WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer mouse models

  1. Mouse models of colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunguang Tong; Wancai Yang; H. Phillip Koeffler

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common malignancies in the world. Many mouse models have been developed to evaluate features of colorectal cancer in humans. These can be grouped into genetically-engineered, chemically-induced, and inoculated models. However, none recapitulates all of the characteristics of human colorectal cancer. It is critical to use a specific mouse model to address a particular research question. Here, we review commonly used mouse models for human colorectal cancer.

  2. Mouse models for cancer research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Lynette Moore; Ping Ji

    2011-01-01

    Mouse models of cancer enable researchers to leamn about tumor biology in complicated and dynamic physiological systems. Since the development of gene targeting in mice, cancer biologists have been among the most frequent users of transgenic mouse models, which have dramatically increased knowledge about how cancers form and grow. The Chinese Joumnal of Cancer will publish a series of papers reporting the use of mouse models in studying genetic events in cancer cases. This editorial is an overview of the development and applications of mouse models of cancer and directs the reader to upcoming papers describing the use of these models to be published in coming issues, beginning with three articles in the current issue.

  3. Mouse models of pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marta Herreros-Villanueva; Elizabeth Hijona; Angel Cosme; Luis Bujanda

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal of human malignancies ranking 4th among cancer-related death in the western world and in the United States,and potent therapeutic options are lacking.Although during the last few years there have been important advances in the understanding of the molecular events responsible for the development of pancreatic cancer,currently specific mechanisms of treatment resistance remain poorly understood and new effective systemic drugs need to be developed and probed.In vivo models to study pancreatic cancer and approach this issue remain limited and present different molecular features that must be considered in the studies depending on the purpose to fit special research themes.In the last few years,several genetically engineered mouse models of pancreatic exocrine neoplasia have been developed.These models mimic the disease as they reproduce genetic alterations implicated in the progression of pancreatic cancer.Genetic alterations such as activating mutations in KRas,or TGFb and/or inactivation of tumoral suppressors such as p53,INK4A/ARF BRCA2 and Smad4 are the most common drivers to pancreatic carcinogenesis and have been used to create transgenic mice.These mouse models have a spectrum of pathologic changes,from pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia to lesions that progress histologically culminating in fully invasive and metastatic disease and represent the most useful preclinical model system.These models can characterize the cellular and molecular pathology of pancreatic neoplasia and cancer and constitute the best tool to investigate new therapeutic approaches,chemopreventive and/or anticancer treatments.Here,we review and update the current mouse models that reproduce different stages of human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and will have clinical relevance in future pancreatic cancer developments.

  4. Genetically engineered mouse models of prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nawijn, Martijn C.; Bergman, Andreas M.; van der Poel, Henk G.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Mouse models of prostate cancer are used to test the contribution of individual genes to the transformation process, evaluate the collaboration between multiple genetic lesions observed in a single tumour, and perform preclinical intervention studies in prostate cancer research. Methods:

  5. Mouse models of anemia of cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Airie Kim

    Full Text Available Anemia of cancer (AC may contribute to cancer-related fatigue and impair quality of life. Improved understanding of the pathogenesis of AC could facilitate better treatment, but animal models to study AC are lacking. We characterized four syngeneic C57BL/6 mouse cancers that cause AC. Mice with two different rapidly-growing metastatic lung cancers developed the characteristic findings of anemia of inflammation (AI, with dramatically different degrees of anemia. Mice with rapidly-growing metastatic melanoma also developed a severe anemia by 14 days, with hematologic and inflammatory parameters similar to AI. Mice with a slow-growing peritoneal ovarian cancer developed an iron-deficiency anemia, likely secondary to chronically impaired nutrition and bleeding into the peritoneal cavity. Of the four models, hepcidin mRNA levels were increased only in the milder lung cancer model. Unlike in our model of systemic inflammation induced by heat-killed Brucella abortus, ablation of hepcidin in the ovarian cancer and the milder lung cancer mouse models did not affect the severity of anemia. Hepcidin-independent mechanisms play an important role in these murine models of AC.

  6. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Aya M; Szakmary, Akos; Schiestl, Robert H

    2016-09-01

    Chronic inflammation is strongly associated with approximately one-fifth of all human cancers. Arising from combinations of factors such as environmental exposures, diet, inherited gene polymorphisms, infections, or from dysfunctions of the immune response, chronic inflammation begins as an attempt of the body to remove injurious stimuli; however, over time, this results in continuous tissue destruction and promotion and maintenance of carcinogenesis. Here, we focus on intestinal inflammation and its associated cancers, a group of diseases on the rise and affecting millions of people worldwide. Intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into inflammatory bowel diseases (ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease) and celiac disease. Long-standing intestinal inflammation is associated with colorectal cancer and small-bowel adenocarcinoma, as well as extraintestinal manifestations, including lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. This article highlights potential mechanisms of pathogenesis in inflammatory bowel diseases and celiac disease, as well as those involved in the progression to associated cancers, most of which have been identified from studies utilizing mouse models of intestinal inflammation. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into chemically induced models; genetic models, which make up the bulk of the studied models; adoptive transfer models; and spontaneous models. Studies in these models have lead to the understanding that persistent antigen exposure in the intestinal lumen, in combination with loss of epithelial barrier function, and dysfunction and dysregulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses lead to chronic intestinal inflammation. Transcriptional changes in this environment leading to cell survival, hyperplasia, promotion of angiogenesis, persistent DNA damage, or insufficient repair of DNA damage due to an excess of proinflammatory mediators are then thought to lead to sustained malignant transformation. With

  7. Preclinical fluorescent mouse models of pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvet, Michael; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2007-02-01

    Here we describe our cumulative experience with the development and preclinical application of several highly fluorescent, clinically-relevant, metastatic orthotopic mouse models of pancreatic cancer. These models utilize the human pancreatic cancer cell lines which have been genetically engineered to selectively express high levels of the bioluminescent green fluorescent (GFP) or red fluorescent protein (RFP). Fluorescent tumors are established subcutaneously in nude mice, and tumor fragments are then surgically transplanted onto the pancreas. Locoregional tumor growth and distant metastasis of these orthotopic implants occurs spontaneously and rapidly throughout the abdomen in a manner consistent with clinical human disease. Highly specific, high-resolution, real-time visualization of tumor growth and metastasis may be achieved in vivo without the need for contrast agents, invasive techniques, or expensive imaging equipment. We have shown a high correlation between florescent optical imaging and magnetic resonance imaging in these models. Alternatively, transplantation of RFP-expressing tumor fragments onto the pancreas of GFP-expressing transgenic mice may be used to facilitate visualization of tumor-host interaction between the pancreatic tumor fragments and host-derived stroma and vasculature. Such in vivo models have enabled us to serially visualize and acquire images of the progression of pancreatic cancer in the live animal, and to demonstrate the real-time antitumor and antimetastatic effects of several novel therapeutic strategies on pancreatic malignancy. These fluorescent models are therefore powerful and reliable tools with which to investigate human pancreatic cancer and therapeutic strategies directed against it.

  8. Mouse models for BRAF-induced cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, C; Carragher, L; Aldridge, V; Giblett, S; Jin, H; Foster, C; Andreadi, C; Kamata, T

    2007-11-01

    Oncogenic mutations in the BRAF gene are detected in approximately 7% of human cancer samples with a particularly high frequency of mutation in malignant melanomas. Over 40 different missense BRAF mutations have been found, but the vast majority (>90%) represent a single nucleotide change resulting in a valine-->glutamate mutation at residue 600 ((V600E)BRAF). In cells cultured in vitro, (V600E)BRAF is able to stimulate endogenous MEK [MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase)/ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) kinase] and ERK phosphorylation leading to an increase in cell proliferation, cell survival, transformation, tumorigenicity, invasion and vascular development. Many of these hallmarks of cancer can be reversed by treatment of cells with siRNA (small interfering RNA) to BRAF or by inhibiting MEK, indicating that BRAF and MEK are attractive therapeutic targets in cancer samples with BRAF mutations. In order to fully understand the role of oncogenic BRAF in cancer development in vivo as well as to test the in vivo efficacy of anti-BRAF or anti-MEK therapies, GEMMs (genetically engineered mouse models) have been generated in which expression of oncogenic BRaf is conditionally dependent on the Cre recombinase. The delivery/activation of the Cre recombinase can be regulated in both a temporal and spatial manner and therefore these mouse models can be used to recapitulate the somatic mutation of BRAF that occurs in different tissues in the development of human cancer. The data so far obtained following Cre-mediated activation in haemopoietic tissue and the lung indicate that (V600E)BRAF mutation can drive tumour initiation and that its primary effect is to induce high levels of cyclin D1-mediated cell proliferation. However, hallmarks of OIS (oncogene-induced senescence) are evident that restrain further development of the tumour.

  9. Quantification of mouse pulmonary cancer models by microcomputed tomography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advances in preclinical cancer models, including orthotopic implantation models or genetically engineered mouse models of cancer, enable pursuing the molecular mechanism of cancer disease that might mimic genetic and biological processes in humans. Lung cancer is the major cause of cancer deaths; therefore, the treatment and prevention of lung cancer are expected to be improved by a better understanding of the complex mechanism of disease. In this study, we have examined the quantification of two distinct mouse lung cancer models by utilizing imaging modalities for monitoring tumor progression and drug efficacy evaluation. The utility of microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) for real-time/non-invasive monitoring of lung cancer progression has been confirmed by combining bioluminescent imaging and histopathological analyses. Further, we have developed a more clinically relevant lung cancer model by utilizing K-rasLSL-G12D/p53LSL-R270H mutant mice. Using micro-CT imaging, we monitored the development and progression of solitary lung tumor in K-rasLSL-G12D/p53LSL-R270H mutant mouse, and further demonstrated tumor growth inhibition by anticancer drug treatment. These results clearly indicate that imaging-guided evaluation of more clinically relevant tumor models would improve the process of new drug discovery and increase the probability of success in subsequent clinical studies. (author)

  10. An Orthotopic Mouse Model of Spontaneous Breast Cancer Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschall, Amy V; Liu, Kebin

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the primary cause of mortality of breast cancer patients. The mechanism underlying cancer cell metastasis, including breast cancer metastasis, is largely unknown and is a focus in cancer research. Various breast cancer spontaneous metastasis mouse models have been established. Here, we report a simplified procedure to establish orthotopic transplanted breast cancer primary tumor and resultant spontaneous metastasis that mimic human breast cancer metastasis. Combined with the bioluminescence live tumor imaging, this mouse model allows tumor growth and progression kinetics to be monitored and quantified. In this model, a low dose (1 x 10(4) cells) of 4T1-Luc breast cancer cells was injected into BALB/c mouse mammary fat pad using a tuberculin syringe. Mice were injected with luciferin and imaged at various time points using a bioluminescent imaging system. When the primary tumors grew to the size limit as in the IACUC-approved protocol (approximately 30 days), mice were anesthetized under constant flow of 2% isoflurane and oxygen. The tumor area was sterilized with 70% ethanol. The mouse skin around the tumor was excised to expose the tumor which was removed with a pair of sterile scissors. Removal of the primary tumor extends the survival of the 4T-1 tumor-bearing mice for one month. The mice were then repeatedly imaged for metastatic tumor spreading to distant organs. Therapeutic agents can be administered to suppress tumor metastasis at this point. This model is simple and yet sensitive in quantifying breast cancer cell growth in the primary site and progression kinetics to distant organs, and thus is an excellent model for studying breast cancer growth and progression, and for testing anti-metastasis therapeutic and immunotherapeutic agents in vivo. PMID:27584043

  11. Mouse models for cancer stem cell research

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Le; Ramesh, Anirudh V.; Flesken-Nikitin, Andrea; Choi, Jinhyang; Nikitin, Alexander Yu.

    2009-01-01

    Cancer stem cell concept assumes that cancers are mainly sustained by a small pool of neoplastic cells, known as cancer stem cells or tumor initiating cells, which are able to reproduce themselves and produce phenotypically heterogeneous cells with lesser tumorigenic potential. Cancer stem cells represent an appealing target for development of more selective and efficient therapies. However, direct testing of the cancer stem cell concept and assessment of its therapeutic implications in human...

  12. Development of A Mouse Model of Menopausal Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth R. Smith

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant understanding of the genetic mutations involved in ovarian epithelial cancer and advances in genomic approaches for expression and mutation profiling of tumor tissues, several key questions in ovarian cancer biology remain enigmatic: the mechanism for the well-established impact of reproductive factors on ovarian cancer risk remains obscure; questions of the cell of origin of ovarian cancer continue to be debated; and the precursor lesion, sequence, or events in progression remain to be defined. Suitable mouse models should complement the analysis of human tumor tissues and may provide clues to these questions currently perplexing ovarian cancer biology.A potentially useful model is the germ cell-deficient Wv (white spotting variant mutant mouse line, which may be used to study the impact of menopausal physiology on the increased risk of ovarian cancer. The Wv mice harbor a point mutation in c-Kit that reduces the receptor tyrosine kinase activity to about 1-5% (it is not a null mutation. Homozygous Wv mutant females have a reduced ovarian germ cell reservoir at birth and the follicles are rapidly depleted upon reaching reproductive maturity, but other biological phenotypes are minimal and the mice have a normal life span. The loss of ovarian function precipitates changes in hormonal and metabolic activity that model features of menopause in humans. As a consequence of follicle depletion, the Wv ovaries develop ovarian tubular adenomas, a benign epithelial tumor corresponding to surface epithelial invaginations and papillomatosis that mark human ovarian aging. Ongoing work will test the possibility of converting the benign epithelial tubular adenomas into neoplastic tumors by addition of an oncogenic mutation, such as of Tp53, to model the genotype and biology of serous ovarian cancer.Model based on the Wv mice may have the potential to gain biological and etiological insights into ovarian cancer development and prevention.

  13. Lung Cancer Signatures in Plasma Based on Proteome Profiling of Mouse Tumor Models

    OpenAIRE

    Taguchi, Ayumu; Politi, Katerina; Pitteri, Sharon J.; Lockwood, William W; Faça, Vitor M.; Kelly-Spratt, Karen; Wong, Chee-Hong; Zhang, Qing; Chin, Alice; Park, Kwon-Sik; Goodman, Gary; Gazdar, Adi F.; Sage, Julien; Dinulescu, Daniela M.; Kucherlapati, Raju

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the potential of in-depth quantitative proteomics to reveal plasma protein signatures that reflect lung tumor biology. We compared plasma protein profiles of four mouse models of lung cancer with profiles of models of pancreatic, ovarian, colon, prostate, and breast cancer and two models of inflammation. A protein signature for Titf1/Nkx2-1, a known lineage-survival oncogene in lung cancer, was found in plasmas of mouse models of lung adenocarcinoma. An EGFR signature was foun...

  14. Mouse model for ROS1-rearranged lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhito Arai

    Full Text Available Genetic rearrangement of the ROS1 receptor tyrosine kinase was recently identified as a distinct molecular signature for human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. However, direct evidence of lung carcinogenesis induced by ROS1 fusion genes remains to be verified. The present study shows that EZR-ROS1 plays an essential role in the oncogenesis of NSCLC harboring the fusion gene. EZR-ROS1 was identified in four female patients of lung adenocarcinoma. Three of them were never smokers. Interstitial deletion of 6q22-q25 resulted in gene fusion. Expression of the fusion kinase in NIH3T3 cells induced anchorage-independent growth in vitro, and subcutaneous tumors in nude mice. This transforming ability was attributable to its kinase activity. The ALK/MET/ROS1 kinase inhibitor, crizotinib, suppressed fusion-induced anchorage-independent growth of NIH3T3 cells. Most importantly, established transgenic mouse lines specifically expressing EZR-ROS1 in lung alveolar epithelial cells developed multiple adenocarcinoma nodules in both lungs at an early age. These data suggest that the EZR-ROS1 is a pivotal oncogene in human NSCLC, and that this animal model could be valuable for exploring therapeutic agents against ROS1-rearranged lung cancer.

  15. Mouse Model for ROS1-Rearranged Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Hiromi; Hama, Natsuko; Kohno, Takashi; Tsuta, Koji; Yoshida, Akihiko; Asamura, Hisao; Mutoh, Michihiro; Hosoda, Fumie; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Shibata, Tatsuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Genetic rearrangement of the ROS1 receptor tyrosine kinase was recently identified as a distinct molecular signature for human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, direct evidence of lung carcinogenesis induced by ROS1 fusion genes remains to be verified. The present study shows that EZR-ROS1 plays an essential role in the oncogenesis of NSCLC harboring the fusion gene. EZR-ROS1 was identified in four female patients of lung adenocarcinoma. Three of them were never smokers. Interstitial deletion of 6q22–q25 resulted in gene fusion. Expression of the fusion kinase in NIH3T3 cells induced anchorage-independent growth in vitro, and subcutaneous tumors in nude mice. This transforming ability was attributable to its kinase activity. The ALK/MET/ROS1 kinase inhibitor, crizotinib, suppressed fusion-induced anchorage-independent growth of NIH3T3 cells. Most importantly, established transgenic mouse lines specifically expressing EZR-ROS1 in lung alveolar epithelial cells developed multiple adenocarcinoma nodules in both lungs at an early age. These data suggest that the EZR-ROS1 is a pivotal oncogene in human NSCLC, and that this animal model could be valuable for exploring therapeutic agents against ROS1-rearranged lung cancer. PMID:23418494

  16. Overview of KRAS-Driven Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Clare; Downward, Julian

    2015-01-01

    KRAS, the most frequently mutated oncogene in non-small cell lung cancer, has been utilized extensively to model human lung adenocarcinomas. The results from such studies have enhanced considerably an understanding of the relationship between KRAS and the development of lung cancer. Detailed in this overview are the features of various KRAS-driven genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of non-small cell lung cancer, their utilization, and the potential of these models for the study of lung cancer biology.

  17. A transgenic mouse model of metastatic prostate cancer originating from neuroendocrine cells

    OpenAIRE

    Garabedian, Emily M.; Humphrey, Peter A.; Jeffrey I Gordon

    1998-01-01

    A transgenic mouse model of metastatic prostate cancer has been developed that is 100% penetrant in multiple pedigrees. Nucleotides −6500 to +34 of the mouse cryptdin-2 gene were used to direct expression of simian virus 40 T antigen to a subset of neuroendocrine cells in all lobes of the FVB/N mouse prostate. Transgene expression is initiated between 7 and 8 weeks of age and leads to development of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia within a week. Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia progres...

  18. Hypothalamic food intake regulation in a cancer-cachectic mouse model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dwarkasing, J.T.; Dijk, van M.; Dijk, F.J.; Boekschoten, M.V.; Faber, J.; Argiles, J.M.; Laviano, A.; Müller, M.R.; Witkamp, R.F.; Norren, van K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Appetite is frequently affected in cancer patients leading to anorexia and consequently insufficient food intake. In this study, we report on hypothalamic gene expression profile of a cancer-cachectic mouse model with increased food intake. In this model, mice bearing C26 tumour have an i

  19. Dietary Zinc and Prostate Cancer in the TRAMP Mouse Model

    OpenAIRE

    Prasad, Ananda S; Mukhtar, Hasan; Beck, Frances W.J.; Adhami, Vaqar M.; Siddiqui, Imtiaz A.; Din, Maria; Hafeez, Bilal B.; KUCUK, Omer

    2010-01-01

    Circumstantial evidence indicates that zinc may have an important role in the prostate. Total zinc levels in the prostate are 10 times higher than in other soft tissues. Zinc concentrations in prostate epithethial cancer cells are decreased significantly. Zinc supplementation for prevention and treatment of prostate cancer in humans has yielded controversial results. No studies have been reported in animal models to show the effect of zinc supplementation on prevention of prostate cancer, thu...

  20. Establishment of Orthotopic Xuanwei Lung Cancer SCID Mouse Model 
and Analysis of Biological Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Yongchun ZHOU; Chen, Yan; Xicai WANG; Liu, Xin; Hutao SHI; Yao, Qian; Jin, Congguo; Wu, Zhiping; Huang, Yunchao

    2012-01-01

    Background and objective The incidence of Xuanwei lung cancer ranks first in China, and its pathogenesis requires in-depth investigation. This study aims to establish an orthotopic Xuanwei lung cancer severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse model and to provide a basic experimental platform for further study. Methods The Xuanwei lung cancer cell line XWLC-05 was inoculated into the lung tissue of SCID mice in high and low doses. The tumor formation rates, tumor characteristics, spontane...

  1. Recent Technological Advances in Using Mouse Models to Study Ovarian Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    House, Carrie Danielle; Hernandez, Lidia; Annunziata, Christina Messineo

    2014-01-01

    Serous epithelial ovarian cancer (SEOC) is the most lethal gynecological cancer in the United States with disease recurrence being the major cause of morbidity and mortality. Despite recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the development of SEOC, the survival rate for women with this disease has remained relatively unchanged in the last two decades. Preclinical mouse models of ovarian cancer, including xenograft, syngeneic, and genetically engineered ...

  2. Photodynamic therapy for breast cancer in a BALB/c mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Tae-Gyu; Lee, Byoung-Rai; Choi, Eun-Young; Kim, Dong Won; Han, Sei-Jun

    2012-01-01

    Objective Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used for superficial neoplasms and its usage has been recently extended to deeper lesions. The purpose of this study was to observe whether or not PDT can cure breast cancer in the solid tumor model, and to define the critical point of laser amount for killing the cancer cells. Methods Twenty four BALB/c mouse models with subcutaneous EMT6 mammary carcinomas were prepared. Mice were divided into eight groups depending on the amount of illumination...

  3. Mouse models in liver cancer research: A review of current literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martijn WH Leenders; Maarten W Nijkamp; Inne HM Borel Rinkes

    2008-01-01

    Primary liver cancer remains one of the most lethal malignancies worldwide. Due to differences in prevalence of etiological factors the incidence of primary liver cancer varies among the world, with a peak in EasL-Asia. As this disease is still lethal in most of the cases, research has to be done to improve our understanding of the disease, offering insights for possible treatment options. For this purpose, animal models are widely used,especially mouse models. In this review, we describe the different types of mouse models used in liver cancer research, with emphasis on genetically engineered mice used in this field. We focus on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), as this is by far the most common Lype of primary liver cancer, accounting for 70%-85% of cases.

  4. Manipulation of DNA Repair Proficiency in Mouse Models of Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Mcilhatton

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Technical and biological innovations have enabled the development of more sophisticated and focused murine models that increasingly recapitulate the complex pathologies of human diseases, in particular cancer. Mouse models provide excellent in vivo systems for deciphering the intricacies of cancer biology within the context of precise experimental settings. They present biologically relevant, adaptable platforms that are amenable to continual improvement and refinement. We discuss how recent advances in our understanding of tumorigenesis and the underlying deficiencies of DNA repair mechanisms that drive it have been informed by using genetically engineered mice to create defined, well-characterized models of human colorectal cancer. In particular, we focus on how mechanisms of DNA repair can be manipulated precisely to create in vivo models whereby the underlying processes of tumorigenesis are accelerated or attenuated, dependent on the composite alleles carried by the mouse model. Such models have evolved to the stage where they now reflect the initiation and progression of sporadic cancers. The review is focused on mouse models of colorectal cancer and how insights from these models have been instrumental in shaping our understanding of the processes and potential therapies for this disease.

  5. Manipulation of DNA Repair Proficiency in Mouse Models of Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcilhatton, Michael A; Boivin, Gregory P; Groden, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Technical and biological innovations have enabled the development of more sophisticated and focused murine models that increasingly recapitulate the complex pathologies of human diseases, in particular cancer. Mouse models provide excellent in vivo systems for deciphering the intricacies of cancer biology within the context of precise experimental settings. They present biologically relevant, adaptable platforms that are amenable to continual improvement and refinement. We discuss how recent advances in our understanding of tumorigenesis and the underlying deficiencies of DNA repair mechanisms that drive it have been informed by using genetically engineered mice to create defined, well-characterized models of human colorectal cancer. In particular, we focus on how mechanisms of DNA repair can be manipulated precisely to create in vivo models whereby the underlying processes of tumorigenesis are accelerated or attenuated, dependent on the composite alleles carried by the mouse model. Such models have evolved to the stage where they now reflect the initiation and progression of sporadic cancers. The review is focused on mouse models of colorectal cancer and how insights from these models have been instrumental in shaping our understanding of the processes and potential therapies for this disease. PMID:27413734

  6. Magnetic Nanoparticle-Based Hyperthermia for Head & Neck Cancer in Mouse Models

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Qun; Wang, Luning; Cheng, Rui; Mao, Leidong; Arnold, Robert D.; Howerth, Elizabeth W.; Chen, Zhuo G; Platt, Simon

    2012-01-01

    In this study, magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle induced hyperthermia is applied for treatment of head and neck cancer using a mouse xenograft model of human head and neck cancer (Tu212 cell line). A hyperthermia system for heating iron oxide nanoparticles was developed by using alternating magnetic fields. Both theoretical simulation and experimental studies were performed to verify the thermotherapy effect. Experimental results showed that the temperature of the tumor center has dramatically...

  7. New Mouse Model May Aid in Developing Effective Therapies for Ovarian Cancer | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer A new genetically engineered mouse model appears promising as an effective tool for preclinical testing of novel therapies for ovarian cancer, which tends to be diagnosed in late stage. There are few effective treatments for the disease.

  8. The landscape of chromosomal aberrations in breast cancer mouse models reveals driver-specific routes to tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Ben-David, Uri; Ha, Gavin; Khadka, Prasidda; Jin, Xin; Wong, Bang; Franke, Lude; Golub, Todd R.

    2016-01-01

    Aneuploidy and copy-number alterations (CNAs) are a hallmark of human cancer. Although genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) are commonly used to model human cancer, their chromosomal landscapes remain underexplored. Here we use gene expression profiles to infer CNAs in 3,108 samples from 45 mouse models, providing the first comprehensive catalogue of chromosomal aberrations in cancer GEMMs. Mining this resource, we find that most chromosomal aberrations accumulate late during breast tu...

  9. Development of a Mouse Model of Menopausal Ovarian Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth R Smith; Ying eWang; Xiang-Xi Mike Xu

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant understanding of the genetic mutations involved in ovarian epithelial cancer and advances in genomic approaches for expression and mutation profiling of tumor tissues, several key questions in ovarian cancer biology remain enigmatic: the mechanism for the well-established impact of reproductive factors on ovarian cancer risk remains obscure; questions of the cell of origin of ovarian cancer continue to be debated; and the precursor lesion, sequence, or events in progressi...

  10. Lobular breast cancer : molecular basis, mouse and cellular models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christgen, Matthias; Derksen, Patrick W B

    2015-01-01

    Infiltrating lobular breast cancer (ILC) is the most common special breast cancer subtype. With mutational or epigenetic inactivation of the cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin (CDH1) being confined almost exclusively to ILC, this tumor entity stands out from all other types of breast cancers. The mol

  11. Mouse p53-Deficient Cancer Models as Platforms for Obtaining Genomic Predictors of Human Cancer Clinical Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueñas, Marta; Santos, Mirentxu; Aranda, Juan F.; Bielza, Concha; Martínez-Cruz, Ana B.; Lorz, Corina; Taron, Miquel; Ciruelos, Eva M.; Rodríguez-Peralto, José L.; Martín, Miguel; Larrañaga, Pedro; Dahabreh, Jubrail; Stathopoulos, George P.; Rosell, Rafael; Paramio, Jesús M.; García-Escudero, Ramón

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the TP53 gene are very common in human cancers, and are associated with poor clinical outcome. Transgenic mouse models lacking the Trp53 gene or that express mutant Trp53 transgenes produce tumours with malignant features in many organs. We previously showed the transcriptome of a p53-deficient mouse skin carcinoma model to be similar to those of human cancers with TP53 mutations and associated with poor clinical outcomes. This report shows that much of the 682-gene signature of this murine skin carcinoma transcriptome is also present in breast and lung cancer mouse models in which p53 is inhibited. Further, we report validated gene-expression-based tests for predicting the clinical outcome of human breast and lung adenocarcinoma. It was found that human patients with cancer could be stratified based on the similarity of their transcriptome with the mouse skin carcinoma 682-gene signature. The results also provide new targets for the treatment of p53-defective tumours. PMID:22880004

  12. Transgenic Mouse Models for Alcohol Metabolism, Toxicity and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heit, Claire; Dong, Hongbin; Chen, Ying; Shah, Yatrik M.; Thompson, David C.; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse leads to tissue damage including a variety of cancers; however, the molecular mechanisms by which this damage occurs remains to be fully understood. The primary enzymes involved in ethanol metabolism include alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), cytochrome P450 isoform 2E1, (CYP2E1), catalase (CAT), and aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH). Genetic polymorphisms in human genes encoding these enzymes are associated with increased risks of alcohol-related tissue damage, as well as differences in alcohol consumption and dependence. Oxidative stress resulting from ethanol oxidation is one established pathogenic event in alcohol-induced toxicity. Ethanol metabolism generates free radicals, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), and has been associated with diminished glutathione (GSH) levels as well as changes in other antioxidant mechanisms. In addition, the formation of protein and DNA adducts associated with the accumulation of ethanol-derived aldehydes can adversely affect critical biological functions and thereby promote cellular and tissue pathology. Animal models have proven to be valuable tools for investigating mechanisms underlying pathogenesis caused by alcohol. In this review, we provide a brief discussion on several animal models with genetic defects in alcohol metabolizing enzymes and GSH synthesizing enzymes and their relevance to alcohol research. PMID:25427919

  13. An In Vivo Mouse Model for Human Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron M. Havens

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available We developed a sensitive real-time polymerase chain reaction (QPCR assay that allows us to track early lodging/homing events in vivo. We used this technology to develop a metastasis assay of human prostate cancer (PCa growth in severe combined immunodeficient mice. For this purpose, marked human PCa cell lines were implanted subcutaneously or in the prostate (orthotopically of severe combined immunodeficient mice as models of primary tumors. Mice were then sacrificed at various time points, and distant tissues were investigated for the presence of metastatic cells. At 3 weeks, a number of tissues were recovered and evaluated by QPCR for the presence of metastatic cells. The data demonstrate that several PCa cell lines are able to spread from the primary lesion and take up residence in distant sites. If the primary tumors were resected at 3 weeks, in several cases, metastastic lesions were identified over the course of 9 months. We propose that this new model may be particularly useful in exploring the molecular events in early metastasis, identifying the metastatic niche, and studying issues pertaining to dormancy.

  14. Recent technological advances in using mouse models to study ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Carrie Danielle; Hernandez, Lidia; Annunziata, Christina Messineo

    2014-01-01

    Serous epithelial ovarian cancer (SEOC) is the most lethal gynecological cancer in the United States with disease recurrence being the major cause of morbidity and mortality. Despite recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the development of SEOC, the survival rate for women with this disease has remained relatively unchanged in the last two decades. Preclinical mouse models of ovarian cancer, including xenograft, syngeneic, and genetically engineered mice, have been developed to provide a mechanism for studying the development and progression of SEOC. Such models strive to increase our understanding of the etiology and dissemination of ovarian cancer in order to overcome barriers to early detection and resistance to standard chemotherapy. Although there is not a single model that is most suitable for studying ovarian cancer, improvements have led to current models that more closely mimic human disease in their genotype and phenotype. Other advances in the field, such as live animal imaging techniques, allow effective monitoring of the microenvironment and therapeutic efficacy. New and improved preclinical mouse models, combined with technological advances to study such models, will undoubtedly render success of future human clinical trials for patients with SEOC.

  15. Mouse Models of Breast Cancer: Platforms for Discovering Precision Imaging Diagnostics and Future Cancer Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, H Charles; Buck, Jason R; Cook, Rebecca S

    2016-02-01

    Representing an enormous health care and socioeconomic challenge, breast cancer is the second most common cancer in the world and the second most common cause of cancer-related death. Although many of the challenges associated with preventing, treating, and ultimately curing breast cancer are addressable in the laboratory, successful translation of groundbreaking research to clinical populations remains an important barrier. Particularly when compared with research on other types of solid tumors, breast cancer research is hampered by a lack of tractable in vivo model systems that accurately recapitulate the relevant clinical features of the disease. A primary objective of this article was to provide a generalizable overview of the types of in vivo model systems, with an emphasis primarily on murine models, that are widely deployed in preclinical breast cancer research. Major opportunities to advance precision cancer medicine facilitated by molecular imaging of preclinical breast cancer models are discussed.

  16. OB glue paste technique for establishing nude mouse human gastric cancer orthotopic transplantation models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Shi; Guo-Jing Zheng; Xiao-Mei Su; Ya-Lin Chen; Yan-Fang Liu; Ling Xu; Pin-Kang Wei; Shen Zhang; Zhi-Feng Qin; Jun Li; Da-Zhi Sun; Yan Xiao; Zhi-Hong Yu; Hui-Ming Lin

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To establish nude mouse human gastric cancer orthotopic transplantation models using OB glue paste technique.METHODS: Using OB glue paste technique,orthtopic transplantation models were established by implanting SGC-7901 and MKN-45 human gastric cancer cell strains into the gastric wall of nude mice.Biological features,growth of the implanted tumors,the success rate of transplantation and the rate of auto-metastasis of the two models were observed.RESULTS: The success rates of orthotopic transplantation of the two models were 94.20% and 96%.The rates of hepatic metastasis,pulmonary metastasis,peritoneal metastasis,lymphocytic metastasis and splenic metastasis were 42.13% and 94.20%,48.43% and 57.97%,30.83% and 36.96%,67.30% and 84.06%,and 59.75% and 10.53%,respectively.The occurrence of ascites was 47.80% and 36.96%.CONCLUSION: OB glue paste technique is easy to follow.The biological behaviors of the nude mouse human gastric cancer orthotopic transplantation models established with this technique are similar to the natural processes of growth and metastasis of human gastric cancer,and,therefore,can be used as an ideal model for experimental research of proliferative metastasis of tumors.

  17. Genomic analysis to define molecular basis of aggressiveness in a mouse model of oral cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Varun Chalivendra; Krishna Latha Kanchi; Onken, Michael D.; Ashley E. Winkler; Elaine Mardis; Ravindra Uppaluri

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the molecular basis underlying aggressive behavior in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), our laboratory developed a carcinogen-induced mouse oral cancer (MOC) cell line model that encompasses the growth and metastasis spectrum of its human counterpart. We performed next-generation sequencing (NGS) and gene expression microarray profiles to explore the genomic and transcriptional backgrounds of the differential MOC line phenotypes, as well as, the cross-species relevance of th...

  18. Proteomic profiling of the hypothalamus in a mouse model of cancer-induced anorexia-cachexia

    OpenAIRE

    Ihnatko, Robert; Post, Claes; Blomqvist, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Background: Anorexia-cachexia is a common and severe cancer-related complication but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, using a mouse model for tumour-induced anorexia-cachexia, we screened for proteins that are differentially expressed in the hypothalamus, the brain’s metabolic control centre. Methods: The hypothalamus of tumour-bearing mice with implanted methylcholanthrene-induced sarcoma (MCG 101) displaying anorexia and their sham-implanted pair-fed or free-fed litterma...

  19. Effect of Endostar Combined with Gemcitabine on the Mouse Model of Human Pancreatic Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林清风

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of recombinant human endostatin,that is,endostar combined with gemcitabine on the mouse model of human pancreatic cancer.Methods We use the cell line PANC-1 and the severe combined immune deficient mice to set up the mouse model of human pancreatic cancer,then devide them into three groups,treat them with gemcitabine,gemcitabine combined with endostar,and 0.9% saline water respectively.We observe the change of the tumor volumn,use ELISA method to detect the serum VEGF level,stain the micro vessel in the tumor tissue with immunohistochemistry method,and compare the data among the different groups respectively.Results On the twenty-eighth day,the tumor volume of the control group,the monotherapy group and the combination group,averaged 1 700 mm3,19.2 mm3,10.4 mm3,serum VEGF level 88.6 L,35.5,26.3 pg/mL and MVD 43.9,30.3,19.2 respectively,which had significant difference.Conclusion Endostar can strengthen the lethal effect of gemcitabine on the mouse model of human pancreatic cancer.

  20. Complementarity of ultrasound and fluorescence imaging in an orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease characterized by dismal 5-year survival rates and limited treatment options. In an effort to provide useful models for preclinical evaluation of new experimental therapeutics, we and others have developed orthotopic mouse models of pancreatic cancer. The utility of these models for pre-clinical testing is dependent upon quantitative, noninvasive methods for monitoring in vivo tumor progression in real time. Toward this goal, we performed whole-body fluorescence imaging and ultrasound imaging to evaluate and to compare these noninvasive imaging modalities for assessing tumor burden and tumor progression in an orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer. The human pancreatic cancer cell line XPA-1, engineered for stable, high-level expression of red fluorescent protein (RFP), was implanted into the pancreas of nude mice using orthotopic implantation. The tumors were allowed to grow over a period of one to several weeks during which time the mice were imaged using both fluorescence imaging and ultrasound imaging to measure tumor burden and to monitor tumor growth. Whole-body fluorescence imaging and ultrasound imaging both allowed for the visualization and measurement of orthotopic pancreatic tumor implants in vivo. The imaging sessions were well-tolerated by the mice and yielded data which correlated well in the quantitative assessment of tumor burden. Whole-body fluorescence and two-dimensional ultrasound imaging showed a strong correlation for measurement of tumor size over a range of tumor sizes (R2 = 0.6627, P = 0.003 for an exposure time of 67 msec and R2 = 0.6553, P = 0.003 for an exposure time of 120 msec). Our findings suggest a complementary role for fluorescence imaging and ultrasound imaging in assessing tumor burden and tumor progression in orthotopic mouse models of human cancer

  1. Illuminating p53 function in cancer with genetically engineered mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Patty B.; Attardi, Laura D.

    2014-01-01

    The key role of the p53 protein in tumor suppression is highlighted by its frequent mutation in human cancers and by the completely penetrant cancer predisposition of p53 null mice. Beyond providing definitive evidence for the critical function of p53 in tumor suppression, genetically engineered mouse models have offered numerous additional insights into p53 function. p53 knock-in mice expressing tumor-derived p53 mutants have revealed that these mutants display gain-of-function activities th...

  2. Magnetic Nanoparticle-Based Hyperthermia for Head & Neck Cancer in Mouse Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qun Zhao, Luning Wang, Rui Cheng, Leidong Mao, Robert D. Arnold, Elizabeth W. Howerth, Zhuo G. Chen, Simon Platt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle induced hyperthermia is applied for treatment of head and neck cancer using a mouse xenograft model of human head and neck cancer (Tu212 cell line. A hyperthermia system for heating iron oxide nanoparticles was developed by using alternating magnetic fields. Both theoretical simulation and experimental studies were performed to verify the thermotherapy effect. Experimental results showed that the temperature of the tumor center has dramatically elevated from around the room temperature to about 40oC within the first 5-10 minutes. Pathological studies demonstrate epithelial tumor cell destruction associated with the hyperthermia treatment.

  3. Nucleotide excision repair- and p53-deficient mouse models in cancer research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoogervorst, Esther M. [Laboratory of Toxicology, Pathology and Genetics, National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Utrecht University, Department of Pathobiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Steeg, Harry van [Laboratory of Toxicology, Pathology and Genetics, National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Vries, Annemieke de [Laboratory of Toxicology, Pathology and Genetics, National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands)]. E-mail: Annemieke.de.Vries@rivm.nl

    2005-07-01

    Cancer is caused by the loss of controlled cell growth due to mutational (in)activation of critical genes known to be involved in cell cycle regulation. Three main mechanisms are known to be involved in the prevention of cells from becoming cancerous; DNA repair and cell cycle control, important to remove DNA damage before it will be fixed into mutations and apoptosis, resulting in the elimination of cells containing severe DNA damage. Several human syndromes are known to have (partially) deficiencies in these pathways, and are therefore highly cancer prone. Examples are xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) caused by an inborn defect in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway and the Li-Fraumeni syndrome, which is the result of a germ line mutation in the p53 gene. XP patients develop skin cancer on sun exposed areas at a relatively early age, whereas Li-Fraumeni patients spontaneously develop a wide variety of early onset tumors, including sarcomas, leukemia's and mammary gland carcinomas. Several mouse models have been generated to mimic these human syndromes, providing us information about the role of these particular gene defects in the tumorigenesis process. In this review, spontaneous phenotypes of mice deficient for nucleotide excision repair and/or the p53 gene will be described, together with their responses upon exposure to either chemical carcinogens or radiation. Furthermore, possible applications of these and newly generated mouse models for cancer will be given.

  4. Overview of Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Breast Cancer Used in Translational Biology and Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenow, Kirsty R; Smalley, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous condition with no single standard of treatment and no definitive method for determining whether a tumor will respond to therapy. The development of murine models that faithfully mimic specific human breast cancer subtypes is critical for the development of patient-specific treatments. While the artificial nature of traditional in vivo xenograft models used to characterize novel anticancer treatments has limited clinical predictive value, the development of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) makes it possible to study the therapeutic responses in an intact microenvironment. GEMMs have proven to be an experimentally tractable platform for evaluating the efficacy of novel therapeutic combinations and for defining the mechanisms of acquired resistance. Described in this overview are several of the more popular breast cancer GEMMs, including details on their value in elucidating the molecular mechanisms of this disorder.

  5. Mouse Model for ROS1-Rearranged Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yasuhito Arai; Yasushi Totoki; Hiroyuki Takahashi; Hiromi Nakamura; Natsuko Hama; Takashi Kohno; Koji Tsuta; Akihiko Yoshida; Hisao Asamura; Michihiro Mutoh; Fumie Hosoda; Hitoshi Tsuda; Tatsuhiro Shibata

    2013-01-01

    Genetic rearrangement of the ROS1 receptor tyrosine kinase was recently identified as a distinct molecular signature for human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, direct evidence of lung carcinogenesis induced by ROS1 fusion genes remains to be verified. The present study shows that EZR-ROS1 plays an essential role in the oncogenesis of NSCLC harboring the fusion gene. EZR-ROS1 was identified in four female patients of lung adenocarcinoma. Three of them were never smokers. Interstiti...

  6. Utilizing Past and Present Mouse Systems to Engineer More Relevant Pancreatic Cancer Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian T DeCant

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of pancreatic cancer has prompted the development of numerous mouse models that aim to recapitulate the phenotypic and mechanistic features of this deadly malignancy. This review accomplishes two tasks. First, it provides an overview of the models that have been used as representations of both the neoplastic and carcinoma phenotypes. Second, it presents new modeling schemes that ultimately will serve to more faithfully capture the temporal and spatial progression of the human disease, providing platforms for improved understanding of the role of non-epithelial compartments in disease etiology as well as evaluating therapeutic approaches.

  7. Proteome and Transcriptome Profiles of a Her2/Neu-driven Mouse Model of Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenherr, Regine M.; Kelly-Spratt, Karen S.; Lin, Chen Wei; Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Liu, Tao; Holzman, Ted; Coleman, Ilsa; Feng, Li-Chia; Lorentzen, Travis D.; Krasnoselsky, Alexei L.; Wang, Pei; Liu, Yan; Gurley, Kay E.; Amon, Lynn M.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Chodosh, Lewis A.; Smith, Richard D.; Nelson, Peter S.; McIntosh, Martin; Kemp, Christopher; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2011-04-01

    In recent years, mouse models have proven to be invaluable in expanding our understanding of cancer biology. We have amassed a tremendous amount of proteomics and transcriptomics data profiling blood and tissues from a Her2-driven mouse model of breast cancer that closely recapitulates the pathology and natural history of human breast cancer. The purpose of this report is to make all of these data publicly available in raw and processed forms, as a resource to the community. Importantly, high quality biospecimens from this same mouse model are freely available through a sample repository that we established, so researchers can readily obtain samples to test biological hypotheses without the need of breeding animals and collecting biospecimens. Specifically, six proteomics and six transcriptomics datasets are available, with the former encompassing 841 liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) experiments of both plasma and tissue samples, and the latter including 255 individual microarray analyses of five different tissue types (thymus, spleen, liver, blood cells, and breast ± laser capture microdissection). A total of 18,880 unique peptides were identified with a PeptideProphet error rate ≤1%, with 3884 non-redundant protein groups identified in five plasma datasets, and 1659 non-redundant protein groups in a tissue dataset (4977 non-redundant protein groups in total). We anticipate that these data will be of use to the community for software tool development, investigations of analytical variation in MS/MS data, development of quality control tools (multiple technical replicates are provided for a subset of the data), empirical selection of proteotypic peptides for multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry, and for advancing our understanding of cancer biology.

  8. No Effect of NGAL/lipocalin-2 on Aggressiveness of Cancer in the MMTV-PyMT/FVB/N Mouse Model for Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramer, Elisabeth P; Glenthøj, Andreas; Häger, Mattias;

    2012-01-01

    NGAL/lipocalin-2 is a siderophore-binding protein that is highly expressed in several cancers. It is suggested to confer a proliferative advantage to cancer cells. Its expression has been correlated with aggressiveness of breast cancer as determined both in patients and in mouse breast cancer...... models. This was recently confirmed in two mouse models of spontaneous breast cancer in wild-type and lipocalin-2-deficient mice. We used a similar strategy using a different mouse strain. Lipocalin-2-deficient mice and mouse mammary tumor virus-polyoma middle T antigen (MMTV-PyMT) mice were crossed...... expression in tumors of MMTV-PyMT-positive and wild-type mice was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR and by immunohistochemistry. The expression of the lipocalin-2 receptors 24p3R and megalin and of Mmp-9, transferrin receptor, and Bdh2 (a producer of a mammalian siderophore) were quantitated by real...

  9. Matrix metalloproteinases and genetic mouse models in cancer research: a mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Edyta; Jablonska, Ewa; Wasowicz, Wojciech; Reszka, Edyta

    2015-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is a multistep and also a multifactorial process that involves agents like genetic and environmental factors. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are major proteolytic enzymes which are involved in cancer cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. Genetic variations in genes encoding the MMPs were shown in human studies to influence cancer risk and phenotypic features of a tumor. The complex role of MMPs seems to be important in the mechanism of carcinogenesis, but it is not well recognized. Rodent studies concentrated particularly on the better understanding of the biological functions of the MMPs and their impact on the pathological process, also through the modification of Mmp genes. This review presents current knowledge and the existing evidence on the importance of selected MMPs in genetic mouse models of cancer and human genetic association studies. Further, this work can be useful for scientists studying the role of the genetic impact of MMPs in carcinogenesis. PMID:25352026

  10. How chromosome mis-segregation leads to cancer: lessons from BubR1 mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunsook

    2014-10-31

    Alteration in chromosome numbers and structures instigate and foster massive genetic instability. As Boveri has seen a hundred years ago (Boveri, 1914; 2008), aneuploidy is hallmark of many cancers. However, whether aneuploidy is the cause or the result of cancer is still at debate. The molecular mechanism behind aneuploidy includes the chromo-some mis-segregation in mitosis by the compromise of spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). SAC is an elaborate network of proteins, which monitor that all chromosomes are bipolarly attached with the spindles. Therefore, the weakening of the SAC is the major reason for chromosome number instability, while complete compromise of SAC results in detrimental death, exemplified in natural abortion in embryonic stage. Here, I will review on the recent progress on the understanding of chromosome mis-segregation and cancer, based on the comparison of different mouse models of BubR1, the core component of SAC. PMID:25256220

  11. Mammary-Stem-Cell-Based Somatic Mouse Models Reveal Breast Cancer Drivers Causing Cell Fate Dysregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer genomics has provided an unprecedented opportunity for understanding genetic causes of human cancer. However, distinguishing which mutations are functionally relevant to cancer pathogenesis remains a major challenge. We describe here a mammary stem cell (MaSC organoid-based approach for rapid generation of somatic genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs. By using RNAi and CRISPR-mediated genome engineering in MaSC-GEMMs, we have discovered that inactivation of Ptpn22 or Mll3, two genes mutated in human breast cancer, greatly accelerated PI3K-driven mammary tumorigenesis. Using these tumor models, we have also identified genetic alterations promoting tumor metastasis and causing resistance to PI3K-targeted therapy. Both Ptpn22 and Mll3 inactivation resulted in disruption of mammary gland differentiation and an increase in stem cell activity. Mechanistically, Mll3 deletion enhanced stem cell activity through activation of the HIF pathway. Thus, our study has established a robust in vivo platform for functional cancer genomics and has discovered functional breast cancer mutations.

  12. Cancer stem cells from human breast tumors are involved in spontaneous metastases in orthotopic mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huiping; Patel, Manishkumar R.; Prescher, Jennifer A.; Patsialou, Antonia; Qian, Dalong; Lin, Jiahui; Wen, Susanna; Chang, Ya-Fang; Bachmann, Michael H.; Shimono, Yohei; Dalerba, Piero; Adorno, Maddalena; Lobo, Neethan; Bueno, Janet; Dirbas, Frederick M.; Goswami, Sumanta; Somlo, George; Condeelis, John; Contag, Christopher H.; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Clarke, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    To examine the role of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) in metastasis, we generated human-in-mouse breast cancer orthotopic models using patient tumor specimens, labeled with optical reporter fusion genes. These models recapitulate human cancer features not captured with previous models, including spontaneous metastasis in particular, and provide a useful platform for studies of breast tumor initiation and progression. With noninvasive imaging approaches, as few as 10 cells of stably labeled BCSCs could be tracked in vivo, enabling studies of early tumor growth and spontaneous metastasis. These advances in BCSC imaging revealed that CD44+ cells from both primary tumors and lung metastases are highly enriched for tumor-initiating cells. Our metastatic cancer models, combined with noninvasive imaging techniques, constitute an integrated approach that could be applied to dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying the dissemination of metastatic CSCs (MCSCs) and to explore therapeutic strategies targeting MCSCs in general or to evaluate individual patient tumor cells and predict response to therapy. PMID:20921380

  13. Chemokine-Targeted Mouse Models of Human Primary and Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huanhuan Joyce; Sun, Jian; Huang, Zhiliang; Hou, Harry; Arcilla, Myra; Rakhilin, Nikolai; Joe, Daniel J.; Choi, Jiahn; Gadamsetty, Poornima; Milsom, Jeff; Nandakumar, Govind; Longman, Randy; Zhou, Xi Kathy; Edwards, Robert; Chen, Jonlin; Chen, Kai Yuan; Bu, Pengcheng; Wang, Lihua; Xu, Yitian; Munroe, Robert; Abratte, Christian; Miller, Andrew D.; Gümüş, Zeynep H.; Shuler, Michael; Nishimura, Nozomi; Edelmann, Winfried; Shen, Xiling; Lipkin, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Current orthotopic xenograft models of human colorectal cancer (CRC) require surgery and do not robustly form metastases in the liver, the most common site clinically. CCR9 traffics lymphocytes to intestine and colorectum. We engineered use of the chemokine receptor CCR9 in CRC cell lines and patient-derived cells to create primary gastrointestinal (GI) tumors in immunodeficient mice by tail-vein injection rather than surgery. The tumors metastasize inducibly and robustly to the liver. Metastases have higher DKK4 and NOTCH signaling levels and are more chemoresistant than paired sub-cutaneous xenografts. Using this approach, we generated 17 chemokine-targeted mouse models (CTMMs) that recapitulate the majority of common human somatic CRC mutations. We also show that primary tumors can be modeled in immunocompetent mice by microinjecting CCR9-expressing cancer cell lines into early-stage mouse blastocysts, which induces central immune tolerance. We expect that CTMMs will facilitate investigation of the biology of CRC metastasis and drug screening. PMID:26006007

  14. Curcumin Inhibits Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis in an Orthotopic Mouse Model of Human Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Bimonte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is a malignant neoplasm originating from transformed cells arising in tissues forming the pancreas. The best chemotherapeutic agent used to treat pancreatic cancer is the gemcitabine. However, gemcitabine treatment is associated with many side effects. Thus novel strategies involving less toxic agents for treatment of pancreatic cancer are necessary. Curcumin is one such agent that inhibits the proliferation and angiogenesis of a wide variety of tumor cells, through the modulation of many cell signalling pathways. In this study, we investigated whether curcumin plays antitumor effects in MIA PaCa-2 cells. In vitro studies showed that curcumin inhibits the proliferation and enhances apoptosis of MIA PaCa-2 cells. To test whether the antitumor activity of curcumin is also observed in vivo, we generated an orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer by injection of MIA PaCa-2 cells in nude mice. We placed mice on diet containing curcumin at 0.6% for 6 weeks. In these treated mice tumors were smaller with respect to controls and showed a downregulation of the transcription nuclear factor NF-κB and NF-κB-regulated gene products. Overall, our data indicate that curcumin has a great potential in treatment of human pancreatic cancer through the modulation of NF-κB pathway.

  15. Establishment of Orthotopic Xuanwei Lung Cancer SCID Mouse Model 
and Analysis of Biological Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchun ZHOU

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The incidence of Xuanwei lung cancer ranks first in China, and its pathogenesis requires in-depth investigation. This study aims to establish an orthotopic Xuanwei lung cancer severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mouse model and to provide a basic experimental platform for further study. Methods The Xuanwei lung cancer cell line XWLC-05 was inoculated into the lung tissue of SCID mice in high and low doses. The tumor formation rates, tumor characteristics, spontaneous metastases, and survival times of the mice were observed, taking a subcutaneously transplanted tumor as control. Results The tumor formation rates of the orthotopic transplantation of lung cancer cells in high and low doses were 81% and 83%, respectively, among which mice in the high-dose group appeared cachectic on day 13. Extensive invasion and adhesion were observed in the contralateral lung and thoracic cavity, but no distant metastasis was exhibited. Mice with low-dose cells in the orthotopic transplantation group appeared cachectic and distant metastasis occurred on day 25. The tumor formation rates in the subcutaneous inoculation group by the high and low doses of cells were 100% and 94.5%, respectively, and no distant metastasis was observed. The rate of metastasis within the orthotopic transplantation group and between the orthotopic and subcutaneous inoculation groups showed a significant difference (P<0.05. A significant difference was indicated by the survival rate within and between the groups (P<0.001. Conclusion We successfully established an orthotopic XWLC SCID mouse model, which lays the foundation for a more in-depth study.

  16. Dimethylaminoparthenolide and gemcitabine: a survival study using a genetically engineered mouse model of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the deadliest cancers due to lack of early detection and absence of effective treatments. Gemcitabine, the current standard-of-care chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer, has limited clinical benefit. Treatment of pancreatic cancer cells with gemcitabine has been shown to induce the activity of the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) which regulates the expression of genes involved in the inflammatory response and tumorigenesis. It has therefore been proposed that gemcitabine-induced NF-κB activation may result in chemoresistance. We hypothesize that NF-κB suppression by the novel inhibitor dimethylaminoparthenolide (DMAPT) may enhance the effect of gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer. The efficacy of DMAPT and gemcitabine was evaluated in a chemoprevention trial using the mutant Kras and p53-expressing LSL-KrasG12D/+; LSL-Trp53R172H; Pdx-1-Cre mouse model of pancreatic cancer. Mice were randomized to treatment groups (placebo, DMAPT [40 mg/kg/day], gemcitabine [50 mg/kg twice weekly], and the combination DMAPT/gemcitabine). Treatment was continued until mice showed signs of ill health at which time they were sacrificed. Plasma cytokine levels were determined using a Bio-Plex immunoassay. Statistical tests used included log-rank test, ANOVA with Dunnett’s post-test, Student’s t-test, and Fisher exact test. Gemcitabine or the combination DMAPT/gemcitabine significantly increased median survival and decreased the incidence and multiplicity of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. The DMAPT/gemcitabine combination also significantly decreased tumor size and the incidence of metastasis to the liver. No significant differences in the percentages of normal pancreatic ducts or premalignant pancreatic lesions were observed between the treatment groups. Pancreata in which no tumors formed were analyzed to determine the extent of pre-neoplasia; mostly normal ducts or low grade pancreatic lesions were observed, suggesting prevention of

  17. Genomic analysis to define molecular basis of aggressiveness in a mouse model of oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun Chalivendra

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the molecular basis underlying aggressive behavior in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, our laboratory developed a carcinogen-induced mouse oral cancer (MOC cell line model that encompasses the growth and metastasis spectrum of its human counterpart. We performed next-generation sequencing (NGS and gene expression microarray profiles to explore the genomic and transcriptional backgrounds of the differential MOC line phenotypes, as well as, the cross-species relevance of the model. Here we describe the comparative analysis of NGS (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/biosample?LinkName=bioproject_biosample_all&from_uid=247825 and expression microarray (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE50041 data from the MOC lines and corresponding human data, as described in our recent publication [1].

  18. Paternal overweight is associated with increased breast cancer risk in daughters in a mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontelles, Camile Castilho; Carney, Elissa; Clarke, Johan; Nguyen, Nguyen M.; Yin, Chao; Jin, Lu; Cruz, M. Idalia; Ong, Thomas Prates; Hilakivi-Clarke, Leena; de Assis, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    While many studies have shown that maternal weight and nutrition in pregnancy affects offspring’s breast cancer risk, no studies have investigated the impact of paternal body weight on daughters’ risk of this disease. Here, we show that diet-induced paternal overweight around the time of conception can epigenetically reprogram father’s germ-line and modulate their daughters’ birth weight and likelihood of developing breast cancer, using a mouse model. Increased body weight was associated with changes in the miRNA expression profile in paternal sperm. Daughters of overweight fathers had higher rates of carcinogen-induced mammary tumors which were associated with delayed mammary gland development and alterations in mammary miRNA expression. The hypoxia signaling pathway, targeted by miRNAs down-regulated in daughters of overweight fathers, was activated in their mammary tissues and tumors. This study provides evidence that paternal peri-conceptional body weight may affect daughters’ mammary development and breast cancer risk and warrants further studies in other animal models and humans. PMID:27339599

  19. Doxil Synergizes with Cancer Immunotherapies to Enhance Antitumor Responses in Syngeneic Mouse Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Rios-Doria

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Based on the previously described roles of doxorubicin in immunogenic cell death, both doxorubicin and liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil were evaluated for their ability to boost the antitumor response of different cancer immunotherapies including checkpoint blockers (anti–PD-L1, PD-1, and CTLA-4 mAbs and TNF receptor agonists (OX40 and GITR ligand fusion proteins in syngeneic mouse models. In a preventative CT26 mouse tumor model, both doxorubicin and Doxil synergized with anti–PD-1 and CTLA-4 mAbs. Doxil was active when CT26 tumors were grown in immunocompetent mice but not immunocompromised mice, demonstrating that Doxil activity is increased in the presence of a functional immune system. Using established tumors and maximally efficacious doses of Doxil and cancer immunotherapies in either CT26 or MCA205 tumor models, combination groups produced strong synergistic antitumor effects, a larger percentage of complete responders, and increased survival. In vivo pharmacodynamic studies showed that Doxil treatment decreased the percentage of tumor-infiltrating regulatory T cells and, in combination with anti–PD-L1, increased the percentage of tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells. In the tumor, Doxil administration increased CD80 expression on mature dendritic cells. CD80 expression was also increased on both monocytic and granulocytic myeloid cells, suggesting that Doxil may induce these tumor-infiltrating cells to elicit a costimulatory phenotype capable of activating an antitumor T-cell response. These results uncover a novel role for Doxil in immunomodulation and support the use of Doxil in combination with checkpoint blockade or TNFR agonists to increase response rates and antitumor activity.

  20. Doxil synergizes with cancer immunotherapies to enhance antitumor responses in syngeneic mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios-Doria, Jonathan; Durham, Nicholas; Wetzel, Leslie; Rothstein, Raymond; Chesebrough, Jon; Holoweckyj, Nicholas; Zhao, Wei; Leow, Ching Ching; Hollingsworth, Robert

    2015-08-01

    Based on the previously described roles of doxorubicin in immunogenic cell death, both doxorubicin and liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil) were evaluated for their ability to boost the antitumor response of different cancer immunotherapies including checkpoint blockers (anti-PD-L1, PD-1, and CTLA-4 mAbs) and TNF receptor agonists (OX40 and GITR ligand fusion proteins) in syngeneic mouse models. In a preventative CT26 mouse tumor model, both doxorubicin and Doxil synergized with anti-PD-1 and CTLA-4 mAbs. Doxil was active when CT26 tumors were grown in immunocompetent mice but not immunocompromised mice, demonstrating that Doxil activity is increased in the presence of a functional immune system. Using established tumors and maximally efficacious doses of Doxil and cancer immunotherapies in either CT26 or MCA205 tumor models, combination groups produced strong synergistic antitumor effects, a larger percentage of complete responders, and increased survival. In vivo pharmacodynamic studies showed that Doxil treatment decreased the percentage of tumor-infiltrating regulatory T cells and, in combination with anti-PD-L1, increased the percentage of tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells. In the tumor, Doxil administration increased CD80 expression on mature dendritic cells. CD80 expression was also increased on both monocytic and granulocytic myeloid cells, suggesting that Doxil may induce these tumor-infiltrating cells to elicit a costimulatory phenotype capable of activating an antitumor T-cell response. These results uncover a novel role for Doxil in immunomodulation and support the use of Doxil in combination with checkpoint blockade or TNFR agonists to increase response rates and antitumor activity. PMID:26408258

  1. Nicotine promotes tumor growth and metastasis in mouse models of lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Davis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nicotine is the major addictive component of tobacco smoke. Although nicotine is generally thought to have limited ability to initiate cancer, it can induce cell proliferation and angiogenesis in a variety of systems. These properties might enable nicotine to facilitate the growth of tumors already initiated. Here we show that nicotine significantly promotes the progression and metastasis of tumors in mouse models of lung cancer. This effect was observed when nicotine was administered through intraperitoneal injections, or through over-the-counter transdermal patches. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In the present study, Line1 mouse adenocarcinoma cells were implanted subcutaneously into syngenic BALB/c mice. Nicotine administration either by intraperitoneal (i.p. injection or transdermal patches caused a remarkable increase in the size of implanted Line1 tumors. Once the tumors were surgically removed, nicotine treated mice had a markedly higher tumor recurrence (59.7% as compared to the vehicle treated mice (19.5%. Nicotine also increased metastasis of dorsally implanted Line1 tumors to the lungs by 9 folds. These studies on transplanted tumors were extended to a mouse model where the tumors were induced by the tobacco carcinogen, NNK. Lung tumors were initiated in A/J mice by i.p. injection of NNK; administration of 1 mg/kg nicotine three times a week led to an increase in the size and the number of tumors formed in the lungs. In addition, nicotine significantly reduced the expression of epithelial markers, E-Cadherin and beta-Catenin as well as the tight junction protein ZO-1; these tumors also showed an increased expression of the alpha(7 nAChR subunit. We believe that exposure to nicotine either by tobacco smoke or nicotine supplements might facilitate increased tumor growth and metastasis. CONCLUSIONS: Our earlier results indicated that nicotine could induce invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT in cultured lung, breast

  2. Optical coherence tomography imaging of colonic crypts in a mouse model of colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welge, Weston A.; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2016-03-01

    Aberrant crypt foci (ACF) are abnormal epithelial lesions that precede development of colonic polyps. As the earliest morphological change in the development of colorectal cancer, ACF is a highly studied phenomenon. The most common method of imaging ACF is chromoendoscopy using methylene blue as a contrast agent. Narrow- band imaging is a contrast-agent-free modality for imaging the colonic crypts. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an attractive alternative to chromoendoscopy and narrow-band imaging because it can resolve the crypt structure at sufficiently high sampling while simultaneously providing depth-resolved data. We imaged in vivo the distal 15 mm of colon in the azoxymethane (AOM) mouse model of colorectal cancer using a commercial swept-source OCT system and a miniature endoscope designed and built in-house. We present en face images of the colonic crypts and demonstrate that different patterns in healthy and adenoma tissue can be seen. These patterns correspond to those reported in the literature. We have previously demonstrated early detection of colon adenoma using OCT by detecting minute thickening of the mucosa. By combining mucosal thickness measurement with imaging of the crypt structure, OCT can be used to correlate ACF and adenoma development in space and time. These results suggest that OCT may be a superior imaging modality for studying the connection between ACF and colorectal cancer.

  3. Transforming growth factor-β and breast cancer: Lessons learned from genetically altered mouse models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-βs are plausible candidate tumor suppressors in the breast. They also have oncogenic activities under certain circumstances, however. Genetically altered mouse models provide powerful tools to analyze the complexities of TGF-βaction in the context of the whole animal. Overexpression of TGF-β can suppress tumorigenesis in the mammary gland, raising the possibility that use of pharmacologic agents to enhance TGF-β function locally might be an effective method for the chemoprevention of breast cancer. Conversely, loss of TGF-β response increases spontaneous and induced tumorigenesis in the mammary gland. This confirms that endogenous TGF-βs have tumor suppressor activity in the mammary gland, and suggests that the loss of TGF-β receptors seen in some human breast hyperplasias may play a causal role in tumor development

  4. Analgesic effects of adenylyl cyclase inhibitor NB001 on bone cancer pain in a mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Wen-bo; Yang, Qi; Guo, Yan-yan; Wang, Lu; Wang, Dong-sheng; Cheng, Qiang; Li, Xiao-ming; Tang, Jun; Zhao, Jian-ning; Liu, Gang; Zhuo, Min

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer pain, especially the one caused by metastasis in bones, is a severe type of pain. Pain becomes chronic unless its causes and consequences are resolved. With improvements in cancer detection and survival among patients, pain has been considered as a great challenge because traditional therapies are partially effective in terms of providing relief. Cancer pain mechanisms are more poorly understood than neuropathic and inflammatory pain states. Chronic inflammatory pain and neuropathic pain are influenced by NB001, an adenylyl cyclase 1 (AC1)-specific inhibitor with analgesic effects. In this study, the analgesic effects of NB001 on cancer pain were evaluated. Results Pain was induced by injecting osteolytic murine sarcoma cell NCTC 2472 into the intramedullary cavity of the femur of mice. The mice injected with sarcoma cells for four weeks exhibited significant spontaneous pain behavior and mechanical allodynia. The continuous systemic application of NB001 (30 mg/kg, intraperitoneally, twice daily for three days) markedly decreased the number of spontaneous lifting but increased the mechanical paw withdrawal threshold. NB001 decreased the concentrations of cAMP and the levels of GluN2A, GluN2B, p-GluA1 (831), and p-GluA1 (845) in the anterior cingulate cortex, and inhibited the frequency of presynaptic neurotransmitter release in the anterior cingulate cortex of the mouse models. Conclusions NB001 may serve as a novel analgesic to treat bone cancer pain. Its analgesic effect is at least partially due to the inhibition of AC1 in anterior cingulate cortex. PMID:27612915

  5. Pathology of genetically engineered mouse models of pancreatic exocrine cancer: Consensus report and recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.H. Hruban; N.V. Adsay; J. Albores-Saavedra; M.R. Anver; A.V. Biankin; G.P. Boivin; E.E. Furth; T. Furukawa; A. Klein; D.S. Klimstra; G. Kloppel; G.Y. Lauwers; D.S. Longnecker; J. Luttges; A. Maitra; G.J.A. Offerhaus; L. Perez-Gallego; M. Redston; D.A. Tuveson

    2006-01-01

    Several diverse genetically engineered mouse models of pancreatic exocrine neoplasia have been developed. These mouse models have a spectrum of pathologic changes; however, until now, there has been no uniform nomenclature to characterize these changes. An international workshop, sponsored by The Na

  6. Prevention of Prostate Cancer with Oleanane Synthetic Triterpenoid CDDO-Me in the TRAMP Mouse Model of Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Xiaohua; Deeb, Dorrah; Liu, Yongbo [Department of General Surgery, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI 48150 (United States); Arbab, Ali S. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI 48150 (United States); Divine, George W. [Department of Public Health Sciences, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI 48150 (United States); Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Gautam, Subhash C., E-mail: sgautam1@hfhs.org [Department of General Surgery, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI 48150 (United States)

    2011-08-19

    2-Cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-28-oic acid (CDDO), a synthetic analog of oleanolic acid, and its C28 methyl ester derivative (CDDO-Me), have shown potent antitumorigenic activity against a wide range of cancer cell lines, including prostate cancer cells in vitro, and inhibited the development of liver and lung cancer in vivo. In the present study, we examined the efficacy of CDDO-Me in preventing the development and progression of prostate cancer in the transgenic adenocarinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. CDDO-Me inhibited the growth of murine TRAMPC-1 prostate cancer cells by inducing apoptosis through the inhibition of antiapoptotic p-Akt, p-mTOR and NF-κB. Early intervention with CDDO-Me (7.5 mg/kg) initiated at five weeks of age for 20 wk inhibited the progression of the preneoplastic lesions (low-grade PIN and high-grade-PIN) to adenocarcinoma in the dorsolateral prostate (DLP) and ventral prostate (VP) lobes of TRAMP mice. Even delayed administration of CDDO-Me started at 12 wk of age for 12 wk inhibited the development of adenocarcimona of the prostate. Both early and late treatment with CDDO-Me inhibited the metastasis of tumor to the distant organs. Treatment with CDDO-Me inhibited the expression of prosurvival p-Akt and NF-κB in the prostate and knocking-down Akt in TRAMPC-1 tumor cells sensitized them to CDDO-Me. These findings indicated that Akt is a target for apoptoxicity in TRAMPC-1 cells in vitro and potentially a target of CDDO-Me for inhibition of prostate cancer in vivo.

  7. Microencapsulated tumor assay: Evaluation of the nude mouse model of pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Zhe Ma; Dong-Feng Cheng; Jin-Hua Ye; Yong Zhou; Jia-Xiang Wang; Min-Min Shi; Bao-San Han; Cheng-Hong Peng

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To establish a more stable and accurate nude mouse model of pancreatic cancer using cancer cell microencapsulation.METHODS: The assay is based on microencapsulation technology, wherein human tumor cells are encapsulated in small microcapsules (approximately 420 μm in diameter) constructed of semipermeable membranes. We implemented two kinds of subcutaneous implantation models in nude mice using the injection of single tumor cells and encapsulated pancreatic tumor cells. The size of subcutaneously implanted tumors was observed on a weekly basis using two methods, and growth curves were generated from these data. The growth and metastasis of orthotopically injected single tumor cells and encapsulated pancreatic tumor cells were evaluated at four and eight weeks postimplantation by positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan and necropsy. The pancreatic tumor samples obtained from each method were then sent for pathological examination. We evaluated differences in the rates of tumor incidence and the presence of metastasis and variations in tumor volume and tumor weight in the cancer microcapsules vs single-cell suspensions.RESULTS: Sequential in vitro observations of the microcapsules showed that the cancer cells in microcapsules proliferated well and formed spheroids at days 4 to 6. Further in vitro culture resulted in bursting of the membrane of the microcapsules and cells deviated outward and continued to grow in flasks. The optimum injection time was found to be 5 d after tumor encapsulation. In the subcutaneous implantation model, there were no significant differences in terms of tumor volume between the encapsulated pancreatic tumor cells and cells alone and rate of tumor incidence. There was a significant difference in the rate of successful implantation between the cancer cell microencapsulation group and the single tumor-cell suspension group (100% vs 71.43%, respectively, P = 0.0489) in the orthotropic implantation model. The former method

  8. Mouse models of medulloblastoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaochong Wu; Paul A. Northcott; Sidney Croul; Michael D. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor. Despite its prevalence and importance in pediatric neuro-oncology, the genes and pathways responsible for its initiation, maintenance,and progression remain poorly understood. Genetically engineered mouse models are an essential tool for uncovering the molecular and cellular basis of human diseases, including cancer, and serve a valuable role as preclinical models for testing targeted therapies. In this review, we summarize how such models have been successfully applied to the study of medulloblastoma over the past decade and what we might expect in the coming years.

