WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer murine xenografts

  1. Impact of MLH1 expression on tumor evolution after curative surgical tumor resection in a murine orthotopic xenograft model for human MSI colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Katy; Ferron, Marianne; Calmel, Claire; Fléjou, Jean-François; Pocard, Marc; Praz, Françoise

    2017-09-01

    Colorectal cancers (CRCs) displaying microsatellite instability (MSI) most often result from MLH1 deficiency. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of MLH1 expression per se on tumor evolution after curative surgical resection using a xenograft tumor model. Transplantable tumors established with the human MLH1-deficient HCT116 cell line and its MLH1-complemented isogenic clone, mlh1-3, were implanted onto the caecum of NOD/SCID mice. Curative surgical resection was performed at day 10 in half of the animals. The HCT116-derived tumors were more voluminous compared to the mlh1-3 ones (P = .001). Lymph node metastases and peritoneal carcinomatosis occurred significantly more often in the group of mice grafted with HCT116 (P = .007 and P = .035, respectively). Mlh1-3-grafted mice did not develop peritoneal carcinomatosis or liver metastasis. After surgical resection, lymph node metastases only arose in the group of mice implanted with HCT116 and the rate of cure was significantly lower than in the mlh1-3 group (P = .047). The murine orthotopic xenograft model based on isogenic human CRC cell lines allowed us to reveal the impact of MLH1 expression on tumor evolution in mice who underwent curative surgical resection and in mice whose tumor was left in situ. Our data indicate that the behavior of MLH1-deficient CRC is not only governed by mutations arising in genes harboring microsatellite repeated sequences but also from their defect in MLH1 as such. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Human pancreatic cancer xenografts recapitulate key aspects of cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delitto, Daniel; Judge, Sarah M; Delitto, Andrea E; Nosacka, Rachel L; Rocha, Fernanda G; DiVita, Bayli B; Gerber, Michael H; George, Thomas J; Behrns, Kevin E; Hughes, Steven J; Wallet, Shannon M; Judge, Andrew R; Trevino, Jose G

    2017-01-03

    Cancer cachexia represents a debilitating syndrome that diminishes quality of life and augments the toxicities of conventional treatments. Cancer cachexia is particularly debilitating in patients with pancreatic cancer (PC). Mechanisms responsible for cancer cachexia are under investigation and are largely derived from observations in syngeneic murine models of cancer which are limited in PC. We evaluate the effect of human PC cells on both muscle wasting and the systemic inflammatory milieu potentially contributing to PC-associated cachexia. Specifically, human PC xenografts were generated by implantation of pancreatic cancer cells, L3.6pl and PANC-1, either in the flank or orthotopically within the pancreas. Mice bearing orthotopic xenografts demonstrated significant muscle wasting and atrophy-associated gene expression changes compared to controls. Further, despite the absence of adaptive immunity, splenic tissue from orthotopically engrafted mice demonstrated elevations in several pro-inflammatory cytokines associated with cancer cachexia, including TNFα, IL1β, IL6 and KC (murine IL8 homologue), when compared to controls. Therefore, data presented here support further investigation into the complexity of cancer cachexia in PC to identify potential targets for this debilitating syndrome.

  3. Frankincense essential oil prepared from hydrodistillation of Boswellia sacra gum resins induces human pancreatic cancer cell death in cultures and in a xenograft murine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Regardless of the availability of therapeutic options, the overall 5-year survival for patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer remains less than 5%. Gum resins from Boswellia species, also known as frankincense, have been used as a major ingredient in Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine to treat a variety of health-related conditions. Both frankincense chemical extracts and essential oil prepared from Boswellia species gum resins exhibit anti-neoplastic activity, and have been investigated as potential anti-cancer agents. The goals of this study are to identify optimal condition for preparing frankincense essential oil that possesses potent anti-tumor activity, and to evaluate the activity in both cultured human pancreatic cancer cells and a xenograft mouse cancer model. Methods Boswellia sacra gum resins were hydrodistilled at 78°C; and essential oil distillate fractions were collected at different durations (Fraction I at 0–2 h, Fraction II at 8–10 h, and Fraction III at 11–12 h). Hydrodistillation of the second half of gum resins was performed at 100°C; and distillate was collected at 11–12 h (Fraction IV). Chemical compositions were identified by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS); and total boswellic acids contents were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Frankincense essential oil-modulated pancreatic tumor cell viability and cytotoxicity were determined by colorimetric assays. Levels of apoptotic markers, signaling molecules, and cell cycle regulators expression were characterized by Western blot analysis. A heterotopic (subcutaneous) human pancreatic cancer xenograft nude mouse model was used to evaluate anti-tumor capability of Fraction IV frankincense essential oil in vivo. Frankincense essential oil-induced tumor cytostatic and cytotoxic activities in animals were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results Longer duration and higher temperature hydrodistillation produced more abundant high molecular

  4. Styrene maleic acid-encapsulated RL71 micelles suppress tumor growth in a murine xenograft model of triple negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martey, Orleans; Nimick, Mhairi; Taurin, Sebastien; Sundararajan, Vignesh; Greish, Khaled; Rosengren, Rhonda J

    2017-01-01

    Patients with triple negative breast cancer have a poor prognosis due in part to the lack of targeted therapies. In the search for novel drugs, our laboratory has developed a second-generation curcumin derivative, 3,5-bis(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzylidene)-1-methylpiperidine-4-one (RL71), that exhibits potent in vitro cytotoxicity. To improve the clinical potential of this drug, we have encapsulated it in styrene maleic acid (SMA) micelles. SMA-RL71 showed improved biodistribution, and drug accumulation in the tumor increased 16-fold compared to control. SMA-RL71 (10 mg/kg, intravenously, two times a week for 2 weeks) also significantly suppressed tumor growth compared to control in a xenograft model of triple negative breast cancer. Free RL71 was unable to alter tumor growth. Tumors from SMA-RL71-treated mice showed a decrease in angiogenesis and an increase in apoptosis. The drug treatment also modulated various cell signaling proteins including the epidermal growth factor receptor, with the mechanisms for tumor suppression consistent with previous work with RL71 in vitro. The nanoformulation was also nontoxic as shown by normal levels of plasma markers for liver and kidney injury following weekly administration of SMA-RL71 (10 mg/kg) for 90 days. Thus, we report clinical potential following encapsulation of a novel curcumin derivative, RL71, in SMA micelles.

  5. Styrene maleic acid-encapsulated RL71 micelles suppress tumor growth in a murine xenograft model of triple negative breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martey O

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Orleans Martey,1 Mhairi Nimick,1 Sebastien Taurin,1 Vignesh Sundararajan,1 Khaled Greish,2 Rhonda J Rosengren1 1Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand; 2Department of Molecular Medicine, College of Medicine and Medical Sciences, Arabian Gulf University, Manama, Kingdom of Bahrain Abstract: Patients with triple negative breast cancer have a poor prognosis due in part to the lack of targeted therapies. In the search for novel drugs, our laboratory has developed a second-generation curcumin derivative, 3,5-bis(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzylidene-1-methylpiperidine-4-one (RL71, that exhibits potent in vitro cytotoxicity. To improve the clinical potential of this drug, we have encapsulated it in styrene maleic acid (SMA micelles. SMA-RL71 showed improved biodistribution, and drug accumulation in the tumor increased 16-fold compared to control. SMA-RL71 (10 mg/kg, intravenously, two times a week for 2 weeks also significantly suppressed tumor growth compared to control in a xenograft model of triple negative breast cancer. Free RL71 was unable to alter tumor growth. Tumors from SMA-RL71-treated mice showed a decrease in angiogenesis and an increase in apoptosis. The drug treatment also modulated various cell signaling proteins including the epidermal growth factor receptor, with the mechanisms for tumor suppression consistent with previous work with RL71 in vitro. The nanoformulation was also nontoxic as shown by normal levels of plasma markers for liver and kidney injury following weekly administration of SMA-RL71 (10 mg/kg for 90 days. Thus, we report clinical potential following encapsulation of a novel curcumin derivative, RL71, in SMA micelles. Keywords: curcumin derivatives, nanomedicine, EGFR, biodistribution

  6. Quantitation of Murine Stroma and Selective Purification of the Human Tumor Component of Patient-Derived Xenografts for Genomic Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina E Schneeberger

    Full Text Available Patient-derived xenograft (PDX mouse models are increasingly used for preclinical therapeutic testing of human cancer. A limitation in molecular and genetic characterization of PDX tumors is the presence of integral murine stroma. This is particularly problematic for genomic sequencing of PDX models. Rapid and dependable approaches for quantitating stromal content and purifying the malignant human component of these tumors are needed. We used a recently developed technique exploiting species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplicon length (ssPAL differences to define the fractional composition of murine and human DNA, which was proportional to the fractional composition of cells in a series of lung cancer PDX lines. We compared four methods of human cancer cell isolation: fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS, an immunomagnetic mouse cell depletion (MCD approach, and two distinct EpCAM-based immunomagnetic positive selection methods. We further analyzed DNA extracted from the resulting enriched human cancer cells by targeted sequencing using a clinically validated multi-gene panel. Stromal content varied widely among tumors of similar histology, but appeared stable over multiple serial tumor passages of an individual model. FACS and MCD were superior to either positive selection approach, especially in cases of high stromal content, and consistently allowed high quality human-specific genomic profiling. ssPAL is a dependable approach to quantitation of murine stromal content, and MCD is a simple, efficient, and high yield approach to human cancer cell isolation for genomic analysis of PDX tumors.

  7. Local control of murine melanoma xenografts in nude mice by neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, B.J.; Corderoy-Buck, S.; Moore, D.E.; Mishima, Y.; Ichihashi, M.

    1992-01-01

    In recent years considerable progress has been made in the development and implementation of neutron capture therapy (NCT) for the treatment of cancer. In particular, the boron analogue of the melanin precursor phenylalanine, i.e., DL-p-boronophenylalanine (BPA), has been used to demonstrate the regression and cure of Harding-Passey (HP) melanoma in syngeneic mice. However, 18 to 25% cures were obtained for neutron irradiations without boron, suggesting that the neutron dose alone plays an important role. Neutron capture therapy of B-16 melanoma xenografts in nude mice showed substantial tumor regression over 35 days, but the survival rate of NCT treated mice after 7 weeks was only 40-60%. In this paper the authors demonstrate the equivalence of the nude mouse model with a syngeneic model, using the same Harding-Passey murine melanoma line, and delineate the conditions required for maximum differential response between neutron irradiation with and without BPA administration, with complete local control as the end point

  8. FDG small animal PET permits early detection of malignant cells in a xenograft murine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanni, Cristina; Spinelli, Antonello; Trespidi, Silvia; Ambrosini, Valentina; Castellucci, Paolo; Farsad, Mohsen; Franchi, Roberto; Fanti, Stefano; Leo, Korinne di; Tonelli, Roberto; Pession, Andrea; Pettinato, Cinzia; Rubello, Domenico

    2007-01-01

    The administration of new anticancer drugs in animal models is the first step from in vitro to in vivo pre-clinical protocols. At this stage it is crucial to ensure that cells are in the logarithmic phase of growth and to avoid vascular impairment, which can cause inhomogeneous distribution of the drug within the tumour and thus lead to bias in the final analysis of efficacy. In subcutaneous xenograft murine models, positivity for cancer is visually recognisable 2-3 weeks after inoculation, when a certain amount of necrosis is usually already present. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of FDG small animal PET for the early detection of malignant masses in a xenograft murine model of human rhabdomyosarcoma. A second goal was to analyse the metabolic behaviour of this xenograft tumour over time. We studied 23 nude mice, in which 7 x 10 6 rhabdomyosarcoma cells (RH-30 cell line) were injected in the dorsal subcutaneous tissues. Each animal underwent four FDG PET scans (GE, eXplore Vista DR) under gas anaesthesia. The animals were studied 2, 5, 14 and 20 days after inoculation. We administered 20 MBq of FDG via the tail vein. Uptake time was 60 min, and acquisition time, 20 min. Images were reconstructed with OSEM 2D iterative reconstruction and the target to background ratio (TBR) was calculated for each tumour. Normal subcutaneous tissue had a TBR of 0.3. Necrosis was diagnosed when one or more cold areas were present within the mass. All the animals were sacrificed and histology was available to verify PET results. PET results were concordant with the findings of necropsy and histology in all cases. The incidence of the tumour was 69.6% (16/23 animals); seven animals did not develop a malignant mass. Ten of the 23 animals had a positive PET scan 2 days after inoculation. Nine of these ten animals developed a tumour; the remaining animal became negative, at the third scan. The positive predictive value of the early PET scan was 90% (9/10 animals

  9. Therapeutic activity of two xanthones in a xenograft murine model of human chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berthou Christian

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously reported that allanxanthone C and macluraxanthone, two xanthones purified from Guttiferae trees, display in vitro antiproliferative and proapoptotic activities in leukemic cells from chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL and leukemia B cell lines. Results Here, we investigated the in vivo therapeutic effects of the two xanthones in a xenograft murine model of human CLL, developed by engrafting CD5-transfected chronic leukemia B cells into SCID mice. Treatment of the animals with five daily injections of either allanxanthone C or macluraxanthone resulted in a significant prolongation of their survival as compared to control animals injected with the solvent alone (p = 0.0006 and p = 0.0141, respectively. The same treatment of mice which were not xenografted induced no mortality. Conclusion These data show for the first time the in vivo antileukemic activities of two plant-derived xanthones, and confirm their potential interest for CLL therapy.

  10. Local delivery of cannabinoid-loaded microparticles inhibits tumor growth in a murine xenograft model of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores Hernán Pérez de la Ossa

    Full Text Available Cannabinoids, the active components of marijuana and their derivatives, are currently investigated due to their potential therapeutic application for the management of many different diseases, including cancer. Specifically, Δ(9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC and Cannabidiol (CBD - the two major ingredients of marijuana - have been shown to inhibit tumor growth in a number of animal models of cancer, including glioma. Although there are several pharmaceutical preparations that permit the oral administration of THC or its analogue nabilone or the oromucosal delivery of a THC- and CBD-enriched cannabis extract, the systemic administration of cannabinoids has several limitations in part derived from the high lipophilicity exhibited by these compounds. In this work we analyzed CBD- and THC-loaded poly-ε-caprolactone microparticles as an alternative delivery system for long-term cannabinoid administration in a murine xenograft model of glioma. In vitro characterization of THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles showed that this method of microencapsulation facilitates a sustained release of the two cannabinoids for several days. Local administration of THC-, CBD- or a mixture (1:1 w:w of THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles every 5 days to mice bearing glioma xenografts reduced tumour growth with the same efficacy than a daily local administration of the equivalent amount of those cannabinoids in solution. Moreover, treatment with cannabinoid-loaded microparticles enhanced apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation and angiogenesis in these tumours. Our findings support that THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles could be used as an alternative method of cannabinoid delivery in anticancer therapies.

  11. Exosomal secretion of cytoplasmic prostate cancer xenograft-derived proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.H. Jansen (Flip); J. Krijgsveld (Jeroen); A.L. Rijswijk (Angelique); G.J.C.M. van den Bemd (Gert-Jan); M.S. van den Berg (Mirella); W.M. van Weerden (Wytske); R. Willemsen (Rob); L.J.M. Dekker (Lennard); T.M. Luider (Theo); G.W. Jenster (Guido)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractNovel markers for prostate cancer (PCa) are needed because current established markers such as prostate-specific antigen lack diagnostic specificity and prognostic value. Proteomics analysis of serum from mice grafted with human PCa xenografts resulted in the identification of 44

  12. Next-generation sequence analysis of cancer xenograft models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando J Rossello

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS studies in cancer are limited by the amount, quality and purity of tissue samples. In this situation, primary xenografts have proven useful preclinical models. However, the presence of mouse-derived stromal cells represents a technical challenge to their use in NGS studies. We examined this problem in an established primary xenograft model of small cell lung cancer (SCLC, a malignancy often diagnosed from small biopsy or needle aspirate samples. Using an in silico strategy that assign reads according to species-of-origin, we prospectively compared NGS data from primary xenograft models with matched cell lines and with published datasets. We show here that low-coverage whole-genome analysis demonstrated remarkable concordance between published genome data and internal controls, despite the presence of mouse genomic DNA. Exome capture sequencing revealed that this enrichment procedure was highly species-specific, with less than 4% of reads aligning to the mouse genome. Human-specific expression profiling with RNA-Seq replicated array-based gene expression experiments, whereas mouse-specific transcript profiles correlated with published datasets from human cancer stroma. We conclude that primary xenografts represent a useful platform for complex NGS analysis in cancer research for tumours with limited sample resources, or those with prominent stromal cell populations.

  13. Early radiation effects in highly apoptotic murine lymphoma xenografts monitored by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Hideyuki; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Murata, Osamu; Kitamoto, Yoshizumi; Saito, Yoshihiro; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Akimoto, Tetsuo; Takahashi, Takeo; Nasu, Sachiko; Niibe, Hideo

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectra ( 31 P-MRS) were obtained from highly apoptotic murine lymphoma xenografts before and up to 24 hr following graded doses of radiation ranging from 2 to 30 Gy. Radiation-induced apoptosis was also estimated up to 24 hr by scoring apoptotic cells in tumor tissue. Methods and Materials: Highly apoptotic murine lymphoma cells, EL4, were subcutaneously transplanted into C57/BL mice. At 7 days after transplantation, radiation was given to the tumor with a single dose at 3, 10, and 30 Gy. The β-ATP/Pi, PME/Pi, and β-ATP/PME values were calculated from the peak area of each spectrum. Radiation-induced apoptosis was scored with counting apoptotic cells on hematoxylin and eosin stained specimens (%apoptosis). Results: The values of % apoptosis 4, 8, and 24 hr after radiation were 21.8, 19.6, and 4.6% at 3 Gy, 35.1, 25.6, and 14.8% at 10 Gy, 38.4, 38.0, and 30.6% at 30 Gy, respectively (cf. 4.4% in control). There was no correlation between early change in β-ATP/Pi and % apoptosis at 4 hr after radiation when most of the apoptosis occurred. An early decrease in PME/Pi was observed at 4 hr after radiation dose at 30 Gy. For each dose, the values of β-ATP/Pi 24 hr after radiation were inversely related to radiation dose. Conclusion: The increase in β-ATP/Pi observed by 31 P-MRS was linked to the degree of histological recovery from radiation-induced apoptosis

  14. Combining fisetin and ionizing radiation suppresses the growth of mammalian colorectal cancers in xenograft tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, Jyh-Der; Wang, Bo-Shen; Chiu, Shu-Jun; Chang, Chun-Yuan; Chen, Chien-Chih; Chen, Fu-Du; Avirmed, Shiirevnyamba; Lee, Yi-Jang

    2016-12-01

    Fisetin (3,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyflavone), which belongs to the flavonoid group of polyphenols and is found in a wide range of plants, has been reported to exhibit a number of biological activities in human cancer cells, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiangiogenic, anti-invasive and antiproliferative effects. Although previous in vitro studies have shown that fisetin treatment increases the apoptotic rate and enhances the radiosensitivity of human colorectal cancer cells, the in vivo effects of fisetin on tumor growth remain unclear. In the present study a murine xenograft tumor model was employed to investigate the therapeutic effects of fisetin in combination with radiation on CT-26 colon cancer cells and human HCT116 colorectal cancer cells. This revealed that intratumoral injection of fisetin significantly suppressed the growth of CT-26 tumors compared with the untreated control group, but had little effect on the growth of HCT116 tumors. However, fisetin in combination with 2-Gy radiation enhanced tumor suppressor activity in murine colon and human colorectal xenograft tumors, as compared with 2-Gy fractionated radiation administered alone for 5 days and fisetin alone. Interestingly, fisetin downregulated the expression of the oncoprotein securin in a p53-independent manner. However, securin-null HCT116 tumors showed only moderate sensitivity to fisetin treatment, and the combination of fisetin and radiation did not significantly suppress securin-null HCT116 tumor growth compared with normal HCT116 tumors. Therefore, the role of securin in mediating the effect of fisetin on colorectal cancer growth warrants further investigation. In conclusion, the results of the current study provide important preclinical data for evaluating the efficacy of fisetin and radiation combination treatment as an adjuvant chemoradiotherapy for human colorectal cancers.

  15. Effects of aurothiomalate treatment on canine osteosarcoma in a murine xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, Valery F; Farese, James P; Siemann, Dietmar W; Abbott, Jeffrey R; Kiupel, Matti; Salute, Marc E; Milner, Rowan J

    2014-03-01

    Osteosarcoma is a highly fatal cancer, with most patients ultimately succumbing to metastatic disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of the antirheumatoid drug aurothiomalate on canine and human osteosarcoma cells and on canine osteosarcoma growth and metastasis in a mouse xenograft model. We hypothesized that aurothiomalate would decrease osteosarcoma cell survival, tumor cellular proliferation, tumor growth, and metastasis. After performing clonogenic assays, aurothiomalate or a placebo was administered to 54 mice inoculated with canine osteosarcoma. Survival, tumor growth, embolization, metastasis, histopathology, cell proliferation marker Ki67, and apoptosis marker caspase-3 were compared between groups. Statistical analysis was carried out using the Kaplan-Meier method with the log-rank test and one-way analysis of variance with the Tukey's test or Dunn's method. Aurothiomalate caused dose-dependent inhibition of osteosarcoma cell survival (Posteosarcoma cell survival and reduced tumor cell proliferation, growth, embolization, and pulmonary metastasis. Given aurothiomalate's established utility in canine and human medicine, our results suggest that this compound may hold promise as an adjunctive therapy for osteosarcoma. Further translational research is warranted to better characterize the dose response of canine and human osteosarcoma to aurothiomalate.

  16. Inhibition of Stromal PlGF Suppresses the Growth of Prostate Cancer Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietmar Abraham

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The growth and vascularization of prostate cancer is dependent on interactions between cancer cells and supporting stromal cells. The primary stromal cell type found in prostate tumors is the carcinoma-associated fibroblast, which produces placental growth factor (PlGF. PlGF is a member of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF family of angiogenic molecules and PlGF mRNA levels increase after androgen deprivation therapy in prostate cancer. In this study, we show that PlGF has a direct dose-dependent proliferative effect on human PC-3 prostate cancer cells in vitro and fibroblast-derived PlGF increases PC-3 proliferation in co-culture. In xenograft tumor models, intratumoral administration of murine PlGF siRNA reduced stromal-derived PlGF expression, reduced tumor burden and decreased the number of Ki-67 positive proliferating cells associated with reduced vascular density. These data show that targeting stromal PlGF expression may represent a therapeutic target for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  17. Hypoxia and metastasis in an orthotopic cervix cancer xenograft model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudary, Naz; Mujcic, Hilda; Wouters, Bradly G.; Hill, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hypoxia can promote tumor metastasis by mechanisms that are believed to result from changes in gene expression. The current study examined the role of putative metastatic genes regulated by cyclic hypoxia in relation to metastasis formation in orthotopic models of cervix cancer. Methods: Orthotopic tumors derived from ME180 human cervix cancer cells or from early generation human cervix cancer xenografts were exposed to cyclic hypoxic conditions during growth in vivo and tumor growth and lymphnode metastases were monitored. Expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and various genes in the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway were inhibited using genetic (inducible shRNA vs CXCR4) small molecule (AMD3100) or antibody (5E1) treatment (CXCR4 and Hh genes, respectively) during tumor growth. Results: As reported previously, exposure of tumor bearing mice to cyclic hypoxia caused a reduction of tumor growth but a large increase in metastasis. Inhibition of CXCR4 or Hh gene activity during tumor growth further reduced primary tumor size and reduced lymphatic metastasis to levels below those seen in control mice exposed to normoxic conditions. Conclusion: Blocking CXCR4 or Hh gene expression are potential therapeutic pathways for improving cervix cancer treatment

  18. Xenograft tumors derived from malignant pleural effusion of the patients with non-small-cell lung cancer as models to explore drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yunhua; Zhang, Feifei; Pan, Xiaoqing; Wang, Guan; Zhu, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Wen, Danyi; Lu, Shun

    2018-05-09

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusions show dramatic responses to specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs); however, after 10-12 months, secondary mutations arise that confer resistance. We generated a murine xenograft model using patient-derived NSCLC cells isolated from the pleural fluid of two patients with NSCLC to investigate the mechanisms of resistance against the ALK- and EGFR-targeted TKIs crizotinib and osimertinib, respectively. Genotypes of patient biopsies and xenograft tumors were determined by whole exome sequencing (WES), and patients and xenograft-bearing mice received targeted treatment (crizotinib or osimertinib) accordingly. Xenograft mice were also treated for prolonged periods to identify whether the development of drug resistance and/or treatment responses were associated with tumor size. Finally, the pathology of patients biopsies and xenograft tumors were compared histologically. The histological characteristics and chemotherapy responses of xenograft tumors were similar to the actual patients. WES showed that the genotypes of the xenograft and patient tumors were similar (an echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4-ALK (EML4-ALK) gene fusion (patient/xenograft: CTC15035 EML4-ALK ) and EGFR L858R and T790M mutations (patient/xenograft: CTC15063 EGFR L858R, T790M )). After continuous crizotinib or osimertinib treatment, WES data suggested that acquired ALK E1210K mutation conferred crizotinib resistance in the CTC15035 EML4-ALK xenograft, while decreased frequencies of EGFR L858R and T790M mutations plus the appearance of v-RAF murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF) G7V mutations and phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit type 2 alpha (PIK3C2A) A86fs frame shift mutations led to osimertinib resistance in the CTC15063 EGFR L858R, T790M xenografts. We successfully developed a new method of generating

  19. Dynamic modulation of phosphoprotein expression in ovarian cancer xenograft models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koussounadis, Antonis; Langdon, Simon P.; Um, Inhwa; Kay, Charlene; Francis, Kyle E.; Harrison, David J.; Smith, V. Anne

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic changes that occur in protein expression after treatment of a cancer in vivo are poorly described. In this study we measure the effect of chemotherapy over time on the expression of a panel of proteins in ovarian cancer xenograft models. The objective was to identify phosphoprotein and other protein changes indicative of pathway activation that might link with drug response. Two xenograft models, platinum-responsive OV1002 and platinum-unresponsive HOX424, were used. Treatments were carboplatin and carboplatin-paclitaxel. Expression of 49 proteins over 14 days post treatment was measured by quantitative immunofluorescence and analysed by AQUA. Carboplatin treatment in the platinum-sensitive OV1002 model triggered up-regulation of cell cycle, mTOR and DDR pathways, while at late time points WNT, invasion, EMT and MAPK pathways were modulated. Estrogen receptor-alpha (ESR1) and ERBB pathways were down-regulated early, within 24 h from treatment administration. Combined carboplatin-paclitaxel treatment triggered a more extensive response in the OV1002 model modulating expression of 23 of 49 proteins. Therefore the cell cycle and DDR pathways showed similar or more pronounced changes than with carboplatin alone. In addition to expression of pS6 and pERK increasing, components of the AKT pathway were modulated with pAKT increasing while its regulator PTEN was down-regulated early. WNT signaling, EMT and invasion markers were modulated at later time points. Additional pathways were also observed with the NFκB and JAK/STAT pathways being up-regulated. ESR1 was down-regulated as was HER4, while further protein members of the ERBB pathway were upregulated late. By contrast, in the carboplatin-unresponsive HOX 424 xenograft, carboplatin only modulated expression of MLH1 while carboplatin-paclitaxel treatment modulated ESR1 and pMET. Thirteen proteins were modulated by carboplatin and a more robust set of changes by carboplatin-paclitaxel. Early changes included

  20. Antitumor activity of the multikinase inhibitor regorafenib in patient-derived xenograft models of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Hung; Ong, Richard; Zopf, Dieter

    2015-10-29

    Unresectable gastric cancer is associated with poor outcomes, with few treatment options available after failure of cytotoxic chemotherapy. Clinical trials of targeted therapies have generally shown no survival benefit in gastric cancer, with the exceptions of the antibodies ramucirumab (anti-VEGFR2) and trastuzumab (anti-HER2/neu). Given the efficacy of the multikinase inhibitor regorafenib in other gastrointestinal tumors, we investigated its potential in gastric cancer. The antitumor activity of oral regorafenib was assessed in eight murine patient-derived gastric cancer xenograft models. Dose-response experiments assessed the efficacy and tolerability of oral regorafenib 5, 10, and 15 mg/kg/day in two models, with 10 mg/kg/day selected for further investigation in all eight models. Tumor weight and volume was monitored during treatment; tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis, apoptosis, and intracellular signaling were assessed using immunohistochemistry and Western blotting of total tumor lysates at the end of treatment. Regorafenib showed dose-dependent inhibition of tumor growth and was well tolerated, with no significant decreases in bodyweight or evident toxicity. Regorafenib 10 mg/kg/day significantly inhibited tumor growth in all eight models (72 to 96 %; all p Regorafenib reduced tumor angiogenesis 3- to 11-fold versus controls in all models (all p Regorafenib was effective in patient-derived models of gastric cancer of different histological subtypes, with inhibition of tumor growth, angiogenesis, and tumor-cell proliferation observed in almost all models. These findings are consistent with the observed activity of regorafenib in preclinical models of other gastrointestinal tumors, and support further clinical investigation in gastric cancer.

  1. Modeling of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia : An Overview of In Vivo Murine and Human Xenograft Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sontakke, Pallavi; Jaques, Jenny; Vellenga, Edo; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Over the past years, a wide variety of in vivo mouse models have been generated in order to unravel the molecular pathology of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) and to develop and improve therapeutic approaches. These models range from (conditional) transgenic models, knock-in models, and murine bone

  2. Identification of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells in the reactive stroma of a prostate cancer xenograft by side population analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santamaria-Martinez, Albert [Institut de Recerca Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Barquinero, Jordi [Institut de Recerca Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Banc de Sang i Teixits, Barcelona (Spain); Barbosa-Desongles, Anna; Hurtado, Antoni; Pinos, Tomas [Institut de Recerca Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Seoane, Joan [Institut de Recerca Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Medical Oncology program, Vall d' Hebron Institute of Oncology, Barcelona (Spain); Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), Barcelona (Spain); Poupon, Marie-France [Institut Curie, Paris (France); Morote, Joan [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Servei d' Urologia. Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Reventos, Jaume [Institut de Recerca Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Munell, Francina, E-mail: fmunell@ir.vhebron.net [Institut de Recerca Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-10-15

    Cancer stem cells are a distinct cellular population that is believed to be responsible for tumor initiation and maintenance. Recent data suggest that solid tumors also contain another type of stem cells, the mesenchymal stem cells or multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), which contribute to the formation of tumor-associated stroma. The Hoechst 33342 efflux assay has proved useful to identify a rare cellular fraction, named Side Population (SP), enriched in cells with stem-like properties. Using this assay, we identified SP cells in a prostate cancer xenograft containing human prostate cancer cells and mouse stromal cells. The SP isolation, subculture and sequential sorting allowed the generation of single-cell-derived clones of murine origin that were recognized as MSC by their morphology, plastic adherence, proliferative potential, adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation ability and immunophenotype (CD45{sup -}, CD81{sup +} and Sca-1{sup +}). We also demonstrated that SP clonal cells secrete transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) and that their inhibition reduces proliferation and accelerates differentiation. These results reveal the existence of SP cells in the stroma of a cancer xenograft, and provide evidence supporting their MSC nature and the role of TGF-{beta}1 in maintaining their proliferation and undifferentiated status. Our data also reveal the usefulness of the SP assay to identify and isolate MSC cells from carcinomas.

  3. Glucose Metabolism of Human Prostate Cancer Mouse Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Jadvar

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that the glucose metabolism of prostate cancer is modulated by androgen. We performed in vivo biodistribution and imaging studies of [F-18] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG accumulation in androgen-sensitive (CWR-22 and androgen-independent (PC-3 human prostate cancer xenografts implanted in castrated and noncastrated male athymic mice. The growth pattern of the CWR-22 tumor was best approximated by an exponential function (tumor size in mm3 = 14.913 e0.108 × days, R2 = .96, n = 5. The growth pattern of the PC-3 tumor was best approximated by a quadratic function (tumor size in mm3 = 0.3511 × days2 + 49.418 × day −753.33, R2 = .96, n = 3. The FDG accumulation in the CWR-22 tumor implanted in the castrated mice was significantly lower, by an average of 55%, in comparison to that implanted in the noncastrated host (1.27 vs. 2.83, respectively, p < .05. The 3-week maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax was 0.99 ± 0.43 (mean ± SD for CWR-22 and 1.21 ± 0.32 for PC-3, respectively. The 5-week SUVmax was 1.22 ± 0.08 for CWR-22 and 1.35 ± 0.17 for PC-3, respectively. The background muscle SUVmax was 0.53 ± 0.11. Glucose metabolism was higher in the PC-3 tumor than in the CWR-22 tumor at both the 3-week (by 18% and the 5-week (by 9.6% micro-PET imaging sessions. Our results support the notions that FDG PET may be useful in the imaging evaluation of response to androgen ablation therapy and in the early prediction of hormone refractoriness in men with metastatic prostate cancer.

  4. Src controls castration recurrence of CWR22 prostate cancer xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Bing; Gillard, Bryan; Gao, Lingqiu; Eng, Kevin H; Gelman, Irwin H

    2013-01-01

    Recurrence of prostate cancer (CaP) after androgen-deprivation therapy continues to have the greatest impact on patient survival. Castration-recurrent (CR)-CaP is likely driven by the activation of androgen receptor (AR) through multiple mechanisms including induction of AR coregulators, AR mutants or splice variants, and AR posttranslational modification such as phosphorylation by Src-family and Ack1 tyrosine kinases. Here, we address whether Src is required for the CR growth of human CWR22 CaP xenografts. The shRNA-mediated Src knockdown or treatment with the Src inhibitors, dasatinib or KXO1, reduced CaP recurrence over controls and increased time-to-recurrence following castration. Moreover, CR-CaP [Src-shRNA] tumors that recurred had similar Src protein and activation levels as those of parental cells, strengthening the notion that Src activity is required for progression to CR-CaP. In contrast, the ability of dasatinib or KXO1 to inhibit Src kinase activity in vitro did not correlate with their ability to inhibit serum-driven in vitro proliferation of CR and androgen-dependent stable cell lines derived from CWR22 tumors (CWR22Rv1 and CWR22PC, respectively), suggesting that the in vitro proliferation of these CaP lines is Src independent. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that Src is a potent and specific therapeutic target for CR-CaP progression

  5. Morpholino-Mediated Isoform Modulation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 (VEGFR2) Reduces Colon Cancer Xenograft Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stagg, Brian C., E-mail: briancstagg@gmail.com; Uehara, Hironori; Lambert, Nathan; Rai, Ruju; Gupta, Isha; Radmall, Bryce; Bates, Taylor; Ambati, Balamurali K. [John A Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, 65 Mario Capecchi Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States)

    2014-11-26

    Angiogenesis plays a key role in tumor growth. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a pro-angiogenic that is involved in tumor angiogenesis. When VEGF binds to membrane-bound vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (mVEGFR2), it promotes angiogenesis. Through alternative polyadenylation, VEGFR2 is also expressed in a soluble form (sVEGFR2). sVEGFR2 sequesters VEGF and is therefore anti-angiogenic. The aim of this study was to show that treatment with a previously developed and reported antisense morpholino oligomer that shifts expression from mVEGFR2 to sVEGFR2 would lead to reduced tumor vascularization and growth in a murine colon cancer xenograft model. Xenografts were generated by implanting human HCT-116 colon cancer cells into the flanks of NMRI nu/nu mice. Treatment with the therapeutic morpholino reduced both tumor growth and tumor vascularization. Because the HCT-116 cells used for the experiments did not express VEGFR2 and because the treatment morpholino targeted mouse rather than human VEGFR2, it is likely that treatment morpholino was acting on the mouse endothelial cells rather than directly on the tumor cells.

  6. Mesenchymal stem cell-based NK4 gene therapy in nude mice bearing gastric cancer xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Y

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Yin Zhu,1,* Ming Cheng,2,* Zhen Yang,3 Chun-Yan Zeng,3 Jiang Chen,3 Yong Xie,3 Shi-Wen Luo,3 Kun-He Zhang,3 Shu-Feng Zhou,4 Nong-Hua Lu1,31Department of Gastroenterology, 2Department of Orthopedics, 3Institute of Digestive Disease, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Jiangxi, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been recognized as promising delivery vehicles for gene therapy of tumors. Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of worldwide cancer mortality, and novel treatment modalities are urgently needed. NK4 is an antagonist of hepatocyte growth factor receptors (Met which are often aberrantly activated in gastric cancer and thus represent a useful candidate for targeted therapies. This study investigated MSC-delivered NK4 gene therapy in nude mice bearing gastric cancer xenografts. MSCs were transduced with lentiviral vectors carrying NK4 complementary DNA or enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP. Such transduction did not change the phenotype of MSCs. Gastric cancer xenografts were established in BALB/C nude mice, and the mice were treated with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, MSCs-GFP, Lenti-NK4, or MSCs-NK4. The tropism of MSCs toward gastric cancer cells was determined by an in vitro migration assay using MKN45 cells, GES-1 cells and human fibroblasts and their presence in tumor xenografts. Tumor growth, tumor cell apoptosis and intratumoral microvessel density of tumor tissue were measured in nude mice bearing gastric cancer xenografts treated with PBS, MSCs-GFP, Lenti-NK4, or MSCs-NK4 via tail vein injection. The results showed that MSCs migrated preferably to gastric cancer cells in vitro. Systemic MSCs-NK4 injection significantly suppressed the growth of gastric cancer xenografts. MSCs-NK4 migrated and accumulated in tumor

  7. Patient-Derived Xenografts of Non Small Cell Lung Cancer: Resurgence of an Old Model for Investigation of Modern Concepts of Tailored Therapy and Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Moro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Current chemotherapy regimens have unsatisfactory results in most advanced solid tumors. It is therefore imperative to devise novel therapeutic strategies and to optimize selection of patients, identifying early those who could benefit from available treatments. Mouse models are the most valuable tool for preclinical evaluation of novel therapeutic strategies in cancer and, among them, patient-derived xenografts models (PDX have made a recent comeback in popularity. These models, obtained by direct implants of tissue fragments in immunocompromised mice, have great potential in drug development studies because they faithfully reproduce the patient’s original tumor for both immunohistochemical markers and genetic alterations as well as in terms of response to common therapeutics They also maintain the original tumor heterogeneity, allowing studies of specific cellular subpopulations, including their modulation after drug treatment. Moreover PDXs maintain at least some aspects of the human microenvironment for weeks with the complete substitution with murine stroma occurring only after 2-3 passages in mouse and represent therefore a promising model for studies of tumor-microenvironment interaction. This review summarizes our present knowledge on mouse preclinical cancer models, with a particular attention on patient-derived xenografts of non small cell lung cancer and their relevance for preclinical and biological studies.

  8. Establishing Prostate Cancer Patient Derived Xenografts: Lessons Learned From Older Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, Pamela J; Russell, Peter; Rudduck, Christina; Tse, Brian W-C; Williams, Elizabeth D; Raghavan, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Background Understanding the progression of prostate cancer to androgen-independence/castrate resistance and development of preclinical testing models are important for developing new prostate cancer therapies. This report describes studies performed 30 years ago, which demonstrate utility and shortfalls of xenografting to preclinical modeling. Methods We subcutaneously implanted male nude mice with small prostate cancer fragments from transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) from 29 pa...

  9. Interrogating open issues in cancer precision medicine with patient-derived xenografts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Byrne, Annette T; Alférez, Denis G; Amant, Frédéric; Annibali, Daniela; Arribas, Joaquín; Biankin, Andrew V; Bruna, Alejandra; Budinská, Eva; Caldas, Carlos; Chang, David K; Clarke, Robert B; Clevers, Hans; Coukos, George; Dangles-Marie, Virginie; Eckhardt, S Gail; Gonzalez-Suarez, Eva; Hermans, Els; Hidalgo, Manuel; Jarzabek, Monika A; de Jong, Steven; Jonkers, Jos; Kemper, Kristel; Lanfrancone, Luisa; Mælandsmo, Gunhild Mari; Marangoni, Elisabetta; Marine, Jean-Christophe; Medico, Enzo; Norum, Jens Henrik; Palmer, Héctor G; Peeper, Daniel S; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Piris-Gimenez, Alejandro; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Rueda, Oscar M; Seoane, Joan; Serra, Violeta; Soucek, Laura; Vanhecke, Dominique; Villanueva, Alberto; Vinolo, Emilie; Bertotti, Andrea; Trusolino, Livio

    Patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) have emerged as an important platform to elucidate new treatments and biomarkers in oncology. PDX models are used to address clinically relevant questions, including the contribution of tumour heterogeneity to therapeutic responsiveness, the patterns of cancer

  10. Interrogating open issues in cancer precision medicine with patient-derived xenografts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Byrne, Annette T.; Alférez, Denis G.; Amant, Frédéric; Annibali, Daniela; Arribas, Joaquín; Biankin, Andrew V.; Bruna, Alejandra; Budinská, Eva; Caldas, Carlos; Chang, David K.; Clarke, Robert B.; Clevers, Hans; Coukos, George; Dangles-Marie, Virginie; Eckhardt, S. Gail; Gonzalez-Suarez, Eva; Hermans, Els; Hidalgo, Manuel; Jarzabek, Monika A.; de Jong, Steven; Jonkers, Jos; Kemper, Kristel; Lanfrancone, Luisa; Mælandsmo, Gunhild Mari; Marangoni, Elisabetta; Marine, Jean-Christophe; Medico, Enzo; Norum, Jens Henrik; Palmer, Héctor G.; Peeper, Daniel S.; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Piris-Gimenez, Alejandro; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Rueda, Oscar M.; Seoane, Joan; Serra, Violeta; Soucek, Laura; Vanhecke, Dominique; Villanueva, Alberto; Vinolo, Emilie; Bertotti, Andrea; Trusolino, Livio

    2017-01-01

    Patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) have emerged as an important platform to elucidate new treatments and biomarkers in oncology. PDX models are used to address clinically relevant questions, including the contribution of tumour heterogeneity to therapeutic responsiveness, the patterns of cancer

  11. Patient-Derived Xenograft Models : An Emerging Platform for Translational Cancer Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hidalgo, Manuel; Amant, Frederic; Biankin, Andrew V.; Budinska, Eva; Byrne, Annette T.; Caldas, Carlos; Clarke, Robert B.; de Jong, Steven; Jonkers, Jos; Maelandsmo, Gunhild Mari; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Seoane, Joan; Trusolino, Livio; Villanueva, Alberto

    Recently, there has been an increasing interest in the development and characterization of patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDX) models for cancer research. PDX models mostly retain the principal histologic and genetic characteristics of their donor tumor and remain stable across passages. These

  12. Colorectal cancer patient-derived xenografted tumors maintain characteristic features of the original tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yong Beom; Hong, Hye Kyung; Choi, Yoon-La; Oh, Ensel; Joo, Kyeung Min; Jin, Juyoun; Nam, Do-Hyun; Ko, Young-Hyeh; Lee, Woo Yong

    2014-04-01

    Despite significant improvements in colon cancer outcomes over the past few decades, preclinical development of more effective therapeutic strategies is still limited by the availability of clinically relevant animal models. To meet those clinical unmet needs, we generated a well-characterized in vivo preclinical platform for colorectal cancer using fresh surgical samples. Primary and metastatic colorectal tumor tissues (1-2 mm(3)) that originate from surgery were implanted into the subcutaneous space of nude mice and serially passaged in vivo. Mutation status, hematoxylin and eosin staining, short tandem repeat profiling, and array comparative genomic hybridization were used to validate the similarity of molecular characteristics between the patient tumors and tumors obtained from xenografts. From surgical specimens of 143 patients, 97 xenograft models were obtained in immunodeficient mice (establish rate = 67%). Thirty-nine xenograft models were serially expanded further in mice with a mean time to reach a size of 1000-1500 mm(3) of 90 ± 20 d. Histologic and immunohistochemical analyses revealed a high degree of pathologic similarity including histologic architecture and expression of CEA, CK7, and CD20 between the patient and xenograft tumors. Molecular analysis showed that genetic mutations, genomic alterations, and gene expression patterns of each patient tumor were also well conserved in the corresponding xenograft tumor. Xenograft animal models derived from fresh surgical sample maintained the key characteristic features of the original tumors, suggesting that this in vivo platform can be useful for preclinical development of novel therapeutic approaches to colorectal cancers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Reproducibility study of [{sup 18}F]FPP(RGD){sub 2} uptake in murine models of human tumor xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Edwin; Liu, Shuangdong; Chin, Frederick; Cheng, Zhen [Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Gowrishankar, Gayatri; Yaghoubi, Shahriar [Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Bioengineering, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Wedgeworth, James Patrick [Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Bioengineering, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Berndorff, Dietmar; Gekeler, Volker [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Global Drug Discovery, Berlin (Germany); Gambhir, Sanjiv S. [Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Bioengineering, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection, Nuclear Medicine, Departments of Radiology and Bioengineering, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2011-04-15

    An {sup 18}F-labeled PEGylated arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) dimer [{sup 18}F]FPP(RGD){sub 2} has been used to image tumor {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin levels in preclinical and clinical studies. Serial positron emission tomography (PET) studies may be useful for monitoring antiangiogenic therapy response or for drug screening; however, the reproducibility of serial scans has not been determined for this PET probe. The purpose of this study was to determine the reproducibility of the integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-targeted PET probe, [{sup 18}F ]FPP(RGD){sub 2} using small animal PET. Human HCT116 colon cancer xenografts were implanted into nude mice (n = 12) in the breast and scapular region and grown to mean diameters of 5-15 mm for approximately 2.5 weeks. A 3-min acquisition was performed on a small animal PET scanner approximately 1 h after administration of [{sup 18}F]FPP(RGD){sub 2} (1.9-3.8 MBq, 50-100 {mu}Ci) via the tail vein. A second small animal PET scan was performed approximately 6 h later after reinjection of the probe to assess for reproducibility. Images were analyzed by drawing an ellipsoidal region of interest (ROI) around the tumor xenograft activity. Percentage injected dose per gram (%ID/g) values were calculated from the mean or maximum activity in the ROIs. Coefficients of variation and differences in %ID/g values between studies from the same day were calculated to determine the reproducibility. The coefficient of variation (mean {+-}SD) for %ID{sub mean}/g and %ID{sub max}/g values between [{sup 18}F]FPP(RGD){sub 2} small animal PET scans performed 6 h apart on the same day were 11.1 {+-} 7.6% and 10.4 {+-} 9.3%, respectively. The corresponding differences in %ID{sub mean}/g and %ID{sub max}/g values between scans were -0.025 {+-} 0.067 and -0.039 {+-} 0.426. Immunofluorescence studies revealed a direct relationship between extent of {alpha}{sub {nu}}{beta}{sub 3} integrin expression in tumors and tumor vasculature

  14. The T61 human breast cancer xenograft: an experimental model of estrogen therapy of breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner, N; Spang-Thomsen, M; Cullen, K

    1996-01-01

    Endocrine therapy is one of the principal treatment modalities of breast cancer, both in an adjuvant setting and in advanced disease. The T61 breast cancer xenograft described here provides an experimental model of the effects of estrogen treatment at a molecular level. T61 is an estrogen receptor......-II), but not transforming growth factor beta-I (TGF-beta1). Of these, IGF-II is the only peptide whose expression is altered by endocrine therapy. Treatment of T61-bearing nude mice with physiologic doses of estrogen is accompanied by loss of IGF-II mRNA expression within 24 hours, and rapid regression of tumor. T61 tumor...

  15. Survivin inhibitor YM155 suppresses gastric cancer xenograft growth in mice without affecting normal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiao Jiao; Lin, Jia Cheng; Ding, Yan Fei; Zhu, Liming; Ye, Jing; Tu, Shui Ping

    2016-02-09

    Survivin overexpression is associated with poor prognosis of human gastric cancer, and is a target for gastric cancer therapy. YM155 is originally identified as a specific inhibitor of survivin. In this study, we investigated the antitumor effect of YM155 on human gastric cancer. Our results showed that YM155 treatment significantly inhibited cell proliferation, reduced colony formation and induced apoptosis of gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Accordingly, YM155 treatment significantly decreased survivin expression without affecting XIAP expression and increased the cleavage of apoptosis-associated proteins caspase 3, 7, 8, 9. YM155 significantly inhibited sphere formation of gastric cancer cells, suppressed expansion and growth of the formed spheres (cancer stem cell-like cells, CSCs) and downregulated the protein levels of β-catenin, c-Myc, Cyclin D1 and CD44 in gastric cancer cells. YM155 infusion at 5 mg/kg/day for 7 days markedly inhibited growth of gastric cancer xenograft in a nude mouse model. Immunohistochemistry staining and Western Blot showed that YM155 treatment inhibited expression of survivin and CD44, induced apoptosis and reduced CD44+ CSCs in xenograft tumor tissues in vivo. No obvious pathological changes were observed in organs (e.g. heart, liver, lung and kidney) in YM155-treated mice. Our results demonstrated that YM155 inhibits cell proliferation, induces cell apoptosis, reduces cancer stem cell expansion, and inhibits xenograft tumor growth in gastric cancer cells. Our results elucidate a new mechanism by which YM155 inhibits gastric cancer growth by inhibition of CSCs. YM155 may be a promising agent for gastric cancer treatment.

  16. Tumor xenograft modeling identifies an association between TCF4 loss and breast cancer chemoresistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorka Ruiz de Garibay

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms of cancer therapeutic resistance is fundamental to improving cancer care. There is clear benefit from chemotherapy in different breast cancer settings; however, knowledge of the mutations and genes that mediate resistance is incomplete. In this study, by modeling chemoresistance in patient-derived xenografts (PDXs, we show that adaptation to therapy is genetically complex and identify that loss of transcription factor 4 (TCF4; also known as ITF2 is associated with this process. A triple-negative BRCA1-mutated PDX was used to study the genetics of chemoresistance. The PDX was treated in parallel with four chemotherapies for five iterative cycles. Exome sequencing identified few genes with de novo or enriched mutations in common among the different therapies, whereas many common depleted mutations/genes were observed. Analysis of somatic mutations from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA supported the prognostic relevance of the identified genes. A mutation in TCF4 was found de novo in all treatments, and analysis of drug sensitivity profiles across cancer cell lines supported the link to chemoresistance. Loss of TCF4 conferred chemoresistance in breast cancer cell models, possibly by altering cell cycle regulation. Targeted sequencing in chemoresistant tumors identified an intronic variant of TCF4 that may represent an expression quantitative trait locus associated with relapse outcome in TCGA. Immunohistochemical studies suggest a common loss of nuclear TCF4 expression post-chemotherapy. Together, these results from tumor xenograft modeling depict a link between altered TCF4 expression and breast cancer chemoresistance.

  17. CysLT(1)R antagonists inhibit tumor growth in a xenograft model of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savari, Sayeh; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Yuan; Sime, Wondossen; Sjölander, Anita

    2013-01-01

    The expression of the inflammatory G-protein coupled receptor CysLT1R has been shown to be upregulated in colon cancer patients and associated with poor prognosis. The present study investigated the correlation between CysLT1R and colon cancer development in vivo using CysLT1R antagonists (ZM198,615 or Montelukast) and the nude mouse xenograft model. Two drug administration regimens were established. The first regimen was established to investigate the importance of CysLT1R in tumor initiation. Nude mice were inoculated with 50 µM CysLT1R antagonist-pretreated HCT-116 colon cancer cells and received continued treatment (5 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally). The second regimen aimed to address the role of CysLT1R in tumor progression. Nude mice were inoculated with non-pretreated HCT-116 cells and did not receive CysLT1R antagonist treatment until recordable tumor appearance. Both regimens resulted in significantly reduced tumor size, attributed to changes in proliferation and apoptosis as determined by reduced Ki-67 levels and increased levels of p21(WAF/Cip1) (Pcolon cancer cell line HCT-116 and CysLT1R antagonists. In addition to significant reductions in cell proliferation, adhesion and colony formation, we observed induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The ability of Montelukast to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenograft was further validated by using two additional colon cancer cell lines, SW-480 and HT-29. Our results demonstrate that CysLT1R antagonists inhibit growth of colon cancer xenografts primarily by reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis of the tumor cells.

  18. Vorinostat, an HDAC inhibitor attenuates epidermoid squamous cell carcinoma growth by dampening mTOR signaling pathway in a human xenograft murine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurundkar, Deepali; Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Chaudhary, Sandeep C. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Ballestas, Mary E. [Department of Pediatrics Infectious Disease, Children' s of Alabama, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL (United States); Kopelovich, Levy [Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, 6130 Executive Blvd., Suite 2114, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Elmets, Craig A. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Athar, Mohammad, E-mail: mathar@uab.edu [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are potent anticancer agents and show efficacy against various human neoplasms. Vorinostat is a potent HDAC inhibitor and has shown potential to inhibit growth of human xenograft tumors. However, its effect on the growth of skin neoplasm remains undefined. In this study, we show that vorinostat (2 μM) reduced expression of HDAC1, 2, 3, and 7 in epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Consistently, it increased acetylation of histone H3 and p53. Vorinostat (100 mg/kg body weight, IP) treatment reduced human xenograft tumor growth in highly immunosuppressed nu/nu mice. Histologically, the vorinostat-treated tumor showed features of well-differentiation with large necrotic areas. Based on proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining and expression of cyclins D1, D2, E, and A, vorinostat seems to impair proliferation by down-regulating the expression of these proteins. However, it also induced apoptosis. The mechanism by which vorinostat blocks proliferation and makes tumor cells prone to apoptosis, involved inhibition of mTOR signaling which was accompanied by reduction in cell survival AKT and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways. Our data provide a novel mechanism-based therapeutic intervention for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Vorinostat may be utilized to cure skin neoplasms in organ transplant recipient (OTR). These patients have high morbidity and surgical removal of these lesions which frequently develop in these patients, is difficult. -- Highlights: ► Vorinostat reduces SCC growth in a xenograft murine model. ► Vorinostat dampens proliferation and induces apoptosis in tumor cells. ► Diminution in mTOR, Akt and ERK signaling underlies inhibition in proliferation. ► Vorinostat by inhibiting HDACs inhibits epithelial–mesenchymal transition.

  19. Vorinostat, an HDAC inhibitor attenuates epidermoid squamous cell carcinoma growth by dampening mTOR signaling pathway in a human xenograft murine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurundkar, Deepali; Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Ballestas, Mary E.; Kopelovich, Levy; Elmets, Craig A.; Athar, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are potent anticancer agents and show efficacy against various human neoplasms. Vorinostat is a potent HDAC inhibitor and has shown potential to inhibit growth of human xenograft tumors. However, its effect on the growth of skin neoplasm remains undefined. In this study, we show that vorinostat (2 μM) reduced expression of HDAC1, 2, 3, and 7 in epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Consistently, it increased acetylation of histone H3 and p53. Vorinostat (100 mg/kg body weight, IP) treatment reduced human xenograft tumor growth in highly immunosuppressed nu/nu mice. Histologically, the vorinostat-treated tumor showed features of well-differentiation with large necrotic areas. Based on proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining and expression of cyclins D1, D2, E, and A, vorinostat seems to impair proliferation by down-regulating the expression of these proteins. However, it also induced apoptosis. The mechanism by which vorinostat blocks proliferation and makes tumor cells prone to apoptosis, involved inhibition of mTOR signaling which was accompanied by reduction in cell survival AKT and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways. Our data provide a novel mechanism-based therapeutic intervention for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Vorinostat may be utilized to cure skin neoplasms in organ transplant recipient (OTR). These patients have high morbidity and surgical removal of these lesions which frequently develop in these patients, is difficult. -- Highlights: ► Vorinostat reduces SCC growth in a xenograft murine model. ► Vorinostat dampens proliferation and induces apoptosis in tumor cells. ► Diminution in mTOR, Akt and ERK signaling underlies inhibition in proliferation. ► Vorinostat by inhibiting HDACs inhibits epithelial–mesenchymal transition.

  20. Preclinical Murine Models for Lung Cancer: Clinical Trial Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Kellar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Murine models for the study of lung cancer have historically been the backbone of preliminary preclinical data to support early human clinical trials. However, the availability of multiple experimental systems leads to debate concerning which model, if any, is best suited for a particular therapeutic strategy. It is imperative that these models accurately predict clinical benefit of therapy. This review provides an overview of the current murine models used to study lung cancer and the advantages and limitations of each model, as well as a retrospective evaluation of the uses of each model with respect to accuracy in predicting clinical benefit of therapy. A better understanding of murine models and their uses, as well as their limitations may aid future research concerning the development and implementation of new targeted therapies and chemotherapeutic agents for lung cancer.

  1. The effects of a picosecond pulsed electric field on angiogenesis in the cervical cancer xenograft models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Limei; Yao, Chenguo; Xiong, Zhengai; Zhang, Ruizhe; Wang, Zhiliang; Wu, Yutong; Qin, Qin; Hua, Yuanyuan

    2016-04-01

    The application of picosecond pulsed electric field (psPEF) is a new biomedical engineering technique used in cancer therapy. However, its effects on cervical cancer angiogenesis are not clear. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of psPEF on angiogenesis in cervical cancer xenograft models. Xenograft tumors were created by subcutaneously inoculating nude mice (athymic BALB/c nu/nu mice) with HeLa cells, then were placed closely between tweezer-type plate electrodes and subjected to psPEF with a gradually increased electric field intensity (0kV/cm, 50kV/cm, 60kV/cm, 70kV/cm). The direct effect on tumor tissue was observed by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The changes of blood vessels and oxygen saturation (sO2) of tumors were monitored in vivo by photoacoustic tomography (PAT). The microvessel density (MVD), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIF-1α and HIF-2α) were detected by immunohistochemical technique (IHC). Their protein expressions and gene transcription levels were evaluated using western blot (WB) and quantitative reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). PsPEF induced obvious necrosis of cervical cancer tissue; with the increasing of electric field intensity, the MVD, vascular PA signal and sO2 values declined significantly. The protein expression and gene transcription levels of VEGF, HIF1α and HIF2α were significantly decreased at the same time. PsPEF exhibited dramatic anti-tumor and anti-angiogenesis effects in cervical cancer xenograft models by exerting direct effect on cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells and indirect effect on tumor angiogenesis-related factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of curcumin on growth of human cervical cancer xenograft in nude mice and underlying mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aixue LIU

    Full Text Available Abstract The present study investigated the effects of curcumin (Cur on growth of human cervical cancer xenograft in nude mice and underlying mechanism. The nude mice modeled with human cervical cancer HeLa cell xenograft were treated with normal saline (control, 3 mg/kg Cisplatin, 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg Cur, respectively. The animal body weight and growth of tumor were measured. The expressions of Bax, Bcl-2, p53, p21, HIF-1α, VEGF and MIF protein in tumor tissue were determined. Results showed that, after treatment for 20 days, the tumor mass and tumor volume in 100 and 200 mg/kg Cur group were significantly lower than control group (P < 0.05. The expressions of Bax, p53 and p21 protein in tumor tissue in 200 mg/kg Cur group were significantly higher than control group (P < 0.05, and the expressions of Bcl-2, HIF-1α, VEGF and MIF protein in tumor tissue in 200 mg/kg Cur group were significantly lower than control group (P < 0.05. Cur can inhibit the growth of HeLa cell xenograft in nude mice. The possible mechanism may be related to its up-regulation of Bax, p53 and p21 protein expression in tumor tissue, and down-regulation of Bcl-2, HIF-1α, VEGF and MIF protein expression.

  3. Expression of cadherin and NCAM in human small cell lung cancer cell lines and xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rygaard, K; Møller, C; Bock, E

    1992-01-01

    characterised, the cadherin family and the Ig superfamily member, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). We investigated expression of these two adhesion molecule families in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines and xenografts by immunoblotting. Nineteen tumours established from 15 patients with SCLC were......Tumour cell adhesion, detachment and aggregation seem to play an important part in tumour invasion and metastasis, and numerous cell adhesion molecules are expressed by tumour cells. Several families of cell-cell adhesion molecules have been described, of which two groups are particularly well...... embryonic development, which may play a role in connection with tumour invasion and metastasis, was found in 14/18 NCAM expressing SCLC tumours. Individual tumours grown as cell lines and as nude mouse xenografts showed no qualitative differences in cadherin or NCAM expression....

  4. Activity of a new nitrosourea (TCNU) in human lung cancer xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergusson, R. J.; Anderson, L. E.; Macpherson, J. S.; Robins, P.; Smyth, J. F.

    1988-01-01

    The activity of a new nitrosourea (TCNU) based on the endogenous amino acid taurine was assessed in three human lung cancer xenografts growing in immunodeficient mice. Moderate activity (specific growth delays of 0.63 and 1.13 compared with controls) was seen in two non-small cell tumours after a single oral administration of 20 mg-1kg. This dose was curative in a small cell xenograft. By using high performance liquid chromatography it was possible to detect parent drug in the tumours as well as the plasma and tissues after oral administration of TCNU. Drug sensitivity was correlated inversely with the amount of the DNA repair enzyme 0(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase assayed from extracts of the tumour cells but not with the levels of parent drug within the tumour. This compound appears to have unique pharmacokinetic properties compared with other chloroethylnitrosoureas. PMID:3390369

  5. Inhibitory effect of Dendrobium officinale polysaccharide on human gastric cancer cell xenografts in nude mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liying ZHANG

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study investigated the inhibitory effect of Dendrobium officinale polysaccharide (DOPA on human gastric cancer cell SGC-7901 xenografts in nude mice. The nude mice with SGC-7901 xenografts were randomly divided into model, 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu, low-dose DOPA, middle-dose DOPA and high-dose DOPA group. The later four groups were intragastrically administrated with 100, 200 and 400 mg·kg–1·day–1 DOPA, 400 mg·kg–1·day–1 5-Fu and normal saline, respectively. After treatment for 20 days, the tumor inhibition rate of in high-dose DOPA group was basically equivalent to 5-Fu group. Compared with 5-Fu, DOPA had no obvious toxic side effect on spleen or thymus indexes, routine blood indexes or liver and kidney functions of nude mice. Compared with model group, the serum tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-2 levels in middle- and high-dose DOPA group were significantly increased (P < 0.05, Bax protein expression was significantly increased (P < 0.05, and Bcl-2 protein expression was significantly decreased (P < 0.05. DOPA can inhibit the growth of SGC-7901 cell xenografts in nude mice. The mechanism may be related to its increase of serum TNF-α and IL-2 levels, up-regulation of Bax protein expression and down-regulation of Bcl-2 protein expression.

  6. Patient Derived Xenograft Models: An Emerging Platform for Translational Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Manuel; Amant, Frederic; Biankin, Andrew V.; Budinská, Eva; Byrne, Annette T.; Caldas, Carlos; Clarke, Robert B.; de Jong, Steven; Jonkers, Jos; Mælandsmo, Gunhild Mari; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Seoane, Joan; Trusolino, Livio; Villanueva, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in the development and characterization of patient derived tumor xenograft (PDX) models for cancer research. PDX models mostly retain the principal histological and genetic characteristics of their donor tumor and remain stable across passages. These models have been shown to be predictive of clinical outcomes and are being used for preclinical drug evaluation, biomarker identification, biological studies, and personalized medicine strategies. This paper summarizes the current state of the art in this field including methodological issues, available collections, practical applications, challenges and shortcoming, and future directions, and introduces a European consortium of PDX models. PMID:25185190

  7. Pulsed terahertz imaging of breast cancer in freshly excised murine tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Tyler; Chavez, Tanny; Khan, Kamrul; Wu, Jingxian; Chakraborty, Avishek; Rajaram, Narasimhan; Bailey, Keith; El-Shenawee, Magda

    2018-02-01

    This paper investigates terahertz (THz) imaging and classification of freshly excised murine xenograft breast cancer tumors. These tumors are grown via injection of E0771 breast adenocarcinoma cells into the flank of mice maintained on high-fat diet. Within 1 h of excision, the tumor and adjacent tissues are imaged using a pulsed THz system in the reflection mode. The THz images are classified using a statistical Bayesian mixture model with unsupervised and supervised approaches. Correlation with digitized pathology images is conducted using classification images assigned by a modal class decision rule. The corresponding receiver operating characteristic curves are obtained based on the classification results. A total of 13 tumor samples obtained from 9 tumors are investigated. The results show good correlation of THz images with pathology results in all samples of cancer and fat tissues. For tumor samples of cancer, fat, and muscle tissues, THz images show reasonable correlation with pathology where the primary challenge lies in the overlapping dielectric properties of cancer and muscle tissues. The use of a supervised regression approach shows improvement in the classification images although not consistently in all tissue regions. Advancing THz imaging of breast tumors from mice and the development of accurate statistical models will ultimately progress the technique for the assessment of human breast tumor margins.

  8. beta 1 integrin inhibition dramatically enhances radiotherapy efficacy in human breast cancer xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Catherine C.; Park, Catherine C.; Zhang, Hui J.; Yao, Evelyn S.; Park, Chong J.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-06-02

    {beta}1 integrin signaling has been shown to mediate cellular resistance to apoptosis after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). Other signaling molecules that increase resistance include Akt, which promotes cell survival downstream of {beta}1 integrin signaling. We showed previously that {beta}1 integrin inhibitory antibodies, AIIB2, enhance apoptosis and decrease growth in human breast cancer cells in 3 dimensional laminin-rich extracellular matrix (3D lrECM) cultures and in vivo. Here we asked whether AIIB2 could synergize with IR to modify Akt-mediated IR resistance. We used 3D lrECM cultures to test the optimal combination of AIIB2 with IR treatment of two breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and HMT3522-T4-2, as well as T4-2 myr-Akt breast cancer colonies or HMT3522-S-1, which form normal organotypic structures in 3D lrECM. Colonies were assayed for apoptosis and {beta}1 integrin/Akt signaling pathways were evaluated using western blot. In addition, mice bearing MCF-7 xenografts were used to validate the findings in 3D lrECM. We report that AIIB2 increased apoptosis optimally post-IR by down regulating Akt in breast cancer colonies in 3D lrECM. In vivo, addition of AIIB2 after IR significantly enhanced tumor growth inhibition and apoptosis compared to either treatment alone. Remarkably, the degree of tumor growth inhibition using AIIB2 plus 2 Gy radiation was similar to that of 8 Gy alone. We showed previously that AIIB2 had no discernible toxicity in mice; here, its addition allowed for a significant reduction in the IR dose that was necessary to achieve comparable growth inhibition and apoptosis in breast cancer xenografts in vivo.

  9. beta 1 integrin inhibition dramatically enhances radiotherapy efficacy in human breast cancer xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Catherine C.; Park, Catherine C.; Zhang, Hui J.; Yao, Evelyn S.; Park, Chong J.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-01-01

    β1 integrin signaling has been shown to mediate cellular resistance to apoptosis after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). Other signaling molecules that increase resistance include Akt, which promotes cell survival downstream of β1 integrin signaling. We showed previously that β1 integrin inhibitory antibodies, AIIB2, enhance apoptosis and decrease growth in human breast cancer cells in 3 dimensional laminin-rich extracellular matrix (3D lrECM) cultures and in vivo. Here we asked whether AIIB2 could synergize with IR to modify Akt-mediated IR resistance. We used 3D lrECM cultures to test the optimal combination of AIIB2 with IR treatment of two breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and HMT3522-T4-2, as well as T4-2 myr-Akt breast cancer colonies or HMT3522-S-1, which form normal organotypic structures in 3D lrECM. Colonies were assayed for apoptosis and β1 integrin/Akt signaling pathways were evaluated using western blot. In addition, mice bearing MCF-7 xenografts were used to validate the findings in 3D lrECM. We report that AIIB2 increased apoptosis optimally post-IR by down regulating Akt in breast cancer colonies in 3D lrECM. In vivo, addition of AIIB2 after IR significantly enhanced tumor growth inhibition and apoptosis compared to either treatment alone. Remarkably, the degree of tumor growth inhibition using AIIB2 plus 2 Gy radiation was similar to that of 8 Gy alone. We showed previously that AIIB2 had no discernible toxicity in mice; here, its addition allowed for a significant reduction in the IR dose that was necessary to achieve comparable growth inhibition and apoptosis in breast cancer xenografts in vivo

  10. Experimental investigation of the penetration of ultrasound nanobubbles in a gastric cancer xenograft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaozhou; Wang, Luofu; Guo, Yanli; Tong, Haipeng; Li, Lang; Ding, Jun; Huang, Haiyun

    2013-08-01

    Nanobubbles as a type of ultrasound contrast agent have attracted much interest in recent years due to their many advantages, such as strong penetrating power and high stability. However, there is still insufficient morphological evidence concerning gas-filled nanobubbles in tumor tissue spaces and tumor angiogenesis. We used a gastric cancer xenograft as an example to study this question. Nanobubbles with a particle size of 435.2 ± 60.53 nm were prepared and compared with SonoVue® microbubbles in vitro and in vivo, and they exhibited a superior contrast imaging effect. After excluding the impact of the nanobubbles in blood vessels through saline flush, we used an ultrasound burst and frozen sectioning to investigate the distribution of nanobubbles in the gastric cancer xenografts and confirmed this by transmission electron microscopy. Preliminary results showed that the nanobubbles were able to pass through the gaps between the endothelial cells in the tumor vascular system to enter the tissue space. These findings could provide morphological evidence for extravascular ultrasound imaging of tumors and serve as a foundation for the application of nanobubbles in extravascular tumor-targeted ultrasonic diagnostics and therapy.

  11. Experimental investigation of the penetration of ultrasound nanobubbles in a gastric cancer xenograft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Xiaozhou; Guo Yanli; Tong Haipeng; Li Lang; Ding Jun; Huang Haiyun; Wang Luofu

    2013-01-01

    Nanobubbles as a type of ultrasound contrast agent have attracted much interest in recent years due to their many advantages, such as strong penetrating power and high stability. However, there is still insufficient morphological evidence concerning gas-filled nanobubbles in tumor tissue spaces and tumor angiogenesis. We used a gastric cancer xenograft as an example to study this question. Nanobubbles with a particle size of 435.2 ± 60.53 nm were prepared and compared with SonoVue ® microbubbles in vitro and in vivo, and they exhibited a superior contrast imaging effect. After excluding the impact of the nanobubbles in blood vessels through saline flush, we used an ultrasound burst and frozen sectioning to investigate the distribution of nanobubbles in the gastric cancer xenografts and confirmed this by transmission electron microscopy. Preliminary results showed that the nanobubbles were able to pass through the gaps between the endothelial cells in the tumor vascular system to enter the tissue space. These findings could provide morphological evidence for extravascular ultrasound imaging of tumors and serve as a foundation for the application of nanobubbles in extravascular tumor-targeted ultrasonic diagnostics and therapy. (paper)

  12. Effects of antineoplastic agents and ionizing irradiation on a human testicular cancer xenograft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osieka, R.; Pfeiffer, R.; Glatte, P.; Schmidt, C.G.; Bamberg, M.; Scherer, E.

    1985-01-01

    Chemotherapy has afforded a high percentage of definitive cures in advanced testicular cancer. Nevertheless some patients with large tumor burden still succumb to chemorefractory disease. Therefore preclinical and clinical evaluation of new drugs and agents not primarily used against this type of disease are still mandatory. For preclinical drug screening purposes heterotransplantation of specific human tumors yields a model with high validity for tumor markers and drug response. Heterotransplantation of a human embryonal testicular cancer was used for simultaneous testing of established agents such as cisplatin, melphalan, bleomycin, vinblastine, etoposide and adriamycin and some newer derivatives such as PHM or mafosfamide. Furthermore agents such as procarbazine, dacarbazine and methyl-CCNU that cross the blood-brain-barrier displayed some interesting activity. The results hint at a unique chemosensitivity pattern of the xenograft line, with some accordance between clinical response to vinblastine and bleomycin and good response of the xenografts to bleomycin but not to vinblastine. Radiotherapy was also effective against this tumor line, but there was not much difference in response when the schedule of fractionation was changed. It is concluded that a combined modality approach might salvage patients with residual, chemorefractory disease. (orig.) [de

  13. Chronic moderate ethanol intake differentially regulates vitamin D hydroxylases gene expression in kidneys and xenografted breast cancer cells in female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Quiroz, Janice; García-Becerra, Rocío; Lara-Sotelo, Galia; Avila, Euclides; López, Sofía; Santos-Martínez, Nancy; Halhali, Ali; Ordaz-Rosado, David; Barrera, David; Olmos-Ortiz, Andrea; Ibarra-Sánchez, María J; Esparza-López, José; Larrea, Fernando; Díaz, Lorenza

    2017-10-01

    Factors affecting vitamin D metabolism may preclude anti-carcinogenic effects of its active metabolite calcitriol. Chronic ethanol consumption is an etiological factor for breast cancer that affects vitamin D metabolism; however, the mechanisms underlying this causal association have not been fully clarified. Using a murine model, we examined the effects of chronic moderate ethanol intake on tumoral and renal CYP27B1 and CYP24A1 gene expression, the enzymes involved in calcitriol synthesis and inactivation, respectively. Ethanol (5% w/v) was administered to 25-hydroxyvitamin D 3 -treated or control mice during one month. Afterwards, human breast cancer cells were xenografted and treatments continued another month. Ethanol intake decreased renal Cyp27b1 while increased tumoral CYP24A1 gene expression.Treatment with 25-hydroxyvitamin D 3 significantly stimulated CYP27B1 in tumors of non-alcohol-drinking mice, while increased both renal and tumoral CYP24A1. Coadministration of ethanol and 25-hydroxyvitamin D 3 reduced in 60% renal 25-hydroxyvitamin D 3 -dependent Cyp24a1 upregulation (Pintake decreases renal and tumoral 25-hydroxyvitamin D 3 bioconversion into calcitriol, while favors degradation of both vitamin D metabolites in breast cancer cells. The latter may partially explain why alcohol consumption is associated with vitamin D deficiency and increased breast cancer risk and progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Intracranial AAV-IFN-β gene therapy eliminates invasive xenograft glioblastoma and improves survival in orthotopic syngeneic murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GuhaSarkar, Dwijit; Neiswender, James; Su, Qin; Gao, Guangping; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2017-02-01

    The highly invasive property of glioblastoma (GBM) cells and genetic heterogeneity are largely responsible for tumor recurrence after the current standard-of-care treatment and thus a direct cause of death. Previously, we have shown that intracranial interferon-beta (IFN-β) gene therapy by locally administered adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV) successfully treats noninvasive orthotopic glioblastoma models. Here, we extend these findings by testing this approach in invasive human GBM xenograft and syngeneic mouse models. First, we show that a single intracranial injection of AAV encoding human IFN-β eliminates invasive human GBM8 tumors and promotes long-term survival. Next, we screened five AAV-IFN-β vectors with different promoters to drive safe expression of mouse IFN-β in the brain in the context of syngeneic GL261 tumors. Two AAV-IFN-β vectors were excluded due to safety concerns, but therapeutic studies with the other three vectors showed extensive tumor cell death, activation of microglia surrounding the tumors, and a 56% increase in median survival of the animals treated with AAV/P2-Int-mIFN-β vector. We also assessed the therapeutic effect of combining AAV-IFN-β therapy with temozolomide (TMZ). As TMZ affects DNA replication, an event that is crucial for second-strand DNA synthesis of single-stranded AAV vectors before active transcription, we tested two TMZ treatment regimens. Treatment with TMZ prior to AAV-IFN-β abrogated any benefit from the latter, while the reverse order of treatment doubled the median survival compared to controls. These studies demonstrate the therapeutic potential of intracranial AAV-IFN-β therapy in a highly migratory GBM model as well as in a syngeneic mouse model and that combination with TMZ is likely to enhance its antitumor potency. © 2016 The Authors. Published by FEBS Press and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Ovarian and cervical cancer patient derived xenografts: The past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Jonathan D; Dobbin, Zachary C; Straughn, J Michael; Buchsbaum, Donald J

    2015-08-01

    Preclinical research in gynecologic malignancies has largely relied upon cloned cancer-derived cell lines and tumor xenografts derived from these cell lines. Unfortunately, the use of cell lines for translational research has disadvantages because genetic and phenotypic alterations from serial passaging have resulted in expression profiles that are different from the original patient tumors. The patient-derived xenograft (PDX) model derived from human tumor not previously cultured has shown better representation of the heterogeneity of gynecologic malignancies and the human tumor microenvironment with preservation of cytogenetics, cellular complexity, and vascular and stromal tumor architecture. Studies have shown promise with these models to analyze tumor development and adaptation, test drug efficacy, and predict clinical outcomes. Their ultimate value may be seen with preclinical drug screening including novel targeted therapies, biomarker identification, and the development of individualized treatment plans. This article reviews PDX model development, current studies testing chemotherapeutics and targeted therapies, and limitations of the PDX model in gynecologic malignancies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Rituximab Treatment Prevents Lymphoma Onset in Gastric Cancer Patient-Derived Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Corso

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Patient-Derived Xenografts (PDXs, entailing implantation of cancer specimens in immunocompromised mice, are emerging as a valuable translational model that could help validate biologically relevant targets and assist the clinical development of novel therapeutic strategies for gastric cancer.More than 30% of PDXs generated from gastric carcinoma samples developed human B-cell lymphomas instead of gastric cancer. These lymphomas were monoclonal, Epstein Barr Virus (EBV positive, originated tumorigenic cell cultures and displayed a mutational burden and an expression profile distinct from gastric adenocarcinomas. The ability of grafted samples to develop lymphomas did not correlate with patient outcome, nor with the histotype, the lymphocyte infiltration level, or the EBV status of the original gastric tumor, impeding from foreseeing lymphoma onset. Interestingly, lymphoma development was significantly more frequent when primary rather than metastatic samples were grafted.Notably, the development of such lympho-proliferative disease could be prevented by a short rituximab treatment upon mice implant, without negatively affecting gastric carcinoma engraftment.Due to the high frequency of human lymphoma onset, our data show that a careful histologic analysis is mandatory when generating gastric cancer PDXs. Such care would avoid misleading results that could occur if testing of putative gastric cancer therapies is performed in lymphoma PDXs. We propose rituximab treatment of mice to prevent lymphoma development in PDX models, averting the loss of human-derived samples.

