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Sample records for cancer patient outcomes

  1. Obstetric Outcomes in Non-Gynecologic Cancer Patients in Remission.

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    Timur, Hakan; Tokmak, Aytekin; Iskender, Cantekin; Yildiz, Elif Sumer; Inal, Hasan Ali; Uygur, Dilek; Danisman, Nuri

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the obstetric and perinatal outcomes in treated women who were diagnosed with non-gynecologic cancer and to compare these findings with pregnant women with no history of cancer. This retrospective study was conducted on 21 pregnant women with non-gynecologic cancer who were in remission (study group) and 63 pregnant women with no history of cancer (control group). The women were admitted to the high-risk pregnancy clinic of Zekai Tahir Burak Women's Health Training and Research Hospital with a diagnosis of pregnancy and cancer between January 2010 and January 2015. Obstetric outcomes and demographic characteristics of the patients were recorded. Age, gravida, parity, abortus, body mass index (BMI), gestational week, smoking, mode of delivery, gestational weight, and perinatal outcomes were examined for each woman. The most common cancer types were thyroid (28.5%) and breast cancers (23.8%), which constituted just over half of the non-gynecologic cancer cases during pregnancy. The time elapsed after the diagnosis was 3.8±2.2 (1-9) years. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups with regard to age, obstetric history, BMI, gestational week, smoking, and obstetric and perinatal outcomes (p>0.05). Negative perinatal outcomes in non-gynecologic cancer patients in remission were found to be within acceptable levels.

  2. Characteristics and outcome of spontaneous bacterial meningitis in patients with cancer compared to patients without cancer.

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    Pomar, Virginia; Benito, Natividad; López-Contreras, Joaquin; Coll, Pere; Gurguí, Mercedes; Domingo, Pere

    2017-05-01

    In cancer patients, who are frequently immunocompromised, bacterial meningitis (BM) can be a severe complication, with a different presentation, etiology, and course, compared to patients without cancer. Our objective is to compare the characteristics and outcomes of BM in patients with and without cancer. A single-center, prospective observational cohort study, conducted between 1982 and 2012, in a tertiary university hospital in Barcelona (Spain). The main outcome measure is in-hospital mortality. We evaluated 659 episodes of BM; 97 (15%) had active cancer. Patients with malignancies were older (median 63 (interquartile range [IQR] 24) vs 52 [IQR 42] years, P meningitis triad (35% vs 50%, P = .05), fever (91% vs 96%, P = .03), neck stiffness (58% vs 78%, P meningitis was the commonest cause of BM (29%) and was more frequent in cancer than noncancer (8%, P meningitis was much less frequent (4% vs 36%, P meningitis and cancer are older and have more subtle clinical manifestations than patients without cancer. Listeria monocytogenes is the predominant pathogen and mortality is higher in cancer patients.

  3. Outcomes in Critically Ill Patients with Cancer-Related Complications.

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    Viviane B L Torres

    Full Text Available Cancer patients are at risk for severe complications related to the underlying malignancy or its treatment and, therefore, usually require admission to intensive care units (ICU. Here, we evaluated the clinical characteristics and outcomes in this subgroup of patients.Secondary analysis of two prospective cohorts of cancer patients admitted to ICUs. We used multivariable logistic regression to identify variables associated with hospital mortality.Out of 2,028 patients, 456 (23% had cancer-related complications. Compared to those without cancer-related complications, they more frequently had worse performance status (PS (57% vs 36% with PS≥2, active malignancy (95% vs 58%, need for vasopressors (45% vs 34%, mechanical ventilation (70% vs 51% and dialysis (12% vs 8% (P<0.001 for all analyses. ICU (47% vs. 27% and hospital (63% vs. 38% mortality rates were also higher in patients with cancer-related complications (P<0.001. Chemo/radiation therapy-induced toxicity (6%, venous thromboembolism (5%, respiratory failure (4%, gastrointestinal involvement (3% and vena cava syndrome (VCS (2% were the most frequent cancer-related complications. In multivariable analysis, the presence of cancer-related complications per se was not associated with mortality [odds ratio (OR = 1.25 (95% confidence interval, 0.94-1.66, P = 0.131]. However, among the individual cancer-related complications, VCS [OR = 3.79 (1.11-12.92, P = 0.033], gastrointestinal involvement [OR = 3.05 (1.57-5.91, P = <0.001] and respiratory failure [OR = 1.96(1.04-3.71, P = 0.038] were independently associated with in-hospital mortality.The prognostic impact of cancer-related complications was variable. Although some complications were associated with worse outcomes, the presence of an acute cancer-related complication per se should not guide decisions to admit a patient to ICU.

  4. Clinical outcome of urachal cancer in Japanese patients.

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    Hayashi, Tatsuro; Yuasa, Takeshi; Uehara, Sho; Inoue, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Shinya; Masuda, Hitoshi; Fujii, Yasuhisa; Fukui, Iwao; Yonese, Junji

    2016-02-01

    The outcome of treatment of Japanese patients with urachal cancer is not well known. The purpose of this study is to clarify the characteristics and outcomes of Japanese patients with urachal cancer. The medical records of patients with urachal cancer who were treated in our hospital between 1994 and 2014 were retrospectively reviewed and statistically analyzed. We found 28 patients who had been diagnosed with urachal cancer and treated in our hospital during the study period. The median age of these patients was 52.3 years [interquartile range (IQR), 46.0-56.8 years]. Seventeen patients underwent surgery in our department. The median observation period of these patients was 42.6 months (IQR, 21.1-49.7 months). Among patients who had undergone surgery, cancer recurred in 7 (41 %). The estimated median time from surgery to recurrence and overall survival (OS) period were 35.8 months [95 % confidence interval (CI), 7.7 months-not determined] and not reached, respectively. Seventeen patients received chemotherapy for metastatic disease. The estimated median OS time from initial metastasis was 23.5 months (95 % CI, 11.8-33.3 months). Urachal cancer is usually locally advanced at presentation and it has a high risk of distant metastases. However, long-term survival following surgical treatment occurs in a significant fraction of patients. This study indicates the current treatment results for patients with urachal cancer in Japanese clinical practice. To establish a standard operation method and chemotherapy, a multicenter, prospective study is needed in a larger population in the future.

  5. Quality of life outcomes in patients with breast cancer

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    Theofilou Paraskevi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Health-related quality of life is now considered an important endpoint in cancer clinical trials. It has been shown that assessing quality of life in cancer patients could contribute to improved treatment and could even serve as a prognostic factor along with medical parameters. This paper presents a review of quality of life outcomes in patients with breast cancer according to previous descriptive findings. This is a bibliographic review of the literature covering publications that appeared in English language biomedical journals between 1987 and 2008. The search strategy included a combination of the key words quality of life and breast cancer in the titles of published articles. The major findings are summarized and presented under different headings: evaluation of health-related quality of life i at the time of diagnosis, ii during treatment, and iii after the completion of treatment. Breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy might experience several side-effects and symptoms that have a negative effect on their quality of life. Also adjuvant hormonal therapies were found to have a similar negative impact on quality of life. Psychological distress-anxiety and depression were found to be common among breast cancer patients. Symptoms-pain, fatigue, and insomnia were among the most common symptoms reported. There was quite an extensive body of literature on quality of life in breast cancer patients. These papers have made a considerable contribution to improving breast cancer care.

  6. Patient-reported outcomes in cancer cachexia clinical trials.

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    Wheelwright, Sally J; Johnson, Colin D

    2015-12-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures should be used when measuring concepts best known to the patient. To maximize the translation of findings into clinical practice, PRO measures that are most relevant for the patient group, should be used and careful reporting of the PRO results is required. The study reviews the use of PRO assessments in cancer cachexia randomized controlled trials. Most, but not all, recent cancer cachexia randomized controlled trials include PRO measures, and significant informative results have been found. PRO measures are rarely the primary endpoint. Most frequently, health -related quality of life and/or symptoms are assessed. However, instruments which are not cancer cachexia-specific are often used. Reporting of PRO data is generally poor. Patient-centred care cannot be delivered without patient-centred outcome information and the assessment of the efficacy of interventions is partly determined by whether there is a measurable perceived patient benefit. To improve the chance of finding significant and useful results, investigators should use cancer cachexia-specific instruments and report their studies carefully.

  7. VEGF gene polymorphisms and outcome of epithelial ovarian cancer patients.

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    Camerin, Gabriela Ribeiro; Brito, Angelo Borsarelli Carvalho; Vassallo, José; Derchain, Sophie Françoise Mauricette; Lima, Carmen Silvia Passos

    2017-02-01

    Since VEGF polymorphisms were associated with variable protein production, we analyzed herein their roles in outcome of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients. Genotypes of 85 patients with primary EOC were identified in DNA by real-time PCR. Progression-free survival and overall survival were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier method, univariate Cox model and bootstrap resampling study. At 60 months of follow-up, progression-free survival was shorter in patients with VEGF c.-2578 CC genotype compared with others (52.7 vs 82.2%; p = 0.04). Those patients had 2.15 more chance of presenting disease progression than others (p = 0.04); bootstrap study validated the result (p = 0.03). Our data suggest that VEGF c.-2578C>A polymorphism acts as a prognostic factor in EOC.

  8. [Survey of cachexia in digestive system cancer patients and its impact on clinical outcomes].

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    Sun, Yandong; Zhang, Bo; Han, Yusong; Jiang, Yi; Zhuang, Qiulin; Gong, Yuda; Wu, Guohao

    2014-10-01

    To investigate cachexia in hospitalized patients with digestive system cancer and evaluate its impact on clinical outcomes. By analyzing the clinical data of 5118 hospitalized patients with digestive system cancer in Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University from January 2012 to December 2013, cachexia was investigated and clinical outcomes between cachexia patients and non-cachexia patients was compared. The total cachexia rate of hospitalized patients with digestive system cancer was 15.7%(803/5118). The highest rate of cachexia was 34.0%(89/262) in patients with pancreatic cancer followed by gastric cancer 22.4%(261/1164), colon cancer 21.7%(146/672), and rectal cancer 20.1%(117/581). In cachexia group and non-cachexia group, the overall completion rate of radical resection was 67.1%(539/803) and 74.5%(3214/4315) respectively(Pdigestive system cancer. Cachexia has significant adverse effects on clinical outcomes in hospitalized patients with digestive system cancer.

  9. Incidental pulmonary embolism in cancer patients: clinical characteristics and outcome – a comprehensive cancer center experience

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    Abdel-Razeq H

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Hikmat N Abdel-Razeq1, Asem H Mansour2, Yousef M Ismael11Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Radiology, King Hussein Cancer Center, Amman, JordanBackground and objectives: Cancer patients undergo routine imaging studies much more than others. The widespread use of the recently introduced multi-detector CT scanners has resulted in an increasing number of incidentally diagnosed pulmonary embolism (PE in asymptomatic cancer patients. The significance and clinical outcome of such incidental PE is described.Methods: Both radiology department and hospital databases were searched for all cancer patients with a diagnosis of incidental PE. CT scans were performed using a 64-slice scanner with a 5.0 mm slice thickness.Results: During the study period, 34 patients with incidental PE were identified. The mean age (±SD was 57.7 (±12.4 years. All patients had active cancer, gastric, lung, colorectal, and lymphomas being the most frequent. Most patients had advanced-stage disease at the time of PE diagnosis; 26 (77% patients had stage IV, whereas only 3 patients had stages I or II disease. Twenty-seven (79% patients had their PE while undergoing active treatment with chemotherapy (68% or radiotherapy (12%; none, however, were on hormonal therapy. Most (74% patients had their PE diagnosed without history of recent hospital admission. Except for 5 (15%, all other patients were anticoagulated. With follow-up, 2 patients developed recurrent PE, 2 others had clinical and echocardiographic evidence of pulmonary hypertension, and 9 (26% died suddenly within 30 days of the diagnosis of incidental PE; 2 of these where among the 5 patients who were not anticoagulated.Conclusion: Incidental PE in cancer patients is increasingly encountered. Similar to symptomatic PE, many were diagnosed in patients with advanced stage disease and while undergoing active anti-cancer therapy. A significant percentage of patients had recurrent emboli, pulmonary hypertension

  10. Yoga & Cancer Interventions: A Review of the Clinical Significance of Patient Reported Outcomes for Cancer Survivors

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    S. Nicole Culos-Reed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Limited research suggests yoga may be a viable gentle physical activity option with a variety of health-related quality of life, psychosocial and symptom management benefits. The purpose of this review was to determine the clinical significance of patient-reported outcomes from yoga interventions conducted with cancer survivors. A total of 25 published yoga intervention studies for cancer survivors from 2004–2011 had patient-reported outcomes, including quality of life, psychosocial or symptom measures. Thirteen of these studies met the necessary criteria to assess clinical significance. Clinical significance for each of the outcomes of interest was examined based on 1 standard error of the measurement, 0.5 standard deviation, and relative comparative effect sizes and their respective confidence intervals. This review describes in detail these patient-reported outcomes, how they were obtained, their relative clinical significance and implications for both clinical and research settings. Overall, clinically significant changes in patient-reported outcomes suggest that yoga interventions hold promise for improving cancer survivors' well-being. This research overview provides new directions for examining how clinical significance can provide a unique context for describing changes in patient-reported outcomes from yoga interventions. Researchers are encouraged to employ indices of clinical significance in the interpretation and discussion of results from yoga studies.

  11. Combining Chemotherapy with Bevacizumab Improves Outcomes for Ovarian Cancer Patients

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    Results from two phase III randomized clinical trials suggest that, at least for some patients with ovarian cancer, adding the antiangiogenesis agent bevacizumab to chemotherapy increases the time to disease progression and may improve survival.

  12. Radiological characteristics, histological features and clinical outcomes of lung cancer patients with coexistent idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

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    Khan, K A; Kennedy, M P; Moore, E; Crush, L; Prendeville, S; Maher, M M; Burke, L; Henry, M T

    2015-02-01

    Despite advances in diagnosis and management, the outcomes for both lung cancer and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) are still unfavourable. The pathophysiology and outcomes for patients with concomitant lung cancer and IPF remains unclear. A retrospective analysis was performed of all patients presenting with concomitant IPF and lung cancer to our centre over a 3-year period. Patients with connective tissue disease, asbestos exposure, sarcoidosis, previous thoracic radiation, radiological evidence of fibrosis but no histological confirmation of lung cancer, or the use of medications known to cause pulmonary fibrosis were excluded. We describe clinical, radiological and pathological characteristics of this group. We also report the response to standardized lung cancer therapy in this cohort. Of 637 lung cancer patients, 34 were identified with concomitant IPF (5.3 %) and all were smokers. 85 % had non-small cell lung cancer, 41 % were squamous cell cancers. The majority of tumours were located in the lower lobes, peripheral and present in an area of honeycombing. Despite the fact that approximately 2/3rds of the patients had localised or locally advanced lung cancer, the outcome of therapy for lung cancer was extremely poor regardless of tumour stage or severity of IPF. At our centre, 1/20 patients with lung cancer have concomitant IPF. The majority of these tumours are small in size, peripheral in location and squamous cell carcinoma; in an area of honey combing. The outcome for concomitant lung cancer and IPF regardless of stage or therapy is poor.

  13. Outcomes of cancer patients after unplanned admission to general intensive care units.

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    Bos, Monique M E M; de Keizer, Nicolette F; Meynaar, Iwan A; Bakhshi-Raiez, Ferishta; de Jonge, Evert

    2012-09-01

    Acute admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) of cancer patients is considered with increasing frequency due to a better life expectancy and more aggressive therapies. The aim of this study was to determine the characteristics and outcomes of cancer patients with unplanned admissions to general ICUs, and to compare these with outcomes of critically ill patients without cancer. All unplanned ICU admissions in the Netherlands collected in the National Intensive Care Evaluation registry between January 2007 and January 2011 were analyzed. Of the 140,154 patients with unplanned ICU admission 10.9% had a malignancy. Medical cancer patients were more severely ill on ICU admission in comparison with medical non-cancer patients, as reflected by higher needs for mechanical ventilation (50.8% vs. 46.4%, p afore mentioned parameters were lower in the surgical cancer patients group. In-hospital mortality was almost twice as high in medical cancer patients (40.6%) as in medical patients without cancer (23.7%). In-hospital mortality of surgical cancer patients (17.4%) was slightly higher than in patients without cancer (14.6%). These data indicate that unplanned ICU admission is associated with a high mortality in patients with cancer when admitted for medical reasons.

  14. Analysing data from patient-reported outcome and quality of life endpoints for cancer clinical trials

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    Bottomley, Andrew; Pe, Madeline; Sloan, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Measures of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and other patient-reported outcomes generate important data in cancer randomised trials to assist in assessing the risks and benefits of cancer therapies and fostering patient-centred cancer care. However, the various ways these measures are anal...... data in cancer randomised trials. This Personal View discusses the reasons why this project was initiated, the rationale for the planned work, and the expected benefits to cancer research, patient and provider decision making, care delivery, and policy making.......Measures of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and other patient-reported outcomes generate important data in cancer randomised trials to assist in assessing the risks and benefits of cancer therapies and fostering patient-centred cancer care. However, the various ways these measures......-Reported Outcomes and Quality of Life Endpoints Data (SISAQOL) initiative has been established. This consortium, directed by the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC), was convened to provide recommendations on how to standardise the analysis of HRQOL and other patient-reported outcomes...

  15. Effectiveness of Nursing Interventions on Physical and Psychological Outcome among Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy

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    T. Sivabalan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cancer patient's undergoing chemotherapy experiences a variety of side effects which has influence on prognosis of illness, activity of daily living and the quality of life. There is a need of nursing care interventions for management and prevention of problem among cancer patients. Aim & Objectives: The present study aimed to assess the effectiveness of nursing interventions on physical and psychological outcome among cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Material and Methods: A true experimental study, post test only design with control group approach was conducted among 130 cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy at oncology ward of Pravara Rural Hospital, Loni (Bk, Ahmednagar, Maharashtra. Cancer patients who are 18 years old or older were selected with systematic random sampling method. Pre tested semi structured interview schedule was used to gather data. The assessment of health status before start of chemotherapy was carried out, followed by the nursing interventions was implemented based on patient needs and problems, and the post test was conducted after the period of interventions. The collected data was tabulated and analyzed using appropriate statistical methods wherever required. Results: The results revealed that the cancer patients experienced a wide range of physical and psychological problems prior to chemotherapy treatment. Cancer patients who received nursing interventions had improved post test mean scores on chemotherapy symptoms, pain and fatigue; emotional well being, anxiety and depression than the patients who received routine care, notably it was statistically significant at p<0.05 level. A significant association was observed between physical, psychological outcome variables and the socio demographic characteristics like sex, site of cancer, stage of cancer, duration of cancer, metastasis of cancer and the regimen of chemotherapy at p<0.05 level. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the nursing

  16. The use and reporting of patient-reported outcomes in phase III breast cancer trials.

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    Brim, Remy L; Pearson, Steven D

    2013-04-01

    Public and government attention to patient-centered research outcomes has been increasing, evidenced by the recent formation of the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute. Drug development clinical trials can be made more patient-centered by collecting patient-reported outcome measures that can inform decision making by patients and their health-care providers. Patient-reported outcomes are important to collect in trials of breast cancer therapeutics, which encompass a wide range of treatment regimens and side effects. We sought to determine recent trends in the use of patient-reported outcomes in drug trials for the treatment of breast cancer and evaluate the reporting of these data in study publications. We searched ClinicalTrials.gov for phase III breast cancer drug trials, recording information on start date, primary completion date, primary outcome measure, primary sponsor, stage of cancer, and patient-reported outcome use. To assess the reporting of patient-reported outcome data, Google.com and PubMed.gov were searched for all publications resulting from included trials. We found 236 eligible trials, starting between May 1989 and December 2011. Of these trials, 83 (35%) stipulated patient-reported outcome use. The rate of patient-reported outcome use in recent years has shown no increase over earlier time periods: 37% (1989-2000) versus 36% (2004-2007) versus 30% (2008-2011) (p = 0.8). Trials with sponsorship led by the pharmaceutical industry and trials including patients with locally advanced or metastatic disease had the highest rates of patient-reported outcome use (40/87 (46%) and 44/102 (43%), respectively). Among the 83 trials that collected patient-reported outcome measures, 36 were completed a minimum of 2 years before our analysis; of these 36 studies, 19 (53%) had published patient-reported outcome data. Data were limited to self-reported descriptions of trials listed on the ClinicalTrial.gov database, which is the best compendium of trial

  17. Defining a standard set of patient-centred outcomes for lung cancer

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    van Bommel, Annelotte C.M.; Stowell, Caleb; Abrahm, Janet L.; Baker, Matthew; Baldotto, Clarissa S.; Baldwin, David R.; Borthwick, Diana; Carbone, David P.; Chen, Aileen B.; Fox, Jesme; Haswell, Tom; Koczywas, Marianna; Kozower, Benjamin D.; Mehran, Reza J.; Schramel, Franz M.; Senan, Suresh; Stirling, Robert G.; van Meerbeeck, Jan P.; Wouters, Michel W.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    In lung cancer, outcome measurement has been mostly limited to survival. Proper assessment of the value of lung cancer treatments, and the performance of institutions delivering care, requires more comprehensive measurement of standardised outcomes. The International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement convened an international, multidisciplinary working group of patient representatives, medical oncologists, surgeons, radiation oncologists, pulmonologists, palliative care specialists, registry experts and specialist nurses to review existing data and practices. Using a modified Delphi method, the group developed a consensus recommendation (“the set”) on the outcomes most essential to track for patients with lung cancer, along with baseline demographic, clinical and tumour characteristics (case-mix variables) for risk adjustment. The set applies to patients diagnosed with nonsmall cell lung cancer and small cell lung cancer. Our working group recommends the collection of the following outcomes: survival, complications during or within 6 months of treatment and patient-reported domains of health-related quality of life including pain, fatigue, cough and dyspnoea. Case-mix variables were defined to improve interpretation of comparisons. We defined an international consensus recommendation of the most important outcomes for lung cancer patients, along with relevant case-mix variables, and are working to support adoption and reporting of these measures globally. PMID:27390281

  18. Outcome of endoscopic therapy for cancer bleeding in patients with unresectable gastric cancer.

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    Kim, Young-Il; Choi, Il Ju; Cho, Soo-Jeong; Lee, Jong Yeul; Kim, Chan Gyoo; Kim, Mi-Jung; Ryu, Keun Won; Kim, Young-Woo; Park, Young Iee

    2013-09-01

    Gastric cancer bleeding is not rare complication in patients with advanced gastric cancer (AGC). The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and clinical outcomes of endoscopic therapy (ET) for upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) from unresectable AGC. Data from 113 patients with UGIB from unresectable AGC who underwent ET at the National Cancer Center, Korea were analyzed retrospectively. Success rates of endoscopic hemostasis, rebleeding rates, mortality at 30 days, and overall survival (OS) rate after initial hemostasis were investigated. The initial hemostasis rate was 92.9% (105/113). Electrocoagulation was the most common method used (92.0%, 104/113), and combination ET was required in 34 patients (30.1%). Rebleeding occurred in 43 patients (41.0%); 3-day and 30-day rebleeding rates were 18.1% and 29.5%, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that transfusion of packed red blood cells (> 5 units) was associated with early rebleeding (≤ 3 days after initial hemostasis) (odd ratio, 4.75; 95% confidential interval, 1.45-15.57; P = 0.010). ET was attempted in 18 patients with rebleeding; hemostasis was achieved in 88.9%. The 30-day mortality rate after initial bleeding event was 15.9%. Median OS after initial hemostasis was 3.2 months. OS was lower for patients with early rebleeding than for those with late rebleeding (> 3 days after initial hemostasis) or without rebleeding (1.0, 3.1, and 4.3 months, respectively; P = 0.004). ET, primarily endoscopic electrocoagulation, achieved a high initial hemostasis rate for UGIB in patients with unresectable AGC. However, rebleeding frequently occurred, and early rebleeding was associated with poor survival. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Nutritional status and postoperative outcomes in patients with gastrointestinal cancer in Vietnam: a retrospective cohort study.

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    Loan, Bui Thi Hong; Nakahara, Shinji; Tho, Bui An; Dang, Tran Ngoc; Anh, Le Ngoc; Huy, Nguyen Do; Ichikawa, Masao

    2017-12-06

    Nutritional support for surgical care is crucial because hospital malnutrition is rather common. However, low- and middle-income countries have not adequately addressed nutritional management of surgical patients. To highlight need for nutritional management in surgical patients, the present study aimed to describe preoperative nutritional status in patients who underwent gastrointestinal cancer surgery in Vietnam and to investigate the relationship between preoperative malnutrition and adverse outcomes, such as postoperative complications and prolonged length of hospital stay. We reviewed medical records of patients who underwent a major curative surgery for gastrointestinal cancer at the national hospital in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. We identified preoperative malnutrition based on body mass index and serum albumin level, and postoperative complications in the first 30 d postoperative. We estimated the relative influence of malnutrition on complications and length of hospital stay using multivariate regression models. Of 459 eligible patients, 63% had colorectal cancer, 33% gastric cancer, and 4% esophageal cancer. The prevalence of malnutrition was 19%. No patients died during hospitalization; however, 26% developed complications after surgery. The average length of hospital stay was 14 d. After controlling for potential confounders, preoperative malnutrition was associated with an increased risk of postoperative complications (odds ratio = 1.97) and prolonged hospital stay (2.8 d). Preoperative malnutrition affects surgical outcomes among patients with gastrointestinal cancer in Vietnam. We recommend implementing preoperative nutritional interventions to achieve better outcomes among surgical cancer patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Characteristics, therapy and outcome in an unselected and prospectively registered cohort of pancreatic cancer patients

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    Bjerregaard, J K; Mortensen, Michael Bau; Schønnemann, K R

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is associated with a dismal prognosis. Few studies have examined characteristics and outcome in an unselected population-based cohort of PC patients. Therefore, we investigated patient baseline characteristics, therapy choices and survival in a complete cohort of patients...

  1. The utility of abbreviated patient-reported outcomes for predicting survival in early stage colorectal cancer.

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    Hsu, Tina; Speers, Caroline H; Kennecke, Hagen F; Cheung, Winson Y

    2017-05-15

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are increasingly used in clinical settings. Prior research suggests that PROs collected at baseline may be associated with cancer survival, but most of those studies were conducted in patients with breast or lung cancer. The objective of this study was to determine the correlation between prospectively collected PROs and cancer-specific outcomes in patients with early stage colorectal cancer. Patients who had newly diagnosed stage II or III colorectal cancer from 2009 to 2010 and had a consultation at the British Columbia Cancer Agency completed the brief Psychosocial Screen for Cancer (PSSCAN) questionnaire, which collects data on patients' perceived social supports, quality of life (QOL), anxiety and depression, and general health. PROs from the PSSCAN were linked with the Gastrointestinal Cancers Outcomes Database, which contains information on patient and tumor characteristics, treatment details, and cancer outcomes. Cox regression models were constructed for overall survival (OS), and Fine and Gray regression models were developed for disease-specific survival (DSS). In total, 692 patients were included. The median patient age was 67 years (range, 26-95 years), and the majority had colon cancer (61%), were diagnosed with stage III disease (54%), and received chemotherapy (58%). In general, patients felt well supported and reported good overall health and QOL. On multivariate analysis, increased fatigue was associated with worse OS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.99; P = .00007) and DSS (HR, 1.63; P = .03), as was lack of emotional support (OS: HR, 4.36; P = .0003; DSS: HR, 1.92; P = .02). Although most patients described good overall health and QOL and indicated that they were generally well supported, patients who experienced more pronounced fatigue or lacked emotional support had a higher likelihood of worse OS and DSS. These findings suggest that abbreviated PROs can inform and assist clinicians to identify patients who have a worse

  2. The frequency, cost, and clinical outcomes of hypernatremia in patients hospitalized to a comprehensive cancer center.

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    Salahudeen, Abdulla K; Doshi, Simit M; Shah, Pankaj

    2013-07-01

    To study the frequency of hypernatremia in hospitalized cancer patients and its impact on clinical outcomes and healthcare cost. Cross-sectional analysis of data obtained from patients admitted to the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center over a 3-month period in 2006. The clinical outcomes and hospital costs were compared among hypernatremics, eunatremics, and hyponatremics (serum sodium values include >147, 135-147, and hypernatremia (90 %) acquired during hospital stay. The multivariate hazard ratio (HR) for mortality in hypernatremic was 5-fold higher than eunatremic (HR for 90 days-5.09 (95 % CI, 3.32-7.81); p hypernatremia was far less frequent than hyponatremia in the hospitalized cancer patients, most hypernatremia were acquired in the hospital and had substantially higher mortality, hospital stay, and hospital bills than eunatremic or even hyponatremic patients. Studies are warranted to determine whether avoidance of hypernatremia or its prompt and sustained correction improves clinical outcomes.

  3. Association Between Preoperative Nutritional Status and Postoperative Outcome in Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

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    Leung, John S L; Seto, Alfred; Li, George K H

    2017-04-01

    Head and neck cancer patients treated with surgery often experience significant postoperative morbidities. Administering preoperative nutritional intervention may improve surgical outcomes, but there is currently a paucity of data reviewing the association between preoperative nutritional status and postoperative outcome. It is therefore of importance to investigate this association among head and neck cancer patients. To assess the association between preoperative nutritional status and postoperative outcome in head and neck cancer patients treated with surgery, a retrospective study of 70 head and neck cancer patients who were surgically treated between 2013 and 2014 in a tertiary referral head and neck surgery center in Hong Kong was conducted. Clinical data regarding preoperative nutritional status and postoperative outcome were retrieved from a computer record system. Logistic and linear regressions were used to analyze the appropriate parameters. A higher preoperative albumin level was associated with lower rates of postoperative complications and better wound healing (P cancer patients, preoperative intervention strategies that boost albumin levels could be considered for improving surgical outcome.

  4. CANCER IMMUNOLOGY AND IMMUNOTHERAPY – UNDERSTANDING AND ADAPTATION THE CURRENT EVIDENCE TO OPTIMIZE PATIENT THERAPY OUTCOMES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlin Savov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this publication includes the try to act as intermediary to the readers, which should be able to understand: - The description of the cancer immunotherapy mechanisms in the context of current therapy decisions for the treatment of cancer - The including criteria for those patients with cancer who could be appropriate candidates for immunotherapy - And to optimize patient outcomes by using best practices to manage the adverse events associated with immunotherapy treatment More than 15 promising immunotherapy approaches being tested in clinical trials with appropriate patients and colleagues for enrollment and peer-to-peer education purposes, respectively.

  5. Quality of Life Outcomes for Bladder Cancer Patients Undergoing Bladder Preservation with Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, Michael A; Goenka, Anuj

    2015-11-01

    For patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer, the decision to undergo radical cystectomy or bladder preservation treatment must incorporate survival differences, toxicity, and quality of life. Our objective was to review patient-reported outcomes for bladder preservation treatment with a focus on patients eligible for radical cystectomy, for whom a comparison of patient-reported outcomes is most relevant. Peer-reviewed, English-language manuscripts in MEDLINE and PubMed databases were examined from 1996 through 2014. Subject headings included quality of life, bladder cancer, bladder sparing, bladder preservation, radiation, and radiotherapy. Prospective and retrospective studies of patient-reported outcomes in patients undergoing bladder preservation with radiotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer were included. Two prospective studies and four retrospective studies were identified. Several weaknesses from these studies were identified including small sample sizes, variable time points of assessment, variation in treatment regimens, and failure to use validated or condition-specific questionnaires. From the available data, bladder preservation appears to result to similar or better general quality of life compared to radical cystectomy with satisfactory urinary and sexual function reported in most series. In general, bladder preservation resulted in more gastrointestinal symptoms than radical cystectomy. This is one of the first reviews on the subject of patient-reported outcomes for bladder preservation in muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Although the data are limited, this review may provide a framework for developing well-designed, prospective comparisons of treatment for this patient cohort.

  6. Behavioral Activation Therapy for Depressed Cancer Patients: Factors Associated with Treatment Outcome and Attrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopko, D. R.; Robertson, S. M. C.; Colman, L.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years there has been increased focus on evaluating the efficacy of psychosocial interventions for cancer patients. Among the several limitations inherent to these programs of research, few studies have targeted patients with well-diagnosed clinical depression and little is known about factors that best predict treatment outcome and…

  7. Patient expectations of functional outcomes after rectal cancer surgery: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jason; Neuman, Heather B; Bennett, Antonia V; Polskin, Lily; Phang, P Terry; Wong, W Douglas; Temple, Larissa K

    2014-02-01

    Rectal cancer patients' expectations of health and function may affect their disease- and treatment-related experience, but how patients form expectations of postsurgery function has received little study. We used a qualitative approach to explore patient expectations of outcomes related to bowel function after sphincter-preserving surgery for rectal cancer. This was a cohort study of patients who were about to undergo sphincter-preserving surgery for rectal cancer. The study was conducted through individual telephone interviews with participants. Twenty-six patients (14 men and 12 women) with clinical TNM stage I to III disease were enrolled. The semistructured interview script contained open-ended questions on patient expectations of postoperative bowel function and its perceived impact on daily function and life. Two researchers analyzed the interview transcripts for emergent themes using a grounded theory approach. Participant expectations of bowel function reflected 3 major themes: 1) information sources, 2) personal attitudes, and 3) expected outcomes. The expected outcomes theme contained references to specific symptoms and participants' descriptions of the certainty, importance, and imminence of expected outcomes. Despite multiple information sources and attempts at maintaining a positive personal attitude, participants expressed much uncertainty about their long-term bowel function. They were more focused on what they considered more important and imminent concerns about being cancer free and getting through surgery. This study was limited by context in terms of the timing of interviews (relative to the treatment course). The transferability to other contexts requires further study. Patient expectations of long-term functional outcomes cannot be considered outside of the overall context of the cancer experience and the relative importance and imminence of cancer- and treatment-related events. Recognizing the complexities of the expectation formation

  8. Nutrition management for head and neck cancer patients improves clinical outcome and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Richter, Urs; Betz, C; Hartmann, S; Brands, R C

    2017-12-01

    Up to 80% of patients with head and neck cancers are malnourished because of their lifestyle and the risk factors associated with this disease. Unfortunately, nutrition management systems are not implemented in most head and neck cancer clinics. Even worse, many head and neck surgeons as well as hospital management authorities disregard the importance of nutrition management in head and neck cancer patients. In addition, the often extensive resection and reconstruction required for tumors in the upper aerodigestive tract pose special challenges for swallowing and sufficient food intake, placing special demands on nutrition management. This article presents the basics of perioperative metabolism and nutrition management of head and neck cancer patients and makes recommendations for clinical practice. Implementing a nutrition management system in head and neck cancer clinics will improve the clinical outcome and the survival of the patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Total Gastrectomy for Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer at a Single Center: Postsurgical Outcomes in 41 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Vivian E; Gholami, Sepideh; Shah, Manish A; Tang, Laura H; Janjigian, Yelena Y; Schattner, Mark; Selby, Luke V; Yoon, Sam S; Salo-Mullen, Erin; Stadler, Zsofia K; Kelsen, David; Brennan, Murray F; Coit, Daniel G

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe postoperative outcomes of total gastrectomy at our institution for patients with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). HDGC, which is mainly caused by germline mutations in the E-cadherin gene (CDH1), renders a lifetime risk of gastric cancer of up to 70%, prompting a recommendation for prophylactic total gastrectomy. A prospective gastric cancer database identified 41 patients with CDH1 mutation who underwent total gastrectomy during 2005 to 2015. Perioperative, histopathologic, and long-term data were collected. Of the 41 patients undergoing total gastrectomy, median age was 47 years (range 20 to 71). There were 14 men and 27 women, with 25 open operations and 16 minimally invasive operations. Median length of stay was 7 days (range 4 to 50). In total, 11 patients (27%) experienced a complication requiring intervention, and there was 1 peri-operative mortality (2.5%). Thirty-five patients (85%) demonstrated 1 or more foci of intramucosal signet ring cell gastric cancer in the examined specimen. At 16 months median follow-up, the median weight loss was 4.7 kg (15% of preoperative weight). By 6 to 12 months postoperatively, weight patterns stabilized. Overall outcome was reported to be "as expected" by 40% of patients and "better than expected" by 45%. Patient-reported outcomes were similar to those of other patients undergoing total gastrectomy. Total gastrectomy should be considered for all CDH1 mutation carriers because of the high risk of invasive diffuse-type gastric cancer and lack of reliable surveillance options. Although most patients have durable weight loss after total gastrectomy, weights stabilize at about 6 to 12 months postoperatively, and patients report outcomes as being good to better than their preoperative expectations. No patients have developed gastric cancer recurrence after resections.

  10. Outcome of genetic evaluation of patients with kidney cancer referred for suspected hereditary cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Kelly L; Alanee, Shaheen; Glogowski, Emily A; Schrader, Kasmintan A; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Klein, Robert; Russo, Paul; Coleman, Jonathan; Offit, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    To analyze patients with kidney cancer referred for evaluation at a high-volume genetics service at a comprehensive cancer center and identify factors associated with positive tests for hereditary cancer syndromes. A retrospective review of patients referred to the Clinical Genetics Service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center was performed, and patients with a personal history of kidney cancer were identified. Patient and disease characteristics were reviewed. In all, 4 variables including age at diagnosis of kidney tumor, presence of syndromic manifestations, family history of kidney cancer, and number of primary malignancies were evaluated for association with positive test results in 2 groups: patients tested for renal cell carcinoma syndromes and Lynch syndrome. Guidance for genetic testing strategy in patients with kidney cancer is provided. Between 1999 and 2012, 120 patients with a history of kidney cancer were evaluated by the Clinical Genetics Service. The mean age at kidney cancer diagnosis was 52 years (interquartile range: 42-63), with 57% being women. A family history of kidney cancer was reported by 39 patients (33%). Time between diagnosis of first cancer and genetic consultation was 5 years in the remaining 23%. Overall, 95 patients were tested for genetic abnormalities with 27 (28%) testing positive. Testing for renal cell carcinoma (RCC)-related syndromes was performed on 43 patients, with 13 testing positive (30%). Lynch syndrome testing was positive in 9 patients (32%) after 28 were tested. In RCC-associated syndromes, young age of diagnosis was associated with positive test results. Conversely, syndromic manifestations and increasing number of primary malignancies were associated with positive Lynch testing. The discovery of inherited kidney cancer syndromes has provided a unique opportunity to identify patients at increased risk for cancer. Factors associated with positive genetic testing are unique to different syndromes. These data

  11. Associations between nutritional status, weight loss, radiotherapy treatment toxicity and treatment outcomes in gastrointestinal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Amanda; Kiss, Nicole; Hodgson, Belinda; Crowe, Timothy C; Walsh, Adam D

    2011-02-01

    Patients with gastrointestinal cancers are susceptible to nutritional deterioration which may be compounded by radiotherapy treatment toxicities. This study aimed to determine whether nutritional status at radiotherapy commencement or changes in nutritional status throughout radiotherapy were associated with treatment toxicity and outcomes in gastrointestinal cancer patients. Seventy-three gastrointestinal cancer patients receiving curative radiotherapy underwent medical record audits assessing body weight, radiotherapy toxicity, unplanned treatment breaks or hospital admissions and completion of prescribed treatment/s. Nutritional status was assessed in a subset of patients (n = 11) using the Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment tool. Seventy-five percent of patients lost weight throughout radiotherapy. Weight loss was significantly greater in patients experiencing unplanned radiotherapy breaks (-3.1% vs -1.6%, p nutritional status during radiotherapy (as measured by weight loss) may be associated with poorer short-term treatment outcomes in gastrointestinal cancer patients. Patient numbers were too small to definitively determine the effect of nutritional status at radiotherapy commencement or changes in nutritional status throughout radiotherapy (defined by PG-SGA) on treatment outcomes. Further research is required to investigate this in larger, longer-term studies. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Improving cancer pain control with NCCN guideline-based analgesic administration: a patient-centered outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjan, Nora

    2014-09-01

    Improving the control of cancer-related pain (CRP) is a clinical and ethical imperative. Clinical research has documented improved treatment tolerance and survival rates among patients with cancer who have effective pain control. Barriers to CRP control include inadequate patient and physician education. Meta-analyses of patient education studies correlate improvements in CRP control with improved communications with health care providers and the implementation of strategies that assist with adherence to medication schedules. These strategies build patient confidence, allowing better self-management of pain and reduced psychological consequences. For physicians, ample educational resources exist in CRP management. However, in both the inpatient and outpatient settings, compliance with NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Adult Cancer Pain continues to be less than 70%, and more than one-third of patients continue to receive inadequate doses of analgesics. Patient-centered outcomes have become an integral end point in health policy, and the nation's medical training, research, and delivery systems are transforming to a value-based accreditation and reimbursement system. Pain control is a significant patient-centered outcome in cancer care, because pain adversely impacts function and affects all domains of quality of life. Agreement is clear on the value of health care interventions that relieve suffering from cancer pain and restore personal dignity. Copyright © 2014 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  13. The Impact of Obesity on Surgical Outcome in Endometrial Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orekoya, Olubunmi; Samson, Marsha E; Trivedi, Tushar; Vyas, Shraddha; Steck, Susan E

    2016-06-01

    Background: Obesity is a significant public health problem in the United States, and many studies have established obesity as a significant risk factor for endometrial cancer. Surgery is the standard of care in staging and treatment of endometrial cancer, and obesity may influence surgical outcomes because of its attendant comorbid conditions. Therefore, assessment of the impact of obesity on surgical outcome is important for decreasing morbidity and improving survival in patients with endometrial cancer. Objective: The aims of this research were to evaluate and review epidemiologic data systematically on the impact of obesity on surgical outcomes and to assess safety and feasibility of newer surgical techniques in obese patients. Materials and Methods: A systematic search of PubMed was conducted to identify articles between 2004 and 2013 that focused on the impact of obesity on surgical outcome. Reference lists of retrieved articles were also used to identify other relevant articles. Thirteen relevant articles were reviewed. Results: Evidence from epidemiologic studies showed that obesity impacts surgical outcome adversely. On average, obese patients have worse surgical outcomes than their nonobese counterparts. In addition, surgical outcome worsens as level of obesity increases. However, surgical procedure also influences this association. Minimally invasive surgeries are more useful and are accompanied with fewer complications than conventional laparotomy and can be performed safely in obese patients. Conclusions: Obesity is a significant risk in the etiology, treatment, and surgical outcomes of patients with endometrial cancer. Future research will need more randomized controlled trials and prospective studies to identify the best procedures for maximal outcomes. (J GYNECOL SURG 32:149).

  14. Outcome after emergency surgery in patients with a free perforation caused by gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Hironori; Hiraki, Shuichi; Sakamoto, Naoko; Yaguchi, Yoshihisa; Horio, Takuya; Kumano, Isao; Akase, Takayoshi; Sugasawa, Hidekazu; Aiko, Satoshi; Ono, Satoshi; Ichikura, Takashi; Kazuo, Hase

    2010-01-01

    Perforation of gastric cancer is rare and it accounts for less than 1% of the incidences of an acute abdomen. In this study, we reviewed cases of benign or malignant gastric perforation in terms of the accuracy of diagnosis and investigated the clinical outcome after emergency surgery in patients with a free perforation caused by gastric cancer. On the basis of pathological examination, gastric cancer was diagnosed in 8 patients and benign ulcer perforation in 32 patients. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of intraoperative diagnosis by pathological examination were 50, 93.8 and 85%, respectively. Except for age, there were no differences in the other demographic characteristics between patients with gastric cancer and benign ulcer perforation. The median survival time of patients with perforated gastric cancer was 195 days after surgery. Patients with gastric cancer perforation had a poorer overall survival rate than those who had T3 tumors without perforation. In addition, in patients with perforation, recurrence of peritoneum occurred more frequently. In conclusion, to improve the survival rate of patients with perforated gastric cancer and to improve the accuracy of intraoperative diagnosis, endoscopic examination and/or pathological examination of the frozen section should be performed, if possible. A balanced surgical strategy using laparoscopic local repair as the first-step of surgery, followed by radical open gastrectomy with lymphadenectomy may be considered.

  15. Comparison of Colonoscopy Surveillance Outcomes Between Young and Older Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Bae; Lee, Hyun Jung; Park, Soo Jung; Hong, Sung Pil; Cheon, Jae Hee; Kim, Won Ho; Kim, Tae Il

    2017-09-01

    Young-onset colorectal cancer is uncommon, but the incidence is increasing. Despite several guidelines for colonoscopic surveillance following colorectal cancer resection, there is little consistency regarding the timing and age-adjusted strategies of surveillance colonoscopy after surgery of young-onset colorectal cancer. The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of surveillance colonoscopy between sporadic colorectal cancer patients with young and older age after curative resection. We retrospectively reviewed 569 colorectal cancer patients who underwent curative resection between January 2006 and December 2010. The primary outcome was comparison of the development of metachronous advanced neoplasia during surveillance colonoscopy between young and older colorectal cancer patients. There were 95 patients in the young age group and 474 patients in the older age group. The mean time interval from surgery to the development of metachronous advanced neoplasia was 99.2 ± 3.7 months in the young age group and 84.4 ± 2.5 months in the old age group (P = 0.03). In the multivariate analysis, age (OR, 3.56; P = 0.04) and family history of colorectal cancer (OR, 2.66; P = 0.008) were associated with the development of metachronous advanced neoplasia. None of the young patients without both family history of colorectal cancer and high-risk findings at index colonoscopy showed advanced neoplasia during the follow-up period. Age and family history of colorectal cancer are independent risk factors for the occurrence of advanced neoplasia after curative colorectal cancer resection, suggesting age-adjusted strategies of surveillance colonoscopy.

  16. Cancer patients' experiences with and perceived outcomes of yoga: results from focus groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Uden-Kraan, C F; Chinapaw, M J M; Drossaert, C H C; Verdonck-de Leeuw, I M; Buffart, L M

    2013-07-01

    Yoga is a "mind-body" exercise, a combination of physical poses with breathing and meditation, and may have beneficial effects on physical and psychosocial symptoms. We aimed to explore cancer patients' motives for practicing yoga, experiences of practicing yoga, and perceived physical and psychosocial outcomes. Participants (n = 45) following yoga classes for cancer patients were asked to participate in focus group interviews, of whom 29 participated. The focus groups (n = 5) were audio taped with prior consent and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed by two coders and independently coded into key issues and themes. Mean age of the participants was 53.8 (SD 10.8) years, of whom 25 were women, and 18 were diagnosed with breast cancer. Motives for participation in yoga were relaxation, the will to be physically active, the wish to pay more attention to one's body, coping with psychosocial symptoms, contributing to their cancer rehabilitation process, and combing physical and mental processes. Main physical and psychosocial experiences of yoga mentioned by patients were regaining body awareness, raising attention to the inner self, learning how to relax, enjoyment, and finding recognition and understanding. Increased physical fitness and function, mental strength and resilience, increased coping, being more relaxed, and happiness were frequently mentioned experiences of patients. Patients with different types of cancer perceived several benefits on physical and psychosocial outcomes by practicing yoga. Therefore, yoga can be a valuable form of supportive care for cancer patients.

  17. Intensive Care Unit Outcomes Among Patients With Cancer After Palliative Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruser, Jacqueline M; Rakhra, Sunpreet S; Sacotte, Ryan M; Wehbe, Firas H; Rademaker, Alfred W; Wunderink, Richard G; Kruser, Tim J

    2017-11-15

    To inform goals of care discussions at the time of palliative radiation therapy (RT) consultation, we sought to characterize intensive care unit (ICU) outcomes for patients treated with palliative RT compared to all other patients with metastatic cancer admitted to the ICU. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients with metastatic cancer admitted to an ICU in a tertiary medical center from January 2010 to September 2015. We compared in-hospital mortality between patients who received palliative RT in the 12 months before admission and all other patients with metastatic cancer. We used multivariable logistic regression to evaluate the association between receipt of palliative RT and in-hospital mortality, adjusting for patient characteristics and acute illness severity. Among 1424 patients with metastatic cancer, 11.3% (n=161) received palliative RT before ICU admission. In-hospital mortality was 36.7% for palliative RT patients, compared with 16.6% for other patients with metastatic cancer (Ppalliative RT was associated with increased in-hospital mortality (odds ratio 2.08, 95% confidence interval 1.34-3.21, P=.001), after adjusting for patient characteristics and severity of critical illness. Only 34 patients (21.1%) treated with palliative RT received additional cancer-directed treatment after ICU admission. For patients with metastatic cancer, prior treatment with palliative RT is associated with increased in-hospital mortality after ICU admission. Nearly half of patients previously treated with palliative RT either died during hospitalization or were discharged with hospice care, and few received further cancer-directed therapy. Palliative RT referral may represent an opportunity to discuss end-of-life treatment preferences with patients and families. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of Screening for Psychological Distress on Patient Outcomes in Cancer: a Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Anna; Roseman, Michelle; Delisle, Vanessa C.; Milette, Katherine; Levis, Brooke; Syamchandra, Achyuth; Stefanek, Michael E.; Stewart, Donna E.; de Jonge, Peter; Coyne, James C.; Thombs, Brett D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Several practice guidelines recommend routine screening for psychological distress in cancer care. The objective was to evaluate the effect of screening cancer patients for psychological distress by assessing the (1) effectiveness of interventions to reduce distress among patients identified as distressed; and (2) effects of screening for distress on distress outcomes. Methods CINAHL, Cochrane, EMBASE, ISI, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and SCOPUS databases were searched through April 6, 2011 with manual searches of 45 relevant journals, reference list review, citation tracking of included articles, and trial registry reviews through June 30, 2012. Articles in any language on cancer patients were included if they (1) compared treatment for patients with psychological distress to placebo or usual care in a randomized controlled trial (RCT); or (2) assessed the effect of screening on psychological distress in a RCT. Results There were 14 eligible RCTs for treatment of distress, and 1 RCT on the effects of screening on patient distress. Pharmacological, psychotherapy and collaborative care interventions generally reduced distress with small to moderate effects. One study investigated effects of screening for distress on psychological outcomes, and it found no improvement. Conclusion Treatment studies reported modest improvement in distress symptoms, but only a single eligible study was found on the effects of screening cancer patients for distress, and distress did not improve in screened patients versus those receiving usual care. Because of the lack of evidence of beneficial effects of screening cancer patients for distress, it is premature to recommend or mandate implementation of routine screening. PMID:23751231

  19. Open access to large scale datasets is needed to translate knowledge of cancer heterogeneity into better patient outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew H Beck

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this guest editorial, Andrew Beck discusses the importance of open access to big data for translating knowledge of cancer heterogeneity into better outcomes for cancer patients.

  20. Treatment outcome in patients with vulvar cancer: comparison of concurrent radiotherapy to postoperative radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ja Young; Kim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Ki Won; Park, Dong Choon; Yoon, Joo Hee; Yoon, Sei Chul [St. Vincent' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Mina [St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    To evaluate outcome and morbidity in patients with vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy, concurrent chemoradiotherapy or postoperative radiotherapy. The records of 24 patients treated with radiotherapy for vulvar cancer between July 1993 and September 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received once daily 1.8-4 Gy fractions external beam radiotherapy to median 51.2 Gy (range, 19.8 to 81.6 Gy) on pelvis and inguinal nodes. Seven patients were treated with primary concurrent chemoradiotherapy, one patient was treated with primary radiotherapy alone, four patients received palliative radiotherapy, and twelve patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy. Twenty patients were eligible for response evaluation. Response rate was 55% (11/20). The 5-year disease free survival was 42.2% and 5-year overall survival was 46.2%, respectively. Fifty percent (12/24) experienced with acute skin complications of grade III or more during radiotherapy. Late complications were found in 8 patients. 50% (6/12) of patients treated with lymph node dissection experienced severe late complications. One patient died of sepsis from lymphedema. However, only 16.6% (2/12) of patients treated with primary radiotherapy developed late complications. Outcome of patients with vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy showed relatively good local control and low recurrence. Severe late toxicities remained higher in patients treated with both node dissection and radiotherapy.

  1. The art and science of cancer education and evaluation: toward facilitating improved patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lenora; Ousley, Anita; Swarz, Jeffrey; Bingham, Raymond J; Erickson, J Bianca; Ellis, Steven; Moody, Terra

    2011-03-01

    Cancer education is a constantly evolving field, as science continues to advance both our understanding of cancer and its effects on patients, families, and communities. Moving discoveries to practice expeditiously is paramount to impacting cancer outcomes. The continuing education of cancer care professionals throughout their practice life is vital to facilitating the adoption of therapeutic innovations. Meanwhile, more general educational programs serve to keep cancer patients, their families, and the public informed of the latest findings in cancer research. The National Cancer Institute conducted an assessment of the current knowledge base for cancer education which involved two literature reviews, one of the general literature of the evaluation of medical and health education efforts, and the other of the preceding 5 years of the Journal of Cancer Education (JCE). These reviews explored a wide range of educational models and methodologies. In general, those that were most effective used multiple methodologies, interactive techniques, and multiple exposures over time. Less than one third of the articles in the JCE reported on a cancer education or communication product, and of these, only 70% had been evaluated for effectiveness. Recommendations to improve the evaluation of cancer education and the educational focus of the JCE are provided.

  2. Outcomes of In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Among Patients With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Waleed; Ghafoor, Irum; Jamshed, Arif; Gul, Sabika; Hafeez, Haroon

    2017-04-01

    To review all episodes where an emergency code was called in a cancer-specialized hospital in Pakistan and to assess survival to discharge among patients who received a cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We reviewed demographic and clinical data related to all "code blue" calls over 3 years. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to test the association of clinical characteristics with the primary outcome of survival to discharge. A total of 646 code blue calls were included in the analysis. The CPR was performed in 388 (60%) of these calls. For every 20 episodes of CPR among patients with cancer of all ages, only 1 resulted in a patient's survival to discharge, even though in 52.2% episodes there was a return of spontaneous circulation. No association was found between the type of rhythm at initiation of CPR and likelihood of survival to discharge. The proportion of patients with advanced cancer surviving to discharge after in-hospital CPR in a low-income country was in line with the reported international experience. Most patients with cancer who received in-hospital CPR did not survive to discharge and did not appear to benefit from resuscitation. Advance directives by patients with cancer limiting aggressive interventions at end of life and proper documentation of these directives will help in provision of care that is humane and consonant with patients' wishes for a dignified death. Patients' early appreciation of the limited benefits of CPR in advanced cancer is likely to help them formulate such advance directives.

  3. Natural history and long-term outcomes of patients treated for early stage colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2013-07-01

    The long-term natural history of early stage colon cancer and the outcome of long-term colonoscopic surveillance in routine specialist clinical practice after removal of the incident cancers have not been fully defined. In the present long-term evaluation up to 25 years, metachronous neoplasia, including both advanced adenomas and carcinomas, was defined. All early stage colorectal cancer patients evaluated consecutively from a single clinical practice underwent follow-up colonoscopic evaluations after removal of the incident cancer and clearing of neoplastic disease. Colonoscopic surveillance was planned for two phases - initially on an annual basis for five years, followed by continued surveillance every three years up to 25 years with removal of any metachronous neoplastic lesion. A total of 128 patients (66 men and 62 women) with 129 incident early stage colorectal cancers were evaluated. Virtually all patients were symptomatic, usually with clinical evidence of blood loss. Incident early cancers were located throughout the colon, especially in the rectosigmoid, and showed no pathological evidence of nodal or other metastases. All patients evaluated during the first five years did not experience recurrent disease or have metachronous cancer detected. After five years, a total of 94 patients were evaluated up to 25 years; six of these patients were found to have seven metachronous colon cancers. All developed cancer more than seven years after removal of the incident colorectal cancer, including six asymptomatic adenocarcinomas, of which only one had evidence of single node involvement. Another patient in this cohort developed a poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma of the colon. In addition, 45% of patients had a total of 217 adenomas removed, including 11% of patients with 33 advanced adenomas. Among 14 patients with advanced adenomas, seven (50%) developed ≥1 late metachronous cancers. Following removal of an incident symptomatic early stage

  4. Effect of marriage on outcomes for elderly patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Eric W; Wilson, Matthew Z; Goldenberg, David; Mackley, Heath; Koch, Wayne; Hollenbeak, Christopher S

    2015-05-01

    Beneficial effects of marriage on cancer outcomes have been observed for many cancers, but oral cavity and pharyngeal cancers have never been examined. We used the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program linked with Medicare records to identify 9403 elderly patients (age ≥66 years) with oral cavity and pharyngeal cancers. We used a propensity score analysis to estimate differences in proportions (pd ) between married and unmarried patients on stage, treatment, and survival. For oral cavity cancers, a larger proportion of married patients presented with earlier stage (pd = 0.05; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.02-0.08), were treated with surgery (pd = 0.06; 95% CI, 0.03-0.08), and survived 1 year (pd = 0.04; 95% CI, 0.01-0.06). Similar results were found for pharyngeal cancers for stage (pd = 0.04; 95% CI, 0.01-0.06), treatment with chemotherapy and radiation (pd = 0.04; 95% CI, 0.01-0.07), and 1-year survival (pd = 0.01; 95% CI, 0.08-0.16). Marriage is associated with earlier stage, aggressive treatment, and superior survival for patients with oral cavity and pharyngeal cancers. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care and patient related outcomes: A critical review of evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Naveen Salins; Raghavendra Ramanjulu; Lipika Patra; Jayita Deodhar; Mary Ann Muckaden

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: World Health Organization and American Society of Clinical Oncology recommend early integration of specialist palliative care in patients with cancer. This paper focuses on critical review of evidence on integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care and patient-related outcomes. Methods: The question for the literature search was - Does integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care influences patient-related outcomes? 31 articles related to ...

  6. Differential effects of patient-related factors on the outcome of radiation therapy for rectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Ikuko; Dyson, Gregory; Snyder, Michael; Kim, Hyeong-Reh; Severson, Richard K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate whether cancer specific survival in rectal cancer patients is affected by patient-related factors, conditional on radiation treatment. Methods 359 invasive rectal cancer patients who consented and provided questionnaire data for a population-based case-control study of colorectal cancer in Metropolitan Detroit were included in this study. Their vital status was ascertained through to the population-based cancer registry. Hazard ratios (HR) for cancer specific and other deaths and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated according to selected patients' characteristics, stratified by radiation status, using joint Cox proportional hazards models. Results A total of 159 patients were found to be deceased after the median follow-up of 9.2 years, and 70% of them were considered to be cancer specific. Smoking and a history of diabetes were associated with an increased probability of deaths from other causes (HR 3.20, 95% CI 1.72–5.97 and HR 2.02, 95% CI 0.98–4.16, respectively), while regular use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) was inversely correlated with cancer-specific mortality (HR 0.50, 95% CI 0.30–0.81). Furthermore, the associations of smoking and NSAIDs with the two different types of deaths (cancer vs others) significantly varied with radiation status (P-values for the interactions= 0.014 for both). In addition, we observed a marginally significantly reduced risk of cancer specific deaths in the patients who had the relative ketogenic diet overall (HR=0.49, 95% 0.23–1.02). Conclusion Further research is warranted to confirm these results in order to develop new interventions to improve outcome from radiation treatment. PMID:27746859

  7. Oncologic and surgical outcomes in colorectal cancer patients with liver cirrhosis: A propensity-matched study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eon Chul Han

    Full Text Available The management of colorectal cancer in patients with liver cirrhosis requires a thorough understanding of both diseases. This study evaluated the effect of liver cirrhosis on oncologic and surgical outcomes and prognostic factors in colorectal cancer patients. Fifty-five consecutive colorectal cancer patients with liver cirrhosis underwent colorectal resection (LC group. Using a prospectively maintained database, these patients were matched 1:4 using propensity scoring with R programming language, package "MatchIt" and "optmatch" by sex, age, cancer location, and tumor stage with 220 patients without liver cirrhosis (non-LC group, resulting in 275 patients. The 5-year overall survival (OS was significantly worse in the LC group than in the non-LC group (46.7% vs. 76.2% respectively, P 10 were prognostic factors for OS. However, the OS was not different between the LC group with MELD-Na score ≤10 and the non-LC group (5-year OS rate, TNM stage ≤II, 85.7 vs 89.5%, p = 0.356; TNM stage ≥III, 41.1 vs 66.2%, p = 0.061. Colorectal cancer patients with liver cirrhosis have poorer OS compared to those without liver cirrhosis; however, the PRF rates are similar. It might be due to the mortality from the liver, and surgical treatment should be actively considered for patients with MELD-Na score <10.

  8. Oncologic and surgical outcomes in colorectal cancer patients with liver cirrhosis: A propensity-matched study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Eon Chul; Ryoo, Seung-Bum; Park, Ji Won; Yi, Jin Wook; Oh, Heung-Kwon; Choe, Eun Kyung; Ha, Heon-Kyun; Park, Byung Kwan; Moon, Sang Hui; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Park, Kyu Joo

    2017-01-01

    The management of colorectal cancer in patients with liver cirrhosis requires a thorough understanding of both diseases. This study evaluated the effect of liver cirrhosis on oncologic and surgical outcomes and prognostic factors in colorectal cancer patients. Fifty-five consecutive colorectal cancer patients with liver cirrhosis underwent colorectal resection (LC group). Using a prospectively maintained database, these patients were matched 1:4 using propensity scoring with R programming language, package "MatchIt" and "optmatch" by sex, age, cancer location, and tumor stage with 220 patients without liver cirrhosis (non-LC group), resulting in 275 patients. The 5-year overall survival (OS) was significantly worse in the LC group than in the non-LC group (46.7% vs. 76.2% respectively, P liver disease plus serum sodium (MELD-Na) score >10 were prognostic factors for OS. However, the OS was not different between the LC group with MELD-Na score ≤10 and the non-LC group (5-year OS rate, TNM stage ≤II, 85.7 vs 89.5%, p = 0.356; TNM stage ≥III, 41.1 vs 66.2%, p = 0.061). Colorectal cancer patients with liver cirrhosis have poorer OS compared to those without liver cirrhosis; however, the PRF rates are similar. It might be due to the mortality from the liver, and surgical treatment should be actively considered for patients with MELD-Na score <10.

  9. Gastrointestinal ostomies and sexual outcomes: a comparison of colorectal cancer patients by ostomy status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, J B; Finan, P H; Haythornthwaite, J A; Kadan, M; Regan, K R; Herman, J M; Efron, J; Diaz, L A; Azad, N S

    2014-02-01

    Research examining effects of ostomy use on sexual outcomes is limited. Patients with colorectal cancer were compared on sexual outcomes and body image based on ostomy status (never, past, and current ostomy). Differences in depression were also examined. Patients were prospectively recruited during clinic visits and by tumor registry mailings. Patients with colorectal cancer (N = 141; 18 past ostomy; 25 current ostomy; and 98 no ostomy history) completed surveys assessing sexual outcomes (medical impact on sexual function, Female Sexual Function Index, International Index of Erectile Function), body image distress (Body Image Scale), and depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale-Short Form). Clinical information was obtained through patient validated self-report measures and medical records. Most participants reported sexual function in the dysfunctional range using established cut-off scores. In analyses adjusting for demographic and medical covariates and depression, significant group differences were found for ostomy status on impact on sexual function (p sexual function (p = .01), and body image (p ostomy groups reported worse impact on sexual function than those who never had an ostomy (p sexual function. The current ostomy group reported worse body image distress than those who never had an ostomy (p sexual or erectile function (p values ≥ .59). Colorectal cancer treatment puts patients at risk for sexual difficulties and some difficulties may be more pronounced for patients with ostomies as part of their treatment. Clinical information and support should be offered.

  10. Outcomes of patients presenting to a dedicated rapid access lung cancer clinic.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dunican, E

    2012-02-01

    We examined the outcomes of the first 500 patients referred to a dedicated Rapid Access Lung Cancer Clinic. A total of 206 patients (41.2%) were diagnosed with a thoracic malignancy; 179 had primary lung cancer and 27 had secondary or other thoracic cancers. Pulmonary nodules requiring ongoing surveillance were found in a further 79 patients (15.8%). Of those patients found to have primary lung cancer, 24 (13.4%) had Small Cell and 145 (81%) had Non Small Cell Lung Cancer. In patients with Non small cell tumours, 26 (21.1%) were stage 1, 14 (11.4%) stage II, 37 (30.1%) stage III and 46 (37.4%) stage IV at diagnosis. For the 129 patients (72%) in whom the thoracic MDT recommended active treatment, primary therapy was surgical resection in 44 (24.6%), combined chemoradiation in 31 patients (17.3%), chemotherapy alone in 39 (21.8%) and radiation in 15 (8.4%).

  11. Outcomes in Patients with Obstructive Jaundice from Metastatic Colorectal Cancer and Implications for Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Shawnn D.; Albert, Scott; Shirley, Lawrence; Schmidt, Carl; Abdel-Misih, Sherif; El-Dika, Samer; Groce, J. Royce; Wu, Christina; Goldberg, Richard M.; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Bloomston, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer can develop jaundice from intrahepatic or extrahepatic causes. Currently, there is little data on the underlying causes and overall survival after onset of jaundice. The purpose of this study was to characterize the causes of jaundice and determine outcomes. Methods Six hundred twenty-nine patients treated for metastatic colorectal cancer between 2004 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Those developing jaundice were grouped as having intrahepatic or extrahepatic obstruction. Demographics, clinicopathologic, and outcome data were analyzed. Results Sixty-two patients with metastatic colorectal cancer developed jaundice. Intrahepatic biliary obstruction was most common, occurring in younger patients. Time from metastatic diagnosis to presentation of jaundice was similar between groups, as was the mean number of prior lines of chemotherapy. Biliary decompression was successful 41.7 % of the time and was attempted more commonly for extrahepatic causes. Median overall survival after onset of jaundice was 1.5 months and it was similar between groups, but improved to 9.6 months in patients who were able to receive further chemotherapy. Conclusions Jaundice due to metastatic colorectal cancer is an ominous finding, representing aggressive tumor biology or exhaustion of therapies. Biliary decompression is often difficult and should only be pursued when additional treatment options are available. PMID:25300799

  12. Patients' Experiences With Care for Lung Cancer and Colorectal Cancer: Findings From the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayanian, John Z.; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Arora, Neeraj K.; Kahn, Katherine L.; Malin, Jennifer L.; Ganz, Patricia A.; van Ryn, Michelle; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Kiefe, Catarina I.; He, Yulei; Urmie, Julie M.; Weeks, Jane C.; Harrington, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To assess patients' experiences with cancer care, ratings of their quality of care, and correlates of these assessments. Patients and Methods For 4,093 patients with lung cancer and 3,685 patients with colorectal cancer in multiple US regions and health care delivery systems, we conducted telephone surveys of patients or their surrogates in English, Spanish, or Chinese at 4 to 7 months after diagnosis. The surveys assessed ratings of the overall quality of cancer care and experiences with three domains of interpersonal care (physician communication, nursing care, and coordination and responsiveness of care). Results English-speaking Asian/Pacific Islander patients and Chinese-speaking patients and those in worse health reported significantly worse adjusted experiences with all three domains of interpersonal care, whereas white, black, and Hispanic patients reported generally similar experiences with interpersonal care. The overall quality of cancer care was rated as excellent by 44.4% of patients with lung cancer and 53.0% of patients with colorectal cancer, and these ratings were most strongly correlated with positive experiences with coordination and responsiveness of care (Spearman rank coefficients of 0.49 and 0.42 for lung and colorectal cancer, respectively). After multivariate adjustment, excellent ratings were less common for each cancer among black patients, English-speaking Asian/Pacific Islander patients, Chinese-speaking patients, and patients reporting worse health status (all P ≤ .05). Conclusion Patients' reports and ratings of care differed significantly by race, language, and health status. Efforts to improve patients' experiences with cancer care should focus on problems affecting Asian and Pacific Islander patients and those in worse health. PMID:20713876

  13. Patients' experiences with care for lung cancer and colorectal cancer: findings from the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayanian, John Z; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Arora, Neeraj K; Kahn, Katherine L; Malin, Jennifer L; Ganz, Patricia A; van Ryn, Michelle; Hornbrook, Mark C; Kiefe, Catarina I; He, Yulei; Urmie, Julie M; Weeks, Jane C; Harrington, David P

    2010-09-20

    To assess patients' experiences with cancer care, ratings of their quality of care, and correlates of these assessments. For 4,093 patients with lung cancer and 3,685 patients with colorectal cancer in multiple US regions and health care delivery systems, we conducted telephone surveys of patients or their surrogates in English, Spanish, or Chinese at 4 to 7 months after diagnosis. The surveys assessed ratings of the overall quality of cancer care and experiences with three domains of interpersonal care (physician communication, nursing care, and coordination and responsiveness of care). English-speaking Asian/Pacific Islander patients and Chinese-speaking patients and those in worse health reported significantly worse adjusted experiences with all three domains of interpersonal care, whereas white, black, and Hispanic patients reported generally similar experiences with interpersonal care. The overall quality of cancer care was rated as excellent by 44.4% of patients with lung cancer and 53.0% of patients with colorectal cancer, and these ratings were most strongly correlated with positive experiences with coordination and responsiveness of care (Spearman rank coefficients of 0.49 and 0.42 for lung and colorectal cancer, respectively). After multivariate adjustment, excellent ratings were less common for each cancer among black patients, English-speaking Asian/Pacific Islander patients, Chinese-speaking patients, and patients reporting worse health status (all P ≤ .05). Patients' reports and ratings of care differed significantly by race, language, and health status. Efforts to improve patients' experiences with cancer care should focus on problems affecting Asian and Pacific Islander patients and those in worse health.