  9. Mouse Models in Prostate Cancer Translational Research: From Xenograft to PDX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Domenica; Del Vecchio, Vitale; Palma, Giuseppe; Barbieri, Antonio; Falco, Michela; Luciano, Antonio; De Biase, Davide; Perdonà, Sisto; Facchini, Gaetano; Arra, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advancement of clinical and preclinical research on PCa, which resulted in the last five years in a decrement of disease incidence by 3-4%, it remains the most frequent cancer in men and the second for mortality rate. Based on this evidence we present a brief dissertation on numerous preclinical models, comparing their advantages and disadvantages; among this we report the PDX mouse models that show greater fidelity to the disease, in terms of histopathologic features of implanted tumor, gene and miRNA expression, and metastatic pattern, well describing all tumor progression stages; this characteristic encourages the translation of preclinical results. These models become particularly useful in meeting the need of new treatments identification that eradicate PCa bone metastases growing, clarifying pathway of angiogenesis, identifying castration-resistant stem-like cells, and studying the antiandrogen therapies. Also of considerable interest are the studies of 3D cell cultures derived from PDX, which have the ability to maintain PDX cell viability with continued native androgen receptor expression, also showing a differential sensitivity to drugs. 3D PDX PCa may represent a diagnostic platform for the rapid assessment of drugs and push personalized medicine. Today the development of preclinical models in vitro and in vivo is necessary in order to obtain increasingly reliable answers before reaching phase III of the drug discovery. PMID:27294148

  10. Mouse Models in Prostate Cancer Translational Research: From Xenograft to PDX

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Vecchio, Vitale; Palma, Giuseppe; Barbieri, Antonio; Falco, Michela; Luciano, Antonio; De Biase, Davide; Perdonà, Sisto; Facchini, Gaetano; Arra, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advancement of clinical and preclinical research on PCa, which resulted in the last five years in a decrement of disease incidence by 3-4%, it remains the most frequent cancer in men and the second for mortality rate. Based on this evidence we present a brief dissertation on numerous preclinical models, comparing their advantages and disadvantages; among this we report the PDX mouse models that show greater fidelity to the disease, in terms of histopathologic features of implanted tumor, gene and miRNA expression, and metastatic pattern, well describing all tumor progression stages; this characteristic encourages the translation of preclinical results. These models become particularly useful in meeting the need of new treatments identification that eradicate PCa bone metastases growing, clarifying pathway of angiogenesis, identifying castration-resistant stem-like cells, and studying the antiandrogen therapies. Also of considerable interest are the studies of 3D cell cultures derived from PDX, which have the ability to maintain PDX cell viability with continued native androgen receptor expression, also showing a differential sensitivity to drugs. 3D PDX PCa may represent a diagnostic platform for the rapid assessment of drugs and push personalized medicine. Today the development of preclinical models in vitro and in vivo is necessary in order to obtain increasingly reliable answers before reaching phase III of the drug discovery. PMID:27294148

  11. Biodistribution and imaging of fluorescently-tagged iron oxide nanoparticles in a breast cancer mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Jennifer A.; Savellano, Mark D.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2013-02-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticle (IONP) hyperthermia is an emerging treatment that shows great potential as a cancer therapy both alone and in synergy with conventional modalities. Pre-clinical studies are attempting to elucidate the mechanisms of action and distributions of IONP in various in vitro and in vivo models, however these studies would greatly benefit from real-time imaging of IONP locations both in cellular and in mammalian systems. To this end, fluorescently-tagged IONP (fIONP) have been employed for real time tracking and co-registration of IONP with iron content. Starch-coated IONP were fluorescently-tagged, purified and analyzed for fluorescent signal at various concentrations. fIONP were incubated with MTGB cells for varying times and cellular uptake analyzed using confocal microscopy, flow cytometry and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). fIONP were also injected into a bilateral mouse tumor model for radiation modification of tumor tissue and enhanced fIONP deposition assessed using a Xenogen IVIS fluorescent imager. Results demonstrated that fIONP concentrations in vitro correlated with ICPMS iron readings. fIONP could be tracked in vitro as well as in tissue samples from an in vivo model. Future work will employ whole animal fluorescent imaging to track the biodistribution of fIONP over time.

  12. Subcutaneous preconditioning increases invasion and metastatic dissemination in mouse colorectal cancer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamo, Patricia; Gallardo, Alberto; Pavón, Miguel A.; Casanova, Isolda; Trias, Manuel; Mangues, Maria A.; Vázquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio; Mangues, Ramon; Céspedes, Maria V.

    2014-01-01

    Mouse colorectal cancer (CRC) models generated by orthotopic microinjection of human CRC cell lines reproduce the pattern of lymphatic, haematological and transcoelomic spread but generate low metastatic efficiency. Our aim was to develop a new strategy that could increase the metastatic efficiency of these models. We used subcutaneous implantation of the human CRC cell lines HCT116 or SW48 prior to their orthotopic microinjection in the cecum of nude mice (SC+ORT). This subcutaneous preconditioning significantly enhanced metastatic dissemination. In the HCT116 model it increased the number and size of metastatic foci in lymph nodes, lung, liver and peritoneum, whereas, in the SW48 model, it induced a shift from non-metastatic to metastatic. In both models the number of apoptotic bodies in the primary tumour in the SC+ORT group was significantly reduced compared with that in the direct orthotopic injection (ORT) group. Moreover, in HCT116 tumours the number of keratin-positive tumour buddings and single epithelial cells increased at the invasion front in SC+ORT mice. In the SW48 tumour model, we observed a trend towards a higher number of tumour buds and single cells in the SC+ORT group but this did not reach statistical significance. At a molecular level, the enhanced metastatic efficiency observed in the HCT116 SC+ORT model was associated with an increase in AKT activation, VEGF-A overexpression and downregulation of β1 integrin in primary tumour tissue, whereas, in SW48 SC+ORT mice, the level of expression of these proteins remained unchanged. In summary, subcutaneous preconditioning increased the metastatic dissemination of both orthotopic CRC models by increasing tumour cell survival and invasion at the tumour invasion front. This approach could be useful to simultaneously study the mechanisms of metastases and to evaluate anti-metastatic drugs against CRC. PMID:24487410

  13. Subcutaneous preconditioning increases invasion and metastatic dissemination in mouse colorectal cancer models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Alamo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Mouse colorectal cancer (CRC models generated by orthotopic microinjection of human CRC cell lines reproduce the pattern of lymphatic, haematological and transcoelomic spread but generate low metastatic efficiency. Our aim was to develop a new strategy that could increase the metastatic efficiency of these models. We used subcutaneous implantation of the human CRC cell lines HCT116 or SW48 prior to their orthotopic microinjection in the cecum of nude mice (SC+ORT. This subcutaneous preconditioning significantly enhanced metastatic dissemination. In the HCT116 model it increased the number and size of metastatic foci in lymph nodes, lung, liver and peritoneum, whereas, in the SW48 model, it induced a shift from non-metastatic to metastatic. In both models the number of apoptotic bodies in the primary tumour in the SC+ORT group was significantly reduced compared with that in the direct orthotopic injection (ORT group. Moreover, in HCT116 tumours the number of keratin-positive tumour buddings and single epithelial cells increased at the invasion front in SC+ORT mice. In the SW48 tumour model, we observed a trend towards a higher number of tumour buds and single cells in the SC+ORT group but this did not reach statistical significance. At a molecular level, the enhanced metastatic efficiency observed in the HCT116 SC+ORT model was associated with an increase in AKT activation, VEGF-A overexpression and downregulation of β1 integrin in primary tumour tissue, whereas, in SW48 SC+ORT mice, the level of expression of these proteins remained unchanged. In summary, subcutaneous preconditioning increased the metastatic dissemination of both orthotopic CRC models by increasing tumour cell survival and invasion at the tumour invasion front. This approach could be useful to simultaneously study the mechanisms of metastases and to evaluate anti-metastatic drugs against CRC.

  14. Targeting anti-cancer drug resistance in mouse models of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaspers, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to anti-cancer drugs is one of the biggest challenges in clinical oncology. In contrast to the success of local therapy (e.g. surgery or radiotherapy), the treatment of disseminated cancers using classical DNA-damaging chemotherapeutic agents and novel specific inhibitors frequently fails

  15. A mouse model for Luminal epithelial like ER positive subtype of human breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generation of novel spontaneous ER positive mammary tumor animal model from heterozygous NIH nude mice. Using brother-sister mating with pedigree expansion system, we derived a colony of heterozygous breeding females showing ER-Positive tumors around the age of 6 months. Complete blood picture, differential leukocyte count, and serum levels of Estrogen, Alanine amino transferase (SGPT), Aspartate amino transferase (SGOT), total protein and albumin were estimated. Aspiration biopsies and microbiology were carried out. Gross pathology of the tumors and their metastatic potential were assessed. The tumors were excised and further characterized using histopathology, cytology, electron microscopy (EM), molecular markers and Mouse mammary Tumor Virus – Long Terminal Repeats (MMTV LTR) specific RT-PCR. The tumors originated from 2ndor 5thor both the mammary glands and were multi-nodulated with variable central necrosis accompanied with an accumulation of inflammatory exudate. Significant increases in estrogen, SGPT, SGOT and neutrophils levels were noticed. Histopathologically, invasive nodular masses of pleomorphic tubular neoplastic epithelial cells invaded fibro-vascular stroma, adjacent dermis and subcutaneous tissue. Metastatic spread through hematogenous and regional lymph nodes, into liver, lungs, spleen, heart and dermal lymphatics was observed. EM picture revealed no viral particles and MMTV-negativity was confirmed through MMTV LTR-specific RT-PCR. High expression of ER α, moderate to high expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), moderate expression of vimentin and Cytokeratin 19 (K19) and low expression of p53 were observed in tumor sections, when compared with that of the normal mammary gland. Since 75% of human breast cancer were classified ER-positive and as our model mimics (in most of the characteristics, such as histopathology, metastasis, high estrogen levels) the ER-positive luminal epithelial-like human breast cancer, this model will

  16. Xenograft and genetically engineered mouse model systems of osteosarcoma and Ewing's sarcoma: tumor models for cancer drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Valerie B; Kamara, Davida F; Kolb, E Anders

    2014-01-01

    Introduction There are > 75 histological types of solid tumors that are classified into two major groups: bone and soft-tissue sarcomas. These diseases are more prevalent in children, and pediatric sarcomas tend to be highly aggressive and rapidly progressive. Sarcomas in adults may follow a more indolent course, but aggressive tumors are also common. Sarcomas that are metastatic at diagnosis, or recurrent following therapy, remain refractory to current treatment options with dismal overall survival rates. A major focus of clinical trials, for patients with sarcoma, is to identify novel and more effective therapeutic strategies targeted to genomic or proteomic aberrations specific to the malignant cells. Critical to the understanding of the potential for targeted therapies are models of disease that are representative of clinical disease and predictive of relevant clinical responses. Areas covered In this article, the authors discuss the use of mouse xenograft models and genetically engineered mice in cancer drug discovery. The authors provide a special focus on models for the two most common bone sarcomas: osteosarcoma (OS) and Ewing's sarcoma (ES). Expert opinion Predicting whether a new anticancer agent will have a positive therapeutic index in patients with OS and ES remains a challenge. The use of mouse sarcoma models for understanding the mechanisms involved in the response of tumors to new treatments is an important step in the process of drug discovery and the development of clinically relevant therapeutic strategies for these diseases. PMID:23844615

  17. Fluorescent and scattering contrast agents in a mouse model of colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Amy M.; Rice, Photini F. S.; Troutman, Timothy S.; Backer, Marina V.; Backer, Joseph M.; Drezek, Rebekah A.; Romanowski, Marek; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2008-02-01

    In previous work we have demonstrated the utility of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) to identify adenoma in mouse models of colorectal cancer with high sensitivity and specificity. However, improved sensitivity to early disease, as well as the ability to distinguish confounders (e.g. fecal contamination, natural variations in mucosal thickness), is desired. In this study, we investigated the signal enhancement of fluorescent and scattering contrast agents in the colons of AOM-treated mice. The fluorescent tracer scVEGF/Cy, targeted to receptors for vascular endothelial growth factor, was visualized on a dual modality OCT/LIF endoscopic system with 1300-nm center wavelength OCT source and 635-nm LIF excitation. Scattering agents were tested with an 890-nm center wavelength endoscopic OCT system. Agents included nanoshells, 120-nm in diameter, and nanorods, 20-nm in diameter by 80-nm in length. Following imaging, colons were excised. Tissue treated with fluorophore was imaged on an epifluorescence microscope. Histological sections were obtained and stained with H&E and silver enhancer to verify disease and identify regions of gold uptake, respectively. Non-specific signal enhancement was observed with the scattering contrast agents. Specificity for adenoma was seen with the scVEGF/Cy dye.

  18. Time-lapse Imaging of Primary Preneoplastic Mammary Epithelial Cells Derived from Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nakles, Rebecca E.; Millman, Sarah L.; Cabrera, M. Carla; Johnson, Peter; Mueller, Susette; Hoppe, Philipp S.; Schroeder, Timm; Furth, Priscilla A.

    2013-01-01

    Time-lapse imaging can be used to compare behavior of cultured primary preneoplastic mammary epithelial cells derived from different genetically engineered mouse models of breast cancer. For example, time between cell divisions (cell lifetimes), apoptotic cell numbers, evolution of morphological changes, and mechanism of colony formation can be quantified and compared in cells carrying specific genetic lesions. Primary mammary epithelial cell cultures are generated from mammary glands without...

  19. Monitoring of prostate cancer growth and metastasis using a PSA luciferase report plasmid in a mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi-Qi; Mao; Yi-Wei; Lin; Hong; Chen; Kai; Yang; De-Bo; Kong; Hai; Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To construct a PSA luciferase report plasmid and monitor the growth and metastasis of prostate cancer after emasculation in SCID mice.Methods:PSA promoter sequence and luciferase gene were amplified by PCR and subsequently inserted into pZsCreen1-1 vector to construct pPSA-FL-Luc vector.LNCaP cells that were stably transfected with pPSA-FL-Luc were used to establish a SCID mouse xenograft model.Then,the growth and metastasis of prostate cancer were monitored via living imaging.Results:We successfully constructed a PSA luciferase piasmid,pPSA-FL-Luc.DHT enhanced lucifcrase activity in a concentration-dependent manner in 293 T cells with pPSA-FL-Luc transfection.Prostate cancer SCID mouse model was established with pPSA-FL-Luc transfected LNCaP cells.In tumor bearing mice with or without emasculation,pPSA-FL-Lue piasmid was applied to monitored tumor growth and metastasis based on bioluminescence imaging.Conclusions:We construct a pPSA-FL-Luc piasmid,which stably expresses luciferase and can be applied to monitor tumor development in a prostate SCID mouse model.

  20. Monitoring of prostate cancer growth and metastasis using a PSA luciferase report plasmid in a mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi-Qi Mao; Yi-Wei Lin; Hong Chen; Kai Yang; De-Bo Kong; Hai Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To construct a PSA luciferase report plasmid and monitor the growth and metastasis of prostate cancer after emasculation in SCID mice. Methods: PSA promoter sequence and luciferase gene were amplified by PCR and subsequently inserted into pZsGreen1-1 vector to construct pPSA-FL-Luc vector. LNCaP cells that were stably transfected with pPSA-FL-Luc were used to establish a SCID mouse xenograft model. Then, the growth and metastasis of prostate cancer were monitored via living imaging. Results:We successfully constructed a PSA luciferase plasmid, pPSA-FL-Luc. DHT enhanced luciferase activity in a concentration-dependent manner in 293T cells with pPSA-FL-Luc transfection. Prostate cancer SCID mouse model was established with pPSA-FL-Luc transfected LNCaP cells. In tumor bearing mice with or without emasculation, pPSA-FL-Luc plasmid was applied to monitored tumor growth and metastasis based on bioluminescence imaging. Conclusions: We construct a pPSA-FL-Luc plasmid, which stably expresses luciferase and can be applied to monitor tumor development in a prostate SCID mouse model.

  1. Urokinase receptor cleavage correlates with tumor volume in a transgenic mouse model of breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thurison, Tine; Almholt, Kasper; Gårdsvoll, Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    marker for cancer than increased expression of muPAR per se. The levels of the muPAR forms are dramatically affected by in vivo challenge with a urokinase -blocking antibody, demonstrating a functional role of uPA in uPAR cleavage. The levels of the muPAR forms are, however, unaffected by u......The urokinase plasminogen activator system plays a key role in tissue degradation during cancer invasion. The linker region between domains I and II of the intact, three domain urokinase receptor uPAR(I-III) is highly susceptible to proteolytic cleavage and the resulting cleaved uPAR forms...... are strong prognostic biomarkers in several types of cancer, i.e., high levels of the cleaved uPAR forms indicate poor survival. To better understand the role of uPAR cleavage in cancer, we have designed immunoassays for specific quantification of intact mouse uPAR [muPAR(I-III)] and mouse uPAR domain I [mu...

  2. The Next Generation of Orthotopic Thyroid Cancer Models: Immunocompetent Orthotopic Mouse Models of BRAFV600E-Positive Papillary and Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Vanden Borre, Pierre; McFadden, David G.; Gunda, Viswanath; Sadow, Peter M.; Varmeh, Shohreh; Bernasconi, Maria; Jacks, Tyler; Parangi, Sareh

    2014-01-01

    Background: While the development of new treatments for aggressive thyroid cancer has advanced in the last 10 years, progress has trailed headways made with other malignancies. A lack of reliable authenticated human cell lines and reproducible animal models is one major roadblock to preclinical testing of novel therapeutics. Existing xenograft and orthotopic mouse models of aggressive thyroid cancer rely on the implantation of highly passaged human thyroid carcinoma lines in immunodeficient m...

  3. SDF-1α mediates wound-promoted tumor growth in a syngeneic orthotopic mouse model of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina H Stuelten

    Full Text Available Increased growth of residual tumors in the proximity of acute surgical wounds has been reported; however, the mechanisms of wound-promoted tumor growth remain unknown. Here, we used a syngeneic, orthotopic mouse model of breast cancer to study mechanisms of wound-promoted tumor growth. Our results demonstrate that exposure of metastatic mouse breast cancer cells (4T1 to SDF-1α, which is increased in wound fluid, results in increased tumor growth. Both, wounding and exposure of 4T1 cells to SDF-1α not only increased tumor growth, but also tumor cell proliferation rate and stromal collagen deposition. Conversely, systemic inhibition of SDF-1α signaling with the small molecule AMD 3100 abolished the effect of wounding, and decreased cell proliferation, collagen deposition, and neoangiogenesis to the levels observed in control animals. Furthermore, using different mouse strains we could demonstrate that the effect of wounding on tumor growth and SDF-1α levels is host dependent and varies between mouse strains. Our results show that wound-promoted tumor growth is mediated by elevated SDF-1α levels and indicate that the effect of acute wounds on tumor growth depends on the predetermined wound response of the host background and its predetermined wound response.

  4. Selective resistance to the PARP inhibitor olaparib in a mouse model for BRCA1-deficient metaplastic breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneman, Linda; van Miltenburg, Martine H.; Michalak, Ewa M.; Braumuller, Tanya M.; Jaspers, Janneke E.; Drenth, Anne Paulien; de Korte-Grimmerink, Renske; Gogola, Ewa; Szuhai, Karoly; Schlicker, Andreas; Bin Ali, Rahmen; Pritchard, Colin; Huijbers, Ivo J.; Berns, Anton; Rottenberg, Sven; Jonkers, Jos

    2015-01-01

    Metaplastic breast carcinoma (MBC) is a rare histological breast cancer subtype characterized by mesenchymal elements and poor clinical outcome. A large fraction of MBCs harbor defects in breast cancer 1 (BRCA1). As BRCA1 deficiency sensitizes tumors to DNA cross-linking agents and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, we sought to investigate the response of BRCA1-deficient MBCs to the PARP inhibitor olaparib. To this end, we established a genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM) for BRCA1-deficient MBC by introducing the MET proto-oncogene into a BRCA1-associated breast cancer model, using our novel female GEMM ES cell (ESC) pipeline. In contrast to carcinomas, BRCA1-deficient mouse carcinosarcomas resembling MBC show intrinsic resistance to olaparib caused by increased P-glycoprotein (Pgp) drug efflux transporter expression. Indeed, resistance could be circumvented by using another PARP inhibitor, AZD2461, which is a poor Pgp substrate. These preclinical findings suggest that patients with BRCA1-associated MBC may show poor response to olaparib and illustrate the value of GEMM-ESC models of human cancer for evaluation of novel therapeutics. PMID:26100884

  5. Dissecting the Role of Curcumin in Tumour Growth and Angiogenesis in Mouse Model of Human Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Bimonte

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is considered the most common cancer for women worldwide and it is now the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among females in the world. Since breast cancer is highly resistant to chemotherapy, alternative anticancer strategies have been developed. In particular, many studies have demonstrated that curcumin, a derivative of turmeric, can be used as natural agent in treatment of some types of cancer by playing antiproliferative and antioxidant effects. In our study, we assessed the antitumor activities of curcumin in ER-negative human breast cancer cell line resistant to chemotherapy, MDA.MB231 by in vitro and in vivo experiments. In vitro data allowed us to demonstrate that curcumin played a role in regulation of proliferation and apoptosis in MDA.MB231 cells. In vivo, by generation of mouse model of breast cancer, we showed that treatment of curcumin inhibited tumor growth and angiogenesis. Specifically, we showed that curcumin is able to deregulate the expression of cyclin D1, PECAM-1, and p65, which are regulated by NF-κB. Our data demonstrated that curcumin could be used as an adjuvant agent to chemotherapy in treatment of triple negative breast cancer.

  6. A new conditional Apc-mutant mouse model for colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C. Robanus-Maandag (Els); P.J. Koelink (Pim); C. Breukel (Cor); D.C.F. Salvatori (Daniela); S.C. Jagmohan-Changur (Shantie); C.A.J. Bosch (Cathy); H.W. Verspaget; P. Devilee (Peter); R. Fodde (Riccardo); M.J.M. Smits (Ron)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMutations of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene predispose individuals to familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), characterized by multiple tumours in the large intestine. Most mouse models heterozygous for truncating mutant Apc alleles mimic FAP, however, the intestinal tumours occ

  7. The nude mouse as an in vivo model for human breast cancer invasion and metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brünner, N; Boysen, B; Rømer, J;

    1993-01-01

    Human breast cancer xenografts only rarely invade and metastasize in nude mice, and have therefore only had limited use as a model for studying mechanisms involved in breast cancer spreading. However, recent reports describe differences not only between various cell lines but also between strains...

  8. Ultrasound-guided direct delivery of 3-bromopyruvate blocks tumor progression in an orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Shinichi; Geschwind, Jean-Francois H; Buijs, Manon; Wijlemans, Joost W; Kwak, Byung Kook; Ganapathy-Kanniappan, Shanmugasundaram

    2013-06-01

    Studies in animal models of cancer have demonstrated that targeting tumor metabolism can be an effective anticancer strategy. Previously, we showed that inhibition of glucose metabolism by the pyruvate analog, 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA), induces anticancer effects both in vitro and in vivo. We have also documented that intratumoral delivery of 3-BrPA affects tumor growth in a subcutaneous tumor model of human liver cancer. However, the efficacy of such an approach in a clinically relevant orthotopic tumor model has not been reported. Here, we investigated the feasibility of ultrasound (US) image-guided delivery of 3-BrPA in an orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic cancer and evaluated its therapeutic efficacy. In vitro, treatment of Panc-1 cells with 3-BrPA resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in cell viability. The loss of viability correlated with a dose-dependent decrease in the intracellular ATP level and lactate production confirming that disruption of energy metabolism underlies these 3-BrPA-mediated effects. In vivo, US-guided delivery of 3-BrPA was feasible and effective as demonstrated by a marked decrease in tumor size on imaging. Further, the antitumor effect was confirmed by (1) a decrease in the proliferative potential by Ki-67 immunohistochemical staining and (2) the induction of apoptosis by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine 5-triphospate nick end labeling staining. We therefore demonstrate the technical feasibility of US-guided intratumoral injection of 3-BrPA in a mouse model of human pancreatic cancer as well as its therapeutic efficacy. Our data suggest that this new therapeutic approach consisting of a direct intratumoral injection of antiglycolytic agents may represent an exciting opportunity to treat patients with pancreas cancer. PMID:23529644

  9. Mouse Stirs up Breast Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Helen Pilcher; 孙雯

    2004-01-01

    @@ The humble house mouse could be more dangerous than we thought,according to a study that suggests a rodent① virus plays a role in the development of breast cancer. But the finding is contentious② and reignites③ a long-standing④wrangle⑤ about the potential⑥ causes of the disease.

  10. Molecularly Characterised Xenograft Tumour Mouse Models: Valuable Tools for Evaluation of New Therapeutic Strategies for Secondary Liver Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available To develop and evaluate new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of human cancers, well-characterised preclinical model systems are a prerequisite. To this aim, we have established xenotransplantation mouse models and corresponding cell cultures from surgically obtained secondary human liver tumours. Established xenograft tumours were patho- and immunohistologically characterised, and expression levels of cancer-relevant genes were quantified in paired original and xenograft tumours and the derivative cell cultures applying RT-PCR-based array technology. Most of the characteristic morphological and immunohistochemical features of the original tumours were shown to be maintained. No differences were found concerning expression of genes involved in cell cycle regulation and oncogenesis. Interestingly, cytokine and matrix metalloproteinase encoding genes appeared to be expressed differentially. Thus, the established models are closely reflecting pathohistological and molecular characteristics of the selected human tumours and may therefore provide useful tools for preclinical analyses of new antitumour strategies in vivo.

  11. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R inhibits human prostate cancer experimental bone metastasis in mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toneri, Makoto; Miwa, Shinji; Zhang, Yong; Hu, Cameron; Yano, Shuya; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Bouvet, Michael; Nakanishi, Hayao; Hoffman, Robert M; Zhao, Ming

    2015-10-13

    Bone metastasis is a frequent occurrence in prostate cancer patients and often is lethal. Zoledronic acid (ZOL) is often used for bone metastasis with limited efficacy. More effective models and treatment methods are required to improve the outcome of prostate cancer patients. In the present study, the effects of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R were analyzed in vitro and in vivo on prostate cancer cells and experimental bone metastasis. Both ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R inhibited the growth of PC-3 cells expressing red fluorescent protien in vitro. To investigate the efficacy of S. typhimurium A1-R on prostate cancer experimental bone metastasis, we established models of both early and advanced stage bone metastasis. The mice were treated with ZOL, S. typhimurium A1-R, and combination therapy of both ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R. ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R inhibited the growth of solitary bone metastases. S. typhimurium A1-R treatment significantly decreased bone metastasis and delayed the appearance of PC-3 bone metastases of multiple mouse models. Additionally, S. typhimurium A1-R treatment significantly improved the overall survival of the mice with multiple bone metastases. The results of the present study indicate that S. typhimurium A1-R is useful to prevent and inhibit prostate cancer bone metastasis and has potential for future clinical use in the adjuvant setting.

  12. MOUSE MODEL FOR PRE-CLINICAL STUDY OF HUMAN CANCER IMMUNOTHERAPY

    OpenAIRE

    Ya, Zhiya; Hailemichael, Yared; Overwijk, Willem; Restifo, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    This unit describes protocols for developing tumors in mice including subcutaneous growth, pulmonary metastases of B16 melanoma, and spontaneous melanoma in B-Raf V600E/PTEN deletion transgenic mouse models. Two immunization methods to prevent B16 tumor growth are described using B16.GM-CSF and recombinant vaccinia virus. A therapeutic approach is also included that uses adoptive transfer of tumor antigen-specific T cells. Methods including CTL induction, isolation, testing, and genetic modif...

  13. A bioluminescent mouse model of proliferation to highlight early stages of pancreatic cancer: A suitable tool for preclinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Latouliere, Luisa; Manni, Isabella; Iacobini, Carla; Pugliese, Giuseppe; Grazi, Gian Luca; Perri, Pasquale; Cappello, Paola; Novelli, Franco; Menini, Stefano; Piaggio, Giulia

    2016-09-01

    Transgenic mouse models designed to recapitulate genetic and pathologic aspects of cancer are useful to study early stages of disease as well as its progression. Among several, two of the most sophisticated models for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are the LSL-Kras(G12D/+);Pdx-1-Cre (KC) and LSL-Kras(G12D/+);LSL-Trp53(R172H/+);Pdx-1-Cre (KPC) mice, in which the Cre-recombinase regulated by a pancreas-specific promoter activates the expression of oncogenic Kras alone or in combination with a mutant p53, respectively. Non-invasive in vivo imaging offers a novel approach to preclinical studies introducing the possibility to investigate biological events in the spatio/temporal dimension. We recently developed a mouse model, MITO-Luc, engineered to express the luciferase reporter gene in cells undergoing active proliferation. In this model, proliferation events can be visualized non-invasively by bioluminescence imaging (BLI) in every body district in vivo. Here, we describe the development and characterization of MITO-Luc-KC- and -KPC mice. In these mice we have now the opportunity to follow PDAC evolution in the living animal in a time frame process. Moreover, by relating in vivo and ex vivo BLI and histopathological data we provide evidence that these mice could represents a suitable tool for pancreatic cancer preclinical studies. Our data also suggest that aberrant proliferation events take place early in pancreatic carcinogenesis, before tumour appearance. PMID:26704357

  14. MOUSE MODEL FOR PRE-CLINICAL STUDY OF HUMAN CANCER IMMUNOTHERAPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ya, Zhiya; Hailemichael, Yared; Overwijk, Willem; Restifo, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    This unit describes protocols for developing tumors in mice including subcutaneous growth, pulmonary metastases of B16 melanoma, and spontaneous melanoma in B-Raf V600E/PTEN deletion transgenic mouse models. Two immunization methods to prevent B16 tumor growth are described using B16.GM-CSF and recombinant vaccinia virus. A therapeutic approach is also included that uses adoptive transfer of tumor antigen-specific T cells. Methods including CTL induction, isolation, testing, and genetic modification of mouse T cells for adoptive transfer by using retrovirus expressing genes of interest are provided. Additional sections, including growing B16 melanoma, enumerating pulmonary metastases, tumor imaging technique and use of recombinant viruses for vaccination, are discussed together with safety concerns. PMID:25640991

  15. Nicotine does not enhance tumorigenesis in mutant K-Ras-driven mouse models of lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Maier, Colleen R.; Hollander, M. Christine; Hobbs, Evthokia A.; Dogan, Irem; Dennis, Phillip A.

    2011-01-01

    Smoking is the leading cause of preventable cancer deaths in the United States. Nicotine replacement therapies (NRT) have been developed to aid in smoking cessation, which decreases lung cancer incidence. However, the safety of NRT is controversial because numerous preclinical studies have shown that nicotine enhances tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo. We modeled NRT in mice to determine the effects of physiological levels of nicotine on lung tumor formation, tumor growth or metastasis. ...

  16. Development of Orthotopic Pancreatic Tumor Mouse Models

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu, Wanglong; Gloria H. Su

    2013-01-01

    Genetically engineered mouse models of pancreatic cancer that recapitulate human pancreatic tumorigenesis have been established. However, the cost associated with generating and housing these mice can be prohibitive. Tumor latency and progression to invasive diseases in these models are also highly variable. Xenograft mouse models of human pancreatic cancer including heterotopic and orthotopic have been widely used in preclinical studies for their comparatively low cost and rapid, predictable...

  17. Whole Reproductive System Non-Negative Matrix Factorization Mass Spectrometry Imaging of an Early-Stage Ovarian Cancer Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paine, Martin R L; Kim, Jaeyeon; Bennett, Rachel V; Parry, R Mitchell; Gaul, David A; Wang, May D; Matzuk, Martin M; Fernández, Facundo M

    2016-01-01

    High-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) is the most common and deadliest form of ovarian cancer. Yet it is largely asymptomatic in its initial stages. Studying the origin and early progression of this disease is thus critical in identifying markers for early detection and screening purposes. Tissue-based mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) can be employed as an unbiased way of examining localized metabolic changes between healthy and cancerous tissue directly, at the onset of disease. In this study, we describe MSI results from Dicer-Pten double-knockout (DKO) mice, a mouse model faithfully reproducing the clinical nature of human HGSC. By using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) for the unsupervised analysis of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) datasets, tissue regions are segregated based on spectral components in an unbiased manner, with alterations related to HGSC highlighted. Results obtained by combining NMF with DESI-MSI revealed several metabolic species elevated in the tumor tissue and/or surrounding blood-filled cyst including ceramides, sphingomyelins, bilirubin, cholesterol sulfate, and various lysophospholipids. Multiple metabolites identified within the imaging study were also detected at altered levels within serum in a previous metabolomic study of the same mouse model. As an example workflow, features identified in this study were used to build an oPLS-DA model capable of discriminating between DKO mice with early-stage tumors and controls with up to 88% accuracy. PMID:27159635

  18. Whole Reproductive System Non-Negative Matrix Factorization Mass Spectrometry Imaging of an Early-Stage Ovarian Cancer Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin R L Paine

    Full Text Available High-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC is the most common and deadliest form of ovarian cancer. Yet it is largely asymptomatic in its initial stages. Studying the origin and early progression of this disease is thus critical in identifying markers for early detection and screening purposes. Tissue-based mass spectrometry imaging (MSI can be employed as an unbiased way of examining localized metabolic changes between healthy and cancerous tissue directly, at the onset of disease. In this study, we describe MSI results from Dicer-Pten double-knockout (DKO mice, a mouse model faithfully reproducing the clinical nature of human HGSC. By using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF for the unsupervised analysis of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI datasets, tissue regions are segregated based on spectral components in an unbiased manner, with alterations related to HGSC highlighted. Results obtained by combining NMF with DESI-MSI revealed several metabolic species elevated in the tumor tissue and/or surrounding blood-filled cyst including ceramides, sphingomyelins, bilirubin, cholesterol sulfate, and various lysophospholipids. Multiple metabolites identified within the imaging study were also detected at altered levels within serum in a previous metabolomic study of the same mouse model. As an example workflow, features identified in this study were used to build an oPLS-DA model capable of discriminating between DKO mice with early-stage tumors and controls with up to 88% accuracy.

  19. Innate lymphoid cells sustain colon cancer through production of interleukin-22 in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchberger, Stefanie; Royston, Daniel J; Boulard, Olivier; Thornton, Emily; Franchini, Fanny; Szabady, Rose L; Harrison, Oliver; Powrie, Fiona

    2013-05-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have an increased risk of colon cancer. However, the immune cells and cytokines that mediate the transition from intestinal inflammation to cancer are poorly understood. We show that bacteria-induced colon cancer is accompanied by differential accumulation of IL-17(+)IL-22(+) colonic innate lymphoid cells (cILCs), which are phenotypically distinct from LTi and NK-22 cells, and that their depletion in mice with dysplastic inflammation blocks the development of invasive colon cancer. Analysis of the functional role of distinct Type 17 cytokines shows that although blockade of IL-17 inhibits some parameters of intestinal inflammation, reduction in dysplasia and colorectal cancer (CRC) requires neutralization of IL-22 indicating a unique role for IL-22 in the maintenance of cancer in this model. Mechanistic analyses showed that IL-22 selectively acts on epithelial cells to induce Stat3 phosphorylation and proliferation. Importantly, we could detect IL-22(+)CD3(+) and IL-22(+)CD3(−) cells in human CRC. Our results describe a new activity of IL-22 in the colon as a nonredundant mediator of the inflammatory cascade required for perpetuation of CRC, highlighting the IL-22 axis as a novel therapeutic target in colon cancer.

  20. Anti-VEGF Therapy in Breast and Lung Mouse Models of Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Domenico Marina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the world after cardiovascular diseases. Some types of cancer cells often travel to other parts of the body through blood circulation or lymph vessels, where they begin to grow. This process is recognized as metastasis. Angiogenesis is the formation of new blood vessels from existing vessel. Normally angiogenesis is a healthy process, that helps the body to heal wounds and repair damaged body tissues, whereas in cancerous condition this process supports new blood vessels formation that provide a tumor with its own blood supply, nutrients and allow it to grow. The most important proximal factor for angiogenesis is the vascular endothelial growth factor VEGF. Angioinhibition is a form of targeted therapy that uses drugs to stop tumors from making new blood vessels. Therefore, in this paper we analyse the importance of VEGF as target of cancer therapy, analysing murine models.

  1. Substance P and beta-endorphin mediate electro-acupuncture induced analgesia in mouse cancer pain model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Sun-Hyung

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Opioid analgesics are generally used to combat the pain associated with cancerous conditions. These agents not only inhibit respiratory function and cause constipation, but also induce other significant side effects such as addiction and tolerance, all of which further contribute to a reduced quality of life for cancer patients. Thus, in the present study, the effects of electro-acupuncture treatment (EA on mechanical allodynia were examined in a cancer pain mouse model. Methods In order to produce a neuropathic cancer pain model, S-180 sarcoma cells were inoculated around the sciatic nerve of left legs of Balb/c mice. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI scanning confirmed the mass of S-180 cancer cells embedded around the sciatic nerve. Mechanical allodynia was most consistently induced in the mouse sarcoma cell line S-180 (2 × 106sarcoma cells-treated group compared to all the other groups studied. EA stimulation (2 Hz was administered daily to ST36 (Zusanli of S-180 bearing mice for 30 min for 9 days after S-180 inoculation. Results EA treatment significantly prolonged paw withdrawal latency from 5 days after inoculation. It also shortened the cumulative lifting duration from 7 days after inoculation, compared to the tumor control. Also, the overexpression of pain peptide substance P in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord was significantly decreased in the EA-treated group compared to the tumor control on Day 9 post inoculation. Furthermore, EA treatment effectively increased the concentration of β-endorphin in blood and brain samples of the mice to a greater extent than that of the tumor control as well as the normal group. The concentration of β-endorphin for EA treatment group increased by 51.457% in the blood and 12.6% in the brain respectively, compared to the tumor control group. Conclusion The findings of this study suggest that a S-180 cancer pain model is useful as a consistent and short time animal model. It also

  2. Gene signatures derived from a c-MET-driven liver cancer mouse model predict survival of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Ivanovska

    Full Text Available Biomarkers derived from gene expression profiling data may have a high false-positive rate and must be rigorously validated using independent clinical data sets, which are not always available. Although animal model systems could provide alternative data sets to formulate hypotheses and limit the number of signatures to be tested in clinical samples, the predictive power of such an approach is not yet proven. The present study aims to analyze the molecular signatures of liver cancer in a c-MET-transgenic mouse model and investigate its prognostic relevance to human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Tissue samples were obtained from tumor (TU, adjacent non-tumor (AN and distant normal (DN liver in Tet-operator regulated (TRE human c-MET transgenic mice (n = 21 as well as from a Chinese cohort of 272 HBV- and 9 HCV-associated HCC patients. Whole genome microarray expression profiling was conducted in Affymetrix gene expression chips, and prognostic significances of gene expression signatures were evaluated across the two species. Our data revealed parallels between mouse and human liver tumors, including down-regulation of metabolic pathways and up-regulation of cell cycle processes. The mouse tumors were most similar to a subset of patient samples characterized by activation of the Wnt pathway, but distinctive in the p53 pathway signals. Of potential clinical utility, we identified a set of genes that were down regulated in both mouse tumors and human HCC having significant predictive power on overall and disease-free survival, which were highly enriched for metabolic functions. In conclusions, this study provides evidence that a disease model can serve as a possible platform for generating hypotheses to be tested in human tissues and highlights an efficient method for generating biomarker signatures before extensive clinical trials have been initiated.

  3. A Cross-Species Analysis of a Mouse Model of Breast Cancer-Specific Osteolysis and Human Bone Metastases Using Gene Expression Profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in women in the United States. During the advanced stages of disease, many breast cancer patients suffer from bone metastasis. These metastases are predominantly osteolytic and develop when tumor cells interact with bone. In vivo models that mimic the breast cancer-specific osteolytic bone microenvironment are limited. Previously, we developed a mouse model of tumor-bone interaction in which three mouse breast cancer cell lines were implanted onto the calvaria. Analysis of tumors from this model revealed that they exhibited strong bone resorption, induction of osteoclasts and intracranial penetration at the tumor bone (TB)-interface. In this study, we identified and used a TB microenvironment-specific gene expression signature from this model to extend our understanding of the metastatic bone microenvironment in human disease and to predict potential therapeutic targets. We identified a TB signature consisting of 934 genes that were commonly (among our 3 cell lines) and specifically (as compared to tumor-alone area within the bone microenvironment) up- and down-regulated >2-fold at the TB interface in our mouse osteolytic model. By comparing the TB signature with gene expression profiles from human breast metastases and an in vitro osteoclast model, we demonstrate that our model mimics both the human breast cancer bone microenvironment and osteoclastogenesis. Furthermore, we observed enrichment in various signaling pathways specific to the TB interface; that is, TGF-β and myeloid self-renewal pathways were activated and the Wnt pathway was inactivated. Lastly, we used the TB-signature to predict cyclopenthiazide as a potential inhibitor of the TB interface. Our mouse breast cancer model morphologically and genetically resembles the osteoclastic bone microenvironment observed in human disease. Characterization of the gene expression signature specific to the TB interface in our model revealed

  4. Therapeutic efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R on human colorectal cancer liver metastasis in orthotopic nude-mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takashi; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Yong; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-10-13

    Liver metastasis is the most frequent cause of death from colon and other cancers. Generally, liver metastasis is recalcitrant to treatment. The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R on liver metastasis in orthotopic mouse models. HT-29 human colon cancer cells expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) were used in the present study. S. typhimurium A1-R infected HT-29 cells in a time-dependent manner, inhibiting cancer-cell proliferation in vitro. S. typhimurium A1-R promoted tumor necrosis and inhibited tumor growth in a subcutaneous tumor mouse model of HT-29-RFP. In orthotopic mouse models, S. typhimurium A1-R targeted liver metastases and significantly reduced their growth. The results of this study demonstrate the future clinical potential of S. typhimurium A1-R targeting of liver metastasis.

  5. Transcriptomic signature of Bexarotene (Rexinoid LGD1069 on mammary gland from three transgenic mouse mammary cancer models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bissonnette Reid P

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rexinoid bexarotene (LGD1069, Targretin is a highly selective retinoid × receptor (RXR agonist that inhibits the growth of pre-malignant and malignant breast cells. Bexarotene was shown to suppress the development of breast cancer in transgenic mice models without side effects. The chemopreventive effects of bexarotene are due to transcriptional modulation of cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Our goal in the present study was to obtain a profile of the genes modulated by bexarotene on mammary gland from three transgenic mouse mammary cancer models in an effort to elucidate its molecular mechanism of action and for the identification of biomarkers of effectiveness. Methods Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE was employed to profile the transcriptome of p53-null, MMTV-ErbB2, and C3(1-SV40 mammary cells obtained from mice treated with bexarotene and their corresponding controls. Results This resulted in a dataset of approximately 360,000 transcript tags representing over 20,000 mRNAs from a total of 6 different SAGE libraries. Analysis of gene expression changes induced by bexarotene in mammary gland revealed that 89 genes were dysregulated among the three transgenic mouse mammary models. From these, 9 genes were common to the three models studied. Conclusion Analysis of the indicated core of transcripts and protein-protein interactions of this commonly modulated genes indicate two functional modules significantly affected by rexinoid bexarotene related to protein biosynthesis and bioenergetics signatures, in addition to the targeting of cancer-causing genes related with cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis.

  6. In vivo MRI of cancer cell fate at the single-cell level in a mouse model of breast cancer metastasis to the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyn, Chris; Ronald, John A; Ramadan, Soha S; Snir, Jonatan A; Barry, Andrea M; MacKenzie, Lisa T; Mikulis, David J; Palmieri, Diane; Bronder, Julie L; Steeg, Patricia S; Yoneda, Toshiyuki; MacDonald, Ian C; Chambers, Ann F; Rutt, Brian K; Foster, Paula J

    2006-11-01

    Metastasis (the spread of cancer from a primary tumor to secondary organs) is responsible for most cancer deaths. The ability to follow the fate of a population of tumor cells over time in an experimental animal would provide a powerful new way to monitor the metastatic process. Here we describe a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique that permits the tracking of breast cancer cells in a mouse model of brain metastasis at the single-cell level. Cancer cells that were injected into the left ventricle of the mouse heart and then delivered to the brain were detectable on MR images. This allowed the visualization of the initial delivery and distribution of cells, as well as the growth of tumors from a subset of these cells within the whole intact brain volume. The ability to follow the metastatic process from the single-cell stage through metastatic growth, and to quantify and monitor the presence of solitary undivided cells will facilitate progress in understanding the mechanisms of brain metastasis and tumor dormancy, and the development of therapeutics to treat this disease. PMID:17029229

  7. Krüppel-like Factor 4 Inhibits Tumorigenic Progression and Metastasis in a Mouse Model of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Yori

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4 is a zinc finger transcription factor that functions as an oncogene or tumor suppressor in a highly tissue-specific cell-dependent manner. However, its precise role in breast cancer and metastasis remains unclear. Here, we show that transient adenoviral expression of KLF4 in the 4T1 orthotopic mammary cancer model significantly attenuated primary tumor growth as well as micrometastases to the lungs and liver. These results can be attributed, in part, to decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis. Further supporting a tumor-suppressive role for KLF4 in the breast, we found that KLF4 expression is lost in a mouse model of HER2/NEU/ERBB2-positive breast cancer. To determine whether enforced KLF4 expression could alter tumor latency in these mice, we used a doxycycline-inducible expression model in the context of the MMTV-Neu transgene. Surprisingly, tumors that developed in this model also lost KLF4 expression, suggesting negative selection for sustained expression. We have previously reported that KLF4 inhibits epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT, a preliminary step in metastatic progression. Overexpression of KLF4 in 4T1 cells led to a significant reduction in the expression of Snail, a key mediator of EMT and metastasis. Conversely, KLF4 silencing increased Snail expression in the nontransformed MCF-10A cell line. Collectively, these data demonstrate the first functional, in vivo evidence for KLF4 as a tumor suppressor in breast cancer cells. Furthermore, our findings suggest an inhibitory role for KLF4 during breast cancer metastases that functions, in part, through repression of Snail.

  8. Global assessment of promoter methylation in a mouse model of cancer identifies ID4 as a putative tumor-suppressor gene in human leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiYu; ChunhuiLiu; JeffVandeusen; BrianBecknell; ZunyanDai; Yue-ZhongWu; AparnaRaval; Te-HuiLiu; WeiDing; CharleneMao; ShujunLiu; LauraTSmith; StephenLee; LauraRassenti; GuidoMarcucci; JohnByrd; MichaelACaligiuri; ChristophPlass

    2005-01-01

    DNA methylation is associated with malignant transformation, but limitations imposed by genetic variability, tumor heterogeneity, availability of paired normal tissues and methodologies for global assessment of DNA methylation have limited progress in understanding the extent of epigenetic events in the initiation and progression of human cancer and in identifying genes that undergo methylation during cancer. We developed a mouse model of T/natural killer acute lymphoblastic leukemia that is always preceded by polyclonal lymphocyte expansion to determine how aberrant promoter DNA methylation and consequent gene silencing might be contributing to leukemic transformation. We used restriction landmark genomic scanning with this mouse model of preleukemia reproducibly progressing to leukemia to show that specific genomic methylation is associated with only the leukemic phase and is not random. We also identified Idb4 as a putative tumor-suppressor gene that is methylated in most mouse and human leukemias but in only a minority of other human cancers.

  9. Cetuximab intensifies the ADCC activity of adoptive NK cells in a nude mouse colorectal cancer xenograft model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shanshan; Li, Xuechun; Chen, Rongming; Yin, Mingang; Zheng, Qiuhong

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, discovered ~40 years ago, are believed to be the most effective cytotoxic lymphocytes to counteract cancer; however, adoptive NK cell therapy in vivo has encountered certain limitations, including a lack of specificity. The drug cetuximab can mediate antibody dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity through NK cells in vivo, and has been approved for the first-line treatment of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-positive metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the ADCC activity of adoptive NK cells, induced by cetuximab in a nude mouse CRC xenograft model, has not been previously reported. The aim of the present study was to explore the ADCC activity of cetuximab combined with adoptive NK cells in CRC xenograft models with various EGFR expressions. The nude mouse xenograft models were established by subcutaneously injecting LOVO or SW620 cells. The mice were then randomly divided into 6 groups: Phosphate-buffered saline, cetuximab, human immunoglobulin G (hIgG), NK cells, hIgG plus NK cells and cetuximab plus NK cells. The ADCC antitumor activity was evaluated in these CRC models. The results indicated that the cetuximab plus NK cells group showed the greatest tumor inhibition effect compared with the NK cells group in LOVO xenograft tumor models with positive EGFR expression. However, the combination of cetuximab and NK cells did not show a stronger tumor inhibitory effect against the SW620 xenograft tumor models compared with the efficiency of NK cells. In conclusion, cetuximab could intensify the ADCC antitumor activity of adoptive NK cells towards CRC with an increased EGFR expression. The combination of cetuximab and NK cells may be a potential immunotherapy for metastatic CRC patients with positive EGFR expression. PMID:27602116

  10. Histological changes caused by meclofenamic acid in androgen independent prostate cancer tumors: evaluation in a mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Delgado-Enciso

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Meclofenamic acid is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that has shown therapeutic potential for different types of cancers, including androgen-independent prostate neoplasms. The antitumor effect of diverse nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been shown to be accompanied by histological and molecular changes that are responsible for this beneficial effect. The objective of the present work was to analyze the histological changes caused by meclofenamic acid in androgen-independent prostate cancer. Tumors were created in a nude mouse model using PC3 cancerous human cells. Meclofenamic acid (10 mg/kg/day; experimental group, n=5 or saline solution (control group, n=5 was administered intraperitoneally for twenty days. Histological analysis was then carried out on the tumors, describing changes in the cellular architecture, fibrosis, and quantification of cellular proliferation and tumor vasculature. Meclofenamic acid causes histological changes that indicate less tumor aggression (less hypercellularity, fewer atypical mitoses, and fewer nuclear polymorphisms, an increase in fibrosis, and reduced cellular proliferation and tumor vascularity. Further studies are needed to evaluate the molecular changes that cause the beneficial and therapeutic effects of meclofenamic acid in androgen-independent prostate cancer.

  11. The conditioned place preference test for assessing welfare consequences and potential refinements in a mouse bladder cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roughan, John V; Coulter, Claire A; Flecknell, Paul A; Thomas, Huw D; Sufka, Kenneth J

    2014-01-01

    Most pre-clinical analgesic efficacy assays still involve nociceptive testing in rodents. This is despite concerns as to the relevance of these tests for evaluating the pain-preventative properties of drugs. More appropriate methods would target pain rather than nociception, but these are currently not available, so it remains unknown whether animal pain equates to the negatively affective and subjective/emotional state it causes in humans. Mouse cancer models are common despite the likelihood of substantial pain. We used Conditioned Place Preference (CPP) testing, assessments of thermal hyperalgesia and behaviour to determine the likelihood that MBT-2 bladder cancer impacts negatively on mouse welfare, such as by causing pain. There was no CPP to saline, but morphine preference in tumour bearing mice exceeded that seen in tumour-free controls. This occurred up to 10 days before the study end-point alongside reduced body weight, development of hyperalgesia and behaviour changes. These effects indicated mice experienced a negative welfare state caused by malaise (if not pain) before euthanasia. Due to the complexity of the assessments needed to demonstrate this, it is unlikely that this approach could be used for routine welfare assessment on a study-by-study basis. However, our results show mice in sufficiently similar studies are likely to benefit from more intensive severity assessment and re-evaluation of end-points with a view to implementing appropriate refinements. In this particular case, a refinement would have been to have euthanased mice at least 7 days earlier or possibly by provision of end-stage pain relief. CPP testing was found to be a helpful method to investigate the responses of mice to analgesics, possibly on a subjective level. These findings and those of other recent studies show it could be a valuable method of screening candidate analgesics for efficacy against cancer pain and possibly other pain or disease models.

  12. The conditioned place preference test for assessing welfare consequences and potential refinements in a mouse bladder cancer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John V Roughan

    Full Text Available Most pre-clinical analgesic efficacy assays still involve nociceptive testing in rodents. This is despite concerns as to the relevance of these tests for evaluating the pain-preventative properties of drugs. More appropriate methods would target pain rather than nociception, but these are currently not available, so it remains unknown whether animal pain equates to the negatively affective and subjective/emotional state it causes in humans. Mouse cancer models are common despite the likelihood of substantial pain. We used Conditioned Place Preference (CPP testing, assessments of thermal hyperalgesia and behaviour to determine the likelihood that MBT-2 bladder cancer impacts negatively on mouse welfare, such as by causing pain. There was no CPP to saline, but morphine preference in tumour bearing mice exceeded that seen in tumour-free controls. This occurred up to 10 days before the study end-point alongside reduced body weight, development of hyperalgesia and behaviour changes. These effects indicated mice experienced a negative welfare state caused by malaise (if not pain before euthanasia. Due to the complexity of the assessments needed to demonstrate this, it is unlikely that this approach could be used for routine welfare assessment on a study-by-study basis. However, our results show mice in sufficiently similar studies are likely to benefit from more intensive severity assessment and re-evaluation of end-points with a view to implementing appropriate refinements. In this particular case, a refinement would have been to have euthanased mice at least 7 days earlier or possibly by provision of end-stage pain relief. CPP testing was found to be a helpful method to investigate the responses of mice to analgesics, possibly on a subjective level. These findings and those of other recent studies show it could be a valuable method of screening candidate analgesics for efficacy against cancer pain and possibly other pain or disease models.

  13. Burn mouse models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calum, Henrik; Høiby, Niels; Moser, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Severe thermal injury induces immunosuppression, involving all parts of the immune system, especially when large fractions of the total body surface area are affected. An animal model was established to characterize the burn-induced immunosuppression. In our novel mouse model a 6 % third-degree b......Severe thermal injury induces immunosuppression, involving all parts of the immune system, especially when large fractions of the total body surface area are affected. An animal model was established to characterize the burn-induced immunosuppression. In our novel mouse model a 6 % third...

  14. Humanized mouse model of ovarian cancer recapitulates patient solid tumor progression, ascites formation, and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard B Bankert

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is the most common cause of death from gynecological cancer. Understanding the biology of this disease, particularly how tumor-associated lymphocytes and fibroblasts contribute to the progression and metastasis of the tumor, has been impeded by the lack of a suitable tumor xenograft model. We report a simple and reproducible system in which the tumor and tumor stroma are successfully engrafted into NOD-scid IL2Rγ(null (NSG mice. This is achieved by injecting tumor cell aggregates derived from fresh ovarian tumor biopsy tissues (including tumor cells, and tumor-associated lymphocytes and fibroblasts i.p. into NSG mice. Tumor progression in these mice closely parallels many of the events that are observed in ovarian cancer patients. Tumors establish in the omentum, ovaries, liver, spleen, uterus, and pancreas. Tumor growth is initially very slow and progressive within the peritoneal cavity with an ultimate development of tumor ascites, spontaneous metastasis to the lung, increasing serum and ascites levels of CA125, and the retention of tumor-associated human fibroblasts and lymphocytes that remain functional and responsive to cytokines for prolonged periods. With this model one will be able to determine how fibroblasts and lymphocytes within the tumor microenvironment may contribute to tumor growth and metastasis, and will make it possible to evaluate the efficacy of therapies that are designed to target these cells in the tumor stroma.

  15. HIF1α deficiency reduces inflammation in a mouse model of proximal colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dessislava N. Mladenova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α is a transcription factor that regulates the adaptation of cells to hypoxic microenvironments, for example inside solid tumours. Stabilisation of HIF1α can also occur in normoxic conditions in inflamed tissue or as a result of inactivating mutations in negative regulators of HIF1α. Aberrant overexpression of HIF1α in many different cancers has led to intensive efforts to develop HIF1α-targeted therapies. However, the role of HIF1α is still poorly understood in chronic inflammation that predisposes the colon to carcinogenesis. We have previously reported that the transcription of HIF1α is upregulated and that the protein is stabilised in inflammatory lesions that are caused by the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID sulindac in the mouse proximal colon. Here, we exploited this side effect of long-term sulindac administration to analyse the role of HIF1α in colon inflammation using mice with a Villin-Cre-induced deletion of Hif1α exon 2 in the intestinal epithelium (Hif1αΔIEC. We also analysed the effect of sulindac sulfide on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR pathway in vitro in colon cancer cells. Most sulindac-treated mice developed visible lesions, resembling the appearance of flat adenomas in the human colon, surrounded by macroscopically normal mucosa. Hif1αΔIEC mice still developed lesions but they were smaller than in the Hif1α-floxed siblings (Hif1αF/F. Microscopically, Hif1αΔIEC mice had significantly less severe colon inflammation than Hif1αF/F mice. Molecular analysis showed reduced MIF expression and increased E-cadherin mRNA expression in the colon of sulindac-treated Hif1αΔIEC mice. However, immunohistochemistry analysis revealed a defect of E-cadherin protein expression in sulindac-treated Hif1αΔIEC mice. Sulindac sulfide treatment in vitro upregulated Hif1α, c-JUN and IL8 expression through the AHR pathway. Taken together, HIF1α expression augments inflammation

  16. HIF1α deficiency reduces inflammation in a mouse model of proximal colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladenova, Dessislava N; Dahlstrom, Jane E; Tran, Phuong N; Benthani, Fahad; Bean, Elaine G; Ng, Irvin; Pangon, Laurent; Currey, Nicola; Kohonen-Corish, Maija R J

    2015-09-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) is a transcription factor that regulates the adaptation of cells to hypoxic microenvironments, for example inside solid tumours. Stabilisation of HIF1α can also occur in normoxic conditions in inflamed tissue or as a result of inactivating mutations in negative regulators of HIF1α. Aberrant overexpression of HIF1α in many different cancers has led to intensive efforts to develop HIF1α-targeted therapies. However, the role of HIF1α is still poorly understood in chronic inflammation that predisposes the colon to carcinogenesis. We have previously reported that the transcription of HIF1α is upregulated and that the protein is stabilised in inflammatory lesions that are caused by the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) sulindac in the mouse proximal colon. Here, we exploited this side effect of long-term sulindac administration to analyse the role of HIF1α in colon inflammation using mice with a Villin-Cre-induced deletion of Hif1α exon 2 in the intestinal epithelium (Hif1α(ΔIEC)). We also analysed the effect of sulindac sulfide on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) pathway in vitro in colon cancer cells. Most sulindac-treated mice developed visible lesions, resembling the appearance of flat adenomas in the human colon, surrounded by macroscopically normal mucosa. Hif1α(ΔIEC) mice still developed lesions but they were smaller than in the Hif1α-floxed siblings (Hif1α(F/F)). Microscopically, Hif1α(ΔIEC) mice had significantly less severe colon inflammation than Hif1α(F/F) mice. Molecular analysis showed reduced MIF expression and increased E-cadherin mRNA expression in the colon of sulindac-treated Hif1α(ΔIEC) mice. However, immunohistochemistry analysis revealed a defect of E-cadherin protein expression in sulindac-treated Hif1α(ΔIEC) mice. Sulindac sulfide treatment in vitro upregulated Hif1α, c-JUN and IL8 expression through the AHR pathway. Taken together, HIF1α expression augments inflammation in

  17. Combination Effect of Regulatory T-Cell Depletion and Ionizing Radiation in Mouse Models of Lung and Colon Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Cheol-Hun [Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biochemistry, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jae-Ho [Department of Biochemistry, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Dong-Yeok; Lee, Hong-Rae; Jo, Wol-Soon; Yang, Kwangmo [Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, You-Soo, E-mail: biotek01@hanmail.net [Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential of low-dose cyclophosphamide (LD-CTX) and anti-CD25 antibody to prevent activation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) during radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We used LD-CTX and anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody as a means to inhibit Tregs and improve the therapeutic effect of radiation in a mouse model of lung and colon cancer. Mice were irradiated on the tumor mass of the right leg and treated with LD-CTX and anti-CD25 antibody once per week for 3 weeks. Results: Combined treatment of LD-CTX or anti-CD25 antibody with radiation significantly decreased Tregs in the spleen and tumor compared with control and irradiation only in both lung and colon cancer. Combinatorial treatments resulted in a significant increase in the effector T cells, longer survival rate, and suppressed irradiated and distal nonirradiated tumor growth. Specifically, the combinatorial treatment of LD-CTX with radiation resulted in outstanding regression of local and distant tumors in colon cancer, and almost all mice in this group survived until the end of the study. Conclusions: Our results suggest that Treg depletion strategies may enhance radiation-mediated antitumor immunity and further improve outcomes after radiation therapy.

  18. Combination Effect of Regulatory T-Cell Depletion and Ionizing Radiation in Mouse Models of Lung and Colon Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the potential of low-dose cyclophosphamide (LD-CTX) and anti-CD25 antibody to prevent activation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) during radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We used LD-CTX and anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody as a means to inhibit Tregs and improve the therapeutic effect of radiation in a mouse model of lung and colon cancer. Mice were irradiated on the tumor mass of the right leg and treated with LD-CTX and anti-CD25 antibody once per week for 3 weeks. Results: Combined treatment of LD-CTX or anti-CD25 antibody with radiation significantly decreased Tregs in the spleen and tumor compared with control and irradiation only in both lung and colon cancer. Combinatorial treatments resulted in a significant increase in the effector T cells, longer survival rate, and suppressed irradiated and distal nonirradiated tumor growth. Specifically, the combinatorial treatment of LD-CTX with radiation resulted in outstanding regression of local and distant tumors in colon cancer, and almost all mice in this group survived until the end of the study. Conclusions: Our results suggest that Treg depletion strategies may enhance radiation-mediated antitumor immunity and further improve outcomes after radiation therapy

  19. Investigation of nuclear nano-morphology marker as a biomarker for cancer risk assessment using a mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bista, Rajan K.; Uttam, Shikhar; Hartman, Douglas J.; Qiu, Wei; Yu, Jian; Zhang, Lin; Brand, Randall E.; Liu, Yang

    2012-06-01

    The development of accurate and clinically applicable tools to assess cancer risk is essential to define candidates to undergo screening for early-stage cancers at a curable stage or provide a novel method to monitor chemoprevention treatments. With the use of our recently developed optical technology--spatial-domain low-coherence quantitative phase microscopy (SL-QPM), we have derived a novel optical biomarker characterized by structure-derived optical path length (OPL) properties from the cell nucleus on the standard histology and cytology specimens, which quantifies the nano-structural alterations within the cell nucleus at the nanoscale sensitivity, referred to as nano-morphology marker. The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of the nuclear nano-morphology marker from histologically normal cells, extracted directly from the standard histology specimens, to detect early-stage carcinogenesis, assess cancer risk, and monitor the effect of chemopreventive treatment. We used a well-established mouse model of spontaneous carcinogenesis--ApcMin mice, which develop multiple intestinal adenomas (Min) due to a germline mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) gene. We found that the nuclear nano-morphology marker quantified by OPL detects the development of carcinogenesis from histologically normal intestinal epithelial cells, even at an early pre-adenomatous stage (six weeks). It also exhibits a good temporal correlation with the small intestine that parallels the development of carcinogenesis and cancer risk. To further assess its ability to monitor the efficacy of chemopreventive agents, we used an established chemopreventive agent, sulindac. The nuclear nano-morphology marker is reversed toward normal after a prolonged treatment. Therefore, our proof-of-concept study establishes the feasibility of the SL-QPM derived nuclear nano-morphology marker OPL as a promising, simple and clinically applicable biomarker for cancer risk assessment and

  20. Hedgehog overexpression leads to the formation of prostate cancer stem cells with metastatic property irrespective of androgen receptor expression in the mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Chang Chin-Pao; Chen Ying-Yu; Tsao Zih-Jay; Wu Chia-Yung; Chen Bo-Yie; Chang Han-Hsin; Yang Chi-Rei; Lin David

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Hedgehog signalling has been implicated in prostate tumorigenesis in human subjects and mouse models, but its effects on transforming normal basal/stem cells toward malignant cancer stem cells remain poorly understood. Methods We produced pCX-shh-IG mice that overexpress Hedgehog protein persistently in adult prostates, allowing for elucidation of the mechanism during prostate cancer initiation and progression. Various markers were used to characterize and confirm the tran...

  1. Bioorthogonal two-component drug delivery in HER2(+) breast cancer mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapuarachchige, Sudath; Kato, Yoshinori; Artemov, Dmitri

    2016-04-01

    The HER2 receptor is overexpressed in approximately 20% of breast cancers and is associated with tumorigenesis, metastasis, and a poor prognosis. Trastuzumab is a first-line targeted drug used against HER2(+) breast cancers; however, at least 50% of HER2(+) tumors develop resistance to trastuzumab. To treat these patients, trastuzumab-based antibody-drug conjugates (ACDs) have been developed and are currently used in the clinic. Despite their high efficacy, the long circulation half-life and non-specific binding of cytotoxic ADCs can result in systemic toxicity. In addition, standard ADCs do not provide an image-guided mode of administration. Here, we have developed a two-component, two-step, pre-targeting drug delivery system integrated with image guidance to circumvent these issues. In this strategy, HER2 receptors are pre-labeled with a functionalized trastuzumab antibody followed by the delivery of drug-loaded nanocarriers. Both components are cross-linked by multiple bioorthogonal click reactions in situ on the surface of the target cell and internalized as nanoclusters. We have explored the efficacy of this delivery strategy in HER2(+) human breast cancer models. Our therapeutic study confirms the high therapeutic efficacy of the new delivery system, with no significant toxicity.

  2. Generation and characterization of a transgenic mouse model for pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Sun; Jie Feng; Xiao-Luan Wei; Rong Zhang; Su-Zhen Dong; Qian Shen; Juan Dong; Hou-Da Li; Ying-He Hu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To generate a SV40Tag transgenic tumor animal model and to study the mechanism underlying tumorigenesis.METHODS: A mammary gland expression vector containing SV40Tag DNA was generated. Transgene fragments were microinjeted into fertilized eggs of FVB mice. The genetically manipulated embryos were transferred into the oviducts of pseudo-pregnant female mice. PCR and Northern blot analysis were used for genotype analysis of F1 and F2 mice.Transgene expression was detected by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: SV40Tag gene was detected in two lines of transgenic mice. One of them delivered the transgene to F1 and a tumor was found in the pancreas of these mice. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry showed that SV40Tag gene was expressed in the tumor. Pathological characterization of the transgenic mice demonstrated that the tumor belonged to pancreatic cystic neoplasm.CONCLUSION: SV40Tag transgenic mouse model can be successfully established. The transgenic mice develop a pancreatic tumor, which can be used for investigation of the molecular mechanism of tumorigenesis in vivo.

  3. Monitoring of Tumor Promotion and Progression in a Mouse Model of Inflammation-Induced Colon Cancer with Magnetic Resonance Colonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R. Young

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Early detection of precancerous tissue has significantly improved survival of most cancers including colorectal cancer (CRC. Animal models designed to study the early stages of cancer are valuable for identifying molecular events and response indicators that correlate with the onset of disease. The goal of this work was to investigate magnetic resonance (MR colonography in a mouse model of CRC on a clinical MR imager. Mice treated with azoxymethane and dextran sulfate sodium were imaged by serial MR colonography (MRC from initiation to euthanasia. Magnetic resonance colonography was obtained with both T1- and T2-weighted images after administration of a Fluorinert enema to remove residual luminal signal and intravenous contrast to enhance the colon wall. Individual tumor volumes were calculated and validated ex vivo. The Fluorinert enema provided a clear differentiation of the lumen of the colon from the mucosal lining. Inflammation was detected 3 days after dextran sulfate sodium exposure and subsided during the next week. Tumors as small as 1.2 mm3 were detected and as early as 29 days after initiation. Individual tumor growths were followed over time, and tumor volumes were measured by MR imaging correlated with volumes measured ex vivo. The use of a Fluorinert enema during MRC in mice is critical for differentiating mural processes from intraluminal debris. Magnetic resonance colonography with Fluorinert enema and intravenous contrast enhancement will be useful in the study of the initial stages of colon cancer and will reduce the number of animals needed for preclinical trials of prevention or intervention.

  4. Effective chemoimmunotherapy with anti-TGFβ antibody and cyclophosphamide in a mouse model of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Chen

    Full Text Available TGFβ is reportedly responsible for accumulation of CD4(+Foxp3(+ regulatory T cells (Tregs in tumor. Thus, we treated mouse 4T1 mammary carcinoma with 1D11, a neutralizing anti-TGFβ (1,2,3 antibody. The treatment delayed tumor growth, but unexpectedly increased the proportion of Tregs in tumor. In vitro, 1D11 enhanced while TGFβ potently inhibited the proliferation of Tregs. To enhance the anti-tumor effects, 1D11 was administered with cyclophosphamide which was reported to eliminate intratumoral Tregs. This combination resulted in long term tumor-free survival of up to 80% of mice, and the tumor-free mice were more resistant to re-challenge with tumor. To examine the phenotype of tumor infiltrating immune cells, 4T1-tumor bearing mice were treated with 1D11 and a lower dose of cyclophosphamide. This treatment markedly inhibited tumor growth, and was accompanied by massive infiltration of IFNγ-producing T cells. Furthermore, this combination markedly decreased the number of splenic CD11b(+Gr1(+ cells, and increased their expression levels of MHC II and CD80. In a spontaneous 4T1 lung metastasis model with resection of primary tumor, this combination therapy markedly increased the survival of mice, indicating it was effective in reducing lethal metastasis burden. Taken together, our data show that anti-TGFβ antibody and cyclophosphamide represents an effective chemoimmunotherapeutic combination.