  17. Aminomethylphosphonic acid inhibits growth and metastasis of human prostate cancer in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parajuli, Keshab Raj; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; You, Zongbing

    2016-03-01

    Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) has been shown to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to determine if AMPA could inhibit growth and metastasis of prostate cancer in vivo. Human prostate cancer PC-3-LacZ-luciferase cells were implanted into the ventral lateral lobes of the prostate in 39 athymic Nu/Nu nude male mice. Seven days later, mice were randomized into the control group (n = 14, treated intraperitoneally with phosphate buffered saline), low dose group (n = 10, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 400 mg/kg body weight/day), and high dose group (n = 15, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 800 mg/kg body weight/day). Tumor growth and metastasis were examined every 4-7 days by bioluminescence imaging of live mice. We found that AMPA treatment significantly inhibited growth and metastasis of orthotopic xenograft prostate tumors and prolonged the survival time of the mice. AMPA treatment decreased expression of BIRC2 and activated caspase 3, leading to increased apoptosis in the prostate tumors. AMPA treatment decreased expression of cyclin D1. AMPA treatment also reduced angiogenesis in the prostate tumors. Taken together, these results demonstrate that AMPA can inhibit prostate cancer growth and metastasis, suggesting that AMPA may be developed into a therapeutic agent for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  18. Prevention of EBV lymphoma development by oncolytic myxoma virus in a murine xenograft model of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Manbok, E-mail: manbok66@dankook.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Rahman, Masmudur M. [Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Cogle, Christopher R. [Department of Hematology/Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); McFadden, Grant [Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States)

    2015-07-10

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with a variety of epithelial and hematologic malignancies, including B-, T- and NK cell-lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease (HD), post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs), nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas, smooth muscle tumors, and HIV-associated lymphomas. Currently, treatment options for EBV-associated malignancies are limited. We have previously shown that myxoma virus specifically targets various human solid tumors and leukemia cells in a variety of animal models, while sparing normal human or murine tissues. Since transplant recipients of bone marrow or solid organs often develop EBV-associated post-transplant LPDs and lymphoma, myxoma virus may be of utility to prevent EBV-associated malignancies in immunocompromised transplant patients where treatment options are frequently limited. In this report, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of myxoma virus purging as a prophylactic strategy for preventing post-transplant EBV-transformed human lymphomas, using a highly immunosuppressed mouse xenotransplantation model. This provides support for developing myxoma virus as a potential oncolytic therapy for preventing EBV-associated LPDs following transplantation of bone marrow or solid organ allografts. - Highlights: • Myxoma virus effectively infects and purges EBV lymphoma cells in vivo. • Oncolytic myxoma virus effectively eradicates oncogenic EBV tumorigenesis. • Ex vivo pre-treatment of myxoma virus can be effective as a preventive treatment modality for post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases.

  19. Prevention of EBV lymphoma development by oncolytic myxoma virus in a murine xenograft model of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Manbok; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Cogle, Christopher R.; McFadden, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with a variety of epithelial and hematologic malignancies, including B-, T- and NK cell-lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease (HD), post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs), nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas, smooth muscle tumors, and HIV-associated lymphomas. Currently, treatment options for EBV-associated malignancies are limited. We have previously shown that myxoma virus specifically targets various human solid tumors and leukemia cells in a variety of animal models, while sparing normal human or murine tissues. Since transplant recipients of bone marrow or solid organs often develop EBV-associated post-transplant LPDs and lymphoma, myxoma virus may be of utility to prevent EBV-associated malignancies in immunocompromised transplant patients where treatment options are frequently limited. In this report, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of myxoma virus purging as a prophylactic strategy for preventing post-transplant EBV-transformed human lymphomas, using a highly immunosuppressed mouse xenotransplantation model. This provides support for developing myxoma virus as a potential oncolytic therapy for preventing EBV-associated LPDs following transplantation of bone marrow or solid organ allografts. - Highlights: • Myxoma virus effectively infects and purges EBV lymphoma cells in vivo. • Oncolytic myxoma virus effectively eradicates oncogenic EBV tumorigenesis. • Ex vivo pre-treatment of myxoma virus can be effective as a preventive treatment modality for post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases

  20. Rapamycin targeting mTOR and hedgehog signaling pathways blocks human rhabdomyosarcoma growth in xenograft murine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaylani, Samer Z. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1600 7th Avenue South, ACC 414, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States); Xu, Jianmin; Srivastava, Ritesh K. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Kopelovich, Levy [Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda (United States); Pressey, Joseph G. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1600 7th Avenue South, ACC 414, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States); Athar, Mohammad, E-mail: mathar@uab.edu [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States)

    2013-06-14

    Graphical abstract: Intervention of poorly differentiated RMS by rapamycin: In poorly differentiated RMS, rapamycin blocks mTOR and Hh signaling pathways concomitantly. This leads to dampening in cell cycle regulation and induction of apoptosis. This study provides a rationale for the therapeutic intervention of poorly differentiated RMS by treating patients with rapamycin alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents. -- Highlights: •Rapamycin abrogates RMS tumor growth by modulating proliferation and apoptosis. •Co-targeting mTOR/Hh pathways underlie the molecular basis of effectiveness. •Reduction in mTOR/Hh pathways diminish EMT leading to reduced invasiveness. -- Abstract: Rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS) represent the most common childhood soft-tissue sarcoma. Over the past few decades outcomes for low and intermediate risk RMS patients have slowly improved while patients with metastatic or relapsed RMS still face a grim prognosis. New chemotherapeutic agents or combinations of chemotherapies have largely failed to improve the outcome. Based on the identification of novel molecular targets, potential therapeutic approaches in RMS may offer a decreased reliance on conventional chemotherapy. Thus, identification of effective therapeutic agents that specifically target relevant pathways may be particularly beneficial for patients with metastatic and refractory RMS. The PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway has been found to be a potentially attractive target in RMS therapy. In this study, we provide evidence that rapamycin (sirolimus) abrogates growth of RMS development in a RMS xenograft mouse model. As compared to a vehicle-treated control group, more than 95% inhibition in tumor growth was observed in mice receiving parenteral administration of rapamycin. The residual tumors in rapamycin-treated group showed significant reduction in the expression of biomarkers indicative of proliferation and tumor invasiveness. These tumors also showed enhanced apoptosis

  1. Distribution and pharmacokinetics of the prodrug daunorubicin-GA3 in nude mice bearing human ovarian cancer xenografts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houba, PHJ; Boven, E; van der Meulen-Muileman, IH; Leenders, RGG; Scheeren, JW; Pinedo, HM; Haisma, HJ

    1999-01-01

    N-[4-daunorubicin-N-carbonyl (oxymethyl)phenyl] O-beta-glucuronyl carbamate (DNR-GA3) is a glucuronide prodrug of daunorubicin (DNR) which induced a better tumor growth delay than DNR when studied at equitoxic doses in three human ovarian cancer xenografts. These results suggested that the prodrug

  2. Age and cellular context influence rectal prolapse formation in mice with caecal wall colorectal cancer xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommelein, Joke; Gremonprez, Félix; Verset, Laurine; De Vlieghere, Elly; Wagemans, Glenn; Gespach, Christian; Boterberg, Tom; Demetter, Pieter; Ceelen, Wim; Bracke, Marc; De Wever, Olivier

    2016-11-15

    In patients with rectal prolapse is the prevalence of colorectal cancer increased, suggesting that a colorectal tumor may induce rectal prolapse. Establishment of tumor xenografts in immunodeficient mice after orthotopic inoculations of human colorectal cancer cells into the caecal wall is a widely used approach for the study of human colorectal cancer progression and preclinical evaluation of therapeutics. Remarkably, 70% of young mice carrying a COLO320DM caecal tumor showed symptoms of intussusception of the large bowel associated with intestinal lumen obstruction and rectal prolapse. The quantity of the COLO320DM bioluminescent signal of the first three weeks post-inoculation predicts prolapse in young mice. Rectal prolapse was not observed in adult mice carrying a COLO320DM caecal tumor or young mice carrying a HT29 caecal tumor. In contrast to HT29 tumors, which showed local invasion and metastasis, COLO320DM tumors demonstrated a non-invasive tumor with pushing borders without presence of metastasis. In conclusion, rectal prolapse can be linked to a non-invasive, space-occupying COLO320DM tumor in the gastrointestinal tract of young immunodeficient mice. These data reveal a model that can clarify the association of patients showing rectal prolapse with colorectal cancer.

  3. The Novel IκB Kinase β Inhibitor, IMD-0560, Has Potent Therapeutic Efficacy in Ovarian Cancer Xenograft Model Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Ikuko; Hashimoto, Kae; Sawada, Kenjiro; Kinose, Yasuto; Nakamura, Koji; Toda, Aska; Nakatsuka, Erika; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Mabuchi, Seiji; Fujikawa, Tomoyuki; Itai, Akiko; Kimura, Tadashi

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant activation of nuclear factor-kappa β (NF-κB) signaling has been correlated with poor outcome among patients with ovarian cancer. Although the therapeutic potential of NF-κB pathway disruption in cancers has been extensively studied, most classical NF-κB inhibitors are poorly selective, exhibit off-target effects, and have failed to be applied in clinical use. IMD-0560, N-[2,5-bis (trifluoromethyl) phenyl]-5-bromo-2-hydroxybenzamide, is a novel low-molecular-weight compound that selectively inhibits the IκB kinase complex and works as an inhibitor of NF-κB signaling. The aim of this study was to assess the therapeutic potential of IMD-0560 against ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo. NF-κB activity (phosphorylation) was determined in 9 ovarian cancer cell lines and the inhibitory effect of IMD-0560 on NF-κB activation was analyzed by Western blotting. Cell viability, cell cycle, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, and angiogenesis were assessed in vitro to evaluate the effect of IMD-0560 on ovarian cancer cells. In vivo efficacy of IMD-0560 was also investigated using an ovarian cancer xenograft mouse model. The NF-κB signaling pathway was constitutively activated in 8 of 9 ovarian cancer cell lines. IMD-0560 inhibited NF-κB activation and suppressed ovarian cancer cell proliferation by inducing G1 phase arrest. IMD-0560 decreased VEGF secretion from cancer cells and inhibited the tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. IMD-0560 significantly inhibited peritoneal metastasis and prolonged the survival in an ovarian cancer xenograft mice model. Immunohistochemical staining of excised tumors revealed that IMD-0560 suppressed VEGF expression, tumor angiogenesis, and cancer cell proliferation. IMD-0560 showed promising therapeutic efficacy against ovarian cancer xenograft mice by inducing cell cycle arrest and suppressing VEGF production from cancer cells. IMD-0560 may be a potential future option in regimens for the

  4. Patient-derived xenograft models to improve targeted therapy in epithelial ovarian cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare eScott

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite increasing evidence that precision therapy targeted to the molecular drivers of a cancer has the potential to improve clinical outcomes, high-grade epithelial ovarian cancer patients are currently treated without consideration of molecular phenotype, and predictive biomarkers that could better inform treatment remain unknown. Delivery of precision therapy requires improved integration of laboratory-based models and cutting-edge clinical research, with pre-clinical models predicting patient subsets that will benefit from a particular targeted therapeutic. Patient-derived xenografts (PDX are renewable tumor models engrafted in mice, generated from fresh human tumors without prior in vitro exposure. PDX models allow an invaluable assessment of tumor evolution and adaptive response to therapy.PDX models have been applied to preclinical drug testing and biomarker identification in a number of cancers including ovarian, pancreatic, breast and prostate cancers. These models have been shown to be biologically stable and accurately reflect the patient tumor with regards to histopathology, gene expression, genetic mutations and therapeutic response. However, pre-clinical analyses of molecularly annotated PDX models derived from high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HG-SOC remain limited. In vivo response to conventional and/or targeted therapeutics has only been described for very small numbers of individual HG-SOC PDX in conjunction with sparse molecular annotation and patient outcome data. Recently, two consecutive panels of epithelial ovarian cancer PDX correlate in vivo platinum response with molecular aberrations and source patient clinical outcomes. These studies underpin the value of PDX models to better direct chemotherapy and predict response to targeted therapy. Tumor heterogeneity, before and following treatment, as well as the importance of multiple molecular aberrations per individual tumor underscore some of the important issues

  5. Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes between Original Breast Cancer and Xenograft Using Machine Learning Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deling Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies in women. Patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDX model is a cutting-edge approach for drug research on breast cancer. However, PDX still exhibits differences from original human tumors, thereby challenging the molecular understanding of tumorigenesis. In particular, gene expression changes after tissues are transplanted from human to mouse model. In this study, we propose a novel computational method by incorporating several machine learning algorithms, including Monte Carlo feature selection (MCFS, random forest (RF, and rough set-based rule learning, to identify genes with significant expression differences between PDX and original human tumors. First, 831 breast tumors, including 657 PDX and 174 human tumors, were collected. Based on MCFS and RF, 32 genes were then identified to be informative for the prediction of PDX and human tumors and can be used to construct a prediction model. The prediction model exhibits a Matthews coefficient correlation value of 0.777. Seven interpretable interactions within the informative gene were detected based on the rough set-based rule learning. Furthermore, the seven interpretable interactions can be well supported by previous experimental studies. Our study not only presents a method for identifying informative genes with differential expression but also provides insights into the mechanism through which gene expression changes after being transplanted from human tumor into mouse model. This work would be helpful for research and drug development for breast cancer.

  6. Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes between Original Breast Cancer and Xenograft Using Machine Learning Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Deling; Li, Jia-Rui; Zhang, Yu-Hang; Chen, Lei; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2018-03-12

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies in women. Patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDX) model is a cutting-edge approach for drug research on breast cancer. However, PDX still exhibits differences from original human tumors, thereby challenging the molecular understanding of tumorigenesis. In particular, gene expression changes after tissues are transplanted from human to mouse model. In this study, we propose a novel computational method by incorporating several machine learning algorithms, including Monte Carlo feature selection (MCFS), random forest (RF), and rough set-based rule learning, to identify genes with significant expression differences between PDX and original human tumors. First, 831 breast tumors, including 657 PDX and 174 human tumors, were collected. Based on MCFS and RF, 32 genes were then identified to be informative for the prediction of PDX and human tumors and can be used to construct a prediction model. The prediction model exhibits a Matthews coefficient correlation value of 0.777. Seven interpretable interactions within the informative gene were detected based on the rough set-based rule learning. Furthermore, the seven interpretable interactions can be well supported by previous experimental studies. Our study not only presents a method for identifying informative genes with differential expression but also provides insights into the mechanism through which gene expression changes after being transplanted from human tumor into mouse model. This work would be helpful for research and drug development for breast cancer.

  7. Human Sulfatase 2 inhibits in vivo tumor growth of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, Sarah M; Concino, Michael F; Liaw, Lucy; Martini, Paolo GV; Iskenderian, Andrea; Cook, Lynette; Romashko, Alla; Tobin, Kristen; Jones, Michael; Norton, Angela; Gómez-Yafal, Alicia; Heartlein, Michael W

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular human sulfatases modulate growth factor signaling by alteration of the heparin/heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) 6-O-sulfation state. HSPGs bind to numerous growth factor ligands including fibroblast growth factors (FGF), epidermal growth factors (EGF), and vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF), and are critically important in the context of cancer cell growth, invasion, and metastasis. We hypothesized that sulfatase activity in the tumor microenvironment would regulate tumor growth in vivo. We established a model of stable expression of sulfatases in the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 and purified recombinant human Sulfatase 2 (rhSulf2) for exogenous administration. In vitro studies were performed to measure effects on breast cancer cell invasion and proliferation, and groups were statistically compared using Student's t-test. The effects of hSulf2 on tumor progression were tested using in vivo xenografts with two methods. First, MDA-MB-231 cells stably expressing hSulf1, hSulf2, or both hSulf1/hSulf2 were grown as xenografts and the resulting tumor growth and vascularization was compared to controls. Secondly, wild type MDA-MB-231 xenografts were treated by short-term intratumoral injection with rhSulf2 or vehicle during tumor growth. Ultrasound analysis was also used to complement caliper measurement to monitor tumor growth. In vivo studies were statistically analyzed using Student's t test. In vitro, stable expression of hSulf2 or administration of rhSulf2 in breast cancer cells decreased cell proliferation and invasion, corresponding to an inhibition of ERK activation. Stable expression of the sulfatases in xenografts significantly suppressed tumor growth, with complete regression of tumors expressing both hSulf1 and hSulf2 and significantly smaller tumor volumes in groups expressing hSulf1 or hSulf2 compared to control xenografts. Despite significant suppression of tumor volume, sulfatases did not affect vascular

  8. Pentastatin-1, a collagen IV derived 20-mer peptide, suppresses tumor growth in a small cell lung cancer xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskimaki, Jacob E; Karagiannis, Emmanouil D; Tang, Benjamin C; Hammers, Hans; Watkins, D Neil; Pili, Roberto; Popel, Aleksander S

    2010-02-01

    Angiogenesis is the formation of neovasculature from a pre-existing vascular network. Progression of solid tumors including lung cancer is angiogenesis-dependent. We previously introduced a bioinformatics-based methodology to identify endogenous anti-angiogenic peptide sequences, and validated these predictions in vitro in human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation and migration assays. One family of peptides with high activity is derived from the alpha-fibrils of type IV collagen. Based on the results from the in vitro screening, we have evaluated the ability of a 20 amino acid peptide derived from the alpha5 fibril of type IV collagen, pentastatin-1, to suppress vessel growth in an angioreactor-based directed in vivo angiogenesis assay (DIVAA). In addition, pentastatin-1 suppressed tumor growth with intraperitoneal peptide administration in a small cell lung cancer (SCLC) xenograft model in nude mice using the NCI-H82 human cancer cell line. Pentastatin-1 decreased the invasion of vessels into angioreactors in vivo in a dose dependent manner. The peptide also decreased the rate of tumor growth and microvascular density in vivo in a small cell lung cancer xenograft model. The peptide treatment significantly decreased the invasion of microvessels in angioreactors and the rate of tumor growth in the xenograft model, indicating potential treatment for angiogenesis-dependent disease, and for translational development as a therapeutic agent for lung cancer.

  9. Pentastatin-1, a collagen IV derived 20-mer peptide, suppresses tumor growth in a small cell lung cancer xenograft model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koskimaki, Jacob E; Karagiannis, Emmanouil D; Tang, Benjamin C; Hammers, Hans; Watkins, D Neil; Pili, Roberto; Popel, Aleksander S

    2010-01-01

    Angiogenesis is the formation of neovasculature from a pre-existing vascular network. Progression of solid tumors including lung cancer is angiogenesis-dependent. We previously introduced a bioinformatics-based methodology to identify endogenous anti-angiogenic peptide sequences, and validated these predictions in vitro in human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation and migration assays. One family of peptides with high activity is derived from the α-fibrils of type IV collagen. Based on the results from the in vitro screening, we have evaluated the ability of a 20 amino acid peptide derived from the α5 fibril of type IV collagen, pentastatin-1, to suppress vessel growth in an angioreactor-based directed in vivo angiogenesis assay (DIVAA). In addition, pentastatin-1 suppressed tumor growth with intraperitoneal peptide administration in a small cell lung cancer (SCLC) xenograft model in nude mice using the NCI-H82 human cancer cell line. Pentastatin-1 decreased the invasion of vessels into angioreactors in vivo in a dose dependent manner. The peptide also decreased the rate of tumor growth and microvascular density in vivo in a small cell lung cancer xenograft model. The peptide treatment significantly decreased the invasion of microvessels in angioreactors and the rate of tumor growth in the xenograft model, indicating potential treatment for angiogenesis-dependent disease, and for translational development as a therapeutic agent for lung cancer

  10. The study of irradiation combined with targeted suicide gene therapy for prostate cancer xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xueguan; Milas, L.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study whether RGD-4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV, one of suicide gene therapy targeting to Integrin αv, can enhance radiotherapeutic effect for DU145 prostate cancer xenografts or not. Methods: When the diameter of tumor in 48 nude mice bearing DU145 prostate cancer in the right leg attained 6.0 mm (5.8-6.3 mm), the mice were entered into the experiment. There were 6 experimental groups (8 mice per group), including the control, radiotherapy only (RT), RGD-4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV only (Targeted, RGD-4C), AAVP HSV-TK/GCV (Non-targeted, non RGD-4C ), radiotherapy plus RGD- 4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV(XRT + RGD-4C) and radiotherapy plus AAVP HSV-TK/GCV group (XRT + Non RGD-4C). The effect of treatment was assessed by tumor growth delay ( the time required when tumor grew from 6.0 mm to 12.0 mm) and tumor cure. Results: Five mice died during the treatment course. There were 6 mice without tumor after treatment, including 1 in RT group, 1 in RGD-4C group, 1 in non RGD-4C group and 3 in XRT + RGD-4C group, respectively. For tumor growth delay analysis in 37 mice, the absolute growth delay (AGD) for RGD-4C, non RGD-4C and RT group was 24.4 ± 9.0, 22.6±11.3 and 28.3 ±5.5 days, respectively. When RGD-4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV or AAVP HSV-TK/GCV combined with radiotherapy, their AGD was 64.7±23.8 and 35.4±9.6 days, and nominal growth delay (NGD) was 40.3 ± 23.8 and 12.8 ± 9.6 days, respectively. The enhancement factor of RGD-4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV and AAVP HSV-TK/GCV for radiotherapy were 1.42 and 0.45. Conclusion: RGD-4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV can enhance radiotherapeutic effect for DU145 prostate cancer xenografts. Further study is needed. (authors)

  11. Imaging Tumor Variation in Response to Photodynamic Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer Xenograft Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Chen, Alina; Rizvi, Imran; O'Hara, Julia A.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Pereira, Stephen P.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: A treatment monitoring study investigated the differential effects of orthotopic pancreatic cancer models in response to interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT), and the validity of using magnetic resonance imaging as a surrogate measure of response was assessed. Methods and Materials: Different orthotopic pancreatic cancer xenograft models (AsPC-1 and Panc-1) were used to represent the range of pathophysiology observed in human beings. Identical dose escalation studies (10, 20, and 40J/cm) using interstitial verteporfin PDT were performed, and magnetic resonance imaging with T2-weighted and T1-weighted contrast were used to monitor the total tumor volume and the vascular perfusion volume, respectively. Results: There was a significant amount of necrosis in the slower-growing Panc-1 tumor using high light dose, although complete necrosis was not observed. Lower doses were required for the same level of tumor kill in the faster-growing AsPC-1 cell line. Conclusions: The tumor growth rate and vascular pattern of the tumor affect the optimal PDT treatment regimen, with faster-growing tumors being relatively easier to treat. This highlights the fact that therapy in human beings shows a heterogeneous range of outcomes, and suggests a need for careful individualized treatment outcomes assessment in clinical work.

  12. Imaging HER2 in response to T-DM1 therapy in breast cancer xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massicano, Adriana Vidal; Aweda, Tolulope; Marqueznostra, Bernadette; El Sayed, Reeta; Beacham, Rebecca; Lapi, Suzanne [University Of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Full text: Introduction: Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become broadly used for the treatment of cancer because they can be engineered to bind specifically to the target and therefore typically have less toxicity compared to broad spectrum chemotherapies (Jauw YWS, Menke-van der Houven van Oordt CW, Hoekstra OS, et al. Front Pharmacol 2016, 7:1-15). Ado-trastuzumab emtansine (TDM1) is a newly approved HER2 targeted therapy which consists of a cytotoxic agent (DM1) linked to trastuzumab and has shown promising results in patients with HER2 positive metastatic breast cancer (Barok MT, Köninki M, Isola K et al. Breast Cancer Res 2011, 13:1465-5411). Although {sup 18}F-FDG is considered the gold standard in the diagnosis and staging of various types of cancer, it is a relatively non-specific marker (Janjigian YY, Viola-Villegas N, Holland JP, Divilov V, Carlin SD et al. J Nucl Med 2013;54:936-43). Alternatively, {sup 89}Zr-Pertuzumab which binds to a different epitope than trastuzumab on the HER2 receptor has shown high selectively in imaging variations in HER2 expression in breast cancer xenograft models (Marquez BV, Ikotun OF, Zheleznyak A, Wright B et al. Mol Pharm 2014;11:3988-95). Therefore, in this work, we investigated the specificity of {sup 89}Zr-Pertuzumab compared to {sup 18}F-FDG to identify early response to ado-trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) in a breast cancer xenograft model. Methods: Pertuzumab was conjugated top-NCS-Bz-DFO at varying molar ratios and labeled with {sup 89}Zr in different conditions. The optimal conditions were used in further in vitro and in vivo studies. In vivo PET imaging was conducted in nude female mice implanted with 17β-estradiol pellets and inoculated with 1 x 107 BT-474 HER2 positive breast cancer cells. In order to acquire baseline images, mice were injected via tail-vein with 200 μCi of 18F-FDG and imaged after 1 hour. The following day, they were injected with 100 μCi of {sup 89}Zr-Pertuzumab (20 μCi/μg) imaged 5

  13. Inhibition of Hedgehog signaling antagonizes serous ovarian cancer growth in a primary xenograft model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher K McCann

    Full Text Available Recent evidence links aberrant activation of Hedgehog (Hh signaling with the pathogenesis of several cancers including medulloblastoma, basal cell, small cell lung, pancreatic, prostate and ovarian. This investigation was designed to determine if inhibition of this pathway could inhibit serous ovarian cancer growth.We utilized an in vivo pre-clinical model of serous ovarian cancer to characterize the anti-tumor activity of Hh pathway inhibitors cyclopamine and a clinically applicable derivative, IPI-926. Primary human serous ovarian tumor tissue was used to generate tumor xenografts in mice that were subsequently treated with cyclopamine or IPI-926.Both compounds demonstrated significant anti-tumor activity as single agents. When IPI-926 was used in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatinum (T/C, no synergistic effect was observed, though sustained treatment with IPI-926 after cessation of T/C continued to suppress tumor growth. Hh pathway activity was analyzed by RT-PCR to assess changes in Gli1 transcript levels. A single dose of IPI-926 inhibited mouse stromal Gli1 transcript levels at 24 hours with unchanged human intra-tumor Gli1 levels. Chronic IPI-926 therapy for 21 days, however, inhibited Hh signaling in both mouse stromal and human tumor cells. Expression data from the micro-dissected stroma in human serous ovarian tumors confirmed the presence of Gli1 transcript and a significant association between elevated Gli1 transcript levels and worsened survival.IPI-926 treatment inhibits serous tumor growth suggesting the Hh signaling pathway contributes to the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer and may hold promise as a novel therapeutic target, especially in the maintenance setting.

  14. High hRFI expression correlates with resistance to Fluoro pyrimidines in human colon cancer cell lines and in xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, S.; Tokyo Univ., Tokyo; Watanabe, T.; Konishi, T.; Kitayama, J.; Nagawa, H.; Kobunai, T.

    2005-01-01

    We previously reported that the over-expression of hRFI, a protein preferentially expressed in the digestive tract regions of several cancers, exhibited a tendency to inhibit TNF-α induced apoptosis. In this study, we sought to determine the potential effect of hRFI expression on the sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and/or other fluoro pyrimidines. For the whole lysates of 8 colon cancer cell lines, we performed Western blotting with anti-hRFI antibody and analyzed the correlations between the expression level of hRFI and the cell lines' sensitivity to 5-FU induced apoptosis. Furthermore, for a tissue micro array consisting of 32 xenograft derived human cancer cell lines, we examined the expression levels of hRFI and survivin by immunohistochemical staining, and analyzed the correlations between the expression of each protein and the sensitivity to several chemotherapeutic agents in the xenografts examined. Both in colon cancer cell lines and in xenografts, the expression level of hRFI was correlated with resistance to 5-FU and its derivatives. This evidence suggests that hRFI may be a marker predicting the response to fluorouracil derived chemotherapeutic agents and that the reduction of the expression level of hRFI might improve the outcome of chemotherapy

  15. Combined therapeutic effect and molecular mechanisms of metformin and cisplatin in human lung cancer xenografts in nude mice

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Qin Chen; Gang Chen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This work was aimed at studying the inhibitory activity of metformin combined with the commonly used chemotherapy drug cisplatin in human lung cancer xenografts in nude mice. We also examined the combined effects of these drugs on the molecular expression of survivin, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C), and vascular endothelial growth factorreceptor-3 (VEGFR-3) to determine the mechanism of action and to explore the potential applicati...

  16. Expression of myc family oncoproteins in small-cell lung-cancer cell lines and xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rygaard, K; Vindeløv, L L; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1993-01-01

    A number of genes have altered activity in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), but especially genes of the myc family (c-myc, L-myc and N-myc) are expressed at high levels in SCLC. Most studies have explored expression at the mRNA level, whereas studies of myc family oncoprotein expression are sparse....... WE examined the expression of myc proto-oncogenes at the mRNA and protein level in 23 cell lines or xenografts. In the cell lines, the doubling time and the cell-cycle distribution, as determined by flow-cytometric DNA analysis, were examined to establish whether the level of myc......-myc. In general, the level of expression of c-myc and N-myc was similar at the mRNA and the protein level. Expression of c-myc was positively correlated with the proliferative index (sum of S and G2+M phases) of cell lines, but not with the population doubling time. In general, L-myc-expressing cell lines had...

  17. Quality Assessments of Long-Term Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Breast Cancer Xenograft Tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jian-Ying; Chen, Lijun; Zhang, Bai; Tian, Yuan; Liu, Tao; Thomas, Stefani N.; Chen, Li; Schnaubelt, Michael; Boja, Emily; Hiltket, Tara; Kinsinger, Christopher; Rodriguez, Henry; Davies, Sherri; Li, Shunqiang; Snider, Jacqueline E.; Erdmann-Gilmore, Petra; Tabb, David L.; Townsend, Reid; Ellis, Matthew; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.; Carr, Steven A.; Zhang, Zhen; Chan, Daniel W.; Zhang, Hui

    2017-09-21

    The identification of protein biomarkers requires large-scale analysis of human specimens to achieve statistical significance. In this study, we evaluated the long-term reproducibility of an iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification) based quantitative proteomics strategy using one channel for universal normalization across all samples. A total of 307 liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) analyses were completed, generating 107 one-dimensional (1D) LC-MS/MS datasets and 8 offline two-dimensional (2D) LC-MS/MS datasets (25 fractions for each set) for human-in-mouse breast cancer xenograft tissues representative of basal and luminal subtypes. Such large-scale studies require the implementation of robust metrics to assess the contributions of technical and biological variability in the qualitative and quantitative data. Accordingly, we developed a quantification confidence score based on the quality of each peptide-spectrum match (PSM) to remove quantification outliers from each analysis. After combining confidence score filtering and statistical analysis, reproducible protein identification and quantitative results were achieved from LC-MS/MS datasets collected over a 16 month period.

  18. Melatonin exerts anti-oral cancer effect via suppressing LSD1 in patient-derived tumor xenograft models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Yu; Lin, Chih-Kung; Tsao, Chang-Huei; Hsieh, Cheng-Chih; Lin, Gu-Jiun; Ma, Kuo-Hsing; Shieh, Yi-Shing; Sytwu, Huey-Kang; Chen, Yuan-Wu

    2017-01-01

    Aberrant activation of histone lysine-specific demethylase (LSD1) increases tumorigenicity; hence, LSD1 is considered a therapeutic target for various human cancers. Although melatonin, an endogenously produced molecule, may defend against various cancers, the precise mechanism involved in its anti-oral cancer effect remains unclear. Patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDTX) models are preclinical models that can more accurately reflect human tumor biology compared with cell line xenograft models. Here, we evaluated the anticancer activity of melatonin by using LSD1-overexpressing oral cancer PDTX models. By assessing oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) tissue arrays through immunohistochemistry, we examined whether aberrant LSD1 overexpression in OSCC is associated with poor prognosis. We also evaluated the action mechanism of melatonin against OSCC with lymphatic metastases by using the PDTX models. Our results indicated that melatonin, at pharmacological concentrations, significantly suppresses cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The observed suppression of proliferation was accompanied by the melatonin-mediated inhibition of LSD1 in oral cancer PDTXs and oral cancer cell lines. In conclusion, we determined that the beneficial effects of melatonin in reducing oral cancer cell proliferation are associated with reduced LSD1 expression in vivo and in vitro. PMID:28422711

  19. Intratumoral Heterogeneity of Breast Cancer Xenograft Models: Texture Analysis of Diffusion-Weighted MR Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Bo La; Cho, Nariya; Li, Mulun; Song, In Chan; Moon, Woo Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Min Hye; Park, So Yeon; Kim, Bo Young [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Ho Chul [Dept. of Computer Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    .464), kurtosis (r = -0.581, r = -0.389), contrast (r = -0.473, r = -0.549) and COR (r = 0.588, r = 0.580) correlated with MVDmean and MVDdiff (p < 0.05 for all). The texture analysis of ADC maps may help to determine the intratumoral spatial heterogeneity of necrosis patterns, amount of cellular proliferation and the vascularity in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 xenograft breast cancer models.

  20. Prevention of Human Lymphoproliferative Tumor Formation in Ovarian Cancer Patient-Derived Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina A. Butler

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Interest in preclinical drug development for ovarian cancer has stimulated development of patient-derived xenograft (PDX or tumorgraft models. However, the unintended formation of human lymphoma in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV–infected human lymphocytes can be problematic. In this study, we have characterized ovarian cancer PDXs which developed human lymphomas and explore methods to suppress lymphoproliferative growth. Fresh human ovarian tumors from 568 patients were transplanted intraperitoneally in SCID mice. A subset of PDX models demonstrated atypical patterns of dissemination with mediastinal masses, hepatosplenomegaly, and CD45-positive lymphoblastic atypia without ovarian tumor engraftment. Expression of human CD20 but not CD3 supported a B-cell lineage, and EBV genomes were detected in all lymphoproliferative tumors. Immunophenotyping confirmed monoclonal gene rearrangements consistent with B-cell lymphoma, and global gene expression patterns correlated well with other human lymphomas. The ability of rituximab, an anti-CD20 antibody, to suppress human lymphoproliferation from a patient's ovarian tumor in SCID mice and prevent growth of an established lymphoma led to a practice change with a goal to reduce the incidence of lymphomas. A single dose of rituximab during the primary tumor heterotransplantation process reduced the incidence of CD45-positive cells in subsequent PDX lines from 86.3% (n = 117 without rituximab to 5.6% (n = 160 with rituximab, and the lymphoma rate declined from 11.1% to 1.88%. Taken together, investigators utilizing PDX models for research should routinely monitor for lymphoproliferative tumors and consider implementing methods to suppress their growth.

  1. Monitoring longitudinal changes in irradiated head and neck cancer xenografts using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwanath, Karthik; Jiang, Shudong; Gunn, Jason R.; Marra, Kayla; Andreozzi, Jacqueline M.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-02-01

    Radiation therapy is often used as the preferred clinical treatment for control of localized head and neck cancer. However, during the course of treatment (6-8 weeks), feedback about functional and/or physiological changes within impacted tissue are not obtained, given the onerous financial and/or logistical burdens of scheduling MRI, PET or CT scans. Diffuse optical sensing is well suited to address this problem since the instrumentation can be made low-cost and portable while still being able to non-invasively provide information about vascular oxygenation in vivo. Here we report results from studies that employed an optical fiber-based portable diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) system to longitudinally monitor changes in tumor vasculature within two head and neck cancer cell lines (SCC-15 and FaDu) xenografted in the flanks of nude mice, in two separate experiments. Once the tumor volumes were 100mm3, 67% of animals received localized (electron beam) radiation therapy in five fractions (8Gy/day, for 5 days) while 33% of the animals served as controls. DRS measurements were obtained from each animal on each day of treatment and then for two weeks post-treatment. Reflectance spectra were parametrized to extract total hemoglobin concentration and blood oxygen-saturation and the resulting time-trends of optical parameters appear to be dissimilar for the two cell-lines. These findings are also compared to previous animal experiments (using the FaDu line) that were irradiated using a photon beam radiotherapy protocol. These results and implications for the use of fiber-based DRS measurements made at local (irradiated) tumor site as a basis for identifying early radiotherapy-response are presented and discussed.

  2. Doxorubicin increases the effectiveness of Apo2L/TRAIL for tumor growth inhibition of prostate cancer xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Zawahry, Ahmed; McKillop, John; Voelkel-Johnson, Christina

    2005-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a significant health problem among American men. Treatment strategies for androgen-independent cancer are currently not available. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (Apo2L/TRAIL) is a death receptor ligand that can induce apoptosis in a variety of cancer cell lines, including androgen-independent PC3 prostate carcinoma cells. In vitro, TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of prostate cancer cell lines can be enhanced by doxorubicin and correlates with the downregulation of the anti-apoptotic protein c-FLIP. This study evaluated the effects of doxorubicin on c-FLIP expression and tumor growth in combination with Apo2L/TRAIL in a xenograft model. In vitro cytotoxic effects of TRAIL were measured using a MTS-based viability assay. For in vivo studies, PC3 prostate carcinoma cells were grown subcutaneously in athymic nude mice and tumor growth was measured following treatment with doxorubicin and/or Apo2L/TRAIL. c-FLIP expression was determined by western blot analysis. Apoptosis in xenografts was detected using TUNEL. Statistical analysis was performed using the student t-test. In vitro experiments show that PC3 cells are partially susceptible to Apo2L/TRAIL and that susceptibility is enhanced by doxorubicin. In mice, doxorubicin did not significantly affect the growth of PC3 xenografts but reduced c-FLIP expression in tumors. Expression of c-FLIP in mouse heart was decreased only at the high doxorubicin concentration (8 mg/kg). Combination of doxorubicin with Apo2L/TRAIL resulted in more apoptotic cell death and tumor growth inhibition than Apo2L/TRAIL alone. Combination of doxorubicin and Apo2L/TRAIL is more effective in growth inhibition of PC3 xenografts in vivo than either agent alone and could present a novel treatment strategy against hormone-refractory prostate cancer. The intracellular mechanism by which doxorubicin enhances the effect of Apo2L/TRAIL on PC3 xenografts may be by reducing expression of c-FLIP

  3. Monoclonal antibodies to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 reveal differential expression patterns in cancer and low antigen expression in normal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bujak, Emil; Pretto, Francesca; Ritz, Danilo; Gualandi, Laura; Wulhfard, Sarah; Neri, Dario

    2014-01-01

    There is a considerable interest for the discovery and characterization of tumor-associated antigens, which may facilitate antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies. Thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 are homologous secreted proteins, which have previously been reported to be overexpressed during remodeling typical for wound healing and tumor progression and to possibly play a functional role in cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. To our knowledge, a complete immunohistochemical characterization of thrombospondins levels in normal rodent tissues has not been reported so far. Using antibody phage technology, we have generated and characterized monoclonal antibodies specific to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2, two antigens which share 62% aminoacid identity. An immunofluorescence analysis revealed that both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues, except for a weak staining of heart tissue by antibodies specific to thrombospondin-1. The analysis also showed that thrombospondin-1 was strongly expressed in 5/7 human tumors xenografted in nude mice, while it was only barely detectable in 3/8 murine tumors grafted in immunocompetent mice. By contrast, a high-affinity antibody to thrombospondin-2 revealed a much lower level of expression of this antigen in cancer specimens. Our analysis resolves ambiguities related to conflicting reports on thrombosponding expression in health and disease. Based on our findings, thrombospondin-1 (and not thrombospondin-2) may be considered as a target for antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies, in consideration of its low expression in normal tissues and its upregulation in cancer. - Highlights: • High affinity monoclonal antibodies to murine and human TSP1 and 2 were raised. • Both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues. • Strong positivity of human tumor xenografts for TSP1 was detected. • Study revealed much lower level of TSP2 expression in cancer specimens

  4. Monoclonal antibodies to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 reveal differential expression patterns in cancer and low antigen expression in normal tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bujak, Emil [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zürich), Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Pretto, Francesca; Ritz, Danilo; Gualandi, Laura; Wulhfard, Sarah [Philochem AG, Libernstrasse 3, CH-8112 Otelfingen (Switzerland); Neri, Dario, E-mail: neri@pharma.ethz.ch [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zürich), Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-09-10

    There is a considerable interest for the discovery and characterization of tumor-associated antigens, which may facilitate antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies. Thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 are homologous secreted proteins, which have previously been reported to be overexpressed during remodeling typical for wound healing and tumor progression and to possibly play a functional role in cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. To our knowledge, a complete immunohistochemical characterization of thrombospondins levels in normal rodent tissues has not been reported so far. Using antibody phage technology, we have generated and characterized monoclonal antibodies specific to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2, two antigens which share 62% aminoacid identity. An immunofluorescence analysis revealed that both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues, except for a weak staining of heart tissue by antibodies specific to thrombospondin-1. The analysis also showed that thrombospondin-1 was strongly expressed in 5/7 human tumors xenografted in nude mice, while it was only barely detectable in 3/8 murine tumors grafted in immunocompetent mice. By contrast, a high-affinity antibody to thrombospondin-2 revealed a much lower level of expression of this antigen in cancer specimens. Our analysis resolves ambiguities related to conflicting reports on thrombosponding expression in health and disease. Based on our findings, thrombospondin-1 (and not thrombospondin-2) may be considered as a target for antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies, in consideration of its low expression in normal tissues and its upregulation in cancer. - Highlights: • High affinity monoclonal antibodies to murine and human TSP1 and 2 were raised. • Both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues. • Strong positivity of human tumor xenografts for TSP1 was detected. • Study revealed much lower level of TSP2 expression in cancer specimens

  5. Metformin decreases the dose of chemotherapy for prolonging tumor remission in mouse xenografts involving multiple cancer cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Hirsch, Heather A; Struhl, Kevin

    2011-05-01

    Metformin, the first-line drug for treating diabetes, selectively kills the chemotherapy resistant subpopulation of cancer stem cells (CSC) in genetically distinct types of breast cancer cell lines. In mouse xenografts, injection of metformin and the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin near the tumor is more effective than either drug alone in blocking tumor growth and preventing relapse. Here, we show that metformin is equally effective when given orally together with paclitaxel, carboplatin, and doxorubicin, indicating that metformin works together with a variety of standard chemotherapeutic agents. In addition, metformin has comparable effects on tumor regression and preventing relapse when combined with a four-fold reduced dose of doxorubicin that is not effective as a monotherapy. Finally, the combination of metformin and doxorubicin prevents relapse in xenografts generated with prostate and lung cancer cell lines. These observations provide further evidence for the CSC hypothesis for cancer relapse, an experimental rationale for using metformin as part of combinatorial therapy in a variety of clinical settings, and for reducing the chemotherapy dose in cancer patients.

  6. Animal study of rh-endostatin combined with ginsenoside Rg3 on inhibiting growth of breast cancer xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Ming Tong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the inhibiting effect of rh-endostatin combined with ginsenoside Rg3 on growth of breast cancer xenografts. Methods: C57BL/6 nude mice were selected as research subjects, animal models with breast cancer xenografts were established through subcutaneous injection of breast cancer cells in the neck and randomly divided into A-D groups, and normal saline, rh-endostatin, ginsenoside Rg3 and rh-endostatin combined with ginsenoside Rg3 were injected respectively. Tumor growth, serum angiogenesis factor contents, percentages of cell cycles and expression levels of cell cycle-related molecules in tumor tissue of four groups were compared. Results: 7 d, 14 d and 21 d after treatment, tumor volume as well as serum VEGF and bFGF contents of B group, C group and D group were significantly lower than those of A group, and tumor volume as well as serum VEGF and bFGF contents of D group were significantly lower than those of B group and C group; 21 d after treatment, tumor weight, percentages of S phase and G2/M phase as well as mRNA contents and protein contents of cyclin E and CDC25A in tumor tissue of B group, C group and D group were lower than those of A group, and G0/G1 phase percentages were higher than that of A group; tumor weight, percentages of S phase and G2/M phase as well as mRNA contents and protein contents of cyclin E and CDC25A in tumor tissue of D group were significantly lower than those of B group and C group, and G0/G1 phase percentage was lower than those of B group and C group. Conclusion: rh-endostatin combined with ginsenoside Rg3 can more effectively inhibit growth of breast cancer xenografts, make cell cycle arrest and down-regulate expression of cell cyclerelated molecules.

  7. Ribosomopathy-like properties of murine and human cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sucheta Kulkarni

    Full Text Available Ribosomopathies comprise a heterogeneous group of hematologic and developmental disorders, often characterized by bone marrow failure, skeletal and other developmental abnormalities and cancer predisposition. They are associated with mutations and/or haplo-insufficiencies of ribosomal proteins (RPs and inefficient ribosomal RNA (rRNA processing. The resulting ribosomal stress induces the canonical p19ARF/Mdm2/p53 tumor suppressor pathway leading to proliferative arrest and/or apoptosis. It has been proposed that this pathway is then inactivated during subsequent neoplastic evolution. We show here that two murine models of hepatoblastoma (HB and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC unexpectedly possess features that mimic the ribosomopathies. These include loss of the normal stoichiometry of RP transcripts and proteins and the accumulation of unprocessed rRNA precursors. Silencing of p19ARF, cytoplasmic sequestration of p53, binding to and inactivation of Mdm2 by free RPs, and up-regulation of the pro-survival protein Bcl-2 may further cooperate to drive tumor growth and survival. Consistent with this notion, re-instatement of constitutive p19ARF expression in the HB model completely suppressed tumorigenesis. In >2000 cases of human HCC, colorectal, breast, and prostate cancer, RP transcript deregulation was a frequent finding. In HCC and breast cancer, the severity of this dysregulation was associated with inferior survival. In HCC, the presence of RP gene mutations, some of which were identical to those previously reported in ribosomopathies, were similarly negatively correlated with long-term survival. Taken together, our results indicate that many if not all cancers possess ribosomopathy-like features that may affect their biological behaviors.

  8. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy change vessel tree geometry and metastatic spread in a small cell lung cancer xenograft mouse tumor model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Frenzel

    Full Text Available Tumor vasculature is critical for tumor growth, formation of distant metastases and efficiency of radio- and chemotherapy treatments. However, how the vasculature itself is affected during cancer treatment regarding to the metastatic behavior has not been thoroughly investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze the influence of hypofractionated radiotherapy and cisplatin chemotherapy on vessel tree geometry and metastasis formation in a small cell lung cancer xenograft mouse tumor model to investigate the spread of malignant cells during different treatments modalities.The biological data gained during these experiments were fed into our previously developed computer model "Cancer and Treatment Simulation Tool" (CaTSiT to model the growth of the primary tumor, its metastatic deposit and also the influence on different therapies. Furthermore, we performed quantitative histology analyses to verify our predictions in xenograft mouse tumor model.According to the computer simulation the number of cells engrafting must vary considerably to explain the different weights of the primary tumor at the end of the experiment. Once a primary tumor is established, the fractal dimension of its vasculature correlates with the tumor size. Furthermore, the fractal dimension of the tumor vasculature changes during treatment, indicating that the therapy affects the blood vessels' geometry. We corroborated these findings with a quantitative histological analysis showing that the blood vessel density is depleted during radiotherapy and cisplatin chemotherapy. The CaTSiT computer model reveals that chemotherapy influences the tumor's therapeutic susceptibility and its metastatic spreading behavior.Using a system biological approach in combination with xenograft models and computer simulations revealed that the usage of chemotherapy and radiation therapy determines the spreading behavior by changing the blood vessel geometry of the primary tumor.

  9. Therapeutic effects of microbubble added to combined high-intensity focused ultrasound and chemotherapy in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Mi Hye [Dept. of Radiology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Young; Kim, Bo Ram; Park, Eun Joo; Kim, Hoe Suk; Han, Joon Koo [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hae Ri [Dept. of Pre-Dentistry, Gangneung-Wonju National University College of Dentistry, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Byung Ihn [Dept. of Radiology, Chung-Ang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To investigate whether high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy. A pancreatic cancer xenograft model was established using BALB/c nude mice and luciferase-expressing human pancreatic cancer cells. Mice were randomly assigned to five groups according to treatment: control (n = 10), gemcitabine alone (GEM; n = 12), HIFU with microbubbles (HIFU + MB, n = 11), combined HIFU and gemcitabine (HIGEM; n = 12), and HIGEM + MB (n = 13). After three weekly treatments, apoptosis rates were evaluated using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay in two mice per group. Tumor volume and bioluminescence were monitored using high-resolution 3D ultrasound imaging and in vivo bioluminescence imaging for eight weeks in the remaining mice. The HIGEM + MB group showed significantly higher apoptosis rates than the other groups (p < 0.05) and exhibited the slowest tumor growth. From week 5, the tumor-volume-ratio relative to the baseline tumor volume was significantly lower in the HIGEM + MB group than in the control, GEM, and HIFU + MB groups (p < 0.05). Despite visible distinction, the HIGEM and HIGEM + MB groups showed no significant differences. High-intensity focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of gemcitabine chemotherapy in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model.

  10. Therapeutic Effects of Microbubbles Added to Combined High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound and Chemotherapy in a Pancreatic Cancer Xenograft Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Mi Hye [Department of Radiology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul 05030 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Young [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 03080 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hae Ri [Department of Pre-Dentistry, Gangneung-Wonju National University College of Dentistry, Gangneung 25457 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bo Ram; Park, Eun-Joo; Kim, Hoe Suk; Han, Joon Koo [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 03080 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Byung Ihn [Department of Radiology, Chung-Ang University Hospital, Seoul 06973 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    To investigate whether high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy. A pancreatic cancer xenograft model was established using BALB/c nude mice and luciferase-expressing human pancreatic cancer cells. Mice were randomly assigned to five groups according to treatment: control (n = 10), gemcitabine alone (GEM; n = 12), HIFU with microbubbles (HIFU + MB, n = 11), combined HIFU and gemcitabine (HIGEM; n = 12), and HIGEM + MB (n = 13). After three weekly treatments, apoptosis rates were evaluated using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay in two mice per group. Tumor volume and bioluminescence were monitored using high-resolution 3D ultrasound imaging and in vivo bioluminescence imaging for eight weeks in the remaining mice. The HIGEM + MB group showed significantly higher apoptosis rates than the other groups (p < 0.05) and exhibited the slowest tumor growth. From week 5, the tumor-volume-ratio relative to the baseline tumor volume was significantly lower in the HIGEM + MB group than in the control, GEM, and HIFU + MB groups (p < 0.05). Despite visible distinction, the HIGEM and HIGEM + MB groups showed no significant differences. High-intensity focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of gemcitabine chemotherapy in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model.

  11. Fluorescent humanized anti-CEA antibody specifically labels metastatic pancreatic cancer in a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lwin, Thinzar M.; Miyake, Kentaro; Murakami, Takashi; DeLong, Jonathan C.; Yazaki, Paul J.; Shivley, John E.; Clary, Bryan; Hoffman, Robert M.; Bouvet, Michael

    2018-03-01

    Specific tumor targeting can result in selective labeling of cancer in vivo for surgical navigation. In the present study, we show that the use of an anti-CEA antibody conjugated to the near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye, IRDye800CW, can selectively target and label pancreatic cancer and its metastases in a clinically relevant patient derived xenograft mouse model.

  12. Murine Double Minute 2 SNP T309G Polymorphism and Urinary Tract Cancer Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Hui; Dai, Yu; Ning, Zhongyun; Fan, Ning; Wang, Zhiping; Li, Pei; Zhang, Liyuan; Tao, Yan; Wang, Hanzhang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Urinary tract cancer is a common cause of cancer-related death. The etiology and pathogenesis of urinary tract cancer remain unclear, with genetic and epigenetic factors playing an important role. Studies of the polymorphism of murine double minute 2 (MDM2) have shown inconclusive trends in the risk of urinary tract cancer. To clarify this inconsistency, we conducted updated meta-analyses to evaluate the role of MDM2 T309G polymorphism in urinary tract cancer susceptibility. Data sou...

  13. lacZ transduced human breast cancer xenografts as an in vivo model for the study of invasion and metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brünner, N; Thompson, E W; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1992-01-01

    in the animals by usual histological procedures would require extensive sectioning of the whole animal. To overcome this problem, we transduced human breast cancer cells with a replication-defective Moloney murine leukaemia retroviral vector (M-MuLV) containing both neoR (neomycin resistance) and lacZ genes...... but not the surrounding mouse tissue on either whole tissue blocks or histological sections. The staining procedure was highly sensitive, allowing detection of microfoci of human cancer cells, and quantitative estimation of the metastatic capacity of the cells. These results indicate that lacZ transduction of human...

  14. Appropriateness of using patient-derived xenograft models for pharmacologic evaluation of novel therapies for esophageal/gastro-esophageal junction cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorin Dodbiba

    Full Text Available The high morbidity and mortality of patients with esophageal (E and gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ cancers, warrants new pre-clinical models for drug testing. The utility of primary tumor xenografts (PTXGs as pre-clinical models was assessed. Clinicopathological, immunohistochemical markers (p53, p16, Ki-67, Her-2/neu and EGFR, and global mRNA abundance profiles were evaluated to determine selection biases of samples implanted or engrafted, compared with the underlying population. Nine primary E/GEJ adenocarcinoma xenograft lines were further characterized for the spectrum and stability of gene/protein expression over passages. Seven primary esophageal adenocarcinoma xenograft lines were treated with individual or combination chemotherapy. Tumors that were implanted (n=55 in NOD/SCID mice had features suggestive of more aggressive biology than tumors that were never implanted (n=32. Of those implanted, 21/55 engrafted; engraftment was associated with poorly differentiated tumors (p=0.04 and older patients (p=0.01. Expression of immunohistochemical markers were similar between patient sample and corresponding xenograft. mRNA differences observed between patient tumors and first passage xenografts were largely due to loss of human stroma in xenografts. mRNA patterns of early vs late passage xenografts and of small vs large tumors of the same passage were similar. Complete resistance was present in 2/7 xenografts while the remaining tumors showed varying degrees of sensitivity, that remained constant across passages. Because of their ability to recapitulate primary tumor characteristics during engraftment and across serial passaging, PTXGs can be useful clinical systems for assessment of drug sensitivity of human E/GEJ cancers.

  15. Comparison of intratumoral FDG and Cu-ATSM distributions in cancer tissue originated spheroid (CTOS) xenografts, a tumor model retaining the original tumor properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Takako; Yuan, Qinghua; Jin, Zhao-Hui; Aung, Winn; Yoshii, Yukie; Hasegawa, Sumitaka; Endo, Hiroko; Inoue, Masahiro; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Saga, Tsuneo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The intratumoral distributions of [ 18 F]FDG and [ 64 Cu]Cu-ATSM have been reported to be similar in adenocarcinomas but different in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in clinical studies. In the present study, we compared the intratumoral distributions of these two tracers in cancer tissue originated spheroid (CTOS) xenografts derived from adenocarcinoma and SCC, which retain the histological characteristics of the original tumors, and in cancer cell line xenografts of corresponding origin, to investigate the underlying mechanism of the distinct FDG and Cu-ATSM distribution patterns in adenocarcinoma and SCC. Methods: CTOSs derived from colon adenocarcinoma and lung SCC and cell lines established from colon adenocarcinoma and lung SCC, which were used for comparison, were subcutaneously transplanted into immunodeficient mice. One hour after administering [ 14 C]FDG and [ 64 Cu]Cu-ATSM, the intratumoral distributions were compared in the xenografts by using dual-tracer autoradiography. Adjacent sections were evaluated for necrosis, vasculature anatomy, Ki-67 antigen, and pimonidazole adducts using hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemical staining. Results: There was a higher regional overlap of high FDG and Cu-ATSM accumulations in the adenocarcinoma CTOS xenografts than in the SCC CTOS xenografts, while the overlap in the adenocarcinoma cell line xenograft was lower than that observed in the SCC cell line. High FDG accumulation occurred primarily in proximity to necrotic or pimonidazole adduct positive regions, while high Cu-ATSM accumulation occurred primarily in live cell regions separate from the necrotic regions. The adenocarcinoma CTOS xenograft had the stereotypical glandular structure, resulting in more intricately mixed regions of live and necrotic cells compared to those observed in the SCC CTOS or the cell line xenografts. Conclusion: Tumor morphological characteristics, specifically the spatial distribution of live and necrotic cell

  16. Human mammary fibroblasts stimulate invasion of breast cancer cells in a three-dimensional culture and increase stroma development in mouse xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, Charlotta J; Moreira, José; Lukanidin, Eugene M; Ambartsumian, Noona S

    2010-01-01

    Tumour phenotype is regulated in a complex fashion as a result of interactions between malignant cells and the tumour stroma. Fibroblasts are the most abundant and perhaps most active part of the tumour stroma. A better understanding of the changes that occur in fibroblasts in response to the presence of malignant cells may lead to the development of new strategies for cancer treatment. We explored the effects of fibroblasts on the growth and invasion of mammary carcinoma tumour cells in vitro and in vivo. In order to analyse secreted factors that affect invasive abilities of breast cancer cells we co-cultured human mammary fibroblasts (HMF3s) and cancer cells (MCF7S1) in three-dimensional (3D) growth conditions devoid of heterogeneous cell-cell contact. To study the possible influence of fibroblasts on MCF7S1 cancer cell growth in vivo we co-injected HMF3s and MCF7S1 cells in Balb/c nu/nu mice. In 3D co-culture both HMF3s and MCF7S1 cells demonstrated enhanced invasion into a Matrigel matrix. This was correlated with enhanced expression of the metastasis promoting S100A4 protein in fibroblasts, stimulation of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 activity, and enhanced secretion of a range of different cytokines. Orthotopic injection of oestrogen-dependent MCF7S1 cancer cells together with fibroblasts showed stimulation of tumour growth in mice without an external oestrogen supply. The resulting tumours were characterized by increased development of extracellular matrix, as well as an increase of murine S100A4 concentration and activity of MMP-2 in the tumour interstitial fluid. Stimulation of the invasive phenotype of tumour cells in 3D co-cultures with fibroblasts could be correlated with increased production of S100A4 and MMP-2. We propose that enhanced development of mouse host-derived tumour stroma in a MCF7S1 co-injection xenograft model leads to oestrogen independency and is triggered by the initial presence of human fibroblasts

  17. High-resolution dynamic imaging and quantitative analysis of lung cancer xenografts in nude mice using clinical PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying Yi; Wang, Kai; Xu, Zuo Yu; Song, Yan; Wang, Chu Nan; Zhang, Chong Qing; Sun, Xi Lin; Shen, Bao Zhong

    2017-08-08

    Considering the general application of dedicated small-animal positron emission tomography/computed tomography is limited, an acceptable alternative in many situations might be clinical PET/CT. To estimate the feasibility of using clinical PET/CT with [F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose for high-resolution dynamic imaging and quantitative analysis of cancer xenografts in nude mice. Dynamic clinical PET/CT scans were performed on xenografts for 60 min after injection with [F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Scans were reconstructed with or without SharpIR method in two phases. And mice were sacrificed to extracting major organs and tumors, using ex vivo γ-counting as a reference. Strikingly, we observed that the image quality and the correlation between the all quantitive data from clinical PET/CT and the ex vivo counting was better with the SharpIR reconstructions than without. Our data demonstrate that clinical PET/CT scanner with SharpIR reconstruction is a valuable tool for imaging small animals in preclinical cancer research, offering dynamic imaging parameters, good image quality and accurate data quatification.

  18. Clonal dominance between subpopulations of mixed small cell lung cancer xenografts implanted ectopically in nude mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabo, K; Vindeløv, L L; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1995-01-01

    Clonal evolution of neoplastic cells during solid tumour growth leads to the emergence of new tumour cell subpopulations with diverging phenotypic characteristics which may alter the behaviour of a malignant disease. Cellular interaction was studied in mixed xenografts in nude mice and during...... clone 54B was found to dominate the parent 54A clone when grown as mixed subcutaneous xenografts in nude mice, whereas no dominance was exerted during in vitro growth. The in vivo dominance could not be explained by differences in growth kinetics between the two tumour cell lines, and the interaction...... was not dependent on 54B being in excess in mixed tumours. The dominance was dependent on close in vivo contact as no remote effect on the growth of 54A was found when the dominating 54B cells were growing in the opposite flank of tumour-bearing mice. Irradiation inactivated 54B cells were unable to exert...

  19. Experimental study on 211At labelled monoclonal antibody 3H11 and its Fab fragment radioimmunotherapy for human gastric cancer xenografts in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Jiannan; Liu Ning; Zhang Shuyuan; Zhang Shiyuan; Luo Deyuan; Zhou Maolun

    1996-01-01

    Experimental radioimmunotherapy investigation of α-emitting radionuclide 211 At labelled anti-gastric cancer monoclonal antibody 3H11 and its Fab fragment for nude mice carrying human gastric cancer xenografts was conducted. Three i.p. injections of 14.8 or 22.2 kBq/g mouse were given, once every 5 days. The results showed that the growth of tumor xenografts was inhibited efficiently. The most evident therapy effect was observed at 15 days after treatment, and the tumor inhibition rates were 65% and 72%, respectively. No radiation injury of important organs was found

  20. Cymbopogon citratus and Camellia sinensis extracts selectively induce apoptosis in cancer cells and reduce growth of lymphoma xenografts in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philion, Cory; Ma, Dennis; Ruvinov, Ivan; Mansour, Fadi; Pignanelli, Christopher; Noel, Megan; Saleem, Ammar; Arnason, John; Rodrigues, Mark; Singh, Inderpal; Ropat, Jesse; Pandey, Siyaram

    2017-01-01

    Cancer cells are reported to have elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and are highly dependent on cellular defense mechanisms against oxidative stress. Numerous nutraceuticals and natural polyphenolic compounds have a wide range of abilities to alter cellular redox states with potential implications in various diseases. Furthermore, therapeutic options for cancers are mostly nonselective treatments including genotoxic or tubulin-targeting compounds. Some of the natural extracts, containing multiple bioactive compounds, could target multiple pathways in cancer cells to selectively induce cell death. Cymbopogon citratus (lemongrass) and Camellia sinensis (white tea) extracts have been shown to have medicinal properties, however, their activity against lymphoma and leukemia, as well as mechanistic details, have not been fully characterized. Herein, we report potent anti-cancer properties in dose and time-dependent manners of ethanolic lemongrass and hot water white tea extracts in lymphoma and leukemia models. Both extracts were able to effectively induce apoptosis selectively in these human cancer cell types. Interestingly, ethanolic lemongrass extract induces apoptosis primarily by the extrinsic pathway and was found to be dependent on the generation of ROS. Conversely, apoptotic induction by hot water white tea extract was independent of ROS. Furthermore, both of these extracts caused mitochondrial depolarization and decreased rates of oxygen consumption in lymphoma and leukemia cells, leading to cell death. Most importantly, both these extracts were effective in reducing tumor growth in human lymphoma xenograft models when administered orally. Thus, these natural extracts could have potential for being nontoxic alternatives for the treatment of cancer. PMID:29340014

  1. Preclinical In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of [18F]FE@SUPPY for Cancer PET Imaging: Limitations of a Xenograft Model for Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Balber

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging probes such as PET-tracers have the potential to improve the accuracy of tumor characterization by directly visualizing the biochemical situation. Thus, molecular changes can be detected early before morphological manifestation. The A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR is described to be highly expressed in colon cancer cell lines and human colorectal cancer (CRC, suggesting this receptor as a tumor marker. The aim of this preclinical study was the evaluation of F18FE@SUPPY as a PET-tracer for CRC using in vitro imaging and in vivo PET imaging. First, affinity and selectivity of FE@SUPPY and its metabolites were determined, proving the favorable binding profile of FE@SUPPY. The human adenocarcinoma cell line HT-29 was characterized regarding its hA3AR expression and was subsequently chosen as tumor graft. Promising results regarding the potential of F18FE@SUPPY as a PET-tracer for CRC imaging were obtained by autoradiography as ≥2.3-fold higher accumulation of F18FE@SUPPY was found in CRC tissue compared to adjacent healthy colon tissue from the same patient. Nevertheless, first in vivo studies using HT-29 xenografts showed insufficient tumor uptake due to (1 poor conservation of target expression in xenografts and (2 unfavorable pharmacokinetics of F18FE@SUPPY in mice. We therefore conclude that HT-29 xenografts are not adequate to visualize hA3ARs using F18FE@SUPPY.

  2. Distinct choline metabolic profiles are associated with differences in gene expression for basal-like and luminal-like breast cancer xenograft models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moestue, Siver A; Borgan, Eldrid; Huuse, Else M; Lindholm, Evita M; Sitter, Beathe; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Engebraaten, Olav; Mælandsmo, Gunhild M; Gribbestad, Ingrid S

    2010-01-01

    Increased concentrations of choline-containing compounds are frequently observed in breast carcinomas, and may serve as biomarkers for both diagnostic and treatment monitoring purposes. However, underlying mechanisms for the abnormal choline metabolism are poorly understood. The concentrations of choline-derived metabolites were determined in xenografted primary human breast carcinomas, representing basal-like and luminal-like subtypes. Quantification of metabolites in fresh frozen tissue was performed using high-resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR MAS MRS). The expression of genes involved in phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) metabolism was retrieved from whole genome expression microarray analyses. The metabolite profiles from xenografts were compared with profiles from human breast cancer, sampled from patients with estrogen/progesterone receptor positive (ER+/PgR+) or triple negative (ER-/PgR-/HER2-) breast cancer. In basal-like xenografts, glycerophosphocholine (GPC) concentrations were higher than phosphocholine (PCho) concentrations, whereas this pattern was reversed in luminal-like xenografts. These differences may be explained by lower choline kinase (CHKA, CHKB) expression as well as higher PtdCho degradation mediated by higher expression of phospholipase A2 group 4A (PLA2G4A) and phospholipase B1 (PLB1) in the basal-like model. The glycine concentration was higher in the basal-like model. Although glycine could be derived from energy metabolism pathways, the gene expression data suggested a metabolic shift from PtdCho synthesis to glycine formation in basal-like xenografts. In agreement with results from the xenograft models, tissue samples from triple negative breast carcinomas had higher GPC/PCho ratio than samples from ER+/PgR+ carcinomas, suggesting that the choline metabolism in the experimental models is representative for luminal-like and basal-like human breast cancer. The differences in choline metabolite

  3. [Compound K suppresses myeloid-derived suppressor cells in a mouse model bearing CT26 colorectal cancer xenograft].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Li, Yalin; Wang, Wuzhou; Zhou, Meijuan; Cao, Zhaohui

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the effect of ginseng-derived compound K (C-K) on apoptosis, immunosuppressive activity, and pro-inflammatory cytokine production of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) from mice bearing colorectal cancer xenograft. Flow-sorted bone marrow MDSCs from Balb/c mice bearing CT26 tumor xenograft were treated with either C-K or PBS for 96 h and examined for apoptosis with Annexin V/7-AAD, Cox-2 and Arg-1 expressions using qRT-PCR, and supernatant IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-17 levels with ELISA. C-K- or PBS-treated MDSCs were subcutaneously implanted along with CT26 tumor cells in WT Balb/c mice, and the tumor size and morphology were evaluated 21 days later. C-K treatment significantly increased the percentages of early and late apoptotic MDSCs in vitro (Pimmunosuppresive effect of MDSCs to inhibit tumor cell proliferation in mice, which suggests a new strategy of tumor therapy by targeting MDSCs.

  4. Optical determination of the hemoglobin oxygenation state of breast biopsies and human breast cancer xenografts in nude mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Fay A.

    1992-05-01

    Differences in the oxygenation state of benign and malignant breast biopsies, and human breast cancer xenografts in immune-deficient mice were monitored using a spectrophotometer with integrating sphere. The breast biopsies were maintained below -50 degree(s)C and the mouse model tumors maintained in growth medium at 0 degree(s)C. Tissue sections 500 (mu) thick were allowed to come up to room temperature for mounting between quartz slides and were evaluated over the wavelength region 240 - 2500 nm. Data collection was done within 10 minutes of the removal of the biopsies from storage and, within 5 minutes for the xenografts. That this preparation protocol allowed us to study the samples very close to the in- vivo state was evident from the lack of deoxyhemoglobin in the benign samples. Component analysis performed in the 300 - 800 nm region showed that the malignant samples contained predominantly deoxygenated blood while the benign samples exhibited oxyhemoglobin signature. Absorption peaks due to fat and traces of bilirubin were also resolved in some of the samples. Assuming that the samples are very nearly representative of the in-vivo condition, these hemoglobin differences may well serve as a basis for imaging tumors or, for tissue characterization in a minimally invasive environment.

  5. Combined therapeutic effect and molecular mechanisms of metformin and cisplatin in human lung cancer xenografts in nude mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Qin Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This work was aimed at studying the inhibitory activity of metformin combined with the commonly used chemotherapy drug cisplatin in human lung cancer xenografts in nude mice. We also examined the combined effects of these drugs on the molecular expression of survivin, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2, vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C, and vascular endothelial growth factorreceptor-3 (VEGFR-3 to determine the mechanism of action and to explore the potential applications of the new effective drug therapy in lung cancer. Materials and Methods: The nude mice model of lung cancer xenografts was established, and mice were randomly divided into the metformin group, the cisplatin group, the metformin + cisplatin group, and the control group. The animals were killed 42 days after drug administration, and the tumor tissues were then sampled to detect the messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA and protein expression levels of survivin, MMP-2, VEGF-C, and VEGFR-3 by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Results: The protein and mRNA expression levels of survivin, MMP-2, VEGF-C, and VEGFR-3 in the cisplatin group and the combined treatment group were lower than that in the control group (P < 0.05. In the metformin group, the expression of MMP-2 protein and mRNA was lower than that in the control group (P < 0.05. The protein and mRNA expression levels of survivin, MMP-2, VEGF-C, and VEGFR-3 in the combined treatment group were lower than that in the cisplatin group and the metformin group (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Metformin inhibited the expression of MMP-2, cisplatin and the combined treatment inhibited the expression of survivin, MMP-2, VEGF-C, and VEGFR-3, and the combined treatment of metformin with cisplatin resulted in enhanced anti-tumor efficacy.

  6. Vorinostat, an HDAC inhibitor attenuates epidermoid squamous cell carcinoma growth by dampening mTOR signaling pathway in a human xenograft murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurundkar, Deepali; Srivastava, Ritesh K; Chaudhary, Sandeep C; Ballestas, Mary E; Kopelovich, Levy; Elmets, Craig A; Athar, Mohammad

    2013-01-15

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are potent anticancer agents and show efficacy against various human neoplasms. Vorinostat is a potent HDAC inhibitor and has shown potential to inhibit growth of human xenograft tumors. However, its effect on the growth of skin neoplasm remains undefined. In this study, we show that vorinostat (2 μM) reduced expression of HDAC1, 2, 3, and 7 in epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Consistently, it increased acetylation of histone H3 and p53. Vorinostat (100mg/kg body weight, IP) treatment reduced human xenograft tumor growth in highly immunosuppressed nu/nu mice. Histologically, the vorinostat-treated tumor showed features of well-differentiation with large necrotic areas. Based on proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining and expression of cyclins D1, D2, E, and A, vorinostat seems to impair proliferation by down-regulating the expression of these proteins. However, it also induced apoptosis. The mechanism by which vorinostat blocks proliferation and makes tumor cells prone to apoptosis, involved inhibition of mTOR signaling which was accompanied by reduction in cell survival AKT and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways. Our data provide a novel mechanism-based therapeutic intervention for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Vorinostat may be utilized to cure skin neoplasms in organ transplant recipient (OTR). These patients have high morbidity and surgical removal of these lesions which frequently develop in these patients, is difficult. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Radioimmunotherapy of human colon cancer xenografts by using 131I labeled-CAb1 F(ab')2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ling; Xu Huiyun; Mi Li; Bian Huijie; Qin Jun; Xiong Hua; Feng Qiang; Wen Ning; Tian Rong; Xu Liqing; Shen Xiaomei; Tang Hao; Chen Zhinan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Therapeutic efficacy, suitable dose, and administration times of 131 I-CAb 1 F(ab') 2 , a new monoclonal antibody therapeutics specifically directed against a cell surface-associated glycoprotein of colon cancer, were investigated in this article. Methods and Materials: In human colon cancer xenografts, 131 I-CAb 1 F(ab') 2 at the dose of 125 μCi, 375 μCi, and 1125 μCi were administrated intraperitoneally on Days 6 and 18 after implantation of HR8348 cells with CAb 1 high reactivity. Survival time and tumor growth inhibition rate were used to evaluate the efficacy and safety of 131 I-CAb 1 F(ab') 2 in treatment of colon cancer xenografts. Results: Treatment of 125, 375, and 1125 μCi 131 I-CAb1 F(ab') 2 did not significantly decrease the mean survival time of nude mice when compared with nontreated groups (p = 0.276, 0.865, 0.582, respectively). Moreover, the mean survival times of nude mice receiving 375 μCi and 1125 μCi 131 I-CAb1 F(ab') 2 were significantly longer than that of 5-FU-treated groups (p 0.018 and 0.042). Tumor growth inhibition rates of the first therapy were 35.67% and 41.37%, with corresponding 131 I-labeled antibody dosage of 375 μCi and 1125 μCi. After single attack dosage, second reinforcement therapy may rise efficacy significantly. Tumor growth inhibition rates of 125 μCi, 375 μCi, and 1125 μCi 131 I-labeled antibody on Day 20 posttherapy were 42.65%, 56.56%, and 84.41%, respectively. Histopathology examination revealed that tissue necrosis of various degrees was found in 131 I-CAb1 F(ab') 2 -treated groups. Conclusion: 131 I-CAb 1 F(ab') 2 is safe and effective for colon cancer. It may be a novel and potentially adjuvant therapeutics for colon cancer

  8. Androgen regulated genes in human prostate xenografts in mice: relation to BPH and prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold D Love

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH and prostate carcinoma (CaP are linked to aging and the presence of androgens, suggesting that androgen regulated genes play a major role in these common diseases. Androgen regulation of prostate growth and development depends on the presence of intact epithelial-stromal interactions. Further, the prostatic stroma is implicated in BPH. This suggests that epithelial cell lines are inadequate to identify androgen regulated genes that could contribute to BPH and CaP and which could serve as potential clinical biomarkers. In this study, we used a human prostate xenograft model to define a profile of genes regulated in vivo by androgens, with an emphasis on identifying candidate biomarkers. Benign transition zone (TZ human prostate tissue from radical prostatectomies was grafted to the sub-renal capsule site of intact or castrated male immunodeficient mice, followed by the removal or addition of androgens, respectively. Microarray analysis of RNA from these tissues was used to identify genes that were; 1 highly expressed in prostate, 2 had significant expression changes in response to androgens, and, 3 encode extracellular proteins. A total of 95 genes meeting these criteria were selected for analysis and validation of expression in patient prostate tissues using quantitative real-time PCR. Expression levels of these genes were measured in pooled RNAs from human prostate tissues with varying severity of BPH pathologic changes and CaP of varying Gleason score. A number of androgen regulated genes were identified. Additionally, a subset of these genes were over-expressed in RNA from clinical BPH tissues, and the levels of many were found to correlate with disease status. Our results demonstrate the feasibility, and some of the problems, of using a mouse xenograft model to characterize the androgen regulated expression profiles of intact human prostate tissues.

  9. Antitumor activity of [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] in mouse xenograft model of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscella, A; Vetrugno, C; Migoni, D; Biagioni, F; Fanizzi, F P; Fornai, F; De Pascali, S A; Marsigliante, S

    2014-01-23

    The higher and selective cytotoxicity of [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] toward cancer cell in both immortalized cell lines and in breast cancer cells in primary cultures, stimulated a pre-clinical study so as to evaluate its therapeutic potential in vivo. The efficacy of [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] was assessed using a xenograft model of breast cancer developed by injection of MCF-7 cells in the flank of BALB/c nude mice. Treatment of solid tumor-bearing mice with [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] induced up to 50% reduction of tumor mass compared with an average 10% inhibition recorded in cisplatin-treated animals. Thus, chemotherapy with [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] was much more effective than cisplatin. We also demonstrated enhanced in vivo pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and tolerability of [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] when compared with cisplatin administered in Wistar rats. Pharmacokinetics studies with [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] revealed prolonged Pt persistence in systemic blood circulation and decreased nefrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity, major target sites of cisplatin toxicity. Overall, [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] turned out to be extremely promising in terms of greater in vivo anticancer activity, reduced nephrotoxicity and acute toxicity compared with cisplatin.

  10. Development of a Patient-Derived Xenograft (PDX of Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis in a Zebrafish Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Mercatali

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bone metastasis is a complex process that needs to be better understood in order to help clinicians prevent and treat it. Xenografts using patient-derived material (PDX rather than cancer cell lines are a novel approach that guarantees more clinically realistic results. A primary culture of bone metastasis derived from a 67-year-old patient with breast cancer was cultured and then injected into zebrafish (ZF embryos to study its metastatic potential. In vivo behavior and results of gene expression analyses of the primary culture were compared with those of cancer cell lines with different metastatic potential (MCF7 and MDA-MB-231. The MCF7 cell line, which has the same hormonal receptor status as the bone metastasis primary culture, did not survive in the in vivo model. Conversely, MDA-MB-231 disseminated and colonized different parts of the ZF, including caudal hematopoietic tissues (CHT, revealing a migratory phenotype. Primary culture cells disseminated and in later stages extravasated from the vessels, engrafting into ZF tissues and reaching the CHT. Primary cell behavior reflected the clinical course of the patient’s medical history. Our results underline the potential for using PDX models in bone metastasis research and outline new methods for the clinical application of this in vivo model.

  11. New peptide receptor radionuclide therapy of invasive cancer cells: in vivo studies using 177Lu-DOTA-AE105 targeting uPAR in human colorectal cancer xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Morten; Rasmussen, Palle; Madsen, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    -of-concept for a theranostic approach as treatment modality in a human xenograft colorectal cancer model. MethodsA DOTA-conjugated 9-mer high affinity uPAR binding peptide (DOTA-AE105) was radiolabeled with 64Cu and 177Lu, for PET imaging and targeted radionuclide therapy study, respectively. Human uPAR-positive CRC HT-29...... for the first time the in vivo efficacy of an uPAR-targeted radionuclide therapeutic intervention on both tumor size and its content of uPAR expressing cells thus setting the stage for future translation into clinical use. © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  12. Emblica officinalis extract induces autophagy and inhibits human ovarian cancer cell proliferation, angiogenesis, growth of mouse xenograft tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok De

    Full Text Available Patients with ovarian cancer (OC may be treated with surgery, chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy, although none of these strategies are very effective. Several plant-based natural products/dietary supplements, including extracts from Emblicaofficinalis (Amla, have demonstrated potent anti-neoplastic properties. In this study we determined that Amla extract (AE has anti-proliferative effects on OC cells under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. We also determined the anti-proliferative effects one of the components of AE, quercetin, on OC cells under in vitro conditions. AE did not induce apoptotic cell death, but did significantly increase the expression of the autophagic proteins beclin1 and LC3B-II under in vitro conditions. Quercetin also increased the expression of the autophagic proteins beclin1 and LC3B-II under in vitro conditions. AE also significantly reduced the expression of several angiogenic genes, including hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α in OVCAR3 cells. AE acted synergistically with cisplatin to reduce cell proliferation and increase expression of the autophagic proteins beclin1 and LC3B-II under in vitro conditions. AE also had anti-proliferative effects and induced the expression of the autophagic proteins beclin1 and LC3B-II in mouse xenograft tumors. Additionally, AE reduced endothelial cell antigen - CD31 positive blood vessels and HIF-1α expression in mouse xenograft tumors. Together, these studies indicate that AE inhibits OC cell growth both in vitro and in vivo possibly via inhibition of angiogenesis and activation of autophagy in OC. Thus AE may prove useful as an alternative or adjunct therapeutic approach in helping to fight OC.