  14. Outcome after neoadjuvant chemoradiation and correlation with nutritional status in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naumann, P.; Habermehl, D.; Welzel, T.; Combs, S.E. [University Clinic Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Debus, J. [University Clinic Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-09-15

    Background: Cancer patients commonly suffer from weight loss since rapid tumor growth can cause catabolic metabolism and depletion of energy stores such as abdominal fat. In locally advanced pancreatic cancer this is even more pronounced due to abdominal pain, fatigue, nausea or malnutrition. In the present article, we quantify this frequently observed weight loss and assess its impact on outcome and survival. Methods: Data on demographics, biometrics, toxicity and survival were collected for the last 100 patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation for locally advanced pancreatic cancer at our department (45.0 Gy and boost up to 54.0 Gy plus concurrent and subsequent gemcitabine), and the subcutaneous fat area at the umbilicus level was measured by computer tomography before and after chemoradiation. Results: After chemoradiation, patients showed a highly statistically significant weight loss and reduction of the subcutaneous fat area. We could determine a very strong correlation of subcutaneous fat area to patient BMI. By categorizing patients according to their BMI based on the WHO classification as slender, normal, overweight and obese, we found improved but not statistically significant survival among obese patients. Accordingly, patients who showed less weight loss tended to survive longer. Conclusions: In this study, patients with pancreatic cancer lost weight during chemoradiation and their subcutaneous fat diminished. Changes in subcutaneous fat area were highly correlated with patients' BMI. Moreover, obese patients and patients who lost less weight had an improved outcome after treatment. Although the extent of weight loss was not significantly correlated with survival, the observed trend warrants greater attention to nutritional status in the future. (orig.)

  15. Patient compliance for postoperative radiotherapy and survival outcome of women with stage I endometrioid endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Koji; Machida, Hiroko; Ragab, Omar M; Garcia-Sayre, Jocelyn; Yessaian, Annie A; Roman, Lynda D

    2017-09-01

    To examine characteristics and survival outcome of women with endometrial cancer who declined postoperative radiotherapy. A retrospective study was conducted to examine surgically-treated grade 1-2 stage IB and grade 3 stage IA-IB endometrioid endometrial cancer in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program between 1983 and 2013 (n = 10 613). Associations of patient declination for guideline-based postoperative radiotherapy and clinico-pathological demographics or survival outcome were examined on multivariable analysis. There were 323 (3.0%) women who declined adjuvant radiotherapy. Women who declined postoperative radiotherapy were more likely to be older, White, Western U.S. residents, and register in recent years (all, adjusted-P compliance to guideline-based postoperative radiotherapy is a prognostic factor for women with stage I endometrioid endometrial cancer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Burden of human metapneumovirus infections in patients with cancer: Risk factors and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Chaer, Firas; Shah, Dimpy P; Kmeid, Joumana; Ariza-Heredia, Ella J; Hosing, Chitra M; Mulanovich, Victor E; Chemaly, Roy F

    2017-06-15

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) causes upper and lower respiratory tract infections (URIs and LRIs, respectively) in healthy and immunocompromised patients; however, its clinical burden in patients with cancer remains unknown. In a retrospective study of all laboratory-confirmed hMPV infections treated at the authors' institution between April 2012 and May 2015, clinical characteristics, risk factors for progression to an LRI, treatment, and outcomes in patients with cancer were determined. In total, 181 hMPV infections were identified in 90 patients (50%) with hematologic malignancies (HMs), in 57 (31%) hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients, and in 34 patients (19%) with solid tumors. Most patients (92%) had a community-acquired infection and presented with URIs (67%), and 43% developed LRIs (59 presented with LRIs and 19 progressed from a URI to an LRI). On multivariable analysis, an underlying HM (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 3.11; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-8.64; P = .029), nosocomial infection (aOR, 26.9; 95% CI, 2.79-259.75; P = .004), and hypoxia (oxygen saturation [SpO2], ≤ 92%) at presentation (aOR, 9.61; 95% CI, 1.98-46.57; P = .005) were identified as independent factors associated with LRI. All-cause mortality at 30 days from hMPV diagnosis was low (4%), and patients with LRIs had a 10% mortality rate at day 30 from diagnosis; whereas patients with URIs had a 0% mortality rate. hMPV infections in patients with cancer may cause significant morbidity, especially for those with underlying HM who may develop an LRI. Despite high morbidity and the lack of directed antiviral therapy for hMPV infections, mortality at day 30 from this infection remained low in this studied population. Cancer 2017;123:2329-2337. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  17. Clinical outcome of high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy in patients with oral cavity cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Kwan Ho; Moon, Sung Ho; Choi, Sung Weon; Park, Joo Yong; Yun, Tak; Lee, Sang Hyun; Lim, Young Kyung; Jeong, Chi Young [National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To evaluate the clinical outcome of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy (IBT) in patients with oral cavity cancer. Sixteen patients with oral cavity cancer treated with HDR remote-control afterloading brachytherapy using 192Ir between 2001 and 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. Brachytherapy was administered in 11 patients as the primary treatment and in five patients as salvage treatment for recurrence after the initial surgery. In 12 patients, external beam radiotherapy (50-55 Gy/25 fractions) was combined with IBT of 21 Gy/7 fractions. In addition, IBT was administered as the sole treatment in three patients with a total dose of 50 Gy/10 fractions and as postoperative adjuvant treatment in one patient with a total of 35 Gy/7 fractions. The 5-year overall survival of the entire group was 70%. The actuarial local control rate after 3 years was 84%. All five recurrent cases after initial surgery were successfully salvaged using IBT +/- external beam radiotherapy. Two patients developed local recurrence at 3 and 5 months, respectively, after IBT. The acute complications were acceptable (< or =grade 2). Three patients developed major late complications, such as radio-osteonecrosis, in which one patient was treated by conservative therapy and two required surgical intervention. HDR IBT for oral cavity cancer was effective and acceptable in diverse clinical settings, such as in the cases of primary or salvage treatment.

  18. Management and outcome of clinically evident neck recurrence in patients with papillary thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Laura Y; Migliacci, Jocelyn C; Tuttle, R Michael; Shaha, Ashok R; Shah, Jatin P; Patel, Snehal G; Ganly, Ian

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to report our incidence of clinically evident neck recurrence, salvage neck management and subsequent outcomes in patients with papillary thyroid cancer. This is important to know so that patients with thyroid cancer can be properly counselled about the implications of recurrent disease and subsequent outcome. An institutional database of 3664 patients with thyroid cancer operated between 1986 and 2010 was reviewed. Patients with nonpapillary histology and gross residual disease and those with distant metastases at presentation or distant metastases prior to nodal recurrence were excluded from the study. Of these, 99 (3.0%) patients developed clinically evident nodal recurrence. Details of recurrence and subsequent therapy were recorded for each patient. Subsequent disease-specific survival (sDSS), distant recurrence-free survival (sDRFS) and nodal recurrence-free survival (sNRFS) were determined from the date of first nodal recurrence using the Kaplan-Meier method. Of the 99 patients, 59% were female and 41% male. The median age was 41 years (range 5-91). The majority of patients had pT3/4 primary tumours (63%) and were pN+ (78%) at initial presentation. The median time to clinically evident nodal recurrence was 28 months (range: 3-264). Nodal recurrence occurred in the central neck in 15 (15%) patients, lateral neck in 74 (75%) patients and both in 10 (10%) patients. After salvage treatment, the 5-year sDSS was 97.4% from time of nodal recurrence. The 5-year sDRFS and sNRFS were 89.2% and 93.7%, respectively. In our series, isolated clinically evident nodal recurrence occurred in 3.0% of patients. Such patients are successfully salvaged with surgery and adjuvant therapy with sDSS of 97.4% at 5 years. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Patient-reported outcomes questionnaire compliance in Cancer Cooperative Group Trials (Alliance N0992).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Pamela J; Burger, Kelli N; Pederson, Levi D; Kaggal, Suneetha; Sloan, Jeff A

    2016-12-01

    The use of patient-reported outcomes in clinical trials is a focal point for research and policy. Non-compliance with planned questionnaires and missing data can threaten both internal validity and generalizability. This retrospective analysis was conducted to determine the extent of, and characteristics associated with, missing patient-reported outcomes. Study characteristics, patient characteristics and adverse events, and reasons for non-compliance were compiled from 14 closed Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology, Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, or Mayo Clinic Cancer Research Consortium clinical trials. Compliance rates were calculated for each patient using the number of booklets completed while the patient was on trial divided by the number of booklets the patient was expected to complete. Frequency counts and summary statistics were compiled. Logistic regression techniques were employed. The 1640 included patients had a median age of 58 years and were mostly White (90.8%) and female (73.8%). Compliance rates per study ranged from 84.7% to 97.2%. The primary endpoint of overall compliance rate was 93.1%. A total of 1267 patients were compliant. Those non-compliant were slightly older (mean = 58.6 vs 57.5, p = 0.03) and had different types of cancers (p compliance according to tumor status (p = 0.66), clinical stage (p = 0.81), baseline quality of life (p = 0.42 for ≥8 vs compliance included patient refusal (N = 136), booklet not administered to patient (N = 199), no clinic visit at the scheduled time for booklet completion (N = 40), and at-home-completed booklet not returned (N = 224). Logistic regression indicates gender (p compliance. Patient-reported outcomes have successfully been implemented into Alliance and Mayo Clinic trials with high rates of patient compliance. Further improvement in compliance can be made with staff commitment and education. Patients are typically non-compliant only when the task at hand is

  20. Clinical outcome and prognostic factors of patients with early-stage epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Li, Ning; Sun, Yangchun; Li, Bin; Xu, Lily; Wu, Lingying

    2017-04-04

    Some subsets of early stage ovarian cancer patients experience more recurrences than others. Studies on prognostics factors gave conflicting results. We investigated consecutive 221 patients with stage I/II ovarian cancer at our institution from 1999 to 2010. Univariate and multivariate analysis of progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were performed. After a median follow-up of 79 months, the 5-year/10-year PFS and 5-year/10-year OS were 78% /76% and 90% /87% respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that stage as the most prominent independent prognostic factor in terms of PFS (stage I vs stage IIA vs stage IIB, Hazard Ratio (HR): 1 vs 4 vs 6.1, P stage I vs stage II, HR: 1 vs 2.1, P early-stage ovarian cancer had a favorable outcome, stage was the most powerful prognostic factor.

  1. Incidence and Outcome of BRCA Mutations in Unselected Patients with Triple Receptor-Negative Breast Cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M

    2011-03-01

    To investigate the incidence of germline and somatic BRCA1\\/2 mutations in unselected patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and determine the prognostic significance of carrying a mutation. Methods: DNA was obtained from 77 TNBC and normal tissues. BRCA1\\/2 exons\\/flanking regions were sequenced from tumor and patients classified as mutant or wild type (WT). Sequencing was repeated from normal tissue to identify germline and somatic mutations. Patient characteristics were compared with chi-square. Survival was estimated by Kaplan-Meier method and compared with log-rank. Cox proportional hazards models were fit to determine the independent association of mutation status with outcome.

  2. Impact of robotics on the outcome of elderly patients with endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoue, Vincent; Zeng, Xing; Lau, Susie; Press, Joshua Z; Abitbol, Jeremie; Gotlieb, Raphael; How, Jeffrey; Wang, Yifan; Gotlieb, Walter H

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the impact of introducing a robotics program on clinical outcome of elderly patients with endometrial cancer. Evaluation and comparison of peri-operative morbidity and disease-free interval in 163 consecutive elderly patients (≥70years) with endometrial cancer undergoing staging procedure with traditional open surgery compared to robotic surgery. All consecutive patients ≥70years of age with endometrial cancer who underwent robotic surgery (n=113) were compared with all consecutive patients ≥70years of age (n=50) before the introduction of a robotic program in December 2007. Baseline patient characteristics were similar in both eras. Patients undergoing robotic surgery had longer mean operating times (244 compared with 217minutes, p=0.009) but fewer minor adverse events (17% compared with 60%, probotics cohort had less estimated mean blood loss (75 vs 334mL, probotics program for the treatment of endometrial cancer in the elderly has significant benefits, including lower minor complication rate, less operative blood loss and shorter hospitalization without compromising 2-year disease-free survival. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Differences in outcome for cervical cancer patients treated with or without brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Johannes; Dreifaldt, Ann-Charlotte; Mordhorst, Louise Bohr; Sorbe, Bengt

    To compare the clinical outcome of cervical cancer patients treated with primary radiotherapy with and without the addition of brachytherapy. In all, 220 patients with cervical cancer stage I-IV treated between 1993 and 2009 were included. Three or five 6.0 Gy fractions of brachytherapy were given in addition to the external beam radiotherapy to 134 patients, whereas 86 patients received external beam radiotherapy alone (EBRTA). In the EBRTA group, the patients received external boost instead of brachytherapy with a total dose to the tumor of 64-72 Gy. The 5-year overall survival and cancer-specific survival rates of the complete series were 42.5% and 55.5%, respectively. The rates of primary complete remission, 5-year cancer-specific survival, and recurrence were 92.5%, 68.5%, and 31.3% for the brachytherapy group vs. 73.3%, 35.4%, and 37.2% for the EBRTA group. The survival (all types) of the patients receiving brachytherapy was significantly (p brachytherapy group. Brachytherapy is important to achieve sufficient doses to the periphery and central part of the tumor and should always be considered in treatment of cervical carcinomas. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Therapy processes, progress, and outcomes for 2 therapies for gynecological cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manne, Sharon L; Myers-Virtue, Shannon; Kashy, Deborah A; Ozga, Melissa; Kissane, David; Heckman, Carolyn; Morgan, Mark

    2017-12-01

    Although a number of effective psychotherapies have been identified for cancer patients, little is known about therapy processes, as they unfold the course of treatment and the role of therapy processes in treatment outcome. We used growth curve modeling to evaluate the associations between therapy processes and outcomes among gynecological cancer patients participating in 2 types of therapy. Two hundred twenty five women newly diagnosed with gynecological cancer were randomly assigned to receive 8 sessions of a coping and communication intervention or a client-centered supportive therapy. Participants completed measures of preintervention and postintervention depression, working alliance after Session 2, and postsession progress and depressive symptoms after each session. Therapists completed measures of perceived patient progress. Both patients and therapists reported a steady increase in session progress and patients reported a steady decrease in depressive symptoms over the course of both the coping and communication intervention and client-centered supportive sessions. Perceived progress in one session predicted progress in the subsequent session. Early working alliance predicted improved session progress and reductions in postsession depressive symptoms over sessions. Working alliance did not predict prepost treatment changes in depression. Patient-rated session progress predicted greater reductions in pretreatment to posttreatment depression, but therapist-rated progress did not. For 2 types of treatment delivered to women diagnosed with gynecological cancer, patient-rated session progress and depressive symptoms rated over therapy sessions may serve as a yardstick that can be useful to therapists to gauge patient's response to treatment. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Treatment outcomes of neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by esophagectomy for patients with esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Hyub; Song, Sang Yun; Shim, Hyun Jeong; Chung, Woong Ki; Ahn, Sung Ja; Yoon, Mee Sun; Jeong, Jae Uk; Song, Ju Young; Nam, Taek Keun [Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    To evaluate treatment outcomes and determine prognostic factors in patients with esophageal cancer treated with esophagectomy after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NCRT). We retrospectively evaluated 39 patients with esophageal cancer who underwent concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by esophagectomy between 2002 and 2012. Initial clinical stages of patients were stage IB in 1 patient (2.6%), stage II in 5 patients (12.9%), and stage III in 33 patients (84.6%). The median age of all the patients was 62 years, and the median follow-up period was 17 months. The 3-year overall survival (OS) rate was 33.6% in all the patients. The 3-year locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS) rate was 33.7%. In multivariate analysis with covariates of age, the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, tumor length, clinical response, clinical stage, pathological response, pathological stage, lymphovascular invasion, surgical type, and radiotherapy to surgery interval, only pathological stage was an independent significant prognostic factor affecting both OS and LRFS. The complications in postoperative day 90 were pneumonia in 9 patients, anastomotic site leakage in 3 patients, and anastomotic site stricture in 2 patients. Postoperative 30-day mortality rate was 10.3% (4/39); the cause of death among these 4 patients was respiratory failure in 3 patients and myocardial infarction in one patient. Only pathological stage was an independent prognostic factor for both OS and LRFS in patients with esophageal cancer treated with esophagectomy after NCRT. We could confirm the significant role of NCRT in downstaging the initial tumor bulk and thus resulting in better survival of patients who gained earlier pathological stage after NCRT.

  6. Systematic review of bladder cancer outcomes in patients with spina bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rove, K O; Husmann, D A; Wilcox, D T; Vricella, G J; Higuchi, T T

    2017-10-01

    In patients with congenital bladder anomalies, bladder augmentation is used as a last resort to reduce intravesical pressure, but concerns about malignant transformation in augmented patients were first raised in the 1980s. The best evidence to date indicates that augmentation does not appear to increase the risk of bladder cancer in spina bifida patients. To date, oncologic outcomes from patients with spina bifida with and without augmentation have only been available in small case reports. To systematically evaluate factors in myelomeningocele patients with bladder cancer, including bladder augmentation, that contribute to overall survival (OS). A systematic review using PubMed was conducted by cross referencing terms 'myelomeningocele,' 'cystoplasty,' 'bladder cancer' and respective synonyms according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. Inclusion criteria were studies with patients with an underlying diagnosis of myelomeningocele and bladder cancer with data on age, stage, and mortality status. Studies were excluded for spinal cord injury, history of tuberculosis or schistosomiasis, or prior ureterosigmoidostomy. Fifty-two patients were identified from 28 studies with a median age at bladder cancer diagnosis of 41 years (range 13-73); 37 (71%) presented with stage III or IV bladder cancer. Overall survival at 1 year and 2 years was 48.5% and 31.5%, respectively. Overall survival was different between those with and without augmentation (P = 0.009) by log-rank analysis. No between-group differences in OS were seen based on age, management with indwelling catheter, diversion with ileal conduit or being on a surveillance program. Only stage remained a significant predictor of OS on multivariate analysis (HR 2.011, 95% CI 1.063-3.804, P = 0.032). Secondary analysis was performed after removing patients with gastric augmentation (n = 8), and no difference in OS was seen between patients with (n = 8

  7. Long-term outcomes of complete urinary tract exenteration for dialysis patients with urothelial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Chien-Hui; Yang, Wen-Horng

    2017-04-01

    To survey long-term outcomes of dialysis patients with urothelial cancers who have undergone complete urinary tract exenteration (bilateral nephroureterectomy and cystectomy). We retrospectively reviewed our patients with urinary tract urothelial cancer. Forty-two dialysis patients who underwent complete urinary tract exenteration were enrolled in our study. Seventeen patients had undergone one-stage complete urinary tract exenteration, and twenty-five patients had undergone multi-stage surgery. We reviewed the demographic, clinical, surgical, and pathological data to determine the clinical and pathologic variables that affected the survival between the two groups. Baseline demographics were comparable in both groups. There was no significant difference in age, American Society of Anesthesiologists class, Charlson index, or body mass index between the two groups. Furthermore, there was no statistically significant difference in estimated blood loss (1280 vs. 1440 ml) or total hospital stay (31 vs. 21 days). Simultaneous upper and lower tract tumors were noted in one-stage CUTE group In comparison with multi-stage surgery, one-stage surgery was associated with a higher complication rate (58.8 vs. 28%). Twenty-two patients were still alive at the end of the study, and 20 had died. The median survival period after confirmation of complete urinary tract exenteration status was 27.5 months. The overall survival was the same between the two groups. The Charlson comorbidity index was a mandatory indicator to predict long-term survival outcome. In dialysis patients with urothelial cancers who have undergone complete urinary tract exenteration, one-stage complete urinary tract exenteration had a high perioperative complication rate. The Charlson comorbidity index was a mandatory indicator to predict long-term survival outcome.

  8. Gastrointestinal ostomies and sexual outcomes: a comparison of colorectal cancer patients by ostomy status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finan, P. H.; Haythornthwaite, J. A.; Kadan, M.; Regan, K. R.; Herman, J. M.; Efron, J.; Diaz, L. A.; Azad, N. S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Research examining effects of ostomy use on sexual outcomes is limited. Patients with colorectal cancer were compared on sexual outcomes and body image based on ostomy status (never, past, and current ostomy). Differences in depression were also examined. Methods Patients were prospectively recruited during clinic visits and by tumor registry mailings. Patients with colorectal cancer (N = 141; 18 past ostomy; 25 current ostomy; and 98 no ostomy history) completed surveys assessing sexual outcomes (medical impact on sexual function, Female Sexual Function Index, International Index of Erectile Function), body image distress (Body Image Scale), and depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale—Short Form). Clinical information was obtained through patient validated self-report measures and medical records. Results Most participants reported sexual function in the dysfunctional range using established cut-off scores. In analyses adjusting for demographic and medical covariates and depression, significant group differences were found for ostomy status on impact on sexual function (p ostomy groups reported worse impact on sexual function than those who never had an ostomy (p ostomy group reported worse body image distress than those who never had an ostomy (p ostomies as part of their treatment. Clinical information and support should be offered. PMID:24091721

  9. Clinical Outcomes of Patients with Resected Oral Cavity Cancer and Simultaneous Second Primary Malignancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ta Liao

    Full Text Available Simultaneous second primary tumors (SSPT are not uncommon in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC living in areas where the habit of betel quid chewing is widespread. We sought to identify the main prognostic factors in OSCC patients with SSPT and incorporate them into a risk stratification scheme.A total of 1822 consecutive patients with primary OSCC treated between January 1996 and February 2014 were analyzed for the presence of SSPT. The 18-month and 5-year overall survival (OS rates served as the main outcome measures.Of the 1822 patients, 77 (4% were found to have SSPT (i.e, two malignancies identified within one month of each other. The 18-month and 5-year OS rates in patients without SSPT and with SSPT were 82% and 69%, and 72% and 53%, respectively (p = 0.0063. Patients with SSPT were further divided into patients with either esophageal cancer or hepatocellular carcinoma (eso-HCC subgroup, n = 8 and other tumors (NO eso-HCC subgroup, n = 69. After multivariate analysis, neck nodal extracapsular spread (ECS, n = 18 and the presence of eso-HCC were identified as independent adverse prognostic factors. The 18-month OS rates of SSPT patients with both eso-HCC and ECS (n = 5 vs. the remaining patients (n = 72 were 0% and 78%, respectively (p < 0.0001.OSCC patients with neck nodal ECS and esophageal cancer or hepatocellular carcinoma as SSPT have a dismal short-term prognosis.

  10. Optimal delivery of colorectal cancer follow-up care: improving patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorgensen ML

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mikaela L Jorgensen,1 Jane M Young,1,2 Michael J Solomon2,3 1Cancer Epidemiology and Services Research (CESR, Sydney School of Public Health, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2Surgical Outcomes Research Centre (SOuRCe, Sydney Local Health District and University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3Discipline of Surgery, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer worldwide. With population aging and increases in survival, the number of CRC survivors is projected to rise dramatically. The time following initial treatment is often described as a period of transition from intensive hospital-based care back into “regular life.” This review provides an overview of recommended follow-up care for people with CRC who have been treated with curative intent, as well as exploring the current state of the research that underpins these guidelines. For patients, key concerns following treatment include the development of recurrent and new cancers, late and long-term effects of cancer and treatment, and the interplay of these factors with daily function and general health. For physicians, survivorship care plans can be a tool for coordinating the surveillance, intervention, and prevention of these key patient concerns. Though much of the research in cancer survivorship to date has focused on surveillance for recurrent disease, many national guidelines differ in their conclusions about the frequency and timing of follow-up tests. Most CRC guidelines refer only briefly to the management of side effects, despite reports that many patients have a range of ongoing physiological, psychosocial, and functional needs. Guidance for surveillance and intervention is often limited by a small number of heterogeneous trials conducted in this patient group. However, recently released survivorship guidelines emphasize the potential for the effectiveness of

  11. Google goes cancer: improving outcome prediction for cancer patients by network-based ranking of marker genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christof Winter

    Full Text Available Predicting the clinical outcome of cancer patients based on the expression of marker genes in their tumors has received increasing interest in the past decade. Accurate predictors of outcome and response to therapy could be used to personalize and thereby improve therapy. However, state of the art methods used so far often found marker genes with limited prediction accuracy, limited reproducibility, and unclear biological relevance. To address this problem, we developed a novel computational approach to identify genes prognostic for outcome that couples gene expression measurements from primary tumor samples with a network of known relationships between the genes. Our approach ranks genes according to their prognostic relevance using both expression and network information in a manner similar to Google's PageRank. We applied this method to gene expression profiles which we obtained from 30 patients with pancreatic cancer, and identified seven candidate marker genes prognostic for outcome. Compared to genes found with state of the art methods, such as Pearson correlation of gene expression with survival time, we improve the prediction accuracy by up to 7%. Accuracies were assessed using support vector machine classifiers and Monte Carlo cross-validation. We then validated the prognostic value of our seven candidate markers using immunohistochemistry on an independent set of 412 pancreatic cancer samples. Notably, signatures derived from our candidate markers were independently predictive of outcome and superior to established clinical prognostic factors such as grade, tumor size, and nodal status. As the amount of genomic data of individual tumors grows rapidly, our algorithm meets the need for powerful computational approaches that are key to exploit these data for personalized cancer therapies in clinical practice.

  12. Evaluating long-term patient-centered outcomes following prostate cancer treatment: findings from the Michigan Prostate Cancer Survivor study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish-Yassine, May; Berenji, Manijeh; Wing, Diane; Copeland, Glenn; Demers, Raymond Y; Garlinghouse, Carol; Fagerlin, Angela; Newth, Gail E; Northouse, Laurel; Holmes-Rovner, Margaret; Rovner, David; Sims, Jerry; Wei, John T

    2014-03-01

    Advances in screening and treatment of prostate cancer have dramatically increased the number of survivors in the US population. Yet the effect of screening is controversial, and in some instances may not be beneficial. Previous studies have typically only reported outcomes of treatment and symptoms within a short time frame following treatment. The persistence of such symptoms over time necessitates an improvement of survivor care so that the medical and support needs of these patients are met. This study aims to perform a patient-centered survey of prostate cancer survivors in the Michigan Cancer Registry to identify treatment side effect rates, evaluate survivors' access to preventive care services post-prostate cancer treatment, and assess the informational needs of these survivors regarding their prostate cancer. Linking case files of the Michigan Cancer Registry with records from the National Death Index, we identified prostate cancer patients diagnosed between 1985 and 2004 and alive on 31 December 2005. Participants were selected using a stratified cross-sectional sampling strategy to ensure adequate inclusion of survivors based upon race and ethnicity, urban versus rural location, and number of years since diagnosis of prostate cancer. A total of 2,499 surveys were completed and returned. (1) Physical symptoms--assessing bowel, sexual, urinary, and vitality symptoms by treatment modality. (2) Access to care--identifying whether diagnostic tests for prostate cancer (prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and digital rectal examination) were performed. Determining whether the survivors had knowledge of the "watchful waiting" paradigm for prostate cancer surveillance. (3) Informational needs--assessing whether the informational needs of patients were addressed by providers. Evaluating the significant predictors associated with seeking information about prostate cancer from any other source. Identifying what factors influenced a person to actively seek out

  13. An Outcome-Based Approach to Assign MELD Exception Points for Patients With Hepatocellular Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kensinger, Clark D; Feurer, Irene D; Karp, Seth J

    2017-09-01

    Current Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) exception points provided to patients with hepatocellular cancer (HCC) are not based on outcome data and advantage these patients compared to those listed based on laboratory values (LABMELD). We sought to develop a data-based assignment for exception points for patients with HCC that equalizes outcomes among HCC and LABMELD patients. We used Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients data to compare patients listed with HCC who received exception points versus patients listed with LABMELD. Nation- and region-specific data were examined for (1) a composite outcome for adverse events of death, delisting, or becoming ineligible for transplant; and (2) transplant rate. We also determined MELD progression rates for LABMELD patients. Candidates listed with LABMELD scores were compared with those listed with 22 exception points for HCC (HCC22) to determine the LABMELD for which statistical parity was achieved for our composite outcome. HCC22 candidates time to adverse event were comparable to LABMELD scores of 16 (LABMELD16) candidates (range, 15-19), whereas time to transplant was comparable to LABMELD22 candidates (range, 21-23). LABMELD22 candidates had 2.1 times greater risk of adverse event compared with HCC22 (95% confidence interval, 1.9-2.4; range, 1.5-2.4). Progression among LABMELD16 candidates whose scores did not improve was similar across regions and averaged 0.94 points/month (95% confidence interval, 0.88-0.99, range 0.80-1.04). To equalize the occurrence of an adverse outcome, the proper listing MELD for patients with HCC is 16, with approximately 1 additional point/month. These results provide a data-driven algorithm to increase fairness in listing priority.

  14. The effect of communication skills training on patient outcomes in cancer care: a systematic review of the literature.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uitterhoeve, R.J.; Bensing, J.M.; Grol, R.P.; Demulder, P.H.M.; Achterberg, T. van

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this review was to determine whether communication training for healthcare professionals (HCP), including nurses and medical doctors, in cancer care improves patient outcomes. Eligible studies with a focus on patient outcomes and a controlled or single group pretest–posttest design

  15. Long Term Outcomes of a Geriatric Liaison Intervention in Frail Elderly Cancer Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liesbeth Hempenius

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the long term effects after discharge of a hospital-based geriatric liaison intervention to prevent postoperative delirium in frail elderly cancer patients treated with an elective surgical procedure for a solid tumour. In addition, the effect of a postoperative delirium on long term outcomes was examined.A three month follow-up was performed in participants of the Liaison Intervention in Frail Elderly study, a multicentre, prospective, randomized, controlled trial. Patients were randomized to standard treatment or a geriatric liaison intervention. The intervention consisted of a preoperative geriatric consultation, an individual treatment plan targeted at risk factors for delirium and daily visits by a geriatric nurse during the hospital stay. The long term outcomes included: mortality, rehospitalisation, Activities of Daily Living (ADL functioning, return to the independent pre-operative living situation, use of supportive care, cognitive functioning and health related quality of life.Data of 260 patients (intervention n = 127, Control n = 133 were analysed. There were no differences between the intervention group and usual-care group for any of the outcomes three months after discharge. The presence of postoperative delirium was associated with: an increased risk of decline in ADL functioning (OR: 2.65, 95% CI: 1.02-6.88, an increased use of supportive assistance (OR: 2.45, 95% CI: 1.02-5.87 and a decreased chance to return to the independent preoperative living situation (OR: 0.18, 95% CI: 0.07-0.49.A hospital-based geriatric liaison intervention for the prevention of postoperative delirium in frail elderly cancer patients undergoing elective surgery for a solid tumour did not improve outcomes 3 months after discharge from hospital. The negative effect of a postoperative delirium on late outcome was confirmed.Nederlands Trial Register, Trial ID NTR 823.

  16. Long Term Outcomes of a Geriatric Liaison Intervention in Frail Elderly Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempenius, Liesbeth; Slaets, Joris P J; van Asselt, Dieneke; de Bock, Truuske H; Wiggers, Theo; van Leeuwen, Barbara L

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the long term effects after discharge of a hospital-based geriatric liaison intervention to prevent postoperative delirium in frail elderly cancer patients treated with an elective surgical procedure for a solid tumour. In addition, the effect of a postoperative delirium on long term outcomes was examined. A three month follow-up was performed in participants of the Liaison Intervention in Frail Elderly study, a multicentre, prospective, randomized, controlled trial. Patients were randomized to standard treatment or a geriatric liaison intervention. The intervention consisted of a preoperative geriatric consultation, an individual treatment plan targeted at risk factors for delirium and daily visits by a geriatric nurse during the hospital stay. The long term outcomes included: mortality, rehospitalisation, Activities of Daily Living (ADL) functioning, return to the independent pre-operative living situation, use of supportive care, cognitive functioning and health related quality of life. Data of 260 patients (intervention n = 127, Control n = 133) were analysed. There were no differences between the intervention group and usual-care group for any of the outcomes three months after discharge. The presence of postoperative delirium was associated with: an increased risk of decline in ADL functioning (OR: 2.65, 95% CI: 1.02-6.88), an increased use of supportive assistance (OR: 2.45, 95% CI: 1.02-5.87) and a decreased chance to return to the independent preoperative living situation (OR: 0.18, 95% CI: 0.07-0.49). A hospital-based geriatric liaison intervention for the prevention of postoperative delirium in frail elderly cancer patients undergoing elective surgery for a solid tumour did not improve outcomes 3 months after discharge from hospital. The negative effect of a postoperative delirium on late outcome was confirmed. Nederlands Trial Register, Trial ID NTR 823.

  17. Costs and outcomes evaluation of patient navigation after abnormal cancer screening: evidence from the Patient Navigation Research Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensink, Mark E; Ramsey, Scott D; Battaglia, Tracy; Fiscella, Kevin; Hurd, Thelma C; McKoy, June M; Patierno, Steven R; Raich, Peter C; Seiber, Eric E; Warren-Mears, Victoria; Whitley, Elizabeth; Paskett, Electra D; Mandelblatt, S

    2014-02-15

    Navigators can facilitate timely access to cancer services, but to the authors' knowledge there are little data available regarding their economic impact. The authors conducted a cost-consequence analysis of navigation versus usual care among 10,521 individuals with abnormal breast, cervical, colorectal, or prostate cancer screening results who enrolled in the Patient Navigation Research Program study from January 1, 2006 to March 31, 2010. Navigation costs included diagnostic evaluation, patient and staff time, materials, and overhead. Consequences or outcomes were time to diagnostic resolution and probability of resolution. Differences in costs and outcomes were evaluated using multilevel, mixed-effects regression modeling adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, language, marital status, insurance status, cancer, and site clustering. The majority of individuals were members of a minority (70.7%) and uninsured or publically insured (72.7%). Diagnostic resolution was higher for navigation versus usual care at 180 days (56.2% vs 53.8%; P = .008) and 270 days (70.0% vs 68.2%; P < .001). Although there were no differences in the average number of days to resolution between the 2 groups (110 days vs 109 days; P = .63), the probability of ever having diagnostic resolution was higher for the navigation group versus the usual-care group (84.5% vs 79.6%; P < .001). The added cost of navigation versus usual care was $275 per patient (95% confidence interval, $260-$290; P < .001). There was no significant difference in stage distribution among the 12.4% of patients in the navigation group vs 11% of the usual-care patients diagnosed with cancer. Navigation adds costs and modestly increases the probability of diagnostic resolution among patients with abnormal screening test results. Navigation is only likely to be cost-effective if improved resolution translates into an earlier cancer stage at the time of diagnosis. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  18. The impact of having both cancer and diabetes on patient-reported outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissers, Pauline A J; Falzon, Louise; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V

    2016-01-01

    included and all were considered of high (40%) or adequate (60%) methodological quality. Eight of the 10 studies focused on health-related quality of life (HRQoL), functioning, or symptoms and 2 studies assessed diabetes self-management. Overall, HRQoL and functioning was lower, and symptoms were higher...... inception to January 2015. All English peer-reviewed studies that included patients with both cancer and diabetes and assessed PROs were included. All included studies were independently assessed on methodological quality by two investigators. RESULTS: Of the 3553 identified studies, 10 studies were......PURPOSE: This systematic review aims to summarize the current literature regarding potential effects of having both cancer and diabetes on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and to provide directions for future research. METHODS: MEDLINE, The Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and PsycINFO were searched from...

  19. Impact of initial tumor volume on radiotherapy outcome in patients with T2 glottic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutkowski, T. [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and the Institute of Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Gliwice (Poland)

    2014-05-15

    The aim of this study was to quantify the impact of initial tumor volume (TV) on radiotherapy (RT) outcome in patients with T2 glottic cancer. Initial TV was calculated for 115 consecutive patients with T2 glottic cancer who had been treated with definitive RT alone at a single institution. The results showed strong correlations of TV with 3-year local tumor control (LTC) and disease-free survival (DFS). For TV ≤ 0.7 cm{sup 3}, 3-year LTC was 83 %; for TV 0.7-3.6 cm{sup 3} this was 70 % and for TV 3.6-17 cm{sup 3} 44 %. Analysis of total dose vs. initial TV showed that larger T2 glottic tumors with a TV of around 5 cm{sup 3} (2-2.5 cm in diameter with 10{sup 10} cancer cells) need an extra 6.5 Gy to achieve similar 3-year LTC rates as for small tumors with a TV of 0.5 cm{sup 3} (∝1 cm in diameter with 10{sup 9} cancer cells). Although classification of tumors according to TV cannot replace TNM staging in daily practice, it could represent a valuable numerical supplement for planning the optimal dose fractionation scheme for individual patients. (orig.)

  20. Rectal cancer: prognostic indicators of long-term outcome in patients considered for surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bown, E J; Lloyd, G M; Boyle, K M; Miller, A S

    2014-02-01

    Patients and clinicians seek an accurate prognosis after resectional surgery for rectal cancer. The aim of this study was to determine long-term outcomes after potentially curative surgery for rectal cancer with particular focus on factors associated with longer-term survival that are available to surgeons in the early post-operative setting. We conducted a retrospective review of a prospectively gathered database of all primary rectal adenocarcinomas considered for surgery in the University Hospitals of Leicester National Health Service (NHS) Trust between 1998 and 2007. Survival was calculated using a Kaplan-Meier method. Factors thought to be associated with survival were subjected to univariate analysis followed by Cox proportion regression. One thousand and twelve patients with primary rectal adenocarcinoma diagnosed between 1998 and 2007 were identified. Eight hundred and fifty three patients did not have metastases at the time of presentation and 726 patients underwent major resectional surgery. Five-year survival was 66 %. Patients' age, Dukes' stage, UICC stage, nodal involvement and circumferential resection margin status were independently associated with long-term survival on multivariate analysis. This is one of the largest series of rectal cancers from a single NHS trust. We have demonstrated that age, Dukes' stage and CRM status are associated with long-term survival. These clinical factors are readily available to the surgeon at the time of first post-operative review and can provide a good clinical guide to prognosis.

  1. Survival outcomes in patients with cervical cancer after inclusion of PET/CT in staging procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Henrik Villibald [University of Copenhagen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Section for Radiotherapy, Rigshospitalet, Department of Oncology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Loft, Annika [University of Copenhagen, Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Berthelsen, Anne Kiil [University of Copenhagen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); University of Copenhagen, Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Christensen, Ib Jarle [University of Copenhagen, The Finsen Laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); University of Copenhagen, Biotech Research and Innovation Centre (BRIC), Copenhagen (Denmark); Hoegdall, Claus [University of Copenhagen, Department of Gynecology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Engelholm, Svend Aage [University of Copenhagen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2015-11-15

    In cancer of the uterine cervix, lymph node metastases are associated with a poor prognosis. Even so, the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) does not take into account diagnostic results of methods such as PET/CT, since these are not readily available everywhere. As undetected lymph node metastases can lead to undertreatment, any difference in the underlying prevalence of false-negative scans between CT and PET/CT may be reflected in treatment outcomes. This study investigated survival outcomes in node-negative patients before and after the introduction of PET/CT. This was a single-institution retrospective analysis of 301 patients with a histopathological diagnosis of cervical cancer. The patients were receiving chemoradiotherapy with curative intent according to the standard protocol of the department for patients without lymph node metastases as assessed by pretreatment CT or PET/CT. Patients were stratified into two groups: PET/CT and non-PET/CT. Patient characteristics and treatment outcomes were acquired from the treatment database. Significant differences of 23 % (95 % CI 17 - 29 %), 19 % (95 % CI 13 - 25 %) and 12 % (95 % CI 6 - 18 %) in 5-year overall, disease-free and disease-specific survival, respectively, were observed between the two patient groups. The difference remained significant in univariate and multivariate analyses of overall survival (hazard ratio 0.61, 95 % CI 0.42 - 0.89; p = 0.010), including age, FIGO stage, performance status, BMI, and histopathology. Inclusion of PET/CT in the preradiotherapy diagnostic protocol may lead to nodal stage migration not reflected in the FIGO stage. It was found to be a significant covariate, and could lead to selection bias that needs to be taken into account when designing and reporting on clinical trials. (orig.)

  2. Treatment outcome of advanced pancreatic cancer patients who are ineligible for a clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ueda A

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Akira Ueda, Ayumu Hosokawa, Kohei Ogawa, Hiroki Yoshita, Takayuki Ando, Shinya Kajiura, Haruka Fujinami, Kengo Kawai, Jun Nishikawa, Kazuto Tajiri, Masami Minemura, Toshiro SugiyamaDepartment of Gastroenterology and Hematology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toyama, Toyama, JapanObjective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer in clinical practice, and assess whether chemotherapy provided a clinical benefit for patients who did not meet the eligibility criteria of the clinical trial.Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 75 patients who received first-line chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer between April 2006 and September 2011. Patients were treated with gemcitabine (GEM alone, S-1 (tegafur, gimeracil, and oteracil potassium alone, or GEM plus S-1. Patients were divided into the clinical trial eligible group (arm eligible or the ineligible group (arm ineligible. We evaluated the efficacy and the safety of the chemotherapy.Results: A total of 23 patients out of 75 (31% belonged to the ineligible group, for the following reasons: 20 patients had poor performance status, eight had massive ascites, one had synchronous malignancy, and one had icterus. The median progression-free survival (PFS was 3.5 months, and the median overall survival (OS was 6.7 months in all patients. In arm eligible, median PFS was 4.5 months, and median OS was 10.5 months. In arm ineligible, median PFS was 1.1 months, and median OS was 2.9 months.Conclusion: The outcome of the patients who did not meet the eligibility criteria was very poor. It is important to select the patients that could benefit from either chemotherapy or optimal supportive care.Keywords: gemcitabine, S-1, clinical practice

  3. Patient Reported Outcomes Questionnaire Compliance in Cancer Cooperative Group Trials (Alliance N0992)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Pamela J; Burger, Kelli N; Pederson, Levi D; Kaggal, Suneetha; Sloan, Jeff A

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The use of Patient Reported Outcomes (PROs) in clinical trials is a focal point for research and policy. Non-compliance with planned questionnaires and missing data can threaten both internal validity and generalizability. This retrospective analysis was conducted to determine the extent of, and characteristics associated with, missing PROs. Methods Study characteristics, patient characteristics and adverse events, and reasons for non-compliance were compiled from 14 closed Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology, Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, or Mayo Clinic Cancer Research Consortium clinical trials. Compliance rates were calculated for each patient using the number of booklets completed while the patient was on trial divided by the number of booklets the patient was expected to complete. Frequency counts and summary statistics were compiled. Logistic regression techniques were employed. Results The 1640 included patients had a median age of 58 years, were mostly white (90.8%) and female (73.8%). Compliance rates per study ranged from 84.7% to 97.2%. The primary endpoint of overall compliance rate was 93.1%. A total of 1267 patients were compliant. Those non-compliant were slightly older (mean 58.6 vs 57.5, p=0.03) and had different types of cancer (pcompliance according to tumor status (p=0.66), clinical stage (p=0.81), baseline quality of life (p=0.42 for ≥8 vs compliance included patient refusal (N=136), booklet not administered to patient (N=199), no clinic visit at the scheduled time for booklet completion (N=40), and at-home completed booklet not returned (N=224). Logistic regression indicates gender (pcompliance. Conclusions PROs have successfully been implemented into Alliance and Mayo Clinic trials with high rates of patient compliance. Further improvement in compliance can be made with staff commitment and education. Patients are typically noncompliant only when the task at hand is burdensome, unclear or logistically challenging. Existing

  4. Outcomes of endometrial cancer patients undergoing surgery with gynecologic oncology involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Michael L; Villella, Jeannine A; Valea, Fidel A; DiSilvestro, Paul A; Chalas, Eva

    2002-10-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the outcomes of patients with endometrial cancer who had primary surgery with gynecologic oncology involvement at university or community hospitals. The study population consisted of all patients who had primary surgery for endometrial cancer with involvement of the attending physicians of the Division of Gynecologic Oncology. The patients were divided into two groups based on whether their surgery was performed at a university or community hospital. Demographic and clinical data were abstracted from the medical records. There were no significant differences between the two groups with regard to Quetelet index (kg/m(2)); intervals between biopsy and consultation, consultation and surgery, and biopsy and surgery; estimated blood loss; incidence of operative or hospital complications; frequency of appropriate surgical staging; stage distribution; histology or grade; and hospital stay. Patients at a university hospital were significantly older, had a higher severity index, were more likely to have had a vaginal hysterectomy, and participate in a research protocol. Both the Quetelet index and the severity index were significantly higher for patients who had vaginal hysterectomy than for those who had either laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomy or total abdominal hysterectomy. When analyzed by surgical approach, the frequencies of pelvic and paraaortic lymph node sampling were comparable between the groups. Both the Quetelet and severity indices were significantly higher for patients who did not have lymph node sampling. Involvement of a gynecologic oncologist at the time of primary surgery for endometrial cancer was associated with comparable outcomes in both the university and community hospital setting.

  5. Outcomes after extended pancreatectomy in patients with borderline resectable and locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, W; Gluth, A; Hinz, U; Koliogiannis, D; Strobel, O; Hackert, T; Werner, J; Büchler, M W

    2016-11-01

    In the recent International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS) consensus on extended pancreatectomy, several issues on perioperative outcome and long-term survival remained unclear. Robust data on outcomes are sparse. The present study aimed to assess the outcome of extended pancreatectomy for borderline resectable and locally advanced pancreatic cancer. A consecutive series of patients with primary pancreatic adenocarcinoma undergoing extended pancreatectomies, as defined by the new ISGPS consensus, were compared with patients who had a standard pancreatectomy. Univariable and multivariable analysis was performed to identify risk factors for perioperative mortality and characteristics associated with survival. Long-term outcome was assessed by means of Kaplan-Meier analysis. The 611 patients who had an extended pancreatectomy had significantly greater surgical morbidity than the 1217 patients who underwent a standard resection (42·7 versus 34·2 per cent respectively), and higher 30-day mortality (4·3 versus 1·8 per cent) and in-hospital mortality (7·5 versus 3·6 per cent) rates. Operating time of 300 min or more, extended total pancreatectomy, and ASA fitness grade of III or IV were associated with increased in-hospital mortality in multivariable analysis, whereas resections involving the colon, portal vein or arteries were not. Median survival and 5-year overall survival rate were reduced in patients having extended pancreatectomy compared with those undergoing a standard resection (16·1 versus 23·6 months, and 11·3 versus 20·6 per cent, respectively). Older age, G3/4 tumours, two or more positive lymph nodes, macroscopic positive resection margins, duration of surgery of 420 min or above, and blood loss of 1000 ml or more were independently associated with decreased overall survival. Extended resections are associated with increased perioperative morbidity and mortality, particularly when extended total pancreatectomy is performed. Favourable

  6. Serum IL-10 Predicts Worse Outcome in Cancer Patients: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pin; Wang, Zhen; Huang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Background IL–10 is an important immunosuppressive cytokine which is frequently elevated in tumor microenvironment. Some studies have reported that overexpression of serous IL–10 is correlated with worse outcome in patients with malignant tumor. Here, we conducted a meta-analysis to assess the prognostic impact of serous IL–10 expression in cancer patients. Methods We searched PubMed and EBSCO for studies in evaluating the association of IL–10 expression—in serum and clinical outcome in cancer patients. Overall survival (OS) was the primary prognostic indicator and disease-free survival (DFS) was the secondary indicator. Extracted data were computed into odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence interval (CI) or a P value for survival at 1, 3 and 5 years. Pooled data were weighted using the Mantel–Haenszel Fixed-effect model. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results A total of 1788 patients with cancer from 21 published studies were incorporated into this meta-analysis. High level of serum IL–10 was significantly associated with worse OS at 1-year (OR = 3.70, 95% CI = 2.81 to 4.87, P < 0.00001), 3-year (OR = 3.33, 95% CI = 2.53 to 4.39, P < 0.0001) and 5-year (OR = 2.80, 95% CI = 1.90 to 4.10, P < 0.0001) of cancer. Subgroup analysis showed that the correlation between serous IL–10 expression and outcome of patients with solid tumors and hematological malignancies are consistent. The association of IL–10 with worse DFS at 1-year (OR = 3.34, 95% CI = 1.40 to 7.94, P = 0.006) and 2-year (OR = 3.91, 95% CI = 1.79 to 8.53, P = 0.0006) was also identified. Conclusions High expression of serous IL–10 leads to an adverse survival in most types of cancer. IL–10 is a valuable biomarker for prognostic prediction and targeting IL–10 treatment options for both solid tumors and hematological malignancies. PMID:26440936

  7. Obesity and the outcome of young breast cancer patients in the UK: the POSH study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copson, E R; Cutress, R I; Maishman, T; Eccles, B K; Gerty, S; Stanton, L; Altman, D G; Durcan, L; Wong, C; Simmonds, P D; Jones, L; Eccles, D M

    2015-01-01

    Obese breast cancer patients have a poorer prognosis than non-obese patients. We examined data from a large prospective cohort study to explore the associations of obesity with tumour pathology, treatment and outcome in young British breast cancer patients receiving modern oncological treatments. A total of 2956 patients aged ≤40 at breast cancer diagnosis were recruited from 126 UK hospitals from 2001 to 2007. Height and weight were measured at registration. Tumour pathology and treatment details were collected. Follow-up data were collected at 6, 12 months, and annually. A total of 2843 eligible patients (96.2%) had a body mass index (BMI) recorded: 1526 (53.7%) were under/healthy-weight (U/H, BMI obese (ob, BMI ≥30). The median tumour size was significantly higher in obese and overweight patients than U/H patients (Ob 26 mm versus U/H 20 mm, P Obese and overweight patients had significantly more grade 3 tumours (63.9% versus 59.0%, P = 0.048; Ov 63.6% versus U/H 59.0% P = 0.034) and node-positive tumours (Ob 54.6% versus U/H 49.0%, P = 0.027; Ov 54.2% versus U/H 49%, P = 0.019) than U/H patients. Obese patients had more ER/PR/HER2-negative tumours than healthy-weight patients (25.0% versus 18.3%, P = 0.001). Eight-year overall survival (OS) and distant disease-free interval (DDFI) were significantly lower in obese patients than healthy-weight patients [OS: hazard ratio (HR) 1.65, P obesity was a significant independent predictor of OS and DDFI in patients with ER-positive disease. Young obese breast cancer patients present with adverse tumour characteristics. Despite adjustment for this, obesity still independently predicts DDFI and OS. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Prediction of treatment outcome with bioimpedance measurements in breast cancer related lymphedema patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Leesuk; Jeon, Jae Yong; Sung, In Young; Jeong, Soon Yong; Do, Jung Hwa; Kim, Hwa Jung

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the usefulness of bioimpedance measurement for predicting the treatment outcome in breast cancer related lymphedema (BCRL) patients. Unilateral BCRL patients who received complex decongestive therapy (CDT) for 2 weeks (5 days per week) were enrolled in this study. We measured the ratio of extracellular fluid (ECF) volume by using bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS), and single frequency bioimpedance analysis (SFBIA) at a 5 kHz frequency before treatment. Arm circumferences were measured at 10 cm above and below the elbow before and after treatment. We also investigated whether there is correlation between ECF ratio and SFBIA ratio with the change of arm circumference after CDT. A total of 73 patients were enrolled in this study. The higher ECF ratio was significantly correlated with higher reduction of arm circumference at both above and below the elbow after treatment, but the higher SFBIA ratio was correlated only with the higher reduction of arm circumference below the elbow. These results show that ECF volume measurements and SFBIA before treatment are useful tools for predicting the outcome of patients with lymphedema. We concluded that ECF volume measure can be used as a screening tool for predicting treatment outcome of BCRL patients.

  9. Clinical outcomes in patients treated with radiotherapy after surgery for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Kyung Mi; Park, Won; Huh, Seung Jae; Bae, Duk Soo; Kim, Byoung Gie; Lee, Jeong Won [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to analyze clinical outcomes from cervical cancer and stratify patients into risk groups for prognostic factors for early-stage disease. We retrospectively reviewed patients with stage IB or IIA cervical cancer treated with adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) or concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) following primary surgery at Samsung Medical Center from 2001 to 2011. Adjuvant RT was added for patients with intermediate-risk factors, and adjuvant CCRT was performed on high-risk patients after surgery. We reviewed 247 patients—149 in the high-risk group and 98 in intermediate-risk group. The median follow-up was 62 months. Loco-regional failure (LRF) alone occurred in 7 patients (2.8%), distant metastasis alone in 37 patients (15.0%) and LRF with DM in 4 patients (1.6%). The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates for both groups were 79.7% and 87.6%, respectively. In the high-risk group, the 5-year DFS and OS probabilities were 72.5% and 81.9%, respectively. Histologic type, pathologic tumor size, and the number of pelvic lymph node (PLN) metastasis were significant prognostic factors for DFS and OS. We suggest a scoring system (0–3) using these prognostic factors to predict poor prognosis in high-risk patients. Using this system, patients with higher scores have higher recurrence and lower survival rates. In the high-risk cervical-cancer group who received primary surgery and adjuvant CCRT, non-squamous type, large tumor size and the number of PLN metastasis were significant prognostic factors, and the number of these factors was associated with survival rates.

  10. Treatment outcome after adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery for patients with stage I endometrial cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Kyung Ja; Park, Kyung Ran [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2016-12-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the treatment outcomes of adjuvant radiotherapy using vaginal brachytherapy (VB) with a lower dose per fraction and/or external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) following surgery for patients with stage I endometrial carcinoma. The subjects were 43 patients with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage I endometrial cancer who underwent adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery between March 2000 and April 2014. Of these, 25 received postoperative VB alone, while 18 received postoperative EBRT to the whole pelvis; 3 of these were treated with EBRT plus VB. The median EBRT dose was 50.0 Gy (45.0–50.4 Gy) and the VB dose was 24 Gy in 6 fractions. Tumor dose was prescribed at a depth of 5 mm from the cylinder surface and delivered twice per week. The median follow-up period for all patients was 57 months (range, 9 to 188 months). Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) for all patients were 92.5% and 95.3%, respectively. Adjuvant radiotherapy was performed according to risk factors and stage IB, grade 3 and lymphovascular invasion were observed more frequently in the EBRT group. Five-year DFS for EBRT and VB alone were 88.1% and 96.0%, respectively (p = 0.42), and 5-year OS for EBRT and VB alone were 94.4% and 96%, respectively (p = 0.38). There was no locoregional recurrence in any patient. Two patients who received EBRT and 1 patient who received VB alone developed distant metastatic disease. Two patients who received EBRT had severe complications, one each of grade 3 gastrointestinal complication and pelvic bone insufficiency fracture. Adjuvant radiotherapy achieved high DFS and OS with acceptable toxicity in stage I endometrial cancer. VB (with a lower dose per fraction) may be a viable option for selected patients with early-stage endometrial cancer following surgery.

  11. Association of TERT Polymorphisms with Clinical Outcome of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueying Zhao

    Full Text Available TERT is of great importance in cancer initiation and progression. Many studies have demonstrated the TERT polymorphisms as risk factors for many cancer types, including lung cancer. However, the impacts of TERT variants on cancer progression and treatment efficacy have remained controversial. This study aimed to investigate the association of TERT polymorphisms with clinical outcome of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients receiving first-line platinum-based chemotherapy, including response rate, clinical benefit, progression-free survival (PFS, overall survival (OS, and grade 3 or 4 toxicity. Seven polymorphisms of TERT were assessed, and a total of 1004 inoperable advanced NSCLC patients treated with platinum-based chemotherapy were enrolled. It is exhibited that the variant heterozygote of rs4975605 showed significant association with a low rate of clinical benefit, and displayed a much stronger effect in never-smoking female subset, leading to the clinical benefit rate decreased from 82.9% (C/C genotype to 56.4% (C/A genotype; adjusted OR, 3.58; P=1.40×10(-4. It is also observed that the polymorphism rs2736109 showed significant correlation with PFS (log-rank P=0.023. In age > 58 subgroup, patients carrying the heterozygous genotype had a longer median PFS than those carrying the wild-type genotypes (P=0.002. The results from the current study, for the first time to our knowledge, provide suggestive evidence of an effect of TERT polymorphisms on disease progression variability among Chinese patients with platinum-treated advanced NSCLC.

  12. Toxicity outcome in patients treated with modulated arc radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengua, Rafael E.; Gonzalez, Maria F.; Barahona, Kaory; Ixquiac, Milton E.; Lucero, Juan F.; Montenegro, Erick; Lopez Guerra, Jose L.; Jaén, Javier; Linares, Luis A.

    2013-01-01

    Aim This study evaluates the acute toxicity outcome in patients treated with RapidArc for localized prostate cancer. Background Modern technologies allow the delivery of high doses to the prostate while lowering the dose to the neighbouring organs at risk. Whether this dosimetric advantage translates into clinical benefit is not well known. Materials and methods Between December 2009 and May 2012, 45 patients with primary prostate adenocarcinoma were treated using RapidArc. All patients received 1.8 Gy per fraction, the median dose to the prostate gland, seminal vesicles, pelvic lymph nodes and surgical bed was 80 Gy (range, 77.4–81 Gy), 50.4 Gy, 50.4 Gy and 77.4 Gy (range, 75.6–79.2 Gy), respectively. Results The time between the last session and the last treatment follow up was a median of 10 months (range, 3–24 months). The incidence of grade 3 acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity was 2.2% and 15.5%, respectively. Grade 2 acute GI and GU toxicity occurred in 30% and 27% of patients, respectively. No grade 4 acute GI and GU toxicity were observed. Older patients (>median) or patients with V60 higher than 35% had significantly higher rates of grade ≥2 acute GI toxicity compared with the younger ones. Conclusions RapidArc in the treatment of localized prostate cancer is tolerated well with no Grade >3 GI and GU toxicities. Older patients or patients with higher V60 had significantly higher rates of grade ≥2 acute GI toxicity. Further research is necessary to assess definitive late toxicity and tumour control outcome. PMID:25061516

  13. Effects of screening for psychological distress on patient outcomes in cancer : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Anna; Roseman, Michelle; Delisle, Vanessa C.; Milette, Katherine; Levis, Brooke; Syamchandra, Achyuth; Stefanek, Michael E.; Stewart, Donna E.; de Jonge, Peter; Coyne, James C.; Thombs, Brett D.

    Objective: Several practice guidelines recommend routine screening for psychological distress in cancer care. The objective was to evaluate the effect of screening cancer patients for psychological distress by assessing the (1) effectiveness of interventions to reduce distress among patients

  14. Outcome in intermediate or high risk prostate cancer patients receiving radiation dose and hormone therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsdottir, Aasa; Muren, Ludvig Paul; Johannessen, Dag C.; Dahl, Olav (Department of Oncology and Medical Physics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway)); Wentzel-Larsen, Tore (Centre for Clinical Research, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway)); Haukaas, Svein Andreas (Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway)); Halvorsen, Ole Johan (Department of Pathology, The Gade Institute, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway))

    2009-07-15

    Background. To analyse the impact of radiation dose escalation and hormone treatment in prostate cancer patients according to risk groups. Material and methods. Totally 494 prostate cancer patients received external beam radiation therapy, with or without androgen deprivation, between January 1990 and December 1999. The patients were divided into three risk groups, where the low risk group (stage T1c, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level =10 ng/ml and WHO Grade 1) included 26 patients, the intermediate risk group (either stage T2, PSA 10.1-20 ng/ml or WHO Grade 2) comprised 149 patients whereas the high-risk group (either stage T3, PSA >20 ng/ml or WHO Grade 3) included 319 patients. Results. In the intermediate risk group, the 5-years bNED rate was 92%, 69% and 61% after a radiation dose of 70 Gy, 66 Gy or 64 Gy, respectively (p < 0.001). In the high-risk group, the 5-year bNED rate was 79%, 69% and 34% for the same dose levels (p < 0.001). The 5-years CSS rates were not significantly different between the dose levels in the intermediate risk group while for the high-risk group it was 93%, 92% and 80% for the three dose levels (p < 0.001). Risk group and radiation doses were independent predictors of bNED, CSS and overall survival, for bNED also hormone treatment was independent predictors. Conclusion. Radiation dose is important for the outcome in intermediate and high risk prostate cancer patients. A dose of 70 Gy should be considered the minimal dose for these patients

  15. Pretreatment organ function in patients with advanced head and neck cancer: clinical outcome measures and patients' views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasch Coen RN

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aim of this study is to thoroughly assess pretreatment organ function in advanced head and neck cancer through various clinical outcome measures and patients' views. Methods A comprehensive, multidimensional assessment was used, that included quality of life, swallowing, mouth opening, and weight changes. Fifty-five patients with stage III-IV disease were entered in this study prior to organ preserving (chemoradiation treatment. Results All patients showed pretreatment abnormalities or problems, identified by one or more of the outcome measures. Most frequent problems concerned swallowing, pain, and weight loss. Interestingly, clinical outcome measures and patients' perception did no always concur. E.g. videofluoroscopy identified aspiration and laryngeal penetration in 18% of the patients, whereas only 7 patients (13% perceived this as problematic; only 2 out of 7 patients with objective trismus actually perceived trismus. Conclusion The assessment identified several problems already pre-treatment, in this patient population. A thorough assessment of both clinical measures and patients' views appears to be necessary to gain insight in all (perceived pre-existing functional and quality of life problems.

  16. Bone Scan Index predicts outcome in patients with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Mads H; Rasmussen, Janne; Edenbrandt, Lars; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul F; Gerke, Oke; Johansen, Allan; Lund, Lars

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the Bone Scan Index (BSI) for prediction of castration resistance and prostate cancer-specific survival (PCSS). In this retrospective study, we used novel computer-assisted software for automated detection/quantification of bone metastases by BSI. Patients with prostate cancer are M-staged by whole-body bone scintigraphy (WBS) and categorised as M0 or M1. Within the M1 group, there is a wide range of clinical outcomes. The BSI was introduced a decade ago providing quantification of bone metastases by estimating the percentage of bone involvement. Being too time consuming, it never gained widespread clinical use. In all, 88 patients with prostate cancer awaiting initiation of androgen-deprivation therapy due to metastases were included. WBS was performed using a two-headed γ-camera. BSI was obtained using the automated platform EXINI bone (EXINI Diagnostics AB, Lund, Sweden). In Cox proportional hazard models, time to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and PCSS were modelled as the dependent variables, whereas prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, Gleason score and BSI were used as explanatory factors. For Kaplan-Meier estimates, BSI groups were dichotomously split into: BSI Gleason score was 7.7 (2-10), and the mean (range) BSI was 1.0 (0-9.2). During a mean (range) follow-up of 26 (8-49) months, 48 patients became castration resistant and 15 had died; most (13) from prostate cancer. In multivariate analysis including PSA level, Gleason score and BSI, only prediction by BSI was statistically significant. This was true both for time to CRPC (hazard ratio [HR] 1.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.22-1.74; C-index increase from 0.49 to 0.69) and for PCSS (HR 1.34, 95% CI 1.07-1.67; C-index increase from 0.76 to 0.95). BSI obtained using a novel automated computer-assisted algorithm appears to be a useful predictor of outcome for time to CRPC and PCSS in patients with hormone-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer. © 2015 The Authors BJU

  17. Costs and Outcomes Evaluation of Patient Navigation Following Abnormal Cancer Screening: Evidence from the Patient Navigation Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensink, Mark E.; Ramsey, Scott D.; Battaglia, Tracy; Fiscella, Kevin; Hurd, Thelma C.; McKoy, June M.; Patierno, Steven R.; Raich, Peter C.; Seiber, Eric E.; Mears, Victoria Warren; Whitley, Elizabeth; Paskett, Electra D.; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Navigators can facilitate timely access to cancer services but there are little data on their economic impact. Methods We conduct a cost-consequence analysis of navigation vs. usual care among 10,521 individuals with abnormal breast, cervix, colorectal or prostate cancer screening results who enrolled in the Patient Navigation Research Program study from January 1 2006 to March 31 2010. Navigation costs included diagnostic evaluation, patient and staff time, materials, and overhead. Consequences or outcomes were time to diagnostic resolution and probability of resolution. Differences in costs and outcomes were evaluated using multi-level, mixed-effects regression adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, language, marital status, insurance, cancer, and site clustering. Results Most individuals were minority (70.7%) and un- or publically-insured (72.7%). Diagnostic resolution was higher for navigation vs. usual care at 180 (56.2% vs. 53.8%, p=0.008) and 270 days: 70.0% vs. 68.2%, p<0.001). While there were no differences in average days to resolution (110 vs. 109 days, p=.63), the probability of ever having diagnostic resolution was higher for navigation vs. usual care (84.5% vs. 79.6%, p <0.001). The added cost of navigation vs. usual care was $275 per patient (95% CI $260 – $290, p <0.001). There was no significant difference in stage distribution among the 12.4% of navigated vs. 11% of usual care patients diagnosed with cancer. Conclusions Navigation adds costs and modestly increases the probability of diagnostic resolution among patients with abnormal screening tests. Navigation is only likely to be cost-effective if improved resolution translates into earlier cancer stage at diagnosis. PMID:24166217

  18. Androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer: long-term safety and patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadi H

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Hamed Ahmadi, Siamak Daneshmand Institute of Urology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT constitutes the first-line treatment for patients with locally advanced tumors, recurrent or metastatic disease. Given its widespread use, clinicians should be familiar with common side effects of this treatment. This review focuses on common side effects of ADT and available treatment options to control the side effects. Also, it briefly compares continuous ADT with other therapeutic approaches for androgen deprivation in prostate cancer patients. Similar to hormonal medications, newer non-hormonal therapeutic options including gabapentin and acupuncture have at best moderate effect in controlling hot flashes in patients on ADT. Supervised and/or home exercise programs significantly improve ADT-related fatigue, metabolic/cardiovascular side effects, and cognitive dysfunction. Denosumab, a human monoclonal antibody against RANK-L, is more effective than bisphosphonates in preventing skeletal-related events in patients with metastatic or castrate-resistant prostate cancer and unlike bisphosphonates, it can also reduce the risk of vertebral fractures in men receiving ADT for non-metastatic prostate cancer. Toremifene, a selective estrogen receptor inhibitor, has dual beneficial effects on ADT-related osteoporosis and metabolic dysfunction. Metformin coupled with lifestyle modification is also a well-tolerated treatment for metabolic changes during ADT. While producing similar oncological outcomes, intermittent ADT is associated with higher quality of life in patients under ADT by improving bone health, less metabolic and hematologic complications, and fewer hot flashes and sexual dysfunction events. Keywords: prostate cancer, androgen deprivation therapy, adverse effects, therapy

  19. A systematic review of oral herpetic viral infections in cancer patients: commonly used outcome measures and interventions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elad, Sharon; Ranna, Vinisha; Ariyawardana, Anura

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To review the literature for outcome measures for oral viral infections in cancer patients. A secondary aim was to update the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer/International Society of Oral Oncology (MASCC/ISOO) clinical practice guidelines for the management of oral...

