal Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-17

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  3. Clinical Usefulness of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the Detection of Early Recurrence in Treated Cervical Cancer Patients with Unexplained Elevation of Serum Tumor Markers

    OpenAIRE

    Chong, Ari; Ha, Jung-Min; Jeong, Shin Young; Song, Ho-Chun; Min, Jung Joon; Bom, Hee-Seung; Choi, Ho-Sun

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the diagnostic value of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for restaging of treated uterine cervix squamous cell cancer with tumor maker elevation that was not explained by other conventional evaluation. We enrolled 32 cases who underwent PET/CT for the restaging of treated cervical cancer with tumor marker elevation that was not explained by recent conventional evaluation. All enrolled cases had squamous cell carcinoma. Increased ...

  4. Development of Hemolytic Anemia in a Nivolumab-Treated Patient with Refractory Metastatic Squamous Cell Skin Cancer and Chronic Lymphatic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, K S; Heine, A; Weimann, T; Kristiansen, G; Brossart, P

    2016-01-01

    Management of patients with metastatic squamous cell skin cancer, refractory to initial therapy with standard chemotherapy and radiation protocols, remains difficult with poor overall prognosis and limited therapeutic options. Recently, promising response rates with nivolumab, a programmed death receptor-1-blocking antibody, in squamous cancer of the head and neck have been demonstrated. Considering the similar histological patterns of squamous cell cancer of the skin and squamous cell cancer of the head and neck, we assumed that nivolumab could also be effective in our patients with refractory metastatic squamous cell cancer of the skin. So far, there have been no clinical data on the therapeutic efficacy of nivolumab in squamous cell skin cancer. We here present a case of a patient with metastatic squamous cell skin cancer refractory to previous therapies, who showed a good response to nivolumab over a period of 5 months, but developed a serious hemolytic crisis under nivolumab treatment after eight applications. PMID:27462240

  5. Effect of Gender on Coagulation Functions: A Study in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients Treated with Bevacizumab, Irinotecan, 5-Fluorouracil, and Leucovorin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemil Bilir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We designed this study to evaluate how coagulation parameters are changed in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC patients treated with bevacizumab, irinotecan, 5-fluorouracil, and leucovorin (FOLFIRI. Methods. A total of 48 mCRC patients who initially received bevacizumab with FOLFIRI were eligible for this study. Thirty-four patients were analyzed at baseline and on the 4th, 8th, and 12th cycles of chemotherapy. Results. There were 19 male and 15 female patients. Baseline characteristics of the groups were similar, but women had better overall survival than men (14 months versus 12 months, P=0.044. D-dimer levels decreased significantly after the 12th cycle compared with baseline in men but not in women. Men and women had increased levels of serum fibrinogen at the early cycles, but these increased fibrinogen levels continued after the 4th cycle of chemotherapy only in women. In addition, serum fibrinogen levels did not significantly change, but aPTT levels decreased in men. Discussion. The major finding of this study is that bevacizumab-FOLFIRI chemotherapy does not promote changes in the coagulation system. If chemotherapy treatment and the possible side effects of FOLFIRI-bevacizumab treatment are well managed, then alterations of the coagulation cascade will not have an impact on overall survival and mortality.

  6. Analysis of outcomes and prognostic factors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients treated by MCP841 protocol: A regional cancer center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhil Kapoor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A dramatic improvement in the survival of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL patients in the last three decades has been observed. MCP 841 protocol is an old but effective tool with tolerable toxicities. The objective of this study was to estimate the relapse-free survival of ALL patients treated uniformly with MCP 841 protocol on the basis of various prognostic factors. Materials and Methods: The study design was retrospective and it was conducted in a regional cancer center of Northwest India. Three hundred and ten ALL patients who underwent treatment with MCP 841 protocol and regular follow-up for up to 5 years were selected for this study. Relapse-free survival was calculated by Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression analysis was used to calculate the hazards ratio (HR using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS software for windows version 20.0. Results: Fifty-four percent patients were 1 lakh/cmm had 41% survival [HR 2.14 (1.76-2.48 with, P < 0.001]. Conclusion: MCP 841 protocol is a useful tool for the treatment of ALL in children when more aggressive protocols can not be used.