  5. Effective chemoimmunotherapy with anti-TGFβ antibody and cyclophosphamide in a mouse model of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Yang, Yuan; Zhou, Qiong; Weiss, Jonathan M; Howard, Olamae Zack; McPherson, John M; Wakefield, Lalage M; Oppenheim, Joost J

    2014-01-01

    TGFβ is reportedly responsible for accumulation of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) in tumor. Thus, we treated mouse 4T1 mammary carcinoma with 1D11, a neutralizing anti-TGFβ (1,2,3) antibody. The treatment delayed tumor growth, but unexpectedly increased the proportion of Tregs in tumor. In vitro, 1D11 enhanced while TGFβ potently inhibited the proliferation of Tregs. To enhance the anti-tumor effects, 1D11 was administered with cyclophosphamide which was reported to eliminate intratumoral Tregs. This combination resulted in long term tumor-free survival of up to 80% of mice, and the tumor-free mice were more resistant to re-challenge with tumor. To examine the phenotype of tumor infiltrating immune cells, 4T1-tumor bearing mice were treated with 1D11 and a lower dose of cyclophosphamide. This treatment markedly inhibited tumor growth, and was accompanied by massive infiltration of IFNγ-producing T cells. Furthermore, this combination markedly decreased the number of splenic CD11b(+)Gr1(+) cells, and increased their expression levels of MHC II and CD80. In a spontaneous 4T1 lung metastasis model with resection of primary tumor, this combination therapy markedly increased the survival of mice, indicating it was effective in reducing lethal metastasis burden. Taken together, our data show that anti-TGFβ antibody and cyclophosphamide represents an effective chemoimmunotherapeutic combination. PMID:24416401

  6. CoREST1 promotes tumor formation and tumor stroma interactions in a mouse model of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohini Mazumdar

    Full Text Available Regulators of chromatin structure and gene expression contribute to tumor formation and progression. The co-repressor CoREST1 regulates the localization and activity of associated histone modifying enzymes including lysine specific demethylase 1 (LSD1 and histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1. Although several CoREST1 associated proteins have been reported to enhance breast cancer progression, the role of CoREST1 in breast cancer is currently unclear. Here we report that knockdown of CoREST1 in the basal-type breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, led to significantly reduced incidence and diminished size of tumors compared to controls in mouse xenograft studies. Notably, CoREST1-depleted cells gave rise to tumors with a marked decrease in angiogenesis. CoREST1 knockdown led to a decrease in secreted angiogenic and inflammatory factors, and mRNA analysis suggests that CoREST1 promotes expression of genes related to angiogenesis and inflammation including VEGF-A and CCL2. CoREST1 knockdown decreased the ability of MDA-MB-231 conditioned media to promote endothelial cell tube formation and migration. Further, tumors derived from CoREST1-depleted cells had reduced macrophage infiltration and the secretome of CoREST1 knockdown cells was deficient in promoting macrophage migration and macrophage-mediated angiogenesis. Taken together, these findings reveal that the epigenetic regulator CoREST1 promotes tumorigenesis in a breast cancer model at least in part through regulation of gene expression patterns in tumor cells that have profound non-cell autonomous effects on endothelial and inflammatory cells in the tumor microenvironment.

  7. Antiproliferative effects of fluoxetine on colon cancer cells and in a colonic carcinogen mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Kannen

    Full Text Available The antidepressant fluoxetine has been under discussion because of its potential influence on cancer risk. It was found to inhibit the development of carcinogen-induced preneoplastic lesions in colon tissue, but the mechanisms of action are not well understood. Therefore, we investigated anti-proliferative effects, and used HT29 colon tumor cells in vitro, as well as C57BL/6 mice exposed to intra-rectal treatment with the carcinogen N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG as models. Fluoxetine increased the percentage of HT29 cells in the G(0/G(1 phase of cell-cycle, and the expression of p27 protein. This was not related to an induction of apoptosis, reactive oxygen species or DNA damage. In vivo, fluoxetine reduced the development of MNNG-induced dysplasia and vascularization-related dysplasia in colon tissue, which was analyzed by histopathological techniques. An anti-proliferative potential of fluoxetine was observed in epithelial and stromal areas. It was accompanied by a reduction of VEGF expression and of the number of cells with angiogenic potential, such as CD133, CD34, and CD31-positive cell clusters. Taken together, our findings suggest that fluoxetine treatment targets steps of early colon carcinogenesis. This confirms its protective potential, explaining at least partially the lower colon cancer risk under antidepressant therapy.

  8. Mouse Models of Tumor Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngiow, Shin Foong; Loi, Sherene; Thomas, David; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is now evolving into a major therapeutic option for cancer patients. Such clinical advances also promote massive interest in the search for novel immunotherapy targets, and to understand the mechanism of action of current drugs. It is projected that a series of novel immunotherapy agents will be developed and assessed for their therapeutic activity. In light of this, in vivo experimental mouse models that recapitulate human malignancies serve as valuable tools to validate the efficacy and safety profile of immunotherapy agents, before their transition into clinical trials. In this review, we will discuss the major classes of experimental mouse models of cancer commonly used for immunotherapy assessment and provide examples to guide the selection of appropriate models. We present some new data concerning the utility of a carcinogen-induced tumor model for comparing immunotherapies and combining immunotherapy with chemotherapy. We will also highlight some recent advances in experimental modeling of human malignancies in mice that are leading towards personalized therapy in patients. PMID:26922998

  9. Pharmacologic inhibition of MLK3 kinase activity blocks the in vitro migratory capacity of breast cancer cells but has no effect on breast cancer brain metastasis in a mouse xenograft model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Hyoe Rhoo

    Full Text Available Brain metastasis of breast cancer is an important clinical problem, with few therapeutic options and a poor prognosis. Recent data have implicated mixed lineage kinase 3 (MLK3 in controlling the in vitro migratory capacity of breast cancer cells, as well as the metastasis of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells from the mammary fat pad to distant lymph nodes in a mouse xenograft model. We therefore set out to test whether MLK3 plays a role in brain metastasis of breast cancer cells. To address this question, we used a novel, brain penetrant, MLK3 inhibitor, URMC099. URMC099 efficiently inhibited the migration of breast cancer cells in an in vitro cell monolayer wounding assay, and an in vitro transwell migration assay, but had no effect on in vitro cell growth. We also tested the effect of URMC099 on tumor formation in a mouse xenograft model of breast cancer brain metastasis. This analysis showed that URMC099 had no effect on the either the frequency or size of breast cancer brain metastases. We conclude that pharmacologic inhibition of MLK3 by URMC099 can reduce the in vitro migratory capacity of breast cancer cells, but that it has no effect on either the frequency or size of breast cancer brain metastases, in a mouse xenograft model.

  10. Comparison of efficacy and toxicity of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM herbal mixture LQ and conventional chemotherapy on lung cancer metastasis and survival in mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    Full Text Available Unlike Western medicine that generally uses purified compounds and aims to target a single molecule or pathway, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM compositions usually comprise multiple herbs and components that are necessary for efficacy. Despite the very long-time and wide-spread use of TCM, there are very few direct comparisons of TCM and standard cytotoxic chemotherapy. In the present report, we compared the efficacy of the TCM herbal mixture LQ against lung cancer in mouse models with doxorubicin (DOX and cyclophosphamide (CTX. LQ inhibited tumor size and weight measured directly as well as by fluorescent-protein imaging in subcutaneous, orthotopic, spontaneous experimental metastasis and angiogenesis mouse models of lung cancer. LQ was efficacious against primary and metastatic lung cancer without weight loss and organ toxicity. In contrast, CTX and DOX, although efficacious in the lung cancer models caused significant weight loss, and organ toxicity. LQ also had anti-angiogenic activity as observed in lung tumors growing in nestin-driven green fluorescent protein (ND-GFP transgenic nude mice, which selectively express GFP in nascent blood vessels. Survival of tumor-bearing mice was also prolonged by LQ, comparable to DOX. In vitro, lung cancer cells were killed by LQ as observed by time-lapse imaging, comparable to cisplatinum. LQ was more potent to induce cell death on cancer cell lines than normal cell lines unlike cytotoxic chemotherapy. The results indicate that LQ has non-toxic efficacy against metastatic lung cancer.

  11. Imaging-Guided Curative Surgical Resection of Pancreatic Cancer in a Xenograft Mouse Model

    OpenAIRE

    Ni, Xiaoling; Yang, Jingxuan; Min LI

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths in North America. The poor survival statistics are due to the fact that there are no reliable tests for early diagnosis and no effective therapies once metastasis has occurred. Surgical resection is the only curative treatment for pancreatic cancer; however, only less than 15% of the patients are eligible for surgery at diagnosis. New therapies are urgently needed for this malignant disease. And combinational therapy inclu...

  12. Innate lymphoid cells sustain colon cancer through production of interleukin-22 in a mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Kirchberger, S.; Royston, D. J.; Boulard, O.; Thornton, E; Franchini, F.; Szabady, R. L.; Harrison, O; Powrie, F

    2013-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have an increased risk of colon cancer. However, the immune cells and cytokines that mediate the transition from intestinal inflammation to cancer are poorly understood. We show that bacteria-induced colon cancer is accompanied by differential accumulation of IL-17+IL-22+ colonic innate lymphoid cells (cILCs), which are phenotypically distinct from LTi and NK-22 cells, and that their depletion in mice with dysplastic inflammation blocks the devel...

  13. Lineage tracing of metastasis in a mouse model for Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    OpenAIRE

    Thakur, Chitra

    2012-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the deadliest form of lung cancer and has a poor prognosis due to its high rate of metastasis. Notably, metastasis is one of the leading causes of death among cancer patients. Despite the clinical importance, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that govern the initiation, establishment and progression of metastasis remain unclear. Moreover, knowledge gained on metastatic process was largely based on cultured or in vitro manipulated cells that were reint...

  14. Vitamin D analogs enhance the anticancer activity of 5-fluorouracil in an in vivo mouse colon cancer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Active vitamin D analogs that are less toxic than calcitriol can be useful in the combined treatment of patients suffering from colon cancer. In the present study we demonstrate, for the first time in an in vivo model system, the biological effect of combined therapy using 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) along with vitamin D analog PRI-2191 (tacalcitol, 1,24-dihydroxyvitamin D3) or PRI-2205 (5,6-trans-isomer of calcipotriol) on colon cancer. We investigated the influence of vitamin D analogs on the anticancer activity of 5-FU or capecitabine in the treatment of mice bearing MC38 mouse colon tumors implanted subcutaneously or orthotopically. The cell cycle distribution, E-cadherin expression and caspase 3/7 activity in vitro were also evaluated. We observed that both PRI-2191 and PRI-2205 significantly enhanced the antitumor activity of 5-FU; but these results depend on the treatment regimen. Applying the optimal schedule of combined therapy we observed a significant decrease in tumor growth, metastasis and also a prolongation of the survival time of mice, in comparison with the administrations of 5-FU given alone. Both combinations indicated a synergistic effect and did not cause toxicity. Moreover, analogs applied after completed course of administration of 5-FU, prolonged the antitumor effect of the drug. Furthermore, when the prodrug of 5-FU, capecitabine, was used, potentiation of its activity was also observed. Our data suggest that vitamin D analogs (especially PRI-2191) might be potentially applied to clinical use in order to enhance the anticancer effect of 5-FU and also prolong its activity against colon cancer. The activity of PRI-2191 is realized through stopping the cells in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase and increasing the expression of E-cadherin

  15. A gene transfer comparative study of HSA-conjugated antiangiogenic factors in a transgenic mouse model of metastatic ocular cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frau, E; Magnon, C; Opolon, P; Connault, E; Opolon, D; Beermann, F; Beerman, F; Abitbol, M; Perricaudet, M; Bouquet, C

    2007-03-01

    Different antiangiogenic and antimetastatic recombinant adenoviruses were tested in a transgenic mouse model of metastatic ocular cancer (TRP1/SV40 Tag transgenic mice), which is a highly aggressive tumor, developed from the pigmented epithelium of the retina. These vectors, encoding amino-terminal fragments of urokinase plasminogen activator (ATF), angiostatin Kringles (K1-3), endostatin (ES) and canstatin (Can) coupled to human serum albumin (HSA) were injected to assess their metastatic and antiangiogenic activities in our model. Compared to AdCO1 control group, AdATF-HSA did not significantly reduce metastatic growth. In contrast, mice treated with AdK1-3-HSA, AdES-HSA and AdCan-HSA displayed significantly smaller metastases (1.19+/-1.19, 0.87+/-1.5, 0.43+/-0.56 vs controls 4.04+/-5.12 mm3). Moreover, a stronger inhibition of metastatic growth was obtained with AdCan-HSA than with AdK1-3-HSA (P=0.04). Median survival was improved by 4 weeks. A close correlation was observed between the effects of these viruses on metastatic growth and their capacity to inhibit tumor angiogenesis. Our study indicates that systemic antiangiogenic factors production by recombinant adenoviruses, particularly Can, might represent an effective way of delaying metastatic growth via inhibition of angiogenesis. PMID:17082795

  16. Mouse model for the DNA repair/basal transcription disorder trichothiodystrophy reveals cancer predisposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. de Boer (Jan); C.F. van Kreijl (Coen); G. Weeda (Geert); F.R. de Gruijl (Frank); D. Bootsma (Dirk); H. van Steeg (Harry); R.J.W. Berg (Rob); J. Garssen (Johan); J. de Wit (Jan); C.T. van Oostrum; R.B. Beems (Rudolf); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); G.T.J. van der Horst (Gijsbertus)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractPatients with the nucleotide excision repair (NER) disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are highly predisposed to develop sunlight-induced skin cancer, in remarkable contrast to photosensitive NER-deficient trichothiodystrophy (TTD) patients carrying mutations in the sam

  17. Core Needle Biopsy of Breast Cancer Tumors Increases Distant Metastases in a Mouse Model12

    OpenAIRE

    Mathenge, Edward Gitau; Dean, Cheryl Ann; Clements, Derek; Vaghar-Kashani, Ahmad; Photopoulos, Steffany; Coyle, Krysta Mila; Giacomantonio, Michael; Malueth, Benjamin; Nunokawa, Anna; Jordan, Julie; Lewis, John D.; Gujar, Shashi Ashok; Marcato, Paola; Lee, Patrick W.K.; Giacomantonio, Carman Anthony

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Incisional biopsies, including the diagnostic core needle biopsy (CNB), routinely performed before surgical excision of breast cancer tumors are hypothesized to increase the risk of metastatic disease. In this study, we experimentally determined whether CNB of breast cancer tumors results in increased distant metastases and examine important resultant changes in the primary tumor and tumor microenvironment associated with this outcome. METHOD: To evaluate the effect of CNB on me...

  18. Sleeping Beauty transposon insertional mutagenesis based mouse models for cancer gene discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarity, Branden S; Largaespada, David A

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale genomic efforts to study human cancer, such as the cancer gene atlas (TCGA), have identified numerous cancer drivers in a wide variety of tumor types. However, there are limitations to this approach, the mutations and expression or copy number changes that are identified are not always clearly functionally relevant, and only annotated genes and genetic elements are thoroughly queried. The use of complimentary, nonbiased, functional approaches to identify drivers of cancer development and progression is ideal to maximize the rate at which cancer discoveries are achieved. One such approach that has been successful is the use of the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-based mutagenesis system in mice. This system uses a conditionally expressed transposase and mutagenic transposon allele to target mutagenesis to somatic cells of a given tissue in mice to cause random mutations leading to tumor development. Analysis of tumors for transposon common insertion sites (CIS) identifies candidate cancer genes specific to that tumor type. While similar screens have been performed in mice with the PiggyBac (PB) transposon and viral approaches, we limit extensive discussion to SB. Here we discuss the basic structure of these screens, screens that have been performed, methods used to identify CIS. PMID:26051241

  19. Predictive imaging of chemotherapeutic response in a transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Yoo, Byunghee; Sherman, Sarah; Mukherjee, Pinku; Ross, Alana; Pantazopoulos, Pamela; Petkova, Victoria; Farrar, Christian; Medarova, Zdravka; Moore, Anna

    2016-08-01

    The underglycosylated mucin 1 tumor antigen (uMUC1) is a biomarker that forecasts the progression of adenocarcinomas. In this study, we evaluated the utility of a dual-modality molecular imaging approach based on targeting uMUC1 for monitoring chemotherapeutic response in a transgenic murine model of pancreatic cancer (KCM triple transgenic mice). An uMUC1-specific contrast agent (MN-EPPT) was synthesized for use with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorescence optical imaging. It consisted of dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles conjugated to the near infrared fluorescent dye Cy5.5 and to a uMUC1-specific peptide (EPPT). KCM triple transgenic mice were given gemcitabine as chemotherapy while control animals received saline injections following the same schedule. Changes in uMUC1 levels following chemotherapy were monitored using T2-weighted MRI and optical imaging before and 24 hr after injection of the MN-EPPT. uMUC1 expression in tumors from both groups was evaluated by histology and qRT-PCR. We observed that the average delta-T2 in the gemcitabine-treated group was significantly reduced compared to the control group indicating lower accumulation of MN-EPPT, and correspondingly, a lower level of uMUC1 expression. In vivo optical imaging confirmed the MRI findings. Fluorescence microscopy of pancreatic tumor sections showed a lower level of uMUC1 expression in the gemcitabine-treated group compared to the control, which was confirmed by qRT-PCR. Our data proved that changes in uMUC1 expression after gemcitabine chemotherapy could be evaluated using MN-EPPT-enhanced in vivo MR and optical imaging. These results suggest that the uMUC1-targeted imaging approach could provide a useful tool for the predictive assessment of therapeutic response. PMID:26996122

  20. Prevention of Prostate Cancer with Oleanane Synthetic Triterpenoid CDDO-Me in the TRAMP Mouse Model of Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Xiaohua; Deeb, Dorrah; Liu, Yongbo; Ali S. Arbab; Divine, George W.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.; GAUTAM, SUBHASH C.

    2011-01-01

    2-Cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-28-oic acid (CDDO), a synthetic analog of oleanolic acid, and its C28 methyl ester derivative (CDDO-Me), have shown potent antitumorigenic activity against a wide range of cancer cell lines, including prostate cancer cells in vitro, and inhibited the development of liver and lung cancer in vivo. In the present study, we examined the efficacy of CDDO-Me in preventing the development and progression of prostate cancer in the transgenic adenocarinoma of the ...

  1. Advanced computational biology methods identify molecular switches for malignancy in an EGF mouse model of liver cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Stegmaier

    Full Text Available The molecular causes by which the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase induces malignant transformation are largely unknown. To better understand EGFs' transforming capacity whole genome scans were applied to a transgenic mouse model of liver cancer and subjected to advanced methods of computational analysis to construct de novo gene regulatory networks based on a combination of sequence analysis and entrained graph-topological algorithms. Here we identified transcription factors, processes, key nodes and molecules to connect as yet unknown interacting partners at the level of protein-DNA interaction. Many of those could be confirmed by electromobility band shift assay at recognition sites of gene specific promoters and by western blotting of nuclear proteins. A novel cellular regulatory circuitry could therefore be proposed that connects cell cycle regulated genes with components of the EGF signaling pathway. Promoter analysis of differentially expressed genes suggested the majority of regulated transcription factors to display specificity to either the pre-tumor or the tumor state. Subsequent search for signal transduction key nodes upstream of the identified transcription factors and their targets suggested the insulin-like growth factor pathway to render the tumor cells independent of EGF receptor activity. Notably, expression of IGF2 in addition to many components of this pathway was highly upregulated in tumors. Together, we propose a switch in autocrine signaling to foster tumor growth that was initially triggered by EGF and demonstrate the knowledge gain form promoter analysis combined with upstream key node identification.

  2. Time-lapse imaging of primary preneoplastic mammary epithelial cells derived from genetically engineered mouse models of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakles, Rebecca E; Millman, Sarah L; Cabrera, M Carla; Johnson, Peter; Mueller, Susette; Hoppe, Philipp S; Schroeder, Timm; Furth, Priscilla A

    2013-01-01

    Time-lapse imaging can be used to compare behavior of cultured primary preneoplastic mammary epithelial cells derived from different genetically engineered mouse models of breast cancer. For example, time between cell divisions (cell lifetimes), apoptotic cell numbers, evolution of morphological changes, and mechanism of colony formation can be quantified and compared in cells carrying specific genetic lesions. Primary mammary epithelial cell cultures are generated from mammary glands without palpable tumor. Glands are carefully resected with clear separation from adjacent muscle, lymph nodes are removed, and single-cell suspensions of enriched mammary epithelial cells are generated by mincing mammary tissue followed by enzymatic dissociation and filtration. Single-cell suspensions are plated and placed directly under a microscope within an incubator chamber for live-cell imaging. Sixteen 650 μm x 700 μm fields in a 4x4 configuration from each well of a 6-well plate are imaged every 15 min for 5 days. Time-lapse images are examined directly to measure cellular behaviors that can include mechanism and frequency of cell colony formation within the first 24 hr of plating the cells (aggregation versus cell proliferation), incidence of apoptosis, and phasing of morphological changes. Single-cell tracking is used to generate cell fate maps for measurement of individual cell lifetimes and investigation of cell division patterns. Quantitative data are statistically analyzed to assess for significant differences in behavior correlated with specific genetic lesions. PMID:23425702

  3. Mouse model for the DNA repair/basal transcription disorder Trichothiodystrophy reveals cancer predisposition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. de Boer (Jan); H. van Steeg (Harry); R.J.W. Berg (Rob); J. Garssen (Johan); J. de Wit (Jan); C.T.M. van Oostrom (Conny); R.B. Beems (Rudolf); G.T.J. van der Horst (Gijsbertus); C.F. van Kreijl (Coen); F.R. de Gruijl (Frank); D. Bootsma (Dirk); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); G. Weeda (Geert)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractPatients with the nucleotide excision repair (NER) disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are highly predisposed to develop sunlight-induced skin cancer, in remarkable contrast to photosensitive NER-deficient trichothiodystrophy (TTD) patients carrying mutations in the same XPD gene. XPD en

  4. Dye-enhanced multimodal confocal microscopy for noninvasive detection of skin cancers in mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jesung; Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.; Yaroslavsky, Anna N.

    2010-03-01

    Skin cancer is the most common form of human cancer. Its early diagnosis and timely treatment is of paramount importance for dermatology and surgical oncology. In this study, we evaluate the use of reflectance and fluorescence confocal microscopy for detecting skin cancers in an in-vivo trial with B16F10 melanoma and SCCVII squamous cell carcinoma in mice. For the experiments, the mice are anesthetized, then the tumors are infiltrated with aqueous solution of methylene blue and imaged. Reflectance images are acquired at 658 nm. Fluorescence is excited at 658 nm and registered in the range between 690 and 710 nm. After imaging, the mice are sacrificed. The tumors are excised and processed for hematoxylin and eosin histopathology, which is compared to the optical images. The results of the study indicate that in-vivo reflectance images provide valuable information on vascularization of the tumor, whereas the fluorescence images mimic the structural features seen in histopathology. Simultaneous dye-enhanced reflectance and fluorescence confocal microscopy shows promise for the detection, demarcation, and noninvasive monitoring of skin cancer development.

  5. The TrkB+ cancer stem cells contribute to post-chemotherapy recurrence of triple-negative breast cancers in an orthotopic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, B; Ma, Z Y; Zhou, Z W; Gao, W C; Du, Z G; Zhao, Z H; Li, Q Q

    2015-02-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are believed to have a crucial role in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) recurrence. However, the exact mechanisms that are functionally critical in CSCs-mediated recurrence remain unclear. Here, we showed that CSCs derived from recurrent TNBCs are endowed with increased self-renewal capacity as compared with those from the matched primary lesions. Using patient-derived specimens, we demonstrated the existence of paracrine brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling between differentiated recurrent TNBC cells and CSCs characterized by the expression of TrkB, the receptor of BDNF. We showed that paclitaxel induced BDNF expression and apoptosis simultaneously in a cell cycle-dependent manner. BDNF promotes the self-renewal potential of the TrkB+CSCs through induction of KLF4. The TrkB+CSCs represent a particular subset indispensable for TNBC relapse. In line with this, TrkB is proved to be a superior predictor for TNBC recurrence. Using a genetically engineered mouse model of TNBC, we observed that ablation of the TrkB+CSCs potentially prevents relapse of malignant tumors. Further preclinical investigation of this promising approach may lead to development of a novel therapeutic strategy to improve the devastating prognosis of TNBC patients.

  6. Role of aerobic glycolysis in genetically engineered mouse models of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dang Chi V

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The propensity of cancer cells to convert high levels of glucose to lactate through aerobic glycolysis has been intensively studied in vitro, and is now understood to be a metabolic adaptation that shunts glucose carbons toward building blocks for the growing cell, as well as producing ATP. Much less is known, however, about the role of aerobic glycolysis and glycolytic enzymes in vivo. A paper in Cancer and Metabolism now documents aerobic glycolysis in the proliferating neural progenitors that form the cerebellum in normal newborn mice, as well as in medulloblastoma tumors derived from these cells in transgenic mice. Hexokinase II is demonstrated to be an essential driver of the observed aerobic glycolysis and the malignancy of the tumors. See research article: http://www.cancerandmetabolism.com/content/1/1/2

  7. Creation of Primary Cell Lines from Lineage-Labeled Mouse Models of Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Frequently, it is necessary to isolate pure populations of cancer cells for downstream assays, such as transcriptional analysis, signaling studies, and the creation of noncontaminated primary cell lines. Genetic lineage labeling with fluorescent reporter alleles allows for the identification of epithelial-derived cells within tumors. This protocol describes a method to isolate lineage-labeled pancreatic epithelial cells for ex vivo analysis, but it can be adapted for any type of lineage-labeled tumor. PMID:25934932

  8. Creation of Primary Cell Lines from Lineage-Labeled Mouse Models of Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rhim, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Frequently, it is necessary to isolate pure populations of cancer cells for downstream assays, such as transcriptional analysis, signaling studies, and the creation of noncontaminated primary cell lines. Genetic lineage labeling with fluorescent reporter alleles allows for the identification of epithelial-derived cells within tumors. This protocol describes a method to isolate lineage-labeled pancreatic epithelial cells for ex vivo analysis, but it can be adapted for any type of lineage-label...

  9. Riboflavin as adjuvant with cisplatin: study in mouse skin cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Maria; Naseem, Imrana

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin used in treatment of solid tumor induces oxidative stress which leads to hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. New strategies are therefore needed to combat toxicity and optimize its therapeutic potential. Riboflavin (VitaminB2) under photoillumination works as an anti proliferative agent and induces apoptosis. These properties of riboflavin have been exploited to mitigate cisplatin induced toxicities. 9,10-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene /12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate  were used to induce skin tumor in Swiss albino mice. The tumor induced mice were treated with cisplatin, riboflavin as well as their combination under photo illumination. In comparison to tumor control group the cisplatin and riboflavin treated groups showed a compromised level of antioxidant enzymes, functional markers and a higher degree of lipid peroxidation. However these parameters tended towards normal in the combination treated group. The results from histopathology indicate that apoptosis was favored mode of cell death and that necrosis was reduced in combination treated groups. Our findings indicate that combination of cisplatin with riboflavin under photo illumination synergizes its anti cancer activity towards cancer cells and attenuates the cisplatin induced toxicities.

  10. Tumor-Targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R in Combination with Trastuzumab Eradicates HER-2-Positive Cervical Cancer Cells in Patient-Derived Mouse Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihiko Hiroshima

    Full Text Available We have previously developed mouse models of HER-2-positive cervical cancer. Tumors in nude mice had histological structures similar to the original tumor and were stained by anti-HER-2 antibody in the same pattern as the patient's cancer. We have also previously developed tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R and have demonstrated its efficacy against patient-derived tumor mouse models, both alone and in combination. In the current study, we determined the efficacy of S. typhimurium A1-R in combination with trastuzumab on a patient-cancer nude-mouse model of HER-2 positive cervical cancer. Mice were randomized to 5 groups and treated as follows: (1 no treatment; (2 carboplatinum (30 mg/kg, ip, weekly, 5 weeks; (3 trastuzumab (20 mg/kg, ip, weekly, 5 weeks; (4 S. typhimurium A1-R (5 × 107 CFU/body, ip, weekly, 5 weeks; (5 S. typhimurium A1-R (5 × 107 CFU/body, ip, weekly, 5 weeks + trastuzumab (20 mg/kg, ip, weekly, 5 weeks. All regimens had significant efficacy compared to the untreated mice. The relative tumor volume of S. typhimurium A1-R + trastuzumab-treated mice was smaller compared to trastuzumab alone (p = 0.007 and S. typhimurium A1-R alone (p = 0.039. No significant body weight loss was found compared to the no treatment group except for carboplatinum-treated mice (p = 0.021. Upon histological examination, viable tumor cells were not detected, and replaced by stromal cells in the tumors treated with S. typhimurium A1-R + trastuzumab. The results of the present study suggest that S. typhimurium A1-R and trastuzumab in combination are highly effective against HER-2-expressing cervical cancer.

  11. Sub-lethal radiation enhances anti-tumor immunotherapy in a transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is not uncommon to observe circulating tumor antigen-specific T lymphocytes in cancer patients despite a lack of significant infiltration and destruction of their tumors. Thus, an important goal for tumor immunotherapy is to identify ways to modulate in vivo anti-tumor immunity to achieve clinical efficacy. We investigate this proposition in a spontaneous mouse tumor model, Rip1-Tag2. Experimental therapies were carried out in two distinctive trial designs, intended to either intervene in the explosive growth of small tumors, or regress bulky end-stage tumors. Rip1-Tag2 mice received a single transfer of splenocytes from Tag-specific, CD4+ T cell receptor transgenic mice, a single sub-lethal radiation, or a combination therapy in which the lymphocyte transfer was preceded by the sub-lethal radiation. Tumor burden, the extent of lymphocyte infiltration into solid tumors and host survival were used to assess the efficacy of these therapeutic approaches. In either intervention or regression, the transfer of Tag-specific T cells alone did not result in significant lymphocyte infiltration into solid tumors, not did it affect tumor growth or host survival. In contrast, the combination therapy resulted in significant reduction in tumor burden, increase in lymphocyte infiltration into solid tumors, and extension of survival. The results indicate that certain types of solid tumors may be intrinsically resistant to infiltration and destruction by tumor-specific T lymphocytes. Our data suggest that such resistance can be disrupted by sub-lethal radiation. The combinatorial approach presented here merits consideration in the design of clinical trials aimed to achieve T cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity

  12. Distinct anti-oncogenic effect of various microRNAs in different mouse models of liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Junyan; Ji, Junfang; Li, Xiaolei; Ding, Ning; Wu, Heng; Liu, Yan; Wang, Xin Wei; Calvisi, Diego F; Song, Guisheng; Chen, Xin

    2015-03-30

    Deregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is a typical feature of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the in vivo relevance of miRNAs along hepatocarcinogenesis remains largely unknown. Here, we show that liver tumors induced in mice by c-Myc overexpression or AKT/Ras co-expression exhibit distinct miRNA expression profiles. Among the downregulated miRNAs, eight (miR-101, miR-107, miR-122, miR-29, miR-365, miR-375, miR-378, and miR-802) were selected and their tumor suppressor activity was determined by overexpressing each of them together with c-Myc or AKT/Ras oncogenes in mouse livers via hydrodynamic transfection. The tumor suppressor activity of these microRNAs was extremely heterogeneous in c-Myc and AKT/Ras mice: while miR-378 had no tumor suppressor activity, miR-107, mir-122, miR-29, miR-365 and miR-802 exhibited weak to moderate tumor suppressor potential. Noticeably, miR-375 showed limited antineoplastic activity against c-Myc driven tumorigenesis, whereas it strongly inhibited AKT/Ras induced hepatocarcinogenesis. Furthermore, miR-101 significantly suppressed both c-Myc and AKT/Ras liver tumor development. Altogether, the present data demonstrate that different oncogenes induce distinct miRNA patterns, whose modulation differently affects hepatocarcinogenesis depending on the driving oncogenes. Finally, our findings support a strong tumor suppressor activity of miR-101 in liver cancer models regardless of the driver oncogenes involved, thus representing a promising therapeutic target in human HCC.

  13. Androgenic dependence of exophytic tumor growth in a transgenic mouse model of bladder cancer: a role for thrombospondin-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Jorge L

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Steroid hormones influence mitogenic signaling pathways, apoptosis, and cell cycle checkpoints, and it has long been known that incidence of bladder cancer (BC in men is several times greater than in women, a difference that cannot be attributed to environmental or lifestyle factors alone. Castration reduces incidence of chemically-induced BC in rodents. It is unclear if this effect is due to hormonal influences on activation/deactivation of carcinogens or a direct effect on urothelial cell proliferation or other malignant processes. We examined the effect of castration on BC growth in UPII-SV40T transgenic mice, which express SV40 T antigen specifically in urothelium and reliably develop BC. Furthermore, because BC growth in UPII-SV40T mice is exophytic, we speculated BC growth was dependent on angiogenesis and angiogenesis was, in turn, androgen responsive. Methods Flat panel detector-based cone beam computed tomography (FPDCT was used to longitudinally measure exophytic BC growth in UPII-SV40T male mice sham-operated, castrated, or castrated and supplemented with dihydrotestosterone (DHT. Human normal bladder and BC biopsies and mouse bladder were examined quantitatively for thrombospondin-1 (TSP1 protein expression. Results Mice castrated at 24 weeks of age had decreased BC volumes at 32 weeks compared to intact mice (p = 0.0071 and castrated mice administered DHT (p = 0.0233; one-way ANOVA, JMP 6.0.3, SAS Institute, Inc.. Bladder cancer cell lines responded to DHT treatment with increased proliferation, regardless of androgen receptor expression levels. TSP1, an anti-angiogenic factor whose expression is inhibited by androgens, had decreased expression in bladders of UPII-SV40T mice compared to wild-type. Castration increased TSP1 levels in UPII-SV40T mice compared to intact mice. TSP1 protein expression was higher in 8 of 10 human bladder biopsies of normal versus malignant tissue from the same patients. Conclusion

  14. Longitudinal MRI evaluation of intracranial development and vascular characteristics of breast cancer brain metastases in a mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heling Zhou

    Full Text Available Longitudinal MRI was applied to monitor intracranial initiation and development of brain metastases and assess tumor vascular volume and permeability in a mouse model of breast cancer brain metastases. Using a 9.4T system, high resolution anatomic MRI and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC perfusion MRI were acquired at different time points after an intracardiac injection of brain-tropic breast cancer MDA-MB231BR-EGFP cells. Three weeks post injection, multifocal brain metastases were first observed with hyperintensity on T2-weighted images, but isointensity on T1-weighted post contrast images, indicating that blood-tumor-barrier (BTB at early stage of brain metastases was impermeable. Follow-up MRI revealed intracranial tumor growth and increased number of metastases that distributed throughout the whole brain. At the last scan on week 5, T1-weighted post contrast images detected BTB disruption in 160 (34% of a total of 464 brain metastases. Enhancement in some of the metastases was only seen in partial regions of the tumor, suggesting intratumoral heterogeneity of BTB disruption. DSC MRI measurements of relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV showed that rCBV of brain metastases was significantly lower (mean= 0.89±0.03 than that of contralateral normal brain (mean= 1.00±0.03; p<0.005. Intriguingly, longitudinal measurements revealed that rCBV of individual metastases at early stage was similar to, but became significantly lower than that of contralateral normal brain with tumor growth (p<0.05. The rCBV data were concordant with histological analysis of microvascular density (MVD. Moreover, comprehensive analysis suggested no significant correlation among tumor size, rCBV and BTB permeability. In conclusion, longitudinal MRI provides non-invasive in vivo assessments of spatial and temporal development of brain metastases and their vascular volume and permeability. The characteristic rCBV of brain metastases may have a diagnostic value.

  15. Genetically engineered mouse models of pituitary tumors

    OpenAIRE

    DavidACano; AlfonsoSoto-Moreno

    2014-01-01

    Animal models constitute valuable tools for investigating the pathogenesis of cancer as well as for preclinical testing of novel therapeutics approaches. However, the pathogenic mechanisms of pituitary tumor formation remain poorly understood, particularly in sporadic adenomas, thus making it a challenge to model pituitary tumors in mice. Nevertheless, genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of pituitary tumors have provided important insight into pituitary tumor biology. In this paper, w...

  16. Correlations of 3T DCE-MRI Quantitative Parameters with Microvessel Density in a Human-Colorectal-Cancer Xenograft Mouse Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sung Jun; An, Chan Sik; Koom, Woong Sub; Song, Ho Taek; Suh, Jin Suck [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    To investigate the correlation between quantitative dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) parameters and microvascular density (MVD) in a human-colon-cancer xenograft mouse model using 3 Tesla MRI. A human-colon-cancer xenograft model was produced by subcutaneously inoculating 1 X 106 DLD-1 human-colon-cancer cells into the right hind limbs of 10 mice. The tumors were allowed to grow for two weeks and then assessed using MRI. DCE-MRI was performed by tail vein injection of 0.3 mmol/kg of gadolinium. A region of interest (ROI) was drawn at the midpoints along the z-axes of the tumors, and a Tofts model analysis was performed. The quantitative parameters (Ktrans, Kep and Ve) from the whole transverse ROI and the hotspot ROI of the tumor were calculated. Immunohistochemical microvessel staining was performed and analyzed according to Weidner's criteria at the corresponding MRI sections. Additional Hematoxylin and Eosin staining was performed to evaluate tumor necrosis. The Mann-Whitney test and Spearman's rho correlation analysis were performed to prove the existence of a correlation between the quantitative parameters, necrosis, and MVD. Whole transverse ROI of the tumor showed no significant relationship between the MVD values and quantitative DCE-MRI parameters. In the hotspot ROI, there was a difference in MVD between low and high group of Ktrans and Kep that had marginally statistical significance (ps = 0.06 and 0.07, respectively). Also, Ktrans and Kep were found to have an inverse relationship with MVD (r -0.61, p = 0.06 in Ktrans; r = -0.60, p = 0.07 in Kep). Quantitative analysis of T1-weighted DCE-MRI using hotspot ROI may provide a better histologic match than whole transverse section ROI. Within the hotspots, Ktrans and Kep tend to have a reverse correlation with MVD in this colon cancer mouse model.

  17. Hedgehog overexpression leads to the formation of prostate cancer stem cells with metastatic property irrespective of androgen receptor expression in the mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Chin-Pao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hedgehog signalling has been implicated in prostate tumorigenesis in human subjects and mouse models, but its effects on transforming normal basal/stem cells toward malignant cancer stem cells remain poorly understood. Methods We produced pCX-shh-IG mice that overexpress Hedgehog protein persistently in adult prostates, allowing for elucidation of the mechanism during prostate cancer initiation and progression. Various markers were used to characterize and confirm the transformation of normal prostate basal/stem cells into malignant cancer stem cells under the influence of Hedgehog overexpression. Results The pCX-shh-IG mice developed prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN that led to invasive and metastatic prostate cancers within 90 days. The prostate cancer was initiated through activation of P63+ basal/stem cells along with simultaneous activation of Hedgehog signalling members, suggesting that P63+/Patch1+ and P63+/Smo+ cells may serve as cancer-initiating cells and progress into malignant prostate cancer stem cells (PCSCs. In the hyperplastic lesions and tumors, the progeny of PCSCs differentiated into cells of basal-intermediate and intermediate-luminal characteristics, whereas rare ChgA+ neuroendocrine differentiation was seen. Furthermore, in the metastatic loci within lymph nodes, kidneys, and lungs, the P63+ PCSCs formed prostate-like glandular structures, characteristic of the primitive structures during early prostate development. Besides, androgen receptor (AR expression was detected heterogeneously during tumor progression. The existence of P63+/AR-, CK14+/AR- and CD44+/AR- progeny indicates direct procurement of AR- malignant cancer trait. Conclusions These data support a cancer stem cell scenario in which Hedgehog signalling plays important roles in transforming normal prostate basal/stem cells into PCSCs and in the progression of PCSCs into metastatic tumor cells.

  18. Transcriptome Analysis of Individual Stromal Cell Populations Identifies Stroma-Tumor Crosstalk in Mouse Lung Cancer Model

    OpenAIRE

    Hyejin Choi; Jianting Sheng; Dingcheng Gao; Fuhai Li; Anna Durrans; Seongho Ryu; Sharrell B. Lee; Navneet Narula; Shahin Rafii; Olivier Elemento; Nasser K. Altorki; Stephen T.C. Wong; Vivek Mittal

    2015-01-01

    Emerging studies have begun to demonstrate that reprogrammed stromal cells play pivotal roles in tumor growth, metastasis, and resistance to therapy. However, the contribution of stromal cells to non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has remained underexplored. We used an orthotopic model of Kras-driven NSCLC to systematically dissect the contribution of specific hematopoietic stromal cells in lung cancer. RNA deep-sequencing analysis of individually sorted myeloid lineage and tumor epithelial c...

  19. Mouse gastric tumor models with prostaglandin E2 pathway activation show similar gene expression profiles to intestinal-type human gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oshima Masanobu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastric cancers are generally classified into better differentiated intestinal-type tumor and poorly differentiated diffuse-type one according to Lauren's histological categorization. Although induction of prostaglandin E2 pathway promotes gastric tumors in mice in cooperation with deregulated Wnt or BMP signalings, it has remained unresolved whether the gastric tumor mouse models recapitulate either of human gastric cancer type. This study assessed the similarity in expression profiling between gastric tumors of transgenic mice and various tissues of human cancers to find best-fit human tumors for the transgenic mice models. Results Global expression profiling initially found gastric tumors from COX-2/mPGES-1 (C2mE-related transgenic mice (K19-C2mE, K19-Wnt1/C2mE, and K19-Nog/C2mE resembled gastric cancers among the several tissues of human cancers including colon, breast, lung and gastric tumors. Next, classification of the C2mE-related transgenic mice by a gene signature to distinguish human intestinal- and diffuse-type tumors showed C2mE-related transgenic mice were more similar to intestinal-type compared with diffuse one. We finally revealed that induction of Wnt pathway cooperating with the prostaglandin E2 pathway in mice (K19-Wnt1/C2mE mice further reproduce features of human gastric intestinal-type tumors. Conclusion We demonstrated that C2mE-related transgenic mice show significant similarity to intestinal-type gastric cancer when analyzed by global expression profiling. These results suggest that the C2mE-related transgenic mice, especially K19-Wnt1/C2mE mice, serve as a best-fit model to study molecular mechanism underlying the tumorigenesis of human gastric intestinal-type cancers.

  20. Effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers on lymphangiogenesis of gastric cancer in a nude mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Liang; CAI Shi-rong; ZHANG Chang-hua; HE Yu-long; ZHAN Wen-hua; WU Hui; PENG Jian-jun

    2008-01-01

    Background Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) and angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARB) can inhibit tumor growth by inhibition of angiogenesis.This study was designed to study the anticancer effects of ACEI and ARB on tumor growth and lymphangiogenesis in an implanted gastric cancer mouse model.Methods A model of gastric cancer was established by subcutaneously inoculating human gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901 into 60 nude mice.One week later,all mice were randomly divided into 5 groups.A control group received physiologic saline once daily for 21 days.Mice in the 4 treatment groups received one of the following agents by gavage once daily for 21 days:perindopril,2 mg/kg;captopril,5 mg/kg;Iosartan,50 mg/kg;or valsartan,40 mg/kg.Twenty-one clays after treatment,all the mice were sacrificed and the tumors were removed.Tumor sections were processed,and immunohistochemical methods were used to observe the expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGF-C),matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP-7),and lymphatic microvessel density (LMVD).Results Tumor volume was significantly inhibited in all ACEI and ARB groups,compared with the control group (all P <0.01).LMVD in the ACEI and ARB groups was also significantly lower than that of the control group (all P<0.01).In the ACEI groups,the expressions of VEGF-C and MMP-7 were both significantly decreased,compared with the control group (all P<0.05).In the ARB groups,expression of VEGF-C was significantly decreased compared with the control group (all P<0.05).However,no significant difference was found in the expression of MMP-7 between ARB groups and the control group.Conclusion In a mouse model,ACEI and ARB might inhibit gastric cancer tumor growth by suppressing lymphangiogenesis.

  1. Targeting the insulin growth factor-1 receptor with fluorescent antibodies enables high resolution imaging of human pancreatic cancer in orthotopic mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Youp; Lee, Jin Young; Zhang, Yong; Hoffman, Robert M.; Bouvet, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to determine whether insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) antibodies, conjugated with bright fluorophores, could enable visualization of pancreatic cancer in orthotopic nude mouse models. IGF-1R antibody (clone 24-31) was conjugated with 550 nm or 650 nm fluorophores. Western blotting confirmed the expression of IGF-1R in Panc-1, BxPC3, and MIAPaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Labeling with fluorophore-conjugated IGF-1R antibody demonstrated fluorescent foci on the membrane of the pancreatic cancer cells. Subcutaneous Panc-1, BxPC-3, and MIA PaCa-2 tumors became fluorescent after intravenous administration of fluorescent IGF-1R antibodies. Orthotopically-transplanted BxPC-3 tumors became fluorescent with the conjugated IGF-1R antibodies, and were easily visible with intravital imaging. Gross and microscopic ex vivo imaging of resected pancreatic tumor and normal pancreas confirmed that fluorescence indeed came from the membrane of cancer cells, and it was stronger from the tumor than the normal tissue. The present study demonstrates that fluorophore-conjugated IGF-1R antibodies can visualize pancreatic cancer and it can be used with various imaging devices such as endoscopy and laparoscopy for diagnosis and fluorescence-guided surgery. PMID:26919100

  2. A Bone Metastasis Nude Mouse Model Created by Ultrasound Guided Intracardiac Injection of Breast Cancer Cells: the Micro-CT, MRI and Bioluminescence Imaging Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Young Jin; Song, Eun Hye; Kim, Seol Hwa; Song, Ho Taek; Suh, Jin Suck [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sang Hyun [Korean Minjok Leadership Academy, Heongsung (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to develop a nude mouse model of bone metastasis by performing intracardiac injection of breast cancer cells under ultrasonography guidance and we wanted to evaluate the development and the distribution of metastasis in vivo using micro-CT, MRI and bioluminescence imaging. Animal experiments were performed in 6-week-old female nude mice. The animals underwent left ventricular injection of 2x105 MDA-MB-231Bo-Luc cells. After injection of the tumor cells, serial bioluminescence imaging was performed for 7 weeks. The findings of micro-CT, MRI and the histology were correlated with the 'hot' lesions seen on the bioluminescence imaging. Metastasis was found in 62.3% of the animals. Two weeks after intracardiac injection, metastasis to the brain, spine and femur was detected with bioluminescence imaging with an increasing intensity by week 7. Micro-CT scan confirmed multiple osteolytic lesions at the femur, spine and skull. MRI and the histology were able to show metastasis in the brain and extraskeletal metastasis around the femur. The intracardiac injection of cancer cells under ultrasonography guidance is a safe and highly reproducible method to produce bone metastasis in nude mice. This bone metastasis nude mouse model will be useful to study the mechanism of bone metastasis and to validate new therapeutics

  3. A Bone Metastasis Nude Mouse Model Created by Ultrasound Guided Intracardiac Injection of Breast Cancer Cells: the Micro-CT, MRI and Bioluminescence Imaging Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to develop a nude mouse model of bone metastasis by performing intracardiac injection of breast cancer cells under ultrasonography guidance and we wanted to evaluate the development and the distribution of metastasis in vivo using micro-CT, MRI and bioluminescence imaging. Animal experiments were performed in 6-week-old female nude mice. The animals underwent left ventricular injection of 2x105 MDA-MB-231Bo-Luc cells. After injection of the tumor cells, serial bioluminescence imaging was performed for 7 weeks. The findings of micro-CT, MRI and the histology were correlated with the 'hot' lesions seen on the bioluminescence imaging. Metastasis was found in 62.3% of the animals. Two weeks after intracardiac injection, metastasis to the brain, spine and femur was detected with bioluminescence imaging with an increasing intensity by week 7. Micro-CT scan confirmed multiple osteolytic lesions at the femur, spine and skull. MRI and the histology were able to show metastasis in the brain and extraskeletal metastasis around the femur. The intracardiac injection of cancer cells under ultrasonography guidance is a safe and highly reproducible method to produce bone metastasis in nude mice. This bone metastasis nude mouse model will be useful to study the mechanism of bone metastasis and to validate new therapeutics

  4. Analysis of the effects of exposure to acute hypoxia on oxidative lesions and tumour progression in a transgenic mouse breast cancer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumour hypoxia is known to be a poor prognostic indicator, predictive of increased risk of metastatic disease and reduced survival. Genomic instability has been proposed as one of the potential mechanisms for hypoxic tumour progression. Both of these features are commonly found in many cancer types, but their relationship and association with tumour progression has not been examined in the same model. To address this issue, we determined the effects of 6 week in vivo acute hypoxic exposure on the levels of mutagenic lipid peroxidation product, malondialdehyde, and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine DNA (8-oxo-dG) lesions in the transgenic polyomavirus middle T (PyMT) breast cancer mouse model. We observed significantly increased plasma lipid peroxidation and 8-oxo-dG lesion levels in the hypoxia-exposed mice. Consumption of malondialdehyde also induced a significant increase in the PyMT tumour DNA lesion levels, however, these increases did not translate into enhanced tumour progression. We further showed that the in vivo exposure to acute hypoxia induced accumulation of F4/80 positive tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs), demonstrating a relationship between hypoxia and macrophages in an experimental model. These data suggest that although exposure to acute hypoxia causes an increase in 8-oxo-dG lesions and TAMs in the PyMT tumours, these increases do not translate into significant changes in tumour progression at the primary or metastatic levels in this strong viral oncogene-driven breast cancer model

  5. Folic Acid supplementary reduce the incidence of adenocarcinoma in a mouse model of colorectal cancer: microarray gene expression profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yan-Wei

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whether Folic acid is a potential drug that may prevent the progression of colorectal carcinoma and when to use are important healthy issues we focus on. Our study is to examine the effect of folic acid on the development of the CRC and the optimal time folic acid should be provided in a mouse-ICR model induced by 1, 2-Dimethylhydrazine. Also, we investigated the gene expression profile of this model related to folic acid. Method Female ICR mouse (n = 130 were divided into 7 groups either with the treatment of 1, 2-Dimethylhydrazine (20 mg/kg bodyweight weekly or folic acid (8 mg/kg bodyweight twice a week for 12 or 24 weeks. Using a 4 × 44 K Agilent whole genome oligo microarray assay, different gene expression among groups (NS, DMH, FA2, FA3 were identified and selected genes were validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Animals with a supplementary of folic acid showed a significant decrease in the incidence, the maximum diameter and multiplicity of adenocarcinomas (P Conclusion Our study demonstrated that folic acid supplementary was significantly associated with the decrease risk of CRC. And the subgroup of providing folic acid without precancerous lesions was more effective than that with precancerous lesions.

  6. Intravesical Toll-like receptor 7 agonist R-837: Optimization of its formulation in an orthotopic mouse model of bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Tomoko; Crain, Brian; Corr, Maripat; Chan, Michael; Cottam, Howard B; Maj, Roberto; Barberis, Alcide; Leoni, Lorenzo; Carson, Dennis A

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the immune response caused by the intravesical administration of the immunomodulator R-837 in various formulations and to estimate its therapeutic potential for bladder cancer. Methods Female C57BL/6 mice were intravesically treated with different formulations of R-837, a Toll-like receptor 7 agonist used for treating genital warts and skin malignancy. The tested formulation mixtures contained different ratios of lactic acid, a thermosensitive poloxamer polymer (Lutrol F127) and 2-(hydroxypropyl)-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD). Induction of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) was analyzed by Luminex microbeads assay. The therapeutic potential of intravesical administration of R-837 was assessed in an orthotopic, syngeneic mouse model of bladder cancer using MB49 cells. Results Intravesical administration of R-837 in lactic acid alone induced systemic and bladder TNFα and KC in a dose-dependent manner. Formulations including poloxamer decreased systemic absorption of R-837 and significantly reduced systemic and local induction of KC. Addition of HPβCD in the poloxamer formulation particularly reversed levels of systemic and local levels of TNFα and KC. Histological examination showed that poloxamer-HPβCD formulation allowed infiltration of mononuclear cells into urothelium and lamina propria. In studies using orthotopic mouse bladder cancer, the tumor loads in R-837-treated mice were significantly lower than those in vehicle-treated or non-treated mice. Conclusion The optimized poloxamer-HPβCD formulation of R-837 shows therapeutic potential for bladder cancer while avoiding adverse side-effects. PMID:20337728

  7. Detection of in situ mammary cancer in a transgenic mouse model: in vitro and in vivo MRI studies demonstrate histopathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, S A; Fan, X; Zamora, M; Foxley, S; River, J; Newstead, G M; Karczmar, G S [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago, 5841 S Maryland Avenue, MC 2026, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Conzen, S D [Department of Medicine and Ben May Department for Cancer Research, University of Chicago, 5841 S Maryland Ave, MC 2115, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Krausz, T [Department of Pathology, University of Chicago, 5841 S Maryland Avenue, MC 6101, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)], E-mail: gskarczm@uchicago.edu

    2008-10-07

    Improving the prevention and detection of preinvasive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is expected to lower both morbidity and mortality from breast cancer. Transgenic mouse models can be used as a 'test bed' to develop new imaging methods and to evaluate the efficacy of candidate preventive therapies. We hypothesized that despite its microscopic size, early murine mammary cancer, including DCIS, might be accurately detected by MRI. C3(1) SV40 TAg female mice (n = 23) between 10 and 18 weeks of age were selected for study. Eleven mice were subjected to in vitro imaging using a T{sub 2}-weighted spin echo sequence and 12 mice were selected for in vivo imaging using a T{sub 1}-weighted gradient echo, a T{sub 2}-weighted spin echo and high spectral and spatial resolution imaging sequences. The imaged glands were carefully dissected, formalin fixed and paraffin embedded, and then H and E stained sections were obtained. The ratio of image-detected versus histologically detected cancers was obtained by reviewing the MR images and H and E sections independently and using histology as the gold standard. MR images were able to detect 12/12 intramammary lymph nodes, 1/1 relatively large ({approx}5 mm) tumor, 17/18 small ({approx}1 mm) tumors and 13/16 ducts distended with DCIS greater than 300 {mu}m. Significantly, there were no false positives-i.e., image detection always corresponded to a histologically detectable cancer in this model. These results indicate that MR imaging can reliably detect both preinvasive in situ and early invasive mammary cancers in mice with high sensitivity. This technology is an important step toward the more effective use of non-invasive imaging in pre-clinical studies of breast cancer prevention, detection and treatment.

  8. Detection of in situ mammary cancer in a transgenic mouse model: in vitro and in vivo MRI studies demonstrate histopathologic correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, S. A.; Conzen, S. D.; Fan, X.; Krausz, T.; Zamora, M.; Foxley, S.; River, J.; Newstead, G. M.; Karczmar, G. S.

    2008-10-01

    Improving the prevention and detection of preinvasive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is expected to lower both morbidity and mortality from breast cancer. Transgenic mouse models can be used as a 'test bed' to develop new imaging methods and to evaluate the efficacy of candidate preventive therapies. We hypothesized that despite its microscopic size, early murine mammary cancer, including DCIS, might be accurately detected by MRI. C3(1) SV40 TAg female mice (n = 23) between 10 and 18 weeks of age were selected for study. Eleven mice were subjected to in vitro imaging using a T2-weighted spin echo sequence and 12 mice were selected for in vivo imaging using a T1-weighted gradient echo, a T2-weighted spin echo and high spectral and spatial resolution imaging sequences. The imaged glands were carefully dissected, formalin fixed and paraffin embedded, and then H&E stained sections were obtained. The ratio of image-detected versus histologically detected cancers was obtained by reviewing the MR images and H&E sections independently and using histology as the gold standard. MR images were able to detect 12/12 intramammary lymph nodes, 1/1 relatively large (~5 mm) tumor, 17/18 small (~1 mm) tumors and 13/16 ducts distended with DCIS greater than 300 µm. Significantly, there were no false positives—i.e., image detection always corresponded to a histologically detectable cancer in this model. These results indicate that MR imaging can reliably detect both preinvasive in situ and early invasive mammary cancers in mice with high sensitivity. This technology is an important step toward the more effective use of non-invasive imaging in pre-clinical studies of breast cancer prevention, detection and treatment.

  9. A Novel Chimeric Antigen Receptor Against Prostate Stem Cell Antigen Mediates Tumor Destruction in a Humanized Mouse Model of Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagisetty, Kiran H.; Tran, Eric; Zheng, Zhili; Gattinoni, Luca; Yu, Zhiya; Burns, William R.; Miermont, Anne M.; Teper, Yaroslav; Rudloff, Udo; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Feldman, Steven A.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Morgan, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Despite advances in the understanding of its molecular pathophysiology, pancreatic cancer remains largely incurable, highlighting the need for novel therapies. We developed a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) specific for prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), a glycoprotein that is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer starting at early stages of malignant transformation. To optimize the CAR design, we used antigen-recognition domains derived from mouse or human antibodies, and intracellular signaling domains containing one or two T cell costimulatory elements, in addition to CD3zeta. Comparing multiple constructs established that the CAR based on human monoclonal antibody Ha1-4.117 had the greatest reactivity in vitro. To further analyze this CAR, we developed a human pancreatic cancer xenograft model and adoptively transferred CAR-engineered T cells into animals with established tumors. CAR-engineered human lymphocytes induced significant antitumor activity, and unlike what has been described for other CARs, a second-generation CAR (containing CD28 cosignaling domain) induced a more potent antitumor effect than a third-generation CAR (containing CD28 and 41BB cosignaling domains). While our results provide evidence to support PSCA as a target antigen for CAR-based immunotherapy of pancreatic cancer, the expression of PSCA on selected normal tissues could be a source of limiting toxicity. PMID:24694017

  10. Transcriptome Analysis of Individual Stromal Cell Populations Identifies Stroma-Tumor Crosstalk in Mouse Lung Cancer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyejin Choi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Emerging studies have begun to demonstrate that reprogrammed stromal cells play pivotal roles in tumor growth, metastasis, and resistance to therapy. However, the contribution of stromal cells to non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC has remained underexplored. We used an orthotopic model of Kras-driven NSCLC to systematically dissect the contribution of specific hematopoietic stromal cells in lung cancer. RNA deep-sequencing analysis of individually sorted myeloid lineage and tumor epithelial cells revealed cell-type-specific differentially regulated genes, indicative of activated stroma. We developed a computational model for crosstalk signaling discovery based on ligand-receptor interactions and downstream signaling networks and identified known and novel tumor-stroma paracrine and tumor autocrine crosstalk-signaling pathways in NSCLC. We provide cellular and molecular insights into components of the lung cancer microenvironment that contribute to carcinogenesis. This study has the potential for development of therapeutic strategies that target tumor-stroma interactions and may complement conventional anti-cancer treatments.

  11. Transcriptome analysis of individual stromal cell populations identifies stroma-tumor crosstalk in mouse lung cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyejin; Sheng, Jianting; Gao, Dingcheng; Li, Fuhai; Durrans, Anna; Ryu, Seongho; Lee, Sharrell B; Narula, Navneet; Rafii, Shahin; Elemento, Olivier; Altorki, Nasser K; Wong, Stephen T C; Mittal, Vivek

    2015-02-24

    Emerging studies have begun to demonstrate that reprogrammed stromal cells play pivotal roles in tumor growth, metastasis, and resistance to therapy. However, the contribution of stromal cells to non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has remained underexplored. We used an orthotopic model of Kras-driven NSCLC to systematically dissect the contribution of specific hematopoietic stromal cells in lung cancer. RNA deep-sequencing analysis of individually sorted myeloid lineage and tumor epithelial cells revealed cell-type-specific differentially regulated genes, indicative of activated stroma. We developed a computational model for crosstalk signaling discovery based on ligand-receptor interactions and downstream signaling networks and identified known and novel tumor-stroma paracrine and tumor autocrine crosstalk-signaling pathways in NSCLC. We provide cellular and molecular insights into components of the lung cancer microenvironment that contribute to carcinogenesis. This study has the potential for development of therapeutic strategies that target tumor-stroma interactions and may complement conventional anti-cancer treatments. PMID:25704820

  12. A mouse model for triple-negative breast cancer tumor-initiating cells (TNBC-TICs) exhibits similar aggressive phenotype to the human disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) exhibit characteristics quite distinct from other kinds of breast cancer, presenting as an aggressive disease--recurring and metastasizing more often than other kinds of breast cancer, without tumor-specific treatment options and accounts for 15% of all types of breast cancer with higher percentages in premenopausal African-American and Hispanic women. The reason for this aggressive phenotype is currently the focus of intensive research. However, progress is hampered by the lack of suitable TNBC cell model systems. To understand the mechanistic basis for the aggressiveness of TNBC, we produced a stable TNBC cell line by sorting for 4T1 cells that do not express the estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR) or the gene for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). As a control, we produced a stable triple-positive breast cancer (TPBC) cell line by transfecting 4T1 cells with rat HER2, ER and PgR genes and sorted for cells with high expression of ER and PgR by flow cytometry and high expression of the HER2 gene by Western blot analysis. We isolated tumor-initiating cells (TICs) by sorting for CD24+/CD44high/ALDH1+ cells from TNBC (TNBC-TICs) and TPBC (TPBC-TICs) stable cell lines. Limiting dilution transplantation experiments revealed that CD24+/CD44high/ALDH1+ cells derived from TNBC (TNBC-TICs) and TPBC (TPBC-TICs) were significantly more effective at repopulating the mammary glands of naïve female BALB/c mice than CD24-/CD44-/ALDH1- cells. Implantation of the TNBC-TICs resulted in significantly larger tumors, which metastasized to the lungs to a significantly greater extent than TNBC, TPBC-TICs, TPBC or parental 4T1 cells. We further demonstrated that the increased aggressiveness of TNBC-TICs correlates with the presence of high levels of mouse twenty-five kDa heat shock protein (Hsp25/mouse HspB1) and seventy-two kDa heat shock protein (Hsp72/HspA1A). Taken together, we have developed a TNBC-TICs model system

  13. Potential reduction of contralateral second breast-cancer risks by prophylactic mammary irradiation: validation in a breast-cancer-prone mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Shuryak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Long-term breast-cancer survivors have a highly elevated risk (1 in 6 at 20 years of contralateral second breast cancer. This high risk is associated with the presence of multiple pre-malignant cell clones in the contralateral breast at the time of primary breast cancer diagnosis. Mechanistic analyses suggest that a moderate dose of X-rays to the contralateral breast can kill these pre-malignant clones such that, at an appropriate Prophylactic Mammary Irradiation (PMI dose, the long-term contralateral breast cancer risk in breast cancer survivors would be considerably decreased. AIMS: To test the predicted relationship between PMI dose and cancer risk in mammary glands that have a high risk of developing malignancies. METHODS: We tested the PMI concept using MMTV-PyVT mammary-tumor-prone mice. Mammary glands on one side of each mouse were irradiated with X-rays, while those on the other side were shielded from radiation. The unshielded mammary glands received doses of 0, 4, 8, 12 and 16 Gy in 4-Gy fractions. RESULTS: In high-risk mammary glands exposed to radiation doses designed for PMI (12 and 16 Gy, tumor incidence rates were respectively decreased by a factor of 2.2 (95% CI, 1.1-5.0 at 12 Gy, and a factor of 3.1 (95% CI, 1.3-8.3 at 16 Gy, compared to those in the shielded glands that were exposed to very low radiation doses. The same pattern was seen for PMI-exposed mammary glands relative to zero-dose controls. CONCLUSIONS: The pattern of cancer risk reduction by PMI was consistent with mechanistic predictions. Contralateral breast PMI may thus have promise as a spatially targeted breast-conserving option for reducing the current high risk of contralateral second breast cancers. For estrogen-receptor positive primary tumors, PMI might optimally be used concomitantly with systemically delivered chemopreventive drugs such as tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors, while for estrogen-receptor negative tumors, PMI might be used alone.

  14. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients.

  15. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients. PMID:26063174

  16. Cationized dextran nanoparticle-encapsulated CXCR4-siRNA enhanced correlation between CXCR4 expression and serum alkaline phosphatase in a mouse model of colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abedini F

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Fatemeh Abedini,1 Hossein Hosseinkhani,2 Maznah Ismail,1,3 Abraham J Domb,4 Abdul Rahman Omar,1,5 Pei Pei Chong,1,2 Po-Da Hong,3 Dah-Shyong Yu,6 Ira-Yudovin Farber41Laboratory of Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, 2Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei, Taiwan, 3Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia, 4Institute of Drug Research, The Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, School of Pharmacy-Faculty of Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel, 5Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia, 6Nanomedicine Research Center, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, TaiwanPurpose: The failure of colorectal cancer treatments is partly due to overexpression of CXCR4 by tumor cells, which plays a critical role in cell metastasis. Moreover, serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP levels are frequently elevated in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. A polysaccharide, dextran, was chosen as the vector of siRNA. Spermine was conjugated to oxidized dextran by reductive amination process to obtain cationized dextran, so-called dextran-spermine, in order to prepare CXCR4-siRNAs/dextran-spermine nanoparticles. The fabricated nanoparticles were used in order to investigate whether downregulation of CXCR4 expression could affect serum ALP in mouse models of colorectal cancer.Methods: Colorectal cancer was established in BALB/C mice following injection of mouse colon carcinoma cells CT.26WT through the tail vein. CXCR4 siRNA for two sites of the target gene was administered following injection of naked siRNA or siRNA encapsulated into nanoparticles.Results: In vivo animal data revealed that CXCR4 silencing by dextran-spermine nanoparticles significantly downregulated CXCR4 expression compared with naked CXCR4 siRNA. Furthermore, there was

  17. Mouse models of Fanconi anemia

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    Parmar, Kalindi; D' Andrea, Alan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, 44 Binney Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Niedernhofer, Laura J., E-mail: niedernhoferl@upmc.edu [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Cancer Institute, 5117 Centre Avenue, Hillman Cancer Center, Research Pavilion 2.6, Pittsburgh, PA 15213-1863 (United States)

    2009-07-31

    Fanconi anemia is a rare inherited disease characterized by congenital anomalies, growth retardation, aplastic anemia and an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia and squamous cell carcinomas. The disease is caused by mutation in genes encoding proteins required for the Fanconi anemia pathway, a response mechanism to replicative stress, including that caused by genotoxins that cause DNA interstrand crosslinks. Defects in the Fanconi anemia pathway lead to genomic instability and apoptosis of proliferating cells. To date, 13 complementation groups of Fanconi anemia were identified. Five of these genes have been deleted or mutated in the mouse, as well as a sixth key regulatory gene, to create mouse models of Fanconi anemia. This review summarizes the phenotype of each of the Fanconi anemia mouse models and highlights how genetic and interventional studies using the strains have yielded novel insight into therapeutic strategies for Fanconi anemia and into how the Fanconi anemia pathway protects against genomic instability.

  18. Mouse Model for Spontaneous Basal-Like Breast Cancer%自发Basal-like乳腺癌小鼠模型研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丹芳; 孙保存; 赵秀兰; 崔艳芬; 徐少艳; 董学易; 车娜

    2011-01-01

    过程中起重要作用.%Objective: Basal-like breast cancer is very Invasive and highly metastatlc with poor prognosis. The molecular mechanisms underlying its tumorigenesis and tumor progression remain unclear, and ideal animal models are lacking. The present study aims to identify the features of spontaneous breast cancer in TA2 mice, to determine whether the mouse model is useful and relevant for human basal-like breast cancer, and to investigate the relationship among pregnancy, mouse mammary tumor virus ( MMTV), and TA2 breast cancer. Methods: Spontaneous breast cancers were collected from 84 female TA2 mice. The metastasis, morphology, and inimun-ophenotype of the TA2 mice bearing breast cancer tumors were determined using hematoxylin, eosin staining, and immunnohistocherms-try, respectively. The similarities between the basal-like breast cancers of the animals and that of the human patients were compared Electrochcmilumincsccnce immunoassay was used to detect the serum levels of estradiol ( E2 ) and progesterone in the TA2 mice (n = 10 ), the mice at dl 5 during the gestation period (n = 6 ), and the normal mice ( n = 6). The MMTV in the TA2 breast cancer cells were checked under electron microscopy ( EM ). The MMTV LTR expression in the mammary glands of the normal and the pregnant mice and the TA2 mice were determined using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Results: The spontaneous breast cancer tissues in the TA2 mice were similar to human basal-like breast cancer in terms of biology, morphology, and phenotype. The mean age of the TA2 mice at tumorigenesis was ( 329.81 ± 95.32 ) d, and the mean frequency of delivery was (2.70 ± 1.8 ), with rapid tumor growth within the gestation period. Metastasis in the visceral organs frequently occurred in TA2 tumors. However, nodal metastasis was not found in the current research. Pulmonary metastasis was seen in 80% ( 64/80 ) of the tumors. The TA2 cancers were homologous in histomorphology. The cancer nest consisted of roundlel cells with

  19. Skin vaccination against cervical cancer associated human papillomavirus with a novel micro-projection array in a mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly J Corbett

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Better delivery systems are needed for routinely used vaccines, to improve vaccine uptake. Many vaccines contain alum or alum based adjuvants. Here we investigate a novel dry-coated densely-packed micro-projection array skin patch (Nanopatch™ as an alternate delivery system to intramuscular injection for delivering an alum adjuvanted human papillomavirus (HPV vaccine (Gardasil® commonly used as a prophylactic vaccine against cervical cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Micro-projection arrays dry-coated with vaccine material (Gardasil® delivered to C57BL/6 mouse ear skin released vaccine within 5 minutes. To assess vaccine immunogenicity, doses of corresponding to HPV-16 component of the vaccine between 0.43 ± 0.084 ng and 300 ± 120 ng (mean ± SD were administered to mice at day 0 and day 14. A dose of 55 ± 6.0 ng delivered intracutaneously by micro-projection array was sufficient to produce a maximal virus neutralizing serum antibody response at day 28 post vaccination. Neutralizing antibody titres were sustained out to 16 weeks post vaccination, and, for comparable doses of vaccine, somewhat higher titres were observed with intracutaneous patch delivery than with intramuscular delivery with the needle and syringe at this time point. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Use of dry micro-projection arrays (Nanopatch™ has the potential to overcome the need for a vaccine cold chain for common vaccines currently delivered by needle and syringe, and to reduce risk of needle-stick injury and vaccine avoidance due to the fear of the needle especially among children.

  20. Rad51c- and Trp53-double-mutant mouse model reveals common features of homologous recombination-deficient breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumiati, M; Munne, P M; Edgren, H; Eldfors, S; Hemmes, A; Kuznetsov, S G

    2016-09-01

    Almost half of all hereditary breast cancers (BCs) are associated with germ-line mutations in homologous recombination (HR) genes. However, the tumor phenotypes associated with different HR genes vary, making it difficult to define the role of HR in BC predisposition. To distinguish between HR-dependent and -independent features of BCs, we generated a mouse model in which an essential HR gene, Rad51c, is knocked-out specifically in epidermal tissues. Rad51c is one of the key mediators of HR and a well-known BC predisposition gene. Here, we demonstrate that deletion of Rad51c invariably requires inactivation of the Trp53 tumor suppressor (TP53 in humans) to produce mammary carcinomas in 63% of female mice. Nonetheless, loss of Rad51c shortens the latency of Trp53-deficient mouse tumors from 11 to 6 months. Remarkably, the histopathological features of Rad51c-deficient mammary carcinomas, such as expression of hormone receptors and luminal epithelial markers, faithfully recapitulate the histopathology of human RAD51C-mutated BCs. Similar to other BC models, Rad51c/p53 double-mutant mouse mammary tumors also reveal a propensity for genomic instability, but lack the focal amplification of the Met locus or distinct mutational signatures reported for other HR genes. Using the human mammary epithelial cell line MCF10A, we show that deletion of TP53 can rescue RAD51C-deficient cells from radiation-induced cellular senescence, whereas it exacerbates their centrosome amplification and nuclear abnormalities. Altogether, our data indicate that a trend for genomic instability and inactivation of Trp53 are common features of HR-mediated BCs, whereas histopathology and somatic mutation patterns are specific for different HR genes. PMID:26820992

  1. Cytokine levels correlate with immune cell infiltration after anti-VEGF therapy in preclinical mouse models of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina L Roland

    Full Text Available The effect of blocking VEGF activity in solid tumors extends beyond inhibition of angiogenesis. However, no studies have compared the effectiveness of mechanistically different anti-VEGF inhibitors with respect to changes in tumor growth and alterations in the tumor microenvironment. In this study we use three distinct breast cancer models, a MDA-MB-231 xenograft model, a 4T1 syngenic model, and a transgenic model using MMTV-PyMT mice, to explore the effects of various anti-VEGF therapies on tumor vasculature, immune cell infiltration, and cytokine levels. Tumor vasculature and immune cell infiltration were evaluated using immunohistochemistry. Cytokine levels were evaluated using ELISA and electrochemiluminescence. We found that blocking the activation of VEGF receptor resulted in changes in intra-tumoral cytokine levels, specifically IL-1beta, IL-6 and CXCL1. Modulation of the level these cytokines is important for controlling immune cell infiltration and ultimately tumor growth. Furthermore, we demonstrate that selective inhibition of VEGF binding to VEGFR2 with r84 is more effective at controlling tumor growth and inhibiting the infiltration of suppressive immune cells (MDSC, Treg, macrophages while increasing the mature dendritic cell fraction than other anti-VEGF strategies. In addition, we found that changes in serum IL-1beta and IL-6 levels correlated with response to therapy, identifying two possible biomarkers for assessing the effectiveness of anti-VEGF therapy in breast cancer patients.

