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Sample records for cancer mutation hotspots

  1. Preferential Formation of Benzo[a]pyrene Adducts at Lung Cancer Mutational Hotspots in P53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denissenko, Mikhail F.; Pao, Annie; Tang, Moon-Shong; Pfeifer, Gerd P.

    1996-10-01

    Cigarette smoke carcinogens such as benzo[a]pyrene are implicated in the development of lung cancer. The distribution of benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE) adducts along exons of the P53 gene in BPDE-treated HeLa cells and bronchial epithelial cells was mapped at nucleotide resolution. Strong and selective adduct formation occurred at guanine positions in codons 157, 248, and 273. These same positions are the major mutational hotspots in human lung cancers. Thus, targeted adduct formation rather than phenotypic selection appears to shape the P53 mutational spectrum in lung cancer. These results provide a direct etiological link between a defined chemical carcinogen and human cancer.

  2. Competitive amplification of differentially melting amplicons (CADMA improves KRAS hotspot mutation testing in colorectal cancer

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    Kristensen Lasse

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer is an extremely heterogeneous group of diseases traditionally categorized according to tissue of origin. However, even among patients with the same cancer subtype the cellular alterations at the molecular level are often very different. Several new therapies targeting specific molecular changes found in individual patients have initiated the era of personalized therapy and significantly improved patient care. In metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC a selected group of patients with wild-type KRAS respond to antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. Testing for KRAS mutations is now required prior to anti-EGFR treatment, however, less sensitive methods based on conventional PCR regularly fail to detect KRAS mutations in clinical samples. Methods We have developed sensitive and specific assays for detection of the seven most common KRAS mutations based on a novel methodology named Competitive Amplification of Differentially Melting Amplicons (CADMA. The clinical applicability of these assays was assessed by analyzing 100 colorectal cancer samples, for which KRAS mutation status has been evaluated by the commercially available TheraScreen® KRAS mutation kit. Results The CADMA assays were sensitive to at least 0.5% mutant alleles in a wild-type background when using 50 nanograms of DNA in the reactions. Consensus between CADMA and the TheraScreen kit was observed in 96% of the colorectal cancer samples. In cases where disagreement was observed the CADMA result could be confirmed by a previously published assay based on TaqMan probes and by fast COLD-PCR followed by Sanger sequencing. Conclusions The high analytical sensitivity and specificity of CADMA may increase diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of KRAS mutation testing in mCRC patients.

  3. Functional analysis of non-hotspot AKT1 mutants found in human breast cancers identifies novel driver mutations: implications for personalized medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Kyung H.; Axtmayer, Jossette; Gustin, John P.; Rajpurohit, Anandita; Lauring, Josh

    2012-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase)-Akt-mTOR pathway is mutated at high frequency in human breast cancer, and this pathway is the focus of active drug discovery and clinical investigation. Trials of personalized cancer therapy seek to leverage knowledge of cancer gene mutations by using mutations to guide the choice of targeted therapies. At the same time, cancer genome sequencing studies are identifying low frequency variants of unknown significance in known cancer genes, as well ...

  4. The absence of the ERBB4 hotspot mutations in melanomas in patients from southern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi-Ming Zhou; Wei Li; Yuan-Xiang Guan; Xing Zhang; Xin-Chun Chen; Ya Ding; Xi-Zhi Wen

    2013-01-01

    V-erb-a erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homolog 4 (ERBB4) has been reported to be somatically mutated in 19% of melanoma cases.To investigate the prevalence of ERBB4 mutations in melanoma patients from southern China,we analyzed 117 formalin-fixed,paraffin-embedded melanoma samples archived in the Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center.A matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) platform was used to screen for mutations.No ERBB4 hotspot mutations were detected.Our results indicate that ERBB4 mutations may play a limited role in melanomas in China; therefore,targeting the ERBB4 mutation in melanoma patients from southern China may not be a promising strategy.

  5. Two Mechanisms Produce Mutation Hotspots at DNA Breaks in Escherichia coli

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    Chandan Shee

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Mutation hotspots and showers occur across phylogeny and profoundly influence genome evolution, yet the mechanisms that produce hotspots remain obscure. We report that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs provoke mutation hotspots via stress-induced mutation in Escherichia coli. With tet reporters placed 2 kb to 2 Mb (half the genome away from an I-SceI site, RpoS/DinB-dependent mutations occur maximally within the first 2 kb and decrease logarithmically to ∼60 kb. A weak mutation tail extends to 1 Mb. Hotspotting occurs independently of I-site/tet-reporter-pair position in the genome, upstream and downstream in the replication path. RecD, which allows RecBCD DSB-exonuclease activity, is required for strong local but not long-distance hotspotting, indicating that double-strand resection and gap-filling synthesis underlie local hotspotting, and newly illuminating DSB resection in vivo. Hotspotting near DSBs opens the possibility that specific genomic regions could be targeted for mutagenesis, and could also promote concerted evolution (coincident mutations within genes/gene clusters, an important issue in the evolution of protein functions.

  6. A survey of DICER1 hotspot mutations in ovarian and testicular sex cord-stromal tumors.

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    Conlon, Niamh; Schultheis, Anne M; Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Silva, Annacarolina; Guerra, Esther; Tornos, Carmen; Reuter, Victor E; Soslow, Robert A; Young, Robert H; Oliva, Esther; Weigelt, Britta

    2015-12-01

    Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors are characterized by the presence of somatic DICER1 hotspot mutations. In this study, we sought to define the association between DICER1 hotspot mutations and different morphologic subtypes of ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors. Furthermore, we aimed to assess whether DICER1 hotspot mutations occur in other ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors, testicular sex cord-stromal tumors, or other female genital tract tumors with rhabdomyosarcomatous differentiation. We subjected a series of ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors (n=32), Sertoli cell tumors (n=5) and gynandroblastomas (n=5), testicular sex cord-stromal tumors (n=15) and a diverse group of female genital tract tumors with rhabdomyosarcomatous morphology (n=10) to DICER1 hotspot mutation analysis using Sanger sequencing. We also tested two gynandroblastomas for the presence of FOXL2 hotspot mutations (p.C134W; c.402C>G). Twenty of 32 (63%) Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors harbored a DICER1 hotspot mutation, of which 80% had the p.E1705K mutation. No association was found between DICER1 mutation status and the presence of heterologous or retiform differentiation in Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors. DICER1 mutations were found at similar frequencies in gynandroblastoma (2/5; 40%) and ovarian Sertoli cell tumors (5/8; 63%; P>0.1), and all mutated tumors harbored a p.E1705K mutation. DICER1 hotspot mutations were also identified in a single cervical rhabdomyosarcoma and in the rhabdomyosarcomatous component of a uterine carcinosarcoma. No DICER1 mutations were detected in testicular sex cord-stromal tumors. Two DICER1 wild-type gynandroblastomas harbored a p.C134W FOXL2 hotspot mutation in both tumor components. In this study we confirmed that DICER1 hotspot mutations occur in over half of ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors, and are unrelated to tumor differentiation. We also widened the spectrum of ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors with sertoliform differentiation, in which DICER1 mutations are known to

  7. The highly prevalent BRCA2 mutation c.2808_2811del (3036delACAA) is located in a mutational hotspot and has multiple origins.

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    Infante, Mar; Durán, Mercedes; Acedo, Alberto; Sánchez-Tapia, Eva María; Díez-Gómez, Beatriz; Barroso, Alicia; García-González, María; Feliubadaló, Lídia; Lasa, Adriana; de la Hoya, Miguel; Esteban-Cardeñosa, Eva; Díez, Orland; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Godino, Javier; Teulé, Alexandre; Osorio, Ana; Lastra, Enrique; González-Sarmiento, Rogelio; Miner, Cristina; Velasco, Eladio A

    2013-11-01

    BRCA2-c.2808_2811del (3036delACAA) is one of the most reported germ line mutations in non-Ashkenazi breast cancer patients. We investigated its genetic origin in 51 Spanish carrier families that were genotyped with 11 13q polymorphic markers. Three independent associated haplotypes were clearly distinguished accounting for 23 [west Castilla y León (WCL)], 20 [east Castilla y León (ECL)] and 6 (South of Spain) families. Mutation age was estimated with the Disequilibrium Mapping using Likelihood Estimation software in a range of 45-68 and 45-71 generations for WCL and ECL haplotypes, respectively. The most prevalent variants, c.2808_2811del and c.2803G > A, were located in a double-hairpin loop structure (c.2794-c.2825) predicted by Quikfold that was proposed as a mutational hotspot. To check this hypothesis, random mutagenesis was performed over a 923 bp fragment of BRCA2, and 86 DNA variants were characterized. Interestingly, three mutations reported in the mutation databases (c.2680G > A, c.2944del and c.2957dup) were replicated and 20 affected the same position with different nucleotide changes. Moreover, five variants were placed in the same hairpin loop of c.2808_2811del, and one affected the same position (c.2808A > G). In conclusion, our results support that at least three different mutational events occurred to generate c.2808_2811del. Other highly prevalent DNA variants, such as BRCA1-c.68_69delAG, BRCA2-c.5946delT and c.8537delAG, are concentrated in hairpin loops, suggesting that these structures may represent mutational hotspots.

  8. Frameshift mutation hotspot identified in Smith-Magenis syndrome: case report and review of literature.

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    Truong, Hoa T; Dudding, Tracy; Blanchard, Christopher L; Elsea, Sarah H

    2010-10-08

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a complex syndrome involving intellectual disabilities, sleep disturbance, behavioural problems, and a variety of craniofacial, skeletal, and visceral anomalies. While the majority of SMS cases harbor an ~3.5 Mb common deletion on 17p11.2 that encompasses the retinoic acid induced-1 (RAI1) gene, some patients carry small intragenic deletions or point mutations in RAI1. We present data on two cases of Smith-Magenis syndrome with mutation of RAI1. Both cases are phenotypically consistent with SMS and RAI1 mutation but also have other anomalies not previously reported in SMS, including spontaneous pneumothoraces. These cases also illustrate variability in the SMS phenotype not previously shown for RAI1 mutation cases, including hearing loss, absence of self-abusive behaviours, and mild global delays. Sequencing of RAI1 revealed mutation of the same heptameric C-tract (CCCCCCC) in exon 3 in both cases (c.3103delC one case and and c.3103insC in the other), resulting in frameshift mutations. Of the seven reported frameshift mutations occurring in poly C-tracts in RAI1, four cases (~57%) occur at this heptameric C-tract. Collectively, these results indicate that this heptameric C-tract is a preferential hotspot for single nucleotide insertion/deletions (SNindels) and therefore, should be considered a primary target for analysis in patients suspected for mutations in RAI1. We expect that as more patients are sequenced for mutations in RAI1, the incidence of frameshift mutations in this hotspot will become more evident.

  9. Frameshift mutation hotspot identified in Smith-Magenis syndrome: case report and review of literature

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    Dudding Tracy

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS is a complex syndrome involving intellectual disabilities, sleep disturbance, behavioural problems, and a variety of craniofacial, skeletal, and visceral anomalies. While the majority of SMS cases harbor an ~3.5 Mb common deletion on 17p11.2 that encompasses the retinoic acid induced-1 (RAI1 gene, some patients carry small intragenic deletions or point mutations in RAI1. We present data on two cases of Smith-Magenis syndrome with mutation of RAI1. Both cases are phenotypically consistent with SMS and RAI1 mutation but also have other anomalies not previously reported in SMS, including spontaneous pneumothoraces. These cases also illustrate variability in the SMS phenotype not previously shown for RAI1 mutation cases, including hearing loss, absence of self-abusive behaviours, and mild global delays. Sequencing of RAI1 revealed mutation of the same heptameric C-tract (CCCCCCC in exon 3 in both cases (c.3103delC one case and and c.3103insC in the other, resulting in frameshift mutations. Of the seven reported frameshift mutations occurring in poly C-tracts in RAI1, four cases (~57% occur at this heptameric C-tract. Collectively, these results indicate that this heptameric C-tract is a preferential hotspot for single nucleotide insertion/deletions (SNindels and therefore, should be considered a primary target for analysis in patients suspected for mutations in RAI1. We expect that as more patients are sequenced for mutations in RAI1, the incidence of frameshift mutations in this hotspot will become more evident.

  10. TERT promoter mutations and monoallelic activation of TERT in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, F W; Bielski, C M; Rinne, M L; Hahn, W C; Sellers, W R; Stegmeier, F; Garraway, L A; Kryukov, G V

    2015-12-14

    Here we report that promoter mutations in telomerase (TERT), the most common noncoding mutations in cancer, give rise to monoallelic expression of TERT. Through deep RNA sequencing, we find that TERT activation in human cancer cell lines can occur in either mono- or biallelic manner. Without exception, hotspot TERT promoter mutations lead to the re-expression of only one allele, accounting for approximately half of the observed cases of monoallelic TERT expression. Furthermore, we show that monoallelic TERT expression is highly prevalent in certain tumor types and widespread across a broad spectrum of cancers. Taken together, these observations provide insights into the mechanisms of TERT activation and the ramifications of noncoding mutations in cancer.

  11. Septin mutations in human cancers

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    Elias T Spiliotis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Septins are GTP-binding proteins that are evolutionarily and structurally related to the RAS oncogenes. Septin expression levels are altered in many cancers and new advances point to how abnormal septin expression may contribute to the progression of cancer. In contrast to the RAS GTPases, which are frequently mutated and actively promote tumorigenesis, little is known about the occurrence and role of septin mutations in human cancers. Here, we review septin missense mutations that are currently in the Catalog of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC database. The majority of septin mutations occur in tumors of the large intestine, skin, endometrium and stomach. Over 25% of the annotated mutations in SEPT2, SEPT4 and SEPT9 belong to large intestine tumors. From all septins, SEPT9 and SEPT14 exhibit the highest mutation frequencies in skin, stomach and large intestine cancers. While septin mutations occur with frequencies lower than 3%, recurring mutations in several invariant and highly conserved amino acids are found across different septin paralogs and tumor types. Interestingly, a significant number of these mutations occur in the GTP-binding pocket and septin dimerization interfaces. Future studies may determine how these somatic mutations affect septin structure and function, whether they contribute to the progression of specific cancers and if they could serve as tumor-specific biomarkers.

  12. Telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter mutations in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allory, Yves; Beukers, Willemien; Sagrera, Ana

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hotspot mutations in the promoter of the gene coding for telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) have been described and proposed to activate gene expression. OBJECTIVES: To investigate TERT mutation frequency, spectrum, association with expression and clinical outcome, and potential ...

  13. Investigating the Inhibitory Effect of Wortmannin in the Hotspot Mutation at Codon 1047 of PIK3CA Kinase Domain: A Molecular Docking and Molecular Dynamics Approach.

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    Kumar, D Thirumal; Doss, C George Priya

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic mutations in phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase, catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA) are the most frequently reported in association with various forms of cancer. Several studies have reported the significance of hotspot mutations in a catalytic subunit of PIK3CA in association with breast cancer. Mutations are frequently observed in the highly conserved region of the kinase domain (797-1068 amino acids) of PIK3CA are activating or gain-of-function mutations. Mutation in codon 1047 occurs in the C-terminal region of the kinase domain with histidine (H) replaced by arginine (R), lysine (L), and tyrosine (Y). Pathogenicity and protein stability predictors PhD-SNP, Align GVGD, HANSA, iStable, and MUpro classified H1047R as highly deleterious when compared to H1047L and H1047Y. To explore the inhibitory activity of Wortmannin toward PIK3CA, the three-dimensional structure of the mutant protein was determined using homology modeling followed by molecular docking and molecular dynamics analysis. Docking studies were performed for the three mutants and native with Wortmannin to measure the differences in their binding pattern. Comparative docking study revealed that H1047R-Wortmannin complex has a higher number of hydrogen bonds as well as the best binding affinity next to the native protein. Furthermore, 100 ns molecular dynamics simulation was initiated with the docked complexes to understand the various changes induced by the mutation. Though Wortmannin was found to nullify the effect of H1047R over the protein, further studies are required for designing a better compound. As SNPs are major genetic variations observed in disease condition, personalized medicine would provide enhanced drug therapy.

  14. Two mutational hotspots in the interleukin-2 receptor {gamma} chain gene causing human X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepper, A.E.; Puck, J.M. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Buckley, R.H. [and others

    1995-09-01

    Human severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a syndrome of profoundly impaired cellular and humoral immunity, is most commonly caused by mutations in the X-linked gene for interleukin-2 (IL-2) receptor {gamma} chain (IL2RG). For mutational analysis of IL2RG in males with SCID, SSCP screening was followed by DNA sequencing. Of 40 IL2RG mutations found in unrelated SCID patients, 6 were point mutations at the CpG dinucleotide at cDNA 690-691, encoding amino acid R226. This residue lies in the extracellular domain of the protein in a region not previously recognized to be significantly conserved in the cytokine receptor gene family, 11 amino acids upstream from the highly conserved WSXWS motif. Three additional instances of mutation at another CpG dinucleotide at cDNA 879 produced a premature termination signal in the intracellular domain of IL2RG, resulting in loss of the SH2-homologous intracellular domain known to be essential for signaling from the IL-2 receptor complex. Mutations at these two hotspots constitute >20% of the X-linked SCID mutations found by our group and a similar proportion of all reported IL2RG mutations. 41 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. The SMAD-binding domain of SKI: a hotspot for de novo mutations causing Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepers, Dorien; Doyle, Alexander J; Oswald, Gretchen; Sparks, Elizabeth; Myers, Loretha; Willems, Patrick J; Mansour, Sahar; Simpson, Michael A; Frysira, Helena; Maat-Kievit, Anneke; Van Minkelen, Rick; Hoogeboom, Jeanette M; Mortier, Geert R; Titheradge, Hannah; Brueton, Louise; Starr, Lois; Stark, Zornitza; Ockeloen, Charlotte; Lourenco, Charles Marques; Blair, Ed; Hobson, Emma; Hurst, Jane; Maystadt, Isabelle; Destrée, Anne; Girisha, Katta M; Miller, Michelle; Dietz, Harry C; Loeys, Bart; Van Laer, Lut

    2015-02-01

    Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome (SGS) is a rare, systemic connective tissue disorder characterized by craniofacial, skeletal, and cardiovascular manifestations that show a significant overlap with the features observed in the Marfan (MFS) and Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS). A distinguishing observation in SGS patients is the presence of intellectual disability, although not all patients in this series present this finding. Recently, SGS was shown to be due to mutations in the SKI gene, encoding the oncoprotein SKI, a repressor of TGFβ activity. Here, we report eight recurrent and three novel SKI mutations in eleven SGS patients. All were heterozygous missense mutations located in the R-SMAD binding domain, except for one novel in-frame deletion affecting the DHD domain. Adding our new findings to the existing data clearly reveals a mutational hotspot, with 73% (24 out of 33) of the hitherto described unrelated patients having mutations in a stretch of five SKI residues (from p.(Ser31) to p.(Pro35)). This implicates that the initial molecular testing could be focused on mutation analysis of the first half of exon 1 of SKI. As the majority of the known mutations are located in the R-SMAD binding domain of SKI, our study further emphasizes the importance of TGFβ signaling in the pathogenesis of SGS.

  16. TP53 Mutational Spectrum in Endometrioid and Serous Endometrial Cancers.

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    Schultheis, Anne M; Martelotto, Luciano G; De Filippo, Maria R; Piscuglio, Salvatore; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Hussein, Yaser R; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Soslow, Robert A; Weigelt, Britta

    2016-07-01

    Endometrial carcinomas (ECs) are heterogeneous at the genetic level. Although TP53 mutations are highly recurrent in serous endometrial carcinomas (SECs), these are also present in a subset of endometrioid endometrial carcinomas (EECs). Here, we sought to define the frequency, pattern, distribution, and type of TP53 somatic mutations in ECs by performing a reanalysis of the publicly available data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). A total of 228 EECs (n=186) and SECs (n=42) from the TCGA data set, for which an integrated genomic characterization was performed, were interrogated for the presence and type of TP53 mutations, and for mutations in genes frequently mutated in ECs. TP53 mutations were found in 15% of EECs and 88% of SECs, and in 91% of copy-number-high and 35% of polymerase (DNA directed), epsilon, catalytic subunit (POLE) integrative genomic subtypes. In addition to differences in prevalence, variations in the type and pattern of TP53 mutations were observed between histologic types and between integrative genomic subtypes. TP53 hotspot mutations were significantly more frequently found in SECs (46%) than in EECs (15%). TP53-mutant EECs significantly more frequently harbored a co-occurring PTEN mutation than TP53-mutant SECs. Finally, a subset of TP53-mutant ECs (22%) was found to harbor frameshift or nonsense mutations. Given that nonsense and frameshift TP53 mutations result in distinct p53 immunohistochemical results that require careful interpretation, and that EECs and SECs display different patterns, types, and distributions of TP53 mutations, the use of the TP53/p53 status alone for the differential diagnosis of EECs and SECs may not be sufficient.

  17. HotSpot Wizard 2.0: automated design of site-specific mutations and smart libraries in protein engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendl, Jaroslav; Stourac, Jan; Sebestova, Eva; Vavra, Ondrej; Musil, Milos; Brezovsky, Jan; Damborsky, Jiri

    2016-07-01

    HotSpot Wizard 2.0 is a web server for automated identification of hot spots and design of smart libraries for engineering proteins' stability, catalytic activity, substrate specificity and enantioselectivity. The server integrates sequence, structural and evolutionary information obtained from 3 databases and 20 computational tools. Users are guided through the processes of selecting hot spots using four different protein engineering strategies and optimizing the resulting library's size by narrowing down a set of substitutions at individual randomized positions. The only required input is a query protein structure. The results of the calculations are mapped onto the protein's structure and visualized with a JSmol applet. HotSpot Wizard lists annotated residues suitable for mutagenesis and can automatically design appropriate codons for each implemented strategy. Overall, HotSpot Wizard provides comprehensive annotations of protein structures and assists protein engineers with the rational design of site-specific mutations and focused libraries. It is freely available at http://loschmidt.chemi.muni.cz/hotspotwizard.

  18. Identifying driver mutations in sequenced cancer genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raphael, Benjamin J; Dobson, Jason R; Oesper, Layla

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing is revolutionizing the study of cancer and enabling the measurement of the somatic mutations that drive cancer development. However, the resulting sequencing datasets are large and complex, obscuring the clinically important mutations in a background of errors, noise......, and random mutations. Here, we review computational approaches to identify somatic mutations in cancer genome sequences and to distinguish the driver mutations that are responsible for cancer from random, passenger mutations. First, we describe approaches to detect somatic mutations from high-throughput DNA...... sequencing data, particularly for tumor samples that comprise heterogeneous populations of cells. Next, we review computational approaches that aim to predict driver mutations according to their frequency of occurrence in a cohort of samples, or according to their predicted functional impact on protein...

  19. Emerging patterns of somatic mutations in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, Ian R.; Takahashi, Koichi; Futreal, P. Andrew; Chin, Lynda

    2013-01-01

    The advance in technological tools for massively parallel, high-throughput sequencing of DNA has enabled the comprehensive characterization of somatic mutations in large number of tumor samples. Here, we review recent cancer genomic studies that have assembled emerging views of the landscapes of somatic mutations through deep sequencing analyses of the coding exomes and whole genomes in various cancer types. We discuss the comparative genomics of different cancers, including mutation rates, s...

  20. Identifying cancer genes from cancer mutation profiles by cancer functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    It is of great importance to identify new cancer genes from the data of large scale genome screenings of gene mutations in cancers. Considering the alternations of some essential functions are indispensable for oncogenesis, we define them as cancer functions and select, as their approximations, a group of detailed functions in GO (Gene Ontology) highly enriched with known cancer genes. To evaluate the efficiency of using cancer functions as features to identify cancer genes, we define, in the screened genes, the known protein kinase cancer genes as gold standard positives and the other kinase genes as gold standard negatives. The results show that cancer associated functions are more efficient in identifying cancer genes than the selection pressure feature. Furthermore, combining cancer functions with the number of non-silent mutations can generate more reliable positive predictions. Finally, with precision 0.42, we suggest a list of 46 kinase genes as candidate cancer genes which are annotated to cancer functions and carry at least 3 non-silent mutations.

  1. TERT promoter mutations in thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rengyun; Xing, Mingzhao

    2016-03-01

    The 2013 discovery of Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations chr5, 1,295,228 C>T (C228T) and 1,295,250 C>T (C250T) in thyroid cancer represents an important event in the thyroid cancer field and much progress has occurred since then. This article provides a comprehensive review of this exciting new thyroid cancer field. The oncogenic role of TERT promoter mutations involves their creation of consensus binding sites for E-twenty-six transcriptional factors. TERT C228T is far more common than TERT C250T and their collective prevalence is, on average, 0, 11.3, 17.1, 43.2 and 40.1% in benign thyroid tumors, papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), follicular thyroid cancer, poorly differentiated thyroid cancer and anaplastic thyroid cancer, respectively, displaying an association with aggressive types of thyroid cancer. TERT promoter mutations are associated with aggressive thyroid tumor characteristics, tumor recurrence and patient mortality as well as BRAF V600E mutation. Coexisting BRAF V600E and TERT promoter mutations have a robust synergistic impact on the aggressiveness of PTC, including a sharply increased tumor recurrence and patient mortality, while either mutation alone has a modest impact. Thus, TERT with promoter mutations represents a prominent new oncogene in thyroid cancer and the mutations are promising new diagnostic and prognostic genetic markers for thyroid cancer, which, in combination with BRAF V600E mutation or other genetic markers (e.g. RAS mutations), are proving to be clinically useful for the management of thyroid cancer. Future studies will specifically define such clinical utilities, elucidate the biological mechanisms and explore the potential as therapeutic targets of TERT promoter mutations in thyroid cancer.

  2. TP53 hotspot mutations are predictive of survival in primary central nervous system lymphoma patients treated with combination chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munch-Petersen, Helga D; Asmar, Fazila; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Areškevičiūtė, Aušrinė; Brown, Peter; Girkov, Mia Seremet; Pedersen, Anja; Sjö, Lene D; Heegaard, Steffen; Broholm, Helle; Kristensen, Lasse S; Ralfkiaer, Elisabeth; Grønbæk, Kirsten

    2016-04-22

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is an aggressive variant of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) confined to the CNS. TP53 mutations (MUT-TP53) were investigated in the context of MIR34A/B/C- and DAPK promoter methylation status, and associated with clinical outcomes in PCNSL patients. In a total of 107 PCNSL patients clinical data were recorded, histopathology reassessed, and genetic and epigenetic aberrations of the p53-miR34-DAPK network studied. TP53 mutational status (exon 5-8), with structural classification of single nucleotide variations according to the IARC-TP53-Database, methylation status of MIR34A/B/C and DAPK, and p53-protein expression were assessed. The 57/107 (53.2 %) patients that were treated with combination chemotherapy +/- rituximab (CCT-treated) had a significantly better median overall survival (OS) (31.3 months) than patients treated with other regimens (high-dose methotrexate/whole brain radiation therapy, 6.0 months, or no therapy, 0.83 months), P TP53 mutations were identified in 32/86 (37.2 %), among which 12 patients had hotspot/direct DNA contact mutations. CCT-treated patients with PCNSL harboring a hotspot/direct DNA contact MUT-TP53 (n = 9) had a significantly worse OS and progression free survival (PFS) compared to patients with non-hotspot/non-direct DNA contact MUT-TP53 or wild-type TP53 (median PFS 4.6 versus 18.2 or 45.7 months), P = 0.041 and P = 0.00076, respectively. Multivariate Cox regression analysis confirmed that hotspot/direct DNA contact MUT-TP53 was predictive of poor outcome in CCT-treated PCNSL patients, P = 0.012 and P = 0.008; HR: 1.86 and 1.95, for OS and PFS, respectively. MIR34A, MIR34B/C, and DAPK promoter methylation were detected in 53/93 (57.0 %), 80/84 (95.2 %), and 70/75 (93.3 %) of the PCNSL patients with no influence on survival. Combined MUT-TP53 and MIR34A methylation was associated with poor PFS (median 6.4 versus 38.0 months), P = 0.0070. This

  3. A Unique Profile of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Gene Mutations in Iranian Patients Suffering Sporadic Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Hasanpour

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the most common and aggressive cancers worldwide. The majority of CRC cases are sporadic that caused by somatic mutations. The Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC; OMIM 611731 is a tumor suppressor gene of Wnt pathway and is frequently mutated in CRC cases. This study was designed to investigate the spectrum of APC gene mutations in Iranian patients with sporadic colorectal cancer. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study, Tumor and normal tissue samples were obtained from thirty randomly selected and unrelated sporadic CRC patients. We examined the hotspot region of the APC gene in all patients. Our mutation detection method was direct DNA sequencing. Results: We found a total of 8 different APC mutations, including two nonsense mutations (c.4099C>T and c.4348C>T, two missense mutations (c.3236C>G and c.3527C>T and four frame shift mutations (c.2804dupA, c.4317delT, c.4464_4471delATTACATT and c.4468_4469dupCA. The c.3236C>G and c.4468_4469dupCA are novel mutations. The overall frequency of APC mutation was 26.7% (8 of 30 patients. Conclusion: This mutation rate is lower in comparison with previous studies from other countries. The findings of present study demonstrate a different APC mutation spectrum in CRC patients of Iranian origin compared with other populations.

  4. Stem cell divisions, somatic mutations, cancer etiology, and cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasetti, Cristian; Li, Lu; Vogelstein, Bert

    2017-03-24

    Cancers are caused by mutations that may be inherited, induced by environmental factors, or result from DNA replication errors (R). We studied the relationship between the number of normal stem cell divisions and the risk of 17 cancer types in 69 countries throughout the world. The data revealed a strong correlation (median = 0.80) between cancer incidence and normal stem cell divisions in all countries, regardless of their environment. The major role of R mutations in cancer etiology was supported by an independent approach, based solely on cancer genome sequencing and epidemiological data, which suggested that R mutations are responsible for two-thirds of the mutations in human cancers. All of these results are consistent with epidemiological estimates of the fraction of cancers that can be prevented by changes in the environment. Moreover, they accentuate the importance of early detection and intervention to reduce deaths from the many cancers arising from unavoidable R mutations.

  5. Biological impacts of "hot-spot" mutations of hepatitis B virus X proteins are genotype B and C differentiated

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Lin; Xiao Xu; Qing-Ling Huang; Yu-Qing Liu; Da-Li Zheng; Wan-Nan Chen; Jian-Yin Lin

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the biological impacts of "hot-spot"mutations on genotype B and C HBV X proteins (HBx).METHODS: Five types of"hot-spot" mutations of genotype B or C HBV X genes, which sequentially lead to the amino acid substitutions of HBx as I127T, F132Y, K130M+V131I,I127T+K130M+V131I, or K130M+V131I+F132Y, respectively,were generated by means of site-directed mutagenesis.To evaluate the anti-proliferative effects, HBx or related mutants' expression vectors were transfected separately to the Chang cells by lipofectamine, and the cells were cultured in hygromycin selective medium for 14 d, drug-resistant colonies were fixed with cold methanol, stained with Giemsa dyes and scored (increase of the colonies indicated the reduction of the anti-proliferation activity,and vice versa). Different types of HBx expression vectors were co-transfected separately with the reporter plasmid pCMVβ to Chang cells, which were lysed 48 h post-transfection and the intra-cellular β-galactosidase activities were monitored (increase of the β-galactosidase activities indicated the reduction of the transactivation activity, and vice versa). All data obtained were calculated by paired-samples t-test.RESULTS: As compared to standard genotype B HBx,mutants of I127T and I127T+K130M+V131I showed higher transactivation and anti-proliferative activities, while the mutants of F132Y, K130M+V131I, and K130M+V131I+F132Y showed lower activities. As compared to standard genotype C HBx, I127T mutant showed higher transactivation activity, while the other four types of mutants showed no differences. With regard to anti-proliferative activity,compared to standard genotype C HBx, F132Y and K130M+V131I mutants showed lower activities, and K130M+V131I +F132Y mutant, on the other hand, showed higher activity,while the mutants of I127T and I127T+K130M+V131I showed no differences.CONCLUSION: "Hot-spot" mutations affect the antiproliferation and transactivation activities of genotype B and/or C HBx, and

  6. The MT-ND1 and MT-ND5 genes are mutational hotspots for Chinese families with clinical features of LHON but lacking the three primary mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yang; Jia, Xiaoyun; Zhang, A-Mei; Wang, Wen-Zhi; Li, Shiqiang; Guo, Xiangming; Kong, Qing-Peng; Zhang, Qingjiong; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2010-08-20

    LHON is one of the most common and primary causes of acute blindness in young male adults. Over 95% of LHON cases are caused by one of the three primary mutations (m.11778G>A, m.14484T>C, and m.3460G>A). In contrast to these genetically diagnosed LHON patients, there are many patients with clinical features of LHON but without the three primary mutations, and these patients have been insufficiently analyzed. We reported 10 suspected Chinese LHON families without the three primary mutations. The overall penetrance (53.4%) in these families is significantly higher than in those families with m.11778G>A (33.3%) or m.3460G>A (25.6%). Complete mtDNA genome sequencing of the 10 families showed that they belonged to different haplogroups and all identified variants (excluding m.12332A>G in mt-tRNA(Leu)) were previously reported. Eight of 12 private non-synonymous variants in the probands are located in the MT-ND1 and MT-ND5 genes, which is substantially higher than that of individuals from general Chinese populations. Comparison of the private variants in the 10 families and in 10 randomly selected mtDNAs from general Chinese populations using resampling simulation strategy further confirmed this pattern. Our results suggest that the MT-ND1 and MT-ND5 genes are mutational hotspots for Chinese families with suspected LHON lacking the common primary mutations. Variants m.3736G>A (p.V144I) in family Le1235 and m.10680G>A (p.A71T) in Le1107 can be the pathogenic mutations for LHON.

  7. Endogenous Multiple Exon Skipping and Back-Splicing at the DMD Mutation Hotspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hitoshi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Kameyama, Toshiki; Saito, Takashi; Masuda, Satoru; Tanihata, Jun; Nagata, Tetsuya; Mayeda, Akila; Takeda, Shin’ichi; Tsukahara, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe muscular disorder. It was reported that multiple exon skipping (MES), targeting exon 45–55 of the DMD gene, might improve patients’ symptoms because patients who have a genomic deletion of all these exons showed very mild symptoms. Thus, exon 45–55 skipping treatments for DMD have been proposed as a potential clinical cure. Herein, we detected the expression of endogenous exons 44–56 connected mRNA transcript of the DMD using total RNAs derived from human normal skeletal muscle by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and identified a total of eight types of MES products around the hotspot. Surprisingly, the 5′ splice sites of recently reported post-transcriptional introns (remaining introns after co-transcriptional splicing) act as splicing donor sites for MESs. We also tested exon combinations to generate DMD circular RNAs (circRNAs) and determined the preferential splice sites of back-splicing, which are involved not only in circRNA generation, but also in MESs. Our results fit the current circRNA-generation model, suggesting that upstream post-transcriptional introns trigger MES and generate circRNA because its existence is critical for the intra-intronic interaction or for extremely distal splicing. PMID:27754374

  8. TOX3 mutations in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Owain Jones

    Full Text Available TOX3 maps to 16q12, a region commonly lost in breast cancers and recently implicated in the risk of developing breast cancer. However, not much is known of the role of TOX3 itself in breast cancer biology. This is the first study to determine the importance of TOX3 mutations in breast cancers. We screened TOX3 for mutations in 133 breast tumours and identified four mutations (three missense, one in-frame deletion of 30 base pairs in six primary tumours, corresponding to an overall mutation frequency of 4.5%. One potentially deleterious missense mutation in exon 3 (Leu129Phe was identified in one tumour (genomic DNA and cDNA. Whilst copy number changes of 16q12 are common in breast cancer, our data show that mutations of TOX3 are present at low frequency in tumours. Our results support that TOX3 should be further investigated to elucidate its role in breast cancer biology.

  9. Significance of duon mutations in cancer genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vinod Kumar; Smith, Kyle S.; Flinders, Colin; Mumenthaler, Shannon M.; de, Subhajyoti

    2016-06-01

    Functional mutations in coding regions not only affect the structure and function of the protein products, but may also modulate their expression in some cases. This class of mutations, recently dubbed “duon mutations” due to their dual roles, can potentially have major impacts on downstream pathways. However their significance in diseases such as cancer remain unclear. In a survey covering 4606 samples from 19 cancer types, and integrating allelic expression, overall mRNA expression, regulatory motif perturbation, and chromatin signatures in one composite index called REDACT score, we identified potential duon mutations. Several such mutations are detected in known cancer genes in multiple cancer types. For instance a potential duon mutation in TP53 is associated with increased expression of the mutant allelic gene copy, thereby possibly amplifying the functional effects on the downstream pathways. Another potential duon mutation in SF3B1 is associated with abnormal splicing and changes in angiogenesis and matrix degradation related pathways. Our findings emphasize the need to interrogate the mutations in coding regions beyond their obvious effects on protein structures.

  10. Emerging patterns of somatic mutations in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Ian R; Takahashi, Koichi; Futreal, P Andrew; Chin, Lynda

    2013-10-01

    Recent advances in technological tools for massively parallel, high-throughput sequencing of DNA have enabled the comprehensive characterization of somatic mutations in a large number of tumour samples. In this Review, we describe recent cancer genomic studies that have assembled emerging views of the landscapes of somatic mutations through deep-sequencing analyses of the coding exomes and whole genomes in various cancer types. We discuss the comparative genomics of different cancers, including mutation rates and spectra, as well as the roles of environmental insults that influence these processes. We highlight the developing statistical approaches that are used to identify significantly mutated genes, and discuss the emerging biological and clinical insights from such analyses, as well as the future challenges of translating these genomic data into clinical impacts.

  11. KRAS and TP53 mutations in bronchoscopy samples from former lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Weimin; Jin, Jide; Yin, Jinling; Land, Stephanie; Gaither-Davis, Autumn; Christie, Neil; Luketich, James D; Siegfried, Jill M; Keohavong, Phouthone

    2017-02-01

    Mutations in the KRAS and TP53 genes have been found frequently in lung tumors and specimens from individuals at high risk for lung cancer and have been suggested as predictive markers for lung cancer. In order to assess the prognostic value of these two genes' mutations in lung cancer recurrence, we analyzed mutations in codon 12 of the KRAS gene and in hotspot codons of the TP53 gene in 176 bronchial biopsies obtained from 77 former lung cancer patients. Forty-seven patients (61.0%) showed mutations, including 35/77 (45.5%) in the KRAS gene and 25/77 (32.5%) in the TP53 gene, among them 13/77 (16.9%) had mutations in both genes. When grouped according to past or current smoking status, a higher proportion of current smokers showed mutations, in particular those in the TP53 gene (P = 0.07), compared with ex-smokers. These mutations were found in both abnormal lesions (8/20 or 40%) and histologically normal tissues (70/156 or 44.9%) (P = 0.812). They consisted primarily of G to A transition and G to T transversion in both the KRAS (41/56 or 73.2%) and TP53 (24/34 or 70.6%) genes, consistent with mutations found in lung tumors of smoking lung cancer patients. Overall, recurrence-free survival (RFS) among all subjects could be explained by age at diagnosis, tumor stage, tumor subtype, and smoking (P TP53 mutations were frequently detected in bronchial tissues of former lung cancer patients. However, the presence of mutation of bronchial biopsies was not significantly associated with a shorter RFS time. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Somatic mutations in aging, cancer and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Scott R; Loeb, Lawrence A; Herr, Alan J

    2012-04-01

    The somatic mutation theory of aging posits that the accumulation of mutations in the genetic material of somatic cells as a function of time results in a decrease in cellular function. In particular, the accumulation of random mutations may inactivate genes that are important for the functioning of the somatic cells of various organ systems of the adult, result in a decrease in organ function. When the organ function decreases below a critical level, death occurs. A significant amount of research has shown that somatic mutations play an important role in aging and a number of age related pathologies. In this review, we explore evidence for increases in somatic nuclear mutation burden with age and the consequences for aging, cancer, and neurodegeneration. We then review evidence for increases in mitochondrial mutation burden and the consequences for dysfunction in the disease processes.

  13. CAT基因突变热点区域的PCR扩增方法%Optimization of PCR Amplification Parameters for Mutational Hotspots in the Human Catalase Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李毅; 赵华; 赵红宇; 章锦才

    2009-01-01

    Objective To study the speciality and sensitivity of PCR for mutational hotspots in the human catalase gene. Methods Blood samples were taken from volunteers for genomic DNA preparation. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of sixteen gene segments encompassing mutational hotspots in the human catalase was carried out. Touchdown and Hot-start PCR was imple-mented to improve the efficiency of gene amplification. Results High and constant amplification effi-ciency is obtained using touchdown and hot-start PCR. Conclusion The stable and reproducible PCR amplification parameters for mutational hotspots in the human catalase gene were optimized.%目的 探讨过氧化氢酶基因突变热点区域PCR扩增方法 ,提高PCR反应的特异性和灵敏度,有助于快速检测CAT基因相关疾病.方法 从人静脉血液标本提取人血液基因组DNA,设计引物扩增特定的CAT基因片段,联合应用热启动PCR和降落PCR技术.结果 建立了重复性好,分辨率高的PCR反应体系.结论 建立了适用于CAT基因突变热点区域的PCR反应体系,有助于快速检测CAT基因相关痰病.

  14. KRAS mutation testing in metastatic colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cong Tan; Xiang Du

    2012-01-01

    The KRAS oncogene is mutated in approximately 35%-45% of colorectal cancers,and KRAS mutational status testing has been highlighted in recent years.The most frequent mutations in this gene,point substitutions in codons 12 and 13,were validated as negative predictors of response to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibodies.Therefore,determining the KRAS mutational status of tumor samples has become an essential tool for managing patients with colorectal cancers.Currently,a variety of detection methods have been established to analyze the mutation status in the key regions of the KRAS gene; however,several challenges remain related to standardized and uniform testing,including the selection of tumor samples,tumor sample processing and optimal testing methods.Moreover,new testing strategies,in combination with the mutation analysis of BRAF,PIK3CA and loss of PTEN proposed by many researchers and pathologists,should be promoted.In addition,we recommend that microsatellite instability,a prognostic factor,be added to the abovementioned concomitant analysis.This review provides an overview of KRAS biology and the recent advances in KRAS mutation testing.This review also addresses other aspects of status testing for determining the appropriate treatment and offers insight into the potential drawbacks of mutational testing.

  15. Exome sequencing identifies rare deleterious mutations in DNA repair genes FANCC and BLM as potential breast cancer susceptibility alleles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ella R Thompson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite intensive efforts using linkage and candidate gene approaches, the genetic etiology for the majority of families with a multi-generational breast cancer predisposition is unknown. In this study, we used whole-exome sequencing of thirty-three individuals from 15 breast cancer families to identify potential predisposing genes. Our analysis identified families with heterozygous, deleterious mutations in the DNA repair genes FANCC and BLM, which are responsible for the autosomal recessive disorders Fanconi Anemia and Bloom syndrome. In total, screening of all exons in these genes in 438 breast cancer families identified three with truncating mutations in FANCC and two with truncating mutations in BLM. Additional screening of FANCC mutation hotspot exons identified one pathogenic mutation among an additional 957 breast cancer families. Importantly, none of the deleterious mutations were identified among 464 healthy controls and are not reported in the 1,000 Genomes data. Given the rarity of Fanconi Anemia and Bloom syndrome disorders among Caucasian populations, the finding of multiple deleterious mutations in these critical DNA repair genes among high-risk breast cancer families is intriguing and suggestive of a predisposing role. Our data demonstrate the utility of intra-family exome-sequencing approaches to uncover cancer predisposition genes, but highlight the major challenge of definitively validating candidates where the incidence of sporadic disease is high, germline mutations are not fully penetrant, and individual predisposition genes may only account for a tiny proportion of breast cancer families.

  16. Kinome-wide Decoding of Network-Attacking Mutations Rewiring Cancer Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Creixell, Pau; Schoof, Erwin M; Simpson, Craig D.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells acquire pathological phenotypes through accumulation of mutations that perturb signaling networks. However, global analysis of these events is currently limited. Here, we identify six types of network-attacking mutations (NAMs), including changes in kinase and SH2 modulation, network...... and experimentally validated several NAMs, including PKCγ M501I and PKD1 D665N, which encode specificity switches analogous to the appearance of kinases de novo within the kinome. We discover mutant molecular logic gates, a drift toward phospho-threonine signaling, weakening of phosphorylation motifs, and kinase......-inactivating hotspots in cancer. Our method pinpoints functional NAMs, scales with the complexity of cancer genomes and cell signaling, and may enhance our capability to therapeutically target tumor-specific networks....

  17. Cancer-Specific Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (TERT Promoter Mutations: Biological and Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiantian Liu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The accumulated evidence has pointed to a key role of telomerase in carcinogenesis. As a RNA-dependent DNA polymerase, telomerase synthesizes telomeric DNA at the end of linear chromosomes, and attenuates or prevents telomere erosion associated with cell divisions. By lengthening telomeres, telomerase extends cellular life-span or even induces immortalization. Consistent with its functional activity, telomerase is silent in most human normal somatic cells while active only in germ-line, stem and other highly proliferative cells. In contrast, telomerase activation widely occurs in human cancer and the enzymatic activity is detectable in up to 90% of malignancies. Recently, hotspot point mutations in the regulatory region of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT gene, encoding the core catalytic component of telomerase, was identified as a novel mechanism to activate telomerase in cancer. This review discusses the cancer-specific TERT promoter mutations and potential biological and clinical significances.

  18. The IARC TP53 mutation database: a resource for studying the significance of TP53 mutations in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magali Olivier

    2007-02-01

    the less frequent mutants studied, suggesting that DNE may play a role in shaping mutation patterns.

    Hotspot mutations have been linked to exposure to environmental factors in several cancers: tobacco smoke in lung cancer, tobacco smoke and alcohol in head and neck cancers, aromatic-amines in bladder cancer, aflatoxine-B1 and HBV in liver cancer, and UV in skin cancer. In lung cancers, four specific mutants are observed at high frequencies, V157F, R158L, R248L and R273L. These hotspots are due to G>T transversions that have been shown to be caused by the presence of benzo(a-pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE adducts on guanines at these codons. BPDE is the main metabolite of benzo(a-pyrene, one of the most potent carcinogens present in high quantity in tobacco smoke. In hepatocellular carcinomas from less developed regions, one specific mutant is observed at a high frequency, R249S.

    Although the precise mechanism remain unknown, its presence is attributed to an interaction between HBV infection and mutagenesis by the food contaminant carcinogen aflatoxine-B1. In these examples, all hotspot mutants are defective for TA. These observations show how mutagenesis by environmental carcinogens and selection of loss of trans-activation can shape TP53 mutation patterns.

    In conclusion, the integration of standardized annotations on the functional impact of missense mutations in the IARC TP53 database provides a powerful framework for the analysis of ";functional"; patterns of mutations in cancers, the detection of genotype/phenotype associations and provide new insights into the factors that shape mutation patterns and influence mutation phenotype, which may have clinical interest.

  19. Acceleration of 5-methylcytosine deamination in cyclobutane dimers by G and its implications for UV-induced C-to-T mutation hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannistraro, Vincent J; Taylor, John-Stephen

    2009-10-01

    Sunlight-induced C-->T mutation hotspots occur most frequently at methylated CpG sites in tumor suppressor genes and are thought to arise from translesion synthesis past deaminated cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). While it is known that methylation enhances CPD formation in sunlight, little is known about the effect of methylation and sequence context on the deamination of 5-methylcytosine ((m)C) and its contribution to mutagenesis at these hotspots. Using an enzymatic method, we have determined the yields and deamination rates of C and (m)C in CPDs and find that the frequency of UVB-induced CPDs correlates with the oxidation potential of the flanking bases. We also found that the deamination of T(m)C and (m)CT CPDs is about 25-fold faster when flanked by G's than by A's, C's or T's in duplex DNA and appears to involve catalysis by the O6 group of guanine. In contrast, the first deamination of either C or (m)C in AC(m)CG with a flanking G was much slower (t(1/2) >250 h) and rate limiting, while the second deamination was much faster. The observation that C(m)CG dimers deaminate very slowly but at the same time correlate with C-->T mutation hotspots suggests that their repair must be slow enough to allow sufficient time for deamination. There are, however, a greater number of single C-->T mutations than CC-->TT mutations at C(m)CG sites even though the second deamination is very fast, which could reflect faster repair of doubly deaminated dimers.

  20. Profile of TP53 gene mutations in sinonasal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmila, Reetta; Bornholdt, Jette; Suitiala, Tuula

    2010-01-01

    %) frameshift or nonsense mutations, and 36 (23%) intronic or silent mutations. In coding region, the most common base change detected was C-->T transition (43/125; 34% of base changes in the coding region). G-->T transversions occurred at a frequency of 10% (12/125), which is less than reported in mutation...... not been reported before as frequently mutated in head and neck cancer or human cancer in general. About half of all tumours with TP53 mutations carried more than one mutation. Interestingly, 86% (19/22) of the silent mutations detected had occurred in tumours with multiple mutations.......Genetic alterations underlying the development of the cancer of the nose and paranasal sinuses (sinonasal cancer, SNC), a rare cancer that can be included in the group of head and neck cancers, are still largely unknown. We recently reported that TP53 mutations are a common feature of SNC...

  1. Ultra-deep sequencing detects ovarian cancer cells in peritoneal fluid and reveals somatic TP53 mutations in noncancerous tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimmel, Jeffrey D; Schmitt, Michael W; Harrell, Maria I; Agnew, Kathy J; Kennedy, Scott R; Emond, Mary J; Loeb, Lawrence A; Swisher, Elizabeth M; Risques, Rosa Ana

    2016-05-24

    Current sequencing methods are error-prone, which precludes the identification of low frequency mutations for early cancer detection. Duplex sequencing is a sequencing technology that decreases errors by scoring mutations present only in both strands of DNA. Our aim was to determine whether duplex sequencing could detect extremely rare cancer cells present in peritoneal fluid from women with high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas (HGSOCs). These aggressive cancers are typically diagnosed at a late stage and are characterized by TP53 mutations and peritoneal dissemination. We used duplex sequencing to analyze TP53 mutations in 17 peritoneal fluid samples from women with HGSOC and 20 from women without cancer. The tumor TP53 mutation was detected in 94% (16/17) of peritoneal fluid samples from women with HGSOC (frequency as low as 1 mutant per 24,736 normal genomes). Additionally, we detected extremely low frequency TP53 mutations (median mutant fraction 1/13,139) in peritoneal fluid from nearly all patients with and without cancer (35/37). These mutations were mostly deleterious, clustered in hotspots, increased with age, and were more abundant in women with cancer than in controls. The total burden of TP53 mutations in peritoneal fluid distinguished cancers from controls with 82% sensitivity (14/17) and 90% specificity (18/20). Age-associated, low frequency TP53 mutations were also found in 100% of peripheral blood samples from 15 women with and without ovarian cancer (none with hematologic disorder). Our results demonstrate the ability of duplex sequencing to detect rare cancer cells and provide evidence of widespread, low frequency, age-associated somatic TP53 mutation in noncancerous tissue.

  2. Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 R132C mutation occurs exclusively in microsatellite stable colorectal cancers with the CpG island methylator phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehall, V L J; Dumenil, T D; McKeone, D M; Bond, C E; Bettington, M L; Buttenshaw, R L; Bowdler, L; Montgomery, G W; Wockner, L F; Leggett, B A

    2014-11-01

    The CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (CIMP) is fundamental to an important subset of colorectal cancer; however, its cause is unknown. CIMP is associated with microsatellite instability but is also found in BRAF mutant microsatellite stable cancers that are associated with poor prognosis. The isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) gene causes CIMP in glioma due to an activating mutation that produces the 2-hydroxyglutarate oncometabolite. We therefore examined IDH1 alteration as a potential cause of CIMP in colorectal cancer. The IDH1 mutational hotspot was screened in 86 CIMP-positive and 80 CIMP-negative cancers. The entire coding sequence was examined in 81 CIMP-positive colorectal cancers. Forty-seven cancers varying by CIMP-status and IDH1 mutation status were examined using Illumina 450K DNA methylation microarrays. The R132C IDH1 mutation was detected in 4/166 cancers. All IDH1 mutations were in CIMP cancers that were BRAF mutant and microsatellite stable (4/45, 8.9%). Unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis identified an IDH1 mutation-like methylation signature in approximately half of the CIMP-positive cancers. IDH1 mutation appears to cause CIMP in a small proportion of BRAF mutant, microsatellite stable colorectal cancers. This study provides a precedent that a single gene mutation may cause CIMP in colorectal cancer, and that this will be associated with a specific epigenetic signature and clinicopathological features.

  3. Origin and distribution of the BRCA2-8765delAG mutation in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldinu Paola

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The BRCA2-8765delAG mutation was firstly described in breast cancer families from French-Canadian and Jewish-Yemenite populations; it was then reported as a founder mutation in Sardinian families. We evaluated both the prevalence of the BRCA2-8765delAG variant in Sardinia and the putative existence of a common ancestral origin through a haplotype analysis of breast cancer family members carrying such a mutation. Methods Eight polymorphic microsatellite markers (D13S1250, centromeric, to D13S267, telomeric spanning the BRCA2 gene locus were used for the haplotype analysis. Screening for the 8765delAG mutation was performed by PCR-based amplification of BRCA2-exon 20, followed by automated sequencing. Results Among families with high recurrence of breast cancer (≥ 3 cases in first-degree relatives, those from North Sardinia shared the same haplotype whereas the families from French Canadian and Jewish-Yemenite populations presented distinct genetic assets at the BRCA2 locus. Screening for the BRCA2-8765delAG variant among unselected and consecutively-collected breast cancer patients originating from the entire Sardinia revealed that such a mutation is present in the northern part of the island only [9/648 (1.4% among cases from North Sardinia versus 0/493 among cases from South Sardinia]. Conclusion The BRCA2-8765delAG has an independent origin in geographically and ethnically distinct populations, acting as a founder mutation in North but not in South Sardinia. Since BRCA2-8765delAG occurs within a triplet repeat sequence of AGAGAG, our study further confirmed the existence of a mutational hot-spot at this genomic position (additional genetic factors within each single population might be involved in generating such a mutation.

  4. Replicative DNA polymerase mutations in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzer, Ellen; Tomlinson, Ian

    2014-02-01

    Three DNA polymerases - Pol α, Pol δ and Pol ɛ - are essential for DNA replication. After initiation of DNA synthesis by Pol α, Pol δ or Pol ɛ take over on the lagging and leading strand respectively. Pol δ and Pol ɛ perform the bulk of replication with very high fidelity, which is ensured by Watson-Crick base pairing and 3'exonuclease (proofreading) activity. Yeast models have shown that mutations in the exonuclease domain of Pol δ and Pol ɛ homologues can cause a mutator phenotype. Recently, we identified germline exonuclease domain mutations (EDMs) in human POLD1 and POLE that predispose to 'polymerase proofreading associated polyposis' (PPAP), a disease characterised by multiple colorectal adenomas and carcinoma, with high penetrance and dominant inheritance. Moreover, somatic EDMs in POLE have also been found in sporadic colorectal and endometrial cancers. Tumors with EDMs are microsatellite stable and show an 'ultramutator' phenotype, with a dramatic increase in base substitutions.

  5. Modelling mutational landscapes of human cancers in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Magali; Weninger, Annette; Ardin, Maude; Huskova, Hana; Castells, Xavier; Vallée, Maxime P.; McKay, James; Nedelko, Tatiana; Muehlbauer, Karl-Rudolf; Marusawa, Hiroyuki; Alexander, John; Hazelwood, Lee; Byrnes, Graham; Hollstein, Monica; Zavadil, Jiri

    2014-03-01

    Experimental models that recapitulate mutational landscapes of human cancers are needed to decipher the rapidly expanding data on human somatic mutations. We demonstrate that mutation patterns in immortalised cell lines derived from primary murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) exposed in vitro to carcinogens recapitulate key features of mutational signatures observed in human cancers. In experiments with several cancer-causing agents we obtained high genome-wide concordance between human tumour mutation data and in vitro data with respect to predominant substitution types, strand bias and sequence context. Moreover, we found signature mutations in well-studied human cancer driver genes. To explore endogenous mutagenesis, we used MEFs ectopically expressing activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and observed an excess of AID signature mutations in immortalised cell lines compared to their non-transgenic counterparts. MEF immortalisation is thus a simple and powerful strategy for modelling cancer mutation landscapes that facilitates the interpretation of human tumour genome-wide sequencing data.

  6. Risks of lynch syndrome cancers for msh6 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Baglietto (Laura); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); J.G. Dowty (James); D.M. White (Darren); A. Wagner (Anja); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); A.H.J.T. Vriends (Anette); N.R. Cartwright (Nicola); R.A. Barnetson (Rebecca); S.M. Farrington (Susan); A. Tenesa (Albert); H. Hampel (Heather); D. Buchanan (Daniel); S. Arnold (Sven); J. Young (Joanne); M.D. Walsh (Michael); J. Jass (Jeremy); F.A. Macrae (Finlay); Y. Antill (Yoland); I.M. Winship (Ingrid); G.G. Giles (Graham); J. Goldblatt (Jack); S. Parry (Susan); G. Suthers (Graeme); B. Leggett (Barbara); M. Butz (Malinda); M. Aronson (Melyssa); J.N. Poynter (Jenny); J.A. Baron (John); L. Le Marchand (Loic); R. Haile (Robert); S. Gallinger (Steve); J.L. Hopper (John); J. Potter (John); A. de La Chapelle (Albert); H. Vasen (Hans); M.G. Dunlop (Malcolm); S.N. Thibodeau (Stephen); M.A. Jenkins (Mark)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Germline mutations in MSH6 account for 10%-20% of Lynch syndrome colorectal cancers caused by hereditary DNA mismatch repair gene mutations. Because there have been only a few studies of mutation carriers, their cancer risks are uncertain. Methods: We identified 113 families

  7. Radiological scenario modeling using the Hotspot code and potential financial impact of treatment of radiation induced cancer to the public; Modelagem de cenario radiologico utilizando o codigo Hotspot e potenciais impactos financeiros para tratamento de cancer radioinduzido ao publico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Gabriel Fidalgo Queiroz da; Andrade, Edson Ramos de; Rebello, Wilson Freitas; Araujo, Olga Maria Oliveira de, E-mail: profgabriel.fisica@gmail.com, E-mail: fisica.dna@gmail.com, E-mail: rebello@ime.eb.br, E-mail: olgafisica2013@hotmail.com [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Secao de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    The work aims to develop a methodology that is able to estimate the financial impact in a radiological emergency events, considering the radiation induced cancer, particularly leukemia. Considering a RDD - Radiological Dispersive Device, consisting of explosives and cesium-137 as radioactive material, a scenario building on the Rio de Janeiro was modeled. The convergence of a risk modeling platform (HotSpot 3.0), the analysis of excess relative risks for humans (BEIR V-Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation V), considering scenarios composed of contaminated areas, are secondary goals.

  8. BRCA1 founder mutations compared to ovarian cancer in Belarus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savanevich, Alena; Oszurek, Oleg; Lubiński, Jan; Cybulski, Cezary; Dębniak, Tadeusz; Narod, Steven A; Gronwald, Jacek

    2014-09-01

    In Belarus and other Slavic countries, founder mutations in the BRCA1 gene are responsible for a significant proportion of breast cancer cases, but the data on contribution of these mutations to ovarian cancers are limited. To estimate the proportion of ovarian cancers in Belarus, which are dependent on BRCA1 Slavic founder mutations, we sought the presence of three most frequent mutations (BRCA1: 5382insC, C61G and, 4153delA) in 158 consecutive unselected cases of ovarian cancer. One of the three founder mutations was present in 25 of 158 unselected cases of ovarian cancer (15.8 %). We recommend that all cases of ovarian cancer in Belarus be offered genetic testing for these founder mutations. Furthermore, genetic testing of the Belarusian population will provide the opportunity to prevent a significant proportion of ovarian cancer.

  9. Prevalence of mutations in APC, CTNNB1, and BRAF in Tunisian patients with sporadic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougatef, Karim; Ouerhani, Slah; Moussa, Amel; Kourda, Nadia; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Lahely, Yannick Blondeau; Najjar, Tawfik; Ben Jilani, Sarra; Benammar-Elgaaied, Amel; Soubrier, Florent; Marrakchi, Raja

    2008-11-01

    Sporadic colorectal tumorigenesis is caused by alterations in the Wnt (APC, CTNNB1) and Ras pathways. Our objective was to analyze the occurrence of these genetic alterations in relation to tumor and patient characteristics. The prevalence of somatic alteration in the hot-spot regions of the APC, BRAF, and CTNNB1 genes was investigated in 48 unselected and unrelated Tunisian patients with sporadic colorectal cancer, and the association between the molecular features at these genes in relation to tumor and patient characteristics (age at diagnosis, sex, tumor localization, stage, and differentiation) was analyzed. Loss of heterozygosity was observed at the APC locus in 52% of the analyzed tumors. 6 novel mutations were detected by polymerase chain reaction sequencing in the mutation cluster region of the APC gene. No mutations were observed in the CTNNB1 gene in any tumor, but 8% of tumors harbored mutation in the BRAF gene. Clinicopathological analyses showed an association between APC point mutations and the earliest occurrence of sporadic colorectal cancer. The findings confirm the heterogeneity of APC gene alteration and also reveal a particular profile of this pathology among Tunisian patients that confirms the epidemiological data for this country.

  10. Colorectal Cancer & Molecular Mutations and Polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aga Syed Sameer

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity, and is the third most common cancer in men and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. The incidence of CRC shows considerable variation among racially or ethnically defined populations in multiracial/ethnic countries. The tumorigenesis of CRC is either because of the chromosomal instability (CIN or microsatellite instability (MIN or involving various proto-oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and also epigenetic changes in the DNA. In this review I have focused on the mutations and polymorphisms of various important genes of the CIN and MIN pathways which have been implicated in the development of CRC.

  11. Filaggrin loss-of-function mutations and incident cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaaby, T; Husemoen, L L N; Thyssen, J P

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) could have opposing effects on cancer risk, as mutations are associated with both 10% higher serum vitamin D levels, which may protect against cancer, and with impaired skin barrier function, which may lead to higher cancer...... susceptibility. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association of the FLG genotype and cancer types in four population-based cohorts. METHODS: A total of 13,376 individuals were genotyped for FLG mutations. Information on cancer was obtained from the Danish Cancer Registry. Persons with a history of cancer...... at baseline were excluded from prospective analyses. RESULTS: There were 1339 incident cancers (median follow-up 11·4 years). The hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for FLG mutation carriers vs. wild types were: for any cancer (HR 0·95, 95% CI 0·78-1·16), any cancer excluding nonmelanoma...

  12. Prevalence of deleterious ATM germline mutations in gastric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dong-Sheng; Tao, Hou-Quan; He, Xu-Jun; Long, Ming; Yu, Sheng; Xia, Ying-Jie; Wei, Zhang; Xiong, Zikai; Jones, Sian; He, Yiping; Yan, Hai; Wang, Xiaoyue

    2015-12-01

    Besides CDH1, few hereditary gastric cancer predisposition genes have been previously reported. In this study, we discovered two germline ATM mutations (p.Y1203fs and p.N1223S) in a Chinese family with a history of gastric cancer by screening 83 cancer susceptibility genes. Using a published exome sequencing dataset, we found deleterious germline mutations of ATM in 2.7% of 335 gastric cancer patients of different ethnic origins. The frequency of deleterious ATM mutations in gastric cancer patients is significantly higher than that in general population (p=0.0000435), suggesting an association of ATM mutations with gastric cancer predisposition. We also observed biallelic inactivation of ATM in tumors of two gastric cancer patients. Further evaluation of ATM mutations in hereditary gastric cancer will facilitate genetic testing and risk assessment.

  13. FOXA1 mutations in hormone dependent cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Louise Louvain Robinson

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The forkhead protein, FOXA1, is a critical interacting partner of the nuclear hormone receptors, oestrogen receptor-α (ER and androgen receptor (AR, which are major drivers of the two most common cancers, namely breast and prostate cancer. Over the past few years, progress has been made in our understanding of how FOXA1 influences nuclear receptor function, with both common and distinct roles in the regulation of ER or AR. Recently, another level of regulation has been described, with the discovery that FOXA1 is mutated in 1.8% of breast and 3-5 % prostate cancers. In addition, a subset of both cancer types exhibit amplification of the genomic region encompassing the FOXA1 gene. Furthermore, there is evidence of somatic changes that influence the DNA sequence under FOXA1 binding regions, which may indirectly influence FOXA1-mediated regulation of ER and AR activity. These recent observations provide insight into the heterogeneity observed in ER and AR driven cancers.

  14. CDH1 germline mutations and hereditary lobular breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, Giovanni; Intra, Mattia; Trentin, Chiara; Veronesi, Paolo; Galimberti, Viviana

    2016-04-01

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer is an autosomal dominant inherited disease associated of CDH1 germline mutations (that encodes for the E-cadherin protein), and lobular breast cancer is the second most frequent type of neoplasia. Recently, novel E-cadherin constitutional alterations have been identified in pedigree clustering only for lobular breast carcinoma without evidence of diffuse gastric tumors and in absence of BRCA1/2 mutations. This first evidence opens novel questions about the inherited correlation between diffuse gastric and lobular breast cancers. In this brief review we revise the literature data about the CDH1 mutation frequency affecting exclusively lobular breast cancer, providing clinical recommendation for asymptomatic mutation carriers.

  15. TP53 mutations, expression and interaction networks in human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaosheng; Sun, Qingrong

    2017-01-03

    Although the associations of p53 dysfunction, p53 interaction networks and oncogenesis have been widely explored, a systematic analysis of TP53 mutations and its related interaction networks in various types of human cancers is lacking. Our study explored the associations of TP53 mutations, gene expression, clinical outcomes, and TP53 interaction networks across 33 cancer types using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). We show that TP53 is the most frequently mutated gene in a number of cancers, and its mutations appear to be early events in cancer initiation. We identified genes potentially repressed by p53, and genes whose expression correlates significantly with TP53 expression. These gene products may be especially important nodes in p53 interaction networks in human cancers. This study shows that while TP53-truncating mutations often result in decreased TP53 expression, other non-truncating TP53 mutations result in increased TP53 expression in some cancers. Survival analyses in a number of cancers show that patients with TP53 mutations are more likely to have worse prognoses than TP53-wildtype patients, and that elevated TP53 expression often leads to poor clinical outcomes. We identified a set of candidate synthetic lethal (SL) genes for TP53, and validated some of these SL interactions using data from the Cancer Cell Line Project. These predicted SL genes are promising candidates for experimental validation and the development of personalized therapeutics for patients with TP53-mutated cancers.

  16. Dietary folate and APC mutations in sporadic colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, S. de; Engeland, M. van; Lüchtenborg, M.; Bruïne, A.P. de; Roemen, G.M.J.M.; Lentjes, M.H.F.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Weijenberg, M.P.

    2006-01-01

    Folate deficiency has been associated with colorectal cancer risk and may be involved in colorectal carcinogenesis through increased chromosome instability, gene mutations, and aberrant DNA methylation. Within the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer, we investigated the associations between

  17. [Current topics in mutations in the cancer genome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaya, Takeshi; Mimori, Koshi; Wakabayashi, Go

    2012-03-01

    Several oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes are involved in the multistep process of carcinogenesis in many cancer types. Recently, global mutational analyses have revealed that the cancer genome has far greater numbers of mutations than previously thought. Furthermore, the next-generation sequencing method, which has a different principle from conventional Sanger sequencing, has provided more information on the cancer genome such as new cancer-related genes and the existence of many rearrangements in solid cancers. Somatic mutations occurring in cancer cells are divided into "driver" and "passenger" mutations. Driver mutations confer a growth advantage upon the neoplastic clone and are crucial for carcinogenesis. The remaining large majority of mutations are passengers, which, by definition, do not confer a growth advantage. Driver genes with low-frequency mutation rates (less than 10%) are also involved in carcinogenesis along with well-known drivers with high-frequency mutations. There are now several celebrated examples of anticancer drugs of which the efficacy in cancer patients can be predicted based on the genotype of several driver genes, such as EGFR, KRAS, and BRAF on the EGFR signaling pathway. The complete catalogs of somatic mutations provided by the sequencing of the cancer genome are expected to prompt new approaches to diagnosis, therapy, and potentially prevention.