  7. Locally advanced non inflammatory breast cancer treated by combined chemotherapy and preoperative irradiation: updated results in a series of 120 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. - To evaluate our updated data concerning survival and locoregional control in a study of locally advanced non inflammatory breast cancer after primary chemotherapy followed by external preoperative irradiation. Patients and methods. - Between 1982 and 1998, 120 patients (75 stage IIIA, 41 stage IIIB, and 4 stage IIIC according to AJCC staging system 2002) were consecutively treated by four courses of induction chemotherapy with anthracycline-containing combinations followed by preoperative irradiation (45 Gy to the breast and nodal areas) and a fifth course of chemotherapy. Three different locoregional approaches were proposed, depending on tumour characteristics and tumour response. After completion of local therapy, all patients received a sixth course of chemotherapy and a maintenance adjuvant chemotherapy regimen without anthracycline. The median follow-up from the beginning of treatment was 140 months. Results. - Mastectomy and axillary dissection were performed in 49 patients (with residual tumour larger than 3 cm in diameter or located behind the nipple or with bifocal tumour), and conservative treatment in 71 patients (39 achieved clinical complete response or partial response >90% and received additional radiation boost to initial tumour bed; 32 had residual mass ≤3 cm in diameter and were treated by wide excision and axillary dissection followed by a boost to the excision site). Ten-year actuarial local failure rate was 13% after irradiation alone, 23% after wide excision and irradiation, and 4% after mastectomy (p =0.1). After multivariate analysis, possibility of breast-conserving therapy was related to initial tumour size (<6 vs. ≥6 cm in diameter, p =0.002). Ten-year overall metastatic disease-free survival rate was 61%. After multivariate analysis, metastatic disease-free survival rates were significantly influenced by clinical stage (stage IIIA-B vs. IIIC, p =0.0003), N-stage (N0 vs. N1-2a, and 3c, p = 0.017), initial tumour size (<6

  8. PI3K Inhibitor BKM120 and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-06

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  9. Photodynamic Therapy Using HPPH in Treating Patients Undergoing Surgery for Primary or Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-20

    Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage I Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage I Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage I Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the

  10. Influence of tumor response on the survival of patients with extensive-stage small-cell lung cancer treated with the etoposide plus cisplatin chemotherapy regimen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guojing Zhang; Yaling Han; Xiaodong Xie; Yongye Liu; Chao Lin; Jianfei Guo; Long Xu; Junling Liu; Ying Piao; Guanzhong Zhang; Yuhui Liu

    2015-01-01

    Objective In this study, we evaluated the dif erence of progression-free survival (PFS) and overal surviv-al (OS) between extensive-stage smal-cel lung cancer (ES-SCLC) patients who acquired partial response (PR) or complete remission (CR) after two cycles of first-line chemotherapy with the etoposide plus cisplatin (EP) regimen and those who acquired PR or CR after four or six cycles. Methods A total of 106 eligible patients treated with the EP chemotherapy regimen for two to six cycles, at The General Hospital of Shenyang Military Region (China) between November 2004 and May 2011, were enrol ed in this study. RECIST version 1.1 was used for the evaluation of chemotherapy ef iciency. We fol owed up al eligible patients every 4 weeks. Al statistical data were analyzed by using SPSS 21.0 statistical package for Windows. Results After a median fol ow-up of 293 days (range, 62–1531 days), al patients had died by the cutof date. Fifty-one patients acquired PR or CR after two cycles of chemotherapy; the median PFS reached 6.0 months (95% CI, 5.1–6.9), and the median OS was 10.5 months (95% CI, 8.6–12.4). Twenty-eight patients acquired PR or CR after four or six cycles; the median PFS was 4.8 months (95% CI, 4.4–5.2), and the median OS was 7.5 months (95% CI, 6.8–8.2). Both PFS and OS showed a statistical dif erence between the two groups. Conclusion ES-SCLC patients who acquired PR or CR after two cycles of the EP regimen as first-line therapy had longer PFS and OS than those who acquired PR or CR after four or six cycles.