  13. Adipocytes enhance murine pancreatic cancer growth via a hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Kathryn M; Considine, Robert V; True, Eben; Swartz-Basile, Deborah A; Pitt, Henry A; Zyromski, Nicholas J

    2016-04-01

    Obesity accelerates the development and progression of pancreatic cancer, though the mechanisms underlying this association are unclear. Adipocytes are biologically active, producing factors such as hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) that may influence tumor progression. We therefore sought to test the hypothesis that adipocyte-secreted factors including HGF accelerate pancreatic cancer cell proliferation. Murine pancreatic cancer cells (Pan02 and TGP-47) were grown in a) conditioned medium (CM) from murine F442A preadipocytes, b) HGF-knockdown preadipocyte CM, c) recombinant murine HGF at increasing doses, and d) CM plus HGF-receptor (c-met) inhibitor. Cell proliferation was measured using the MTT assay. ANOVA and t-test were applied; p TGP-47 cell proliferation relative to control (59 ± 12% and 34 ± 12%, p TGP-47 cells remained unchanged. Recombinant HGF dose-dependently increased Pan02, but not TGP-47, proliferation (p TGP-47 cells. These experiments demonstrate that adipocyte-derived factors accelerate murine pancreatic cancer proliferation. In the case of Pan02 cells, HGF is responsible, in part, for this proliferation. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Growth suppression of MCF-7 cancer cell-derived xenografts in nude mice by caveolin-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Ping; Wang Xiaohui; Li Fei; Qi Baoju; Zhu Hua; Liu Shuang; Cui Yeqing; Chen Jianwen

    2008-01-01

    Caveolin-1 is an essential structural constituent of caveolae membrane domains that has been implicated in mitogenic signaling and oncogenesis. However, the exact functional role of caveolin-1 still remains controversial. In this report, utilizing MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma cells stably transfected with caveolin-1 (MCF-7/cav-1 cells), we demonstrate that caveolin-1 expression dramatically inhibits invasion and migration of these cells. Importantly, in vivo experiments employing xenograft tumor models demonstrated that expression of caveolin-1 results in significant growth inhibition of breast tumors. Moreover, a dramatic delay in tumor progression was observed in MCF-7/cav-1 cells as compared with MCF-7 cells. Histological analysis of tumor sections demonstrated a marked decrease in the percentage of proliferating tumor cells (Ki-67 assay) along with an increase in apoptotic tumor cells (TUNEL assay) in MCF-7/cav-1-treated animals. Our current findings provide for the first time in vivo evidence that caveolin-1 can indeed function as a tumor suppressor in human breast adenocarcinoma derived from MCF-7 cells rather than as a tumor promoter

  15. Enhanced antitumor efficacy and reduced systemic toxicity of sulfatide-containing nanoliposomal doxorubicin in a xenograft model of colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Lin

    Full Text Available Sulfatide is a glycosphingolipid known to interact with several extracellular matrix proteins, such as tenascin-C which is overexpressed in many types of cancer including that of the colon. In view of the limited success of chemotherapy in colorectal cancer and high toxicity of doxorubicin (DOX, a sulfatide-containing liposome (SCL encapsulation approach was taken to overcome these barriers. This study assessed the in vitro cytotoxicity, biodistribution, therapeutic efficacy and systemic toxicity in vivo of sulfatide-containing liposomal doxorubicin (SCL-DOX using human colonic adenocarcinoma HT-29 xenograft as the experimental model. In vitro, SCL-DOX was shown to be delivered into the nuclei and displayed prolonged retention compared with the free DOX. The use of this nanodrug delivery system to deliver DOX for treatment of tumor-bearing mice produced a much improved therapeutic efficacy in terms of tumor growth suppression and extended survival in contrast to the free drug. Furthermore, treatment of tumor-bearing mice with SCL-DOX resulted in a lower DOX uptake in the principal sites of toxicity of the free drug, namely the heart and skin, as well as reduced myelosuppression and diminished cardiotoxicity. Such natural lipid-guided nanodrug delivery systems may represent a new strategy for the development of effective anticancer chemotherapeutics targeting the tumor microenvironment for both primary tumor and micrometastases.

  16. Radioimmunoimaging of human colon and gastric cancers xenografts by NCC-ST-439 and NCC-ST-433 monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Kayoko; Tsukatani, Yasushi; Nishiguchi, Iku

    1987-01-01

    Both NCC-ST-439 and NCC-ST-433 are monoclonal antibodies raised against human gastric cancer (St-4) xenografts in nude mice. Imaging and localization experiments were performed by injecting I-125 labeled antibodies into nude mice bearing CO-4 (colon carcinoma) and H-111 (gastric carcinoma). There was uptake of NCC-ST-439 (polymer) into the CO-4, though it was not clearly visualized until 5 days post injection. By injecting NCC-ST-439 (monomer), CO-4 was better seen at day 3, while average accumulation into the tumors decreased compared with NCC-ST-439 (polymer). High radioactivities were observed in the liver and spleen, which was probably due to the immunocomplex with the antigen in the blood. NCC-ST-433 was selectively accumulated into the H-111 with tumor to blood ratio 7.8 at day 7, without significant uptake into the liver and spleen. Significant correlation was also found between the tumor uptake level of NCC-ST-433 and size of tumors. Excellent images of H-111 were obtained 3 days after the injection. NCC-ST-433 holds promise for the radioimmunodetection of gastric cancers. (author)

  17. Enhanced effect of geldanamycin nanocomposite against breast cancer cells growing in vitro and as xenograft with vanquished normal cell toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhu, Suma [Department of Radiation Biology and Toxicology, School of Life Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal 576 104, Karnataka (India); Ananthanarayanan, Preeta; Aziz, Sajida Kannangar [Department of Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal 576 104, Karnataka (India); Rai, Sharada [Department of Pathology, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore Campus, Manipal University, Mangalore 575 001, Karnataka (India); Mutalik, Srinivas [Department of Pharmaceutics, Manipal College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal 576 104, Karnataka (India); Sadashiva, Satish Rao Bola, E-mail: rao.satish@manipal.edu [Department of Radiation Biology and Toxicology, School of Life Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal 576 104, Karnataka (India)

    2017-04-01

    Despite enormous advances in remedies developed for breast cancer, an effective therapeutic strategy by targeting malignant cells with the least normal tissue toxicity is yet to be developed. Hsp90 is considered to be an important therapeutic target to inhibit cell proliferation. Geldanamycin (GDM), a potent inhibitor of Hsp90 was withdrawn from clinical trials due to its undesirable hepatotoxicity. We report a superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPION) based polymeric nanocomposite of GDM augmenting anticancer competence with decreased hepatic toxicity. The particle size of nanocomposite was ascertained to be 76 ± 10 nm with acceptable stability. A comparative dose dependent in vitro validation of cytotoxicity showed an enhanced cellular damage and necrosis in breast cancer (MCF-7) cell line at a low dose of 5.49 nM (in GDM nanocomposite) in contrast to 20 nM of pure GDM, while normal breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A) were least affected. Besides, in vivo study (in breast cancer xenografts) substantiated 2.7 fold delay in tumor progression mediated by redundancy in the downstream functions of p-Akt and MAPK-Erk leading to apoptosis with negligible hepatotoxicity. Pure GDM disrupted the function and morphology of liver with lesser therapeutic efficacy than the GDM nanocomposite. These findings deduce that GDM based polymeric magnetite nanocomposite play a vital role in efficacious therapy while vanquishing normal cells and hepatic toxicity and thereby promising it to be reinstated in clinics. - Highlights: • GDM nanocomposite shows selective cell kill of cancerous breast cells. • Nanocomposite delays the growth of tumor in comparison to pure GDM treatment. • GDM promotes apoptosis by down-regulation of p-Akt and MAPK-Erk. • GDM nanocomposite nullifies the hepatotoxicity generally exhibited by pure GDM.

  18. Cetuximab Reduces the Accumulation of Radiolabeled Bevacizumab in Cancer Xenografts without Decreasing VEGF Expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heskamp, Sandra; Boerman, Otto C.; Molkenboer-Kuenen, Janneke D. M.; Sweep, Fred C. G. J.; Geurts-Moespot, Anneke; Engelhardt, Mallory S.; van der Graaf, Winette T. A.; Oyen, Wim J. G.; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W. M.

    2014-01-01

    Bevacizumab and cetuximab are approved for the treatment of cancer. However, in advanced colorectal cancer, addition of cetuximab to chemotherapy with bevacizumab did not improve survival. The reason for the lack of activity remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of

  19. Cetuximab reduces the accumulation of radiolabeled bevacizumab in cancer xenografts without altering VEGF expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heskamp, S.; Boerman, O.C.; Molkenboer-Kuenen, J.D.M.; Sweep, F.C.; Geurts-Moespot, A.; Engelhardt, M.S.; Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Oyen, W.J.G.; Laarhoven, H.W.M. van

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Bevacizumab and cetuximab are approved for the treatment of cancer. However, in advanced colorectal cancer, addition of cetuximab to chemotherapy with bevacizumab did not improve survival. The reason for the lack of activity remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the

  20. Consumption of lycopene inhibits the growth and progression of colon cancer in a mouse xenograft model

    Science.gov (United States)

    A previous study indicated that lycopene could significantly inhibit the proliferation of human colon cancer cells in vitro. However, the in vivo anticancer effects of lycopene against colon cancer have not been demonstrated yet. Therefore, this study investigated whether consumption of lycopene cou...

  1. Combination of Vandetanib, Radiotherapy, and Irinotecan in the LoVo Human Colorectal Cancer Xenograft Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachsberger, Phyllis; Burd, Randy; Ryan, Anderson; Daskalakis, Constantine; Dicker, Adam P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The tumor growth kinetics of the human LoVo colorectal xenograft model was assessed in response to vandetanib, an orally available receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, radiotherapy (RT), or irinotecan (CPT-11), as single therapies and in combination. Methods and Materials: LoVo cells were injected subcutaneously into the right hind limb (5x10 6 cells in 100μL phosphate-buffered saline) of athymic NCR NUM mice and tumors were grown to a volume of 200-300 mm 3 before treatment. Vandetanib was administered at 50 mg/kg daily orally for 14 days starting on Day 1. RT was given as three fractions (3x3 Gy) on Days 1, 2, and 3. CPT-11 was given at 15 mg/kg intraperitoneally on Days 1 and 3. Tumor volumes were measured on a daily basis and calculated by measuring tumor diameters with digital calipers in two orthogonal dimensions. Results: All three single treatments (vandetanib, CPT-11, and radiation) significantly slowed LoVo colorectal tumor growth. Vandetanib significantly increased the antitumor effects of CPT-11 and radiation when given in combination with either of these treatments. These treatment combinations resulted in a slow tumor growth rate during the 2 weeks of vandetanib administration. The triple combination of vandetanib, CPT-11, and radiation produced the most marked improvement in response as observed by measurable shrinkage of tumors during the first week of treatment. Conclusions: The tumor growth delay kinetics observed in this study of the LoVo colorectal model suggest concurrent and sustained post-sequencing of vandetanib with cytotoxic therapy may be beneficial in tumors of this type.

  2. Establishment of human patient-derived endometrial cancer xenografts in NOD scid gamma mice for the study of invasion and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Unno

    Full Text Available Most endometrial cancers are detected early and have a good prognosis, while some endometrial cancers are highly invasive, metastasize early, and respond suboptimally to therapy. Currently, appropriate model systems to study the aggressive nature of these tumors are lacking. The objective of this study was to establish a mouse xenograft model of endometrial tumors derived from patients in order to study the biological aggressive characteristics that underlie invasion and metastasis.Endometrial tumor tissue fragments (1.5 mm × 1.5 mm from patients undergoing surgery, were transplanted under the renal capsule of NOD scid gamma mice. After 6-8 weeks, tumors were excised and serially transplanted into additional mice for propagation. Immunohistochemical analysis of the tumors was done for various tumor markers.Four cases of different subtypes of endometrial cancer were grown and propagated in mice. Three of the four tumor cases invaded into the kidneys and to adjacent organs. While all tumors exhibited minimal to no staining for estrogen receptor α, progesterone receptor staining was observed for tumor grafts. In addition, levels and localization of E-cadherin, cytokeratin and vimentin varied depending on subtype. Finally, all tumor xenografts stained positively for urokinase plasminogen activator while 3 tumor xenografts, which showed invasive characteristics, stained positively for urokinase plasminogen activator receptor.Endometrial tumors transplanted under the renal capsule exhibit growth, invasion and local spread. These tumors can be propagated and used to study aggressive endometrial cancer.

  3. Characterization of an immunodominant cancer-specific O-glycopeptide epitope in murine podoplanin (OTS8)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steentoft, Catharina; Schjoldager, Katrine T; Cló, Emiliano

    2010-01-01

    antibody 237, developed to a spontaneous murine fibrosarcoma, was shown to be directed to murine podoplanin (OTS8) with truncated Tn O-glycans. Our understanding of such cancer-specific auto-antibodies to truncated glycoforms of glycoproteins is limited. Here we have investigated immunogenicity...... of a chemoenzymatically produced Tn-glycopeptide derived from the putative murine podoplanin O-glycopeptide epitope. We found that the Tn O-glycopeptide was highly immunogenic in mice and produced a Tn-glycoform specific response with no reactivity against unglycosylated peptides or the O-glycopeptide with extended O......-glycan (STn and T glycoforms). The immunodominant epitope was strictly dependent on the peptide sequence, required Tn at a specific single Thr residue (Thr(77)), and antibodies to the epitope were not found in naive mice. We further tested a Tn O-glycopeptide library derived from human podoplanin...

  4. Combining fisetin and ionizing radiation suppresses the growth of mammalian colorectal cancers in xenograft tumor models

    OpenAIRE

    Leu, Jyh-Der; Wang, Bo-Shen; Chiu, Shu-Jun; Chang, Chun-Yuan; Chen, Chien-Chih; Chen, Fu-Du; Avirmed, Shiirevnyamba; Lee, Yi-Jang

    2016-01-01

    Fisetin (3,7,3?,4?-tetrahydroxyflavone), which belongs to the flavonoid group of polyphenols and is found in a wide range of plants, has been reported to exhibit a number of biological activities in human cancer cells, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiangiogenic, anti-invasive and antiproliferative effects. Although previous in vitro studies have shown that fisetin treatment increases the apoptotic rate and enhances the radiosensitivity of human colorectal cancer cells, the in vi...

  5. 64Cu-ATSM Reflects pO2 Levels in Human Head and Neck Cancer Xenografts but Not in Colorectal Cancer Xenografts: Comparison with 64CuCl2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fan; Jørgensen, Jesper T; Forman, Julie; Hansen, Anders E; Kjaer, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    The hypoxia PET tracer (64)Cu-diacetyl-bis(N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazonate) ((64)Cu-ATSM) has shown promising results in clinical studies. However, concerns have been raised with regard to the possible effect of copper metabolism and free copper on tumor uptake and thereby the robustness of (64)Cu-ATSM as a hypoxia marker. In this study, accumulation and distribution of (64)Cu-ATSM and (64)CuCl2 in tumor tissue were compared with partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) probe measurements. One-hour dynamic PET scans were performed on nude mice bearing subcutaneous human head and neck tumors (FaDu) and human colorectal tumors (HT29) after administration of either (64)Cu-ATSM or (64)CuCl2. Subsequently, tracks were generated and track markers were positioned in tumors to allow for registration of their exact location on the high-resolution CT scan. After completion of the CT scan, pO2 probe measurements were performed along each track. PET and CT images were coregistered and ROIs drawn on the basis of the location of track markers and pO2 probe measurement depth. A linear mixed model for repeated measures was applied for the comparison of PET tracer uptake to corresponding pO2 values. Comparable uptake of (64)Cu-ATSM and (64)CuCl2 was found in the kidney, muscle, and liver of all animals, but (64)CuCl2 showed a higher uptake 10-60 min after injection in both tumor models. Significant differences were also found for both tumor-to-muscle and tumor-to-liver ratios. The intratumoral distribution of (64)Cu-ATSM, but not (64)CuCl2, showed a significant negative relationship with pO2 measurements in FaDu tumors. However, this relationship was not found in HT29 tumors. (64)Cu-ATSM and (64)CuCl2 displayed different uptake in tumors. In human head and neck xenografts, (64)Cu-ATSM but not (64)CuCl2 reflected pO2 measurements, indicating that (64)Cu-ATSM is a hypoxia-specific marker in this tumor type. However, data from colorectal cancer xenografts indicated that (64)Cu-ATSM may not be

  6. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of a telodendrimer micellar paclitaxel nanoformulation in a mouse xenograft model of ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao W

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Wenwu Xiao1, Juntao Luo2, Teesta Jain3, John Riggs3, Harry P Tseng1, Paul T Henderson3, Simon R Cherry4, Douglas Rowland4, Kit S Lam1,31Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, UC Davis Cancer Center, University of California Davis, Sacramento, CA; 2Department of Pharmacology, SUNY Upstate Cancer Research Institute, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY; 3Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, 4Department of Biomedical Engineering, UC Davis Cancer Center, University of California Davis, Davis, CABackground: A multifunctional telodendrimer-based micelle system was characterized for delivery of imaging and chemotherapy agents to mouse tumor xenografts. Previous optical imaging studies demonstrated qualitatively that these classes of nanoparticles, called nanomicelles, preferentially accumulate at tumor sites in mice. The research reported herein describes the detailed quantitative imaging and biodistribution profiling of nanomicelles loaded with a cargo of paclitaxel.Methods: The telodendrimer was covalently labeled with 125I and the nanomicelles were loaded with 14C-paclitaxel, which allowed measurement of pharmacokinetics and biodistribution in the mice using microSPECT/CT imaging and liquid scintillation counting, respectively.Results: The radio imaging data showed preferential accumulation of nanomicelles at the tumor site along with a slower clearance rate than paclitaxel formulated in Cremophor EL (Taxol®. Liquid scintillation counting confirmed that 14C-labeled paclitaxel sequestered in nanomicelles had increased uptake by tumor tissue and slower pharmacokinetics than Taxol.Conclusion: Overall, the results indicate that nanomicelle-formulated paclitaxel is a potentially superior formulation compared with Taxol in terms of water solubility, pharmacokinetics, and tumor accumulation, and may be clinically useful for both tumor imaging and improved chemotherapy applications

  7. Sex differences in the MB49 syngeneic, murine model of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White-Gilbertson, Shai; Davis, Megan; Voelkel-Johnson, Christina; Kasman, Laura M

    The MB49 syngeneic, murine model of bladder cancer has been widely used for more than 35 years. In humans, bladder cancer is one third as prevalent in women as in men, with a trend toward lower prevalence in parous compared to nulliparous women. Our objective was to determine if the MB49 bladder cancer model reproduces the sex differences observed in humans, and to determine its sensitivity to testosterone and the pregnancy hormone, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). Male and female C57BL/6 mice were implanted with MB49 murine bladder cancer cells, and observed for tumor growth. MB49 dose responses to hCG and dihydrotestosterone were determined in vitro . MB49 tumor growth was significantly greater in male mice than female mice. Pregnancy did not affect MB49 tumor growth in female mice. MB49 cells did not proliferate in response to hCG in vitro and the functional receptor for gonadotropins was absent. Dihydrotestosterone strongly stimulated growth of MB49 cells in vitro . The MB49 murine model of bladder cancer reproduced some aspects of the sex differences observed in humans. Our results suggest that testosterone may stimulate MB49 cell proliferation, which may explain the more rapid MB49 tumor growth observed in male mice.

  8. Development of a Novel Preclinical Pancreatic Cancer Research Model: Bioluminescence Image-Guided Focal Irradiation and Tumor Monitoring of Orthotopic Xenografts1

    OpenAIRE

    Tuli, Richard; Surmak, Andrew; Reyes, Juvenal; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Armour, Michael; Leubner, Ashley; Blackford, Amanda; Tryggestad, Erik; Jaffee, Elizabeth M; Wong, John; DeWeese, Theodore L; Herman, Joseph M

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: We report on a novel preclinical pancreatic cancer research model that uses bioluminescence imaging (BLI)-guided irradiation of orthotopic xenograft tumors, sparing of surrounding normal tissues, and quantitative, noninvasive longitudinal assessment of treatment response. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Luciferase-expressing MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic carcinoma cells were orthotopically injected in nude mice. BLI was compared to pathologic tumor volume, and photon emission was assessed over time. B...

  9. The use of matrigel has no influence on tumor development or PET imaging in FaDu human head and neck cancer xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fliedner, Frederikke P.; Hansen, Anders Elias; Jorgensen, Jesper T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In preclinical research MatrixgelTM Basement Membrane Matrix (MG) is used frequently for the establishment of syngeneic and xenograft cancer models. Limited information on its influence on parameters including; tumor growth, vascularization, hypoxia and imaging characteristics....... In sub study II ten mice from each group (+MG, n = 10; -MG, n = 10) were included and tumors collected for immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis of tumor microenvironment including; proliferation ratio, micro vessel density, average vessel area, hypoxia, nuclear density, and necrosis. Tumors for IHC were...

  10. Critical role of c-Jun overexpression in liver metastasis of human breast cancer xenograft model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yan; Hu, Meiru; Shen, Beifen; Guo, Ning; Pu, Xiaoyun; Shi, Ming; Chen, Liyong; Song, Yuhua; Qian, Lu; Yuan, Guogang; Zhang, Hao; Yu, Ming

    2007-01-01

    c-Jun/AP-1 has been linked to invasive properties of aggressive breast cancer. Recently, it has been reported that overexpression of c-Jun in breast cancer cell line MCF-7 resulted in increased AP-1 activity, motility and invasiveness of the cells in vitro and tumor formation in nude mice. However, the role of c-Jun in metastasis of human breast cancer in vivo is currently unknown. To further investigate the direct involvement of c-Jun in tumorigenesis and metastasis, in the present study, the effects of c-Jun overexpression were studied in both in vitro and in nude mice. Ectopic overexpression of c-Jun promoted the growth of MCF-7 cells and resulted in a significant increase in the percentage of cells in S phase and increased motility and invasiveness. Introduction of c-Jun gene alone into weakly invasive MCF-7 cells resulted in the transfected cells capable of metastasizing to the nude mouse liver following tail vein injection. The present study confirms that overexpression of c-Jun contributes to a more invasive phenotype in MCF-7 cells. It indicates an interesting relationship between c-Jun expression and increased property of adhesion, migration and in vivo liver metastasis of MCF-7/c-Jun cells. The results provide further evidence that c-Jun is involved in the metastasis of breast cancer. The finding also opens an opportunity for development of anti-c-Jun strategies in breast cancer therapy

  11. Endocrine-Therapy-Resistant ESR1 Variants Revealed by Genomic Characterization of Breast-Cancer-Derived Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunqiang Li

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available To characterize patient-derived xenografts (PDXs for functional studies, we made whole-genome comparisons with originating breast cancers representative of the major intrinsic subtypes. Structural and copy number aberrations were found to be retained with high fidelity. However, at the single-nucleotide level, variable numbers of PDX-specific somatic events were documented, although they were only rarely functionally significant. Variant allele frequencies were often preserved in the PDXs, demonstrating that clonal representation can be transplantable. Estrogen-receptor-positive PDXs were associated with ESR1 ligand-binding-domain mutations, gene amplification, or an ESR1/YAP1 translocation. These events produced different endocrine-therapy-response phenotypes in human, cell line, and PDX endocrine-response studies. Hence, deeply sequenced PDX models are an important resource for the search for genome-forward treatment options and capture endocrine-drug-resistance etiologies that are not observed in standard cell lines. The originating tumor genome provides a benchmark for assessing genetic drift and clonal representation after transplantation.

  12. Embelin suppresses growth of human pancreatic cancer xenografts, and pancreatic cancer cells isolated from KrasG12D mice by inhibiting Akt and Sonic hedgehog pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minzhao Huang

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is a deadly disease, and therefore effective treatment and/or prevention strategies are urgently needed. The objectives of this study were to examine the molecular mechanisms by which embelin inhibited human pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro, and xenografts in Balb C nude mice, and pancreatic cancer cell growth isolated from KrasG12D transgenic mice. XTT assays were performed to measure cell viability. AsPC-1 cells were injected subcutaneously into Balb c nude mice and treated with embelin. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were measured by Ki67 and TUNEL staining, respectively. The expression of Akt, and Sonic Hedgehog (Shh and their target gene products were measured by the immunohistochemistry, and Western blot analysis. The effects of embelin on pancreatic cancer cells isolated from 10-months old KrasG12D mice were also examined. Embelin inhibited cell viability in pancreatic cancer AsPC-1, PANC-1, MIA PaCa-2 and Hs 766T cell lines, and these inhibitory effects were blocked either by constitutively active Akt or Shh protein. Embelin-treated mice showed significant inhibition in tumor growth which was associated with reduced expression of markers of cell proliferation (Ki67, PCNA and Bcl-2 and cell cycle (cyclin D1, CDK2, and CDK6, and induction of apoptosis (activation of caspase-3 and cleavage of PARP, and increased expression of Bax. In addition, embelin inhibited the expression of markers of angiogenesis (COX-2, VEGF, VEGFR, and IL-8, and metastasis (MMP-2 and MMP-9 in tumor tissues. Antitumor activity of embelin was associated with inhibition of Akt and Shh pathways in xenografts, and pancreatic cancer cells isolated from KrasG12D mice. Furthermore, embelin also inhibited epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT by up-regulating E-cadherin and inhibiting the expression of Snail, Slug, and ZEB1. These data suggest that embelin can inhibit pancreatic cancer growth, angiogenesis and metastasis by suppressing Akt and

  13. The utility of fecal corticosterone metabolites and animal welfare assessment protocols as predictive parameters of tumor development and animal welfare in a murine xenograft model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kirsten Rosenmaj; Jørgensen, Pernille Schønning; Pipper, Christian Bressen

    2013-01-01

    consumption, and an animal welfare assessment (AWA) protocol revealed marked differences between control and cancer lines as the size of the tumor increased. However, only the AWA protocol was effective in predicting the tumor size and the level of fecal corticosterone metabolites (FCM). FCM levels were...

  14. Anti-metastasis activity of black rice anthocyanins against breast cancer: analyses using an ErbB2 positive breast cancer cell line and tumoral xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Li-Ping; Han, Bin; Yu, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Xiang-Yan; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Wei; Zhu, Yan-Feng; Peng, Xiao-Li; Zou, Qiang; Li, Sui-Yan

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence from animal, epidemiological and clinical investigations suggest that dietary anthocyanins have potential to prevent chronic diseases, including cancers. It is also noteworthy that human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (ErbB2) protein overexpression or ErbB2 gene amplification has been included as an indicator for metastasis and higher risk of recurrence for breast cancer. The present experiments investigated the anti-metastasis effects of black rice anthocyanins (BRACs) on ErbB2 positive breast cancer cells in vivo and in vitro. Oral administration of BRACs (150 mg/kg/day) reduced transplanted tumor growth, inhibited pulmonary metastasis, and decreased lung tumor nodules in BALB/c nude mice bearing ErbB2 positive breast cancer cell MDA-MB-453 xenografts. The capacity for migration, adhesion, motility and invasion was also inhibited by BRACs in MDA-MB-453 cells in a concentration dependent manner, accompanied by decreased activity of a transfer promoting factor, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA). Together, our results indicated that BRACs possess anti-metastasis potential against ErbB2 positive human breast cancer cells in vivo and in vitro through inhibition of metastasis promoting molecules.

  15. New peptide receptor radionuclide therapy of invasive cancer cells: in vivo studies using 177Lu-DOTA-AE105 targeting uPAR in human colorectal cancer xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Morten; Rasmussen, Palle; Madsen, Jacob; Ploug, Michael; Kjaer, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The proposition of uPAR as a potential target in cancer therapy is advanced by its predominant expression at the invasive front of colorectal cancer (CRC) and its value as prognostic biomarker for poor survival in this disease. In this study, we provide the first in vivo proof-of-concept for a theranostic approach as treatment modality in a human xenograft colorectal cancer model. Methods: A DOTA-conjugated 9-mer high affinity uPAR binding peptide (DOTA-AE105) was radiolabeled with 64 Cu and 177 Lu, for PET imaging and targeted radionuclide therapy study, respectively. Human uPAR-positive CRC HT-29 cells were inoculated in Nude mice and treated with 177 Lu-DOTA-AE105 once a visible tumor had formed. To evaluate the true effect of the targeted radiotherapy, two controls groups were included in this study, one receiving a 177 Lu-labeled non-binding control peptide and one receiving vehicle. All animals were treated day 0 and 7. A parallel 18 F-FLT PET/CT study was performed on day 0, 1, 3 and 6. Dosimetry calculations were based on a biodistribution study, where organs and tissue of interest were collected 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 and 24 h post injection of 177 Lu-DOTA-AE105. Toxicity was assessed by recording mouse weight and by H and E staining of kidneys in each treatment group. Results: uPAR-positive HT-29 xenograft was clearly visualized by PET/CT imaging using 64 Cu-DOTA-AE105. Subsequently, these xenograft transplants were locally irradiated using 177 Lu-DOTA-AE105, where a significant effect on tumor size and the number of uPAR-positive cells in the tumor was found (p 18 F-FLT PET/CT imaging study revealed a significant correlation between 18 F-FLT tumor uptake and efficacy of the radionuclide therapy. A histological examination of the kidneys from one animal in each treatment group did not reveal any gross abnormalities and the general performance of all treated animals also showed no indications of radioactivity-induced toxicity. Conclusion: These findings

  16. GPR55 receptor antagonist decreases glycolytic activity in PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cell line and tumor xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Michel; Catazaro, Jonathan; Singh, Nagendra S; Wnorowski, Artur; Boguszewska-Czubara, Anna; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Powers, Robert; Wainer, Irving W

    2017-11-15

    The Warburg effect is a predominant metabolic pathway in cancer cells characterized by enhanced glucose uptake and its conversion to l-lactate and is associated with upregulated expression of HIF-1α and activation of the EGFR-MEK-ERK, Wnt-β-catenin, and PI3K-AKT signaling pathways. (R,R')-4'-methoxy-1-naphthylfenoterol ((R,R')-MNF) significantly reduces proliferation, survival, and motility of PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cells through inhibition of the GPR55 receptor. We examined (R,R')-MNF's effect on glycolysis in PANC-1 cells and tumors. Global NMR metabolomics was used to elucidate differences in the metabolome between untreated and (R,R')-MNF-treated cells. LC/MS analysis was used to quantify intracellular concentrations of β-hydroxybutyrate, carnitine, and l-lactate. Changes in target protein expression were determined by Western blot analysis. Data was also obtained from mouse PANC-1 tumor xenografts after administration of (R,R')-MNF. Metabolomics data indicate that (R,R')-MNF altered fatty acid metabolism, energy metabolism, and amino acid metabolism and increased intracellular concentrations of β-hydroxybutyrate and carnitine while reducing l-lactate content. The cellular content of phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 and hexokinase 2 was reduced consistent with diminished PI3K-AKT signaling and glucose metabolism. The presence of the GLUT8 transporter was established and found to be attenuated by (R,R')-MNF. Mice treated with (R,R')-MNF had significant accumulation of l-lactate in tumor tissue relative to vehicle-treated mice, together with reduced levels of the selective l-lactate transporter MCT4. Lower intratumoral levels of EGFR, pyruvate kinase M2, β-catenin, hexokinase 2, and p-glycoprotein were also observed. The data suggest that (R,R')-MNF reduces glycolysis in PANC-1 cells and tumors through reduced expression and function at multiple controlling sites in the glycolytic pathway. © 2017 UICC.

  17. Porphyrin lipid nanoparticles for enhanced photothermal therapy in a patient-derived orthotopic pancreas xenograft cancer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLaughlin, Christina M.; Ding, Lili; Jin, Cheng; Cao, Pingjiang; Siddiqui, Iram; Hwang, David M.; Chen, Juan; Wilson, Brian C.; Zheng, Gang; Hedley, David W.

    2016-03-01

    Local disease control is a major problem in the treatment of pancreatic cancer, because curative-intent surgery is only possible in a minority of patients, and radiotherapy cannot be delivered in curative doses. Despite the promise of photothermal therapy (PTT) for ablation of pancreatic tumors, this approach remains under investigated. Using photothermal sensitizers in combination with laser light for PTT can result in more efficient conversion of light energy to heat, and confinement of thermal destruction to the tumor, thus sparing adjacent organs and vasculature. Porphyrins have been previously employed as photosensitizers for PDT and PTT, however their incorporation in to "porphysomes", lipid-based nanoparticles each containing ~80,000 porphyrins through conjugation of pyropheophorbide to phospholipids, carries two distinct advantages: 1) high-density porphyrin packing imparts the nanoparticles with enhanced photonic properties for imaging and phototherapy; 2) the enhanced permeability and retention effect may be exploited for optimal delivery of porphysomes to the tumor region thus high payload porphyrin delivery. The feasibility of porphysome-enhanced PTT for pancreatic cancer treatment was investigated using a patient-derived orthotopic pancreas xenograft tumor model. Uptake of porphysomes at the orthotopic tumor site was validated using ex vivo fluorescence imaging of intact organs of interest. The accumulation of porphysomes in orthotopic tumor microstructure was also confirmed by fluorescence imaging of excised tissue slices. PTT progress was monitored as changes in tumor surface temperature using IR optical imaging. Histological analyses were conducted to examine microstructure changes in tissue morphology, and the viability of remaining tumor tissues following exposure to heat. These studies may also provide insight as to the contribution of heat sink in application of thermal therapies to highly vascularized pancreatic tumors.

  18. Nicotine stimulates pancreatic cancer xenografts by systemic increase in stress neurotransmitters and suppression of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wadei, Hussein A N; Plummer, Howard K; Schuller, Hildegard M

    2009-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a leading cause of cancer mortality in Western countries. We have shown previously that four representative human PDAC cell lines were regulated by beta-adrenoreceptors via cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent signaling. In the current study, we have tested the hypothesis that nicotine stimulates the growth of PDAC xenografts in nude mice by increasing the systemic levels of the stress neurotransmitters adrenaline and noradrenaline, which are the physiological agonists for beta-adrenoreceptors and that inhibition by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) of the adenylyl cyclase-dependent pathway downstream of adrenoreceptors blocks this effect. The size of xenografts from PDAC cell line Panc-1 was determined 30 days after inoculation of the cancer cells. Stress neurotransmitters in serum as well as cAMP in the cellular fraction of blood and in tumor tissue were assessed by immunoassays. Levels of GABA, its synthesizing enzymes GAD65 and GAD67 and beta-adrenergic signaling proteins in the tumor tissue were determined by western blotting. Nicotine significantly increased the systemic levels of adrenaline, noradrenaline and cAMP while increasing xenograft size and protein levels of cAMP, cyclic AMP response element-binding protein and p-extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 in the tumor tissue. Nicotine additionally reduced the protein levels of both GAD isozymes and GABA in tumor tissue. Treatment with GABA abolished these responses to nicotine and blocked the development of xenografts in mice not exposed to nicotine. These findings suggest that the development and progression of PDAC is subject to significant modulation by stimulatory stress neurotransmitters and inhibitory GABA and that treatment with GABA may be useful for marker-guided cancer intervention of PDAC.

  19. Honokiol inhibits sphere formation and xenograft growth of oral cancer side population cells accompanied with JAK/STAT signaling pathway suppression and apoptosis induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Jhy-Shrian; Yao, Chih-Jung; Chuang, Shuang-En; Yeh, Chi-Tai; Lee, Liang-Ming; Chen, Ruei-Ming; Chao, Wan-Ju; Whang-Peng, Jacqueline; Lai, Gi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Eliminating cancer stem cells (CSCs) has been suggested for prevention of tumor recurrence and metastasis. Honokiol, an active compound of Magnolia officinalis, had been proposed to be a potential candidate drug for cancer treatment. We explored its effects on the elimination of oral CSCs both in vitro and in vivo. By using the Hoechst side population (SP) technique, CSCs-like SP cells were isolated from human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines, SAS and OECM-1. Effects of honokiol on the apoptosis and signaling pathways of SP-derived spheres were examined by Annexin V/Propidium iodide staining and Western blotting, respectively. The in vivo effectiveness was examined by xenograft mouse model and immunohistochemical tissue staining. The SP cells possessed higher stemness marker expression (ABCG2, Ep-CAM, Oct-4 and Nestin), clonogenicity, sphere formation capacity as well as tumorigenicity when compared to the parental cells. Treatment of these SP-derived spheres with honokiol resulted in apoptosis induction via Bax/Bcl-2 and caspase-3-dependent pathway. This apoptosis induction was associated with marked suppression of JAK2/STAT3, Akt and Erk signaling pathways in honokiol-treated SAS spheres. Consistent with its effect on JAK2/STAT3 suppression, honokiol also markedly inhibited IL-6-mediated migration of SAS cells. Accordingly, honokiol dose-dependently inhibited the growth of SAS SP xenograft and markedly reduced the immunohistochemical staining of PCNA and endothelial marker CD31 in the xenograft tumor. Honokiol suppressed the sphere formation and xenograft growth of oral CSC-like cells in association with apoptosis induction and inhibition of survival/proliferation signaling pathways as well as angiogenesis. These results suggest its potential as an integrative medicine for combating oral cancer through targeting on CSCs. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2265-6) contains supplementary material, which is available to

  20. Raloxifene inhibits tumor growth and lymph node metastasis in a xenograft model of metastatic mammary cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhong-Lian

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of raloxifene, a novel selective estrogen receptor modulator, were studied in a mouse metastatic mammary cancer model expressing cytoplasmic ERα. Methods Mammary tumors, induced by inoculation of syngeneic BALB/c mice with BJMC3879luc2 cells, were subsequently treated with raloxifene at 0, 18 and 27 mg/kg/day using mini-osmotic pumps. Results In vitro study demonstrated that the ERα in BJMC3879luc2 cells was smaller (between 50 and 64 kDa than the normal-sized ERα (66 kDa and showed cytoplasmic localization. A statistically significant but weak estradiol response was observed in this cell line. When BJMC3879luc2 tumors were implanted into mice, the ERα mRNA levels were significantly higher in females than in males. In vitro studies showed that raloxifene induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in the G1-phase and a decrease in the cell population in the S-phase. In animal experiments, tumor volumes were significantly suppressed in the raloxifene-treated groups. The multiplicity of lymph node metastasis was significantly decreased in the 27 mg/kg group. Levels of apoptosis were significantly increased in the raloxifene-treated groups, whereas the levels of DNA synthesis were significantly decreased in these groups. No differences in microvessel density in tumors were observed between the control and raloxifene-treated groups. The numbers of dilated lymphatic vessels containing intraluminal tumor cells were significantly reduced in mammary tumors in the raloxifene-treated groups. The levels of ERα mRNA in mammary tumors tended to be decreased in the raloxifene-treated groups. Conclusion These results suggest that the antimetastatic activity of raloxifene in mammary cancer expressing cytoplasmic ERα may be a crucial finding with clinical applications and that raloxifene may be useful as an adjuvant therapy and for the chemoprevention of breast cancer development.

  1. Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Therapeutic Targets Revealed by Tumor-Stroma Cross-Talk Analyses in Patient-Derived Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rémy Nicolle

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Preclinical models based on patient-derived xenografts have remarkable specificity in distinguishing transformed human tumor cells from non-transformed murine stromal cells computationally. We obtained 29 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC xenografts from either resectable or non-resectable patients (surgery and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspirate, respectively. Extensive multiomic profiling revealed two subtypes with distinct clinical outcomes. These subtypes uncovered specific alterations in DNA methylation and transcription as well as in signaling pathways involved in tumor-stromal cross-talk. The analysis of these pathways indicates therapeutic opportunities for targeting both compartments and their interactions. In particular, we show that inhibiting NPC1L1 with Ezetimibe, a clinically available drug, might be an efficient approach for treating pancreatic cancers. These findings uncover the complex and diverse interplay between PDAC tumors and the stroma and demonstrate the pivotal role of xenografts for drug discovery and relevance to PDAC.

  2. Pharmacologic inhibition of MLK3 kinase activity blocks the in vitro migratory capacity of breast cancer cells but has no effect on breast cancer brain metastasis in a mouse xenograft model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Hyoe Rhoo

    Full Text Available Brain metastasis of breast cancer is an important clinical problem, with few therapeutic options and a poor prognosis. Recent data have implicated mixed lineage kinase 3 (MLK3 in controlling the in vitro migratory capacity of breast cancer cells, as well as the metastasis of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells from the mammary fat pad to distant lymph nodes in a mouse xenograft model. We therefore set out to test whether MLK3 plays a role in brain metastasis of breast cancer cells. To address this question, we used a novel, brain penetrant, MLK3 inhibitor, URMC099. URMC099 efficiently inhibited the migration of breast cancer cells in an in vitro cell monolayer wounding assay, and an in vitro transwell migration assay, but had no effect on in vitro cell growth. We also tested the effect of URMC099 on tumor formation in a mouse xenograft model of breast cancer brain metastasis. This analysis showed that URMC099 had no effect on the either the frequency or size of breast cancer brain metastases. We conclude that pharmacologic inhibition of MLK3 by URMC099 can reduce the in vitro migratory capacity of breast cancer cells, but that it has no effect on either the frequency or size of breast cancer brain metastases, in a mouse xenograft model.

  3. Genomic characterisation of small cell lung cancer patient-derived xenografts generated from endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration specimens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy L Leong

    Full Text Available Patient-derived xenograft (PDX models generated from surgical specimens are gaining popularity as preclinical models of cancer. However, establishment of PDX lines from small cell lung cancer (SCLC patients is difficult due to very limited amount of available biopsy material. We asked whether SCLC cells obtained from endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA could generate PDX lines that maintained the phenotypic and genetic characteristics of the primary tumor. Following successful EBUS-TBNA sampling for diagnostic purposes, we obtained an extra sample for cytologic analysis and implantation into the flanks of immunodeficient mice. Animals were monitored for engraftment for up to 6 months. Histopathologic and immunohistochemical analysis, and targeted next-generation re-sequencing, were then performed in both the primary sample and the derivative PDX line. A total of 12 patients were enrolled in the study. EBUS-TBNA aspirates yielded large numbers of viable tumor cells sufficient to inject between 18,750 and 1,487,000 cells per flank, and to yield microgram quantities of high-quality DNA. Of these, samples from 10 patients generated xenografts (engraftment rate 83% with a mean latency of 104 days (range 63-188. All but one maintained a typical SCLC phenotype that closely matched the original sample. Identical mutations that are characteristic of SCLC were identified in both the primary sample and xenograft line. EBUS-TBNA has the potential to be a powerful tool in the development of new targeting strategies for SCLC patients by providing large numbers of viable tumor cells suitable for both xenografting and complex genomic analysis.

  4. Imaging of dihydrofolate reductase fusion gene expression in xenografts of human liver metastases of colorectal cancer in living rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer-Kuckuk, Philipp; Bertino, Joseph R.; Banerjee, Debabrata [Molecular Pharmacology and Therapeutics Program, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School/UMDNJ, 195 Little Albany Street, NJ 08903, New Brunswick (United States); Doubrovin, Mikhail; Blasberg, Ronald; Tjuvajev, Juri Gelovani [Department of Neurooncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Gusani, Niraj J.; Fong, Yuman [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Gade, Terence; Koutcher, Jason A. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Balatoni, Julius; Finn, Ronald [Radiochemistry/Cyclotron Core Facility, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Akhurst, Tim; Larson, Steven [Nuclear Medicine Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2003-09-01

    Radionuclide imaging has been demonstrated to be feasible to monitor transgene expression in vivo. We hypothesized that a potential application of this technique is to non-invasively detect in deep tissue, such as cancer cells metastatic to the liver, a specific molecular response following systemic drug treatment. Utilizing human colon adenocarcinoma cells derived from a patient's liver lesion we first developed a nude rat xenograft model for colorectal cancer metastatic to the liver. Expression of a dihydrofolate reductase-herpes simplex virus 1 thymidine kinase fusion (DHFR-HSV1 TK) transgene in the hepatic tumors was monitored in individual animals using the tracer [{sup 124}I]2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-5-iodouracil-{beta}-d-arabinofuranoside (FIAU) and a small animal micro positron emission tomograph (microPET), while groups of rats were imaged using the tracer [{sup 131}I]FIAU and a clinical gamma camera. Growth of the human metastatic colorectal cancer cells in the rat liver was detected using magnetic resonance imaging and confirmed by surgical inspection. Single as well as multiple lesions of different sizes and sites were observed in the liver of the animals. Next, using a subset of rats bearing hepatic tumors, which were retrovirally bulk transduced to express the DHFR-HSV1 TK transgene, we imaged the fusion protein expression in the hepatic tumor of living rats using the tracer [{sup 124}I]FIAU and a microPET. The observed deep tissue signals were highly specific for the tumors expressing the DHFR-HSV1 TK fusion protein compared with parental untransduced tumors and other tissues as determined by gamma counting of tissue samples. A subsequent study used the tracer [{sup 131}I]FIAU and a gamma camera to monitor two groups of transduced hepatic tumor-bearing rats. Prior to imaging, one group was treated with trimetrexate to exploit DHFR-mediated upregulation of the fusion gene product. Imaging in the living animal as well as subsequent gamma

  5. SU-G-TeP3-08: Pre-Clinical Radionuclide Therapy Dosimetry in Several Pediatric Cancer Xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, I; Otto, M; Weichert, J; Baiu, D; Bednarz, B [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The focus of this work is to perform Monte Carlo-based dosimetry for several pediatric cancer xenografts in mice treated with a novel radiopharmaceutical {sup 131}I-CLR1404. Methods: Four mice for each tumor cell line were injected with 8–13 µCi/g of the {sup 124}124I-CLR1404. PET/CT images of each individual mouse were acquired at 5–6 time points over the span of 96–170 hours post-injection. Following acquisition, the images were co-registered, resampled, rescaled, corrected for partial volume effects (PVE), and masked. For this work the pre-treatment PET images of {sup 124}I-CLR1404 were used to predict therapeutic doses from {sup 131}I-CLR1404 at each time point by assuming the same injection activity and accounting for the difference in physical decay rates. Tumors and normal tissues were manually contoured using anatomical and functional images. The CT and the PET images were used in the Geant4 (v9.6) Monte Carlo simulation to define the geometry and source distribution, respectively. The total cumulated absorbed dose was calculated by numerically integrating the dose-rate at each time point over all time on a voxel-by-voxel basis. Results: Spatial distributions of the absorbed dose rates and dose volume histograms as well as mean, minimum, maximum, and total dose values for each ROI were generated for each time point. Conclusion: This work demonstrates how mouse-specific MC-based dosimetry could potentially provide more accurate characterization of efficacy of novel radiopharmaceuticals in radionuclide therapy. This work is partially funded by NIH grant CA198392.

  6. Nilotinib Enhances Tumor Angiogenesis and Counteracts VEGFR2 Blockade in an Orthotopic Breast Cancer Xenograft Model with Desmoplastic Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Zafarnia

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF/VEGF receptor (VEGFR-targeted therapies predominantly affect nascent, immature tumor vessels. Since platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR blockade inhibits vessel maturation and thus increases the amount of immature tumor vessels, we evaluated whether the combined PDGFR inhibition by nilotinib and VEGFR2 blockade by DC101 has synergistic therapy effects in a desmoplastic breast cancer xenograft model. In this context, besides immunohistological evaluation, molecular ultrasound imaging with BR55, the clinically used VEGFR2-targeted microbubbles, was applied to monitor VEGFR2-positive vessels noninvasively and to assess the therapy effects on tumor angiogenesis. DC101 treatment alone inhibited tumor angiogenesis, resulting in lower tumor growth and in significantly lower vessel density than in the control group after 14 days of therapy. In contrast, nilotinib inhibited vessel maturation but enhanced VEGFR2 expression, leading to markedly increased tumor volumes and a significantly higher vessel density. The combination of both drugs led to an almost similar tumor growth as in the DC101 treatment group, but VEGFR2 expression and microvessel density were higher and comparable to the controls. Further analyses revealed significantly higher levels of tumor cell–derived VEGF in nilotinib-treated tumors. In line with this, nilotinib, especially in low doses, induced an upregulation of VEGF and IL-6 mRNA in the tumor cells in vitro, thus providing an explanation for the enhanced angiogenesis observed in nilotinib-treated tumors in vivo. These findings suggest that nilotinib inhibits vessel maturation but counteracts the effects of antiangiogenic co-therapy by enhancing VEGF expression by the tumor cells and stimulating tumor angiogenesis.

  7. The carboxyl terminal trimer of procollagen I induces pro-metastatic changes and vascularization in breast cancer cells xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visigalli, Davide; Palmieri, Daniela; Strangio, Antonella; Astigiano, Simonetta; Barbieri, Ottavia; Casartelli, Gianluigi; Zicca, Antonio; Manduca, Paola

    2009-01-01

    The COOH terminal peptide of Pro-collagen type I (PICP, also called C3) is chemotactic for endothelial melanoma and breast cancer cells. PICP induces the expression of Metalloproteinases-2 and -9, of Vascular endothelial growth factor and of the chemokine CXCL-12 receptor CXCR4 in MDA MB231 breast carcinoma cells in vitro. We used a model of xenografts in BalbC/nude mice obtaining tumors by implanting in contro-lateral subcutaneous positions MDA MB231 cells added or not with purified PICP and studied the earlier phases of tumor development, up to 48 days from implant, by histology, immunostain and in situ hybridization. Addition of PICP promotes rapid vascularization of the tumors while does not affect mitotic and apoptotic indexes and overall tumor growth. PICP-treated, relative to control tumors, show up-modulation of Vascular endothelial factor, Metalloproteinase-9 and CXCR4, all tumor prognostic genes; they also show down-modulation of the endogenous Metalloproteinase inhibitor, reversion-inducing-cysteine-rich protein with kazal motifs, and a different pattern of modulation of Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2. These changes occur in absence of detectable expression of CXCL-12, up to 38 days, in control and treated tumors. PICP has an early promoting effect in the acquisition by the tumors of prometastatic phenotype. PICP may be play a relevant role in the productive interactions between stroma and tumor cells by predisposing the tumor cells to respond to the proliferation stimuli ensuing the activation of signaling by engagement of CXCR4 by cytokines and by fostering their extravasion, due to the induction of increased vascular development

  8. Comparison of radioimmunotherapy and external beam radiotherapy in colon cancer xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buras, R.R.; Wong, J.F.C.; Kuhn, J.A.; Beatty, B.G.; Williams, L.E.; Beatty, J.D.; Wanek, P.M.

    1993-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy and external beam radiotherapy were compared in a nude mouse human colon cancer model. Radioimmunotherapy was delivered by intraperitoneal injection of 90 Y-labeled anticarcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody (anti-CEA MAB). Single fraction external beam radiotherapy was delivered using a 60 Co teletherapy unit. Control groups received saline, unlabeled anit-CEA monoclonal antibody and labeled nonspecific monoclonal antibody. Tumor growth suppression was expressed as delay to reach 2g compared to saline controls. Unlabeled anti-CEA monoclonal antibody and labeled nonspecific monoclonal antibody had no effect. External beam radiotherapy of 300, 600, 1000 and 2000 cGy produced growth delays of 3, 12, 17, and 22 days, respectively. Radioimmunotherapy with 120 μCi, 175 μCi, and 225 μCi resulted in growth delays of 20, 34, and 36 days. Estimated absorbed tumor dose was 1750 cGy in the 120 μCi group. Similar comparisons were done with the more radioresistant WiDr human colon carcinoma cell line. External beam radiotherapy doses of 400, 800, 1200, and 1600 cGy resulted in growth delays of 6, 21, 36 and 48 days, respectively. Radioimmunotherapy of 120 μCi and 175 μCi resulted in growth delays of 9 and 19 days, respectively. The 120 μCi dose delivered an estimated absorbed tumor dose of 1080 cGy to WiDr tumors. In summary, for the radiosensitive LS174T line, radioimmunotherapy produced biologic effects that were comparable to a similar dose of single fraction external beam radiotherapy. For the more radioresistant WiDr tumor, radioimmunotherapy produced a biologic effect which was less than a similar dose of single fraction external beam radiotherapy. These studies suggest that a tumor's response to radioimmunotherapy relative to that of external beam radiotherapy is, in part, dependent on tumor radiosensitivity and repair capacity. 23 refs., 5 figs. 4 tabs

  9. Combined 5-FU and ChoKα inhibitors as a new alternative therapy of colorectal cancer: evidence in human tumor-derived cell lines and mouse xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana de la Cueva

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third major cause of cancer related deaths in the world. 5-fluorouracil (5-FU is widely used for the treatment of colorectal cancer but as a single-agent renders low response rates. Choline kinase alpha (ChoKα, an enzyme that plays a role in cell proliferation and transformation, has been reported overexpressed in many different tumors, including colorectal tumors. ChoKα inhibitors have recently entered clinical trials as a novel antitumor strategy.ChoKα specific inhibitors, MN58b and TCD-717, have demonstrated a potent antitumoral activity both in vitro and in vivo against several tumor-derived cell line xenografts including CRC-derived cell lines. The effect of ChoKα inhibitors in combination with 5-FU as a new alternative for the treatment of colon tumors has been investigated both in vitro in CRC-tumour derived cell lines, and in vivo in mouse xenografts models. The effects on thymidilate synthase (TS and thymidine kinase (TK1 levels, two enzymes known to play an essential role in the mechanism of action of 5-FU, were analyzed by western blotting and quantitative PCR analysis. The combination of 5-FU with ChoKα inhibitors resulted in a synergistic effect in vitro in three different human colon cancer cell lines, and in vivo against human colon xenografts in nude mice. ChoKα inhibitors modulate the expression levels of TS and TK1 through inhibition of E2F production, providing a rational for its mechanism of action.Our data suggest that both drugs in combination display a synergistic antitumoral effect due to ChoKα inhibitors-driven modulation of the metabolization of 5-FU. The clinical relevance of these findings is strongly supported since TCD-717 has recently entered Phase I clinical trials against solid tumors.

  10. Anti-tumor activity of high-dose EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor and sequential docetaxel in wild type EGFR non-small cell lung cancer cell nude mouse xenografts

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Ning; Zhang, Qianqian; Fang, Shu; Han, Xiao; Wang, Zhehai

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with wild-type epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is still a challenge. This study explored antitumor activity of high-dose icotinib (an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor) plus sequential docetaxel against wild-type EGFR NSCLC cells-generated nude mouse xenografts. Nude mice were subcutaneously injected with wild-type EGFR NSCLC A549 cells and divided into different groups for 3-week treatment. Tumor xenograft volumes were monitored and record...

  11. Intracapillary HbO2 saturations in murine tumours and human tumour xenografts measured by cryospectrophotometry: relationship to tumour volume, tumour pH and fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofstad, E K; Fenton, B M; Sutherland, R M

    1988-05-01

    Frequency distributions for intracapillary HbO2 saturation were determined for two murine tumour lines (KHT, RIF-1) and two human ovarian carcinoma xenograft lines (MLS, OWI) using a cryospectrophotometric method. The aim was to search for possible relationships between HbO2 saturation status and tumour volume, tumour pH and fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells. Tumour pH was measured by 31P NMR spectroscopy. Hypoxic fractions were determined from cell survival curves for tumours irradiated in vivo and assayed in vitro. Tumours in the volume range 100-4000 mm3 were studied and the majority of the vessels were found to have HbO2 saturations below 10%. The volume-dependence of the HbO2 frequency distributions differed significantly among the four tumour lines; HbO2 saturation status decreased with increasing tumour volume for the KHT, RIF-1 and MLS lines and was independent of tumour volume for the OWI line. The data indicated that the rate of decrease in HbO2 saturation status during tumour growth was related to the rate of development of necrosis. The volume-dependence of tumour pH was very similar to that of the HbO2 saturation status for all tumour lines. Significant correlations were therefore found between HbO2 saturation status and tumour pH, both within tumour lines and across the four tumour lines, reflecting that the volume-dependence of both parameters probably was a compulsory consequence of reduced oxygen supply conditions during tumour growth. Hypoxic fraction increased during tumour growth for the KHT, RIF-1 and MLS lines and was volume-independent for the OWI line, suggesting a relationship between HbO2 saturation status and hypoxic fraction within tumour lines. However, there was no correlation between these two parameters across the four tumour lines, indicating that the hypoxic fraction of a tumour is not determined only by the oxygen supply conditions; other parameters may also be important, e.g. oxygen diffusivity, rate of oxygen

  12. Dendritic cell-based vaccination in cancer: therapeutic implications emerging from murine models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soledad eMac Keon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play a pivotal role in the orchestration of immune responses, and are thus key targets in cancer vaccine design. Since the 2010 FDA approval of the first cancer DC-based vaccine (Sipuleucel T there has been a surge of interest in exploiting these cells as a therapeutic option for the treatment of tumors of diverse origin. In spite of the encouraging results obtained in the clinic, many elements of DC-based vaccination strategies need to be optimized. In this context, the use of experimental cancer models can help direct efforts towards an effective vaccine design. This paper reviews recent findings in murine models regarding the antitumoral mechanisms of DC-based vaccination, covering issues related to antigen sources, the use of adjuvants and maturing agents, and the role of DC subsets and their interaction in the initiation of antitumoral immune responses. The summary of such diverse aspects will highlight advantages and drawbacks in the use of murine models, and contribute to the design of successful DC-based translational approaches for cancer treatment.

  13. Novel cancer gene variants and gene fusions of triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) reveal their molecular diversity conserved in the patient-derived xenograft (PDX) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jaeyun; Jang, Kiwon; Ju, Jung Min; Lee, Eunji; Lee, Jong Won; Kim, Hee Jung; Kim, Jisun; Lee, Sae Byul; Ko, Beom Seok; Son, Byung Ho; Lee, Hee Jin; Gong, Gyungyup; Ahn, Sei Yeon; Choi, Jung Kyoon; Singh, Shree Ram; Chang, Suhwan

    2018-04-20

    Despite the improved 5-year survival rate of breast cancer, triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) remains a challenge due to lack of effective targeted therapy and higher recurrence and metastasis than other subtypes. To identify novel druggable targets and to understand its unique biology, we tried to implement 24 patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) of TNBC. The overall success rate of PDX implantation was 45%, much higher than estrogen receptor (ER)-positive cases. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed conserved ER/PR/Her2 negativity (with two exceptions) between the original and PDX tumors. Genomic analysis of 10 primary tumor-PDX pairs with Ion AmpliSeq CCP revealed high degree of variant conservation (85.0% to 96.9%) between primary and PDXs. Further analysis showed 44 rare variants with a predicted high impact in 36 genes including Trp53, Pten, Notch1, and Col1a1. Among them, we confirmed frequent Notch1 variant. Furthermore, RNA-seq analysis of 24 PDXs revealed 594 gene fusions, of which 163 were in-frame, including AZGP1-GJC3 and NF1-AARSD1. Finally, western blot analysis of oncogenic signaling proteins supporting molecular diversity of TNBC PDXs. Overall, our report provides a molecular basis for the usefulness of the TNBC PDX model in preclinical study. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. A novel rabbit anti-hepatocyte growth factor monoclonal neutralizing antibody inhibits tumor growth in prostate cancer cells and mouse xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Yanlan; Chen, Yicheng; Ding, Guoqing; Wang, Mingchao; Wu, Haiyang; Xu, Liwei; Rui, Xuefang; Zhang, Zhigen

    2015-01-01

    The hepatocyte growth factor and its receptor c-Met are correlated with castration-resistance in prostate cancer. Although HGF has been considered as an attractive target for therapeutic antibodies, the lack of cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with human/mouse HGFs is a major obstacle in preclinical developments. We generated a panel of anti-HGF RabMAbs either blocking HGF/c-Met interaction or inhibiting c-Met phosphorylation. We selected one RabMAb with mouse cross-reactivity and demonstrated that it blocked HGF-stimulated downstream activation in PC-3 and DU145 cells. Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibited not only the growth of PC-3 cells but also HGF-dependent proliferation in HUVECs. We further demonstrated the efficacy and potency of the anti-HGF RabMAb in tumor xenograft mice models. Through these in vitro and in vivo experiments, we explored a novel therapeutic antibody for advanced prostate cancer. - Highlights: • HGF is an attractive target for castration-refractory prostate cancer. • We generated and characterized a panel of anti-HGF rabbit monoclonal antibodies. • More than half of these anti-HGF RabMAbs was cross-reactive with mouse HGF. • Anti-HGF RabMAb blocks HGF-stimulated phosphorylation and cell growth in vitro. • Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in xenograft mice

  15. A novel rabbit anti-hepatocyte growth factor monoclonal neutralizing antibody inhibits tumor growth in prostate cancer cells and mouse xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yanlan; Chen, Yicheng; Ding, Guoqing; Wang, Mingchao; Wu, Haiyang; Xu, Liwei; Rui, Xuefang; Zhang, Zhigen, E-mail: srrshurology@163.com

    2015-08-14

    The hepatocyte growth factor and its receptor c-Met are correlated with castration-resistance in prostate cancer. Although HGF has been considered as an attractive target for therapeutic antibodies, the lack of cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with human/mouse HGFs is a major obstacle in preclinical developments. We generated a panel of anti-HGF RabMAbs either blocking HGF/c-Met interaction or inhibiting c-Met phosphorylation. We selected one RabMAb with mouse cross-reactivity and demonstrated that it blocked HGF-stimulated downstream activation in PC-3 and DU145 cells. Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibited not only the growth of PC-3 cells but also HGF-dependent proliferation in HUVECs. We further demonstrated the efficacy and potency of the anti-HGF RabMAb in tumor xenograft mice models. Through these in vitro and in vivo experiments, we explored a novel therapeutic antibody for advanced prostate cancer. - Highlights: • HGF is an attractive target for castration-refractory prostate cancer. • We generated and characterized a panel of anti-HGF rabbit monoclonal antibodies. • More than half of these anti-HGF RabMAbs was cross-reactive with mouse HGF. • Anti-HGF RabMAb blocks HGF-stimulated phosphorylation and cell growth in vitro. • Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in xenograft mice.

  16. Radiation responses of human bladder cancer assessed in vitro or as xenografts in immune-deprived mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannock, I.; Choo, B.; Buick, R.

    1984-01-01

    The response to radiation of cells derived from transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the human bladder has been studied. In vitro radiation survival curves for two established cell lines, RT-4 and MGH-U1, and for a cell line HB-10 derived recently from biopsy of a metastatic lymph node were characterized by values of D 0 and anti n in the range of 1.1-1.5 Gy and 2-7 respectively. The oxygen enhancement ratio of HB-10 cells was 2.8. Xenografts derived from the line HB-10 were irradiated in vivo under both aerobic and hypoxic conditions and cell survival was assessed in agar. Both aerobic and hypoxic survival curves were similar to that obtained for irradiation of hypoxic HB-10 cells in culture. Another tumor line, HB-15, derived from a cystoscopic biopsy of primary TCC, was maintained by transplantation of xenografts. Regrowth curves for HB-15 xenografts after radiation doses of 10 or 20 Gy were parallel to the growth curve for untreated controls but with volume reduced by factors of about 5 and 20 respectively. Cells derived from TCC of the human bladder exhibit parameters of radiation survival similar to those of other mammalian cells, and that xenografts derived from such cells contain a high proportion of hypoxic cells

  17. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibody 15 and its fragments for localization and imaging of xenografts of human lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, K.; Kamma, H.; Ogata, T.

    1988-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (MAb) 15 and its F(ab')2 and Fab fragments were radioiodinated, and their biodistribution and imaging were compared in BALB/c nude mice bearing a xenograft of a human lung cancer (TKB-2). Association constants for 125I-labeled MAb 15 IgG, F(ab')2, and Fab were 1.9 X 10(9), 1.8 X 10(9), and 3.7 X 10(8) M-1, respectively. Immunoreactive fractions ranged from 0.59 to 0.50. Cultured TKB-2 cells expressed 1.1 X 10(4) binding sites/cell for MAb 15 IgG in vitro. The binding of a control antibody and the binding of its fragments to TKB-2 cells were less than 3% of the input doses. The mice with the TKB-2 tumors were given simultaneous injections of 10 microCi of 131I-labeled MAb 15 or its fragments and 10 microCi of 125I-labeled control IgG or its fragments. With MAb 15 IgG, the percentage of the injected dose bound per gram of tissue (ID/g) of the tumor was 3.68% at day 7, when the localization index (LI) was 4.38. At day 2 after MAb 15 F(ab')2 injection, 1.12% of the ID/g was localized in the tumor and the LI was 3.04. After MAb 15 Fab injection, the percentage of the ID/g of the tumor was 0.31% and the LI was 2.58 at day 1. MAb 15 IgG, F(ab')2, and Fab cleared from the blood early, with a half-life of 33, 16, and 9 hours, respectively. The distributions of MAb 15 and its fragments in the normal organs did not differ from those of the control. Radioimaging with 100 microCi of 131I-labeled MAb 15 and its fragments showed that 42%, 44%, and 32% of the total-body count were localized in the tumor with IgG at day 7, F(ab')2 at day 2, or Fab at day 1, respectively. Because the radioactivity remaining in the tumor with Fab was low, the image was insufficient. Throughout the period, less than 10% of the control IgG and its fragments remained in the tumor. Microautoradiography confirmed the binding of MAb 15 and its fragments to the tumor cells

  18. A combination of p53-activating APR-246 and phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody potently inhibits tumor development in hormone-dependent mutant p53-expressing breast cancer xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Y

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Yayun Liang,1 Benford Mafuvadze,1 Cynthia Besch-Williford,2 Salman M Hyder1 1Deparment of Biomedical Sciences and Dalton Cardiovascular Research Center, Columbia, MO, USA; 2IDEXX BioResearch, Columbia, MO, USA Background: Between 30 and 40% of human breast cancers express a defective tumor suppressor p53 gene. Wild-type p53 tumor suppressor protein promotes cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis and inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor–dependent angiogenesis, whereas mutant p53 protein (mtp53 lacks these functions, resulting in tumor cell survival and metastasis. Restoration of p53 function is therefore a promising drug-targeted strategy for combating mtp53-expressing breast cancer. Methods: In this study, we sought to determine whether administration of APR-246, a small-molecule drug that restores p53 function, in combination with 2aG4, an antibody that targets phosphatidylserine residues on tumor blood vessels and disrupts tumor vasculature, effectively inhibits advanced hormone-dependent breast cancer tumor growth. Results: APR-246 reduced cell viability in mtp53-expressing BT-474 and T47-D human breast cancer cells in vitro, and significantly induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. However, APR-246 did not reduce cell viability in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, which express wild-type p53. We next examined APR-246’s anti-tumor effects in vivo using BT-474 and T47-D tumor xenografts established in female nude mice. Tumor-bearing mice were treated with APR-246 and/or 2aG4 and tumor volume followed over time. Tumor growth was more effectively suppressed by combination treatment than by either agent alone, and combination therapy completely eradicated some tumors. Immunohistochemistry analysis of tumor tissue sections demonstrated that combination therapy more effectively induced apoptosis and reduced cell proliferation in tumor xenografts than either agent alone. Importantly, combination therapy dramatically reduced the density of blood

  19. A small molecule inhibitor of ETV1, YK-4-279, prevents prostate cancer growth and metastasis in a mouse xenograft model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Rahim

    Full Text Available The erythroblastosis virus E26 transforming sequences (ETS family of transcription factors consists of a highly conserved group of genes that play important roles in cellular proliferation, differentiation, migration and invasion. Chromosomal translocations fusing ETS factors to promoters of androgen responsive genes have been found in prostate cancers, including the most clinically aggressive forms. ERG and ETV1 are the most commonly translocated ETS proteins. Over-expression of these proteins in prostate cancer cells results in a more invasive phenotype. Inhibition of ETS activity by small molecule inhibitors may provide a novel method for the treatment of prostate cancer.We recently demonstrated that the small molecule YK-4-279 inhibits biological activity of ETV1 in fusion-positive prostate cancer cells leading to decreased motility and invasion in-vitro. Here, we present data from an in-vivo mouse xenograft model. SCID-beige mice were subcutaneously implanted with fusion-positive LNCaP-luc-M6 and fusion-negative PC-3M-luc-C6 tumors. Animals were treated with YK-4-279, and its effects on primary tumor growth and lung metastasis were evaluated. YK-4-279 treatment resulted in decreased growth of the primary tumor only in LNCaP-luc-M6 cohort. When primary tumors were grown to comparable sizes, YK-4-279 inhibited tumor metastasis to the lungs. Expression of ETV1 target genes MMP7, FKBP10 and GLYATL2 were reduced in YK-4-279 treated animals. ETS fusion-negative PC-3M-luc-C6 xenografts were unresponsive to the compound. Furthermore, YK-4-279 is a chiral molecule that exists as a racemic mixture of R and S enantiomers. We established that (S-YK-4-279 is the active enantiomer in prostate cancer cells.Our results demonstrate that YK-4-279 is a potent inhibitor of ETV1 and inhibits both the primary tumor growth and metastasis of fusion positive prostate cancer xenografts. Therefore, YK-4-279 or similar compounds may be evaluated as a potential

  20. B lymphoma Moloney murine leukemia virus insertion region 1: An oncogenic mediator in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qipeng; Li, Qiaqia; Zhu, Sen; Yi, Yang; Cao, Qi

    2018-06-01

    B lymphoma Moloney murine leukemia virus insertion region 1 (BMI1), a core member of polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1), has been intensely investigated in the field of cancer epigenetics for decades. Widely known as a critical regulator in cellular physiology, BMI1 is essential in self-renewal and differentiation in different lineages of stem cells. BMI1 also plays a significant role in cancer etiology for its involvement in pathological progress such as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer stem cell maintenance, propagation, and differentiation. Importantly, overexpression of BMI1 is predictive for drug resistance, tumor recurrence, and eventual therapy failure of various cancer subtypes, which renders the pharmacological targeting at BMI1 as a novel and promising therapeutic approach. The study on prostate cancer, a prevalent hormone-related cancer among men, has promoted enormous research advancements in cancer genetics and epigenetics. This review summarizes the role of BMI1 as an oncogenic and epigenetic regulator in tumor initiation, progression, and relapse of prostate cancer.

  1. Celecoxib and GABA cooperatively prevent the progression of pancreatic cancer in vitro and in xenograft models of stress-free and stress-exposed mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein A N Al-Wadei

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC has a poor prognosis and is associated with high levels of psychological distress. We have shown that beta-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs, which are activated by stress neurotransmitters, regulate PDAC cells via cyclic AMP (cAMP-dependent signaling in vitro, that social stress promotes PDAC progression in mouse xenografts and that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA inhibits these responses in vitro and in vivo. The targeted inhibition of stress-induced regulatory pathways may abolish the potentially negative impact of psychological stress on clinical outcomes. Our current data show that chronic exposure of PDAC cell lines Panc-1 (activating point mutations in K-ras and BXPC-3 (no mutations in K-ras in vitro to the stress neurotransmitter epinephrine at the concentration (15 nM previously measured in the serum of mice exposed to social stress significantly increased proliferation and migration. These responses were inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by celecoxib. The effects of celecoxib alone and in combination with γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA on the progression of subcutaneous mouse xenografts from the cell line (BXPC-3 most responsive to epinephrine were then investigated in the presence and absence of social stress. Cancer-stimulating factors (VEGF & prostaglandin E(2 [PGE(2] and levels of cAMP were measured by immunoassays in blood and xenograft tissue. Phosphorylation of the signaling proteins ERK, CREB, Src, and AKT was assessed by ELISA assays and Western blotting. Expression of COX-2, 5-lipoxygenase, and p-5-LOX were determined by semi-quantitative Western blotting. Celecoxib alone significantly inhibited xenograft progression and decreased systemic and tumor VEGF, PGE2, and cAMP as well as phosphorylated signaling proteins in stress-exposed and stress-free mice. These responses were significantly enhanced by co-treatment with GABA. The celecoxib-induced downregulation of COX-2 protein and p-5-LOX

  2. A bioengineered murine model using CD24+CD44+ pancreatic cancer stem cells for chemotherapy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Shengqi; Li, Jianshe; Zhang, Zhongtao; Deng, Yiming

    2015-01-01

    In this work we first developed a murine pancreatic tumor model using CD24 + CD44 + pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSC) supported by an electrospun scaffold. Unlike conventional models, the use of CSC and the scaffold, which were biologically and chemically defined, afforded scientists a reliable platform to evaluate novel chemotherapy regimens. CD24 + CD44 + CSC successfully initiated tumorigenesis in vitro on the scaffold without suffering apoptosis, evidencing the lack of cytotoxicity of scaffolding materials. Also, the scaffold contributed to the acceleration of in vivo tumorigenesis and increased the likelihood of tumor formation. Using this model, we set out to explore the effectiveness of irinotecan/gemcitabine (IRIN-GEM), a chemotherapy regimen, for pancreatic cancer. Our study showed that IRIN-GEM induced a tumor regression whereas gemcitabine alone could only arrest the tumor growth. Further study suggested that the superior performance of IRIN-GEM could be attributed to its capacity to demolish the CD24 + CD44 + CSC sub-population by inducing a large-scale apoptosis. The use of highly proliferative yet homogenous CD24 + CD44 + CSC along with a chemically defined scaffold accelerated the tumor formation and significantly reduced the variability associated with conventional murine models. Armed with this new model, we discovered that IRIN-GEM would be a promising chemotherapy candidate for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. (paper)

  3. Shigella mediated depletion of macrophages in a murine breast cancer model is associated with tumor regression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Galmbacher

    Full Text Available A tumor promoting role of macrophages has been described for a transgenic murine breast cancer model. In this model tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs represent a major component of the leukocytic infiltrate and are associated with tumor progression. Shigella flexneri is a bacterial pathogen known to specificly induce apotosis in macrophages. To evaluate whether Shigella-induced removal of macrophages may be sufficient for achieving tumor regression we have developed an attenuated strain of S. flexneri (M90TDeltaaroA and infected tumor bearing mice. Two mouse models were employed, xenotransplantation of a murine breast cancer cell line and spontanous breast cancer development in MMTV-HER2 transgenic mice. Quantitative analysis of bacterial tumor targeting demonstrated that attenuated, invasive Shigella flexneri primarily infected TAMs after systemic administration. A single i.v. injection of invasive M90TDeltaaroA resulted in caspase-1 dependent apoptosis of TAMs followed by a 74% reduction in tumors of transgenic MMTV-HER-2 mice 7 days post infection. TAM depletion was sustained and associated with complete tumor regression.These data support TAMs as useful targets for antitumor therapy and highlight attenuated bacterial pathogens as potential tools.

  4. Cytotoxic activity of methanol extracts from Basidiomycete mushrooms on murine cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasi, S; Lohézic-Le Dévéhat, F; Sauleau, P; Bézivin, C; Boustie, J

    2004-04-01

    Crude methanol extracts of 58 mushroom species were screened for their cytotoxic activities against two murine cancer cell lines, L1210 and 3LL, using the tetrazolium assay. A majority of extracts (74%) exhibited IC50 > 100 microg/ml against both cell lines. A most marked activity against one of the cell lines was noted for nine species (14% of the tested species). While Amanitales and Russulales tested were not found active, Polyporales and Boletales gave better results. Four species exhibited a significant cytotoxic activity (IC50 Suillus granulatus, S. luteus). The last one had never been investigated for its cytotoxic compounds before.

  5. The use of matrigel has no influence on tumor development or PET imaging in FaDu human head and neck cancer xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fliedner, Frederikke P.; Hansen, Anders Elias; Jorgensen, Jesper T.

    2016-01-01

    is currently available. This study evaluates the potential effect of matrigel use in a human head and neck cancer xenograft model (FaDu; hypopharyngeal carcinoma) in NMRI nude mice. The FaDu cell line was chosen based on its frequent use in studies of cancer imaging and tumor microenvironment. Methods: NMRI...... nude mice (n = 34) were divided into two groups and subcutaneously injected with FaDu cells in medium either including (+MG) or excluding matrigel (-MG). In sub study I seven mice from each group (+MG, n = 7; -MG, n = 7) were 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET/CT scanned on Day 5, 8, 12, 15, and 19...... for the FaDu xenograft model evaluated. Tumors in the -MG group displayed increased angiogenesis compared to the +MG tumors. No difference in 18F-FDG PET uptake for tumors of different groups was found. Based on these observations the influence of matrigel on tumor imaging and tumor microenvironment seems...

  6. Heterogeneity of functional properties of Clone 66 murine breast cancer cells expressing various stem cell phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Farrell, Tracy; Sharma, Gayatri; McGuire, Timothy R; O'Kane, Barbara; Sharp, J Graham

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer grows, metastasizes and relapses from rare, therapy resistant cells with a stem cell phenotype (cancer stem cells/CSCs). However, there is a lack of studies comparing the functions of CSCs isolated using different phenotypes in order to determine if CSCs are homogeneous or heterogeneous. Cells with various stem cell phenotypes were isolated by sorting from Clone 66 murine breast cancer cells that grow orthotopically in immune intact syngeneic mice. These populations were compared by in vitro functional assays for proliferation, growth, sphere and colony formation; and in vivo limiting dilution analysis of tumorigenesis. The proportion of cells expressing CD44(high)CD24(low/neg), side population (SP) cells, ALDH1(+), CD49f(high), CD133(high), and CD34(high) differed, suggesting heterogeneity. Differences in frequency and size of tumor spheres from these populations were observed. Higher rates of proliferation of non-SP, ALDH1(+), CD34(low), and CD49f(high) suggested properties of transit amplifying cells. Colony formation was higher from ALDH1(-) and non-SP cells than ALDH1(+) and SP cells suggesting a progenitor phenotype. The frequency of clonal colonies that grew in agar varied and was differentially altered by the presence of Matrigel™. In vivo, fewer cells with a stem cell phenotype were needed for tumor formation than "non-stem" cells. Fewer SP cells were needed to form tumors than ALDH1(+) cells suggesting further heterogeneities of cells with stem phenotypes. Different levels of cytokines/chemokines were produced by Clone 66 with RANTES being the highest. Whether the heterogeneity reflects soluble factor production remains to be determined. These data demonstrate that Clone 66 murine breast cancer cells that express stem cell phenotypes are heterogeneous and exhibit different functional properties, and this may also be the case for human breast cancer stem cells.

