WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer molecular mechanism

  1. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Psychological Stress and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kyeong Jin; Lee, Yu Jin; Yang, Yong Ryoul; Park, Seorim; Suh, Pann-Ghill; Follo, Matilde Yung; Cocco, Lucio; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2016-01-01

    Psychological stress is an emotion experienced when people are under mental pressure or encounter unexpected problems. Extreme or repetitive stress increases the risk of developing human disease, including cardiovascular disease (CVD), immune diseases, mental disorders, and cancer. Several studies have shown an association between psychological stress and cancer growth and metastasis in animal models and case studies of cancer patients. Stress induces the secretion of stress-related mediators, such as catecholamine, cortisol, and oxytocin, via the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis or the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). These stress-related hormones and neurotransmitters adversely affect stress-induced tumor progression and cancer therapy. Catecholamine is the primary factor that influences tumor progression. It can regulate diverse cellular signaling pathways through adrenergic receptors (ADRs), which are expressed by several types of cancer cells. Activated ADRs enhance the proliferation and invasion abilities of cancer cells, alter cell activity in the tumor microenvironment, and regulate the interaction between cancer and its microenvironment to promote tumor progression. Additionally, other stress mediators, such as glucocorticoids and oxytocin, and their cognate receptors are involved in stress-induced cancer growth and metastasis. Here, we will review how each receptor-mediated signal cascade contributes to tumor initiation and progression and discuss how we can use these molecular mechanisms for cancer therapy. PMID:26916018

  2. Molecular mechanisms of metastasis in prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Noel W.Clarke; Claire A.Hart; Mick D.Brown

    2009-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) preferentially metastasizes to the bone marrow stroma of the axial skeleton.This activity is the principal cause of PCa morbidity and mortality.The exact mechanism of PCa metastasis is currently unknown,although considerable progress has been made in determining the key players in this process.In this review,we present the current understanding of the molecular processes driving PCa metastasis to the bone.

  3. Molecular mechanisms of tamoxifen-associated endometrial cancer (Review)

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Rong; Hilakivi-Clarke, Leena; Clarke, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Tamoxifen has been prescribed to millions of females for breast cancer prevention or treatment. However, tamoxifen is known to significantly enhance the risk of developing endometrial lesions, including hyperplasia, polyps, carcinomas, and sarcoma. Notably, tamoxifen-associated endometrial cancer often has a poor clinical outcome. Understanding the molecular mechanism of tamoxifen-induced endometrial cancer is essential for developing strategies that minimize tamoxifen’s effects on the endome...

  4. Molecular mechanisms of radioresistance: applications for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A significant part of head and neck cancers is clinically radioresistant. The mechanisms of acquired or intrinsic radioresistance of head and neck tumors are still unclear. More recently molecular research focused on alterations in cell cycle control and resistance to programmed cell death in tumor cells as possible mechanisms of radioresistance. Some molecular targets of radiosensitivity or radioresistance (e.g. specific oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes) are known in specific tumor cells or tumor model systems. Such key targets for head and neck cancer cells are also emerging in in vitro studies. However, it is unclear so far if the modification of such molecular targets in vivo leads to an increased tumor selective radiosensitivity. Nevertheless, selected molecular targets could be potential novel tools for modifying radiosensitivity through gene therapy in patients with radioresistant head and neck cancers. (orig.)

  5. Targeted therapies in epithelial ovarian cancer: Molecular mechanisms of action

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroaki; Itamochi

    2010-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death in women with gynecological cancer. Most patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage and have a poor prognosis.Currently, surgical tumor debulking, followed by platinum- and taxane-based chemotherapy is the standard treatment for advanced ovarian cancer. However, these patients are at great risk of recurrence and emerging drug resistance. Therefore, novel treatment strategies are required to improve outcomes for women with advanced ovarian cancer. A variety of molecular targeted agents, the majority of which are monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule protein-kinase inhibitors, have been explored in the management of ovarian cancer. The targets of these agents include angiogenesis, the human epidermal growth factor receptor family, ubiquitinproteasome pathway, epigenetic modulators, poly(ADPribose) polymerase (PARP), and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, which are aberrant in tumor tissue. The antiangiogenic agent, bevacizumab, has been reported as the most effective targeted agent and should be included in the standard chemotherapeutic regimen for advanced ovarian cancer. PARP inhibitors, which are mainly used in breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene-mutated patients, and mTOR inhibitors are also attractive treatment strategies, either alone or combination with chemotherapy, for ovarian cancer. Understanding the tumor molecular biology and identification of predictive biomarkers are essential steps for selection of the best treatment strategies. This article reviews the molecular mechanisms of the most promising targeted agents that are under early phase clinical evaluation for ovarian cancer.

  6. Molecular mechanisms of TRAIL-induced apoptosis of cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Tumor Necrosis Factor-related Apoptosis-inducing Ligand (TRAIL) is a recently identified member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family[1]. Numerous studies indicate that TRAIL can induce apoptosis of cancer cells but not of normal cells, pointing to the possibility of de-veloping TRAIL into a cancer drug[2-4]. This review will summary the molecular mechanisms of TRAIL-induced apoptosis and discuss the questions to be resolved in this field.

  7. Molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Souček, Karel; Lincová, Eva; Staršíchová, Andrea; Pernicová, Zuzana; Vondráček, Jan; Machala, M.; Kozubík, Alois

    Brno, 2008. s. 11. ISBN 978-80-7013-474-0. [Aktuální problematika genetické toxikologie, 31. pracovní dny České a slovenské společnosti pro mutagenezi zevním prostředím Československé biologické společnosti. 12.05.2008-14.05.2008, Brno] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA310/07/0961; GA ČR(CZ) GA204/07/0834 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : prostate cancer * neuroendocrine differentiation * inflammation Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  8. Molecular Mechanism Underlying Lymphatic Metastasis in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwen Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As the most challenging human malignancies, pancreatic cancer is characterized by its insidious symptoms, low rate of surgical resection, high risk of local invasion, metastasis and recurrence, and overall dismal prognosis. Lymphatic metastasis, above all, is recognized as an early adverse event in progression of pancreatic cancer and has been described to be an independent poor prognostic factor. It should be noted that the occurrence of lymphatic metastasis is not a casual or stochastic but an ineluctable and designed event. Increasing evidences suggest that metastasis-initiating cells (MICs and the microenvironments may act as a double-reed style in this crime. However, the exact mechanisms on how they function synergistically for this dismal clinical course remain largely elusive. Therefore, a better understanding of its molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in pancreatic lymphatic metastasis is urgently required. In this review, we will summarize the latest advances on lymphatic metastasis in pancreatic cancer.

  9. Retinoic acid receptors: from molecular mechanisms to cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Masi, Alessandra; Leboffe, Loris; De Marinis, Elisabetta; Pagano, Francesca; Cicconi, Laura; Rochette-Egly, Cécile; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Ascenzi, Paolo; Nervi, Clara

    2015-02-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), the major bioactive metabolite of retinol or vitamin A, induces a spectrum of pleiotropic effects in cell growth and differentiation that are relevant for embryonic development and adult physiology. The RA activity is mediated primarily by members of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) subfamily, namely RARα, RARβ and RARγ, which belong to the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily of transcription factors. RARs form heterodimers with members of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) subfamily and act as ligand-regulated transcription factors through binding specific RA response elements (RAREs) located in target genes promoters. RARs also have non-genomic effects and activate kinase signaling pathways, which fine-tune the transcription of the RA target genes. The disruption of RA signaling pathways is thought to underlie the etiology of a number of hematological and non-hematological malignancies, including leukemias, skin cancer, head/neck cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, prostate cancer, renal cell carcinoma, pancreatic cancer, liver cancer, glioblastoma and neuroblastoma. Of note, RA and its derivatives (retinoids) are employed as potential chemotherapeutic or chemopreventive agents because of their differentiation, anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, and anti-oxidant effects. In humans, retinoids reverse premalignant epithelial lesions, induce the differentiation of myeloid normal and leukemic cells, and prevent lung, liver, and breast cancer. Here, we provide an overview of the biochemical and molecular mechanisms that regulate the RA and retinoid signaling pathways. Moreover, mechanisms through which deregulation of RA signaling pathways ultimately impact on cancer are examined. Finally, the therapeutic effects of retinoids are reported. PMID:25543955

  10. The molecular mechanisms between metabolic syndrome and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Wen, Ya-Yuan; Li, Zhi-Rong; Luo, Dong-Lin; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2016-03-18

    Metabolic syndrome, which is extremely common in developed and some developing countries, is a clustering of at least three of five of the following medical conditions: abdominal obesity, elevated blood pressure, elevated fasting plasma glucose, high serum triglycerides, and low high-density lipoprotein levels. It has been proved that there is a strong association between metabolic syndrome and breast cancer. Metabolic syndrome could increase the risk of breast cancer and influence the prognosis of the breast cancer patients. Some characteristic of metabolic syndrome such as obesity and lack of physical exercise are all risk factors for developing breast cancer. The metabolic syndrome mainly include obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypercholesterolemia and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and each of them impacts the risk of breast cancer and the prognosis of the breast cancer patients in different ways. In this Review, we focus on recently uncovered aspects of the immunological and molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the development of this highly prevalent and serious disease. These studies bring new insight into the complex associations between metabolic syndrome and breast cancer and have led to the development of novel therapeutic strategies that might enable a personalized approach in the management of this disease. PMID:26891869

  11. Molecular mechanisms underlying progesterone-enhanced breast cancer cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Chen; Lee, Wen-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Progesterone (P4) was demonstrated to inhibit migration in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), but to enhance migration in T47D breast cancer cells. To investigate the mechanism responsible for this switch in P4 action, we examined the signaling pathway responsible for the P4-induced migration enhancement in breast cancer cell lines, T47D and MCF-7. Here, we demonstrated that P4 activated the cSrc/AKT signaling pathway, subsequently inducing RSK1 activation, which in turn increased phosphorylation of p27 at T198 and formation of the p27pT198-RhoA complex in the cytosol, thereby preventing RhoA degradation, and eventually enhanced migration in T47D cells. These findings were confirmed in the P4-treated MCF-7. Comparing the P4-induced molecular events in between breast cancer cells and VSMCs, we found that P4 increased p27 phosphorylation at T198 in breast cancer cells through RSK1 activation, while P4 increased p27 phosphorlation at Ser10 in VSMCs through KIS activation. P27pT198 formed the complex with RhoA and prevented RhoA degradation in T47D cells, whereas p-p27Ser10 formed the complex with RhoA and caused RhoA degradation in VSMCs. The results of this study highlight the molecular mechanism underlying P4-enhanced breast cancer cell migration, and suggest that RSK1 activation is responsible for the P4-induced migration enhancement in breast cancer cells. PMID:27510838

  12. Molecular mechanisms of pharmacological doses of ascorbate on cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturelli, Sascha; Sinnberg, Tobias W; Niessner, Heike; Busch, Christian

    2015-06-01

    Intravenous application of high-dose ascorbate (vitamin C) has been used in complementary medicine since the 1970s to treat cancer patients. In recent years it became evident that high-dose ascorbate in the millimolar range bears selective cytotoxic effects on cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. This anticancer effect is dose dependent, catalyzed by serum components and mediated by reactive oxygen species and ascorbyl radicals, making ascorbate a pro-oxidative pro-drug that catalyzes hydrogen peroxide production in tissues instead of acting as a radical scavenger. It further depends on HIF-1 signaling and oxygen pressure, and shows a strong epigenetic signature (alteration of DNA-methylation and induction of tumor-suppressing microRNAs in cancer cells). The detailed understanding of ascorbate-induced antiproliferative molecular mechanisms warrants in-depth preclinical evaluation in cancer-bearing animal models for the optimization of an efficacious therapy regimen (e.g., combination with hyperbaric oxygen or O2-sensitizers) that subsequently need to be evaluated in clinical trials. PMID:26065536

  13. Brain Metastases from Colorectal Cancer: Microenvironment and Molecular Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Yi-Wen Zang; Xiao-Dong Gu; Jian-Bin Xiang; Zong-You Chen

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common digestive tract malignancies in the world. Owing to the newer and more effective systemic therapies, the life of colorectal cancer patients can be remarkably prolonged, and the incidence of brain metastases is increasing. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms of brain metastasis from colorectal cancer. Here we review the tumor microenvironment and metastasis associated molecules in brain metastases from colorectal cancer. A furthe...

  14. The epidemiology and molecular mechanisms linking obesity, diabetes, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Rosalyn D; Gallagher, Emily J; Scheinman, Eyal J; Damouni, Rawan; LeRoith, Derek

    2013-01-01

    The worldwide epidemic of obesity is associated with increasing rates of the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Epidemiological studies have reported that these conditions are linked to increased rates of cancer incidence and mortality. Obesity, particularly abdominal obesity, is associated with insulin resistance and the development of dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, and ultimately type 2 diabetes. Although many metabolic abnormalities occur with obesity and type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia appear to be central to these conditions and may contribute to dyslipidemia and altered levels of circulating estrogens and androgens. In this review, we will discuss the epidemiological and molecular links between obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cancer, and how hyperinsulinemia and dyslipidemia may contribute to cancer development. We will discuss how these metabolic abnormalities may interact with estrogen signaling in breast cancer growth. Finally, we will discuss the effects of type 2 diabetes medications on cancer risk. PMID:23810003

  15. Predicting cancer drug mechanisms of action using molecular network signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Justin R; Bruno, Peter M; Hemann, Michael T; Lauffenburger, Douglas A

    2013-07-01

    Molecular signatures are a powerful approach to characterize novel small molecules and derivatized small molecule libraries. While new experimental techniques are being developed in diverse model systems, informatics approaches lag behind these exciting advances. We propose an analysis pipeline for signature based drug annotation. We develop an integrated strategy, utilizing supervised and unsupervised learning methodologies that are bridged by network based statistics. Using this approach we can: 1, predict new examples of drug mechanisms that we trained our model upon; 2, identify "New" mechanisms of action that do not belong to drug categories that our model was trained upon; and 3, update our training sets with these "New" mechanisms and accurately predict entirely distinct examples from these new categories. Thus, not only does our strategy provide statistical generalization but it also offers biological generalization. Additionally, we show that our approach is applicable to diverse types of data, and that distinct biological mechanisms characterize its resolution of categories across different data types. As particular examples, we find that our predictive resolution of drug mechanisms from mRNA expression studies relies upon the analog measurement of a cell stress-related transcriptional rheostat along with a transcriptional representation of cell cycle state; whereas, in contrast, drug mechanism resolution from functional RNAi studies rely upon more dichotomous (e.g., either enhances or inhibits) association with cell death states. We believe that our approach can facilitate molecular signature-based drug mechanism understanding from different technology platforms and across diverse biological phenomena. PMID:23287973

  16. Quantum Interactomics and Cancer Molecular Mechanisms: I. Report Outline

    CERN Document Server

    Baianu, I C

    2004-01-01

    Single cell interactomics in simpler organisms, as well as somatic cell interactomics in multicellular organisms, involve biomolecular interactions in complex signalling pathways that were recently represented in modular terms by quantum automata with ‘reversible behavior’ representing normal cell cycling and division. Other implications of such quantum automata, modular modeling of signaling pathways and cell differentiation during development are in the fields of neural plasticity and brain development leading to quantum-weave dynamic patterns and specific molecular processes underlying extensive memory, learning, anticipation mechanisms and the emergence of human consciousness during the early brain development in children. Cell interactomics is here represented for the first time as a mixture of ‘classical’ states that determine molecular dynamics subject to Boltzmann statistics and ‘steady-state’, metabolic (multi-stable) manifolds, together with ‘configuration’ spaces of metastable quant...

  17. Molecular mechanisms of long noncoding RNAs on gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianwen; Mo, Xiaoyan; Fu, Liyun; Xiao, Bingxiu; Guo, Junming

    2016-02-23

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are non-protein coding transcripts longer than 200 nucleotides. Aberrant expression of lncRNAs has been found associated with gastric cancer, one of the most malignant tumors. By complementary base pairing with mRNAs or forming complexes with RNA binding proteins (RBPs), some lncRNAs including GHET1, MALAT1, and TINCR may mediate mRNA stability and splicing. Other lncRNAs, such as BC032469, GAPLINC, and HOTAIR, participate in the competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) network. Under certain circumstances, ANRIL, GACAT3, H19, MEG3, and TUSC7 exhibit their biological roles by associating with microRNAs (miRNAs). By recruiting histone-modifying complexes, ANRIL, FENDRR, H19, HOTAIR, MALAT1, and PVT1 may inhibit the transcription of target genes in cis or trans. Through these mechanisms, lncRNAs form RNA-dsDNA triplex. CCAT1, GAPLINC, GAS5, H19, MEG3, and TUSC7 play oncogenic or tumor suppressor roles by correlated with tumor suppressor P53 or onco-protein c-Myc, respectively. In conclusion, interaction with DNA, RNA and proteins is involved in lncRNAs' participation in gastric tumorigenesis and development. PMID:26788991

  18. Molecular mechanisms of cisplatin resistance in cervical cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Xueqiong

    2016-01-01

    Haiyan Zhu, Hui Luo, Wenwen Zhang, Zhaojun Shen, Xiaoli Hu, Xueqiong Zhu Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Patients with advanced or recurrent cervical cancer have poor prognosis, and their 1-year survival is only 10%–20%. Chemotherapy is considered as the standard treatment for patients with advanced or recurrent cervical cancer, and cisplatin appears to tr...

  19. Molecular mechanisms of cisplatin resistance in cervical cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu H; Luo H; Zhang W; Shen Z; Hu X; Zhu X

    2016-01-01

    Haiyan Zhu, Hui Luo, Wenwen Zhang, Zhaojun Shen, Xiaoli Hu, Xueqiong Zhu Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Patients with advanced or recurrent cervical cancer have poor prognosis, and their 1-year survival is only 10%–20%. Chemotherapy is considered as the standard treatment for patients with advanced or recurrent cervical cancer, and cisplatin appears to treat the ...

  20. Predicting cancer drug mechanisms of action using molecular network signatures

    OpenAIRE

    Pritchard, Justin R.; Bruno, Peter M.; Hemann, Michael T.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular signatures are a powerful approach to characterize novel small molecules and derivatized small molecule libraries. While new experimental techniques are being developed in diverse model systems, informatics approaches lag behind these exciting advances. We propose an analysis pipeline for signature based drug annotation. We develop an integrated strategy, utilizing supervised and unsupervised learning methodologies that are bridged by network based statistics. Using this approach we...

  1. Molecular mechanisms of heptaplatin effective against cisplatin-resistant cancer cell lines: less involvement of metallothionein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon Sung-Pyo

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heptaplatin is a new platinum derivative with anticancer activity against various cancer cell lines, including cisplatin-resistant cancer cell lines (Cancer Chemother Pharmacol 1995; 35: 441. Methods Molecular mechanisms of heptaplatin effective against cisplatin-resistant cancer cell lines has been investigated in connection with metallothionein (MT. Cytotoxicity was determined by an MTT assay. MT mRNA, was determined by RT-PCR assay. Transfection study was carried out to examine the function of MT. Results Of various gastric cancer cell lines, SNU-638 and SNU-601 showed the highest and lowest levels of MT mRNA, respectively, showing 80-fold difference. The IC50 values of SNU-638 to cisplatin, carboplatin and heptaplatin were 11.2-fold, 5.1-fold and 2.0-fold greater than those of SNU-601, respectively. Heptaplatin was more effective against cisplatin-resistant and MT-transfected gastric cancer sublines than cisplatin or carboplatin was. In addition, heptaplatin attenuated cadmium, but not zinc, induction of MT. Conclusion These results indicate that molecular mechanisms of heptaplatin effective against cisplatin-resistant gastric cancer sublines is at least in part due to the less involvement of MT in heptaplatin resistance as well as its attenuation of MT induction.

  2. Effect of Transforming Viruses on Molecular Mechanisms Associated With Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    DAYARAM, TAJHAL; Marriott, Susan J.

    2008-01-01

    Viruses have been linked to approximately 20% of all human tumors worldwide. These transforming viruses encode viral oncoproteins that interact with cellular proteins to enhance viral replication. The transcriptional and post-transcriptional effects of these viral oncoproteins ultimately result in cellular transformation. Historically, viral research has been vital to the discovery of oncogenes and tumor suppressors with more current research aiding in unraveling some mechanisms of carcinogen...

  3. Molecular Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; Guvench, Olgun; Alexander D MacKerell

    2014-01-01

    Molecular Mechanics (MM) force fields are the methods of choice for protein simulations, which are essential in the study of conformational flexibility. Given the importance of protein flexibility in drug binding, MM is involved in most if not all Computational Structure-Based Drug Discovery (CSBDD) projects. This section introduces the reader to the fundamentals of MM, with a special emphasis on how the target data used in the parametrization of force fields determine their strengths and wea...

  4. Multiple Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Action of Lycopene in Cancer Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Trejo-Solís

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies suggest that including fruits, vegetables, and whole grains in regular dietary intake might prevent and reverse cellular carcinogenesis, reducing the incidence of primary tumours. Bioactive components present in food can simultaneously modulate more than one carcinogenic process, including cancer metabolism, hormonal balance, transcriptional activity, cell-cycle control, apoptosis, inflammation, angiogenesis and metastasis. Some studies have shown an inverse correlation between a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and carotenoids and a low incidence of different types of cancer. Lycopene, the predominant carotenoid found in tomatoes, exhibits a high antioxidant capacity and has been shown to prevent cancer, as evidenced by clinical trials and studies in cell culture and animal models. In vitro studies have shown that lycopene treatment can selectively arrest cell growth and induce apoptosis in cancer cells without affecting normal cells. In vivo studies have revealed that lycopene treatment inhibits tumour growth in the liver, lung, prostate, breast, and colon. Clinical studies have shown that lycopene protects against prostate cancer. One of the main challenges in cancer prevention is the integration of new molecular findings into clinical practice. Thus, the identification of molecular biomarkers associated with lycopene levels is essential for improving our understanding of the mechanisms underlying its antineoplastic activity.

  5. Natural Products as Promising Antitumoral Agents in Breast Cancer: Mechanisms of Action and Molecular Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonofiglio, Daniela; Giordano, Cinzia; De Amicis, Francesca; Lanzino, Marilena; Andò, Sebastiano

    2016-01-01

    Extensive research over the past several decades has identified numerous dietary and phytochemical compounds that have chemopreventive potential and could represent an important source of anti-cancer lead molecules. In this scenario several nutritional factors have attracted considerable attention as modifiable risk factor in the prevention of breast cancer, the most frequently diagnosed cancer and a major cause of death among women worldwide. There is an immediate need for more effective and less toxic therapeutic and preventive strategies for breast cancers able also to counteract the recurrent phenomenon of resistance to hormonal and targeted therapy that represent the first-line treatment in the management of breast cancer patients. The present review focuses on chemopreventive and anti-cancer activities of different bioactive compounds obtained from dietary sources such as Omega-3 fatty acids, naturally present in fish, Resveratrol (3,5,40-trihydroxy-transstilbene), a phytoalexin found in grapes and Epigallocatechin Gallate, a polyphenolic compound found in green tea, or purified from medicinal plant (Oldenlandia Diffusa) and fruits (Ziziphus Jujube) highlighting their potential use in breast cancer treatment. Herein, we discuss the molecular mechanisms by which the bioactive compounds can inhibit carcinogenesis by regulating antioxidant enzyme activities, and inducing antiproliferative and apoptotic effects in different breast cancer cell lines. Understanding the mechanism of action of dietary compounds or traditionally used herbs having potential preventive and therapeutic effects on cancer may provide a rationale for further translational studies. This review emphasizes the importance, in the next future, of a proper scientific validation of these natural bioactive compounds for clinical use in the therapeutic portfolio for breast cancer. PMID:26156544

  6. Antiproliferative and Molecular Mechanism of Eugenol-Induced Apoptosis in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eko Supriyanto

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic phytochemicals are a broad class of nutraceuticals found in plants which have been extensively researched by scientists for their health-promoting potential. One such a compound which has been comprehensively used is eugenol (4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol, which is the active component of Syzigium aromaticum (cloves. Aromatic plants like nutmeg, basil, cinnamon and bay leaves also contain eugenol. Eugenol has a wide range of applications like perfumeries, flavorings, essential oils and in medicine as a local antiseptic and anesthetic. Increasing volumes of literature showed eugenol possesses antioxidant, antimutagenic, antigenotoxic, anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties. Molecular mechanism of eugenol-induced apoptosis in melanoma, skin tumors, osteosarcoma, leukemia, gastric and mast cells has been well documented. This review article will highlight the antiproliferative activity and molecular mechanism of the eugenol induced apoptosis against the cancer cells and animal models.

  7. Antiproliferative and molecular mechanism of eugenol-induced apoptosis in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaganathan, Saravana Kumar; Supriyanto, Eko

    2012-01-01

    Phenolic phytochemicals are a broad class of nutraceuticals found in plants which have been extensively researched by scientists for their health-promoting potential. One such a compound which has been comprehensively used is eugenol (4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol), which is the active component of Syzigium aromaticum (cloves). Aromatic plants like nutmeg, basil, cinnamon and bay leaves also contain eugenol. Eugenol has a wide range of applications like perfumeries, flavorings, essential oils and in medicine as a local antiseptic and anesthetic. Increasing volumes of literature showed eugenol possesses antioxidant, antimutagenic, antigenotoxic, anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties. Molecular mechanism of eugenol-induced apoptosis in melanoma, skin tumors, osteosarcoma, leukemia, gastric and mast cells has been well documented. This review article will highlight the antiproliferative activity and molecular mechanism of the eugenol induced apoptosis against the cancer cells and animal models. PMID:22634840

  8. Molecular Mechanisms of Silibinin-Mediated Cancer Chemoprevention with Major Emphasis on Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ting, Harold; Deep, Gagan; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in early detection, prostate cancer remains the second highest cancer mortality in American men, and even successful interventions are associated with enormous health care costs as well as prolonged deleterious effects on quality of patient life. Prostate cancer chemoprevention is one potential avenue to alleviate these burdens. It is a regime whereby long-term treatments are intended to prevent or arrest cancer development, in contrast to more direct intervention upon diseas...

  9. Molecular mechanism and clinical impact of APOBEC3B-catalyzed mutagenesis in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Reuben S

    2015-01-01

    Cancer genomic DNA sequences enable identification of all mutations and suggest targets for precision medicine. The identities and patterns of the mutations themselves also provide critical information for deducing the originating DNA damaging agents, causal molecular mechanisms, and thus additional therapeutic targets. A classic example is ultraviolet light, which crosslinks adjacent pyrimidines and leads to C-to-T transitions. A new example is the DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3B, which was identified recently as a source of DNA damage and mutagenesis in breast, head/neck, cervix, bladder, lung, ovary, and to lesser extents additional cancer types. This enzyme is normally an effector protein in the innate immune response to virus infection but upregulation in these cancer types causes elevated levels of genomic C-to-U deamination events, which manifest as C-to-T transitions and C-to-G transversions within distinct DNA trinucleotide contexts (preferentially 5'-TCA and 5'-TCG). Genomic C-to-U deamination events within the same trinucleotide contexts also lead to cytosine mutation clusters (kataegis), and may precipitate visible chromosomal aberrations such as translocations. Clinical studies indicate that APOBEC3B upregulation correlates with poorer outcomes for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients, including shorter durations of disease-free survival and overall survival after surgery. APOBEC3B may therefore have both diagnostic and prognostic potential. APOBEC3B may also be a candidate for therapeutic targeting because inhibition of this non-essential enzyme is predicted to decrease tumor mutation rates and diminish the likelihood of undesirable mutation-dependent outcomes such as recurrence, metastasis, and the development of therapy resistant tumors. PMID:25848704

  10. Molecular mechanism of bitter melon juice efficacy against pancreatic cancer. | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Pancreatic cancer (PanC) is an aggressive disease;median life of PanC patients post-diagnosis is been tested in several clinical trials for its anti-diabetic effects and has plenty of human safety data. We, therefore, anticipate that the positive outcomes from the proposed studies will provide compelling rationale for initiating clinical trials to establish BMJ activity against human pancreatic cancer. |

  11. Chinese Medicines Induce Cell Death: The Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms for Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Xuanbin Wang; Yibin Feng; Ning Wang; Fan Cheung; Hor Yue Tan; Sen Zhong; Charlie Li; Seiichi Kobayashi

    2014-01-01

    Chinese medicines have long history in treating cancer. With the growing scientific evidence of biomedical researches and clinical trials in cancer therapy, they are increasingly accepted as a complementary and alternative treatment. One of the mechanisms is to induce cancer cell death. Aim. To comprehensively review the publications concerning cancer cell death induced by Chinese medicines in recent years and provide insights on anticancer drug discovery from Chinese medicines. Materials and...

  12. The effect of fasting on the important molecular mechanisms related to cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahideh Keyvani

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Fasting does have remarkable benefits in the treatment of cancer and another diseases such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and a multitude of other chronic diseases. It has been determined that fasting could play an important role during cancer treatment and progression via the regulation of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 as well as other growth factors. Also, it has been shown that fasting would enhance the chemotherapy effect in cancer patients, selectively protects normal cells and organisms from chemotherapy toxicity, while simultaneously sensitizing tumors. In this article, we discuss the benefits of fasting in the treatment of cancer through several different molecular pathways.

  13. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of 3,3′-Diindolylmethane in Gastrointestinal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Mi Kim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies in humans have shown that 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM, which is found in cruciferous vegetables, such as cabbage and broccoli, is effective in the attenuation of gastrointestinal cancers. This review presents the latest findings on the use, targets, and modes of action of DIM for the treatment of human gastrointestinal cancers. DIM acts upon several cellular and molecular processes in gastrointestinal cancer cells, including apoptosis, autophagy, invasion, cell cycle regulation, metastasis, angiogenesis, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. In addition, DIM increases the efficacy of other drugs or therapeutic chemicals when used in combinatorial treatment for gastrointestinal cancer. The studies to date offer strong evidence to support the use of DIM as an anticancer and therapeutic agent for gastrointestinal cancer. Therefore, this review provides a comprehensive understanding of the preventive and therapeutic properties of DIM in addition to its different perspective on the safety of DIM in clinical applications for the treatment of gastrointestinal cancers.

  14. Synergistic Effect and Molecular Mechanisms of Traditional Chinese Medicine on Regulating Tumor Microenvironment and Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jingnan Xu; Zhuo Song; Qiujun Guo; Jie Li

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of tumor cells with the microenvironment is like a relationship between the “seeds” and “soil,” which is a hotspot in recent cancer research. Targeting at tumor microenvironment as well as tumor cells has become a new strategy for cancer treatment. Conventional cancer treatments mostly focused on single targets or single mechanism (the seeds or part of the soil); few researches intervened in the whole tumor microenvironment and achieved ideal therapeutic effect as expected. Tr...

  15. Exploring mechanisms of diet-colon cancer associations through candidate molecular interaction networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, David; Li, Jun; Jensen, Kasper;

    2014-01-01

    -nutrient interactions. Here, we used colon cancer as a proof-of-concept for understanding key regulatory sites of diet on the disease pathway. Results: We started from a unique vantage point by having a database of 158 plants positively associated to colon cancer reduction and their molecular composition (similar to 3......,500 unique compounds). We generated a comprehensive picture of the interaction profile of these edible and non-edible plants with a predefined candidate colon cancer target space consisting of similar to 1,900 proteins. This knowledge allowed us to study systematically the key components in colon cancer that...... are targeted synergistically by phytochemicals and identify statistically significant and highly correlated protein networks that could be perturbed by dietary habits. Conclusion: We propose here a framework for interrogating the critical targets in colon cancer processes and identifying plant...

  16. Curcumin: Updated Molecular Mechanisms and Intervention Targets in Human Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Yin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin, a yellow pigment derived from Curcuma longa Linn, has attracted great interest in the research of cancer during the past decades. Extensive studies documented that curcumin attenuates cancer cell proliferation and promotes apoptosis in vivo and in vitro. Curcumin has been demonstrated to interact with multiple molecules and signal pathways, which makes it a potential adjuvant anti-cancer agent to chemotherapy. Previous investigations focus on the mechanisms of action for curcumin, which is shown to manipulate transcription factors and induce apoptosis in various kinds of human cancer. Apart from transcription factors and apoptosis, emerging studies shed light on latent targets of curcumin against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, microRNAs (miRNA, autophagy and cancer stem cell. The present review predominantly discusses significance of EGFR, miRNA, autophagy and cancer stem cell in lung cancer therapy. Curcumin as a natural phytochemicals could communicate with these novel targets and show synergism to chemotherapy. Additionally, curcumin is well tolerated in humans. Therefore, EGFR-, miRNA-, autophagy- and cancer stem cell-based therapy in the presence of curcumin might be promising mechanisms and targets in the therapeutic strategy of lung cancer.

  17. Study of molecular mechanism of cancer cell apoptosis induced by proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gal of this study is (i) to confirm JNK-mediated histone H2AX phosphorylation in apoptotic cancer cell in response to proton irradiation and (ii) to identify novel H2AX interacting proteins. (iii) Furthermore, we will provide the molecular information about improvement of proton beam-mediated radiotherapy

  18. Molecular mechanisms associated with breast cancer based on integrated gene expression profiling by bioinformatics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Han, Bing; Guo, Liang; Fan, Zhimin

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we aimed to gain more insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for breast cancer (BC) progression. Three gene expression profiles of human BC were integrated and used to screen the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between healthy breast samples and BC samples. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) network of DEGs was constructed by mapping DEGs into the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes (STRING) database; then the subnetworks of PPI were constructed with plug-in, MCODE and DEGs in Subnetwork 1 were analysed based on Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway database ( http://www.genome.jp/kegg /). In addition, co-expression network of DEGs was established using the Cytoscape. Totalally 931 DEGs were selected, including 340 up-regulated genes and 591 down-regulated genes. KEGG pathway analysis for DEGs in Subnetwork 1 showed that the pathogenesis of BC was associated with cell cycle, oocyte meiosis, progesterone-mediated oocyte maturation and p53 signalling pathways. Meanwhile, the most significant-related DEGs were found by co-expression network analysis of DEGs. In conclusion, CCNG1 might be involved in the progression of BC via inhibiting cell proliferation, and ADAMTS1 might play a crucial role in BC development through the regulation of angiogenesis. PMID:26804550

  19. Molecular mechanisms of curcumin and its semisynthetic analogues in prostate cancer prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Brian C; Mock, Charlotta D; Thilagavathi, Ramasamy; Selvam, Chelliah

    2016-05-01

    Primary prostate cancer, also known as prostate adenocarcinoma (PCa), is a devastating cancer in men worldwide. Europe and developing countries of Asia have fewer reported cases of prostate cancer compared to increasing cases in the United States with higher incidence in Black men. Risk factors associated with prostate cancer are aging, genetics, lifestyle, high body mass index as well as carcinogenic exposure to carbon-containing fuels, tobacco, and charbroiled meats. Hormone therapy and radical prostatectomy are commonly implemented treatments. The >20.000 prostate cancer deaths of 2013 suggest that there exists a need for enhanced chemopreventive and therapeutic agents for prostate cancer treatment. Fruits, vegetables, and red wines contain high levels of polyphenolic levels. Consumption of these products may provide chemoprevetion of PCa. Curcumin, the major compound from the turmeric rhizome Curcuma longa has long been used for medicinal purposes as an antiseptic and wound healing. This review focuses on curcumin's therapeutic effectiveness in vitro and in vivo in prostate cancer models. The review will highlight the mechanisms of actions of curcumin in the signaling pathways of prostate cancer. PMID:27018446

  20. In Vivo Anti-Cancer Mechanism of Low-Molecular-Weight Fucosylated Chondroitin Sulfate (LFCS) from Sea Cucumber Cucumaria frondosa

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoxiao Liu; Yong Liu; Jiejie Hao; Xiaoliang Zhao; Yinzhi Lang; Fei Fan; Chao Cai; Guoyun Li; Lijuan Zhang; Guangli Yu

    2016-01-01

    The low-molecular-weight fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (LFCS) was prepared from native fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (FCS), which was extracted and isolated from sea cucumber Cucumaria frondosa, and the anti-cancer mechanism of LFCS on mouse Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) was investigated. The results showed that LFCS remarkably inhibited LLC growth and metastasis in a dose-dependent manner. LFCS induced cell cycle arrest by increasing p53/p21 expression and apoptosis through activation of ca...

  1. Chinese Medicines Induce Cell Death: The Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuanbin Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chinese medicines have long history in treating cancer. With the growing scientific evidence of biomedical researches and clinical trials in cancer therapy, they are increasingly accepted as a complementary and alternative treatment. One of the mechanisms is to induce cancer cell death. Aim. To comprehensively review the publications concerning cancer cell death induced by Chinese medicines in recent years and provide insights on anticancer drug discovery from Chinese medicines. Materials and Methods. Chinese medicines (including Chinese medicinal herbs, animal parts, and minerals were used in the study. The key words including “cancer”, “cell death”, “apoptosis”, “autophagy,” “necrosis,” and “Chinese medicine” were used in retrieval of related information from PubMed and other databases. Results. The cell death induced by Chinese medicines is described as apoptotic, autophagic, or necrotic cell death and other types with an emphasis on their mechanisms of anticancer action. The relationship among different types of cell death induced by Chinese medicines is critically reviewed and discussed. Conclusions. This review summarizes that CMs treatment could induce multiple pathways leading to cancer cell death, in which apoptosis is the dominant type. To apply these preclinical researches to clinic application will be a key issue in the future.

  2. Helicobacter pylori eradication to prevent gastric cancer:underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shingo Tsuji; Norio Hayashi; Masahiko Tsujii; Hiroaki Murata; Tsutomu Nishida; Masato Komori; Masakazu Yasumaru; Shuji Ishii; Yoshiaki Sasayama; Sunao Kawano

    2006-01-01

    Numerous cellular and molecular events have been described in development of gastric cancer. In this article,we overviewed roles of Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) infection on some of the important events in gastric carcinogenesis and discussed whether these cellular and molecular events are reversible after cure of the infection. There are several bacterial components affecting gastric epithelial kinetics and promotion of gastric carcinogenesis. The bacterium also increases risks of genetic instability and mutations due to NO and other reactive oxygen species. Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes such as RUNX3 may alter the frequency of phenotype change of gastric glands to those with intestinal metaplasia. Host factors such as increased expression of growth factors, cytokines and COX-2 have been also reported in non-cancerous tissue in H pylori-positive subjects. It is noteworthy that most of the above phenomena are reversed after the cure of the infection. However,some of them including overexpression of COX-2 continue to exist and may increase risks for carcinogenesis in metaplastic or dysplastic mucosa even after successful H pylori eradication. Thus, H pylori eradication may not completely abolish the risk for gastric carcinogenesis. Efficiency of the cure of the infection in suppressing gastric cancer depends on the timing and the target population,and warrant further investigation.

  3. Report of National Cancer Institute symposium: comparison of mechanisms of carcinogenesis by radiation and chemical agents. I. Common molecular mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, D.C.

    1984-01-01

    Some aspects of molecular mechanisms common to radiation and chemical carcinogenesis are discussed, particularly the DNA damage done by these agents. Emphasis is placed on epidemiological considerations and on dose-response models used in risk assessment to extrapolate from experimental data obtained at high doses to the effects from long-term, low-level exposures. 3 references, 6 figures. (ACR)

  4. Inhibitory effects and molecular mechanisms of tetrahydrocurcumin against human breast cancer MCF-7 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Han

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tetrahydrocurcumin (THC, an active metabolite of curcumin, has been reported to have similar biological effects to curcumin, but the mechanism of the antitumor activity of THC is still unclear. Methods: The present study was to investigate the antitumor effects and mechanism of THC in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells using the methods of MTT assay, LDH assay, flow cytometry analysis, and western blot assay. Results: THC was found to have markedly cytotoxic effect and antiproliferative activity against MCF-7 cells in a dose-dependent manner with the IC50 for 24 h of 107.8 μM. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that THC mediated the cell-cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase, and 32.8% of MCF-7 cells entered the early phase of apoptosis at 100 μM for 24 h. THC also dose-dependently led to apoptosis in MCF-7 cells via the mitochondrial pathway, as evidenced by the activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9, the elevation of intracellular ROS, a decrease in Bcl-2 and PARP expression, and an increase in Bax expression. Meanwhile, cytochrome C was released to cytosol and the loss of mitochondria membrane potential (Δψm was observed after THC treatment. Conclusion: THC is an excellent source of chemopreventive agents in the treatment of breast cancer and has excellent potential to be explored as antitumor precursor compound.

  5. In Vivo Anti-Cancer Mechanism of Low-Molecular-Weight Fucosylated Chondroitin Sulfate (LFCS) from Sea Cucumber Cucumaria frondosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Yong; Hao, Jiejie; Zhao, Xiaoliang; Lang, Yinzhi; Fan, Fei; Cai, Chao; Li, Guoyun; Zhang, Lijuan; Yu, Guangli

    2016-01-01

    The low-molecular-weight fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (LFCS) was prepared from native fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (FCS), which was extracted and isolated from sea cucumber Cucumaria frondosa, and the anti-cancer mechanism of LFCS on mouse Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) was investigated. The results showed that LFCS remarkably inhibited LLC growth and metastasis in a dose-dependent manner. LFCS induced cell cycle arrest by increasing p53/p21 expression and apoptosis through activation of caspase-3 activity in LLC cells. Meanwhile, LFCS suppressed the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), increased the expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) and downregulated the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) level. Furthermore, LFCS significantly suppressed the activation of ERK1/2/p38 MAPK/NF-κB pathway, which played a prime role in expression of MMPs. All of these data indicate LFCS may be used as anti-cancer drug candidates and deserve further study. PMID:27187337

  6. In Vivo Anti-Cancer Mechanism of Low-Molecular-Weight Fucosylated Chondroitin Sulfate (LFCS from Sea Cucumber Cucumaria frondosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxiao Liu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The low-molecular-weight fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (LFCS was prepared from native fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (FCS, which was extracted and isolated from sea cucumber Cucumaria frondosa, and the anti-cancer mechanism of LFCS on mouse Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC was investigated. The results showed that LFCS remarkably inhibited LLC growth and metastasis in a dose-dependent manner. LFCS induced cell cycle arrest by increasing p53/p21 expression and apoptosis through activation of caspase-3 activity in LLC cells. Meanwhile, LFCS suppressed the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, increased the expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1 and downregulated the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs level. Furthermore, LFCS significantly suppressed the activation of ERK1/2/p38 MAPK/NF-κB pathway, which played a prime role in expression of MMPs. All of these data indicate LFCS may be used as anti-cancer drug candidates and deserve further study.

  7. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of cancer prevention by dietary phytochemicals: From experimental models to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maru, Girish B; Hudlikar, Rasika R; Kumar, Gaurav; Gandhi, Khushboo; Mahimkar, Manoj B

    2016-02-26

    Chemoprevention is one of the cancer prevention approaches wherein natural/synthetic agent(s) are prescribed with the aim to delay or disrupt multiple pathways and processes involved at multiple steps, i.e., initiation, promotion, and progression of cancer. Amongst environmental chemopreventive compounds, diet/beverage-derived components are under evaluation, because of their long history of exposure to humans, high tolerability, low toxicity, and reported biological activities. This compilation briefly covers and compares the available evidence on chemopreventive efficacy and probable mechanism of chemoprevention by selected dietary phytochemicals (capsaicin, curcumin, diallyl sulphide, genistein, green/black tea polyphenols, indoles, lycopene, phenethyl isocyanate, resveratrol, retinoids and tocopherols) in experimental systems and clinical trials. All the dietary phytochemicals covered in this review have demonstrated chemopreventive efficacy against spontaneous or carcinogen-induced experimental tumors and/or associated biomarkers and processes in rodents at several organ sites. The observed anti-initiating, anti-promoting and anti-progression activity of dietary phytochemicals in carcinogen-induced experimental models involve phytochemical-mediated redox changes, modulation of enzymes and signaling kinases resulting to effects on multiple genes and cell signaling pathways. Results from clinical trials using these compounds have not shown them to be chemopreventive. This may be due to our: (1) inability to reproduce the exposure conditions, i.e., levels, complexity, other host and lifestyle factors; and (2) lack of understanding about the mechanisms of action and agent-mediated toxicity in several organs and physiological processes in the host. Current research efforts in addressing the issues of exposure conditions, bioavailability, toxicity and the mode of action of dietary phytochemicals may help address the reason for observed mismatch that may ultimately

  8. [RNA interference: biogenesis molecular mechanisms and its applications in cervical cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Bermúdez-Morales, Víctor Hugo; Madrid-Marina, Vicente

    2010-01-01

    RNAi (RNA interference) is a natural process by which eukaryotic cells silence gene expression through small interference RNAs (siRNA) which are complementary to messenger RNA (mRNA). In this process, the siRNA that are 21-25 nucleotides long and are known as microRNA (miRNA), either associate with the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), which targets and cleaves the complementary mRNAs by the endonucleolytic pathway, or repress the translation. It is also possible to silence exogenous gene expression during viral infections by using DNA templates to transcribe siRNA with properties that are identical to those of bioactive microRNA. Persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the main etiological agent during cervical cancer development and the HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes, which induce cellular transformation and immortalization, represent strategic targets to be silenced with siRNA. In several in vitro and in vivo studies, it has been demonstrated that the introduction of siRNA directed against the E6 and E7 oncogenes in human tumoral cervical cells transformed by HPV, leads to the efficient silencing of HPV E6 and E7 oncogene expression, which induces the accumulation of the products of the p53 and pRb tumor suppressor genes and activates the mechanism of programmed cell death by apoptosis; thus, the progression of the tumoral growth process may be prevented. The goal of this review is to analyze the microRNA biogenesis process in the silencing of gene expression and to discuss the different protocols for the use of siRNA as a potential gene therapy strategy for the treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:20415061

  9. Molecular Mechanisms of Preeclampsia

    OpenAIRE

    Vitoratos, N.; Hassiakos, D.; C. Iavazzo

    2012-01-01

    Preeclampsia is one of the leading causes of maternal morbidity/mortality. The pathogenesis of preeclampsia is still under investigation. The aim of this paper is to present the molecular mechanisms implicating in the pathway leading to preeclampsia.

  10. The role of leptin in gastric cancer: Clinicopathologic features and molecular mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kang Nyeong [Department of Internal Medicine, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Ho Soon, E-mail: hschoi96@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Internal Medicine, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Sun Young [Department of Internal Medicine, Healthcare Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital Healthcare System Gangnam Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyun Ki; Lee, Young Yiul; Lee, Oh Young; Yoon, Byung Chul; Hahm, Joon Soo [Department of Internal Medicine, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Paik, Seung Sam [Pathology, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Leptin and Ob-R are expressed in gastric adenoma and early and advanced cancer. • Leptin is more likely associated with differentiated gastric cancer or cardia cancer. • Leptin proliferates gastric cancer cells via activating the STAT3 and ERK1/2 pathways. - Abstract: Obesity is associated with certain types of cancer, including gastric cancer. However, it is still unclear whether obesity-related cytokine, leptin, is implicated in gastric cancer. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the role of leptin in gastric cancer. The expression of leptin and its receptor, Ob-R, was assessed by immunohistochemical staining and was compared in patients with gastric adenoma (n = 38), early gastric cancer (EGC) (n = 38), and advanced gastric cancer (AGC) (n = 38), as a function of their clinicopathological characteristics. Gastric cancer cell lines were studied to investigate the effects of leptin on the signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) and extracellular receptor kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling pathways using MTT assays, immunoblotting, and inhibition studies. Leptin was expressed in gastric adenomas (42.1%), EGCs (47.4%), and AGCs (43.4%). Ob-R expression tended to increase from gastric adenoma (2%), through EGC (8%), to AGC (18%). Leptin induced the proliferation of gastric cancer cells by activating STAT3 and ERK1/2 and up-regulating the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Blocking Ob-R with pharmacological inhibitors and by RNAi decreased both the leptin-induced activation of STAT3 and ERK1/2 and the leptin-induced expression of VEGF. Leptin plays a role in gastric cancer by stimulating the proliferation of gastric cancer cells via activating the STAT3 and ERK1/2 pathways.

  11. The role of leptin in gastric cancer: Clinicopathologic features and molecular mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Leptin and Ob-R are expressed in gastric adenoma and early and advanced cancer. • Leptin is more likely associated with differentiated gastric cancer or cardia cancer. • Leptin proliferates gastric cancer cells via activating the STAT3 and ERK1/2 pathways. - Abstract: Obesity is associated with certain types of cancer, including gastric cancer. However, it is still unclear whether obesity-related cytokine, leptin, is implicated in gastric cancer. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the role of leptin in gastric cancer. The expression of leptin and its receptor, Ob-R, was assessed by immunohistochemical staining and was compared in patients with gastric adenoma (n = 38), early gastric cancer (EGC) (n = 38), and advanced gastric cancer (AGC) (n = 38), as a function of their clinicopathological characteristics. Gastric cancer cell lines were studied to investigate the effects of leptin on the signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) and extracellular receptor kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling pathways using MTT assays, immunoblotting, and inhibition studies. Leptin was expressed in gastric adenomas (42.1%), EGCs (47.4%), and AGCs (43.4%). Ob-R expression tended to increase from gastric adenoma (2%), through EGC (8%), to AGC (18%). Leptin induced the proliferation of gastric cancer cells by activating STAT3 and ERK1/2 and up-regulating the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Blocking Ob-R with pharmacological inhibitors and by RNAi decreased both the leptin-induced activation of STAT3 and ERK1/2 and the leptin-induced expression of VEGF. Leptin plays a role in gastric cancer by stimulating the proliferation of gastric cancer cells via activating the STAT3 and ERK1/2 pathways

  12. Molecular Mechanisms by Which a Fucus vesiculosus Extract Mediates Cell Cycle Inhibition and Cell Death in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf Geisen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive cancer entities, with an extremely poor 5-year survival rate. Therefore, novel therapeutic agents with specific modes of action are urgently needed. Marine organisms represent a promising source to identify new pharmacologically active substances. Secondary metabolites derived from marine algae are of particular interest. The present work describes cellular and molecular mechanisms induced by an HPLC-fractionated, hydrophilic extract derived from the Baltic brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus (Fv1. Treatment with Fv1 resulted in a strong inhibition of viability in various pancreatic cancer cell lines. This extract inhibited the cell cycle of proliferating cells due to the up-regulation of cell cycle inhibitors, shown on the mRNA (microarray data and protein level. As a result, cells were dying in a caspase-independent manner. Experiments with non-dividing cells showed that proliferation is a prerequisite for the effectiveness of Fv1. Importantly, Fv1 showed low cytotoxic activity against non-malignant resting T cells and terminally differentiated cells like erythrocytes. Interestingly, accelerated killing effects were observed in combination with inhibitors of autophagy. Our in vitro data suggest that Fv1 may represent a promising new agent that deserves further development towards clinical application.

  13. Molecular Mechanisms Contributing to Resistance to Tyrosine Kinase-Targeted Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most important pathways in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway. This pathway affects several crucial processes in tumor development and progression, including tumor cell proliferation, apoptosis regulation, angiogenesis, and metastatic invasion. Targeting EGFR is currently being intensely explored. We are witnessing the development of a number of potential molecular-inhibiting treatments for application in clinical oncology. In the last decade, the tyrosine kinase (TK) domain of the EGFR was identified in NSCLC patients, and it has responded very well with a dramatic clinical improvement to TK inhibitors such are gefitinib and erlotinib. Unfortunately, there were primary and/or secondary resistance to these treatments, as shown by clinical trials. Subsequent molecular biology studies provided some explanations for the drug resistance phenomenon. The molecular mechanisms of resistance need to be clarified. An in-depth understanding of these targeted-therapy resistance may help us explore new strategies for overcoming or reversing the resistance to these inhibitors for the future of NSCLC treatment

  14. Molecular mechanisms for inhibition of colon cancer cells by combined epigenetic-modulating epigallocatechin gallate and sodium butyrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioactive compounds are considered safe and have been shown to alter genetic and epigenetic profiles of tumor cells. However, many of these changes have been reported at molecular concentrations higher than physiologically achievable levels. We investigated the role of the combinatorial effects of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a predominant polyphenol in green tea, and sodium butyrate (NaB), a dietary microbial fermentation product of fiber, in the regulation of survivin, which is an overexpressed anti-apoptotic protein in colon cancer cells. For the first time, our study showed that the combination treatment induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in RKO, HCT-116 and HT-29 colorectal cancer cells. This was found to be regulated by the decrease in HDAC1, DNMT1, survivin and HDAC activity in all three cell lines. A G2/M arrest was observed for RKO and HCT-116 cells, and G1 arrest for HT-29 colorectal cancer cells for combinatorial treatment. Further experimentation of the molecular mechanisms in RKO colorectal cancer (CRC) cells revealed a p53-dependent induction of p21 and an increase in nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)-p65. An increase in double strand breaks as determined by gamma-H2A histone family member X (γ-H2AX) protein levels and induction of histone H3 hyperacetylation was also observed with the combination treatment. Further, we observed a decrease in global CpG methylation. Taken together, these findings suggest that at low and physiologically achievable concentrations, combinatorial EGCG and NaB are effective in promoting apoptosis, inducing cell cycle arrest and DNA-damage in CRC cells. - Highlights: • EGCG and NaB as a combination inhibits colorectal cancer cell proliferation. • The combination treatment induces DNA damage, G2/M and G1 arrest and apoptosis. • Survivin is effectively down-regulated by the combination treatment. • p21 and p53 expressions are induced by the combination treatment. • Epigenetic proteins DNMT1 and HDAC1 are

  15. Molecular mechanisms for inhibition of colon cancer cells by combined epigenetic-modulating epigallocatechin gallate and sodium butyrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldanha, Sabita N., E-mail: sabivan@uab.edu [Department of Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 175 Campbell Hall, 1300 University Boulevard, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL 36104 (United States); Kala, Rishabh [Department of Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 175 Campbell Hall, 1300 University Boulevard, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Tollefsbol, Trygve O., E-mail: trygve@uab.edu [Department of Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 175 Campbell Hall, 1300 University Boulevard, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Comprehensive Center for Healthy Aging, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Nutrition Obesity Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Comprehensive Diabetes Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Bioactive compounds are considered safe and have been shown to alter genetic and epigenetic profiles of tumor cells. However, many of these changes have been reported at molecular concentrations higher than physiologically achievable levels. We investigated the role of the combinatorial effects of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a predominant polyphenol in green tea, and sodium butyrate (NaB), a dietary microbial fermentation product of fiber, in the regulation of survivin, which is an overexpressed anti-apoptotic protein in colon cancer cells. For the first time, our study showed that the combination treatment induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in RKO, HCT-116 and HT-29 colorectal cancer cells. This was found to be regulated by the decrease in HDAC1, DNMT1, survivin and HDAC activity in all three cell lines. A G2/M arrest was observed for RKO and HCT-116 cells, and G1 arrest for HT-29 colorectal cancer cells for combinatorial treatment. Further experimentation of the molecular mechanisms in RKO colorectal cancer (CRC) cells revealed a p53-dependent induction of p21 and an increase in nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)-p65. An increase in double strand breaks as determined by gamma-H2A histone family member X (γ-H2AX) protein levels and induction of histone H3 hyperacetylation was also observed with the combination treatment. Further, we observed a decrease in global CpG methylation. Taken together, these findings suggest that at low and physiologically achievable concentrations, combinatorial EGCG and NaB are effective in promoting apoptosis, inducing cell cycle arrest and DNA-damage in CRC cells. - Highlights: • EGCG and NaB as a combination inhibits colorectal cancer cell proliferation. • The combination treatment induces DNA damage, G2/M and G1 arrest and apoptosis. • Survivin is effectively down-regulated by the combination treatment. • p21 and p53 expressions are induced by the combination treatment. • Epigenetic proteins DNMT1 and HDAC1 are

  16. Current Molecular Targeted Therapy in Advanced Gastric Cancer: A Comprehensive Review of Therapeutic Mechanism, Clinical Trials, and Practical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaichun Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the great progress in the treatment of gastric cancer, it is still the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Patients often miss the opportunity for a surgical cure, because the cancer has already developed into advanced cancer when identified. Compared to best supportive care, chemotherapy can improve quality of life and prolong survival time, but the overall survival is often short. Due to the molecular study of gastric cancer, new molecular targeted drugs have entered the clinical use. Trastuzumab, an antibody targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, can significantly improve survival in advanced gastric cancer patients with HER2 overexpression. Second-line treatment of advanced gastric cancer with ramucirumab, an antibody targeting VEGFR-2, alone or in combination with paclitaxel, has been proved to provide a beneficial effect. The VEGFR-2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor, apatinib, can improve the survival of advanced gastric cancer patients after second-line chemotherapy failure. Unfortunately, none of the EGFR targeting antibodies (cetuximab or panitumumab, VEGF targeting monoclonal antibodies (bevacizumab, mTOR inhibitor (everolimus, or HGF/MET pathway targeting drugs has a significant survival benefit. Many other clinical trials based on molecular markers are underway. This review will summarize targeted therapies for advanced gastric cancer.

  17. ROS-Dependent Mitochondria Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Antitumor Activity of Pleurotus abalonus Acidic Polysaccharides in Human Breast Cancer MCF-7 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Xiaolong; ZHAO Yan; Jiao, Yadong; Shi, Tengrui; Yang, Xingbin

    2013-01-01

    Background A greater reduction in cancer risk associated with mushroom diet rich in fungus polysaccharides is generally accepted. Meanwhile, edible Pleurotus abalonus as a member of Abalone mushroom family is a popular nutritional supplement that purportedly prevents cancer occurrence. However, these anecdotal claims are supported by limited studies describing tumor-inhibitory responses to the promising polysaccharides, and the molecular mechanisms underlying these properties have not yet bee...

  18. Analysis of Somatic Mutations in Cancer: Molecular Mechanisms of Activation in the ErbB Family of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ErbB/EGFR/HER family of kinases consists of four homologous receptor tyrosine kinases which are important regulatory elements in many cellular processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration. Somatic mutations in, or over-expression of, the ErbB family is found in many cancers and is correlated with a poor prognosis; particularly, clinically identified mutations found in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) of ErbB1 have been shown to increase its basal kinase activity and patients carrying these mutations respond remarkably to the small tyrosine kinase inhibitor gefitinib. Here, we analyze the potential effects of the currently catalogued clinically identified mutations in the ErbB family kinase domains on the molecular mechanisms of kinase activation. Recently, we identified conserved networks of hydrophilic and hydrophobic interactions characteristic to the active and inactive conformation, respectively. Here, we show that the clinically identified mutants influence the kinase activity in distinctive fashion by affecting the characteristic interaction networks

  19. Molecular mechanisms of cytotoxic side effects of platinum anti-cancer drugs – a molecular orbital study

    OpenAIRE

    Fong, Clifford,

    2015-01-01

    The side effects of Pt drugs have been examined by evaluating the literature on Pt chemistry, pharmacology, cellular transport, and clinical efficacy and correlating these studies with molecular orbital computations. It is concluded that Pt chemotherapeutical regimes are dominated by side reactions, particularly hydrolysis in blood serum and delivery efficiency. For example, it is shown that transplatin is therapeutically inactive because it hydrolyses faster in blood serum than ciplatin, so ...

  20. Molecular phenotyping of human ovarian cancer stem cells unravels the mechanisms for repair and chemoresistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvero, Ayesha B; Chen, Rui; Fu, Han-Hsuan;

    2009-01-01

    tumor and may be the primary source of recurrence. We describe the characterization of human ovarian cancer stem cells (OCSCs). These cells have a distinctive genetic profile that confers them with the capacity to recapitulate the original tumor, proliferate with chemotherapy, and promote recurrence...

  1. Combined therapeutic effect and molecular mechanisms of metformin and cisplatin in human lung cancer xenografts in nude mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Qin Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This work was aimed at studying the inhibitory activity of metformin combined with the commonly used chemotherapy drug cisplatin in human lung cancer xenografts in nude mice. We also examined the combined effects of these drugs on the molecular expression of survivin, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2, vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C, and vascular endothelial growth factorreceptor-3 (VEGFR-3 to determine the mechanism of action and to explore the potential applications of the new effective drug therapy in lung cancer. Materials and Methods: The nude mice model of lung cancer xenografts was established, and mice were randomly divided into the metformin group, the cisplatin group, the metformin + cisplatin group, and the control group. The animals were killed 42 days after drug administration, and the tumor tissues were then sampled to detect the messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA and protein expression levels of survivin, MMP-2, VEGF-C, and VEGFR-3 by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Results: The protein and mRNA expression levels of survivin, MMP-2, VEGF-C, and VEGFR-3 in the cisplatin group and the combined treatment group were lower than that in the control group (P < 0.05. In the metformin group, the expression of MMP-2 protein and mRNA was lower than that in the control group (P < 0.05. The protein and mRNA expression levels of survivin, MMP-2, VEGF-C, and VEGFR-3 in the combined treatment group were lower than that in the cisplatin group and the metformin group (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Metformin inhibited the expression of MMP-2, cisplatin and the combined treatment inhibited the expression of survivin, MMP-2, VEGF-C, and VEGFR-3, and the combined treatment of metformin with cisplatin resulted in enhanced anti-tumor efficacy.