  11. Prospective evaluation of pulmonary function in cancer patients treated with total body irradiation, high-dose melphalan, and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary function tests (standard vital capacity, SVC; total lung capacity, TLC; forced expiratory volume in 1 second-forced vital capacity ratio, FEV1/FVC; carbon monoxide transfer factor, DLCO) were prospectively evaluated in patients (median age 25 years, 13-52 years; median follow-up 20 months, 6-51 months) with Hodgkin's disease (15 patients), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (9 patients), and inflammatory breast cancer (3 patients) treated with sequential high-dose therapy comprising the following phases over approximately 2 months: (a) cyclophosphamide (7 g/m2); (b) vincristine (1.4 mg/m2), methotrexate (8 g/m2), and cisplatinum (120 mg/m2) or etoposide (2 g/m2); (c) total body irradiation (TBI; 12.5 gy, 5 fractions over 48 hours), intravenous melphalan (120-180 mg/m2), and transplantation of autologous peripheral blood and/or bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells. Within 2 months after transplantation, 12 patients also received 25 Gy radiotherapy boost to mediastinum and clavicular regions. In vivo dosimetry evaluations of fractionated TBI treatments showed that mean radiation dose absorbed by lungs was 12.18 Gy (97.4% of TBI dose). Despite such a high radiation dose, we observed only transient and subclinical decrease of SVC, TLC, and DLCO. The decrease of SVC, TLC, and DLCO was more evident and prolonged in patients receiving radiotherapy boost. All parameters progressively recovered to normal values within 2 years after transplantation. In contrast, FEV1/FVC remained within normal limits in all patients, thus demonstrating the absence of obstructive ventilatory changes. In addition, no interstitial pneumonia was observed

  12. Interval to Biochemical Failure Predicts Clinical Outcomes in Patients With High-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated by Combined-Modality Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shilkrut, Mark; McLaughlin, P. William [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Merrick, Gregory S. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Vainshtein, Jeffrey M.; Feng, Felix Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A., E-mail: dhamm@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To validate the prognostic value of interval to biochemical failure (IBF) in patients with high-risk prostate cancer (HiRPCa) treated with combined-modality radiation therapy (CMRT) with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of HiRPCa (prostate-specific antigen >20 ng/mL, Gleason score [GS] 8-10, or clinical T stage T3-T4) treated with either dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or CMRT. Interval to biochemical failure was classified as ≤18 or >18 months from the end of all therapy to the date of biochemical failure (BF). Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards regression were used to evaluate the prognostic value of IBF ≤18 months for distant metastasis (DM) and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). Results: Of 958 patients with a median follow-up of 63.2 months, 175 patients experienced BF. In those with BF, there were no differences in pretreatment clinical characteristics between the EBRT and CMRT groups, except for a higher proportion of patients with GS 8-10 in the CMRT group (70% vs 52%, P=.02). Median IBF after all therapy was 24.0 months (interquartile range 9.6-46.0) in the EBRT group and 18.9 months (interquartile range 9.2-34.5) in the CMRT group (P=.055). On univariate analysis, IBF ≤18 months was associated with increased risk of DM and PCSM in the entire cohort and the individual EBRT and CMRT groups. On multivariate analysis, only GS 9-10 and IBF ≤18 months, but not the radiation therapy regimen or ADT use, predicted DM (hazard ratio [HR] 3.7, P<.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-10.3 for GS 9-10; HR 3.9, P<.0001, 95% CI 2.4-6.5 for IBF ≤18 months) and PCSM (HR 14.8, P<.009, 95% CI 2.0-110 for GS 9-10; HR 4.4, P<.0001, 95% CI 2.4-8.1 for IBF ≤18 months). Conclusions: Short IBF was highly prognostic for higher DM and PCSM in patients with HiRPCa. The prognostic value of IBF for DM and PCSM was not affected by the radiation