  7. Effect of estrogen withdrawal on energy-rich phosphates and prediction of estrogen dependence monitored by in vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of four human breast cancer xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, C A; Kristjansen, P E; Brünner, N

    1995-01-01

    The effect of estrogen withdrawal on energy metabolism was studied in four human breast cancer xenografts: the estrogen-dependent MCF-7 and ZR75-1 and the estrogen-independent ZR75/LCC-3 and MDA-MB-231. The tumors were grown in ovariectomized nude mice with a s.c. implanted estrogen pellet. After......-clamped tumors prepared 14 days after estrogen removal were analyzed for ATP and phosphocreatine content. Our findings suggest a correlation between estrogen withdrawal and the steady-state concentrations of ATP, phosphocreatine, and Pi in human breast cancer xenografts. Discrimination analysis...

  8. PKM2 Thr454 phosphorylation increases its nuclear translocation and promotes xenograft tumor growth in A549 human lung cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Zhenhai, E-mail: tomsyu@163.com [Center for Reproductive Medicine, Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical University, Weifang, Shandong, 261031 (China); Huang, Liangqian [Institute of Health Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences (SIBS), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) & Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine -SJTUSM, Shanghai, 200025 (China); Qiao, Pengyun; Jiang, Aifang; Wang, Li; Yang, Tingting [Center for Reproductive Medicine, Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical University, Weifang, Shandong, 261031 (China); Tang, Shengjian; Zhang, Wei [Plastic Surgery Institute of Weifang Medical University, Weifang, Shandong, 261041 (China); Ren, Chune, E-mail: ren@wfmc.edu.cn [Center for Reproductive Medicine, Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical University, Weifang, Shandong, 261031 (China)

    2016-05-13

    Pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) is a key enzyme of glycolysis which is highly expressed in many tumor cells, and plays an important role in the Warburg effect. In previous study, we found PIM2 phosphorylates PKM2 at Thr454 residue (Yu, etl 2013). However, the functions of PKM2 Thr454 modification in cancer cells still remain unclear. Here we find PKM2 translocates into the nucleus after Thr454 phosphorylation. Replacement of wild type PKM2 with a mutant (T454A) enhances mitochondrial respiration, decreases pentose phosphate pathway, and enhances chemosensitivity in A549 cells. In addition, the mutant (T454A) PKM2 reduces xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. These findings demonstrate that PKM2 T454 phosphorylation is a potential therapeutic target in lung cancer.

  9. Targeting Tumor Cells with Anti-CD44 Antibody Triggers Macrophage-Mediated Immune Modulatory Effects in a Cancer Xenograft Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisel, Daniela; Birzele, Fabian; Voss, Edgar; Nopora, Adam; Bader, Sabine; Friess, Thomas; Goller, Bernhard; Laifenfeld, Daphna; Weigand, Stefan; Runza, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    CD44, a transmembrane receptor reported to be involved in various cellular functions, is overexpressed in several cancer types and supposed to be involved in the initiation, progression and prognosis of these cancers. Since the sequence of events following the blockage of the CD44-HA interaction has not yet been studied in detail, we profiled xenograft tumors by RNA Sequencing to elucidate the mode of action of the anti-CD44 antibody RG7356. Analysis of tumor and host gene-expression profiles led us to the hypothesis that treatment with RG7356 antibody leads to an activation of the immune system. Using cytokine measurements we further show that this activation involves the secretion of chemo-attractants necessary for the recruitment of immune cells (i.e. macrophages) to the tumor site. We finally provide evidence for antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) of the malignant cells by macrophages.

  10. Targeting Tumor Cells with Anti-CD44 Antibody Triggers Macrophage-Mediated Immune Modulatory Effects in a Cancer Xenograft Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Maisel

    Full Text Available CD44, a transmembrane receptor reported to be involved in various cellular functions, is overexpressed in several cancer types and supposed to be involved in the initiation, progression and prognosis of these cancers. Since the sequence of events following the blockage of the CD44-HA interaction has not yet been studied in detail, we profiled xenograft tumors by RNA Sequencing to elucidate the mode of action of the anti-CD44 antibody RG7356. Analysis of tumor and host gene-expression profiles led us to the hypothesis that treatment with RG7356 antibody leads to an activation of the immune system. Using cytokine measurements we further show that this activation involves the secretion of chemo-attractants necessary for the recruitment of immune cells (i.e. macrophages to the tumor site. We finally provide evidence for antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP of the malignant cells by macrophages.

  11. Time-dependent pharmacokinetics of dexamethasone and its efficacy in human breast cancer xenograft mice: a semi-mechanism-based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Chen, Rong; Yao, Qing-Yu; Liu, Sheng-Jun; Tian, Xiu-Yun; Hao, Chun-Yi; Lu, Wei; Zhou, Tian-Yan

    2018-03-01

    Dexamethasone (DEX) is the substrate of CYP3A. However, the activity of CYP3A could be induced by DEX when DEX was persistently administered, resulting in auto-induction and time-dependent pharmacokinetics (pharmacokinetics with time-dependent clearance) of DEX. In this study we investigated the pharmacokinetic profiles of DEX after single or multiple doses in human breast cancer xenograft nude mice and established a semi-mechanism-based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model for characterizing the time-dependent PK of DEX as well as its anti-cancer effect. The mice were orally given a single or multiple doses (8 mg/kg) of DEX, and the plasma concentrations of DEX were assessed using LC-MS/MS. Tumor volumes were recorded daily. Based on the experimental data, a two-compartment model with first order absorption and time-dependent clearance was established, and the time-dependence of clearance was modeled by a sigmoid E max equation. Moreover, a semi-mechanism-based PK/PD model was developed, in which the auto-induction effect of DEX on its metabolizing enzyme CYP3A was integrated and drug potency was described using an E max equation. The PK/PD model was further used to predict the drug efficacy when the auto-induction effect was or was not considered, which further revealed the necessity of adding the auto-induction effect into the final PK/PD model. This study established a semi-mechanism-based PK/PD model for characterizing the time-dependent pharmacokinetics of DEX and its anti-cancer effect in breast cancer xenograft mice. The model may serve as a reference for DEX dose adjustments or optimization in future preclinical or clinical studies.

  12. Correlations of 3T DCE-MRI Quantitative Parameters with Microvessel Density in a Human-Colorectal-Cancer Xenograft Mouse Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Sung Jun; An, Chan Sik; Koom, Woong Sub; Song, Ho Taek; Suh, Jin Suck

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the correlation between quantitative dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) parameters and microvascular density (MVD) in a human-colon-cancer xenograft mouse model using 3 Tesla MRI. A human-colon-cancer xenograft model was produced by subcutaneously inoculating 1 X 106 DLD-1 human-colon-cancer cells into the right hind limbs of 10 mice. The tumors were allowed to grow for two weeks and then assessed using MRI. DCE-MRI was performed by tail vein injection of 0.3 mmol/kg of gadolinium. A region of interest (ROI) was drawn at the midpoints along the z-axes of the tumors, and a Tofts model analysis was performed. The quantitative parameters (Ktrans, Kep and Ve) from the whole transverse ROI and the hotspot ROI of the tumor were calculated. Immunohistochemical microvessel staining was performed and analyzed according to Weidner's criteria at the corresponding MRI sections. Additional Hematoxylin and Eosin staining was performed to evaluate tumor necrosis. The Mann-Whitney test and Spearman's rho correlation analysis were performed to prove the existence of a correlation between the quantitative parameters, necrosis, and MVD. Whole transverse ROI of the tumor showed no significant relationship between the MVD values and quantitative DCE-MRI parameters. In the hotspot ROI, there was a difference in MVD between low and high group of Ktrans and Kep that had marginally statistical significance (ps = 0.06 and 0.07, respectively). Also, Ktrans and Kep were found to have an inverse relationship with MVD (r -0.61, p = 0.06 in Ktrans; r = -0.60, p = 0.07 in Kep). Quantitative analysis of T1-weighted DCE-MRI using hotspot ROI may provide a better histologic match than whole transverse section ROI. Within the hotspots, Ktrans and Kep tend to have a reverse correlation with MVD in this colon cancer mouse model.

  13. Correlations of 3T DCE-MRI Quantitative Parameters with Microvessel Density in a Human-Colorectal-Cancer Xenograft Mouse Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sung Jun; An, Chan Sik; Koom, Woong Sub; Song, Ho Taek; Suh, Jin Suck [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    To investigate the correlation between quantitative dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) parameters and microvascular density (MVD) in a human-colon-cancer xenograft mouse model using 3 Tesla MRI. A human-colon-cancer xenograft model was produced by subcutaneously inoculating 1 X 106 DLD-1 human-colon-cancer cells into the right hind limbs of 10 mice. The tumors were allowed to grow for two weeks and then assessed using MRI. DCE-MRI was performed by tail vein injection of 0.3 mmol/kg of gadolinium. A region of interest (ROI) was drawn at the midpoints along the z-axes of the tumors, and a Tofts model analysis was performed. The quantitative parameters (Ktrans, Kep and Ve) from the whole transverse ROI and the hotspot ROI of the tumor were calculated. Immunohistochemical microvessel staining was performed and analyzed according to Weidner's criteria at the corresponding MRI sections. Additional Hematoxylin and Eosin staining was performed to evaluate tumor necrosis. The Mann-Whitney test and Spearman's rho correlation analysis were performed to prove the existence of a correlation between the quantitative parameters, necrosis, and MVD. Whole transverse ROI of the tumor showed no significant relationship between the MVD values and quantitative DCE-MRI parameters. In the hotspot ROI, there was a difference in MVD between low and high group of Ktrans and Kep that had marginally statistical significance (ps = 0.06 and 0.07, respectively). Also, Ktrans and Kep were found to have an inverse relationship with MVD (r -0.61, p = 0.06 in Ktrans; r = -0.60, p = 0.07 in Kep). Quantitative analysis of T1-weighted DCE-MRI using hotspot ROI may provide a better histologic match than whole transverse section ROI. Within the hotspots, Ktrans and Kep tend to have a reverse correlation with MVD in this colon cancer mouse model.

  14. Selenite Treatment Inhibits LAPC-4 Tumor Growth and Prostate-Specific Antigen Secretion in a Xenograft Model of Human Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, Rumi S.; Husbeck, Bryan; Feldman, David; Knox, Susan J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Selenium compounds have known chemopreventive effects on prostate cancer. However selenite, an inorganic form of selenium, has not been extensively studied as a treatment option for prostate cancer. Our previous studies have demonstrated the inhibition of androgen receptor expression and androgen stimulated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) expression by selenite in human prostate cancer cell lines. In this study, we investigated the in vivo effects of selenite as a therapy to treat mice with established LAPC-4 tumors. Methods and Materials: Male mice harboring androgen-dependent LAPC-4 xenograft tumors were treated with selenite (2 mg/kg intraperitoneally three times per week) or vehicle for 42 days. In addition, androgen-independent LAPC-4 xenograft tumors were generated in female mice over 4 to 6 months. Once established, androgen-independent LAPC-4 tumor fragments were passaged into female mice and were treated with selenite or vehicle for 42 days. Changes in tumor volume and serum PSA levels were assessed. Results: Selenite significantly decreased androgen-dependent LAPC-4 tumor growth in male mice over 42 days (p < 0.001). Relative tumor volume was decreased by 41% in selenite-treated animals compared with vehicle-treated animals. The inhibition of LAPC-4 tumor growth corresponded to a marked decrease in serum PSA levels (p < 0.01). In the androgen-independent LAPC-4 tumors in female mice, selenite treatment decreased tumor volume by 58% after 42 days of treatment (p < 0.001). Conclusions: These results suggest that selenite may have potential as a novel therapeutic agent to treat both androgen-dependent and androgen-independent prostate cancer

  15. Autophagy inhibition synergistically enhances anti-cancer efficacy of RAMBA, VN/12-1 in SKBR-3 cells and tumor xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbole, Abhijit M.; Purushottamachar, Puranik; Martin, Marlena S.; Daskalakis, Constantine; Njar, Vincent C. O.

    2012-01-01

    VN/12-1 is a novel retinoic acid metabolism blocking agent (RAMBA) discovered in our laboratory. The purpose of the study was to elucidate the molecular mechanism of VN/12-1’s anticancer activity in breast cancer cell lines and in tumor xenografts. We investigated the effects of VN/12-1 on induction of autophagy andapoptosis in SKBR-3 cells. Further, we also examined the impact of pharmacological and genomic inhibition of autophagy on VN/12-1’s anti-cancer activity. Finally, the anti-tumor activity of VN/12-1 was evaluated as a single agent and in combination with autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CHL) in an SKBR-3 mouse xenograft model. Short exposure of low dose (< 10 µM) of VN/12-1 induced endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS), autophagy and inhibits G1-S phase transition and caused a protective response. However, higher dose of VN/12-1 initiates apoptosis in vitro. Inhibition of autophagy using either pharmacological inhibitors or RNA interference of Beclin-1 enhanced anti-cancer activity induced by VN/12-1 in SKBR-3 cells by triggering apoptosis. Importantly, VN/12-1 (5 mg/kg twice weekly) and the combination of VN/12-1 (5 mg/kg twice weekly) + chloroquine (50 mg/kg twice weekly) significantly suppressed established SKBR-3 tumor growth by 81.4% (p < 0.001 vs. control) and 96.2% (p < 0.001 vs. control), respectively. Our novel findings suggest that VN/12-1 may be useful as a single agent or in combination with autophagy inhibitors for treating human breast cancers. Our data provides a strong rationale for clinical evaluation of VN/12-1 as single agent or in combination with autophagy inhibitors. PMID:22334589

  16. Fractionated therapy of HER2-expressing breast and ovarian cancer xenografts in mice with targeted alpha emitting 227Th-DOTA-p-benzyl-trastuzumab.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Heyerdahl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate therapeutic efficacy and normal tissue toxicity of single dosage and fractionated targeted alpha therapy (TAT in mice with HER2-expressing breast and ovarian cancer xenografts using the low dose rate radioimmunoconjugate (227Th-DOTA-p-benzyl-trastuzumab. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Nude mice carrying HER2-overexpressing subcutaneous SKOV-3 or SKBR-3 xenografts were treated with 1000 kBq/kg (227Th-trastuzumab as single injection or four injections of 250 kBq/kg with intervals of 4-5 days, 2 weeks, or 4 weeks. Control animals were treated with normal saline or unlabeled trastuzumab. In SKOV-3 xenografts tumor growth to 10-fold size was delayed (p<0.01 and survival with tumor diameter less than 16 mm was prolonged (p<0.05 in all TAT groups compared to the control groups. No statistically significant differences were seen among the treated groups. In SKBR-3 xenografts tumor growth to 10-fold size was delayed in the single injection and 4-5 days interval groups (p<0.001 and all except the 4 weeks interval TAT group showed improved survival to the control groups (p<0.05. Toxicity was assessed by blood cell counts, clinical chemistry measurements and body weight. Transient reduction in white blood cells was seen for the single injection and 4-5 days interval groups (p<0.05. No significant changes were seen in red blood cells, platelets or clinical chemistry parameters. Survival without life threatening loss of body weight was significantly prolonged in 4 weeks interval group compared to single injection group (p<0.05 for SKOV-3 animals and in 2 weeks interval group compared with the 4-5 days interval groups (p<0.05 for SKBR-3 animals. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The same concentration of radioactivity split into several fractions may improve toxicity of (227Th-radioimmunotherapy while the therapeutic effect is maintained. Thus, it might be possible to increase the cumulative absorbed radiation dose

  17. Sci-Thur PM – Colourful Interactions: Highlights 03: Radiation induced glycogen accumulation in non-small cell lung cancer xenografts detected using Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harder, Samantha J.; Isabelle, Martin; DeVorkin, Lindsay; Smazynski, Julian; Beckham, Wayne; Brolo, Alexandre; Lum, Julian; Jirasek, Andrew [BC Cancer Agency/ Vancouver Island Cancer Centre, Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, BC Cancer Agency/ Vancouver Island Cancer Centre, BC Cancer Agency/ Vancouver Island Cancer Centre, BC Cancer Agency/ Vancouver Island Cancer Centre, University of Victoria/ Department of Chemistry, BC Cancer Agency/ Vancouver Island Cancer Centre, University of British Columbia Okanagan (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: This study presents the novel application of Raman spectroscopy (RS) to identify biochemical signatures of radiation response in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) xenografts, irradiated in vivo. Methods: Human NSCLC cells (H460) were subcutaneously injected into the flanks of 12 mice. Tumours were treated with single fraction radiation doses (0, 5 or 15 Gy) and harvested at 3 days post irradiation. A Renishaw inVia Raman microscope coupled to a 785 nm laser was used to collect Raman spectral maps for each tumour. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining for CAIX was used to visualize hypoxia, and co-registration between IHC fluorescence and Raman images was carried out. Results: Principal component analysis revealed radiation induced spectral signatures linked to changes in protein, nucleic acid, lipid and carbohydrates. In particular, a marked increase in glycogen for irradiated tumours was observed. Spatial mapping revealed intra-tumoural heterogeneity in the distribution of glycogen within the tumour, suggesting tumour response to radiation is not globally uniform. Furthermore, co-registration of Raman glycogen maps with CAIX IHC staining showed a correlation between glycogen rich and hypoxic regions of the tissue. Conclusions: We identify glycogen as a unique radiation induced response in NSCLC tumour xenografts, which may reflect inherent metabolic changes associated with radiation response in tissue. This study provides unique insight into the biochemical response of tumours, irradiated in vivo, and demonstrates the potential of RS for detecting radiobiological responses in tumours.

  18. Sci-Thur PM – Colourful Interactions: Highlights 03: Radiation induced glycogen accumulation in non-small cell lung cancer xenografts detected using Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harder, Samantha J.; Isabelle, Martin; DeVorkin, Lindsay; Smazynski, Julian; Beckham, Wayne; Brolo, Alexandre; Lum, Julian; Jirasek, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study presents the novel application of Raman spectroscopy (RS) to identify biochemical signatures of radiation response in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) xenografts, irradiated in vivo. Methods: Human NSCLC cells (H460) were subcutaneously injected into the flanks of 12 mice. Tumours were treated with single fraction radiation doses (0, 5 or 15 Gy) and harvested at 3 days post irradiation. A Renishaw inVia Raman microscope coupled to a 785 nm laser was used to collect Raman spectral maps for each tumour. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining for CAIX was used to visualize hypoxia, and co-registration between IHC fluorescence and Raman images was carried out. Results: Principal component analysis revealed radiation induced spectral signatures linked to changes in protein, nucleic acid, lipid and carbohydrates. In particular, a marked increase in glycogen for irradiated tumours was observed. Spatial mapping revealed intra-tumoural heterogeneity in the distribution of glycogen within the tumour, suggesting tumour response to radiation is not globally uniform. Furthermore, co-registration of Raman glycogen maps with CAIX IHC staining showed a correlation between glycogen rich and hypoxic regions of the tissue. Conclusions: We identify glycogen as a unique radiation induced response in NSCLC tumour xenografts, which may reflect inherent metabolic changes associated with radiation response in tissue. This study provides unique insight into the biochemical response of tumours, irradiated in vivo, and demonstrates the potential of RS for detecting radiobiological responses in tumours.

  19. Pulsatilla saponin A, an active molecule from Pulsatilla chinensis, induces cancer cell death and inhibits tumor growth in mouse xenograft models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Chen, Weichang; Jiao, Yang; Hou, Jianquan; Wu, Qingyu; Liu, Yanli; Qi, Xiaofei

    2014-05-15

    Many natural compounds possess antitumor growth activities. Pulsatilla chinensis is an herb used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat infectious diseases. More recently, extracts from P chinensis have been shown to contain antitumor activities. In this study, we isolated Pulsatilla saponin A as an active compound from P chinensis extracts and tested its anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo. In cell culture, Pulsatilla saponin A significantly inhibited the growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma SMCC-7721 cells and pancreatic BXPC3 and SW1990 cancer cells. Similar inhibitory activities were observed when the compound was tested in mouse xenograft tumor models using human hepatocellular carcinoma Bel-7402 and pancreatic cancer SW1990 cells. In Comet assay and flow cytometric analysis of cell cycle distribution and annexin V expression, DNA damage, G2 arrest, and apoptosis were identified in Pulsatilla saponin A-treated cancer cells. Based on the results of Western blotting, p53 and cyclin B protein levels were higher, whereas Bcl-2 protein levels were lower in Pulsatilla saponin A-treated cancer cells than in vehicle-treated cells. Pulsatilla saponin A may exert its antitumor effect by inducing DNA damage and causing G2 arrest and apoptosis in cancer cells. Pulsatilla saponin A and its derivatives may be developed as a new class of anticancer agents. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Early therapy monitoring of 125I seed interstitial implant in a pancreatic cancer xenograft by 18F-FDG Micro-PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhongmin; Liu Yu; Chen Kemin; Lu Jian; Gong Ju; Zheng Yunfeng; Zhang Liyun; Liu Fenju

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the application value of early evaluation and monitoring of 125 I interstitial implantation in a pancreatic cancer xenograft. Methods: Xenograft models were created by subcutaneous injection of Sw 1990 human pancreatic cancer cell suspensions into the right hind limbs of the immunodeficient BABL/c nude mice. The tumors size were about 8-10 mm after two weeks. The mice were randomly divided into 3 groups,including control group (n=4), empty seed implantation group (n=4) and 125 I implantation group (n=4). Before treatment and one week after treatment, 18 F-FDG Micro-PET/CT scan was performed and then maximum standardized uptake values (SUV max ), mean standardized uptake values (SUV mean ), tumor size and necrosis rate were measured. HE staining and TK1 immunohistochemistry examination were carried out in the paraffin-embedded sample. Results: Before treatment the SUV max and SUV mean values of three groups did not reach statistical significance. One week after treatment the SUV max and SUV mean values of three groups were 3.53±1.20 and 0.57±0.26 vs. 3.83±2.13 and 0.59 ±0.24 vs. 0.29±0.23 and 0.016±0.001, respectively, with a significant difference (F=7.62, P=0.01; F=10.34, P=0.005). The SUV max and SUV mean values of 125 I implant group were significantly lower than empty seed implant group and control group and were significantly lower than before treatment. Before treatment, tumor necrosis rate of three groups were not significantly different. Immunohistochemical staining found the TK1 positive staining index of three groups were respectively (64.25±1.71)%, (62.25±2.22)% and (38.25±1.71)% with statistically significant difference (F=233.67, P<0.001). The TK1 positive staining index of 125 I implant group was significantly lower than empty seed implant group and control group. The SUV max values had some positive correlation with TK1 positive staining index (r=0.85, P=0.001). Conclusions: 18 F-FDG Micro-PET/CT may be useful as a

  1. Antitumour Effects of Isocurcumenol Isolated from Curcuma zedoaria Rhizomes on Human and Murine Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, S.; Padmaja, G.; Remani, P.

    2011-01-01

    Curcuma zedoaria belonging to the family Zingiberaceae has been used in the traditional system of medicine in India and Southwest Asia in treating many human ailments and is found to possess many biological activities. The rationale of the present study was to isolate, identify, and characterize antitumour principles from the rhizomes of Curcuma zedoaria, to assess its cytotoxic effects on human and murine cancer cells, to determine its apoptosis inducing capacity in cancer cells, and to evaluate its tumour reducing properties in in vivo mice models. Isocurcumenol was characterized as the active compound by spectroscopy and was found to inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells without inducing significant toxicity to the normal cells. Fluorescent staining exhibited the morphological features of apoptosis in the compound-treated cancer cells. In vivo tumour reduction studies revealed that a dose of 35.7 mg/kg body weight significantly reduced the ascitic tumour in DLA-challenged mice and increased the lifespan with respect to untreated control mice. PMID:27429805

  2. Growth inhibitory effects of the dual ErbB1/ErbB2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor PKI-166 on human prostate cancer xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Tran, Chris; Sawyers, Charles L

    2002-09-15

    Experiments with human prostate cancer cell lines have shown that forced overexpression of the ErbB2-receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) promotes androgen-independent growth and increases androgen receptor-transcriptional activity in a ligand-independent fashion. To investigate the relationship between ErbB-RTK signaling and androgen in genetically unmanipulated human prostate cancer, we performed biochemical and biological studies with the dual ErbB1/ErbB2 RTK inhibitor PKI-166 using human prostate cancer xenograft models with isogenic sublines reflecting the transition from androgen-dependent to androgen-independent growth. In the presence of low androgen concentrations, PKI-166 showed profound growth-inhibitory effects on tumor growth, which could be partially reversed by androgen add-back. At physiological androgen concentrations, androgen withdrawal greatly enhanced the ability of PKI-166 to retard tumor growth. The level of extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation correlated with the response to PKI-166 treatment, whereas the expression levels of ErbB1 and ErbB2 did not. These results suggest that ErbB1/ErbB2 RTKs play an important role in the biology of androgen-independent prostate cancer and provide a rationale for clinical evaluation of inhibitors targeted to this pathway.

  3. Fluorescently labeled chimeric anti-CEA antibody improves detection and resection of human colon cancer in a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) nude mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metildi, Cristina A; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Luiken, George A; Talamini, Mark A; Hoffman, Robert M; Bouvet, Michael

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a new fluorescently labeled chimeric anti-CEA antibody for improved detection and resection of colon cancer. Frozen tumor and normal human tissue samples were stained with chimeric and mouse antibody-fluorophore conjugates for comparison. Mice with patient-derived orthotopic xenografts (PDOX) of colon cancer underwent fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) or bright-light surgery (BLS) 24 hr after tail vein injection of fluorophore-conjugated chimeric anti-CEA antibody. Resection completeness was assessed using postoperative images. Mice were followed for 6 months for recurrence. The fluorophore conjugation efficiency (dye/mole ratio) improved from 3-4 to >5.5 with the chimeric CEA antibody compared to mouse anti-CEA antibody. CEA-expressing tumors labeled with chimeric CEA antibody provided a brighter fluorescence signal on frozen human tumor tissues (P = 0.046) and demonstrated consistently lower fluorescence signals in normal human tissues compared to mouse antibody. Chimeric CEA antibody accurately labeled PDOX colon cancer in nude mice, enabling improved detection of tumor margins for more effective FGS. The R0 resection rate increased from 86% to 96% with FGS compared to BLS. Improved conjugating efficiency and labeling with chimeric fluorophore-conjugated antibody resulted in better detection and resection of human colon cancer in an orthotopic mouse model. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Malonyl-coenzyme-A is a potential mediator of cytotoxicity induced by fatty-acid synthase inhibition in human breast cancer cells and xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizer, E S; Thupari, J; Han, W F; Pinn, M L; Chrest, F J; Frehywot, G L; Townsend, C A; Kuhajda, F P

    2000-01-15

    A biologically aggressive subset of human breast cancers and other malignancies is characterized by elevated fatty-acid synthase (FAS) enzyme expression, elevated fatty acid (FA) synthesis, and selective sensitivity to pharmacological inhibition of FAS activity by cerulenin or the novel compound C75. In this study, inhibition of FA synthesis at the physiologically regulated step of carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA by 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid (TOFA) was not cytotoxic to breast cancer cells in clonogenic assays. FAS inhibitors induced a rapid increase in intracellular malonyl-CoA to several fold above control levels, whereas TOFA reduced intracellular malonyl-CoA by 60%. Simultaneous exposure of breast cancer cells to TOFA and an FAS inhibitor resulted in significantly reduced cytotoxicity and apoptosis. Subcutaneous xenografts of MCF7 breast cancer cells in nude mice treated with C75 showed FA synthesis inhibition, apoptosis, and inhibition of tumor growth to less than 1/8 of control volumes, without comparable toxicity in normal tissues. The data suggest that differences in intermediary metabolism render tumor cells susceptible to toxic fluxes in malonyl-CoA, both in vitro and in vivo.

  5. In vitro and in vivo MMP gene expression localisation by In Situ-RT-PCR in cell culture and paraffin embedded human breast cancer cell line xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haupt, Larisa M; Thompson, Erik W; Trezise, Ann EO; Irving, Rachel E; Irving, Michael G; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2006-01-01

    Members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family of proteases are required for the degradation of the basement membrane and extracellular matrix in both normal and pathological conditions. In vitro, MT1-MMP (MMP-14, membrane type-1-MMP) expression is higher in more invasive human breast cancer (HBC) cell lines, whilst in vivo its expression has been associated with the stroma surrounding breast tumours. MMP-1 (interstitial collagenase) has been associated with MDA-MB-231 invasion in vitro, while MMP-3 (stromelysin-1) has been localised around invasive cells of breast tumours in vivo. As MMPs are not stored intracellularly, the ability to localise their expression to their cells of origin is difficult. We utilised the unique in situ-reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (IS-RT-PCR) methodology to localise the in vitro and in vivo gene expression of MT1-MMP, MMP-1 and MMP-3 in human breast cancer. In vitro, MMP induction was examined in the MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 HBC cell lines following exposure to Concanavalin A (Con A). In vivo, we examined their expression in archival paraffin embedded xenografts derived from a range of HBC cell lines of varied invasive and metastatic potential. Mouse xenografts are heterogenous, containing neoplastic human parenchyma with mouse stroma and vasculature and provide a reproducible in vivo model system correlated to the human disease state. In vitro, exposure to Con A increased MT1-MMP gene expression in MDA-MB-231 cells and decreased MT1-MMP gene expression in MCF-7 cells. MMP-1 and MMP-3 gene expression remained unchanged in both cell lines. In vivo, stromal cells recruited into each xenograft demonstrated differences in localised levels of MMP gene expression. Specifically, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-435 and Hs578T HBC cell lines are able to influence MMP gene expression in the surrounding stroma. We have demonstrated the applicability and sensitivity of IS-RT-PCR for the examination of MMP gene expression both in vitro and in

  6. Hypoxia Potentiates the Radiation-Sensitizing Effect of Olaparib in Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Xenografts by Contextual Synthetic Lethality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yanyan; Verbiest, Tom; Devery, Aoife M.; Bokobza, Sivan M.; Weber, Anika M.; Leszczynska, Katarzyna B.; Hammond, Ester M.; Ryan, Anderson J., E-mail: anderson.ryan@oncology.ox.ac.uk

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors potentiate radiation therapy in preclinical models of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and other types of cancer. However, the mechanisms underlying radiosensitization in vivo are incompletely understood. Herein, we investigated the impact of hypoxia on radiosensitization by the PARP inhibitor olaparib in human NSCLC xenograft models. Methods and Materials: NSCLC Calu-6 and Calu-3 cells were irradiated in the presence of olaparib or vehicle under normoxic (21% O{sub 2}) or hypoxic (1% O{sub 2}) conditions. In vitro radiosensitivity was assessed by clonogenic survival assay and γH2AX foci assay. Established Calu-6 and Calu-3 subcutaneous xenografts were treated with olaparib (50 mg/kg, daily for 3 days), radiation (10 Gy), or both. Tumors (n=3/group) were collected 24 or 72 hours after the first treatment. Immunohistochemistry was performed to assess hypoxia (carbonic anhydrase IX [CA9]), vessels (CD31), DNA double strand breaks (DSB) (γH2AX), and apoptosis (cleaved caspase 3 [CC3]). The remaining xenografts (n=6/group) were monitored for tumor growth. Results: In vitro, olaparib showed a greater radiation-sensitizing effect in Calu-3 and Calu-6 cells in hypoxic conditions (1% O{sub 2}). In vivo, Calu-3 tumors were well-oxygenated, whereas Calu-6 tumors had extensive regions of hypoxia associated with down-regulation of the homologous recombination protein RAD51. Olaparib treatment increased unrepaired DNA DSB (P<.001) and apoptosis (P<.001) in hypoxic cells of Calu-6 tumors following radiation, whereas it had no significant effect on radiation-induced DNA damage response in nonhypoxic cells of Calu-6 tumors or in the tumor cells of well-oxygenated Calu-3 tumors. Consequently, olaparib significantly increased radiation-induced growth inhibition in Calu-6 tumors (P<.001) but not in Calu-3 tumors. Conclusions: Our data suggest that hypoxia potentiates the radiation-sensitizing effects of

  7. Modifications in Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Parameters After α-Particle-Emitting {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab Therapy of HER2-Expressing Ovarian Cancer Xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heyerdahl, Helen, E-mail: Helen.Heyerdahl@rr-research.no [Department of Radiation Biology, Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital - The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Røe, Kathrine [Department of Oncology, Division of Medicine, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog (Norway); Brevik, Ellen Mengshoel [Department of Research and Development, Algeta ASA, Oslo (Norway); Dahle, Jostein [Nordic Nanovector AS, Oslo (Norway)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of α-particle-emitting {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab radioimmunotherapy on tumor vasculature to increase the knowledge about the mechanisms of action of {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab. Methods and Materials: Human HER2-expressing SKOV-3 ovarian cancer xenografts were grown bilaterally in athymic nude mice. Mice with tumor volumes 253 ± 36 mm{sup 3} (mean ± SEM) were treated with a single injection of either {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab at a dose of 1000 kBq/kg body weight (treated group, n=14 tumors) or 0.9% NaCl (control group, n=10 tumors). Dynamic T1-weighted contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) was used to study the effect of {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab on tumor vasculature. DCEMRI was performed before treatment and 1, 2, and 3 weeks after therapy. Tumor contrast-enhancement curves were extracted voxel by voxel and fitted to the Brix pharmacokinetic model. Pharmacokinetic parameters for the tumors that underwent radioimmunotherapy were compared with the corresponding parameters of control tumors. Results: Significant increases of k{sub ep}, the rate constant of diffusion from the extravascular extracellular space to the plasma (P<.05), and k{sub el,} the rate of clearance of contrast agent from the plasma (P<.01), were seen in the radioimmunotherapy group 2 and 3 weeks after injection, compared with the control group. The product of k{sub ep} and the amplitude parameter A, associated with increased vessel permeability and perfusion, was also significantly increased in the radioimmunotherapy group 2 and 3 weeks after injection (P<.01). Conclusions: Pharmacokinetic modeling of MRI contrast-enhancement curves evidenced significant alterations in parameters associated with increased tumor vessel permeability and tumor perfusion after {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab treatment of HER2-expressing ovarian cancer xenografts.

  8. Early evaluation of the effects of chemotherapy with longitudinal FDG small-animal PET in human testicular cancer xenografts: early flare response does not reflect refractory disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aide, Nicolas [GRECAN, EA 1772, IFR 146 ICORE, Caen University, Bioticla Unit, Caen (France); Francois Baclesse Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Nuclear Medicine Department, Caen (France); Centre Francois Baclesse, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Caen Cedex 5 (France); Poulain, Laurent; Briand, Melanie; Dutoit, Soizic; Labiche, Alexandre; Gauduchon, Pascal [GRECAN, EA 1772, IFR 146 ICORE, Caen University, Bioticla Unit, Caen (France); Allouche, Stephane [University Hospital, Biochemistry Department, Caen (France); Ngo-Van Do, Aurelie; Nataf, Valerie; Talbot, Jean-Noel; Montravers, Francoise [Tenon Hospital and University Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris 6), LIMP, Paris (France); Batalla, Alain [Francois Baclesse Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Medical Physics Unit, Caen (France)

    2009-03-15

    We aimed to evaluate the usefulness of FDG PET in the early prediction of the effects of chemotherapy on human testicular cancer xenografts. Nude rats bearing subcutaneous human embryonal carcinoma xenografts received either cisplatin (5 mg/kg) or saline serum. Small-animal PET studies were performed on days 0, 2, 4 and 7 and compared to immunochemistry studies, flow cytometry studies and hexokinase assays. Cisplatin treatment resulted in biphasic FDG uptake evolution: a peak was observed on day 2, followed by a marked decrease on day 7 despite an insignificant change in tumour volume. Similarly, a peak in cyclin A immunostaining was observed on days 2 and 4, followed by a significant decrease on day 7. Flow cytometry showed that the cyclin A peak was not related to increased cell proliferation but was due to a transient S and G{sub 2}/M cell cycle arrest. A marked increase in cell apoptosis was observed from day 2 to day 7. GLUT-1 showed a significant decrease on day 7. Macrophagic infiltrate remained stable except for an increase observed on day 7. In control tumours, continuous growth was observed, all immunostaining markers remaining stable over time. Hexokinase activity was significantly lower on day 7 in treated tumours than in controls. FDG PET may be useful in the early evaluation of treatment in patients with testicular cancer. In our model, a very early increased [{sup 18}F]-FDG uptake was related to a transient cell cycle arrest and early stage apoptosis but did not reveal refractory disease. (orig.)

  9. Efficacy of a non-hypercalcemic vitamin-D2 derived anti-cancer agent (MT19c and inhibition of fatty acid synthesis in an ovarian cancer xenograft model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard G Moore

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Numerous vitamin-D analogs exhibited poor response rates, high systemic toxicities and hypercalcemia in human trials to treat cancer. We identified the first non-hypercalcemic anti-cancer vitamin D analog MT19c by altering the A-ring of ergocalciferol. This study describes the therapeutic efficacy and mechanism of action of MT19c in both in vitro and in vivo models. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Antitumor efficacy of MT19c was evaluated in ovarian cancer cell (SKOV-3 xenografts in nude mice and a syngenic rat ovarian cancer model. Serum calcium levels of MT19c or calcitriol treated animals were measured. In-silico molecular docking simulation and a cell based VDR reporter assay revealed MT19c-VDR interaction. Genomewide mRNA analysis of MT19c treated tumors identified drug targets which were verified by immunoblotting and microscopy. Quantification of cellular malonyl CoA was carried out by HPLC-MS. A binding study with PPAR-Y receptor was performed. MT19c reduced ovarian cancer growth in xenograft and syngeneic animal models without causing hypercalcemia or acute toxicity. MT19c is a weak vitamin-D receptor (VDR antagonist that disrupted the interaction between VDR and coactivator SRC2-3. Genome-wide mRNA analysis and western blot and microscopy of MT19c treated xenograft tumors showed inhibition of fatty acid synthase (FASN activity. MT19c reduced cellular levels of malonyl CoA in SKOV-3 cells and inhibited EGFR/phosphoinositol-3kinase (PI-3K activity independently of PPAR-gamma protein. SIGNIFICANCE: Antitumor effects of non-hypercalcemic agent MT19c provide a new approach to the design of vitamin-D based anticancer molecules and a rationale for developing MT19c as a therapeutic agent for malignant ovarian tumors by targeting oncogenic de novo lipogenesis.

  10. MR Imaging Biomarkers to Monitor Early Response to Hypoxia-Activated Prodrug TH-302 in Pancreatic Cancer Xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomeng Zhang

    Full Text Available TH-302 is a hypoxia-activated prodrug known to activate selectively under the hypoxic conditions commonly found in solid tumors. It is currently being evaluated in clinical trials, including two trials in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinomas (PDAC. The current study was undertaken to evaluate imaging biomarkers for prediction and response monitoring of TH-302 efficacy in xenograft models of PDAC. Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE and diffusion weighted (DW magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were used to monitor acute effects on tumor vasculature and cellularity, respectively. Three human PDAC xenografts with known differential responses to TH-302 were imaged prior to, and at 24 h and 48 hours following a single dose of TH-302 or vehicle to determine if imaging changes presaged changes in tumor volumes. DW-MRI was performed at five b-values to generate apparent diffusion coefficient of water (ADC maps. For DCE-MRI, a standard clinically available contrast reagent, Gd-DTPA, was used to determine blood flow into the tumor region of interest. TH-302 induced a dramatic decrease in the DCE transfer constant (Ktrans within 48 hours after treatment in the sensitive tumors, Hs766t and Mia PaCa-2, whereas TH-302 had no effect on the perfusion behavior of resistant SU.86.86 tumors. Tumor cellularity, estimated from ADC, was significantly increased 24 and 48 hours after treatment in Hs766t, but was not observed in the Mia PaCa-2 and SU.86.86 groups. Notably, growth inhibition of Hs766t was observed immediately (day 3 following initiation of treatment, but was not observed in MiaPaCa-2 tumors until 8 days after initiation of treatment. Based on these preclinical findings, DCE-MRI measures of vascular perfusion dynamics and ADC measures of cell density are suggested as potential TH-302 response biomarkers in clinical trials.

  11. MR Imaging Biomarkers to Monitor Early Response to Hypoxia-Activated Prodrug TH-302 in Pancreatic Cancer Xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaomeng; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W; Martinez, Gary V; Cornnell, Heather H; Hart, Charles P; Baker, Amanda F; Gillies, Robert

    2016-01-01

    TH-302 is a hypoxia-activated prodrug known to activate selectively under the hypoxic conditions commonly found in solid tumors. It is currently being evaluated in clinical trials, including two trials in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinomas (PDAC). The current study was undertaken to evaluate imaging biomarkers for prediction and response monitoring of TH-302 efficacy in xenograft models of PDAC. Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) and diffusion weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used to monitor acute effects on tumor vasculature and cellularity, respectively. Three human PDAC xenografts with known differential responses to TH-302 were imaged prior to, and at 24 h and 48 hours following a single dose of TH-302 or vehicle to determine if imaging changes presaged changes in tumor volumes. DW-MRI was performed at five b-values to generate apparent diffusion coefficient of water (ADC) maps. For DCE-MRI, a standard clinically available contrast reagent, Gd-DTPA, was used to determine blood flow into the tumor region of interest. TH-302 induced a dramatic decrease in the DCE transfer constant (Ktrans) within 48 hours after treatment in the sensitive tumors, Hs766t and Mia PaCa-2, whereas TH-302 had no effect on the perfusion behavior of resistant SU.86.86 tumors. Tumor cellularity, estimated from ADC, was significantly increased 24 and 48 hours after treatment in Hs766t, but was not observed in the Mia PaCa-2 and SU.86.86 groups. Notably, growth inhibition of Hs766t was observed immediately (day 3) following initiation of treatment, but was not observed in MiaPaCa-2 tumors until 8 days after initiation of treatment. Based on these preclinical findings, DCE-MRI measures of vascular perfusion dynamics and ADC measures of cell density are suggested as potential TH-302 response biomarkers in clinical trials.

  12. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition blocks M2 macrophage differentiation and suppresses metastasis in murine breast cancer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Rang Na

    Full Text Available Tumor cells are often associated with abundant macrophages that resemble the alternatively activated M2 subset. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs inhibit anti-tumor immune responses and promote metastasis. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 inhibition is known to prevent breast cancer metastasis. This study hypothesized that COX-2 inhibition affects TAM characteristics potentially relevant to tumor cell metastasis. We found that the specific COX-2 inhibitor, etodolac, inhibited human M2 macrophage differentiation, as determined by decreased CD14 and CD163 expressions and increased TNFα production. Several key metastasis-related mediators, such as vascular endothelial growth factor-A, vascular endothelial growth factor-C, and matrix metalloproteinase-9, were inhibited in the presence of etodolac as compared to untreated M2 macrophages. Murine bone marrow derived M2 macrophages also showed enhanced surface MHCII IA/IE and CD80, CD86 expressions together with enhanced TNFα expressions with etodolac treatment during differentiation. Using a BALB/c breast cancer model, we found that etodolac significantly reduced lung metastasis, possibly due to macrophages expressing increased IA/IE and TNFα, but decreased M2 macrophage-related genes expressions (Ym1, TGFβ. In conclusion, COX-2 inhibition caused loss of the M2 macrophage characteristics of TAMs and may assist prevention of breast cancer metastasis.

  13. A paclitaxel-loaded recombinant polypeptide nanoparticle outperforms Abraxane in multiple murine cancer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Jayanta; Bellucci, Joseph J.; Weitzhandler, Isaac; McDaniel, Jonathan R.; Spasojevic, Ivan; Li, Xinghai; Lin, Chao-Chieh; Chi, Jen-Tsan Ashley; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2015-08-01

    Packaging clinically relevant hydrophobic drugs into a self-assembled nanoparticle can improve their aqueous solubility, plasma half-life, tumour-specific uptake and therapeutic potential. To this end, here we conjugated paclitaxel (PTX) to recombinant chimeric polypeptides (CPs) that spontaneously self-assemble into ~60 nm near-monodisperse nanoparticles that increased the systemic exposure of PTX by sevenfold compared with free drug and twofold compared with the Food and Drug Administration-approved taxane nanoformulation (Abraxane). The tumour uptake of the CP-PTX nanoparticle was fivefold greater than free drug and twofold greater than Abraxane. In a murine cancer model of human triple-negative breast cancer and prostate cancer, CP-PTX induced near-complete tumour regression after a single dose in both tumour models, whereas at the same dose, no mice treated with Abraxane survived for >80 days (breast) and 60 days (prostate), respectively. These results show that a molecularly engineered nanoparticle with precisely engineered design features outperforms Abraxane, the current gold standard for PTX delivery.

  14. Overexpression of YB1 C-terminal domain inhibits proliferation, angiogenesis and tumorigenicity in a SK-BR-3 breast cancer xenograft mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jian-Hong; Cui, Nai-Peng; Wang, Shuo; Zhao, Ming-Zhi; Wang, Bing; Wang, Ya-Nan; Chen, Bao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Y-box-binding protein 1 (YB1) is a multifunctional transcription factor with vital roles in proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. In this study, we have examined the role of its C-terminal domain (YB1 CTD) in proliferation, angiogenesis and tumorigenicity in breast cancer. Breast cancer cell line SK-BR-3 was infected with GFP-tagged YB1 CTD adenovirus expression vector. An 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) proliferation assay showed that YB1 CTD decreased SK-BR-3 cell proliferation, and down-regulated cyclin B1 and up-regulated p21 levels in SK-BR-3 cells. YB1 CTD overexpression changed the cytoskeletal organization and slightly inhibited the migration of SK-BR-3 cells. YB1 CTD also inhibited secreted VEGF expression in SK-BR-3 cells, which decreased SK-BR-3-induced EA.hy926 endothelial cell angiogenesis in vitro. YB1 CTD overexpression attenuated the ability of SK-BR-3 cells to form tumours in nude mice, and decreased in vivo VEGF levels and angiogenesis in the xenografts in SK-BR-3 tumour-bearing mice. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the vital role of YB1 CTD overexpression in inhibiting proliferation, angiogenesis and tumorigenicity of breast cancer cell line SK-BR-3.

  15. Trimethoxy-resveratrol and piceatannol administered orally suppress and inhibit tumor formation and growth in prostate cancer xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resveratrol (Res) is recognized as a promising cancer chemoprevention dietary polyphenol with antioxidative, anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties. However, the role of its analogues in prostate cancer (PCa) chemoprevention is still unknown. METHODS. We synthesized natural and synthetic anal...

  16. Antitumor activity of erlotinib (OSI-774, Tarceva) alone or in combination in human non-small cell lung cancer tumor xenograft models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Brian; Kolinsky, Kenneth; Smith, Melissa; Beck, Gordon; Rashed, Mohammad; Adames, Violeta; Linn, Michael; Wheeldon, Eric; Gand, Laurent; Birnboeck, Herbert; Hoffmann, Gerhard

    2004-06-01

    Our objective was the preclinical assessment of the pharmacokinetics, monotherapy and combined antitumor activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (HER1/EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib in athymic nude mice bearing non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) xenograft models. Immunohistochemistry determined the HER1/EGFR status of the NSCLC tumor models. Pharmacokinetic studies assessed plasma drug concentrations of erlotinib in tumor- and non-tumor-bearing athymic nude mice. These were followed by maximum tolerated dose (MTD) studies for erlotinib and each chemotherapy. Erlotinib was then assessed alone and in combination with these chemotherapies in the NSCLC xenograft models. Complete necropsies were performed on most of the animals in each study to further assess antitumor or toxic effects. Erlotinib monotherapy dose-dependently inhibited tumor growth in the H460a tumor model, correlating with circulating levels of drug. There was antitumor activity at the MTD with each agent tested in both the H460a and A549 tumor models (erlotinib 100 mg/kg: 71 and 93% tumor growth inhibition; gemcitabine 120 mg/kg: 93 and 75% tumor growth inhibition; cisplatin 6 mg/kg: 81 and 88% tumor growth inhibition). When each compound was given at a fraction of the MTD, tumor growth inhibition was suboptimal. Combinations of gemcitabine or cisplatin with erlotinib were assessed at 25% of the MTD to determine efficacy. In both NSCLC models, doses of gemcitabine (30 mg/kg) or cisplatin (1.5 mg/kg) with erlotinib (25 mg/kg) at 25% of the MTD were well tolerated. For the slow growing A549 tumor, there was significant tumor growth inhibition in the gemcitabine/erlotinib and cisplatin/erlotinib combinations (above 100 and 98%, respectively), with partial regressions. For the faster growing H460a tumor, there was significant but less remarkable tumor growth inhibition in these same combinations (86 and 53% respectively). These results show that in NSCLC xenograft tumors with similar

  17. Imaging small human prostate cancer xenografts after pretargeting with bispecific bombesin-antibody complexes and targeting with high specific radioactivity labeled polymer-drug conjugates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, Vishwesh; Gada, Keyur; Panwar, Rajiv; Ferris, Craig; Khaw, Ban-An; Varvarigou, Alexandra; Majewski, Stan; Weisenberger, Andrew; Tekabe, Yared

    2012-01-01

    Pretargeting with bispecific monoclonal antibodies (bsMAb) for tumor imaging was developed to enhance target to background activity ratios. Visualization of tumors was achieved by the delivery of mono- and divalent radiolabeled haptens. To improve the ability to image tumors with bsMAb, we have combined the pretargeting approach with targeting of high specific activity radiotracer labeled negatively charged polymers. The tumor antigen-specific antibody was replaced with bombesin (Bom), a ligand that binds specifically to the growth receptors that are overexpressed by many tumors including prostate cancer. Bom-anti-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) bispecific antibody complexes were used to demonstrate pretargeting and imaging of very small human prostate cancer xenografts targeted with high specific activity 111 In- or 99m Tc-labeled negatively charged polymers. Bispecific antibody complexes consisting of intact anti-DTPA antibody or Fab' linked to Bom via thioether bonds (Bom-bsCx or Bom-bsFCx, respectively) were used to pretarget PC-3 human prostate cancer xenografts in SCID mice. Negative control mice were pretargeted with Bom or anti-DTPA Ab. 111 In-Labeled DTPA-succinyl polylysine (DSPL) was injected intravenously at 24 h (7.03 ± 1.74 or 6.88 ± 1.89 MBq 111 In-DSPL) after Bom-bsCx or 50 ± 5.34 MBq of 99m Tc-DSPL after Bom-bsFCx pretargeting, respectively. Planar or single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT gamma images were obtained for up to 3 h and only planar images at 24 h. After imaging, all mice were killed and biodistribution of 111 In or 99m Tc activities were determined by scintillation counting. Both planar and SPECT/CT imaging enabled detection of PC-3 prostate cancer lesions less than 1-2 mm in diameter in 1-3 h post 111 In-DSPL injection. No lesions were visualized in Bom or anti-DTPA Ab pretargeted controls. 111 In-DSPL activity in Bom-bsCx pretargeted tumors (1.21 ± 0.36%ID/g) was 5.4 times that in tumors pretargeted with

  18. Patient-derived Hormone-naive Prostate Cancer Xenograft Models Reveal Growth Factor Receptor Bound Protein 10 as an Androgen Receptor-repressed Gene Driving the Development of Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jun; Ci, Xinpei; Xue, Hui; Wu, Rebecca; Dong, Xin; Choi, Stephen Yiu Chuen; He, Haiqing; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Fang; Qu, Sifeng; Zhang, Fan; Haegert, Anne M; Gout, Peter W; Zoubeidi, Amina; Collins, Colin; Gleave, Martin E; Lin, Dong; Wang, Yuzhuo

    2018-06-01

    Although androgen deprivation therapy is initially effective in controlling growth of hormone-naive prostate cancers (HNPCs) in patients, currently incurable castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) inevitably develops. To identify CRPC driver genes that may provide new targets to enhance CRPC therapy. Patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) of HNPCs that develop CRPC following host castration were examined for changes in expression of genes at various time points after castration using transcriptome profiling analysis; particular attention was given to pre-CRPC changes in expression indicative of genes acting as potential CRPC drivers. The functionality of a potential CRPC driver was validated via its knockdown in cultured prostate cancer cells; its clinical relevance was established using data from prostate cancer patient databases. Eighty genes were found to be significantly upregulated at the CRPC stage, while seven of them also showed elevated expression prior to CRPC development. Among the latter, growth factor receptor bound protein 10 (GRB10) was the most significantly and consistently upregulated gene. Moreover, elevated GRB10 expression in clinical prostate cancer samples correlated with more aggressive tumor types and poorer patient treatment outcome. GRB10 knockdown markedly reduced prostate cancer cell proliferation and activity of AKT, a well-established CRPC mediator. A positive correlation between AKT activity and GRB10 expression was also found in clinical cohorts. GRB10 acts as a driver of CRPC and sensitizes androgen receptor pathway inhibitors, and hence GRB10 targeting provides a novel therapeutic strategy for the disease. Development of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is a major problem in the management of the disease. Using state-of-the-art patient-derived hormone-naive prostate cancer xenograft models, we found and validated the growth factor receptor bound protein 10 gene as a driver of CRPC, indicating that it may be used as a

  19. Monitoring tumor proliferative response to radiotherapy using 18F-fluorothymidine in human head and neck cancer xenograft in comparison with Ki-67

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatema, Chowdhury Nusrat; Yu, Wenwen; Kitagawa, Yoshimasa; Zhao, Songji; Zhao, Yan; Murakami, Masahiro; Nishijima, Ken-ichi; Tamaki, Nagara; Kuge, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    Although radiotherapy is an important treatment strategy for head and neck cancers, it induces tumor repopulation which adversely affects therapeutic outcome. In this regard, fractionated radiotherapy is widely applied to prevent tumor repopulation. Evaluation of tumor proliferative activity using 18 F-fluorothymidine (FLT), a noninvasive marker of tumor proliferation, may be useful for determining the optimal timing of and dose in the repetitive irradiation. Thus, to assess the potentials of FLT, we evaluated the sequential changes in intratumoral proliferative activity in head and neck cancer xenografts (FaDu) using FLT. FaDu tumor xenografts were established in nude mice and assigned to control and two radiation-treated groups (10 and 20 Gy). Tumor volume was measured daily. 3 H-FLT was injected intravenously 2 h before killing. Mice were killed 6, 24, 48 h, and 7 days after the radiation treatment. Intratumoral 3 H-FLT level was visually and quantitatively assessed by autoradiography. Ki-67 immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed. In radiation-treated mice, the tumor growth was significantly suppressed compared with the control group, but the tumor volume in these mice gradually increased with time. In the visual assessment, intratumoral 3 H-FLT level diffusely decreased 6 h after the radiation treatment and then gradually increased with time, whereas no apparent changes were observed in Ki-67 IHC. Six hours after the radiation treatment at 10 and 20 Gy, the intratumoral 3 H-FLT level markedly decreased to 45 and 40% of the control, respectively (P 3 H-FLT levels at 48 h and on day 7 were significantly higher than that at 6 h. The intratumoral 3 H-FLT levels in both treated groups were 68 and 60% at 24 h (P<0.001), 71 and 77% at 48 h (P<0.001), and 83 and 81% on day 7 (P=NS) compared with the control group. Intratumoral FLT uptake level markedly decreased at 6 h and then gradually increased with time. Sequential evaluation of intratumoral proliferative

  20. Imaging of HER2/neu-positive BT-474 human breast cancer xenografts in athymic mice using 111In-trastuzumab (Herceptin) Fab fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Ying; Wang, Judy; Scollard, Deborah A.; Mondal, Hridya; Holloway, Claire; Kahn, Harriette J.; Reilly, Raymond M.

    2005-01-01

    Trastuzumab (Herceptin) Fab were prepared by digestion of intact IgG with immobilized papain, derivatized with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and radiolabeled with 111 In. The dissociation constant (K d ) for binding of Fab to HER2/neu-positive SK-BR-3 human breast cancer cells was two- to threefold higher than for intact IgG (14-36 vs. 8-14 nM). The binding affinity was not significantly decreased after DTPA derivatization (K d =47 nM). 111 In-trastuzumab Fab localized specifically in HER2/neu-positive BT-474 human breast cancer xenografts in athymic mice with tumor uptake of 7.8±0.7% injected dose (ID)/g and tumor/blood ratio of 25.2±1.6 at 72 h postinjection compared with 2.7±0.7% ID/g and 7.0±0.9 for 111 In-HuM195 anti-CD33 Fab (significantly different, P 111 In-trastuzumab Fab as early as 24 h postinjection

  1. 131I-recombinant human EGF has antitumor effects against MCF-7 human breast cancer xenografts with low levels of EGFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Y.-C.; Xu, W.-Y.; Tan, T.-Z.; He Sheng

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the inhibitory action of 131 I-recombinant human EGF ( 131 I-rhEGF) on MCF-7 human breast cancer tumor development in nude mice. The activity and tumor uptake of 131 I-rhEGF was measured by tissue distribution assay, and its effect on tumor growth was measured by monitoring tumor size after treatment with 131 I-rhEGF. Changes in tumor cell ultrastructure were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and pathological changes in tumor tissue were observed by light microscopy. The tissue distribution assay revealed that 131 I-rhEGF was markedly absorbed by the tumor and reached its maximal uptake rate (16.73%ID · g -1 ) at 120 hours at which point the drug concentration in the tumor was 11.1-fold, 8.1-fold, and 6.6-fold higher than that in blood, liver, and kidneys, respectively. Tumor size measurements showed that tumor development was significantly inhibited by intravenously and intratumorally injected 131 I-rhEGF. Tumor inhibition rates (82.0% and 80.7%, respectively) were significantly higher than those of tumors treated with 131 I (7.49%) and 131 I-HSA (6.91%; P 131 I-rhEGF could significantly damage and ultimately kill tumor cells. Our results suggest that 131 I-rhEGF suppresses development of xenografted breast cancer cells in nude mice, providing a novel candidate for receptor-mediated targeted radiotherapy

  2. Imaging of HER2/neu-positive BT-474 human breast cancer xenografts in athymic mice using {sup 111}In-trastuzumab (Herceptin) Fab fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Ying [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2C4 (Canada); Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 2S2 (Canada); Wang, Judy [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2C4 (Canada); Scollard, Deborah A. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2C4 (Canada); Mondal, Hridya [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2C4 (Canada); Holloway, Claire [Sunnybrook and Women' s College Health Sciences Center, Toronto, Ontario, M4N 3M5 (Canada); Kahn, Harriette J. [Sunnybrook and Women' s College Health Sciences Center, Toronto, Ontario, M4N 3M5 (Canada); Reilly, Raymond M. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2C4 (Canada) and Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 2S2 (Canada) and Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E2 (Canada)]. E-mail: raymond.reilly@utoronto.ca

    2005-01-01

    Trastuzumab (Herceptin) Fab were prepared by digestion of intact IgG with immobilized papain, derivatized with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and radiolabeled with {sup 111}In. The dissociation constant (K{sub d}) for binding of Fab to HER2/neu-positive SK-BR-3 human breast cancer cells was two- to threefold higher than for intact IgG (14-36 vs. 8-14 nM). The binding affinity was not significantly decreased after DTPA derivatization (K{sub d}=47 nM). {sup 111}In-trastuzumab Fab localized specifically in HER2/neu-positive BT-474 human breast cancer xenografts in athymic mice with tumor uptake of 7.8{+-}0.7% injected dose (ID)/g and tumor/blood ratio of 25.2{+-}1.6 at 72 h postinjection compared with 2.7{+-}0.7% ID/g and 7.0{+-}0.9 for {sup 111}In-HuM195 anti-CD33 Fab (significantly different, P<.001). Small (3-5 mm in diameter) BT-474 tumors were imaged with {sup 111}In-trastuzumab Fab as early as 24 h postinjection.

  3. Mangosenone F, A Furanoxanthone from Garciana mangostana, Induces Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Apoptosis in Lung Cancer Cells and Decreases Xenograft Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Kyung Hye; Ryu, Hyung Won; Park, Mi Jin; Park, Ki Hun; Kim, Jin Hyo; Lee, Mi-Ja; Kang, Hyeon Jung; Kim, Sun Lim; Lee, Jin Hwan; Seo, Woo Duck

    2015-11-01

    Mangosenone F (MSF), a natural xanthone, was isolated form Carcinia mangotana, and a few studies have reported its glycosidase inhibitor effect. In this study we investigated the anti lung cancer effect of MSF both in vitro and in vivo. MSF inhibited cancer cell cytotoxicity and induced and induced apoptosis via reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in NCI-H460. MSF treatment also showed in pronounced release of apoptogenic cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol, downregulation of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, and upregulation of Bax, suggesting that caspase-mediated pathways were involved in MSF-induced apoptosis. ROS activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway was shown to play a predominant role in the apoptosis mechanism of MSF. Compared with cisplatin treatment, MSF treatment showed significantly increased inhibition of the growth of NCI-H460 cells xenografted in nude mice. Together, these results indicate the potential of MSF as a candidate natural anticancer drug by promoting ROS production. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Lin28b is sufficient to drive liver cancer and necessary for its maintenance in murine models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Liem H.; Robinton, Daisy A.; Seligson, Marc; Wu, Linwei; Li, Lin; Rakheja, Dinesh; Comerford, Sarah; Ramezani, Saleh; Sun, Xiankai; Parikh, Monisha; Yang, Erin; Powers, John T.; Shinoda, Gen; Shah, Samar; Hammer, Robert; Daley, George Q.; Zhu, Hao

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Lin28a/b are RNA-binding proteins that influence stem cell maintenance, metabolism, and oncogenesis. Poorly differentiated, aggressive cancers often overexpress Lin28, but its role in tumor initiation or maintenance has not been definitively addressed. We report that LIN28B overexpression is sufficient to initiate hepatoblastoma and hepatocellular carcinoma in murine models. We also detected Lin28b overexpression in MYC-driven hepatoblastomas, and liver-specific deletion of Lin28a/b reduced tumor burden, extended latency, and prolonged survival. Both intravenous siRNA against Lin28b and conditional Lin28b deletion reduced tumor burden and prolonged survival. Igf2bp proteins are upregulated and Igf2bp3 is required in the context of LIN28B overexpression to promote growth. Thus, multiple murine models demonstrate that Lin28b is both sufficient to initiate liver cancer and necessary for its maintenance. PMID:25117712

  5. The intriguing role of fibroblasts and c-Jun in the chemopreventive and therapeutic effect of finasteride on xenograft models of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Nong Niu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In a large clinical trial, finasteride reduced the rate of low-grade prostate cancer (PCa while increasing the incidence of high-grade cancer. Whether finasteride promotes the development of high-grade tumors remains controversial. We demonstrated the role of fibroblasts and c-Jun in chemopreventive and therapeutic effect of finasteride on xenograft models of PCa. LNCaP (PC3 cells or recombinants of cancer cells and fibroblasts were implanted in male athymic nude mice treated with finasteride. Tumor growth, cell proliferation, apoptosis, p-Akt, and p-ERK1/2 were evaluated. In LNCaP (PC3 mono-grafted models, finasteride did not change the tumor growth. In recombinant-grafted models, fibroblasts and c-Jun promoted tumor growth; finasteride induced proliferation of LNCaP cells and repressed PC3 cell apoptosis. When c-Jun was knocked out, fibroblasts and/or finasteride did not promote the tumor growth. Finasteride inhibited p-Akt and p-ERK1/2 in mono-culture cancer cells while stimulating the same signaling molecules in the presence of fibroblasts. Reduced p-Akt and p-ERK1/2 were noted in the presence of c-Jun−/− fibroblasts. Fibroblasts and c-Jun promote PCa growth; finasteride further stimulates tumor growth with promoted proliferation, repressed apoptosis, and up-regulated pro-proliferative molecular pathway in the presence of fibroblasts and c-Jun. Stromal-epithelial interactions play critical roles in finasteride′s therapeutic effects on PCa. Our findings have preliminary implications in using finasteride as a chemopreventive or therapeutic agent for PCa patients.

  6. Anti-tumor effect of 131I labeled 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin on human non-small cell lung cancer in xenograft-bearing nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Jin; Liu Lu; Zhu Xiaoli; Chen Daozhen; Gao Wen; Jiang Xinyu; Huang Ying

    2008-01-01

    Objective: 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) has been developed as a novel heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) inhibitor being used in clinical trials. HSP90 is known as a molecular target for tumor therapy. The goal of this study was to investigate the inhibitive effects of 131 I labeled 17-AAG on human non-small cell lung cancer in xenograft-bearing nude mice. Methods: 17-AAG was labeled with 131 I. Twenty-eight BALB/c nude mice bearing H460 human non-small cell lung carcinoma tumor xenograft were randomly divided into seven groups, one control group and six treatment groups according to the route of administration (via tail vein injection or intratumoral injection) and the doses of injected radio-activity (5.5 MBq x 2 with 8 d interval, 11.0 MBq and 5.5 MBq). Two additional mice were treated with intratumoral injection of Na 131 I solution that was served as seintigraphic imaging controls. In each group two mice underwent scintigraphy at 2 h, 6 h, 24 h, 2 d, 3 d, 7 d, 10 d and 16 d. After 16 d the tumor inhibition rate was calculated. Then all of the mice were sacrificed and the tumor tissues were obtained for histological examination and immunohistochemical assay. Results: Persistent accumulation of 131 I-17-AAG in the tumors was seen on seintigraphic images. Tumor inhibiting effect was demonstrated in all treatment groups with varying degrees. The highest tumor inhibition rate (86.77 ± 4.57)% was shown in the group with interval intratumoral injection (5.5 MBq x 2). There was no significant difference of tumor inhibition rates between 5.5 MBq x 2 group (via tail vein injection) and 11.0 MBq group( via tail vein injection, q=1.67, P>0.05). While among the other treatment groups, there was significant difference in tumor inhibition rates( q=3.16-24.34, all P 131 I-17-AAG may effectively inhibit the tumor growth and expression of HSP90α antigen expression in non-small cell lung cancer bearing nude mice. The more prominent anti-tumor effect may be

  7. Phenolic compounds from Viscum album tinctures enhanced antitumor activity in melanoma murine cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Michelle Nonato de Oliveira; Oliveira, Adriana Passos; Wiecikowski, Adalgisa Felippe; Carvalho, Renato Sampaio; Castro, Juliana de Lima; de Oliveira, Felipe Alves Gomes; Pereira, Henrique Marcelo Gualberto; da Veiga, Venicio Feo; Capella, Marcia Marques Alves; Rocha, Leandro; Holandino, Carla

    2018-03-01

    Cancer is one of the biggest problems in public health worldwide. Plants have been shown important role in anticancer research. Viscum album L. (Santalaceae), commonly known as mistletoe, is a semi-parasitic plant that grows on different host trees. In complementary medicine, extracts from European mistletoe ( Viscum album L.) have been used in the treatment of cancer. The study was conducted to identify chemical composition and antitumor potential of Viscum album tinctures. Chemical analysis performed by high resolution chromatography equipped with high resolution mass spectrometer identified caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, sakuranetin, isosakuranetin, syringenin 4-O-glucoside, syringenin 4-O-apiosyl-glucoside, alangilignoside C and ligalbumoside A compounds. Some of these compounds are probably responsible for the reduction of tumoral cellular growth in a dose-dependent manner. It was observed that melanoma murine cells (B16F10) were more sensitive to V. album tinctures than human leukaemic cells (K562), besides non-tumoral cells (MA-104) had a much lower cytotoxicity to them. Apoptotic-like cells were observed under light microscopy and were confirmed by a typical DNA fragmentation pattern. Additionally, flow cytometry results using Annexin-V/FITC permitted to quantify increased expression of early and late apoptotic markers on tumoral cells, confirming augmented Sub G0 population, which was probably associated with a consistent decrease in G1, and an increase in S or G2/M populations. Results indicate the chemical composition of V. album tinctures influences the mechanisms of in vitro tumoral cell death, suggesting a potential use in cancer pharmacotherapy research.

  8. Targeting tissue factor as a novel therapeutic oncotarget for eradication of cancer stem cells isolated from tumor cell lines, tumor xenografts and patients of breast, lung and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhiwei; Xu, Jie; Cheng, Jijun; McMichael, Elizabeth; Yu, Lianbo; Carson, William E

    2017-01-03

    Targeting cancer stem cell (CSC) represents a promising therapeutic approach as it can potentially fight cancer at its root. The challenge is to identify a surface therapeutic oncotarget on CSC. Tissue factor (TF) is known as a common yet specific surface target for cancer cells and tumor neovasculature in several solid cancers. However, it is unknown if TF is expressed by CSCs. Here we demonstrate that TF is constitutively expressed on CD133 positive (CD133+) or CD24-CD44+ CSCs isolated from human cancer cell lines, tumor xenografts from mice and breast tumor tissues from patients. TF-targeted agents, i.e., a factor VII (fVII)-conjugated photosensitizer (fVII-PS for targeted photodynamic therapy) and fVII-IgG1Fc (Immunoconjugate or ICON for immunotherapy), can eradicate CSC via the induction of apoptosis and necrosis and via antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity, respectively. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that TF is a novel surface therapeutic oncotarget for CSC, in addition to cancer cell TF and tumor angiogenic vascular endothelial TF. Moreover, this research highlights that TF-targeting therapeutics can effectively eradicate CSCs, without drug resistance, isolated from breast, lung and ovarian cancer with potential to translate into other most commonly diagnosed solid cancer, in which TF is also highly expressed.

  9. Androgen-independent proliferation of LNCaP prostate cancer cells infected by xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakoki, Katsura; Kamiyama, Haruka; Izumida, Mai; Yashima, Yuka; Hayashi, Hideki; Yamamoto, Naoki; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Igawa, Tsukasa; Sakai, Hideki; Kubo, Yoshinao

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • XMRV infection induces androgen-independent growth in LNCaP cells. • XMRV infection reduces expression of androgen receptor. • XMRV promotes appearance of androgen blocker-resistant prostate cancer cells. - Abstract: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a novel gammaretrovirus that was originally isolated from human prostate cancer. It is now believed that XMRV is not the etiologic agent of prostate cancer. An analysis of murine leukemia virus (MLV) infection in various human cell lines revealed that prostate cancer cell lines are preferentially infected by XMRV, and this suggested that XMRV infection may confer some sort of growth advantage to prostate cancer cell lines. To examine this hypothesis, androgen-dependent LNCaP cells were infected with XMRV and tested for changes in certain cell growth properties. We found that XMRV-infected LNCaP cells can proliferate in the absence of the androgen dihydrotestosterone. Moreover, androgen receptor expression is significantly reduced in XMRV-infected LNCaP cells. Such alterations were not observed in uninfected and amphotropic MLV-infected LNCaP cells. This finding explains why prostate cancer cell lines are preferentially infected with XMRV

  10. Xenografts in zebrafish embryos as a rapid functional assay for breast cancer stem-like cell identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguiara, Arrate; Holgado, Olaia; Beloqui, Izaskun; Abalde, Leire; Sanchez, Yolanda; Callol, Carles; Martin, Angel G

    2011-11-01

    The cancer stem cell is defined by its capacity to self-renew, the potential to differentiate into all cells of the tumor and the ability to proliferate and drive the expansion of the tumor. Thus, targeting these cells may provide novel anti-cancer treatment strategies. Breast cancer stem cells have been isolated according to surface marker expression, ability to efflux fluorescent dyes, increased activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase or the capacity to form spheres in non-adherent culture conditions. In order to test novel drugs directed towards modulating self-renewal of cancer stem cells, rapid, easy and inexpensive assays must be developed. Using 2 days-post-fertilization (dpf) zebrafish embryos as transplant recipients, we show that cells grown in mammospheres from breast carcinoma cell lines migrate to the tail of the embryo and form masses with a significantly higher frequency than parental monolayer populations. When stem-like self-renewal was targeted in the parental population by the use of the dietary supplement curcumin, cell migration and mass formation were reduced, indicating that these effects were associated with stem-like cell content. This is a proof of principle report that proposes a rapid and inexpensive assay to target in vivo cancer stem-like cells, which may be used to unravel basic cancer stem cell biology and for drug screening.

  11. Cooperation of Ad-hING4 and 125I seed in tumor-suppression on human pancreatic cancer xenograft in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai Hongyan; Fa Yihua; Su Chenghai; Yang Jicheng; Sheng Weihua; Xie Yufeng

    2009-01-01

    This work is to investigate the combined tumor-suppression effect of Adenovirus-mediated human ING4 (Ad-hING4) and 125 I seed on human pancreatic cancer xenograft and the possible mechanisms. Ad-hING4 recombinant adenovirus vector was transected into QBI-293A cells and high titre adenovirus was obtained. Subcutaneous tumor models were established with 25 nude mice with human pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1. They were randomly divided into 5 groups: PBS control group, Ad carrier group, 125 I seed brachytherapy group, Ad-hING4 gene treatment group, combined 125 I seed and Ad-hING4 group. The tumor volumes were measured every 5 days after treatment, and were sacrificed on the 20th day. The tumors were measured and weighed to determine the ratio of tumor-suppression and Jin-Shi q value. Morphological changes of tumor cells,the tissue injury and apoptotic index AI were examined on pathological sections. MVD, Survivin and Caspase3 were tested in immunohistochemistry. The results show that the tumor-suppressive ratio of the 125 I seed group, Ad-hING4 group, combined treatment group were,respectively, 34.19%(P 0.05). It can be concluded that 125 I seed and Ad-hING4 inhibit the growth of PANC-1 pancreatic cancer on nude mice significantly. These indicate a synergy of the combined treatments in tumor-suppression and Ad-hING4 is a promising novel radiosensitizer. The mechanisms of tumor-suppressive may be multi-pathways such as down-regulation the expression of Survivin and up-regulation the expression of Caspase3 to induce apoptosis and inhibit angiogenesis. (authors)

  12. 131I-Recombinant human EGF has anti-tumor effects against MCF-7 human breast cancer xenografts with low levels of EGFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yunchun; Tan Tianzhi; Xu Weiyun; He Sheng

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the inhibitory action of 131 I-recombinant human EGF ( 131 I-rhEGF) on MCF-7 human breast cancer tumor development in nude mice. Methods: The activity and tumor uptake of 131 I-rhEGF was measured by tissue distribution assay, and its effect on tumor growth was measured by monitoring tumor size after treatment with 131 I-rhEGF, Changes in tumor cell ultrastructure were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and pathological changes in tumor tissue were observed by light microscopy. Results: The tissue distribution assay revealed that 131 I-rhEGF was markedly absorbed by the tumor and reached its maximal uptake rate (16.73% ID·g-l) at 120 h, at which point the drug concentration in the tumor was 11.1-fold, 8.1-fold, 6.6-fold higher than that in blood, liver, kidneys, respectively. The tumor size measurements showed that tumor development was significantly inhibited by intravenously and intratumorally injected 131 I-rhEGF. The extent of tumor inhibition rates (82.0% and 80.7%, respectively) were significantly higher than those of tumors treated with 131 I (7.49%) and 131 I-HSA (6.91%; P 131 I-rhEGF could significantly damage and ultimately kill tumor cells. Conclusions: Our results suggest that 131 I-rhEGF suppresses development of xenografted breast cancer cells in nude mice, providing a novel candidate for receptor-mediated targeted radiotherapy. Key words. Iodine-131 rhEGF Breast cancer Therapy. (authors)

  13. The Influence of Tissue Ischemia Time on RNA Integrity and Patient-Derived Xenografts (PDX) Engraftment Rate in a Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Biobank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrera, Francesco; Tabbò, Fabrizio; Bessone, Luca; Maletta, Francesca; Gaudiano, Marcello; Ercole, Elisabetta; Annaratone, Laura; Todaro, Maria; Boita, Monica; Filosso, Pier Luigi; Solidoro, Paolo; Delsedime, Luisa; Oliaro, Alberto; Sapino, Anna; Ruffini, Enrico; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Bio-repositories are invaluable resources to implement translational cancer research and clinical programs. They represent one of the most powerful tools for biomolecular studies of clinically annotated cohorts, but high quality samples are required to generate reliable molecular readouts and functional studies. The objective of our study was to define the impact of cancer tissue ischemia time on RNA and DNA quality, and for the generation of Patient-Derived Xenografts (PDXs). One-hundred thirty-five lung cancer specimens were selected among our Institutional BioBank samples. Associations between different warm (surgical) and cold (ex-vivo) ischemia time ranges and RNA quality or PDXs engraftment rates were assessed. RNA quality was determined by RNA integrity number (RINs) values. Fresh viable tissue fragments were implanted subcutaneously in NSG mice and serially transplanted. RNAs with a RIN>7 were detected in 51% of the sample (70/135), with values of RIN significantly lower (OR 0.08, P = 0.01) in samples preserved for more than 3 hours before cryopreservation. Higher quality DNA samples had a concomitant high RIN. Sixty-three primary tumors (41 adenocarcinoma) were implanted with an overall engraftment rate of 33%. Both prolonged warm (>2 hours) and ex-vivo ischemia time (>10 hours) were associated to a lower engraftment rate (OR 0.09 P = 0.01 and OR 0.04 P = 0.008, respectively). RNA quality and PDXs engraftment rate were adversely affected by prolonged ischemia times. Proper tissue collection and processing reduce failure rate. Overall, NSCLC BioBanking represents an innovative modality, which can be successfully executed in routine clinical settings, when stringent Standard Operating Procedures are adopted.