  2. Molecular mechanisms involved in the inhibition of MDA-MB-435 breast cancer cells by phenolic acids from the red-flesh peach BY00P6653

    Science.gov (United States)

    A wide variety of fruits and vegetables extracts have been shown to protect against cancer cell growth in vitro. Increasing evidence suggests that phenolics compounds found in fruits and vegetables may have anticancer properties. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the anti-proliferative...

  3. Molecular mechanisms of cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fava, Giammarco

    2010-04-15

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CC), the malignant tumor of the epithelial cells lining the biliary ducts, has undergone a worldwide increase in incidence and mortality. The malignant transformation of the biliary cells originates from a multistep process evolving through chronic inflammation of the biliary tract to CC. In the last few years several advances have been towards understanding and clarifying the molecular mechanisms implicated in the cholangiocarcinogenesis process. However, many pathophysiologic aspects governing the growth of CC are still undefined. The poor prognosis of this tumor underlines the urgent need to codify the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in the growth and progression of CC in order to design effective preventive measures and valid treatment regimens. This review reports on progresses made in the last few years in clarifying the molecular pathways involved in the process of cholangiocarcinogenesis. PMID:21607138

  4. Change of the cell cycle after flutamide treatment in prostate cancer cells and its molecular mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Wang; Wei-Jun Qin; He Wang; Guo-Xing Shao; Chen Shao; Chang-Hong Shi; Lei Zhang; Hong-Hong Yue; Peng-Fei Wang; Bo Yang; Yun-Tao Zhang; Fan Liu

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To explore the effect of androgen receptor (AR) on the expression of the cell cycle-related genes, such as CDKN1A and BTG1, in prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. Methods: After AR antagonist flutamide treatment and confirmation of its effect by phase contrast microscope and flow cytometry, the differential expression of the cell cycle-related genes was analyzed by a cDNA microarray. The flutamide treated cells were set as the experimental group and the LNCaP cells as the control. We labeled cDNA probes of the experimental group and control group with Cy5 and Cy3 dyes, respectively, through reverse transcription. Then we hybridized the cDNA probes with cDNA microarrays, which contained 8 126 unique human cDNA sequences and the chip was scanned to get the fluorescent values of Cy5 and Cy3 on each spot. After primary analysis, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR) tests were carried out to confirm the results of the chips. Results:After AR antagonist flutamide treatment,three hundred and twenty-six genes (3.93 %) expressed differentially, 97 down-regulated and 219 up-regulated.Among them, eight up-regulated genes might be cell cycle-related, namely CDC10, NRAS, BTG1, Weel, CLK3,DKFZP564A122, CDKN1A and BTG2. The CDKN1A and BTG1 gene mRNA expression was confirmed to be higher in the experimental group by RT-PCR, whilep53 mRNA expression had no significant changes. Conclusion: Flutamide treatment might up-regulate CDKN1A and BTG1 expression in prostate cancer cells. The protein expressions of CDKN1A and BTG1 play an important role in inhibiting the proliferation of cancer cells. CDKN1A has a great impact on the cell cycle of prostate cancer cells and may play a role in the cancer cells in a p53-independent pathway. The prostate cancer cells might affect the cell cycle-related genes by activating AR and thus break the cell cycle control.

  5. Molecular mechanisms controlling asymmetric and symmetric self-renewal of cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Young Dong; Kwon, Yong Tae

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), or alternatively called tumor initiating cells (TICs), are a subpopulation of tumor cells, which possesses the ability to self-renew and differentiate into bulk tumor mass. An accumulating body of evidence suggests that CSCs contribute to the growth and recurrence of tumors and the resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy. CSCs achieve self-renewal through asymmetric division, in which one daughter cell retains the self-renewal ability, and the other is destined to diff...

  6. Anticancer Molecular Mechanisms of Resveratrol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varoni, Elena M.; Lo Faro, Alfredo Fabrizio; Sharifi-Rad, Javad; Iriti, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is a pleiotropic phytochemical belonging to the stilbene family. Though it is only significantly present in grape products, a huge amount of preclinical studies investigated its anticancer properties in a plethora of cellular and animal models. Molecular mechanisms of resveratrol involved signaling pathways related to extracellular growth factors and receptor tyrosine kinases; formation of multiprotein complexes and cell metabolism; cell proliferation and genome instability; cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase signaling (cytokine, integrin, and developmental pathways); signal transduction by the transforming growth factor-β super-family; apoptosis and inflammation; and immune surveillance and hormone signaling. Resveratrol also showed a promising role to counteract multidrug resistance: in adjuvant therapy, associated with 5-fluoruracyl and cisplatin, resveratrol had additive and/or synergistic effects increasing the chemosensitization of cancer cells. Resveratrol, by acting on diverse mechanisms simultaneously, has been emphasized as a promising, multi-target, anticancer agent, relevant in both cancer prevention and treatment.

  7. Epidemiological and molecular mechanisms aspects linking obesity and cancer Mecanismos epidemiológicos e moleculares que associam obesidade e câncer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Osório-Costa

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available About 25% of cancer cases globally are due to excess weight and a sedentary lifestyle. These results are alarming, as the world knows a pandemy of obesity and, in consequence, insulin resistance. Obesity may increase risk for various cancers by several mechanisms, including increasing sex and metabolic hormones, and inflammation. Here, we present a review of epidemiological and molecular evidences linking obesity and cancer - particularly colorectal, post-menopausal breast, endometrial, pancreatic, high grade prostate, hepatocellular, gallbladder, kidney and esophageal adenocarcinoma. The expected striking increase in the incidence of cancer in the near future related to obesity turns the knowledge of this field of great impact as it is needed to the development of strategies to prevent and treat this disease.Aproximadamente 25% dos casos de câncer são decorrentes do excesso de peso e do modo de vida sedentário. Esses resultados são alarmantes, pois o mundo vive uma pandemia de obesidade e, consequentemente, de resistência à insulina. A obesidade pode aumentar o risco de vários tipos de câncer por diversos mecanismos, incluindo aumento dos hormônios sexuais e metabólicos, e de inflamação. Neste trabalho, apresentamos uma revisão das evidências epidemiológicas e moleculares que relacionam a obesidade ao câncer - em particular aos cânceres colorretal, mamário na pós-menopausa, endometrial, pancreático, prostático avançado, hepatocelular, de bexiga, renal e esofágico. O aumento esperado da incidência de câncer relacionado à obesidade em um futuro próximo torna o conhecimento dessa área de grande importância, uma vez que este é fundamental para o desenvolvimento de estratégias preventivas e terapêuticas para a doença.

  8. Molecular mechanisms in gliomagenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulleman, Esther; Helin, Kristian

    2005-01-01

    , in order to design novel therapies and treatments for GBM, research has recently intensified to identify the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to GBM formation. Modeling of astrocytomas by genetic manipulation of mice suggests that deregulation of the pathways that control gliogenesis during...... pathways. The expression of several of the components of these signaling cascades has been found altered in GBM, and recent data indicate that combinations of mutations in these pathways may contribute to GBM formation, although the exact mechanisms are still to be uncovered. Use of novel techniques...... including large-scale genomics and proteomics in combination with relevant mouse models will most likely provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying glioma formation and will hopefully lead to development of treatment modalities for GBM....

  9. Defective Expression of TGFBR3 Gene and Its Molecular Mechanisms in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua ZHOU

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been reported that defective expression of TGFBR3 was found in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. However, its molecular mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of this study is to investigate expression of TGFBR3 in NSCLC cell lines and normal human bronchial epithelial cell (HBEpiC, and to explore potential molecular mechanisms underlying inactivation of TGFBR3 gene. Methods Western blot was performed to determine the expression of TGFBR3 in HBEpiC and NSCLC cell lines. Automatic image analysis was carried out to estimate relative expression of TGFBR3 protein. We screened for mutation of the promoter region of TGFBR3 gene using DNA direct sequencing. Bisulfite-sodium modification sequencing was used to detect the methylation status of TGFBR3 promoter. Results TGFBR3 protein level was abnormally reduced in NSCLC cell lines as compared with HBEpiC. There was significant difference in TGFBR3 expression between the highly metastatic cell line 95D and non-metastatic cell lines, including LTEP-α-2, A549 and NCI-H460. No mutation and methylation was found in upstream sites -165 to -75 of the proximal promoter of TGFBR3 in HBEpiC and NSCLC cell lines. Hypermethylation was shown in upstream sites -314 to -199 of the distal promoter of TGFBR3 in HBEpiC and NSCLC cell lines. Conclusion Reduced expression of TGFBR3 was observed in NSCLC cell lines, especially in 95D, suggesting that TGFBR3 might play an important role in development and progression of NSCLC and correlate with NSCLC invasion and migration. The methylation event occurring at TGFBR3 promoter is not a major cause for reduction of TGFBR3 expression.

  10. Molecular mechanisms of cholangiocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Fava, Giammarco

    2010-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CC), the malignant tumor of the epithelial cells lining the biliary ducts, has undergone a worldwide increase in incidence and mortality. The malignant transformation of the biliary cells originates from a multistep process evolving through chronic inflammation of the biliary tract to CC. In the last few years several advances have been towards understanding and clarifying the molecular mechanisms implicated in the cholangiocarcinogenesis process. However, many pathophysio...

  11. Molecular biology of pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miroslav Zavoral; Petra Minarikova; Filip Zavada; Cyril Salek; Marek Minarik

    2011-01-01

    In spite of continuous research efforts directed at early detection and treatment of pancreatic cancer, the outlook for patients affected by the disease remains dismal. With most cases still being diagnosed at advanced stages, no improvement in survival prognosis is achieved with current diagnostic imaging approaches. In the absence of a dominant precancerous condition, several risk factors have been identified including family history, chronic pancreatitis, smoking, diabetes mellitus, as well as certain genetic disorders such as hereditary pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, familial atypical multiple Most pancreatic carcinomas, however, remain sporadic. Current progress in experimental molecular techniques has enabled detailed understanding of the molecular processes of pancreatic cancer development. According to the latest information, malignant pancreatic transformation involves multiple oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes that are involved in a variety of signaling pathways. The most characteristic aberrations (somatic point mutations and allelic losses) affect oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes within RAS, AKT and Wnt signaling, and have a key role in transcription and proliferation, as well as systems that regulate the cell cycle (SMAD/DPC, CDKN2A/p16) and apoptosis (TP53). Understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms should promote development of new methodology for early diagnosis and facilitate improvement in current approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment.

  12. Imaging of Lung Cancer in the Era of Molecular Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Nishino, Mizuki; Jackman, David M.; Hatabu, Hiroto; Jänne, Pasi A.; Johnson, Bruce E.; Van den Abbeele, Annick D.

    2011-01-01

    Recent discoveries characterizing the molecular basis of lung cancer brought fundamental changes in lung cancer treatment. The authors review the molecular pathogenesis of lung cancer, including genomic abnormalities, targeted therapies, and resistance mechanisms, and discuss lung cancer imaging with novel techniques. Knowledge of the molecular basis of lung cancer is essential for radiologists to properly interpret imaging and assess response to therapy. Quantitative and functional imaging h...

  13. Advances in the Molecular Mechanisms and Prognostic Significance of EMT 
in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinchen CAO

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT has an important role in the development of embryo, as well as that in the metastasis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Recent researches have demonstrated that both morphological and phenotypic conversions emerge in cells undergoing EMT. As most of relevant studies were on other cancers, it is essential to uncover whether it is the similar mechanisms accounting for EMT in NSCLC. With the progress of the studies, EMT-related basic researches are gradually applied to predicting the prognosis of NSCLC. The aim of this article was to discuss the mechanisms related to EMT emerging in NSCLC.

  14. [Molecular Subtypes of Gastric Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatogai, Ken; Doi, Toshihiko

    2016-03-01

    Gastric cancer has been classified based on the pathological characteristics including microscopic configuration and growth pattern. Although these classifications have been used in studies investigating prognosis and recurrence pattern, they are not considered for decisions regarding the therapeutic strategy. In the ToGA study, trastuzumab, an anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, demonstrated clinical efficacy for gastric cancer with HER2 overexpression or HER2 gene amplification. Based on these findings of the ToGA study, the definition of HER2-positive gastric cancer was established. Thereafter, several molecular targeted agents, including agents targeting other receptor tyrosine kinases, have been investigated in gastric cancer. However, to date no biomarker, except HER2, has been established. Based on the recent technological development in the field of gene analysis, a comprehensive molecular evaluation of gastric cancer was performed as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA)project, and a new molecular classification was proposed that divided gastric cancer into the following 4 subtypes: tumors positive for Epstein-Barr virus, microsatellite instability tumors, genomically stable tumors, and tumors with chromosomal instability. Each subtype has specific molecular alterations including gene mutation and amplification, DNA methylation, and protein overexpression. Additionally, some subtypes were suggested to be correlated with the clinicopathological characteristics or as targets of some molecular targeted agents that are currently under development. The new molecular classification is expected to be a roadmap for patient stratification and clinical trials on molecular targeted therapies in gastric cancer. PMID:27067842

  15. Mechanisms of cancer metastasis to the bone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Juan YIN; Claire B. POLLOCK; Kathleen KELLY

    2005-01-01

    Some of the most common human cancers, including breast cancer, prostate cancer, and lung cancer, metastasize with avidity to bone. What is the basis for their preferential growth within the bone microenvironment? Bidirectional interactions between tumor cells and cells that make up bone result in a selective advantage for tumor growth and can lead to bone destruction or new bone matrix deposition. This review discusses our current understanding of the molecular components and mechanisms that are responsible for those interactions.

  16. Breast cancer heterogeneity: mechanisms, proofs, and implications

    OpenAIRE

    Yi-Hsuan Hsiao, Ming-Chih Chou, Carol Fowler, Jeffrey T. Mason, Yan-gao Man

    2010-01-01

    Human breast cancer represents a group of highly heterogeneous lesions consisting of about 20 morphologically distinct subtypes with substantially different molecular and/or biochemical signatures, clinical courses, and prognoses. This study analyzed the possible correlation between the morphological presentations of breast cancer and two hypothesized models of carcinogenesis, in order to identify the intrinsic mechanism(s) and clinical implications of breast cancer heterogeneity.

  17. Breast cancer heterogeneity: mechanisms, proofs, and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsuan Hsiao, Ming-Chih Chou, Carol Fowler, Jeffrey T. Mason, Yan-gao Man

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Human breast cancer represents a group of highly heterogeneous lesions consisting of about 20 morphologically distinct subtypes with substantially different molecular and/or biochemical signatures, clinical courses, and prognoses. This study analyzed the possible correlation between the morphological presentations of breast cancer and two hypothesized models of carcinogenesis, in order to identify the intrinsic mechanism(s and clinical implications of breast cancer heterogeneity.

  18. Biological Significance and the Related Molecular Mechanism of Ets1 mRNA Expression in Lung Cancer by Tissue Microarray (TMA)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expressions and molecular mechanism of Ets-1 mRNA, and TGFβ1 and c-Met proteins in the pathogenesis, progression of lung cancer by tissue microarray (TMA) method. Methods: The expressions of Ets-1 mRNA, and TGFβ1 and c-Met proteins were detected in 89 primary lung cancers, 12 lung cancer with lymph-node metastasis and 12 precancerous lesions by FISH(fluorescence in situ hybridization) and immunohistochemical method, and 10 normal lung tissues were used as controls. Results: The expressions of Ets-1 mRNA, and TGFβ1 and c-Met proteins were significantly higher in 89 primary lung cancer than in the control group (P<0.05). The expressions of Ets-1 mRNA, and TGFβ1 and c-Met proteins were related to lymph node metastasis and clinical stages. There was a positive correlation between the Ets-1 mRNA expression and TGFβ1 and c-Met proteins (P<0.05). Conclusion: Ets-1 mRNA, TGFβ1 and c-Met proteins may be related to the pathogenesis, progression and malignant behavior of lung cancer. They may play an important role in prognosis assessment of lung cancer.

  19. Molecular therapeutics in pancreas cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Vignesh; Weekes, Colin D

    2016-04-15

    The emergence of the "precision-medicine" paradigm in oncology has ushered in tremendous improvements in patient outcomes in a wide variety of malignancies. However, pancreas ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has remained an obstinate challenge to the oncology community and continues to be associated with a dismal prognosis with 5-year survival rates consistently less than 5%. Cytotoxic chemotherapy with gemcitabine-based regimens has been the cornerstone of treatment in PDAC especially because most patients present with inoperable disease. But in recent years remarkable basic science research has improved our understanding of the molecular and genetic basis of PDAC. Whole genomic analysis has exemplified the genetic heterogeneity of pancreas cancer and has led to ingenious efforts to target oncogenes and their downstream signaling cascades. Novel stromal depletion strategies have been devised based on our enhanced recognition of the complex architecture of the tumor stroma and the various mechanisms in the tumor microenvironment that sustain tumorigenesis. Immunotherapy using vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors has also risen to the forefront of therapeutic strategies against PDAC. Furthermore, adoptive T cell transfer and strategies to target epigenetic regulators are being explored with enthusiasm. This review will focus on the recent advances in molecularly targeted therapies in PDAC and offer future perspectives to tackle this lethal disease. PMID:27096032

  20. Molecular imaging in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyners, A K L; Broekman, K E; Glaudemans, A W J M; Brouwers, A H; Arts, H J G; van der Zee, A G J; de Vries, E G E; Jalving, M

    2016-04-01

    Ovarian cancer has a high mortality and novel-targeted treatment strategies have not resulted in breakthroughs for this disease. Insight into the molecular characteristics of ovarian tumors may improve diagnosis and selection of patients for treatment with targeted therapies. A potential way to achieve this is by means of molecular imaging. Generic tumor processes, such as glucose metabolism ((18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose) and DNA synthesis ((18)F-fluorodeoxythymidine), can be visualized non-invasively. More specific targets, such as hormone receptors, growth factor receptors, growth factors and targets of immunotherapy, can also be visualized. Molecular imaging can capture data on intra-patient tumor heterogeneity and is of potential value for individualized, target-guided treatment selection. Early changes in molecular characteristics during therapy may serve as early predictors of response. In this review, we describe the current knowledge on molecular imaging in the diagnosis and as an upfront or early predictive biomarker in patients with ovarian cancer. PMID:27141066

  1. Cancer Stratification by Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justus Weber

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The lack of specificity of traditional cytotoxic drugs has triggered the development of anticancer agents that selectively address specific molecular targets. An intrinsic property of these specialized drugs is their limited applicability for specific patient subgroups. Consequently, the generation of information about tumor characteristics is the key to exploit the potential of these drugs. Currently, cancer stratification relies on three approaches: Gene expression analysis and cancer proteomics, immunohistochemistry and molecular imaging. In order to enable the precise localization of functionally expressed targets, molecular imaging combines highly selective biomarkers and intense signal sources. Thus, cancer stratification and localization are performed simultaneously. Many cancer types are characterized by altered receptor expression, such as somatostatin receptors, folate receptors or Her2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Similar correlations are also known for a multitude of transporters, such as glucose transporters, amino acid transporters or hNIS (human sodium iodide symporter, as well as cell specific proteins, such as the prostate specific membrane antigen, integrins, and CD20. This review provides a comprehensive description of the methods, targets and agents used in molecular imaging, to outline their application for cancer stratification. Emphasis is placed on radiotracers which are used to identify altered expression patterns of cancer associated markers.

  2. Molecular mechanisms of paclitaxel and NM-3 on human gastric cancer in a severe combined immune deficiency mice orthotopic implantation model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Shui Zhu; Ming-Quan Song; Guo-Qiang Chen; Qin Li; Qun Sun; Qiang Zhang

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To explore the molecular mechanisms of action of paclitaxel and NM-3 on human gastric cancer in severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) mice.METHODS: Human gastric cancer cells SGC-7901 were implanted into SCID mice and mice were treated with paclitaxel and NM-3. The effects of paclitaxel and NM-3 on apoptosis of human gastric cancer cells were analyzed using flow cytometry, TUNEL assays, and DNA fragment analyses.RESULTS: Apoptosis of SGC-7901 cells was successfully induced by paclitaxel, NM-3, and the combination of paclitaxel and NM-3 24 h after injection as shown by the presence of apoptotic hypodiploid peaks on the flow cytometer before G1-S and a characteristic apoptotic band pattern in the DNA electrophoresis. The apoptotic rate detected by TUNEL assay was found to be significantly higher in the paclitaxel/NM-3 compared to the control group (38.5% ± 5.14% vs 13.2% ± 1.75%,P < 0.01).CONCLUSION: Paclitaxel in combination with NM-3 is able to induce apoptosis of the human gastric cancer cells in SCID mice effectively and synergistically.

  3. Molecular imaging in cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The success of cancer therapy can be difficult to predict, as its efficacy is often predicated upon characteristics of the cancer, treatment, and individual that are not fully understood or are difficult to ascertain. Monitoring the response of disease to treatment is therefore essential and has traditionally been characterized by changes in tumor volume. However, in many instances, this singular measure is insufficient for predicting treatment effects on patient survival. Molecular imaging allows repeated in vivo measurement of many critical molecular features of neoplasm, such as metabolism, proliferation, angiogenesis, hypoxia, and apoptosis, which can be employed for monitoring therapeutic response. In this review, we examine the current methods for evaluating response to treatment and provide an overview of emerging PET molecular imaging methods that will help guide future cancer therapies. (orig.)

  4. Molecular imaging in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sairah R; Rockall, Andrea G; Barwick, Tara D

    2016-06-01

    Despite the development of screening and of a vaccine, cervix cancer is a major cause of cancer death in young women worldwide. A third of women treated for the disease will recur, almost inevitably leading to death. Functional imaging has the potential to stratify patients at higher risk of poor response or relapse by improved delineation of disease extent and tumor characteristics. A number of molecular imaging biomarkers have been shown to predict outcome at baseline and/or early during therapy in cervical cancer. In future this could help tailor the treatment plan which could include selection of patients for close follow up, adjuvant therapy or trial entry for novel agents or adaptive clinical trials. The use of molecular imaging techniques, FDG PET/CT and functional MRI, in staging and response assessment of cervical cancer is reviewed. PMID:26859085

  5. Molecular mechanism of apoptosis induction by Gaillardin, a sesquiterpene lactone, in breast cancer cell lines : Gaillardin-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahian, Faranak; Aghaei, Mahmoud; Abdolmohammadi, Mohammad Hossein; Hamzeloo-Moghadam, Maryam

    2015-12-01

    Medicinal plant extracts have been widely used for cancer treatment. Gaillardin is a natural sesquiterpene lactone that has recently been reported to have anticancer properties. The ability to induce apoptosis is an important property of a candidate anticancer drug, which discriminates between anticancer drugs and toxic compounds. The current study was therefore carried out to address the issue if Gaillardin is able to induce apoptosis in the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-468 and to determine the underlying mechanism of its anticancer effects. Apoptosis induction by Gaillardin treatment was confirmed by annexin V-FITC/PI staining, and caspase-3,-6, and-9 activation. Using Western blot analysis, we found that Gaillardin upregulated the pro-apoptotic protein Bax and p53 and downregulated the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Moreover, the apoptotic effect of Gaillardin was also related to ROS production and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). Taken together, these results demonstrate that Gaillardin can inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cells via inducing mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and therefore, might be a promising molecule in cancer chemoprevention or chemotherapy. PMID:26843455

  6. Molecular genetics of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaert, Julie; Prenen, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 90% of colorectal cancer cases are sporadic without family history or genetic predisposition, while in less than 10% a causative genetic event has been identified. Historically, colorectal cancer classification was only based on clinical and pathological features. Many efforts have been made to discover the genetic and molecular features of colorectal cancer, and there is more and more evidence that these features determine the prognosis and response to (targeted) treatment. Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease, with three known major molecular groups. The most common is the chromosomal instable group, characterized by an accumulation of mutations in specific oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. The second is the microsatellite instable group, caused by dysfunction of DNA mismatch repair genes leading to genetic hypermutability. The CpG Island Methylation phenotype is the third group, distinguished by hypermethylation. Colorectal cancer subtyping has also been addressed using genome-wide gene expression profiling in large patient cohorts and recently several molecular classification systems have been proposed. In this review we would like to provide an up-to-date overview of the genetic aspects of colorectal cancer. PMID:24714764

  7. Molecular oncology of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyooka, Shinichi; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Soh, Junichi; Aokage, Keiju; Yamane, Masaomi; Oto, Takahiro; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Miyoshi, Shinichiro

    2011-08-01

    Progress in genetic engineering has made it possible to elucidate the molecular biological abnormalities in lung cancer. Mutations in KRAS and P53 genes, loss of specific alleles, and DNA methylation of the tumor suppressor genes were the major abnormalities investigated between 1980 and the 2000s. In 2004, mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene that cause oncogene addiction were discovered in non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs), especially in adenocarcinomas. Because they are strongly associated with sensitivity to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs), a great deal of knowledge has been acquired in regard to both EGFR and other genes in the EGFR family and their downstream genes. Moreover, in 2007 the existence of the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene was discovered in NSCLC; and the same as EGFR-TKIs, ALK inhibitors are being found to be highly effective in lung cancers that have this translocation. These discoveries graphically illustrate that molecular biological findings are directly linked to the development of clinical oncology and to improving the survival rates of lung cancer patients. Here, we review the remarkable progress in molecular biological knowledge acquired thus far in regard to lung cancer, especially NSCLC, and the future possibilities. PMID:21850578

  8. Molecular classification of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, N-Y; Tan, P

    2016-05-01

    Gastric cancer (GC), a heterogeneous disease characterized by epidemiologic and histopathologic differences across countries, is a leading cause of cancer-related death. Treatment of GC patients is currently suboptimal due to patients being commonly treated in a uniform fashion irrespective of disease subtype. With the advent of next-generation sequencing and other genomic technologies, GCs are now being investigated in great detail at the molecular level. High-throughput technologies now allow a comprehensive study of genomic and epigenomic alterations associated with GC. Gene mutations, chromosomal aberrations, differential gene expression and epigenetic alterations are some of the genetic/epigenetic influences on GC pathogenesis. In addition, integrative analyses of molecular profiling data have led to the identification of key dysregulated pathways and importantly, the establishment of GC molecular classifiers. Recently, The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) network proposed a four subtype classification scheme for GC based on the underlying tumor molecular biology of each subtype. This landmark study, together with other studies, has expanded our understanding on the characteristics of GC at the molecular level. Such knowledge may improve the medical management of GC in the future. PMID:26861606

  9. Histone deacetylase inhibitors in castration-resistant prostate cancer: molecular mechanism of action and recent clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Kaushik, Dharam; Vashistha, Vishal; Isharwal, Sudhir; Sediqe, Soud A.; Lin, Ming-Fong

    2015-01-01

    Historically, androgen-deprivation therapy has been the cornerstone for treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. Unfortunately, nearly majority patients with prostate cancer transition to the refractory state of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Newer therapeutic agents are needed for treating these CRPC patients that are unresponsive to androgen deprivation and/or chemotherapy. The histone deacetylase (HDAC) family of enzymes limits the expression of genomic regions by improving b...

  10. Molecular mechanisms of rosacea pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davydova A.M.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents possible molecular mechanisms for rosacea pathogenesis from current domestic and foreign clinical observations and laboratory research: regulation and expression defects of antimicrobial peptides, vascular endothelial growth factor, the effect of serine proteases, oxidative stress, reactive oxygen species and ferritin on the occurrence and course of rosacea. New developments in molecular biology and genetics are advanced for researching the interaction of multiple factors involved in rosacea pathogenesis, as well as providing the bases for potentially new therapies.

  11. ROS-dependent mitochondria molecular mechanisms underlying antitumor activity of Pleurotus abalonus acidic polysaccharides in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolong Shi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A greater reduction in cancer risk associated with mushroom diet rich in fungus polysaccharides is generally accepted. Meanwhile, edible Pleurotus abalonus as a member of Abalone mushroom family is a popular nutritional supplement that purportedly prevents cancer occurrence. However, these anecdotal claims are supported by limited studies describing tumor-inhibitory responses to the promising polysaccharides, and the molecular mechanisms underlying these properties have not yet been elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We here fractionated the crude polysaccharide preparation from the fruiting bodies of P. abalonus into three fractions, namely PAP-1, PAP-2 and PAP-3, and tested these fractions for antiproliferative activity in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. The largest PAP-3, an acidic polysaccharide fraction with a molecular mass of 3.68×10(5 Da, was the most active in inhibiting MCF-7 cancer cells with an IC50 of 193 µg/mL. The changes in cell normal morphology were observed by DAPI staining and the PAP-3-induced apoptosis was confirmed by annexin V/propidium iodide staining. The apoptosis was involved in mitochondria-mediated pathway including the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm, the increase of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, caspase-9/3 activation, and poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP degradation, as well as intracellular ROS production. PAP-3 also induced up-regulation of p53, and cell cycle arrest at the S phase. The incubation of MCF-7 cells with antioxidant superoxide dismutase (SOD and N-acetylcysteine (NAC significantly attenuated the ROS generation and apoptosis caused by PAP-3, indicating that intracellular ROS plays a pivotal role in cell death. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that the polysaccharides, especially acidic PAP-3, are very important nutritional ingredients responsible for, at least in part, the anticancer health benefits of P. abalonus via ROS-mediated mitochondrial apoptotic

  12. Molecular mechanism of cholangiocarcinoma carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maemura, Kosei; Natsugoe, Shoji; Takao, Sonshin

    2014-10-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a highly malignant cancer of the biliary tract with a poor prognosis, which often arises from conditions causing long-term inflammation, injury, and reparative biliary epithelial cell proliferation. Several conditions are known to be major risk factors for cancer in the biliary tract or gallbladder, including primary sclerosing cholangitis, liver fluke infection, pancreaticobiliary maljunction, and chemical exposure in proof-printing workers. Abnormalities in various signaling cascades, molecules, and genetic mutations are involved in the pathogenesis of CCA. CCA is characterized by a series of highly recurrent mutations in genes, including KRAS, BRF, TP53, Smad, and p16(INK4a) . Cytokines that are affected by inflammatory environmental conditions, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), play an important role in cancer pathogenesis. Prominent signaling pathways important in carcinogenesis include TGF-β/Smad, IL-6/STAT-3, PI3K/AKT, Wnt, RAF/MEK/MAPK, and Notch. Additionally, some microRNAs regulate targets in critical pathways of CCA development and progression. This review article provides the understanding of the genetic and epigenetic mechanism(s) of carcinogenesis in CCA, which leads to the development of new therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of this devastating cancer. PMID:24895231

  13. Molecular Targets and Mechanisms of Cancer Prevention and Treatment by Withaferin A, A Naturally Occurring Steroidal Lactone

    OpenAIRE

    Vyas, Avani R.; Singh, Shivendra V

    2013-01-01

    The plants used in Ayurvedic medicine, which has been practiced in India for thousands of years for the treatment of a variety of disorders, are rich in chemicals potentially useful for prevention and treatment of cancer. Withania somnifera (commonly known as Ashwagandha in Ayurvedic medicine) is one such medicinal plant whose anticancer value was realized over four decades ago after isolation of a crystalline steroidal compound (withaferin A) from the leaves of this shrub. The root and leaf ...

  14. Molecular Epidemiology of Female Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Seon-Hee Yim; Yeun-Jun Chung

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is still a leading cause of cancer mortality in the world. The incidence of lung cancer in developed countries started to decrease mainly due to global anti-smoking campaigns. However, the incidence of lung cancer in women has been increasing in recent decades for various reasons. Furthermore, since the screening of lung cancer is not as yet very effective, clinically applicable molecular markers for early diagnosis are much required. Lung cancer in women appears to have differenc...

  15. Stimulation of angiogenesis resulting from cooperation between macrophages and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells: proposed molecular mechanism and effect of tetrathiomolybdate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infiltration by macrophages (Mφ) indicates a poor prognosis in breast cancers, in particular by inducing angiogenesis. Our study aimed 1) to investigate the mechanism by which cooperation between Mφ and aggressive breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) induces angiogenesis; 2) to examine the effect of tetrathiomolybdate (TM) on this angiogenic activity. Mφ coincubated with MDA-MB-231 were used as a model to mimic the inflammatory microenvironment. Angiogenesis induced by the culture media was tested in the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Mφ phenotype was evaluated by 1) expression of the M1 marker CD80, and secretion of interleukin 10 (IL-10), an M2 marker; 2) capacity to secrete Tumour Necrosis Factor α (TNFα) when stimulated by lipopolysaccharide/interferon γ (LPS/IFNγ); 3) ability to induce MDA-MB-231 apoptosis. To explore the molecular mechanisms involved, cytokine profiles of conditioned media from MDA-MB-231, Mφ and the coculture were characterised by an antibody cytokine array. All experiments were carried out both in presence and in absence of TM. Incubation of Mφ with MDA-MB-231 induced a pro-angiogenic effect in the CAM. It emerged that the angiogenic activity of the coculture is due to the capacity of Mφ to switch from M1 Mφ towards M2, probably due to an increase in Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor. This M1-M2 switch was shown by a decreased expression of CD80 upon LPS/IFNγ stimulation, an increased secretion of IL-10, a decreased secretion of TNFα in response to LPS/IFNγ and an inability to potentiate apoptosis. At the molecular level, the angiogenic activity of the coculture medium can be explained by the secretion of CXC chemokines/ELR+ and CC chemokines. Although TM did not modify either the M2 phenotype in the coculture or the profile of the secreted chemokines, it did decrease the angiogenic activity of the coculture medium, suggesting that TM inhibited angiogenic activity by interfering with the endothelial cell signalling

  16. Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, M.C. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Lippman, M. [Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)] [comps.

    1992-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

  17. Therapeutic efficacy and molecular mechanisms of snake (Walterinnesia aegyptia) venom-loaded silica nanoparticles in the treatment of breast cancer- and prostate cancer-bearing experimental mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badr, Gamal; Al-Sadoon, Mohamed K; Rabah, Danny M

    2013-12-01

    The treatment of drug-resistant cancer is a clinical challenge, and thus screening for novel anticancer drugs is critically important. We recently demonstrated a strong enhancement of the antitumor activity of snake (Walterinnesia aegyptia) venom (WEV) in vitro in breast carcinoma, prostate cancer, and multiple myeloma cell lines but not in normal cells when the venom was combined with silica nanoparticles (WEV+NP). In the present study, we investigated the in vivo therapeutic efficacy of WEV+NP in breast cancer- and prostate cancer-bearing experimental mouse models. Xenograft breast and prostate tumor mice models were randomized into 4 groups for each cancer model (10 mice per group) and were treated with vehicle (control), NP, WEV, or WEV+NP daily for 28 days post tumor inoculation. The tumor volumes were monitored throughout the experiment. On Day 28 post tumor inoculation, breast and prostate tumor cells were collected and either directly cultured for flow cytometry analysis or lysed for Western blot and ELISA analysis. Treatment with WEV+NP or WEV alone significantly reduced both breast and prostate tumor volumes compared to treatment with NP or vehicle alone. Compared to treatment with WEV alone, treatment of breast and prostate cancer cells with WEV+NP induced marked elevations in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydroperoxides, and nitric oxide; robust reductions in the levels of the chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL12, CXCL13, and CXCL16 and decreased surface expression of their cognate chemokine receptors CXCR3, CXCR4, CXCR5, and CXCR6; and subsequent reductions in the chemokine-dependent migration of both breast and prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, we found that WEV+NP strongly inhibited insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1)- and epidermal growth factor (EGF)-mediated proliferation of breast and prostate cancer cells, respectively, and enhanced the induction of apoptosis by increasing the activity of caspase-3,-8, and -9 in both breast and

  18. Fernblock (Polypodium leucotomos Extract): Molecular Mechanisms and Pleiotropic Effects in Light-Related Skin Conditions, Photoaging and Skin Cancers, a Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrado, Concepcion; Mascaraque, Marta; Gilaberte, Yolanda; Juarranz, Angeles; Gonzalez, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Healthier life styles include increased outdoors time practicing sports and walking. This means increased exposure to the sun, leading to higher risk of sunburn, photoaging and skin cancer. In addition to topical barrier products, oral supplementations of various botanicals endowed with antioxidant activity are emerging as novel method of photoprotection. Polypodium leucotomos extract (PL, commercial name Fernblock®, IFC Group, Spain) is a powerful antioxidant due to its high content of phenolic compounds. PL is administered orally, with proven safety, and it can also be used topically. Its mechanisms include inhibition of the generation and release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by ultraviolet (UV) light. It also prevents UV- and ROS-induced DNA damage with inhibition of AP1 and NF-κB and protection of natural antioxidant enzyme systems. At the cellular level, PL decreases cellular apoptosis and necrosis mediated UV and inhibits abnormal extracellular matrix remodeling. PL reduces inflammation, prevents immunosuppression, activates tumor suppressor p53 and inhibits UV-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme expression. In agreement with increased p53 activity, PL decreased UV radiation-induced cell proliferation. PL also prevents common deletions mitochondrial DNA damage induced by UVA, and MMP-1 expression induced Visible Light and Infrared Radiation. These cellular and molecular effects are reflected in inhibitions of carcinogenesis and photoaging. PMID:27367679

  19. Fernblock (Polypodium leucotomos Extract: Molecular Mechanisms and Pleiotropic Effects in Light-Related Skin Conditions, Photoaging and Skin Cancers, a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concepcion Parrado

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Healthier life styles include increased outdoors time practicing sports and walking. This means increased exposure to the sun, leading to higher risk of sunburn, photoaging and skin cancer. In addition to topical barrier products, oral supplementations of various botanicals endowed with antioxidant activity are emerging as novel method of photoprotection. Polypodium leucotomos extract (PL, commercial name Fernblock®, IFC Group, Spain is a powerful antioxidant due to its high content of phenolic compounds. PL is administered orally, with proven safety, and it can also be used topically. Its mechanisms include inhibition of the generation and release of reactive oxygen species (ROS by ultraviolet (UV light. It also prevents UV- and ROS-induced DNA damage with inhibition of AP1 and NF-κB and protection of natural antioxidant enzyme systems. At the cellular level, PL decreases cellular apoptosis and necrosis mediated UV and inhibits abnormal extracellular matrix remodeling. PL reduces inflammation, prevents immunosuppression, activates tumor suppressor p53 and inhibits UV-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 enzyme expression. In agreement with increased p53 activity, PL decreased UV radiation-induced cell proliferation. PL also prevents common deletions mitochondrial DNA damage induced by UVA, and MMP-1 expression induced Visible Light and Infrared Radiation. These cellular and molecular effects are reflected in inhibitions of carcinogenesis and photoaging.

  20. Molecular imaging for cancer targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Molecular-genetic imaging which has grown rapidly is currently been applied to studies of gene expression regulation, activity of signal transduction pathways, angiogenesis, tumor metastases, stem cell migration, and monitoring cells involved in different components of immune response. Our Molecular and Genetic Imaging Core (MAGIC), established in late 2002, has developed a platform of small animal functional, molecular, and morphologic quantitative imaging techniques which are providing data about biochemical, genetic or pharmacological processes in vivo, and repetitively in the same animal. We first established chimeric reporter and therapeutic gene systems for specific targeting on hepatoma of mouse model. In- vivo microPET and bioluminescence imaging demonstrated the usefulness of tissue specific chimeric tk and hNIS genes. For trafficking the stem cell and cancer cells, we also have established dual and triple reporter gene system and correspondent reporter probes for in vivo imaging by microPET or microSPECT. The second application of translational biomedical imaging of cancer targeting therapy is on the inhibitors of tyrosine kinase, the key enzyme of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Mutations in the kinase domain of EGFR have higher levels of basal receptor phosphorylation and that are associated with clinical responsiveness to Iressa in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). High mutation rate for EGFR in Taiwanese patients of adenocarcinoma of lung suggests an urgent requirement of a non-invasive imaging tool for pre-treatment and during therapy evaluation of lung cancer patients using EGFR signalling inhibitor. Our current work on radiosynthesis of the analogue of Iressa--morpholino-[124I]-IPQA and in vitro and in vivo studies of high basal EGFR-expressing H1299's derivatives (L858R and E746-A750 del cell lines) subcutaneous tumor xenografts in immunocompromised mice, has proven that [124I]-IPQA is a feasible in vivo imaging

  1. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Bacterial Persisters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maisonneuve, Etienne; Gerdes, Kenn

    2014-01-01

    All bacteria form persisters, cells that are multidrug tolerant and therefore able to survive antibiotic treatment. Due to the low frequencies of persisters in growing bacterial cultures and the complex underlying molecular mechanisms, the phenomenon has been challenging to study. However, recent...... technological advances in microfluidics and reporter genes have improved this scenario. Here, we summarize recent progress in the field, revealing the ubiquitous bacterial stress alarmone ppGpp as an emerging central regulator of multidrug tolerance and persistence, both in stochastically and environmentally...

  2. [Molecular bases of cancer immunology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Rodríguez, R; Peralta-Zaragoza, O; Madrid-Marina, V

    1995-01-01

    The immune system is a tight network of different types of cells and molecules. The coordinated action of these elements mounts a precise immune response against tumor cells. However, these cells present several escape mechanisms, leading to tumor progression. This paper shows several cellular and molecular events involved in the regulation of the immune response against tumor cells. The interaction of several molecules such as MHC, TcR, adhesins, tumor antigens and cytokines are discussed, as well as the most recent knowledge about escape mechanisms and immunotherapy. PMID:7502157

  3. Molecular imaging of apoptosis in cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakumaeki, Juhana M. [Cellular and Molecular Imaging Group, Department of Biomedical NMR, A.I. Virtanen Institute for Molecular Sciences, University of Kuopio, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland) and Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio University Hospital, P.O. Box 1777, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland)]. E-mail: juhana.hakumaki@uku.fi; Liimatainen, Timo [Cellular and Molecular Imaging Group, Department of Biomedical NMR, A.I. Virtanen Institute for Molecular Sciences, University of Kuopio, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland)

    2005-11-01

    Apoptosis plays an important role in cancer. Mechanisms hindering its action are implicated in a number of malignancies. Also, the induction of apoptosis plays a pivotal role in non-surgical cancer treatment regimes such as irradiation, chemotherapy, or hormones. Recent advanced in imaging science have made it now possible for us to detect and visualize previously inaccessible and even unrecognized biological phenomena in cells and tissue undergoing apoptosis in vivo. Not only are these imaging techniques painting an intriguing picture of the spatiotemporal characteristics and metabolic and biophysical of apoptosis in situ, but they are expected to have an ever increasing impact in preclinical testing and design of new anticancer agents as well. Rapid and accurate visualization of apoptotic response in the clinical settings can also be of significant diagnostic and prognostic worth. With the advent of molecular medicine and patient-tailored treatment options and therapeutic agents, such monitoring techniques are becoming paramount.

  4. Molecular mechanisms of curcumin action: gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishodia, Shishir

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin derived from the tropical plant Curcuma longa has a long history of use as a dietary agent, food preservative, and in traditional Asian medicine. It has been used for centuries to treat biliary disorders, anorexia, cough, diabetic wounds, hepatic disorders, rheumatism, and sinusitis. The preventive and therapeutic properties of curcumin are associated with its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. Extensive research over several decades has attempted to identify the molecular mechanisms of curcumin action. Curcumin modulates numerous molecular targets by altering their gene expression, signaling pathways, or through direct interaction. Curcumin regulates the expression of inflammatory cytokines (e.g., TNF, IL-1), growth factors (e.g., VEGF, EGF, FGF), growth factor receptors (e.g., EGFR, HER-2, AR), enzymes (e.g., COX-2, LOX, MMP9, MAPK, mTOR, Akt), adhesion molecules (e.g., ELAM-1, ICAM-1, VCAM-1), apoptosis related proteins (e.g., Bcl-2, caspases, DR, Fas), and cell cycle proteins (e.g., cyclin D1). Curcumin modulates the activity of several transcription factors (e.g., NF-κB, AP-1, STAT) and their signaling pathways. Based on its ability to affect multiple targets, curcumin has the potential for the prevention and treatment of various diseases including cancers, arthritis, allergies, atherosclerosis, aging, neurodegenerative disease, hepatic disorders, obesity, diabetes, psoriasis, and autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes the molecular mechanisms of modulation of gene expression by curcumin. PMID:22996381

  5. Molecular biological mechanism II. Molecular mechanisms of cell cycle regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cell cycle in eukaryotes is regulated by central cell cycle controlling protein kinase complexes. These protein kinase complexes consist of a catalytic subunit from the cyclin-dependent protein kinase family (CDK), and a regulatory subunit from the cyclin family. Cyclins are characterised by their periodic cell cycle related synthesis and destruction. Each cell cycle phase is characterised by a specific set of CDKs and cyclins. The activity of CDK/cyclin complexes is mainly regulated on four levels. It is controlled by specific phosphorylation steps, the synthesis and destruction of cyclins, the binding of specific inhibitor proteins, and by active control of their intracellular localisation. At several critical points within the cell cycle, named checkpoints, the integrity of the cellular genome is monitored. If damage to the genome or an unfinished prior cell cycle phase is detected, the cell cycle progression is stopped. These cell cycle blocks are of great importance to secure survival of cells. Their primary importance is to prevent the manifestation and heritable passage of a mutated genome to daughter cells. Damage sensing, DNA repair, cell cycle control and apoptosis are closely linked cellular defence mechanisms to secure genome integrity. Disregulation in one of these defence mechanisms are potentially correlated with an increased cancer risk and therefore in at least some cases with an increased radiation sensitivity. (orig.)

  6. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Trepo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocarcinogenesis is a complex process that remains still partly understood. That might be explained by the multiplicity of etiologic factors, the genetic/epigenetic heterogeneity of tumors bulks and the ignorance of the liver cell types that give rise to tumorigenic cells that have stem cell-like properties. The DNA stress induced by hepatocyte turnover, inflammation and maybe early oncogenic pathway activation and sometimes viral factors, leads to DNA damage response which activates the key tumor suppressive checkpoints p53/p21Cip1 and p16INK4a/pRb responsible of cell cycle arrest and cellular senescence as reflected by the cirrhosis stage. Still obscure mechanisms, but maybe involving the Wnt signaling and Twist proteins, would allow pre-senescent hepatocytes to bypass senescence, acquire immortality by telomerase reactivation and get the last genetic/epigenetic hits necessary for cancerous transformation. Among some of the oncogenic pathways that might play key driving roles in hepatocarcinogenesis, c-myc and the Wnt/β-catenin signaling seem of particular interest. Finally, antiproliferative and apoptosis deficiencies involving TGF-β, Akt/PTEN, IGF2 pathways for instance are prerequisite for cancerous transformation. Of evidence, not only the transformed liver cell per se but the facilitating microenvironment is of fundamental importance for tumor bulk growth and metastasis.

  7. Mechanisms of Therapeutic Resistance in Cancer (Stem) Cells with Emphasis on Thyroid Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine; Natarajan, Suchitra; Thanasupawat, Thatchawan; Medapati, Manoj; PATHAK, ALOK; Ghavami, Saeid; Klonisch, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The two main reasons for death of cancer patients, tumor recurrence and metastasis, are multi-stage cellular processes that involve increased cell plasticity and coincide with elevated resistance to anti-cancer treatments. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key contributor to metastasis in many cancer types, including thyroid cancer and is known to confer stem cell-like properties onto cancer cells. This review provides an overview of molecular mechanisms and factors known to con...

  8. Molecular Diagnostic Applications in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Huth

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer, a clinically diverse disease, is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Application of novel molecular diagnostic tests, which are summarized in this article, may lead to an improved survival of colorectal cancer patients.  Distinction of these applications is based on the different molecular principles found in colorectal cancer (CRC. Strategies for molecular analysis of single genes (as KRAS or TP53 as well as microarray based techniques are discussed. Moreover, in addition to the fecal occult blood testing (FOBT and colonoscopy some novel assays offer approaches for early detection of colorectal cancer like the multitarget stool DNA test or the blood-based Septin 9 DNA methylation test. Liquid biopsy analysis may also exhibit great diagnostic potential in CRC for monitoring developing resistance to treatment. These new diagnostic tools and the definition of molecular biomarkers in CRC will improve early detection and targeted therapy of colorectal cancer.

  9. Molecular Mechanisms of Cardiovascular Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The average lifespan of humans is increasing, and with it the percentage of people entering the 65 and older age group is growing rapidly and will continue to do so in the next 20 years. Within this age group, cardiovascular disease will remain the leading cause of death, and the cost associated with treatment will continue to increase. Aging is an inevitable part of life and unfortunately poses the largest risk factor for cardiovascular disease. CONTENT: We provide an overview of some of the molecular mechanisms involved in regulating lifespan and health, including mitochondria, telomeres, stem cells, sirtuins, Adenosine Monophosphate-activated Protein Kinase, Mammalian Target of Rapamycin and Insulin-like Growth Factor 1. We also provide future perspectives of lifespan and health, which are intimately linked fields. SUMMARY: Aging remains the biggest non-modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The biological, structural and mechanical changes in senescent cardiovascular system are thought to contribute in increasing incidence of cardiovascular disease in aging. Understanding the mechanisms contributing to such changes is therefore crucial for both prevention and development of treatment for cardiovascular diseases. KEYWORDS: cardiovascular aging, mitochondria, telomeres, sirtuin, stem cells.

  10. Molecular targeted photoimmunotherapy for HER2-positive human gastric cancer in combination with chemotherapy results in improved treatment outcomes through different cytotoxic mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Kimihiro; Mitsunaga, Makoto; Arihiro, Seiji; Saruta, Masayuki; Matsuoka, Mika; Kobayashi, Hisataka; Tajiri, Hisao

    2016-01-01

    Background Photoimmunotherapy (PIT) is a novel type of molecular optical imaging-guided cancer phototherapy based on a monoclonal antibody conjugated to a photosensitizer, IR700, in combination with near-infrared (NIR) light. PIT rapidly causes target-specific cell death by inducing cell membrane damages and appears to be highly effective; however, we have previously demonstrated that tumor recurrences were eventually seen in PIT-treated mice, likely owing to inhomogeneous mAb-IR700 conjugate...

  11. Molecular Mechanisms Behind the Chemopreventive Effects of Anthocyanidins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Xing Hou

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthocyanins are polyphenolic ring-based flavonoids, and are widespread in fruits and vegetables of red-blue color. Epidemiological investigations and animal experiments have indicated that anthocyanins may contribute to cancer chemoprevention. The studies on the mechanism have been done recently at molecular level. This review summarizes current molecular bases for anthocyanidins on several key steps involved in cancer chemoprevention: (i inhibition of anthocyanidins in cell transformation through targeting mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway and activator protein 1 (AP-1 factor; (ii suppression of anthocyanidins in inflammation and carcinogenesis through targeting nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB pathway and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2 gene; (iii apoptotic induction of cancer cells by anthocyanidins through reactive oxygen species (ROS / c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK-mediated caspase activation. These data provide a first molecular view of anthocyanidins contributing to cancer chemoprevention.

  12. Inhibition of growth, migration and invasion of human bladder cancer cells by antrocin, a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from Antrodia cinnamomea, and its molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Kun-Yuan; Wu, Chun-Chi; Chia, Chi-Hao; Hsu, Shih-Lan; Tzeng, Yew-Min

    2016-04-10

    Bladder cancer is the ninth most common cancer around the world, and is a severe urological cancer irrespective of sex. Approximately 65% of the bladder cancers will recur following surgery; with more than 20% of those patients showing an advanced and metastatic stage, with reducing prognosis. Metastasis causes the most death of bladder cancer yet current therapeutic options remain limited. Antrocin, a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from Antrodia cinnamomea, has been identified as a strong cytotoxic agent against lung and metastatic breast cancer cells; however, the effects and mechanisms of antrocin on cancer growth and metastasis remain largely unclear. This study showed that treatment with cytotoxic concentration of antrocin induced both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways in human bladder cancer 5637 cells, evidenced by increase of Fas, DR5, Bax expression and caspase-3, -8 and -9 activation. Exposure to non-cytotoxic concentrations of antrocin significantly inhibited cell growth, migration, and invasion, which was associated with decreased phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and paxillin. Antrocin also reduced subcellular distribution of FAK and paxillin at the focal adhesion contacts of the cell periphery site, and disrupted the formation of filopodia and lamellipodia. Moreover, antrocin increased epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-related gene E-cadherin and decreased vimentin expression. Real-time PCR analysis showed that antrocin downregulated the expression of mRNA of several MMPs, including MMP-2. Moreover, the phosphorylation of ERK and c-Fos were also attenuated by antrocin. Data from chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that antrocin decreased the DNA binding activity of c-Fos to the upstream/enhancer region of MMP-2 promoter, an action likely to result in the reducing MMP-2 expression. Overall, this is the first study which demonstrates that antrocin-inhibited migration and invasion of bladder cancer cells is partly

  13. Molecular mechanisms in radiation carcinogenesis: introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular studies of radiation carcinogenesis are discussed in relation to theories for extrapolating from cellular and animal models to man. Skin cancer is emphasized because of sunlight-induced photochemical damage to DNA. It is emphasized that cellular and animal models are needed as well as molecular theories for quantitative evaluation of hazardous environmental agents. (U.S.)

  14. Molecular Biology of Esophageal Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuanXi; JanBrabender; RalfMetzger; PaulM.Schneider

    2004-01-01

    There have been many new developments in our understanding of esophageal carcinoma biology over the past several years. Information regarding both of the major forms of this disease, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, has accumulated in conjunction with data on precursor conditions such as Barrett's esophagus. Interesting and promising findings have included overexpression of proto-oncogenes,loss of heterozygosity at multiple chromosomal loci, tumor suppressor gene inactivation, epigenetic silencing by DNA methylation, and mutations and deletions involving the tumor suppressor gene p53. Important cancer pathways, the cyclin kinase inhibitor cascade and the DNA mismatch repair process, implicated in the genesis of multiple tumor types have also been inculpated in esophageal carcinogenesis. Alterations in the p16 and p15 cyclin kinase inhibitors including point mutations and homozygous deletions have been reported in primary esophageal tumors. Further developments in the field of molecular carcinogenesis of esophageal malignancies promise to yield improvements in prevention, early detection, prognostic categorization, and perhaps gene-based therapy of this deadly disease.

  15. Integrated Molecular Profiling in Advanced Cancers Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-21

    Breast Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Genitourinary Cancer; Pancreatobiliary Gastrointestinal Cancer; Upper Aerodigestive Tract Cancer; Gynecological Cancers; Melanoma Cancers; Rare Cancers; Unknown Primary Cancers

  16. Genetic and molecular changes in ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Robert L; Gourley, Charlie

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer represents the most lethal gynecological malignancy in the developed world, and can be divided into five main histological subtypes: high grade serous, endometrioid, clear cell, mucinous and low grade serous. These subtypes represent distinct disease entities, both clinically and at the molecular level. Molecular analysis has revealed significant genetic heterogeneity in ovarian cancer, particularly within the high grade serous subtype. As such, this subtype has been the focus of much research effort to date, revealing molecular subgroups at both the genomic and transcriptomic level that have clinical implications. However, stratification of ovarian cancer patients based on the underlying biology of their disease remains in its infancy. Here, we summarize the molecular changes that characterize the five main ovarian cancer subtypes, highlight potential opportunities for targeted therapeutic intervention and outline priorities for future research.

  17. Molecular Profiling of Prostate Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Nna, Emmanuel Okechukwu

    2009-01-01

    In the UK, more than 30 000 men are diagnosed annually with prostate cancer (PCa) and about 10 000 men die from it each year. Although several molecular markers have been associated with prostate cancer development and/ or progression, only few of them are used in diagnostic pathology. The current standard tests include serum PSA test, digital rectal examination and histology of prostate biopsy. Recently the PCA-3 molecular test was approved in the European Union, and it is now...

  18. Molecular imaging of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, A.L.L.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women. Imaging techniques play a pivotal role in breast cancer management, especially in lesion detection, treatment planning and evaluation, and prognostication. These imaging techniques have however limitations such as the use of ionizing radiatio

  19. Pomegranate Extracts and Cancer Prevention: Molecular and Cellular Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Syed, Deeba N.; Chamcheu, Jean-Christopher; Adhami, Vaqar M.; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    There is increased appreciation by the scientific community that dietary phytochemicals can be potential weapons in the fight against cancer. Emerging data has provided new insights into the molecular and cellular framework needed to establish novel mechanism-based strategies for cancer prevention by selective bioactive food components. The unique chemical composition of the pomegranate fruit, rich in antioxidant tannins and flavonoids has drawn the attention of many investigators. Polyphenol...

  20. Molecular Classification and Correlates in Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ogino, Shuji; Goel, Ajay

    2008-01-01

    Molecular classification of colorectal cancer is evolving. As our understanding of colorectal carcinogenesis improves, we are incorporating new knowledge into the classification system. In particular, global genomic status [microsatellite instability (MSI) status and chromosomal instability (CIN) status] and epigenomic status [CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) status] play a significant role in determining clinical, pathological and biological characteristics of colorectal cancer. In thi...

  1. Molecular epidemiology and the genetics of environmental cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shields, P.G.; Harris, C.C. (Laboratory of Human Carcinogenesis, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1991-08-07

    Environmental, occupational, and recreational exposures to carcinogens contribute to cancer risk in humans. Cancer formation is a multistage process involving tumor initiation, promotion, conversion, and progression. Carcinogens can affect any of these stages through genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. The association of a suspected carcinogenic exposure and cancer risk can be studied in populations with classic epidemiologic techniques. However, these techniques are not applicable to the assessment of risk in individuals. Molecular epidemiology, in contrast, is a field that integrates molecular biology, in vitro and in vivo laboratory models, biochemistry, and epidemiology to infer individual cancer risk. Carcinogen-macromolecular adduct levels, and somatic cell mutations can be measured to determine the biologically effective dose of a carcinogen. Molecular epidemiology also explores host cancer susceptibilities, such as carcinogen metabolic activation, DNA repair, endogenous mutation rates, and inheritance of mutated tumor suppressor genes. Substantial interindividual variation for each of these biologic end points has been shown and, therefore, highlights the need for assessing cancer risk on an individual basis. Given the pace of the last decade, it is feasible that the next 10 years will allow molecular epidemiologists to develop a cancer-risk profile for an individual that includes assessment of a number of factors. This will help focus preventive strategies and strengthen quantitative risk assessments. 96 refs.

  2. Molecular deformation mechanisms in polyethylene.

    OpenAIRE

    Coutry, Sandry

    2001-01-01

    This work is concerned with details of the molecular changes caused by deformation and also establishes any conformational differences between linear and branched polyethylene before, during and after deformation. Four blends of isotopically labelled polymers of different types, rapidly quenched from the melt, have been studied by Mixed Crystal Infra-red Spectroscopy and Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS), in order to clarify any differences in the molecular basis of drawing...

  3. Molecular biology of the lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Lung cancer is one of the most common malignant diseases and leading cause of cancer death worldwide. The advances in molecular biology and genetics, including the modern microarray technology and rapid sequencing techniques, have enabled a remarkable progress into elucidating the lung cancer ethiopathogenesis. Numerous studies suggest that more than 20 different genetic and epigenetic alterations are accumulating during the pathogenesis of clinically evident pulmonary cancers as a clonal, multistep process. Thus far, the most investigated alterations are the inactivational mutations and losses of tumour suppressor genes and the overexpression of growth-promoting oncogenes. More recently, the acquired epigenetic inactivation of tumour suppressor genes by promoter hypermethylation has been recognized. The early clonal genetic abnormalities that occur in preneoplastic bronchial epithelium damaged by smoking or other carcinogenes are being identified. The molecular distinctions between small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as well as between tumors with different clinical outcomes have been described. These investigations lead to the hallmarks of lung cancer. Conclusions. It is realistic to expect that the molecular and cell culture-based investigations will lead to discoveries of new clinical applications with the potential to provide new avenues for early diagnosis, risk assessment, prevention, and most important, new more effective treatment approaches for the lung cancer patients. (author)

  4. Radionuclide molecular target therapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer harms people's health or even lives severely. Currently, the morbidity and mortality of lung cancer are ascending all over the world. Accounting for 38.08% of malignant tumor caused death in male and 16% in female in cities,ranking top in both sex. Especially, the therapy of non-small cell lung cancer has not been obviously improved for many years. Recently, sodium/iodide transporter gene transfection and the therapy of molecular target drugs mediated radionuclide are being taken into account and become the new research directions in treatment of advanced lung cancer patients with the development of technology and theory for medical molecular biology and the new knowledge of lung cancer's pathogenesis. (authors)

  5. Exploiting novel molecular targets in gastrointestinal cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Novel molecular targets are being discovered as we learn more about the aberrant processes underlying various cancers. Efforts to translate this knowledge are starting to impact on the care of patients with gastrointestinal cancers. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway and angiogenesis have been targeted successfully in colorectal cancer with cetuximab, panitunumab and bevacizumab. Similarly, EGFR-targeting with erlotinib yielded significant survival benefit in pancreatic cancer when combined with gemcitabine. The multi-targeting approach with sorafenib has made it the first agent to achieve significant survival benefit in hepatocellular carcinoma. Efforts to exploit the dysregulated Akt/mTOR pathway in GI cancer therapy are ongoing. These molecular targets can be disrupted by various approaches, including the use of monoclonal antibody to intercept extracellular ligands and disrupt receptor-ligand binding, and small molecule inhibitors that interrupt the activation of intracellular kinases.