  13. Relationship Between Radiation-Induced Apoptosis of T Lymphocytes and Chronic Toxicity in Patients With Prostate Cancer Treated by Radiation Therapy: A Prospective Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foro, Palmira, E-mail: pforo@parcdesalutmar.cat [Department of Radiation Oncology, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Algara, Manuel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Lozano, Joan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Rodriguez, Nuria; Sanz, Xavier [Department of Radiation Oncology, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Torres, Erica [Pathology Department, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Carles, Joan [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Department of Oncology, Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Reig, Anna; Membrive, Ismael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Quera, Jaume [Department of Radiation Oncology, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Fernandez-Velilla, Enric; Pera, Oscar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Lacruz, Marti [Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Radiation Protection Department, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Bellosillo, Beatriz [Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Pathology Department, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the correlation of radiation-induced apoptosis in vitro of CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes with late toxicity of prostate cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: 214 patients were prospectively included in the study. Peripheral blood was drawn from patients before treatment and irradiated with 8 Gy. The percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes that underwent radiation-induced apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry. Toxicity and mortality were correlated in 198 cases with pretreatment apoptosis and clinical and biological variables by use of a Cox proportional hazards model. Results: The mean percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte radiation-induced apoptosis was 28.58% (±14.23) and 50.76% (±18.9), respectively. Genitourinary (GU) toxicity was experienced by 39.9% of patients, while gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity was experienced by 19.7%. The probability of development of GU toxicity was nearly doubled (hazard ratio [HR] 1.99, P=.014) in those patients in whom the percentage of in vitro radiation-induced apoptosis of CD4+ T-lymphocytes was ≤28.58%. It was also almost double in patients who received doses ≥50 Gy in 65% of the bladder volume (V65 ≥50) (HR 1.92, P=.048). No correlation was found between GI toxicity and any of the variables studied. The probability of death during follow-up, after adjustment for different variables, was 2.7 times higher in patients with a percentage of CD8+ T lymphocyte apoptosis ≤50.76% (P=.022). Conclusions: In conclusion, our study shows, in the largest prospective cohort of prostate cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy, that in vitro radiation-induced apoptosis of CD4+ T lymphocytes assessed before radiation therapy was associated with the probability of developing chronic GU toxicity. In addition, the radiation dose received in the urinary bladder (V65 ≥50) affected the occurrence of GU toxicity. Finally, we also demonstrate that radiation-induced apoptosis of

  14. Malnutrition in patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer-prevalence and relationship with oral symptoms : an explorative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager-Wittenaar, Harriet; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Vissink, Arjan; van Oort, Rob P.; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to assess prevalence of malnutrition after treatment for oral/oropharyngeal cancer and to explore how oral symptoms relate to malnutrition after treatment. In this cross-sectional study, malnutrition (weight loss a parts per thousand yenaEuro parts per thousand 10% in 6 months or a

  15. The effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy on quality of life in oral and oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with radiotherapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerlach, N.L.; Barkhuysen, R.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Janssens, G.O.; Sterk, W.; Merkx, M.A.T.

    2008-01-01

    Radiotherapy is used in the setting of curative treatment for head and neck cancer. Xerostomia and related problems occur when major salivary glands are included in the irradiation fields. This reduces quality of life (QOL). Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is a well accepted treatment or prevention

  16. Long-term Outcomes and Quality of Life of 186 Patients With Primary Parotid Carcinoma Treated With Surgery and Radiotherapy at the Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Mamgani, Abrahim, E-mail: a.al-mamgani@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rooij, Peter van [Department of Biostatistics, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Verduijn, Gerda M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Meeuwis, Cees A. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Levendag, Peter C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To assess the outcomes, toxicity, and quality of life (QOL) of patients with primary parotid carcinoma treated with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy at the Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: Between 1995 and 2010, 186 patients with parotid carcinoma were treated with parotidectomy with or without neck dissection, followed by radiotherapy. Elective nodal irradiation (ENI) was applied to high-risk, node-negative disease. End points were locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS), late toxicity, and QOL. Results: After a median follow-up of 58 months (range, 4-172 months), the 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimates for LRC, DFS, CSS, and OS were 89%, 83%, 80%, and 68%, respectively. Forty-five events were reported: 24 distant metastases (DM) and 21 locoregional failures (LRF). Event-free survival rates by histological types were 89%, 78%, 76%, 74%, and 70% for acinic cell, mucoepidermoid, adenoid cystic, adenocarcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma, respectively. More LRF were reported in patients with squamous cell and high-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma (21% and 19%, respectively) than in patients with other histological types (p = 0.04) and more DM in patients with adenoid cystic and adenocarcinoma (20% and 19%, respectively) than in patients with other types (p = 0.03). None of the high-risk node-negative patients who received ENI developed regional failure. On multivariate analysis, T stage, N stage, grade, and presence of perineural invasion and facial paralysis correlated significantly with DFS. The 5-year cumulative incidence of grade {>=}2 late toxicity was 8%. QOL scores deteriorate during and shortly after treatment but returned in almost all scales to baseline scores within 6 months. Conclusions: Of the entire group, surgery and postoperative radiotherapy resulted in excellent outcomes with minimal side effects and preservation of good QOL scores. However, in