  18. Kinome-wide Decoding of Network-Attacking Mutations Rewiring Cancer Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creixell, Pau; Schoof, Erwin M.; Simpson, Craig D.; Longden, James; Miller, Chad J.; Lou, Hua Jane; Perryman, Lara; Cox, Thomas R.; Zivanovic, Nevena; Palmeri, Antonio; Wesolowska-Andersen, Agata; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Itamochi, Hiroaki; Bodenmiller, Bernd; Erler, Janine T.; Turk, Benjamin E.; Linding, Rune

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cancer cells acquire pathological phenotypes through accumulation of mutations that perturb signaling networks. However, global analysis of these events is currently limited. Here, we identify six types of network-attacking mutations (NAMs), including changes in kinase and SH2 modulation, network rewiring, and the genesis and extinction of phosphorylation sites. We developed a computational platform (ReKINect) to identify NAMs and systematically interpreted the exomes and quantitative (phospho-)proteomes of five ovarian cancer cell lines and the global cancer genome repository. We identified and experimentally validated several NAMs, including PKCγ M501I and PKD1 D665N, which encode specificity switches analogous to the appearance of kinases de novo within the kinome. We discover mutant molecular logic gates, a drift toward phospho-threonine signaling, weakening of phosphorylation motifs, and kinase-inactivating hotspots in cancer. Our method pinpoints functional NAMs, scales with the complexity of cancer genomes and cell signaling, and may enhance our capability to therapeutically target tumor-specific networks. PMID:26388441

  19. TP53 hotspot mutations are predictive of survival in primary central nervous system lymphoma patients treated with combination chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch-Petersen, Helga D; Asmar, Fazila; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos;

    2016-01-01

    that hotspot/direct DNA contact MUT-TP53 was predictive of poor outcome in CCT-treated PCNSL patients, P = 0.012 and P = 0.008; HR: 1.86 and 1.95, for OS and PFS, respectively. MIR34A, MIR34B/C, and DAPK promoter methylation were detected in 53/93 (57.0 %), 80/84 (95.2 %), and 70/75 (93.3 %) of the PCNSL...

  20. BRCA1/BRCA2 founder mutations and cancer risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henriette Roed; Nilbert, Mef; Petersen, Janne

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes significantly contribute to hereditary breast cancer and ovarian cancer, but the phenotypic effect from different mutations is insufficiently recognized. We used a western Danish clinic-based cohort of 299 BRCA families to study the female cancer risk...... in mutation carriers and their untested first-degree relatives. Founder mutations were characterized and the risk of cancer was assessed in relation to the specific mutations. In BRCA1, the cumulative cancer risk at age 70 was 35 % for breast cancer and 29 % for ovarian cancer. In BRCA2, the cumulative risk...... was 44 % for breast cancer and 15 % for ovarian cancer. We identified 47 distinct BRCA1 mutations and 48 distinct mutations in BRCA2. Among these, 8 founder mutations [BRCA1 c.81-?_4986+?del, c.3319G>T (p.Glu1107*), c.3874delT and c.5213G>A (p.Gly1738Glu) and BRCA2 c.6373delA, c.7008-1G>A, c.7617+1G...

  1. Automated Selection of Hotspots (ASH): enhanced automated segmentation and adaptive step finding for Ki67 hotspot detection in adrenal cortical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Lu (Hao); T.G. Papathomas (Thomas); D. van Zessen (David); D. Palli (Domenico); R.R. de Krijger (Ronald); P.J. van der Spek (Peter); W.N.M. Dinjens (Winand); A.P. Stubbs (Andrew P.)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: In prognosis and therapeutics of adrenal cortical carcinoma (ACC), the selection of the most active areas in proliferative rate (hotspots) within a slide and objective quantification of immunohistochemical Ki67 Labelling Index (LI) are of critical importance. In addition to i

  2. The prevalence of PIK3CA mutations in gastric and colon cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velho, S; Oliveira, C; Ferreira, A; Ferreira, AC; Suriano, G; Schwartz, S; Duval, A; Carneiro, F; Machado, JC; Hamelin, R; Seruca, R

    2005-01-01

    A wide variety of tumours show PIK3CA mutations leading to increased phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) activity. We have determined the frequency of PIK3CA mutations in exons 9 and 20 that has previously been reported as mutational hotspot regions in distinct tumour models. One hundred and fifty

  3. Tumor Mutation Burden Forecasts Outcome in Ovarian Cancer with BRCA1 or BRCA2 Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Kochupurakkal, Bose; Gonzalez-Izarzugaza, Jose Maria;

    2013-01-01

    Background: Increased number of single nucleotide substitutions is seen in breast and ovarian cancer genomes carrying disease-associated mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2. The significance of these genome-wide mutations is unknown. We hypothesize genome-wide mutation burden mirrors deficiencies in DNA...... repair and is associated with treatment outcome in ovarian cancer. Methods and Results: The total number of synonymous and non-synonymous exome mutations (Nmut), and the presence of germline or somatic mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (mBRCA) were extracted from whole-exome sequences of high-grade serous...... ovarian cancers from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier methods were used to correlate Nmut with chemotherapy response and outcome. Higher Nmut correlated with a better response to chemotherapy after surgery. In patients with mBRCA-associated cancer, low Nmut was associated...

  4. Prognostic and Predictive Roles of KRAS Mutation in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda K. Arrington

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The RAS gene family is among the most studied and best characterized of the known cancer-related genes. Of the three human ras isoforms, KRAS is the most frequently altered gene, with mutations occurring in 17%–25% of all cancers. In particular, approximately 30%–40% of colon cancers harbor a KRAS mutation. KRAS mutations in colon cancers have been associated with poorer survival and increased tumor aggressiveness. Additionally, KRAS mutations in colorectal cancer lead to resistance to select treatment strategies. In this review we examine the history of KRAS, its prognostic value in patients with colorectal cancer, and evidence supporting its predictive value in determining appropriate therapies for patients with colorectal cancer.

  5. Frequency of TERT promoter mutations in human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinagre, João; Almeida, Ana; Pópulo, Helena; Batista, Rui; Lyra, Joana; Pinto, Vasco; Coelho, Ricardo; Celestino, Ricardo; Prazeres, Hugo; Lima, Luis; Melo, Miguel; da Rocha, Adriana Gaspar; Preto, Ana; Castro, Patrícia; Castro, Ligia; Pardal, Fernando; Lopes, José Manuel; Santos, Lúcio Lara; Reis, Rui Manuel; Cameselle-Teijeiro, José; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Lima, Jorge; Máximo, Valdemar; Soares, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Reactivation of telomerase has been implicated in human tumorigenesis, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we report the presence of recurrent somatic mutations in the TERT promoter in cancers of the central nervous system (43%), bladder (59%), thyroid (follicular cell-derived, 10%) and skin (melanoma, 29%). In thyroid cancers, the presence of TERT promoter mutations (when occurring together with BRAF mutations) is significantly associated with higher TERT mRNA expression, and in glioblastoma we find a trend for increased telomerase expression in cases harbouring TERT promoter mutations. Both in thyroid cancers and glioblastoma, TERT promoter mutations are significantly associated with older age of the patients. Our results show that TERT promoter mutations are relatively frequent in specific types of human cancers, where they lead to enhanced expression of telomerase.

  6. Molecular Pathways: Isocitrate Dehydrogenase Mutations in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Owen; Yen, Katharine; Mellinghoff, Ingo K

    2016-04-15

    IDH1 and IDH2 are homodimeric enzymes that catalyze the conversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) and concomitantly produce reduced NADPH from NADP(+) Mutations in the genes encoding IDH1 and IDH2 have recently been found in a variety of human cancers, most commonly glioma, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), chondrosarcoma, and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. The mutant protein loses its normal enzymatic activity and gains a new ability to produce the "oncometabolite" R(-)-2-hydroxyglutarate (R-2-HG). R-2-HG competitively inhibits α-KG-dependent enzymes which play crucial roles in gene regulation and tissue homeostasis. Expression of mutant IDH impairs cellular differentiation in various cell lineages and promotes tumor development in cooperation with other cancer genes. First-generation inhibitors of mutant IDH have entered clinical trials, and have shown encouraging results in patients with IDH-mutant AML. This article summarizes recent progress in our understanding of the role of mutant IDH in tumorigenesis.Clin Cancer Res; 22(8); 1837-42. ©2016 AACR.

  7. A CpG mutational hotspot in a ONECUT binding site accounts for the prevalent variant of Hemophilia B Leyden

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Hemophilia B, or the “royal disease,” arises from mutations in coagulation factor IX (F9). Mutations within the F9 promoter are associated with a remarkable hemophilia B subtype, termed hemophilia B Leyden, in which symptoms ameliorate after puberty. Mutations at the −5/−6 site (nucleotides −5 and −6 relative to the transcription start site, designated +1) account for the majority of Leyden cases and have been postulated to disrupt the binding of a transcriptional activator, the identity of w...

  8. Breast cancer in BRCA mutation carriers: medical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Andrea; Geuna, Elena; Zucchini, Giorgia; Aversa, Caterina; Martinello, Rossella; Montemurro, Filippo

    2016-10-01

    About 10% of breast cancers are associated with the inheritance of autosomal dominant breast cancer susceptibility alleles BRCA1 and BRCA2. Until recently, the medical management of BRCA mutation-associated breast cancer has not differed from that of the sporadic breast cancer counterpart. However, there is mounting evidence that this molecular alteration confers sensitivity or resistance to systemic therapies that can be exploited in terms of medical management. For example, studies support the use of platinum salts chemotherapy in BRCA mutated cancers. Moreover, a number of targeted therapies are showing activity in BRCA mutation carriers. Above all, BRCA defective tumor cells are particularly sensitive to Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. This review will summarize the state of the art of the medical treatment of breast cancer in BRCA mutation carriers, with a particular focus on chemotherapies and targeted therapies.

  9. The R304X mutation of the Aryl hydrocarbon receptor Interacting Protein gene in familial isolated pituitary adenomas: mutational Hot-Spot or founder effect?

    OpenAIRE

    Occhi, G.; Jaffrain-Rea, M. L.; Trivellin, G.; Albiger, N; Ceccato, F.; De Menis, E.; Angelini, M.; Ferasin, S; Beckers, Albert; F. Mantero; Scaroni, C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Mutations in the Aryl hydrocarbon receptor Interacting Protein (AIP) gene have been described in about 15% of kindreds with Familial Isolated Pituitary Adenomas (FIPA) and in a minority of early onset sporadic pituitary adenomas (PA). Among the AIP mutations reported so far, the R304X (AIPR304X) represents, together with the "Finnish mutation" Q14X, the most common one. Methods: Three AIPR304X Italian families, including a newly reported kindred, have been genotyped for 12 genetic...

  10. Transitions at CpG dinucleotides, geographic clustering of TP53 mutations and food availability patterns in colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Verginelli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer is mainly attributed to diet, but the role exerted by foods remains unclear because involved factors are extremely complex. Geography substantially impacts on foods. Correlations between international variation in colorectal cancer-associated mutation patterns and food availabilities could highlight the influence of foods on colorectal mutagenesis. METHODOLOGY: To test such hypothesis, we applied techniques based on hierarchical clustering, feature extraction and selection, and statistical pattern recognition to the analysis of 2,572 colorectal cancer-associated TP53 mutations from 12 countries/geographic areas. For food availabilities, we relied on data extracted from the Food Balance Sheets of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Dendrograms for mutation sites, mutation types and food patterns were constructed through Ward's hierarchical clustering algorithm and their stability was assessed evaluating silhouette values. Feature selection used entropy-based measures for similarity between clusterings, combined with principal component analysis by exhaustive and heuristic approaches. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Mutations clustered in two major geographic groups, one including only Western countries, the other Asia and parts of Europe. This was determined by variation in the frequency of transitions at CpGs, the most common mutation type. Higher frequencies of transitions at CpGs in the cluster that included only Western countries mainly reflected higher frequencies of mutations at CpG codons 175, 248 and 273, the three major TP53 hotspots. Pearson's correlation scores, computed between the principal components of the datamatrices for mutation types, food availability and mutation sites, demonstrated statistically significant correlations between transitions at CpGs and both mutation sites and availabilities of meat, milk, sweeteners and animal fats, the energy-dense foods at the basis of

  11. Mutations and epimutations in the origin of cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltomaeki, Paeivi, E-mail: Paivi.Peltomaki@Helsinki.Fi

    2012-02-15

    Cancer is traditionally viewed as a disease of abnormal cell proliferation controlled by a series of mutations. Mutations typically affect oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes thereby conferring growth advantage. Genomic instability facilitates mutation accumulation. Recent findings demonstrate that activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, as well as genomic instability, can be achieved by epigenetic mechanisms as well. Unlike genetic mutations, epimutations do not change the base sequence of DNA and are potentially reversible. Similar to genetic mutations, epimutations are associated with specific patterns of gene expression that are heritable through cell divisions. Knudson's hypothesis postulates that inactivation of tumor suppressor genes requires two hits, with the first hit occurring either in somatic cells (sporadic cancer) or in the germline (hereditary cancer) and the second one always being somatic. Studies on hereditary and sporadic forms of colorectal carcinoma have made it evident that, apart from genetic mutations, epimutations may serve as either hit or both. Furthermore, recent next-generation sequencing studies show that epigenetic genes, such as those encoding histone modifying enzymes and subunits for chromatin remodeling systems, are themselves frequent targets of somatic mutations in cancer and can act like tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. This review discusses genetic vs. epigenetic origin of cancer, including cancer susceptibility, in light of recent discoveries. Situations in which mutations and epimutations occur to serve analogous purposes are highlighted.

  12. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Is Not Associated with KRAS Mutations in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Saber

    Full Text Available Mutations in epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR, as well as in the EGFR downstream target KRAS are frequently observed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, an independent risk factor for developing NSCLC, is associated with an increased activation of EGFR. In this study we determined presence of EGFR and KRAS hotspot mutations in 325 consecutive NSCLC patients subjected to EGFR and KRAS mutation analysis in the diagnostic setting and for whom the pulmonary function has been determined at time of NSCLC diagnosis. Information about age at diagnosis, sex, smoking status, forced vital capacity (FVC and forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1 was collected. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease(COPD was defined according to 2013 GOLD criteria. Chi-Square, student t-test and multivariate logistic regression were used to analyze the data. A total of 325 NSCLC patients were included, 193 with COPD and 132 without COPD. COPD was not associated with presence of KRAS hotspot mutations, while EGFR mutations were significantly higher in non-COPD NSCLC patients. Both female gender (HR 2.61; 95% CI: 1.56-4.39; pT and G>C transversions were significantly more frequent in females (86.2% than in males (61.5% (p = 0.008. The exon 19del mutation was more frequent in non-smokers (90% compared to current or past smokers (36.8%. In conclusion, KRAS mutations are more common in females and smokers, but are not associated with COPD-status in NSCLC patients. EGFR mutations are more common in non-smoking NSCLC patients.

  13. Common filaggrin gene mutations and risk of cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Peter; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Sørensen, Erik

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As carriers of filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations may have a compromised cervical mucosal barrier against human papillomavirus infection, our primary objective was to study their risk of cervical cancer. METHODS: We genotyped 586 cervical cancer patients for the two most common FLG...... mutations, R501X and 2282del4, using blood from the Copenhagen Hospital Biobank, Denmark. Controls (n = 8050) were genotyped in previous population-based studies. Information on cervical cancer, mortality and emigration were obtained from national registers. Odds ratios (OR) were estimated by logistic...... and stratification by cancer stage. RESULTS: The primary results showed that FLG mutations were not associated with the risk of cervical cancer (6.3% of cases and 7.7% of controls were carriers; OR adjusted 0.81, 95% CI 0.57-1.14; OR adjusted+ weighted 0.96, 95% CI 0.58-1.57). Among cases, FLG mutations increased...

  14. BRCA2 Mutations in 154 Finnish Male Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsi Syrjäkoski

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The etiology and pathogenesis of male breast cancer (MBC are poorly known. This is due to the fact that the disease is rare, and large-scale genetic epidemiologic studies have been difficult to carry out. Here, we studied the frequency of eight recurrent Finnish BRCA2 founder mutations in a large cohort of 154 MBC patients (65% diagnosed in Finland from 1967 to 1996. Founder mutations were detected in 10 patients (6.5%, eight of whom carried the 9346(-2 A>G mutation. Two novel mutations (4075 delGT and 5808 del5 were discovered in a screening of the entire BRCA2 coding region in 34 samples. However, these mutations were not found in the rest of the 120 patients studied. Patients with positive family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer were often BRCA2 mutation carriers (44%, whereas those with no family history showed a low frequency of involvement (3.6%; P < .0001. Finally, we found only one Finnish MBC patient with 999 dell, the most common founder mutation in Finnish female breast cancer (FBC patients, and one that explains most of the hereditary FBC and MBC cases in Iceland. The variation in BRCA2 mutation spectrum between Finnish MBC patients and FBC patients in Finland and breast cancer patients in Iceland suggests that modifying genetic and environmental factors may significantly influence the penetrance of MBC and FBC in individuals carrying germline BRCA2 mutations in some populations.

  15. Profiling critical cancer gene mutations in clinical tumor samples.

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    Laura E MacConaill

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Detection of critical cancer gene mutations in clinical tumor specimens may predict patient outcomes and inform treatment options; however, high-throughput mutation profiling remains underdeveloped as a diagnostic approach. We report the implementation of a genotyping and validation algorithm that enables robust tumor mutation profiling in the clinical setting. METHODOLOGY: We developed and implemented an optimized mutation profiling platform ("OncoMap" to interrogate approximately 400 mutations in 33 known oncogenes and tumor suppressors, many of which are known to predict response or resistance to targeted therapies. The performance of OncoMap was analyzed using DNA derived from both frozen and FFPE clinical material in a diverse set of cancer types. A subsequent in-depth analysis was conducted on histologically and clinically annotated pediatric gliomas. The sensitivity and specificity of OncoMap were 93.8% and 100% in fresh frozen tissue; and 89.3% and 99.4% in FFPE-derived DNA. We detected known mutations at the expected frequencies in common cancers, as well as novel mutations in adult and pediatric cancers that are likely to predict heightened response or resistance to existing or developmental cancer therapies. OncoMap profiles also support a new molecular stratification of pediatric low-grade gliomas based on BRAF mutations that may have immediate clinical impact. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate the clinical feasibility of high-throughput mutation profiling to query a large panel of "actionable" cancer gene mutations. In the future, this type of approach may be incorporated into both cancer epidemiologic studies and clinical decision making to specify the use of many targeted anticancer agents.

  16. Human Papillomavirus 16E6 Oncogene Mutation in Cervical Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Sun; Xiao-qin Ha; Tong-de Lv; Chuan-ping Xing; Bin Liu; Xiao-zhe Cao

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Cervical cancer (CC) is the second most common type of cancer in women worldwide, after breast cancer. High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) are considered to be the major causes of cervical cancer. HPV16 is the most common type of HR-HPVs and HPV16 E6 gene is one of the major oncogenes. Specific mutations are considered as dangerous factors causing CC. This study was designed to find mutations of HPV16 E6 and the relationship between the mutations and the happening of CC.Methods: The tissue DNA was extracted from 15 biopsies of CC. Part of HPV16 E6 gene (nucleotide 201-523) was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from the CC tissue DNA. The PCR fragments were sequenced and analyzed.Results: The result of PCR showed that the positive rate of HPV16 E6 was 93.33% (14/15). After sequencing and analyzing, in the 13 out of 14 PCR fragments, 4 maintained prototype (30.77%), 8 had a same 350G mutation (61.54%), and 1 had a 249G mutation (7.69%).Conclusion: This study suggest that there is a high infection rate of HPV in cervical cancer and most of the HPV16 E6 gene has mutations. Those mutations may have an association with the development of cervical cancer.

  17. The SMAD-binding domain of SKI: a hotspot for de novo mutations causing Shprintzen–Goldberg syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Schepers, Dorien; Doyle, Alexander J; Oswald, Gretchen; Sparks, Elizabeth; Myers, Loretha; Patrick J Willems; Mansour, Sahar; Simpson, Michael A; Frysira, Helena; Maat-Kievit, Anneke; Van Minkelen, Rick; Hoogeboom, Jeanette M; Mortier, Geert R.; Titheradge, Hannah; Brueton, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Shprintzen–Goldberg syndrome (SGS) is a rare, systemic connective tissue disorder characterized by craniofacial, skeletal, and cardiovascular manifestations that show a significant overlap with the features observed in the Marfan (MFS) and Loeys–Dietz syndrome (LDS). A distinguishing observation in SGS patients is the presence of intellectual disability, although not all patients in this series present this finding. Recently, SGS was shown to be due to mutations in the SKI gene, encoding the ...

  18. Somatic mutation patterns and compound response in cancers

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    Ningning He

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of various cancer cell lines can recapitulate knowntumor-associated mutations and genetically define cancersubsets. This approach also enables comparative surveys ofassociations between cancer mutations and drug responses.Here, we analyzed the effects of ∼40,000 compounds oncancer cell lines that showed diverse mutation-dependentsensitivity profiles. Over 1,000 compounds exhibited uniquesensitivity on cell lines with specific mutational genotypes,and these compounds were clustered into six different classesof mutation-oriented sensitivity. The present analysis providesnew insights into the relationship between somatic mutationsand selectivity response of chemicals, and these results shouldhave applications related to predicting and optimizing therapeuticwindows for anti-cancer agents. [BMB Reports 2013;46(2: 97-102

  19. [CHEK2-mutation in Dutch breast cancer families: expanding genetic testing for breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adank, M.A.; Hes, F.J.; Zelst-Stams, W.A.G. van; Tol, M.P. van den; Seynaeve, C.; Oosterwijk, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    - In the majority of breast cancer families, DNA testing does not show BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations and the genetic cause of breast cancer remains unexplained. - Routine testing for the CHEK2*1100delC mutation has recently been introduced in breast cancer families in the Netherlands. - The 1100delC muta

  20. Mutation analysis underlying the downregulation of the thyroid hormone receptor β1 gene in the Chinese breast cancer population

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    Ling YQ

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Yaqin Ling,1 Xiaoling Ling,2 Lu Fan,1 Yong Wang,3,* Qing Li1,* 1Department of Pathophysiology, College of Basic Medical, Lanzhou University, 2Medical Oncology, Lanzhou University First Hospital, 3Department of Gastroenterology, Lanzhou General Hospital of Lanzhou Military Command of PLA, Lanzhou, Gansu Province, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: There are a growing number of reports suggesting that the aberrant expression and mutation of the thyroid hormone receptor β1 (TRβ1 gene is associated with the development of human neoplasms. However, its exact role in the pathogenesis of breast cancer remains elusive. In the present study, we analyzed the mRNA expression and mutations of the TRβ1 gene in the Chinese breast cancer population.Methods: The expression of TRβ1 mRNA was examined by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and mutations in the TRβ1 gene in the hotspot region that spans exons 7–10 were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism and automated DNA sequencing.Results: TRβ1 mRNA expression was significantly reduced in all 105 breast cancer specimens examined. A total of 20 samples showed truncating mutations within the exons 7–10 of the TRβ1 gene, where eight cases harbored a frame shift mutation (five cases of c.850insA in exon 7 and three cases c.1028delA in exon 8, whereas missense mutations were observed in 12 breast cancer cases. The 20 cases with mutation in the TRβ1 gene showed a reduction in TRβ1 mRNA expression compared with that observed in matched normal tissues. The mutation was also correlated with menopausal stage and estrogen receptor status.Conclusion: The findings of the present study suggest that the aberrant expression and mutations of the TRβ1 gene are associated with the development of breast cancer and that the ­mutations in the TRβ1 gene partly serve as the underlying

  1. Blocking DNA Repair in Advanced BRCA-Mutated Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this trial, patients with relapsed or refractory advanced cancer and confirmed BRCA mutations who have not previously been treated with a PARP inhibitor will be given BMN 673 by mouth once a day in 28-day cycles.

  2. DETECTION OF GENE MUTATION IN SPUTUM OF LUNG CANCER PATIENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG He-long; WANG Wen-liang; CUI Da-xiang

    1999-01-01

    @@ Lung cancer is a common malignant tumor, which has ahigh incidence and mortality rate. Therefore, it is necessary to seek a new method for the diagnosis, especially the early diagnosis of lung cancer. The development of molecular biology makes the gene diagnosis of lung cancer possible.PCR-SSCP was applied to detect p53 gene mutation of lung cancer patients' sputum cells and we have achieved good results.

  3. Global Characterization of Protein-Altering Mutations in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    considerably less is known about the contribution of somatic point mutations to the pathogenesis of prostate cancer (3, 4, 8), including those specific somatic...Totowa, NJ), 2nd Ed, pp 3–32. 39. O’Roak BJ, et al. (2011) Exome sequencing in sporadic autism spectrum disorders identifies severe de novo mutations. Nat

  4. A simple algebraic cancer equation: calculating how cancers may arise with normal mutation rates

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    Shibata Darryl

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this article is to present a relatively easy to understand cancer model where transformation occurs when the first cell, among many at risk within a colon, accumulates a set of driver mutations. The analysis of this model yields a simple algebraic equation, which takes as inputs the number of stem cells, mutation and division rates, and the number of driver mutations, and makes predictions about cancer epidemiology. Methods The equation [p = 1 - (1 - (1 - (1 - udkNm ] calculates the probability of cancer (p and contains five parameters: the number of divisions (d, the number of stem cells (N × m, the number of critical rate-limiting pathway driver mutations (k, and the mutation rate (u. In this model progression to cancer "starts" at conception and mutations accumulate with cell division. Transformation occurs when a critical number of rate-limiting pathway mutations first accumulates within a single stem cell. Results When applied to several colorectal cancer data sets, parameter values consistent with crypt stem cell biology and normal mutation rates were able to match the increase in cancer with aging, and the mutation frequencies found in cancer genomes. The equation can help explain how cancer risks may vary with age, height, germline mutations, and aspirin use. APC mutations may shorten pathways to cancer by effectively increasing the numbers of stem cells at risk. Conclusions The equation illustrates that age-related increases in cancer frequencies may result from relatively normal division and mutation rates. Although this equation does not encompass all of the known complexity of cancer, it may be useful, especially in a teaching setting, to help illustrate relationships between small and large cancer features.

  5. An Evolutionary Approach for Identifying Driver Mutations in Colorectal Cancer.

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    Jasmine Foo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The traditional view of cancer as a genetic disease that can successfully be treated with drugs targeting mutant onco-proteins has motivated whole-genome sequencing efforts in many human cancer types. However, only a subset of mutations found within the genomic landscape of cancer is likely to provide a fitness advantage to the cell. Distinguishing such "driver" mutations from innocuous "passenger" events is critical for prioritizing the validation of candidate mutations in disease-relevant models. We design a novel statistical index, called the Hitchhiking Index, which reflects the probability that any observed candidate gene is a passenger alteration, given the frequency of alterations in a cross-sectional cancer sample set, and apply it to a mutational data set in colorectal cancer. Our methodology is based upon a population dynamics model of mutation accumulation and selection in colorectal tissue prior to cancer initiation as well as during tumorigenesis. This methodology can be used to aid in the prioritization of candidate mutations for functional validation and contributes to the process of drug discovery.

  6. Two different BRCA2 mutations found in a multigenerational family with a history of breast, prostate, and lung cancers

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    Caporale DA

    2014-06-01

    BRCA2. This mutation that has been reported in many women of Spanish descent is within a hotspot and is predicted to have resulted from three separate mutational events. Although sporadic mutations can occur, more than likely it is the result of a germ line mutation inherited from the Italian family line and was carried by a father that died of prostate cancer. Since individual III-2 had an early onset of breast cancer, it is recommended that siblings of II-1 seek genetic counseling and be screened for the BRCA2-3036delACAA variant. The individual with breast and lung cancer (II-8 was not a carrier of this mutation, but rather a carrier of the BRCA2-c.6275_6276delTT (6503delTT, which is also a truncated mutation but more common in those of Irish/Scottish descent. It is recommended that her immediate family members be screened for this mutation to assess their risk of breast cancer. We conclude that DNA screening of the BRCA2 promoter region and the BRCA2-6503delTT site from a lung tumor biopsy taken from individual II-8 would provide more insight into the possible association of this BRCA2 variant with lung cancer.Keywords: breast/prostate/lung cancers, BRCA2 deletions, AS PCR, genogram

  7. Immunohistochemical correlates of TP53 somatic mutations in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murnyák, Balázs; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2016-10-04

    Despite controversy on the correlation between p53 accumulation and TP53 mutational status, immunohistochemical (IHC) detection of overexpressed protein has long been used as a surrogate method for mutation analysis. The aim of our study was to characterise the IHC expression features of TP53 somatic mutations and define their occurrence in human cancers. A large-scale database analysis was conducted in the IARC TP53 Database (R17); 7878 mutations with IHC features were retrieved representing 60 distinct tumour sites. The majority of the alterations were immunopositive (p TP53 mutations were divided into three IHC groups according to mutation frequency and IHC positivity. Each group had female dominance. Among the IHC groups, significant correlations were observed with age at diagnosis in breast, bladder, liver, haematopoietic system and head & neck cancers. An increased likelihood of false negative IHC associated with rare nonsense mutations was observed in certain tumour sites. Our study demonstrates that p53 immunopositivity largely correlates with TP53 mutational status but expression is absent in certain mutation types.Besides, describing the complex IHC expression of TP53 somatic mutations, our results reveal some caveats for the diagnostic practice.

  8. Nucleotide and phylogenetic analyses of the Chlamydia trachomatis ompA gene indicates it is a hotspot for mutation

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    Brunelle Brian W

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serovars of the human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis occupy one of three specific tissue niches. Genomic analyses indicate that the serovars have a phylogeny congruent with their pathobiology and have an average substitution rate of less than one nucleotide per kilobase. In contrast, the gene that determines serovar specificity, ompA, has a phylogenetic association that is not congruent with tissue tropism and has a degree of nucleotide variability much higher than other genomic loci. The ompA gene encodes the major surface-exposed antigenic determinant, and the observed nucleotide diversity at the ompA locus is thought to be due to recombination and host immune selection pressure. The possible contribution of a localized increase in mutation rate, however, has not been investigated. Results Nucleotide diversity and phylogenetic relationships of the five constant and four variable domains of the ompA gene, as well as several loci surrounding ompA, were examined for each serovar. The loci flanking the ompA gene demonstrated that nucleotide diversity increased monotonically as ompA is approached and that their gene trees are not congruent with either ompA or tissue tropism. The variable domains of the ompA gene had a very high level of non-synonymous change, which is expected as these regions encode the surface-exposed epitopes and are under positive selection. However, the synonymous changes are clustered in the variable regions compared to the constant domains; if hitchhiking were to account for the increase in synonymous changes, these substitutions should be more evenly distributed across the gene. Recombination also cannot entirely account for this increase as the phylogenetic relationships of the constant and variable domains are congruent with each other. Conclusions The high number of synonymous substitutions observed within the variable domains of ompA appears to be due to an increased mutation rate within this region

  9. Novel recurrently mutated genes and a prognostic mutation signature in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jun; Wu, William K K; Li, Xiangchun; He, Jun; Li, Xiao-Xing; Ng, Simon S M; Yu, Chang; Gao, Zhibo; Yang, Jie; Li, Miao; Wang, Qiaoxiu; Liang, Qiaoyi; Pan, Yi; Tong, Joanna H; To, Ka F; Wong, Nathalie; Zhang, Ning; Chen, Jie; Lu, Youyong; Lai, Paul B S; Chan, Francis K L; Li, Yingrui; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jun; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2015-01-01

    Background Characterisation of colorectal cancer (CRC) genomes by next-generation sequencing has led to the discovery of novel recurrently mutated genes. Nevertheless, genomic data has not yet been used for CRC prognostication. Objective To identify recurrent somatic mutations with prognostic significance in patients with CRC. Method Exome sequencing was performed to identify somatic mutations in tumour tissues of 22 patients with CRC, followed by validation of 187 recurrent and pathway-related genes using targeted capture sequencing in additional 160 cases. Results Seven significantly mutated genes, including four reported (APC, TP53, KRAS and SMAD4) and three novel recurrently mutated genes (CDH10, FAT4 and DOCK2), exhibited high mutation prevalence (6–14% for novel cancer genes) and higher-than-expected number of non-silent mutations in our CRC cohort. For prognostication, a five-gene-signature (CDH10, COL6A3, SMAD4, TMEM132D, VCAN) was devised, in which mutation(s) in one or more of these genes was significantly associated with better overall survival independent of tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) staging. The median survival time was 80.4 months in the mutant group versus 42.4 months in the wild type group (p=0.0051). The prognostic significance of this signature was successfully verified using the data set from the Cancer Genome Atlas study. Conclusions The application of next-generation sequencing has led to the identification of three novel significantly mutated genes in CRC and a mutation signature that predicts survival outcomes for stratifying patients with CRC independent of TNM staging. PMID:24951259

  10. BRCA1 Gene Mutations in Chinese Families with Breast Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yurong Shi; Chenbin Li; Ruifang Niu; Xishan Hao; Xiangcheng Zhi; Liansheng Ning

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the frequency of BRCA1 gene mutations in breast cancer families in China.METHODS Genomic DNA was obtained by conventional techniques from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells collected from 94 persons derived from 45 breast cancer families. All participants gave written informed consent. The mutations in the BRCA1 gene were detected by the polymerase chain reaction and single stranded conformation polymorphism(PCR-SSCP). Then , the samples of interest were sent for direct DNA sequencing.RESULTS No mutation sites were found in exon 2 or 20 by DNA sequencing.Eight sites were found in exon 11 such as 2201C>T (Ser694Ser),3232A>G(Glu 1038Gly), 2201C >A/G (Ser694Arg), 2731C >T (Pro871Leu),2086A >T(Asn591lle) and three sites of 1584G>T (Glu424Stop). Three mutation sites were found in exon 16 which included 5106A >G (Met1663Val),5208delT(Stop 1639) and 4956A>G (Ser 1613Gly).CONCLUSION These mutation sites may be related to breast cancer, but more investigation is needed to determine whether the mutation sites are hot spots of mutations in Chinese familial breast cancer patients.

  11. The role of mutation in the new cancer paradigm

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    Prehn Richmond T

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The almost universal belief that cancer is caused by mutation may gradually be giving way to the belief that cancer begins as a cellular adaptation that involves the local epigenetic silencing of various genes. In my own interpretation of the new epigenetic paradigm, the genes epigenetically suppressed are genes that normally serve in post-embryonic life to suppress and keep suppressed those other genes upon which embryonic development depends. Those other genes, if not silenced or suppressed in the post-embryonic animal, become, I suggest, the oncogenes that are the basis of neoplasia. Mutations that occur in silenced genes supposedly go unrepaired and are, therefore, postulated to accumulate, but such mutations probably play little or no causative role in neoplasia because they occur in already epigenetically silenced genes. These mutations probably often serve to make the silencing, and therefore the cancer, epigenetically irreversible.

  12. Spectrum of K ras mutations in Pakistani colorectal cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murtaza, B.N.; Bibi, A. [School of Biological Sciences, University of the Punjab, Quaid-i-Azam Campus, Lahore (Pakistan); Rashid, M.U.; Khan, Y.I. [Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Johar Town, Lahore (Pakistan); Chaudri, M.S. [Services Institute of Medical Sciences, Lahore (Pakistan); Shakoori, A.R. [School of Biological Sciences, University of the Punjab, Quaid-i-Azam Campus, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2013-11-29

    The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is increasing daily worldwide. Although different aspects of CRC have been studied in other parts of the world, relatively little or almost no information is available in Pakistan about different aspects of this disease at the molecular level. The present study was aimed at determining the frequency and prevalence of K ras gene mutations in Pakistani CRC patients. Tissue and blood samples of 150 CRC patients (64% male and 36% female) were used for PCR amplification of K ras and detection of mutations by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, and nucleotide sequencing. The K ras mutation frequency was found to be 13%, and the most prevalent mutations were found at codons 12 and 13. A novel mutation was also found at codon 31. The dominant mutation observed was a G to A transition. Female patients were more susceptible to K ras mutations, and these mutations were predominant in patients with a nonmetastatic stage of CRC. No significant differences in the prevalence of K ras mutations were observed for patient age, gender, or tumor type. It can be inferred from this study that Pakistani CRC patients have a lower frequency of K ras mutations compared to those observed in other parts of the world, and that K ras mutations seemed to be significantly associated with female patients.

  13. Germline Mutations in Predisposition Genes in Pediatric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonson, Michael N.; Gruber, Tanja A.; Easton, John; Hedges, Dale; Ma, Xiaotu; Zhou, Xin; Yergeau, Donald A.; Wilkinson, Mark R.; Vadodaria, Bhavin; Chen, Xiang; McGee, Rose B.; Hines-Dowell, Stacy; Nuccio, Regina; Quinn, Emily; Shurtleff, Sheila A.; Rusch, Michael; Patel, Aman; Becksfort, Jared B.; Wang, Shuoguo; Weaver, Meaghann S.; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Gajjar, Amar; Ellison, David W.; Pappo, Alberto S.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Downing, James R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The prevalence and spectrum of predisposing mutations among children and adolescents with cancer are largely unknown. Knowledge of such mutations may improve the understanding of tumorigenesis, direct patient care, and enable genetic counseling of patients and families. METHODS In 1120 patients younger than 20 years of age, we sequenced the whole genomes (in 595 patients), whole exomes (in 456), or both (in 69). We analyzed the DNA sequences of 565 genes, including 60 that have been associated with autosomal dominant cancer-predisposition syndromes, for the presence of germline mutations. The pathogenicity of the mutations was determined by a panel of medical experts with the use of cancer-specific and locus-specific genetic databases, the medical literature, computational predictions, and second hits identified in the tumor genome. The same approach was used to analyze data from 966 persons who did not have known cancer in the 1000 Genomes Project, and a similar approach was used to analyze data from an autism study (from 515 persons with autism and 208 persons without autism). RESULTS Mutations that were deemed to be pathogenic or probably pathogenic were identified in 95 patients with cancer (8.5%), as compared with 1.1% of the persons in the 1000 Genomes Project and 0.6% of the participants in the autism study. The most commonly mutated genes in the affected patients were TP53 (in 50 patients), APC (in 6), BRCA2 (in 6), NF1 (in 4), PMS2 (in 4), RB1 (in 3), and RUNX1 (in 3). A total of 18 additional patients had protein-truncating mutations in tumor-suppressor genes. Of the 58 patients with a predisposing mutation and available information on family history, 23 (40%) had a family history of cancer. CONCLUSIONS Germline mutations in cancer-predisposing genes were identified in 8.5% of the children and adolescents with cancer. Family history did not predict the presence of an underlying predisposition syndrome in most patients. (Funded by the American

  14. Cancer-Associated IDH1 Mutations Produce 2-hydroxyglutarate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dang, L.; White, D; Gross, S; Bennett, B; Bittinger, M; Driggers, E; Fantin, V; Jang, H; Jin, S; et al.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the enzyme cytosolic isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) are a common feature of a major subset of primary human brain cancers. These mutations occur at a single amino acid residue of the IDH1 active site, resulting in loss of the enzyme's ability to catalyse conversion of isocitrate to {alpha}-ketoglutarate. However, only a single copy of the gene is mutated in tumours, raising the possibility that the mutations do not result in a simple loss of function. Here we show that cancer-associated IDH1 mutations result in a new ability of the enzyme to catalyse the NADPH-dependent reduction of {alpha}-ketoglutarate to R(-)-2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG). Structural studies demonstrate that when arginine 132 is mutated to histidine, residues in the active site are shifted to produce structural changes consistent with reduced oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate and acquisition of the ability to convert {alpha}-ketoglutarate to 2HG. Excess accumulation of 2HG has been shown to lead to an elevated risk of malignant brain tumours in patients with inborn errors of 2HG metabolism. Similarly, in human malignant gliomas harbouring IDH1 mutations, we find markedly elevated levels of 2HG. These data demonstrate that the IDH1 mutations result in production of the onco-metabolite 2HG, and indicate that the excess 2HG which accumulates in vivo contributes to the formation and malignant progression of gliomas.

  15. A Novel Technique to Detect EGFR Mutations in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanbin Liu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR gene mutations occur in multiple human cancers; therefore, the detection of EGFR mutations could lead to early cancer diagnosis. This study describes a novel EGFR mutation detection technique. Compared to direct DNA sequencing detection methods, this method is based on allele-specific amplification (ASA, recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA, peptide nucleic acid (PNA, and SYBR Green I (SYBR, referred to as the AS-RPA-PNA-SYBR (ARPS system. The principle of this technique is based on three continuous steps: ASA or ASA combined with PNA to prevent non-target sequence amplification (even single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs, the rapid amplification advantage of RPA, and appropriate SYBR Green I detection (the samples harboring EGFR mutations show a green signal. Using this method, the EGFR 19Del(2 mutation was detected in 5 min, while the EGFR L858R mutation was detected in 10 min. In this study, the detection of EGFR mutations in clinical samples using the ARPS system was compatible with that determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and DNA sequencing methods. Thus, this newly developed methodology that uses the ARPS system with appropriate primer sets is a rapid, reliable, and practical way to assess EGFR mutations in clinical samples.

  16. B-Raf mutation: a key player in molecular biology of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M A; Salajegheh, A; Smith, R A; Lam, A K-Y

    2013-12-01

    B-Raf is one of the more commonly mutated proto-oncogenes implicated in the development of cancers. In this review, we consider the mechanisms and clinical impacts of B-Raf mutations in cancer and discuss the implications for the patient in melanoma, thyroid cancer and colorectal cancer, where B-Raf mutations are particularly common.

  17. Sequence analysis of mutations and translocations across breast cancer subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerji, Shantanu; Cibulskis, Kristian; Rangel-Escareno, Claudia; Brown, Kristin K.; Carter, Scott L.; Frederick, Abbie M.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Sivachenko, Andrey Y.; Sougnez, Carrie; Zou, Lihua; Cortes, Maria L.; Fernandez-Lopez, Juan C.; Peng, Shouyong; Ardlie, Kristin G.; Auclair, Daniel; Bautista-Piña, Veronica; Duke, Fujiko; Francis, Joshua; Jung, Joonil; Maffuz-Aziz, Antonio; Onofrio, Robert C.; Parkin, Melissa; Pho, Nam H.; Quintanar-Jurado, Valeria; Ramos, Alex H.; Rebollar-Vega, Rosa; Rodriguez-Cuevas, Sergio; Romero-Cordoba, Sandra L.; Schumacher, Steven E.; Stransky, Nicolas; Thompson, Kristin M.; Uribe-Figueroa, Laura; Baselga, Jose; Beroukhim, Rameen; Polyak, Kornelia; Sgroi, Dennis C.; Richardson, Andrea L.; Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo; Lander, Eric S.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Garraway, Levi A.; Golub, Todd R.; Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge; Toker, Alex; Getz, Gad; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Meyerson, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Breast carcinoma is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in women worldwide with an estimated 1.38 million new cases and 458,000 deaths in 2008 alone1. This malignancy represents a heterogeneous group of tumours with characteristic molecular features, prognosis, and responses to available therapy2–4. Recurrent somatic alterations in breast cancer have been described including mutations and copy number alterations, notably ERBB2 amplifications, the first successful therapy target defined by a genomic aberration5. Prior DNA sequencing studies of breast cancer genomes have revealed additional candidate mutations and gene rearrangements 6–10. Here we report the whole-exome sequences of DNA from 103 human breast cancers of diverse subtypes from patients in Mexico and Vietnam compared to matched-normal DNA, together with whole-genome sequences of 22 breast cancer/normal pairs. Beyond confirming recurrent somatic mutations in PIK3CA11, TP536, AKT112, GATA313, and MAP3K110, we discovered recurrent mutations in the CBFB transcription factor gene and deletions of its partner RUNX1. Furthermore, we have identified a recurrent MAGI3-AKT3 fusion enriched in triple-negative breast cancer lacking estrogen and progesterone receptors and ERBB2 expression. The Magi3-Akt3 fusion leads to constitutive activation of Akt kinase, which is abolished by treatment with an ATP-competitive Akt small-molecule inhibitor. PMID:22722202

  18. Mutational profiles in triple-negative breast cancer defined by ultradeep multigene sequencing show high rates of PI3K pathway alterations and clinically relevant entity subgroup specific differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegsmann, Mark; Endris, Volker; Wolf, Thomas; Pfarr, Nicole; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Loibl, Sibylle; Denkert, Carsten; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Budczies, Jan; Sinn, Peter; Weichert, Wilko

    2014-10-30

    Mutational profiling of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) by whole exome sequencing (WES) yielded a landscape of genomic alterations in this tumor entity. However, the clinical significance of these findings remains enigmatic. Further, integration of WES in routine diagnostics using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) material is currently not feasible. Therefore, we designed and validated a breast cancer specific gene panel for semiconductor-based sequencing comprising 137 amplicons covering mutational hotspots in 44 genes and applied this panel on a cohort of 104 well-characterized FFPE TNBC with complete clinical follow-up. TP53 mutations were present in more than 80% of cases. PI3K pathway alterations (29.8%) comprising mainly PIK3CA mutations (22.1%) but also mutations and/or amplifications/deletions in other PI3K-associated genes (7.7%) were far more frequently observed, when compared to WES data. Alterations in MAPK signaling genes (8.7%) and cell-cycle regulators (14.4%) were also frequent. Mutational profiles were linked to TNBC subgroups defined by morphology and immunohistochemistry. Alterations in cell-cycle pathway regulators were linked with better overall (p=0.053) but not disease free survival. Taken together, we could demonstrate that breast cancer targeted hotspot sequencing is feasible in a routine setting and yields reliable and clinically meaningful results. Mutational spectra were linked to clinical and immunohistochemically defined parameters.

  19. Deep sequencing of cancer-related genes revealed GNAS mutations to be associated with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms and its main pancreatic duct dilation.

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    Shinichi Takano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To clarify the genetic mutations associated with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN and IPMN-related pancreatic tumours, we conducted cancer-related gene profiling analyses using pure pancreatic juice and resected pancreatic tissues. METHODS: Pure pancreatic juice was collected from 152 patients [nine with a normal pancreas, 22 with chronic pancreatitis (CP, 39 with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC, and 82 with IPMN], and resected tissues from the pancreas were collected from 48 patients (six IPMNs and 42 PDACs. The extracted DNA was amplified by multiplexed polymerase chain reaction (PCR targeting 46 cancer-related genes containing 739 mutational hotspots. The mutations were analysed using a semiconductor-based DNA sequencer. RESULTS: Among the 46 cancer-related genes, KRAS and GNAS mutations were most frequently detected in both PDAC and IPMN cases. In pure pancreatic juice, GNAS mutations were detected in 7.7% of PDAC cases and 41.5% of IPMN cases (p<0.001 vs. others. All PDAC cases with GNAS mutations (n = 3 were accompanied by IPMN. Multivariate analysis revealed that GNAS mutations in IPMN cases were associated with dilated main pancreatic ducts (MPD, p = 0.016, while no statistically independent associations with clinical variables were observed for KRAS mutations. In the resected pancreatic tissues, GNAS mutations were detected in 50% of PDAC cases concomitant with IPMN, 33.3% of PDAC cases derived from IPMN, and 66.7% of IPMN cases, while no GNAS mutations were detected in cases of PDAC without IPMN. CONCLUSIONS: The GNAS mutation was specifically found in the cases with IPMN and it was speculated that some PDACs might be influenced by the concomitant but separately-located IPMN in their pathogenic mechanism. Furthermore, the GNAS mutation was significantly associated with MPD dilatation in IPMN cases, suggesting its role in mucus hypersecretion.

  20. P53 mutations and cancer: a tight linkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perri, Francesco; Pisconti, Salvatore; Della Vittoria Scarpati, Giuseppina

    2016-12-01

    P53 is often mutated in solid tumors, in fact, somatic changes involving the gene encoding for p53 (TP53) have been discovered in more than 50% of human malignancies and several data confirmed that p53 mutations represent an early event in cancerogenesis. Main p53 functions consist in cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, senescence and apoptosis induction in response to mutagenic stimuli, and, to exert those functions, p53 acts as transcriptional factor. Recent data have highlighted another very important role of p53, consisting in regulate cell metabolism and cell response to oxidative stress. Majority of tumor suppressor genes, such as adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), retinoblastoma-associated protein (RB) and Von-Hippel-Lindau (VHL) are inactivated by deletion or early truncation mutations in tumors, resulting in the decreased or loss of expression of their proteins. Differently, most p53 mutations in human cancer are missense mutations, which result in the production of full-length mutant p53 proteins. It has been reported that mutant p53 proteins and wild type p53 proteins often regulate same cellular biological processes with opposite effects. So, mutant p53 has been reported to supply the cancer cells of glucose and nutrients, and, to avoid reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated damage during oxidative stress. These last features are able to render tumor cells resistant to ionizing radiations and chemotherapy. A future therapeutic approach in tumors bearing p53 mutations may be to deplete cancer cells of their energy reserves and antioxidants.

  1. Dietary folate and APC mutations in sporadic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vogel, Stefan; van Engeland, Manon; Lüchtenborg, Margreet; de Bruïne, Adriaan P; Roemen, Guido M J M; Lentjes, Marjolein H F M; Goldbohm, R Alexandra; van den Brandt, Piet A; de Goeij, Anton F P M; Weijenberg, Matty P

    2006-12-01

    Folate deficiency has been associated with colorectal cancer risk and may be involved in colorectal carcinogenesis through increased chromosome instability, gene mutations, and aberrant DNA methylation. Within the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer, we investigated the associations between dietary folate intake and colorectal cancer risk with (APC(+)) and without (APC(-)) truncating APC mutations, accounting for hMLH1 expression and K-ras mutations. In total, 528 cases and 4200 subcohort members were available for data analyses of the study cohort (n = 120,852) from a follow-up period between 2.3 and 7.3 y after baseline. Adjusted gender-specific incidence rate ratios (RR) over tertiles of folate intake were calculated in case-cohort analyses for colon and rectal cancer. Although relatively high folate intake was not associated with overall colorectal cancer risk, it reduced the risk of APC(-)colon tumors in men (RR 0.58, 95% CI 0.32-1.05, P(trend) = 0.06 for the highest vs. lowest tertile of folate intake). In contrast, it was positively associated with APC(+) colon tumors in men (highest vs. lowest tertile: RR 2.77, 95% CI 1.29-5.95, P(trend) = 0.008) and was even stronger when the lack of hMLH1 expression and K-ras mutations were excluded (RR 3.99, 95% CI 1.43-11.14, P(trend) = 0.007). Such positive associations were not observed among women; nor was folate intake associated with rectal cancer when APC mutation status was taken into account. Relatively high folate consumption reduced the risk of APC(-) colon tumors, but folate intake was positively associated with APC(+) colon tumors among men. These opposite results may indicate that folate enhances colorectal carcinogenesis through a distinct APC mutated pathway.

  2. Androgen receptor gene mutations in hormone-refractory prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallén, M J; Linja, M; Kaartinen, K; Schleutker, J; Visakorpi, T

    1999-12-01

    Prostate cancer is considered to be one of the most hormone-dependent human malignancies. As a key mediator of hormonal response, the androgen receptor (AR) is believed to have an important role in the progression of prostate cancer. Mutations in the coding region of the AR gene have been found in both untreated and hormone-refractory prostate cancer, but the frequency of such mutations at different stages of the disease is poorly documented and even contradictory results have been published. In the present study, the frequency of AR gene mutations was determined in 30 locally recurrent and two metastatic hormone-refractory prostate tumours using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), non-radioactive single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), and sequencing. The length of the polymorphic CAG repeat, which is inversely correlated with the ability of the AR to activate transcription, was also analysed as well as the GGC repeat. Twelve samples were known to contain an AR gene amplification. Altogether, one point mutation (Gly(674)-->Ala) and one microsatellite mutation (CAG(20)-->CAG(18)) were found, both in cancers containing the AR gene amplification. The mean lengths of the polymorphic CAG and GGC repeats were similar to those observed in the normal population. These results favour the view that mutations in the AR gene are rare in hormone-refractory prostate cancer and do not play an important role, at least, in local relapse. Instead, the amplification and consequent overexpression of the wild-type AR gene seem to be the most common alteration involving the AR in hormone-refractory prostate cancer.

  3. MuSiC: identifying mutational significance in cancer genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dees, Nathan D; Zhang, Qunyuan; Kandoth, Cyriac; Wendl, Michael C; Schierding, William; Koboldt, Daniel C; Mooney, Thomas B; Callaway, Matthew B; Dooling, David; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; Ding, Li

    2012-08-01

    Massively parallel sequencing technology and the associated rapidly decreasing sequencing costs have enabled systemic analyses of somatic mutations in large cohorts of cancer cases. Here we introduce a comprehensive mutational analysis pipeline that uses standardized sequence-based inputs along with multiple types of clinical data to establish correlations among mutation sites, affected genes and pathways, and to ultimately separate the commonly abundant passenger mutations from the truly significant events. In other words, we aim to determine the Mutational Significance in Cancer (MuSiC) for these large data sets. The integration of analytical operations in the MuSiC framework is widely applicable to a broad set of tumor types and offers the benefits of automation as well as standardization. Herein, we describe the computational structure and statistical underpinnings of the MuSiC pipeline and demonstrate its performance using 316 ovarian cancer samples from the TCGA ovarian cancer project. MuSiC correctly confirms many expected results, and identifies several potentially novel avenues for discovery.

  4. Survival in Norwegian BRCA1 mutation carriers with breast cancer

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    Hagen Anne

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several studies of survival in women with BRCA1 mutations have shown either reduced survival or no difference compared to controls. Programmes for early detection and treatment of inherited breast cancer, have failed to demonstrate a significant improvement in survival in BRCA1 mutation carriers. One hundred and sixty-seven women with disease-associated germline BRCA1 mutations and breast cancer from 1980 to 2001 were identified. Tumour characteristics, treatment given and survival were recorded. A control group comprising three hundred and four women matched for age, time of diagnosis and stage were used to compare survival. BRCA1 mutation carriers were found to have a poorer prognosis, which could be explained by neither the mode of surgical treatment nor the use of adjuvant chemotherapy. BRCA1 mutation carriers with node negative breast cancer had worse overall survival than controls. Our findings confirm the serious prognosis of BRCA1-associated breast cancer even when diagnosed at an early stage, and that type of treatment does not influence prognosis.

  5. Mutations in the AXIN1 gene in advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yardy, George W; Bicknell, David C; Wilding, Jennifer L;

    2009-01-01

    The Wnt signalling pathway directs aspects of embryogenesis and is thought to contribute to maintenance of certain stem cell populations. Disruption of the pathway has been observed in many different tumour types. In bowel, stomach, and endometrial cancer, this is usually due to mutation of genes...... encoding Wnt pathway components APC or beta-catenin. Such mutations are rare in hepatocellular carcinomas and medulloblastomas with Wnt pathway dysfunction, and there, mutation in genes for other Wnt molecules, such as Axin, is more frequently found....

  6. Telomerase promoter mutations in cancer: an emerging molecular biomarker?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinagre, João; Pinto, Vasco; Celestino, Ricardo; Reis, Marta; Pópulo, Helena; Boaventura, Paula; Melo, Miguel; Catarino, Telmo; Lima, Jorge; Lopes, José Manuel; Máximo, Valdemar; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Soares, Paula

    2014-08-01

    Cell immortalization has been considered for a long time as a classic hallmark of cancer cells. Besides telomerase reactivation, such immortalization could be due to telomere maintenance through the "alternative mechanism of telomere lengthening" (ALT) but the mechanisms underlying both forms of reactivation remained elusive. Mutations in the coding region of telomerase gene are very rare in the cancer setting, despite being associated with some degenerative diseases. Recently, mutations in telomerase (TERT) gene promoter were found in sporadic and familial melanoma and subsequently in several cancer models, notably in gliomas, thyroid cancer and bladder cancer. The importance of these findings has been reinforced by the association of TERT mutations in some cancer types with tumour aggressiveness and patient survival. In the first part of this review, we summarize the data on the biology of telomeres and telomerase, available methodological approaches and non-neoplastic diseases associated with telomere dysfunction. In the second part, we review the information on telomerase expression and genetic alterations in the most relevant types of cancer (skin, thyroid, bladder and central nervous system) on record, and discuss the value of telomerase as a new biomarker with impact on the prognosis and survival of the patients and as a putative therapeutic target.

  7. EGFR Mutations in Surgically Resected Fresh Specimens from 697 Consecutive Chinese Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Their Relationships with Clinical Features

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    Yuanyang Lai

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to reveal the true status of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutations in Chinese patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC after lung resections. EGFR mutations of surgically resected fresh tumor samples from 697 Chinese NSCLC patients were analyzed by Amplification Refractory Mutation System (ARMS. Correlations between EGFR mutation hotspots and clinical features were also explored. Of the 697 NSCLC patients, 235 (33.7% patients had tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKIs sensitive EGFR mutations in 41 (14.5% of the 282 squamous carcinomas, 155 (52.9% of the 293 adenocarcinomas, 34 (39.5% of the 86 adenosquamous carcinomas, one (9.1% of the 11 large-cell carcinomas, 2 (11.1% of the 18 sarcomatoid carcinomas, and 2 (28.6% of the 7 mucoepidermoid carcinomas. TKIs sensitive EGFR mutations were more frequently found in female patients (p < 0.001, non-smokers (p = 0.047 and adenocarcinomas (p < 0.001. The rates of exon 19 deletion mutation (19-del, exon 21 L858R point mutation (L858R, exon 21 L861Q point mutation (L861Q, exon 18 G719X point mutations (G719X, including G719C, G719S, G719A were 43.4%, 48.1%, 1.7% and 6.8%, respectively. Exon 20 T790M point mutation (T790M was detected in 3 squamous carcinomas and 3 adenocarcinomas and exon 20 insertion mutation (20-ins was detected in 2 patients with adenocarcinoma. Our results show the rates of EGFR mutations are higher in all types of NSCLC in Chinese patients. 19-del and L858R are two of the more frequent mutations. EGFR mutation detection should be performed as a routine postoperative examination in Chinese NSCLC patients.

  8. Modeling the Etiology of p53-mutated Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Ricardo E; Shen, Hong; Duan, Lei; Kim, Reuben H; Kim, Terresa; Park, No-Hee; Maki, Carl G

    2016-05-06

    p53 gene mutations are among the most common alterations in cancer. In most cases, missense mutations in one TP53 allele are followed by loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH), so tumors express only mutant p53. TP53 mutations and LOH have been linked, in many cases, with poor therapy response and worse outcome. Despite this, remarkably little is known about how TP53 point mutations are acquired, how LOH occurs, or the cells involved. Nutlin-3a occupies the p53-binding site in MDM2 and blocks p53-MDM2 interaction, resulting in the stabilization and activation of p53 and subsequent growth arrest or apoptosis. We leveraged the powerful growth inhibitory activity of Nutlin-3a to select p53-mutated cells and examined how TP53 mutations arise and how the remaining wild-type allele is lost or inactivated. Mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient colorectal cancer cells formed heterozygote (p53 wild-type/mutant) colonies when cultured in low doses of Nutlin-3a, whereas MMR-corrected counterparts did not. Placing these heterozygotes in higher Nutlin-3a doses selected clones in which the remaining wild-type TP53 was silenced. Our data suggest silencing occurred through a novel mechanism that does not involve DNA methylation, histone methylation, or histone deacetylation. These data indicate MMR deficiency in colorectal cancer can give rise to initiating TP53 mutations and that TP53 silencing occurs via a copy-neutral mechanism. Moreover, the data highlight the use of MDM2 antagonists as tools to study mechanisms of TP53 mutation acquisition and wild-type allele loss or silencing in cells with defined genetic backgrounds.

  9. Functional characterization of human cancer-derived TRKB mutations.

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    Thomas R Geiger

    Full Text Available Cancer originates from cells that have acquired mutations in genes critical for controlling cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. Often, tumors continue to depend on these so-called driver mutations, providing the rationale for targeted anticancer therapies. To date, large-scale sequencing analyses have revealed hundreds of mutations in human tumors. However, without their functional validation it remains unclear which mutations correspond to driver, or rather bystander, mutations and, therefore, whether the mutated gene represents a target for therapeutic intervention. In human colorectal tumors, the neurotrophic receptor TRKB has been found mutated on two different sites in its kinase domain (TRKB(T695I and TRKB(D751N. Another site, in the extracellular part of TRKB, is mutated in a human lung adenocarcinoma cell line (TRKB(L138F. Lastly, our own analysis has identified one additional TRKB point mutation proximal to the kinase domain (TRKB(P507L in a human melanoma cell line. The functional consequences of all these point mutations, however, have so far remained elusive. Previously, we have shown that TRKB is a potent suppressor of anoikis and that TRKB-expressing cells form highly invasive and metastatic tumors in nude mice. To assess the functional consequences of these four TRKB mutations, we determined their potential to suppress anoikis and to form tumors in nude mice. Unexpectedly, both colon cancer-derived mutants, TRKB(T695I and TRKB(D751N, displayed reduced activity compared to that of wild-type TRKB. Consistently, upon stimulation with the TRKB ligand BDNF, these mutants were impaired in activating TRKB and its downstream effectors AKT and ERK. The two mutants derived from human tumor cell lines (TRKB(L138F and TRKB(P507L were functionally indistinguishable from wild-type TRKB in both in-vitro and in-vivo assays. In conclusion, we fail to detect any gain-of-function of four cancer-derived TRKB point mutations.

  10. Direct Transcriptional Consequences of Somatic Mutation in Breast Cancer

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    Adam Shlien

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Disordered transcriptomes of cancer encompass direct effects of somatic mutation on transcription, coordinated secondary pathway alterations, and increased transcriptional noise. To catalog the rules governing how somatic mutation exerts direct transcriptional effects, we developed an exhaustive pipeline for analyzing RNA sequencing data, which we integrated with whole genomes from 23 breast cancers. Using X-inactivation analyses, we found that cancer cells are more transcriptionally active than intermixed stromal cells. This is especially true in estrogen receptor (ER-negative tumors. Overall, 59% of substitutions were expressed. Nonsense mutations showed lower expression levels than expected, with patterns characteristic of nonsense-mediated decay. 14% of 4,234 rearrangements caused transcriptional abnormalities, including exon skips, exon reusage, fusions, and premature polyadenylation. We found productive, stable transcription from sense-to-antisense gene fusions and gene-to-intergenic rearrangements, suggesting that these mutation classes drive more transcriptional disruption than previously suspected. Systematic integration of transcriptome with genome data reveals the rules by which transcriptional machinery interprets somatic mutation.

  11. Activating mutation in MET oncogene in familial colorectal cancer

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    Schildkraut Joellen M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In developed countries, the lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC is 5%, and it is the second leading cause of death from cancer. The presence of family history is a well established risk factor with 25-35% of CRCs attributable to inherited and/or familial factors. The highly penetrant inherited colon cancer syndromes account for approximately 5%, leaving greater than 20% without clear genetic definition. Familial colorectal cancer has been linked to chromosome 7q31 by multiple affected relative pair studies. The MET proto-oncogene which resides in this chromosomal region is considered a candidate for genetic susceptibility. Methods MET exons were amplified by PCR from germline DNA of 148 affected sibling pairs with colorectal cancer. Amplicons with altered sequence were detected with high-resolution melt-curve analysis using a LightScanner (Idaho Technologies. Samples demonstrating alternative melt curves were sequenced. A TaqMan assay for the specific c.2975C >T change was used to confirm this mutation in a cohort of 299 colorectal cancer cases and to look for allelic amplification in tumors. Results Here we report a germline non-synonymous change in the MET proto-oncogene at amino acid position T992I (also reported as MET p.T1010I in 5.2% of a cohort of sibling pairs affected with CRC. This genetic variant was then confirmed in a second cohort of individuals diagnosed with CRC and having a first degree relative with CRC at prevalence of 4.1%. This mutation has been reported in cancer cells of multiple origins, including 2.5% of colon cancers, and in Conclusions Although the MET p.T992I genetic mutation is commonly found in somatic colorectal cancer tissues, this is the first report also implicating this MET genetic mutation as a germline inherited risk factor for familial colorectal cancer. Future studies on the cancer risks associated with this mutation and the prevalence in different at-risk populations will

  12. TP53 Mutations in Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

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    Akira Mogi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor gene TP53 is frequently mutated in human cancers. Abnormality of the TP53 gene is one of the most significant events in lung cancers and plays an important role in the tumorigenesis of lung epithelial cells. Human lung cancers are classified into two major types, small cell lung cancer (SCLC and nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The latter accounts for approximately 80% of all primary lung cancers, and the incidence of NSCLC is increasing yearly. Most clinical studies suggest that NSCLC with TP53 alterations carries a worse prognosis and may be relatively more resistant to chemotherapy and radiation. A deep understanding of the role of TP53 in lung carcinogenesis may lead to a more reasonably targeted clinical approach, which should be exploited to enhance the survival rates of patients with lung cancer. This paper will focus on the role of TP53 in the molecular pathogenesis, epidemiology, and therapeutic strategies of TP53 mutation in NSCLC.

  13. Somatic LKB1 mutations promote cervical cancer progression.

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    Shana N Wingo

    Full Text Available Human Papilloma Virus (HPV is the etiologic agent for cervical cancer. Yet, infection with HPV is not sufficient to cause cervical cancer, because most infected women develop transient epithelial dysplasias that spontaneously regress. Progression to invasive cancer has been attributed to diverse host factors such as immune or hormonal status, as no recurrent genetic alterations have been identified in cervical cancers. Thus, the pressing question as to the biological basis of cervical cancer progression has remained unresolved, hampering the development of novel therapies and prognostic tests. Here we show that at least 20% of cervical cancers harbor somatically-acquired mutations in the LKB1 tumor suppressor. Approximately one-half of tumors with mutations harbored single nucleotide substitutions or microdeletions identifiable by exon sequencing, while the other half harbored larger monoallelic or biallelic deletions detectable by multiplex ligation probe amplification (MLPA. Biallelic mutations were identified in most cervical cancer cell lines; HeLa, the first human cell line, harbors a homozygous 25 kb deletion that occurred in vivo. LKB1 inactivation in primary tumors was associated with accelerated disease progression. Median survival was only 13 months for patients with LKB1-deficient tumors, but >100 months for patients with LKB1-wild type tumors (P = 0.015, log rank test; hazard ratio = 0.25, 95% CI = 0.083 to 0.77. LKB1 is thus a major cervical tumor suppressor, demonstrating that acquired genetic alterations drive progression of HPV-induced dysplasias to invasive, lethal cancers. Furthermore, LKB1 status can be exploited clinically to predict disease recurrence.

  14. PI3K expression and PIK3CA mutations are related to colorectal cancer metastases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Fen Zhu; Bao-Hua Yu; Da-Li Li; Hong-Lin Ke; Xian-Zhi Guo; Xiu-Ying Xiao

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To assess the significance of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) in colorectal cancer (CRC) and toxicity of LY294002 in CRC cells with different metastatic abilities.METHODS:Sixty formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded CRC tumor specimens were investigated.Adjacent normal colonic mucosa specimens from 10 of these cases were selected as controls.PI3K protein was detected by immunohistochemistry and PIK3CA mutations were investigated by gene sequencing analysis.A flowcytometry-based apoptosis detection kit was used to determine PI3K inhibitor-induced apoptosis in CRC cell lines SW480 and SW620.Expression of phosphorylated protein kinase B in CRC cell lines was detected by Western blotting.RESULTS:There was a significant difference in the proportion of primary lesions (30%,18/60) vs metastatic lesions (46.7%,28/60) that were positive for PI3K (P <0.05).Mutations were detected in exon 9 (13.3%) and exon 20 (8.3%).Out of 60 cases,seven mutations were identified:two hotspot mutations,C.1633G>A resulting in E545A,and C.3140A>G resulting in H1047R; two novel missense mutations C.1624G>A and C.3079G>A;and three synonymous mutations (C.1641G>A,C.1581C>T and C.3027T>A).Exposure of SW480 cells to PI3K inhibitor for 48 h resulted in a significant increase of apoptotic cells in a dose-dependent manner [3.2% apoptotic cells in 0 μmol/L,4.3% in 5 μmol/L,6.3% in 10 μ.mol/L (P < 0.05),and 6.7% in 20 μmol/L (P < 0.05)].Moreover,PI3K inhibitor induced a similar significant increase of apoptotic cells in the SW620 cell line for 48 h [3.3% apoptotic cells in 0 μmol/L,13.3%in 5 μmol/L (P < 0.01),19.2% in 10 μmol/L (P < 0.01),and 21.3% in 20 μmol/L (P < 0.01)J.CONCLUSION:High PI3K expression is associated with CRC metastasis.PI3K inhibitor induced apoptosis in CRC cells and displayed strong cytotoxicity for highly metastatic cells.PI3K inhibition may be an effective treatment for CRC.