  2. Synergistic effect of therapeutic stem cells expressing cytosine deaminase and interferon-beta via apoptotic pathway in the metastatic mouse model of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Bo-Rim; Kim, Seung U; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-02-01

    As an approach to improve treatment of breast cancer metastasis to the brain, we employed genetically engineered stem cells (GESTECs, HB1.F3 cells) consisting of neural stem cells (NSCs) expressing cytosine deaminase and the interferon-beta genes, HB1.F3.CD and HB1.F3.CD.IFN-β. In this model, MDA-MB-231/Luc breast cancer cells were implanted in the right hemisphere of the mouse brain, while pre-stained GESTECs with redfluorescence were implanted in the contralateral brain. Two days after stem cells injection, 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) was administrated via intraperitoneal injection. Histological analysis of extracted brain confirmed the therapeutic efficacy of GESTECs in the presence of 5-FC based on reductions in density and aggressive tendency of breast cancer cells, as well as pyknosis, karyorrhexis, and karyolysis relative to a negative control. Additionally, expression of PCNA decreased in the stem cells treated group. Treatment of breast cancer cells with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) increased the expression of pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative factor, BAX and p21 protein through phosphorylation of p53 and p38. Moreover, analysis of stem cell migratory ability revealed that MDA-MB-231 cells endogenously secreted VEGF, and stem cells expressed their receptor (VEGFR2). To confirm the role of VEGF/VEGFR2 signaling in tumor tropism of stem cells, samples were treated with the VEGFR2 inhibitor, KRN633. The number of migrated stem cells decreased significantly in response to KRN633 due to Erk1/2 activation and PI3K/Akt inhibition. Taken together, these results indicate that treatment with GESTECs, particularly HB1.F3.CD.IFN-β co-expressing CD.IFN-β, may be a useful strategy for treating breast cancer metastasis to the brain in the presence of a prodrug.

  3. Ursolic acid inhibits the growth of human pancreatic cancer and enhances the antitumor potential of gemcitabine in an orthotopic mouse model through suppression of the inflammatory microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Yadav, Vivek R; Sung, Bokyung; Gupta, Subash C; Tyagi, Amit K; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2016-03-15

    The development of chemoresistance in human pancreatic cancer is one reason for the poor survival rate for patients with this cancer. Because multiple gene products are linked with chemoresistance, we investigated the ability of ursolic acid (UA) to sensitize pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine, a standard drug used for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. These investigations were done in AsPC-1, MIA PaCa-2, and Panc-28 cells and in nude mice orthotopically implanted with Panc-28 cells. In vitro, UA inhibited proliferation, induced apoptosis, suppressed NF-κB activation and its regulated proliferative, metastatic, and angiogenic proteins. UA (20 μM) also enhanced gemcitabine (200 nM)-induced apoptosis and suppressed the expression of NF-κB-regulated proteins. In the nude mouse model, oral administration of UA (250 mg/kg) suppressed tumor growth and enhanced the effect of gemcitabine (25 mg/kg). Furthermore, the combination of UA and gemcitabine suppressed the metastasis of cancer cells to distant organs such as liver and spleen. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that biomarkers of proliferation (Ki-67) and microvessel density (CD31) were suppressed by the combination of UA and gemcitabine. UA inhibited the activation of NF-κB and STAT3 and the expression of tumorigenic proteins regulated by these inflammatory transcription factors in tumor tissue. Furthermore, the combination of two agents decreased the expression of miR-29a, closely linked with tumorigenesis, in the tumor tissue. UA was found to be bioavailable in animal serum and tumor tissue. These results suggest that UA can inhibit the growth of human pancreatic tumors and sensitize them to gemcitabine by suppressing inflammatory biomarkers linked to proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis.

  4. Ursolic acid inhibits the growth of human pancreatic cancer and enhances the antitumor potential of gemcitabine in an orthotopic mouse model through suppression of the inflammatory microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Yadav, Vivek R.; Sung, Bokyung; Gupta, Subash C.; Tyagi, Amit K.; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2016-01-01

    The development of chemoresistance in human pancreatic cancer is one reason for the poor survival rate for patients with this cancer. Because multiple gene products are linked with chemoresistance, we investigated the ability of ursolic acid (UA) to sensitize pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine, a standard drug used for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. These investigations were done in AsPC-1, MIA PaCa-2, and Panc-28 cells and in nude mice orthotopically implanted with Panc-28 cells. In vitro, UA inhibited proliferation, induced apoptosis, suppressed NF-κB activation and its regulated proliferative, metastatic, and angiogenic proteins. UA (20 μM) also enhanced gemcitabine (200 nM)-induced apoptosis and suppressed the expression of NF-κB-regulated proteins. In the nude mouse model, oral administration of UA (250 mg/kg) suppressed tumor growth and enhanced the effect of gemcitabine (25 mg/kg). Furthermore, the combination of UA and gemcitabine suppressed the metastasis of cancer cells to distant organs such as liver and spleen. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that biomarkers of proliferation (Ki-67) and microvessel density (CD31) were suppressed by the combination of UA and gemcitabine. UA inhibited the activation of NF-κB and STAT3 and the expression of tumorigenic proteins regulated by these inflammatory transcription factors in tumor tissue. Furthermore, the combination of two agents decreased the expression of miR-29a, closely linked with tumorigenesis, in the tumor tissue. UA was found to be bioavailable in animal serum and tumor tissue. These results suggest that UA can inhibit the growth of human pancreatic tumors and sensitize them to gemcitabine by suppressing inflammatory biomarkers linked to proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis. PMID:26909608

  5. In vivo imaging of human breast cancer mouse model with high level expression of calcium sensing receptor at 3T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baio, Gabriella; Tagliafico, Alberto; Neumaier, Carlo Emanuele [National Cancer Institute, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, IST, Genoa (Italy); Fabbi, Marina; Carbotti, Grazia [National Cancer Institute, Unit of Immunological Therapy, IST, Genoa (Italy); Emionite, Laura; Cilli, Michele [National Cancer Institute, Animal Facility, IST, Genoa (Italy); Salvi, Sandra; Truini, Mauro [National Cancer Institute, Department of Pathology, IST, Genoa (Italy); Ghedin, Piero; Prato, Sabina [General Electric, GE, Milano (Italy)

    2012-03-15

    To demonstrate that manganese can visualise calcium sensing receptor (CaSR)-expressing cells in a human breast cancer murine model, as assessed by clinical 3T magnetic resonance (MR). Human MDA-MB-231-Luc or MCF7-Luc breast cancer cells were orthotopically grown in NOD/SCID mice to a minimum mass of 5 mm. Mice were evaluated on T1-weighted sequences before and after intravenous injection of MnCl{sub 2}. To block the CaSR-activated Ca{sup 2+} channels, verapamil was injected at the tumour site 5 min before Mn{sup 2+} administration. CaSR expression in vivo was studied by immunohistochemistry. Contrast enhancement was observed at the tumour periphery 10 min after Mn{sup 2+} administration, and further increased up to 40 min. In verapamil-treated mice, no contrast enhancement was observed. CaSR was strongly expressed at the tumour periphery. Manganese enhanced magnetic resonance imaging can visualise CaSR-expressing breast cancer cells in vivo, opening up possibilities for a new MR contrast agent. (orig.)

  6. Antitumor activity of [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] in mouse xenograft model of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscella, A; Vetrugno, C; Migoni, D; Biagioni, F; Fanizzi, F P; Fornai, F; De Pascali, S A; Marsigliante, S

    2014-01-01

    The higher and selective cytotoxicity of [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] toward cancer cell in both immortalized cell lines and in breast cancer cells in primary cultures, stimulated a pre-clinical study so as to evaluate its therapeutic potential in vivo. The efficacy of [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] was assessed using a xenograft model of breast cancer developed by injection of MCF-7 cells in the flank of BALB/c nude mice. Treatment of solid tumor-bearing mice with [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] induced up to 50% reduction of tumor mass compared with an average 10% inhibition recorded in cisplatin-treated animals. Thus, chemotherapy with [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] was much more effective than cisplatin. We also demonstrated enhanced in vivo pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and tolerability of [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] when compared with cisplatin administered in Wistar rats. Pharmacokinetics studies with [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] revealed prolonged Pt persistence in systemic blood circulation and decreased nefrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity, major target sites of cisplatin toxicity. Overall, [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] turned out to be extremely promising in terms of greater in vivo anticancer activity, reduced nephrotoxicity and acute toxicity compared with cisplatin. PMID:24457958

  7. Analysis of the effects of exposure to acute hypoxia on oxidative lesions and tumour progression in a transgenic mouse breast cancer model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lunt Sarah

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumour hypoxia is known to be a poor prognostic indicator, predictive of increased risk of metastatic disease and reduced survival. Genomic instability has been proposed as one of the potential mechanisms for hypoxic tumour progression. Both of these features are commonly found in many cancer types, but their relationship and association with tumour progression has not been examined in the same model. Methods To address this issue, we determined the effects of 6 week in vivo acute hypoxic exposure on the levels of mutagenic lipid peroxidation product, malondialdehyde, and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine DNA (8-oxo-dG lesions in the transgenic polyomavirus middle T (PyMT breast cancer mouse model. Results We observed significantly increased plasma lipid peroxidation and 8-oxo-dG lesion levels in the hypoxia-exposed mice. Consumption of malondialdehyde also induced a significant increase in the PyMT tumour DNA lesion levels, however, these increases did not translate into enhanced tumour progression. We further showed that the in vivo exposure to acute hypoxia induced accumulation of F4/80 positive tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs, demonstrating a relationship between hypoxia and macrophages in an experimental model. Conclusion These data suggest that although exposure to acute hypoxia causes an increase in 8-oxo-dG lesions and TAMs in the PyMT tumours, these increases do not translate into significant changes in tumour progression at the primary or metastatic levels in this strong viral oncogene-driven breast cancer model.

  8. IL-12 immunotherapy of Braf(V600E)-induced papillary thyroid cancer in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parhar, Ranjit S; Zou, Minjing; Al-Mohanna, Futwan A; Baitei, Essa Y; Assiri, Abdullah M; Meyer, Brian F; Shi, Yufei

    2016-01-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) accounts for >80% thyroid malignancies, and BRAF(V600E) mutation is frequently found in >40% PTC. Interleukin-12 (IL-12) is a proinflammatory heterodimeric cytokine with strong antitumor activity. It is not known whether IL-12 immunotherapy is effective against Braf(V600E)-induced PTC. In the present study, we investigated the effectiveness of IL-12 immunotherapy against Braf(V600E)-induced PTC in LSL-Braf(V600E)/TPO-Cre mice. LSL-Braf(V600E)/TPO-Cre mice were created for thyroid-specific expression of Braf(V600E) under the endogenous Braf promoter, and spontaneous PTC developed at about 5 weeks of age. The mice were subjected to two treatment regimens: (1) weekly intramuscular injection of 50 μg plasmid DNA expressing a single-chain IL-12 fusion protein (scIL-12/CMVpDNA), (2) daily intraperitoneal injection of mouse recombinant IL-12 protein (mrIL-12, 100 ng per day). The role of T cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in IL-12-mediated antitumor effects was determined by a (51)Cr-release cytotoxicity assay. Tumor size and weight were significantly reduced by either weekly intramuscular injection of scIL-12/CMVpDNA or daily intraperitoneal injection of mrIL-12, and tumor became more localized. Survival was significantly increased when treatment started at 1 week of age as compared with that at the 6 weeks of age. Both NK and CD8(+) T cells were involved in the cytotoxicity against tumor cells and their antitumor activity was significantly reduced in tumor-bearing mice. TGF-β also inhibited the antitumor activity of NK and CD8(+) T cells. The immune suppression was completely reversed by IL-12 treatment and partially recovered by anti-TGF-β antibody. We conclude that both IL-12 gene therapy and recombinant protein therapy are effective against PTC. Given that the immune response is significantly suppressed in tumor-bearing mice and can be restored by IL-12, the current study raises a

  9. Late intervention with anti-BRAF(V600E) therapy induces tumor regression in an orthotopic mouse model of human anaplastic thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehs, Matthew A; Nucera, Carmelo; Nagarkatti, Sushruta S; Sadow, Peter M; Morales-Garcia, Dieter; Hodin, Richard A; Parangi, Sareh

    2012-02-01

    Human anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is a lethal disease with an advanced clinical presentation and median survival of 3 months. The BRAF(V600E) oncoprotein is a potent transforming factor that causes human thyroid cancer cell progression in vitro and in vivo; therefore, we sought to target this oncoprotein in a late intervention model of ATC in vivo. We used the human ATC cell line 8505c, which harbors the BRAF(V600E) and TP53(R248G) mutations. Immunocompromised mice were randomized to receive the selective anti-BRAF(V600E) inhibitor, PLX4720, or vehicle by oral gavage 28 d after tumor implantation, 1 wk before all animals typically die due to widespread metastatic lung disease and neck compressive symptoms in this model. Mice were euthanized weekly to evaluate tumor volume and metastases. Control mice showed progressive tumor growth and lung metastases by 35 d after tumor implantation. At that time, all control mice had large tumors, were cachectic, and were euthanized due to their tumor-related weight loss. PLX4720-treated mice, however, showed a significant decrease in tumor volume and lung metastases in addition to a reversal of tumor-related weight loss. Mouse survival was extended to 49 d in PLX4720-treated animals. PLX4720 treatment inhibited cell cycle progression from 28 d to 49 d in vivo. PLX4720 induces striking tumor regression and reversal of cachexia in an in vivo model of advanced thyroid cancer that harbors the BRAF(V600E) mutation.

  10. Initiation of Metastatic Breast Carcinoma by Targeting of the Ductal Epithelium with Adenovirus-Cre: A Novel Transgenic Mouse Model of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svoronos, Nikolaos; Tesone, Amelia J.; Stephen, Tom L.; Perales-Puchalt, Alfredo; Nguyen, Jenny; Zhang, Paul J.; Fiering, Steven N.; Tchou, Julia; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease involving complex cellular interactions between the developing tumor and immune system, eventually resulting in exponential tumor growth and metastasis to distal tissues and the collapse of anti-tumor immunity. Many useful animal models exist to study breast cancer, but none completely recapitulate the disease progression that occurs in humans. In order to gain a better understanding of the cellular interactions that result in the formation of latent metastasis and decreased survival, we have generated an inducible transgenic mouse model of YFP-expressing ductal carcinoma that develops after sexual maturity in immune-competent mice and is driven by consistent, endocrine-independent oncogene expression. Activation of YFP, ablation of p53, and expression of an oncogenic form of K-ras was achieved by the delivery of an adenovirus expressing Cre-recombinase into the mammary duct of sexually mature, virgin female mice. Tumors begin to appear 6 weeks after the initiation of oncogenic events. After tumors become apparent, they progress slowly for approximately two weeks before they begin to grow exponentially. After 7-8 weeks post-adenovirus injection, vasculature is observed connecting the tumor mass to distal lymph nodes, with eventual lymphovascular invasion of YFP+ tumor cells to the distal axillary lymph nodes. Infiltrating leukocyte populations are similar to those found in human breast carcinomas, including the presence of αβ and γδ T cells, macrophages and MDSCs. This unique model will facilitate the study of cellular and immunological mechanisms involved in latent metastasis and dormancy in addition to being useful for designing novel immunotherapeutic interventions to treat invasive breast cancer. PMID:24748051

  11. Quantitative bioluminescence imaging of mouse tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Jen-Chieh; Kung, Andrew L

    2015-01-05

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) has become an essential technique for preclinical evaluation of anticancer therapeutics and provides sensitive and quantitative measurements of tumor burden in experimental cancer models. For light generation, a vector encoding firefly luciferase is introduced into human cancer cells that are grown as tumor xenografts in immunocompromised hosts, and the enzyme substrate luciferin is injected into the host. Alternatively, the reporter gene can be expressed in genetically engineered mouse models to determine the onset and progression of disease. In addition to expression of an ectopic luciferase enzyme, bioluminescence requires oxygen and ATP, thus only viable luciferase-expressing cells or tissues are capable of producing bioluminescence signals. Here, we summarize a BLI protocol that takes advantage of advances in hardware, especially the cooled charge-coupled device camera, to enable detection of bioluminescence in living animals with high sensitivity and a large dynamic range.

  12. Targeted gene therapy and in vivo bioluminescent imaging for monitoring postsurgical recurrence and metastasis in mouse models of liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Q; Yao, C L; Li, L; Xin, Z; Jing, Z K; Li, L X

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of combined targeted gene therapy on recurrence and metastasis after liver cancer resection in nude mice. Twenty BALB/C mice were randomly divided into control and treatment groups with 10 mice in each group and a male/female ratio of 1:1. Luciferase gene-labeled human primary hepatic carcinoma cell line MHCC97-H was then used to prepare a carcinoma model. An optical in vivo imaging technique (OIIT) was used 10 days later to detect the distribution of tumor cells, followed by partial liver resection and gene therapy. In the treatment group, 100 mL phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) containing 1 x 1012 rAAV/AFP/IL-24 gene viral vectors was injected into liver sections and peritumoral posterior peritoneal tissues; in the control group, the same amount of PBS containing 1 x 1012 empty viral vectors was injected at the same sites. OIIT was then used to detect the in vivo tumor metastasis 21 days later. Luciferase gene-labeled human primary hepatic carcinoma cell line MHCC97-H successfully infected 20 nude mice, and OIIT showed that the two groups exhibited metastasis after local tumor resection, but there were more tumor cells in the control group (P < 0.05). rAAV/AFP/IL-24 gene therapy can inhibit recurrence after liver cancer resection. PMID:27525931

  13. The role of inflammation induced by radiation or lipopolysaccharides in the metastatic process in a mouse model of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitterer, Chantal

    Mortality from breast cancer is primarily due to metastatic disease, which often appears years after treatment of the primary tumor. Radiation as well as bacterial infection induces inflammation, which by releasing cytokines can be implicated in metastatic processes. Using in vitro and in vivo models, the ability of radiation to awaken dormant lung metastases was assessed as well as the capacity of a bacterial infection to enhance metastatic progression in already proliferating lung metastases. As models, we used the D2.0R (dormant) and D2A1 (proliferative) cell lines, which are derived from spontaneous murine mammary tumors. The ability of radiation to awaken dormant D2.0R mammary cancer cells was assessed in a 3-dimension (3D) cell culture system, which resulted in the formation of microspheres of cancer cells. The addition of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2; 100ng/m1) or conditioned media from irradiated (5 Gy) CALU-3 human bronchial epithelial cells stimulated the proliferation of the dormant D2.0R cells resulting in microspheres with a larger diameter compared to the untreated cells. Regarding the proliferative D2A1 microspheres, their rate of proliferation was not further increased by adding PGE2 or the conditioned media of irradiated CALU-3 cells. In Balb/c mice bearing dormant lung D2.0R micrometastases, our data showed that a fractionated radiation dose (5x7.5 Gy) to the mammary gland resulted in a significant increase in the development of metastases, as measured 42 days post-irradiation by bioluminescent reaction. We also evaluated whether a bacterial infection could stimulate the growth of D2A1 cancer cells. Gram-negative bacteria release the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that induces an inflammatory response. In lungs of mice treated with LPS, a higher level of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) was measured supporting the induction of an inflammation. This was accompanied by an increase of cell adhesion molecules (VCAM-1 and ICAM-1) 5 hours after treatment. The ability

  14. In vivo suppression of solid Ehrlich cancer via chlorophyllin derivative mediated PDT: an albino mouse tumour model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomaa, Iman; Saraya, Hend; Zekri, Maha; Abdel-Kader, Mahmoud

    2015-03-01

    In this study, copper chlorophyllin was used as a photosensitizer for photodynamic therapy (PDT) in Ehrlich tumour mouse model. Six groups of animals comprising 5 animals per group were subcutaneously transplanted with 1x106 Ehrlich tumour cells. A single dose of 200 μg/gm body weight chlorophylin derivative was administered by intravenous (IV) or intratumoral (IT) routes. Mice were exposed to monochromatic red laser of 630 nm for 1 h, and tumour regression was followed up for three consecutive months post treatment. Several Biochemical, histological and molecular tests were performed in order to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the applied treatment. An interest has been also directed towards investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying chlorophyllin derivative mediated PDT. PDT-treated animals via either the IV or IT routes showed significant decrease in tumour size 72 h post-treatment. Tumours at the IV-PDT group disappeared totally within a week with no recurrence over three months follow up. In the IT-PDT, the decrease in tumour size at the first week was interrupted by a slight increase; however never reached the original size. Histological examination of tumour tissues of the IV-PDT group at 24 h post treatment demonstrated restoring the normal muscle tissue architecture, and the biochemical assays indicated normal liver functions. The immunohistochemical analysis of caspase-3, and the quantitative PCR results of caspases-8 and 9 proved the presence of extrinsic apoptotic pathway after cholorphyllin derivative-mediated PDT. In conclusion IV-PDT strategy proved better cure rate than the IT-PDT, with no recurrence over three months of follow up.

  15. Mouse Model for the Preclinical Study of Metastatic Disease | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute seeks partners for collaborative research to co-develop a mouse model that shows preclinical therapeutic response of residual metastatic disease.

  16. Functional and molecular characterisation of EO771.LMB tumours, a new C57BL/6-mouse-derived model of spontaneously metastatic mammary cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron N. Johnstone

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The translation of basic research into improved therapies for breast cancer patients requires relevant preclinical models that incorporate spontaneous metastasis. We have completed a functional and molecular characterisation of a new isogenic C57BL/6 mouse model of breast cancer metastasis, comparing and contrasting it with the established BALB/c 4T1 model. Metastatic EO771.LMB tumours were derived from poorly metastatic parental EO771 mammary tumours. Functional differences were evaluated using both in vitro assays and spontaneous metastasis assays in mice. Results were compared to non-metastatic 67NR and metastatic 4T1.2 tumours of the 4T1 model. Protein and transcript levels of markers of human breast cancer molecular subtypes were measured in the four tumour lines, as well as p53 (Tp53 tumour-suppressor gene status and responses to tamoxifen in vivo and in vitro. Array-based expression profiling of whole tumours identified genes and pathways that were deregulated in metastatic tumours. EO771.LMB cells metastasised spontaneously to lung in C57BL/6 mice and displayed increased invasive capacity compared with parental EO771. By immunohistochemical assessment, EO771 and EO771.LMB were basal-like, as was the 4T1.2 tumour, whereas 67NR had a luminal phenotype. Primary tumours from all lines were negative for progesterone receptor, Erb-b2/Neu and cytokeratin 5/6, but positive for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. Only 67NR displayed nuclear estrogen receptor alpha (ERα positivity. EO771 and EO771.LMB expressed mutant p53, whereas 67NR and 4T1.2 were p53-null. Integrated molecular analysis of both the EO771/EO771.LMB and 67NR/4T1.2 pairs indicated that upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3, parathyroid hormone-like hormone (Pthlh and S100 calcium binding protein A8 (S100a8 and downregulation of the thrombospondin receptor (Cd36 might be causally involved in metastatic dissemination of breast cancer.

  17. Mouse models for methylmalonic aciduria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi L Peters

    Full Text Available Methylmalonic aciduria (MMA is a disorder of organic acid metabolism resulting from a functional defect of methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM. MMA is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, thus therapies are necessary to help improve quality of life and prevent renal and neurological complications. Transgenic mice carrying an intact human MCM locus have been produced. Four separate transgenic lines were established and characterised as carrying two, four, five or six copies of the transgene in a single integration site. Transgenic mice from the 2-copy line were crossed with heterozygous knockout MCM mice to generate mice hemizygous for the human transgene on a homozygous knockout background. Partial rescue of the uniform neonatal lethality seen in homozygous knockout mice was observed. These rescued mice were significantly smaller than control littermates (mice with mouse MCM gene. Biochemically, these partial rescue mice exhibited elevated methylmalonic acid levels in urine, plasma, kidney, liver and brain tissue. Acylcarnitine analysis of blood spots revealed elevated propionylcarnitine levels. Analysis of mRNA expression confirms the human transgene is expressed at higher levels than observed for the wild type, with highest expression in the kidney followed closely by brain and liver. Partial rescue mouse fibroblast cultures had only 20% of the wild type MCM enzyme activity. It is anticipated that this humanised partial rescue mouse model of MMA will enable evaluation of long-term pathophysiological effects of elevated methylmalonic acid levels and be a valuable model for the investigation of therapeutic strategies, such as cell transplantation.

  18. A study of an effective sunitinib–chemotherapeutic combination regimen for bladder cancer treatment using a mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dah-Shyong Yu

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Combination of the tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor sunitinib with gemcitabine chemotherapy synergistically enhances tumor cytotoxicity and may provide a new treatment modality for advanced bladder cancer.

  19. The Thrombospondin-1 Mimetic ABT-510 Increases the Uptake and Effectiveness of Cisplatin and Paclitaxel in a Mouse Model of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole E. Campbell

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC comprises approximately 90% of ovarian cancers and arises from the surface epithelium. Typical treatment of EOC involves cytoreductive surgery combined with chemotherapy. More recent therapies have targeted the tumor vasculature using antiangiogenic compounds such as thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1. TSP-1 mimetic peptides such as ABT-510 have been created and have been in various clinical trials. We have previously shown that ABT-510 reduces abnormal vasculature associated with tumor tissue and increases the presence of mature blood vessels. It has been hypothesized that treatment with antiangiogenic compounds would allow increased delivery of cytotoxic agents and enhance treatment. In this study, we evaluated the potential role of ABT-510 and various chemotherapeutics (cisplatin and paclitaxel on tumor progression, angiogenesis, and the benefits of combinational treatments on tissue uptake and perfusion using an orthotopic syngeneic mouse model of EOC. Animals were treated with ABT-510 (100 mg/kg per day alone or in combination with cisplatin (2 mg/kg per 3 days or paclitaxel (10 mg/kg per 2 days at 60 days after tumor induction. Radiolabeled and fluorescently labeled paclitaxel demonstrated a significant increase in tumor uptake after ABT-510 treatment. Combined treatment with ABT-510 and cisplatin or paclitaxel resulted in a significant increase in tumor cell and tumor endothelial cell apoptosis and a resultant decrease in ovarian tumor size. Combined treatment also regressed secondary lesions and eliminated the presence of abdominal ascites. The results from this study show that through vessel normalization, ABT-510 increases uptake of chemotherapy drugs and can induce regression of advanced ovarian cancer.

  20. 4-tert-Octylphenol stimulates the expression of cathepsins in human breast cancer cells and xenografted breast tumors of a mouse model via an estrogen receptor-mediated signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Cathepsins B and D were markedly enhanced by octylphenol (OP) in MCF-7 cells. ► OP may accelerate breast cancer cell growth and cathepsins via ER-mediated signaling. ► Breast cancer cells exposed with OP to mouse model were more aggressive. ► OP can promote metastasis through the amplification of cathepsins B and D via ER-mediated signaling pathway. -- Abstract: Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are defined as environmental compounds that modulate steroid hormone receptor-dependent responses an abnormal manner, resulting in adverse health problems for humans such as cancer growth and metastasis. Cathepsins are proteases that have been implicated in cancer progression. However, there have been few studies about the association between cathepsins and estrogenic chemicals during the cancer progression. In this study, we examined the effect(s) of 4-tert-octylphenol (OP), a potent EDC, on the expression of cathepsins B and D in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells and a xenograft mouse model. Treatment with OP significantly induced the proliferation MCF-7 cells in an MTT assay. In addition, the expression of cathepsins B and D was markedly enhanced in MCF-7 cells at both the transcriptional and the translational levels following treatment with E2 or OP up to 48 h. These results demonstrated the ability of OP to disrupt normal transcriptional regulation of cathepsins B and D in human breast cancer cells. However, the effects of OP on cell growth or overexpression of cathepsins by inhibiting ER-mediated signaling were abolished by an ER antagonist and siRNA specific for ERα. In conclusion, our findings suggest that OP at 10−6 M, like E2, may accelerate breast cancer cell proliferation and the expression of cathepsins through an ER-mediated signaling pathway. In addition, the breast cancer cells exposed with OP to a xenograft mouse model were more aggressive according to our histological analysis and showed markedly increased expression of cathepsin

  1. Mouse Xenograft Model for Mesothelioma | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize a new mouse model for monoclonal antibodies and immunoconjugates that target malignant mesotheliomas. Applications of the technology include models for screening compounds as potential therapeutics for mesothelioma and for studying the pathology of mesothelioma.

  2. SIRT1 catalytic activity has little effect on tumor formation and metastases in a mouse model of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine V Clark-Knowles

    Full Text Available The protein deacetylase SIRT1 has been implicated in the regulation of a large number of cellular processes that are thought to be required for cancer initiation and progression. There are conflicting data that make it unclear whether Sirt1 functions as an oncogene or tumor suppressor. To assess the effect of SIRT1 on the emergence and progression of mammary tumors, we crossed mice that harbor a point mutation that abolishes SIRT1 catalytic activity with mice carrying the polyoma middle T transgene driven by the murine mammary tumor virus promoter (MMTV-PyMT. The absence of SIRT1 catalytic activity neither accelerated nor blocked the formation of tumors and metastases in this model. There was a lag in tumor latency that modestly extended survival in Sirt1 mutant mice that we attribute to a delay in mammary gland development and not to a direct effect of SIRT1 on carcinogenesis. These results are consistent with previous evidence suggesting that Sirt1 is not a tumor promoter or a tumor suppressor.

  3. Computerized segmentation algorithm with personalized atlases of murine MRIs in a SV40 large T-antigen mouse mammary cancer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Adam R.; Markiewicz, Erica; Mustafi, Devkumar; Fan, Xiaobing; Conzen, Suzanne; Karczmar, Greg; Giger, Maryellen L.

    2016-03-01

    Quantities of MRI data, much larger than can be objectively and efficiently analyzed manually, are routinely generated in preclinical research. We aim to develop an automated image segmentation and registration pipeline to aid in analysis of image data from our high-throughput 9.4 Tesla small animal MRI imaging center. T2-weighted, fat-suppressed MRIs were acquired over 4 life-cycle time-points [up to 12 to 18 weeks] of twelve C3(1) SV40 Large T-antigen mice for a total of 46 T2-weighted MRI volumes; each with a matrix size of 192 x 256, 62 slices, in plane resolution 0.1 mm, and slice thickness 0.5 mm. These image sets were acquired with the goal of tracking and quantifying progression of mammary intraepithelial neoplasia (MIN) to invasive cancer in mice, believed to be similar to ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in humans. Our segmentation algorithm takes 2D seed-points drawn by the user at the center of the 4 co-registered volumes associated with each mouse. The level set then evolves in 3D from these 2D seeds. The contour evolution incorporates texture information, edge information, and a statistical shape model in a two-step process. Volumetric DICE coefficients comparing the automatic with manual segmentations were computed and ranged between 0.75 and 0.58 for averages over the 4 life-cycle time points of the mice. Incorporation of these personalized atlases with intra and inter mouse registration is expected to enable locally and globally tracking of the morphological and textural changes in the mammary tissue and associated lesions of these mice.

  4. Functional imaging of the angiogenic switch in a transgenic mouse model of human breast cancer by dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolino, Lorena; Longo, Dario Livio; Dastrù, Walter; Cutrin, Juan Carlos; Dettori, Daniela; Lanzardo, Stefania; Oliviero, Salvatore; Cavallo, Federica; Aime, Silvio

    2016-07-15

    Tumour progression depends on several sequential events that include the microenvironment remodelling processes and the switch to the angiogenic phenotype, leading to new blood vessels recruitment. Non-invasive imaging techniques allow the monitoring of functional alterations in tumour vascularity and cellularity. The aim of this work was to detect functional changes in vascularisation and cellularity through Dynamic Contrast Enhanced (DCE) and Diffusion Weighted (DW) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) modalities during breast cancer initiation and progression of a transgenic mouse model (BALB-neuT mice). Histological examination showed that BALB-neuT mammary glands undergo a slow neoplastic progression from simple hyperplasia to invasive carcinoma, still preserving normal parts of mammary glands. DCE-MRI results highlighted marked functional changes in terms of vessel permeability (K(trans) , volume transfer constant) and vascularisation (vp , vascular volume fraction) in BALB-neuT hyperplastic mammary glands if compared to BALB/c ones. When breast tissue progressed from simple to atypical hyperplasia, a strong increase in DCE-MRI biomarkers was observed in BALB-neuT in comparison to BALB/c mice (K(trans)  = 5.3 ± 0.7E-4 and 3.1 ± 0.5E-4; vp  = 7.4 ± 0.8E-2 and 4.7 ± 0.6E-2 for BALB-neuT and BALB/c, respectively) that remained constant during the successive steps of the neoplastic transformation. Consistent with DCE-MRI observations, microvessel counting revealed a significant increase in tumour vessels. Our study showed that DCE-MRI estimates can accurately detect the angiogenic switch at early step of breast cancer carcinogenesis. These results support the view that this imaging approach is an excellent tool to characterize microvasculature changes, despite only small portions of the mammary glands developed neoplastic lesions in a transgenic mouse model. PMID:26941084

  5. Phospho-Ibuprofen (MDC-917) Is a Novel Agent against Colon Cancer: Efficacy, Metabolism, and Pharmacokinetics in Mouse Models

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Gang; Sun, Yu; Nie, Ting; Mackenzie, Gerardo G.; Huang, Liqun; Kopelovich, Levy; Komninou, Despina; Rigas, Basil

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a novel chemical modification of conventional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to reduce their toxicity and enhance their efficacy. Phospho-ibuprofen [(PI) 2-(4-isobutyl-phenyl)-propionic acid-4-(diethoxy-phosphoryloxy)-butyl ester (MDC-917)], a novel derivative of ibuprofen, strongly inhibited the growth of human colon cancer cells in vitro and SW480 human colon cancer xenografts in nude mice. PI was metabolized minimally by cultured cells, but extensively by liver micr...

  6. Vitamin D for combination photodynamic therapy of skin cancer in individuals with vitamin D deficiency: Insights from a preclinical study in a mouse model of squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Sanjay; Thomas, Erik; Hasan, Tayyaba; Maytin, Edward V.

    2016-03-01

    Combination photodynamic therapy (cPDT) in which vitamin D (VD) is given prior to aminolevulinate, a precursor (pro-drug) for protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), is an approach developed in our laboratory. We previously showed that 1α,25- dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol), given prior to PDT, enhances accumulation of PpIX and improves cell death post-PDT in a mouse skin cancer model. However, since calcitriol poses a risk for hypercalcemia, we replaced systemic calcitriol with oral cholecalciferol (D3), administered as a high (tenfold, "10K") diet over a ten-day period. Here, we ask whether VD deficiency might alter the response to cPDT. Nude mice were fed a VD-deficient diet for at least 4 weeks ("deficient"); controls were fed a normal 1,000 IU/kg diet ("1K"). Human A431 cells were implanted subcutaneously and mice were switched to the 10K diet or continued on their baseline diets (controls). In other experiments, mice received a human equivalent dose of 50,000 IU D3 by oral gavage, to simulate administration of a single, high-dose VD pill. At various times, tumors were harvested and serum was collected to measure levels of VD metabolic intermediates. A significant increase in PpIX levels and in the expression of differentiation and proliferation markers in tumor tissue was observed after VD supplementation of both the deficient and 1K mice. Further results describing mechanistic details of PpIX enhancement through alteration of heme- and VD-metabolic enzyme levels will be presented. Based on these results, a clinical study using oral vitamin D prior to PDT for human skin cancer should be performed.

  7. N-hydroxylation of 4-aminobiphenyl by CYP2E1 produces oxidative stress in a mouse model of chemically induced liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuang; Sugamori, Kim S; Tung, Aveline; McPherson, J Peter; Grant, Denis M

    2015-04-01

    4-Aminobiphenyl (ABP) is a trace component of cigarette smoke and hair dyes, a suspected human carcinogen and a potent rodent liver carcinogen. Postnatal exposure of mice to ABP results in a higher incidence of liver tumors in males than in females, paralleling the sex difference in human liver cancer incidence. A traditional model of ABP tumorigenesis involves initial CYP1A2-mediated N-hydroxylation, which eventually leads to production of mutagenic ABP-DNA adducts that initiate tumor growth. However, several studies have found no correlation between sex or CYP1A2 function and the DNA-damaging, mutagenic, or tumorigenic effects of ABP. Oxidative stress may be an important etiological factor for liver cancer, and it has also been linked to ABP exposure. The goals of this study were to identify novel enzyme(s) that contribute to ABP N-oxidation, and to investigate a potential role for oxidative stress in ABP liver tumorigenicity. Isozyme-selective inhibition experiments using liver microsomes from wild-type and genetically modified mice identified CYP2E1 as a major ABP N-hydroxylating enzyme. The N-hydroxylation of ABP by transiently expressed CYP2E1 produced oxidative stress in cultured mouse hepatoma cells. In vivo postnatal exposure of mice to a tumorigenic dose of ABP also produced oxidative stress in male wild-type mice, but not in male Cyp2e1(-/-) mice or in female mice. However, a stronger NRF2-associated antioxidant response was observed in females. Our results identify CYP2E1 as a novel ABP-N-oxidizing enzyme, and suggest that sex differences in CYP2E1-dependent oxidative stress and antioxidant responses to ABP may contribute to the observed sex difference in tumor incidence. PMID:25601990

  8. Variable epitope library carrying heavily mutated survivin-derived CTL epitope variants as a new class of efficient vaccine immunogen tested in a mouse model of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NoeDominguez-Romero, Allan; Zamora-Alvarado, Rubén; Servín-Blanco, Rodolfo; Pérez-Hernández, Erendira G; Castrillon-Rivera, Laura E; Munguia, Maria Elena; Acero, Gonzalo; Govezensky, Tzipe; Gevorkian, Goar; Manoutcharian, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The antigenic variability of tumor cells leading to dynamic changes in cancer epitope landscape along with escape from immune surveillance by down-regulating tumor antigen expression/presentation and immune tolerance are major obstacles for the design of effective vaccines. We have developed a novel concept for immunogen construction based on introduction of massive mutations within the epitopes targeting antigenically variable pathogens and diseases. Previously, we showed that these immunogens carrying large combinatorial libraries of mutated epitope variants, termed as variable epitope libraries (VELs), induce potent, broad and long lasting CD8+IFN-γ+ T-cell response as well as HIV-neutralizing antibodies. In this proof-of-concept study, we tested immunogenic properties and anti-tumor effects of the VELs bearing survivin-derived CTL epitope (GWEPDDNPI) variants in an aggressive metastatic mouse 4T1 breast tumor model. The constructed VELs had complexities of 10,500 and 8,000 individual members, generated as combinatorial M13 phage display and synthetic peptide libraries, respectively, with structural composition GWXPXDXPI, where X is any of 20 natural amino acids. Statistically significant tumor growth inhibition was observed in BALB/c mice immunized with the VELs in both prophylactic and therapeutic settings. Vaccinated mice developed epitope-specific spleen cell and CD8+ IFN-γ+ T-cell responses that recognize more than 50% of the panel of 87 mutated epitope variants, as demonstrated in T-cell proliferation assays and FACS analysis. These data indicate the feasibility of the application of this new class of immunogens based on VEL concept as an alternative approach for the development of molecular vaccines against cancer.

  9. Genetic and pharmacological inactivation of the purinergic P2RX7 receptor dampens inflammation but increases tumor incidence in a mouse model of colitis-associated cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, Paul; Cherfils-Vicini, Julien; Bazin, Marie; Ilie, Marius; Juhel, Thierry; Hébuterne, Xavier; Gilson, Eric; Schmid-Alliana, Annie; Boyer, Olivier; Adriouch, Sahil; Vouret-Craviari, Valérie

    2015-03-01

    Colitis-associated cancer (CAC) is a complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Binding of extracellular ATP to the purinergic receptor P2RX7 has emerged as a critical event in controlling intestinal inflammation, acting to limit elevation of proinflammatory mast cells and cytokines and promote survival of regulatory T cells (Treg) and enteric neurons. In this study, we investigated the effect of P2RX7 blockade in an established mouse model of CAC. Using genetic and pharmacologic tools, we found unexpectedly that while P2RX7 mediated inflammatory responses, it also acted at an early time to suppress CAC development. P2RX7 blockade enhanced proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells and protected them from apoptosis. The proliferative effects of P2RX7 blockade were associated with an increased production of TGFβ1 that was sufficient to stimulate the proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells. Finally, P2RX7 blockade also altered immune cell infiltration and promoted Treg accumulation within lesions of the digestive system. Taken together, our findings reveal an unexpected role for P2RX7 in preventing CAC, suggesting cautions in the use of P2RX7 inhibitors to treat IBD given the possibility of increasing risks CAC as a result. PMID:25564520

  10. Therapeutic application of injectable thermosensitive hydrogel in preventing local breast cancer recurrence and improving incision wound healing in a mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Na; Gong, Changyang; Qian, Zhiyong; Luo, Feng; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Helan; Wei, Yuquan

    2012-08-01

    Many drug delivery systems (DDSs) have been investigated for local targeting of malignant disease with the intention of increasing anti-tumor activity and minimizing systemic toxicity. An injectable thermosensitive hydrogel was applied to prevent locoregional recurrence of 4T1 breast cancer in a mouse model. The presented hydrogel, which is based on poly(ethyleneglycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-PCL-PEG, PECE), flows freely at normal temperature, forms a gel within seconds in situ at body temperature, and eventually releases the drug in a consistent and sustained fashion as it gradually biodegrades. Locoregional recurrence after primary tumor removal was significantly inhibited in mice treated with the paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded PECE hydrogel subcutaneously (9.1%) administered, compared with the blank hydrogel (80.0%), systemic (77.8%) and locally (75.0%) administered PTX, and the control group (100%) (P 0.05), in agreement with histopathological examinations. This novel DDSs represents a promising approach for local adjuvant therapy in malignant disease.

  11. Collagen induced arthritis increases secondary metastasis in MMTV-PyV MT mouse model of mammary cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruber Helen E

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have demonstrated that sites of chronic inflammation are often associated with the establishment and growth of various malignancies. A common inflammatory condition in humans is autoimmune arthritis (AA. Although AA and cancer are different diseases, many of the underlying processes that contribute to the disorders of the joints and connective tissue that characterize AA also affect cancer progression and metastasis. Systemically, AA can lead to cellular infiltration and inflammation of the lungs. Several studies have reported statistically significant risk ratios between AA and breast cancer. Despite this knowledge being available, there has been minimal research linking breast cancer, arthritis, and metastasis associated with breast cancer. Notably both diseases are extremely prevalent in older post-menopausal women. Methods To establish the novel link between arthritis induced inflammation and secondary metastasis associated with breast cancer, PyV MT mice that spontaneously develop mammary gland carcinoma were injected with Type II collagen (CII to induce arthritis at 9 and 18 weeks of age for pre-metastatic and metastatic condition. The sites of secondary metastasis and the associated inflammatory microenvironment were evaluated. Results A significant increase in breast cancer-associated secondary metastasis to the lungs and bones was observed in the arthritic versus the non-arthritic PyV MT mice along with an increase in primary tumor burden. We report significant increases in the levels of interstitial cellular infiltrates and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-17 (IL-17, interleukin-6 (IL-6, Pro- Matrix metallopeptidase 9 (Pro-MMP9, insulin like growth factor-II (GF-II and macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF in the arthritic lung and bone milieu as well as in the circulation. These pro-inflammatory cytokines along with the inflammatory microenvironment may be the underlying factors

  12. Mouse models of congenital cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graw, J

    1999-06-01

    Mouse mutants affecting lens development are excellent models for corresponding human disorders. The mutant aphakia has been characterised by bilaterally aphakic eyes (Varnum and Stevens, J Hered 1968;59:147-50); the corresponding gene was mapped to chromosome 19 (Varnum and Stevens, Mouse News Lett 1975;53:35). Recent investigations in our laboratory refined the linkage of 0.6 cM proximal to the marker D19Mit10. Several candidate genes have been excluded (Chuk1, Fgf8, Lbp1, Npm3, Pax2, Pitx3). The Cat3 mutations are characterised by vacuolated lenses caused by alterations in the initial secondary lens fibre cell differentiation. Secondary malformations develop at the cornea and iris, but the retina remains unaffected. The mutation has been mapped to chromosome 10 close to the markers D10Mit41 and D10Mit95. Several candidate genes have been excluded (Dcn, Elk3, Ldc, Mell8, Tr2-11). The series of Cat2 mutations have been mapped close to the gamma-crystallin genes (Cryg; Löster et al., Genomics 1994;23:240-2). The Cat2nop mutation is characterised by a mutation in the third exon of Crygb leading to a truncated gamma B-crystallin and the termination of lens fibre cell differentiation. The Cat2 mutants are interesting models for human cataracts caused by mutations in the human CRYG genes at chromosome 2q32-35. PMID:10627821

  13. Treatment with rhenium-188-perrhenate and iodine-131 of NIS-expressing mammary cancer in a mouse model remarkably inhibited tumor growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadachova, Ekaterina [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States)]. E-mail: edadacho@aecom.yu.edu; Nguyen, Andrew [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Lin, Elaine Y. [Department of Developmental and Molecular Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Gnatovskiy, Leo [Department of Developmental and Molecular Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Lu, Ping [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Pollard, Jeffrey W. [Department of Developmental and Molecular Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States)

    2005-10-01

    Introduction: Novel therapeutic modalities are needed for breast cancer patients in whom standard treatments are not effective. Mammary gland sodium/iodide symporter has been identified as a molecular target in breast cancers in humans and in some transgenic mouse models. We report the results of a therapy study with {sup 131}I{sup -} and {sup 188}ReO{sub 4} {sup -} of breast cancer in polyoma middle T oncoprotein (PyMT) transgenic mice endogenously expressing the Na{sup +}/I{sup -} symporter (NIS). Methods: PyMT mice (12-13 weeks old) with one palpable tumor of 0.5-0.8 cm in diameter were used. For the therapy studies, PyMT mice were (1) treated with two intraperitoneal injections of 1.5 mCi of {sup 188}ReO{sub 4} {sup -} 1 week apart, (2) pretreated for 1 week with 5 {mu}g of triiodothyronine (T3) followed by two intraperitoneal injections of 1.5 mCi of {sup 131}I{sup -} 1 week apart or (3) left untreated. The tumor and normal organ uptakes were assessed by scintigraphic imaging. The thyroid function of treated and control animals was evaluated at the completion of the study by measuring the T3/thyroxine (T4) ratio in their blood. Results: There was significant uptake of {sup 131}I{sup -} and {sup 188}ReO{sub 4} {sup -} in the primary palpable tumors as well as in nonpalpable tumors, stomachs and thyroids. The tumor uptake after the second injection was 10 times lower in comparison with the first injection. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited in both the {sup 131}I{sup -} and {sup 188}ReO{sub 4} {sup -} groups in comparison with the control group, and tumors in the {sup 188}ReO{sub 4} {sup -} group increased in size significantly less than in the {sup 131}I{sup -} group. The T3/T4 ratios were calculated to be 27 and 25 for the control group and the {sup 188}ReO{sub 4} {sup -} group, respectively; for {sup 131}I{sup -}, both the T3 and T4 levels were below detection limit, demonstrating much less effect on the thyroids of treatment with {sup 188}ReO{sub 4

  14. Effects of CXCR4 siRNA/dextran-spermine nanoparticles on CXCR4 expression and serum LDH levels in a mouse model of colorectal cancer metastasis to the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liver metastasis is the main cause of mortality related to colorectal cancer. CXCR4 is necessary for the outgrowth of colon cancer micrometastases. In oncology, it has been demonstrated that several human tumors release lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) into the circulation. CXCR4 gene expression and serum LDH levels are often increased in patients with colorectal cancer. Despite technological advances in cancer therapy, five-year overall survival is still around 50%. Therefore, better treatment needs to be developed. RNA interference (RNAi) is a modern and powerful tool for inhibition of gene expression. However, the rate-limiting step in this technology is effective delivery of RNAi agents. We have investigated a novel strategy of CXCR4 siRNA therapy and its effect on serum LDH levels in a BALB/C mouse model of colorectal cancer metastasis to the liver. Hepatic metastasis was established by injecting a CT26.WT mouse colon carcinoma cell line via the tail vein. Our results demonstrated that CXCR4 siRNA/ dextran-spermine nanoparticles achieved high silencing efficiency with low toxicity. Favorable localization of the nanoparticles was confirmed with CXCR4 gene expression in the liver, that was correlated with serum LDH levels. More research will be needed to determine the effect of CXCR4 silencing on serum LDH levels, which may be a useful marker for predicting liver metastasis in colorectal cancer

  15. A multimodality imaging model to track viable breast cancer cells from single arrest to metastasis in the mouse brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkins, Katie M.; Hamilton, Amanda M.; Makela, Ashley V.; Chen, Yuanxin; Foster, Paula J.; Ronald, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular MRI involves sensitive visualization of iron-labeled cells in vivo but cannot differentiate between dead and viable cells. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) measures cellular viability, and thus we explored combining these tools to provide a more holistic view of metastatic cancer cell fate in mice. Human breast carcinoma cells stably expressing Firefly luciferase were loaded with iron particles, injected into the left ventricle, and BLI and MRI were performed on days 0, 8, 21 and 28. The number of brain MR signal voids (i.e., iron-loaded cells) on day 0 significantly correlated with BLI signal. Both BLI and MRI signals decreased from day 0 to day 8, indicating a loss of viable cells rather than a loss of iron label. Total brain MR tumour volume on day 28 also correlated with BLI signal. Overall, BLI complemented our sensitive cellular MRI technologies well, allowing us for the first time to screen animals for successful injections, and, in addition to MR measures of cell arrest and tumor burden, provided longitudinal measures of cancer cell viability in individual animals. We predict this novel multimodality molecular imaging framework will be useful for evaluating the efficacy of emerging anti-cancer drugs at different stages of the metastatic cascade. PMID:27767185

  16. Keratoacanthoma Pathobiology in Mouse Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine N. Gibson-Corley

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently we described skin tumors driven by skin-specific expression of Zmiz1 and here we define keratoacanthoma pathobiology in this mouse model. Similar to human keratoacanthoma development, we were able to segregate murine keratoacanthomas into three developmental phases: growth, maturation, and regression. These tumors had areas with cellular atypia, high mitotic rate, and minor local invasion in the growth phase, but with development they transitioned to maturation and regression phases with evidence of resolution. The early aggressive appearance could easily be misdiagnosed as a malignant change if the natural pathobiology was not well-defined in the model. To corroborate these findings in the Zmiz1 model, we examined squamous skin tumors from another tumor study in aging mice, and these tumors followed a similar biological progression. Lastly, we were able to evaluate the utility of the model to assess immune cell infiltration (F4/80, B220 Granzyme B, CD3 cells, arginase-1 in the regression phase; however, because inflammation was present at all phases of development, a more comprehensive approach will be needed in future investigations. Our study of keratoacanthomas in selected murine models suggests that these squamous tumors can appear histologically aggressive during early development, but with time will enter a regression phase indicating a benign biology. Importantly, studies of squamous skin tumor models should be cautious in tumor diagnosis as the early growth distinction between malignant versus benign based solely on histopathology may not be easily discerned without longitudinal studies to confirm the tumor pathobiology.

  17. Selective expression of myosin IC Isoform A in mouse and human cell lines and mouse prostate cancer tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanna Ihnatovych

    Full Text Available Myosin IC is a single headed member of the myosin superfamily. We recently identified a novel isoform and showed that the MYOIC gene in mammalian cells encodes three isoforms (isoforms A, B, and C. Furthermore, we demonstrated that myosin IC isoform A but not isoform B exhibits a tissue specific expression pattern. In this study, we extended our analysis of myosin IC isoform expression patterns by analyzing the protein and mRNA expression in various mammalian cell lines and in various prostate specimens and tumor tissues from the transgenic mouse prostate (TRAMP model by immunoblotting, qRT-PCR, and by indirect immunohistochemical staining of paraffin embedded prostate specimen. Analysis of a panel of mammalian cell lines showed an increased mRNA and protein expression of specifically myosin IC isoform A in a panel of human and mouse prostate cancer cell lines but not in non-cancer prostate or other (non-prostate- cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrate that myosin IC isoform A expression is significantly increased in TRAMP mouse prostate samples with prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN lesions and in distant site metastases in lung and liver when compared to matched normal tissues. Our observations demonstrate specific changes in the expression of myosin IC isoform A that are concurrent with the occurrence of prostate cancer in the TRAMP mouse prostate cancer model that closely mimics clinical prostate cancer. These data suggest that elevated levels of myosin IC isoform A may be a potential marker for the detection of prostate cancer.

  18. Mouse model of intracerebellar haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tijjani Salihu, Abubakar; Muthuraju, Sangu; Aziz Mohamed Yusoff, Abdul; Ahmad, Farizan; Zulkifli Mustafa, Mohd; Jaafar, Hasnan; Idris, Zamzuri; Rahman Izaini Ghani, Abdul; Malin Abdullah, Jafri

    2016-10-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the behavior and neuronal morphological changes in the perihaemorrhagic tissue of the mouse intracerebellar haemorrhage experimental model. Adult male Swiss albino mice were stereotactically infused with collagenase type VII (0.4U/μl of saline) unilaterally in to the cerebellum, following anaesthesia. Motor deficits were assessed using open field and composite score for evaluating the mouse model of cerebellar ataxia at 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 days after collagenase infusion. The animals were sacrificed at the same time interval for evaluation of perihaematomal neuronal degeneration using haematoxylin and eosin staining and Annexin V-FITC/Propidium iodide assay. At the end of the study, it was found that infusion of 0.4U collagenase produces significant locomotor and ataxic deficit in the mice especially within the first week post surgery, and that this gradually improved within three weeks. Neuronal degeneration evident by cytoplasmic shrinkage and nuclear pyknosis was observed at the perihaematomal area after one day; especially at 3 and 7 days post haemorrhage. By 21 days, both the haematoma and degenerating neurons in the perihaematomal area were phagocytosed and the remaining neuronal cells around the scar tissue appeared normal. Moreover, Annexin-V/propidium iodide-positive cells were observed at the perihaematomal area at 3 and 7 days implying that the neurons likely die via apoptosis. It was concluded that a population of potentially salvageable neurons exist in the perihaematomal area after cerebellar haemorrhage throughout a wide time window that could be amenable to treatment. PMID:27327104

  19. Adoptive immunotherapy of human pancreatic cancer with lymphokine-activated killer cells and interleukin-2 in a nude mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pancreatic cancer cell line was grown in orthotopic and heterotopic positions in young Swiss/NIH nude mice, which were tested with adoptive immunotherapy. Mice were injected with 1 x 10(7) human cancer cells in the subcutaneous tissue and duodenal lobe of the pancreas. The mice were randomly divided into four groups: group IA (LAK + IL-2) (N = 25) received 2 X 10(7) human lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells from normal donors by tail vein injection followed by 10,000 units of human recombinant interleukin-2 (IL-2) given intraperitoneally every 12 hours for 28 days; group IB (IL-2) (N = 27) was given the same dose of IL-2 alone; group IC (RPMI-1640) (N = 18) received a placebo consisting of 1 ml of RPMI-1640 intraperitoneally every 12 hours; and group ID (LAK) (N = 14) received 2 X 10(7) LAK cells but no IL-2. Toxicity was significantly higher in group IB, with a mortality rate of 45.5% (10/22 animals) versus a 0% mortality (0/25) in group IA. None of the group IA or IB animals died of pancreatic cancer during the experiment. The animals that did not receive IL-2 died before 28 days in 14.2% of group IC and in 16.7% of group ID. The area under the growth curve of subcutaneous tumors during the course of treatment and the pancreatic tumor weight at the end of treatment were compared in each group. Subcutaneous tumors had a reduced rate of growth in group IA animals compared to all the other treatments. Pancreatic tumor growth was slowed in group IA. The animals treated with IL-2 alone (group IB) showed some slowing of tumor growth that was intermediate between group IA, group IC, and group ID. A similar experiment was done with irradiated (375 rad) mice. Nine nude mice with tumors were treated with LAK + IL-2 (group IIA), eight received IL-2 alone (group IIB), and seven received placebo (group IIC)

  20. Evaluation of Efficacy of Radioimmunotherapy with 90Y-Labeled Fully Human Anti-Transferrin Receptor Monoclonal Antibody in Pancreatic Cancer Mouse Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Sugyo

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive tumor and the prognosis remains poor. Therefore, development of more effective therapy is needed. We previously reported that 89Zr-labeled TSP-A01, an antibody against transferrin receptor (TfR, is highly accumulated in a pancreatic cancer xenograft, but not in major normal organs. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of radioimmunotherapy (RIT with 90Y-TSP-A01 in pancreatic cancer mouse models.TfR expression in pancreatic cancer cell lines (AsPC-1, BxPC-3, MIAPaCa-2 was evaluated by immunofluorescence staining. 111In-labeled anti-TfR antibodies (TSP-A01, TSP-A02 were evaluated in vitro by cell binding assay with the three cell lines and by competitive inhibition assay with MIAPaCa-2. In vivo biodistribution was evaluated in mice bearing BxPC-3 and MIAPaCa-2 xenografts. Tumor volumes of BxPC-3 and MIAPaCa-2 were sequentially measured after 90Y-TSP-A01 injection and histological analysis of tumors was conducted.MIAPaCa-2 cells showed the highest TfR expression, followed by AsPC-1 and BxPC-3 cells. 111In-TSP-A01 and 111In-TSP-A02 bound specifically to the three cell lines according to TfR expression. The dissociation constants for TSP-A01, DOTA-TSP-A01, TSP-A02, and DOTA-TSP-A02 were 0.22, 0.28, 0.17, and 0.22 nM, respectively. 111In-TSP-A01 was highly accumulated in tumors, especially in MIAPaCa-2, but this was not true of 111In-TSP-A02. The absorbed dose for 90Y-TSP-A01 was estimated to be 8.3 Gy/MBq to BxPC-3 and 12.4 Gy/MBq to MIAPaCa-2. MIAPaCa-2 tumors treated with 3.7 MBq of 90Y-TSP-A01 had almost completely disappeared around 3 weeks after injection and regrowth was not observed. Growth of BxPC-3 tumors was inhibited by 3.7 MBq of 90Y-TSP-A01, but the tumor size was not reduced.90Y-TSP-A01 treatment achieved an almost complete response in MIAPaCa-2 tumors, whereas it merely inhibited the growth of BxPC-3 tumors. 90Y-TSP-A01 is a promising RIT agent for pancreatic cancer, although further

  1. Benzyl Isothiocyanate Inhibits Prostate Cancer Development in the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) Model, Which Is Associated with the Induction of Cell Cycle G1 Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Han Jin; Lim, Do Young; Kwon, Gyoo Taik; Kim, Ji Hee; Huang, Zunnan; Song, Hyerim; Oh, Yoon Sin; Kang, Young-Hee; Lee, Ki Won; Dong, Zigang; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) is a hydrolysis product of glucotropaeolin, a compound found in cruciferous vegetables, and has been shown to have anti-tumor properties. In the present study, we investigated whether BITC inhibits the development of prostate cancer in the transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice. Five-week old, male TRAMP mice and their nontransgenic littermates were gavage-fed with 0, 5, or 10 mg/kg of BITC every day for 19 weeks. The weight of the genitourinary tract increased markedly in TRAMP mice and this increase was suppressed significantly by BITC feeding. H and E staining of the dorsolateral lobes of the prostate demonstrated that well-differentiated carcinoma (WDC) was a predominant feature in the TRAMP mice. The number of lobes with WDC was reduced by BITC feeding while that of lobes with prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia was increased. BITC feeding reduced the number of cells expressing Ki67 (a proliferation marker), cyclin A, cyclin D1, and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)2 in the prostatic tissue. In vitro cell culture results revealed that BITC decreased DNA synthesis, as well as CDK2 and CDK4 activity in TRAMP-C2 mouse prostate cancer cells. These results indicate that inhibition of cell cycle progression contributes to the inhibition of prostate cancer development in TRAMP mice treated with BITC. PMID:26907265

  2. Benzyl Isothiocyanate Inhibits Prostate Cancer Development in the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma Mouse Prostate (TRAMP Model, Which Is Associated with the Induction of Cell Cycle G1 Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Jin Cho

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC is a hydrolysis product of glucotropaeolin, a compound found in cruciferous vegetables, and has been shown to have anti-tumor properties. In the present study, we investigated whether BITC inhibits the development of prostate cancer in the transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate (TRAMP mice. Five-week old, male TRAMP mice and their nontransgenic littermates were gavage-fed with 0, 5, or 10 mg/kg of BITC every day for 19 weeks. The weight of the genitourinary tract increased markedly in TRAMP mice and this increase was suppressed significantly by BITC feeding. H and E staining of the dorsolateral lobes of the prostate demonstrated that well-differentiated carcinoma (WDC was a predominant feature in the TRAMP mice. The number of lobes with WDC was reduced by BITC feeding while that of lobes with prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia was increased. BITC feeding reduced the number of cells expressing Ki67 (a proliferation marker, cyclin A, cyclin D1, and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK2 in the prostatic tissue. In vitro cell culture results revealed that BITC decreased DNA synthesis, as well as CDK2 and CDK4 activity in TRAMP-C2 mouse prostate cancer cells. These results indicate that inhibition of cell cycle progression contributes to the inhibition of prostate cancer development in TRAMP mice treated with BITC.

  3. Influence of dietary fat type on benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] biotransformation in a B(a)P-induced mouse model of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diggs, Deacqunita L; Myers, Jeremy N; Banks, Leah D; Niaz, Mohammad S; Hood, Darryl B; Roberts, L Jackson; Ramesh, Aramandla

    2013-12-01

    In the US alone, around 60,000 lives/year are lost due to colon cancer. Diet and environment have been implicated in the development of sporadic colon tumors. The objective of this study was to determine how dietary fat potentiates the development of colon tumors through altered B(a)P biotransformation, using the Adenomatous polyposis coli with Multiple intestinal neoplasia mouse model. Benzo(a)pyrene was administered to mice through tricaprylin, and unsaturated (USF; peanut oil) and saturated (SF; coconut oil) fats at doses of 50 and 100 μg/kg via oral gavage over a 60-day period. Blood, colon, and liver were collected at the end of exposure period. The expression of B(a)P biotransformation enzymes [cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A1, CYP1B1 and glutathione-S-transferase] in liver and colon were assayed at the level of protein, mRNA and activities. Plasma and tissue samples were analyzed by reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography for B(a)P metabolites. Additionally, DNA isolated from colon and liver tissues was analyzed for B(a)P-induced DNA adducts by the (32)P-postlabeling method using a thin-layer chromatography system. Benzo(a)pyrene exposure through dietary fat altered its metabolic fate in a dose-dependent manner, with 100 μg/kg dose group registering an elevated expression of B(a)P biotransformation enzymes, and greater concentration of B(a)P metabolites, compared to the 50 μg/kg dose group (Pcolon and liver, whose concentrations also registered a dose-dependent increase. These metabolites were found to bind with DNA and form B(a)P-DNA adducts, which may have contributed to colon tumors in a subchronic exposure regimen.

  4. Mouse Models for Filovirus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly L. Warfield

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The filoviruses marburg- and ebolaviruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever (HF in humans and nonhuman primates. Because many cases have occurred in geographical areas lacking a medical research infrastructure, most studies of the pathogenesis of filoviral HF, and all efforts to develop drugs and vaccines, have been carried out in biocontainment laboratories in non-endemic countries, using nonhuman primates (NHPs, guinea pigs and mice as animal models. NHPs appear to closely mirror filoviral HF in humans (based on limited clinical data, but only small numbers may be used in carefully regulated experiments; much research is therefore done in rodents. Because of their availability in large numbers and the existence of a wealth of reagents for biochemical and immunological testing, mice have become the preferred small animal model for filovirus research. Since the first experiments following the initial 1967 marburgvirus outbreak, wild-type or mouse-adapted viruses have been tested in immunocompetent or immunodeficient mice. In this paper, we review how these types of studies have been used to investigate the pathogenesis of filoviral disease, identify immune responses to infection and evaluate antiviral drugs and vaccines. We also discuss the strengths and weaknesses of murine models for filovirus research, and identify important questions for further study.

  5. Mouse Model of Devil Facial Tumour Disease establishes that an effective immune response can be generated against the cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry L Pinfold

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The largest carnivorous marsupial in Australia, the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii is facing extinction in the wild due to a transmissible cancer known as Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD. DFTD is a clonal cell line transmitted from host to host with 100% mortality and no known immunity. While it was first considered that low genetic diversity of the population of devils enabled the allograft transmission of DFTD recent evidence reveals that genetically diverse animals succumb to the disease. The lack of an immune response against the DFTD tumor cells may be due to a lack of immunogenicity of the tumor cells. This could facilitate transmission between devils. To test immunogenicity, mice were injected with viable DFTD cells and anti-DFTD immune responses analyzed. A range of antibody isotypes against DFTD cells was detected, indicating that as DFTD cells can induce an immune response they are immunogenic. This was supported by cytokine production, when splenocytes from mice injected with DFTD cells were cultured in vitro with DFTD cells and the supernatant analyzed. There was a significant production of IFN-γ and TNF-α following the first injection with DFTD cells and a significant production of IL-6 and IL-10 following the second injection. Splenocytes from naïve or immunized mice killed DFTD cells in in vitro cytotoxicity assays. Thus they are also targets for immunological destruction. We conclude that as an immune response can be generated against DFTD cells they would be suitable targets for a vaccine.

  6. Potential Reduction of Contralateral Second Breast-Cancer Risks by Prophylactic Mammary Irradiation: Validation in a Breast-Cancer-Prone Mouse Model

    OpenAIRE

    Igor Shuryak; Lubomir B Smilenov; Kleiman, Norman J.; Brenner, David J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term breast-cancer survivors have a highly elevated risk (1 in 6 at 20 years) of contralateral second breast cancer. This high risk is associated with the presence of multiple pre-malignant cell clones in the contralateral breast at the time of primary breast cancer diagnosis. Mechanistic analyses suggest that a moderate dose of X-rays to the contralateral breast can kill these pre-malignant clones such that, at an appropriate Prophylactic Mammary Irradiation (PMI) dose, the ...

  7. Case analysis of NOD-SCID mouse with patient-derived tumor xenogrraft models of gastric cancer%NOD-SCID小鼠移植人体胃癌实验案例分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董静; 刘霞; 舒翔; 李玉红; 唐志佼; 闫平

    2015-01-01

    Objective:hTe tumor type and the pathological features of tumor were identiifed in murine xenogratfs model of gastric cancer. Methods:hTe tumor histopathologic features was observed by HE stainings;the expression of CD43, CD45RB, CD57, CK in mouse tumor and the expression of CD43 and CD57 in mouse spleen were analyzed by immunohistochemical method to diagnose the tumor types and sources. Results:The histological features and characteristics of the mouse subcutaneous tumor were not consistent with human gastric cancer by histological observation. hTe CD43, CD45RB, CD57 markers were positive in mouse tumor by immunohistochemical analysis, indicating that mouse tumor cells were constituted by T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes and NK cells. But in the mouse spleen, T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes and NK cells were all negative. Conclusion:hTe subcutaneous tumors of the NOD-SCID mice were lymphoma and derived from lymphoid tissue in gastric cancer by transplantation.%目的:鉴定小鼠胃癌移植模型中生成的肿瘤类型及病理特征。方法:采用HE染色法对肿瘤病理组织学特征进行观察,用免疫组织化学的方法分析肿瘤中CD43、CD45RB、CD57、CK等标志物的表达及小鼠脾脏中CD43、CD57的表达以诊断肿瘤类型及来源。结果:经组织学观察,小鼠皮下肿瘤组织与人胃癌组织结构形态并不相符。经免疫组织化学分析,小鼠肿瘤抗人体的CD43、CD45RB、CD57均为阳性,提示肿瘤细胞中由大量T淋巴细胞、B淋巴细胞和NK细胞组成;但小鼠脾脏内T、B淋巴细胞和NK细胞均为阴性。结论:小鼠皮下肿瘤为淋巴瘤,来源于移植的胃癌组织中带有的淋巴组织。

  8. Demethylation of Cancer/Testis Antigens and CpG ODN Stimulation Enhance Dendritic Cell and Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Function in a Mouse Mammary Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Zhong Sun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cancer/testis antigens (CTAs are ideal targets for cancer immunotherapy in virtue of their restricted expression profile in normal tissues. However, CTA-targeted immunotherapy has been rather disappointing clinical setting for CTAs are downregulated by cytosine-phosphate-guanosine (CpG methylation in their promoter regions, so that tumor cells have low immunogenicity. Methods. We reinduced mouse CTA P1A through demethylation process and generated P1A-specific cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTLs by immunizing BALB/c (H-2d mice with dendritic cells pulsed with a P1A-specific peptide and CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN immune adjuvant. Results. We found that demethylation and CpG ODN immune adjuvant stimulation facilitated DC maturation and enhanced the allogenic capacity of P1A-specific CTLs against target cells both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions. Our results suggested that CTA induction and immune adjuvant stimulation is a feasible strategy in cancer immunotherapy.

  9. Plumbagin, a medicinal plant (Plumbago zeylanica) - derived 1,4-naphthoquinone, inhibits growth and metastasis of human prostate cancer PC-3M-luciferase cells in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Hafeez, Bilal Bin; Zhong, Weixiong; Fischer, Joseph W.; Mustafa, Ala; Shi, Xudong Daniel; Meske, Louise; Hong, Hao; Cai, Weibo; Havighurst, Thomas; Kim, KyungMann; Verma, Ajit K.