  17. Studies on changes in bulks of body per dose and in the positioning of duodenum by respiration when treating pancreatic cancer patients with radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Hyeong Jun; Chun, Geum Seong; Park, Yeong Gyu [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    In the case of treating pancreatic cancer, the importance is put on the spread of dose. Changes take place in duodenum in accordance with respiration. Thus, in this paper, I am going to trace the positioning of duodenum and the changes in bulks of body per dose by scanning the patients' Kilo voltage Cone-Beam CT using the hospital equipped CT-on rail System. Seeing three patients, I have acquired KVCBCT by using CT-on rail System and spotted the change in positioning at duodenum after comparing with the preliminary image of treatment plan by using SYNGO Software. Then, I followed the change in the bulk of duodenum and analyzed the changes in bulks of body on the same dose by transmitting the acquired KVCBCT into Pinnacle, a treatment plan system. The changes in the positioning shall be as set forth like this: 1.2 cm, 1.0 cm in Left-Right Direction, 0 cm, 0.8 cm in Craniocaudal Direction, 0.1 cm, and 1.0 cm in Anterior-Posterior Direction. Patient number one showed that his bulks in body had increased by maximum 460%, minimum 120%, the bulks in patient number two had increased by maximum 490%, minimum 160%, and the bulks of patient number three had increased by maximum 150%. But Minimum volume decreased 30%. Patient number one showed only a little bit of change at first when compared with the preliminary treatment plan. However, the dose increased the bulks in the patient's body: V{sub 10} 118%, V{sub 20} 117%, V{sub 30} 400%, and V{sub 40} 480% In treating patients with radiation therapy using 3D-CRT, the dose amount penetrated into duodenum needs to be minimized by planning appropriate treatment beforehand. In order to establish an appropriate treatment plan it is required to comprehend the changes at positioning of the duodenum by respiration and predict the changes in the bulks of duodenum by setting precise Planning Target Volume.

  18. Predictors for pneumonitis during local-regional radiotherapy in patients with advanced breast cancer previously treated with high dose chemotherapy and bone marrow transplant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: High dose chemotherapy and autologous bone marrow rescue (HDC) are being increasingly used in patients with advanced breast cancer. Pulmonary toxicity is common following HDC, and may be exacerbated by local-regional radiation therapy (RT). We evaluated potential predictors for pulmonary toxicity in breast cancer patients treated with RT following HDC, in an effort to reduce overall lung toxicity. Methods: Thirty eight patients with breast cancer involving 10 or more axillary lymph nodes and treated in two prospective trials (CALGB 8782 and 9082) entailing induction CAF chemotherapy plus HDC (cytoxan, cisplatin, carmustine) followed by local regional RT (chest wall, supraclavicular fossa, ± internal mammary and axillary lymph nodes) were evaluated. Thirteen patients (Group A) developed new or progressive lung toxicity during RT, while 25 did not (Group B). Lung toxicity was defined as progressive pulmonary symptoms requiring the initiation of corticosteroids. A variety of pre-RT pulmonary parameters were reviewed in an attempt to identify quantitative predictors for the development of lung toxicity during RT. Pulmonary function tests (PFT's: FEV1 and DLCO) were obtained in all patients prior to and following induction CAF, and at regular intervals after HDC. To measure the degree of recent improvement or decline in the pre-RT PFT's, we calculated the ratio of the most recent PFT to the previous minimum. Differences between the means of the pulmonary parameters were tested for significance using the Student T-test. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups with respect to the mean preCAF, preHDC, or preRT DLCO's, as shown in the figure. The mean preCAF and preHDC FEV1's were higher in Group B (109%, 96%, respectively) than in Group A (96%, 89%). The most significant difference between the two groups was in the direction of the DLCO immediately prior to RT. In (12(13)) patients in Group A (the group with lung