  14. Murine Pancreatic Cancer Alters T Cell Activation and Apoptosis and Worsens Survival After Cecal Ligation and Puncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, John D; Chen, Ching-Wen; Liang, Zhe; Zhang, Wenxiao; Chihade, Deena B; Burd, Eileen M; Farris, Alton B; Ford, Mandy L; Coopersmith, Craig

    2018-06-08

    Patients with cancer who develop sepsis have a markedly higher mortality than patients who were healthy prior to the onset of sepsis. Potential mechanisms underlying this difference have previously been examined in two preclinical models of cancer followed by sepsis. Both pancreatic cancer/pneumonia and lung cancer/cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) increase murine mortality, associated with alterations in lymphocyte apoptosis and intestinal integrity. However, pancreatic cancer/pneumonia decreases lymphocyte apoptosis and increases gut apoptosis while lung cancer/CLP increases lymphocyte apoptosis and decreases intestinal proliferation. These results cannot distinguish the individual roles of cancer versus sepsis since different models of each were used. We therefore created a new cancer/sepsis model to standardize each variable. Mice were injected with a pancreatic cancer cell line and three weeks later cancer mice and healthy mice were subjected to CLP. Cancer septic mice had a significantly higher 10-day mortality than previously healthy septic mice. Cancer septic mice had increased CD4 T cells and CD8 T cells, associated with decreased CD4 T cell apoptosis 24 hours after CLP. Further, splenic CD8+ T cell activation was decreased in cancer septic mice. In contrast, no differences were noted in intestinal apoptosis, proliferation or permeability, nor were changes noted in local bacterial burden, renal, liver or pulmonary injury. Cancer septic mice thus have consistently reduced survival compared to previously healthy septic mice, independent of the cancer or sepsis model utilized. Changes in lymphocyte apoptosis are common to cancer model and independent of sepsis model whereas gut apoptosis is common to sepsis model and independent of cancer model. The host response to the combination of cancer and sepsis is dependent, at least in part, on both chronic co-morbidity and acute illness.

  15. Murine Th9 cells promote the survival of myeloid dendritic cells in cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jungsun; Li, Haiyan; Zhang, Mingjun; Lu, Yong; Hong, Bangxing; Zheng, Yuhuan; He, Jin; Yang, Jing; Qian, Jianfei; Yi, Qing

    2014-08-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells to initiate immune responses, and DC survival time is important for affecting the strength of T-cell responses. Interleukin (IL)-9-producing T-helper (Th)-9 cells play an important role in anti-tumor immunity. However, it is unclear how Th9 cells communicate with DCs. In this study, we investigated whether murine Th9 cells affected the survival of myeloid DCs. DCs derived from bone marrow of C57BL/6 mice were cocultured with Th9 cells from OT-II mice using transwell, and the survival of DCs was examined. DCs cocultured with Th9 cells had longer survival and fewer apoptotic cells than DCs cultured alone in vitro. In melanoma B16-OVA tumor-bearing mice, DCs conditioned by Th9 cells lived longer and induced stronger anti-tumor response than control DCs did in vivo. Mechanistic studies revealed that IL-3 but not IL-9 secreted by Th9 cells was responsible for the prolonged survival of DCs. IL-3 upregulated the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL and activated p38, ERK and STAT5 signaling pathways in DCs. Taken together, our data provide the first evidence that Th9 cells can promote the survival of DCs through IL-3, and will be helpful for designing Th9 cell immunotherapy and more effective DC vaccine for human cancers.

  16. Induction of premature senescence by single and fractionated irradiation in human cancer cell line and xenografted mice model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Hee Jung; Kim, Bong Cho; Lee, Hyung Chul; Ji, Young Hoon; Park, Seung Woo; Lee, Jae Seon

    2011-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is one of the best therapeutic strategies for cancer treatment. The cellular responses to ionizing radiation (IR) are varied ranging from cellular senescence to apoptotic cell death. To increase the efficacy of IR treatment is a major issue of radiation biology. From the point of view, the induction of premature senescence using the therapeutic dose of IR could be a promising treatment for tumors. The aim of this study is whether the premature senescence could contribute to cancer treatment by irradiation

  17. Preliminary evaluation of 1′-[18F]fluoroethyl-β-D-lactose ([18F]FEL) for detection of pancreatic cancer in nude mouse orthotopic xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arumugam, Thiruvengadam; Paolillo, Vincenzo; Young, Daniel; Wen, XiaoXia; Logsdon, Craig D.; De Palatis, Louis; Alauddin, Mian M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Early detection of pancreatic cancer could save many thousands of lives. Non-invasive diagnostic imaging, including PET with [ 18 F]FDG, has inadequate resolution for detection of small (2–3 mm) pancreatic tumours. We demonstrated the efficacy of PET imaging with an 18 F-labelled lactose derivative, [ 18 F]FEDL, that targets HIP/PAP, a biomarker that is overexpressed in the peritumoural pancreas. We developed another analogue, 1-[ 18 F]fluoroethyl lactose ([ 18 F]FEL), which is simpler to synthesise, for the same application. We conducted a preliminary evaluation of the new probe and its efficacy in detecting orthotopic pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in mice. Methods: Xenografts were developed in nude mice by injecting L3.6pl/GL + pancreatic carcinoma cells into the pancreas of each mouse. Tumour growth was monitored by bioluminescence imaging (BLI); accuracy of BLI tumour size estimates was verified by MRI in two representative mice. When the tumour size reached approximately 2–3 mm, the animals were injected with [ 18 F]FEL (3.7 MBq) and underwent static PET/CT scans. Blood samples were collected at 2, 5, 10, 20 and 60 min after [ 18 F]FEL injection to track blood clearance. Following imaging, animals were sacrificed and their organs and tumours/pancreatic tissue were collected and counted on a gamma counter. Pancreas, including tumour, was frozen, sliced and used for autoradiography and immunohistochemical analysis of HIP/PAP expression. Results: Tumour growth was rapid, as observed by BLI and MRI. Blood clearance of [ 18 F]FEL was bi-exponential, with half-lives of approximately 3.5 min and 40 min. Mean accumulation of [ 18 F]FEL in the peritumoural pancreatic tissue was 1.29 ± 0.295 %ID/g, and that in the normal pancreas of control animals was 0.090 ± 0.101 %ID/g. [ 18 F]FEL was cleared predominantly by the kidneys. Comparative analysis of autoradiographic images and immunostaining results demonstrated a correlation between [ 18 F

  18. Concomitant consumption of lycopene and fish oil inhibits tumor growth and progression in a mouse xenograft model of colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our previous report showed that concomitant supplementation of lycopene and eicosa-pentaenoic acid synergistically inhibited the proliferation of human colon cancer HT-29 cells in vitro. To validate our findings, the present study investigated whether consumption of lycopene and fish oil would help ...

  19. Development of a Novel Preclinical Pancreatic Cancer Research Model: Bioluminescence Image-Guided Focal Irradiation and Tumor Monitoring of Orthotopic Xenografts1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuli, Richard; Surmak, Andrew; Reyes, Juvenal; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Armour, Michael; Leubner, Ashley; Blackford, Amanda; Tryggestad, Erik; Jaffee, Elizabeth M; Wong, John; DeWeese, Theodore L; Herman, Joseph M

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: We report on a novel preclinical pancreatic cancer research model that uses bioluminescence imaging (BLI)-guided irradiation of orthotopic xenograft tumors, sparing of surrounding normal tissues, and quantitative, noninvasive longitudinal assessment of treatment response. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Luciferase-expressing MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic carcinoma cells were orthotopically injected in nude mice. BLI was compared to pathologic tumor volume, and photon emission was assessed over time. BLI was correlated to positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) to estimate tumor dimensions. BLI and cone-beam CT (CBCT) were used to compare tumor centroid location and estimate setup error. BLI and CBCT fusion was performed to guide irradiation of tumors using the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP). DNA damage was assessed by γ-H2Ax staining. BLI was used to longitudinally monitor treatment response. RESULTS: Bioluminescence predicted tumor volume (R = 0.8984) and increased linearly as a function of time up to a 10-fold increase in tumor burden. BLI correlated with PET/CT and necropsy specimen in size (P < .05). Two-dimensional BLI centroid accuracy was 3.5 mm relative to CBCT. BLI-guided irradiated pancreatic tumors stained positively for γ-H2Ax, whereas surrounding normal tissues were spared. Longitudinal assessment of irradiated tumors with BLI revealed significant tumor growth delay of 20 days relative to controls. CONCLUSIONS: We have successfully applied the SARRP to a bioluminescent, orthotopic preclinical pancreas cancer model to noninvasively: 1) allow the identification of tumor burden before therapy, 2) facilitate image-guided focal radiation therapy, and 3) allow normalization of tumor burden and longitudinal assessment of treatment response. PMID:22496923

  20. Development of a novel preclinical pancreatic cancer research model: bioluminescence image-guided focal irradiation and tumor monitoring of orthotopic xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuli, Richard; Surmak, Andrew; Reyes, Juvenal; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Armour, Michael; Leubner, Ashley; Blackford, Amanda; Tryggestad, Erik; Jaffee, Elizabeth M; Wong, John; Deweese, Theodore L; Herman, Joseph M

    2012-04-01

    We report on a novel preclinical pancreatic cancer research model that uses bioluminescence imaging (BLI)-guided irradiation of orthotopic xenograft tumors, sparing of surrounding normal tissues, and quantitative, noninvasive longitudinal assessment of treatment response. Luciferase-expressing MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic carcinoma cells were orthotopically injected in nude mice. BLI was compared to pathologic tumor volume, and photon emission was assessed over time. BLI was correlated to positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) to estimate tumor dimensions. BLI and cone-beam CT (CBCT) were used to compare tumor centroid location and estimate setup error. BLI and CBCT fusion was performed to guide irradiation of tumors using the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP). DNA damage was assessed by γ-H2Ax staining. BLI was used to longitudinally monitor treatment response. Bioluminescence predicted tumor volume (R = 0.8984) and increased linearly as a function of time up to a 10-fold increase in tumor burden. BLI correlated with PET/CT and necropsy specimen in size (P < .05). Two-dimensional BLI centroid accuracy was 3.5 mm relative to CBCT. BLI-guided irradiated pancreatic tumors stained positively for γ-H2Ax, whereas surrounding normal tissues were spared. Longitudinal assessment of irradiated tumors with BLI revealed significant tumor growth delay of 20 days relative to controls. We have successfully applied the SARRP to a bioluminescent, orthotopic preclinical pancreas cancer model to noninvasively: 1) allow the identification of tumor burden before therapy, 2) facilitate image-guided focal radiation therapy, and 3) allow normalization of tumor burden and longitudinal assessment of treatment response.

  1. Anti-tumor activity of high-dose EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor and sequential docetaxel in wild type EGFR non-small cell lung cancer cell nude mouse xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ning; Zhang, Qianqian; Fang, Shu; Han, Xiao; Wang, Zhehai

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with wild-type epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is still a challenge. This study explored antitumor activity of high-dose icotinib (an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor) plus sequential docetaxel against wild-type EGFR NSCLC cells-generated nude mouse xenografts. Nude mice were subcutaneously injected with wild-type EGFR NSCLC A549 cells and divided into different groups for 3-week treatment. Tumor xenograft volumes were monitored and recorded, and at the end of experiments, tumor xenografts were removed for Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses. Compared to control groups (negative control, regular-dose icotinib [IcoR], high-dose icotinib [IcoH], and docetaxel [DTX]) and regular icotinib dose (60 mg/kg) with docetaxel, treatment of mice with a high-dose (1200 mg/kg) of icotinib plus sequential docetaxel for 3 weeks (IcoH-DTX) had an additive effect on suppression of tumor xenograft size and volume (P Icotinib-containing treatments markedly reduced phosphorylation of EGFR, mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK), and protein kinase B (Akt), but only the high-dose icotinib-containing treatments showed an additive effect on CD34 inhibition (P icotinib plus docetaxel had a similar effect on mouse weight loss (a common way to measure adverse reactions in mice), compared to the other treatment combinations. The study indicate that the high dose of icotinib plus sequential docetaxel (IcoH-DTX) have an additive effect on suppressing the growth of wild-type EGFR NSCLC cell nude mouse xenografts, possibly through microvessel density reduction. Future clinical trials are needed to confirm the findings of this study. PMID:27852073

  2. Comparisons of [{sup 18}F]-1-deoxy-1-fluoro-scyllo-inositol with [{sup 18}F]-FDG for PET imaging of inflammation, breast and brain cancer xenografts in athymic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLarty, Kristin; Moran, Matthew D. [Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada); PET Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada); Scollard, Deborah A.; Chan, Conrad [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2 (Canada); Sabha, Nesrin; Mukherjee, Joydeep; Guha, Abhijit [Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8 (Canada); McLaurin, JoAnne [Centre for Research in Neurodegenerative Diseases, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H2 (Canada); Nitz, Mark [Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H6 (Canada); Houle, Sylvain; Wilson, Alan A. [Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada); PET Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada); Reilly, Raymond M., E-mail: raymond.reilly@utoronto.ca [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2 (Canada); Toronto General Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2 (Canada); Vasdev, Neil, E-mail: neil.vasdev@utoronto.ca [Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada); PET Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada)

    2011-10-15

    Introduction: The aim of the study was to evaluate the uptake of [{sup 18}F]-1-deoxy-1-fluoro-scyllo-inositol ([{sup 18}F]-scyllo-inositol) in human breast cancer (BC) and glioma xenografts, as well as in inflammatory tissue, in immunocompromised mice. Studies of [{sup 18}F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([{sup 18}F]-FDG) under the same conditions were also performed. Methods: Radiosynthesis of [{sup 18}F]-scyllo-inositol was automated using a commercial synthesis module. Tumour, inflammation and normal tissue uptakes were evaluated by biodistribution studies and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using [{sup 18}F]-scyllo-inositol and [{sup 18}F]-FDG in mice bearing subcutaneous MDA-MB-231, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-361 human BC xenografts, intracranial U-87 MG glioma xenografts and turpentine-induced inflammation. Results: The radiosynthesis of [{sup 18}F]-scyllo-inositol was automated with good radiochemical yields (24.6%{+-}3.3%, uncorrected for decay, 65{+-}2 min, n=5) and high specific activities ({>=}195 GBq/{mu}mol at end of synthesis). Uptake of [{sup 18}F]-scyllo-inositol was greatest in MDA-MB-231 BC tumours and was comparable to that of [{sup 18}F]-FDG (4.6{+-}0.5 vs. 5.5{+-}2.1 %ID/g, respectively; P=.40), but was marginally lower in MDA-MB-361 and MCF-7 xenografts. Uptake of [{sup 18}F]-scyllo-inositol in inflammation was lower than [{sup 18}F]-FDG. While uptake of [{sup 18}F]-scyllo-inositol in intracranial U-87 MG xenografts was significantly lower than [{sup 18}F]-FDG, the tumour-to-brain ratio was significantly higher (10.6{+-}2.5 vs. 2.1{+-}0.6; P=.001). Conclusions: Consistent with biodistribution studies, uptake of [{sup 18}F]-scyllo-inositol was successfully visualized by PET imaging in human BC and glioma xenografts, with lower accumulation in inflammatory tissue than [{sup 18}F]-FDG. The tumour-to-brain ratio of [{sup 18}F]-scyllo-inositol was also significantly higher than that of [{sup 18}F]-FDG for visualizing intracranial glioma xenografts in

  3. Comparisons of [18F]-1-deoxy-1-fluoro-scyllo-inositol with [18F]-FDG for PET imaging of inflammation, breast and brain cancer xenografts in athymic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLarty, Kristin; Moran, Matthew D.; Scollard, Deborah A.; Chan, Conrad; Sabha, Nesrin; Mukherjee, Joydeep; Guha, Abhijit; McLaurin, JoAnne; Nitz, Mark; Houle, Sylvain; Wilson, Alan A.; Reilly, Raymond M.; Vasdev, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the study was to evaluate the uptake of [ 18 F]-1-deoxy-1-fluoro-scyllo-inositol ([ 18 F]-scyllo-inositol) in human breast cancer (BC) and glioma xenografts, as well as in inflammatory tissue, in immunocompromised mice. Studies of [ 18 F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([ 18 F]-FDG) under the same conditions were also performed. Methods: Radiosynthesis of [ 18 F]-scyllo-inositol was automated using a commercial synthesis module. Tumour, inflammation and normal tissue uptakes were evaluated by biodistribution studies and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using [ 18 F]-scyllo-inositol and [ 18 F]-FDG in mice bearing subcutaneous MDA-MB-231, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-361 human BC xenografts, intracranial U-87 MG glioma xenografts and turpentine-induced inflammation. Results: The radiosynthesis of [ 18 F]-scyllo-inositol was automated with good radiochemical yields (24.6%±3.3%, uncorrected for decay, 65±2 min, n=5) and high specific activities (≥195 GBq/μmol at end of synthesis). Uptake of [ 18 F]-scyllo-inositol was greatest in MDA-MB-231 BC tumours and was comparable to that of [ 18 F]-FDG (4.6±0.5 vs. 5.5±2.1 %ID/g, respectively; P=.40), but was marginally lower in MDA-MB-361 and MCF-7 xenografts. Uptake of [ 18 F]-scyllo-inositol in inflammation was lower than [ 18 F]-FDG. While uptake of [ 18 F]-scyllo-inositol in intracranial U-87 MG xenografts was significantly lower than [ 18 F]-FDG, the tumour-to-brain ratio was significantly higher (10.6±2.5 vs. 2.1±0.6; P=.001). Conclusions: Consistent with biodistribution studies, uptake of [ 18 F]-scyllo-inositol was successfully visualized by PET imaging in human BC and glioma xenografts, with lower accumulation in inflammatory tissue than [ 18 F]-FDG. The tumour-to-brain ratio of [ 18 F]-scyllo-inositol was also significantly higher than that of [ 18 F]-FDG for visualizing intracranial glioma xenografts in NOD SCID mice, giving a better contrast. -- Graphical Abstract: Display Omitted

  4. Antisense imaging of epidermal growth factor-induced p21{sup WAF-1/CIP-1} gene expression in MDA-MB-468 human breast cancer xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Judy; Chen, Paul; Mrkobrada, Marko [Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, 19 Russell Street, M5S 2S2, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hu, Meiduo [Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, 19 Russell Street, M5S 2S2, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Vallis, Katherine A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Reilly, Raymond M. [Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2003-09-01

    Molecular imaging of the expression of key genes which determine the response to DNA damage following cancer treatment may predict the effectiveness of a particular treatment strategy. A prominent early response gene for DNA damage is the gene encoding p21{sup WAF-1/CIP-1}, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor that regulates progression through the cell cycle. In this study, we explored the feasibility of imaging p21{sup WAF-1/CIP-1} gene expression at the mRNA level using an 18-mer phosphorothioated antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) labeled with {sup 111}In. The known induction of the p21{sup WAF-1/CIP-1} gene in MDA-MB-468 human breast cancer cells following exposure to epidermal growth factor (EGF) was used as an experimental tool. Treatment of MDA-MB-468 cells in vitro with EGF (20 nM) increased the ratio of p21{sup WAF-1/CIP-1} mRNA/{beta}-actin mRNA threefold within 2 h as measured by the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A concentration-dependent inhibition of EGF-induced p21{sup WAF-1/CIP-1} protein expression was achieved in MDA-MB-468 cells by treatment with antisense ODNs with up to a tenfold decrease observed at 1 {mu}M. There was a fourfold lower inhibition of p21{sup WAF-1/CIP-1} protein expression by control sense or random sequence ODNs. Intratumoral injections of EGF (15 {mu}g/day x 3 days) were employed to induce p21{sup WAF-1/CIP-1} gene expression in MDA-MB-468 xenografts implanted subcutaneously into athymic mice. RT-PCR of explanted tumors showed a threefold increased level of p21{sup WAF-1/CIP-1} mRNA compared with normal saline-treated tumors. Successful imaging of EGF-induced p21{sup WAF-1/CIP-1} gene expression in MDA-MB-468 xenografts was achieved at 48 h post injection of {sup 111}In-labeled antisense ODNs (3.7 MBq; 2 {mu}g). Tumors displaying basal levels of p21{sup WAF-1/CIP-1} gene expression in the absence of EGF treatment could not be visualized. Biodistribution studies showed a significantly higher tumor

  5. TGF-β Blockade Reduces Mortality and Metabolic Changes in a Validated Murine Model of Pancreatic Cancer Cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Stephanie H; Tomkötter, Lena; Vahle, Anne-Kristin; Rokosh, Rae; Avanzi, Antonina; Mahmood, Syed Kashif; Deutsch, Michael; Alothman, Sara; Alqunaibit, Dalia; Ochi, Atsuo; Zambirinis, Constantinos; Mohaimin, Tasnima; Rendon, Mauricio; Levie, Elliot; Pansari, Mridul; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Daley, Donnele; Barilla, Rocky; Pachter, H Leon; Tippens, Daniel; Malik, Hassan; Boutajangout, Allal; Wisniewski, Thomas; Miller, George

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cachexia is a debilitating condition characterized by a combination of anorexia, muscle wasting, weight loss, and malnutrition. This condition affects an overwhelming majority of patients with pancreatic cancer and is a primary cause of cancer-related death. However, few, if any, effective therapies exist for both treatment and prevention of this syndrome. In order to develop novel therapeutic strategies for pancreatic cancer cachexia, appropriate animal models are necessary. In this study, we developed and validated a syngeneic, metastatic, murine model of pancreatic cancer cachexia. Using our model, we investigated the ability of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) blockade to mitigate the metabolic changes associated with cachexia. We found that TGF-β inhibition using the anti-TGF-β antibody 1D11.16.8 significantly improved overall mortality, weight loss, fat mass, lean body mass, bone mineral density, and skeletal muscle proteolysis in mice harboring advanced pancreatic cancer. Other immunotherapeutic strategies we employed were not effective. Collectively, we validated a simplified but useful model of pancreatic cancer cachexia to investigate immunologic treatment strategies. In addition, we showed that TGF-β inhibition can decrease the metabolic changes associated with cancer cachexia and improve overall survival.

  6. TGF-β Blockade Reduces Mortality and Metabolic Changes in a Validated Murine Model of Pancreatic Cancer Cachexia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie H Greco

    Full Text Available Cancer cachexia is a debilitating condition characterized by a combination of anorexia, muscle wasting, weight loss, and malnutrition. This condition affects an overwhelming majority of patients with pancreatic cancer and is a primary cause of cancer-related death. However, few, if any, effective therapies exist for both treatment and prevention of this syndrome. In order to develop novel therapeutic strategies for pancreatic cancer cachexia, appropriate animal models are necessary. In this study, we developed and validated a syngeneic, metastatic, murine model of pancreatic cancer cachexia. Using our model, we investigated the ability of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β blockade to mitigate the metabolic changes associated with cachexia. We found that TGF-β inhibition using the anti-TGF-β antibody 1D11.16.8 significantly improved overall mortality, weight loss, fat mass, lean body mass, bone mineral density, and skeletal muscle proteolysis in mice harboring advanced pancreatic cancer. Other immunotherapeutic strategies we employed were not effective. Collectively, we validated a simplified but useful model of pancreatic cancer cachexia to investigate immunologic treatment strategies. In addition, we showed that TGF-β inhibition can decrease the metabolic changes associated with cancer cachexia and improve overall survival.

  7. TGF-β Blockade Reduces Mortality and Metabolic Changes in a Validated Murine Model of Pancreatic Cancer Cachexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokosh, Rae; Avanzi, Antonina; Mahmood, Syed Kashif; Deutsch, Michael; Alothman, Sara; Alqunaibit, Dalia; Ochi, Atsuo; Zambirinis, Constantinos; Mohaimin, Tasnima; Rendon, Mauricio; Levie, Elliot; Pansari, Mridul; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Daley, Donnele; Barilla, Rocky; Pachter, H. Leon; Tippens, Daniel; Malik, Hassan; Boutajangout, Allal; Wisniewski, Thomas; Miller, George

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cachexia is a debilitating condition characterized by a combination of anorexia, muscle wasting, weight loss, and malnutrition. This condition affects an overwhelming majority of patients with pancreatic cancer and is a primary cause of cancer-related death. However, few, if any, effective therapies exist for both treatment and prevention of this syndrome. In order to develop novel therapeutic strategies for pancreatic cancer cachexia, appropriate animal models are necessary. In this study, we developed and validated a syngeneic, metastatic, murine model of pancreatic cancer cachexia. Using our model, we investigated the ability of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) blockade to mitigate the metabolic changes associated with cachexia. We found that TGF-β inhibition using the anti-TGF-β antibody 1D11.16.8 significantly improved overall mortality, weight loss, fat mass, lean body mass, bone mineral density, and skeletal muscle proteolysis in mice harboring advanced pancreatic cancer. Other immunotherapeutic strategies we employed were not effective. Collectively, we validated a simplified but useful model of pancreatic cancer cachexia to investigate immunologic treatment strategies. In addition, we showed that TGF-β inhibition can decrease the metabolic changes associated with cancer cachexia and improve overall survival. PMID:26172047

  8. A comparative study of the biologic and molecular basis of murine mammary carcinoma: a model for human breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlom, J.; Kufe, D.; Hehlman, R.; Spiegelman, S.; Bentvelzen, P.; Michalides, R.; Hageman, P.

    1976-01-01

    Tritiated-DNA complementary to mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) RNA was synthesized in an endogeneous reaction with MMTV particles. This DNA was used as a probe via molecular hybridization to detect MMTV-specific RNA in 'spontaneous' mammary tumors of several strains of mice, including the 'nonproducer' BALB/c mammary tumors. MMTV-specific RNA was also found in certain normal tissues (spleen, kidney, and epididymis) of a high-mammary-cancer strain (GR). Aging or treatment with nonviral carcinogens also induced the appearance of MMTV-specific RNA in certain normal tissues of the low-mammary-cancer strains, C57BL and BALB/c. The relationship of the presence of MMTV-specific RNA to the etiology and pathogenesis of murine mammary neoplasia and its potential application to human breast cancer are discussed

  9. Inhibition of Cell Proliferation and Growth of Pancreatic Cancer by Silencing of Carbohydrate Sulfotransferase 15 In Vitro and in a Xenograft Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Takakura

    Full Text Available Chondroitin sulfate E (CS-E, a highly sulfated glycosaminoglycan, is known to promote tumor invasion and metastasis. Because the presence of CS-E is detected in both tumor and stromal cells in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC, multistage involvement of CS-E in the development of PDAC has been considered. However, its involvement in the early stage of PDAC progression is still not fully understood. In this study, to clarify the direct role of CS-E in tumor, but not stromal, cells of PDAC, we focused on carbohydrate sulfotransferase 15 (CHST15, a specific enzyme that biosynthesizes CS-E, and investigated the effects of the CHST15 siRNA on tumor cell proliferation in vitro and growth in vivo. CHST15 mRNA is highly expressed in the human pancreatic cancer cell lines PANC-1, MIA PaCa-2, Capan-1 and Capan-2. CHST15 siRNA significantly inhibited the expression of CHST15 mRNA in these four cells in vitro. Silencing of the CHST15 gene in the cells was associated with significant reduction of proliferation and up-regulation of the cell cycle inhibitor-related gene p21CIP1/WAF1. In a subcutaneous xenograft tumor model of PANC-1 in nude mice, a single intratumoral injection of CHST15 siRNA almost completely suppressed tumor growth. Reduced CHST15 protein signals associated with tumor necrosis were observed with the treatment with CHST15 siRNA. These results provide evidence of the direct action of CHST15 on the proliferation of pancreatic tumor cells partly through the p21CIP1/WAF1 pathway. Thus, CHST15-CS-E axis-mediated tumor cell proliferation could be a novel therapeutic target in the early stage of PDAC progression.

  10. Cancer testis antigen vaccination affords long-term protection in a murine model of ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Chiriva-Internati

    Full Text Available Sperm protein (Sp17 is an attractive target for ovarian cancer (OC vaccines because of its over-expression in primary as well as in metastatic lesions, at all stages of the disease. Our studies suggest that a Sp17-based vaccine can induce an enduring defense against OC development in C57BL/6 mice with ID8 cells, following prophylactic and therapeutic treatments. This is the first time that a mouse counterpart of a cancer testis antigen (Sp17 was shown to be expressed in an OC mouse model, and that vaccination against this antigen significantly controlled tumor growth. Our study shows that the CpG-adjuvated Sp17 vaccine overcomes the issue of immunologic tolerance, the major barrier to the development of effective immunotherapy for OC. Furthermore, this study provides a better understanding of OC biology by showing that Th-17 cells activation and contemporary immunosuppressive T-reg cells inhibition is required for vaccine efficacy. Taken together, these results indicate that prophylactic and therapeutic vaccinations can induce long-standing protection against OC and delay tumor growth, suggesting that this strategy may provide additional treatments of human OC and the prevention of disease onset in women with a family history of OC.

  11. Monitoring of tumor growth and metastasis potential in MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc human breast cancer xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.-F. [Department of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Sec. 2, Li-Nong Street, Pei-tou 112, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Y.-Y. [Department of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Sec. 2, Li-Nong Street, Pei-tou 112, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wang, H.-E. [Department of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Sec. 2, Li-Nong Street, Pei-tou 112, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, R.-S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Nuclear Medicine Department, Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Pang Fei [Department of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hwang, J.-J. [Department of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Sec. 2, Li-Nong Street, Pei-tou 112, Taipei, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: jjhwang@ym.edu.tw

    2007-02-01

    Molecular imaging of reporter gene expression provides a rapid, sensitive and non-invasive monitoring of tumor behaviors. In this study, we reported the establishment of a novel animal model for longitudinal examination of tumor growth kinetics and metastatic spreading in vivo. The highly metastatic human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-435s cell line was engineered to stably express herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1-tk) and luciferase (luc). Both {sup 131}I-FIAU and D-luciferin were used as reporter probes. For orthotopic tumor formation, MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc cells were implanted into the first nipple of 6-week-old female NOD/SCID mice. For metastatic study, cells were injected via the lateral tail vein. Mice-bearing MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc tumors were scanned for tumor growth and metastatsis using Xenogen IVIS50 system. Gamma scintigraphy and whole-body autoradiography were also applied to confirm the tumor localization. The results of bioluminescence imaging as well as histopathological finding showed that tumors could be detected in femur, spine, ovary, lungs, kidney, adrenal gland, lymph nodes and muscle at 16 weeks post i.v. injection, and correlated photons could be quantified. This MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc human breast carcinoma-bearing mouse model combined with multimodalities of molecular imaging may facilitate studies on the molecular mechanisms of cancer invasion and metastasis.

  12. Monitoring of tumor growth and metastasis potential in MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc human breast cancer xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.-F.; Lin, Y.-Y.; Wang, H.-E.; Liu, R.-S.; Pang Fei; Hwang, J.-J.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular imaging of reporter gene expression provides a rapid, sensitive and non-invasive monitoring of tumor behaviors. In this study, we reported the establishment of a novel animal model for longitudinal examination of tumor growth kinetics and metastatic spreading in vivo. The highly metastatic human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-435s cell line was engineered to stably express herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1-tk) and luciferase (luc). Both 131 I-FIAU and D-luciferin were used as reporter probes. For orthotopic tumor formation, MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc cells were implanted into the first nipple of 6-week-old female NOD/SCID mice. For metastatic study, cells were injected via the lateral tail vein. Mice-bearing MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc tumors were scanned for tumor growth and metastatsis using Xenogen IVIS50 system. Gamma scintigraphy and whole-body autoradiography were also applied to confirm the tumor localization. The results of bioluminescence imaging as well as histopathological finding showed that tumors could be detected in femur, spine, ovary, lungs, kidney, adrenal gland, lymph nodes and muscle at 16 weeks post i.v. injection, and correlated photons could be quantified. This MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc human breast carcinoma-bearing mouse model combined with multimodalities of molecular imaging may facilitate studies on the molecular mechanisms of cancer invasion and metastasis

  13. High-Resolution Longitudinal Screening with Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a Murine Brain Cancer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A. Bock

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the main limitations of intracranial models of diseases is our present inability to monitor and evaluate the intracranial compartment noninvasively over time. Therefore, there is a growing need for imaging modalities that provide thorough neuropathological evaluations of xenograft and transgenic models of intracranial pathology. In this study, we have established protocols for multiple-mouse magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to follow the growth and behavior of intracranial xenografts of gliomas longitudinally. We successfully obtained weekly images on 16 mice for a total of 5 weeks on a 7-T multiple-mouse MRI. T2- and Ti-weighted imaging with gadolinium enhancement of vascularity was used to detect tumor margins, tumor size, and growth. These experiments, using 3D whole brain images obtained in four mice at once, demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining repeat radiological images in intracranial tumor models and suggest that MRI should be incorporated as a research modality for the investigation of intracranial pathobiology.

  14. Biophysical and morphological effects of nanodiamond/nanoplatinum solution (DPV576) on metastatic murine breast cancer cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghoneum, Alia; Zhu, Huanqi; Woo, JungReem; Zabinyakov, Nikita; Sharma, Shivani; Gimzewski, James K

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles have recently gained increased attention as drug delivery systems for the treatment of cancer due to their minute size and unique chemical properties. However, very few studies have tested the biophysical changes associated with nanoparticles on metastatic cancer cells at the cellular and sub-cellular scales. Here, we investigated the mechanical and morphological properties of cancer cells by measuring the changes in cell Young’s Modulus using AFM, filopodial retraction (FR) by time lapse optical light microscopy imaging and filopodial disorganization by high resolution AFM imaging of cells upon treatment with nanoparticles. In the current study, nanomechanical changes in live murine metastatic breast cancer cells (4T1) post exposure to a nanodiamond/nanoplatinum mixture dispersed in aqueous solution (DPV576), were monitored. Results showed a decrease in Young’s modulus at two hours post treatment with DPV576 in a dose dependent manner. Partial FR at 20 min and complete FR at 40 min were observed. Moreover, analysis of the retraction distance (in microns) measured over time (minutes), showed that a DPV576 concentration of 15%v/v yielded the highest FR rate. In addition, DPV576 treated cells showed early signs of filopodial disorganization and disintegration. This study demonstrates the changes in cell stiffness and tracks early structural alterations of metastatic breast cancer cells post treatment with DPV576, which may have important implications in the role of nanodiamond/nanoplatinum based cancer cell therapy and sensitization to chemotherapy drugs. (paper)

  15. Effects of milk fermented by Lactobacillus helveticus R389 on a murine breast cancer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno de LeBlanc, Alejandra de; Matar, Chantal; LeBlanc, Nicole; Perdigón, Gabriela

    2005-01-01

    Antitumour activity is one of the health-promoting effects attributed to the lactic acid bacteria and their products of fermentation. Previous studies in mice demonstrated that bioactive compounds released in milk fermented by Lactobacillus helveticus R389 contribute to its immunoenhancing and antitumour properties. The aim of the present work was to study the effects of the consumption of milk fermented by L. helveticus R389 or its proteolytic-deficient variant, L. helveticus L89, on a murine hormone-dependent breast cancer model. Mice were fed with milk fermented by L. helveticus R389 or L. helveticus L89, during 2 or 7 days. The tumour control group received no special feeding. At the end of the feeding period, the mice were challenged by a subcutaneous injection of tumour cells in the mammary gland. Four days post-injection, the mice received fermented milk on a cyclical basis. The rate of tumour development and the cytokines in serum, mammary gland tissue and tumour-isolated cells were monitored. Bcl-2-positive cells in mammary glands and cellular apoptosis in tumour tissue were also studied. Seven days of cyclical administration of milk fermented by either bacterial strain delayed or stopped the tumour development. Cytokines demonstrated that L. helveticus R389 modulated the immune response challenged by the tumour. IL-10 and IL-4 were increased in all the samples from this group. In comparison with the tumour control, all test groups showed a decrease of IL-6, a cytokine involved in oestrogen synthesis. Seven days of cyclical feeding with milk fermented by L. helveticus R389 produced an increase in the number of apoptotic cells, compared with all other groups. This study demonstrated that 7 days of cyclical administration of milk fermented by both strains of L. helveticus diminishes tumour growth, stimulating an antitumour immune response. Compounds released during milk fermentation with L. helveticus R389 would be implicated in its immunoregulatory capacity

  16. A novel selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) MK-4541 exerts anti-androgenic activity in the prostate cancer xenograft R-3327G and anabolic activity on skeletal muscle mass & function in castrated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisamore, Michael J; Gentile, Michael A; Dillon, Gregory Michael; Baran, Matthew; Gambone, Carlo; Riley, Sean; Schmidt, Azriel; Flores, Osvaldo; Wilkinson, Hilary; Alves, Stephen E

    2016-10-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor super family of transcription factors. Androgens play an essential role in the development, growth, and maintenance of male sex organs, as well as the musculoskeletal and central nervous systems. Yet with advancing age, androgens can drive the onset of prostate cancer, the second leading cause of cancer death in males within the United States. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) by pharmacologic and/or surgical castration induces apoptosis of prostate cells and subsequent shrinkage of the prostate and prostate tumors. However, ADT is associated with significant musculoskeletal and behavioral adverse effects. The unique pharmacological activity of selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) MK-4541 recently has been reported as an AR antagonist with 5α-reductase inhibitor function. The molecule inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in AR positive, androgen dependent prostate cancer cells. Importantly, MK-4541 inhibited androgen-dependent prostate growth in male rats yet maintained lean body mass and bone formation following ovariectomy in female rats. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of SARM MK-4541 in the androgen-dependent Dunning R3327-G prostate carcinoma xenograft mouse model as well as on skeletal muscle mass and function, and AR-regulated behavior in mice. MK-4541 significantly inhibited the growth of R3327-G prostate tumors, exhibited anti-androgen effects on the seminal vesicles, reduced plasma testosterone concentrations in intact males, and inhibited Ki67 expression. MK-4541 treated xenografts appeared similar to xenografts in castrated mice. Importantly, we demonstrate that MK-4541 exhibited anabolic activity in androgen deficient conditions, increasing lean body mass and muscle function in adult castrated mice. Moreover, MK-4541 treatment restored general activity levels in castrated mice. Thus, MK-4541 exhibits an optimum profile as an adjuvant therapy to ADT

  17. Cancer associated fibroblasts promote tumor growth and metastasis by modulating the tumor immune microenvironment in a 4T1 murine breast cancer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie Liao

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Local inflammation associated with solid tumors commonly results from factors released by tumor cells and the tumor stroma, and promotes tumor progression. Cancer associated fibroblasts comprise a majority of the cells found in tumor stroma and are appealing targets for cancer therapy. Here, our aim was to determine the efficacy of targeting cancer associated fibroblasts for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer.We demonstrate that cancer associated fibroblasts are key modulators of immune polarization in the tumor microenvironment of a 4T1 murine model of metastatic breast cancer. Elimination of cancer associated fibroblasts in vivo by a DNA vaccine targeted to fibroblast activation protein results in a shift of the immune microenvironment from a Th2 to Th1 polarization. This shift is characterized by increased protein expression of IL-2 and IL-7, suppressed recruitment of tumor-associated macrophages, myeloid derived suppressor cells, T regulatory cells, and decreased tumor angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. Additionally, the vaccine improved anti-metastatic effects of doxorubicin chemotherapy and enhanced suppression of IL-6 and IL-4 protein expression while increasing recruitment of dendritic cells and CD8(+ T cells. Treatment with the combination therapy also reduced tumor-associated Vegf, Pdgfc, and GM-CSF mRNA and protein expression.Our findings demonstrate that cancer associated fibroblasts promote tumor growth and metastasis through their role as key modulators of immune polarization in the tumor microenvironment and are valid targets for therapy of metastatic breast cancer.

  18. Cancer associated fibroblasts promote tumor growth and metastasis by modulating the tumor immune microenvironment in a 4T1 murine breast cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Debbie; Luo, Yunping; Markowitz, Dorothy; Xiang, Rong; Reisfeld, Ralph A

    2009-11-23

    Local inflammation associated with solid tumors commonly results from factors released by tumor cells and the tumor stroma, and promotes tumor progression. Cancer associated fibroblasts comprise a majority of the cells found in tumor stroma and are appealing targets for cancer therapy. Here, our aim was to determine the efficacy of targeting cancer associated fibroblasts for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. We demonstrate that cancer associated fibroblasts are key modulators of immune polarization in the tumor microenvironment of a 4T1 murine model of metastatic breast cancer. Elimination of cancer associated fibroblasts in vivo by a DNA vaccine targeted to fibroblast activation protein results in a shift of the immune microenvironment from a Th2 to Th1 polarization. This shift is characterized by increased protein expression of IL-2 and IL-7, suppressed recruitment of tumor-associated macrophages, myeloid derived suppressor cells, T regulatory cells, and decreased tumor angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. Additionally, the vaccine improved anti-metastatic effects of doxorubicin chemotherapy and enhanced suppression of IL-6 and IL-4 protein expression while increasing recruitment of dendritic cells and CD8(+) T cells. Treatment with the combination therapy also reduced tumor-associated Vegf, Pdgfc, and GM-CSF mRNA and protein expression. Our findings demonstrate that cancer associated fibroblasts promote tumor growth and metastasis through their role as key modulators of immune polarization in the tumor microenvironment and are valid targets for therapy of metastatic breast cancer.

  19. MicroPET/CT imaging of patient-derived pancreatic cancer xenografts implanted subcutaneously or orthotopically in NOD-scid mice using 64Cu-NOTA-panitumumab F(ab')2 fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, Amanda J.; Cao, Ping-Jiang; Hedley, David W.; Sidhu, Sachdev S.; Winnik, Mitchell A.; Reilly, Raymond M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Our objective was to study microPET/CT imaging of patient-derived pancreatic cancer xenografts in NOD-scid mice using F(ab') 2 fragments of the fully-human anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody, panitumumab (Vectibix) labeled with 64 Cu. More than 90% of pancreatic cancers are EGFR-positive. Methods: F(ab') 2 fragments were produced by proteolytic digestion of panitumumab IgG or non-specific human IgG, purified by ultrafiltration then modified with NOTA chelators for complexing 64 Cu. Panitumumab IgG and Fab fragments were similarly labeled with 64 Cu. EGFR immunoreactivity was determined in competition and direct (saturation) cell binding assays. The biodistribution of 64 Cu-labeled panitumumab IgG, F(ab') 2 and Fab was compared in non-tumor-bearing Balb/c mice. MicroPET/CT and biodistribution studies were performed in NOD-scid mice engrafted subcutaneously (s.c.) or orthotopically with patient-derived OCIP23 pancreatic tumors, or in NOD-scid with s.c. PANC-1 human pancreatic cancer xenografts. Results: Panitumumab F(ab') 2 fragments were produced in high purity (> 90%), derivitized with 3.2 ± 0.7 NOTA/F(ab') 2 , and labeled with 64 Cu (0.3–3.6 MBq/μg). The binding of 64 Cu-NOTA-panitumumab F(ab') 2 to OCIP23 or PANC-1 cells was decreased significantly by an excess of panitumumab IgG. The K d for binding of 64 Cu-NOTA-panitumumab F(ab') 2 to EGFR on PANC-1 cells was 0.14 ± 0.05 nmol/L. F(ab') 2 fragments exhibited more suitable normal tissue distribution for tumor imaging with 64 Cu than panitumumab IgG or Fab. Tumor uptake at 48 h post injection (p.i.) of 64 Cu-NOTA-panitumumab F(ab') 2 was 12.0 ± 0.9% injected dose/g (ID/g) in s.c. and 11.8 ± 0.9% ID/g in orthotopic OCIP23 tumors vs. 6.1 ± 1.1% ID/g in s.c. PANC-1 xenografts. Tumor/Blood (T/B) ratios were 5:1 to 9:1 for OCIP23 and 2.4:1 for PANC-1 tumors. Tumor uptake of 64 Cu-NOTA-non-specific F(ab') 2 in OCIP23 xenografts was 5-fold lower than 64

  20. Molecular analysis of primary gastric cancer, corresponding xenografts, and 2 novel gastric carcinoma cell lines reveals novel alterations in gastric carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milne, Anya N. A.; Sitarz, Robert; Carvalho, Ralph; Polak, Mirjam M.; Ligtenberg, Madolijn; Pauwels, Patrick; Offerhaus, G. Johan A.; Weterman, Marian A. J.

    2007-01-01

    We report the molecular characterization of 8 primary gastric carcinomas, corresponding xenografts, and 2 novel gastric carcinoma cell lines. We compared the tumors and cell lines, with respect to histology, immunohistochemistry, copy number, and hypermethylation of up to 38 genes using

  1. Bispecific antibody complex pre-targeting and targeted delivery of polymer drug conjugates for imaging and therapy in dual human mammary cancer xenografts. Targeted polymer drug conjugates for cancer diagnosis and therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaw, Ban-An; Gada, Keyur S.; Patil, Vishwesh; Panwar, Rajiv; Mandapati, Savitri [Northeastern University, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Bouve College of Health Sciences, School of Pharmacy, Boston, MA (United States); Hatefi, Arash [Rutgers University, Department of Pharmaceutics, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Majewski, Stan [West Virginia University, Department of Radiology, Morgantown, WV (United States); Weisenberger, Andrew [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Doxorubicin, a frontline chemotherapeutic agent, limited by its cardiotoxicity and other tissue toxicities, was conjugated to N-terminal DTPA-modified polyglutamic acid (D-Dox-PGA) to produce polymer pro-drug conjugates. D-Dox-PGA or Tc-99 m labeled DTPA-succinyl-polylysine polymers (DSPL) were targeted to HER2-positive human mammary carcinoma (BT-474) in a double xenografted SCID mouse model also hosting HER2-negative human mammary carcinoma (BT-20). After pretargeting with bispecific anti-HER2-affibody-anti-DTPA-Fab complexes (BAAC), anti-DTPA-Fab or only phosphate buffered saline, D-Dox-PGA or Tc-99 m DSPL were administered. Positive therapeutic control mice were injected with Dox alone at maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Only BT-474 lesions were visualized by gamma imaging with Tc-99 m-DSPL; BT-20 lesions were not. Therapeutic efficacy was equivalent in mice pretargeted with BAAC/targeted with D-Dox-PGA to mice treated only with doxorubicin. There was no total body weight (TBW) loss at three times the doxorubicin equivalent MTD with D-Dox-PGA, whereas mice treated with doxorubicin lost 10 % of TBW at 2 weeks and 16 % after the second MTD injection leading to death of all mice. Our cancer imaging and pretargeted therapeutic approaches are highly target specific, delivering very high specific activity reagents that may result in the development of a novel theranostic application. HER/2 neu specific affibody-anti-DTPA-Fab bispecific antibody pretargeting of HER2 positive human mammary xenografts enabled exquisite targeting of polymers loaded with radioisotopes for molecular imaging and doxorubicin for effective therapy without the associating non-tumor normal tissue toxicities. (orig.)

  2. Transient human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMA) interference in CA 125 measurements during monitoring of ovarian cancer patients treated with murine monoclonal antibody.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oei, A.L.M.; Sweep, F.C.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Olthaar, A.J.; Thomas, C.M.G.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMA) on serial CA 125 measurements in serum of patients with epithelial ovarian cancer following single intraperitoneal (IP) therapy with Yttrium-90-labeled human milk fat globule 1 murine monoclonal antibody ((90)Y-muHMFG1) as

  3. Exposure to maternal obesogenic diet worsens some but not all pre-cancer phenotypes in a murine genetic model of prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Okeyo-Owuor

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer research has been predominantly focused on adult exposures and risk factors. However, because the prostate develops during gestation and early life, exposure to external factors, such as obesity, during development could affect the prostate cancer progression in adults. Our previous work demonstrated that exposure to a high fat/high sugar (HF/HS diet during gestation and until weaning stimulated prostate hyperplasia and altered the Pten/Akt pathway in adult mice fed a normal diet after weaning. Here, we asked whether maternal exposure to HF/HS would worsen prostate phenotypes in mice lacking Pten, a widely accepted driver of prostate cancer. We found that, at six weeks of age, both Chow (control-and HF/HS-exposed Pten knockout mice showed evidence of murine PIN that included ducts with central comedo necrosis but that the HF/HS exposure did not influence murine PIN progression. The Pten knockout mice exposed to HF/HS in utero had significantly more mitotic cells than Pten knockouts exposed to Chow diet. In the Pten null background, the maternal HF/HS diet enhanced proliferation but did not have an additive effect on Akt activation. We observed neuroendocrine differentiation in Pten knockout mice, a phenotype that had not been previously described in this model.

  4. Antitumor effect of malaria parasite infection in a murine Lewis lung cancer model through induction of innate and adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lili; He, Zhengxiang; Qin, Li; Li, Qinyan; Shi, Xibao; Zhao, Siting; Chen, Ling; Zhong, Nanshan; Chen, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common malignancy in humans and its high fatality means that no effective treatment is available. Developing new therapeutic strategies for lung cancer is urgently needed. Malaria has been reported to stimulate host immune responses, which are believed to be efficacious for combating some clinical cancers. This study is aimed to provide evidence that malaria parasite infection is therapeutic for lung cancer. Antitumor effect of malaria infection was examined in both subcutaneously and intravenously implanted murine Lewis lung cancer (LLC) model. The results showed that malaria infection inhibited LLC growth and metastasis and prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Histological analysis of tumors from mice infected with malaria revealed that angiogenesis was inhibited, which correlated with increased terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated (TUNEL) staining and decreased Ki-67 expression in tumors. Through natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity activity, cytokine assays, enzyme-linked immunospot assay, lymphocyte proliferation, and flow cytometry, we demonstrated that malaria infection provided anti-tumor effects by inducing both a potent anti-tumor innate immune response, including the secretion of IFN-γ and TNF-α and the activation of NK cells as well as adaptive anti-tumor immunity with increasing tumor-specific T-cell proliferation and cytolytic activity of CD8(+) T cells. Notably, tumor-bearing mice infected with the parasite developed long-lasting and effective tumor-specific immunity. Consequently, we found that malaria parasite infection could enhance the immune response of lung cancer DNA vaccine pcDNA3.1-hMUC1 and the combination produced a synergistic antitumor effect. Malaria infection significantly suppresses LLC growth via induction of innate and adaptive antitumor responses in a mouse model. These data suggest that the malaria parasite may provide a novel strategy or therapeutic vaccine vector for anti-lung cancer

  5. Antitumor effect of malaria parasite infection in a murine Lewis lung cancer model through induction of innate and adaptive immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lung cancer is the most common malignancy in humans and its high fatality means that no effective treatment is available. Developing new therapeutic strategies for lung cancer is urgently needed. Malaria has been reported to stimulate host immune responses, which are believed to be efficacious for combating some clinical cancers. This study is aimed to provide evidence that malaria parasite infection is therapeutic for lung cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Antitumor effect of malaria infection was examined in both subcutaneously and intravenously implanted murine Lewis lung cancer (LLC model. The results showed that malaria infection inhibited LLC growth and metastasis and prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Histological analysis of tumors from mice infected with malaria revealed that angiogenesis was inhibited, which correlated with increased terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated (TUNEL staining and decreased Ki-67 expression in tumors. Through natural killer (NK cell cytotoxicity activity, cytokine assays, enzyme-linked immunospot assay, lymphocyte proliferation, and flow cytometry, we demonstrated that malaria infection provided anti-tumor effects by inducing both a potent anti-tumor innate immune response, including the secretion of IFN-γ and TNF-α and the activation of NK cells as well as adaptive anti-tumor immunity with increasing tumor-specific T-cell proliferation and cytolytic activity of CD8(+ T cells. Notably, tumor-bearing mice infected with the parasite developed long-lasting and effective tumor-specific immunity. Consequently, we found that malaria parasite infection could enhance the immune response of lung cancer DNA vaccine pcDNA3.1-hMUC1 and the combination produced a synergistic antitumor effect. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Malaria infection significantly suppresses LLC growth via induction of innate and adaptive antitumor responses in a mouse model. These data suggest that the malaria

  6. NOSH–aspirin (NBS-1120), a novel nitric oxide- and hydrogen sulfide-releasing hybrid is a potent inhibitor of colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Olson, Kenneth R.; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► NOSH–aspirin is the first dual acting NO and H 2 S releasing hybrid. ► Its IC 50 for cell growth inhibition is in the low nano-molar range. ► Structure–activity studies show that the sum of the parts does not equal the whole. ► NOSH–aspirin reduced tumor growth by 85% in mice bearing a colon cancer xenograft. -- Abstract: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are prototypical anti-cancer agents. However, their long-term use is associated with adverse gastrointestinal effects. Recognition that endogenous gaseous mediators, nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) can increase mucosal defense mechanisms has led to the development of NO- and H 2 S-releasing NSAIDs with increased safety profiles. Here we report on a new hybrid, NOSH–aspirin, which is an NO- and H 2 S-releasing agent. NOSH–aspirin inhibited HT-29 colon cancer growth with IC 50 s of 45.5 ± 2.5, 19.7 ± 3.3, and 7.7 ± 2.2 nM at 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively. This is the first NSAID based agent with such high degree of potency. NOSH–aspirin inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, and caused G 0 /G 1 cell cycle block. Reconstitution and structure–activity studies representing a fairly close approximation to the intact molecule showed that NOSH–aspirin was 9000-fold more potent than the sum of its parts towards growth inhibition. NOSH–aspirin inhibited ovine COX-1 more than ovine COX-2. NOSH–ASA treatment of mice bearing a human colon cancer xenograft caused a reduction in volume of 85%. Taken together, these results demonstrate that NOSH–aspirin has strong anti-cancer potential and merits further evaluation.

  7. Modifications in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging parameters after α-particle-emitting ²²⁷Th-trastuzumab therapy of HER2-expressing ovarian cancer xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyerdahl, Helen; Røe, Kathrine; Brevik, Ellen Mengshoel; Dahle, Jostein

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of α-particle-emitting (227)Th-trastuzumab radioimmunotherapy on tumor vasculature to increase the knowledge about the mechanisms of action of (227)Th-trastuzumab. Human HER2-expressing SKOV-3 ovarian cancer xenografts were grown bilaterally in athymic nude mice. Mice with tumor volumes 253 ± 36 mm(3) (mean ± SEM) were treated with a single injection of either (227)Th-trastuzumab at a dose of 1000 kBq/kg body weight (treated group, n=14 tumors) or 0.9% NaCl (control group, n=10 tumors). Dynamic T1-weighted contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) was used to study the effect of (227)Th-trastuzumab on tumor vasculature. DCEMRI was performed before treatment and 1, 2, and 3 weeks after therapy. Tumor contrast-enhancement curves were extracted voxel by voxel and fitted to the Brix pharmacokinetic model. Pharmacokinetic parameters for the tumors that underwent radioimmunotherapy were compared with the corresponding parameters of control tumors. Significant increases of kep, the rate constant of diffusion from the extravascular extracellular space to the plasma (PTh-trastuzumab treatment of HER2-expressing ovarian cancer xenografts. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. 4-tert-Octylphenol stimulates the expression of cathepsins in human breast cancer cells and xenografted breast tumors of a mouse model via an estrogen receptor-mediated signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hye-Rim; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cathepsins B and D were markedly enhanced by octylphenol (OP) in MCF-7 cells. ► OP may accelerate breast cancer cell growth and cathepsins via ER-mediated signaling. ► Breast cancer cells exposed with OP to mouse model were more aggressive. ► OP can promote metastasis through the amplification of cathepsins B and D via ER-mediated signaling pathway. -- Abstract: Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are defined as environmental compounds that modulate steroid hormone receptor-dependent responses an abnormal manner, resulting in adverse health problems for humans such as cancer growth and metastasis. Cathepsins are proteases that have been implicated in cancer progression. However, there have been few studies about the association between cathepsins and estrogenic chemicals during the cancer progression. In this study, we examined the effect(s) of 4-tert-octylphenol (OP), a potent EDC, on the expression of cathepsins B and D in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells and a xenograft mouse model. Treatment with OP significantly induced the proliferation MCF-7 cells in an MTT assay. In addition, the expression of cathepsins B and D was markedly enhanced in MCF-7 cells at both the transcriptional and the translational levels following treatment with E2 or OP up to 48 h. These results demonstrated the ability of OP to disrupt normal transcriptional regulation of cathepsins B and D in human breast cancer cells. However, the effects of OP on cell growth or overexpression of cathepsins by inhibiting ER-mediated signaling were abolished by an ER antagonist and siRNA specific for ERα. In conclusion, our findings suggest that OP at 10 −6 M, like E2, may accelerate breast cancer cell proliferation and the expression of cathepsins through an ER-mediated signaling pathway. In addition, the breast cancer cells exposed with OP to a xenograft mouse model were more aggressive according to our histological analysis and showed markedly increased expression of

  9. Histone modification enhances the effectiveness of IL-13 receptor targeted immunotoxin in murine models of human pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puri Raj K

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interleukin-13 Receptor α2 (IL-13Rα2 is a tumor-associated antigen and target for cancer therapy. Since IL-13Rα2 is heterogeneously overexpressed in a variety of human cancers, it would be highly desirable to uniformly upregulate IL-13Rα2 expression in tumors for optimal targeting. Methods We examined epigenetic regulation of IL-13Rα2 in a murine model of human pancreatic cancer by Bisulfite-PCR, sequencing for DNA methylation and chromatin immunoprecipitation for histone modification. Reverse transcription-PCR was performed for examining changes in IL-13Rα2 mRNA expression after treatment with histone deacetylase (HDAC and c-jun inhibitors. In vitro cytotoxicity assays and in vivo testing in animal tumor models were performed to determine whether HDAC inhibitors could enhance anti-tumor effects of IL-13-PE in pancreatic cancer. Mice harboring subcutaneous tumors were treated with HDAC inhibitors systemically and IL-13-PE intratumorally. Results We found that CpG sites in IL-13Rα2 promoter region were not methylated in all pancreatic cancer cell lines studied including IL-13Rα2-positive and IL-13Rα2-negative cell lines and normal cells. On the other hand, histones at IL-13Rα2 promoter region were highly-acetylated in IL-13Rα2-positive but much less in receptor-negative pancreatic cancer cell lines. When cells were treated with HDAC inhibitors, not only histone acetylation but also IL-13Rα2 expression was dramatically enhanced in receptor-negative pancreatic cancer cells. In contrast, HDAC inhibition did not increase IL-13Rα2 in normal cell lines. In addition, c-jun in IL-13Rα2-positive cells was expressed at higher level than in negative cells. Two types of c-jun inhibitors prevented increase of IL-13Rα2 by HDAC inhibitors. HDAC inhibitors dramatically sensitized cancer cells to immunotoxin in the cytotoxicity assay in vitro and increased IL-13Rα2 in the tumors subcutaneously implanted in the immunodeficient

  10. Antitumor Efficacy of the Dual PI3K/mTOR Inhibitor PF-04691502 in a Human Xenograft Tumor Model Derived from Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells Harboring a PIK3CA Mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas D Fang

    Full Text Available PIK3CA (phosphoinositide-3-kinase, catalytic, alpha polypeptide mutations can help predict the antitumor activity of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway inhibitors in both preclinical and clinical settings. In light of the recent discovery of tumor-initiating cancer stem cells (CSCs in various tumor types, we developed an in vitro CSC model from xenograft tumors established in mice from a colorectal cancer patient tumor in which the CD133+/EpCAM+ population represented tumor-initiating cells. CD133+/EpCAM+ CSCs were enriched under stem cell culture conditions and formed 3-dimensional tumor spheroids. Tumor spheroid cells exhibited CSC properties, including the capability for differentiation and self-renewal, higher tumorigenic potential and chemo-resistance. Genetic analysis using an OncoCarta™ panel revealed a PIK3CA (H1047R mutation in these cells. Using a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor, PF-04691502, we then showed that blockage of the PI3K/mTOR pathway inhibited the in vitro proliferation of CSCs and in vivo xenograft tumor growth with manageable toxicity. Tumor growth inhibition in mice was accompanied by a significant reduction of phosphorylated Akt (pAKT (S473, a well-established surrogate biomarker of PI3K/mTOR signaling pathway inhibition. Collectively, our data suggest that PF-04691502 exhibits potent anticancer activity in colorectal cancer by targeting both PIK3CA (H1047R mutant CSCs and their derivatives. These results may assist in the clinical development of PF-04691502 for the treatment of a subpopulation of colorectal cancer patients with poor outcomes.

  11. Radioimmunotherapy of small cell lung cancer xenograft mice with a 90Y anti-ROBO1 monoclonal antibody: Pathological study of effects on tumor and normal organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, K.; Koyama, K.; Kitada, T.; Takahashi, M.; Momose, T.; Suga, K.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. ROBO1 is a membrane protein that is concerned about axon guidance. It is reported that ROBO1 contributes to tumor metastasis and angio genesis. ROBO1 is specifically expressed at high levels in small cell lung cancer (SCLC). In this study, we performed radioimmunotherapy (RIT) to SCLC models, and analyzed pathological alteration of tumor and organs. Methods: For the biodistribution study, 111 In-DOTA anti-ROBO1 IgG (about 370 kBq, 111 In anti-ROBO1) was injected into NCI-H69 xenograft mice via tail vein. To evaluate antitumor effect, RIT study was performed. 90 Y-DOTA anti-ROBO1 IgG (about 7.4 MBq, 90 Y anti-ROBO1) was injected. The experiments measured tumor volume, mouse weights and blood cell counts periodically. The tumors and organs (liver, kidney, intestine, spleen, femoral and sternum) of mice were obtained, and histopathologic analysis were carried out. Results: as a result of biodistribution study, the specific accumulation in the tumor of 111 In anti-ROBO1 was observed. Liver, kidney, spleen and lung showed comparatively high accumulation of 111 In anti-ROBO1. In the RIT study, 90 Y anti-ROBO1 significantly reduced tumor volume compared with original volume and increased median survival time to 58 days (p<0.01, versus saline, 28 days), while 90 Y anti-ROBO1 induced transient pancytopenia. Histopathologic analysis of tumors and organs further validated the therapeutic efficacy and the systemic toxicity of 90 Y anti-ROBO1. In day 7 when tumor volume reduced to 60% compared with original volume, irreversible nuclear denaturation and fibrosis were observed. The percentage of TUNEL-positive cells increased to 11.4%±5.1 in the day 7 (p<0.01, versus control, 4.14%±1.4), which showed increase of DNA fragmentation and apoptosis in the tumor tissues. Normal organs excluding spleen and sternum showed no significant injury. In day 7 post injection, spleen showed transient reduction of hematopoietic cells. Hematopoietic cells in

  12. The Role of Tumor Protein 53 Mutations in Common Human Cancers and Targeting the Murine Double Minute 2–P53 Interaction for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayebeh Hamzehloie

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The gene TP53 (also known as protein 53 or tumor protein 53, encoding transcription factor P53, is mutated or deleted in half of human cancers, demonstrating the crucial role of P53 in tumor suppression. There are reports of nearly 250 independent germ line TP53 mutations in over 100 publications. The P53 protein has the structure of a transcription factor and, is made up of several domains. The main function of P53 is to organize cell defense against cancerous transformation. P53 is a potent transcription factor that is activated in response to diverse stresses, leading to the induction of cell cycle arrest, apoptosis or senescence. The P53 tumor suppressor is negatively regulated in cells by the murine double minute 2 (MDM2 protein. Murine double minute 2 favors its nuclear export, and stimulates its degradation. Inhibitors of the P53-MDM2 interaction might be attractive new anticancer agents that could be used to activate wild-type P53 in tumors. Down regulation of MDM2 using an small interfering RNA (siRNA approach has recently provided evidence for a new role of MDM2 in the P53 response, by modulating the inhibition of the cyclin dependent kinase 2 (cdk2 by P21/WAF1 (also known as cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1 or CDK-interacting protein 1.

  13. Neuroimmune mechanisms of behavioral alterations in a syngeneic murine model of human papilloma virus-related head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichaya, Elisabeth G; Vermeer, Daniel W; Christian, Diana L; Molkentine, Jessica M; Mason, Kathy A; Lee, John H; Dantzer, Robert

    2017-05-01

    Patients with cancer often experience a high symptom burden prior to the start of treatment. As disease- and treatment-related neurotoxicities appear to be additive, targeting disease-related symptoms may attenuate overall symptom burden for cancer patients and improve the tolerability of treatment. It has been hypothesized that disease-related symptoms are a consequence of tumor-induced inflammation. We tested this hypothesis using a syngeneic heterotopic murine model of human papilloma virus (HPV)-related head and neck cancer. This model has the advantage of being mildly aggressive and not causing cachexia or weight loss. We previously showed that this tumor leads to increased IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α expression in the liver and increased IL-1β expression in the brain. The current study confirmed these features and demonstrated that the tumor itself exhibits high inflammatory cytokine expression (e.g., IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α) compared to healthy tissue. While there is a clear relationship between cytokine levels and behavioral deficits in this model, the behavioral changes are surprisingly mild. Therefore, we sought to confirm the relationship between behavior and inflammation by amplifying the effect using a low dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0.1mg/kg). In tumor-bearing mice LPS induced deficits in nest building, tail suspension, and locomotor activity approximately 24h after LPS. However, these mice did not display an exacerbation of LPS-induced weight loss, anorexia, or anhedonia. Further, while heightened serum IL-6 was observed there was minimal priming of liver or brain cytokine expression. Next we sought to inhibit tumor-induced burrowing deficits by reducing inflammation using minocycline. Minocycline (∼50mg/kg/day in drinking water) was able to attenuate tumor-induced inflammation and burrowing deficits. These data provide evidence in favor of an inflammatory-like mechanism for the behavioral alterations associated with tumor growth in a syngeneic

  14. Murine Lung Cancer Increases CD4+ T Cell Apoptosis and Decreases Gut Proliferative Capacity in Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, John D; Mittal, Rohit; Fay, Katherine T; Chen, Ching-Wen; Liang, Zhe; Margoles, Lindsay M; Burd, Eileen M; Farris, Alton B; Ford, Mandy L; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2016-01-01

    Mortality is significantly higher in septic patients with cancer than in septic patients without a history of cancer. We have previously described a model of pancreatic cancer followed by sepsis from Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in which cancer septic mice have higher mortality than previously healthy septic mice, associated with increased gut epithelial apoptosis and decreased T cell apoptosis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether this represents a common host response by creating a new model in which both the type of cancer and the model of sepsis are altered. C57Bl/6 mice received an injection of 250,000 cells of the lung cancer line LLC-1 into their right thigh and were followed three weeks for development of palpable tumors. Mice with cancer and mice without cancer were then subjected to cecal ligation and puncture and sacrificed 24 hours after the onset of sepsis or followed 7 days for survival. Cancer septic mice had a higher mortality than previously healthy septic mice (60% vs. 18%, p = 0.003). Cancer septic mice had decreased number and frequency of splenic CD4+ lymphocytes secondary to increased apoptosis without changes in splenic CD8+ numbers. Intestinal proliferation was also decreased in cancer septic mice. Cancer septic mice had a higher bacterial burden in the peritoneal cavity, but this was not associated with alterations in local cytokine, neutrophil or dendritic cell responses. Cancer septic mice had biochemical evidence of worsened renal function, but there was no histologic evidence of renal injury. Animals with cancer have a significantly higher mortality than previously healthy animals following sepsis. The potential mechanisms associated with this elevated mortality differ significantly based upon the model of cancer and sepsis utilized. While lymphocyte apoptosis and intestinal integrity are both altered by the combination of cancer and sepsis, the patterns of these alterations vary greatly depending on the models used.

  15. Murine Lung Cancer Increases CD4+ T Cell Apoptosis and Decreases Gut Proliferative Capacity in Sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Lyons

    Full Text Available Mortality is significantly higher in septic patients with cancer than in septic patients without a history of cancer. We have previously described a model of pancreatic cancer followed by sepsis from Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in which cancer septic mice have higher mortality than previously healthy septic mice, associated with increased gut epithelial apoptosis and decreased T cell apoptosis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether this represents a common host response by creating a new model in which both the type of cancer and the model of sepsis are altered.C57Bl/6 mice received an injection of 250,000 cells of the lung cancer line LLC-1 into their right thigh and were followed three weeks for development of palpable tumors. Mice with cancer and mice without cancer were then subjected to cecal ligation and puncture and sacrificed 24 hours after the onset of sepsis or followed 7 days for survival.Cancer septic mice had a higher mortality than previously healthy septic mice (60% vs. 18%, p = 0.003. Cancer septic mice had decreased number and frequency of splenic CD4+ lymphocytes secondary to increased apoptosis without changes in splenic CD8+ numbers. Intestinal proliferation was also decreased in cancer septic mice. Cancer septic mice had a higher bacterial burden in the peritoneal cavity, but this was not associated with alterations in local cytokine, neutrophil or dendritic cell responses. Cancer septic mice had biochemical evidence of worsened renal function, but there was no histologic evidence of renal injury.Animals with cancer have a significantly higher mortality than previously healthy animals following sepsis. The potential mechanisms associated with this elevated mortality differ significantly based upon the model of cancer and sepsis utilized. While lymphocyte apoptosis and intestinal integrity are both altered by the combination of cancer and sepsis, the patterns of these alterations vary greatly depending on

  16. Therapeutic immunization strategies against cervical cancer : induction of cell-mediated immunity in murine models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bungener, Laura Barbara

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study described in this thesis is the development of a therapeutic immunization strategy against cervical cancer and pre-malignant precursor lesions of cervical cancer (CIN lesions). Cervical cancer is caused by high risk human papillomavirus (HPV). Two of the early proteins of high

  17. Comparison of [(11)C]Choline ([(11)C]CHO) and [(18)F]Bombesin (BAY 86-4367) as Imaging Probes for Prostate Cancer in a PC-3 Prostate Cancer Xenograft Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzenböck, Sarah Marie; Schmeja, Philipp; Kurth, Jens; Souvatzoglou, Michael; Nawroth, Roman; Treiber, Uwe; Kundt, Guenther; Berndt, Sandra; Graham, Keith; Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, Reingard; Schwaiger, Markus; Ziegler, Sibylle I; Dinkelborg, Ludger; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Krause, Bernd Joachim

    2016-06-01

    Carbon-11- and fluorine-18-labeled choline derivatives are commonly used in prostate cancer imaging in the clinical setting for staging and re-staging of prostate cancer. Due to a limited detection rate of established positron emission tomography (PET) tracers, there is a clinical need for innovative tumor-specific PET compounds addressing new imaging targets. The aim of this study was to compare the properties of [(18)F]Bombesin (BAY 86-4367) as an innovative biomarker for prostate cancer imaging targeting the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor and [(11)C]Choline ([(11)C]CHO) in a human prostate tumor mouse xenograft model by small animal PET/X-ray computed tomography (CT). We carried out a dual-tracer small animal PET/CT study comparing [(18)F]Bombesin and [(11)C]CHO. The androgen-independent human prostate tumor cell line PC-3 was implanted subcutaneously in the flanks of nu/nu NMRI mice (n = 10) (PET/CT measurements of two [(11)C]Choline mice could not be analyzed due to technical reasons). [(18)F]Bombesin and [(11)C]CHO PET/CT imaging was performed about 3-4 weeks after the implantation of PC-3 cells on two separate days. After the intravenous tail vein injection of 14 MBq [(18)F]Bombesin and 37 MBq [(11)C]CHO, respectively, a dynamic study over 60 min was acquired in list mode using an Inveon animal PET/CT scanner (Siemens Medical Solutions). The sequence of [(18)F]Bombesin and [(11)C]CHO was randomized. Image analysis was performed using summed images as well as dynamic data. To calculate static and dynamic tumor-to-muscle (T/M), tumor-to-blood (T/B), liver-to-blood (L/B), and kidney-to-blood (K/B) ratios, 4 × 4 × 4 mm(3) volumes of interest (VOIs) of tumor, muscle (thigh), liver, kidney, and blood derived from transversal slices were used. The mean T/M ratio of [(18)F]Bombesin and [(11)C]CHO was 6.54 ± 2.49 and 1.35 ± 0.30, respectively. The mean T/B ratio was 1.83 ± 0.79 for [(18)F]Bombesin and 0.55 ± 0.10 for [(11)C

  18. Therapeutic Silencing of Bcl-2 by Systemically Administered siRNA Nanotherapeutics Inhibits Tumor Growth by Autophagy and Apoptosis and Enhances the Efficacy of Chemotherapy in Orthotopic Xenograft Models of ER (− and ER (+ Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Tekedereli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bcl-2 is overexpressed in about a half of human cancers and 50–70% of breast cancer patients, thereby conferring resistance to conventional therapies and making it an excellent therapeutic target. Small interfering RNA (siRNA offers novel and powerful tools for specific gene silencing and molecularly targeted therapy. Here, we show that therapeutic silencing of Bcl-2 by systemically administered nanoliposomal (NL-Bcl-2 siRNA (0.15 mg siRNA/kg, intravenous twice a week leads to significant antitumor activity and suppression of growth in both estrogen receptor-negative (ER(− MDA-MB-231 and ER-positive (+ MCF7 breast tumors in orthotopic xenograft models (P < 0.05. A single intravenous injection of NL-Bcl-2-siRNA provided robust and persistent silencing of the target gene expression in xenograft tumors. NL-Bcl-2-siRNA treatment significantly increased the efficacy of chemotherapy when combined with doxorubicin in both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 animal models (P < 0.05. NL-Bcl-2-siRNA treatment-induced apoptosis and autophagic cell death, and inhibited cyclin D1, HIF1α and Src/Fak signaling in tumors. In conclusion, our data provide the first evidence that in vivo therapeutic targeting Bcl-2 by systemically administered nanoliposomal-siRNA significantly inhibits growth of both ER(− and ER(+ breast tumors and enhances the efficacy of chemotherapy, suggesting that therapeutic silencing of Bcl-2 by siRNA is a viable approach in breast cancers.

  19. Anticancer Efficacy of Cordyceps militaris Ethanol Extract in a Xenografted Leukemia Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Gwang Park

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cordyceps militaris is used widely as a traditional medicine in East Asia. Although a few studies have attempted to elucidate the anticancer activities of C. militaris, the precise mechanism of C. militaris therapeutic effects is not fully understood. We examined the anticancer activities of C. militaris ethanolic extract (Cm-EE and its cellular and molecular mechanisms. For this purpose, a xenograft mouse model bearing murine T cell lymphoma (RMA cell-derived cancers was established to investigate in vivo anticancer mechanisms. MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay, immunoblotting analysis, and flow cytometric assay were employed to check in vitro cytotoxicity, molecular targets, and proapoptotic action of Cm-EE. Interestingly, cancer sizes and mass were reduced in a C. militaris-administered group. Levels of the phosphorylated forms of p85 and AKT were clearly decreased in the group administered with Cm-EE. This result indicated that levels of phosphoglycogen synthase kinase 3β (p-GSK3β and cleaved caspase-3 were increased with orally administered Cm-EE. In addition, Cm-EE directly inhibited the viability of cultured RMA cells and C6 glioma cells. The number of proapoptotic cells was significantly increased in a Cm-EE treated group compared with a control group. Our results suggested that C. militaris might be able to inhibit cancer growth through regulation of p85/AKT-dependent or GSK3β-related caspase-3-dependent apoptosis.

  20. Early Treatment Response Monitoring Using 2-Deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose Positron Emission Tomography Imaging during Fractionated Radiotherapy of Head Neck Cancer Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiayi Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To determine the optimal timing and analytic method of 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography (PET imaging during fractionated radiotherapy (RT to predict tumor control. Methods. Ten head neck squamous cell carcinoma xenografts derived from the UT-14-SCC cell line were irradiated with 50 Gy at 2 Gy per day over 5 weeks. Dynamic PET scans were acquired over 70 minutes at baseline (week 0 and weekly for seven weeks. PET data were analyzed using standard uptake value (SUV, retention index (RI, sensitivity factor (SF, and kinetic index (Ki. Results. Four xenografts had local failure (LF and 6 had local control. Eighty scans from week 0 to week 7 were analyzed. RI and SF after 10 Gy appeared to be the optimal predictors for LF. In contrast, SUV and Ki during RT were not significant predictors for LF. Conclusion. RI and SF of PET obtained after the first week of fractionated RT were the optimal methods and timing to predict tumor control.