  6. Molecular mechanism of cisplatin resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Cisplatin is widely used in the treatment of many tumors,particularly in ovarian cancer.GST-π,metallothionein(MT), multidrug resistance associated proteins(MRPs), nucleotide excision repair(NER), mismatch repair(MMR) and oncogenes contribute to drug resistance of cisplatin.

  7. DNA aptamers as molecular probes for colorectal cancer study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwame Sefah

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding the molecular features of specific tumors can increase our knowledge about the mechanism(s underlying disease development and progression. This is particularly significant for colorectal cancer, which is a heterogeneous complex of diseases developed in a sequential manner through a multistep carcinogenic process. As such, it is likely that tumors with similar characteristics might originate in the same manner and have a similar molecular behavior. Therefore, specific mapping of the molecular features can be potentially useful for both tumor classification and the development of appropriate therapeutic regimens. However, this can only be accomplished by developing high-affinity molecular probes with the ability to recognize specific markers associated with different tumors. Aptamers can most easily meet this challenge based on their target diversity, flexible manipulation and ease of development. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: Using a method known as cell-based Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment (cell-SELEX and colorectal cancer cultured cell lines DLD-1 and HCT 116, we selected a panel of target-specific aptamers. Binding studies by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy showed that these aptamers have high affinity and selectivity. Our data further show that these aptamers neither recognize normal colon cells (cultured and fresh, nor do they recognize most other cancer cell lines tested. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The selected aptamers can identify specific biomarkers associated with colorectal cancers. We believe that these probes could be further developed for early disease detection, as well as prognostic markers, of colorectal cancers.

  8. Polarization effects in molecular mechanical force fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cieplak, Piotr [Burnham Institute for Medical Research, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92120 (United States); Dupradeau, Francois-Yves [UMR CNRS 6219-Faculte de Pharmacie, Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, 1 rue des Louvels, F-80037 Amiens (France); Duan, Yong [Genome Center and Department of Applied Science, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Wang Junmei, E-mail: pcieplak@burnham.or [Department of Pharmacology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 6001 Forest Park Boulevard, ND9.136, Dallas, TX 75390-9050 (United States)

    2009-08-19

    The focus here is on incorporating electronic polarization into classical molecular mechanical force fields used for macromolecular simulations. First, we briefly examine currently used molecular mechanical force fields and the current status of intermolecular forces as viewed by quantum mechanical approaches. Next, we demonstrate how some components of quantum mechanical energy are effectively incorporated into classical molecular mechanical force fields. Finally, we assess the modeling methods of one such energy component-polarization energy-and present an overview of polarizable force fields and their current applications. Incorporating polarization effects into current force fields paves the way to developing potentially more accurate, though more complex, parameterizations that can be used for more realistic molecular simulations. (topical review)

  9. Polarization effects in molecular mechanical force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieplak, Piotr; Dupradeau, François-Yves; Duan, Yong; Wang, Junmei

    2009-08-19

    The focus here is on incorporating electronic polarization into classical molecular mechanical force fields used for macromolecular simulations. First, we briefly examine currently used molecular mechanical force fields and the current status of intermolecular forces as viewed by quantum mechanical approaches. Next, we demonstrate how some components of quantum mechanical energy are effectively incorporated into classical molecular mechanical force fields. Finally, we assess the modeling methods of one such energy component-polarization energy-and present an overview of polarizable force fields and their current applications. Incorporating polarization effects into current force fields paves the way to developing potentially more accurate, though more complex, parameterizations that can be used for more realistic molecular simulations. PMID:21828594

  10. Molecular biology in lung cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalina, I.; Biroš, Erik

    Poland: Institute of Nuclear Physics, 2002. s. 32. [NATO advanced research workshop. 23.06.2002-27.06.2002, Krakow - Poland] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : cancer Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  11. Quantum mechanics of molecular structures

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru

    2012-01-01

    At a level accessible to advanced undergraduates, this textbook explains the fundamental role of quantum mechanics in determining the structure, dynamics, and other properties of molecules. Readers will come to understand the quantum-mechanical basis for harmonic oscillators, angular momenta and scattering processes. Exercises are provided to help readers deepen their grasp of the essential phenomena.

  12. Molecular deformation mechanisms in polyethylene

    CERN Document Server

    Coutry, S

    2001-01-01

    adjacent labelled stems is significantly larger when the DPE guest is a copolymer molecule. Our comparative studies on various types of polyethylene lead to the conclusion that their deformation behaviour under drawing has the same basis, with additional effects imputed to the presence of tie-molecules and branches. Three major points were identified in this thesis. The changes produced by drawing imply (1) the crystallisation of some of the amorphous polymer and the subsequent orientation of the newly formed crystals, (2) the re-orientation of the crystalline ribbons and (3) the beginning of crystallite break-up. However, additional effects were observed for the high molecular weight linear sample and the copolymer sample and were attributed, respectively, to the presence of tie-molecules and of branches. It was concluded that both the tie-molecules and the branches are restricting the molecular movement during deformation, and that the branches may be acting as 'anchors'. This work is concerned with details...

  13. Harmful molecular mechanisms in sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Rittirsch, Daniel; Flierl, Michael A; Ward, Peter A.

    2008-01-01

    Sepsis and sepsis-associated multi-organ failure are major challenges for scientists and clinicians and are a tremendous burden for health-care systems. Despite extensive basic research and clinical studies, the pathophysiology of sepsis is still poorly understood. We are now beginning to understand that sepsis is a heterogeneous, dynamic syndrome caused by imbalances in the ‘inflammatory network’. In this Review, we highlight recent insights into the molecular interactions that occur during ...

  14. Molecular mechanisms of radiation onco-genesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Induction of cancer is the most important somatic effect of radiation at dose level below 1 Gy (100 rad). Most of the data used to derive risk estimates for low-dose levels are obtained from exposures occurring at dose levels of 0.1 Gy (10 Rad) or above. Benign or malignant tumour induction, is viewed as a probable function of the dose received. This is known as a stochastic effect. When the radiation dose increases the probability of the effect is increased, but there is no effect on the severity. In order to allow that future extrapolation of high-dose epidemiological data may be made with confidence, it is important that a much more detailed picture be gained of the cellular and molecular processes that mediate oncogenic changes in mammalian cells. Many studies have been done in understanding the mechanisms of radiation onco-genesis Today we are just on the frontier of what is a fast-moving and complex research field. (author)

  15. Cancer Hallmarks, Biomarkers and Breast Cancer Molecular Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiaofeng; Xiang, Liangjian; Li, Ting; Bai, Zhonghu

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a complex disease encompassing multiple tumor entities, each characterized by distinct morphology, behavior and clinical implications. Besides estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, novel biomarkers have shown their prognostic and predictive values, complicating our understanding towards to the heterogeneity of such cancers. Ten cancer hallmarks have been proposed by Weinberg to characterize cancer and its carcinogenesis. By reviewing biomarkers and breast cancer molecular subtypes, we propose that the divergent outcome observed from patients stratified by hormone status are driven by different cancer hallmarks. 'Sustaining proliferative signaling' further differentiates cancers with positive hormone receptors. 'Activating invasion and metastasis' and 'evading immune destruction' drive the differentiation of triple negative breast cancers. 'Resisting cell death', 'genome instability and mutation' and 'deregulating cellular energetics' refine breast cancer classification with their predictive values. 'Evading growth suppressors', 'enabling replicative immortality', 'inducing angiogenesis' and 'tumor-promoting inflammation' have not been involved in breast cancer classification which need more focus in the future biomarker-related research. This review novels in its global view on breast cancer heterogeneity, which clarifies many confusions in this field and contributes to precision medicine. PMID:27390604

  16. Molecular Targets of TRAIL-Sensitizing Agents in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Monteleone

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL, a member of the TNF superfamily, interacts with its functional death receptors (DRs and induces apoptosis in a wide range of cancer cell types. Therefore, TRAIL has been considered as an attractive agent for cancer therapy. However, many cancers are resistant to TRAIL-based therapies mainly due to the reduced expression of DRs and/or up-regulation of TRAIL pathway-related anti-apoptotic proteins. Compounds that revert such defects restore the sensitivity of cancer cells to TRAIL, suggesting that combined therapies could help manage neoplastic patients. In this article, we will focus on the TRAIL-sensitizing effects of natural products and synthetic compounds in colorectal cancer (CRC cells and discuss the molecular mechanisms by which such agents enhance the response of CRC cells to TRAIL.

  17. Molecular mechanism of insulin resistance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Samir Bhattacharya; Debleena Dey; Sib Sankar Roy

    2007-03-01

    Free fatty acids are known to play a key role in promoting loss of insulin sensitivity, thereby causing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. However, the underlying mechanism involved is still unclear. In searching for the cause of the mechanism, it has been found that palmitate inhibits insulin receptor (IR) gene expression, leading to a reduced amount of IR protein in insulin target cells. PDK1-independent phosphorylation of PKCε causes this reduction in insulin receptor gene expression. One of the pathways through which fatty acid can induce insulin resistance in insulin target cells is suggested by these studies. We provide an overview of this important area, emphasizing the current status.

  18. Resveratrol and Calcium Signaling: Molecular Mechanisms and Clinical Relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey E. McCalley

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol is a naturally occurring compound contributing to cellular defense mechanisms in plants. Its use as a nutritional component and/or supplement in a number of diseases, disorders, and syndromes such as chronic diseases of the central nervous system, cancer, inflammatory diseases, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases has prompted great interest in the underlying molecular mechanisms of action. The present review focuses on resveratrol, specifically its isomer trans-resveratrol, and its effects on intracellular calcium signaling mechanisms. As resveratrol’s mechanisms of action are likely pleiotropic, its effects and interactions with key signaling proteins controlling cellular calcium homeostasis are reviewed and discussed. The clinical relevance of resveratrol’s actions on excitable cells, transformed or cancer cells, immune cells and retinal pigment epithelial cells are contrasted with a review of the molecular mechanisms affecting calcium signaling proteins on the plasma membrane, cytoplasm, endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria. The present review emphasizes the correlation between molecular mechanisms of action that have recently been identified for resveratrol and their clinical implications.

  19. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Pituitary Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapochnik, Melanie; Nieto, Leandro Eduardo; Fuertes, Mariana; Arzt, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    During the last years, progress has been made on the identification of mechanisms involved in anterior pituitary cell transformation and tumorigenesis. Oncogene activation, tumor suppressor gene inactivation, epigenetic changes, and microRNAs deregulation contribute to the initiation of pituitary tumors. Despite the high prevalence of pituitary adenomas, they are mostly benign, indicating that intrinsic mechanisms may regulate pituitary cell expansion. Senescence is characterized by an irreversible cell cycle arrest and represents an important protective mechanism against malignancy. Pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG) is an oncogene involved in early stages of pituitary tumor development, and also triggers a senescence response by activating DNA-damage signaling pathway. Cytokines, as well as many other factors, play an important role in pituitary physiology, affecting not only cell proliferation but also hormone secretion. Special interest is focused on interleukin-6 (IL-6) because its dual function of stimulating pituitary tumor cell growth but inhibiting normal pituitary cells proliferation. It has been demonstrated that IL-6 has a key role in promoting and maintenance of the senescence program in tumors. Senescence, triggered by PTTG activation and mediated by IL-6, may be a mechanism for explaining the benign nature of pituitary tumors. PMID:26718581

  20. Cellular and molecular mechanisms in kidney fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Jeremy S.

    2014-01-01

    Fibrosis is a characteristic feature of all forms of chronic kidney disease. Deposition of pathological matrix in the interstitial space and within the walls of glomerular capillaries as well as the cellular processes resulting in this deposition are increasingly recognized as important factors amplifying kidney injury and accelerating nephron demise. Recent insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of fibrogenesis herald the promise of new therapies to slow kidney disease progression. This review focuses on new findings that enhance understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms of fibrosis, the characteristics of myofibroblasts, their progenitors, and molecular pathways regulating both fibrogenesis and its resolution. PMID:24892703

  1. Molecular mechanisms and treatment options for muscle wasting eiseases

    OpenAIRE

    Rüegg, Markus A.; Glass, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Loss of muscle mass can be the consequence of pathological changes, as observed in muscular dystrophies; or it can be secondary to cachexia-inducing diseases that cause muscle atrophy, such as cancer, heart disease, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; or it can be a consequence of aging or simple disuse. Although muscular dystrophies are rare, muscle loss affects millions of people worldwide.Wediscuss the molecular mechanisms involved in muscular dystrophy and in muscle atrophy and pres...

  2. Molecular Mechanisms of Green Tea Polyphenols

    OpenAIRE

    Dou, Q. Ping

    2009-01-01

    Tea, next to water, is the most popular beverage in the world. It has been suggested that tea consumption has the cancer-preventive effects. Epidemiological studies have indicated decreased cancer occurrence in people who regularly drink green tea. Research has also discovered numerous mechanisms of action to explain the biological effects of tea. The most abundant and popular compound studied in tea research is (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate or (−)-EGCG, which is a powerful antioxidant and c...

  3. Molecular mechanisms of cryptococcal meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Tong-Bao; Perlin, David; Xue, Chaoyang

    2012-01-01

    Fungal meningitis is a serious disease caused by a fungal infection of the central nervous system (CNS) mostly in individuals with immune system deficiencies. Fungal meningitis is often fatal without proper treatment, and the mortality rate remains unacceptably high even with antifungal drug interventions. Currently, cryptococcal meningitis is the most common fungal meningitis in HIV-1/AIDS, and its disease mechanism has been extensively studied. The key steps for fungi to infect brain and ca...

  4. Molecular mechanisms of manganese mutagenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    el-Deiry, W S; Downey, K M; So, A G

    1984-01-01

    The mechanism by which DNA polymerase discriminates between complementary and noncomplementary nucleotides for insertion into a primer terminus has been investigated. Apparent kinetic constants for the insertion of dGTP and dATP into the hook polymer d(C)194-d(G)12 with Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I (large fragment) were determined. The results suggest that the high specificity of base selection by DNA polymerase I is achieved by utilization of both Km and Vmax differences between complem...

  5. Molecular mechanism of sweetness sensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBois, Grant E

    2016-10-01

    The current understanding of peripheral molecular events involved in sweet taste sensation in humans is reviewed. Included are discussions of the sweetener receptor T1R2/T1R3, its agonists, antagonists, positive allosteric modulators, the transduction of its activation in taste bud cells and the coding of its signaling to the CNS. Areas of incomplete understanding include 1) signal communication with afferent nerve fibers, 2) contrasting concentration/response (C/R) functions for high-potency (HP) sweeteners (hyperbolic) and carbohydrate (CHO) sweeteners (linear), 3) contrasting temporal profiles for HP sweeteners (delayed onset and extinction) and CHO sweeteners (rapid onset and extinction) and 4) contrasting adaptation behaviors for HP sweeteners (moderate to strong adaptation) and CHO sweeteners (low adaptation). Evidence based on the sweet water aftertastes of several novel sweetness inhibitors is presented providing new support for constitutive activity in T1R2/T1R3. And a model is developed to rationalize the linear C/R functions of CHO sweeteners and hyperbolic C/R functions of HP sweeteners, where the former may activate T1R2/T1R3 by both binding and constitutive activity modulation (i.e., without binding) and the latter activate T1R2/T1R3 only by binding. PMID:26992959

  6. Cancer cachexia, mechanism and treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tomoyoshi Aoyagi; Krista P Terracina; Ali Raza; Hisahiro Matsubara; Kazuaki Takabe

    2015-01-01

    It is estimated that half of all patients with cancereventually develop a syndrome of cachexia, with anorexiaand a progressive loss of adipose tissue and skeletalmuscle mass. Cancer cachexia is characterized by systemicinflammation, negative protein and energy balance, andan involuntary loss of lean body mass. It is an insidioussyndrome that not only has a dramatic impact on patientquality of life, but also is associated with poor responsesto chemotherapy and decreased survival. Cachexia isstill largely an underestimated and untreated condition,despite the fact that multiple mechanisms are reported tobe involved in its development, with a number of cytokinespostulated to play a role in the etiology of the persistentcatabolic state. Existing therapies for cachexia, includingorexigenic appetite stimulants, focus on palliation ofsymptoms and reduction of the distress of patients andfamilies rather than prolongation of life. Recent therapiesfor the cachectic syndrome involve a multidisciplinaryapproach. Combination therapy with diet modificationand/or exercise has been added to novel pharmaceuticalagents, such as Megestrol acetate, medroxyprogesterone,ghrelin, omega-3-fatty acid among others. These agentsare reported to have improved survival rates as well asquality of life. In this review, we will discuss the emergingunderstanding of the mechanisms of cancer cachexia,the current treatment options including multidisciplinarycombination therapies, as well an update on new andongoing clinical trials.

  7. Green vegetables and colon cancer: the mechanism of a protective effect by chlorophyll

    OpenAIRE

    Vogel, de, E.F.

    2006-01-01

    One of the important environmental determinants of the risk of colon cancer is the composition of the diet. Regular consumption of high amounts of red meat increases colon cancer risk. In contrast, consumption of green vegetables decreases the risk of colon cancer. This thesis provides a molecular mechanism of how these two dietary components might modulate colon cancer risk.

  8. New molecular targets against cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duenas-Gonzalez A

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Alfonso Duenas-Gonzalez,1,2 Alberto Serrano-Olvera,3 Lucely Cetina,4 Jaime Coronel4 1Unit of Biomedical Research in Cancer, Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas UNAM/Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Mexico City, 2ISSEMyM Cancer Center, Toluca, 3Medical Oncology Service, ABC Medical Center, Mexico City, 4Division of Clinical Research, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Mexico City, Mexico On behalf of the Tumor Study Group Abstract: Cervical cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer worldwide and the fourth leading cause of cancer death in women. Major advances but still insufficient achievements in the treatment of locally advanced and high-risk early stage patients have occurred in the last decade with the incorporation of concurrent cisplatin with radiation and, lately, gemcitabine added to cisplatin chemoradiation. Despite a number of clinical studies incorporating molecular-targeted therapy as radiosensitizers being in progress, so far, only antiangiogenic therapy with bevacizumab added to cisplatin chemoradiation has demonstrated safety and shown encouraging results in a Phase II study. In advanced disease, cisplatin doublets do not have a great impact on the natural history of the disease with median survival rates not exceeding 13 months. The first Phase III study of bevacizumab, added to cisplatin or a non-cisplatin-containing doublet, showed significant increase in both overall survival and progression-free survival. Further studies are needed before bevacizumab plus chemotherapy can be considered the standard of care for advanced disease. Characterization of the mutational landscape of cervical cancer has already been initiated, indicating that, for now, few of these targetable alterations match with available agents. Progress in both the mutational landscape knowledge and developments of novel targeted therapies may result in more effective and individualized treatments for cervical cancer. The potential efficacy of

  9. Molecular markers for thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of the study of the thyroid nodule lies in excluding the possibility of a malignant lesion because the majority of lesions are benign but there is a malignancy risk of 5 to 10%. Most of them are well differentiated carcinomas originating in the follicular epithelium. In spite of the fact that the majority are benign lesions, distinguishing them from carcinomas is crucial to treatment and adequate follow-up. Fine-needle biopsy allows making the diagnosis in most of cases. However, this method is restricted, particularly when diagnosing follicular lesions. In an effort to improve the diagnostic accuracy of biopsy and to provide new diagnosing criteria, a number of molecular markers have been put forward, some of which has wide range of approval whereas others still awaits to be validated for further implementation. This article presented an updated review of molecular markers with higher number of evidence, more accessible and potentially usable from a methodological viewpoint for diagnosis of the thyroid nodule before surgery. The importance of the study of the thyroid nodule lies in excluding the possibility of a malignant lesion because the majority of lesions are benign but there is a malignancy risk of 5 to 10%. Most of them are well differentiated carcinomas originating in the follicular epithelium. In spite of the fact that the majority are benign lesions, distinguishing them from carcinomas is crucial to treatment and adequate follow-up. Fine-needle biopsy allows making the diagnosis in most of cases. However, this method is restricted, particularly when diagnosing follicular lesions. In an effort to improve the diagnostic accuracy of biopsy and to provide new diagnosing criteria, a number of molecular markers have been put forward, some of which has wide range of approval whereas others still awaits to be validated for further implementation. This article presented an updated review of molecular markers with higher number of evidence, more

  10. Molecular mechanisms of induced mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genetic analysis has revealed that radiation and many chemical mutagens induce in bacteria an error-prone DNA repair process which is responsible for their mutagenic effect. The biochemical mechanism of this inducible error-prone repair has been studied by analysis of the first round of DNA synthesis on ultraviolet light-irradiated phiX174 DNA in both intact and ultraviolet light-irradiated host cells. Intracellular phiX174 DNA was extracted, subjected to isopycnic CsCl density-gradient analysis, hydroxylapatite chromatography and digestion by single-strand-specific endonuclease S1. Ultraviolet light-induced photolesions in viral DNA cause a permanent blockage of DNA synthesis in intact Escherichia coli cells. However, when host cells were irradiated and incubated to induce fully the error-prone repair system, a significant fraction of irradiated phiX174 DNA molecules can be fully replicated. Thus, inducible error-prone repair in E.coli is manifested by an increased capacity for DNA synthesis on damaged phiX174 DNA. Chloramphenicol (100 μ g/ml), which is an inhibitor of the inducible error-prone DNA repair, is also an inhibitor of this particular inducible DNA synthesis. (author)

  11. Molecular mechanisms of DNA photodamage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starrs, S.M

    2000-05-01

    Photodamage in DNA, caused by ultraviolet (UV) light, can occur by direct excitation of the nucleobases or indirectly via the action of photosensitisers. Such, DNA photodamage can be potentially mutagenic or lethal. Among the methods available for detecting UV-induced DNA damage, gel sequencing protocols, utilising synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides as targets for UV radiation, allow photolesions to be mapped at nucleotide resolution. This approach has been applied to investigate both DNA damage mechanisms. Following a general overview of DNA photoreactivity, and a description of the main experimental procedures, Chapter 3 identifies the origin of an anomalous mobility shift observed in purine chemical sequence ladders that can confuse the interpretation of DNA cleavage results; measures to abolish this shift are also described. Chapters 4 and 5 examine the alkali-labile DNA damage photosensitised by representative nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and the fluoroquinolone antibiotics. Suprofen was the most photoactive NSAID studied, producing different patterns of guanine-specific damage in single-stranded and duplex DNA. Uniform modification of guanine bases, typifying attack by singlet oxygen, was observed in single-stranded oligodeoxyribonucleotides. In duplex molecules, modification was limited to the 5'-G of GG doublets, which is indicative of an electron transfer. The effect of quenchers and photoproduct analysis substantiated these findings. The quinolone, nalidixic acid, behaves similarly. The random base cleavage photosensitised by the fluoroquinolones, has been attributed to free radicals produced during their photodecomposition. Chapter 6 addresses the photoreactivity of purines within unusual DNA structures formed by the repeat sequences (GGA){sub n} and (GA){sub n}, and a minihairpin. There was no definitive evidence for enhanced purine reactivity caused by direct excitation. Finally, Chapter 7 investigates the mutagenic potential of a

  12. Molecular mechanisms of DNA photodamage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photodamage in DNA, caused by ultraviolet (UV) light, can occur by direct excitation of the nucleobases or indirectly via the action of photosensitisers. Such, DNA photodamage can be potentially mutagenic or lethal. Among the methods available for detecting UV-induced DNA damage, gel sequencing protocols, utilising synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides as targets for UV radiation, allow photolesions to be mapped at nucleotide resolution. This approach has been applied to investigate both DNA damage mechanisms. Following a general overview of DNA photoreactivity, and a description of the main experimental procedures, Chapter 3 identifies the origin of an anomalous mobility shift observed in purine chemical sequence ladders that can confuse the interpretation of DNA cleavage results; measures to abolish this shift are also described. Chapters 4 and 5 examine the alkali-labile DNA damage photosensitised by representative nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and the fluoroquinolone antibiotics. Suprofen was the most photoactive NSAID studied, producing different patterns of guanine-specific damage in single-stranded and duplex DNA. Uniform modification of guanine bases, typifying attack by singlet oxygen, was observed in single-stranded oligodeoxyribonucleotides. In duplex molecules, modification was limited to the 5'-G of GG doublets, which is indicative of an electron transfer. The effect of quenchers and photoproduct analysis substantiated these findings. The quinolone, nalidixic acid, behaves similarly. The random base cleavage photosensitised by the fluoroquinolones, has been attributed to free radicals produced during their photodecomposition. Chapter 6 addresses the photoreactivity of purines within unusual DNA structures formed by the repeat sequences (GGA)n and (GA)n, and a minihairpin. There was no definitive evidence for enhanced purine reactivity caused by direct excitation. Finally, Chapter 7 investigates the mutagenic potential of a dimeric adenine

  13. Molecular mechanism of the sweet taste enhancers

    OpenAIRE

    Feng ZHANG; Klebansky, Boris; Fine, Richard M.; Liu, Haitian; Xu, Hong; Servant, Guy; Zoller, Mark; Tachdjian, Catherine; Li, Xiaodong

    2010-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators of the human sweet taste receptor have been developed as a new way of reducing dietary sugar intake. Besides their potential health benefit, the sweet taste enhancers are also valuable tool molecules to study the general mechanism of positive allosteric modulations of T1R taste receptors. Using chimeric receptors, mutagenesis, and molecular modeling, we reveal how these sweet enhancers work at the molecular level. Our data argue that the sweet enhancers follow a...

  14. Molecular Signaling Pathways Mediating Osteoclastogenesis Induced by Prostate Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced prostate cancer commonly metastasizes to bone leading to osteoblastic and osteolytic lesions. Although an osteolytic component governed by activation of bone resorbing osteoclasts is prominent in prostate cancer metastasis, the molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer-induced osteoclastogenesis are not well-understood. We studied the effect of soluble mediators released from human prostate carcinoma cells on osteoclast formation from mouse bone marrow and RAW 264.7 monocytes. Soluble factors released from human prostate carcinoma cells significantly increased viability of naïve bone marrow monocytes, as well as osteoclastogenesis from precursors primed with receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand (RANKL). The prostate cancer-induced osteoclastogenesis was not mediated by RANKL as it was not inhibited by osteoprotegerin (OPG). However inhibition of TGFβ receptor I (TβRI), or macrophage-colony stimulating factor (MCSF) resulted in attenuation of prostate cancer-induced osteoclastogenesis. We characterized the signaling pathways induced in osteoclast precursors by soluble mediators released from human prostate carcinoma cells. Prostate cancer factors increased basal calcium levels and calcium fluctuations, induced nuclear localization of nuclear factor of activated t-cells (NFAT)c1, and activated prolonged phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in RANKL-primed osteoclast precursors. Inhibition of calcium signaling, NFATc1 activation, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation significantly reduced the ability of prostate cancer mediators to stimulate osteoclastogenesis. This study reveals the molecular mechanisms underlying the direct osteoclastogenic effect of prostate cancer derived factors, which may be beneficial in developing novel osteoclast-targeting therapeutic approaches

  15. Molecular diagnosis of prostate cancer: Topical issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Knyazev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is the second most common cancer and the fifth highest malignancy mortality rate in men worldwide. Although PC is detectable in 15-20% of men during life, its death risk is only about 3%. This means that not all PC cases require the same management tactics. The given review analyzes the current investigations searching for molecular biological markers to predict the course of PC and to choose its treatment policy, including that in the development of resistance to androgen-deprivation therapy.

  16. Molecular diagnosis of prostate cancer: Topical issues

    OpenAIRE

    E. N. Knyazev; K. A. Fomicheva; K. M. Nyushko; Kaprin, A. D.; B. Ya. Alekseev; M. Yu. Shkurnikov

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the second most common cancer and the fifth highest malignancy mortality rate in men worldwide. Although PC is detectable in 15-20% of men during life, its death risk is only about 3%. This means that not all PC cases require the same management tactics. The given review analyzes the current investigations searching for molecular biological markers to predict the course of PC and to choose its treatment policy, including that in the development of resistance to androge...

  17. Molecular diagnosis of prostate cancer: Topical issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Knyazev

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is the second most common cancer and the fifth highest malignancy mortality rate in men worldwide. Although PC is detectable in 15-20% of men during life, its death risk is only about 3%. This means that not all PC cases require the same management tactics. The given review analyzes the current investigations searching for molecular biological markers to predict the course of PC and to choose its treatment policy, including that in the development of resistance to androgen-deprivation therapy.

  18. Molecular Imaging of Pulmonary Cancer and Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Divgi, Chaitanya R.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular imaging (MI) may be defined as imaging in vivo using molecules that report on biologic function. This review will focus on the clinical use of radioactive tracers (nonpharmacologic amounts of compounds labeled with a radioactive substance) that permit external imaging using single photon emission computed tomography (planar, SPECT) or positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Imaging of lung cancer has been revolutionized with the use of fluorine-18–labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (18F...

  19. Molecular dynamics investigation of mechanical mixing in mechanical alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular dynamic simulation is exploited to obtain a deep insight of atomic scale mixing and amorphization mechanisms happening during mechanical mixing. Impact-relaxation cycles are performed to simulate the mechanical alloying process. The results obtained by structural analysis shows that the final structure obtained through simulation of mechanical alloying is in an amorphous state. This analysis reveals that amorphization occurs concurrently with the attainment of a perfectly mixed alloy. The results indicate diffusion and deformation are two important mechanisms for mixing during mechanical alloying. The rate of diffusion is controlled by the temperature and by the density of defects in the structure. Deformation enhances mixing directly by sliding atomic layers on each other and increases the number of defects in the structure. The results agree with mechanical alloying experiments described in the literature

  20. Molecular dynamics investigation of mechanical mixing in mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali Nematollahi, Gh. [Department of Ceramic, Materials and Energy Research Center, Karaj, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: ali61gh@yahoo.com; Marzbanrad, E.; Aghaei, A.R. [Department of Ceramic, Materials and Energy Research Center, Karaj, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-09-25

    Molecular dynamic simulation is exploited to obtain a deep insight of atomic scale mixing and amorphization mechanisms happening during mechanical mixing. Impact-relaxation cycles are performed to simulate the mechanical alloying process. The results obtained by structural analysis shows that the final structure obtained through simulation of mechanical alloying is in an amorphous state. This analysis reveals that amorphization occurs concurrently with the attainment of a perfectly mixed alloy. The results indicate diffusion and deformation are two important mechanisms for mixing during mechanical alloying. The rate of diffusion is controlled by the temperature and by the density of defects in the structure. Deformation enhances mixing directly by sliding atomic layers on each other and increases the number of defects in the structure. The results agree with mechanical alloying experiments described in the literature.

  1. CPFP Summer Curriculum: Molecular Prevention Course | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program (CPFP) one-week course on molecular aspects of cancer prevention follows the Principles and Practice of Cancer Prevention and Control course. It provides a strong background about molecular biology and genetics of cancer, and an overview of cutting-edge research and techniques in the fields of molecular epidemiology, biomarkers, multi-omic, and translational research. The following topics will be typically presented: |

  2. The implications of breast cancer molecular phenotype for radiation oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ShirinSioshansi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The identification of distinct molecular subtypes of breast cancer has advanced the understanding and treatment of breast cancer by providing insight into prognosis, patterns of recurrence and effectiveness of therapy. The prognostic significance of molecular phenotype with regard to distant recurrences and overall survival are well established in the literature and has been readily incorporated into systemic therapy management decisions. However, despite the accumulating data suggesting similar prognostic significance for locoregional recurrence, integration of molecular phenotype into local management decision making has lagged. Although there are some conflicting reports, collectively the literature supports a low risk of local recurrence in the hormone receptor positive luminal subtypes compared to hormone receptor negative subtypes (triple negative and HER2-enriched. The development of targeted therapies, such as trastuzumab for the treatment of HER2-enriched subtype, has been shown to mitigate the increased risk of local recurrence. Unfortunately, no such remedy exists to address the increased risk of local recurrence for patients with triple negative tumors, making it a clinical challenge for radiation oncologists. In this review we discuss the correlation between molecular subtype and local recurrence following either breast conservation therapy or mastectomy. We also explore the possible mechanisms for increased local recurrence in triple negative breast cancer and radiotherapeutic implications for this population, such as the safety of breast conservation, consideration of dose escalation and the appropriateness of accelerated partial breast irradiation.

  3. Ocular diseases: immunological and molecular mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jing; Huang, Yi-Fei; Zhang, Wen-Jing; Chen, Xiao-Fei; Guo, Yu-Mian

    2016-01-01

    Many factors, such as environmental, microbial and endogenous stress, antigen localization, can trigger the immunological events that affect the ending of the diverse spectrum of ocular disorders. Significant advances in understanding of immunological and molecular mechanisms have been researched to improve the diagnosis and therapy for patients with ocular inflammatory diseases. Some kinds of ocular diseases are inadequately responsive to current medications; therefore, immunotherapy may be a potential choice as an alternative or adjunctive treatment, even in the prophylactic setting. This article first provides an overview of the immunological and molecular mechanisms concerning several typical and common ocular diseases; second, the functions of immunological roles in some of systemic autoimmunity will be discussed; third, we will provide a summary of the mechanisms that dictate immune cell trafficking to ocular local microenvironment in response to inflammation.

  4. Molecular Markers with Predictive and Prognostic Relevance in Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Alphy Rose-James; TT, Sreelekha

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer accounts for the majority of cancer-related deaths worldwide of which non-small-cell lung carcinoma alone takes a toll of around 85%. Platinum-based therapy is the stronghold for lung cancer at present. The discovery of various molecular alterations that underlie lung cancer has contributed to the development of specifically targeted therapies employing specific mutation inhibitors. Targeted chemotherapy based on molecular profiling has shown great promise in lung cancer treatment...

  5. Molecular basis of the triple negative breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ayse Feyda Nursal

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women and more than 1 million breast cancer cases are diagnosed each year all over the world. Breast cancer is a complex and heterogeneous disease in terms of its molecular structure, mutation type, metastase properties, clinical course and therapeutic response. Breast cancer is divided into subtypes based on expression properties of molecular markers as estrogen receptor, progestron receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Triple-...

  6. Clinical Challenges to Current Molecularly Targeted Therapies in Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Gagan; Eggert, Ashley; Puri, Neelu

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is difficult to treat with a poor prognosis and a five year survival of 15%. Current molecularly targeted therapies are initially effective in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients; however, they are plagued with difficulties including induced resistance and small therapeutically responsive populations. This mini review describes the mechanism of resistance to several molecularly targeted therapies which are currently being used to treat NSCLC. The major targets discussed are c-Met, EGFR, HER2, ALK, VEGFR, and BRAF. The first generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) resulted in resistance; however, second and third generation TKIs are being developed, which are generally more efficacious and have potential to treat NSCLC patients with resistance to first generation TKIs. Combination therapies could also be effective in preventing TKI resistance in NSCLC patients.

  7. Engineered antibodies for molecular imaging of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Anna M

    2014-01-01

    Antibody technology has transformed drug development, providing robust approaches to producing highly targeted and active therapeutics that can routinely be advanced through clinical evaluation and registration. In parallel, there is an emerging need to access similarly targeted agents for diagnostic purposes, including non-invasive imaging in preclinical models and patients. Antibody engineering enables modification of key properties (immunogenicity, valency, biological inertness, pharmacokinetics, clearance route, site-specific conjugation) in order to produce targeting agents optimized for molecular imaging. Expanded availability of positron-emitting radionuclides has led to a resurgence of interest and applications of immunoPET (immuno-positron emission tomography). Molecular imaging using engineered antibodies and fragments provides a general approach for assessing cell surface phenotype in vivo and stands to play an increasingly important role in cancer diagnosis, treatment selection, and monitoring of molecularly targeted therapeutics. PMID:24091005

  8. Molecular mechanism for the umami taste synergism

    OpenAIRE

    Feng ZHANG; Klebansky, Boris; Fine, Richard M.; Xu, Hong; Pronin, Alexey; Liu, Haitian; Tachdjian, Catherine; Li, Xiaodong

    2008-01-01

    Umami is one of the 5 basic taste qualities. The umami taste of L-glutamate can be drastically enhanced by 5′ ribonucleotides and the synergy is a hallmark of this taste quality. The umami taste receptor is a heteromeric complex of 2 class C G-protein-coupled receptors, T1R1 and T1R3. Here we elucidate the molecular mechanism of the synergy using chimeric T1R receptors, site-directed mutagenesis, and molecular modeling. We propose a cooperative ligand-binding model involving the Venus flytrap...

  9. Molecular mechanisms for tumour resistance to chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shu-Ting; Li, Zhi-Ling; He, Zhi-Xu; Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2016-08-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the prevailing methods used to treat malignant tumours, but the outcome and prognosis of tumour patients are not optimistic. Cancer cells gradually generate resistance to almost all chemotherapeutic drugs via a variety of distinct mechanisms and pathways. Chemotherapeutic resistance, either intrinsic or acquired, is caused and sustained by reduced drug accumulation and increased drug export, alterations in drug targets and signalling transduction molecules, increased repair of drug-induced DNA damage, and evasion of apoptosis. In order to better understand the mechanisms of chemoresistance, this review highlights our current knowledge of the role of altered drug metabolism and transport and deregulation of apoptosis and autophagy in the development of tumour chemoresistance. Reduced intracellular activation of prodrugs (e.g. thiotepa and tegafur) or enhanced drug inactivation by Phase I and II enzymes contributes to the development of chemoresistance. Both primary and acquired resistance can be caused by alterations in the transport of anticancer drugs which is mediated by a variety of drug transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance associated proteins, and breast cancer resistance protein. Presently there is a line of evidence indicating that deregulation of programmed cell death including apoptosis and autophagy is also an important mechanism for tumour resistance to anticancer drugs. Reversal of chemoresistance is likely via pharmacological and biological approaches. Further studies are warranted to grasp the full picture of how each type of cancer cells develop resistance to anticancer drugs and to identify novel strategies to overcome it. PMID:27097837

  10. Molecularly targeted drugs for metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng YD

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ying-dong Cheng, Hua Yang, Guo-qing Chen, Zhi-cao Zhang Department of General Surgery, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, People's Republic of China Abstract: The survival rate of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC has significantly improved with applications of molecularly targeted drugs, such as bevacizumab, and led to a substantial improvement in the overall survival rate. These drugs are capable of specifically targeting the inherent abnormal pathways in cancer cells, which are potentially less toxic than traditional nonselective chemotherapeutics. In this review, the recent clinical information about molecularly targeted therapy for mCRC is summarized, with specific focus on several of the US Food and Drug Administration-approved molecularly targeted drugs for the treatment of mCRC in the clinic. Progression-free and overall survival in patients with mCRC was improved greatly by the addition of bevacizumab and/or cetuximab to standard chemotherapy, in either first- or second-line treatment. Aflibercept has been used in combination with folinic acid (leucovorin–fluorouracil–irinotecan (FOLFIRI chemotherapy in mCRC patients and among patients with mCRC with wild-type KRAS, the outcomes were significantly improved by panitumumab in combination with folinic acid (leucovorin–fluorouracil–oxaliplatin (FOLFOX or FOLFIRI. Because of the new preliminary studies, it has been recommended that regorafenib be used with FOLFOX or FOLFIRI as first- or second-line treatment of mCRC chemotherapy. In summary, an era of new opportunities has been opened for treatment of mCRC and/or other malignancies, resulting from the discovery of new selective targeting drugs. Keywords: metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC, antiangiogenic drug, bevacizumab, aflibercept, regorafenib, cetuximab, panitumumab, clinical trial, molecularly targeted therapy

  11. Molecular mechanism and regulation of autophagy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-ping YANG; Zhong-qin LIANG; Zhen-lun GU; Zheng-hong QIN

    2005-01-01

    Autophagy is a major cellular pathway for the degradation of long-lived proteins and cytoplasmic organelles in eukaryotic cells. A large number of intracellular/extracellular stimuli, including amino acid starvation and invasion of microorganisms, are able to induce the autophagic response in cells. The discovery of the ATG genes in yeast has greatly advanced our understanding of the molecular mechanisms participating in autophagy and the genes involved in regulating the autophagic pathway. Many yeast genes have mammalian homologs,suggesting that the basic machinery for autophagy has been evolutionarily conserved along the eukaryotic phylum. The regulation of autophagy is a very complex process. Many signaling pathways, including target of rapamycin (TOR) or mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-I (PI3K-I)/PKB, GTPases, calcium and protein synthesis all play important roles in regulating autophagy. The molecular mechanisms and regulation of autophagy are discussed in this review.

  12. Molecular mechanisms of amyloid self-regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Landreh, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid is associated with both pathological protein deposits and the formation of functional protein structures. Therefore, several strategies have evolved to control the formation or inhibition of amyloid in vivo. In this thesis, three separate systems were investigated in which amyloidogenic protein segments are coupled to regulatory elements that prevent or promote fibrillation. We describe the molecular mechanism for how (a) a propeptide segment prevents the uncontrolled a...

  13. Cellular and molecular mechanisms in kidney fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Duffield, Jeremy S.

    2014-01-01

    Fibrosis is a characteristic feature of all forms of chronic kidney disease. Deposition of pathological matrix in the interstitial space and within the walls of glomerular capillaries as well as the cellular processes resulting in this deposition are increasingly recognized as important factors amplifying kidney injury and accelerating nephron demise. Recent insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of fibrogenesis herald the promise of new therapies to slow kidney disease progressi...

  14. Molecular Mechanism of Biological Proton Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomes, R.

    1998-09-01

    Proton transport across lipid membranes is a fundamental aspect of biological energy transduction (metabolism). This function is mediated by a Grotthuss mechanism involving proton hopping along hydrogen-bonded networks embedded in membrane-spanning proteins. Using molecular simulations, the authors have explored the structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic properties giving rise to long-range proton translocation in hydrogen-bonded networks involving water molecules, or water wires, which are emerging as ubiquitous H{sup +}-transport devices in biological systems.

  15. Molecular mechanism of magnet formation in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, T; Sakaguchi, T

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic bacteria have an ability to synthesize intracellular ferromagnetic crystalline particles consisting of magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4) which occur within a specific size range (50-100 nm). Bacterial magnetic particles (BMPs) can be distinguished by the regular morphology and the presence of an thin organic membrane enveloping crystals from abiologically formed magnetite. The particle is the smallest magnetic crystal that has a regular morphology within the single domain size. Therefore, BMPs have an unfathomable amount of potential value for various technological applications not only scientific interests. However, the molecular and genetic mechanism of magnetite biomineralization is hardly understood although iron oxide formation occurs widely in many higher animals as well as microorganisms. In order to elucidate the molecular and genetic mechanisms of magnetite biomineralization, a magnetic bacterium Magnetospirillum sp. AMB-1, for which gene transfer and transposon mutagenesis techniques had been recently developed, has been used as a model organism. Several findings and information on the BMPs formation process have been obtained within this decade by means of studies with this model organism and its related one. Biomineralization mechanism and potential availability in biotechnology of bacterial magnets have been elucidated through molecular and genetic approach. PMID:16232810

  16. SU-E-I-39: Molecular Image Guided Cancer Stem Cells Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdollahi, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Cancer stem cells resistance to radiation is a problematic issue that has caused a big fail in cancer treatment. Methods: As a primary work, molecular imaging can indicate the main mechanisms of radiation resistance of cancer stem cells. By developing and commissioning new probes and nanomolecules and biomarkers, radiation scientist will able to identify the essential pathways of radiation resistance of cancer stem cells. As the second solution, molecular imaging is a best way to find biological target volume and delineate cancer stem cell tissues. In the other hand, by molecular imaging techniques one can image the treatment response in tumor and also in normal tissue. In this issue, the response of cancer stem cells to radiation during therapy course can be imaged, also the main mechanisms of radiation resistance and finding the best radiation modifiers (sensitizers) can be achieved by molecular imaging modalities. In adaptive radiotherapy the molecular imaging plays a vital role to have higher tumor control probability by delivering high radiation doses to cancer stem cells in any time of treatment. The outcome of a feasible treatment is dependent to high cancer stem cells response to radiation and removing all of which, so a good imaging modality can show this issue and preventing of tumor recurrence and metastasis. Results: Our results are dependent to use of molecular imaging as a new modality in the clinic. We propose molecular imaging as a new radiobiological technique to solve radiation therapy problems due to cancer stem cells. Conclusion: Molecular imaging guided cancer stem cell diagnosis and therapy is a new approach in the field of cancer treatment. This new radiobiological imaging technique should be developed in all clinics as a feasible tool that is more biological than physical imaging.

  17. SU-E-I-39: Molecular Image Guided Cancer Stem Cells Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Cancer stem cells resistance to radiation is a problematic issue that has caused a big fail in cancer treatment. Methods: As a primary work, molecular imaging can indicate the main mechanisms of radiation resistance of cancer stem cells. By developing and commissioning new probes and nanomolecules and biomarkers, radiation scientist will able to identify the essential pathways of radiation resistance of cancer stem cells. As the second solution, molecular imaging is a best way to find biological target volume and delineate cancer stem cell tissues. In the other hand, by molecular imaging techniques one can image the treatment response in tumor and also in normal tissue. In this issue, the response of cancer stem cells to radiation during therapy course can be imaged, also the main mechanisms of radiation resistance and finding the best radiation modifiers (sensitizers) can be achieved by molecular imaging modalities. In adaptive radiotherapy the molecular imaging plays a vital role to have higher tumor control probability by delivering high radiation doses to cancer stem cells in any time of treatment. The outcome of a feasible treatment is dependent to high cancer stem cells response to radiation and removing all of which, so a good imaging modality can show this issue and preventing of tumor recurrence and metastasis. Results: Our results are dependent to use of molecular imaging as a new modality in the clinic. We propose molecular imaging as a new radiobiological technique to solve radiation therapy problems due to cancer stem cells. Conclusion: Molecular imaging guided cancer stem cell diagnosis and therapy is a new approach in the field of cancer treatment. This new radiobiological imaging technique should be developed in all clinics as a feasible tool that is more biological than physical imaging

  18. Molecular Imaging of Biomarkers in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulaner, Gary A.; Riedl, Chris C.; Dickler, Maura N.; Jhaveri, Komal; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Weber, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    The success of breast cancer therapy is ultimately defined by clinical endpoints such as survival. It is valuable to have biomarkers that can predict the most efficacious therapies or measure response to therapy early in the course of treatment. Molecular imaging has a promising role in complementing and overcoming some of the limitations of traditional biomarkers by providing the ability to perform noninvasive, repeatable whole-body assessments. The potential advantages of imaging biomarkers are obvious and initial clinical studies have been promising, but proof of clinical utility still requires prospective multicenter clinical trials. PMID:26834103

  19. Oral cancer: molecular technologies for risk assessment and diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan Tao Chen

    2008-01-01

    @@ Purpose: The effective biomarkers related to diagnosis, metastasis, drug resistance and irradiation sensitivity of oral cancers will help the pathologist and oncologist to determine the molecular taxonomy diagnosis and design the individualization treatment for the patients with oral cancers.

  20. Mechanisms of inherited cancer susceptibility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shirley HODGSON

    2008-01-01

    A small proportion of many cancers are due to inherited mutations in genes, which result in a high risk to the individual of developing specific cancers. There are several classes of genes that may be involved: tumour suppressor genes, oncogenes, genes encoding proteins involved in DNA repair and cell cycle control, and genes involved in stimulating the angiogenic pathway. Alterations in susceptibility to cancer may also be due to variations in genes involved in carcinogen metabolism. This review discusses examples of some of these genes and the associated clinical conditions caused by the inheritance of mutations in such genes.

  1. Molecular markers′ progress of breast cancer treatment efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Dan Wang; Jingwei Xu; Guang Shi; Guanghao Yin

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a famous malignant tumor which is caused by varieties of mutation in multiple genes. In order to detect breast cancer in an earlier time and take appropriate treatment which includes  predicting treatment efficacy, we need a more accurate method of discovering the occurrence of breast cancer. With the development of molecular biology and biological detection technologies continue to emerge, molecular markers of breast cancer have gaining more and more widespread attention, an...

  2. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and cancer: usefulness of proteomic approaches in assessment of the molecular mechanisms and efficacy of novel therapeutics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hajdúch, M.; Skalníková, Helena; Halada, Petr; Vydra, D.; Džubák, P.; Dziechciarková, M.; Strnad, M.; Radioch, D.; Gadher, S. J.; Kovářová, Hana

    Weinheim : Wiley, 2007 - (Van Eyk, J.; Dunn, M.), s. 177-202 ISBN 978-3-527-31637-3 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : CDKI Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  3. The mTOR Pathway and the Role of Energy Balance Throughout Life in Colorectal Cancer Etiology and Prognosis: Unravelling Mechanisms Through a Multidimensional Molecular Epidemiologic Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Weijenberg, Matty P.; Hughes, Laura A. E.; Bours, Martijn J. L.; Simons, Colinda C. J. M.; van Engeland, Manon; van den Brandt, Piet A.

    2013-01-01

    Timing of exposure to lifestyle factors that influence energy balance may differentially affect colorectal cancer (CRC) risk and prognosis. Caloric restriction in youth and short stature, as markers of early-life exposures, have shown to decrease CRC risk, whereas large body size and low physical activity levels in adulthood are established risk factors for CRC. Regarding prognosis, overweight, sarcopenia, and their co-occurrence (sarcopenic obesity) may negatively influence the health and qu...

  4. Mechanically induced luminescence changes in molecular assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagara, Yoshimitsu; Kato, Takashi

    2009-11-01

    Altering the shape and properties of a material through external factors such as heat, light, pressure, pH, electric or magnetic fields, or the introduction of a guest molecule, is an attractive prospect. In this Perspective, piezochromic luminescent materials - which change the colour of their luminescence in response to mechanical stimuli - are described. Such piezochromism has been observed for a few molecular materials that contain luminescent cores in liquid-crystalline and crystalline solid states, as well as for polymeric materials doped with dyes. These changes in photoluminescent colour can be activated by various types of mechanical pressure such as shearing, grinding or elongation, which can trigger different mechanisms of producing the colour. Such stimuli-responsive materials have potential for various applications, including sensors, memory and displays. PMID:21378953

  5. Molecular Mechanisms of Renal Ischemic Conditioning Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierulf-Lassen, Casper; Nieuwenhuijs-Moeke, Gertrude J; Krogstrup, Nicoline V; Oltean, Mihai; Jespersen, Bente; Dor, Frank J M F

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury is the leading cause of acute kidney injury in a variety of clinical settings such as renal transplantation and hypovolemic and/or septic shock. Strategies to reduce ischemia-reperfusion injury are obviously clinically relevant. Ischemic conditioning is an inherent part of the renal defense mechanism against ischemia and can be triggered by short periods of intermittent ischemia and reperfusion. Understanding the signaling transduction pathways of renal ischemic conditioning can promote further clinical translation and pharmacological advancements in this era. This review summarizes research on the molecular mechanisms underlying both local and remote ischemic pre-, per- and postconditioning of the kidney. The different types of conditioning strategies in the kidney recruit similar powerful pro-survival mechanisms. Likewise, renal ischemic conditioning mobilizes many of the same protective signaling pathways as in other organs, but differences are recognized. PMID:26330099

  6. Molecular mechanisms for protein-encoded inheritance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiltzius, Jed J.W.; Landau, Meytal; Nelson, Rebecca; Sawaya, Michael R.; Apostol, Marcin I.; Goldschmidt, Lukasz; Soriaga, Angela B.; Cascio, Duilio; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Eisenberg, David; (Cornell); (HHMI)

    2009-12-01

    In prion inheritance and transmission, strains are phenotypic variants encoded by protein 'conformations'. However, it is unclear how a protein conformation can be stable enough to endure transmission between cells or organisms. Here we describe new polymorphic crystal structures of segments of prion and other amyloid proteins, which offer two structural mechanisms for the encoding of prion strains. In packing polymorphism, prion strains are encoded by alternative packing arrangements (polymorphs) of {beta}-sheets formed by the same segment of a protein; in segmental polymorphism, prion strains are encoded by distinct {beta}-sheets built from different segments of a protein. Both forms of polymorphism can produce enduring conformations capable of encoding strains. These molecular mechanisms for transfer of protein-encoded information into prion strains share features with the familiar mechanism for transfer of nucleic acid-encoded information into microbial strains, including sequence specificity and recognition by noncovalent bonds.

  7. Molecular Mechanisms in Exercise-Induced Cardioprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Golbidi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical inactivity is increasingly recognized as modifiable behavioral risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. A partial list of proposed mechanisms for exercise-induced cardioprotection include induction of heat shock proteins, increase in cardiac antioxidant capacity, expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress proteins, anatomical and physiological changes in the coronary arteries, changes in nitric oxide production, adaptational changes in cardiac mitochondria, increased autophagy, and improved function of sarcolemmal and/or mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channels. It is currently unclear which of these protective mechanisms are essential for exercise-induced cardioprotection. However, most investigations focus on sarcolemmal KATP channels, NO production, and mitochondrial changes although it is very likely that other mechanisms may also exist. This paper discusses current information about these aforementioned topics and does not consider potentially important adaptations within blood or the autonomic nervous system. A better understanding of the molecular basis of exercise-induced cardioprotection will help to develop better therapeutic strategies.

  8. Molecular profiling of childhood cancer: Biomarkers and novel therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Saletta

    2014-06-01

    General significance: The increasing recognition of the heterogeneity of molecular causes of cancer favors the continued development of molecularly targeted agents, and their transfer to pediatric and adolescent populations.

  9. Fecal Molecular Markers for Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani Kanthan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite multiple screening techniques, including colonoscopy, flexible sigmoidoscopy, radiological imaging, and fecal occult blood testing, colorectal cancer remains a leading cause of death. As these techniques improve, their sensitivity to detect malignant lesions is increasing; however, detection of precursor lesions remains problematic and has generated a lack of general acceptance for their widespread usage. Early detection by an accurate, noninvasive, cost-effective, simple-to-use screening technique is central to decreasing the incidence and mortality of this disease. Recent advances in the development of molecular markers in faecal specimens are encouraging for its use as a screening tool. Genetic mutations and epigenetic alterations that result from the carcinogenetic process can be detected by coprocytobiology in the colonocytes exfoliated from the lesion into the fecal matter. These markers have shown promising sensitivity and specificity in the detection of both malignant and premalignant lesions and are gaining popularity as a noninvasive technique that is representative of the entire colon. In this paper, we summarize the genetic and epigenetic fecal molecular markers that have been identified as potential targets in the screening of colorectal cancer.

  10. Molecular Link between Vitamin D and Cancer Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William B. Grant

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The metabolite of vitamin D, 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (also known as calcitriol, is a biologically active molecule required to maintain the physiological functions of several target tissues in the human body from conception to adulthood. Its molecular mode of action ranges from immediate nongenomic responses to longer term mechanisms that exert persistent genomic effects. The genomic mechanisms of vitamin D action rely on cross talk between 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 signaling pathways and that of other growth factors or hormones that collectively regulate cell proliferation, differentiation and cell survival. In vitro and in vivo studies demonstrate a role for vitamin D (calcitriol in modulating cellular growth and development. Vitamin D (calcitriol acts as an antiproliferative agent in many tissues and significantly slows malignant cellular growth. Moreover, epidemiological studies have suggested that ultraviolet-B exposure can help reduce cancer risk and prevalence, indicating a potential role for vitamin D as a feasible agent to prevent cancer incidence and recurrence. With the preventive potential of this biologically active agent, we suggest that countries where cancer is on the rise—yet where sunlight and, hence, vitamin D may be easily acquired—adopt awareness, education and implementation strategies to increase supplementation with vitamin D in all age groups as a preventive measure to reduce cancer risk and prevalence.

  11. Inhibitory effects of polyphenol-enriched extract from Ziyang tea against human breast cancer MCF-7 cells through reactive oxygen species-dependent mitochondria molecular mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfeng Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A polyphenol-enriched extract from selenium-enriched Ziyang green tea (ZTP was selected to evaluate its antitumor effects against human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. In ZTP, (−-epigallocatechin gallate (28.2% was identified as the major catechin, followed by (−-epigallocatechin (5.7% and (−-epicatechin gallate (12.6%. ZTP was shown to inhibit MCF-7 cell proliferation (half maximal inhibitory concentration, IC50 = 172.2 μg/mL by blocking cell-cycle progression at the G0/G1 phase and inducing apoptotic death. Western blotting assay indicated that ZTP induced cell-cycle arrest by upregulation of p53 and reduced the expression of CDK2 in MCF-7 cells. ZTP-caused cell apoptosis was associated with an increase in Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, and activation of caspase-3 and -9. MCF-7 cells treated with ZTP also showed an overproduction of reactive oxygen species, suggesting that reactive oxygen species played an important role in the induction of apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. This is the first report showing that ZTP is a potential novel dietary agent for cancer chemoprevention or chemotherapy.

  12. Radioadaptive response and its molecular mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioadaptive response is a biological defense of which low dose ionizing radiation induces cellular resistance to the genotoxic effects of subsequent challenge irradiation. However, so for molecular mechanism of radioadaptive response remains obscure. Research is mainly involved in activation of the intracellular repair system, cell cycle regulation system, antioxidative stress system and stress-response protein. Signaling factors involved in cell response to radiation include protein kinase C, mitogen-activated protein kinase, p53 tumor suppressor' protein, ataxia-telansiectasia mutated, and DNA-dependent protein kinase. (authors)

  13. Thymic Output: Influence Factors and Molecular Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong Jin; Jun Zhang; Weifeng Chen

    2006-01-01

    Thymus is a primary lymphoid organ, able to generate mature T cells that eventually colonize secondary lymphoid organs, and is therefore essential for peripheral T cell renewal. Recent data showed that normal thymocyte export can be altered by several influence factors including several chemokines,sphingosinel-phosphate (S1P),transcription factors such as Foxjl, Kruppel-like transcription factor 2 (KLF2) and antigen stimulation, etc. In this review, we summarized the recent reports about study strategies, influence factors and possible molecular mechanisms in thymic output.

  14. Molecular diagnosis for personalized target therapy in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jae Yong

    2013-09-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In advanced and metastatic gastric cancer, the conventional chemotherapy with limited efficacy shows an overall survival period of about 10 months. Patient specific and effective treatments known as personalized cancer therapy is of significant importance. Advances in high-throughput technologies such as microarray and next generation sequencing for genes, protein expression profiles and oncogenic signaling pathways have reinforced the discovery of treatment targets and personalized treatments. However, there are numerous challenges from cancer target discoveries to practical clinical benefits. Although there is a flood of biomarkers and target agents, only a minority of patients are tested and treated accordingly. Numerous molecular target agents have been under investigation for gastric cancer. Currently, targets for gastric cancer include the epidermal growth factor receptor family, mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor axis, and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-AKT-mammalian target of rapamycin pathways. Deeper insights of molecular characteristics for gastric cancer has enabled the molecular classification of gastric cancer, the diagnosis of gastric cancer, the prediction of prognosis, the recognition of gastric cancer driver genes, and the discovery of potential therapeutic targets. Not only have we deeper insights for the molecular diversity of gastric cancer, but we have also prospected both affirmative potentials and hurdles to molecular diagnostics. New paradigm of transdisciplinary team science, which is composed of innovative explorations and clinical investigations of oncologists, geneticists, pathologists, biologists, and bio-informaticians, is mandatory to recognize personalized target therapy. PMID:24156032

  15. Killing cancer with platycodin D through multiple mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad; Maryam, Amara; Zhang, He; Mehmood, Tahir; Ma, Tonghui

    2016-03-01

    Cancer is a multi-faceted disease comprised of a combination of genetic, epigenetic, metabolic and signalling aberrations which severely disrupt the normal homoeostasis of cell growth and death. Rational developments of highly selective drugs which specifically block only one of the signalling pathways have been associated with limited therapeutic success. Multi-targeted prevention of cancer has emerged as a new paradigm for effective anti-cancer treatment. Platycodin D, a triterpenoid saponin, is one the major active components of the roots of Platycodon grandiflorum and possesses multiple biological and pharmacological properties including, anti-nociceptive, anti-atherosclerosis, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, anti-obesity, immunoregulatory, hepatoprotective and anti-tumour activities. Recently, the anti-cancer activity of platycodin D has been extensively studied. The purpose of this review was to give our perspectives on the current status of platycodin D and discuss its anti-cancer activity and molecular mechanisms which may help the further design and conduct of pre-clinical and clinical trials to develop it successfully into a potential lead drug for oncological therapy. Platycodin D has been shown to fight cancer by inducing apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and autophagy and inhibiting angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis by targeting multiple signalling pathways which are frequently deregulated in cancers suggesting that this multi-target activity rather than a single effect may play an important role in developing platycodin D into potential anti-cancer drug. PMID:26648178

  16. Statistical mechanics and dynamics of molecular fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quack, M. (Goettingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Physikalische Chemie)

    1981-05-11

    The foundations of the use of statistical-mechanical equations of motion, in particular the Pauli equation, for the description of intramolecular processes and molecular fragmentation are discussed briefly. Quantum-mechanical trajectories for model systems illustrate how the statistical behaviour may emerge from the dynamical equations of motion. Product state distributions resulting from the fragmentation of strongly coupled, metastable intermediates in chemical-activation experiments can be calculated by using restricted equipartition, which applies as the long-time limit of the Pauli equation. A simple Pauli-equation model is proposed to calculate lifetimes of metastable intermediates. The consequences of the finite rate of intramolecular relaxation processes for the specific rate constants for fragmentation and possible deviations from microcanonical equilibrium are explored.