  20. Oncological outcomes following radical prostatectomy for patients with pT4 prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharam Kaushik

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives: Radical prostatectomy (RP for locally advanced prostate cancer may reduce the risk of metastasis and cancer-specific death. Herein, we evaluated the outcomes for patients with pT4 disease treated with RP. Materials and methods: Among 19,800 men treated with RP at Mayo Clinic from 1987 to 2010, 87 were found to have pT4 tumors. Biochemical recurrence (BCR-free survival, systemic progression (SP free survival and overall survival (OS were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to assess the association of clinic-pathological features with outcome. Results: Median follow-up was 9.8 years (IQR 3.6, 13.4. Of the 87 patients, 50 (57.5% were diagnosed with BCR, 30 (34.5% developed SP, and 38 (43.7% died, with 11 (12.6% dying of prostate cancer. Adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy was administered to 77 men, while 32 received adjuvant external beam radiation therapy. Ten-year BCR-free survival, SP-free survival, and OS was 37%, 64%, and 70% respectively. On multivariate analysis, the presence of positive lymph nodes was marginally significantly associated with patients' risk of BCR (HR: 1.94; p=0.05, while both positive lymph nodes (HR 2.96; p=0.02 and high pathologic Gleason score (HR 1.95; p=0.03 were associated with SP. Conclusions: Patients with pT4 disease may experience long-term survival following RP, and as such, when technically feasible, surgical resection should be considered in the multimodal treatment approach to these men.

  1. Patient outcomes from lung cancer and diabetes mellitus: a matched case–control study

    OpenAIRE

    Karlin, Nina J; Amin, Shailja B; Buras, Matthew R; Kosiorek, Heidi E; Verona, Patricia M; Cook, Curtiss B

    2017-01-01

    Aim: This case–control study examined the impact of diabetes mellitus (DM) on survival in lung cancer patients and lung cancer on glycemic control in DM. Materials & methods: Patients with a new lung cancer diagnosis and DM (n = 124) were matched to 124 lung cancer patients without DM. Laboratory results and DM and cancer therapies were obtained from electronic records. Results: Five-year overall survival for lung cancer patients with and without DM was 20 versus 29% (p = .12). Glycemic contr...

  2. Treatment outcomes of patients with cervical cancer with complete metabolic responses after definitive chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onal, Cem [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Adana (Turkey); Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Adana Research and Treatment Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Adana (Turkey); Reyhan, Mehmet; Yapar, Ali Fuat [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Guler, Ozan C. [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Adana (Turkey)

    2014-07-15

    We sought to evaluate failure patterns and prognostic factors predictive of recurrences and survival in cervical cancer patients who are treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy (ChRT), who have a subsequent complete metabolic response (CMR) with {sup 18} F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography (FDG-PET) after treatment. The records of 152 cervical cancer patients who were treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy were evaluated. All patients underwent pre-treatment positron emission tomography (PET-CT), and post-treatment PET-CT was performed within a median of 3.9 months (range, 3.0-9.8 months) after the completion of ChRT. The prognoses of partial response/progressive disease (PR/PD) cases (30 patients, 18 %) and CMR cases (122 patients, %82) were evaluated. Univariate and multivariate analysis effecting the treatment outcome was performed in CMR cases. The median follow-ups for all patients and surviving patients were 28.7 (range, 3.3-78.7 months) and 33.2 months (range, 6.23-78.7 months), respectively. Four-year overall survival (OS) rate was significantly better in patients with CMR compared to patients with PR/PD (66.9 % vs. 12.4 %, p < 0.001, respectively). Patients with PR/PD had higher maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) of primary cervical tumor (26.4 ± 10.1 vs. 15.9 ± 6.3; p < 0.001) and larger tumor (6.4 cm ± 2.3 cm vs. 5.0 cm ± 1.4 cm; p < 0.001) compared to patients with CMR. Of the 122 patients with post-treatment CMRs, 25 (21 %) developed local, locoregional, or distant failure. In univariate analysis, tumor size ≥ 5 cm, 'International Federation of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' (FIGO) stage ≥ IIB, and pelvic and/or para-aortic lymph node metastasis were predictive of both overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS), while histology was predictive of only OS. In multivariate analysis, tumor size, stage and lymph node metastasis were predictive of OS and DFS. Although CMR is associated with

  3. The Impacts of Inclusion in Clinical Trials on Outcomes among Patients with Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Yun Lee

    Full Text Available Metastatic breast cancer (MBC remains a devastating and incurable disease. Over the past decade, the implementation of clinical trials both with and without molecular targeted therapeutics has impacted the daily clinical treatment of patients with MBC. In this study, we determine whether including MBC patients in clinical trials affects clinical outcomes.We retrospectively reviewed data for a total of 863 patients diagnosed with initial or recurrent (after receiving adjuvant systemic treatments following surgery metastatic disease between January 2000 and December 2013. Data were obtained from the breast cancer database of Samsung Medical Center.Among the 806 patients selected for inclusion, 188 (23% had participated in clinical trials. A total of 185 clinical trials were conducted from 2000 to 2014. When compared with earlier periods (n = 10 for 2000-2004, clinical trial enrollment significantly increased over time (n = 103 for 2005-2009, P = 0.024; n = 110 for 2010-2014, P = 0.046. Multivariate analyses revealed that biologic subtype, distant recurrence free interval (DRFI, and clinical trial enrollment were independent predictors of overall survival. Patients who participated in clinical trials showed improved survival, with a hazard ratio of 0.75 (95% CI, 0.59-0.95, which was associated with a 25% reduction in the risk of death. However, subgroup analysis showed that this improved survival benefit was not maintained in patients with triple negative breast cancer (TNBC.Although not conclusive, we could speculate that there were differences in the use of newer agents or regimens over time, and these differences appear to be associated with improved survival.

  4. Prognostic role of tumor volume for radiotherapy outcome in patient with T2 laryngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutkowski, T.; Wygoda, A.; Skladowski, K.; Rutkowski, R.; Maciejewski, B. [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice (Poland). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Hejduk, B. [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice (Poland). Dept. of Radiodiagnostic; Kolosza, Z. [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice (Poland). Dept. of Epidemiology

    2013-10-15

    Background and purpose: Tumor volume (TV) is recognized as a prognostic factor of treatment outcome for head and neck tumors but is not routinely included in the treatment decision-making process. The purpose of the study was to define its prognostic role for patients with T2 laryngeal cancer. Material and methods: TV of 160 patients who underwent RT between 2002 and 2006 for T2 laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma were reviewed. The tumor was located in the glottis and epiglottis in 82 (51 %) and 78 (49 %) patients, respectively. TV was manually contoured on pretreatment, planning, contrast-enhanced CT scans and the volumetric measurement (cm{sup 3}) was calculated by the volume algorithm. Results: The median TV value was 2.01 cm{sup 3} (range 0.15-21.68 cm{sup 3}). The median TV was significantly lower in patients with glottic tumors (p < 0.0001), N0 (p < 0.001), or well histopatologically differentiated tumors (p = 0.01). A significant correlation between TV, hemoglobin concentration (p < 0.01), and total dose (TD; p < 0.001) was observed. On univariate analyses, TV influenced local control (LC; p = 0.02) and overall survival (OS, p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, both age (HR 1.038, p = 0.03) and TV (HR = 1.075, p = 0.01) remained significantly related to LC and OS (age: HR 1.038, p = 0.005; TV: HR 1.097, p = 0.0001). Conclusion: Large TV worsen prognosis of patients with T2 laryngeal cancer. A large TV is more common for supraglottic, poorly differentiated tumors and may suggest higher risk of nodal spread. The routine estimation of TV prior to therapy may be essential in order to select the best treatment option for patients with T2 laryngeal cancer. (orig.)

  5. Outcomes of oral cavity cancer patients treated with surgery followed by postoperative intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan-Davidson, Sean R; Mohamed, Abdallah S R; Myers, Jeffrey N; Gunn, Gary B; Johnson, Faye M; Skinner, Heath; Beadle, Beth M; Gillenwater, Ann M; Phan, Jack; Frank, Steven J; William, William N; Wong, Andrew J; Lai, Stephen Y; Fuller, Clifton D; Morrison, William H; Rosenthal, David I; Garden, Adam S

    2017-09-01

    Although treatment paradigms have not changed significantly, radiotherapy, surgery, and imaging techniques have improved, leading us to investigate oncologic and survival outcomes for oral cavity squamous cell cancer (OCSCC) patients treated with surgery followed by postoperative IMRT. Records of patients with pathological diagnosis of OCSCC treated between 2000 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients' demographic, disease, and treatment criteria were extracted. Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate survival curves. Two hundred eighty-nine patients were analyzed. Median follow-up was 35months. Two hundred sixty-eight had neck dissections (93%), of which 66% had nodal involvement, and 51% of those positive dissections had extracapsular extension. Forty patients received induction chemotherapy and 107 received concurrent chemotherapy. Median dose to high risk clinical target volume was 60Gy/30 fractions. The 5-year locoregional control and overall survival rates were 76% and 57%, respectively. Tumors with >1.5cm depth of invasion had significantly higher risk of local failure compared with ≤1.5cm (p1.5cm depth of invasion (p=0.003) were independent predictors of poorer survival. Disease outcomes were consistent with historical data and did not appear compromised by the use of IMRT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Outcome analysis of breast cancer patients who declined evidence-based treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Kurian

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To analyze the characteristics and outcomes of women with breast cancer in the Northern Alberta Health Region (NAHR who declined recommended primary standard treatments. Methods A chart review was performed of breast cancer patients who refused recommended treatments during the period 1980 to 2006. A matched pair analysis was performed to compare the survival data between those who refused or received standard treatments. Results A total of 185 (1.2% patients refused standard treatment. Eighty-seven (47% were below the age of 75 at diagnosis. The majority of those who refused standard treatments were married (50.6%, 50 years or older (60.9%, and from the urban area (65.5%. The 5-year overall survival rates were 43.2% (95% CI: 32.0 to 54.4% for those who refused standard treatments and 81.9% (95% CI: 76.9 to 86.9% for those who received them. The corresponding values for the disease-specific survival were 46.2% (95% CI: 34.9 to 57.6% vs. 84.7% (95% CI: 80.0 to 89.4%. Conclusions Women who declined primary standard treatment had significantly worse survival than those who received standard treatments. There is no evidence to support using Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM as primary cancer treatment.

  7. Psychosocial Outcomes of Sharing a Diagnosis of Cancer with a Pediatric Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Haya Raz; Nili Tabak; Shulamith Kreitler

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This innovative pilot study was designed to provide research-based evidence on the variables to consider informing a child of his/her cancer diagnosis, so as to minimize the negative psychosocial effects of the cancer experience on survivors. The hypotheses of the study were that 'good information' about cancer, will allow the child a better understanding way to cope with treatment and improve socio-psychological outcomes at adulthood.Methods: Ninety-one adult childhood cancer sur...

  8. Cancer patients' control preferences in decision making and associations with patient-reported outcomes: a prospective study in an outpatient cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, Markus; Schildmann, Jan; Trautmann, Freya; Hentschel, Leopold; Hornemann, Beate; Rentsch, Anke; Ehninger, Gerhard; Schmitt, Jochen

    2017-09-01

    "Shared decision making" has been proposed as a prerequisite of patient-centered care. However, little is known on factors, which may influence cancer patients' decision control preferences (DCP) in routine care. This study investigated possible determinants of the patients' DCP with respect to patient characteristics and patient-reported outcomes (PROs). Consecutive patients presenting at a comprehensive cancer center between May 2014 and October 2014 were offered a self-administered electronic questionnaire including standardized PRO measures and patients' DCP. Results were linked with patient characteristics from the hospital information system and analyzed using cross-sectional methods. Out of 126 patients participating, 102 (81%; 65% male; mean age 62 years) completed the DCP-item. Overall, 49% (n = 50) preferred shared treatment decision responsibility, 29% (n = 30) preferred to leave the control to his/her physician, whereas 22% (n = 22) preferred to be in control of his/her treatment decision. Higher age (p = 0.035) and elevated distress levels (p = 0.038) were significantly associated with an increased willingness to leave the decision control to the physician. Further sociodemographic and PRO measures were not associated with patients' DCP. Our findings demonstrate that DCP assessment in routine cancer care is possible and provides important information to the treating oncologist. Information on DCP combined with PRO may contribute to more individualized decision making in cancer care.

  9. Clinical application and outcomes of sentinel node navigation surgery in patients with early gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arigami, Takaaki; Uenosono, Yoshikazu; Yanagita, Shigehiro; Okubo, Keishi; Kijima, Takashi; Matsushita, Daisuke; Amatatsu, Masahiko; Hagihara, Takahiko; Haraguchi, Naoto; Mataki, Yuko; Ehi, Katsuhiko; Ishigami, Sumiya; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2017-01-01

    Sentinel node navigation surgery (SNNS) has been recognized as a minimally invasive tool for individualized lymphadenectomy in patients with early gastric cancer (EGC). The aim of this study was to compare clinicopathological factors, adverse events, and clinical outcomes between sentinel node mapping (SNM) and SN dissection (SND) groups and assess the clinical utility of SNNS in patients with EGC. The clinical data of 157 patients with EGC, diagnosed as clinical T1N0M0 with tumors ≤ 40 mm, undergoing SNNS between March 2004 and April 2016 were retrospectively reviewed. Twenty-seven patients were excluded from the analysis. In the remaining 130 patients, 59 and 71 patients underwent standard lymphadenectomy for SNM and SND, respectively. The sentinel node detection rate in the SNM and SND groups was 98.3% (58/59) and 100% (71/71), respectively. Two (3.5%), 15 (25.9%), and 41 (70.7%) patients having sentinel nodes underwent total gastrectomy, proximal gastrectomy (PG), and distal gastrectomy (DG), respectively, in the SNM group. One (1.4%), 5 (7.0%), 10 (14.1%), 39 (54.9%), and 16 (22.5%) patients underwent PG, DG, segmental gastrectomy, local resection, and endoscopic submucosal dissection, respectively, in the SND group. There was no significant difference in postoperative complications between the SNM and SND groups (P = 0.781). Survival did not differ between the both groups (P = 0.856). The present results suggest that personalized surgery with SND provides technical safety and curability related with a favorable survival outcome in patients with EGC. PMID:29088895

  10. Psychometric Characteristics of a Patient Reported Outcome Measure on Ego-Integrity and Despair among Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleijn, Gitta; Post, Lenneke; Witte, Birgit I; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T; Westerhof, Gerben J; Cuijpers, Pim; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate psychometric characteristics of a questionnaire (the Northwestern Ego-integrity Scale (NEIS)) on ego-integrity (the experience of wholeness and meaning in life, even in spite of negative experiences) and despair (the experience of regret about the life one has led, and feelings of sadness, failure and hopelessness) among cancer patients. Cancer patients (n = 164) completed patient reported outcome measures on ego-integrity and despair (NEIS), psychological distress, anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS)), and quality of life (EORTC QLQ-C30 (cancer survivors, n = 57) or EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL (advanced cancer patients, n = 107)). Confirmatory Factor Analysis was used to assess construct validity. Cronbach's alpha was used to assess internal consistency. Convergent validity was tested based on a priori defined hypotheses: a higher level of ego-integrity was expected to be related to a higher level of quality of life, and lower levels of distress, depression and anxiety; a higher level of despair was expected to be related to a lower level of quality of life, and higher levels of distress, depression and anxiety. The majority of all items (94.5%) of the NEIS were completed by patients and single item missing rate was below 2%. The two subscales, labeled as Ego-integrity (5 items) and Despair (4 items) had acceptable internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha .72 and .61, respectively). The Ego-integrity subscale was not significantly associated with quality of life, distress, anxiety, or depression. The Despair subscale correlated significantly (p ego-integrity and despair among cancer patients.

  11. Is social support associated with improved clinical outcomes in geriatric lung cancer patients? Observations from North Central Cancer Treatment Group Studies N9921 and N0222

    OpenAIRE

    Jatoi, Aminah; Hillman, Shauna L; Ziegler, Katie L Allen; Stella, Philip J.; Soori, Gamini S.; Rowland, Kendrith M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Social support is defined as a network of family/friends who provide practical and emotional help. A sizable literature describes a direct relationship between social support and improved cancer clinical outcomes. This study explored the extent of social support and its potential association with survival and adverse events in geriatric lung cancer patients. Methods: One hundred thirteen patients, who were aged 65 years or older, had incurable cancer, and were enrolled in one of t...

  12. Review of electronic patient-reported outcomes systems used in cancer clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Roxanne E; Snyder, Claire F; Abernethy, Amy P; Basch, Ethan; Potosky, Arnold L; Roberts, Aaron C; Loeffler, Deena R; Reeve, Bryce B

    2014-07-01

    The use of electronic patient-reported outcomes (PRO) systems is increasing in cancer clinical care settings. This review comprehensively identifies existing PRO systems and explores how systems differ in the administration of PRO assessments, the integration of information into the clinic workflow and electronic health record (EHR) systems, and the reporting of PRO information. Electronic PRO (e-PRO) systems were identified through a semistructured review of published studies, gray literature, and expert identification. System developers were contacted to provide detailed e-PRO system characteristics and clinical implementation information using a structured review form. A total of 33 unique systems implemented in cancer clinical practice were identified. Of these, 81% provided detailed information about system characteristics. Two system classifications were established: treatment-centered systems designed for patient monitoring during active cancer treatment (n = 8) and patient-centered systems following patients across treatment and survivorship periods (n = 19). There was little consensus on administration, integration, or result reporting between these system types. Patient-centered systems were more likely to provide user-friendly features such as at-home assessments, integration into larger electronic system networks (eg, EHRs), and more robust score reporting options. Well-established systems were more likely to have features that increased assessment flexibility (eg, location, automated reminders) and better clinical integration. The number of e-PRO systems has increased. Systems can be programmed to have numerous features that facilitate integration of PRO assessment and routine monitoring into clinical care. Important barriers to system usability and widespread adoption include assessment flexibility, clinical integration, and high-quality data collection and reporting. Copyright © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  13. A systematic review of clinical outcomes for patients diagnosed with skin cancer spinal metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, C Rory; Sankey, Eric W; Liu, Ann; Elder, Benjamin D; Kosztowski, Thomas; Lo, Sheng-Fu L; Fisher, Charles G; Clarke, Michelle J; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Sciubba, Daniel M

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT Surgical procedures and/or adjuvant therapies are effective modalities for the treatment of symptomatic spinal metastases. However, clinical results specific to the skin cancer spinal metastasis cohort are generally lacking. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the literature for treatments, clinical outcomes, and survival following the diagnosis of a skin cancer spinal metastasis and evaluate prognostic factors in the context of spinal skin cancer metastases stratified by tumor subtype. METHODS The authors performed a literature review using PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and Web of Science to identify articles since 1950 that reported survival, clinical outcomes, and/or prognostic factors for the skin cancer patient population with spinal metastases. The methodological quality of reviews was assessed using the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) tool. RESULTS Sixty-five studies met the preset criteria and were included in the analysis. Of these studies, a total of 25, 40, 25, and 12 studies included patients who underwent some form of surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or observation alone, respectively. Sixty-three of the 65 included studies were retrospective in nature (Class of Evidence [CoE] IV), and the 2 prospective studies were CoE II. Based on the studies analyzed, the median overall survival for a patient with a spinal metastasis from a primary skin malignancy is 4.0 months; survival by tumor subtype is 12.5 months for patients with basal cell carcinoma (BCC), 4.0 months for those with melanoma, 4.0 months for those with squamous cell carcinoma, 3.0 months for those with pilomatrix carcinoma, and 1.5 months for those with Merkel cell carcinoma (p < 0.0001). The overall percentage of known continued disease progression after spine metastasis diagnosis was 40.1% (n = 244/608, range 25.0%-88.9%), the rate of known recurrence of the primary skin cancer lesion was 3.5% (n = 21/608, range 0

  14. Patient-reported quality of life outcomes following treatment for oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeze, J; Rennie, A; Dawson, D; Tipper, J; Rehman, K-U; Grew, N; Pigadas, N

    2018-03-01

    Patient-reported quality of life (QoL) outcomes have the potential to assist clinicians in providing individually tailored treatment decisions. QoL assessments were collected prospectively for 168 consecutive patients treated for oral cancer between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2014 using the University of Washington Quality of Life Questionnaire. Patients were followed up for 18 months post-treatment. Sub-group analyses were performed using paired t-tests and analysis of variance (ANOVA) to compare the effects of adjunctive chemoradiotherapy, type of bone resection, and methods of soft and hard tissue flap reconstruction. The greatest statistically significant reduction in QoL for all oral cavity sub-sites was found following the treatment of floor of mouth tumours (-18.9%, P=0.018). Laser excision for matched patient cohorts resulted in improved resultant QoL compared to other excision techniques (P=0.0002). No significant difference in QoL was found when radial forearm and anterolateral thigh flaps were matched, or when fibula and scapula flaps were matched. These findings support the use of laser excision and the avoidance of postoperative radiotherapy if curative intent and survival outcomes are maintained. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Group support for patients with metastatic cancer. A randomized outcome study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, D; Bloom, J R; Yalom, I

    1981-05-01

    The effects of weekly supportive group meetings for women with metastatic carcinoma of the breast were systematically evaluated in a one-year, randomized, prospective outcome study. The groups focused on the problems of terminal illness, including improving relationships with family, friends, and physicians and living as fully as possible in the face of death. We hypothesized that this invention would lead to improved mood, coping strategies, and self-esteem among those in the treatment group. Eighty-six patients were tested at four-month intervals. The treatment group had significantly lower mood-disturbance scores on the Profile of Mood States scale, had fewer maladaptive coping responses, and were less phobic than the control group. This study provides objective evidence that a supportive group intervention for patients with metastatic cancer results in psychological benefit. Mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of this group intervention are explored.

  16. Prevalence and outcome of patients with cancer and acute coronary syndrome undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: a BleeMACS substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannaccone, Mario; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Vadalà, Paolo; Wilton, Stephen B; Noussan, Patrizia; Colombo, Francesco; Raposeiras Roubín, Sergio; Abu Assi, Emad; González-Juanatey, José Ramón; Simao Henriques, Jose Paulo; Saucedo, Jorge; Kikkert, Wouter J; Nuñez-Gil, Iván; Ariza-Sole, Albert; Song, Xian-Tao; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Liebetrau, Christoph; Kawaji, Tetsuma; Moretti, Claudio; Garbo, Roberto; Huczek, Zenon; Nie, Shao-Ping; Fujii, Toshiharu; Correia, Luis Cl; Kawashiri, Masa-Aki; García Acuña, José María; Southern, Danielle; Alfonso, Emilio; Terol, Belén; Garay, Alberto; Zhang, Dongfeng; Chen, Yalei; Xanthopoulou, Ioanna; Osman, Neriman; Möllmann, Helge; Shiomi, Hiroki; Giordana, Francesca; Kowara, Michal; Filipiak, Krzysztof; Wang, Xiao; Yan, Yan; Fan, Jing-Yao; Ikari, Yuji; Nakahashi, Takuya; Sakata, Kenji; Gaita, Fiorenzo; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Kalpak, Oliver; Kedev, Sasko

    2017-06-01

    The prevalence and outcome of patients with cancer that experience acute coronary syndrome (ACS) have to be determined. The BleeMACS project is a multicentre observational registry enrolling patients with acute coronary syndrome undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention worldwide in 15 hospitals. The primary endpoint was a composite event of death and re-infarction after one year of follow-up. Bleedings were the secondary endpoint. 15,401 patients were enrolled, 926 (6.4%) in the cancer group and 14,475 (93.6%) in the group of patients without cancer. Patients with cancer were older (70.8±10.3 vs. 62.8±12.1 years, Pprevalence in patients with acute coronary syndrome undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention, with a major risk of cardiovascular events and bleedings. Moreover, these patients are often undertreated from clinical despite medical therapy seems to be protective. Registration:The BleeMACS project (NCT02466854).

  17. Patients' Preferences for Outcome, Process and Cost Attributes in Cancer Treatment: A Systematic Review of Discrete Choice Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bien, Daniela R; Danner, Marion; Vennedey, Vera; Civello, Daniele; Evers, Silvia M; Hiligsmann, Mickaël

    2017-10-01

    As several studies have been conducted to elicit patients' preferences for cancer treatment, it is important to provide an overview and synthesis of these studies. This study aimed to systematically review discrete choice experiments (DCEs) about patients' preferences for cancer treatment and assessed the relative importance of outcome, process and cost attributes. A systematic literature review was conducted using PubMed and EMBASE to identify all DCEs investigating patients' preferences for cancer treatment between January 2010 and April 2016. Data were extracted using a predefined extraction sheet, and a reporting quality assessment was applied to all studies. Attributes were classified into outcome, process and cost attributes, and their relative importance was assessed. A total of 28 DCEs were identified. More than half of the studies (56%) received an aggregate score lower than 4 on the PREFS (Purpose, Respondents, Explanation, Findings, Significance) 5-point scale. Most attributes were related to outcome (70%), followed by process (25%) and cost (5%). Outcome attributes were most often significant (81%), followed by process (73%) and cost (67%). The relative importance of outcome attributes was ranked highest in 82% of the cases where it was included, followed by cost (43%) and process (12%). This systematic review suggests that attributes related to cancer treatment outcomes are the most important for patients. Process and cost attributes were less often included in studies but were still (but less) important to patients in most studies. Clinicians and decision makers should be aware that attribute importance might be influenced by level selection for that attribute.

  18. Utilization of Patient-Reported Outcomes to Guide Symptom Management during Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Malika Danner; Ming-yang Hung; Yung, Thomas M.; Marilyn Ayoob; Siyuan Lei; Collins, Brian T.; Simeng Suy; Collins, Sean P.

    2017-01-01

    IntroductionUtilization of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) to guide symptom management during radiation therapy is increasing. This study focuses on the use of the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite for Clinical Practice (EPIC-CP) as a tool to assess urinary and bowel bother during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and its utility in guiding medical management.MethodsBetween September 2015 and January 2017, 107 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated wi...

  19. Utilization of Patient-Reported Outcomes to Guide Symptom Management during Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Danner, Malika; Hung, Ming-yang; Yung, Thomas M.; Ayoob, Marilyn; Lei, Siyuan; Collins, Brian T.; Suy, Simeng; Collins, Sean P.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Utilization of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) to guide symptom management during radiation therapy is increasing. This study focuses on the use of the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite for Clinical Practice (EPIC-CP) as a tool to assess urinary and bowel bother during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and its utility in guiding medical management. Methods Between September 2015 and January 2017, 107 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated...

  20. Outcomes of Advanced Gastric Cancer Patients Treated with at Least Three Lines of Systemic Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanotto, Valentina; Uccello, Mario; Pecora, Irene; Rimassa, Lorenza; Leone, Francesco; Rosati, Gerardo; Santini, Daniele; Giampieri, Riccardo; Di Donato, Samantha; Tomasello, Gianluca; Silvestris, Nicola; Pietrantonio, Filippo; Battaglin, Francesca; Avallone, Antonio; Scartozzi, Mario; Lutrino, Eufemia Stefania; Melisi, Davide; Antonuzzo, Lorenzo; Pellegrino, Antonio; Ferrari, Laura; Bordonaro, Roberto; Vivaldi, Caterina; Gerratana, Lorenzo; Bozzarelli, Silvia; Filippi, Roberto; Bilancia, Domenico; Russano, Marco; Aprile, Giuseppe

    2017-08-31

    Second-line therapy has consistently demonstrated survival benefit if compared with best supportive care; however, there is limited evidence whether further lines of treatment may improve the prognosis of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) patients. Starting from a real-world cohort of 868 AGC patients, we retrospectively analyzed baseline parameters, tumor characteristics, and treatment data of those treated with at least three lines. Categorical features were described through cross-tables and chi-square test. We explored the impact of treatment intensity and progression-free survival (PFS) experienced in previous lines on PFS and overall survival in third-line by uni- and multivariate Cox regression models and described by Kaplan-Meier estimator plot with log-rank test. Overall, 300 patients were included in the analysis. The most common site of primary tumor was gastric body; 45.3% of cancers had an intestinal histotype, 14% were human epidermal growth receptor 2 positive. In third-line, 45.7% of patients received a single-agent chemotherapy, 49.7% a combination regimen. Patients who had experienced a first-line PFS ≥6.9 months had a better prognosis compared with those who had achieved a shorter one. Consistently, a second-line PFS ≥3.5 months positively influenced the prognosis. Patients receiving a third-line combination regimen had better outcomes compared with those treated with a single-agent chemotherapy. Our real-world study confirms that selected AGC patients may receive third-line treatment. Longer PFS in previous lines or a more intense third-line treatment positively influenced prognosis. Further efforts are warranted to define the best therapeutic sequences, and to identify the optimal candidate for treatment beyond second-line. The benefit of third-line treatment to advanced gastric cancer patients is controversial. Our study depicts a real scenario of the clinical practice in Italy, confirming that a non-negligible proportion of patients receive a

  1. Immune profiles and clinical outcomes between sepsis patients with or without active cancer requiring admission to intensive care units.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Feng Fang

    Full Text Available Immunoparalysis was observed in both patients with cancer and sepsis. In cancer patients, Cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 and programmed cell death protein 1/programmed death-ligand 1 axis are two key components of immunoparalysis. Several emerging therapies against these two axes gained significant clinical benefit. In severe sepsis patients, immunoparalysis was known as compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome and this has been suggested as an important cause of death in patients with sepsis. It would be interesting to see if immune status was different in severe sepsis patients with or without active cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the differences in immune profiles, and clinical outcomes between severe sepsis patients with or without cancer admitted to ICU.A combined retrospective and prospective observational study from a cohort of adult sepsis patients admitted to three medical ICUs at Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital in Taiwan between August 2013 and June 2016.Of the 2744 patients admitted to the ICU, 532 patients with sepsis were included. Patients were divided into those with or without active cancer according to their medical history. Of the 532 patients, 95 (17.9% patients had active cancer, and 437 (82.1% patients had no active cancer history. Patients with active cancer were younger (p = 0.001 and were less likely to have diabetes mellitus (p < 0.001, hypertension (p < 0.001, coronary artery disease (p = 0.004, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (p = 0.002 or stroke (p = 0.002 compared to patients without active cancer. Patients with active cancer also exhibited higher baseline lactate levels (p = 0.038, and higher baseline plasma interleukin (IL-10 levels (p = 0.040, higher trend of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF (p = 0.004 compared to patients without active cancer. The 14-day, 28-day and 90-day mortality rates were higher for patients with active cancer than those without active cancer

  2. Perioperative Outcomes of 3-Arm Versus 4-Arm Robotic Radical Hysterectomy in Patients with Cervical Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Ga Won; Eoh, Kyung Jin; Chung, Young Shin; Kim, Sang Wun; Kim, Sunghoon; Nam, Eun Ji; Lee, Jung Yun; Kim, Young Tae

    2017-12-26

    To investigate and compare surgical outcomes of the 3 versus 4 robotic arm approaches for robotic surgery in patients with cervical cancer. A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). An academic tertiary hospital. A total of 142 patients with stage 1A1 to IIB cervical carcinoma who underwent robotic surgery were included for analysis. The subjects were divided according to the surgical approach (i.e., the number of robotic arms), and the 2 groups were compared in terms of intraoperative data and postoperative outcomes. Robotic radical hysterectomy (RRH) with lymphadenectomy using 3 robotic arms (n = 101) versus 4 robotic arms (n = 41). Perioperative surgical outcomes. The 3-arm robotic approach consisted of a camera arm, 2 robotic arms, and 1 conventional assistant port. An additional robotic arm was placed on the right side of the patient's abdomen for the 4-arm robotic approach. The mean age, body mass index, cell type, Fédération Internationale de Gynécologie et d'Obstétrique stage, and type of surgery were not significantly different between the 2 cohorts. The 3-arm approach showed favorable outcomes over the 4-arm approach in terms of postoperative pain at 6 and 24 hours (3.8 ± 1.8 vs 4.5 ± 1.7 and 2.8 ± 1.7 vs 3.4 ± 1.6, respectively; p = .033 and .049) and postoperative hemoglobin difference (1.8 ± 0.9 vs 2.6 ± 1.3 and 1.9 ± 1.1 vs 2.4 ± 0.9 on days 1 and 3, respectively; p = .002 and .004). The median length of postoperative hospital stay, total operative time, docking time, lymph node yield, and intraoperative and postoperative complication rates were comparable between the 2 cohorts. Surgical outcomes and complications rates of RRH for cervical cancer using the 4-arm approach were comparable with that of the 3-arm approach with decreased early postoperative pain in the 3-arm group. Cost-benefit analysis and the impact on surgical training

  3. Patient-reported Outcomes of Acupuncture for Symptom Control in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Lora M A; Osian, Sarah Rausch; Jacobsen, Paul B; Johnstone, Peter A S

    2015-06-01

    Acupuncture is increasingly offered as a treatment option for managing cancer-related symptoms. In addition to randomized controlled trials, patient-reported outcomes may be needed to establish treatment effectiveness. This study retrospectively examined the symptoms and the satisfaction ratings of 90 patients receiving acupuncture at an integrative oncology clinic. At least two acupuncture sessions were completed by 72% of the sample. The prevalence rates of fatigue, pain, anxiety, physical distress, emotional distress, and poor quality of life before acupuncture were > 62%. Paired t tests revealed a significant reduction in symptoms from baseline until after the first acupuncture session and after the last session (p acupuncture. The majority were satisfied with the service. The results of this study suggest that acupuncture may be useful as an adjunct treatment for cancer symptom management. While high-quality trials are still needed to establish the treatment's efficacy, patients may benefit from these primarily safe, low-cost services. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. [Characteristics and Outcomes of Treatment in Patients with Stage IV Colorectal Cancer with Mismatch Repair Deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Keiichiro; Chika, Noriyasu; Suzuki, Okihide; Ito, Tetsuya; Amano, Kunihiko; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Fukuchi, Minoru; Kumagai, Youichi; Mochiki, Erito; Ishida, Hideyuki

    2016-11-01

    Mismatch repair(MMR)protein deficiency in colorectal cancer is well correlated with high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-H). There are little data on mismatch repair deficiency(dMMR)colorectal cancers in Japan. In addition, we have no available data on the therapeutic efficacy of oxaliplatin(oxa)-based chemotherapy, one of the standard treatment regimens for metastatic colorectal cancer, for patients with dMMR colorectal cancer. The subjects were 254 patients with Stage IV colorectal cancer whose tumors were immunohistochemically stained for MMR proteins, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2. Patients who underwent R0 resection were excluded. Clinicopathologic factors and the efficacy of oxa-based chemotherapy were compared between patients with dMMR colorectal cancer and those with mismatch repair proficient(pMMR)colorectal cancer. There were 7(2.8%)patients with dMMR. Four patients demonstrated both MLH1 and PMS2 loss, while 3 patients demonstrated both MSH2 and MSH6 loss. Though the dMMR had a higher frequency in female patients(p=0.02) and a lower frequency in those with liver metastasis(pcolorectal cancers was lower than those(4-11%)reported in Western countries. Therefore, the clinical significance of universal screeningfor dMMR in all colorectal cancer samples may not be valid. Concerningsurvival benefit, oxa-based chemotherapy seems to be an effective alternative in clinical practice for metastatic colorectal cancer patients with dMMR.

  5. Psychological outcome of patients following treatment of oral cancer and its relation with functional status and coping mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanein, Kamal Abdel-Aal Mohamed; Musgrove, Brian T; Bradbury, Eileen

    2005-12-01

    Traditionally health-care providers have measured outcome of treatment of disease by focusing on tumour response and disease-free survival. However, it has become increasingly apparent that the behavioural and functional impact of treatment on the patient is important. This study investigates the psychological outcome and its relationship with functional status and coping mechanisms following treatment of oral cancer patients. Sixty-eight patients were evaluated 6 months to 6 years after treatment (from October 1992 to October 1997) for oral cancer. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) was used for psychological evaluation, the University of Washington Quality of Life Questionnaire (UW-QOL) and The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) for evaluating the head and neck specific and general functional status, respectively. Finally, the "Mental Adjustment to Cancer Questionnaire" (MAC-Q) was used for evaluation of coping mechanisms. The incidence of anxiety and/or depression was 25% and the socio-demographic and medical characteristics showed poor correlation with the psychological outcome in this study. The results indicated that there was a strong association between psychological outcome and head and neck specific and general quality-of-life (QOL) domains, and style of coping. The p-value was less than 0.01 for most of the domains and items of functional status and the effective coping style. Deteriorated functional status and ineffective coping strategies are strongly associated with poor psychological outcome in patients with oral cancer.

  6. Comparison of treatment outcome in metastatic colorectal cancer patients included in a clinical trial versus daily practice in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, L.; Koopman, M.; Gils, C.W. van; Ottevanger, P.B.; Punt, C.J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The external validity of trial results is a matter of debate, and no strong evidence is available to support whether a trial may have a positive or a negative effect on the outcome of patients. Methods. We compared the results of stage IV colorectal cancer patients treated within a large

  7. Prevalence and outcome of patients with cancer and acute coronary syndrome undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: a BleeMACS substudy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iannaccone, Mario; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Vadalà, Paolo; Wilton, Stephen B.; Noussan, Patrizia; Colombo, Francesco; Raposeiras Roubín, Sergio; Abu Assi, Emad; González-Juanatey, José Ramón; Henriques, Jose Paulo Simao; Saucedo, Jorge; Kikkert, Wouter J.; Nuñez-Gil, Iván; Ariza-Sole, Albert; Song, Xian-Tao; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Liebetrau, Christoph; Kawaji, Tetsuma; Moretti, Claudio; Garbo, Roberto; Huczek, Zenon; Nie, Shao-Ping; Fujii, Toshiharu; Correia, Luis Cl; Kawashiri, Masa-Aki; García Acuña, José María; Southern, Danielle; Alfonso, Emilio; Terol, Belén; Garay, Alberto; Zhang, Dongfeng; Chen, Yalei; Xanthopoulou, Ioanna; Osman, Neriman; Möllmann, Helge; Shiomi, Hiroki; Giordana, Francesca; Kowara, Michal; Filipiak, Krzysztof; Wang, Xiao; Yan, Yan; Fan, Jing-Yao; Ikari, Yuji; Nakahashi, Takuya; Sakata, Kenji; Gaita, Fiorenzo; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Kalpak, Oliver; Kedev, Sasko

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence and outcome of patients with cancer that experience acute coronary syndrome (ACS) have to be determined. The BleeMACS project is a multicentre observational registry enrolling patients with acute coronary syndrome undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention worldwide in 15

  8. Impact of splenectomy on surgical outcome in patients with cancer of the distal esophagus and gastro-esophageal junction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pultrum, B. B.; van Bastelaar, J.; Schreurs, Liesbeth; van Dullemen, H. M.; Groen, H.; Nijsten, M. W. N.; van Dam, G. M.; Plukker, J. T. H. M.

    We aim to determine the effect of splenectomy on clinical outcome in patients with cancer of the distal esophagus and gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ) after a curative intended resection. From January 1991 to July 2004, 210 patients underwent a potentially curative gastroesophageal resection with an

  9. Improved outcomes due to changes in organization of care for patients with ovarian cancer in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggink, F. A.; Mom, C. H.; Kruitwagen, R. F.; Reyners, A. K.; Van Driel, W. J.; Massuger, L. F.; Niemeijer, G. C.; Van der Zee, A. G.; van der Aa, M. A.; Nijman, H. W.

    Objectives. Objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of changes in patterns of care, for example centralization and treatment sequence, on surgical outcome and survival in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Methods. Patients diagnosed with FIGO stage IIB-IV EOC (2004-2013)

  10. A Standard Set of Value-Based Patient-Centered Outcomes for Breast Cancer: The International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM) Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Wee Loon; Schouwenburg, Maartje G; van Bommel, Annelotte C M; Stowell, Caleb; Allison, Kim H; Benn, Karen E; Browne, John P; Cooter, Rodney D; Delaney, Geoff P; Duhoux, Francois P; Ganz, Patricia A; Hancock, Patricia; Jagsi, Reshma; Knaul, Felicia M; Knip, Anne M; Koppert, Linetta B; Kuerer, Henry M; McLaughin, Sarah; Mureau, Marc A M; Partridge, Ann H; Reid, Dereesa Purtell; Sheeran, Lisa; Smith, Thomas J; Stoutjesdijk, Mark J; Vrancken Peeters, Marie Jeanne T F D; Wengström, Yvonne; Yip, Cheng-Har; Saunders, Christobel

    2017-05-01

    A major challenge in value-based health care is the lack of standardized health outcomes measurements, hindering optimal monitoring and comparison of the quality of health care across different settings globally. The International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM) assembled a multidisciplinary international working group, comprised of 26 health care providers and patient advocates, to develop a standard set of value-based patient-centered outcomes for breast cancer (BC). The working group convened via 8 teleconferences and completed a follow-up survey after each meeting. A modified 2-round Delphi method was used to achieve consensus on the outcomes and case-mix variables to be included. Patient focus group meetings (8 early or metastatic BC patients) and online anonymized surveys of 1225 multinational BC patients and survivors were also conducted to obtain patients' input. The standard set encompasses survival and cancer control, and disutility of care (eg, acute treatment complications) outcomes, to be collected through administrative data and/or clinical records. A combination of multiple patient-reported outcomes measurement (PROM) tools is recommended to capture long-term degree of health outcomes. Selected case-mix factors were recommended to be collected at baseline. The ICHOM will endeavor to achieve wide buy-in of this set and facilitate its implementation in routine clinical practice in various settings and institutions worldwide.

  11. Oncological outcomes of renal pelvic and ureteral cancer patients registered in 2005: the first large population report from the Cancer Registration Committee of the Japanese Urological Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Miki, Tsuneharu; Kanayama, Hiro-Omi; Ohyama, Chikara; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki; Eto, Masatoshi; Naito, Seiji; Fukumori, Tomoharu; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Takahashi, Satoru; Homma, Yukio; Kamoi, Kazumi

    2014-05-01

    To describe the clinical and pathological characteristics and the outcomes of renal pelvic and ureteral cancer patients diagnosed in 2005 in Japan. In 2011, data were collected from renal pelvic and ureteral cancer patients diagnosed in 2005. A total of 1509 registered patients from 348 institutions were analyzed. Epidemiology and survival were analyzed based on each cancer location and on cancer multiplicity. The 5-year overall survival of the 1509 patients was estimated at 0.64. Open surgery was carried out in 409 renal pelvic cancer cases (66.9%) and 315 ureteral cancer cases (63.0%). The retroperitoneal approach was common, and lymph node dissection was carried out in approximately one-third of open surgery cases and one-fifth of laparoscopic cases. Approximately 60% of the operated unilateral renal pelvic or ureteral cancer was diagnosed as invasive, and just 14.6% was diagnosed as stage pTa. Distribution of the estimated worst tumor grade was significantly different for renal pelvic cancer and ureteral cancer. This article presents the first large population report of survival data in Japanese renal pelvic and ureteral cancer patients. In comparison with the Japanese bladder cancer database report in 1999-2001 from the Cancer Registration Committee of the Japanese Urological Association, the pathological characteristics of renal pelvic and ureteral cancer were diagnosed as aggressive. © 2013 The Japanese Urological Association.

  12. Outcomes of ESD for patients with early gastric cancer and comorbid liver cirrhosis: a propensity score analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Motohiko; Nishida, Tsutomu; Hamasaki, Toshimitsu; Kawai, Naoki; Yoshio, Toshiyuki; Egawa, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Katsumi; Ogiyama, Hideharu; Komori, Masato; Nakahara, Masanori; Yabuta, Takamasa; Nishihara, Akihiro; Hayashi, Yoshito; Yamada, Takuya; Takehara, Tetsuo

    2015-06-01

    Gastric cancer and liver cirrhosis (LC) are often comorbid. However, little is known about the clinical outcomes of gastric endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) in patients with comorbid LC. This case-control study used a multicentre retrospective cohort. We identified 69 LC patients from the cohort of patients with early gastric cancer, who underwent gastric ESD at 12 hospitals from March 2003 to November 2010. Using the propensity score matching method, 69 patients without LC were used to compare the short- and long-term outcomes of ESD. Among the 69 LC patients, 53 (77 %) were Child-Pugh grade A (CP-A) and 16 (28 %) had past or present histories of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Short-term outcomes did not differ between the LC patients and controls or between the CP-A and CP-B/C patients. Although the LC patients had significantly worse long-term outcomes than the controls (the 5-year overall survival rates were 60 vs. 91 %, respectively), patients with CP-A liver function without HCC histories had an overall survival almost equivalent to that of patients without LC (controls). LC patients appear to be good candidates for ESD if they have CP-A liver function and no history of HCC. Although their short-term outcomes were not inferior, the patients with Child-Pugh grades B/C or with histories of HCC benefited less from ESD.

  13. Effect of Comorbidity on Postoperative Survival Outcomes in Patients with Solid Cancers: A 6-Year Multicenter Study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Wen-Chi; Chang, Pei-Hung; Lu, Chang-Hsien; Liu, Keng-Hao; Hung, Yu-Shin; Hung, Chia-Yen; Liu, Chien-Ting; Yeh, Kun-Yun; Lin, Yung-Chang; Yeh, Ta-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Patients with comorbidities are more likely to experience treatment-related toxicities and death. Our aim was to examine the effect of comorbidity on postoperative survival outcomes in patients with solid cancers. In total, 37,288 patients who underwent potentially curative operations for solid cancers at four affiliated hospitals of the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, between 2007 and 2012, were stratified according to the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) for postoperative survival analysis. Multivariate Cox regression was used to adjust hazard ratios of survival outcomes among different CCI subgroups. A significantly greater proportion of patients with comorbidities presented with poorer clinicopathological characteristics compared to those without. After cancer surgery, 26% of patients died after a median follow-up duration of 38.9 months. Overall mortality rates of patients with CCI scores of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5-8 were 22.9%, 29.5%, 38.2%, 43.2%, 50.2%, and 56.4%, respectively. After adjusting for other clinicopathological factors, patients with increasing CCI scores were associated with significantly reduced overall and noncancer-specific survival rates, while only patients with CCI scores of >2 were associated with higher cancer-specific mortality rates. Patients with increasing numbers of comorbidities were associated with reduced postoperative survival outcomes. Patients with multiple comorbidities were most vulnerable to both cancer- and noncancer-specific deaths in the first 6 months after cancer surgery. Our results suggest that for both the patient and clinician, it should be taken into consideration about cancer surgery when dealing with multiple comorbidities.

  14. Evaluating the utility of existing patient-reported outcome scales in novel patient populations with pancreatic cancer, lung cancer, and myeloproliferative neoplasms using medicare current beneficiary survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Jasmina I; Mytelka, Daniel S; Duh, Mei Sheng; Birnbaum, Howard G; Cummings, Alice Kate; San Roman, Alexandra M; Price, Gregory L; Swindle, Ralph W

    2013-01-01

    While there are validated patient-reported outcomes (PRO) instruments for use in specific cancer populations, no validated general instruments exist for use in conditions common to multiple cancers, such as muscle wasting and consequent physical disability. The Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS), a survey in a nationally representative sample of Medicare beneficiaries, includes items from three well known scales with general applicability to cancer patients: Katz activities of daily living (ADL), Rosow-Breslau instrumental ADL (IADL), and a subset of physical performance items from the Nagi scale. This study evaluated properties of the Katz ADL, Rosow-Breslau IADL, and a subset of the Nagi scale in patients with pancreatic cancer, lung cancer, and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) using data from MCBS linked with Medicare claims in order to understand the potential utility of the three scales in these populations; understanding patient-perceived significance was not in scope. The study cohorts included Medicare beneficiaries aged ≥65 years as of 1 January of the year of their first cancer diagnosis with one or more health assessments in a community setting in the MCBS Access to Care data from 1991 to 2009. Beneficiaries had at least two diagnoses in de-identified Medicare claims data linked to the MCBS for one of the following cancers: pancreatic, lung, or MPN. The Katz ADL, Rosow-Breslau IADL, and Nagi scales were calculated to assess physical functioning over time from cancer diagnosis. Psychometric properties for each scale in each cohort were evaluated by testing for internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and responsiveness by comparing differences in mean scale scores over time as cancer progresses, and differences in mean scale scores before and after hospitalization (for lung cancer cohort). The study cohorts included 90 patients with pancreatic cancer, 863 with lung cancer, and 135 with MPN. Among each cancer cohort, the Katz ADL, Rosow

  15. Tumor control outcomes of patients treated with trimodality therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copp, Hillary; Bissonette, Eric A; Theodorescu, Dan

    2005-06-01

    To evaluate, in a pilot study, the tumor control outcomes of our approach and define the pretreatment characteristics that predict a response to therapy. Patients with advanced clinically localized prostate cancer have a high likelihood of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure 3 to 5 years after initial treatment. We adopted trimodality therapy (neoadjuvant and adjuvant androgen ablation, external beam radiotherapy [RT], and a brachytherapy boost) to augment biochemical disease-free survival in this patient population. From 1997 to 2000, 93 patients with clinical Stage T2b or greater, or PSA level greater than 10 ng/mL, or Gleason score 7 or greater were treated with external beam RT followed by palladium-103 brachytherapy. Two to three months before external beam RT, an 8 to 9-month regimen of leuprolide and an oral antiandrogen was initiated. Patients were followed up at 3 to 4-month intervals with PSA determination and digital rectal examination. Perineural invasion, the percentage of cancer in biopsy cores, pretreatment PSA level, clinical T stage, and Gleason score were analyzed as prognostic factors for biochemical failure defined by both the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) criteria and PSA level greater than 0.2 ng/mL. The median length of follow-up was 45 months. The overall probability of biochemical failure using a PSA level greater than 0.2 ng/mL at 4 years was 79% (95% confidence interval 69% to 89%). With the ASTRO criteria, the overall failure rate at the same point was 77% (95% confidence interval 68% to 87%). Gleason score (P = 0.07) showed a trend toward predicting biochemical failure using the PSA level greater than 0.2 ng/mL criterion. Trimodality RT offers excellent tumor control in patients with poor prognosis who often relapse early. Longer follow-up will be important to determine whether these results are durable over time.

  16. Second cancers in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia who received frontline fludarabine, cyclophosphamide and rituximab therapy: distribution and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamini, Ohad; Jain, Preetesh; Trinh, Long; Qiao, Wei; Strom, Sara S; Lerner, Susan; Wang, Xuemei; Burger, Jan; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Kantarjian, Hagop; O'Brien, Susan; Wierda, William; Estrov, Zeev; Keating, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) are known to have an increased incidence of second cancers, but the contribution of commonly used frontline therapies to the incidence of second cancers is unclear. We report on the characteristics, incidence, outcomes and factors associated with second cancers in 234 patients receiving fludarabine, cyclophosphamide and rituximab (FCR) based regimens in the frontline setting. The risk of second cancers was 2.38 times higher than the expected risk in the general population. Ninety-three patients (40%) had other cancers before and 66 patients (28%) after FCR. Rates of therapy related acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome (t-AML/MDS) (5.1%) and Richter transformation (RT) (9%) were high, while solid tumors were not increased. Overall survival of patients with second cancers after frontline FCR was shorter (median of 4.5 years) compared to patients with and without prior cancers. Second cancer risk after frontline FCR is mainly due to high rates of t-AML/MDS and RT, and as speculated the survival of affected patients is shorter.

  17. Second cancers in patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia who received frontline FCR therapy – Distribution and clinical outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamini, Ohad; Jain, Preetesh; Trinh, Long; Qiao, Wei; Strom, Sara S.; Lerner, Susan; Wang, Xuemei; Burger, Jan; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Kantarjian, Hagop; O’Brien, Susan; Wierda, William; Estrov, Zeev; Keating, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) are known to have an increased incidence of second cancers, but the contribution of commonly used frontline therapies to the incidence of second cancers is unclear. We report on the characteristics, incidence, outcomes and factors associated with second cancers in 234 patients receiving Fludarabine, Cyclophosphamide, and Rituximab (FCR) based regimens in the frontline setting. The risk of second cancers was 2.38 times higher than the expected risk in the general population. Ninety three patients (40%) had other cancers before and 66 patients (28%) after FCR. The rates of t-AML/MDS (5.1%) and Richter’s transformation (RT) (9%) were high while solid tumors were not increased. Overall survival of patients with second cancers after frontline FCR was shorter (median of 4.5 years) compared to patients with and without prior cancers. Second cancer risk after frontline FCR is mainly due to high rates of t-AML/MDS and RT and as speculated the survival of affected patients is shorter. PMID:25308294

  18. Follow-up care for breast cancer survivors: improving patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chopra I

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ishveen Chopra,1 Avijeet Chopra2 1Department of Pharmacy Administration, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 2Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA Background: Appropriate follow-up care is important for improving health outcomes in breast cancer survivors (BCSs and requires determination of the optimum intensity of clinical examination and surveillance, assessment of models of follow-up care such as primary care-based follow-up, an understanding of the goals of follow-up care, and unique psychosocial aspects of care for these patients. The objective of this systematic review was to identify studies focusing on follow-up care in BCSs from the patient's and physician's perspective or from patterns of care and to integrate primary empirical evidence on the different aspects of follow-up care from these studies. Methods: A comprehensive literature review and evaluation was conducted for all relevant publications in English from January 1, 1990 to December 31, 2013 using electronic databases. Studies were included in the final review if they focused on BCS’s preferences and perceptions, physician's perceptions, patterns of care, and effectiveness of follow-up care. Results: A total of 47 studies assessing the different aspects of follow-up care were included in the review, with a majority of studies (n=13 evaluating the pattern of follow-up care in BCSs, followed by studies focusing on BCS's perceptions (n=9 and preferences (n=9. Most of the studies reported variations in recommended frequency, duration, and intensity of follow-up care as well as frequency of mammogram screening. In addition, variations were noted in patient preferences for type of health care provider (specialist versus non-specialist. Further, BCSs perceived a lack of psychosocial support and information for management of side effects. Conclusion: The studies reviewed, conducted in a range of settings, reflect variations in

  19. Ex Vivo Apoptosis in CD8+ Lymphocytes Predicts Rectal Cancer Patient Outcome

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    Sebastian Winkler

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Apoptotic rates in peripheral blood lymphocytes can predict radiation induced normal tissue toxicity. We studied whether apoptosis in lymphocytes has a prognostic value for therapy outcome. Methods. Lymphocytes of 87 rectal cancer patients were ex vivo irradiated with 2 Gy, 8 Gy, or a combination of 2 Gy ionizing radiation and Oxaliplatin. Cells were stained with Annexin V and 7-Aminoactinomycin D and apoptotic and necrotic rates were analyzed by multicolor flow cytometry. Results. After treatment, apoptotic and necrotic rates in CD8+ cells are consistently higher than in CD4+ cells, with lower corresponding necrotic rates. Apoptotic and necrotic rates of CD4+ cells and CD8+ cells correlated well within the 2 Gy, 8 Gy, and 2 Gy and Oxaliplatin arrangements (p≤0.009. High apoptotic CD8+ rates after 2 Gy, 8 Gy, and 2 Gy + Oxaliplatin treatment were prognostically favorable for metastasis-free survival (p=0.009, p=0.038, and p=0.009 and disease-free survival (p=0.013, p=0.098, and p=0.013. Conclusions. Ex vivo CD8+ apoptotic rates are able to predict the patient outcome in regard to metastasis-free or disease-free survival. Patients with higher CD8+ apoptotic rates in the peripheral blood have a more favorable prognosis. In addition to the prediction of late-toxicity by utilization of CD4+ apoptotic rates, the therapy outcome can be predicted by CD8+ apoptotic rates.

  20. Oral cancer development in patients with leukoplakia--clinicopathological factors affecting outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oral leukoplakia (OL is the best-known potentially malignant disorder. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the clinicopathological factors predictive of outcome in a large cohort of patients with OL, and report our experience in the early detection of malignant events. METHODS: A total of 320 patients with biopsy-proven OL were retrospectively reviewed from the study institution who had a mean follow-up of 5.1 years. Data on patient and lesion at initial diagnosis and patient underwent sequential biopsies were reviewed. Multiple biopsies indicates > = 3 times sequential biopsies. Oral cancer-free survival rate (OCFS was determined by the Kaplan-Meier method and significant factors were identified by Cox regression analysis. RESULTS: The 3-year and 5-year OCFS was 86.6% and 82.0%, respectively. A new binary system of grading oral dysplasia was performed and Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that high-grade dysplasia had significantly higher malignant incidence than low-grade dysplasia (5-year OCFS, 90.5% vs 59.0%; P60 years, lesion located at lateral/ventral tongue, non-homogenous lesion, high-grade dysplasia were independent significant indicators for OL malignant transformation. In addition, significant positive correlation between the multiple biopsies and these 4 factors and malignant outcome was established. CONCLUSIONS: Elderly patients with OL located at lateral/ventral tongue and who had non-homogenous lesion with high-grade dysplasia correlated much higher risk of transformation. This high-risk subpopulation was suggested to undergo sequential biopsies and histologic examination contributing to early detection of malignant event.

  1. Oral Cancer Development in Patients with Leukoplakia – Clinicopathological Factors Affecting Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lan; Feng, Jin-Qiu; Yang, Xi; Li, Jiang; Zhou, Zeng-Tong; Zhang, Chen-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Background Oral leukoplakia (OL) is the best-known potentially malignant disorder. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the clinicopathological factors predictive of outcome in a large cohort of patients with OL, and report our experience in the early detection of malignant events. Methods A total of 320 patients with biopsy-proven OL were retrospectively reviewed from the study institution who had a mean follow-up of 5.1 years. Data on patient and lesion at initial diagnosis and patient underwent sequential biopsies were reviewed. Multiple biopsies indicates > = 3 times sequential biopsies. Oral cancer-free survival rate (OCFS) was determined by the Kaplan-Meier method and significant factors were identified by Cox regression analysis. Results The 3-year and 5-year OCFS was 86.6% and 82.0%, respectively. A new binary system of grading oral dysplasia was performed and Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that high-grade dysplasia had significantly higher malignant incidence than low-grade dysplasia (5-year OCFS, 90.5% vs 59.0%; P60 years, lesion located at lateral/ventral tongue, non-homogenous lesion, high-grade dysplasia were independent significant indicators for OL malignant transformation. In addition, significant positive correlation between the multiple biopsies and these 4 factors and malignant outcome was established. Conclusions Elderly patients with OL located at lateral/ventral tongue and who had non-homogenous lesion with high-grade dysplasia correlated much higher risk of transformation. This high-risk subpopulation was suggested to undergo sequential biopsies and histologic examination contributing to early detection of malignant event. PMID:22514665

  2. Impact of Surgeon Volume on Outcomes of Older Stage I Lung Cancer Patients Treated via Video-assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cardinale B; Wolf, Andrea; Mhango, Grace; Wisnivesky, Juan P

    2017-01-01

    Surgeon procedure volume influences outcomes of patients undergoing cancer operations. Limited data are available, however, on the volume-outcome relationship for video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study, we used population-based data to evaluate the extent to which surgeon volume is associated with postoperative and long-term oncological outcomes following VATS resection for older patients with early-stage NSCLC. Stage I NSCLC patients >65 years treated with VATS wedge, segmentectomy, or lobectomy between 2000 and 2010 were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry linked to Medicare. Surgeon volume was grouped into tertiles (low, intermediate, and high). Outcomes included perioperative complications, intensive care unit admission, extended length of stay, perioperative (30-day) mortality, and long-term overall and lung cancer-specific survival. We used propensity score methods to compare adjusted survival of patients by surgical volume group. A total of 2295 study patients were identified. Patients treated by high-volume surgeons had decreased intensive care unit admissions (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.46, 95% CI: 0.41-0.51) and postoperative length of stay (HR: 0.75, 95% CI: 0.61-0.92). Adjusted analyses showed that overall (HR: 0.73, 95% CI: 0.62-0.87) and lung cancer-specific (HR: 0.76, 95% CI: 0.58-0.99) survival was better for patients treated by high-volume surgeons. Elderly stage I NSCLC patients undergoing VATS by high-volume surgeons have reduced postoperative complications and improved survival. Organization of care favoring referrals of VATS candidates to high-volume providers may help improve the outcomes of patients with early-stage lung cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Feasibility test of a UK-scalable electronic system for regular collection of patient-reported outcome measures and linkage with clinical cancer registry data: The electronic Patient-reported Outcomes from Cancer Survivors (ePOCS system

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    Velikova Galina

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer survivors can face significant physical and psychosocial challenges; there is a need to identify and predict which survivors experience what sorts of difficulties. As highlighted in the UK National Cancer Survivorship Initiative, routine post-diagnostic collection of patient reported outcome measures (PROMs is required; to be most informative, PROMs must be linked and analysed with patients' diagnostic and treatment information. We have designed and built a potentially cost-efficient UK-scalable electronic system for collecting PROMs via the internet, at regular post-diagnostic time-points, for linking these data with patients' clinical data in cancer registries, and for electronically managing the associated patient monitoring and communications; the electronic Patient-reported Outcomes from Cancer Survivors (ePOCS system. This study aims to test the feasibility of the ePOCS system, by running it for 2 years in two Yorkshire NHS Trusts, and using the Northern and Yorkshire Cancer Registry and Information Service. Methods/Design Non-metastatic breast, colorectal and prostate cancer patients (largest survivor groups, within 6 months post-diagnosis, will be recruited from hospitals in the Yorkshire Cancer Network. Participants will be asked to complete PROMS, assessing a range of health-related quality-of-life outcomes, at three time-points up to 15 months post-diagnosis, and subsequently to provide opinion on the ePOCS system via a feedback questionnaire. Feasibility will be examined primarily in terms of patient recruitment and retention rates, the representativeness of participating patients, the quantity and quality of collected PROMs data, patients' feedback, the success and reliability of the underpinning informatics, and the system running costs. If sufficient data are generated during system testing, these will be analysed to assess the health-related quality-of-life outcomes reported by patients, and to explore

  4. CO-EXISTING PROSTATE CANCER AND DIABETES MELLITUS: IMPLICATIONS FOR PATIENT OUTCOMES AND CARE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlin, Nina J; Amin, Shailja B; Verona, Patricia M; Kosiorek, Heidi E; Cook, Curtiss B

    2017-07-01

    To investigate how diabetes mellitus (DM) impacts short-term overall survival (OS) for patients with prostate cancer and to examine how prostate cancer impacts glycemic control in DM. Patients with DM and prostate cancer newly diagnosed from 2007 to 2014 were identified from the institutional cancer registry and matched to patients with prostate cancer but no DM according to age and year of prostate cancer diagnosis. The study included 276 cases and 276 controls; the mean age was 72 years, most (93%) were white, the most common Gleason score (52%) was 7, and the majority (56%) were tumor stage II. Patients with DM had a higher mean body mass index (P = .03). Alcohol use and performance status differed by group (Pdiabetes mellitus; HbA1c = hemoglobin A1c; OS = overall survival.

  5. The treatment outcomes and the use of adjuvant therapies in breast cancer patients with severe co-morbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jaihong; Lee, Han-Byoel; Lee, Eun-Shin; Kang, Young Joon; Kim, Yumi; Choi, Jihye; Rhu, Jiyoung; Shin, Hee-Chul; Han, Wonshik; Noh, Dong-Young; Moon, Hyeong-Gon

    2017-01-01

    Studies have suggested a potential role of patient's co-morbidity in determining the survival outcomes of breast cancer. In this study, we examined the long-term oncologic outcomes in breast cancer patients who underwent curative surgery according to their pre-existing comorbid conditions and analyzed the association between the co-morbidity and the use of adjuvant therapies. The medical records of 2,501 patients who underwent surgery for primary breast cancer from June 2006 to June 2010 were reviewed retrospectively. The patients were classified into three groups according to preoperative ASA status determined by the anesthesiologists. Clinico-pathologic characteristics and survival outcomes of the patients were compared among the different co-morbidity groups. There were 1,792 (71.6%), 665 (26.6%), and 44 (1.8%) patients in ASA I, II, and III, respectively. Total 95 (3.8%) deaths and 269 (10.8%) recurrences (loco-regional and distant) occurred during the median follow-up period of 71 months. Patients with high comorbidity showed significantly higher rate of deaths (51 (2.8%), 38 (5.7%) and 6 (13.6%) deaths in ASA I, II and III group, respectively, pco-morbidity group received adjuvant therapies (77 (4.3%), 44 (6.6%) and 8 (18.2%) in ASA I, II, and III, respectively, pco-morbidity conditions. In this study, high comorbidity was related to increased risk of death and recurrence in breast cancer. The increased risk of recurrence in high co-morbidity group was mostly seen in patients who did not receive adjuvant therapies. Considering the relatively low rates of serious adverse effects in high co-morbidity patients who received adjuvant therapies, active use of adjuvant therapies in selected patients may improve survival outcomes in breast cancer patients with severe co-morbidities.

  6. Music interventions for improving psychological and physical outcomes in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, Joke; Dileo, Cheryl; Magill, Lucanne; Teague, Aaron

    2016-08-15

    Having cancer may result in extensive emotional, physical and social suffering. Music interventions have been used to alleviate symptoms and treatment side effects in cancer patients. To assess and compare the effects of music therapy and music medicine interventions for psychological and physical outcomes in people with cancer. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2016, Issue 1), MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, LILACS, Science Citation Index, CancerLit, CAIRSS, Proquest Digital Dissertations, ClinicalTrials.gov, Current Controlled Trials, the RILM Abstracts of Music Literature, http://www.wfmt.info/Musictherapyworld/ and the National Research Register. We searched all databases, except for the last two, from their inception to January 2016; the other two are no longer functional, so we searched them until their termination date. We handsearched music therapy journals, reviewed reference lists and contacted experts. There was no language restriction. We included all randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials of music interventions for improving psychological and physical outcomes in adult and pediatric patients with cancer. We excluded participants undergoing biopsy and aspiration for diagnostic purposes. Two review authors independently extracted the data and assessed the risk of bias. Where possible, we presented results in meta-analyses using mean differences and standardized mean differences. We used post-test scores. In cases of significant baseline difference, we used change scores. We identified 22 new trials for inclusion in this update. In total, the evidence of this review rests on 52 trials with a total of 3731 participants. We included music therapy interventions offered by trained music therapists, as well as music medicine interventions, which are defined as listening to pre-recorded music, offered by medical staff. We categorized 23 trials as music therapy trials and 29 as music medicine trials

  7. Clinical Outcome among Nasopharyngeal Cancer Patients in a Multi-Ethnic Society in Singapore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Wen Mak

    Full Text Available Nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC is endemic among Chinese populations in Southeast Asia. However, the outcomes of non-Chinese NPC patients in Singapore are not well reported.To determine if non-Chinese NPC patients have a different prognosis and examine the clinical outcomes of NPC patients in a multi-ethnic society.Retrospective chart review of 558 NPC patients treated at a single academic tertiary hospital from 2002 to 2012. Survival and recurrence rates were analysed and predictive factors identified using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression model.Our cohort comprised 409 males (73.3% and 149 females (26.7% with a median age of 52 years. There were 476 Chinese (85.3%, 57 Malays (10.2%, and 25 of other ethnic groups (4.5%. Non-Chinese patients were more likely to be associated with advanced nodal disease at initial presentation (p = 0.049, compared with the Chinese. However, there were no statistical differences in their overall survival (OS or disease specific survival (DSS (p = 0.934 and p = 0.857 respectively. The 3-year and 5-year cohort OS and DSS rates were 79.3%, 70.7%, and 83.2%, 77.4% respectively. Advanced age (p<0.001, N2 disease (p = 0.036, N3 disease (p<0.001, and metastatic disease (p<0.001 at presentation were independently associated with poor overall survival. N2 disease (p = 0.032, N3 disease (p<0.001 and metastatic disease (p<0.001 were also independently associated with poor DSS. No predictive factors were associated with loco-regional recurrence after definitive treatment. Advanced age (p = 0.044, N2 disease (p = 0.033 and N3 disease (p<0.001 were independently associated with distant relapse.In a multi-ethnic society in Singapore, non-Chinese are more likely to present with advanced nodal disease. This however did not translate into poorer survival outcomes. Older patients with N2 or N3 disease are associated with a higher risk of distant relapse and poor overall survival.