    2012-01-01

    We present here first time that Plumbagin (PL), a medicinal plant-derived 1,4-naphthoquinone, inhibits the growth and metastasis of prostate cancer (PCa) in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model. In this study, human PCa PC-3M-luciferase cells (2X106) were injected into the prostate of athymic nude mice. Three days post cell implantation, mice were treated with PL (2 mg/kg body wt. i.p five days in a week) for 8 weeks. Growth and metastasis of PC-3M-luciferase cells was examined weekly by biolu...

  10. Optimized Mouse Model for the Imaging of Tumor Metastasis upon Experimental Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Sergio Lavilla-Alonso; Usama Abo-Ramadan; Juha Halavaara; Sophie Escutenaire; Turgut Tatlisumak; Kalle Saksela; Anna Kanerva; Akseli Hemminki; Sari Pesonen

    2011-01-01

    Development of new cancer treatments focuses increasingly on the relation of cancer tissue with its microenvironment. A major obstacle for the development of new anti-cancer therapies has been the lack of relevant animal models that would reproduce all the events involved in disease progression from the early-stage primary tumor until the development of mature metastatic tissue. To this end, we have developed a readily imageable mouse model of colorectal cancer featuring highly reproducible f...

  11. Establishment of mouse lung tumor models and development of new therapeutic approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Savai, Rajkumar

    2005-01-01

    Two mouse models of lung cancer were used to investigate cancer progression, cancer treatment, and cancer imaging. One model was established by subcutaneous injection of human adenocarcinoma A549 cells and lewis lung carcinoma (LLC1) cells, the other by intratracheal instillation of LLC1 cells. In the first study, the role of HIF-1 in tumor progression was investigated. Overexpression of HIF-1alpha by genetic alteration of adenocarcinoma cells decreased tumor size, due to decreased pr...

  12. The wobbler mouse, an ALS animal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moser, Jakob Maximilian; Bigini, Paolo; Schmitt-John, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This review article is focused on the research progress made utilizing the wobbler mouse as animal model for human motor neuron diseases, especially the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The wobbler mouse develops progressive degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons and shows striking...... similarities to ALS. The cellular effects of the wobbler mutation, cellular transport defects, neurofilament aggregation, neuronal hyperexcitability and neuroinflammation closely resemble human ALS. Now, 57 years after the first report on the wobbler mouse we summarize the progress made in understanding...

  13. Mouse models in male fertility research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duangporn Jamsai; Moira K O'Bryan

    2011-01-01

    Limited knowledge of the genetic causes of male infertility has resulted in few treatment and targeted therapeutic options.Although the ideal approach to identify infertility causing mutations is to conduct studies in the human population,this approach has progressed slowly due to the limitations described herein.Given the complexity of male fertility,the entire process cannot be modeled in vitro.As such,animal models,in particular mouse models,provide a valuable alternative for gene identification and experimentation.Since the introduction of molecular biology and recent advances in animal model production,there has been a substantial acceleration in the identification and characterization of genes associated with many diseases,including infertility.Three major types of mouse models are commonly used in biomedical research,including knockout/knockin/gene-trapped,transgenic and chemical-induced point mutant mice.Using these mouse models,over 400 genes essential for male fertility have been revealed.It has,however,been estimated that thousands of genes are involved in the regulation of the complex process of male fertility,as many such genes remain to be characterized.The current review is by no means a comprehensive list of these mouse models,rather it contains examples of how mouse models have advanced our knowledge of post-natal germ cell development and male fertility regulation.

  14. Spontaneous initiation, promotion and progression of colorectal cancer in the novel A/J Min/+ mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sødring, Marianne; Gunnes, Gjermund; Paulsen, Jan Erik

    2016-04-15

    The C57BL/6J multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min/+) mouse is a widely used murine model for familial adenomatous polyposis, a hereditary form of human colorectal cancer. However, it is a questionable model partly because the vast majority of tumors arise in the small intestine, and partly because the fraction of tumors that progress to invasive carcinomas is minuscule. A/J mice are typically more susceptible to carcinogen-induced colorectal cancer than C57BL/6J mice. To investigate whether the novel Min/+ mouse on the A/J genetic background could be a better model for colorectal cancer, we examined the spontaneous intestinal tumorigenesis in 81 A/J Min/+ mice ranging in age from 4 to 60 weeks. The A/J Min/+ mouse exhibited a dramatic increase in number of colonic lesions when compared to what has been reported for the conventional Min/+ mouse; however, an increase in small intestinal lesions did not occur. In addition, this novel mouse model displayed a continual development of colonic lesions highlighted by the transition from early lesions (flat ACF) to tumors over time. In mice older than 40 weeks, 13 colonic (95% CI: 8.7-16.3) and 21 small intestinal (95% CI: 18.6-24.3) tumors were recorded. Notably, a considerable proportion of those lesions progressed to carcinomas in both the colon (21%) and small intestine (51%). These findings more closely reflect aspects of human colorectal carcinogenesis. In conclusion, the novel A/J Min/+ mouse may be a relevant model for initiation, promotion and progression of colorectal cancer.

  15. The wobbler mouse, an ALS animal model

    OpenAIRE

    Moser, Jakob Maximilian; Bigini, Paolo; Schmitt-John, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This review article is focused on the research progress made utilizing the wobbler mouse as animal model for human motor neuron diseases, especially the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The wobbler mouse develops progressive degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons and shows striking similarities to ALS. The cellular effects of the wobbler mutation, cellular transport defects, neurofilament aggregation, neuronal hyperexcitability and neuroinflammation closely resemble human ALS. Now,...

  16. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) linked to near infrared (NIR) dyes conjugated to chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) antibody enhances imaging of liver metastases in a nude-mouse model of human colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maawy, Ali A; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhang, Yong; Luiken, George A; Hoffman, Robert M; Bouvet, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We report here that polyethylene glycol (PEG) linked to near infrared dyes conjugated to chimeric mouse-human anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) antibody greatly improves imaging of liver metastases in a nude mouse model of colon-cancer experimental metastases. PEGylated and non-PEGylated DyLight 650 and 750 dyes were conjugated to the chimeric anti-CEA antibody. The dyes were initially injected intravenously into nude mice without tumors. Tissue biodistribution was determined by tissue sonication and analyzing tissue dye concentration profiles over time. PEGylated dyes had significantly lower accumulation in the liver (p = 0.03 for the 650 dyes; p = 0.002 for the 750 dyes) compared to non-PEGylated dyes. In an experimental liver metastasis model of HT-29 colon cancer, PEGylated dyes conjugated to the anti-CEA antibody showed good labeling of metastatic tumors with high contrast between normal and malignant tissue which was not possible with the non-PEGylated dyes since there was so much non-specific accumulation in the liver. PEGylation of the DyLight 650 and 750 NIR dyes significantly altered tissue biodistribution, allowing brighter tissue labeling, decreased accumulation in normal organs, particularly the liver. This enabled high fidelity and high contrast imaging of liver metastases.

  17. Polyethylene glycol (PEG linked to near infrared (NIR dyes conjugated to chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA antibody enhances imaging of liver metastases in a nude-mouse model of human colon cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali A Maawy

    Full Text Available We report here that polyethylene glycol (PEG linked to near infrared dyes conjugated to chimeric mouse-human anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA antibody greatly improves imaging of liver metastases in a nude mouse model of colon-cancer experimental metastases. PEGylated and non-PEGylated DyLight 650 and 750 dyes were conjugated to the chimeric anti-CEA antibody. The dyes were initially injected intravenously into nude mice without tumors. Tissue biodistribution was determined by tissue sonication and analyzing tissue dye concentration profiles over time. PEGylated dyes had significantly lower accumulation in the liver (p = 0.03 for the 650 dyes; p = 0.002 for the 750 dyes compared to non-PEGylated dyes. In an experimental liver metastasis model of HT-29 colon cancer, PEGylated dyes conjugated to the anti-CEA antibody showed good labeling of metastatic tumors with high contrast between normal and malignant tissue which was not possible with the non-PEGylated dyes since there was so much non-specific accumulation in the liver. PEGylation of the DyLight 650 and 750 NIR dyes significantly altered tissue biodistribution, allowing brighter tissue labeling, decreased accumulation in normal organs, particularly the liver. This enabled high fidelity and high contrast imaging of liver metastases.

  18. A HLA-A2-restricted CTL epitope induces anti-tumor effects against human lung cancer in mouse xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Yuh-Pyng; Lin, Su-I; Chen, I-Hua; Liu, Hsin-Yu; Lin, Chen-Yuan; Chiang, I-Ping; Roffler, Steve; Chen, Hsin-Wei; Liu, Shih-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is attractive for antigen-specific T cell-mediated anti-tumor therapy, especially in induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. In this report, we evaluated human CTL epitope-induced anti-tumor effects in human lung cancer xenograft models. The tumor associated antigen L6 (TAL6) is highly expressed in human lung cancer cell lines and tumor specimens as compared to normal lung tissues. TAL6 derived peptides strongly inhibited tumor growth, cancer metastasis and prolonged survival time in HLA-A2 transgenic mice immunized with a formulation of T-helper (Th) peptide, synthetic CpG ODN, and adjuvant Montanide ISA-51 (ISA-51). Adoptive transfer of peptide-induced CTL cells from HLA-A2 transgenic mice into human tumor xenograft SCID mice significantly inhibited tumor growth. Furthermore, combination of CTL-peptide immunotherapy and gemcitabine additively improved the therapeutic effects. This pre-clinical evaluation model provides a useful platform to develop efficient immunotherapeutic drugs to treat lung cancer and demonstrates a promising strategy with benefit of antitumor immune responses worthy of further development in clinical trials. PMID:26621839

  19. Defining the role of polyamines in colon carcinogenesis using mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia A Ignatenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetics and diet are both considered important risk determinants for colorectal cancer, a leading cause of death in the US and worldwide. Genetically engineered mouse (GEM models have made a significant contribution to the characterization of colorectal cancer risk factors. Reliable, reproducible, and clinically relevant animal models help in the identification of the molecular events associated with disease progression and in the development of effictive treatment strategies. This review is focused on the use of mouse models for studying the role of polyamines in colon carcinogenesis. We describe how the available mouse models of colon cancer such as the multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min mice and knockout genetic models facilitate understanding of the role of polyamines in colon carcinogenesis and help in the development of a rational strategy for colon cancer chemoprevention.

  20. A novel mouse model of human breast cancer stem-like cells with high CD44+CD24-/lower phenotype metastasis to human bone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LING Li-jun; WANG Feng; WANG Shui; LIU Xiao-an; SHEN En-chao; DING Qiang; LU Chao; XU Jian; CAO Qin-hong; ZHU Hai-qing

    2008-01-01

    Background A satisfactory animal model of breast cancer metastasizing to bone is unavailable. In this study, we used human breast cancer stem-like cells and human bone to build a novel "human-source" model of human breast cancer skeletal metastasis.Methods Human breast cancer stem-like cells, the CD44+/CD24-/lower subpopulation, was separated and cultured. Before injection with the stem-like cells, mice were implanted with human bone in the right or left dorsal flanks. Animals in Groups A, B, and C were injected with 1x105, 1x106 human breast cancer stem-like cells, and 1x106 parental MDA-MB-231 cells, respectively. A positive control group (D) without implantation of human bone was also injected with 1x106 MDA-MB-231 cells. Immunohistochemistry was performed for determination of CD34, CD105, smooth muscle antibody, CD44, CD24, cytokine, CXC chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4), and osteopontin (OPN). mRNA levels of CD44, CD24, CXCR4, and OPN in bone metastasis tissues were analyzed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results Our results demonstrated that cells in implanted human bones of group B, which received 1x106 cancer stem-like cells, stained strongly positive for CD44, CXCR4, and OPN, whereas those of other groups showed no or minimum staining. Moreover, group B had the highest incidence of human bone metastasis (77.8%, P=0.0230) and no accompaniment of other tissue metastasis. The real-time PCR showed an increase of CD44, CXCR4, and OPN mRNA in metastatic bone tissues in group B compared with those of groups C and D, however the expression of CD24 mRNA in group B were the lowest. Conclusions In the novel "human source" model of breast cancer, breast cancer stem-like cells demonstrated a higher human bone-seeking ability. Its mechanism might be related to the higher expressions of CD44, CXCR4, and OPN, and the lower expression of CD24 in breast cancer stem-like cells.

  1. Citrobacter rodentium mouse model of bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepin, Valerie F; Collins, James W; Habibzay, Maryam; Frankel, Gad

    2016-10-01

    Infection of mice with Citrobacter rodentium is a robust model to study bacterial pathogenesis, mucosal immunology, the health benefits of probiotics and the role of the microbiota during infection. C. rodentium was first isolated by Barthold from an outbreak of mouse diarrhea in Yale University in 1972 and was 'rediscovered' by Falkow and Schauer in 1993. Since then the use of the model has proliferated, and it is now the gold standard for studying virulence of the closely related human pathogens enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC and EHEC, respectively). Here we provide a detailed protocol for various applications of the model, including bacterial growth, site-directed mutagenesis, mouse inoculation (from cultured cells and after cohabitation), monitoring of bacterial colonization, tissue extraction and analysis, immune responses, probiotic treatment and microbiota analysis. The main protocol, from mouse infection to clearance and analysis of tissues and host responses, takes ∼5 weeks to complete. PMID:27606775

  2. The cellular cancer resistance of the SR/CR mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Janne; Hau, Jann; Jensen, Henrik Elvang;

    2012-01-01

    injection showed formations of immune cells morphologically resembling polymorphonuclear granulocytes and macrophages adjoining the cancer cells. The results point to the potential involvement of innate immune cells in cancer immunology. Our data support migration of polymorphonuclear granulocytes......The SR/CR mouse phenotype, first described in 1999 in BALB/c and later bred into C57BL/6 mice, is resistant to cancer formation following high doses of cancer cells administered intraperitoneally. The tumor cell targeting and destruction mechanisms have not been identified. By fluorescence......-activated cell sorting analysis, the immune response of SR/CR mice after intraperitoneal injection of cancer cells was investigated and compared with parent strain mice. A massive influx of leukocytes into the peritoneal cavity was found. A large fraction of these leukocytes were polymorphonuclear granulocytes...

  3. AOM/DSS Model of Colitis-Associated Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parang, Bobak; Barrett, Caitlyn W; Williams, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of colitis-associated carcinoma (CAC) has benefited substantially from mouse models that faithfully recapitulate human CAC. Chemical models, in particular, have enabled fast and efficient analysis of genetic and environmental modulators of CAC without the added requirement of time-intensive genetic crossings. Here we describe the Azoxymethane (AOM)/Dextran Sodium Sulfate (DSS) mouse model of inflammatory colorectal cancer.

  4. Effects of CXCR4 siRNA/dextran-spermine nanoparticles on CXCR4 expression and serum LDH levels in a mouse model of colorectal cancer metastasis to the liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abedini F

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Fatemeh Abedini1, Maznah Ismail1,4, Hossein Hosseinkhani2, Tengku Azmi Tengku Ibrahim1,3, Abdul Rahman Omar1,3, Pei Pei Chong4, Mohd Hair Bejo3, Abraham J Domb51Laboratory of Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia; 2Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, 4Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia; 5Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Natural Products, School of Pharmacy, Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem, IsraelAbstract: Liver metastasis is the main cause of mortality related to colorectal cancer. CXCR4 is necessary for the outgrowth of colon cancer micrometastases. In oncology, it has been demonstrated that several human tumors release lactate dehydrogenase (LDH into the circulation. CXCR4 gene expression and serum LDH levels are often increased in patients with colorectal cancer. Despite technological advances in cancer therapy, five-year overall survival is still around 50%. Therefore, better treatment needs to be developed. RNA interference (RNAi is a modern and powerful tool for inhibition of gene expression. However, the rate-limiting step in this technology is effective delivery of RNAi agents. We have investigated a novel strategy of CXCR4 siRNA therapy and its effect on serum LDH levels in a BALB/C mouse model of colorectal cancer metastasis to the liver. Hepatic metastasis was established by injecting a CT26.WT mouse colon carcinoma cell line via the tail vein. Our results demonstrated that CXCR4 siRNA/dextran-spermine nanoparticles achieved high silencing efficiency with low toxicity. Favorable localization of the nanoparticles was confirmed with CXCR4 gene expression in the liver, that was correlated with serum LDH levels. More research will be needed to determine the effect of CXCR4

  5. Recapitulating Human Gastric Cancer Pathogenesis: Experimental Models of Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Lin; El Zaatari, Mohamad; Merchant, Juanita L

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the various experimental models to study gastric cancer pathogenesis, with the role of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) used as the major examples. We review differences in human stomach anatomy compared to the stomachs of the experimental models, including the mouse and invertebrate models such as Drosophila and C. elegans. The contribution of major signaling pathways, e.g., Notch, Hedgehog, AKT/PI3K is discussed in the context of their potential contribution to foregut tumorigenesis. We critically examine the rationale behind specific GEMMs, chemical carcinogens, dietary promoters, Helicobacter infection, and direct mutagenesis of relevant oncogenes and tumor suppressor that have been developed to study gastric cancer pathogenesis. Despite species differences, more efficient and effective models to test specific genes and pathways disrupted in human gastric carcinogenesis have yet to emerge. As we better understand these species differences, "humanized" versions of mouse models will more closely approximate human gastric cancer pathogenesis. Towards that end, epigenetic marks on chromatin, the gut microbiota, and ways of manipulating the immune system will likely move center stage, permitting greater overlap between rodent and human cancer phenotypes thus providing a unified progression model. PMID:27573785

  6. Near infra-red photoimmunotherapy with anti-CEA-IR700 results in extensive tumor lysis and a significant decrease in tumor burden in orthotopic mouse models of pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali A Maawy

    Full Text Available Photoimmunotherapy (PIT of cancer utilizes tumor-specific monoclonal antibodies conjugated to a photosensitizer phthalocyanine dye IR700 which becomes cytotoxic upon irradiation with near infrared light. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy of PIT on human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo in an orthotopic nude mouse model. The binding capacity of anti-CEA antibody to BxPC-3 human pancreatic cancer cells was determined by FACS analysis. An in vitro cytotoxicity assay was used to determine cell death following treatment with PIT. For in vivo determination of PIT efficacy, nude mice were orthotopically implanted with BxPC-3 pancreatic tumors expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP. After tumor engraftment, the mice were divided into two groups: (1 treatment with anti-CEA-IR700 + 690 nm laser and (2 treatment with 690 nm laser only. Anti-CEA-IR700 (100 μg was administered to group (1 via tail vein injection 24 hours prior to therapy. Tumors were then surgically exposed and treated with phototherapy at an intensity of 150 mW/cm2 for 30 minutes. Whole body imaging was done subsequently for 5 weeks using an OV-100 small animal imaging system. Anti-CEA-IR700 antibody bound to the BxPC3 cells to a high degree as shown by FACS analysis. Anti-CEA-IR700 caused extensive cancer cell killing after light activation compared to control cells in cytotoxicity assays. In the orthotopic models of pancreatic cancer, the anti-CEA-IR700 group had significantly smaller tumors than the control after 5 weeks (p<0.001. There was no significant difference in the body weights of mice in the anti-CEA-IR700 and control groups indicating that PIT was well tolerated by the mice.

  7. Comparison of a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody conjugated with visible or near-infrared fluorescent dyes for imaging pancreatic cancer in orthotopic nude mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maawy, Ali A.; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Luiken, George A.; Hoffman, Robert M.; Bouvet, Michael

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a set of visible and near-infrared dyes conjugated to a tumor-specific chimeric antibody for high-resolution tumor imaging in orthotopic models of pancreatic cancer. BxPC-3 human pancreatic cancer was orthotopically implanted into pancreata of nude mice. Mice received a single intravenous injection of a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody conjugated to one of the following fluorophores: 488-nm group (Alexa Fluor 488 or DyLight 488); 550-nm group (Alexa Fluor 555 or DyLight 550); 650-nm group (Alexa Fluor 660 or DyLight 650), or the 750-nm group (Alexa Fluor 750 or DyLight 755). After 24 h, the Olympus OV100 small-animal imaging system was used for noninvasive and intravital fluorescence imaging of mice. Dyes were compared with respect to depth of imaging, resolution, tumor-to-background ratio (TBR), photobleaching, and hemoglobin quenching. The longer wavelength dyes had increased depth of penetration and ability to detect the smallest tumor deposits and provided the highest TBRs, resistance to hemoglobin quenching, and specificity. The shorter wavelength dyes were more photostable. This study showed unique advantages of each dye for specific cancer imaging in a clinically relevant orthotopic model.

  8. Mouse Models of Diabetic Nephropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Brosius, Frank C.; Alpers, Charles E.; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Breyer, Matthew D.; Coffman, Thomas M.; Gurley, Susan B.; Harris, Raymond C.; Kakoki, Masao; Kretzler, Matthias; Leiter, Edward H.; Levi, Moshe; McIndoe, Richard A.; Sharma, Kumar; Smithies, Oliver; Susztak, Katalin

    2009-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the major cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. Despite its prevalence, identification of specific factors that cause or predict diabetic nephropathy has been delayed in part by lack of reliable animal models that mimic the disease in humans. The Animal Models of Diabetic Complications Consortium (AMDCC) was created 8 years ago by the National Institutes of Health to develop and characterize models of diabetic nephropathy and other complications. This interim rep...

  9. Engineering a new mouse model for vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manga, Prashiela; Orlow, Seth J

    2012-07-01

    Although the precise mechanisms that trigger vitiligo remain elusive, autoimmune responses mediate its progression. The development of therapies has been impeded by a paucity of animal models, since mice lack interfollicular melanocytes, the primary targets in vitiligo. In this issue, Harris et al. describe a mouse model in which interfollicular melanocytes are retained by Kit ligand overexpression and an immune response is initiated by transplanting melanocyte-targeting CD8+ T cells.

  10. Retraction: "Inactivation of Ink4a/Arf Leads to Deregulated Expression of miRNAs in K-Ras Transgenic Mouse Model of Pancreatic Cancer" by Ali et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The above article, published online on June 21, 2012 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the journal Editor in Chief, Gary S. Stein, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed following an investigation from Wayne State University involving the first author and the corresponding author that found Figure 5A to be inappropriately manipulated. Literature Cited Ali S, Banerjee S, Logna F, Bao B, Philip PA, Korc M, Sarkar FH. 2012. Inactivation of Ink4a/Arf leads to deregulated expression of miRNAs in K-Ras transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer. J Cell Physiol 227:3373-3380; doi: 10.1002/jcp.24036. PMID:27315161

  11. Retraction: "Inactivation of Ink4a/Arf Leads to Deregulated Expression of miRNAs in K-Ras Transgenic Mouse Model of Pancreatic Cancer" by Ali et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The above article, published online on June 21, 2012 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the journal Editor in Chief, Gary S. Stein, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed following an investigation from Wayne State University involving the first author and the corresponding author that found Figure 5A to be inappropriately manipulated. Literature Cited Ali S, Banerjee S, Logna F, Bao B, Philip PA, Korc M, Sarkar FH. 2012. Inactivation of Ink4a/Arf leads to deregulated expression of miRNAs in K-Ras transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer. J Cell Physiol 227:3373-3380; doi: 10.1002/jcp.24036.

  12. Emerging and Evolving Ovarian Cancer Animal Models

    OpenAIRE

    Bobbs, Alexander S; Jennifer M. Cole; Cowden Dahl, Karen D.

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is the leading cause of death from a gynecological malignancy in the United States. By the time a woman is diagnosed with OC, the tumor has usually metastasized. Mouse models that are used to recapitulate different aspects of human OC have been evolving for nearly 40 years. Xenograft studies in immunocompromised and immunocompetent mice have enhanced our knowledge of metastasis and immune cell involvement in cancer. Patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) can accurately reflect ...

  13. Mouse kidney transplantation: models of allograft rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, George H; Hesketh, Emily E; Clay, Michael; Borthwick, Gary; Hughes, Jeremy; Marson, Lorna P

    2014-01-01

    Rejection of the transplanted kidney in humans is still a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The mouse model of renal transplantation closely replicates both the technical and pathological processes that occur in human renal transplantation. Although mouse models of allogeneic rejection in organs other than the kidney exist, and are more technically feasible, there is evidence that different organs elicit disparate rejection modes and dynamics, for instance the time course of rejection in cardiac and renal allograft differs significantly in certain strain combinations. This model is an attractive tool for many reasons despite its technical challenges. As inbred mouse strain haplotypes are well characterized it is possible to choose donor and recipient combinations to model acute allograft rejection by transplanting across MHC class I and II loci. Conversely by transplanting between strains with similar haplotypes a chronic process can be elicited were the allograft kidney develops interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy. We have modified the surgical technique to reduce operating time and improve ease of surgery, however a learning curve still needs to be overcome in order to faithfully replicate the model. This study will provide key points in the surgical procedure and aid the process of establishing this technique.

  14. High-Fat, High-Calorie Diet Enhances Mammary Carcinogenesis and Local Inflammation in MMTV-PyMT Mouse Model of Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowen, Sarah [Department of Surgery, West Virginia University Health Sciences Center, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University Health Sciences Center, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); McLaughlin, Sarah L. [Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University Health Sciences Center, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Hobbs, Gerald [Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University Health Sciences Center, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Department of Statistics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Coad, James [Department of Pathology, West Virginia University Health Sciences Center, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Martin, Karen H. [Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University Health Sciences Center, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, West Virginia University Health Sciences Center, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Olfert, I. Mark [Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University Health Sciences Center, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Department of Human Performance and Exercise Physiology, West Virginia University Health Sciences Center, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Vona-Davis, Linda, E-mail: lvdavis@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Surgery, West Virginia University Health Sciences Center, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University Health Sciences Center, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2015-06-26

    Epidemiological studies provide strong evidence that obesity and the associated adipose tissue inflammation are risk factors for breast cancer; however, the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We evaluated the effect of a high-fat/high-calorie diet on mammary carcinogenesis in the immunocompetent MMTV-PyMT murine model. Four-week old female mice (20/group) were randomized to receive either a high-fat (HF; 60% kcal as fat) or a low-fat (LF; 16% kcal) diet for eight weeks. Body weights were determined, and tumor volumes measured by ultrasound, each week. At necropsy, the tumors and abdominal visceral fat were weighed and plasma collected. The primary mammary tumors, adjacent mammary fat, and lungs were preserved for histological and immunohistochemical examination and quantification of infiltrating macrophages, crown-like structure (CLS) formation, and microvessel density. The body weight gains, visceral fat weights, the primary mammary tumor growth rates and terminal weights, were all significantly greater in the HF-fed mice. Adipose tissue inflammation in the HF group was indicated by hepatic steatosis, pronounced macrophage infiltration and CLS formation, and elevations in plasma monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), leptin and proinflammatory cytokine concentrations. HF intake was also associated with higher tumor-associated microvascular density and the proangiogenic factor MCP-1. This study provides preclinical evidence in a spontaneous model of breast cancer that mammary adipose tissue inflammation induced by diet, enhances the recruitment of macrophages and increases tumor vascular density suggesting a role for obesity in creating a microenvironment favorable for angiogenesis in the progression of breast cancer.

  15. High-Fat, High-Calorie Diet Enhances Mammary Carcinogenesis and Local Inflammation in MMTV-PyMT Mouse Model of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Cowen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies provide strong evidence that obesity and the associated adipose tissue inflammation are risk factors for breast cancer; however, the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We evaluated the effect of a high-fat/high-calorie diet on mammary carcinogenesis in the immunocompetent MMTV-PyMT murine model. Four-week old female mice (20/group were randomized to receive either a high-fat (HF; 60% kcal as fat or a low-fat (LF; 16% kcal diet for eight weeks. Body weights were determined, and tumor volumes measured by ultrasound, each week. At necropsy, the tumors and abdominal visceral fat were weighed and plasma collected. The primary mammary tumors, adjacent mammary fat, and lungs were preserved for histological and immunohistochemical examination and quantification of infiltrating macrophages, crown-like structure (CLS formation, and microvessel density. The body weight gains, visceral fat weights, the primary mammary tumor growth rates and terminal weights, were all significantly greater in the HF-fed mice. Adipose tissue inflammation in the HF group was indicated by hepatic steatosis, pronounced macrophage infiltration and CLS formation, and elevations in plasma monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, leptin and proinflammatory cytokine concentrations. HF intake was also associated with higher tumor-associated microvascular density and the proangiogenic factor MCP-1. This study provides preclinical evidence in a spontaneous model of breast cancer that mammary adipose tissue inflammation induced by diet, enhances the recruitment of macrophages and increases tumor vascular density suggesting a role for obesity in creating a microenvironment favorable for angiogenesis in the progression of breast cancer.

  16. High-Fat, High-Calorie Diet Enhances Mammary Carcinogenesis and Local Inflammation in MMTV-PyMT Mouse Model of Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidemiological studies provide strong evidence that obesity and the associated adipose tissue inflammation are risk factors for breast cancer; however, the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We evaluated the effect of a high-fat/high-calorie diet on mammary carcinogenesis in the immunocompetent MMTV-PyMT murine model. Four-week old female mice (20/group) were randomized to receive either a high-fat (HF; 60% kcal as fat) or a low-fat (LF; 16% kcal) diet for eight weeks. Body weights were determined, and tumor volumes measured by ultrasound, each week. At necropsy, the tumors and abdominal visceral fat were weighed and plasma collected. The primary mammary tumors, adjacent mammary fat, and lungs were preserved for histological and immunohistochemical examination and quantification of infiltrating macrophages, crown-like structure (CLS) formation, and microvessel density. The body weight gains, visceral fat weights, the primary mammary tumor growth rates and terminal weights, were all significantly greater in the HF-fed mice. Adipose tissue inflammation in the HF group was indicated by hepatic steatosis, pronounced macrophage infiltration and CLS formation, and elevations in plasma monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), leptin and proinflammatory cytokine concentrations. HF intake was also associated with higher tumor-associated microvascular density and the proangiogenic factor MCP-1. This study provides preclinical evidence in a spontaneous model of breast cancer that mammary adipose tissue inflammation induced by diet, enhances the recruitment of macrophages and increases tumor vascular density suggesting a role for obesity in creating a microenvironment favorable for angiogenesis in the progression of breast cancer

  17. A mouse stromal response to tumor invasion predicts prostate and breast cancer patient survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Bacac

    Full Text Available Primary and metastatic tumor growth induces host tissue responses that are believed to support tumor progression. Understanding the molecular changes within the tumor microenvironment during tumor progression may therefore be relevant not only for discovering potential therapeutic targets, but also for identifying putative molecular signatures that may improve tumor classification and predict clinical outcome. To selectively address stromal gene expression changes during cancer progression, we performed cDNA microarray analysis of laser-microdissected stromal cells derived from prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN and invasive cancer in a multistage model of prostate carcinogenesis. Human orthologs of genes identified in the stromal reaction to tumor progression in this mouse model were observed to be expressed in several human cancers, and to cluster prostate and breast cancer patients into groups with statistically different clinical outcomes. Univariate Cox analysis showed that overexpression of these genes is associated with shorter survival and recurrence-free periods. Taken together, our observations provide evidence that the expression signature of the stromal response to tumor invasion in a mouse tumor model can be used to probe human cancer, and to provide a powerful prognostic indicator for some of the most frequent human malignancies.

  18. Mouse Models for Filovirus Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly L Warfield; Bradfute, Steven B; Mike Bray

    2012-01-01

    The filoviruses marburg- and ebolaviruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever (HF) in humans and nonhuman primates. Because many cases have occurred in geographical areas lacking a medical research infrastructure, most studies of the pathogenesis of filoviral HF, and all efforts to develop drugs and vaccines, have been carried out in biocontainment laboratories in non-endemic countries, using nonhuman primates (NHPs), guinea pigs and mice as animal models. NHPs appear to closely mirror filovir...

  19. The Adnectin CT-322 is a novel VEGF receptor 2 inhibitor that decreases tumor burden in an orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Andrew F

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic cancer continues to have a 5-year survival of less than 5%. Therefore, more effective therapies are necessary to improve prognosis in this disease. Angiogenesis is required for tumor growth, and subsequently, mediators of angiogenesis are attractive targets for therapy. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is a well-characterized mediator of tumor angiogenesis that functions primarily by binding and activating VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2. In this study, we evaluate the use of CT-322, a novel biologic (Adnectin. This small protein is based on a human fibronectin domain and has beneficial properties in that it is fully human, stable, and is produced in bacteria. CT-322 binds to and inhibits activation of VEGFR2. Methods The efficacy of CT-322 was evaluated in vivo using two orthotopic pancreatic tumor models. The first model was a human tumor xenograft where MiaPaCa-2 cells were injected into the tail of the pancreas of nude mice. The second model was a syngeneic tumor using Pan02 cells injected into pancreas of C57BL/6J mice. In both models, therapy was initiated once primary tumors were established. Mice bearing MiaPaCa-2 tumors were treated with vehicle or CT-322 alone. Gemcitabine alone or in combination with CT-322 was added to the treatment regimen of mice bearing Pan02 tumors. Therapy was given twice a week for six weeks, after which the animals were sacrificed and evaluated (grossly and histologically for primary and metastatic tumor burden. Primary tumors were also evaluated by immunohistochemistry for the level of apoptosis (TUNEL, microvessel density (MECA-32, and VEGF-activated blood vessels (Gv39M. Results Treatment with CT-322 was effective at preventing pancreatic tumor growth and metastasis in orthotopic xenograft and syngeneic models of pancreatic cancer. Additionally, CT-322 treatment increased apoptosis, reduced microvessel density and reduced the number of VEGF-activated blood vessels in tumors

  20. Mouse Genetic Models of Human Brain Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Celeste eLeung; Zhengping eJia

    2016-01-01

    Over the past three decades, genetic manipulations in mice have been used in neuroscience as a major approach to investigate the in vivo function of genes and their alterations. In particular, gene targeting techniques using embryonic stem cells have revolutionized the field of mammalian genetics and have been at the forefront in the generation of numerous mouse models of human brain disorders. In this review, we will first examine childhood developmental disorders such as autism, intellectua...

  1. Digenic Inheritance in Cystinuria Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meritxell Espino

    Full Text Available Cystinuria is an aminoaciduria caused by mutations in the genes that encode the two subunits of the amino acid transport system b0,+, responsible for the renal reabsorption of cystine and dibasic amino acids. The clinical symptoms of cystinuria relate to nephrolithiasis, due to the precipitation of cystine in urine. Mutations in SLC3A1, which codes for the heavy subunit rBAT, cause cystinuria type A, whereas mutations in SLC7A9, which encodes the light subunit b0,+AT, cause cystinuria type B. By crossing Slc3a1-/- with Slc7a9-/- mice we generated a type AB cystinuria mouse model to test digenic inheritance of cystinuria. The 9 genotypes obtained have been analyzed at early (2- and 5-months and late stage (8-months of the disease. Monitoring the lithiasic phenotype by X-ray, urine amino acid content analysis and protein expression studies have shown that double heterozygous mice (Slc7a9+/-Slc3a1+/- present lower expression of system b0,+ and higher hyperexcretion of cystine than single heterozygotes (Slc7a9+/-Slc3a1+/+ and Slc7a9+/+Slc3a1+/- and give rise to lithiasis in 4% of the mice, demonstrating that cystinuria has a digenic inheritance in this mouse model. Moreover in this study it has been demonstrated a genotype/phenotype correlation in type AB cystinuria mouse model providing new insights for further molecular and genetic studies of cystinuria patients.

  2. NIH mouse study finds gut microorganisms may determine cancer treatment outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    An intact gut commensal microbiota, which is a population of microorganisms living in the intestine, is required for optimal response to cancer therapy, according to a mouse study by scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI)

  3. 顺铂诱导三阴性乳腺癌4T1耐药小鼠模型的建立%Establishment of a cisplatin-resistant mouse model of 4T1 triple negative breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    盛佳钰; 陈红风

    2015-01-01

    Objective To establish a cisplatin-resistant 4T1 mouse model of triple negative breast cancer .Meth-ods A drug resistant mice model was established with cisplatin ( DDP ) induction and in-vivo/in-vitro tumorigenic ap-proach.Its resistance characteristics were identified by MTT assay .Changes of drug resistance gene ( MDR1, BCRP, MMP7, GST-π) and protein ( P-gp, BCRP, MMP7) expression, and phosphorate-Akt and total-Akt protein expression were evaluated by real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry and western blot method , respectively.Small animal live imaging technology was applied to detect tumor growth .Results Resistance fold (RF) of cisplatin-resistant 4T1 mouse model was 12.84.The expression of MDR1, BCRP, MMP 7, GST-πmRNA and P-gp, BCRP, MMP 7 proteins in the resistant mice were higher than that in the non-resistant mice .The result of western blot showed that a statistically higher expression of p-Akt in resistant mice than that in non-resistant mice at protein levels (P0.05 ) .Given same dose of DDP , resistant mice showed lower sensitivity than non-resistant mice significantly (P0.05). 分别给予这两种模型小鼠相同剂量的DDP治疗后,耐药小鼠对DDP的敏感性明显低于非耐药小鼠(P<0.01). 结论 初步建立了三阴性乳腺癌耐药4T1小鼠模型,为三阴性乳腺癌临床个体化治疗及耐药逆转研究等提供了良好的实验动物平台.

  4. Short-Course Treatment With Gefitinib Enhances Curative Potential of Radiation Therapy in a Mouse Model of Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokobza, Sivan M.; Jiang, Yanyan; Weber, Anika M.; Devery, Aoife M.; Ryan, Anderson J., E-mail: anderson.ryan@oncology.ox.ac.uk

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the combination of radiation and an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) in preclinical models of human non-small cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Sensitivity to an EGFR TKI (gefitinib) or radiation was assessed using proliferation assays and clonogenic survival assays. Effects on receptor signal transduction pathways (pEGFR, pAKT, pMAPK) and apoptosis (percentage of cleaved PARP Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)) were assessed by Western blotting. Radiation-induced DNA damage was assessed by γH2AX immunofluorescence. Established (≥100 mm{sup 3}) EGFR-mutated (HCC287) or EGFR wild-type (A549) subcutaneous xenografts were treated with radiation (10 Gy, day 1) or gefitinib (50 mg/kg, orally, on days 1-3) or both. Results: In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines with activating EGFR mutations (PC9 or HCC827), gefitinib treatment markedly reduced pEGFR, pAKT, and pMAPK levels and was associated with an increase in cleaved PARP but not in γH2AX foci. Radiation treatment increased the mean number of γH2AX foci per cell but did not significantly affect EGFR signaling. In contrast, NSCLC cell lines with EGFR T790M (H1975) or wild-type EGFR (A549) were insensitive to gefitinib treatment. The combination of gefitinib and radiation treatment in cell culture produced additive cell killing with no evidence of synergy. In xenograft models, a short course of gefitinib (3 days) did not significantly increase the activity of radiation treatment in wild-type EGFR (A549) tumors (P=.27), whereas this combination markedly increased the activity of radiation (P<.001) or gefitinib alone (P=.002) in EGFR-mutated HCC827 tumors, producing sustained tumor regressions. Conclusions: Gefitinib treatment increases clonogenic cell killing by radiation but only in cell lines sensitive to gefitinib alone. Our data suggest additive rather than synergistic interactions between gefitinib and radiation and that a

  5. Arsenic and chromium in drinking water promote tumorigenesis in a mouse colitis-associated colorectal cancer model and the potential mechanism is ROS-mediated Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Mandal, Ardhendu K.; Saito, Hiroshi; Pulliam, Joseph F.; Lee, Eun Y.; Ke, Zun-Ji; Lu, Jian; Ding, Songze; Li, Li; Shelton, Brent J; Tucker, Thomas; Evers, B. Mark; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to carcinogenic metals, such as trivalent arsenic [As(III)] and hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], through drinking water is a major global public health problem and is associated with various cancers. However, the mechanism of their carcinogenicity remains unclear. In this study, we used azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulfate (AOM/DSS)-induced mouse colitis-associated colorectal cancer model to investigate their tumorigenesis. Our results demonstrate that exposure to As(III) or Cr(VI), alone or in combination, together with AOM/DSS pretreatment has a promotion effect, increasing the colorectal tumor incidence, multiplicity, size, and grade, as well as cell inflammatory response. Two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry revealed that As(III) or Cr(VI) treatment alone significantly changed the density of proteins. The expression of β-catenin and phospho-GSK was increased by treatment of carcinogenic metals alone. Concomitantly, the expression of NADPH oxidase1 (NOX1) and the level of 8-OHdG were also increased by treatment of carcinogenic metals alone. Antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, were decreased. Similarly, in an in vitro system, exposure of CRL-1807 to carcinogenic metals increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, the expression of β-catenin, phospho-GSK, and NOX1. Inhibition of ROS generation by addition of SOD or catalase inhibited β-catenin expression and activity. Our study provides a new animal model to study the carcinogenicity of As(III) and Cr(VI) and suggest that As(III) and Cr(VI) promote colorectal cancer tumorigenesis, at least partly, through ROS-mediated Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:22552367

  6. Arsenic and chromium in drinking water promote tumorigenesis in a mouse colitis-associated colorectal cancer model and the potential mechanism is ROS-mediated Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin; Mandal, Ardhendu K. [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Saito, Hiroshi [Department of Surgery and Physiology, Lucille P. Markey Cancer Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Pulliam, Joseph F.; Lee, Eun Y. [Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Ke, Zun-Ji; Lu, Jian; Ding, Songze [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Li, Li [Department of Family Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Shelton, Brent J.; Tucker, Thomas [Markey Cancer Control Program, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40504 (United States); Evers, B. Mark [Department of Surgery and Physiology, Lucille P. Markey Cancer Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Zhang, Zhuo [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Shi, Xianglin, E-mail: xshi5@uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Exposure to carcinogenic metals, such as trivalent arsenic [As(III)] and hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], through drinking water is a major global public health problem and is associated with various cancers. However, the mechanism of their carcinogenicity remains unclear. In this study, we used azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulfate (AOM/DSS)-induced mouse colitis-associated colorectal cancer model to investigate their tumorigenesis. Our results demonstrate that exposure to As(III) or Cr(VI), alone or in combination, together with AOM/DSS pretreatment has a promotion effect, increasing the colorectal tumor incidence, multiplicity, size, and grade, as well as cell inflammatory response. Two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry revealed that As(III) or Cr(VI) treatment alone significantly changed the density of proteins. The expression of β-catenin and phospho-GSK was increased by treatment of carcinogenic metals alone. Concomitantly, the expression of NADPH oxidase1 (NOX1) and the level of 8-OHdG were also increased by treatment of carcinogenic metals alone. Antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, were decreased. Similarly, in an in vitro system, exposure of CRL-1807 to carcinogenic metals increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, the expression of β-catenin, phospho-GSK, and NOX1. Inhibition of ROS generation by addition of SOD or catalase inhibited β-catenin expression and activity. Our study provides a new animal model to study the carcinogenicity of As(III) and Cr(VI) and suggests that As(III) and Cr(VI) promote colorectal cancer tumorigenesis, at least partly, through ROS-mediated Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. -- Highlights: ► Carcinogenic metals in drinking water promote colorectal tumor formation in vivo. ► Carcinogenic metals induce β-catenin activation in vivo and in vitro. ► ROS generation induced by carcinogenic metals mediated β-catenin activation.

  7. Specific tumor labeling enhanced by polyethylene glycol linkage of near infrared dyes conjugated to a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody in a nude mouse model of human pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maawy, Ali A.; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhang, Yong; Luiken, George A.; Hoffman, Robert M.; Bouvet, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Labeling of metastatic tumors can aid in their staging and resection of cancer. Near infrared (NIR) dyes have been used in the clinic for tumor labeling. However, there can be a nonspecific uptake of dye by the liver, lungs, and lymph nodes, which hinders detection of metastasis. In order to overcome these problems, we have used two NIR dyes (DyLight 650 and 750) conjugated to a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody to evaluate how polyethylene glycol linkage (PEGylation) can improve specific tumor labeling in a nude mouse model of human pancreatic cancer. The conjugated PEGylated and non-PEGylated DyLight 650 and 750 dyes were injected intravenously into non-tumor-bearing nude mice. Serum samples were collected at various time points in order to determine serum concentrations and elimination kinetics. Conjugated PEGylated dyes had significantly higher serum dye concentrations than non-PEGylated dyes (p=0.005 for the 650 dyes and pdyes). Human pancreatic tumors subcutaneously implanted into nude mice were labeled with antibody-dye conjugates and serially imaged. Labeling with conjugated PEGylated dyes resulted in significantly brighter tumors compared to the non-PEGylated dyes (pdyes; p=0.01 for 750 dyes). PEGylation of the NIR dyes also decreased their accumulation in lymph nodes, liver, and lung. These results demonstrate enhanced selective tumor labeling by PEGylation of dyes conjugated to a tumor-specific antibody, suggesting their future clinical use in fluorescence-guided surgery.

  8. Utilization of quantitative in vivo pharmacology approaches to assess combination effects of everolimus and irinotecan in mouse xenograft models of colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica L Bradshaw-Pierce

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway is frequently dysregulated in cancers and inhibition of mTOR has demonstrated the ability to modulate pro-survival pathways. As such, we sought to determine the ability of the mTOR inhibitor everolimus to potentiate the antitumor effects of irinotecan in colorectal cancer (CRC. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The combinatorial effects of everolimus and irinotecan were evaluated in vitro and in vivo in CRC cell lines harboring commonly found mutations in PIK3CA, KRAS and/or BRAF. Pharmacokinetically-directed dosing protocols of everolimus and irinotecan were established and used to assess the in vivo antitumor effects of the agents. At the end of treatment, 3-6 tumors per treatment arm were harvested for biomarker analysis by NMR metabolomics. RESULTS: Everolimus and irinotecan/SN38 demonstrated synergistic anti-proliferative effects in multiple CRC cell lines in vitro. Combination effects of everolimus and irinotecan were determined in CRC xenograft models using clinically-relevant dosing protocols. Everolimus demonstrated significant tumor growth inhibition alone and when combined with irinotecan in HT29 and HCT116 tumor xenografts. Metabolomic analysis showed that HT29 tumors were more metabolically responsive than HCT116 tumors. Everolimus caused a decrease in glycolysis in both tumor types whilst irinotecan treatment resulted in a profound accumulation of lipids in HT29 tumors indicating a cytotoxic effect. CONCLUSIONS: Quantitative analysis of tumor growth and metabolomic data showed that the combination of everolimus and irinotecan was more beneficial in the BRAF/PIK3CA mutant HT29 tumor xenografts, which had an additive effect, than the KRAS/PIK3CA mutant HCT116 tumor xenografts, which had a less than additive effect.

  9. Small interfering RNA targeted to IGF-IR delays tumor growth and induces proinflammatory cytokines in a mouse breast cancer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiphanie Durfort

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I and its type I receptor (IGF-IR play significant roles in tumorigenesis and in immune response. Here, we wanted to know whether an RNA interference approach targeted to IGF-IR could be used for specific antitumor immunostimulation in a breast cancer model. For that, we evaluated short interfering RNA (siRNAs for inhibition of in vivo tumor growth and immunological stimulation in immunocompetent mice. We designed 2'-O-methyl-modified siRNAs to inhibit expression of IGF-IR in two murine breast cancer cell lines (EMT6, C4HD. Cell transfection of IGF-IR siRNAs decreased proliferation, diminished phosphorylation of downstream signaling pathway proteins, AKT and ERK, and caused a G0/G1 cell cycle block. The IGF-IR silencing also induced secretion of two proinflammatory cytokines, TNF- α and IFN-γ. When we transfected C4HD cells with siRNAs targeting IGF-IR, mammary tumor growth was strongly delayed in syngenic mice. Histology of developing tumors in mice grafted with IGF-IR siRNA treated C4HD cells revealed a low mitotic index, and infiltration of lymphocytes and polymorphonuclear neutrophils, suggesting activation of an antitumor immune response. When we used C4HD cells treated with siRNA as an immunogen, we observed an increase in delayed-type hypersensitivity and the presence of cytotoxic splenocytes against wild-type C4HD cells, indicative of evolving immune response. Our findings show that silencing IGF-IR using synthetic siRNA bearing 2'-O-methyl nucleotides may offer a new clinical approach for treatment of mammary tumors expressing IGF-IR. Interestingly, our work also suggests that crosstalk between IGF-I axis and antitumor immune response can mobilize proinflammatory cytokines.

  10. Fusion of cell-penetrating peptides to thermally responsive biopolymer improves tumor accumulation of p21 peptide in a mouse model of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker LR

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Leslie R Walker,1 Jung Su Ryu,1 Eddie Perkins,2 Lacey R McNally,3 Drazen Raucher1 1Department of Biochemistry, 2Department of Neurosurgery, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USA; 3Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USAAbstract: Current therapies for the treatment of pancreatic cancer are limited. The limitations of this type of treatment are abundant. The majority of chemotherapeutic agents used in clinics are highly toxic to both tumor cells and normal tissues due to the lack of specificity. Resistance can develop due to overexposure of these agents. To address these issues, these agents must be made more exclusive toward the tumor site. We have developed a macromolecular carrier based on the sequence of the biopolymer elastin-like polypeptide (ELP that is able to aggregate upon reaching the externally heated tumor environment. This carrier is specific to the tumor as it only aggregates at the heated tumor site. ELP is soluble below its transition temperature but will aggregate when the temperature is raised above its transition temperature. ELP was modified by p21, a cell cycle inhibitory peptide, and the addition of Bac, a cell-penetrating peptide with nuclear localization capabilities. In this study, p21-ELP-Bac and its control, ELP-p21, were used in cell proliferation studies using the pancreatic cancer cell lines Panc-1, MiaPaca-2, and S2013. ELP-p21 had little effect on proliferation, while the half maximal inhibitory concentration of p21-ELP-Bac was ~30 µM. As translocation across the plasma membrane is a limiting step for delivery of macromolecules, these polypeptides were utilized in a pancreatic xenograft model to study the plasma clearance, biodistribution, tumor accumulation, and tumor reduction capabilities of the polypeptide with and without a cell-penetrating peptide.Keywords: elastin-like polypeptide, peptide, targeted drug delivery, macromolecule

  11. Effects of social isolation stress on immune response and survival time of mouse with liver cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Liu; Zhun Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of isolation stress on mouse with liver cancer and possible associated mechanisms.METHODS: Transplantable murine hepatoma22 (H22) model was used to evaluate the effects of social isolation stress on murine liver cancer. Mice were immunized with sheep red blood cell (SRBC) and intraperitoneally inoculated with H22 cell, then divided into two groups, one reared individually as group (Ⅰ) and the other reared in groups as group (G). Titer of antibody to SRBC and interleukin 2 (IL-2) in serum was monitored. The survival time of mouse with liver cancer was observed.RESULTS: The titer of antibody to SRBC in group (G) was 1:24.5 and that in group (Ⅰ) was 1:11.2. There was a significant difference between these two groups (t = 2.60,P = 0.02). A significant difference in IL-2 concentration was observed between group (G) (39.6 ng/L) and group (Ⅰ) (47.1 ng/L, t= 2.14, P = 0.046). The survival time in group (G) (16.5 d) was markedly longer than that in group (Ⅰ) (13.2 d, t = 3.46, P = 0.002).CONCLUSION: Our study suggests that survival time of the mouse bearing H22 tumor is affected by the social isolation stress and the associated mechanism may be the immunological changes under the social isolation stress.

  12. Loss of adipose triglyceride lipase is associated with human cancer and induces mouse pulmonary neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zoughbi, Wael; Pichler, Martin; Gorkiewicz, Gregor; Guertl-Lackner, Barbara; Haybaeck, Johannes; Jahn, Stephan W; Lackner, Carolin; Liegl-Atzwanger, Bernadette; Popper, Helmut; Schauer, Silvia; Nusshold, Elisa; Kindt, Alida S D; Trajanoski, Zlatko; Speicher, Michael R; Haemmerle, Guenther; Zimmermann, Robert; Zechner, Rudolf; Vesely, Paul W; Hoefler, Gerald

    2016-06-01

    Metabolic reprogramming is a hallmark of cancer. Understanding cancer metabolism is instrumental to devise innovative therapeutic approaches. Anabolic metabolism, including the induction of lipogenic enzymes, is a key feature of proliferating cells. Here, we report a novel tumor suppressive function for adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the rate limiting enzyme in the triglyceride hydrolysis cascade.In immunohistochemical analysis, non-small cell lung cancers, pancreatic adenocarcinoma as well as leiomyosarcoma showed significantly reduced levels of ATGL protein compared to corresponding normal tissues. The ATGL gene was frequently deleted in various forms of cancers. Low levels of ATGL mRNA correlated with significantly reduced survival in patients with ovarian, breast, gastric and non-small cell lung cancers. Remarkably, pulmonary neoplasia including invasive adenocarcinoma developed spontaneously in mice lacking ATGL pointing to an important role for this lipase in controlling tumor development.Loss of ATGL, as detected in several forms of human cancer, induces spontaneous development of pulmonary neoplasia in a mouse model. Our results, therefore, suggest a novel tumor suppressor function for ATGL and contribute to the understanding of cancer metabolism. We propose to evaluate loss of ATGL protein expression for the diagnosis of malignant tumors. Finally, modulation of the lipolytic pathway may represent a novel therapeutic approach in the treatment of human cancer.

  13. Genetic ablation of Bcl-x attenuates invasiveness without affecting apoptosis or tumor growth in a mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey H Hager

    Full Text Available Tumor cell death is modulated by an intrinsic cell death pathway controlled by the pro- and anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family. Up-regulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members has been shown to suppress cell death in pre-clinical models of human cancer and is implicated in human tumor progression. Previous gain-of-function studies in the RIP1-Tag2 model of pancreatic islet carcinogenesis, involving uniform or focal/temporal over-expression of Bcl-x(L, demonstrated accelerated tumor formation and growth. To specifically assess the role of endogenous Bcl-x in regulating apoptosis and tumor progression in this model, we engineered a pancreatic beta-cell-specific knockout of both alleles of Bcl-x using the Cre-LoxP system of homologous recombination. Surprisingly, there was no appreciable effect on tumor cell apoptosis rates or on tumor growth in the Bcl-x knockout mice. Other anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members were expressed but not substantively altered at the mRNA level in the Bcl-x-null tumors, suggestive of redundancy without compensatory transcriptional up-regulation. Interestingly, the incidence of invasive carcinomas was reduced, and tumor cells lacking Bcl-x were impaired in invasion in a two-chamber trans-well assay under conditions mimicking hypoxia. Thus, while the function of Bcl-x in suppressing apoptosis and thereby promoting tumor growth is evidently redundant, genetic ablation implicates Bcl-x in selectively facilitating invasion, consistent with a recent report documenting a pro-invasive capability of Bcl-x(L upon exogenous over-expression.

  14. A mouse model of in utero transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijagal, Amar; Le, Tom; Wegorzewska, Marta; Mackenzie, Tippi C

    2011-01-01

    The transplantation of stem cells and viruses in utero has tremendous potential for treating congenital disorders in the human fetus. For example, in utero transplantation (IUT) of hematopoietic stem cells has been used to successfully treat patients with severe combined immunodeficiency. In several other conditions, however, IUT has been attempted without success. Given these mixed results, the availability of an efficient non-human model to study the biological sequelae of stem cell transplantation and gene therapy is critical to advance this field. We and others have used the mouse model of IUT to study factors affecting successful engraftment of in utero transplanted hematopoietic stem cells in both wild-type mice and those with genetic diseases. The fetal environment also offers considerable advantages for the success of in utero gene therapy. For example, the delivery of adenoviral, adeno-associated viral, retroviral, and lentiviral vectors into the fetus has resulted in the transduction of multiple organs distant from the site of injection with long-term gene expression. in utero gene therapy may therefore be considered as a possible treatment strategy for single gene disorders such as muscular dystrophy or cystic fibrosis. Another potential advantage of IUT is the ability to induce immune tolerance to a specific antigen. As seen in mice with hemophilia, the introduction of Factor IX early in development results in tolerance to this protein. In addition to its use in investigating potential human therapies, the mouse model of IUT can be a powerful tool to study basic questions in developmental and stem cell biology. For example, one can deliver various small molecules to induce or inhibit specific gene expression at defined gestational stages and manipulate developmental pathways. The impact of these alterations can be assessed at various timepoints after the initial transplantation. Furthermore, one can transplant pluripotent or lineage specific progenitor

  15. Recent advances in mouse models of obesityandnonalcoholic steatohepatitis-associatedhepatocarcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth mostcommon cancer, and obesity has been establishedas a risk factor for HCC development. Nonalcoholicsteatohepatitis (NASH) is apparently the key linkbetween obesity and hepatocarcinogenesis, and obesityalso accelerates HCC development synergistically withother risk factors, such as hepatitis virus infectionand alcohol consumption. As an explanation for thepathogenesis of NASH, the so-called "two-hit" theoryhas been widely accepted, but recently, a better model,the so-called "multiple-hits hypothesis" was proposed,which states that many disease-promoting factors mayoccur in parallel, rather than consecutively. However,the overall mechanism remains largely unknown. Variouscell-cell and organ-organ interactions are involved inthe pathogenesis of NASH, and thus appropriate in vivodisease models are essential for a deeper understanding.However, replicating the full spectrum of human NASHhas been difficult, as NASH involves obesity, insulinresistance, steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and ultimately HCC,and the lack of an appropriate mouse model has beena considerable barrier to determining the missing linksamong obesity, NASH, and HCC. In recent years, severalinnovative mouse models presenting obesity- and NASHassociatedHCC have been established by modifieddiets, chemotoxic agents, genetic manipulation, or acombination of these factors, shedding some light onthis complex network and providing new therapeuticstrategies. Thus, in this paper, I review the mousemodels of obesity- and NASH-associated HCC, especiallyfocusing on recent advances and their clinical relevance.

  16. In vivo analysis of p53 tumor suppressor function using genetically engineered mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Brož, Daniela Kenzelmann; Attardi, Laura D.

    2010-01-01

    p53 is a crucial tumor suppressor, as evidenced by the high propensity for p53 mutation during human cancer development. Already more than a decade ago, p53 knockout mice confirmed that p53 is critical for preventing tumorigenesis. More recently, a host of p53 knock-in mouse strains has been generated, with the aim of either more precisely modeling p53 mutations in human cancer or better understanding p53's regulation and downstream activities. In the first category, several mouse strains exp...

  17. Efficacy and toxicity of replication-competent adenovirus-mediated double suicide gene therapy in combination with radiation therapy in an orthotopic mouse prostate cancer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of replication-competent adenovirus-mediated double suicide gene therapy in an adjuvant setting with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in an experimental prostate cancer model in preparation for a Phase I clinical study in humans. Methods: For efficacy studies, i.m. DU145 and intraprostatic LNCaP C4-2 tumors were established in immune-deficient mice. Tumors were injected with the lytic, replication-competent Ad5-CD/TKrep adenovirus containing a cytosine deaminase (CD)/herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-1 TK) fusion gene. Two days later, mice were administered 1 week of 5-fluorocytosine + ganciclovir (GCV) prodrug therapy and fractionated doses of EBRT (trimodal therapy). Tumor control rate of trimodal therapy was compared to that of EBRT alone. For toxicology studies, immune-competent male mice received a single intraprostatic injection (1010 vp) of the replication-competent Ad5-CD/TKrep adenovirus. Two days later, mice were administered 4 weeks of 5-fluorocytosine + GCV prodrug therapy and 56 Gy EBRT to the pelvic region. The toxicity of trimodal therapy was assessed by histopathologic analysis of major organs and clinical chemistries. Results: In both the i.m. DU145 and intraprostatic LNCaP C4-2 tumor models, trimodal therapy significantly improved primary tumor control beyond that of EBRT alone. In the DU145 model, trimodal therapy resulted in a tumor growth delay (70 days) that was more than twice that (32 days) of EBRT alone. Whereas EBRT failed to eradicate DU145 tumors, trimodal therapy resulted in 25% tumor cure. In the LNCaP C4-2 tumor model, EBRT slowed the growth of intraprostatic tumors, but resulted in no tumor cures, and 57% of the mice developed retroperitoneal lymph node metastases at 3 months. By contrast, trimodal therapy resulted in 44% tumor cure and reduced significantly the percentage (13%) of lymph node metastases relative to EBRT alone. Overall

  18. A transgenic mouse model of metastatic carcinoma involving transdifferentiation of a gastric epithelial lineage progenitor to a neuroendocrine phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Syder, Andrew J.; Karam, Sherif M.; Mills, Jason C.; Ippolito, Joseph E.; Ansari, Habib R.; Farook, Vidya; Jeffrey I Gordon

    2004-01-01

    Human neuroendocrine cancers (NECs) arise in various endoderm-derived epithelia, have diverse morphologic features, exhibit a wide range of growth phenotypes, and generally have obscure cellular origins and ill-defined molecular mediators of initiation and progression. We describe a transgenic mouse model of metastatic gastric cancer initiated by expressing simian virus 40 large tumor antigen (SV40 TAg), under control of regulatory elements from the mouse Atp4b gene, in the progenitors of aci...

  19. Lewis肺癌细胞构建小鼠股骨骨癌痛行为模型%A mouse model of bone cancer pain signs constructed by Lewis lung carcinoma cells inoculation of the femur

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄晓玲; 孔高茵; 黄东

    2009-01-01

    目的 观察骨癌痛行为模型小鼠影像学改变和骨质损害程度.方法 将Lewis肺癌细胞接种于雄性C57BL/6小鼠股骨骨髓腔,构建骨癌痛动物行为模型.术后7 d始隔日观察小鼠自发痛反应、测定行走评分与热缩腿反射潜伏期.术后第7、15、23天,行双侧后肢X线摄片,评估肿瘤诱发的骨组织破坏程度.同时取术侧后肢行苏木精-伊红(HE)染色后观察骨质破坏情况,术后23 d另取腰段脊髓做神经胶质酸性蛋白(GFAP)免疫组化检查.结果 实验组接种后第11d左右出现明显自发痛行为,表现为自发抬足时间延长;第13天左右出现明显行走诱发患肢痛和热痛敏现象,表现为使用评分持续下降与缩腿潜伏期显著降低.术后23 d放射学结果显示,术侧股骨下段骨髓腔消失,骨皮质中断.同时HE染色可见肿瘤细胞充满骨髓腔,且穿破骨皮质向外生长,侵犯周围肌肉组织.免疫组化结果示术侧腰段脊髓星形胶质细胞增生、肥大.结论 采用Lewis肺癌细胞构建小鼠骨癌痛模型是可行的.%Objective To evaluate the behavior and bone destruction of the mouse model of bone cancer pain signs. Method A mouse model of bone cancer pain signs was developed by intra-femur inoculations of Lewis lung carcinoma cells in C57BL/6 mice. Spontane-ous lifting time, ambulatory score and paw withdrawal latencies to radiant heat stimulation were measured in alternative days throughout the experiment. The structural damage of the femur were monitored by radiogram on the 7th, 15th and 23rd day respectively, and the pathohisto-logical changes of the femur bones were observed by hematoxylin-eosin staining (HE) staining on the same days. Meanwhile, the glial fibril-lary acid protein (GFAP) immunohistochemistry changes of the spinal cord in lumbar segments on the 23rd day after inoculation were ob-served. Results Mice received intra-femur inoculation of Lewis lung carcinoma cells gradually developed

  20. Criteria for Validating Mouse Models of Psychiatric Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Chadman, Kathryn K.; Yang, Mu; Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2009-01-01

    Animal models of human diseases are in widespread use for biomedical research. Mouse models with a mutation in a single gene or multiple genes are excellent research tools for understanding the role of a specific gene in the etiology of a human genetic disease. Ideally, the mouse phenotypes will recapitulate the human phenotypes exactly. However, exact matches are rare, particularly in mouse models of neuropsychiatric disorders. This article summarizes the current strategies for optimizing th...

  1. Effect of ghrelin and anamorelin (ONO-7643), a selective ghrelin receptor agonist, on tumor growth in a lung cancer mouse xenograft model

    OpenAIRE

    Northrup, R.; K. Kuroda; Duus, E. Manning; Barnes, S. Routt; Cheatham, L; Wiley, T.; Pietra, C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Anamorelin (ONO-7643) is an orally active ghrelin receptor agonist in development for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)-related anorexia/cachexia. It displays both orexigenic and anabolic properties via ghrelin mimetic activity and transient increases in growth hormone (GH). However, increasing GH and insulin-like growth factor-1 in cancer patients raises concerns of potentially stimulating tumor growth. Therefore, we investigated the effect of ghrelin and anamorelin on tumor growth ...

  2. Mouse Models for Efficacy Testing of Agents against Radiation Carcinogenesis—A Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Leena Rivina; Robert Schiestl

    2012-01-01

    As the number of cancer survivors treated with radiation as a part of their therapy regimen is constantly increasing, so is concern about radiation-induced cancers. This increases the need for therapeutic and mitigating agents against secondary neoplasias. Development and efficacy testing of these agents requires not only extensive in vitro assessment, but also a set of reliable animal models of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. The laboratory mouse (Mus musculus) remains one of the best anim...

  3. Diabetes protects from prostate cancer by downregulating androgen receptor: new insights from LNCaP cells and PAC120 mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Barbosa-Desongles

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes has been associated with decreased risk of prostate cancer in observational studies, and this inverse association has been recently confirmed in several large cohort studies. However the mechanisms involved in this protective effect remain to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to explore whether different features of type 2 diabetes (hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α] protect against the development of prostate cancer. For this purpose LNCaP cells were used for in vitro experiments and nude mice in which PAC120 (hormone-dependent human prostate cancer xenografts had been implanted were used for in vivo examinations. We provide evidence that increasing glucose concentrations downregulate androgen receptor (AR mRNA and protein levels through NF-κB activation in LNCaP cells. Moreover, there was a synergic effect of glucose and TNFα in downregulating the AR in LNCaP cells. By contrast, insulin had no effect on AR regulation. In vivo experiments showed that streptozotocin-induced diabetes (STZ-DM produces tumor growth retardation and a significant reduction in AR expression in PAC120 prostate cancer mice. In conclusion, our results suggest that hyperglycemia and TNF-α play an important role in protecting against prostate cancer by reducing androgen receptor levels via NF-κB.

  4. MicroRNAs in mouse models of lymphoid malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola A. O. Zanesi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs has revealed a new layer of gene expression regulation that affects many normal and pathologic biological systems. Among the malignancies affected by the dysregulation of miRNAs there are cancers of lymphoid origin, in which miRNAs are thought to have tumor suppressive or tumor promoting activities, depending on the nature of their specific targets. In the last 4-5 years, the experimental field that provided the deepest insights into the in vivo biology of miRNAs is that of mouse modeling in which transgenic and knockout animals mimic, respectively, over-expression or down-regulation of specific miRNAs involved in human leukemia/lymphoma. This review discusses recent advances in our understanding of lymphoid malignancies based on the natural and engineered mouse models of three different miRNAs, miR-15a/16-1 cluster, miR-155, and miR-17-92 cluster.

  5. Generation of a mouse model for studying the role of upregulated RTEL1 activity in tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoli; Sandhu, Sumit; Nabi, Zinnatun; Ding, Hao

    2012-10-01

    Regulator of telomere length 1 (RTEL1) is a DNA helicase protein that has been demonstrated to be required for the maintenance of telomere length and genomic stability. It has also been found to be essential for DNA homologous recombination during DNA repairing. Human RTEL1 genomic locus (20q13.3) is frequently amplified in multiple types of human cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma and gastrointestinal tract tumors, indicating that upregulated RTEL1 activity could be important for tumorigenesis. In this study, we have developed a conditional transgenic mouse model that overexpress mouse Rtel1 in a Cre-excision manner. By crossing with a ubiquitous Cre mouse line, we further demonstrated that these established Rtel1 conditional transgenic mice allow to efficiently and highly express a functional Rtel1 that is able to rescue the embryonic defects of Rtel1 null mouse allele. Furthermore, we demonstrated that more than 70% transgenic mice that widely overexpress Rtel1 developed liver tumors that recapitulate many malignant features of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Our work not only generated a valuable mouse model for determining the role of RTEL1 in the development of cancers, but also provided the first genetic evidence to support that amplification of RTEL1, as observed in several types of human cancers, is tumorigenic. PMID:22238064

  6. Lentivirus-mediated RNA interference targeting the ObR gene in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells in a nude mouse xenograft model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Rong-quan; GU Jun-chao; DU Song-tao; YU Wei; WANG Yu; ZHANG Zhong-tao; BAI Zhi-gang; MA Xue-mei

    2012-01-01

    Background There is a significant association between obesity and breast cancer,which is possibly due to the expression of leptin.Therefore,it is important to clarify the role of leptin/ObR (leptin receptor) signaling during the progression of human breast cancer.Methods Nude mice with xenografts of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells were administered recombinant human leptin subcutaneous via injection around the tumor site.Mice in the experimental group were intratumorally injected with ObR-RNAi-lentivirus,while negative control group mice were injected with the same dose of negative-lentivirus.Tumor size was blindly measured every other day,and mRNA and protein expression levels of ObR,estrogen receptor α(ERα),and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) for each group were determined.Results Knockdown of ObR-treated xenografted nude mice with a high leptin microenvironment was successfully established.Local injection of ObR-RNAi-lentivirus significantly suppressed the established tumor growth in nude mice.ObR level was significantly lower in the experimental group than in the negative control group,while the amounts of ERα and VEGF expression were significantly lower in the leptin group than in the control group (P <0.01 for all).Conclusions Inhibition of leptin/ObR signaling is essential to breast cancer proliferation and possible crosstalk between ObR and ERα,and VEGF,and may lead to novel therapeutic treatments aiming at targeting ObR in breast cancers.

  7. A Transgenic Mouse Model of Poliomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Satoshi; Nagata, Noriyo

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic mice (tg mice) that express the human poliovirus receptor (PVR), CD155, are susceptible to poliovirus and develop a neurological disease that resembles human poliomyelitis. Assessment of the neurovirulence levels of poliovirus strains, including mutant viruses produced by reverse genetics, circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus, and vaccine candidates, is useful for basic research of poliovirus pathogenicity, the surveillance of circulating polioviruses, and the quality control of oral live poliovirus vaccines, and does not require the use of monkeys. Furthermore, PVR-tg mice are useful for studying poliovirus tissue tropism and host immune responses. PVR-tg mice can be bred with mice deficient in the genes involved in viral pathogenicity. This report describes the methods used to analyze the pathogenicity and immune responses of poliovirus using the PVR-tg mouse model. PMID:26983733

  8. A mouse model for testing remyelinating therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, C Brian; Sun, Sunny; Roholt, Andrew; Benson, Emily; Edberg, Dale; Medicetty, Satish; Dutta, Ranjan; Kidd, Grahame; Macklin, Wendy B; Trapp, Bruce

    2016-09-01

    Used in combination with immunomodulatory therapies, remyelinating therapies are a viable therapeutic approach for treating individuals with multiple sclerosis. Studies of postmortem MS brains identified greater remyelination in demyelinated cerebral cortex than in demyelinated brain white matter and implicated reactive astrocytes as an inhibitor of white matter remyelination. An animal model that recapitulates these phenotypes would benefit the development of remyelination therapeutics. We have used a modified cuprizone protocol that causes a consistent and robust demyelination of mouse white matter and cerebral cortex. Spontaneous remyelination occurred significantly faster in the cerebral cortex than in white matter and reactive astrocytes were more abundant in white matter lesions. Remyelination of white matter and cerebral cortex was therapeutically enhanced by daily injections of thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3). In summary, we describe an in vivo demyelination/remyelination paradigm that can be powered to determine efficacy of therapies that enhance white matter and cortical remyelination. PMID:27384502

  9. Triplex-forming oligonucleotides targeting c-MYC potentiate the anti-tumor activity of gemcitabine in a mouse model of human cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Boulware, Stephen B.; Christensen, Laura A.; Thames, Howard; Coghlan, Lezlee; Vasquez, Karen M.; Finch, Rick A.