  17. Statistical mechanics and dynamics of molecular fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The foundations of the use of statistical-mechanical equations of motion, in particular the Pauli equation, for the description of intramolecular processes and molecular fragmentation are discussed briefly. Quantum-mechanical trajectories for model systems illustrate how the statistical behaviour may emerge from the dynamical equations of motion. Product state distributions resulting from the fragmentation of strongly coupled, metastable intermediates in chemical-activation experiments can be calculated by using restricted equipartition, which applies as the long-time limit of the Pauli equation. A simple Pauli-equation model is proposed to calculate lifetimes of metastable intermediates. The consequences of the finite rate of intramolecular relaxation processes for the specific rate constants for fragmentation and possible deviations from microcanonical equilibrium are explored. (author)

  18. Molecular mechanisms of glucocorticoid receptor signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Labeur

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights the most recent findings on the molecular mechanisms of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR. Most effects of glucocorticoids are mediated by the intracellular GR which is present in almost every tissue and controls transcriptional activation via direct and indirect mechanisms. Nevertheless the glucocorticoid responses are tissue -and gene- specific. GR associates selectively with corticosteroid ligands produced in the adrenal gland in response to changes of humoral homeostasis. Ligand interaction with GR promotes either GR binding to genomic glucocorticoid response elements, in turn modulating gene transcription, or interaction of GR monomers with other transcription factors activated by other signalling pathways leading to transrepression. The GR regulates a broad spectrum of physiological functions, including cell differentiation, metabolism and inflammatory responses. Thus, disruption or dysregulation of GR function will result in severe impairments in the maintenance of homeostasis and the control of adaptation to stress.

  19. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Antitumor Activity of 3-Aminopropanamide Irreversible Inhibitors of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Galvani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Overcoming the emergence of acquired resistance to clinically approved epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR inhibitors is a major challenge in the treatment of advanced non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a series of novel compounds affecting viability of NSCLC NCI-H1975 cells (carrying the EGFR T790M mutation. The inhibition of the autophosphorylation of EGFR occurred at nanomolar concentrations and both UPR1282 and UPR1268 caused a significant induction of apoptosis. Targeting of EGFR and downstream pathways was confirmed by a peptide substrate array, which highlighted the inhibition of other kinases involved in NSCLC cell aggressive behavior. Accordingly, the drugs inhibited migration (about 30% vs. control, which could be, in part, explained also by the increase of E-cadherin expression. Additionally, we observed a contraction of the volume of H1975 spheroids, associated with the reduction of the cancer stem–like cell hallmark CD133. The activity of UPR1282 was retained in H1975 xenograft models where it determined tumor shrinkage (P < .05 and resulted well tolerated compared to canertinib. Of note, the kinase activity profile of UPR1282 on xenograft tumor tissues showed overlapping results with respect to the activity in H1975 cells, unraveling the inhibition of kinases involved in pivotal proliferation and invasive signaling pathways. In conclusion, UPR1282 and UPR1268 are effective against various processes involved in malignancy transformation and progression and may be promising compounds for the future treatment of gefitinib-resistant NSCLCs.

  20. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of cadmium carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium is a heavy metal, which is widely used in industry, affecting human health through occupational and environmental exposure. In mammals, it exerts multiple toxic effects and has been classified as a human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Cadmium affects cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and other cellular activities. Cd2+ does not catalyze Fenton-type reactions because it does not accept or donate electrons under physiological conditions, and it is only weakly genotoxic. Hence, indirect mechanisms are implicated in the carcinogenicity of cadmium. In this review multiple mechanisms are discussed, such as modulation of gene expression and signal transduction, interference with enzymes of the cellular antioxidant system and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), inhibition of DNA repair and DNA methylation, role in apoptosis and disruption of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion. Cadmium affects both gene transcription and translation. The major mechanisms of gene induction by cadmium known so far are modulation of cellular signal transduction pathways by enhancement of protein phosphorylation and activation of transcription and translation factors. Cadmium interferes with antioxidant defense mechanisms and stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species, which may act as signaling molecules in the induction of gene expression and apoptosis. The inhibition of DNA repair processes by cadmium represents a mechanism by which cadmium enhances the genotoxicity of other agents and may contribute to the tumor initiation by this metal. The disruption of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion by cadmium probably further stimulates the development of tumors. It becomes clear that there exist multiple mechanisms which contribute to the carcinogenicity of cadmium, although the relative weights of these contributions are difficult to estimate

  1. Molecular mechanism of size control in development and human diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaolong Yang; Tian Xu

    2011-01-01

    How multicellular organisms control their size is a fundamental question that fascinated generations of biologists.In the past 10 years, tremendous progress has been made toward our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying size control. Original studies from Drosophila showed that in addition to extrinsic nutritional and hormonal cues, intrinsic mechanisms also play important roles in the control of organ size during development. Several novel signaling pathways such as insulin and Hippo-LATS signaling pathways have been identified that control organ size by regulating cell size and/or cell number through modulation of cell growth, cell division, and cell death. Later studies using mammalian cell and mouse models also demonstrated that the signaling pathways identified in flies are also conserved in mammals. Significantly, recent studies showed that dysregulation of size control plays important roles in the development of many human diseases sucha as cancer,diabetes,and hypertrophy.

  2. Molecular inhibitory mechanism of tricin on tyrosinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Yan; Li, Lin; Hu, Song-Qing

    2013-04-01

    Tricin was evaluated as a type of tyrosinase inhibitor with good efficacy compared to arbutin. Tricin functioned as a non-competitive inhibitor of tyrosinase, with an equilibrium constant of 2.30 mmol/L. The molecular mechanisms underlying the inhibition of tyrosinase by tricin were investigated by means of circular dichroism spectra, fluorescence quenching and molecular docking. These assays demonstrated that the interactions between tricin and tyrosinase did not change the secondary structure. The interaction of tricin with residues in the hydrophobic pocket of tyrosinase was revealed by fluorescence quenching; the complex was stabilized by hydrophobic associations and hydrogen bonding (with residues Asn80 and Arg267). Docking results implied that the possible inhibitory mechanisms may be attributed to the stereospecific blockade effects of tricin on substrates or products and flexible conformation alterations in the tyrosinase active center caused by weak interactions between tyrosinase and tricin. The application of this type of flavonoid as a tyrosinase inhibitor will lead to significant advances in the field of depigmentation.

  3. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Macrophage Response to Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Amit Rahat

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Monocytes and Macrophages (Mo/Mϕ exhibit great plasticity, as they can shift between different modes of activation and, driven by their immediate microenvironment, perform divergent functions. These include, among others, patrolling their surroundings and maintaining homeostasis (resident Mo/Mϕ, combating invading pathogens and tumor cells (classically activated or M1 Mo/Mϕ, orchestrating wound healing (alternatively activated or M2 Mo/Mϕ, and restoring homeostasis after an inflammatory response (resolution Mϕ. Hypoxia is an important factor in the Mϕ microenvironment, is prevalent in many physiological and pathological conditions, and is interdependent with the inflammatory response. Although Mo/Mϕ have been studied in hypoxia, the mechanisms by which hypoxia influences the different modes of their activation, and how it regulates the shift between them, remain unclear. Here we review the current knowledge about the molecular mechanisms that mediate this hypoxic regulation of Mϕ activation. Much is known about the hypoxic transcriptional regulatory network, which includes the master regulators HIF-1 and NF-κB, as well as other transcription factors (e.g. AP-1, Erg-1, but we also highlight the role of post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms. These mechanisms mediate hypoxic induction of Mϕ pro-angiogenic mediators, suppress M1 Mϕ by post-transcriptionally inhibiting pro-inflammatory mediators, and help shift the classically activated Mϕ into an activation state which approximate the alternatively activated or resolution Mϕ.

  4. Mechanisms Linking Obesity and Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Louie, Sharon M.; Roberts, Lindsay S.; Daniel K Nomura

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of obesity in US adults has been steadily increasing over the past few decades. Many comorbidities associated with obesity have been well-established such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. However, more recently an epidemiological relationship between obesity and the prevalence of a variety of cancers has also been uncovered. The shift of the paradigm surrounding white adipose tissue function from purely an energy storage tissue, to one that has both endocrine and ...

  5. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of muscle atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bonaldo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is a plastic organ that is maintained by multiple pathways regulating cell and protein turnover. During muscle atrophy, proteolytic systems are activated, and contractile proteins and organelles are removed, resulting in the shrinkage of muscle fibers. Excessive loss of muscle mass is associated with poor prognosis in several diseases, including myopathies and muscular dystrophies, as well as in systemic disorders such as cancer, diabetes, sepsis and heart failure. Muscle loss also occurs during aging. In this paper, we review the key mechanisms that regulate the turnover of contractile proteins and organelles in muscle tissue, and discuss how impairments in these mechanisms can contribute to muscle atrophy. We also discuss how protein synthesis and degradation are coordinately regulated by signaling pathways that are influenced by mechanical stress, physical activity, and the availability of nutrients and growth factors. Understanding how these pathways regulate muscle mass will provide new therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of muscle atrophy in metabolic and neuromuscular diseases.

  6. Multifunctional nanomaterials for advanced molecular imaging and cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Prasad

    Nanotechnology offers tremendous potential for use in biomedical applications, including cancer and stem cell imaging, disease diagnosis and drug delivery. The development of nanosystems has aided in understanding the molecular mechanisms of many diseases and permitted the controlled nanoscale manipulation of biological phenomena. In recent years, many studies have focused on the use of several kinds of nanomaterials for cancer and stem cell imaging and also for the delivery of anticancer therapeutics to tumor cells. However, the proper diagnosis and treatment of aggressive tumors such as brain and breast cancer requires highly sensitive diagnostic agents, in addition to the ability to deliver multiple therapeutics using a single platform to the target cells. Addressing these challenges, novel multifunctional nanomaterial-based platforms that incorporate multiple therapeutic and diagnostic agents, with superior molecular imaging and targeting capabilities, has been presented in this work. The initial part of this work presents the development of novel nanomaterials with superior optical properties for efficiently delivering soluble cues such as small interfering RNA (siRNA) into brain cancer cells with minimal toxicity. Specifically, this section details the development of non-toxic quantums dots for the imaging and delivery of siRNA into brain cancer and mesenchymal stem cells, with the hope of using these quantum dots as multiplexed imaging and delivery vehicles. The use of these quantum dots could overcome the toxicity issues associated with the use of conventional quantum dots, enabled the imaging of brain cancer and stem cells with high efficiency and allowed for the delivery of siRNA to knockdown the target oncogene in brain cancer cells. The latter part of this thesis details the development of nanomaterial-based drug delivery platforms for the co-delivery of multiple anticancer drugs to brain tumor cells. In particular, this part of the thesis focuses on

  7. Hormonal and molecular aspects of endometrioid endometrial cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, Vincentius Hubertus Willibrordus Maria

    2008-01-01

    This thesis concerns the expression and prognostic value of various hormones and molecular markers playing a role n endometrioid endometrial cancer. Especially we were interested in the enzyme aromatase, its expression and (prognostic) role in endometrioid endometrial cancer. Endometrial cancer is t

  8. Screened Electrostatic Interactions in Molecular Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Truhlar, Donald G

    2014-10-14

    In a typical application of molecular mechanics (MM), the electrostatic interactions are calculated from parametrized partial atomic charges treated as point charges interacting by radial Coulomb potentials. This does not usually yield accurate electrostatic interactions at van der Waals distances, but this is compensated by additional parametrized terms, for example Lennard-Jones potentials. In the present work, we present a scheme involving radial screened Coulomb potentials that reproduces the accurate electrostatics much more accurately. The screening accounts for charge penetration of one subsystem's charge cloud into that of another subsystem, and it is incorporated into the interaction potential in a way similar to what we proposed in a previous article (J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2010, 6, 3330) for combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations, but the screening parameters are reoptimized for MM. The optimization is carried out with electrostatic-potential-fitted partial atomic charges, but the optimized parameters should be useful with any realistic charge model. In the model we employ, the charge density of an atom is approximated as the sum of a point charge representing the nucleus and inner electrons and a smeared charge representing the outermost electrons; in particular, for all atoms except hydrogens, the smeared charge represents the two outermost electrons in the present model. We find that the charge penetration effect can cause very significant deviations from the popular point-charge model, and by comparison to electrostatic interactions calculated by symmetry-adapted perturbation theory, we find that the present results are considerably more accurate than point-charge electrostatic interactions. The mean unsigned error in electrostatics for a large and diverse data set (192 interaction energies) decreases from 9.2 to 3.3 kcal/mol, and the error in the electrostatics for 10 water dimers decreases from 1.7 to 0.5 kcal

  9. Molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis and DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most organisms including man have evolved ways to handle damage produce in DNA by environmental agents including chemical mutagens and carcinogens. The process of repair of some types of damage is highly regulated in a tissue and cell line-specific fashion and varies from organism to organism. Thus, the ultimate biological effects of the lesions depend not only on the extent of their formation but on the efficiency of their removal as well. The research objectives of this laboratory are to elucidate the mechanism and regulation of repair of damage in DNA produced by simple alkylating mutagens and carcinogens, as well as the mutagenic changes in DNA produced as a result of persistence of unrepaired lesions. Specifically, the current topics of the authors research are (1) to elucidate the enzymatic mechanism of the human repair enzyme, DNA-O6-methylguanine methyltransferase, and to determine the molecular mechanism of its regulation and (2) to study the nature of mutations induced by the presence of alkylated bases and ionizing radiation-damaged bases in DNA using shuttle plasmids that replicate both in human cells and E. coli. The following report on last year's experiments bear upon the first objective

  10. Molecular mechanisms of HIV-1 associated neurodegeneration

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hakan Ozdener

    2005-06-01

    Since identification of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1), numerous studies suggest a link between neurological impairments, in particular dementia, with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) with alarming occurrence worldwide. Approximately, 60% of HIV-infected people show some form of neurological impairment, and neuropathological changes are found in 90% of autopsied cases. Approximately 30% of untreated HIV-infected persons may develop dementia. The mechanisms behind these pathological changes are still not understood. Mounting data obtained by in vivo and in vitro experiments suggest that neuronal apoptosis is a major feature of HIV associated dementia (HAD), which can occur in the absence of direct infection of neurons. The major pathway of neuronal apoptosis occurs indirectly through release of neurotoxins by activated cells in the central nervous system (CNS) involving the induction of excitotoxicity and oxidative stress. In addition a direct mechanism induced by viral proteins in the pathogenesis of HAD may also play a role. This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms of HIV-associated dementia and possible therapeutic strategies.

  11. Molecular Mechanisms of Mouse Skin Tumor Promotion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rundhaug, Joyce E.; Fischer, Susan M., E-mail: smfischer@mdanderson.org [The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park-Research Division, P.O. Box 389, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States)

    2010-04-13

    Multiple molecular mechanisms are involved in the promotion of skin carcinogenesis. Induction of sustained proliferation and epidermal hyperplasia by direct activation of mitotic signaling pathways or indirectly in response to chronic wounding and/or inflammation, or due to a block in terminal differentiation or resistance to apoptosis is necessary to allow clonal expansion of initiated cells with DNA mutations to form skin tumors. The mitotic pathways include activation of epidermal growth factor receptor and Ras/Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling. Chronic inflammation results in inflammatory cell secretion of growth factors and cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukins, as well as production of reactive oxygen species, all of which can stimulate proliferation. Persistent activation of these pathways leads to tumor promotion.

  12. Molecular mechanism of TNF signaling and beyond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng-gang LIU

    2005-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a proinflammatory cytokine that plays a critical role in diverse cellular events,including cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. TNF is also involved in many types of diseases. In recent years, the molecular mechanisms of TNF functions have been intensively investigated. Studies from many laboratories have demonstrated that the TNF-mediated diverse biological responses are achieved through activating multiple signaling pathways. Especially the activation of transcription factors NF-κB and AP-1 plays a critical role in mediating these cellular responses. Several proteins, including FADD, the death domain kinase RIP and the TNF receptor associated factor TRAF2 have been identified as the key effectors of TNF signaling. Recently, we found that the effector molecules of TNF signaling, such as RIP and TRAF2, are also involved in other cellular responses. These finding suggests that RIP and TRAF2 serve a broader role than as just an effector of TNF signaling.

  13. Molecular mechanisms involved in intestinal iron absorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul Sharp; Surjit Kaila Srai

    2007-01-01

    Iron is an essential trace metal in the human diet due to its obligate role in a number of metabolic processes.In the diet, iron is present in a number of different forms, generally described as haem (from haemoglobin and myoglobin in animal tissue) and non-haem iron (including ferric oxides and salts, ferritin and lactoferrin).This review describes the molecular mechanisms that co-ordinate the absorption of iron from the diet and its release into the circulation. While many components of the iron transport pathway have been elucidated, a number of key issues still remain to be resolved. Future work in this area will provide a clearer picture regarding the transcellular flux of iron and its regulation by dietary and humoral factors.

  14. Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When considering and analyzing experimental material concerning cellular aspects of the problem of radiation carcinogenesis, the following conclusions can be made: neoplastic transformation of cells in a culture is caused already by small radiation doses, under the effect of which the level of DNA injury is quite insignificant; the frequency of cell transformation depends on the type of radiation, it is particularly pronounced under the effect of radiations with a high linear energy transfer; a correlation between the processes of postradiation recovery and radiogenic transformation of cells is detected, nonrepairable injures of DNA playing the most important role in radiation carcinogenesis; tumour promoters and anticarcinogenic agens produce a modifying effect on the transformation of irradiated cells. Molecular mechanisms of oncogene activation are thoroughly studied using the model of virus carcinogenesis, the problem of the nature of chemical and, in particular, radiation cell transformation remains scantily investigated

  15. Animal models and therapeutic molecular targets of cancer: utility and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cekanova M

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Maria Cekanova, Kusum Rathore Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA Abstract: Cancer is the term used to describe over 100 diseases that share several common hallmarks. Despite prevention, early detection, and novel therapies, cancer is still the second leading cause of death in the USA. Successful bench-to-bedside translation of basic scientific findings about cancer into therapeutic interventions for patients depends on the selection of appropriate animal experimental models. Cancer research uses animal and human cancer cell lines in vitro to study biochemical pathways in these cancer cells. In this review, we summarize the important animal models of cancer with focus on their advantages and limitations. Mouse cancer models are well known, and are frequently used for cancer research. Rodent models have revolutionized our ability to study gene and protein functions in vivo and to better understand their molecular pathways and mechanisms. Xenograft and chemically or genetically induced mouse cancers are the most commonly used rodent cancer models. Companion animals with spontaneous neoplasms are still an underexploited tool for making rapid advances in human and veterinary cancer therapies by testing new drugs and delivery systems that have shown promise in vitro and in vivo in mouse models. Companion animals have a relatively high incidence of cancers, with biological behavior, response to therapy, and response to cytotoxic agents similar to those in humans. Shorter overall lifespan and more rapid disease progression are factors contributing to the advantages of a companion animal model. In addition, the current focus is on discovering molecular targets for new therapeutic drugs to improve survival and quality of life in cancer patients. Keywords: mouse cancer model, companion animal cancer model, dogs, cats, molecular targets

  16. Pilocytic astrocytoma: pathology, molecular mechanisms and markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, V Peter; Jones, David T W; Giannini, Caterina

    2015-06-01

    Pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs) were recognized as a discrete clinical entity over 70 years ago. They are relatively benign (WHO grade I) and have, as a group, a 10-year survival of over 90%. Many require merely surgical removal and only very infrequently do they progress to more malignant gliomas. While most show classical morphology, they may present a spectrum of morphological patterns, and there are difficult cases that show similarities to other gliomas, some of which are malignant and require aggressive treatment. Until recently, almost nothing was known about the molecular mechanisms involved in their development. The use of high-throughput sequencing techniques interrogating the whole genome has shown that single abnormalities of the mitogen-activating protein kinase (MAPK) pathway are exclusively found in almost all cases, indicating that PA represents a one-pathway disease. The most common mechanism is a tandem duplication of a ≈2 Mb-fragment of #7q, giving rise to a fusion between two genes, resulting in a transforming fusion protein, consisting of the N-terminus of KIAA1549 and the kinase domain of BRAF. Additional infrequent fusion partners have been identified, along with other abnormalities of the MAP-K pathway, affecting tyrosine kinase growth factor receptors at the cell surface (e.g., FGFR1) as well as BRAF V600E, KRAS, and NF1 mutations among others. However, while the KIAA1549-BRAF fusion occurs in all areas, the incidence of the various other mutations identified differs in PAs that develop in different regions of the brain. Unfortunately, from a diagnostic standpoint, almost all mutations found have been reported in other brain tumor types, although some retain considerable utility. These molecular abnormalities will be reviewed, and the difficulties in their potential use in supporting a diagnosis of PA, when the histopathological findings are equivocal or in the choice of individualized therapy, will be discussed. PMID:25792358

  17. Mechanisms by which circadian rhythm disruption may lead to cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. C. Roden

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Humans have evolved in a rhythmic environment and display daily (circadian rhythms in physiology, metabolism and behaviour that are in synchrony with the solar day. Modern lifestyles have compromised the exposure to bright light during the day and dark nights, resulting in the desynchronisation of endogenously generated circadian rhythms from the external environment and loss of coordination between rhythms within the body. This has detrimental effects on physical and mental health, due to the misregulation and uncoupling of important cellular and physiological processes. Long-term shift workers who are exposed to bright light at night experience the greatest disruption of their circadian rhythms. Studies have shown an association between exposure to light at night, circadian rhythm disruption and an increased risk of cancer. Previous reviews have explored the relevance of light and melatonin in cancer, but here we explore the correlation of circadian rhythm disruption and cancer in terms of molecular mechanisms affecting circadian gene expression and melatonin secretion.

  18. How hyperglycemia promotes atherosclerosis: molecular mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayfield Elliot J

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Both type I and type II diabetes are powerful and independent risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD, stroke, and peripheral arterial disease. Atherosclerosis accounts for virtually 80% of all deaths among diabetic patients. Prolonged exposure to hyperglycemia is now recognized a major factor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in diabetes. Hyperglycemia induces a large number of alterations at the cellular level of vascular tissue that potentially accelerate the atherosclerotic process. Animal and human studies have elucidated three major mechanisms that encompass most of the pathological alterations observed in the diabetic vasculature: 1 Nonenzymatic glycosylation of proteins and lipids which can interfere with their normal function by disrupting molecular conformation, alter enzymatic activity, reduce degradative capacity, and interfere with receptor recognition. In addition, glycosylated proteins interact with a specific receptor present on all cells relevant to the atherosclerotic process, including monocyte-derived macrophages, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells. The interaction of glycosylated proteins with their receptor results in the induction of oxidative stress and proinflammatory responses 2 oxidative stress 3 protein kinase C (PKC activation with subsequent alteration in growth factor expression. Importantly, these mechanisms may be interrelated. For example, hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress promotes both the formation of advanced glycosylation end products and PKC activation.

  19. Molecular mechanism of phototropin light signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okajima, Koji

    2016-03-01

    Phototropin (phot) is a blue light (BL) receptor kinase involved in the BL responses of several species, ranging from green algae to higher plants. Phot converts BL signals from the environment into biochemical signals that trigger cellular responses. In phot, the LOV1 and LOV2 domains of the N-terminal region utilize BL for cyclic photoreactions and regulate C-terminal serine/threonine kinase (STK) activity. LOV2-STK peptides are the smallest functional unit of phot and are useful for understanding regulation mechanisms. The combined analysis of spectroscopy and STK activity assay in Arabidopsis phots suggests that the decay speed of the photo-intermediate S390 in LOV2 is one of the factors contributing to light sensitive kinase activity. LOV2 and STK are thought to be adjacent to each other in LOV2-STK with small angle scattering (SAXS). BL irradiation induces LOV2-STK elongation, resulting in LOV2 shifting away from STK. The N- and C-terminal lateral regions of LOV2, A'α-helix, Jα-helix, and A'α/Aβ gap are responsible for the propagation of the BL signal to STK via conformational changes. The comparison between LOV2-STK and full-length phot from Chlamydomonas suggests that LOV1 is directly adjacent to LOV2 in LOV2-STK; therefore, LOV1 may indirectly regulate STK. The molecular mechanism of phot is discussed. PMID:26815763

  20. Molecular Dimensions of Gastric Cancer: Translational and Clinical Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Young; Noh, Sung Hoon; Cheong, Jae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a global health burden and has the highest incidence in East Asia. This disease is complex in nature because it arises from multiple interactions of genetic, local environmental, and host factors, resulting in biological heterogeneity. This genetic intricacy converges on molecular characteristics reflecting the pathophysiology, tumor biology, and clinical outcome. Therefore, understanding the molecular characteristics at a genomic level is pivotal to improving the clinical care of patients with gastric cancer. A recent landmark study, The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project, showed the molecular landscape of gastric cancer through a comprehensive molecular evaluation of 295 primary gastric cancers. The proposed molecular classification divided gastric cancer into four subtypes: Epstein-Barr virus-positive, microsatellite unstable, genomic stable, and chromosomal instability. This information will be taken into account in future clinical trials and will be translated into clinical therapeutic decisions. To fully realize the clinical benefit, many challenges must be overcome. Rapid growth of high-throughput biology and functional validation of molecular targets will further deepen our knowledge of molecular dimensions of this cancer, allowing for personalized precision medicine. PMID:26498010

  1. Molecular Mechanisms of Insulin Resistance Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vsevolod Arsen'evich Tkachuk

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance (IR is a phenomenon associated with an impaired ability of insulin to stimulate glucose uptake by target cells and to reduce the blood glucose level. A response increase in insulin secretion by the pancreas and hyperinsulinemia are compensatory reactions of the body. The development of IR leads to the inability of target cells to respond to insulin that results in developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and metabolic syndrome. For this reason, the metabolic syndrome is defined in practice as a combination of IR with one or more pathologies such as T2DM, arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, abdominal obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and some others. However, a combination of high blood glucose and insulin levels always serves as its physiological criterion.IR should be considered as a systemic failure of the endocrine regulation in the body. Physiological causes of IR are diverse. The main ones are nutritional overload and accumulation of certain lipids and their metabolites in cells, low physical activity, chronic inflammation and stress of various nature, including oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress (impairment of damaged protein degradation in the cell. Recent studies have demonstrated that these physiological mechanisms likely act through a single intracellular scenario. This is the impairment of signal transduction from the insulin receptor to its targets via the negative feedback mechanism in intracellular insulin-dependent signaling cascades.This review describes the physiological and intracellular mechanisms of insulin action and focuses on their abnormalities upon IR development. Finally, feasible trends in early molecular diagnosis and therapy of IR are discussed.

  2. Molecular Mechanisms of Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Jane A.; Maron, Bradley A.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease that is precipitated by hypertrophic pulmonary vascular remodeling of distal arterioles to increase pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance in the absence of left heart, lung parenchymal, or thromboembolic disease. Despite available medical therapy, pulmonary artery remodeling and its attendant hemodynamic consequences result in right ventricular dysfunction, failure, and early death. To limit morbidity and mortality, attention has focused on identifying the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying aberrant pulmonary artery remodeling to identify pathways for intervention. While there is a well-recognized heritable genetic component to PAH, there is also evidence of other genetic perturbations, including pulmonary vascular cell DNA damage, activation of the DNA damage response, and variations in microRNA expression. These findings likely contribute, in part, to dysregulation of proliferation and apoptosis signaling pathways akin to what is observed in cancer; changes in cellular metabolism, metabolic flux, and mitochondrial function; and endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition as key signaling pathways that promote pulmonary vascular remodeling. This review will highlight recent advances in the field with an emphasis on the aforementioned molecular mechanisms as contributors to the pulmonary vascular disease pathophenotype. PMID:27213345

  3. Molecular Mechanisms of Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane A. Leopold

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a devastating disease that is precipitated by hypertrophic pulmonary vascular remodeling of distal arterioles to increase pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance in the absence of left heart, lung parenchymal, or thromboembolic disease. Despite available medical therapy, pulmonary artery remodeling and its attendant hemodynamic consequences result in right ventricular dysfunction, failure, and early death. To limit morbidity and mortality, attention has focused on identifying the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying aberrant pulmonary artery remodeling to identify pathways for intervention. While there is a well-recognized heritable genetic component to PAH, there is also evidence of other genetic perturbations, including pulmonary vascular cell DNA damage, activation of the DNA damage response, and variations in microRNA expression. These findings likely contribute, in part, to dysregulation of proliferation and apoptosis signaling pathways akin to what is observed in cancer; changes in cellular metabolism, metabolic flux, and mitochondrial function; and endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition as key signaling pathways that promote pulmonary vascular remodeling. This review will highlight recent advances in the field with an emphasis on the aforementioned molecular mechanisms as contributors to the pulmonary vascular disease pathophenotype.

  4. 益生菌抗结肠癌作用及分子机制研究进展%Research Progress of Probiotics in Colon Cancer Prevention and Its Molecular Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李冰; 单毓娟; 张兰威; 张英春; 陈镜羽

    2013-01-01

    Probiotics are usually live microorganisms which confer health benefits on host like improving intestinal flora balance. It can improve a number of physiological functions such as enhancing immunity, relieving hypersensitivity and inflammatory bowel disease, defencing infection, as well as anticancer, etc. This review summary the research progress of anti-colon-cancer effectiveness of probiotics, its fermentation broth, its bacteria composition and metabolic compositions firstly. Then the molecular mechanisms of its anti-colon carcinoma properties are introduced. Its molecular mechanisms mainly includes: immune-modulatory properties and anti-inflammatory, inhibiting proliferation and promoting apoptosis, producing beneficial metabolites, inhibiting carcinogens-activated enzyme and an-ti-genotoxic activity. Finally, the applications of probiotics in clinic are presented. The results show that probiotics not only play a protective role in the development of colon cancer, but also greatly improve the gut symptoms of patients with carcinoma after colostomy. At present, separation of active probiotic bacteria ingredients and its function research has become a research focus. These will provide the novel strategies and idea for exploring , exploiting and applying the products of probiotics in future.%益生菌是指一类通过改善肠内菌群平衡,对宿主起到有益作用的活性微生物,具有提高免疫力、抗过敏、缓解炎性肠道疾病、抗感染、抗癌等生物学功能.本文首先阐述益生菌、益生菌发酵液、其菌体成分、代谢成分抗结肠癌作用的研究进展;随后阐述其抗结肠癌的分子机制,主要包括;免疫调节和抗炎症作用,抑制细胞增殖和促进细胞凋亡,产生有益的代谢物和抑制致癌物活化酶与遗传解毒;最后介绍益生菌在临床医学研究中的应用情况,益生菌不仅可以在结肠癌发生过程中起到一定的保护作用,且能够很好的改善结肠

  5. Molecular Markers of Lung Cancer in MAYAK Workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven A. Belinsky, PhD

    2007-02-15

    The molecular mechanisms that result in the elevated risk for lung cancer associated with exposure to radiation have not been well characterized. Workers from the MAYAK nuclear enterprise are an ideal cohort in which to study the molecular epidemiology of cancer associated with radiation exposure and to identify the genes targeted for inactivation that in turn affect individual risk for radiation-induced lung cancer. Epidemiology studies of the MAYAK cohort indicate a significantly higher frequency for adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in workers than in a control population and a strong correlation between these tumor types and plutonium exposure. Two hypotheses will be evaluated through the proposed studies. First, radiation exposure targets specific genes for inactivation by promoter methylation. This hypothesis is supported by our recent studies with the MAYAK population that demonstrated the targeting of the p16 gene for inactivation by promoter methylation in adenocarcinomas from workers (1). Second, genes inactivated in tumors can serve as biomarkers for lung cancer risk in a cancer-free population of workers exposed to plutonium. Support for this hypothesis is based on exciting preliminary results of our nested, case-control study of persons from the Colorado cohort. In that study, a panel of methylation markers for predicting lung cancer risk is being evaluated in sputum samples from incident lung cancer cases and controls. The first hypothesis will be tested by determining the prevalence for promoter hypermethylation of a panel of genes shown to play a critical role in the development of either adenocarcinoma and/or SCC associated with tobacco. Our initial studies on adenocarcinoma in MAYAK workers will be extended to evaluate methylation of the PAX5 {alpha}, PAX5 {beta}, H-cadherin, GATA5, and bone morphogenesis 3B (BMP3B) genes in the original sample set described under Preliminary studies. In addition, studies will be initiated in SCC

  6. [Molecular biological predictors for kidney cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vtorushin, S V; Tarakanova, V O; Zavyalova, M V

    2016-01-01

    The paper considers the data available in the modern literature on studies of potential molecular predictors for renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Investigations of cell death markers, namely; Bcl-2 as an inhibitor of apoptosis, are of interest. Its high expression correlates with a more favorable prognosis. Inactivation of Berclin 1 that is an authophagy indicator in intact tissues gives rise to t high risk for tumorigenesis. At the same time, high Beclin 1 expression in the tissue of the tumor itself results in the lower efficiency of performed chemotherapy. Excess annexin A2 in the tumor promotes the growth and invasion of cancer cells. Patients with tumor over-expression of SAM68 protein involved in cell proliferation have a lower overall survival rate. The lifespan of patients without distinct metastases survive significantly longer in the overexpression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM). High PD-L1 protein expression on the cell membrane is considered to be a potential marker of effective immunotherapy for RCC. PMID:27077146

  7. Quantum Interactomics and Cancer Molecular Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Baianu, Dr. I.C.

    1987-01-01

    Single cell interactomics in simpler organisms, as well as somatic cell interactomics in multicellular organisms, involve biomolecular interactions in complex signalling pathways that were recently represented in modular terms by quantum automata with ‘reversible behavior’ representing normal cell cycling and division. Other implications of such quantum automata, modular modeling of signaling pathways and cell differentiation during development are in the fields of neural plasticity and brain...

  8. Molecular mechanisms in cancer induction and prevention.

    OpenAIRE

    Borek, C

    1993-01-01

    Chemical and physical carcinogens, present in our environment and encountered in a variety of occupations, produce damage to DNA. X-rays produced direct ionizations and indirect hydroxyl radical attack. UV light in the short wavelength is specifically absorbed by unsaturated bonds in DNA, RNA, and proteins. There are a number of genetic sites that are specifically affected by environmental agents, and an increased sensitivity is found in certain genetic diseases. The development of a fully ma...

  9. A targeted molecular probe for colorectal cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attramadal, T.; Bjerke, R.; Indrevoll, B.; Moestue, S.; Rogstad, A.; Bendiksen, R.; Healey, A.; Johannesen, E.

    2008-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major cause of cancer death. Morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs can be reduced if the disease can be detected at an early stage. Screening is a viable approach as there is a clear link to risk factors such as age. We have developed a fluorescent contrast agent for use during colonoscopy. The agent is administered intravenously and is targeted to an early stage molecular marker for colorectal cancer. The agent consists of a targeting section comprising a peptide, and a fluorescent reporter molecule. Clinical imaging of the agent is to be performed with a far red fluorescence imaging channel (635 nm excitation/660-700 nm emission) as an adjunct to white light colonoscopy. Preclinical proof of mechanism results are presented. The compound has a K d of ~3nM. Two human xenograft tumour models were used. Tumour cells were implanted and grown subcutaneously in nude mice. Imaging using a fluorescence reflectance imaging system and quantitative biodistribution studies were performed. Substances tested include the targeted agent, and a scrambled sequence of the peptide (no binding) used as a negative control. Competition studies were also performed by co-administration of 180 times excess unlabelled peptide. Positive imaging contrast was shown in the tumours, with a clear relationship to expression levels (confirmed with quantitative biodistribution data). There was a significant difference between the positive and negative control substances, and a significant reduction in contrast in the competition experiment.

  10. Molecular biology of breast cancer metastasis Molecular expression of vascular markers by aggressive breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During embryogenesis, the formation of primary vascular networks occurs via the processes of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. In uveal melanoma, vasculogenic mimicry describes the 'embryonic-like' ability of aggressive, but not nonaggressive, tumor cells to form networks surrounding spheroids of tumor cells in three-dimensional culture; these recapitulate the patterned networks seen in patients' aggressive tumors and correlates with poor prognosis. The molecular profile of these aggressive tumor cells suggests that they have a deregulated genotype, capable of expressing vascular phenotypes. Similarly, the embryonic-like phenotype expressed by the aggressive human breast cancer cells is associated with their ability to express a variety of vascular markers. These studies may offer new insights for consideration in breast cancer diagnosis and therapeutic intervention strategies

  11. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of adipogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Dmitrievich Egorov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The main components of metabolic syndrome include insulin resistance, hypertriglyceridemia and arterial hypertension. Obesity is the cause of metabolic syndrome, mainly as a consequence of the endocrine function of adipose tissue. The volume of adipose tissue depends on the size of individual adipocytes and on their number. The number of adipocytes increases as a result of enhanced adipocyte differentiation. The transcriptional cascade that regulates this differentiation has been well studied. The major adipogenic transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma is a ligand-activated nuclear receptor with essential roles in adipogenesis. Its ligands are used to treat metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The present article describes the basic molecular and cellular mechanisms of adipogenesis and discusses the impact of insulin, glucocorticoids, cyclic adenosine monophosphate-activating agents, nuclear receptors and transcription factors on the process of adipogenesis. New regulatory regions of the genome that are capable of binding multiple transcription factors are described, and the most promising drug targets for the treatment of metabolic syndrome and obesity, including the homeodomain proteins Pbx1 and Prep1, are discussed.

  12. Cellular and molecular mechanisms in liver fibrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novo, Erica; Cannito, Stefania; Paternostro, Claudia; Bocca, Claudia; Miglietta, Antonella; Parola, Maurizio

    2014-04-15

    Liver fibrogenesis is a dynamic and highly integrated molecular, tissue and cellular process, potentially reversible, that drives the progression of chronic liver diseases (CLD) towards liver cirrhosis and hepatic failure. Hepatic myofibroblasts (MFs), the pro-fibrogenic effector cells, originate mainly from activation of hepatic stellate cells and portal fibroblasts being characterized by a proliferative and survival attitude. MFs also contract in response to vasoactive agents, sustain angiogenesis and recruit and modulate activity of cells of innate or adaptive immunity. Chronic activation of wound healing and oxidative stress as well as derangement of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions are "major" pro-fibrogenic mechanisms, whatever the etiology. However, literature has outlined a complex network of pro-fibrogenic factors and mediators proposed to modulate CLD progression, with some of them being at present highly debated in the field, including the role of epithelial to mesenchymal transition and Hedgehog signaling pathways. Hypoxia and angiogenesis as well as inflammasomes are recently emerged as ubiquitous pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrogenic determinants whereas adipokines are mostly involved in CLD related to metabolic disturbances (metabolic syndrome and/or obesity and type 2 diabetes). Finally, autophagy as well as natural killer and natural killer-T cells have been recently proposed to significantly affect fibrogenic CLD progression. PMID:24631571

  13. Molecular and genetic mechanisms of environmental mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This program is primarily concerned with elucidation of the nature of DNA lesions produced by environmental and energy related mutagens, their mechanisms of action, and their repair. The main focus is on actions of chemical mutagens and electromagnetic radiations. Synergistic interactions between mutagens and the mutational processes that lead to synergism are being investigated. Mutagens are chosen for study on the basis of their potential for analysis of mutation (as genetic probes), for development of procedures for reducing mutational damage, for their potential importance to risk assessment, and for development of improved mutagen testing systems. Bacterial cells are used because of the rapidity and clarity of scientific results that can be obtained, the detailed genetic maps, and the many well-defined mutand strains available. The conventional tools of microbial and molecular genetics are used, along with intercomparison of genetically related strains. Advantage is taken of tcollective dose commitment will result in more attention being paid to potential releases of radionuclides at relatively short times after disposal

  14. Epigenetic: a molecular link between testicular cancer and environmental exposures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DavidHVOLLE

    2012-11-01

    Here we will review chromatin modifications which can affect testicular physiology leading to the development of testicular cancer; and highlight potential molecular pathways involved in these alterations in the context of environmental exposures.

  15. Epidermal growth factor receptor targeted molecularly therapies of cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been known to be a significant factor in the development and growth of many types of cancers. It is now accepted that the EGFR signal transduction net work plays an important role in multiple tumorigenic processes, contributing to cancer cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastasis, as well as protection from apoptosis. Recently, EGFR monoclonal antibodies (McAb) and epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase (EGFR-TK) inhibitors have been validated as new treatment approach for those EGFR-positive cancers and have shown activity aginst advanced, chemofractory cancers in clinical trials. This article focuses on three EGFR targeted molecularly therapies of cancers. (authors)

  16. Molecular concept in human oral cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Krishna, Akhilesh; Singh, Shraddha; Kumar, Vijay; Pal, U. S.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of oral cancer remains high in both Asian and Western countries. Several risk factors associated with development of oral cancer are now well-known, including tobacco chewing, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Cancerous risk factors may cause many genetic events through chromosomal alteration or mutations in genetic material and lead to progression and development of oral cancer through histological progress, carcinogenesis. Oral squamous carcinogenesis is a multistep process in...

  17. Applications of molecular MRI and optical imaging in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Penet, Marie-France; Mikhaylova, Maria; Li, Cong; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Glunde, Kristine; Pathak, Arvind P.; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the most exciting advances in molecular-functional imaging of cancer are occurring at the interface between chemistry and imaging. Several of these advances have occurred through the development of novel imaging probes that report on molecular pathways, the tumor micro-environment and the response of tumors to treatment; as well as through novel image-guided platforms such as nanoparticles and nanovesicles that deliver therapeutic agents against specific targets and pathways. Cancer c...

  18. Mechanics at the molecular scale: Insight into the physical mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neucheva, Olga A.; Temirov, Ruslan; Tautz, Stefan [Institut fuer Bio- und Nanosysteme (IBN-3) and JARA - Fundamental of Future Information Technology, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The manipulation of atoms and molecules is one of the problems under investigation in a surface science. The first successful attempt to transfer an atom from a surface with use of a scanning tunneling microscope has been realized by Eigler et al. An interest to understand the underlying physical mechanism from both experimental and theoretical points of view has led to investigations of many systems which can be used as atomic and molecular switches. In our work the behaviour of a single PTCDA molecule on Ag(111) has been investigated with a LT-STM. Two level fluctuations of the conductance of the junction have been observed within a narrow range of the tip heights and bias voltages. The bistability is related to reversible switching of one of the carboxylic oxygen atoms between the surface and the STM-tip. The current passing through the junction induces vibrations of the molecule leading to weakening and breaking of a chemical bond with the surface and establishing a new one with the tip and vice versa. The switching frequency strongly depends on the bias voltages and tip heights, following a non-linear dependence on the current.

  19. Molecular Mechanism and Potential Targets for Blocking HPV-Induced Lesion Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Guzmán-Olea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistent infection with high-risk HPV is the etiologic agent associated with the development of cervical cancer (CC development. However, environmental, social, epidemiological, genetic, and host factors may have a joint influence on the risk of disease progression. Cervical lesions caused by HPV infection can be removed naturally by the host immune response and only a small percentage may progress to cancer; thus, the immune response is essential for the control of precursor lesions and CC. We present a review of recent research on the molecular mechanisms that allow HPV-infected cells to evade immune surveillance and potential targets of molecular therapy to inhibit tumor immune escape.

  20. Molecular Mechanism and Potential Targets for Blocking HPV-Induced Lesion Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Olea, E; Bermúdez-Morales, V H; Peralta-Zaragoza, O; Torres-Poveda, K; Madrid-Marina, V

    2012-01-01

    Persistent infection with high-risk HPV is the etiologic agent associated with the development of cervical cancer (CC) development. However, environmental, social, epidemiological, genetic, and host factors may have a joint influence on the risk of disease progression. Cervical lesions caused by HPV infection can be removed naturally by the host immune response and only a small percentage may progress to cancer; thus, the immune response is essential for the control of precursor lesions and CC. We present a review of recent research on the molecular mechanisms that allow HPV-infected cells to evade immune surveillance and potential targets of molecular therapy to inhibit tumor immune escape. PMID:22220169

  1. Overview of mechanisms of cancer chemopreventive agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidemiological data provide evidence that it is possible to prevent cancer and other chronic diseases, some of which share common pathogenetic mechanisms, such as DNA damage, oxidative stress, and chronic inflammation. An obvious approach is avoidance of exposure to recognized risk factors. As complementary strategies, it is possible to render the organism more resistant to mutagens/carcinogens and/or to inhibit progression of the disease by administering chemopreventive agents. In a primary prevention setting, addressed to apparently healthy individuals, it is possible to inhibit mutation and cancer initiation by triggering protective mechanisms either in the extracellular environment or inside cells, e.g., by modifying transmembrane transport, modulating metabolism, blocking reactive species, inhibiting cell replication, maintaining DNA structure, modulating DNA metabolism and repair, and controlling gene expression. Tumor promotion can be counteracted by inhibiting genotoxic effects, favoring antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity, inhibiting proteases and cell proliferation, inducing cell differentiation, modulating apoptosis and signal transduction pathways, and protecting intercellular communications. In a secondary prevention setting, when a premalignant lesion has been detected, it is possible to inhibit tumor progression via the same mechanisms, and in addition by affecting the hormonal status and the immune system in various ways, and by inhibiting tumor angiogenesis. Although tertiary prevention, addressed to cancer patients after therapy, is outside the classical definition of chemoprevention, it exploits similar mechanisms. It is also possible to affect cell-adhesion molecules, to activate antimetastasis genes, and to inhibit proteases involved in basement membrane degradation

  2. Physiology and molecular mechanism of glucocorticoid action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Nagalski

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous glucocorticoids (GCs are secreted into the systemic circulation from the adrenal cortex. This release is under the control of the circadian clock and can be enhanced at any time in response to a stressor. The levels of circulating GC are regulated systemically by the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and locally by access to target cells and pre-receptor metabolism by 11β-hydroxysteroids dehydrogenase enzymes. GCs mediate their genomic action by binding to two different ligand-inducible transcription factors: high-affinity mineralocorticoid receptor (MR and 10-fold lower affinity glucocorticoid receptors (GRs. Responses to GCs vary among individuals, cells, and tissues. The diversity and specificity in the steroid hormone’s response in the cell is controlled at different levels, including receptor translocation, interaction with specific transcription factors and coregulators, and the regulation of receptor protein levels by microRNA. Moreover, multiple GR isoforms are generated from one single GR gene by alternative splicing and alternative translation initiation. These isoforms all have unique tissue distribution patterns and transcriptional regulatory profiles. Furthermore, each is subjected to various post-translational modifications that affect receptor function. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms of GC action is further complicated by the realization that GCs can induce rapid, non-genomic effects within the cytoplasm. A tight regulation of GC secretion and their cell-specific activity is essential for proper organism function. This is particularly seen under conditions of GC deficiency or excess, as in Addison’s disease and Cushing’s syndrome, respectively.

  3. Survivin-T34A: molecular mechanism and therapeutic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan R Aspe

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan R Aspe, Nathan R WallCenter for Health Disparities Research and Molecular Medicine, Division of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Department of Basic Sciences, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA, USAAbstract: The inhibitor of apoptosis protein survivin's threonine 34 to alanine (T34A mutation abolishes a phosphorylation site for p34(cdc2–cyclin B1, resulting in initiation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in cancer cells; however, it has little known direct effects on normal cells. The possibility that targeting survivin in this way may provide a novel approach for selective cancer gene therapy has yet to be fully evaluated. Although a flurry of work was undertaken in the late 1990s and early 2000s, only minor advances on this mutant have recently taken place. We recently described that cells generated to express a stable form of the mutant protein released this survivin-T34A to the conditioned medium. When this conditioned medium was collected and deposited on naive tumor cells, conditioned medium T34A was as effective as some chemotherapeutics in the induction of tumor cell apoptosis, and when combined with other forms of genotoxic stressors potentiated their killing effects. We hope with this review to revitalize the T34A field, as there is still much that needs to be investigated. In addition to determining the therapeutic dose and the duration of drug therapy required at the disease site, a better understanding of other key factors is also important. These include knowledge of target cell populations, cell-surface receptors, changes that occur in the target tissue at the molecular and cellular level with progression of the disease, and the mechanism and site of therapeutic action.Keywords: survivin, T34A, apoptosis, proliferation, therapy

  4. Molecular markers for detection, surveillance and prognostication of bladder cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrooman, O.P.; Witjes, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Many markers for the detection of bladder cancers have been tested and almost all urinary markers reported are better than cytology with regard to sensitivity, but they score lower in specificity. Currently molecular and genetic changes play an important role in the discovery of new molecular marker

  5. New generation of breast cancer clinical trials implementing molecular profiling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dimitrios Zardavas; Martine Piccart-Gebhart

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of molecular profiling technologies in oncology deepens our knowledge for the molecular landscapes of cancer diagnoses, identifying aberrations that could be linked with specific therapeutic vulnerabilities. In particular, there is an increasing list of molecularly targeted anticancer agents undergoing clinical development that aim to block specific molecular aberrations. This leads to a paradigm shift, with an increasing list of specific aberrations dictating the treatment of patients with cancer. This paradigm shift impacts the field of clinical trials, since the classical approach of having clinico-pathological disease characteristics dictating the patients' enrolment in oncology trials shifts towards the implementation of molecular profiling as pre-screening step. In order to facilitate the successful clinical development of these new anticancer drugs within specific molecular niches of cancer diagnoses, there have been developed new, innovative trial designs that could be classified as follows: i) longitudinal cohort studies that implement (or not) "nested" downstream trials, 2) studies that assess the clinical utility of molecular profiling, 3) "master" protocol trials, iv) "basket" trials, v) trials following an adaptive design. In the present article, we review these innovative study designs, providing representative examples from each category and we discuss the challenges that still need to be addressed in this era of new generation oncology trials implementing molecular profiling. Emphasis is put on the field of breast cancer clinical trials.

  6. Mechanisms of radiation-induced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this chapter, descriptive empirical models are used to arrive at cancer risk estimates from low levels of ionizing radiations. The mechanisms by which radiation may produce carcinogenic changes are postulated to include the induction of: mutations, including alterations in the structure of single genes or chromosomes; changes in gene expression, without mutations; and oncogenic viruses, which, in turn, may cause neoplasia. Included is a discussion of radiobiological factors affecting oncogenic transformations. 114 Ref

  7. 从肝郁角度探讨乳腺癌发病机理及中医药干预的分子机制%Investigation on Pathogenesis of Breast Cancer and TCM Drug Intervention Molecular Mechanism from View of Liver Depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕雨桐; 李杰

    2013-01-01

    情志不畅与乳腺癌的发生、发展、预后密切相关.文章对古代医家及现代学者就肝郁与乳腺癌的发生、发展及辨病施治等方面进行了系统梳理,对情志因素与乳腺癌的关系进行分析,并从调控免疫抑制细胞的角度探讨了中医药干预的分子机制.作者认为,在乳腺癌的发生发展及治疗中,肝郁是基本病机,疏肝健脾是基本法则,调控免疫抑制是中药分子机制.%Depressive disorder is associated with the incidence of breast cancer development and prognosis.This paper summarizes the view of the ancient physicians and modern scholars on the occurrence of liver depression and breast cancer development and disease differentiation therapy to analyze the relationship between emotional factors and breast cancer and explore the molecular mechanisms of TCM intervention from the immunosuppressive cells point of view.Liver depression is the basic pathogenesis and the regulation of immune suppression is the molecular mechanism of Chinese medicine in the incidence of breast cancer development with method of soothing liver and strengthening spleen.

  8. Targeted Gold Nanoparticles enable Molecular CT Imaging of Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Popovtzer, Rachela; Agrawal, Ashish; Kotov, Nicholas A.; Popovtzer, Aron; Balter, James; Carey, Thomas E.; Kopelman, Raoul

    2008-01-01

    X-ray based computed tomography (CT), is among the most convenient imaging/diagnostic tools in hospitals today in terms of availability, efficiency and cost. However, in contrast to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and various nuclear medicine imaging modalities, CT is not considered a molecular imaging modality since targeted and molecularly specific contrast agents have not yet been developed. Here we describe a targeted molecular imaging platform that enables, for the first time, cancer de...

  9. MATCH: An Atom- Typing Toolset for Molecular Mechanics Force Fields

    OpenAIRE

    Yesselman, Joseph D.; Price, Daniel J.; Knight, Jennifer L.; Brooks, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a toolset of program libraries collectively titled MATCH (Multipurpose Atom-Typer for CHARMM) for the automated assignment of atom types and force field parameters for molecular mechanics simulation of organic molecules. The toolset includes utilities for the conversion from multiple chemical structure file formats into a molecular graph. A general chemical pattern-matching engine using this graph has been implemented whereby assignment of molecular mechanics atom types, charges ...

  10. Molecular Concordance Between Primary Breast Cancer and Matched Metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøigård, Anne Bruun; Larsen, Martin Jakob; Thomassen, Mads;

    2016-01-01

    receptors, transcriptomics, and genome aberrations in primary tumors and metastases. In conclusion, biopsy of metastatic lesions at recurrence of breast cancer is encouraged to provide optimal treatment of the disease. Furthermore, molecular profiling of metastatic tissue provides invaluable mechanistic......Clinical management of breast cancer is increasingly personalized and based on molecular profiling. Often, primary tumors are used as proxies for systemic disease at the time of recurrence. However, recent studies have revealed substantial discordances between primary tumors and metastases, both....... The purpose of this review is to illuminate the extent of cancer genome evolution through disease progression and the degree of molecular concordance between primary breast cancers and matched metastases. We present an overview of the most prominent studies investigating the expression of endocrine...

  11. Novel approaches for the molecular classification of prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert H. Getzenberg

    2010-01-01

    @@ Among the urologic cancers, prostate cancer is by far the most common, and it appears to have the potential to affect almost all men throughout the world as they age. A number of studies have shown that many men with prostate cancer will not die from their disease, but rather with the disease but from other causes. These men have a form of prostate cancer that is de-scribed as "very low risk" and has often been called indolent. There are however a group of men that have a form of prostate cancer that is much more aggressive and life threatening. Unlike other cancer types, we have few tools to provide for the molecular classification of prostate cancer.

  12. Molecular imaging in the framework of personalized cancer medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkić, Dzevad; Belkić, Karen

    2013-11-01

    With our increased understanding of cancer cell biology, molecular imaging offers a strategic bridge to oncology. This complements anatomic imaging, particularly magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, which is sensitive but not specific. Among the potential harms of false positive findings is lowered adherence to recommended surveillance post-therapy and by persons at increased cancer risk. Positron emission tomography (PET) plus computerized tomography (CT) is the molecular imaging modality most widely used in oncology. In up to 40% of cases, PET-CT leads to changes in therapeutic management. Newer PET tracers can detect tumor hypoxia, bone metastases in androgen-sensitive prostate cancer, and human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2)-expressive tumors. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy provides insight into several metabolites at the same time. Combined with MRI, this yields magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), which does not entail ionizing radiation and is thus suitable for repeated monitoring. Using advanced signal processing, quantitative information can be gleaned about molecular markers of brain, breast, prostate and other cancers. Radiation oncology has benefited from molecular imaging via PET-CT and MRSI. Advanced mathematical approaches can improve dose planning in stereotactic radiosurgery, stereotactic body radiotherapy and high dose-rate brachytherapy. Molecular imaging will likely impact profoundly on clinical decision making in oncology. Molecular imaging via MR could facilitate early detection especially in persons at high risk for specific cancers. PMID:24511645

  13. Molecular profiling of breast cancer: portraits but not physiognomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancers differ in response to treatment and may have a divergent clinical course despite having a similar histopathological appearance. New technology using DNA microarrays provides a systematic method to identify key markers for prognosis and treatment response by profiling thousands of genes expressed in a single cancer. Microarray profiling of 38 invasive breast cancers now confirms striking molecular differences between ductal carcinoma specimens and suggests a new classification for oestrogen-receptor negative breast cancer. Future approaches will need to include methods for high-throughput clinical validation and the ability to analyze microscopic samples

  14. Molecular alterations in childhood thyroid cancer after Chernobyl accident and low-dose radiation risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The linear no-threshold (LNT) model of radiation carcinogenesis has been used for evaluating the risk from radiation exposure. While the epidemiological studies have supported the LNT model at doses above 100 mGy, more uncertainties are still existed in the LNT model at low doses below 100 mGy. Thus, it is urged to clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying radiation carcinogenesis. After the Chernobyl accident in 1986, significant amount of childhood thyroid cancer has emerged in the children living in the contaminated area. As the incidence of sporadic childhood thyroid cancer is very low, it is quite evident that those cancer cases have been induced by radiation exposure caused mainly by the intake of contaminated foods, such as milk. Because genetic alterations in childhood thyroid cancers have extensively been studied, it should provide a unique chance to understand the molecular mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis. In a current review, molecular signatures obtained from the molecular studies of childhood thyroid cancer after Chernobyl accident have been overviewed, and new roles of radiation exposure in thyroid carcinogenesis will be discussed. (author)

  15. Quantum mechanics of molecular rate processes

    CERN Document Server

    Levine, Raphael D

    1999-01-01

    This survey of applications of the theory of collisions and rate processes to molecular problems explores collisions of molecules with internal structure, generalized Ehrenfest theorem, theory of reactive collisions, and role of symmetry. It also reviews partitioning technique, equivalent potentials and quasibound states, theory of direct reactions, more. 1969 edition.

  16. Molecular genetics of breast cancer progression

    OpenAIRE

    Sigurður Ingvarsson 1956

    1999-01-01

    Somatic changes in the genome of breast cancer cells include amplifications, deletions and gene mutations. Several chromosome regions harboring known oncogenes are found amplified in breast tumors. Despite the high number of chromosome regions deleted in breast tumors the functional relationship to known genes at these locations and cancer growth is mainly undiscovered. Mutations in two tumor suppressor genes (TSG) have been described in a subset of breast carcinomas. These TSG are the TP53, ...

  17. TOPICAL REVIEW: Polarization effects in molecular mechanical force fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieplak, Piotr; Dupradeau, François-Yves; Duan, Yong; Wang, Junmei

    2009-08-01

    The focus here is on incorporating electronic polarization into classical molecular mechanical force fields used for macromolecular simulations. First, we briefly examine currently used molecular mechanical force fields and the current status of intermolecular forces as viewed by quantum mechanical approaches. Next, we demonstrate how some components of quantum mechanical energy are effectively incorporated into classical molecular mechanical force fields. Finally, we assess the modeling methods of one such energy component—polarization energy—and present an overview of polarizable force fields and their current applications. Incorporating polarization effects into current force fields paves the way to developing potentially more accurate, though more complex, parameterizations that can be used for more realistic molecular simulations.

  18. Hyperpolarizabilities of extended molecular mechanical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harczuk, Ignat; Vahtras, Olav; Ågren, Hans

    2016-03-16

    We propose and evaluate algorithms for the calculation of molecular polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities of extended chemical systems. These algorithms are generalizations of the Silberstein-Applequist procedure involving interacting induced classical dipoles through the localized polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities. The models are evaluated in terms of interacting molecular units as well as interacting atomic units that result from the atomic decomposition scheme known as the LoProp transformation. We introduce a generalized LoProp scheme which applies to hyperpolarizabilities as well as to polarizabilities. The accuracy of the second-order Applequist method is tested for the first hyperpolarizability for the TIP3P water model using both Hartree-Fock and density functional theory evaluated with different basis sets. Possible applications and ramifications of the scheme are discussed. PMID:26954519

  19. Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Rahimov, Fedik; Kunkel, Louis M

    2013-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a group of heterogeneous genetic diseases characterized by progressive degeneration and weakness of skeletal muscle. Since the discovery of the first muscular dystrophy gene encoding dystrophin, a large number of genes have been identified that are involved in various muscle-wasting and neuromuscular disorders. Human genetic studies complemented by animal model systems have substantially contributed to our understanding of the molecular pathomechanisms underlying ...

  20. Molecular epidemiology, prenatal exposure and prevention of cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Molecular Epidemiology was originally conceived as a preventive approach, providing a valuable tool for investigating risk factors for cancer in vulnerable populations. Biomarkers can be used as early indicators of risk for preventative purposes and risk assessment. The present contribution mainly refers to in utero exposures to carcinogens, since humans are especially vulnerable during fetal development. Environmental exposures in utero can increase risks for both childhood and adult cancers...

  1. Anaplastic thyroid cancer: molecular pathogenesis and emerging therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Smallridge, Robert C.; Marlow, Laura A.; Copland, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is a rare malignancy. While external beam radiation therapy has improved locoregional control, the median survival of ∼ 4 months has not changed in more than half a century due to uncontrolled systemic metastases. The objective of this study was to review the literature in order to identify potential new strategies for treating this highly lethal cancer. PubMed searches were the principal source of articles reviewed. The molecular pathogenesis of ATC includes m...