  8. The impact of mindfulness-based interventions on symptom burden, positive psychological outcomes, and biomarkers in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouleau, Codie R; Garland, Sheila N; Carlson, Linda E

    2015-01-01

    Research on the use of mindfulness-based stress reduction and related mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) in cancer care has proliferated over the past decade. MBIs have aimed to facilitate physical and emotional adjustment to life with cancer through the cultivation and practice of mindfulness (ie, purposeful, nonjudgmental, moment-to-moment awareness). This descriptive review highlights three categories of outcomes that have been evaluated in MBI research with cancer patients - namely, symptom reduction, positive psychological growth, and biological outcomes. We also examine the clinical relevance of each targeted outcome, while describing recently published original studies to highlight novel applications of MBIs tailored to individuals with cancer. Accumulating evidence suggests that participation in a MBI contributes to reductions in psychological distress, sleep disturbance, and fatigue, and promotes personal growth in areas such as quality of life and spirituality. MBIs may also influence markers of immune function, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis regulation, and autonomic nervous system activity, though it remains unclear whether these biological changes translate to clinically important health benefits. We conclude by discussing methodological limitations of the extant literature, and implications of matching MBIs to the needs and preferences of cancer patients. Overall, the growing popularity of MBIs in cancer care must be balanced against scientific evidence for their impact on specific clinical outcomes.

  9. Electronic cigarette use among cancer patients: Characteristics of e-cigarette users and their smoking cessation outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borderud, Sarah P.; Li, Yuelin; Burkhalter, Jack; Sheffer, Christine E.; Ostroff, Jamie S.

    2017-01-01

    Background Given that continued smoking after a cancer diagnosis increases the risk for adverse health outcomes, cancer patients are strongly advised to quit. Despite a current lack of evidence regarding their safety and effectiveness as a cessation tool, electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are becoming increasingly popular. In order to guide oncologists’ communication with their patients about e-cigarette use, this paper provides the first published clinical data about e-cigarette use and cessation outcomes among cancer patients. Methods Participants (n=1074) included smokers (cancer patients) who recently enrolled in a tobacco treatment program at a comprehensive cancer center. Standard demographic, tobacco use history and follow-up cessation outcomes were assessed. Results A threefold increase in e-cigarette use was observed from 2012 to 2013 (10.6% vs. 38.5%). E-cigarette users were more nicotine dependent than non-users, had more prior quit attempts, and were more likely to be diagnosed with thoracic and head or neck cancers. Using a complete case analysis, e-cigarette users were as likely to be smoking at follow-up as non-users, (OR: 1.0; 95%CI 0.5–1.7). Using an intention to treat analysis, e-cigarette users were twice as likely to be smoking at follow-up as non-users, (OR: 2.0; 95%CI 1.2–3.3). Conclusions The high rate of e-cigarette use observed is consistent with recent papers highlighting increased e-cigarette use in the general population. Our longitudinal findings raise doubt about the utility of e-cigarettes for facilitating smoking cessation among cancer patients. Further research is needed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of e-cigarettes as a cessation treatment for cancer patients. PMID:25252116

  10. A Review of Psychoeducational Interventions to Improve Sexual Functioning, Quality of Life, and Psychological Outcomes in Gynecological Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Ka Ming; Chan, Joanne C Y; Choi, Kai K C; Chan, Carmen W H

    2016-01-01

    Psychoeducational interventions are recommended for use with clinical gynecological cancer patients to improve their patient care outcomes. However, the evidence of their effectiveness is far from conclusive. The objective of this study was to identify the best available research evidence related to the effects of psychoeducational interventions on sexual functioning, quality of life, and psychological outcomes in gynecological cancer patients. A systematic search was conducted to identify English and Chinese articles from the inception of the databases to April 2012 and included 13 English databases and 7 Chinese databases. Gray literature or unpublished studies were also searched. A total of 11 studies involving 975 gynecological cancer patients were included in the review. Meta-analysis results for 4 comparable studies indicated that psychoeducational interventions were effective in treating depressive symptoms among gynecological cancer patients (standardized mean difference = -0.80; 95% confidence interval, -1.05 to -0.54), whereas information provision significantly improved the mental aspect of quality of life (standardized mean difference = -0.41; 95% confidence interval, -0.74 to -0.08). With regard to sexual functioning, psychoeducational interventions appeared to have benefits in improving the sexual life of patients. Findings confirm the effectiveness of psychoeducational interventions on depressive symptoms and mental aspect of the quality of life in gynecological cancer patients. The authors discuss the implications of review findings for the effective design of psychoeducational interventions including components, provider, provision time frame, and duration for clinical practice, as well as psychoeducational intervention research.

  11. Clinical and quality of life outcomes following anatomical lung resection for lung cancer in high-risk patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Henrietta; Gammon, David; Routledge, Tom; Harrison-Phipps, Karen

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Surgery remains the gold standard for patients with resectable nonsmall cell lung cancer. Current guidance identifies patients with poor pulmonary reserve to fall within a high-risk cohort. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical and quality of life outcomes of anatomical lung resection in patients deemed high risk based on pulmonary function measurements. METHODS: A retrospective review of patients undergoing anatomical lung resection for nonsmall cell lung cancer between January 2013 and January 2015 was performed. All patients with limited pulmonary reserve defined as predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 s or transfer factor of the lung for carbon monoxide of <40% were included in the study. Postoperative complications, admission to the Intensive Care Unit, length of stay, and 30-day in-hospital mortality were recorded. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality of life questionnaire lung cancer 13 questionnaire was used to assess quality of life outcomes. RESULTS: Fifty-three patients met the inclusion criteria. There was no in-hospital mortality, and 30-day mortality was 1.8%. No complications were seen in 64% (n = 34), minor complications occurred in 26% (n = 14), while 9% had a major complication (n = 5). Quality of life outcomes were above the reference results for patients with early stage lung cancer. CONCLUSION: Anatomical lung resection can be performed safely in selected high-risk patients based on pulmonary function without significant increase in morbidity or mortality and with acceptable quality of life outcomes. Given that complications following lung resection are multifactorial, fitness for surgery should be thoroughly assessed in all patients with resectable disease within a multidisciplinary setting. High operative risk by pulmonary function tests alone should not preclude surgical resection. PMID:28469717

  12. Body Mass Index and Total Psoas Area Affect Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Pneumonectomy for Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervochon, Remi; Bobbio, Antonio; Guinet, Claude; Mansuet-Lupo, Audrey; Rabbat, Antoine; Régnard, Jean-François; Roche, Nicolas; Damotte, Diane; Iannelli, Antonio; Alifano, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Hypothesizing that morphometric measurements are reliable markers of fitness in patients with lung cancer requiring aggressive surgical intervention, the purpose of this study was to assess their impact on postoperative outcome and long-term survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) requiring pneumonectomy. Height, weight, and body mass index (BMI), as well as usual clinical, laboratory (including C-reactive protein [CRP] concentrations), and pathologic data were retrospectively retrieved from files of 161 consecutive patients treated by pneumonectomy for NSCLC, whose preoperative computed tomographic (CT) scans were available in the Picture Archive and Communication System (PACS) of the hospital. Cross-sectional areas of right and left psoas areas (measured by CT scan at the L3 level), perirenal fat thickness, and anterior subcutaneous tissue thickness at the left renal vein level were also assessed. BMI and total psoas area were strongly and directly correlated (p = 0.0000001), whereas BMI was inversely related to CRP levels. Sarcopenia (total psoas area ≤33rd percentile) was associated with high CRP levels (>20 mg/L) (p = 0.010). Factors associated with 90-day mortality included older age (p = 0.000045), lower body weight (p = 0.032), and BMI less than or equal to 25 kg/m 2 (p = 0.013). At univariate analysis, long-term outcome was negatively affected by a nonsquamous cell histologic type (p = 0.011), pathologic stage IIIB-IV (p =0.026), CRP levels greater than 20 mg/L (p = 0.017), BMI less than or equal to 25 kg/m 2 (p = 0.010), and total psoas area less than or equal to the 33rd percentile (p = 0.029). Multivariate analysis showed the independent prognostic value of both BMI and total psoas area. BMI less than or equal to 25 kg/m 2 and total psoas cross-sectional area less than or equal to the 33rd percentile are prognostic determinants in patients with NSCLC requiring pneumonectomy. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic

  13. The role of surgery for pancreatic cancer: a 12-year review of patient outcome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Badger, S A

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Pancreatic cancer has a poor prognosis with <5% alive at 5 years, despite active surgical treatment. The study aim was to review patients undergoing pancreatic resection and assess the effect of clinical and pathological parameters on survival. PATIENTS AND METHODS: All patients who had undergone radical pancreatic surgery, January 1996 to December 2008, were identified from the unit database. Additional information was retrieved from the patient records. The demographic, clinical, and pathological records were recorded using Microsoft Excel. Survival was assessed using Kaplan-Meier and predictors of survival determined by multinominal logistic regression and log rank test. RESULTS: 126 patients were identified from the database. The majority (106) had a Whipple\\'s procedure, 14 had a distal pancreatectomy and 6 had local periampullary excision. The average age of the Whipple\\'s group of patients was 61.7 years (+\\/- 11.7) with most procedures performed for malignancy (n=100). Survival was worse with adenocarcinoma compared to all other pathologies (p=0.013), while periampullary tumours had a better prognosis compared to other locations (p=0.019). Survival decreased with poorer differentiation (p=0.001), increasing pT (p<0.001) and pN stage (p<0.001). Survival was worse with perineural (p=0.04) or lymphovascular invasion (p=0.05). A microscopic postive resection margin (R1) was associated with a worse survival (p=0.007). Tumour differentiation (p=0.001) and positive nodal status (p<0.001) were found to be independent predictors of mortality. CONCLUSION: Tumour differentiation and nodal status are important predictors of outcome. A positive resection margin is associated with a poorer survival.

  14. Long-term Survival Outcomes by Smoking Status in Surgical and Nonsurgical Patients With Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meguid, Robert A.; Hooker, Craig M.; Harris, James; Xu, Li; Westra, William H.; Sherwood, J. Timothy; Sussman, Marc; Cattaneo, Stephen M.; Shin, James; Cox, Solange; Christensen, Joani; Prints, Yelena; Yuan, Nance; Zhang, Jennifer; Yang, Stephen C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Survival outcomes of never smokers with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who undergo surgery are poorly characterized. This investigation compared surgical outcomes of never and current smokers with NSCLC. Methods: This investigation was a single-institution retrospective study of never and current smokers with NSCLC from 1975 to 2004. From an analytic cohort of 4,546 patients with NSCLC, we identified 724 never smokers and 3,822 current smokers. Overall, 1,142 patients underwent surgery with curative intent. For survival analysis by smoking status, hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard modeling and then further adjusted by other covariates. Results: Never smokers were significantly more likely than current smokers to be women (P cancer diagnosis has little impact on the long-term survival of patients with NSCLC, especially after curative surgery. Despite different etiologies between lung cancer in never and current smokers the prognosis is equally dismal. PMID:20507946

  15. The impact of mindfulness-based interventions on symptom burden, positive psychological outcomes, and biomarkers in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouleau CR

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Codie R Rouleau,1 Sheila N Garland,2 Linda E Carlson3 1Department of Psychology, Faculty of Arts, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 2Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 3Department of Oncology, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada Abstract: Research on the use of mindfulness-based stress reduction and related mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs in cancer care has proliferated over the past decade. MBIs have aimed to facilitate physical and emotional adjustment to life with cancer through the cultivation and practice of mindfulness (ie, purposeful, nonjudgmental, moment-to-moment awareness. This descriptive review highlights three categories of outcomes that have been evaluated in MBI research with cancer patients – namely, symptom reduction, positive psychological growth, and biological outcomes. We also examine the clinical relevance of each targeted outcome, while describing recently published original studies to highlight novel applications of MBIs tailored to individuals with cancer. Accumulating evidence suggests that participation in a MBI contributes to reductions in psychological distress, sleep disturbance, and fatigue, and promotes personal growth in areas such as quality of life and spirituality. MBIs may also influence markers of immune function, hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis regulation, and autonomic nervous system activity, though it remains unclear whether these biological changes translate to clinically important health benefits. We conclude by discussing methodological limitations of the extant literature, and implications of matching MBIs to the needs and preferences of cancer patients. Overall, the growing popularity of MBIs in cancer care must be balanced against scientific evidence for their impact on specific clinical outcomes. Keywords: mindfulness-based intervention

  16. Dance/movement therapy for improving psychological and physical outcomes in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, Joke; Shim, Minjung; Goodill, Sherry W

    2015-01-07

    Current cancer care increasingly incorporates psychosocial interventions. Cancer patients use dance/movement therapy to learn to accept and reconnect with their bodies, build new self-confidence, enhance self-expression, address feelings of isolation, depression, anger and fear and to strengthen personal resources. To update the previously published review that examined the effects of dance/movement therapy and standard care versus standard care alone or standard care and other interventions on psychological and physical outcomes in patients with cancer. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 6), MEDLINE (OvidSP, 1950 to June week 4, 2014), EMBASE (OvidSP, 1980 to 2014 week 26), CINAHL (EBSCOhost, 1982 to July 15 2014), PsycINFO (EBSCOhost, 1806 to July 15 2014), LILACS (Virual Health Library, 1982 to July 15 2014), Science Citation Index (ISI, 1974 to July 15 2014), CancerLit (1983 to 2003), International Bibliography of Theatre and Dance (1989 to July 15 2014), the National Research Register (2000 to September 2007), Proquest Digital Dissertations, ClinicalTrials.gov, and Current Controlled Trials (all to July 15 2014). We handsearched dance/movement therapy and related topics journals, reviewed reference lists and contacted experts. There was no language restriction. We included all randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials of dance/movement therapy interventions for improving psychological and physical outcomes in patients with cancer. We considered studies only if dance/movement therapy was provided by a formally trained dance/movement therapist or by trainees in a formal dance/movement therapy program. Two review authors independently extracted the data and assessed the methodological quality, seeking additional information from the trial researchers when necessary. Results were presented using standardized mean differences. We identified one new trial for inclusion in this update. In

  17. Implant-prosthetic rehabilitation after radiation treatment in head and neck cancer patients: a case-series report of outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotic Jasna

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Slovenia has a high burden of head and neck cancer. Patients are mostly treated with surgery followed by radiation therapy. Advanced surgical and prosthodontic techniques have expanded the rehabilitation options. The aim of the study was to review the outcome of implant-prosthetic treatment after radiation therapy.

  18. CA125-related measures of tumor kinetics and outcome of patients with recurrent ovarian cancer receiving chemotherapy: a retrospective evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colloca, Giuseppe; Venturino, Antonella; Addamo, Gianfranco; Coccorullo, Zaira; Ratti, Riccardo; Caltabiano, Graziano; Guarneri, Domenico

    2013-12-01

    Defining the reliability of cancer antigen-125-related kinetics criteria versus Gynecologic Cancer Inter Group criteria in predicting the tumor outcome after chemotherapy in patients with recurrent ovarian cancer. A retrospective monoinstitutional assessment of CA125-related versus Gynecologic Cancer Inter Group-related parameters was performed after cytotoxic chemotherapy in patients with metastatic ovarian cancer treated from 2006 to 2011. A correlation analysis between the response and progression measurements has been performed, and the outcome has been reported. Among 42 eligible patients, tumor response and progression calculated by CA125 kinetics, with tumor response at 8 weeks and specific growth rate at progression, exhibited a significant correlation with progression-free and overall survival, similar to tumor response and progression by Gynecologic Cancer Inter Group criteria. The tumor response at 8 weeks higher than 1.77 appears to be a good surrogate of clinical response, whereas the definition of progression when CA125 increases above a value double than the nadir suggests a similar performance of growth rate at progression versus Gynecologic Cancer Inter Group criteria and warrants further investigation.

  19. Surgical Treatment and Outcome of Patients with De Novo Lung Cancer After Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Fumihiro; Toyokawa, Gouji; Harada, Noboru; Itoh, Shinji; Harimoto, Norifumi; Ikegami, Toru; Okamoto, Tatsuro; Soejima, Yuji; Yoshizumi, Tomoharu; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2017-05-01

    De novo malignancy, including primary lung cancer, is one of the limitations to long-term survival after liver transplantation. The purpose of this study was to describe patients who developed de novo lung cancer after living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT) and investigate their clinicopathological features as well as the feasibility of surgical resection. We investigated 554 patients who underwent LDLT. De novo lung cancer after LDLT was observed in five (0.9%) out of 554 studied patients: four men and one woman, aged 61-78 years (mean=67 years). All four men had a smoking history. Clinical stages of de novo lung cancer were stage IA in three patients, and stage IB and IV in one patient each. Three out of five patients underwent pulmonary lobectomy and pathological stage was IA in two patients and IIA in one. All patients who underwent surgery stopped immunosuppressive therapy 1 day preoperatively and restarted on postoperative day 1. There were no serious postoperative complications. All three patients are still alive without any recurrence, with survival ranging from 8 to 29 months, with an average of 16.3 months after diagnosis of lung cancer. Although the study population was small, these results suggest that pulmonary lobectomy of de novo lung cancer after LDLT, even under immunosuppressive conditions, is a feasible procedure and may yield a survival benefit. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  20. Short-term outcome of total laparoscopic distal gastrectomy for overweight and obese patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Motokazu; Kinoshita, Takahiro; Shibasaki, Hidehito; Kato, Yuichiro; Gotohda, Naoto; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Konishi, Masaru

    2013-11-01

    Laparoscopic distal gastrectomy for gastric cancer has been firmly established in recent decades but still is a difficult procedure, especially for obese patients, as with open surgery. This study aimed to evaluate the perioperative outcome of total laparoscopic distal gastrectomy (TLDG) for early gastric cancer patients with a body mass index (BMI) exceeding 25 kg/m(2) and to consider countermeasures to this. Perioperative outcomes were compared between 42 patients with a BMI exceeding 25 kg/m(2) [overweight or obese group (OWG)] and 174 patients with a BMI lower than 25 kg/m(2) [normal or underweight group (NWG)] who underwent TLDG between September 2010 and December 2012. The BMI was 26.0 ± 1.4 kg/m(2) in the OWG group and 22.0 ± 2.1 kg/m(2) in the NWG group (P obese patients, TLDG was managed safely. The procedure was considered to be difficult but sufficiently feasible.

  1. Outcomes of Robotic Radical Prostatectomy in High-risk Prostate Cancer Patients: Experience in 60 Patients with Oncological and Functional Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Erdem Canda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In this retrospective study, we report outcomes of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RARP in high-risk prostate cancer (HRPC, classified according to the D’Amico risk criteria and with a minimum follow-up of 1 year. Methods: A total of 60 patients who had at least one preoperative HRPC feature and underwent RARP were included. Mean patient age and preoperative serum prostate-specific antigen level were 66.4±7.5 years and 13.4±11.0 ng/ml, respectively. Preoperatively, 3 (5.0%, 4 (6.7%, 17 (28.3%, 3 (5.0%, and 33 (55.0% patients had prostate biopsy-proven Gleason scores of 5+4, 4+5, 4+4, 3+5, and 2 pads/day. Of the 27 patients with no preoperative erectile dysfunction (ED, 17 (63.0% had no ED at a mean follow-up of 1 year. Trifecta and pentafecta rates were 43.2% and 28.7%, respectively. Conclusion: Based on our experience, RARP in HRPC is a relatively safe procedure with satisfactory oncological and functional outcomes.

  2. Deletion of Chromosome 4q Predicts Outcome in Stage II Colon Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. M. Brosens

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Around 30% of all stage II colon cancer patients will relapse and die of their disease. At present no objective parameters to identify high-risk stage II colon cancer patients, who will benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy, have been established. With traditional histopathological features definition of high-risk stage II colon cancer patients is inaccurate. Therefore more objective and robust markers for prediction of relapse are needed. DNA copy number aberrations have proven to be robust prognostic markers, but have not yet been investigated for this specific group of patients. The aim of the present study was to identify chromosomal aberrations that can predict relapse of tumor in patients with stage II colon cancer.

  3. Bloodstream infections in patients with solid tumors: epidemiology, antibiotic therapy, and outcomes in 528 episodes in a single cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Mar; Gudiol, Carlota; Garcia-Vidal, Carol; Ardanuy, Carmen; Carratalà, Jordi

    2014-05-01

    Current information regarding bloodstream infection (BSI) in patients with solid tumors is scarce. We assessed the epidemiology, antibiotic therapy, and outcomes of BSI in these patients. We also compared patients who died with those who survived to identify risk factors associated with mortality. From January 2006 to July 2012 all episodes of BSI in patients with solid tumors at a cancer center were prospectively recorded and analyzed. A total of 528 episodes of BSI were documented in 489 patients. The most frequent neoplasms were hepatobiliary tumors (19%), followed by lung cancer (18%) and lower gastrointestinal malignancies (16%). Many patients had received corticosteroid therapy (41%), and 15% had neutropenia (AmpC-producing Enterobacteriaceae (n = 13). The majority of patients with BSI caused by MDR organisms had received antibiotics (70%), and they had been previously hospitalized (61.4%) more frequently than patients with BSI caused by susceptible strains. Inadequate empirical antibiotic therapy was given to 23% of patients, with a higher proportion in those with BSI due to a MDR strain (69%). Early (cancer (OR, 35.39; 95% CI, 2.48-504.91), shock at presentation (OR, 25.84; 95% CI, 3.73-179.0), and corticosteroid therapy (OR, 6.98; 95% CI, 1.61-30.21).BSI in patients with solid tumors occurred mainly among those with hepatobiliary cancer, and cholangitis was the most frequent source; gram-negative bacilli were the most frequent causative agents. MDR organisms were relatively common, particularly in patients who had previously received antibiotics and had been hospitalized; these patients were frequently treated with inadequate empirical antibiotic therapy and had a poorer outcome. The case-fatality rate of patients with solid tumors and BSI was high and was associated with chronic advanced cancer, corticosteroid therapy, and shock at presentation.

  4. Impact of a Fast-track Esophagectomy Protocol on Esophageal Cancer Patient Outcomes and Hospital Charges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shewale, Jitesh B; Correa, Arlene M; Baker, Carla M

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of a fast-track esophagectomy protocol (FTEP) on esophageal cancer patients' safety, length of hospital stay (LOS), and hospital charges. BACKGROUND: FTEP involved transferring patients to the telemetry unit instead of the surgical intensive care unit (SICU) after...... esophagectomy. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 708 consecutive patients who underwent esophagectomy for primary esophageal cancer during the 4 years before (group A; 322 patients) or 4 years after (group B; 386 patients) the institution of an FTEP. Postoperative morbidity and mortality, LOS, and hospital...

  5. Depression and Oropharynx Cancer Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn, Eileen H; Valentine, Alan; Jethanandani, Amit; Basen-Engquist, Karen; Fellman, Bryan; Urbauer, Diana; Atkinson, Emma; Yusuf, Syed Wamique; Lenihan, Daniel; Woods, Myrshia L; Kies, Merrill S; Sood, Anil K; Carmack, Cindy; Morrison, William H; Gillenwater, Ann; Sturgis, Erich M; Garden, Adam S

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown a modest relationship between depression and mortality in patients with cancer. Our study addressed methodological weaknesses in the literature by restricting the sample to patients with one cancer type, adjusting for factors known to affect outcome, and following up patients for a sufficient period. We prospectively followed patients newly diagnosed with squamous cell oropharyngeal cancer from the start of radiation therapy until death or until date of last clinical visit. All patients were optimally treated with radiation and sometimes chemotherapy. After adjusting for tumor stage, treatment, comorbidities, smoking, excessive alcohol use, and demographic factors, we assessed the effects of baseline self-reported depression on overall survival and recurrence. One hundred thirty participants were followed for a median of 5 years. The average age was 56 years, and 83% were male. Eighteen participants died during the study and 15 experienced disease recurrence. Self-reported depression was associated with decreased overall survival duration (hazard ratio = 3.6, 95% confidence interval = 1.2-10.8) and disease recurrence (hazard ratio = 3.8, 95% confidence interval = 1.2-12.2) in multivariate analysis. In addition, smoking was associated with disease recurrence. Patients with oropharyngeal cancer may benefit from depression screening and evidence-based treatments, if appropriate. Future studies are needed to determine whether depression is an independent prognostic factor of outcome and to elucidate biobehavioral mechanisms involved in patients with oropharyngeal cancer.

  6. Influence of yoga on postoperative outcomes and wound healing in early operable breast cancer patients undergoing surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Raghavendra

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Context : Pre- and postoperative distress in breast cancer patients can cause complications and delay recovery from surgery. Objective : The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of yoga intervention on postoperative outcomes and wound healing in early operable breast cancer patients undergoing surgery. Methods : Ninety-eight recently diagnosed stage II and III breast cancer patients were recruited in a randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of a yoga program with supportive therapy and exercise rehabilitation on postoperative outcomes and wound healing following surgery. Subjects were assessed at the baseline prior to surgery and four weeks later. Sociodemographic, clinical and investigative notes were ascertained in the beginning of the study. Blood samples were collected for estimation of plasma cytokines-soluble Interleukin (IL-2 receptor (IL-2R, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha and interferon (IFN-gamma. Postoperative outcomes such as the duration of hospital stay and drain retention, time of suture removal and postoperative complications were ascertained. We used independent samples t test and nonparametric Mann Whitney U tests to compare groups for postoperative outcomes and plasma cytokines. Regression analysis was done to determine predictors for postoperative outcomes. Results : Sixty-nine patients contributed data to the current analysis (yoga: n = 33, control: n = 36. The results suggest a significant decrease in the duration of hospital stay ( P = 0.003, days of drain retention ( P = 0.001 and days for suture removal ( P = 0.03 in the yoga group as compared to the controls. There was also a significant decrease in plasma TNF alpha levels following surgery in the yoga group ( P < 0.001, as compared to the controls. Regression analysis on postoperative outcomes showed that the yoga intervention affected the duration of drain retention and hospital stay as well as TNF alpha levels. Conclusion : The results suggest

  7. Influence of yoga on postoperative outcomes and wound healing in early operable breast cancer patients undergoing surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Raghavendra M; Nagendra, H R; Raghuram, Nagarathna; Vinay, C; Chandrashekara, S; Gopinath, K S; Srinath, B S

    2008-01-01

    Pre- and postoperative distress in breast cancer patients can cause complications and delay recovery from surgery. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of yoga intervention on postoperative outcomes and wound healing in early operable breast cancer patients undergoing surgery. Ninety-eight recently diagnosed stage II and III breast cancer patients were recruited in a randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of a yoga program with supportive therapy and exercise rehabilitation on postoperative outcomes and wound healing following surgery. Subjects were assessed at the baseline prior to surgery and four weeks later. Sociodemographic, clinical and investigative notes were ascertained in the beginning of the study. Blood samples were collected for estimation of plasma cytokines-soluble Interleukin (IL)-2 receptor (IL-2R), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interferon (IFN)-gamma. Postoperative outcomes such as the duration of hospital stay and drain retention, time of suture removal and postoperative complications were ascertained. We used independent samples t test and nonparametric Mann Whitney U tests to compare groups for postoperative outcomes and plasma cytokines. Regression analysis was done to determine predictors for postoperative outcomes. Sixty-nine patients contributed data to the current analysis (yoga: n = 33, control: n = 36). The results suggest a significant decrease in the duration of hospital stay (P = 0.003), days of drain retention (P = 0.001) and days for suture removal (P = 0.03) in the yoga group as compared to the controls. There was also a significant decrease in plasma TNF alpha levels following surgery in the yoga group (P < 0.001), as compared to the controls. Regression analysis on postoperative outcomes showed that the yoga intervention affected the duration of drain retention and hospital stay as well as TNF alpha levels. The results suggest possible benefits of yoga in reducing postoperative complications in

  8. Retrospective study of the effect of disease progression on patient reported outcomes in HER-2 negative metastatic breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Elaine

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This retrospective study evaluated the impact of disease progression and of specific sites of metastasis on patient reported outcomes (PROs that assess symptom burden and health related quality of life (HRQoL in women with metastatic breast cancer (mBC. Methods HER-2 negative mBC patients (n = 102 were enrolled from 7 U.S. community oncology practices. Demographic, disease and treatment characteristics were abstracted from electronic medical records and linked to archived Patient Care Monitor (PCM assessments. The PCM is a self-report measure of symptom burden and HRQoL administered as part of routine care in participating practices. Linear mixed models were used to examine change in PCM scores over time. Results Mean age was 57 years, with 72% of patients Caucasian, and 25% African American. Median time from mBC diagnosis to first disease progression was 8.8 months. Metastasis to bone (60%, lung (28% and liver (26% predominated at initial metastatic diagnosis. Results showed that PCM items assessing fatigue, physical pain and trouble sleeping were sensitive to either general effects of disease progression or to effects associated with specific sites of metastasis. Progression of disease was also associated with modest but significant worsening of General Physical Symptoms, Treatment Side Effects, Acute Distress and Impaired Performance index scores. In addition, there were marked detrimental effects of liver metastasis on Treatment Side Effects, and of brain metastasis on Acute Distress. Conclusions Disease progression has a detrimental impact on cancer-related symptoms. Delaying disease progression may have a positive impact on patients' HRQoL.

  9. Predictive Potential of Preoperative Nutritional Status in Long-Term Outcome Projections for Patients with Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Katsunobu; Ohira, Masaichi; Tamura, Tatsuro; Toyokawa, Takahiro; Amano, Ryosuke; Kubo, Naoshi; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Muguruma, Kazuya; Yashiro, Masakazu; Maeda, Kiyoshi; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2016-02-01

    Preoperative nutritional status not only correlates with the incidence of postoperative complications but also may be indicative of long-term outcomes for patients with cancer. The impact of preoperative nutritional status on outcomes for patients undergoing gastrectomy for gastric cancer (GC) was investigated. The study reviewed 594 patients treated for GC by gastrectomy at the authors' hospital between January, 2004 and December, 2010. Onodera's prognostic nutritional index (PNI) was invoked, using an optimal cut point to group patients as having high (PNI > 45; n = 449) or low (PNI ≤ 45; n = 145) nutritional status. Clinicopathologic features, perioperative results, and long-term outcomes, including cause of death, were compared. Multivariate analysis of 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) indicated that low PNI was independently associated with unfavorable outcomes for patients with GC. In subgroup analysis, the 5-year OS and DSS rates for patients with GC at stages 1 and 2 were significantly worse in the low PNI group than in the high PNI group. Although wound and extrasurgical field infections also tended to be more frequent in the low PNI group, postoperative intraabdominal infections did not differ significantly by group. Preoperative PNI may have merit as a gauge of prognosis for patients with GC at stages 1 and 2, but PNI and postoperative morbidity showed no correlation in this setting.

  10. Patient Reported Outcomes in a New Home-Based Rehabilitation Programme for Prostate Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villumsen, Brigitta R.; Grønbech Jørgensen, Martin; Frystyk, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The most optimal exercise plan for men with prostate cancer (PC) receiving androgen deprivation therapy needs to be identified. We plan to investigate a 12-week home-based health programme (exergaming) on physical function, fatigue and metabolic parameters in this group. In addition, our study...

  11. Prediction of individual patient outcome in cancer: comparison of artificial neural networks and Kaplan--Meier methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostwick, D G; Burke, H B

    2001-04-15

    There is a great need for accurate treatment and outcome prediction in cancer. Two methods for prediction, artificial neural networks and Kaplan--Meier plots, have not, to the authors' knowledge, been compared previously. This review compares the advantages and disadvantages of the use of artificial neural networks and Kaplan--Meier curves for treatment and outcome prediction in cancer. Artificial neural networks are useful for prediction of outcome for individual patients with cancer because they are as accurate as the best traditional statistical methods, are able to capture complex phenomena without a priori knowledge, and can be reduced to a simpler model if the phenomena are not complex. Kaplan--Meier plots are of limited accuracy for prediction because they require partitioning of variables, require cutting continuous variables into discrete pieces, and can only handle one or two variables effectively. Artificial neural networks are an efficient statistical method for outcome prediction in cancer that utilizes all available powerful prognostic factors and maximizes predictive accuracy. Use of Kaplan--Meier plots for predictions is discouraged because of serious technical limitations and low accuracy. Copyright 2001 American Cancer Society.

  12. Nutrition outcomes following implementation of validated swallowing and nutrition guidelines for patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Teresa; Ross, Lynda; Jones, Lee; Hughes, Brett; Banks, Merrilyn

    2014-09-01

    Head and neck cancer patients have a high risk of malnutrition and swallowing dysfunction. This study reports on adherence and nutrition outcomes with the use of local evidence-based guidelines for the nutrition management of patients with head and neck cancer, including placement of proactive gastrostomy tubes for high risk patients. This study is a prospective observational audit in patients treated for head and neck cancer at a tertiary hospital from 2007 to 2008 (n = 539). Nutrition outcomes (weight, nutritional status and type of nutrition support) were compared for each nutrition risk category. Primary outcome was 10 % or more weight loss at 3 months post-treatment (n = 219). Overall adherence to the guideline tube feeding recommendations was 81 %. High risk patients had mean weight loss of 6 % on completion of treatment and 9 % at 3 months post-treatment, despite the majority having a proactive gastrostomy tube. Medium and low risk patients also lost weight over this time. Univariate analysis found that non-adherence to the guidelines was associated with weight loss at 3 months (p = 0.013). Multivariate analysis found overweight patients had 1.82 greater odds, and obese patients had 3.49 greater odds of losing weight (p = 0.021). Patients with significant weight loss at diagnosis had decreased odds of losing weight later (p = 0.011). Clinically significant weight loss was still prevalent in this population despite proactive interventions. Predictors of weight loss support the evidence-based guidelines' risk categories, and adherence was important to improve outcomes. Further research is required to determine the impact of significant weight loss in patients with high body mass index (BMI).

  13. Epoetin alfa improves anemia and anemia-related, patient-reported outcomes in patients with breast cancer receiving myelotoxic chemotherapy: Results of a european, multicenter, randomized, controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Pronzato (Paolo); E. Cortesi (Enrico); C.C.D. van der Rijt (Carin); A. Bols (Alain); J.A. Moreno-Nogueira (José); C.F. de Oliveira; P. Barrett-Lee (Peter); P.J. Ostler (Peter); R. Rosso (Ricardo)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractPurpose. To evaluate the effects of epoetin alfa on patient- reported outcomes (PROs) in patients with breast cancer receiving myelotoxic chemotherapy. Materials and Methods. Women with hemoglobin concentrations ≤12.0 g/dl and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status

  14. Validity of Patient-Reported Swallowing and Speech Outcomes in Relation to Objectively Measured Oral Function Among Patients Treated for Oral or Oropharyngeal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinkel, R. N P M; Verdonck-de Leeuw, I. M.; de Bree, R.; Aaronson, N. K.; Leemans, C. R.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the construct validity of the patient-reported outcomes Swallowing Quality of Life Questionnaire (SWAL-QOL) and Speech Handicap Index (SHI) in relation to objectively measured oral function among patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer. The study

  15. Improved outcomes in patients with head and neck cancer using a standardized care protocol for postoperative alcohol withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansford, Christopher D; Guerriero, Cathleen H; Kocan, Mary J; Turley, Richard; Groves, Michael W; Bahl, Vinita; Abrahamse, Paul; Bradford, Carol R; Chepeha, Douglas B; Moyer, Jeffrey; Prince, Mark E; Wolf, Gregory T; Aebersold, Michelle L; Teknos, Theodoros N

    2008-08-01

    To show clinical benefit in the main outcome measures by the use of a standardized protocol for identification, characterization, and treatment of alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) in postoperative patients with head and neck cancer. Prospective cohort study with a retrospective cohort control. Tertiary care university. A total of 26 consecutive postoperative patients with AWS were selected from among 652 patients with head and neck cancer to be enrolled in the protocol from March 2003 through March 2005. Controls consisted of 14 of 981 consecutive patients with AWS from March 2000 through December 2002. Application of a standardized care protocol. Sensitivity and specificity of preoperative screening for AWS risk, predictability of outcomes, length of stay, transfers to the intensive care unit (ICU), AWS symptoms, postoperative morbidity and mortality, doses of pharmacotherapy required, and charges. Protocol patients demonstrated significantly fewer AWS-related ICU transfers and less delirium and violence than preprotocol patients. Mortality, wound complications, hospital charges, and doses of benzodiazepines, clonidine, and haloperidol were not significantly different between these 2 groups. Preoperative medical history correlated poorly with AWS outcomes. Screening was 87.5% sensitive and 99.7% specific. Late enrollees to the protocol (false-negative screening results) showed many significantly worse outcomes than immediate enrollees. Use of the standardized AWS symptom-triggered protocol decreased delirium, violence, and AWS-related ICU transfers without significantly increasing hospital charges.

  16. Psychosocial therapies for patients with cancer: a current review of interventions using psychoneuroimmunology-based outcome measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subnis, Utkarsh B; Starkweather, Angela R; McCain, Nancy L; Brown, Richard F

    2014-03-01

    As part of a new standard of quality cancer care, the Institute of Medicine has recommended inclusion of therapies that address psychosocial needs of cancer patients. A range of psychosocial therapies for managing acute and chronic stress have been developed for patients with cancer, based on the scientific framework of psychoneuroimmunology (PNI). The current review aimed to identify studies of new and emerging PNI-based psychosocial therapies in patients with cancer that have used neuroendocrine-immune biomarkers as outcomes. Specifically, this review aimed to evaluate studies based on the cancer populations involved, types of psychosocial therapies, and PNI measures employed. Methodology was guided by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. The PubMed, EMBASE, PsychINFO, CINAHL, and Google Scholar online databases were searched using combinations of keywords obtained from previous reviews of psychosocial interventions. Studies from 2001 to 2012 were included if they ( : ) were published in English, ( : ) used experimental or quasi-experimental designs, ( : ) evaluated psychosocial therapies, ( : ) involved cancer patients, and ( : ) reported results on at least one neuroendocrine or immune outcome measure. The search strategy identified 403 records and 2 stages of screening were used to eliminate irrelevant studies. A total of 24 cancer-specific studies of psychosocial therapies that used PNI-based outcome measures were included in this review. Most studies included early-stage breast cancer patients, and 2 major types of therapies emerged, cognitive-behavioral therapies and complementary medical therapies. Durations of interventions ranged widely, from 1.3 hours over a single week to 27 hours over 18 weeks. Considerable diversity in PNI outcomes made statistical comparisons problematic. Studies of cognitive-behavioral therapies were found to have reported the most success in impacting PNI-based measures, which

  17. Survival outcomes in patients with cervical cancer after inclusion of PET/CT in staging procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik Villibald; Loft, Annika; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil

    2015-01-01

    /CT. METHODS: This was a single-institution retrospective analysis of 301 patients with a histopathological diagnosis of cervical cancer. The patients were receiving chemoradiotherapy with curative intent according to the standard protocol of the department for patients without lymph node metastases......PURPOSE: In cancer of the uterine cervix, lymph node metastases are associated with a poor prognosis. Even so, the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) does not take into account diagnostic results of methods such as PET/CT, since these are not readily available everywhere...

  18. Risk factors and outcomes of severe acute respiratory failure requiring invasive mechanical ventilation in cancer patients: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martos-Benítez, F D; Gutiérrez-Noyola, A; Badal, M; Dietrich, N A

    2017-09-28

    To determine the risk factors for severe acute respiratory failure requiring invasive mechanical ventilation (SARF-MV) and its effect upon clinical outcomes in critically ill cancer patients. A retrospective cohort study was carried out. A 12-bed oncological intensive care unit (ICU) from January 2014 to December 2015. A total of 878 consecutive cancer patients were included. Patients with an ICU stay of ≤1 day were excluded. The final sample size was 691 patients. None. Clinical variables at ICU admission were extracted from the medical records. The primary outcome was SARF-MV. We also measured ICU and hospital mortality, as well as length of stay. The SARF-MV rate was 15.8%. The multivariate analysis identified brain tumour (OR 14.54; 95%CI 3.86-54.77; p<0.0001), stage IV cancer (OR 3.47; 95%CI 1.26-9.54; p=0.016), sepsis upon admission (OR 2.28; 95%CI 1.14-4.56; p=0.020) and an APACHE II score≥20 points (OR 5.38; 95%CI 1.92-15.05; p=0.001) as being independently associated to SARF-MV. Compared with the patients without SARF-MV, those with SARF-MV had a prolonged length of ICU stay (p<0.0001), a lower ICU survival rate (p<0.0001) and a lower hospital survival rate (p<0.0001). A number of clinical factors are related to SARF-MV. In this regard, SARF-MV is a powerful factor independently correlated to poor outcomes. Future studies should investigate means for preventing SARF-MV in critically ill cancer patients, which may have an impact upon outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  19. Gene expression alterations associated with outcome in aromatase inhibitor-treated ER+ early-stage breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Karina G; Lyng, Maria B; Elias, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AI), either alone or together with chemotherapy, have become the standard adjuvant treatment for postmenopausal, estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer. Although AIs improve overall survival, resistance is still a major clinical problem, thus additional biomarkers...... predictive of outcome of ER+ breast cancer patients treated with AIs are needed. Global gene expression analysis was performed on ER+ primary breast cancers from patients treated with adjuvant AI monotherapy; half experienced recurrence (median follow-up 6.7 years). Gene expression alterations were validated...... by qRT-PCR, and functional studies evaluating the effect of siRNA-mediated gene knockdown on cell growth were performed. Twenty-six genes, including TFF3, DACH1, RGS5, and GHR, were shown to exhibit altered expression in tumors from patients with recurrence versus non-recurrent (fold change ≥1.5, p

  20. Costs and outcomes associated with hospitalized cancer patients with neutropenic complications: A retrospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    SCHILLING, M. BLANE; PARKS, CONNIE; DEETER, ROBERT G.

    2011-01-01

    The average total hospitalization costs for adult cancer patients with neutropenic complications were quantified and the average length of hospital stay (LOS), all-cause mortality during hospitalization and reimbursement rates were determined. This observational retrospective cohort study identified adult patients with cancer who were hospitalized from January 2005 through June 2008 using a large private US health care database (>342 inpatient facilities). ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes identified patients by cancer type and who had neutropenic complications. The utilization and accounting systems of the hospitals were used to calculate mean (±95% confidence interval) hospitalization costs and LOS and percent all-cause mortality and reimbursement. Costs were adjusted to 2009 US dollars. There were 3,814 patients who had cancer and neutropenia, 1,809 (47.4%) also had an infection or fever and 1,188 (31.1%) had infection. Mean hospitalization costs were $18,042 (95% CI 16,997–19,087) for patients with neutropenia, $22,839 (95% CI 21,006–24,672) for patients with neutropenia plus infection or fever and $27,587 (95% CI 24,927–30,247) for patients with neutropenia plus infection. Mean LOS were 9 days (95% CI 8.7–9.3), 10.7 days (95% CI 10.2–11.2) and 12.6 days (95% CI 11.9–13.3), respectively. Mortality followed a similar trend; 8.3, 13.7 and 19.4%, respectively. By cancer type, hematologic malignancies had the highest average hospitalization costs and longest mean LOS of $52,579 (95% CI 42,183–62,975) and 20.3 days (95% CI 17.4–23.2), and a high mortality rate of 20.0%, while primary breast cancer patients had the lowest cost of $8,413 (95% CI 6,103–10,723), shortest LOS of 5.5 days (95% CI 4.2–6.8) and lowest mortality (0%). Mean reimbursement rates were 100.0, 101.5 and 95.4% for patients with neutropenia, neutropenia plus infection or fever and neutropenia plus infection, respectively. Hospitalized cancer patients with neutropenic complications had a

  1. Body Composition as a Prognostic Factor of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Toxicity and Outcome in Patients with Locally Advanced Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmela, Carolina; Velho, Sónia; Agostinho, Lisa; Branco, Francisco; Santos, Marta; Santos, Maria Pia Costa; Oliveira, Maria Helena; Strecht, João; Maio, Rui; Cravo, Marília; Baracos, Vickie E

    2017-03-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has been shown to improve survival in locally advanced gastric cancer, but it is associated with significant toxicity. Sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity have been studied in several types of cancers and have been reported to be associated with higher chemotherapy toxicity and morbi-mortality. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of sarcopenia/sarcopenic obesity in patients with gastric cancer, as well as its association with chemotherapy toxicity and long-term outcomes. A retrospective analysis was performed using an academic cancer center patient cohort diagnosed with locally advanced gastric cancer between January 2012 and December 2014 and treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We analyzed body composition (skeletal muscle and visceral fat index) in axial computed tomography images. A total of 48 patients met the inclusion criteria. The mean age was 68±10 years, and 33 patients (69%) were men. Dose-limiting toxicity was observed in 22 patients (46%), and treatment was terminated early owing to toxicity in 17 patients (35%). Median follow-up was 17 months. Sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity were found at diagnosis in 23% and 10% of patients, respectively. We observed an association between termination of chemotherapy and both sarcopenia (P=0.069) and sarcopenic obesity (P=0.004). On multivariate analysis, the odds of treatment termination were higher in patients with sarcopenia (odds ratio=4.23; P=0.050). Patients with sarcopenic obesity showed lower overall survival (median survival of 6 months [95% confidence interval {CI}=3.9-8.5] vs. 25 months [95% CI=20.2-38.2]; log-rank test P=0.000). Sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity were associated with early termination of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with gastric cancer; additionally, sarcopenic obesity was associated with poor survival.

  2. Treatment outcomes and prognostic factors of gallbladder cancer patients after postoperative radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suzy; Kim, Kyubo; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, Sun Whe; Bang, Yung-Jue

    2011-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims To investigate survival rates and prognostic factors of patients with gallbladder cancer who were treated with surgery and postoperative radiation therapy. Methods Seventeen gallbladder cancer patients who received surgery and postoperative radiotherapy from October 1989 to April 1998 were included in this retrospective study. Five patients had stage II, 8 patients had stage III, and 4 patients had stage IV disease according to the 1997 American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging. All patients received ≥40 Gy of postoperative radiotherapy with a daily dose of 2.0 Gy/fraction and 15 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. An analysis was performed for the end-points of overall and disease-free survival. Results Of the 17 patients, 13 had no residual disease (R0), 1 had microscopic residual disease (R1), and 3 had macroscopic residual disease (R2) after surgery. Among patients with no residual disease, 4 had locoregional recurrences during the follow-up period. One patient with microscopic residual disease had local recurrence. The 5-year overall survival rate was 38.2%. The median overall survival time was 21 months and the median disease-free survival time was 12 months. Old age (≥60 years old), female gender, a high pathological stage (≥IVA), and the presence of residual disease after surgery were significant prognostic factors for disease-free survival. Conclusions Despite a high proportion of patients with advanced disease and macroscopic residual disease, the prognosis of gallbladder patients who had postoperative radiotherapy is encouraging. Additional investigation to improve the loco-regional control of gallbladder cancer patients with adverse prognostic factors is warranted. PMID:26421032

  3. Fifth Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference of the Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup: Recommendations on incorporating patient-reported outcomes in clinical trials in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Florence; Hilpert, Felix; Okamoto, Aikou; Stuart, Gavin; Ochiai, Kasunori; Friedlander, Michael

    2017-06-01

    Despite the support for including patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and health-related quality of life in clinical trials, there have been deficiencies in how these have been assessed and reported in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) clinical trials. To redress this, the 5th Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference, included a plenary session entitled 'How to include PROs in clinical trials'. The perspective is a summary of the recommendations made by the Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup unanimously agreed on the importance of PROs and PRO end-points in EOC clinical trials. They recognised that effort must be made to ensure the integrity of collection of PRO data and to avoid missing data. PRO end-points should be based on the PRO hypotheses, be context specific and reflect the patient population and the objectives of treatment (e.g. first line, maintenance therapy, early or late relapse). The PRO end-points inform the choice of PRO measures used in the trial and how the results are analysed and reported. There was agreement that progression-free survival should be supported by PROs among patients with late relapse (platinum sensitive) and that progression-free survival alone was not sufficient as the primary end-point of clinical trials in patients with platinum resistant/refractory EOC and PROs should be included as either the primary/co-primary end-point in this subset of patients. Novel approaches to measure the benefit of palliative chemotherapy such as time until definitive deterioration of Health-Related Quality of Life were recommended. There was consensus to endorse the ISOQOL and CONSORT-PRO guidelines on the inclusion and reporting of PRO endpoints in protocols and that all future EOC Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup trials should adhere to these. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Pain in cancer. An outcome research project to evaluate the epidemiology, the quality and the effects of pain treatment in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicora Mariaflavia

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Management of pain related to advanced or metastatic cancer, although the availability of several pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions and the existence of well-known guidelines and protocols, is often difficult and inadequate. Evidence of the relative effectiveness of current options for treating cancer pain from comparative randomized studies is scanty. Methods In the context of a wider project, a multicenter, open label, prospective Outcome Research study will be launched in Italy in 2006 to investigate the epidemiology of cancer pain and of its treatments, the quality of analgesic-drug therapy and the effectiveness of alternative analgesic strategies in a large, prospective, unselected cohort of cancer patients using the state-of-the art of patient-reported-outcomes. About 100 Italian centers will recruit 2500 patients with advanced/progressive/metastatic cancer with pain (related to the cancer disease requiring analgesic treatments. Each center is expected to recruit 25 consecutive and eligible patients during the study inception period. Approximately two months will be allowed for subject recruitment and enrollment. Subject evaluation and follow-up will be for 3 months. The effect on outcomes of various therapeutic analgesic options administered by physicians, given the observational approach where patients are not assigned at random to different treatments, will be compared using the propensity score approach, allowing the adjustment for treatment selection bias. Later, after the launch of the observational study and on the basis of results, in specific subsamples of patients and in select centers of the network, a Randomized Controlled Trial will be carried out to formally compare the efficacy of alternative analgesic strategies, with particular emphasis on oral morphine (as comparator and buprenorphine patch (as experimental arm. Results from the outcome (cohort and experimental (Randomized

  5. Three-gene predictor of clinical outcome for gastric cancer patients treated with chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H K; Choi, I J; Kim, C G; Kim, H S; Oshima, A; Yamada, Y; Arao, T; Nishio, K; Michalowski, A; Green, J E

    2012-01-01

    To identify transcriptional profiles predictive of the clinical benefit of cisplatin and fluorouracil (CF) chemotherapy to gastric cancer patients, endoscopic biopsy samples from 96 CF-treated metastatic gastric cancer patients were prospectively collected before therapy and analyzed using high-throughput transcriptional profiling and array comparative genomic hybridization. Transcriptional profiling identified 917 genes that are correlated with poor patient survival after CF at P<0.05 (poor prognosis signature), in which protein synthesis and DNA replication/recombination/repair functional categories are enriched. A survival risk predictor was then constructed using genes, which are included in the poor prognosis signature and are contained within identified genomic amplicons. The combined expression of three genes—MYC, EGFR and FGFR2—was an independent predictor for overall survival of 27 CF-treated patients in the validation set (adjusted P=0.017), and also for survival of 40 chemotherapy-treated gastric cancer patients in a published data set (adjusted P=0.026). Thus, combined expression of MYC, EGFR and FGFR2 is predictive of poor survival in CF-treated metastatic gastric cancer patients. PMID:21173787

  6. The impact on clinical outcome of high prevalence of diabetes mellitus in Taiwanese patients with colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Ching-Wen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both colorectal cancer (CRC and diabetes mellitus (DM are important public health problems worldwide. As there are controversies about survival impact on CRC patients with preexisting DM, the purpose of the present study is to evaluate the incidence and the survival impact of preexisting DM on the long-term outcomes of patients with CRC in Taiwan. Methods From January 2002 to December 2008, 1,197 consecutive patients with histologically proven primary CRC, who received surgical treatment at a single institution, were enrolled. The clinicopathologic features between these patients with and without DM were retrospectively investigated. Moreover, we intended to analyze the impact of DM on overall survival (OS and cancer-specific survival (CSS rates. Results Of 1,197 CRC patients, 23.6% of patients had either a reported history of DM or were currently taking one or more diabetes-controlling medications. CRC patients with DM were significantly older than those without DM (P P vs 6.01%, P = 0.040. Conclusions A considerably high prevalence of DM in CRC patients but no significant impact of DM on survival was observed in the single-institution retrospective study, regardless of cancer stages and tumor locations. Therefore, treatment strategies for CRC patients with DM should be the same as patients without DM.

  7. Follow-up care for breast cancer survivors: improving patient outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Chopra I; Chopra A

    2014-01-01

    Ishveen Chopra,1 Avijeet Chopra2 1Department of Pharmacy Administration, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 2Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA Background: Appropriate follow-up care is important for improving health outcomes in breast cancer survivors (BCSs) and requires determination of the optimum intensity of clinical examination and surveillance, assessment of models of follow-up care such as primary care-based follow-up, an under...

  8. Exploring the Interaction Between Nursing Decision Making and Patient Outcomes in 2 European Cancer Centers: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valcarenghi, Dario; Bagnasco, Annamaria; Aleo, Giuseppe; Catania, Gianluca; Zanini, Milko; Cavaliere, Bruno; Carnevale, Franco; Sasso, Loredana

    2017-04-20

    In some clinical settings, nurses have difficulty describing the outcomes of their caring activities. Understanding the reasons for this could help nurse leaders to improve the effectiveness and visibility of nursing practice and safeguard nurses' working conditions. The aims of this study were to understand how nurses working in 2 different adult cancer centers make healthcare decisions and assess the respective outcomes on their patients. Through a constructivist grounded theory approach, we involved 15 clinical cancer nurses with different experiences and educational backgrounds and 6 nurse managers, working in 2 comprehensive cancer centers, 1 in Italy and 1 in Switzerland. Data were collected in 2 phases using 20 semistructured interviews and 9 field observations. Six macrocategories emerged: interacting with situational factors, deciding relevant interventions, using multiple decision-making approaches, evaluating interventions and reporting them, pursuing healthcare outcomes, and clarifying professional identity and roles. Nurses' decision-making processes varied and were influenced by various factors, which mutually influenced one another. This process was interpreted using an explicative theory called "dynamic decision-making adaptation." The present study showed how the aims, contents, and degree of autonomy in the nurses' decision-making process are strongly influenced by the dialectic interaction between professional and contextual factors, such as competency and professional identity. Cancer nurses could influence their clinical practice by developing nursing competencies that effectively resolve patients' problems. This is a key factor that nurses govern autonomously and therefore a responsibility that involves the entire nursing educational, organizational, and scientific leadership.

  9. A systematic review of oral herpetic viral infections in cancer patients: commonly used outcome measures and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elad, Sharon; Ranna, Vinisha; Ariyawardana, Anura; Correa, Maria Elvira Pizzigatti; Tilly, Vanessa; Nair, Raj G; Rouleau, Tanya; Logan, Richard M; Pinto, Andres; Charette, Veronica; Saunders, Debbie P; Jensen, Siri Beier

    2017-02-01

    To review the literature for outcome measures for oral viral infections in cancer patients. A secondary aim was to update the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer/International Society of Oral Oncology (MASCC/ISOO) clinical practice guidelines for the management of oral viral infections in cancer patients. Databases were searched for articles published in the English language, 1981-2013. Studies that met the eligibility criteria were reviewed systematically. The data about the outcome measures were classified according to the aim of the study: prevention, treatment, or non-interventional. The results of interventional studies were compared to the 2010 MASCC/ISOO publication. Multiple clinical and laboratory tests were used to measure oral viral infections, with great variability between studies. Most of the studies were about Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV). The outcome measure that was most commonly used was the presence of HSV infection diagnosed based on a combination of suggestive clinical presentation with a positive laboratory result. HSV culture was the most commonly reported laboratory outcome measure. Acyclovir and valacyclovir were consistently reported to be efficacious in the management of oral herpetic infections. No new data on the quality of life and economic aspects was found. Considering the variability in outcome measures reported to assess oral herpetic infections the researcher should select carefully the appropriate measures based on the objective of the study. Acyclovir and valacyclovir are effective in the management of oral herpetic infections in patients receiving treatment for cancer. Studies on newer anti-viral drugs may be useful to address the issue of anti-viral resistance.

  10. Survival advantage of marriage in uterine cancer patients contrasts poor outcome for widows: a Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, William J; Stany, Michael P; Phippen, Neil T; Bunch, Kristen P; Oliver, Kate E; Tian, Chunqiao; Maxwell, G Larry; Darcy, Kathleen M; Hamilton, Chad A

    2015-02-01

    Marriage confers a survival advantage for many cancers but has yet to be evaluated in uterine cancer patients. We sought to determine whether uterine cancer survival varied by self-reported relationship status. Data were downloaded from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program for women diagnosed with uterine cancer (between 1991 and 2010 in nine geographic regions). Patients with complete clinical data for analysis were categorized as married, single, widowed or other (divorced or separated). Differences in distributions were evaluated using Chi-square, exact and/or Mantel-Haenszel test. Uterine cancer survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier method with log-rank test and multivariate Cox regression analysis. Of 47,420 eligible patients, 56% were married, 15% were single and 19% were widows. Married vs. non-married women had a higher likelihood of having low risk (grade 1/2 endometrioid) endometrial cancer and local disease (pmarriage. This report identifies widows as a new high-risk subpopulation with significantly inferior outcomes potentially benefiting from personalized care and social support. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Utility of a perioperative nutritional intervention on postoperative outcomes in high-risk head & neck cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Nicholas R; Johnson, Jonas T; Fratangelo, Christina E; Smith, Brenda K; Kemerer, Patricia A; Ferris, Robert L

    2016-03-01

    Investigate both the utility and feasibility of perioperative nutritional supplementation with an arginine-enriched immunonutrition formula to high-risk head and neck cancer surgical patients and examine its effects on acute post-operative clinical outcomes. This prospective, non-randomized, interventional cohort study compared high-risk head and neck cancer surgical patients who consumed a pre- and post-operative arginine-based nutritional supplement to those that did not. Outcome measures included post-operative complications, length of hospitalization, readmission rates and measurement of nutritional biomarkers. 195 high-risk head and neck cancer surgical patients were enrolled. 59% of the patients used the nutritional supplement, 41% did not. Of the 80 patients who did not receive the immunonutrition formula, 38 (47.5%) experienced post-operative complications of all types as compared to 29 of the 115 (25.2%) patients who did consume the product (p=0.0021). Pharyngeal leaks or fistulas were the most common post-operative complications in both groups and more common in patients who did not receive supplementation (p=0.007). Length of stay was on average 2.8 days longer in patients who did not have enhanced nutrition (p=0.02), while readmission rates between the two groups were similar (p=0.91). Measurements of nutritional biomarkers were not reported secondary to low collection rates. Enhanced perioperative nutrition may result in significant reductions of post-operative fistula formations and decreased length of stay in a high-risk head and neck cancer population, even in the setting of poor compliance. The potential quality improvement in both patient care and healthcare cost is both real and significant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact of intra-abdominal fat on surgical outcome and overall survival of patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J H; Chin, H M; Hwang, S S; Jun, K H

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of obesity on surgical outcome and prognosis in patients with gastric cancer. A total of 304 patients who underwent curative gastrectomy for gastric adenocarcinoma between January 2005 and March 2008were enrolled. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated before the operation and visceral fat area (VFA) was measured by abdominal computed tomography (CT). The patients were divided according to BMI class and VFA quartile. The influence of BMI and VFA on surgical outcome and survival was evaluated. The median BMI was 23.3 kg/m(2) and the median VFA was 103 cm(2). There was a significant positive correlation between BMI and VFA. According to BMI class and VFA quartile, there were no significant differences in patients' characteristics or surgical outcome, with the exception of a significantly longer operation time and fewer retrieved lymph nodes in patients with a high BMI and VFA. The unadjusted overall and disease free survival were not significantly different between BMI classes or VFA quartiles. Obesity, as represented by BMI and VFA, may not be a poor prognostic factor in patients with gastric cancer. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Treatment outcome and prognostic variables for local control and survival in patients receiving radical radiotherapy for urinary bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fokdal, Lars; Høyer, Morten; von der Maase, Hans

    2004-01-01

    for the selection of patients for curative intended radiotherapy. During radiotherapy acute transient side effects were recorded in 78% of the patients; severe bowel complications were recorded in 9 patients (3%). Following radiotherapy, 10 patients (3%) developed intestinal reactions requiring surgery. Three......The aim of this retrospective study was to analyze the outcome of radical radiotherapy in 292 patients with bladder cancer and to identify prognostic factors for local control and survival. Median age was 72.3 years (range 45-83 years). Median follow up was 66 months (range 18-121 months). All...... patients were treated by use of a standard 3-field technique with 60 Gy in 30 fractions to the tumor and the bladder. The elective lymph nodes were treated with doses in the range from 46 Gy to 60 Gy. Complete response was obtained in 52% of the patients at 3-month control. However, 41% of all patients...

  14. Quality of life outcomes in patients with anal cancer after combined radiochemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welzel, Grit; Haegele, Verena; Wenz, Frederik; Mai, Sabine Kathrin [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To assess self-reported quality of life (QoL) experienced by anal cancer patients after radiochemotherapy, and to identify patient- and disease-related factors associated with QoL. Patients and Methods: A total of 88 patients treated for anal cancer at our institution between 1990 and 2006 were identified from our database. Of these, 15 patients had died, and 4 were lost to follow-up. QoL was assessed using the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire (cancer-specific QoL) and the colorectal cancer module QLQ-CR38 (site-specific QoL); 52 responses were received. The median follow-up was 36 months (range, 5-137 months). Results: As for cancer-specific QoL, global health QoL score (mean 60.4) was similar to the general German population, whereas most of the function and symptom scale scores were considerably lower/higher in anal cancer patients. The most prominent mean score differences were observed in role functioning (-21.8 points), emotional functioning (-20.7 points), social functioning (-28.9 points), diarrhea (+34.6 points), and financial difficulties (+26.9 points; p < 0.001). As for site-specific QoL, the mean function scale scores ranged from 22.1 (sexual function) to 63.2 (body image), and the mean symptom scale scores from 14.7 (weight loss) to 69.0 (stoma-related problems, 4 patients) and 67.9 (male sexual dysfunction), respectively. Most of the QoL scores were not affected by late toxicity, patient- or disease-related factors. Fatigue (+18.2 points) emerged as the strongest predictor of impaired QoL. Conclusion: The global health QoL of anal cancer patients is comparable with that of the general German population, but there are specific limitations, e.g., sexual dysfunction, urological/gastrointestinal complaints, financial difficulties, fatigue, and a reduction in emotional and social well-being. (orig.)

  15. Decreased expression of RNA interference machinery, Dicer and Drosha, is associated with poor outcome in ovarian cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merritt, William M.; Lin, Yvonne G.; Han, Liz Y.; Kamat, Aparna A.; Spannuth, Whitney A.; Schmandt, Rosemarie; Urbauer, Diana; Pennacchio, Len A.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Zeidan, Alexandra; Wang, Hua; Mueller, Peter; Lenburg, Marc E.; Gray, Joe W.; Mok, Samuel; Birrer, Michael J.; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Coleman, Robert L.; Bar-Eli, Menashe; Sood, Anil K.

    2008-05-06

    The clinical and functional significance of RNA interference (RNAi) machinery, Dicer and Drosha, in ovarian cancer is not known and was examined. Dicer and Drosha expression was measured in ovarian cancer cell lines (n=8) and invasive epithelial ovarian cancer specimens (n=111) and correlated with clinical outcome. Validation was performed with previously published cohorts of ovarian, breast, and lung cancer patients. Anti-Galectin-3 siRNA and shRNA transfections were used for in vitro functional studies. Dicer and Drosha mRNA and protein levels were decreased in 37% to 63% of ovarian cancer cell lines and in 60% and 51% of human ovarian cancer specimens, respectively. Low Dicer was significantly associated with advanced tumor stage (p=0.007), and low Drosha with suboptimal surgical cytoreduction (p=0.02). Tumors with both high Dicer and Drosha were associated with increased median patient survival (>11 years vs. 2.66 years for other groups; p<0.001). In multivariate analysis, high Dicer (HR=0.48; p=0.02), high-grade histology (HR=2.46; p=0.03), and poor chemoresponse (HR=3.95; p<0.001) were identified as independent predictors of disease-specific survival. Findings of poor clinical outcome with low Dicer expression were validated in separate cohorts of cancer patients. Galectin-3 silencing with siRNA transfection was superior to shRNA in cell lines with low Dicer (78-95% vs. 4-8% compared to non-targeting sequences), and similar in cell lines with high Dicer. Our findings demonstrate the clinical and functional impact of RNAi machinery alterations in ovarian carcinoma and support the use of siRNA constructs that do not require endogenous Dicer and Drosha for therapeutic applications.

  16. Surgical Outcomes of Lung Cancer Patients with Combined Pulmonary Fibrosis and Emphysema and Those with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis without Emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Seijiro; Koike, Terumoto; Hashimoto, Takehisa; Ishikawa, Hiroyuki; Okada, Akira; Watanabe, Takehiro; Tsuchida, Masanori

    2016-08-23

    Combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE) is a unique disorder. The aim of this study was to compare the surgical outcomes of lung cancer patients with CPFE and those with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) without emphysema. A total of 1548 patients who underwent surgery for primary lung cancer between January 2001 and December 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Of the 1548 patients, 55 (3.6%) had CPFE on computed tomography (CT), and 45 (2.9%) had IPF without emphysema. The overall and disease-free 5-year survival rates for patients with CPFE were not significantly worse than those for patients with IPF without emphysema (24.9% vs. 36.8%, p = 0.814; 39.8% vs. 39.3%, p = 0.653, respectively). Overall, 21 (38.1%) patients with CPFE and nine patients (20.0%) with IPF without emphysema developed postoperative cardiopulmonary complications. Patients with CPFE had significantly more postoperative cardiopulmonary complications involving pulmonary air leakage for >6 days, hypoxemia, and arrhythmia than patients with IPF without emphysema (p = 0.048). There was no significant difference in survival after surgical treatment between CPFE patients and IPF patients without emphysema, but CPFE patients had significantly higher morbidity than IPF patients without emphysema.

  17. Doctor-patient relationship as motivation and outcome: examining uses of an Interactive Cancer Communication System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Bret R; Han, Jeong Yeob; Hawkins, Robert P; Stewart, James; McTavish, Fiona; Gustafson, David H

    2007-04-01

    To examine how the pre-existing doctor-patient relationship predicts conceptually distinct service use within an Interactive Cancer Communication System (ICCS) for underserved women with breast cancer and in turn how service utilization influences the doctor-patient relationship. Study sample included 231 recently diagnosed, lower income breast cancer patients. Participants were provided a free computer, Internet access and training in how to use an ICCS called the Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System (CHESS) "Living with Breast Cancer" program. Survey data was collected at pre-test and 4-months after using the system, and use data about how women used the system was also collected. The only statistically significant predictor of service use was that patients with a more negative appraisal about the doctor-patient relationship used the Ask an Expert service more frequently, and there were trends toward a more negative appraisal of the doctor-patient relationship being associated with higher use of Information and Interactive services. Conversely, there was a trend toward a more positive appraisal predicting higher use of the Discussion Group service. In terms of statistically significant effects, more frequent utilization of Information services was associated with a more positive appraisal of the doctor relationship. While a more negative perception of the doctor-patient relationships at pre-test was associated with higher use of most of the conceptually distinct services within this ICCS, use of the Information services was associated with having a more positive appraisal of the doctor-patient relationship at post-test suggesting that high-quality information on the Internet can serve to improve patients' satisfaction with their doctor.