    2013-01-01

    Antimetabolite chemotherapy remains an essential cancer treatment modality, but often produces only marginal benefit due to the lack of tumor specificity, the development of drug resistance, and the refractoriness of slowly-proliferating cells in solid tumors. Here, we report a novel strategy to circumvent the proliferation-dependence of traditional antimetabolite-based therapies. Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) were used to target site-specific DNA damage to the human c-MYC oncogene,...

  10. Triplex-forming oligonucleotides targeting c-MYC potentiate the anti-tumor activity of gemcitabine in a mouse model of human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulware, Stephen B; Christensen, Laura A; Thames, Howard; Coghlan, Lezlee; Vasquez, Karen M; Finch, Rick A

    2014-09-01

    Antimetabolite chemotherapy remains an essential cancer treatment modality, but often produces only marginal benefit due to the lack of tumor specificity, the development of drug resistance, and the refractoriness of slowly proliferating cells in solid tumors. Here, we report a novel strategy to circumvent the proliferation-dependence of traditional antimetabolite-based therapies. Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) were used to target site-specific DNA damage to the human c-MYC oncogene, thereby inducing replication-independent, unscheduled DNA repair synthesis (UDS) preferentially in the TFO-targeted region. The TFO-directed UDS facilitated incorporation of the antimetabolite, gemcitabine (GEM), into the damaged oncogene, thereby potentiating the anti-tumor activity of GEM. Mice bearing COLO 320DM human colon cancer xenografts (containing amplified c-MYC) were treated with a TFO targeted to c-MYC in combination with GEM. Tumor growth inhibition produced by the combination was significantly greater than with either TFO or GEM alone. Specific TFO binding to the genomic c-MYC gene was demonstrated, and TFO-induced DNA damage was confirmed by NBS1 accumulation, supporting a mechanism of enhanced efficacy of GEM via TFO-targeted DNA damage-induced UDS. Thus, coupling antimetabolite chemotherapeutics with a strategy that facilitates selective targeting of cells containing amplification of cancer-relevant genes can improve their activity against solid tumors, while possibly minimizing host toxicity. PMID:23681918

  11. 99mTc-PR81 as a Potential Agent for Imaging Human Breast Cancer; Radiolabeling, Quality Control & Radioimmunoscintigraphic Studies in Mouse Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "M. Salouti

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Background: Breast cancer is the sec-ond leading cause of cancer death in women. More than 180,000 women are diagnosed with breast can-cer each year in the United States. Radioimmunoscin-tigraphy is a technique which uses radiolabeled anti-bodies to visualize tumors, taking advantage of anti-gens preferentially expressed by malignant tissues. The PR81 is a new murine anti-MUC1 monoclonal antibody that was found to react with the membrane extracts of several human breast cancerous tissues. In this study we have developed a method for direct la-beling of this MAb with 99mTc which is very simple, rapid and efficient. The quality control of the new agent and imaging studies in BALB/c mice bearing breast tumor xenografts were performed. Materials & Methods: The Ab reduction was per-formed with 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME at a molar ratio of 2000:1 (2-ME:MAb and reduced Ab was la-beled with 99mTc via methylene diphosphonate (MDP as a transchelator. The labeling efficiency was determined by ITLC. The amount of radiocolloids was measured by cellulose nitrate electrophoresis. Stability of labeled product was checked in fresh hu-man serum by gel filtration chromatography (FPLC over 24 hrs. The integrity of labeled MAb was checked by means of SDS-PAGE. Cell-binding assay was used to test binding ability of 99mTc-PR81 to MCF 7 cells. Biodistribution was studied in normal BALB/c mice at 4 and 24 hr post-injection. The tumor imag-ing was performed in female BALB/c mice with breast tumor xenografts at 24 hr after the new com-plex injection. Results: The labeling efficiency was 94.2%±2.3 and radiocolloids were 2.5%±1.7. In vitro stability was 70%±5.7 in fresh human serum over 24 hrs. There was no significant Ab fragmentation due to labeling procedure. Both labeled and unlabeled PR81 were able to compete for binding to MCF 7 cells. Biodis-tribution studies in normal BALB/c mice showed that there was no important accumulation in any organ. The

  12. Kanglaite combined Gemcitabine inhibits growth of nude mouse subcutaneous transplantation tumor of human PC-3 pancreatic cancer cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; JIN Jian-guang; QIN Zhao-yin

    2005-01-01

    Objective:To study the mechanisms of pancreatic cancer treatment with Kanglaite combined Gemcitabine by investigating the relationship between the apoptosis and the expression of bcl-2, Bax and VEGF in pancreatic cancer cells.Methods:Nude mouse subcutaneous transplantation tumor model of Human PC-3 pancreatic cancer was established; the expressions of bcl-2, Bax and VEGF of transplantation tumor cell were determined; the earlier apoptosis rate of pancreatic cancer cell and the gross tumor volume were determined. Results:Kanglaite combined Gemcitabine remarkably decreased the protein expression of bcl-2,raised the expression of Bax,increased the apoptosis rate of the pancreatic cancer and contract the gross tumor volume. Kanglaite greatly decreased the protein expression of VEGF of the tumor cell. Conclusion:Therapeutic efficacy of Kanglaite combined Gemcitabine is far better than separate use of the two medicines in the pancreatic cancer transplantation tumor treatment.

  13. Conditional Expression of Human 15-Lipoxygenase-1 in Mouse Prostate Induces Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia: The FLiMP Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uddhav P. Kelavkar

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and mortality of prostate cancer (PCa vary greatly in different geographic regions, for which lifestyle factors, such as dietary fat intake, have been implicated. Human 15-lipoxygenase-1 (h15-LO-1, which metabolizes polyunsaturated fatty acids, is a highly regulated, tissue-specific, lipid-peroxidating enzyme that functions in physiological membrane remodeling and in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, inflammation, and carcinogenesis. We have shown that aberrant overexpression of 15-LO-1 occurs in human PCa, particularly high-grade PCa, and in high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN, and that the murine orthologue is increased in SV40-based genetically engineered mouse (GEM models of PCa, such as LADY and TRansgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate. To further define the role of 15-LO-1 in prostate carcinogenesis, we established a novel GEM model with targeted overexpression of h15-LO-1 in the prostate [human fifteen lipoxygenase-1 in mouse prostate (FLiMP]. We used a Cre- mediated and a loxP-mediated recombination strategy to target h15-LO-1 specifically to the prostate of C57BL/6 mice. Wild-type (wt, FLiMP+/-, and FLiMP+/+ mice aged 7 to 21, 24 to 28, and 35 weeks were characterized by histopathology, immunohistochemistry (IHC, and DNA/RNA and enzyme analyses. Compared to wt mice, h15-LO-1 enzyme activity was increased similarly in both homozygous FLiMP+/+ and hemizygous FLiMP+/- prostates. Dorsolateral and ventral prostates of FLiMP mice showed focal and progressive epithelial hyperplasia with nuclear atypia, indicative of the definition of mouse prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (mPIN according to the National Cancer Institute. These foci showed increased proliferation by Ki-67 IHC. No progression to invasive PCa was noted up to 35 weeks. By IHC, h15-LO-1 expression was limited to luminal epithelial cells, with increased expression in mPIN foci (similar to human HGPIN. In summary, targeted overexpression of h

  14. Rhodamine-RCA in vivo labeling guided laser capture microdissection of cancer functional angiogenic vessels in a murine squamous cell carcinoma mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bur Monica

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer growth, invasion and metastasis are highly related to tumor-associated neovasculature. The presence and progression of endothelial cells in cancer is chaotic, unorganized, and angiogenic vessels are less functional. Therefore, not all markers appearing on the chaotic endothelial cells are accessible if a drug is given through the vascular route. Identifying endothelial cell markers from functional cancer angiogenic vessels will indicate the accessibility and potential efficacy of vascular targeted therapies. Results In order to quickly and effectively identify endothelial cell markers on the functional and accessible tumor vessels, we developed a novel technique by which tumor angiogenic vessels are labeled in vivo followed by Laser Capture Microdissection of microscopically isolated endothelial cells for genomic screening. Female C3H mice (N = 5 with established SCCVII tumors were treated with Rhodamine-RCA lectin by tail vein injection, and after fluorescence microscopy showed a successful vasculature staining, LCM was then performed on frozen section tissue using the PixCell II instrument with CapSure HS caps under the Rhodamine filter. By this approach, the fluorescent angiogenic endothelial cells were successfully picked up. As a result, the total RNA concentration increased from an average of 33.4 ng/ul +/- 24.3 (mean +/- S.D. to 1913.4 ng/ul +/- 164. Relatively pure RNA was retrieved from both endothelial and epithelial cells as indicated by the 260/280 ratios (range 2.22–2.47. RT-PCR and gene electrophoresis successfully detected CD31 and Beta-Actin molecules with minimal Keratin 19 expression, which served as the negative control. Conclusion Our present study demonstrates that in vivo Rhodamine RCA angiogenic vessel labeling provided a practical approach to effectively guide functional endothelial cell isolation by laser capture microdissection with fluorescent microscopy, resulting in high quality RNA and

  15. The tumor suppressor kinase LKB1: lessons from mouse models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saara Ollila; Tomi P. M(a)kel(a)

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the tumor suppressor gene LKB1 are important in hereditary Peutz-Jeghers syndrome,as well as in sporadic cancers including lung and cervical cancer.LKB1 is a kinase-activating Kinase,and a number of LKB1-dependent phosphorylation cascades regulate fundamental cellular and organismal processes in at least metabolism,polarity,cytoskeleton organization,and proliferation.Conditional targeting approaches are beginning to demonstrate the relevance and specificity of these signaling pathways in development and homeostasis of multiple organs.More than one of the pathways also appear to contribute to tumor growth following Lkb1 deficiencies based on a number of mouse tumor models.Lkb1-dependent activation of AMPK and subsequent inactivation of mammalian target of rapamycin signaling are implicated in several of the models,and other less well characterized pathways are also involved.Conditional targeting studies of Lkb1 also point an important role of LKB1 in epithelial-masenchymal interactions,significantly expanding knowledge on the relevance of LKB1 in human disease.

  16. Antibodies to Placental Immunoregulatory Ferritin with Transfer of Polyclonal Lymphocytes Arrest MCF-7 Human Breast Cancer Growth in a Nude Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Halpern

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The recently cloned human gene named “placental immunoregulatory ferritin” (PLIF is a pregnancyrelated immunomodulator. Recombinant PLIF and its bioactive domain C48 are immune-suppressive and induce pronounced IL-10 production by immune cells. PLIF is expressed in the placenta and breast cancer cells. Blocking PLIF in pregnant mice by anti-C48 antibodies inhibited placental and fetal growth and modulated the cytokine network. It has been revealed that anti-C48 treatment inhibited MCF-7 tumor growth in nude mice. However, this significant effect was observed only in those transfused with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Blocking PLIF in tumor-engrafted human immune cell transfused mice resulted in massive infiltration of human CD45+ cells (mainly CD8+ T cells, both intratumorally and in the tumor periphery, and a significant number of caspase-3+ cells. In vitro, antiC48 treatment of MCF-7 tumor cells cocultured with human lymphocytes induced a significant increase in interferon-γ secretion. We conclude that blocking PLIF inhibits breast cancer growth, possibly by an effect on the cytokine network in immune cells and on breakdown of immunosuppression.

  17. Enriched environment housing enhances the sensitivity of mouse pancreatic cancer to chemotherapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yufeng; Gan, Yu; Yuan, Hui; Wang, Qing; Fan, Yingchao; Li, Guohua; Zhang, Jian; Yao, Ming; Gu, Jianren; Tu, Hong

    2016-04-29

    Living in an enriched housing environment is an established model of eustress and has been consistently shown to reduce the growth of transplanted tumors, including pancreatic cancer. Here, we further investigate the influence of an enriched environment (EE) on the efficacy of chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer. Male C57BL/6 mice were housed in EE or standard environment (SE) conditions and transplanted with syngeneic Panc02 pancreatic cancer cells. Tumor-bearing mice were treated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or gemcitabine (GEM) to examine their sensitivities to chemotherapy. The results showed that both 5-FU and GEM exerted the dose dependent inhibition of tumor growth. The tumor inhibition rates of low-dose 5-FU and GEM were improved from 17.7% and 23.6% to 46.3% and 49.9% by EE housing. Importantly, tumor cells isolated from the pancreatic cancer xenografts of EE mice had significantly enhanced sensitivities to both 5-FU and GEM (IC50 for 5-FU: 2.8 μM versus 27.3 μM; IC50 for GEM: 0.8 μM versus 5.0 μM). Furthermore, using microarray analyses, we identified the "ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter" that was overrepresented among EE-induced down-regulated genes in pancreatic cancer. Particularly, the tumoral expression of ABC transporter A8b (ABCA8b) was confirmed to be significantly decreased by EE. Over-expression of ABCA8b in mouse pancreatic cancer cells led to a marked decrease in the sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs both in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, our data indicate that benign stressful stimulation can synergistically boost the efficiency of chemotherapeutics in pancreatic cancer, which suggests a novel strategy for adjuvant cancer therapy.

  18. Establishment of a mouse mammary cancer model stably expressing human HER2/neu gene and luciferase gene%表达人HER2/neu及荧光素酶的小鼠乳腺癌模型的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴婷; 檀英霞; 王颖丽; 李素波; 鲍国强; 季守平

    2012-01-01

    Objective To establish a mouse breast cancer model stably expressing human HER2/neu and firefly lucif-erase gene. Methods 4T1 cells were successively transfected with human HER2/neu and firefly luciferase gene and selected with G418 and hygromycin respectively. The HER2/neu and luciferase protein in selected clones were detected by Western-blot and bioluminescence imaging technology. Finally, the 1. 5 x 10 4T1 cells stably expressing HER2/neu and luciferase gene were transplanted in the mammary fatpad of BALB/c mice. The proliferation and metastasis of the tumor graft were observed and determined with bioluminescence imaging technology. Results and Conclusion After transfection and selection, G418 and hygromycin resistant 4T1 clones were obtained. Western blot analysis showed the transfected 4T1 cells expressed a high level of HER2/neu protein. FACS results showed that almost all the cells from the selected clone expressed GFP protein. Tumor graft experiments showed that the transfected cells had similar in vivo tumorigenesis and metastasis to wild-type 4T1 cells. The results suggest that an HER2/neu- and luciferase-expressing mouse breast cancer model is successfully established.%目的 建立表达HER2/neu表皮生长因子受体及萤火虫荧光素酶基因的小鼠乳腺癌细胞模型.方法 将重组人HER2/neu原癌基因真核表达载体与荧光素酶报告基因依次转染小鼠乳腺癌4T1细胞系,用G418与潮霉素加压筛选阳性克隆,Western印迹及活体成像技术鉴定HER2/neu和荧光素酶在4T1细胞中的表达.在BALB/c小鼠前肢乳腺皮下注射该细胞1.5×106个,活体成像观察肿瘤的生长及转移.结果与结论经过两步转染获得抗G418及潮霉素4T1细胞,Western印迹结果显示,该细胞高表达HER2/neu.流式细胞术检测结果提示几乎所有细胞均有GFP的表达.用该细胞株接种小鼠后具有与野生型4T1细胞相似的成瘤性和转移能力.实验结果提示

  19. Challenges in pre-clinical testing of anti-cancer drugs in cell culture and in animal models

    OpenAIRE

    HogenEsch, Harm; Yu Nikitin, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Experiments with cultures of human tumor cell lines, xenografts of human tumors into immunodeficient mice, and mouse models of human cancer are important tools in the development and testing of anti-cancer drugs. Tumors are complex structures composed of genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous cancer cells that interact in a reciprocal manner with the stromal microenvironment and the immune system. Modeling the complexity of human cancers in cell culture and in mouse models for preclinic...

  20. Mouse Models for Efficacy Testing of Agents against Radiation Carcinogenesis — A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Rivina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available As the number of cancer survivors treated with radiation as a part of their therapy regimen is constantly increasing, so is concern about radiation-induced cancers. This increases the need for therapeutic and mitigating agents against secondary neoplasias. Development and efficacy testing of these agents requires not only extensive in vitro assessment, but also a set of reliable animal models of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. The laboratory mouse (Mus musculus remains one of the best animal model systems for cancer research due to its molecular and physiological similarities to man, small size, ease of breeding in captivity and a fully sequenced genome. This work reviews relevant M. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animal models and methodologies of induction of radiation-induced leukemia, thymic lymphoma, breast, and lung cancer in these models. Where available, the associated molecular pathologies are also included.

  1. A Gnotobiotic Mouse Model Demonstrates that Dietary Fiber Protects Against Colorectal Tumorigenesis in a Microbiota- and Butyrate–Dependent Manner

    OpenAIRE

    Donohoe, Dallas R.; Holley, Darcy; Collins, Leonard B.; Montgomery, Stephanie A.; Whitmore, Alan C.; Hillhouse, Andrew; Curry, Kaitlin P.; Renner, Sarah W.; Greenwalt, Alicia; Ryan, Elizabeth P.; Godfrey, Virginia; Heise, Mark T.; Threadgill, Deborah S.; Han, Anna; Swenberg, James A.

    2014-01-01

    It is controversial whether dietary fiber protects against colorectal cancer because of conflicting results from human epidemiologic studies. However, these studies and mouse models of colorectal cancer have not controlled the composition of gut microbiota, which ferment fiber into short-chain fatty acids such as butyrate. Butyrate is noteworthy because it has energetic and epigenetic functions in colonocytes and tumorsuppressive properties in colorectal-cancer cell lines. We utilized gnotobi...

  2. A novel chimeric flagellum fused with the multi-epitope vaccine CTB-UE prevents Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric cancer in a BALB/c mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hui; Lv, Xiaobo; Yang, Jue; Liu, Wei; Yang, Huan; Xi, Tao; Xing, Yingying

    2015-11-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection causes peptic ulcers, gastric adenocarcinoma, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. The eradication of H. pylori might be an effective means of preventing gastric cancer. A dual-antigen epitope and dual-adjuvant vaccine called CTB-UE-CF (CCF) was constructed by combining a multi-epitope vaccine CTB-UE with a novel chimeric flagellum (CF) to simultaneously activate Toll-like receptor (TLR) 5-agonist activity and preserve the immunogenicity of H. pylori flagellum FlaA. The evaluation of efficacy to reduce H. pylori colonization was performed using BALB/c mice by oral immunization with a triple dose of this vaccine strain. Two weeks after the last immunization, mice were sacrificed to determine specific antibody levels and proinflammatory cytokine production. To determine the presence of H. pylori, we detected the number of H. pylori by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) and measured the urease activity in the gastric tissue. The results showed that the immunogenicity and mucosal immune responses of CCF performed significantly better than those of CTB-UE. This dual-antigen epitope and dual-adjuvant system might greatly contribute to the development of a safe and efficient therapeutic vaccine for humans against H. pylori infection.

  3. Characterization of a mouse model of headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dongyue; Ren, Lynn; Qiu, Chang-Shen; Liu, Ping; Peterson, Jonathan; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Cao, Yu-Qing

    2016-08-01

    Migraine and other primary headache disorders affect a large population and cause debilitating pain. Establishing animal models that display behavioral correlates of long-lasting and ongoing headache, the most common and disabling symptom of migraine, is vital for the elucidation of disease mechanisms and identification of drug targets. We have developed a mouse model of headache, using dural application of capsaicin along with a mixture of inflammatory mediators (IScap) to simulate the induction of a headache episode. This elicited intermittent head-directed wiping and scratching as well as the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase in trigeminal ganglion neurons. Interestingly, dural application of IScap preferentially induced FOS protein expression in the excitatory but not inhibitory cervical/medullary dorsal horn neurons. The duration of IScap-induced behavior and the number of FOS-positive neurons correlated positively in individual mice; both were reduced to the control level by the pretreatment of antimigraine drug sumatriptan. Dural application of CGRP(8-37), the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist, also effectively blocked IScap-induced behavior, which suggests that the release of endogenous CGRP in the dura is necessary for IScap-induced nociception. These data suggest that dural IScap-induced nocifensive behavior in mice may be mechanistically related to the ongoing headache in humans. In addition, dural application of IScap increased resting time in female mice. Taken together, we present the first detailed study using dural application of IScap in mice. This headache model can be applied to genetically modified mice to facilitate research on the mechanisms and therapeutic targets for migraine headache. PMID:27058678

  4. Changes in microRNA (miRNA) expression during pancreatic cancer development and progression in a genetically engineered KrasG12D;Pdx1-Cre mouse (KC) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Macha, Muzafar A; Menning, Melanie S; Dey, Parama; Pai, Priya; Smith, Lynette M; Mo, Yin-Yuan; Batra, Surinder K

    2015-11-24

    Differential expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) has been demonstrated in various cancers, including pancreatic cancer (PC). Due to the lack of tissue samples from early-stages of PC, the stage-specific alteration of miRNAs during PC initiation and progression is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the global miRNA expression profile and their processing machinery during PC progression using the KrasG12D;Pdx1-Cre (KC) mouse model. At 25 weeks, the miRNA microarray analysis revealed significant downregulation of miR-150, miR-494, miR-138, miR-148a, miR-216a, and miR-217 and upregulation of miR-146b, miR-205, miR-31, miR-192, and miR-21 in KC mice compared to controls. Further, expression of miRNA biosynthetic machinery including Dicer, Exportin-5, TRKRA, and TARBP2 were downregulated, while DGCR8 and Ago2 were upregulated in KC mice. In addition, from 10 to 50 weeks of age, stage-specific expression profiling of miRNA in KC mice revealed downregulation of miR-216, miR-217, miR-100, miR-345, miR-141, miR-483-3p, miR-26b, miR-150, miR-195, Let-7b and Let-96 and upregulation of miR-21, miR-205, miR-146b, miR-34c, miR-1273, miR-223 and miR-195 compared to control mice. Interestingly, the differential expression of miRNA in mice also corroborated with the miRNA expression in human PC cell lines and tissue samples; ectopic expression of Let-7b in CD18/HPAF and Capan1 cells resulted in the downregulation of KRAS and MSST1 expression. Overall, the present study aids an understanding of miRNA expression patterns during PC pathogenesis and helps to facilitate the identification of promising and novel early diagnostic/prognostic markers and therapeutic targets. PMID:26516699

  5. Transgenic mouse model for the study of enterovirus 71 neuropathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, Ken; Nagata, Noriyo; Sato, Yuko; Ong, Kien Chai; Wong, Kum Thong; Yamayoshi, Seiya; Shimanuki, Midori; Shitara, Hiroshi; Taya, Choji; KOIKE, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    EV71 infection with severe neurological complications has become a serious public health concern. However, suitable small animal models to study human EV71 pathogenesis are not available. We have generated a Tg mouse model by expressing the human EV71 receptor, Scavenger receptor B2, and found it to be susceptible to EV71 infection. This Tg mouse model exhibits neurological disease and pathology very similar to that observed in humans. The results confirm that the Scavenger receptor B2 recept...

  6. Characterization of a pneumococcal meningitis mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mook-Kanamori Barry

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background S. pneumoniae is the most common causative agent of meningitis, and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. We aimed to develop an integrated and representative pneumococcal meningitis mouse model resembling the human situation. Methods Adult mice (C57BL/6 were inoculated in the cisterna magna with increasing doses of S. pneumoniae serotype 3 colony forming units (CFU; n = 24, 104, 105, 106 and 107 CFU and survival studies were performed. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, brain, blood, spleen, and lungs were collected. Subsequently, mice were inoculated with 104 CFU S. pneumoniae serotype 3 and sacrificed at 6 (n = 6 and 30 hours (n = 6. Outcome parameters were bacterial outgrowth, clinical score, and cytokine and chemokine levels (using Luminex® in CSF, blood and brain. Meningeal inflammation, neutrophil infiltration, parenchymal and subarachnoidal hemorrhages, microglial activation and hippocampal apoptosis were assessed in histopathological studies. Results Lower doses of bacteria delayed onset of illness and time of death (median survival CFU 104, 56 hrs; 105, 38 hrs, 106, 28 hrs. 107, 24 hrs. Bacterial titers in brain and CSF were similar in all mice at the end-stage of disease independent of inoculation dose, though bacterial outgrowth in the systemic compartment was less at lower inoculation doses. At 30 hours after inoculation with 104 CFU of S. pneumoniae, blood levels of KC, IL6, MIP-2 and IFN- γ were elevated, as were brain homogenate levels of KC, MIP-2, IL-6, IL-1β and RANTES. Brain histology uniformly showed meningeal inflammation at 6 hours, and, neutrophil infiltration, microglial activation, and hippocampal apoptosis at 30 hours. Parenchymal and subarachnoidal and cortical hemorrhages were seen in 5 of 6 and 3 of 6 mice at 6 and 30 hours, respectively. Conclusion We have developed and validated a murine model of pneumococcal meningitis.

  7. Influences of intrathecal administration of roscovitine on bone cancer pain in mouse models%鞘内注射Roscovitine对小鼠骨癌痛行为学的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张睿; 马正良; 梅凤美; 张娟; 顾晓萍

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the influences of intrathecal administration of roscovitine on bone cancer pain in mouse models. Methods Twenty four C3H/Hej mice were divided randomly into group S(sham + vehicle ), group C(tumor + vehicle) or group R (tumor+ roscovitine) (n = 8 ). Osteosarcoma NCTC 2472 cells were implanted into the intramedullary space of the right femurs of mice to make bone cancer pain models. α-MEM (group Sand group C) or roscovitine (group R) was injected in 14 post-implanted day. Pain behaviors such as paw withdrawal mechanical threshold(PMWT) and paw withdrawal thermal latency (PWTL) were observed at 1,6, 24,48 and 72 post-injective hour, respectively. Results The level of PMWT and PTWL among every group had no difference before operation. At day 7 after inoculation, PMWT of group tumor decreased to (1.08±0.24) g, and at day 10 PTWL shortened to (12.7±1.4) s, and then the pain behaviors of group tumor showed aggravation along with the development of cancer pain. There was significant difference in the pain behavior thresholds between group sham and group tumor (P<0.05). The level of PM WT [ (0.70±0.19 ) g ] and PTWL [ ( 14.16±1.07 ) s] increased compared with group C and base level at 6 h after intrathecal administration of 20 μg Roscovitine, and kept increasing until reaching maximum level after 12 h, then the value decreased gradually, lowering to the level of group C after 72 h. Conclusion Intrathecal administration of roscovitine can relief bone cancer pain in mouse models.%目的 探讨鞘内给予细胞周期依赖性激酶5(cyclin-dependent kinases,Cdk5)特异性拮抗剂Roscovitine对小鼠骨癌痛行为学的影响.方法 24只C3H/Hej 小鼠采用随机数字表法随机分为3组,S组(假手术后14 d+溶媒)、C组(接种后14d+溶媒)、R组(接种后14 d+Roscovitine),每组8只.C组和R组将含2×105个纤维肉瘤NCTC 2472细胞的最小必需培养基(α-MEM)20μl注射到小鼠右侧股骨远端骨髓腔内,制作骨癌

  8. Mouse models to study dengue virus immunology and pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël M. Zellweger

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of a compelling murine model of dengue virus (DENV infection has been challenging, because dengue virus clinical isolates do not readily replicate or cause pathology in immunocompetent mice. However, research using immunocompromised mice and/or mouse-adapted viruses allows to investigate questions that may be impossible to address in human studies. In this review, we discuss the potential strengths and limitations of existing mouse models of dengue disease. Human studies are descriptive by nature; moreover, the strain, time, and sequence of infection are often unknown. In contrast, in mice, the conditions of infection are well defined and a large number of experimental parameters can be varied at will. Therefore, mouse models offer an opportunity to experimentally test hypotheses that are based on epidemiological observations. In particular, gain-of-function or loss-of-function models can be established to assess how different components of the immune system (either alone or in combination contribute to protection or pathogenesis during secondary infections or after vaccination. In addition, mouse models have been used for pre-clinical testing of antiviral drug or for vaccine development studies. Conclusions based on mouse experiments must be extrapolated to DENV infection in humans with caution due to the inherent limitations of animal models. However, research in mouse models is a useful complement to in vitro and epidemiological data, and may delineate new areas that deserve attention during future human studies.

  9. 腹腔注射沙利度胺对骨癌痛小鼠痛行为的影响%Effect of intraperitoneal injection of thalidomide on pain behaviors in a mouse model of bone cancer pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑亚国; 马正良; 梅凤美; 张睿; 任炳旭; 张娟; 顾小萍

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of intraperitoneal injection of thalidomide on pain behaviors in a mouse model of bone cancer pain. Methods 36 male C3H/HeJ mice were divided randomly into tumor group (n= 18) and sham group (n= 18) ,six mice from each group were chosen to examine the time course of changes in behavior after tumor cells inoculated to the bone. 2 × 105 osteosarcoma NCTC 2472 cells were implanted into the intramedullary space of the right femurs of mice to induce ongoing bone cancer related pain behaviors. The sham group was inoculated by α-MEM without any cells. On the day before inoculation,the tumor mice were divided randomly into tumor + thalidomide group and tumor + vehicle group. The sham group mice were further divided randomly into sham + thalidomide group and sham + vehicle group. Pain ethology indexes such as paw withdrawal mechanical threshold (PWMT) and paw withdrawal thermal latency (PWTL) were observed on 1 d before inoculation and on 3 d ,5 d ,7 d, 10 d, 14 d after inoculation. Results ( 1 ) At day 7 after the operation, compared with sham mice ( 1. 70 ± 0. 33 ) g, PWMT of tumor mice decreased to ( 1.07 ± 0. 30) g (P < 0. 05 ). At day 10, PWTL shortened to ( 12.60 ± 1.69 ) s (P < 0. 05 ) compared with sham mice ( 17.70 ± 1.54 ) s. And the pain behaviors of tumor mice were aggravated along with the development of cancer pain. (2) At day 7 after the operation, compared with tumor + vehicle group ( 1. 07 ± 0.39 ) g, PWMT of tumor + thalidomide group increased to ( 1. 53 ± 0. 39 ) g (P <0.05). At day 10, PWTL extended to ( 16.48 ± 1.13 ) s compared with sham mice ( 12.64 ± 1. 56) s (P <0. 05 ). Conclusion Intraperitoneal injection of thalidomide can efficiently relieve mechanical hyperalgia and thermal hyperalgia in a mouse model of bone cancer pain.%目的 观察腹腔注射沙利度胺对骨癌痛小鼠痛行为的影响.方法 36只C3H/HeJ小鼠随机分为肿瘤组(n=18)和假手术组(n=18),每组抽取6只小鼠

  10. MRI enhancement scanning features and pathology of the orthotropic transplantation nude mouse model with human pancreatic cancer%人胰腺癌原位移植模型MRI增强扫描特征及病理对照研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王冬青; 何伟; 罗一烽; 孙维斌; 许云飞; 殷瑞根; 王铮超

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the MRI imaging features, and pathologic basis of the orthotropic transplantation nude mouse model with human pancreatic cancer. Methods Adopting Siemens Magnetom Trio Tim 3.0 Tesla superconductive MRI and breast coil was used to examine 30 orthotropic transplantation nude mouse models of the human pancreatic cancer, these mouse were sampled to acquire TSE-T1 -weighted and T2-weighted transverse axial images. Intraperitoneal injection of Gd DTP A was used to perform continuous dynamic enhancement scanning. Signal intensities of tumors were measured in plain scanning and each phase' s enhancement scanning images, respectively. Intensification rates of tumors were calculated. Pathologic examination of tumors was performed to be compared with the findings of MRI scanning. Results The successful rate of inoculation of 30 nude mice was 100%. The histological findings were comparable with poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Compared with signal of adjacent tissues, the MRI findings of the tumors were uniformly slightly hypointensity (90% , 27/30) , or unevenly (10% , 3/30) on TSE-T1WI; uniformly (20% , 6/30) or unevenly (80% , 24/30) hyperintensity with equal or more hyper signal spots on TSE-T2WI. Signal intensities on plain scanning was 228.35 ±11.71, and 1.5,3,6,9, 12 min after enhancement scanning, thesignal intensities were 258.20 ± 11.17, 301.75 ± 17.09, 358.65 ±25.13, 480.05 ± 19.01, 558.35 ± 40.49, which were significantly higher than those in plain scanning (P <0.01). The intensification rate of every phase was 0.13 ±0.04, 0.35 ±0.11, 0.56 ±0.10, 1.10 ±0.10, 1.45 ±0.18, and the difference among these phases was statistically significant (P <0.01). The significantly intensified area was the area where the tumor cells grew actively with rich capillaries; the central area without intensification was the area of necrotic tissue and/or densely packed tumor cells and few capillaries. Conclusions High resolution MRI imaging of

  11. Drinking Citrus Fruit Juice Inhibits Vascular Remodeling in Cuff-Induced Vascular Injury Mouse Model

    OpenAIRE

    Ohnishi, Arika; Asayama, Rie; Mogi, Masaki; Nakaoka, Hirotomo; Kan-no, Harumi; Tsukuda, Kana; Chisaka, Toshiyuki; Wang, Xiao-li; Bai, Hui-Yu; Shan, Bao-Shuai; Kukida, Masayoshi; Iwanami, Jun; Horiuchi, Masatsugu

    2015-01-01

    Citrus fruits are thought to have inhibitory effects on oxidative stress, thereby attenuating the onset and progression of cancer and cardiovascular disease; however, there are few reports assessing their effect on vascular remodeling. Here, we investigated the effect of drinking the juice of two different citrus fruits on vascular neointima formation using a cuff-induced vascular injury mouse model. Male C57BL6 mice were divided into five groups as follows: 1) Control (water) (C), 2) 10% Cit...

  12. Animal Models of Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robert L.; Fleet, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease that afflicts a large number of people in the United States. The use of animal models has the potential to increase our understanding of carcinogenesis, tumor biology, and the impact of specific molecular events on colon biology. In addition, animal models with features of specific human colorectal cancers can be used to test strategies for cancer prevention and treatment. In this review we provide an overview of the mechanisms driving human cancer, we discuss the approaches one can take to model colon cancer in animals, and we describe a number of specific animal models that have been developed for the study of colon cancer. We believe that there are many valuable animal models to study various aspects of human colorectal cancer. However, opportunities for improving upon these models exist. PMID:23076650

  13. Behavioral phenotypes of genetic mouse models of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazdoba, T M; Leach, P T; Crawley, J N

    2016-01-01

    More than a hundred de novo single gene mutations and copy-number variants have been implicated in autism, each occurring in a small subset of cases. Mutant mouse models with syntenic mutations offer research tools to gain an understanding of the role of each gene in modulating biological and behavioral phenotypes relevant to autism. Knockout, knockin and transgenic mice incorporating risk gene mutations detected in autism spectrum disorder and comorbid neurodevelopmental disorders are now widely available. At present, autism spectrum disorder is diagnosed solely by behavioral criteria. We developed a constellation of mouse behavioral assays designed to maximize face validity to the types of social deficits and repetitive behaviors that are central to an autism diagnosis. Mouse behavioral assays for associated symptoms of autism, which include cognitive inflexibility, anxiety, hyperactivity, and unusual reactivity to sensory stimuli, are frequently included in the phenotypic analyses. Over the past 10 years, we and many other laboratories around the world have employed these and additional behavioral tests to phenotype a large number of mutant mouse models of autism. In this review, we highlight mouse models with mutations in genes that have been identified as risk genes for autism, which work through synaptic mechanisms and through the mTOR signaling pathway. Robust, replicated autism-relevant behavioral outcomes in a genetic mouse model lend credence to a causal role for specific gene contributions and downstream biological mechanisms in the etiology of autism.

  14. The dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor NVP-BEZ235 induces tumor regression in a genetically engineered mouse model of PIK3CA wild-type colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jatin Roper

    Full Text Available To examine the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of the dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor NVP-BEZ235 in treatment of PIK3CA wild-type colorectal cancer (CRC.PIK3CA mutant and wild-type human CRC cell lines were treated in vitro with NVP-BEZ235, and the resulting effects on proliferation, apoptosis, and signaling were assessed. Colonic tumors from a genetically engineered mouse (GEM model for sporadic wild-type PIK3CA CRC were treated in vivo with NVP-BEZ235. The resulting effects on macroscopic tumor growth/regression, proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and signaling were examined.In vitro treatment of CRC cell lines with NVP-BEZ235 resulted in transient PI3K blockade, sustained decreases in mTORC1/mTORC2 signaling, and a corresponding decrease in cell viability (median IC(50 = 9.0-14.3 nM. Similar effects were seen in paired isogenic CRC cell lines that differed only in the presence or absence of an activating PIK3CA mutant allele. In vivo treatment of colonic tumor-bearing mice with NVP-BEZ235 resulted in transient PI3K inhibition and sustained blockade of mTORC1/mTORC2 signaling. Longitudinal tumor surveillance by optical colonoscopy demonstrated a 97% increase in tumor size in control mice (p = 0.01 vs. a 43% decrease (p = 0.008 in treated mice. Ex vivo analysis of the NVP-BEZ235-treated tumors demonstrated a 56% decrease in proliferation (p = 0.003, no effects on apoptosis, and a 75% reduction in angiogenesis (p = 0.013.These studies provide the preclinical rationale for studies examining the efficacy of the dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor NVP-BEZ235 in treatment of PIK3CA wild-type CRC.

  15. Mouse Models for Studying the Formation and Propagation of Prions*

    OpenAIRE

    Watts, JC; Prusiner, SB

    2014-01-01

    Prions are self-propagating protein conformers that cause a variety of neurodegenerative disorders in humans and animals. Mouse models have played key roles in deciphering the biology of prions and in assessing candidate therapeutics. The development of transgenic mice that form prions spontaneously in the brain has advanced our understanding of sporadic and genetic prion diseases. Furthermore, the realization that many proteins can become prions has necessitated the development of mouse mode...

  16. CONSTRUCTION AND EXPRESSION OF A HUMAN-MOUSE CHIMERIC ANTIBODY AGAINST HUMAN BLADDER CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白银; 王琰; 周丽君; 俞莉章

    2001-01-01

    To construct and express a human-mouse chimeric antibody against human bladder cancer. Method: The variable region genes of anti-human bladder cancer monoclonal antibody BDI-1 were cloned by RT-PCR. A human-mouse chimeric antibody expression vector was constructed and transfected into CHO cells. The chimeric antibody against bladder cancer was expressed and characterized. Result: Eukaryotic expression vector of the chimeric antibody against human bladder carcinoma was successfully constructed, and was expressed in eukaryotic cells; the expressed chimeric antibody ch-BDI showed same specificity as its parent McAb against human bladder cancer cells. Conclusion: The constructed chimeric antibody was expressed successfully in eukaryotic cells, and the chimeric antibody had desired affinity against human bladder cancer cells.

  17. Development and testing of a mouse simulated space flight model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1987-01-01

    The development and testing of a mouse model for simulating some aspects of weightlessness that occurs during space flight, and the carrying out of immunological experiments on animals undergoing space flight is examined. The mouse model developed was an antiorthostatic, hypokinetic, hypodynamic suspension model similar to one used with rats. The study was divided into two parts. The first involved determination of which immunological parameters should be observed on animals flown during space flight or studied in the suspension model. The second involved suspending mice and determining which of those immunological parameters were altered by the suspension. Rats that were actually flown in Space Shuttle SL-3 were used to test the hypotheses.

  18. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H. Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G.; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Baker, Henry V.; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R.; McDonald-Smith, Grace P.; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C.; López, Cecilia M.; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E.; Minei, Joseph P.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Bankey, Paul E.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B.; Billiar, Timothy R.; West, Michael A.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Klein, Matthew B.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Brownstein, Bernard H.; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E.; Mason, Philip H.; Cobb, J. Perren; Rahme, Laurence G.; Lowry, Stephen F.; Maier, Ronald V.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Herndon, David N.; Davis, Ronald W.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Abouhamze, Amer; Balis, Ulysses G. J.; Camp, David G.; De, Asit K.; Harbrecht, Brian G.; Hayden, Douglas L.; Kaushal, Amit; O’Keefe, Grant E.; Kotz, Kenneth T.; Qian, Weijun; Schoenfeld, David A.; Shapiro, Michael B.; Silver, Geoffrey M.; Smith, Richard D.; Storey, John D.; Tibshirani, Robert; Toner, Mehmet; Wilhelmy, Julie; Wispelwey, Bram; Wong, Wing H

    2013-01-01

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the responses in corresponding mouse models correlate poorly with the human conditions and also, one another. Among genes changed significantly in humans, the murine orthologs are close to random in matching their human counterparts (e.g., R2 between 0.0 and 0.1). In addition to improvements in the current animal model systems, our study supports higher priority for translational medical research to focus on the more complex human conditions rather than relying on mouse models to study human inflammatory diseases. PMID:23401516

  19. Glipizide suppresses prostate cancer progression in the TRAMP model by inhibiting angiogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Cuiling Qi; Bin Li; Yang Yang; Yongxia Yang; Jialin Li; Qin Zhou; Yinxin Wen; Cuiling Zeng; Lingyun Zheng; Qianqian Zhang; Jiangchao Li; Xiaodong He; Jia Zhou; Chunkui Shao; Lijing Wang

    2016-01-01

    Drug repurposing of non-cancer drugs represents an attractive approach to develop new cancer therapy. Using the TRAMP transgenic mouse model, glipizide, a widely used drug for type 2 diabetes mellitus, has been identified to suppress prostate cancer (PC) growth and metastasis. Angiogenesis is intimately associated with various human cancer developments. Intriguingly, glipizide significantly reduces microvessel density in PC tumor tissues, while not inhibiting prostate cancer cell proliferatio...

  20. Redirection of Human Cancer Cells upon the Interaction with the Regenerating Mouse Mammary Gland Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia M. Rosenfield

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumorigenesis is often described as a result of accumulated mutations that lead to growth advantage and clonal expansion of mutated cells. There is evidence in the literature that cancer cells are influenced by the microenvironment. Our previous studies demonstrated that the mouse mammary gland is capable of redirecting mouse cells of non-mammary origins as well as Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV-neu transformed cells toward normal mammary epithelial cell fate during gland regeneration. Interestingly, the malignant phenotype of MMTV-neu transformed cells was suppressed during serial transplantation experiments. Here, we discuss our studies that demonstrated the potential of the regenerating mouse mammary gland to redirect cancer cells of different species into a functional tumor-free mammary epithelial cell progeny. Immunochemistry for human specific CD133, mitochondria, cytokeratins as well as milk proteins and FISH for human specific probe identified human epithelial cell progeny in ducts, lobules, and secretory acini. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH for human centromeric DNA and FACS analysis of propidium iodine staining excluded the possibility of mouse-human cell fusion. To our knowledge this is the first evidence that human cancer cells of embryonic or somatic origins respond to developmental signals generated by the mouse mammary gland microenvironment during gland regeneration in vivo.

  1. TU-F-12A-01: Quantitative Non-Linear Compartment Modeling of 89Zr- and 124I- Labeled J591 Monoclonal Antibody Kinetics Using Serial Non-Invasive Positron Emission Tomography Imaging in a Pre-Clinical Human Prostate Cancer Mouse Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine the binding kinetics of human IgG monoclonal antibody J591 which targets prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) in a pre-clinical mouse cancer model using quantitative PET compartmental analysis of two radiolabeled variants. Methods: PSMA is expressed in normal human prostate, and becomes highly upregulated in prostate cancer, making it a promising therapeutic target. Two forms of J591, radiolabeled with either 89Zr or 124I, were prepared. 89Zr is a radiometal that becomes trapped in the cell upon internalization by the antigen-antibody complex, while radioiodine leaves the cell. Mice with prostate cancer xenografts underwent non-invasive serial imaging on a Focus 120 microPET up to 144 hours post-injection of J591. A non-linear compartmental model describing the binding and internalization of antibody in tumor xenograft was developed and applied to the PET-derived time-activity curves. The antibody-antigen association rate constant (ka), total amount of antigen per gram tumor (Ag-total), internalization rate of antibody-antigen complex, and efflux rate of radioisotope from tumor were fitted using the model. The surface-bound and the internalized activity were also estimated. Results: Values for ka, Ag-total, and internalization rate were found to be similar regardless of radiolabel payload used. The efflux rate, however, was ∼ 9-fold higher for 124I-J591 than for 89Zr-J591. Time-dependent surface-bound and internalized radiotracer activity were similar for both radiolabels at early times post-injection, but clearly differed beyond 24 hours. Conclusion: Binding and internalization of J591 to PSMA-expressing tumor xenografts were similar when radiolabeled with either 89Zr or 124I payload. The difference in efflux of radioactivity from tumor may be attributable to differential biological fate intracellularly of the radioisotopes. This has great significance for radioimmunotherapy and antibody-drug conjugates. Further exploration using the

  2. Engineered Swine Models of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne L. Watson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, the technology to engineer genetically modified swine has seen many advancements, and because their physiology is remarkably similar to that of humans, swine models of cancer may be extremely valuable for preclinical safety studies as well as toxicity testing of pharmaceuticals prior to the start of human clinical trials. Hence, the benefits of using swine as a large animal model in cancer research and the potential applications and future opportunities of utilizing pigs in cancer modeling are immense. In this review, we discuss how pigs have been and can be used as a biomedical models for cancer research, with an emphasis on current technologies. We have focused on applications of precision genetics that can provide models that mimic human cancer predisposition syndromes. In particular, we describe the advantages of targeted gene-editing using custom endonucleases, specifically TALENs and CRISPRs, and transposon systems, to make novel pig models of cancer with broad preclinical applications.

  3. Engineered Swine Models of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Adrienne L; Carlson, Daniel F; Largaespada, David A; Hackett, Perry B; Fahrenkrug, Scott C

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, the technology to engineer genetically modified swine has seen many advancements, and because their physiology is remarkably similar to that of humans, swine models of cancer may be extremely valuable for preclinical safety studies as well as toxicity testing of pharmaceuticals prior to the start of human clinical trials. Hence, the benefits of using swine as a large animal model in cancer research and the potential applications and future opportunities of utilizing pigs in cancer modeling are immense. In this review, we discuss how pigs have been and can be used as a biomedical models for cancer research, with an emphasis on current technologies. We have focused on applications of precision genetics that can provide models that mimic human cancer predisposition syndromes. In particular, we describe the advantages of targeted gene-editing using custom endonucleases, specifically TALENs and CRISPRs, and transposon systems, to make novel pig models of cancer with broad preclinical applications. PMID:27242889

  4. Antiangiogenic cancer drug using the zebrafish model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Massimo M

    2014-09-01

    The process of de novo vessel formation, called angiogenesis, is essential for tumor progression and spreading. Targeting of molecular pathways involved in such tumor angiogenetic processes by using specific drugs or inhibitors is important for developing new anticancer therapies. Drug discovery remains to be the main focus for biomedical research and represents the essence of antiangiogenesis cancer research. To pursue these molecular and pharmacological goals, researchers need to use animal models that facilitate the elucidation of tumor angiogenesis mechanisms and the testing of antiangiogenic therapies. The past few years have seen the zebrafish system emerge as a valid model organism to study developmental angiogenesis and, more recently, as an alternative vertebrate model for cancer research. In this review, we will discuss why the zebrafish model system has the advantage of being a vertebrate model equipped with easy and powerful transgenesis as well as imaging tools to investigate not only physiological angiogenesis but also tumor angiogenesis. We will also highlight the potential of zebrafish for identifying antitumor angiogenesis drugs to block tumor development and progression. We foresee the zebrafish model as an important system that can possibly complement well-established mouse models in cancer research to generate novel insights into the molecular mechanism of the tumor angiogenesis. PMID:24903092

  5. CML Mouse Model Generated from Leukemia Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yiguo

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder with a high number of well-differentiated neutrophils in peripheral blood and myeloid cells in bone marrow (BM). CML is derived from the hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph(+), t(9;22)-(q34;q11)), resulting in generating a fusion oncogene, BCR/ABL1. HSCs with Ph(+) are defined as leukemia stem cells (LSCs), a subpopulation cell at the apex of hierarchies in leukemia cells and responsible for the disease continuous propagation. Several kinds of CML models have been developed to reveal the mechanism of CML pathogenesis and evaluate therapeutic drugs in the past three decades. Here, we describe the procedures to generate a CML mouse model by introducing BCR/ABL1 into Lin(-)Sca1(+) cKit(+) population cells purified from mouse bone marrow. In CML retroviral transduction/transplantation mouse models, this modified model can mimic CML pathogenesis on high fidelity. PMID:27581136

  6. Animal models and therapeutic molecular targets of cancer: utility and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cekanova M

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Maria Cekanova, Kusum Rathore Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA Abstract: Cancer is the term used to describe over 100 diseases that share several common hallmarks. Despite prevention, early detection, and novel therapies, cancer is still the second leading cause of death in the USA. Successful bench-to-bedside translation of basic scientific findings about cancer into therapeutic interventions for patients depends on the selection of appropriate animal experimental models. Cancer research uses animal and human cancer cell lines in vitro to study biochemical pathways in these cancer cells. In this review, we summarize the important animal models of cancer with focus on their advantages and limitations. Mouse cancer models are well known, and are frequently used for cancer research. Rodent models have revolutionized our ability to study gene and protein functions in vivo and to better understand their molecular pathways and mechanisms. Xenograft and chemically or genetically induced mouse cancers are the most commonly used rodent cancer models. Companion animals with spontaneous neoplasms are still an underexploited tool for making rapid advances in human and veterinary cancer therapies by testing new drugs and delivery systems that have shown promise in vitro and in vivo in mouse models. Companion animals have a relatively high incidence of cancers, with biological behavior, response to therapy, and response to cytotoxic agents similar to those in humans. Shorter overall lifespan and more rapid disease progression are factors contributing to the advantages of a companion animal model. In addition, the current focus is on discovering molecular targets for new therapeutic drugs to improve survival and quality of life in cancer patients. Keywords: mouse cancer model, companion animal cancer model, dogs, cats, molecular targets

  7. Sarcophine-Diol, a Skin Cancer Chemopreventive Agent, Inhibits Proliferation and Stimulates Apoptosis in Mouse Melanoma B16F10 Cell Line

    OpenAIRE

    Hesham Fahmy; Ahmed, Safwat A.; Szymanski, Pawel T.; Bhimanna Kuppast; Sherief Khalifa

    2011-01-01

    Sarcodiol (SD) is a semi-synthetic derivative of sarcophine, a marine natural product. In our previous work, we reported the significant chemopreventive effects of SD against non-melanoma skin cancer both in vitro and in vivo mouse models. In this investigation, we extended this work to study the effect of sarcodiol on melanoma development, the more deadly form of skin cancer, using the mouse melanoma B16F10 cell line. In this study we report that SD inhibits the de novo DNA synthesis and enh...

  8. DMSO exhibits similar cytotoxicity effects to thalidomide in mouse breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Öz, Ece Simsek; Aydemir, Esra; Fışkın, Kayahan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of thalidomide on 4T1 and 4THMpc mouse breast cancer cell lines. Mouse breast cancer cells (4T1) and cells derived from metastatic lesions (4THMpc) were treated with various doses of thalidomide [10-2-100 µM dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as recommended] and 1.4 µM DMSO (maximum DMSO concentration in the highest thalidomide dose) as a DMSO control against the untreated control groups. MTT was used to evaluate the cytotoxic...

  9. Application of hepatitis B virus replication mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the value of the hepatitis B virus(HBV) replication mouse model with regard to several aspects of the study of HBV biology.METHODS:To evaluate the HBV replication mouse model in detecting the efficacy of anti-HBV agents,the interferon inducer polyinosinic-polytidylin acid(polyIC) and nucleotide analogues adefovir and entecavir were administered to mice injected with wild type pHBV4.1,and the inhibiting effect of these agents on HBV DNA replication was evaluated.To identify the model's value ...

  10. Parkinson’s disease mouse models in translational research

    OpenAIRE

    Antony, Paul; Diederich, Nico; Balling, Rudi

    2011-01-01

    Animal models with high predictive power are a prerequisite for translational research. The closer the similarity of a model to Parkinson’s disease (PD), the higher is the predictive value for clinical trials. An ideal PD model should present behavioral signs and pathology that resemble the human disease. The increasing understanding of PD stratification and etiology, however, complicates the choice of adequate animal models for preclinical studies. An ultimate mouse model, relevant to addres...

  11. Transcription factors link mouse WAP-T mammary tumors with human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Benjamin; Streichert, Thomas; Wegwitz, Florian; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Klätschke, Kristin; Wagener, Christoph; Deppert, Wolfgang; Tolstonog, Genrich V

    2013-03-15

    Mouse models are important tools to decipher the molecular mechanisms of mammary carcinogenesis and to mimic the respective human disease. Despite sharing common phenotypic and genetic features, the proper translation of murine models to human breast cancer remains a challenging task. In a previous study we showed that in the SV40 transgenic WAP-T mice an active Met-pathway and epithelial-mesenchymal characteristics distinguish low- and high-grade mammary carcinoma. To assign these murine tumors to corresponding human tumors we here incorporated the analysis of expression of transcription factor (TF) coding genes and show that thereby a more accurate interspecies translation can be achieved. We describe a novel cross-species translation procedure and demonstrate that expression of unsupervised selected TFs, such as ELF5, HOXA5 and TFCP2L1, can clearly distinguish between the human molecular breast cancer subtypes--or as, for example, expression of TFAP2B between yet unclassified subgroups. By integrating different levels of information like histology, gene set enrichment, expression of differentiation markers and TFs we conclude that tumors in WAP-T mice exhibit similarities to both, human basal-like and non-basal-like subtypes. We furthermore suggest that the low- and high-grade WAP-T tumor phenotypes might arise from distinct cells of tumor origin. Our results underscore the importance of TFs as common cross-species denominators in the regulatory networks underlying mammary carcinogenesis.

  12. Mass spectrometry analysis of hepcidin peptides in experimental mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold Tjalsma

    Full Text Available The mouse is a valuable model for unravelling the role of hepcidin in iron homeostasis, however, such studies still report hepcidin mRNA levels as a surrogate marker for bioactive hepcidin in its pivotal function to block ferroportin-mediated iron transport. Here, we aimed to assess bioactive mouse Hepcidin-1 (Hep-1 and its paralogue Hepcidin-2 (Hep-2 at the peptide level. To this purpose, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR and tandem-MS was used for hepcidin identification, after which a time-of-flight (TOF MS-based methodology was exploited to routinely determine Hep-1 and -2 levels in mouse serum and urine. This method was biologically validated by hepcidin assessment in: i 3 mouse strains (C57Bl/6; DBA/2 and BABL/c upon stimulation with intravenous iron and LPS, ii homozygous Hfe knock out, homozygous transferrin receptor 2 (Y245X mutated mice and double affected mice, and iii mice treated with a sublethal hepatotoxic dose of paracetamol. The results showed that detection of Hep-1 was restricted to serum, whereas Hep-2 and its presumed isoforms were predominantly present in urine. Elevations in serum Hep-1 and urine Hep-2 upon intravenous iron or LPS were only moderate and varied considerably between mouse strains. Serum Hep-1 was decreased in all three hemochromatosis models, being lowest in the double affected mice. Serum Hep-1 levels correlated with liver hepcidin-1 gene expression, while acute liver damage by paracetamol depleted Hep-1 from serum. Furthermore, serum Hep-1 appeared to be an excellent indicator of splenic iron accumulation. In conclusion, Hep-1 and Hep-2 peptide responses in experimental mouse agree with the known biology of hepcidin mRNA regulators, and their measurement can now be implemented in experimental mouse models to provide novel insights in post-transcriptional regulation, hepcidin function, and kinetics.

  13. Virtues and limitations of the preimplantation mouse embryo as a model system

    OpenAIRE

    Robert A Taft

    2007-01-01

    The mouse is the most widely used model of preimplantation embryo development, but is it a good model? Its small size, prolificacy and ease of handling make the mouse a relatively low cost, readily available and attractive alternative when embryos from other species are difficult or expensive to obtain. However, the real power of the mouse as a model lies in mouse genetics. The development of inbred mouse strains facilitated gene discovery as well as our understanding of gene function and reg...

  14. Lack of Fetuin-A (α2-HS-Glycoprotein) Reduces Mammary Tumor Incidence and Prolongs Tumor Latency via the Transforming Growth Factor-β Signaling Pathway in a Mouse Model of Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Guillory, Bobby; Sakwe, Amos M.; Saria, Margret; Thompson, Pamela; Adhiambo, Christine; Koumangoye, Rainelli; Ballard, Billy; Binhazim, Awadh; Cone, Cecil; Jahanen-Dechent, Willi; Ochieng, Josiah

    2010-01-01

    The present analyses were done to define the role of fetuin-A (Fet) in mammary tumorigenesis using the polyoma middle T antigen (PyMT) transgenic mouse model. We crossed Fet-null mice in the C57BL/6 background with PyMT mice in the same background and after a controlled breeding protocol obtained PyMT/Fet+/+, PyMT/Fet+/−, and PyMT/Fet−/− mice that were placed in control and experimental groups. Whereas the control group (PyMT/Fet+/+) formed mammary tumors 90 days after birth, tumor latency wa...

  15. CRISPR-mediated direct mutation of cancer genes in the mouse liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wen; Chen, Sidi; Yin, Hao; Tammela, Tuomas; Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Joshi, Nikhil S.; Cai, Wenxin; Yang, Gillian; Bronson, Roderick; Crowley, Denise G.; Zhang, Feng; Anderson, Daniel G.; Sharp, Phillip A.; Jacks, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    The study of cancer genes in mouse models has traditionally relied on genetically-engineered strains made via transgenesis or gene targeting in embryonic stem (ES) cells1. Here we describe a new method of cancer model generation using the CRISPR/Cas system in vivo in wild-type mice. We have used hydrodynamic injection to deliver a CRISPR plasmid DNA expressing Cas9 and single guide RNAs (sgRNAs)2–4 to the liver and directly target the tumor suppressor genes Pten5 and p536, alone and in combination. CRISPR-mediated Pten mutation led to elevated Akt phosphorylation and lipid accumulation in hepatocytes, phenocopying the effects of deletion of the gene using Cre-LoxP technology7, 8. Simultaneous targeting of Pten and p53 induced liver tumors that mimicked those caused by Cre-loxP-mediated deletion of Pten and p53. DNA sequencing of liver and tumor tissue revealed insertion or deletion (indel) mutations of the tumor suppressor genes, including bi-allelic mutations of both Pten and p53 in tumors. Furthermore, co-injection of Cas9 plasmids harboring sgRNAs targeting the β-Catenin gene (Ctnnb1) and a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) oligonucleotide donor carrying activating point mutations led to the generation of hepatocytes with nuclear localization of β-Catenin. This study demonstrates the feasibility of direct mutation of tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in the liver using the CRISPR/Cas system, which presents a new avenue for rapid development of liver cancer models and functional genomics. PMID:25119044

  16. CRISPR-mediated direct mutation of cancer genes in the mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wen; Chen, Sidi; Yin, Hao; Tammela, Tuomas; Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Joshi, Nikhil S; Cai, Wenxin; Yang, Gillian; Bronson, Roderick; Crowley, Denise G; Zhang, Feng; Anderson, Daniel G; Sharp, Phillip A; Jacks, Tyler

    2014-10-16

    The study of cancer genes in mouse models has traditionally relied on genetically-engineered strains made via transgenesis or gene targeting in embryonic stem cells. Here we describe a new method of cancer model generation using the CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated proteins) system in vivo in wild-type mice. We used hydrodynamic injection to deliver a CRISPR plasmid DNA expressing Cas9 and single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) to the liver that directly target the tumour suppressor genes Pten (ref. 5) and p53 (also known as TP53 and Trp53) (ref. 6), alone and in combination. CRISPR-mediated Pten mutation led to elevated Akt phosphorylation and lipid accumulation in hepatocytes, phenocopying the effects of deletion of the gene using Cre-LoxP technology. Simultaneous targeting of Pten and p53 induced liver tumours that mimicked those caused by Cre-loxP-mediated deletion of Pten and p53. DNA sequencing of liver and tumour tissue revealed insertion or deletion mutations of the tumour suppressor genes, including bi-allelic mutations of both Pten and p53 in tumours. Furthermore, co-injection of Cas9 plasmids harbouring sgRNAs targeting the β-catenin gene and a single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide donor carrying activating point mutations led to the generation of hepatocytes with nuclear localization of β-catenin. This study demonstrates the feasibility of direct mutation of tumour suppressor genes and oncogenes in the liver using the CRISPR/Cas system, which presents a new avenue for rapid development of liver cancer models and functional genomics.

  17. GEMMs as preclinical models for testing pancreatic cancer therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Aarthi Gopinathan; Morton, Jennifer P.; Jodrell, Duncan I.; Owen J. Sansom

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is the most common form of pancreatic tumour, with a very limited survival rate and currently no available disease-modifying treatments. Despite recent advances in the production of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs), the development of new therapies for pancreatic cancer is still hampered by a lack of reliable and predictive preclinical animal models for this disease. Preclinical models are vitally important for assessing therapies in the fi...

  18. Mouse Models of Neurofibromatosis 1 and 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H. Gutmann

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurofibromatoses represent two of the most common inherited tumor predisposition syndromes affecting the nervous system. Individuals with neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1 are prone to the development of astrocytomas and peripheral nerve sheath tumors whereas those affected with neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2 develop schwannomas and meningiomas. The development of traditional homozygous knockout mice has provided insights into the roles of the NF1 and NF2 genes during development and in differentiation, but has been less instructive regarding the contribution of NF1 and NF2 dysfunction to the pathogenesis of specific benign and malignant tumors. Recent progress employing novel mouse targeting strategies has begun to illuminate the roles of the NF1 and NF2 gene products in the molecular pathogenesis of NF-associated tumors.

  19. Modeling Breast Tumor Development with a Humanized Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment plays a critical role in breast cancer growth and progression to metastasis. Here, we describe a method to examine stromal-epithelial interactions during tumor formation and progression utilizing human-derived mammary epithelial cells and breast stromal cells. This method outlines the isolation of each cell type from reduction mammoplasty tissue, the culture and genetic modification of both epithelial and stromal cells using lentiviral technology, and the method of humanizing and implantation of transformed epithelial cells into the cleared mammary fat pads of immunocompromised mice. This model system may be a useful tool to dissect signaling interactions that contribute to invasive tumor behavior and therapeutic resistance. PMID:27581027

  20. A Neural Model of Demyelination of the Mouse Spinal Cord

    OpenAIRE

    Petreska, Biljana; Yovel, Yossi

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a neural network model of demyelination of the mouse motor pathways, coupled to a central pattern generation (CPG) model for quadruped walking. Demyelination is the degradation of the myelin layer covering the axons which can be caused by several neurodegenerative autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis. We use this model - to our knowledge first of its kind - to investigate the locomotion deficits that appear following demyelination of axons in the spinal cord. Our...

  1. Towards a mouse model of depression : a psychoneuroendocrine approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalm, Sergiu

    2012-01-01

    Chronic stress is considered a vulnerability factor for depression. A key symptom is anhedonia; a reduced response to positive stimuli. Drugs are effective for only 20-40% of the patients and new drugs are urgently needed. The objective of the research was to develop a mouse model of depression that

  2. NOD mouse model for Sjogren's syndrome: lack of longitudinal stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.M. Lodde; F. Mineshiba; M.R. Kok; J. Wang; C. Zheng; M. Schmidt; A.P. Cotrim; M. Kriete; P.P. Tak; B.J. Baum

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse is not only a widely used model for diabetes mellitus type I, but also for the chronic autoimmune disease Sjogren's syndrome (SS), mainly affecting salivary and lacrimal glands. We studied the efficacy of local recombinant serotype 2 adeno-associated vi

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF AEROMONAS VIRULENCE USING AN IMMUNOCOMPROMISED MOUSE MODEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    An immunocompromised mouse model was used to characterize Aeromonas strains for their ability to cause opportunistic, extraintestinal infections. A total of 34 isolates of Aeromonas (A. hydrophila [n = 12]), A. veronii biotype sobria [n = 7], A. caviae [n = 4], A. enchelia [n = 4...

  4. Monitoring Prostate Tumor Growth in an Orthotopic Mouse Model Using Three-Dimensional Ultrasound Imaging Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Jie; Cozzi, Paul; Hung, Tzong-Tyng; Hao, Jingli; Graham, Peter; Li, Yong

    2016-02-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is the most commonly diagnosed and the second leading cause of death from cancer in males in USA. Prostate orthotopic mouse model has been widely used to study human CaP in preclinical settings. Measurement of changes in tumor size obtained from noninvasive diagnostic images is a standard method for monitoring responses to anticancer modalities. This article reports for the first time the usage of a three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound system equipped with photoacoustic (PA) imaging in monitoring longitudinal prostate tumor growth in a PC-3 orthotopic NODSCID mouse model (n = 8). Two-dimensional and 3D modes of ultrasound show great ability in accurately depicting the size and shape of prostate tumors. PA function on two-dimensional and 3D images showed average oxygen saturation and average hemoglobin concentration of the tumor. Results showed a good fit in representative exponential tumor growth curves (n = 3; r(2) = 0.948, 0.955, and 0.953, respectively) and a good correlation of tumor volume measurements performed in vivo with autopsy (n = 8, r = 0.95, P model, with advantages such as high contrast, uncomplicated protocols, economical equipment, and nonharmfulness to animals. PA mode also enabled display of blood oxygenation surrounding the tumor and tumor vasculature and angiogenesis, making 3D ultrasound imaging an ideal tool for preclinical cancer research.

  5. Lymphangiogenesis and Axillary Lymph Node Metastases Correlated with VEGF-C Expression in Two Immunocompetent Mouse Mammary Carcinoma Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Ito

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphangiogenesis and the expression of vascular endothelial cell growth factor C (VEGF-C in tumors have been considered to be causally promoting lymphatic metastasis. There are only a few studies on lymphatic metastasis in immunocompetent allograft mouse models. To study the relationship between VEGF-C-mediated lymphangiogenesis and axillary lymph node metastasis, we used two mouse mammary carcinoma cell lines; the BJMC338 has a low metastatic propensity, whereas the BJMC3879 has a high metastatic propensity although it originated from the former cell line. Each cell line was injected separately into two groups of female BALB/c mice creating in vivo mammary cancer models. The expression level of VEGF-C in BJMC3879 was higher than BJMC338. As the parent cell line, BJMC3879-derived tumors showed higher expression of VEGF-C compared to BJMC338-derived tumors. This higher expression of VEGF-C in BJMC3879-derived tumors was associated with marked increase in infiltrating macrophages and enhanced expression of lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor-1 (LYVE-1 reflecting increased tumoral lymphatic density and subsequent induction of axillary lymph node metastasis. Our mouse mammary carcinoma models are allotransplanted tumors showing the same axillary lymph node metastatic spectrum as human breast cancers. Therefore, our mouse models are ideal for exploring the various molecular mechanisms of cancer metastasis.

  6. Evaluation of the E mu-pim-1 transgenic mouse model for short-term carcinogenicity testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Kreijl, C. F.; van Oordt, C. W. V.; Kroese, E. D.;

    1998-01-01

    The value of the chronic rodent carcinogenicity assay in adequately predicting cancer risk in humans has become a matter of debate over the past few years. Therefore, more rapid and accurate alternative tests are urgently needed. Transgenic mouse models, those harboring genetic changes that are r......The value of the chronic rodent carcinogenicity assay in adequately predicting cancer risk in humans has become a matter of debate over the past few years. Therefore, more rapid and accurate alternative tests are urgently needed. Transgenic mouse models, those harboring genetic changes...... that are relevant to the multistage cancer process, may provide such alternative tests. Transgenic E mu-pim-1 mice, developed by Berns and coworkers in 1989, contain the pim-1 oncogene, which is expressed at elevated levels in their lymphoid compartments. As a result, these mice are predisposed to the development...

  7. Rapid genetic algorithm optimization of a mouse computational model: Benefits for anthropomorphization of neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Teodora Bot

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available While the mouse presents an invaluable experimental model organism in biology, its usefulness in cardiac arrhythmia research is limited in some aspects due to major electrophysiological differences between murine and human action potentials (APs. As previously described, these species-specific traits can be partly overcome by application of a cell-type transforming clamp (CTC to anthropomorphize the murine cardiac AP. CTC is a hybrid experimental-computational dynamic clamp technique, in which a computationally calculated time-dependent current is inserted into a cell in real time, to compensate for the differences between sarcolemmal currents of that cell (e.g., murine and the desired species (e.g., human. For effective CTC performance, mismatch between the measured cell and a mathematical model used to mimic the measured AP must be minimal. We have developed a genetic algorithm (GA approach that rapidly tunes a mathematical model to reproduce the AP of the murine cardiac myocyte under study. Compared to a prior implementation that used a template-based model selection approach, we show that GA optimization to a cell-specific model results in a much better recapitulation of the desired AP morphology with CTC. This improvement was more pronounced when anthropomorphizing neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes to human-like APs than to guinea pig APs. CTC may be useful for a wide range of applications, from screening effects of pharmaceutical compounds on ion channel activity, to exploring variations in the mouse or human genome. Rapid GA optimization of a cell-specific mathematical model improves CTC performance and may therefore expand the applicability and usage of the CTC technique.

  8. Quantitative trait loci affecting phenotypic variation in the vacuolated lens mouse mutant, a multigenic mouse model of neural tube defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korstanje, Ron; Desai, Jigar; Lazar, Gloria; King, Benjamin; Rollins, Jarod; Spurr, Melissa; Joseph, Jamie; Kadambi, Sindhuja; Li, Yang; Cherry, Allison; Matteson, Paul G.; Paigen, Beverly; Millonig, James H.

    2008-01-01

    Korstanje R, Desai J, Lazar G, King B, Rollins J, Spurr M, Joseph J, Kadambi S, Li Y, Cherry A, Matteson PG, Paigen B, Millonig JH. Quantitative trait loci affecting phenotypic variation in the vacuolated lens mouse mutant, a multigenic mouse model of neural tube defects. Physiol Genomics 35: 296-30

  9. Current Concepts: Mouse Models of Sjögren's Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tegan N. Lavoie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren's syndrome (SjS is a complex chronic autoimmune disease of unknown etiology which primarily targets the exocrine glands, resulting in eventual loss of secretory function. The disease can present as either primary SjS or secondary SjS, the latter of which occurs concomitantly with another autoimmune disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, or primary biliary cirrhosis. Current advancements in therapeutic prevention and treatment for SjS are impeded by lack of understanding in the pathophysiological and clinical progression of the disease. Development of appropriate mouse models for both primary and secondary SjS is needed in order to advance knowledge of this disease. This paper details important features, advantages, and pitfalls of current animal models of SjS, including spontaneous, transgenic, knockout, immunization, and transplantation chimera mouse models, and emphasizes the need for a better model in representing the human SjS phenotype.