  1. NOSH-aspirin (NBS-1120), a novel nitric oxide- and hydrogen sulfide-releasing hybrid is a potent inhibitor of colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Olson, Kenneth R; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2012-03-16

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are prototypical anti-cancer agents. However, their long-term use is associated with adverse gastrointestinal effects. Recognition that endogenous gaseous mediators, nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) can increase mucosal defense mechanisms has led to the development of NO- and H(2)S-releasing NSAIDs with increased safety profiles. Here we report on a new hybrid, NOSH-aspirin, which is an NO- and H(2)S-releasing agent. NOSH-aspirin inhibited HT-29 colon cancer growth with IC(50)s of 45.5 ± 2.5, 19.7 ± 3.3, and 7.7 ± 2.2 nM at 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively. This is the first NSAID based agent with such high degree of potency. NOSH-aspirin inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, and caused G(0)/G(1) cell cycle block. Reconstitution and structure-activity studies representing a fairly close approximation to the intact molecule showed that NOSH-aspirin was 9000-fold more potent than the sum of its parts towards growth inhibition. NOSH-aspirin inhibited ovine COX-1 more than ovine COX-2. NOSH-ASA treatment of mice bearing a human colon cancer xenograft caused a reduction in volume of 85%. Taken together, these results demonstrate that NOSH-aspirin has strong anti-cancer potential and merits further evaluation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Hypoxia-induced alteration of tracer accumulation in cultured cancer cells and xenografts in mice: implications for pre-therapeutic prediction of treatment outcomes with 99mTc-sestamibi, 201Tl chloride and 99mTc-HL91

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinuya, Seigo; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Li, Xiao-Feng; Bai, Jingming; Michigishi, Takatoshi; Tonami, Norihisa; Watanabe, Naoto; Shuke, Noriyuki; Takayama, Teruhiko; Bunko, Hisashi

    2002-01-01

    Weak visualization of tumours in pre-therapeutic scintigrams with technetium-99m sestamibi (MIBI) is likely a predictive sign of unfavourable tumour response to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. However, factors relating to this scintigraphic finding are not well understood. The presence of hypoxic tumour cells is one of the major reasons for therapeutic failure; consequently, we attempted to determine whether oxygenation status affects 99m Tc-MIBI accumulation in tumour cells. LS180 human colon cancer and T24 human bladder cancer cells were incubated in air or N 2 gas at 37 C. Cellular uptake of 99m Tc-MIBI was subsequently determined at 15, 60 and 120 min. Uptake of thallium-201 chloride was also assessed. Uptake of 99m Tc-HL91 was assessed as a hypoxic marker. Accumulation of the tracers in LS180 xenografts was observed in mice treated with 5 mg/kg hydralazine and compared with that in untreated mice. pO 2 in the medium and tumours was measured with O 2 microelectrodes. N 2 gas flow gradually reduced pO 2 in the cell suspension to 1-2 mmHg in 60 min. Cellular uptake of 99m Tc-MIBI in LS180 cells decreased by approximately 30% in N 2 gas in comparison to that in air throughout the study. Hypoxia had a more prominent influence on 201 Tl uptake, which displayed a reduction of approximately 60% in N 2 gas at 120 min, than on 99m Tc-MIBI uptake. On the other hand, N 2 gas induced an increase of 170% in 99m Tc-HL91 uptake at 120 min, indicating the hypoxic condition of cells. The results of in vitro assays employing the T24 cell line were similar to those obtained with the LS180 cell line. Hydralazine treatment markedly reduced 99m Tc-MIBI and 201 Tl accumulation in LS180 xenografts; moreover, intratumoural pO 2 decreased from 14.5±6.6 mmHg to 7.6±6.2 mmHg. 99m Tc-HL91 accumulation in xenografts was markedly increased by hydralazine. In conclusion, hypoxia reduced accumulation of 99m Tc-MIBI and 201 Tl in tumour cells. Accordingly, hypoxia may be an important factor in

  3. Monitoring the Effects of Anti-angiogenesis on the Radiation Sensitivity of Pancreatic Cancer Xenografts Using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Ning; Cao, Minsong; Chin-Sinex, Helen; Mendonca, Marc; Ko, Song-Chu; Stantz, Keith M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To image the intratumor vascular physiological status of pancreatic tumors xenografts and their response to anti-angiogenic therapy using dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT), and to identify parameters of vascular physiology associated with tumor x-ray sensitivity after anti-angiogenic therapy. Methods and Materials: Nude mice bearing human BxPC-3 pancreatic tumor xenografts were treated with 5 Gy of radiation therapy (RT), either a low dose (40 mg/kg) or a high dose (150 mg/kg) of DC101, the anti-VEGF receptor-2 anti-angiogenesis antibody, or with combination of low or high dose DC101 and 5 Gy RT (DC101-plus-RT). DCE-CT scans were longitudinally acquired over a 3-week period post-DC101 treatment. Parametric maps of tumor perfusion and fractional plasma volume (F p ) were calculated and their averaged values and histogram distributions evaluated and compared to controls, from which a more homogeneous physiological window was observed 1-week post-DC101. Mice receiving a combination of DC101-plus-RT(5 Gy) were imaged baseline before receiving DC101 and 1 week after DC101 (before RT). Changes in perfusion and F p were compared with alternation in tumor growth delay for RT and DC101-plus-RT (5 Gy)-treated tumors. Results: Pretreatment with low or high doses of DC101 before RT significantly delayed tumor growth by an average 7.9 days compared to RT alone (P ≤ .01). The increase in tumor growth delay for the DC101-plus-RT-treated tumors was strongly associated with changes in tumor perfusion (ΔP>−15%) compared to RT treated tumors alone (P=.01). In addition, further analysis revealed a trend linking the tumor's increased growth delay to its tumor volume-to-DC101 dose ratio. Conclusions: DCE-CT is capable of monitoring changes in intratumor physiological parameter of tumor perfusion in response to anti-angiogenic therapy of a pancreatic human tumor xenograft that was associated with enhanced radiation response

  4. NOSH-aspirin (NBS-1120), a novel nitric oxide- and hydrogen sulfide-releasing hybrid is a potent inhibitor of colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder [Department of Physiology, Pharmacology, and Neuroscience, Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education, City University of New York Medical School, New York, NY 10031 (United States); Olson, Kenneth R. [Department of Physiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, South Bend, IN 46617 (United States); Kashfi, Khosrow, E-mail: kashfi@med.cuny.edu [Department of Physiology, Pharmacology, and Neuroscience, Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education, City University of New York Medical School, New York, NY 10031 (United States)

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NOSH-aspirin is the first dual acting NO and H{sub 2}S releasing hybrid. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Its IC{sub 50} for cell growth inhibition is in the low nano-molar range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure-activity studies show that the sum of the parts does not equal the whole. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NOSH-aspirin reduced tumor growth by 85% in mice bearing a colon cancer xenograft. -- Abstract: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are prototypical anti-cancer agents. However, their long-term use is associated with adverse gastrointestinal effects. Recognition that endogenous gaseous mediators, nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) can increase mucosal defense mechanisms has led to the development of NO- and H{sub 2}S-releasing NSAIDs with increased safety profiles. Here we report on a new hybrid, NOSH-aspirin, which is an NO- and H{sub 2}S-releasing agent. NOSH-aspirin inhibited HT-29 colon cancer growth with IC{sub 50}s of 45.5 {+-} 2.5, 19.7 {+-} 3.3, and 7.7 {+-} 2.2 nM at 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively. This is the first NSAID based agent with such high degree of potency. NOSH-aspirin inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, and caused G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle block. Reconstitution and structure-activity studies representing a fairly close approximation to the intact molecule showed that NOSH-aspirin was 9000-fold more potent than the sum of its parts towards growth inhibition. NOSH-aspirin inhibited ovine COX-1 more than ovine COX-2. NOSH-ASA treatment of mice bearing a human colon cancer xenograft caused a reduction in volume of 85%. Taken together, these results demonstrate that NOSH-aspirin has strong anti-cancer potential and merits further evaluation.

  5. Putative cancer stem cells may be the key target to inhibit cancer cell repopulation between the intervals of chemoradiation in murine mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Licun; Blum, Walter; Zhu, Chang-Qi; Yun, Zhihong; Pecze, Laszlo; Kohno, Mikihiro; Chan, Mei-Lin; Zhao, Yidan; Felley-Bosco, Emanuela; Schwaller, Beat; de Perrot, Marc

    2018-04-27

    Cancer cell repopulation during chemotherapy or radiotherapy is a major factor limiting the efficacy of treatment. Cancer stem cells (CSC) may play critical roles during this process. We aim to demonstrate the role of mesothelioma stem cells (MSC) in treatment failure and eventually to design specific target therapies against MSC to improve the efficacy of treatment in malignant mesothelioma. Murine mesothelioma AB12 and RN5 cells were used to compare tumorigenicity in mice. The expression of CSC-associated genes was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR in both cell lines treated with chemo-radiation. Stemness properties of MSC-enriched RN5-EOS-Puro2 cells were characterized with flow cytometry and immunostaining. A MSC-specific gene profile was screened by microarray assay and confirmed thereafter. Gene Ontology analysis of the selected genes was performed by GOMiner. Tumor growth delay of murine mesothelioma AB12 cells was achieved after each cycle of cisplatin treatment, however, tumors grew back rapidly due to cancer cell repopulation between courses of chemotherapy. Strikingly, a 10-times lower number of irradiated cells in both cell lines led to a similar tumor incidence and growth rate as with untreated cells. The expression of CSC-associated genes such as CD24, CD133, CD90 and uPAR was dramatically up-regulated, while others did not change significantly after chemoradiation. Highly enriched MSC after selection with puromycin displayed an increasing GFP-positive population and showed typical properties of stemness. Comparatively, the proportion of MSC significantly increased after RN5-EOS parental cells were treated with either chemotherapy, γ-ray radiation, or a combination of the two, while MSC showed more resistance to the above treatments. A group of identified genes are most likely MSC-specific, and major pathways related to regulation of cell growth or apoptosis are involved. Upregulation of the gene transcripts Tnfsf18, Serpinb9b, Ly6a

  6. Cancer causes increased mortality and is associated with altered apoptosis in murine sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Amy C; Robertson, Charles M; Belt, Brian; Clark, Andrew T; Chang, Katherine C; Leathersich, Ann M; Dominguez, Jessica A; Perrone, Erin E; Dunne, W Michael; Hotchkiss, Richard S; Buchman, Timothy G; Linehan, David C; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2010-03-01

    Whereas most septic patients have an underlying comorbidity, most animal models of sepsis use mice that were healthy before the onset of infection. Malignancy is the most common comorbidity associated with sepsis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether mice with cancer have a different response to sepsis than healthy animals. Prospective, randomized controlled study. Animal laboratory in a university medical center. C57Bl/6 mice. Animals received a subcutaneous injection of either 250,000 cells of the transplantable pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line Pan02 (cancer) or phosphate-buffered saline (healthy). Three weeks later, mice given Pan02 cells had reproducible, nonmetastatic tumors. Both groups of mice then underwent intratracheal injection of either Pseudomonas aeruginosa (septic) or 0.9% NaCl (sham). Animals were killed 24 hrs postoperatively or followed-up 7 days for survival. Mice with cancer and healthy mice appeared similar when subjected to sham operation, although cancer animals had lower levels of T- and B-lymphocyte apoptosis. Septic mice with cancer had increased mortality compared to previously healthy septic mice subjected to the identical injury (52% vs. 28%; p = .04). This was associated with increased bacteremia but no difference in local pulmonary infection. Septic mice with cancer also had increased intestinal epithelial apoptosis. Although sepsis induced an increase in T- and B-lymphocyte apoptosis in all animals, septic mice with cancer had decreased T- and B-lymphocyte apoptosis compared to previously healthy septic mice. Serum and pulmonary cytokines, lung histology, complete blood counts, and intestinal proliferation were similar between septic mice with cancer and previously healthy septic mice. When subjected to the same septic insult, mice with cancer have increased mortality compared to previously healthy animals. Decreased systemic bacterial clearance and alterations in intestinal epithelial and lymphocyte apoptosis may

  7. EGFR gene overexpression retained in an invasive xenograft model by solid orthotopic transplantation of human glioblastoma multiforme into nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Diao; Hua, Tian Xin; Lin, Huang Yan

    2011-03-01

    Orthotopic xenograft animal model from human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell lines often do not recapitulate an extremely important aspect of invasive growth and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene overexpression of human GBM. We developed an orthotopic xenograft model by solid transplantation of human GBM into the brain of nude mouse. The orthotopic xenografts sharing the same histopathological features with their original human GBMs were highly invasive and retained the overexpression of EGFR gene. The murine orthotopic GBM models constitute a valuable in vivo system for preclinical studies to test novel therapies for human GBM.

  8. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells display anti-cancer activity in SCID mice bearing disseminated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Secchiero

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although multimodality treatment can induce high rate of remission in many subtypes of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL, significant proportions of patients relapse with incurable disease. The effect of human bone marrow (BM mesenchymal stem cells (MSC on tumor cell growth is controversial, and no specific information is available on the effect of BM-MSC on NHL. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The effect of BM-MSC was analyzed in two in vivo models of disseminated non-Hodgkin's lymphomas with an indolent (EBV(- Burkitt-type BJAB, median survival = 46 days and an aggressive (EBV(+ B lymphoblastoid SKW6.4, median survival = 27 days behavior in nude-SCID mice. Intra-peritoneal (i.p. injection of MSC (4 days after i.p. injection of lymphoma cells significantly increased the overall survival at an optimal MSC:lymphoma ratio of 1:10 in both xenograft models (BJAB+MSC, median survival = 58.5 days; SKW6.4+MSC, median survival = 40 days. Upon MSC injection, i.p. tumor masses developed more slowly and, at the histopathological observation, exhibited a massive stromal infiltration coupled to extensive intra-tumor necrosis. In in vitro experiments, we found that: i MSC/lymphoma co-cultures modestly affected lymphoma cell survival and were characterized by increased release of pro-angiogenic cytokines with respect to the MSC, or lymphoma, cultures; ii MSC induce the migration of endothelial cells in transwell assays, but promoted endothelial cell apoptosis in direct MSC/endothelial cell co-cultures. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data demonstrate that BM-MSC exhibit anti-lymphoma activity in two distinct xenograft SCID mouse models of disseminated NHL.

  9. Negligible colon cancer risk from food-borne acrylamide exposure in male F344 rats and nude (nu/nu mice-bearing human colon tumor xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayadev Raju

    Full Text Available Acrylamide, a possible human carcinogen, is formed in certain carbohydrate-rich foods processed at high temperature. We evaluated if dietary acrylamide, at doses (0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg diet reflecting upper levels found in human foods, modulated colon tumorigenesis in two rodent models. Male F344 rats were randomized to receive diets without (control or with acrylamide. 2-weeks later, rats in each group received two weekly subcutaneous injections of either azoxymethane (AOM or saline, and were killed 20 weeks post-injections; colons were assessed for tumors. Male athymic nude (nu/nu mice bearing HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma cells-derived tumor xenografts received diets without (control or with acrylamide; tumor growth was monitored and mice were killed 4 weeks later. In the F344 rat study, no tumors were found in the colons of the saline-injected rats. However, the colon tumor incidence was 54.2% and 66.7% in the control and the 2 mg/kg acrylamide-treated AOM-injected groups, respectively. While tumor multiplicity was similar across all diet groups, tumor size and burden were higher in the 2 mg/kg acrylamide group compared to the AOM control. These results suggest that acrylamide by itself is not a "complete carcinogen", but acts as a "co-carcinogen" by exacerbating the effects of AOM. The nude mouse study indicated no differences in the growth of human colon tumor xenografts between acrylamide-treated and control mice, suggesting that acrylamide does not aid in the progression of established tumors. Hence, food-borne acrylamide at levels comparable to those found in human foods is neither an independent carcinogen nor a tumor promoter in the colon. However, our results characterize a potential hazard of acrylamide as a colon co-carcinogen in association with known and possibly other environmental tumor initiators/promoters.

  10. Evaluation of the antioxidant impact of ginger-based kombucha on the murine breast cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salafzoon, Samaneh; Mahmoodzadeh Hosseini, Hamideh; Halabian, Raheleh

    2017-10-21

    Background Abnormal metabolism is a common event in cancerous cells. For example, the increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, particularly due to aerobic respiration during invasive stage, results in cancer progression. Herein, the impact of kombucha tea prepared from ginger on the alteration of antioxidant agents was assessed in the breast cancer animal model. Methods Two types of kombucha tea with or without ginger were administered to BALB/c mice before and after tumor challenge. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were evaluated in tumor, liver and kidney. Results Administration of kombucha ginger tea significantly decreased catalase activity as well as GSH and MDA level in tumor homogenate (pkombucha ginger tea (pkombucha prepared from ginger could exert minor antioxidant impacts by balancing multi antioxidant factors in different tissues in the breast cancer models.

  11. The Antimetastatic and Antiangiogenesis Effects of Kefir Water on Murine Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamberi, Nur Rizi; Abu, Nadiah; Mohamed, Nurul Elyani; Nordin, Noraini; Keong, Yeap Swee; Beh, Boon Kee; Zakaria, Zuki Abu Bakar; Nik Abdul Rahman, Nik Mohd Afizan; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu

    2016-12-01

    Kefir is a unique cultured product that contains beneficial probiotics. Kefir culture from other parts of the world exhibits numerous beneficial qualities such as anti-inflammatory, immunomodulation, and anticancer effects. Nevertheless, kefir cultures from different parts of the world exert different effects because of variation in culture conditions and media. Breast cancer is the leading cancer in women, and metastasis is the major cause of death associated with breast cancer. The antimetastatic and antiangiogenic effects of kefir water made from kefir grains cultured in Malaysia were studied in 4T1 breast cancer cells. 4T1 cancer cells were treated with kefir water in vitro to assess its antimigration and anti-invasion effects. BALB/c mice were injected with 4T1 cancer cells and treated orally with kefir water for 28 days. Kefir water was cytotoxic toward 4T1 cells at IC 50 (half-maximal inhibitory concentration) of 12.5 and 8.33 mg/mL for 48 and 72 hours, respectively. A significant reduction in tumor size and weight (0.9132 ± 0.219 g) and a substantial increase in helper T cells (5-fold) and cytotoxic T cells (7-fold) were observed in the kefir water-treated group. Proinflammatory and proangiogenic markers were significantly reduced in the kefir water-treated group. Kefir water inhibited tumor proliferation in vitro and in vivo mainly through cancer cell apoptosis, immunomodulation by stimulating T helper cells and cytotoxic T cells, and anti-inflammatory, antimetastatic, and antiangiogenesis effects. This study brought out the potential of the probiotic beverage kefir water in cancer treatment. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Peptides Derived from Type IV Collagen, CXC Chemokines, and Thrombospondin-1 Domain-Containing Proteins Inhibit Neovascularization and Suppress Tumor Growth in MDA-MB-231 Breast Cancer Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob E. Koskimaki

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis or neovascularization, the process of new blood vessel formation from preexisting microvasculature, involves interactions among several cell types including parenchymal, endothelial cells, and immune cells. The formation of new vessels is tightly regulated by a balance between endogenous proangiogenic and antiangiogenic factors to maintain homeostasis in tissue; tumor progression and metastasis in breast cancer have been shown to be angiogenesis-dependent. We previously introduced a systematic methodology to identify putative endogenous antiangiogenic peptides and validated these predictions in vitro in human umbilical vein endothelial cell proliferation and migration assays. These peptides are derived from several protein families including type IV collagen, CXC chemokines, and thrombospondin-1 domain-containing proteins. On the basis of the results from the in vitro screening, we have evaluated the ability of one peptide selected from each family named pentastatin-1, chemokinostatin-1, and properdistatin, respectively, to suppress angiogenesis in an MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer orthotopic xenograft model in severe combined immunodeficient mice. Peptides were administered intraperitoneally once per day. We have demonstrated significant suppression of tumor growth in vivo and subsequent reductions in microvascular density, indicating the potential of these peptides as therapeutic agents for breast cancer.

  13. Targeting human prostate cancer with 111In-labeled D2B IgG, F(ab')2 and Fab fragments in nude mice with PSMA-expressing xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lütje, Susanne; van Rij, Catharina M; Franssen, Gerben M; Fracasso, Giulio; Helfrich, Wijnand; Eek, Annemarie; Oyen, Wim J; Colombatti, Marco; Boerman, Otto C

    2015-01-01

    D2B is a new monoclonal antibody directed against an extracellular domain of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), which is overexpressed in prostate cancer. The potential of D2B IgG, and F(ab')2 and Fab fragments of this antibody for targeting prostate cancer was determined in mice bearing subcutaneous prostate cancer xenografts. The optimal time point for imaging was determined in biodistribution and microSPECT imaging studies with (111)In-D2B IgG, (111)In-capromab pendetide, (111)In-D2B F(ab')2 and (111)In-D2B Fab fragments in mice with PSMA-expressing LNCaP and PSMA-negative PC3 tumors at several time points after injection. All (111)In-labeled antibody formats specifically accumulated in the LNCaP tumors, with highest uptake of (111)In-D2B IgG and (111)In-capromab pendetide at 168 h p.i. (94.8 ± 19.2% injected dose per gram (ID/g) and 16.7 ± 2.2% ID/g, respectively), whereas uptake of (111)In-D2B F(ab')2 and (111)In-D2B Fab fragments peaked at 24 h p.i. (12.1 ± 3.0% ID/g and 15.1 ± 2.9% ID/g, respectively). Maximum LNCaP tumor-to-blood ratios were 13.0 ± 2.3 (168 h p.i.), 6.2 ± 0.7 (24 h p.i.), 23.0 ± 4.0 (24 h p.i.) and 4.5 ± 0.6 (168 h p.i.) for (111)In-D2B IgG, (111)In-F(ab')2, (111)In-Fab and (111)In-capromab pendetide, respectively. LNCaP tumors were clearly visualized with microSPECT with all antibody formats. This study demonstrates the feasibility of D2B IgG, F(ab')2 and Fab fragments for targeting PSMA-expressing prostate cancer xenografts. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Effect of fenhexamid and cyprodinil on the expression of cell cycle- and metastasis-related genes via an estrogen receptor-dependent pathway in cellular and xenografted ovarian cancer models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Go, Ryeo-Eun; Kim, Cho-Won; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Fenhexamid and cyprodinil are antifungal agents (pesticides) used for agriculture, and are present at measurable amounts in fruits and vegetables. In the current study, the effects of fenhexamid and cyprodinil on cancer cell proliferation and metastasis were examined. Additionally, the protein expression levels of cyclin D1 and cyclin E as well as cathepsin D were analyzed in BG-1 ovarian cancer cells that express estrogen receptors (ERs). The cells were cultured with 0.1% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO; control), 17β-estradiol (E2; 10 −9 M), and fenhexamid or cyprodinil (10 –5 –10 −7 M). Results of a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay showed that fenhexamid and cyprodinil increased BG-1 cell proliferation about 1.5 to 2 times similar to E2 (5 times) compared to the control. When the cells were co-treated with ICI 182,780 (10 −8 M), an ER antagonist, the proliferation of pesticide-treated BG-1 cells was decreased to the level of the control. A wound healing assay revealed that the pesticides reduced the disrupted area in the BG-1 cell monolayer similar to E2. Protein levels of cyclin D1 and E as well as cathepsin D were increased by fenhexamid and cyprodinil. This effect was reversed by co-treatment with ICI 182,780. In a xenograft mouse model with transplanted BG-1 cells, cyprodinil significantly increased tumor mass formation about 2 times as did E2 (6 times) compared to the vehicle (0.1% DMSO) over an 80-day period. In contrast, fenhexamid did not promote ovarian tumor formation in this mouse model. Cyprodinil also induced cell proliferation along with the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and cathepsin D in tumor tissues similar to E2. Taken together, these results imply that fenhexamid and cyprodinil may have disruptive effects on ER-expressing cancer by altering the cell cycle- and metastasis-related gene expression via an ER-dependent pathway. - Highlights: • Fenhexamid and

  15. The AKT inhibitor AZD5363 is selectively active in PI3KCA mutant gastric cancer, and sensitizes a patient-derived gastric cancer xenograft model with PTEN loss to Taxotere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Davies, Barry R; Han, Sufang; Zhou, Minhua; Bai, Yu; Zhang, Jingchuan; Xu, Yan; Tang, Lily; Wang, Huiying; Liu, Yuan Jie; Yin, Xiaolu; Ji, Qunsheng; Yu, De-Hua

    2013-10-02

    Activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway is a common phenomenon in cancer due to multiple mechanisms, including mutation of PI3KCA, loss or mutation of PTEN, or over-expression of receptor tyrosine kinases. We recently developed a novel AKT kinase inhibitor, AZD5363, and demonstrated that HGC27, a cell line harboring both PI3KCA mutation and PTEN loss, displayed the greatest sensitivity to this AKT inhibitor in vitro and in vivo. To further elucidate the correlation between AZD5363 response and genetic alterations in gastric cancer (GC) and identify GC patients with both PI3KCA mutations and PTEN loss, we investigated the effects of pharmacological inhibition of AKT on a panel of 20 GC cell lines and genetic aberrations in tumor samples from a cohort of Chinese GC patients. We demonstrated that GC cells with PI3KCA mutations were selectively sensitive to AZD5363. Disease linkage studies showed that PI3KCA activating mutations or PTEN loss were found in 2.7% (4/150) and 23% (14/61) of Chinese GC patients respectively. To further dissect the role of PI3KCA mutation and PTEN loss in response to AKT inhibition, we tested the antitumor activity of AZD5363 in two patient-derived GC xenograft (PDGCX) models harboring either PI3KCA mutation or PTEN loss. Our data indicated that AZD5363 monotherapy treatment led to a moderate response in the PI3KCA mutant PDGCX model. Whilst monotherapy AZD5363 or Taxotere were ineffective in the PTEN negative PDGCX model, significant anti-tumor activity was observed when AZD5363 was combined with Taxotere. Our results indicated that PI3KCA mutation is an important determinant of response to AKT inhibition in GC and combination with AZD5363 can overcome innate resistance to Taxotere in a PTEN loss PDGCX model. It is suggested that AKT inhibitor is an attractive option for treatment of a new segment of GC patients with aberrant PI3K/AKT signaling.

  16. Establishment and characterization of a novel murine model of pancreatic cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, Katherine A; Zhu, Xinxia; Burfeind, Kevin G; Krasnow, Stephanie M; Levasseur, Peter R; Morgan, Terry K; Marks, Daniel L

    2017-10-01

    Cachexia is a complex metabolic and behavioural syndrome lacking effective therapies. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most important conditions associated with cachexia, with >80% of PDAC patients suffering from the condition. To establish the cardinal features of a murine model of PDAC-associated cachexia, we characterized the effects of implanting a pancreatic tumour cell line from a syngeneic C57BL/6 KRAS G12D P53 R172H Pdx-Cre +/+ (KPC) mouse. Male and female C57BL/6 mice were inoculated subcutaneously, intraperitoneally, or orthotopically with KPC tumour cells. We performed rigorous phenotypic, metabolic, and behavioural analysis of animals over the course of tumour development. All routes of administration produced rapidly growing tumours histologically consistent with moderate to poorly differentiated PDAC. The phenotype of this model was dependent on route of administration, with orthotopic and intraperitoneal implantation inducing more severe cachexia than subcutaneous implantation. KPC tumour growth decreased food intake, decreased adiposity and lean body mass, and decreased locomotor activity. Muscle catabolism was observed in both skeletal and cardiac muscles, but the dominant catabolic pathway differed between these tissues. The wasting syndrome in this model was accompanied by hypothalamic inflammation, progressively decreasing brown and white adipose tissue uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1) expression, and increased peripheral inflammation. Haematological and endocrine abnormalities included neutrophil-dominant leukocytosis and anaemia, and decreased serum testosterone. Syngeneic KPC allografts are a robust model for studying cachexia, which recapitulate key features of the PDAC disease process and induce a wide array of cachexia manifestations. This model is therefore ideally suited for future studies exploring the physiological systems involved in cachexia and for preclinical studies of novel therapies. © 2017 The Authors. Journal

  17. Theranostic pretargeted radioimmunotherapy of colorectal cancer xenografts in mice using picomolar affinity {sup 86}Y- or {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-Bn binding scFv C825/GPA33 IgG bispecific immunoconjugates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheal, Sarah M.; Lee, Sang-gyu; Punzalan, Blesida; Larson, Steven M. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry Program, New York, NY (United States); Xu, Hong; Guo, Hong-fen [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Pediatrics, New York, NY (United States); Chalasani, Sandhya; Carrasquillo, Jorge A. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Fung, Edward K. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry Program, New York, NY (United States); Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States); Jungbluth, Achim [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Pathology, New York, NY (United States); Zanzonico, Pat B.; O' Donoghue, Joseph [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States); Smith-Jones, Peter M. [Stony Brook University, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Stony Brook University, Department of Radiology, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Wittrup, K.D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, Cambridge, MA (United States); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Biological Engineering, Cambridge, MA (United States); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Cambridge, MA (United States); Cheung, Nai-Kong V. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry Program, New York, NY (United States); Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Pediatrics, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-05-15

    GPA33 is a colorectal cancer (CRC) antigen with unique retention properties after huA33-mediated tumor targeting. We tested a pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) approach for CRC using a tetravalent bispecific antibody with dual specificity for GPA33 tumor antigen and DOTA-Bn-(radiolanthanide metal) complex. PRIT was optimized in vivo by titrating sequential intravenous doses of huA33-C825, the dextran-based clearing agent, and the C825 haptens {sup 177}Lu-or {sup 86}Y-DOTA-Bn in mice bearing the SW1222 subcutaneous (s.c.) CRC xenograft model. Using optimized PRIT, therapeutic indices (TIs) for tumor radiation-absorbed dose of 73 (tumor/blood) and 12 (tumor/kidney) were achieved. Estimated absorbed doses (cGy/MBq) to tumor, blood, liver, spleen, and kidney for single-cycle PRIT were 65.8, 0.9 (TI 73), 6.3 (TI 10), 6.6 (TI 10), and 5.3 (TI 12), respectively. Two cycles of PRIT (66.6 or 111 MBq {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-Bn) were safe and effective, with a complete response of established s.c. tumors (100 - 700 mm{sup 3}) in nine of nine mice, with two mice alive without recurrence at >140 days. Tumor log kill in this model was estimated to be 2.1 - 3.0 based on time to 500-mm{sup 3} tumor recurrence. In addition, PRIT dosimetry/diagnosis was performed by PET imaging of the positron-emitting DOTA hapten {sup 86}Y-DOTA-Bn. We have developed anti-GPA33 PRIT as a triple-step theranostic strategy for preclinical detection, dosimetry, and safe targeted radiotherapy of established human colorectal mouse xenografts. (orig.)

  18. Theranostic pretargeted radioimmunotherapy of colorectal cancer xenografts in mice using picomolar affinity 86Y- or 177Lu-DOTA-Bn binding scFv C825/GPA33 IgG bispecific immunoconjugates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheal, Sarah M.; Lee, Sang-gyu; Punzalan, Blesida; Larson, Steven M.; Xu, Hong; Guo, Hong-fen; Chalasani, Sandhya; Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Fung, Edward K.; Jungbluth, Achim; Zanzonico, Pat B.; O'Donoghue, Joseph; Smith-Jones, Peter M.; Wittrup, K.D.; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2016-01-01

    GPA33 is a colorectal cancer (CRC) antigen with unique retention properties after huA33-mediated tumor targeting. We tested a pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) approach for CRC using a tetravalent bispecific antibody with dual specificity for GPA33 tumor antigen and DOTA-Bn-(radiolanthanide metal) complex. PRIT was optimized in vivo by titrating sequential intravenous doses of huA33-C825, the dextran-based clearing agent, and the C825 haptens 177 Lu-or 86 Y-DOTA-Bn in mice bearing the SW1222 subcutaneous (s.c.) CRC xenograft model. Using optimized PRIT, therapeutic indices (TIs) for tumor radiation-absorbed dose of 73 (tumor/blood) and 12 (tumor/kidney) were achieved. Estimated absorbed doses (cGy/MBq) to tumor, blood, liver, spleen, and kidney for single-cycle PRIT were 65.8, 0.9 (TI 73), 6.3 (TI 10), 6.6 (TI 10), and 5.3 (TI 12), respectively. Two cycles of PRIT (66.6 or 111 MBq 177 Lu-DOTA-Bn) were safe and effective, with a complete response of established s.c. tumors (100 - 700 mm 3 ) in nine of nine mice, with two mice alive without recurrence at >140 days. Tumor log kill in this model was estimated to be 2.1 - 3.0 based on time to 500-mm 3 tumor recurrence. In addition, PRIT dosimetry/diagnosis was performed by PET imaging of the positron-emitting DOTA hapten 86 Y-DOTA-Bn. We have developed anti-GPA33 PRIT as a triple-step theranostic strategy for preclinical detection, dosimetry, and safe targeted radiotherapy of established human colorectal mouse xenografts. (orig.)

  19. Theranostic pretargeted radioimmunotherapy of colorectal cancer xenografts in mice using picomolar affinity Y-86- or Lu-177-DOTA-Bn binding scFv C825/GPA33 IgG bispecific immunoconjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheal, Sarah M.; Xu, Hong; Guo, Hong-fen; Lee, Sang-gyu; Punzalan, Blesida; Chalasani, Sandhya; Fung, Edward K.; Jungbluth, Achim; Zanzonico, Pat B.; Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; O’Donoghue, Joseph; Smith-Jones, Peter M.; Wittrup, K. Dane; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.; Larson, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose GPA33 is a colorectal cancer (CRC) antigen with unique retention properties after huA33-mediated tumor targeting. We tested a pre-targeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) approach for CRC using a tetravalent bispecific antibody with dual specificity for GPA33 tumor antigen and DOTA-Bn (radiolanthanide metal) complex. Methods PRIT was optimized in vivo by titrating sequential intravenous doses of huA33-C825, the dextran-based clearing agent (CA), and the C825-haptens 177Lu-or 86Y-DOTA-Bn in mice bearing the SW1222 subcutaneous (s.c.) CRC xenograft model. Results Using optimized PRIT, therapeutic indices (TIs) for tumor radiation absorbed dose of 73 (tumor/blood) and 12 (tumor/kidney) were achieved. Estimated absorbed doses (cGy/MBq) to tumor, blood, liver, spleen, and kidney for single-cycle PRIT were 65.8, 0.9 (TI: 73), 6.3 (TI: 10), 6.6 (TI: 10), and 5.3 (TI: 12), respectively. Two cycles of PRIT treatment (66.6 or 111 MBq 177Lu-DOTA-Bn) were safe and effective, with 9/9 complete responses of established s.c. tumors (100–700 mm3) and 2/9 alive without recurrence >140 d. Tumor log kill in this model was estimated to be 2.1–3.0 based time to 500-mm3 tumor recurrence. In addition, PRIT dosimetry/diagnosis was performed by PET imaging of the positron-emitting DOTA-hapten 86Y-DOTA-Bn. Conclusions We have developed anti-GPA33 PRIT, as a triple-step theranostic strategy for pre-clinical detection, dosimetry and safe targeted radiotherapy of established human colorectal mouse xenografts. PMID:26596724

  20. Anti-tumor effects of ONC201 in combination with VEGF-inhibitors significantly impacts colorectal cancer growth and survival in vivo through complementary non-overlapping mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Jessica; Kline, C Leah; Zhou, Lanlan; Khazak, Vladimir; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2018-01-22

    Small molecule ONC201 is an investigational anti-tumor agent that upregulates intra-tumoral TRAIL expression and the integrated stress response pathway. A Phase I clinical trial using ONC201 therapy in advanced cancer patients has been completed and the drug has progressed into Phase II trials in several cancer types. Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains one of the leading causes of cancer worldwide and metastatic disease has a poor prognosis. Clinical trials in CRC and other tumor types have demonstrated that therapeutics targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway, such as bevacizumab, are effective in combination with certain chemotherapeutic agents. We investigated the potential combination of VEGF inhibitors such as bevacizumab and its murine-counterpart; along with other anti-angiogenic agents and ONC201 in both CRC xenograft and patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models. We utilized non-invasive imaging and immunohistochemistry to determine potential mechanisms of action. Our results demonstrate significant tumor regression or complete tumor ablation in human xenografts with the combination of ONC201 with bevacizumab, and in syngeneic MC38 colorectal cancer xenografts using a murine VEGF-A inhibitor. Imaging demonstrated the impact of this combination on decreasing tumor growth and tumor metastasis. Our results indicate that ONC201 and anti-angiogenic agents act through distinct mechanisms while increasing tumor cell death and inhibiting proliferation. With the use of both a murine VEGF inhibitor in syngeneic models, and bevacizumab in human cell line-derived xenografts, we demonstrate that ONC201 in combination with anti-angiogenic therapies such as bevacizumab represents a promising approach for further testing in the clinic for the treatment of CRC.

  1. Innate immunity based cancer immunotherapy: B16-F10 murine melanoma model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Caisová, V.; Vieru, A.; Kumžáková, Z.; Glaserová, S.; Husniková, H.; Vácová, N.; Krejčová, G.; Paďouková, L.; Jochmanová, I.; Wolf, K. I.; Chmelař, J.; Kopecký, Jan; Ženka, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 1 (2016), č. článku 940. ISSN 1471-2407 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : cancer immunotherapy * innate immunity * melanoma * neutrophils * resiquimod * mannan * phagocytosis Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.288, year: 2016

  2. Benzophenone-1 stimulated the growth of BG-1 ovarian cancer cells by cell cycle regulation via an estrogen receptor alpha-mediated signaling pathway in cellular and xenograft mouse models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Min-Ah; Hwang, Kyung-A; Lee, Hye-Rim; Yi, Bo-Rim; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► BP-1 induced cell growth was reversed by an ER antagonist in BG-1 cells. ► BP-1 up-regulated the mRNA expression of cyclin D1. ► Up-regulation of cyclin D1 by BP-1 was reversed by an ER antagonist. ► BP-1 is a potential endocrine disruptor that exerts estrogenic effects. - Abstract: 2,4-Dihydroxybenzophenone (benzophenone-1; BP-1) is an UV stabilizer primarily used to prevent polymer degradation and deterioration in quality due to UV irradiation. Recently, BP-1 has been reported to bioaccumulate in human bodies by absorption through the skin and has the potential to induce health problems including endocrine disruption. In the present study, we examined the xenoestrogenic effect of BP-1 on BG-1 human ovarian cancer cells expressing estrogen receptors (ERs) and relevant xenografted animal models in comparison with 17-β estradiol (E2). In in vitro cell viability assay, BP-1 (10 −8 –10 −5 M) significantly increased BG-1 cell growth the way E2 did. The mechanism underlying the BG-1 cell proliferation was proved to be related with the up-regulation of cyclin D1, a cell cycle progressor, by E2 or BP-1. Both BP-1 and E2 induced cell growth and up-regulation of cyclin D1 were reversed by co-treatment with ICI 182,780, an ER antagonist, suggesting that BP-1 may mediate the cancer cell proliferation via an ER-dependent pathway like E2. On the other hand, the expression of p21, a regulator of cell cycle progression at G 1 phase, was not altered by BP-1 though it was down-regulated by E2. In xenograft mouse models transplanted with BG-1 cells, BP-1 or E2 treatment significantly increased the tumor mass formation compared to a vehicle (corn oil) within 8 weeks. In histopathological analysis, the tumor sections of E2 or BP-1 group displayed extensive cell formations with high density and disordered arrangement, which were supported by the increased number of BrdUrd positive nuclei and the over-expression of cyclin D1 protein. Taken together, these

  3. Murine Double Minute 2 SNP T309G Polymorphism and Urinary Tract Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hui; Dai, Yu; Ning, Zhongyun; Fan, Ning; Wang, Zhiping; Li, Pei; Zhang, Liyuan; Tao, Yan; Wang, Hanzhang

    2016-03-01

    Urinary tract cancer is a common cause of cancer-related death. The etiology and pathogenesis of urinary tract cancer remain unclear, with genetic and epigenetic factors playing an important role. Studies of the polymorphism of murine double minute 2 (MDM2) have shown inconclusive trends in the risk of urinary tract cancer.To clarify this inconsistency, we conducted updated meta-analyses to evaluate the role of MDM2 T309G polymorphism in urinary tract cancer susceptibility.Data sources were Pubmed (1966-May 2015), Chinese biomedicine literature database (1978-May 2015), and hand searching of the reference lists of included studies:(1) research categories case-control study or a nested case-control study; (2) information evaluating the association between the MDM2 SNP309 and urinary tract cancer risk; (3) studies with sufficient data to perform a meta-analysis.It included the use of odds ratios (ORs) to assess the strength of the association, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) give a sense of the precision of the estimate. We used I for the assessment of between-study heterogeneity, and publication bias was assessed using the funnel plot and the Egger test. Statistical analyses were performed by Review Manage, version 5.0 and Stata 11.0.A total of 18 studies met the eligibility criteria and were included in our analyses. Overall, there was no statistical association between MDM2 SNP309 and prostate cancer risk for the allele contrast, the GG genotype, the recessive genetic model, the dominant genetic model, and prostate cancer risk in all subjects (OR = 0.96, 95% CI 0.87-1.05, P = 0.36; OR = 0.93, 95% CI 0.75-1.15, P = 0.50; OR = 1.00, 95% CI 0.87-1.15, P = 0.99; OR = 0.93, 95% CI 0.80-1.07, P = 0.30), and between MDM2 SNP309 and bladder cancer risk (the allele contrast: OR = 1.06, 95% CI 0.89-1.27, P = 0.50; the GG genotype: OR = 1.12, 95% CI 0.79-1.61, P = 0.52; the dominant genetic model: OR = 1.03, 95% CI 0

  4. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling of an antagonist (SM-406/AT-406) of multiple inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) in a mouse xenograft model of human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Li, Yanyan; Zou, Peng; Yu, Jing-yu; McEachern, Donna; Wang, Shaomeng; Sun, Duxin

    2013-09-01

    The inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) are a class of key apoptosis regulators overexpressed or dysregulated in cancer. SM-406/AT-406 is a potent and selective small molecule mimetic of Smac that antagonizes the inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs). A physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK-PD) model was developed to predict the tissue concentration-time profiles of SM-406, the related onco-protein levels in tumor, and the tumor growth inhibition in a mouse model bearing human breast cancer xenograft. In the whole body physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for pharmacokinetics characterization, a well stirred (perfusion rate-limited) model was used to describe SM-406 pharmacokinetics in the lung, heart, kidney, intestine, liver and spleen, and a diffusion rate-limited (permeability limited) model was used for tumor. Pharmacodynamic (PD) models were developed to correlate the SM-406 concentration in tumor to the cIAP1 degradation, pro-caspase 8 decrease, CL-PARP accumulation and tumor growth inhibition. The PBPK-PD model well described the experimental pharmacokinetic data, the pharmacodynamic biomarker responses and tumor growth. This model may be helpful to predict tumor and plasma SM-406 concentrations in the clinic. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Inhibition of signaling between human CXCR4 and zebrafish ligands by the small molecule IT1t impairs the formation of triple-negative breast cancer early metastases in a zebrafish xenograft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Tulotta

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC is a highly aggressive and recurrent type of breast carcinoma that is associated with poor patient prognosis. Because of the limited efficacy of current treatments, new therapeutic strategies need to be developed. The CXCR4-CXCL12 chemokine signaling axis guides cell migration in physiological and pathological processes, including breast cancer metastasis. Although targeted therapies to inhibit the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis are under clinical experimentation, still no effective therapeutic approaches have been established to block CXCR4 in TNBC. To unravel the role of the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis in the formation of TNBC early metastases, we used the zebrafish xenograft model. Importantly, we demonstrate that cross-communication between the zebrafish and human ligands and receptors takes place and human tumor cells expressing CXCR4 initiate early metastatic events by sensing zebrafish cognate ligands at the metastatic site. Taking advantage of the conserved intercommunication between human tumor cells and the zebrafish host, we blocked TNBC early metastatic events by chemical and genetic inhibition of CXCR4 signaling. We used IT1t, a potent CXCR4 antagonist, and show for the first time its promising anti-tumor effects. In conclusion, we confirm the validity of the zebrafish as a xenotransplantation model and propose a pharmacological approach to target CXCR4 in TNBC.

  6. Silibinin inhibits accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and tumor growth of murine breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forghani, Parvin; Khorramizadeh, Mohammad R; Waller, Edmund K

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC)s increase in blood and accumulate in the tumor microenvironment of tumor-bearing animals, contributing to immune suppression in cancer. Silibinin, a natural flavonoid from the seeds of milk thistle, has been developed as an anti-inflammatory agent and supportive care agent to reduce the toxicity of cancer chemotherapy. The goals of this study were to evaluate the effect of silibinin on MDSCs in tumor-bearing mice and antitumor activity of silibinin in a mouse model of breast cancer. 4T1 luciferase-transfected mammary carcinoma cells were injected into in the mammary fat pad female BALB/c mice, and female CB17-Prkdc Scid/J mice. Silibinin treatment started on day 4 or day 14 after tumor inoculation continued every other day. Tumor growth was monitored by bioluminescent imaging (BLI) measuring total photon flux. Flow cytometry measured total leukocytes, CD11b + Gr-1 + MDSC, and T cells in the blood and tumors of tumor-bearing mice. The effects of silibinin on 4T1 cell viability in vitro were measured by BLI. Treatment with silibinin increased overall survival in mice harboring tumors derived from the 4T1-luciferase breast cancer cell line, and reduced tumor volumes and numbers of CD11b + Gr-1 + MDSCs in the blood and tumor, and increased the content of T cells in the tumor microenvironment. Silibinin failed to inhibit tumor growth in immunocompromised severe combined immunodeficiency mice, supporting the hypothesis that anticancer effect of silibinin is immune-mediated. The antitumor activity of silibinin requires an intact host immune system and is associated with decreased accumulation of blood and tumor-associated MDSCs

  7. Vitamin D enhances the efficacy of photodynamic therapy in a murine model of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollakanti, Kishore R; Anand, Sanjay; Maytin, Edward V

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous metastasis occurs more frequently in breast cancer than in any other malignancy in women, causing significant morbidity. Photodynamic therapy (PDT), which combines a porphyrin-based photosensitizer and activation by light, can be employed for breast cancer (especially cutaneous metastases) but tumor control after PDT has not surpassed traditional treatments methods such as surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy up to now. Here, we report that breast cancer nodules in mice can be effectively treated by preconditioning the tumors with 1α, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 (calcitriol; Vit D) prior to administering 5-aminolevulinate (ALA)-based PDT. Breast carcinoma tumors (MDA-MB-231 cells implanted subcutaneously in nude mice) received systemic Vit D (1 μg/kg) for 3 days prior to receiving ALA. The addition of Vit D increased intratumoral accumulation of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) by 3.3 ± 0.5-fold, relative to mice receiving ALA alone. Bioluminescence imaging in vivo and immunohistochemical staining confirmed that tumor-specific cell death after ALA-PDT was markedly enhanced (36.8 ± 7.4-fold increase in TUNEL-positive nuclei; radiance decreased to 14% of control) in Vit D pretreated tumors as compared to vehicle-pretreated tumors. Vit D stimulated proliferation (10.7 ± 2.8-fold) and differentiation (9.62 ± 1.7-fold) in tumor cells, underlying an augmented cellular sensitivity to ALA-PDT. The observed enhancement of tumor responses to ALA-PDT after low, nontoxic doses of Vit D supports a new combination approach that deserves consideration in the clinical setting, and offers potential for improved remission of cutaneous breast cancer metastases

  8. Hyperinsulinemia Promotes Esophageal Cancer Development in a Surgically-Induced Duodeno-Esophageal Reflux Murine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diletta Arcidiacono

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Hyperinsulinemia could have a role in the growing incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC and its pre-cancerous lesion, Barrett’s Esophagus, a possible consequence of Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease. Obesity is known to mediate esophageal carcinogenesis through different mechanisms including insulin-resistance leading to hyperinsulinemia, which may mediate cancer progression via the insulin/insulin-like growth factor axis. We used the hyperinsulinemic non-obese FVB/N (Friend leukemia virus B strain MKR (muscle (M-IGF1R-lysine (K-arginine (R mouse model to evaluate the exclusive role of hyperinsulinemia in the pathogenesis of EAC related to duodeno-esophageal reflux. FVB/N wild-type (WT and MKR mice underwent jejunum-esophageal anastomosis side—to end with the exclusion of the stomach. Thirty weeks after surgery, the esophagus was processed for histological, immunological and insulin/Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1 signal transduction analyses. Most of the WT mice (63.1% developed dysplasia, whereas most of the MKR mice (74.3% developed squamous cell and adenosquamous carcinomas, both expressing Human Epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2. Hyperinsulinemia significantly increased esophageal cancer incidence in the presence of duodenal-reflux. Insulin receptor (IR and IGF1 receptor (IGF1R were overexpressed in the hyperinsulinemic condition. IGF1R, through ERK1/2 mitogenic pattern activation, seems to be involved in cancer onset. Hyperinsulinemia-induced IGF1R and HER2 up-regulation could also increase the possibility of forming of IGF1R/HER2 heterodimers to support cell growth/proliferation/progression in esophageal carcinogenesis.

  9. The Role of XMRV, a Novel Xenotropic Murine Retrovirus, in Human Prostate Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    ultimately determine the true prevalence of these viruses in humans and then to determine whether there is a link to any pathology. BODY...characterization of the novel XMRV virus , documenting its tissue tropism and interferon-sensitivity. We also documented the prevalence of the virus in human ...correlation of XMRV with prostate cancer prognosis. The recog- nition that human papilloma viruses most often initiate cervical carcinomas has focused

  10. Hyperinsulinemia Promotes Esophageal Cancer Development in a Surgically-Induced Duodeno-Esophageal Reflux Murine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcidiacono, Diletta; Dedja, Arben; Giacometti, Cinzia; Fassan, Matteo; Nucci, Daniele; Francia, Simona; Fabris, Federico; Zaramella, Alice; Gallagher, Emily J; Cassaro, Mauro; Rugge, Massimo; LeRoith, Derek; Alberti, Alfredo; Realdon, Stefano

    2018-04-14

    Hyperinsulinemia could have a role in the growing incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) and its pre-cancerous lesion, Barrett's Esophagus, a possible consequence of Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease. Obesity is known to mediate esophageal carcinogenesis through different mechanisms including insulin-resistance leading to hyperinsulinemia, which may mediate cancer progression via the insulin/insulin-like growth factor axis. We used the hyperinsulinemic non-obese FVB/N (Friend leukemia virus B strain) MKR (muscle (M)-IGF1R-lysine (K)-arginine (R) mouse model to evaluate the exclusive role of hyperinsulinemia in the pathogenesis of EAC related to duodeno-esophageal reflux. FVB/N wild-type (WT) and MKR mice underwent jejunum-esophageal anastomosis side-to end with the exclusion of the stomach. Thirty weeks after surgery, the esophagus was processed for histological, immunological and insulin/Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) signal transduction analyses. Most of the WT mice (63.1%) developed dysplasia, whereas most of the MKR mice (74.3%) developed squamous cell and adenosquamous carcinomas, both expressing Human Epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). Hyperinsulinemia significantly increased esophageal cancer incidence in the presence of duodenal-reflux. Insulin receptor (IR) and IGF1 receptor (IGF1R) were overexpressed in the hyperinsulinemic condition. IGF1R, through ERK1/2 mitogenic pattern activation, seems to be involved in cancer onset. Hyperinsulinemia-induced IGF1R and HER2 up-regulation could also increase the possibility of forming of IGF1R/HER2 heterodimers to support cell growth/proliferation/progression in esophageal carcinogenesis.

  11. Beneficial immune modulatory effects of a specific nutritional combination in a murine model for cancer cachexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, J; Vos, P; Kegler, D; van Norren, K; Argilés, J M; Laviano, A; Garssen, J; van Helvoort, A

    2008-01-01

    The majority of patients with advanced cancer are recognised by impaired immune competence influenced by several factors, including the type and stage of the tumour and the presence of cachexia. Recently, a specific nutritional combination containing fish oil, specific oligosaccharide mixture, high protein content and leucine has been developed aimed to support the immune system of cancer patients in order to reduce the frequency and severity of (infectious) complications. In a recently modified animal model cachexia is induced by inoculation of C26 tumour cells in mice. In a pre-cachectic state, no effect was observed on contact hypersensitivity, a validated in vivo method to measure Th1-mediated immune function, after adding the individual nutritional ingredients to the diet of tumour-bearing mice. However, the complete mixture resulted in significantly improved Th1 immunity. Moreover, in a cachectic state, the complete mixture reduced plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and beneficially affected ex vivo immune function. Accordingly, the combination of the nutritional ingredients is required to obtain a synergistic effect, leading to a reduced inflammatory state and improved immune competence. From this, it can be concluded that the specific nutritional combination has potential as immune-supporting nutritional intervention to reduce the risk of (infectious) complications in cancer patients. PMID:19018259

  12. Efficient inhibition of murine breast cancer growth and metastasis by gene transferred mouse survivin Thr34→Ala mutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen li-Juan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metastasis in breast cancer is a vital concern in treatment because most women with primary breast cancer have micrometastases to distant sites at diagnosis. As a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP family, survivin has been proposed as an attractive target for new anticancer interventions. In this study, we investigated the role of the plasmid encoding the phosphorylation-defective mouse survivin threonine 34→alanine mutant (Msurvivin T34A plasmid in suppressing both murine primary breast carcinomas and pulmonary metastases. Methods In vitro study, induction of apoptosis by Msurvivin T34A plasmid complexed with cationic liposome (DOTAP/Chol was examined by PI staining fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometric analysis. The anti-tumor and anti-metastases activity of Msurvivin T34A plasmid complexed with cationic liposome (DOTAP/Chol was evaluated in female BALB/c mice bearing 4T1 s.c. tumors. Mice were treated twice weekly with i.v. administration of Msurvivin T34A plasmid complexed with cationic liposome (DOTAP/Chol, PORF-9 null plasmid complexed with cationic liposome (DOTAP/Chol, 0.9% NaCl solution for 4 weeks. Tumor volume was observed. After sacrificed, tumor net weight was measured and Lung metastatic nodules of each group were counted. Assessment of apoptotic cells by TUNEL assay was conducted in tumor tissue. Microvessel density within tumor tissue was determined by CD31 immunohistochemistry. Alginate-encapsulated tumor cells test was conducted to evaluate the effect on angiogenesis. By experiment of cytotoxicity T lymphocytes, we test whether Msurvivin T34A plasmid complexed with cationic liposome (DOTAP/Chol can induce specific cell immune response. Results Administration of Msurvivin T34A plasmid complexed with cationic liposome (DOTAP/Chol resulted in significant inhibition in the growth and metastases of 4T1 tumor model. These anti-tumor and anti-metastases responses were associated with

  13. [68Ga]pentixafor for CXCR4 imaging in a PC-3 prostate cancer xenograft model - comparison with [18F]FDG PET/CT, MRI and ex vivo receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzenböck, Sarah M; Stenzel, Jan; Otto, Thomas; Helldorff, Heike V; Bergner, Carina; Kurth, Jens; Polei, Stefan; Lindner, Tobias; Rauer, Romina; Hohn, Alexander; Hakenberg, Oliver W; Wester, Hans J; Vollmar, Brigitte; Krause, Bernd J

    2017-11-10

    The aim was to characterize the properties of [ 68 Ga]Pentixafor as tracer for prostate cancer imaging in a PC-3 prostate cancer xenograft mouse model and to investigate its correlation with [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ex vivo analyses. Static [ 68 Ga]Pentixafor and [ 18 F]FDG PET as well as morphological/ diffusion weighted MRI and 1 H MR spectroscopy was performed. Imaging data were correlated with ex vivo biodistribution and CXCR4 expression in PC-3 tumors (immunohistochemistry (IHC), mRNA analysis). Flow cytometry was performed for evaluation of localization of CXCR4 receptors ( in vitro PC-3 cell experiments). Tumor uptake of [ 68 Ga]Pentixafor was significantly lower compared to [ 18 F]FDG. Ex vivo CXCR4 mRNA expression of tumors was shown by PCR. Only faint tumor CXCR4 expression was shown by IHC (immuno reactive score of 3). Accordingly, flow cytometry of PC-3 cells revealed only a faint signal, cell membrane permeabilisation showed a slight signal increase. There was no significant correlation of [ 68 Ga]Pentixafor tumor uptake and ex vivo receptor expression. Spectroscopy showed typical spectra of prostate cancer. PC-3 tumor uptake of [ 68 Ga]Pentixafor was existent but lower compared to [ 18 F]FDG. No significant correlation of ex vivo tumor CXCR4 receptor expression and [ 68 Ga]Pentixafor tumor uptake was shown. CXCR4 receptor expression on the surface of PC-3 cells was existent but rather low possibly explaining the limited [ 68 Ga]Pentixafor tumor uptake; receptor localization in the interior of PC-3 cells is presumable as shown by cell membrane permeabilisation. Further studies are necessary to define the role of [ 68 Ga]Pentixafor in prostate cancer imaging.

  14. Comparative evaluation of synthetic anti-HER2 Affibody molecules site-specifically labelled with {sup 111}In using N-terminal DOTA, NOTA and NODAGA chelators in mice bearing prostate cancer xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malmberg, Jennie; Varasteh, Zohreh; Orlova, Anna [Uppsala University, Preclinical PET Platform, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Uppsala (Sweden); Perols, Anna; Braun, Alexis; Eriksson Karlstroem, Amelie [AlbaNova University Centre, Division of Molecular Biotechnology, School of Biotechnology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Altai, Mohamed; Tolmachev, Vladimir [Uppsala University, Unit of Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden); Sandstroem, Mattias [Uppsala University Hospital, Section of Medical Physics, Department of Oncology, Uppsala (Sweden); Garske, Ulrike [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Nuclear Medicine, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2012-03-15

    In disseminated prostate cancer, expression of human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) is one of the pathways to androgen independence. Radionuclide molecular imaging of HER2 expression in disseminated prostate cancer might identify patients for HER2-targeted therapy. Affibody molecules are small (7 kDa) targeting proteins with high potential as tracers for radionuclide imaging. The goal of this study was to develop an optimal Affibody-based tracer for visualization of HER2 expression in prostate cancer. A synthetic variant of the anti-HER2 Z{sub HER2:342} Affibody molecule, Z{sub HER2:S1}, was N-terminally conjugated with the chelators DOTA, NOTA and NODAGA. The conjugated proteins were biophysically characterized by electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS), circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensor analysis. After labelling with {sup 111}In, the biodistribution was assessed in normal mice and the two most promising conjugates were further evaluated for tumour targeting in mice bearing DU-145 prostate cancer xenografts. The HER2-binding equilibrium dissociation constants were 130, 140 and 90 pM for DOTA-Z{sub HER2:S1}, NOTA-Z{sub HER2:S1} and NODAGA-Z{sub HER2:S1}, respectively. A comparative study of {sup 111}In-labelled DOTA-Z{sub HER2:S1}, NOTA-Z{sub HER2:S1} and NODAGA-Z{sub HER2:S1} in normal mice demonstrated a substantial influence of the chelators on the biodistribution properties of the conjugates. {sup 111}In-NODAGA-Z{sub HER2:S1} had the most rapid clearance from blood and healthy tissues. {sup 111}In-NOTA-Z{sub HER2:S1} showed high hepatic uptake and was excluded from further evaluation. {sup 111}In-DOTA-Z{sub HER2:S1} and {sup 111}In-NODAGA-Z{sub HER2:S1} demonstrated specific uptake in DU-145 prostate cancer xenografts in nude mice. The tumour uptake of {sup 111}In-NODAGA-Z{sub HER2:S1}, 5.6 {+-} 0.4%ID/g, was significantly lower than the uptake of {sup 111}In-DOTA-Z{sub HER2:S1

  15. A Simple Diet- and Chemical-Induced Murine NASH Model with Rapid Progression of Steatohepatitis, Fibrosis and Liver Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchida, Takuma; Lee, Youngmin A; Fujiwara, Naoto; Ybanez, Maria; Allen, Brittany; Martins, Sebastiao; Fiel, M Isabel; Goossens, Nicolas; Chou, Hsin-I; Hoshida, Yujin; Friedman, Scott L

    2018-03-20

    Although the majority of patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) have only steatosis without progression, a sizable fraction develop non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which can lead to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Many established diet-induced mouse models for NASH require 24-52 weeks, which makes testing for drug response costly and time consuming. We have sought to establish a murine NASH model with rapid progression of extensive fibrosis and HCC by using a western diet (WD), which is high-fat, high-fructose and high-cholesterol, combined with low dose weekly intraperitoneal carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ), which served as an accelerator. C57BL/6J mice were fed a normal chow diet (ND) ± CCl 4 or WD ± CCl 4 for 12 and 24 weeks. Addition of CCl 4 exacerbated histological features of NASH, fibrosis, and tumor development induced by WD, which resulted in stage 3 fibrosis at 12 weeks and HCC development at 24 weeks. Furthermore, whole liver transcriptomic analysis indicated that dysregulated molecular pathways in WD/CCl 4 mice and immunologic features were closely similar to those of human NASH. Our mouse NASH model exhibits rapid progression of advanced fibrosis and HCC, and mimics histological, immunological and transcriptomic features of human NASH, suggesting that it will be a useful experimental tool for preclinical drug testing. A carefully characterized model has been developed in mice that recapitulates the progressive stages of human fatty liver disease, from simple steatosis, to inflammation, fibrosis and cancer. The functional pathways of gene expression and immune abnormalities in this model closely resemble human disease. The ease and reproducibility of this model makes it ideal to study disease pathogenesis and test new treatments. Copyright © 2018 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Near-Infrared Optical Imaging of Ovarian Cancer Xenografts with Novel α3-Integrin Binding Peptide “OA02”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olulanu H. Aina

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Through screening of random one-bead one-compound (OBOC libraries, we previously identified cyclic peptides with the cDGXGXXc motif that bind to α3 integrin subunit on ovarian adenocarcinoma cell lines ES-2, SKOV-3, and CaOV-3. We subsequently synthesized two secondary libraries based on this motif and identified new peptides that bound with a higher affinity to these cell lines. One of the peptides identified from the 20% “down-substituted” focused library was the cdG-HCit-GPQc (“OA02” peptide. The goal of this study was to determine whether this peptide labeled with near-infrared probes could be detected after intravenous injection in ovarian tumor-bearing mice and if it would selectively localize in the tumor. Three different forms of this peptide were synthesized, “OA02”-biotin (noncovalently linked to streptavidin-Cy5.5; “OA02”-Cy5.5 and “OA02”-AlexaFluo 680. Using a KODAK IS2000MM image station, these peptide probes were used at the near-infrared (NIR spectra to image nude mice bearing ES-2 (α3 integrin positive and Raji (α3 integrin negative xenografts. The peptide probe displayed highly specific tumor uptake within 15 min, which lasted for 70 min for “OA02”-Cy5.5 and “OA02”-AlexaFluo 680 and for 24 hours for “OA02”-biotin-streptavidin-Cy5.5. Some kidney and bladder signal were noted. Prior injection with anti-α3 monoclonal antibody blocked the binding of this peptide to the ES-2 tumors.

  17. Oxygen and Perfusion Kinetics in Response to Fractionated Radiation Therapy in FaDu Head and Neck Cancer Xenografts Are Related to Treatment Outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Fangyao [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Vishwanath, Karthik [Department of Physics, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio (United States); Salama, Joseph K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Division of Radiation Oncology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Erkanli, Alaattin; Peterson, Bercedis [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Oleson, James R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Division of Radiation Oncology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Lee, Walter T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Division of Head and Neck Surgery and Communicative Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Section of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Brizel, David M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Division of Head and Neck Surgery and Communicative Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Ramanujam, Nimmi [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Dewhirst, Mark W., E-mail: mark.dewhirst@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: To test whether oxygenation kinetics correlate with the likelihood for local tumor control after fractionated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We used diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to noninvasively measure tumor vascular oxygenation and total hemoglobin concentration associated with radiation therapy of 5 daily fractions (7.5, 9, or 13.5 Gy/d) in FaDu xenografts. Spectroscopy measurements were obtained immediately before each daily radiation fraction and during the week after radiation therapy. Oxygen saturation and total hemoglobin concentration were computed using an inverse Monte Carlo model. Results: First, oxygenation kinetics during and after radiation therapy, but before tumor volumes changed, were associated with local tumor control. Locally controlled tumors exhibited significantly faster increases in oxygenation after radiation therapy (days 12-15) compared with tumors that recurred locally. Second, within the group of tumors that recurred, faster increases in oxygenation during radiation therapy (day 3-5 interval) were correlated with earlier recurrence times. An area of 0.74 under the receiver operating characteristic curve was achieved when classifying the local control tumors from all irradiated tumors using the oxygen kinetics with a logistic regression model. Third, the rate of increase in oxygenation was radiation dose dependent. Radiation doses ≤9.5 Gy/d did not initiate an increase in oxygenation, whereas 13.5 Gy/d triggered significant increases in oxygenation during and after radiation therapy. Conclusions: Additional confirmation is required in other tumor models, but these results suggest that monitoring tumor oxygenation kinetics could aid in the prediction of local tumor control after radiation therapy.

  18. Formulation, Characterization, and Antitumor Properties of Trans- and Cis-Citral in the 4T1 Breast Cancer Xenograft Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, San; Kapur, Arvinder; Patankar, Manish S; Xiong, May P

    2015-08-01

    Citral is composed of a random mixture of two geometric stereoisomers geranial (trans-citral) and neral (cis-citral) yet few studies have directly compared their in vivo antitumor properties. A micelle formulation was therefore developed. Geranial and neral were synthesized. Commercially-purchased citral, geranial, and neral were formulated in PEG-b-PCL (block sizes of 5000:10,000, Mw/Mn 1.26) micelles. In vitro degradation, drug release, cytotoxicity, flow cytometry, and western blot studies were conducted. The antitumor properties of drug formulations (40 and 80 mg/kg based on MTD studies) were evaluated on the 4T1 xenograft mouse model and tumor tissues were analyzed by western blot. Micelles encapsulated drugs with >50% LE at 5-40% drug to polymer (w/w), displayed sustained release (t1/2 of 8-9 h), and improved drug stability at pH 5.0. The IC50 of drug formulations against 4T1 cells ranged from 1.4 to 9.9 μM. Western blot revealed that autophagy was the main cause of cytotoxicity. Geranial at 80 mg/kg was most effective at inhibiting tumor growth. Geranial is significantly more potent than neral and citral at 80 mg/kg (p < 0.001) and western blot of tumor tissues confirms that autophagy and not apoptosis is the major mechanism of tumor growth inhibition in p53-null 4T1 cells.

  19. Oxygen and Perfusion Kinetics in Response to Fractionated Radiation Therapy in FaDu Head and Neck Cancer Xenografts Are Related to Treatment Outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Fangyao; Vishwanath, Karthik; Salama, Joseph K.; Erkanli, Alaattin; Peterson, Bercedis; Oleson, James R.; Lee, Walter T.; Brizel, David M.; Ramanujam, Nimmi; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To test whether oxygenation kinetics correlate with the likelihood for local tumor control after fractionated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We used diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to noninvasively measure tumor vascular oxygenation and total hemoglobin concentration associated with radiation therapy of 5 daily fractions (7.5, 9, or 13.5 Gy/d) in FaDu xenografts. Spectroscopy measurements were obtained immediately before each daily radiation fraction and during the week after radiation therapy. Oxygen saturation and total hemoglobin concentration were computed using an inverse Monte Carlo model. Results: First, oxygenation kinetics during and after radiation therapy, but before tumor volumes changed, were associated with local tumor control. Locally controlled tumors exhibited significantly faster increases in oxygenation after radiation therapy (days 12-15) compared with tumors that recurred locally. Second, within the group of tumors that recurred, faster increases in oxygenation during radiation therapy (day 3-5 interval) were correlated with earlier recurrence times. An area of 0.74 under the receiver operating characteristic curve was achieved when classifying the local control tumors from all irradiated tumors using the oxygen kinetics with a logistic regression model. Third, the rate of increase in oxygenation was radiation dose dependent. Radiation doses ≤9.5 Gy/d did not initiate an increase in oxygenation, whereas 13.5 Gy/d triggered significant increases in oxygenation during and after radiation therapy. Conclusions: Additional confirmation is required in other tumor models, but these results suggest that monitoring tumor oxygenation kinetics could aid in the prediction of local tumor control after radiation therapy.

  20. Adenovirus-mediated IL-12 gene therapy in combination with radiotherapy for murine liver cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Daoyan; Dai Bingbing; Wang Zhonghe; Chen Shishu

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the synergistic antitumor effects of adenovirus-mediated IL-12 gene therapy in combination with radiotherapy in mice bearing liver cancer. Methods: Balb/c mice bearing liver cancer received the treatment at day 1 with tumor local irradiation (TLI) of 20 Gy or mask irradiation when tumor size reached 0.6-1.0 cm. Within 1 hour after irradiation, adenovirus containing IL-12 gene or PBS was intra-tumor injected once a week. Forty-eight hours after the second injection, IFN-γ levels in sera and the supernatant of cultured spleen cells were assayed by ELISA, CTL activity of spleen cells was measured by 3 H-TdR release assay, and phenotypes of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes were analysed by immunohistochemical staining. Results: The growth of tumors in animals treated with a combination of IL-12 gene therapy and TLI was inhibited more significantly than those with either single treatment (P + and CD8 + lymphocyte infiltration and tumor-specific cytolytic activities, and the levels of IFN-γ in sera were higher in IL-12 gene therapy and IL-12 gene therapy combined with TLI groups. Conclusion: These results suggest that IL-12 gene therapy combined with radiotherapy is more effective than both single treatment modalities and can induce specific antitumor immuno-response greatly

  1. Integrated genomics of ovarian xenograft tumor progression and chemotherapy response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuckey, Ashley; Brodsky, Alexander S; Fischer, Andrew; Miller, Daniel H; Hillenmeyer, Sara; Kim, Kyu K; Ritz, Anna; Singh, Rakesh K; Raphael, Benjamin J; Brard, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most deadly gynecological cancer with a very poor prognosis. Xenograft mouse models have proven to be one very useful tool in testing candidate therapeutic agents and gene function in vivo. In this study we identify genes and gene networks important for the efficacy of a pre-clinical anti-tumor therapeutic, MT19c. In order to understand how ovarian xenograft tumors may be growing and responding to anti-tumor therapeutics, we used genome-wide mRNA expression and DNA copy number measurements to identify key genes and pathways that may be critical for SKOV-3 xenograft tumor progression. We compared SKOV-3 xenografts treated with the ergocalciferol derived, MT19c, to untreated tumors collected at multiple time points. Cell viability assays were used to test the function of the PPARγ agonist, Rosiglitazone, on SKOV-3 cell growth. These data indicate that a number of known survival and growth pathways including Notch signaling and general apoptosis factors are differentially expressed in treated vs. untreated xenografts. As tumors grow, cell cycle and DNA replication genes show increased expression, consistent with faster growth. The steroid nuclear receptor, PPARγ, was significantly up-regulated in MT19c treated xenografts. Surprisingly, stimulation of PPARγ with Rosiglitazone reduced the efficacy of MT19c and cisplatin suggesting that PPARγ is regulating a survival pathway in SKOV-3 cells. To identify which genes may be important for tumor growth and treatment response, we observed that MT19c down-regulates some high copy number genes and stimulates expression of some low copy number genes suggesting that these genes are particularly important for SKOV-3 xenograft growth and survival. We have characterized the time dependent responses of ovarian xenograft tumors to the vitamin D analog, MT19c. Our results suggest that PPARγ promotes survival for some ovarian tumor cells. We propose that a combination of regulated expression and copy number

  2. Evidence for tankyrases as antineoplastic targets in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, Alexander M; Johnson, Kevin C; Stan, Radu V; Sanglikar, Aarti; Ahmed, Yashi; Dmitrovsky, Ethan; Freemantle, Sarah J

    2013-01-01

    New pharmacologic targets are urgently needed to treat or prevent lung cancer, the most common cause of cancer death for men and women. This study identified one such target. This is the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, which is deregulated in cancers, including those lacking adenomatous polyposis coli or β-catenin mutations. Two poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) enzymes regulate canonical Wnt activity: tankyrase (TNKS) 1 and TNKS2. These enzymes poly-ADP-ribosylate (PARsylate) and destabilize axin, a key component of the β-catenin phosphorylation complex. This study used comprehensive gene profiles to uncover deregulation of the Wnt pathway in murine transgenic and human lung cancers, relative to normal lung. Antineoplastic consequences of genetic and pharmacologic targeting of TNKS in murine and human lung cancer cell lines were explored, and validated in vivo in mice by implantation of murine transgenic lung cancer cells engineered with reduced TNKS expression relative to controls. Microarray analyses comparing Wnt pathway members in malignant versus normal tissues of a murine transgenic cyclin E lung cancer model revealed deregulation of Wnt pathway components, including TNKS1 and TNKS2. Real-time PCR assays independently confirmed these results in paired normal-malignant murine and human lung tissues. Individual treatments of a panel of human and murine lung cancer cell lines with the TNKS inhibitors XAV939 and IWR-1 dose-dependently repressed cell growth and increased cellular axin 1 and tankyrase levels. These inhibitors also repressed expression of a Wnt-responsive luciferase construct, implicating the Wnt pathway in conferring these antineoplastic effects. Individual or combined knockdown of TNKS1 and TNKS2 with siRNAs or shRNAs reduced lung cancer cell growth, stabilized axin, and repressed tumor formation in murine xenograft and syngeneic lung cancer models. Findings reported here uncovered deregulation of specific components of the Wnt pathway in both

  3. Role of DNA Methylation in Altering Gene Expression During the Early Stages of Human Breast Cancer Progression in the MCF10AT Xenograft Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Christman, Judith

    2004-01-01

    ...) Collect microdissected tissue representative of each of the morphologically different stages of early breast cancer progression in the MCFlOAT model to obtain RNA and DNA for miroarray analysis...

  4. Photo activation of HPPH encapsulated in “Pocket” liposomes triggers multiple drug release and tumor cell killing in mouse breast cancer xenografts

    OpenAIRE

    Puri, Anu; Sine,Jessica; Urban,Cordula; Charron,Heather; Valim,Niksa; Tata,Darrell; Schiff,Rachel; Joshi,Amit; Blumenthal,Robert; Thayer,Derek

    2014-01-01

    Jessica Sine,1,* Cordula Urban,2,* Derek Thayer,1 Heather Charron,2 Niksa Valim,2 Darrell B Tata,3 Rachel Schiff,4 Robert Blumenthal,1 Amit Joshi,2 Anu Puri1 1Membrane Structure and Function Section, Basic Research Laboratory, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute – Frederick, Frederick, MD, USA; 2Department of Radiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; 3US Food and Drug Administration, CDRH/OSEL/Division of Physics, White Oak Campus, MD, USA; 4Lester ...

  5. The 2-oxoglutarate analog 3-oxoglutarate decreases normoxic hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in cancer cells, induces cell death, and reduces tumor xenograft growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koivunen P

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Peppi Koivunen,1 Stuart M Fell,2,3 Wenyun Lu,4 Joshua D Rabinowitz,4 Andrew L Kung,5,6 Susanne Schlisio,2,7 1Biocenter Oulu, Faculty of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Oulu Center for Cell-Matrix Research, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland; 2Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research Ltd, Stockholm, Sweden; 3Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; 4Department of Chemistry and Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 5Department of Medical Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 6Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA; 7Department of Microbiology and Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Abstract: The cellular response to hypoxia is primarily regulated by the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs. HIF-1α is also a major mediator of tumor physiology, and its abundance is correlated with therapeutic resistance in a broad range of cancers. Accumulation of HIF-1α under hypoxia is mainly controlled by the oxygen-sensing HIF prolyl 4-hydroxylases (EGLNs, also known as PHDs. Here, we identified a high level of normoxic HIF-1α protein in various cancer cell lines. EGLNs require oxygen and 2-oxoglutarate for enzymatic activity. We tested the ability of several cell-permeable 2-oxoglutarate analogs to regulate the abundance of HIF-1α protein. We identified 3-oxoglutarate as a potent regulator of HIF-1α in normoxic conditions. In contrast to 2-oxoglutarate, 3-oxoglutarate decreased the abundance of HIF-1α protein in several cancer cell lines in normoxia and diminished HIF-1α levels independent of EGLN enzymatic activity. Furthermore, we observed that 3-oxoglutarate was detrimental to cancer cell survival. We show that esterified 3-oxoglutarate, in combination with the cancer chemotherapeutic drug vincristine, induces apoptosis and inhibits tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. Our data

  6. Luzindole but not 4-phenyl-2- propionamidotetralin (4P-PDOT) diminishes the inhibitory effect of melatonin on murine Colon 38 cancer growth in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winczyk, Katarzyna; Fuss-Chmielewska, Julita; Lawnicka, Hanna; Pawlikowski, Marek; Karasek, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Our earlier studies have shown that MLT exerts the inhibitory effect on murine cancer via membrane and nuclear receptors. We have found that the antagonist of MT1 receptors does not diminish the antiproliferative effect of MLT on Colon 38 cells, and the contribution of MT2 receptors has been suggested to be responsible. Therefore, in the present study we have examined the influence of the 4-phenyl-2-propionamidotetralin (4P-PDOT), which is a selective antagonist of MT2 membrane receptor, and luzindole - an antagonist of both membrane receptors, on an oncostatic action of MLT. The murine cancer cell line Colon 38 was used in the experiments. In 48 hrs cell culture the effects of MLT, 4P-PDOT and luzindole administered alone and MLT applied jointly with either 4P-PDOT or luzindole were examined. The growth of cancer cells was assessed using the modified colorimetric Mosmann method. Melatonin at both examined concentrations (10-7, 10-9 M) significantly decreased the viability of cancer cells. The selective antagonist of MT2 membrane receptor, namely 4P-PDOT and luzindole applied separately did not have an effect on the growth of Colon 38 cells. The addition of 4P-PDOT to MLT did not change the inhibitory effect of MLT, whereas luzindole given together with MLT diminished, but failed to block totally, the oncostatic properties of MLT. The obtained data and our previous studies conducted on Colon 38 cancer indicate that membrane melatonin receptors are not indispensable to the oncostatic action of melatonin and thus other pathways such as nuclear signaling and receptor-independent mechanism may be also involved.

  7. In vivo imaging of pancreatic tumours and liver metastases using 7 Tesla MRI in a murine orthotopic pancreatic cancer model and a liver metastases model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadlich Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of tumour death in the western world. However, appropriate tumour models are scarce. Here we present a syngeneic murine pancreatic cancer model using 7 Tesla MRI and evaluate its clinical relevance and applicability. Methods 6606PDA murine pancreatic cancer cells were orthotopically injected into the pancreatic head. Liver metastases were induced through splenic injection. Animals were analyzed by MRI three and five weeks following injection. Tumours were detected using T2-weighted high resolution sequences. Tumour volumes were determined by callipers and MRI. Liver metastases were analyzed using gadolinium-EOB-DTPA and T1-weighted 3D-Flash sequences. Tumour blood flow was measured using low molecular gadobutrol and high molecular gadolinium-DTPA. Results MRI handling and applicability was similar to human systems, resolution as low as 0.1 mm. After 5 weeks tumour volumes differed significantly (p 3+/-243 mm3 with MRI (mean 918 mm3+/-193 mm3 with MRI being more precise. Histology (n = 5 confirmed MRI tumour measurements (mean size MRI 38.5 mm2+/-22.8 mm2 versus 32.6 mm2+/-22.6 mm2 (histology, p 3+/-56.7 mm3 after 5 weeks. Lymphnodes were also easily identified. Tumour accumulation of gadobutrol was significantly (p Conclusions This model permits monitoring of tumour growth and metastasis formation in longitudinal non-invasive high-resolution MR studies including using contrast agents comparable to human pancreatic cancer. This multidisciplinary environment enables radiologists, surgeons and physicians to further improve translational research and therapies of pancreatic cancer.

  8. Early detection of response to experimental chemotherapeutic Top216 with [18F]FLT and [18F]FDG PET in human ovary cancer xenografts in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mette Munk; Erichsen, Kamille Dumong; Björkling, Fredrik

    2010-01-01

    3'-Deoxy-3'-[(18)F]fluorothymidine ((18)F-FLT) is a tracer used to assess cell proliferation in vivo. The aim of the study was to use (18)F-FLT positron emission tomography (PET) to study treatment responses to a new anti-cancer compound. To do so, we studied early anti-proliferative effects...