  18. Obesity, lymphadenectomy and survival outcomes in intermediate to high-risk, early-stage endometrial cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkov, Faina; Edwards, Robert P; Althouse, Andrew; Rauh-Hain, Jose A; Del Carmen, Marcela G; Freese, Kyle E; Kelley, Joseph L; Olawaiye, Alexander B

    2015-01-01

    Lymphadenectomy or lymph node dissection is a topic of controversy in endometrial cancer (EC) treatment. Associations between lymph node dissections and clinical factors were retrospectively examined in obese, endometrioid endometrial cancer patients with early-stage disease between 1995 and 2005. Overall, EC-specific and recurrence-free survival were also evaluated. Out of 192 patients, 61 (32%) did not have a lymph node examination, 55 (29%) had less than ten lymph nodes removed and 76 (39%) had ≥10 removed. Lymph node dissection count was not significantly associated with overall, EC-specific or recurrence-free survival. Analysis revealed no significant associations between ≥10 dissected lymph nodes and survival outcomes among obese, EC patients, which supports the need for additional investigation of the merit of lymphadenectomy among these patients.

  19. Quality-of-life outcomes in patients with gynecologic cancer referred to integrative oncology treatment during chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Samuels, Noah; Schiff, Elad; Raz, Orit Gressel; Sharabi, Ilanit Shalom; Lavie, Ofer

    2015-12-01

    Integrative oncology incorporates complementary medicine (CM) therapies in patients with cancer. We explored the impact of an integrative oncology therapeutic regimen on quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes in women with gynecological cancer undergoing chemotherapy. A prospective preference study examined patients referred by oncology health care practitioners (HCPs) to an integrative physician (IP) consultation and CM treatments. QOL and chemotherapy-related toxicities were evaluated using the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS) and Measure Yourself Concerns and Wellbeing (MYCAW) questionnaire, at baseline and at a 6-12-week follow-up assessment. Adherence to the integrative care (AIC) program was defined as ≥ 4 CM treatments, with ≤ 30 days between each session. Of 128 patients referred by their HCP, 102 underwent IP consultation and subsequent CM treatments. The main concerns expressed by patients were fatigue (79.8%), gastrointestinal symptoms (64.6%), pain and neuropathy (54.5 %), and emotional distress (45.5%). Patients in both AIC (n = 68) and non-AIC (n = 28) groups shared similar demographic, treatment, and cancer-related characteristics. ESAS fatigue scores improved by a mean of 1.97 points in the AIC group on a scale of 0-10 and worsened by a mean of 0.27 points in the non-AIC group (p = 0.033). In the AIC group, MYCAW scores improved significantly (p < 0.0001) for each of the leading concerns as well as for well-being, a finding which was not apparent in the non-AIC group. An IP-guided CM treatment regimen provided to patients with gynecological cancer during chemotherapy may reduce cancer-related fatigue and improve other QOL outcomes.

  20. Fasting glucose and treatment outcome in breast and colorectal cancer patients treated with targeted agents: results from a historic cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, M; Sperati, F; Stranges, S; Carlomagno, C; Nasti, G; Iaffaioli, V; Caolo, G; Mottolese, M; Botti, G; Terrenato, I; Vici, P; Serpico, D; Giordano, A; D'Aiuto, G; Crispo, A; Montella, M; Capurso, G; Delle Fave, G; Fuhrman, B; Botti, C; De Placido, S

    2012-07-01

    We investigated pretreatment fasting glucose as a predictor of patients' important outcomes in breast and colorectal cancers undergoing targeted therapies. In a historic cohort of 202 breast and 218 colorectal cancers treated with targeted agents from 1998 to 2009, we used the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test to estimate survival through tertiles of fasting glucose and the Cox proportional hazards model for multivariate analysis stratified by primary site of cancer and including gender, age and body mass index. The median follow-up was 20 months (1-128). At 60 months, 65% of patients in the lowest tertile of fasting glucose did not experiment disease progression compared with 34% in the highest tertile (P=0.001). Seventy-six percent of females in the lowest tertile showed no progression compared with 49% in the top tertiles (P=0.015). In multivariate analysis, fasting glucose was a significant predictor of time to disease progression only in breast cancer patients in the first tertile compared with the third (P=0.017). We found evidence of a predictive role of pretreatment fasting glucose in the development of resistance in breast cancer patients treated with targeted agents. Prospective studies are warranted to confirm our findings.

  1. Risk stratification for surgical outcomes in older colorectal cancer patients using ISAR-HP and G8 screening tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souwer, Esteban T D; Verweij, Norbert M; van den Bos, Frederiek; Bastiaannet, Esther; Slangen, Rob M E; Steup, Willem H; Hamaker, Marije E; Portielje, Johanna E A

    2017-11-09

    Older patients are at risk for adverse outcomes after surgical treatment of cancer. Identifying patients at risk could affect treatment decisions and prevent functional decline. Screening tools are available to select patients for Geriatric Assessment. Until now their predictive value for adverse outcomes in older colorectal cancer patients has not been investigated. To study the predictive value of the Geriatric 8 (G8) and Identification of Seniors at Risk for Hospitalized Patients (ISAR-HP) screening tools for adverse outcomes after elective colorectal surgery in patients older than 70years. Primary outcomes were 30-day complication rates, secondary outcomes were the length of hospital stay and six-month mortality. Multicentre cohort study from two hospitals in the Netherlands. Frail was defined as a G8 ≤14 and/or ISAR-HP ≥2. Odds ratio (OR) is given with 95% CI. Overall, 139 patients (52%) out of 268 patients were included; 32 patients (23%) were ISAR-HP-frail, 68 (50%) were G8-frail, 20 were frail on both screening tools. Median age was 77.7years. ISAR-HP frail patients were at risk for 30-day complications OR 2.4 (CI 1.1-5.4, p=0.03), readmission OR 3.4 (1.1-11.0), cardiopulmonary complications OR 5.9 (1.6-22.6), longer hospital stay (10.3 versus 8.9day) and six-months mortality OR 4.9 (1.1-23.4). When ISAR-HP and G8 were combined OR increased for readmission, 30-day and six-months mortality. G8 alone had no predictive value. ISAR-HP-frail patients are at risk for adverse outcomes after colorectal surgery. ISAR-HP combined with G8 has the strongest predictive value for complications and mortality. Patients screening frail on ISAR-HP are at increased risk for morbidity and mortality. Screening results of G8 alone was not predictive for postoperative outcomes. Predictive value increased when G8 and ISAR-HP were combined. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of Long-Term Outcomes of Postmastectomy Radiotherapy between Breast Cancer Patients with and without Immediate Flap Reconstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Hua Lee

    Full Text Available To compare the long-term clinical outcomes of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT between breast cancer patients with and without immediate transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM flap reconstruction.The study included 492 patients with stage II or III breast cancer who underwent modified radical mastectomy (MRM and chemotherapy followed by PMRT between 1997 and 2011. Cox regression model and Kaplan-Meier curves were calculated, and the log-rank test was used to evaluate the differences between overall and disease-free survival rates in the 2 groups.Among 492 patients, 213 patients had immediate TRAM flap reconstruction. The mean follow-up was 7.2 years (range, 11-191 months. The 5-year and 10-year disease free survival rates were 81% and 76% for the TRAM flap group and 78% and 73% for the non-flap group. The 5-year and 10-year overall survival rates were 89% and 73% for the TRAM flap group and 83% and 74% for the non-flap group.There exists no statistically significant difference in the rates of local recurrence, distant metastasis, disease-free and overall survival when comparing immediate TRAM flap reconstruction with no reconstruction. Our results suggest that immediate TRAM flap reconstruction does not compromise long term clinical outcomes in breast cancer patients requiring PMRT.

  3. Investigation of opioid use and long-term oncologic outcomes for non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Tak Kyu; Jeon, Jae Hyun; Lee, Jong Mog; Kim, Moon Soo; Kim, Jee Hee; Cho, Hyeyeon; Kim, Seong-Eun; Eom, Woosik

    2017-01-01

    Opioids are commonly used for postoperative pain control in cancer patients. In addition to pain control, an association between opioid use and long-term oncologic outcomes, such as recurrence or overall survival, has been postulated. The aim of this study was to determine whether postoperative opioid use in patients with non-small cell lung cancer is associated with long-term oncologic outcomes, including recurrence and death. Data obtained from 1009 medical records of patients who underwent...

  4. Sleep–wake disturbances in cancer patients: narrative review of literature focusing on improving quality of life outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dickerson SS

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Suzanne S Dickerson, Laurie M Connors, Ameera Fayad, Grace E Dean School of Nursing, State University of New York, University at Buffalo, NY, USA Purpose: Evidence suggests a high prevalence of sleep–wake disturbances in patients with cancer, occurring at diagnosis, during treatment, and continuing to survivorship. Yet associations between sleep–wake disturbances and the impact on quality of life outcomes is less clear. The purpose of this narrative review of the literature is to evaluate sleep–wake disturbances in patients with cancer, to describe the influence of poor sleep on quality of life as an outcome, and to evaluate the evidence to recommend future interventions. Framework and methods: This review was guided by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA approach. Four databases (CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and Embase were searched using terms "cancer OR neoplasm", "sleep, sleep disturbance, sleep disorders or insomnia", and "quality of life"; the search included all years, English language, and peer-reviewed articles on research studies. Studies included measurements of sleep and quality of life in cancer patients at a minimum of two time points and demonstrated relationships between sleep and quality of life. Data were collected on date, patient demographics, cancer type and treatment, timeframe, design, measurement, variables, and results. Results: This narrative review demonstrates that sleep–wake disturbance is a major problem/symptom in patients with cancer. Of the 18 studies included, measurement of sleep-related variables included objective and subjective measures; however, direct measurement of the associations between sleep and quality of life was not common. Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia and mind–body interventions demonstrated feasibility when implemented into cancer care settings. In addition, the majority of interventions exhibited moderate effectiveness in improving

  5. Comparative effectiveness of prostate cancer treatments for patient-centered outcomes: A systematic review and meta-analysis (PRISMA Compliant).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayadevappa, Ravishankar; Chhatre, Sumedha; Wong, Yu-Ning; Wittink, Marsha N; Cook, Ratna; Morales, Knashawn H; Vapiwala, Neha; Newman, Diane K; Guzzo, Thomas; Wein, Alan J; Malkowicz, Stanley B; Lee, David I; Schwartz, Jerome S; Gallo, Joseph J

    2017-05-01

    In the context of prostate cancer (PCa) characterized by the multiple alternative treatment strategies, comparative effectiveness analysis is essential for informed decision-making. We analyzed the comparative effectiveness of PCa treatments through systematic review and meta-analysis with a focus on outcomes that matter most to newly diagnosed localized PCa patients. We performed a systematic review of literature published in English from 1995 to October 2016. A search strategy was employed using terms "prostate cancer," "localized," "outcomes," "mortality," "health related quality of life," and "complications" to identify relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs), prospective, and retrospective studies. For observational studies, only those adjusting for selection bias using propensity-score or instrumental-variables approaches were included. Multivariable adjusted hazard ratio was used to assess all-cause and disease-specific mortality. Funnel plots were used to assess the level of bias. Our search strategy yielded 58 articles, of which 29 were RCTs, 6 were prospective studies, and 23 were retrospective studies. The studies provided moderate data for the patient-centered outcome of mortality. Radical prostatectomy demonstrated mortality benefit compared to watchful waiting (all-cause HR = 0.63 CI = 0.45, 0.87; disease-specific HR = 0.48 CI = 0.40, 0.58), and radiation therapy (all-cause HR = 0.65 CI = 0.57, 0.74; disease-specific HR = 0.51 CI = 0.40, 0.65). However, we had minimal comparative information about tradeoffs between and within treatment for other patient-centered outcomes in the short and long-term. Lack of patient-centered outcomes in comparative effectiveness research in localized PCa is a major hurdle to informed and shared decision-making. More rigorous studies that can integrate patient-centered and intermediate outcomes in addition to mortality are needed.

  6. Gastric Cancer Transcription Factors in Patient Reported Outcomes (GCTF-PRO) – Draft proposal

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    The GCTF-PRO seeks to examine the extent gastric cancer patients are tapping into new information particularly outside of conventional healthcare disclosures. Its significance is in assessing dimensions of QOL paradigms that frame statistical power using predictive methods. It seeks to embed evidence-based theories (perceptual and cognitive) to awareness levels in an attempt to bridge the biotechnological advances with prognostic/ diagnostic-related patient satisfactions. At present, it may c...

  7. Cancer patients' experiences with and perceived outcomes of yoga: results from focus groups.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Uden-Kraan, C.F.; Chinapaw, M.J.M.; Drossaert, C.H.; de Leeuw, I.M.; Buffart, L.M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Yoga is a "mind-body" exercise, a combination of physical poses with breathing and meditation, and may have beneficial effects on physical and psychosocial symptoms. We aimed to explore cancer patients' motives for practicing yoga, experiences of practicing yoga, and perceived physical and

  8. Impact of Comorbidities on the Outcomes of Older Patients Receiving Rectal Cancer Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ru Chang

    2012-12-01

    Conclusion: Older patients with comorbidities are at a higher risk of in-hospital complications following rectal cancer surgery, whereas the presence of comorbidities did not show a significant adverse effect on 1-year mortality in the present study. We suggest using population-based data to establish effective therapeutic strategies for treating each comorbidity.

  9. GSTP1-1 in ovarian cyst fluid and disease outcome of patients with ovarian cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolwijck, E.; Zusterzeel, P.L.M.; Roelofs, H.M.J.; Hendriks, J.C.M.; Peters, W.H.M.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.

    2009-01-01

    Detoxification enzymes, especially glutathione S-transferase P1-1 (GSTP1-1), have been implicated in resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy. We studied GSTP1-1 levels in ovarian cyst fluid (oCF), obtained during surgery before chemotherapy, of patients with epithelial ovarian cancer and clinical

  10. Long Term Outcomes of a Geriatric Liaison Intervention in Frail Elderly Cancer Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hempenius, Liesbeth; Slaets, Joris; van Asselt, Dieneke; de Bock, Truuske H; Wiggers, Theo; van Leeuwen, Barbara L

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the long term effects after discharge of a hospital-based geriatric liaison intervention to prevent postoperative delirium in frail elderly cancer patients treated with an elective surgical procedure for a solid tumour. In addition, the effect of a

  11. Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes of Lung Cancer Patients 
with EGFR Mutations in Exons 19 and 21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renwang LIU

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Studies on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR signaling pathways and the therapeutic effects of EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs have recently proven that targeted therapy has a major role in the treatment of lung cancer. However, the therapeutic effects of EGFR-TKIs on lung cancers with different EGFR mutation subtypes remain unclear. And if there is a significant difference in the effects of EGFR-TKIs, the mechanisms for the difference remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical importance of EGFR mutations in exons 19 and 21 of lung cancer patients and to compare the outcomes of these patients. Methods The study recruited 113 patients who had non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC with EGFR mutations. EGFR mutations were detected for 47 patients using Real-time PCR or DNA sequencinag. The mutations of the remaining patients were determined using xTag-EGFR liquid chip technology. All stages I-III patients underwent radical resection followed by 4 cycles of postoperative chemotherapy. Patients with pleural metastases underwent pleural biopsy, pleurodesis, and chemotherapy only. Patients with distant metastases underwent biopsy and chemotherapy only. Collected clinical data were analyzed using SPSS 19.0 software. Results EGFR exon mutations 19 and 21 were found in 56 and 57 patients, respectively. The mean age of patients with exon 19 mutations was lower than the age of the patients with exon 21 mutations (57.02±11.31 years vs 62.25±7.76 years, respectively; P0.05 between the patients with exon 19 and 21 mutations; and survival analysis of 91 (80.5% patients with complete clinical data found no differences in overall survival. Stratification analysis found out that patients with exon 19 mutations had longer overall survival associated with age>61 years, male gender, ever smoking, and stage IV disease; although the differences were not significant. Conclusion Compared to the lung

  12. Cytoplasmic Drosha Is Aberrant in Precancerous Lesions of Gastric Carcinoma and Its Loss Predicts Worse Outcome for Gastric Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hailong; Hou, Yixuan; Xu, Liyun; Zeng, Zongyue; Wen, Siyang; Du, Yan-E; Sun, Kexin; Yin, Jiali; Lang, Lei; Tang, Xiaoli; Liu, Manran

    2016-04-01

    The nuclear localization of Drosha is critical for its function as a microRNA maturation regulator. Dephosphorylation of Drosha at serine 300 and serine 302 disrupts its nuclear localization, and aberrant distribution of Drosha has been detected in some tumors. The purpose of the present study was to assess cytoplasmic/nuclear Drosha expression in gastric cancer carcinogenesis and progression. Drosha expression and its subcellular location was investigated by immunohistochemical staining of a set of tissue microarrays composed of normal adjacent tissues (374), chronic gastritis (137), precancerous lesions (94), and gastric adenocarcinoma (829) samples, and in gastric cancer cell lines with varying differentiation by immunofluorescence and western blot assay. Gradual loss of cytoplasmic Drosha was accompanied by tumor progression in both gastric cancer tissues and cell lines, and was inversely associated with tumor volume (P = 0.002), tumor grade (P gastric cancer. High levels of cytoplasmic Drosha predicted longer survival (LR = 7.088, P = 0.008) in gastric cancer patients. Our data provide novel insights into gastric cancer that cytoplasmic Drosha potentially plays a role in preventing carcinogenesis and tumor progression, and may be an independent predictor of patient outcome.

  13. Severity of lung fibrosis affects early surgical outcomes of lung cancer among patients with combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimae, Takahiro; Suzuki, Kenji; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Ikeda, Norihiko; Takamochi, Kazuya; Aokage, Keiju; Shimada, Yoshihisa; Miyata, Yoshihiro; Okada, Morihito

    2016-07-01

    Combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE) is defined as upper lobe emphysema and lower lobe fibrosis, which are representative lung disorders that increase the prevalence of lung cancer. This unique disorder may affect the morbidity and mortality during the early period after surgery. The present study aimed to identify which clinicopathological features significantly affect early surgical outcomes after lung resection in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and in those with CPFE.We retrospectively assessed 2295 patients with NSCLC and found that 151 (6.6%) had CPFE. All were surgically treated between January 2008 and December 2010 at 4 institutions.The postoperative complication rates for patients with and without CPFE were 39% and 17%, respectively. The 90-day mortality rates were higher among patients with than without CPFE (7.9% vs 1%). Acute exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia was the main cause of death among 12 patients with CPFE who died within 90 days after surgery. Multivariate logistic regression analysis selected CPFE, gender, age, and clinical stage as independent predictive factors for postoperative complications, and CPFE, clinical stage, and sex for 90-day mortality. The severity of lung fibrosis on preoperative CT images was an independent predictive factor for 90-day mortality among patients with CPFE.The key predictive factor for postoperative mortality and complications of lung resection for NSCLC was CPFE. The severity of lung fibrosis was the principal predictor of early outcomes after lung surgery among patients with CPFE and NSCLC.

  14. Psychological and behavioural predictors of pain management outcomes in patients with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Ramune; Møldrup, Claus; Christrup, Lona Louring

    2010-01-01

    To better understand the phenomenon of patient-related barriers to cancer pain management and address them more effectively in interventional studies, a theoretical model related to psychological aspects of pain experience and pain-related behaviours was elaborated. The aim of the study was to an......To better understand the phenomenon of patient-related barriers to cancer pain management and address them more effectively in interventional studies, a theoretical model related to psychological aspects of pain experience and pain-related behaviours was elaborated. The aim of the study...... Perceived Involvement in Care Scale measuring the quality of patient-physician pain communication, and the Danish version of Medication Adherence Report Scale (DMARS-4). Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS 16.00. The results of the multivariable linear regression analyses showed that pain intensity...

  15. Therapeutic alliance and treatment outcome in psychodynamic psychotherapy of depressed breast cancer patients: the same old story or different from other populations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuteritz, Katja; Weißflog, Gregor; Barthel, Yvette; Brähler, Elmar; Zwerenz, Rüdiger; Wiltink, Jörg; Beutel, Manfred E

    2017-11-01

    A good therapeutic alliance is associated with better treatment outcomes in diverse types of psychotherapy and patient populations, but little is known about therapeutic alliance in psychotherapies with cancer patients. This study examines the association of therapeutic alliance and treatment outcome in short term psychodynamic psychotherapy (STPP) for breast cancer patients. Within a randomized controlled trial, 47 completers of STPP could be included in the analyses. The therapeutic alliance was assessed by patients and therapists at treatment termination with the Helping Alliance Questionnaire. Outcome was defined as no diagnosis of depression assessed with Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-I) and a reduction of the HADS-depression score by at least two points at treatment termination. Patients' alliance ratings were significantly associated with outcome (r = 0.46, p = 0.015), while, in contrast to findings in non-cancer populations, therapists' ratings were unrelated. There was no association between patients' and therapists' ratings of therapeutic alliance. Especially success and working related aspects of patients' alliance scores were associated with outcome. Patients' and therapists' alliance scores were unrelated to any of their baseline characteristics, therapist characteristic or treatment variables. We conclude that therapists should regularly assess the quality of patients' perceived therapeutic alliance in the course of psychotherapy with breast cancer patients to improve psychotherapy outcome. The breast cancer patients' perspective should be actively inquired and considered throughout treatment by therapists. Possible discrepancies between both judgements can be addressed in treatment.

  16. Psychosocial outcomes of sharing a diagnosis of cancer with a pediatric patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haya Raz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This innovative pilot study was designed to provide research-based evidence on the variables to consider informing a child of his/her cancer diagnosis, so as to minimize the negative psychosocial effects of the cancer experience on survivors. The hypotheses of the study were that 'good information' about cancer, will allow the child a better understanding way to cope with treatment and improve socio-psychological outcomes at adulthood.Methods: Ninety-one adult childhood cancer survivors got the questionnaires while waiting to their routine checkup at a grate childhood cancer medical center in center Israel. Results: To our surprise and not according to the hypothesis, there was a difference between children diagnosed up to 12 years of age and those diagnosed during adolescence. (Participants were divided into two groups according to their age at diagnosis: from birth to 12-years-old and from age 12 to 18. In the group diagnosed at a younger age, those who had received good information were found to have better quality of life, lower mental pain and higher mental pain tolerance than did those in the same group (diagnosed at a younger age who received not good information. By contrast, in the group diagnosed during adolescence, those who had received not good information scored higher on these measures than did their counterparts who had received good information.Conclusions: Given that information conveyed to children diagnosed with cancer can have a significant impact on survivors' quality of life, further research is needed to determine the precise information to be divulged to children at the time of diagnosis. In the meantime, extreme caution, sensitivity, and careful judgement are required. Clinical Relevance: Findings the current study and of future studies can be used to formulate clear guidelines for assessing a child's readiness and the information to be divulged, so as to improve the quality of life of childhood cancer

  17. Short-term outcomes for laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy for body mass index ≥30 patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Xingmao; Liang, Jianwei; Hu, Junjie; Zeng, Weigen; Zhou, Zhixiang

    2015-05-01

    Obesity is known to be a preoperative risk factor for gastric cancer surgery. This study aimed to investigate the influence of obesity on the surgical outcomes of laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy (LADG) for gastric cancer. The clinical data of 131 patients with gastric cancer from January 2010-December 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. Perioperative outcomes were compared between 43 patients with a body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m(2) (obese group) and 88 patients with a BMI obese group than for the nonobese group (234.1 ± 57.2 min versus 212.2 ± 43.5 min, P = 0.026). There were no statistically significant differences between two groups in terms of intraoperative blood loss, the number of retrieved lymph nodes, postoperative recovery, and postoperative complications (P > 0.05). During the follow-up period of 5 mo-49 mo (average, 36 mo), the overall survival rates were not significantly different between the two groups (80.0% [32/40] versus 81.9% [68/83], P > 0.05). The differences in recurrence and metastasis between the two groups were not statistically significant. Our analysis revealed that LADG can be safely performed in patients with BMI ≥30. The procedure was considered to be difficult but sufficiently feasible. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Complementary and alternative medicine use, patient-reported outcomes, and treatment satisfaction among men with localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Scott D; Zeliadt, Steven B; Blough, David K; Fedorenko, Catherine R; Fairweather, Megan E; McDermott, Cara L; Penson, David F; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K; Hamilton, Ann S; Arora, Neeraj K

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the association between complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use, satisfaction with treatment, and patient-reported outcomes after treatment. The Prostate CAncer Therapy Selection Study prospectively surveyed patients newly diagnosed with localized prostate cancer about their treatment decision-making process and outcomes. The Prostate CAncer Therapy Selection Study recruited patients from 3 geographic areas through hospital-based urology clinics and community urology practices. More than 700 patients completed the baseline and follow-up surveys. More than 50% of respondents reported using CAM; this decreased to 39% if prayer was excluded as a type of CAM. On multivariate analysis, factors related to communication with the treating physician, but not CAM use, were associated with treatment satisfaction. The likelihood of stability or improvement in urinary, bowel, and sexual function at 6 months was related to the choice of primary therapy but was unrelated to CAM use. In the present prospective observational study, CAM use was highly prevalent but unrelated to treatment satisfaction or changes in functional status. The effect of CAM on these endpoints remains to be established in comparative effectiveness studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Clinical outcome in 520 consecutive Danish rectal cancer patients treated with short course preoperative radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L H; Altaf, R; Harling, H

    2010-01-01

    tumours in the lower two thirds of the rectum and were referred for preoperative radiotherapy with 5 x 5 Gy. The inclusion period was 56 months. Radiotherapy data was retrospectively collected. RESULTS: Of the 520 patients, 514 completed radiotherapy and 506 had surgery. Surgery was considered curative......AIM: The purpose of this study was to analyse the results of preoperative short course radiotherapy in a consecutive, national cohort of patients with rectal cancer. METHODS: Through a validated, prospective national database we identified 520 Danish patients who presented with high-risk mobile...

  20. Outcomes of uterine cervical cancer patients with pelvic lymph node metastases after radiotherapy without boost irradiation of metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Eriko; Koiwai, Keiichiro; Ina, Hironobu; Fukazawa, Ayumu; Sakai, Katsuya; Ozawa, Takesumi; Matsushita, Hirohide; Kadoya, Masumi

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of uterine cervical cancer patients with pelvic lymph node (PLN) metastases after radiotherapy without boost irradiation of the metastases and to clarify the necessity of the boost irradiation of metastatic lesions. Thirty-two patients with uterine cervical cancer metastasizing only to the PLN were treated with definitive radiotherapy without boost irradiation of the metastases between 2008 and 2012 at our institution and were selected for this study. The pattern of progression, overall survival, and progression-free survival were analyzed. Ninety percent of the PLN metastases were controlled by radiotherapy. Twenty-two of 32 patients (69%) experienced progression. Distant metastases as initial progression were observed in 21 of these 22 patients (95%). Only two patients experienced failures in pre-treatment metastatic PLN as initial progression, along with other failures. Severe late lower gastrointestinal toxicities were not observed in any patients. Two-year cumulative overall survival and progression-free survival were 74% and 31%, respectively. Boost irradiation of PLN metastases is not necessarily indispensable. Further studies to examine the necessity of boost irradiation of PLN metastases in radiotherapy for uterine cervical cancer patients with metastases are required. © 2017 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  1. The outcome of surgical treatment in patients with obstructive colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Kısaoğlu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available orectal cancer obstructions are responsible for about 85% of colonic emergencies. The aim of this study was to investigate the results of urgent surgical intervention that applied in acute colonic obstructions related to cancer. Methods: In this study, 86 cases presenting with acute colonic obstruction who were operated with the diagnosis of colonic tumor between January 2010 and December 2010 were assessed retrospectively. Age, gender, symptoms on presentation, presence of concomitant disease, surgical methods applied, complication and mortality rates were recorded.Results: Fifty of the cases were male, 36 were female. The mean age was 63.6 years. Twenty cases had undergone emergency colonoscopic examination at diagnosis and an obstructive lesion had been observed. The surgical operations performed were right hemicolectomy in 18, sigmoid resection in 34, left hemicolectomy in 10, abdomino-perineal resection in 2, subtotal colectomy in 4, transverse colectomy in two. Primary anastomosis was performed in thirty-four cases. Mortality was observed in 12 cases. Conclusions: In selected cases of left colon cancers with obstruction, resection and primary anastomosis is generally possible. Those over 70, presence of co-morbidities, albumin level under 3 g/dl, ASA score 3 and higher, blood loss of more than 500 ml, and preoperative blood transfusion were related to the high postoperative morbidity.Key words: Colorectal cancer, obstruction, surgical treatment, outcome.

  2. Developing an easy-to-use tablet computer application for assessing patient-reported outcomes in patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromme, Erik K; Kenworthy-Heinige, Tawni; Hribar, Michelle

    2011-06-01

    In order to be practically useful, computer applications for patients with cancer must be easily usable by people with limited computer literacy and impaired vision or dexterity. We describe the usability development process for an application that collects quality of life and symptom information from patients with cancer. Usability testing consisted of user testing with cancer patients to identify initial design problems and a survey to compare the computer application's ease of use between elderly and younger patients. In user-testing phase, seven men aged 56 to 77 with prostate cancer were observed using the application and interviewed afterwards identifying several usability concerns. Sixty patients with breast, gastrointestinal, or prostate cancer participated in the ease of use survey, with 40% (n=24) aged 65 or older. Younger patients reported significantly higher scores than elderly patients (14.0 vs. 10.8, p = .001), even when prior computer and touch screen use was controlled. Elderly users reported lower ease of use scores than younger users; however, their average rating was quite high-10.8 on a scale of -16 to +16. It may be unrealistic to expect elderly or less computer literate users to rate any application as positively as younger, more computer savvy users-perhaps it is enough that they rate the application positively and can use it without undue difficulties. We hope that our process can serve as a model for how to bridge the fields of computer usability and healthcare.

  3. Prognostic factors for different outcomes in patients with metastatic spinal cord compression from cancer of unknown primary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Sarah

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with cancer of unknown primary account for 10% of patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC. This retrospective study was performed to identify prognostic factors for functional outcome, local control of MSCC, and survival in 175 of such patients treated with radiotherapy alone. Methods Investigated were nine potential prognostic factors including age, gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance score (ECOG-PS, number of involved vertebrae, pre-radiotherapy ambulatory status, other bone metastases, visceral metastases, time developing motor deficits before radiotherapy, and the radiation schedule. Results On multivariate analysis, better functional outcome was associated with absence of visceral metastases (estimate: 0.72; 95%-confidence interval [CI]: 0.07-1.36; p = 0.030 and a slower (>7 days development of motor deficits (estimate: 1.93; 95%-CI: 1.18-2.68; p  Conclusions This study identified additional independent prognostic factors for functional outcome, local control of MSCC, and survival after radiotherapy of MSCC from cancer of unknown primary. These prognostic factors can help select the best treatment regimen for each individual patient.

  4. Swallowing in the first year after chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer: clinician- and patient-reported outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Joanne M; McColl, Elaine; Carding, Paul N; Hildreth, Anthony J; Kelly, Charles; Wilson, Janet A

    2014-03-01

    This prospective study evaluated swallowing outcomes prechemoradiotherapy (pre-CRT) up to 1 year post-CRT, in a substantial cohort of patients with head and neck cancer and explored factors predicting outcome. One hundred twelve patients were assessed pretreatment and at 3, 6, and 12 months posttreatment using a questionnaire, endoscopic assessment, water swallow test, and diet score. Seventy-one patients were retained, the majority had oropharyngeal (53%) or hypopharyngeal cancer (20%). A marked deterioration occurred between pretreatment and 3 months posttreatment (p ≤ .01). Significant improvement between 3 and 12 months was found on 2 swallowing measures, but not self reported. Three of the 4 pretreatment assessments predicted outcomes at 1 year. CRT results in a marked deterioration on different paradigms of swallowing measurements. Improvement occurs on some clinical measures, but limited change is observed in patients' perceptions. Pretreatment measures are important indicators of long-term dysphagia. Swallowing recovery is complex, taking different courses between clinical tests and perspectives. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  5. Is the Distance Worth It? Patients With Rectal Cancer Traveling to High-Volume Centers Experience Improved Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhaomin; Becerra, Adan Z; Justiniano, Carla F; Boodry, Courtney I; Aquina, Christopher T; Swanger, Alex A; Temple, Larissa K; Fleming, Fergal J

    2017-12-01

    It is unclear whether traveling long distances to high-volume centers would compensate for travel burden among patients undergoing rectal cancer resection. The purpose of this study was to determine whether operative volume outweighs the advantages of being treated locally by comparing the outcomes of patients with rectal cancer treated at local, low-volume centers versus far, high-volume centers. This was a population-based study. The National Cancer Database was queried for patients with rectal cancer. Patients with stage II or III rectal cancer who underwent surgical resection between 2006 and 2012 were included. The outcomes of interest were margins, lymph node yield, receipt of neoadjuvant chemoradiation, adjuvant chemotherapy, readmission within 30 days, 30-day and 90-day mortality, and 5-year overall survival. A total of 18,605 patients met inclusion criteria; 2067 patients were in the long-distance/high-volume group and 1362 in the short-distance/low-volume group. The median travel distance was 62.6 miles for the long-distance/high-volume group and 2.3 miles for the short-distance/low-volume group. Patients who were younger, white, privately insured, and stage III were more likely to have traveled to a high-volume center. When controlled for patient factors, stage, and hospital factors, patients in the short-distance/low-volume group had lower odds of a lymph node yield ≥12 (OR = 0.51) and neoadjuvant chemoradiation (OR = 0.67) and higher 30-day (OR = 3.38) and 90-day mortality (OR = 2.07) compared with those in the long-distance/high-volume group. The short-distance/low-volume group had a 34% high risk of overall mortality at 5 years compared with the long-distance/high-volume group. We lacked data regarding patient and physician decision making and surgeon-specific factors. Our results indicate that when controlled for patient, tumor, and hospital factors, patients who traveled a long distance to a high-volume center had improved lymph node yield

  6. Clinical outcomes after sentinel lymph node biopsy in clinically node-negative breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Hee Ji; Keun Ki Chang; Suh, Chang Ok; Kim, Yong Bae [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ju Ree [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Cheil General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Hee Rim [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    To evaluate non-sentinel lymph node (LN) status after sentinel lymph node biopsy (SNB) in patients with breast cancer and to identify the predictive factors for disease failure. From January 2006 to December 2007, axillary lymph node (ALN) dissection after SNB was performed for patients with primary invasive breast cancer who had no clinical evidence of LN metastasis. A total of 320 patients were treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy. The median age of patients was 48 years, and the median follow-up time was 72.8 months. Close resection margin (RM) was observed in 13 patients. The median number of dissected SNB was two, and that of total retrieved ALNs was 11. Sentinel node accuracy was 94.7%, and the overall false negative rate (FNR) was 5.3%. Eleven patients experienced treatment failure. Local recurrence, regional LN recurrence, and distant metastasis were identified in 0.9%, 1.9%, and 2.8% of these patients, respectively. Sentinel LN status were not associated with locoregional recurrence (p > 0.05). Close RM was the only significant factor for disease-free survival (DFS) in univariate and multivariate analysis. The 5-year overall survival, DFS, and locoregional DFS were 100%, 96.8%, and 98.1%, respectively. In this study, SNB was performed with high accuracy and low FNR and high locoregional control was achieved.

  7. Organ Preservation Using Contact Radiotherapy for Early Rectal Cancer: Outcomes of Patients Treated at a Single Centre in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhadda, A S; Martin, A; Killeen, S; Hunter, I A

    2017-03-01

    Contact radiotherapy for early rectal cancer uses 50 kV X-rays to treat rectal cancers under direct vision. We present data of a series of patients treated at a single centre with prospective follow-up and functional assessment. All patients were treated at the Queen's Centre for Oncology, Hull, UK between September 2011 and October 2015. Patients received a biopsy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the liver/pelvis, computed tomography of the chest and endorectal ultrasound. Patients were deemed to be either unfit for radical surgery or refused it due to the need for a permanent stoma. Follow-up consisted of 3 monthly flexible sigmoidoscopy and MRI of the liver/pelvis and 12 monthly computed tomography of the chest. In total, 42 patients were treated with contact radiotherapy ± external beam chemo/radiotherapy without any primary surgical excision. The median age was 78 years (range 50-94 years). Local recurrence-free survival was 88%, disease-free survival was 86% and overall survival was 88% with a median follow-up of 24 months (range 5-54 months). The median time to recurrence was 12 months (range 4-14 months). The estimated 30 day surgical mortality for this cohort with radical surgery was 12%. Mortality from the contact radiotherapy procedure was 0%. Functional outcomes as investigated by the Low Anterior Resection Syndrome (LARS) score were good, with 65% having no LARS. Contact radiotherapy for early rectal cancer is a safe, well-tolerated outpatient procedure, allowing organ preservation, with excellent oncological and functional outcomes. For elderly co-morbid patients with suitable rectal cancers this should be considered as a standard of care. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of leukocyte alteration on treatment outcomes following preoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Gyu; Park, Won; Choi, Doo Ho [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-09-15

    Hematotoxicity following anti-cancer treatment is known to be related to treatment efficacy in several malignancies. The purpose of this study was to examine the hematologic parameters related to the tumor response and survival in patients treated with curative surgery following preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for rectal cancer. Four hundred eighteen patients with rectal cancer who underwent preoperative CRT and curative surgery were analyzed, retrospectively. The main clinical factors and blood cell counts before and after CRT were investigated with respect to their relationships with tumor downstaging and patient survival. The post-CRT leukocyte count was significantly different between the tumor downstaging group and the nondownstaging group (median, 4740/uL vs. 5130/uL; p = 0.013). Multivariate analysis showed that histological grade, circumferential extent, and post-CRT leukocyte count were related to tumor downstaging. In addition, histological grade, post-CRT leukocyte count, and tumor downstaging were related to disease-free survival. The 5-year disease-free survival and overall survival in patients with post-CRT leukocyte count ≤3730/uL, which is the cut-off value derived from the receiver operation characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, were significantly higher than those with higher counts (88.0% vs. 71.6%, p = 0.001; 94.4% vs. 84.1%, p = 0.024). Post-CRT leukocyte count of ≤3730/uL could be regarded as a good prognostic factor for tumor response and survival in rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative CRT.

  9. Cosmetic outcome and patient satisfaction after skin-sparing mastectomy for breast cancer with immediate reconstruction of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Satsuki; Tamaki, Yasuhiro; Yano, Kenji; Okishiro, Noritsugu; Yanagisawa, Tetsu; Imasato, Mitsunobu; Shimazu, Kenzo; Kim, Seun J; Miyoshi, Yasuo; Tanji, Yoshio; Taguchi, Tetsuya; Noguchi, Shinzaburo

    2008-03-01

    We conducted a retrospective study to assess the safety, cosmetic outcome, and patients' satisfaction after skin-sparing (SSM) and nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) for breast cancer with immediate reconstruction of the breast (SMIBR). The subjects were patients, who underwent SMIBR, breast-conserving surgery (BCS), and total mastectomy (MST) between 2000 and 2004 at Osaka University Hospital. Cosmetic outcome was estimated by 4 reviewers by scoring postoperative photographs of the patients. Patient satisfaction was evaluated with a questionnaire for assessment of quality of life for Japanese breast cancer patients. Of the 74 patients who had undergone SMIBR, 4 developed local recurrences (5%). The local recurrence rate for SMIBR patients was greater than that for BCS (4/178) and MST (3/178, P = .10). The distant recurrence rate was similar for all three types of patients (5% for SMIBR, 5% for BCS, and 9% for MST). The median averaged score by 4 reviewers for the estimated cosmetic outcomes was 7.8 for the SMIBR and 7.5 for the BCS group (P = .20), and for age-adjusted patients, the corresponding scores were 8.2 and 8.0 (P = .70). There was no difference in cosmetic outcome between the SSM and NSM subgroups (P = .09). Average scores for patient satisfaction (social activity, physical aspects, and general condition) were the same for the 3 groups. For body image, the BCS and SMIBR groups had higher scores than the MST group (p < 0.05). Average scores for questions relating to bodily pain and sexual aspects were higher for the BCS than the MST group, but were not different between SMIBR and BCS groups. Similar trends for the 3 groups were observed when patients were divided into subgroups by tumor size or axillary dissection. SMIBR is safe with a comparatively low local recurrence rate and the same distant recurrence rate as for BCS and MST. Moreover, it results in objective cosmetic outcome and patient satisfaction as good as those for BCS, and greater patient

  10. Association between Parenchymal Enhancement of the Contralateral Breast in Dynamic Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging and Outcome of Patients with Unilateral Invasive Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velden, Bas; Dmitriev, Ivan; Loo, C.E.; Pijnappel, Ruud; Gilhuijs, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To retrospectively investigate whether parenchymal enhancement in dynamic contrast material–enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the contralateral breast in patients with unilateral invasive breast cancer is associated with therapy outcome. Materials and Methods After obtaining

  11. Psychosocial Outcomes of Sharing a Diagnosis of Cancer with a Pediatric Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Haya; Tabak, Nili; Kreitler, Shulamith

    2016-01-01

    This innovative pilot study was designed to provide research-based evidence on the variables to consider informing a child of his/her cancer diagnosis, so as to minimize the negative psychosocial effects of the cancer experience on survivors. The hypotheses of the study were that "good information" about cancer, will allow the child a better understanding way to cope with treatment and improve sociopsychological outcomes at adulthood. Ninety-one adult childhood cancer (CC) survivors got the questionnaires while waiting to their routine checkup at a grate CC medical center in center Israel. To our surprise and not according to the hypothesis, there was a difference between children diagnosed up to 12 years of age and those diagnosed during adolescence. (Participants were divided into two groups according to their age at diagnosis: from birth to 12 years old and from age 12-18). In the group diagnosed at a younger age, those who had received "good information" were found to have better quality of life, lower mental pain, and higher mental pain tolerance than did those in the same group (diagnosed at a younger age) who received "not good information." By contrast, in the group diagnosed during adolescence, those who had received "not good information" scored higher on these measures than did their counterparts who had received "good information." Given that information conveyed to children diagnosed with cancer can have a significant impact on survivors' quality of life, further research is needed to determine the precise information to be divulged to children at the time of diagnosis. In the meantime, extreme caution, sensitivity, and careful judgment are required. Findings of the current study and of future studies can be used to formulate clear guidelines for assessing a child's readiness and the information to be divulged, so as to improve the quality of life of CC survivors.

  12. Oncology Nursing Minimum Data Set (ONMDS): can we hypothesize a set of prevalent Nursing Sensitive Outcomes (NSO) in cancer patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, A; Mauri, S; Gandini, S; Magon, G

    2013-01-01

    The nursing minimum data set (NMDS) was created in 1977 in the United States to collect uniform standardised data that could be comparable among different nursing areas or patients. So far, in the literature, an NMDS in an oncology setting has not yet been described. Considering an oncology nursing minimum data set (ONMDS), which data could be chosen to define this tool regarding cancer patient care? At the European Institute of Oncology (IEO), 20 experienced oncology nurses representing surgical, medical, and critical areas participated in a nursing record working group. All nurses followed an educational course on NMDS, and they shared clinical experiences to find which data common among different areas could be useful to care. To identify these data, nurses considered three issues: what is nursing care for nurses in the IEO? What is the nurses' responsibility in the IEO? What is the organisational nursing model in the IEO? Nurses in the IEO are autonomous in decision making and recognised by patients and by a multi-professional team; the organisational nursing model is primary nursing with patient-centred care. Nursing data must therefore show the quality and results of this care. With this in mind, the working group decided to orient the ONMDS toward nursing-sensitive outcomes (NSOs), meeting also with psychologists, physiotherapists, and dieticians. Nurses analysed Oncology Nursing Society outcomes, and through focus groups, experiential meetings, role playing, and case studies, they integrated them with other NSOs. The ONMDS is composed of 49 NSOs recognised as the most common and frequent oncologic outcomes regardless of the treatment that the patient undergoes. These outcomes were clustered into 15 categories. The categories are: gastrointestinal outcomes, genitourinary outcomes, respiratory outcomes, skin outcomes, fluid and electrolyte balance outcomes, neurological outcomes, security, functional status, vascular access outcomes, nutritional status, pain

  13. Comparable survival outcome of metastatic colorectal cancer in Indigenous and non-Indigenous patients: Retrospective analysis of the South Australian metastatic colorectal cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Yoko; Karapetis, Christos S; Roder, David; Beeke, Carol; Hocking, Christopher; Roy, Amitesh C; Townsend, Amanda R; Padbury, Rob; Maddern, Guy; Price, Timothy J

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to investigate disparities in demographics, disease characteristics, treatment and overall survival between South Australian (SA) Indigenous and non-Indigenous patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). This employs a retrospective population study using the SA mCRC registry. The SA mCRC registry identifies mCRC patients from hospital encounters, histopathology reports, medical oncology letters, clinician notification, attendances at multidisciplinary meetings and death audits by the SA Cancer Registry. A total of 2865 adult mCRC patients including 14 Indigenous patients were identified through the SA mCRC registry between February 2006 and August 2013. Patients were linked to the SA Cancer Registry to obtain Indigenous status. Demographic, disease and treatment characteristics were compared using Chi-squared test and t-test; while overall survival defined as time to any cause of death was analysed using Cox regression. No difference was observed for clinical characteristics, except for a higher proportion of Indigenous patients receiving chemotherapy (85.7% versus 58.5%; P = 0.04). The rate of liver surgery was similar across the two groups (21.0% versus 15.1%; P = 0.40). The median overall survivals were equivalent (11.9 months versus 15.1 months; hazard ratio = 1.00; 95% confidence interval for hazard ratio, 0.54-1.86). Clinical characteristics and survival outcomes were similar between Indigenous and non-Indigenous patients captured on the SA mCRC registry, and outcome of those who have an access to comprehensive cancer care appeared independent of Indigenous status and in line with large clinical trials. Underestimation of Indigenous cases due to their lower utilisation of cancer service could not be excluded and ultimately the accurate reporting of these patients is crucial. © 2015 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  14. The Outcome of Postoperative Radiation Therapy for Patients with Stage II Pancreatic Cancer (T3 or N1 Disease)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Won; Chun, Misun; Kim, Myung Wook; Kim, Wook Hwan; Kang, Seok Yun; Kang, Seung Hee; Oh, Young Taek; Lee, Sunyoung; Yang, Juno [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    Purpose: To analyze retrospectively the outcome of postoperative radiation therapy with or without concurrent chemotherapy for curatively resected stage II pancreatic cancer with T3 or N1 disease. Materials and Methods: Between January 1996 and December 2005, twenty-eight patients completed adjuvant radiation therapy at Ajou University Hospital. The patients had either pathologic T3 stage or N1 stage. The radiation target volume encompassed the initial tumor bed identified preoperatively, resection margin area and celiac nodal area. In the case of N1 patients, the radiation field extended to the lower margin of the L3 vertebra for covering both para-aortic lymph nodes bearing area. The median total radiation dose was 50 Gy. Ten patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Thirteen patients (46%) showed loco-regional recurrences. The celiac axis nodal area was the most frequent site (4 patients). Five patients showed both loco-regional recurrence and a distant metastasis. Patients with positive lymph nodes had a relatively high probability of a distant metastasis (57.1%). Patients that had a positive resection margin showed a relatively high local failure rate (57.1%). The median disease-free survival period of all patients was 6 months and the 1- and 2-year disease free survival rates were 27.4% and 8.2%, respectively. The median overall survival period was 9 months. The 2- and 3-year overall survival rates were 31.6% and 15.8%, respectively. Conclusion: The pancreatic cancer patients with stage II had a high risk of local failure and a high risk of a distant metastasis. We suggest the concurrent use of an effective radiation-sensitizing chemotherapeutic drug and adjuvant chemotherapy after postoperative radiation therapy for the treatment of patients with stage II pancreatic cancer.

  15. Characteristics and outcomes of sentinel node-positive breast cancer patients after total mastectomy without axillary-specific treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom, Sarah; Cody, Hiram; Tan, Lee; Morrow, Monica; Pesce, Catherine; Setton, Jeremy; Rogers, Katherine; Arnold, Brittany; Eaton, Anne; Catalano, Jeffrey; McCormick, Beryl; Powell, Simon; Ho, Alice

    2012-11-01

    Regional failure rates are low in patients with a positive sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) who undergo breast-conserving therapy without axillary lymph node dissection (ALND). The applicability of these findings to total mastectomy (TM) patients is not established. Our aims were to evaluate the characteristics and outcomes of SLNB-positive TM patients who did not receive axillary-specific treatment and to compare them to similar patients who underwent breast-conserving surgery (BCS). A total of 535 patients with early-stage breast cancer who underwent definitive breast surgery (210 TM, 325 BCS), had a positive SLNB and did not receive ALND between 1997 and 2009 were identified from an institutional database. Characteristics and outcomes were compared between the TM and BCS groups. Most patients had stage I to IIA, estrogen receptor-positive, progesterone receptor-positive, Her2-negative invasive ductal carcinoma, with minimal nodal disease. Compared to the BCS group, TM patients were younger, had larger tumors, had higher nomogram scores predicting additional axillary disease and were more likely to receive chemotherapy. Ninety-four percent of the BCS cohort and 5 % of the TM cohort received adjuvant radiotherapy. At a median follow-up of 57.8 months, the 4-year local, regional and distant failure rates were 1.7, 1.2 and 0.7 % in the TM group and 1.4, 1.0 and 3.7 % in the BCS group. The 4-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 94.8 and 97.8 % in the TM group and 90.1 and 92.6 % in the BCS group. Early-stage breast cancer patients with minimal sentinel node disease experience excellent outcomes without ALND, whether they undergo BCS or TM.

  16. Patient-reported quality of life, unmet needs and care coordination outcomes: Moving toward targeted breast cancer survivorship care planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Meagan Elizabeth; Butow, Phyllis; Spillane, Andrew John; Boyle, Frances

    2016-06-01

    Survivorship care plans (SCPs) have been proposed for universal use with the aim of addressing the many unmet needs of cancer survivors. Trials have failed to find a significant impact of SCPs on quality of life outcomes. This study evaluated quality of life, unmet needs, satisfaction with health care and perception of cancer care coordination at the end of treatment in a cohort of women at the end of treatment for early breast cancer. The aim was to identify specific needs to assist in the design of a tailored SCP. Women completed patient-reported measures of health-related quality of life (FACT-B [ES]), unmet needs (CaSUN), satisfaction with medical care and cancer care coordination. Total scores and subscale scores for the whole cohort and results of analysis comparing three age groups were reported. Sixty-eight women (mean age 56) participated. Mean score for FACT-B = 108 and FACT-B (ES) = 167.4. Younger women (quality of life (P = 0.001 for FACT-B, TOI and FACT-B [ES]). Using CaSUN, 76.1% of participants reported at least one unmet need; mean number of unmet needs = 6.2. Younger women reported more unmet needs than older women. The most frequently reported unmet need was fear of cancer recurrence. Overall, participants were very satisfied with medical care and cancer care coordination. Younger women reported poorer quality of life and more unmet needs. SCPs should specifically target younger women and must include strategies to address fear of cancer recurrence if they are to lead to a measureable difference in outcomes. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. ABO blood type/Rh factor and the incidence and outcomes for patients with triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jennifer; Gao, Feng; Klimberg, V Suzanne; Margenthaler, Julie A

    2012-10-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has a poorer prognosis; the factors that contribute to this remain unclear. We hypothesized that TNBC is associated with ABO blood type/Rh factors that account for differences in survival. We identified 468 patients with stage I-III TNBC [estrogen receptor (ER)-negative, progesterone receptor (PR)-negative, and HER2 nonamplified]. Patient/tumor characteristics, treatments, and outcomes were obtained. Data were examined for associations with specific ABO blood type/Rh factors. Descriptive statistics and χ (2) analysis were utilized for data summary and comparisons. Of 468 TNBC patients, 283 had known ABO blood type [122 (43 %) O, 108 (38 %) A, 39 (14 %) B, and 14 (5 %) AB] and Rh factor [253 (89 %) positive and 30 (11 %) negative]. Mean patient age was 53.7 ± 12.5 years, and median follow-up was 30.2 ± 20.5 months. The incidence of each ABO blood type/Rh factor in our TNBC cohort was not different from the general population or a cohort of ER-positive breast cancers (P > 0.05). Compared with patients with blood type O, there was no difference in breast cancer-specific mortality for type A [hazard ratio (HR) 0.906; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.554-1.481], type B (HR 1.534; 95 % CI 0.792-2.972), or type AB (HR 0.488; 95 % CI 0.113-2.106). Compared with women with negative Rh, there was no difference in breast cancer-specific mortality for women with positive Rh (HR 1.161; 95 % CI 0.568-2.374). TNBC was not associated with a specific ABO blood type or Rh factor. Our results failed to demonstrate an association between ABO blood type/Rh factor and breast cancer mortality in patients with TNBC.

  18. IGF-I induced genes in stromal fibroblasts predict the clinical outcome of breast and lung cancer patients

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    Herrmann Richard

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I signalling is important for cancer initiation and progression. Given the emerging evidence for the role of the stroma in these processes, we aimed to characterize the effects of IGF-I on cancer cells and stromal cells separately. Methods We used an ex vivo culture model and measured gene expression changes after IGF-I stimulation with cDNA microarrays. In vitro data were correlated with in vivo findings by comparing the results with published expression datasets on human cancer biopsies. Results Upon stimulation with IGF-I, breast cancer cells and stromal fibroblasts show some common and other distinct response patterns. Among the up-regulated genes in the stromal fibroblasts we observed a significant enrichment in proliferation associated genes. The expression of the IGF-I induced genes was coherent and it provided a basis for the segregation of the patients into two groups. Patients with tumours with highly expressed IGF-I induced genes had a significantly lower survival rate than patients whose tumours showed lower levels of IGF-I induced gene expression (P = 0.029 - Norway/Stanford and P = 7.96e-09 - NKI dataset. Furthermore, based on an IGF-I induced gene expression signature derived from primary lung fibroblasts, a separation of prognostically different lung cancers was possible (P = 0.007 - Bhattacharjee and P = 0.008 - Garber dataset. Conclusion Expression patterns of genes induced by IGF-I in primary breast and lung fibroblasts accurately predict outcomes in breast and lung cancer patients. Furthermore, these IGF-I induced gene signatures derived from stromal fibroblasts might be promising predictors for the response to IGF-I targeted therapies. See the related commentary by Werner and Bruchim: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/8/2

  19. Assessment of nutritional parameter outcome in laryngeal cancer patients undergoing laryngectomy

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    Mohamad Taghi Khorsandi Ashtiani

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Laryngectomy in patients with laryngeal cancer can lead to the reduction of nutritional parameters. Supportive treatments and supplementary nutritional supports are recommended in all patients undergoing laryngectomy, even with acceptable preoperative nutritional indices.The aim of this study was to evaluate postoperative changes in nutritional parameters in patients with laryngeal cancer undergoing laryngectomy. Materials and Methods: In a prospective study from 2005 to 2007, 30 candidate patients for total laryngectomy in Amir Alam Hospital in Tehran were included for final diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma (stage T4. Nutritional parameters including body mass index (BMI, serum levels of albumin, hemoglobin, total protein concentration, total lymphocyte number and percentage were assessed one week before and one month after laryngectomy. All patients used their routine dietary regimens and those who received nutritional supplementation after surgery were excluded from the study. Results: Except for white blood cell count, a significant reduction was found in BMI, lymphocyte count, serum hemoglobin, total protein and albumin levels after surgery (P

  20. Cancer-Related Fatigue in Patients With and Survivors of Hodgkin Lymphoma: The Impact on Treatment Outcome and Social Reintegration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behringer, Karolin; Goergen, Helen; Müller, Horst; Thielen, Indra; Brillant, Corinne; Kreissl, Stefanie; Halbsguth, Teresa Veronika; Meissner, Julia; Greil, Richard; Moosmann, Peter; Shonukan, Oluwatoyin; Rueffer, Jens Ulrich; Flechtner, Hans-Henning; Fuchs, Michael; Diehl, Volker; Engert, Andreas; Borchmann, Peter

    2016-12-20

    Purpose Cancer-related fatigue occurs frequently in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and has a major impact on their quality of life. We hypothesized that severe fatigue (sFA) might have an impact on patients' treatment outcome and social reintegration. Methods Of 5,306 patients enrolled in the German Hodgkin Study Group's fifth generation of clinical trials in HL (HD13, HD14, and HD15; nonqualified and older [> 60 years] patients excluded), 4,529 provided data on health-related quality of life. We describe sFA (defined as a score ≥ 50 on the 0 to 100 scale from the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30) before and up to 9 years after therapy and analyze its impact on treatment outcome and social reintegration. Results The proportion of patients reporting sFA was 37% at baseline and ranged from 20% to 24% during follow-up. Baseline sFA was associated with significantly impaired progression-free survival and a trend to impaired overall survival, which can be overcome in patients receiving highly effective HL therapies as applied in our fifth-generation trials. Our analysis revealed a significant negative association of sFA and employment in survivors: 5 years after therapy, 51% and 63% of female and male survivors, respectively, with sFA were working or in professional education, compared with 78% and 90% without sFA, respectively ( P reintegration during follow-up. This observation underscores the need to address fatigue as a significant diagnosis when treating patients with and survivors of cancer.

  1. Determining issues of importance for the evaluation of quality of life and patient-reported outcomes in breast cancer: results of a survey of 1072 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollen, Patricia J; Msaouel, Pavlos; Gralla, Richard J

    2015-06-01

    Identifying key issues for patients is central to assessing treatment for cancer, especially when evaluating health-related quality of life (QL) and patient-reported outcomes (PROs). This study was conducted to provide enhanced content validity support by incorporating the views of a large number of patients with breast cancer. This methodological study used an anonymous, cross-sectional, electronic web-based survey of 1072 patients with a diagnosis of breast cancer. Patients ranked the importance of 21 issues on a 5-point scale. Issues included general, physical, functional, psychosocial, and summative items. Analysis was also performed by four key factors (age group, time since diagnosis, adjuvant treatment or not, and tumor extent). All of the top five issues rated as either "very important" or "important" were global issues-rather than symptoms-such as maintaining quality of life (ranked in these two highest categories by 99 % of patients), maintaining independence (97 %), and ability to perform normal activities (97 %). The abilities to concentrate and to be able to sleep (97 and 96 %, respectively) were ranked above specific breast cancer symptoms. Specific symptoms included within the top ten highest ranked items were fatigue, depression, anxiety, shortness of breath, and pain. This is the largest analysis of evidence-based data determining support for content validity for QL and PROs provided by patients with breast cancer. While symptoms are important to patients, the survey also demonstrates that PRO measures that only evaluate symptoms are not fully responding to patient-expressed needs. These results provide confidence in the content of quality of life measures for large groups of patients with breast cancer, including the new Breast Cancer Symptom Scale (BCSS) questionnaire.

  2. Treatment and outcome in cancer cervix patients treated between 1979 and 1994: A single institutional experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyamkishore Shrivastava

    2013-01-01

    Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study of 6234 patients with carcinoma of the cervix treated with radical intent between 1979 and 1994. All the work-up, staging investigations, treatment details, radiation protocols, outcomes, and toxicities were noted, compiled, and analyzed. Results: With a mean age of 46 years (range: 18-90 years; median: 45 years, 669 (11% patients were in stage Ib, 284 (5% were in stage IIa, 1891 (30% were in stage IIb, 69 (1% were in stage IIIa, and 3321 (53% were in stage IIIb. With a median follow-up of 68 months (57-79 months for the entire group, there was no significant difference in the outcome of 953 patients with international federation of gynecology and obstetrics (FIGO Ib-IIa treated after radical surgery, pre-operative radiation therapy (pre-op RT + Sx or after radical radiation; their disease-free survival (DFS was 60-62% at 8 years. In our series of 1891 patients with stage IIb and 3321 with stage IIIb, a respective DFS of 56% and 40% was achieved at 8 years. Conclusion: Over the last two decades, with the acquisition of newer facilities and inception of Joint Clinics, there has been a significant refinement in the treatment protocols and outcome. Improving radiation strategies to improve therapeutic ratio is the key to success.

  3. Differences in histopathological and biochemical outcomes in patients with low Gleason score prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbarn, Hendrik; Karakiewicz, Pierre I; Ahyai, Sascha A; Chun, Felix K H; Jeldres, Claudio; Haese, Alexander; Heinzer, Hans; Zacharias, Mario; Heuer, Roman; Eichelberg, Christian; Steuber, Thomas; Budäus, Lars; Köllermann, Jens; Salomon, Georg; Schlomm, Thorsten; Perrotte, Paul; Fisch, Margit; Huland, Hartwig; Graefen, Markus

    2010-03-01

    Diagnosis (case series). 4. To test whether the number or percentage of positive biopsy cores can be used to discriminate between patients with prostate cancer of a favourable and less favourable Gleason score (GS) or =3) were stratified into low- vs high-risk groups. Subsequently, we stratified patients according to the GS and the percentage of positive biopsy cores ( or =50%). The pathological stage and the 5-year biochemical recurrence (BCR)-free survival rates were examined in univariable and multivariable models. Based on the number of positive cores, the rate of extraprostatic disease was 11.7% and 23.3%, respectively, in the low-and high-risk GS < or =3 + 3 groups (P < 0.001). The 5-year BCR-free survival rates were 95.0%, 77.8%, 81.2% and 66.5% for, respectively, low- and high-risk GS < or =3 + 3 and for low- and high-risk GS 3 + 4 patients. Univariable and multivariable intergroup BCR rate differences were statistically significant between low- vs high-risk GS 3 + 3 patients (P < 0.001), but not significant between high-risk GS < or =3 + 3 vs low-risk GS 3 + 4 patients (P = 0.6). Comparable results were obtained when comparisons were made according to the percentage of positive biopsy cores. Our results corroborate the finding that not all patients with a biopsy GS of < or =3 + 3 prostate cancer have low-risk disease. High-risk GS < or =3 + 3 patients have a similar risk profile as more favourable GS 3 + 4 patients. This finding warrants consideration when deciding on treatment.

  4. [Influence of obesity on short-term surgical outcome in patients with gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shi-kuan; Zhou, Yan-bing; Zhou, Cheng-fu; Wang, Pei-ge; Wang, Hai-bo; Mao, Wei-zheng; Wang, Zhen-guang

    2010-02-01

    To explore the influence of obesity on surgical procedure and short-term surgical outcome in patients with gastric carcinoma. A total of 426 patients with gastric carcinoma underwent laparotomy in our hospital during January 2006 and June 2008. All the patients were divided into obesity group and non-obesity group according to body mass index (BMI). The thickness of subcutaneous fat (SCF), abdominal anterior-posterior diameter (APD) and transverse diameter (TD) at the umbilicus level were measured by abdominal CT. Furthermore, the surgical data and postoperative conditions including short-term outcome were reviewed and compared between two groups. The incidence of obesity was 29.8% in gastric carcinoma patients. Mean values of SCF thickness, APD and TD in obesity group and non-obesity group were (21.8+/-7.1) mm vs (14.4+/-7.5) mm, (223.2+/-24.6) mm vs (181.8+/-23.5) mm and (323.6+/-23.8) mm vs (285.8+/-24.4) mm (P=0.000). Longer operative time (P=0.007) and less amount of dissected lymph nodes were found in obesity group as compared to non-obesity group (P=0.000). Also, obesity group lasted a longer postoperative period of fever (P=0.000) and experienced more post-operative complications (P=0.005) than non-obesity group did. Abdominal CT scan may display the abdominal shape of gastric carcinoma patients, hence, it is useful to evaluate the difficulty of surgical procedure. These patients may involve in complicated surgical procedure and worse short-term outcome due to obese abdominal shape. Therefore, perioperative management should be emphasized for these patients.

  5. Patient compliance is critical for equivalent clinical outcomes for breast cancer treated by breast-conservation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B D; Brown, W A; Ampil, F L; Burton, G V; Yu, H; McDonald, J C

    2000-06-01

    To determine the compliance with a standard breast-conservation therapy (BCT) program in a predominantly indigent, minority population of patients with early breast cancer (stage I and II) served by a rural state institution in the South; to compare the clinical outcomes of this group with those reported in clinical trials; and to examine the socioeconomic factors that may have contributed to the rate of compliance. Disease-free survival and overall survival in early breast cancer treated by BCT versus modified radical mastectomy are reported to be equivalent in prospective randomized trials. However, patients enrolled in clinical trials may not be representative of patients living in the various diverse communities that make up the United States. The authors' hypothesis is that patients enrolled in clinical trials at the national level may not be representative of indigent patients in the rural South and that clinical trial results may not be directly applicable. A retrospective review of 55 women with early-stage breast cancer treated from 1990 to 1995 was performed. Clinical data, compliance with treatment and clinical follow-up, and recurrence rates were examined. Statistical analysis performed include the Fisher exact test, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, and log-rank test. Full compliance (defined as completion of the entire course of radiation therapy and clinical follow-up) with the BCT program was observed in only 36% of patients. Fifteen of the 35 noncompliant patients did not complete radiation therapy. A significantly higher local failure rate was observed: 8 of these 15 patients (53%) have had local failure. In contrast, patients who were either in full compliance with the BCT program or were deficient only in that they missed part of their clinical follow-up had local failure rates of 5% (1/20) and 10% (2/20), respectively. Age, race, stage of cancer, economic status (measured by availability of medical insurance), distance of patient's residence from

  6. The impact of music therapy versus music medicine on psychological outcomes and pain in cancer patients: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, Joke; Potvin, Noah; Kesslick, Amy; Shim, Minjung; Radl, Donna; Schriver, Emily; Gracely, Edward J; Komarnicky-Kocher, Lydia T

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the impact of music therapy (MT) versus music medicine (MM) interventions on psychological outcomes and pain in cancer patients and to enhance understanding of patients' experiences of these two types of music interventions. This study employed a mixed methods intervention design in which qualitative data were embedded within a randomized cross-over trial. Thirty-one adult cancer patients participated in two sessions that involved interactive music making with a music therapist (MT) and two sessions in which they listened to pre-recorded music without the presence of a therapist (MM). Before and after each session, participants reported on their mood, anxiety, relaxation, and pain by means of visual analogue and numeric rating scales. Thirty participants completed an exit interview. The quantitative data suggest that both interventions were equally effective in enhancing target outcomes. However, 77.4 % of participants expressed a preference for MT sessions. The qualitative data indicate that music improves symptom management, embodies hope for survival, and helps connect to a pre-illness self, but may also access memories of loss and trauma. MT sessions helped participants tap into inner resources such as playfulness and creativity. Interactive music making also allowed for emotional expression. Some participants preferred the familiarity and predictability of listening to pre-recorded music. The findings of this study advocate for the use of music in cancer care. Treatment benefits may depend on patient characteristics such as outlook on life and readiness to explore emotions related to the cancer experience.

  7. Investigation of Genetic Polymorphisms Related to the Outcome of Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellen Silva Cintra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between ATM, TP53 and MDM2 polymorphisms in prostate cancer patients and morbidity after radiotherapy. The presence of ATM (rs1801516, TP53 (rs1042522, rs1800371, rs17878362, rs17883323, and rs35117667, and MDM2 (rs2279744 polymorphisms was assessed by direct sequencing of PCR fragments from 48 patients with histologically proven prostate adenocarcinoma and treated with external beam radiation. The side effects were classified according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG score. The results showed no association between clinical characteristics and the development of radiation toxicities (P > 0.05. The C>T transition in the position 16273 (intron 3 of TP53 (rs35117667 was significantly associated with the risk of acute skin toxicity (OR: 0.0072, 95% CI 0.0002–0.227, P = 0.003. The intronic TP53 polymorphism at position 16250 (rs17883323 was associated with chronic urinary toxicity (OR: 0.071, 95%CI 0.006–0.784, P = 0.032. No significant associations were found for the remaining polymorphisms (P > 0.05. The results show that clinical characteristics were not determinant on the developing of radiation sensitivity in prostate cancer patients, and intronic TP53 polymorphisms would be associated with increased acute and chronic radiation toxicities. These observations corroborate the importance of investigating the genetic profile to predict adverse side effects in patients undergoing radiotherapy.