  10. Liver Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing liver cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  11. Breast Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing breast cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  12. Prostate Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing prostate cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  13. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing pancreatic cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  14. Colorectal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing colorectal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  15. Bladder Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing bladder cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  16. Esophageal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing esophageal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  17. Cervical Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing cervical cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  18. Testicular Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of testicular cervical cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  19. Ovarian Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing ovarian cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  20. Lung Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing lung cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  1. Examination of diagnostic features in multiphoton microscopy and optical coherence tomography images of ovarian tumorigenesis in a mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jennifer M.

    Ovarian cancer is a deadly disease owing to the non-specific symptoms and suspected rapid progression, leading to frequent late stage detection and poor prognosis. Medical imaging methods such as CT, MRI and ultrasound as well as serum testing for cancer markers have had extremely poor performance for early disease detection. Due to the poor performance of available screening methods, and the impracticality and ineffectiveness of taking tissue biopsies from the ovary, women at high risk for developing ovarian cancer are often advised to undergo prophylactic salpingo-oophorectomy. This surgery results in many side effects and is most often unnecessary since only a fraction of high risk women go on to develop ovarian cancer. Better understanding of the early development of ovarian cancer and characterization of morphological changes associated with early disease could lead to the development of an effective screening test for women at high risk. Optical imaging methods including optical coherence tomography (OCT) and multiphoton microscopy (MPM) are excellent tools for studying disease progression owing to the high resolution and depth sectioning capabilities. Further, these techniques are excellent for optical biopsy because they can image in situ non-destructively. In the studies described in this dissertation OCT and MPM are used to identify cellular and tissue morphological changes associated with early tumor development in a mouse model of ovarian cancer. This work is organized into three specific aims. The first aim is to use the images from the MPM phenomenon of second harmonic generation to quantitatively examine the morphological differences in collagen structure in normal mouse ovarian tissue and mouse ovarian tumors. The second aim is to examine the differences in endogenous two-photon excited fluorescence in normal mouse ovarian tissue and mouse ovarian tumors. The third and final aim is to identify changes in ovarian microstructure resulting from early

  2. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H. Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G.; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Baker, Henry V.; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R; McDonald-Smith, Grace P.; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C.; López, Cecilia M.; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E; Minei, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the respon...

  3. A mouse model for HBV immunotolerance and immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Dan; Liu, Longchao; Zhu, Danming; Peng, Hua; Su, Lishan; Fu, Yang-Xin; Zhang, Liguo

    2013-01-01

    Lack of an appropriate small animal model remains a major hurdle for studying the immunotolerance and immunopathogenesis induced by hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. In this study, we report a mouse model with sustained HBV viremia after infection with a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) carrying a replicable HBV genome (AAV/HBV). Similar to the clinical HBV carriers, the mice infected with AAV/HBV were sero-negative for antibodies against HBV surface antigen (HBsAg). Immunization wit...

  4. Retinoic acid fails to reverse emphysema in adult mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Fujita, M; Ye, Q.; Ouchi, H.; Nakashima, N; Hamada, N; Hagimoto, N; Kuwano, K.; Mason, R.; Nakanishi, Y

    2004-01-01

    Methods: The models used were an elastase induced emphysema model for acute alveolar destruction and a tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α transgenic mouse which exhibits chronic air space enlargement, loss of elastic recoil, increased lung volume, and pulmonary hypertension comparable to human pulmonary emphysema. All-trans-retinoic acid (2 mg/kg) was injected for 12 successive days after the establishment of emphysema. The effects of treatment were evaluated using physiological and morphometric ...

  5. Analgesic effects of lappaconitine in leukemia bone pain in a mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Cui Zhu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Bone pain is a common and severe symptom in cancer patients. The present study employed a mouse model of leukemia bone pain by injection K562 cells into tibia of mouse to evaluate the analgesic effects of lappacontine. Our results showed that the lappaconitine treatment at day 15, 17 and 19 could effectively reduce the spontaneous pain scoring values, restore reduced degree in the inclined-plate test induced by injection of K562 cells, as well as restore paw mechanical withdrawal threshold and paw withdrawal thermal latency induced by injection of K562 cells to the normal levels. Additionally, the molecular mechanisms of lappaconitine’s analgesic effects may be related to affect the expression levels of endogenous opioid system genes (POMC, PENK and MOR, as well as apoptosis-related genes (Xiap, Smac, Bim, NF-κB and p53. Our present results indicated that lappaconitine may become a new analgesic agent for leukemia bone pain management.

  6. Monitoring Prostate Tumor Growth in an Orthotopic Mouse Model Using Three-Dimensional Ultrasound Imaging Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Ni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (CaP is the most commonly diagnosed and the second leading cause of death from cancer in males in USA. Prostate orthotopic mouse model has been widely used to study human CaP in preclinical settings. Measurement of changes in tumor size obtained from noninvasive diagnostic images is a standard method for monitoring responses to anticancer modalities. This article reports for the first time the usage of a three-dimensional (3D ultrasound system equipped with photoacoustic (PA imaging in monitoring longitudinal prostate tumor growth in a PC-3 orthotopic NODSCID mouse model (n = 8. Two-dimensional and 3D modes of ultrasound show great ability in accurately depicting the size and shape of prostate tumors. PA function on two-dimensional and 3D images showed average oxygen saturation and average hemoglobin concentration of the tumor. Results showed a good fit in representative exponential tumor growth curves (n = 3; r2 = 0.948, 0.955, and 0.953, respectively and a good correlation of tumor volume measurements performed in vivo with autopsy (n = 8, r = 0.95, P < .001. The application of 3D ultrasound imaging proved to be a useful imaging modality in monitoring tumor growth in an orthotopic mouse model, with advantages such as high contrast, uncomplicated protocols, economical equipment, and nonharmfulness to animals. PA mode also enabled display of blood oxygenation surrounding the tumor and tumor vasculature and angiogenesis, making 3D ultrasound imaging an ideal tool for preclinical cancer research.

  7. Mouse models for atherosclerosis and pharmaceutical modifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zadelaar, A.S.M.; Kleemann, R.; Verschuren, L.; Vries-van der Weij, J. de; Hoorn, J. van der; Princen, H.M.; Kooistra, T.

    2007-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a multifactorial highly-complex disease with numerous etiologies that work synergistically to promote lesion development. The ability to develop preventive and ameliorative treatments will depend on animal models that mimic the human subject metabolically and pathophysiologically

  8. Osthole suppresses seizures in the mouse maximal electroshock seizure model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luszczki, Jarogniew J; Andres-Mach, Marta; Cisowski, Wojciech; Mazol, Irena; Glowniak, Kazimierz; Czuczwar, Stanislaw J

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the anticonvulsant effects of osthole {[7-methoxy-8-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one]--a natural coumarin derivative} in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model. The antiseizure effects of osthole were determined at 15, 30, 60, and 120 min after its systemic (i.p.) administration. Time course of anticonvulsant action of osthole revealed that the natural coumarin derivative produced a clear-cut antielectroshock activity in mice and the experimentally-derived ED(50) values for osthole ranged from 259 to 631 mg/kg. In conclusion, osthole suppresses seizure activity in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model. It may become a novel treatment option following further investigation in other animal models of epilepsy and preclinical studies. PMID:19236860

  9. Molecular imaging of vessels in mouse models of disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vascular imaging of angiogenesis in mouse models of disease requires multi modal imaging hardware capable of targeting both structure and function at different physical scales. The three dimensional (3D) structure and function vascular information allows for accurate differentiation between biological processes. For example, image analysis of vessel development in angiogenesis vs. arteriogenesis enables more accurate detection of biological variation between subjects and more robust and reliable diagnosis of disease. In the recent years a number of micro imaging modalities have emerged in the field as preferred means for this purpose. They provide 3D volumetric data suitable for analysis, quantification, validation, and visualization of results in animal models. This review highlights the capabilities of microCT, ultrasound and microPET for multimodal imaging of angiogenesis and molecular vascular targets in a mouse model of tumor angiogenesis. The basic principles of the imaging modalities are described and experimental results are presented.

  10. X-ray phase-contrast CT of a pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Tapfer

    Full Text Available To explore the potential of grating-based x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (CT for preclinical research, a genetically engineered mouse model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC was investigated. One ex-vivo mouse specimen was scanned with different grating-based phase-contrast CT imaging setups covering two different settings: i high-resolution synchrotron radiation (SR imaging and ii dose-reduced imaging using either synchrotron radiation or a conventional x-ray tube source. These experimental settings were chosen to assess the potential of phase-contrast imaging for two different types of application: i high-performance imaging for virtual microscopy applications and ii biomedical imaging with increased soft-tissue contrast for in-vivo applications. For validation and as a reference, histological slicing and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were performed on the same mouse specimen. For each x-ray imaging setup, attenuation and phase-contrast images were compared visually with regard to contrast in general, and specifically concerning the recognizability of lesions and cancerous tissue. To quantitatively assess contrast, the contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR of selected regions of interest (ROI in the attenuation images and the phase images were analyzed and compared. It was found that both for virtual microscopy and for in-vivo applications, there is great potential for phase-contrast imaging: in the SR-based benchmarking data, fine details about tissue composition are accessible in the phase images and the visibility of solid tumor tissue under dose-reduced conditions is markedly superior in the phase images. The present study hence demonstrates improved diagnostic value with phase-contrast CT in a mouse model of a complex endogenous cancer, promoting the use and further development of grating-based phase-contrast CT for biomedical imaging applications.

  11. Engineered Swine Models of Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, Adrienne L; Carlson, Daniel F.; Largaespada, David A; Hackett, Perry B; Fahrenkrug, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, the technology to engineer genetically modified swine has seen many advancements, and because their physiology is remarkably similar to that of humans, swine models of cancer may be extremely valuable for preclinical safety studies as well as toxicity testing of pharmaceuticals prior to the start of human clinical trials. Hence, the benefits of using swine as a large animal model in cancer research and the potential applications and future opportunities of utilizing pigs...

  12. A transgenic mouse model for trilateral retinoblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Brien, J.M.; Marcus, D.M.; Bernards, R.A.; Carpenter, J.L.; Windle, J.J.; Mellon, P.; Albert, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    We present a murine model of trilateral retinoblastoma. Ocular retinoblastoma and central nervous system tumors are observed in a line of mice formed by the transgenic expression of SV40 T-antigen. An oncogenic protein known to bind to the retinoblastoma gene product (p105-Rb) is specifically expres

  13. Cross-species comparison of aCGH data from mouse and human BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutated breast cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genomic gains and losses are a result of genomic instability in many types of cancers. BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutated breast cancers are associated with increased amounts of chromosomal aberrations, presumably due their functions in genome repair. Some of these genomic aberrations may harbor genes whose absence or overexpression may give rise to cellular growth advantage. So far, it has not been easy to identify the driver genes underlying gains and losses. A powerful approach to identify these driver genes could be a cross-species comparison of array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) data from cognate mouse and human tumors. Orthologous regions of mouse and human tumors that are commonly gained or lost might represent essential genomic regions selected for gain or loss during tumor development. To identify genomic regions that are associated with BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutated breast cancers we compared aCGH data from 130 mouse Brca1Δ/Δ;p53Δ/Δ, Brca2Δ/Δ;p53Δ/Δ and p53Δ/Δ mammary tumor groups with 103 human BRCA1-mutated, BRCA2-mutated and non-hereditary breast cancers. Our genome-wide cross-species analysis yielded a complete collection of loci and genes that are commonly gained or lost in mouse and human breast cancer. Principal common CNAs were the well known MYC-associated gain and RB1/INTS6-associated loss that occurred in all mouse and human tumor groups, and the AURKA-associated gain occurred in BRCA2-related tumors from both species. However, there were also important differences between tumor profiles of both species, such as the prominent gain on chromosome 10 in mouse Brca2Δ/Δ;p53Δ/Δ tumors and the PIK3CA associated 3q gain in human BRCA1-mutated tumors, which occurred in tumors from one species but not in tumors from the other species. This disparity in recurrent aberrations in mouse and human tumors might be due to differences in tumor cell type or genomic organization between both species. The selection of the oncogenome during mouse and

  14. The Event Coordination Notation: Behaviour Modelling Beyond Mickey Mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Jesper; Kindler, Ekkart

    2015-01-01

    The Event Coordination Notation (ECNO) allows modelling the desired behaviour of a software system on top of any object-oriented software. Together with existing technologies from Model-based Software Engineering (MBSE) for automatically generating the software for the structural parts, ECNO allows...... management system. This way, we demonstrate that ECNO can be used for modelling software beyond the typical Mickey Mouse examples. This example demonstrates that the essence of workflow management – including its behaviour – can be captured in ECNO: in a sense, it is a domain model of workflow management...

  15. Mouse Models Recapitulating Human Adrenocortical Tumors: What Is Lacking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leccia, Felicia; Batisse-Lignier, Marie; Sahut-Barnola, Isabelle; Val, Pierre; Lefrançois-Martinez, A-Marie; Martinez, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cortex tumors are divided into benign forms, such as primary hyperplasias and adrenocortical adenomas (ACAs), and malignant forms or adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs). Primary hyperplasias are rare causes of adrenocorticotropin hormone-independent hypercortisolism. ACAs are the most common type of adrenal gland tumors and they are rarely “functional,” i.e., producing steroids. When functional, adenomas result in endocrine disorders, such as Cushing’s syndrome (hypercortisolism) or Conn’s syndrome (hyperaldosteronism). By contrast, ACCs are extremely rare but highly aggressive tumors that may also lead to hypersecreting syndromes. Genetic analyses of patients with sporadic or familial forms of adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) led to the identification of potentially causative genes, most of them being involved in protein kinase A (PKA), Wnt/β-catenin, and P53 signaling pathways. Development of mouse models is a crucial step to firmly establish the functional significance of candidate genes, to dissect mechanisms leading to tumors and endocrine disorders, and in fine to provide in vivo tools for therapeutic screens. In this article, we will provide an overview on the existing mouse models (xenografted and genetically engineered) of ACTs by focusing on the role of PKA and Wnt/β-catenin pathways in this context. We will discuss the advantages and limitations of models that have been developed heretofore and we will point out necessary improvements in the development of next generation mouse models of adrenal diseases. PMID:27471492

  16. Mouse Models Recapitulating Human Adrenocortical Tumors: What Is Lacking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leccia, Felicia; Batisse-Lignier, Marie; Sahut-Barnola, Isabelle; Val, Pierre; Lefrançois-Martinez, A-Marie; Martinez, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cortex tumors are divided into benign forms, such as primary hyperplasias and adrenocortical adenomas (ACAs), and malignant forms or adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs). Primary hyperplasias are rare causes of adrenocorticotropin hormone-independent hypercortisolism. ACAs are the most common type of adrenal gland tumors and they are rarely "functional," i.e., producing steroids. When functional, adenomas result in endocrine disorders, such as Cushing's syndrome (hypercortisolism) or Conn's syndrome (hyperaldosteronism). By contrast, ACCs are extremely rare but highly aggressive tumors that may also lead to hypersecreting syndromes. Genetic analyses of patients with sporadic or familial forms of adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) led to the identification of potentially causative genes, most of them being involved in protein kinase A (PKA), Wnt/β-catenin, and P53 signaling pathways. Development of mouse models is a crucial step to firmly establish the functional significance of candidate genes, to dissect mechanisms leading to tumors and endocrine disorders, and in fine to provide in vivo tools for therapeutic screens. In this article, we will provide an overview on the existing mouse models (xenografted and genetically engineered) of ACTs by focusing on the role of PKA and Wnt/β-catenin pathways in this context. We will discuss the advantages and limitations of models that have been developed heretofore and we will point out necessary improvements in the development of next generation mouse models of adrenal diseases. PMID:27471492

  17. Nonspecific airway reactivity in a mouse model of asthma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collie, D.D.; Wilder, J.A.; Bice, D.E.

    1995-12-01

    Animal models are indispensable for studies requiring an intact immune system, especially for studying the pathogenic mechanisms in atopic diseases, regulation of IgE production, and related biologic effects. Mice are particularly suitable and have been used extensively for such studies because their immune system is well characterized. Further, large numbers of mutants or inbred strains of mice are available that express deficiencies of individual immunologic processes, inflammatory cells, or mediator systems. By comparing reactions in such mice with appropriate control animals, the unique roles of individual cells or mediators may be characterized more precisely in the pathogenesis of atopic respiratory diseases including asthma. However, given that asthma in humans is characterized by the presence of airway hyperresponsiveness to specific and nonspecific stimuli, it is important that animal models of this disease exhibit similar physiologic abnormalities. In the past, the size of the mouse has limited its versatility in this regard. However, recent studies indicate the feasibility of measuring pulmonary responses in living mice, thus facilitating the physiologic evaluation of putative mouse models of human asthma that have been well charcterized at the immunologic and patholigic level. Future work will provide details of the morphometry of the methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction and will further seek to determine the relationship between cigarette smoke exposure and the development of NS-AHR in the transgenic mouse model.

  18. Lessons learned using different mouse models during space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Farris, Alton B; Wang, Ya

    2016-06-01

    Unlike terrestrial ionizing radiation, space radiation, especially galactic cosmic rays (GCR), contains high energy charged (HZE) particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Due to a lack of epidemiologic data for high-LET radiation exposure, it is highly uncertain how high the carcinogenesis risk is for astronauts following exposure to space radiation during space missions. Therefore, using mouse models is necessary to evaluate the risk of space radiation-induced tumorigenesis; however, which mouse model is better for these studies remains uncertain. Since lung tumorigenesis is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and low-LET radiation exposure increases human lung carcinogenesis, evaluating space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis is critical to enable safe Mars missions. Here, by comparing lung tumorigenesis obtained from different mouse strains, as well as miR-21 in lung tissue/tumors and serum, we believe that wild type mice with a low spontaneous tumorigenesis background are ideal for evaluating the risk of space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis, and circulating miR-21 from such mice model might be used as a biomarker for predicting the risk.

  19. Lessons learned using different mouse models during space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Farris, Alton B.; Wang, Ya

    2016-06-01

    Unlike terrestrial ionizing radiation, space radiation, especially galactic cosmic rays (GCR), contains high energy charged (HZE) particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Due to a lack of epidemiologic data for high-LET radiation exposure, it is highly uncertain how high the carcinogenesis risk is for astronauts following exposure to space radiation during space missions. Therefore, using mouse models is necessary to evaluate the risk of space radiation-induced tumorigenesis; however, which mouse model is better for these studies remains uncertain. Since lung tumorigenesis is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and low-LET radiation exposure increases human lung carcinogenesis, evaluating space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis is critical to enable safe Mars missions. Here, by comparing lung tumorigenesis obtained from different mouse strains, as well as miR-21 in lung tissue/tumors and serum, we believe that wild type mice with a low spontaneous tumorigenesis background are ideal for evaluating the risk of space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis, and circulating miR-21 from such mice model might be used as a biomarker for predicting the risk.

  20. Magnolol inhibits the inflammatory response in mouse mammary epithelial cells and a mouse mastitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wang; Dejie, Liang; Xiaojing, Song; Tiancheng, Wang; Yongguo, Cao; Zhengtao, Yang; Naisheng, Zhang

    2015-02-01

    Mastitis comprises an inflammation of the mammary gland, which is almost always linked with bacterial infection. The treatment of mastitis concerns antimicrobial substances, but not very successful. On the other hand, anti-inflammatory therapy with Chinese traditional medicine becomes an effective way for treating mastitis. Magnolol is a polyphenolic binaphthalene compound extracted from the stem bark of Magnolia sp., which has been shown to exert a potential for anti-inflammatory activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effects of magnolol on inflammation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mastitis mouse model in vivo and the mechanism of this protective effects in LPS-stimulated mouse mammary epithelial cells (MMECs) in vitro. The damage of tissues was determined by histopathology and myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay. The expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), inhibitory kappa B (IκBα) protein, p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) were determined by Western blot. The results showed that magnolol significantly inhibit the LPS-induced TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β production both in vivo and vitro. Magnolol declined the phosphorylation of IκBα, p65, p38, ERK, and JNK in LPS-stimulated MMECs. Furthermore, magnolol inhibited the expression of TLR4 in LPS-stimulated MMECs. In vivo study, it was also observed that magnolol attenuated the damage of mastitis tissues in the mouse models. These findings demonstrated that magnolol attenuate LPS-stimulated inflammatory response by suppressing TLR4/NF-κB/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling system. Thereby, magnolol may be a therapeutic agent against mastitis.

  1. Genetically modified mouse models for premature ovarian failure (POF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagarlamudi, Krishna; Reddy, Pradeep; Adhikari, Deepak; Liu, Kui

    2010-02-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a complex disorder that affects approximately 1% of women. POF is characterized by the depletion of functional ovarian follicles before the age of 40 years, and clinically, patients may present with primary amenorrhea or secondary amenorrhea. Although some genes have been hypothesized to be candidates responsible for POF, the etiology of most of the cases is idiopathic, with the underlying causes still unidentified because of the heterogeneity of the disease. In this review, we consider some mutant mouse models that exhibit phenotypes which are comparable to human POF, and we suggest that the use of these mouse models may help us to gain a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying POF in humans.

  2. The utility of Apc-mutant rats in modeling human colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy A. Irving

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Prior to the advent of genetic engineering in the mouse, the rat was the model of choice for investigating the etiology of cancer. Now, recent advances in the manipulation of the rat genome, combined with a growing recognition of the physiological differences between mice and rats, have reignited interest in the rat as a model of human cancer. Two recently developed rat models, the polyposis in the rat colon (Pirc and Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD strains, each carry mutations in the intestinal-cancer-associated adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc gene. In contrast to mouse models carrying Apc mutations, in which cancers develop mainly in the small intestine rather than in the colon and there is no gender bias, these rat models exhibit colonic predisposition and gender-specific susceptibility, as seen in human colon cancer. The rat also provides other experimental resources as a model organism that are not provided by the mouse: the structure of its chromosomes facilitates the analysis of genomic events, the size of its colon permits longitudinal analysis of tumor growth, and the size of biological samples from the animal facilitates multiplexed molecular analyses of the tumor and its host. Thus, the underlying biology and experimental resources of these rat models provide important avenues for investigation. We anticipate that advances in disease modeling in the rat will synergize with resources that are being developed in the mouse to provide a deeper understanding of human colon cancer.

  3. Therapeutic Touch Has Significant Effects on Mouse Breast Cancer Metastasis and Immune Responses but Not Primary Tumor Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Gronowicz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence-based integrative medicine therapies have been introduced to promote wellness and offset side-effects from cancer treatment. Energy medicine is an integrative medicine technique using the human biofield to promote well-being. The biofield therapy chosen for study was Therapeutic Touch (TT. Breast cancer tumors were initiated in mice by injection of metastatic 66cl4 mammary carcinoma cells. The control group received only vehicle. TT or mock treatments were performed twice a week for 10 minutes. Two experienced TT practitioners alternated treatments. At 26 days, metastasis to popliteal lymph nodes was determined by clonogenic assay. Changes in immune function were measured by analysis of serum cytokines and by fluorescent activated cells sorting (FACS of immune cells from the spleen and lymph nodes. No significant differences were found in body weight gain or tumor size. Metastasis was significantly reduced in the TT-treated mice compared to mock-treated mice. Cancer significantly elevated eleven cytokines. TT significantly reduced IL-1-a, MIG, IL-1b, and MIP-2 to control/vehicle levels. FACS demonstrated that TT significantly reduced specific splenic lymphocyte subsets and macrophages were significantly elevated with cancer. Human biofield therapy had no significant effect on primary tumor but produced significant effects on metastasis and immune responses in a mouse breast cancer model.

  4. Therapeutic Touch Has Significant Effects on Mouse Breast Cancer Metastasis and Immune Responses but Not Primary Tumor Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronowicz, Gloria; Secor, Eric R; Flynn, John R; Jellison, Evan R; Kuhn, Liisa T

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based integrative medicine therapies have been introduced to promote wellness and offset side-effects from cancer treatment. Energy medicine is an integrative medicine technique using the human biofield to promote well-being. The biofield therapy chosen for study was Therapeutic Touch (TT). Breast cancer tumors were initiated in mice by injection of metastatic 66cl4 mammary carcinoma cells. The control group received only vehicle. TT or mock treatments were performed twice a week for 10 minutes. Two experienced TT practitioners alternated treatments. At 26 days, metastasis to popliteal lymph nodes was determined by clonogenic assay. Changes in immune function were measured by analysis of serum cytokines and by fluorescent activated cells sorting (FACS) of immune cells from the spleen and lymph nodes. No significant differences were found in body weight gain or tumor size. Metastasis was significantly reduced in the TT-treated mice compared to mock-treated mice. Cancer significantly elevated eleven cytokines. TT significantly reduced IL-1-a, MIG, IL-1b, and MIP-2 to control/vehicle levels. FACS demonstrated that TT significantly reduced specific splenic lymphocyte subsets and macrophages were significantly elevated with cancer. Human biofield therapy had no significant effect on primary tumor but produced significant effects on metastasis and immune responses in a mouse breast cancer model.

  5. Therapeutic Touch Has Significant Effects on Mouse Breast Cancer Metastasis and Immune Responses but Not Primary Tumor Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronowicz, Gloria; Secor, Eric R; Flynn, John R; Jellison, Evan R; Kuhn, Liisa T

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based integrative medicine therapies have been introduced to promote wellness and offset side-effects from cancer treatment. Energy medicine is an integrative medicine technique using the human biofield to promote well-being. The biofield therapy chosen for study was Therapeutic Touch (TT). Breast cancer tumors were initiated in mice by injection of metastatic 66cl4 mammary carcinoma cells. The control group received only vehicle. TT or mock treatments were performed twice a week for 10 minutes. Two experienced TT practitioners alternated treatments. At 26 days, metastasis to popliteal lymph nodes was determined by clonogenic assay. Changes in immune function were measured by analysis of serum cytokines and by fluorescent activated cells sorting (FACS) of immune cells from the spleen and lymph nodes. No significant differences were found in body weight gain or tumor size. Metastasis was significantly reduced in the TT-treated mice compared to mock-treated mice. Cancer significantly elevated eleven cytokines. TT significantly reduced IL-1-a, MIG, IL-1b, and MIP-2 to control/vehicle levels. FACS demonstrated that TT significantly reduced specific splenic lymphocyte subsets and macrophages were significantly elevated with cancer. Human biofield therapy had no significant effect on primary tumor but produced significant effects on metastasis and immune responses in a mouse breast cancer model. PMID:26113869

  6. Sleep Phenotyping in a Mouse Model of Extreme Trait Anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Jakubcakova, Vladimira; Flachskamm, Cornelia; Landgraf, Rainer; Kimura, Mayumi

    2012-01-01

    Background There is accumulating evidence that anxiety impairs sleep. However, due to high sleep variability in anxiety disorders, it has been difficult to state particular changes in sleep parameters caused by anxiety. Sleep profiling in an animal model with extremely high vs. low levels of trait anxiety might serve to further define sleep patterns associated with this psychopathology. Methodology/Principal Findings Sleep-wake behavior in mouse lines with high (HAB), low (LAB) and normal (NA...

  7. Cardiac Dysfunction in the BACHD Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Schroeder, Analyne M.; Huei Bin Wang; Saemi Park; Jordan, Maria C.; Fuying Gao; Giovanni Coppola; Fishbein, Michael C; Kenneth P Roos; Ghiani, Cristina A.; Colwell, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    While Huntington’s disease (HD) is classified as a neurological disorder, HD patients exhibit a high incidence of cardiovascular events leading to heart failure and death. In this study, we sought to better understand the cardiovascular phenotype of HD using the BACHD mouse model. The age-related decline in cardiovascular function was assessed by echocardiograms, electrocardiograms, histological and microarray analysis. We found that structural and functional differences between WT and BACHD ...

  8. A mouse model of intestinal stem cell function and regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Slorach, E M; Campbell, F. C.; Dorin, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    We present here an in vivo mouse model for intestinal stem cell function and differentiation that uses postnatal intestinal epithelial cell aggregates to generate a differentiated murine small intestinal mucosa with full crypt-villus architecture. The process of neomucosal formation is highly similar to that of intestinal regeneration. Both in vivo grafting and primary culture of these cells reveal two different epithelial cell populations, which display properties consistent with intestinal ...

  9. Predictably irrational: assaying cognitive inflexibility in mouse models of schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Brigman, Jonathan L.

    2010-01-01

    The development of sophisticated, translatable mouse-based assays modeling the behavioral manifestations of neuropsychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia has lagged the advances in molecular and genomic techniques. Our laboratory has made efforts to fill this gap by investing in the development of novel assays, including adapting a touchscreen-based method for measuring cognitive and executive functions for use in mice. As part of these efforts, a recent study by Brigman et al. (2009) inv...

  10. Substrate reduction therapy in mouse models of the glycosphingolipidoses.

    OpenAIRE

    Platt, Frances M.; Jeyakumar, Mylvaganam; Andersson, Ulrika; Heare, Tanya; Dwek, Raymond A.; Butters, Terry D.

    2003-01-01

    Substrate reduction therapy uses small molecules to slow the rate of glycolipid biosynthesis. One of these drugs, N-butyldeoxynojirimycin (NB-DNJ), shows efficacy in mouse models of Tay-Sachs, Sandhoff and Fabry diseases. This offers the prospect that NB-DNJ may be of therapeutic benefit, at least in the juvenile and adult onset variants of these disorders. The infantile onset variants will require an additional enzyme-augmenting modality if the pathology is to be significantly improved. A se...

  11. Extracting Extra-Telomeric Phenotypes from Telomerase Mouse Models

    OpenAIRE

    Sung, Young Hoon; Ali, Muhammad; Lee, Han-Woong

    2013-01-01

    Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) is the protein component of telomerase and combined with an RNA molecule, telomerase RNA component, forms the telomerase enzyme responsible for telomere elongation. Telomerase is essential for maintaining telomere length from replicative attrition and thus contributes to the preservation of genome integrity. Although diverse mouse models have been developed and studied to prove the physiological roles of telomerase as a telomere-elongating enzyme, recen...

  12. Chondroprotective effects of Salubrinal in a mouse model of osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    K. HAMAMURA; Nishimura, A; Iino, T; Takigawa, S.; SUDO, A.; Yokota, H

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Salubrinal is a synthetic agent that elevates phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2α) and alleviates stress to the endoplasmic reticulum. Previously, we reported that in chondrocytes, Salubrinal attenuates expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13) through downregulating nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) signalling. We herein examine whether Salubrinal prevents the degradation of articular cartilage in a mouse model of osteoarthri...

  13. Real-Time Bioluminescence Imaging of Nitroreductase in Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ping; Zhang, Huateng; Deng, Quankun; Liu, Wei; Yang, Linghui; Li, Guobo; Chen, Guo; Du, Lupei; Ke, Bowen; Li, Minyong

    2016-06-01

    Nitroreductase (NTR) is an endogenous reductase overexpressed in hypoxic tumors; however, its precise detection in living cells and animals remains a considerable challenge. Herein, we developed three reaction-based probes and a related bioluminescence assay for the real-time NTR detection. The high sensitivity and selectivity of probe 3, combined with its remarkable potential of bioluminescence imaging, affords a valuable approach for in vivo imaging of NTR in a tumor model mouse. PMID:27197544

  14. Towards a mouse model of depression: a psychoneuroendocrine approach

    OpenAIRE

    Dalm, Sergiu

    2012-01-01

    Chronic stress is considered a vulnerability factor for depression. A key symptom is anhedonia; a reduced response to positive stimuli. Drugs are effective for only 20-40% of the patients and new drugs are urgently needed. The objective of the research was to develop a mouse model of depression that would express anhedonia, induced by chronic stress. Mice were repeatedly exposed to the non-physical presence of a rat. Alterations in stress system activity were measured. Anhedonia was assessed ...

  15. Real-Time Bioluminescence Imaging of Nitroreductase in Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ping; Zhang, Huateng; Deng, Quankun; Liu, Wei; Yang, Linghui; Li, Guobo; Chen, Guo; Du, Lupei; Ke, Bowen; Li, Minyong

    2016-06-01

    Nitroreductase (NTR) is an endogenous reductase overexpressed in hypoxic tumors; however, its precise detection in living cells and animals remains a considerable challenge. Herein, we developed three reaction-based probes and a related bioluminescence assay for the real-time NTR detection. The high sensitivity and selectivity of probe 3, combined with its remarkable potential of bioluminescence imaging, affords a valuable approach for in vivo imaging of NTR in a tumor model mouse.

  16. A Mouse Model of Zika Virus Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazear, Helen M; Govero, Jennifer; Smith, Amber M; Platt, Derek J; Fernandez, Estefania; Miner, Jonathan J; Diamond, Michael S

    2016-05-11

    The ongoing Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic and unexpected clinical outcomes, including Guillain-Barré syndrome and birth defects, has brought an urgent need for animal models. We evaluated infection and pathogenesis with contemporary and historical ZIKV strains in immunocompetent mice and mice lacking components of the antiviral response. Four- to six-week-old Irf3(-/-)Irf5(-/-)Irf7(-/-) triple knockout mice, which produce little interferon α/β, and mice lacking the interferon receptor (Ifnar1(-/-)) developed neurological disease and succumbed to ZIKV infection, whereas single Irf3(-/-), Irf5(-/-), and Mavs(-/-) knockout mice exhibited no overt illness. Ifnar1(-/-) mice sustained high viral loads in the brain and spinal cord, consistent with evidence that ZIKV causes neurodevelopmental defects in human fetuses. The testes of Ifnar1(-/-) mice had the highest viral loads, which is relevant to sexual transmission of ZIKV. This model of ZIKV pathogenesis will be valuable for evaluating vaccines and therapeutics as well as understanding disease pathogenesis. PMID:27066744

  17. Methods in Mammary Gland Development and Cancer: the second ENDBC meeting - intravital imaging, genomics, modeling and metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Stingl, John; Matthew J Smalley; Glukhova, Marina A.; Bentires-Alj, Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    The second meeting of the European Network for Breast Development and Cancer (ENBDC) on 'Methods in Mammary Gland Development and Cancer' was held in April 2010 in Weggis, Switzerland. The focus was on genomics and bioinformatics, extracellular matrix and stroma-epithelial cell interactions, intravital imaging, the search for metastasis founder cells and mouse models of breast cancer.

  18. An improved intrafemoral injection with minimized leakage as an orthotopic mouse model of osteosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Hiromi; Iyer, Swathi V.; Sasaki, Ken; Tawfik, Ossama W.; Iwakuma, Tomoo

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma, the most common type of primary bone cancer, is the second highest cause of cancer-related death in pediatric patients. To understand the mechanisms behind osteosarcoma progression and to discover novel therapeutic strategies for this disease, a reliable and appropriate mouse model is essential. For this purpose, osteosarcoma cells need to be injected into the bone marrow. Previously, the intratibial and intrafemoral injection methods were reported; however, the major drawback of these methods is the potential leakage of tumor cells from the injection site during or after these procedures. To overcome this, we have established an improved method to minimize leakage in an orthotopic mouse model of osteosarcoma. By taking advantage of the anatomical benefits of the femur with less bowing and larger medullary cavity than those of the tibia, osteosarcoma cells are injected directly into the femoral cavity following reaming of its intramedullary space. To prevent potential leakage of tumor cells during and after the surgery, the injection site is sealed with bone wax. This method requires a minor surgery of approximately 15 minutes under anesthesia. Our established orthotopic osteosarcoma model could serve as a valuable and reliable tool for examining tumor progression of various types of bone tumors. PMID:26142221

  19. Behavioral characterization of mouse models of neuroferritinopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Capoccia

    Full Text Available Ferritin is the main intracellular protein of iron storage with a central role in the regulation of iron metabolism and detoxification. Nucleotide insertions in the last exon of the ferritin light chain cause a neurodegenerative disease known as Neuroferritinopathy, characterized by iron deposition in the brain, particularly in the cerebellum, basal ganglia and motor cortex. The disease progresses relentlessly, leading to dystonia, chorea, motor disability and neuropsychiatry features. The characterization of a good animal model is required to compare and contrast specific features with the human disease, in order to gain new insights on the consequences of chronic iron overload on brain function and behavior. To this aim we studied an animal model expressing the pathogenic human FTL mutant 498InsTC under the phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK promoter. Transgenic (Tg mice showed strong accumulation of the mutated protein in the brain, which increased with age, and this was accompanied by brain accumulation of ferritin/iron bodies, the main pathologic hallmark of human neuroferritinopathy. Tg-mice were tested throughout development and aging at 2-, 8- and 18-months for motor coordination and balance (Beam Walking and Footprint tests. The Tg-mice showed a significant decrease in motor coordination at 8 and 18 months of age, with a shorter latency to fall and abnormal gait. Furthermore, one group of aged naïve subjects was challenged with two herbicides (Paraquat and Maneb known to cause oxidative damage. The treatment led to a paradoxical increase in behavioral activation in the transgenic mice, suggestive of altered functioning of the dopaminergic system. Overall, data indicate that mice carrying the pathogenic FTL498InsTC mutation show motor deficits with a developmental profile suggestive of a progressive pathology, as in the human disease. These mice could be a powerful tool to study the neurodegenerative mechanisms leading to the disease and help

  20. Behavioral characterization of mouse models of neuroferritinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capoccia, Sara; Maccarinelli, Federica; Buffoli, Barbara; Rodella, Luigi F; Cremona, Ottavio; Arosio, Paolo; Cirulli, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Ferritin is the main intracellular protein of iron storage with a central role in the regulation of iron metabolism and detoxification. Nucleotide insertions in the last exon of the ferritin light chain cause a neurodegenerative disease known as Neuroferritinopathy, characterized by iron deposition in the brain, particularly in the cerebellum, basal ganglia and motor cortex. The disease progresses relentlessly, leading to dystonia, chorea, motor disability and neuropsychiatry features. The characterization of a good animal model is required to compare and contrast specific features with the human disease, in order to gain new insights on the consequences of chronic iron overload on brain function and behavior. To this aim we studied an animal model expressing the pathogenic human FTL mutant 498InsTC under the phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) promoter. Transgenic (Tg) mice showed strong accumulation of the mutated protein in the brain, which increased with age, and this was accompanied by brain accumulation of ferritin/iron bodies, the main pathologic hallmark of human neuroferritinopathy. Tg-mice were tested throughout development and aging at 2-, 8- and 18-months for motor coordination and balance (Beam Walking and Footprint tests). The Tg-mice showed a significant decrease in motor coordination at 8 and 18 months of age, with a shorter latency to fall and abnormal gait. Furthermore, one group of aged naïve subjects was challenged with two herbicides (Paraquat and Maneb) known to cause oxidative damage. The treatment led to a paradoxical increase in behavioral activation in the transgenic mice, suggestive of altered functioning of the dopaminergic system. Overall, data indicate that mice carrying the pathogenic FTL498InsTC mutation show motor deficits with a developmental profile suggestive of a progressive pathology, as in the human disease. These mice could be a powerful tool to study the neurodegenerative mechanisms leading to the disease and help developing

  1. 77 FR 24499 - Government-Owned Inventions; Availability for Licensing: Mouse Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-24

    ....gov . Sirt3 Knockout (Sirt3\\tm1.1Cxd\\) Mouse Model for Cardiology and Metabolism Studies Description... Applications: Cardiology, Metabolism. Developer of Mouse: Chuxia Deng, Ph.D. (NIDDK). Relevant Publication:...

  2. Targeted Antivascular Therapy with the Apolipoprotein(a Kringle V, rhLK8, Inhibits the Growth and Metastasis of Human Prostate Cancer in an Orthotopic Nude Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Jeong Lee

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Antivascular therapy has emerged as a rational strategy to improve the treatment of androgen-independent prostate cancer owing to the necessity of establishing a vascular network for the growth and progression of the primary and metastatic tumor. We determined whether recombinant human apolipoprotein(a kringle V, rhLK8, produces therapeutic efficacy in an orthotopic human prostate cancer animal model. Fifty thousand androgen-independent human prostate cancer cells (PC-3MM2 were injected into the prostate of nude mice. After 3 days, these mice were randomized to receive the vehicle solution (intraperitoneally [i.p.], daily, paclitaxel (8 mg/kg i.p., weekly, rhLK8 (50 mg/kg i.p., daily, or a combination of paclitaxel and rhLK8 for 4 weeks. Treatment with paclitaxel or rhLK8 alone did not show significant therapeutic effects on tumor incidence or on tumor size compared with the control group. The combination of rhLK8 and paclitaxel significantly reduced tumor size and incidence of lymph node metastasis. Significant reduction in microvessel density and cellular proliferation and induction of apoptosis of tumor cells, and tumor-associated endothelial cells, were also achieved. Similarly, PC-3MM2 tumors growing in the tibia showed significant suppression of tumor growth and lymph node metastasis by the combination treatment with rhLK8 and paclitaxel. The integrity of the bone was significantly preserved, and apoptosis of tumor cells and tumor-associated endothelial cells was increased. In conclusion, these results suggest that targeting the tumor microenvironment with the antivascular effect of rhLK8 combined with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy could be a new and effective approach in the treatment of androgen-independent prostate cancer and their metastases.

  3. Targeted antivascular therapy with the apolipoprotein(a) kringle V, rhLK8, inhibits the growth and metastasis of human prostate cancer in an orthotopic nude mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho-Jeong; Yu, Hyun-Kyung; Papadopoulos, John N; Kim, Seung Wook; He, Junqin; Park, Yong-Keun; Yoon, Yeup; Kim, Jang-Seong; Kim, Sun Jin

    2012-04-01

    Antivascular therapy has emerged as a rational strategy to improve the treatment of androgen-independent prostate cancer owing to the necessity of establishing a vascular network for the growth and progression of the primary and metastatic tumor. We determined whether recombinant human apolipoprotein(a) kringle V, rhLK8, produces therapeutic efficacy in an orthotopic human prostate cancer animal model. Fifty thousand androgen-independent human prostate cancer cells (PC-3MM2) were injected into the prostate of nude mice. After 3 days, these mice were randomized to receive the vehicle solution (intraperitoneally [i.p.], daily), paclitaxel (8 mg/kg i.p., weekly), rhLK8 (50 mg/kg i.p., daily), or a combination of paclitaxel and rhLK8 for 4 weeks. Treatment with paclitaxel or rhLK8 alone did not show significant therapeutic effects on tumor incidence or on tumor size compared with the control group. The combination of rhLK8 and paclitaxel significantly reduced tumor size and incidence of lymph node metastasis. Significant reduction in microvessel density and cellular proliferation and induction of apoptosis of tumor cells, and tumor-associated endothelial cells, were also achieved. Similarly, PC-3MM2 tumors growing in the tibia showed significant suppression of tumor growth and lymph node metastasis by the combination treatment with rhLK8 and paclitaxel. The integrity of the bone was significantly preserved, and apoptosis of tumor cells and tumor-associated endothelial cells was increased. In conclusion, these results suggest that targeting the tumor microenvironment with the antivascular effect of rhLK8 combined with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy could be a new and effective approach in the treatment of androgen-independent prostate cancer and their metastases.

  4. Adenoviral targeting of malignant melanoma for fluorescence-guided surgery prevents recurrence in orthotopic nude-mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Shuya; Takehara, Kiyoto; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Urata, Yasuo; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Bouvet, Michael; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant melanoma requires precise resection in order to avoid metastatic recurrence. We report here that the telomerase-dependent, green fluorescent protein (GFP)-containing adenovirus OBP-401 could label malignant melanoma with GFP in situ in orthotopic mouse models. OBP-401-based fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) resulted in the complete resection of malignant melanoma in the orthotopic models, where conventional bright-light surgery (BLS) could not. High-dose administration of OBP-401 enabled FGS without residual cancer cells or recurrence, due to its dual effect of cancer-cell labeling with GFP and killing. PMID:26701857

  5. Mouse models of dengue virus infection for vaccine testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarathy, Vanessa V; Milligan, Gregg N; Bourne, Nigel; Barrett, Alan D T

    2015-12-10

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease caused by four serologically and genetically related viruses termed DENV-1 to DENV-4. With an annual global burden of approximately 390 million infections occurring in the tropics and subtropics worldwide, an effective vaccine to combat dengue is urgently needed. Historically, a major impediment to dengue research has been development of a suitable small animal infection model that mimics the features of human illness in the absence of neurologic disease that was the hallmark of earlier mouse models. Recent advances in immunocompromised murine infection models have resulted in development of lethal DENV-2, DENV-3 and DENV-4 models in AG129 mice that are deficient in both the interferon-α/β receptor (IFN-α/β R) and the interferon-γ receptor (IFN-γR). These models mimic many hallmark features of dengue disease in humans, such as viremia, thrombocytopenia, vascular leakage, and cytokine storm. Importantly AG129 mice develop lethal, acute, disseminated infection with systemic viral loads, which is characteristic of typical dengue illness. Infected AG129 mice generate an antibody response to DENV, and antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) models have been established by both passive and maternal transfer of DENV-immune sera. Several steps have been taken to refine DENV mouse models. Viruses generated by peripheral in vivo passages incur substitutions that provide a virulent phenotype using smaller inocula. Because IFN signaling has a major role in immunity to DENV, mice that generate a cellular immune response are desired, but striking the balance between susceptibility to DENV and intact immunity is complicated. Great strides have been made using single-deficient IFN-α/βR mice for DENV-2 infection, and conditional knockdowns may offer additional approaches to provide a panoramic view that includes viral virulence and host immunity. Ultimately, the DENV AG129 mouse models result in reproducible lethality and offer multiple

  6. Evaluation of an in vitro toxicogenetic mouse model for hepatotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerous studies support the fact that a genetically diverse mouse population may be useful as an animal model to understand and predict toxicity in humans. We hypothesized that cultures of hepatocytes obtained from a large panel of inbred mouse strains can produce data indicative of inter-individual differences in in vivo responses to hepato-toxicants. In order to test this hypothesis and establish whether in vitro studies using cultured hepatocytes from genetically distinct mouse strains are feasible, we aimed to determine whether viable cells may be isolated from different mouse inbred strains, evaluate the reproducibility of cell yield, viability and functionality over subsequent isolations, and assess the utility of the model for toxicity screening. Hepatocytes were isolated from 15 strains of mice (A/J, B6C3F1, BALB/cJ, C3H/HeJ, C57BL/6J, CAST/EiJ, DBA/2J, FVB/NJ, BALB/cByJ, AKR/J, MRL/MpJ, NOD/LtJ, NZW/LacJ, PWD/PhJ and WSB/EiJ males) and cultured for up to 7 days in traditional 2-dimensional culture. Cells from B6C3F1, C57BL/6J, and NOD/LtJ strains were treated with acetaminophen, WY-14,643 or rifampin and concentration-response effects on viability and function were established. Our data suggest that high yield and viability can be achieved across a panel of strains. Cell function and expression of key liver-specific genes of hepatocytes isolated from different strains and cultured under standardized conditions are comparable. Strain-specific responses to toxicant exposure have been observed in cultured hepatocytes and these experiments open new opportunities for further developments of in vitro models of hepatotoxicity in a genetically diverse population.

  7. New Mouse Models to Investigate the Efficacy of Drug Combinations in Human Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hanyang; Woolfson, Adrian; Jiang, Xiaoyan

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) comprises a simple and effective paradigm for generating new insights into the cellular origin, pathogenesis, and treatment of many types of human cancer. In particular, mouse models of CML have greatly facilitated the understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms and pathogenesis of this disease and have led to the identification of new drug targets that in some cases offer the possibility of functional cure. There are currently three established CML mouse models: the BCR-ABL transgenic model, the BCR-ABL retroviral transduction/transplantation model, and the xenotransplant immunodeficient model. Each has its own unique advantages and disadvantages. Depending on the question of interest, some models may be more appropriate than others. In this chapter, we describe a newly developed xenotransplant mouse model to determine the efficacy of novel therapeutic agents, either alone or in combination. The model facilitates the evaluation of the frequency of leukemic stem cells with long-term leukemia-initiating activity, a critical subcellular population that causes disease relapse and progression, through the utilization of primary CD34(+) CML stem/progenitor cells obtained from CML patients at diagnosis and prior to drug treatment. We have also investigated the effectiveness of new combination treatment strategies designed to prevent the development of leukemia in vivo using BCR-ABL (+) blast crisis cells as a model system. These types of in vivo studies are important for the prediction of individual patient responses to drug therapy, and have the potential to facilitate the design of personalized combination therapy strategies. PMID:27581149

  8. Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and sulfotransferases contribute significantly to the disposition of genistein in mouse intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Xu, Haiyan; Wang, Stephen W J; Hu, Ming

    2010-12-01

    The low bioavailability of genistein has impeded its development into a therapeutic agent. Our earlier studies indicate that glucuronidation is one of the major barriers to genistein oral bioavailability. This study will determine how sulfotransferases and efflux transporters affect its intestinal disposition. A rodent intestinal perfusion model and S9 fractions were used. Sulfate excretion rates were comparable to glucuronide excretion in mouse small intestine but significantly higher than glucuronide excretion in mouse colon, which is different from rat intestinal disposition but similar to disposition in Caco-2 cells. To define efflux transporter(s) involved in sulfate excretion, two organic anion inhibitors (estrone sulfate and dihydroepiandrosterone sulfate) or a multidrug resistance protein inhibitor (MK-571) were used but neither was able to decrease the excretion of genistein sulfates. In contrast, the excretion of genistein sulfate decreased substantially (>90%) in small intestine of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) knockout mice and became undetectable in colon of the knockout mice. The excretion rates of genistein glucuronide in the small intestine of BCRP knockout mice were also significant decreased (78%). This study shows clearly that BCRP facilitates the cellular genistein sulfate excretion by removing sulfates to prevent their backward hydrolysis and to limit substrate inhibition, indicating that BCRP plays a dominant role in genistein sulfate excretion and a significant role in genistein glucuronide excretion in the mouse intestine.

  9. Interleukins in chronic liver disease: lessons learned from experimental mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammerich L

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Linda Hammerich, Frank Tacke Department of Medicine III, University Hospital Aachen, Aachen, Germany Abstract: Interleukins represent a class of immunomodulatory cytokines, small intercellular signaling proteins, that are critically involved in the regulation of immune responses. They are produced in large amounts by various cell types during inflammatory reactions, and the balance of cytokines determines the outcome of an immune response. Therefore, cytokines are regarded as interesting therapeutic targets for the treatment of patients with liver diseases. Mouse models provide a good tool for in vivo studies on cytokine function, as human and mouse cytokines share many homologies. Sophisticated mouse models either mimicking distinct pathological conditions or targeting cytokines and cytokine-signaling pathways in the liver or even in distinct cellular compartments have provided enormous insight into the different functions of interleukins during hepatic inflammation. Interleukins may have pro- as well as anti-inflammatory functions in chronic liver diseases, some interleukins even both, dependent on the inflammatory stimulus, the producing and the responding cell type. IL-17, for example, promotes hepatic fibrogenesis through activation of hepatic stellate cells and facilitates development of liver cancer through recruitment of myeloid-derived suppressor cells. IL-22, on the other hand, protects from development of fibrosis or steatohepatitis. IL-12 balances T-helper (Th-1 and Th2 cell responses in infectious disease models. IL-13 and IL-33, two cytokines related to Th2 cells and innate lymphoid cells, promote fibrotic responses in the liver. IL-10 is the prototypic anti-inflammatory interleukin with tissue-protective functions during chronic liver injury and fibrogenesis. Despite its critical role for inducing the acute-phase response in the liver, IL-6 signaling is protective during fibrosis progression, but promotes hepatocellular carcinoma

  10. Enriched environment inhibits mouse pancreatic cancer growth and down-regulates the expression of mitochondria-related genes in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guohua; Gan, Yu; Fan, Yingchao; Wu, Yufeng; Lin, Hechun; Song, Yanfang; Cai, Xiaojin; Yu, Xiang; Pan, Weihong; Yao, Ming; Gu, Jianren; Tu, Hong

    2015-01-19

    Psycho-social stress has been suggested to influence the development of cancer, but it remains poorly defined with regard to pancreatic cancer, a lethal malignancy with few effective treatment modalities. In this study, we sought to investigate the impacts of enriched environment (EE) housing, a rodent model of "eustress", on the growth of mouse pancreatic cancer, and to explore the potential underlying mechanisms through gene expression profiling. The EE mice showed significantly reduced tumor weights in both subcutaneous (53%) and orthotopic (41%) models, while each single component of EE (inanimate stimulation, social stimulation or physical exercise) was not profound enough to achieve comparative anti-tumor effects as EE. The integrative transcriptomic and proteomic analysis revealed that in response to EE, a total of 129 genes in the tumors showed differential expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. The differentially expressed genes were mostly localized to the mitochondria and enriched in the citrate cycle and oxidative phosphorylation pathways. Interestingly, nearly all of the mitochondria-related genes were down-regulated by EE. Our data have provided experimental evidence in favor of the application of positive stress or of benign environmental stimulation in pancreatic cancer therapy.

  11. New Mouse Model for Dengue Virus Vaccine Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Alison J.; Roehrig, John T.

    1999-01-01

    Several dengue (DEN) virus vaccines are in development; however, the lack of a reliable small animal model in which to test them is a major obstacle. Because evidence suggests that interferon (IFN) is involved in the human anti-DEN virus response, we tested mice deficient in their IFN functions as potential models. Intraperitoneally administered mouse-adapted DEN 2 virus was uniformly lethal in AG129 mice (which lack alpha/beta IFN and gamma IFN receptor genes), regardless of age. Immunized m...

  12. Integrating Factor Analysis and a Transgenic Mouse Model to Reveal a Peripheral Blood Predictor of Breast Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevins Joseph R

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transgenic mouse tumor models have the advantage of facilitating controlled in vivo oncogenic perturbations in a common genetic background. This provides an idealized context for generating transcriptome-based diagnostic models while minimizing the inherent noisiness of high-throughput technologies. However, the question remains whether models developed in such a setting are suitable prototypes for useful human diagnostics. We show that latent factor modeling of the peripheral blood transcriptome in a mouse model of breast cancer provides the basis for using computational methods to link a mouse model to a prototype human diagnostic based on a common underlying biological response to the presence of a tumor. Methods We used gene expression data from mouse peripheral blood cell (PBC samples to identify significantly differentially expressed genes using supervised classification and sparse ANOVA. We employed these transcriptome data as the starting point for developing a breast tumor predictor from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs by using a factor modeling approach. Results The predictor distinguished breast cancer patients from healthy individuals in a cohort of patients independent from that used to build the factors and train the model with 89% sensitivity, 100% specificity and an area under the curve (AUC of 0.97 using Youden's J-statistic to objectively select the model's classification threshold. Both permutation testing of the model and evaluating the model strategy by swapping the training and validation sets highlight its stability. Conclusions We describe a human breast tumor predictor based on the gene expression of mouse PBCs. This strategy overcomes many of the limitations of earlier studies by using the model system to reduce noise and identify transcripts associated with the presence of a breast tumor over other potentially confounding factors. Our results serve as a proof-of-concept for using an

  13. Honokiol inhibits pathological retinal neovascularization in oxygen-induced retinopathy mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vavilala, Divya Teja [Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Missouri-Kansas City, MO (United States); O’Bryhim, Bliss E. [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Ponnaluri, V.K. Chaithanya [Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Missouri-Kansas City, MO (United States); White, R. Sid; Radel, Jeff [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Symons, R.C. Andrew [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Ophthalmology Department, Royal Melbourne Hospital, University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Department of Surgery, Royal Melbourne Hospital, University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Mukherji, Mridul, E-mail: mukherjim@umkc.edu [Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Missouri-Kansas City, MO (United States)

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Aberrant activation of HIF pathway is the underlying cause of ischemic neovascularization. •Honokiol has better therapeutic index as a HIF inhibitor than digoxin and doxorubicin. •Daily IP injection of honokiol in OIR mouse model reduced retinal neovascularization. •Honokiol also prevents vaso-obliteration, the characteristic feature of the OIR model. •Honokiol enhanced physiological revascularization of the retinal vascular plexuses. -- Abstract: Aberrant activation of the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) pathway is the underlying cause of retinal neovascularization, one of the most common causes of blindness worldwide. The HIF pathway also plays critical roles during tumor angiogenesis and cancer stem cell transformation. We have recently shown that honokiol is a potent inhibitor of the HIF pathway in a number of cancer and retinal pigment epithelial cell lines. Here we evaluate the safety and efficacy of honokiol, digoxin, and doxorubicin, three recently identified HIF inhibitors from natural sources. Our studies show that honokiol has a better safety to efficacy profile as a HIF inhibitor than digoxin and doxorubicin. Further, we show for the first time that daily intraperitoneal injection of honokiol starting at postnatal day (P) 12 in an oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) mouse model significantly reduced retinal neovascularization at P17. Administration of honokiol also prevents the oxygen-induced central retinal vaso-obliteration, characteristic feature of the OIR model. Additionally, honokiol enhanced physiological revascularization of the retinal vascular plexuses. Since honokiol suppresses multiple pathways activated by HIF, in addition to the VEGF signaling, it may provide advantages over current treatments utilizing specific VEGF antagonists for ocular neovascular diseases and cancers.

  14. Carnosine retards tumor growth in vivo in an NIH3T3-HER2/neu mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Meixensberger Jürgen; Gebhardt Rolf; Hengstler Jan; Hermes Matthias; Geiger Kathrin D; Fuchs Beate; Zemitzsch Nadine; Renner Christof; Gaunitz Frank

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background It was previously demonstrated that the dipeptide carnosine inhibits growth of cultured cells isolated from patients with malignant glioma. In the present work we investigated whether carnosine also affects tumor growth in vivo and may therefore be considered for human cancer therapy. Results A mouse model was used to investigate whether tumor growth in vivo can be inhibited by carnosine. Therefore, NIH3T3 fibroblasts, conditionally expressing the human epidermal growth fa...

  15. Molecular dynamics study of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of mouse hepatocytes and hepatomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Aoki, Noriyuki; Okazaki, Susumu

    2016-02-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of normal mouse hepatocytes and hepatomas in water have been performed under physiological isothermal-isobaric conditions (310.15 K and 1 atm). The changes in the membrane properties induced by hepatic canceration were investigated and were compared with previous MD calculations included in our previous study of the changes in membrane properties induced by murine thymic canceration. The calculated model membranes for normal hepatocytes and hepatomas comprised 23 and 24 kinds of lipids, respectively. These included phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, lysophospholipids, and cholesterol. We referred to previously published experimental values for the mole fraction of the lipids adopted in the present calculations. The calculated structural and dynamic properties of the membranes such as lateral structure, order parameters, lateral self-diffusion constants, and rotational correlation times all showed that hepatic canceration causes plasma membranes to become more ordered laterally and less fluid. Interestingly, this finding contrasts with the less ordered structure and increased fluidity of plasma membranes induced by thymic canceration observed in our previous MD study.

  16. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) Mouse Model in Translational Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cong; Li, Shaoguang

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder characterized by increased proliferation of granulocytic cells without the loss of their capability to differentiate. CML is a clonal disease, originated at the level of Hematopoietic Stem Cells with the Philadelphia chromosome resulting from a reciprocal translocation between the chromosomes 9 and 22t(9;22)-(q34;q11). This translocation produces a fusion gene known as BCR-ABL which acquires uncontrolled tyrosine kinase activity, constantly turning on its downstream signaling molecules/pathways, and promoting proliferation of leukemia cell through anti-apoptosis and acquisition of additional mutations. To evaluate the role of each critical downstream signaling molecule of BCR-ABL and test therapeutic drugs in vivo, it is important to use physiological mouse disease models. Here, we describe a mouse model of CML induced by BCR-ABL retrovirus (MSCV-BCR-ABL-GFP; MIG-BCR-ABL) and how to use this model in translational research.Moreover, to expand the application of this retrovirus induced CML model in a lot of conditional knockout mouse strain, we modified this vector to a triple gene coexpression vector in which we can co-express BCR-ABL, GFP, and a third gene which will be tested in different systems. To apply this triple gene system in conditional gene knockout strains, we can validate the CML development in the knockout mice and trace the leukemia cell following the GFP marker. In this protocol, we also describe how we utilize this triple gene system to prove the function of Pten as a tumor suppressor in leukemogenesis. Overall, this triple gene system expands our research spectrum in current conditional gene knockout strains and benefits our CML translational research. PMID:27150093

  17. Mouse models for genes involved in impaired spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryan, M K; de Kretser, D

    2006-02-01

    Since the introduction of molecular biology and gene ablation technologies there have been substantial advances in our understanding of how sperm are made and fertilization occurs. There have been at least 150 different models of specifically altered gene function produced that have resulted in male infertility spanning virtually all aspects of the spermatogenic, sperm maturation and fertilization processes. While each has, or potentially will reveal, novel aspects of these processes, there is still much of which we have little knowledge. The current review is by no means a comprehensive list of these mouse models, rather it gives an overview of the potential for such models which up to this point have generally been 'knockouts'; it presents alternative strategies for the production of new models and emphasizes the importance of thorough phenotypic analysis in order to extract a maximum amount of information from each model.

  18. Prolonged gabapentin analgesia in an experimental mouse model of fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ueda Hiroshi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In a new mouse model for generalized pain syndrome, including fibromyalgia, which used intermittent cold stress (ICS, bilateral allodynia in the hindpaw was observed that lasted more than 12 days; thermal hyperalgesia lasted 15 days. During constant cold stress (CCS, mice showed only a transient allodynia. A female prevalence in ICS-induced allodynia was observed in gonadectomized but not in gonad intact mice. Systemic gabapentin showed complete anti-allodynic effects in the ICS model at the one-tenth dose for injury-induced neuropathic pain model, and central gabapentin showed long-lasting analgesia for 4 days in ICS, but not the injury model. These results suggest that the ICS model is useful for the study of generalized pain syndrome.

  19. Cancer cell expression of autotaxin controls bone metastasis formation in mouse through lysophosphatidic acid-dependent activation of osteoclasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion David

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bone metastases are highly frequent complications of breast cancers. Current bone metastasis treatments using powerful anti-resorptive agents are only palliative indicating that factors independent of bone resorption control bone metastasis progression. Autotaxin (ATX/NPP2 is a secreted protein with both oncogenic and pro-metastatic properties. Through its lysosphospholipase D (lysoPLD activity, ATX controls the level of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA in the blood. Platelet-derived LPA promotes the progression of osteolytic bone metastases of breast cancer cells. We asked whether ATX was involved in the bone metastasis process. We characterized the role of ATX in osteolytic bone metastasis formation by using genetically modified breast cancer cells exploited on different osteolytic bone metastasis mouse models. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Intravenous injection of human breast cancer MDA-B02 cells with forced expression of ATX (MDA-B02/ATX to immunodeficiency BALB/C nude mice enhanced osteolytic bone metastasis formation, as judged by increased bone loss, tumor burden, and a higher number of active osteoclasts at the metastatic site. Mouse breast cancer 4T1 cells induced the formation of osteolytic bone metastases after intracardiac injection in immunocompetent BALB/C mice. These cells expressed active ATX and silencing ATX expression inhibited the extent of osteolytic bone lesions and decreased the number of active osteoclasts at the bone metastatic site. In vitro, osteoclast differentiation was enhanced in presence of MDA-B02/ATX cell conditioned media or recombinant autotaxin that was blocked by the autotaxin inhibitor vpc8a202. In vitro, addition of LPA to active charcoal-treated serum restored the capacity of the serum to support RANK-L/MCSF-induced osteoclastogenesis. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Expression of autotaxin by cancer cells controls osteolytic bone metastasis formation. This work demonstrates a new role for LPA as a

  20. Quantification of Lung Metastases from In Vivo Mouse Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Joan; Erler, Janine T

    2016-01-01

    Cancer research has made significant progress in terms of understanding and targeting primary tumors; however, the challenge remains for the successful treatment of metastatic cancers. This highlights the importance to use in vivo models to study the metastatic process, as well as for preclinical...... testing of compounds that could inhibit metastasis. As a result, proper quantification of metastases from in vivo models is of the utmost significance. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for collecting and handling lung tissues from mice, and guidance for subsequent analysis of metastases, as well...

  1. Effect of Cnidium Lactone on Serum Mutant P53 and BCL-2/BAX Expression in Human Prostate Cancer Cells PC-3 Tumor-Bearing BALB/C Nude Mouse Model

    OpenAIRE

    Bi, Dongbin; Yang, Mingshan; Zhao, Xia; Huang, Shiming

    2015-01-01

    Background Cnidium lactone is a natural coumarin compound that can inhibit a variety of cancer cell proliferation and induce cancer cell apoptosis. This experiment investigated the effect of cnidium lactone on molecular marker expression in prostate cancer nude mice to study its effect in inducing apoptosis. Material/Methods We randomly and equally divided 30 male BALB/C nude mice inoculated with human prostate cancer cells PC-3 into a negative control group, a cyclophosphamide group (500 mg/...

  2. Colon cancer metastasis in mouse liver is not affected by hypercoagulability due to Factor V Leiden mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klerk, CPW; Smorenburg, SM; Spek, CA; Van Noorden, CJF

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Clinical trials have shown life-prolonging effects of antithrombotics in cancer patients, but the molecular mechanisms remain unknown due to the multitude of their effects. We investigated in a mouse model whether one of the targets of antithrombotic therapy, fibrin deposition, stimulates tumour development. Fibrin may provide either protection of cancer cells in the circulation against mechanical stress and the immune system, or form a matrix for tumours and/or angiogenesis in tumours to develop. Mice homozygous for Factor V Leiden (FVL), a mutation in one of the coagulation factors that facilitates fibrin formation, were used to investigate whether hypercoagulability affects tumour development in an experimental metastasis model. Liver metastases of colon cancer were induced in mice with the FVL mutation and wild-type littermates. At day 21, number and size of tumours at the liver surface, fibrin/fibrinogen distribution, vessel density and the presence of newly formed vessels in tumours were analysed. Number and size of tumours did not differ between mice with and without the FVL mutation. Fibrin/fibrinogen was found in the cytoplasm of hepatocytes and cancer cells, in blood vessels in liver and tumour tissue and diffusely distributed outside vessels in tumours, indicating leaky vessels. Vessel density and angiogenesis varied widely between tumours, but a pre-dominance for vessel-rich or vessel-poor tumours or vessel formation could not be found in either genotype. In conclusion, the FVL mutation has no effect on the development of secondary tumours of colon cancer in livers of mice. Fibrin deposition and thus inhibition of fibrin formation by anticoagulants do not seem to affect tumour development in this model. PMID:17635646

  3. C57BL/6 mouse model of epithelial ovarian cancer and its biological characteristics%C57BL/6小鼠上皮性卵巢癌模型的建立及其生物学特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张祖娟; 李艺; 崔恒; 昌晓红; 陈新华; 叶雪

    2012-01-01

    Objective To establish epithelial ovarian cancer of peritoneal metastasis model and subcutaneous tumor model in immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice, thus to provide basis of diagnosis, treatment and prevention- related basic research for ovarian cancer. Methods Cultured inbred C57BL/6 mice poorly differentiated ovarian ade-nocarcinoma cell line ID- 8 in vitro. SPF grade C57BL/6 female mice (6~8 weeks) were inoculated with logarithmic phase of ID- 8 cells with 1X 107, 5 X 106, 1X 106 and 1 X 105 cells / dose intraperitoneally and subcutaneously into the flank. They were invided into 8 groups with 6 in each. Tumor formation rate, ascites, metastasis and survival rate were recorded. An additional set of 6 animals were injected intraperitoneally (5 X106 ID - 8 cells) and then sacrificed at different time intervals for necropsy and pathologic analysis. The remaining animals were sacrificed and examined just before they died. Results The tumor formation rate was 100%. In peritoneal tumor model group, the average survival time was (141 + 6. 7) d, (122.8 + 4.5) d, (83.4 + 7.2) d, (74.4 + 4.5) d in 1X 105, 1X 106, 5 X 106 and 1 X 107 ID- 8 cells group, with the tumor cell load increased, the survival time was significantly shorter (P<0. 05). In subcutaneous tumor group, nodule formation time was about 1 week in 1 X 107 cells group; 1 week in 5X106 cells group; 3 weeks in IX 106 cells group and 6 weeks in 1X105 cells group. As the tumor cells inoculation load increased, the diameter and volume of tumor increased significantly (P<0. 05). Conclusions C57BL/6 mice intraperitoneal ovarian cancer model is similar to human epithelial ovarian cancer stage Ⅲ and Ⅳ. The immune or drug therapy efficacy is easier observed in subcutaneous tumor model. Establishing the ID- 8 cells ovarian cancer tumor model in immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice is helpful for clinical study of the treatment of ovarian cancer and immunological study of molecular models.%目的 在免疫功能正常的C57BL/6小

  4. Review: US Spelling Colorectal cancer models for novel drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovko, Daniel; Kedrin, Dmitriy; Yilmaz, Omer H.; Roper, Jatin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite increased screening rates and advances in targeted therapy, colorectal cancer (CRC) remains the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality. CRC models that recapitulate key features of human disease are essential to the development of novel and effective therapeutics. Classic methods of modeling CRC such as human cell lines and xenograft mice, while useful for many applications, carry significant limitations. Recently developed in vitro and in vivo models overcome some of these deficiencies and thus can be utilized to better model CRC for mechanistic and translational research. Areas Covered The authors review established models of in vitro cell culture and describe advances in organoid culture for studying normal and malignant intestine. They also discuss key features of classic xenograft models and describe other approaches for in vivo CRC research, including patient-derived xenograft, carcinogen-induced, orthotopic transplantation, and transgenic mouse models. We also describe mouse models of metastatic CRC. Expert opinion No single model is optimal for drug discovery in CRC. Genetically engineered models overcome many limitations of xenograft models. Three-dimensional organoids can be efficiently derived from both normal and malignant tissue for large-scale in vitro and in vivo (transplantation) studies, and are thus a significant advance in CRC drug discovery. PMID:26295972

  5. Mouse models of SCN5A-related cardiac arrhythmias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavien eCharpentier

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutations of SCN5A gene, which encodes the α-subunit of the voltage-gated Na+ channel NaV1.5, underlie hereditary cardiac arrhythmic syndromes such as the type 3 long QT syndrome, cardiac conduction diseases, the Brugada syndrome, the sick sinus syndrome, atrial standstill and numerous overlap syndromes. Patch-clamp studies in heterologous expression systems have provided important information to understand the genotype-phenotype relationships of these diseases. However, they could not clarify how SCN5A mutations can be responsible for such a large spectrum of diseases, for the late age of onset or the progressiveness of some of these diseases and for the overlapping syndromes. Genetically modified mice rapidly appeared as promising tools for understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms of cardiac SCN5A-related arrhythmic syndromes and several mouse models have been established. This paper reviews some of the results obtained on these models that, for most of them, recapitulate the clinical phenotypes of the patients. It also points out that these models also have their own limitations. Overall, mouse models appear as powerful tools to elucidate the pathophysiological mechanisms of SCN5A-related diseases and offer the opportunity to investigate the secondary cellular consequences of SCN5A mutations such as the expression remodelling of other genes that might participate to the overall phenotype. Finally, they constitute useful tools for addressing the role of genetic and environmental modifiers on cardiac electrical activity.