  9. Methylselenol, a selenium metabolite, modulates p53 pathway and inhibits the growth of colon cancer xenografts in Balb/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huawei; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Johnson, Luann K

    2013-05-01

    It is has been hypothesized that methylselenol is a critical selenium metabolite for anticancer activity in vivo. In this study, we used a protein array which contained 112 different antibodies known to be involved in the p53 pathway to investigate the molecular targets of methylselenol in human HCT116 colon cancer cells. The array analysis indicated that methylselenol exposure changed the expression of 11 protein targets related to the regulation of cell cycle and apoptosis. Subsequently, we confirmed these proteins with the Western blotting approach, and found that methylselenol increased the expression of GADD 153 and p21 but reduced the level of c-Myc, E2F1 and Phos p38 MAP kinase. Similar to our previous report on human HCT116 colon cancer cells, methylselenol also inhibited cell growth and led to an increase in G1 and G2 fractions with a concomitant drop in S-phase in mouse colon cancer MC26 cells. When the MC26 cells were transplanted to their immune-competent Balb/c mice, methylselenol-treated MC26 cells had significantly less tumor growth potential than that of untreated MC26 cells. Taken together, our data suggest that methylselenol modulates the expression of key genes related to cell cycle and apoptosis and inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. The retinamide VNLG-152 inhibits f-AR/AR-V7 and MNK-eIF4E signaling pathways to suppress EMT and castration-resistant prostate cancer xenograft growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamurthy, Vidya P; Ramalingam, Senthilmurugan; Gediya, Lalji K; Njar, Vincent C O

    2018-03-01

    VNLG-152 is a novel retinamide (NR) shown to suppress growth and progression of genetically diverse prostate cancer cells via inhibition of androgen receptor signaling and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) translational machinery. Herein, we report therapeutic effects of VNLG-152 on castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) growth and metastatic phenotype in a CRPC tumor xenograft model. Administration of VNLG-152 significantly and dose-dependently suppressed the growth of aggressive CWR22Rv1 tumors by 63.4% and 76.3% at 10 and 20 mg·kg -1 bw, respectively (P AR)/androgen receptor splice variant-7 (AR-V7), mitogen-activated protein kinase-interacting kinases 1 and 2 (MNK1/2), phosphorylated eIF4E and their associated target proteins, including prostate-specific antigen, cyclin D1 and Bcl-2, were strongly decreased in VNLG-152-treated tumors signifying inhibition of f-AR/AR-V7 and MNK-eIF4E signaling in VNLG-152-treated CWR22Rv1 tumors as observed in vitro. VNLG-152 also suppressed the epithelial to mesenchymal transition in CWR22Rv1 tumors as evidenced by repression of N-cadherin, β-catenin, claudin, Slug, Snail, Twist, vimentin and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) with upsurge in E-cadherin. These results highlight the promising use of VNLG-152 in CRPC therapy and justify its further development towards clinical trials. © 2018 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  11. [18F]FDG and [18F]FLT positron emission tomography imaging following treatment with belinostat in human ovary cancer xenografts in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mette Munk; Erichsen, Kamille Dumong; Johnbeck, Camilla Bardram

    2013-01-01

    Belinostat is a histone deacetylase inhibitor with anti-tumor effect in several pre-clinical tumor models and clinical trials. The aim of the study was to evaluate changes in cell proliferation and glucose uptake by use of 3'-deoxy-3'-[(18)F]fluorothymidine ([18F]FLT) and 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-......]fluoro-D-glucose ([18F]FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) following treatment with belinostat in ovarian cancer in vivo models....

  12. Ukrain, a plant derived semi-synthetic compound, exerts antitumor effects against murine and human breast cancer and induce protective antitumor immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, E N; Srivatsan, S; Mohammadi, H; Daniels, D; Shashidharamurthy, R; Selvaraj, P

    2012-12-01

    Despite the recent advances in anti-cancer therapies, breast cancer accounts for the highest percentage of estimated new cases among female cancer patients. The anti-cancer drug Ukrain, a plant-derived semi-synthetic compound, has been shown to be effective in a variety of tumor models including colon, brain, ovarian, melanoma and lymphoma. However, the direct cytotoxic effects of Ukrain have yet to be investigated in breast cancer models. Herein, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity of Ukrain using murine (4T07 and TUBO) and human (SKBR-3) breast cancer cell lines. Cells were treated with varying concentrations of Ukrain for up to 72 h and analyzed for viability by trypan blue exclusion, apoptosis by intracellular caspase 3 and Annexin V staining, and proliferative potential by a clonogenic assay. Female BALB/c mice were challenged subcutaneously (s.c.) with 4T07-RG cells and administered 5 mg/kg or 12.5 mg/kg body weight Ukrain intravenously (i.v.) on the same day and 3 days later. Protective immune responses were determined following re-challenge of tumor-free mice 35 days post primary challenge. Ukrain exposure induced apoptosis in a dose and time-dependent manner with 50 µg/mL Ukrain leading to >50% cell death after 48 h exposure for all three breast cancer cell lines. Ukrain administration (12.5 mg/kg) led to significant inhibition of 4T07 tumor growth in vivo and sustained protective anti-tumor immunity following secondary challenge. Our findings demonstrate the in vitro and in vivo cytotoxic effects of Ukrain on breast cancer cells and may provide insight into designing Ukrain-based therapies for breast cancer patients.

  13. Ultrasound contrast-enhanced study as an imaging biomarker for anti-cancer drug treatment: preliminary study with paclitaxel in a xenograft mouse tumor model (secondary publication)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hak Jong; Hwang, Sung Il; Jung, Hyun Sook; Kang, Mi Ra [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Jong Hoe; Kong, Hoon Young [Dept. of Molecular Biology, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess tumor angiogenesis using contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) of human prostate cancer cells (PC3) that were implanted in mice before and after paclitaxel injection. Twelve mice were injected with human PC3. The mice were grouped into two groups; one was the paclitaxel-treated group (n=6) and the other was the control group (n=6). Before administering paclitaxel into the peritoneal cavity, baseline CEUS was performed after the administration of 500 μL (1×108 microbubbles) of contrast agent. The area under the curve (AUC) up to 50 seconds after injection was derived from the time-intensity curves. After injection of paclitaxel or saline, CEUS studies were performed at the 1-week follow-up. Changes in tumor volume and the AUC in both two groups were evaluated. After CEUS, the microvessel density (MVD) was compared between the groups. In the paclitaxel-treated group, the AUC from CEUS showed a significant decrease 1-week after paclitaxel administration (P=0.030), even though the tumor volume showed no significant changes (P=0.116). In the control group, there was no significant decrease of the AUC (P=0.173). Pathologically, there was a significant difference in MVD between both groups (P=0.002). The AUC from the time intensity curve derived from CEUS showed an early change in response to the anti-cancer drug treatment that preceded the change in tumor size. The findings of CEUS could serve as an imaging biomarker for assessing tumor responses to anti-cancer drug treatment.

  14. Development of a Novel SPECT Tracer to Image c-Met Expression in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in a Human Tumor Xenograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhaoguo; Xiao, Yadi; Wang, Kai; Yan, Ji; Xiao, Zunyu; Fang, Fang; Jin, Zhongnan; Liu, Yang; Sun, Xilin; Shen, Baozhong

    2018-05-18

    Rationale: Elevated expression of the c-Met receptor plays a crucial role in cancers. In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), aberrant activation of c-Met signaling pathway contributes to tumorigenesis and cancer progression, and may mediate acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted therapy. c-Met is therefore emerging as a promising therapeutic target for treating NSCLC, and the methods for noninvasive in vivo assessment of c-Met expression will improve NSCLC treatment and diagnosis. Methods: A new peptide-based (cMBP) radiotracer targeting c-Met, 99m Tc-hydrazine nicotinamide (HYNIC)-cMBP, was developed for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. Cell uptake assays were performed on two NSCLC cell lines with different c-Met expression: H1993 (high expression) and H1299 (no expression). In vivo tumor specificity was assessed by SPECT imaging in tumor-bearing mice at 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 h after injection of the probe. Blocking assays, biodistribution and autoradiography were also conducted to determine probe specificity. Results: 99m Tc-HYNIC-cMBP was prepared with high efficiency and showed higher uptake in H1993 cells than H1299 cells. Biodistribution and autoradiography also showed significantly higher accumulation of 99m Tc-HYNIC-cMBP in H1993 tumors than H1299 (H1993: 4.74±1.43 %ID/g and H1299: 1.00±0.37 %ID/g at 0.5h, pc-Met was demonstrated by competitive block with excess un-radiolabeled peptide. Conclusion: We developed a novel SPECT tracer, 99m Tc-HYNIC-cMBP, for c-Met-targeted imaging in NSCLC that specifically bound to c-Met with favorable pharmacokinetics in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2018 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  15. A novel method for RNA extraction from FFPE samples reveals significant differences in biomarker expression between orthotopic and subcutaneous pancreatic cancer patient-derived xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Malachia; Adamian, Yvess; Brown, Mark; Maawy, Ali; Chang, Alexander; Lee, Jacqueline; Gharibi, Armen; Katz, Matthew H; Fleming, Jason; Hoffman, Robert M; Bouvet, Michael; Doebler, Robert; Kelber, Jonathan A

    2017-01-24

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) can identify and validate new biomarkers of cancer onset, progression and therapy resistance. Substantial archives of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) cancer samples from patients represent a rich resource for linking molecular signatures to clinical data. However, performing NGS on FFPE samples is limited by poor RNA purification methods. To address this hurdle, we developed an improved methodology for extracting high-quality RNA from FFPE samples. By briefly integrating a newly-designed micro-homogenizing (mH) tool with commercially available FFPE RNA extraction protocols, RNA recovery is increased by approximately 3-fold while maintaining standard A260/A280 ratios and RNA quality index (RQI) values. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the mH-purified FFPE RNAs are longer and of higher integrity. Previous studies have suggested that pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) gene expression signatures vary significantly under in vitro versus in vivo and in vivo subcutaneous versus orthotopic conditions. By using our improved mH-based method, we were able to preserve established expression patterns of KRas-dependency genes within these three unique microenvironments. Finally, expression analysis of novel biomarkers in KRas mutant PDAC samples revealed that PEAK1 decreases and MST1R increases by over 100-fold in orthotopic versus subcutaneous microenvironments. Interestingly, however, only PEAK1 levels remain elevated in orthotopically grown KRas wild-type PDAC cells. These results demonstrate the critical nature of the orthotopic tumor microenvironment when evaluating the clinical relevance of new biomarkers in cells or patient-derived samples. Furthermore, this new mH-based FFPE RNA extraction method has the potential to enhance and expand future FFPE-RNA-NGS cancer biomarker studies.

  16. Intratumoral pharmacokinetic analysis by 19F-magnetic resonance spectroscopy and cytostatic in vivo activity of gemcitabine (dFdC) in two small cell lung cancer xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristjansen, P E; Quistorff, B; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gemcitabine, 2'2'difluoro-deoxycytidine (dFdC), has shown activity in several preclinical models, and presently the compound is being clinically evaluated in patients with lung cancer and other solid tumors. DESIGN: The cytostatic in vivo activity of dFdC was tested in the two human.......p. every third day, four times were applied. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Significant activity of gemcitabine was demonstrated in both SCLC tumor lines. The tumor line 54A is the most sensitive to radiotherapy, doxorubicin, and nitrosoureas; but in this case the 54B tumors were more sensitive to gemcitabine...

  17. Conjugated nanoliposome with the HER2/neu-derived peptide GP2 as an effective vaccine against breast cancer in mice xenograft model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefeh Razazan

    Full Text Available One of the challenging issues in vaccine development is peptide and adjuvant delivery into target cells. In this study, we developed a vaccine and therapeutic delivery system to increase cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL response against a breast cancer model overexpressing HER2/neu. Gp2, a HER2/neu-derived peptide, was conjugated to Maleimide-mPEG2000-DSPE micelles and post inserted into liposomes composed of DMPC, DMPG phospholipids, and fusogenic lipid dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE containing monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL adjuvant (DMPC-DMPG-DOPE-MPL-Gp2. BALB/c mice were immunized with different formulations and the immune response was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. ELISpot and intracellular cytokine analysis by flow cytometry showed that the mice vaccinated with Lip-DOPE-MPL-GP2 incited the highest number of IFN-γ+ in CD8+ cells and CTL response. The immunization led to lower tumor sizes and longer survival time compared to the other groups of mice immunized and treated with the Lip-DOPE-MPL-GP2 formulation in both prophylactic and therapeutic experiments. These results showed that co-formulation of DOPE and MPL conjugated with GP2 peptide not only induces high antitumor immunity but also enhances therapeutic efficacy in TUBO mice model. Lip-DOPE-MPL-GP2 formulation could be a promising vaccine and a therapeutic delivery system against HER2 positive cancers and merits further investigation.

  18. Human murine mammary tumour virus-like agents are genetically distinct from endogenous retroviruses and are not detectable in breast cancer cell lines or biopsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mant, Christine; Gillett, Cheryl; D'Arrigo, Corrado; Cason, John

    2004-01-01

    It has been reported that a human murine mammary tumour virus (MMTV)-like virus (HMLV), which may be an endogenous human retrovirus (HERV), occurs in the human breast cancer cell lines T47D and MCF-7 and, in 38% of human breast cancer biopsies. As the aetiology of most breast cancers remains unknown, it is important to verify these observations in differing breast cancer populations worldwide. Thus, we sought to determine the genetic relationships between HMLVs, MMTVs, and HERVs, and to investigate the association between HMLVs and breast cancer biopsies from South London, UK. Phylogenetic analyses of the env/pol region indicated that HMLVs are indistinct from MMTVs, and that MMTVS/HMLVs exhibit only low sequence homologies with HERVs. A search of the human genome confirmed that HMLVs are not endogenous. Using MMTV polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers described previously, we amplified DNA from all cell lines except MCF-7 and from 7 of 44 (16%) breast cancer biopsies. A restriction fragment length polymorphism assay was designed to distinguish between HMLVs and MMTVs, and upon analyses, PCR amplicons appeared to be HMLVs. To confirm these findings, amplicons from the T47D cell line and from four randomly selected breast cancer patients were sequenced. Of 106 DNA sequences obtained, 103 were homologous with a short arm of human chromosome (Chr) 3 (3p13), two with Chr 4, and one with Chr 8. None of the sequences exhibited significant nucleotide homology with MMTVs, HMLVs, or with HERVs (all <50%). Thus, we conclude that (i) HMLVs are integral members of the MMTV family; (ii) MMTVs/HMLVs are genetically distinct from HERVs; (iii) MMTV/HMLV DNA is not present in human breast cancer cell lines or clinical biopsies in our locality

  19. Effects of siRNA Silencing of TUG1 and LCAL6 Long Non-coding RNAs on Patient-derived Xenograft of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Tian; Huang, Hairong; Li, Xiaoyou; Liao, Jing; Yang, Zhijian; Hoffman, Robert M; Cheng, X I; Liang, Lei; Hu, Wenjuan; Yun, Shifeng

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish a patient-derived xenograft (PDX) mouse model of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and investigate the anti-tumor efficacy of silencing of TUG1 and LCAL6 long non-coding RNA in the PDX model. PDXs were established by subcutaneously implanting NSCLC surgical tumor fragments into immunodeficient mice. PDX characterization was performed by histopathological, immunohistochemical and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses for NSCLC subtype-specific markers and expression of LCAL6 and TUG1. Anti-tumor efficacy of siRNA silencing of TUG1 and LCAL6 was also investigated in the PDX model. The effect of TUG1 and LCAL6 silencing on protein expression of proliferation marker Ki67 and HOX-gene family HOXB7 in the tumors was assessed by immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting. Establishment of NSCLC PDX models resulted in 9 of 26 cases (34.6%). Lung squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) had a higher engraftment rate (58.3%) than lung adenocarcinomas (ADC) (18.2%) (pTUG1. The tumor volume and weight were significantly reduced in the TUG1-silenced group as compared to the control group (p0.05). Expression of both TUG1and LCAL6 was reduced by siRNA treatment. Expression of Ki67 and HOXB7 was significantly suppressed in both the TUG1- and LCAL6-silenced groups compared to the control group (pTUG1-silenced group showed more reduced Ki67 expression than the LCAL6-silenced group (pTUG1 and LCAL6. Silencing of TUG1 inhibited both tumor growth and expression of the proliferation marker Ki67 and HOX-gene family HOXB7 in the PDX model of NSCLC. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  20. Photo activation of HPPH encapsulated in “Pocket” liposomes triggers multiple drug release and tumor cell killing in mouse breast cancer xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sine J

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jessica Sine,1,* Cordula Urban,2,* Derek Thayer,1 Heather Charron,2 Niksa Valim,2 Darrell B Tata,3 Rachel Schiff,4 Robert Blumenthal,1 Amit Joshi,2 Anu Puri1 1Membrane Structure and Function Section, Basic Research Laboratory, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute – Frederick, Frederick, MD, USA; 2Department of Radiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; 3US Food and Drug Administration, CDRH/OSEL/Division of Physics, White Oak Campus, MD, USA; 4Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: We recently reported laser-triggered release of photosensitive compounds from liposomes containing dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC and 1,2 bis(tricosa-10,12-diynoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DC8,9PC. We hypothesized that the permeation of photoactivated compounds occurs through domains of enhanced fluidity in the liposome membrane and have thus called them “Pocket” liposomes. In this study we have encapsulated the red light activatable anticancer photodynamic therapy drug 2-(1-Hexyloxyethyl-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH (Ex/Em410/670 nm together with calcein (Ex/Em490/517 nm as a marker for drug release in Pocket liposomes. A mole ratio of 7.6:1 lipid:HPPH was found to be optimal, with >80% of HPPH being included in the liposomes. Exposure of liposomes with a cw-diode 660 nm laser (90 mW, 0–5 minutes resulted in calcein release only when HPPH was included in the liposomes. Further analysis of the quenching ratios of liposome-entrapped calcein in the laser treated samples indicated that the laser-triggered release occurred via the graded mechanism. In vitro studies with MDA-MB-231-LM2 breast cancer cell line showed significant cell killing upon treatment of cell-liposome suspensions with the laser. To assess in vivo efficacy, we implanted MDA-MB-231-LM2 cells containing the luciferase gene along the mammary fat pads

  1. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Modeling of the Anti-Tumor Effect of Sunitinib Combined with Dopamine in the Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Xenograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Fangran; Wang, Siyuan; Zhu, Xiao; Xue, Junsheng; Li, Jingyun; Wang, Lijie; Li, Jian; Lu, Wei; Zhou, Tianyan

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the anti-tumor effect of sunitinib in combination with dopamine in the treatment of nu/nu nude mice bearing non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) A549 cells and to develop the combination PK/PD model. Further, simulations were conducted to optimize the administration regimens. A PK/PD model was developed based on our preclinical experiment to explore the relationship between plasma concentration and drug effect quantitatively. Further, the model was evaluated and validated. By fixing the parameters obtained from the PK/PD model, simulations were built to predict the tumor suppression under various regimens. The synergistic effect was observed between sunitinib and dopamine in the study, which was confirmed by the effect constant (GAMA, estimated as 2.49). The enhanced potency of dopamine on sunitinib was exerted by on/off effect in the PK/PD model. The optimal dose regimen was selected as sunitinib (120 mg/kg, q3d) in combination with dopamine (2 mg/kg, q3d) based on the simulation study. The synergistic effect of sunitinib and dopamine was demonstrated by the preclinical experiment and confirmed by the developed PK/PD model. In addition, the regimens were optimized by means of modeling as well as simulation, which may be conducive to clinical study.

  2. Doxorubicin-Loaded PEG-PCL-PEG Micelle Using Xenograft Model of Nude Mice: Effect of Multiple Administration of Micelle on the Suppression of Human Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Fa Hsieh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The triblock copolymer is composed of two identical hydrophilic segments: Monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol (mPEG and one hydrophobic segment poly(ε‑caprolactone (PCL; which is synthesized by coupling of mPEG-PCL-OH and mPEG‑COOH in a mild condition using dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and 4-dimethylamino pyridine. The amphiphilic block copolymer can self-assemble into nanoscopic micelles to accommodate doxorubixin (DOX in the hydrophobic core. The physicochemical properties and in vitro tests, including cytotoxicity of the micelles, have been characterized in our previous study. In this study, DOX was encapsulated into micelles with a drug loading content of 8.5%. Confocal microscopy indicated that DOX was internalized into the cytoplasm via endocystosis. A dose-finding scheme of the polymeric micelle (placebo showed a safe dose of PEG-PCL-PEG micelles was 71.4 mg/kg in mice. Importantly, the circulation time of DOX-loaded micelles in the plasma significantly increased compared to that of free DOX in rats. A biodistribution study displayed that plasma extravasation of DOX in liver and spleen occurred in the first four hours. Lastly, the tumor growth of human breast cancer cells in nude mice was suppressed by multiple injections (5 mg/kg, three times daily on day 0, 7 and 14 of DOX-loaded micelles as compared to multiple administrations of free DOX.

  3. Influence of vitamin D on cisplatin sensitivity in testicular germ cell cancer-derived cell lines and in a NTera2 xenograft model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anne; Blomberg Jensen, Martin; Nielsen, John Erik

    2013-01-01

    The active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25(OH)(2)D(3)) has anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, and pro-differentiating effects in somatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) also augments the anti-tumor effects of several chemotherapeutic agents, including...... cisplatin, which may have clinical relevance. Given the pro-differentiation effect of vitamin D recently demonstrated in testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs), we hypothesized that 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) could be a beneficial adjunctive to existing chemotherapy regime used to treat these tumors. In this study, cell...... survival effects of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3), another pro-differentiation compound, retinoic acid and cisplatin were investigated in TGCT-derived cell lines in vitro. 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) augmented the effect of cisplatin in an embryonal carcinoma-derived cell line (NTera2), possibly through downregulation...

  4. Doxorubicin-Loaded PEG-PCL-PEG Micelle Using Xenograft Model of Nude Mice: Effect of Multiple Administration of Micelle on the Suppression of Human Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuong, Nguyen-Van [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, 200, Chung Pei Rd., Chung Li, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, Ho Chi Minh City University of Industry, 12 Nguyen Van Bao St, Ho Chi Minh (Viet Nam); Jiang, Jian-Lin; Li, Yu-Lun [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, 200, Chung Pei Rd., Chung Li, Taiwan (China); Chen, Jim-Ray [Department of Pathology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Keelung, Taiwan and Chang Gung University, College of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Jwo, Shyh-Chuan [Division of General Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Keelung, Taiwan and Chang Gung University, College of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Ming-Fa, E-mail: mfhsieh@cycu.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, 200, Chung Pei Rd., Chung Li, Taiwan (China)

    2010-12-28

    The triblock copolymer is composed of two identical hydrophilic segments Monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol) (mPEG) and one hydrophobic segment poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL); which is synthesized by coupling of mPEG-PCL-OH and mPEG-COOH in a mild condition using dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and 4-dimethylamino pyridine. The amphiphilic block copolymer can self-assemble into nanoscopic micelles to accommodate doxorubixin (DOX) in the hydrophobic core. The physicochemical properties and in vitro tests, including cytotoxicity of the micelles, have been characterized in our previous study. In this study, DOX was encapsulated into micelles with a drug loading content of 8.5%. Confocal microscopy indicated that DOX was internalized into the cytoplasm via endocystosis. A dose-finding scheme of the polymeric micelle (placebo) showed a safe dose of PEG-PCL-PEG micelles was 71.4 mg/kg in mice. Importantly, the circulation time of DOX-loaded micelles in the plasma significantly increased compared to that of free DOX in rats. A biodistribution study displayed that plasma extravasation of DOX in liver and spleen occurred in the first four hours. Lastly, the tumor growth of human breast cancer cells in nude mice was suppressed by multiple injections (5 mg/kg, three times daily on day 0, 7 and 14) of DOX-loaded micelles as compared to multiple administrations of free DOX.

  5. Doxorubicin-Loaded PEG-PCL-PEG Micelle Using Xenograft Model of Nude Mice: Effect of Multiple Administration of Micelle on the Suppression of Human Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuong, Nguyen-Van; Jiang, Jian-Lin; Li, Yu-Lun; Chen, Jim-Ray; Jwo, Shyh-Chuan; Hsieh, Ming-Fa

    2010-01-01

    The triblock copolymer is composed of two identical hydrophilic segments Monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol) (mPEG) and one hydrophobic segment poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL); which is synthesized by coupling of mPEG-PCL-OH and mPEG-COOH in a mild condition using dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and 4-dimethylamino pyridine. The amphiphilic block copolymer can self-assemble into nanoscopic micelles to accommodate doxorubixin (DOX) in the hydrophobic core. The physicochemical properties and in vitro tests, including cytotoxicity of the micelles, have been characterized in our previous study. In this study, DOX was encapsulated into micelles with a drug loading content of 8.5%. Confocal microscopy indicated that DOX was internalized into the cytoplasm via endocystosis. A dose-finding scheme of the polymeric micelle (placebo) showed a safe dose of PEG-PCL-PEG micelles was 71.4 mg/kg in mice. Importantly, the circulation time of DOX-loaded micelles in the plasma significantly increased compared to that of free DOX in rats. A biodistribution study displayed that plasma extravasation of DOX in liver and spleen occurred in the first four hours. Lastly, the tumor growth of human breast cancer cells in nude mice was suppressed by multiple injections (5 mg/kg, three times daily on day 0, 7 and 14) of DOX-loaded micelles as compared to multiple administrations of free DOX

  6. Reciprocal feedback regulation of PI3K and androgen receptor signaling in PTEN-deficient prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Brett S; Chapinski, Caren; Wongvipat, John; Hieronymus, Haley; Chen, Yu; Chandarlapaty, Sarat; Arora, Vivek K; Le, Carl; Koutcher, Jason; Scher, Howard; Scardino, Peter T; Rosen, Neal; Sawyers, Charles L

    2011-05-17

    Prostate cancer is characterized by its dependence on androgen receptor (AR) and frequent activation of PI3K signaling. We find that AR transcriptional output is decreased in human and murine tumors with PTEN deletion and that PI3K pathway inhibition activates AR signaling by relieving feedback inhibition of HER kinases. Similarly, AR inhibition activates AKT signaling by reducing levels of the AKT phosphatase PHLPP. Thus, these two oncogenic pathways cross-regulate each other by reciprocal feedback. Inhibition of one activates the other, thereby maintaining tumor cell survival. However, combined pharmacologic inhibition of PI3K and AR signaling caused near-complete prostate cancer regressions in a Pten-deficient murine prostate cancer model and in human prostate cancer xenografts, indicating that both pathways coordinately support survival. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of a porphyrazine-Gd(III) MRI contrast agent and in vivo imaging of a breast cancer xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Evan R; Ma, Zhidong; Waters, Emily A; Macrenaris, Keith W; Subramanian, Rohit; Barrett, Anthony G M; Meade, Thomas J; Hoffman, Brian M

    2014-01-01

    Porphyrazines (Pz), or tetraazaporphyrins, are being studied for their potential use in detection and treatment of cancer. Here, an amphiphilic Cu-Pz-Gd(III) conjugate has been prepared via azide-alkyne Huisgen cycloaddition or 'click' chemistry between an azide functionalized Pz and alkyne functionalized DOTA-Gd(III) analog for use as an MRI contrast agent. This agent, Cu-Pz-Gd(III), is synthesized in good yield and exhibits solution-phase ionic relaxivity (r1  = 11.5 mM(-1) s(-1)) that is approximately four times higher than that of a clinically used monomeric Gd(III) contrast agent, DOTA-Gd(III). Breast tumor cells (MDA-MB-231) associate with Cu-Pz-Gd(III) in vitro, where significant contrast enhancement (9.336 ± 0.335 contrast-to-noise ratio) is observed in phantom cell pellet MR images. This novel contrast agent was administered in vivo to an orthotopic breast tumor model in athymic nude mice and MR images were collected. The average T1 of tumor regions in mice treated with 50 mg kg(-1) Cu-Pz-Gd(III) decreased relative to saline-treated controls. Furthermore, the decrease in T1 was persistent relative to mice treated with the monomeric Gd(III) contrast agent. An ex vivo biodistribution study confirmed that Cu-Pz-Gd(III) accumulates in the tumors and is rapidly cleared, primarily through the kidneys. Differential accumulation and T1 enhancement by Cu-Pz-Gd(III) in the tumor's core relative to the periphery offer preliminary evidence that this agent would find application in the imaging of necrotic tissue. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Imaging and biodistribution of Her2/neu expression in non-small cell lung cancer xenografts with 64Cu-labeled trastuzumab PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paudyal, P.; Paudyal, B.; Hanaoka, Hirofumi

    2010-01-01

    Non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC) overexpress the Her2/neu gene in approximately 59% of cases. Trastuzumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody, interferes with Her2 signaling and is approved for the treatment of Her2/neu overexpressing breast cancer. However, its therapeutic use in Her2/neu overexpressing NSCLC remains obscure. The present study aimed to determine the role of 64 Cu-labeled trastuzumab positron emission tomography (PET) for non-invasive imaging of Her2/neu expression in NSCLC. Trastuzumab was conjugated with the bifunctional chelator 1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane-1, 4, 7, 10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) and radiolabeled with 64 Cu. The molecular specificity of DOTA-trastuzumab was determined in NSCLC cell lines with Her2/neu overexpression (NCI-H2170) and negative expression (NCI-H520). Imaging of Her2/neu expression was performed in NCI-H2170 tumor-bearing mice with 64 Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab PET and 64 Cu-DOTA-immunoglobulin G (IgG). In vitro studies revealed specific binding of DOTA-trastuzumab in the Her2/neu positive NCI-H2170 cells, while no binding was seen in the Her2/neu negative NCI-H520 cell line. Biodistribution and PET studies revealed a significantly high accumulation of 64 Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab in the Her2/neu overexpressing NCI-H2170 tumor at 24 and 48 h post-injection (21.4±1.4% and 23.2±5.1% injection dose/gram (% ID/g), respectively). PET imaging of Her2/neu negative NCI-H520 tumors showed much less uptake of 64 Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab (4.0% ID/g). The NCI-H2170 tumor uptake of 64 Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab was significantly higher than that of 64 Cu-DOTA-IgG (P 64 Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab showed a very clear image of a Her2/neu positive tumor and appeared to be effective as a PET tracer for imaging of Her2/neu gene expression in NSCLC, suggesting its potential clinical use for identifying patients that might benefit from trastuzumab-based therapy. (author)

  9. Photo activation of HPPH encapsulated in "Pocket" liposomes triggers multiple drug release and tumor cell killing in mouse breast cancer xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sine, Jessica; Urban, Cordula; Thayer, Derek; Charron, Heather; Valim, Niksa; Tata, Darrell B; Schiff, Rachel; Blumenthal, Robert; Joshi, Amit; Puri, Anu

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported laser-triggered release of photosensitive compounds from liposomes containing dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and 1,2 bis(tricosa-10,12-diynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DC(8,9)PC). We hypothesized that the permeation of photoactivated compounds occurs through domains of enhanced fluidity in the liposome membrane and have thus called them "Pocket" liposomes. In this study we have encapsulated the red light activatable anticancer photodynamic therapy drug 2-(1-Hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH) (Ex/Em410/670 nm) together with calcein (Ex/Em490/517 nm) as a marker for drug release in Pocket liposomes. A mole ratio of 7.6:1 lipid:HPPH was found to be optimal, with >80% of HPPH being included in the liposomes. Exposure of liposomes with a cw-diode 660 nm laser (90 mW, 0-5 minutes) resulted in calcein release only when HPPH was included in the liposomes. Further analysis of the quenching ratios of liposome-entrapped calcein in the laser treated samples indicated that the laser-triggered release occurred via the graded mechanism. In vitro studies with MDA-MB-231-LM2 breast cancer cell line showed significant cell killing upon treatment of cell-liposome suspensions with the laser. To assess in vivo efficacy, we implanted MDA-MB-231-LM2 cells containing the luciferase gene along the mammary fat pads on the ribcage of mice. For biodistribution experiments, trace amounts of a near infrared lipid probe DiR (Ex/Em745/840 nm) were included in the liposomes. Liposomes were injected intravenously and laser treatments (90 mW, 0.9 cm diameter, for an exposure duration ranging from 5-8 minutes) were done 4 hours postinjection (only one tumor per mouse was treated, keeping the second flank tumor as control). Calcein release occurred as indicated by an increase in calcein fluorescence from laser treated tumors only. The animals were observed for up to 15 days postinjection and tumor volume and luciferase expression was measured. A

  10. Photo activation of HPPH encapsulated in “Pocket” liposomes triggers multiple drug release and tumor cell killing in mouse breast cancer xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sine, Jessica; Urban, Cordula; Thayer, Derek; Charron, Heather; Valim, Niksa; Tata, Darrell B; Schiff, Rachel; Blumenthal, Robert; Joshi, Amit; Puri, Anu

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported laser-triggered release of photosensitive compounds from liposomes containing dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and 1,2 bis(tricosa-10,12-diynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DC8,9PC). We hypothesized that the permeation of photoactivated compounds occurs through domains of enhanced fluidity in the liposome membrane and have thus called them “Pocket” liposomes. In this study we have encapsulated the red light activatable anticancer photodynamic therapy drug 2-(1-Hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH) (Ex/Em410/670 nm) together with calcein (Ex/Em490/517 nm) as a marker for drug release in Pocket liposomes. A mole ratio of 7.6:1 lipid:HPPH was found to be optimal, with >80% of HPPH being included in the liposomes. Exposure of liposomes with a cw-diode 660 nm laser (90 mW, 0–5 minutes) resulted in calcein release only when HPPH was included in the liposomes. Further analysis of the quenching ratios of liposome-entrapped calcein in the laser treated samples indicated that the laser-triggered release occurred via the graded mechanism. In vitro studies with MDA-MB-231-LM2 breast cancer cell line showed significant cell killing upon treatment of cell-liposome suspensions with the laser. To assess in vivo efficacy, we implanted MDA-MB-231-LM2 cells containing the luciferase gene along the mammary fat pads on the ribcage of mice. For biodistribution experiments, trace amounts of a near infrared lipid probe DiR (Ex/Em745/840 nm) were included in the liposomes. Liposomes were injected intravenously and laser treatments (90 mW, 0.9 cm diameter, for an exposure duration ranging from 5–8 minutes) were done 4 hours postinjection (only one tumor per mouse was treated, keeping the second flank tumor as control). Calcein release occurred as indicated by an increase in calcein fluorescence from laser treated tumors only. The animals were observed for up to 15 days postinjection and tumor volume and luciferase expression was measured. A

  11. High dietary level of synthetic vitamin E on lipid peroxidation, membrane fatty acid composition and cytotoxicity in breast cancer xenograft and in mouse host tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnes Christopher J

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background d-α-tocopherol is a naturally occurring form of vitamin E not previously known to have antitumor activity. Synthetic vitamin E (sE is a commonly used dietary supplement consisting of a mixture of d-α-tocopherol and 7 equimolar stereoisomers. To test for antilipid peroxidation and for antitumor activity of sE supplementation, two groups of nude mice bearing a MDA-MB 231 human breast cancer tumor were fed an AIN-76 diet, one with and one without an additional 2000 IU/kg dry food (equivalent to 900 mg of all-rac-α-tocopherol or sE. This provided an intake of about 200 mg/kg body weight per day. The mice were killed at either 2 or 6 weeks after the start of dietary intervention. During necropsy, tumor and host tissues were excised for histology and for biochemical analyses. Results Tumor growth was significantly reduced by 6 weeks of sE supplementation. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, an indicator of lipid peroxidation, were suppressed in tumor and in host tissues in sE supplemented mice. In the sE treated mice, the fatty acid composition of microsomal and mitochondrial membranes of tumor and host tissues had proportionately less linoleic acid (n-6 C 18-2, similar levels of arachidonic acid (n-6 C 20-4, but more docosahexanoic acid (n-3 C 22-6. The sE supplementation had no significant effect on blood counts or on intestinal histology but gave some evidence of cardiac toxicity as judged by myocyte vacuoles and by an indicator of oxidative stress (increased ratio of Mn SOD mRNA over GPX1 mRNA. Conclusions At least one of the stereoisomers in sE has antitumor activity. Synthetic vitamin E appears to preferentially stabilize membrane fatty acids with more double bonds in the acyl chain. Although sE suppressed tumor growth and lipid peroxidation, it may have side-effects in the heart.

  12. Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor-based targeting using bombesin analogues is superior to metabolism-based targeting using choline for in vivo imaging of human prostate cancer xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Rogier P.J. [Erasmus MC, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC, Department of Urology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Weerden, W.M. van; Bangma, C.H.; Reneman, S. [Erasmus MC, Department of Urology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Krenning, E.P.; Berndsen, S.; Grievink-de Ligt, C.H.; Groen, H.C.; Blois, E. de; Breeman, W.A.P.; Jong, M. de [Erasmus MC, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-07-15

    Prostate cancer (PC) is a major health problem. Overexpression of the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) in PC, but not in the hyperplastic prostate, provides a promising target for staging and monitoring of PC. Based on the assumption that cancer cells have increased metabolic activity, metabolism-based tracers are also being used for PC imaging. We compared GRPR-based targeting using the {sup 68}Ga-labelled bombesin analogue AMBA with metabolism-based targeting using {sup 18}F-methylcholine ({sup 18}F-FCH) in nude mice bearing human prostate VCaP xenografts. PET and biodistribution studies were performed with both {sup 68}Ga-AMBA and {sup 18}F-FCH in all VCaP tumour-bearing mice, with PC-3 tumour-bearing mice as reference. Scanning started immediately after injection. Dynamic PET scans were reconstructed and analysed quantitatively. Biodistribution of tracers and tissue uptake was expressed as percent of injected dose per gram tissue (%ID/g). All tumours were clearly visualized using {sup 68}Ga-AMBA. {sup 18}F-FCH showed significantly less contrast due to poor tumour-to-background ratios. Quantitative PET analyses showed fast tumour uptake and high retention for both tracers. VCaP tumour uptake values determined from PET at steady-state were 6.7 {+-} 1.4%ID/g (20-30 min after injection, N = 8) for {sup 68}Ga-AMBA and 1.6 {+-} 0.5%ID/g (10-20 min after injection, N = 8) for {sup 18}F-FCH, which were significantly different (p <0.001). The results in PC-3 tumour-bearing mice were comparable. Biodistribution data were in accordance with the PET results showing VCaP tumour uptake values of 9.5 {+-} 4.8%ID/g (N = 8) for {sup 68}Ga-AMBA and 2.1 {+-} 0.4%ID/g (N = 8) for {sup 18}F-FCH. Apart from the GRPR-expressing organs, uptake in all organs was lower for {sup 68}Ga-AMBA than for {sup 18}F-FCH. Tumour uptake of {sup 68}Ga-AMBA was higher while overall background activity was lower than observed for {sup 18}F-FCH in the same PC-bearing mice. These results

  13. In vitro Cytotoxicity, Pharmacokinetics, Tissue Distribution, and Metabolism of Small-Molecule Protein Kinase D Inhibitors, kb-NB142-70 and kb-NB165-09, in Mice bearing Human Cancer Xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jianxia; Clausen, Dana M.; Beumer, Jan H.; Parise, Robert A.; Egorin, Merrill J.; Bravo-Altamirano, Karla; Wipf, Peter; Sharlow, Elizabeth R.; Wang, Qiming Jane; Eiseman, Julie L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Protein kinase D (PKD) mediates diverse biological responses including cell growth and survival. Therefore, PKD inhibitors may have therapeutic potential. We evaluated the in vitro cytotoxicity of two PKD inhibitors, kb-NB142-70 and its methoxy analog, kb-NB165-09, and examined their in vivo efficacy and pharmacokinetics. Methods The in vitro cytotoxicities of kb-NB142-70 and kb-NB165-09 were evaluated by MTT assay against PC-3, androgen independent prostate cancer cells, and CFPAC-1 and PANC-1, pancreatic cancer cells. Efficacy studies were conducted in mice bearing either PC-3 or CPFAC-1 xenografts. Tumor-bearing mice were euthanized between 5 and 1440 min after iv dosing, and plasma and tissue concentrations were measured by HPLC-UV. Metabolites were characterized by LC-MS/MS. Results kb-NB142-70 and kb-NB165-09 inhibited cellular growth in the low-mid μM range. The compounds were inactive when administered to tumor-bearing mice. In mice treated with kb-NB142-70, the plasma Cmax was 36.9 nmol/mL and the PC-3 tumor Cmax was 11.8 nmol/g. In mice dosed with kb-NB165-09, the plasma Cmax was 61.9 nmol/mL while the PANC-1 tumor Cmax was 8.0 nmol/g. The plasma half-lives of kb-NB142-70 and kb-NB165-09 were 6 and 14 min, respectively. Both compounds underwent oxidation and glucuronidation. Conclusions kb-NB142-70 and kb-NB165-09 were rapidly metabolized, and concentrations in tumor were lower than those required for in vitro cytotoxicity. Replacement of the phenolic hydroxyl group with a methoxy group increased the plasma half-life of kb-NB165-09 2.3-fold over that of kb-NB142-70. Rapid metabolism in mice suggests that next-generation compounds will require further structural modifications to increase potency and/or metabolic stability. PMID:23108699

  14. Chimeric anti-tenascin antibody 81C6: Increased tumor localization compared with its murine parent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalutsky, Michael R.; Archer, Gary E.; Garg, Pradeep K.; Batra, Surinder K.; Bigner, Darell D.

    1996-01-01

    When labeled using the Iodogen method, a chimeric antibody composed of the human IgG 2 constant region and the variable regions of murine anti-tenascin 81C6 exhibited superior uptake in human glioma xenografts compared with its murine parent. In the current study, three paired-label experiments were performed in athymic mice with subcutaneous D-54 MG human glioma xenografts to evaluate further the properties of radioiodinated chimeric 81C6. These studies demonstrated that (a) the enhanced tumor uptake of chimeric 81C6 is specific; (b) when labeling was performed using N-succinimidyl 3-iodobenzoate, chimeric 81C6 again showed preferential accumulation in tumor compared with murine 81C6; and (c) the tumor uptake advantage observed previously with murine 81C6 for N-succinimidyl 3-iodobenzoate compared with Iodogen labeling did not occur with chimeric 81C6

  15. Improvement of Radiation-Mediated Immunosuppression of Human NSCLC Tumour Xenografts in a Nude Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Tokalov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Human tumour xenografts in a nude rat model have consistently been used as an essential part of preclinical studies for anticancer drugs activity in human. Commonly, these animals receive whole body irradiation to assure immunosuppression. But whole body dose delivery might be inhomogeneous and the resulting incomplete bone marrow depletion may modify tumour behaviour. To improve irradiation-mediated immunosuppression of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC xenografts in a nude rat model irradiation (2 + 2 Gy from opposite sides of animals has been performed using a conventional X-ray tube. The described modification of whole body irradiation improves growth properties of human NSCLC xenografts in a nude rat model. The design of the whole body irradiation mediated immunosuppression described here for NSCLC xenografts may be useful for research applications involving other types of human tumours.

  16. Antitumor activity of ZD6126, a novel vascular-targeting agent, is enhanced when combined with ZD1839, an epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and potentiates the effects of radiation in a human non-small cell lung cancer xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raben, David; Bianco, Cataldo; Damiano, Vincenzo; Bianco, Roberto; Melisi, Davide; Mignogna, Chiara; D'Armiento, Francesco Paolo; Cionini, Luca; Bianco, A Raffaele; Tortora, Giampaolo; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Bunn, Paul

    2004-08-01

    Targeting the tumor vasculature may offer an alternative or complementary therapeutic approach to targeting growth factor signaling in lung cancer. The aim of these studies was to evaluate the antitumor effects in vivo of the combination of ZD6126, a tumor-selective vascular-targeting agent; ZD1839 (gefitinib, Iressa), an epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor; and ionizing radiation in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer xenograft model. Athymic nude mice with established flank A549 human non-small cell lung cancer xenograft model xenografts were treated with fractionated radiation therapy, ZD6126, ZD1839, or combinations of each treatment. ZD6126 (150 mg/kg) was given i.p. the day after each course of radiation. Animals treated with ZD1839 received 100 mg/kg per dose per animal, 5 or 7 days/wk for 2 weeks. Immunohistochemistry was done to evaluate the effects on tumor growth using an anti-Ki67 monoclonal antibody. Effects on tumor-induced vascularization were quantified using an anti-factor VIII-related antigen monoclonal antibody. ZD6126 attenuated the growth of human A549 flank xenografts compared with untreated animals. Marked antitumor effects were observed when animals were treated with a combination of ZD6126 and fractionated radiation therapy with protracted tumor regression. ZD6126 + ZD1839 resulted in a greater tumor growth delay than either agent alone. Similar additive effects were seen with ZD1839 + fractionated radiation. Finally, the addition of ZD6126 to ZD1839 and radiation therapy seemed to further improve tumor growth control, with a significant tumor growth delay compared with animals treated with single agent or with double combinations. Immunohistochemistry showed that ZD1839 induced a marked reduction in A549 tumor cell proliferation. Both ZD1839 and ZD6126 treatment substantially reduced tumor-induced angiogenesis. ZD6126 caused marked vessel destruction through loss of endothelial cells and thrombosis

  17. Pediatric medulloblastoma xenografts including molecular subgroup 3 and CD133+ and CD15+ cells are sensitive to killing by oncolytic herpes simplex viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Gregory K; Moore, Blake P; Nan, Li; Kelly, Virginia M; Etminan, Tina; Langford, Catherine P; Xu, Hui; Han, Xiaosi; Markert, James M; Beierle, Elizabeth A; Gillespie, G Yancey

    2016-02-01

    Childhood medulloblastoma is associated with significant morbidity and mortality that is compounded by neurotoxicity for the developing brain caused by current therapies, including surgery, craniospinal radiation, and chemotherapy. Innate therapeutic resistance of some aggressive pediatric medulloblastoma has been attributed to a subpopulation of cells, termed cancer-initiating cells or cancer stemlike cells (CSCs), marked by the surface protein CD133 or CD15. Brain tumors characteristically contain areas of pathophysiologic hypoxia, which has been shown to drive the CSC phenotype leading to heightened invasiveness, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Novel therapies that target medulloblastoma CSCs are needed to improve outcomes and decrease toxicity. We hypothesized that oncolytic engineered herpes simplex virus (oHSV) therapy could effectively infect and kill pediatric medulloblastoma cells, including CSCs marked by CD133 or CD15. Using 4 human pediatric medulloblastoma xenografts, including 3 molecular subgroup 3 tumors, which portend worse patient outcomes, we determined the expression of CD133, CD15, and the primary HSV-1 entry molecule nectin-1 (CD111) by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis. Infectability and cytotoxicity of clinically relevant oHSVs (G207 and M002) were determined in vitro and in vivo by FACS, immunofluorescent staining, cytotoxicity assays, and murine survival studies. We demonstrate that hypoxia increased the CD133+ cell fraction, while having the opposite effect on CD15 expression. We established that all 4 xenografts, including the CSCs, expressed CD111 and were highly sensitive to killing by G207 or M002. Pediatric medulloblastoma, including Group 3 tumors, may be an excellent target for oHSV virotherapy, and a clinical trial in medulloblastoma is warranted. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. miR-200–containing extracellular vesicles promote breast cancer cell metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Minh T.N.; Hamar, Peter; Guo, Changying; Basar, Emre; Perdigão-Henriques, Ricardo; Balaj, Leonora; Lieberman, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. Not all cancer cells within a tumor are capable of metastasizing. The microRNA-200 (miR-200) family, which regulates the mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition, is enriched in the serum of patients with metastatic cancers. Ectopic expression of miR-200 can confer metastatic ability to poorly metastatic tumor cells in some settings. Here, we investigated whether metastatic capability could be transferred between metastatic and nonmetastatic cancer cells via extracellular vesicles. miR-200 was secreted in extracellular vesicles from metastatic murine and human breast cancer cell lines, and miR-200 levels were increased in sera of mice bearing metastatic tumors. In culture, murine and human metastatic breast cancer cell extracellular vesicles transferred miR-200 microRNAs to nonmetastatic cells, altering gene expression and promoting mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition. In murine cancer and human xenograft models, miR-200–expressing tumors and extracellular vesicles from these tumors promoted metastasis of otherwise weakly metastatic cells either nearby or at distant sites and conferred to these cells the ability to colonize distant tissues in a miR-200–dependent manner. Together, our results demonstrate that metastatic capability can be transferred by the uptake of extracellular vesicles. PMID:25401471

  19. Effect of endocrine therapy on growth of T61 human breast cancer xenografts is directly correlated to a specific down-regulation of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brünner, N; Yee, D; Kern, F G

    1993-01-01

    xenograft. Growth of the T61 tumour is inhibited by treatment with E2 and TAM. Ribonuclease (RNAse) protection assays with human- and mouse-specific IGF-II antisense probes were used to study the regulation of IGF-II mRNA by E2 and TAM in the tumour. IGF-II protein expression was studied by radioimmunoassay......-IR3 resulted in inhibition of tumour growth during treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)...

  20. Vitrification and xenografting of human ovarian tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Christiani Andrade; Dolmans, Marie-Madeleine; David, Anu; Jaeger, Jonathan; Vanacker, Julie; Camboni, Alessandra; Donnez, Jacques; Van Langendonckt, Anne

    2012-11-01

    To assess the efficiency of two vitrification protocols to cryopreserve human preantral follicles with the use of a xenografting model. Pilot study. Gynecology research unit in a university hospital. Ovarian biopsies were obtained from seven women aged 30-41 years. Ovarian tissue fragments were subjected to one of three cryopreservation protocols (slow freezing, vitrification protocol 1, and vitrification protocol 2) and xenografted for 1 week to nude mice. The number of morphologically normal follicles after cryopreservation and grafting and fibrotic surface area were determined by histologic analysis. Apoptosis was assessed by the TUNEL method. Morphometric analysis of TUNEL-positive surface area also was performed. Follicle proliferation was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. After xenografting, a difference was observed between the cryopreservation procedures applied. According to TUNEL analysis, both vitrification protocols showed better preservation of preantral follicles than the conventional freezing method. Moreover, histologic evaluation showed a significantly higher proportion of primordial follicles in vitrified (protocol 2)-warmed ovarian tissue than in frozen-thawed tissue. The proportion of growing follicles and fibrotic surface area was similar in all groups. Vitrification procedures appeared to preserve not only the morphology and survival of preantral follicles after 1 week of xenografting, but also their ability to resume folliculogenesis. In addition, vitrification protocol 2 had a positive impact on the quiescent state of primordial follicles after xenografting. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Virus Delivery of CRISPR Guides to the Murine Prostate for Gene Alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Maria; Berthelsen, Martin F; Bakiri, Latifa; Wagner, Erwin F; Thomsen, Martin K

    2018-04-27

    With an increasing incidence of prostate cancer, identification of new tumor drivers or modulators is crucial. Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMM) for prostate cancer are hampered by tumor heterogeneity and its complex microevolution dynamics. Traditional prostate cancer mouse models include, amongst others, germline and conditional knockouts, transgenic expression of oncogenes, and xenograft models. Generation of de novo mutations in these models is complex, time-consuming, and costly. In addition, most of traditional models target the majority of the prostate epithelium, whereas human prostate cancer is well known to evolve as an isolated event in only a small subset of cells. Valuable models need to simulate not only prostate cancer initiation, but also progression to advanced disease. Here we describe a method to target a few cells in the prostate epithelium by transducing cells by viral particles. The delivery of an engineered virus to the murine prostate allows alteration of gene expression in the prostate epithelia. Virus type and quantity will hereby define the number of targeted cells for gene alteration by transducing a few cells for cancer initiation and many cells for gene therapy. Through surgery-based injection in the anterior lobe, distal from the urinary track, the tumor in this model can expand without impairing the urinary function of the animal. Furthermore, by targeting only a subset of prostate epithelial cells the technique enables clonal expansion of the tumor, and therefore mimics human tumor initiation, progression, as well as invasion through the basal membrane. This novel technique provides a powerful prostate cancer model with improved physiological relevance. Animal suffering is limited, and since no additional breeding is required, overall animal count is reduced. At the same time, analysis of new candidate genes and pathways is accelerated, which in turn is more cost efficient.

  2. A targeted complement-dependent strategy to improve the outcome of mAb therapy, and characterization in a murine model of metastatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvington, Michelle; Huang, Yuxiang; Morgan, B. Paul; Qiao, Fei; van Rooijen, Nico; Atkinson, Carl

    2012-01-01

    Complement inhibitors expressed on tumor cells provide an evasion mechanism against mAb therapy and may modulate the development of an acquired antitumor immune response. Here we investigate a strategy to amplify mAb-targeted complement activation on a tumor cell, independent of a requirement to target and block complement inhibitor expression or function, which is difficult to achieve in vivo. We constructed a murine fusion protein, CR2Fc, and demonstrated that the protein targets to C3 activation products deposited on a tumor cell by a specific mAb, and amplifies mAb-dependent complement activation and tumor cell lysis in vitro. In syngeneic models of metastatic lymphoma (EL4) and melanoma (B16), CR2Fc significantly enhanced the outcome of mAb therapy. Subsequent studies using the EL4 model with various genetically modified mice and macrophage-depleted mice revealed that CR2Fc enhanced the therapeutic effect of mAb therapy via both macrophage-dependent FcγR-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, and by direct complement-mediated lysis. Complement activation products can also modulate adaptive immunity, but we found no evidence that either mAb or CR2Fc treatment had any effect on an antitumor humoral or cellular immune response. CR2Fc represents a potential adjuvant treatment to increase the effectiveness of mAb therapy of cancer. PMID:22442351

  3. In Vivo Detection of HSP90 Identifies Breast Cancers with Aggressive Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Takuya; Kaneko, Kensuke; Gwin, William R; Morse, Michael A; Hobeika, Amy; Pogue, Brian W; Hartman, Zachary C; Hughes, Philip F; Haystead, Timothy; Lyerly, H Kim

    2017-12-15

    Purpose: Hsp90, a chaperone to numerous molecular pathways in malignant cells, is elevated in aggressive breast cancers. We hypothesized that identifying breast cells with elevated Hsp90 activity in situ could result in early detection of aggressive breast cancers. Experimental Design: We exploited the uptake of an Hsp90 inhibitor by malignant cells to create an imaging probe (HS131) of Hsp90 activity by linking it to a near-infrared (nIR) dye. HS131 uptake into cells correlated with cell membrane expression of Hsp90 and was used to image molecular subtypes of murine and human breast cancers in vitro and in murine models. Results: HS131 imaging was both sensitive and specific in detecting the murine 4T1 breast cancer cell line, as well as subclones with differing metastatic potential. Highly metastatic subclones (4T07) had high HS131 uptake, but subclones with lower metastatic potential (67NR, 168FARN) had low HS131 uptake. We generated isogenic cell lines to demonstrate that overexpression of a variety of specific oncogenes resulted in high HS131 uptake and retention. Finally, we demonstrated that HS131 could be used to detect spontaneous tumors in MMTV-neu mice, as well as primary and metastatic human breast cancer xenografts. HS131 could image invasive lobular breast cancer, a histologic subtype of breast cancer which is often undetectable by mammography. Conclusions: An HSP90-targeting nIR probe is sensitive and specific in imaging all molecular subtypes of murine and human breast cancer, with higher uptake in aggressive and highly metastatic clones. Clinical studies with Hsp90-targeting nIR probes will be initiated shortly. Clin Cancer Res; 23(24); 7531-42. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Non-toxic approach for treatment of breast cancer and its cutaneous metastasis: Capecitabine (Xeloda) enhanced photodynamic therapy in a murine tumor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Sanjay; Denisyuk, Anton; Bullock, Taylor; Govande, Mukul; Maytin, Edward V.

    2018-02-01

    Breast cancer (BCA) is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women, with distant metastases to lung, liver, bone and skin occurring in approximately 40% of cases. Radiation therapy (RT) has been successfully employed for the treatment of BCA; however, multiple rounds of RT are associated with undesirable cutaneous side effects. This study explores PDT as a therapeutic alternative, to be given alone or in combination with RT and chemotherapy. Earlier, we had developed differentiation-enhanced combination photodynamic therapy (cPDT) using a neoadjuvant (5-fluorouracil; 5FU) prior to PDT. The neoadjuvant increases the levels of PpIX, leading to better efficacy following aminolevulinate (ALA)- based PDT. Here, to avoid the toxicity of systemic 5FU, we used a nontoxic 5FU precursor (Capecitabine; CPBN) in a new cPDT regimen. CBPN, a standard chemotherapeutic for BCA, is metabolized to 5FU specifically within tumor tissue. Murine (4T1) BCA cells were injected into breast fat pads of nude mice. CPBN was administered by oral gavage followed by intraperitoneal ALA and red light for PDT. CPBN pretreatment of 4T1 tumors led to increased tumor cell differentiation (3.5 fold), homogenous elevation of intratumoral PpIX levels (4.5 fold), and enhanced tumor cell death post-PDT (5 fold), relative to vehicle control. Using an in vivo imaging system (IVIS), a decline in tumor growth following CPBN-PDT was observed. Results showing the effect of CPBN-PDT on distant metastases of BCA to lung, lymph nodes and skin will be presented. In summary, CPBN-PDT, a novel combination approach, has a significant potential for translation into the clinic.

  5. GU81, a VEGFR2 antagonist peptoid, enhances the anti-tumor activity of doxorubicin in the murine MMTV-PyMT transgenic model of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynn, Kristi D; Udugamasooriya, D Gomika; Roland, Christina L; Castrillon, Diego H; Kodadek, Thomas J; Brekken, Rolf A

    2010-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a primary stimulant of angiogenesis under physiological and pathological conditions. Anti-VEGF therapy is a clinically proven strategy for the treatment of a variety of cancers including colon, breast, lung, and renal cell carcinoma. Since VEGFR2 is the dominant angiogenic signaling receptor, it has become an important target in the development of novel anti-angiogenic therapies. We have reported previously the development of an antagonistic VEGFR2 peptoid (GU40C4) that has promising anti-angiogenic activity in vitro and in vivo. In the current study, we utilize a derivative of GU40C4, termed GU81 in therapy studies. GU81 was tested alone or in combination with doxorubicin for in vivo efficacy in the MMTV-PyMT transgenic model of breast cancer. The derivative GU81 has increased in vitro efficacy compared to GU40C4. Single agent therapy (doxorubicin or GU81 alone) had no effect on tumor weight, histology, tumor fat content, or tumor growth index. However, GU81 is able to significantly to reduce total vascular area as a single agent. GU81 used in combination with doxorubicin significantly reduced tumor weight and growth index compared to all other treatment groups. Furthermore, treatment with combination therapy significantly arrested tumor progression at the premalignant stage, resulting in increased tumor fat content. Interestingly, treatment with GU81 alone increased tumor-VEGF levels and macrophage infiltration, an effect that was abrogated when used in combination with doxorubicin. This study demonstrates the VEGFR2 antagonist peptoid, GU81, enhances the anti-tumor activity of doxorubicin in spontaneous murine MMTV-PyMT breast tumors

  6. Styrene maleic acid-encapsulated paclitaxel micelles: antitumor activity and toxicity studies following oral administration in a murine orthotopic colon cancer model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parayath NN

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Neha N Parayath,1 Hayley Nehoff,1 Samuel E Norton,2 Andrew J Highton,2 Sebastien Taurin,1,3 Roslyn A Kemp,2 Khaled Greish1,4 1Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, 2Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand; 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 4Princess Al-Jawhara Centre for Molecular Medicine, Arabian Gulf University, Manama, Kingdom of Bahrain Abstract: Oral administration of paclitaxel (PTX, a broad spectrum anticancer agent, is challenged by its low uptake due to its poor bioavailability, efflux through P-glycoprotein, and gastrointestinal toxicity. We synthesized PTX nanomicelles using poly(styrene-co-maleic acid (SMA. Oral administration of SMA-PTX micelles doubled the maximum tolerated dose (60 mg/kg vs 30 mg/kg compared to the commercially available PTX formulation (PTX [Ebewe]. In a murine orthotopic colon cancer model, oral administration of SMA-PTX micelles at doses 30 mg/kg and 60 mg/kg reduced tumor weight by 54% and 69%, respectively, as compared to the control group, while no significant reduction in tumor weight was observed with 30 mg/kg of PTX (Ebewe. In addition, toxicity of PTX was largely reduced by its encapsulation into SMA. Furthermore, examination of the tumors demonstrated a decrease in the number of blood vessels. Thus, oral delivery of SMA-PTX micelles may provide a safe and effective strategy for the treatment of colon cancer. Keywords: oral delivery, anticancer nanomedicine, CT-26, enhanced permeability and retention (EPR effect, HUVEC, antiangiogenic

  7. RANK rewires energy homeostasis in lung cancer cells and drives primary lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Shuan; Sigl, Verena; Wimmer, Reiner Alois; Novatchkova, Maria; Jais, Alexander; Wagner, Gabriel; Handschuh, Stephan; Uribesalgo, Iris; Hagelkruys, Astrid; Kozieradzki, Ivona; Tortola, Luigi; Nitsch, Roberto; Cronin, Shane J; Orthofer, Michael; Branstetter, Daniel; Canon, Jude; Rossi, John; D'Arcangelo, Manolo; Botling, Johan; Micke, Patrick; Fleur, Linnea La; Edlund, Karolina; Bergqvist, Michael; Ekman, Simon; Lendl, Thomas; Popper, Helmut; Takayanagi, Hiroshi; Kenner, Lukas; Hirsch, Fred R; Dougall, William; Penninger, Josef M

    2017-10-15

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths. Besides smoking, epidemiological studies have linked female sex hormones to lung cancer in women; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we report that the receptor activator of nuclear factor-kB (RANK), the key regulator of osteoclastogenesis, is frequently expressed in primary lung tumors, an active RANK pathway correlates with decreased survival, and pharmacologic RANK inhibition reduces tumor growth in patient-derived lung cancer xenografts. Clonal genetic inactivation of KRas G12D in mouse lung epithelial cells markedly impairs the progression of KRas G12D -driven lung cancer, resulting in a significant survival advantage. Mechanistically, RANK rewires energy homeostasis in human and murine lung cancer cells and promotes expansion of lung cancer stem-like cells, which is blocked by inhibiting mitochondrial respiration. Our data also indicate survival differences in KRas G12D -driven lung cancer between male and female mice, and we show that female sex hormones can promote lung cancer progression via the RANK pathway. These data uncover a direct role for RANK in lung cancer and may explain why female sex hormones accelerate lung cancer development. Inhibition of RANK using the approved drug denosumab may be a therapeutic drug candidate for primary lung cancer. © 2017 Rao et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  8. Aortic valve replacement with the Biocor PSB stentless xenograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolini, P; Luciani, G B; Vecchi, B; Pugliese, P; Mazzucco, A

    1998-08-01

    The midterm clinical results after aortic valve replacement with the Biocor PSB stentless xenograft on all patients operated between October 1992 and October 1996 were reviewed. One hundred six patients, aged 70+/-6 years, had aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis (67%), regurgitation (11%), or both (22%). Associated procedures were done in 49 patients (46%), including coronary artery bypass in 30 patients, mitral valve repair/replacement in 16, and ascending aorta replacement in 5 patients. Aortic cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass times were 96+/-24 and 129+/-31 minutes, respectively. There were 3 (3%) early deaths due to low output (2 patients) and cerebrovascular accident (1 patient). Follow-up of survivors ranged from 6 to 66 months (mean, 39+/-14 months). Survival was 94%+/-2% and 90%+/-3% at 1 and 5 years. There were 5 late deaths due to cardiac cause (2), cancer (2), and pulmonary embolism (1 patient). No patient had structural valve deterioration, whereas 100% and 95%+/-3% were free from valve-related events at 1 and 5 years. There were two reoperations due to narrowing of the left coronary ostium and endocarditis, with an actuarial freedom from reoperation of 99%+/-1% and 98+/-1% at 1 and 5 years, respectively. Functional results demonstrated a mean peak transprosthetic gradient of 16+/-12 mm Hg, with only 1 patient (1%) with a 55 mm Hg gradient. No cases of valve regurgitation greater than mild were recorded at follow-up. Assessment of New York Heart Association functional class demonstrated a significant improvement (2.9+/-0.6 versus 1.4+/-0.7; p=0.01). All patients were free from anticoagulation. Aortic valve replacement using the Biocor PSB stentless xenograft offers excellent midterm survival, negligible valve deterioration, and a very low rate of valve-related events, which are comparable to estimates reported with other models of stentless xenografts and currently available stented xenografts. Hemodynamic performance is favorable and

  9. {sup 89}Zr-labeled nivolumab for imaging of T-cell infiltration in a humanized murine model of lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    England, Christopher G.; Ehlerding, Emily B.; Ellison, Paul A.; Hernandez, Reinier; Barnhart, Todd E. [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Jiang, Dawei [Health Science Center, Shenzhen University, Guangdong Key Laboratory for Biomedical Measurements and Ultrasound Imaging, School of Biomedical Engineering, Guangzhou (China); University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Rekoske, Brian T. [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Medicine, Madison, WI (United States); McNeel, Douglas G. [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Medicine, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI (United States); Huang, Peng [Health Science Center, Shenzhen University, Guangdong Key Laboratory for Biomedical Measurements and Ultrasound Imaging, School of Biomedical Engineering, Guangzhou (China); Cai, Weibo [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI (United States)

    2018-01-15

    Nivolumab is a human monoclonal antibody specific for programmed cell death-1 (PD-1), a negative regulator of T-cell activation and response. Acting as an immune checkpoint inhibitor, nivolumab binds to PD-1 expressed on the surface of many immune cells and prevents ligation by its natural ligands. Nivolumab is only effective in a subset of patients, and there is limited evidence supporting its use for diagnostic, monitoring, or stratification purposes. {sup 89}Zr-Df-nivolumab was synthesized to map the biodistribution of PD-1-expressing tumor infiltrating T-cells in vivo using a humanized murine model of lung cancer. The tracer was developed by radiolabeling the antibody with the positron emitter zirconium-89 ({sup 89}Zr). Imaging results were validated by ex vivo biodistribution studies, and PD-1 expression was validated by immunohistochemistry. Data obtained from PET imaging were used to determine human dosimetry estimations. The tracer showed elevated binding to stimulated PD-1 expressing T-cells in vitro and in vivo. PET imaging of {sup 89}Zr-Df-nivolumab allowed for clear delineation of subcutaneous tumors through targeting of localized activated T-cells expressing PD-1 in the tumors and salivary glands of humanized A549 tumor-bearing mice. In addition to tumor uptake, salivary and lacrimal gland infiltration of T-cells was noticeably visible and confirmed via histological analysis. These data support our claim that PD-1-targeted agents allow for tumor imaging in vivo, which may assist in the design and development of new immunotherapies. In the future, noninvasive imaging of immunotherapy biomarkers may assist in disease diagnostics, disease monitoring, and patient stratification. (orig.)

  10. A novel murine model of inflammatory bowel disease and inflammation-associated colon cancer with ulcerative colitis-like features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura P Hale

    Full Text Available Mutations that increase susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD have been identified in a number of genes in both humans and mice, but the factors that govern how these mutations contribute to IBD pathogenesis and result in phenotypic presentation as ulcerative colitis (UC or Crohn disease (CD are not well understood. In this study, mice deficient in both TNF and IL-10 (T/I mice were found to spontaneously develop severe colitis soon after weaning, without the need for exogenous triggers. Colitis in T/I mice had clinical and histologic features similar to human UC, including a markedly increased risk of developing inflammation-associated colon cancer. Importantly, development of spontaneous colitis in these mice was prevented by antibiotic treatment. Consistent with the known role of Th17-driven inflammation in response to bacteria, T/I mice had elevated serumTh17-type cytokines when they developed spontaneous colitis and after systemic bacterial challenge via NSAID-induced degradation of the mucosal barrier. Although TNF production has been widely considered to be be pathogenic in IBD, these data indicate that the ability to produce normal levels of TNF actually protects against the spontaneous development of colitis in response to intestinal colonization by bacteria. The T/I mouse model will be useful for developing new rationally-based therapies to prevent and/or treat IBD and inflammation-associated colon cancer and may further provide important insights into the pathogenesis of UC in humans.

  11. Essential roles of high-mobility group box 1 in the development of murine colitis and colitis-associated cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Shin; Hikiba, Yohko; Shibata, Wataru; Ohmae, Tomoya; Yanai, Ayako; Ogura, Keiji; Yamada, Shingo; Omata, Masao

    2007-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear factor released extracellularly as a proinflammatory cytokine. We measured the HMGB1 concentration in the sera of mice with chemically induced colitis (DSS; dextran sulfate sodium salt) and found a marked increase. Inhibition of HMGB1 by neutralizing anti-HMGB1 antibody resulted in reduced inflammation in DSS-treated colons. In macrophages, HMGB1 induces several proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6, which are regulated by NF-κB activation. Two putative sources of HMGB1 were explored: in one, bacterial factors induce HMGB1 secretion from macrophages and in the other, necrotic epithelial cells directly release HMGB1. LPS induced a small amount of HMGB1 in macrophages, but macrophages incubated with supernatant prepared from necrotic cells and containing large amounts of HMGB1 activated NF-κB and induced IL-6. Using the colitis-associated cancer model, we demonstrated that neutralizing anti-HMGB1 antibody decreases tumor incidence and size. These observations suggest that HMGB1 is a potentially useful target for IBD treatment and the prevention of colitis-associated cancer

  12. Expression of membrane anchored cytokines and B7-1 alters tumor microenvironment and induces protective antitumor immunity in a murine breast cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Erica N; Cimino-Mathews, Ashley; Machiah, Deepa K; Patel, Jaina M; Krishnamoorthy, Arun; Tien, Linda; Shashidharamurthy, Rangaiah; Selvaraj, Periasamy

    2013-05-07

    Many studies have shown that the systemic administration of cytokines or vaccination with cytokine-secreting tumors augments an antitumor immune response that can result in eradication of tumors. However, these approaches are hampered by the risk of systemic toxicity induced by soluble cytokines. In this study, we have evaluated the efficacy of 4TO7, a highly tumorigenic murine mammary tumor cell line, expressing glycosyl phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored form of cytokine molecules alone or in combination with the costimulatory molecule B7-1 as a model for potential cell or membrane-based breast cancer vaccines. We observed that the GPI-anchored cytokines expressed on the surface of tumor cells greatly reduced the overall tumorigenicity of the 4TO7 tumor cells following direct live cell challenge as evidenced by transient tumor growth and complete regression within 30 days post challenge. Tumors co-expressing B7-1 and GPI-IL-12 grew the least and for the shortest duration, suggesting that this combination of immunostimulatory molecules is most potent. Protective immune responses were also observed following secondary tumor challenge. Further, the 4TO7-B7-1/GPI-IL-2 and 4TO7-B7-1/GPI-IL-12 transfectants were capable of inducing regression of a wild-type tumor growing at a distant site in a concomitant tumor challenge model, suggesting the tumor immunity elicited by the transfectants can act systemically and inhibit the tumor growth at a distant site. Additionally, when used as irradiated whole cell vaccines, 4TO7-B7-1/GPI-IL-12 led to a significant inhibition in tumor growth of day 7 established tumors. Lastly, we observed a significant decrease in the prevalence of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T-cells in the tumor microenvironment on day 7 post challenge with 4TO7-B7-1/GPI-IL-12 cells, which provides mechanistic insight into antitumor efficacy of the tumor-cell membrane expressed IL-12. These studies have implications in designing membrane

  13. Utility of a human-mouse xenograft model and in vivo near-infrared fluorescent imaging for studying wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Victoria K; Tassi, Elena; Schmidt, Marcel O; McNish, Sean; Baker, Stephen; Attinger, Christopher; Wang, Hong; Shara, Nawar; Wellstein, Anton

    2015-12-01

    To study the complex cellular interactions involved in wound healing, it is essential to have an animal model that adequately mimics the human wound microenvironment. Currently available murine models are limited because wound contraction introduces bias into wound surface area measurements. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate utility of a human-mouse xenograft model for studying human wound healing. Normal human skin was harvested from elective abdominoplasty surgery, xenografted onto athymic nude (nu/nu) mice, and allowed to engraft for 3 months. The graft was then wounded using a 2-mm punch biopsy. Wounds were harvested on sequential days to allow tissue-based markers of wound healing to be followed sequentially. On the day of wound harvest, mice were injected with XenoLight RediJect cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) probe and imaged according to package instructions. Immunohistochemistry confirms that this human-mouse xenograft model is effective for studying human wound healing in vivo. Additionally, in vivo fluorescent imaging for inducible COX-2 demonstrated upregulation from baseline to day 4 (P = 0·03) with return to baseline levels by day 10, paralleling the reepithelialisation of the wound. This human-mouse xenograft model, combined with in vivo fluorescent imaging provides a useful mechanism for studying molecular pathways of human wound healing. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Retrotransposition of long interspersed nucleotide element-1 is associated with colitis but not tumors in a murine colitic cancer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Otsubo

    Full Text Available Long interspersed element-1 (L1 is a transposable element that can move within the genome, potentially leading to genome diversity and modified gene function. Although L1 activity in somatic cells is normally suppressed through DNA methylation, some L1s are activated in tumors including colorectal carcinoma. However, how L1-retrotransposition (L1-RTP is involved in gastrointestinal disorders remains to be elucidated. We hypothesized that L1-RTP in somatic cells might contribute to colitis-associated cancer (CAC. To address this, we employed an experimental model of CAC using transgenic L1-reporter mice carrying a human L1-EGFP reporter gene. Mice were subjected to repeated cycles of colitis induced by administration of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS in drinking water with injection of carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM. L1-RTP levels were measured by a quantitative polymerase chain reaction targeting the newly inserted reporter EGFP in various tissues and cell types, including samples obtained by laser microdissection and cell sorting with flow cytometry. DNA methylation levels of the human L1 promoter were analyzed by bisulfite pyrosequencing. AOM+DSS-treated mice exhibited significantly higher levels of L1-RTP in whole colon tissue during the acute phase of colitis when compared with control naïve mice. L1-RTP levels in whole colon tissue were positively correlated with the histological severity of colitis and degree of neutrophil infiltration into the lamina propria (LP, but not with tumor development in the colon. L1-RTP was enriched in LP mesenchymal cells rather than epithelial cells (ECs, myeloid, or lymphoid cells. DNA methylation levels of the human L1 promoter region showed a negative correlation with L1-RTP levels. L1-RTP was absent from most tumors found in 22-week-old mice. In conclusion, we demonstrated that L1-RTP was induced in the mouse CAC mucosa in accordance with the acute inflammatory response; however, retrotransposition appears

  15. Cancer immunogenomic approach to neoantigen discovery in a checkpoint blockade responsive murine model of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolkind, Paul; Przybylski, Dariusz; Marjanovic, Nemanja; Nguyen, Lan; Lin, Tianxiang; Johanns, Tanner; Alexandrov, Anton; Zhou, Liye; Allen, Clint T.; Miceli, Alexander P.; Schreiber, Robert D.; Artyomov, Maxim; Dunn, Gavin P.; Uppaluri, Ravindra

    2018-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) are an ideal immunotherapy target due to their high mutation burden and frequent infiltration with lymphocytes. Preclinical models to investigate targeted and combination therapies as well as defining biomarkers to guide treatment represent an important need in the field. Immunogenomics approaches have illuminated the role of mutation-derived tumor neoantigens as potential biomarkers of response to checkpoint blockade as well as representing therapeutic vaccines. Here, we aimed to define a platform for checkpoint and other immunotherapy studies using syngeneic HNSCC cell line models (MOC2 and MOC22), and evaluated the association between mutation burden, predicted neoantigen landscape, infiltrating T cell populations and responsiveness of tumors to anti-PD1 therapy. We defined dramatic hematopoietic cell transcriptomic alterations in the MOC22 anti-PD1 responsive model in both tumor and draining lymph nodes. Using a cancer immunogenomics pipeline and validation with ELISPOT and tetramer analysis, we identified the H-2Kb-restricted ICAM1P315L (mICAM1) as a neoantigen in MOC22. Finally, we demonstrated that mICAM1 vaccination was able to protect against MOC22 tumor development defining mICAM1 as a bona fide neoantigen. Together these data define a pre-clinical HNSCC model system that provides a foundation for future investigations into combination and novel therapeutics. PMID:29423108

  16. Diclofenac inhibits tumor growth in a murine model of pancreatic cancer by modulation of VEGF levels and arginase activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Mayorek

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diclofenac is one of the oldest anti-inflammatory drugs in use. In addition to its inhibition of cyclooxygenases (COX, diclofenac potently inhibits phospholipase A(2 (PLA(2, thus yielding a broad anti-inflammatory effect. Since inflammation is an important factor in the development of pancreatic tumors we explored the potential of diclofenac to inhibit tumor growth in mice inoculated with PANCO2 cells orthotopically. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that diclofenac treatment (30 mg/kg/bw for 11 days of mice inoculated with PANC02 cells, reduced the tumor weight by 60%, correlating with increased apoptosis of tumor cells. Since this effect was not observed in vitro on cultured PANCO2 cells, we theorized that diclofenac beneficial treatment involved other mediators present in vivo. Indeed, diclofenac drastically decreased tumor vascularization by downregulating VEGF in the tumor and in abdominal cavity fluid. Furthermore, diclofenac directly inhibited vascular sprouting ex vivo. Surprisingly, in contrast to other COX-2 inhibitors, diclofenac increased arginase activity/arginase 1 protein content in tumor stroma cells, peritoneal macrophages and white blood cells by 2.4, 4.8 and 2 fold, respectively. We propose that the subsequent arginine depletion and decrease in NO levels, both in serum and peritoneal cavity, adds to tumor growth inhibition by malnourishment and poor vasculature development. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, diclofenac shows pronounced antitumoral properties in pancreatic cancer model that can contribute to further treatment development. The ability of diclofenac to induce arginase activity in tumor stroma, peritoneal macrophages and white blood cells provides a tool to study a controversial issue of pro-and antitumoral effects of arginine depletion.

  17. Diclofenac inhibits tumor growth in a murine model of pancreatic cancer by modulation of VEGF levels and arginase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorek, Nina; Naftali-Shani, Nili; Grunewald, Myriam

    2010-09-15

    Diclofenac is one of the oldest anti-inflammatory drugs in use. In addition to its inhibition of cyclooxygenases (COX), diclofenac potently inhibits phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)), thus yielding a broad anti-inflammatory effect. Since inflammation is an important factor in the development of pancreatic tumors we explored the potential of diclofenac to inhibit tumor growth in mice inoculated with PANCO2 cells orthotopically. We found that diclofenac treatment (30 mg/kg/bw for 11 days) of mice inoculated with PANC02 cells, reduced the tumor weight by 60%, correlating with increased apoptosis of tumor cells. Since this effect was not observed in vitro on cultured PANCO2 cells, we theorized that diclofenac beneficial treatment involved other mediators present in vivo. Indeed, diclofenac drastically decreased tumor vascularization by downregulating VEGF in the tumor and in abdominal cavity fluid. Furthermore, diclofenac directly inhibited vascular sprouting ex vivo. Surprisingly, in contrast to other COX-2 inhibitors, diclofenac increased arginase activity/arginase 1 protein content in tumor stroma cells, peritoneal macrophages and white blood cells by 2.4, 4.8 and 2 fold, respectively. We propose that the subsequent arginine depletion and decrease in NO levels, both in serum and peritoneal cavity, adds to tumor growth inhibition by malnourishment and poor vasculature development. In conclusion, diclofenac shows pronounced antitumoral properties in pancreatic cancer model that can contribute to further treatment development. The ability of diclofenac to induce arginase activity in tumor stroma, peritoneal macrophages and white blood cells provides a tool to study a controversial issue of pro-and antitumoral effects of arginine depletion.