  2. Choline metabolism-based molecular diagnosis of cancer: an update

    OpenAIRE

    Glunde, Kristine; Penet, Marie-France; Jiang, Lu; Jacobs, Michael A.; Zaver M Bhujwalla

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal choline metabolism continues to be identified in multiple cancers. Molecular causes of abnormal choline metabolism are changes in choline kinase-α, ethanolamine kinase-α, phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C and -D and glycerophosphocholine phosphodiesterases, as well as several choline transporters. The net outcome of these enzymatic changes is an increase in phosphocholine and total choline (tCho) and, in some cancers, a relative decrease of glycerophosphocholine. The incre...

  3. Integrated molecular portrait of non-small cell lung cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Lazar, Vladimir; Suo, Chen; Orear, Cedric; van den Oord, Joost; Balogh, Zsofia; Guegan, Justine; Job, Bastien; Meurice, Guillaume; Ripoche, Hugues; Calza, Stefano; Hasmats, Johanna; Lundeberg, Joakim; Lacroix, Ludovic; Vielh, Philippe; Dufour, Fabienne

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), a leading cause of cancer deaths, represents a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, mostly comprising squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), adenocarcinoma (AC) and large-cell carcinoma (LCC). The objectives of this study were to utilize integrated genomic data including copy-number alteration, mRNA, microRNA expression and candidate-gene full sequencing data to characterize the molecular distinctions between AC and SCC. Methods Comparative genomic hybridiz...

  4. Epidemiological-molecular evidence of metabolic reprogramming on proliferation, autophagy and cell signaling in pancreas cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søreide, Kjetil; Sund, Malin

    2015-01-28

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the deadliest human cancers with little progress made in survival over the past decades, and 5-year survival usually below 5%. Despite this dismal scenario, progresses have been made in understanding of the underlying tumor biology through among other definition of precursor lesions, delineation of molecular pathways, and advances in genome-wide technology. Further, exploring the relationship between epidemiological risk factors involving metabolic features to that of an altered cancer metabolism may provide the foundation for new therapies. Here we explore how nutrients and caloric intake may influence the KRAS-driven ductal carcinogenesis through mediators of metabolic stress, including autophagy in presence of TP53, advanced glycation end products (AGE) and the receptors (RAGE) and ligands (HMGB1), as well as glutamine pathways, among others. Effective understanding the cancer metabolism mechanisms in pancreatic cancer may propose new ways of prevention and treatment. PMID:24704294

  5. CD24 as a Molecular Marker in Ovarian Cancer: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic cancer, with a mortality rate of > 60%. Cancer stem cell (CSC hypothesis offers an attractive explanation of chemoresistance, metastasis, etc., associated with the disease. However, there are still controversy and limitation in defining the CSC markers. CD24 is a mucin-type glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-linked glycoprotein, expressed on the surface of cells, which serves as a normal receptor for P-selectin and is found involved in molecular adhesion and metastatic tumor spread. Expression rate of CD24 has been associated with progression of various cancers and poor survival rates. In this review, the function of CD24 in ovarian cancer, especially in ovarian CSC system, was discussed in an effort to broaden the interpretation of potential mechanism.

  6. Effects and potential mechanisms of exercise training on cancer progression: a translational perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betof, Allison S; Dewhirst, Mark W; Jones, Lee W

    2013-03-01

    Over the past decade there has been increasing research and clinical interest in the role of exercise therapy/rehabilitation as an adjunct therapy to improve symptom control and management following a cancer diagnosis. More recently, the field of 'exercise - oncology' has broadened in scope to investigate whether the benefits extend beyond symptom control to modulate cancer-specific outcomes (i.e., cancer progression and metastasis). Here we review the extant epidemiological evidence examining the association between exercise behavior, functional capacity/exercise capacity, and cancer-specific recurrence and mortality as well as all-cause mortality individuals following a cancer diagnosis. We also evaluate evidence from clinical studies investigating the effects of structured exercise on blood-based biomarkers associated with cancer progression/metastasis as well findings from preclinical investigations examining the effects and molecular mechanisms of exercise in mouse models of cancer. Current gaps in knowledge are also discussed. PMID:22610066

  7. Molecular Concordance Between Primary Breast Cancer and Matched Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krøigård, Anne Bruun; Larsen, Martin Jakob; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A

    2016-07-01

    Clinical management of breast cancer is increasingly personalized and based on molecular profiling. Often, primary tumors are used as proxies for systemic disease at the time of recurrence. However, recent studies have revealed substantial discordances between primary tumors and metastases, both with respect to traditional clinical treatment targets and on the genomic and transcriptomic level. With the increasing use of molecularly targeted therapy, discordance of actionable molecular targets between primary tumors and recurrences can result in nonoptimal treatment or unnecessary side effects. The purpose of this review is to illuminate the extent of cancer genome evolution through disease progression and the degree of molecular concordance between primary breast cancers and matched metastases. We present an overview of the most prominent studies investigating the expression of endocrine receptors, transcriptomics, and genome aberrations in primary tumors and metastases. In conclusion, biopsy of metastatic lesions at recurrence of breast cancer is encouraged to provide optimal treatment of the disease. Furthermore, molecular profiling of metastatic tissue provides invaluable mechanistic insight into the biology underlying metastatic progression and has the potential to identify novel, potentially druggable, drivers of progression. PMID:27089067

  8. A review of molecular biomarkers for bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miakhil I

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Numerous molecular markers for bladder cancer have been identified and investigated with various laboratory techniques. Molecular markers are isolated from tissue, serum and urine. They fall into proteomic, genetic and epigenetic categories. Some of molecular markers show promising results in terms of facilitating early diagnosis and guiding treatment. Molecular markers or the so- called biomarkers can provide additional information alongside staging, grading and lymphovascular invasion, for better prognostication.Aim:This studyprovides an up-to-date review of the frequently studied and most important biomarkers that have shown consistent relevance in relation to bladder cancer. Methods: The key words were searched on the PubMed, Google scholar and NHS library search engines. Results: More than twenty biomarkers as per our methodology were identified but only half of them have shown consistence relevance in bladder cancer. Conclusion: It is envisaged that a combination of a few biomarkers, which are investigated frequently and have shown clinical relevance, could possibly provide useful information in predicting recurrence and provide useful prognostic information. So far none of the biomarkers for bladder cancer are adopted in the UK standard practice. Despite that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA had approved some of these biomarkers, none of the urology associations incorporated them in to their guidelines as yet. However, it won’t be long before a final consensus is reached to integrate molecular staging in to the current TNM staging system.

  9. Correlation of morphological and molecular parameters for colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shuai; Roney, Celeste A.; Li, Qian; Jiang, James; Cable, Alex; Summers, Ronald M.; Chen, Yu

    2010-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. There is great interest in studying the relationship among microstructures and molecular processes of colorectal cancer during its progression at early stages. In this study, we use our multi-modality optical system that could obtain co-registered optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fluorescence molecular imaging (FMI) images simultaneously to study CRC. The overexpressed carbohydrate α-L-fucose on the surfaces of polyps facilitates the bond of adenomatous polyps with UEA-1 and is used as biomarker. Tissue scattering coefficient derived from OCT axial scan is used as quantitative value of structural information. Both structural images from OCT and molecular images show spatial heterogeneity of tumors. Correlations between those values are analyzed and demonstrate that scattering coefficients are positively correlated with FMI signals in conjugated. In UEA-1 conjugated samples (8 polyps and 8 control regions), the correlation coefficient is ranged from 0.45 to 0.99. These findings indicate that the microstructure of polyps is changed gradually during cancer progression and the change is well correlated with certain molecular process. Our study demonstrated that multi-parametric imaging is able to simultaneously detect morphology and molecular information and it can enable spatially and temporally correlated studies of structure-function relationships during tumor progression.

  10. Molecular mechanics applied to single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Ferreira Ávila

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Single-walled carbon nanotubes, with stiffness of 1.0 TPa and strength of 60 GPa, are a natural choice for high strength materials. A problem, however, arises when experimental data are compiled. The large variability of experimental data leads to the development of numerical models denominated molecular mechanics, which is a "symbiotic" association of molecular dynamics and solid mechanics. This paper deals with molecular mechanics simulations of single-walled carbon nanotubes. To be able to evaluate the molecular mechanics model, the three major carbon nanotube configurations (armchair, zigzag and chiral were simulated. It was proven that the carbon nanotube configuration has influence on stiffness. By varying the radius, hence the curvature, the Young's modulus changed from 0.95 TPa to 5.5 TPa, and the Poisson's ratio ranged from 0.15 to 0.29. The numerical simulations were in good agreement with those presented in the literature.

  11. Symposium on molecular and cellular mechanisms of mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These proceedings contain abstracts only of the 21 papers presented at the Sympsoium. The papers dealt with molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis and cellular responses to chemical and physical mutagenic agents

  12. Molecular mechanisms of epithelial host defense in the airways

    OpenAIRE

    Vos, Joost Bastiaan

    2007-01-01

    Airway epithelial cells are indispensable for the host defense system in the lungs. Various strategies by which epithelial cells protect the lungs against inhaled pathogens have been described. In spite of that, the molecular mechanisms by which epithelial cells initiate and control the host defense response have not been explored systematically. In this thesis, the molecular mechanisms underlying the initiation and regulation of the early epithelial host defense response in the airways were ...

  13. Endometrial cancer : from a molecular genetic perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Smid-Koopman (Ellen)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe first observations indicative of a role of genetic factors in carcinogenesis were made as early as 1912, when Rous demonstrated that a filterable agent (i.e. virus) could induce cancer in chicken (Rous 1965). In 1914, Boveri postulated a "genetic" theory on carcinogenesis by hypothes

  14. Molecular markers as therapeutic targets in lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hsin-Hui Tseng; Biao He

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is responsible for 29% of cancer deaths in the United States and has very low 5-year survival rates of approximately 11% in men and 15% in women.Although the early diagnosis of lung cancer may increase the survival rate with adequate treatment,advanced lung cancers are often metastasized and receive limited benefit from therapeutic regimens.As conventional treatments for lung cancer reach their limitations,researchers have attempted to discover novel drug therapies aimed at specific targets contributing to the progression of tumorigenesis.Recent advances in systems biology have enabled the molecular biology of lung carcinogenesis to be elucidated.Our understanding of the physiologic processes of tumor development provide a means to design more effective and specific drugs with less toxicity,thereby accelerating the delivery of new drug therapies to the patient's bedside.

  15. Molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis by vinyl chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogliotti, Eugenia

    2006-01-01

    In 1974 vinyl chloride (VC), a gas used in the plastics industry, was shown to be a human carcinogen, inducing a very rare type of tumor, angiosarcoma of the liver. The same type of tumor was induced in rodents exposed to VC thus providing an excellent model for mechanistic studies. Here, we review the numerous studies on the mechanism of action of VC with particular emphasis on the DNA products induced by this strong alkylating agent. In particular, the genotoxicity, repair mechanisms, in vivo formation and tumor mutation spectra by etheno-adducts will be analysed and possible approaches for future research suggested. PMID:17033136

  16. Gene expression profiling revealed novel mechanism of action of Taxotere and Furtulon in prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both Taxotere and Capecitabine have shown anti-cancer activity against various cancers including prostate cancer. In combination, Taxotere plus Capecitabine has demonstrated higher anti-cancer activity in advanced breast cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms of action of Taxotere and Capecitabine have not been fully elucidated in prostate cancer. The total RNA from PC3 and LNCaP prostate cells untreated and treated with 2 nM Taxotere, 110 μM Furtulon (active metabolite of Capecitabine), or 1 nM Taxotere plus 50 μM Furtulon for 6, 36, and 72 hours, was subjected to Affymetrix Human Genome U133A Array analysis. Real-time PCR and Western Blot analysis were conducted to confirm microarray data. Taxotere and Furtulon down-regulated some genes critical for cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, transcription factor, cell signaling, and oncogenesis, and up-regulated some genes related to the induction of apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and differentiation in both cell lines. Taxotere and Furtulon also up-regulated some genes responsible for chemotherapeutic resistance, suggesting the induction of cancer cell resistance to these agents. Taxotere and Furtulon caused the alternation of a large number of genes, many of which may contribute to the molecular mechanisms by which Taxotere and Furtulon inhibit the growth of prostate cancer cells. This information could be utilized for further mechanistic research and for devising optimized therapeutic strategies against prostate cancer

  17. Review on the Applications and Molecular Mechanisms of Xihuang Pill in Tumor Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiujun Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Xihuang pill (XH is a complementary and alternative medicine that has been used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM for the treatment of tumors since the 18th century. XH has clinical effects on non-Hodgkin lymphoma, breast cancer, gastric cancer, liver cancer, and bone metastasis. XH can also inhibit the growth of tumor cells and cancer stem cells, prevent tumor invasion and angiogenesis, and regulate the tumor microenvironment. XH is composed of Ru Xiang (olibanum, Mo Yao (Commiphora myrrha, She Xiang (Moschus, and Niu Huang (Calculus bovis. Some of the compounds found in these ingredients exert multiple antitumor effects and may synergize with the other ingredients. We aimed to summarize the clinical applications and molecular mechanisms of XH and its chemical composition. This review will provide potential new strategies and alternative perspectives for tumor treatments and basic research into complementary and alternative medicine.

  18. Histone deacetylase inhibitors – molecular mechanisms of actions and clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Grabarska

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylases (HDACs play an important role in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression implicated in cancer pathogenesis. Inhibitors of HDACs (HDI are under investigation as novel anti-cancer drugs, which induce histone hyperacetylation. These agents modulate chromatin structure leading to transcriptional changes of a very large number of genes, which affect signaling pathways, inhibit cell cycle progression and angiogenesis, and induce apoptosis in cancer cells. Currently, several HDI are in clinical trials used in monotherapy or in combination with other cytostatics, showing promising anticancer effects. To date, more than 15 HDIs have been found as potential drugs. This paper reviews the molecular mechanisms of HDI action on cancer cells and summarizes clinical trials of the most promising HDIs in the treatment of patients with hematologic malignancies and solid tumors.

  19. Integrating tumor microenvironment with cancer molecular classifications

    OpenAIRE

    Becht, Etienne; De Reyniès, Aurélien; Fridman, Wolf H.

    2015-01-01

    Editorial summary The composition of the tumor microenvironment is associated with a patient's prognosis and can be therapeutically targeted. A link between the cellular composition and genomic features of the tumor and its response to immunotherapy is beginning to emerge. Analyzing the microenvironment of tumor molecular subgroups can be a useful approach to tailor immunotherapies.

  20. Molecular buckets: cyclodextrins for oral cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Calleja, P.; Huarte, J; Agüeros, M.; Ruiz-Gaton, L. (Luisa); Espuelas, S.; J.M. Irache

    2012-01-01

    The oral route is preferred by patients for drug administration due to its convenience, resulting in improved compliance. Unfortunately, for a number of drugs (e.g., anticancer drugs), this route of administration remains a challenge. Oral chemotherapy may be an attractive option and especially appropriate for chronic treatment of cancer. However, this route of administration is particularly complicated for the administration of anticancer drugs ascribed to Class IV of the Biopharmaceutical C...

  1. Molecular mechanisms of alternative estrogen receptor signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Björnström, Linda

    2003-01-01

    Estrogen is a key regulator of growth, differentiation and function in a broad range of target tissues, including the male and female reproductive tracts, mammary gland, bone, brain and the cardiovascular system. The biological effects of estrogen are mediated through estrogen receptor a (ERalpha) and estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta), which belong to a large superfamily of nuclear receptors that act as ligand-activated transcription factors. The classical mechanism of ER acti...

  2. Molecular Mechanisms of Sleep and Mood

    OpenAIRE

    Lagus, Markus

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Sleep disturbances and mood alterations are highly interrelated. The majority of patients suffering from depression report a reduced sleep quality. Inversely, people with sleep complaints are at elevated risk to develop depression. The complex regulation of these phenomena involves several brain areas and mechanisms. The susceptibility to change in this system is influenced by several factors, such as age and stressful lifestyle that are considered in this study. HYPOTHESIS The hyp...

  3. Molecular mechanisms of bone formation in spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Chávez, Susana Aideé; Quiñonez-Flores, Celia María; Pacheco-Tena, César

    2016-07-01

    Spondyloarthritis comprise a group of inflammatory rheumatic diseases characterized by its association to HLA-B27 and the presence of arthritis and enthesitis. The pathogenesis involves both an inflammatory process and new bone formation, which eventually lead to ankylosis of the spine. To date, the intrinsic mechanisms of the pathogenic process have not been fully elucidated, and our progress is remarkable in the identification of therapeutic targets to achieve the control of the inflammatory process, yet our ability to inhibit the excessive bone formation is still insufficient. The study of new bone formation in spondyloarthritis has been mostly conducted in animal models of the disease and only few experiments have been done using human biopsies. The deregulation and overexpression of molecules involved in the osteogenesis process have been observed in bone cells, mesenchymal cells, and fibroblasts. The signaling associated to the excessive bone formation is congruent with those involved in the physiological processes of bone remodeling. Bone morphogenetic proteins and Wnt pathways have been found deregulated in this disease; however, the cause for uncontrolled stimulation remains unknown. Mechanical stress appears to play an important role in the pathological osteogenesis process; nevertheless, the association of other important factors, such as the presence of HLA-B27 and environmental factors, remains uncertain. The present review summarizes the experimental findings that describe the signaling pathways involved in the new bone formation process in spondyloarthritis in animal models and in human biopsies. The role of mechanical stress as the trigger of these pathways is also reviewed. PMID:26838262

  4. Immunophenotyping invasive breast cancer: paving the road for molecular imaging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, J.F.; Brussel, A.S. van; Groep, P. van der; Morsink, F.H.; Bult, P.; Wall, E. van der; Diest, P.J. van

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Mammographic population screening in The Netherlands has increased the number of breast cancer patients with small and non-palpable breast tumors. Nevertheless, mammography is not ultimately sensitive and specific for distinct subtypes. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers m

  5. Molecular imaging of cancer using PET and SPECT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    molecular imaging of cancer. Especially the possibility of a quick transfer of methods developed in animals to patients (translational research) is an important strength. This article will briefly discuss the newest applications and their importance and perspective in relation to the shift in paradigm in...... medicine towards more individualized treatment....

  6. Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer: Present and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eAlcantara

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Medical imaging technologies have undergone explosive growth over the past few decades and now play a central role in clinical oncology. But the truly transformative power of imaging in the clinical management of cancer patients lies ahead. Today, imaging is at a crossroads, with molecularly targeted imaging agents expected to broadly expand the capabilities of conventional anatomical imaging methods. Molecular imaging will allow clinicians to not only see where a tumour is located in the body, but also to visualize the expression and activity of specific molecules (e.g. proteases and protein kinases and biological processes (e.g. apoptosis, angiogenesis, and metastasis that influence tumour behavior and/or response to therapy. Breast cancer, the most common cancer among women and a research area where our group is actively involved, is a very heterogeneous disease with diverse patterns of development and response to treatment. Hence, molecular imaging is expected to have a major impact on this type of cancer, leading to important improvements in diagnosis, individualized treatment, and drug development, as well as our understanding of how breast cancer arises.

  7. Molecular Mechanisms of Circadian Regulation During Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanello, Susana; Boyle, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Disruption of the regular environmental circadian cues in addition to stringent and demanding operational schedules are two main factors that undoubtedly impact sleep patterns and vigilant performance in the astronaut crews during spaceflight. Most research is focused on the behavioral aspects of the risk of circadian desynchronization, characterized by fatigue and health and performance decrement. A common countermeasure for circadian re-entrainment utilizes blue-green light to entrain the circadian clock and mitigate this risk. However, an effective countermeasure targeting the photoreceptor system requires that the basic circadian molecular machinery remains intact during spaceflight. The molecular clock consists of sets of proteins that perform different functions within the clock machinery: circadian oscillators (genes whose expression levels cycle during the day, keep the pass of cellular time and regulate downstream effector genes), the effector or output genes (those which impact the physiology of the tissue or organism), and the input genes (responsible for sensing the environmental cues that allow circadian entrainment). The main environmental cue is light. As opposed to the known photoreceptors (rods and cones), the non-visual light stimulus is received by a subset of the population of retinal ganglion cells called intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGC) that express melanopsin (opsin 4 -Opn4-) as the photoreceptor. We hypothesize that spaceflight may affect ipRGC and melanopsin expression, which may be a contributing cause of circadian disruption during spaceflight. To answer this question, eyes from albino Balb/cJ mice aboard STS-133 were collected for histological analysis and gene expression profiling of the retina at 1 and 7 days after landing. Both vivarium and AEM (animal enclosure module) mice were used as ground controls. Opn4 expression was analyzed by real time RT/qPCR and retinal sections were stained for Opn4

  8. TCGA divides gastric cancer into four molecular subtypes:implications for individualized therapeutics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths in the world. The treatment of gastric cancer is chalenging because of its highly heterogeneous etiology and clinical characteristics. Recent genomic and molecular characterization of gastric cancer, especialy the findings reported by the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), have shed light on the heterogeneity and potential targeted therapeutics for four different subtypes of gastric cancer.

  9. Plant regeneration: cellular origins and molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeuchi, Momoko; Ogawa, Yoichi; Iwase, Akira; Sugimoto, Keiko

    2016-05-01

    Compared with animals, plants generally possess a high degree of developmental plasticity and display various types of tissue or organ regeneration. This regenerative capacity can be enhanced by exogenously supplied plant hormones in vitro, wherein the balance between auxin and cytokinin determines the developmental fate of regenerating organs. Accumulating evidence suggests that some forms of plant regeneration involve reprogramming of differentiated somatic cells, whereas others are induced through the activation of relatively undifferentiated cells in somatic tissues. We summarize the current understanding of how plants control various types of regeneration and discuss how developmental and environmental constraints influence these regulatory mechanisms. PMID:27143753

  10. Strategies to Optimize Molecularly Targeted Anti-Cancer Agent Combinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Erdogan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic agents which are used in cancer chemotherapy reduced several times the number of neoplastic cells but not fully. Therefore, usage of and ldquo;targeted therapeutics" which were developed with much more rational approach is increasing markedly in patients with solid cancer. Targeted therapeutics due to selective targets aims cancer cells with specific molecular defect thereby, kils the cancer cells, which makes it possible to continue normal cells in a healthy environment. The rapid emergence of hundreds of new agents that modulates ever-growing list of the cancer-specific molecular targets promise great hope for cancer patients. Evaluation of the target agent individually, in combination with standard therapy and other target agents bring about important development challenges. As possible combinations of drugs number is unlimited, the identification of the most promising combinations and giving priority to assessing their strategies are very important.In this article important elements of the development strategy of the target agent combinations will be considered. Difficulties in this kind of combinations of rational pre-clinical and clinical evaluation and possible approaches to overcome these challenges will be discussed. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(4.000: 432-451

  11. Evolving molecularly targeted therapies for advanced-stage thyroid cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Keith C; Ryder, Mabel

    2016-07-01

    Increased understanding of disease-specific molecular targets of therapy has led to the regulatory approval of two drugs (vandetanib and cabozantinib) for the treatment of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), and two agents (sorafenib and lenvatinib) for the treatment of radioactive- iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in both the USA and in the EU. The effects of these and other therapies on overall survival and quality of life among patients with thyroid cancer, however, remain to be more-clearly defined. When applied early in the disease course, intensive multimodality therapy seems to improve the survival outcomes of patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), but salvage therapies for ATC are of uncertain benefit. Additional innovative, rationally designed therapeutic strategies are under active development both for patients with DTC and for patients with ATC, with multiple phase II and phase III randomized clinical trials currently ongoing. Continued effort is being made to identify further signalling pathways with potential therapeutic relevance in thyroid cancers, as well as to elaborate on the complex interactions between signalling pathways, with the intention of translating these discoveries into effective and personalized therapies. Herein, we summarize the progress made in molecular medicine for advanced-stage thyroid cancers of different histotypes, analyse how these developments have altered - and might further refine - patient care, and identify open questions for future research. PMID:26925962

  12. Pathological Bases for a Robust Application of Cancer Molecular Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador J. Diaz-Cano

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Any robust classification system depends on its purpose and must refer to accepted standards, its strength relying on predictive values and a careful consideration of known factors that can affect its reliability. In this context, a molecular classification of human cancer must refer to the current gold standard (histological classification and try to improve it with key prognosticators for metastatic potential, staging and grading. Although organ-specific examples have been published based on proteomics, transcriptomics and genomics evaluations, the most popular approach uses gene expression analysis as a direct correlate of cellular differentiation, which represents the key feature of the histological classification. RNA is a labile molecule that varies significantly according with the preservation protocol, its transcription reflect the adaptation of the tumor cells to the microenvironment, it can be passed through mechanisms of intercellular transference of genetic information (exosomes, and it is exposed to epigenetic modifications. More robust classifications should be based on stable molecules, at the genetic level represented by DNA to improve reliability, and its analysis must deal with the concept of intratumoral heterogeneity, which is at the origin of tumor progression and is the byproduct of the selection process during the clonal expansion and progression of neoplasms. The simultaneous analysis of multiple DNA targets and next generation sequencing offer the best practical approach for an analytical genomic classification of tumors.

  13. Application of Proteomics to Cancer Molecular Diagnostics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sam HANASH

    2009-01-01

    @@ Strategies to achieve personalized medicine and improve public health encompass assessment of an individual's risk for disease, early detection and molecular classification of disease resulting in an informed choice of the most appropriate treatment instituted at an early stage of disease develop- ment. A major contribution of proteomics in this field is the development of blood based tests to achieve the goals of personalized medicine.

  14. Strains, Mechanism, and Perspective: Salmonella-Based Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng-Zhi; Kazmierczak, Robert A.; Eisenstark, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Recently, investigation of bacterial-based tumor therapy has regained focus due to progress in molecular, cellular, and microbial biology. Many bacteria such as Salmonella, Listeria, Escherichia, and Clostridium have proved to have tumor targeting and in some cases even tumor-destroying phenotypes. Furthermore, bacterial clinical treatments for cancer have been improved by combination with other therapeutic methods such as chemotherapeutic drugs and radioactive agents. Synthetic biology techniques have also driven the development of new bacterial-based cancer therapies. However, basic questions about the mechanisms of bacterial-mediated tumor targeting and destruction are still being elucidated. In this review, we focus on three tumor-therapeutic Salmonella models, the most intensively studied bacterial genus in this field. One of these Salmonella models is our Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2 derived strain CRC2631, engineered to minimize toxicity but maximize tumor-targeting and destruction effects. The other two are VNP20009 and A1-R. We compare the means by which these therapeutic candidate strain models were selected for study, their tumor targeting and tumor destruction phenotypes in vitro and in vivo, and what is currently known about the mechanisms by which they target and destroy tumors.

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of Circadian Regulation During Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanello, S. B.; Boyle, R.

    2012-01-01

    The physiology of both vertebrates and invertebrates follows internal rhythms coordinated in phase with the 24-hour daily light cycle. This circadian clock is governed by a central pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the brain. However, peripheral circadian clocks or oscillators have been identified in most tissues. How the central and peripheral oscillators are synchronized is still being elucidated. Light is the main environmental cue that entrains the circadian clock. Under the absence of a light stimulus, the clock continues its oscillation in a free-running condition. In general, three functional compartments of the circadian clock are defined. The vertebrate retina contains endogenous clocks that control many aspects of retinal physiology, including retinal sensitivity to light, neurohormone synthesis (melatonin and dopamine), rod disk shedding, signalling pathways and gene expression. Neurons with putative local circadian rhythm generation are found among all the major neuron populations in the mammalian retina. In the mouse, clock genes and function are more localized to the inner retinal and ganglion cell layers. The photoreceptor, however, secrete melatonin which may still serve a an important circadian signal. The reception and transmission of the non-visual photic stimulus resides in a small subpopulation (1-3%) or retinal ganglion cells (RGC) that express the pigment melanopsin (Opn4) and are called intrisically photoreceptive RGC (ipRGC). Melanopsin peak absorption is at 420 nm and all the axons of the ipRGC reach the SCN. A common countermeasure for circadian re-entrainment utilizes blue-green light to entrain the circadian clock and mitigate the risk of fatigue and health and performance decrement due to circadian rhythm disruption. However, an effective countermeasure targeting the photoreceptor system requires that the basic circadian molecular machinery remains intact during spaceflight. We hypothesize that spaceflight may affect ip

  16. Photodynamic therapy: Biophysical mechanisms and molecular responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Soumya

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT), photochemical reactions induced by optical activation of sensitizer molecules cause destruction of the target tissue. In this thesis we present results of several related studies, which investigated the influence of photophysical properties and photobleaching mechanisms of sensitizers and oxygen-dependent tissue optical properties on PDT treatment efficacy. The bleaching mechanism of the sensitizer meso-tetra hydroxyphenyl chlorin (mTHPC) is examined indirectly using measurements of photochemical oxygen consumption during PDT irradiation of multicell tumor spheroids. Analysis of the results with a theoretical model of oxygen diffusion that incorporates the effects of sensitizer photobleaching shows that mTHPC is degraded via a singlet-oxygen (1O2)-mediated bleaching process. The analysis allows us to extract photophysical parameters of mTHPC which are used to account for its enhanced clinical photodynamic potency in comparison to that of Photofrin. Evaluation of the spatially-resolved fluorescence in confocal optical sections of intact spheroids during PDT irradiation allows for the direct experimental verification of mTHPC's 1O2-mediated bleaching mechanism. The technique is also used to investigate the complex bleaching kinetics of Photofrin. The results allow us to successfully reconcile apparently contradictory experimental observations and to confirm the predictions of a new theoretical model in which both 1O2 and excited triplet sensitizer molecules are allowed to contribute to photobleaching. Based on studies performed in tissue-simulating erythrocyte phantoms and in a murine tumor model in vivo, we present clinically relevant results which indicate that a shift toward increased hemoglobin-oxygen saturation due to improved tissue oxygenation reduces PDT treatment beam attenuation and may allow for more effective treatment of deeper lesions. Finally, we investigate the induction of the stress protein, heat shock protein 70 (HSP

  17. Understanding molecular mechanism of higher plant plasticity under abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Hong-Bo; Guo, Qing-Jie; Chu, Li-Ye; Zhao, Xi-Ning; Su, Zhong-Liang; Hu, Ya-Chen; Cheng, Jiang-Feng

    2007-01-15

    Higher plants play the most important role in keeping a stable environment on the earth, which regulate global circumstances in many ways in terms of different levels (molecular, individual, community, and so on), but the nature of the mechanism is gene expression and control temporally and spatially at the molecular level. In persistently changing environment, there are many adverse stress conditions such as cold, drought, salinity and UV-B (280-320 mm), which influence plant growth and crop production greatly. Plants differ from animals in many aspects, but the important may be that plants are more easily influenced by environment than animals. Plants have a series of fine mechanisms for responding to environmental changes, which has been established during their long-period evolution and artificial domestication. These mechanisms are involved in many aspects of anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, genetics, development, evolution and molecular biology, in which the adaptive machinery related to molecular biology is the most important. The elucidation of it will extremely and purposefully promote the sustainable utilization of plant resources and make the best use of its current potential under different scales. This molecular mechanism at least include environmental signal recognition (input), signal transduction (many cascade biochemical reactions are involved in this process), signal output, signal responses and phenotype realization, which is a multi-dimensional network system and contain many levels of gene expression and regulation. We will focus on the molecular adaptive machinery of higher plant plasticity under abiotic stresses. PMID:16914294

  18. Molecular pathogenesis of sporadic colorectal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Hidetsugu; Kuroda, Hajime; Imai, Yasuo; Hiraishi, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) results from the progressive accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations that lead to the transformation of normal colonic mucosa to adenocarcinoma. Approximately 75% of CRCs are sporadic and occur in people without genetic predisposition or family history of CRC. During the past two decades, sporadic CRCs were classified into three major groups according to frequently altered/mutated genes. These genes have been identified by linkage analyses of cancer-prone families and by individual mutation analyses of candidate genes selected on the basis of functional data. In the first half of this review, we describe the genetic pathways of sporadic CRCs and their clinicopathologic features. Recently, large-scale genome analyses have detected many infrequently mutated genes as well as a small number of frequently mutated genes. These infrequently mutated genes are likely described in a limited number of pathways. Gene-oriented models of CRC progression are being replaced by pathway-oriented models. In the second half of this review, we summarize the present knowledge of this research field and discuss its prospects. PMID:26738600

  19. Molecular imaging in neuroendocrine tumors : Molecular uptake mechanisms and clinical results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, Klaas P.; Neels, Oliver N.; Kema, Ido P.; Elsinga, Philip H.; Links, Thera P.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Jager, Pieter L.

    2009-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors can originate almost everywhere in the body and consist of a great variety of subtypes. This paper focuses on molecular imaging methods using nuclear medicine techniques in neuroendocrine tumors, coupling molecular uptake mechanisms of radiotracers with clinical results. A non-

  20. Research on the molecular scale material removal mechanism in chemical mechanical polishing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG YongGuang; ZHAO YongWu

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates a novel molecular scale material removal mechanism in chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) by incorporating the order-of-magnitude calculations,particle adhesion force,defect of wafer,thickness of newly formed oxidizedlayer,and large deformation of pad/particle not discussed by previous analysis.The theoretical analysis and experimental data show that the indentation depth,scratching depth and polishing surface roughness are on the order of molecular scale or less.There.fore,this novel mechanism has gained the support from wide order-of- magnitude calculations and experimental data.In addition,with the decrease in the particle size,the molecular scale removal mechanism is plausibly one of the most promising removal mechanisms to clarify the CMP polishing process.The results are useful to substantiating the molecular-scale mechanism of the CMP material removal in addition to its underlying theoretical foundation.

  1. Molecular mechanisms of LRRK2 regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Philip Jeffrey

    Non-synonymous mutations in LRRK2 are the most common known cause of familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). The dominant inheritance of these mutations in familial PD suggests a gain-of-function mechanism. Increased kinase activity observed in the most common PD associated LRRK2 mutation G2019S suggests that kinase activity is central to disease. However, not all mutations associated with disease are reported to alter kinase activity and controversy exists in the literature about the effects of mutations appearing in the GTPase domain on kinase activity. The studies conducted as a part of this work aim to characterize the mechanisms that regulate LRRK2 kinase activity and the effects of mutations on enzymatic activity of LRRK2 protein. LRRK2 is a large protein with multiple predicted functional domains including two enzymatic domains in the same protein, the small ras-like GTPase domain and a serine-threonine protein kinase domain. Previous studies indicate that LRRK2 kinase is dependent on a functional GTPase domain and binding to GTP is required for kinase activity. Recent work detailed in this dissertation indicates a complex and reciprocal relationship between kinase and GTPase domains. LRRK2 kinase activity is dependent on adapting a homo-dimer that is augmented by PD mutations that increase LRRK2 kinase activity. Activated LRRK2 autophosphorylates the GTPase and c-terminus of Ras (COR) domains robustly. Phosphorylation of these domains is required for normal activity, as preventing autophosphorylation of these sites drastically lowers kinase activity and GTP binding while phosphorylation maintains baseline activity while still reducing GTP binding. Furthermore, we have developed antibodies specific to autophosphorylation residues that track with LRRK2 kinase activity in vitro. While no measurable activity was detected from treated LRRK2 in vivo, LRRK2 protein purified from brain tissue treated with inflammatory stimuli such as LPS, which increases

  2. Molecular mechanisms of asymmetric RAF dimer activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambrina, Pablo G; Bohuszewicz, Olga; Buchete, Nicolae-Viorel; Kolch, Walter; Rosta, Edina

    2014-08-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications in cell regulatory mechanisms. Dimerization plays also a crucial role in the kinase activity of many kinases, including RAF, CDK2 (cyclin-dependent kinase 2) and EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), with heterodimers often being the most active forms. However, the structural and mechanistic details of how phosphorylation affects the activity of homo- and hetero-dimers are largely unknown. Experimentally, synthesizing protein samples with fully specified and homogeneous phosphorylation states remains a challenge for structural biology and biochemical studies. Typically, multiple changes in phosphorylation lead to activation of the same protein, which makes structural determination methods particularly difficult. It is also not well understood how the occurrence of phosphorylation and dimerization processes synergize to affect kinase activities. In the present article, we review available structural data and discuss how MD simulations can be used to model conformational transitions of RAF kinase dimers, in both their phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms. PMID:25109958

  3. Molecular mechanisms of alcohol associated pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dahn; L; Clemens; Mark; A; Wells; Katrina; J; Schneider; Shailender; Singh

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is commonly associated with the development of both acute and chronic pancreatitis. Despite this close association, the fact that only a small percentage of human beings who abuse alcohol develop pancreatitis indicates that alcohol abuse alone is not sufficient to initiate clinical pancreatitis. This contention is further supported by the fact that administration of ethanol to experimental animals does not cause pancreatitis. Because of these findings, it is widely believed that ethanol sensitizes the pancreas to injury and additional factors trigger the development of overt pancreatitis. How ethanol sensitizes the pancreas to pancreatitis is not entirely known. Numerous studies have demonstrated that ethanol and its metabolites have a number of deleterious effects on acinar cells. Important acinar cells properties that are affected by ethanol include: calcium signaling, secretion of zymogens, autophagy, cellular regeneration, the unfolded protein response, and mitochondrial membrane integrity. In addition to the actions of ethanol on acinar cells, it is apparent that ethanol also affects pancreatic stellatecells. Pancreatic stellate cells have a critical role in normal tissue repair and the pathologic fibrotic response. Given that ethanol and its metabolites affect so many pancreatic functions, and that all of these effects occur simultaneously, it is likely that none of these effects is "THE" effect. Instead, it is most likely that the cumulative effect of ethanol on the pancreas predisposes the organ to pancreatitis. The focus of this article is to highlight some of the important mechanisms by which ethanol alters pancreatic functions and may predispose the pancreas to disease.

  4. The promise of molecular epidemiology in defining the association between radiation and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular epidemiology involves the inclusion in epidemiologic studies of biologic measurements made at a genetic and molecular level and aims to improve the current knowledge of disease etiology and risk. One of the goals of molecular epidemiology studies of cancer is to determine the role of environmental and genetic factors in initiation and progression of malignancies and to use this knowledge to develop preventive strategies. This approach promises extraordinary opportunities for revolutionizing the practice of medicine and reducing risk. However, this will be accompanied by the need to address and resolve many challenges, such as ensuring the appropriate interpretation of molecular testing and resolving associated ethical, legal, and social issues. Traditional epidemiologic approaches determined that exposure to ionizing radiation poses significantly increased risk of leukemia and several other types of cancer. Such studies provided the basis for setting exposure standards to protect the public and the workforce from potentially adverse effects of ionizing radiation. These standards were set by using modeling approaches to extrapolate from the biological effects observed in high-dose radiation studies to predicted, but mostly immeasurable, effects at low radiation doses. It is anticipated that the addition of the molecular parameters to the population-based studies will help identify the genes and pathways characteristic of cancers due to radiation exposure of individuals, as well as identify susceptible or resistant subpopulations. In turn, the information about the molecular mechanisms should aid to improve risk assessment. While studies on radiogenic concerns are currently limited to only a few candidate genes, the exponential growth of scientific knowledge and technology promises expansion of knowledge about identity of participating genes and pathways in the future. This article is meant to provide an introductory overview of recent advances in

  5. [Development of molecular targeted therapies in lung cancers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Kenichi; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2014-05-01

    Human cancers usually possess cumulative genetic aberrations. However, recent studies have revealed that the proliferation and survival of specific subsets of lung cancer depend on a few somatic mutation(s), so-called driver mutations. Representative driver mutations include the EGFR mutation and ALK translocation identified in about 40% and 3% of lung adenocarcinomas in Japan, respectively. These tumors are extremely sensitive to the respective tyrosine kinase inhibitors. This sensitivity has encouraged researchers and clinicians to explore novel driver mutations in lung cancers as future molecular targets. Driver mutations reported so far include the HER2 mutation, BRAF mutation, ROS1 translocation, RET translocation, and NTRK translocation in lung adenocarcinomas, and FGFR1 amplification, DDR2 mutation, and FGFR3 translocation in lung squamous cell carcinomas. However, despite initial dramatic responses, the acquisition of resistance to molecular targeted drugs is almost inevitable. Overcoming resistance to molecular targeted drugs, the key drugs at this time, is an urgent issue to improve the outcomes of lung cancer patients. PMID:24946519

  6. Non-invasive Optical Molecular Imaging for Cancer Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhen

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. It remains the second most common cause of death in the US, accounting for nearly 1 out of every 4 deaths. Improved fundamental understanding of molecular processes and pathways resulting in cancer development has catalyzed a shift towards molecular analysis of cancer using imaging technologies. It is expected that the non-invasive or minimally invasive molecular imaging analysis of cancer can significantly aid in improving the early detection of cancer and will result in reduced mortality and morbidity associated with the disease. The central hypothesis of the proposed research is that non-invasive imaging of changes in metabolic activity of individual cells, and extracellular pH within a tissue will improve early stage detection of cancer. The specific goals of this research project were to: (a) develop novel optical imaging probes to image changes in choline metabolism and tissue pH as a function of progression of cancer using clinically isolated tissue biopsies; (b) correlate changes in tissue extracellular pH and metabolic activity of tissues as a function of disease state using clinically isolated tissue biopsies; (c) provide fundamental understanding of relationship between tumor hypoxia, acidification of the extracellular space and altered cellular metabolism with progression of cancer. Three novel molecular imaging probes were developed to detect changes in choline and glucose metabolism and extracellular pH in model systems and clinically isolated cells and biopsies. Glucose uptake and metabolism was measured using a fluorescence analog of glucose, 2-NBDG (2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-2-deoxy-D-glucose), while choline metabolism was measured using a click chemistry analog of choline, propargyl choline, which can be in-situ labeled with a fluorophore Alexa-488 azide via a click chemistry reaction. Extracellular pH in tissue were measured by Alexa-647 labeled pHLIP (pH low insertion peptide

  7. Mechanical feedback in the molecular ISM of luminous IR galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Loenen, A. F.; Spaans, M.; Baan, W. A.; Meijerink, R

    2008-01-01

    Aims: Molecular emission lines originating in the nuclei of luminous infra-red galaxies are used to determine the physical properties of the nuclear ISM in these systems. Methods: A large observational database of molecular emission lines is compared with model predictions that include heating by UV and X-ray radiation, mechanical heating, and the effects of cosmic rays. Results: The observed line ratios and model predictions imply a separation of the observedsystems into three groups: XDRs, ...

  8. Lactobacilli as multifaceted probiotics with poorly disclosed molecular mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Turpin, Williams; Humblot, Christèle; M. Thomas; Guyot, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria and more particularly lactobacilli have been used for the production of fermented foods for centuries. Several lactobacilli have been recognized as probiotics due to their wide range of health-promoting effects in humans. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underpinning their probiotic functions. Here we reviewed the main beneficial effects of lactobacilli and discussed, when the information is available, the molecular machinery involved in their probi...

  9. Molecular Theory of the Living Cell Concepts, Molecular Mechanisms, and Biomedical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Sungchul

    2012-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive molecular theory of the living cell based on over thirty concepts, principles and laws imported from thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, quantum mechanics, chemical kinetics, informatics, computer science, linguistics, semiotics, and philosophy. The author formulates physically, chemically and enzymologically realistic molecular mechanisms to account for the basic living processes such as ligand-receptor interactions, protein folding, single-molecule enzymic catalysis, force-generating mechanisms in molecular motors, signal transduction, regulation of the genome-wide RNA metabolism, morphogenesis, the micro-macro coupling in coordination dynamics, the origin of life, and the mechanisms of biological evolution itself. Possible solutions to basic and practical problems facing contemporary biology and biomedical sciences have been suggested, including pharmacotheragnostics and personalized medicine.

  10. Procathepsin D and cancer: From molecular biology to clinical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Vetvicka, Vaclav; Vashishta, Aruna; Saraswat-Ohri, Sujata; Vetvickova, Jana

    2010-01-01

    Procathepsin D (pCD) is overexpressed and secreted by cells of various tumor types including breast and lung carcinomas. pCD affects multiple features of tumor cells including proliferation, invasion, metastases and apoptosis. Several laboratories have previously shown that the mitogenic effect of pCD on cancer cells is mediated via its propeptide part (APpCD). However, the exact mechanism of how pCD affects cancer cells has not been identified. Recent observations have also revealed the poss...

  11. Molecular Aspects of Breast Cancer Metastasis to the Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Leonard Da Silva; Simpson, Peter T.; Sunil R. Lakhani; Saunus, Jodi M; Majid Momeny

    2011-01-01

    Our knowledge of the biology underlying the development of brain metastases (BM) from breast cancer has improved over the last decade due to large clinical epidemiological studies, animal models of metastasis, and the use of high-resolution gene expression profiling technologies. However, there are still major gaps in our understanding of the mechanisms utilized by breast cancer cells to colonize the brain microenvironment, thus our arsenal of therapies remains relatively nonspecific, and the...

  12. Near Infrared Imaging of Molecular Beacons in Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, Britton

    2001-03-01

    The recent demonstrations of the efficacy of the tumor to background contrast in breast cancer using the tricarbo-cyanine near infrared (NIR) agent with time domain 2-D imaging presages the greater efficacy of site-directed optical contrast agents for early detection of cancers which show contrast (tissue to background) of over 20 fold. Further increases of contrast are obtained with structures that quench the fluorescence until the agent is delivered, recognized, and opened by specific enzymatic activity of the tumor. These are termed ``Molecular Beacons". In order to image the localization of the Beacons, we employ light pen ( 20μ) in LN2 gives the desired 3D high resolution image of the location of the Beacon within in the cancer cell. Since cancer prevention is linked to early detection, the high signal to background obtainable with Molecular Beacons enables the detection of very early subsurface cancers, especially breast and prostate (NIH, UIP). Thus the fluorescent Beacon excites and emits in the NIR window and signals from several cm deep in breast are detected by diffusive wave optical tomography (DWOT). Detection of objects ( 800 nm) affording 0.2 mm object detection of even low Beacon concentrations. One, two, and 3-D localization is made possible by one, two, and three orthogonal phase array null planes.

  13. Molecular markers and targets for colorectal cancer prevention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naveena B JANAKIRAM; Chinthalapally V RAO

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most prevalent cancer in the world. If detected at an early stage, treatment often might lead to cure. As prevention is better than cure, epidemiological studies reveal that having a healthy diet often protects from pro-moting/developing cancer. An important consideration in evaluating new drugs and devices is determining whether a product can effectively treat a targeted disease. There are quite a number of biomarkers making their way into clinical trials and few are awaiting the preclinical efficacy and safety results to enter into clinical trials. Researchers are facing challenges in modifying trial design and defining the right control population, validating biomarker assays from the bio-logical and analytical perspective and using biomarker data as a guideline for decision making. In spite of following all guidelines, the results are disappointing from many of the large clinical trials. To avoid these disappointments, selection of biomarkers and its target drug needs to be evaluated in appropriate animal models for its toxicities and efficacies. The focus of this review is on the few of the potential molecular targets and their biomarkers in colorectal cancers. Strengths and limitations of biomarkers/surrogate endpoints are also discussed. Various pathways involved in tumor cells and the specific agents to target the altered molecular biomarkerin biomolecular pathwayare elucidated. Importance of emerging new platforms siRNAs and miRNAs technology for colorectal cancer therapeutics is reviewed.

  14. Molecular subtyping of breast cancer: opportunities for new therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullan, P B; Millikan, R C

    2007-12-01

    Evidence is accumulating that breast cancer is not one disease but many separate diseases. DNA microarray-based gene expression profiling has demonstrated subtypes with distinct phenotypic features and clinical responses. Prominent among the new subtypes is 'basal-like' breast cancer, one of the 'intrinsic' subtypes defined by negativity for the estrogen, progesterone, and HER2/neu receptors and positivity for cytokeratins-5/6. Focusing on basal-like breast cancer, we discuss how molecular technologies provide new chemotherapy targets, optimising treatment whilst sparing patients from unnecessary toxicity. Clinical trials are needed that incorporate long-term follow-up of patients with well-characterised tumour markers. Whilst the absence of an obvious dominant oncogene driving basal-like breast cancer and the lack of specific therapeutic agents are serious stumbling blocks, this review will highlight several promising therapeutic candidates currently under evaluation. Thus, new molecular technologies should provide a fundamental foundation for better understanding breast and other cancers which may be exploited to save lives. (Part of a Multi-author Review). PMID:17957336

  15. Mini-review: Molecular mechanisms of antifouling compounds

    KAUST Repository

    Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2013-04-01

    Various antifouling (AF) coatings have been developed to protect submerged surfaces by deterring the settlement of the colonizing stages of fouling organisms. A review of the literature shows that effective AF compounds with specific targets are ones often considered non-toxic. Such compounds act variously on ion channels, quorum sensing systems, neurotransmitters, production/release of adhesive, and specific enzymes that regulate energy production or primary metabolism. In contrast, AF compounds with general targets may or may not act through toxic mechanisms. These compounds affect a variety of biological activities including algal photosynthesis, energy production, stress responses, genotoxic damage, immunosuppressed protein expression, oxidation, neurotransmission, surface chemistry, the formation of biofilms, and adhesive production/release. Among all the targets, adhesive production/release is the most common, possibly due to a more extensive research effort in this area. Overall, the specific molecular targets and the molecular mechanisms of most AF compounds have not been identified. Thus, the information available is insufficient to draw firm conclusions about the types of molecular targets to be used as sensitive biomarkers for future design and screening of compounds with AF potential. In this review, the relevant advantages and disadvantages of the molecular tools available for studying the molecular targets of AF compounds are highlighted briefly and the molecular mechanisms of the AF compounds, which are largely a source of speculation in the literature, are discussed. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  16. Mechanisms of cancer-induced bone pain

    OpenAIRE

    Lozano-Ondoua, AN; Symons-Liguori, AM; Vanderah, TW

    2013-01-01

    Cancerous cells can originate in a number of different tissues such as prostate, breast and lung, yet often go undetected and are non-painful. Many types of cancers will metastasize toward the bone microenvironment first. Tumor burden within the bone causes excruciating breakthrough pain with properties of continual pain inadequately managed with current analgesics. Part of this failure is due to the poor understanding of the etiology of cancer pain. Animal models of cancer-induced bone pain ...

  17. Reaction Mechanism of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Glutamine Synthetase Using Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Cátia; Ramos, Maria J; Fernandes, Pedro Alexandrino

    2016-06-27

    This paper is devoted to the understanding of the reaction mechanism of mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine synthetase (mtGS) with atomic detail, using computational quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods at the ONIOM M06-D3/6-311++G(2d,2p):ff99SB//B3LYP/6-31G(d):ff99SB level of theory. The complete reaction undergoes a three-step mechanism: the spontaneous transfer of phosphate from ATP to glutamate upon ammonium binding (ammonium quickly loses a proton to Asp54), the attack of ammonia on phosphorylated glutamate (yielding protonated glutamine), and the deprotonation of glutamine by the leaving phosphate. This exothermic reaction has an activation free energy of 21.5 kcal mol(-1) , which is consistent with that described for Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase (15-17 kcal mol(-1) ). The participating active site residues have been identified and their role and energy contributions clarified. This study provides an insightful atomic description of the biosynthetic reaction that takes place in this enzyme, opening doors for more accurate studies for developing new anti-tuberculosis therapies. PMID:27225077

  18. Molecular targets of aspirin and cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, L; Ai, G; Spitale, R C; Bhat, G J

    2014-07-01

    Salicylates from plant sources have been used for centuries by different cultures to treat a variety of ailments such as inflammation, fever and pain. A chemical derivative of salicylic acid, aspirin, was synthesised and mass produced by the end of the 19th century and is one of the most widely used drugs in the world. Its cardioprotective properties are well established; however, recent evidence shows that it can also act as a chemopreventive agent. Its antithrombotic and anti-inflammatory actions occur through the inhibition of cyclooxygenases. The precise mechanisms leading to its anticancer effects are not clearly established, although multiple mechanisms affecting enzyme activity, transcription factors, cellular signalling and mitochondrial functions have been proposed. This review presents a brief account of the major COX-dependent and independent pathways described in connection with aspirin's anticancer effects. Aspirin's unique ability to acetylate biomolecules besides COX has not been thoroughly investigated nor have all the targets of its primary metabolite, salicylic acid been identified. Recent reports on the ability of aspirin to acetylate multiple cellular proteins warrant a comprehensive study to investigate the role of this posttranslational modification in its anticancer effects. In this review, we also raise the intriguing possibility that aspirin may interact and acetylate cellular molecules such as RNA, and metabolites such as CoA, leading to a change in their function. Research in this area will provide a greater understanding of the mechanisms of action of this drug. PMID:24874482

  19. Application of DNA chip and nuclear technology to study on molecular mechanism of radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One major challenge facing todays cancer researchers is the development of new approaches for the identification of carcinogens and other environmental hazards. Here, the authors describe the potential impact of emerging technologies for measuring gene expression profiles on carcinogen identification and on the general field of radiation carcinogenesis. An example of one of these technologies is the use of DNA chips. The authors provide an overview the mechanism and applications of DNA chip, and the application to study on molecular mechanism of radiation carcinogenesis

  20. MicroRNAs as molecular markers in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Silva

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in the western world for both men and women. Lung cancer appears to be a perfect candidate for a screening program, since it is the number one cancer killer, it has a long preclinical phase, curative treatment for the minority of patients who are diagnosed early and a target population at risk (smokers and it is also a major economic burden. The earliest approaches to identifying cancer markers were based on preliminary clinical or pathological observations, although molecular biology is a strong candidate for occupying a place among the set of methods. In search of markers, several alterations, such as mutations, loss of heterozygosity, microsatellite instability, DNA methylation, mitochondrial DNA mutations, viral DNA, modified expression of mRNA, miRNA and proteins, and structurally altered proteins have all been analysed. MicroRNAs (miRNA are small RNA molecules, about 19-25 nucleotides long and encoded in genomes of plants, animals, fungi and viruses. It has been reported that miRNAs may have multiple functions in lung development and that aberrant expression of miRNAs could induce lung tumorigenesis. We review here the role of miRNAs in lung tumorigenesis and also as a novel type of biomarker.-----------------------------------Cite this article as:Silva J, Garcia V, Lopez-Gonzalez A, Provencio M. MicroRNAs as molecular markers in lung cancer. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2013;1(1:010111. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14319/ijcto.0101.11

  1. Immunophenotyping invasive breast cancer: paving the road for molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mammographic population screening in The Netherlands has increased the number of breast cancer patients with small and non-palpable breast tumors. Nevertheless, mammography is not ultimately sensitive and specific for distinct subtypes. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers might increase specificity and sensitivity of detection. Because development of new tracers is labor-intensive and costly, we searched for the smallest panel of tumor membrane markers that would allow detection of the wide spectrum of invasive breast cancers. Tissue microarrays containing 483 invasive breast cancers were stained by immunohistochemistry for a selected set of membrane proteins known to be expressed in breast cancer. The combination of highly tumor-specific markers glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1-R), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), hepatocyte growth factor receptor (MET), and carbonic anhydrase 9 (CAIX) 'detected' 45.5% of tumors, especially basal/triple negative and HER2-driven ductal cancers. Addition of markers with a 2-fold tumor-to-normal ratio increased the detection rate to 98%. Including only markers with >3 fold tumor-to-normal ratio (CD44v6) resulted in an 80% detection rate. The detection rate of the panel containing both tumor-specific and less tumor-specific markers was not dependent on age, tumor grade, tumor size, or lymph node status. In search of the minimal panel of targeted probes needed for the highest possible detection rate, we showed that 80% of all breast cancers express at least one of a panel of membrane markers (CD44v6, GLUT1, EGFR, HER2, and IGF1-R) that may therefore be suitable for molecular imaging strategies. This study thereby serves as a starting point for further development of a set of antibody-based optical tracers with a high breast cancer detection rate

  2. Immunophenotyping invasive breast cancer: paving the road for molecular imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vermeulen Jeroen F

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammographic population screening in The Netherlands has increased the number of breast cancer patients with small and non-palpable breast tumors. Nevertheless, mammography is not ultimately sensitive and specific for distinct subtypes. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers might increase specificity and sensitivity of detection. Because development of new tracers is labor-intensive and costly, we searched for the smallest panel of tumor membrane markers that would allow detection of the wide spectrum of invasive breast cancers. Methods Tissue microarrays containing 483 invasive breast cancers were stained by immunohistochemistry for a selected set of membrane proteins known to be expressed in breast cancer. Results The combination of highly tumor-specific markers glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1-R, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, hepatocyte growth factor receptor (MET, and carbonic anhydrase 9 (CAIX 'detected' 45.5% of tumors, especially basal/triple negative and HER2-driven ductal cancers. Addition of markers with a 2-fold tumor-to-normal ratio increased the detection rate to 98%. Including only markers with >3 fold tumor-to-normal ratio (CD44v6 resulted in an 80% detection rate. The detection rate of the panel containing both tumor-specific and less tumor-specific markers was not dependent on age, tumor grade, tumor size, or lymph node status. Conclusions In search of the minimal panel of targeted probes needed for the highest possible detection rate, we showed that 80% of all breast cancers express at least one of a panel of membrane markers (CD44v6, GLUT1, EGFR, HER2, and IGF1-R that may therefore be suitable for molecular imaging strategies. This study thereby serves as a starting point for further development of a set of antibody-based optical tracers with a high breast cancer detection rate.

  3. Growth-inhibitory Effects of Curcumin on Ovary Cancer Cells and Its Mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑丽端; 童强松; 吴翠环

    2004-01-01

    Summary: To study the growth-inhibitory ettects ot curcumin on human ovary cancer A2780 cells in vitro and its molecular mechanisms, the growth inhibition rates of A2780 cancer cells, after being treated with 10 μmol/L-50 μmol/L curcumin for 6-24 h, were examined by MTT method. The morphological changes of cancer cells were observed under inversion microscopy. Cellular apoptotic rates were determined by using TUNEL. The protein expression levels of bcl-2, p53 and MDM2 in cancer cells were examined by SP immunohistochemistry. After being treated by various concentrations of curcumin, the growth of cancer cells was inhibited significantly. Some cancer cells presented characteristic morphological changes of apoptosis. The rates of apoptosis were 6.41% -28.48% (P<0.01). The expression of bcl-2 and p53 was decreased, which depended on the action time (P<0.01). There were no obvious changes in MDM2 expression. It was concluded that curcumin could significantly inhibit the growth of ovary cancer cells. The induction of apoptosis by down-regulating the expression of bcl-2 and p53 was probably one of its molecular mechanisms.

  4. AN EPIDEMIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR GENETIC STUDY ON BREAST CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾卫华; 王继先; 李本孝; 李征

    2000-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the genetic susceptibility for breast cancer of Chinese, a hospital-based case-control study, pedigree survey and molecular genetic study were conducted. Methods. Logistic regression model and stratification methods were used in the risk factors analysis. Li-Mantel art and Falconer methods were used to analyze the segregation ratio and heritability. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were used to detect AI, G-banding technique was used to detect the chromosome aberration of peripheral blood lymphocyte. Results. Family history of breast cancer is related to enhanced breast cancer risk significartly, OR is 3.905 ( 95 % CI = 1.079 ~ 14.13), and it widely interacts with other risk factors. Accumulative incidence of breast cancer in first degree relatives is 9.99%, which is larger than that in second, third degree and non-blood relatives. Segregation ratio is 0.021, heritability among first degree relatives is 35.6 ± 5.8%. Frequencies of LOH at BRCA1 and BRCA2 loci in sporadic breast cancer are 6.12% and 5.77% respectively. In the sibs, both of them show LOH at D13S173 locus, and high frequencies of chromosome aberrations were observed. Conclusions. Genetic susceptibility contributes to breast cancer occurrence of Chinese, and its racial variation may be one of the important reasons for the large difference of incidence between western and eastern countries.

  5. AN EPIDEMIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR GENETIC STUDY ON BREAST CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾卫华; 王继先; 李本孝; 李征

    2000-01-01

    Obieaites. To investigate the genetic susceptibility for breast cancer of Chinese, a hospital-besed case-control study, pedigree survey and molecular genetic study were conducted. Methods. Logistic regression model and stratification methods were used in the risk factors analysis. Li-Mantel-Gart and Falconer methods were used to analyze the segregation ratio and heritability. Polymemse chain reaction (PCR) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were used to detect AI, G-banding technique was used to detect the chromosome aberration of peripheral blood lymphocyte. Results. Family history of breast cancer is related to enhanced breast cancer risk significantly, OR is 3.905(95% CI = 1.079—14.13), and it widely interacts with other risk factors. Accumulative incidence of breast cancer in first degree relatives is 9.99%, which is larger than that in second, third degree and non-blnod relatives. Segregation ratio is 0.021, heritability among first degree relatives is 35.6 ± 5.8%. Frequencies of LDH at BRCA1 and BRCA2 loci in sporadic breast cancer are 6.12% and 5.77% respectively. In the sibs, both of them show LOH at D13S173 locus, and high frequencies of chromosome abermtions were observed.Condusions. Genetic susceptibility contributes to breast cancer occurrence of Chinese, and its racial variation may be one of the important reasons for the large difference of incidence between western and eastern countries.