  19. Famotidine as a radioprotector for rectal mucosa in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. Phase I/II randomized placebo-controlled trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razzaghdoust, A. [Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Paramedical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mozdarani, H. [Tarbiat Modares University, Department of Medical Genetics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mofid, B. [Shohada-e- Tajrish Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiotherapy, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Acute bowel toxicity significantly affects the quality of life of patients treated with pelvic radiotherapy. This study was performed to assess whether pretreatment with famotidine can reduce acute radiation toxicities in patients undergoing radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Between April 2012 and February 2013, 36 patients undergoing radiotherapy for prostate cancer were enrolled to receive either placebo or famotidine. The patients received external-beam radiotherapy up to 70 Gy at daily fractions of 1.8-2 Gy (5 days/week). Oral famotidine 40 mg (80 mg/day) or placebo was administered twice daily (4 and 3 h prior to each radiotherapy fraction). Bowel and bladder acute toxicities were evaluated weekly during radiotherapy and once thereafter according to RTOG grading criteria. Famotidine was well tolerated. No grade III or higher acute toxicities were noted in the two groups. Grade II rectal toxicity developed significantly more often in patients receiving placebo than in patients receiving famotidine (10/18 vs. 2/16, p = 0.009). Moreover, no rectal bleeding occurred in the famotidine group, while 5 patients in the placebo group experienced rectal bleeding during treatment (p = 0.046). The duration of rectal toxicity in the radiotherapy course was also reduced in the famotidine group (15.7 vs. 25.2 days, p = 0.027). No significant difference between the two groups was observed in terms of urinary toxicity. We demonstrated for the first time that famotidine significantly reduces radiation-induced injury on rectal mucosa representing a suitable radioprotector for patients treated with radiotherapy for prostate cancer. (orig.) [German] Die akute Darmtoxizitaet in der Strahlentherapie beeinflusst massgeblich die Lebensqualitaet der Patienten. Die Studie dient zur Klaerung des Famotidineinsatzes in der Vorbehandlung von Prostatakarzinompatienten zur Reduktion der Strahlenbelastung waehrend der Strahlentherapie. Von April 2012 bis Februar 2013 wurden 36

  20. Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of Salvia officinalis in controlling hot flashes in prostate cancer patients treated with androgen deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandecasteele, Katrien; Ost, Piet; Oosterlinck, Willem; Fonteyne, Valérie; Neve, Wilfried De; Meerleer, Gert De

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Salvia officinalis in controlling hot flashes in prostate cancer patients treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Ten patients experiencing hot flashes were included in a single-centre prospective pilot study. Treatment consisted of 150 mg of Salvia officinalis extract taken orally three times daily. A diary questionnaire scoring hot flashes, subjective side effects and quality of life (QOL) had to be completed. Clinical examination was performed at every visit and the concentration of ADT-linked hormones, haemoglobin and cholesterol was measured before, during and after ending treatment. Before the start of treatment, a 1 week baseline registration was performed. An analysis of variance with time of measurement as a within-subject factor was performed. When analysing the hot flashes score, one patient was excluded due to insufficient diary notes. The mean weekly score declined from 112 (SD = 71) at baseline to 59 (SD = 54) at the end of treatment (p = 0.002). Hot flashes diminished significantly from the first week up to and including week 3. This was maintained during treatment. There was no effect on QOL. There were no side effects. It is concluded that Salvia officinalis is efficient and safe in the treatment hot flashes, without improving QOL.