  8. Investigation of Genetic Polymorphisms Related to the Outcome of Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cintra, Hellen Silva; Pinezi, Juliana Castro Dourado; Machado, Graziella Dias Pinheiro; de Carvalho, Gustavo Moura; Carvalho, Ana Terra Silva; dos Santos, Thalles Eduardo Dias; Marciano, Ricardo Duarte; Soares, Renata de Bastos Ascenço

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between ATM, TP53 and MDM2 polymorphisms in prostate cancer patients and morbidity after radiotherapy. The presence of ATM (rs1801516), TP53 (rs1042522, rs1800371, rs17878362, rs17883323, and rs35117667), and MDM2 (rs2279744) polymorphisms was assessed by direct sequencing of PCR fragments from 48 patients with histologically proven prostate adenocarcinoma and treated with external beam radiation. The side effects were classified according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) score. The results showed no association between clinical characteristics and the development of radiation toxicities (P > 0.05). The C>T transition in the position 16273 (intron 3) of TP53 (rs35117667) was significantly associated with the risk of acute skin toxicity (OR: 0.0072, 95% CI 0.0002–0.227, P = 0.003). The intronic TP53 polymorphism at position 16250 (rs17883323) was associated with chronic urinary toxicity (OR: 0.071, 95%CI 0.006–0.784, P = 0.032). No significant associations were found for the remaining polymorphisms (P > 0.05). The results show that clinical characteristics were not determinant on the developing of radiation sensitivity in prostate cancer patients, and intronic TP53 polymorphisms would be associated with increased acute and chronic radiation toxicities. These observations corroborate the importance of investigating the genetic profile to predict adverse side effects in patients undergoing radiotherapy. PMID:24324286

  9. PTEN loss is a context-dependent outcome determinant in obese and non-obese endometrioid endometrial cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westin, Shannon N; Ju, Zhenlin; Broaddus, Russell R; Krakstad, Camilla; Li, Jane; Pal, Navdeep; Lu, Karen H; Coleman, Robert L; Hennessy, Bryan T; Klempner, Samuel J; Werner, Henrica M J; Salvesen, Helga B; Cantley, Lewis C; Mills, Gordon B; Myers, Andrea P

    2015-10-01

    Endometrial cancer incidence is increasing, due in part to a strong association with obesity. Mutations in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway, the central relay pathway of insulin signals, occur in the majority of endometrioid adenocarcinomas, the most common form of endometrial cancer. We sought to determine the impact of PI3K pathway alterations on progression free survival in a cohort of endometrioid endometrial cancers. Prognostic utility of PIK3CA, PIK3R1, and PTEN mutations, as well as PTEN protein loss by immunohistochemistry, was explored in the context of patient body mass index. Reverse-phase protein arrays were utilized to assess protein expression based on PTEN status. Among 187 endometrioid endometrial cancers, there were no statistically significant associations between PFS and PIK3CA, PIK3R1, PTEN mutation or loss. When stratified by body mass index, PTEN loss was associated with improved progression free survival (P obese (body mass index ≥ 30) patients. PTEN loss resulted in distinct protein changes: Canonical PI3K pathway activation was observed only in the non-obese population while decreased expression of β-CATENIN and phosphorylated FOXO3A was observed in obese patients. These data suggest the impact of PTEN loss on tumor biology and clinical outcomes must be interpreted in the context of body mass index, and provide a potential explanation for discrepant reports on the effect of PTEN status and obesity on prognosis in endometrial cancer. This reveals a clinically important interaction between metabolic state and tumor genetics that may unveil the biologic underpinning of obesity-related cancers and impact ongoing clinical trials with PI3K pathway inhibitors. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Adjuvant chemoradiation after laparoscopically assisted radical vaginal hysterectomy (LARVH) in patients with cervical cancer. Oncologic outcome and morbidity

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    Gruen, Arne; Musik, Thabea; Stromberger, Carmen; Budach, Volker; Marnitz, Simone [Charite Univ. Medicine Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiooncology; Koehler, Christhardt; Schneider, Achim [Charite Univ. Medicine Berlin, Campus Mitte- und Benjamim Franklin, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Gynaecology; Fueller, Juergen; Wendt, Thomas [Jena Univ. Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Radiooncology

    2011-06-15

    Compared to laparotomic surgery, laparoscopically assisted radical vaginal hysterectomy (LARVH) offers decreased blood loss during surgery and faster convalescence of the patient postoperatively, while at the same time delivering similar oncologic results. However, there is no data on outcome and toxicity of LARVH followed by (chemo)radiation. A total of 55 patients (range 28-78 years) with cervical cancer on FIGO stages IB1-IIIA (Tables 1 and 2) with risk factors were submitted to either external beam radiotherapy alone [EBRT, n = 8 (14%), including paraaortic irradiation, n = 4 (2.2%); EBRT and brachytherapy (BT), n = 33 (60%); BT alone, n = 14 (25.5%)] or chemoradiation after LARVH. At a median follow-up of 4.4 years, the 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) was 81.8% with 84.5% overall survival (OS). Acute grade 3 side effects were seen in 4 patients. These were mainly gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) symptoms. Grade 4 side effects were not observed. With similar oncologic outcome data and mostly mild side effects, LARVH followed by (chemo)radiation is a valid alternative in the treatment of cervical cancer patients. (orig.)

  11. Adjuvant chemoradiation after laparoscopically assisted vaginal radical hysterectomy (LARVH) in patients with cervical cancer: oncologic outcome and morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, Arne; Musik, Thabea; Köhler, Christhardt; Füller, Jürgen; Wendt, Thomas; Stromberger, Carmen; Budach, Volker; Schneider, Achim; Marnitz, Simone

    2011-06-01

    Compared to laparotomic surgery, laparoscopically assisted radical vaginal hysterectomy (LARVH) offers decreased blood loss during surgery and faster convalescence of the patient postoperatively, while at the same time delivering similar oncologic results. However, there is no data on outcome and toxicity of LARVH followed by (chemo)radiation. A total of 55 patients (range 28-78 years) with cervical cancer on FIGO stages IB1-IIIA (Tables 1 and 2) with risk factors were submitted to either external beam radiotherapy alone [EBRT, n = 8 (14%), including paraaortic irradiation, n = 4 (2.2%); EBRT and brachytherapy (BT), n = 33 (60%); BT alone, n = 14 (25.5%)] or chemoradiation after LARVH. At a median follow-up of 4.4 years, the 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) was 81.8% with 84.5% overall survival (OS). Acute grade 3 side effects were seen in 4 patients. These were mainly gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) symptoms. Grade 4 side effects were not observed. With similar oncologic outcome data and mostly mild side effects, LARVH followed by (chemo)radiation is a valid alternative in the treatment of cervical cancer patients.

  12. Preliminary outcome of a treatment strategy based on perioperative chemotherapy and surgery in patients with locally advanced colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arredondo, J; Pastor, C; Baixauli, J; Rodríguez, J; González, I; Vigil, C; Chopitea, A; Hernández-Lizoáin, J L

    2013-05-01

    Preoperative chemotherapy followed by radical surgery is an attractive treatment for locally advanced colon cancer (LACC) given the promising results of this approach in other locally advanced tumours. The study evaluates the outcome and treatment-related complications of perioperative oxaliplatin- and capecitabine-based chemotherapy and surgery for clinical Stage III colon cancer. Twenty-two consecutive patients with a CT-staged LACC were included. All were staged at baseline and before surgery. Surgery-related complications and oncological outcome were determined. Toxicity was manageable, with 19/22 patients completing the planned chemotherapy protocol. The median time from initial diagnosis to surgery was 65.5 days. The median time from the end of chemotherapy to surgery was 22 days. After neoadjuvant treatment, tumour reduction of 69.5% was observed by CT scan and a 59.9% decrease of SUVmax (standard uptake value) was achieved on positron emission tomography/CT. No progressive disease was reported during preoperative chemotherapy and surgery was performed in all 22 patients. Four patients developed postoperative complications. After a median postoperative follow-up of 14.4 months, the actuarial overall and disease-free survival rates were 100 and 90%. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery and chemotherapy for LACC is safe without apparent increase of early and medium-term complications. © 2013 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2013 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  13. Conversations for providers caring for patients with rectal cancer: Comparison of long-term patient-centered outcomes for patients with low rectal cancer facing ostomy or sphincter-sparing surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrinton, Lisa J; Altschuler, Andrea; McMullen, Carmit K; Bulkley, Joanna E; Hornbrook, Mark C; Sun, Virginia; Wendel, Christopher S; Grant, Marcia; Baldwin, Carol M; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Temple, Larissa K F; Krouse, Robert S

    2016-09-01

    For some patients with low rectal cancer, ostomy (with elimination into a pouch) may be the only realistic surgical option. However, some patients have a choice between ostomy and sphincter-sparing surgery. Sphincter-sparing surgery has been preferred over ostomy because it offers preservation of normal bowel function. However, this surgery can cause incontinence and bowel dysfunction. Increasingly, it has become evident that certain patients who are eligible for sphincter-sparing surgery may not be well served by the surgery, and construction of an ostomy may be better. No validated assessment tool or decision aid has been published to help newly diagnosed patients decide between the two surgeries or to help physicians elicit long-term surgical outcomes. Furthermore, comparison of long-term outcomes and late effects after the two surgeries has not been synthesized. Therefore, this systematic review summarizes controlled studies that compared long-term survivorship outcomes between these two surgical groups. The goals are: 1) to improve understanding and shared decision-making among surgeons, oncologists, primary care providers, patients, and caregivers; 2) to increase the patient's participation in the decision; 3) to alert the primary care provider to patient challenges that could be addressed by provider attention and intervention; and 4) ultimately, to improve patients' long-term quality of life. This report includes discussion points for health care providers to use with their patients during initial discussions of ostomy and sphincter-sparing surgery as well as questions to ask during follow-up examinations to ascertain any long-term challenges facing the patient. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:387-397. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  14. The Impact of SMAD4 Loss on Outcome in Patients with Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Treated with Systemic Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Ormanns

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of the tumor suppressor mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 4 (SMAD4 has not yet been defined in patients (pts with advanced pancreatic cancer (aPC. This translational research study was designed to evaluate the impact of tumoral SMAD4 loss on clinicopathological parameters and outcome in PC patients receiving palliative chemotherapy. Using immunohistochemistry, we examined SMAD4 expression in tumor tissue of 143 aPC pts treated within completed prospective clinical and biomarker trials. In uni- and multivariate analyses, SMAD4 expression status was correlated to clinicopathological patient characteristics and outcome. At chemotherapy initiation, 128 pts had metastatic PC; most pts (n = 99 received a gemcitabine-based regimen. SMAD4 loss was detected in 92 pts (64%; patient characteristics such as gender, age, tumor grading, disease stage or number of metastatic sites had no significant impact on tumoral SMAD4 status. In univariate analyses, SMAD4 loss had no impact on overall survival (hazard ratio (HR 1.008, p = 0.656; however, we observed a prolonged progression-free survival (HR 1.565, p = 0.038 in pts with tumoral SMAD4 loss. This finding was confirmed in multivariate analyses (HR 1.790, p = 0.040, but only for gemcitabine-treated pts. In contrast to previous studies in resectable PC, loss of SMAD4 expression was not associated with a negative outcome in patients with advanced PC receiving systemic chemotherapy.

  15. Methods for implementing patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures of symptomatic adverse events in cancer clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Ethan; Rogak, Lauren J.; Dueck, Amylou C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is increasing interest to use patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures to evaluate symptomatic adverse events (AEs) in cancer treatment trials. However, there are currently no standard recommended approaches for integrating patient-reported AE measures into trials. Methods Approaches are identified from prior trials for selecting AEs for solicited patient-reporting; administering patient-reported AE measures; and analyzing and reporting results. Findings Approaches for integrating patient-reported AE measures into cancer trials generally combine current standard methods for clinician-reported AEs as well as established best practices for employing PRO measures. Specific AEs can be selected for a PRO questionnaire based on common and expected reactions in a given trial context, derived from literature review and qualitative/mixed methods evaluations and should be the same set administered across all arms of a trial. A mechanism for collecting unsolicited patient-reported AEs will also ideally be included. Patients will preferably report at baseline and end of active treatment as well as on a frequent standardized schedule during active treatment, such as weekly from home, with a recall period corresponding to the frequency of reporting (e.g., past 7 days). Less frequent reporting may be considered after an initial intensive monitoring period for trials of prolonged treatments and during long-term follow up. Electronic PRO data collection is preferred. Backup data collection for missed PRO reports is advisable to boost response rates. Analysis can employ a combination of approaches to AE and PRO data. If a high proportion of patients is experiencing baseline symptoms, systematic subtraction of these from on-study AEs should be considered to improve reporting of symptoms related to treatment. More granular longitudinal analyses of individual symptoms can also be useful. Implications Methods are evolving for integrating patient-reported symptomatic AEs

  16. Technical knacks and outcomes of extended extrahepatic bile duct resection in patients with mid bile duct cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Ha, Tae-Yong; Kim, Ki-Hun; Ahn, Chul-Soo; Moon, Deok-Bog; Song, Gi-Won; Jung, Dong-Hwan; Park, Gil-Chun; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2013-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Mid bile duct cancers often involve the proximal intrapancreatic bile duct, and resection of the extrahepatic bile duct (EHBD) can result in a tumor-positive distal resection margin (RM). We attempted a customized surgical procedure to obtain a tumor-free distal RM during EHBD resection, so that R0 resection can be achieved without performing pancreaticoduodenectomy through extended EHBD resection. Methods We previously reported the surgical procedures of extended EHBD resection, in which the intrapancreatic duct excavation resembles a ≥2 cm-long funnel. This unique procedure was performed in 11 cases of mid bile duct cancer occurring in elderly patients between the ages of 70 and 83 years. Results The tumor involved the intrapancreatic duct in all cases. Deep pancreatic excavation per se required about 30-60 minutes. Cancer-free hepatic duct RM was obtained in 10 patients. Prolonged leakage of pancreatic juice occurred in 2 patients, but all were controlled with supportive care. Adjuvant therapies were primarily applied to RM-positive or lymph node-positive patients. Their 1-year and 3-year survival rates were 90.9% and 60.6%, respectively. Conclusions We suggest that extended EHBD resection can be performed as a beneficial option to achieve R0 resection in cases in which pancreaticoduodenectomy should be avoided due to various causes including old age and expectation of a poor outcome. PMID:26155223

  17. Treatment, short-term outcomes, and costs associated with larynx cancer care in commercially insured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Andrew T; Chang, Hsien-Yen; Quon, Harry; Kang, Hyunseok; Kiess, Ana P; Eisele, David W; Frick, Kevin D; Gourin, Christine G

    2018-01-01

    To examine associations between treatment, complications, and costs in patients with laryngeal cancer. Retrospective cross-sectional analysis of MarketScan Commercial Claim and Encounters data. We evaluated 10,969 patients diagnosed with laryngeal cancer from 2010 to 2012 using cross-tabulations and multivariate regression. Chemoradiation was significantly associated with supraglottic tumors (relative risk ratio [RRR] = 5.9 [4.4-7.8]), pretreatment gastrostomy (RRR = 4.0 [2.7-6.1]), and alcohol abuse (RRR = 0.5 [0.3-0.9]). Treatment-related complications occurred in 23% of patients, with medical complications in 22% and surgical complications in 7%. Chemoradiation (odds ratio [OR] = 3.7 [2.6-5.2]), major surgical procedures (OR = 4.9 [3.5-6.8]), reconstruction (OR = 7.7 (4.1-14.7)], and advanced comorbidity (OR = 9.7 [5.7-16.5] were associated with acute complications. Recurrent/persistent disease occurred in 23% of patients and was associated with high-volume care (OR = 1.4 [1.1-1.8]). Salvage surgery was performed in 46% of patients with recurrent/persistent disease and was less likely for supraglottic disease (OR = 0.5 [0.4-0.8]) and after chemoradiation (OR = 0.4 [0.2-0.6]). Initial treatment and 1-year overall costs for chemoradiation were higher than all other treatment categories, after controlling for all other variables including complications and salvage. High-volume care was associated with significantly lower costs of care for surgical patients but was not associated with differences in costs of care for nonoperative treatment. In commercially insured patients laryngeal cancer, chemoradiation was associated with increased costs, an increased likelihood of treatment-related medical complications, and a reduced likelihood of surgical salvage. Higher-volume surgical care was associated with lower initial treatment and 1-year costs of care. These data have implications for discussions of value and quality in an era of healthcare reform. 2c. Laryngoscope

  18. Patient reported outcomes in head and neck cancer: selecting instruments for quality of life integration in clinical protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Augusta P; Gonçalves, Joaquim; Sequeira, Teresa; Ribeiro, Cláudia; Lopes, Carlos; Monteiro, Eurico; Pimentel, Francisco L

    2010-10-31

    Health Related Quality of Life has been used in medical research for more than twenty years, being progressively accepted during the last decade as an important patient reported outcome. Considering the multidimensional approach involved in Health Related Quality of Life assessment, instrument applicability and cultural adaptation must be tested for each population. In order to select the most appropriate instrument for Head and Neck cancer patients, two major Health Related Quality of Life specific questionnaires for Head and Neck cancer patients were compared. Conceptual differences, psychometric characteristics, scores, reliability, construct validity and sensitivity to symptomatology, tumour location, tumour size were analyzed. 102 consecutive Head and Neck cancer patients completed two different Health Related Quality of Life questionnaires: EORTC QLQ-C30 and its specific head and neck module QLQ-H&N35 and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy Scales (FACT-H&N). Patients completed the questionnaires, immediately before consultation as a part of the routine evaluation. A greater variability was always found in the EORTC QLC-C30 questionnaire's scores for all comparable domains. Both instruments revealed a good internal consistency and demonstrated to be good tools to distinguish symptomatic patients. The EORTC questionnaires still demonstrated sensitivity to distinguish T3 and T4 staging. Conceptual differences and the psychometric characteristics are discussed. Our results suggest that these two instruments assess different aspects of Health Related Quality of Life - the questionnaires should be used separately and chosen according to the study objectives and methodology. This study emphases the importance in selecting the appropriate tool as a critical success factor in implementing routine Health Related Quality of Life assessment in clinical practice. This decision assumes particularly importance when utilization of results in real time and

  19. Associations Between Travel Distance, Hospital Volume, and Outcomes Following Radical Cystectomy in Patients With Muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Leilei; Taylor, Benjamin L; Mamtani, Ronac; Christodouleas, John P; Guzzo, Thomas J

    2018-01-02

    To explore the associations between travel distance, hospital volume, and outcomes following radical cystectomy (RC) for muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). The 2006 to 2013 National Cancer Database was queried to identify patients with MIBC who underwent RC. Multivariable regressions alternately including travel distance, hospital volume, and both in the models were used. Travel distances and hospital volumes were categorized by quartiles. Outcomes of interest were overall survival and quality-of-care indicators. A total of 6551 patients were included in the final cohort. When only travel distance or hospital volume was included in the multivariable regression model, fourth quartiles of both variables were associated with improved overall survival. When both travel distance and hospital volume were included in the model, only hospital volume was found to be associated with overall survival. Sensitivity analyses with both travel distance and hospital volume considered as continuous variables showed similar results. Patients who underwent RC in high-volume hospitals were more likely to receive neoadjuvant chemotherapy, have 10 or more lymph nodes removed, but also had higher odds of surgical delay (>3 months) in the full models adjusting for travel distance. This National Cancer Database-based study suggests that the association between longer travel distance and improved overall survival (distance bias effect) after RC for MIBC is mainly mediated by higher hospital volume. The benefits of having RC at high-volume hospitals may outweigh the potential disadvantages of longer travel distance, which further supports the continued regionalization of RC and cancer care for MIBC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical outcome of percutaneous RF-ablation of non-operable patients with liver metastasis from breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kümler, Iben; Parner, Vibeke Kirk; Tuxen, Malgorzata K.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Despite improved anti-neoplastic treatment the prognosis for patients with liver metastases from metastatic breast cancer remains poor. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-two consecutive patients with metastatic breast cancer treated with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) at the Department...

  1. Plasma TIMP-1 levels and treatment outcome in patients treated with XELOX for metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, C; Qvortrup, C; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2011-01-01

    and oxaliplatin) as first-line treatment. PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred and twenty patients were included. Blood samples were collected before treatment and 3 weeks later before the next treatment cycle. Plasma TIMP-1 and serum CEA levels were correlated to treatment outcome. RESULTS: No significant...... associations between baseline TIMP-1 or CEA levels and best response to treatment or progression-free survival (PFS) could be demonstrated. In contrast, high baseline plasma TIMP-1 levels were associated with poor overall survival (OS), P = 0.008, hazard ratio (HR) = 1.80 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.......03). Conclusions: Both high baseline and subsequent increase in TIMP-1 levels were associated with shorter OS in patients with mCRC receiving XELOX as first-line treatment, whereas baseline TIMP-1 levels were not associated with response or PFS following XELOX treatment....

  2. Short-Term Outcomes of Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection in Patients with Early Gastric Cancer: A Prospective Multicenter Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Il Ju; Lee, Na Rae; Kim, Sang Gyun; Lee, Wan Sik; Park, Seun Ja; Kim, Jae J.; Lee, Jun Haeng; Kwon, Jin-Won; Park, Seung-Hee; You, Ji Hye; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lim, Chul-Hyun; Cho, Joo Young; Kim, Gwang Ha; Lee, Yong Chan; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Kim, Ji Young; Chun, Hoon Jai; Seol, Sang-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is an effective treatment for early gastric cancer (EGC) that has demonstrated a minimal risk of lymph node metastasis in retrospective studies. We sought to prospectively evaluate the short-term outcomes of ESD treatment in EGCs. Methods A prospective multicenter cohort study of neoplasms 3 cm or less in diameter at endoscopic size evaluation was performed in 12 Korean ESD study group-related university hospitals and the National Cancer Center. Resected specimens were evaluated by the central pathologic review board. Results A patient cohort (n=712) with a total of 737 EGCs was analyzed. The margin-freeen bloc resection rate was 97.3%, and curative resection of 640 lesions (86.8%) was achieved. Lower curative resection rates were associated with lesions 2 to 3 cm in size prior to ESD compared with lesions 2 cm or less in size (78.6% vs 88.1%, respectively, p=0.009). Significant factors associated with noncurative resection were moderately or poorly differentiated histological type, posterior wall tumor location, tumor size larger than 3 cm, ulceration, and submucosal invasion. Delayed bleeding occurred in 49 patients (6.9%), and 12 patients (1.7%) exhibited perforations. Conclusions ESD is an effective treatment with a high curative resection rate for EGCs that meets relatively conservative pre-ESD indications. Long-term survival outcomes should be evaluated in follow-up studies. PMID:27172929

  3. Twitter Social Media is an Effective Tool for Breast Cancer Patient Education and Support: Patient-Reported Outcomes by Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attai, Deanna J; Cowher, Michael S; Al-Hamadani, Mohammed; Schoger, Jody M; Staley, Alicia C; Landercasper, Jeffrey

    2015-07-30

    Despite reported benefits, many women do not attend breast cancer support groups. Abundant online resources for support exist, but information regarding the effectiveness of participation is lacking. We report the results of a Twitter breast cancer support community participant survey. The aim was to determine the effectiveness of social media as a tool for breast cancer patient education and decreasing anxiety. The Breast Cancer Social Media Twitter support community (#BCSM) began in July 2011. Institutional review board approval with a waiver of informed consent was obtained for a deidentified survey that was posted for 2 weeks on Twitter and on the #BCSM blog and Facebook page. There were 206 respondents to the survey. In all, 92.7% (191/206) were female. Respondents reported increased knowledge about breast cancer in the following domains: overall knowledge (80.9%, 153/189), survivorship (85.7%, 162/189), metastatic breast cancer (79.4%, 150/189), cancer types and biology (70.9%, 134/189), clinical trials and research (66.1%, 125/189), treatment options (55.6%, 105/189), breast imaging (56.6%, 107/189), genetic testing and risk assessment (53.9%, 102/189), and radiotherapy (43.4%, 82/189). Participation led 31.2% (59/189) to seek a second opinion or bring additional information to the attention of their treatment team and 71.9% (136/189) reported plans to increase their outreach and advocacy efforts as a result of participation. Levels of reported anxiety before and after participation were analyzed: 29 of 43 (67%) patients who initially reported "high or extreme" anxiety reported "low or no" anxiety after participation (Psocial media support group.

  4. Impact of Diabetes, Insulin, and Metformin Use on the Outcome of Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Primary Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenblick, Amir; Agbor-Tarh, Dominique; Bradbury, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies have suggested an association between metformin use and improved outcome in patients with diabetes and breast cancer. In the current study, we aimed to explore this association in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 ) -positive primary breast cancer in the cont...

  5. Long-Term Outcomes and Complications in Patients With Craniopharyngioma: The British Columbia Cancer Agency Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Andrea C., E-mail: andrealo@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Howard, A. Fuchsia [School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Nichol, Alan; Sidhu, Keerat; Abdulsatar, Farah [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Hasan, Haroon [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Goddard, Karen [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: We report long-term outcomes and complications of craniopharyngioma patients referred to our institution. Methods and Materials: Between 1971 and 2010, 123 consecutive patients received primary treatment for craniopharyngioma in British Columbia and were referred to our institution. The median age was 30 years (range, 2-80 years). Thirty-nine percent of patients were treated primarily with subtotal resection (STR) and radiation therapy (RT), 28% with STR alone, 15% with gross total resection, 11% with cyst drainage (CD) alone, 5% with CD+RT, and 2% with RT alone. Eight percent of patients received intracystic bleomycin (ICB) therapy. Results: Median follow-up was 8.9 years, and study endpoints were reported at 10 years. Ten-year Kaplan-Meier progression-free survival (PFS) was 46%. Patients treated with STR+RT or CD+RT had the highest PFS (82% and 83%, respectively). There were no significant differences between PFS after adjuvant versus salvage RT (84% vs 74%, respectively; P=.6). Disease-specific survival (DSS) was 88%, and overall survival (OS) was 80%. Primary treatment modality did not affect DSS or OS, while older age was a negative prognostic factor for OS but not DSS. Kaplan-Meier rates for visual deterioration, anterior pituitary hormone deficiency, diabetes insipidus, seizure disorder, and cerebrovascular events (CVE) due to treatment, not tumor progression, were 27%, 76%, 45%, 16%, and 11%, respectively. The CVE rate was 29% in patients who received ICB compared to 10% in those who did not (P=.07). Conclusions: We report favorable PFS in patients with craniopharyngioma, especially in those who received RT after surgery. DSS and OS rates were excellent regardless of primary treatment modality. We observed a high incidence of hypopituitarism, visual deterioration, and seizure disorder. Eleven percent of patients experienced CVEs after treatment. There was a suggestion of increased CVE risk in patients treated with ICB.

  6. A guided self-help intervention targeting psychological distress among head and neck cancer and lung cancer patients: motivation to start, experiences and perceived outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebber, Anne-Marie H; van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Melissant, Heleen C; Cuijpers, Pim; van Straten, Annemieke; Becker-Commissaris, Annemarie; Leemans, C René; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M

    2017-01-01

    Recent results of a randomized clinical trial showed that a guided self-help intervention (based on problem-solving therapy) targeting psychological distress among head and neck cancer and lung cancer patients is effective. This study qualitatively explored motivation to start, experiences with and perceived outcomes of this intervention. Data were collected from semi-structured interviews of 16 patients. All interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed individually by two coders and coded into key issues and themes. Patients participated in the intervention for intrinsic (e.g. to help oneself) and for extrinsic reasons (e.g. being asked by a care professional or to help improve health care). Participants indicated positive and negative experiences with the intervention. Several participants appreciated participating as being a pleasant way to work on oneself, while others described participating as too confrontational. Some expressed their disappointment as they felt the intervention had brought them nothing or indicated that they felt worse temporarily, but most participants perceived positive outcomes of the intervention (e.g. feeling less distressed and having learned what matters in life). Cancer patients have various reasons to start a guided self-help intervention. Participants appreciated the guided self-help as intervention to address psychological distress, but there were also concerns. Most participants reported the intervention to be beneficial. The results suggest the need to identify patients who might benefit most from guided self-help targeting psychological distress and that interventions should be further tailored to individual cancer patients' requirements.

  7. Characteristics and outcomes of breast cancer patients enrolled in the National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program sponsored phase I clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynce, Filipa; Blackburn, Matthew J; Cai, Ling; Wang, Heping; Rubinstein, Larry; Harris, Pamela; Isaacs, Claudine; Pohlmann, Paula R

    2017-11-08

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death among women. Given the availability of approved therapies and abundance of phase II and III clinical trials, historically few BC patients have been referred for consideration of participation on a phase I trial. We were interested in determining whether clinical benefit rates differed in patients with BC from other patients enrolled in phase I trials. We performed a retrospective analysis of all Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP) sponsored phase I trials from 1993 to 2012. We report an analysis of demographic variables, rates of response to treatment, grade 4 toxicities, and treatment-related deaths. De-identified data from 8087 patients were analyzed, with 1,376 having a diagnosis of BC. The median time from initial cancer diagnosis to enrollment in a CTEP-sponsored phase I clinical trial was 614 days for all patients. Breast cancer patients were enrolled on average 790 days after initial diagnosis, while non-BC patients had a median enrollment time of 582 days (p enrolled on phase I clinical trials, BC patients tend to derive clinical benefit from these therapies with similar toxicity profile. This evidence further supports enrollment of BC patients on phase I trials.

  8. A comprehensive analysis of clinical outcomes in lung cancer patients harboring a MET exon 14 skipping mutation compared to other driver mutations in an East Asian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, Chien-Hung; Hsieh, Min-Shu; Wu, Shang-Gin; Shih, Jin-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent somatic splice-site alterations at MET exon 14 (MET(Δ14)), which result in exon skipping and MET proto-oncogene, receptor tyrosine kinase (MET) activation, have been characterised. However, their demographic features and clinical outcomes in East Asian lung cancer patients have yet to be determined. A one-step reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), using RNA samples from 850 East Asian lung cancer patients, was performed in order to detect MET(Δ14) and five other major driver mutations, including those in the EGFR, KRAS, ALK, HER2, and ROS1 genes. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to confirm the overexpression of MET in patients harbouring the MET(Δ14) mutation. We analysed the demographic data and clinical outcomes of MET(Δ14) mutation positive lung cancer patients and compared them to those of MET(Δ14) mutation negative lung cancer patients. In total, 27 lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) patients and 1 squamous cell carcinoma patient with the MET(Δ14) mutation were identified. The overall incidence was 3.3% for lung cancer and 4.0% for lung ADC. IHC demonstrated that the majority of lung cancer patients harboring a MET(Δ14) mutation exhibited a strong cytoplasmic expression of MET. MET(Δ14) mutation positive patients were generally quite elderly individuals. Stage IV MET(Δ14) mutation positive lung cancer patients receiving no specific anti-MET therapy were observed to have a similar overall survival (OS) compared to patients in the all negative group (P>0.05). In the multivariate analysis, mutation status was found not to be a major risk factor for OS in lung cancer patients without appropriate tyrosine kinase inhibitors treatment. The OS of MET(Δ14) mutation positive lung cancer patients is comparable to that of the major driver gene mutation negative lung cancer patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Matched Cohort Analysis of Outcomes of Definitive Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahn, Shannon, E-mail: shannonkahn@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Jani, Ashesh; Edelman, Scott; Rossi, Peter; Godette, Karen; Landry, Jerome; Anderson, Cynthia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To compare the biochemical outcome and toxicity scores of men with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and prostate cancer with a matched control population with negative or unknown HIV status when treated with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: A single-institution database of men with prostate cancer treated with EBRT from 1999 to 2009 was reviewed. Thirteen men with HIV were identified and matched to 2 control patients according to age, race, T stage, prostate-specific antigen level, Gleason score, RT dose, intensity-modulated RT vs. three-dimensional conformal RT, and whole-pelvis vs. prostate-only RT, for a total of 39 cases. The median follow-up time was 39 months (range, 3-110 months). Results: The 4-year biochemical failure (BF)-free survival rate was 87% in the HIV-positive group vs. 89% in the controls (p = 0.94). Pre- and post-RT viral loads were found to be predictive of BF (p = 0.04 and p = 0.04, respectively). No men with HIV died, whereas 2 in the control group died of causes unrelated to prostate cancer. Acute and chronic genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity were less in the HIV-positive patients than in controls (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p = 0.003, and p < 0.001, respectively). The HIV-positive men experienced an average decline in CD4 count of 193 cells/mm{sup 3}. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that men with HIV treated with EBRT have a similar risk of BF; however, high viral loads may contribute to an increased risk. This analysis supports that HIV-positive men with prostate cancer can be treated with definitive EBRT with similar disease control and toxicity outcomes as in the general population.

  10. Antithrombotic therapy in patients with thrombocytopenic cancer: outcomes associated with reduced-dose, low-molecular-weight heparin during hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babilonia, Katrina M; Golightly, Larry K; Gutman, Jonathan A; Hassell, Kathryn L; Kaiser, Jeffrey N; Kiser, Tyree H; Klem, Patrick M; Trujillo, Toby C

    2014-11-01

    Guidelines are discordant concerning management of patients having thrombocytopenia with cancer-associated thrombosis (CAT). Hospitalized adults with CAT and platelets ≤50 × 10(9) cells/L were managed with dalteparin 100 units/kg subcutaneously once daily. Comparator patients with CAT and platelets >50 × 10(9) cells/L were managed with dalteparin 200 units/kg/d. Outcomes of 35 patients with thrombocytopenia (mean platelet count 26 ± 8.3 × 10(9) cells/L) and 58 comparator patients (mean platelet count 155 ± 75 × 10(9) cells/L) were evaluated. In all, 2 (5.7%) patients in the thrombocytopenia group and 1 patient (1.9%) in the comparator group experienced new-onset venous thromboembolism (odds ratio 3.31, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.29-37.90, P = .556). The incidence of bleeding in patients with thrombocytopenia (8.6%) was similar to that in comparator patients (9.4%; risk ratio 0.94, 95% CI 0.37-2.39, P = .607). In hospitalized patients having thrombocytopenia with CAT, reduced-dose low-molecular-weight heparin was generally efficacious. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Integration of Early Specialist Palliative Care in Cancer Care and Patient Related Outcomes: A Critical Review of Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salins, Naveen; Ramanjulu, Raghavendra; Patra, Lipika; Deodhar, Jayita; Muckaden, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: World Health Organization and American Society of Clinical Oncology recommend early integration of specialist palliative care in patients with cancer. This paper focuses on critical review of evidence on integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care and patient-related outcomes. Methods: The question for the literature search was – Does integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care influences patient-related outcomes? 31 articles related to literature search review question were included in this paper. Results: Ten patient-related outcomes of early specialist palliative care in adult cancer care was studied. Studies by Temel et al. (2012), Bakitas et al. (2009), Zimmermann et al. (2014), Rugno et al. (2014), Lowery et al. (2013) and Walker et al. (2014) showed early specialist palliative care improves health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Studies by Pirl et al. (2012), Lowery et al. (2013), and Walker et al. (2014) showed early specialist palliative care improved mood depression and anxiety. Studies by Zimmermann et al. and Rugno et al. (2014) showed symptom control benefit of early specialist palliative care. Studies by Temel (2010), Bakitas (2015) and Rugno et al. (2014) showed survival improvement with early specialist palliative care. All these studies were carried in ambulatory palliative care setting. No survival benefit of palliative care intervention was seen in inpatient palliative care setting. The studies by Geer et al. (2012), Rugno et al. (2014), and Lowery et al. (2013) showed that early palliative care intervention positively influences treatment decision making. All the studies showed that palliative care intervention group received less intravenous chemotherapy in last few weeks of life. Studies by Yoong et al. and Temel et al. (2011) shows early specialist palliative care improves advanced care planning. Studies by Temel et al. (2010), Greer et al. (2012), McNamara et al. (2013), Hui et al. (2014

  12. PROutine: a feasibility study assessing surveillance of electronic patient reported outcomes and adherence via smartphone app in advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benze, Gesine; Nauck, Friedemann; Alt-Epping, Bernd; Gianni, Giuseppe; Bauknecht, Thomas; Ettl, Johannes; Munte, Anna; Kretzschmar, Luisa; Gaertner, Jan

    2017-10-26

    In advanced cancer, quality of life (QoL) is a major treatment goal. In order to achieve this, the identification of suffering by screening for patient-reported-outcomes (PROs, i.e., symptoms) is of utmost importance. The use of paper-pencil questionnaires is associated with significant shortcomings due to missing data, recall bias and transcription errors. Other than that, the electronic recording of PROs by mobile Health (mHealth) offers a number of advantages. The aim of this study was to test whether the routine assessment of PROs via a newly developed smartphone application (MeQoL®) is feasible. A prospective, uncontrolled, multi-center, feasibility trial was performed in adult outpatients with advanced, solid cancer. Patients under anti-cancer therapy and with regular outpatient visits were eligible. Patients daily recorded the degree of perceived distress (NCCN Distress Thermometer®), pain intensity {average and worst [numerical rating scale (NRS), 0-10]}, the number of breakthrough pain episodes (BPE) and ten questions from a modified version of the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS). Weekly, five questions concerning different domains of QoL from the short-form 8 (SF-8) questionnaire were obtained. Also, patients recorded the intake of their opioid rescue medication. According to the main scope of the trial (feasibility), no primary endpoint was defined. Rather, the following main feasibility criteria were assessed: missing data, drop-out- and acceptance-rate, patient satisfaction, patients' judgement of practicability, patients' and physicians' suggestions for improvement and basic clinical and demographic data of the participating patients. The study was registered in the German Clinical Trials Register (ID: DRKS00008761). In three German cancer centers, 40 patients {female: 28 (70%); average age, 57 years [range, 27-73 years; standard deviation (SD), 12]} were included. As three devices were lost on transport, 37 devices could be evaluated. The

  13. Triple-negative breast cancer patients treated at MD Anderson Cancer Center in phase I trials: improved outcomes with combination chemotherapy and targeted agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Prasanth; Moulder, Stacy; Lee, J Jack; Janku, Filip; Valero, Vicente; Zinner, Ralph G; Naing, Aung; Fu, Siqing; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M; Hong, David; Stephen, Bettzy; Stephens, Philip; Yelensky, Roman; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Kurzrock, Razelle; Wheler, Jennifer J

    2014-12-01

    Patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) have poor treatment outcomes. We reviewed the electronic records of consecutive patients with metastatic TNBC treated in phase I clinic at MD Anderson Cancer Center (Houston, TX) between Augu st 2005 and May 2012. One hundred and six patients received at least 1 phase I trial. Twelve of 98 evaluable patients (12%) had either complete response (CR; n = 1), partial response (PR; n = 7), or stable disease ≥ 6 months (SD; n = 4). Patients treated on matched therapy (n = 16) compared with those on nonmatched therapy (n = 90) had improved SD ≥ 6 months/PR/CR (33% vs. 8%; P = 0.018) and longer progression-free survival (PFS; median, 6.4 vs. 1.9 months; P = 0.001). Eleven of 57 evaluable patients (19%) treated with combination chemotherapy and targeted therapy had SD ≥ 6 months/PR/CR versus 1 of 41 evaluable patients (2%) treated on other phase I trials (P = 0.013), and longer PFS (3.0 vs. 1.6 months; P improved PFS compared with those with and without molecular alterations treated on nonmatched therapy (n = 27; 6.4 vs. 3.2 months; P = 0.036). On multivariate analysis, improved PFS was associated with treatment with combined chemotherapy and targeted agents (P = 0.0002), ≤ 2 metastatic sites (P = 0.003), therapy with PI3K/AKT/mTOR inhibitors for those with cognate pathway abnormalities (P = 0.018), and treatment with antiangiogenic agents (P = 0.023). In summary, combinations of chemotherapy and angiogenesis and/or PI3K/AKT/mTOR inhibitors demonstrated improved outcomes in patients with metastatic TNBC. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Sublingual Fentanyl Tablets for Relief of Breakthrough Pain in Cancer Patients and Association with Quality-of-Life Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guitart, Jordi; Vargas, María Isabel; De Sanctis, Vicente; Folch, Jordi; Salazar, Rafael; Fuentes, José; Coma, Jordi; Ferreras, Julia; Moya, Jordi; Tomás, Albert; Estivill, Pere; Rodelas, Francisco; Jiménez, Antonio Javier

    2015-12-01

    Breakthrough pain (BTP) is highly prevalent in patients with cancer and is strongly associated with adverse outcomes related to health status, mood, anxiety and depression. However, studies on the effect of BTP medication on quality of life (QOL) are lacking. The purpose of this study was to provide a qualitative evaluation of the effect of sublingual fentanyl tablets (SFT), a therapy specifically developed for BTP, on the QOL of cancer pain patients. We conducted a multicentre, prospective observation post-authorisation, open-label study between March and December 2013. The study consisted of a screening visit and four assessment points at 3, 7, 15 and 30 days. Pain intensity (PI), frequency of BTP, onset of pain relief and adverse events (AEs) were assessed at each visit. Anxiety and depression were evaluated using the validated Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and health status using the Short Form 12, version 2 (SF-12v2) Health Survey. Of the 102 patients considered eligible, 81 (79.4 %) were enrolled; of these, 69 (85.1 %) completed the study. Significant pain reduction was achieved for average PI (p < 0.001) compared with baseline. At the end of the observational period, HADS scores showed significant improvement in the depression subscale (p = 0.005) and the anxiety subscale (p < 0.001). Similarly, SF-12 scores showed significant improvement, both in the mental component score (p < 0.001) and the physical component score (p = 0.002). SFT was well-tolerated and only one patient withdrew from the study due to drug-related AEs. SFT represents an effective, well-tolerated treatment for cancer BTP. Results provide consistent evidence for the positive impact of SFT on health-related QOL and physical functioning as well as other co-morbidities of cancer BTP such as anxiety and depression.

  15. The effect of creative psychological interventions on psychological outcomes for adult cancer patients: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, S; Buxton, S; Sheffield, D

    2015-01-01

    This systematic review examined the effectiveness of creative psychological interventions (CPIs) for adult cancer patients. In particular, the findings of randomised controlled trials of art, drama, dance/movement and music therapies on psychological outcomes were examined. The review yielded 10 original studies analysing data from a total of 488 patients. Data extraction and quality assessment were conducted by two independent reviewers. Four of the papers focused on the use of art therapy, three studies used music therapy, one paper utilised dance therapy, one study used dance/movement therapy and the remaining paper used creative arts therapies, which was a combination of different art-based therapy approaches. Eight papers focused solely on breast cancer patients, and the remaining studies included mixed cancer sites/stages. The studies reported improvements in anxiety and depression, quality of life, coping, stress, anger and mood. However, few physical benefits of CPIs were reported; there was no significant impact of a CPI on physical aspects of quality of life, vigour-activity or fatigue-inertia or physical functioning. One study was assessed as high quality, seven studies were assessed as satisfactory and two studies were assessed to be of poorer quality. There is initial evidence that CPIs benefit adult cancer patients with respect to anxiety and depression, quality of life, coping, stress, anger and mood; there was no evidence to suggest that any one type of CPI was especially beneficial. However, more and better quality research needs to be conducted, particularly in the areas of drama and dance/movement therapies. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Identification of candidate polymorphisms on stress oxidative and DNA damage repair genes related with clinical outcome in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Patricia; Furriol, Jessica; Bermejo, Begoña; Chaves, Felipe Javier; Lluch, Ana; Eroles, Pilar

    2012-12-05

    Diverse polymorphisms have been associated with the predisposition to develop cancer. On fewer occasions, they have been related to the evolution of the disease and to different responses to treatment. Previous studies of our group have associated polymorphisms on genes related to oxidative stress (rs3736729 on GCLC and rs207454 on XDH) and DNA damage repair (rs1052133 on OGG1) with a predisposition to develop breast cancer. In the present work, we have evaluated the hypothesis that these polymorphisms also play a role in a patient's survival. A population-based cohort study of 470 women diagnosed with primary breast cancer and a median follow up of 52.44 months was conducted to examine the disease-free and overall survival in rs3736729, rs207454 and rs1052133 genetic variants. Adjusted Cox regression analysis was used to that end. The Kaplan-Meier analysis shows that rs3736729 on GCLC presents a significant association with disease-free survival and overall survival. The polymorphisms rs1052133 on OGG1 and rs207454 on XDH show a trend of association with overall survival. The analysis based on hormonal receptor status revealed a stronger association. The CC genotype on rs207454 (XDH) was significantly associated with lower time of disease free survival (p = 0.024) in progesterone receptor negative (PGR-) patients and rs3736729 (GCLC) was significantly associated with disease free survival (p = 0.001) and overall survival (p = 0.012) in the subgroup of estrogen receptor negative (ER-) patients. This work suggests that unfavorable genetic variants in the rs207454 (XDH) and rs3736729 (GCLC) polymorphisms may act as predictors of the outcome in negative progesterone receptor and negative estrogen receptor breast cancer patients, respectively.

  17. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for late radiation-induced tissue toxicity: prospectively patient-reported outcome measures in breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teguh, David N.; Bol Raap, René; Struikmans, Henk; Verhoef, Cees; Koppert, Linetta B.; Koole, Arne; Huang, Yadi; van Hulst, Rob A.

    2016-01-01

    This study examines patient reported outcome measures of women undergoing hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT) after breast-conserving therapy. Included were 57 women treated with HBOT for late radiation-induced tissue toxicity (LRITT) referred in the period January 2014-December 2015. HBOT consisted

  18. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for late radiation-induced tissue toxicity: Prospectively patient-reported outcome measures in breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.N. Teguh (David); R. Bol Raap (René); H. Struikmans (Henk); C. Verhoef (Kees); L.B. Koppert (Lisa); A. Koole (Arne); Y. Huang (Yadi); R.A. van Hulst (R.)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstract__Introduction:__ This study examines patient reported outcome measures of women undergoing hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT) after breast-conserving therapy. __Method:__ Included were 57 women treated with HBOT for late radiation-induced tissue toxicity (LRITT) referred in the

  19. Outcome in patients with small cell lung cancer re-irradiated for brain metastases after prior prophylactic cranial irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Denise; Bozorgmehr, Farastuk; Adeberg, Sebastian; Opfermann, Nils; von Eiff, Damian; Rieber, Juliane; Kappes, Jutta; Foerster, Robert; König, Laila; Thomas, Michael; Debus, Jürgen; Steins, Martin; Rieken, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    Patients with brain metastases from small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) who underwent prior prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) are often treated with a second course of whole brain radiation therapy (Re-WBRT) or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for purposes of palliation in symptomatic patients, hope for increased life expectancy or even as an alternative to untolerated steroids. Up to date there is only limited data available regarding the effect of this treatment. This study examines outcomes in patients in a single institution who underwent cerebral re-irradiation after prior PCI. We examined the medical records of 76 patients with brain metastases who had initially received PCI between 2008 and 2015 and were subsequently irradiated with a second course of cerebral radiotherapy. Patients underwent re-irradiation using either Re-WBRT (88%) or SRS (17%). The outcomes, including symptom palliation, radiation toxicity, and overall survival (OS) following re-irradiation were analyzed. Survival and correlations were calculated using log-rank, univariate, and multivariate Cox proportional hazards-ratio analyses. Treatment-related toxicity was classified according to CTCAE v4.0. Median OS of all patients was 3 months (range 0-12 months). Median OS after Re-WBRT was 3 months (range 0-12 months). Median OS after SRS was 5 months (range 0-12 months). Karnofsky performance status scale (KPS ≥50%) was significantly associated with improved OS in both univariate (HR 2772; p=0,009) and multivariate analyses (HR 2613; p=0,024) for patients receiving Re-WBRT. No unexpected toxicity was observed and the observed toxicity remained consistently low. Symptom palliation was achieved in 40% of symptomatic patients. In conclusion, cerebral re-irradiation after prior PCI is beneficial for symptom palliation and is associated with minimal side effects in patients with SCLC. Our survival data suggests that it is primarily useful in patients with adequate performance status. Copyright

  20. Relative dose intensity of chemotherapy and its impact on outcomes in patients with early breast cancer or aggressive lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildiers, Hans; Reiser, Marcel

    2011-03-01

    Early studies suggested a link between chemotherapy dosing and outcomes in breast cancer and aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. To help define the impact of relative dose intensity (RDI) and the role of growth factor support, we conducted a systematic literature review. Many breast cancer patients do not achieve planned RDI. Older age, obesity and febrile neutropenia are associated with reduced RDI, which leads to worse survival in several studies, particularly those including anthracyclines. G-CSF prophylaxis improved RDI in most, but not all, studies. There may be a threshold above which increasing RDI does not further improve outcomes (∼85% for CMF and anthracycline-based regimens). For lymphoma, there is strong evidence that patients benefit from full-dose chemotherapy, with RDI reductions associated with reduced survival. The definition of "full dose" is, however, unclear. Older age and higher disease stage may be associated with reduced RDI, and G-CSF improved the chances of higher RDI in most studies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Advanced non-small cell lung cancer in patients aged 45 years or younger: outcomes and prognostic factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Chia-Lin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancer in young patients (less or equal to 45 years is uncommon and has clinical characteristics different from that in older patients. We investigated the outcomes and prognostic factors of young patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods From January 2000 to December 2009, we enrolled patients aged ≤45 years and diagnosed with stage IIIB or IV NSCLC. Their clinical data, including age, gender, performance status, histologic types, disease stages, laboratory data at diagnosis, treatment modalities, and survival were reviewed and analyzed. A Cox proportional hazard model was used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR and its 95% confidence interval (CI. Results A total of 144 patients with advanced NSCLC were included. Female patients were more prevalent (n = 74, 51.4%. Adenocarcinoma was the most common histologic type (n = 119, 82.6% in both genders (male, n = 54, 77.1%; female, n = 65, 87.8%. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR sequences were determined using tumor specimens from 58 patients, and 29 showed an EGFR mutation. No significant difference in median survival was found between patient groups with and without the EGFR mutation (798 vs. 708 days, p = 0.65. In multivariate analysis, male gender (HR, 1.70; 95% CI: 1.08-2.68, body mass index (BMI less than 25 kg/m2 (HR, 2.72; 95% CI: 1.39-5.30, stage IV disease (HR, 2.62; 95% CI: 1.50-4.57, and anemia (HR, 2.08; 95% CI: 1.15-3.77 were associated with a short survival time. Conclusions Low BMI, stage IV disease, anemia at diagnosis, and male gender were the negative prognostic factors for young patients with advanced NSCLC.

  2. Can Mathematical Models Predict the Outcomes of Prostate Cancer Patients Undergoing Intermittent Androgen Deprivation Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, R. A.; Packer, A. M.; Kuang, Y.

    Androgen deprivation therapy is a common treatment for advanced or metastatic prostate cancer. Like the normal prostate, most tumors depend on androgens for proliferation and survival but often develop treatment resistance. Hormonal treatment causes many undesirable side effects which significantly decrease the quality of life for patients. Intermittently applying androgen deprivation in cycles reduces the total duration with these negative effects and may reduce selective pressure for resistance. We extend an existing model which used measurements of patient testosterone levels to accurately fit measured serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels. We test the model's predictive accuracy, using only a subset of the data to find parameter values. The results are compared with those of an existing piecewise linear model which does not use testosterone as an input. Since actual treatment protocol is to re-apply therapy when PSA levels recover beyond some threshold value, we develop a second method for predicting the PSA levels. Based on a small set of data from seven patients, our results showed that the piecewise linear model produced slightly more accurate results while the two predictive methods are comparable. This suggests that a simpler model may be more beneficial for a predictive use compared to a more biologically insightful model, although further research is needed in this field prior to implementing mathematical models as a predictive method in a clinical setting. Nevertheless, both models are an important step in this direction.

  3. Tailored and integrated Web-based tools for improving psychosocial outcomes of cancer patients: the DoTTI development framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Rochelle; Bryant, Jamie; Sanson-Fisher, Rob; Tzelepis, Flora; Henskens, Frans; Paul, Christine; Stevenson, William

    2014-03-14

    Effective communication with cancer patients and their families about their disease, treatment options, and possible outcomes may improve psychosocial outcomes. However, traditional approaches to providing information to patients, including verbal information and written booklets, have a number of shortcomings centered on their limited ability to meet patient preferences and literacy levels. New-generation Web-based technologies offer an innovative and pragmatic solution for overcoming these limitations by providing a platform for interactive information seeking, information sharing, and user-centered tailoring. The primary goal of this paper is to discuss the advantages of comprehensive and iterative Web-based technologies for health information provision and propose a four-phase framework for the development of Web-based information tools. The proposed framework draws on our experience of constructing a Web-based information tool for hematological cancer patients and their families. The framework is based on principles for the development and evaluation of complex interventions and draws on the Agile methodology of software programming that emphasizes collaboration and iteration throughout the development process. The DoTTI framework provides a model for a comprehensive and iterative approach to the development of Web-based informational tools for patients. The process involves 4 phases of development: (1) Design and development, (2) Testing early iterations, (3) Testing for effectiveness, and (4) Integration and implementation. At each step, stakeholders (including researchers, clinicians, consumers, and programmers) are engaged in consultations to review progress, provide feedback on versions of the Web-based tool, and based on feedback, determine the appropriate next steps in development. This 4-phase framework is evidence-informed and consumer-centered and could be applied widely to develop Web-based programs for a diverse range of diseases.

  4. Quality of life, functional outcome, and voice handicap index in partial laryngectomy patients for early glottic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandogan Tolga

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study, we aim to gather information about the quality of life issues, functional outcomes and voice problems facing early glottic cancer patients treated with the surgical techniques such as laryngofissure cordectomy, fronto-lateral laryngectomy, or cricohyoidopexi. In particular, consistency of life and voice quality issues with the laryngeal tissue excised during surgery is examined. In addition, the effects of arytenoidectomy to the life and voice quality are also studied. Methods 29 male patients were enrolled voluntarily in the study. The average age was 53.9 years. Three out of 10 patients with laryngofissure cordectomy also had arytenoidectomy. 11 patients had fronto-lateral laryngectomy with Tucker reconstruction, two of which also had arytenoidectomy. There were eight patients with cricohyoidopexi and bilateral functional neck dissection. Three of these patients also had arytenoidectomy. In bilateral functional neck dissection cases, spinal accessory nerve was preserved and level V of the neck was not dissected. None of the patients had neither radiotherapy nor voice therapy. Cordectomy patients never had a temporary tracheotomy or were connected to a feeding tube. Data was collected for 13 months for the cordectomy group, 14 months for fronto-lateral laryngectomy and cricohyoidopexi groups on average post-operatively. Statistical analysis in this study was carried out using the one-way analysis of variance, and the Post-Hoc group comparisons were made after Bonferroni and Scheffé-procedures. In order to determine the effects of arytenoidectomy, a regression analysis is carried out to see if there are statistical differences in answers given to the survey questions among patients who were arytenoidectomized during their surgeries. Results There was a statistically significant difference between cordectomy and cricohyoidopexi group in answers to the University of Washington- Quality of Life- Revised survey

  5. Identification of Candidate Polymorphisms on Stress Oxidative and DNA Damage Repair Genes Related with Clinical Outcome in Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Rodrigues

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Diverse polymorphisms have been associated with the predisposition to develop cancer. On fewer occasions, they have been related to the evolution of the disease and to different responses to treatment. Previous studies of our group have associated polymorphisms on genes related to oxidative stress (rs3736729 on GCLC and rs207454 on XDH and DNA damage repair (rs1052133 on OGG1 with a predisposition to develop breast cancer. In the present work, we have evaluated the hypothesis that these polymorphisms also play a role in a patient’s survival. A population-based cohort study of 470 women diagnosed with primary breast cancer and a median follow up of 52.44 months was conducted to examine the disease-free and overall survival in rs3736729, rs207454 and rs1052133 genetic variants. Adjusted Cox regression analysis was used to that end. The Kaplan-Meier analysis shows that rs3736729 on GCLC presents a significant association with disease-free survival and overall survival. The polymorphisms rs1052133 on OGG1 and rs207454 on XDH show a trend of association with overall survival. The analysis based on hormonal receptor status revealed a stronger association. The CC genotype on rs207454 (XDH was significantly associated with lower time of disease free survival (p = 0.024 in progesterone receptor negative (PGR− patients and rs3736729 (GCLC was significantly associated with disease free survival (p = 0.001 and overall survival (p = 0.012 in the subgroup of estrogen receptor negative (ER− patients. This work suggests that unfavorable genetic variants in the rs207454 (XDH and rs3736729 (GCLC polymorphisms may act as predictors of the outcome in negative progesterone receptor and negative estrogen receptor breast cancer patients, respectively.

  6. A Wireless Health Outcomes Monitoring System (WHOMS): development and field testing with cancer patients using mobile phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielli, Emilia; Carminati, Fabio; La Capra, Stella; Lina, Micaela; Brunelli, Cinzia; Tamburini, Marcello

    2004-06-15

    Health-Related Quality of Life assessment is widely used in clinical research, but rarely in clinical practice. Barriers including practical difficulties administering printed questionnaires have limited their use. Telehealth technology could reduce these barriers and encourage better doctor-patient interaction regarding patient symptoms and quality-of-life monitoring. The aim of this study was to develop a new system for transmitting patients' self-reported outcomes using mobile phones or the internet, and to test whether patients can and will use the system via a mobile phone. We have developed a prototype of a Wireless Health Outcomes Monitoring System, which allows structured questionnaires to be sent to the patient by their medical management team. The patients' answers are directly sent to an authorised website immediately accessible by the medical team, and are displayed in a graphic format that highlights the patient's state of health. In the present study, 97 cancer inpatients were asked to complete a ten-item questionnaire. The questionnaire was delivered by display on a mobile phone, and was answered by the patients using the mobile phone keypad. Of the 97 patients, 56 (58%) attempted the questionnaire, and all of these 56 completed it. Only 6% of the total number of questions were left unanswered by patients. Forty-one (42%) patients refused to participate, mostly due to their lack of familiarity with mobile phone use. Compared with those who completed the questionnaire, patients who refused to participate were older, had fewer years of education and were less familiar with new communications technology (mobile phone calls, mobile phone SMS, internet, email). More than half of the patients self-completed the questionnaire using the mobile phone. This proportion may increase with the use of multichannel communications which can be incorporated into the system. The proportion may also increase if the patient's partner and/or family were able to assist the

  7. A Wireless Health Outcomes Monitoring System (WHOMS: development and field testing with cancer patients using mobile phones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunelli Cinzia

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health-Related Quality of Life assessment is widely used in clinical research, but rarely in clinical practice. Barriers including practical difficulties administering printed questionnaires have limited their use. Telehealth technology could reduce these barriers and encourage better doctor-patient interaction regarding patient symptoms and quality-of-life monitoring. The aim of this study was to develop a new system for transmitting patients' self-reported outcomes using mobile phones or the internet, and to test whether patients can and will use the system via a mobile phone. Methods We have developed a prototype of a Wireless Health Outcomes Monitoring System, which allows structured questionnaires to be sent to the patient by their medical management team. The patients' answers are directly sent to an authorised website immediately accessible by the medical team, and are displayed in a graphic format that highlights the patient's state of health. In the present study, 97 cancer inpatients were asked to complete a ten-item questionnaire. The questionnaire was delivered by display on a mobile phone, and was answered by the patients using the mobile phone keypad. Results Of the 97 patients, 56 (58% attempted the questionnaire, and all of these 56 completed it. Only 6% of the total number of questions were left unanswered by patients. Forty-one (42% patients refused to participate, mostly due to their lack of familiarity with mobile phone use. Compared with those who completed the questionnaire, patients who refused to participate were older, had fewer years of education and were less familiar with new communications technology (mobile phone calls, mobile phone SMS, internet, email. Conclusion More than half of the patients self-completed the questionnaire using the mobile phone. This proportion may increase with the use of multichannel communications which can be incorporated into the system. The proportion may also

  8. Perioperative Immunonutrition in Well-Nourished Patients Undergoing Surgery for Head and Neck Cancer: Evaluation of Inflammatory and Immunologic Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay D. Plank

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Limited work is available on the benefits of nutritional support enriched with arginine and n-3 fatty acids in surgical patients with head and neck cancer, particularly if well-nourished. We conducted a pilot study in these patients to examine effects on inflammatory markers and clinical outcome. Patients scheduled for radical resection of the oral cavity were randomised to 5 day preoperative and 5 day postoperative Impact® (IMN, n = 4, or no preoperative supplementary nutrition and Isosource® postoperatively (STD, n = 4. Plasma fatty acids, C-reactive protein (CRP, tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-6 and IL-10 were measured at baseline, day of surgery and on postoperative days (POD 2, 4 and 10. Postoperative complications were recorded. The (eicosapentaenoic acid plus docosahexaenoic acid to arachidonic acid ratio was significantly higher in IMN patients on POD 2, 4 and 10 (P < 0.01. While not statistically significant, CRP, TNF-α, and IL-6 concentrations were higher in the STD group on POD2 while IL-10 was lower. Median length of stay was 10 (range 10–43 days in the IMN group and 21.5 (7–24 days in the STD group. Five complications were seen in the STD group and two in the IMN group. The results support the need for a larger trial focusing on clinical outcome.

  9. Epidural analgesia during open radical prostatectomy does not improve long-term cancer-related outcome: a retrospective study in patients with advanced prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Y Wuethrich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A beneficial effect of regional anesthesia on cancer related outcome in various solid tumors has been proposed. The data on prostate cancer is conflicting and reports on long-term cancer specific survival are lacking. METHODS: In a retrospective, single-center study, outcomes of 148 consecutive patients with locally advanced prostate cancer pT3/4 who underwent retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP with general anesthesia combined with intra- and postoperative epidural analgesia (n=67 or with postoperative ketorolac-morphine analgesia (n=81 were reviewed. The median observation time was 14.00 years (range 10.87-17.75 yrs. Biochemical recurrence (BCR-free, local and distant recurrence-free, cancer-specific, and overall survival were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier technique. Multivariate Cox proportional-hazards regression models were used to analyze clinicopathologic variables associated with disease progression and death. RESULTS: The survival estimates for BCR-free, local and distant recurrence-free, cancer-specific survival and overall survival did not differ between the two groups (P=0.64, P=0.75, P=0.18, P=0.32 and P=0.07. For both groups, higher preoperative PSA (hazard ratio (HR 1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.01-1.02, P<0.0001, increased specimen Gleason score (HR 1.24, 95% CI 1.06-1.46, P=0.007 and positive nodal status (HR 1.66, 95% CI 1.03-2.67, P=0.04 were associated with higher risk of BCR. Increased specimen Gleason score predicted death from prostate cancer (HR 2.46, 95% CI 1.65-3.68, P<0.0001. CONCLUSIONS: General anaesthesia combined with epidural analgesia did not reduce the risk of cancer progression or improve survival after RRP for prostate cancer in this group of patients at high risk for disease progression with a median observation time of 14.00 yrs.

  10. Health outcomes of women with breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Colzani, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    The overall survival of breast cancer patients has increased quite remarkably in the past decades in the developed countries due to substantial improvements in diagnosis and treatment. As a consequence, the proportion of women alive after a breast cancer diagnosis is currently increasing. It is therefore becoming of outmost importance to also focus on medium- and long-term health outcomes of women with breast cancer. Swedish population registers were used to study time-dependent surviva...

  11. Upregulated solute carrier family 37 member 1 in colorectal cancer is associated with poor patient outcome and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Daiki; Saito, Motonobu; Saito, Katsuharu; Watanabe, Yohei; Matsumoto, Yoshiko; Kanke, Yasuyuki; Onozawa, Hisashi; Hayase, Suguru; Sakamoto, Wataru; Ishigame, Teruhide; Momma, Tomoyuki; Ohki, Shinji; Takenoshita, Seiichi

    2018-02-01

    Solute carrier (SLC) drug transporters exchange various molecules without energy from adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis, indicating an association with anticancer drug resistance. However, the expression and role of SLC transporters in malignant tumors has not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, in the current study, the expression of SLC37A family genes was evaluated in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), and it was revealed that SLC family 37 member 1 (SLC37A1) expression was significantly increased in tumorous tissues compared with that in non-tumorous tissues. The cases with upregulated expression of SLC37A1 by immunohistochemical staining were significantly associated with positive venous invasion and liver metastasis. Furthermore, upregulated SLC37A1 expression was associated with poor overall survival time in the present cohort. These results indicated that SLC37A1 is involved in the hematogenous metastasis of CRC. To investigate whether SLC37A1 is associated with hematogenous metastasis and glycolipid metabolism, SLC37A1 was knocked down in colon cancer cells, and the expression of sialyl Lewis A and sialyl Lewis X was observed to be decreased. In summary, upregulation of SLC37A1 was observed in patients with CRC, and was associated with poor patient outcomes and survival. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to propose a key role of SLC37A1 in CRC, and additional studies are warranted to reveal the functional role of SLC37A1 in CRC development.