  6. Probing molecular mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone: biophysical modeling identifies key regulators of functional dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshuman Dixit

    Full Text Available Deciphering functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone machinery is an important objective in cancer biology aiming to facilitate discovery of targeted anti-cancer therapies. Despite significant advances in understanding structure and function of molecular chaperones, organizing molecular principles that control the relationship between conformational diversity and functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 activity lack a sufficient quantitative characterization. We combined molecular dynamics simulations, principal component analysis, the energy landscape model and structure-functional analysis of Hsp90 regulatory interactions to systematically investigate functional dynamics of the molecular chaperone. This approach has identified a network of conserved regions common to the Hsp90 chaperones that could play a universal role in coordinating functional dynamics, principal collective motions and allosteric signaling of Hsp90. We have found that these functional motifs may be utilized by the molecular chaperone machinery to act collectively as central regulators of Hsp90 dynamics and activity, including the inter-domain communications, control of ATP hydrolysis, and protein client binding. These findings have provided support to a long-standing assertion that allosteric regulation and catalysis may have emerged via common evolutionary routes. The interaction networks regulating functional motions of Hsp90 may be determined by the inherent structural architecture of the molecular chaperone. At the same time, the thermodynamics-based "conformational selection" of functional states is likely to be activated based on the nature of the binding partner. This mechanistic model of Hsp90 dynamics and function is consistent with the notion that allosteric networks orchestrating cooperative protein motions can be formed by evolutionary conserved and sparsely connected residue clusters. Hence, allosteric signaling through a small network of distantly connected

  7. Molecular Mechanisms Controlling the Early Mouse Embryo Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Ivan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Few are known about the molecular mechanism controlling the early embryo development. The reduce dimension of the embryos, only a few μm, the small quantities of proteins synthesized and the artificial environment influence makes difficult to decode the mechanisms controlling early embryonic stages of development. Although, in the last few years many genes have been showed to be active in the early embryonic stages of development, only a few have been characterized and found to be implicated in the molecular mechanism responsible of preimplantational embryos development. Ped gene (Preimplantational embryo development is considered to be involved in regulation of embryonic cleavage division and subsequent embryo survival. This review presents, based on a rich documentation, the main mechanisms involved in early embryo development.

  8. Exploring molecular links between lymph node invasion and cancer prognosis in human breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sangwoo; Nam, Hojung; Lee, Doheon

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Lymph node invasion is one of the most powerful clinical factors in cancer prognosis. However, molecular level signatures of their correlation are remaining poorly understood. Here, we propose a new approach, monotonically expressed gene analysis (MEGA), to correlate transcriptional patterns of lymph node invasion related genes with clinical outcome of breast cancer patients. Results Using MEGA, we scored all genes with their transcriptional patterns ov...

  9. Exploring molecular links between lymph node invasion and cancer prognosis in human breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Sangwoo; Nam Hojung; Lee Doheon

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Lymph node invasion is one of the most powerful clinical factors in cancer prognosis. However, molecular level signatures of their correlation are remaining poorly understood. Here, we propose a new approach, monotonically expressed gene analysis (MEGA), to correlate transcriptional patterns of lymph node invasion related genes with clinical outcome of breast cancer patients. Results Using MEGA, we scored all genes with their transcriptional patterns over progression level...

  10. Molecular Targeted Therapies Using Botanicals for Prostate Cancer Chemoprevention

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Nagi; Chornokur, Ganna

    2012-01-01

    In spite of the large number of botanicals demonstrating promise as potential cancer chemopreventive agents, most have failed to prove effectiveness in clinical trials. Critical requirements for moving botanical agents to recommendation for clinical use include adopting a systematic, molecular-target based approach and utilizing the same ethical and rigorous methods that are used to evaluate other pharmacological agents. Preliminary data on a mechanistic rationale for chemoprevention activity...

  11. Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene: Mechanics, Morphology, and Clinical Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Sobieraj, MC; Rimnac, CM

    2008-01-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is a semicrystalline polymer that has been used for over four decades as a bearing surface in total joint replacements. The mechanical properties and wear properties of UHMWPE are of interest with respect to the in vivo performance of UHMWPE joint replacement components. The mechanical properties of the polymer are dependent on both its crystalline and amorphous phases. Altering either phase (i.e., changing overall crystallinity, crystalline m...

  12. Molecular mechanisms of experience-dependent plasticity in visual cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Tropea, Daniela; Van Wart, Audra; Sur, Mriganka

    2008-01-01

    A remarkable amount of our current knowledge of mechanisms underlying experience-dependent plasticity during cortical development comes from study of the mammalian visual cortex. Recent advances in high-resolution cellular imaging, combined with genetic manipulations in mice, novel fluorescent recombinant probes, and large-scale screens of gene expression, have revealed multiple molecular mechanisms that underlie structural and functional plasticity in visual cortex. We situate these mechanis...

  13. Status and Advances of RGD Molecular Imaging in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning YUE

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer has been one of the most common and the highest mortality rates malignant tumors at home and abroad. Sustained angiogenesis was not only the characteristic of malignant tumors, but also the foundation of tumor proliferation, invasion, recurrence and metastasis, it was also one of the hot spots of treatments in lung cancer biology currently. Integrins played an important part in tumor angiogenesis. Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD peptides could combine with integrins specifically, and the application of radionuclide-labeled RGD molecular probes enabled imaging of tumor blood vessels to reflect its changes. The lung cancer imaging of RGD peptides at home and abroad in recent years was reviewed in this article.

  14. Multifunctional Gold Nanostars for Molecular Imaging and Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Yuan, Hsiangkuo; Fales, Andrew; Register, Janna; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2015-08-01

    Plasmonics-active gold nanoparticles offer excellent potential in molecular imaging and cancer therapy. Among them, gold nanostars (AuNS) exhibit cross-platform flexibility as multimodal contrast agents for macroscopic X-ray computer tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), as well as nanoprobes for photoacoustic tomography (PAT), two-photon photoluminescence (TPL) and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Their surfactant-free surface enables versatile functionalization to enhance cancer targeting, and allow triggered drug release. AuNS can also be used as an efficient platform for drug carrying, photothermal therapy, and photodynamic therapy. This review paper presents the latest progress regarding AuNS as a promising nanoplatform for cancer nanotheranostics. Future research directions with AuNS for biomedical applications will also be discussed.

  15. Vitamin D and colorectal cancer: molecular, epidemiological and clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Ruoxu; Ng, Kimmie; Giovannucci, Edward L; Manson, JoAnn E; Qian, Zhi Rong; Ogino, Shuji

    2016-05-01

    In many cells throughout the body, vitamin D is converted into its active form calcitriol and binds to the vitamin D receptor (VDR), which functions as a transcription factor to regulate various biological processes including cellular differentiation and immune response. Vitamin D-metabolising enzymes (including CYP24A1 and CYP27B1) and VDR play major roles in exerting and regulating the effects of vitamin D. Preclinical and epidemiological studies have provided evidence for anti-cancer effects of vitamin D (particularly against colorectal cancer), although clinical trials have yet to prove its benefit. In addition, molecular pathological epidemiology research can provide insights into the interaction of vitamin D with tumour molecular and immunity status. Other future research directions include genome-wide research on VDR transcriptional targets, gene-environment interaction analyses and clinical trials on vitamin D efficacy in colorectal cancer patients. In this study, we review the literature on vitamin D and colorectal cancer from both mechanistic and population studies and discuss the links and controversies within and between the two parts of evidence. PMID:27245104

  16. Feature Selection and Molecular Classification of Cancer Using Genetic Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Yu

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite important advances in microarray-based molecular classification of tumors, its application in clinical settings remains formidable. This is in part due to the limitation of current analysis programs in discovering robust biomarkers and developing classifiers with a practical set of genes. Genetic programming (GP is a type of machine learning technique that uses evolutionary algorithm to simulate natural selection as well as population dynamics, hence leading to simple and comprehensible classifiers. Here we applied GP to cancer expression profiling data to select feature genes and build molecular classifiers by mathematical integration of these genes. Analysis of thousands of GP classifiers generated for a prostate cancer data set revealed repetitive use of a set of highly discriminative feature genes, many of which are known to be disease associated. GP classifiers often comprise five or less genes and successfully predict cancer types and subtypes. More importantly, GP classifiers generated in one study are able to predict samples from an independent study, which may have used different microarray platforms. In addition, GP yielded classification accuracy better than or similar to conventional classification methods. Furthermore, the mathematical expression of GP classifiers provides insights into relationships between classifier genes. Taken together, our results demonstrate that GP may be valuable for generating effective classifiers containing a practical set of genes for diagnostic/ prognostic cancer classification.

  17. Molecular characterization of the stomach microbiota in patients with gastric cancer and controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dicksved, J.; Lindberg, M.; Rosenquist, M.; Enroth, H.; Jansson, J.K.; Engstrand, L.

    2009-01-15

    Persistent infection of the gastric mucosa by Helicobacter pylori, can initiate an inflammatory cascade that progresses into atrophic gastritis, a condition associated with reduced capacity for secretion of gastric acid and an increased risk in developing gastric cancer. The role of H. pylori as an initiator of inflammation is evident but the mechanism for development into gastric cancer has not yet been proven. A reduced capacity for gastric acid secretion allows survival and proliferation of other microbes that normally are killed by the acidic environment. It has been postulated that some of these species may be involved in the development of gastric cancer, however their identities are poorly defined. In this study, the gastric microbiota from ten patients with gastric cancer was characterized and compared with five dyspeptic controls using the molecular profiling approach, terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), in combination with 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing. T-RFLP analysis revealed a complex bacterial community in the cancer patients that was not significantly different from the controls. Sequencing of 140 clones revealed 102 phylotypes, with representatives from five bacterial phyla (Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Fusobacteria). The data revealed a relatively low abundance of H. pylori and showed that the gastric cancer microbiota was instead dominated by different species of the genera Streptococcus, Lactobacillus, Veillonella and Prevotella. The respective role of these species in development of gastric cancer remains to be determined.

  18. Environmental effects on molecular biomarkers expression in pancreatic and brain cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensah, Lawrence; Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Massodi, Iqbal; Anbil, Sriram; Mai, Zhiming; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2013-03-01

    A complete understanding of the biological mechanisms regulating devastating disease such as cancer remains elusive. Pancreatic and brain cancers are primary among the cancer types with poor prognosis. Molecular biomarkers have emerged as group of proteins that are preferentially overexpressed in cancers and with a key role in driving disease progression and resistance to chemotherapy. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a cell proliferative biomarker is particularly highly expressed in most cancers including brain and pancreatic cancers. The ability of EGFR to sustain prolong cell proliferation is augmented by biomarkers such as Bax, Bcl-XL and Bcl-2, proteins regulating the apoptotic process. To better understand the role and effect of the microenvironment on these biomarkers in pancreatic cancer (PaCa); we analysed two pancreatic tumor lines (AsPc-1 and MiaPaCa-2) in 2D, 3D in-vitro cultures and in orthotopic tumors at different growth stages. We also investigated in patient derived glioblastoma (GBM) tumor cultures, the ability to utilize the EGFR expression to specifically deliver photosensitizer to the cells for photodynamic therapy. Overall, our results suggest that (1) microenvironment changes affect biomarker expression; thereby it is critical to understand these effects prior to designing combination therapies and (2) EGFR expression in tumor cells indeed could serve as a reliable and a robust biomarker that could be used to design targeted and image-guided photodynamic therapy.

  19. Mechanical Characterization of Breast Tissue Constituents for Cancer Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Zaeimdar, Shima

    2014-01-01

    Breast elastography is a method of cancer detection that uses the response of soft tissue to deformations, leading to discovery of abnormalities. The methods of Clinical Breast Examination and Breast Self-Examination are based primarily on stiffness and, hence, on the mechanics of tissue constituents examined by palpation (Goodson, 1996). However, little is known about the mechanical characteristics of breast tissue under compression and the contribution of tissue mechanics to breast cancer d...

  20. Molecular mechanism of adaptive response to low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adaptive response is a term used to describe the ability of a low, priming dose of ionizing radiation to modify the effects of a subsequent higher, challenge dose. Molecular mechanism of adaptive response to low dose radiation is involved in signal transduction pathway, reactive oxygen species, DNA damage repair

  1. Dissection of molecular mechanisms underlying speech and language disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, S

    2005-01-01

    Developmental disorders affecting speech and language are highly heritable, but very little is currently understood about the neuromolecular mechanisms that underlie these traits. Integration of data from diverse research areas, including linguistics, neuropsychology, neuroimaging, genetics, molecular neuroscience, developmental biology, and evolutionary anthropology, is becoming essential for unraveling the relevant pathways. Recent studies of the FOXP2 gene provide a case in point. Mutation...

  2. Potential Anti-Cancer Activities and Mechanisms of Costunolide and Dehydrocostuslactone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejing Lin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Costunolide (CE and dehydrocostuslactone (DE are derived from many species of medicinal plants, such as Saussurea lappa Decne and Laurus nobilis L. They have been reported for their wide spectrum of biological effects, including anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antiviral, antimicrobial, antifungal, antioxidant, antidiabetic, antiulcer, and anthelmintic activities. In recent years, they have caused extensive interest in researchers due to their potential anti-cancer activities for various types of cancer, and their anti-cancer mechanisms, including causing cell cycle arrest, inducing apoptosis and differentiation, promoting the aggregation of microtubule protein, inhibiting the activity of telomerase, inhibiting metastasis and invasion, reversing multidrug resistance, restraining angiogenesis has been studied. This review will summarize anti-cancer activities and associated molecular mechanisms of these two compounds for the purpose of promoting their research and application.

  3. Roles of Ubiquitination and SUMOylation on Prostate Cancer: Mechanisms and Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenbang Chen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The initiation and progression of human prostate cancer are highly associated with aberrant dysregulations of tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes. Despite that deletions and mutations of tumor suppressors and aberrant elevations of oncogenes at the genetic level are reported to cause cancers, emerging evidence has revealed that cancer progression is largely regulated by posttranslational modifications (PTMs and epigenetic alterations. PTMs play critical roles in gene regulation, cellular functions, tissue development, diseases, malignant progression and drug resistance. Recent discoveries demonstrate that ubiquitination and SUMOylation are complicated but highly-regulated PTMs, and make essential contributions to diseases and cancers by regulation of key factors and signaling pathways. Ubiquitination and SUMOylation pathways can be differentially modulated under various stimuli or stresses in order to produce the sustained oncogenic potentials. In this review, we discuss some new insights about molecular mechanisms on ubiquitination and SUMOylation, their associations with diseases, oncogenic impact on prostate cancer (PCa and clinical implications for PCa treatment.

  4. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer: translating molecular biology approaches into the clinical realm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Sala, Evis; Hricak, Hedvig [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Grimm, Jan [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Program in Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States); Donati, Olivio F. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-05-01

    The epidemiology of prostate cancer has dramatically changed since the introduction of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening in the 1980's. Most prostate cancers today are detected at early stages of the disease and are considered 'indolent'; however, some patients' prostate cancers demonstrate a more aggressive behaviour which leads to rapid progression and death. Increasing understanding of the biology underlying the heterogeneity that characterises this disease has led to a continuously evolving role of imaging in the management of prostate cancer. Functional and metabolic imaging techniques are gaining importance as the impact on the therapeutic paradigm has shifted from structural tumour detection alone to distinguishing patients with indolent tumours that can be managed conservatively (e.g., by active surveillance) from patients with more aggressive tumours that may require definitive treatment with surgery or radiation. In this review, we discuss advanced imaging techniques that allow direct visualisation of molecular interactions relevant to prostate cancer and their potential for translation to the clinical setting in the near future. The potential use of imaging to follow molecular events during drug therapy as well as the use of imaging agents for therapeutic purposes will also be discussed. (orig.)

  5. Topoisomerase I and II inhibitors: chemical structure, mechanisms of action and role in cancer chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezhenkova, L. G.; Tsvetkov, V. B.; Shtil, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    The review summarizes and analyzes recent published data on topoisomerase I and II inhibitors as potential antitumour agents. Functions and the mechanism of action of topoisomerases are considered. The molecular mechanism of interactions between low-molecular-weight compounds and these proteins is discussed. Topoisomerase inhibitors belonging to different classes of chemical compounds are systematically covered. Assays for the inhibition of topoisomerases and the possibilities of using the computer-aided modelling for the rational design of novel drugs for cancer chemotherapy are presented. The bibliography includes 127 references.

  6. Catalytic mechanism of RNA backbone cleavage by ribonuclease H from quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosta, Edina; Nowotny, Marcin; Yang, Wei; Hummer, Gerhard

    2011-06-15

    We use quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations to study the cleavage of the ribonucleic acid (RNA) backbone catalyzed by ribonuclease H. This protein is a prototypical member of a large family of enzymes that use two-metal catalysis to process nucleic acids. By combining Hamiltonian replica exchange with a finite-temperature string method, we calculate the free energy surface underlying the RNA-cleavage reaction and characterize its mechanism. We find that the reaction proceeds in two steps. In a first step, catalyzed primarily by magnesium ion A and its ligands, a water molecule attacks the scissile phosphate. Consistent with thiol-substitution experiments, a water proton is transferred to the downstream phosphate group. The transient phosphorane formed as a result of this nucleophilic attack decays by breaking the bond between the phosphate and the ribose oxygen. In the resulting intermediate, the dissociated but unprotonated leaving group forms an alkoxide coordinated to magnesium ion B. In a second step, the reaction is completed by protonation of the leaving group, with a neutral Asp132 as a likely proton donor. The overall reaction barrier of ∼15 kcal mol(-1), encountered in the first step, together with the cost of protonating Asp132, is consistent with the slow measured rate of ∼1-100/min. The two-step mechanism is also consistent with the bell-shaped pH dependence of the reaction rate. The nonmonotonic relative motion of the magnesium ions along the reaction pathway agrees with X-ray crystal structures. Proton-transfer reactions and changes in the metal ion coordination emerge as central factors in the RNA-cleavage reaction. PMID:21539371

  7. Appraisal of progenitor markers in the context of molecular classification of breast cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Haviv, Izhak

    2011-01-01

    Clinical management of breast cancer relies on case stratification, which increasingly employs molecular markers. The motivation behind delineating breast epithelial differentiation is to better target cancer cases through innate sensitivities bequeathed to the cancer from its normal progenitor state. A combination of histopathological and molecular classification of breast cancer cases suggests a role for progenitors in particular breast cancer cases. Although a remarkable fraction of the re...

  8. Molecular targets for the treatment of pancreatic cancer: Clinical and experimental studies

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuoka, Tasuku; Yashiro, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Although recent therapeutic developments for patients with pancreatic cancer have provided survival benefits, the outcomes for patients with pancreatic cancer remain unsatisfactory. Molecularly targeted cancer therapy has advanced in the past decade with the use of a number of pathways as candidates of therapeutic targets. This review summarizes the molecular features of this refractory disease while focusing on the...

  9. [Transforming growth factor beta-1: structure, function, and regulation mechanisms in cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta-Zaragoza, O; Lagunas-Martínez, A; Madrid-Marina, V

    2001-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-beta 1) is produced by several cell lineages such as lymphocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells, and its expression serves in both autocrine and paracrine modes to control the differentiation, proliferation, and state of activation of these and other cells. In general, TGF-beta 1 has pleiotropic properties on the immune response during the development of infection diseases and cancer; however, the mechanisms of action and regulation of gene expression of this cytokine are poorly understood, in this review, the biological properties and the molecular mechanisms that regulate TGF-beta 1 gene expression are described, to understand the role of this cytokine in growth and cell differentiation. The knowledge of molecular mechanisms of gene expression of TGF-beta 1 may serve to develop new cancer therapies. The English version of this paper is available at: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.html PMID:11547595

  10. Overexpression of cancer-associated genes via epigenetic derepression mechanisms in gynecologic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae MinJeong

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Like other cancers, most gynecologic cancers caused by aberrant expression of cancer-related genes. Epigenetics is one of important gene expression mechanisms which contribute to cancer development and progression by regulating cancer-related genes. Since the discovery of differential gene expression patterns in cancer cells compared with normal cells, extensive efforts have been made to explore the origins of abnormal gene expression in cancer. Epigenetics, the study inheritable changes in gene expression that do not alter DNA sequence, is a key area of this research. DNA methylation and histone modification are well-known epigenetic mechanisms, microRNAs and alternative splicing have recently been identified as important regulators of epigenetic changes. These epigenetic mechanisms not only affect specific target gene expression but also regulate the functioning of other epigenetic mechanisms. Moreover, these diverse epigenetic regulations occur simultaneously. Epigenetic regulation of gene expression is extraordinarily complicated and requires that all epigenetic mechanisms be studied at once to determine the exact gene regulation mechanisms. Traditionally, the contribution of epigenetics to cancer is thought to be mediated through the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs expression. But recently it is arising that some oncogenes or cancer-promoting genes (CPGs are overexpressed in diverse type of cancers through epigenetic derepression mechanism, such as DNA demethylation, histone demethylation. Epigenetic derepression arises from diverse epigenetic changes, and all of these mechanisms are actively interact each other to increase oncogenes or CPGs expression in cancer cell. Oncogenes or CPGs overexpressed through epigenetic derepression can initiate cancer development, and the accumulation of these abnormal epigenetic changes makes cancer more aggressive and resistant to treatment. This review discusses epigenetic mechanisms involved

  11. Mitochondrial electron transport chain identified as a novel molecular target of SPIO nanoparticles mediated cancer-specific cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chengyong; Jiang, Shengwei; Jin, Haijing; Chen, Shuzhen; Lin, Gan; Yao, Huan; Wang, Xiaoyong; Mi, Peng; Ji, Zhiliang; Lin, Yuchun; Lin, Zhongning; Liu, Gang

    2016-03-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are highly cytotoxic and target cancer cells with high specificity; however, the mechanism by which SPIONs induce cancer cell-specific cytotoxicity remains unclear. Herein, the molecular mechanism of SPION-induced cancer cell-specific cytotoxicity to cancer cells is clarified through DNA microarray and bioinformatics analyses. SPIONs can interference with the mitochondrial electron transport chain (METC) in cancer cells, which further affects the production of ATP, mitochondrial membrane potential, and microdistribution of calcium, and induces cell apoptosis. Additionally, SPIONs induce the formation of reactive oxygen species in mitochondria; these reactive oxygen species trigger cancer-specific cytotoxicity due to the lower antioxidative capacity of cancer cells. Moreover, the DNA microarray and gene ontology analyses revealed that SPIONs elevate the expression of metallothioneins in both normal and cancer cells but decrease the expression of METC genes in cancer cells. Overall, these results suggest that SPIONs induce cancer cell death by targeting the METC, which is helpful for designing anti-cancer nanotheranostics and evaluating the safety of future nanomedicines. PMID:26773667

  12. Investigation of deformation mechanisms of staggered nanocomposites using molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiazhagan, S.; Anup, S.

    2016-08-01

    Biological materials with nanostructure of regularly or stair-wise staggered arrangements of hard platelets reinforced in a soft protein matrix have superior mechanical properties. Applications of these nanostructures to ceramic matrix composites could enhance their toughness. Using molecular dynamics simulations, mechanical behaviour of the bio-inspired nanocomposites is studied. Regularly staggered model shows better flow behaviour compared to stair-wise staggered model due to the symmetrical crack propagation along the interface. Though higher stiffness and strength are obtained for stair-wise staggered models, rapid crack propagation reduces the toughness. Arresting this crack propagation could lead to superior mechanical properties in stair-wise staggered models.

  13. Normal Mode Analysis with Molecular Geometry Restraints: Bridging Molecular Mechanics and Elastic Models

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Mingyang; Ma, Jianpeng

    2011-01-01

    A new method for normal mode analysis is reported for all-atom structures using molecular geometry restraints (MGR). Similar to common molecular mechanics force fields, the MGR potential contains short- and long-range terms. The short-range terms are defined by molecular geometry, i.e. bond lengths, angles and dihedrals; the long-range term is similar to that in elastic network models. Each interaction term uses a single force constant parameter, and is determined by fitting against a set of ...

  14. A Modiifed Molecular Structure Mechanics Method for Analysis of Graphene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUA Jun; LI Dongbo; ZHAO Dong; LIANG Shengwei; LIU Qinlong; JIA Ruiyan

    2015-01-01

    Based on molecular mechanics and the deformation characteristics of the atomic lattice structure of graphene, a modiifed molecular structure mechanics method was developed to improve the original one, that is, the semi-rigid connections were used to model the bond angle variations between the C-C bonds in graphene. The simulated results show that the equivalent space frame model with semi-rigid connections for graphene proposed in this article is a simple, efifcient, and accurate model to evaluate the equivalent elastic properties of graphene. Though the present computational model of the semi-rigid connected space frame is only applied to characterize the mechanical behaviors of the space lattices of graphene, it has more potential applications in the static and dynamic analyses of graphene and other nanomaterials.

  15. Xenogeneic homologous genes, molecular evolution and cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田聆; 魏于全

    2001-01-01

    Cancer is one of the main causes for death of human beings to date, and cancer biotherapy (mainlyimmunotherapy and gene therapy) has become the most promising approach after surgical therapy, radiotherapy andchemotherapy. However, there are still many limitations on cancer immunotherapy and gene therapy; therefore great ef-fort is being made to develop new strategies. It has been known that, in the process of evolution, a number of genes, theso-called xenogeneic homologous genes, are well-conserved and show the structural and/or functional similarity betweenvarious species to some degree. The nucleotide changes between various xenogeneic homologous genes are derived frommutation, and most of them are neutral mutations. Considering that the subtle differences in xenogeneic homologousgenes can break immune tolerance, enhance the immunogenicity and induce autologous immune response so as to elimi-nate tumor cells, we expect that a strategy of inducing autoimmune response using the property of xenogeneic homologousgenes will become a new therapy for cancer. Moreover, this therapy can also be used in the treatment of other diseases,such as autoimmune diseases and AIDS. This article will discuss the xenogeneic homologous genes, molecular evolutionand cancer therapy.

  16. Molecular targets of cancer chemoprevention by garlic-derived organosulfides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anna HERMAN-ANTOSIEWICZ; Anna A POWOLNY; Shivendra V SINGH

    2007-01-01

    The medicinal benefits of Allium vegetables, especially garlic, have been noted throughout recorded history. The known health benefits of Allium vegetables and their constituents include cardiovascular protective effects, stimulation of immune function, reduction of blood glucose level, radioprotection, improvement of memory loss, protection against microbial, viral and fungal infections, as well as anticancer effects. Population-based case control studies have suggested an inverse correlation between dietary intake of Allium vegetables and the risk of different types of cancers. The anticarcinogenic effect of Allium vegetables in-eluding garlic is attributed to organosulfur compounds (OSC), which are highly effective in affording protection against cancer in animal models induced by a variety of chemical carcinogens. More recent studies have shown that certain naturally occurring OSC analogues can suppress proliferation of cancer cells in culture and in vivo. The OSC-induced changes in the proliferation of cancer Cellsare frequently associated with perturbations in cell cycle progression and induc-tion of G2/M phase arrest. The OSC have also been demonstrated to induce apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway by altering the ratio of the Bc1-2 family of proteins both in cell culture and in in vivo models. Anti-angiogenic activity for garlic-derived OSC has also been documented. This article summarizes current knowledge on molecular targets of cancer chemoprevention by OSC.

  17. A physical mechanism of cancer heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cong; Wang, Jin

    2016-02-01

    We studied a core cancer gene regulatory network motif to uncover possible source of cancer heterogeneity from epigenetic sources. When the time scale of the protein regulation to the gene is faster compared to the protein synthesis and degradation (adiabatic regime), normal state, cancer state and an intermediate premalignant state emerge. Due to the epigenetics such as DNA methylation and histone remodification, the time scale of the protein regulation to the gene can be slower or comparable to the protein synthesis and degradation (non-adiabatic regime). In this case, many more states emerge as possible phenotype alternations. This gives the origin of the heterogeneity. The cancer heterogeneity is reflected from the emergence of more phenotypic states, larger protein concentration fluctuations, wider kinetic distributions and multiplicity of kinetic paths from normal to cancer state, higher energy cost per gene switching, and weaker stability.

  18. Electron transport properties of single molecular junctions under mechanical modulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron transport behaviors of single molecular junctions are very sensitive to the atomic scale molecule-metal electrode contact interfaces, which have been difficult to control. We used a modified scanning probe microscope-break junction technique (SPM-BJT) to control the dynamics of the contacts and simultaneously monitor both the conductance and force. First, by fitting the measured data into a modified multiple tunneling barrier model, the static contact resistances, corresponding to the different contact conformations of single alkanedithiol and alkanediamine molecular junctions, were identified. Second, the changes of contact decay constant were measured under mechanical extensions of the molecular junctions, which helped to classify the different single molecular conductance sets into specific microscopic conformations of the molecule-electrode contacts. Third, by monitoring the changes of force and contact decay constant with the mechanical extensions, the changes of conductance were found to be caused by the changes of contact bond length and by the atomic reorganizations near the contact bond. This study provides a new insight into the understanding of the influences of contact conformations, especially the effect of changes of dynamic contact conformation on electron transport through single molecular junctions. (paper)

  19. Estrogen Receptor-Targeted Contrast Agents for Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Breast Cancer Hormonal Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pais, Adi; Degani, Hadassa

    2016-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) α is overexpressed in most breast cancers, and its level serves as a major prognostic factor. It is important to develop quantitative molecular imaging methods that specifically detect ER in vivo and assess its function throughout the entire primary breast cancer and in metastatic breast cancer lesions. This study presents the biochemical and molecular features, as well as the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) effects of two novel ER-targeted contrast agents (CAs), based on pyridine-tetra-acetate-Gd(III) chelate conjugated to 17β-estradiol (EPTA-Gd) or to tamoxifen (TPTA-Gd). The experiments were conducted in solution, in human breast cancer cells, and in severe combined immunodeficient mice implanted with transfected ER-positive and ER-negative MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts. Binding studies with ER in solution and in human breast cancer cells indicated affinities in the micromolar range of both CAs. Biochemical and molecular studies in breast cancer cell cultures showed that both CAs exhibit estrogen-like agonistic activity, enhancing cell proliferation, as well as upregulating cMyc oncogene and downregulating ER expression levels. The MRI longitudinal relaxivity was significantly augmented by EPTA-Gd in ER-positive cells as compared to ER-negative cells. Dynamic contrast-enhanced studies with EPTA-Gd in vivo indicated specific augmentation of the MRI water signal in the ER-positive versus ER-negative xenografts, confirming EPTA-Gd-specific interaction with ER. In contrast, TPTA-Gd did not show increased enhancement in ER-positive tumors and did not appear to interact in vivo with the tumors' ER. However, TPTA-Gd was found to interact strongly with muscle tissue, enhancing muscle signal intensity in a mechanism independent of the presence of ER. The specificity of EPTA-Gd interaction with ER in vivo was further verified by acute and chronic competition with tamoxifen. The chronic tamoxifen treatment also revealed that this

  20. Ligand binding to anti-cancer target CD44 investigated by molecular simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tin Trung; Tran, Duy Phuoc; Pham Dinh Quoc Huy; Hoang, Zung; Carloni, Paolo; Van Pham, Phuc; Nguyen, Chuong; Li, Mai Suan

    2016-07-01

    CD44 is a cell-surface glycoprotein and receptor for hyaluronan, one of the major components of the tumor extracellular matrix. There is evidence that the interaction between CD44 and hyaluronan promotes breast cancer metastasis. Recently, the molecule F-19848A was shown to inhibit hyaluronan binding to receptor CD44 in a cell-based assay. In this study, we investigated the mechanism and energetics of F-19848A binding to CD44 using molecular simulation. Using the molecular mechanics/Poisson Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method, we obtained the binding free energy and inhibition constant of the complex. The van der Waals (vdW) interaction and the extended portion of F-19848A play key roles in the binding affinity. We screened natural products from a traditional Chinese medicine database to search for CD44 inhibitors. From combining pharmaceutical requirements with docking and molecular dynamics simulations, we found ten compounds that are potentially better or equal to the F-19848A ligand at binding to CD44 receptor. Therefore, we have identified new candidates of CD44 inhibitors, based on molecular simulation, which may be effective small molecules for the therapy of breast cancer. PMID:27342250

  1. The Mechanism in Gastric Cancer Chemoprevention by Allicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Runlan; Fang, Dengyang; Hang, Hongdong; Tang, Zeyao

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains high prevalence and fatality rates in China even though its morbidity has been decreased drastically. Allicin, which is from an assistance food-garlic (Allium Sativum L), was found to be effective in gastric cancer treatment. It is a defensive substance with a board biological properties: inhibition of bacteria, fungus, virus, controlled hypertension, diabetes, and chemoprevention of several cancers, etc. Experiments have shown that allicin can be chemopreventive to gastric cancer by inhibiting the growth of cancer cells, arresting cell cycle at G2/M phase, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, which includes the caspase-dependent/-independent pathways and death receptor pathway. Those mechanisms probably involve in modulating enzymatic activity, restraining DNA formation, scavenging free radicals, and affecting cell proliferation and even tumor growth. Therefore, this review is focus on the mechanism of allicin in gastric cancer. PMID:26555611

  2. Heat shock proteins in hepatocellular carcinoma: Molecular mechanism and therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cun; Zhang, Yurong; Guo, Kun; Wang, Ning; Jin, Haojie; Liu, Yinkun; Qin, Wenxin

    2016-04-15

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are highly conserved proteins, which are expressed at low levels under normal conditions, but significantly induced in response to cellular stresses. As molecular chaperones, HSPs play crucial roles in protein homeostasis, apoptosis, invasion and cellular signaling transduction. The induction of HSPs is an important part of heat shock response, which could help cancer cells to adapt to stress conditions. Because of the constant stress condition in tumor microenvironment, HSPs overexpression is widely reported in many human cancers. In light of the significance of HSPs for cancer cells to survive and obtain invasive phenotype under stress condition, HSPs are often associated with poor prognosis and treatment resistance in many types of human cancers. It has been described that upregulation of HSPs may serve as diagnostic and prognostic markers in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Targeting HSPs with specific inhibitor alone or in combination with chemotherapy regimens holds promise for the improvement of outcomes for HCC patients. In this review, we summarize the expression profiles, functions and molecular mechanisms of HSPs (HSP27, HSP70 and HSP90) as well as a HSP-like protein (clusterin) in HCC. In addition, we address progression and challenges in targeting these HSPs as novel therapeutic strategies in HCC. PMID:26853533

  3. Unravelling the molecular mechanisms of the canonical Wnt signalling pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, S. S.

    2010-01-01

    The Canonical Wnt signaling pathway (Wnt/beta-catenin pathway) is required during embryonic development and maintenance of adult-renewing tissue homeostasis. Deregulation of this pathway is found associated with cancer and other diseases. The main goal of this thesis is to discern the regulation mechanisms of canonical Wnt signaling and thereby identify potential drug targets. We found that, neither the dissembled of Axin1, APC or GSK3 from the destruction complex nor inactivation of GSK3 and...

  4. Molecular mechanisms in the regulation of adult neurogenesis during stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeland, Martin; Zunszain, Patricia A; Pariante, Carmine M

    2015-04-01

    Coping with stress is fundamental for mental health, but understanding of the molecular neurobiology of stress is still in its infancy. Adult neurogenesis is well known to be regulated by stress, and conversely adult neurogenesis regulates stress responses. Recent studies in neurogenic cells indicate that molecular pathways activated by glucocorticoids, the main stress hormones, are modulated by crosstalk with other stress-relevant mechanisms, including inflammatory mediators, neurotrophic factors and morphogen signalling pathways. This Review discusses the pathways that are involved in this crosstalk and thus regulate this complex relationship between adult neurogenesis and stress. PMID:25790864

  5. Cancer-related fatigue: Mechanisms, risk factors, and treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Bower, Julienne E.

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue is one of the most common and distressing side effects of cancer and its treatment, and may persist for years after treatment completion in otherwise healthy survivors. Cancer-related fatigue causes disruption in all aspects of quality of life and may be a risk factor for reduced survival. The prevalence and course of fatigue in cancer patients has been well characterized, and there is growing understanding of underlying biological mechanisms. Inflammation has emerged as a key biologi...

  6. Genetic classification and molecular mechanisms of primary dystonia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xueping Chen; Huifang Shang; Zuming Luo

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary dystonia is a heterogeneous disease, with a complex genetic basis. In previous studies, primary dystonia was classified according to age of onset, involved regions, and other clinical characteristics. With the development of molecular genetics, new virulence genes and sites have been discovered. Therefore, there is a gradual understanding of the various forms of dystonia, based on new viewpoints. There are 15 subtypes of dystonia, based on the molecular level, i.e., DYT1 to DYT15. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the genetic development of dystonia in detail, and to further investigate molecular mechanisms of dystonia. RETRIEVAL STRATEGY: A computer-based online search was conducted in PubMed for English language publications containing the keywords "dystonia and genetic" from January 1980 to March 2007. There were 105 articles in total. Inclusion criteria: ① the contents of the articles should closely address genetic classification and molecular mechanisms of primary dystonia; ② the articles published in recent years or in high-impact journals took preference. Exclusion criteria: duplicated articles. LITERATURE EVALUATION: The selected articles were on genetic classification and molecular genetics mechanism of primary dystonia. Of those, 27 were basic or clinical studies. DATA SYNTHESIS: ① Dystonia is a heterogeneous disease, with a complex genetic basis. According to the classification of the Human Genome Organization, there are 15 dystonia subtypes, based on genetics, i.e., DYT1-DYT15,including primary dystonia, dystonia plus syndrome, degeneration plus dystonia, and paroxysmal dyskinesia plus dystonia. ② To date, the chromosomes of 13 subtypes have been localized; however, DYT2 and DYT4 remain unclear. Six subtypes have been located within virulence genes. Specifically, torsinA gene expression results in the DYT1 genotype; autosomal dominant GTP cyclohydrolase I gene expression and recessive tyrosine hydroxylase expression result in the DYT5

  7. Molecular mechanisms of thyroid tumorigenesis; Molekulare Mechanismen der Schilddruesentumorgenese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, K.; Fuehrer, D. [Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig (Germany). Abt. fuer Endokrinolgoie, Diabetologie und Nephrologie

    2008-09-15

    Thyroid nodules are the most frequent endocrine disorder and occur in approximately 30% of the German population. Thyroid nodular disease constitutes a very heterogeneous entity. A striking diversity of possible functional and morphological features of a thyroid tumour derived from the same thyroid ancestor cell, is a hallmark of thyroid tumorigenesis and is due to specific genetic alterations. Defects in known candidate genes can be found in up to 70% of differentiated thyroid carcinomas and determine the respective cancer phenotype. Papillary thyroid cancers (PTC) harbour BRAF (or much less frequently RAS) mutations in sporadically occurring tumours, while radiation-induced PTC display chromosomal rearrangements such as RET, TRK, APR9 / BRAF. These genetic events results in constitutive MAPKinase activation. Follicular thyroid cancers (FTC) harbour RAS mutations or PAX8/ PPAR{gamma} rearrangements, both of which, however have also been identified in follicular adenoma. In addition, recent studies show, that activation of PI3K/AKT signalling occurs with high frequency in follicular thyroid tumours. Undifferentiated (anaplastic) thyroid cancers (ATC) display genetic features of FTC or PTC, in addition to aberant activation of multiple tyrosinkinase pathways (overexpression or mutations in PI3K and MAPK pathways). This underscores the concept of a sequential evolution of ATC from differentiated thyroid cancer, a process widely conceived to be triggered by p53 inactivation. In contrast, the molecular pathogenesis of benign thyroid tumours, in particular cold thyroid nodules is less known, except for toxic thyroid nodules, which arise from constitutive activation of cAMP signalling, predominantly through TSHR mutations. (orig.)

  8. Biologia molecular do câncer cervical Molecular biology of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Augusto Rivoire

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A carcinogênese é um processo de múltiplas etapas. Alterações no equilíbrio citogenético ocorrem na transformação do epitélio normal a câncer cervical. Numerosos estudos apoiam a hipótese de que a infecção por HPV está associada com o desenvolvimento de alterações malignas e pré-malignas do trato genital inferior. Neste trabalho são apresentadas as bases para a compreensão da oncogênese cervical. O ciclo celular é controlado por proto-oncogenes e genes supressores. Quando ocorrem mutações, proto-oncogenes tornam-se oncogenes, que são carcinogênicos e causam multiplicação celular excessiva. A perda da ação de genes supressores funcionais pode levar a célula ao crescimento inadequado. O ciclo celular também pode ser alterado pela ação de vírus, entre eles o HPV (Human Papiloma Virus, de especial interesse na oncogênese cervical. Os tipos de HPV 16 e 18 são os de maior interesse, freqüentemente associados a câncer cervical e anal. O conhecimento das bases moleculares que estão envolvidas na oncogênese cervical tem sido possível devido a utilização de técnicas avançadas de biologia molecular. A associação destas técnicas aos métodos diagnósticos clássicos, poderão levar a uma melhor avaliação das neoplasias cervicais e auxiliar no desenvolvimento de novas terapias, talvez menos invasivas e mais efetivas.Carcinogenesis involves several steps. Disorders of the cytogenetic balance occur during the evolution from normal epithelium to cervical cancer. Several studies support the hypothesis that the Human Papiloma Virus (HPV infection is associated to development of premalignant and malignant lesions of cervical cancer. In this review we show the basis to understand cervical oncogenesis. The cell cycle is controlled by protooncogenes and supressive genes. This orchestrated cell cycle can be affected by virus such as HPV. Of special interest in the cervical carcinogenesis are the HPV subtypes 16 and 18

  9. A Physical Mechanism and Global Quantification of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chong; Wang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Initiation and progression of cancer depend on many factors. Those on the genetic level are often considered crucial. To gain insight into the physical mechanisms of breast cancer, we construct a gene regulatory network (GRN) which reflects both genetic and environmental aspects of breast cancer. The construction of the GRN is based on available experimental data. Three basins of attraction, representing the normal, premalignant and cancer states respectively, were found on the phenotypic landscape. The progression of breast cancer can be seen as switching transitions between different state basins. We quantified the stabilities and kinetic paths of the three state basins to uncover the biological process of breast cancer formation. The gene expression levels at each state were obtained, which can be tested directly in experiments. Furthermore, by performing global sensitivity analysis on the landscape topography, six key genes (HER2, MDM2, TP53, BRCA1, ATM, CDK2) and four regulations (HER2⊣TP53, CDK2⊣BRCA1, ATM→MDM2, TP53→ATM) were identified as being critical for breast cancer. Interestingly, HER2 and MDM2 are the most popular targets for treating breast cancer. BRCA1 and TP53 are the most important oncogene of breast cancer and tumor suppressor gene, respectively. This further validates the feasibility of our model and the reliability of our prediction results. The regulation ATM→MDM2 has been extensive studied on DNA damage but not on breast cancer. We notice the importance of ATM→MDM2 on breast cancer. Previous studies of breast cancer have often focused on individual genes and the anti-cancer drugs are mainly used to target the individual genes. Our results show that the network-based strategy is more effective on treating breast cancer. The landscape approach serves as a new strategy for analyzing breast cancer on both the genetic and epigenetic levels and can help on designing network based medicine for breast cancer. PMID:27410227

  10. The pathology of familial breast cancer: Immunohistochemistry and molecular analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive studies of BRCA1- and BRCA2-associated breast tumours have been carried out in the few years since the identification of these familial breast cancer predisposing genes. The morphological studies suggest that BRCA1 tumours differ from BRCA2 tumours and from sporadic breast cancers. Recent progress in immunohistochemistry and molecular biology techniques has enabled in-depth investigation of molecular pathology of these tumours. Studies to date have investigated issues such as steroid hormone receptor expression, mutation status of tumour suppressor genes TP53 and c-erbB2, and expression profiles of cell cycle proteins p21, p27 and cyclin D1. Despite relative paucity of data, strong evidence of unique biological characteristics of BRCA1-associated breast cancer is accumulating. BRCA1-associated tumours appear to show an increased frequency of TP53 mutations, frequent p53 protein stabilization and absence of imunoreactivity for steroid hormone receptors. Further studies of larger number of samples of both BRCA1- and BRCA2-associated tumours are necessary to clarify and confirm these observations

  11. Women at high risk of breast cancer: Molecular characteristics, clinical presentation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleibl, Zdenek; Kristensen, Vessela N

    2016-08-01

    The presence of breast cancer in any first-degree female relative in general nearly doubles the risk for a proband and the risk gradually increases with the number of affected relatives. Current advances in molecular oncology and oncogenetics may enable the identification of high-risk individuals with breast-cancer predisposition. The best-known forms of hereditary breast cancer (HBC) are caused by mutations in the high-penetrance genes BRCA1 and BRCA2. Other genes, including PTEN, TP53, STK11/LKB1, CDH1, PALB2, CHEK2, ATM, MRE11, RAD50, NBS1, BRIP1, FANCA, FANCC, FANCM, RAD51, RAD51B, RAD51C, RAD51D, and XRCC2 have been described as high- or moderate-penetrance breast cancer-susceptibility genes. The majority of breast cancer-susceptibility genes code for tumor suppressor proteins that are involved in critical processes of DNA repair pathways. This is of particular importance for those women who, due to their increased risk of breast cancer, may be subjected to more frequent screening but due to their repair deficiency might be at the risk of developing radiation-induced malignancies. It has been proven that cancers arising from the most frequent BRCA1 gene mutation carriers differ significantly from the sporadic disease of age-matched controls in their histopathological appearances and molecular characteristics. The increased depth of mutation detection brought by next-generation sequencing and a better understanding of the mechanisms through which these mutations cause the disease will bring novel insights in terms of oncological prevention, diagnostics, and therapeutic options for HBC patients. PMID:27318168

  12. Protective mechanism against cancer found in progeria patient cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI scientists have studied cells of patients with an extremely rare genetic disease that is characterized by drastic premature aging and discovered a new protective cellular mechanism against cancer. They found that cells from patients with Hutchinson Gi

  13. The origin of chiral discrimination: supersonic molecular beam experiments and molecular dynamics simulations of collisional mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The target of the present paper is the study of chirality effects in molecular dynamics from both a theoretical and an experimental point of view under the hypothesis of a molecular dynamics mechanism as the origin of chiral discrimination. This is a fundamental problem per se, and of possible relevance for the problem of the intriguing homochirality in Nature, so far lacking satisfactory explanations. We outline the steps that have been taken so far toward this direction, motivated by various experimental studies of supersonic molecular beams carried out in this laboratory, such as the detection of aligned oxygen in gaseous streams and further evidence on nitrogen, benzene and various hydrocarbons, showing the insurgence of molecular orientation in the dynamics of molecules in flows and in molecular collisions. Chiral effects are theoretically demonstrated to show up in the differential scattering of oriented molecules, also when impinging on surfaces. Focus on possible mechanisms for chiral bio-stereochemistry of oriented reactants may be of pre-biotical interest, for example when flowing in atmospheres of rotating bodies, specifically the planet Earth, as well as in vortex motions of celestial objects. Molecular dynamics simulations and experimental verifications of the hypothesis are reviewed and objectives of future research activity proposed.

  14. The origin of chiral discrimination: supersonic molecular beam experiments and molecular dynamics simulations of collisional mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aquilanti, Vincenzo; Grossi, Gaia; Lombardi, Andrea; Maciel, Glauciete S; Palazzetti, Federico [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Perugia, Via Elce di Sotto 8, 06123 Perugia (Italy)], E-mail: abulafia@dyn.unipg.it

    2008-10-15

    The target of the present paper is the study of chirality effects in molecular dynamics from both a theoretical and an experimental point of view under the hypothesis of a molecular dynamics mechanism as the origin of chiral discrimination. This is a fundamental problem per se, and of possible relevance for the problem of the intriguing homochirality in Nature, so far lacking satisfactory explanations. We outline the steps that have been taken so far toward this direction, motivated by various experimental studies of supersonic molecular beams carried out in this laboratory, such as the detection of aligned oxygen in gaseous streams and further evidence on nitrogen, benzene and various hydrocarbons, showing the insurgence of molecular orientation in the dynamics of molecules in flows and in molecular collisions. Chiral effects are theoretically demonstrated to show up in the differential scattering of oriented molecules, also when impinging on surfaces. Focus on possible mechanisms for chiral bio-stereochemistry of oriented reactants may be of pre-biotical interest, for example when flowing in atmospheres of rotating bodies, specifically the planet Earth, as well as in vortex motions of celestial objects. Molecular dynamics simulations and experimental verifications of the hypothesis are reviewed and objectives of future research activity proposed.

  15. Molecular Modification of Metadherin/MTDH Impacts the Sensitivity of Breast Cancer to Doxorubicin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenchuan Song

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a leading cause of death in women and with an increasing worldwide incidence. Doxorubicin, as a first-line anthracycline-based drug is conventional used on breast cancer clinical chemotherapy. However, the drug resistances limited the curative effect of the doxorubicin therapy in breast cancer patients, but the molecular mechanism determinants of breast cancer resistance to doxorubicin chemotherapy are not fully understood. In order to explore the association between metadherin (MTDH and doxorubicin sensitivity, the differential expressions of MTDH in breast cancer cell lines and the sensitivity to doxorubicin of breast cancer cell lines were investigated.The mRNA and protein expression of MTDH were determined by real-time PCR and Western blot in breast cancer cells such as MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, MDA-MB-435S, MCF-7/ADR cells. Once MTDH gene was knocked down by siRNA in MCF-7/ADR cells and overexpressed by MTDH plasmid transfection in MDA-MB-231 cells, the cell growth and therapeutic sensitivity of doxorubicin were evaluated using MTT and the Cell cycle assay and apoptosis rate was determined by flow cytometry.MCF-7/ADR cells revealed highly expressed MTDH and MDA-MB-231 cells had the lowest expression of MTDH. After MTDH gene was knocked down, the cell proliferation was inhibited, and the inhibitory rate of cell growth and apoptosis rate were enhanced, and the cell cycle arrest during the G0/G1 phase in the presence of doxorubicin treatment. On the other hand, the opposite results were observed in MDA-MB-231 cells with overexpressed MTDH gene.MTDH gene plays a promoting role in the proliferation of breast cancer cells and its high expression may be associated with doxorubicin sensitivity of breast cancer.

  16. [Advances in molecular mechanism of bacterial reduction of hexavalent chromium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dou; Zhao, You-Cai; Song, Li-Yan; Yin, Ya-Jie; Wang, Yang-Qing; Xu, Zhong-Hui

    2014-04-01

    Cr(VI) has been causing serious environmental pollution due to its carcinogenicity, teratogenicity and strong migration. Reduction of Cr( VI) to Cr(III), a precipitation that is much less toxic, is an efficient strategy to control Cr pollution. Within the strategy, bacterial reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) has been considered as one of the best bioremediation methods because of its efficiency, environment friendly, and low cost; however, the molecular mechanism remains large unknown. This review summarizes Cr(VI) reduction bacterial species and its application in pollution control, elaborates the pathways of Cr( VI) reduction and functional proteins involved, concludes the molecular mechanism of baterial reduction Cr(VI), and discusses the orientation of the future research. PMID:24946623

  17. [Molecular mechanisms of the plague pathogenic agent interaction with invertebrates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutyrev, V V; Eroshenko, G A; Popov, N V; Vidiaeva, N A; Konnov, N P

    2009-01-01

    Microbe Russian Anti-Plague Research Institute, Saratov, Russia The literature data and experimental results of the authors on the molecular basis of plague agent interaction with invertebrates are discussed. The details of the plague agent life cycle, its genome organization, and molecular genetic mechanisms of its survival in flea vector and on the nematode cuticule are discussed. The experimental data about the ability to form biofilms at abiotic and biotic surfaces in the Yersinia pestis strains of the main and non-main subspecies are presented. Mechanisms of horizontal and vertical transmission of plague agent are considered. The suggestion about participation of the new member in the complex parasitic biocenosis (nematode, vector parasite) is put forward. PMID:20050160

  18. MicroRNAs and cancer resistance: A new molecular plot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanini, F; Fabbri, M

    2016-05-01

    The most common cause of cancer relapse is drug resistance, acquired or intrinsic, which strongly limits the efficacy of both conventional and new targeted chemotherapy. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a growing, large family of short noncoding RNAs frequently dysregulated in malignancies. Although the mechanism of miRNA-mediated drug resistance is not fully understood, an increasing amount of evidence suggests their involvement in the acquisition of tumor cell drug resistance, pointing towards the need for novel and more innovative therapeutic approaches. Use of antagomiRs or mimics can modulate specific miRNAs in order to restore gene networks and signaling pathways, perhaps optimizing chemotherapies by increasing cancer cell sensitivity to drugs. The aim of this review is to provide a state-of-the-art scenario with regard to the most recent discoveries in the field of miRNAs involved in the process of resistance to cancer therapy. PMID:26875151

  19. Molecular Endoscopic Ultrasound for Diagnosis of Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy is a safe and effective technique in diagnosing and staging of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. However its predictive negative value does not exceed 50% to 60%. Unfortunately, the majority of pancreatic cancer patients have a metastatic and/or a locally advanced disease (i.e., not eligible for curative resection) which explains the limited access to pancreatic tissue specimens. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy is the most widely used approach for cytological and histological material sampling in these situations used in up to two thirds of patients with pancreatic cancer. Based on this unique material, we and others developed strategies to improve the differential diagnosis between carcinoma and inflammatory pancreatic lesions by analysis of KRAS oncogene mutation, microRNA expression and methylation, as well as mRNA expression using both qRT-PCR and Low Density Array Taqman analysis. Indeed, differentiating pancreatic cancer from pseudotumoral chronic pancreatitis remains very difficult in current clinical practice, and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy analysis proved to be very helpful. In this review, we will compile the clinical and molecular advantages of using endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy in managing pancreatic cancer

  20. Molecular Endoscopic Ultrasound for Diagnosis of Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Cordelier

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy is a safe and effective technique in diagnosing and staging of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. However its predictive negative value does not exceed 50% to 60%. Unfortunately, the majority of pancreatic cancer patients have a metastatic and/or a locally advanced disease (i.e., not eligible for curative resection which explains the limited access to pancreatic tissue specimens. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy is the most widely used approach for cytological and histological material sampling in these situations used in up to two thirds of patients with pancreatic cancer. Based on this unique material, we and others developed strategies to improve the differential diagnosis between carcinoma and inflammatory pancreatic lesions by analysis of KRAS oncogene mutation, microRNA expression and methylation, as well as mRNA expression using both qRT-PCR and Low Density Array Taqman analysis. Indeed, differentiating pancreatic cancer from pseudotumoral chronic pancreatitis remains very difficult in current clinical practice, and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy analysis proved to be very helpful. In this review, we will compile the clinical and molecular advantages of using endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy in managing pancreatic cancer.

  1. Molecular Endoscopic Ultrasound for Diagnosis of Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bournet, Barbara [Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Center Rangueil, 1 avenue Jean Poulhès, TSA 50032, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); INSERM U1037, University Hospital Center Rangueil, Toulouse (France); Pointreau, Adeline; Delpu, Yannick; Selves, Janick; Torrisani, Jerome [INSERM U1037, University Hospital Center Rangueil, Toulouse (France); Buscail, Louis, E-mail: buscail.l@chu-toulouse.fr [Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Center Rangueil, 1 avenue Jean Poulhès, TSA 50032, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); INSERM U1037, University Hospital Center Rangueil, Toulouse (France); Cordelier, Pierre [INSERM U1037, University Hospital Center Rangueil, Toulouse (France)

    2011-02-24

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy is a safe and effective technique in diagnosing and staging of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. However its predictive negative value does not exceed 50% to 60%. Unfortunately, the majority of pancreatic cancer patients have a metastatic and/or a locally advanced disease (i.e., not eligible for curative resection) which explains the limited access to pancreatic tissue specimens. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy is the most widely used approach for cytological and histological material sampling in these situations used in up to two thirds of patients with pancreatic cancer. Based on this unique material, we and others developed strategies to improve the differential diagnosis between carcinoma and inflammatory pancreatic lesions by analysis of KRAS oncogene mutation, microRNA expression and methylation, as well as mRNA expression using both qRT-PCR and Low Density Array Taqman analysis. Indeed, differentiating pancreatic cancer from pseudotumoral chronic pancreatitis remains very difficult in current clinical practice, and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy analysis proved to be very helpful. In this review, we will compile the clinical and molecular advantages of using endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy in managing pancreatic cancer.

  2. Pancreatic Cancer Gene Therapy: From Molecular Targets to Delivery Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillat, Cristina, E-mail: cristina.fillat@crg.es; Jose, Anabel; Ros, Xavier Bofill-De; Mato-Berciano, Ana; Maliandi, Maria Victoria; Sobrevals, Luciano [Programa Gens i Malaltia, Centre de Regulació Genòmica-CRG, UPF, Parc de Recerca Biomedica de Barcelona-PRBB and Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Raras (CIBERER), Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-01-18

    The continuous identification of molecular changes deregulating critical pathways in pancreatic tumor cells provides us with a large number of novel candidates to engineer gene-targeted approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment. Targets—both protein coding and non-coding—are being exploited in gene therapy to influence the deregulated pathways to facilitate cytotoxicity, enhance the immune response or sensitize to current treatments. Delivery vehicles based on viral or non-viral systems as well as cellular vectors with tumor homing characteristics are a critical part of the design of gene therapy strategies. The different behavior of tumoral versus non-tumoral cells inspires vector engineering with the generation of tumor selective products that can prevent potential toxic-associated effects. In the current review, a detailed analysis of the different targets, the delivery vectors, the preclinical approaches and a descriptive update on the conducted clinical trials are presented. Moreover, future possibilities in pancreatic cancer treatment by gene therapy strategies are discussed.

  3. Pancreatic Cancer Gene Therapy: From Molecular Targets to Delivery Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The continuous identification of molecular changes deregulating critical pathways in pancreatic tumor cells provides us with a large number of novel candidates to engineer gene-targeted approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment. Targets—both protein coding and non-coding—are being exploited in gene therapy to influence the deregulated pathways to facilitate cytotoxicity, enhance the immune response or sensitize to current treatments. Delivery vehicles based on viral or non-viral systems as well as cellular vectors with tumor homing characteristics are a critical part of the design of gene therapy strategies. The different behavior of tumoral versus non-tumoral cells inspires vector engineering with the generation of tumor selective products that can prevent potential toxic-associated effects. In the current review, a detailed analysis of the different targets, the delivery vectors, the preclinical approaches and a descriptive update on the conducted clinical trials are presented. Moreover, future possibilities in pancreatic cancer treatment by gene therapy strategies are discussed

  4. Delineating Molecular Mechanisms of Squamous Tissue Homeostasis and Neoplasia: Focus on p63

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn E. King

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mouse models have informed us that p63 is critical for normal epidermal development and homeostasis. The p53/p63/p73 family is expressed as multiple protein isoforms due to a combination of alternative promoter usage and C-terminal alternative splicing. These isoforms can mimic or interfere with one another, and their balance ultimately determines biological outcome in a context-dependent manner. While not frequently mutated, p63, and in particular the ΔNp63 subclass, is commonly overexpressed in human squamous cell cancers. In vitro keratinocytes and murine transgenic and transplantation models have been invaluable in elucidating the contribution of altered p63 levels to cancer development, and studies have identified the roles for ΔNp63 isoforms in keratinocyte survival and malignant progression, likely due in part to their transcriptional regulatory function. These findings can be extended to human cancers; for example, the novel recognition of NFκB/c-Rel as a downstream effector of p63 has identified a role for NFκB/c-Rel in human squamous cell cancers. These models will be critical in enhancing the understanding of the specific molecular mechanisms of cancer development and progression.

  5. Mechanisms of immune response regulation in lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Domagala-Kulawik, Joanna; Osinska, Iwona; Hoser, Grazyna

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths. As a solid tumor with low antigenicity and heterogenic phenotype lung cancer evades host immune defense. The cytotoxic anticancer effect is suppressed by a complex mechanism in tumor microenvironment. The population of regulatory T cells (Tregs) plays a crucial role in this inhibition of immune response. Tregs are defined by presence of forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) molecule. The high expression of Foxp3 was found in lung cancer cells and in tumor in...

  6. MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF FUNCTIONAL RESCUE MEDIATED BY P53 TUMOR SUPPRESSOR MUTATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Yu-Hong; Chen, Y. Morris; Ye, Xiang; Lu, Qiang; Tretyachenko-Ladokhina, Vira; Yang, Wei; Senear, Donald F.; Luo, Ray

    2009-01-01

    We have utilized both molecular dynamics simulations and solution biophysical measurements to investigate the rescue mechanism of mutation N235K, which plays a key role in the recently identified global suppressor motif of K235/Y239/R240 in the human p53 DNA-binding domain (DBD). Previous genetic analysis indicates that N235K alone rescues five out of six destabilized cancer mutants. However, the solution biophysical measurement shows that N235K generates only a slight increase to the stabili...

  7. AB071. The molecular mechanism of acrosome formation and globozoospermia

    OpenAIRE

    Gui, Yaoting

    2015-01-01

    Objective The acrosome is a specialized organelle that covers the anterior part of the sperm nucleus and plays an essential role in the process of fertilization. The present study is to review the molecular mechanism of acrosome formation and explore its relationship with globozoospermia Methods We reviewed the published papers from PubMed, and also report some research progress of acrosome formation in our laboratory. Results Acrosome formation can be divided into four stages: Golgi-phase, c...

  8. Molecular Mechanisms of Nasal Epithelium in Rhinitis and Rhinosinusitis

    OpenAIRE

    Toppila-Salmi, Sanna; van Drunen, Cornelis M; Fokkens, Wytske J; Golebski, Korneliuz; Mattila, Pirkko; Joenvaara, Sakari; Renkonen, Jutta; Renkonen, Risto

    2014-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis, nonallergic rhinitis, and chronic rhinosinusitis are multifactorial upper airway diseases with high prevalence. Several genetic and environmental factors are proposed to predispose to the pathogenesis of the inflammatory upper airway diseases. Still, the molecular mechanisms leading toward the onset and progression of upper airway diseases are largely unknown. The upper airway epithelium has an important role in sensing the environment and regulating the inhaled air. As suc...

  9. Molecular quantum mechanical observers, symmetry, and string theory

    OpenAIRE

    Dance, M.

    2010-01-01

    The paper \\cite{Dance0601} tentatively suggested a physical picture that might underlie string theories. The string parameters $\\tau $ and $\\sigma_i $ were interpreted as spacetime dimensions which a simple quantum mechanical observer can observe, while symmetries of the relevant observer states could limit the observability of other dimensions. An atomic observer was the focus of the discussion. The present paper extends the discussion of\\cite{Dance0601} to molecular observers, including the...

  10. Molecular mechanisms in muscular dystrophy: a gene expression profiling study.

    OpenAIRE

    Turk, Rolf

    2006-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a group of neuromuscular disorders characterized by progres¬sive muscle weakness and wasting. Although the underlying genetic defects of a large number of muscular dystrophies are now know, the molecular mechanisms resulting in the devastating effects of the disease are not yet clear. Furthermore, the muscular dystrophies differ in clinical presentation and severity. The processes responsible for this di¬vergence are largely unknown as well. In this thesis, gene e...

  11. Molecular mechanism of signaling by tumor necrosis factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    查纪坤; 舒红兵

    2002-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine with multiple biological effects,including cell growth,differentiation,apoptosis,immune regulation and induction of inflammation. The effects of TNF are mediated by two receptors,TNF-R1 and TNF-R2. The major signal transduction pathways triggered by TNF include those that lead to apoptosis,activation of transcription factor NF-??B and protein kinase JNK. This review will discuss the molecular mechanisms of these signaling pathways.

  12. The strawberry plant defense mechanism: a molecular review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amil-Ruiz, Francisco; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Caballero, José L

    2011-11-01

    Strawberry, a small fruit crop of great importance throughout the world, has been considered a model plant system for Rosaceae, and is susceptible to a large variety of phytopathogenic organisms. Most components and mechanisms of the strawberry defense network remain poorly understood. However, from current knowledge, it seems clear that the ability of a strawberry plant to respond efficiently to pathogens relies first on the physiological status of injured tissue (pre-formed mechanisms of defense) and secondly on the general ability to recognize and identify the invaders by surface plant receptors, followed by a broad range of induced mechanisms, which include cell wall reinforcement, production of reactive oxygen species, phytoalexin generation and pathogenesis-related protein accumulation. Dissection of these physiological responses at a molecular level will provide valuable information to improve future breeding strategies for new strawberry varieties and to engineer strawberry plants for durable and broad-spectrum disease resistance. In turn, this will lead to a reduction in use of chemicals and in environmental risks. Advances in the understanding of the molecular interplay between plant (mainly those considered model systems) and various classes of microbial pathogens have been made in the last two decades. However, major progress in the genetics and molecular biology of strawberry is still needed to uncover fully the way in which this elaborate plant innate immune system works. These fundamental insights will provide a conceptual framework for rational human intervention through new strawberry research approaches. In this review, we will provide a comprehensive overview and discuss recent advances in molecular research on strawberry defense mechanisms against pathogens. PMID:21984602

  13. Molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolones resistance in Mycoplasma hominis clinical isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Meng Dong-Ya; Sun Chang-Jian; Yu Jing-Bo; Ma Jun; Xue Wen-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolones resistance in Mycoplasma hominis (MH) clinical strains isolated from urogenital specimens. 15 MH clinical isolates with different phenotypes of resistance to fluoroquinolones antibiotics were screened for mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of DNA gyrase (gyrA and gyrB) and topoisomerase IV (parC and parE) in comparison with the reference strain PG21, which is susceptible to fluoroquinolones antibiotics. 15 ...

  14. Radiotracer studies on molecular mechanisms of death and resuscitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracer techniques and artificial circulation were applied to rabbits after death by anoxia and deep hypothermia in order to study molecular mechanisms. 60 min after death the biosynthesis and disintegration of protein RNA and DNA practically stopped in all organs. In animals cooled post mortem the process of biosynthesis and degradation of protein, RNA and DNA, as well as the physiological functions of the whole organism, were restored. (author)

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of nanocrystalline nickel: structure and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swygenhoven, H. van [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Caro, A. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina). Centro Atomico Bariloche

    1997-09-01

    Molecular dynamics computer simulations of low temperature elastic and plastic deformation of Ni nanophase samples (3-7 nm) are performed. The samples are polycrystals nucleated from different seeds, with random locations and orientations. Bulk and Young`s modulus, onset of plastic deformation and mechanism responsible for the plastic behaviour are studied and compared with the behaviour of coarse grained samples. (author) 1 fig., 3 refs.

  16. Recent Advances in Molecular Mechanisms of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Annambhotla, Suman; Bourgeois, Sebastian; Wang, Xinwen; Lin, Peter H.; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Changyi

    2008-01-01

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) is an increasingly common clinical condition with fatal implications. It is associated with advanced age, male gender, cigarette smoking, atherosclerosis, hypertension, and genetic predisposition. Although significant evidence has emerged in the last decade, the molecular mechanisms of AAA formation remains poorly understood. Currently, the treatment for AAA remains primarily surgical with the lone innovation of endovascular therapy. With advance in the human g...

  17. Mechanisms of ventricular arrhythmias: from molecular fluctuations to electrical turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhilin; Weiss, James N

    2015-01-01

    Ventricular arrhythmias have complex causes and mechanisms. Despite extensive investigation involving many clinical, experimental, and computational studies, effective biological therapeutics are still very limited. In this article, we review our current understanding of the mechanisms of ventricular arrhythmias by summarizing the state of knowledge spanning from the molecular scale to electrical wave behavior at the tissue and organ scales and how the complex nonlinear interactions integrate into the dynamics of arrhythmias in the heart. We discuss the challenges that we face in synthesizing these dynamics to develop safe and effective novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:25340965

  18. Underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms in childhood irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumpitazi, Bruno P; Shulman, Robert J

    2016-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) affects a large number of children throughout the world. The symptom expression of IBS is heterogeneous, and several factors which may be interrelated within the IBS biopsychosocial model play a role. These factors include visceral hyperalgesia, intestinal permeability, gut microbiota, psychosocial distress, gut inflammation, bile acids, food intolerance, colonic bacterial fermentation, and genetics. The molecular and cellular mechanisms of these factors are being actively investigated. In this mini-review, we present updates of these mechanisms and, where possible, relate the findings to childhood IBS. Mechanistic elucidation may lead to the identification of biomarkers as well as personalized childhood IBS therapies. PMID:26883355

  19. Lignin biodegradation: experimental evidence, molecular, biochemical and physiological mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monties, B.

    1985-01-01

    A critical review is presented of English, French and some German language literature, mainly from 1983 onwards. It examines experimental evidence on the behaviour as barriers to biodegradation of lignins and phenolic polymers such as tannins and suberins. The different molecular mechanisms of lignolysis by fungi (mainly), actinomycetes and bacteria are examined. A new biochemical approach to the physiological mechanism of regulation of lignolytic activities is suggested based on the discoveries of ligniolytic enzymes: effects of nitrogen, oxygen and substrate are discussed. It is concluded that a better knowledge of the structure and reactivity of phenolic barriers is needed in order to control the process of lignolysis.

  20. Cardiovascular effects of cocaine: cellular, ionic and molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turillazzi, E; Bello, S; Neri, M; Pomara, C; Riezzo, I; Fineschi, V

    2012-01-01

    Cocaine is a widely abused drug responsible for the majority of deaths ascribed to drug overdose. Many mechanisms have been proposed in order to explain the various cocaine associated cardiovascular complications. Conventionally, cocaine cardiotoxicity has been thought to be mediated indirectly through its sympathomimetic effect, i.e., by inhibiting the reuptake and thus increasing the levels of neuronal catecholamines at work on adrenoceptors. Increased oxidative stress, reactive oxygen species, and cocaine-induced apoptosis in the heart muscle have suggested a new way to understand the cardiotoxic effects of cocaine. More recent studies have led the attention to the interaction of cocaine and some metabolites with cardiac sodium, calcium and potassium channels. The current paper is aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms of cocaine cardiotoxicity which have a specific clinical and forensic interest. From a clinical point of view the full knowledge of the exact mechanisms by which cocaine exerts cardio - vascular damage is essential to identify potential therapeutic targets and improve novel strategies for cocaine related cardiovascular diseases. From a forensic point of view, it is to be underlined that cocaine use is often associated to sudden death in young, otherwise healthy individuals. While such events are widely reported, the relationship between cardiac morphological alterations and molecular/cellular mechanisms is still controversial. In conclusion, the study of cocaine cardiovascular toxicity needs a strict collaboration between clinicians and pathologists which may be very effective in further dissecting the mechanisms underlying cocaine cardiotoxicity and understanding the cardiac cocaine connection. PMID:22856657

  1. Molecular biology-based diagnosis and therapy for pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mainly described are author's investigations of the title subject through clinical and basic diagnosis/therapeutic approach. Based on their consideration of carcinogenesis and pathological features of pancreatic cancer (PC), analysis of expression of cancer-related genes in clinically available samples like pancreatic juice and cells biopsied can result in attaining their purposes. Desmoplasia, a pathological feature of PC, possibly induces resistance to therapy and one of strategies is probably its suppression. Targeting stem cells of the mesenchyma as well as those of PC is also a strategy in future. Authors' studies have revealed that quantitation of hTERT (coding teromerase) mRNA levels in PC cells micro-dissected from cytological specimens is an accurate molecular biological diagnostic method applicable clinically. Other cancer-related genes are also useful for the diagnosis and mucin (MUC) family genes are shown to be typical ones for differentiating the precancerous PC, PC and chronic pancreatisis. Efficacy of standard gemcitabine chemotherapy can be individualized with molecular markers concerned to metabolism of the drug like dCK. Radiotherapy/radio-chemotherapy are not so satisfactory for PC treatment now. Authors have found elevated MMP-2 expression and HGF/c-Met signal activation in irradiated PC cells, which can increase the invasive capability; and stimulation of phosphorylation and activation of c-Met/MARK in co-culture of irradiated PC cells with messenchymal cells from PC, which possibly leads to progression of malignancy of PC through their interaction, of which suppression, therefore, can be a new approach to increase the efficacy of radiotherapy. Authors are making effort to introducing adenovirus therapy in clinic; exempli gratia (e.g.), the virus carrying wild type p53, a cancer-suppressive gene, induces apoptosis of PC cells often having its mutated gene. (T.T.)

  2. Molecular Mechanisms of Neurodegeneration in Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Saif; Bhatia, Kanchan; Kannan, Annapoorna; Gangwani, Laxman

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive motor neuron disease with a high incidence and is the most common genetic cause of infant mortality. SMA is primarily characterized by degeneration of the spinal motor neurons that leads to skeletal muscle atrophy followed by symmetric limb paralysis, respiratory failure, and death. In humans, mutation of the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene shifts the load of expression of SMN protein to the SMN2 gene that produces low levels of full-length SMN protein because of alternative splicing, which are sufficient for embryonic development and survival but result in SMA. The molecular mechanisms of the (a) regulation of SMN gene expression and (b) degeneration of motor neurons caused by low levels of SMN are unclear. However, some progress has been made in recent years that have provided new insights into understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of SMA pathogenesis. In this review, we have briefly summarized recent advances toward understanding of the molecular mechanisms of regulation of SMN levels and signaling mechanisms that mediate neurodegeneration in SMA. PMID:27042141

  3. [Progress in the molecular genetic mechanism of gonadoblastoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lili, Yu; Wanru, Dong; Minghui, Chen; Xiangyang, Kong

    2015-11-01

    Gonadoblastoma (GB), a rare in situ germ cell tumor derived from sex cord and germ cells, is closely associated with gonadal dysgenesis. About 80% of GB individuals exhibit 46, XY female phenotype while the others are 45, XY and 46, XX with disorders of sex development. Moreover, 35% of GB can eventually develop into malignant tumors, such as seminoma and dysgerminoma tumors. The molecular genetic mechanism of GB remains to be fully uncovered due to phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity. Increasing studies show that the formation of GB is closely related to genes regulating sexual differentiation and determination (e.g., SRY, WT1, SOX9, Foxl2, TSPY, etc), and is affected by the interaction of genetic and epigenetic regulation. Here we describe the clinical and pathological features, diagnosis and treatment of GB, and also summarize the molecular genetic and epigenetic mechanisms underlying the gonadal abnormalities that lead to GB. We analyze and construct the common gene regulatory networks related to the development of GB, and describe some obstacles and deficiencies in current studies to provide innovative perspectives on further studying the pathological and molecular mechanisms of GB. PMID:26582524

  4. Genomic and molecular mechanisms for efficient biodegradation of aromatic dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Su; Xie, Shangxian; Chen, Hu; Cheng, Yanbing; Shi, Yan; Qin, Xing; Dai, Susie Y; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Yuan, Joshua S

    2016-01-25

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms for aromatic compound degradation is crucial for the development of effective bioremediation strategies. We report the discovery of a novel phenomenon for improved degradation of Direct Red 5B azo dye by Irpex lacteus CD2 with lignin as a co-substrate. Transcriptomics analysis was performed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of aromatic degradation in white rot fungus by comparing dye, lignin, and dye/lignin combined treatments. A full spectrum of lignin degradation peroxidases, oxidases, radical producing enzymes, and other relevant components were up-regulated under DR5B and lignin treatments. Lignin induced genes complemented the DR5B induced genes to provide essential enzymes and redox conditions for aromatic compound degradation. The transcriptomics analysis was further verified by manganese peroxidase (MnP) protein over-expression, as revealed by proteomics, dye decolorization assay by purified MnP and increased hydroxyl radical levels, as indicated by an iron reducing activity assay. Overall, the molecular and genomic mechanisms indicated that effective aromatic polymer degradation requires synergistic enzymes and radical-mediated oxidative reactions to form an effective network of chemical processes. This study will help to guide the development of effective bioremediation and biomass degradation strategies. PMID:26476316

  5. Overcoming ABC transporter-mediated multidrug resistance: Molecular mechanisms and novel therapeutic drug strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Zhang, Han; Assaraf, Yehuda G; Zhao, Kun; Xu, Xiaojun; Xie, Jinbing; Yang, Dong-Hua; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Multidrug resistance is a key determinant of cancer chemotherapy failure. One of the major causes of multidrug resistance is the enhanced efflux of drugs by membrane ABC transporters. Targeting ABC transporters projects a promising approach to eliminating or suppressing drug resistance in cancer treatment. To reveal the functional mechanisms of ABC transporters in drug resistance, extensive studies have been conducted from identifying drug binding sites to elucidating structural dynamics. In this review article, we examined the recent crystal structures of ABC proteins to depict the functionally important structural elements, such as domains, conserved motifs, and critical amino acids that are involved in ATP-binding and drug efflux. We inspected the drug-binding sites on ABC proteins and the molecular mechanisms of various substrate interactions with the drug binding pocket. While our continuous battle against drug resistance is far from over, new approaches and technologies have emerged to push forward our frontier. Most recent developments in anti-MDR strategies include P-gp inhibitors, RNA-interference, nano-medicines, and delivering combination strategies. With the advent of the 'Omics' era - genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics - these disciplines play an important role in fighting the battle against chemoresistance by further unraveling the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance and shed light on medical therapies that specifically target MDR. PMID:27449595

  6. An in vivo molecular response analysis of colorectal cancer treated with Astragalus membranaceus extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ailun; Yang, Chih-Hsueh; Chen, Chih-Hao; Chen, Chang-Han; Hsu, Shih-Lan; Lee, Mei-Hsien; Lee, Hoong-Chien; Su, Li-Jen

    2016-02-01

    The fact that many chemotherapeutic drugs cause chemoresistance and side effects during the course of colorectal cancer treatment necessitates development of novel cytotoxic agents aiming to attenuate new molecular targets. Here, we show that Astragalus membranaceus (Fischer) Bge. var. mongolicus (Bge.) Hsiao (AM), a traditional Chinese medicine, can inhibit tumor growth in vivo and elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms. The antitumor effect of AM was assessed on the subcutaneous tumors of human colorectal cancer cell line HCT116 grafted into nude mice. The mice were treated with either water or 500 mg/kg AM once per day, before being sacrificed for extraction of tumors, which were then subjected to microarray expression profiling. The gene expression of the extraction was then profiled using microarray analysis. The identified genes differentially expressed between treated mice and controls reveal that administration of AM suppresses chromosome organization, histone modification, and regulation of macromolecule metabolic process. A separate analysis focused on differentially expressed microRNAs revealing involvement of macromolecule metabolism, and intracellular transport, as well as several cancer signaling pathways. For validation, the input of the identified genes to The Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures led to many chemopreventive agents of natural origin that produce similar gene expression profiles to that of AM. The demonstrated effectiveness of AM suggests a potential therapeutic drug for colorectal cancer. PMID:26719057

  7. Molecular structure and elastic properties of thermotropic liquid crystals: Integrated molecular dynamics—Statistical mechanical theory vs molecular field approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capar, M. Ilk; Nar, A.; Ferrarini, A.; Frezza, E.; Greco, C.; Zakharov, A. V.; Vakulenko, A. A.

    2013-03-01

    The connection between the molecular structure of liquid crystals and their elastic properties, which control the director deformations relevant for electro-optic applications, remains a challenging objective for theories and computations. Here, we compare two methods that have been proposed to this purpose, both characterized by a detailed molecular level description. One is an integrated molecular dynamics-statistical mechanical approach, where the bulk elastic constants of nematics are calculated from the direct correlation function (DCFs) and the single molecule orientational distribution function [D. A. McQuarrie, Statistical Mechanics (Harper & Row, New York, 1973)]. The latter is obtained from atomistic molecular dynamics trajectories, together with the radial distribution function, from which the DCF is then determined by solving the Ornstein-Zernike equation. The other approach is based on a molecular field theory, where the potential of mean torque experienced by a mesogen in the liquid crystal phase is parameterized according to its molecular surface. In this case, the calculation of elastic constants is combined with the Monte Carlo sampling of single molecule conformations. Using these different approaches, but the same description, at the level of molecular geometry and torsional potentials, we have investigated the elastic properties of the nematic phase of two typical mesogens, 4'-n-pentyloxy-4-cyanobiphenyl and 4'-n-heptyloxy-4-cyanobiphenyl. Both methods yield K3(bend) >K1 (splay) >K2 (twist), although there are some discrepancies in the average elastic constants and in their anisotropy. These are interpreted in terms of the different approximations and the different ways of accounting for the structural properties of molecules in the two approaches. In general, the results point to the role of the molecular shape, which is modulated by the conformational freedom and cannot be fully accounted for by a single descriptor such as the aspect ratio.

  8. Molecular structure and elastic properties of thermotropic liquid crystals: integrated molecular dynamics--statistical mechanical theory vs molecular field approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilk Capar, M; Nar, A; Ferrarini, A; Frezza, E; Greco, C; Zakharov, A V; Vakulenko, A A

    2013-03-21

    The connection between the molecular structure of liquid crystals and their elastic properties, which control the director deformations relevant for electro-optic applications, remains a challenging objective for theories and computations. Here, we compare two methods that have been proposed to this purpose, both characterized by a detailed molecular level description. One is an integrated molecular dynamics-statistical mechanical approach, where the bulk elastic constants of nematics are calculated from the direct correlation function (DCFs) and the single molecule orientational distribution function [D. A. McQuarrie, Statistical Mechanics (Harper & Row, New York, 1973)]. The latter is obtained from atomistic molecular dynamics trajectories, together with the radial distribution function, from which the DCF is then determined by solving the Ornstein-Zernike equation. The other approach is based on a molecular field theory, where the potential of mean torque experienced by a mesogen in the liquid crystal phase is parameterized according to its molecular surface. In this case, the calculation of elastic constants is combined with the Monte Carlo sampling of single molecule conformations. Using these different approaches, but the same description, at the level of molecular geometry and torsional potentials, we have investigated the elastic properties of the nematic phase of two typical mesogens, 4'-n-pentyloxy-4-cyanobiphenyl and 4'-n-heptyloxy-4-cyanobiphenyl. Both methods yield K3(bend) >K1 (splay) >K2 (twist), although there are some discrepancies in the average elastic constants and in their anisotropy. These are interpreted in terms of the different approximations and the different ways of accounting for the structural properties of molecules in the two approaches. In general, the results point to the role of the molecular shape, which is modulated by the conformational freedom and cannot be fully accounted for by a single descriptor such as the aspect ratio

  9. Isoforms of thyroxine-binding globulin as a model for molecular epidemiology of human cancer risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    -binding globulin (TBG) by 50-60%, but no elevation in free T4, as compared with similar control groups of from Minsk. One of the reasons for the euthyroid syndrome in teenagers from the contaminated region was shown to be the blood isoforms in TBG. These isoforms differed in the structure of the carbohydrate components and as a rule are characterized by a prolonged circulation time. Using specific affinity chromatography, with subsequent immunological assay we shown that a certain amount of serum TBG-molecules in persons from Khojniki contains a high level of TBG (about 30% higher than the control group) containing fucosyalated biantennary sugar chains with more prolonged survival time. Previous findings showed that increased levels of fucosylation are observed for some serum glycoproteins in the blood of tumour patients. We provide evidence for variations in the TBGfuc which are contained in the serum TBG pool of patients suffering from cancer with various localisation. Thus, analysis of TBGfuc may be regarded as a prognostic marker in the determination of risk groups. The molecular mechanism of increased activity of fucosyl transferases will be discussed. We propose to measure the level of TBG fucosylated to assess the human cancer risk and habitants of contaminated region of Belarus. (authors)

  10. Development of molecularly targeted agents and immunotherapies in small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Adam; Bhosle, Jaishree; Abdelraouf, Fatma; Popat, Sanjay; O'Brien, Mary; Yap, Timothy A

    2016-06-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a smoking-induced malignancy with multiple toxin-associated mutations, which accounts for 15% of all lung cancers. It remains a clinical challenge with a rapid doubling time, early dissemination and poor prognosis. Despite multiple clinical trials in SCLC, platinum-based chemotherapy remains the mainstay of treatment in the first line advanced disease setting; good initial responses are nevertheless inevitably followed by disease relapse and survival ultimately remains poor. There are currently no molecularly targeted agents licenced for use in SCLC. Advances in sequencing the cancer genome and other high-throughput profiling technologies have identified aberrant pathways and mechanisms implicated in SCLC development and progression. Novel anti-tumour therapeutics that impact these putative targets are now being developed and investigated in SCLC. In this review, we discuss novel anti-tumour agents assessed in SCLC with reference to the complex molecular mechanisms implicated in SCLC development and progression. We focus on novel DNA damage response inhibitors, immune checkpoint modulators and antibody-drug conjugates that have shown promise in SCLC, and which may potentially transform treatment strategies in this disease. Finally, we envision the future management of SCLC and propose a biomarker-driven translational treatment paradigm for SCLC that incorporates next generation sequencing studies with patient tumours, circulating plasma DNA and functional imaging. Such modern strategies have the potential to transform the management and improve patient outcomes in SCLC. PMID:27060747

  11. Mechanisms of Cancer Induction by Tobacco-Specific NNK and NNN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobacco use is a major public health problem worldwide. Tobacco-related cancers cause millions of deaths annually. Although several tobacco agents play a role in the development of tumors, the potent effects of 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and N'-nitrosonornicotine (NNN) are unique. Metabolically activated NNK and NNN induce deleterious mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppression genes by forming DNA adducts, which could be considered as tumor initiation. Meanwhile, the binding of NNK and NNN to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor promotes tumor growth by enhancing and deregulating cell proliferation, survival, migration, and invasion, thereby creating a microenvironment for tumor growth. These two unique aspects of NNK and NNN synergistically induce cancers in tobacco-exposed individuals. This review will discuss various types of tobacco products and tobacco-related cancers, as well as the molecular mechanisms by which nitrosamines, such as NNK and NNN, induce cancer

  12. Molecular markers in breast cancer: new tools in imaging and prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Vermeulen, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women. Although breast cancer is mainly diagnosed by mammography, other imaging modalities (e.g. MRI, PET) are increasingly used. The most recent developments in the field of molecular imaging comprise the application of near-infrared fluorescent labeled (NIRF) tracers for detection of breast cancer. Thus far, only a few molecular imaging tracers have been taken to the clinic of which most are suitable for PET. My thesis describes the e...

  13. Hyperpolarized 13C MR for Molecular Imaging of Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, David M.; Kurhanewicz, John

    2014-01-01

    Hyperpolarization using dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization has emerged as a versatile method to dramatically improve the MR signal of low-sensitivity nuclei. This technique facilitates the study of real-time metabolism in vitro and in vivo using 13C-enriched substrates and has been applied to numerous models of human disease. In particular, several mechanisms underlying prostate cancer have been interrogated using hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopy. This review highlights key metabolic ...

  14. Effects of Honey and Its Mechanisms of Action on the Development and Progression of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omotayo O. Erejuwa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Honey is a natural product known for its varied biological or pharmacological activities—ranging from anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antibacterial, antihypertensive to hypoglycemic effects. This review article focuses on the role of honey in modulating the development and progression of tumors or cancers. It reviews available evidence (some of which is very recent with regards to the antimetastatic, antiproliferative and anticancer effects of honey in various forms of cancer. These effects of honey have been thoroughly investigated in certain cancers such as breast, liver and colorectal cancer cell lines. In contrast, limited but promising data are available for other forms of cancers including prostate, bladder, endometrial, kidney, skin, cervical, oral and bone cancer cells. The article also underscores the various possible mechanisms by which honey may inhibit growth and proliferation of tumors or cancers. These include regulation of cell cycle, activation of mitochondrial pathway, induction of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, induction of apoptosis, modulation of oxidative stress, amelioration of inflammation, modulation of insulin signaling and inhibition of angiogenesis. Honey is highly cytotoxic against tumor or cancer cells while it is non-cytotoxic to normal cells. The data indicate that honey can inhibit carcinogenesis by modulating the molecular processes of initiation, promotion, and progression stages. Thus, it may serve as a potential and promising anticancer agent which warrants further experimental and clinical studies.

  15. Oncogenic activation of ERG: A predominant mechanism in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taduru L Sreenath

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevalent gene fusions involving regulatory sequences of the androgen receptor (AR regulated genes (primarily TMPRSS2 and protein coding sequences of nuclear transcription factors of the ETS gene family (predominantly ERG result in unscheduled androgen dependent ERG expression in prostate cancer (CaP.Cumulative data from a large number of studies in the past six years accentuate ERG alterations in more than half of all CaP patients in Western countries. Studies underscore that ERG functions are involved in the biology of CaP. ERG expression in normal context is selective to endothelial cells, specific hematopoetic cells and pre-cartilage cells. Normal functions of ERG are highlighted in hematopoetic stem cells. Emerging data continues to unravel molecular and cellular mechanisms by which ERG may contribute to CaP. Herein, we focus on biological and clinical aspects of ERG oncogenic alterations, potential of ERG-based stratification of CaP and the possibilities of targeting the ERG network in developing new therapeutic strategies for the disease.

  16. Oncogenic activation of ERG: A predominant mechanism in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenath, Taduru L; Dobi, Albert; Petrovics, Gyorgy; Srivastava, Shiv

    2011-01-01

    Prevalent gene fusions involving regulatory sequences of the androgen receptor (AR) regulated genes (primarily TMPRSS2) and protein coding sequences of nuclear transcription factors of the ETS gene family (predominantly ERG) result in unscheduled androgen dependent ERG expression in prostate cancer (CaP).Cumulative data from a large number of studies in the past six years accentuate ERG alterations in more than half of all CaP patients in Western countries. Studies underscore that ERG functions are involved in the biology of CaP. ERG expression in normal context is selective to endothelial cells, specific hematopoetic cells and pre-cartilage cells. Normal functions of ERG are highlighted in hematopoetic stem cells. Emerging data continues to unravel molecular and cellular mechanisms by which ERG may contribute to CaP. Herein, we focus on biological and clinical aspects of ERG oncogenic alterations, potential of ERG-based stratification of CaP and the possibilities of targeting the ERG network in developing new therapeutic strategies for the disease. PMID:22279422

  17. MOLECULAR MECHANISM OF URANIUM REDUCTION BY CLOSTRIDIA AND ITS MANIPULATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FRANCIS, A.J.; GAO, W.; CHIDAMBARAM, D.; DODGE, C.J.

    2006-11-16

    This research addresses the need for detailed studies of the enzymatic mechanisms for reduction of radionuclides and/or metals by fermentative microorganisms. The overall objective of this research is to elucidate systematically the molecular mechanisms involved in the reduction of uranium by Clostridia. We propose to (1) determine the role of hydrogenases in uranium reduction, (2) purify the enzymes involved in uranium reduction, (3) determine the mechanisms of reduction, e.g., one or two electron transfer reactions, and (4) elucidate the genetic control of the enzymes and cellular factors involved in uranium reduction. This is a collaborative study between BNL and Stanford University involving expertise in biomolecular science, biochemistry, microbiology, and electrochemistry.

  18. Molecular Mechanism of Uranium Reduction by Clostridia and its Manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. J. Francis; W. Gao, D. Chidambaram; C.J. Dodge

    2006-06-01

    This research addresses the need for detailed studies of the enzymatic mechanisms for reduction of radionuclides and/or metals by fermentative microorganisms. The overall objective of this research is to elucidate systematically the molecular mechanisms involved in the reduction of uranium by Clostridia. We propose to (1) determine the role of hydrogenases in uranium reduction, (22) purify the enzymes involved in uranium reduction, (3) determine the mechanisms of reduction, e.g., one or two electron transfer reactions, and (4) elucidate the genetic control of the enzymes and cellular factors involved in uranium reduction. This is a collaborative study between BNL and Stanford University involving expertise in biomolecular science, biochemistry, microbiology, and electrochemistry.

  19. T cell mediated pathogenesis in EAE: Molecular mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian C Kurschus

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available T cells are major initiators and mediators of disease in multiple sclerosis (MS and in its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. EAE is an antigen-driven autoimmune model in which immunization against myelin autoantigens elicits strong T cell responses which initiate its pathology with CNS myelin destruction. T cells cause pathogenic events by several mechanisms; some work in a direct fashion in the CNS, such as direct cytokine-induced damage, granzyme-mediated killing, or glutamate-induced neurotoxicity, whereas most are indirect mechanisms, such as activation of other cell types like macrophages, B cells, or neutrophils. This review aims to describe and discuss the molecular effector mechanism by which T cells harm the CNS during EAE.

  20. Physiological, Molecular and Genetic Mechanisms of Long-Term Habituation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calin-Jageman, Robert J

    2009-09-12

    Work funded on this grant has explored the mechanisms of long-term habituation, a ubiquitous form of learning that plays a key role in basic cognitive functioning. Specifically, behavioral, physiological, and molecular mechanisms of habituation have been explored using a simple model system, the tail-elicited siphon-withdrawal reflex (T-SWR) in the marine mollusk Aplysia californica. Substantial progress has been made on the first and third aims, providing some fundamental insights into the mechanisms by which memories are stored. We have characterized the physiological correlates of short- and long-term habituation. We found that short-term habituation is accompanied by a robust sensory adaptation, whereas long-term habituation is accompanied by alterations in sensory and interneuron synaptic efficacy. Thus, our data indicates memories can be shifted between different sites in a neural network as they are consolidated from short to long term. At the molecular level, we have accomplished microarray analysis comparing gene expression in both habituated and control ganglia. We have identified a network of putatively regulated transcripts that seems particularly targeted towards synaptic changes (e.g. SNAP25, calmodulin) . We are now beginning additional work to confirm regulation of these transcripts and build a more detailed understanding of the cascade of molecular events leading to the permanent storage of long-term memories. On the third aim, we have fostered a nascent neuroscience program via a variety of successful initiatives. We have funded over 11 undergraduate neuroscience scholars, several of whom have been recognized at national and regional levels for their research. We have also conducted a pioneering summer research program for community college students which is helping enhance access of underrepresented groups to life science careers. Despite minimal progress on the second aim, this project has provided a) novel insight into the network mechanisms by

  1. Molecular mechanisms of foliar water uptake in a desert tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xia; Zhou, Maoxian; Dong, Xicun; Zou, Songbing; Xiao, Honglang; Ma, Xiao-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Water deficits severely affect growth, particularly for the plants in arid and semiarid regions of the world. In addition to precipitation, other subsidiary water, such as dew, fog, clouds and small rain showers, may also be absorbed by leaves in a process known as foliar water uptake. With the severe scarcity of water in desert regions, this process is increasingly becoming a necessity. Studies have reported on physical and physiological processes of foliar water uptake. However, the molecular mechanisms remain less understood. As major channels for water regulation and transport, aquaporins (AQPs) are involved in this process. However, due to the regulatory complexity and functional diversity of AQPs, their molecular mechanism for foliar water uptake remains unclear. In this study, Tamarix ramosissima, a tree species widely distributed in desert regions, was investigated for gene expression patterns of AQPs and for sap flow velocity. Our results suggest that the foliar water uptake of T. ramosissima occurs in natural fields at night when the humidity is over a threshold of 85 %. The diurnal gene expression pattern of AQPs suggests that most AQP gene expressions display a circadian rhythm, and this could affect both photosynthesis and transpiration. At night, the PIP2-1 gene is also upregulated with increased relative air humidity. This gene expression pattern may allow desert plants to regulate foliar water uptake to adapt to extreme drought. This study suggests a molecular basis of foliar water uptake in desert plants. PMID:26567212

  2. Molecular mechanisms of IgE mediated food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Verma, Alok Kumar; Das, Mukul; Dwivedi, Premendra D

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this review is to collate current knowledge and recent advances in molecular mechanism behind the immediate type hypersensitivity of foods. Food allergy is a growing concern of human health in developed as well as developing countries now days. Food allergic reactions are mostly IgE mediated and also known as immediate type hypersensitivity or type I reaction. This review encompasses a wide range of molecular events during IgE mediated reactions like primary exposure of allergens, processing of allergens by antigen presenting cells, role of transcription factors like GATA-3, STAT-6, NF-AT, c-maf, c-kit and NF-κB, Treg cells, toll like receptors, cytokines and chemokines, class switch to IgE, FcεR1 receptor, priming of IgE on mast cells or basophils, signaling events followed by secondary exposure of allergens, degranulation and release of mediators like leukotrienes, histamines, prostaglandins, β-hexosaminidase and ultimately anaphylaxis. This review may be helpful to beginners as well as experts working in the field of allergy and immunology because of the stepwise explanations of molecular mechanisms involved in IgE mediated reactions. PMID:22668720

  3. Studies on the molecular mechanisms of seed germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chao; Yang, Pingfang

    2015-05-01

    Seed germination that begins with imbibition and ends with radicle emergence is the first step for plant growth. Successful germination is not only crucial for seedling establishment but also important for crop yield. After being dispersed from mother plant, seed undergoes continuous desiccation in ecosystem and selects proper environment to trigger germination. Owing to the contribution of transcriptomic, proteomic, and molecular biological studies, molecular aspect of seed germination is elucidated well in Arabidopsis. Recently, more and more proteomic and genetic studies concerning cereal seed germination were performed on rice (Oryza sativa) and barley (Hordeum vulgare), which possess completely different seed structure and domestication background with Arabidopsis. In this review, both the common features and the distinct mechanisms of seed germination are compared among different plant species including Arabidopsis, rice, and maize. These features include morphological changes, cell and its related structure recovery, metabolic activation, hormone behavior, and transcription and translation activation. This review will provide more comprehensive insights into the molecular mechanisms of seed germination. PMID:25597791

  4. Mechanism(s) of Pancreatic Cancer-induced Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Chari, Suresh T.

    2014-01-01

    While long-standing diabetes (DM) modestly increases the risk of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PC), there is growing evidence that PC frequently causes DM. Up to 85% of PC patients have DM or hyperglycemia, which frequently manifests in the 2 to 3 years preceding the diagnosis of cancer. Conversely, subjects with new-onset DM have a high probability (5-8 folds higher than the population) of being diagnosed with PC within 1-3 years of DM onset. Resection of the PC leads to amelioration of ...

  5. Breast Cancer Genetic and Molecular Subtype Impacts Response to Omega-3 Fatty Acid Ethyl Esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching Hui; Fabian, Carol; Hursting, Stephen; deGraffenried, Linda A

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have correlated frequent omega-3 (n-3) fatty acid consumption with a lower risk for breast cancer; however, recent prospective studies have been less conclusive. Efforts in the preventive setting have focused on the use of n-3 fatty acids, and the pharmaceutical ethyl esters (EE) of these natural compounds, for high-risk patient populations. Limited understanding of specific mechanisms by which these agents function has hampered identification of the cancer subtype(s) that would gain the greatest therapeutic benefit. In this study, we investigated the in vitro effects of n-3 EEs in four distinct breast cancer subtypes and explored how they affect not only breast cancer cell survival but also modulate the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma signaling pathways. Similar to the high variance in response observed in human studies, we found that the effectiveness of n-3 EEs depends on the molecular characteristics of the MCF-7, CAMA-1, MDA-MB-231, and SKBR3 breast cancer cell lines and is closely associated with the suppression of NF-κB. These data strongly suggest that the use of n-3 fatty acids and their pharmaceutical ether esters in the prevention and therapeutic setting should be guided by specific tumor characteristics. PMID:27367296

  6. Molecular profiling of multiple human cancers defines an inflammatory cancer-associated molecular pattern and uncovers KPNA2 as a uniform poor prognostic cancer marker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh M Rachidi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Immune evasion is one of the recognized hallmarks of cancer. Inflammatory responses to cancer can also contribute directly to oncogenesis. Since the immune system is hardwired to protect the host, there is a possibility that cancers, regardless of their histological origins, endow themselves with a common and shared inflammatory cancer-associated molecular pattern (iCAMP to promote oncoinflammation. However, the definition of iCAMP has not been conceptually and experimentally investigated. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Genome-wide cDNA expression data was analyzed for 221 normal and 324 cancer specimens from 7 cancer types: breast, prostate, lung, colon, gastric, oral and pancreatic. A total of 96 inflammatory genes with consistent dysregulation were identified, including 44 up-regulated and 52 down-regulated genes. Protein expression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry for some of these genes. The iCAMP contains proteins whose roles in cancer have been implicated and others which are yet to be appreciated. The clinical significance of many iCAMP genes was confirmed in multiple independent cohorts of colon and ovarian cancer patients. In both cases, better prognosis correlated strongly with high CXCL13 and low level of GREM1, LOX, TNFAIP6, CD36, and EDNRA. An "Inflammatory Gene Integrated Score" was further developed from the combination of 18 iCAMP genes in ovarian cancer, which predicted overall survival. Noticeably, as a selective nuclear import protein whose immuno-regulatory function just begins to emerge, karyopherin alpha 2 (KPNA2 is uniformly up-regulated across cancer types. For the first time, the cancer-specific up-regulation of KPNA2 and its clinical significance were verified by tissue microarray analysis in colon and head-neck cancers. CONCLUSION: This work defines an inflammatory signature shared by seven epithelial cancer types and KPNA2 as a consistently up-regulated protein in cancer. Identification of iCAMP may not only

  7. Molecular targeted treatment and radiation therapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) inhibitors confer clinical benefit in metastatic colorectal cancer when combined with chemotherapy. An emerging strategy to improve outcomes in rectal cancer is to integrate biologically active, targeted agents as triple therapy into chemoradiation protocols. Material and methods: cetuximab and bevacizumab have now been incorporated into phase I-II studies of preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for rectal cancer. The rationale of these combinations, early efficacy and toxicity data, and possible molecular predictors for tumor response are reviewed. Computerized bibliographic searches of Pubmed were supplemented with hand searches of reference lists and abstracts of ASCO and ASTRO meetings. Results: the combination of cetuximab and CRT can be safely applied without dose compromises of the respective treatment components. Disappointingly low rates of pathologic complete remission have been noted in several phase II studies. The K-ras mutation status and the gene copy number of EGFR may predict tumor response. The toxicity pattern (radiation-induced enteritis, perforations) and surgical complications (wound healing, fistula, bleeding) observed in at least some of the clinical studies with bevacizumab and CRT warrant further investigations. Conclusion: longer follow-up (and, finally, randomized trials) is needed to draw any firm conclusions with respect to local and distant failure rates, and toxicity associated with these novel treatment approaches. (orig.)

  8. Molecular genetic analysis of tumor suppressor genes in ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To examine the loci of putative tumor suppressor genes in ovarian cancers, we performed the molecular genetic analysis with fresh human ovarian cancers and observed the following data. Frequent allelic losses were observed on chromosomes 4p(42%), 6p(50%), 7p(43%), 8q(31%), 12p(38%), 12q(33%), 16p(33%), 16q(37%), and 19p(34%) in addition to the previously reported 6q, 11p, and 17p in ovarian caroinomas. we have used an additional probe, TCP10 to narrow down the deleted region on chromosome 6q. TCP10 was reported to be mapped to 6q 25-27. Allelic loss was found to be 40% in epithelial ovarian caroinomas. This finding suggests that chromosome 6q 24-27 is one of putative region haboring the tumor suppressor gene of epithelial ovarian cancer (particularly serous type). To examine the association between FAL(Fractional Allelic Loss) and histopathological features, the FAL value on each phenotypically different tumor was calculated as the ratio of the number of allelic losses versus the number of cases informative in each chromosomal arm. The average FALs for each phenotypically different tumor were: serous cystoadenocarcinomas. FAL=0.31 : mucinous 0.12 : and clear cell carcinoma. FAL=0.20. (Author)

  9. Molecular targeted treatment and radiation therapy for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquardt, Friederike; Roedel, Franz; Capalbo, Gianni; Weiss, Christian; Roedel, Claus [Dept. of Radiation Therapy, Univ. of Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    Background: EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) inhibitors confer clinical benefit in metastatic colorectal cancer when combined with chemotherapy. An emerging strategy to improve outcomes in rectal cancer is to integrate biologically active, targeted agents as triple therapy into chemoradiation protocols. Material and methods: cetuximab and bevacizumab have now been incorporated into phase I-II studies of preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for rectal cancer. The rationale of these combinations, early efficacy and toxicity data, and possible molecular predictors for tumor response are reviewed. Computerized bibliographic searches of Pubmed were supplemented with hand searches of reference lists and abstracts of ASCO and ASTRO meetings. Results: the combination of cetuximab and CRT can be safely applied without dose compromises of the respective treatment components. Disappointingly low rates of pathologic complete remission have been noted in several phase II studies. The K-ras mutation status and the gene copy number of EGFR may predict tumor response. The toxicity pattern (radiation-induced enteritis, perforations) and surgical complications (wound healing, fistula, bleeding) observed in at least some of the clinical studies with bevacizumab and CRT warrant further investigations. Conclusion: longer follow-up (and, finally, randomized trials) is needed to draw any firm conclusions with respect to local and distant failure rates, and toxicity associated with these novel treatment approaches. (orig.)

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Cognitive Dysfunction following Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendall Rae Walker

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI results in significant disability due to cognitive deficits particularly in attention, learning and memory and higher-order executive functions. The role of TBI in chronic neurodegeneration and the development of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS and most recently chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE is of particular importance. However, despite significant effort very few therapeutic options exist to prevent or reverse cognitive impairment following TBI. In this review we present experimental evidence of the known secondary injury mechanisms which contribute to neuronal cell loss, axonal injury and synaptic dysfunction and hence cognitive impairment both acutely and chronically following TBI. In particular we focus on the mechanisms linking TBI to the development of two forms of dementia: AD and CTE. We provide evidence of potential molecular mechanisms involved in modulating Aβ and Tau following TBI and provide evidence of the role of these mechanisms in AD pathology. Additionally we propose a mechanism by which Aβ generated as a direct result of TBI is capable of exacerbating secondary injury mechanisms thereby establishing a neurotoxic cascade that leads to chronic neurodegeneration.

  11. Influence of low molecular weight heparin on cancer patients’ survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Ptushkin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available There is an evidence of interaction between the hemostasis system and tumor progression factors. It is known that in addition to the fibrin formation and platelets activation, thrombin can influence many cells function interacting with protease-activating receptors including tumor cells. These receptors are involved in the malignant cell phenotype formation (adhesion, proliferation, proteolysis. Thrombin can also affect angiogenesis by stimulating endothelial cells penetration through basal membrane and its migration with new vessels formation. Furthermore, it can cause the release of main neoangiogenesis promoter – vascular endothelial growth factor. All of the above and many other linkages of coagulation and tumor create a theoretical background of possible affecting tumor by regulation of the coagulation activity. Thepromise of this approach is controversial, but there is some clinical and experimental evidence of their effectiveness. The most used group ofdrugs for this purpose was heparins. Several retrospective studies have shown a benefit of low molecular weight heparins (LMWH over unfractionated heparin in cancer patient survival. The appearance of a new heparins group – ultra LMWH are of interest from this point ofview and their possible use in cancer patients. To date bemiparin and semuloparin are used in clinic. Both (bemiparin about 3600 kDa,semuloparin 3000 kDa have substancially reduced molecular weight as compared with the smallest of LMWH – enoxaparin (4600 kDa.Use of bemiparin in patients with small cell lung cancer receiving chemotherapy resulted in increased of 2-year survival rate compared to the control group (68.6 % vs. 29.4 %, p = 0.0042.

  12. Animal viruses, radiation, repair mechanisms, and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of radiation on animal viruses are reviewed in terms of repair mechanisms and their possible relationship to virus transformation and carcinogenesis. Repair mechanisms are reviewed under the headings; multiplicity reactivation, photoreactivation, host-cell reactivation (dark repair), and uv reactivation. Other topics discussed are: transformation of cells in vitro by irradiated viruses, oncogenicity of virus-transformed cells in vivo, and possible role of repair mechanisms in virus transformation and oncogenesis

  13. Cancer Cachexia:Mechanisms and Clinical Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Donohoe, Claire L.; Ryan, Aoife M.; John V. Reynolds

    2011-01-01

    PUBLISHED Cachexia is amultifactorial process of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue atrophy resulting in progressive weight loss. It is associated with poor quality of life, poor physical function, and poor prognosis in cancer patients. It involves multiple pathways: procachectic and proinflammatory signals from tumour cells, systemic inflammation in the host, and widespread metabolic changes (increased resting energy expenditure and alterations in metabolism of protein, fat, and ...

  14. Mechanisms of Helicobacter pylori antibiotic resistance and molecular testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiro eNishizawa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is the main factor affecting the efficacy of current treatment methods against infection caused by this organism. The traditional culture methods for testing bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics are expensive and require 10 to 14 days. Since resistance to clarithromycin, fluoroquinolone, and tetracycline seems to be exclusively caused by specific mutations in a small region of the responsible gene, molecular methods offer an attractive alternative to the above-mentioned techniques. The technique of polymerase chain reaction (PCR is an accurate and rapid method for the detection of mutations that confer antibiotic resistance. This review highlights the mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in H. pylori and the molecular methods for antibiotic susceptibility testing.

  15. Complement system part I - molecular mechanisms of activation and regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eMerle

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Complement is a complex innate immune surveillance system, playing a key role in defense against pathogens and in host homeostasis. The complement system is initiated by conformational changes in recognition molecular complexes upon sensing danger signals. The subsequent cascade of enzymatic reactions is tightly regulated to assure that complement is activated only at specific locations requiring defense against pathogens, thus avoiding host tissue damage. Here we discuss the recent advances describing the molecular and structural basis of activation and regulation of the complement pathways and their implication on physiology and pathology. This article will review the mechanisms of activation of alternative, classical and lectin pathways, the formation of C3 and C5 convertases, the action of anaphylatoxins and the membrane attack complex. We will also discuss the importance of structure-function relationships using the example of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Lastly we will discuss the development and benefits of therapies using complement inhibitors.

  16. Conduction mechanism of nitronyl-nitroxide molecular magnetic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotti, N.; Heintze, E.; Slota, M.; Hübner, R.; Wang, F.; Nuss, J.; Dressel, M.; Bogani, L.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the conduction mechanisms of nitronyl-nitroxide (NIT) molecular radicals, as useful for the creation of nanoscopic molecular spintronic devices, finding that it does not correspond to standard Mott behavior, as previously postulated. We provide a complete investigation using transport measurements, low-energy, sub-THz spectroscopy and introducing differently substituted phenyl appendages. We show that a nontrivial surface-charge-limited regime is present in addition to the standard low-voltage Ohmic conductance. Scaling analysis allows one to determine all the main transport parameters for the compounds and highlights the presence of charge-trapping effects. Comparison among the different compounds shows the relevance of intermolecular stacking between the aromatic ring of the phenyl appendix and the NIT motif in the creation of useful electron transport channels. The importance of intermolecular pathways is further highlighted by electronic structure calculations, which clarify the nature of the electronic channels and their effect on the Mott character of the compounds.

  17. A mechanically-induced colon cancer cell population shows increased metastatic potential

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Xin

    2014-05-29

    Background: Metastasis accounts for the majority of deaths from cancer. Although tumor microenvironment has been shown to have a significant impact on the initiation and/or promotion of metastasis, the mechanism remains elusive. We previously reported that HCT-8 colon cancer cells underwent a phenotypic transition from an adhesive epithelial type (E-cell) to a rounded dissociated type (R-cell) via soft substrate culture, which resembled the initiation of metastasis. The objective of current study was to investigate the molecular and metabolic mechanisms of the E-R transition.Methods: Global gene expressions of HCT-8 E and R cells were measured by RNA Sequencing (RNA-seq); and the results were further confirmed by real-time PCR. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), anoikis resistance, enzyme activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 3 family, member A1 (ALDH3A1), and in vitro invasion assay were tested on both E and R cells. The deformability of HCT-8 E and R cells was measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). To study the in vivo invasiveness of two cell types, athymic nude mice were intra-splenically injected with HCT-8 E or R cells and sacrificed after 9 weeks. Incidences of tumor development and metastasis were histologically evaluated and analyzed with Fisher\\'s exact test.Results: Besides HCT-8, E-R transition on soft substrates was also seen in three other cancer cell lines (HCT116, SW480 colon and DU145 prostate cancer). The expression of some genes, such as ALDH3A1, TNS4, CLDN2, and AKR1B10, which are known to play important roles in cancer cell migration, invasion, proliferation and apoptosis, were increased in HCT-8 R cells. R cells also showed higher ALDH3A1 enzyme activity, higher ROS, higher anoikis resistance, and higher softness than E cells. More importantly, in vitro assay and in vivo animal models revealed that HCT-8 R cells were more invasive than E cells.Conclusions: Our comprehensive comparison of HCT-8 E and R cells revealed differences of molecular

  18. Nuclear EGFR as a molecular target in cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been one of the most targeted receptors in the field of oncology. While anti-EGFR inhibitors have demonstrated clinical success in specific cancers, most patients demonstrate either intrinsic or acquired resistance within one year of treatment. Many mechanisms of resistance to EGFR inhibitors have been identified, one of these being attributed to alternatively localized EGFR from the cell membrane into the cell’s nucleus. Inside the nucleus, EGFR functions as a co-transcription factor for several genes involved in cell proliferation and angiogenesis, and as a tyrosine kinase to activate and stabilize proliferating cell nuclear antigen and DNA dependent protein kinase. Nuclear localized EGFR is highly associated with disease progression, worse overall survival in numerous cancers, and enhanced resistance to radiation, chemotherapy, and the anti-EGFR therapies gefitinib and cetuximab. In this review the current knowledge of how nuclear EGFR enhances resistance to cancer therapeutics is discussed, in addition to highlighting ways to target nuclear EGFR as an anti-cancer strategy in the future

  19. Ambient-Potential Composite Ewald Method for ab Initio Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, Timothy J; York, Darrin M

    2016-06-14

    A new approach for performing Particle Mesh Ewald in ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations with extended atomic orbital basis sets is presented. The new approach, the Ambient-Potential Composite Ewald (CEw) method, does not perform the QM/MM interaction with Mulliken charges nor electrostatically fit charges. Instead the nuclei and electron density interact directly with the MM environment, but in a manner that avoids the use of dense Fourier transform grids. By performing the electrostatics with the underlying QM density, the CEw method avoids self-consistent field instabilities that have been encountered with simple charge mapping procedures. Potential of mean force (PMF) profiles of the p-nitrophenyl phosphate dissociation reaction in explicit solvent are computed from PBE0/6-31G* QM/MM molecular dynamics simulations with various electrostatic protocols. The CEw profiles are shown to be stable with respect to real-space Ewald cutoff, whereas the PMFs computed from truncated and switched electrostatics produce artifacts. PBE0/6-311G**, AM1/d-PhoT, and DFTB2 QM/MM simulations are performed to generate two-dimensional PMF profiles of the phosphoryl transesterification reactions with ethoxide and phenoxide leaving groups. The semiempirical models incorrectly produce a concerted ethoxide mechanism, whereas PBE0 correctly produces a stepwise mechanism. The ab initio reaction barriers agree more closely to experiment than the semiempirical models. The failure of Mulliken-charge QM/MM-Ewald is analyzed. PMID:27171914

  20. Molecular mechanical properties of short-sequence peptide enzyme mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tsukasa; Vo Ngo, Bao C; Xiao, Leyang; Arya, Gaurav; Heller, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    While considerable attempts have been made to recreate the high turnover rates of enzymes using synthetic enzyme mimics, most have failed and only a few have produced minimal reaction rates that can barely be considered catalytic. One particular approach we have focused on is the use of short-sequence peptides that contain key catalytic groups in close proximity. In this study, we designed six different peptides and tested their ability to mimic the catalytic mechanism of the cysteine proteases. Acetylation and deacylation by Ellman's Reagent trapping experiments showed the importance of having phenylalanine groups surrounding the catalytic sites in order to provide greater proximity between the cysteine, histidine, and aspartate amino acid R-groups. We have also carried out all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to determine the distance between these catalytic groups and the overall mechanical flexibility of the peptides. We found strong correlations between the magnitude of fluctuations in the Cys-His distance, which determines the flexibility and interactions between the cysteine thiol and histidine imidazole groups, and the deacylation rate. We found that, in general, shorter Cys-His distance fluctuations led to a higher deacylation rate constant, implying that greater confinement of the two residues will allow a higher frequency of the acetyl exchange between the cysteine thiol and histidine imidazole R-groups. This may be the key to future design of peptide structures with molecular mechanical properties that lead to viable enzyme mimics. PMID:25921736

  1. Steered Molecular Dynamics Methods Applied to Enzyme Mechanism and Energetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, C L; Martí, M A; Roitberg, A E

    2016-01-01

    One of the main goals of chemistry is to understand the underlying principles of chemical reactions, in terms of both its reaction mechanism and the thermodynamics that govern it. Using hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM)-based methods in combination with a biased sampling scheme, it is possible to simulate chemical reactions occurring inside complex environments such as an enzyme, or aqueous solution, and determining the corresponding free energy profile, which provides direct comparison with experimental determined kinetic and equilibrium parameters. Among the most promising biasing schemes is the multiple steered molecular dynamics method, which in combination with Jarzynski's Relationship (JR) allows obtaining the equilibrium free energy profile, from a finite set of nonequilibrium reactive trajectories by exponentially averaging the individual work profiles. However, obtaining statistically converged and accurate profiles is far from easy and may result in increased computational cost if the selected steering speed and number of trajectories are inappropriately chosen. In this small review, using the extensively studied chorismate to prephenate conversion reaction, we first present a systematic study of how key parameters such as pulling speed, number of trajectories, and reaction progress are related to the resulting work distributions and in turn the accuracy of the free energy obtained with JR. Second, and in the context of QM/MM strategies, we introduce the Hybrid Differential Relaxation Algorithm, and show how it allows obtaining more accurate free energy profiles using faster pulling speeds and smaller number of trajectories and thus smaller computational cost. PMID:27497165

  2. Molecular and Mechanical Causes of Microtubule Catastrophe and Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, Pavel; Gudimchuk, Nikita; Voevodin, Vladimir; Tikhonravov, Alexander; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L

    2015-12-15

    Tubulin polymers, microtubules, can switch abruptly from the assembly to shortening. These infrequent transitions, termed "catastrophes", affect numerous cellular processes but the underlying mechanisms are elusive. We approached this complex stochastic system using advanced coarse-grained molecular dynamics modeling of tubulin-tubulin interactions. Unlike in previous simplified models of dynamic microtubules, the catastrophes in this model arise owing to fluctuations in the composition and conformation of a growing microtubule tip, most notably in the number of protofilament curls. In our model, dynamic evolution of the stochastic microtubule tip configurations over a long timescale, known as the system's "aging", gives rise to the nonexponential distribution of microtubule lifetimes, consistent with experiment. We show that aging takes place in the absence of visible changes in the microtubule wall or tip, as this complex molecular-mechanical system evolves slowly and asymptotically toward the steady-state level of the catastrophe-promoting configurations. This new, to our knowledge, theoretical basis will assist detailed mechanistic investigations of the mechanisms of action of different microtubule-binding proteins and drugs, thereby enabling accurate control over the microtubule dynamics to treat various pathologies. PMID:26682815

  3. The molecular mechanism of HOTAIR in tumorigenesis, metastasis, and drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaolong; Chen, Jin; Tang, Wenru

    2014-12-01

    Long non-coding RNAs have been reported to play an important role in cellular metabolism and development. Homeobox transcript antisense intergenic RNA (HOTAIR), a long non-coding RNA, is pervasively over-expressed in most human cancers compared with non-cancerous adjacent tissues. Although many articles have reported that HOTAIR is closely associated with metastasis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, advanced pathological stage, drug resistance, and poor prognosis, the role of HOTAIR in gene regulation and tumor development is largely unknown, and the potential molecular mechanisms are not completely clear yet. In this review, we summarized the recent progress in the study of the major functions of HOTAIR. miR-331-3p, miR-130a, miR-7, miR-141, HER2, c-MYC, WIF-1, RBM38, PTEN, and Col-1 are involved in the HOTAIR regulation network. We tried to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of HOTAIR in the aspects of tumorigenesis, metastasis, drug resistance, and regulation. PMID:25385164

  4. United polarizable multipole water model for molecular mechanics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Rui; Wang, Qiantao; Ren, Pengyu, E-mail: pren@mail.utexas.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Wang, Lee-Ping; Pande, Vijay S. [Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2015-07-07

    We report the development of a united AMOEBA (uAMOEBA) polarizable water model, which is computationally 3–5 times more efficient than the three-site AMOEBA03 model in molecular dynamics simulations while providing comparable accuracy for gas-phase and liquid properties. In this coarse-grained polarizable water model, both electrostatic (permanent and induced) and van der Waals representations have been reduced to a single site located at the oxygen atom. The permanent charge distribution is described via the molecular dipole and quadrupole moments and the many-body polarization via an isotropic molecular polarizability, all located at the oxygen center. Similarly, a single van der Waals interaction site is used for each water molecule. Hydrogen atoms are retained only for the purpose of defining local frames for the molecular multipole moments and intramolecular vibrational modes. The parameters have been derived based on a combination of ab initio quantum mechanical and experimental data set containing gas-phase cluster structures and energies, and liquid thermodynamic properties. For validation, additional properties including dimer interaction energy, liquid structures, self-diffusion coefficient, and shear viscosity have been evaluated. The results demonstrate good transferability from the gas to the liquid phase over a wide range of temperatures, and from nonpolar to polar environments, due to the presence of molecular polarizability. The water coordination, hydrogen-bonding structure, and dynamic properties given by uAMOEBA are similar to those derived from the all-atom AMOEBA03 model and experiments. Thus, the current model is an accurate and efficient alternative for modeling water.

  5. United polarizable multipole water model for molecular mechanics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the development of a united AMOEBA (uAMOEBA) polarizable water model, which is computationally 3–5 times more efficient than the three-site AMOEBA03 model in molecular dynamics simulations while providing comparable accuracy for gas-phase and liquid properties. In this coarse-grained polarizable water model, both electrostatic (permanent and induced) and van der Waals representations have been reduced to a single site located at the oxygen atom. The permanent charge distribution is described via the molecular dipole and quadrupole moments and the many-body polarization via an isotropic molecular polarizability, all located at the oxygen center. Similarly, a single van der Waals interaction site is used for each water molecule. Hydrogen atoms are retained only for the purpose of defining local frames for the molecular multipole moments and intramolecular vibrational modes. The parameters have been derived based on a combination of ab initio quantum mechanical and experimental data set containing gas-phase cluster structures and energies, and liquid thermodynamic properties. For validation, additional properties including dimer interaction energy, liquid structures, self-diffusion coefficient, and shear viscosity have been evaluated. The results demonstrate good transferability from the gas to the liquid phase over a wide range of temperatures, and from nonpolar to polar environments, due to the presence of molecular polarizability. The water coordination, hydrogen-bonding structure, and dynamic properties given by uAMOEBA are similar to those derived from the all-atom AMOEBA03 model and experiments. Thus, the current model is an accurate and efficient alternative for modeling water

  6. Drugs meeting the molecular basis of diabetic kidney disease: bridging from molecular mechanism to personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J; Oberbauer, Rainer; Perco, Paul; Heinzel, Andreas; Heinze, Georg; Mayer, Gert; Mayer, Bernd

    2015-08-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is a complex, multifactorial disease and is associated with a high risk of renal and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Clinical practice guidelines for diabetes recommend essentially identical treatments for all patients without taking into account how the individual responds to the instituted therapy. Yet, individuals vary widely in how they respond to medications and therefore optimal therapy differs between individuals. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms of variability in drug response will help tailor optimal therapy. Polymorphisms in genes related to drug pharmacokinetics have been used to explore mechanisms of response variability in DKD, but with limited success. The complex interaction between genetic make-up and environmental factors on the abundance of proteins and metabolites renders pharmacogenomics alone insufficient to fully capture response variability. A complementary approach is to attribute drug response variability to individual variability in underlying molecular mechanisms involved in the progression of disease. The interplay of different processes (e.g. inflammation, fibrosis, angiogenesis, oxidative stress) appears to drive disease progression, but the individual contribution of each process varies. Drugs at the other hand address specific targets and thereby interfere in certain disease-associated processes. At this level, biomarkers may help to gain insight into which specific pathophysiological processes are involved in an individual followed by a rational assessment whether a specific drug's mode of action indeed targets the relevant process at hand. This article describes the conceptual background and data-driven workflow developed by the SysKid consortium aimed at improving characterization of the molecular mechanisms underlying DKD at the interference of the molecular impact of individual drugs in order to tailor optimal therapy to individual patients. PMID:26209732

  7. Molecular Mechanism of Allosteric Communication in Hsp70 Revealed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Chiappori, Federica; Merelli, Ivan; Colombo, Giorgio; Milanesi, Luciano; Morra, Giulia

    2012-01-01

    Author Summary Allostery, or the capability of proteins to respond to ligand binding events with a variation in structure or dynamics at a distant site, is a common feature for biomolecular function and regulation in a large number of proteins. Intra-protein connections and inter-residue coordinations underlie allosteric mechanisms and react to binding primarily through a finely tuned modulation of motions and structures at the microscopic scale. Hence, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations...

  8. Mechanical Properties of Gelatin Gels; Effect of Molecular Weight and Molecular Weight Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Jonhard, Eysturskarð

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the gelatin manufacturer is to partial hydrolyze the covalent cross-linkages that organize the collagen molecules into a quarter staggered arrangement found in connective tissue, to minimize the hydrolysis of the peptide bonds and to obtain the appropriate molecular weigh distribution (MWD) for a specific application.The mechanical properties of the resulting gelatin are known to be influenced by the tissues and species from which it is produced as well as the pretreatment and ext...

  9. Functions and mechanisms of long noncoding RNAs in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng ZZ

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Zhenzi Peng, Chunfang Zhang, Chaojun Duan Institute of Medical Sciences, Key Laboratory of Cancer Proteomics of Chinese Ministry of Health, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Lung cancer is a heterogeneous disease, and there is a lack of adequate biomarkers for diagnosis. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs are emerging as an important set of molecules because of their roles in various key pathophysiological pathways, including cell growth, apoptosis, and metastasis. We review the current knowledge of the lncRNAs in lung cancer. In-depth analyses of lncRNAs in lung cancer have increased the number of potential effective biomarkers, thus providing options to increase the therapeutic benefit. In this review, we summarize the functions, mechanisms, and regulatory networks of lncRNAs in lung cancer, providing a basis for further research in this field. Keywords: ncRNA, tumorigenesis, biomarker, network, proliferation, apoptosis 

  10. Growth Inhibition and Apoptosis Inducing Mechanisms of Curcumin on Human Ovarian Cancer Cell Line A2780

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Li-duan; TONG Qiang-song; WU Cui-huan

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the growth inhibition effects and apoptosis inducing mechanisms of curcumin on human ovarian cancer cell line A2780. Methods: After treatment with 10-50 μmol/L curcumin for 6-24 h, the growth activity of A2780 cancer cells were studied by [ 4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyItetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetry. Cellular apoptosis was inspected by flow cytometery and acridine orange-ethidium bromide fluorescent staining methods. The fragmentation of cellular chromosome DNA was detected by DNA ladder, the ultrastructural change was observed under a transmission electron microscope,and the protein levels of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB, P65) and cysteinyl aspartate specific protease-3 (Caspase-3) in ovarian cancer cells were measured by immunohistochemistry. Results: After treatment with various concentrations of curcumin, the growth inhibition rates of cancer cells reached 62.05%- 89.24%,with sub-G1 peaks appearing on histogram. Part of the cancer cells showed characteristic morphological changes of apoptosis under fluorescence and electron microscopes, and the rate of apoptosis was 21.5 % -33.5%. The protein expression of NF-κB was decreased, while that of Caspase-3 was increased in a timedependent manner. Conclusion: Curcumin could significantly inhibit the growth of human ovarian cancer cells;inducing apoptosis through up-regulating Caspase-3 and down-regulating gene expression of NF-κB is probably one of its molecular mechanisms.

  11. Prediction of organic molecular crystal geometries from MP2-level fragment quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Kaushik D.; Beran, Gregory J. O.

    2012-11-01

    The fragment-based hybrid many-body interaction (HMBI) model provides a computationally affordable means of applying electronic structure wavefunction methods to molecular crystals. It combines a quantum mechanical treatment of individual molecules in the unit cell and their short-range pairwise interactions with a polarizable molecular mechanics force-field treatment of long-range and many-body interactions. Here, we report the implementation of analytic nuclear gradients for the periodic model to enable full relaxation of both the atomic positions and crystal lattice parameters. Using a set of five, chemically diverse molecular crystals, we compare the quality of the HMBI MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ-level structures with those obtained from dispersion-corrected periodic density functional theory, B3LYP-D*, and from the Amoeba polarizable force field. The MP2-level structures largely agree with the experimental lattice parameters to within 2%, and the root-mean-square deviations in the atomic coordinates are less than 0.2 Å. These MP2 structures are almost as good as those predicted from periodic B3LYP-D*/TZP and are significantly better than those obtained with B3LYP-D*/6-31G(d,p) or with the Amoeba force field.

  12. Investigation of molecular mechanisms and regulatory pathways of pro-angiogenic nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nethi, Susheel Kumar; Veeriah, Vimal; Barui, Ayan Kumar; Rajendran, Saranya; Mattapally, Saidulu; Misra, Sanjay; Chatterjee, Suvro; Patra, Chitta Ranjan

    2015-05-01

    Angiogenesis, a process involving the growth of new blood vessels from the pre-existing vasculature, plays a crucial role in various pathophysiological conditions. We have previously demonstrated that europium hydroxide [EuIII(OH)3] nanorods (EHNs) exhibit pro-angiogenic properties through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. Considering the enormous implication of angiogenesis in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and cancer, it is essential to understand in-depth molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways in order to develop the most efficient and effective alternative treatment strategy for CVDs. However, the exact underlying mechanism and cascade signaling pathways behind the pro-angiogenic properties exhibited by EHNs still remain unclear. Herein, we report for the first time that the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a redox signaling molecule, generated by these EHNs activates the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) that promotes the nitric oxide (NO) production in a PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)/Akt dependent manner, eventually triggering angiogenesis. We intensely believe that the investigation and understanding of the in-depth molecular mechanism and signaling pathways of EHNs induced angiogenesis will help us in developing an effective alternative treatment strategy for cardiovascular related and ischemic diseases where angiogenesis plays an important role.Angiogenesis, a process involving the growth of new blood vessels from the pre-existing vasculature, plays a crucial role in various pathophysiological conditions. We have previously demonstrated that europium hydroxide [EuIII(OH)3] nanorods (EHNs) exhibit pro-angiogenic properties through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. Considering the enormous implication of angiogenesis in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and cancer, it is essential to understand in-depth molecular

  13. Buckling of microtubules: An insight by molecular and continuum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular structural mechanics method has been extended to investigate the buckling of microtubules (MTs) with various configurations. The results indicate that for relative short MTs the shear deformation effect, rather than the nonlocal effect, is mainly responsible for the limitation of their widely used Euler beam description and the observed length-dependence of their bending stiffness. In addition, the configuration effect of MTs is also studied and considered as an explanation for the large scattering of the critical buckling force and bending stiffness observed in existing experiments. This configuration effect is also found to mainly originate from the geometry of the MTs and is mainly determined by the protofilament number.

  14. Mixed 2D molecular systems: Mechanic, thermodynamic and dielectric properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beňo, Juraj; Weis, Martin; Dobročka, Edmund; Haško, Daniel

    2008-08-01

    Study of Langmuir monolayers consisting of stearic acid (SA) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) molecules was done by surface pressure-area isotherms ( π- A), the Maxwell displacement current (MDC) measurement, X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the selected mechanic, thermodynamic and dielectric properties based on orientational structure of monolayers. On the base of π- A isotherms analysis we explain the creation of stable structures and found optimal monolayer composition. The dielectric properties represented by MDC generated monolayers were analyzed in terms of excess dipole moment, proposing the effect of dipole-dipole interaction. XRR and AFM results illustrate deposited film structure and molecular ordering.

  15. Mixed 2D molecular systems: Mechanic, thermodynamic and dielectric properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Study of Langmuir monolayers consisting of stearic acid (SA) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) molecules was done by surface pressure-area isotherms (π-A), the Maxwell displacement current (MDC) measurement, X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the selected mechanic, thermodynamic and dielectric properties based on orientational structure of monolayers. On the base of π-A isotherms analysis we explain the creation of stable structures and found optimal monolayer composition. The dielectric properties represented by MDC generated monolayers were analyzed in terms of excess dipole moment, proposing the effect of dipole-dipole interaction. XRR and AFM results illustrate deposited film structure and molecular ordering

  16. Pain in Breast Cancer Treatment: Aggravating Factors and Coping Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Maria de Fatima Guerreiro Godoy; Livia Maria Pereira de Godoy; Stelamarys Barufi; José Maria Pereira de Godoy

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate pain in women with breast cancer-related lymphedema and the characteristics of aggravating factors and coping mechanisms. The study was conducted in the Clinica Godoy, São Jose do Rio Preto, with a group of 46 women who had undergone surgery for the treatment of breast cancer. The following variables were evaluated: type and length of surgery; number of radiotherapy and chemotherapy sessions; continued feeling of the removed breast (phantom limb), i...

  17. Mechanisms of oestrogen receptor (ER) gene regulation in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, J S

    2016-07-01

    Most breast cancers are driven by a transcription factor called oestrogen receptor (ER). Understanding the mechanisms of ER activity in breast cancer has been a major research interest and recent genomic advances have revealed extraordinary insights into how ER mediates gene transcription and what occurs during endocrine resistance. This review discusses our current understanding on ER activity, with an emphasis on several evolving, but important areas of ER biology. PMID:26884552

  18. Effects on DNA Damage and/or Repair Processes as Biological Mechanisms Linking Psychological Stress to Cancer Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Jenkins, Frank J; Van Houten, Bennett; Bovbjerg, Dana H

    2014-01-01

    Considerable research effort in the past several decades has focused on the impact of psychological stress, and stress hormones, on cancer progression. Numerous studies have reported that stress hormone treatment or in vivo stress exposure can enhance the growth of tumor cell lines in vitro, as well as tumors in animal models, and have begun to explore molecular mechanisms. Comparatively little research has focused on the impact of psychological stress and stress hormones on cancer initiation...

  19. Molecular Principles of Gene Fusion Mediated Rewiring of Protein Interaction Networks in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latysheva, Natasha S; Oates, Matt E; Maddox, Louis; Flock, Tilman; Gough, Julian; Buljan, Marija; Weatheritt, Robert J; Babu, M Madan

    2016-08-18

    Gene fusions are common cancer-causing mutations, but the molecular principles by which fusion protein products affect interaction networks and cause disease are not well understood. Here, we perform an integrative analysis of the structural, interactomic, and regulatory properties of thousands of putative fusion proteins. We demonstrate that genes that form fusions (i.e., parent genes) tend to be highly connected hub genes, whose protein products are enriched in structured and disordered interaction-mediating features. Fusion often results in the loss of these parental features and the depletion of regulatory sites such as post-translational modifications. Fusion products disproportionately connect proteins that did not previously interact in the protein interaction network. In this manner, fusion products can escape cellular regulation and constitutively rewire protein interaction networks. We suggest that the deregulation of central, interaction-prone proteins may represent a widespread mechanism by which fusion proteins alter the topology of cellular signaling pathways and promote cancer. PMID:27540857

  20. Molecular View of Protein Crystal Growth: Molecular Interactions, Surface Reconstruction and Growth Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadarajah, Arunan; Li, Huayu; Konnert, John H.; Pusey, Marc L.

    2000-01-01

    Studies of the growth and molecular packing of tetragonal lysozyme crystals suggest that there is an underlying molecular growth mechanism, in addition to the classical one involving screw dislocation/2D) nucleation growth. These crystals are constructed by strongly bonded molecular chains forming helices about the 43 axes. The helices are connected to each other by weaker bonds. Crystal growth proceeds by the formation of these 4(sub 3) helices, which would explain some unexpected observations by earlier investigators, such as bimolecular growth steps on the (110) face. Another consequence of these molecular considerations is that only one of two possible packing arrangements could occur on the crystal faces and that their growth unit was at least a tetramer corresponding to the 4(sub 3) helix. Two new high resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were developed to directly confirm these predictions on tetragonal lysozyme crystals. Most earlier investigations of protein crystal growth with AFM were in the low resolution mode which is adequate to investigate the classical growth mechanisms, but cannot resolve molecular features and mechanisms. Employing the first of the newly developed techniques, high resolution AFM images of the (110) face were compared with the theoretically constructed images for the two possible packing arrangements on this face. The prediction that the molecular packing arrangement of these faces corresponded to that for complete 4(sub 3) helices was confirmed in this manner. This investigation also showed the occurrence of surface reconstruction on protein crystals. The molecules on the surface of the (110) face were found to pack closer along the 4(sub 3) axes than those in the interior. The second new AFM technique was used to follow the growth process by measuring the dimensions of individual growth units on the (110) face. Linescans across a growth step, performed near the saturation limit of the crystals, allowed the growth

  1. Alterations in cancer cell mechanical properties after fluid shear stress exposure: a micropipette aspiration study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chivukula VK

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Venkat Keshav Chivukula,1 Benjamin L Krog,1,2 Jones T Nauseef,2 Michael D Henry,2 Sarah C Vigmostad1 1Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Iowa, Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, IA, USA Abstract: Over 90% of cancer deaths result not from primary tumor development, but from metastatic tumors that arise after cancer cells circulate to distal sites via the circulatory system. While it is known that metastasis is an inefficient process, the effect of hemodynamic parameters such as fluid shear stress (FSS on the viability and efficacy of metastasis is not well understood. Recent work has shown that select cancer cells may be able to survive and possibly even adapt to FSS in vitro. The current research seeks to characterize the effect of FSS on the mechanical properties of suspended cancer cells in vitro. Nontransformed prostate epithelial cells (PrEC LH and transformed prostate cancer cells (PC-3 were used in this study. The Young's modulus was determined using micropipette aspiration. We examined cells in suspension but not exposed to FSS (unsheared and immediately after exposure to high (6,400 dyn/cm2 and low (510 dyn/cm2 FSS. The PrEC LH cells were ~140% stiffer than the PC-3 cells not exposed to FSS. Post-FSS exposure, there was an increase of ~77% in Young's modulus after exposure to high FSS and a ~47% increase in Young's modulus after exposure to low FSS for the PC-3 cells. There was no significant change in the Young's modulus of PrEC LH cells post-FSS exposure. Our findings indicate that cancer cells adapt to FSS, with an increased Young's modulus being one of the adaptive responses, and that this adaptation is specific only to PC-3 cells and is not seen in PrEC LH cells. Moreover, this adaptation appears to be graded in response to the magnitude of FSS experienced by the cancer cells. This is the first study

  2. Molecular profiles of screen detected vs. symptomatic breast cancer and their impact on survival: results from a clinical series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stage shift is widely considered a major determinant of the survival benefit conferred by breast cancer screening. However, factors and mechanisms underlying such a prognostic advantage need further clarification. We sought to compare the molecular characteristics of screen detected vs. symptomatic breast cancers and assess whether differences in tumour biology might translate into survival benefit. In a clinical series of 448 women with operable breast cancer, the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test were used to estimate the likelihood of cancer recurrence and death. The Cox proportional hazard model was used for the multivariate analyses including mode of detection, age at diagnosis, tumour size, and lymph node status. These same models were applied to subgroups defined by molecular subtypes. Screen detected breast cancers tended to show more favourable clinicopathological features and survival outcomes compared to symptomatic cancers. The luminal A subtype was more common in women with mammography detected tumours than in symptomatic patients (68.5 vs. 59.0%, p=0.04). Data analysis across categories of molecular subtypes revealed significantly longer disease free and overall survival for screen detected cancers with a luminal A subtype only (p=0.01 and 0.02, respectively). For women with a luminal A subtype, the independent prognostic role of mode of detection on recurrence was confirmed in Cox proportional hazard models (p=0.03). An independent role of modality of detection on survival was also suggested (p=0.05). Molecular subtypes did not substantially explain the differences in survival outcomes between screened and symptomatic patients. However, our results suggest that molecular profiles might play a role in interpreting such differences at least partially. Further studies are warranted to reinterpret the efficacy of screening programmes in the light of tumour biology

  3. Estimation of mechanical properties of single wall carbon nanotubes using molecular mechanics approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Subba Rao; Sunil Anandatheertha; G Narayana Naik; G Gopalakrishnan

    2015-06-01

    Molecular mechanics based finite element analysis is adopted in the current work to evaluate the mechanical properties of Zigzag, Armchair and Chiral Single wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNT) of different diameters and chiralities. Three different types of atomic bonds, that is Carbon–Carbon covalent bond and two types of Carbon–Carbon van der Waals bonds are considered in the carbon nanotube system. The stiffness values of these bonds are calculated using the molecular potentials, namely Morse potential function and Lennard-Jones interaction potential function respectively and these stiffness’s are assigned to spring elements in the finite element model of the CNT. The geometry of CNT is built using a macro that is developed for the finite element analysis software. The finite element model of the CNT is constructed, appropriate boundary conditions are applied and the behavior of mechanical properties of CNT is studied.

  4. Molecular targets of dietary agents for prevention and therapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Bharat B; Shishodia, Shishir

    2006-05-14

    While fruits and vegetables are recommended for prevention of cancer and other diseases, their active ingredients (at the molecular level) and their mechanisms of action less well understood. Extensive research during the last half century has identified various molecular targets that can potentially be used not only for the prevention of cancer but also for treatment. However, lack of success with targeted monotherapy resulting from bypass mechanisms has forced researchers to employ either combination therapy or agents that interfere with multiple cell-signaling pathways. In this review, we present evidence that numerous agents identified from fruits and vegetables can interfere with several cell-signaling pathways. The agents include curcumin (turmeric), resveratrol (red grapes, peanuts and berries), genistein (soybean), diallyl sulfide (allium), S-allyl cysteine (allium), allicin (garlic), lycopene (tomato), capsaicin (red chilli), diosgenin (fenugreek), 6-gingerol (ginger), ellagic acid (pomegranate), ursolic acid (apple, pears, prunes), silymarin (milk thistle), anethol (anise, camphor, and fennel), catechins (green tea), eugenol (cloves), indole-3-carbinol (cruciferous vegetables), limonene (citrus fruits), beta carotene (carrots), and dietary fiber. For instance, the cell-signaling pathways inhibited by curcumin alone include NF-kappaB, AP-1, STAT3, Akt, Bcl-2, Bcl-X(L), caspases, PARP, IKK, EGFR, HER2, JNK, MAPK, COX2, and 5-LOX. The active principle identified in fruit and vegetables and the molecular targets modulated may be the basis for how these dietary agents not only prevent but also treat cancer and other diseases. This work reaffirms what Hippocrates said 25 centuries ago, let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food. PMID:16563357

  5. Molecular mechanisms for synchronous, asynchronous, and spontaneous neurotransmitter release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeser, Pascal S; Regehr, Wade G

    2014-01-01

    Most neuronal communication relies upon the synchronous release of neurotransmitters, which occurs through synaptic vesicle exocytosis triggered by action potential invasion of a presynaptic bouton. However, neurotransmitters are also released asynchronously with a longer, variable delay following an action potential or spontaneously in the absence of action potentials. A compelling body of research has identified roles and mechanisms for synchronous release, but asynchronous release and spontaneous release are less well understood. In this review, we analyze how the mechanisms of the three release modes overlap and what molecular pathways underlie asynchronous and spontaneous release. We conclude that the modes of release have key fusion processes in common but may differ in the source of and necessity for Ca(2+) to trigger release and in the identity of the Ca(2+) sensor for release. PMID:24274737

  6. Molecular Mechanisms of Survival Strategies in Extreme Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Migliardo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Today, one of the major challenges in biophysics is to disclose the molecular mechanisms underlying biological processes. In such a frame, the understanding of the survival strategies in extreme conditions received a lot of attention both from the scientific and applicative points of view. Since nature provides precious suggestions to be applied for improving the quality of life, extremophiles are considered as useful model-systems. The main goal of this review is to present an overview of some systems, with a particular emphasis on trehalose playing a key role in several extremophile organisms. The attention is focused on the relation among the structural and dynamic properties of biomolecules and bioprotective mechanisms, as investigated by complementary spectroscopic techniques at low- and high-temperature values.

  7. Anisotropic mechanical properties of graphene: a molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ming; Zeng, Anna; Zeng, Kevin

    2014-03-01

    The anisotropic mechanical properties of monolayer graphene with different shapes have been studied using an efficient quantum mechanics molecular dynamics scheme based on a semi-empirical Hamiltonian (refereed as SCED-LCAO) [PRB 74, 15540; PHYSE 42, 1]. We have found the anisotropic nature of the membrane stress. The stresses along the armchair direction are slightly stronger than that along the zigzag direction, showing strong direction selectivity. The graphene with the rectangular shape could sustain strong load (i . e ., 20%) in both armchair and zigzag directions. The graphene with the rhombus shape show large difference in the strain direction: it will quickly crack after 18 % of strain in armchair the direction, but slowly destroyed after 20% in the zigzag direction. The obtained 2D Young's modulus at infinitesimal strain and the third-order (effective nonlinear) elastic modulus are in good consistent with the experimental observation.

  8. A molecular understanding of the dynamic mechanism of aquaporin osmosis

    CERN Document Server

    Shua, Liangsuo; Qian, Xin; Wanga, Xiyun; Lin, Yixin; Tan, Kai; Shu, Chaohui; Jin, Shiping

    2014-01-01

    AQPs (aquaporins), the rapid water channels of cells, play a key role in maintaining osmotic equilibrium of cells. In this paper, we reported the dynamic mechanism of AQP osmosis at the molecular level. A theoretical model based on molecular dynamics was carried out and verified by the published experimental data. The reflection coefficients ({\\sigma}) of neutral molecules are mainly decided by their relative size with AQPs, and increase with a third power up to a constant value 1. This model also indicated that the reflection coefficient of a complete impermeable solute can be smaller than 1. The H+ concentration of solution can influence the driving force of the AQPs by changing the equivalent diameters of vestibules surrounded by loops with abundant polar amino acids. In this way, pH of solution can regulate water permeability of AQPs. Therefore, an AQP may not only work as a switch to open or close, but as a rapid response molecular valve to control its water flow. The vestibules can prevent the channel b...

  9. Molecular Basis of the Anti-Cancer Effects of Genistein Isoflavone in LNCaP Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartmann J

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prostate cancer is the most common form of non-skin cancer within the United States and the second leading cause of cancer deaths. Survival rates for the advanced disease remain relatively low, and conventional treatments may be accompanied by significant side effects. As a result, current research is aimed at alternative or adjuvant treatments that will target components of the signal transduction, cell-cycle and apoptosis pathways, to induce cell death with little or no toxic side effects to the patient. In this study, we investigated the effect of genistein isoflavone, a soy derivative, on expression levels of genes involved in these pathways. The mechanism of genistein-induced cell death was also investigated. The chemosensitivity of the LNCaP prostate cancer cells to genistein was investigated using ATP and MTS assays, and a caspase binding assay was used to determine apoptosis induction. Several molecular targets were determined using cDNA microarray and RT-PCR analysis.Results: The overall data revealed that genistein induces cell death in a time- and dose-dependent manner, and regulates expression levels of several genes involved in carcinogenesis and immunity. Several cell-cycle genes were down-regulated, including the mitotic kinesins, cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases. Various members of the Bcl-2 family of apoptotic proteins were also affected. The DefB1 and the HLA membrane receptor genes involved in immunogenicity were also up-regulated.Conclusion: The results indicate that genistein inhibits growth of the hormone-dependent prostate cancer cells, LNCaP, via apoptosis induction through regulation of some of the genes involved in carcinogenesis of many tumors, and immunogenicity. This study augments the potential phytotherapeutic and immunotherapeutic significance of genistein isoflavone.

  10. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Effects of Statins in the Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia J. McFarland

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, commonly referred to as statins, are widely used in the treatment of dyslipidaemia, in addition to providing primary and secondary prevention against cardiovascular disease and stroke. Statins’ effects on the central nervous system (CNS, particularly on cognition and neurological disorders such as stroke and multiple sclerosis, have received increasing attention in recent years, both within the scientific community and in the media. Current understanding of statins’ effects is limited by a lack of mechanism-based studies, as well as the assumption that all statins have the same pharmacological effect in the central nervous system. This review aims to provide an updated discussion on the molecular mechanisms contributing to statins’ possible effects on cognitive function, neurodegenerative disease, and various neurological disorders such as stroke, epilepsy, depression and CNS cancers. Additionally, the pharmacokinetic differences between statins and how these may result in statin-specific neurological effects are also discussed.

  11. Molecular Mechanisms of Phosphorus Metabolism and Transport during Leaf Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyla A. Stigter

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Leaf senescence, being the final developmental stage of the leaf, signifies the transition from a mature, photosynthetically active organ to the attenuation of said function and eventual death of the leaf. During senescence, essential nutrients sequestered in the leaf, such as phosphorus (P, are mobilized and transported to sink tissues, particularly expanding leaves and developing seeds. Phosphorus recycling is crucial, as it helps to ensure that previously acquired P is not lost to the environment, particularly under the naturally occurring condition where most unfertilized soils contain low levels of soluble orthophosphate (Pi, the only form of P that roots can directly assimilate from the soil. Piecing together the molecular mechanisms that underpin the highly variable efficiencies of P remobilization from senescing leaves by different plant species may be critical for devising effective strategies for improving overall crop P-use efficiency. Maximizing Pi remobilization from senescing leaves using selective breeding and/or biotechnological strategies will help to generate P-efficient crops that would minimize the use of unsustainable and polluting Pi-containing fertilizers in agriculture. This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms whereby P is remobilized from senescing leaves and transported to sink tissues, which encompasses the action of hormones, transcription factors, Pi-scavenging enzymes, and Pi transporters.

  12. Molecular mechanisms of the plant heat stress response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Ai-Li; Ding, Yan-Fei; Jiang, Qiong [China Jiliang University, Xueyuan Road 258, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Zhu, Cheng, E-mail: pzhch@cjlu.edu.cn [China Jiliang University, Xueyuan Road 258, Hangzhou 310018 (China)

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► This review elaborates the response networks of heat stress in plants. ► It elaborates proteins responding to heat stress in special physiological period. ► The proteins and pathways have formed a basic network of the heat stress response. ► Achievements of the various technologies are also combined. -- Abstract: High temperature has become a global concern, which seriously affects the growth and production of plants, particularly crops. Thus, the molecular mechanism of the heat stress response and breeding of heat-tolerant plants is necessary to protect food production and ensure crop safety. This review elaborates on the response networks of heat stress in plants, including the Hsf and Hsp response pathways, the response of ROS and the network of the hormones. In addition, the production of heat stress response elements during particular physiological periods of the plant is described. We also discuss the existing problems and future prospects concerning the molecular mechanisms of the heat stress response in plants.

  13. Molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolones resistance in Mycoplasma hominis clinical isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Dong-Ya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolones resistance in Mycoplasma hominis (MH clinical strains isolated from urogenital specimens. 15 MH clinical isolates with different phenotypes of resistance to fluoroquinolones antibiotics were screened for mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs of DNA gyrase (gyrA and gyrB and topoisomerase IV (parC and parE in comparison with the reference strain PG21, which is susceptible to fluoroquinolones antibiotics. 15 MH isolates with three kinds of quinolone resistance phenotypes were obtained. Thirteen out of these quinolone-resistant isolates were found to carry nucleotide substitutions in either gyrA or parC. There were no alterations in gyrB and no mutations were found in the isolates with a phenotype of resistance to Ofloxacin (OFX, intermediate resistant to Levofloxacin (LVX and Sparfloxacin (SFX, and those susceptible to all three tested antibiotics. The molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance in clinical isolates of MH was reported in this study. The single amino acid mutation in ParC of MH may relate to the resistance to OFX and LVX and the high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones for MH is likely associated with mutations in both DNA gyrase and the ParC subunit of topoisomerase IV.

  14. Hemolytic mechanism of dioscin proposed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fu; Wang, Renxiao

    2010-01-01

    Saponins are a class of compounds containing a triterpenoid or steroid core with some attached carbohydrate modules. Many saponins cause hemolysis. However, the hemolytic mechanism of saponins at the molecular level is not yet fully understood. In an attempt to explore this issue, we have studied dioscin-a saponin with high hemolytic activity-through extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Firstly, all-atom MD simulations of 8 ns duration were conducted to study the stability of the dioscin-cholesterol complex and the cholesterol-cholesterol complex in water and in decane, respectively. MM-GB/SA computations indicate that the dioscin-cholesterol complex is energetically more favorable than the cholesterol-cholesterol complex in a non-polar environment. Next, several coarse-grained MD simulations of 400 ns duration were conducted to directly observe the distribution of multiple dioscin molecules on a DPPC-POPC-PSM-CHOL lipid bilayer. Our results indicate that dioscin can penetrate into the lipid bilayer, accumulate in the lipid raft micro-domain, and then bind cholesterol. This leads to the destabilization of lipid raft and consequent membrane curvature, which may eventually result in the hemolysis of red cells. This possible mechanism of hemolysis can well explain some experimental observations on hemolysis. PMID:19513766

  15. [Research Progress of a Novel Pro-apoptosis Gene PNAS-4 in Gene Therapy and Its Molecular Mechanism Hypotheses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bin; Li, Yuan

    2015-12-01

    PNAS-4 is a novel pro-apoptosis gene identified latetly. In recent years, there has been a large number of research reports on the basic studies about PNAS-4 in cancer gene therapy and gene therapy of PNAS-4 alone or combined with chemotherapy or radiotherapy manifested a good application prospect, but its molecular mechanisms to promote apoptosis is not clear yet. In this paper, recent research about PNAS-4 in cancer gene therapy is briefly reviewed, and recent hypotheses on its molecular mechanisms to promote apoptosis are especially elucidated. Based on its newly identified characteristics of structural domain, we made a point that PNAS-4 might regulate functions of some target protein related to apoptosis by deSumoylation as a new deSumoylating isopeptidase, and consequently promote apoptosis. PMID:27079118

  16. Protein nitration and nitrosylation by NO-donating aspirin in colon cancer cells: Relevance to its mechanism of action

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Jennie L.; Ji, Ping; Ouyang, Nengtai; Kopelovich, Levy; Rigas, Basil

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide-donating aspirin (NO-ASA) is a promising agent for cancer prevention. Although studied extensively, its molecular targets and mechanism of action are still unclear. S-nitrosylation of signaling proteins is emerging as an important regulatory mechanism by NO. Here, we examined whether S-nitrosylation of the NF-κB, p53, and Wnt signaling proteins by NO-ASA might explain, in part, its mechanism of action in colon cancer. NO-ASA releases significant amounts of NO detected intracellul...

  17. Molecular mechanisms in deformation of cross-linked hydrogel nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathesan, Santhosh; Rath, Amrita; Ghosh, Pijush

    2016-02-01

    The self-folding behavior in response to external stimuli observed in hydrogels is potentially used in biomedical applications. However, the use of hydrogels is limited because of its reduced mechanical properties. These properties are enhanced when the hydrogels are cross-linked and reinforced with nanoparticles. In this work, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is applied to perform uniaxial tension and pull out tests to understand the mechanism contributing towards the enhanced mechanical properties. Also, nanomechanical characterization is performed using quasi static nanoindentation experiments to determine the Young's modulus of hydrogels in the presence of nanoparticles. The stress-strain responses for chitosan (CS), chitosan reinforced with hydroxyapatite (HAP) and cross-linked chitosan are obtained from uniaxial tension test. It is observed that the Young's modulus and maximum stress increase as the HAP content increases and also with cross-linking process. Load displacement plot from pullout test is compared for uncross-linked and cross-linked chitosan chains on hydroxyapatite surface. MD simulation reveals that the variation in the dihedral conformation of chitosan chains and the evolution of internal structural variables are associated with mechanical properties. Additional results reveal that the formation of hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions is responsible for the above variations in different systems. PMID:26652360

  18. Characterization of molecular mechanisms of in vivo UVR induced cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galichanin, Konstantin; Talebizadeh, Nooshin; Söderberg, Per

    2012-01-01

    Cataract is the leading cause of blindness in the world (1). The World Health Organization defines cataract as a clouding of the lens of the eye which impedes the transfer of light. Cataract is a multi-factorial disease associated with diabetes, smoking, ultraviolet radiation (UVR), alcohol, ionizing radiation, steroids and hypertension. There is strong experimental (2-4) and epidemiological evidence (5,6) that UVR causes cataract. We developed an animal model for UVR B induced cataract in both anesthetized (7) and non-anesthetized animals (8). The only cure for cataract is surgery but this treatment is not accessible to all. It has been estimated that a delay of onset of cataract for 10 years could reduce the need for cataract surgery by 50% (9). To delay the incidence of cataract, it is needed to understand the mechanisms of cataract formation and find effective prevention strategies. Among the mechanisms for cataract development, apoptosis plays a crucial role in initiation of cataract in humans and animals (10). Our focus has recently been apoptosis in the lens as the mechanism for cataract development (8,11,12). It is anticipated that a better understanding of the effect of UVR on the apoptosis pathway will provide possibilities for discovery of new pharmaceuticals to prevent cataract. In this article, we describe how cataract can be experimentally induced by in vivo exposure to UVR-B. Further RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry are presented as tools to study molecular mechanisms of UVR-B induced cataract. PMID:23222480

  19. Molecular application of spectral photoacoustic imaging in pancreatic cancer pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshman, Minalini; Hupple, Clinton; Lohse, Ines; Hedley, David; Needles, Andrew; Theodoropoulos, Catherine

    2012-12-01

    Spectral imaging is an advanced photo-acoustic (PA) mode that can discern optical absorption of contrast agent(s) in the tissue micro-environment. This advancement is made possible by precise control of optical wavelength using a tunable pulsed laser, ranging from 680-970 nm. Differential optical absorption of blood oxygenation states makes spectral imaging of hemoglobin ideal to investigate remodeling of the tumor microenvironment- a molecular change that renders resistance to standard cancer treatment. Approach: Photo-acoustic imaging was performed on the Vevo® LAZR system (VisualSonics) at 5-20 Hz. Deep abdominal imaging was accomplished with a LZ250D probe at a center frequency of 21MHz and an axial resolution of 75 μm. The tumor model was generated in an immune compromised mouse by surgical implantation of primary patient derived tumors, in the pancreas. Results: Spectral imaging for oxygen saturation at 750 nm and 850 nm characterized this tumor with a poorly oxygenated core surrounded by a well oxygenated periphery. Multispectral imaging identified a sub region in the core with a four-fold signal exclusively at 750 and 800 nm. A co-registered 2D image of this region was shown to be echogenic and calcification was suspected. Perfusion imaging with contrast enhanced ultrasound using microbubbles (Vevo MicroMarker® contrast agents, VisualSonics) identified functional vessels towards this sub region. Histology confirmed calcification and vascularization in the tumor core. Taken together, non-invasive characterization of the tumor microenvironment using photo-acoustics rendered spectral imaging a sensitive tool to monitor molecular changes representative of progression of pancreatic cancer that kills within 6 months of diagnosis.

  20. Molecular and Computational Studies on Apoptotic Pathway Regulator, Bcl-2 Gene from Breast Cancer Cell Line MCF-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Pragya; Khan, M J

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a dreadful disease constituting abnormal growth and proliferation of malignant cells in the body. Next to lung cancer, breast cancer is the most common form of cancer affecting women. The apoptotic pathway regulators, B cell lymphoma family of protein, play a key role in various malignancies defining cancer and their constitutive expression plays an integral role in breast cancer chemotherapy. The research work discusses the identification and molecular cloning of a B cell lymphoma like gene from human breast cancer cell line. The open reading frame of the gene consisted of 965 nucleotides, encoding a protein of 380 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 42.5 kilodalton. The predicted physiochemical properties of the gene were as follows: Isoelectric point - 9.49, molecular formula - C1893H3004N534O548S16, total number of negatively charged residues, (Aspartate+Glutamate) - 26, total number of positively charged residues, (Arginine+Lysine)-39, instability index-42.08 (unstable protein) and grand average of hydropathicity is -0.202. Additionally, phobius prediction suggested non-cytoplasmic localization of the putative protein. The presence of secondary structure in the protein was determined by Memsat program. A 3 dimensional protein homology model was generated using threading based method of protein modeling for structural and functional annotation of the putative protein. Future prospects accounts for the biochemical characterization of the enzyme including in vitro assays on breast cancer cell line would establish the functional characteristics of the protein and its physiological mechanisms in breast cancer development and its therapeutic-target role in future. PMID:27168686

  1. Molecular and computational studies on apoptotic pathway regulator, Bcl-2 gene from breast cancer cell line MCF-7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragya Tiwari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a dreadful disease constituting abnormal growth and proliferation of malignant cells in the body. Next to lung cancer, breast cancer is the most common form of cancer affecting women. The apoptotic pathway regulators, B cell lymphoma family of protein, play a key role in various malignancies defining cancer and their constitutive expression plays an integral role in breast cancer chemotherapy. The research work discusses the identification and molecular cloning of a B cell lymphoma like gene from human breast cancer cell line. The open reading frame of the gene consisted of 965 nucleotides, encoding a protein of 380 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 42.5 kilodalton. The predicted physiochemical properties of the gene were as follows: Isoelectric point - 9.49, molecular formula - C1893H3004N534O548S16, total number of negatively charged residues, (Aspartate+Glutamate - 26, total number of positively charged residues, (Arginine+Lysine-39, instability index-42.08 (unstable protein and grand average of hydropathicity is -0.202. Additionally, phobius prediction suggested non-cytoplasmic localization of the putative protein. The presence of secondary structure in the protein was determined by Memsat program. A 3 dimensional protein homology model was generated using threading based method of protein modeling for structural and functional annotation of the putative protein. Future prospects accounts for the biochemical characterization of the enzyme including in vitroassays on breast cancer cell line would establish the functional characteristics of the protein and its physiological mechanisms in breast cancer development and its therapeutic-target role in future.

  2. Molecular and Computational Studies on Apoptotic Pathway Regulator, Bcl-2 Gene from Breast Cancer Cell Line MCF-7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Pragya; Khan, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a dreadful disease constituting abnormal growth and proliferation of malignant cells in the body. Next to lung cancer, breast cancer is the most common form of cancer affecting women. The apoptotic pathway regulators, B cell lymphoma family of protein, play a key role in various malignancies defining cancer and their constitutive expression plays an integral role in breast cancer chemotherapy. The research work discusses the identification and molecular cloning of a B cell lymphoma like gene from human breast cancer cell line. The open reading frame of the gene consisted of 965 nucleotides, encoding a protein of 380 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 42.5 kilodalton. The predicted physiochemical properties of the gene were as follows: Isoelectric point - 9.49, molecular formula - C1893H3004N534O548S16, total number of negatively charged residues, (Aspartate+Glutamate) - 26, total number of positively charged residues, (Arginine+Lysine)-39, instability index-42.08 (unstable protein) and grand average of hydropathicity is -0.202. Additionally, phobius prediction suggested non-cytoplasmic localization of the putative protein. The presence of secondary structure in the protein was determined by Memsat program. A 3 dimensional protein homology model was generated using threading based method of protein modeling for structural and functional annotation of the putative protein. Future prospects accounts for the biochemical characterization of the enzyme including in vitro assays on breast cancer cell line would establish the functional characteristics of the protein and its physiological mechanisms in breast cancer development and its therapeutic-target role in future.

  3. Synthesis and evaluation of a peptide targeted small molecular Gd-DOTA monoamide conjugate for MR molecular imaging of prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xueming; Burden-Gulley, Susan M.; Yu, Guan-Ping; Tan, Mingqian; Lindner, Daniel; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M.; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2012-01-01

    Tumor extracellular matrix has an abundance of cancer related proteins that can be used as biomarkers for cancer molecular imaging. Innovative design and development of safe and effective targeted contrast agents to these biomarkers would allow effective MR cancer molecular imaging with high spatial resolution. In this study, we synthesized a low molecular weight CLT1 peptide targeted Gd(III) chelate CLT1-dL-(Gd-DOTA)4 specific to clotted plasma proteins in tumor stroma for cancer MR molecula...

  4. Molecular markers in breast cancer: new tools in imaging and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women. Although breast cancer is mainly diagnosed by mammography, other imaging modalities (e.g. MRI, PET) are increasingly used. The most recent developments in the field of molecular imaging comprise the application of near-infrared fluoresc

  5. Pancreatic Cancer Gene Therapy: From Molecular Targets to Delivery Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Victoria Maliandi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuous identification of molecular changes deregulating critical pathways in pancreatic tumor cells provides us with a large number of novel candidates to engineer gene-targeted approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment. Targets—both protein coding and non-coding—are being exploited in gene therapy to influence the deregulated pathways to facilitate cytotoxicity, enhance the immune response or sensitize to current treatments. Delivery vehicles based on viral or non-viral systems as well as cellular vectors with tumor homing characteristics are a critical part of the design of gene therapy strategies. The different behavior of tumoral versus non-tumoral cells inspires vector engineering with the generation of tumor selective products that can prevent potential toxic-associated effects. In the current review, a detailed analysis of the different targets, the delivery vectors, the preclinical approaches and a descriptive update on the conducted clinical trials are presented. Moreover, future possibilities in pancreatic cancer treatment by gene therapy strategies are discussed.

  6. Molecular mechanisms involved in chemoresistance in paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Tatjana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL is the most common paediatric cancer. Despite cure rates approaching 80%, resistance to treatment and disease relapse remain a significant clinical problem. Identification of the genes and biological pathways responsible for chemoresistance is therefore crucial for the design of novel therapeutic approaches aiming to improve patient survival. Mutations in the membrane transporter P-glycoprotein genes, genetic variations in drug-metabolising enzymes and defects in apoptotic pathways are mechanisms of chemoresistance common to a wide spectrum of cancers and also play a role in paediatric ALL. In addition, several recent microarray studies have identified transcriptional profiles specifically associated with chemoresistance and pointed to a number of potentially novel therapeutic targets. These microarray studies have shown that genes discriminating between clinically responsive and resistant leukaemias tend to be involved in cellular processes such as regulation of cell cycle, proliferation, and DNA repair. Here we review the outcomes of these microarray studies and also present our own investigations into apoptotic resistance to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs in paediatric ALL. We present stratification of paediatric ALL by the profile of DNA damage response following ionising radiation (IR in vitro. This approach allows classification of ALL tumours at presentation into IR-apoptotic sensitive and IR-apoptotic resistant. Furthermore, apoptotic resistant leukaemias exhibit abnormal response of NFkB pathway following irradiation and inhibition of this pathway can sensitise leukaemic cells to IR-induced DSBs.

  7. Molecular targeting of intracellular compartments specifically in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Hetal; Gibo, Denise M; Debinski, Waldemar

    2010-05-01

    We have implemented a strategy in which a genetically engineered, single-chain protein specifically recognizes cancer cells and is trafficked to a targeted subcellular compartment, such as the nucleus. The recombinant protein termed IL-13.E13K-D2-NLS has a triple functional property: (1) it binds a cancer-associated receptor, interleukin 13 receptor alpha 2 (IL-13Rα2), using modified IL-13 ligand, IL-13.E13K; (2) it exports its C-terminal portion out of the endosomal compartment using Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (PE) translocation domain (D2); and (3) it travels to and accumulates in the nucleus guided by the nuclear localization signal (NLS). Here, we have demonstrated that this protein is transported into the brain tumor cells' nucleus, using 3 different methods of protein conjugation to dyes for the purpose of direct visualization of the protein's intracellular trafficking. IL-13.E13K-D2-NLS, and not the controls such as IL-13.E13K-D2, IL-13.E13K-NLS, or IL-13.E13K, accumulated in nuclei very efficiently, which increased with the time the cells were exposed to the protein. Also, IL-13.E13K-D2-NLS did not exhibit nuclear transport in cells with low expression levels of IL-13Rα2. Thus, it is possible to recognize cancer cells through their specific receptors and deliver a conjugated protein that travels specifically to the nucleus. Hence, our molecular targeting strategy succeeded in generating a single-chain proteinaceous agent capable of delivering drugs/labels needed to be localized to the cells' nuclei or potentially any other subcellular compartment, for their optimal efficacy or ability to exert their specific action. PMID:20740056

  8. Molecular and Epigenetic Mechanisms of MLL in Human Leukemogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballabio, Erica; Milne, Thomas A., E-mail: thomas.milne@imm.ox.ac.uk [MRC Molecular Haematology Unit, Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital Headington, Oxford OX3 9DS (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-10

    Epigenetics is often defined as the study of heritable changes in gene expression or chromosome stability that don’t alter the underlying DNA sequence. Epigenetic changes are established through multiple mechanisms that include DNA methylation, non-coding RNAs and the covalent modification of specific residues on histone proteins. It is becoming clear not only that aberrant epigenetic changes are common in many human diseases such as leukemia, but that these changes by their very nature are malleable, and thus are amenable to treatment. Epigenetic based therapies have so far focused on the use of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors, which tend to have more general and widespread effects on gene regulation in the cell. However, if a unique molecular pathway can be identified, diseases caused by epigenetic mechanisms are excellent candidates for the development of more targeted therapies that focus on specific gene targets, individual binding domains, or specific enzymatic activities. Designing effective targeted therapies depends on a clear understanding of the role of epigenetic mutations during disease progression. The Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) protein is an example of a developmentally important protein that controls the epigenetic activation of gene targets in part by methylating histone 3 on lysine 4. MLL is required for normal development, but is also mutated in a subset of aggressive human leukemias and thus provides a useful model for studying the link between epigenetic cell memory and human disease. The most common MLL mutations are chromosome translocations that fuse the MLL gene in frame with partner genes creating novel fusion proteins. In this review, we summarize recent work that argues MLL fusion proteins could function through a single molecular pathway, but we also highlight important data that suggests instead that multiple independent mechanisms underlie MLL mediated leukemogenesis.

  9. Molecular and Epigenetic Mechanisms of MLL in Human Leukemogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A. Milne

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetics is often defined as the study of heritable changes in gene expression or chromosome stability that don’t alter the underlying DNA sequence. Epigenetic changes are established through multiple mechanisms that include DNA methylation, non-coding RNAs and the covalent modification of specific residues on histone proteins. It is becoming clear not only that aberrant epigenetic changes are common in many human diseases such as leukemia, but that these changes by their very nature are malleable, and thus are amenable to treatment. Epigenetic based therapies have so far focused on the use of histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors, which tend to have more general and widespread effects on gene regulation in the cell. However, if a unique molecular pathway can be identified, diseases caused by epigenetic mechanisms are excellent candidates for the development of more targeted therapies that focus on specific gene targets, individual binding domains, or specific enzymatic activities. Designing effective targeted therapies depends on a clear understanding of the role of epigenetic mutations during disease progression. The Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL protein is an example of a developmentally important protein that controls the epigenetic activation of gene targets in part by methylating histone 3 on lysine 4. MLL is required for normal development, but is also mutated in a subset of aggressive human leukemias and thus provides a useful model for studying the link between epigenetic cell memory and human disease. The most common MLL mutations are chromosome translocations that fuse the MLL gene in frame with partner genes creating novel fusion proteins. In this review, we summarize recent work that argues MLL fusion proteins could function through a single molecular pathway, but we also highlight important data that suggests instead that multiple independent mechanisms underlie MLL mediated leukemogenesis.

  10. MOLECULAR MECHANISM OF MICROBIAL TECHNETIUM REDUCTION FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiChristina, Thomas J. [Georgia Tech

    2013-04-30

    Microbial Tc(VII) reduction is an attractive alternative strategy for bioremediation of technetium-contaminated subsurface environments. Traditional ex situ remediation processes (e.g., adsorption or ion exchange) are often limited by poor extraction efficiency, inhibition by competing ions and production of large volumes of produced waste. Microbial Tc(VII) reduction provides an attractive alternative in situ remediation strategy since the reduced end-product Tc(IV) precipitates as TcO2, a highly insoluble hydrous oxide. Despite its potential benefits, the molecular mechanism of microbial Tc(VII) reduction remains poorly understood. The main goal of the proposed DOENABIR research project is to determine the molecular mechanism of microbial Tc(VII) reduction. Random mutagenesis studies in our lab have resulted in generation of a set of six Tc(VII) reduction-deficient mutants of Shewanella oneidensis. The anaerobic respiratory deficiencies of each Tc(VII) reduction-deficient mutant was determined by anaerobic growth on various combinations of three electron donors and 14 terminal electron acceptors. Results indicated that the electron transport pathways to Tc(VII), NO3 -, Mn(III) and U(VI) share common structural or regulatory components. In addition, we have recently found that wild-type Shewanella are also able to reduce Tc(IV) as electron acceptor, producing Tc(III) as an end-product. The recent genome sequencing of a variety of technetium-reducing bacteria and the anticipated release of several additional genome sequences in the coming year, provides us with an unprecedented opportunity to determine the mechanism of microbial technetium reduction across species and genus lines.

  11. Molecular and Epigenetic Mechanisms of MLL in Human Leukemogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epigenetics is often defined as the study of heritable changes in gene expression or chromosome stability that don’t alter the underlying DNA sequence. Epigenetic changes are established through multiple mechanisms that include DNA methylation, non-coding RNAs and the covalent modification of specific residues on histone proteins. It is becoming clear not only that aberrant epigenetic changes are common in many human diseases such as leukemia, but that these changes by their very nature are malleable, and thus are amenable to treatment. Epigenetic based therapies have so far focused on the use of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors, which tend to have more general and widespread effects on gene regulation in the cell. However, if a unique molecular pathway can be identified, diseases caused by epigenetic mechanisms are excellent candidates for the development of more targeted therapies that focus on specific gene targets, individual binding domains, or specific enzymatic activities. Designing effective targeted therapies depends on a clear understanding of the role of epigenetic mutations during disease progression. The Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) protein is an example of a developmentally important protein that controls the epigenetic activation of gene targets in part by methylating histone 3 on lysine 4. MLL is required for normal development, but is also mutated in a subset of aggressive human leukemias and thus provides a useful model for studying the link between epigenetic cell memory and human disease. The most common MLL mutations are chromosome translocations that fuse the MLL gene in frame with partner genes creating novel fusion proteins. In this review, we summarize recent work that argues MLL fusion proteins could function through a single molecular pathway, but we also highlight important data that suggests instead that multiple independent mechanisms underlie MLL mediated leukemogenesis

  12. Cellular, Molecular Consequences of Peroxisome Proliferator- Activated Receptor-δ Activation in Ovarian Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Vignati

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-δ (PPAR-δ is a ligand-activated transcription factor. In addition to its canonical role in lipid, glucose metabolism, PPAR-δ controls cell proliferation, death, differentiation in several tissues. Here we have examined the expression of PPAR-δ in ovarian tumors, the cellular, molecular consequences of its activation in ovarian cancer cells. PPAR-δ was expressed in a large number of epithelial ovarian tumors, cell lines. The PPAR-δ lig, ciglitazone inhibited the growth, clonogenic survival of ovarian cancer cells, inducing cell cycle arrest, cell death. Growth inhibition by ciglitazone was reversed by the PPAR-δ antagonist GW9662, indicating the involvement of PPAR-δ- dependent mechanisms. Microarray-based gene profiling revealed complex changes in the transcriptional program of ovarian cancer cells on treatment with ciglitazone, identified multiple pathways that may contribute to PPAR-δ ligands' antitumor activity. Genes upregulated by ciglitazone were predominantly associated with metabolic, differentiation, tumorsuppressor pathways, whereas downregulated genes were involved in cell proliferation, cell cycle, cell organization, steroid biosynthesis. Collectively, our data indicate that PPAR-δ activation by selective agonists is a valid strategy for ovarian cancer therapy, prevention, should be tested alone, in combination with other anticancer drugs.

  13. Mechanisms of autophagy and apoptosis:Recent developments in breast cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan; M; Esteve; Erwin; Knecht

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy,the pathway whereby cell components are degraded by lysosomes,is involved in the cell response to environmental stresses,such as nutrient deprivation,hypoxia or exposition to chemotherapeutic agents.Under these conditions,which are reminiscent of certain phases of tumor development,autophagy either promotes cell survival or induces cell death. This strengthens the possibility that autophagy could be an important target in cancer therapy,as has been proposed.Here,we describe the regulation of survival and death by autophagy and apoptosis,especially in cultured breast cancer cells.In particular,we discuss whether autophagy represents an apoptosis-independent process and/or if they share common pathways. We believe that understanding in detail the molecular mechanisms that underlie the relationships between autophagy and apoptosis in breast cancer cells could improve the available treatments for this disease.

  14. Tryptophan metabolism in breast cancers: molecular imaging and immunohistochemistry studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Tryptophan oxidation via the kynurenine pathway is an important mechanism of tumoral immunoresistance. Increased tryptophan metabolism via the serotonin pathway has been linked to malignant progression in breast cancer. In this study, we combined quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) with tumor immunohistochemistry to analyze tryptophan transport and metabolism in breast cancer. Methods: Dynamic α-[11C]methyl-L-tryptophan (AMT) PET was performed in nine women with stage II–IV breast cancer. PET tracer kinetic modeling was performed in all tumors. Expression of L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1), indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO; the initial and rate-limiting enzyme of the kynurenine pathway) and tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1; the initial enzyme of the serotonin pathway) was assessed by immunostaining of resected tumor specimens. Results: Tumor AMT uptake peaked at 5–20 min postinjection in seven tumors; the other two cases showed protracted tracer accumulation. Tumor standardized uptake values (SUVs) varied widely (2.6–9.8) and showed a strong positive correlation with volume of distribution values derived from kinetic analysis (P < .01). Invasive ductal carcinomas (n = 6) showed particularly high AMT SUVs (range, 4.7–9.8). Moderate to strong immunostaining for LAT1, IDO and TPH1 was detected in most tumor cells. Conclusions: Breast cancers show differential tryptophan kinetics on dynamic PET. SUVs measured 5–20 min postinjection reflect reasonably the tracer's volume of distribution. Further studies are warranted to determine if in vivo AMT accumulation in these tumors is related to tryptophan metabolism via the kynurenine and serotonin pathways.

  15. New mechanisms and therapeutic potential of curcumin for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, Isabel; Sánchez-Fidalgo, Susana; Alarcón de la Lastra, Catalina

    2008-09-01

    Curcumin is a polyphenol derived from Curcuma longa. Over the last few years, a number of studies have provided evidence of its main pharmacological properties including chemosensitizing, radiosensitizing, wound healing activities, antimicrobial, antiviral, antifungical, immunomodulatory, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory. More recent data provide interesting insights into the effect of this compound on cancer chemoprevention and chemotherapy. In fact, preclinical studies have shown its ability to inhibit carcinogenesis in various types of cancer including colorectal cancer (CRC). Curcumin has the capacity of interact with multiple molecular targets affecting the multistep process of carcinogenesis. Also, curcumin is able to arrest the cell cycle, to inhibit the inflammatory response and the oxidative stress and to induce apoptosis in cancer cells. Likewise, it has been shown to possess marked antiangiogenic properties. Furthermore, curcumin potentiates the growth inhibitory effect of cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors and traditional chemotherapy agents implicating another promising therapy regimen in the future treatment of CRC. However, its clinical advance has been hindered by its short biological half-life and low bioavailability after oral administration. This review is intended to provide the reader an update of the bioavailability and pharmacokinetics of curcumin and describes the recently identified molecular pathways responsible of its anticancer potential in CRC. PMID:18655004

  16. The development of molecular epidemiology to elucidate cancer risk and prognosis: a historical perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Ambrosone, Christine B.; Curtis C Harris

    2010-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology in cancer research grew from the field of chemical carcinogenesis and the use biomarkers for environmental exposures, with incorporation of principles from early pharmacogenetics. Over the years, molecular epidemiology has become extremely complex, with studies evaluating associations between cancer risk and prognosis and numerous markers of susceptibility, exposure and early effects, as well as epidemiologic factors. In this article, we review the field of molecular ep...

  17. A Novel Gene Signature for Molecular Diagnosis of Human Prostate Cancer by RT-qPCR

    OpenAIRE

    Rizzi, Federica; Belloni, Lucia; Crafa, Pellegrino; Lazzaretti, Mirca; Remondini, Daniel; Ferretti, Stefania; Cortellini, Piero; Corti, Arnaldo; Bettuzzi, Saverio

    2008-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer (CaP) is one of the most relevant causes of cancer death in Western Countries. Although detection of CaP at early curable stage is highly desirable, actual screening methods present limitations and new molecular approaches are needed. Gene expression analysis increases our knowledge about the biology of CaP and may render novel molecular tools, but the identification of accurate biomarkers for reliable molecular diagnosis is a real challenge. We describe here the di...

  18. Molecular Biology of Pancreatic Cancer: How Useful Is It in Clinical Practice?

    OpenAIRE

    Sakorafas, George H; Vasileios Smyrniotis

    2012-01-01

    Context During the recent two decades dramatic advances of molecular biology allowed an in-depth understanding of pancreatic carcinogenesis. It is currently accepted that pancreatic cancer has a genetic component. The real challenge is now how these impressive advances could be used in clinical practice. Objective To critically present currently available data regarding clinical application of molecular biology in pancreatic cancer. Methods Reports about clinical implications of molecular bio...

  19. Molecular subtyping of DCIS: heterogeneity of breast cancer reflected in pre-invasive disease

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, S. E.; Warwick, J.; Carpenter, R.; Bowen, R L; Duffy, S W; Jones, J L

    2010-01-01

    Background: Molecular profiling has identified at least four subtypes of invasive breast carcinoma, which exhibit distinct clinical behaviour. There is good evidence now that DCIS represents the non-obligate precursor to invasive breast cancer and therefore it should be possible to identify similar molecular subtypes at this stage. In addition to a limited five-marker system to identify molecular subtypes in invasive breast cancer, it is evident that other biological molecules may identify di...

  20. The Molecular Fingerprint of High Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer Reflects Its Fallopian Tube Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Meyer

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available High grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC, the most lethal and frequent type of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC, has poor long term prognosis due to a combination of factors: late detection, great metastatic potential and the capacity to develop resistance to available therapeutic drugs. Furthermore, there has been considerable controversy concerning the etiology of this malignancy. New studies, both clinical and molecular, strongly suggest that HGSC originates not from the surface of the ovary, but from the epithelial layer of the neighboring fallopian tube fimbriae. In this paper we summarize data supporting the central role of fallopian tube epithelium in the development of HGSC. Specifically, we address cellular pathways and regulatory mechanisms which are modulated in the process of transformation, but also genetic changes which accumulate during disease progression. Similarities between fallopian tube mucosa and the malignant tissue of HGSC warrant a closer analysis of homeostatic mechanisms in healthy epithelium in order to elucidate key steps in disease development. Finally, we highlight the importance of the cancer stem cell (CSC identification and understanding of its niche regulation for improvement of therapeutic strategies.