  6. A new mouse model of metabolic syndrome and associated complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Zheng, Yue; Nishina, Patsy M; Naggert, Jürgen K.

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic Syndrome (MS) encompasses a clustering of risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including obesity, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia. We characterized a new mouse model carrying a dominant mutation, C57BL/6J-Nmf15/+ (B6-Nmf15/+), which develops additional complications of MS such as adipose tissue inflammation and cardiomyopathy. A backcross was used to genetically map the Nmf15 locus. Mice were examined in the CLAMS™ animal monitoring system, and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and blood chemistry analyses were performed. Hypothalamic LepR, SOCS1 and STAT3 phosphorylation were examined. Cardiac function was assessed by Echo- and Electro Cardiography. Adipose tissue inflammation was characterized by in situ hybridization and measurement of Jun kinase activity. The Nmf15 locus mapped to distal mouse chromosome 5 with a LOD score of 13.8. Nmf15 mice developed obesity by 12 weeks of age. Plasma leptin levels were significantly elevated in pre-obese Nmf15 mice at 8 weeks of age and an attenuated STAT3 phosphorylation in the hypothalamus suggests a primary leptin resistance. Adipose tissue from Nmf15 mice showed a remarkable degree of inflammation and macrophage infiltration as indicated by expression of the F4/80 marker and increased phosphorylation of JNK1/2. Lipidosis was observed in tubular epithelial cells and glomeruli of the kidney. Nmf15 mice demonstrate both histological and pathophysiological evidence of cardiomyopathy. The Nmf15 mouse model provides a new entry point into pathways mediating leptin resistance and obesity. It is one of few models that combine many aspects of metabolic syndrome and can be useful for testing new therapeutic approaches for combating obesity complications, particularly cardiomyopathy. PMID:19398498

  7. In vivo comparison of transduction efficiency with recombinant adenovirus-mediated p53 in a human colon cancer mouse model by different delivery routes%rAd/p53不同给药途径治疗人类结肠癌荷瘤鼠模型p53导入效率的在体评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Xie; Biling Liang; ling Zhang; Qihua Yang; Xiongfei Gu; Jing Xu; Mingwang Chen

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate transduction efficiency with recombinant adenovirus-mediated p53 (rAd/p53) therapy in a human colon cancer mouse model by intra-tumoral injection and intra-arterial delivery. Methods: The tumor pieces of human colon cancer SW480 were implanted in the livers of 45 nude mice. These mice were administrated with rAd/p53 by intratu-moral injection and intra-arterial delivery. After 24 h, 48 h and 72 h rAd/p53 administration, 5 mice each group were killed with over anesthesia and their livers were removed. P53 expression and apoptosis of tumor and liver were assessed. Results: P53 expression and apoptosis of intratumoral administration group was higher than tail vein group and control group. Apoptosis and p53 expression of livers in three groups had no significant difference. Conclusion: p53 gene transduction efficiency and anticancer effect of tAd/p53 is much better by intra-tumoral injection than intra-arterial delivery.

  8. A new immunization and treatment strategy for mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) associated cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braitbard, Ori; Roniger, Maayan; Bar-Sinai, Allan; Rajchman, Dana; Gross, Tamar; Abramovitch, Hillel; Ferla, Marco La; Franceschi, Sara; Lessi, Francesca; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Mazzanti, Chiara M.; Bevilacqua, Generoso; Hochman, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) causes mammary carcinoma or lymphoma in mice. An increasing body of evidence in recent years supports its involvement also in human sporadic breast cancer. It is thus of importance to develop new strategies to impair the development, growth and metastasis of MMTV-associated cancers. The signal peptide of the envelope precursor protein of this virus: MMTV-p14 (p14) is an excellent target for such strategies, due to unique characteristics distinct from its regular endoplasmic reticulum targeting function. These include cell surface expression in: murine cancer cells that harbor the virus, human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells that ectopically express p14, as well as cultured human cells derived from an invasive ductal breast carcinoma positive for MMTV sequences. These findings support its use in signal peptide-based immune targeting. Indeed, priming and boosting mice with p14 elicits a specific anti-signal peptide immune response sufficient for protective vaccination against MMTV-associated tumors. Furthermore, passive immunization using a combination of anti-p14 monoclonal antibodies or the transfer of T-cells from immunized mice (Adoptive Cell Transfer) is also therapeutically effective. With reports demonstrating involvement of MMTV in human breast cancer, we propose the immune-mediated targeting of p14 as a strategy for prevention, treatment and diagnosis of MMTV-associated cancers. PMID:26934560

  9. Cardiac manifestations in the mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis I

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan, Maria C.; Zheng, Yi; Ryazantsev, Sergey; Rozengurt, Nora; Roos, Kenneth P.; Neufeld, Elizabeth F.

    2005-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis I (MPS I, α-l-iduronidase deficiency disease) is a heritable lysosomal storage disorder involving multiple organs, including the heart. Malfunction of the heart is also a major manifestation in the mouse model of MPS I, progressing in severity from 6 to 10 months (of a one-year life span). In comparisons of MPS I with wild type mice, the heart was found enlarged, with thickened septal and posterior walls, primarily because of infiltration of the muscle by storage-laden c...

  10. Dantrolene is neuroprotective in Huntington's disease transgenic mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington's disease (HD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the Huntingtin protein which results in the selective degeneration of striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs. Our group has previously demonstrated that calcium (Ca2+ signaling is abnormal in MSNs from the yeast artificial chromosome transgenic mouse model of HD (YAC128. Moreover, we demonstrated that deranged intracellular Ca2+ signaling sensitizes YAC128 MSNs to glutamate-induced excitotoxicity when compared to wild type (WT MSNs. In previous studies we also observed abnormal neuronal Ca2+ signaling in neurons from spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2 and spinocerebellar ataxia 3 (SCA3 mouse models and demonstrated that treatment with dantrolene, a ryanodine receptor antagonist and clinically relevant Ca2+ signaling stabilizer, was neuroprotective in experiments with these mouse models. The aim of the current study was to evaluate potential beneficial effects of dantrolene in experiments with YAC128 HD mouse model. Results The application of caffeine and glutamate resulted in increased Ca2+ release from intracellular stores in YAC128 MSN cultures when compared to WT MSN cultures. Pre-treatment with dantrolene protected YAC128 MSNs from glutamate excitotoxicty, with an effective concentration of 100 nM and above. Feeding dantrolene (5 mg/kg twice a week to YAC128 mice between 2 months and 11.5 months of age resulted in significantly improved performance in the beam-walking and gait-walking assays. Neuropathological analysis revealed that long-term dantrolene feeding to YAC128 mice significantly reduced the loss of NeuN-positive striatal neurons and reduced formation of Httexp nuclear aggregates. Conclusions Our results support the hypothesis that deranged Ca2+ signaling plays an important role in HD pathology. Our data also implicate the RyanRs as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of HD and demonstrate that Ryan

  11. Protective antitumor immunity induced by tumor cell lysates conjugated with diphtheria toxin and adjuvant epitope in mouse breast tumor models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ze-Yu Wang; Rong-Yue Cao; Jie Wu; Tai-Ming LI; Jing-Jing Liu; Yun Xing; Bin Liu; Lei Lu; Xiao Huang; Chi-Yu Ge; Wen-Jun Yao; Mao-Lei Xu; Zhen-Qiu Gao

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cell vaccine-based immunotherapy has received increasing interest in many clinical trials involving patients with breast cancer.Combining with appropriate adjuvants can enhance the weak immunogenic properties of tumor cell lysates (TCL).In this study,diphtheria toxin (DT) and two tandem repeats of mycobacterial heat shock protein 70 (mHSP70) fragment 407-426 (M2) were conjugated to TCL with glutaraldehyde,and the constructed cancer cell vaccine was named DT-TCL-M2.Subcutaneous injection of DT-TCL-M2 in mice effectively elicited tumor-specific polyclonal immune responses,including humoral and cellular immune responses.High levels of antibodies against TCL were detected in the serum of immunized mice with ELISA and verified with Western blot analyses.The splenocytes from immunized mice showed potent cytotoxicity on Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells.Moreover,the protective antitumor immunity induced by DT-TCL-M2 inhibited tumor growth in a mouse breast tumor model.DTTCL-M2 also attenuated tumor-induced angiogenesis and slowed tumor growth in a mouse intradermal tumor model.These findings demonstrate that TCL conjugated with appropriate adjuvants induced effective antitumor immunity in vivo.Improvements in potency could further make cancer cell vaccines a useful and safe method for preventing cancer recurrence after resection.

  12. Mouse Models of Stargardt 3 Dominant Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabas, Peter; Gorusupudi, Aruna; Bernstein, Paul S; Krizaj, David

    2016-01-01

    Stargardt type 3 macular degeneration is dependent on a dominant defect in a single gene, ELOVL4 (elongase of very long chain fatty acids 4). The encoded enzyme, ELOVL4, is required for the synthesis of very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (VLC-PUFAs), a rare class of > C24 lipids. In vitro expression studies suggest that mutated ELOVL4(STGD3) proteins fold improperly, resulting in ER stress and formation of cytosolic aggresomes of wild type and mutant ELOVL4. Although a number of mouse models have been developed to determine whether photoreceptor cell loss in STGD3 results from depletion of VLC-PUFAs, aggresome-dependent cell stress or a combination of these two factors, none of these models adequately recapitulates the disease phenotype in humans. Thus, the precise molecular mechanism by which ELOVL4 mutation causes photoreceptor degeneration in mice and in human patients remains to be characterized. This mini review compares and evaluates current STGD3 mouse models and determines what conclusions can be drawn from past work. PMID:26427404

  13. A new humanized mouse model for alopecia areata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilhar, Amos; Keren, Aviad; Paus, Ralf

    2013-12-01

    Although alopecia areata (AA) is not life threatening, it may lead to severe psychological disturbances, reducing the quality of life in all ages. Thus, a new animal model is needed for shedding more light onto the pathogenesis of this cell-mediated, organ-specific autoimmune disease to identify more effective therapeutic strategies. Recently, we succeeded in developing a new humanized mouse model of AA, which includes transplantation of healthy human scalp skin obtained from normal volunteers on to severe-combined immunodeficient mice. This is followed by intradermal injection of either autologous or allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells, which had been cultured with high dose of IL-2 and enriched for natural killer group 2D-positive (NKG2D+) and CD56+ cells. This protocol leads to rapid and predictable development of focal hair loss, with all the characteristic clinical, histological, and immunohistochemical features of AA. This humanized mouse AA model underscores the functional importance of NKG2D+ and CD56+ cells in AA pathogenesis and promises to be instrumental for identifying novel AA treatment strategies. PMID:24326548

  14. Choice of mouse strain influences the outcome in a mouse model of chemical-induced asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa De Vooght

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The development of occupational asthma is the result of interactions between environmental factors and individual susceptibility. We assessed how our model of chemical-induced asthma is influenced by using different mouse strains. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: On days 1 and 8, male mice of 7 different strains (BALB/c, BP/2, A/J, C57Bl/6, DBA/2, CBA and AKR were dermally treated with toluene-2,4-diisocyanate (TDI (0.3% or vehicle (acetone/olive oil, AOO, 2:3 on each ear (20 microl. On day 15, they received an oropharyngeal instillation of TDI (0.01% or AOO (1:4. Airway reactivity to methacholine, total and differential cell counts in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL and total serum IgE and IgG(2a levels were measured. Lymphocyte subpopulations in auricular lymph nodes and in vitro release of cytokines by ConA stimulated lymphocytes were assessed. In TDI-sensitized and challenged mice, airway hyper-reactivity was only observed in BALB/c, BP/2, A/J and AKR mice; airway inflammation was most pronounced in BALB/c mice; numbers of T-helper (CD4(+, T-activated (CD4(+CD25(+, T-cytotoxic (CD8(+ and B- lymphocytes (CD19(+ were increased in the auricular lymph nodes of BALB/c, BP/2, A/J and CBA mice; elevated concentrations of IL-4, IL-10, IL-13 and IFN-gamma were detected in supernatant of lymphocytes from BALB/c, BP/2, A/J, C57Bl/6 and CBA mice cultured with concanavaline A, along with an increase in total serum IgE. CONCLUSION: The used mouse strain has considerable and variable impacts on different aspects of the asthma phenotype. The human phenotypical characteristics of chemically-induced occupational asthma were best reproduced in Th2-biased mice and in particular in BALB/c mice.

  15. Revisiting the mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy

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    Kim CB

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Clifford B Kim,1,2 Patricia A D’Amore,2–4 Kip M Connor1,2 1Angiogenesis Laboratory, Massachusetts Eye and Ear, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, 3Schepens Eye Research Institute, Massachusetts Eye and Ear, 4Department of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Abnormal blood vessel growth in the retina is a hallmark of many retinal diseases, such as retinopathy of prematurity (ROP, proliferative diabetic retinopathy, and the wet form of age-related macular degeneration. In particular, ROP has been an important health concern for physicians since the advent of routine supplemental oxygen therapy for premature neonates more than 70 years ago. Since then, researchers have explored several animal models to better understand ROP and retinal vascular development. Of these models, the mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR has become the most widely used, and has played a pivotal role in our understanding of retinal angiogenesis and ocular immunology, as well as in the development of groundbreaking therapeutics such as anti-vascular endothelial growth factor injections for wet age-related macular degeneration. Numerous refinements to the model have been made since its inception in the 1950s, and technological advancements have expanded the use of the model across multiple scientific fields. In this review, we explore the historical developments that have led to the mouse OIR model utilized today, essential concepts of OIR, limitations of the model, and a representative selection of key findings from OIR, with particular emphasis on current research progress. Keywords: ROP, OIR, angiogenesis

  16. A Versatile Orthotopic Nude Mouse Model for Study of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Chok Yan Ip

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence indicates tumor-stromal interactions play a crucial role in cancer. An in vivo esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC orthotopic animal model was developed with bioluminescence imaging established with a real-time monitoring platform for functional and signaling investigation of tumor-stromal interactions. The model was produced by injection of luciferase-labelled ESCC cells into the intraesophageal wall of nude mice. Histological examination indicates this orthotopic model is highly reproducible with 100% tumorigenesis among the four ESCC cell lines tested. This new model recapitulates many clinical and pathological properties of human ESCC, including esophageal luminal stricture by squamous cell carcinoma with nodular tumor growth, adventitia invasion, lymphovascular invasion, and perineural infiltration. It was tested using an AKT shRNA knockdown of ESCC cell lines and the in vivo tumor suppressive effects of AKT knockdown were observed. In conclusion, this ESCC orthotopic mouse model allows investigation of gene functions of cancer cells in a more natural tumor microenvironment and has advantages over previous established models. It provides a versatile platform with potential application for metastasis and therapeutic regimen testing.

  17. Quantification of Brain Access of Exendin-4 in the C57BL Mouse Model by SPIM Fluorescence Imaging and the Allen Mouse Brain Reference Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Casper Bo; Secher, Anna; Hecksher-Sørensen, Jacob;

    2015-01-01

    construct a SPIM brain atlas based on the Allen mouse brain 3D reference model and use it to analyze the access of peripherally injected Exendin-4 into the brain compared to a negative control group. The constructed atlas consists of an average SPIM volume obtained from eight C57BL mouse brains using group...

  18. Development of a mouse model of abdominal cutaneous flaps for breast reconstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel John Womac

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Autologous tissue transfer, in addition to replacing tissue that was lost during injury or surgery, offers women an excellent option to improve cosmetic appearance and self-confidence following mastectomy due to breast cancer. However, flap necrosis is a complication in obese patients undergoing this procedure. We created a mouse model to study the flap-related complications that leads to decreased flap survival in autologous breast reconstruction. METHODS: Left superficial inferior epigastric (SIE pedicle abdominal-cutaneous flaps were elevated in 8 week-old, obese ob/ob male mice and their lean littermates. Flaps were followed by serial photography. Area of flap necrosis was measured at 7 days. Statistical analysis was performed. RESULTS: Necrosis was observed at the distal margin of the flaps, in both lean and obese groups. Lean left SIE flaps (n = 8 had a total area flap necrosis of 9.1% at 7 days whereas obese left SIE flaps (n = 8 had a total area flap necrosis of 45.5% at 7 days. Obese flaps had a statistically significant increase in necrosis compared to the lean flaps, p = 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: There was a significant difference between flap survival in lean and obese SIE pedicle flaps in our mouse model. We have developed the first flap model of obesity utilizing the superficial epigastric pedicle in the mouse. This model is optimal for future studies to dissect out mechanisms that lead to the complications related to flap survival for breast reconstruction, especially in obese subjects.

  19. ANIMAL MODELS OF CANCER: A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Archana M Navale

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death worldwide. In USA three persons out of five will develop some type of cancer. Beyond these statistics of mortality, the morbidity due to cancer presents a real scary picture. Last 50 years of research has rendered some types of cancer curable, but still the major fear factor associated with this disease is unchanged. Animal models are classified according to the method of induction of cancer in the animal. Spontaneous tumor models are the most primi...

  20. Mouse mammary tumor biology: a short history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiff, Robert D; Kenney, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    For over a century, mouse mammary tumor biology and the associated Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) have served as the foundation for experimental cancer research, in general, and, in particular, experimental breast cancer research. Spontaneous mouse mammary tumors were the basis for studies of the natural history of neoplasia, oncogenic viruses, host responses, endocrinology, and neoplastic progression. However, lacking formal proof of a human mammary tumor virus, the preeminence of the mouse model faded in the 1980s. Since the late 1980s, genetically engineered mice (GEM) have proven extremely useful for studying breast cancer and have become the animal model for human breast cancer. Hundreds of mouse models of human breast cancer have been developed since the first demonstration, in 1984, that the mouse mammary gland could be molecularly targeted and used to test the oncogenicity of candidate human genes. Now, very few scientists can avoid using a mouse model to test the biology of their favorite gene. The GEM have attracted a new generation of molecular and cellular biologists eager to apply their skills to these surrogates of the human disease. Newcomers often enter the field without an appreciation of the origins of mouse mammary tumor biology and the basis for many of the prevailing concepts. Our purpose in writing this short history of mouse mammary tumor biology is to provide a historical perspective for the benefit of the newcomers. If Einstein was correct in that "we stand on the shoulders of giants," the neophytes should meet their giants. PMID:17433908

  1. A new mouse model to explore therapies for preeclampsia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulwahab Ahmed

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pre-eclampsia, a pregnancy-specific multisystemic disorder is a leading cause of maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity. This syndrome has been known to medical science since ancient times. However, despite considerable research, the cause/s of preeclampsia remain unclear, and there is no effective treatment. Development of an animal model that recapitulates this complex pregnancy-related disorder may help to expand our understanding and may hold great potential for the design and implementation of effective treatment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that the CBA/J x DBA/2 mouse model of recurrent miscarriage is also a model of immunologically-mediated preeclampsia (PE. DBA/J mated CBA/J females spontaneously develop many features of human PE (primigravidity, albuminuria, endotheliosis, increased sensitivity to angiotensin II and increased plasma leptin levels that correlates with bad pregnancy outcomes. We previously reported that antagonism of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF signaling by soluble VEGF receptor 1 (sFlt-1 is involved in placental and fetal injury in CBA/J x DBA/2 mice. Using this animal model that recapitulates many of the features of preeclampsia in women, we found that pravastatin restores angiogenic balance, ameliorates glomerular injury, diminishes hypersensitivity to angiotensin II and protects pregnancies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We described a new mouse model of PE, were the relevant key features of human preeclampsia develop spontaneously. The CBA/J x DBA/2 model, that recapitulates this complex disorder, helped us identify pravastatin as a candidate therapy to prevent preeclampsia and its related complications. We recognize that these studies were conducted in mice and that clinical trials are needed to confirm its application to humans.

  2. Mouse models of cognitive disorders in trisomy 21: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sérégaza, Zohra; Roubertoux, Pierre L; Jamon, Marc; Soumireu-Mourat, Bernard

    2006-05-01

    Trisomy 21 (TRS21) is the most frequent genetic cause of mental retardation. Although the presence of an extra copy of HSA21 is known to be at the origin of the syndrome, we do not know which 225 HSA21 genes have an effect on cognitive processes. Mouse models of TRS21 have been developed using syntenies between HSA21 and MMU16, MMU10 and MMU17. Available mouse models carry extra fragments of MMU16 or of HSA21 that cover all of HSA21 (chimeric HSA21) or MMU16 (Ts16); some carry large parts of MMU16 (Ts65Dn, Ts1Cje, Ms1Cje), while others have reduced contiguous fragments covering the D21S17-ETS2 region or single transfected genes. This offers a nest design strategy for deciphering cognitive (learning, memory and exploration) and associated brain abnormalities involving each of these chromosomal regions. This review confirms the crucial but not exclusive contribution of the D21S17-ETS2 region encompassing 16 genes to cognitive disorders. PMID:16523244

  3. Mouse models of Mdm2 and Mdm4 and their clinical implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shunbin Xiong

    2013-01-01

    Mdm2 and Mdm4 are two key negative regulators of the tumor suppressor p53.Deletion of either Mdm2 or Mdm4 induces p53-dependent early embryonic lethality in knockout mouse models.The tissuespecific deletion of Mdm2 induces p53-dependent apoptosis,whereas the deletion of Mdm4 induces both p53-dependent apoptosis and cell cycle arrest.Compared to Mdm4 deletion,Mdm2 deletion causes more severe phenotypic defects.Disrupting the Mdm2 and Mdm4 interaction using knockin mice models causes embryonic lethality that can be completely rescued by the concomitant loss of p53,suggesting that Mdm2 and Mdm4 heterodimerization is critical to inhibit p53 activity during embryogenesis.Overexpression of Mdm2 and Mdm4 in mice induces spontaneous tumorigenesis,which clearly indicates that Mdm2 and Mdm4 are bona fide oncogenes.Studies from these mouse models strongly suggest that blocking Mdm2-and Mdm4-mediated p53 inhibition is an appealing therapeutic strategy for cancer patients with wild-type p53 alleles.

  4. Metabolomic Changes Accompanying Transformation and Acquisition of Metastatic Potential in a Syngeneic Mouse Mammary Tumor Model*

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Xin; Bennet, Bryson; Mu, Euphemia; Rabinowitz, Joshua; Kang, Yibin

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer type for women in the western world. Despite decades of research, the molecular processes associated with breast cancer progression are still inadequately defined. Here, we focus on the systematic alteration of metabolism by using the state of the art metabolomic profiling techniques to investigate the changes of 157 metabolites during the progression of normal mouse mammary epithelial cells to an isogenic series of mammary tumor cell lines with increas...

  5. Radio-deoxynucleoside Analogs used for Imaging tk Expression in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibin Tian, Xincheng Lu, Hong Guo, David Corn, Joseph Molter, Bingcheng Wang, Guangbin Luo, Zhenghong Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: A group of radiolabeled thymidine analogs were developed as radio-tracers for imaging herpes viral thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk or its variants used as reporter gene. A transgenic mouse model was created to express tk upon liver injury or naturally occurring hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. The purpose of this study was to use this unique animal model for initial testing with radio-labeled thymidine analogs, mainly a pair of newly emerging nucleoside analogs, D-FMAU and L-FMAU.Methods: A transgeneic mouse model was created by putting a fused reporter gene system, firefly luciferase (luc and HSV1-tk, under the control of mouse alpha fetoprotein (Afp promoter. Initial multimodal imaging, which was consisted of bioluminescent imaging (BLI and planar gamma scintigraphy with [125I]-FIAU, was used for examining the model creation in the new born and liver injury in the adult mice. Carcinogen diethylnitrosamine (DEN was then administrated to induce HCC in these knock-in mice such that microPET imaging could be used to track the activity of Afp promoter during tumor development and progression by imaging tk expression first with [18F]-FHBG. Dynamic PET scans with D-[18F]-FMAU and L-[18F]-FMAU were then performed to evaluate this pair of relatively new tracers. Cells were derived from these liver tumors for uptake assays using H-3 labeled version of PET tracers.Results: The mouse model with dual reporters: HSV1-tk and luc placed under the transcriptional control of an endogenous Afp promoter was used for imaging studies. The expression of the Afp gene was highly specific in proliferative hepatocytes, in regenerative liver, and in developing fetal liver, and thus provided an excellent indicator for liver injury and cancer development in adult mice. Both D-FMAU and L-FMAU showed stable liver tumor uptake where the tk gene was expressed under the Afp promoter. The performance of this pair of tracers was slightly different in terms of signal

  6. Regression of retinopathy by squalamine in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Rosemary D; Yan, Yun; Geng, Yixun; Zasloff, Michael; Williams, Jon I

    2004-07-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether an antiangiogenic agent, squalamine, given late during the evolution of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) in the mouse, could improve retinal neovascularization. OIR was induced in neonatal C57BL6 mice and the neonates were treated s.c. with squalamine doses begun at various times after OIR induction. A system of retinal whole mounts and assessment of neovascular nuclei extending beyond the inner limiting membrane from animals reared under room air or OIR conditions and killed periodically from d 12 to 21 were used to assess retinopathy in squalamine-treated and untreated animals. OIR evolved after 75% oxygen exposure in neonatal mice with florid retinal neovascularization developing by d 14. Squalamine (single dose, 25 mg/kg s.c.) given on d 15 or 16, but not d 17, substantially improved retinal neovascularization in the mouse model of OIR. There was improvement seen in the degree of blood vessel tuft formation, blood vessel tortuosity, and central vasoconstriction with squalamine treatment at d 15 or 16. Single-dose squalamine at d 12 was effective at reducing subsequent development of retinal neovascularization at doses as low as 1 mg/kg. Squalamine is a very active inhibitor of OIR in mouse neonates at doses as low as 1 mg/kg given once. Further, squalamine given late in the course of OIR improves retinopathy by inducing regression of retinal neovessels and abrogating invasion of new vessels beyond the inner-limiting membrane of the retina. PMID:15128931

  7. Dysregulation of bile acid homeostasis in parenteral nutrition mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Le; Yang, Ill; Kong, Bo; Shen, Jianliang; Gorczyca, Ludwik; Memon, Naureen; Buckley, Brian T; Guo, Grace L

    2016-01-15

    Long-term parenteral nutrition (PN) administration can lead to PN-associated liver diseases (PNALD). Although multiple risk factors have been identified for PNALD, to date, the roles of bile acids (BAs) and the pathways involved in BA homeostasis in the development and progression of PNALD are still unclear. We have established a mouse PN model with IV infusion of PN solution containing soybean oil-based lipid emulsion (SOLE). Our results showed that PN altered the expression of genes involved in a variety of liver functions at the mRNA levels. PN increased liver gene expression of Cyp7a1 and markedly decreased that of Cyp8b1, Cyp7b1, Bsep, and Shp. CYP7A1 and CYP8B1 are important for synthesizing the total amount of BAs and regulating the hydrophobicity of BAs, respectively. Consistently, both the levels and the percentages of primary BAs as well as total non-12α-OH BAs increased significantly in the serum of PN mice compared with saline controls, whereas liver BA profiles were largely similar. The expression of several key liver-X receptor-α (LXRα) target genes involved in lipid synthesis was also increased in PN mouse livers. Retinoid acid-related orphan receptor-α (RORα) has been shown to induce the expression of Cyp8b1 and Cyp7b1, as well as to suppress LXRα function. Western blot showed significantly reduced nuclear migration of RORα protein in PN mouse livers. This study shows that continuous PN infusion with SOLE in mice leads to dysregulation of BA homeostasis. Alterations of liver RORα signaling in PN mice may be one of the mechanisms implicated in the pathogenesis of PNALD. PMID:26564717

  8. Gait analysis in a mouse model resembling Leigh disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haas, Ria; Russel, Frans G; Smeitink, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    Leigh disease (LD) is one of the clinical phenotypes of mitochondrial OXPHOS disorders and also known as sub-acute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy. The disease has an incidence of 1 in 77,000 live births. Symptoms typically begin early in life and prognosis for LD patients is poor. Currently, no clinically effective treatments are available. Suitable animal and cellular models are necessary for the understanding of the neuropathology and the development of successful new therapeutic strategies. In this study we used the Ndufs4 knockout (Ndufs4(-/-)) mouse, a model of mitochondrial complex I deficiency. Ndusf4(-/-) mice exhibit progressive neurodegeneration, which closely resemble the human LD phenotype. When dissecting behavioral abnormalities in animal models it is of great importance to apply translational tools that are clinically relevant. To distinguish gait abnormalities in patients, simple walking tests can be assessed, but in animals this is not easy. This study is the first to demonstrate automated CatWalk gait analysis in the Ndufs4(-/-) mouse model. Marked differences were noted between Ndufs4(-/-) and control mice in dynamic, static, coordination and support parameters. Variation of walking speed was significantly increased in Ndufs4(-/-) mice, suggesting hampered and uncoordinated gait. Furthermore, decreased regularity index, increased base of support and changes in support were noted in the Ndufs4(-/-) mice. Here, we report the ability of the CatWalk system to sensitively assess gait abnormalities in Ndufs4(-/-) mice. This objective gait analysis can be of great value for intervention and drug efficacy studies in animal models for mitochondrial disease.

  9. Granzyme B-based cytolytic fusion protein targeting EpCAM specifically kills triple negative breast cancer cells in vitro and inhibits tumor growth in a subcutaneous mouse tumor model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amoury, Manal; Kolberg, Katharina; Anh-Tuan Pham, [Unknown; Hristodorov, Dmitrij; Mladenov, Radoslav; Di Fiore, Stefano; Helfrich, Wijnand; Kiessling, Fabian; Fischer, Rainer; Pardo, Alessa; Thepen, Theophilus; Hussain, Ahmad F.; Nachreiner, Thomas; Barth, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is associated with poor prognosis and high prevalence among young premenopausal women. Unlike in other breast cancer subtypes, no targeted therapy is currently available. Overexpression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) in 60% of TNBC tumors correlates

  10. Apo-10'-lycopenoic acid suppresses lung cancer cell growth by activating retinoic acid receptor Beta in vitro, and inhibits lung tumorigenesis in vivo in the A/J mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lycopene, which has been associated with a lower risk of a variety of cancers including lung cancer, can be cleaved enzymatically at its 9',10'-double bond and converted into apo-10'-lycopenoids both in vivo and in vitro. Here, we evaluated the potential chemopreventive effect of apo-10'-lycopenoic...

  11. 13A. Integrative Cancer Care: The Life Over Cancer Model

    OpenAIRE

    Block, Keith; Block, Penny; Gyllenhaal, Charlotte; Shoham, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Focus Areas: Integrative Algorithms of Care Integrative cancer treatment fully blends conventional cancer treatment with integrative therapies such as diet, supplements, exercise and biobehavioral approaches. The Life Over Cancer model comprises three spheres of intervention: improving lifestyle, improving biochemical environment (terrain), and improving tolerance of conventional treatment. These levels are applied within the context of a life-affirming approach to cancer patients and treatme...

  12. PET/CT Imaging in Mouse Models of Myocardial Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Gargiulo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Different species have been used to reproduce myocardial infarction models but in the last years mice became the animals of choice for the analysis of several diseases, due to their short life cycle and the possibility of genetic manipulation. Many techniques are currently used for cardiovascular imaging in mice, including X-ray computed tomography (CT, high-resolution ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear medicine procedures. Cardiac positron emission tomography (PET allows to examine noninvasively, on a molecular level and with high sensitivity, regional changes in myocardial perfusion, metabolism, apoptosis, inflammation, and gene expression or to measure changes in anatomical and functional parameters in heart diseases. Currently hybrid PET/CT scanners for small laboratory animals are available, where CT adds high-resolution anatomical information. This paper reviews mouse models of myocardial infarction and discusses the applications of dedicated PET/CT systems technology, including animal preparation, anesthesia, radiotracers, and images postprocessing.

  13. Multimodality pH imaging in a mouse dorsal skin fold window chamber model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Hui Min; Schafer, Rachel; Pagel, Mark M.; Robey, Ian F.; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2013-03-01

    Upregulate levels of expression and activity of membrane H+ ion pumps in cancer cells drives the extracellular pH (pHe,) to values lower than normal. Furthermore, disregulated pH is indicative of the changes in glycolytic metabolism in tumor cells and has been shown to facilitate extracellular tissue remodeling during metastasis Therefore, measurement of pHe could be a useful cancer biomarker for diagnostic and therapy monitoring evaluation. Multimodality in-vivo imaging of pHe in tumorous tissue in a mouse dorsal skin fold window chamber (DSFWC) model is described. A custom-made plastic window chamber structure was developed that is compatible with both imaging optical and MR imaging modalities and provides a model system for continuous study of the same tissue microenvironment on multiple imaging platforms over a 3-week period. For optical imaging of pHe, SNARF-1 carboxylic acid is injected intravenously into a SCID mouse with an implanted tumor. A ratiometric measurement of the fluorescence signal captured on a confocal microscope reveals the pHe of the tissue visible within the window chamber. This imaging method was used in a preliminary study to evaluate sodium bicarbonate as a potential drug treatment to reverse tissue acidosis. For MR imaging of pHe the chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) was used as an alternative way of measuring pHe in a DSFWC model. ULTRAVIST®, a FDA approved x-ray/CT contrast agent has been shown to have a CEST effect that is pH dependent. A ratiometric analysis of water saturation at 5.6 and 4.2 ppm chemical shift provides a means to estimate the local pHe.

  14. Effect of exercise on retrograde transport in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Whitney, Darryl Campbell

    2007-01-01

    The potential for exercise to improve function and delay disease progression in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has been examined in some detail. Recent studies have shown that retrograde transport is diminished throughout disease progression in this mouse model. The finding that exercise plus viral delivery of IGF-1 significantly improves lifespan of the G93A transgenic mouse highlights the need to investigate the mechanisms by which exercise may alter factors associated...

  15. A novel rabbit anti-hepatocyte growth factor monoclonal neutralizing antibody inhibits tumor growth in prostate cancer cells and mouse xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yanlan; Chen, Yicheng; Ding, Guoqing; Wang, Mingchao; Wu, Haiyang; Xu, Liwei; Rui, Xuefang; Zhang, Zhigen, E-mail: srrshurology@163.com

    2015-08-14

    The hepatocyte growth factor and its receptor c-Met are correlated with castration-resistance in prostate cancer. Although HGF has been considered as an attractive target for therapeutic antibodies, the lack of cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with human/mouse HGFs is a major obstacle in preclinical developments. We generated a panel of anti-HGF RabMAbs either blocking HGF/c-Met interaction or inhibiting c-Met phosphorylation. We selected one RabMAb with mouse cross-reactivity and demonstrated that it blocked HGF-stimulated downstream activation in PC-3 and DU145 cells. Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibited not only the growth of PC-3 cells but also HGF-dependent proliferation in HUVECs. We further demonstrated the efficacy and potency of the anti-HGF RabMAb in tumor xenograft mice models. Through these in vitro and in vivo experiments, we explored a novel therapeutic antibody for advanced prostate cancer. - Highlights: • HGF is an attractive target for castration-refractory prostate cancer. • We generated and characterized a panel of anti-HGF rabbit monoclonal antibodies. • More than half of these anti-HGF RabMAbs was cross-reactive with mouse HGF. • Anti-HGF RabMAb blocks HGF-stimulated phosphorylation and cell growth in vitro. • Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in xenograft mice.

  16. A Neonatal Mouse Spinal Cord Compression Injury Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Züchner, Mark; Glover, Joel C; Boulland, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) typically causes devastating neurological deficits, particularly through damage to fibers descending from the brain to the spinal cord. A major current area of research is focused on the mechanisms of adaptive plasticity that underlie spontaneous or induced functional recovery following SCI. Spontaneous functional recovery is reported to be greater early in life, raising interesting questions about how adaptive plasticity changes as the spinal cord develops. To facilitate investigation of this dynamic, we have developed a SCI model in the neonatal mouse. The model has relevance for pediatric SCI, which is too little studied. Because neural plasticity in the adult involves some of the same mechanisms as neural plasticity in early life(1), this model may potentially have some relevance also for adult SCI. Here we describe the entire procedure for generating a reproducible spinal cord compression (SCC) injury in the neonatal mouse as early as postnatal (P) day 1. SCC is achieved by performing a laminectomy at a given spinal level (here described at thoracic levels 9-11) and then using a modified Yasargil aneurysm mini-clip to rapidly compress and decompress the spinal cord. As previously described, the injured neonatal mice can be tested for behavioral deficits or sacrificed for ex vivo physiological analysis of synaptic connectivity using electrophysiological and high-throughput optical recording techniques(1). Earlier and ongoing studies using behavioral and physiological assessment have demonstrated a dramatic, acute impairment of hindlimb motility followed by a complete functional recovery within 2 weeks, and the first evidence of changes in functional circuitry at the level of identified descending synaptic connections(1). PMID:27078037

  17. Skeletal metastasis: treatments, mouse models,and the Wnt signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kenneth C.Valkenburg; Matthew R.Steensma; Bart O.Williams; Zhendong Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal metastases result in significant morbidity and mortality.This is particularly true of cancers with a strong predilection for the bone,such as breast,prostate,and lung cancers.There is currently no reliable cure for skeletal metastasis,and palliative therapy options are limited.The Wnt signaling pathway has been found to play an integral role in the process of skeletal metastasis and may be an important clinical target.Several experimental models of skeletal metastasis have been used to find new biomarkers and test new treatments.In this review,we discuss pathologic process of bone metastasis,the roles of the Wnt signaling,and the available experimental models and treatments.

  18. Cell-Autonomous Progeroid Changes in Conditional Mouse Models for Repair Endonuclease XPG Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeij, Wilbert P.; Tresini, Maria; Weymaere, Michael; Menoni, Hervé; Brandt, Renata M. C.; de Waard, Monique C.; Botter, Sander M.; Sarker, Altaf H.; Jaspers, Nicolaas G. J.; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; van der Pluijm, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    As part of the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) process, the endonuclease XPG is involved in repair of helix-distorting DNA lesions, but the protein has also been implicated in several other DNA repair systems, complicating genotype-phenotype relationship in XPG patients. Defects in XPG can cause either the cancer-prone condition xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) alone, or XP combined with the severe neurodevelopmental disorder Cockayne Syndrome (CS), or the infantile lethal cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS) syndrome, characterized by dramatic growth failure, progressive neurodevelopmental abnormalities and greatly reduced life expectancy. Here, we present a novel (conditional) Xpg−/− mouse model which -in a C57BL6/FVB F1 hybrid genetic background- displays many progeroid features, including cessation of growth, loss of subcutaneous fat, kyphosis, osteoporosis, retinal photoreceptor loss, liver aging, extensive neurodegeneration, and a short lifespan of 4–5 months. We show that deletion of XPG specifically in the liver reproduces the progeroid features in the liver, yet abolishes the effect on growth or lifespan. In addition, specific XPG deletion in neurons and glia of the forebrain creates a progressive neurodegenerative phenotype that shows many characteristics of human XPG deficiency. Our findings therefore exclude that both the liver as well as the neurological phenotype are a secondary consequence of derailment in other cell types, organs or tissues (e.g. vascular abnormalities) and support a cell-autonomous origin caused by the DNA repair defect itself. In addition they allow the dissection of the complex aging process in tissue- and cell-type-specific components. Moreover, our data highlight the critical importance of genetic background in mouse aging studies, establish the Xpg−/− mouse as a valid model for the severe form of human XPG patients and segmental accelerated aging, and strengthen the link between DNA damage and aging. PMID:25299392

  19. Cell-autonomous progeroid changes in conditional mouse models for repair endonuclease XPG deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Barnhoorn

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available As part of the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER process, the endonuclease XPG is involved in repair of helix-distorting DNA lesions, but the protein has also been implicated in several other DNA repair systems, complicating genotype-phenotype relationship in XPG patients. Defects in XPG can cause either the cancer-prone condition xeroderma pigmentosum (XP alone, or XP combined with the severe neurodevelopmental disorder Cockayne Syndrome (CS, or the infantile lethal cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS syndrome, characterized by dramatic growth failure, progressive neurodevelopmental abnormalities and greatly reduced life expectancy. Here, we present a novel (conditional Xpg-/- mouse model which -in a C57BL6/FVB F1 hybrid genetic background- displays many progeroid features, including cessation of growth, loss of subcutaneous fat, kyphosis, osteoporosis, retinal photoreceptor loss, liver aging, extensive neurodegeneration, and a short lifespan of 4-5 months. We show that deletion of XPG specifically in the liver reproduces the progeroid features in the liver, yet abolishes the effect on growth or lifespan. In addition, specific XPG deletion in neurons and glia of the forebrain creates a progressive neurodegenerative phenotype that shows many characteristics of human XPG deficiency. Our findings therefore exclude that both the liver as well as the neurological phenotype are a secondary consequence of derailment in other cell types, organs or tissues (e.g. vascular abnormalities and support a cell-autonomous origin caused by the DNA repair defect itself. In addition they allow the dissection of the complex aging process in tissue- and cell-type-specific components. Moreover, our data highlight the critical importance of genetic background in mouse aging studies, establish the Xpg-/- mouse as a valid model for the severe form of human XPG patients and segmental accelerated aging, and strengthen the link between DNA damage and aging.

  20. Differential impact of cysteine cathepsins on genetic mouse models of de novo carcinogenesis: cathepsin B as emerging therapeutic target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eReinheckel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal cysteine cathepsins belong to a family of 11 human proteolytic enzymes. Some of them correlate with progression in a variety of cancers and therefore are considered as potential therapeutic targets. Until recently, the contribution of individual cathepsins to tumorigenesis and tumor progression remained unknown. By crossing various types of mouse cancer models with mice where specific cathepsins have been ablated, we contributed to this gap of knowledge and will summarize the results in this report. The employed models are the Rip1-Tag2 model for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, the K14-HPV16 model for squamous skin and cervical cancers, and the MMTV-PyMT model for metastasizing breast cancer, the KPC model for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and the APCmin mice developing early stages of intestinal neoplasia. All models harbor mutations in relevant tumor suppressors and/or cell-type specific expression of potent oncogenes, which initiate de novo carcinogenesis in the targeted tissues. In all these models deletion of cathepsin B led to suppression of the aggressiveness of the respective cancer phenotype. Cathepsin B may network with other proteases as it was shown for cathepsin X/Z. In contrast, deletion of cathepsin L was beneficial in the RiP1-Tag2 model, but enhanced tumorigenesis in the APCmin, and the K14-HPV16 mice. A logical consequence of these results would be to further pursue selective inhibition of cathepsin B. Moreover, it became clear that cathepsins B and S derived from cells of the tumor microenvironment support cancer growth. Strikingly, delivery of broad spectrum cysteine cathepsin inhibitors in the tumor microenvironment disrupts the permissive ecosystem of the cancer and results in impaired growth or even in regression of the tumor. In addition, combination of cysteine cathepsin inhibition and standard chemotherapy improves the therapeutic response of the latter.

  1. Conditional mouse models demonstrate oncogene-dependent differences in tumor maintenance and recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diversity in the pathophysiology of breast cancer frustrates therapeutic progress. We need to understand how mechanisms activated by specific combinations of oncogenes, tumor suppressors, and hormonal signaling pathways govern response to therapy and prognosis. A recent series of investigations conducted by Chodosh and colleagues offers new insights into the similarities and differences between specific oncogenic pathways. Expression of three oncogenes relevant to pathways activated in human breast cancers (c-myc, activated neu and Wnt1) were targeted to murine mammary epithelial cells using the same transgenic tetracycline-responsive conditional gene expression system. While the individual transgenic lines demonstrate similarly high rates of tumor penetrance, rates of oncogene-independent tumor maintenance and recurrence following initial regression are significantly different, and are modifiable by mutations in specific cooperating oncogenes or loss of tumor suppressor gene expression. The experiments make three notable contributions. First, they illustrate that rates of tumor regression and recurrence following initial regression are dependent upon the pathways activated by the initiating oncogene. The experiments also demonstrate that altered expression or mutation of specific cooperating oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes results in different rates of tumor regression and recurrence. Finally, they exemplify the power of conditional mouse models for elucidating how specific molecular mechanisms give rise to the complexity of human cancer

  2. Analysis of mouse model pathology: a primer for studying the anatomic pathology of genetically engineered mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiff, Robert D; Miller, Claramae H; Munn, Robert J

    2014-06-01

    This primer of pathology is intended to introduce investigators to the structure (morphology) of cancer with an emphasis on genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models (GEMMs). We emphasize the necessity of using the entire biological context for the interpretation of anatomic pathology. Because the primary investigator is responsible for almost all of the information and procedures leading up to microscopic examination, they should also be responsible for documentation of experiments so that the microscopic interpretation can be rendered in context of the biology. The steps involved in this process are outlined, discussed, and illustrated. Because GEMMs are unique experimental subjects, some of the more common pitfalls are discussed. Many of these errors can be avoided with attention to detail and continuous quality assurance.

  3. Quercetin inhibits inflammatory bone resorption in a mouse periodontitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napimoga, Marcelo H; Clemente-Napimoga, Juliana T; Macedo, Cristina G; Freitas, Fabiana F; Stipp, Rafael N; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2013-12-27

    Periodontitis is a disease that leads to bone destruction and represents the main cause of tooth loss in adults. The development of aggressive periodontitis has been associated with increased inflammatory response that is induced by the presence of a subgingival biofilm containing Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. The flavonoid quercetin (1) is widespread in vegetables and fruits and exhibits many biological properties for possible medical and clinical applications such as its anti-inflamatory and antioxidant effects. Thus, in the present study, the properties of 1 have been evaluated in bone loss and inflammation using a mouse periodontitis model induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans infection. Subcutaneous treatment with 1 reduced A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced bone loss and IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-17, RANKL, and ICAM-1 production in the gingival tissue without affecting bacterial counts. These results demonstrated that quercetin exhibits protective effects in A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced periodontitis in mice by modulating cytokine and ICAM-1 production.

  4. Transgenerational transmission of hyperactivity in a mouse model of ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinmin; Lee, Kevin P; Spencer, Thomas J; Biederman, Joseph; Bhide, Pradeep G

    2014-02-19

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurobehavioral disorder affecting children and adults. Genetic and environmental factors are associated with the etiology of ADHD. Among the environmental factors, exposure of the developing brain to nicotine is considered a major risk factor. Recent evidence suggests that environmental influences on the brain and behavior may be transmitted from one generation to the next. We used a prenatal nicotine exposure (PNE) mouse model of ADHD to test the hypothesis that PNE-induced hyperactivity, a proxy for human ADHD phenotype, is transmitted from one generation to the next. Our data reveal transgenerational transmission of PNE-induced hyperactivity in mice via the maternal but not the paternal line of descent. We suggest that transgenerational transmission is a plausible mechanism for propagation of environmentally induced ADHD phenotypes in the population. PMID:24553919

  5. Neuroprotection in a novel mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Lidster

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is an immune-mediated, demyelinating and neurodegenerative disease that currently lacks any neuroprotective treatments. Innovative neuroprotective trial designs are required to hasten the translational process of drug development. An ideal target to monitor the efficacy of strategies aimed at treating multiple sclerosis is the visual system, which is the most accessible part of the human central nervous system. A novel C57BL/6 mouse line was generated that expressed transgenes for a myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-specific T cell receptor and a retinal ganglion cell restricted-Thy1 promoter-controlled cyan fluorescent protein. This model develops spontaneous or induced optic neuritis, in the absence of paralytic disease normally associated with most rodent autoimmune models of multiple sclerosis. Demyelination and neurodegeneration could be monitored longitudinally in the living animal using electrophysiology, visual sensitivity, confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography all of which are relevant to human trials. This model offers many advantages, from a 3Rs, economic and scientific perspective, over classical experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis models that are associated with substantial suffering of animals. Optic neuritis in this model led to inflammatory damage of axons in the optic nerve and subsequent loss of retinal ganglion cells in the retina. This was inhibited by the systemic administration of a sodium channel blocker (oxcarbazepine or intraocular treatment with siRNA targeting caspase-2. These novel approaches have relevance to the future treatment of neurodegeneration of MS, which has so far evaded treatment.

  6. Design and development of a robotized system coupled to µCT imaging for intratumoral drug evaluation in a HCC mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaétan Bour

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most common cancer related deaths worldwide. One of the main challenges in cancer treatment is drug delivery to target cancer cells specifically. Preclinical evaluation of intratumoral drugs in orthotopic liver cancer mouse models is difficult, as percutaneous injection hardly can be precisely performed manually. In the present study we have characterized a hepatoma model developing a single tumor nodule by implantation of Hep55.1C cells in the liver of syngeneic C57BL/6J mice. Tumor evolution was followed up by µCT imaging, and at the histological and molecular levels. This orthotopic, poorly differentiated mouse HCC model expressing fibrosis, inflammation and cancer markers was used to assess the efficacy of drugs. We took advantage of the high precision of a previously developed robotized system for automated, image-guided intratumoral needle insertion, to administer every week in the tumor of the Hep55.1C mouse model. A significant tumor growth inhibition was observed using our robotized system, whereas manual intraperitoneal administration had no effect, by comparison to untreated control mice.

  7. Evaluation of immunological escape mechanisms in a mouse model of colorectal liver metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Detlef

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The local and systemic activation and regulation of the immune system by malignant cells during carcinogenesis is highly complex with involvement of the innate and acquired immune system. Despite the fact that malignant cells do have antigenic properties their immunogenic effects are minor suggesting tumor induced mechanisms to circumvent cancer immunosurveillance. The aim of this study is the analysis of tumor immune escape mechanisms in a colorectal liver metastases mouse model at different points in time during tumor growth. Methods CT26.WT murine colon carcinoma cells were injected intraportally in Balb/c mice after median laparotomy using a standardized injection technique. Metastatic tumor growth in the liver was examined by standard histological procedures at defined points in time during metastatic growth. Liver tissue with metastases was additionally analyzed for cytokines, T cell markers and Fas/Fas-L expression using immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and RT-PCR. Comparisons were performed by analysis of variance or paired and unpaired t test when appropriate. Results Intraportal injection of colon carcinoma cells resulted in a gradual and time dependent metastatic growth. T cells of regulatory phenotype (CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ which might play a role in protumoral immune response were found to infiltrate peritumoral tissue increasingly during carcinogenesis. Expression of cytokines IL-10, TGF-β and TNF-α were increased during tumor growth whereas IFN-γ showed a decrease of the expression from day 10 on following an initial increase. Moreover, liver metastases of murine colon carcinoma show an up-regulation of FAS-L on tumor cell surface with a decreased expression of FAS from day 10 on. CD8+ T cells express FAS and show an increased rate of apoptosis at perimetastatic location. Conclusions This study describes cellular and macromolecular changes contributing to immunological escape mechanisms during metastatic

  8. The regulation of skeletal muscle protein turnover during the progression of cancer cachexia in the Apc(Min/+ mouse.

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    James P White

    Full Text Available Muscle wasting that occurs with cancer cachexia is caused by an imbalance in the rates of muscle protein synthesis and degradation. The Apc(Min/+ mouse is a model of colorectal cancer that develops cachexia that is dependent on circulating IL-6. However, the IL-6 regulation of muscle protein turnover during the initiation and progression of cachexia in the Apc(Min/+ mouse is not known. Cachexia progression was studied in Apc(Min/+ mice that were either weight stable (WS or had initial (≤5%, intermediate (6-19%, or extreme (≥20% body weight loss. The initiation of cachexia reduced %MPS 19% and a further ∼50% with additional weight loss. Muscle IGF-1 mRNA expression and mTOR targets were suppressed with the progression of body weight loss, while muscle AMPK phosphorylation (Thr 172, AMPK activity, and raptor phosphorylation (Ser 792 were not increased with the initiation of weight loss, but were induced as cachexia progressed. ATP dependent protein degradation increased during the initiation and progression of cachexia. However, ATP independent protein degradation was not increased until cachexia had progressed beyond the initial phase. IL-6 receptor antibody administration prevented body weight loss and suppressed muscle protein degradation, without any effect on muscle %MPS or IGF-1 associated signaling. In summary, the %MPS reduction during the initiation of cachexia is associated with IGF-1/mTOR signaling repression, while muscle AMPK activation and activation of ATP independent protein degradation occur later in the progression of cachexia. IL-6 receptor antibody treatment blocked cachexia progression through the suppression of muscle protein degradation, while not rescuing the suppression of muscle protein synthesis. Attenuation of IL-6 signaling was effective in blocking the progression of cachexia, but not sufficient to reverse the process.

  9. Stochastic model of Tsc1 lesions in mouse brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Prabhakar

    Full Text Available Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC is an autosomal dominant disorder due to mutations in either TSC1 or TSC2 that affects many organs with hamartomas and tumors. TSC-associated brain lesions include subependymal nodules, subependymal giant cell astrocytomas and tubers. Neurologic manifestations in TSC comprise a high frequency of mental retardation and developmental disorders including autism, as well as epilepsy. Here, we describe a new mouse model of TSC brain lesions in which complete loss of Tsc1 is achieved in multiple brain cell types in a stochastic pattern. Injection of an adeno-associated virus vector encoding Cre recombinase into the cerebral ventricles of mice homozygous for a Tsc1 conditional allele on the day of birth led to reduced survival, and pathologic findings of enlarged neurons, cortical heterotopias, subependymal nodules, and hydrocephalus. The severity of clinical and pathologic findings as well as survival was shown to be dependent upon the dose and serotype of Cre virus injected. Although several other models of TSC brain disease exist, this model is unique in that the pathology reflects a variety of TSC-associated lesions involving different numbers and types of cells. This model provides a valuable and unique addition for therapeutic assessment.

  10. A STAT-1 knockout mouse model for Machupo virus pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shurtleff Amy C

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Machupo virus (MACV, a member of the Arenaviridae, causes Bolivian hemorrhagic fever, with ~20% lethality in humans. The pathogenesis of MACV infection is poorly understood, and there are no clinically proven treatments for disease. This is due, in part, to a paucity of small animal models for MACV infection in which to discover and explore candidate therapeutics. Methods Mice lacking signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT-1 were infected with MACV. Lethality, viral replication, metabolic changes, hematology, histopathology, and systemic cytokine expression were analyzed throughout the course of infection. Results We report here that STAT-1 knockout mice succumbed to MACV infection within 7-8 days, and presented some relevant clinical and histopathological manifestations of disease. Furthermore, the model was used to validate the efficacy of ribavirin in protection against infection. Conclusions The STAT-1 knockout mouse model can be a useful small animal model for drug testing and preliminary immunological analysis of lethal MACV infection.

  11. Investigating the role of macrophages in tumor formation using a MaFIA mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, A B; Elnaggar, A M; Robison, R A; O'Neill, K

    2013-08-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) interact with tumors in their development, growth and metastatic activities. Using a transgenic mouse model that allows for the selective depletion of macrophages we were able to access the macrophage's potential to facilitate metastasis. In the MaFIA (Macrophage Fas-Induced Apoptosis) mouse, transgene-expressing cells of the myeloid lineage undergo death by apoptosis in the presence of the drug AP20187. Enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was fused to the suicide gene to allow identification of transgene-expressing cells. Tumor induction was accomplished by subdermal and intravenous injections of B16-F10 melanoma cells. Metastasis in mice with depleted macrophages was compared to metastasis in normal control mice. The lungs and kidneys were examined for metastatic cells. The macrophage-depleted groups showed significantly less metastasis (P>0.001) compared to the control groups. We theorize that macrophages may aid the metastatic process by fusing with melanoma cells. Using appropriate cell markers and fluorescence-activated cell sorting, we were able to detect a small population of double-positive cells. We confirmed cell fusion by microscopic analysis, visualizing the cell's morphology by both immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. The presence of double-positive cells suggests macrophage/cancer cell fusion could be a possible mechanism for metastasis. PMID:23722325

  12. Automatic Segmentation Framework of Building Anatomical Mouse Model for Bioluminescence Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah Alali

    2013-01-01

    Bioluminescence tomography is known as a highly ill-posed inverse problem. To improve the reconstruction performance by introducing anatomical structures as a priori knowledge, an automatic segmentation framework has been proposed in this paper to extract the mouse whole-body organs and tissues, which enables to build up a heterogeneous mouse model for reconstruction of bioluminescence tomography. Finally, an in vivo mouse experiment has been conducted to evaluate this framework by using an X...

  13. Sleep phenotyping in a mouse model of extreme trait anxiety.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimira Jakubcakova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is accumulating evidence that anxiety impairs sleep. However, due to high sleep variability in anxiety disorders, it has been difficult to state particular changes in sleep parameters caused by anxiety. Sleep profiling in an animal model with extremely high vs. low levels of trait anxiety might serve to further define sleep patterns associated with this psychopathology. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Sleep-wake behavior in mouse lines with high (HAB, low (LAB and normal (NAB anxiety-related behaviors was monitored for 24 h during baseline and recovery after 6 h sleep deprivation (SD. The amounts of each vigilance state, sleep architecture, and EEG spectral variations were compared between the mouse lines. In comparison to NAB mice, HAB mice slept more and exhibited consistently increased delta power during non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep. Their sleep patterns were characterized by heavy fragmentation, reduced maintenance of wakefulness, and frequent intrusions of rapid eye movement (REM sleep. In contrast, LAB mice showed a robust sleep-wake rhythm with remarkably prolonged sleep latency and a long, persistent period of wakefulness. In addition, the accumulation of delta power after SD was impaired in the LAB line, as compared to HAB mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Sleep-wake patterns were significantly different between HAB and LAB mice, indicating that the genetic predisposition to extremes in trait anxiety leaves a biological scar on sleep quality. The enhanced sleep demand observed in HAB mice, with a strong drive toward REM sleep, may resemble a unique phenotype reflecting not only elevated anxiety but also a depression-like attribute.

  14. Computational modeling of the spatiotemporal dynamics of cancer stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signoriello, Alexandra; Bosenberg, Marcus; Shattuck, Mark; O'Hern, Corey

    2015-03-01

    Cancer stem cells can differentiate into any cell type in a particular tumor, and thus can reform a tumor even when seeded from a single cell. Despite their importance, the identification of stem cells, their interactions, and how and why they malfunction to cause cancer and form tumors are not well understood. We have developed discrete element modeling (DEM) simulations to investigate the role of stem cells in the formation of heterogeneous cell populations in melanoma tumors. The DEM simulations include elastic, excluded volume, and signaling interactions between cells and rates for cell differentiation, apoptosis, and growth. The DEM is calibrated to results from experimental studies of melanoma tumor growth in mouse models. We use the simulations to generate virtual tumors and study their morphology and cell subtype populations as a function of time.

  15. Photodynamic therapy of oral Candida infection in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Fernanda; Ferraresi, Cleber; Jorge, Antonio Olavo C; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-06-01

    Species of the fungal genus Candida, can cause oral candidiasis especially in immunosuppressed patients. Many studies have investigated the use of photodynamic therapy (PDT) to kill fungi in vitro, but this approach has seldom been reported in animal models of infection. This study investigated the effects of PDT on Candida albicans as biofilms grown in vitro and also in an immunosuppressed mouse model of oral candidiasis infection. We used a luciferase-expressing strain that allowed non-invasive monitoring of the infection by bioluminescence imaging. The phenothiazinium salts, methylene blue (MB) and new methylene blue (NMB) were used as photosensitizers (PS), combined or not with potassium iodide (KI), and red laser (660nm) at four different light doses (10J, 20J, 40J and 60J). The best in vitro log reduction of CFU/ml on biofilm grown cells was: MB plus KI with 40J (2.31 log; p<0.001); and NMB without KI with 60J (1.77 log; p<0.001). These conditions were chosen for treating the in vivo model of oral Candida infection. After 5days of treatment the disease was practically eradicated, especially using MB plus KI with 40J. This study suggests that KI can potentiate PDT of fungal infection using MB (but not NMB) and could be a promising new approach for the treatment of oral candidiasis.

  16. Photodynamic therapy of oral Candida infection in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Fernanda; Ferraresi, Cleber; Jorge, Antonio Olavo C; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-06-01

    Species of the fungal genus Candida, can cause oral candidiasis especially in immunosuppressed patients. Many studies have investigated the use of photodynamic therapy (PDT) to kill fungi in vitro, but this approach has seldom been reported in animal models of infection. This study investigated the effects of PDT on Candida albicans as biofilms grown in vitro and also in an immunosuppressed mouse model of oral candidiasis infection. We used a luciferase-expressing strain that allowed non-invasive monitoring of the infection by bioluminescence imaging. The phenothiazinium salts, methylene blue (MB) and new methylene blue (NMB) were used as photosensitizers (PS), combined or not with potassium iodide (KI), and red laser (660nm) at four different light doses (10J, 20J, 40J and 60J). The best in vitro log reduction of CFU/ml on biofilm grown cells was: MB plus KI with 40J (2.31 log; p<0.001); and NMB without KI with 60J (1.77 log; p<0.001). These conditions were chosen for treating the in vivo model of oral Candida infection. After 5days of treatment the disease was practically eradicated, especially using MB plus KI with 40J. This study suggests that KI can potentiate PDT of fungal infection using MB (but not NMB) and could be a promising new approach for the treatment of oral candidiasis. PMID:27074245

  17. A mouse model for HBV immunotolerance and immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dan; Liu, Longchao; Zhu, Danming; Peng, Hua; Su, Lishan; Fu, Yang-Xin; Zhang, Liguo

    2014-01-01

    Lack of an appropriate small animal model remains a major hurdle for studying the immunotolerance and immunopathogenesis induced by hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. In this study, we report a mouse model with sustained HBV viremia after infection with a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) carrying a replicable HBV genome (AAV/HBV). Similar to the clinical HBV carriers, the mice infected with AAV/HBV were sero-negative for antibodies against HBV surface antigen (HBsAg). Immunization with the conventional HBV vaccine in the presence of aluminum adjuvant failed to elicit an immune response against HBV in these mice. To identify a vaccine that can potentially circumvent this tolerance, the TLR9 agonist CpG was added to HBsAg as an adjuvant. Vaccination of mice with HBsAg/CpG induced not only clearance of viremia, but also strong antibody production and T-cell responses. Furthermore, both the DNA replication and protein expression of HBV were significantly reduced in the livers of AAV/HBV-infected mice. Accordingly, AAV/HBV-infected mice may be used as a robust model for investigating the underlying mechanism(s) of HBV immunotolerance and for developing novel immunotherapies to eradicate HBV infections. PMID:24076617

  18. Introducing Human APOE into Aβ Transgenic Mouse Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon M. Tai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein E (apoE and apoE/amyloid-β (Aβ transgenic (Tg mouse models are critical to understanding apoE-isoform effects on Alzheimer's disease risk. Compared to wild type, apoE−/− mice exhibit neuronal deficits, similar to apoE4-Tg compared to apoE3-Tg mice, providing a model for Aβ-independent apoE effects on neurodegeneration. To determine the effects of apoE on Aβ-induced neuropathology, apoE−/− mice were crossed with Aβ-Tg mice, resulting in a significant delay in plaque deposition. Surprisingly, crossing human-apoE-Tg mice with apoE−/−/Aβ-Tg mice further delayed plaque deposition, which eventually developed in apoE4/Aβ-Tg mice prior to apoE3/Aβ-Tg. One approach to address hAPOE-induced temporal delay in Aβ pathology is an additional insult, like head injury. Another is crossing human-apoE-Tg mice with Aβ-Tg mice that have rapid-onset Aβ pathology. For example, because 5xFAD mice develop plaques by 2 months, the prediction is that human-apoE/5xFAD-Tg mice develop plaques around 6 months and 12 months before other human-apoE/Aβ-Tg mice. Thus, tractable models for human-apoE/Aβ-Tg mice continue to evolve.

  19. Debridement increases survival in a mouse model of subcutaneous anthrax.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary P Weiner

    Full Text Available Anthrax is caused by infection with Bacillus anthracis, a spore-forming gram-positive bacterium. A major virulence factor for B. anthracis is an immunomodulatory tripartite exotoxin that has been reported to alter immune cell chemotaxis and activation. It has been proposed that B. anthracis infections initiate through entry of spores into the regional draining lymph nodes where they germinate, grow, and disseminate systemically via the efferent lymphatics. If this model holds true, it would be predicted that surgical removal of infected tissues, debridement, would have little effect on the systemic dissemination of bacteria. This model was tested through the development of a mouse debridement model. It was found that removal of the site of subcutaneous infection in the ear increased the likelihood of survival and reduced the quantity of spores in the draining cervical lymph nodes (cLN. At the time of debridement 12 hours post-injection measurable levels of exotoxins were present in the ear, cLN, and serum, yet leukocytes within the cLN were activated; countering the concept that exotoxins inhibit the early inflammatory response to promote bacterial growth. We conclude that the initial entry of spores into the draining lymph node of cutaneous infections alone is not sufficient to cause systemic disease and that debridement should be considered as an adjunct to antibiotic therapy.

  20. Expression patterns of esophageal cancer deregulated genes in C57BL/6J mouse embryogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Zhang; Fu-Lu Gao; Hui-Ying Zhi; Ai-Ping Luo; Fang Ding; Min Wu; Zhi-Hua Liu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression patterns of esophageal squamous cell cancer deregulated genes in mid to late stages of C57BL/6J mouse embryogenesis, and the correlation between these genes in embryonic development and tumorigenesis of esophageal squamous cell cancer.METHODS: Reverse northern screening was performed to examine the expression patterns of esophageal cancer deregulated genes in C57BL/6J mouse embryogenesis. To confirm the gene expression patterns, semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)was carried out for 3 of the randomly picked differentially expressed genes.RESULTS: Within these esophageal cancer deregulated genes, 4 patterns of expression were observed at 3 stages embryonic d 11.5 (E11.5), embryonic d 13.5 (E13.5) and postnatal d1 (P1). (1) Up-regulation during the E11.5 period,down- regulation during the E13.5 and P1 period (up-downdown), the 10 up-regulated genes during the E11.5 period could be classified into 6 known genes and 4 unknown genes.The known genes included differentiation related genes (SL00A8), immunity related gene (IGL), translation and transcription regulation genes (RPL15, EEF1AL), cytoskeletal protein (TUBA1), cysteine protease inhibitor (cystatin B).(2) Up-regulation during the E13.5 and P1 period (downup-up), such as the SPRR2A which was down-regulated at E11.5. (3) Down-regulation during the E11.5 and E13.5 period (down-down-up), such as RHCG and keratin 4. (4) Fluctuating expression, down initially, up at E13.5, and then down again (down-up-down). EMP1 belonged to such a gene, which was highly expressed at E13.5.CONCLUSION: The results will be helpful for understanding the function of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC)deregulated genes in embryonic development and tumorigenesis. S100A8 and S100A9 may play different roles in early embryonic development. IGL may be an oncofetal protein, and EMP1 relates with neurogenesis at E13.5. The genes identified pertinent to embryonic

  1. Sleeping Beauty mutagenesis in a mouse medulloblastoma model defines networks that discriminate between human molecular subgroups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovesi, Laura A.; Ng, Ching Ging; Davis, Melissa J.; Remke, Marc; Taylor, Michael D.; Adams, David J.; Rust, Alistair G.; Ward, Jerrold M.; Ban, Kenneth H.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.; Wainwright, Brandon J.

    2013-01-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis screen is a powerful tool to facilitate the discovery of cancer genes that drive tumorigenesis in mouse models. In this study, we sought to identify genes that functionally cooperate with sonic hedgehog signaling to initiate medulloblastoma (MB), a tumor of the cerebellum. By combining SB mutagenesis with Patched1 heterozygous mice (Ptch1lacZ/+), we observed an increased frequency of MB and decreased tumor-free survival compared with Ptch1lacZ/+ controls. From an analysis of 85 tumors, we identified 77 common insertion sites that map to 56 genes potentially driving increased tumorigenesis. The common insertion site genes identified in the mutagenesis screen were mapped to human orthologs, which were used to select probes and corresponding expression data from an independent set of previously described human MB samples, and surprisingly were capable of accurately clustering known molecular subgroups of MB, thereby defining common regulatory networks underlying all forms of MB irrespective of subgroup. We performed a network analysis to discover the likely mechanisms of action of subnetworks and used an in vivo model to confirm a role for a highly ranked candidate gene, Nfia, in promoting MB formation. Our analysis implicates candidate cancer genes in the deregulation of apoptosis and translational elongation, and reveals a strong signature of transcriptional regulation that will have broad impact on expression programs in MB. These networks provide functional insights into the complex biology of human MB and identify potential avenues for intervention common to all clinical subgroups. PMID:24167280

  2. NOSH–aspirin (NBS-1120), a novel nitric oxide- and hydrogen sulfide-releasing hybrid is a potent inhibitor of colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► NOSH–aspirin is the first dual acting NO and H2S releasing hybrid. ► Its IC50 for cell growth inhibition is in the low nano-molar range. ► Structure–activity studies show that the sum of the parts does not equal the whole. ► NOSH–aspirin reduced tumor growth by 85% in mice bearing a colon cancer xenograft. -- Abstract: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are prototypical anti-cancer agents. However, their long-term use is associated with adverse gastrointestinal effects. Recognition that endogenous gaseous mediators, nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) can increase mucosal defense mechanisms has led to the development of NO- and H2S-releasing NSAIDs with increased safety profiles. Here we report on a new hybrid, NOSH–aspirin, which is an NO- and H2S-releasing agent. NOSH–aspirin inhibited HT-29 colon cancer growth with IC50s of 45.5 ± 2.5, 19.7 ± 3.3, and 7.7 ± 2.2 nM at 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively. This is the first NSAID based agent with such high degree of potency. NOSH–aspirin inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, and caused G0/G1 cell cycle block. Reconstitution and structure–activity studies representing a fairly close approximation to the intact molecule showed that NOSH–aspirin was 9000-fold more potent than the sum of its parts towards growth inhibition. NOSH–aspirin inhibited ovine COX-1 more than ovine COX-2. NOSH–ASA treatment of mice bearing a human colon cancer xenograft caused a reduction in volume of 85%. Taken together, these results demonstrate that NOSH–aspirin has strong anti-cancer potential and merits further evaluation.

  3. In-silico QTL mapping of postpubertal mammary ductal development in the mouse uncovers potential human breast cancer risk loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic background plays a dominant role in mammary gland development and breast cancer (BrCa). Despite this, the role of genetics is only partially understood. This study used strain-dependent variation in an inbred mouse mapping panel, to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying structura...

  4. Cancer-derived VEGF plays no role in malignant ascites formation in the mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bayasi Guleng; Tsuneo Ikenoue; Yasushi Fukushima; Keita Morikane; Makoto Miyagishi; Kazunari Taira; Takao Kawabe; Masao Omata; Keisuke Tateishi; Fumihiko Kanai; Amarsanaa Jazag; Miki Ohta; Yoshinari Asaoka; Hideaki Ijichi; Yasuo Tanaka; Jun Imamura

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent mediator of peritoneal fluid accumulation following tumor progression. This study investigated the role of VEGF secreted by cancerous cells in the formation of malignant ascites.METHODS: VEGF expression was e