  12. Frequent genetic abnormalities of the PI3K/AKT pathway in primary ovarian cancer predict patient outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jia; Zhang, Lin; Greshock, Joel; Colligon, Theresa A.; Wang, Yan; Ward, Renee; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Lassus, Heini; Butzow, Ralf; Godwin, Andrew K.; Testa, Joseph R.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Gimotty, Phyllis A.; Coukos, George; Weber, Barbara L.; Degenhardt, Yan

    2011-01-01

    Identification and characterization of underlying genetic aberrations could facilitate diagnosis and treatment of ovarian cancer. Copy number analysis using array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) on 93 primary ovarian tumors identified PI3K/AKT pathway as the most frequently altered cancer related pathway. Furthermore, survival analyses to correlate gene copy number and mutation data with patient outcome showed that copy number gains of PIK3CA, PIK3CB and PIK3R4 in these tumors were associated with decreased survival. To confirm these findings at the protein level, immunohistochemistry (IHC) for PIK3CA product p110α and p-Akt was performed on tissue microarrays from 522 independent serous ovarian cancers. Overexpression of either of these two proteins was found to be associated with decreased survival. Multivariant analysis from these samples further showed that overexpression of p-AKT and /or p110α is an independent prognostic factor for these tumors. siRNAs targeting altered PI3K/AKT pathway genes inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in ovarian cancer cell lines. In addition, the effect of the siRNAs in different cell lines seemed to correlate with the particular genetic alterations that the cell line carries. These results strongly support the utilization of PI3K pathway inhibitors in ovarian cancer. They also suggest identifying the specific component in the PI3K pathway that is genetically altered has the potential to help select the most effective therapy. Both mutation as well as copy number changes can be used as predictive markers for this purpose. PMID:21563232

  13. Symptoms and Distress in Children With Advanced Cancer: Prospective Patient-Reported Outcomes From the PediQUEST Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Joanne; Orellana, Liliana; Ullrich, Christina; Cook, E Francis; Kang, Tammy I; Rosenberg, Abby; Geyer, Russ; Feudtner, Chris; Dussel, Veronica

    2015-06-10

    Thousands of children are living with advanced cancer; yet patient-reported outcomes (PROs) have rarely been used to describe their experiences. We aimed to describe symptom distress in 104 children age 2 years or older with advanced cancer enrolled onto the Pediatric Quality of Life and Evaluation of Symptoms Technology (PediQUEST) Study (multisite clinical trial evaluating an electronic PRO system). Symptom data were collected using age- and respondent-adapted versions of the PediQUEST Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale (PQ-MSAS) at most once per week. Clinical and treatment data were obtained from medical records. Individual symptom scores were dichotomized into high/low distress. Determinants of PQ-MSAS scores were explored using linear mixed-effects models. During 9 months of follow-up, PQ-MSAS was administered 920 times: 459 times in teens (99% self-report), 249 times in children ages 7 to 12 years (96% child/parent report), and 212 times in those ages 2 to 6 years (parent reports). Common symptoms included pain (48%), fatigue (46%), drowsiness (39%), and irritability (37%); most scores indicated high distress. Among the 73 PQ-MSAS surveys administered in the last 12 weeks of life, pain was highly prevalent (62%; 58% with high distress). Being female, having a brain tumor, experiencing recent disease progression, and receiving moderate- or high-intensity cancer-directed therapy in the prior 10 days were associated with worse PQ-MSAS scores. In the final 12 weeks of life, receiving mild cancer-directed therapy was associated with improved psychological PQ-MSAS scores. Children with advanced cancer experience high symptom distress. Strategies to promote intensive symptom management are indicated, especially with disease progression or administration of intensive treatments. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  14. Pyramidal lobe decreases endogenous TSH stimulation without impact on radio-iodine therapy outcome in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicka-Gutaj, Nadia; Klimowicz, Aleksandra; Sowinski, Jerzy; Oleksa, Robert; Gryczynska, Maria; Wyszomirska, Anna; Czarnywojtek, Agata; Ruchala, Marek

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the frequency of pyramidal lobe (PL) detected in iodine-131 (I-131) scans of thyroid bed in patients after thyroidectomy for differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) and to investigate influence of PL on endogenous thyrotropin (TSH) stimulation as well as on the effects of the radio-iodine ablation in one-year follow-up. This study was designed as a retrospective analysis of 302 radio-iodine neck scans of patients thyroidectomized due to DTC. The study population was selected from patients with PL detected in thyroid bed scintigraphy. Patients without PL were included to the control group. The study and the control groups did not differ in age, sex of patients, histological type and stage of the DTC. Pyramidal lobes were found in 30.5% of all patients. Patients in the study group underwent repeat surgery more often than controls without PL. Preablative TSH level in patients with PL was statistically lower than in the control group, in contrast to free thyroid hormones, which were higher in patients with PL. Preablative and postablative TSH-stimulated thyroglobulin (Tg) and antibodies against thyroglobulin (TgAbs) were measured in both groups, and comparison did not reveal differences. Moreover, for the per-patient analysis, sites of uptake in whole body scintigraphy performed 1 year after radio-iodine remnant ablation (RRA) did not differ between the study and the control groups. Pyramidal lobe decreases endogenous TSH stimulation without impact on radio-iodine therapy outcome in patients with DTC. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  15. Geriatric Assessment as a Predictor of Tolerance, Quality of Life, and Outcomes in Older Patients With Head and Neck Cancers and Lung Cancers Receiving Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderWalde, Noam A; Deal, Allison M; Comitz, Elizabeth; Stravers, Lori; Muss, Hyman; Reeve, Bryce B; Basch, Ethan; Tepper, Joel; Chera, Bhishamjit

    2017-07-15

    To evaluate the association between functional status based on a geriatric assessment (GA) and outcomes of tolerance to treatment in patients with lung or head and neck cancer receiving radiation therapy (RT) or chemoradiation (CRT). A prospective cohort study was conducted in patients aged ≥65 years with head and neck cancer or lung cancer undergoing curative intent RT or CRT. Pretreatment GA, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and patient-reported outcomes (PRO) were obtained. Questionnaires were repeated biweekly during RT and at 6 weeks after treatment. Dysfunction was defined as scores 3-day treatment delay, change in RT or CRT regimen, or death. Associations of dysfunction with tolerance to radiation therapy, HRQoL changes, and PRO ratings were evaluated. Of the 50 patients accrued, 46 had evaluable data. Mean age was 72.5 years (range, 65-92 years). At baseline, 37% had dysfunction. Poor tolerance to RT or CRT occurred in 39%. There was no association between dysfunction and tolerance. Patients with dysfunction had lower baseline HRQoL scores. From baseline to end of RT, those with baseline dysfunction had less of a decline in Role Functioning (P=.01) and Global Health Score (P=.04) domains. However, from end of RT to 6-week follow-up, those with dysfunction were more likely to continue to drop in the Physical, Role Functioning, and Social domains (all Ppatient population. Larger studies could further elucidate the GA's predictive value. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Applicability of the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) to the evaluation of cancer patients with acute or chronic pain in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Bruna S; Massutti, Tânia M; Longaray, Vanessa K; Trevisan, Daniela F; Lucena, Amália de Fátima

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the clinical applicability of the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) to the evaluation of cancer patients with a nursing diagnosis of acute or chronic pain in a palliative care unit. A prospective longitudinal study performed on a sample of 13 adult cancer patients in a palliative care unit. Patients were followed for at least 4 days. Data were collected with an instrument containing eight nursing outcomes and nineteen NOC indicators. Statistical analysis was performed using generalized estimating equation models. The following outcome and indicator scores changed significantly over the course of the study: reported pain and length of pain episodes in the pain level outcome; social relationships in the personal well-being outcome; respirator rate in the vital signs outcome; and describes causal factors in the pain control outcome. The NOC outcomes and indicators included in this study were able to successfully evaluate the clinical evolution of cancer patients in palliative care. These scores proved to be applicable for use in palliative nursing care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of symptom clusters on quality of life outcomes in patients from japan with advanced nonsmall cell lung cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamami Hamada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Identify symptom clusters based on symptoms experienced by patients with advanced nonsmall cell lung cancers (NSCLCs, and examine the relationship between the symptom clusters and impairment in everyday life and quality of life (QOL. Methods: Using the M.D. Anderson Symptom Inventory, 9 symptom items and the QOL Questionnaire (QLQ-C-30 evaluation apparatus from the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, we evaluated symptom severity, interference in daily life, and QOL. Factor analysis and multiple regression analysis techniques were used. Results: Sixty patients with advanced NSCLCs seen in pulmonary medicine departments were included in the study. The average age of patients was 64.33 (standard deviation = 11.40. Thirty-six were male and 24 were female. Three symptom clusters were identified as fatigue/anorexia cluster (dry mouth, altered the sense of taste, drowsiness, fatigue/tiredness, and lack of appetite, pain cluster (anxiety, sadness, and pain, numbness cluster (numbness, leg weakness, and distress. The pain cluster had the strongest influence (adjusted R2 = 0.355 on daily life (emotions while the numbness cluster most strongly affected walking. The fatigue/anorexia cluster explained 22.7% of role function variance. This symptom clustering may be unique among patients with advanced NSCLCs. Conclusions: Each of these clusters affected QOL and everyday life with varying degrees of influence. In clinical screening assessments, focusing on symptom clusters could provide tailored management strategies for patients with advanced NSCLCs. These care strategies may improve outcomes specifically for advanced NSCLCs patients.

  18. The relationship between baseline nutritional status with subsequent parenteral nutrition and clinical outcomes in cancer patients undergoing hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashi, Pankaj G; Gupta, Digant; Lammersfeld, Carolyn A; Braun, Donald P; Popiel, Brenten; Misra, Subhasis; Brown, Komen C

    2013-08-14

    The combination of cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) is a promising treatment option for selected patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis. This retrospective study investigated the relationship between baseline nutritional assessment with subsequent parenteral nutritional (PN) and clinical outcomes in cancer patients undergoing CRS and HIPEC. A consecutive series of 60 patients undergoing CRS and HIPEC at our institution between January 2009 and May 2011. Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) was used to assess nutritional status. Patients were classified preoperatively as: well nourished (SGA-A), mildly-moderately malnourished (SGA-B), and severely malnourished (SGA-C). For PN, patients were divided into 2 groups: those who received PN (PN+) and those who did not receive PN (PN-). The primary outcomes of interest were length of stay (LOS), postoperative complications, ECOG performance status (PS) and survival. LOS was calculated as the number of days in the hospital post surgery. Performance status was measured on a scale of 0-4. Survival was calculated from the date of first visit to the date of death/last contact. Of 60 patients, 19 were males and 41 females. The mean age at presentation was 50.3 years. The most common cancer types were colorectal (n = 24) and gynecologic (n = 19) with the majority of patients (n = 47) treated previously before coming to our institution. 33 patients were SGA-A, 22 SGA-B and 5 SGA-C prior to surgery. Of a total of 60 patients, 31 received PN. Mean LOS for the entire cohort was 16.2 days (SD = 9.8). Mean LOS for preoperative SGA-A, SGA-B and SGA-C were 15.0, 15.2 and 27.8 days respectively (ANOVA p = 0.02). Overall incidence of complications was 26.7% (16/60). Complications were recorded in 9 of 33 (27.3%) preoperative SGA-A patients and 7 of 27 (25.9%) SGA-B + C patients (p = 0.91). The median overall survival was 17.5 months (95% CI = 13.0 to 22

  19. A model for predicting clinical outcome in patients with human papillomavirus-positive tonsillar and base of tongue cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tertipis, Nikolaos; Hammar, Ulf; Näsman, Anders; Vlastos, Andrea; Nordfors, Cecilia; Grün, Nathalie; Ährlund-Richter, Andreas; Sivars, Lars; Haeggblom, Linnea; Marklund, Linda; Hammarstedt-Nordenvall, Lalle; Chaturvedi, Anil K; Munck-Wikland, Eva; Ramqvist, Torbjörn; Bottai, Matteo; Dalianis, Tina

    2015-08-01

    To combine clinical and molecular markers into an algorithm for predicting outcome for individual patients with human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA/p16(INK4a) positive tonsillar and base of tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC and BOTSCC). Head-neck cancer treatment has become more intensified, comprising not only surgery and radiotherapy, but also induction/concomitant chemotherapy and targeted therapy. With less treatment, 3-year disease free survival (DFS) is 80% for HPV-positive TSCC and BOTSCC. An 85-100% 3-year DFS is observed for HPV(+) TSCC and BOTSCC with absence of HLA class I, or CD44 expression, or high CD8(+) tumour-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) counts suggesting that therapy could be tapered for many if patients could be identified individually. Patients treated curatively, with HPV DNA/p16(INK4a) positive tumours examined for HLA class I and II, CD44 and CD8(+)TILs, were included. An L1-regularised logistic regression was used to evaluate the effect of the biomarker data, age, stage, diagnosis, smoking and treatment on 3-year risk of death or relapse on a training cohort of 197 patients diagnosed 2000-2007 and validated on a cohort of 118 patients diagnosed 2008-2011. The variables finally included in the model were HLA class I, CD8(+) TILs, age, stage and diagnosis (TSCC or BOTSCC). The model showed acceptable discrimination and calibration. The discriminative ability of the model did not diminish after validation (AUC=0.77). To our knowledge, this is the first model to utilise information from several markers to predict an individual probability of clinical outcome for patients with HPV DNA/p16(INK4a) positive tumours. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. In Vivo Tumor Growth Rate Measured by US in Preoperative Period and Long Term Disease Outcome in Breast Cancer Patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yoo, Tae-Kyung; Min, Jun Won; Kim, Min Kyoon; Lee, Eunshin; Kim, Jongjin; Lee, Han-Byoel; Kang, Young Joon; Kim, Yun-Gyoung; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Moon, Woo Kyung; Cho, Nariya; Noh, Dong-Young; Han, Wonshik

    2015-01-01

    .... Breast cancer patients who received at least two serial breast ultrasonographies (US) in our institution during preoperative period and were surgically treated between 2002 and 2010 were reviewed...

  1. Association between Parenchymal Enhancement of the Contralateral Breast in Dynamic Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging and Outcome of Patients with Unilateral Invasive Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Velden, Bas H M; Dmitriev, Ivan; Loo, Claudette E; Pijnappel, Ruud M; Gilhuijs, Kenneth G A

    2015-09-01

    To retrospectively investigate whether parenchymal enhancement in dynamic contrast material-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the contralateral breast in patients with unilateral invasive breast cancer is associated with therapy outcome. After obtaining approval of the institutional review board and patients' written informed consent, 531 women with unilateral invasive breast cancer underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging between 2000 and 2008. The contralateral parenchyma was segmented automatically, in which the mean of the top 10% late enhancement was calculated. Cox regression was used to test associations between parenchymal enhancement, patient and tumor characteristics, and overall survival and invasive disease-free survival. Subset analyses were performed and stratified according to immunohistochemical subtypes and type of adjuvant treatment received. Median follow-up was 86 months. Age (P breast cancer (n = 398), age (P images (P = .049), and parenchymal enhancement (P = .011) were significant. In patients who underwent endocrine therapy (n = 174), parenchymal enhancement was the only significant covariate for overall survival and invasive disease-free survival (P enhancement in the contralateral breast of patients with invasive unilateral breast cancer is significantly associated with long-term outcome, particularly in patients with estrogen receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative breast cancer. Lower value of the mean top 10% enhancement of the parenchyma shows potential as a predictive biomarker for relatively poor outcome in patients who undergo endocrine therapy. These results should, however, be validated in a larger study.

  2. Analysing data from patient-reported outcome and quality of life endpoints for cancer clinical trials: a start in setting international standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottomley, Andrew; Pe, Madeline; Sloan, Jeff; Basch, Ethan; Bonnetain, Franck; Calvert, Melanie; Campbell, Alicyn; Cleeland, Charles; Cocks, Kim; Collette, Laurence; Dueck, Amylou C; Devlin, Nancy; Flechtner, Hans-Henning; Gotay, Carolyn; Greimel, Eva; Griebsch, Ingolf; Groenvold, Mogens; Hamel, Jean-Francois; King, Madeleine; Kluetz, Paul G; Koller, Michael; Malone, Daniel C; Martinelli, Francesca; Mitchell, Sandra A; Moinpour, Carol M; Musoro, Jammbe; O'Connor, Daniel; Oliver, Kathy; Piault-Louis, Elisabeth; Piccart, Martine; Pimentel, Francisco L; Quinten, Chantal; Reijneveld, Jaap C; Schürmann, Christoph; Smith, Ashley Wilder; Soltys, Katherine M; Taphoorn, Martin J B; Velikova, Galina; Coens, Corneel

    2016-11-01

    Measures of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and other patient-reported outcomes generate important data in cancer randomised trials to assist in assessing the risks and benefits of cancer therapies and fostering patient-centred cancer care. However, the various ways these measures are analysed and interpreted make it difficult to compare results across trials, and hinders the application of research findings to inform publications, product labelling, clinical guidelines, and health policy. To address these problems, the Setting International Standards in Analyzing Patient-Reported Outcomes and Quality of Life Endpoints Data (SISAQOL) initiative has been established. This consortium, directed by the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC), was convened to provide recommendations on how to standardise the analysis of HRQOL and other patient-reported outcomes data in cancer randomised trials. This Personal View discusses the reasons why this project was initiated, the rationale for the planned work, and the expected benefits to cancer research, patient and provider decision making, care delivery, and policy making. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617 radioligand therapy and outcome in patients with metastasized castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braeuer, Axel; Grubert, Lena Sophie; Roll, Wolfgang; Schaefers, Michael; Rahbar, Kambiz [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster (Germany); Schrader, Andres Jan; Boegemann, Martin [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Urology, Muenster (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    Radioligand therapies targeting prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) have been established for the treatment of metastasized castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in the last decade and show promising response rates and a favourable toxicity profile. The aim of this study was to evaluate the overall survival (OS) and to identify parameters predicting outcome in mCRPC patients treated with {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617. Between December 2014 and January 2017, 59 consecutive patients (median age 72 years); interquartile range, (IQR, 66-76 years) with mCRPC, who had been treated with at least one next-generation antihormonal drug as well as chemotherapy, were included in this study. Biochemical response was evaluated using Prostate Cancer Working Group 3 (PCWG3) criteria. Survival was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox regression proportional hazards model. Toxicity was assessed using Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). The study was approved by the local ethics committee. The 59 patients were treated with a total of 159 cycles (median 3 cycles, range 1-7) of {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617 (median dose 6.11 GBq, IQR 5.9-6.3 GBq). The median follow-up was 24 weeks (IQR 15-36 weeks). Follow-up data for at least 12 weeks (PCWG3) were available in 76% (45) of the patients. For outcome results data from all patients treated with at least one cycle were analysed. A decline in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) of ≥50% occurred in 53%, and a decline in PSA of any amount in 91% of patients. The estimated median OS was 32 weeks. An initial alkaline phosphatase (ALP) level <220 U/L and a PSA decline after the first cycle were associated with a longer OS (56 vs. 28 weeks, p < 0.01, and 56 vs. 29 weeks, p = 0.04, respectively). The median estimated PSA progression-free survival (PPFS) was 18 weeks. Only ALP level <220 U/L was significantly associated with a longer PPFS (41 vs. 18 weeks, p < 0.01). A PSA decline after the first cycle of {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617

  4. Comparable outcome between endometrioid and non-endometrioid tumors in patients with early-stage high-grade endometrial cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reynaers, E. A. E. M.; Ezendam, N. P. M.; Pijnenborg, J. M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Approximately 25% of endometrial cancer patients present with high-grade tumors. Unlike the clearly defined work-up for non-endometrioid endometrial cancer, no consensus exists for surgical staging and adjuvant therapy in high-grade endometrioid endometrial cancer. We compared the

  5. Comparable outcome between endometrioid and non-endometrioid tumors in patients with early-stage high-grade endometrial cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reynaers, E.A.; Ezendam, N.P.; Pijnenborg, J.M.A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Approximately 25% of endometrial cancer patients present with high-grade tumors. Unlike the clearly defined work-up for non-endometrioid endometrial cancer, no consensus exists for surgical staging and adjuvant therapy in high-grade endometrioid endometrial cancer. We compared the

  6. DNA damage repair and survival outcomes in advanced gastric cancer patients treated with first-line chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronchetti, Livia; Melucci, Elisa; De Nicola, Francesca; Goeman, Frauke; Casini, Beatrice; Sperati, Francesca; Pallocca, Matteo; Terrenato, Irene; Pizzuti, Laura; Vici, Patrizia; Sergi, Domenico; Di Lauro, Luigi; Amoreo, Carla Azzurra; Gallo, Enzo; Diodoro, Maria Grazia; Pescarmona, Edoardo; Vitale, Ilio; Barba, Maddalena; Buglioni, Simonetta; Mottolese, Marcella; Fanciulli, Maurizio; De Maria, Ruggero; Maugeri-Saccà, Marcello

    2017-06-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) network is exploited by cancer cells to withstand chemotherapy. Gastric cancer (GC) carries deregulation of the DDR and harbors genetic defects that fuel its activation. The ATM-Chk2 and ATR-Chk1-Wee1 axes are deputed to initiate DNA repair. Overactivation of these pathways in cancer cells may represent an adaptive response for compensating genetic defects deregulating G1 -S transition (e.g., TP53) and ATM/ATR-initiated DNA repair (e.g., ARID1A). We hypothesized that DDR-linked biomarkers may predict clinical outcomes in GC patients treated with chemotherapy. Immunohistochemical assessment of DDR kinases (pATM, pChk2, pChk1 and pWee1) and DNA damage markers (γ-H2AX and pRPA32) was performed in biological samples from 110 advanced GC patients treated with first-line chemotherapy, either in phase II trials or in routine clinical practice. In 90 patients, this characterization was integrated with targeted ultra-deep sequencing for evaluating the mutational status of TP53 and ARID1A. We recorded a positive association between the investigated biomarkers. The combination of two biomarkers (γ-H2AX(high) /pATM(high) ) was an adverse factor for both progression-free survival (multivariate Cox: HR 2.23, 95%CI: 1.47-3.40) and overall survival (multivariate Cox: HR: 2.07, 95%CI: 1.20-3.58). The relationship between the γ-H2AX(high) /pATM(high) model and progression-free survival was consistent across the different TP53 backgrounds and was maintained in the ARID1A wild-type setting. Conversely, this association was no longer observed in an ARID1A-mutated subgroup. The γ-H2AX(high) /pATM(high) model negatively impacted survival outcomes in GC patients treated with chemotherapy. The mutational status of ARID1A, but apparently not TP53 mutations, affects its predictive significance. © 2017 UICC.

  7. Tandem repeat variation near the HIC1 (hypermethylated in cancer 1) promoter predicts outcome of oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Satoshi; Schirripa, Marta; Loupakis, Fotios; Cao, Shu; Zhang, Wu; Yang, Dongyun; Ning, Yan; Berger, Martin D; Miyamoto, Yuji; Suenaga, Mitsukuni; Iqubal, Syma; Barzi, Afsaneh; Cremolini, Chiara; Falcone, Alfredo; Battaglin, Francesca; Salvatore, Lisa; Borelli, Beatrice; Helentjaris, Timothy G; Lenz, Heinz-Josef

    2017-11-15

    The hypermethylated in cancer 1/sirtuin 1 (HIC1/SIRT1) axis plays an important role in regulating the nucleotide excision repair pathway, which is the main oxaliplatin-induced damage-repair system. On the basis of prior evidence that the variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) sequence located near the promoter lesion of HIC1 is associated with HIC1 gene expression, the authors tested the hypothesis that this VNTR is associated with clinical outcome in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who receive oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. Four independent cohorts were tested. Patients who received oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy served as the training cohort (n = 218), and those who received treatment without oxaliplatin served as the control cohort (n = 215). Two cohorts of patients who received oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy were used for validation studies (n = 176 and n = 73). The VNTR sequence near HIC1 was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction analysis and gel electrophoresis and was tested for associations with the response rate, progression-free survival, and overall survival. In the training cohort, patients who harbored at least 5 tandem repeats (TRs) in both alleles had a significantly shorter PFS compared with those who had fewer than 4 TRs in at least 1 allele (9.5 vs 11.6 months; hazard ratio, 1.93; P = .012), and these findings remained statistically significant after multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 2.00; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-3.54; P = .018). This preliminary association was confirmed in the validation cohort, and patients who had at least 5 TRs in both alleles had a worse PFS compared with the other cohort (7.9 vs 9.8 months; hazard ratio, 1.85; P = .044). The current findings suggest that the VNTR sequence near HIC1 could be a predictive marker for oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Cancer 2017;123:4506-14. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  8. Postoperative survival and functional outcomes for patients with metastatic gynecological cancer to the spine: case series and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ann; Sankey, Eric W; Goodwin, C Rory; Kosztowski, Thomas A; Elder, Benjamin D; Bydon, Ali; Witham, Timothy F; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Sciubba, Daniel M

    2016-01-01

    Spinal metastases from gynecological cancers are rare, with few cases reported in the literature. In this study, the authors examine a series of patients with spinal metastases from gynecological cancer and review the literature. The cases of 6 consecutive patients who underwent spine surgery for metastatic gynecological cancer between 2007 and 2012 at a single institution were retrospectively reviewed. The recorded demographic, operative, and postoperative factors were reviewed, and the functional outcomes were determined by change in Karnofsky Performance Scale and the American Spine Injury Association (ASIA) score during follow-up. A systematic review of the literature was also performed to evaluate outcomes for patients with similar gynecological metastases to the spine. In this series, details regarding metastatic gynecological cancers to the spine are as follows: 2 patients with cervical cancer (both presented at age 46 years, mean postoperative survival of 32 months), 2 patients with endometrial cancer (mean age of 40 years, mean postoperative survival of 26 months), and 2 patients with leiomyosarcoma (mean age of 44 years, mean postoperative survival of 20 months). All patients presented with pain, and no complications were noted following surgery. All patients with known follow-up had stable or improved neurological outcomes, performance status, and improved pain, without local recurrence of tumor. Overall median survival after diagnosis of metastatic spine lesions for all cases in the literature as well as those treated by the authors was 15 months. When categorized by type, median survival of patients with cervical cancer (n = 2), endometrial cancer (n = 26), and leiomyosarcoma (n = 16) was 32, 10, and 22.5 months, respectively. Gynecological cancers metastasizing to the spine are rare. In this series, overall survival following diagnosis of spinal metastasis and surgery was 27 months, with cervical cancer, endometrial cancer, and leiomyosarcoma survival

  9. Correlation of Hypertension and Proteinuria with Outcome in Elderly Bevacizumab-Treated Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliu, Jaime; Salud, Antonieta; Safont, Maria J.; García-Girón, Carlos; Aparicio, Jorge; Losa, Ferran; Bosch, Carlos; Escudero, Pilar; Casado, Enrique; Jorge, Monica; Bohn, Uriel; Pérez-Carrión, Ramon; Carmona, Alberto; Custodio, Ana B.; Maurel, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies suggest a relationship between hypertension and outcome in bevacizumab-treated patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We performed a retrospective analysis of two phase II studies (BECA and BECOX) to determine if hypertension and proteinuria predict outcome in elderly patients with mCRC treated with bevacizumab. Patients and Methods Patients ≥70 years of age received either capecitabine 1250 mg/m2 bid days 1–14 + bevacizumab 7.5 mg/kg day 1 every 21 days (BECA study) or capecitabine 1000 mg/m2 bid days 1–14 with bevacizumab 7.5 mg/kg and oxaliplatin 130 mg/m2 day 1 (BECOX study). The primary objective was to correlate hypertension and proteinuria with overall response rate (ORR), time to progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS). Secondary objectives included identification of risk factors associated with the development of hypertension and proteinuria and determining whether development of hypertension or proteinuria in the first 2 cycles was related to ORR, disease-control rate (DCR), TTP or OS. Results In total, 127 patients (median age 75.5 years) were included in the study. Hypertension correlated with DCR and OS; proteinuria correlated with ORR and DCR. Proteinuria or hypertension in the first 2 cycles did not correlate with efficacy. Risk factors for hypertension were female gender (odds ratio [OR] 0.241; P = 0.011) and more bevacizumab cycles (OR 1.112; P = 0.002); risk factors for proteinuria were diabetes (OR 3.869; P = 0.006) and more bevacizumab cycles (OR 1.181; Pproteinuria is correlated with ORR but not with OS and TTP. Both hypertension and proteinuria are associated with the duration of bevacizumab treatment and do not represent an independent prognostic factor. PMID:25602286

  10. Impact of Weight Change During the Course of Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy on Outcomes in Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients: Retrospective Analysis of 425 Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topkan, Erkan, E-mail: docdretopkan@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baskent University Adana Medical Faculty, Adana (Turkey); Parlak, Cem [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baskent University Adana Medical Faculty, Adana (Turkey); Selek, Ugur [American Hospital, University of Texas MD Anderson Radiation Oncology Center, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: We retrospectively investigated the impact of weight change (WC) during concurrent chemoradiation therapy (C-CRT) on clinical outcomes of stage 3B non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 425 patients treated with C-CRT were included. All patients received 60 to 66 Gy of thoracic radiation therapy concurrently with 1 to 3 cycles of platinum-based chemotherapy. Pre- and posttreatment weight measurements on first and last days of C-CRT were used for WC. Patients were divided into 2 groups: group 1 = weight loss (WL); group 2 = weight preservation/gain (WP) for comparative analyses. Results: Following C-CRT, 252 patients (59.3%) experienced WL, while 89 patients (20.9%) and 84 patients (19.8%) showed WP or WG. At median 24.2 months of follow-up, 142 patients (33.4%) were alive (84 WP [48.6%] and 58 WL [23.0%]), and 58 (13.6%) of them were free of disease progression (41 [23.7%] for WP and 17 [6.7%] for WL). Median overall survival (OS), locoregional progression-free survival (LRPFS), progression-free survival (PFS), and distant metastases-free survival (DMFS) for the entire population were 22.8, 14.4, 10.6, and 11.7 months, respectively. Intergroup comparisons between WP and WL cohorts revealed significantly superior OS, LRPFS, PFS, and DMFS in WP patients (P<.05 for each). On multivariate analyses, only WL and advanced T stage were associated with poor prognosis (P<.05). Conclusions: Present results in 425 stage 3B NSCLC patients demonstrated that WL during C-CRT is strongly associated with inferior survival outcomes compared to WP. This emerging finding might be useful by forming an encouraging basis for future investigations in facilitating a way to improve the outcomes of these patients experiencing WL during C-CRT.

  11. Six-month follow-up of patient-rated outcomes in a randomized controlled trial of exercise training during breast cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courneya, Kerry S; Segal, Roanne J; Gelmon, Karen; Reid, Robert D; Mackey, John R; Friedenreich, Christine M; Proulx, Caroline; Lane, Kirstin; Ladha, Aliya B; Vallance, Jeffrey K; Liu, Qi; Yasui, Yutaka; McKenzie, Donald C

    2007-12-01

    Few exercise trials in cancer patients have reported longer-term follow-up. Here, we report a 6-month follow-up of exercise behavior and patient-rated outcomes from an exercise trial in breast cancer patients. Breast cancer patients initiating adjuvant chemotherapy (n = 242) were randomly assigned to usual care (n = 82), resistance exercise training (RET; n = 82), or aerobic exercise training (AET; n = 78) for the duration of their chemotherapy. At 6-month follow-up, participants were mailed a questionnaire that assessed quality of life, self-esteem, fatigue, anxiety, depression, and exercise behavior. Two hundred one (83.1%) participants provided 6-month follow-up data. Adjusted linear mixed-model analyses showed that, at 6-month follow-up, the RET group reported higher self-esteem [adjusted mean difference, 1.6; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.1-3.2; P = 0.032] and the AET group reported lower anxiety (adjusted mean difference, -4.7; 95% CI, -0.0 to -9.3; P = 0.049) compared with the usual care group. Moreover, compared with participants reporting no regular exercise during the follow-up period, those reporting regular aerobic and resistance exercise also reported better patient-rated outcomes, including quality of life (adjusted mean difference, 9.5; 95% CI, 1.2-17.8; P = 0.025). Improvements in self-esteem observed with RET during breast cancer chemotherapy were maintained at 6-month follow-up whereas reductions in anxiety not observed with AET during breast cancer chemotherapy emerged at 6-month follow-up. Moreover, adopting a combined aerobic and resistance exercise program after breast cancer chemotherapy was associated with further improvements in patient-rated outcomes. Exercise training during breast cancer chemotherapy may result in some longer-term and late effects for selected patient-rated outcomes.

  12. Frequency, predictors, and outcomes of urine drug testing among patients with advanced cancer on chronic opioid therapy at an outpatient supportive care clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Joseph A; Edwards, Tonya; Lu, Zhanni; Reddy, Suresh; Hui, David; Wu, Jimin; Liu, Diane; Williams, Janet L; Bruera, Eduardo

    2016-12-01

    Data are limited on the use and outcomes of urine drug tests (UDTs) among patients with advanced cancer. The main objective of this study was to determine the factors associated with UDT ordering and results in outpatients with advanced cancer. A retrospective chart review was conducted of 1058 patients who attended an outpatient supportive care clinic from March 2014 to November 2015. Sixty-one patients who were receiving chronic opioid therapy and underwent UDTs were identified. A control group of 120 patients who did not undergo UDTs was selected for comparison. Sixty-one of 1058 patients (6%) underwent UDTs, and 33 of 61 patients (54%) had abnormal results. Multivariate analysis indicated that the odds ratio for UDT ordering was 3.9 in patients who had positive Cut Down, Annoyed, Guilty, and Eye Opener (CAGE) questionnaire results (P = .002), 4.41 in patients aged patients who had moderate-to-severe pain (Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale pain scores ≥4; P patients with advanced-stage cancer, (P = .008), and 0.25 in patients who had moderate-to-severe fatigue (P = .001). Among 52 abnormal UDT results in 33 patients, the most common opioid findings were prescribed opioids absent in urine (14 of 52 tests; 27%) and unprescribed opioids in urine (13 of 52 tests; 25%). UDTs were used infrequently among outpatients with advanced cancer who were receiving chronic opioid therapy. Younger age, positive CAGE questionnaire results, early stage cancer or no evidence of disease status, higher pain intensity, and lower fatigue scores were significant predictors of UDT ordering. More than 50% of UDT results were abnormal. More research is necessary to better characterize aberrant opioid use in patients with advanced cancer. Cancer 2016;122:3732-9. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  13. Disease Progression/Clinical Outcome Model for Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer in Patients Treated with Eribulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hasselt, J. G C; Gupta, A.; Hussein, Z.; Beijnen, J. H.; Schellens, J. H M; Huitema, A. D R

    2015-01-01

    Frameworks that associate cancer dynamic disease progression models with parametric survival models for clinical outcome have recently been proposed to support decision making in early clinical development. Here we developed such a disease progression clinical outcome model for castration-resistant

  14. CLINICAL FEATURES AND CLINICAL OUTCOME OF ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA PATIENTS TREATED AT CAIRO NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE IN EGYPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola Khorshid

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The current study reports the clinical features and treatment outcome of 67 patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL presented to National Cancer Institute (NCI-Cairo, in Egypt from January 2007 to January 2011. The median follow-up time was 36 months. All patients were treated with the simultaneous administration of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA and anthracyclin. The treatment protocol was modified due to resource limitations at the NCI-Cairo by replacing of idarubicin with doxorubicin in most of the cases and the inclusion of cytarbine during the consolidation phase only in pediatric patients. All patients who achieved molecular complete remission (CRm after consolidation received two-year maintenance treatment with low dose chemotherapy composed of 6 mercaptopurine, methotrexate and intermittent ATRA courses. The median age at presentation was 29 years. There was a slight male predominance (53%.  Bleeding was the most common presenting symptom (79%. Most patients had an intermediate risk Sanz score (49% and 34% had a high risk score.  All patients achieved molecular CR at end of consolidation therapy with a median duration of 100 days. The main therapeutic complications during the induction phase were febrile neutropenia (42%, bleeding (18% and differentiation syndrome (11%. Five patients died at diagnosis due to bleeding, three died during induction chemotherapy due to febrile neutropenia (n=2 and bleeding (n=1 and one patient died during consolidation therapy due to febrile neutropenia.  The 3-year OS was 89% and relapse rate was 3%. Adapting standard AIDA treatment protocols to limited resources by reducing dose-intensity during treatment consolidation, using ATRA in the consolidation phase and alternative anthracyclin (doxorubicin may be a valid treatment option in developing countries. In spite of the increased incidence of high and intermediate risk score APL in our sample, we reported an acceptable CR rate, toxicity and OS.

  15. CLINICAL FEATURES AND CLINICAL OUTCOME OF ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA PATIENTS TREATED AT CAIRO NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE IN EGYPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer M Fouad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available

    The current study reports the clinical features and treatment outcome of 67 patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL presented to National Cancer Institute (NCI-Cairo, in Egypt from January 2007 to January 2011. The median follow-up time was 36 months. All patients were treated with the simultaneous administration of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA and anthracyclin. The treatment protocol was modified due to resource limitations at the NCI-Cairo by replacing of idarubicin with doxorubicin in most of the cases and the inclusion of cytarbine during the consolidation phase only in pediatric patients. All patients who achieved molecular complete remission (CRm after consolidation received two-year maintenance treatment with low dose chemotherapy composed of 6 mercaptopurine, methotrexate and intermittent ATRA courses. The median age at presentation was 29 years. There was a slight male predominance (53%.  Bleeding was the most common presenting symptom (79%. Most patients had an intermediate risk Sanz score (49% and 34% had a high risk score.  All patients achieved molecular CR at end of consolidation therapy with a median duration of 100 days. The main therapeutic complications during the induction phase were febrile neutropenia (42%, bleeding (18% and differentiation syndrome (11%. Five patients died at diagnosis due to bleeding, three died during induction chemotherapy due to febrile neutropenia (n=2 and bleeding (n=1 and one patient died during consolidation therapy due to febrile neutropenia.  The 3-year OS was 89% and relapse rate was 3%. Adapting standard AIDA treatment protocols to limited resources by reducing dose-intensity during treatment consolidation, using ATRA in the consolidation phase and alternative anthracyclin (doxorubicin may be a valid treatment option in developing countries. In spite of the increased incidence of high and intermediate risk score APL in our sample, we reported an acceptable CR rate

  16. Is neuroendocrine cell differentiation detected using chromogranin A from patients with bone metastatic prostate cancer a prognostic factor for outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Kogenta; Aoki, Shigeyuki; Taki, Tomohiro; Matsubara, Hiroyuki; Sai, Shotoku; Naruse, Katsuya; Tobiume, Motoi; Katsuda, Remi; Zennami, Kenji; Honda, Nobuaki; Nakagawa, Atsuko; Ikeda, Hiroshi

    2006-05-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of overexpression of neuroendrocrine (NE) cell differentiation determined by immunohistochemical staining for chromogranin A (Cg A) in diagnostic needle biopsy specimens of bone metastatic prostate cancers. A total of 50 patients diagnosed as having bone metastatic prostate cancer were studied. The period of observation was between 6.9 and 79.4 months (median 48.7 months). Cg A was detected by immunostaining using the labeled streptavidin biotin method. Cg A-positivity was defined as the presence of immunostained cells in 10% or more of the tumor. All statistical analyses were carried out using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences Software, version 10.0 for Windows. Eleven patients (22%) were classified into the Cg A-positive group. There were no significant differences in clinical data between the Cg A-positive and Cg A-negative groups. The 5-year cause-specific survival rate was 34.1% for the Cg A-positive group and 55.2% for the Cg A-negative group (p=0.3763). The 3-year non-recurrence rate was 9.1% for the Cg A-positive group and 35.9% for the Cg A-negative group, and this difference was significant (p=0.0253). The 3-year cause-specific survival rates after recurrence were 38.4% and 42.3% respectively (p=0.8125). We consider that NE cell differentiation of the primary tumor in cases of bone metastatic prostate cancer is not a prognostic factor for outcome.

  17. The Impact of Body Mass Index on the Surgical Outcomes of Patients With Gastric Cancer: A 10-Year, Single-Institution Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hai-Ning; Chen, Xin-Zu; Zhang, Wei-Han; Yang, Kun; Chen, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Zhi-Xin; Chen, Jia-Ping; Zhou, Zong-Guang; Hu, Jian-Kun

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the impact of body mass index (BMI) on the short-term and long-term results of a large cohort of gastric cancer (GC) patients undergoing gastrectomy.Recently, the "obesity paradox" has been proposed, referring to the paradoxically "better" outcomes of overweight and obese patients compared with nonoverweight patients. The associations between BMI and surgical outcomes among patients with GC remain controversial.A single-institution cohort of 1249 GC patients undergoing gastrectomy between 2000 and 2010 were categorized to low-BMI (risk of mild postoperative complications, the high-BMI patients exhibited paradoxically "superior" survival outcomes compared with the normal-BMI patients. These findings confirm the "obesity paradox" in GC patients undergoing gastrectomy.

  18. The colostomy impact score: development and validation of a patient reported outcome measure for rectal cancer patients with a permanent colostomy. A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyø, A; Emmertsen, K J; Pinkney, T D; Christensen, P; Laurberg, S

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to develop and validate a simple scoring system evaluating the impact of colostomy dysfunction on quality of life (QOL) in patients with a permanent stoma after rectal cancer treatment. In this population-based study, 610 patients with a permanent colostomy after previous rectal cancer treatment during the period 2001-2007 completed two questionnaires: (i) the basic stoma questionnaire consisting of 22 items about stoma function with one anchor question addressing the overall stoma impact on QOL and (ii) the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ) C30. Answers from half of the cohort were used to develop the score and subsequently validated on the remaining half. Logistic regression analyses identified and selected items for the score and multivariate analysis established the score value allocated to each item. The colostomy impact score includes seven items with a total range from 0 to 38 points. A score of ≥ 10 indicates major colostomy impact (Major CI). The score has a sensitivity of 85.7% for detecting patients with significant stoma impact on QOL. Using the EORTC QLQ scales, patients with Major CI experienced significant impairment in their QOL compared to the Minor CI group. This new scoring system appears valid for the assessment of the impact on QOL from having a permanent colostomy in a Danish rectal cancer population. It requires validation in non-Danish populations prior to its acceptance as a valuable patient-reported outcome measure for patients internationally. Colorectal Disease © 2016 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  19. Utilization of Patient-Reported Outcomes to Guide Symptom Management during Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danner, Malika; Hung, Ming-Yang; Yung, Thomas M; Ayoob, Marilyn; Lei, Siyuan; Collins, Brian T; Suy, Simeng; Collins, Sean P

    2017-01-01

    Utilization of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) to guide symptom management during radiation therapy is increasing. This study focuses on the use of the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite for Clinical Practice (EPIC-CP) as a tool to assess urinary and bowel bother during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and its utility in guiding medical management. Between September 2015 and January 2017, 107 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with 35-36.25 Gy via SBRT in five fractions. PROs were assessed using EPIC-CP 1 h prior to the first fraction and after each subsequent fraction. Symptom management medications were prescribed based on the physician clinical judgment or if patients reported a moderate to big problem. Clinical significance was assessed using a minimally important difference of 1/2 SD from baseline score. A median baseline EPIC-CP urinary symptom score of 1.5 significantly increased to 3.7 on the day of the final treatment (p big problem that increased to 28% by the end of the fifth treatment. A median baseline EPIC-CP bowel symptom score of 0.3 significantly increased to 1.4 on the day of the final treatment (p big problem that increased to 3.7% by the end of the fifth treatment. The percentage of patients requiring an increased dose of alpha-antagonist increased to 47% by the end of treatment, and an additional 28% of patients required a short steroid taper to manage moderate to big urinary problems. Similarly, the percentage of patients requiring antidiarrheals reached 12% by the fifth treatment. During the course of SBRT, an increasing percentage of patients experienced clinically significant symptoms many of which required medical management. Monitoring patient symptoms during treatment allowed for prompt detection and management of acute urinary and bowel symptoms. The usage of symptom management medications was high in this study compared to historical controls and may be due to increased physician

  20. Utilization of Patient-Reported Outcomes to Guide Symptom Management during Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malika Danner

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionUtilization of patient-reported outcomes (PROs to guide symptom management during radiation therapy is increasing. This study focuses on the use of the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite for Clinical Practice (EPIC-CP as a tool to assess urinary and bowel bother during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT and its utility in guiding medical management.MethodsBetween September 2015 and January 2017, 107 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with 35–36.25 Gy via SBRT in five fractions. PROs were assessed using EPIC-CP 1 h prior to the first fraction and after each subsequent fraction. Symptom management medications were prescribed based on the physician clinical judgment or if patients reported a moderate to big problem. Clinical significance was assessed using a minimally important difference of 1/2 SD from baseline score.ResultsA median baseline EPIC-CP urinary symptom score of 1.5 significantly increased to 3.7 on the day of the final treatment (p < 0.0001. Prior to treatment, 9.3% of men felt that their overall urinary function was a moderate to big problem that increased to 28% by the end of the fifth treatment. A median baseline EPIC-CP bowel symptom score of 0.3 significantly increased to 1.4 on the day of the final treatment (p < 0.0001. Prior to treatment, 1.9% of men felt that their overall bowel function was a moderate to big problem that increased to 3.7% by the end of the fifth treatment. The percentage of patients requiring an increased dose of alpha-antagonist increased to 47% by the end of treatment, and an additional 28% of patients required a short steroid taper to manage moderate to big urinary problems. Similarly, the percentage of patients requiring antidiarrheals reached 12% by the fifth treatment.ConclusionDuring the course of SBRT, an increasing percentage of patients experienced clinically significant symptoms many of which required medical management

  1. Clinical outcome and health-related quality-of-life following microsurgical reconstruction in patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Hayder, Shems; Elberg, Jens Jørgen; Charabi, Birgitte

    2017-01-01

    L in patients with oral or oropharyngeal cancer following free flap reconstruction. Methods: A retrospective review of medical records and self-administered HRQoL questionnaires, EORTC QLQ-C30, and -H&N35. All patients who underwent surgery for oral or oropharyngeal cancer followed by primary reconstruction...

  2. Clinical Outcomes of Image Guided Adaptive Hypofractionated Weekly Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer in Patients Unsuitable for Radical Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafeez, Shaista, E-mail: shaista.hafeez@icr.ac.uk [The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); McDonald, Fiona; Lalondrelle, Susan [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); McNair, Helen; Warren-Oseni, Karole; Jones, Kelly [The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Harris, Victoria [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Taylor, Helen; Khoo, Vincent [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Thomas, Karen [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Hansen, Vibeke; Dearnaley, David; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert [The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-01

    Purpose and Objectives: We report on the clinical outcomes of a phase 2 study assessing image guided hypofractionated weekly radiation therapy in bladder cancer patients unsuitable for radical treatment. Methods and Materials: Fifty-five patients with T2-T4aNx-2M0-1 bladder cancer not suitable for cystectomy or daily radiation therapy treatment were recruited. A “plan of the day” radiation therapy approach was used, treating the whole (empty) bladder to 36 Gy in 6 weekly fractions. Acute toxicity was assessed weekly during radiation therapy, at 6 and 12 weeks using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Late toxicity was assessed at 6 months and 12 months using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grading. Cystoscopy was used to assess local control at 3 months. Cumulative incidence function was used to determine local progression at 1 at 2 years. Death without local progression was treated as a competing risk. Overall survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median age was 86 years (range, 68-97 years). Eighty-seven percent of patients completed their prescribed course of radiation therapy. Genitourinary and gastrointestinal grade 3 acute toxicity was seen in 18% (10/55) and 4% (2/55) of patients, respectively. No grade 4 genitourinary or gastrointestinal toxicity was seen. Grade ≥3 late toxicity (any) at 6 and 12 months was seen in 6.5% (2/31) and 4.3% (1/23) of patients, respectively. Local control after radiation therapy was 92% of assessed patients (60% total population). Cumulative incidence of local progression at 1 year and 2 years for all patients was 7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 2%-17%) and 17% (95% CI 8%-29%), respectively. Overall survival at 1 year was 63% (95% CI 48%-74%). Conclusion: Hypofractionated radiation therapy delivered weekly with a plan of the day approach offers good local control with acceptable toxicity in a patient population not suitable for radical bladder treatment.

  3. Population-based study of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy and survival outcomes of breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedrosian, Isabelle; Hu, Chung-Yuan; Chang, George J

    2010-03-17

    Despite increased demand for contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM), the survival benefit of this procedure remains uncertain. We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database to identify 107 106 women with breast cancer who had undergone mastectomy for treatment between 1998 and 2003 and a subset of 8902 women who also underwent CPM during the same period. Associations between predictor variables and the likelihood of undergoing CPM were evaluated by use of chi(2) analyses. Risk-stratified (estrogen receptor [ER] status, stage, and age) adjusted survival analyses were performed by using Cox regression. Statistical tests were two-sided. In a univariate analysis, CPM was associated with improved disease-specific survival (hazard ratio [HR] of death = 0.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.57 to 0.69; P mastectomy also had a lower overall risk for contralateral breast cancer than women with ER-negative tumors (0.46% vs 0.90%, difference = 0.44%; P < .001). CPM is associated with a small improvement in 5-year breast cancer-specific survival mainly in young women with early-stage ER-negative breast cancer. This effect is related to a higher baseline risk of contralateral breast cancer.

  4. Investigation of opioid use and long-term oncologic outcomes for non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tak Kyu Oh

    Full Text Available Opioids are commonly used for postoperative pain control in cancer patients. In addition to pain control, an association between opioid use and long-term oncologic outcomes, such as recurrence or overall survival, has been postulated. The aim of this study was to determine whether postoperative opioid use in patients with non-small cell lung cancer is associated with long-term oncologic outcomes, including recurrence and death. Data obtained from 1009 medical records of patients who underwent curative resection at the National Cancer Center, Korea between January 2006 and December 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. Seven-day opioid use was divided into four quartiles to analyze probability of recurrence and death. Multivariate regression analyses of recurrence and death was conducted, including the calculation of odds ratios. A total of 871 patients were analyzed. When opioid dosage was examined by quartiles, the probability of death and recurrence increased gradually with increasing opioid use. However, in the multivariate regression analysis, the amount of opioid usage did not affect the risk of recurrence or death of lung cancer (P = 0.520 for recurrence; P = 0.659 for death. Opioid use was correlated with outcome when stratified by lung cancer stage (P = 0.004 for recurrence; P = 0.049 for death; however, the odds ratios only slightly increased (1.001 for stage IA-IIIA for both outcomes. In non-small cell lung cancer patients, the amount of opioid usage does not affect the risk of recurrence and death of lung cancer. There was an association with stage (IA-IIIA, but the effect was negligible. A well-designed prospective study is needed.

  5. Investigation of opioid use and long-term oncologic outcomes for non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Tak Kyu; Jeon, Jae Hyun; Lee, Jong Mog; Kim, Moon Soo; Kim, Jee Hee; Cho, Hyeyeon; Kim, Seong-Eun; Eom, Woosik

    2017-01-01

    Opioids are commonly used for postoperative pain control in cancer patients. In addition to pain control, an association between opioid use and long-term oncologic outcomes, such as recurrence or overall survival, has been postulated. The aim of this study was to determine whether postoperative opioid use in patients with non-small cell lung cancer is associated with long-term oncologic outcomes, including recurrence and death. Data obtained from 1009 medical records of patients who underwent curative resection at the National Cancer Center, Korea between January 2006 and December 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. Seven-day opioid use was divided into four quartiles to analyze probability of recurrence and death. Multivariate regression analyses of recurrence and death was conducted, including the calculation of odds ratios. A total of 871 patients were analyzed. When opioid dosage was examined by quartiles, the probability of death and recurrence increased gradually with increasing opioid use. However, in the multivariate regression analysis, the amount of opioid usage did not affect the risk of recurrence or death of lung cancer (P = 0.520 for recurrence; P = 0.659 for death). Opioid use was correlated with outcome when stratified by lung cancer stage (P = 0.004 for recurrence; P = 0.049 for death); however, the odds ratios only slightly increased (1.001 for stage IA-IIIA) for both outcomes. In non-small cell lung cancer patients, the amount of opioid usage does not affect the risk of recurrence and death of lung cancer. There was an association with stage (IA-IIIA), but the effect was negligible. A well-designed prospective study is needed.

  6. Intensity modulated radiotherapy as neoadjuvant chemoradiation for the treatment of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Outcome analysis and comparison with a 3D-treated patient cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, S.E.; Habermehl, D.; Kessel, K.; Brecht, I. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Bergmann, F.; Schirmacher, P. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Pathology; Werner, J.; Buechler, M.W. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Surgery; Jaeger, D. [National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, J. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Clinical Cooperation Unit Radiation Oncology

    2013-09-15

    Background: To evaluate outcome after intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared to 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-RT) as neoadjuvant treatment in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Materials and methods: In total, 57 patients with LAPC were treated with IMRT and chemotherapy. A median total dose of 45 Gy to the PTV {sub baseplan} and 54 Gy to the PTV {sub boost} in single doses of 1.8 Gy for the PTV {sub baseplan} and median single doses of 2.2 Gy in the PTV {sub boost} were applied. Outcomes were evaluated and compared to a large cohort of patients treated with 3D-RT. Results: Overall treatment was well tolerated in all patients and IMRT could be completed without interruptions. Median overall survival was 11 months (range 5-37.5 months). Actuarial overall survival at 12 and 24 months was 36 % and 8 %, respectively. A significant impact on overall survival could only be observed for a decrease in CA 19-9 during treatment, patients with less pre-treatment CA 19-9 than the median, as well as weight loss during treatment. Local progression-free survival was 79 % after 6 months, 39 % after 12 months, and 13 % after 24 months. No factors significantly influencing local progression-free survival could be identified. There was no difference in overall and progression-free survival between 3D-RT and IMRT. Secondary resectability was similar in both groups (26 % vs. 28 %). Toxicity was comparable and consisted mainly of hematological toxicity due to chemotherapy. Conclusion: IMRT leads to a comparable outcome compared to 3D-RT in patients with LAPC. In the future, the improved dose distribution, as well as advances in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) techniques, may improve the use of IMRT in local dose escalation strategies to potentially improve outcome. (orig.)

  7. Patient-reported outcome (PRO) questionnaires for men who have radical surgery for prostate cancer: a conceptual review of existing instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protopapa, Evangelia; van der Meulen, Jan; Moore, Caroline M; Smith, Sarah C

    2017-10-01

    To critically review conceptual frameworks for available patient-reported outcome (PRO) questionnaires in men having radical prostatectomy (RP), psychometrically evaluate each questionnaire, and identify whether each is appropriate for use at the level of the individual patient. We searched PubMed, the Reports and Publications database of the University of Oxford Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Group and the website of the International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM) for psychometric reviews of prostate cancer-specific PRO questionnaires. From these we identified relevant questionnaires and critically appraised the conceptual content, guided by the Wilson and Cleary framework and psychometric properties, using well established criteria. The searches found four reviews and one recommendation paper. We identified seven prostate cancer-specific PROs: the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite-26 (EPIC-26), Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite-50 (EPIC-50), University of California-Los Angeles Prostate Cancer Index (UCLA-PCI), Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - Prostate Cancer Subscale (FACT-P PCS), European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire - prostate specific 25-item (EORTC QLQ-PR25), Prostate Cancer - Quality of Life (PC-QoL), and Symptom Tracking and Reporting (STAR). Six out of seven measures purported to measure health-related quality of life (HRQL), but items focused strongly on urinary and sexual symptoms/functioning. The remaining questionnaire (STAR) claimed to assess functional recovery after RP. The psychometric evidence for these questionnaires was incomplete and variable in quality; none had evidence that they were appropriate for use with individual patients. Several questionnaires provide the basis of measures of urinary and/or sexual symptoms/functioning. Further work should explore other aspects of HRQL that are important for men having RP. Further psychometric work

  8. The Effects of a Comprehensive Coping Strategy on Clinical Outcomes in Breast Cancer Bone Marrow Transplant Patients and Primary Caregiver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-08-01

    27, 28. Northouse 28 presented summary empirical evidence from 19 studies that families may experience similar emotions as the breast cancer patient...REFERENCES 1. Peters , W.P. High-dose chemotherapy and autologous bone marrow support for breast cancer (1992). In V.T. DeVita, S. Hellman and S...innovations in Breast Cancer Care, (1), 75-76. 28. Northouse , L.L. (1995). The impact of cancer in women on the family. Cancer Practice. (3), 134-142. 29

  9. Long-term survival outcomes by smoking status in surgical and nonsurgical patients with non-small cell lung cancer: comparing never smokers and current smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meguid, Robert A; Hooker, Craig M; Harris, James; Xu, Li; Westra, William H; Sherwood, J Timothy; Sussman, Marc; Cattaneo, Stephen M; Shin, James; Cox, Solange; Christensen, Joani; Prints, Yelena; Yuan, Nance; Zhang, Jennifer; Yang, Stephen C; Brock, Malcolm V

    2010-09-01

    Survival outcomes of never smokers with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who undergo surgery are poorly characterized. This investigation compared surgical outcomes of never and current smokers with NSCLC. This investigation was a single-institution retrospective study of never and current smokers with NSCLC from 1975 to 2004. From an analytic cohort of 4,546 patients with NSCLC, we identified 724 never smokers and 3,822 current smokers. Overall, 1,142 patients underwent surgery with curative intent. For survival analysis by smoking status, hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard modeling and then further adjusted by other covariates. Never smokers were significantly more likely than current smokers to be women (P cancer diagnosis has little impact on the long-term survival of patients with NSCLC, especially after curative surgery. Despite different etiologies between lung cancer in never and current smokers the prognosis is equally dismal.

  10. Abdominoperineal resection and low anterior resection: comparison of long-term oncologic outcome in matched patients with lower rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin C; Yu, Chang S; Lim, Seok B; Kim, Chan W; Kim, Jong H; Kim, Tae W

    2013-04-01

    The current study aimed to compare the oncologic outcome and pattern of metastasis after abdominoperineal resection (APR) and low anterior resection (LAR) treating lower rectal cancer. A total of 804 patients undergoing curative resection (R0) were enrolled prospectively. The APR and LAR groups (n = 402, respectively) were matched for gender, age, and stage, for a retrospectively comparative analysis. In a multivariate analysis with potential variables, APR itself was not a risk factor for increased local recurrence (LR) or reduced survival (P = 0.243-0.994). Circumferential resection margin (CRM) involvement as an operation-related risk was 1.6-fold more frequent in the APR group and was significantly associated with LR and systemic recurrence (OR, 2.487-4.017; P CRM+) was concurrently correlated with advanced stage, larger tumor (long diameter, >4 cm), and longer sagittal midpelvic diameter (>10 cm) in a multivariate analysis (P CRM+ and the presence of an infiltrating tumor were correlated with disease-free survival (hazard ratio (HR), 1.644 and 1.654, respectively), whereas elevated serum carcinoembryonic antigen and LVI+ were correlated with overall survival (HR, 1.57 and 1.671, respectively), in a multivariate analysis with potential variables (P < 0.05). When performed with appropriate skill to achieve R0 resection, APR can be used safely without impairing oncological outcome, although sphincter-preserving surgery should remain the preferred option.

  11. Clinical and cosmetic outcomes in patients treated with high-dose-rate electronic brachytherapy for nonmelanoma skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paravati, Anthony J; Hawkins, Peter G; Martin, Amanda N; Mansy, Gina; Rahn, Doug A; Advani, Sunil J; Hoisak, Jeremy; Dragojevic, Irena; Martin, Peter J; Miller, Charles J; Sanghvi, Parag

    2015-01-01

    To retrospectively analyze clinical and cosmetic outcomes in patients treated for nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) with high-dose-rate (HDR) electronic brachytherapy (EBT) using surface applicators. We identified 127 patients who had 154 NMSC lesions, 149 of which were basal cell carcinoma, treated with HDR EBT at our institution between July 2012 and March 2014. Lesions were treated to 40 Gy in 8 fractions. Local control, acute toxicity, late toxicity, and cosmetic outcomes were analyzed retrospectively. Acute and late toxicities were graded using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Cosmetic outcomes were graded using a standard scale based on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Schema. Median (range) follow-up from completion of treatment was 16.1 (3.4-34.8 months). The overall crude recurrence rate was 1.3% (n = 2). Grade 0 to 1 acute radiation dermatitis was observed in 52.6% of treated lesions (n = 81), grade 2 in 34.4% (n = 53), and grade 3 in 13.0% (n = 20). No acute toxicity greater than grade 3 was observed and all acute toxic events resolved after treatment. Grade 0 to 1 late toxicity was observed in 94.2% of cases (n = 145), and grade 2 in 5.8% (n = 9). No late toxicity greater than grade 2 was observed. Across the 152 controlled lesions, cosmetic results were excellent in 94.2% of treated lesions (n = 145), good in 3.3% (n = 5), fair in 0.7% (n = 1), and poor in 0.7% (n = 1). HDR EBT confers promising local control, minimal toxicity, and excellent cosmesis in our institutional experience. It should be considered ideal for NMSC of the head and neck, particularly for basal cell carcinoma involving central facial locations where surgical cosmesis may be inferior. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A retrospective analysis of clinical outcome of patients with chemo-refractory metastatic breast cancer treated in a single institution phase I unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunetto, A T; Sarker, D; Papadatos-Pastos, D; Fehrmann, R; Kaye, S B; Johnston, S; Allen, M; De Bono, J S; Swanton, C

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND METHODS: Novel approaches to treat chemo-refractory metastatic breast cancer (MBC) are currently under investigation. This retrospective series reviews the outcome of 70 MBC patients who have participated in 30 phase I trials at the Royal Marsden Hospital from 2002 to 2009. RESULTS:

  13. Use of Community Health Workers and Patient Navigators to Improve Cancer Outcomes Among Patients Served by Federally Qualified Health Centers: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Katherine B; Milliken, Erin L; Rohan, Elizabeth A; DeGroff, Amy; White, Susan; Melillo, Stephanie; Rorie, William E; Signes, Carmita-Anita C; Young, Paul A

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: In the United States, disparities in cancer screening, morbidity, and mortality are well documented, and often are related to race/ethnicity and socioeconomic indicators including income, education, and healthcare access. Public health approaches that address social determinants of health have the greatest potential public health benefit, and can positively impact health disparities. As public health interventions, community health workers (CHWs), and patient navigators (PNs) work to address disparities and improve cancer outcomes through education, connecting patients to and navigating them through the healthcare system, supporting patient adherence to screening and diagnostic services, and providing social support and linkages to financial and community resources. Clinical settings, such as federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) are mandated to provide care to medically underserved communities, and thus are also valuable in the effort to address health disparities. We conducted a systematic literature review to identify studies of cancer-related CHW/PN interventions in FQHCs, and to describe the components and characteristics of those interventions in order to guide future intervention development and evaluation. Method: We searched five databases for peer-reviewed CHW/PN intervention studies conducted in partnership with FQHCs with a focus on cancer, carried out in the United States, and published in English between January 1990 and December 2013. Results: We identified 24 articles, all reporting positive outcomes of CHW/PNs interventions in FQHCs. CHW/PN interventions most commonly promoted breast, cervical, or colorectal cancer screening and/or referral for diagnostic resolution. Studies were supported largely through federal funding. Partnerships with academic institutions and community-based organizations provided support and helped develop capacity among FQHC clinic leadership and community members. Discussion: Both the FQHC system and CHW

  14. Effect of hiv serological status on outcome in patients with cancer of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    By the fourth year the survival probabilities had fallen to 0% for the seropositive while it was 46% for the seronegative patients. Conclusion: Radiotherapy was effective in both sets of patients with comparable good objective response. The survival probabilities for the seropositive patients were significantly lower than for the ...

  15. Clinical course and outcome of patients with high-level microsatellite instability cancers in a real-life setting: a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halpern N

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Naama Halpern,1 Yael Goldberg,2 Luna Kadouri,2 Morasha Duvdevani,2 Tamar Hamburger,2 Tamar Peretz,2 Ayala Hubert2 1Institute of Oncology, The Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel; 2Sharett Institute of Oncology, Hadassah Medical Center, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel Background: The prognostic and predictive significance of the high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-H phenotype in various malignancies is unclear. We describe the characteristics, clinical course, and outcomes of patients with MSI-H malignancies treated in a real-life hospital setting.Patients and methods: A retrospective analysis of MSI-H cancer patient files was conducted. We analyzed the genetic data, clinical characteristics, and oncological treatments, including chemotherapy and surgical interventions.Results: Clinical data of 73 MSI-H cancer patients were available. Mean age at diagnosis of first malignancy was 52.3 years. Eight patients (11% had more than four malignancies each. Most patients (76% had colorectal cancer (CRC. Seventeen patients (23% had only extracolonic malignancies. Eighteen women (36% had gynecological malignancy. Nine women (18% had breast cancer. Mean follow-up was 8.5 years. Five-year overall survival and disease-free survival of all MSI-H cancer patients from first malignancy were 86% and 74.6%, respectively. Five-year overall survival rates of stage 2, 3, and 4 MSI-H CRC patients were 89.5%, 58.4%, and 22.9%, respectively.Conclusion: Although the overall prognosis of MSI-H cancer patients is favorable, this advantage may not be maintained in advanced MSI-H CRC patients. Keywords: microsatellite instability, malignancy, treatment, outcome

  16. Conversations for Providers Caring for Rectal Cancer Patients: Comparison of Long-Term Patient-Centered Outcomes for Low Rectal Cancer Patients Facing Ostomy or Sphincter-Sparing Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrinton, Lisa J.; Altschuler, Andrea; McMullen, Carmit K.; Bulkley, Joanna E.; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Sun, Virginia; Wendel, Christopher S.; Grant, Marcia; Baldwin, Carol M.; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Temple, Larissa K.F.; Krouse, Robert S.

    2017-01-01

    For some low rectal cancer patients, ostomy (with elimination into a pouch) may be the only realistic surgical option. However, some patients have a choice between ostomy and sphincter-sparing surgery. Sphincter-sparing surgery has been preferred over ostomy because it offers preservation of normal bowel function. However, this surgery can cause incontinence and bowel dysfunction. Increasingly, it has become evident that certain patients eligible for sphincter-sparing surgery may not be well served by the surgery and construction of an ostomy may be better. No validated assessment tool or decision aid has been published to help newly diagnosed patients decide between the two surgeries, or to help physicians elicit long-term surgical outcomes. Furthermore, comparison of long-term outcomes and late effects following the two surgeries has not been synthesized. We therefore conducted a systematic review to examine this ? This systematic review summarizes controlled studies that compared long-term survivorship outcomes between these two surgical groups. Our goals are: 1) improve understanding and shared decision-making among surgeons, oncologists, primary care providers, patients, and caregivers; 2) increase the patient’s participation in the decision; (3) alert the primary care provider to patient challenges that could be addressed by provider attention and intervention; and 4) ultimately, improve patients’ long-term quality of life. This report includes discussion points for health care providers to use with their patients during initial discussions of ostomy and sphincter-sparing surgery, as well as questions to ask during follow-up examinations to ascertain any long-term challenges facing the patient. PMID:26999757

  17. Body Composition as a Prognostic Factor of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Toxicity and Outcome in Patients with Locally Advanced Gastric Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Palmela, Carolina; Velho, S?nia; Agostinho, Lisa; Branco, Francisco; Santos, Marta; Santos, Maria Pia Costa; Oliveira, Maria Helena de; Strecht, Jo?o; Maio, Rui; Cravo, Mar?lia; Baracos, Vickie E.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has been shown to improve survival in locally advanced gastric cancer, but it is associated with significant toxicity. Sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity have been studied in several types of cancers and have been reported to be associated with higher chemotherapy toxicity and morbi-mortality. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of sarcopenia/sarcopenic obesity in patients with gastric cancer, as well as its association with chemotherapy toxicity...

  18. Teleophthalmology: improving patient outcomes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreelatha OK

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Omana Kesary Sreelatha,1 Sathyamangalam VenkataSubbu Ramesh2 1Ophthalmology Department, Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Oman; 2Department of Optometry, School of Allied Health Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal, India Abstract: Teleophthalmology is gaining importance as an effective eye care delivery modality worldwide. In many developing countries, teleophthalmology is being utilized to provide quality eye care to the underserved urban population and the unserved remote rural population. Over the years, technological innovations have led to improvement in evidence and teleophthalmology has evolved from a research tool to a clinical tool. The majority of the current teleophthalmology services concentrate on patient screening and appropriate referral to experts. Specialty care using teleophthalmology services for the pediatric group includes screening as well as providing timely care for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP. Among geriatric eye diseases, specialty teleophthalmology care is focused toward screening and referral for diabetic retinopathy (DR, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (ARMD, and other sight-threatening conditions. Comprehensive vision screening and refractive error services are generally covered as part of most of the teleophthalmology methods. Over the past decades, outcome assessment of health care system includes patients’ assessments on their health, care, and services they receive. Outcomes, by and large, remain the ultimate validators of the effectiveness and quality of medical care. Teleophthalmology produces the same desired clinical outcome as the traditional system. Remote portals allow specialists to provide care over a larger region, thereby improving health outcomes and increasing accessibility of specialty care to a larger population. A high satisfaction level and acceptance is reported in the majority of the studies because of increased accessibility and reduced traveling cost and time

  19. Tumor-infiltrating FoxP3+ Tregs predict favorable outcome in colorectal cancer patients: A meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guoming; Li, Zhi’an; Wang, Shimin

    2017-01-01

    FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (FoxP3+ Tregs) are considered to be a key mediator in immune escape and tumor progression. However, the role of FoxP3+ Tregs in human colorectal cancer (CRC) remains controversial. Herein, we conducted a meta-analysis including 17 published studies with 3811 patients identified from PubMed and EBSCO to assess the prognostic impact of tumor-infiltrating FoxP3+ Tregs in human CRC. We found FoxP3+ Tregs infiltrating into both intraepithelium and stroma within tumor were significantly positively correlated with 1, 3, 5 and 10-year overall survival (OS), but not with 1, 3, 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) of patients. Interestingly, in stratified analyses by compartments within tumor FoxP3+ Tregs infiltrating into, FoxP3+ Tregs invading stromal compartment significantly improved 3 and 5-year OS, yet OS wasn’t improved when FoxP3+ Tregs infiltrated into intraepithelium only. Furthermore, FoxP3+ Tregs invading both intraepithelium and stroma significantly inversely correlated with TNM stage of CRC. In conclusion, High density of FoxP3+ Tregs within tumor especially at stromal compartment leads to a favorable outcome in CRC, implicating FoxP3+ Tregs are one of valuable indexes for prognostic prediction in human CRC. PMID:29088871

  20. Electronic Monitoring Device of Patient-Reported Outcomes and Function in Improving Patient-Centered Care in Patients With Gastrointestinal Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-06

    Stage I Adult Liver Cancer; Stage I Colorectal Cancer; Stage IA Gastric Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Gastric Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Adult Liver Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Adult Liver Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Adult Liver Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Adult Liver Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVA Liver Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Liver Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer

  1. Murine breast cancer mastectomy model that predicts patient outcomes for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuta, Eriko; Rashid, Omar M; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2017-11-01

    Despite massive expenditures in preclinical studies, many breast cancer agents show efficacy in murine models but fail in human trials. In humans, metastatic disease determines survival, but preclinical murine models only evaluate drug efficacy against the primary tumor. We hypothesized that evaluating efficacy against metastatic breast cancer would more efficiently predict efficacy in a murine model than evaluating the primary tumor alone. This study (1) critically evaluated a murine tumor removal model with metastatic tumor burden quantification for breast cancer preclinical trials and (2) validated the model with an agent that previously passed preclinical trials but failed human trials. Tumorectomy and Halsted (radical) mastectomy procedures after inoculation of 4T1-luc2 cells were compared. The effect of AZD0530, an oral Src inhibitor that passed preclinical trials but failed human trials, was evaluated using an inoculation model with/without Halsted mastectomy. Significant amounts of residual disease were confirmed by bioluminescence (P = 0.003) and 100% developed local recurrence after tumorectomy versus 14% (P = 0.005) after Halsted mastectomy. Bioluminescence value at 15 min after luciferin injection highly correlated with peak except for 24 h after injection. AZD0530 significantly suppressed primary tumor burden compared with no treatment (P = 0.002); but not in lung metastases. In a Halsted mastectomy model, AZD0530 had no efficacy against lung metastases or difference in survival. We critically evaluated and established a murine mastectomy model to evaluate metastatic tumors. It provides a new model for preclinical drug development that mimics the human adjuvant setting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of thymidylate synthase gene polymorphism on the response to chemotherapy and clinical outcome of non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Honglin; Bao, Dengke; Guo, Xu; Hu, Jie; Li, Xiaofei; Wan, Shaogui; Xing, Jinliang

    2015-09-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of thymidylate synthase (TYMS) gene have been reported to be associated with development or prognosis of several cancers. However, the association between polymorphisms of TYMS gene and clinical outcomes of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients are still unknown. In the present study, we investigated the associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of TYMS gene and response to chemotherapy as well as clinical outcomes in NSCLC patients. Five SNPs in TYMS gene were genotyped using the Sequenom iPLEX genotyping system in a hospital-based cohort with 500 NSCLC patients, and their associations with NSCLC outcomes were evaluated by Cox proportional hazard regression analysis under three genetic models (additive, dominant, and recessive models). Our data showed that there was no significant association between individual SNP and overall survival of NSCLC patients. However, SNP rs2847153 was significantly associated with NSCLC recurrence under recessive model. We further identified a significant interaction between rs2847153 and chemotherapy in modifying clinical outcome of patients. Our data showed that individuals carrying GG/GA genotypes of rs2847153 had a significantly better response to chemotherapy when comparing to those carrying AA genotype. Conclusively, our data suggest that SNPs rs2847153 in TYMS gene may be a potential biomarker for predicting clinical outcome and personalized treatment in NSCLC patients.