  15. Less frequently mutated genes in colorectal cancer: evidences from next-generation sequencing of 653 routine cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malapelle, Umberto; Pisapia, Pasquale; Sgariglia, Roberta; Vigliar, Elena; Biglietto, Maria; Carlomagno, Chiara; Giuffrè, Giuseppe; Troncone, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    Aims The incidence of RAS/RAF/PI3KA and TP53 gene mutations in colorectal cancer (CRC) is well established. Less information, however, is available on other components of the CRC genomic landscape, which are potential CRC prognostic/predictive markers. Methods Following a previous validation study, ion-semiconductor next-generation sequencing (NGS) was employed to process 653 routine CRC samples by a multiplex PCR targeting 91 hotspot regions in 22 CRC significant genes. Results A total of 796 somatic mutations in 499 (76.4%) tumours were detected. Besides RAS/RAF/PI3KA and TP53, other 12 genes showed at least one mutation including FBXW7 (6%), PTEN (2.8%), SMAD4 (2.1%), EGFR (1.2%), CTNNB1 (1.1%), AKT1 (0.9%), STK11 (0.8%), ERBB2 (0.6%), ERBB4 (0.6%), ALK (0.2%), MAP2K1 (0.2%) and NOTCH1 (0.2%). Conclusions In a routine diagnostic setting, NGS had the potential to generate robust and comprehensive genetic information also including less frequently mutated genes potentially relevant for prognostic assessments or for actionable treatments. PMID:26797410

  16. Electron holes appear to trigger cancer-implicated mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John; Villagran, Martha

    Malignant tumors are caused by mutations, which also affect their subsequent growth and evolution. We use a novel approach, computational DNA hole spectroscopy [M.Y. Suarez-Villagran & J.H. Miller, Sci. Rep. 5, 13571 (2015)], to compute spectra of enhanced hole probability based on actual sequence data. A hole is a mobile site of positive charge created when an electron is removed, for example by radiation or contact with a mutagenic agent. Peaks in the hole spectrum depict sites where holes tend to localize and potentially trigger a base pair mismatch during replication. Our studies of reveal a correlation between hole spectrum peaks and spikes in human mutation frequencies. Importantly, we also find that hole peak positions that do not coincide with large variant frequencies often coincide with cancer-implicated mutations and/or (for coding DNA) encoded conserved amino acids. This enables combining hole spectra with variant data to identify critical base pairs and potential cancer `driver' mutations. Such integration of DNA hole and variance spectra could also prove invaluable for pinpointing critical regions, and sites of driver mutations, in the vast non-protein-coding genome. Supported by the State of Texas through the Texas Ctr. for Superconductivity.

  17. Landscape of somatic mutations in 560 breast cancer whole genome sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nik-Zainal, Serena; Davies, Helen; Staaf, Johan; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Glodzik, Dominik; Zou, Xueqing; Martincorena, Inigo; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Martin, Sancha; Wedge, David C.; Van Loo, Peter; Ju, Young Seok; Smid, Marcel; Brinkman, Arie B; Morganella, Sandro; Aure, Miriam R.; Lingjærde, Ole Christian; Langerød, Anita; Ringnér, Markus; Ahn, Sung-Min; Boyault, Sandrine; Brock, Jane E.; Broeks, Annegien; Butler, Adam; Desmedt, Christine; Dirix, Luc; Dronov, Serge; Fatima, Aquila; Foekens, John A.; Gerstung, Moritz; Hooijer, Gerrit KJ; Jang, Se Jin; Jones, David R.; Kim, Hyung-Yong; King, Tari A.; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Lee, Hee Jin; Lee, Jeong-Yeon; Li, Yilong; McLaren, Stuart; Menzies, Andrew; Mustonen, Ville; O’Meara, Sarah; Pauporté, Iris; Pivot, Xavier; Purdie, Colin A.; Raine, Keiran; Ramakrishnan, Kamna; Rodríguez-González, F. Germán; Romieu, Gilles; Sieuwerts, Anieta M.; Simpson, Peter T; Shepherd, Rebecca; Stebbings, Lucy; Stefansson, Olafur A; Teague, Jon; Tommasi, Stefania; Treilleux, Isabelle; Van den Eynden, Gert G.; Vermeulen, Peter; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Yates, Lucy; Caldas, Carlos; van’t Veer, Laura; Tutt, Andrew; Knappskog, Stian; Tan, Benita Kiat Tee; Jonkers, Jos; Borg, Åke; Ueno, Naoto T; Sotiriou, Christos; Viari, Alain; Futreal, P. Andrew; Campbell, Peter J; Span, Paul N.; Van Laere, Steven; Lakhani, Sunil R; Eyfjord, Jorunn E.; Thompson, Alastair M.; Birney, Ewan; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; van de Vijver, Marc J; Martens, John W.M.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Richardson, Andrea L.; Kong, Gu; Thomas, Gilles; Stratton, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    We analysed whole genome sequences of 560 breast cancers to advance understanding of the driver mutations conferring clonal advantage and the mutational processes generating somatic mutations. 93 protein-coding cancer genes carried likely driver mutations. Some non-coding regions exhibited high mutation frequencies but most have distinctive structural features probably causing elevated mutation rates and do not harbour driver mutations. Mutational signature analysis was extended to genome rearrangements and revealed 12 base substitution and six rearrangement signatures. Three rearrangement signatures, characterised by tandem duplications or deletions, appear associated with defective homologous recombination based DNA repair: one with deficient BRCA1 function; another with deficient BRCA1 or BRCA2 function; the cause of the third is unknown. This analysis of all classes of somatic mutation across exons, introns and intergenic regions highlights the repertoire of cancer genes and mutational processes operative, and progresses towards a comprehensive account of the somatic genetic basis of breast cancer. PMID:27135926

  18. Assessment of SLX4 Mutations in Hereditary Breast Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohela Shah

    Full Text Available SLX4 encodes a DNA repair protein that regulates three structure-specific endonucleases and is necessary for resistance to DNA crosslinking agents, topoisomerase I and poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors. Recent studies have reported mutations in SLX4 in a new subtype of Fanconi anemia (FA, FA-P. Monoallelic defects in several FA genes are known to confer susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancers.To determine if SLX4 is involved in breast cancer susceptibility, we sequenced the entire SLX4 coding region in 738 (270 Jewish and 468 non-Jewish breast cancer patients with 2 or more family members affected by breast cancer and no known BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. We found a novel nonsense (c.2469G>A, p.W823* mutation in one patient. In addition, we also found 51 missense variants [13 novel, 23 rare (MAF1%], of which 22 (5 novel and 17 rare were predicted to be damaging by Polyphen2 (score = 0.65-1. We performed functional complementation studies using p.W823* and 5 SLX4 variants (4 novel and 1 rare cDNAs in a human SLX4-null fibroblast cell line, RA3331. While wild type SLX4 and all the other variants fully rescued the sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC, campthothecin (CPT, and PARP inhibitor (Olaparib the p.W823* SLX4 mutant failed to do so.Loss-of-function mutations in SLX4 may contribute to the development of breast cancer in very rare cases.

  19. Tamoxifen and Risk of Contralateral Breast Cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Milne, Roger L; Rookus, Matti A;

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether adjuvant tamoxifen treatment for breast cancer (BC) is associated with reduced contralateral breast cancer (CBC) risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers.......To determine whether adjuvant tamoxifen treatment for breast cancer (BC) is associated with reduced contralateral breast cancer (CBC) risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers....

  20. Identification of Germline Genetic Mutations in Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo-Mullen, Erin E.; O’Reilly, Eileen; Kelsen, David; Ashraf, Asad M.; Lowery, Maeve; Yu, Kenneth; Reidy, Diane; Epstein, Andrew S.; Lincoln, Anne; Saldia, Amethyst; Jacobs, Lauren M.; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Zhang, Liying; Kurtz, Robert; Saltz, Leonard; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark; Stadler, Zsofia K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC) is part of several cancer predisposition syndromes; however, indications for genetic counseling/testing are not well-defined. We sought to determine mutation prevalence and characteristics that predict for inherited predisposition to PAC. Methods We identified 175 consecutive PAC patients who underwent clinical genetics assessment at Memorial Sloan Kettering between 2011–2014. Clinical data, family history, and germline results were evaluated. Results Among 159 PAC patients who pursued genetic testing, 24 pathogenic mutations were identified (15.1%; 95%CI, 9.5%–20.7%), including BRCA2(n=13), BRCA1(n=4), p16(n=2), PALB2(n=1), and Lynch syndrome(n=4). BRCA1/BRCA2 prevalence was 13.7% in Ashkenazi Jewish(AJ) (n=95) and 7.1% in non-AJ(n=56) patients. In AJ patients with strong, weak, or absent family history of BRCA-associated cancers, mutation prevalence was 16.7%, 15.8%, and 7.4%, respectively. Mean age at diagnosis in all mutation carriers was 58.5y(range 45–75y) compared to 64y(range 27–87y) in non-mutation carriers(P=0.02). Although BRCA2 was the most common mutation identified, no patients with early-onset PAC(≤50y) harbored a BRCA2 mutation and the mean age at diagnosis in BRCA2 carriers was equivalent to non-mutation carriers(P=0.34). Mutation prevalence in early-onset patients(n=21) was 28.6%, including BRCA1(n=2), p16(n=2), MSH2(n=1) and MLH1(n=1). Conclusion Mutations in BRCA2 account for over 50% of PAC patients with an identified susceptibility syndrome. AJ patients had high BRCA1/BRCA2 prevalence regardless of personal/family history, suggesting that ancestry alone indicates a need for genetic evaluation. With the exception of BRCA2-associated PAC, inherited predisposition to PAC is associated with earlier age at PAC diagnosis suggesting that this subset of patients may also represent a population warranting further evaluation. PMID:26440929

  1. PROMISES FOR TREATING COLON CANCER PATIENTS WITH BRAF GENE MUTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Fedyanin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Colon cancer represents a heterogenous disease group, which differ by cancerogenesis mechanisms, molecular alterations, prognosis and treatment possibilities. In modern clinical practice assessment of KRAS and NRAS genes status is already necessary in order to prescribe anti-EGFR treatment for metastatic disease. A separate poor prognosis group are patients with BRAF mutation. In this review we will focus on biological features of BRAF-mutant colorectal cancer, its epidemiology, clinical features on different stages, treatment choice and promising new treatment possibilities.

  2. Mutator gene and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Chapelle, Albert; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    2008-02-05

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  3. MANAGEMENT OF BREAST CANCER WITH BRCA GENE MUTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Wayan Ari Sumardika

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE The management of individual who has a genetic predisposition for breast cancer requires careful planning. It is estimated that 5-10% of breast cancer in Western countries is a hereditary breast cancer and 80-90% of them is the result of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes mutations. The individual with BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations have a high risk for experiencing breast cancer and other types of cancer, especially ovarian cancer. Although there are some differences, management of patients with hereditary breast cancer in principle is equal to management of non-hereditary breast cancer. Contra lateral mastectomy surgery and/or oophorectomy may be considered as initial therapy. The uses of breast conserving surgery in patients with BRCA-positive status are still controversial because of the risk of recurrence on ipsilateral breast, so did the use of ionization radiation modalities. Post surgery follow up is an important aspect in the management of patients with mutations of these genes in which follow up aims to find local recurrence, secondary breast cancer, contra lateral breast cancer as early as possible /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  4. Biology of lung cancer: genetic mutation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoi, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    At present, most cases of unresectable cancer cannot be cured. Genetic mutations, EMT, and cancer stem cells are three major issues linked to poor prognosis in such cases, all connected by inter- and intra-tumor heterogeneity. Issues on inter-/intra-tumor heterogeneity of genetic mutation could be resolved with recent and future technologies of deep sequencers, whereas, regarding such issues as the "same genome, different epigenome/phenotype", we expect to solve many of these problems in the future through further research in stem cell biology. We herein review and discuss the three major issues in the biology of cancers, especially from the standpoint of stem cell biology.

  5. An exactly solvable, spatial model of mutation accumulation in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Chay; Nowak, Martin A.; Waclaw, Bartlomiej

    2016-12-01

    One of the hallmarks of cancer is the accumulation of driver mutations which increase the net reproductive rate of cancer cells and allow them to spread. This process has been studied in mathematical models of well mixed populations, and in computer simulations of three-dimensional spatial models. But the computational complexity of these more realistic, spatial models makes it difficult to simulate realistically large and clinically detectable solid tumours. Here we describe an exactly solvable mathematical model of a tumour featuring replication, mutation and local migration of cancer cells. The model predicts a quasi-exponential growth of large tumours, even if different fragments of the tumour grow sub-exponentially due to nutrient and space limitations. The model reproduces clinically observed tumour growth times using biologically plausible rates for cell birth, death, and migration rates. We also show that the expected number of accumulated driver mutations increases exponentially in time if the average fitness gain per driver is constant, and that it reaches a plateau if the gains decrease over time. We discuss the realism of the underlying assumptions and possible extensions of the model.

  6. Clinical Genotyping of Non–Small Cell Lung Cancers Using Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing: Utility of Identifying Rare and Co-mutations in Oncogenic Driver Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura J. Tafe

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Detection of somatic mutations in non–small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs, especially adenocarcinomas, is important for directing patient care when targeted therapy is available. Here, we present our experience with genotyping NSCLC using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM and the AmpliSeq Cancer Hotspot Panel v2. We tested 453 NSCLC samples from 407 individual patients using the 50 gene AmpliSeq Cancer Hotspot Panel v2 from May 2013 to July 2015. Using 10 ng of DNA, up to 11 samples were simultaneously sequenced on the Ion Torrent PGM (316 and 318 chips. We identified variants with the Ion Torrent Variant Caller Plugin, and Golden Helix's SVS software was used for annotation and prediction of the significance of the variants. Three hundred ninety-eight samples were successfully sequenced (12.1% failure rate. In all, 633 variants in 41 genes were detected with a median of 2 (range of 0 to 7 variants per sample. Mutations detected in BRAF, EGFR, ERBB2, KRAS, NRAS, and PIK3CA were considered potentially actionable and were identified in 237 samples, most commonly in KRAS (37.9%, EGFR (11.1%, BRAF (4.8%, and PIK3CA (4.3%. In our patient population, all mutations in EGFR, KRAS, and BRAF were mutually exclusive. The Ion Torrent Ampliseq technology can be utilized on small biopsy and cytology specimens, requires very little input DNA, and can be applied in clinical laboratories for genotyping of NSCLC. This targeted next-generation sequencing approach allows for detection of common and also rare mutations that are clinically actionable in multiple patients simultaneously.

  7. Exome mutation burden predicts clinical outcome in ovarian cancer carrying mutated BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Kochupurakkal, Bose; Gonzalez-Izarzugaza, Jose Maria;

    2013-01-01

    Reliable biomarkers predicting resistance or sensitivity to anti-cancer therapy are critical for oncologists to select proper therapeutic drugs in individual cancer patients. Ovarian and breast cancer patients carrying germline mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes are often sensitive to DNA damaging...... drugs and relative to non-mutation carriers present a favorable clinical outcome following therapy. Genome sequencing studies have shown a high number of mutations in the tumor genome in patients carrying BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations (mBRCA). The present study used exome-sequencing and SNP 6 array data...... had either germlines or somatic mutations of BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. The results revealed that the Nmut was significantly lower in the chemotherapy-resistant mBRCA HGSOC defined by progression within 6 months after completion of first line platinum-based chemotherapy. We found a significant association...

  8. Mutation of the BRAF Genes in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhimin HUANG

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available BRAF mutations have been found to be a driver mutation and maybe a therapy target in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. This article reviews the current understanding of BRAF gene, its structure, expression, the signal pathway, as well as its relationship with cancer especially the targeted therapies for non-small cell lung cancer.

  9. Precise Detection of IDH1/2 and BRAF Hotspot Mutations in Clinical Glioma Tissues by a Differential Calculus Analysis of High-Resolution Melting Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatae, Ryusuke; Hata, Nobuhiro; Yoshimoto, Koji; Kuga, Daisuke; Akagi, Yojiro; Murata, Hideki; Suzuki, Satoshi O; Mizoguchi, Masahiro; Iihara, Koji

    2016-01-01

    High resolution melting (HRM) is a simple and rapid method for screening mutations. It offers various advantages for clinical diagnostic applications. Conventional HRM analysis often yields equivocal results, especially for surgically obtained tissues. We attempted to improve HRM analyses for more effective applications to clinical diagnostics. HRM analyses were performed for IDH1R132 and IDH2R172 mutations in 192 clinical glioma samples in duplicate and these results were compared with sequencing results. BRAFV600E mutations were analyzed in 52 additional brain tumor samples. The melting profiles were used for differential calculus analyses. Negative second derivative plots revealed additional peaks derived from heteroduplexes in PCR products that contained mutations; this enabled unequivocal visual discrimination of the mutations. We further developed a numerical expression, the HRM-mutation index (MI), to quantify the heteroduplex-derived peak of the mutational curves. Using this expression, all IDH1 mutation statuses matched those ascertained by sequencing, with the exception of three samples. These discordant results were all derived from the misinterpretation of sequencing data. The effectiveness of our approach was further validated by analyses of IDH2R172 and BRAFV600E mutations. The present analytical method enabled an unequivocal and objective HRM analysis and is suitable for reliable mutation scanning in surgically obtained glioma tissues. This approach could facilitate molecular diagnostics in clinical environments.

  10. Are medullary breast cancers an indication for BRCA1 mutation screening? A mutation analysis of 42 cases of medullary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iau, P T C; Marafie, M; Ali, A; Sng, J H; Macmillan, R D; Pinder, S; Denley, H E; Ellis, I O; Wenzyck, P; Scott, N; Cross, G; Blamey, R W

    2004-05-01

    Recommended guidelines have limited breast cancer gene ( BRCA1 ) mutation testing to individuals with a personal or family history of early onset breast and/or ovarian cancer, and those with multiple affected close relatives. Such large breast cancer families are rare in the general population, limiting the clinical application of the BRCA1 discovery. Previous reports have suggested an association between medullary breast cancer and BRCA1 mutation carriers. To test the feasibility of using these rare histological subtypes as an alternative to epidemiological factors, 42 cases of medullary cancer unselected for family history were screened for BRCA1 point mutations and large exon rearrangements. The large majority (83%) of these patients did not have significant family of breast or ovarian cancer. Two deleterious mutations resulting in a premature stop codon, and one exon 13 duplication were found. All mutations were detected in patients with typical medullary cancer, who had family history of multiple breast and ovarian cancers. Our findings suggest that medullary breast cancers are not an indication for BRCA1 mutation screening in the absence of significant family risk factors.

  11. Mutations of p53 gene exons 4-8 in human esophageal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Ya Li; Jin-Tian Tang; Li-Qun Jia; Pei-Wen Li

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the tumor suppressor gene p53 mutations in exon 4, esophageal cancer and adjacent noncancerous tissues.METHODS: We performed p53 (exons 4-8) gene mutation analysis on 24 surgically resected human esophageal cancer specimens by PCR, single-strand conformation polymorphism, and DNA sequencing. RESULTS: p53 gene mutations were detected in 9 of 22 (40.9%) esophageal cancer specimens and 10 of 17 (58.8%) adjacent non-cancerous tissues. Eight of sixteen (50.0%) point mutations detected were G-A transitions and 9 of 18 (50.0%) p53 gene mutations occurred in exon 4 in esophageal cancer specimens. Only 1 of 11 mutations detected was G-A transition and 4 of 11 (36.4%) p53 gene mutations occurred in exon 4 in adjacent non-cancerous tissues.CONCLUSION: Mutation of p53 gene in exon 4 may play an important role in development of esophageal cancer. The observation of p53 gene mutation in adjacent noncancerous tissues suggests that p53 gene mutation may be an early event in esophageal carcinogenesis. Some clinical factors, including age, sex, pre-operation therapy and location of tumors, do not influence p53 gene mutation rates.

  12. A common Greenlandic Inuit BRCA1 RING domain founder mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T.v.O.; Ejlertsen, B.; Albrechtsen, Anders;

    2009-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in the tumour suppressor proteins BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. We examined 32 breast and/or ovarian cancer patients from Greenland for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. Whereas no mutations were identified in 19 families, 13 families exhibited a BRCA1...... exon 3 nucleotide 234 T > G mutation, which has not previously been reported in the breast cancer information core (BIC) database. The mutation changes a conserved cysteine 39 to a glycine in the Zn(2+) site II of the RING domain, which is essential for BRCA1 ubiquitin ligase activity. Eight...... of the families had members with ovarian cancer, suggesting that the RING domain may be an ovarian cancer hotspot. By SNP array analysis, we find that all 13 families share a 4.5 Mb genomic fragment containing the BRCA1 gene, showing that the mutation originates from a founder. Finally, analysis of 1152 Inuit...

  13. Mutations in the D-loop region of mitochondrial DNA in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yibing Zhao; Hongyu Yang; Guoyu Chen

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the mutations in the D-loop region of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in gastric cancer.Methods: The mtDNA of D-loop region was amplified by PCR and sequenced in 20 samples from gastric cancer tissue and adjacent normal membrane. Results: There were 7/20(35% ) mutations in the mtDNA of D-loop region in gastric cancer patients. There were four microsatellite instabilities among the 18 mutations. Nine new polymorphisms were identified in 20 patients. Conclusion: The mtDNA of Dloop region might be highly polymorphoric and the mutation rate is high in patients with gastric cancer.

  14. NRAS germline variant G138R and multiple rare somatic mutations on APC in colorectal cancer patients in Taiwan by next generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Pi-Yueh; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Chang, Nai-Chung; Chang, Shih-Cheng; Wang, Mei-Chia; Tsai, Shu-Hui; Wen, Ying-Hao; Tsai, Wen-Sy; Chan, Err-Cheng; Lu, Jang-Jih

    2016-06-21

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) arises from mutations in a subset of genes. We investigated the germline and somatic mutation spectrum of patients with CRC in Taiwan by using the AmpliSeq Cancer Hotspot Panel V2. Fifty paired freshly frozen stage 0-IV CRC tumors and adjacent normal tissue were collected. Blood DNA from 20 healthy donors were used for comparison of germline mutations. Variants were identified using an ion-torrent personal genomic machine and subsequently confirmed by Sanger sequencing or pyrosequencing. Five nonsynonymous germline variants on 4 cancer susceptible genes, CDH1, APC, MLH1, and NRAS, were observed in 6 patients with CRC (12%). Among them, oncogene NRAS G138R variant was identified as having a predicted damaging effect on protein function, which has never been reported by other laboratories. CDH1 T340A variants were presented in 3 patients. The germline variants in the cancer patients differed completely from those found in asymptomatic controls. Furthermore, a total of 56 COSMIC and 21 novel somatic variants distributed in 20 genes were detected in 44 (88%) of the CRC samples. High inter- and intra-tumor heterogeneity levels were observed. Nine rare variants located in the β-catenin binding region of the APC gene were discovered, 7 of which could cause amino acid frameshift and might have a pathogenic effect. In conclusion, panel-based mutation detection by using a high-throughput sequencing platform can elucidate race-dependent cancer genomes. This approach facilitates identifying individuals at high risk and aiding the recognition of novel mutations as targets for drug development.

  15. Prostate cancer in a man with a BRCA2 mutation and a personal history of bilateral breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, C F; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, C; Sopik, V; Narod, S A

    2015-08-01

    Men with a BRCA2 mutation face substantial lifetime risks for the development of both breast and prostate cancer. A male who was initially diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 32 was subsequently diagnosed at age 77 with both contralateral breast cancer and prostate cancer. He was found to be BRCA2 mutation carrier. The patient was treated with contralateral mastectomy, breast irradiation, prostate irradiation and adjuvant endocrine therapy. At age 83 he died of metastatic prostate cancer. Our case underscores the observation that BRCA2 mutation carriers are at risk for multiple cancers, including contralateral breast cancer, and illustrates the need for current practice recommendations for the early detection of breast and prostate cancer in men with BRCA2 mutations.

  16. Ovarian cancer in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers : The impact of mutation position and family history on the cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teixeira, Natalja; Mourits, Marian J. E.; Vos, Janet R.; van der Kolk, Donna M.; Jansen, Liesbeth; Oosterwijk, Jan; de Bock, Geertruida H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Assessing the combined impact of mutation position, regarding the ovarian cancer cluster region (OCCR), and type of cancer family history (FH) on age-related penetrance of ovarian cancer (OC) in women from BRCA/2 families from the northern Netherlands. Study design: A consecutive series

  17. Mutation Analysis in the BRCA1 Gene in Chinese Breast Cancer Families

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUZhengyan; ZHENLinlin; FANPing

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the mutation of BRCA1 gene in Chinese breast cancer families. Methods:Fifteen families were selected, involving 41 members, consisting of 23 breast cancer patients. Using poly-merase chain reaction and single stranded conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP), and subsequent DNA sequencing, the mutation of BRCA1 genes were analyzed. Results: Four mutations were found in all fam-ilies, and the proportion of mutation was 26.7% (4/15) in breast cancer families. One of the 4 mutations was 2228 insC, resulting in chain termination at codon 711. The remaining 3 mutations were 1884A→T and 3232A→G, resulting in single amino acid change respectively. Conclusion: BRCA1 is a breast cancer susceptibility gene. The relatively low proportion and frequency of BRCA1 mutations in our study hints additional BRCA genes existed.

  18. Abstract 5324: Pan-cancer identification of mutated pathways and protein complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leiserson, Mark D.; Vandin, Fabio; Wu, Hsin-Ta

    2014-01-01

    that are mutually exclusive across the tumor cohort. There are numerous examples of mutually exclusive mutations between interacting proteins; e.g. BRAF and KRAS in colorectal cancer. Dendrix++ generalizes this idea to find larger groups of mutually exclusive mutations.We applied HotNet2 and Dendrix++ to whole......Large-scale cancer sequencing efforts such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and others have shown that tumors exhibit extensive mutational heterogeneity with relatively few genes mutated at significant frequency and many genes mutated in only a small number of individuals. This long tail...... phenomenon complicates the identification of driver mutations by their observed frequency. The long tail is explained in part by the fact that driver mutations target genes in signaling and regulatory pathways, and these pathways may be perturbed by different mutations in different tumors.We developed two...

  19. TP53 mutation spectrum in smokers and never smoking lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Rita Halvorsen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground: TP53 mutations are among the most common mutations found in lung cancers, identified as an independent prognostic factor in many types of cancers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency and prognostic impact of TP53 mutations in never-smokers and in different histological subtypes of lung cancer.Methods: We analysed tumour tissue from 394 non-small cell carcinomas including adenocarcinomas (n=229, squamous cell carcinomas (n=112, large cell carcinomas (n=30 and others (n=23 for mutations in TP53 by the use of Sanger sequencing (n=394 and next generation sequencing (n=100. Results: TP53 mutations were identified in 47.2% of the samples, with the highest frequency (65% of mutations among squamous cell carcinomas. Among never-smokers, 36% carried a TP53 mutation, identified as a significant independent negative prognostic factor in this subgroup. For large cell carcinomas, a significantly prolonged progression free survival was found for those carrying a TP53 mutation. In addition, the frequency of frameshift mutations was doubled in squamous cell carcinomas (20.3% compared to adenocarcinomas (9.1%.Conclusion: TP53 mutation patterns differ between the histological subgroups of lung cancers, as also influenced by smoking history. This indicates that the histological subtypes in lung cancer are genetically different, and that smoking-induced TP53 mutations may have a different biological impact than TP53 mutations occurring in never-smokers.

  20. Women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations survive ovarian cancer at higher rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Results from a National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored multicenter study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association on January 25, 2012, provides strong evidence that BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutation carriers with ovarian cancer were more

  1. Validation of an Ion Torrent Sequencing Platform for the Detection of Gene Mutations in Biopsy Specimens from Patients with Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiro Fujita

    Full Text Available Treatment for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is often determined by the presence of biomarkers that predict the response to agents targeting specific molecular pathways. Demands for multiplex analysis of the genes involved in the pathogenesis of NSCLC are increasing.We validated the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM system using the Ion AmpliSeq Cancer Hotspot Panel and compared the results with those obtained using the gold standard methods, conventional PCR and Sanger sequencing. The cycleave PCR method was used to verify the results.The Ion Torrent PGM resulted in a similar level of accuracy in identifying multiple genetic mutations in parallel, compared with conventional PCR and Sanger sequencing; however, the Ion Torrent PGM was superior to the other sequencing methods in terms of increased ease of use, even when taking into account the small amount of DNA that was obtained from formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE biopsy specimens.

  2. Routine testing for PALB2 mutations in familial pancreatic cancer families and breast cancer families with pancreatic cancer is not indicated

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harinck, Femme; Kluijt, Irma; van Mil, Saskia E.; Waisfisz, Quinten; van Os, Theo A. M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Wagner, Anja; Olderode-Berends, Maran; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Kuipers, Ernst J.; Poley, Jan-Werner; Fockens, Paul; Bruno, Marco J.

    2012-01-01

    PALB2-mutation carriers not only have an increased risk for breast cancer (BC) but also for pancreatic cancer (PC). Thus far, PALB2 mutations have been mainly found in PC patients from families affected by both PC and BC. As it is well known that the prevalence of gene mutations varies between diffe

  3. FADS2 function loss at the cancer hotspot 11q13 locus diverts lipid signaling precursor synthesis to unusual eicosanoid fatty acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo Jung Park

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genes coding for the fatty acid desaturases (FADS1, 2, 3 localized at the cancer genomic hotspot 11q13 locus are required for the biosynthesis of 20 carbon polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA that are direct eicosanoid precursors. In several cancer cell lines, FADS2 encoded Δ6 and Δ8 desaturation is not functional. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Analyzing MCF7 cell fatty acids with detailed structural mass spectrometry, we show that in the absence of FADS2 activity, the FADS1 product Δ5-desaturase operates to produce 5,11,14-20∶3 and 5,11,14,17-20∶4. These PUFA are missing the 8-9 double bond of the eicosanoid signaling precursors arachidonic acid (5,8,11,14-20∶4 and eicosapentaenoic acid (5,8,11,14,17-20∶5. Heterologous expression of FADS2 restores Δ6 and Δ8-desaturase activity and normal eicosanoid precursor synthesis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The loss of FADS2-encoded activities in cancer cells shuts down normal PUFA biosynthesis, deleting the endogenous supply of eicosanoid and downstream docosanoid precursors, and replacing them with unusual butylene-interrupted fatty acids. If recapitulated in vivo, the normal eicosanoid and docosanoid cell signaling milieu would be depleted and altered due to reduction and substitution of normal substrates with unusual substrates, with unpredictable consequences for cellular communication.

  4. Detection of eight BRCA1 mutations in 10 breast/ovarian cancer families, including 1 family with male breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sruewing, J.P.; Brody, L.C.; Erdos, M.R. [National Institute of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    Genetic epidemiological evidence suggests that mutations in BRCA1 may be responsible for approximately one half of early onset familial breast cancer and the majority of familial breast/ovarian cancer. The recent cloning of BRCA1 allows for the direct detection of mutations, but the feasibility of presymptomatic screening for cancer susceptibility is unknown. We analyzed genomic DNA from one affected individual from each of 24 families with at least three cases of ovarian or breast cancer, using SSCP assays. Variant SSCP bands were subcloned and sequenced. Allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization was used to verify sequence changes and to screen DNA from control individuals. Six frameshift and two missense mutations were detected in 10 different families. A frameshift mutation was detected in a male proband affected with both breast and prostate cancer. A 40-bp deletion was detected in a patient who developed intra-abdominal carcinomatosis 1 year after prophylactic oophorectomy. Mutations were detected throughout the gene, and only one was detected in more than a single family. These results provide further evidence that inherited breast and ovarian cancer can occur as a consequence of a wide array of BRCA1 mutations. These results suggests that development of a screening test for BRCA1 mutations will be technically challenging. The finding of a mutation in a family with male breast cancer, not previously thought to be related to BRCA1, also illustrates the potential difficulties of genetic counseling for individuals known to carry mutations. 37 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. Association between thyroid cancer and epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in female with nonsmall cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seo Yun; Kim, Hye-Ryoun; Kim, Cheol Hyeon; Koh, Jae Soo; Baek, Hee Jong; Choi, Chang-Min; Song, Joon Seon; Lee, Jae Cheol; Na, Im II

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation and thyroid cancer in female patients with nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). METHODS: In a retrospective study, we examined 835 female patients who were diagnosed with NSCLC and underwent an EGFR mutation test between June 2003 and August 2013. The associations of EGFR mutation with thyroid cancer and a family history of thyroid cancer were evaluated using logistic regression models. RESULTS: EGFR mutation was found in 378 of 835 patients. In addition to adenocarcinoma (P cancer (5.8% versus 2.6%; P = 0.020), while showing a trend toward inverse association with a personal history of nonthyroid cancer (5.8% vs. 9.0%; P = 0.086). Likewise, the incidence of EGFR mutations was associated with a family history of thyroid cancer (2.9% vs. 0.9%; P = 0.028), while showing a trend toward inverse association with a family history of nonthyroid cancer (27.8% vs. 33.7%; P = 0.066). Multivariate logistic regression showed that the incidence of EGFR mutations was different in women with thyroid or nonthyroid cancer (P = 0.035) and in women with a family history of thyroid or nonthyroid cancer (P = 0.023). CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that thyroid cancer and a family history of thyroid cancer are associated with EGFR-mutated NSCLC in female patients. The differences in the incidence of thyroid cancer and a family history of thyroid cancer by EGFR mutational status provide new insight into pathogenesis of this genetic change.

  6. OGG1 Mutations and Risk of Female Breast Cancer: Meta-Analysis and Experimental Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashif Ali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In first part of this study association between OGG1 polymorphisms and breast cancer susceptibility was explored by meta-analysis. Second part of the study involved 925 subjects, used for mutational analysis of OGG1 gene using PCR-SSCP and sequencing. Fifteen mutations were observed, which included five intronic mutations, four splice site mutations, two 3′UTR mutations, three missense mutations, and a nonsense mutation. Significantly (pG and 3′UTR variant g.9798848G>A. Among intronic mutations, highest (~15 fold increase in breast cancer risk was associated with g.9793680G>A (p<0.009. Similarly ~14-fold increased risk was associated with Val159Gly (p<0.01, ~17-fold with Gly221Arg (p<0.005, and ~18-fold with Ser326Cys (p<0.004 in breast cancer patients compared with controls, whereas analysis of nonsense mutation showed that ~13-fold (p<0.01 increased breast cancer risk was associated with Trp375STOP in patients compared to controls. In conclusion, a significant association was observed between OGG1 germ line mutations and breast cancer risk. These findings provide evidence that OGG1 may prove to be a good candidate of better diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of breast cancer.

  7. Mutated human androgen receptor gene detected in a prostatic cancer patient is also activated by estradiol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elo, J.P.; Kvist, L.; Leinonen, K.; Isomaa, V. [Univ. of Oulu (Finland)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    Androgens are necessary for the development of prostatic cancer. The mechanisms by which the originally androgen-dependent prostatic cancer cells are relieved of the requirement to use androgen for their growth are largely unknown. The human prostatic cancer cell line LNCaP has been shown to contain a point mutation in the human androgen receptor gene (hAR), suggesting that changes in the hAR may contribute to the abnormal hormone response of prostatic cells. To search for point mutations in the hAR, we used single strand conformation polymorphism analysis and a polymerase chain reaction direct sequencing method to screen 23 prostatic cancer specimens from untreated patients, 6 prostatic cancer specimens from treated patients, and 11 benign prostatic hyperplasia specimens. One mutation was identified in DNA isolated from prostatic cancer tissue, and the mutation was also detected in the leukocyte DNA of the patient and his offspring. The mutation changed codon 726 in exon E from arginine to leucine and was a germ line mutation. The mutation we found in exon E of the hAR gene does not alter the ligand binding specificity of the AR, but the mutated receptor was activated by estradiol to a significantly greater extent than the wild-type receptor. The AR gene mutation described in this study might be one explanation for the altered biological activity of prostatic cancer. 36 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Prevalence of TP53 germ line mutations in young Pakistani breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Muhammad U; Gull, Sidra; Asghar, Kashif; Muhammad, Noor; Amin, Asim; Hamann, Ute

    2012-06-01

    Women from Pakistan and India are more often diagnosed with early-onset breast cancer than Caucasian women. Given that only 12% of Pakistani women diagnosed with breast cancer at or before 30 years of age have previously been shown to harbor germ line mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, the genetic causes of the majority of early-onset cases are unexplained. Since germ line mutations in the tumor suppressor gene TP53 predispose women to early-onset breast cancer, we assessed the prevalence of TP53 mutations in 105 early-onset breast cancer patients from Pakistan, who had previously been found to be negative for BRCA1 and BRCA2 germ line mutations. The patient group included 67 women diagnosed with early-onset breast cancer at or before age 30 with no family history of breast or ovarian cancer (EO30NFH group) and 38 women diagnosed with breast cancer at or before age 40 with one or more first- or second-degree relatives with breast or ovarian cancer (EO40FH group). Mutation analysis of the complete TP53 coding region was performed using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography analysis, followed by DNA sequencing of variant fragments. One deleterious mutation, c.499-500delCA in exon 5, was identified in the 105 breast cancer patients (1%). This mutation is novel in the germ line and has not been described in other populations. It was detected in a 28-year-old patient with no family history of breast or ovarian cancer. This mutation is rare as it was not detected in additional 157 recently recruited non-BRCA1 and non-BRCA2-associated early-onset breast cancer patients. Our findings show that TP53 mutations may account for a minimal portion of early-onset breast cancer in Pakistan.

  9. Simultaneous DNA and RNA mapping of somatic mitochondrial mutations across diverse human cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stewart, James B.; Alaei-Mahabadi, Babak; Radhakrishnan, Sabarinathan;

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the nuclear genome are required for tumor formation, but the functional consequences of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are less understood. Here we identify somatic mtDNA mutations across 527 tumors and 14 cancer types, using an approach that takes advantage of e...

  10. Targeted prostate cancer screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bancroft, Elizabeth K; Page, Elizabeth C; Castro, Elena;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Men with germline breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) or breast cancer 2, early onset (BRCA2) gene mutations have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer (PCa) than noncarriers. IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted screening in ...

  11. c-src activating mutation analysis in Chinese patients with colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye-Xiong Tan; Han-Tao Wang; Peng Zhang; Zhong-Hua Yan; Guan-Long Dai; Meng-Chao Wu; Hong-Yang Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the occurrence of cellular src (c-src)activating mutation at codon 531 in colorectal cancer patients from Chinese mainland.METHODS: Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay followed by sequencing and single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis were carried out to screen 110 samples of primary colorectal cancer and 20 colorectal liver metastases.RESULTS: Only one sample showed PCR-RFLP-positive results and carried somatic codon 531 mutations. No additional mutation of c-src exon 12 was found.CONCLUSION: c-src codon 531 mutation in colorectal cancer is not the cause of c-src activation.

  12. Male breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silvestri, Valentina; Barrowdale, Daniel; Mulligan, Anna Marie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA1 and, more commonly, BRCA2 mutations are associated with increased risk of male breast cancer (MBC). However, only a paucity of data exists on the pathology of breast cancers (BCs) in men with BRCA1/2 mutations. Using the largest available dataset, we determined whether MBCs...

  13. Male breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silvestri, Valentina; Barrowdale, Daniel; Mulligan, Anna Marie;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA1 and, more commonly, BRCA2 mutations are associated with increased risk of male breast cancer (MBC). However, only a paucity of data exists on the pathology of breast cancers (BCs) in men with BRCA1/2 mutations. Using the largest available dataset, we determined whether MBCs aris...

  14. Founding BRCA1 mutations in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in southern Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannsson, O; Ostermeyer, E A; Håkansson, S; Friedman, L S; Johansson, U; Sellberg, G; Brøndum-Nielsen, K; Sele, V; Olsson, H; King, M C; Borg, A

    1996-03-01

    Nine different germ-line mutations in the BRCA1 breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene were identified in 15 of 47 kindreds from southern Sweden, by use of SSCP and heteroduplex analysis of all exons and flanking intron region and by a protein-truncation test for exon 11, followed by direct sequencing. All but one of the mutations are predicted to give rise to premature translation termination and include seven frameshift insertions or deletions, a nonsense mutation, and a splice acceptor site mutation. The remaining mutation is a missense mutation (Cys61Gly) in the zinc-binding motif. Four novel Swedish founding mutations were identified: the nucleotide 2595 deletion A was found in five families, the C 1806 T nonsense mutation in three families, the 3166 insertion TGAGA in three families, and the nucleotide 1201 deletion 11 in two families. Analysis of the intragenic polymorphism D17S855 supports common origins of the mutations. Eleven of the 15 kindreds manifesting BRCA1 mutations were breast-ovarian cancer families, several of them with a predominant ovarian cancer phenotype. The set of 32 families in which no BRCA1 alterations were detected included 1 breast-ovarian cancer kindred manifesting clear linkage to the BRCA1 region and loss of the wild-type chromosome in associated tumors. Other tumor types found in BRCA1 mutation/haplotype carriers included prostatic, pancreas, skin, and lung cancer, a malignant melanoma, an oligodendroglioma, and a carcinosarcoma. In all, 12 of 16 kindreds manifesting BRCA1 mutation or linkage contained ovarian cancer, as compared with only 6 of the remaining 31 families (P<.001). The present study confirms the involvement of BRCA1 in disease predisposition for a subset of hereditary breast cancer families often characterized by ovarian cancers.

  15. Founding BRCA1 mutations in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in southern Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johannsson, O.; Hakansson, S.; Johannson, U. [Univ. Hospital, Lund (Sweden)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    Nine different germ-line mutations in the BRCA1 breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene were identified in 15 of 47 kindreds from southern Sweden, by use of SSCP and heteroduplex analysis of all exons and flanking intron region and by a protein-truncation test for exon 11, followed by direct sequencing. All but one of the mutations are predicted to give rise to premature translation termination and include seven frameshift insertions or deletions, a nonsense mutation, and a splice acceptor site mutation. The remaining mutation is a missense mutation (Cys61Gly) in the zinc-binding motif. Four novel Swedish founding mutations were identified: the nucleotide 2595 deletion A was found in five families, the C 1806 T nonsense mutation in three families, the 3166 insertion TGAGA in three families, and the nucleotide 1201 deletion 11 in two families. Analysis of the intragenic polymorphism D17S855 supports common origins of the mutations. Eleven of the 15 kindreds manifesting BRCA1 mutations were breast-ovarian cancer families, several of them with a predominant ovarian cancer phenotype. The set of 32 families in which no BRCA1 alterations were detected included 1 breast-ovarian cancer kindred manifesting clear linkage to the BRCA1 region and loss of the wild-type chromosome in associated tumors. Other tumor types found in BRCA1 mutation/haplotype carriers included prostatic, pancreas, skin, and lung cancer, a malignant melanoma, an oligodendroglioma, and a carcinosarcoma. In all, 12 of 16 kindreds manifesting BRCA1 mutation or linkage contained ovarian cancer, as compared with only 6 of the remaining 31 families (P < .001). The present study confirms the involvement of BRCA1 in disease predisposition for a subset of hereditary breast cancer families often characterized by ovarian cancers. 28 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. LRRK2 G2019S mutations are associated with an increased cancer risk in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders-Pullman, Rachel; Barrett, Matthew J; Stanley, Kaili M; Luciano, Marta San; Shanker, Vicki; Severt, Lawrence; Hunt, Ann; Raymond, Deborah; Ozelius, Laurie J; Bressman, Susan B

    2010-11-15

    Leucine rich repeat kinase (LRRK2) G2019S mutations are presumed to cause PD through a toxic gain of function of the protein kinase. Small molecule kinase inhibitors have been developed for the treatment of certain cancers, and some antioncogenic agents such as sunitinib, may nonspecifically inhibit LRRK2. Few studies, however, have assessed cancer risk in LRRK2 mutation carriers. To explore this risk, we evaluated records of Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) PD patients participating in genetic research. Charts were reviewed for 163 unrelated AJ PD patients, 31 of whom harbored the G2019S mutation. History of cancer was queried at baseline intake using a form reviewing medical conditions, and charts were reviewed for all follow-up visits. 9/31 LRRK2 G2019S mutation carriers had nonskin cancers, whereas 15/132 without mutations had nonskin cancers, representing an almost threefold increased risk in this group (HR 2.9, 95% CI 1.3-6.6). Age at first nonskin cancer was younger in the LRRK2 carriers (56.0 years) than the noncarriers (62.0 years), but was not significant. 67% of the LRRK2 carriers had their cancer before the onset of PD, whereas only 40% of noncarriers developed their first nonskin cancer before onset of PD. While further evaluation is warranted, our findings indicate an increased risk of nonskin cancers in LRRK2 G2019S mutation carriers, which may be related to toxic gain of function of mutated LRRK2.

  17. Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 in breast cancer families: Are there more breast cancer-susceptibility genes?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serova, O.M.; Mazoyer, S.; Putet, N. [CNRS, Lyon (France)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    To estimate the proportion of breast cancer families due to BRCA1 or BRCA2, we performed mutation screening of the entire coding regions of both genes supplemented with linkage analysis of 31 families, 8 containing male breast cancers and 23 site-specific female breast cancer. A combination of protein-truncation test and SSCP or heteroduplex analyses was used for mutation screening complemented, where possible, by the analysis of expression level of BRCA1 and BRCA2 alleles. Six of the eight families with male breast cancer revealed frameshift mutations, two in BRCA1 and four in BRCA2. Although most families with female site-specific breast cancers were thought to be due to mutations in either BRCA1 or BRCA2, we identified only eight mutations in our series of 23 site-specific female breast cancer families (34%), four in BRCA1 and four in BRCA2. According to the posterior probabilities calculated for mutation-negative families, based on linkage data and mutation screening results, we would expect 8-10 site-specific female breast cancer families of our series to be due to neither BRCA1 nor BRCA2. Thus, our results suggest the existence of at least one more major breast cancer-susceptibility gene. 24 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  18. BRCA Mutations Increase Fertility in Families at Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer Risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Kwiatkowski

    Full Text Available Deleterious mutations in the BRCA genes are responsible for a small, but significant, proportion of breast and ovarian cancers (5 - 10 %. Proof of de novo mutations in hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (HBOC families is rare, in contrast to founder mutations, thousands of years old, that may be carried by as much as 1 % of a population. Thus, if mutations favoring cancer survive selection pressure through time, they must provide advantages that compensate for the loss of life expectancy.This hypothesis was tested within 2,150 HBOC families encompassing 96,325 individuals. Parameters included counts of breast/ovarian cancer, age at diagnosis, male breast cancer and other cancer locations. As expected, well-known clinical parameters discriminated between BRCA-mutated families and others: young age at breast cancer, ovarian cancer, pancreatic cancer and male breast cancer. The major fertility differences concerned men in BRCA-mutated families: they had lower first and mean age at paternity, and fewer remained childless. For women in BRCA families, the miscarriage rate was lower. In a logistic regression including clinical factors, the different miscarriage rate and men's mean age at paternity remained significant.Fertility advantages were confirmed in a subgroup of 746 BRCA mutation carriers and 483 non-carriers from BRCA mutated families. In particular, female carriers were less often nulliparous (9.1 % of carriers versus 16.0 %, p = 0.003 and had more children (1.8 ± 1.4 SD versus 1.5 ± 1.3, p = 0.002 as well as male carriers (1.7 ± 1.3 versus 1.4 ± 1.3, p = 0.024.Although BRCA mutations shorten the reproductive period due to cancer mortality, they compensate by improving fertility both in male and female carriers.

  19. Driven by Mutations: The Predictive Value of Mutation Subtype in EGFR-Mutated Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Emily; Feld, Emily; Horn, Leora

    2016-12-23

    EGFR-mutated NSCLC is a genetically heterogeneous disease that includes more than 200 distinct mutations. The implications of mutational subtype for both prognostic and predictive value are being increasingly understood. Although the most common EGFR mutations-exon 19 deletions or L858R mutations-predict sensitivity to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), it is now being recognized that outcomes may be improved in patients with exon 19 deletions. Additionally, 10% of patients will have an uncommon EGFR mutation, and response to EGFR TKI therapy is highly variable depending on the mutation. Given the growing recognition of the genetic and clinical variation seen in this disease, the development of comprehensive bioinformatics-driven tools to both analyze response in uncommon mutation subtypes and inform clinical decision making will be increasingly important. Clinical trials of novel EGFR TKIs should prospectively account for the presence of uncommon mutation subtypes in study design.

  20. Experiences from treatment-predictive KRAS testing; high mutation frequency in rectal cancers from females and concurrent mutations in the same tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Mats; Ekstrand, Anna; Edekling, Thomas;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: KRAS mutations represent key alterations in colorectal cancer development and lead to constitutive EGFR signaling. Since EGFR inhibition represents a therapeutic strategy in advanced colorectal cancer, KRAS mutation analysis has quickly been introduced as a treatment-predictive test. ...... therapies, whereas the observation of concurrent KRAS mutations imply that repeated KRAS targeting may occur during tumor progression in a subset of colorectal cancers.......BACKGROUND: KRAS mutations represent key alterations in colorectal cancer development and lead to constitutive EGFR signaling. Since EGFR inhibition represents a therapeutic strategy in advanced colorectal cancer, KRAS mutation analysis has quickly been introduced as a treatment-predictive test...... carried Gly12Cys/Gly12Asp in an adenomatous component and additionally acquired Gly12Val in the invasive component. CONCLUSION: The demonstration of a particularly high KRAS mutation frequency among female rectal cancer patients suggests that this subset is the least likely to respond to anti-EGFR...

  1. Somatic mutations of APC gene in carcinomas from hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Huang; Shu Zheng; Shen-Hang Jin; Su-Zhan Zhang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the mutational features of adenomatous polyposis coii (APC) gene and its possible arising mechanism in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancers (HNPCC).METHODS: PCR-based In Vitro Synthesized Protein Test (IVSP) assay and sequencing analysis were used to confirm somatic mutations of whole APC gene in 19 HNPCC cases. RESULTS: Eleven cases with 13 mutations were determined to harbor APC mutations. The prevalence of APC mutation was 58%(11/19). The mutations consisted of 9 frameshift and 4 nonsense ones, indicating that there were more frameshift mutations (69%). The frameshift mutations allexhibited deletion or insertion of 1-2 bp and most of them (7/9) happened at simple nucleotide repeat sequences, particularly within (A)n tracts (5/9). All point mutations presented C-to-T transitions at CpG sites. CONCLUSION: Mutations of APC gene were detected in more than half of HNPCC, indicating that its mutation was a common molecular event and might play an important role in the tumorigenesis of HNPCC. Locations of frameshift mutations at simple nucleotide repeat sequences and point mutations at CpG sites suggested that many mutations probably derived from endogenous processes including mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency. Defective MMR might affect the nature of APC mutations in HNPCC and likely occur earlier than APC mutational inactivation in some patients.

  2. Mutations in circulating mitochondrial DNA: Cassandra of oral cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Eugene S

    2012-07-01

    Cell-free circulating nucleic acids in human blood are increasing being researched as a source of diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for clinical oncology. High copy number per cell and frequent mutations in various malignancies make mitochondrial genome an attractive target for such an investigation, but practical development and validation of biomarkers based on cell-free mitochondrial DNA has been lagging. Uzawa and colleagues report in the July issue of Oncotarget that in a retrospective study of patients with oral cancer the load of mutant mitochondrial DNA in patient's serum was a strong indicator of postoperative recurrence. Based on these observations, the predictive value of circulating mutant mitochondrial DNA merits further evaluation in patients with oral and other malignancies.

  3. Breast cancer risk in Chinese women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lu; Sun, Jie; Zhang, Juan; He, Yingjian; Ouyang, Tao; Li, Jinfeng; Wang, Tianfeng; Fan, Zhaoqing; Fan, Tie; Lin, Benyao; Xie, Yuntao

    2016-04-01

    BRCA1/2 mutations represent approximately 5 % of unselected Chinese women with breast cancer. However, the breast cancer risk of Chinese women with BRCA1/2 mutations is unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to estimate the age-specific cumulative risk of breast cancer in Chinese women who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. Our study included 1816 unselected Chinese women with breast cancer and 5549 female first-degree relatives of these probands. All probands were screened for BRCA1/2 mutation. The age-specific cumulative risks of BRCA1/2 carriers were estimated using the kin-cohort study by comparing the history of breast cancer in first-degree female relatives of BRCA1/2 carriers and non-carriers. Among the 1816 probands, 125 BRCA1/2 pathogenic mutations were identified (70 in the BRCA1 gene and 55 in the BRCA2 gene). The incidence of breast cancer in the first-degree female relatives of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers was significantly higher (3.7-fold and 4.4-fold for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, respectively) than in non-carriers. The estimated cumulative risks of breast cancer by age 70 years were 37.9 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 24.1-54.4 %] for BRCA1 mutation carriers and 36.5 % (95 % CI 26.7-51.8 %) for BRCA2 mutation carriers, respectively. Our study suggests that the breast cancer risk of Chinese women with BRCA1/2 mutations appears to be relatively high by the age of 70. Therefore, genetic counseling, enhanced surveillance, and individual preventive strategies should be provided for Chinese women who carry a BRCA1/2 mutation.

  4. Identification of Variant-Specific Functions of PIK3CA by Rapid Phenotyping of Rare Mutations | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Large-scale sequencing efforts are uncovering the complexity of cancer genomes, which are composed of causal "driver" mutations that promote tumor progression along with many more pathologically neutral "passenger" events. The majority of mutations, both in known cancer drivers and uncharacterized genes, are generally of low occurrence, highlighting the need to functionally annotate the long tail of infrequent mutations present in heterogeneous cancers.

  5. p53 Mutations and Protein Overexpression in Primary Colorectal Cancer and its Liver Metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To compare p53 status in primary and hepatic metastatic colorectal cancer in 34 patients. Methods: p53 gene status (exons 5- 9) was examined by PCR, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and automated sequencing. P53 protein was detected by immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibody DO-7. Results: p53 mutations were found in exons 5 through 9 in 21 of 34 patients (61.8%). Among them, 5 patients had mutation in liver metastasis but not in their primary tumors while in the other patients the same mutations were found in both primary and metastatic colorectal cancers. In no patients was p53 mutation exclusively found in the primary colorectal tumors. Moreover, additional mutation was detected in the metastatic lesions in two cases. Of the 37 mutations within the exons examined, 73% was missense mutation and 16% was nonsense mutation. There were 4 microinsertions. P53 protein was overexpressed in both primary and metastatic colorectal cancers with p53 gene mutations. The presence of p53 mutation significantly correlated with p53 protein accumulation (r=0.96, p< 0.001). However, in 4 patients with p53 nonsense mutation, immunohistochemical staining was negative. In three patients who showed no p53 mutation of the primary tumor, p53 protein was consistently overexpressed. Conclusion: In colorectal cancers, p53 gene mutation usually appears first in the primary tumor and maintains as such but is more prominent when metastasized to the liver. However, p53 gene mutation may occur only after being metastasized.Although p53 gene mutation and p53 protein overexpression correlate with each other, either parameter examined alone may lead to false positive or negative results.

  6. Detecting the somatic mutations spectrum of Chinese lung cancer by analyzing the whole mitochondrial DNA genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yu; Huang, Jie; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Jun; Qiao, Fei; Chen, Hua-Mei; Hong, Zhi-Peng

    2015-02-01

    To detect the somatic mutations and character its spectrum in Chinese lung cancer patients. In this study, we sequenced the whole mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genomes for 10 lung cancer patients including the primary cancerous, matched paracancerous normal and distant normal tissues. By analyzing the 30 whole mtDNA genomes, eight somatic mutations were identified from five patients investigated, which were confirmed with the cloning and sequencing of the somatic mutations. Five of the somatic mutations were detected among control region and the rests were found at the coding region. Heterogeneity was the main character of the somatic mutations in Chinese lung cancer patients. Further potential disease-related screening showed that, except the C deletion at position 309 showed AD-weakly associated, most of them were not disease-related. Although the role of aforementioned somatic mutations was unknown, however, considering the relative higher frequency of somatic mutations among the whole mtDNA genomes, it hints that detecting the somatic mutation(s) from the whole mtDNA genomes can serve as a useful tool for the Chinese lung cancer diagnostic to some extent.

  7. Identification of and Molecular Basis for SIRT6 Loss-of-Function Point Mutations in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugel, Sita; Feldman, Jessica L; Klein, Mark A; Silberman, Dafne M; Sebastián, Carlos; Mermel, Craig; Dobersch, Stephanie; Clark, Abbe R; Getz, Gad; Denu, John M; Mostoslavsky, Raul

    2015-10-20

    Chromatin factors have emerged as the most frequently dysregulated family of proteins in cancer. We have previously identified the histone deacetylase SIRT6 as a key tumor suppressor, yet whether point mutations are selected for in cancer remains unclear. In this manuscript, we characterized naturally occurring patient-derived SIRT6 mutations. Strikingly, all the mutations significantly affected either stability or catalytic activity of SIRT6, indicating that these mutations were selected for in these tumors. Further, the mutant proteins failed to rescue sirt6 knockout (SIRT6 KO) cells, as measured by the levels of histone acetylation at glycolytic genes and their inability to rescue the tumorigenic potential of these cells. Notably, the main activity affected in the mutants was histone deacetylation rather than demyristoylation, pointing to the former as the main tumor-suppressive function for SIRT6. Our results identified cancer-associated point mutations in SIRT6, cementing its function as a tumor suppressor in human cancer.

  8. BRCA somatic mutations and epigenetic BRCA modifications in serous ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschetta, M; George, A; Kaye, S B; Banerjee, S

    2016-08-01

    The significant activity of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) inhibitors in the treatment of germline BRCA mutation-associated ovarian cancer, which represents ∼15% of HGS cases, has recently led to European Medicines Agency and food and drug administration approval of olaparib. Accumulating evidence suggests that PARP inhibitors may have a wider application in the treatment of sporadic ovarian cancers. Up to 50% of HGS ovarian cancer patients may exhibit homologous recombination deficiency (HRD) through mechanisms including germline BRCA mutations, somatic BRCA mutations, and BRCA promoter methylation. In this review, we discuss the role of somatic BRCA mutations and BRCA methylation in ovarian cancer. There is accumulating evidence for routine somatic BRCA mutation testing, but the relevance of BRCA epigenetic modifications is less clear. We explore the challenges that need to be addressed if the full potential of these markers of HRD is to be utilised in clinical practice.

  9. CDH1 mutations in gastric cancer patients from northern Brazil identified by Next- Generation Sequencing (NGS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Husny, Antonette; Raiol-Moraes, Milene; Amador, Marcos; Ribeiro-Dos-Santos, André M; Montagnini, André; Barbosa, Silvanira; Silva, Artur; Assumpção, Paulo; Ishak, Geraldo; Santos, Sidney; Pinto, Pablo; Cruz, Aline; Ribeiro-Dos-Santos, Ândrea

    2016-05-13

    Gastric cancer is considered to be the fifth highest incident tumor worldwide and the third leading cause of cancer deaths. Developing regions report a higher number of sporadic cases, but there are only a few local studies related to hereditary cases of gastric cancer in Brazil to confirm this fact. CDH1 germline mutations have been described both in familial and sporadic cases, but there is only one recent molecular description of individuals from Brazil. In this study we performed Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) to assess CDH1 germline mutations in individuals who match the clinical criteria for Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer (HDGC), or who exhibit very early diagnosis of gastric cancer. Among five probands we detected CDH1 germline mutations in two cases (40%). The mutation c.1023T > G was found in a HDGC family and the mutation c.1849G > A, which is nearly exclusive to African populations, was found in an early-onset case of gastric adenocarcinoma. The mutations described highlight the existence of gastric cancer cases caused by CDH1 germline mutations in northern Brazil, although such information is frequently ignored due to the existence of a large number of environmental factors locally. Our report represent the first CDH1 mutations in HDGC described from Brazil by an NGS platform.

  10. Whole genomes redefine the mutational landscape of pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Nicola; Pajic, Marina; Patch, Ann-Marie; Chang, David K.; Kassahn, Karin S.; Bailey, Peter; Johns, Amber L.; Miller, David; Nones, Katia; Quek, Kelly; Quinn, Michael C. J.; Robertson, Alan J.; Fadlullah, Muhammad Z. H.; Bruxner, Tim J. C.; Christ, Angelika N.; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Manning, Suzanne; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Wani, Shivangi; Wilson, Peter J; Markham, Emma; Cloonan, Nicole; Anderson, Matthew J.; Fink, J. Lynn; Holmes, Oliver; Kazakoff, Stephen H.; Leonard, Conrad; Newell, Felicity; Poudel, Barsha; Song, Sarah; Taylor, Darrin; Waddell, Nick; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Wu, Jianmin; Pinese, Mark; Cowley, Mark J.; Lee, Hong C.; Jones, Marc D.; Nagrial, Adnan M.; Humphris, Jeremy; Chantrill, Lorraine A.; Chin, Venessa; Steinmann, Angela M.; Mawson, Amanda; Humphrey, Emily S.; Colvin, Emily K.; Chou, Angela; Scarlett, Christopher J.; Pinho, Andreia V.; Giry-Laterriere, Marc; Rooman, Ilse; Samra, Jaswinder S.; Kench, James G.; Pettitt, Jessica A.; Merrett, Neil D.; Toon, Christopher; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q.; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Jamieson, Nigel B.; Graham, Janet S.; Niclou, Simone P.; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Grützmann, Robert; Aust, Daniela; Hruban, Ralph H.; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Morgan, Richard A.; Lawlor, Rita T.; Corbo, Vincenzo; Bassi, Claudio; Falconi, Massimo; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Tortora, Giampaolo; Tempero, Margaret A.; Gill, Anthony J.; Eshleman, James R.; Pilarsky, Christian; Scarpa, Aldo; Musgrove, Elizabeth A.; Pearson, John V.; Biankin, Andrew V.; Grimmond, Sean M.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most lethal of malignancies and a major health burden. We performed whole-genome sequencing and copy number variation (CNV) analysis of 100 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs). Chromosomal rearrangements leading to gene disruption were prevalent, affecting genes known to be important in pancreatic cancer (TP53, SMAD4, CDKN2A, ARID1A and ROBO2) and new candidate drivers of pancreatic carcinogenesis (KDM6A and PREX2). Patterns of structural variation (variation in chromosomal structure) classified PDACs into 4 subtypes with potential clinical utility: the subtypes were termed stable, locally rearranged, scattered and unstable. A significant proportion harboured focal amplifications, many of which contained druggable oncogenes (ERBB2, MET, FGFR1, CDK6, PIK3R3 and PIK3CA), but at low individual patient prevalence. Genomic instability co-segregated with inactivation of DNA maintenance genes (BRCA1, BRCA2 or PALB2) and a mutational signature of DNA damage repair deficiency. Of 8 patients who received platinum therapy, 4 of 5 individuals with these measures of defective DNA maintenance responded. PMID:25719666

  11. The contribution of founder mutations in BRCA1 to breast cancer in Belarus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uglanitsa, N; Oszurek, O; Uglanitsa, K; Savonievich, E; Lubiński, J; Cybulski, C; Debniak, T; Narod, S A; Gronwald, J

    2010-10-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 gene increase susceptibility to both breast and ovarian cancer. In some countries, including several in Eastern Europe, founder mutations in the BRCA1 gene are responsible for a significant proportion of breast cancer cases. To estimate the hereditary proportion of breast cancer in Belarus, we sought the presence of any of three founder mutations in BRCA1 (4153delA, 5382insC and C61G) in 500 unselected cases of breast cancer. These mutations have previously been identified in breast/ovarian cancer families from Belarus and from other Slavic countries, including Poland and Russia. One of the three founder mutations in BRCA1 was present in 38 of 500 unselected cases of breast cancer (7.6%). A mutation was found in 12.6% of women diagnosed before age 50 and 5.6% of women diagnosed after age 50. A mutation was identified in 2 of 251 newborn controls (0.8%). The hereditary proportion of breast cancers in Belarus is among the highest of any countries studied to date.

  12. Relationship between EGFR and KRAS mutations and prognosis in Chinese patients with non-small cell lung cancer:a mutation analysis with real-time polymerase chain reaction using scorpion amplification refractory mutation system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高洁

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the gene mutation of EGFR and KRAS in Chinese patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) ,and to analyze the relationship between the gene mutations and the clinicopathological features and EGFR-TKI efficiency. Methods EGFR mutation was detected in 120 patients and KRAS mutation in 104 patients

  13. cDNA sequencing improves the detection of P53 missense mutations in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesionek-Kupnicka Dorota

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently published data showed discrepancies beteween P53 cDNA and DNA sequencing in glioblastomas. We hypothesised that similar discrepancies may be observed in other human cancers. Methods To this end, we analyzed 23 colorectal cancers for P53 mutations and gene expression using both DNA and cDNA sequencing, real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. Results We found P53 gene mutations in 16 cases (15 missense and 1 nonsense. Two of the 15 cases with missense mutations showed alterations based only on cDNA, and not DNA sequencing. Moreover, in 6 of the 15 cases with a cDNA mutation those mutations were difficult to detect in the DNA sequencing, so the results of DNA analysis alone could be misinterpreted if the cDNA sequencing results had not also been available. In all those 15 cases, we observed a higher ratio of the mutated to the wild type template by cDNA analysis, but not by the DNA analysis. Interestingly, a similar overexpression of P53 mRNA was present in samples with and without P53 mutations. Conclusion In terms of colorectal cancer, those discrepancies might be explained under three conditions: 1, overexpression of mutated P53 mRNA in cancer cells as compared with normal cells; 2, a higher content of cells without P53 mutation (normal cells and cells showing K-RAS and/or APC but not P53 mutation in samples presenting P53 mutation; 3, heterozygous or hemizygous mutations of P53 gene. Additionally, for heterozygous mutations unknown mechanism(s causing selective overproduction of mutated allele should also be considered. Our data offer new clues for studying discrepancy in P53 cDNA and DNA sequencing analysis.

  14. Mutation analysis of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in a male breast cancer population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, L.S.; Gayther, S.A.; Ponder, B.A.J. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    A population-based series of 54 male breast cancer cases from Southern California were analyzed for germ-line mutations in the inherited breast/ovarian cancer genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2. Nine (17%) of the patients had a family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer in at least one first-degree relative. A further seven (13%) of the patients reported breast/ovarian cancer in at least one second-degree relative and in no first-degree relatives. No germ-line BRCA1 mutations were found. Two male breast cancer patients (4% of the total) were found to carry novel truncating mutations in the BRCA2 gene. Only one of the two male breast cancer patients carrying a BRCA2 mutation had a family history of cancer, with one case of ovarian cancer in a first-degree relative. The remaining eight cases (89%) of male breast cancer with a family history of breast/ovarian cancer in first-degree relatives remain unaccounted for by mutations in either the BRCA1 gene or the BRCA2 gene. 23 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  15. BRCA1 and BRCA2 Gene Mutations Screening In Sporadic Breast Cancer Patients In Kazakhstan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainur R. Akilzhanova

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: A large number of distinct mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have been reported worldwide, but little is known regarding the role of these inherited susceptibility genes in breast cancer risk among Kazakhstan women. Aim: To evaluate the role of BRCA1/2 mutations in Kazakhstan women presenting with sporadic breast cancer. Methods: We investigated the distribution and nature of polymorphisms in BRCA1 and BRCA2 entire coding regions in 156 Kazakhstan sporadic breast cancer cases and 112 age-matched controls using automatic direct sequencing. Results: We identified 22 distinct variants, including 16 missense mutations and 6 polymorphisms in BRCA1/2 genes. In BRCA1, 9 missense mutations and 3 synonymous polymorphisms were observed. In BRCA2, 7 missense mutations and 3 polymorphisms were detected. There was a higher prevalence of observed mutations in Caucasian breast cancer cases compared to Asian cases (p<0.05; higher frequencies of sequence variants were observed in Asian controls. No recurrent or founder mutations were observed in BRCA1/2 genes. There were no statistically significant differences in age at diagnosis, tumor histology, size of tumor, and lymph node involvement between women with breast cancer with or without the BRCA sequence alterations. Conclusions: Considering the majority of breast cancer cases are sporadic, the present study will be helpful in the evaluation of the need for the genetic screening of BRCA1/2 mutations and reliable genetic counseling for Kazakhstan sporadic breast cancer patients. Evaluation of common polymorphisms and mutations and breast cancer risk in families with genetic predisposition to breast cancer is ongoing in another current investigation. 

  16. Clonal status of actionable driver events and the timing of mutational processes in cancer evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGranahan, Nicholas; Favero, Francesco; de Bruin, Elza C.

    2015-01-01

    and uncovered putative cancer genes involved in subclonal expansions, including CTNNA2 and ATXN1. Our results provide a pan-cancer census of driver events within the context of intratumor heterogeneity and reveal patterns of tumor evolution across cancers. The frequent presence of subclonal driver mutations...

  17. High specificity but low sensitivity of mutation-specific antibodies against EGFR mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondgaard, Anna-Louise; Høgdall, Estrid; Mellemgaard, Anders;

    2014-01-01

    Determination of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations has a pivotal impact on treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A standardized test has not yet been approved. So far, Sanger DNA sequencing has been widely used. Its rather low sensitivity has led to the development...

  18. Mutation and methylation analysis of the chromodomain-helicase-DNA binding 5 gene in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorringe, Kylie L; Choong, David Yh; Williams, Louise H; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Sridhar, Anita; Qiu, Wen; Bearfoot, Jennifer L; Campbell, Ian G

    2008-11-01

    Chromodomain, helicase, DNA binding 5 (CHD5) is a member of a subclass of the chromatin remodeling Swi/Snf proteins and has recently been proposed as a tumor suppressor in a diverse range of human cancers. We analyzed all 41 coding exons of CHD5 for somatic mutations in 123 primary ovarian cancers as well as 60 primary breast cancers using high-resolution melt analysis. We also examined methylation of the CHD5 promoter in 48 ovarian cancer samples by methylation-specific single-stranded conformation polymorphism and bisulfite sequencing. In contrast to previous studies, no mutations were identified in the breast cancers, but somatic heterozygous missense mutations were identified in 3 of 123 ovarian cancers. We identified promoter methylation in 3 of 45 samples with normal CHD5 and in 2 of 3 samples with CHD5 mutation, suggesting these tumors may have biallelic inactivation of CHD5. Hemizygous copy number loss at CHD5 occurred in 6 of 85 samples as assessed by single nucleotide polymorphism array. Tumors with CHD5 mutation or methylation were more likely to have mutation of KRAS or BRAF (P = .04). The aggregate frequency of CHD5 haploinsufficiency or inactivation is 16.2% in ovarian cancer. Thus, CHD5 may play a role as a tumor suppressor gene in ovarian cancer; however, it is likely that there is another target of the frequent copy number neutral loss of heterozygosity observed at 1p36.

  19. Mutation and Methylation Analysis of the Chromodomain-Helicase-DNA Binding 5 Gene in Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kylie L. Gorringe

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Chromodomain, helicase, DNA binding 5 (CHD5 is a member of a subclass of the chromatin remodeling Swi/Snf proteins and has recently been proposed as a tumor suppressor in a diverse range of human cancers. We analyzed all 41 coding exons of CHD5 for somatic mutations in 123 primary ovarian cancers as well as 60 primary breast cancers using high-resolution melt analysis. We also examined methylation of the CHD5 promoter in 48 ovarian cancer samples by methylation-specific single-stranded conformation polymorphism and bisulfite sequencing. In contrast to previous studies, no mutations were identified in the breast cancers, but somatic heterozygous missense mutations were identified in 3 of 123 ovarian cancers. We identified promoter methylation in 3 of 45 samples with normal CHD5 and in 2 of 3 samples with CHD5 mutation, suggesting these tumors may have biallelic inactivation of CHD5. Hemizygous copy number loss at CHD5 occurred in 6 of 85 samples as assessed by single nucleotide polymorphism array. Tumors with CHD5 mutation or methylation were more likely to have mutation of KRAS or BRAF (P = .04. The aggregate frequency of CHD5 haploinsufficiency or inactivation is 16.2% in ovarian cancer. Thus, CHD5 may play a role as a tumor suppressor gene in ovarian cancer; however, it is likely that there is another target of the frequent copy number neutral loss of heterozygosity observed at 1p36.

  20. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation analysis in breast-ovarian cancer families from northeastern Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkowska, Magdalena; BroZek, Izabela; Wysocka, Barbara; Haraldsson, Karin; Sandberg, Therese; Johansson, Ulla; Sellberg, Gunilla; Borg, Ake; Limon, Janusz

    2003-05-01

    Sixty high-risk breast and/or ovarian cancer families from North-Eastern Poland were screened for germline mutations in BRCA1 (MIM# 113705) and BRCA2 (MIM# 600185), using a combination of protein truncation test, denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and direct sequencing. Sixteen (27%) of the families were found to carry nine different BRCA mutations, including 14 families with BRCA1 mutation and two families with BRCA2 mutation. The results suggest the presence of two strong BRCA1 founder mutations in the Polish population - 5382insC (6 families) and 300T>G (Cys61Gly; 3 families). The remaining seven mutations were found in single families and included three previously reported BRCA1 mutations (185delAG, 2682C>T [Gln855Ter] and 3819del5), a novel BRCA1 mutation (IVS14+1G>A), as well as two BRCA2 mutations (4088delA and 7985G>A [Trp2586Ter]) not previously observed in Polish families. We confirm the strong influence of two Central-Eastern European BRCA1 founder mutations in familial breast and/or ovarian cancer in Poland. We also conclude that the Polish population has a more dispersed BRCA mutation spectrum than had been earlier thought. This warrants further careful BRCA mutation screening in order to optimise genetic counselling and disease prevention in affected families.

  1. Assessment of BRCA 1,2 gene mutation as genetic risk factor for ovarian cancer

    OpenAIRE

    MAMARASULOVA DILFUZAHON ZAKIRJANOVNA; MAMADALIEVA YASHNAR SOLIEVNA; ERGASHEVA ZUMRAD ABDUKAUMOVNA; AZIZOV URYI DALIMOVICH

    2016-01-01

    The analysis was conducted pathological preparations 204 patients with verified diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Prevailed 5382insC mutation (BRCA1) 4.0 % of the sample of breast cancer patients, 11.6 % of the sample of patients with ovarian cancer, which is consistent with the data of numerous works of domestic and foreign authors, which have been shown the prevalence of mutations 5382insC gene BRCA1 in various areas of Andizhan region. Five mutations 4153delA, 5382insC, Cys61Gly, 2080delA, 3819...

  2. Five recurrent BRCA1/2 mutations are responsible for cancer predisposition in the majority of Slovenian breast cancer families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novakovic Srdjan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both recurrent and population specific mutations have been found in different areas of the world and more specifically in ethnically defined or isolated populations. The population of Slovenia has over several centuries undergone limited mixing with surrounding populations. The current study was aimed at establishing the mutation spectrum of BRCA1/2 in the Slovenian breast/ovarian cancer families taking advantage of a complete cancer registration database. A second objective was to determine the cancer phenotype of these families. Methods The original population database was composed of cancer patients from the Institute of Oncology Ljubljana in Slovenia which also includes current follow-up status on these patients. The inclusion criteria for the BRCA1/2 screening were: (i probands with at least two first degree relatives with breast and ovarian cancer; (ii probands with only two first degree relatives of breast cancer where one must be diagnosed less than 50 years of age; and (iii individual patients with breast and ovarian cancer, bilateral breast cancer, breast cancer diagnosed before the age of 40 and male breast cancer without any other cancer in the family. Results Probands from 150 different families met the inclusion criteria for mutation analysis of which 145 consented to testing. A BRCA1/2 mutation was found in 56 (39%. Two novel large deletions covering consecutive exons of BRCA1 were found. Five highly recurrent specific mutations were identified (1806C>T, 300T>G, 300T>A, 5382insC in the BRCA1 gene and IVS16-2A>G in the BRCA2 gene. The IVS16-2A>G in the BRCA2 gene appears to be a unique founder mutation in the Slovenian population. A practical implication is that only 4 PCR fragments can be used in a first screen and reveal the cancer predisposing mutation in 67% of the BRCA1/2 positive families. We also observed an exceptionally high frequency of 4 different pathogenic missense mutations, all affecting one of

  3. Hotspots, Jets and Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardcastle, M. J.

    2008-06-01

    I discuss the nature of `hotspots' and `jet knots' in the kpc-scale structures of powerful radio galaxies and their relationship to jet-environment interactions. I describe evidence for interaction between the jets of FRI sources and their local environments, and discuss its relationship to particle acceleration, but the main focus of the paper is the hotspots of FRIIs and on new observational evidence on the nature of the particle acceleration associated with them.

  4. DETECTION OF p53 GENE MUTATION IN PLASMA OF PATIENTS WITH GASTRIC CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏鹏程; 李子禹; 张连海; 万文徽; 任晖; 张桂国; 王怡; 邓国仁; 季加孚

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigated p53 gene mutation in plasma of gastric cancer patients. Methods: DNA extracted from plasma and matched tumor and tumor-adjacent non-cancerous tissues of 96 gastric cancer patients, and DNA from 20 healthy volunteers were studied. Exon 5, 6, 7, and 8 of p53 were amplified by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). The mutation status was analyzed by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC), followed by direct sequencing of cases with aberrant chromatographic patterns. Results: Heterozygous mutations of p53 gene were detected in 19.9% (19/96) of primary tumor tissues and 5.2% (5/96) of corresponding plasma. All p53 gene mutations detected in plasma DNA consisted with mutations in the matched primary tumor samples. Neither the tumor-adjacent gastric mucosa tissues nor control plasma from healthy volunteers showed p53 gene mutation. No correlation was found between p53 mutation status and clinicopathological features of gastric cancer patients. Conclusion: p53 gene mutation in plasma can be detected in tissues and plasma of gastric cancer patients, which could be applied in screening and surveillance of this disease.

  5. Prevalence of low-penetrant germline TP53 D49H mutation in Japanese cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Ken; Urakami, Kenichi; Nagashima, Takeshi; Shimoda, Yuji; Ohnami, Shumpei; Ohnami, Sumiko; Ohshima, Keiichi; Mochizuki, Tohru; Hatakeyama, Keiichi; Serizawa, Masakuni; Akiyama, Yasuto; Maruyama, Kouji; Katagiri, Hirohisa; Ishida, Yuji; Takahashi, Kaoru; Nishimura, Seiichiro; Terashima, Masanori; Kawamura, Taiichi; Kinugasa, Yusuke; Yamakawa, Yushi; Onitsuka, Tetsuro; Ohde, Yasuhisa; Sugino, Takashi; Ito, Ichiro; Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki; Horiuchi, Yasue; Mizuguchi, Maki; Yamazaki, Mutsumi; Inoue, Kengo; Wakamatsu, Kimiko; Sugiyama, Misato; Uesaka, Katsuhiko; Kusuhara, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Using whole exome sequencing data obtained from 1,685 Japanese cancer patients, we examined genetic variations of germline TP53 and found 10 types of non-synonymous single nucleotide variants. In the present study, we focused on 6 patients with germline D49H mutation located in the transactivation domain 2 of p53 protein, since the mutation seemed to be prevalent in cancer patients and to be pathogenic. According to the initial survey for family history of the proband with the germline TP53 D49H mutation, one osteosarcoma patient and his pedigree fulfill the criteria for Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome and the 2009 Chompret criteria for germline TP53 mutation screening. Since this patient possesses double germline mutations of TP53 D49H and A159D, further studies are required to evaluate contribution of the D49H mutation in this morbidity. The remaining 5 patients had family histories of cancer, but none fulfills the criteria either for the Li-Fraumeni/Li-Fraumeni-like syndromes or the 2009 Chompret criteria for germline TP53 mutation screening. It is possible to postulate that the germline TP53 D49H mutation is likely to be low-penetrant in some pedigrees. The present study also indicates that the survey for the germline TP53 mutation plays an important role in clinical practice as it will prevent mistaking cancer patients with unusual heredities for sporadic cases.

  6. NOD2 mutations and colorectal cancer - Where do we stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branquinho, Diogo; Freire, Paulo; Sofia, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Due to the overwhelming burden of colorectal cancer (CRC), great effort has been placed on identifying genetic mutations that contribute to disease development and progression. One of the most studied polymorphisms that could potentially increase susceptibility to CRC involves the nucleotide-binding and oligomerization-domain containing 2 (NOD2) gene. There is growing evidence that the biological activity of NOD2 is far greater than previously thought and a link with intestinal microbiota and mucosal immunity is increasingly sought after. In fact, microbial composition may be an important contributor not only to inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) but also to CRC. Recent studies have showed that deficient NOD2 function confers a communicable risk of colitis and CRC. Despite the evidence from experimental models, population-based studies that tried to link certain NOD2 polymorphisms and an increase in CRC risk have been described as conflicting. Significant geographic discrepancies in the frequency of such polymorphisms and different interpretations of the results may have limited the conclusions of those studies. Since being first associated to IBD and CRC, our understanding of the role of this gene has come a long way, and it is tempting to postulate that it may contribute to identify individuals with susceptible genetic background that may benefit from early CRC screening programs or in predicting response to current therapeutic tools. The aim of this review is to clarify the status quo of NOD2 mutations as genetic risk factors to chronic inflammation and ultimately to CRC. The use of NOD2 as a predictor of certain phenotypic characteristics of the disease will be analyzed as well. PMID:27152134

  7. NOD2 mutations and colorectal cancer - Where do we stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branquinho, Diogo; Freire, Paulo; Sofia, Carlos

    2016-04-27

    Due to the overwhelming burden of colorectal cancer (CRC), great effort has been placed on identifying genetic mutations that contribute to disease development and progression. One of the most studied polymorphisms that could potentially increase susceptibility to CRC involves the nucleotide-binding and oligomerization-domain containing 2 (NOD2) gene. There is growing evidence that the biological activity of NOD2 is far greater than previously thought and a link with intestinal microbiota and mucosal immunity is increasingly sought after. In fact, microbial composition may be an important contributor not only to inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) but also to CRC. Recent studies have showed that deficient NOD2 function confers a communicable risk of colitis and CRC. Despite the evidence from experimental models, population-based studies that tried to link certain NOD2 polymorphisms and an increase in CRC risk have been described as conflicting. Significant geographic discrepancies in the frequency of such polymorphisms and different interpretations of the results may have limited the conclusions of those studies. Since being first associated to IBD and CRC, our understanding of the role of this gene has come a long way, and it is tempting to postulate that it may contribute to identify individuals with susceptible genetic background that may benefit from early CRC screening programs or in predicting response to current therapeutic tools. The aim of this review is to clarify the status quo of NOD2 mutations as genetic risk factors to chronic inflammation and ultimately to CRC. The use of NOD2 as a predictor of certain phenotypic characteristics of the disease will be analyzed as well.

  8. Novel mutations of PRSS1 gene in patients with pancreatic cancer among Han population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Kai; LIU Qi-cai; LIN Jian-hua; LIN Xin-hua; ZHUANG Ze-hao; GAO Feng; OU Qi-shui

    2011-01-01

    Background A high mortality rate of pancreatic cancer becomes a bottleneck for further treatment with long-term efficacy. It is urgent to find a new mean to predict the early onset of pancreatic cancer accurately. The authors hypothesized that genetic variants of cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene could affect trypsin expression/function and result in abnormal activation of protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2), then lead to pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to elaborate some novel mutations of PRSS1 gene in the patients with pancreatic cancer.Methods Totally 156 patients with pancreatic cancer and 220 unrelated individuals as controls were enrolled in this study. The mutations of PRSS1 gene were analyzed by direct sequencing. K-ras Mutation Detection Kit was used to find the general k-ras gene disorder in the pancreatic cancer tissue. Then the clinical data were collected and analyzed simultaneously.Results There were two patients who carried novel mutations which was IVS 3 +157 G>C of PRSS1 gene in peripheral blood specimens and pancreatic cancer tissue. What's more, it was surprising to find a novel complicated mutation of exon 3 in PRSS1 gene (c.409 A>G and c.416 C>T) in another young patient. The complicated mutation made No. 135 and No.137 amino acid transfer from Thr to Ala and Thr to Met respectively. No any mutation was found in the normal controls while no mutations of k-ras gene were detected in the three patients.Conclusion Mutations of PRSS1 gene may be an important factor of pancreatic cancer.

  9. The risk for developing cancer in Israeli ATM, BLM, and FANCC heterozygous mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitman, Yael; Boker-Keinan, Lital; Berkenstadt, Michal; Liphsitz, Irena; Weissglas-Volkov, Daphna; Ries-Levavi, Liat; Sarouk, Ifat; Pras, Elon; Friedman, Eitan

    2016-03-01

    Cancer risks in heterozygous mutation carriers of the ATM, BLM, and FANCC genes are controversial. To shed light on this issue, cancer rates were evaluated by cross referencing asymptomatic Israeli heterozygous mutation carriers in the ATM, BLM, and FANCC genes with cancer diagnoses registered at the Israeli National Cancer Registry (INCR). Comparison of observed to expected Standardized Incidence Rates (SIR) was performed. Overall, 474 individuals participated in the study: 378 females; 25 Arab and 31 Jewish ATM carriers, 152 BLM carriers, and 170 FANCC carriers (all Ashkenazim). Age range at genotyping was 19-53 years (mean + SD 30.6 + 5 years). In addition, 96 males were included; 5, 34, and 57 ATM, BLM, and FANCC mutation carriers, respectively. Over 5-16 years from genotyping (4721 person/years), 15 new cancers were diagnosed in mutation carriers: 5 breast, 4 cervical, 3 melanomas, and one each bone sarcoma, pancreatic, and colorectal cancer. No single cancer diagnosis was more prevalent then expected in all groups combined or per gene analyzed. Specifically breast cancer SIR was 0.02-0.77. We conclude that Israeli ATM, BLM, and FANCC heterozygous mutation carriers are not at an increased risk for developing cancer.

  10. Ovarian cancer susceptibility alleles and risk of ovarian cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Susan J; Antoniou, Antonis C; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B

    2012-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancer. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified six alleles associated with risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated four of these loci as potential modifiers...... for the remaining loci were consistent with odds ratio estimates for the general population. The identification of multiple loci modifying ovarian cancer risk may be useful for counseling women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations regarding their risk of ovarian cancer....

  11. A BAP1 mutation in a Danish family predisposes to uveal melanoma and other cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aoude, Lauren G; Wadt, Karin; Bojesen, Anders;

    2013-01-01

    with predominantly uveal melanoma but also a range of other tumor types including lung, neuroendocrine, stomach, and breast cancer; as well as pigmented skin lesions. Whole-exome sequencing identified a BAP1 splice mutation located at c.581-2A>G, which leads to a premature truncation of BAP1 in an individual......Truncating germline mutations in the tumor suppressor gene BRCA-1 associated protein-1 (BAP1) have been reported in families predisposed to developing a wide range of different cancer types including uveal melanoma and cutaneous melanoma. There has also been an association between amelanotic tumor...... development and germline BAP1 mutation suggesting a possible phenotypic characteristic of BAP1 mutation carriers. Though there have been many types of cancer associated with germline BAP1 mutation, the full spectrum of disease association is yet to be ascertained. Here we describe a Danish family...

  12. Pedigree and genetic analysis of a novel mutation carrier patient suffering from hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miklós Tanyi; László Damjanovich; Judith Olasz; Géza Lukács; Orsolya Csuka; László Tóth; Zoltán Szentirmay; Zsuzsa Ress; Zsolt Barta; János L Tanyi

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To screen a suspected Hungarian HNPCC family to find specific mutations and to evaluate their effect on the presentation of the disease.METHODS: The family was identified by applying the Amsterdam and Bethesda Criteria. Immunohistoche-mistry was performed, and DNA samples isolated from tumor tissue were evaluated for microsatellite instability.The identification of possible mutations was carried out by sequencing the hMLH1 and hMSH2 genes.RESULTS: Two different mutations were observed in the index patient and in his family members. The first mutation was located in exon 7, codon 422 of hMSH2,and caused a change from Glu to STOP codon. No other report of such a mutation has been published, as far as we could find in the international databases. The second mutation was found in exon 3 codon 127 of the hMSH2 gene, resulting in Asp→Ser substitution. The second mutation was already published, as a non-pathogenic allelic variation.CONCLUSION: The pedigree analysis suggested that the newly detected nonsense mutation in exon 7 of the hMSH2 gene might be responsible for the development of colon cancers. Tn family members where the exon 7mutation is not coupled with this missense mutation, colon cancer appears after the age of 40. The association of these two mutations seems to decrease the age of manifestation of the disease into the early thirties.

  13. Low prevalence of germline hMSH6 mutations in colorectal cancer families from Spain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ana Sánchez de Abajo; Trinidad Caldes; Miguel de la Hoya; Alicia Tosar; Javier Godino; Juan Manuel Fernández; Jose Lopez Asenjo; Beatriz Perez Villamil; Pedro Perez Segura; Eduardo Diaz-Rubio

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence and penetrance of hMSH6 mutations in Spanish HNPCC families that was negative for mutation in hMLH1 or hMSH2.METHODS: We used PCR-based DGGE assay and direct Sequencing to screen for hMSH6 gene in 91 HNPCC families.RESULTS: we have identified 10 families with germ-line mutations in the DNA sequence. These mutations included two intronic variation, three missense mutation, one nonsense mutation, and four silent mutations. Among the 10 germ-line mutations identified in the Spanish cohort,8 were novel, perhaps, suggesting different mutational spectra in the Spanish population. Detailed pedigrees were constructed for the three families with a possible pathogenic hMSH6 mutation. The two silent mutations H388H and L758L, detected in a person affected of colorectal cancer at age 29, produce loss of the wild-type allele in the tumor sample. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that expression of MSH6 protein was lost only in the tumors from the carriers of V878A and Q263X mutations.CONCLUSION: Altogether, our results indicate that disease-causing germ-line mutations of hMSH6 are very less frequent in Spanish HNPCC families.

  14. Founding BRCA1 mutations in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in southern Sweden.

    OpenAIRE

    Johannsson, O; Ostermeyer, E A; Håkansson, S; Friedman, L S; Johansson, U; Sellberg, G.; Brøndum-Nielsen, K; Sele, V.; Olsson, H.; King, M C; Borg, A.

    1996-01-01

    Nine different germ-line mutations in the BRCA1 breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene were identified in 15 of 47 kindreds from southern Sweden, by use of SSCP and heteroduplex analysis of all exons and flanking intron region and by a protein-truncation test for exon 11, followed by direct sequencing. All but one of the mutations are predicted to give rise to premature translation termination and include seven frameshift insertions or deletions, a nonsense mutation, and a splice accep...

  15. Mutations of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in patients with bilateral breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Steinmann, D; Bremer, M.; Rades, D; SKAWRAN, B.; Siebrands, C; Karstens, J.H.; Dörk, T.

    2001-01-01

    Mutations of the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes have been shown to strongly predispose towards the development of contralateral breast cancer in patients from large multi-case families. In order to test the hypothesis that BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations are more frequent in patients with bilateral breast cancer, we have investigated a hospital-based series of 75 consecutive patients with bilateral breast cancer and a comparison group of 75 patients with unilateral breast cancer, pairwise matched by age and ...

  16. BRCA1 and BRCA2 Germline Mutations Screening in Algerian Breast/Ovarian Cancer Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Cherbal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in women in Algeria. The contribution of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations to hereditary breast/ovarian cancer in Algerian population is largely unknown. Here, we describe analysis of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in 86 individuals from 70 families from an Algerian cohort with a personal and family history suggestive of genetic predisposition to breast cancer.

  17. The Splicing Efficiency of Activating HRAS Mutations Can Determine Costello Syndrome Phenotype and Frequency in Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartung, Anne-Mette; Swensen, Jeff; Uriz, Inaki E;

    2016-01-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) may be caused by activating mutations in codon 12/13 of the HRAS proto-oncogene. HRAS p.Gly12Val mutations have the highest transforming activity, are very frequent in cancers, but very rare in CS, where they are reported to cause a severe, early lethal, phenotype. We ident...

  18. Integrative genome analyses identify key somatic driver mutations of small-cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peifer, Martin; Fernandez-Cuesta, Lynnette; Sos, Martin L.; George, Julie; Seidel, Danila; Kasper, Lawryn H.; Plenker, Dennis; Leenders, Frauke; Sun, Ruping; Zander, Thomas; Menon, Roopika; Koker, Mirjam; Dahmen, Ilona; Mueller, Christian; Di Cerbo, Vincenzo; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Altmueller, Janine; Baessmann, Ingelore; Becker, Christian; de Wilde, Bram; Vandesompele, Jo; Boehm, Diana; Ansen, Sascha; Gabler, Franziska; Wilkening, Ines; Heynck, Stefanie; Heuckmann, Johannes M.; Lu, Xin; Carter, Scott L.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Banerji, Shantanu; Getz, Gad; Park, Kwon-Sik; Rauh, Daniel; Gruetter, Christian; Fischer, Matthias; Pasqualucci, Laura; Wright, Gavin; Wainer, Zoe; Russell, Prudence; Petersen, Iver; Chen, Yuan; Stoelben, Erich; Ludwig, Corinna; Schnabel, Philipp; Hoffmann, Hans; Muley, Thomas; Brockmann, Michael; Engel-Riedel, Walburga; Muscarella, Lucia A.; Fazio, Vito M.; Groen, Harry; Timens, Wim; Sietsma, Hannie; Thunnissen, Erik; Smit, Egbert; Heideman, Danielle A. M.; Snijders, Peter J. F.; Cappuzzo, Federico; Ligorio, Claudia; Damiani, Stefania; Field, John; Solberg, Steinar; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Lund-Iversen, Marius; Saenger, Joerg; Clement, Joachim H.; Soltermann, Alex; Moch, Holger; Weder, Walter; Solomon, Benjamin; Soria, Jean-Charles; Validire, Pierre; Besse, Benjamin; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Brambilla, Christian; Lantuejoul, Sylvie; Lorimier, Philippe; Schneider, Peter M.; Hallek, Michael; Pao, William; Meyerson, Matthew; Sage, Julien; Shendure, Jay; Schneider, Robert; Buettner, Reinhard; Wolf, Juergen; Nuernberg, Peter; Perner, Sven; Heukamp, Lukas C.; Brindle, Paul K.; Haas, Stefan; Thomas, Roman K.

    2012-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive lung tumor subtype with poor prognosis(1-3). We sequenced 29 SCLC exomes, 2 genomes and 15 transcriptomes and found an extremely high mutation rate of 7.4 +/- 1 protein-changing mutations per million base pairs. Therefore, we conducted integrated analys

  19. Mutation in D-loop region of mitochondrial DNA in gastric cancer and its significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Bing Zhao; Hong-Yu Yang; Xi-Wei Zhang; Guo-Yu Chen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: lo investigate the mutation in D-loop region of mitochondrial DNA in gastric cancer and its influence on the changes of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell cycle. METHODS: The D-loop region was amplified by PCR and sequenced. Reactive oxygen species and cell cycle were detected by flow cytometry in 20 specimens from gastriccancer and adjacent normal tissues. According to the sequence results, gastric cancer tissue was divided into mutation group and control group. Reactive oxygen species, apoptosis and proliferation in the two groups were compared.RESULTS: Among the 20 gastric cancer specimens, 18 mutations were identified in 7 patients, the mutation rate being 35%. There were four microsatellite instabilities in the mutations. No mutation was found in the adjacent tissues. Reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and proliferation in the mutation group were all significantly higher than those in control group.CONCLUSION: Mutation in D-loop region plays a role in the genesis and development of gastric cancer.

  20. ESR1 mutations: Moving towards guiding treatment decision-making in metastatic breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Angus (Lindsay); N. Beije (Nick); A. Jäger (A.); J.W.M. Martens (John W. M.); S. Sleijfer (Stefan)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractMutations in the gene coding for the estrogen receptor (ER), ESR1, have been associated with acquired endocrine resistance in patients with ER-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Functional studies revealed that these ESR1 mutations lead to constitutive activity of the ER, meaning t

  1. Deleterious Germline BLM Mutations and the Risk for Early-onset Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voer, R.M. de; Hahn, M.M.; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Hoischen, A.; Gilissen, C.F.; Henkes, A.; Spruijt, L.; Zelst-Stams, W.A. van; Kets, C.M.; Verwiel, E.T.P.; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Schackert, H.K.; Kessel, A.G. van; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ligtenberg, M.J.; Kuiper, R.P.

    2015-01-01

    Bloom syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by chromosomal instability and increased cancer risk, caused by biallelic mutations in the RECQL-helicase gene BLM. Previous studies have led to conflicting conclusions as to whether carriers of heterozygous BLM mutations have an increa

  2. Indication for CDKN2A-mutation analysis in familial pancreatic cancer families without melanomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harinck, Femme; Kluijt, Irma; van der Stoep, Nienke; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; Wagner, Anja; Aalfs, Cora M.; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Poley, Jan-Werner; Kuipers, Ernst J.; Fockens, Paul; van Os, Theo A. M.; Bruno, Marco J.

    2012-01-01

    Background CDKN2A-mutation carriers run a high risk of developing melanomas and have an increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer (PC). Familial PC (FPC) patients with a personal history or family history of melanomas are therefore offered CDKN2A-mutation analysis. In contrast, CDKN2A testing i

  3. HMLH1 gene mutation in gastric cancer patients and their kindred

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Hua Li; Xian-Zhe Shi; Shen Lü; Min Liu; Wan-Ming Cui; Li-Na Liu; Jing Jiang; Guo-Wang Xu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the status of hMLH1 gene point mutations of gastric cancer kindreds and gastric cancer patients from northern China, and to find out gene mutation status in the population susceptible to gastric cancer. METHODS: Blood samples of 120 members from five gastric cancer families, 56 sporadic gastric cancer patients and control individuals were collected. After DNA extraction,the mutations of exon 8 and exon 12 of hMLH1 gene were investigated by PCR-SSCP-CE, followed by DNA sequencing.RESULTS: In the five kindreds, the mutation frequency was 25% (5/16) for the probands and 18% (19/104) for the non-cancerous members, which were significantly higher than the controls (P<0.01 x2 = 7.71, P<0.01 x2 = 8.65, respectively). In the sporadic gastric cancer, the mutation frequency was 7% (4/56), which was similar to that (5/100) in the healthy controls. The mutation point of exon 8 was at 219 codon of hMLH1 gene (A-G), resulting in a substitution of Ile-Val (ATC-GTC), whereas the mutation of exon 12 was at 384 codon of hMLH1 gene (T-A) resulting in a substitution of Asp-Val (GTT-GAT), which were the same as previously found in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma.CONCLUSION: The members of gastric cancer families from northern China may have similar genetic background of hMLH1 gene mutation as those of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma.

  4. Mutations of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in patients with bilateral breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, D; Bremer, M; Rades, D; Skawran, B; Siebrands, C; Karstens, J H; Dörk, T

    2001-09-14

    Mutations of the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes have been shown to strongly predispose towards the development of contralateral breast cancer in patients from large multi-case families. In order to test the hypothesis that BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations are more frequent in patients with bilateral breast cancer, we have investigated a hospital-based series of 75 consecutive patients with bilateral breast cancer and a comparison group of 75 patients with unilateral breast cancer, pairwise matched by age and family history, for mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Five frameshift deletions (517delGT in BRCA1; 4772delA, 5946delCT, 6174delT and 8138del5 in BRCA2) were identified in patients with bilateral disease. No further mutations, apart from polymorphisms and 3 rare unclassified variants, were found after scanning the whole BRCA1 and BRCA2 coding sequence. Three pathogenic BRCA1 mutations (Cys61Gly, 3814del5, 5382insC) were identified in the group of patients with unilateral breast cancer. The frequencies of common BRCA1 and BRCA2 missense variants were not different between the 2 groups. In summary, we did not find a significantly increased prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in a hospital-based cohort of German patients with bilateral breast cancer. We conclude that bilaterality of breast cancer on its own is not strongly associated with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations when adjusted for age and family history. The high frequency of bilateral disease in multi-case breast cancer families may be due to a familial aggregation of additional susceptibility factors modifying the penetrance of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations.

  5. Mutation screening of mismatch repair gene Mlh3 in familial esophageal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Xu Liu; Yu Li; Xue-Dong Jiang; Hong-Nian Yin; Lin Zhang; Yu Wang; Jun Yang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To shed light on the possible role of mismatch repair gene Mlh3 in familial esophageal cancer (FEC).METHODS: A total of 66 members from 10 families suggestive of a genetic predisposition to hereditary esophageal cancer were screened for germline mutations in Mlh3 with denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC), a newly developed method of comparative sequencing based on heteroduplex detection. For all samples exhibiting abnormal DHPLC profiles,sequence changes were evaluated by cycle sequencing.For any mutation in family members, we conducted a segregation study to compare its prevalence in sporadic esophageal cancer patients and normal controls.RESULTS: Exons of Mlh3 in all samples were successfully examined. Overall, 4 missense mutations and 3 polymorphisms were identified in 4 families. Mlh3 missense mutations in families 9 and 10 might be pathogenic, but had a reduced penetrance. While in families 1 and 7,there was no sufficient evidence supporting the monogenic explanations of esophageal cancers in families.The mutations were found in 33% of high-risk families and 50% of low-risk families.CONCLUSION: Mlh3 is a high risk gene with a reduced penetrance in some families. However, it acts as a low risk gene for esophageal cancer in most families. Mutations of Mlh3 may work together with other genes in an accumulated manner and result in an increased risk of esophageal tumor. DHPLC is a robust and sensitive technique for screening gene mutations.

  6. The spectrum of SWI/SNF mutations, ubiquitous in human cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Hunter Shain

    Full Text Available SWI/SNF is a multi-subunit chromatin remodeling complex that uses the energy of ATP hydrolysis to reposition nucleosomes, thereby modulating gene expression. Accumulating evidence suggests that SWI/SNF functions as a tumor suppressor in some cancers. However, the spectrum of SWI/SNF mutations across human cancers has not been systematically investigated. Here, we mined whole-exome sequencing data from 24 published studies representing 669 cases from 18 neoplastic diagnoses. SWI/SNF mutations were widespread across diverse human cancers, with an excess of deleterious mutations, and an overall frequency approaching TP53 mutation. Mutations occurred most commonly in the SMARCA4 enzymatic subunit, and in subunits thought to confer functional specificity (ARID1A, ARID1B, PBRM1, and ARID2. SWI/SNF mutations were not mutually-exclusive of other mutated cancer genes, including TP53 and EZH2 (both previously linked to SWI/SNF. Our findings implicate SWI/SNF as an important but under-recognized tumor suppressor in diverse human cancers, and provide a key resource to guide future investigations.

  7. Cancer-associated mutations are preferentially distributed in protein kinase functional sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izarzugaza, Jose M G; Redfern, Oliver C; Orengo, Christine A; Valencia, Alfonso

    2009-12-01

    Protein kinases are a superfamily involved in many crucial cellular processes, including signal transmission and regulation of cell cycle. As a consequence of this role, kinases have been reported to be associated with many types of cancer and are considered as potential therapeutic targets. We analyzed the distribution of pathogenic somatic point mutations (drivers) in the protein kinase superfamily with respect to their location in the protein, such as in structural, evolutionary, and functionally relevant regions. We find these driver mutations are more clearly associated with key protein features than other somatic mutations (passengers) that have not been directly linked to tumor progression. This observation fits well with the expected implication of the alterations in protein kinase function in cancer pathogenicity. To explain the relevance of the detected association of cancer driver mutations at the molecular level in the human kinome, we compare these with genetically inherited mutations (SNPs). We find that the subset of nonsynonymous SNPs that are associated to disease, but sufficiently mild to the point of being widespread in the population, tend to avoid those key protein regions, where they could be more detrimental for protein function. This tendency contrasts with the one detected for cancer associated-driver-mutations, which seems to be more directly implicated in the alteration of protein function. The detailed analysis of protein kinase groups and a number of relevant examples, confirm the relation between cancer associated-driver-mutations and key regions for protein kinase structure and function.

  8. An analysis of substitution, deletion and insertion mutations in cancer genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iengar, Prathima

    2012-08-01

    Cancer-associated mutations in cancer genes constitute a diverse set of mutations associated with the disease. To gain insight into features of the set, substitution, deletion and insertion mutations were analysed at the nucleotide level, from the COSMIC database. The most frequent substitutions were c → t, g → a, g → t, and the most frequent codon changes were to termination codons. Deletions more than insertions, FS (frameshift) indels more than I-F (in-frame) ones, and single-nucleotide indels, were frequent. FS indels cause loss of significant fractions of proteins. The 5'-cut in FS deletions, and 5'-ligation in FS insertions, often occur between pairs of identical bases. Interestingly, the cut-site and 3'-ligation in insertions, and 3'-cut and join-pair in deletions, were each found to be the same significantly often (p Proto-oncogenes undergo fewer, less-disruptive mutations, in selected protein regions, to activate a single allele. Finally, catalogues, in ranked order, of genes mutated in each cancer, and cancers in which each gene is mutated, were created. The study highlights the nucleotide level preferences and disruptive nature of cancer mutations.

  9. Oncogene Mutations in Colorectal Polyps Identified in the Norwegian Colorectal Cancer Prevention (NORCCAP) Screening Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorentzen, Jon A.; Grzyb, Krzysztof; De Angelis, Paula M.; Hoff, Geir; Eide, Tor J.; Andresen, Per Arne

    2016-01-01

    Data are limited on oncogene mutation frequencies in polyps from principally asymptomatic participants of population-based colorectal cancer screening studies. In this study, DNA from 204 polyps, 5 mm or larger, were collected from 176 participants of the NORCCAP screening study and analyzed for mutations in KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA including the rarely studied KRAS exons 3 and 4 mutations. KRAS mutations were identified in 23.0% of the lesions and were significantly associated with tubulovillous adenomas and large size. A significantly higher frequency of KRAS mutations in females was associated with mutations in codon 12. The KRAS exon 3 and 4 mutations constituted 23.4% of the KRAS positive lesions, which is a larger proportion compared to previous observations in colorectal cancer. BRAF mutations were identified in 11.3% and were associated with serrated polyps. None of the individuals were diagnosed with de novo or recurrent colorectal cancer during the follow-up time (median 11.2 years). Revealing differences in mutation-spectra according to gender and stages in tumorigenesis might be important for optimal use of oncogenes as therapeutic targets and biomarkers. PMID:27656095

  10. Significance of somatic mutations and content alteration of mitochondrial DNA in esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yu-Fen

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The roles of mitochondria in energy metabolism, the generation of ROS, aging, and the initiation of apoptosis have implicated their importance in tumorigenesis. In this study we aim to establish the mutation spectrum and to understand the role of somatic mtDNA mutations in esophageal cancer. Methods The entire mitochondrial genome was screened for somatic mutations in 20 pairs (18 esophageal squamous cell carcinomas, one adenosquamous carcinoma and one adenocarcinoma of tumor/surrounding normal tissue of esophageal cancers, using temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE, followed by direct DNA sequencing to identify the mutations. Results Fourteen somatic mtDNA mutations were identified in 55% (11/20 of tumors analyzed, including 2 novel missense mutations and a frameshift mutation in ND4L, ATP6 subunit, and ND4 genes respectively. Nine mutations (64% were in the D-loop region. Numerous germline variations were found, at least 10 of them were novel and five were missense mutations, some of them occurred in evolutionarily conserved domains. Using real-time quantitative PCR analysis, the mtDNA content was found to increase in some tumors and decrease in others. Analysis of molecular and other clinicopathological findings does not reveal significant correlation between somatic mtDNA mutations and mtDNA content, or between mtDNA content and metastatic status. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that somatic mtDNA mutations in esophageal cancers are frequent. Some missense and frameshift mutations may play an important role in the tumorigenesis of esophageal carcinoma. More extensive biochemical and molecular studies will be necessary to determine the pathological significance of these somatic mutations.

  11. Elevated expression of Ki-67 identifies aggressive prostate cancers but does not distinguish BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitra, A V; Jameson, C; Barbachano, Y;

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancers in men with germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations are more aggressive than morphologically similar cancers in men without these mutations. This study was performed to test the hypothesis that enhanced expression of Ki-67, as a surrogate of cell proliferation, is a characteristic...... feature of prostate cancers occurring in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. The study cohort comprised 20 cases of prostate cancer in mutation carriers and 126 control sporadic prostate cancers. Of the combined sample cohort, 65.7% stained only within malignant tissues while 0.7% stained in both malignant...... a background of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations or as sporadic disease. The data suggest that, since elevated Ki-67 does not distinguish prostate cancers occurring in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers from sporadic prostatic malignancies, the effects of these genetic mutations are probably independent. While all...

  12. CHEK2 1100 delC mutation in Russian ovarian cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krylova, Nadezhda Yu; Ponomariova, Daria N; Sherina, Natalia Yu; Ogorodnikova, Natalia Yu; Logvinov, Denis A; Porhanova, Natalia V; Lobeiko, Oksana S; Urmancheyeva, Adel F; Maximov, Sergey Ya; Togo, Alexandr V; Suspitsin, Evgeny N; Imyanitov, Evgeny N

    2007-09-15

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 germ-line mutations occur in a significant number of unselected ovarian cancer (OC) patients, thus making a noticeable contribution to OC morbidity. It is of interest whether CHEK2, which is frequently regarded as a third breast cancer specific gene, is also relevant to ovarian cancer pathogenesis. In this report we analyzed the presence of CHEK2 1100 delC founder mutation in 268 randomly recruited OC patients. The mutation was identified in 2 women with OC (0.8%) as compared to 1/448 (0.2%) healthy middle-aged and 0/373 elderly tumour-free women. Taken together this result and the negative findings of two other published reports on an association of CHEK2 with ovarian cancer indicate that there is no justification for intensive ovarian cancer screening in CHEK2 1100 delC carriers.

  13. CHEK2 1100 delC mutation in Russian ovarian cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krylova Nadezhda

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract BRCA1 and BRCA2 germ-line mutations occur in a significant number of unselected ovarian cancer (OC patients, thus making a noticeable contribution to OC morbidity. It is of interest whether CHEK2, which is frequently regarded as a third breast cancer specific gene, is also relevant to ovarian cancer pathogenesis. In this report we analyzed the presence of CHEK2 1100 delC founder mutation in 268 randomly recruited OC patients. The mutation was identified in 2 women with OC (0.8% as compared to 1/448 (0.2% healthy middle-aged and 0/373 elderly tumour-free women. Taken together this result and the negative findings of two other published reports on an association of CHEK2 with ovarian cancer indicate that there is no justification for intensive ovarian cancer screening in CHEK2 1100 delC carriers.

  14. Reproductive and hormonal factors, and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Rookus, Matti; Andrieu, Nadine;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several reproductive and hormonal factors are known to be associated with ovarian cancer risk in the general population, including parity and oral contraceptive (OC) use. However, their effect on ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers has only been investigated...... in a small number of studies. METHODS: We used data on 2,281 BRCA1 carriers and 1,038 BRCA2 carriers from the International BRCA1/2 Carrier Cohort Study to evaluate the effect of reproductive and hormonal factors on ovarian cancer risk for mutation carriers. Data were analyzed within a weighted Cox...... proportional hazards framework. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in the risk of ovarian cancer between parous and nulliparous carriers. For parous BRCA1 mutation carriers, the risk of ovarian cancer was reduced with each additional full-term pregnancy (P trend = 0.002). BRCA1 carriers who had...

  15. Systems Pharmacology‐Based Discovery of Natural Products for Precision Oncology Through Targeting Cancer Mutated Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, J; Cai, C; Wang, Q; Lin, P

    2017-01-01

    Massive cancer genomics data have facilitated the rapid revolution of a novel oncology drug discovery paradigm through targeting clinically relevant driver genes or mutations for the development of precision oncology. Natural products with polypharmacological profiles have been demonstrated as promising agents for the development of novel cancer therapies. In this study, we developed an integrated systems pharmacology framework that facilitated identifying potential natural products that target mutated genes across 15 cancer types or subtypes in the realm of precision medicine. High performance was achieved for our systems pharmacology framework. In case studies, we computationally identified novel anticancer indications for several US Food and Drug Administration‐approved or clinically investigational natural products (e.g., resveratrol, quercetin, genistein, and fisetin) through targeting significantly mutated genes in multiple cancer types. In summary, this study provides a powerful tool for the development of molecularly targeted cancer therapies through targeting the clinically actionable alterations by exploiting the systems pharmacology of natural products. PMID:28294568

  16. Frequent POLE1 p.S297F mutation in Chinese patients with ovarian endometrioid carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Yang; Liu, Fa-Ying; Liu, Huai; Wang, Feng [Key Laboratory of Women' s Reproductive Health of Jiangxi Province, Jiangxi Provincial Maternal and Child Health Hospital, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); Central Laboratory, Jiangxi Provincial Maternal and Child Health Hospital, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); Li, Wei [Key Laboratory of Women' s Reproductive Health of Jiangxi Province, Jiangxi Provincial Maternal and Child Health Hospital, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); Central Laboratory, Jiangxi Provincial Maternal and Child Health Hospital, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); Graduate School of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330031 (China); Huang, Mei-Zhen [Graduate School of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330031 (China); Jiangxi Provincial Cancer Institute, Jiangxi Provincial Cancer Hospital, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330029 (China); Huang, Yan; Yuan, Xiao-Qun [Key Laboratory of Women' s Reproductive Health of Jiangxi Province, Jiangxi Provincial Maternal and Child Health Hospital, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); Central Laboratory, Jiangxi Provincial Maternal and Child Health Hospital, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); Graduate School of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330031 (China); Xu, Xiao-Yun [Graduate School of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330031 (China); Jiangxi Provincial Cancer Institute, Jiangxi Provincial Cancer Hospital, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330029 (China); Huang, Ou-Ping, E-mail: huangouping@gmail.com [Jiangxi Provincial Cancer Institute, Jiangxi Provincial Cancer Hospital, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330029 (China); He, Ming, E-mail: jxhm56@hotmail.com [Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Therapeutics, Nanchang University School of Pharmaceutical Science, Nanchang 330006 (China)

    2014-03-15

    The catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase epsilon (POLE1) functions primarily in nuclear DNA replication and repair. Recently, POLE1 mutations were detected frequently in colorectal and endometrial carcinomas while with lower frequency in several other types of cancer, and the p.P286R and p.V411L mutations were the potential mutation hotspots in human cancers. Nevertheless, the mutation frequency of POLE1 in ovarian cancer still remains largely unknown. Here, we screened a total of 251 Chinese samples with distinct subtypes of ovarian carcinoma for the presence of POLE1 hotspot mutations by direct sequencing. A heterozygous somatic POLE1 mutation, p.S297F (c.890C>T), but not p.P286R and p.V411L hotspot mutations observed in other cancer types, was identified in 3 out of 37 (8.1%) patients with ovarian endometrioid carcinoma; this mutation was evolutionarily highly conserved from Homo sapiens to Schizosaccharomyces. Of note, the POLE1 mutation coexisted with mutation in the ovarian cancer-associated PPP2R1A (protein phosphatase 2, regulatory subunit A, α) gene in a 46-year-old patient, who was also diagnosed with ectopic endometriosis in the benign ovary. In addition, a 45-year-old POLE1-mutated ovarian endometrioid carcinoma patient was also diagnosed with uterine leiomyoma while the remaining 52-year-old POLE1-mutated patient showed no additional distinctive clinical manifestation. In contrast to high frequency of POLE1 mutations in ovarian endometrioid carcinoma, no POLE1 mutations were identified in patients with other subtypes of ovarian carcinoma. Our results showed for the first time that the POLE1 p.S297F mutation, but not p.P286R and p.V411L hotspot mutations observed in other cancer types, was frequent in Chinese ovarian endometrioid carcinoma, but absent in other subtypes of ovarian carcinoma. These results implicated that POLE1 p.S297F mutation might be actively involved in the pathogenesis of ovarian endometrioid carcinoma, but might not be actively

  17. PIK3CA Mutation in Colorectal Cancer: Relationship with Genetic and Epigenetic Alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiko Nosho

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Somatic PIK3CA mutations are often present in colorectal cancer. Mutant PIK3CA activates AKT signaling, which up-regulates fatty acid synthase (FASN. Microsatellite instability (MSI and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP are important molecular classifiers in colorectal cancer. However, the relationship between PIK3CA mutation, MSI and CIMP remains uncertain. Using Pyrosequencing technology, we detected PIK3CA mutations in 91 (15% of 590 population-based colorectal cancers. To determine CIMP status, we quantified DNA methylation in eight CIMP-specific promoters [CACNA1G, CDKN2A (p16, CRABP1, IGF2, MLH1, NEUROG1, RUNX3, and SOCS1] by real-time polymerase chain reaction (MethyLight. PIK3CA mutation was significantly associated with mucinous tumors [P = .0002; odds ratio (OR = 2.44], KRAS mutation (P < .0001; OR = 2.68, CIMP-high (P = .03; OR = 2.08, phospho–ribosomal protein S6 expression (P = .002; OR = 2.19, and FASN expression (P = .02; OR = 1.85 and inversely with p53 expression (P = .01; OR = 0.54 and β-catenin (CTNNB1 alteration (P = .004; OR = 0.43. In addition, PIK3CA G-to-A mutations were associated with MGMT loss (P = .001; OR = 3.24 but not with MGMT promoter methylation. In conclusion, PIK3CA mutation is significantly associated with other key molecular events in colorectal cancer, and MGMT loss likely contributes to the development of PIK3CA G>A mutation. In addition, Pyrosequencing is useful in detecting PIK3CA mutation in archival paraffin tumor tissue. PIK3CA mutational data further emphasize heterogeneity of colorectal cancer at the molecular level.

  18. Mutation analysis of the checkpoint kinase 2 gene in colorectal cancer cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wei-dong; ZHONG Bai-yun; ZHANG Yang-de; CHOI Gyu-seog

    2007-01-01

    Background Checkpoint kinase 2 (CHK2) is a DNA damage-activated protein kinase which is involved in cell cycle checkpoint control.CHK2 gene could be a candidate gene for colorectal cancer susceptibility.But there are few systematic repots on mutation of CHK2 in colorectal cancer.Methods The mutations of all 14 exons of CHK2 in 56 colorecfal cancer cell lines were screened systematically.using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) to screen the mismatches of the CHK2 exons amplified products,and then the suspected mutant cell lines were scanned by nucleotide sequence analysis.Results VACO400 in CHK2 exon 1a was suspected to have mutation by DHPLC and confirmed by sequence,but this was nonsense mutation.C106,CX-1,HT-29,SK01,SW480,SW620 and VACO400 in CHK2 exon 1b were confirmed to have the same nonsense mutation in 11609 A>G.DLD-1 and HCT-15 in CHK2 exon 2 were confirmed to have missense mutation R145W.which was heterozygous C>T missense mutation at nucleotide 433.leading to an Arg>Trp substitution within the FHA domain.Conclusions The CHK2 mutation in colorectal cancer is a low frequency event.There are just 10 cell lines to have sequence variations in all the 14 exons in 56 colorectal cancer cell lines and only DLD-1/HCT-15 had heterozygous missense mutation.These findings may give useful information of susceptibility of colorectal cancer as single nucleotide polymorphysim.

  19. Correlations between Endomyocardial Biopsies and Cardiac Manifestations in Taiwanese Patients with the Chinese Hotspot IVS4+919G>A Mutation: Data from the Fabry Outcome Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Rong Hsu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We retrospectively evaluated correlations between cardiac manifestations and globotriaosylceramide (Gb3 accumulation in cardiomyocytes from Taiwanese patients with Fabry disease and the IVS4+919G>A (IVS4 mutation who underwent endomyocardial biopsy (Shire; Fabry Outcome Survey data; extracted January 2015. Of 24 males and six females (median age [Q1; Q3] at biopsy 60.4 [57.4; 64.1] and 61.3 [60.4; 65.1] years, respectively, 13 males (54.2% and five females (83.3% received agalsidase alfa enzyme replacement therapy (ERT before biopsy. Median left ventricular mass indexed to height (LVMI within ±6 months of biopsy was 65.3 (52.7; 93.1 in males and 53.2 (42.0; 55.0 g/m2.7 in females. A moderate, positive, statistically significant correlation was found between the percentage area Gb3 accumulation in cardiomyocytes and LVMI (Spearman’s ρ, 0.45; p = 0.014; a smaller, positive, non-statistically significant correlation was observed between cardiomyocyte diameter and LVMI (Spearman’s ρ 0.16, p = 0.394. Moderate, statistically significant, negative correlations were found between Gb3 accumulation and ERT duration (Spearman’s ρ, −0.49, p = 0.007 and between cardiomyocyte size and ERT duration (Spearman’s ρ, −0.37, p = 0.048. Longer ERT duration was associated with smaller amounts of Gb3 accumulation and smaller cardiomyocyte size. Further follow-up is recommended to confirm these trends in a larger sample size.

  20. Cancers of the upper gastro-intestinal tract: a review of somatic mutation distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi-Ardekani, Behnoush; Hainaut, Pierre

    2014-04-01

    Cancers of the upper gastro-intestinal tract (UGIT) comprise esophageal, esophago-gastric junction, stomach and duodenal cancers. Together, these cancers represent over 1.5 million cases and are the cause of about 1.25 million deaths annually. This group of cancers encompasses diseases with marked disparities in etiology, geographic distribution, histopathological features and frequency. Based on histological origin, squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus (ESCC), which arises through a dysplasia-carcinoma sequence within the squamous mucosa, is a completely different cancer than junction, stomach and duodenal cancers, which develop within glandular epithelia through cascades involving inflammation, metaplasia, dysplasia and carcinoma. At the frontline between these two histological domains, cancers of the esophago-gastric junction constitute a mixed group of glandular tumors including distal esophageal adenocarcinomas and cancers arising within the most proximal part of the stomach - the cardia. Most of UGIT cancers are sporadic, although familial susceptibility genes have been identified for stomach and rare cases of ESCC. We have used the COSMIC database (http://www.sanger.ac.uk/genetics/CGP/cosmic/) to identify genes commonly mutated in UGIT cancers. Regardless of etiology and histopathology, three genes are mutated in at least 5% of UGIT cancers: TP53, CDKN2a and PIK3CA. Another three genes, NFE2L2, PTCH1 and NOTCH1, are mutated in ESCC only. Conversely, genes of the RAS family and of the CDH1/APC/CTNNB1 pathway are mutated only in non-squamous cancers, with differences in mutated genes according to topography. We review the potential functional significance of these observations for understanding mechanisms of UGIT carcinogenesis.

  1. PALB2 germline mutations in familial breast cancer cases with personal and family history of pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    PALB2 germline mutations in familial breast cancer cases with personal and family history of pancreatic cancer phone: +39-02-23903224 (Radice, Paolo) (Radice, Paolo) IFOM, Fondazione Istituto FIRC di Oncologia Molecolare - Milan - ITALY (Peterlongo, Paolo) Department of Preventive and Predictive Medicine, Unit of Molecular Bases of Genetic Risk and Genetic Testing, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori - Milan - ITALY (Peterlongo, Pao...

  2. Conformational SERS Classification of K-Ras Point Mutations for Cancer Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morla-Folch, Judit; Gisbert-Quilis, Patricia; Masetti, Matteo; Garcia-Rico, Eduardo; Alvarez-Puebla, Ramon A; Guerrini, Luca

    2017-02-20

    Point mutations in Ras oncogenes are routinely screened for diagnostics and treatment of tumors (especially in colorectal cancer). Here, we develop an optical approach based on direct SERS coupled with chemometrics for the study of the specific conformations that single-point mutations impose on a relatively large fragment of the K-Ras gene (141 nucleobases). Results obtained offer the unambiguous classification of different mutations providing a potentially useful insight for diagnostics and treatment of cancer in a sensitive, fast, direct and inexpensive manner.

  3. PIK3CA mutations may be discordant between primary and corresponding metastatic disease in Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont Jensen, Jeanette; Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Knoop, Ann;

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: PIK3CA mutations are frequent in breast cancer and activate the PI3K/Akt pathway. Unexpectedly, PIK3CA mutation appears in general to be associated with better outcome. In a cohort of patients where both primary and metastatic lesions were available the objective was to assess changes...... recurrence than wild type cases (p=0.03). CONCLUSIONS: PIK3CA mutations occur at high frequency in primary and metastatic breast cancer; these may not necessarily confer increased aggressiveness as mutants had a longer time to recurrence. Because PIK3CA status quite frequently changes between primary...

  4. Impact of smoking status and pathologic type on epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yi-sheng; WU Yi-long; YANG Jin-ji; ZHANG Xu-chao; YANG Xue-ning; HUANG Yu-juan; XU Chong-rui; ZHOU Qing; WANG Zhen; SU Jian

    2011-01-01

    Background Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in lung carcinomas can make the disease more responsive to the treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of EGFR mutations in a large series of lung carcinomas.Methods We examined 1195 consecutive lung cancer patients for EGFR mutations in exons 18, 19, and 21 using direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction products. A detailed smoking history was obtained. Patients were categorized as never smokers (<100 lifetime cigarettes), former smokers (quit >1 year ago), or current smokers (quit <1 year ago).Results There were EGFR mutations in 9 (4.5%) of 201 squamous carcinomas, in 1 (2%) of 50 large cell carcinomas,and in 1 (2.3%) of 44 small cell carcinomas that were investigated. Three hundred and twenty-seven mutations were found in the series of 858 adenocarcinomas (38.1%). Among 858 lung adenocarcinomas, we detected EGFR mutations in 250 (48.6%) of 514 never smokers, 39 (33.9%) of 115 former smokers, and 38 (16.6%) of 229 current smokers.Significantly fewer EGFR mutations were found in people who smoked for more than 15 pack-years (P=0.0002) or stopped smoking less than 15 years ago (P=0.033) compared with individuals who never smoked.Conclusions Adenocarcinoma is the most frequent EGFR mutation pathologic type in lung cancer. The likelihood of EGFR mutations in exons 18, 19 and 21 decreases as the number of pack-years increases. Mutations were less common in people who smoked for more than 15 pack-years or who stopped smoking cigarettes less than 15 years ago. These data can assist clinicians in assessing the likelihood of exons 18, 19, or 21 EGFR mutations in Chinese patients with lung cancer when mutational analysis is not feasible.

  5. Hotspot swells revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Scott D.; Adam, Claudia

    2014-10-01

    The first attempts to quantify the width and height of hotspot swells were made more than 30 years ago. Since that time, topography, ocean-floor age, and sediment thickness datasets have improved considerably. Swell heights and widths have been used to estimate the heat flow from the core-mantle boundary, constrain numerical models of plumes, and as an indicator of the origin of hotspots. In this paper, we repeat the analysis of swell geometry and buoyancy flux for 54 hotspots, including the 37 considered by Sleep (1990) and the 49 considered by Courtillot et al. (2003), using the latest and most accurate data. We are able to calculate swell geometry for a number of hotspots that Sleep was only able to estimate by comparison with other swells. We find that in spite of the increased resolution in global bathymetry models there is significant uncertainty in our calculation of buoyancy fluxes due to differences in our measurement of the swells’ width and height, the integration method (volume integration or cross-sectional area), and the variations of the plate velocities between HS2-Nuvel1a (Gripp and Gordon, 1990) and HS3-Nuvel1a (Gripp and Gordon, 2002). We also note that the buoyancy flux for Pacific hotspots is in general larger than for Eurasian, North American, African and Antarctic hotspots. Considering that buoyancy flux is linearly related to plate velocity, we speculate that either the calculation of buoyancy flux using plate velocity over-estimates the actual vertical flow of material from the deep mantle or that convection in the Pacific hemisphere is more vigorous than the Atlantic hemisphere.

  6. Incidence and Outcome of BRCA Mutations in Unselected Patients with Triple Receptor-Negative Breast Cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M

    2011-03-01

    To investigate the incidence of germline and somatic BRCA1\\/2 mutations in unselected patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and determine the prognostic significance of carrying a mutation. Methods: DNA was obtained from 77 TNBC and normal tissues. BRCA1\\/2 exons\\/flanking regions were sequenced from tumor and patients classified as mutant or wild type (WT). Sequencing was repeated from normal tissue to identify germline and somatic mutations. Patient characteristics were compared with chi-square. Survival was estimated by Kaplan-Meier method and compared with log-rank. Cox proportional hazards models were fit to determine the independent association of mutation status with outcome.

  7. Reliability of KRAS mutation testing in metastatic colorectal cancer patients across five laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feigelson Heather

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the KRAS gene are associated with poor response to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors used in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Factors influencing KRAS test results in tumor specimens include: tumor heterogeneity, sample handling, slide preparation, techniques for tumor enrichment, DNA preparation, assay design and sensitivity. We evaluated comparability and consistency of KRAS test results among five laboratories currently being used to determine KRAS mutation status of metastatic colorectal cancer specimens in a large, multi-center observational study. Findings Twenty formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human colorectal cancer samples from colon resections previously tested for KRAS mutations were selected based on mutation status (6 wild type, 8 codon 12 mutations, and 6 codon 13 mutations. We found good agreement across laboratories despite differences in mutation detection methods. Eighteen of twenty samples (90% were concordant across all five labs. Discordant results are likely not due to laboratory error, but instead to tumor heterogeneity, contamination of the tumor sample with normal tissue, or analytic factors affecting assay sensitivity. Conclusions Our results indicate commercial and academic laboratories provide reliable results for the common KRAS gene mutations at codons 12 and 13 when an adequate percentage of tumor cells is present in the sample.

  8. Concurrent mutation in exons 1 and 2 of the K-ras oncogene in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiorella Guadagni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The K-ras gene is frequently mutated in colorectal cancer and has been associated with tumor initiation and progression; approximately 90% of the activating mutations are found in codons 12 and 13 of exon 1 and just under 5% in codon 61 located in exon 2. These mutations determine single aminoacidic substitutions in the GTPase pocket leading to a block of the GTP hydrolytic activity of the K-ras p21 protein, and therefore to its constitutive activation. Point mutations in sites of the K-ras gene, other than codons 12, 13 and 61, and other types of genetic alterations, may occur in a minority of cases, such as in the less frequent cases of double mutations in the K-ras gene. However, all mutations in this gene, even those which occur in non-canonical sites or double mutations, are relevant oncogenic alterations in colorectal cancer and may underlie K-ras pathway hyperactivation. In the present study, we report the case of a patient with colorectal cancer presenting a concurrent point mutation in exons 1 and 2 of the K-ras gene, a GGT to TGT substitution (Glycine to Cysteine at codon 12, and a GAC to AAC substitution (Aspartic Acid to Asparagine at codon 57. In addition, we found in the same patient’s sample a silent polymorphism at codon 11 (Ala11Ala of exon 1. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 4, pp. 729–733

  9. Coexistence of K-ras mutations and HPV infection in colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tezol Ayda

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of the ras genes or association with human papillomavirus infection have been extensively studied in colorectal cancer. However, the correlation between K-ras mutations and HPV in colorectal cancer has not been investigated yet. In this study we aimed to investigate the presence of K-ras mutations and their correlation with HPV infection in colon cancer. Methods K-ras mutations were analyzed by a mutagenic PCR assay and digestion with specific restriction enzymes to distinguish the wild-type and mutant codons. HPV infection was analyzed by PCR amplification and hybridization with specific probes by Southern blotting. Stattistical analyses were performed by the chi-square and Fisher's exact tests Results HPV gene fragments were detected in 43 tumors and 17 normal tissue samples. HPV 18 was the prevalent type in the tumor tissue. A mutation at codon 12 of the K-ras gene was present in 31 patients. 56% of the HPV-positive tumors also harbored a K-ras mutation. Codon 13 mutations were not observed. These data indicate that infection with high risk HPV types and mutational activation of the K-ras gene are frequent events in colorectal carcinogenesis. Conclusion Our findings suggest that mutational activation of the K-ras gene is a common event in colon carcinogenesis and that HPV infection may represent an important factor in the development of the premalignant lesions leading to the neoplastic phenotype.

  10. Characterization of Somatic Mutations in Air Pollution-Related Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xian-Jun; Yang, Min-Jun; Zhou, Bo; Wang, Gui-Zhen; Huang, Yun-Chao; Wu, Li-Chuan; Cheng, Xin; Wen, Zhe-Sheng; Huang, Jin-Yan; Zhang, Yun-Dong; Gao, Xiao-Hong; Li, Gao-Feng; He, Shui-Wang; Gu, Zhao-Hui; Ma, Liang; Pan, Chun-Ming; Wang, Ping; Chen, Hao-Bin; Hong, Zhi-Peng; Wang, Xiao-Lu; Mao, Wen-Jing; Jin, Xiao-Long; Kang, Hui; Chen, Shu-Ting; Zhu, Yong-Qiang; Gu, Wen-Yi; Liu, Zi; Dong, Hui; Tian, Lin-Wei; Chen, Sai-Juan; Cao, Yi; Wang, Sheng-Yue; Zhou, Guang-Biao

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution has been classified as Group 1 carcinogenic to humans, but the underlying tumorigenesis remains unclear. In Xuanwei City of Yunnan Province, the lung cancer incidence is among the highest in China attributed to severe air pollution generated by combustion of smoky coal, providing a unique opportunity to dissect lung carcinogenesis of air pollution. Here we analyzed the somatic mutations of 164 non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) from Xuanwei and control regions (CR) where smoky coal was not used. Whole genome sequencing revealed a mean of 289 somatic exonic mutations per tumor and the frequent C:G → A:T nucleotide substitutions in Xuanwei NSCLCs. Exome sequencing of 2010 genes showed that Xuanwei and CR NSCLCs had a mean of 68 and 22 mutated genes per tumor, respectively (p < 0.0001). We found 167 genes (including TP53, RYR2, KRAS, CACNA1E) which had significantly higher mutation frequencies in Xuanwei than CR patients, and mutations in most genes in Xuanwei NSCLCs differed from those in CR cases. The mutation rates of 70 genes (e.g., RYR2, MYH3, GPR144, CACNA1E) were associated with patients' lifetime benzo(a)pyrene exposure. This study uncovers the mutation spectrum of air pollution-related lung cancers, and provides evidence for pollution exposure–genomic mutation relationship at a large scale. PMID:26288819

  11. Characterization of Somatic Mutations in Air Pollution-Related Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Jun Yu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution has been classified as Group 1 carcinogenic to humans, but the underlying tumorigenesis remains unclear. In Xuanwei City of Yunnan Province, the lung cancer incidence is among the highest in China attributed to severe air pollution generated by combustion of smoky coal, providing a unique opportunity to dissect lung carcinogenesis of air pollution. Here we analyzed the somatic mutations of 164 non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs from Xuanwei and control regions (CR where smoky coal was not used. Whole genome sequencing revealed a mean of 289 somatic exonic mutations per tumor and the frequent C:G → A:T nucleotide substitutions in Xuanwei NSCLCs. Exome sequencing of 2010 genes showed that Xuanwei and CR NSCLCs had a mean of 68 and 22 mutated genes per tumor, respectively (p < 0.0001. We found 167 genes (including TP53, RYR2, KRAS, CACNA1E which had significantly higher mutation frequencies in Xuanwei than CR patients, and mutations in most genes in Xuanwei NSCLCs differed from those in CR cases. The mutation rates of 70 genes (e.g., RYR2, MYH3, GPR144, CACNA1E were associated with patients' lifetime benzo(apyrene exposure. This study uncovers the mutation spectrum of air pollution-related lung cancers, and provides evidence for pollution exposure–genomic mutation relationship at a large scale.

  12. The prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations among young Mexican women with triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal-Garza, C; Weitzel, J N; Llacuachaqui, M; Sifuentes, E; Magallanes-Hoyos, M C; Gallardo, L; Alvarez-Gómez, R M; Herzog, J; Castillo, D; Royer, R; Akbari, Mohammad; Lara-Medina, F; Herrera, L A; Mohar, A; Narod, S A

    2015-04-01

    Various guidelines recommend that women with triple-negative breast cancer should be tested for BRCA1 mutations, but the prevalence of mutations may vary with ethnic group and with geographic region, and the optimal cutoff age for testing has not been established. We estimated the frequencies of BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA) mutations among 190 women with triple-negative breast cancer, unselected for family history, diagnosed at age 50 or less at a single hospital in Mexico City. Patients were screened for 115 recurrent BRCA mutations, which have been reported previously in women of Hispanic origin, including a common large rearrangement Mexican founder mutation (BRCA1 ex9-12del). A BRCA mutation was detected in 44 of 190 patients with triple-negative breast cancer (23 %). Forty-three mutations were found in BRCA1 and one mutation was found in BRCA2. Seven different mutations accounted for 39 patients (89 % of the total mutations). The Mexican founder mutation (BRCA1 ex9-12del) was found 18 times and accounted for 41 % of all mutations detected. There is a high prevalence of BRCA1 mutations among young triple-negative breast cancer patients in Mexico. Women with triple-negative breast cancer in Mexico should be screened for mutations in BRCA1.

  13. NMD Microarray Analysis for Rapid Genome-Wide Screen of Mutated Genes in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maija Wolf

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene mutations play a critical role in cancer development and progression, and their identification offers possibilities for accurate diagnostics and therapeutic targeting. Finding genes undergoing mutations is challenging and slow, even in the post-genomic era. A new approach was recently developed by Noensie and Dietz to prioritize and focus the search, making use of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD inhibition and microarray analysis (NMD microarrays in the identification of transcripts containing nonsense mutations. We combined NMD microarrays with array-based CGH (comparative genomic hybridization in order to identify inactivation of tumor suppressor genes in cancer. Such a “mutatomics” screening of prostate cancer cell lines led to the identification of inactivating mutations in the EPHB2 gene. Up to 8% of metastatic uncultured prostate cancers also showed mutations of this gene whose loss of function may confer loss of tissue architecture. NMD microarray analysis could turn out to be a powerful research method to identify novel mutated genes in cancer cell lines, providing targets that could then be further investigated for their clinical relevance and therapeutic potential.

  14. A BAP1 mutation in a Danish family predisposes to uveal melanoma and other cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren G Aoude

    Full Text Available Truncating germline mutations in the tumor suppressor gene BRCA-1 associated protein-1 (BAP1 have been reported in families predisposed to developing a wide range of different cancer types including uveal melanoma and cutaneous melanoma. There has also been an association between amelanotic tumor development and germline BAP1 mutation suggesting a possible phenotypic characteristic of BAP1 mutation carriers. Though there have been many types of cancer associated with germline BAP1 mutation, the full spectrum of disease association is yet to be ascertained. Here we describe a Danish family with predominantly uveal melanoma but also a range of other tumor types including lung, neuroendocrine, stomach, and breast cancer; as well as pigmented skin lesions. Whole-exome sequencing identified a BAP1 splice mutation located at c.581-2A>G, which leads to a premature truncation of BAP1 in an individual with uveal melanoma. This mutation was carried by several other family members with melanoma or various cancers. The finding expands on the growing profile of BAP1 as an important uveal and cutaneous melanoma tumor suppressor gene and implicates its involvement in the development of lung, and stomach cancer.

  15. Genetic Variation at 9p22.2 and Ovarian Cancer Risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramus, Susan J.; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Gayther, Simon A.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Roversi, Gaia; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Allavena, Anna; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Gismondi, Viviana; Capra, Fabio; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Cruger, Dorthe; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Olsson, Hakan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; Karlsson, Per; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Ake; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Gorski, Bohdan; Cybulski, Cezary; Debniak, Tadeusz; Osorio, Ana; Duran, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti A.; Verhoef, Senno; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine A.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.; Bodmer, Danielle; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; van Os, Theo A.; Asperen, Christi J.; Blok, Marinus J.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Dunning, Alison M.; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Pichert, Gabriella; Cole, Trevor; Hodgson, Shirley; Brewer, Carole; Morrison, Patrick J.; Porteous, Mary; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Side, Lucy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Gregory, Helen; Godwin, Andrew; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Moncoutier, Virginie; Castera, Laurent; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Bonadona, Valerie; Leroux, Dominique; Faivre, Laurence; Lidereau, Rosette; Nogues, Catherine; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Prieur, Fabienne; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnes; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Fert-Ferrer, Sandra; Miron, Alex; Buys, Saundra S.; Hopper, John L.; Daly, Mary B.; John, Esther M.; Terry, Mary Beth; Goldgar, David; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Jonson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Vijai, Joseph; Dutra-Clarke, Ana V. C.; Przybylo, Jennifer A.; Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Beattie, Mary S.; Schmutzler, Rita; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Fiebig, Britta; Sutter, Christian; Arnold, Norbert; Deissler, Helmut; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Kast, Karin; Niederacher, Dieter; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomaeki, Kristiina; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Holland, Helene; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Although several common variants have been associated with breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers, none have been associated with ovarian cancer susceptibility. A

  16. Detection and significance of epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in esophageal,esophagogastric junction and gastric cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕萧

    2014-01-01

    Objective To detect the frequency of EGFR mutation and expression in Chinese patients with esophageal,esophagogastric junction and gastric cancers,and to clarify the value of EGFR mutation and expression in predicting the efficacy of TKI in the treatment of these tumors.Methods In this study,180 tumor samples with histologically confirmed esophageal cancer(39 cases),cancer of

  17. Genetic variation at 9p22.2 and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Susan J; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Gayther, Simon A

    2011-01-01

    Background Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Although several common variants have been associated with breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers, none have been associated with ovarian cancer susceptibility....

  18. Genetic variation at 9p22.2 and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Susan J; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Gayther, Simon A

    2011-01-01

    Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Although several common variants have been associated with breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers, none have been associated with ovarian cancer susceptibility. A genome-w...

  19. Genetic variation at 9p22.2 and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.J. Ramus (Susan); C. Kartsonaki (Christiana); S.A. Gayther (Simon); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); J. Beesley (Jonathan); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); L. McGuffog (Lesley); S. Healey (Sue); F.J. Couch (Fergus); X. Wang (Xing); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); G. Roversi (Gaia); M. Barile (Monica); A. Viel (Alessandra); A. Allavena (Anna); L. Ottini (Laura); L. Papi (Laura); V. Gismondi (Viviana); F. Capra (Fabio); P. Radice (Paolo); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); G. Glendon (Gord); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); M. Thomassen (Mads); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); T.A. Kruse (Torben); D. Cruger (Dorthe); U.B. Jensen; M.A. Caligo (Maria); H. Olsson (Hkan); U. Kristoffersson (Ulf); A. Lindblom (Annika); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); P. Karlsson (Per); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (M.); Å. Borg (Åke); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); T. Byrski (Tomasz); J. Gronwald (Jacek); B. Górski (Bohdan); C. Cybulski (Cezary); T. Dbniak (Tadeusz); A. Osorio (Ana); M. Durán (Mercedes); M.-I. Tejada; J. Benitez (Javier); U. Hamann (Ute); M.A. Rookus (Matti); S. Verhoef; M.A. Tilanus-Linthorst (Madeleine); M.P. Vreeswijk (Maaike); D. Bodmer (Danielle); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); M.J. Blok (Marinus); H. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); S. Peock (Susan); M. Cook (Margaret); C.T. Oliver (Clare); D. Frost (Debra); A.M. Dunning (Alison); D.G. Evans (Gareth); R. Eeles (Rosalind); G. Pichert (Gabriella); T.J. Cole (Trevor); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); C. Brewer (Carole); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); M.E. Porteous (Mary); M.J. Kennedy (John); M.T. Rogers (Mark); L. Side (Lucy); A. Donaldson (Alan); H. Gregory (Helen); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); V. Moncoutier (Virginie); L. Castera (Laurent); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); L. Barjhoux (Laure); V. Bonadona (Valérie); D. Leroux (Dominique); L. Faivre (Laurence); R. Lidereau (Rosette); C. Nogues (Catherine); Y.-J. Bignon (Yves-Jean); F. Prieur (Fabienne); M.-A. Collonge-Rame; L. Vénat-Bouvet (Laurence); S. Fert-Ferrer (Sandra); A. Miron (Alexander); S.S. Buys (Saundra); J. Hopper (John); M.J. Daly (Mark); E.M. John (Esther); M-B. Terry (Mary-beth); D. Goldgar (David); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); L. Jønson (Lars); B.A. Agnarsson (Bjarni); K. Offit (Kenneth); T. Kircchoff (Tomas); J. Vijai (Joseph); A. Dutra-Clarke (Ana); J.A. Przybylo (Jennifer); M. Montagna (Marco); C. Casella (Cinzia); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); I. Blanco (Ignacio); C. Lazaro (Conxi); K.B. Moysich (Kirsten); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); J. Gross (Jenny); M.S. Beattie (Mary); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); A. Meindl (Alfons); I. Ruehl (Ina); B. Fiebig (Britta); C. Sutter (Christian); N. Arnold (Norbert); H. Deissler (Helmut); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); K. Kast (Karin); D. Niederacher (Dieter); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); J. Simard (Jacques); P. Soucy (Penny); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); H. Holland (Helene); D.F. Easton (Douglas); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); C.J. van Asperen (Christi)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Although several common variants have been associated with breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers, none have been associated with ovarian cancer suscep

  20. Fat and K-ras mutations in sporadic colorectal cancer in The Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, M.; Weijenberg, M.P.; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Schouten, L.J.; Koedijk, F.D.H.; Roemen, G.M.J.M.; Lentjes, M.H.F.M.; Bruïne, A.P. de; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2004-01-01

    Associations between dietary intake of various fats and specific K-ras mutations in colorectal cancer (CRC) were investigated within the framework of The Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer (NLCS). After 7.3 years of follow-up and with exclusion of the first 2.3 years, 448 colon and 160 rect

  1. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation Enhances Expression of Cadherin-5 in Lung Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ming-Szu; Chen, I-Chuan; Lung, Jr-Hau; Lin, Paul-Yann; Li, Ya-Chin; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation has been shown to play a critical role in tumor angiogenesis. In this study, we investigate the correlation between EGFR mutations and cadherin-5 (CDH5), which is an angiogenic factor, in lung cancer cells. Increased expression CDH5 is observed in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutations. Stable lung cancer cell lines expressing mutant (exon 19 deletion E746-A750, and exon 21 missense mutation L858R) and wild type EGFR genes are established. A significantly higher expression of CDH5 is observed in exon 19 deletion stable lung cancer cells and mouse xenografts. Further studies show that expression of CDH5 is decreased after the inhibition of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutation. In addition, mutant EGFR genes potentiates angiogenesis in lung cancer cells, which is inhibited by CDH5 siRNA, and potentiates migration and invasion in lung cancer cells. Our study shows that mutant EGFR genes are associated with overexpression of CDH5 through increased phosphorylation of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways. Our result may provide an insight into the association of mutant EGFR and CDH5 expression in lung cancer and aid further development of target therapy for NSCLC in the future.

  2. BRAF mutation-specific promoter methylation of FOX genes in colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.H.J. van Roon (Eddy); A. Boot (Arnoud); A.A. Dihal (Ashwin); R.F. Ernst (Robert); T. van Wezel (Tom); H. Morreau (Hans); J.M. Boer (Judith)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Cancer-specific hypermethylation of (promoter) CpG islands is common during the tumorigenesis of colon cancer. Although associations between certain genetic aberrations, such as BRAF mutation and microsatellite instability, and the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), have

  3. Contralateral breast cancer after radiotherapy among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernstein, Jonine L; Thomas, Duncan C; Shore, Roy E

    2013-01-01

    Women with germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/BRCA2) mutations are at very high risk of developing breast cancer, including asynchronous contralateral breast cancer (CBC). BRCA1/BRCA2 genes help maintain genome stability and assist in DNA repair. We examined whether the risk of CBC associated with ra...

  4. Common genetic variation at BARD1 is not associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spurdle, Amanda B; Marquart, Louise; McGuffog, Lesley;

    2011-01-01

    Inherited BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutations confer elevated breast cancer risk. Knowledge of factors that can improve breast cancer risk assessment in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers may improve personalized cancer prevention strategies.......Inherited BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutations confer elevated breast cancer risk. Knowledge of factors that can improve breast cancer risk assessment in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers may improve personalized cancer prevention strategies....

  5. Guanine holes are prominent targets for mutation in cancer and inherited disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albino Bacolla

    Full Text Available Single base substitutions constitute the most frequent type of human gene mutation and are a leading cause of cancer and inherited disease. These alterations occur non-randomly in DNA, being strongly influenced by the local nucleotide sequence context. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying such sequence context-dependent mutagenesis are not fully understood. Using bioinformatics, computational and molecular modeling analyses, we have determined the frequencies of mutation at G • C bp in the context of all 64 5'-NGNN-3' motifs that contain the mutation at the second position. Twenty-four datasets were employed, comprising >530,000 somatic single base substitutions from 21 cancer genomes, >77,000 germline single-base substitutions causing or associated with human inherited disease and 16.7 million benign germline single-nucleotide variants. In several cancer types, the number of mutated motifs correlated both with the free energies of base stacking and the energies required for abstracting an electron from the target guanines (ionization potentials. Similar correlations were also evident for the pathological missense and nonsense germline mutations, but only when the target guanines were located on the non-transcribed DNA strand. Likewise, pathogenic splicing mutations predominantly affected positions in which a purine was located on the non-transcribed DNA strand. Novel candidate driver mutations and tissue-specific mutational patterns were also identified in the cancer datasets. We conclude that electron transfer reactions within the DNA molecule contribute to sequence context-dependent mutagenesis, involving both somatic driver and passenger mutations in cancer, as well as germline alterations causing or associated with inherited disease.

  6. Prevalence and contribution of BRCA1 mutations in breast cancer and ovarian cancer: Results from three US population-based case-control studies of ovarian cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittemore, A.S.; Gong, G.; Itnyre, J. [Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, CA (United States)

    1997-03-01

    We investigate the familial risks of cancers of the breast and ovary, using data pooled from three population-based case-control studies of ovarian cancer that were conducted in the United States. We base estimates of the frequency of mutations of BRCA1 (and possibly other genes) on the reported occurrence of breast cancer and ovarian cancer in the mothers and sisters of 922 women with incident ovarian cancer (cases) and in 922 women with no history of ovarian cancer (controls). Segregation analysis and goodness-of-fit testing of genetic models suggest that rare mutations (frequency .0014; 95% confidence interval .0002-.011) account for all the observed aggregation of breast cancer and ovarian cancer in these families. The estimated risk of breast cancer by age 80 years is 73.5% in mutation carriers and 6.8% in noncarriers. The corresponding estimates for ovarian cancer are 27.8% in carriers and 1.8% in noncarriers. For cancer risk in carriers, these estimates are lower than those obtained from families selected for high cancer prevalence. The estimated proportion of all U.S. cancer diagnoses, by age 80 years, that are due to germ-line BRCA1 mutations is 3.0% for breast cancer and 4.4% for ovarian cancer. Aggregation of breast cancer and ovarian cancer was less evident in the families of 169 cases with borderline ovarian cancers than in the families of cases with invasive cancers. Familial aggregation did not differ by the ethnicity of the probands, although the number of non-White and Hispanic cases (N = 99) was sparse. 14 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Exome sequencing reveals AMER1 as a frequently mutated gene in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Pamplona, Rebeca; Lopez-Doriga, Adriana; Paré-Brunet, Laia; Lázaro, Kira; Bellido, Fernando; Alonso, M. Henar; Aussó, Susanna; Guinó, Elisabet; Beltrán, Sergi; Castro-Giner, Francesc; Gut, Marta; Sanjuan, Xavier; Closa, Adria; Cordero, David; Morón-Duran, Francisco D.; Soriano, Antonio; Salazar, Ramón; Valle, Laura; Moreno, Victor

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Somatic mutations occur at early stages of adenoma and accumulate throughout colorectal cancer (CRC) progression. The aim of this study was to characterize the mutational landscape of stage II tumors and to search for novel recurrent mutations likely implicated in CRC tumorigenesis. DESIGN The exomic DNA of 42 stage II, microsatellite stable, colon tumors and their paired mucosae were sequenced. Other molecular data available in the discovery dataset (gene expression, methylation, and CNV) was used to further characterize these tumors. Additional datasets comprising 553 CRC samples were used to validate the discovered mutations. RESULTS As a result, 4,886 somatic single nucleotide variants (SNVs) were found. Almost all SNVs were private changes, with few mutations shared by more than one tumor, thus revealing tumor-specific mutational landscapes. Nevertheless, these diverse mutations converged into common cellular pathways such as cell cycle or apoptosis. Among this mutational heterogeneity, variants resulting in early stop-codons in the AMER1 (also known as FAM123B or WTX) gene emerged as recurrent mutations in CRC. Loses of AMER1 by other mechanisms apart from mutations such as methylation and copy number aberrations were also found. Tumors lacking this tumor suppressor gene exhibited a mesenchymal phenotype characterized by inhibition of the canonical Wnt pathway. CONCLUSION In silico and experimental validation in independent datasets confirmed the existence of functional mutations in AMER1 in approximately 10% of analyzed CRC tumors. Moreover, these tumors exhibited a characteristic phenotype. PMID:26071483

  8. Identification of a Danish breast/ovarian cancer family double heterozygote for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Ane Y; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent;

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the two breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Patients with mutations in both genes are rarely reported and often involve Ashkenazi founder mutations. Here we report the first identification of a Danish...... breast and ovarian cancer family heterozygote for mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The BRCA1 nucleotide 5215G > A/c.5096G > A mutation results in the missense mutation Arg1699Gln, while the BRCA2 nucleotide 859 + 4A > G/c.631 + 4A > G is novel. Exon trapping experiments and reverse transcriptase...... (RT)-PCR analysis revealed that the BRCA2 mutation results in skipping of exon 7, thereby introducing a frameshift and a premature stop codon. We therefore classify the mutation as disease causing. Since the BRCA1 Arg1699Gln mutation is also suggested to be disease-causing, we consider this family...

  9. DETECTION OF p53 GENE MUTATION OF BRONCHOSCOPIC SAMPLIES IN THE PATIENTS SUSPECTED TO LUNG CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To determine the feasibility of detecting p53 gene mutations for early diagnosis of lung cancer using the samples from bronchoscopic examination. Methods: Point mutations of the exon 5-8 of p53 gene were detected in 85 bronchoscopic samples of 35 patients suspected to be lung cancer using silver staining PCR-SSCP. Results: p53 gene mutations were founded in 10 of 35 patients(28.6%). The incidence of p53 gene mutations (14.9%) was obviously higher than the cytological positive incidence(2.9%) in samples of sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage and brush, especially for the sputum(27.7%). In the bronchoscopic biopsy specimens, the incidence of p53 gene mutations (12.5%) was lower than that of pathologic positive result (50.0%). However, in view of all the bronchoscopic samples, there was no statistically difference between cytopathologic positive results (11.8%) and the incidence of p53 gene mutations (14.1%). Although the p53 mutations were most common in the samples from the patients bronchoscopically manifested as neoplasm compared with other manifestations, there was no statistical difference. It is valuable to notice that 3 patients with p53 gene mutation merely presented as bronchial inflammation in bronchoscope. Conclusion: Results indicated that the value of detecting p53 gene mutation for the diagnosis of lung cancer using the bronchoscopic samples was more superior to cytological examination and detection of p53 gene mutations in post-bronchoscopic sputum was easy and effective, may be used as a valuable method for early diagnosis of lung cancer.

  10. Mutational analysis of single circulating tumor cells by next generation sequencing in metastatic breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galardi, Francesca; Pestrin, Marta; Gabellini, Stefano; Simi, Lisa; Mancini, Irene; Vannucchi, Alessandro Maria; Pazzagli, Mario; Di Leo, Angelo; Pinzani, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) represent a “liquid biopsy” of the tumor potentially allowing real-time monitoring of cancer biology and therapies in individual patients. The purpose of the study was to explore the applicability of a protocol for the molecular characterization of single CTCs by Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) in order to investigate cell heterogeneity and provide a tool for a personalized medicine approach. CTCs were enriched and enumerated by CellSearch in blood from four metastatic breast cancer patients and singularly isolated by DEPArray. Upon whole genome amplification 3–5 single CTCs per patient were analyzed by NGS for 50 cancer-related genes. We found 51 sequence variants in 25 genes. We observed inter- and intra-patient heterogeneity in the mutational status of CTCs. The highest number of somatic deleterious mutations was found in the gene TP53, whose mutation is associated with adverse prognosis in breast cancer. The discordance between the mutational status of the primary tumor and CTCs observed in 3 patients suggests that, in advanced stages of cancer, CTC characteristics are more closely linked to the dynamic modifications of the disease status. In one patient the mutational profiles of CTCs before and during treatment shared only few sequence variants. This study supports the applicability of a non-invasive approach based on the liquid biopsy in metastatic breast cancer patients which, in perspective, should allow investigating the clonal evolution of the tumor for the development of new therapeutic strategies in precision medicine. PMID:27034166

  11. Will Chinese ovarian cancer patients benefit from knowing the BRCA2 mutation status?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Yan Liu; Wei Zhang

    2012-01-01

    In Western countries,the mutation status of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes is commonly determined for genetic counseling among members of families with a history of breast or ovarian cancer,especially for women of the Ashkenazi Jewish ethnicity.Recent studies in the Cancer Genome Atlas project have demonstrated that BRCA2 mutation carriers are more responsive to platinum-based chemotherapy among high-grade serous ovarian cancer patients.Thus,in Western countries,the mutation status of BRCA1 and BRCA2 is recognized to have an important value with which to assess cancer risk and therapeutic response.However,very limited studies of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations and their implications for counseling and therapeutic prediction have been conducted in China.Therefore,a potentially important genetic test that is technically simple has not benefited Chinese women with an increased risk of breast or ovarian cancer.This article summarizes the current progress in the study of BRCA1/2 mutation in China and recommends an increased effort in applying advances in genetic testing to the clinical management of Chinese patients with ovarian cancer.

  12. Theory development from studies with young women with breast cancer who are BRCA mutation negative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Rebekah; Kopin, Samantha

    2013-01-01

    Researchers and practitioners can use inductively derived theory to direct their research and practice. This article describes the ongoing development of a theory that can assist in explaining experiences of young women with breast cancer who have genetic testing for the BRCA mutation. Seventeen BRCA-negative women with breast cancer from a larger grounded theory study were interviewed. While receiving a negative BRCA mutation test result subsequent to a breast cancer diagnosis was described as a relief, the information was also confusing. The author's published Theory of Genetic Vulnerability is expanded to incorporate the outcomes of this analysis.

  13. The CASP8 rs3834129 polymorphism and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The rs3834129 polymorphism, in the promoter of CASP8 gene, has been recently reported as associated with breast cancer risk in the general population, with the minor allele del having a protective effect. Some of the genetic variants found associated with breast cancer risk were reported as risk modifiers in individuals with mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Here, we tested the effect of the rs3834129 del allele on breast cancer risk in BRCA mutation carriers. The rs3834...

  14. Adiposity is associated with p53 gene mutations in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochs-Balcom, Heather M; Marian, Catalin; Nie, Jing; Brasky, Theodore M; Goerlitz, David S; Trevisan, Maurizio; Edge, Stephen B; Winston, Janet; Berry, Deborah L; Kallakury, Bhaskar V; Freudenheim, Jo L; Shields, Peter G

    2015-10-01

    Mutations in the p53 gene are among the most frequent genetic events in human cancer and may be triggered by environmental and occupational exposures. We examined the association of clinical and pathological characteristics of breast tumors and breast cancer risk factors according to the prevalence and type of p53 mutations. Using tumor blocks from incident cases from a case-control study in western New York, we screened for p53 mutations in exons 2-11 using the Affymetrix p53 Gene Chip array and analyzed case-case comparisons using logistic regression. The p53 mutation frequency among cases was 28.1 %; 95 % were point mutations (13 % of which were silent) and the remainder were single base pair deletions. Sixty seven percent of all point mutations were transitions; 24 % of them are G:C>A:T at CpG sites. Positive p53 mutation status was associated with poorer differentiation (OR, 95 % CI 2.29, 1.21-4.32), higher nuclear grade (OR, 95 % CI 1.99, 1.22-3.25), and increased Ki-67 status (OR, 95 % CI 1.81, 1.10-2.98). Cases with P53 mutations were more likely to have a combined ER-positive and PR-negative status (OR, 95 % CI 1.65, 1.01-2.71), and a combined ER-negative and PR-negative status (OR, 95 % CI 2.18, 1.47-3.23). Body mass index >30 kg/m(2), waist circumference >79 cm, and waist-to-hip ratio >0.86 were also associated with p53 status; obese breast cancer cases are more likely to have p53 mutations (OR, 95 % CI 1.78, 1.19-2.68). We confirmed that p53 mutations are associated with less favorable tumor characteristics and identified an association of p53 mutation status and adiposity.

  15. MTHFR Gene Polymorphism-Mutations and Air Pollution as Risk Factors for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Mildred C.; Yu, Pojui; Shiao, S. Pamela K.

    2017-01-01

    Background The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) is one of the most investigated genes associated with breast cancer for its role in epigenetic pathways. Objectives The objectives of this metaprediction study were to examine the polymorphism-mutation risk subtypes of MTHFR and air pollution as contributing factors for breast cancer. Methods For triangulation purposes in metapredictive analyses, we used a recursive partition tree, nonlinear association curve fit, and heat maps for data visualization, in addition to the conventional comparison procedure and pooled analyses. Results We included 36,683 breast cancer cases and 40,689 controls across 82 studies for MTHFR 677 and 23,252 cases and 27,094 controls across 50 studies for MTHFR 1298. MTHFR 677 TT was a risk genotype for breast cancer (p = .0004) and in the East Asian subgroup (p = .005). On global maps, the most polymorphism-mutations on MTHFR 677 TT were found in the Middle East, Europe, Asia, and the Americas, whereas the most mutations on MTHFR 1298 CC were located in Europe and the Middle East for the control group. The geographic information system maps further revealed that MTHFR 677 TT mutations yielded a higher risk of breast cancer for Australia, East Asia, the Middle East, South Europe, Morocco, and the Americas and that MTHFR 1298 CC mutations yielded a higher risk in Asia, the Middle East, South Europe, and South America. Metapredictive analysis revealed that air pollution level was significantly associated with MTHFR 677 TT polymorphism-mutation genotype. Discussion We present the most comprehensive analyses to date of MTHFR polymorphism-mutations and breast cancer risk. Future nursing studies are needed to investigate the health impact on breast cancer of epigenetics and air pollution across populations. PMID:28114181

  16. Risk modeling and screening for BRCA1 mutations among Filipino breast cancer patients

    CERN Document Server

    Nato, A Q J

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer susceptibility gene, type 1(BRCA1) has been thought to be responsible for approx 45% of families with multiple breast carcinomas and for approx 80% of breast and ovarian cancer families. In this study, we investigated 34 familial Filipino breast cancer (BC) patients to: (a) estimate breast cancer risks and BRCA1/2 mutation carrier probabilities using risk assessment and prior probability models, respectively; (b) screen for putative polymorphisms at selected smaller exons of BRCA1 by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis; (c) screen for truncated mutations at BRCA1 exon 11 by radioactive protein truncation test (PTT); and (d) estimate posterior probabilities upon incorporation of screening results. SSCP analysis revealed 8 unique putative polymorphisms. Low prevalence of unique putative polymorphisms at exon 2, 5, 17, and 22 may indicate probable mutations. Contrastingly, high prevalence of unique putative polymorphisms at exons 13, 15, and 16 may suggest true polymorphisms whi...

  17. Distinct pattern of p53 mutations in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spruck, C H; Rideout, W M; Olumi, A F

    1993-01-01

    A distinct mutational spectrum for the p53 tumor suppressor gene in bladder carcinomas was established in patients with known exposures to cigarette smoke. Single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis of exons 5 through 8 of the p53 gene showed inactivating mutations in 16 of 40 (40%) bladder...

  18. Evaluation of candidate stromal epithelial cross-talk genes identifies association between risk of serous ovarian cancer and TERT, a cancer susceptibility "hot-spot"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnatty, Sharon E; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing;

    2010-01-01

    with ovarian cancer risk in the smaller, five-study replication study (Pper-allele=0.03). Combined analysis of the discovery and replication sets for this TERT SNP showed an increased risk of serous ovarian cancer among non-Hispanic whites [adj. ORper-allele 1.14 (1.04-1.24) p=0.003]. Our study adds...

  19. Risk of Cancer in Cases of Suspected Lynch Syndrome Without Germline Mutation

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Soler, María; Pérez-Carbonell, Lucía; Guarinos, Carla; Zapater, Pedro; Castillejo, Adela; Barberá, Víctor Manuel; Juárez, Miriam; Bessa, Xavier; Xicola, Rosa M; Clofent, Juan; Bujanda, Luis; Balaguer, Francesc; Reñé, Josep-Maria; de Castro, Luisa; Marín-Gabriel, José C.

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims: Colorectal cancers (CRCs) with microsatellite instability (MSI) and a mismatch repair (MMR) immunohistochemical deficit without hypermethylation of the MLH1 promoter are likely to be caused by Lynch syndrome. Some patients with these cancers have not been found to have pathogenic germline mutations and are considered to have Lynch-like syndrome (LLS). The aim of this study was to determine the risk of cancer in families of patients with LLS. Methods: We studied a population...

  20. Does the age of breast cancer diagnosis in first-degree relatives impact on the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, John; Metcalfe, Kelly A; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Armel, Susan; Lynch, Henry T; Karlan, Beth; Foulkes, William; Singer, Christian F; Neuhausen, Susan L; Eng, Charis; Iqbal, Javaid; Narod, Steven A

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to estimate the age-specific annual risks of breast cancer in a woman with a germline BRCA mutation and an affected first-degree relative according to the age of breast cancer diagnosis in the relative. Women with BRCA mutations with no previous diagnosis of breast cancer and with one first-degree relative with breast cancer were followed for breast cancers for a mean of 5.9 years (minimum 2 years). Age-specific annual breast cancer risks were calculated, according to the age of breast cancer diagnosis in the proband and the first-degree relative. 1114 cancer-free women with a BRCA mutation with a single first-degree relative with breast cancer were eligible for the study. 122 women (11.0 %) were diagnosed with incident breast cancer. The annual risk of breast cancer was 2.0 % for women with BRCA1 mutations and was 1.6 % for women with BRCA2 mutations. The age of breast cancer diagnosis in the first-degree relative did not affect the annual breast cancer risks for BRCA1 mutation carriers. For BRCA2 mutation carriers, the annual breast cancer risk was 4.5 % for women with a first-degree relative diagnosed with breast cancer under the age of 30 years and was 0.7 % for women with a relative diagnosed over the age of 60. Among women with BRCA2 mutations, a family history of early-onset breast cancer is a risk factor for developing breast cancer. Risk assessment for healthy BRCA2 mutation carriers should consider the ages of breast cancers diagnosed in first-degree relatives.

  1. Classical pathology and mutational load of breast cancer - integration of two worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budczies, Jan; Bockmayr, Michael; Denkert, Carsten; Klauschen, Frederick; Lennerz, Jochen K; Györffy, Balázs; Dietel, Manfred; Loibl, Sibylle; Weichert, Wilko; Stenzinger, Albrecht

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer is a complex molecular disease comprising several biological subtypes. However, daily routine diagnosis is still based on a small set of well-characterized clinico-pathological variables. Here, we try to link the two worlds of surgical pathology and multilayered molecular profiling by analyzing the relationships between clinico-pathological phenotypes and mutational loads of breast cancer. We evaluated the number of mutated genes with somatic non-silent mutations in different subgroups of breast cancer based on clinico-pathological, including immunohistochemical and tumour characteristics. The analysis was performed for a cohort of 687 primary breast cancer patients with mutational profiling, gene expression and clinico-pathological data available from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project. The number of mutated genes was strongly positively associated with higher tumour grade (p = 1.4e-14) and with the different immunohistochemical and PAM50 molecular subtypes of breast cancer (p = 1.4e-10 and p = 4.3e-10, respectively). We observed significant associations (|R| > 0.4) between the abundance of mutated genes and expression levels of genes related to proliferation in the overall cohort and hormone receptor positive cohort, including the Recurrence Score gene signature (e.g., MYBL2 and BIRC5). Specific mutated genes (TP53, NCOR1, NF1, PTPRD and RB1) were highly significantly associated with high loads of mutated genes. Multivariate analysis for overall survival (OS) revealed a worse survival for patients with high numbers of mutated genes (hazard ratio = 4.6, 95% CI: 1.0 - 20.0, p = 0.044). Here, we report a strong association of the number of mutated genes with immunohistochemical and PAM50 subtypes and tumour grade in breast cancer. We provide evidence that specific levels of the mutational load underlie different morphological and biological phenotypes, which collectively constitute the current basis of pathological diagnosis

  2. Can selenium be a modifier of cancer risk in CHEK2 mutation carriers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Satish; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna

    2013-11-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element for humans, playing an important role in various major metabolic pathways. Selenium helps to protect the body from the poisonous effects of heavy metals and other harmful substances. Medical studies have provided evidence of selenium supplementation in preventing certain cancers. Low and too high selenium (Se) status correlates with increased risk of e.g. lung, larynx, colorectal and prostate cancers. A higher level of selenium and supplementation with selenium has been shown to be associated with substantially reduced cancer mortality. Selenium exerts its biological roles through selenoproteins, which are involved in oxidoreductions, redox signalling, antioxidant defence, thyroid hormone metabolism and immune responses. Checkpoint kinase 2 (CHEK2) is an important signal transducer of cellular responses to DNA damage and acts as a tumour suppressor gene. Mutations in the CHEK2 gene have been shown to be associated with increased risks of several cancers. Four common mutations in CHEK2 gene (1100delC, IVS2+1G>A, del5395 and I157T) have been identified in the Polish population. Studies have provided evidence that CHEK2-truncating and/or missense mutations are associated with increased risk of breast, prostate, thyroid, colon and kidney cancers. The variability in penetrance and cancer expression in CHEK2 mutation carriers can probably be explained by the influence of other genetic or environmental factors. One of the possible candidates is Se, which together with genetic variations in selenoprotein genes may influence susceptibility to cancer risk.

  3. Activating ESR1 mutations in hormone-resistant metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Dan R; Wu, Yi-Mi; Vats, Pankaj; Su, Fengyun; Lonigro, Robert J; Cao, Xuhong; Kalyana-Sundaram, Shanker; Wang, Rui; Ning, Yu; Hodges, Lynda; Gursky, Amy; Siddiqui, Javed; Tomlins, Scott A; Roychowdhury, Sameek; Pienta, Kenneth J; Kim, Scott Y; Roberts, J Scott; Rae, James M; Van Poznak, Catherine H; Hayes, Daniel F; Chugh, Rashmi; Kunju, Lakshmi P; Talpaz, Moshe; Schott, Anne F; Chinnaiyan, Arul M

    2013-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer in women, and over two-thirds of cases express estrogen receptor-α (ER-α, encoded by ESR1). Through a prospective clinical sequencing program for advanced cancers, we enrolled 11 patients with ER-positive metastatic breast cancer. Whole-exome and transcriptome analysis showed that six cases harbored mutations of ESR1 affecting its ligand-binding domain (LBD), all of whom had been treated with anti-estrogens and estrogen deprivation therapies. A survey of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) identified four endometrial cancers with similar mutations of ESR1. The five new LBD-localized ESR1 mutations identified here (encoding p.Leu536Gln, p.Tyr537Ser, p.Tyr537Cys, p.Tyr537Asn and p.Asp538Gly) were shown to result in constitutive activity and continued responsiveness to anti-estrogen therapies in vitro. Taken together, these studies suggest that activating mutations in ESR1 are a key mechanism in acquired endocrine resistance in breast cancer therapy.

  4. BRCA somatic and germline mutation detection in paraffin embedded ovarian cancers by next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafficini, Andrea; Simbolo, Michele; Parisi, Alice; Rusev, Borislav; Luchini, Claudio; Cataldo, Ivana; Piazzola, Elena; Sperandio, Nicola; Turri, Giona; Franchi, Massimo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Bovo, Chiara; Lawlor, Rita T; Scarpa, Aldo

    2016-01-12

    BRCA mutated ovarian cancers respond better to platinum-based therapy and to the recently approved PARP-inhibitors. There is the need for efficient and timely methods to detect both somatic and germline mutations using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues and commercially available technology. We used a commercial kit exploring all exons and 50bp exon-intron junctions of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, and semiconductor next-generation sequencing (NGS) on DNA from 47 FFPE samples of high-grade serous ovarian cancers. Pathogenic mutations were found in 13/47 (28%) cancers: eight in BRCA1 and five in BRCA2. All BRCA1 and two BRCA2 mutations were germline; three BRCA2 mutations were somatic. All mutations were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. To evaluate the performance of the NGS panel, we assessed its capability to detect the 6,953 variants described for BRCA1 and BRCA2 in ClinVar and COSMIC databases using callability analysis. 6,059 (87.1%) variants were identified automatically by the software; 829 (12.0%) required visual verification. The remaining 65 (0.9%) variants were uncallable, and would require 15 Sanger reactions to be resolved. Thus, the sensitivity of the NGS-panel was 99.1%. In conclusion, NGS performed with a commercial kit is highly efficient for detection of germline and somatic mutations in BRCA genes using routine FFPE tissue.

  5. Detection of frameshift mutations of RIZin gastric cancers with microsatellite instability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai-Feng Pan; You-Yong Lu; Wan-Guo Liu; Lian Zhang; Wei-Cheng You

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the frameshift mutations of the retinoblastomaprotein-interacting zinc finger gene RIZ in gastric cancer with microsatellite instability, and to identify two coding polyadenosine tracts of RIZ.METHODS: Frameshift mutations at (A)8 and (A)9 tracts of RIZwere detected in 70 human gastric cancer (HGC) specimens by DHPLC and DNA sequencing. Microsatelliteinstability (MSI) status was assessed by two mononucleotide markers, BAT26 and BAT25, by means of denaturing highperformance liquid chromatography (DHPLC).RESULTS: In 70 HGC samples, 8 (11.4%) were found positivefor instabilities at BAT26 and BAT25. In 7 of the 8 cases with instabilities at both BAT26 and BAT25 (MSI-H), 1 was unstable at BAT26 but stable at BAT25. Frameshift mutations were identified in 4 (57.1%) of the 7 samples with MSI-Hin the (A)9 tract of RIZ without mutations in the (A)8 tract.In contrast, frameshift mutations were found in neither of the polyadenosine tracts in 63 samples of MSI-L or MSI stable tumors. Pro704 LOH detection in 4 cases with frameshift mutations did not find LOH in these cases.CONCLUSION: Frameshift mutations of RIZ may play an important role in gastric cancers with MSI.

  6. BRCA somatic and germline mutation detection in paraffin embedded ovarian cancers by next-generation sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafficini, Andrea; Simbolo, Michele; Parisi, Alice; Rusev, Borislav; Luchini, Claudio; Cataldo, Ivana; Piazzola, Elena; Sperandio, Nicola; Turri, Giona; Franchi, Massimo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Bovo, Chiara; Lawlor, Rita T.; Scarpa, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    BRCA mutated ovarian cancers respond better to platinum-based therapy and to the recently approved PARP-inhibitors. There is the need for efficient and timely methods to detect both somatic and germline mutations using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues and commercially available technology. We used a commercial kit exploring all exons and 50bp exon-intron junctions of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, and semiconductor next-generation sequencing (NGS) on DNA from 47 FFPE samples of high-grade serous ovarian cancers. Pathogenic mutations were found in 13/47 (28%) cancers: eight in BRCA1 and five in BRCA2. All BRCA1 and two BRCA2 mutations were germline; three BRCA2 mutations were somatic. All mutations were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. To evaluate the performance of the NGS panel, we assessed its capability to detect the 6,953 variants described for BRCA1 and BRCA2 in ClinVar and COSMIC databases using callability analysis. 6,059 (87.1%) variants were identified automatically by the software; 829 (12.0%) required visual verification. The remaining 65 (0.9%) variants were uncallable, and would require 15 Sanger reactions to be resolved. Thus, the sensitivity of the NGS-panel was 99.1%. In conclusion, NGS performed with a commercial kit is highly efficient for detection of germline and somatic mutations in BRCA genes using routine FFPE tissue. PMID:26745875

  7. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in lung cancer: preclinical and clinical data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge, S.E.D.C.; Kobayashi, S.S.; Costa, D.B. [Harvard Medical School, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-09-05

    Lung cancer leads cancer-related mortality worldwide. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the most prevalent subtype of this recalcitrant cancer, is usually diagnosed at advanced stages, and available systemic therapies are mostly palliative. The probing of the NSCLC kinome has identified numerous nonoverlapping driver genomic events, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations. This review provides a synopsis of preclinical and clinical data on EGFR mutated NSCLC and EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Classic somatic EGFR kinase domain mutations (such as L858R and exon 19 deletions) make tumors addicted to their signaling cascades and generate a therapeutic window for the use of ATP-mimetic EGFR TKIs. The latter inhibit these kinases and their downstream effectors, and induce apoptosis in preclinical models. The aforementioned EGFR mutations are stout predictors of response and augmentation of progression-free survival when gefitinib, erlotinib, and afatinib are used for patients with advanced NSCLC. The benefits associated with these EGFR TKIs are limited by the mechanisms of tumor resistance, such as the gatekeeper EGFR-T790M mutation, and bypass activation of signaling cascades. Ongoing preclinical efforts for treating resistance have started to translate into patient care (including clinical trials of the covalent EGFR-T790M TKIs AZD9291 and CO-1686) and hold promise to further boost the median survival of patients with EGFR mutated NSCLC.

  8. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutations in lung cancer: preclinical and clinical data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.E.D.C. Jorge

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer leads cancer-related mortality worldwide. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC, the most prevalent subtype of this recalcitrant cancer, is usually diagnosed at advanced stages, and available systemic therapies are mostly palliative. The probing of the NSCLC kinome has identified numerous nonoverlapping driver genomic events, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR gene mutations. This review provides a synopsis of preclinical and clinical data on EGFR mutated NSCLC and EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs. Classic somatic EGFR kinase domain mutations (such as L858R and exon 19 deletions make tumors addicted to their signaling cascades and generate a therapeutic window for the use of ATP-mimetic EGFR TKIs. The latter inhibit these kinases and their downstream effectors, and induce apoptosis in preclinical models. The aforementioned EGFR mutations are stout predictors of response and augmentation of progression-free survival when gefitinib, erlotinib, and afatinib are used for patients with advanced NSCLC. The benefits associated with these EGFR TKIs are limited by the mechanisms of tumor resistance, such as the gatekeeper EGFR-T790M mutation, and bypass activation of signaling cascades. Ongoing preclinical efforts for treating resistance have started to translate into patient care (including clinical trials of the covalent EGFR-T790M TKIs AZD9291 and CO-1686 and hold promise to further boost the median survival of patients with EGFR mutated NSCLC.

  9. The Emergent Landscape of Detecting EGFR Mutations Using Circulating Tumor DNA in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Lun Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The advances in targeted therapies for lung cancer are based on the evaluation of specific gene mutations especially the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. The assays largely depend on the acquisition of tumor tissue via biopsy before the initiation of therapy or after the onset of acquired resistance. However, the limitations of tissue biopsy including tumor heterogeneity and insufficient tissues for molecular testing are impotent clinical obstacles for mutation analysis and lung cancer treatment. Due to the invasive procedure of tissue biopsy and the progressive development of drug-resistant EGFR mutations, the effective initial detection and continuous monitoring of EGFR mutations are still unmet requirements. Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA detection is a promising biomarker for noninvasive assessment of cancer burden. Recent advancement of sensitive techniques in detecting EGFR mutations using ctDNA enables a broad range of clinical applications, including early detection of disease, prediction of treatment responses, and disease progression. This review not only introduces the biology and clinical implementations of ctDNA but also includes the updating information of recent advancement of techniques for detecting EGFR mutation using ctDNA in lung cancer.

  10. Limited clinical relevance of mitochondrial DNA mutation and gene expression analyses in ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachinger Andrea

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, numerous studies have investigated somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA in various tumours. The observed high mutation rates might reflect mitochondrial deregulation; consequently, mutation analyses could be clinically relevant. The purpose of this study was to determine if mutations in the mitochondrial D-loop region and/or the level of mitochondrial gene expression could influence the clinical course of human ovarian carcinomas. Methods We sequenced a 1320-base-pair DNA fragment of the mitochondrial genome (position 16,000-750 in 54 cancer samples and in 44 corresponding germline control samples. In addition, six transcripts (MT-ATP6, MT-CO1, MT-CYB, MT-ND1, MT-ND6, and MT-RNR1 were quantified in 62 cancer tissues by real-time RT-PCR. Results Somatic mutations in the D-loop sequence were found in 57% of ovarian cancers. Univariate analysis showed no association between mitochondrial DNA mutation status or mitochondrial gene expression and any of the examined clinicopathologic parameters. A multivariate logistic regression model revealed that the expression of the mitochondrial gene RNR1 might be used as a predictor of tumour sensitivity to chemotherapy. Conclusion In contrast to many previously published papers, our study indicates rather limited clinical relevance of mitochondrial molecular analyses in ovarian carcinomas. These discrepancies in the clinical utility of mitochondrial molecular tests in ovarian cancer require additional large, well-designed validation studies.

  11. Identification and characterization of retinoblastoma gene mutations disturbing apoptosis in human breast cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berge Elisabet

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tumor suppressor pRb plays a key role regulating cell cycle arrest, and disturbances in the RB1 gene have been reported in different cancer forms. However, the literature reports contradictory findings with respect to a pro - versus anti - apoptotic role of pRb, and the consequence of alterations in RB1 to chemotherapy sensitivity remains unclear. This study is part of a project investigating alterations in pivotal genes as predictive factors to chemotherapy sensitivity in breast cancer. Results Analyzing 73 locally advanced (stage III breast cancers, we identified two somatic and one germline single nucleotide changes, each leading to amino acid substitution in the pRb protein (Leu607Ile, Arg698Trp, and Arg621Cys, respectively. This is the first study reporting point mutations affecting RB1 in breast cancer tissue. In addition, MLPA analysis revealed two large multiexon deletions (exons 13 to 27 and exons 21 to 23 with the exons 21-23 deletion occurring in the tumor also harboring the Leu607Ile mutation. Interestingly, Leu607Ile and Arg621Cys point mutations both localize to the spacer region of the pRb protein, a region previously shown to harbor somatic and germline mutations. Multiple sequence alignment across species indicates the spacer to be evolutionary conserved. All three RB1 point mutations encoded nuclear proteins with impaired ability to induce apoptosis compared to wild-type pRb in vitro. Notably, three out of four tumors harboring RB1 mutations displayed primary resistance to treatment with either 5-FU/mitomycin or doxorubicin while only 14 out of 64 tumors without mutations were resistant (p = 0.046. Conclusions Although rare, our findings suggest RB1 mutations to be of pathological importance potentially affecting sensitivity to mitomycin/anthracycline treatment in breast cancer.

  12. Mutations in components of the Wnt signaling pathway in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai-Feng Pan; Wan-Guo Liu; Lian Zhang; Wei-Cheng You; You-Yong Lu

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To explore the contribution of AXIN1,AXIN2 and beta-catenin,components of Wnt signaling pathway,to the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer(GC),we examined AXIN1,AXIN2 exon7 and CTNNB1(encoding betacatenin) exon3 mutations in 70 GCs.METHODS:The presence of mutations was identified by polymerase chain reaction(PCR)-based denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and direct DNA sequencing.Beta-catenin expression was detected by immunohistochemical analysis.RESULTS:Among the 70 GCs,5(7.1%)had mutations in one or two of these three components.A frameshift mutation(1 bp deletion)in exon7 of AXIN2 was found in one case.Four cases,including the case with a mutation in AXIN2,had frameshift mutations and missense mutations in AXIN1.Five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs),334 C>T,874 C>T,1396 G>A,1690 C>T and 1942 T>G,were identified in AXTN1.A frameshift mutation(27 bp deletion) spanning exon3 of CTNNB1 was observed in one case.All four cases with mutations in AXIN1 and AXIN2 showed nuclear betacatenin expression.CONCLUSION:These data indicate that the mutations in AXIN1 and AXIN2 may contribute to gastric carcinogenesis.

  13. Evaluation of candidate stromal epithelial cross-talk genes identifies association between risk of serous ovarian cancer and TERT, a cancer susceptibility "hot-spot".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon E Johnatty

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that variants in genes expressed as a consequence of interactions between ovarian cancer cells and the host micro-environment could contribute to cancer susceptibility. We therefore used a two-stage approach to evaluate common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 173 genes involved in stromal epithelial interactions in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC. In the discovery stage, cases with epithelial ovarian cancer (n=675 and controls (n=1,162 were genotyped at 1,536 SNPs using an Illumina GoldenGate assay. Based on Positive Predictive Value estimates, three SNPs-PODXL rs1013368, ITGA6 rs13027811, and MMP3 rs522616-were selected for replication using TaqMan genotyping in up to 3,059 serous invasive cases and 8,905 controls from 16 OCAC case-control studies. An additional 18 SNPs with Pper-alleleor=0.5. However genotypes at TERT rs7726159 were associated with ovarian cancer risk in the smaller, five-study replication study (Pper-allele=0.03. Combined analysis of the discovery and replication sets for this TERT SNP showed an increased risk of serous ovarian cancer among non-Hispanic whites [adj. ORper-allele 1.14 (1.04-1.24 p=0.003]. Our study adds to the growing evidence that, like the 8q24 locus, the telomerase reverse transcriptase locus at 5p15.33, is a general cancer susceptibility locus.

  14. Frameshift mutation of WISP3 gene and its regional heterogeneity in gastric and colorectal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Hwa; Choi, Youn Jin; Je, Eun Mi; Kim, Ho Shik; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2016-04-01

    WISP3 is involved in many cancer-related processes including epithelial-mesenchymal transition, cell death, invasion, and metastasis and is considered a tumor suppressor. The aim of our study was to find whether WISP3 gene was mutated and expressionally altered in gastric (GC) and colorectal cancers (CRCs). WISP3 gene possesses a mononucleotide repeat in the coding sequence that could be mutated in cancers with high microsatellite instability (MSI-H). We analyzed 79 GCs and 156 CRCs, and found that GCs (8.8%) and CRCs (10.5%) with MSI-H, but not those with microsatellite stable/low MSI, harbored a frameshift mutation. We also analyzed intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) of the frameshift mutation in 16 CRCs and found that the WISP3 mutation exhibited regional ITH in 25% of the CRCs. In immunohistochemistry, loss of WISP3 expression was identified in 24% of GCs and 21% of CRCs. The loss of expression was more common in those with WISP3 mutation than with wild-type WISP3 and those with MSI-H than with microsatellite stable/low MSI. Our data indicate that WISP3 harbored not only frameshift mutation but also mutational ITH and loss of expression, which together might play a role in tumorigenesis of GC and CRC with MSI-H by inhibiting tumor suppressor functions of WISP3. Our data also suggest that mutation analysis in multiregions is needed for a proper evaluation of mutation status in GC and CRC with MSI-H.

  15. A multilevel pan-cancer map links gene mutations tocancer hallmarks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TheoAKnijnenburg; TychoBismeijer; LodewykFAWessels; IlyaShmulevich

    2015-01-01

    Background:A central challenge in cancer research is to create models that bridge the gap between the molecular level on which interventions can be designed and the cellular and tissue levels on which the disease phenotypes are manifested. This study was undertaken to construct such a model from functional annotations and explore its use when integrated with large-scale cancer genomics data. Methods:We created a map that connects genes to cancer hallmarks via signaling pathways. We projected gene mutation and focal copy number data from various cancer types onto this map. We performed statistical analyses to uncover mutually exclusive and co-occurring oncogenic aberrations within this topology. Results:Our analysis showed that although the genetic ifngerprint of tumor types could be very different, there were less variations at the level of hallmarks, consistent with the idea that different genetic alterations have similar functional outcomes. Additionally, we showed how the multilevel map could help to clarify the role of infrequently mutated genes, and we demonstrated that mutually exclusive gene mutations were more prevalent in pathways, whereas many co-occurring gene mutations were associated with hallmark characteristics. Conclusions:Overlaying this map with gene mutation and focal copy number data from various cancer types makes it possible to investigate the similarities and differences between tumor samples systematically at the levels of not only genes but also pathways and hallmarks.

  16. A novel BAP1 mutation is associated with melanocytic neoplasms and thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Kevin J; Gallanis, Gregory T; Heller, Kathleen A; Melas, Marilena; Idos, Gregory E; Culver, Julie O; Martin, Sue-Ellen; Peng, David H; Gruber, Stephen B

    2016-03-01

    Germline mutations in the tumor suppressor gene, BRCA-1 associated protein (BAP1), underlie a tumor predisposition syndrome characterized by increased risk for numerous cancers including uveal melanoma, melanocytic tumors and mesothelioma, among others. In the present study we report the identification of a novel germline BAP1 mutation, c.1777C>T, which produces a truncated BAP1 protein product and segregates with cancer. Family members with this mutation demonstrated a primary clinical phenotype of autosomal dominant, early-onset melanocytic neoplasms with immunohistochemistry (IHC) of these tumors demonstrating lack of BAP1 protein expression. In addition, family members harboring the BAP1 c.1777C>T germline mutation developed other neoplastic disease including thyroid cancer. IHC analysis of the thyroid cancer, as well, demonstrated loss of BAP1 protein expression. Our investigation identifies a new BAP1 mutation, further highlights the relevance of BAP1 as a clinically important tumor suppressor gene, and broadens the range of cancers associated with BAP1 inactivation. Further study will be required to understand the full scope of BAP1-associated neoplastic disease.

  17. Radioprotection of IDH1-Mutated Cancer Cells by the IDH1-Mutant Inhibitor AGI-5198.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Remco J; Botman, Dennis; Smits, Myrthe A; Hira, Vashendriya V; van Lith, Sanne A; Stap, Jan; Henneman, Peter; Khurshed, Mohammed; Lenting, Krissie; Mul, Adri N; Dimitrakopoulou, Dionysia; van Drunen, Cornelis M; Hoebe, Ron A; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Wilmink, Johanna W; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Vandertop, W Peter; Leenders, William P; Bleeker, Fonnet E; van Noorden, Cornelis J

    2015-11-15

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) is mutated in various types of human cancer to IDH1(R132H), a structural alteration that leads to catalysis of α-ketoglutarate to the oncometabolite D-2-hydroxyglutarate. In this study, we present evidence that small-molecule inhibitors of IDH1(R132H) that are being developed for cancer therapy may pose risks with coadministration of radiotherapy. Cancer cells heterozygous for the IDH1(R132H) mutation exhibited less IDH-mediated production of NADPH, such that after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR), there were higher levels of reactive oxygen species, DNA double-strand breaks, and cell death compared with IDH1 wild-type cells. These effects were reversed by the IDH1(R132H) inhibitor AGI-5198. Exposure of IDH1 wild-type cells to D-2-hydroxyglutarate was sufficient to reduce IDH-mediated NADPH production and increase IR sensitivity. Mechanistic investigations revealed that the radiosensitivity of heterozygous cells was independent of the well-described DNA hypermethylation phenotype in IDH1-mutated cancers. Thus, our results argue that altered oxidative stress responses are a plausible mechanism to understand the radiosensitivity of IDH1-mutated cancer cells. Further, they offer an explanation for the relatively longer survival of patients with IDH1-mutated tumors, and they imply that administration of IDH1(R132H) inhibitors in these patients may limit irradiation efficacy in this setting.

  18. Distribution of KRAS and BRAF mutations in Moroccan patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchoudi, N; Amrani Hassani Joutei, H; Jouali, F; Fekkak, J; Rhaissi, H

    2013-12-01

    Targeted therapies have an increasing importance in digestive oncology. To our knowledge, we are the first to report the distribution of KRAS and BRAF mutations in Moroccan patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) in order to introduce targeted therapy in the arsenal of therapeutic modalities for management of this cancer in Morocco. In this study, 92 samples obtained from patients with CRC were tested for the presence of the nine most common mutations in the KRAS gene and BRAF gene. Among the tested patients, 76.09% of patients had wt-KRAS genotype and 23.91% were KRAS mutants and the majority of mutations would result in an amino acid substitution of glycine by aspartic acid (68.2%) The predominant mutations are G>A transitions and G>T transversions. Around 5% (5.43%) of the tested patients bore the V600E mutation in BRAF gene. Only one patient showing to have the V600E mutation in BRAF was also mutated-KRAS. Summing up the results about the KRAS and the BRAF mutation carriers from our study, the portion of potentially non responsive patients for the anti-EGFR treatment is 28.26%.

  19. Functional examination of MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 intronic mutations identified in Danish colorectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Sanne M; Dandanell, Mette; Rasmussen, Lene J

    2013-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 predispose to the development of colorectal cancer (Lynch syndrome or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer). These mutations include disease-causing frame-shift, nonsense, and splicing mutations as well as large genomi...... rearrangements. However, a large number of mutations, including missense, silent, and intronic variants, are classified as variants of unknown clinical significance.......Germ-line mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 predispose to the development of colorectal cancer (Lynch syndrome or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer). These mutations include disease-causing frame-shift, nonsense, and splicing mutations as well as large genomic...

  20. Frequency of K-RAS and N-RAS Gene Mutations in Colorectal Cancers in Southeastern Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsen, Naseri; Ahmadreza, Sebzari; Fatemeh, Haghighi; Fatemeh, Hajipoor; Fariba, Emadian Razavi

    2016-01-09

    Background: K-RAS and N-RAS gene mutations cause resistance to treatment in patients with colorectal cancer. Based on this, awareness of mutation of these genes is considered a clinically important step towards better diagnosis and appropriate treatment. Materials and Methods: Fifty paraffin-embedded blocks of colorectal cancer were obtained from Imam Reza Hospital of Birjand, Iran. Following DNA extraction, the samples were analyzed for common mutations of exons 2, 3 and 4 of KRAS and NRAS genes using real time PCR and pyrosequencing. Results: According to this study, the prevalence of mutations was respectively 28% (14 out of 50) and 2% (1 out of 50) in KRAS and NRAS genes. All the mutations were observed in patients >50 years old. Conclusions: Mutations were found in both KRAS and NRAS genes in colorectal cancers in Iranian patients. Determining the frequency of these mutations in each geographical region may be necessary to benefit from targeted cancer therapy.

  1. Germline HABP2 Mutation Causing Familial Nonmedullary Thyroid Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gara, Sudheer Kumar; Jia, Li; Merino, Maria J.; Agarwal, Sunita K.; Zhang, Lisa; Cam, Maggie; Patel, Dhaval; Kebebew, Electron

    2015-01-01

    Familial nonmedullary thyroid cancer accounts for 3 to 9% of all cases of thyroid cancer, but the susceptibility genes are not known. Here, we report a germline variant of HABP2 in seven affected members of a kindred with familial nonmedullary thyroid cancer and in 4.7% of 423 patients with thyroid cancer. This variant was associated with increased HABP2 protein expression in tumor samples from affected family members, as compared with normal adjacent thyroid tissue and samples from sporadic ...

  2. Cancer immunology. Mutational landscape determines sensitivity to PD-1 blockade in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Naiyer A; Hellmann, Matthew D; Snyder, Alexandra; Kvistborg, Pia; Makarov, Vladimir; Havel, Jonathan J; Lee, William; Yuan, Jianda; Wong, Phillip; Ho, Teresa S; Miller, Martin L; Rekhtman, Natasha; Moreira, Andre L; Ibrahim, Fawzia; Bruggeman, Cameron; Gasmi, Billel; Zappasodi, Roberta; Maeda, Yuka; Sander, Chris; Garon, Edward B; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D; Schumacher, Ton N; Chan, Timothy A

    2015-04-03

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors, which unleash a patient's own T cells to kill tumors, are revolutionizing cancer treatment. To unravel the genomic determinants of response to this therapy, we used whole-exome sequencing of non-small cell lung cancers treated with pembrolizumab, an antibody targeting programmed cell death-1 (PD-1). In two independent cohorts, higher nonsynonymous mutation burden in tumors was associated with improved objective response, durable clinical benefit, and progression-free survival. Efficacy also correlated with the molecular smoking signature, higher neoantigen burden, and DNA repair pathway mutations; each factor was also associated with mutation burden. In one responder, neoantigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses paralleled tumor regression, suggesting that anti-PD-1 therapy enhances neoantigen-specific T cell reactivity. Our results suggest that the genomic landscape of lung cancers shapes response to anti-PD-1 therapy.

  3. Screening of 1331 Danish breast and/or ovarian cancer families identified 40 novel BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas V O; Jønson, Lars; Steffensen, Ane Y;

    2011-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in the tumour suppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. Since 1999 we have performed mutational screening of breast and/or ovarian cancer patients in East Denmark. During this period we have identified 40 novel sequence variations in BRCA1...... and BRCA2 in high risk breast and/or ovarian cancer families. The mutations were detected via pre-screening using dHPLC or high-resolution melting and direct sequencing. We identified 16 variants in BRCA1, including 9 deleterious frame-shift mutations, 2 intronic variants, 4 missense mutations, and 1...... interpreted as pathogenic, 3 missense mutations were suggested to be pathogenic based on in silico analysis, 6 mutations were suggested to be benign since they were identified in patients together with a well-known disease-causing BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation, while 12 were variants of unknown significance....

  4. Identification of novel BRCA founder mutations in Middle Eastern breast cancer patients using capture and Sanger sequencing analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Rong; Siraj, Abdul K; Al-Obaisi, Khadija A S; Beg, Shaham; Al Hazmi, Mohsen; Ajarim, Dahish; Tulbah, Asma; Al-Dayel, Fouad; Al-Kuraya, Khawla S

    2016-09-01

    Ethnic differences of breast cancer genomics have prompted us to investigate the spectra of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in different populations. The prevalence and effect of BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 mutations in Middle Eastern population is not fully explored. To characterize the prevalence of BRCA mutations in Middle Eastern breast cancer patients, BRCA mutation screening was performed in 818 unselected breast cancer patients using Capture and/or Sanger sequencing. 19 short tandem repeat (STR) markers were used for founder mutation analysis. In our study, nine different types of deleterious mutation were identified in 28 (3.4%) cases, 25 (89.3%) cases in BRCA 1 and 3 (10.7%) cases in BRCA 2. Seven recurrent mutations identified accounted for 92.9% (26/28) of all the mutant cases. Haplotype analysis was performed to confirm c.1140 dupG and c.4136_4137delCT mutations as novel putative founder mutation, accounting for 46.4% (13/28) of all BRCA mutant cases and 1.6% (13/818) of all the breast cancer cases, respectively. Moreover, BRCA 1 mutation was significantly associated with BRCA 1 protein expression loss (p = 0.0005). Our finding revealed that a substantial number of BRCA mutations were identified in clinically high risk breast cancer from Middle East region. Identification of the mutation spectrum, prevalence and founder effect in Middle Eastern population facilitates genetic counseling, risk assessment and development of cost-effective screening strategy.

  5. Identification of EGFR kinase domain mutations among lung cancer patients in China: implication for targeted cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao Ming QIN; Xiao CHEN; Jing De ZHU; Duan Qing PEI

    2005-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of death with one of the lowest survival rates. However, a subset of lung cancer patients who are of Asian origin and carry somatic mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor or EGFR have responded remarkable well to two tyrosine kinase inhibitors, gefitinib and erlotinib. While EGFR mutation profiles have been reported from Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan, there is no such report from mainland of China where the largest pool of patients reside. In this report, we identified ten somatic mutations from a total of 41 lung cancer patients in China. Among them, seven mutations were found in 17 adenocarcinomas. In contrast to previous reports, eight of these mutations are deletions in exon 19 and two of these deletions are homozygous. These results suggest that a large portion of Chinese adenocarcinoma patients could benefit from gefitinib or erlotinib. This unique mutation profile provides a rationale to develop the next generation of EGFR inhibitors more suitable for the Chinese population.

  6. BRCA1-related breast cancer in Austrian breast and ovarian cancer families: specific BRCA1 mutations and pathological characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, T M; Möslinger, R A; Muhr, D; Langbauer, G; Hirtenlehner, K; Concin, H; Doeller, W; Haid, A; Lang, A H; Mayer, P; Ropp, E; Kubista, E; Amirimani, B; Helbich, T; Becherer, A; Scheiner, O; Breiteneder, H; Borg, A; Devilee, P; Oefner, P; Zielinski, C

    1998-07-29

    We identified 17 BRCA1 mutations in 86 Austrian breast and ovarian cancer families (20%) that were screened for mutations by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) and the protein truncation test (PTT). Eleven distinct mutations were detected, 4 of them (962del4, 2795del4, 3135del4 and L3376stop) not previously reported in families of non-Austrian origin. In addition, 6 rare missense mutations (allele frequency Cys61Gly (3 times) 5382insC (2 times) and Q1806stop (2 times). Haplotype analysis of the 4 recurrent mutations suggested a common ancestor for each of these. Thirty-four breast cancer cases from 17 families with BRCA1 mutations were further analyzed. We observed a low median age of onset (39.5 years). Sixty-eight percent of all BRCA1 breast cancer cases had negative axillary lymph nodes. This group showed a significant prevalence of a negative estrogen and progesterone receptor status and stage I tumors compared with an age-related, node-negative control group. The prevalence of grade III tumors was marginally significant. Survival analysis either with a control group matched for age (within 5 years), grade, histologic subtype and estrogen receptor status, or with an age-related, node-negative comparison group, showed no statistical difference.

  7. Investigating BRCA Mutations: A Breakthrough in Precision Medicine of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modena, Alessandra; Iacovelli, Roberto; Scarpa, Aldo; Brunelli, Matteo; Ciccarese, Chiara; Fantinel, Emanuela; Bimbatti, Davide; Massari, Francesco; Martignoni, Guido; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2016-10-01

    Despite the development of novel effective therapeutic strategies, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) remains a disease with a lethal course and a high biological and molecular heterogeneity. To date, germline mutations in the BRCA gene represent one of the main risk factors for developing prostate cancer, with a strong association with aggressive phenotype and poor clinical outcomes. A better understanding of the genomic landscape of prostate cancer has strengthened the idea that "synthetic lethality" of this disease might be useful in cancer-drug discovery, focusing on agents such as platinum compounds and poly (adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase inhibitors (PARPi). In this review, we summarize the main data available on BRCA mutations and discuss the clinical implications of these genomic aberrations in the management of prostate cancer, stressing the need to identify prognostic and predictive biomarkers and to deeply understand the mechanisms of treatment resistance, in order to maximize personalized medicine protocols and therefore clinical benefit.

  8. Prognostic impact of mismatch repair genes germline defects in colorectal cancer patients: are all mutations equal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccaroni, Elena; Bracci, Raffaella; Giampieri, Riccardo; Bianchi, Francesca; Belvederesi, Laura; Brugiati, Cristiana; Pagliaretta, Silvia; Del Prete, Michela; Scartozzi, Mario; Cascinu, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Background Lynch syndrome (LS) is the most common hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) syndrome, caused by germline mutations in MisMatch Repair (MMR) genes, particularly in MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. Patients with LS seem to have a more favourable prognosis than those with sporadic CRC, although the prognostic impact of different mutation types is unknown. Aim of our study is to compare survival outcomes of different types of MMR mutations in patients with LS-related CRC. Methods 302 CRC patients were prospectively selected on the basis of Amsterdam or Revised Bethesda criteria to undergo genetic testing: direct sequencing of DNA and MLPA were used to examine the entire MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 coding sequence. Patients were classified as mutation-positive or negative according to the genetic testing result. Results A deleterious MMR mutation was found in 38/302 patients. Median overall survival (OS) was significantly higher in mutation-positive vs mutation-negative patients (102.6 vs 77.7 months, HR:0.63, 95%CI:0.46–0.89, p = 0.0083). Different types of mutation were significantly related with OS: missense or splicing-site mutations were associated with better OS compared with rearrangement, frameshift or non-sense mutations (132.5 vs 82.5 months, HR:0.46, 95%CI:0.16–0.82, p = 0.0153). Conclusions Our study confirms improved OS for LS-patients compared with mutation-negative CRC patients. In addition, not all mutations could be considered equal: the better prognosis in CRC patients with MMR pathogenic missense or splicing site mutation could be due to different functional activity of the encoded MMR protein. This matter should be investigated by use of functional assays in the future. PMID:26485756

  9. Exome sequencing reveals a potential mutational trajectory and treatments for a specific pancreatic cancer patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotterell J

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available James Cotterell1,21Center for Genomic Regulation, Barcelona, Spain; 2Garvan Institute for Medical Research, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaAbstract: Pancreatic cancer is the fourth biggest killer, and has one of the worst prognoses, of any cancer type. Approximately 95% of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer will not survive beyond 5 years post diagnosis, and these statistics have barely improved in over 40 years. Here, genomic changes in one particular patient with stage IV metastatic pancreatic cancer were explored to suggest a potential personalized treatment. In particular, exome sequencing of genomic DNA extracted from blood and the cancer biopsy was utilized with the aim of identifying mutational drivers of the cancer. This analysis revealed a splice site mutation in RBCK1 as the most promising driver of the cancer and a therapy based on a pan-cyclin-dependent kinase (pan-CDK inhibitor, flavopiridol. This study suggests that drugs whose effectiveness is unclear for general populations of cancer sufferers should possibly be reconsidered for specific patients where the drug could be rationally argued to improve outcome.Keyword: personalized medicine, driver mutation identification, next generation sequencing

  10. PIK3CA and TP53 gene mutations in human breast cancer tumors frequently detected by ion torrent DNA sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xusheng Bai

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common malignancy and the leading cause of cancer deaths in women worldwide. While specific genetic mutations have been linked to 5-10% of breast cancer cases, other environmental and epigenetic factors influence the development and progression of the cancer. Since unique mutations patterns have been observed in individual cancer samples, identification and characterization of the distinctive breast cancer molecular profile is needed to develop more effective target therapies. Until recently, identifying genetic cancer mutations via personalized DNA sequencing was impractical and expensive. The recent technological advancements in next-generation DNA sequencing, such as the semiconductor-based Ion Torrent sequencing platform, has made DNA sequencing cost and time effective with more reliable results. Using the Ion Torrent Ampliseq Cancer Panel, we sequenced 737 loci from 45 cancer-related genes to identify genetic mutations in 105 human breast cancer samples. The sequencing analysis revealed missense mutations in PIK3CA, and TP53 genes in the breast cancer samples of various histologic types. Thus, this study demonstrates the necessity of sequencing individual human cancers in order to develop personalized drugs or combination therapies to effectively target individual, breast cancer-specific mutations.

  11. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutations and Radiotherapy 
in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing ZHONG

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy plays a pivotal role in the treatment for lung cancer. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutation in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC which predicts tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI treatment response may also has effect on radiation response. NSCLC harboring kinase-domain mutations in EGFR exhibits enhanced radio-sensitivity due to dramatically diminished capacity to resolve radiation-induced DSBs (DNA double-strand breaks associating with the inefficiency of EGFR nuclear translocation. Recently, several preliminary clinical studies show certain efficacy of concurrent EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and radiotherapy. However its further response in EGFR-mutated NSCLC is unclear. The correlation between EGFR mutation genotype and the radiotherapy response and clinical outcome is worthy of further study.

  12. Data mining using the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer BioMart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Rebecca; Forbes, Simon A; Beare, David; Bamford, S; Cole, Charlotte G; Ward, Sari; Bindal, Nidhi; Gunasekaran, Prasad; Jia, Mingming; Kok, Chai Yin; Leung, Kenric; Menzies, Andrew; Butler, Adam P; Teague, Jon W; Campbell, Peter J; Stratton, Michael R; Futreal, P Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) (http://www.sanger.ac.uk/cosmic) is a publicly available resource providing information on somatic mutations implicated in human cancer. Release v51 (January 2011) includes data from just over 19,000 genes, 161,787 coding mutations and 5573 gene fusions, described in more than 577,000 tumour samples. COSMICMart (COSMIC BioMart) provides a flexible way to mine these data and combine somatic mutations with other biological relevant data sets. This article describes the data available in COSMIC along with examples of how to successfully mine and integrate data sets using COSMICMart. DATABASE URL: http://www.sanger.ac.uk/genetics/CGP/cosmic/biomart/martview/.

  13. Breast cancer screening of pregnant and breastfeeding women with BRCA mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Harris; Matsen, Cindy; Freer, Phoebe; Kohlmann, Wendy; Stein, Matthew; Buys, Saundra S; Colonna, Sarah

    2017-04-01

    Screening recommendations for women with BRCA mutations include annual breast MRI starting at age 25, with annual mammogram added at age 30. The median age of childbearing in the US is age 28, therefore many BRCA mutation carriers will be pregnant or breastfeeding during the time when intensive screening is most important to manage their increased breast cancer risk. Despite this critical overlap, there is little evidence to guide clinicians on the appropriate screening for women with BRCA mutations during pregnancy or breastfeeding. Hormonal shifts that occur during pregnancy, the postpartum period, and breastfeeding result in changes to the breasts that may further complicate the sensitivity and specificity of screening modalities. We explore the safety and efficacy of available breast cancer screening modalities, including clinical breast exam, mammogram, breast MRI, and ultrasound among women with BRCA mutations who are pregnant or breastfeeding, providing recommendations from the most current published literature and expert opinion.

  14. Germline HABP2 Mutation Causing Familial Nonmedullary Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gara, Sudheer Kumar; Jia, Li; Merino, Maria J; Agarwal, Sunita K; Zhang, Lisa; Cam, Maggie; Patel, Dhaval; Kebebew, Electron

    2015-07-30

    Familial nonmedullary thyroid cancer accounts for 3 to 9% of all cases of thyroid cancer, but the susceptibility genes are not known. Here, we report a germline variant of HABP2 in seven affected members of a kindred with familial nonmedullary thyroid cancer and in 4.7% of 423 patients with thyroid cancer. This variant was associated with increased HABP2 protein expression in tumor samples from affected family members, as compared with normal adjacent thyroid tissue and samples from sporadic cancers. Functional studies showed that HABP2 has a tumor-suppressive effect, whereas the G534E variant results in loss of function.

  15. The prevalence of BRCA1 mutations among young women with triple-negative breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeSai Damini

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular screening for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations is now an established component of risk evaluation and management of familial breast cancer. Features of hereditary breast cancer include an early age-of-onset and over-representation of the 'triple-negative' phenotype (negative for estrogen-receptor, progesterone-receptor and HER2. The decision to offer genetic testing to a breast cancer patient is usually based on her family history, but in the absence of a family history of cancer, some women may qualify for testing based on the age-of-onset and/or the pathologic features of the breast cancer. Methods We studied 54 women who were diagnosed with high-grade, triple-negative invasive breast cancer at or before age 40. These women were selected for study because they had little or no family history of breast or ovarian cancer and they did not qualify for genetic testing using conventional family history criteria. BRCA1 screening was performed using a combination of fluorescent multiplexed-PCR analysis, BRCA1 exon-13 6 kb duplication screening, the protein truncation test (PTT and fluorescent multiplexed denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE. All coding exons of BRCA1 were screened. The two large exons of BRCA2 were also screened using PTT. All mutations were confirmed with direct sequencing. Results Five deleterious BRCA1 mutations and one deleterious BRCA2 mutation were identified in the 54 patients with early-onset, triple-negative breast cancer (11%. Conclusion Women with early-onset triple-negative breast cancer are candidates for genetic testing for BRCA1, even in the absence of a family history of breast or ovarian cancer.

  16. Personalized prediction of EGFR mutation-induced drug resistance in lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Debby D.; Weiqiang Zhou; Hong Yan; Maria Wong; Victor Lee

    2013-01-01

    EGFR mutation-induced drug resistance has significantly impaired the potency of small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors in lung cancer treatment. Computational approaches can provide powerful and efficient techniques in the investigation of drug resistance. In our work, the EGFR mutation feature is characterized by the energy components of binding free energy (concerning the mutant-inhibitor complex), and we combine it with specific personal features for 168 clinical subjects to construct a...

  17. Bioinformatics Study of Cancer-Related Mutations within p53 Phosphorylation Site Motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaona Ji

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available p53 protein has about thirty phosphorylation sites located at the N- and C-termini and in the core domain. The phosphorylation sites are relatively less mutated than other residues in p53. To understand why and how p53 phosphorylation sites are rarely mutated in human cancer, using a bioinformatics approaches, we examined the phosphorylation site and its nearby flanking residues, focusing on the consensus phosphorylation motif pattern, amino-acid correlations within the phosphorylation motifs, the propensity of structural disorder of the phosphorylation motifs, and cancer mutations observed within the phosphorylation motifs. Many p53 phosphorylation sites are targets for several kinases. The phosphorylation sites match 17 consensus sequence motifs out of the 29 classified. In addition to proline, which is common in kinase specificity-determining sites, we found high propensity of acidic residues to be adjacent to phosphorylation sites. Analysis of human cancer mutations in the phosphorylation motifs revealed that motifs with adjacent acidic residues generally have fewer mutations, in contrast to phosphorylation sites near proline residues. p53 phosphorylation motifs are mostly disordered. However, human cancer mutations within phosphorylation motifs tend to decrease the disorder propensity. Our results suggest that combination of acidic residues Asp and Glu with phosphorylation sites provide charge redundancy which may safe guard against loss-of-function mutations, and that the natively disordered nature of p53 phosphorylation motifs may help reduce mutational damage. Our results further suggest that engineering acidic amino acids adjacent to potential phosphorylation sites could be a p53 gene therapy strategy.

  18. Analysis of PIK3CA Mutations and Activation Pathways in Triple Negative Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Cossu-Rocca

    Full Text Available Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC accounts for 12-24% of all breast carcinomas, and shows worse prognosis compared to other breast cancer subtypes. Molecular studies demonstrated that TNBCs are a heterogeneous group of tumors with different clinical and pathologic features, prognosis, genetic-molecular alterations and treatment responsivity. The PI3K/AKT is a major pathway involved in the regulation of cell survival and proliferation, and is the most frequently altered pathway in breast cancer, apparently with different biologic impact on specific cancer subtypes. The most common genetic abnormality is represented by PIK3CA gene activating mutations, with an overall frequency of 20-40%. The aims of our study were to investigate PIK3CA gene mutations on a large series of TNBC, to perform a wider analysis on genetic alterations involving PI3K/AKT and BRAF/RAS/MAPK pathways and to correlate the results with clinical-pathologic data.PIK3CA mutation analysis was performed by using cobas® PIK3CA Mutation Test. EGFR, AKT1, BRAF, and KRAS genes were analyzed by sequencing. Immunohistochemistry was carried out to identify PTEN loss and to investigate for PI3K/AKT pathways components.PIK3CA mutations were detected in 23.7% of TNBC, whereas no mutations were identified in EGFR, AKT1, BRAF, and KRAS genes. Moreover, we observed PTEN loss in 11.3% of tumors. Deregulation of PI3K/AKT pathways was revealed by consistent activation of pAKT and p-p44/42 MAPK in all PIK3CA mutated TNBC.Our data shows that PIK3CA mutations and PI3K/AKT pathway activation are common events in TNBC. A deeper investigation on specific TNBC genomic abnormalities might be helpful in order to select patients who would benefit from current targeted therapy strategies.

  19. Mutational landscape determines sensitivity to PD-1 blockade in non–small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Naiyer A.; Hellmann, Matthew D.; Snyder, Alexandra; Kvistborg, Pia; Makarov, Vladimir; Havel, Jonathan J.; Lee, William; Yuan, Jianda; Wong, Phillip; Ho, Teresa S.; Miller, Martin L.; Rekhtman, Natasha; Moreira, Andre L.; Ibrahim, Fawzia; Bruggeman, Cameron; Gasmi, Billel; Zappasodi, Roberta; Maeda, Yuka; Sander, Chris; Garon, Edward B.; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Schumacher, Ton N.; Chan, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors, which unleash a patient’s own T cells to kill tumors, are revolutionizing cancer treatment. To unravel the genomic determinants of response to this therapy, we used whole-exome sequencing of non–small cell lung cancers treated with pembrolizumab, an antibody targeting programmed cell death-1 (PD-1). In two independent cohorts, higher nonsynonymous mutation burden in tumors was associated with improved objective response, durable clinical benefit, and progression-free survival. Efficacy also correlated with the molecular smoking signature, higher neoantigen burden, and DNA repair pathway mutations; each factor was also associated with mutation burden. In one responder, neoantigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses paralleled tumor regression, suggesting that anti–PD-1 therapy enhances neoantigen-specific T cell reactivity. Our results suggest that the genomic landscape of lung cancers shapes response to anti–PD-1 therapy. PMID:25765070

  20. Convergence of mutation and epigenetic alterations identifies common genes in cancer that predict for poor prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy A Chan

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The identification and characterization of tumor suppressor genes has enhanced our understanding of the biology of cancer and enabled the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic modalities. Whereas in past decades, a handful of tumor suppressors have been slowly identified using techniques such as linkage analysis, large-scale sequencing of the cancer genome has enabled the rapid identification of a large number of genes that are mutated in cancer. However, determining which of these many genes play key roles in cancer development has proven challenging. Specifically, recent sequencing of human breast and colon cancers has revealed a large number of somatic gene mutations, but virtually all are heterozygous, occur at low frequency, and are tumor-type specific. We hypothesize that key tumor suppressor genes in cancer may be subject to mutation or hypermethylation. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here, we show that combined genetic and epigenetic analysis of these genes reveals many with a higher putative tumor suppressor status than would otherwise be appreciated. At least 36 of the 189 genes newly recognized to be mutated are targets of promoter CpG island hypermethylation, often in both colon and breast cancer cell lines. Analyses of primary tumors show that 18 of these genes are hypermethylated strictly in primary cancers and often with an incidence that is much higher than for the mutations and which is not restricted to a single tumor-type. In the identical breast cancer cell lines in which the mutations were identified, hypermethylation is usually, but not always, mutually exclusive from genetic changes for a given tumor, and there is a high incidence of concomitant loss of expression. Sixteen out of 18 (89% of these genes map to loci deleted in human cancers. Lastly, and most importantly, the reduced expression of a subset of these genes strongly correlates with poor clinical outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Using an unbiased genome

  1. TP53 germline mutation testing in 180 families suspected of Li-Fraumeni syndrome: mutation detection rate and relative frequency of cancers in different familial phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, M.W.G.; Verhoef, S.; Rookus, M.A.; Pruntel, R.; van der Hout, A.H.; Hogervorst, F.B.L.; Kluijt, I.; Sijmons, R.H.; Aalfs, C.M.; Wagner, A.; Ausems, M.G.E.M.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; van Asperen, C.J.; Gómez García, E.B.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; ten Kate, L.P.; Menko, F.H.; van 't Veer, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome. Most families fulfilling the classical diagnostic criteria harbour TP53 germline mutations. However, TP53 germline mutations may also occur in less obvious phenotypes. As a result, different criteria a

  2. DETECTION OF K-RAS AND P53 MUTATIONS IN SPUTUM SAMPLES OF LUNG CANCER PATIENTS USING LASER CAPTURE MICRODISSECTION MICROSCOPE AND MUTATION ANALYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detection of K-ras and p53 Mutations in Sputum Samples of Lung Cancer Patients Using Laser Capture Microdissection Microscope and Mutation AnalysisPhouthone Keohavong a,*, Wei-Min Gao a, Kui-Cheng Zheng a, Hussam Mady b, Qing Lan c, Mona Melhem b, and Judy Mumford d.<...

  3. Aneuploidy, the somatic mutation that makes cancer a species of its own.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duesberg, P; Rasnick, D

    2000-10-01

    The many complex phenotypes of cancer have all been attributed to "somatic mutation." These phenotypes include anaplasia, autonomous growth, metastasis, abnormal cell morphology, DNA indices ranging from 0.5 to over 2, clonal origin but unstable and non-clonal karyotypes and phenotypes, abnormal centrosome numbers, immortality in vitro and in transplantation, spontaneous progression of malignancy, as well as the exceedingly slow kinetics from carcinogen to carcinogenesis of many months to decades. However, it has yet to be determined whether this mutation is aneuploidy, an abnormal number of chromosomes, or gene mutation. A century ago, Boveri proposed cancer is caused by aneuploidy, because it correlates with cancer and because it generates "pathological" phenotypes in sea urchins. But half a century later, when cancers were found to be non-clonal for aneuploidy, but clonal for somatic gene mutations, this hypothesis was abandoned. As a result aneuploidy is now generally viewed as a consequence, and mutated genes as a cause of cancer although, (1) many carcinogens do not mutate genes, (2) there is no functional proof that mutant genes cause cancer, and (3) mutation is fast but carcinogenesis is exceedingly slow. Intrigued by the enormous mutagenic potential of aneuploidy, we undertook biochemical and biological analyses of aneuploidy and gene mutation, which show that aneuploidy is probably the only mutation that can explain all aspects of carcinogenesis. On this basis we can now offer a coherent two-stage mechanism of carcinogenesis. In stage one, carcinogens cause aneuploidy, either by fragmenting chromosomes or by damaging the spindle apparatus. In stage two, ever new and eventually tumorigenic karyotypes evolve autocatalytically because aneuploidy destabilizes the karyotype, ie. causes genetic instability. Thus, cancer cells derive their unique and complex phenotypes from random chromosome number mutation, a process that is similar to regrouping assembly lines

  4. Dynamic tracing for epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in urinary circulating DNA in gastric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiu-Qin; Xue, Wen-Hua; Zhao, Song-Feng; Zhang, Xiao-Jian; Sun, Wukong

    2017-02-01

    The mutations of epidermal growth factor receptor are detected in gastric cancer, indicating its suitability as a target for receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, as well as a marker for clinical outcome of chemotherapeutic treatments. However, extraction of quality tumor tissue for molecular processes remains challenging. Here, we aimed to examine the clinical relevance of urinary cell-free DNA as an alternative tumor material source used specifically for monitoring epidermal growth factor receptor mutations. Therefore, 120 gastric cancer patients with epidermal growth factor receptor mutations and 100 healthy controls were recruited for the study. The gastric patients also received epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor treatment for a serial monitoring study. Paired primary tumor specimens were obtained with blood and urine samples, which were taken at a 1-month interval for a duration of 12 months. We found that urinary cell-free DNA yielded a close agreement of 92% on epidermal growth factor receptor mutation status when compared to primary tissue at baseline, and of 99% epidermal growth factor receptor mutation status when compared to plasma samples at different time points. Thus, our data suggest that urinary cell-free DNA may be a reliable source for screening and monitoring epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in the primary gastric cancer.

  5. Detection of somatic mutations by high-resolution DNA melting (HRM analysis in multiple cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Gonzalez-Bosquet

    Full Text Available Identification of somatic mutations in cancer is a major goal for understanding and monitoring the events related to cancer initiation and progression. High resolution melting (HRM curve analysis represents a fast, post-PCR high-throughput method for scanning somatic sequence alterations in target genes. The aim of this study was to assess the sensitivity and specificity of HRM analysis for tumor mutation screening in a range of tumor samples, which included 216 frozen pediatric small rounded blue-cell tumors as well as 180 paraffin-embedded tumors from breast, endometrial and ovarian cancers (60 of each. HRM analysis was performed in exons of the following candidate genes known to harbor established commonly observed mutations: PIK3CA, ERBB2, KRAS, TP53, EGFR, BRAF, GATA3, and FGFR3. Bi-directional sequencing analysis was used to determine the accuracy of the HRM analysis. For the 39 mutations observed in frozen samples, the sensitivity and specificity of HRM analysis were 97% and 87%, respectively. There were 67 mutation/variants in the paraffin-embedded samples, and the sensitivity and specificity for the HRM analysis were 88% and 80%, respectively. Paraffin-embedded samples require higher quantity of purified DNA for high performance. In summary, HRM analysis is a promising moderate-throughput screening test for mutations among known candidate genomic regions. Although the overall accuracy appears to be better in frozen specimens, somatic alterations were detected in DNA extracted from paraffin-embedded samples.

  6. K-ras mutations in sinonasal cancers in relation to wood dust exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornholdt, Jette; Hansen, Johnni; Steiniche, Torben

    2008-01-01

    carefully reviewed pathologically before inclusion. Paraffin embedded tumour samples from 58 adenocarcinomas, 109 squamous cell carcinomas and 7 other carcinomas were analysed for K-ras codon 12, 13 and 61 point mutations by restriction fragment length polymorphisms and direct sequencing. Information...... mutations were suggested to be related to wood dust exposure, but these studies were too limited to detect statistically significant associations. Methods We examined 174 cases of sinonasal cancer diagnosed in Denmark in the period from 1991 to 2001. To ensure uniformity, all histological diagnoses were...... to unexposed [OR = 21.0, CI = 8.0–55.0]. K-ras was mutated in 13% of the adenocarcinomas (seven patients) and in 1% of squamous cell carcinomas (one patient). Of these eight mutations, five mutations were located in the codon 12. The exact sequence change of remaining three could not be identified...

  7. DriverNet: uncovering the impact of somatic driver mutations on transcriptional networks in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashashati, Ali; Haffari, Gholamreza; Ding, Jiarui; Ha, Gavin; Lui, Kenneth; Rosner, Jamie; Huntsman, David G; Caldas, Carlos; Aparicio, Samuel A; Shah, Sohrab P

    2012-12-22

    Simultaneous interrogation of tumor genomes and transcriptomes is underway in unprecedented global efforts. Yet, despite the essential need to separate driver mutations modulating gene expression networks from transcriptionally inert passenger mutations, robust computational methods to ascertain the impact of individual mutations on transcriptional networks are underdeveloped. We introduce a novel computational framework, DriverNet, to identify likely driver mutations by virtue of their effect on mRNA expression networks. Application to four cancer datasets reveals the prevalence of rare candidate driver mutations associated with disrupted transcriptional networks and a simultaneous modulation of oncogenic and metabolic networks, induced by copy number co-modification of adjacent oncogenic and metabolic drivers. DriverNet is available on Bioconductor or at http://compbio.bccrc.ca/software/drivernet/.

  8. Biochip-Based Detection of KRAS Mutation in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Ziegler

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at evaluating the potential of a biochip assay to sensitively detect KRAS mutation in DNA from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC tissue samples. The assay covers 10 mutations in codons 12 and 13 of the KRAS gene, and is based on mutant-enriched PCR followed by reverse-hybridization of biotinylated amplification products to an array of sequence-specific probes immobilized on the tip of a rectangular plastic stick (biochip. Biochip hybridization identified 17 (21% samples to carry a KRAS mutation of which 16 (33% were adenocarcinomas and 1 (3% was a squamous cell carcinoma. All mutations were confirmed by DNA sequencing. Using 10 ng of starting DNA, the biochip assay demonstrated a detection limit of 1% mutant sequence in a background of wild-type DNA. Our results suggest that the biochip assay is a sensitive alternative to protocols currently in use for KRAS mutation testing on limited quantity samples.

  9. Identification of and Molecular Basis for SIRT6 Loss-of-Function Point Mutations in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sita Kugel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin factors have emerged as the most frequently dysregulated family of proteins in cancer. We have previously identified the histone deacetylase SIRT6 as a key tumor suppressor, yet whether point mutations are selected for in cancer remains unclear. In this manuscript, we characterized naturally occurring patient-derived SIRT6 mutations. Strikingly, all the mutations significantly affected either stability or catalytic activity of SIRT6, indicating that these mutations were selected for in these tumors. Further, the mutant proteins failed to rescue sirt6 knockout (SIRT6 KO cells, as measured by the levels of histone acetylation at glycolytic genes and their inability to rescue the tumorigenic potential of these cells. Notably, the main activity affected in the mutants was histone deacetylation rather than demyristoylation, pointing to the former as the main tumor-suppressive function for SIRT6. Our results identified cancer-associated point mutations in SIRT6, cementing its function as a tumor suppressor in human cancer.

  10. Is there a biological cost of protein disorder? Analysis of cancer-associated mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajkos, Mátyás; Mészáros, Bálint; Simon, István; Dosztányi, Zsuzsanna

    2012-01-01

    As many diseases can be traced back to altered protein function, studying the effect of genetic variations at the level of proteins can provide a clue to understand how changes at the DNA level lead to various diseases. Cellular processes rely not only on proteins with well-defined structure but can also involve intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) that exist as highly flexible ensembles of conformations. Disordered proteins are mostly involved in signaling and regulatory processes, and their functional repertoire largely complements that of globular proteins. However, it was also suggested that protein disorder entails an increased biological cost. This notion was supported by a set of individual IDPs involved in various diseases, especially in cancer, and the increased amount of disorder observed among disease-associated proteins. In this work, we tested if there is any biological risk associated with protein disorder at the level of single nucleotide mutations. Specifically, we analyzed the distribution of mutations within ordered and disordered segments. Our results demonstrated that while neutral polymorphisms were more likely to occur within disordered segments, cancer-associated mutations had a preference for ordered regions. Additionally, we proposed an alternative explanation for the association of protein disorder and the involvement in cancer with the consideration of functional annotations. Individual examples also suggested that although disordered segments are fundamental functional elements, their presence is not necessarily accompanied with an increased mutation rate in cancer. The presented study can help to understand how the different structural properties of proteins influence the consequences of genetic mutations.

  11. KRAS-mutated plasma DNA as predictor of outcome from irinotecan monotherapy in metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, K G; Appelt, A L; Pallisgaard, N

    2013-01-01

    Background:We investigated the clinical implications of KRAS and BRAF mutations detected in both archival tumor tissue and plasma cell-free DNA in metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with irinotecan monotherapy.Methods:Two hundred and eleven patients receiving second-line irinotecan (350...... with mutations detectable in plasma responded to therapy. Response rate and disease control rate in plasma KRAS wt patients were 19 and 66% compared with 0 and 37%, in patients with pKRAS mutations, (P=0.04 and 0.01). Tumor KRAS status was not associated with PFS but with OS in the validation cohort. Plasma BRAF...

  12. KRAS and BRAF Mutation Detection: Is Immunohistochemistry a Possible Alternative to Molecular Biology in Colorectal Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Piton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available KRAS genotyping is mandatory in metastatic colorectal cancer treatment prior to undertaking antiepidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR monoclonal antibody therapy. BRAF V600E mutation is often present in colorectal carcinoma with CpG island methylator phenotype and microsatellite instability. Currently, KRAS and BRAF evaluation is based on molecular biology techniques such as SNaPshot or Sanger sequencing. As molecular testing is performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE samples, immunodetection would appear to be an attractive alternative for detecting mutations. Thus, our objective was to assess the validity of KRAS and BRAF immunodetection of mutations compared with the genotyping reference method in colorectal adenocarcinoma. KRAS and BRAF genotyping was assessed by SNaPshot. A rabbit anti-human KRAS polyclonal antibody was tested on 33 FFPE colorectal tumor samples with known KRAS status. Additionally, a mouse anti-human BRAF monoclonal antibody was tested on 30 FFPE tumor samples with known BRAF status. KRAS immunostaining demonstrated both poor sensitivity (27% and specificity (64% in detecting KRAS mutation. Conversely, BRAF immunohistochemistry showed perfect sensitivity (100% and specificity (100% in detecting V600E mutation. Although molecular biology remains the reference method for detecting KRAS mutation, immunohistochemistry could be an attractive method for detecting BRAF V600E mutation in colorectal cancer.

  13. KRAS and BRAF Mutation Detection: Is Immunohistochemistry a Possible Alternative to Molecular Biology in Colorectal Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piton, Nicolas; Borrini, Francesco; Bolognese, Antonio; Lamy, Aude; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    KRAS genotyping is mandatory in metastatic colorectal cancer treatment prior to undertaking antiepidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody therapy. BRAF V600E mutation is often present in colorectal carcinoma with CpG island methylator phenotype and microsatellite instability. Currently, KRAS and BRAF evaluation is based on molecular biology techniques such as SNaPshot or Sanger sequencing. As molecular testing is performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples, immunodetection would appear to be an attractive alternative for detecting mutations. Thus, our objective was to assess the validity of KRAS and BRAF immunodetection of mutations compared with the genotyping reference method in colorectal adenocarcinoma. KRAS and BRAF genotyping was assessed by SNaPshot. A rabbit anti-human KRAS polyclonal antibody was tested on 33 FFPE colorectal tumor samples with known KRAS status. Additionally, a mouse anti-human BRAF monoclonal antibody was tested on 30 FFPE tumor samples with known BRAF status. KRAS immunostaining demonstrated both poor sensitivity (27%) and specificity (64%) in detecting KRAS mutation. Conversely, BRAF immunohistochemistry showed perfect sensitivity (100%) and specificity (100%) in detecting V600E mutation. Although molecular biology remains the reference method for detecting KRAS mutation, immunohistochemistry could be an attractive method for detecting BRAF V600E mutation in colorectal cancer.

  14. Simultaneous DNA and RNA Mapping of Somatic Mitochondrial Mutations across Diverse Human Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, James B.; Alaei-Mahabadi, Babak; Sabarinathan, Radhakrishnan; Samuelsson, Tore; Gorodkin, Jan; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Larsson, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the nuclear genome are required for tumor formation, but the functional consequences of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are less understood. Here we identify somatic mtDNA mutations across 527 tumors and 14 cancer types, using an approach that takes advantage of evidence from both genomic and transcriptomic sequencing. We find that there is selective pressure against deleterious coding mutations, supporting that functional mitochondria are required in tumor cells, and also observe a strong mutational strand bias, compatible with endogenous replication-coupled errors as the major source of mutations. Interestingly, while allelic ratios in general were consistent in RNA compared to DNA, some mutations in tRNAs displayed strong allelic imbalances caused by accumulation of unprocessed tRNA precursors. The effect was explained by altered secondary structure, demonstrating that correct tRNA folding is a major determinant for processing of polycistronic mitochondrial transcripts. Additionally, the data suggest that tRNA clusters are preferably processed in the 3′ to 5′ direction. Our study gives insights into mtDNA function in cancer and answers questions regarding mitochondrial tRNA biogenesis that are difficult to address in controlled experimental systems. PMID:26125550

  15. Simultaneous DNA and RNA Mapping of Somatic Mitochondrial Mutations across Diverse Human Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B Stewart

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Somatic mutations in the nuclear genome are required for tumor formation, but the functional consequences of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations are less understood. Here we identify somatic mtDNA mutations across 527 tumors and 14 cancer types, using an approach that takes advantage of evidence from both genomic and transcriptomic sequencing. We find that there is selective pressure against deleterious coding mutations, supporting that functional mitochondria are required in tumor cells, and also observe a strong mutational strand bias, compatible with endogenous replication-coupled errors as the major source of mutations. Interestingly, while allelic ratios in general were consistent in RNA compared to DNA, some mutations in tRNAs displayed strong allelic imbalances caused by accumulation of unprocessed tRNA precursors. The effect was explained by altered secondary structure, demonstrating that correct tRNA folding is a major determinant for processing of polycistronic mitochondrial transcripts. Additionally, the data suggest that tRNA clusters are preferably processed in the 3' to 5' direction. Our study gives insights into mtDNA function in cancer and answers questions regarding mitochondrial tRNA biogenesis that are difficult to address in controlled experimental systems.

  16. High frequency and allele-specific differences of BRCA1 founder mutations in breast cancer and ovarian cancer patients from Belarus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanova, N V; Antonenkova, N N; Rogov, Y I; Karstens, J H; Hillemanns, P; Dörk, T

    2010-10-01

    Breast cancer and ovarian cancer are common malignancies in Belarus accounting for about 3500 and 800 new cases per year, respectively. For breast cancer, the rates and age of onset appear to vary significantly in regions differentially affected by the Chernobyl accident. We assessed the frequency and distribution of three BRCA1 founder mutations 5382insC, 4153delA and Cys61Gly in two hospital-based series of 1945 unselected breast cancer patients and of 201 unselected ovarian cancer patients from Belarus as well as in 1019 healthy control females from the same population. Any of these mutations were identified in 4.4% of the breast cancer patients, 26.4% of the ovarian cancer patients and 0.5% of the controls. In the breast cancer patients, BRCA1 mutations were strongly associated with earlier age at diagnosis, with oestrogen receptor (ER) negative tumours and with a first-degree family history of breast cancer, although only 35% of the identified BRCA1 mutation carriers had such a family history. There were no marked differences in the regional distribution of BRCA1 mutations, so that the significant differences in age at diagnosis and family history of breast cancer patients from areas afflicted by the Chernobyl accident could not be explained by BRCA1. We next observed a higher impact and a shifted mutational spectrum of BRCA1 in the series of Byelorussian ovarian cancer patients where the three founder mutations accounted for 26.4% (53/201). While the Cys61Gly mutation appeared underrepresented in ovarian cancer as compared with breast cancer cases from the same population (p = 0.01), the 4153delA mutation made a higher contribution to ovarian cancer than to breast cancer (p < 0.01). BRCA1 mutations were significantly enriched among ovarian cancer cases with a first-degree family history of breast or ovarian cancer, whereas the median age at ovarian cancer diagnosis was not different between mutation carriers and non-carriers. Taken together, these results

  17. Inherited Susceptibility to Breast Cancer in Healthy Women: Mutation in Breast Cancer Genes, Immune Surveillance, and Psychological Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    hypotheses were investigated: Hypothesis 1: Women with family histories of breast cancer are more emotionally distressed than women at normal risk... emotionally distressed than women at normal risk, particularly after notification that they carry a mutation in a primary susceptibility gene. o Healthy...Valdimarsdottir HB, Montgomery GH, Bovbjerg DH. Heightened cortisol responses to daily stress in working women at familial risk for breast cancer. Biological

  18. Circulating-free DNA Mutation Associated with Response of Targeted Therapy in Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-positive Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qing; Qi, Fan; Bian, Li; Zhang, Shao-Hua; Wang, Tao; Jiang, Ze-Fei

    2017-01-01

    Background: The addition of anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-targeted drugs, such as trastuzumab, lapatinib, and trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1), to chemotherapy significantly improved prognosis of HER2-positive breast cancer patients. However, it was confused that metastatic patients vary in the response of targeted drug. Therefore, methods of accurately predicting drug response were really needed. To overcome the spatial and temporal limitations of biopsies, we aimed to develop a more sensitive and less invasive method of detecting mutations associated with anti-HER2 therapeutic response through circulating-free DNA (cfDNA). Methods: From March 6, 2014 to December 10, 2014, 24 plasma samples from 20 patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer who received systemic therapy were eligible. We used a panel for detection of hot-spot mutations from 50 oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, and then used targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) to identify somatic mutation of these samples in those 50 genes. Samples taken before their first trastuzumab administration and subsequently proven with clinical benefit were grouped into sensitive group. The others were collected after disease progression of the trastuzumab-based therapy and were grouped into the resistant group. Results: A total of 486 single-nucleotide variants from 46 genes were detected. Of these 46 genes, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA), proto-oncogene c-Kit (KIT), and tumor protein p53 (TP53) were the most common mutated genes. Seven genes, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), G protein subunit alpha S (GNAS), HRas proto-oncogene (HRAS), mutL homolog 1 (MLH1), cadherin 1 (CDH1), neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog (NRAS), and NOTCH1, that only occurred mutations in the resistant group were associated with the resistance of targeted therapy. In addition, we detected a HER2 S855I mutation in two patients who had

  19. G388R mutation of the FGFR4 gene is not relevant to breast cancer prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jézéquel, P; Campion, L; Joalland, M-P; Millour, M; Dravet, F; Classe, J-M; Delecroix, V; Deporte, R; Fumoleau, P; Ricolleau, G

    2004-01-12

    This study screened large cohorts of node-positive and node-negative breast cancer patients to determine whether the G388R mutation of the FGFR4 gene is a useful prognostic marker for breast cancer as reported by Bange et al in 2002. Node-positive (n=139) and node-negative (n=95) breast cancer cohorts selected for mutation screening were followed up for median periods of 89 and 87 months, respectively. PCR - RFLP analysis was modified to facilitate molecular screening. Curves for disease-free survival were plotted according to the Kaplan - Meier method, and a log-rank test was used for comparisons between groups. Three other nonparametric linear rank-tests particularly suitable for investigating possible relations between G388R mutation and early cancer progression were also used. Kaplan - Meier analysis based on any of the four nonparametric linear rank tests performed for node-positive and node-negative patients was not indicative of disease-free survival time. G388R mutation of the FGFR4 gene is not relevant for breast cancer prognosis.

  20. Characterization of breast cancers with PI3K mutations in an academic practice setting using SNaPshot profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Vandana G; Cooper Lloyd, M; Ballinger, Tarah; Sanders, Melinda E; Du, Liping; Lai, Darson; Su, Zengliu; Mayer, Ingrid; Levy, Mia; LaFrance, Delecia R; Vnencak-Jones, Cindy L; Shyr, Yu; Dahlman, Kimberly B; Pao, William; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2014-06-01

    Mutations in the PIK3CA gene are common in breast cancer and represent a clinically useful therapeutic target. Several larger, population-based studies have shown a positive prognostic significance associated with these mutations. This study aims to further identify characteristics of patients harboring PIK3CA mutations while evaluating the clinical impact of genomic testing for these mutations. Tumors from 312 patients at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center were analyzed for PIK3CA mutations using a multiplex screening assay (SNaPshot). Mutation rates, receptor status, histopathologic characteristics, and time to recurrence were assessed. The number of patients participating in clinical trials, specifically trials relating to the PIK3CA mutation, was examined. Statistically significant differences between wild-type and mutated tumors were determined using the Wilcoxon, Pearson, and Fischer exact tests. The PIK3CA mutation was found in 25 % of tumors tested. Patients with PIK3CA mutations were significantly more likely to express hormone receptors, be of lower combined histological grade, and have a reduced time to recurrence. Patients found to have a PIK3CA mutation were significantly more likely to enter a PIK3CA-specific clinical trial. In addition to confirming previously established positive prognostic characteristics of tumors harboring PIK3CA mutations, this study demonstrates the feasibility and utility of mutation profiling in a clinical setting. PIK3CA mutation testing impacted treatment and resulted in more patients entering mutation-specific clinical trials.

  1. Association of type and location of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations with risk of breast and ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebbeck, Timothy R; Mitra, Nandita; Wan, Fei

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Limited information about the relationship between specific mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) and cancer risk exists. OBJECTIVE: To identify mutation-specific cancer risks for carriers of BRCA1/2. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Observational study of women who were ascertained...

  2. Association of type and location of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations with risk of breast and ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Rebbeck (Timothy); N. Mitra (Nandita); F. Wan (Fei); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); S. Healey (Sue); L. McGuffog (Lesley); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); D.F. Easton (Douglas); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); Y. Laitman (Yael); A. Kushnir (Anya); S. Paluch-Shimon (Shani); R. Berger (Raanan); J. Zidan (Jamal); E. Friedman (Eitan); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (Marie); Z. Einbeigi (Zakaria); N. Loman (Niklas); K. Harbst (Katja); J. Rantala (Johanna); B. Melin (Beatrice); D. Huo (Dezheng); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); J.L. Seldon (Joyce); P.A. Ganz (Patricia); R.L. Nussbaum (Robert L.); S. Chan (Salina); K. Odunsi (Kunle); S.A. Gayther (Simon); S.M. Domchek (Susan); B.K. Arun (Banu); K.H. Lu (Karen); G. Mitchell (Gillian); B. Karlan; C.S. Walsh (Christine); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); S.S. Pathak; E.B. Ross (Eric); M.J. Daly (Mark); A.S. Whittemore (Alice); E.M. John (Esther); A. Miron (Alexander); M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); W.K. Chung (Wendy K.); D. Goldgar (David); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); L. Tihomirova (Laima); N. Tung (Nadine); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); L. Steele (Linda); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); T. Ramon Y Cajal; A. Osorio (Ana); J. Benítez (Javier); J. Godino (Javier); M.I. Tejada; M. Duran (Mercedes); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); K.A. Bobolis (Kristie A.); S.R. Sand (Sharon); A. Fontaine (Annette); A. Savarese (Antonella); B. Pasini (Barbara); B. Peissel (Bernard); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); D. Zaffaroni (Daniela); F. Vignolo-Lutati (Francesca); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); G. Giannini (Giuseppe); L. Bernard (Loris); M. Genuardi (Maurizio); P. Radice (Paolo); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); V. Pensotti (Valeria); V. Gismondi (Viviana); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); F. Fostira (Florentia); J. Garber (Judy); D. Torres (Diana); M.U. Rashid (Muhammad); U. Hamann (Ute); S. Peock (Susan); D. Frost (Debra); R. Platte (Radka); D.G. Evans (Gareth); R. Eeles (Rosalind); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); D. Eccles (Diana); T. Cole (Trevor); J. Cook (Jackie); C. Brewer (Carole); S. Hodgson (Shirley); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); L.J. Walker (Lisa); M.E. Porteous (Mary); M.J. Kennedy (John); L. Izatt (Louise); L. Adlard; A. Donaldson (Alan); S.D. Ellis (Steve); P. Sharma (Priyanka); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); A. Becker (Alexandra); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); E. Hahnen (Eric); C. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); S. Engert (Stefanie); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); C. Mundhenke (Christoph); D. Niederacher (Dieter); M.C. Fleisch (Markus); C. Sutter (Christian); C.R. Bartram; N. Dikow (Nicola); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); D. Steinemann (Doris); K. Kast (Karin); M. Beer (Marit); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); B.H.F. Weber (Bernhard); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); M. Belotti (Muriel); M. Gauthier-Villars (Marion); F. Damiola (Francesca); N. Boutry-Kryza (N.); C. Lasset (Christine); H. Sobol (Hagay); J.-P. Peyrat; D.W. Muller (Danièle); J.P. Fricker (Jean Pierre); M.-A. Collonge-Rame; I. Mortemousque (Isabelle); C. Nogues (Catherine); E. Rouleau (Etienne); C. Isaacs (Claudine); A. de Paepe (Anne); B. Poppe (Bruce); K. Claes (Kathleen); K. De Leeneer (Kim); M. Piedmonte (Marion); G. Rodriguez (Gustavo); K. Wakely (Katie); J.F. Boggess (John); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); J. Basil (Jack); M. Azodi (Masoud); K.-A. Phillips (Kelly-Anne); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); A. Romero (Atocha); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); S. Verhoef; J.M. Collee (Margriet); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); J.C. Oosterwijk (Jan); J.J. Gille (Johan); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); C.M. Kets; M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); C.M. Aalfs (Cora); P. Devilee (Peter); A.R. Mensenkamp (Arjen); A. Kwong (Ava); E. Olah; J. Papp (Janos); O. Díez (Orland); C. Lazaro (Conxi); E. Darder (Esther); I. Blanco (Ignacio); M. Salinas; A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); J. Gronwald (Jacek); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); G. Sukiennicki (Grzegorz); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); T. Byrski (Tomasz); C. Cybulski (Cezary); A. Toloczko-Grabarek (Aleksandra); E. Złowocka-Perłowska (Elzbieta); J. Menkiszak (Janusz); A. Arason (Adalgeir); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); J. Simard (Jacques); R. Laframboise (Rachel)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractImportance: Limited information about the relationship between specific mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) and cancer risk exists. Objective: To identify mutation-specific cancer risks for carriers of BRCA1/2. Design, Setting, and Participants: Observational study ofwomen whowere asce

  3. Accuracy of Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Testing Criteria and Outcomes in Patients With a Germline Mutation in CDH1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Post, Rachel S.; Vogelaar, Ingrid P.; Manders, Peggy; van der Kolk, Lizet E.; Cats, Annemieke; van Hest, Liselotte P.; Sijmons, Rolf; Aalfs, Cora M.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Garcia, Encarna B. Gomez; Wagner, Anja; Hes, Frederik J.; Arts, Neeltje; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; van Krieken, J. Han; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Germline mutations in the cadherin 1, type 1, E-cadherin gene (CDH1) cause a predisposition to gastric cancer. We evaluated the ability of the internationally accepted hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) criteria to identify individuals with pathogenic mutations in CDH1, and

  4. Accuracy of Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Testing Criteria and Outcomes in Patients With a Germline Mutation in CDH1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Post, Rachel S.; Vogelaar, Ingrid P.; Manders, Peggy; Van Der Kolk, Lizet E.; Cats, Annemieke; Van Hest, Liselotte P.; Sijmons, Rolf; Aalfs, Cora M.; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Gómez García, Encarna B.; Wagner, Anja; Hes, Frederik J.; Arts, Neeltje; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Van Krieken, J. Han; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Germline mutations in the cadherin 1, type 1, E-cadherin gene (CDH1) cause a predisposition to gastric cancer. We evaluated the ability of the internationally accepted hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) criteria to identify individuals with pathogenic mutations in CDH1, and a

  5. Microsatellite instability derived JAK1 frameshift mutations are associated with tumor immune evasion in endometrioid endometrial cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stelloo, Ellen; Versluis, Marco A; Nijman, Hans W; de Bruyn, Marco; Plat, Annechien; Osse, Elisabeth M; van Dijk, Reinhardt H; Nout, Remi A; Creutzberg, Carien L; de Bock, Geertruida H; Smit, Vincent T; Bosse, Tjalling; Hollema, Harry

    2016-01-01

    JAK1 frameshift mutations may promote cancer cell immune evasion by impeding upregulation of the antigen presentation pathway in microsatellite unstable endometrial cancers (ECs). This study investigated the JAK1 mutation frequency, its functional implication in immune evasion and its prognostic sig

  6. Laminin gene LAMB4 is somatically mutated and expressionally altered in gastric and colorectal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Mi Ryoung; An, Chang Hyeok; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Laminins are important in tumor invasion and metastasis as well as in maintenance of normal epithelial cell structures. However, mutation status of laminin chain-encoding genes remains unknown in cancers. Aim of this study was to explore whether laminin chain genes are mutated and expressionally altered in gastric (GC) and colorectal cancers (CRC). In a public database, we found that laminin chain genes LAMA1, LAMA3, LAMB1 and LAMB4 had mononucleotide repeats in the coding sequences that might be mutation targets in the cancers with microsatellite instability (MSI). We analyzed the genes in 88 GC and 139 CRC [high MSI (MSI-H) or stable MSI/low MSI (MSS/MSI-L)] by single strand conformation polymorphism analysis and DNA sequencing. In the present study, we found LAMB4 (11.8% of GC and 7.6% of CRC with MSI-H), LAMA3 (2.9% of GC and 2.5 of CRC with MSI-H), LAMA1 (5.9% of GC with MSI-H) and LAMB1 frameshift mutations (1.3% of CRC with MSI-H). These mutations were not found in MSS/MSI-L (0/114). We also analyzed LAMB4 expression in GC and CRC by immunohistochemistry. Loss of LAMB4 expression was identified in 17-32% of the GC and CRC. Of note, the loss expression was more common in the cancers with LAMB4 mutation or those with MSI-H. Our data show that frameshift mutations of LAMA1, LAMA3, LAMB1 and LAMB4, and loss of LAMB4 may be features of GC and CRC with MSI-H.

  7. A review of gigaxonin mutations in giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, James J; Liu, Isabelle Y; Wang, Marilene B; Srivatsan, Eri S

    2016-07-01

    Gigaxonin, the product of GAN gene localized to chromosome 16, is associated with the early onset neuronal degeneration disease giant axonal neuropathy (GAN). Gigaxonin is an E3 ubiquitin ligase adaptor protein involved in intermediate filament processing in neural cells, and vimentin filaments in fibroblasts. Mutations of the gene cause pre-neural filaments to accumulate and form giant axons resulting in the inhibition of neural cell signaling. Analysis of the catalog of somatic mutations in cancer, driver DB and IDGC data portal databases containing 21,000 tumor genomic sequences has identified GAN patient mutations in cancer cell lines and primary tumors. The database search has also shown the presence of identical missense and nonsense gigaxonin mutations in GAN and colon cancer. These mutations frequently occur in the domains associated with protein homodimerization and substrate interaction such as Broad-Complex, Tramtrack and Bric a brac (BTB), BTB associated C-terminal KELCH (BACK), and KELCH repeats. Analysis of the International HapMap Project database containing 1200 normal genomic sequences has identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs2608555, in exon 8 of the gigaxonin sequence. While this SNP is present in >40 % of Caucasian population, it is present in less than 10 % of Japanese and Chinese populations. Although the role of gigaxonin polymorphism is not yet known, CFTR and MDR1 gene studies have shown that silent mutations play a role in the instability and aberrant splicing and folding of mRNAs. We believe that molecular and functional investigation of gigaxonin mutations including the exon 8 polymorphism could lead to an improved understanding of the relationship between GAN and cancer.

  8. Frequent mutations in EGFR, KRAS and TP53 genes in human lung cancer tumors detected by ion torrent DNA sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Cai

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most common malignancy and the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. While smoking is by far the leading cause of lung cancer, other environmental and genetic factors influence the development and progression of the cancer. Since unique mutations patterns have been observed in individual cancer samples, identification and characterization of the distinctive lung cancer molecular profile is essential for developing more effective, tailored therapies. Until recently, personalized DNA sequencing to identify genetic mutations in cancer was impractical and expensive. The recent technological advancements in next-generation DNA sequencing, such as the semiconductor-based Ion Torrent sequencing platform, has made DNA sequencing cost and time effective with more reliable results. Using the Ion Torrent Ampliseq Cancer Panel, we sequenced 737 loci from 45 cancer-related genes to identify genetic mutations in 76 human lung cancer samples. The sequencing analysis revealed missense mutations in KRAS, EGFR, and TP53 genes in the breast cancer samples of various histologic types. Thus, this study demonstrates the necessity of sequencing individual human cancers in order to develop personalized drugs or combination therapies to effectively target individual, breast cancer-specific mutations.

  9. Evaluation of candidate stromal epithelial cross-talk genes identifies association between risk of serous ovarian cancer and TERT, a cancer susceptibility "hot-spot"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnatty, Sharon E; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing;

    2010-01-01

    SNPs-PODXL rs1013368, ITGA6 rs13027811, and MMP3 rs522616-were selected for replication using TaqMan genotyping in up to 3,059 serous invasive cases and 8,905 controls from 16 OCAC case-control studies. An additional 18 SNPs with Pper-alleleor=0.5). However genotypes at TERT rs7726159 were associated...... with ovarian cancer risk in the smaller, five-study replication study (Pper-allele=0.03). Combined analysis of the discovery and replication sets for this TERT SNP showed an increased risk of serous ovarian cancer among non-Hispanic whites [adj. ORper-allele 1.14 (1.04-1.24) p=0.003]. Our study adds...

  10. Antitumor effects and molecular mechanisms of ponatinib on endometrial cancer cells harboring activating FGFR2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Hee; Kwak, Yeonui; Kim, Nam Doo; Sim, Taebo

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant mutational activation of FGFR2 is associated with endometrial cancers (ECs). AP24534 (ponatinib) currently undergoing clinical trials has been known to be an orally available multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Our biochemical kinase assay showed that AP24534 is potent against wild-type FGFR1-4 and 5 mutant FGFRs (V561M-FGFR1, N549H-FGFR2, K650E-FGFR3, G697C-FGFR3, N535K-FGFR4) and possesses the strongest kinase-inhibitory activity on N549H-FGFR2 (IC50 of 0.5 nM) among all FGFRs tested. We therefore investigated the effects of AP24534 on endometrial cancer cells harboring activating FGFR2 mutations and explored the underlying molecular mechanisms. AP24534 significantly inhibited the proliferation of endometrial cancer cells bearing activating FGFR2 mutations (N549K, K310R/N549K, S252W) and mainly induced G1/S cell cycle arrest leading to apoptosis. AP24534 also diminished the kinase activity of immunoprecipitated FGFR2 derived from MFE-296 and MFE-280 cells and reduced the phosphorylation of FGFR2 and FRS2 on MFE-296 and AN3CA cells. AP24534 caused substantial reductions in ERK phosphorylation, PLCγ signaling and STAT5 signal transduction on ECs bearing FGFR2 activating mutations. Akt signaling pathway was also deactivated by AP24534. AP24534 causes the chemotherapeutic effect through mainly the blockade of ERK, PLCγ and STAT5 signal transduction on ECs. Moreover, AP24534 inhibited migration and invasion of endometrial cancer cells with FGFR2 mutations. In addition, AP24534 significantly blocked anchorage-independent growth of endometrial cancer cells. We, for the first time, report the molecular mechanisms by which AP24534 exerts antitumor effects on ECs with FGFR2 activating mutations, which would provide mechanistic insight into ongoing clinical investigations of AP24534 for ECs.

  11. Update of the androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, B; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1999-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 309 to 374 during the past year. We have expanded the database by adding information on AR-interacting proteins; and we have improved the database by identifying those mutation entries that have been updated. Mutations of unknown significance have now been reported in both the 5' and 3' untranslated regions of the AR gene, and in individuals who are somatic mosaics constitutionally. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphisms, including silent mutations, have been discovered in normal individuals and in individuals with male infertility. A mutation hotspot associated with prostatic cancer has been identified in exon 5. The database is available on the internet (http://www.mcgill.ca/androgendb/), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  12. Common breast cancer-predisposition alleles are associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Spurdle, Amanda B; Sinilnikova, Olga M;

    2008-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 confer high risks of breast cancer. However, evidence suggests that these risks are modified by other genetic or environmental factors that cluster in families. A recent genome-wide association study has shown that common alleles at single nucleotide...... polymorphisms (SNPs) in FGFR2 (rs2981582), TNRC9 (rs3803662), and MAP3K1 (rs889312) are associated with increased breast cancer risks in the general population. To investigate whether these loci are also associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, we genotyped these SNPs in a sample...... of 10,358 mutation carriers from 23 studies. The minor alleles of SNP rs2981582 and rs889312 were each associated with increased breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers (per-allele hazard ratio [HR] = 1.32, 95% CI: 1.20-1.45, p(trend) = 1.7 x 10(-8) and HR = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.02-1.24, p(trend) = 0...

  13. Recurrent HOXB13 mutations in the Dutch population do not associate with increased breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingjing; Prager-van der Smissen, Wendy J C; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Collée, J Margriet; Cornelissen, Sten; Lamping, Roy; Nieuwlaat, Anja; Foekens, John A; Hooning, Maartje J; Verhoef, Senno; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Martens, John W M; Hollestelle, Antoinette

    2016-01-01

    The HOXB13 p.G84E mutation has been firmly established as a prostate cancer susceptibility allele. Although HOXB13 also plays a role in breast tumor progression, the association of HOXB13 p.G84E with breast cancer risk is less evident. Therefore, we comprehensively interrogated the entire HOXB13 coding sequence for mutations in 1,250 non-BRCA1/2 familial breast cancer cases and 800 controls. We identified two predicted deleterious missense mutations, p.G84E and p.R217C, that were recurrent among breast cancer cases and further evaluated their association with breast cancer risk in a larger study. Taken together, 4,520 familial non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer cases and 3,127 controls were genotyped including the cases and controls of the whole gene screen. The concordance rate for the genotyping assays compared with Sanger sequencing was 100%. The prostate cancer risk allele p.G84E was identified in 18 (0.56%) of 3,187 cases and 16 (0.70%) of 2,300 controls (OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.41-1.59, P = 0.54). Additionally, p.R217C was identified in 10 (0.31%) of 3,208 cases and 2 (0.087%) of 2,288 controls (OR = 3.57, 95% CI = 0.76-33.57, P = 0.14). These results imply that none of the recurrent HOXB13 mutations in the Dutch population are associated with breast cancer risk, although it may be worthwhile to evaluate p.R217C in a larger study.

  14. Mutational analysis of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer families from Asturias (Northern Spain)

    OpenAIRE

    Blay, Pilar; Santamaría, Iñigo; Pitiot, Ana S.; Luque, María; Alvarado, Marta G; Lastra, Ana; Fernández, Yolanda; Paredes, Ángeles; Freije, José MP; Balbín, Milagros

    2013-01-01

    Background The prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Spain is heterogeneous and varies according to geographical origin of studied families. The contribution of these mutations to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer has not been previously investigated in Asturian populations (Northern Spain). Methods In the present work, 256 unrelated high-risk probands with breast and/or ovarian cancer from families living in Asturias were analyzed for the presence of a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation fr...

  15. Efficiency of BRCAPRO and Myriad II mutation probability thresholds versus cancer history criteria alone for BRCA1/2 mutation detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Harssel, J J T; van Roozendaal, C E P; Detisch, Y; Brandão, R D; Paulussen, A D C; Zeegers, M; Blok, M J; Gómez García, E B

    2010-06-01

    Considerable differences exist amongst countries in the mutation probability methods and thresholds used to select patients for BRCA1/2 genetic screening. In order to assess the added value of mutation probability methods, we have retrospectively calculated the BRCAPRO and Myriad II probabilities in 306 probands who had previously been selected for DNA-analysis according to criteria based on familial history of cancer. DNA-analysis identified 52 mutations (16.9%) and 11 unclassified variants (UVs, 3.6%). Compared to cancer history, a threshold > or = 10% with BRCAPRO or with Myriad II excluded about 40% of the patients from analysis, including four with a mutation and probabilities 20% with BRCAPRO and Myriad II. In summary, BRCAPRO and Myriad II are more efficient than cancer history alone to exclude patients without a mutation. BRCAPRO performs better for the detection of BRCA1 mutations than of BRCA2 mutations. The Myriad II scores provided no additional information than the BRCAPRO scores alone for the detection of patients with a mutation. The use of thresholds excluded from analysis the majority of patients carrying an UV.

  16. E-cadherin destabilization accounts for the pathogenicity of missense mutations in hereditary diffuse gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Simões-Correia

    Full Text Available E-cadherin is critical for the maintenance of tissue architecture due to its role in cell-cell adhesion. E-cadherin mutations are the genetic cause of Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer (HDGC and missense mutations represent a clinical burden, due to the uncertainty of their pathogenic role. In vitro and in vivo, most mutations lead to loss-of-function, although the causal factor is unknown for the majority. We hypothesized that destabilization could account for the pathogenicity of E-cadherin missense mutations in HDGC, and tested our hypothesis using in silico and in vitro tools. FoldX algorithm was used to calculate the impact of each mutation in E-cadherin native-state stability, and the analysis was complemented with evolutionary conservation, by SIFT. Interestingly, HDGC patients harbouring germline E-cadherin destabilizing mutants present a younger age at diagnosis or death, suggesting that the loss of native-state stability of E-cadherin accounts for the disease phenotype. To elucidate the biological relevance of E-cadherin destabilization in HDGC, we investigated a group of newly identified HDGC-associated mutations (E185V, S232C and L583R, of which L583R is predicted to be destabilizing. We show that this mutation is not functional in vitro, exhibits shorter half-life and is unable to mature, due to premature proteasome-dependent degradation, a phenotype reverted by stabilization with the artificial mutation L583I (structurally tolerated. Herein we report E-cadherin structural models suitable to predict the impact of the majority of cancer-associated missense mutations and we show that E-cadherin destabilization leads to loss-of-function in vitro and increased pathogenicity in vivo.

  17. Oncogene mutational profile in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang ZC

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Zi-Chen Zhang,1,* Sha Fu,1,* Fang Wang,1 Hai-Yun Wang,1 Yi-Xin Zeng,2 Jian-Yong Shao11Department of Molecular Diagnostics, 2Department of Experimental Research, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is a common tumor in Southern China, but the oncogene mutational status of NPC patients has not been clarified. Using time-of-flight mass spectrometry, 238 mutation hotspots in 19 oncogenes were examined in 123 NPC patients. The relationships between mutational status and clinical data were assessed with a χ2 or Fisher's exact test. Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan–Meier method with the log-rank test. In 123 patients, 21 (17.1% NPC tumors were positive for mutations in eight oncogenes: six patients had PIK3CA mutations (4.9%, five NRAS mutations (4.1%, four KIT mutations (3.3%, two PDGFRA mutations (1.6%, two ABL mutations (1.6%, and one with simultaneous mutations in HRAS, EGFR, and BRAF (1%. Patients with mutations were more likely to relapse or develop metastasis than those with wild-type alleles (P=0.019. No differences or correlations were found in other clinical characteristics or in patient survival. No mutations were detected in oncogenes AKT1, AKT2, CDK, ERBB2, FGFR1, FGFR3, FLT3, JAK2, KRAS, MET, and RET. These results demonstrate an association between NPC and mutations in NRAS, KIT, PIK3CA, PDGFRA, and ABL, which are associated with patient relapse and metastasis. Keywords: NPC, oncogene, mutation

  18. BRCA1 mutations in Algerian breast cancer patients: high frequency in young, sporadic cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Uhrhammer, Amina Abdelouahab, Laurence Lafarge, Viviane Feillel, Ahmed Ben Dib, Yves-Jean Bignon

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer rates and median age of onset differ between Western Europe and North Africa. In Western populations, 5 to 10 % of breast cancer cases can be attributed to major genetic factors such as BRCA1 and BRCA2, while this attribution is not yet well defined among Africans. To help determine the contribution of BRCA1 mutations to breast cancer in a North African population, we analysed genomic DNA from breast cancer cases ascertained in Algiers. Both familial cases (at least three breast cancers in the same familial branch, or two with one bilateral or diagnosed before age 40 and sporadic cases less than 38 years of age were studied. Complete sequencing plus quantitative analysis of the BRCA1 gene was performed. 9.8 % (5/51 of early-onset sporadic and 36.4 % (4/11 of familial cases were found to be associated with BRCA1 mutations. This is in contrast 10.3 % of French HBOC families exhibiting a BRCA1 mutation. One mutation, c.798_799delTT, was observed in two Algerian families and in two families from Tunisia, suggesting a North African founder allele. Algerian non-BRCA1 tumors were of significantly higher grade than French non-BRCA tumors, and the age at diagnosis for Algerian familial cases was much younger than that for French non-BRCA familial cases. In conclusion, we observed a much higher frequency of BRCA1 mutations among young breast cancer patients than observed in Europe, suggesting biological differences and that the inclusion criterea for analysis in Western Europe may not be applicable for the Northern African population.

  19. LYN-activating mutations mediate antiestrogen resistance in estrogen receptor–positive breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Luis J.; Fox, Emily M.; Balko, Justin M.; Garrett, Joan T.; Kuba, María Gabriela; Estrada, Mónica Valeria; González-Angulo, Ana María; Mills, Gordon B.; Red-Brewer, Monica; Mayer, Ingrid A.; Abramson, Vandana; Rizzo, Monica; Kelley, Mark C.; Meszoely, Ingrid M.; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptor–positive (ER+) breast cancers adapt to hormone deprivation and become resistant to antiestrogen therapy. Here, we performed deep sequencing on ER+ tumors that remained highly proliferative after treatment with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and identified a D189Y mutation in the inhibitory SH2 domain of the SRC family kinase (SFK) LYN. Evaluation of 463 breast tumors in The Cancer Genome Atlas revealed four LYN mutations, two of which affected the SH2 domain. In addition, LYN was upregulated in multiple ER+ breast cancer lines resistant to long-term estrogen deprivation (LTED). An RNAi-based kinome screen revealed that LYN is required for growth of ER+ LTED breast cancer cells. Kinase assays and immunoblot analyses of SRC substrates in transfected cells indicated that LYND189Y has higher catalytic activity than WT protein. Further, LYND189Y exhibited reduced phosphorylation at the inhibitory Y507 site compared with LYNWT. Other SH2 domain LYN mutants, E159K and K209N, also exhibited higher catalytic activity and reduced inhibitory site phosphorylation. LYND189Y overexpression abrogated growth inhibition by fulvestrant and/or the PI3K inhibitor BKM120 in 3 ER+ breast cancer cell lines. The SFK inhibitor dasatinib enhanced the antitumor effect of BKM120 and fulvestrant against estrogen-deprived ER+ xenografts but not LYND189Y-expressing xenografts. These results suggest that LYN mutations mediate escape from antiestrogens in a subset of ER+ breast cancers. PMID:25401474

  20. HFE H63D mutation frequency shows an increase in Turkish women with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guler Emine

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hereditary hemochromatosis gene HFE plays a pivotal role in iron homeostasis. The association between cancer and HFE hetero- or homozygosity has previously been shown including hepatocellular and nonhepatocellular malignancies. This study was performed to compare frequencies of HFE C282Y and H63D variants in Turkish women with breast cancer and healthy controls. Methods Archived DNA samples of Hacettepe University Oncology Institute were used in this study. The HFE gene was investigated by PCR-RFLP. Results All subjects studied were free from C282Y mutation. Thirty-nine patients had H63D mutation and were all heterozygous. H63D allele frequency was 22.2% (39/176 in the breast cancer patients, and 14% (28/200 in the healthy volunteers. Statistical analysis of cases with HFE H63D phenotype showed significant difference between breast cancer and healthy volunteers (P = 0.02. Conclusion Our results suggest that HFE H63D mutation frequencies were increased in the breast cancer patients in comparison to those in the general population. Also, odds ratios (odds ratio = 2.05 computed in this study suggest that H63D has a positive association with breast cancer.

  1. The clonal and mutational evolution spectrum of primary triple negative breast cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sohrab P.; Roth, Andrew; Goya, Rodrigo; Oloumi, Arusha; Ha, Gavin; Zhao, Yongjun; Turashvili, Gulisa; Ding, Jiarui; Tse, Kane; Haffari, Gholamreza; Bashashati, Ali; Prentice, Leah M.; Khattra, Jaswinder; Burleigh, Angela; Yap, Damian; Bernard, Virginie; McPherson, Andrew; Shumansky, Karey; Crisan, Anamaria; Giuliany, Ryan; Heravi-Moussavi, Alireza; Rosner, Jamie; Lai, Daniel; Birol, Inanc; Varhol, Richard; Tam, Angela; Dhalla, Noreen; Zeng, Thomas; Ma, Kevin; Chan, Simon; Griffith, Malachi; Moradian, Annie; Grace Cheng, S.-W.; Morin, Gregg B.; Watson, Peter; Gelmon, Karen; Chia, Stephen; Chin, Suet-Feung; Curtis, Christina; Rueda, Oscar; Pharoah, Paul D; Damaraju, Sambasivarao; Mackey, John; Hoon, Kelly; Harkins, Timothy; Tadigotla, Vasisht; Sigaroudinia, Mahvash; Gascard, Philippe; Tlsty, Thea; Costello, Joseph F; Meyer, Irmtraud M; Eaves, Connie J; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Jones, Steven; Huntsman, David; Hirst, Martin; Caldas, Carlos; Marra, Marco A; Aparicio, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Primary triple negative breast cancers (TNBC) represent approximately 16% of all breast cancers1 and are a tumour type defined by exclusion, for which comprehensive landscapes of somatic mutation have not been determined. Here we show in 104 early TNBC cases, that at the time of diagnosis these cancers exhibit a wide and continuous spectrum of genomic evolution, with some exhibiting only a handful of somatic aberrations in a few pathways, whereas others contain hundreds of somatic events and multiple pathways implicated. Integration with matched whole transcriptome sequence data revealed that only ~36% of mutations are expressed. By examining single nucleotide variant (SNV) allelic abundance derived from deep re-sequencing (median >20,000 fold) measurements in 2414 somatic mutations, we determine for the first time in an epithelial tumour, the relative abundance of clonal genotypes among cases in the population. We show that TNBC vary widely and continuously in their clonal frequencies at the time of diagnosis, with basal subtype TNBC2,3 exhibiting more variation than non-basal TNBC. Although p53 and PIK3CA/PTEN somatic mutations appear clonally dominant compared with other pathways, in some tumours their clonal frequencies are incompatible with founder status. Mutations in cytoskeletal and cell shape/motility proteins occurred at lower clonal frequencies, suggesting they occurred later during tumour progression. Taken together our results show that future attempts to dissect the biology and therapeutic responses of TNBC will require the determination of individual tumour clonal genotypes. PMID:22495314

  2. Origins and functional consequences of somatic mitochondrial DNA mutations in human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Young Seok; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Gerstung, Moritz; Martincorena, Inigo; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Davies, Helen R; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Gundem, Gunes; Shlien, Adam; Bolli, Niccolo; Behjati, Sam; Tarpey, Patrick S; Nangalia, Jyoti; Massie, Charles E; Butler, Adam P; Teague, Jon W; Vassiliou, George S; Green, Anthony R; Du, Ming-Qing; Unnikrishnan, Ashwin; Pimanda, John E; Teh, Bin Tean; Munshi, Nikhil; Greaves, Mel; Vyas, Paresh; El-Naggar, Adel K; Santarius, Tom; Collins, V Peter; Grundy, Richard; Taylor, Jack A; Hayes, D Neil; Malkin, David; Foster, Christopher S; Warren, Anne Y; Whitaker, Hayley C; Brewer, Daniel; Eeles, Rosalind; Cooper, Colin; Neal, David; Visakorpi, Tapio; Isaacs, William B; Bova, G Steven; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Futreal, P Andrew; Lynch, Andy G; Chinnery, Patrick F; McDermott, Ultan; Stratton, Michael R; Campbell, Peter J

    2014-10-01

    Recent sequencing studies have extensively explored the somatic alterations present in the nuclear genomes of cancers. Although mitochondria control energy metabolism and apoptosis, the origins and impact of cancer-associated mutations in mtDNA are unclear. In this study, we analyzed somatic alterations in mtDNA from 1675 tumors. We identified 1907 somatic substitutions, which exhibited dramatic replicative strand bias, predominantly C > T and A > G on the mitochondrial heavy strand. This strand-asymmetric signature differs from those found in nuclear cancer genomes but matches the inferred germline process shaping primate mtDNA sequence content. A number of mtDNA mutations showed considerable heterogeneity across tumor types. Missense mutations were selectively neutral and often gradually drifted towards homoplasmy over time. In contrast, mutations resulting in protein truncation undergo negative selection and were almost exclusively heteroplasmic. Our findings indicate that the endogenous mutational mechanism has far greater impact than any other external mutagens in mitochondria and is fundamentally linked to mtDNA replication.

  3. Mutational Context and Diverse Clonal Development in Early and Late Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iver Nordentoft

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer (or urothelial cell carcinoma [UCC] is characterized by field disease (malignant alterations in surrounding mucosa and frequent recurrences. Whole-genome, exome, and transcriptome sequencing of 38 tumors, including four metachronous tumor pairs and 20 superficial tumors, identified an APOBEC mutational signature in one-third. This was biased toward the sense strand, correlated with mean expression level, and clustered near breakpoints. A > G mutations were up to eight times more frequent on the sense strand (p < 0.002 in [ACG]AT contexts. The patient-specific APOBEC signature was negatively correlated to repair-gene expression and was not related to clinicopathological parameters. Mutations in gene families and single genes were related to tumor stage, and expression of chromatin modifiers correlated with survival. Evolutionary and subclonal analyses of early/late tumor pairs showed a unitary origin, and discrete tumor clones contained mutated cancer genes. The ancestral clones contained Pik3ca/Kdm6a mutations and may reflect the field-disease mutations shared among later tumors.

  4. Aberrant RNA splicing in cancer; expression changes and driver mutations of splicing factor genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveen, A; Kilpinen, S; Ruusulehto, A; Lothe, R A; Skotheim, R I

    2016-05-12

    Alternative splicing is a widespread process contributing to structural transcript variation and proteome diversity. In cancer, the splicing process is commonly disrupted, resulting in both functional and non-functional end-products. Cancer-specific splicing events are known to contribute to disease progression; however, the dysregulated splicing patterns found on a genome-wide scale have until recently been less well-studied. In this review, we provide an overview of aberrant RNA splicing and its regulation in cancer. We then focus on the executors of the splicing process. Based on a comprehensive catalog of splicing factor encoding genes and analyses of available gene expression and somatic mutation data, we identify cancer-associated patterns of dysregulation. Splicing factor genes are shown to be significantly differentially expressed between cancer and corresponding normal samples, and to have reduced inter-individual expression variation in cancer. Furthermore, we identify enrichment of predicted cancer-critical genes among the splicing factors. In addition to previously described oncogenic splicing factor genes, we propose 24 novel cancer-critical splicing factors predicted from somatic mutations.

  5. Epidemiology of Patients with Ovarian Cancer with and Without a BRCA1/2 Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiderpass, Elisabete; Tyczynski, Jerzy E

    2015-12-01

    Ovarian cancer survival rates have improved only slightly in recent decades; however, treatment of this disease is expected to undergo rapid change as strategies incorporating molecular-targeted therapies enter clinical practice. Carriers of deleterious mutations (defined as a harmful mutation) in either the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene (BRCAm) have a significantly increased risk of developing ovarian cancer. Epidemiology data in large (>500 patients) unselected ovarian cancer populations suggest that the expected incidence rate for BRCAm in this population is 12-14 %. Patients with a BRCAm are typically diagnosed at a younger age than those without a BRCAm. Associations with BRCAm vary according to ethnicity, with women of Ashkenazi Jewish descent being 10 times more likely to have a BRCAm than the general population. In terms of survival, patients with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer who have a BRCAm may have improved overall survival compared with patients who do not carry a BRCAm. Although genetic testing for BRCAm remains relatively uncommon in ovarian cancer patients, testing is becoming cheaper and increasingly accessible; however, this approach is not without numerous social, ethical and policy issues. Current guidelines recommend BRCAm testing in specific ovarian cancer patients only; however, with the emergence of treatments that are targeted at patients with a BRCAm, genetic testing of all patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer may lead to improved patient outcomes in this patient population. Knowledge of BRCAm status could, therefore, help to inform treatment decisions and identify relatives at increased risk of developing cancer.

  6. Mobile genetic elements and cancer. From mutations to gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozeretska, I A; Demydov, S V; Ostapchenko, L I

    2011-12-01

    In the present review, an association between cancer and the activity of the non-LTR retroelements L1, Alu, and SVA, as well as endogenous retroviruses, in the human genome, is analyzed. Data suggesting that transposons have been involved in embryogenesis and malignization processes, are presented. Events that lead to the activation of mobile elements in mammalian somatic cells, as well as the use of mobile elements in genetic screening and cancer gene therapy, are reviewed.

  7. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer : updated clinical guidelines with an emphasis on germline CDH1 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Post, Rachel S.; Vogelaar, Ingrid P.; Carneiro, Fatima; Guilford, Parry; Huntsman, David; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Caldas, Carlos; Schreiber, Karen E. Chelcun; Hardwick, Richard H.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Bardram, Linda; Benusiglio, Patrick R.; Bisseling, Tanya M.; Blair, Vanessa; Bleiker, Eveline; Boussioutas, Alex; Cats, Annemieke; Coit, Daniel; DeGregorio, Lynn; Figueiredo, Joana; Ford, James M.; Heijkoop, Esther; Hermens, Rosella; Humar, Bostjan; Kaurah, Pardeep; Keller, Gisella; Lai, Jennifer; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; O'Donovan, Maria; Oliveira, Carla; Pinheiro, Hugo; Ragunath, Krish; Rasenberg, Esther; Richardson, Susan; Roviello, Franco; Schackert, Hans; Seruca, Raquel; Taylor, Amy; ter Huurne, Anouk; Tischkowitz, Marc; Joe, Sheena Tjon A.; van Dijck, Benjamin; van Grieken, Nicole C. T.; van Hillegersberg, Richard; van Sandick, Johanna W.; Vehof, Rianne; van Krieken, J. Han; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C.

    2015-01-01

    Germline CDH1 mutations confer a high lifetime risk of developing diffuse gastric (DGC) and lobular breast cancer (LBC). A multidisciplinary workshop was organised to discuss genetic testing, surgery, surveillance strategies, pathology reporting and the patient's perspective on multiple aspects, inc

  8. Mutational analysis of the BRCA1 gene in 30 Czech ovarian cancer patients

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Zikan; P. Pohlreich; J. Stribrna

    2005-04-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the most severe of oncological diseases. Inherited mutations in cancer susceptibility genes play a causal role in 5–10% of newly diagnosed tumours. BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene alterations are found in the majority of these cases. The aim of this study was to analyse the BRCA1 gene in the ovarian cancer risk group to characterize the spectrum of its mutations in the Czech Republic. Five overlapping fragments amplified on both genomic DNA and cDNA were used to screen for the whole protein-coding sequence of the BRCA1 gene. These fragments were analysed by the protein truncation test (PTT) and direct sequencing. Three inactivating mutations were identified in the group of 30 Czech ovarian cancer patients: the 5382insC mutation in two unrelated patients and a deletion of exons 21 and 22 in another patient. In addition, we have found an alternatively spliced product lacking exon 5 in two other unrelated patients. The 5382insC is the most frequent alteration of the BRCA1 gene in Central and Eastern Europe. The deletion of exons 21 and 22 affects the BRCT functional domain of the BRCA1 protein. Although large genomic rearragements are known to be relatively frequent in Western European populations, no analyses have been performed in our region yet.

  9. K-ras oncogene mutations in sporadic colorectal cancer in The Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, M.; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Weijenberg, M.P.; Roemen, G.M.J.M.; Lentjes, M.H.F.M.; Pachen, M.M.M.; Smits, K.M.; Bruïne, A.P. de; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2003-01-01

    Activation of K-ras oncogene has been implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis, being mutated in 30-60% of the adenocarcinomas. In this study, 737 incident colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, originating from 120 852 men and women (55-69 years at baseline) participating in the Netherlands Cohort Study

  10. A truncating mutation of HDAC2 in human cancers confers resistance to histone deacetylase inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ropero, S; Fraga, MF; Ballestar, E;

    2006-01-01

    Disruption of histone acetylation patterns is a common feature of cancer cells, but very little is known about its genetic basis. We have identified truncating mutations in one of the primary human histone deacetylases, HDAC2, in sporadic carcinomas with microsatellite instability and in tumors a...

  11. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer: updated clinical guidelines with an emphasis on germline CDH1 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, R.S. van der; Vogelaar, I.P.; Carneiro, F.; Guilford, P.; Huntsman, D.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Caldas, C.; Schreiber, K.E.; Hardwick, R.H.; Ausems, M.G.; Bardram, L.; Benusiglio, P.R.; Bisseling, T.M.; Blair, V.; Bleiker, E.; Boussioutas, A.; Cats, A.; Coit, D.; DeGregorio, L.; Figueiredo, J.; Ford, J.M.; Heijkoop, E.; Hermens, R.; Humar, B.; Kaurah, P.; Keller, G.; Lai, J.; Ligtenberg, M.J.; O'Donovan, M.; Oliveira, C.; Pinheiro, H.; Ragunath, K.; Rasenberg, E.; Richardson, S.; Roviello, F.; Schackert, H.; Seruca, R.; Taylor, A.; Huurne, A. Ter; Tischkowitz, M.; Joe, S.T.; Dijck, B. van; Grieken, N.C. van; Hillegersberg, R. van; Sandick, J.W. van; Vehof, R.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Fitzgerald, R.C.

    2015-01-01

    Germline CDH1 mutations confer a high lifetime risk of developing diffuse gastric (DGC) and lobular breast cancer (LBC). A multidisciplinary workshop was organised to discuss genetic testing, surgery, surveillance strategies, pathology reporting and the patient's perspective on multiple aspects, inc

  12. Functional categories of TP53 mutation in colorectal cancer: results of an International Collaborative Study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iacopetta, B.; Russo, A.; Bazan, V.; Dardanoni, G.; Gebbia, N.; Soussi, T.; Kerr, D.J.; Elsaleh, H.; Soong, R.; Kandioler, D.; Janschek, E.; Kappel, S.; Lung, M.; Leung, C.S.; Ko, J.M.; Yuen, S.; Ho, J.; Leung, S.Y.; Crapez, E.; Duffour, J.; Ychou, M.; Leahy, D.T.; O'Donoghue, D.P.; Agnese, V.; Cascio, S.; Fede, G. Di; Chieco-Bianchi, L.; Bertorelle, R.; Belluco, C.; Giaretti, W.; Castagnola, P.; Ricevuto, E.; Ficorella, C.; Bosari, S.; Arizzi, C.D.; Miyaki, M.; Onda, M.; Kampman, E.; Diergaarde, B.; Royds, J.; Lothe, R.A.; Diep, C.B.; Meling, G.I.; Ostrowski, J.; Trzeciak, L.; Guzinska-Ustymowicz, K.; Zalewski, B.; Capella, G.M.; Moreno, V.; Peinado, M.A.; Lonnroth, C.; Lundholm, K.; Sun, X.F.; Jansson, A.; Bouzourene, H.; Hsieh, L.L.; Tang, R.; Smith, D.R.; Allen-Mersh, T.G.; Khan, Z.A.; Shorthouse, A.J.; Silverman, M.L.; Kato, S.; Ishioka, C.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Loss of TP53 function through gene mutation is a critical event in the development and progression of many tumour types including colorectal cancer (CRC). In vitro studies have found considerable heterogeneity amongst different TP53 mutants in terms of their transactivating abilities. Th

  13. Functional categories of TP53 mutation in colorectal cancer: results of an International Collaborative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iacopetta, B.; Russo, A.; Bazan, V.; Kampman, E.; Diergaarde, B.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Loss of TP53 function through gene mutation is a critical event in the development and progression of many tumour types including colorectal cancer (CRC). In vitro studies have found considerable heterogeneity amongst different TP53 mutants in terms of their transactivating abilities. Th

  14. Knowledge about hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer; mutation carriers and physicians at equal levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanska, Katarina; Carlsson, Christina; Bendahl, Pär-Ola

    2009-01-01

    of the physicians correctly estimated the risk to inherit an HNPCC predisposing mutation. Among family members, young age (... suggested a later starting age for surveillance than recommended. CONCLUSION: The finding of similar levels of knowledge about key features of HNPCC in at risk individuals and physicians reflect the challenge physicians face in keeping up to date on hereditary cancer and may have implications...

  15. The butterfly effect in cancer: a single base mutation can remodel the cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Jonathan R; Zhang, Yaoyang; Liao, Lujian; Ueno, Lynn; Du, Lisa; Jonkers, Marloes; Yates, John R; Vogt, Peter K

    2015-01-27

    We have compared the proteome, transcriptome, and metabolome of two cell lines: the human breast epithelial line MCF-10A and its mutant descendant MCF-10A-H1047R. These cell lines are derived from the same parental stock and differ by a single amino acid substitution (H1047R) caused by a single nucleotide change in one allele of the PIK3CA gene, which encodes the catalytic subunit p110α of PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase). They are considered isogenic. The H1047R mutation of PIK3CA is one of the most frequently encountered somatic cancer-specific mutations. In MCF-10A, this mutation induces an extensive cellular reorganization that far exceeds the known signaling activities of PI3K. The changes are highly diverse, with examples in structural protein levels, the DNA repair machinery, and sterol synthesis. Gene set enrichment analysis reveals a highly significant concordance of the genes differentially expressed in MCF-10A-H1047R cells and the established protein and RNA signatures of basal breast cancer. No such concordance was found with the specific gene signatures of other histological types of breast cancer. Our data document the power of a single base mutation, inducing an extensive remodeling of the cell toward the phenotype of a specific cancer.

  16. Early detection of breast and ovarian cancer in families with BRCA mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, HFA; Tesfay, E; Mourits, MJE; Rutgers, E; Verheyen, R; Oosterwijk, J; Beex, L; Boonstra, J.

    2005-01-01

    Women at risk of breast and ovarian cancer due to a genetic predisposition may opt for preventive surgery or surveillance. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of surveillance in families with a BRCA mutation. Sixty-eight BRCA-families underwent surveillance using annual mammogra

  17. Frameshift mutation of UVRAG: Switching a tumor suppressor to an oncogene in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shanshan; Liang, Chengyu

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) ranks as the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the Western world. It has a nearly 50% metastasis rate and only a subset of patients respond to current treatment strategy. UVRAG, a key autophagy effector and a guardian of chromosomal stability, is truncated by a frameshift (FS) mutation in CRC with microsatellite instability (MSI). However, the pathological and clinical significance of this UVRAG truncation remains less understood. Our recent study discovered that this FS mutation yields a much shortened form of the UVRAG protein, which counteracts most of the tumor-suppressor functions of wild-type (WT) UVRAG in autophagy, centrosome stability, and DNA repair in a dominant-negative fashion. Whereas this truncated mutation of UVRAG promotes tumorigenesis, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and metastasis, it appears to sensitize CRC tumors to adjuvant chemotherapy, making it a potential molecular marker to individualize therapeutic approach in CRC.

  18. Circulating free DNA as biomarker and source for mutation detection in metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen Lise Garm; Pallisgaard, Niels; Andersen, Rikke Fredslund

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in plasma has shown potential as biomarker in various cancers and could become an importance source for tumour mutation detection. The objectives of our study were to establish a normal range of cfDNA in a cohort of healthy individuals and to compare...... this with four cohorts of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients. We also investigated the prognostic value of cfDNA and analysed the tumour-specific KRAS mutations in the plasma. METHODS: The study was a prospective biomarker evaluation in four consecutive Phase II trials, including 229 patients...... the prognostic value of cfDNA measurement in plasma and utility for mutation detection with the method presented....

  19. Plac8 Links Oncogenic Mutations to Regulation of Autophagy and Is Critical to Pancreatic Cancer Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conan Kinsey

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in p53 and RAS potently cooperate in oncogenic transformation, and correspondingly, these genetic alterations frequently coexist in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA and other human cancers. Previously, we identified a set of genes synergistically activated by combined RAS and p53 mutations as frequent downstream mediators of tumorigenesis. Here, we show that the synergistically activated gene Plac8 is critical for pancreatic cancer growth. Silencing of Plac8 in cell lines suppresses tumor formation by blocking autophagy, a process essential for maintaining metabolic homeostasis in PDA, and genetic inactivation in an engineered mouse model inhibits PDA progression. We show that Plac8 is a critical regulator of the autophagic machinery, localizing to the lysosomal compartment and facilitating lysosome-autophagosome fusion. Plac8 thus provides a mechanistic link between primary oncogenic mutations and the induction of autophagy, a central mechanism of metabolic reprogramming, during PDA progression.

  20. Detecting the spectrum of multigene mutations in non-small cell lung cancer by Snapshot assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Su; Xiao-Sui Huang; Yi-Long Wu; Xu-Chao Zhang; She-Juan An; Wen-Zhao Zhong; Ying Huang; Shi-Liang Chen; Hong-Hong Yan; Zhi-Hong Chen; Wei-Bang Guo

    2014-01-01

    As molecular targets continue to be identified and more targeted inhibitors are developed for personalized treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), multigene mutation determination will be needed for routine oncology practice and for clinical trials. In this study, we evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of multigene mutation testing by using the Snapshot assay in NSCLC. We retrospectively reviewed a cohort of 110 consecutive NSCLC specimens for which epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation testing was performed between November 2011 and December 2011 using Sanger sequencing. Using the Snapshot assay, mutation statuses were detected forEGFR, Kirsten rate sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS), phosphoinositide-3-kinase catalytic alpha polypeptide (PIK3CA), v-Raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF), v-ras neuroblastoma viral oncogene homolog (NRAS), dual specificity mitogen activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MEK1), phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) in patient specimens and cellline DNA. Snapshot data were compared to Sanger sequencing data. Of the 110 samples, 51 (46.4%) harbored at least one mutation. The mutation frequency in adenocarcinoma specimens was 55.6%, and the frequencies ofEGFR, KRAS, PIK3CA, PTEN, andMEK1 mutations were 35.5%, 9.1%, 3.6%, 0.9%, and 0.9%, respectively. No mutation was found in theHER2, NRAS, orBRAF genes. Three of the 51 mutant samples harbored double mutations: twoPIK3CA mutations coexisted withKRAS orEGFR mutations, and another KRAS mutation coexisted with aPTEN mutation. Among the 110 samples, 47 were surgical specimens, 60 were biopsy specimens, and 3 were cytological specimens; the corresponding mutation frequencies were 51.1%, 41.7%, and 66.7%, respectively (P = 0.532). Compared to Sanger sequencing, Snapshot specificity was 98.4% and sensitivity was 100% (positive predictive value, 97.9%; negative predictive value, 100%). The Snapshot assay

  1. Determination of EGFR and KRAS mutational status in Greek non-small-cell lung cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    PAPADOPOULOU, EIRINI; TSOULOS, NIKOLAOS; TSIRIGOTI, ANGELIKI; APESSOS, ANGELA; AGIANNITOPOULOS, KONSTANTINOS; METAXA-MARIATOU, VASILIKI; ZAROGOULIDIS, KONSTANTINOS; ZAROGOULIDIS, PAVLOS; KASARAKIS, DIMITRIOS; KAKOLYRIS, STYLIANOS; DAHABREH, JUBRAIL; VLASTOS, FOTIS; ZOUBLIOS, CHARALAMPOS; RAPTI, AGGELIKI; PAPAGEORGIOU, NIKI GEORGATOU; VELDEKIS, DIMITRIOS; GAGA, MINA; ARAVANTINOS, GERASIMOS; KARAVASILIS, VASILEIOS; KARAGIANNIDIS, NAPOLEON; NASIOULAS, GEORGE

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that certain patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that harbor activating somatic mutations within the tyrosine kinase domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene may be effectively treated using targeted therapy. The use of EGFR inhibitors in patient therapy has been demonstrated to improve response and survival rates; therefore, it was suggested that clinical screening for EGFR mutations should be performed for all patients. Numerous clinicopathological factors have been associated with EGFR and Kirsten-rat sarcoma oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutational status including gender, smoking history and histology. In addition, it was reported that EGFR mutation frequency in NSCLC patients was ethnicity-dependent, with an incidence rate of ~30% in Asian populations and ~15% in Caucasian populations. However, limited data has been reported on intra-ethnic differences throughout Europe. The present study aimed to investigate the frequency and spectrum of EGFR mutations in 1,472 Greek NSCLC patients. In addition, KRAS mutation analysis was performed in patients with known smoking history in order to determine the correlation of type and mutation frequency with smoking. High-resolution melting curve (HRM) analysis followed by Sanger sequencing was used to identify mutations in exons 18–21 of the EGFR gene and in exon 2 of the KRAS gene. A sensitive next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology was also employed to classify samples with equivocal results. The use of sensitive mutation detection techniques in a large study population of Greek NSCLC patients in routine diagnostic practice revealed an overall EGFR mutation frequency of 15.83%. This mutation frequency was comparable to that previously reported in other European populations. Of note, there was a 99.8% concordance between the HRM method and Sanger sequencing. NGS was found to be the most sensitive method. In addition, female non-smokers demonstrated a high prevalence of

  2. A comprehensive catalogue of somatic mutations in cancer genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, Errol C

    2010-04-04

    This Hot Topics contribution considers two recently published papers that demonstrate the utility of advanced DNA sequencing technologies for identifying classes of mutations other than base substitutions. Data are presented from genome analyses of immortalized cell lines derived from a malignant melanoma and a small cell carcinoma of the lung. Among other observations the studies suggest the operation of novel DNA repair mechanisms or modes.

  3. Values of mutations of K-ras oncogene at codon 12 in detection of pancreatic cancer:15-year experience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-Qing Mu; You-Shu Peng; Qiao-Jian Xu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To summarize progress in the study of K-ras gene studies in pancreatic cancer and its potential clinical significance in screening test for early detection of pancreatic cancer, and to differentiate pancreatic cancer from chronic pancreatitis in recent decade.METHODS: Literature search (MEDLINE 1986-2003) was performed using the key words K-ras gene, pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis, and diagnosis. Two kind of opposite points of view on the significance of K-ras gene in detection early pancreatic cancer and differentiation pancreatic cancer from chronic pancreatitis were investigated.The presence of a K-ras gene mutation at codon 12 has been seen in 75-100% of pancreatic cancers, and is not rare in patients with chronic pancreatitis, and represents an increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer. However, the significance of the detection of this mutation in specimens obtained by needle aspiration from pure pancreatic juice and from stools for its utilization for the detection of early pancreatic cancer, and differentiation pancreatic cancer from chronic pancreatitis remains controversial. CONCLUSION: The value of K-ras gene mutation for the detection of early pancreatic cancer and differentiation pancreatic cancer from chronic pancreatitis remains uncertains in clinical pratice. Nevertheless, K-ras mutation screening may increase the sensitivity of FNA and ERP cytology and may be useful in identifying pancreatitis patients at high risk for developing cancer, and as a adjunct with cytology to differentiate pancreatic cancer from chronic pancreatitis.

  4. An integrative genomic and proteomic analysis of PIK3CA, PTEN and AKT mutations in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stemke-Hale, Katherine; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria; Lluch, Ana; Neve, Richard M.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Davies, Michael; Carey, Mark; Hu, Zhi; Guan, Yinghui; Sahin, Aysegul; Symmans, W. Fraser; Pusztai, Lajos; Nolden, Laura K.; Horlings, Hugo; Berns, Katrien; Hung, Mien-Chie; van de Vijver, Marc J.; Valero, Vicente; Gray, Joe W.; Bernards, Rene; Mills, Gordon B.; Hennessy, Bryan T.

    2008-05-06

    Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway aberrations are common in cancer. By applying mass spectroscopy-based sequencing and reverse phase protein arrays to 547 human breast cancers and 41 cell lines, we determined the subtype specificity and signaling effects of PIK3CA, AKT and PTEN mutations, and the effects of PIK3CA mutations on responsiveness to PI3K inhibition in-vitro and on outcome after adjuvant tamoxifen. PIK3CA mutations were more common in hormone receptor positive (33.8%) and HER2-positive (24.6%) than in basal-like tumors (8.3%). AKT1 (1.4%) and PTEN (2.3%) mutations were restricted to hormone receptor-positive cancers with PTEN protein levels also being significantly lower in hormone receptor-positive cancers. Unlike AKT1 mutations, PIK3CA (39%) and PTEN (20%) mutations were more common in cell lines than tumors, suggesting a selection for these but not AKT1 mutations during adaptation to culture. PIK3CA mutations did not have a significant impact on outcome in 166 hormone receptor-positive breast cancer patients after adjuvant tamoxifen. PIK3CA mutations, in comparison with PTEN loss and AKT1 mutations, were associated with significantly less and indeed inconsistent activation of AKT and of downstream PI3K/AKT signaling in tumors and cell lines, and PTEN loss and PIK3CA mutation were frequently concordant, suggesting different contributions to pathophysiology. PTEN loss but not PIK3CA mutations rendered cells sensitive to growth inhibition by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Thus, PI3K pathway aberrations likely play a distinct role in the pathogenesis of different breast cancer subtypes. The specific aberration may have implications for the selection of PI3K-targeted therapies in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer.

  5. Germline mutations in MAP3K6 are associated with familial gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Gaston

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is among the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. While heritable forms of gastric cancer are relatively rare, identifying the genes responsible for such cases can inform diagnosis and treatment for both hereditary and sporadic cases of gastric cancer. Mutations in the E-cadherin gene, CDH1, account for 40% of the most common form of familial gastric cancer (FGC, hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC. The genes responsible for the remaining forms of FGC are currently unknown. Here we examined a large family from Maritime Canada with FGC without CDH1 mutations, and identified a germline coding variant (p.P946L in mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 6 (MAP3K6. Based on conservation, predicted pathogenicity and a known role of the gene in cancer predisposition, MAP3K6 was considered a strong candidate and was investigated further. Screening of an additional 115 unrelated individuals with non-CDH1 FGC identified the p.P946L MAP3K6 variant, as well as four additional coding variants in MAP3K6 (p.F849Sfs*142, p.P958T, p.D200Y and p.V207G. A somatic second-hit variant (p.H506Y was present in DNA obtained from one of the tumor specimens, and evidence of DNA hypermethylation within the MAP3K6 gene was observed in DNA from the tumor of another affected individual. These findings, together with previous evidence from mouse models that MAP3K6 acts as a tumor suppressor, and studies showing the presence of somatic mutations in MAP3K6 in non-hereditary gastric cancers and gastric cancer cell lines, point towards MAP3K6 variants as a predisposing factor for FGC.

  6. Mutations and polymorphic BRCA variants transmission in breast cancer familial members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilato, Brunella; Martinucci, Marianna; Danza, Katia; Pinto, Rosamaria; Petriella, Daniela; Lacalamita, Rosanna; Bruno, Michele; Lambo, Rossana; D'Amico, Cosimo; Paradiso, Angelo; Tommasi, Stefania

    2011-02-01

    We previously showed that about 80% of breast cancer patients at high risk to carry mutation in BRCA genes presented at least one polymorphism in these genes which resulted potentially harmful by in silico analysis. In the present paper, the genealogic transmission of those polymorphic coding and noncoding variants of BRCA genes in family's members has been investigated. Thirty families, enrolled within the Genetic Counselling Program of our Institute, with probands and at least one-first degree relative (n = 67 family members) available, have been studied for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 pathological mutation and polymorphic variants' transmission. Ten and 6 probands carried Mendelian transmitted mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, respectively. Polymorphic coding and noncoding variants were transmitted in each family's relatives with a frequency ranging from 42 to 100%, with similar rate for each SNP in mutated and nonmutated families with the only exception of BRCA1 K1183R significantly more frequent in mutated families (P = 0.004); conversely, this SNP and BRCA2 N372H, were more frequently present in breast cancer relatives belonging to families in which pathological BRCA mutations were not present. Furthermore, specific haplotypes were transmitted in all relatives as BRCA1 871Leu-1038Gly, present in both BRCA mutated and nonmutated families, while BRCA2 289His-991Asp-IVS14+53 C>T present only in BRCAX families suggesting the harmful role of these SNPs. In conclusion, analysis of SNPs maps and modality of their transmission could identify further susceptibility markers and provide a basis for a better DNA-based cancer classification.

  7. Common genetic variation at BARD1 is not associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spurdle, A.B.; Marquart, L.; McGuffog, L.; Healey, S.; Sinilnikova, O.; Wan, F.; Chen, X.; Beesley, J.; Singer, C.F.; Dressler, A.C.; Gschwantler-Kaulich, D.; Blum, J.L.; Tung, N.; Weitzel, J.; Lynch, H.; Garber, J.; Easton, D.F.; Peock, S.; Cook, M.; Oliver, C.T.; Frost, D.; Conroy, D.; Evans, D.G.; Lalloo, F.; Eeles, R.; Izatt, L.; Davidson, R.; Chu, C.; Eccles, D.; Selkirk, C.G.; Daly, M.; Isaacs, C.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D.; Sinilnikova, O.M.; Buecher, B.; Belotti, M.; Mazoyer, S.; Barjhoux, L.; Verny-Pierre, C.; Lasset, C.; Dreyfus, H.; Pujol, P.; Collonge-Rame, M.A.; Rookus, M.A.; Verhoef, S.; Kriege, M.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ausems, M.G.; Os, T.A. van; Wijnen, J.; Devilee, P.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.E.; Blok, M.J.; Heikkinen, T.; Nevanlinna, H.; Jakubowska, A.; Lubinski, J.; Huzarski, T.; Byrski, T.; Durocher, F.; Couch, F.J.; Lindor, N.M.; Wang, X.; Thomassen, M.; Domchek, S.; Nathanson, K.; Caligo, M.; Jernstrom, H.; Liljegren, A.; Ehrencrona, H.; Karlsson, P.; Ganz, P.A.; Olopade, O.I.; Tomlinson, G.; Neuhausen, S.; Antoniou, A.C.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Rebbeck, T.R.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inherited BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutations confer elevated breast cancer risk. Knowledge of factors that can improve breast cancer risk assessment in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers may improve personalized cancer prevention strategies. METHODS: A cohort of 5,546 BRCA1 and 2,865 BRCA2 mutat

  8. Mutational analysis of circulating tumor cells from colorectal cancer patients and correlation with primary tumor tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lyberopoulou

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs provide a non-invasive accessible source of tumor material from patients with cancer. The cellular heterogeneity within CTC populations is of great clinical importance regarding the increasing number of adjuvant treatment options for patients with metastatic carcinomas, in order to eliminate residual disease. Moreover, the molecular profiling of these rare cells might lead to insight on disease progression and therapeutic strategies than simple CTCs counting. In the present study we investigated the feasibility to detect KRAS, BRAF, CD133 and Plastin3 (PLS3 mutations in an enriched CTCs cell suspension from patients with colorectal cancer, with the hypothesis that these genes` mutations are of great importance regarding the generation of CTCs subpopulations. Subsequently, we compared CTCs mutational status with that of the corresponding primary tumor, in order to access the possibility of tumor cells characterization without biopsy. CTCs were detected and isolated from blood drawn from 52 colorectal cancer (CRC patients using a quantum-dot-labelled magnetic immunoassay method. Mutations were detected by PCR-RFLP or allele-specific PCR and confirmed by direct sequencing. In 52 patients, discordance between primary tumor and CTCs was 5.77% for KRAS, 3.85% for BRAF, 11.54% for CD133 rs3130, 7.69% for CD133 rs2286455 and 11.54% for PLS3 rs6643869 mutations. Our results support that DNA mutational analysis of CTCs may enable non-invasive, specific biomarker diagnostics and expand the scope of personalized medicine for cancer patients.

  9. Ovarian cancer susceptibility alleles and risk of ovarian cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramus, Susan J; Antoniou, Antonis C; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Soucy, Penny; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Złowocka, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Aalfs, Cora M; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; van Asperen, Christi J; van Roozendaal, K E P; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Collée, J Margriet; Kriege, Mieke; van der Luijt, Rob B; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Jacobs, Chris; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Douglas, Fiona; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E; Kennedy, M John; Pathak, Harsh; Godwin, Andrew K; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Calender, Alain; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Faivre, Laurence; Loustalot, Catherine; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K; John, Esther M; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas v O; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar Th; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Gaudet, Mia M; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Van Le, Linda; Hoffman, James S; Ewart Toland, Amanda; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Issacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Iganacio; Tornero, Eva; Navarro, Matilde; Moysich, Kirsten B; Karlan, Beth Y; Gross, Jenny; Olah, Edith; Vaszko, Tibor; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A; Beattie, Mary S; Dorfling, Cecelia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Diez, Orland; Kwong, Ava; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Fiebig, Britta; Schäfer, Dieter; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Plante, Marie; Spurdle, Amanda B; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan Chun; Wang, Xianshu; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V Shane; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bernard, Loris; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Pharoah, Paul D P; Gayther, Simon A; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F; Couch, Fergus J; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2012-04-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancer. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified six alleles associated with risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated four of these loci as potential modifiers of ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs10088218 (at 8q24), rs2665390 (at 3q25), rs717852 (at 2q31), and rs9303542 (at 17q21), were genotyped in 12,599 BRCA1 and 7,132 BRCA2 carriers, including 2,678 ovarian cancer cases. Associations were evaluated within a retrospective cohort approach. All four loci were associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA2 carriers; rs10088218 per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 0.81 (95% CI: 0.67-0.98) P-trend = 0.033, rs2665390 HR = 1.48 (95% CI: 1.21-1.83) P-trend = 1.8 × 10(-4), rs717852 HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.10-1.42) P-trend = 6.6 × 10(-4), rs9303542 HR = 1.16 (95% CI: 1.02-1.33) P-trend = 0.026. Two loci were associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 carriers; rs10088218 per-allele HR = 0.89 (95% CI: 0.81-0.99) P-trend = 0.029, rs2665390 HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.10-1.42) P-trend = 6.1 × 10(-4). The HR estimates for the remaining loci were consistent with odds ratio estimates for the general population. The identification of multiple loci modifying ovarian cancer risk may be useful for counseling women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations regarding their risk of ovarian cancer.

  10. Changes in mutational status during third-line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Pallisgaard, Niels; Andersen, Rikke Fredslund

    2014-01-01

    KRAS and BRAF mutations are responsible for primary resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) MoAbs in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), but it is unknown what causes wildtype (wt) patients to develop resistance during treatment. We measured circulating free DNA (cfDNA), KRAS...... and BRAF in plasma and report the changes during third line treatment with cetuximab and irinotecan. One-hundred-and-eight patients received irinotecan 350 mg/m2 q3w and weekly cetuximab (250 mg/m2) until progression (RECIST) or unacceptable toxicity. cfDNA and number of mutated KRAS/BRAF alleles in plasma...... different types of mutations detected in the plasma, including synchronous KRAS and BRAF. Twelve patients had a primary KRAS mutant tumor, but wild-type disease according to baseline plasma analysis, eight of these obtained stabilization of disease. In five patients with primary wt disease a mutation...

  11. Distinct Clinicopathological Patterns of Mismatch Repair Status in Colorectal Cancer Stratified by KRAS Mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbin Li

    Full Text Available In sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC, the BRAFV600E mutation is associated with deficient mismatch repair (MMR status and inversely associated with to KRAS mutations. In contrast to deficient MMR (dMMR CRC, data on the presence of KRAS oncogenic mutations in proficient MMR (pMMR CRC and their relationship with tumor progression are scarce. We therefore examined the MMR status in combination with KRAS mutations in 913 Chinese patients and correlated the findings obtained with clinical and pathological features. The MMR status was determined based on detection of MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 expression. KRAS mutation and dMMR status were detected in 36.9% and 7.5% of cases, respectively. Four subtypes were determined by MMR and KRAS mutation status: KRAS (+/pMMR (34.0%, KRAS (+/dMMR (2.9%, KRAS (-/pMMR (58.5% and KRAS (-/dMMR (4.6%. A higher percentage of pMMR tumors with KRAS mutation were most likely to be female (49.0%, proximal located (45.5%, a mucinous histology (38.4%, and to have increased lymph node metastasis (60.3%, compared with pMMR tumors without BRAFV600E and KRAS mutations (36.0%, 29.3%, 29.4% and 50.7%, respectively; all P < 0.01. To the contrary, compared with those with KRAS(-/dMMR tumors, patients with KRAS(+/dMMR tumors demonstrated no statistically significant differences in gender, tumor location, pT depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis, pTNM stage, and histologic grade. This study revealed that specific epidemiologic and clinicopathologic characteristics are associated with MMR status stratified by KRAS mutation. Knowledge of MMR and KRAS mutation status may enhance molecular pathologic staging of CRC patients and metastatic progression in CRC can be estimated based on the combination of these biomarkers.

  12. Timing of oral contraceptive use and the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsopoulos, Joanne; Lubinski, Jan; Moller, Pal; Lynch, Henry T; Singer, Christian F; Eng, Charis; Neuhausen, Susan L; Karlan, Beth; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Huzarski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; McCuaig, Jeanna; Senter, Leigha; Tung, Nadine; Ghadirian, Parviz; Eisen, Andrea; Gilchrist, Dawna; Blum, Joanne L; Zakalik, Dana; Pal, Tuya; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A

    2014-02-01

    It is not clear if early oral contraceptive use increases the risk of breast cancer among young women with a breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) mutation. Given the benefit of oral contraceptives for the prevention of ovarian cancer, estimating age-specific risk ratios for oral contraceptive use and breast cancer is important. We conducted a case-control study of 2,492 matched pairs of women with a deleterious BRCA1 mutation. Breast cancer cases and unaffected controls were matched on year of birth and country of residence. Detailed information about oral contraceptive use was collected from a routinely administered questionnaire. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) for the association between oral contraceptive and breast cancer, by age at first use and by age at diagnosis. Among BRCA1 mutation carriers, oral contraceptive use was significantly associated with an increased risk of breast cancer for women who started the pill prior to age 20 (OR 1.45; 95 % CI 1.20-1.75; P = 0.0001) and possibly between ages 20 and 25 as well (OR 1.19; 95 % CI 0.99-1.42; P = 0.06). The effect was limited to breast cancers diagnosed before age 40 (OR 1.40; 95 % CI 1.14-1.70; P = 0.001); the risk of early-onset breast cancer increased by 11 % with each additional year of pill use when initiated prior to age 20 (OR 1.11; 95 % CI 1.03-1.20; P = 0.008). There was no observed increase for women diagnosed at or after the age of 40 (OR 0.97; 95 % CI 0.79-1.20; P = 0.81). Oral contraceptive use before age 25 increases the risk of early-onset breast cancer among women with a BRCA1 mutation and the risk increases with duration of use. Caution should be taken when advising women with a BRCA1 mutation to take an oral contraceptive prior to age 25.

  13. An effect from anticipation also in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families without identified mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timshel, Susanne; Therkildsen, Christina; Bendahl, Pär-Ola;

    2009-01-01

    Optimal prevention of hereditary cancer is central and requires initiation of surveillance programmes and/or prophylactic measures at a safe age. Anticipation, expressed as an earlier age at onset in successive generations, has been demonstrated in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC...... the Amsterdam criteria for HNPCC and showed normal MMR function and/or lack of disease-predisposing MMR gene mutation. In total, 319 cancers from 212 parent-child pairs in 99 families were identified. A paired t-test and a bivariate statistical model were used to assess anticipation. Both methods demonstrated...

  14. The Splicing Efficiency of Activating HRAS Mutations Can Determine Costello Syndrome Phenotype and Frequency in Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Mette Hartung

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Costello syndrome (CS may be caused by activating mutations in codon 12/13 of the HRAS proto-oncogene. HRAS p.Gly12Val mutations have the highest transforming activity, are very frequent in cancers, but very rare in CS, where they are reported to cause a severe, early lethal, phenotype. We identified an unusual, new germline p.Gly12Val mutation, c.35_36GC>TG, in a 12-year-old boy with attenuated CS. Analysis of his HRAS cDNA showed high levels of exon 2 skipping. Using wild type and mutant HRAS minigenes, we confirmed that c.35_36GC>TG results in exon 2 skipping by simultaneously disrupting the function of a critical Exonic Splicing Enhancer (ESE and creation of an Exonic Splicing Silencer (ESS. We show that this vulnerability of HRAS exon 2 is caused by a weak 3' splice site, which makes exon 2 inclusion dependent on binding of splicing stimulatory proteins, like SRSF2, to the critical ESE. Because the majority of cancer- and CS- causing mutations are located here, they affect splicing differently. Therefore, our results also demonstrate that the phenotype in CS and somatic cancers is not only determined by the different transforming potentials of mutant HRAS proteins, but also by the efficiency of exon 2 inclusion resulting from the different HRAS mutations. Finally, we show that a splice switching oligonucleotide (SSO that blocks access to the critical ESE causes exon 2 skipping and halts proliferation of cancer cells. This unravels a potential for development of new anti-cancer therapies based on SSO-mediated HRAS exon 2 skipping.

  15. Detection of EGFR and KRAS Mutation by Pyrosequencing Analysis in Cytologic Samples of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Eun; Lee, So-Young; Park, Hyung-Kyu; Oh, Seo-Young; Kim, Hee-Joung; Lee, Kye-Young; Kim, Wan-Seop

    2016-08-01

    EGFR and KRAS mutations are two of the most common mutations that are present in lung cancer. Screening and detecting these mutations are of issue these days, and many different methods and tissue samples are currently used to effectively detect these two mutations. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the testing for EGFR and KRAS mutations by pyrosequencing method, and compared the yield of cytology versus histology specimens in a consecutive series of patients with lung cancer. We retrospectively reviewed EGFR and KRAS mutation results of 399 (patients with EGFR mutation test) and 323 patients (patients with KRAS mutation test) diagnosed with lung cancer in Konkuk University Medical Center from 2008 to 2014. Among them, 60 patients had received both EGFR and KRAS mutation studies. We compared the detection rate of EGFR and KRAS tests in cytology, biopsy, and resection specimens. EGFR and KRAS mutations were detected in 29.8% and 8.7% of total patients, and the positive mutation results of EGFR and KRAS were mutually exclusive. The detection rate of EGFR mutation in cytology was higher than non-cytology (biopsy or resection) materials (cytology: 48.5%, non-cytology: 26.1%), and the detection rate of KRAS mutation in cytology specimens was comparable to non-cytology specimens (cytology: 8.3%, non-cytology: 8.7%). We suggest that cytology specimens are good alternatives that can readily substitute tissue samples for testing both EGFR and KRAS mutations. Moreover, pyrosequencing method is highly sensitive in detecting EGFR and KRAS mutations in lung cancer patients.

  16. K-ras genetic mutation and influencing factor analysis for Han and Uygur nationality colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eli, Mayinur; Mollayup, Ablikim; Muattar; Liu, Chao; Zheng, Chao; Bao, Yong-Xing

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the K-ras genetic mutation status in colorectal cancer patients, compare the difference of K-ras genetic mutation rate in Han and Uygur nationality and analyze the influencing factor. 91 cases (52 cases of Han nationality and 39 cases of Uygur nationality) of colorectal biopsy or surgical ablation pathology specimen from the first affiliated hospital of Xinjiang Medical University during January, 2010 to March, 2013 were collected to detect the 12th and 13th code mutation status of K-ras gene exon 2 with pyrosequencing method and compare the difference of K-ras gene mutation rate between Han and Uygur nationality patients. Single factor analysis and multiple factor logistic regression analysis were utilized to analyze the influencing factor for K-ras genetic mutation. 33 cases of patients with K-ras genetic mutation were found from the 91 cases colorectal cancer patients and the total mutation rate was 36.3%. Among them, 24 cases (72.7%) were found with mutation only in the 12th code, 9 cases (27.3%) were found with mutation only in the 13th code and no one case was found with mutation in both the two codes. Mutation rate of the 12th code in the Uygur nationality was significantly higher than that in the Han nationality (P0.05). There were no associativity (P>0.05) between the K-ras genetic mutation and sex, age, smoking history, drinking history, tumor location, macropathology type, differentiation level, staging, invasive depth, lymph nodes transferring and metastasis in colorectal cancer patients (P>0.05). K-ras genetic mutation rate is high in colorectal cancer patients. The mutation rate of 12th code in Uygur nationality is higher than that in Han nationality. There is no significant associativity between K-ras genetic mutation rate and patients' clinical pathology characteristic.

  17. Wide spetcrum mutational analysis of metastatic renal cell cancer: a retrospective next generation sequencing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Gruppioni, Elisa; Massari, Francesco; Giunchi, Francesca; Altimari, Annalisa; Ciccarese, Chiara; Bimbatti, Davide; Scarpa, Aldo; Iacovelli, Roberto; Porta, Camillo; Virinder, Sarhadi; Tortora, Giampaolo; Artibani, Walter; Schiavina, Riccardo; Ardizzoni, Andrea; Brunelli, Matteo; Knuutila, Sakari; Martignoni, Guido

    2017-01-31

    Renal cell cancer (RCC) is characterized by histological and molecular heterogeneity that may account for variable response to targeted therapies. We evaluated retrospectively with a next generation sequencing (NGS) approach using a pre-designed cancer panel the mutation burden of 32 lesions from 22 metastatic RCC patients treated with at least one tyrosine kinase or mTOR inhibitor. We identified mutations in the VHL, PTEN, JAK3, MET, ERBB4, APC, CDKN2A, FGFR3, EGFR, RB1, TP53 genes. Somatic alterations were correlated with response to therapy. Most mutations hit VHL1 (31,8%) followed by PTEN (13,6%), JAK3, FGFR and TP53 (9% each). Eight (36%) patients were wild-type at least for the genes included in the panel.A genotype concordance between primary RCC and its secondary lesion was found in 3/6 cases. Patients were treated with Sorafenib, Sunitinib and Temsirolimus with partial responses in 4 (18,2%) and disease stabilization in 7 (31,8%). Among the 4 partial responders, 1 (25%) was wild-type and 3 (75%) harbored different VHL1 variants. Among the 7 patients with disease stabilization 2 (29%) were wild-type, 2 (29%) PTEN mutated, and single patients (14% each) displayed mutations in VHL1, JAK3 and APC/CDKN2A. Among the 11 non-responders 7 (64%) were wild-type, 2 (18%) were p53 mutated and 2 (18%) VHL1 mutated.No significant associations were found among RCC histotype, mutation variants and response to therapies. In the absence of predictive biomarkers for metastatic RCC treatment, a NGS approach may address single patients to basket clinical trials according to actionable molecular specific alterations.

  18. Prognostic significance of K-Ras mutation rate in metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincenzi, Bruno; Cremolini, Chiara; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Russo, Antonio; Mannavola, Francesco; Perrone, Giuseppe; Pantano, Francesco; Loupakis, Fotios; Rossini, Daniele; Ongaro, Elena; Bonazzina, Erica; Dell'Aquila, Emanuela; Imperatori, Marco; Zoccoli, Alice; Bronte, Giuseppe; De Maglio, Giovanna; Fontanini, Gabriella; Natoli, Clara; Falcone, Alfredo; Santini, Daniele; Onetti-Muda, Andrea; Siena, Salvatore; Tonini, Giuseppe; Aprile, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Activating mutations of K-Ras gene have a well-established role as predictors of resistance to anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients. Their prognostic value is controversial, and no data regarding the prognostic value of mutation rate, defined as the percentage of mutated alleles/tumor sample, are available. We aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of K-Rasmutation rate in a homogenous cohort of mCRC patients receiving first-line doublet plus bevacizumab. Patients and Methods: This retrospective study enrolled 397 K-Ras mutant mCRC patients from 6 Italian centers, and 263 patients were fully evaluable for our analysis. K-Ras mutation rate was assessed by pyrosequencing. Patients with less than 60% of cancer cells in tumor tissue were excluded. No patients received anti-EGFR containing anticancer therapy, at any time. Median mutation rate was 40% and was adopted as cut-off. The primary and secondary endpoints were PFS and OS respectively. Results: At univariate analysis, K-Ras mutation rate higher than 40% was significantly associated with lower PFS (7.3 vs 9.1 months; P < 0.0001) and OS (21 vs 31 months; P = 0.004). A multivariate model adjusted for age at diagnosis, site of origin of tumor tissue (primary vs metastases), referral center, number of metastatic sites, and first-line chemotherapy backbone, showed that K-Ras mutation rate remained a significant predictor of PFS and OS in the whole population. Discussion: Our data demonstrate an association between K-Ras mutation rate and prognosis in mCRC patients treated with bevacizumab-containing first-line therapy. These data deserve to be verified in an independent validation set. PMID:26384309

  19. A Simple Model-Based Approach to Inferring and Visualizing Cancer Mutation Signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Yuichi; Tremmel, Georg; Miyano, Satoru; Stephens, Matthew

    2015-12-01

    Recent advances in sequencing technologies have enabled the production of massive amounts of data on somatic mutations from cancer genomes. These data have led to the detection of characteristic patterns of somatic mutations or "mutation signatures" at an unprecedented resolution, with the potential for new insights into the causes and mechanisms of tumorigenesis. Here we present new methods for modelling, identifying and visualizing such mutation signatures. Our methods greatly simplify mutation signature models compared with existing approaches, reducing the number of parameters by orders of magnitude even while increasing the contextual factors (e.g. the number of flanking bases) that are accounted for. This improves both sensitivity and robustness of inferred signatures. We also provide a new intuitive way to visualize the signatures, analogous to the use of sequence logos to visualize transcription factor binding sites. We illustrate our new method on somatic mutation data from urothelial carcinoma of the upper urinary tract, and a larger dataset from 30 diverse cancer types. The results illustrate several important features of our methods, including the ability of our new visualization tool to clearly highlight the key features of each signature, the improved robustness of signature inferences from small sample sizes, and more detailed inference of signature characteristics such as strand biases and sequence context effects at the base two positions 5' to the mutated site. The overall framework of our work is based on probabilistic models that are closely connected with "mixed-membership models" which are widely used in population genetic admixture analysis, and in machine learning for document clustering. We argue that recognizing these relationships should help improve understanding of mutation signature extraction problems, and suggests ways to further improve the statistical methods. Our methods are implemented in an R package pmsignature (https

  20. Effects of TP53 and PIK3CA mutations in early breast cancer: a matter of co-mutation and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotoula, Vassiliki; Karavasilis, Vasilios; Zagouri, Flora; Kouvatseas, George; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Gogas, Helen; Lakis, Sotiris; Pentheroudakis, George; Bobos, Mattheos; Papadopoulou, Kyriaki; Tsolaki, Eleftheria; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Lazaridis, Georgios; Koutras, Angelos; Aravantinos, Gerasimos; Christodoulou, Christos; Papakostas, Pavlos; Markopoulos, Christos; Zografos, George; Papandreou, Christos; Fountzilas, George

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the outcome of breast cancer (BC) patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy is affected by co-mutated TP53 and PIK3CA according to stromal tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). Paraffin tumors of all clinical subtypes from 1661 patients with operable breast cancer who were treated within 4 adjuvant trials with anthracycline-taxanes chemotherapy were informative for TP53 and PIK3CA mutation status (semiconductor sequencing genotyping) and for stromal TILs density. Disease-free survival (DFS) was examined. TP53 mutations were associated with higher (p TP53-PIK3CA co-mutations (6 % of all tumors) conferred worst DFS (HR 0.59; 95 % CI 0.44-0.79; p = 0.001 for PIK3CA-only). TP53-only mutations were unfavorable in patients with lower TILs, while patients with lower TILs performed worse if their tumors carried TP53-only mutations (interaction p = 0.046). Multivariate analysis revealed favorable PIK3CA-only mutations in non-LPBC (HR 0.64; 95 % CI 0.47-0.88; p = 0.007), and unfavorable TP53 mutations in ER/PgRpos/HER2neg (HR 1.55; 95 % CI 1.07-2.24; p = 0.021). Mutations did not interact with TILs in non-LP triple-negative and HER2-positive patients. TP53 and PIK3CA mutations appear to have diverse effects on the outcome of early BC patients, according to whether these genes are co-mutated or not, and for TP53 according to TILs density and ER/PgR-status. These findings need to be considered when evaluating the effect of these two most frequently mutated genes in the context of large clinical trials.

  1. Screening of 1331 Danish breast and/or ovarian cancer families identified 40 novel BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas V O; Jønson, Lars; Steffensen, Ane Y;

    2011-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in the tumour suppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. Since 1999 we have performed mutational screening of breast and/or ovarian cancer patients in East Denmark. During this period we have identified 40 novel sequence variations in BRCA1...... and BRCA2 in high risk breast and/or ovarian cancer families. The mutations were detected via pre-screening using dHPLC or high-resolution melting and direct sequencing. We identified 16 variants in BRCA1, including 9 deleterious frame-shift mutations, 2 intronic variants, 4 missense mutations, and 1...... synonymous variant. The remaining 24 variants were identified in BRCA2, including 10 deleterious mutants (6 frame-shift and 4 nonsense), 2 intronic variants, 10 missense mutations and 2 synonymous variants. The frequency of the variants of unknown significance was examined in control individuals. Moreover...

  2. A Novel WRN Frameshift Mutation Identified by Multiplex Genetic Testing in a Family with Multiple Cases of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Wang, Guosheng; Zhao, Xinyi; Ye, Song; Shen, Peng; Wang, Weilin; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technology allows simultaneous analysis of multiple susceptibility genes for clinical cancer genetics. In this study, multiplex genetic testing was conducted in a Chinese family with multiple cases of cancer to determine the variations in cancer predisposition genes. The family comprises a mother and her five daughters, of whom the mother and the eldest daughter have cancer and the secondary daughter died of cancer. We conducted multiplex genetic testing of 90 cancer susceptibility genes using the peripheral blood DNA of the mother and all five daughters. WRN frameshift mutation is considered a potential pathogenic variation according to the guidelines of the American College of Medical Genetics. A novel WRN frameshift mutation (p.N1370Tfs*23) was identified in the three cancer patients and in the youngest unaffected daughter. Other rare non-synonymous germline mutations were also detected in DICER and ELAC2. Functional mutations in WRN cause Werner syndrome, a human autosomal recessive disease characterized by premature aging and associated with genetic instability and increased cancer risk. Our results suggest that the WRN frameshift mutation is important in the surveillance of other members of this family, especially the youngest daughter, but the pathogenicity of the novel WRN frameshift mutation needs to be investigated further. Given its extensive use in clinical genetic screening, multiplex genetic testing is a promising tool in clinical cancer surveillance.

  3. PCR-SSCP-DNA sequencing method in detecting PTEN gene mutation and its significance in human gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan-Yong Guo; Xuan-Fu Xu; Jian-Ye Wu; Shu-Fang Liu

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To discuss the possible effect of PTEN gene mutations on occurrence and development of gastric cancer.METHODS: Fifty-three gastric cancer specimens were selected to probe PTEN gene mutations in genome of gastric cancer and paracancerous tissues using PCR-SSCP-DNA sequencing method based on microdissection and to observe the protein expression by immunohistochemistry technique.RESULTS: PCR-SSCP-DNA sequencing indicated that 4 kinds of mutation sites were found in 5 of 53 gastric cancer specimens.One kind of mutation was found in exons.AA-TCC mutation was located at 40bp upstream of 3' lateral exert 7 (115946 AA-TCC).Such mutations led to terminator formation in the 297th codon of the PTEN gene.The other 3 kinds of mutation were found in introns,including a G-C point mutation at 91 bp upstream of 5' lateral exon 5(90896 G-C),a T-G point mutation at 24 bp upstream of 5' lateral exon 5 (90963 T-G),and a single base A mutation at 7 bp upstream of 5' lateral exon 5 (90980 A del).The PTEN protein expression in gastric cancer and paracancerous tissues detected using immunohistochemistry technique indicated that the total positive rate of PTEN protein expression was 66% in gastric cancer tissue,which was significantly lower than that (100%) in paracancerous tissues (P<0.005).CONCLUSION: PTEN gene mutation and expression may play an important role in the occurrence and development of gastric cancer.(C)2008 The WJG Press.All rights reserved.

  4. Mutational analysis of NOTCH1, 2, 3 and 4 genes in common solid cancers and acute leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Hak; Jeong, Eun Goo; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2007-12-01

    NOTCH proteins (NOTCH1, NOTCH2, NOTCH3 and NOTCH4) play crucial roles in embryonic development. Also, mounting evidence indicates that NOTCH contributes to the pathogenesis of hematopoietic and solid malignancies. Recent studies reported a high incidence of gain-of-function mutations of the NOTCH1 gene in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALL). To see whether NOTCH1 mutation occurs in other malignancies, we analyzed NOTCH1 for the detection of somatic mutations in 334 malignancies, including 48 lung, 48 breast, 48 colorectal and 48 gastric carcinomas, and 142 acute leukemias (105 acute myelogenous leukemias, 32 B-ALLs and 4 T-ALLs) by single-strand conformation polymorphism assay. Also, to see whether other NOTCH genes harbor somatic mutations, we analyzed NOTCH2, NOTCH3 and NOTCH4 genes in the same tissue samples. Overall, we detected three NOTCH mutations in the cancers, which consisted of one NOTCH1 mutation in the T-ALLs (25.0%), one NOTCH2 mutation in the breast carcinomas (2.1%), and one NOTCH3 mutation in the colorectal carcinomas (2.0%). There was no NOTCH mutation in other malignancies analyzed. Our data indicate that NOTCH1 is mutated in T-ALL, but not in other common human cancers, and that NOTCH2, NOTCH3 and NOTH4 genes are rarely mutated in common human cancers. Despite the importance of NOTCH activation in many types of human cancers, mutation of NOTCH genes, except for NOTCH1 mutation in T-ALL, may not play an important role in the tumorigenesis of common cancers.

  5. Global Characterization of Protein-Altering Mutations in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Abnormalities Strongly Correlate with Changes at the Expression Level and Suggest Functional Interactions between AR, PTEN and TMPRSS2/ ERG Chaux et...prostate cancer. J Urol 170: 1817–1821. 34. Chaux A, Albadine R, Toubaji A, Hicks J, Meeker A, et al. (2011) Immunohistochemistry for ERG expression

  6. FBXW7 mutations in patients with advanced cancers: clinical and molecular characteristics and outcomes with mTOR inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis L Jardim

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: FBXW7 is a tumor suppressor gene responsible for the degradation of several proto-oncogenes. Preclinical data suggest that FBXW7 mutations sensitize cells to mTOR inhibitors. Clinicopathologic characteristics of cancer patients with FBXW7 mutations and their responses to mTOR inhibitors remain unknown. METHODS: Using multiplex gene panels we evaluated how the FBXW7 mutation affected the cancer phenotype of patients referred to a phase I clinic starting January 2012. Whenever possible patients positive for FBXW7 mutation were treated with regimens containing an mTOR inhibitors and their outcomes were reviewed. RESULTS: FBXW7 mutations were detected in 17 of 418 patients (4.0%. Among tumor types with more than 10 patients tested, FBXW7 mutations occurred in colorectal cancer (7/49; 14.3%, squamous cell cancer of head and neck (2/18; 11.1%, liver (1/13; 7.7%, and ovarian cancers (1/40; 2.5%. No one clinical, pathological or demographic feature was characteristic of the FBXW7-mutated patient population. The mutation occurred in isolation in only 2/17 (12% patients, and KRAS was frequently found as a concomitant mutation, especially in patients with colorectal cancer (6/7; 86%. Ten patients were treated on a protocol containing an mTOR inhibitor, with a median time to treatment failure of 2.8 months (range, 1.3-6.8. One patient with liver cancer (fibrolamellar subtype continues to have a prolonged stable disease for 6.8+ months. CONCLUSION: In patients with advanced cancers, somatic mutations in FBXW7 usually occur with other simultaneous molecular aberrations, which can contribute to limited therapeutic efficacy of mTOR inhibitors.

  7. KRAS mutational status as a predictor of epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor efficacy in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baynes, Roy D; Gansert, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitors of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have demonstrated promising potential in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer. However, a proportion of patients do not respond to therapy with EGFR inhibitors, and therefore, there has been interest in identifying those patients most likely to benefit from therapy with these agents. KRAS, a member of the RAS family of signaling proteins, plays an important role in EGFR-mediated regulation of cellular proliferation and survival. Although there is still some debate regarding the prognostic importance of KRAS mutations in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, several recent phase 2 and 3 studies have identified the presence of mutations at codons 12 and 13 of KRAS as predictors of poor response to the anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies panitumumab and cetuximab. Patients with wild-type KRAS were found to have significantly better progression-free survival, overall survival, and/or objective response rate compared with patients harboring KRAS mutations. As a result, there has been growing interest in the development of KRAS mutational status as a biomarker for predicting patient response to EGFR-targeted therapy. Screening colorectal tumors for the absence of KRAS mutations may help identify patients most likely to benefit from anti-EGFR therapies.

  8. Are KRAS/BRAF mutations potent prognostic and/or predictive biomarkers in colorectal cancers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Tomoya

    2012-02-01

    KRAS and BRAF mutations lead to the constitutive activation of EGFR signaling through the oncogenic Ras/Raf/Mek/Erk pathway. Currently, KRAS is the only potential biomarker for predicting the efficacy of anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies (mAb) in colorectal cancer (CRC). However, a recent report suggested that the use of cetuximab was associated with survival benefit among patients with p.G13D-mutated tumors. Furthermore, although the presence of mutated BRAF is one of the most powerful prognostic factors for advanced and recurrent CRC, it remains unknown whether patients with BRAF-mutated tumors experience a survival benefit from treatment with anti-EGFR mAb. Thus, the prognostic or predictive relevance of the KRAS and BRAF genotype in CRC remains controversial despite several investigations. Routine KRAS/BRAF screening of pathological specimens is required to promote the appropriate clinical use of anti-EGFR mAb and to determine malignant phenotypes in CRC. The significance of KRAS/BRAF mutations as predictive or prognostic biomarkers should be taken into consideration when selecting a KRAS/BRAF screening assay. This article will review the spectrum of KRAS/BRAF genotype and the impact of KRAS/BRAF mutations on the clinicopathological features and prognosis of patients with CRC, particularly when differentiating between the mutations at KRAS codons 12 and 13. Furthermore, the predictive role of KRAS/BRAF mutations in treatments with anti-EGFR mAb will be verified, focusing on KRAS p.G13D and BRAF mutations.

  9. A novel fully automated molecular diagnostic system (AMDS for colorectal cancer mutation detection.

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    Shiro Kitano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA mutations are frequently observed in colorectal cancer (CRC. In particular, KRAS mutations are strong predictors for clinical outcomes of EGFR-targeted treatments such as cetuximab and panitumumab in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC. For mutation analysis, the current methods are time-consuming, and not readily available to all oncologists and pathologists. We have developed a novel, simple, sensitive and fully automated molecular diagnostic system (AMDS for point of care testing (POCT. Here we report the results of a comparison study between AMDS and direct sequencing (DS in the detection of KRAS, BRAF and PI3KCA somatic mutations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: DNA was extracted from a slice of either frozen (n = 89 or formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE CRC tissue (n = 70, and then used for mutation analysis by AMDS and DS. All mutations (n = 41 among frozen and 27 among FFPE samples detected by DS were also successfully (100% detected by the AMDS. However, 8 frozen and 6 FFPE samples detected as wild-type in the DS analysis were shown as mutants in the AMDS analysis. By cloning-sequencing assays, these discordant samples were confirmed as true mutants. One sample had simultaneous "hot spot" mutations of KRAS and PIK3CA, and cloning assay comfirmed that E542K and E545K were not on the same allele. Genotyping call rates for DS were 100.0% (89/89 and 74.3% (52/70 in frozen and FFPE samples, respectively, for the first attempt; whereas that of AMDS was 100.0% for both sample sets. For automated DNA extraction and mutation detection by AMDS, frozen tissues (n = 41 were successfully detected all mutations within 70 minutes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: AMDS has superior sensitivity and accuracy over DS, and is much easier to execute than conventional labor intensive manual mutation analysis. AMDS has great potential for POCT equipment for mutation analysis.

  10. Dietary folate intake and K-ras mutations in sporadic colon and rectal cancer in the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, M.; Weijenberg, M.P.; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Roemen, G.M.J.M.; Lentjes, M.H.F.M.; Bruïne, A.P. de; Engeland, M. van; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2005-01-01

    We studied the association between dietary folate and specific K-ras mutations in colon and rectal cancer in The Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer. After 7.3 years of follow-up, 448 colon and 160 rectal cancer patients and 3,048 sub-cohort members (55-69 years at baseline) were available f

  11. Human papillomavirus type 16 and TP53 mutation in oral cancer: matched analysis of the IARC multicenter study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dai, M; Clifford, GM; Calvez, F le; Castellsague, X; Snijders, P.J.F.; Pawlita, M; Herrero, R; Hainaut, P; Franceschi, S

    2004-01-01

    TP53 mutations were analyzed in 35 human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 DNA-positive cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx and in 35 HPV DNA-negative cancers matched by subsite, country, sex, age, and tobacco and alcohol consumption. Wild-type TP53 was found more frequently in cancer specimens tha

  12. Breast cancer screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers after risk reducing salpingo-oophorectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fakkert, I.E.; Jansen, L.; Meijer, K.; Kok, Theo; Oosterwijk, J.C.; Mourits, M.J.E.; de Bock, G.H.

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer screening is offered to BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers from the age of 25 years because of their increased risk of breast cancer. As ovarian cancer screening is not effective, risk-reducing salpingho-oophorectomy (RRSO) is offered after child bearing age. RRSO before menopause reduc

  13. Frequent alteration of MLL3 frameshift mutations in microsatellite deficient colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Watanabe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MLL3 is a histone 3-lysine 4 methyltransferase with tumor-suppressor properties that belongs to a family of chromatin regulator genes potentially altered in neoplasia. Mutations in MLL3 were found in a whole genome analysis of colorectal cancer but have not been confirmed by a separate study. METHODS AND RESULTS: We analyzed mutations of coding region and promoter methylation in MLL3 using 126 cases of colorectal cancer. We found two isoforms of MLL3 and DNA sequencing revealed frameshift and other mutations affecting both isoforms of MLL3 in colorectal cancer cells and 19 of 134 (14% primary colorectal samples analyzed. Moreover, frameshift mutations were more common in cases with microsatellite instability (31% both in CRC cell lines and primary tumors. The largest isoform of MLL3 is transcribed from a CpG island-associated promoter that has highly homology with a pseudo-gene on chromosome 22 (psiTPTE22. Using an assay which measured both loci simultaneously we found prominent age related methylation in normal colon (from 21% in individuals less than 25 years old to 56% in individuals older than 70, R = 0.88, p<0.001 and frequent hypermethylation (83% in both CRC cell lines and primary tumors. We next studied the two loci separately and found that age and cancer related methylation was solely a property of the pseudogene CpG island and that the MLL3 loci was unmethylated. CONCLUSIONS: We found that frameshift mutations of MLL3 in both CRC cells and primary tumor that were more common in cases with microsatellite instability. Moreover, we have shown CpG island-associated promoter of MLL3 gene has no DNA methylation in CRC cells but also primary tumor and normal colon, and this region has a highly homologous of pseudo gene (psiTPTE22 that was age relate DNA methylation.

  14. Specific point mutations in key redox enzymes are associated with chemoresistance in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Nicole M; Belotte, Jimmy; Saed, Mohammed G; Memaj, Ira; Diamond, Michael P; Morris, Robert T; Saed, Ghassan M

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathophysiology of ovarian cancer. Resistance to chemotherapy presents a significant challenge for ovarian cancer treatment. Specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in key redox enzymes have been associated with ovarian cancer survival and progression. The objective of this study was to determine whether chemotherapy induces point mutations in key redox enzymes that lead to the acquisition of chemoresistance in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Human EOC cell lines and their chemoresistant counterpart were utilized for this study. Specific SNPs in key redox enzymes were analyzed by TaqMan SNP Genotyping. Activities and levels of key redox enzymes were determined by real-time RT-PCR, ELISA and a greiss assay. Point mutations in key redox enzymes were introduced into sensitive EOC cells via the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Cell viability and IC50 for cisplatin were determined by the MTT Cell Proliferation Assay. Data was analyzed with SPSS using Student's two-tailed t-tests and One-way ANOVA followed by Dunnett's or Tukey's post hoc tests, penhancement in oxidative stress as compared to sensitive counterparts. Additionally, chemoresistant EOC cells manifested specific point mutations, which are associated with altered enzymatic activity, in key redox enzymes that are not detected in sensitive counterparts. Supplementation of an antioxidant was able to successfully sensitize EOC cells to chemotherapeutics. Causality was established by the induction of these point mutations in sensitive EOC cells, which resulted in a significant increase in the level of chemoresistance. These findings indicate that chemotherapy induces specific point mutations in key redox enzymes that contribute to the acquisition of chemoresistance in EOC cells, highlighting a potential novel mechanism. Identification of targets for chemoresistance with either biomarker and/or screening potential will have a significant impact for the treatment of this

  15. Association of the germline TP53 R337H mutation with breast cancer in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivastava Kumar

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The germline TP53-R337H mutation is strongly associated with pediatric adrenocortical tumors (ACT in southern Brazil; it has low penetrance and limited tissue specificity in most families and therefore is not associated with Li-Fraumeni syndrome. However, other tumor types, mainly breast cancer, have been observed in carriers of several unrelated kindreds, raising the possibility that the R337H mutation may also contribute to breast tumorigenesis in a genetic background-specific context. Methods We conducted a case-control study to determine the prevalence of the R337H mutation by sequencing TP53 exon 10 in 123 women with breast cancer and 223 age- and sex-matched control subjects from southern Brazil. Fisher's test was used to compare the prevalence of the R337H. Results The R337H mutation was found in three patients but in none of the controls (p = 0.0442. Among the carriers, two had familial history of cancer meeting the Li-Fraumeni-like criteria. Remarkably, tumors in each of these three cases underwent loss of heterozygosity by eliminating the mutant TP53 allele rather than the wild-type allele. Polymorphisms were identified within the TP53 (R72P and Ins16 and MDM2 (SNP309 genes that may further diminish TP53 tumor suppressor activity. Conclusion These results demonstrate that the R337H mutation can significantly increase the risk of breast cancer in carriers, which likely depends on additional cooperating genetic factors. These findings are also important for understanding how low-penetrant mutant TP53 alleles can differentially influence tumor susceptibility.

  16. Mutation Screening of 1,237 Cancer Genes across Six Model Cell Lines of Basal-Like Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonor Olsson

    Full Text Available Basal-like breast cancer is an aggressive subtype generally characterized as poor prognosis and lacking the expression of the three most important clinical biomarkers, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2. Cell lines serve as useful model systems to study cancer biology in vitro and in vivo. We performed mutational profiling of six basal-like breast cancer cell lines (HCC38, HCC1143, HCC1187, HCC1395, HCC1954, and HCC1937 and their matched normal lymphocyte DNA using targeted capture and next-generation sequencing of 1,237 cancer-associated genes, including all exons, UTRs and upstream flanking regions. In total, 658 somatic variants were identified, of which 378 were non-silent (average 63 per cell line, range 37-146 and 315 were novel (not present in the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer database; COSMIC. 125 novel mutations were confirmed by Sanger sequencing (59 exonic, 48 3'UTR and 10 5'UTR, 1 splicing, with a validation rate of 94% of high confidence variants. Of 36 mutations previously reported for these cell lines but not detected in our exome data, 36% could not be detected by Sanger sequencing. The base replacements C/G>A/T, C/G>G/C, C/G>T/A and A/T>G/C were significantly more frequent in the coding regions compared to the non-coding regions (OR 3.2, 95% CI 2.0-5.3, P<0.0001; OR 4.3, 95% CI 2.9-6.6, P<0.0001; OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.8-3.1, P<0.0001; OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.2-2.7, P = 0.024, respectively. The single nucleotide variants within the context of T[C]T/A[G]A and T[C]A/T[G]A were more frequent in the coding than in the non-coding regions (OR 3.7, 95% CI 2.2-6.1, P<0.0001; OR 3.8, 95% CI 2.0-7.2, P = 0.001, respectively. Copy number estimations were derived from the targeted regions and correlated well to Affymetrix SNP array copy number data (Pearson correlation 0.82 to 0.96 for all compared cell lines; P<0.0001. These mutation calls across 1,237 cancer-associated genes and identification of novel variants will aid in

  17. BRCA mutations cause reduction in miR-200c expression in triple negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erturk, Elif; Cecener, Gulsah; Tezcan, Gulcin; Egeli, Unal; Tunca, Berrin; Gokgoz, Sehsuvar; Tolunay, Sahsine; Tasdelen, Ismet

    2015-02-10

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is the most aggressive and poorly understood subclass of breast cancer (BC). Over the recent years, miRNA expression studies have been providing certain detailed overview that aberrant expression of miRNAs is associated with TNBC. Although TNBC tumors are strongly connected with loss of function of BRCA genes, there is no knowledge about the effect of BRCA mutation status on miRNA expressions in TNBC cases. The aims of this study were to evaluate the expression profile of miRNAs that plays role in TNBC progression and the role of BRCA mutations in their regulation. The expression level of BC associated 13 miRNAs was analyzed in 7 BRCA mutations positive, 6 BRCA mutations negative TNBC cases and 20 non-tumoral tissues using RT-PCR. According to RT2 Profiler PCR Array Data Analysis, let-7a expression was 4.67 fold reduced in TNBCs as compared to normal tissues (P=0.031). In addition, miR-200c expression was 5.75 fold reduced in BRCA mutation positive TNBC tumors (P=0.005). Analysis revealed a negative correlation between miR-200c and VEGFA expressions (r=-468). Thus, miR-200c may be involved in invasion and metastasis in TNBC cases with BRCA mutation. In this study we provide the knowledge on the first report of association between microRNA-200c and BRCA mutations in TNBC. Further studies and evaluations are required, but this miRNA may provide novel therapeutic molecular targets for TNBC treatment and new directions for the development of anticancer drugs.

  18. Simultaneous DNA and RNA mapping of somatic mitochondrial mutations across diverse human cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stewart, James B.; Alaei-Mahabadi, Babak; Radhakrishnan, Sabarinathan;

    2015-01-01

    -coupled errors as the major source of mutations. Interestingly, while allelic ratios in general were consistent in RNA compared to DNA, some mutations in tRNAs displayed strong allelic imbalances caused by accumulation of unprocessed tRNA precursors. The effect was explained by altered secondary structure......, demonstrating that correct tRNA folding is a major determinant for processing of polycistronic mitochondrial transcripts. Additionally, the data suggest that tRNA clusters are preferably processed in the 3' to 5' direction. Our study gives insights into mtDNA function in cancer and answers questions regarding...... mitochondrial tRNA biogenesis that are difficult to address in controlled experimental systems....

  19. The Emerging Mutational Landscape of G-proteins and G-protein Coupled Receptors in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    O’Hayre, Morgan; Vázquez-Prado, José; Kufareva, Irina; Stawiski, Eric W.; Handel, Tracy M.; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Gutkind, J. Silvio

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant expression and activity of G proteins and G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are frequently associated with tumorigenesis. Deep sequencing studies show that 4.2% of tumors carry activating mutations in GNAS (encoding Gαs), and that oncogenic activating mutants in genes encoding Gαq family members (GNAQ or GNA11) are present in ~66% and ~6% of melanomas arising in the eye and skin, respectively. Furthermore, nearly 20% of human tumors harbor mutations in GPCRs. Many human cancer-asso...

  20. Exomic Sequencing of Medullary Thyroid Cancer Reveals Dominant and Mutually Exclusive Oncogenic Mutations in RET and RAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yuchen; Sausen, Mark; Leary, Rebecca; Bettegowda, Chetan; Roberts, Nicholas J.; Bhan, Sheetal; Ho, Allen S.; Khan, Zubair; Bishop, Justin; Westra, William H.; Wood, Laura D.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Tufano, Ralph P.; Robinson, Bruce; Dralle, Henning; Toledo, Sergio P. A.; Toledo, Rodrigo A.; Morris, Luc G. T.; Ghossein, Ronald A.; Fagin, James A.; Chan, Timothy A.; Velculescu, Victor E.; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Nelkin, Barry D.; Ball, Douglas W.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is a rare thyroid cancer that can occur sporadically or as part of a hereditary syndrome. Objective: To explore the genetic origin of MTC, we sequenced the protein coding exons of approximately 21,000 genes in 17 sporadic MTCs. Patients and Design: We sequenced the exomes of 17 sporadic MTCs and validated the frequency of all recurrently mutated genes and other genes of interest in an independent cohort of 40 MTCs comprised of both sporadic and hereditary MTC. Results: We discovered 305 high-confidence mutations in the 17 sporadic MTCs in the discovery phase, or approximately 17.9 somatic mutations per tumor. Mutations in RET, HRAS, and KRAS genes were identified as the principal driver mutations in MTC. All of the other additional somatic mutations, including mutations in spliceosome and DNA repair pathways, were not recurrent in additional tumors. Tumors without RET, HRAS, or KRAS mutations appeared to have significantly fewer mutations overall in protein coding exons. Conclusions: Approximately 90% of MTCs had mutually exclusive mutations in RET, HRAS, and KRAS, suggesting that RET and RAS are the predominant driver pathways in MTC. Relatively few mutations overall and no commonly recurrent driver mutations other than RET, HRAS, and KRAS were seen in the MTC exome. PMID:23264394

  1. [Clinical significance and distribution of BRCA genes mutation in sporadic high grade serous ovarian cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W L; Wang, Z Z; Zhao, J Z; Hou, Y Y; Wu, X X; Li, W; Dong, B; Tong, T T; Guo, Y J

    2017-01-25

    Objective: To investigate the mutations of BRCA genes in sporadic high grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) and study its clinical significance. Methods: Sixty-eight patients between January 2015 and January 2016 from the Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Zhengzhou University were collected who were based on pathological diagnosis of ovarian cancer and had no reported family history, and all patients firstly hospitalized were untreated in other hospitals before. (1) The BRCA genes were detected by next-generation sequencing (NGS) method. (2) The serum tumor markers included carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), CA(125), CA(199), and human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) were detected by the chemiluminescence methods, and their correlation was analyzed by Pearson linear correlation. Descriptive statistics and comparisons were performed using two-tailed t-tests, Pearson's chi square test, Fisher's exact tests or logistic regression analysis as appropriate to research the clinicopathologic features associated with BRCA mutations, including age, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage, platinum-based chemotherapy sensitivity, distant metastases, serum tumor markers (STM) . Results: (1) Fifteen cases (22%, 15/68) BRCA mutations were identified (BRCA1: 11 cases; BRCA2: 4 cases), and four novel mutations were observed. (2) The levels of CEA, CA(199), and HE4 were lower in BRCA mutations compared to that in control group, while no significant differences were found (P>0.05), but the level of CA(125) was much higher in BRCA mutation group than that in controls (t=-3.536, P=0.003). Further linear regression analysis found that there was a significant linear correlation between CA(125) and HE4 group (r=0.494, PBRCA(+) and BRCA(-) group (P>0.05), while significant differences were found in CA(125) and sensitivity to platinum-based chemotherapy between the patients with BRCA mutation and wild type (PBRCA mutations in sporadic HGSOC (P=0.007). Conclusion: The

  2. EphB6 overexpression and Apc mutation together promote colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dan; Yuan, Liang; Liu, Xin; Li, Mingqi; Zhang, Fubin; Gu, Xin Yue; Zhang, Dongwei; Yang, Youlin; Cui, Binbin; Tong, Jinxue; Zhou, Jin; Yu, Zhiwei

    2016-05-24

    The erythropoietin-producing hepatocyte (Eph) family tyrosine kinases play important roles in tumorigenesis and cancer aggression. In this study, we investigated the role of EphB6 in oncogenic transformation of colorectal epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. EphB6 is upregulated in human colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues as compared to normal tissues, and its overexpression promotes proliferation, migration and invasion by IMCE colorectal adenoma cells, in which one Apc allele is mutated. EphB6 overexpression together with Apc mutation leads to the development of colorectal tumors in vivo. Expression microarrays using mRNAs and lncRNAs isolated from EphB6-overexpresssing IMCE and control cells revealed a large number of dysregulated genes involved in cancer-related functions and pathways. The present study is the first to demonstrate that EphB6 overexpression together with Apc gene mutations may enhance proliferation, invasion and metastasis by colorectal epithelial cells. Microarray data and pathway analysis of differentially expressed genes provided insight into possible EphB6-regulated mechanisms promoting tumorigenesis and cancer progression. EphB6 overexpression may represent a novel, effective biomarker predictive of cell proliferation, invasion and metastasis patterns in CRC tumors.

  3. Risk of cancer by ATM missense mutations in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dombernowsky, Sarah Louise; Weischer, Maren; Allin, Kristine Højgaard;

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: Truncating and missense mutations in the ATM gene, which cause insufficient DNA damage surveillance, allow damaged cells to proceed into mitosis, which eventually results in increased cancer susceptibility. We tested the hypotheses that ATM Ser49Cys and ATM Ser707Pro heterozygosity......: Multifactorially adjusted hazard ratios for ATM Ser49Cys heterozygotes versus noncarriers were 1.2 (95% CI, 0.9 to 1.5) for cancer overall, 0.8 (95% CI, 0.3 to 2.0) for breast cancer, 4.8 (95% CI, 2.2 to 11) for melanoma, 2.3 (95% CI, 1.1 to 5.0) for prostate cancer, and 3.4 (95% CI, 1.1 to 11) for cancer...... increase the risk of cancer overall, of breast cancer, and of 26 other cancer subtypes in the general population. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We genotyped 10,324 individuals from the Danish general population who were observed prospectively for 36 years, during which 2,056 developed cancer. RESULTS...

  4. Epidemiology of doublet/multiplet mutations in lung cancers: evidence that a subset arises by chronocoordinate events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenbin Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Evidence strongly suggests that spontaneous doublet mutations in normal mouse tissues generally arise from chronocoordinate events. These chronocoordinate mutations sometimes reflect "mutation showers", which are multiple chronocoordinate mutations spanning many kilobases. However, little is known about mutagenesis of doublet and multiplet mutations (domuplets in human cancer. Lung cancer accounts for about 25% of all cancer deaths. Herein, we analyze the epidemiology of domuplets in the EGFR and TP53 genes in lung cancer. The EGFR gene is an oncogene in which doublets are generally driver plus driver mutations, while the TP53 gene is a tumor suppressor gene with a more typical situation in which doublets derive from a driver and passenger mutation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: EGFR mutations identified by sequencing were collected from 66 published papers and our updated EGFR mutation database (www.egfr.org. TP53 mutations were collected from IARC version 12 (www-p53.iarc.fr. For EGFR and TP53 doublets, no clearly significant differences in race, ethnicity, gender and smoking status were observed. Doublets in the EGFR and TP53 genes in human lung cancer are elevated about eight- and three-fold, respectively, relative to spontaneous doublets in mouse (6% and 2.3% versus 0.7%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Although no one characteristic is definitive, the aggregate properties of doublet and multiplet mutations in lung cancer are consistent with a subset derived from chronocoordinate events in the EGFR gene: i the eight frameshift doublets (present in 0.5% of all patients with EGFR mutations are clustered and produce a net in-frame change; ii about 32% of doublets are very closely spaced (< or =30 nt; and iii multiplets contain two or more closely spaced mutations. TP53 mutations in lung cancer are very closely spaced (< or =30 nt in 33% of doublets, and multiplets generally contain two or more very closely spaced mutations. Work in

  5. Consensus for EGFR mutation testing in non-small cell lung cancer: results from a European workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirker, Robert; Herth, Felix J F; Kerr, Keith M;

    2010-01-01

    Activating somatic mutations of the tyrosine kinase domain of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have recently been characterized in a subset of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients harboring these mutations in their tumors show excellent response to EGFR...... tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs). The EGFR-TKI gefitinib has been approved in Europe for the treatment of adult patients with locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC with activating mutations of the EGFR TK. Because EGFR mutation testing is not yet well established across Europe, biomarker......-directed therapy only slowly emerges for the subset of NSCLC patients most likely to benefit: those with EGFR mutations....

  6. The spatial regulation of meiotic recombination hotspots: are all DSB hotspots crossover hotspots?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrentino, Maria-Elisabetta; Borde, Valérie

    2012-07-15

    A key step for the success of meiosis is programmed homologous recombination, during which crossovers, or exchange of chromosome arms, take place. Crossovers increase genetic diversity but their main function is to ensure accurate chromosome segregation. Defects in crossover number and position produce aneuploidies that represent the main cause of miscarriages and chromosomal abnormalities such as Down's syndrome. Recombination is initiated by the formation of programmed double strand breaks (DSBs), which occur preferentially at places called DSB hotspots. Among all DSBs generated, only a small fraction is repaired by crossover, the other being repaired by other homologous recombination pathways. Crossover maps have been generated in a number of organisms, defining crossover hotspots. With the availability of genome-wide maps of DSBs as well as the ability to measure genetically the repair outcome at several hotspots, it is becoming more and more clear that not all DSB hotspots behave the same for crossover formation, suggesting that chromosomal features distinguish different types of hotspots.

  7. Breast ductal carcinoma in situ carry mutational driver events representative of invasive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Jia-Min B; Savas, Peter; Fellowes, Andrew P; Mir Arnau, Gisela; Kader, Tanjina; Vedururu, Ravikiran; Hewitt, Chelsee; Takano, Elena A; Byrne, David J; Choong, David Yh; Millar, Ewan Ka; Lee, C Soon; O'Toole, Sandra A; Lakhani, Sunil R; Cummings, Margaret C; Mann, G Bruce; Campbell, Ian G; Dobrovic, Alexander; Loi, Sherene; Gorringe, Kylie L; Fox, Stephen B

    2017-03-24

    The spectrum of genomic alterations in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is relatively unexplored, but is likely to provide useful insights into its biology, its progression to invasive carcinoma and the risk of recurrence. DCIS (n=20) with a range of phenotypes was assessed by massively parallel sequencing for mutations and copy number alterations and variants validated by Sanger sequencing. PIK3CA mutations were identified in 11/20 (55%), TP53 mutations in 6/20 (30%), and GATA3 mutations in 9/20 (45%). Screening an additional 91 cases for GATA3 mutations identified a final frequency of 27% (30/111), with a high proportion of missense variants (8/30). TP53 mutations were exclusive to high grade DCIS and more frequent in PR-negative tumors compared with PR-positive tumors (P=0.037). TP53 mutant tumors also had a significantly higher fraction of the genome altered by copy number than wild-type tumors (P=0.005), including a significant positive association with amplification or gain of ERBB2 (P<0.05). The association between TP53 mutation and ERBB2 amplification was confirmed in a wider DCIS cohort using p53 immunohistochemistry as a surrogate marker for TP53 mutations (P=0.03). RUNX1 mutations and MAP2K4 copy number loss were novel findings in DCIS. Frequent copy number alterations included gains on 1q, 8q, 17q, and 20q and losses on 8p, 11q, 16q, and 17p. Patterns of genomic alterations observed in DCIS were similar to those previously reported for invasive breast cancers, with all DCIS having at least one bona fide breast cancer driver event. However, an increase in GATA3 mutations and fewer copy number changes were noted in DCIS compared with invasive carcinomas. The role of such alterations as prognostic and predictive biomarkers in DCIS is an avenue for further investigation.Modern Pathology advance online publication, 24 March 2017; doi:10.1038/modpathol.2017.21.

  8. Prevalence of an inherited cancer predisposition syndrome associated with the germ line TP53 R337H mutation in Paraguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legal, Edith Falcon-de; Ascurra, Marta; Custódio, Gislaine; Ayala, Horacio Legal; Monteiro, Magna; Vega, Celeste; Fernández-Nestosa, María José; Vega, Sonia; Sade, Elis R; Coelho, Izabel M M; Ribeiro, Enilze M S F; Cavalli, Iglenir J; Figueiredo, Bonald C

    2015-04-01

    The tumor suppressor gene TP53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancer, and the germline TP53 R337H mutation is the most common mutation reported to date. However, this mutation is associated with a lower cumulative lifetime cancer risk than other mutations in the p53 DNA-binding domain. A detailed statistical analysis of 171,500 DNA tests in Brazilian neonates found that 0.27% of the general population is positive for this mutation, and some of the estimated 200,000 Brazilian R337H carriers in southern and southeastern Brazil have already developed cancer. The present study was designed to estimate R337H prevalence in neighboring Paraguay. To address this question, 10,000 dried blood samples stored in Guthrie cards since 2008 were randomly selected from the Paraguayan municipalities located at the border with Brazil. These samples were tested for R337H mutation using the PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. This germline mutation was detected in five samples (5/10,000), indicating that the total number of R337H carriers in Paraguay may be as high as 3500. Previous studies have shown that other countries (i.e., Portugal, Spain, and Germany) presented one family with this mutation, leading us to conclude that, besides Brazil and Paraguay, other countries may have multiple families carrying this mutation, which is an inherited syndrome that is difficult to control.

  9. Somatic mutational analysis of FAK in breast cancer: A novel gain-of-function mutation due to deletion of exon 33

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Xu-Qian [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai JiaoTong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Liu, Xiang-Fan [Faculty of Medical Laboratory Science, Shanghai JiaoTong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Yao, Ling [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai JiaoTong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Chen, Chang-Qiang; Gu, Zhi-Dong [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai JiaoTong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Ni, Pei-Hua [Faculty of Medical Laboratory Science, Shanghai JiaoTong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Zheng, Xin-Min [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai JiaoTong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Fan, Qi-Shi, E-mail: qishifan@126.com [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai JiaoTong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China)

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •A novel FAK splicing mutation identified in breast tumor. •FAK-Del33 mutation promotes cell migration and invasion. •FAK-Del33 mutation regulates FAK/Src signal pathway. -- Abstract: Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) regulates cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and survival. We identified a novel splicing mutant, FAK-Del33 (exon 33 deletion, KF437463), in both breast and thyroid cancers through colony sequencing. Considering the low proportion of mutant transcripts in samples, this mutation was detected by TaqMan-MGB probes based qPCR. In total, three in 21 paired breast tissues were identified with the FAK-Del33 mutation, and no mutations were found in the corresponding normal tissues. When introduced into a breast cell line through lentivirus infection, FAK-Del33 regulated cell motility and migration based on a wound healing assay. We demonstrated that the expression of Tyr397 (main auto-phosphorylation of FAK) was strongly increased in FAK-Del33 overexpressed breast tumor cells compared to wild-type following FAK/Src RTK signaling activation. These results suggest a novel and unique role of the FAK-Del33 mutation in FAK/Src signaling in breast cancer with significant implications for metastatic potential.

  10. Rare and unusual endocrine cancer syndromes with mutated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodish, Maya B; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2010-12-01

    The study of a number of rare familial syndromes associated with endocrine tumor development has led to the identification of genes involved in the development of these tumors. Major advances have expanded our understanding of the pathophysiology of these rare endocrine tumors, resulting in the elucidation of causative genes in rare familial diseases and a better understanding of the signaling pathways implicated in endocrine cancers. Recognition of the familial syndrome associated with a particular patient's endocrine tumor has important implications in terms of prognosis, screening of family members, and screening for associated conditions.

  11. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Activating Mutations in Squamous Histology of Lung Cancer Patients of Southern Bulgaria

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    Genova Silvia N.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There is only limited data on the prevalence of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR activating mutations in squamous cell carcinomas and adenosquamous carcinomas of the lung in patients of the Southern Bulgarian region and the efficacy of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. AIM: Previous reports for Bulgarian population showed high incidence of EGFR mutations in the squamous cell carcinomas, so we set the goal to investigate their frequency in Southern Bulgaria, after precise immunohistochemical verification of lung cancers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two hundred and thirty-six lung carcinomas were included in this prospective study. All biopsies were initially analysed with p63, TTF1, Napsin A, CK7, CK34βE12, synaptophysin, CK20 and CDX2. Two hundred and twenty-five non-small cell lung carcinomas were studied with real-time PCR technology to assess the status of the EGFR gene. RESULTS: We detected 132 adenocarcinomas (58.7%, 89 squamous cell carcinomas (39.2%, 4 adenosquamous carcinomas (1.8%, 9 large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas (3.8% and 2 metastatic colorectal adenocarcinomas (0.8%. Activating mutations in the EGF receptor had 3 out of 89 squamous cell carcinomas (3.37%. We have established mutations in L858R, deletion in exon 19 and rare mutation in S7681. One out of four adenosquamous carcinomas had a point mutation in the L858R (25%. CONCLUSIONS: The frequency of EGFR mutations we found in lung squamous cell carcinomas in a Southern Bulgarian region is lower than that in European countries. Ethnic diversity in the region does not play role of an independent predictive factor in terms of mutation frequency.

  12. Establishment and application of a multiplex genetic mutation-detection method of lung cancer based on MassARRAY platform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Xia Tian; Xu-Chao Zhang; Zhen Wang; Jian-Guang Chen; Shi-Liang Chen; Wei-Bang Guo; Yi-Long Wu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:This study aims to establish a method for highly parallel multiplexed detection of genetic mutations in Chinese lung cancer samples through Agena iPLEX chemistry and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight analysis on MassARRAY mass spectrometry platform. Methods:We reviewed the related literature and data on lung cancer treatments. We also identified 99 mutation hot spots in 13 target genes closely related to the pathogenesis, drug resistance, and metastasis of lung cancer. A total of 297 primers, composed of 99 paired forward and reverse amplification primers and 99 matched extension primers, were designed using Assay Design software. The detection method was established by analyzing eight cell lines and six lung cancer specimens. The proposed method was then validated through comparisons by using a LungCartaTM kit. The sensitivity and specificity of the proposed method were evaluated by directly sequencingEGFR andKRAS genes in 100 lung cancer cases. Results:The proposed method was able to detect multiplex genetic mutations in lung cancer cell lines. This finding was consistent with the observations on previously reported mutations. The proposed method can also detect such mutations in clinical lung cancer specimens. This result was consistent with the observations with LungCartaTM kit. However, anFGFR2 mutation was detected only through the proposed method. The measured sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 96.3%, respectively. Conclusions:The proposed MassARRAY technology-based multiplex method can detect genetic mutations in Chinese lung cancer patients. Therefore, the proposed method can be applied to detect mutations in other cancer tissues.

  13. Quantum dots immunofluorescence histochemical detection of EGFR gene mutations in the non-small cell lung cancers using mutation-specific antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qu YG

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Yan-Gang Qu,1 Qian Zhang,2 Qi Pan,3 Xian-Da Zhao,4 Yan-Hua Huang,2 Fu-Chun Chen,3 Hong-Lei Chen41Department of Pathology, The Central Hospital of Enshi Autonomous Prefecture, Enshi, 2Department of Molecular Pathology, Wuhan Nano Tumor Diagnosis Engineering Research Center, Wuhan, Hubei, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Thoracosurgery, Traditional Chinese Medical Hospital of Wenling, Wenling, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Pathology, School of Basic Medical Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei, People’s Republic of ChinaBackground: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutation status plays an important role in therapeutic decision making for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients. Since EGFR mutation-specific antibodies (E746-A750del and L858R have been developed, EGFR mutation detection by immunohistochemistry (IHC is a suitable screening test. On this basis, we want to establish a new screening test, quantum dots immunofluorescence histochemistry (QDs-IHC, to assess EGFR gene mutation in NSCLC tissues, and we compared it to traditional IHC and amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS.Materials and methods: EGFR gene mutations were detected by QDs-IHC, IHC, and ADx-ARMS in 65 cases of NSCLC composed of 55 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens and ten pleural effusion cell blocks, including 13 squamous cell carcinomas, two adenosquamous carcinomas, and 50 adenocarcinomas.Results: Positive rates of EGFR gene mutations detected by QDs-IHC, IHC, and ADx-ARMS were 40.0%, 36.9%, and 46.2%, respectively, in 65 cases of NSCLC patients. The sensitivity of QDs-IHC when detecting EGFR mutations, as compared to ADx-ARMS, was 86.7% (26/30; the specificity for both antibodies was 100.0% (26/26. IHC sensitivity was 80.0% (24/30 and the specificity was 92.31% (24/26. When detecting EGFR mutations, QDs-IHC and ADx-ARMS had perfect consistency (κ=0.882; P<0.01. Excellent agreement was observed

  14. Relationship of KRAS and PIK3CA gene mutation in colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan-Bao Yao; Qian-Yi Kuang; Xi Fu; Shi-Yao Huang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the relationship between KRAS/PIK3CA gene mutation and clinicopathologic characteristics such as gender, age, tumor location, pathological pattern, histological grade, TNM stage and lymph node metastasis, especially the relationship with distant metastasis of colorectal cancer.Methods:A total of94 cases of colorectal cancer samples surgically resected in Gastrointestinal Surgery Department of our hospital from January 2012 to August 2015 were collected, DNA was extracted and then KRAS and PIK3CA gene sequencing was carried out; their clinicopathologic characteristics (gender, age, tumor location, pathological pattern, histological grade, TNM stage, lymph node metastasis and distant metastasis) were analyzed, the relationship between KRAS/PIK3CA gene mutation and above factors, especially distant metastasis was analyzed, and statistical analysis processing was conducted; patients received 3-year follow-up, distant metastasis and recurrence were observed, and the number of their cases was counted, statistically analyzed and processed.Results:KRAS gene mutation was not associated with gender, age, tumor location, pathological pattern and histological grade, and significantly associated with distant metastasis, lymph node metastasis and TNM stage; PIK3CA was not associated with gender, age, tumor location, pathological pattern and histological grade, and associated with TNM stage, lymph node metastasis and distant metastasis; 7 cases (7.4%) were with mutation of both KRAS and PIK3CA (double positive), and 55 cases (57.4%) were with no mutation at all (double negative); in double positive cases, 5 cases were with distant metastasis, metastasis rate was 71.4% and higher than that of double negative (16/55, 29.1%), and there were statistical differences; it was found in follow-up that metastasis rate of KRAS mutant type was higher than that of wild type, and differences were statistically significant; recurrence rates of KRAS and PIK3CA mutant type

  15. Founder mutations in early-onset, familial and bilateral breast cancer patients from Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolenko, Anna P; Rozanov, Maxim E; Mitiushkina, Natalia V; Sherina, Natalia Yu; Iyevleva, Aglaya G; Chekmariova, Elena V; Buslov, Konstantin G; Shilov, Evgeny S; Togo, Alexandr V; Bit-Sava, Elena M; Voskresenskiy, Dmitry A; Chagunava, Oleg L; Devilee, Peter; Cornelisse, Cees; Semiglazov, Vladimir F; Imyanitov, Evgeny N

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that founder mutations may play a noticeable role in breast cancer (BC) predisposition in Russia. Here we performed a systematic analysis of eight recurrent mutations in 302 BC cases (St.-Petersburg, Russia), which were selected due to the presence of clinical indicators of hereditary disease (bilaterality and/or early onset (A in 2 (0.7%), and BRCA1 185delAG, BRCA2 6174delT and NBS1 657del5 in 1 (0.3%) patient each. No cases with BRCA1 300T>G (C61G) mutation was identified. The obtained data suggest that a significant fraction of hereditary BC cases in Russia can be diagnosed using only a limited number of simple PCR tests.

  16. Lack of the type III epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Olsen, Dorte Aalund; Nielsen, Jens Nederby;

    2007-01-01

    network are being investigated and mutations in the EGFR gene have been identified. The type III epidermal growth factor receptor, a tumour-specific, ligand independent, constitutively activated form of EGFR, might contribute to the malignant phenotype in CRC and may be a potential target for anticancer...... therapy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of EGFRvIII in CRC by PCR and protein analysis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study included 79 colorectal cancer patients for PCR analysis and 50 patients for protein analysis by Western blots, in two different laboratories. RESULTS......: No type III mutations were detected in our material. CONCLUSION: The EGFRvIII mutations are rare in colorectal adenocarcinomas and overall probability does not appear to contribute to the malignant phenotype of this disease....

  17. LYN-activating mutations mediate antiestrogen resistance in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Luis J; Fox, Emily M; Balko, Justin M; Garrett, Joan T; Kuba, María Gabriela; Estrada, Mónica Valeria; González-Angulo, Ana María; Mills, Gordon B; Red-Brewer, Monica; Mayer, Ingrid A; Abramson, Vandana; Rizzo, Monica; Kelley, Mark C; Meszoely, Ingrid M; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2014-12-01

    Estrogen receptor-positive (ER(+)) breast cancers adapt to hormone deprivation and become resistant to antiestrogen therapy. Here, we performed deep sequencing on ER(+) tumors that remained highly proliferative after treatment with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and identified a D189Y mutation in the inhibitory SH2 domain of the SRC family kinase (SFK) LYN. Evaluation of 463 breast tumors in The Cancer Genome Atlas revealed four LYN mutations, two of which affected the SH2 domain. In addition, LYN was upregulated in multiple ER(+) breast cancer lines resistant to long-term estrogen deprivation (LTED). An RNAi-based kinome screen revealed that LYN is required for growth of ER(+) LTED breast cancer cells. Kinase assays and immunoblot analyses of SRC substrates in transfected cells indicated that LYN(D189Y) has higher catalytic activity than WT protein. Further, LYN(D189Y) exhibited reduced phosphorylation at the inhibitory Y507 site compared with LYN(WT). Other SH2 domain LYN mutants, E159K and K209N, also exhibited higher catalytic activity and reduced inhibitory site phosphorylation. LYN(D189Y) overexpression abrogated growth inhibition by fulvestrant and/or the PI3K inhibitor BKM120 in 3 ER(+) breast cancer cell lines. The SFK inhibitor dasatinib enhanced the antitumor effect of BKM120 and fulvestrant against estrogen-deprived ER(+) xenografts but not LYN(D189Y)-expressing xenografts. These results suggest that LYN mutations mediate escape from antiestrogens in a subset of ER(+) breast cancers.

  18. Comparing the DNA hypermethylome with gene mutations in human colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornel E Schuebel

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a transcriptome-wide approach to identify genes affected by promoter CpG island DNA hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing in colorectal cancer. By screening cell lines and validating tumor-specific hypermethylation in a panel of primary human colorectal cancer samples, we estimate that nearly 5% or more of all known genes may be promoter methylated in an individual tumor. When directly compared to gene mutations, we find larger numbers of genes hypermethylated in individual tumors, and a higher frequency of hypermethylation within individual genes harboring either genetic or epigenetic changes. Thus, to enumerate the full spectrum of alterations in the human cancer genome, and to facilitate the most efficacious grouping of tumors to identify cancer biomarkers and tailor therapeutic approaches, both genetic and epigenetic screens should be undertaken.

  19. CRISPR-mediated direct mutation of cancer genes in the mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wen; Chen, Sidi; Yin, Hao; Tammela, Tuomas; Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Joshi, Nikhil S; Cai, Wenxin; Yang, Gillian; Bronson, Roderick; Crowley, Denise G; Zhang, Feng; Anderson, Daniel G; Sharp, Phillip A; Jacks, Tyler

    2014-10-16

    The study of cancer genes in mouse models has traditionally relied on genetically-engineered strains made via transgenesis or gene targeting in embryonic stem cells. Here we describe a new method of cancer model generation using the CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated proteins) system in vivo in wild-type mice. We used hydrodynamic injection to deliver a CRISPR plasmid DNA expressing Cas9 and single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) to the liver that directly target the tumour suppressor genes Pten (ref. 5) and p53 (also known as TP53 and Trp53) (ref. 6), alone and in combination. CRISPR-mediated Pten mutation led to elevated Akt phosphorylation and lipid accumulation in hepatocytes, phenocopying the effects of deletion of the gene using Cre-LoxP technology. Simultaneous targeting of Pten and p53 induced liver tumours that mimicked those caused by Cre-loxP-mediated deletion of Pten and p53. DNA sequencing of liver and tumour tissue revealed insertion or deletion mutations of the tumour suppressor genes, including bi-allelic mutations of both Pten and p53 in tumours. Furthermore, co-injection of Cas9 plasmids harbouring sgRNAs targeting the β-catenin gene and a single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide donor carrying activating point mutations led to the generation of hepatocytes with nuclear localization of β-catenin. This study demonstrates the feasibility of direct mutation of tumour suppressor genes and oncogenes in the liver using the CRISPR/Cas system, which presents a new avenue for rapid development of liver cancer models and functional genomics.

  20. CRISPR-mediated direct mutation of cancer genes in the mouse liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wen; Chen, Sidi; Yin, Hao; Tammela, Tuomas; Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Joshi, Nikhil S.; Cai, Wenxin; Yang, Gillian; Bronson, Roderick; Crowley, Denise G.; Zhang, Feng; Anderson, Daniel G.; Sharp, Phillip A.; Jacks, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    The study of cancer genes in mouse models has traditionally relied on genetically-engineered strains made via transgenesis or gene targeting in embryonic stem (ES) cells1. Here we describe a new method of cancer model generation using the CRISPR/Cas system in vivo in wild-type mice. We have used hydrodynamic injection to deliver a CRISPR plasmid DNA expressing Cas9 and single guide RNAs (sgRNAs)2–4 to the liver and directly target the tumor suppressor genes Pten5 and p536, alone and in combination. CRISPR-mediated Pten mutation led to elevated Akt phosphorylation and lipid accumulation in hepatocytes, phenocopying the effects of deletion of the gene using Cre-LoxP technology7, 8. Simultaneous targeting of Pten and p53 induced liver tumors that mimicked those caused by Cre-loxP-mediated deletion of Pten and p53. DNA sequencing of liver and tumor tissue revealed insertion or deletion (indel) mutations of the tumor suppressor genes, including bi-allelic mutations of both Pten and p53 in tumors. Furthermore, co-injection of Cas9 plasmids harboring sgRNAs targeting the β-Catenin gene (Ctnnb1) and a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) oligonucleotide donor carrying activating point mutations led to the generation of hepatocytes with nuclear localization of β-Catenin. This study demonstrates the feasibility of direct mutation of tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in the liver using the CRISPR/Cas system, which presents a new avenue for rapid development of liver cancer models and functional genomics. PMID:25119044

  1. Dietary acrylamide intake and the risk of colorectal cancer with specific mutations in KRAS and APC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogervorst, Janneke G F; de Bruijn-Geraets, Daisy; Schouten, Leo J; van Engeland, Manon; de Kok, Theo M C M; Goldbohm, R Alexandra; van den Brandt, Piet A; Weijenberg, Matty P

    2014-05-01

    Acrylamide, a probable human carcinogen, is present in heat-treated carbohydrate-rich foods. Epidemiological studies have not shown a clear association between acrylamide intake and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. This may be due to the molecular heterogeneity in colorectal tumors, which was not taken into consideration before. Since the acrylamide metabolite glycidamide induces specific DNA mutations in rodents, we investigated whether acrylamide is associated with CRC risk characterized by mutations in Kirsten-ras (KRAS) and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC); key genes in colorectal carcinogenesis. This case-cohort analysis, within the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer, was based on 7.3 years of follow-up. Acrylamide intake was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire. Mutation analysis of codons 1286-1520 in exon 15 in APC and codons 12 and 13 in exon 1 in KRAS was performed on tumor tissue of 733 cases. Hazard ratios (HR) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards analysis. Among men, acrylamide intake was statistically significantly associated with an increased risk of particularly tumors with an activating KRAS mutation {HR fourth versus first quartile: 2.12 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.16-3.87], P trend: 0.01}. Among women, acrylamide intake was statistically significantly associated with a decreased risk of particularly tumors with a truncating APC mutation (fourth versus first quartile: 0.47 (95% CI: 0.23-0.94), P trend: 0.02), but only in the highest quartile of intake. This is the first study to show that acrylamide might be associated with CRC with specific somatic mutations, differentially in men and women. More research is needed to corroborate or refute these findings.

  2. Rapid Mutation Scanning of Genes Associated with Familial Cancer Syndromes Using Denaturing High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah J. Marsh

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in tumor suppressor genes, or less frequently oncogenes, have been identified in up to 19 familial cancer syndromes including Li-Fraumeni syndrome, familial paraganglioma, familial adenomatous polyposis coli and breast and ovarian cancers. Multiple genes have been associated with some syndromes as approximately 26 genes have been linked to the development of these familial cancers. With this increased knowledge of the molecular determinants of familial cancer comes an equal expectation for efficient genetic screening programs. We have trialled denaturing highperformance liquid chromatography (dHPLC as a tool for rapid germline mutation scanning of genes implicated in three familial cancer syndromes - Cowden syndrome (PTEN mutation, multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (RET mutation and von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL mutation. Thirty-two mutations, including 21 in PTEN, 9 in RET plus a polymorphism, and 2 in VHL, were analyzed using the WAVE DNA fragment analysis system with 100% detection efficiency. In the case of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN, mutations were scattered along most of the gene. However, mutations in the RET proto-oncogene associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 were limited to specific clusters or “hot spots”. The use of GC-clamped primers to scan for mutations scattered along PTEN exons was shown to greatly enhance the sensitivity of detection of mutant hetero- and homoduplex peaks at a single denaturation temperature compared to fragments generated using non-GC-clamped primers. Thus, when scanning tumor suppressor genes for germline mutation using dHPLC, the incorporation of appropriate GCclamped primers will likely increase the efficiency of mutation detection.

  3. Multi-mutational model for cancer based on age-time patterns of radiation effects: 2. Biological aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendelsohn, M.L.; Pierce, P.A.

    1997-09-04

    Biological properties of relevance when modeling cancers induced in the atom bomb survivors include the wide distribution of the induced cancers across all organs, their biological indistinguishability from background cancers, their rates being proportional to background cancer rates, their rates steadily increasing over at least 50 years as the survivors age, and their radiation dose response being linear. We have successfully described this array of properties with a modified Armitage-Doll model using 5 to 6 somatic mutations, no intermediate growth, and the dose-related replacement of any one of these time-driven mutations by a radiation-induced mutation. Such a model is contrasted to prevailing models that use fewer mutations combined with intervening growth. While the rationale and effectiveness of our model is compelling for carcinogenesis in the atom bomb survivors, the lack of a promotional component may limit the generality of the model for other types of human carcinogenesis.

  4. Transcription Restores DNA Repair to Heterochromatin, Determining Regional Mutation Rates in Cancer Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina L. Zheng

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Somatic mutations in cancer are more frequent in heterochromatic and late-replicating regions of the genome. We report that regional disparities in mutation density are virtually abolished within transcriptionally silent genomic regions of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (cSCCs arising in an XPC−/− background. XPC−/− cells lack global genome nucleotide excision repair (GG-NER, thus establishing differential access of DNA repair machinery within chromatin-rich regions of the genome as the primary cause for the regional disparity. Strikingly, we find that increasing levels of transcription reduce mutation prevalence on both strands of gene bodies embedded within H3K9me3-dense regions, and only to those levels observed in H3K9me3-sparse regions, also in an XPC-dependent manner. Therefore, transcription appears to reduce mutation prevalence specifically by relieving the constraints imposed by chromatin structure on DNA repair. We model this relationship among transcription, chromatin state, and DNA repair, revealing a new, personalized determinant of cancer risk.

  5. A cancer derived mutation in the Retinoblastoma gene with a distinct defect for LXCXE dependent interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demone Jordan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interaction between viral oncoproteins such as Simian virus 40 TAg, adenovirus E1A, and human papilloma virus E7, and the retinoblastoma protein (pRB occurs through a well characterized peptide sequence, LXCXE, on the viral protein and a well conserved groove in the pocket domain of pRB. Cellular proteins, such as histone deacetylases, also use this mechanism to interact with the retinoblastoma protein to repress transcription at cell cycle regulated genes. For these reasons this region of the pRB pocket domain is thought to play a critical role in growth suppression. Results In this study, we identify and characterize a tumor derived allele of the retinoblastoma gene (RB1 that possesses a discrete defect in its ability to interact with LXCXE motif containing proteins that compromises proliferative control. To assess the frequency of similar mutations in the RB1 gene in human cancer, we screened blood and tumor samples for similar alleles. We screened almost 700 samples and did not detect additional mutations, indicating that this class of mutation is rare. Conclusions Our work provides proof of principal that alleles encoding distinct, partial loss of function mutations in the retinoblastoma gene that specifically lose LXCXE dependent interactions, are found in human cancer.

  6. Optimal Therapeutic Strategy for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer with Mutated Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong SHI

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Although epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs have been widely used in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients, it is still controversial about how to combine EGFR-TKI with chemotherapy and other targeted drugs. We have made a summary on the current therapeutic models of EGFR-TKI combined with chemotherapy/bevacizumab in this review and aimed to find the optimal therapeutic strategy for NSCLC patients with EGFR mutation.

  7. Characterization of DDR2 Inhibitors for the Treatment of DDR2 Mutated Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Terai, Hideki; Tan, Li; Beauchamp, Ellen M; Hatcher, John M.; Liu, Qingsong; Meyerson, Matthew; Gray, Nathanael S.; Hammerman, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in precision medicine approaches over the past decade, the majority of nonsmall cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) are refractory to treatment with targeted small molecule inhibitors. Previous work has identified mutations in the Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2) kinase as potential therapeutic targets in NSCLCs. While DDR2 is potently targeted by several multitargeted kinase inhibitors, most notably dasatinib, toxicity has limited the clinical application of anti-DDR2 therapy. Here...

  8. DNA polymerase ε and δ exonuclease domain mutations in endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, David N; Briggs, Sarah E W; Palles, Claire; Domingo, Enric; Kearsey, Stephen J; Grimes, Jonathon M; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Howarth, Kimberley M; Hodgson, Shirley V; Kaur, Kulvinder; Taylor, Jenny; Tomlinson, Ian P M

    2013-07-15

    Accurate duplication of DNA prior to cell division is essential to suppress mutagenesis and tumour development. The high fidelity of eukaryotic DNA replication is due to a combination of accurate incorporation of nucleotides into the nascent DNA strand by DNA polymerases, the recognition and removal of mispaired nucleotides (proofreading) by the exonuclease activity of DNA polymerases δ and ε, and post-replication surveillance and repair of newly synthesized DNA by the mismatch repair (MMR) apparatus. While the contribution of defective MMR to neoplasia is well recognized, evidence that faulty DNA polymerase activity is important in cancer development has been limited. We have recently shown that germline POLE and POLD1 exonuclease domain mutations (EDMs) predispose to colorectal cancer (CRC) and, in the latter case, to endometrial cancer (EC). Somatic POLE mutations also occur in 5-10% of sporadic CRCs and underlie a hypermutator, microsatellite-stable molecular phenotype. We hypothesized that sporadic ECs might also acquire somatic POLE and/or POLD1 mutations. Here, we have found that missense POLE EDMs with good evidence of pathogenic effects are present in 7% of a set of 173 endometrial cancers, although POLD1 EDMs are uncommon. The POLE mutations localized to highly conserved residues and were strongly predicted to affect proofreading. Consistent with this, POLE-mutant tumours were hypermutated, with a high frequency of base substitutions, and an especially large relative excess of G:C>T:A transversions. All POLE EDM tumours were microsatellite stable, suggesting that defects in either DNA proofreading or MMR provide alternative mechanisms to achieve genomic instability and tumourigenesis.

  9. DNA polymerase ɛ and δ exonuclease domain mutations in endometrial cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, David N.; Briggs, Sarah E.W.; Palles, Claire; Domingo, Enric; Kearsey, Stephen J.; Grimes, Jonathon M.; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Howarth, Kimberley M.; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Kaur, Kulvinder; Taylor, Jenny; Tomlinson, Ian P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate duplication of DNA prior to cell division is essential to suppress mutagenesis and tumour development. The high fidelity of eukaryotic DNA replication is due to a combination of accurate incorporation of nucleotides into the nascent DNA strand by DNA polymerases, the recognition and removal of mispaired nucleotides (proofreading) by the exonuclease activity of DNA polymerases δ and ɛ, and post-replication surveillance and repair of newly synthesized DNA by the mismatch repair (MMR) apparatus. While the contribution of defective MMR to neoplasia is well recognized, evidence that faulty DNA polymerase activity is important in cancer development has been limited. We have recently shown that germline POLE and POLD1 exonuclease domain mutations (EDMs) predispose to colorectal cancer (CRC) and, in the latter case, to endometrial cancer (EC). Somatic POLE mutations also occur in 5–10% of sporadic CRCs and underlie a hypermutator, microsatellite-stable molecular phenotype. We hypothesized that sporadic ECs might also acquire somatic POLE and/or POLD1 mutations. Here, we have found that missense POLE EDMs with good evidence of pathogenic effects are present in 7% of a set of 173 endometrial cancers, although POLD1 EDMs are uncommon. The POLE mutations localized to highly conserved residues and were strongly predicted to affect proofreading. Consistent with this, POLE-mutant tumours were hypermutated, with a high frequency of base substitutions, and an especially large relative excess of G:C>T:A transversions. All POLE EDM tumours were microsatellite stable, suggesting that defects in either DNA proofreading or MMR provide alternative mechanisms to achieve genomic instability and tumourigenesis. PMID:23528559

  10. Limited significance of family history for presence of BRCA1 gene mutation in Polish breast and ovarian cancer cases

    OpenAIRE

    Brozek, Izabela; Ratajska, Magdalena; Piatkowska, Magdalena; Kluska, Anna; Balabas, Aneta; Dabrowska, Michalina; Nowakowska, Dorota; Niwinska, Anna; Rachtan, Jadwiga; Steffen, Jan; Limon, Janusz

    2012-01-01

    It is estimated that about 5–10% of ovarian and 2–5% of all breast cancer patients are carriers of a germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation. Most families with detected BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation are qualified for molecular testing on the basis of family history of breast or ovarian cancers. The purpose of our study was to establish the frequency of positive family history of cancer in a series of Polish consecutive breast and ovarian cancer patients in two groups, with and without the BRCA1...

  11. Candidate Genetic Modifiers for Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Rudolph, Anja; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hamann, Ute; Wilkening, Stefan; Chen, Bowang; Rookus, Matti A.; Schmidt, MarjankaK.; van der Baan, Frederieke H.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Walker, Logan C.; Lose, Felicity; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Garcia, Encarna B. Gomez; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Chung, Wendy K.; Miron, Alex; Southey, Melissa C.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jonson, Lars; Osorio, Ana; Martinez-Bouzas, Cristina; Benitez, Javier; Conway, Edye E.; Blazer, Kathleen R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Barile, Monica; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Mariette, Frederique; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Papi, Laura; Martayan, Aline; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth R.; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Ellis, Steve; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Claes, Kathleen; Van Maerken, Tom; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Delnatte, Capucine; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Coupier, Isabelle; Barjhoux, Laure; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Golmard, Lisa; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Belotti, Muriel; Piedmonte, Marion; Friedlander, Michael L.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Copeland, Larry J.; de la Hoya, Miguel; Perez Segura, Pedro; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomaeki, Kristiina; van Os, Theo A. M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P. G.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; van Doorn, Helena C.; Collee, J. Margriet; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Arason, Adalgeir; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Olswold, Curtis; Couch, Fergus J.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I.; Offit, Kenneth; Corines, Marina; Jacobs, Lauren; Robson, Mark E.; Zhang, Liying; Joseph, Vijai; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Ake; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Friedman, Eitan; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Ligtenberg, Jakobus J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying factors. In thi

  12. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk inBRCA1andBRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Peterlongo (Paolo); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); K.B. Moysich (Kirsten); A. Rudolph (Anja); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); J. Simard (Jacques); P. Soucy (Penny); R. Eeles (Rosalind); D.F. Easton (Douglas); U. Hamann (Ute); S. Wilkening (Stefan); B. Chen (Bowang); M.A. Rookus (Matti); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka K.); F.H. Van Der Baan (Frederieke H.); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); L.C. Walker (Logan); F. Lose (Felicity); A.-T. Maia (Ana-Teresa); M. Montagna (Marco); L. Matricardi (Laura); J. Lubinski (Jan); A. Jakubowska (Anna); E.B.G. Garcia; O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); R.L. Nussbaum (Robert L.); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B.K. Arun (Banu); B. Karlan; S. Orsulic (Sandra); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); W.K. Chung (Wendy K.); A. Miron (Alexander); M.C. Southey (Melissa); D. Goldgar (David); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); Y.C. Ding (Yuan Chun); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); A.-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); L. Jønson (Lars); A. Osorio (Ana); C. Martínez-Bouzas (Cristina); J. Benítez (Javier); E.E. Conway (Edye E.); K.R. Blazer (Kathleen R.); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (Daniela); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); M. Barile (Monica); F. Ficarazzi (Filomena); F. Mariette (F.); S. Fortuzzi (S.); A. Viel (Alessandra); G. Giannini (Giuseppe); L. Papi (Laura); A. Martayan (Aline); M.G. Tibiletti (Maria Grazia); P. Radice (Paolo); A. Vratimos (Athanassios); F. Fostira (Florentia); J. Garber (Judy); A. Donaldson (Alan); C. Brewer (Carole); C. Foo (Claire); D.G. Evans (Gareth); D. Frost (Debra); D. Eccles (Diana); A. Brady (A.); J. Cook (Jackie); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); L. Adlard; J. Barwell (Julian); L.J. Walker (Lisa); L. Izatt (Louise); L. Side (Lucy); M.J. Kennedy (John); M.T. Rogers (Mark); M.E. Porteous (Mary); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); R. Platte (Radka); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); S. Hodgson (Shirley); S.D. Ellis (Steve); T. Cole (Trevor); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); T. Van Maerken (Tom); A. Meindl (Alfons); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); C. Sutter (Christian); C. Engel (Christoph); D. Niederacher (Dieter); D. Steinemann (Doris); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); K. Kast (Karin); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); B. Bressac-de Paillerets (Brigitte); B. Buecher (Bruno); C.D. Delnatte (Capucine); C. Houdayer (Claude); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); F. Damiola (Francesca); I. Coupier (Isabelle); L. Barjhoux (Laure); L. Vénat-Bouvet (Laurence); L. Golmard (Lisa); N. Boutry-Kryza (N.); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); O. Caron (Olivier); P. Pujol (Pascal); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); M. Belotti (Muriel); M. Piedmonte (Marion); M.L. Friedlander (Michael L.); G. Rodriguez (Gustavo); L.J. Copeland (Larry J.); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); P. Perez-Segura (Pedro); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); M.P. Vreeswijk (Maaike); N. Hoogerbrugqe (N.); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); H.C. van Doorn (Helena); J.M. Collee (Margriet); E. Olah; O. Díez (Orland); I. Blanco (Ignacio); C. Lazaro (Conxi); J. Brunet (Joan); L. Feliubadaló (L.); C. Cybulski (Cezary); J. Gronwald (Jacek); K. Durda (Katarzyna); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); G. Sukiennicki (Grzegorz); A. Arason (Adalgeir); J. Chiquette (Jocelyne); P.J. Teixeira; C. Olswold (Curtis); F.J. Couch (Fergus); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); X. Wang (X.); C. Szabo (Csilla); K. Offit (Kenneth); M. Corines (Marina); L. Jacobs (Lauren); M.E. Robson (Mark E.); L. Zhang (Lingling); V. Joseph (Vijai); A. Berger (Andreas); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); D.G. Kaulich (Daphne Gschwantler); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; C. Phelan (Catherine); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); G. Rennert (Gad); A.-M. Mulligan (Anna-Marie); G. Glendon (Gord); S. Tchatchou (Sandrine); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A.E. Toland (Amanda); A. Bojesen (Anders); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); M. Thomassen (Mads); U.B. Jensen; Y. Laitman (Yael); J. Rantala (Johanna); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); M.S. Askmalm (Marie); Å. Borg (Åke); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); L. McGuffog (Lesley); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); S. Healey (Sue); A. Lee (Andrew); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul D.P.); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); E. Friedman (Eitan)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying fac

  13. Mutational and structural analysis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma using whole genome sequencing | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract: Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a genetically heterogeneous cancer comprising at least two molecular subtypes that differ in gene expression and distribution of mutations. Recently, application of genome/exome sequencing and RNA-seq to DLBCL has revealed numerous genes that are recurrent targets of somatic point mutation in this disease.

  14. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Danish families with hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Hansen, Thomas V O; Borg, Ake

    2008-01-01

    A national study of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Danish HBOC (Hereditary Breast Ovarian Cancer) families revealed a total number of 322 mutation positive families, 206 (64%) BRCA1 and 116 (36%) BRCA2 positive families from a population of 5.5 million inhabitants. Seven hundred and twenty six muta...

  15. Prognostic value of BRAF and KRAS mutation status in stage II and III microsatellite instable colon cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Cuba, E. M. V.; Snaebjornsson, P.; Heideman, D. A. M.; van Grieken, N. C. T.; Bosch, L.J.W.; Fijneman, R. J. A.; Belt, E.; Bril, H.; Stockmann, H. B. A. C.; Hooijberg, E.; Punt, C. J. A.; Koopman, M.; Nagtegaal, I. D.; Coupe, V. H. M.; Carvalho, B.; Meijer, G. A.

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) has been associated with favourable survival in early stage colorectal cancer (CRC) compared to microsatellite stable (MSS) CRC. The BRAF V600E mutation has been associated with worse survival in MSS CRC. This mutation occurs in 40% of MSI CRC and it is unclear wheth

  16. Prostate Cancer in a Male with Holt-Oram Syndrome: First Clinical Association of the TBX5 Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aherne, Noel J; Rangaswamy, Guhan; Thirion, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Holt-Oram syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder which is caused by mutations of TBX5 and is characterised by cardiac and skeletal abnormalities. TBX5 is part of the T-box gene family and is thought to upregulate tumour cell proliferation and metastasis when mutated. We report the first clinical case of prostate cancer in an individual with Holt Oram syndrome.

  17. Role of heterozygous APC mutation in niche succession and initiation of colorectal cancer--a computational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roschen Sasikumar

    Full Text Available Mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC gene are found in most colorectal cancers. They cause constitutive activation of proliferative pathways when both alleles of the gene are mutated. However studies on individuals with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP have shown that a single mutated APC allele can also create changes in the precancerous colon crypt, like increased number of stem cells, increased crypt fission, greater variability of DNA methylation patterns, and higher somatic mutation rates. In this paper, using a computational model of colon crypt dynamics, we evolve and investigate a hypothesis on the effect of heterozygous APC mutation that explains these different observations. Based on previous reports and the results from the computational model we propose the hypothesis that heterozygous APC mutation has the effect of increasing the chances for a stem cell to divide symmetrically, producing two stem cell daughters. We incorporate this hypothesis into the model and perform simulation experiments to investigate the consequences of the hypothesis. Simulations show that this hypothesis links together the changes in FAP crypts observed in previous studies. The simulations also show that an APC(+/- stem cell gets selective advantages for dominating the crypt and progressing to cancer. This explains why most colon cancers are initiated by APC mutation. The results could have implications for preventing or retarding the onset of colon cancer in people with inherited or acquired mutation of one APC allele. Experimental validation of the hypothesis as well as investigation into the molecular mechanisms of this effect may therefore be worth undertaking.

  18. Prostate cancer in a male with Holt-Oram syndrome: first clinical association of the TBX5 mutation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Aherne, Noel J

    2013-08-05

    Holt-Oram syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder which is caused by mutations of TBX5 and is characterised by cardiac and skeletal abnormalities. TBX5 is part of the T-box gene family and is thought to upregulate tumour cell proliferation and metastasis when mutated. We report the first clinical case of prostate cancer in an individual with Holt Oram syndrome.

  19. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying factors. In ...

  20. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peterlongo, P.; Chang-Claude, J.; Moysich, K.B.; Rudolph, A.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Simard, J.; Soucy, P.; Eeles, R.A.; Easton, D.F.; Hamann, U.; Wilkening, S.; Chen, B.; Rookus, M.A.; Schmidt, M.K.; Baan, F.H. van der; Spurdle, A.B.; Walker, L.C.; Lose, F.; Maia, A.T.; Montagna, M.; Matricardi, L.; Lubinski, J.; Jakubowska, A.; Garcia, E.B.; Olopade, O.I.; Nussbaum, R.L.; Nathanson, K.L.; Domchek, S.M.; Rebbeck, T.R.; Arun, B.K.; Karlan, B.Y.; Orsulic, S.; Lester, J.; Chung, W.K.; Miron, A.; Southey, M.C.; Goldgar, D.E.; Buys, S.S.; Janavicius, R.; Dorfling, C.M.; Rensburg, E.J. van; Ding, Y.C.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Hansen, T.V.; Gerdes, A.M.; Ejlertsen, B.; Jonson, L.; Osorio, A.; Martinez-Bouzas, C.; Benitez, J.; Conway, E.E.; Blazer, K.R.; Weitzel, J.N.; Manoukian, S.; Peissel, B.; Zaffaroni, D.; Scuvera, G.; Barile, M.; Ficarazzi, F.; Mariette, F.; Fortuzzi, S.; Viel, A.; Giannini, G.; Papi, L.; Martayan, A.; Tibiletti, M.G.; Radice, P.; Vratimos, A.; Fostira, F.; Garber, J.E.; Donaldson, A.; Brewer, C.; Foo, C.; Evans, D.G.; Frost, D.; Eccles, D.; Brady, A.; Cook, J.; Tischkowitz, M.; Adlard, J.; Barwell, J.; Walker, L.; Izatt, L.; Side, L.E.; Kennedy, M.J.; Rogers, M.T.; Porteous, M.E.; Morrison, P.J.; Platte, R.; Davidson, R.; Hodgson, S.V.; Ellis, S.; Cole, T.; Godwin, A.K.; Claes, K.; Maerken, T. Van; Meindl, A.; Gehrig, A.; Sutter, C.; Engel, C.; Hoogerbrugge, N.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying factors. In thi

  1. More breast cancer patients prefer BRCA-mutation testing without prior face-to-face genetic counseling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sie, A.S.; Zelst-Stams, W.A.G. van; Spruijt, L.; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Brunner, H.G.; Prins, J.B.; Hoogerbrugge, N.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, most breast cancer (BC) patients receive face-to-face genetic counseling (DNA-intake) prior to BRCA-mutation testing, with generic information regarding hereditary BC and BRCA-mutation testing. This prospective study evaluated a novel format: replacing the intake consultation with telepho

  2. Methylation and mutation analysis of p16 gene in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Ding; Xiao-Ping Le; Qin-Xian Zhang; Peng Du

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study methylation, frequencies of homozygous deletion and mutation of p16 gene in gastric carcinoma.METHODS: The methylation pattern in exon 1 and exon 2of p16 gene was studied with polymerase chain reaction (PCR), using methylation sensitive restriction endonuclease HpaⅡ and methylation insensitive restriction endonudease MspⅠ. PCR technique was used to detect homozygous deletions of exon 1 and exon 2 of p16 gene and single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) technique was used to detect the mutation of the gene.RESULTS: Hypermethylation changes in exon 1 and exon 2 of p16 gene were observed in 25 % and 45 % of 20gastric cancer tissues, respectively, while no methylation abnormality was found in normal tissues. The homozygous deletion frequency of exon 1 and exon 2 of p16 gene in 20gastric cancer tissues was 20 % and 10 %, respectively. No mutation was found in exon 1 of p16 gene, while abnormal single strands were found in 2 (10 %) cases in exon 2 as detected by SSCP.CONCLUSION: The results suggest that hypermethylation and abnormality of p16 gene may play a key role in the progress of gastric cancer. Hypermethylation of exon 2 of p16 gene may have effects on the carcinogenesis of gastric mucosa and may be a later event.

  3. Toll-like receptors and cancer: MYD88 mutation and inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Q Wang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs expressed on immune cells are crucial for the early detection of invading pathogens, in initiating early innate immune response and in orchestrating the adaptive immune response. PRRs are activated by specific pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs that are present in pathogenic microbes or nucleic acids of viruses or bacteria. However, inappropriate activation of these PRRs, such as the Toll-like receptors (TLRs, due to genetic lesions or chronic inflammation has been demonstrated to be a major cause of many haematological malignancies. Gain-of-function mutations in the TLR adaptor protein MYD88 found in 39% of the activated B cell type of diffuse large B cell lymphomas (ABC-DLBCL and almost 100% of Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia (WM further highlight the involvement of TLRs in these malignancies. MYD88 mutations result in the chronic activation of TLR signalling pathways, thus the constitutive activation of the transcription factor NFκB to promote cell survival and proliferation. These recent insights into TLR pathway driven malignancies warrant the need for a better understanding of TLRs in cancers and the development of novel anti-cancer therapies targeting TLRs. This review focuses on Toll-like receptors function and signalling in normal or inflammatory conditions, and how mutations can also hijack the TLR signalling pathways to give rise to cancer. Lastly, we discuss how potential therapeutic agents could be used to restore normal responses to TLRs and have long lasting anti-tumour effects.

  4. Are lung cysts in renal cell cancer (RCC) patients an indication for FLCN mutation analysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannesma, Paul C; Houweling, Arjan C; Menko, Fred H; van de Beek, I; Reinhard, Rinze; Gille, Johan J P; van Waesberghe, JanHein T M; Thunnissen, Erik; Starink, Theo M; Postmus, Pieter E; van Moorselaar, R Jeroen A

    2016-04-01

    Renal cell cancer (RCC) represents 2-3% of all cancers and is the most lethal of the urologic malignancies, in a minority of cases caused by a genetic predisposition. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHD) is one of the hereditary renal cancer syndromes. As the histological subtype and clinical presentation in BHD are highly variable, this syndrome is easily missed. Lung cysts--mainly under the main carina--are reported to be present in over 90% of all BHD patients and might be an important clue in differentiating between sporadic RCC and BHD associated RCC. We conducted a retrospective study among patients diagnosed with sporadic RCC, wherein we retrospectively scored for the presence of lung cysts on thoracic CT. We performed FLCN mutation analysis in 8 RCC patients with at least one lung cysts under the carina. No mutations were identified. We compared the radiological findings in the FLCN negative patients to those in 4 known BHD patients and found multiple basal lung cysts were present significantly more frequent in FLCN mutation carriers and may be an indication for BHD syndrome in apparent sporadic RCC patients.

  5. Characterization of DDR2 Inhibitors for the Treatment of DDR2 Mutated Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terai, Hideki; Tan, Li; Beauchamp, Ellen M; Hatcher, John M; Liu, Qingsong; Meyerson, Matthew; Gray, Nathanael S; Hammerman, Peter S

    2015-12-18

    Despite advances in precision medicine approaches over the past decade, the majority of nonsmall cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) are refractory to treatment with targeted small molecule inhibitors. Previous work has identified mutations in the Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2) kinase as potential therapeutic targets in NSCLCs. While DDR2 is potently targeted by several multitargeted kinase inhibitors, most notably dasatinib, toxicity has limited the clinical application of anti-DDR2 therapy. Here, we have characterized compound 1 and other tool compounds demonstrating selectivity for DDR2 and show that while these compounds inhibit DDR2 in lung cancer model systems, they display limited antiproliferative activity in DDR2 mutated cell lines as compared to dual DDR2/SRC inhibitors. We show that DDR2 and SRC are binding partners, that SRC activity is tied to DDR2 activation, and that dual inhibition of both DDR2 and SRC leads to enhanced suppression of DDR2 mutated lung cancer cell lines. These results support the further evaluation of dual SRC/DDR2 targeting in NSCLC, and we report a tool compound, compound 5, which potently inhibits both SRC and DDR2 with a distinct selectivity profile as compared to dasatinib.

  6. TP53 Mutation, Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition, and Stemlike Features in Breast Cancer Subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danila Coradini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Altered p53 protein is prevalently associated with the pathologic class of triple-negative breast cancers and loss of p53 function has recently been linked to the induction of an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT and acquisition of stemness properties. We explored the association between TP53 mutational status and expression of some genes involved in the canonical TGF-β signaling pathway (the most potent EMT inducer and in two early EMT associated events: loss of cell polarity and acquisition of stemness-associated features. We used a publicly accessible microarray dataset consisting of 251 p53-sequenced primary breast cancers. Statistical analysis indicated that mutant p53 tumors (especially those harboring a severe mutation were consistent with the aggressive class of triple-negative cancers and that, differently from cell cultures, surgical tumors underexpressed some TGF-β related transcription factors known as involved in EMT (ID1, ID4, SMAD3, SMAD4, SMAD5, ZEB1. These unexpected findings suggest an interesting relationship between p53 mutation, mammary cell dedifferentiation, and the concomitant acquisition of stemlike properties (as indicated by the overexpression of PROM1 and NOTCH1 genes, which improve tumor cells aggressiveness as indicated by the overexpression of genes associated with cell proliferation (CDK4, CDK6, MKI67 and migration (CXCR4, MMP1.

  7. The prognostic value of BRAF mutation in colorectal cancer and melanoma: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Gholamreza Safaee Ardekani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutation of BRAF is a predominant event in cancers with poor prognosis such as melanoma and colorectal cancer. BRAF mutation leads to a constitutive activation of mitogen activated protein kinase pathway which is essential for cell proliferation and tumor progression. Despite tremendous efforts made to target BRAF for cancer treatment, the correlation between BRAF mutation and patient survival is still a matter of controversy. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Clinical studies on the correlation between BRAF mutation and patient survival were retrieved from MEDLINE and EMBASE databases between June 2002 and December 2011. One hundred twenty relevant full text studies were categorized based on study design and cancer type. Publication bias was evaluated for each category and pooled hazard ratio (HR with 95% confidence interval (CI was calculated using random or fixed effect meta-analysis based on the percentage of heterogeneity. Twenty six studies on colorectal cancer (11,773 patients and four studies on melanoma (674 patients were included in our final meta-analysis. The average prevalence of BRAF mutation was 9.6% in colorectal cancer, and 47.8% in melanoma reports. We found that BRAF mutation increases the risk of mortality in colorectal cancer patients for more than two times; HR = 2.25 (95% CI, 1.82-2.83. In addition, we revealed that BRAF mutation also increases the risk of mortality in melanoma patients by 1.7 times (95% CI, 1.37-2.12. CONCLUSIONS: We revealed that BRAF mutation is an absolute risk factor for patient survival in colorectal cancer and melanoma.

  8. MicroRNA genes and their target 3'-untranslated regions are infrequently somatically mutated in ovarian cancers.

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    Georgina L Ryland

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are key regulators of gene expression and have been shown to have altered expression in a variety of cancer types, including epithelial ovarian cancer. MiRNA function is most often achieved through binding to the 3'-untranslated region of the target protein coding gene. Mutation screening using massively-parallel sequencing of 712 miRNA genes in 86 ovarian cancer cases identified only 5 mutated miRNA genes, each in a different case. One mutation was located in the mature miRNA, and three mutations were predicted to alter the secondary structure of the miRNA transcript. Screening of the 3'-untranslated region of 18 candidate cancer genes identified one mutation in each of AKT2, EGFR, ERRB2 and CTNNB1. The functional effect of these mutations is unclear, as expression data available for AKT2 and EGFR showed no increase in gene transcript. Mutations in miRNA genes and 3'-untranslated regions are thus uncommon in ovarian cancer.

  9. MicroRNA genes and their target 3'-untranslated regions are infrequently somatically mutated in ovarian cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryland, Georgina L; Bearfoot, Jennifer L; Doyle, Maria A; Boyle, Samantha E; Choong, David Y H; Rowley, Simone M; Tothill, Richard W; Gorringe, Kylie L; Campbell, Ian G

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs are key regulators of gene expression and have been shown to have altered expression in a variety of cancer types, in