  18. Immunotherapeutic effect of Concholepas hemocyanin in the murine bladder cancer model: evidence for conserved antitumor properties among hemocyanins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moltedo, Bruno; Faunes, Fernando; Haussmann, Denise; De Ioannes, Pablo; De Ioannes, Alfredo E; Puente, Javier; Becker, María Inés

    2006-12-01

    hemocyanin. They suggest that this is an ancient conserved immunogenic mechanism shared by those hemocyanins that is able to enhance T helper type 1 immunity and lead to antitumor activity. Therefore, Concholepas concholepas hemocyanin may be an alternative candidate for providing safe and effective immunotherapy for human superficial bladder cancer.

  19. Establishment of animal model for the analysis of cancer cell metastasis during radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Kuk; Jang, Su Jin; Kang, Sung Wook; Park, Sunhoo; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Kim, Wun-Jae; Kang, Joo Hyun; Um, Hong-Duck

    2012-01-01

    Γ-Ionizing radiation (IR) therapy is one of major therapeutic tools in cancer treatment. Nevertheless, γ-IR therapy failed due to occurrence of metastasis, which constitutes a significant obstacle in cancer treatment. The main aim of this investigation was to construct animal model which present metastasis during radiotherapy in a mouse system in vivo and establishes the molecular mechanisms involved. The C6L transfectant cell line expressing firefly luciferase (fLuc) was treated with γ-IR, followed by immunoblotting, zymography and invasion assay in vitro. We additionally employed the C6L transfectant cell line to construct xenografts in nude mice, which were irradiated with γ-IR. Irradiated xenograft-containing mice were analyzed via survival curves, measurement of tumor size, and bioluminescence imaging in vivo and ex vivo. Metastatic lesions in organs of mice were further assessed using RT-PCR, H & E staining and immunohistochemistry. γ-IR treatment of C6L cells induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and increased cell invasion. In irradiated xenograft-containing mice, tumor sizes were decreased dramatically and survival rates extended. Almost all non-irradiated xenograft-containing control mice had died within 4 weeks. However, we also observed luminescence signals in about 22.5% of γ-IR-treated mice. Intestines or lungs of mice displaying luminescence signals contained several lesions, which expressed the fLuc gene and presented histological features of cancer tissues as well as expression of EMT markers. These findings collectively indicate that occurrences of metastases during γ-IR treatment accompanied induction of EMT markers, including increased MMP activity. Establishment of a murine metastasis model during γ-IR treatment should aid in drug development against cancer metastasis and increase our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the metastatic process

  20. Poly(ethylene glycol-block-poly(ε-caprolactone– and phospholipid-based stealth nanoparticles with enhanced therapeutic efficacy on murine breast cancer by improved intracellular drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He XD

    2015-03-01

    breast tumor–bearing mice.Results: LPPs were vesicles around 100 nm in size with negative zeta potential. With enhanced stability, LPPs achieved sustainable release of cancer therapeutics. The cellular uptake level was closely related to the PEG chain length of PEG-b-PCL; a shorter PEG chain resulted in higher cellular uptake. Moreover, the cellular internalization of LPP2000 modified by PEG2000-b-PCL2000 on 4T1 cells was 2.1-fold higher than LDP2000 due to the improved stability of LPP2000. The cytotoxicity of PTX-loaded LPP2000 was also higher than that of LDP2000 and LPP5000 as observed using a WST-8 assay, while blank LPPs showed negligible toxicity. Consistent with the results of the in vitro study, in vivo experiments showed that LPPs allowed significantly improved bioavailability and prolonged T1/2ß as compared to free PTX injection. More importantly, LPPs mainly accumulated at the tumor site, probably due to the enhanced permeation and retention effect (EPR effect. As a nanomedicine, LPP2000 (tumor inhibition rate of 75.1% significantly enhanced the therapeutic effect of PTX in 4T1 breast tumor–bearing mice by inhibiting tumor growth compared to LDP2000 and LPP5000 (tumor inhibition rates of 56.3% and 49.5%, respectively.Conclusion: Modification of liposomes with PEG2000-b-PCL2000 can simultaneously improve drug accumulation at the target tumor site and tumor cells, showing great promise for utilization as a PEG modification tool in the fabrication of stealth nanoparticles for cancer chemotherapy. Keywords: nanoparticles PEG-b-PCL, phospholipid, murine breast cancer chemotherapy, paclitaxel

  1. Tumor Repression of VCaP Xenografts by a Pyrrole-Imidazole Polyamide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda E Hargrove

    Full Text Available Pyrrole-imidazole (Py-Im polyamides are high affinity DNA-binding small molecules that can inhibit protein-DNA interactions. In VCaP cells, a human prostate cancer cell line overexpressing both AR and the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion, an androgen response element (ARE-targeted Py-Im polyamide significantly downregulates AR driven gene expression. Polyamide exposure to VCaP cells reduced proliferation without causing DNA damage. Py-Im polyamide treatment also reduced tumor growth in a VCaP mouse xenograft model. In addition to the effects on AR regulated transcription, RNA-seq analysis revealed inhibition of topoisomerase-DNA binding as a potential mechanism that contributes to the antitumor effects of polyamides in cell culture and in xenografts. These studies support the therapeutic potential of Py-Im polyamides to target multiple aspects of transcriptional regulation in prostate cancers without genotoxic stress.

  2. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibition Radiosensitizes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Chettiar, Sivarajan T. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Aftab, Blake T. [Department of Medical Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Armour, Michael; Gajula, Rajendra; Gandhi, Nishant; Salih, Tarek; Herman, Joseph M.; Wong, John [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Rudin, Charles M. [Department of Medical Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Tran, Phuoc T. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Medical Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Hales, Russell K., E-mail: rhales1@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Despite improvements in chemoradiation, local control remains a major clinical problem in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor recurrence by promoting survival of tumorigenic precursors and through effects on tumor-associated stroma. Whether Hedgehog inhibition can affect radiation efficacy in vivo has not been reported. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the effects of a targeted Hedgehog inhibitor (HhAntag) and radiation on clonogenic survival of human non-small cell lung cancer lines in vitro. Using an A549 cell line xenograft model, we examined tumor growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and gene expression changes after concomitant HhAntag and radiation. In a transgenic mouse model of Kras{sup G12D}-induced and Twist1-induced lung adenocarcinoma, we assessed tumor response to radiation and HhAntag by serial micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning. Results: In 4 human lung cancer lines in vitro, HhAntag showed little or no effect on radiosensitivity. By contrast, in both the human tumor xenograft and murine inducible transgenic models, HhAntag enhanced radiation efficacy and delayed tumor growth. By use of the human xenograft model to differentiate tumor and stromal effects, mouse stromal cells, but not human tumor cells, showed significant and consistent downregulation of Hedgehog pathway gene expression. This was associated with increased tumor cell apoptosis. Conclusions: Targeted Hedgehog pathway inhibition can increase in vivo radiation efficacy in lung cancer preclinical models. This effect is associated with pathway suppression in tumor-associated stroma. These data support clinical testing of Hedgehog inhibitors as a component of multimodality therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

  3. A comprehensive patient-derived xenograft collection representing the heterogeneity of melanoma

    OpenAIRE

    Krepler, Clemens; Sproesser, Katrin; Brafford, Patricia; Beqiri, Marilda; Garman, Bradley; Xiao, Min; Shannan, Batool; Watters, Andrea; Perego, Michela; Zhang, Gao; Vultur, Adina; Yin, Xiangfan; Liu, Qin; Anastopoulos, Ioannis N; Wubbenhorst, Bradley

    2017-01-01

    Summary: Therapy of advanced melanoma is changing dramatically. Following mutational and biological subclassification of this heterogeneous cancer, several targeted and immune therapies were approved and increased survival significantly. To facilitate further advancements through pre-clinical in vivo modeling, we have established 459 patient-derived xenografts (PDX) and live tissue samples from 384 patients representing the full spectrum of clinical, therapeutic, mutational, and biological he...

  4. Targeting human prostate cancer with In-111-labeled D2B IgG, F(ab ')(2) and Fab fragments in nude mice with PSMA-expressing xenografts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutje, Susanne; van Rij, Catharina M.; Franssen, Gerben M.; Fracasso, Giulio; Helfrich, Wijnand; Eek, Annemarie; Oyen, Wim J.; Colombatti, Marco; Boerman, Otto C.

    2014-01-01

    D2B is a new monoclonal antibody directed against an extracellular domain of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), which is overexpressed in prostate cancer. The potential of D2B IgG, and F(ab)(2) and Fab fragments of this antibody for targeting prostate cancer was determined in mice bearing

  5. Targeting human prostate cancer with (111) In-labeled D2B IgG, F(ab')2 and Fab fragments in nude mice with PSMA-expressing xenografts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutje, S.; Rij, C.M. van; Franssen, G.M.; Fracasso, G.; Helfrich, W.; Eek, A.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Colombatti, M.; Boerman, O.C.

    2015-01-01

    D2B is a new monoclonal antibody directed against an extracellular domain of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), which is overexpressed in prostate cancer. The potential of D2B IgG, and F(ab')2 and Fab fragments of this antibody for targeting prostate cancer was determined in mice bearing

  6. Assessment of Hypoxia in the Stroma of Patient-Derived Pancreatic Tumor Xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohse, Ines; Lourenco, Corey; Ibrahimov, Emin; Pintilie, Melania [Ontario Cancer Institute and Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, 610 University Ave., Toronto, ON M5G2M9 (Canada); Tsao, Ming-Sound [Ontario Cancer Institute and Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, 610 University Ave., Toronto, ON M5G2M9 (Canada); Department of Pathology, University Health Network, 200 Elizabeth Street, Toronto, ON M5G2C4 (Canada); Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, 27 King’s College Circle, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S1A1 (Canada); Hedley, David W., E-mail: david.hedley@uhn.ca [Ontario Cancer Institute and Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, 610 University Ave., Toronto, ON M5G2M9 (Canada); Departments of Medical Biophysics University of Toronto, 610 University Ave., Toronto, ON M5G2M9 (Canada); Departments of Medicine, University of Toronto, 610 University Ave., Toronto, ON M5G2M9 (Canada); Department of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, 610 University Ave., Toronto, ON M5G2M9 (Canada)

    2014-02-26

    The unusually dense stroma of pancreatic cancers is thought to play an important role in their biological aggression. The presence of hypoxia is also considered an adverse prognostic factor. Although it is usually assumed that this is the result of effects of hypoxia on the epithelial component, it is possible that hypoxia exerts indirect effects via the tumor stroma. We therefore measured hypoxia in the stroma of a series of primary pancreatic cancer xenografts. Nine patient-derived pancreatic xenografts representing a range of oxygenation levels were labeled by immunohistochemistry for EF5 and analyzed using semi-automated pattern recognition software. Hypoxia in the tumor and stroma was correlated with tumor growth and metastatic potential. The extent of hypoxia varied from 1%–39% between the different models. EF5 labeling in the stroma ranged from 0–20% between models, and was correlated with the level of hypoxia in the tumor cell area, but not microvessel density. Tumor hypoxia correlated with spontaneous metastasis formation with the exception of one hypoxic model that showed disproportionately low levels of hypoxia in the stroma and was non-metastatic. Our results demonstrate that hypoxia exists in the stroma of primary pancreatic cancer xenografts and suggest that stromal hypoxia impacts the metastatic potential.

  7. Models of breast cancer: quo vadis, animal modeling?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, Kay-Uwe

    2004-01-01

    Rodent models for breast cancer have for many decades provided unparalleled insights into cellular and molecular aspects of neoplastic transformation and tumorigenesis. Despite recent improvements in the fidelity of genetically engineered mice, rodent models are still being criticized by many colleagues for not being 'authentic' enough to the human disease. Motives for this criticism are manifold and range from a very general antipathy against the rodent model system to well-founded arguments that highlight physiological variations between species. Newly proposed differences in genetic pathways that cause cancer in humans and mice invigorated the ongoing discussion about the legitimacy of the murine system to model the human disease. The present commentary intends to stimulate a debate on this subject by providing the background about new developments in animal modeling, by disputing suggested limitations of genetically engineered mice, and by discussing improvements but also ambiguous expectations on the authenticity of xenograft models to faithfully mimic the human disease

  8. PET imaging of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) in prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Dorthe; Persson, Morten; Kjaer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptors (uPAR) represents an important biomarker for aggressiveness in most common malignant diseases, including prostate cancer (PC). Accordingly, uPAR expression either assessed directly in malignant PC tissue or assessed directly in plasma...... and prognostic imaging method. In this review, we will focus on the recent development of uPAR PET and the relevance within prostate cancer imaging. Novel antibody and small-molecule radiotracers-targeting uPAR, including a series of uPAR-targeting PET ligands, based on the high affinity peptide ligand AE105......, have been synthesized and tested in vitro and in vivo in preclinical murine xenograft models and, recently, in a first-ever clinical uPAR PET study in cancer patients, including patients with PC. In this phase I study, a high and specific uptake of the tracer 64Cu-DOTA-AE105 was found in both primary...

  9. Alterations in NO- and PGI2- dependent function in aorta in the orthotopic murine model of metastatic 4T1 breast cancer: relationship with pulmonary endothelial dysfunction and systemic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczek, E; Denslow, A; Mateuszuk, L; Proniewski, B; Wojcik, T; Sitek, B; Fedorowicz, A; Jasztal, A; Kus, E; Chmura-Skirlinska, A; Gurbiel, R; Wietrzyk, J; Chlopicki, S

    2018-05-22

    Patients with cancer develop endothelial dysfunction and subsequently display a higher risk of cardiovascular events. The aim of the present work was to examine changes in nitric oxide (NO)- and prostacyclin (PGI 2 )-dependent endothelial function in the systemic conduit artery (aorta), in relation to the formation of lung metastases and to local and systemic inflammation in a murine orthotopic model of metastatic breast cancer. BALB/c female mice were orthotopically inoculated with 4T1 breast cancer cells. Development of lung metastases, lung inflammation, changes in blood count, systemic inflammatory response (e.g. SAA, SAP and IL-6), as well as changes in NO- and PGI 2 -dependent endothelial function in the aorta, were examined 2, 4, 5 and 6 weeks following cancer cell transplantation. As early as 2 weeks following transplantation of breast cancer cells, in the early metastatic stage, lungs displayed histopathological signs of inflammation, NO production was impaired and nitrosylhemoglobin concentration in plasma was decreased. After 4 to 6 weeks, along with metastatic development, progressive leukocytosis and systemic inflammation (as seen through increased SAA, SAP, haptoglobin and IL-6 plasma concentrations) were observed. Six weeks following cancer cell inoculation, but not earlier, endothelial dysfunction in aorta was detected; this involved a decrease in basal NO production and a decrease in NO-dependent vasodilatation, that was associated with a compensatory increase in cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)- derived PGI 2 production. In 4 T1 metastatic breast cancer in mice early pulmonary metastasis was correlated with lung inflammation, with an early decrease in pulmonary as well as systemic NO availability. Late metastasis was associated with robust, cancer-related, systemic inflammation and impairment of NO-dependent endothelial function in the aorta that was associated with compensatory upregulation of the COX-2-derived PGI 2 pathway.

  10. Orthotopic Patient-Derived Glioblastoma Xenografts in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhongye; Kader, Michael; Sen, Rajeev; Placantonakis, Dimitris G

    2018-01-01

    Patient-derived xenografts (PDX) provide in vivo glioblastoma (GBM) models that recapitulate actual tumors. Orthotopic tumor xenografts within the mouse brain are obtained by injection of GBM stem-like cells derived from fresh surgical specimens. These xenografts reproduce GBM's histologic complexity and hallmark biological behaviors, such as brain invasion, angiogenesis, and resistance to therapy. This method has become essential for analyzing mechanisms of tumorigenesis and testing the therapeutic effect of candidate agents in the preclinical setting. Here, we describe a protocol for establishing orthotopic tumor xenografts in the mouse brain with human GBM cells.

  11. Validation of a mouse xenograft model system for gene expression analysis of human acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Richard W

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pre-clinical models that effectively recapitulate human disease are critical for expanding our knowledge of cancer biology and drug resistance mechanisms. For haematological malignancies, the non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID mouse is one of the most successful models to study paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL. However, for this model to be effective for studying engraftment and therapy responses at the whole genome level, careful molecular characterisation is essential. Results Here, we sought to validate species-specific gene expression profiling in the high engraftment continuous ALL NOD/SCID xenograft. Using the human Affymetrix whole transcript platform we analysed transcriptional profiles from engrafted tissues without prior cell separation of mouse cells and found it to return highly reproducible profiles in xenografts from individual mice. The model was further tested with experimental mixtures of human and mouse cells, demonstrating that the presence of mouse cells does not significantly skew expression profiles when xenografts contain 90% or more human cells. In addition, we present a novel in silico and experimental masking approach to identify probes and transcript clusters susceptible to cross-species hybridisation. Conclusions We demonstrate species-specific transcriptional profiles can be obtained from xenografts when high levels of engraftment are achieved or with the application of transcript cluster masks. Importantly, this masking approach can be applied and adapted to other xenograft models where human tissue infiltration is lower. This model provides a powerful platform for identifying genes and pathways associated with ALL disease progression and response to therapy in vivo.

  12. Imaging Primary Prostate Cancer and Bone Metastasis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2004-01-01

    ... and androgen independent prostate cancer xenografted mice. Specific Aims: (1) Design, synthesize, and characterize positrori emitting bombesin analogs, labeled with copper-64 or fluorine-I 8; (2...

  13. Assessment of a novel VEGF targeted agent using patient-derived tumor tissue xenograft models of colon carcinoma with lymphatic and hepatic metastases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketao Jin

    Full Text Available The lack of appropriate tumor models of primary tumors and corresponding metastases that can reliably predict for response to anticancer agents remains a major deficiency in the clinical practice of cancer therapy. It was the aim of our study to establish patient-derived tumor tissue (PDTT xenograft models of colon carcinoma with lymphatic and hepatic metastases useful for testing of novel molecularly targeted agents. PDTT of primary colon carcinoma, lymphatic and hepatic metastases were used to create xenograft models. Hematoxylin and eosin staining, immunohistochemical staining, genome-wide gene expression analysis, pyrosequencing, qRT-PCR, and western blotting were used to determine the biological stability of the xenografts during serial transplantation compared with the original tumor tissues. Early passages of the PDTT xenograft models of primary colon carcinoma, lymphatic and hepatic metastases revealed a high degree of similarity with the original clinical tumor samples with regard to histology, immunohistochemistry, genes expression, and mutation status as well as mRNA expression. After we have ascertained that these xenografts models retained similar histopathological features and molecular signatures as the original tumors, drug sensitivities of the xenografts to a novel VEGF targeted agent, FP3 was evaluated. In this study, PDTT xenograft models of colon carcinoma with lymphatic and hepatic metastasis have been successfully established. They provide appropriate models for testing of novel molecularly targeted agents.

  14. Activation of PDGFr-β Signaling Pathway after Imatinib and Radioimmunotherapy Treatment in Experimental Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Michio [Minamata City Hospital and Medical Center, Minamata City, Kumamoto 867 (Japan); Kortylewicz, Zbigniew P.; Enke, Charles A.; Mack, Elizabeth; Baranowska-Kortylewicz, Janina, E-mail: jbaranow@unmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, J. Bruce Henriksen Cancer Research Laboratories, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198 (United States)

    2011-05-25

    Pancreatic cancer does not respond to a single-agent imatinib therapy. Consequently, multimodality treatments are contemplated. Published data indicate that in colorectal cancer, imatinib and radioimmunotherapy synergize to delay tumor growth. In pancreatic cancer, the tumor response is additive. This disparity of outcomes merited further studies because interactions between these modalities depend on the imatinib-induced reduction of the tumor interstitial fluid pressure. The examination of human and murine PDGFr-β/PDGF-B pathways in SW1990 pancreatic cancer xenografts revealed that the human branch is practically dormant in untreated tumors but the insult on the stromal component produces massive responses of human cancer cells. Inhibition of the stromal PDGFr-β with imatinib activates human PDGFr-β/PDGF-B signaling loop, silent in untreated xenografts, via an apparent paracrine rescue pathway. Responses are treatment-and time-dependent. Soon after treatment, levels of human PDGFr-β, compared to untreated tumors, are 3.4×, 12.4×, and 5.7× higher in imatinib-, radioimmunotherapy + imatinib-, and radioimmunotherapy-treated tumors, respectively. A continuous 14-day irradiation of imatinib-treated xenografts reduces levels of PDGFr-β and phosphorylated PDGFr-β by 5.3× and 4×, compared to earlier times. Human PDGF-B is upregulated suggesting that the survival signaling via the autocrine pathway is also triggered after stromal injury. These findings indicate that therapies targeting pancreatic cancer stromal components may have unintended mitogenic effects and that these effects can be reversed when imatinib is used in conjunction with radioimmunotherapy.

  15. Activation of PDGFr-β Signaling Pathway after Imatinib and Radioimmunotherapy Treatment in Experimental Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Michio; Kortylewicz, Zbigniew P.; Enke, Charles A.; Mack, Elizabeth; Baranowska-Kortylewicz, Janina

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer does not respond to a single-agent imatinib therapy. Consequently, multimodality treatments are contemplated. Published data indicate that in colorectal cancer, imatinib and radioimmunotherapy synergize to delay tumor growth. In pancreatic cancer, the tumor response is additive. This disparity of outcomes merited further studies because interactions between these modalities depend on the imatinib-induced reduction of the tumor interstitial fluid pressure. The examination of human and murine PDGFr-β/PDGF-B pathways in SW1990 pancreatic cancer xenografts revealed that the human branch is practically dormant in untreated tumors but the insult on the stromal component produces massive responses of human cancer cells. Inhibition of the stromal PDGFr-β with imatinib activates human PDGFr-β/PDGF-B signaling loop, silent in untreated xenografts, via an apparent paracrine rescue pathway. Responses are treatment-and time-dependent. Soon after treatment, levels of human PDGFr-β, compared to untreated tumors, are 3.4×, 12.4×, and 5.7× higher in imatinib-, radioimmunotherapy + imatinib-, and radioimmunotherapy-treated tumors, respectively. A continuous 14-day irradiation of imatinib-treated xenografts reduces levels of PDGFr-β and phosphorylated PDGFr-β by 5.3× and 4×, compared to earlier times. Human PDGF-B is upregulated suggesting that the survival signaling via the autocrine pathway is also triggered after stromal injury. These findings indicate that therapies targeting pancreatic cancer stromal components may have unintended mitogenic effects and that these effects can be reversed when imatinib is used in conjunction with radioimmunotherapy

  16. Early induction of cytokines/cytokine receptors and Cox2, and activation of NF-κB in 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide-induced murine oral cancer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yu-Ching [Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Department of Veterinary Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Ho, Heng-Chien; Lee, Miau-Rong [Department of Biochemistry, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Lai, Kuang-Chi [Department of Surgery, China Medical University Beigang Hospital, Yunlin 651, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Chung-Min; Lin, Yueh-Min [Department of Pathology, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua 500, Taiwan (China); Ho, Tin-Yun [School of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Hsiang, Chien-Yun, E-mail: cyhsiang@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Department of Microbiology, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Chung, Jing-Gung, E-mail: jgchung@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Department of Biological Science and Technology, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung 413, Taiwan (China)

    2012-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to identify the genes induced early in murine oral carcinogenesis. Murine tongue tumors induced by the carcinogen, 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO), and paired non-tumor tissues were subjected to microarray analysis. Hierarchical clustering of upregulated genes in the tumor tissues revealed an association of induced genes with inflammation. Cytokines/cytokine receptors induced early were subsequently identified, clearly indicating their involvement in oral carcinogenesis. Hierarchical clustering also showed that cytokine-mediated inflammation was possibly linked with Mapk6. Cox2 exhibited the greatest extent (9–18 fold) of induction in the microarray data, and its early induction was observed in a 2 h painting experiment by RT-PCR. MetaCore analysis showed that overexpressed Cox2 may interact with p53 and transcriptionally inhibit expression of several downstream genes. A painting experiment in transgenic mice also demonstrated that NF-κB activates early independently of Cox2 induction. MetaCore analysis revealed the most striking metabolic alterations in tumor tissues, especially in lipid metabolism resulting from the reduction of Pparα and Rxrg. Reduced expression of Mapk12 was noted, and MetaCore analysis established its relationship with decreased efficiency of Pparα phosphorylation. In conclusion, in addition to cytokines/cytokine receptors, the early induction of Cox2 and NF-κB activation is involved in murine oral carcinogenesis.

  17. Early induction of cytokines/cytokine receptors and Cox2, and activation of NF-κB in 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide-induced murine oral cancer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yu-Ching; Ho, Heng-Chien; Lee, Miau-Rong; Lai, Kuang-Chi; Yeh, Chung-Min; Lin, Yueh-Min; Ho, Tin-Yun; Hsiang, Chien-Yun; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the genes induced early in murine oral carcinogenesis. Murine tongue tumors induced by the carcinogen, 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO), and paired non-tumor tissues were subjected to microarray analysis. Hierarchical clustering of upregulated genes in the tumor tissues revealed an association of induced genes with inflammation. Cytokines/cytokine receptors induced early were subsequently identified, clearly indicating their involvement in oral carcinogenesis. Hierarchical clustering also showed that cytokine-mediated inflammation was possibly linked with Mapk6. Cox2 exhibited the greatest extent (9–18 fold) of induction in the microarray data, and its early induction was observed in a 2 h painting experiment by RT-PCR. MetaCore analysis showed that overexpressed Cox2 may interact with p53 and transcriptionally inhibit expression of several downstream genes. A painting experiment in transgenic mice also demonstrated that NF-κB activates early independently of Cox2 induction. MetaCore analysis revealed the most striking metabolic alterations in tumor tissues, especially in lipid metabolism resulting from the reduction of Pparα and Rxrg. Reduced expression of Mapk12 was noted, and MetaCore analysis established its relationship with decreased efficiency of Pparα phosphorylation. In conclusion, in addition to cytokines/cytokine receptors, the early induction of Cox2 and NF-κB activation is involved in murine oral carcinogenesis.

  18. A Comprehensive Patient-Derived Xenograft Collection Representing the Heterogeneity of Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemens Krepler

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Therapy of advanced melanoma is changing dramatically. Following mutational and biological subclassification of this heterogeneous cancer, several targeted and immune therapies were approved and increased survival significantly. To facilitate further advancements through pre-clinical in vivo modeling, we have established 459 patient-derived xenografts (PDX and live tissue samples from 384 patients representing the full spectrum of clinical, therapeutic, mutational, and biological heterogeneity of melanoma. PDX have been characterized using targeted sequencing and protein arrays and are clinically annotated. This exhaustive live tissue resource includes PDX from 57 samples resistant to targeted therapy, 61 samples from responders and non-responders to immune checkpoint blockade, and 31 samples from brain metastasis. Uveal, mucosal, and acral subtypes are represented as well. We show examples of pre-clinical trials that highlight how the PDX collection can be used to develop and optimize precision therapies, biomarkers of response, and the targeting of rare genetic subgroups. : Krepler et al. have established a collection of melanoma patient-derived xenografts (PDX. Melanoma is a very heterogeneous cancer, and this large collection includes even rare subtypes and genetic aberrations in sufficient numbers. Multiple PDX from therapy-resistant patients are characterized and tested in pre-clinical trials for second line therapies. Keywords: melanoma, patient-derived xenografts, targeted therapy, immune checkpoint blockade, melanoma brain metastasis, in vivo models, BRAF inhibitor resistance, ERK inhibitor, MDM2 inhibitor, PI3K beta inhibitor

  19. Human tumour xenografts established and serially transplanted in mice immunologically deprived by thymectomy, cytosine arabinoside and whole-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, P.J.; Thomas, J.M.; Peckham, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    Mice immunologically deprived by thymectomy, cytosine arabinoside treatment and whole-body irradiation were used to study the growth of human tumours as xenografts. 10/16 melanoma biopsies, 4/13 ovarian carcinoma biopsies and 3/6 uterine cancer biopsies grew as serially transplantable xenograft lines. The tumour lines were studied through serial passages by histology, histo-chemistry, electron microscopy, chromosome analysis, immune fluorescence, growth rate measurement and mitotic counts. They retained the characteristics of the tumours of origin, with the exception of loss of pigmentation in two melanomas, histological dedifferentiation in the uterine carcinomas, and increased mitotic frequency and growth rate in some melanomas. It was concluded that this type of animal preparation is as useful as alternative methods of immunological deprivation, or as athymic nude mice, for the growth of human tumour xenografts, at least for some experimental purposes. (author)

  20. Cáncer experimental e inflamación sistémica en un modelo murino Systemic inflammation and experimental cancer in a murine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Bruzzo

    2007-10-01

    both animals and human beings. In contrast, the relationship between cancer and systemic inflammation has been less studied. In this work, we demonstrated that the growth of the murine fibrosarcoma MC-C, was accompanied by manifestations of systemic inflammation, as demonstrated by an increase in both the number of circulating polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN and the serum concentration of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β, interleukin-6 (IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and the acute phase proteins C reactive (CRP and serum A amyloid (SAA. Two temporally separate peaks of systemic inflammation were detected during tumor development. The first was displayed during the first week after tumor inoculation. The second peak began around day 14 and its intensity was proportional to tumor size. In mice bearing a large MC-C tumor, a high number of circulating PMN and myeloid precursors were evident. Most of these cells exhibited activation evidenced by an increased reactive oxygen species generation and high expression of the Gr1+/Mac1+ markers. Inoculation of thioglycolate -which generates a transient systemic inflammation- accelerated the growth of MC-C tumor and reciprocally, inhibition of such systemic inflammation by using indomethacin, prevented that enhancing effect. This suggests that the systemic inflammation that the tumor generates on its own, could be part of its growth strategy.

  1. Clearance of 131I-labeled murine monoclonal antibody from patients' blood by intravenous human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, J.S.; Sivolapenko, G.B.; Hird, V.; Davies, K.A.; Walport, M.; Ritter, M.A.; Epenetos, A.A.

    1990-01-01

    Five patients treated with intraperitoneal 131I-labeled mouse monoclonal antibody for ovarian cancer also received i.v. exogenous polyclonal human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody. The pharmacokinetics of 131I-labeled monoclonal antibody in these patients were compared with those of 28 other patients receiving i.p.-radiolabeled monoclonal antibody for the first time without exogenous human anti-murine immunoglobulin, and who had no preexisting endogenous human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody. Patients receiving i.v. human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody demonstrated a rapid clearance of 131I-labeled monoclonal antibody from their circulation. The (mean) maximum 131I blood content was 11.4% of the injected activity in patients receiving human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody compared to 23.3% in patients not given human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody. Intravenous human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody decreased the radiation dose to bone marrow (from 131I-labeled monoclonal antibody in the vascular compartment) 4-fold. Following the injection of human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody, 131I-monoclonal/human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody immune complexes were rapidly transported to the liver. Antibody dehalogenation in the liver was rapid, with 87% of the injected 131I excreted in 5 days. Despite the efficient hepatic uptake of immune complexes, dehalogenation of monoclonal antibody was so rapid that the radiation dose to liver parenchyma from circulating 131I was decreased 4-fold rather than increased. All patients developed endogenous human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody 2 to 3 weeks after treatment

  2. Radio-adjuvant effects of ginsan on murine breast carcinoma xenografted model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Ji Young; Son, Hyeog Jin; Kim, Hyung Doo; Han, Young Soo; Yun, Yeon Sook; Song, Jie Young [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    In a number of studies, polysaccharide extracted from Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer, ginsan has been demonstrated to be a potent promising biological response modifier (BRM), including proliferation of lymphocyte, generation of lymphokine activated killer cells, and production of several cytokines. Macrophages are the first line of defense to infections or pathogens in host innate immunity. In addition, it plays a prominent role as a professional antigen presenting cells to trigger cellular immunity. In the light of that, the current study was designed to evaluate whether ginsan exhibits anti-tumor effect as well as synergistic function with chemo- or radio-therapy.

  3. Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG inhibits progression of LuCaP35 xenograft prostate tumors to castration resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Katherine J; Langmann, Gabrielle; Ai, Junkui; Ramos-Garcia, Raquel; Vessella, Robert L; Wang, Zhou

    2012-07-01

    Advanced prostate cancer is currently treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). ADT initially results in tumor regression; however, all patients eventually relapse with castration-resistant prostate cancer. New approaches to delay the progression of prostate cancer to castration resistance are in desperate need. This study addresses whether targeting Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) regulation of androgen receptor (AR) can inhibit prostate cancer progression to castration resistance. The HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG was injected intraperitoneally into nude mice bearing LuCaP35 xenograft tumors to determine the effect of HSP90 inhibition on prostate cancer progression to castration resistance and host survival. Administration of 17-AAG maintained androgen-sensitivity, delayed the progression of LuCaP35 xenograft tumors to castration resistance, and prolonged the survival of host. In addition, 17-AAG prevented nuclear localization of endogenous AR in LuCaP35 xenograft tumors in castrated nude mice. Targeting Hsp90 or the mechanism by which HSP90 regulates androgen-independent AR nuclear localization and activation may lead to new approaches to prevent and/or treat castration-resistant prostate cancer. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. In vivo inhibitory activity of andrographolide derivative ADN-9 against liver cancer and its mechanisms involved in inhibition of tumor angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Zhao, Jin; Wang, Yake; Xu, Haiwei; Wu, Zhenwei; Hu, Yangyang; Jiang, Kunkun; Shen, Pengpeng; Ma, Cuiyun; Guan, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Yan; Ma, Jiahui; Shang, Ning; Yan, Guangming; Wang, Zhenji; Dai, Guifu

    2017-07-15

    It is well known that liver cancer is a highly aggressive malignancy with poor prognosis. Andrographolide (AD), a major bioactive component of Andrographis paniculata (Burm. F.), is a potential anti-cancer pharmacophore and the synthesis of AD derivatives with better cytotoxicity to cancer cells has attracted considerable attentions. In the present study, we evaluated the in vivo inhibitory effects of ADN-9, a 15-benzylidene substituted derivative of AD, on the growth and metastasis of murine hepatoma H22 using an orthotopic xenograft model and a subcutaneous xenograft model, and we further studied the anti-angiogenic action and the related mechanisms of ADN-9 in vivo and in vitro. Importantly, ADN-9 remarkably suppressed the growth and metastasis of both orthotopic and subcutaneous xenograft tumors, and the serum AFP level in orthotopic hepatoma-bearing mice treated with 100mg/kg ADN-9 (ig.) was decreased to the normal level. We also found that ADN-9 showed stronger abilities than AD in shrinking tumors, suppressing the invasion and metastasis of H22 cells, decreasing the MVD and promoting tumor cell apoptosis in subcutaneous xenograft of mice. Additionally, ADN-9 exhibited stronger inhibitory activity than AD against the migration and VEGF-induced capillary-like tube formation in HUVECs, which was further proved to be associated with attenuating VEGF/VEGFR2/AKT signaling pathway. The present research provides the first evidence that a 15-substituted AD derivative is more promising than the parent compound in therapeutic treatment of liver cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. In vivo bioluminescence imaging using orthotopic xenografts towards patient's derived-xenograft Medulloblastoma models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadzadeh, Fatemeh; Ferrucci, Veronica; DE Antonellis, Pasqualino; Zollo, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    Medulloblastoma is a cerebellar neoplasia of the central nervous system. Four molecular subgrups have been identified (MBWNT, MBSHH, MBgroup3 and MBgroup4) with distinct genetics and clinical outcome. Among these, MBgroup3-4 are highly metastatic with the worst prognosis. The current standard therapy includes surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. Thus, specific treatments adapted to cure those different molecular subgroups are needed. The use of orthotopic xenograft models, together with the non-invasive in vivo biolumiscence imaging (BLI) technology, is emerging during preclinical studies to test novel therapeutics for medulloblastoma treatment. Orthotopic MB xenografts were performed by injection of Daoy-luc cells, that had been previously infected with lentiviral particles to stably express luciferase gene, into the fourth right ventricle of the cerebellum of ten nude mice. For the implantation, specific stereotactic coordinates were used. Seven days after the implantation the mice were imaged by acquisitions of bioluminescence imaging (BLI) using IVIS 3D Illumina Imaging System (Xenogen). Tumor growth was evaluated by quantifying the bioluminescence signals using the integrated fluxes of photons within each area of interest using the Living Images Software Package 3.2 (Xenogen-Perkin Elmer). Finally, histological analysis using hematoxylin-eosin staining was performed to confirm the presence of tumorigenic cells into the cerebellum of the mice. We describe a method to use the in vivo bioluminescent imaging (BLI) showing the potential to be used to investigate the potential antitumorigenic effects of a drug for in vivo medulloblastoma treatment. We also discuss other studies in which this technology has been applied to obtain a more comprehensive knowledge of medulloblastoma using orthotopic xenograft mouse models. There is a need to develop patient's derived-xenograft (PDX) model systems to test novel drugs for medulloblastoma treatment within each molecular sub

  6. Effect of traditional Chinese medicine composit Guben Yiliu III combined with gemcitabine on human pancreatic cancer xenograft in nude mice%固本抑瘤Ⅲ号方联合吉西他滨对人胰腺癌裸鼠异位移植瘤的抑瘤作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘炬; 钱海利; 徐志坚; 张立生; 叶霈智; 田爱平; 杨宏丽

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨固本抑瘤Ⅲ号方以及与吉西他滨联合治疗人胰腺癌裸鼠异位移植瘤的抑瘤作用。方法将40只荷瘤裸鼠随机分为对照组、吉西他滨组、固本抑瘤Ⅲ号联合吉西他滨组、固本抑瘤Ⅲ号组,每组10只。于接种后第8天开始给药,观察指标为瘤重、裸鼠体重、移植瘤体积。结果吉西他滨组、固本抑瘤Ⅲ号联合吉西他滨组、固本抑瘤Ⅲ号组的抑瘤率分别为49.2%、68.9%和28.0%。固本抑瘤Ⅲ号联合吉西他滨组较吉西他滨组抑瘤作用更强( P<0.05)。吉西他滨组、固本抑瘤Ⅲ号联合吉西他滨组、固本抑瘤Ⅲ号组移植瘤体积均较对照组明显降低,差异有显著性。固本抑瘤Ⅲ号联合吉西他滨组体重下降明显,体重较对照组、吉西他滨组及固本抑瘤Ⅲ号组明显下降,差异有显著性。结论固本抑瘤Ⅲ号方具有增加吉西他滨化疗治疗人胰腺癌裸鼠腋下移植瘤疗效的作用。%Objective To explore whether the Chinese medicine Guben Yiliu III can improve the effect of gemcit -abine on human pancreatic cancer xenograft in nude mice . Methods Nude mice with transplanted human pancreatic cancer were divided randomly into 4 groups: control group, gemcitabine treatment group , combined ( Guben Yiliu III +gemcitabine) group, and Guben Yiliu III group, 10 mice in each group.The gemcitabine group and combined group were treated with gemcitabine from the 8th day after transplantation in a dose of 100 mg/kg by i.p.injection, twice a week. Guben Yiliu III and combined groups were given the aqueous solution of Guben Yiliu III granules p .o.since the 8th day af-ter transplantation .Result The inhibition rate of transplanted tumor in the three treatment groups were 48.9% in the gemcitabine group , 68.9%in the combined group , and 28.0%in the Guben Yiliu III group .The combined group showed a significantly higher inhibition rate than the gemcitabine group (P<0

  7. Spontaneous transformation of murine oviductal epithelial cells: A model system to investigate the onset of fallopian-derived tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIchael P. Endsley

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available High-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC is the most lethal ovarian cancer histotype. The fallopian tube secretory epithelial cells (FTSECs are a proposed progenitor cell type. Genetically altered FTSECs form tumors in mice; however, a spontaneous HGSC model has not been described. Apart from a subpopulation of genetically predisposed women, most women develop ovarian cancer spontaneously, which is associated with aging and lifetime ovulations. A murine oviductal cell line (MOELOW was developed and continuously passaged in culture to mimic cellular aging (MOEHIGH. The MOEHIGH cellular model exhibited a loss of acetylated tubulin consistent with an outgrowth of secretory epithelial cells in culture. MOEHIGH cells proliferated significantly faster than MOELOW, and the MOEHIGH cells produced more 2D foci and 3D soft agar colonies as compared to MOELOW. MOEHIGH were xenografted into athymic female nude mice both in the subcutaneous and the intraperiteonal compartments. Only the subcutaneous grafts formed tumors that were negative for cytokeratin, but positive for oviductal markers such as oviductal glycoprotein 1 and Pax8. These tumors were considered to be poorly differentiated carcinoma. The differential molecular profiles between MOEHIGH and MOELOW were determined using RNA-Seq and confirmed by protein expression to uncover pathways important in transformation, like the p53 pathway, the FOXM1 pathway, WNT signaling, and splicing. MOEHIGH had enhanced protein expression of c-myc, Cyclin E, p53 and FOXM1 with reduced expression of p21. MOEHIGH were also less sensitive to cisplatin and DMBA, which induce lesions typically repaired by base-excision repair. A model of spontaneous tumorogenesis was generated starting with normal oviductal cells. Their transition to cancer involved alterations in pathways associated with high-grade serous cancer in humans.

  8. A dominated and resistant subpopulation causes regrowth after response to 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea treatment of a heterogeneous small cell lung cancer xenograft in nude mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabo, K; Roed, H; Vindeløv, L L

    1994-01-01

    In order to address the question of the influence of a primarily chemoresistant tumor cell subpopulation on the progression of a heterogeneous tumor after cytotoxic therapy, in vitro established human small cell lung cancer cell lines of a 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU)-sensitive (592...... was demonstrated in the 9:1 mixed tumors in which only 592 cells were detectable at the start of the treatment. The response was short and less pronounced compared with tumors containing only 592. In the regrowing tumors after treatment, only NYH was detected. In untreated 9:1 mixed control tumors, only 592 cells...

  9. Antitumor effect of novel anti-podoplanin antibody NZ-12 against malignant pleural mesothelioma in an orthotopic xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Shinji; Kaneko, Mika Kato; Tsuchihashi, Yuki; Izumi, Toshihiro; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Okada, Naoto; Sato, Chiemi; Tobiume, Makoto; Otsuka, Kenji; Miyamoto, Licht; Tsuchiya, Koichiro; Kawazoe, Kazuyoshi; Kato, Yukinari; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2016-09-01

    Podoplanin (aggrus) is highly expressed in several types of cancers, including malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Previously, we developed a rat anti-human podoplanin mAb, NZ-1, and a rat-human chimeric anti-human podoplanin antibody, NZ-8, derived from NZ-1, which induced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-dependent cytotoxicity against podoplanin-positive MPM cell lines. In this study, we showed the antitumor effect of NZ-1, NZ-8, and NZ-12, a novel rat-human chimeric anti-human podoplanin antibody derived from NZ-1, in an MPM orthotopic xenograft SCID mouse model. Treatment with NZ-1 and rat NK (CD161a(+) ) cells inhibited the growth of tumors and the production of pleural effusion in NCI-H290/PDPN or NCI-H226 orthotopic xenograft mouse models. NZ-8 and human natural killer (NK) (CD56(+) ) cells also inhibited tumor growth and pleural effusion in MPM orthotopic xenograft mice. Furthermore, NZ-12 induced potent ADCC mediated by human MNC, compared with either NZ-1 or NZ-8. Antitumor effects were observed following treatment with NZ-12 and human NK (CD56(+) ) cells in MPM orthotopic xenograft mice. In addition, combined immunotherapy using the ADCC activity of NZ-12 mediated by human NK (CD56(+) ) cells with pemetrexed, led to enhanced antitumor effects in MPM orthotopic xenograft mice. These results strongly suggest that combination therapy with podoplanin-targeting immunotherapy using both NZ-12 and pemetrexed might provide an efficacious therapeutic strategy for the treatment of MPM. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  10. Identification of Biomarkers of Necrosis in Xenografts Using Imaging Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Roberto; Garate, Jone; Lage, Sergio; Terés, Silvia; Higuera, Mónica; Bestard-Escalas, Joan; López, Daniel H; Guardiola-Serrano, Francisca; Escribá, Pablo V; Barceló-Coblijn, Gwendolyn; Fernández, José A

    2016-02-01

    Xenografts are commonly used to test the effect of new drugs on human cancer. However, because of their heterogeneity, analysis of the results is often controversial. Part of the problem originates in the existence of tumor cells at different metabolic stages: from metastatic to necrotic cells, as it happens in real tumors. Imaging mass spectrometry is an excellent solution for the analysis of the results as it yields detailed information not only on the composition of the tissue but also on the distribution of the biomolecules within the tissue. Here, we use imaging mass spectrometry to determine the distribution of phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), and their plasmanyl- and plasmenylether derivatives (PC-P/O and PE-P/O) in xenografts of five different tumor cell lines: A-549, NCI-H1975, BX-PC3, HT29, and U-87 MG. The results demonstrate that the necrotic areas showed a higher abundance of Na(+) adducts and of PC-P/O species, whereas a large abundance of PE-P/O species was found in all the xenografts. Thus, the PC/PC-ether and Na(+)/K(+) ratios may highlight the necrotic areas while an increase on the number of PE-ether species may be pointing to the existence of viable tumor tissues. Furthermore, the existence of important changes in the concentration of Na(+) and K(+) adducts between different tissues has to be taken into account while interpreting the imaging mass spectrometry results. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  11. Influence of histamine and serotonin antagonists on the growth of xenografted human colorectal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkla, D H; Tutton, P J

    1981-12-01

    Four lines of human colorectal cancer were established and serially propagated as subcutaneous xenographs in immunosuppressed inbred CBA/Lac mice. Established xenografts were then used to investigate the influence of a serotonin antagonist (BW 501c) and a histamine H2 receptor antagonists (Cimetidine) on xenograft growth. The growth of each of the four tumor lines was significantly inhibited by BW 501c throughout the treatment, whereas the growth of only two tumor lines was significantly inhibited by Cimetidine treatment. The response of individual tumor lines was not predictable on the basis of either tumor histopathology or the natural growth rate of the untreated xenograft. A number of alternative, but not mutually exclusive, hypotheses are suggested to explain the results. One hypothesis proposes that colorectal tumors are composed of subpopulations of tumor cells that are variously dependent on or independent of amine hormones. Another hypothesis is that tumor cells exhibit temporal changes in hormone sensitivity to amine hormones during treatment. Finally, it is suggested that serotonin and/or histamine H2 antagonists may be useful in preventing the repopulation of colorectal carcinomas following antineoplastic therapy with the use of conventional drugs.

  12. Utility of Glioblastoma Patient-Derived Orthotopic Xenografts in Drug Discovery and Personalized Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Patrizii

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite substantial effort and resources dedicated to drug discovery and development, new anticancer agents often fail in clinical trials. Among many reasons, the lack of reliable predictive preclinical cancer models is a fundamental one. For decades, immortalized cancer cell cultures have been used to lay the groundwork for cancer biology and the quest for therapeutic responses. However, cell lines do not usually recapitulate cancer heterogeneity or reveal therapeutic resistance cues. With the rapidly evolving exploration of cancer “omics,” the scientific community is increasingly investigating whether the employment of short-term patient-derived tumor cell cultures (two- and three-dimensional and/or patient-derived xenograft models might provide a more representative delineation of the cancer core and its therapeutic response. Patient-derived cancer models allow the integration of genomic with drug sensitivity data on a personalized basis and currently represent the ultimate approach for preclinical drug development and biomarker discovery. The proper use of these patient-derived cancer models might soon influence clinical outcomes and allow the implementation of tailored personalized therapy. When assessing drug efficacy for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, currently, the most reliable models are generated through direct injection of patient-derived cells or more frequently the isolation of glioblastoma cells endowed with stem-like features and orthotopically injecting these cells into the cerebrum of immunodeficient mice. Herein, we present the key strengths, weaknesses, and potential applications of cell- and animal-based models of GBM, highlighting our experience with the glioblastoma stem-like patient cell-derived xenograft model and its utility in drug discovery.

  13. Impact of ER520, a candidate of selective estrogen receptor modulators, on in vitro cell growth, migration, invasion, angiogenesis and in vivo tumor xenograft of human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijun; Wang, Ying; Du, Huaqing; Jiang, Yao; Tang, Zhichao; Liu, Hongyi; Xiang, Hua; Xiao, Hong

    2015-12-01

    ER520, a derivative of indenoisoquinoline, is a patented compound. This study was designed to screen its biological properties and to evaluate its antineoplastic and antiangiogenic effect. Western blot was employed to monitor the ERα and ERβ protein expression in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells and endometrial carcinoma Ishikawa cells. MTT assay was employed to determine cell proliferation. Cell adhesion, scratch and Transwell assay were utilized to estimate the ability of cellular adhesion, migration and invasion. ELISA kit was applied to detect the VEGF products in culture medium. In addition, the inhibitory effect of ER520 on the vessel-like construction of HUVEC cells and the angiogenesis of chicken embryos was investigated. The efficiency of ER520 on tumor growth in nude mice was also assessed. ER520 inhibited the expression of ERα in MCF-7 and Ishikawa cells, while it increased ERβ protein level. ER520 also suppressed the proliferation of MCF-7 and Ishikawa cells. Due to its remarkably negative role in cell adhesion, migration and invasion, ER520 showed a potential ability of inhibiting tumor metastasis. Meanwhile, ER520 reduced the VEGF secretion of MCF-7 and Ishikawa cells, prevented the formation of VEGF-stimulated tubular structure and the cell migration of HUVEC cells, and inhibited the angiogenesis of chicken chorioallantoic membrane. Animal experiment also demonstrated that ER520 could frustrate the in vivo tumor growth and the inhibitory ratio was 48.5 % compared with control group. Our findings indicate that ER520 possesses the competence to be a candidate against breast cancer and angiogenesis.

  14. Physicochemical characterization of two deproteinized bovine xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Accorsi-Mendonça

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate salts, or more specifically hydroxyapatite, are products of great interest in the fields of medical and dental science due to their biocompatibility and osteoconduction property. Deproteinized xenografts are primarily constituted of natural apatites, sintered or not. Variations in the industrial process may affect physicochemical properties and, therefore, the biological outcome. The purpose of this work was to characterize the physical and chemical properties of deproteinized xenogenic biomaterials, Bio-Oss (Geistlich Biomaterials, Wolhuser, Switzerland and Gen-Ox (Baumer S.A., Brazil, widely used as bone grafts. Scanning electron microscopy, infrared region spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry and degradation analysis were conducted. The results show that both materials presented porous granules, composed of crystalline hydroxyapatite without apparent presence of other phases. Bio-Oss presented greater dissolution in Tris-HCl than Gen-Ox in the degradation test, possibly due to the low crystallinity and the presence of organic residues. In conclusion, both commercial materials are hydroxyapatite compounds, Bio-Oss being less crystalline than Gen-Ox and, therefore, more prone to degradation.

  15. Claudin-4-targeted optical imaging detects pancreatic cancer and its precursor lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neesse, Albrecht; Hahnenkamp, Anke; Griesmann, Heidi; Buchholz, Malte; Hahn, Stefan A; Maghnouj, Abdelouahid; Fendrich, Volker; Ring, Janine; Sipos, Bence; Tuveson, David A; Bremer, Christoph; Gress, Thomas M; Michl, Patrick

    2013-07-01

    Novel imaging methods based on specific molecular targets to detect both established neoplasms and their precursor lesions are highly desirable in cancer medicine. Previously, we identified claudin-4, an integral constituent of tight junctions, as highly expressed in various gastrointestinal tumours including pancreatic cancer. Here, we investigate the potential of targeting claudin-4 with a naturally occurring ligand to visualise pancreatic cancer and its precursor lesions in vitro and in vivo by near-infrared imaging approaches. A non-toxic C-terminal fragment of the claudin-4 ligand Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (C-CPE) was labelled with a cyanine dye (Cy5.5). Binding of the optical tracer was analysed on claudin-4 positive and negative cells in vitro, and tumour xenografts in vivo. In addition, two genetically engineered mouse models for pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and pancreatic cancer were used for in vivo validation. Optical imaging studies were conducted using 2D planar fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI) technology and 3D fluorescence-mediated tomography (FMT). In vitro, the peptide-dye conjugate showed high binding affinity to claudin-4 positive CAPAN1 cells, while claudin-4 negative HT1080 cells revealed little or no fluorescence. In vivo, claudin-4 positive tumour xenografts, endogenous pancreatic tumours, hepatic metastases, as well as preinvasive PanIN lesions, were visualised by FRI and FMT up to 48 h after injection showing a significantly higher average of fluorochrome concentration as compared with claudin-4 negative xenografts and normal pancreatic tissue. C-CPE-Cy5.5 combined with novel optical imaging methods enables non-invasive visualisation of claudin-4 positive murine pancreatic tumours and their precursor lesions, representing a promising modality for early diagnostic imaging.

  16. Global Conservation of Protein Status between Cell Lines and Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Biau

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Common preclinical models for testing anticancer treatment include cultured human tumor cell lines in monolayer, and xenografts derived from these cell lines in immunodeficient mice. Our goal was to determine how similar the xenografts are compared with their original cell line and to determine whether it is possible to predict the stability of a xenograft model beforehand. We studied a selection of 89 protein markers of interest in 14 human cell cultures and respective subcutaneous xenografts using the reverse-phase protein array technology. We specifically focused on proteins and posttranslational modifications involved in DNA repair, PI3K pathway, apoptosis, tyrosine kinase signaling, stress, cell cycle, MAPK/ERK signaling, SAPK/JNK signaling, NFκB signaling, and adhesion/cytoskeleton. Using hierarchical clustering, most cell culture-xenograft pairs cluster together, suggesting a global conservation of protein signature. Particularly, Akt, NFkB, EGFR, and Vimentin showed very stable protein expression and phosphorylation levels highlighting that 4 of 10 pathways were highly correlated whatever the model. Other proteins were heterogeneously conserved depending on the cell line. Finally, cell line models with low Akt pathway activation and low levels of Vimentin gave rise to more reliable xenograft models. These results may be useful for the extrapolation of cell culture experiments to in vivo models in novel targeted drug discovery.

  17. IWR-1, a tankyrase inhibitor, attenuates Wnt/β-catenin signaling in cancer stem-like cells and inhibits in vivo the growth of a subcutaneous human osteosarcoma xenograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Neves, Sara R; Paiva-Oliveira, Daniela I; Fontes-Ribeiro, Carlos; Bovée, Judith V M G; Cleton-Jansen, Anne-Marie; Gomes, Célia M F

    2018-02-01

    Wnt/β-catenin or canonical Wnt signaling pathway regulates the self-renewal of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) and is involved in tumor progression and chemotherapy resistance. Previously, we reported that this pathway is activated in a subset of osteosarcoma CSCs and that doxorubicin induced stemness properties in differentiated cells through Wnt/β-catenin activation. Here, we investigated whether pharmacological Wnt/β-catenin inhibition, using a tankyrase inhibitor (IWR-1), might constitute a strategy to target CSCs and improve chemotherapy efficacy in osteosarcoma. IWR-1 was specifically cytotoxic for osteosarcoma CSCs. IWR-1 impaired spheres' self-renewal capacity by compromising landmark steps of the canonical Wnt signaling, namely translocation of β-catenin to the nucleus and subsequent TCF/LEF activation and expression of Wnt/β-catenin downstream targets. IWR-1 also hampered the activity and expression of key stemness-related markers. In vitro, IWR-1 induced apoptosis of osteosarcoma spheres and combined with doxorubicin elicited synergistic cytotoxicity, reversing spheres' resistance to this drug. In vivo, IWR-1 co-administration with doxorubicin substantially decreased tumor progression, associated with specific down-regulation of TCF/LEF transcriptional activity, nuclear β-catenin and expression of the putative CSC marker Sox2. We suggest that targeting the Wnt/β-catenin pathway can eliminate CSCs populations in osteosarcoma. Combining conventional chemotherapy with Wnt/β-catenin inhibition may ameliorate therapeutic outcomes, by eradicating the aggressive osteosarcoma CSCs and reducing drug resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Protein kinase CK2 inhibition is associated with the destabilization of HIF-1α in human cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, Barbara; Rasmussen, Tine D. L.; Schnitzler, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Screening for protein kinase CK2 inhibitors of the structural diversity compound library (DTP NCI/NIH) led to the discovery of 4-[(E)-(fluoren-9-ylidenehydrazinylidene)-methyl]benzoic acid (E9). E9 induces apoptotic cell death in various cancer cell lines and upon hypoxia, the compound suppresses...... and maize CK2alpha in complex with E9 reveals unique binding properties of the inhibitor to the enzyme, accounting for its affinity and selectivity....... CK2-catalyzed HSP90/Cdc37 phosphorylation and induces HIF-1alpha degradation. Furthermore, E9 exerts a strong anti-tumour activity by inducing necrosis in murine xenograft models underlining its potential to be used for cancer treatment in future clinical studies. Crystal structure analysis of human...

  19. Nanoparticles target early-stage breast cancer metastasis in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Evgeniya; Zinger, Assaf; da Silva, Dana; Yaari, Zvi; Kajal, Ashima; Vardi-Oknin, Dikla; Goldfeder, Mor; Schroeder, Josh E.; Shainsky-Roitman, Janna; Hershkovitz, Dov; Schroeder, Avi

    2017-10-01

    Despite advances in cancer therapy, treating cancer after it has metastasized remains an unmet clinical challenge. In this study we demonstrate that 100 nm liposomes target triple-negative murine breast-cancer metastases post intravenous administration. Metastatic breast cancer was induced in BALB/c mice either experimentally, by a tail vein injection of 4T1 cells, or spontaneously, after implanting a primary tumor xenograft. To track their biodistribution in vivo the liposomes were labeled with multi-modal diagnostic agents, including indocyanine green and rhodamine for whole-animal fluorescent imaging, gadolinium for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and europium for a quantitative biodistribution analysis. The accumulation of liposomes in the metastases peaked at 24 h post the intravenous administration, similar to the time they peaked in the primary tumor. The efficiency of liposomal targeting to the metastatic tissue exceeded that of a non-liposomal agent by 4.5-fold. Liposomes were detected at very early stages in the metastatic progression, including metastatic lesions smaller than 2 mm in diameter. Surprisingly, while nanoparticles target breast cancer metastasis, they may also be found in elevated levels in the pre-metastatic niche, several days before metastases are visualized by MRI or histologically in the tissue. This study highlights the promise of diagnostic and therapeutic nanoparticles for treating metastatic cancer, possibly even for preventing the onset of the metastatic dissemination by targeting the pre-metastatic niche.

  20. Labelling of anti-human bladder tumor chimeric antibody with 99Tcm and radioimmunoimaging of bladder carcinoma xenograft in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunli; Wang Rongfu; Fu Zhanli; Bai Yin; Ding Yi; Yu Lizhang

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the in vitro immunoreactivity and in vivo tissue distribution, tumor targeting property of anti-human bladder tumor human-murine chimeric antibody (ch-BDI) labeled with 99 Tc m and to investigate its possibility for being used in guiding diagnosis and guiding therapy of bladder cancer. Methods: The ch-BDI was labeled with 99 Tc m by improved Schwarz method and the labeled antibody was purified by Sephadex G-50. Labeling yield and radiochemical purity were measured by paper chromatography. The immunoreactive fraction and association constant (K a ) were measured by Lindmo method and Scatchard analysis, respectively. 11.1 MBq (30 μg) 99 Tc m -ch-BDI was intravenously injected into nude mice bearing human bladder cancer xenografts in the right thigh and radioimmunoimaging (RII) was performed 2, 6, 20 and 24 h postinjection. The images were processed by region of interest (ROI) method to acquire the counts of whole body and the tumor and the counts ratios of tumor to contralateral normal tissue or to tissues of other non-tumor bearing organs. The mice were killed after 24 h postinjection imaging and tissue distribution was measured. %ID/g and target to nontarget (T/NT) ratios were calculated. Results: The labeling yield and radiochemical purity of 99 Tc m -ch-BDI were (66.5±7.3)% and >90%, respectively. The immunoreactive fraction was 76% and K a was 3.56 x 10 9 L/mol. RII showed that the tumor was clearly visualized 6 h postinjection and becoming clearer along with time prolonging. The radioactivity of whole body decreased rapidly with time, whereas the radioactivity of the tumor decreased slowly. The T/NT ratios was increased with time. Biodistribution results showed that tumor uptake was 17.4%ID/g 24 h postinjection. T/NT ratios were very high except for the kidney. T/NT ratios for brain, muscle, intestinal wall, bone and heart wall were 136.0, 55.1, 39.3, 29.7 and 27.9, respectively. Conclusion: 99 Tc m -ch-BDI exhibits excellent

  1. In-vivo optical detection of cancer using chlorin e6 – polyvinylpyrrolidone induced fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, William WL; Thong, Patricia SP; Bhuvaneswari, Ramaswamy; Soo, Khee Chee; Heng, Paul WS; Olivo, Malini

    2009-01-01

    Photosensitizer based fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy is fast becoming a promising approach for cancer detection. The purpose of this study was to examine the use of the photosensitizer chlorin e6 (Ce6) formulated in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a potential exogenous fluorophore for fluorescence imaging and spectroscopic detection of human cancer tissue xenografted in preclinical models as well as in a patient. Fluorescence imaging was performed on MGH human bladder tumor xenografted on both the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and the murine model using a fluorescence endoscopy imaging system. In addition, fiber optic based fluorescence spectroscopy was performed on tumors and various normal organs in the same mice to validate the macroscopic images. In one patient, fluorescence imaging was performed on angiosarcoma lesions and normal skin in conjunction with fluorescence spectroscopy to validate Ce6-PVP induced fluorescence visual assessment of the lesions. Margins of tumor xenografts in the CAM model were clearly outlined under fluorescence imaging. Ce6-PVP-induced fluorescence imaging yielded a specificity of 83% on the CAM model. In mice, fluorescence intensity of Ce6-PVP was higher in bladder tumor compared to adjacent muscle and normal bladder. Clinical results confirmed that fluorescence imaging clearly captured the fluorescence of Ce6-PVP in angiosarcoma lesions and good correlation was found between fluorescence imaging and spectral measurement in the patient. Combination of Ce6-PVP induced fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy could allow for optical detection and discrimination between cancer and the surrounding normal tissues. Ce6-PVP seems to be a promising fluorophore for fluorescence diagnosis of cancer

  2. NRP-1 monoclonal antibody in combination with metronomic chemotherapy (MCT) inhibits the growth of gastric cancer xenografts in nude mice%NRP-1单抗联合节律化疗对裸鼠胃癌移植瘤生长的抑制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁园; 徐芸; 陈玉强; 颜江华

    2017-01-01

    目的:探讨NRP-1单抗联合多西他赛节律化疗对胃癌裸鼠移植瘤的抗肿瘤疗效.方法:BALB/c裸鼠皮下接种胃癌BGC-823细胞制备移植瘤模型,将荷瘤裸鼠以数字随机表法随机分为对照组、NRP-1单抗组、节律化疗组(MCT)、联合组(NRP-1mAb+MCT),每组6只.除对照组,其余各组于造模第8天开始分别给予相应治疗,给药2周,观察裸鼠一般状况,隔天测量裸鼠体重及肿瘤体积.裸鼠处死后称瘤质量,H-E染色观察瘤组织形态,免疫组化检测裸鼠瘤组织中NRP-1蛋白、VEGF、MVD表达.结果:联合组移植瘤的体积和质量显著低于其他各组[(0.394±0.128) vs (0.748±0.152)、(0.867±0.361)、(1.247±0.494)g;(0.613±0.223) vs (0.866±0.115)、(1.098±0.343)、(1.474±0.644)cm3.均P<0.05],抑瘤率较其他治疗组差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).对照组癌组织细胞生长良好,血管丰富,给药组癌组织出现不同程度的片状坏死,血管成分减少.免疫组化染色显示,对照组NRP-1表达明显高于治疗各组(P<0.05),联合组的NRP-1、VEGF、MVD表达均显著低于其余各组(P<0.05).结论:NRP-1单抗联合多西他赛节律化疗可能通过下调NRP-1表达而显著抑制BGC-823胃癌移植瘤的生长及血管生成.%Objective:To investigate the antitumor effect of NRP-1 monoclonal antibody combined with docetaxel metronomic chemotherapy in nude mice bearing gastric cancer xenografts.Methods:BALB / c mice were inoculated subcutaneously with BGC-823 cells to establish xenograft model;the tumor bearing rats were randomly divided into control group,NRP-1 monoclonal antibody group (NRP-lmAb),rhythm chemotherapy group (MCT) and combined group (NRP-lmAb+MCT).Except the control group,the other three groups were given the corresponding treatment on the 8th day after the model establishment.After 2 weeks of administration,the general condition of nude mice was observed and the body weight and tumor volume were measured the next day

  3. Experimental radioimmunotherapy of a xenografted human glioma using [sup 131]I-labeled monoclonal antibody to epidermal growth factor receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Nakazawa, Shozo [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan); Herlyn, D

    1993-09-01

    [sup 131]I-labeled F (ab')[sub 2] fragments of murine monoclonal antibodies (MAb) 425 specific to the epidermal growth factor receptor expressed on human gliomas were used in experimental human malignant glioma immunotherapy. Two injections of 150 [mu]Ci [sup 131]I-labeled 425 F(ab')[sub 2] achieved growth inhibition of U-87MG human malignant glioma xenografts in nude mice. This radiolabeled specific MAb F(ab')[sub 2] was significantly superior to radiolabeled fragments of an anti-hepatitis virus control MAb A5C3 in influencing tumor growth. However, similar treatment of established human malignant glioma xenografts did not inhibit progressive tumor growth significantly. No clear tumor inhibition was produced by unlabeled MAb 425F(ab')[sub 2]. These studies suggest that [sup 131]I-labeled MAbs have a significant antitumor effect where unmodified antibody is ineffective. Multiple doses of antibody may achieve an increase in labeled MAb concentration in tumors. (author).

  4. Emodin enhances the chemosensitivity of endometrial cancer by inhibiting ROS-mediated Cisplatin-resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ning; Zhang, Hong; Su, Shan; Ding, Yumei; Yu, Xiaohui; Tang, Yujie; Wang, Qingfang; Liu, Peishu

    2017-12-18

    Background Endometrial cancer is a common cause of death in gynecological malignancies. Cisplatin is a clinically chemotherapeutic agent. However, drug-resistance is the primary cause of treatment failure. Objective Emodin is commonly used clinically to increase the sensitivity of chemotherapeutic agents, yet whether Emodin promotes the role of Cisplatin in the treatment of endometrial cancer has not been studied. Method CCK-8 kit was utilized to determine the growth of two endometrial cancer cell lines, Ishikawa and HEC-IB. The apoptosis level of Ishikawa and HEC-IB cells was detected by Annexin V / propidium iodide double-staining assay. ROS level was detected by DCFH-DA and NADPH oxidase expression. Expressions of drug-resistant genes were examined by real-time PCR and Western blotting. Results Emodin combined with Cisplatin reduced cell growth and increased the apoptosis of endometrial cancer cells. Co-treatment of Emodin and Cisplatin increased chemosensitivity by inhibiting the expression of drug-resistant genes through reducing the ROS levels in endometrial cancer cells. In an endometrial cancer xenograft murine model, the tumor size was reduced and animal survival time was increased by co-treatment of Emodin and Cisplatin. Conclusion This study demonstrates that Emodin enhances the chemosensitivity of Cisplatin on endometrial cancer by inhibiting ROS-mediated expression of drug-resistance genes. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Allografts versus Equine Xenografts in Calcaneal Fracture Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonmez, Mehmet Mesut; Armagan, Raffi; Ugurlar, Meric; Eren, Tugrul

    Displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures are difficult to treat. We determined the functional results and complications of using allografts or equine xenografts in treating these fractures. We reviewed patients seen at our center from May 2011 to December 2014 with Sanders type III or IV unilateral calcaneal fractures treated with locking plates and an additional bone allograft or equine xenograft. A minimum of 1 year after surgery, a history of infection and functional outcomes were assessed using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society clinical rating system. Changes in the Gissane angle (GA) and Böhler angle were assessed from radiographs. Of the 91 eligible patients, 15 were lost to follow-up, leaving a sample of 76 patients (42 males): 45 received allografts (19 for type III and 26 for type IV fractures) and 31 received xenografts (20 for type III and 11 for type IV fractures). The mean age was about 40 years in both groups. After ≥1 year of follow-up, the proportion of patients in the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society scoring categories did not differ significantly between the 2 groups (mean ankle score, 86.5 in the allograft group and 85.1 in the xenograft group), and the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society functional outcomes were good or excellent in 69% and 68%, respectively (p = .986). The groups did not differ in the incidence of superficial or deep infection (p = 1.000). The Böhler angles were significantly decreased in the xenograft group. Xenografts might be preferred for repairing intra-articular calcaneal fractures because they can perform as well as allografts, avoid donor site morbidities, and are more available and less expensive than allografts. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Murine Models of Gastric Corpus PreneoplasiaSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine P. Petersen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma evolves in a field of pre-existing metaplasia. Over the past 20 years, a number of murine models have been developed to address aspects of the physiology and pathophysiology of metaplasia induction. Although none of these models has achieved true recapitulation of the induction of adenocarcinoma, they have led to important insights into the factors that influence the induction and progression of metaplasia. Here, we review the pathologic definitions relevant to alterations in gastric corpus lineages and classification of metaplasia by specific lineage markers. In addition, we review present murine models of the induction and progression of spasmolytic polypeptide (TFF2–expressing metaplasia, the predominant metaplastic lineage observed in murine models. These models provide a basis for the development of a broader understanding of the physiological and pathophysiological roles of metaplasia in the stomach. Keywords: SPEM, Intestinal Metaplasia, Gastric Cancer, TFF2, Chief Cell, Hyperplasia

  7. The impact of the opioids fentanyl and morphine on nociception and bone destruction in a murine model of bone cancer pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ElMouedden, M.; Meert, T.F.

    2007-01-01

    Chronic pain resulting from metastasis into skeleton of certain neoplastic diseases remains poorly understood and relatively resistant to analgesic treatment. Opioids are the principal axis in drug therapy for this type of pain, especially at the end stage of cancer. Our aim was to examine whether,

  8. The use of Zymosan A and bacteria anchored to tumor cells for effective cancer immunotherapy: B16-F10 murine melanoma model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Waldmannová, E.; Caisová, V.; Fáberová, J.; Sváčková, P.; Kovářová, M.; Sváčková, D.; Kumžáková, Z.; Jačková, A.; Vácová, N.; Nedbalová, P.; Horká, Marie; Kopecký, Jan; Ženka, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 39, OCT (2016), s. 295-306 ISSN 1567-5769 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : melanoma B16-F10, * cancer immunotherapy * frustrated phagocytosis Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation; EC - Immunology (BC-A) Impact factor: 2.956, year: 2016

  9. Understanding Heterogeneity and Permeability of Brain Metastases in Murine Models of HER2-Positive Breast Cancer Through Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Implications for Detection and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna H. Murrell

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Brain metastases due to breast cancer are increasing, and the prognosis is poor. Lack of effective therapy is attributed to heterogeneity of breast cancers and their resulting metastases, as well as impermeability of the blood–brain barrier (BBB, which hinders delivery of therapeutics to the brain. This work investigates three experimental models of HER2+ breast cancer brain metastasis to better understand the inherent heterogeneity of the disease. We use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to quantify brain metastatic growth and explore its relationship with BBB permeability. DESIGN: Brain metastases due to breast cancer cells (SUM190-BR3, JIMT-1-BR3, or MDA-MB-231-BR-HER2 were imaged at 3 T using balanced steady-state free precession and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted spin echo sequences. The histology and immunohistochemistry corresponding to MRI were also analyzed. RESULTS: There were differences in metastatic tumor appearance by MRI, histology, and immunohistochemistry (Ki67, CD31, CD105 across the three models. The mean volume of an MDA-MB-231-BR-HER2 tumor was significantly larger compared to other models (F2,12 = 5.845, P < .05; interestingly, this model also had a significantly higher proportion of Gd-impermeable tumors (F2,12 = 22.18, P < .0001. Ki67 staining indicated that Gd-impermeable tumors had significantly more proliferative nuclei compared to Gd-permeable tumors (t[24] = 2.389, P < .05 in the MDA-MB-231-BR-HER2 model. CD31 and CD105 staining suggested no difference in new vasculature patterns between permeable and impermeable tumors in any model. CONCLUSION: Significant heterogeneity is present in these models of brain metastases from HER2+ breast cancer. Understanding this heterogeneity, especially as it relates to BBB permeability, is important for improvement in brain metastasis detection and treatment delivery.

  10. Radioimmunodetection of human tumor xenografts by monoclonal antibody F(ab')/sub 2/ fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herlyn, D.; Munz, D.L.; Herlyn, M.; Koprowski, H.; Powe, J.; Alavi, A.; Meinken, G.E.; Srivastava, S.C.

    1986-01-01

    Procedures are described for the radiolocalization of human tumors by murine monoclonal antibodies (MAb) in animal model systems. Visualization of tumor xenografts was clearer in nude mice compared to experimentally immunosuppressed mice due to the higher tumor viability. MAb localization in tumor tissue was greatly enhanced when F(ab')/sub 2/ fragments rather than intact antibody molecules were used. Although tumors could be visualized with /sup 131/I-, /sup 123/I-or /sup 111/In-labeled MAb fragments without background subtraction, tumor-to-background ratios of radioactivity were highest for /sup 131/I-labeled fragments. /sup 131/I-labeled F(ab')/sub 2/ fragments of eight MAb against human colorectal carcinoma, melanoma or lung carcinoma localized specifically only in those tumors that bound the MAb in vitro and not in unrelated tumors. Radiolabeled fragments of MAb with other specificities (anti-hepatitis virus MAb) did not localize in tumors. All MAb that inhibited tumor growth in nude mice effectively localized these tumors by ..gamma..-scintigraphy. Some MAb were effective in localizing tumors but ineffective in inhibiting their growth. The ability of the specific radiolabeled F(ab')/sub 2/ fragments to localize in tumor grafts correlated significantly with MAb binding affinity and density of antigenic sites on tumor cells together, but not with either in vitro binding parameter alone.

  11. Novel LIMK2 Inhibitor Blocks Panc-1 Tumor Growth in a mouse xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rak, Roni; Haklai, Roni; Elad-Tzfadia, Galit; Wolfson, Haim J; Carmeli, Shmuel; Kloog, Yoel

    2014-01-01

    LIM kinases (LIMKs) are important cell cytoskeleton regulators that play a prominent role in cancer manifestation and neuronal diseases. The LIMK family consists of two homologues, LIMK1 and LIMK2, which differ from one another in expression profile, intercellular localization, and function. The main substrate of LIMK is cofilin, a member of the actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF) protein family. When phosphorylated by LIMK, cofilin is inactive. LIMKs play a contributory role in several neurodevelopmental disorders and in cancer growth and metastasis. We recently reported the development and validation of a novel LIMK inhibitor, referred to here as T56-LIMKi, using a combination of computational methods and classical biochemistry techniques. Here we report that T56-LIMKi inhibits LIMK2 with high specificity, and shows little or no cross-reactivity with LIMK1. We found that T56-LIMKi decreases phosphorylated cofilin (p-cofilin) levels and thus inhibits growth of several cancerous cell lines, including those of pancreatic cancer, glioma and schwannoma. Because the most promising in-vitro effect of T56-LIMKi was observed in the pancreatic cancer cell line Panc-1, we tested the inhibitor on a nude mouse Panc-1 xenograft model. T56-LIMKi reduced tumor size and p-cofilin levels in the Panc-1 tumors, leading us to propose T56-LIMKi as a candidate drug for cancer therapy.

  12. Quantitative proteomic analysis of human lung tumor xenografts treated with the ectopic ATP synthase inhibitor citreoviridin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsuan Wu

    Full Text Available ATP synthase is present on the plasma membrane of several types of cancer cells. Citreoviridin, an ATP synthase inhibitor, selectively suppresses the proliferation and growth of lung cancer without affecting normal cells. However, the global effects of targeting ectopic ATP synthase in vivo have not been well defined. In this study, we performed quantitative proteomic analysis using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ and provided a comprehensive insight into the complicated regulation by citreoviridin in a lung cancer xenograft model. With high reproducibility of the quantitation, we obtained quantitative proteomic profiling with 2,659 proteins identified. Bioinformatics analysis of the 141 differentially expressed proteins selected by their relative abundance revealed that citreoviridin induces alterations in the expression of glucose metabolism-related enzymes in lung cancer. The up-regulation of enzymes involved in gluconeogenesis and storage of glucose indicated that citreoviridin may reduce the glycolytic intermediates for macromolecule synthesis and inhibit cell proliferation. Using comprehensive proteomics, the results identify metabolic aspects that help explain the antitumorigenic effect of citreoviridin in lung cancer, which may lead to a better understanding of the links between metabolism and tumorigenesis in cancer therapy.

  13. Ell3 stimulates proliferation, drug resistance, and cancer stem cell properties of breast cancer cells via a MEK/ERK-dependent signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Hee-Jin [Department of Biomedical Science, College of Life Science, CHA University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gwangil [Department of Pathology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kyung-Soon, E-mail: kspark@cha.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Science, College of Life Science, CHA University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •Ell3 enhances proliferation and drug resistance of breast cancer cell lines. •Ell3 is related to the cancer stem cell characteristics of breast cancer cell lines. •Ell3 enhances oncogenicity of breast cancer through the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. -- Abstract: Ell3 is a RNA polymerase II transcription elongation factor that is enriched in testis. The C-terminal domain of Ell3 shows strong similarities to that of Ell (eleven−nineteen lysine-rich leukemia gene), which acts as a negative regulator of p53 and regulates cell proliferation and survival. Recent studies in our laboratory showed that Ell3 induces the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells by protecting differentiating cells from apoptosis via the promotion of p53 degradation. In this study, we evaluated the function of Ell3 in breast cancer cell lines. MCF-7 cell lines overexpressing Ell3 were used to examine cell proliferation and cancer stem cell properties. Ectopic expression of Ell3 in breast cancer cell lines induces proliferation and 5-FU resistance. In addition, Ell3 expression increases the cancer stem cell population, which is characterized by CD44 (+) or ALDH1 (+) cells. Mammosphere-forming potential and migration ability were also increased upon Ell3 expression in breast cancer cell lines. Through biochemical and molecular biological analyses, we showed that Ell3 regulates proliferation, cancer stem cell properties an