  3. Long-term Outcome of Peripherally Implanted Venous Access Ports in the Forearm in Female Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klösges, Laura, E-mail: l.kloesges@uni-bonn.de; Meyer, Carsten, E-mail: carsten.meyer@ukb.uni-bonn.de; Boschewitz, Jack, E-mail: jack.boschewitz@ukb.uni-bonn.de; Andersson, Magnus, E-mail: magnus.andersson@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Universitätsklinikum Bonn, Department of Radiology (Germany); Rudlowski, Christian, E-mail: c.rudlowski@evk.de [Evangelisches Krankenhaus Bergisch Gladbach, Department of Gynecology (Germany); Schild, Hans H., E-mail: hans.schild@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Universitätsklinikum Bonn, Department of Radiology (Germany); Wilhelm, Kai, E-mail: kai.wilhelm@ek-bonn.de [Ev. Kliniken Bonn, Johanniter-Krankenhaus, Department of Radiology (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    PurposeThe aim of this retrospective study was to analyze the long-term outcome of peripherally implanted venous access ports in the forearm at our institution in a female patient collective.MethodsBetween June 2002 and May 2011, a total of 293 female patients with an underlying malignancy had 299 forearm ports implanted in our interventional radiology suite. The mean age of the cohort was 55 ± 12 years (range 26–81 years). The majority of women suffered from breast (59.5 %) or ovarian cancer (28.1 %). Complications were classified as infectious complications, thrombotic and nonthrombotic catheter dysfunction (dislocation of the catheter or port chamber, fracture with/without embolization or kinking of the catheter, port occlusion), and others.ResultsWe analyzed a total of 90,276 catheter days in 248 port systems (47 patients were lost to follow-up). The mean device service interval was 364 days per catheter (range 8–2,132, median 223 days, CI 311–415, SD 404). Sixty-seven early (≤30 days from implantation) or late complications (>30 days) occurred during the observation period (0.74/1,000 catheter days). Common complications were port infection (0.18/1,000 days), thrombotic dysfunction (0.12/1,000 days), and skin dehiscence (0.12/1,000 days). Nonthrombotic dysfunction occurred in a total of 21 cases (0.23/1,000 days) and seemed to cumulate on the venous catheter entry site on the distal upper arm.ConclusionPeripherally implanted venous access ports in the forearm are a safe alternative to chest or upper-arm ports in female oncology patients. Special attention should be paid to signs of skin dehiscence and nonthrombotic dysfunction, especially when used for long-term treatment.

  4. Outcomes of Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy in Patients With Potentially Operable Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagerwaard, Frank J., E-mail: fj.lagerwaard@vumc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verstegen, Naomi E.; Haasbeek, Cornelis J.A.; Slotman, Ben J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Paul, Marinus A. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Smit, Egbert F. [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Senan, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-05-01

    Background: Approximately two-thirds of patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in The Netherlands currently undergo surgical resection. As an increasing number of fit patients have elected to undergo stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) in recent years, we studied outcomes after SABR in patients with potentially operable stage I NSCLC. Methods and Materials: In an institutional prospective database collected since 2003, 25% of lung SABR cases (n = 177 patients) were found to be potentially operable when the following patients were excluded: those with (1) synchronous lung tumors or other malignancy, (2) prior high-dose radiotherapy/pneumonectomy, (3) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a severity score of 3-4 according to the Global initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease classification. (4) a performance score of {>=}3, and (5) other comorbidity precluding surgery. Study patients included 101 males and 76 females, with a median age of 76 years old, 60% of whom were staged as T1 and 40% of whom were T2. Median Charlson comorbidity score was 2 (range, 0-5). A SABR dose of 60 Gy was delivered using a risk-adapted scheme in 3, 5, or 8 fractions, depending on tumor size and location. Follow-up chest computed tomography scans were obtained at 3, 6, and 12 months and yearly thereafter. Results: Median follow-up was 31.5 months; and median overall survival (OS) was 61.5 months, with 1- and 3-year survival rates of 94.7% and 84.7%, respectively. OS rates at 3 years in patients with (n = 59) and without (n = 118) histological diagnosis did not differ significantly (96% versus 81%, respectively, p = 0.39). Post-SABR 30-day mortality was 0%, while predicted 30-day mortality for a lobectomy, derived using the Thoracoscore predictive model (Falcoz PE et al. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2007;133:325-332), would have been 2.6%. Local control rates at 1 and 3 years were 98% and 93%, respectively. Regional and distant failure rates at 3 years were each

  5. MiR-34b is associated with clinical outcome in triple-negative breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svoboda Marek

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is the most common malignancy with the highest incidence rates among women worldwide. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC represents the major phenotype of basal-like molecular subtype of breast cancer, characterized by higher incidence in young women and a very poor prognosis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs playing significant role in the pathogenesis of many cancers including breast cancer. Therefore, miRNAs are also potential prognostic and/or predictive biomarkers in triple-negative breast cancer patients. Methods Thirty-nine TNBC patients with available formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissues were enrolled in the study. MiR-34a, miR-34b, and miR-34c were analyzed using qRT-PCR and correlated to clinico-pathological features of TNBC patients. Results Expression levels of miR-34b significantly correlate with disease free survival (DFS (p = 0.0020, log-rank test and overall survival (OS (p = 0.0008, log-rank test of TNBC patients. No other significant associations between miR-34a, miR-34b, and miR-34c with available clinical pathological data were observed. Conclusions MiR-34b expression negatively correlates with disease free survival and overall survival in TNBC patients. Thus, miR-34b may present a new promising prognostic biomarker in TNBC patients, but independent validations are necessary.

  6. Assessment of kallikrein-related peptidase 5 (KLK5) protein expression in tumor tissue of advanced ovarian cancer patients by immunohistochemistry and ELISA: correlation with clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Julia; Yassouridis, Alexandra; Walch, Axel; Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Schmitt, Manfred; Kiechle, Marion; Wang, Ping; Drecoll, Enken; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Loessner, Daniela; Kotzsch, Matthias; Magdolen, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Members of the human kallikrein-related peptidase (KLK) family, including KLK5, have been reported to play an important role in ovarian cancer progression. In the present study, we assessed KLK5 protein expression in ovarian cancer tissues by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and ELISA, and analyzed its association with clinicopathologic parameters and disease outcome in 95 patients with advanced ovarian cancer FIGO stage III/IV. KLK5 immunoexpression was evaluated in ovarian cancer tissue microarrays by IHC using a manual semiquantitative scoring system. KLK5 antigen levels were determined in ovarian cancer tumour tissue extracts by ELISA. KLK5 protein is expressed in ovarian cancer tissue by stromal and tumor cells. Mean KLK5 immunoscore values in tumor cells (KLK5-Tc; 5.7, range 0 to 12) were higher compared to stromal cells (KLK5-Sc; 1.2, range 0 to 9) but the correlation between KLK5-Tc and KLK5-Sc was rather low (rs = 0.34, P ovarian cancer patients. KLK5-Tc and KLK5-Tc+Sc scores as well as the KLK5-E values were not associated with patients' outcome. In multivariable analysis, KLK5-Sc expression was found to be statistically significant for PFS. Patients with elevated KLK5-Sc had a two-fold lower risk of disease recurrence (HR = 0.53, P = 0.037) as compared to patients with low KLK5-Sc. For KLK5-Sc and OS, a trend towards statistical significance was observed (HR = 0.62, P = 0.077). These results indicate that KLK5 overexpression by stromal cells (KLK5-Sc) may be a positive modulator lowering aggressiveness of ovarian cancer.

  7. Oncological management and obstetric and neonatal outcomes for women diagnosed with cancer during pregnancy: a 20-year international cohort study of 1170 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, Jorine; Verheecke, Magali; Van Calsteren, Kristel; Van Calster, Ben; Shmakov, Roman G; Mhallem Gziri, Mina; Halaska, Michael J; Fruscio, Robert; Lok, Christianne A R; Boere, Ingrid A; Zola, Paolo; Ottevanger, Petronella B; de Groot, Christianne J M; Peccatori, Fedro A; Dahl Steffensen, Karina; Cardonick, Elyce H; Polushkina, Evgeniya; Rob, Lukas; Ceppi, Lorenzo; Sukhikh, Gennady T; Han, Sileny N; Amant, Frédéric

    2018-03-01

    Awareness is growing that cancer can be treated during pregnancy, but the effect of this change on maternal and neonatal outcomes is unknown. The International Network on Cancer, Infertility and Pregnancy (INCIP) registers the incidence and maternal, obstetric, oncological, and neonatal outcomes of cancer occurring during pregnancy. We aimed to describe the oncological management and obstetric and neonatal outcomes of patients registered in INCIP and treated in the past 20 years, and assess associations between cancer type or treatment modality and obstetric and neonatal outcomes. This descriptive cohort study included pregnant patients with cancer registered from all 37 centres (from 16 countries) participating in the INCIP registry. Oncological, obstetric, and neonatal outcome data of consecutive patients diagnosed with primary invasive cancer during pregnancy between Jan 1, 1996, and Nov 1, 2016, were retrospectively and prospectively collected. We analysed changes over time in categorical patient characteristics, outcomes, and treatment methods with log-binomial regression. We used multiple logistic regression to analyse preterm, prelabour rupture of membranes (PPROM) or preterm contractions, small for gestational age, and admission to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The INCIP registry study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00330447, and is ongoing. 1170 patients were included in the analysis and 779 (67%) received treatment during pregnancy. Breast cancer was the most common malignant disease (462 [39%]). Every 5 years, the likelihood of receiving treatment during pregnancy increased (relative risk [RR] 1·10, 95% CI 1·05-1·15), mainly related to an increase of chemotherapeutic treatment (1·31, 1·20-1·43). Overall, 955 (88%) of 1089 singleton pregnancies ended in a livebirth, of which 430 (48%) of 887 pregnancies ended preterm. Each 5 years, we observed more livebirths (RR 1·04, 95% CI 1·01-1·06) and fewer iatrogenic preterm

  8. Population-based study of peritumoral lymphovascular invasion and outcome among patients with operable breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejlertsen, Bent; Jensen, Maj-Britt; Rank, Fritz

    2009-01-01

    characteristics and therapy. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: Complete follow-up was achieved for 15,659 patients. The median estimated potential follow-up was 6.4 years for invasive disease-free interval and 7.7 years for overall survival. Invasive disease-free interval and overall survival were...... high-risk criterion. Lymphovascular invasion should not by itself be considered sufficient to move patients from a low-risk group to a high-risk group....

  9. Patient-reported Outcomes in Randomised Controlled Trials of Prostate Cancer: Methodological Quality and Impact on Clinical Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efficace, Fabio; Feuerstein, Michael; Fayers, Peter; Cafaro, Valentina; Eastham, James; Pusic, Andrea; Blazeby, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Context Patient-reported outcomes (PRO) data from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are increasingly used to inform patient-centred care as well as clinical and health policy decisions. Objective The main objective of this study was to investigate the methodological quality of PRO assessment in RCTs of prostate cancer (PCa) and to estimate the likely impact of these studies on clinical decision making. Evidence acquisition A systematic literature search of studies was undertaken on main electronic databases to retrieve articles published between January 2004 and March 2012. RCTs were evaluated on a predetermined extraction form, including (1) basic trial demographics and clinical and PRO characteristics; (2) level of PRO reporting based on the recently published recommendations by the International Society for Quality of Life Research; and (3) bias, assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. Studies were systematically analysed to evaluate their relevance for supporting clinical decision making. Evidence synthesis Sixty-five RCTs enrolling a total of 22 071 patients were evaluated, with 31 (48%) in patients with nonmetastatic disease. When a PRO difference between treatments was found, it related in most cases to symptoms only (n = 29, 58%). Although the extent of missing data was generally documented (72% of RCTs), few reported details on statistical handling of this data (18%) and reasons for dropout (35%). Improvements in key methodological aspects over time were found. Thirteen (20%) RCTs were judged as likely to be robust in informing clinical decision making. Higher-quality PRO studies were generally associated with those RCTs that had higher internal validity. Conclusions Including PRO in RCTs of PCa patients is critical for better evaluating the treatment effectiveness of new therapeutic approaches. Marked improvements in PRO quality reporting over time were found, and it is estimated that at least one-fifth of PRO RCTs have provided sufficient

  10. The impact of body mass index on treatment outcomes for patients with low-intermediate risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamoah, Kosj; Zeigler-Johnson, Charnita M; Jeffers, Abra; Malkowicz, Bruce; Spangler, Elaine; Park, Jong Y; Whittemore, Alice; Rebbeck, Timothy R

    2016-07-29

    Little is known about the relationship between preoperative body mass index and need for adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) following radical prostatectomy. The goal of this study was to evaluate the utility of body mass index in predicting adverse clinical outcomes which require adjuvant RT among men with organ-confined prostate cancer (PCa). We used a prospective cohort of 1,170 low-intermediate PCa risk men who underwent radical prostatectomy and evaluated the effect of body mass index on adverse pathologic features and freedom from biochemical failure (FFbF). Clinical and pathologic variables were compared across the body mass index groups using an analysis of variance model for continuous variables or χ(2) for categorical variables. Factors related to adverse pathologic features were examined using logistic regression models. Time to biochemical recurrence was compared across the groups using a log-rank survivorship analysis. Multivariable analysis predicting biochemical recurrence was conducted with a Cox proportional hazards model. Patients with elevated body mass index (defined as body mass index ≥25 kg/m(2)) had greater extraprostatic extension (p = 0.004), and positive surgical margins (p = 0.01). Elevated body mass index did not correlate with preoperative risk groupings (p = 0.94). However, when compared with non-obese patients (body mass index <30 kg/m(2)), obese patients (body mass index ≥30 kg/m(2)) were much more likely to have higher rate of adverse pathologic features (p = 0.006). In patients with low- and intermediate- risk disease, obesity was strongly associated with rate of pathologic upgrading of tumors (p = 0.01 and p = 0.02), respectively. After controlling for known preoperative risk factors, body mass index was independently associated with ≥2 adverse pathologic features (p = 0.002), an indicator for adjuvant RT as well as FFbF (p = 0.001). Body mass index of ≥30 kg/m(2) is independently

  11. Psychological and behavioural predictors of pain management outcomes in patients with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    Perceived Involvement in Care Scale measuring the quality of patient-physician pain communication, and the Danish version of Medication Adherence Report Scale (DMARS-4). Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS 16.00. The results of the multivariable linear regression analyses showed that pain intensity...

  12. Surgical outcome prediction in patients with advanced ovarian cancer using computed tomography scans and intraoperative findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha-Jeong Kim

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: The combination of omental extension to the stomach or spleen and involvement of inguinal or pelvic lymph nodes in preoperative CT scans is considered predictive of suboptimal cytoreduction. These patients may be more appropriately treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgical cytoreduction.

  13. Treatment and Outcomes in Patients With Primary Cutaneous B-Cell Lymphoma: The BC Cancer Agency Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, Sarah N., E-mail: shamilton7@bccancer.bc.ca [University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Radiation Therapy Program, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Wai, Elaine S. [Radiation Therapy Program, BC Cancer Agency, Victoria (Canada); Tan, King [Department of Pathology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Alexander, Cheryl [Radiation Therapy Program, BC Cancer Agency, Victoria (Canada); Gascoyne, Randy D. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Department of Pathology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Centre for Lymphoid Cancer, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Connors, Joseph M. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Centre for Lymphoid Cancer, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To review the treatment and outcomes of patients with primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma (CBCL). Methods and Materials: Clinical characteristics, treatment, and outcomes were analyzed for all patients referred to our institution from 1981 through 2011 with primary CBCL without extracutaneous or distant nodal spread at diagnosis (n=136). Hematopathologists classified 99% of cases using the World Health Organization-European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (WHO-EORTC) guidelines. Results: Median age at diagnosis was 62 years. Classification was 18% diffuse large B-cell leg-type (DLBCL-leg), 32% follicle center (FCCL), 45% marginal zone (MZL), and 6% nonclassifiable (OTHER). Of the 111 subjects with indolent lymphoma (FCCL, MZL, OTHER), 79% received radiation alone (RT), 11% surgery alone, 3% chemotherapy alone, 4% chemotherapy followed by RT, and 3% observation. Following treatment, 29% of subjects relapsed. In-field recurrence occurred in 2% treated with RT and in 33% treated with surgery alone. Of the 25 subjects with DLBCL-leg, 52% received chemotherapy followed by RT, 24% chemotherapy, 20% RT, and 4% surgery alone. Seventy-nine percent received CHOP-type chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin or epirubicin, vincristine, prednisone), 47% with rituximab added. Overall and disease-specific survival and time to progression at 5 years were 81%, 92%, and 69% for indolent and 26%, 61%, and 54% for DLBCL-leg, respectively. On Cox regression analysis of indolent subjects, RT was associated with better time to progression (P=.05). RT dose, chemo, age >60 y, and >1 lesion were not significantly associated with time to progression. For DLBCL-leg, disease-specific survival at 5 years was 100% for those receiving rituximab versus 67% for no rituximab (P=.13). Conclusions: This review demonstrates better outcomes for indolent histology compared with DLBCL-leg, validating the prognostic utility of the WHO-EORTC classification. In the indolent group

  14. Polymorphisms of homologous recombination genes and clinical outcomes of non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Yin

    Full Text Available The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs is the major mechanism to maintain genomic stability in response to irradiation. We hypothesized that genetic polymorphisms in DSB repair genes may affect clinical outcomes among non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients treated with definitive radio(chemotherapy. We genotyped six potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs (i.e., RAD51 -135G>C/rs1801320 and -172G>T/rs1801321, XRCC2 4234G>C/rs3218384 and R188H/rs3218536 G>A, XRCC3 T241M/rs861539 and NBN E185Q/rs1805794 and estimated their associations with overall survival (OS and radiation pneumonitis (RP in 228 NSCLC patients. We found a predictive role of RAD51 -135G>C SNP in RP development (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.52, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.31-0.86, P = 0.010 for CG/CC vs. GG. We also found that RAD51 -135G>C and XRCC2 R188H SNPs were independent prognostic factors for overall survival (adjusted HR = 1.70, 95% CI, 1.14-2.62, P = 0.009 for CG/CC vs. GG; and adjusted HR = 1.70; 95% CI, 1.02-2.85, P = 0.043 for AG vs. GG, respectively and that the SNP-survival association was most pronounced in the presence of RP. Our study suggests that HR genetic polymorphisms, particularly RAD51 -135G>C, may influence overall survival and radiation pneumonitis in NSCLC patients treated with definitive radio(chemotherapy. Large studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  15. Polymorphisms of Homologous Recombination Genes and Clinical Outcomes of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated with Definitive Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ming; Liao, Zhongxing; Huang, Yu-Jing; Liu, Zhensheng; Yuan, Xianglin; Gomez, Daniel; Wang, Li-E; Wei, Qingyi

    2011-01-01

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is the major mechanism to maintain genomic stability in response to irradiation. We hypothesized that genetic polymorphisms in DSB repair genes may affect clinical outcomes among non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with definitive radio(chemo)therapy. We genotyped six potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (i.e., RAD51 −135G>C/rs1801320 and −172G>T/rs1801321, XRCC2 4234G>C/rs3218384 and R188H/rs3218536 G>A, XRCC3 T241M/rs861539 and NBN E185Q/rs1805794) and estimated their associations with overall survival (OS) and radiation pneumonitis (RP) in 228 NSCLC patients. We found a predictive role of RAD51 −135G>C SNP in RP development (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.52, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.31–0.86, P = 0.010 for CG/CC vs. GG). We also found that RAD51 −135G>C and XRCC2 R188H SNPs were independent prognostic factors for overall survival (adjusted HR = 1.70, 95% CI, 1.14–2.62, P = 0.009 for CG/CC vs. GG; and adjusted HR = 1.70; 95% CI, 1.02–2.85, P = 0.043 for AG vs. GG, respectively) and that the SNP-survival association was most pronounced in the presence of RP. Our study suggests that HR genetic polymorphisms, particularly RAD51 −135G>C, may influence overall survival and radiation pneumonitis in NSCLC patients treated with definitive radio(chemo)therapy. Large studies are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:21647442

  16. Survival outcomes of obese patients in type II endometrial cancer: Defining the prognostic impact of increasing BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingsley, Caroline C; Cansino, Catherine; O'Malley, David M; Cohn, David E; Fowler, Jeffrey M; Copeland, Larry J; Backes, Floor J; Salani, Ritu

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the role of obesity as a risk factor for type II endometrial cancer (EC), as well as the prognostic significance of increasing body mass index (BMI) on survival. A single institution retrospective analysis of 154 type II EC cases from 1987 to 2010 was conducted. Patients were categorized into cohorts by BMI (normal (obese class I (30-34.9), and obese class II-III (≥35)). Descriptive, regression and ANOVA analyses were performed. Kaplan-Meier curves were compared with log rank tests. The BMI distribution was 22.8% normal BMI; 24% overweight; 17.5% class I; and 35.7% class II-III. The median follow up was 41 months. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 45.4, 36.0, 35.3 and 42.0 months and overall survival (OS) was 54.7, 44.7, 44.8 and 49.7 months, among the respective groups. There was no association between BMI and PFS (p=0.71), OS (p=0.72), or time to recurrence (p=0.71). There were no differences among the increasing BMI groups compared to normal weight women for the risk of death. Our analysis did not reveal any differences in outcomes by BMI group. Our data reveals that obesity is highly prevalent in type II ECs, though obesity has not historically been described as a risk factor. While BMI as a single variable may not be prognostic for survival outcomes, the role of obesity as a risk factor for type II EC should be further investigated, given the increasing prevalence of obesity in type II ECs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of abiraterone on patient-related outcomes in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Amm, Joelle; Nassabein, Rami; Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B

    2017-01-01

    Abiraterone acetate has established a major role in the treatment paradigm of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer ever since pivotal trials, COU-AA-301 and COU-AA-302, have shown benefit in both the second-line and first-line (post- and pre-chemotherapy) setting, respectively, with improvement in overall survival as well as secondary end points such as prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and radiographic response rates, time to PSA progression, and progression-free survival. There has been a lot of interest and emphasis in the evaluation of patient-related outcomes (PROs) as it relates to quality of life, pain, adverse events, fatigue, and among others, in the use of different agents that have been shown to improve survival. This review examines the companion PROs in conjunction with abiraterone acetate use. This is particularly relevant since PROs are increasingly viewed as a key metric for drug label claims in granting approval across regulatory agencies, including the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency.

  18. Poor outcome of elderly patients with platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer: results from the SOCRATES retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignata, Sandro; Ferrandina, Gabriella; Scarfone, Giovanna; Scollo, Paolo; Odicino, Franco; Cormio, Gennaro; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Frigerio, Luigi; Mereu, Liliana; Ghezzi, Fabio; Manzione, Luigi; Lauria, Rossella; Breda, Enrico; Alletti, Desiderio Gueli; Ballardini, Michela; Vernaglia, Alessandra; Sorio, Roberto; Tumolo, Salvatore; Musso, Pietro; Magni, Giovanna; Pisano, Carmela; Morabito, Alessandro

    2009-09-01

    Elderly patients with ovarian carcinoma have a poorer prognosis compared with their younger counterpart, and this depends in most cases on undertreatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate, retrospectively, the pattern of care and the prognosis of elderly patients with platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer. The SOCRATES study retrospectively assessed the pattern of care of a cohort of patients with recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer observed in the years 2000-2002 in 37 Italian centres. Data were collected between April and September 2005. Patients with recurrent ovarian cancer with >6 months of platinum free interval were considered eligible. Four-hundred-ninety-three patient files were collected and 425 were considered eligible and analyzed. Ninety-four patients with age >or=70 years and 331 patients with age 1 vs. 1), performance status at recurrence (2-3 vs. 0-1), RFI (6-12 months vs. >12 months), age at recurrence, were independently associated with survival. Elderly patients with platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer receive less surgery and chemotherapy. Response to chemotherapy is better in younger patients. Age is an unfavourable factor independently associated to a worst prognosis.

  19. Evaluation of Discordance in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Patients with Negative Radioiodine Scans and Positive Thyroglobulin Values at the Ablation Outcome Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Gözde Özkan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We aimed to evaluate the discordance of 5 mCi (185 MBq I-131 whole body scan (WBS and thyroglobulin (Tg values at the ablation outcome control in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC patients who had thyroidectomy and then received radioiodine (RAI ablation. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 36 DTC patients who had RAI treatment in our department between 1992-2009 and whose 5 mCi (185 MBq I-131 WBS were negative, but Tg values were ≥2 ng/ml during the ablation outcome control (Patient group. Thirty-six patients whose Tg values were 2 cm (p2 cm (p40 (p<0.01 were significantly different between lymph node and micrometastatic groups.Conclusion: I-131 WBS/Tg level discordance at the ablation outcome control is mainly caused by metastatic lymph nodes.

  20. Influence of obesity and other risk factors on survival outcomes in patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandona, Monica; Linehan, David; Hawkins, William; Strasberg, Steven; Gao, Feng; Wang-Gillam, Andrea

    2011-08-01

    Established risk factors for the development of pancreatic cancer include tobacco use, family history of pancreatic cancer, personal history of diabetes, and obesity. The impact of risk factors on prognosis in patients with pancreatic cancer, particularly obesity, has recently become controversial. We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy between 1995 and 2009. Patients were categorized by body mass index (BMI) as normal (18.5-24.9 kg/m), overweight (25-29.9 kg/m), or obese (≥30 kg/m). Univariate analysis was performed to evaluate the association of obesity and other risk factors on overall survival. Of the 355 patients evaluated, 149 (42.0%) had normal BMI, 131 (36.9%) were overweight, and 75 (21.1%) were obese. Overall survival for normal, overweight, and obese groups was 17.3 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 14.2-20.8 months), 20.0 months (95% CI, 16.6-23.6 months), and 22.1 months (95% CI, 16.5-36.4 months), respectively (P = 0.58). Hazard ratios for tobacco use, family history of pancreatic cancer, and history of diabetes were 1.07, 1.38, and 0.87, respectively. Obesity and other risk factors have no impact on overall survival in patients with adenocarcinoma after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Further studies investigating the relationship between risk factors and their prognostic significance in patients with pancreatic cancer are warranted.

  1. Psychoeducational Interventions with Pediatric Cancer Patients: Part II. Effects of Information and Skills Training on Health-Related Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beale, Ivan L.; Bradlyn, Andrew S.; Kato, Pamela M.

    2003-01-01

    In Part I of this paper, we described a model that was used as a framework for reviewing studies of psychoeducational interventions intended to influence illness- and treatment-related behaviors and attitudes in pediatric cancer patients. In Part II, we distinguish between interventions that attempt to influence patients' behaviors just by…

  2. Transanal total mesorectal excision (TaTME) for rectal cancer: effects on patient-reported quality of life and functional outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koedam, T W A; van Ramshorst, G H; Deijen, C L; Elfrink, A K E; Meijerink, W J H J; Bonjer, H J; Sietses, C; Tuynman, J B

    2017-01-01

    Transanal total mesorectal excision (TaTME) has rapidly become an important component of the treatment of rectal cancer surgery. Cohort studies have shown feasibility concerning procedure, specimen quality and morbidity. However, concerns exist about quality of life and ano(neo)rectal function. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate quality of life in patients following TaTME for rectal cancer with anastomosis. Consecutive patients who underwent restorative TaTME surgery for rectal adenocarcinoma in an academic teaching center with tertiary referral function were evaluated. Validated questionnaires were prospectively collected. Quality of life was assessed by the EuroQol 5D (EQ-5D), European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer's QLQ-C30 and QLQ-CR29 and low anterior resection syndrome (LARS) scale. Outcomes of the questionnaires at 1 and 6 months were compared with preoperative (baseline) values. Thirty patients after restorative TaTME for rectal cancer were included. Deterioration for all domains was mainly observed at 1 month after surgery compared to baseline, but most outcomes had returned to baseline at 6 months. Social function and anal pain remained significantly worse at 6 months. Major LARS (score >30) was 33% at 6 months after ileostomy closure. No end colostomies were required. TaTME is associated with acceptable quality of life and functional outcome at 6 months after surgery comparable to published results after conventional laparoscopic low anterior resection.

  3. Self-reported quality of life and functional outcome in patients with rectal cancer – QoLiREC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asplund, Dan; Heath, Jane; González, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    of the common QoL instruments are brief and not sufficiently detailed to provide a deeper understanding of the factors that determine QoL. The aim of this study was to explore patients' experiences and long-term QoL in an unselected cohort of patients with rectal cancer. METHODS: This is a prospective...... international multicentre study based on a comprehensive, validated questionnaire on functional impairments and QoL administered to an unselected population of 1,500 patients with rectal cancer at diagnosis and after one, two and five years. The clinical characteristics are retrieved from the national quality...... improve patients' QoL. FUNDING: This study was supported by the Swedish Research Council, grant number 2012-1768; the Swedish Cancer Society CAN 2010/593 and CAN 2013/500; the Swedish Society of Medicine; the Gothenburg Medical Society; the Health & Medical Care Committee of the Regional Executive Board...

  4. Thyroid Lobectomy Is Associated with Excellent Clinical Outcomes in Properly Selected Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Patients with Primary Tumors Greater Than 1 cm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Vaisman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective. An individualized risk-based approach to the treatment of thyroid cancer is being extensively discussed in the recent literature. However, controversies about the ideal surgical approach remain an important issue with regard to the impact on prognosis and follow-up strategies. This study was designed to describe clinical outcomes in a cohort of low and intermediate risk thyroid cancer patients treated with thyroid lobectomy. Methods. Retrospective review of 70 patients who underwent lobectomy. Results. After a median follow-up of 11 years, 5 patients (5/70, 7.1% recurred and 5 had a completion for benign lesions, while 60 patients (86% continued to be observed without evidence for disease recurrence. Suspicious ultrasound findings were significantly more common in patients that had structural disease recurrence (100% versus 4.3%, P<0.001. Furthermore, a rising suppressed Tg value over time was also associated with structural disease recurrence (80% versus 21.5%, P=0.01. After additional therapy, 99% of the patients had no evidence of disease. Conclusions. Properly selected thyroid cancer patients can be treated with lobectomy with excellent clinical outcomes.

  5. Predicting biopsy outcome after mammography: what is the likelihood the patient has invasive or in situ breast cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Donald L; Vacek, Pamela M; Skelly, Joan M; Geller, Berta M

    2005-08-01

    As many as 1,000,000 breast biopsies are performed annually in the United States. Although substantial effort has been devoted to estimating breast cancer risk, there have been no studies to predict outcome in women undergoing breast biopsy. A population-based study was undertaken to develop and test models for predicting the probability of invasive breast cancer and/or ductal carcinoma-in-situ in 7670 women undergoing breast biopsy after mammography. Logistical prediction models were developed by using data from 6129 randomly selected women and tested with data from the remaining women. The overall cancer prevalence among women undergoing biopsy was 22.4%. Prevalence in women with mammograms highly suggestive of malignancy (category 5) was 84.6%, with minimal variation in individual cancer probabilities due to age. A total of 24.6% of women with suspicious mammograms (category 4) had cancer, but individual probability estimates ranged from .01 to .86, depending on age, presence of a lump, previous biopsy, menopausal status, and use of postmenopausal hormone therapy. These variables also influenced biopsy outcome in women with other mammography assessments (categories 0-3), but the overall prevalence was lower (8.6%), and estimated probabilities ranged from .01 to .45. When cancer was present, the probability of invasive disease was influenced by mammogram assessment category, absence of mammogram calcifications, and presence of a lump. The probabilities of invasive cancer and ductal carcinoma-in-situ in women undergoing biopsy can be more accurately predicted by using clinical characteristics in addition to mammography findings. This information could potentially influence decisions regarding immediate biopsy or continued surveillance.

  6. Influence of body mass index on clinicopathologic features, surgical morbidity and outcome in patients with endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbayır, Ozgur; Corbacıoglu Esmer, Aytul; Numanoglu, Ceyhun; Cılesız Goksedef, B Pinar; Akca, Aysu; Bakır, Lale Vuslat; Kuru, Oguzhan

    2012-11-01

    To examine the influence of obesity on the patient characteristics and clinicopathologic features of endometrial cancer, and to find how treatment and prognosis were affected by obesity in women with endometrial cancer. The data of 370 consecutive women operated for endometrial cancer were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were divided into three categories as treatment including total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral oophorectomy and peritoneal cytology. Pelvic lymphadenectomy was carried out for all patients except for those with no myometrial invasion regardless of the tumor grade or for whom it was technically impossible. Paraaortic lymphadenectomy was performed when pre- and intraoperative assessments suggested non-endometrioid or grade 3 endometrioid cancer, >50 % myometrial invasion and cervical involvement. Patients with a BMI (body mass index) of 50 % myometrial invasion and more likely to have stage I disease. There were no significant differences in the incidences of positive pelvic and paraaortic lymph nodes and tumor grades between the three groups. Also, there were no differences in surgery type, the mean of removed pelvic and paraaortic lymph node number, hospital stay, blood loss and complications between the groups. The patients with a BMI of ≥30 had significantly longer operating time. There were no statistically significant differences in recurrences, the median number of months at recurrence or the site of recurrence between the three groups, as well as the 5-year overall and disease-free survival of patients. Multivariate proportional hazard models identified stage III and IV disease as significant covariates for mortality rates, while stage III and IV disease, hypertension and pelvic irradiation were identified as significant covariates for recurrence rates. Positive peritoneal cytology, deep myometrial invasion and stage II-IV endometrial cancer were significantly more common in patients with a BMI of <25. There were no significant

  7. High serum levels of interleukin-6 in patients with advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer: the effect on the outcome and the response to chemotherapy plus bevacizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Masayasu; Nagasaki, Takaya; Shiga, Kazuyoshi; Takahashi, Hiroki; Takeyama, Hiromitsu

    2017-04-01

    We evaluated the relationship of the pretreatment serum IL-6 levels with the outcome and treatment response in patients with advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) who underwent bevacizumab-containing chemotherapy. In this retrospective study, the pretreatment serum IL-6 and plasma vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels were measured in 113 patients with metastatic CRC. The cut-off values for these measurements, as determined by a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, were 4.3 and 66 pg/mL, respectively. The median follow-up period was 19 months (range 1-40 months). Sixty-three patients had primary cancer, and 38 had a metachronous recurrence. Thirty patients underwent curative resection, and 71 underwent chemotherapy, 53 of whom received bevacizumab-containing chemotherapy. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were estimated using Kaplan-Meier and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analyses. The plasma VEGF levels and positive KRAS mutation status were not associated with the outcomes. However, high serum IL-6 levels were significantly associated with poorer OS and PFS in comparison to low serum IL-6 levels. A Cox proportional hazards regression analysis showed that high serum IL-6 levels were an independent risk factor for a poor outcome. In patients with metastatic CRC, high pretreatment serum IL-6 levels were associated with a poor outcome and bevacizumab resistance.

  8. AGXT and ERCC2 polymorphisms are associated with clinical outcome in metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with 5-FU/oxaliplatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjersem, J B; Thomsen, M.; Guren, T

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate whether specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with influence on drug transport, biotransformation and repair mechanisms are associated with treatment outcome and toxicity in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We genotyped blood samples fro...... as markers of clinical outcome in oxaliplatin-treated mCRC patients. If validated in other studies, they could improve the selection of therapy in mCRC.The Pharmacogenomics Journal advance online publication, 11 August 2015; doi:10.1038/tpj.2015.54.......The objective of the study was to investigate whether specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with influence on drug transport, biotransformation and repair mechanisms are associated with treatment outcome and toxicity in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We genotyped blood samples from...

  9. Effects of psychoeducational interventions on sexual functioning, quality of life and psychological outcomes in patients with gynaecological cancer: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Ka Ming; H Chan, Carmen W; Chan, Joanne C Y

    2012-01-01

    The diagnosis of gynaecological cancer and the effects of related treatment have adverse effects on sexual functioning, quality of life and psychological outcomes of patients. Psychoeducational interventions are recommended for use in clinical areas for gynaecological cancer patients to improve patient outcomes. However, the evidence for its effectiveness is far from conclusive. Moreover, such interventions are still scarce or even absent in most countries. To identify the best available evidence related to the effectiveness of psychoeducational interventions for gynaecological cancer patients on sexual functioning, quality of life and psychological outcomes. Randomized controlled trials.Adult women who with a primary gynaecological cancer confirmed by pathology test.Psychoeducational interventions that aimed at enhancing the acceptance of the disease and recovery from the illness and treatment among gynaecological cancer patients.Sexual functioning, quality of life and psychological outcomes including, but not limited to, anxiety, depression, distress, adjustment to illness, mood, self-esteem, uncertainty, and coping. Thirty electronic bibliographic databases in English and Chinese were searched from their inception to April 2012. The Joanna Briggs Institute Critical Appraisal Checklist for experimental studies was used to critically appraise the methodological quality of studies. Two reviewers extracted and summarized the details of included studies using the Joanna Briggs Institute data extraction form independently. Quantitative results of comparable studies were pooled in statistical meta-analysis. Standardized mean difference and 95% confidence interval were calculated for the summary effect of continuous data measured by different scales. Results were presented in narrative form where statistical pooling was not appropriate. A total of 11 randomized controlled trials involving 975 gynaecological cancer patients were included. Only four studies were

  10. Long-term Functional and Quality-of-Life Outcomes After Transoral Robotic Surgery in Patients With Oropharyngeal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achim, Virginie; Bolognone, Rachel K; Palmer, Andrew D; Graville, Donna J; Light, Tyler J; Li, Ryan; Gross, Neil; Andersen, Peter E; Clayburgh, Daniel

    2017-10-26

    In recent years, transoral robotic surgery (TORS) has emerged as a useful treatment for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). In appropriately selected patients, the use of TORS may allow avoidance of adjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, thereby avoiding the long-term adverse effects of these therapies. To compare functional speech, swallowing, and quality-of-life outcomes longitudinally between those undergoing TORS only and those undergoing TORS and adjuvant radiotherapy (TORS+RT) or TORS and chemoradiotherapy (TORS+CRT). This prospective, longitudinal cohort study performed from June 1, 2013, through November 31, 2015, included 74 patients undergoing TORS for initial treatment of OPSCC at a single tertiary academic hospital. Data were collected at baseline, postoperatively (7-21 days), at short-term follow-up (6-12 months), and at long-term follow-up (>12 months). The quality-of-life metrics included the 10-item Eating Assessment Tool and the University of Michigan Head and Neck Quality of Life instrument. Data were also collected on tumor staging, surgical and adjuvant therapy details, patient comorbidities, tracheostomy and feeding tube use, and functional speech and swallowing status using the Performance Status Scale for Head and Neck Cancer Patients. Seventy-four patients were enrolled in the study (mean [SD] age, 61.39 [7.99] years; 68 [92%] male). Median long-term follow-up was 21 months (range, 12-36 months). The response rates were 86% (n = 64) postoperatively, 88% (n = 65) at short-term follow-up, and 86% (n = 64) at long-term follow-up. In all 3 groups, there was a significant worsening in pain and all swallowing-related measures postoperatively. There was subsequent improvement over time, with different trajectories observed across the 3 intervention groups. Postoperative dysphagia improved significantly more quickly in the TORS-only group. At long-term follow-up, weight loss differed between the TORS-only and TORS

  11. A randomised controlled trial comparing the effects of a 12-week supervised exercise versus usual care on outcomes in haematological cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furzer, Bonnie J; Ackland, Timothy R; Wallman, Karen E; Petterson, Anna S; Gordon, Sandy M; Wright, Kemi E; Joske, David J L

    2016-04-01

    Following treatment, haematological cancer (HEM) patients exhibit significant physical deconditioning and psychological distress. Exercise has been shown as a clinically effective and safe intervention for cancer patients, with the potential to reverse the deleterious effects following treatment. Our aim was to investigate the efficacy of a 12-week exercise rehabilitation on cancer-related fatigue (CRF) and associated outcomes in HEM patients post-treatment. Patients with a HEM were recruited to participate in a 12-week exercise rehabilitation intervention post-treatment. Pre-, post- and follow-up assessments were conducted on outcome measures including CRF, quality of life (QoL), psychological distress, cardiovascular fitness, muscle strength (MS) and body composition. Patients were given tailored exercise programmes comprising aerobic and resistance exercises, carried out three times per week for 12 weeks in local gyms and clinics. Usual-care participants were offered a delayed, tailored 12-week exercise intervention after the initial study period. Thirty-seven patients (49 % recruitment rate) were randomly assigned to the 12-week exercise rehabilitation (n = 18) or usual care (n = 19) with a 91 % adherence to the exercise intervention. Following the exercise programme, significant improvements were seen in CRF (p = 0.01), cardiovascular fitness (p ≤ 0.001), QoL (p ≤ 0.001), MS (p ≤ 0.001) and body composition (p = 0.001), with moderate to large effects for all primary outcomes. Patient follow-up at 24 weeks demonstrated outcome maintenance in the exercise rehabilitation group and significant improvements in outcomes in usual-care patients following participation in a delayed exercise programme. There were no adverse reactions or study withdrawals. A 12-week exercise rehabilitation programme resulted in significant statistical (p ≤ 0.05) and clinical improvements in CRF and additional outcomes in HEM patients following

  12. Long-term outcome of HER2 positive metastatic breast cancer patients treated with first-line trastuzumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, B; Kotsori, K; Mohammed, K; Walsh, G; Smith, I E

    2015-12-01

    Trastuzumab has changed the natural history of metastatic HER2 positive breast cancer. Some patients remain well and in remission for many years. There is currently no established duration after which trastuzumab in the advanced setting can be safely discontinued. This study aims to evaluate long-term efficacy and cardiac safety of trastuzumab when used as first-line treatment for patients with metastatic HER2 positive breast cancer. We retrospectively identified 215 patients with HER2 positive, locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer who commenced first line trastuzumab-containing therapy for metastatic disease between 2001 and 2010 at The Royal Marsden Hospital. The median progression free survival for all patients was 12 months (95%CI: 10.3-14.6 months); 103 (48%) patients remained in remission beyond one year, 59 (27%) beyond two years and 25 (12%) beyond five years. The median overall survival was 2.6 years (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.2-3.3). The objective response rate (ORR) was 65% with 17 (8%) complete responses and 120 (57%) partial responses. Trastuzumab was well tolerated. Twenty eight (13%) patients recorded any grade of left ventricular dysfunction. There was no significant difference in cardiac toxicity between those patients on less than or more than one year of trastuzumab. Trastuzumab is associated with long-term remissions in a significant proportion of patients with metastatic HER2 positive disease when used in the first-line advanced setting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The natural history and predictors of outcome following biochemical relapse in the dose escalation era for prostate cancer patients undergoing definitive external beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumsteg, Zachary S; Spratt, Daniel E; Romesser, Paul B; Pei, Xin; Zhang, Zhigang; Polkinghorn, William; McBride, Sean; Kollmeier, Marisa; Yamada, Yoshiya; Zelefsky, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    The management of biochemical failure (BF) following external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer is controversial, due to both the heterogeneous disease course following a BF and a lack of clinical trials in this setting. We sought to characterize the natural history and predictors of outcome for patients experiencing BF in a large cohort of men with localized prostate cancer undergoing definitive dose-escalated EBRT. This retrospective analysis included 2694 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with EBRT at a large academic center. Of these, 609 experienced BF, defined as prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir + 2 ng/ml. The median follow-up was 83 mo for all patients and 122 mo for BF patients. All patients received EBRT at doses of 75.6-86.4 Gy. The primary objective of this study was to determine predictors of distant progression at the time of BF. Cox proportional hazards models were used in univariate and multivariate analyses of distant metastases (DM), and a competing risks method was used to analyze prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). From the date of BF, the median times to DM and PCSM mortality were 5.4 yr and 10.5 yr, respectively. Shorter posttreatment PSA doubling time, a higher initial clinical tumor stage, a higher pretreatment Gleason score, and a shorter interval from the end of radiotherapy to BF were independent predictors for clinical progression following BF. Patients with two of these risk factors had a significantly higher incidence of DM and PCSM following BF than those with zero or one risk factor. The main limitations of this study are its retrospective nature and heterogeneous salvage interventions. Clinical and pathologic factors can help identify patients at high risk of clinical progression following BF. In this report, we look at predictors of outcome for patients with prostate cancer recurrence, as determined by prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, following radiation treatment. We found that the

  14. Procalcitonin Improves the Glasgow Prognostic Score for Outcome Prediction in Emergency Patients with Cancer: A Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Christina Rast

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS is useful for predicting long-term mortality in cancer patients. Our aim was to validate the GPS in ED patients with different cancer-related urgency and investigate whether biomarkers would improve its accuracy. We followed consecutive medical patients presenting with a cancer-related medical urgency to a tertiary care hospital in Switzerland. Upon admission, we measured procalcitonin (PCT, white blood cell count, urea, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, corrected calcium, C-reactive protein, and albumin and calculated the GPS. Of 341 included patients (median age 68 years, 61% males, 81 (23.8% died within 30 days after admission. The GPS showed moderate prognostic accuracy (AUC 0.67 for mortality. Among the different biomarkers, PCT provided the highest prognostic accuracy (odds ratio 1.6 (95% confidence interval 1.3 to 1.9, P<0.001, AUC 0.69 and significantly improved the GPS to a combined AUC of 0.74 (P=0.007. Considering all investigated biomarkers, the AUC increased to 0.76 (P<0.001. The GPS performance was significantly improved by the addition of PCT and other biomarkers for risk stratification in ED cancer patients. The benefit of early risk stratification by the GPS in combination with biomarkers from different pathways should be investigated in further interventional trials.

  15. DOC-2/DAB2 Interacting Protein Status in High-Risk Prostate Cancer Correlates With Outcome for Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy

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    Jacobs, Corbin; Tumati, Vasu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Kapur, Payal [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Yan, Jingsheng [Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Hong, David; Bhuiyan, Manzerul [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Xie, Xian-Jin [Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Pistenmaa, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Simmons Cancer Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Yu, Lan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Hsieh, Jer-Tsong [Simmons Cancer Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Department of Urology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Saha, Debabrata [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Simmons Cancer Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Kim, D. W. Nathan, E-mail: Nathan.Kim@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Simmons Cancer Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: This pilot study investigates the role of DOC-2/DAB2 Interacting Protein (DAB2IP) and enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) as prognostic biomarkers in high-risk prostate cancer patients receiving definitive radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Immunohistochemistry was performed and scored by an expert genitourinary pathologist. Clinical endpoints evaluated were freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF), castration resistance–free survival (CRFS), and distant metastasis–free survival (DMFS). Log-rank test and Cox regression were used to determine significance of biomarker levels with clinical outcome. Results: Fifty-four patients with high-risk prostate cancer (stage ≥T3a, or Gleason score ≥8, or prostate-specific antigen level ≥20 ng/mL) treated with radiation therapy from 2005 to 2012 at our institution were evaluated. Nearly all patients expressed EZH2 (98%), whereas 28% of patients revealed DAB2IP reduction and 72% retained DAB2IP. Median follow-up was 34.0 months for DAB2IP-reduced patients, 29.9 months for DAB2IP-retained patients, and 32.6 months in the EZH2 study. Reduction in DAB2IP portended worse outcome compared with DAB2IP-retained patients, including FFBF (4-year: 37% vs 89%, P=.04), CRFS (4-year: 50% vs 90%, P=.02), and DMFS (4-year: 36% vs 97%, P=.05). Stratified EZH2 expression trended toward significance for worse FFBF and CRFS (P=.07). Patients with reduced DAB2IP or highest-intensity EZH2 expression exhibited worse FFBF (4-year: 32% vs 95%, P=.02), CRFS (4-year: 28% vs 100%, P<.01), and DMFS (4-year: 39% vs 100%, P=.04) compared with the control group. Conclusion: Loss of DAB2IP is a potent biomarker that portends worse outcome despite definitive radiation therapy for patients with high-risk prostate cancer. Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 is expressed in most high-risk tumors and is a less potent discriminator of outcome in this study. The DAB2IP status in combination with degree of EZH2 expression may be useful for

  16. Expression of class III {beta}-tubulin is predictive of patient outcome in patients with non-small cell lung cancer receiving vinorelbine-based chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sève, Pascal; Isaac, Sylvie; Trédan, Olivier; Souquet, Pierre-Jean; Pachéco, Yves; Pérol, Maurice; Lafanéchère, Laurence; Penet, Aurélie; Peiller, Eva-Laure; Dumontet, Charles

    2005-08-01

    To determine the prevalence and the prognostic value of microtubule component expression in tumors of patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Expression of microtubular components was immunohistochemically examined in 93 tumor samples from untreated patients with stage III and IV NSCLC. All patients received vinorelbine-based chemotherapy. Response to chemotherapy, progression-free survival, and overall survival were correlated with the expression of microtubule proteins. The response rate was 27.3% (21 partial responses among 77 valuable patients). Although expression of microtubule components was not associated with the response rate, high class III beta-tubulin expression was correlated with resistance to vinorelbine, defined as disease progression under treatment. Patients whose tumors expressed high levels of class III beta-tubulin isotype had shorter progression-free survival and overall survival (P = 0.002 and 0.001, respectively). High Delta2 alpha-tubulin expression was associated with a shorter overall survival (P = 0.018). Tubulin II levels were not found to be correlated with patient outcome. A multivariate analysis, taking into account sex, age, histology, stage, weight loss, and class II beta-tubulin, class III beta-tubulin, and Delta2 alpha-tubulin levels, confirmed that class III beta-tubulin expression was independently correlated with progression-free survival (P = 0.04) and overall survival (P = 0.012). These findings suggest that a high level of expression of class III beta-tubulin in tumor cells is associated with resistance to vinorelbine and a poor prognosis in patients with NSCLC receiving vinorelbine-based chemotherapy.

  17. Effects of additional laparoscopic cholecystectomy on outcomes of laparoscopic gastrectomy in patients with gastric cancer based on a national administrative database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Atsuhiko; Okamoto, Kohji; Muramatsu, Keiji; Kubo, Tatsuhiko; Fujino, Yoshihisa; Matsuda, Shinya

    2014-01-01

    Little information is available on the effects of adding laparoscopic cholecystectomy to laparoscopic gastrectomy on outcomes of patients with gastric cancer. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of adding laparoscopic cholecystectomy to laparoscopic gastrectomy on outcomes in patients with gastric cancer using a national administrative database. A total of 14,006 patients treated with laparoscopic gastrectomy for gastric cancer were referred to 744 hospitals in Japan between 2009 and 2011. Patients were divided into two groups, those who also underwent simultaneous laparoscopic cholecystectomy for gallbladder stones (n = 1484) and those who underwent laparoscopic gastrectomy alone (n = 12,522). Laparoscopy-related complications, in-hospital mortality, length of stay, and medical costs during hospitalization were compared in the patient groups. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that adding laparoscopic cholecystectomy did not affect laparoscopy-related complications (odds ratio, 1.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.84-1.24; P = 0.788) or in-hospital mortality (odds ratio, 1.16; 95% CI, 0.49-2.76; P = 0.727). Multiple linear regression analysis also showed that adding laparoscopic cholecystectomy did not affect the length of stay (unstandardized coefficient, 0.37 d; 95% CI, -0.47 to 1.22 d; P = 0.389). However, adding laparoscopic cholecystectomy was associated with significantly increased medical costs during hospitalization (unstandardized coefficient, $1256.0 (95% CI, $806.2-$1705.9; P < 0.001). This study demonstrated that adding laparoscopic cholecystectomy did not affect outcomes of patients undergoing laparoscopic gastrectomy for gastric cancer, although medical costs during hospitalization were significantly increased. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A randomized controlled trial on the effectiveness of strength training on clinical and muscle cellular outcomes in patients with prostate cancer during androgen deprivation therapy: rationale and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsen Lene

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies indicate that strength training has beneficial effects on clinical health outcomes in prostate cancer patients during androgen deprivation therapy. However, randomized controlled trials are needed to scientifically determine the effectiveness of strength training on the muscle cell level. Furthermore, close examination of the feasibility of a high-load strength training program is warranted. The Physical Exercise and Prostate Cancer (PEPC trial is designed to determine the effectiveness of strength training on clinical and muscle cellular outcomes in non-metastatic prostate cancer patients after high-dose radiotherapy and during ongoing androgen deprivation therapy. Methods/design Patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy for 9-36 months combined with external high-dose radiotherapy for locally advanced prostate cancer are randomized to an exercise intervention group that receives a 16 week high-load strength training program or a control group that is encouraged to maintain their habitual activity level. In both arms, androgen deprivation therapy is continued until the end of the intervention period. Clinical outcomes are body composition (lean body mass, bone mineral density and fat mass measured by Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry, serological outcomes, physical functioning (muscle strength and cardio-respiratory fitness assessed with physical tests and psycho-social functioning (mental health, fatigue and health-related quality of life assessed by questionnaires. Muscle cellular outcomes are a muscle fiber size b regulators of muscle fiber size (number of myonuclei per muscle fiber, number of satellite cells per muscle fiber, number of satellite cells and myonuclei positive for androgen receptors and proteins involved in muscle protein degradation and muscle hypertrophy and c regulators of muscle fiber function such as proteins involved in cellular stress and mitochondrial function. Muscle cellular outcomes

  19. Variations in the quality and costs of end-of-life care, preferences and palliative outcomes for cancer patients by place of death: the QUALYCARE study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koffman Jonathan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emerging trends and new policies suggest that more cancer patients might die at home in the future. However, not all have equal chances of achieving this. Furthermore, there is lack of evidence to support that those who die at home experience better care and a better death than those who die as inpatients. The QUALYCARE study aims to examine variations in the quality and costs of end-of-life care, preferences and palliative outcomes associated with dying at home or in an institution for cancer patients. Methods/Design Mortality followback survey (with a nested case-control study of home vs. hospital deaths conducted with bereaved relatives of cancer patients in four Primary Care Trusts in London. Potential participants are identified from death registrations and approached by the Office for National Statistics in complete confidence. Data are collected via a postal questionnaire to identify the informal and formal care received in the three months before death and the associated costs, relatives' satisfaction with care, and palliative outcomes for the patients and their relatives. A well-established questionnaire to measure relatives' views on the care integrates four brief and robust tools - the Client Service Receipt Inventory, the Palliative Outcome Scale, the EQ-5 D and the Texas Revised Inventory of Grief. Further questions assess patients and relatives' preferences for place of death. The survey aims to include 500 bereaved relatives (140 who experienced a home death, 205 a hospital death, 115 a hospice death and 40 a nursing home death. Bivariate and multivariate analyses will explore differences in place of death and place of end-of-life care, in preferences for place of death, patients' palliative outcomes and relatives' bereavement outcomes, in relation to place of death. Factors influencing death at home and the costs of end-of-life care by place of death will be identified. Discussion Collecting data on end

  20. Variations in the quality and costs of end-of-life care, preferences and palliative outcomes for cancer patients by place of death: the QUALYCARE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Barbara; McCrone, Paul; Hall, Sue; Koffman, Jonathan; Higginson, Irene J

    2010-08-02

    Emerging trends and new policies suggest that more cancer patients might die at home in the future. However, not all have equal chances of achieving this. Furthermore, there is lack of evidence to support that those who die at home experience better care and a better death than those who die as inpatients. The QUALYCARE study aims to examine variations in the quality and costs of end-of-life care, preferences and palliative outcomes associated with dying at home or in an institution for cancer patients. Mortality followback survey (with a nested case-control study of home vs. hospital deaths) conducted with bereaved relatives of cancer patients in four Primary Care Trusts in London. Potential participants are identified from death registrations and approached by the Office for National Statistics in complete confidence. Data are collected via a postal questionnaire to identify the informal and formal care received in the three months before death and the associated costs, relatives' satisfaction with care, and palliative outcomes for the patients and their relatives. A well-established questionnaire to measure relatives' views on the care integrates four brief and robust tools - the Client Service Receipt Inventory, the Palliative Outcome Scale, the EQ-5 D and the Texas Revised Inventory of Grief. Further questions assess patients and relatives' preferences for place of death. The survey aims to include 500 bereaved relatives (140 who experienced a home death, 205 a hospital death, 115 a hospice death and 40 a nursing home death). Bivariate and multivariate analyses will explore differences in place of death and place of end-of-life care, in preferences for place of death, patients' palliative outcomes and relatives' bereavement outcomes, in relation to place of death. Factors influencing death at home and the costs of end-of-life care by place of death will be identified. Collecting data on end-of-life care retrospectively from bereaved relatives has ethical

  1. Clinical outcomes, toxicity, and cosmesis in breast cancer patients with close skin spacing treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI using multi-lumen/catheter applicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mani Akhtari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI using a single-lumen device is associated with better cosmetic outcomes if the spacing between the applicator and skin is > 7 mm. However, there are no reports addressing the late toxicity and clinical outcomes in patients treated with single-entry multi-lumen/catheter applicators who had close skin spacing (7 mm or less. We undertook this study to report clinical outcome, acute and late toxicity as well as cosmesis of early stage breast cancer patients with close skin spacing treated with APBI using multi-lumen or multi-catheter devices. Material and methods : This is a retrospective study of all breast cancer patients who had undergone APBI using single-entry multi-lumen/catheter devices in a single institution between 2008 to 2012. The study was limited to those with ≤ 7 mm spacing between the device and skin. Results : We identified 37 patients and 38 lesions with skin spacing of ≤ 7 mm. Seven lesions (18% had spacing of ≤ 3 mm. Median follow-up was 47.5 months. There was one case of ipsilateral breast recurrence and one ipsilateral axillary recurrence. Based on RTOG criteria, 22 treated lesions experienced grade 1 and 9 lesions experienced grade 2 toxicity. Twenty-one lesions experienced late grade 1 toxicity. One patient had to undergo mastectomy due to mastitis. Twenty-four treated breasts showed excellent and 11 had good cosmetic outcome. Overall cosmesis trended towards a significant correlation with skin spacing. However, all patients with ≤ 3 mm skin spacing experienced acute and late toxicities. Conclusions : Accelerated partial breast irradiation can be safely performed in patients with skin spacing of ≤ 7 mm using single-entry multi-lumen/catheter applicators with excellent cosmetic outcomes and an acceptable toxicity profile. However, skin spacing of ≤ 3 mm is associated with acute and late toxicity and should be avoided if possible.

  2. Prediction of pathological and oncological outcomes based on extended prostate biopsy results in patients with prostate cancer receiving radical prostatectomy: a single institution study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishizaki Fumio

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prediction of pathological outcomes prior to surgery remains a challenging problem for the appropriate surgical indication of prostate cancer. This study was performed to identify preoperative values predictive of pathological and oncological outcomes based on standardized extended prostate biopsies with core histological results diagrammed/mapped in patients receiving radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer clinically diagnosed as localized or locally advanced disease. Methods In 124 patients with clinically localized or locally advanced prostate cancer (cT1c–cT3a without prior treatment, pathological outcomes on the surgical specimen including seminal vesicle involvement (SVI, positive surgical margin (PSM, and perineural invasion (PNI were studied in comparison with clinical parameters based on the results of 14-core prostate biopsies comprising sextant, laterally-directed sextant, and bilateral transition zone (TZ sampling. Results Concerning the association of pathological outcomes with oncological outcomes, patients with PSM and PNI on surgical specimens had poorer biochemical-progression-free survival than those without PSM (logrank p = 0.002 and PNI (p = 0.003; it was also poorer concerning SVI, although the difference was not significant (p = 0.120. Concerning the impact of clinical parameters on these pathological outcomes, positive TZ and multiple positive biopsy cores in the prostatic middle were independent values predictive of SVI with multivariate analyses (p = 0.020 and p = 0.025, respectively; both positive TZ and multiple positive prostatic middle biopsies were associated with larger tumor volume (p  Conclusions %positive cores and Gleason score in extended biopsies were independent values predictive of PSM and PNI in prostate cancer clinically diagnosed as localized or locally advanced disease, respectively, which were associated with poorer oncological outcomes. When

  3. Muscle dysfunction in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jesper Frank; Jones, L W; Andersen, J L

    2014-01-01

    implications of muscle dysfunction in cancer patients. The efficacy of exercise training to prevent and/or mitigate cancer-related muscle dysfunction is also discussed. DESIGN: We identified 194 studies examining muscular outcomes in cancer patients by searching PubMed and EMBASE databases. RESULTS: Muscle...... in oncology practice. Significant progress has been made over the last decade in the field of exercise oncology, indicating that exercise training constitutes a potent modulator of skeletal muscle function in patients with cancer. CONCLUSION: There are clear associations between muscle dysfunction...... dysfunction is evident across all stages of the cancer trajectory. The causes of cancer-related muscle dysfunction are complex, but may involve a wide range of tumor-, therapy- and/or lifestyle-related factors, depending on the clinical setting of the individual patient. The main importance of muscle...

  4. Oncology Nursing Minimum Data Set (ONMDS): can we hypothesize a set of prevalent Nursing Sensitive Outcomes (NSO) in cancer patients?

    OpenAIRE

    Milani, A.; Mauri, S; Gandini, S; Magon, G.

    2013-01-01

    Background The nursing minimum data set (NMDS) was created in 1977 in the United States to collect uniform standardised data that could be comparable among different nursing areas or patients. So far, in the literature, an NMDS in an oncology setting has not yet been described. Considering an oncology nursing minimum data set (ONMDS), which data could be chosen to define this tool regarding cancer patient care? Material and methods At the European Institute of Oncology (IEO), 20 experienced o...

  5. Clinical Outcomes of Colorectal Cancer in Kenya | Saidi | Annals of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background The incidence of colorectal cancer in Africa is increasing. True data on clinical outcomes of the disease is hampered by follow up challenges. Method Follow up data of 233 patients treated for colorectal cancer between 2005 and 2010 at various Nairobi hospitals were evaluated. The primary outcome was ...

  6. Sites of Distant Relapse and Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: High Incidence of Central Nervous System Metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, Elizabeth; Sohl, Jessica; Razzak, Abdul R.; Arnaout, Amal; Winer, Eric P.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the outcomes of patients with metastatic triple negative breast cancers, including the risk and clinical consequences of central nervous system (CNS) relapse. Patients and Methods Using pharmacy and pathology records, a study group of 116 patients treated for metastatic triple negative breast cancer at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute from January 2000 to June 2006 was identified. Results The median survival from time of metastatic diagnosis was 13.3 months. Sixteen patients (14%) were diagnosed with CNS involvement at the time of initial metastatic diagnosis; overall, 46% of patients were diagnosed with CNS metastases prior to death. Median survival after a diagnosis of CNS metastasis was 4.9 months. The age and race-adjusted rate of death for patients whose first presentation included a CNS metastasis was 3.4 times (95%CI:1.9, 6.1) that of patients without a CNS lesion at first metastatic presentation. Of 53 patients who developed brain metastases, only 3 patients were judged to have stable or responsive systemic disease in the face of progressive CNS disease at the last follow up prior to death. Conclusion Triple negative breast cancer is associated with poor survival after recurrence. CNS relapse is common, but death as a direct consequence of CNS progression in the setting of controlled systemic disease is uncommon. Thus, it does not appear that the high rate of CNS involvement is due to a sanctuary effect, but rather to the lack of effective therapies in general for this aggressive subtype of breast cancer. New treatment strategies are needed. PMID:18833576

  7. Network information improves cancer outcome prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Janine; Winter, Christof; Isik, Zerrin; Schroeder, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Disease progression in cancer can vary substantially between patients. Yet, patients often receive the same treatment. Recently, there has been much work on predicting disease progression and patient outcome variables from gene expression in order to personalize treatment options. Despite first diagnostic kits in the market, there are open problems such as the choice of random gene signatures or noisy expression data. One approach to deal with these two problems employs protein-protein interaction networks and ranks genes using the random surfer model of Google's PageRank algorithm. In this work, we created a benchmark dataset collection comprising 25 cancer outcome prediction datasets from literature and systematically evaluated the use of networks and a PageRank derivative, NetRank, for signature identification. We show that the NetRank performs significantly better than classical methods such as fold change or t-test. Despite an order of magnitude difference in network size, a regulatory and protein-protein interaction network perform equally well. Experimental evaluation on cancer outcome prediction in all of the 25 underlying datasets suggests that the network-based methodology identifies highly overlapping signatures over all cancer types, in contrast to classical methods that fail to identify highly common gene sets across the same cancer types. Integration of network information into gene expression analysis allows the identification of more reliable and accurate biomarkers and provides a deeper understanding of processes occurring in cancer development and progression. © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Short- and long-term outcomes of endoscopic submucosal dissection for early gastric cancer in elderly patients aged 75 years and older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumiyoshi, Tetsuya; Kondo, Hitoshi; Fujii, Ryoji; Minagawa, Takeyoshi; Fujie, Shinya; Kimura, Tomohiro; Ihara, Hideyuki; Yoshizaki, Naohito; Hirayama, Michiaki; Oyamada, Yumiko; Okushiba, Shunichi

    2017-05-01

    Only a few studies have reported long-term outcomes for endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) of early gastric cancer (EGC) in elderly patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of ESD for EGC in elderly patients ≥75 years with respect to both short- and long-term outcomes. We reviewed the clinical data of elderly patients ≥75 years who had undergone ESD for EGC at Tonan Hospital from January 2003 to May 2010. A total of 177 consecutive patients, including 145 with curative resection (CR) and 32 with noncurative resection (non-CR), were examined. Of the 32 patients with non-CR, 15 underwent additional surgery, and lymph node metastases were found in 3 patients. The remaining 17 patients were followed without additional surgery because of advanced age or poor general condition. Procedure-related complications, such as post-ESD bleeding, perforation and pneumonia, were within the acceptable range. The 5-year survival rates of patients with CR, those with additional surgery after non-CR, and those without additional surgery after non-CR were 84.6, 73.3, and 58.8 %, respectively. No deaths were attributable to the original gastric cancer; patients succumbed to other illnesses, including malignancy and respiratory disease. In elderly patients, ESD is an acceptable treatment for EGC in terms of both short- and long-term outcomes. Careful clinical assessment of elderly patients is necessary before ESD. After ESD, medical follow-up is important so that other malignancies and diseases that affect the elderly are not overlooked.

  9. DNA Methylation Targets Influenced by Bisphenol A and/or Genistein Are Associated with Survival Outcomes in Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden