WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer molecular imaging

  1. Molecular imaging in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyners, A K L; Broekman, K E; Glaudemans, A W J M; Brouwers, A H; Arts, H J G; van der Zee, A G J; de Vries, E G E; Jalving, M

    2016-04-01

    Ovarian cancer has a high mortality and novel-targeted treatment strategies have not resulted in breakthroughs for this disease. Insight into the molecular characteristics of ovarian tumors may improve diagnosis and selection of patients for treatment with targeted therapies. A potential way to achieve this is by means of molecular imaging. Generic tumor processes, such as glucose metabolism ((18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose) and DNA synthesis ((18)F-fluorodeoxythymidine), can be visualized non-invasively. More specific targets, such as hormone receptors, growth factor receptors, growth factors and targets of immunotherapy, can also be visualized. Molecular imaging can capture data on intra-patient tumor heterogeneity and is of potential value for individualized, target-guided treatment selection. Early changes in molecular characteristics during therapy may serve as early predictors of response. In this review, we describe the current knowledge on molecular imaging in the diagnosis and as an upfront or early predictive biomarker in patients with ovarian cancer. PMID:27141066

  2. Molecular imaging in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sairah R; Rockall, Andrea G; Barwick, Tara D

    2016-06-01

    Despite the development of screening and of a vaccine, cervix cancer is a major cause of cancer death in young women worldwide. A third of women treated for the disease will recur, almost inevitably leading to death. Functional imaging has the potential to stratify patients at higher risk of poor response or relapse by improved delineation of disease extent and tumor characteristics. A number of molecular imaging biomarkers have been shown to predict outcome at baseline and/or early during therapy in cervical cancer. In future this could help tailor the treatment plan which could include selection of patients for close follow up, adjuvant therapy or trial entry for novel agents or adaptive clinical trials. The use of molecular imaging techniques, FDG PET/CT and functional MRI, in staging and response assessment of cervical cancer is reviewed. PMID:26859085

  3. Cancer Stratification by Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justus Weber

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The lack of specificity of traditional cytotoxic drugs has triggered the development of anticancer agents that selectively address specific molecular targets. An intrinsic property of these specialized drugs is their limited applicability for specific patient subgroups. Consequently, the generation of information about tumor characteristics is the key to exploit the potential of these drugs. Currently, cancer stratification relies on three approaches: Gene expression analysis and cancer proteomics, immunohistochemistry and molecular imaging. In order to enable the precise localization of functionally expressed targets, molecular imaging combines highly selective biomarkers and intense signal sources. Thus, cancer stratification and localization are performed simultaneously. Many cancer types are characterized by altered receptor expression, such as somatostatin receptors, folate receptors or Her2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Similar correlations are also known for a multitude of transporters, such as glucose transporters, amino acid transporters or hNIS (human sodium iodide symporter, as well as cell specific proteins, such as the prostate specific membrane antigen, integrins, and CD20. This review provides a comprehensive description of the methods, targets and agents used in molecular imaging, to outline their application for cancer stratification. Emphasis is placed on radiotracers which are used to identify altered expression patterns of cancer associated markers.

  4. Molecular imaging in cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The success of cancer therapy can be difficult to predict, as its efficacy is often predicated upon characteristics of the cancer, treatment, and individual that are not fully understood or are difficult to ascertain. Monitoring the response of disease to treatment is therefore essential and has traditionally been characterized by changes in tumor volume. However, in many instances, this singular measure is insufficient for predicting treatment effects on patient survival. Molecular imaging allows repeated in vivo measurement of many critical molecular features of neoplasm, such as metabolism, proliferation, angiogenesis, hypoxia, and apoptosis, which can be employed for monitoring therapeutic response. In this review, we examine the current methods for evaluating response to treatment and provide an overview of emerging PET molecular imaging methods that will help guide future cancer therapies. (orig.)

  5. Molecular imaging for cancer targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Molecular-genetic imaging which has grown rapidly is currently been applied to studies of gene expression regulation, activity of signal transduction pathways, angiogenesis, tumor metastases, stem cell migration, and monitoring cells involved in different components of immune response. Our Molecular and Genetic Imaging Core (MAGIC), established in late 2002, has developed a platform of small animal functional, molecular, and morphologic quantitative imaging techniques which are providing data about biochemical, genetic or pharmacological processes in vivo, and repetitively in the same animal. We first established chimeric reporter and therapeutic gene systems for specific targeting on hepatoma of mouse model. In- vivo microPET and bioluminescence imaging demonstrated the usefulness of tissue specific chimeric tk and hNIS genes. For trafficking the stem cell and cancer cells, we also have established dual and triple reporter gene system and correspondent reporter probes for in vivo imaging by microPET or microSPECT. The second application of translational biomedical imaging of cancer targeting therapy is on the inhibitors of tyrosine kinase, the key enzyme of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Mutations in the kinase domain of EGFR have higher levels of basal receptor phosphorylation and that are associated with clinical responsiveness to Iressa in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). High mutation rate for EGFR in Taiwanese patients of adenocarcinoma of lung suggests an urgent requirement of a non-invasive imaging tool for pre-treatment and during therapy evaluation of lung cancer patients using EGFR signalling inhibitor. Our current work on radiosynthesis of the analogue of Iressa--morpholino-[124I]-IPQA and in vitro and in vivo studies of high basal EGFR-expressing H1299's derivatives (L858R and E746-A750 del cell lines) subcutaneous tumor xenografts in immunocompromised mice, has proven that [124I]-IPQA is a feasible in vivo imaging

  6. Molecular imaging of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, A.L.L.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women. Imaging techniques play a pivotal role in breast cancer management, especially in lesion detection, treatment planning and evaluation, and prognostication. These imaging techniques have however limitations such as the use of ionizing radiatio

  7. Molecular Imaging of Pulmonary Cancer and Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Divgi, Chaitanya R.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular imaging (MI) may be defined as imaging in vivo using molecules that report on biologic function. This review will focus on the clinical use of radioactive tracers (nonpharmacologic amounts of compounds labeled with a radioactive substance) that permit external imaging using single photon emission computed tomography (planar, SPECT) or positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Imaging of lung cancer has been revolutionized with the use of fluorine-18–labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (18F...

  8. Engineered antibodies for molecular imaging of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Anna M

    2014-01-01

    Antibody technology has transformed drug development, providing robust approaches to producing highly targeted and active therapeutics that can routinely be advanced through clinical evaluation and registration. In parallel, there is an emerging need to access similarly targeted agents for diagnostic purposes, including non-invasive imaging in preclinical models and patients. Antibody engineering enables modification of key properties (immunogenicity, valency, biological inertness, pharmacokinetics, clearance route, site-specific conjugation) in order to produce targeting agents optimized for molecular imaging. Expanded availability of positron-emitting radionuclides has led to a resurgence of interest and applications of immunoPET (immuno-positron emission tomography). Molecular imaging using engineered antibodies and fragments provides a general approach for assessing cell surface phenotype in vivo and stands to play an increasingly important role in cancer diagnosis, treatment selection, and monitoring of molecularly targeted therapeutics. PMID:24091005

  9. Imaging of Lung Cancer in the Era of Molecular Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Nishino, Mizuki; Jackman, David M.; Hatabu, Hiroto; Jänne, Pasi A.; Johnson, Bruce E.; Van den Abbeele, Annick D.

    2011-01-01

    Recent discoveries characterizing the molecular basis of lung cancer brought fundamental changes in lung cancer treatment. The authors review the molecular pathogenesis of lung cancer, including genomic abnormalities, targeted therapies, and resistance mechanisms, and discuss lung cancer imaging with novel techniques. Knowledge of the molecular basis of lung cancer is essential for radiologists to properly interpret imaging and assess response to therapy. Quantitative and functional imaging h...

  10. Molecular Imaging of Biomarkers in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulaner, Gary A.; Riedl, Chris C.; Dickler, Maura N.; Jhaveri, Komal; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Weber, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    The success of breast cancer therapy is ultimately defined by clinical endpoints such as survival. It is valuable to have biomarkers that can predict the most efficacious therapies or measure response to therapy early in the course of treatment. Molecular imaging has a promising role in complementing and overcoming some of the limitations of traditional biomarkers by providing the ability to perform noninvasive, repeatable whole-body assessments. The potential advantages of imaging biomarkers are obvious and initial clinical studies have been promising, but proof of clinical utility still requires prospective multicenter clinical trials. PMID:26834103

  11. Molecular imaging of apoptosis in cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakumaeki, Juhana M. [Cellular and Molecular Imaging Group, Department of Biomedical NMR, A.I. Virtanen Institute for Molecular Sciences, University of Kuopio, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland) and Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio University Hospital, P.O. Box 1777, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland)]. E-mail: juhana.hakumaki@uku.fi; Liimatainen, Timo [Cellular and Molecular Imaging Group, Department of Biomedical NMR, A.I. Virtanen Institute for Molecular Sciences, University of Kuopio, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland)

    2005-11-01

    Apoptosis plays an important role in cancer. Mechanisms hindering its action are implicated in a number of malignancies. Also, the induction of apoptosis plays a pivotal role in non-surgical cancer treatment regimes such as irradiation, chemotherapy, or hormones. Recent advanced in imaging science have made it now possible for us to detect and visualize previously inaccessible and even unrecognized biological phenomena in cells and tissue undergoing apoptosis in vivo. Not only are these imaging techniques painting an intriguing picture of the spatiotemporal characteristics and metabolic and biophysical of apoptosis in situ, but they are expected to have an ever increasing impact in preclinical testing and design of new anticancer agents as well. Rapid and accurate visualization of apoptotic response in the clinical settings can also be of significant diagnostic and prognostic worth. With the advent of molecular medicine and patient-tailored treatment options and therapeutic agents, such monitoring techniques are becoming paramount.

  12. Targeted Gold Nanoparticles enable Molecular CT Imaging of Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Popovtzer, Rachela; Agrawal, Ashish; Kotov, Nicholas A.; Popovtzer, Aron; Balter, James; Carey, Thomas E.; Kopelman, Raoul

    2008-01-01

    X-ray based computed tomography (CT), is among the most convenient imaging/diagnostic tools in hospitals today in terms of availability, efficiency and cost. However, in contrast to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and various nuclear medicine imaging modalities, CT is not considered a molecular imaging modality since targeted and molecularly specific contrast agents have not yet been developed. Here we describe a targeted molecular imaging platform that enables, for the first time, cancer de...

  13. Applications of molecular MRI and optical imaging in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Penet, Marie-France; Mikhaylova, Maria; Li, Cong; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Glunde, Kristine; Pathak, Arvind P.; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the most exciting advances in molecular-functional imaging of cancer are occurring at the interface between chemistry and imaging. Several of these advances have occurred through the development of novel imaging probes that report on molecular pathways, the tumor micro-environment and the response of tumors to treatment; as well as through novel image-guided platforms such as nanoparticles and nanovesicles that deliver therapeutic agents against specific targets and pathways. Cancer c...

  14. Molecular imaging in the framework of personalized cancer medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkić, Dzevad; Belkić, Karen

    2013-11-01

    With our increased understanding of cancer cell biology, molecular imaging offers a strategic bridge to oncology. This complements anatomic imaging, particularly magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, which is sensitive but not specific. Among the potential harms of false positive findings is lowered adherence to recommended surveillance post-therapy and by persons at increased cancer risk. Positron emission tomography (PET) plus computerized tomography (CT) is the molecular imaging modality most widely used in oncology. In up to 40% of cases, PET-CT leads to changes in therapeutic management. Newer PET tracers can detect tumor hypoxia, bone metastases in androgen-sensitive prostate cancer, and human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2)-expressive tumors. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy provides insight into several metabolites at the same time. Combined with MRI, this yields magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), which does not entail ionizing radiation and is thus suitable for repeated monitoring. Using advanced signal processing, quantitative information can be gleaned about molecular markers of brain, breast, prostate and other cancers. Radiation oncology has benefited from molecular imaging via PET-CT and MRSI. Advanced mathematical approaches can improve dose planning in stereotactic radiosurgery, stereotactic body radiotherapy and high dose-rate brachytherapy. Molecular imaging will likely impact profoundly on clinical decision making in oncology. Molecular imaging via MR could facilitate early detection especially in persons at high risk for specific cancers. PMID:24511645

  15. Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer: Present and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eAlcantara

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Medical imaging technologies have undergone explosive growth over the past few decades and now play a central role in clinical oncology. But the truly transformative power of imaging in the clinical management of cancer patients lies ahead. Today, imaging is at a crossroads, with molecularly targeted imaging agents expected to broadly expand the capabilities of conventional anatomical imaging methods. Molecular imaging will allow clinicians to not only see where a tumour is located in the body, but also to visualize the expression and activity of specific molecules (e.g. proteases and protein kinases and biological processes (e.g. apoptosis, angiogenesis, and metastasis that influence tumour behavior and/or response to therapy. Breast cancer, the most common cancer among women and a research area where our group is actively involved, is a very heterogeneous disease with diverse patterns of development and response to treatment. Hence, molecular imaging is expected to have a major impact on this type of cancer, leading to important improvements in diagnosis, individualized treatment, and drug development, as well as our understanding of how breast cancer arises.

  16. Immunophenotyping invasive breast cancer: paving the road for molecular imaging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, J.F.; Brussel, A.S. van; Groep, P. van der; Morsink, F.H.; Bult, P.; Wall, E. van der; Diest, P.J. van

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Mammographic population screening in The Netherlands has increased the number of breast cancer patients with small and non-palpable breast tumors. Nevertheless, mammography is not ultimately sensitive and specific for distinct subtypes. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers m

  17. Molecular imaging of cancer using PET and SPECT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    molecular imaging of cancer. Especially the possibility of a quick transfer of methods developed in animals to patients (translational research) is an important strength. This article will briefly discuss the newest applications and their importance and perspective in relation to the shift in paradigm in...... medicine towards more individualized treatment....

  18. Non-invasive Optical Molecular Imaging for Cancer Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhen

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. It remains the second most common cause of death in the US, accounting for nearly 1 out of every 4 deaths. Improved fundamental understanding of molecular processes and pathways resulting in cancer development has catalyzed a shift towards molecular analysis of cancer using imaging technologies. It is expected that the non-invasive or minimally invasive molecular imaging analysis of cancer can significantly aid in improving the early detection of cancer and will result in reduced mortality and morbidity associated with the disease. The central hypothesis of the proposed research is that non-invasive imaging of changes in metabolic activity of individual cells, and extracellular pH within a tissue will improve early stage detection of cancer. The specific goals of this research project were to: (a) develop novel optical imaging probes to image changes in choline metabolism and tissue pH as a function of progression of cancer using clinically isolated tissue biopsies; (b) correlate changes in tissue extracellular pH and metabolic activity of tissues as a function of disease state using clinically isolated tissue biopsies; (c) provide fundamental understanding of relationship between tumor hypoxia, acidification of the extracellular space and altered cellular metabolism with progression of cancer. Three novel molecular imaging probes were developed to detect changes in choline and glucose metabolism and extracellular pH in model systems and clinically isolated cells and biopsies. Glucose uptake and metabolism was measured using a fluorescence analog of glucose, 2-NBDG (2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-2-deoxy-D-glucose), while choline metabolism was measured using a click chemistry analog of choline, propargyl choline, which can be in-situ labeled with a fluorophore Alexa-488 azide via a click chemistry reaction. Extracellular pH in tissue were measured by Alexa-647 labeled pHLIP (pH low insertion peptide

  19. Near Infrared Imaging of Molecular Beacons in Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, Britton

    2001-03-01

    The recent demonstrations of the efficacy of the tumor to background contrast in breast cancer using the tricarbo-cyanine near infrared (NIR) agent with time domain 2-D imaging presages the greater efficacy of site-directed optical contrast agents for early detection of cancers which show contrast (tissue to background) of over 20 fold. Further increases of contrast are obtained with structures that quench the fluorescence until the agent is delivered, recognized, and opened by specific enzymatic activity of the tumor. These are termed ``Molecular Beacons". In order to image the localization of the Beacons, we employ light pen ( 20μ) in LN2 gives the desired 3D high resolution image of the location of the Beacon within in the cancer cell. Since cancer prevention is linked to early detection, the high signal to background obtainable with Molecular Beacons enables the detection of very early subsurface cancers, especially breast and prostate (NIH, UIP). Thus the fluorescent Beacon excites and emits in the NIR window and signals from several cm deep in breast are detected by diffusive wave optical tomography (DWOT). Detection of objects ( 800 nm) affording 0.2 mm object detection of even low Beacon concentrations. One, two, and 3-D localization is made possible by one, two, and three orthogonal phase array null planes.

  20. Status and Advances of RGD Molecular Imaging in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning YUE

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer has been one of the most common and the highest mortality rates malignant tumors at home and abroad. Sustained angiogenesis was not only the characteristic of malignant tumors, but also the foundation of tumor proliferation, invasion, recurrence and metastasis, it was also one of the hot spots of treatments in lung cancer biology currently. Integrins played an important part in tumor angiogenesis. Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD peptides could combine with integrins specifically, and the application of radionuclide-labeled RGD molecular probes enabled imaging of tumor blood vessels to reflect its changes. The lung cancer imaging of RGD peptides at home and abroad in recent years was reviewed in this article.

  1. Multifunctional Gold Nanostars for Molecular Imaging and Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Yuan, Hsiangkuo; Fales, Andrew; Register, Janna; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2015-08-01

    Plasmonics-active gold nanoparticles offer excellent potential in molecular imaging and cancer therapy. Among them, gold nanostars (AuNS) exhibit cross-platform flexibility as multimodal contrast agents for macroscopic X-ray computer tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), as well as nanoprobes for photoacoustic tomography (PAT), two-photon photoluminescence (TPL) and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Their surfactant-free surface enables versatile functionalization to enhance cancer targeting, and allow triggered drug release. AuNS can also be used as an efficient platform for drug carrying, photothermal therapy, and photodynamic therapy. This review paper presents the latest progress regarding AuNS as a promising nanoplatform for cancer nanotheranostics. Future research directions with AuNS for biomedical applications will also be discussed.

  2. Multifunctional nanomaterials for advanced molecular imaging and cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Prasad

    Nanotechnology offers tremendous potential for use in biomedical applications, including cancer and stem cell imaging, disease diagnosis and drug delivery. The development of nanosystems has aided in understanding the molecular mechanisms of many diseases and permitted the controlled nanoscale manipulation of biological phenomena. In recent years, many studies have focused on the use of several kinds of nanomaterials for cancer and stem cell imaging and also for the delivery of anticancer therapeutics to tumor cells. However, the proper diagnosis and treatment of aggressive tumors such as brain and breast cancer requires highly sensitive diagnostic agents, in addition to the ability to deliver multiple therapeutics using a single platform to the target cells. Addressing these challenges, novel multifunctional nanomaterial-based platforms that incorporate multiple therapeutic and diagnostic agents, with superior molecular imaging and targeting capabilities, has been presented in this work. The initial part of this work presents the development of novel nanomaterials with superior optical properties for efficiently delivering soluble cues such as small interfering RNA (siRNA) into brain cancer cells with minimal toxicity. Specifically, this section details the development of non-toxic quantums dots for the imaging and delivery of siRNA into brain cancer and mesenchymal stem cells, with the hope of using these quantum dots as multiplexed imaging and delivery vehicles. The use of these quantum dots could overcome the toxicity issues associated with the use of conventional quantum dots, enabled the imaging of brain cancer and stem cells with high efficiency and allowed for the delivery of siRNA to knockdown the target oncogene in brain cancer cells. The latter part of this thesis details the development of nanomaterial-based drug delivery platforms for the co-delivery of multiple anticancer drugs to brain tumor cells. In particular, this part of the thesis focuses on

  3. Immunophenotyping invasive breast cancer: paving the road for molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mammographic population screening in The Netherlands has increased the number of breast cancer patients with small and non-palpable breast tumors. Nevertheless, mammography is not ultimately sensitive and specific for distinct subtypes. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers might increase specificity and sensitivity of detection. Because development of new tracers is labor-intensive and costly, we searched for the smallest panel of tumor membrane markers that would allow detection of the wide spectrum of invasive breast cancers. Tissue microarrays containing 483 invasive breast cancers were stained by immunohistochemistry for a selected set of membrane proteins known to be expressed in breast cancer. The combination of highly tumor-specific markers glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1-R), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), hepatocyte growth factor receptor (MET), and carbonic anhydrase 9 (CAIX) 'detected' 45.5% of tumors, especially basal/triple negative and HER2-driven ductal cancers. Addition of markers with a 2-fold tumor-to-normal ratio increased the detection rate to 98%. Including only markers with >3 fold tumor-to-normal ratio (CD44v6) resulted in an 80% detection rate. The detection rate of the panel containing both tumor-specific and less tumor-specific markers was not dependent on age, tumor grade, tumor size, or lymph node status. In search of the minimal panel of targeted probes needed for the highest possible detection rate, we showed that 80% of all breast cancers express at least one of a panel of membrane markers (CD44v6, GLUT1, EGFR, HER2, and IGF1-R) that may therefore be suitable for molecular imaging strategies. This study thereby serves as a starting point for further development of a set of antibody-based optical tracers with a high breast cancer detection rate

  4. Immunophenotyping invasive breast cancer: paving the road for molecular imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vermeulen Jeroen F

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammographic population screening in The Netherlands has increased the number of breast cancer patients with small and non-palpable breast tumors. Nevertheless, mammography is not ultimately sensitive and specific for distinct subtypes. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers might increase specificity and sensitivity of detection. Because development of new tracers is labor-intensive and costly, we searched for the smallest panel of tumor membrane markers that would allow detection of the wide spectrum of invasive breast cancers. Methods Tissue microarrays containing 483 invasive breast cancers were stained by immunohistochemistry for a selected set of membrane proteins known to be expressed in breast cancer. Results The combination of highly tumor-specific markers glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1-R, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, hepatocyte growth factor receptor (MET, and carbonic anhydrase 9 (CAIX 'detected' 45.5% of tumors, especially basal/triple negative and HER2-driven ductal cancers. Addition of markers with a 2-fold tumor-to-normal ratio increased the detection rate to 98%. Including only markers with >3 fold tumor-to-normal ratio (CD44v6 resulted in an 80% detection rate. The detection rate of the panel containing both tumor-specific and less tumor-specific markers was not dependent on age, tumor grade, tumor size, or lymph node status. Conclusions In search of the minimal panel of targeted probes needed for the highest possible detection rate, we showed that 80% of all breast cancers express at least one of a panel of membrane markers (CD44v6, GLUT1, EGFR, HER2, and IGF1-R that may therefore be suitable for molecular imaging strategies. This study thereby serves as a starting point for further development of a set of antibody-based optical tracers with a high breast cancer detection rate.

  5. Molecular application of spectral photoacoustic imaging in pancreatic cancer pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshman, Minalini; Hupple, Clinton; Lohse, Ines; Hedley, David; Needles, Andrew; Theodoropoulos, Catherine

    2012-12-01

    Spectral imaging is an advanced photo-acoustic (PA) mode that can discern optical absorption of contrast agent(s) in the tissue micro-environment. This advancement is made possible by precise control of optical wavelength using a tunable pulsed laser, ranging from 680-970 nm. Differential optical absorption of blood oxygenation states makes spectral imaging of hemoglobin ideal to investigate remodeling of the tumor microenvironment- a molecular change that renders resistance to standard cancer treatment. Approach: Photo-acoustic imaging was performed on the Vevo® LAZR system (VisualSonics) at 5-20 Hz. Deep abdominal imaging was accomplished with a LZ250D probe at a center frequency of 21MHz and an axial resolution of 75 μm. The tumor model was generated in an immune compromised mouse by surgical implantation of primary patient derived tumors, in the pancreas. Results: Spectral imaging for oxygen saturation at 750 nm and 850 nm characterized this tumor with a poorly oxygenated core surrounded by a well oxygenated periphery. Multispectral imaging identified a sub region in the core with a four-fold signal exclusively at 750 and 800 nm. A co-registered 2D image of this region was shown to be echogenic and calcification was suspected. Perfusion imaging with contrast enhanced ultrasound using microbubbles (Vevo MicroMarker® contrast agents, VisualSonics) identified functional vessels towards this sub region. Histology confirmed calcification and vascularization in the tumor core. Taken together, non-invasive characterization of the tumor microenvironment using photo-acoustics rendered spectral imaging a sensitive tool to monitor molecular changes representative of progression of pancreatic cancer that kills within 6 months of diagnosis.

  6. A targeted molecular probe for colorectal cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attramadal, T.; Bjerke, R.; Indrevoll, B.; Moestue, S.; Rogstad, A.; Bendiksen, R.; Healey, A.; Johannesen, E.

    2008-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major cause of cancer death. Morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs can be reduced if the disease can be detected at an early stage. Screening is a viable approach as there is a clear link to risk factors such as age. We have developed a fluorescent contrast agent for use during colonoscopy. The agent is administered intravenously and is targeted to an early stage molecular marker for colorectal cancer. The agent consists of a targeting section comprising a peptide, and a fluorescent reporter molecule. Clinical imaging of the agent is to be performed with a far red fluorescence imaging channel (635 nm excitation/660-700 nm emission) as an adjunct to white light colonoscopy. Preclinical proof of mechanism results are presented. The compound has a K d of ~3nM. Two human xenograft tumour models were used. Tumour cells were implanted and grown subcutaneously in nude mice. Imaging using a fluorescence reflectance imaging system and quantitative biodistribution studies were performed. Substances tested include the targeted agent, and a scrambled sequence of the peptide (no binding) used as a negative control. Competition studies were also performed by co-administration of 180 times excess unlabelled peptide. Positive imaging contrast was shown in the tumours, with a clear relationship to expression levels (confirmed with quantitative biodistribution data). There was a significant difference between the positive and negative control substances, and a significant reduction in contrast in the competition experiment.

  7. Bench to bedside molecular functional imaging in translational cancer medicine: to image or to imagine?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ongoing research on malignant and normal cell biology has substantially enhanced the understanding of the biology of cancer and carcinogenesis. This has led to the development of methods to image the evolution of cancer, target specific biological molecules, and study the anti-tumour effects of novel therapeutic agents. At the same time, there has been a paradigm shift in the field of oncological imaging from purely structural or functional imaging to combined multimodal structure–function approaches that enable the assessment of malignancy from all aspects (including molecular and functional level) in a single examination. The evolving molecular functional imaging using specific molecular targets (especially with combined positron-emission tomography [PET] computed tomography [CT] using 2- [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose [FDG] and other novel PET tracers) has great potential in translational research, giving specific quantitative information with regard to tumour activity, and has been of pivotal importance in diagnoses and therapy tailoring. Furthermore, molecular functional imaging has taken a key place in the present era of translational cancer research, producing an important tool to study and evolve newer receptor-targeted therapies, gene therapies, and in cancer stem cell research, which could form the basis to translate these agents into clinical practice, popularly termed “theranostics”. Targeted molecular imaging needs to be developed in close association with biotechnology, information technology, and basic translational scientists for its best utility. This article reviews the current role of molecular functional imaging as one of the main pillars of translational research. -- Highlights: •Molecular functional imaging (MFI) gives insight into the tumor biology and intratumoral heterogeneity. •It has potential role in identifying radiomic signatures associated with underlying gene-expression. •Radiomics can be used to create a road map

  8. Exogenous Molecular Probes for Targeted Imaging in Cancer: Focus on Multi-modal Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Bishnu P. [Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University of Michigan, School of Medicine, 109 Zina Pitcher Place, BSRB 1722, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Wang, Thomas D., E-mail: thomaswa@umich.edu [Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University of Michigan, School of Medicine, 109 Zina Pitcher Place, BSRB 1722, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2010-06-11

    Cancer is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity in our healthcare system. Molecular imaging is an emerging methodology for the early detection of cancer, guidance of therapy, and monitoring of response. The development of new instruments and exogenous molecular probes that can be labeled for multi-modality imaging is critical to this process. Today, molecular imaging is at a crossroad, and new targeted imaging agents are expected to broadly expand our ability to detect and manage cancer. This integrated imaging strategy will permit clinicians to not only localize lesions within the body but also to manage their therapy by visualizing the expression and activity of specific molecules. This information is expected to have a major impact on drug development and understanding of basic cancer biology. At this time, a number of molecular probes have been developed by conjugating various labels to affinity ligands for targeting in different imaging modalities. This review will describe the current status of exogenous molecular probes for optical, scintigraphic, MRI and ultrasound imaging platforms. Furthermore, we will also shed light on how these techniques can be used synergistically in multi-modal platforms and how these techniques are being employed in current research.

  9. Molecular markers in breast cancer: new tools in imaging and prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Vermeulen, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women. Although breast cancer is mainly diagnosed by mammography, other imaging modalities (e.g. MRI, PET) are increasingly used. The most recent developments in the field of molecular imaging comprise the application of near-infrared fluorescent labeled (NIRF) tracers for detection of breast cancer. Thus far, only a few molecular imaging tracers have been taken to the clinic of which most are suitable for PET. My thesis describes the e...

  10. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer: translating molecular biology approaches into the clinical realm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Sala, Evis; Hricak, Hedvig [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Grimm, Jan [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Program in Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States); Donati, Olivio F. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-05-01

    The epidemiology of prostate cancer has dramatically changed since the introduction of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening in the 1980's. Most prostate cancers today are detected at early stages of the disease and are considered 'indolent'; however, some patients' prostate cancers demonstrate a more aggressive behaviour which leads to rapid progression and death. Increasing understanding of the biology underlying the heterogeneity that characterises this disease has led to a continuously evolving role of imaging in the management of prostate cancer. Functional and metabolic imaging techniques are gaining importance as the impact on the therapeutic paradigm has shifted from structural tumour detection alone to distinguishing patients with indolent tumours that can be managed conservatively (e.g., by active surveillance) from patients with more aggressive tumours that may require definitive treatment with surgery or radiation. In this review, we discuss advanced imaging techniques that allow direct visualisation of molecular interactions relevant to prostate cancer and their potential for translation to the clinical setting in the near future. The potential use of imaging to follow molecular events during drug therapy as well as the use of imaging agents for therapeutic purposes will also be discussed. (orig.)

  11. Molecular imaging of cancer: MR spectroscopy and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging is a non-invasive diagnostic tool for the investigation of cancer metabolism. As an adjunct to morphologic and dynamic magnetic resonance imaging, it is routinely used for the staging, assessment of treatment response, and therapy monitoring in brain, breast, and prostate cancer. Recently, its application was extended to other cancerous diseases, such as malignant soft-tissue tumours, gastrointestinal and gynecological cancers, as well as nodal metastasis. In this review, we discuss the current and evolving clinical applications of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. In addition, we will briefly discuss other evolving techniques, such as phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging, sodium imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging in cancer assessment.

  12. SU-E-I-39: Molecular Image Guided Cancer Stem Cells Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdollahi, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Cancer stem cells resistance to radiation is a problematic issue that has caused a big fail in cancer treatment. Methods: As a primary work, molecular imaging can indicate the main mechanisms of radiation resistance of cancer stem cells. By developing and commissioning new probes and nanomolecules and biomarkers, radiation scientist will able to identify the essential pathways of radiation resistance of cancer stem cells. As the second solution, molecular imaging is a best way to find biological target volume and delineate cancer stem cell tissues. In the other hand, by molecular imaging techniques one can image the treatment response in tumor and also in normal tissue. In this issue, the response of cancer stem cells to radiation during therapy course can be imaged, also the main mechanisms of radiation resistance and finding the best radiation modifiers (sensitizers) can be achieved by molecular imaging modalities. In adaptive radiotherapy the molecular imaging plays a vital role to have higher tumor control probability by delivering high radiation doses to cancer stem cells in any time of treatment. The outcome of a feasible treatment is dependent to high cancer stem cells response to radiation and removing all of which, so a good imaging modality can show this issue and preventing of tumor recurrence and metastasis. Results: Our results are dependent to use of molecular imaging as a new modality in the clinic. We propose molecular imaging as a new radiobiological technique to solve radiation therapy problems due to cancer stem cells. Conclusion: Molecular imaging guided cancer stem cell diagnosis and therapy is a new approach in the field of cancer treatment. This new radiobiological imaging technique should be developed in all clinics as a feasible tool that is more biological than physical imaging.

  13. SU-E-I-39: Molecular Image Guided Cancer Stem Cells Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Cancer stem cells resistance to radiation is a problematic issue that has caused a big fail in cancer treatment. Methods: As a primary work, molecular imaging can indicate the main mechanisms of radiation resistance of cancer stem cells. By developing and commissioning new probes and nanomolecules and biomarkers, radiation scientist will able to identify the essential pathways of radiation resistance of cancer stem cells. As the second solution, molecular imaging is a best way to find biological target volume and delineate cancer stem cell tissues. In the other hand, by molecular imaging techniques one can image the treatment response in tumor and also in normal tissue. In this issue, the response of cancer stem cells to radiation during therapy course can be imaged, also the main mechanisms of radiation resistance and finding the best radiation modifiers (sensitizers) can be achieved by molecular imaging modalities. In adaptive radiotherapy the molecular imaging plays a vital role to have higher tumor control probability by delivering high radiation doses to cancer stem cells in any time of treatment. The outcome of a feasible treatment is dependent to high cancer stem cells response to radiation and removing all of which, so a good imaging modality can show this issue and preventing of tumor recurrence and metastasis. Results: Our results are dependent to use of molecular imaging as a new modality in the clinic. We propose molecular imaging as a new radiobiological technique to solve radiation therapy problems due to cancer stem cells. Conclusion: Molecular imaging guided cancer stem cell diagnosis and therapy is a new approach in the field of cancer treatment. This new radiobiological imaging technique should be developed in all clinics as a feasible tool that is more biological than physical imaging

  14. Molecular markers in breast cancer: new tools in imaging and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women. Although breast cancer is mainly diagnosed by mammography, other imaging modalities (e.g. MRI, PET) are increasingly used. The most recent developments in the field of molecular imaging comprise the application of near-infrared fluoresc

  15. Breast imaging technology: Probing physiology and molecular function using optical imaging - applications to breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present review addresses the capacity of optical imaging to resolve functional and molecular characteristics of breast cancer. We focus on recent developments in optical imaging that allow three-dimensional reconstruction of optical signatures in the human breast using diffuse optical tomography (DOT). These technologic advances allow the noninvasive, in vivo imaging and quantification of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin and of contrast agents that target the physiologic and molecular functions of tumors. Hence, malignancy differentiation can be based on a novel set of functional features that are complementary to current radiologic imaging methods. These features could enhance diagnostic accuracy, lower the current state-of-the-art detection limits, and play a vital role in therapeutic strategy and monitoring

  16. Molecular MR imaging of cancer gene therapy. Ferritin transgene reporter takes the stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular imaging using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been actively investigated and made rapid progress in the past decade. Applied to cancer gene therapy, the technique's high spatial resolution allows evaluation of gene delivery into target tissues. Because noninvasive monitoring of the duration, location, and magnitude of transgene expression in tumor tissues or cells provides useful information for assessing therapeutic efficacy and optimizing protocols, molecular imaging is expected to become a critical step in the success of cancer gene therapy in the near future. We present a brief overview of the current status of molecular MR imaging, especially in vivo reporter gene imaging using ferritin and other reporters, discuss its application to cancer gene therapy, and present our research of MR imaging detection of electroporation-mediated cancer gene therapy using the ferritin reporter gene. (author)

  17. Basic research and clinical application of optical molecular imaging in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a rapidly developing biomedical imaging technology,in vivo optical molecular imaging has been widely applied in various research fields owing to its unique real-time, quantitative and noninvasive characteristics. The applications of in vivo optical imaging technology in the basic and clinical research of breast cancer were reviewed, including detection of distant metastasis,tumor apoptosis, cell cycle, hypoxia and angiogenesis, ER-mediated molecular pathway, breast cancer stem cells, early diagnosis, sentinel node biopsy, evaluation of drug efficacy and detection of human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) expression. They all seem to have a promising potential in in vivo optical molecular imaging. (authors)

  18. Endoscopic molecular imaging of human bladder cancer using a CD47 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ying; Volkmer, Jens-Peter; Mach, Kathleen E; Rouse, Robert V; Liu, Jen-Jane; Sahoo, Debashis; Chang, Timothy C; Metzner, Thomas J; Kang, Lei; van de Rijn, Matt; Skinner, Eila C; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Weissman, Irving L; Liao, Joseph C

    2014-10-29

    A combination of optical imaging technologies with cancer-specific molecular imaging agents is a potentially powerful strategy to improve cancer detection and enable image-guided surgery. Bladder cancer is primarily managed endoscopically by white light cystoscopy with suboptimal diagnostic accuracy. Emerging optical imaging technologies hold great potential for improved diagnostic accuracy but lack imaging agents for molecular specificity. Using fluorescently labeled CD47 antibody (anti-CD47) as molecular imaging agent, we demonstrated consistent identification of bladder cancer with clinical grade fluorescence imaging systems, confocal endomicroscopy, and blue light cystoscopy in fresh surgically removed human bladders. With blue light cystoscopy, the sensitivity and specificity for CD47-targeted imaging were 82.9 and 90.5%, respectively. We detected variants of bladder cancers, which are diagnostic challenges, including carcinoma in situ, residual carcinoma in tumor resection bed, recurrent carcinoma following prior intravesical immunotherapy with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), and excluded cancer from benign but suspicious-appearing mucosa. CD47-targeted molecular imaging could improve diagnosis and resection thoroughness for bladder cancer. PMID:25355698

  19. From molecular imaging to personalized radionuclide therapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows. 68Gallium is a positron emitter (t1/2 68 min) which can be produced from a generator in a convenient, 'in-house' preparation and used for labeling of peptides, e.g. somatostatin analogues (SA) like DOTATOC or DOTATATE for molecular imaging of SSTR expressing tumors. Since 2004, we have performed over 7700 68Ga PET/CT studies in patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NET) and have established SSTR PET/CT as the new gold standard for imaging G1 and G2 NET (staging, re-staging, therapy response evaluation and detection of unknown primary NET). The same peptides can be labeled with 177Lutetium or 90Yttrium for radionuclide therapy, a form of personalized treatment (THERANOSTICS approach). PRRNT is based on the receptor-mediated internalization of SA. Several clinical trials indicate that PRRNT can deliver effective radiation doses to tumors. A German multi-institutional registry study with prospective follow up in 450 patients indicates that PRRT is an effective therapy for patients with G1-2 neuroendocrine tumors, irrespective of previous therapies, with a survival advantage of several years compared to other therapies and only minor side effects. Median overall survival (OS) of all patients from the start of treatment was 59 months. Median progression-free survival (PFS) measured from last cycle of therapy accounted to 41 mo. Median PFS of pancreatic NET was 39 mo. Similar results were obtained for NET of unknown primary (median PFS: 38 mo) whereas NET of small bowel had a median PFS of 51 months. Side effects like 3-4 NEThro- or hemato-toxicity were observed in only 0.2% and 2% of patients respectively. PRRNT is highly effective in the management of NET, even in advanced cases. In patients with progressive neuroendocrine tumors, fractionated, personalized PRRNT with lower doses of radioactivity given over a longer period of time (Bad Berka Concept using sequential (DUO) PRRNT) results in excellent therapeutic responses. By

  20. Molecular imaging of cancer with radiolabeled peptides and PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vāvere, Amy L; Rossin, Raffaella

    2012-06-01

    Radiolabeled peptides hold promise for diagnosis and therapy of cancer as well as for early monitoring of therapy outcomes, patient stratification, etc. This manuscript focuses on the development of peptides labeled with 18F, 64Cu, 68Ga and other positron-emitting radionuclides for PET imaging. The major techniques for radionuclide incorporation are briefly discussed. Then, examples of positron-emitting peptides targeting somatostatin receptors, integrins, gastrin-releasing peptide receptors, vasointestinal peptide receptors, melanocortin 1 receptors and others are reviewed. PMID:22292762

  1. Peptide-Targeted Nanoglobular Gd-DOTA Monoamide Conjugates for Magnetic Resonance Cancer Molecular Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Mingqian; Wu, Xueming; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Chen, Qianjin; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2010-01-01

    Effective imaging of cancer molecular biomarker is critical for accurate cancer diagnosis and prognosis. CLT1 peptide was observed to specifically bind to the fibrin-fibronectin complexes presented in tumor extracellular matrix. In this study, we synthesized and evaluated CLT1 peptide-targeted nanoglobular Gd-DOTA monoamide conjugates for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the fibrin-fibronectin complexes in tumor. The targeted nanoglobular contrast agents were prepared by conjugating peptide...

  2. Early Cancer Detection and Targeted Therapy by Magnetic Resonance Molecular Imaging and Nano Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zhao

    2015-01-01

    The common theme of my 5-year PhD research is to channel progress in spin physics and nano-bio-materials into meaningful improvements in the theoretical studies, methodological developments, and advanced applications of magnetic resonance (MR) to: 1) MR Molecular Imaging: to detect lesions (especially cancers) at early stages through imaging the existence and locations of physiologically important biomarkers; and2) MR Nano Medicine: to cure diseases (especially cancers) by targeted therapy th...

  3. Molecular imaging of HER2-positive breast cancer: a step toward an individualized 'image and treat' strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capala, Jacek; Bouchelouche, Kirsten

    2010-01-01

    HER2 overexpression is correlated with aggressive tumor behavior and poor clinical outcome. Therefore, HER2 has become an important prognostic and predictive factor, as well as a target for molecular therapies. The article reviews recent advances in molecular imaging of HER2 that could facilitate...... individual approaches to targeted therapy of HER2-positive breast cancers....

  4. Synthesis and evaluation of a peptide targeted small molecular Gd-DOTA monoamide conjugate for MR molecular imaging of prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xueming; Burden-Gulley, Susan M.; Yu, Guan-Ping; Tan, Mingqian; Lindner, Daniel; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M.; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2012-01-01

    Tumor extracellular matrix has an abundance of cancer related proteins that can be used as biomarkers for cancer molecular imaging. Innovative design and development of safe and effective targeted contrast agents to these biomarkers would allow effective MR cancer molecular imaging with high spatial resolution. In this study, we synthesized a low molecular weight CLT1 peptide targeted Gd(III) chelate CLT1-dL-(Gd-DOTA)4 specific to clotted plasma proteins in tumor stroma for cancer MR molecula...

  5. Cancer Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Criteria Screening and Interventional Trials Radiology Network (ACRIN) Phase I/II Trials CIP ARRA-Funded Clinical Trials Informatics The Cancer Imaging Archive Imaging Informatics Challenges TCGA Imaging Genomics Quantitative Imaging Network LIDC-IDRI Imaging Informatics Resources News & ...

  6. Molecular imaging of hypoxia in non-small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, Connie [King' s College London, St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Cancer Imaging, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); National Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Singapore (Singapore); St Thomas' Hospital, Imaging 2, London (United Kingdom); Blower, Philip J. [King' s College London, St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Imaging Chemistry and Biology, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Goh, Vicky [King' s College London, St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Cancer Imaging, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Radiology, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Landau, David B. [King' s College London, St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Cancer Imaging, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Clinical Oncology, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Cook, Gary J.R. [King' s College London, St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Cancer Imaging, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); St Thomas' Hospital, Clinical PET Imaging Centre, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the commonest cancer worldwide but survival remains poor with a high risk of relapse, particularly after nonsurgical treatment. Hypoxia is present in a variety of solid tumours, including NSCLC. It is associated with treatment resistance and a poor prognosis, although when recognised may be amenable to different treatment strategies. Thus, noninvasive assessment of intratumoral hypoxia could be used to stratify patients for modification of subsequent treatment to improve tumour control. Molecular imaging approaches targeting hypoxic cells have shown some early success in the clinical setting. This review evaluates the evidence for hypoxia imaging using PET in NSCLC and explores its potential clinical utility. (orig.)

  7. Molecular imaging of hypoxia in non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the commonest cancer worldwide but survival remains poor with a high risk of relapse, particularly after nonsurgical treatment. Hypoxia is present in a variety of solid tumours, including NSCLC. It is associated with treatment resistance and a poor prognosis, although when recognised may be amenable to different treatment strategies. Thus, noninvasive assessment of intratumoral hypoxia could be used to stratify patients for modification of subsequent treatment to improve tumour control. Molecular imaging approaches targeting hypoxic cells have shown some early success in the clinical setting. This review evaluates the evidence for hypoxia imaging using PET in NSCLC and explores its potential clinical utility. (orig.)

  8. Tryptophan metabolism in breast cancers: molecular imaging and immunohistochemistry studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Tryptophan oxidation via the kynurenine pathway is an important mechanism of tumoral immunoresistance. Increased tryptophan metabolism via the serotonin pathway has been linked to malignant progression in breast cancer. In this study, we combined quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) with tumor immunohistochemistry to analyze tryptophan transport and metabolism in breast cancer. Methods: Dynamic α-[11C]methyl-L-tryptophan (AMT) PET was performed in nine women with stage II–IV breast cancer. PET tracer kinetic modeling was performed in all tumors. Expression of L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1), indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO; the initial and rate-limiting enzyme of the kynurenine pathway) and tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1; the initial enzyme of the serotonin pathway) was assessed by immunostaining of resected tumor specimens. Results: Tumor AMT uptake peaked at 5–20 min postinjection in seven tumors; the other two cases showed protracted tracer accumulation. Tumor standardized uptake values (SUVs) varied widely (2.6–9.8) and showed a strong positive correlation with volume of distribution values derived from kinetic analysis (P < .01). Invasive ductal carcinomas (n = 6) showed particularly high AMT SUVs (range, 4.7–9.8). Moderate to strong immunostaining for LAT1, IDO and TPH1 was detected in most tumor cells. Conclusions: Breast cancers show differential tryptophan kinetics on dynamic PET. SUVs measured 5–20 min postinjection reflect reasonably the tracer's volume of distribution. Further studies are warranted to determine if in vivo AMT accumulation in these tumors is related to tryptophan metabolism via the kynurenine and serotonin pathways.

  9. Hyperpolarized 13C MR for Molecular Imaging of Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, David M.; Kurhanewicz, John

    2014-01-01

    Hyperpolarization using dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization has emerged as a versatile method to dramatically improve the MR signal of low-sensitivity nuclei. This technique facilitates the study of real-time metabolism in vitro and in vivo using 13C-enriched substrates and has been applied to numerous models of human disease. In particular, several mechanisms underlying prostate cancer have been interrogated using hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopy. This review highlights key metabolic ...

  10. Estrogen Receptor-Targeted Contrast Agents for Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Breast Cancer Hormonal Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pais, Adi; Degani, Hadassa

    2016-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) α is overexpressed in most breast cancers, and its level serves as a major prognostic factor. It is important to develop quantitative molecular imaging methods that specifically detect ER in vivo and assess its function throughout the entire primary breast cancer and in metastatic breast cancer lesions. This study presents the biochemical and molecular features, as well as the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) effects of two novel ER-targeted contrast agents (CAs), based on pyridine-tetra-acetate-Gd(III) chelate conjugated to 17β-estradiol (EPTA-Gd) or to tamoxifen (TPTA-Gd). The experiments were conducted in solution, in human breast cancer cells, and in severe combined immunodeficient mice implanted with transfected ER-positive and ER-negative MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts. Binding studies with ER in solution and in human breast cancer cells indicated affinities in the micromolar range of both CAs. Biochemical and molecular studies in breast cancer cell cultures showed that both CAs exhibit estrogen-like agonistic activity, enhancing cell proliferation, as well as upregulating cMyc oncogene and downregulating ER expression levels. The MRI longitudinal relaxivity was significantly augmented by EPTA-Gd in ER-positive cells as compared to ER-negative cells. Dynamic contrast-enhanced studies with EPTA-Gd in vivo indicated specific augmentation of the MRI water signal in the ER-positive versus ER-negative xenografts, confirming EPTA-Gd-specific interaction with ER. In contrast, TPTA-Gd did not show increased enhancement in ER-positive tumors and did not appear to interact in vivo with the tumors' ER. However, TPTA-Gd was found to interact strongly with muscle tissue, enhancing muscle signal intensity in a mechanism independent of the presence of ER. The specificity of EPTA-Gd interaction with ER in vivo was further verified by acute and chronic competition with tamoxifen. The chronic tamoxifen treatment also revealed that this

  11. Molecular Imaging of Biological Gene Delivery Vehicles for Targeted Cancer Therapy: Beyond Viral Vectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Jung Joon; Nguyen, Vu H. [Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Gambhir, Sanjiv S. [Stanford University, California(United States)

    2010-04-15

    Cancer persists as one of the most devastating diseases in the world. Problems including metastasis and tumor resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy have seriously limited the therapeutic effects of present clinical treatments. To overcome these limitations, cancer gene therapy has been developed over the last two decades for a broad spectrum of applications, from gene replacement and knockdown to vaccination, each with different requirements for gene delivery. So far, a number of genes and delivery vectors have been investigated, and significant progress has been made with several gene therapy modalities in clinical trials. Viral vectors and synthetic liposomes have emerged as the vehicles of choice for many applications. However, both have limitations and risks that restrict gene therapy applications, including the complexity of production, limited packaging capacity, and unfavorable immunological features. While continuing to improve these vectors, it is important to investigate other options, particularly nonarrival biological agents such as bacteria, bacteriophages, and bacteria-like particles. Recently, many molecular imaging techniques for safe, repeated, and high-resolution in vivo imaging of gene expression have been employed to assess vector-mediated gene expression in living subjects. In this review, molecular imaging techniques for monitoring biological gene delivery vehicles are described, and the specific use of these methods at different steps is illustrated. Linking molecular imaging to gene therapy will eventually help to develop novel gene delivery vehicles for preclinical study and support the development of future human applications.

  12. Molecular Imaging of Biological Gene Delivery Vehicles for Targeted Cancer Therapy: Beyond Viral Vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer persists as one of the most devastating diseases in the world. Problems including metastasis and tumor resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy have seriously limited the therapeutic effects of present clinical treatments. To overcome these limitations, cancer gene therapy has been developed over the last two decades for a broad spectrum of applications, from gene replacement and knockdown to vaccination, each with different requirements for gene delivery. So far, a number of genes and delivery vectors have been investigated, and significant progress has been made with several gene therapy modalities in clinical trials. Viral vectors and synthetic liposomes have emerged as the vehicles of choice for many applications. However, both have limitations and risks that restrict gene therapy applications, including the complexity of production, limited packaging capacity, and unfavorable immunological features. While continuing to improve these vectors, it is important to investigate other options, particularly nonarrival biological agents such as bacteria, bacteriophages, and bacteria-like particles. Recently, many molecular imaging techniques for safe, repeated, and high-resolution in vivo imaging of gene expression have been employed to assess vector-mediated gene expression in living subjects. In this review, molecular imaging techniques for monitoring biological gene delivery vehicles are described, and the specific use of these methods at different steps is illustrated. Linking molecular imaging to gene therapy will eventually help to develop novel gene delivery vehicles for preclinical study and support the development of future human applications.

  13. Early detection of breast cancer: a molecular optical imaging approach using novel estrogen conjugate fluorescent dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Shubhadeep; Jose, Iven

    2011-02-01

    Estrogen induced proliferation of mutant cells is widely understood to be the one of major risk determining factor in the development of breast cancer. Hence determination of the Estrogen Receptor[ER] status is of paramount importance if cancer pathogenesis is to be detected and rectified at an early stage. Near Infrared Fluorescence [NIRf] Molecular Optical Imaging is emerging as a powerful tool to monitor bio-molecular changes in living subjects. We discuss pre-clinical results in our efforts to develop an optical imaging diagnostic modality for the early detection of breast cancer. We have successfully carried out the synthesis and characterization of a novel target-specific NIRf dye conjugate aimed at measuring Estrogen Receptor[ER] status. The conjugate was synthesized by ester formation between 17-β estradiol and a hydrophilic derivative of Indocyanine Green (ICG) cyanine dye, bis-1,1-(4-sulfobutyl) indotricarbocyanine-5-carboxylic acid, sodium salt. In-vitro studies regarding specific binding and endocytocis of the dye performed on ER+ve [MCF-7] and control [MDA-MB-231] adenocarcinoma breast cancer cell lines clearly indicated nuclear localization of the dye for MCF-7 as compared to plasma level staining for MDA-MB-231. Furthermore, MCF-7 cells showed ~4.5-fold increase in fluorescence signal intensity compared to MDA-MB-231. A 3-D mesh model mimicking the human breast placed in a parallel-plate DOT Scanner is created to examine the in-vivo efficacy of the dye before proceeding with clinical trials. Photon migration and florescence flux intensity is modeled using the finite-element method with the coefficients (quantum yield, molar extinction co-efficient etc.) pertaining to the dye as obtained from photo-physical and in-vitro studies. We conclude by stating that this lipophilic dye can be potentially used as a target specific exogenous contrast agent in molecular optical imaging for early detection of breast cancer.

  14. Molecular assessment of surgical-resection margins of gastric cancer by mass-spectrometric imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberlin, Livia S; Tibshirani, Robert J; Zhang, Jialing; Longacre, Teri A; Berry, Gerald J; Bingham, David B; Norton, Jeffrey A; Zare, Richard N; Poultsides, George A

    2014-02-18

    Surgical resection is the main curative option for gastrointestinal cancers. The extent of cancer resection is commonly assessed during surgery by pathologic evaluation of (frozen sections of) the tissue at the resected specimen margin(s) to verify whether cancer is present. We compare this method to an alternative procedure, desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometric imaging (DESI-MSI), for 62 banked human cancerous and normal gastric-tissue samples. In DESI-MSI, microdroplets strike the tissue sample, the resulting splash enters a mass spectrometer, and a statistical analysis, here, the Lasso method (which stands for least absolute shrinkage and selection operator and which is a multiclass logistic regression with L1 penalty), is applied to classify tissues based on the molecular information obtained directly from DESI-MSI. The methodology developed with 28 frozen training samples of clear histopathologic diagnosis showed an overall accuracy value of 98% for the 12,480 pixels evaluated in cross-validation (CV), and 97% when a completely independent set of samples was tested. By applying an additional spatial smoothing technique, the accuracy for both CV and the independent set of samples was 99% compared with histological diagnoses. To test our method for clinical use, we applied it to a total of 21 tissue-margin samples prospectively obtained from nine gastric-cancer patients. The results obtained suggest that DESI-MSI/Lasso may be valuable for routine intraoperative assessment of the specimen margins during gastric-cancer surgery. PMID:24550265

  15. Radiogenomic analysis of breast cancer: dynamic contrast enhanced - magnetic resonance imaging based features are associated with molecular subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijian; Fan, Ming; Zhang, Juan; Zheng, Bin; Wang, Xiaojia; Li, Lihua

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignant tumor with upgrading incidence in females. The key to decrease the mortality is early diagnosis and reasonable treatment. Molecular classification could provide better insights into patient-directed therapy and prognosis prediction of breast cancer. It is known that different molecular subtypes have different characteristics in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination. Therefore, we assumed that imaging features can reflect molecular information in breast cancer. In this study, we investigated associations between dynamic contrasts enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) features and molecular subtypes in breast cancer. Sixty patients with breast cancer were enrolled and the MR images were pre-processed for noise reduction, registration and segmentation. Sixty-five dimensional imaging features including statistical characteristics, morphology, texture and dynamic enhancement in breast lesion and background regions were semiautomatically extracted. The associations between imaging features and molecular subtypes were assessed by using statistical analyses, including univariate logistic regression and multivariate logistic regression. The results of multivariate regression showed that imaging features are significantly associated with molecular subtypes of Luminal A (p=0.00473), HER2-enriched (p=0.00277) and Basal like (p=0.0117), respectively. The results indicated that three molecular subtypes are correlated with DCE-MRI features in breast cancer. Specifically, patients with a higher level of compactness or lower level of skewness in breast lesion are more likely to be Luminal A subtype. Besides, the higher value of the dynamic enhancement at T1 time in normal side reflect higher possibility of HER2-enriched subtype in breast cancer.

  16. Radiofrequency Heat-Enhanced Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer: Towards Interventional Molecular Image-Guided Chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Yurong; Han, Guocan; Wang, Yue; Hu, Xi; Li, Zhiming; Chen, Lumin; Bai, Weixian; Luo, Jingfeng; Zhang, Yajing; Sun, Jihong; Yang, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women worldwide. Recent developments in minimally invasive interventional radiology techniques have significantly improved breast cancer treatment. This study aimed to develop a novel technique for the local management of breast cancers using radiofrequency heat (RFH). We performed both in vitro experiments using human breast cancer cells and in vivo validation in xenograft animal models with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and pathological corr...

  17. REAL-TIME DETECTION OF SURVIVIN mRNA EXPRESSION IN CERVICAL CANCER CELL LINES USING MOLECULAR BEACON IMAGING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    An Ruifang; He Dalin; Xue Yan; Wang Shu; Xie Li; Zhao Jun; Wang Xinyang; Yang Lili

    2006-01-01

    Objective To detect the expression of survivin mRNA in cervical cancer cell lines using molecular beacon imaging technology. Methods Human cervical cancer cells (HeLa and SiHa) and human fetal lung fibroblast HFL-I were cultured in vitro. After adding 100 nmol/L survivin mRNA molecular beacon, the fluorescent signals were observed under fluorescent microscope. The expressions of survivin in cervical cancer cells and HFL-I cell were examined by immunocytochemical streptravidin-biothin peroxidase (SP) assay at the same time. Results Two kinds of survivin mRNA molecular beacon, with different color fluorescence, had strong fluorescent signal in cervical cancer cell lines, and the signal in SiHa cell line was stronger, but these signals were not found in HFL-I ; Immunocytochemical staining of positive survivin was located in the cytoplasm of cervical cancer cell lines HeLa and SiHa, whereas, no expression of survivin was detected in HFL-I cell line. Conclusion The technology of molecular beacon imaging can be used to detect the expression of survivin mRNA in viable cells successfully, and may provide a new approach to the diagnosis of early stage cervical cancer and the following-up in the clinic.

  18. NIR-Cyanine Dye Linker: a Promising Candidate for Isochronic Fluorescence Imaging in Molecular Cancer Diagnostics and Therapy Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Komljenovic, Dorde; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Ehemann, Volker; Pipkorn, Ruediger; Schrenk, Hans-Hermann; Debus, Jürgen; Braun, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Personalized anti-cancer medicine is boosted by the recent development of molecular diagnostics and molecularly targeted drugs requiring rapid and efficient ligation routes. Here, we present a novel approach to synthetize a conjugate able to act simultaneously as an imaging and as a chemotherapeutic agent by coupling functional peptides employing solid phase peptide synthesis technologies. Development and the first synthesis of a fluorescent dye with similarity in the polymethine part of the ...

  19. Peptide targeted high-resolution molecular imaging of prostate cancer with MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xueming; Yu, Guanping; Lindner, Daniel; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M.; Zhang, Qi; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive accurate detection of prostate cancer is critical for clinical management of the disease. Molecular MRI has a potential for accurate detection of prostate cancer with high spatial resolution. Fibronectin is a hallmark of epithelial-mesenchymal transition occurred in aggressive prostate cancer and highly expressed in malignant tumors. A pentapeptide CREKA targeted contrast agent CREKA-dL-(DOTA-Gd)4 was synthesized and evaluated to target fibrin-fibronectin complexes in tumor extra...

  20. Cardiovascular molecular MR imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Lamb, H J; van der Meer, R. W.; Roos, A. (Anna); Bax, J J

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Cardiovascular molecular imaging is a rapidly evolving field of research, aiming to image and quantify molecular and cellular targets in vivo. MR imaging has some inherent properties that make it very suitable for cardiovascular molecular imaging. Until now, only a limited number of studies have been published on cardiovascular molecular imaging using MR imaging. Review In the current review, MR techniques that have already shown potential are discussed. Metabolic MR imaging can ...

  1. Comprehensive Evaluation of the Anti-Angiogenic and Anti-Neoplastic Effects of Endostar on Liver Cancer through Optical Molecular Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Qian ZHANG; Du, Yang; Xue, Zhenwen; Chi, Chongwei; Jia, Xiaohua; Tian, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging enables non-invasive monitoring of tumor growth, progression, and drug treatment response, and it has become an important tool to promote biological studies in recent years. In this study, we comprehensively evaluated the in vivo anti-angiogenic and anti-neoplastic effects of Endostar on liver cancer based on the optical molecular imaging systems including micro-computer tomography (Micro-CT), bioluminescence molecular imaging (BLI) and fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT...

  2. Molecular imaging of tumor angiogenesis with VEGFR2 targeting microbubbles in colon cancer bearing nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of tumor neovascularization imaging in a nude mouse model of colon cancer by contrast ultrasound molecular imaging (UMI) of VEGF receptor 2 (kinase insert domain receptor, KDR). Methods: Targeted microbubbles (MBt) were built by conjugating K237, a small peptide with high affinity for KDR, to liposome microbubbles through a biotin-avidin bridge. Control microbubbles (MBc) with control peptide were prepared by the same method. Nude mice models of LS174T human colon cancer were established. MBt and MBc were injected intravenously in twelve mice in random order with an interval of 30 min. MBt were injected in another six mice after K237-peptide blocking. UMI was performed in all mice at 5 min postinjection to observe the imaging difference and measure the video intensity (Ⅵ) of tumor tissues in different groups. One-way analysis of variance and the least significant difference t test were performed to analyze the difference of tumor Ⅵ in the groups with MBt, MBc and K237 blocking. Immunohistochemistry was applied to detect the expression and distribution of KDR in tumor tissue and adjacent tumor tissues. Results: K237 peptide was successfully conjugated to the surface of microbubbles through biotin-avidin mediation. Ultrasound imaging signal of the tumor was high in the MBt group, while there were no significant enhancement in the groups of K237 blocking and MBc. The Ⅵ in MBt, MBc and K237 blocking groups was significantly different (F=39.130, P<0.01). There was a significant difference of Ⅵ in the MBt group compared to the MBc group (30.18 ± 9.56 vs 8.28 ± 4.74, t=6.91, P<0.01). In the K237 blocking group Ⅵ was significantly lower than that in the MBt group (9.23 ± 3.44 vs 30.18 ± 9.56, t=4.91, P<0.01). Immunohistochemistry results showed that KDR was highly expressed in tumor tissue. Conclusions: KDR-targeting liposome contrast microbubbles may specifically and efficiently link to tumor vascular endothelial cells in

  3. Molecular imaging of HER2-positive breast cancer: a step toward an individualized 'image and treat' strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capala, Jacek; Bouchelouche, Kirsten

    2010-01-01

    HER2 overexpression is correlated with aggressive tumor behavior and poor clinical outcome. Therefore, HER2 has become an important prognostic and predictive factor, as well as a target for molecular therapies. The article reviews recent advances in molecular imaging of HER2 that could facilitate...

  4. Molecular breast imaging. An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of molecular imaging is to visualize and quantify biological, physiological and pathological processes at cellular and molecular levels. Molecular imaging using various techniques has recently become established in breast imaging. Currently molecular imaging techniques comprise multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), proton MR spectroscopy (1H-MRSI), nuclear imaging by breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI), positron emission tomography (PET) and positron emission mammography (PEM) and combinations of techniques (e.g. PET-CT and multiparametric PET-MRI). Recently, novel techniques for molecular imaging of breast tumors, such as sodium imaging (23Na-MRI), phosphorus spectroscopy (31P-MRSI) and hyperpolarized MRI as well as specific radiotracers have been developed and are currently under investigation. It can be expected that molecular imaging of breast tumors will enable a simultaneous assessment of the multiple metabolic and molecular processes involved in cancer development and thus an improved detection, characterization, staging and monitoring of response to treatment will become possible. (orig.)

  5. Hybrid plasmonic magnetic nanoparticles as molecular specific agents for MRI/optical imaging and photothermal therapy of cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoparticles which consist of a plasmonic layer and an iron oxide moiety could provide a promising platform for development of multimodal imaging and therapy approaches in future medicine. However, the feasibility of this platform has yet to be fully explored. In this study we demonstrated the use of gold-coated iron oxide hybrid nanoparticles for combined molecular specific MRI/optical imaging and photothermal therapy of cancer cells. The gold layer exhibits a surface plasmon resonance that provides optical contrast due to light scattering in the visible region and also presents a convenient surface for conjugating targeting moieties, while the iron oxide cores give strong T2 (spin-spin relaxation time) contrast. The strong optical absorption of the plasmonic gold layer also makes these nanoparticles a promising agent for photothermal therapy. We synthesized hybrid nanoparticles which specifically target epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a common biomarker for many epithelial cancers. We demonstrated molecular specific MRI and optical imaging in MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells. Furthermore, we showed that receptor-mediated aggregation of anti-EGFR hybrid nanoparticles allows selective destruction of highly proliferative cancer cells using a nanosecond pulsed laser at 700 nm wavelength, a significant shift from the peak absorbance of isolated hybrid nanoparticles at 532 nm

  6. Comparison of radiation exposure and associated radiation-induced cancer risks from mammography and molecular imaging of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Recent studies have raised concerns about exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation from medical imaging procedures. Little has been published regarding the relative exposure and risks associated with breast imaging techniques such as breast specific gamma imaging (BSGI), molecular breast imaging (MBI), or positron emission mammography (PEM). The purpose of this article was to estimate and compare the risks of radiation-induced cancer from mammography and techniques such as PEM, BSGI, and MBI in a screening environment. Methods: The authors used a common scheme for all estimates of cancer incidence and mortality based on the excess absolute risk model from the BEIR VII report. The lifetime attributable risk model was used to estimate the lifetime risk of radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality. All estimates of cancer incidence and mortality were based on a population of 100 000 females followed from birth to age 80 and adjusted for the fraction that survives to various ages between 0 and 80. Assuming annual screening from ages 40 to 80 and from ages 50 to 80, the cumulative cancer incidence and mortality attributed to digital mammography, screen-film mammography, MBI, BSGI, and PEM was calculated. The corresponding cancer incidence and mortality from natural background radiation was calculated as a useful reference. Assuming a 15%-32% reduction in mortality from screening, the benefit/risk ratio for the different imaging modalities was evaluated. Results: Using conventional doses of 925 MBq Tc-99m sestamibi for MBI and BSGI and 370 MBq F-18 FDG for PEM, the cumulative cancer incidence and mortality were found to be 15-30 times higher than digital mammography. The benefit/risk ratio for annual digital mammography was >50:1 for both the 40-80 and 50-80 screening groups, but dropped to 3:1 for the 40-49 age group. If the primary use of MBI, BSGI, and PEM is in women with dense breast tissue, then the administered doses need to be in the range

  7. The application of surgical navigation system using optical molecular imaging technology in orthotopic breast cancer and metastasis studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Chongwei; Zhang, Qian; Kou, Deqiang; Ye, Jinzuo; Mao, Yamin; Qiu, Jingdan; Wang, Jiandong; Yang, Xin; Du, Yang; Tian, Jie

    2014-02-01

    Currently, it has been an international focus on intraoperative precise positioning and accurate resection of tumor and metastases. The methods such as X-rays, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have played an important role in preoperative accurate diagnosis. However, most of them are inapplicable for intraoperative surgery. We have proposed a surgical navigation system based on optical molecular imaging technology for intraoperative detection of tumors and metastasis. This system collects images from two CCD cameras for real-time fluorescent and color imaging. For image processing, the template matching algorithm is used for multispectral image fusion. For the application of tumor detection, the mouse breast cancer cell line 4T1-luc, which shows highly metastasis, was used for tumor model establishment and a model of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expressing breast cancer. The tumor-bearing nude mice were given tail vein injection of MMP 750FAST (PerkinElmer, Inc. USA) probe and imaged with both bioluminescence and fluorescence to assess in vivo binding of the probe to the tumor and metastases sites. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining was performed to confirm the presence of tumor and metastasis. As a result, one tumor can be observed visually in vivo. However liver metastasis has been detected under surgical navigation system and all were confirmed by histology. This approach helps surgeons to find orthotopic tumors and metastasis during intraoperative resection and visualize tumor borders for precise positioning. Further investigation is needed for future application in clinics.

  8. Quantitative imaging of atomic and molecular species in cancer cell cultures with TOF-SIMS and Laser-SNMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fartmann, M.; Kriegeskotte, C.; Dambach, S.; Wittig, A.; Sauerwein, W.; Arlinghaus, H. F.

    2004-06-01

    For boron neutron capture therapy, a promising cancer therapy under development, knowledge about the subcellular boron distribution is important. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and nonresonant laser secondary neutral mass spectrometry (NR-Laser-SNMS) have been used for examining freeze-fractured, freeze-dried human melanoma cells incubated with sodium mercaptoundecahydro-closo-dodecaborate ( Na210B12H11SH, BSH), a 10B containing drug. With both techniques, elemental and molecular images were obtained from the cancer cells with very high sensitivity and subcellular resolution. The measurement of the K/Na ratio demonstrated that the preparation technique used was appropriate for preserving the chemical and structural integrity of living cells. The boron images showed that the intensity of intracellular and extracellular boron signals was clearly different after incubation of cells in different boron concentrations.

  9. Quantitative imaging of atomic and molecular species in cancer cell cultures with TOF-SIMS and Laser-SNMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For boron neutron capture therapy, a promising cancer therapy under development, knowledge about the subcellular boron distribution is important. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and nonresonant laser secondary neutral mass spectrometry (NR-Laser-SNMS) have been used for examining freeze-fractured, freeze-dried human melanoma cells incubated with sodium mercaptoundecahydro-closo-dodecaborate (Na210B12H11SH,BSH), a 10B containing drug. With both techniques, elemental and molecular images were obtained from the cancer cells with very high sensitivity and subcellular resolution. The measurement of the K/Na ratio demonstrated that the preparation technique used was appropriate for preserving the chemical and structural integrity of living cells. The boron images showed that the intensity of intracellular and extracellular boron signals was clearly different after incubation of cells in different boron concentrations

  10. NIR-Cyanine Dye Linker: a Promising Candidate for Isochronic Fluorescence Imaging in Molecular Cancer Diagnostics and Therapy Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komljenovic, Dorde; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Ehemann, Volker; Pipkorn, Ruediger; Schrenk, Hans-Hermann; Debus, Jürgen; Braun, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Personalized anti-cancer medicine is boosted by the recent development of molecular diagnostics and molecularly targeted drugs requiring rapid and efficient ligation routes. Here, we present a novel approach to synthetize a conjugate able to act simultaneously as an imaging and as a chemotherapeutic agent by coupling functional peptides employing solid phase peptide synthesis technologies. Development and the first synthesis of a fluorescent dye with similarity in the polymethine part of the Cy7 molecule whose indolenine-N residues were substituted with a propylene linker are described. Methylating agent temozolomide is functionalized with a tetrazine as a diene component whereas Cy7-cell penetrating peptide conjugate acts as a dienophilic reaction partner for the inverse Diels-Alder click chemistry-mediated ligation route yielding a theranostic conjugate, 3-mercapto-propionic-cyclohexenyl-Cy7-bis-temozolomide-bromide-cell penetrating peptide. Synthesis route described here may facilitate targeted delivery of the therapeutic compound to achieve sufficient local concentrations at the target site or tissue. Its versatility allows a choice of adequate imaging tags applicable in e.g. PET, SPECT, CT, near-infrared imaging, and therapeutic substances including cytotoxic agents. Imaging tags and therapeutics may be simultaneously bound to the conjugate applying click chemistry. Theranostic compound presented here offers a solid basis for a further improvement of cancer management in a precise, patient-specific manner. PMID:26722379

  11. NIR-Cyanine Dye Linker: a Promising Candidate for Isochronic Fluorescence Imaging in Molecular Cancer Diagnostics and Therapy Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komljenovic, Dorde; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Ehemann, Volker; Pipkorn, Ruediger; Schrenk, Hans-Hermann; Debus, Jürgen; Braun, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Personalized anti-cancer medicine is boosted by the recent development of molecular diagnostics and molecularly targeted drugs requiring rapid and efficient ligation routes. Here, we present a novel approach to synthetize a conjugate able to act simultaneously as an imaging and as a chemotherapeutic agent by coupling functional peptides employing solid phase peptide synthesis technologies. Development and the first synthesis of a fluorescent dye with similarity in the polymethine part of the Cy7 molecule whose indolenine-N residues were substituted with a propylene linker are described. Methylating agent temozolomide is functionalized with a tetrazine as a diene component whereas Cy7-cell penetrating peptide conjugate acts as a dienophilic reaction partner for the inverse Diels-Alder click chemistry-mediated ligation route yielding a theranostic conjugate, 3-mercapto-propionic-cyclohexenyl-Cy7-bis-temozolomide-bromide-cell penetrating peptide. Synthesis route described here may facilitate targeted delivery of the therapeutic compound to achieve sufficient local concentrations at the target site or tissue. Its versatility allows a choice of adequate imaging tags applicable in e.g. PET, SPECT, CT, near-infrared imaging, and therapeutic substances including cytotoxic agents. Imaging tags and therapeutics may be simultaneously bound to the conjugate applying click chemistry. Theranostic compound presented here offers a solid basis for a further improvement of cancer management in a precise, patient-specific manner. PMID:26722379

  12. PET for molecular imaging of cancer: a tool for tailored therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of personalised medicine has led to a need for improved phenotyping as well as prediction of treatment response early after therapy initiation. Most of the molecular biology methods used today need tissue sampling for in vitro analysis. In contrast, molecular imaging allows for non-invasive studies at the molecular level in living, intact organisms. Accordingly, molecular imaging with PET has been one of the most successful techniques in such phenotyping and response prediction using FDG. In addition, recent development of new PET tracers has further improved the value of PET in tumor characterization. Such new PET tracers allow for visualization of tumor specific receptors and tissue characteristics such as ability to metastasize. Furthermore, PET has a high sensitivity and allows for quantification and is not prone to sampling error as seen with biopsies. We will present examples of development of probes targeting the somatostatin receptor type 2, over-expressed in neuroendocrine tumors, including our first-in-man studies of 64Cu-DOTATATE. Also development in probes for visualization of the invasive phenotype will be presented. Finally, with the most recent development of true integrated PET/MRI scanners it has now become possible to add information from MRI. The value of such hybrid imaging will also be briefly discussed. (author)

  13. Sentinel lymph node detection in breast cancer patients using surgical navigation system based on fluorescence molecular imaging technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Chongwei; Kou, Deqiang; Ye, Jinzuo; Mao, Yamin; Qiu, Jingdan; Wang, Jiandong; Yang, Xin; Tian, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Introduction: Precision and personalization treatments are expected to be effective methods for early stage cancer studies. Breast cancer is a major threat to women's health and sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) is an effective method to realize precision and personalized treatment for axillary lymph node (ALN) negative patients. In this study, we developed a surgical navigation system (SNS) based on optical molecular imaging technology for the precise detection of the sentinel lymph node (SLN) in breast cancer patients. This approach helps surgeons in precise positioning during surgery. Methods: The SNS was mainly based on the technology of optical molecular imaging. A novel optical path has been designed in our hardware system and a feature-matching algorithm has been devised to achieve rapid fluorescence and color image registration fusion. Ten in vivo studies of SLN detection in rabbits using indocyanine green (ICG) and blue dye were executed for system evaluation and 8 breast cancer patients accepted the combination method for therapy. Results: The detection rate of the combination method was 100% and an average of 2.6 SLNs was found in all patients. Our results showed that the method of using SNS to detect SLN has the potential to promote its application. Conclusion: The advantage of this system is the real-time tracing of lymph flow in a one-step procedure. The results demonstrated the feasibility of the system for providing accurate location and reliable treatment for surgeons. Our approach delivers valuable information and facilitates more detailed exploration for image-guided surgery research.

  14. Molecular imaging of tumour hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By allowing an earlier diagnosis and a more exhaustive assessment of extension of the disease, the tomography by emission of positrons (PET) transforms the care of numerous cancers. At present, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]-F.D.G.) imaging appears as the only one available but new molecular markers are being developed. In the next future they would modify the approach of cancers. In this context, the molecular imaging of the hypoxia and especially the 18Fluoromisonidazole PET ([18F]-MISO PET) can give supplementary information allowing the mapping of hypoxic regions within the tumour. Because of the links, which exist between tumour hypoxia and treatment resistance of very numerous cancers, this information can have an interest, for determination of prognosis as well as for the delineation, volumes to be irradiated. Head and neck tumours are doubtless those for which the literature gives the most elements on the therapeutic impact of tumour hypoxia. Targeted therapies, based on hypoxia, already exist and the contribution of the molecular imaging could be decisive in the evaluation of the impact of such treatment. Molecular imaging of brain tumours remains to be developed. The potential contributions of the [18F]-MISO PET for the care of these patients need to be confirmed. In this context, we propose a review of hypoxia molecular imaging taking as examples head and neck tumours and glioblastomas (GB), two tumours for which hypoxia is one of the key factors to overcome in order to increase therapeutics results

  15. A targeted nanoglobular contrast agent from host-guest self-assembly for MR cancer molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhuxian; Han, Zhen; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2016-04-01

    The clinical application of nanoparticular Gd(III) based contrast agents for tumor molecular MRI has been hindered by safety concerns associated with prolonged tissue retention, although they can produce strong tumor enhancement. In this study, a targeted well-defined cyclodextrin-based nanoglobular contrast agent was developed through self-assembly driven by host-guest interactions for safe and effective cancer molecular MRI. Multiple β-cyclodextrins attached POSS (polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane) nanoglobule was used as host molecule. Adamantane-modified macrocyclic Gd(III) contrast agent, cRGD (cyclic RGDfK peptide) targeting ligand and fluorescent probe was used as guest molecules. The targeted host-guest nanoglobular contrast agent cRGD-POSS-βCD-(DOTA-Gd) specifically bond to αvβ3 integrin in malignant 4T1 breast tumor and provided greater contrast enhancement than the corresponding non-targeted agent. The agent also provided significant fluorescence signal in tumor tissue. The histological analysis of the tumor tissue confirmed its specific and effective targeting to αvβ3 integrin. The targeted imaging agent has a potential for specific cancer molecular MR and fluorescent imaging. PMID:26874280

  16. The development of EGFR molecular imaging and gene mutation in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vivo epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) imaging has great potential to affect patient-specific treatment for NSCLC, applying a targeted therapy, and measuring molecular-specific effects of treatment. New PET/CT radiotracers,such as N-(4-bromo-2-fluorophenyl)-6-methoxy-7-[(1-methylpiperidin-4-yl) methoxy]quinazolin-4-amine (ZD6476), five 4-(anilino) quinazoline derivatives (ML01) and 4-[(3-iodophenyl) amino]-7-(2-[2-{2-(2-[2-{2-([18F]fluoroethoxy)-ethoxy}-ethoxy]-ethoxy)- ethoxy }-ethoxy]-quinazoline-6-yl-acrylamide) ([18F]F-PEG6-IPQA) are now available. But, 11C labeled-4-N-(3-bromoanilino)-6, 7-dimethoxyquinazoline (PD153035) is the only PET/CT radiotracer used for human clinical evaluation,primarily for EGFR imaging. Finally, the most important aspect of successful imaging is the identification and characterization of EGFR at the cellular or sub-cellular level with high specificity for the target. Considering the need for further development of such PET/CT tracers, EGFR molecular imaging will be presented along with an important examination of the progression that has been made thus far in the field. (authors)

  17. Molecular PET imaging for biology-guided adaptive radiotherapy of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integration of molecular imaging PET techniques into therapy selection strategies and radiation treatment planning for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) can serve several purposes. First, pre-treatment assessments can steer decisions about radiotherapy modifications or combinations with other modalities. Second, biology-based objective functions can be introduced to the radiation treatment planning process by co-registration of molecular imaging with planning computed tomography (CT) scans. Thus, customized heterogeneous dose distributions can be generated with escalated doses to tumor areas where radiotherapy resistance mechanisms are most prevalent. Third, monitoring of temporal and spatial variations in these radiotherapy resistance mechanisms early during the course of treatment can discriminate responders from non-responders. With such information available shortly after the start of treatment, modifications can be implemented or the radiation treatment plan can be adapted tailing the biological response pattern. Currently, these strategies are in various phases of clinical testing, mostly in single-center studies. Further validation in multicenter set-up is needed. Ultimately, this should result in availability for routine clinical practice requiring stable production and accessibility of tracers, reproducibility and standardization of imaging and analysis methods, as well as general availability of knowledge and expertise. Small studies employing adaptive radiotherapy based on functional dynamics and early response mechanisms demonstrate promising results. In this context, we focus this review on the widely used PET tracer 18F-FDG and PET tracers depicting hypoxia and proliferation; two well-known radiation resistance mechanisms

  18. Molecular imaging in oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schober, Otmar; Riemann, Burkhard (eds.) [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2013-02-01

    Considers in detail all aspects of molecular imaging in oncology, ranging from basic research to clinical applications in the era of evidence-based medicine. Examines technological issues and probe design. Discusses preclinical studies in detail, with particular attention to multimodality imaging. Presents current clinical use of PET/CT, SPECT/CT, and optical imagingWritten by acknowledged experts. The impact of molecular imaging on diagnostics, therapy, and follow-up in oncology is increasing significantly. The process of molecular imaging includes key biotarget identification, design of specific molecular imaging probes, and their preclinical evaluation, e.g., in vivo using small animal studies. A multitude of such innovative molecular imaging probes have already entered clinical diagnostics in oncology. There is no doubt that in future the emphasis will be on multimodality imaging in which morphological, functional, and molecular imaging techniques are combined in a single clinical investigation that will optimize diagnostic processes. This handbook addresses all aspects of molecular imaging in oncology, ranging from basic research to clinical applications in the era of evidence-based medicine. The first section is devoted to technology and probe design, and examines a variety of PET and SPECT tracers as well as multimodality probes. Preclinical studies are then discussed in detail, with particular attention to multimodality imaging. In the third section, diverse clinical applications are presented, and the book closes by looking at future challenges. This handbook will be of value to all who are interested in the revolution in diagnostic oncology that is being brought about by molecular imaging.

  19. Molecular imaging in oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Dzik-Jurasz, A S K

    2004-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease that manifests in loss of normal cellular homeostatic mechanisms. The biology and therapeutic modulation of neoplasia occurs at the molecular level. An understanding of these molecular processes is therefore required to develop novel prognostic and early biomarkers of response. In addition to clinical applications, increased impetus for the development of such technologies has been catalysed by pharmaceutical companies investing in the development of molecular ther...

  20. Molecular Imaging in the Management of Adrenocortical Cancer: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ka Kit; Miller, Barbra S; Viglianti, Benjamin L; Dwamena, Ben A; Gauger, Paul G; Cook, Gary J; Colletti, Patrick M; Rubello, Domenico; Gross, Milton D

    2016-08-01

    Adrenocortical cancer (ACC) is an uncommon primary neoplasm of the adrenal cortex with dismal prognosis. It often presents with symptoms and signs of adrenal cortical hormone hypersecretion and abdominal mass effect or is incidentally detected as an adrenal mass on imaging performed for other indications. Endocrine evaluation, comprehensive staging, and meticulous resection are crucial to ensure the best possible outcome. Despite extensive initial surgical resection, local and distant metastases are not uncommon with disappointing 5-year survival, although progress is being made at high-volume centers. Accurate restaging of recurrent disease is important to guide further management. Mitotane, external beam radiation and chemotherapy, and newer anticancer systemic treatments are used as adjunctives for inoperable disease and distant metastases. Contrast-enhanced CT and MRI are first-line imaging modalities for evaluation of ACC to characterize adrenal masses and to determine tumor resectability. Emerging literature supports F-FDG PET/CT use to determine the malignant potential of adrenal masses. In patients with a diagnosis of ACC, FDG PET/CT is sensitive for detecting metastatic disease, and its tumor accumulation has been correlated to pathology, Weiss scores, and prognosis. Metomidate, labeled with C for PET or with I for SPECT/CT, allows characterization of an adrenal mass as being of adrenocortical origin with high specificity. Taking advantage of its adrenocortical avidity, metomidate has been labeled with I for radionuclide therapy in a subset of ACC. In this review, we describe how nuclear medicine imaging, and specifically PET, can assist surgical management of ACC. PMID:26825212

  1. Imaging male breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, S., E-mail: sdoyle2@nhs.net [Primrose Breast Care Unit, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Steel, J.; Porter, G. [Primrose Breast Care Unit, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Male breast cancer is rare, with some pathological and radiological differences from female breast cancer. There is less familiarity with the imaging appearances of male breast cancer, due to its rarity and the more variable use of preoperative imaging. This review will illustrate the commonest imaging appearances of male breast cancer, with emphasis on differences from female breast cancer and potential pitfalls in diagnosis, based on a 10 year experience in our institution.

  2. Cardiovascular Molecular Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Khanicheh, Elham

    2009-01-01

    Although there have been significant improvements in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases they still remain the main cause of morbidity and mortality globally. Currently available diagnostic approaches may not be adequate to detect pathologic changes during the early disease stages, which may be valuable for risk stratification and also to assess a response to a therapy. Therefore molecular imaging techniques such as Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound (CEU) molecular imaging to noninvasively i...

  3. Molecular photonic imaging of cancer using light-emitting e. coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer research has long sought a magic bullet that would selectively target and destroy malignant cells. In this study, we exploited that E. coli injected into tumor-bearing mice selectively target and proliferate in solid tumors by employing optical imaging technique. Lux operon or GFP has been cloned into pUC19 plasmid to engineer pUC19Lux or pUC19gfp which was transformed into varying kinds of wild type (MG1655) or mutant E.coli strains. For stable expression, lux operon was cloned with asd (aspartate β-semialdehyde dehydrogenase) gene and transformed into asd defective E. coli (MG1655asd-/asd+lux). These bacteria were i.v. injected into tumor mice or directly into central necrosis of tumor. The imaging signal from wild type E.coli was detected initially at liver (20min), then migrated to and shine in the tumor mass until 2 weeks of injection which was consistently observed in immuno-defective (nude) and -competent (Balb/c) mice. Imaging signal of stbaly transformed strain (MG1655asd-/asd+lux) was stronger and longer-lasting than that of transiently transformed strain (MG1655lux). Flagella defective E. coli strain failed to reach tumor loci. Only a few amounts of stress regulatory defective E. coli strain arrived at but couldn't survive at the tumor loci. E. coli colonies expressing GFP was mostly observed at the border of central necrosis and peripheral proliferative areas in immunofluorescence studies. Directly injected MG1655ad-/asd+lux was transiently observed at central necrosis followed by spreading to the peripheral tumor mass which was consistent with the finding by tail vein injection. We successfully engineered E. coli strain stably expressing lux reporter gene. E. coli strongly targeted solid tumor regardless of host immune status. Our results support that the targeting of tumor by E.coli is an active process and would be applied as a delivery vehicle of varying imaging markers or therapeutic molecules

  4. Plectin-1 targeted AAV vector for the molecular imaging of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KimberlyAKelly

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is highly malignant disease that is the 4th leading cause of cancer-related death in the US. Gene therapy using AAV vectors to selectively deliver genes to PDAC cells is an attractive treatment option for pancreatic cancer. However, most AAV serotypes display a broad spectrum of tissue tropism and none of the existing serotypes specifically target PDAC cells. This study tests the hypothesis that AAV2 can be genetically re-engineered to specifically target PDAC cells by modifying the capsid surface to display a peptide that has previously been shown to bind plectin-1. Towards this end, a Plectin-1 Targeting Peptide (PTP was inserted into the loop IV region of the AAV2 capsid, and the resulting capsid (AAV-PTP was used in a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments. In vitro, AAV-PTP was found to target all five human PDAC cell lines tested (PANC-1, MIA PaCa-2, HPAC, MPanc-96 and BxPC-3 preferentially over two non-neoplastic human pancreatic cell lines (HPDE and hPSC. In vivo, mice bearing subcutaneous tumor xenografts were generated using the PANC-1 cell line. Once tumors reached a size of ~1-2 mm in diameter, the mice were injected intravenously with luciferase reporter vectors packaged in the either AAV-PTP or wild type AAV2 capsids. Luciferase expression was then monitored by bioluminescence imaging on days 3, 7 and 14 after vector injection. The results indicate that the AAV-PTP capsid displays a 37-fold preference for PANC-1 tumor xenographs over liver and other tissues; whereas the wild type AAV2 capsid displays a complementary preference for liver over tumors and other tissues. Together, these results establish proof-of-principle for the ability of PTP-modified AAV capsids to selectively target gene delivery to PDAC cells in vivo, which opens promising new avenues for the early detection, diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  5. A novel functional CT contrast agent for molecular imaging of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ji; Chaudhary, Ahmed; Chmura, Steven J.; Pelizzari, Charles; Rajh, Tijana; Wietholt, Christian; Kurtoglu, Metin; Aydogan, Bulent

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using a 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG) labeled gold nanoparticle (AuNP-2-DG) as a functionally targeted computed tomography (CT) contrast agent to obtain high-resolution metabolic and anatomic information of tumor in a single CT scan. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were fabricated and were conjugated with 1-DG or 2-DG. 1-DG provides an excellent comparison since it is known to interfere with the ability of the glucose transporter to recognize the sugar moiety. The human alveolar epithelial cancer cell line, A-549, was chosen for the in vitro cellular uptake assay. Three groups of cell samples were incubated with the 1-DG or 2-DG labeled AuNP and the unlabeled AuNP. Following the incubation, the cells were washed with sterile phosphate buffered saline to remove the excess AuNPs and spun using a centrifuge. The cell pellets were imaged using a microCT scanner immediately after the centrifugation. Internalization of AuNP-2-DG is verified using transmission electron microscopy imaging. Significant contrast enhancement in the cell samples incubated with the AuNP-2-DG with respect to the cell samples incubated with the unlabeled AuNP and the AuNP-1-DG was observed in multiple CT slices. Results from our in vitro experiments suggest that the AuNP-2-DG may be used as a functional CT contrast agent to provide high-resolution metabolic and anatomic information in a single CT scan. These results justify further in vitro and in vivo experiments to study the feasibility of using the AuNP-2-DG as a functional CT contrast agent in radiation therapy settings.

  6. A novel functional CT contrast agent for molecular imaging of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using a 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG) labeled gold nanoparticle (AuNP-2-DG) as a functionally targeted computed tomography (CT) contrast agent to obtain high-resolution metabolic and anatomic information of tumor in a single CT scan. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were fabricated and were conjugated with 1-DG or 2-DG. 1-DG provides an excellent comparison since it is known to interfere with the ability of the glucose transporter to recognize the sugar moiety. The human alveolar epithelial cancer cell line, A-549, was chosen for the in vitro cellular uptake assay. Three groups of cell samples were incubated with the 1-DG or 2-DG labeled AuNP and the unlabeled AuNP. Following the incubation, the cells were washed with sterile phosphate buffered saline to remove the excess AuNPs and spun using a centrifuge. The cell pellets were imaged using a microCT scanner immediately after the centrifugation. Internalization of AuNP-2-DG is verified using transmission electron microscopy imaging. Significant contrast enhancement in the cell samples incubated with the AuNP-2-DG with respect to the cell samples incubated with the unlabeled AuNP and the AuNP-1-DG was observed in multiple CT slices. Results from our in vitro experiments suggest that the AuNP-2-DG may be used as a functional CT contrast agent to provide high-resolution metabolic and anatomic information in a single CT scan. These results justify further in vitro and in vivo experiments to study the feasibility of using the AuNP-2-DG as a functional CT contrast agent in radiation therapy settings.

  7. Molecular-receptor-specific, non-toxic, near-infrared-emitting Au cluster-protein nanoconjugates for targeted cancer imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular-receptor-targeted imaging of folate receptor positive oral carcinoma cells using folic-acid-conjugated fluorescent Au25 nanoclusters (Au NCs) is reported. Highly fluorescent Au25 clusters were synthesized by controlled reduction of Au+ ions, stabilized in bovine serum albumin (BSA), using a green-chemical reducing agent, ascorbic acid (vitamin-C). For targeted-imaging-based detection of cancer cells, the clusters were conjugated with folic acid (FA) through amide linkage with the BSA shell. The bioconjugated clusters show excellent stability over a wide range of pH from 4 to 14 and fluorescence efficiency of ∼5.7% at pH 7.4 in phosphate buffer saline (PBS), indicating effective protection of nanoclusters by serum albumin during the bioconjugation reaction and cell-cluster interaction. The nanoclusters were characterized for their physico-chemical properties, toxicity and cancer targeting efficacy in vitro. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) suggests binding energies correlating to metal Au 4f7/2∼83.97 eV and Au 4f5/2∼87.768 eV. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed the formation of individual nanoclusters of size ∼1 nm and protein cluster aggregates of size ∼8 nm. Photoluminescence studies show bright fluorescence with peak maximum at ∼674 nm with the spectral profile covering the near-infrared (NIR) region, making it possible to image clusters at the 700-800 nm emission window where the tissue absorption of light is minimum. The cell viability and reactive oxygen toxicity studies indicate the non-toxic nature of the Au clusters up to relatively higher concentrations of 500 μg ml-1. Receptor-targeted cancer detection using Au clusters is demonstrated on FR+ve oral squamous cell carcinoma (KB) and breast adenocarcinoma cell MCF-7, where the FA-conjugated Au25 clusters were found internalized in significantly higher concentrations compared to the negative control cell lines. This study demonstrates the

  8. Molecular-receptor-specific, non-toxic, near-infrared-emitting Au cluster-protein nanoconjugates for targeted cancer imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Retnakumari, Archana; Setua, Sonali; Menon, Deepthy; Ravindran, Prasanth; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor [Amrita Centre for Nanoscience and Molecular Medicine, Amrita Institute of Medical Science, Cochin, 682 041 (India); Muhammed, Habeeb; Pradeep, Thalappil, E-mail: manzoor_nanomed@yahoo.com [Indian Institute of Technology, DST unit on Nanoscience, Chennai, 600 036 (India)

    2010-02-05

    Molecular-receptor-targeted imaging of folate receptor positive oral carcinoma cells using folic-acid-conjugated fluorescent Au{sub 25} nanoclusters (Au NCs) is reported. Highly fluorescent Au{sub 25} clusters were synthesized by controlled reduction of Au{sup +} ions, stabilized in bovine serum albumin (BSA), using a green-chemical reducing agent, ascorbic acid (vitamin-C). For targeted-imaging-based detection of cancer cells, the clusters were conjugated with folic acid (FA) through amide linkage with the BSA shell. The bioconjugated clusters show excellent stability over a wide range of pH from 4 to 14 and fluorescence efficiency of {approx}5.7% at pH 7.4 in phosphate buffer saline (PBS), indicating effective protection of nanoclusters by serum albumin during the bioconjugation reaction and cell-cluster interaction. The nanoclusters were characterized for their physico-chemical properties, toxicity and cancer targeting efficacy in vitro. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) suggests binding energies correlating to metal Au 4f{sub 7/2{approx}}83.97 eV and Au 4f{sub 5/2{approx}}87.768 eV. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed the formation of individual nanoclusters of size {approx}1 nm and protein cluster aggregates of size {approx}8 nm. Photoluminescence studies show bright fluorescence with peak maximum at {approx}674 nm with the spectral profile covering the near-infrared (NIR) region, making it possible to image clusters at the 700-800 nm emission window where the tissue absorption of light is minimum. The cell viability and reactive oxygen toxicity studies indicate the non-toxic nature of the Au clusters up to relatively higher concentrations of 500 {mu}g ml{sup -1}. Receptor-targeted cancer detection using Au clusters is demonstrated on FR{sup +ve} oral squamous cell carcinoma (KB) and breast adenocarcinoma cell MCF-7, where the FA-conjugated Au{sub 25} clusters were found internalized in significantly higher concentrations

  9. Molecular-receptor-specific, non-toxic, near-infrared-emitting Au cluster-protein nanoconjugates for targeted cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retnakumari, Archana; Setua, Sonali; Menon, Deepthy; Ravindran, Prasanth; Muhammed, Habeeb; Pradeep, Thalappil; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2010-02-01

    Molecular-receptor-targeted imaging of folate receptor positive oral carcinoma cells using folic-acid-conjugated fluorescent Au25 nanoclusters (Au NCs) is reported. Highly fluorescent Au25 clusters were synthesized by controlled reduction of Au+ ions, stabilized in bovine serum albumin (BSA), using a green-chemical reducing agent, ascorbic acid (vitamin-C). For targeted-imaging-based detection of cancer cells, the clusters were conjugated with folic acid (FA) through amide linkage with the BSA shell. The bioconjugated clusters show excellent stability over a wide range of pH from 4 to 14 and fluorescence efficiency of ~5.7% at pH 7.4 in phosphate buffer saline (PBS), indicating effective protection of nanoclusters by serum albumin during the bioconjugation reaction and cell-cluster interaction. The nanoclusters were characterized for their physico-chemical properties, toxicity and cancer targeting efficacy in vitro. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) suggests binding energies correlating to metal Au 4f7/2~83.97 eV and Au 4f5/2~87.768 eV. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed the formation of individual nanoclusters of size ~1 nm and protein cluster aggregates of size ~8 nm. Photoluminescence studies show bright fluorescence with peak maximum at ~674 nm with the spectral profile covering the near-infrared (NIR) region, making it possible to image clusters at the 700-800 nm emission window where the tissue absorption of light is minimum. The cell viability and reactive oxygen toxicity studies indicate the non-toxic nature of the Au clusters up to relatively higher concentrations of 500 µg ml-1. Receptor-targeted cancer detection using Au clusters is demonstrated on FR+ve oral squamous cell carcinoma (KB) and breast adenocarcinoma cell MCF-7, where the FA-conjugated Au25 clusters were found internalized in significantly higher concentrations compared to the negative control cell lines. This study demonstrates the potential of using

  10. Molecular cardiovascular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although huge and long-lasting research efforts have been spent on the development of new diagnostic techniques investigating cardiovascular diseases, still fundamental challenges exist; the main challenge being the diagnosis of a suspected or known coronary artery disease or its consequences (myocardial infarction, heart failure etc.). Beside morphological techniques, functional imaging modalities are available in clinical diagnostic algorithms, whereas molecular cardiovascular imaging techniques are still under development. This review summarizes clinical-diagnostical challenges of modern cardiovascular medicine as well as the potential of new molecular imaging techniques to face these. (orig.)

  11. Molecular image in biomedical research. Molecular imaging unit of the National Cancer Research Center; Imagen molecular an investigation biomedica. La Unidad de Imagen Molecular del Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Bruzon, J.; Mulero Anhiorte, F.

    2010-07-01

    This article has two basic objectives. firstly, it will review briefly the most important imaging techniques used in biomedical research indicting the most significant aspects related to their application in the preclinical stage. Secondly, it will present a practical application of these techniques in a pure biomedical research centre (not associated to a clinical facility). Practical aspects such as organisation, equipment, work norms, shielding of the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) Imaging Unit will be shown. This is a pioneering facility in the application of these techniques in research centres without any dependence or any direct relationship with other hospital Nuclear Medicine services. (Author) 7 refs.

  12. Prostate-specific membrane antigen targeted protein contrast agents for molecular imaging of prostate cancer by MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Fan; Salarian, Mani; Xue, Shenghui; Qiao, Jingjuan; Feng, Jie; Tan, Shanshan; Patel, Anvi; Li, Xin; Mamouni, Kenza; Hekmatyar, Khan; Zou, Juan; Wu, Daqing; Yang, Jenny J.

    2016-06-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is one of the most specific cell surface markers for prostate cancer diagnosis and targeted treatment. However, achieving molecular imaging using non-invasive MRI with high resolution has yet to be achieved due to the lack of contrast agents with significantly improved relaxivity for sensitivity, targeting capabilities and metal selectivity. We have previously reported our creation of a novel class of protein Gd3+ contrast agents, ProCA32, which displayed significantly improved relaxivity while exhibiting strong Gd3+ binding selectivity over physiological metal ions. In this study, we report our effort in further developing biomarker-targeted protein MRI contrast agents for molecular imaging of PSMA. Among three PSMA targeted contrast agents engineered with addition of different molecular recognition sequences, ProCA32.PSMA exhibits a binding affinity of 1.1 +/- 0.1 μM for PSMA while the metal binding affinity is maintained at 0.9 +/- 0.1 × 10-22 M. In addition, ProCA32.PSMA exhibits r1 of 27.6 mM-1 s-1 and r2 of 37.9 mM-1 s-1 per Gd (55.2 and 75.8 mM-1 s-1 per molecule r1 and r2, respectively) at 1.4 T. At 7 T, ProCA32.PSMA also has r2 of 94.0 mM-1 s-1 per Gd (188.0 mM-1 s-1 per molecule) and r1 of 18.6 mM-1 s-1 per Gd (37.2 mM-1 s-1 per molecule). This contrast capability enables the first MRI enhancement dependent on PSMA expression levels in tumor bearing mice using both T1 and T2-weighted MRI at 7 T. Further development of these PSMA-targeted contrast agents are expected to be used for the precision imaging of prostate cancer at an early stage and to monitor disease progression and staging, as well as determine the effect of therapeutic treatment by non-invasive evaluation of the PSMA level using MRI.Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is one of the most specific cell surface markers for prostate cancer diagnosis and targeted treatment. However, achieving molecular imaging using non-invasive MRI with high

  13. Molecular MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic medicobiological research in recent years has made rapid advances in the functional understanding of normal and pathological processes down to the molecular level. At the same time, various imaging modalities have developed from the depiction of organs to approaching the depiction of the cellular level and are about to make the visualization of molecular processes an established procedure. Besides other modalities like PET and near-infrared fluorescence, MR imaging offers some promising options for molecular imaging as well as some applications that have already been tested such as the visualization of enzyme activity, the depiction of the expression of certain genes, the visualization of surface receptors, or the specific demonstration of cells involved in the body's immune response. A major advantage of molecular magnetic resonance imaging (mMRI) over other more sensitive modalities is its high spatial resolution. However, the establishment of mMRI crucially relies on further improvements in resolution and the development of molecular markers for improving its sensitivity and specificity. The state of the art of mMRI is presented by giving a survey of the literature on experimental studies and reporting the results our study group obtained during investigation on gliomas. (orig.)

  14. Ultrasound molecular imaging: Moving toward clinical translation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Bachawal, Sunitha V.; Willmann, Jürgen K., E-mail: willmann@stanford.edu

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Ultrasound molecular imaging is a highly sensitive modality. • A clinical grade ultrasound contrast agent has entered first in human clinical trials. • Several new potential future clinical applications of ultrasound molecular imaging are being explored. - Abstract: Ultrasound is a widely available, cost-effective, real-time, non-invasive and safe imaging modality widely used in the clinic for anatomical and functional imaging. With the introduction of novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents, another dimension of ultrasound has become a reality: diagnosing and monitoring pathological processes at the molecular level. Most commonly used ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents are micron sized, gas-containing microbubbles functionalized to recognize and attach to molecules expressed on inflamed or angiogenic vascular endothelial cells. There are several potential clinical applications currently being explored including earlier detection, molecular profiling, and monitoring of cancer, as well as visualization of ischemic memory in transient myocardial ischemia, monitoring of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease, and assessment of arteriosclerosis. Recently, a first clinical grade ultrasound contrast agent (BR55), targeted at a molecule expressed in neoangiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2; VEGFR2) has been introduced and safety and feasibility of VEGFR2-targeted ultrasound imaging is being explored in first inhuman clinical trials in various cancer types. This review describes the design of ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents, imaging techniques, and potential future clinical applications of ultrasound molecular imaging.

  15. Ultrasound molecular imaging: Moving toward clinical translation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Ultrasound molecular imaging is a highly sensitive modality. • A clinical grade ultrasound contrast agent has entered first in human clinical trials. • Several new potential future clinical applications of ultrasound molecular imaging are being explored. - Abstract: Ultrasound is a widely available, cost-effective, real-time, non-invasive and safe imaging modality widely used in the clinic for anatomical and functional imaging. With the introduction of novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents, another dimension of ultrasound has become a reality: diagnosing and monitoring pathological processes at the molecular level. Most commonly used ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents are micron sized, gas-containing microbubbles functionalized to recognize and attach to molecules expressed on inflamed or angiogenic vascular endothelial cells. There are several potential clinical applications currently being explored including earlier detection, molecular profiling, and monitoring of cancer, as well as visualization of ischemic memory in transient myocardial ischemia, monitoring of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease, and assessment of arteriosclerosis. Recently, a first clinical grade ultrasound contrast agent (BR55), targeted at a molecule expressed in neoangiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2; VEGFR2) has been introduced and safety and feasibility of VEGFR2-targeted ultrasound imaging is being explored in first inhuman clinical trials in various cancer types. This review describes the design of ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents, imaging techniques, and potential future clinical applications of ultrasound molecular imaging

  16. Molecular biology of pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miroslav Zavoral; Petra Minarikova; Filip Zavada; Cyril Salek; Marek Minarik

    2011-01-01

    In spite of continuous research efforts directed at early detection and treatment of pancreatic cancer, the outlook for patients affected by the disease remains dismal. With most cases still being diagnosed at advanced stages, no improvement in survival prognosis is achieved with current diagnostic imaging approaches. In the absence of a dominant precancerous condition, several risk factors have been identified including family history, chronic pancreatitis, smoking, diabetes mellitus, as well as certain genetic disorders such as hereditary pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, familial atypical multiple Most pancreatic carcinomas, however, remain sporadic. Current progress in experimental molecular techniques has enabled detailed understanding of the molecular processes of pancreatic cancer development. According to the latest information, malignant pancreatic transformation involves multiple oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes that are involved in a variety of signaling pathways. The most characteristic aberrations (somatic point mutations and allelic losses) affect oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes within RAS, AKT and Wnt signaling, and have a key role in transcription and proliferation, as well as systems that regulate the cell cycle (SMAD/DPC, CDKN2A/p16) and apoptosis (TP53). Understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms should promote development of new methodology for early diagnosis and facilitate improvement in current approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment.

  17. ICMIC Institutions - Cancer Imaging Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ICMIC grants facilitate interaction among scientists from a variety of fields to conduct multidisciplinary research on cellular and molecular imaging related to cancer. Pre-ICMIC planning grants have provided time and funds for investigators and institutions to prepare themselves, organizationally and scientifically, to establish ICMICs.

  18. Molecular Imaging in Breast Cancer: From Whole-Body PET/CT to Dedicated Breast PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Koolen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET, with or without integrated computed tomography (CT, using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG is based on the principle of elevated glucose metabolism in malignant tumors, and its use in breast cancer patients is frequently being investigated. It has been shown useful for classification, staging, and response monitoring, both in primary and recurrent disease. However, because of the partial volume effect and limited resolution of most whole-body PET scanners, sensitivity for the visualization of small tumors is generally low. To improve the detection and quantification of primary breast tumors with FDG PET, several dedicated breast PET devices have been developed. In this nonsystematic review, we shortly summarize the value of whole-body PET/CT in breast cancer and provide an overview of currently available dedicated breast PETs.

  19. The use of molecular imaging combined with genomic techniques to understand the heterogeneity in cancer metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdhury, R.; Ganeshan, B.; Irshad, S; Lawler, K; Eisenblätter, M.; Milewicz, H; Rodriguez-Justo, M; Miles, K; Ellis, P.; Groves, A.; Punwani, S; Ng, T

    2014-01-01

    Tumour heterogeneity has, in recent times, come to play a vital role in how we understand and treat cancers; however, the clinical translation of this has lagged behind advances in research. Although significant advancements in oncological management have been made, personalized care remains an elusive goal. Inter- and intratumour heterogeneity, particularly in the clinical setting, has been difficult to quantify and therefore to treat. The histological quantification of heterogeneity of tumo...

  20. Molecular constituents of colorectal cancer metastatic to the liver by imaging infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, James V.; Chen, Zhaomin; Li, Ran; Nystrom, Steven V.; Butke, Ryan; Miller, Barrie; Hitchcock, Charles L.; Allen, Heather C.; Povoski, Stephen P.; Martin, Edward W.

    2015-03-01

    Infrared (IR) imaging spectroscopy of human liver tissue slices has been used to identify and characterize liver metastasis of colorectal origin which was surgically removed from a consenting patient and frozen without formalin fixation or dehydration procedures, so that lipids and water remain in the tissues. First, a k-means clustering analysis, using metrics from the IR spectra, identified groups within the image. The groups were identified as tumor or nontumor regions by comparing to an H and E stain of the same sample after IR imaging. Then, calibrant IR spectra of protein, several fats, glycogen, and polyvinyl alcohol were isolated by differencing spectra from different regions or groups in the image space. Finally, inner products (or scores) of the IR spectra at each pixel in the image with each of the various calibrants were calculated showing how the calibrant molecules vary in tumor and nontumor regions. In this particular case, glycogen and protein changes enable separation of tumor and nontumor regions as shown with a contour plot of the glycogen scores versus the protein scores.

  1. Computational methods for molecular imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Kuangyu; Li, Shuo

    2015-01-01

    This volume contains original submissions on the development and application of molecular imaging computing. The editors invited authors to submit high-quality contributions on a wide range of topics including, but not limited to: • Image Synthesis & Reconstruction of Emission Tomography (PET, SPECT) and other Molecular Imaging Modalities • Molecular Imaging Enhancement • Data Analysis of Clinical & Pre-clinical Molecular Imaging • Multi-Modal Image Processing (PET/CT, PET/MR, SPECT/CT, etc.) • Machine Learning and Data Mining in Molecular Imaging. Molecular imaging is an evolving clinical and research discipline enabling the visualization, characterization and quantification of biological processes taking place at the cellular and subcellular levels within intact living subjects. Computational methods play an important role in the development of molecular imaging, from image synthesis to data analysis and from clinical diagnosis to therapy individualization. This work will bring readers fro...

  2. Lymphatic drainage, CTV and molecular imaging in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trodella, Lucio; Ciresa, Marzia; D'Angelillo, Rolando; Ramella, Sara

    2003-01-01

    Prognosis for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients who have locally advanced unresectable disease is poor for persistent thoracic disease and development of distant metastasis. In view of the poor rate of local control following conventional radiation therapy, there is a great need for methods to improve its efficacy. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) is a high precision radiotherapy able to deliver higher doses with smaller doses to the surrounding normal tissues. However, the real problem is: "what do I want to treat?" This question is addressed based on the clinical and biological target volume definition. Selection of the CTV is therefore basically the clinical compromise between the most radical possible CTV and the critical normal tissue tolerance. The clinical target volume includes the GTV plus a margin to encompass subclinical or microscopic malignant disease immediately adjacent to it. Standard radiation therapy consists of a dose of 40 Gy to the entire mediastinum, supraclavicular fossa, and ipsilateral hilum, even if there is no evidence of disease in these areas. Despite the high risk of nodal spread in lung cancer, the benefit of additional elective nodal irradiation (ENI) is not proven while it seems to significantly increase the rate of radiation morbidity. Several studies have been published where ENI was systematically omitted. The main arguments for omitting ENI and the principal clinical experiences, are discussed. PMID:15018317

  3. Preparation of MR molecular probes targeting CD40 mutant and the preliminary study of imaging ovarian cancer in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To develop an ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) based MR probe targeting CD40 mutant and investigate its biological and chemical properties and its targeting effect on ovarian cancer cells in vitro. Methods: To prepare immunologically competent probe, the monoclonal antibody was conjugated with USPIO particles modified by DMSA based on chemical crosslinking method. The USPIO labeled anti-human CD40 mutant monoclonal antibody 5H6 (5H6-USPIO) was the experimental probe, and the USPIO labeled anti-human CD40 monoclonal antibody 5C11 (5C11-USPIO) and USPIO served as control agents. The flow cytometry, confocal microscopy and Prussian blue staining were employed to assess the magnetic performance and analyze its bioactivity of the probe. The probe's cell MR imaging in vitro was carried out using ovarian caner cells (HO8910) with high CD40 mutant expression. The analysis of signal data of different groups was conducted by using one-way ANOVA and LSD test. The probe's effect on ovarian caner cells' growth was measured by CCK-8 kit. Results: The stable molecular probe carrying nanoparticles and CD40 mutant antibody was built and purified successfully. The probe had similar magnetic property compared with original USPIO. Immunofluorescence and Prussian blue staining confirmed that the molecular probe could recognize CD40 mutant on ovarian cancer cells (HO8910) with high specificity. The probe had no effect on the growth of HO8910 cells. MR cell imaging in vitro showed that the value of T2 and T2* decreased significantly after the probe binding with HO8910 cells and T2WI became darker than control groups. The T2 and T2* relaxation time of 5H6-USPIO group was (40.05 ± 1.62) ms and (3.08 ± 0.11) ms, respectively. The T2 and T2* relaxation time of 5H6-USPIO group was shorter than 5C11-USPIO [(85.38 ± 4.74) and (11.82 ± 1.00) ms, respectively] and USPIO [(91.62 ± 3.35) and (13.60 ± 1.92) ms, respectively] groups with statistical

  4. Molecular Biomedical Imaging Laboratory (MBIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Molecular Biomedical Imaging Laboratory (MBIL) is adjacent-a nd has access-to the Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences clinical imaging facilities. MBIL...

  5. Molecular Imaging in Genetic Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Ayden; Van Gestel, Frederick; Yaghoubi, Shahriar

    2016-01-01

    The field of biomedical imaging has made significant advances in recent times. This includes extremely high-resolution anatomic imaging and functional imaging of physiologic and pathologic processes as well as novel modalities in optical imaging to evaluate molecular features within the cellular environment. The latter has made it possible to image phenotypic markers of various genotypes that are implicated in human development, behavior, and disease. This article discusses the role of molecular imaging in genetic and precision medicine. 

  6. Multifunctional dendrimer-based nanoparticles for in vivo MR/CT dual-modal molecular imaging of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li K

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Kangan Li,1,4,5,* Shihui Wen,2,* Andrew C Larson,4,5 Mingwu Shen,2 Zhuoli Zhang,4,5 Qian Chen,3 Xiangyang Shi,2,3 Guixiang Zhang1 1Department of Radiology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Donghua University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, Donghua University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 4Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA; 5Robert H Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, IL, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Development of dual-mode or multi-mode imaging contrast agents is important for accurate and self-confirmatory diagnosis of cancer. We report a new multifunctional, dendrimer-based gold nanoparticle (AuNP as a dual-modality contrast agent for magnetic resonance (MR/computed tomography (CT imaging of breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. In this study, amine-terminated generation 5 poly(amidoamine dendrimers modified with gadolinium chelate (DOTA-NHS and polyethylene glycol monomethyl ether were used as templates to synthesize AuNPs, followed by Gd(III chelation and acetylation of the remaining dendrimer terminal amine groups; multifunctional dendrimer-entrapped AuNPs (Gd-Au DENPs were formed. The formed Gd-Au DENPs were used for both in vitro and in vivo MR/CT imaging of human MCF-7 cancer cells. Both MR and CT images demonstrate that MCF-7 cells and the xenograft tumor model can be effectively imaged. The Gd-Au DENPs uptake, mainly in the cell cytoplasm, was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. The cell cytotoxicity assay, cell morphology observation, and flow cytometry show that the developed Gd-Au DENPs have good biocompatibility in the given concentration range. Our results

  7. [Molecular Subtypes of Gastric Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatogai, Ken; Doi, Toshihiko

    2016-03-01

    Gastric cancer has been classified based on the pathological characteristics including microscopic configuration and growth pattern. Although these classifications have been used in studies investigating prognosis and recurrence pattern, they are not considered for decisions regarding the therapeutic strategy. In the ToGA study, trastuzumab, an anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, demonstrated clinical efficacy for gastric cancer with HER2 overexpression or HER2 gene amplification. Based on these findings of the ToGA study, the definition of HER2-positive gastric cancer was established. Thereafter, several molecular targeted agents, including agents targeting other receptor tyrosine kinases, have been investigated in gastric cancer. However, to date no biomarker, except HER2, has been established. Based on the recent technological development in the field of gene analysis, a comprehensive molecular evaluation of gastric cancer was performed as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA)project, and a new molecular classification was proposed that divided gastric cancer into the following 4 subtypes: tumors positive for Epstein-Barr virus, microsatellite instability tumors, genomically stable tumors, and tumors with chromosomal instability. Each subtype has specific molecular alterations including gene mutation and amplification, DNA methylation, and protein overexpression. Additionally, some subtypes were suggested to be correlated with the clinicopathological characteristics or as targets of some molecular targeted agents that are currently under development. The new molecular classification is expected to be a roadmap for patient stratification and clinical trials on molecular targeted therapies in gastric cancer. PMID:27067842

  8. Fluorescence background subtraction technique for hybrid fluorescence molecular tomography/x-ray computed tomography imaging of a mouse model of early stage lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ale, Angelique; Ermolayev, Vladimir; Deliolanis, Nikolaos C.; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2013-05-01

    The ability to visualize early stage lung cancer is important in the study of biomarkers and targeting agents that could lead to earlier diagnosis. The recent development of hybrid free-space 360-deg fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and x-ray computed tomography (XCT) imaging yields a superior optical imaging modality for three-dimensional small animal fluorescence imaging over stand-alone optical systems. Imaging accuracy was improved by using XCT information in the fluorescence reconstruction method. Despite this progress, the detection sensitivity of targeted fluorescence agents remains limited by nonspecific background accumulation of the fluorochrome employed, which complicates early detection of murine cancers. Therefore we examine whether x-ray CT information and bulk fluorescence detection can be combined to increase detection sensitivity. Correspondingly, we research the performance of a data-driven fluorescence background estimator employed for subtraction of background fluorescence from acquisition data. Using mice containing known fluorochromes ex vivo, we demonstrate the reduction of background signals from reconstructed images and sensitivity improvements. Finally, by applying the method to in vivo data from K-ras transgenic mice developing lung cancer, we find small tumors at an early stage compared with reconstructions performed using raw data. We conclude with the benefits of employing fluorescence subtraction in hybrid FMT-XCT for early detection studies.

  9. Potential of Diffusion-Weighted Imaging in the Characterization of Malignant, Benign, and Healthy Breast Tissues and Molecular Subtypes of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Uma; Sah, Rani G.; Agarwal, Khushbu; Parshad, Rajinder; Seenu, Vurthaluru; Mathur, Sandeep R.; Hari, Smriti; Jagannathan, Naranamangalam R.

    2016-01-01

    The role of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in the diagnosis of breast cancer and its association with molecular biomarkers was investigated in 259 patients with breast cancer, 67 with benign pathology, and 54 healthy volunteers using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) at 1.5 T. In 59 breast cancer patients, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCEMRI) was also acquired. Mean ADC of malignant lesions was significantly lower (1.02 ± 0.17 × 10−3 mm2/s) compared to benign (1.57 ± 0.26 × 10−3 mm2/s) and healthy (1.78 ± 0.13 × 10−3 mm2/s) breast tissues. A cutoff ADC value of 1.23 × 10−3 mm2/s (sensitivity 92.5%; specificity 91.1%; area under the curve 0.96) to differentiate malignant from benign diseases was arrived by receiver operating curve analysis. In 10/59 breast cancer patients, indeterminate DCE curve was seen, while their ADC value was indicative of malignancy, implying the potential of the addition of DWI in increasing the specificity of DCEMRI data. Further, the association of ADC with tumor volume, stage, hormonal receptors [estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor (HER2)], and menopausal status was investigated. A significant difference was seen in tumor volume between breast cancer patients of stages IIA and IIIA, IIB and IIIA, and IIB and III (B + C), respectively (P < 0.05). Patients with early breast cancer (n = 52) had significantly lower ADC and tumor volume than those with locally advanced breast cancer (n = 207). No association was found in ADC and tumor volume with the menopausal status. Breast cancers with ER−, PR−, and triple-negative (TN) status showed a significantly larger tumor volume compared to ER+, PR+, and non-triple-negative (nTN) cancers, respectively. Also, TN tumors showed a significantly higher ADC compared to ER+, PR+, and nTN cancers. Patients with ER− and TN cancers were younger than those with ER+ and nTN cancers

  10. Molecular imaging in atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atherosclerosis is the major cause of cardiovascular disease, which still has the leading position in morbidity and mortality in the Western world. Many risk factors and pathobiological processes are acting together in the development of atherosclerosis. This leads to different remodelling stages (positive and negative) which are both associated with plaque physiology and clinical presentation. The different remodelling stages of atherosclerosis are explained with their clinical relevance. Recent advances in basic science have established that atherosclerosis is not only a lipid storage disease, but that also inflammation has a fundamental role in all stages of the disease. The molecular events leading to atherosclerosis will be extensively reviewed and described. Further on in this review different modalities and their role in the different stages of atherosclerosis will be discussed. Non-nuclear invasive imaging techniques (intravascular ultrasound, intravascular MRI, intracoronary angioscopy and intravascular optical coherence tomography) and non-nuclear non-invasive imaging techniques (ultrasound with Doppler flow, electron-bean computed tomography, coronary computed tomography angiography, MRI and coronary artery MR angiography) will be reviewed. After that we focus on nuclear imaging techniques for detecting atherosclerotic plaques, divided into three groups: atherosclerotic lesion components, inflammation and thrombosis. This emerging area of nuclear imaging techniques can provide measures of biological activity of atherosclerotic plaques, thereby improving the prediction of clinical events. As we will see in the future perspectives, at present, there is no special tracer that can be called the diagnostic tool to diagnose prospective stroke or infarction in patients. Nevertheless, we expect such a tracer to be developed in the next few years and maybe, theoretically, it could even be used for targeted therapy (in the form of a beta-emitter) to combat

  11. Molecular imaging in quality health care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Quality health care results from translating fundamental bench discoveries and making them available to patients. During the past decade, 'molecular imaging' has emerged both as a new tool/technology and as a research and clinical discipline. Molecular imaging is an interdisciplinary approach involving biologists, physicists, physicians, mathematicians, conventional chemists, radiochemists and other specialists who have joined forces for better understanding and visualizing of both normal physiological processes and the molecular processes preceding the morphological manifestations of disease in vivo. Molecular imaging has been defined as 'non-invasive, quantitative, and repetitive imaging of targeted macromolecules and biological processes in living organisms' or as 'the visual representation, characterization, and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and sub-cellular levels within intact living organisms'. Weissleder defined molecular imaging in the most simple terms as 'studying diseases non-invasively at the molecular level'. Regardless of these semantic differences molecular imaging can contribute significantly to the preclinical and clinical drug and disease evaluation process. It is interesting to note, that despite major advances in imaging technology, cancer mortality has remained largely unchanged over the last three decades. Imaging has thus far enabled us to look through a magnifying glass at disease processes but has failed to dramatically influence disease outcomes. Emerging data suggest that molecular PET imaging is about to change this situation. High resolution molecular imaging devices designed for small animal research have developed into valuable tools for drug evaluation and imaging probe design. These include microPET, microCT, microMRI and optical imaging devices. These have enabled us to study drug effects in vivo by monitoring longitudinally their effects on tumour cell metabolism or proliferation. The only

  12. A Preclinical Evaluation of Antrodia camphorata Alcohol Extracts in the Treatment of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Using Non-Invasive Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng-Feng Chiou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to provide a platform for the pre-clinical evaluation of anti-cancer properties of a unique CAM (complementary and alternative medicine agent, Antrodia camphorata alcohol extract (ACAE, in a mouse model with the advantageous non-invasive in vivo bioluminescence molecular imaging technology. In vitro analyses on the proliferation, migration/invasion, cell cycle and apoptosis were performed on ACAE-treated non-small cell lung cancer cells, H441GL and control CGL1 cells. In vivo, immune-deficient mice were inoculated subcutaneously with H441GL followed by oral gavages of ACAE. The effect of ACAE on tumor progression was monitored by non-invasive bioluminescence imaging. The proliferation and migration/invasion of H441GL cells were inhibited by ACAE in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, ACAE induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and apoptosis in H441GL cells as shown by flow cytometric analysis, Annexin-V immunoflourescence and DNA fragmentation. In vivo bioluminescence imaging revealed that tumorigenesis was significantly retarded by oral treatment of ACAE in a dose-dependent fashion. Based on our experimental data, ACAE contains anti-cancer properties and could be considered as a potential CAM agent in future clinical evaluation.

  13. Time-resolved molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junliang; Blaga, Cosmin I.; Agostini, Pierre; DiMauro, Louis F.

    2016-06-01

    Time-resolved molecular imaging is a frontier of ultrafast optical science and physical chemistry. In this article, we review present and future key spectroscopic and microscopic techniques for ultrafast imaging of molecular dynamics and show their differences and connections. The advent of femtosecond lasers and free electron x-ray lasers bring us closer to this goal, which eventually will extend our knowledge about molecular dynamics to the attosecond time domain.

  14. Dose reduction in molecular breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Chowdhury, Samir; Hugg, James W.; Moats, Rex A.; Patt, Bradley E.

    2011-10-01

    Molecular Breast Imaging (MBI) is the imaging of radiolabeled drugs, cells, or nanoparticles for breast cancer detection, diagnosis, and treatment. Screening of broad populations of women for breast cancer with mammography has been augmented by the emergence of breast MRI in screening of women at high risk for breast cancer. Screening MBI may benefit the sub-population of women with dense breast tissue that obscures small tumors in mammography. Dedicated breast imaging equipment is necessary to enable detection of early-stage tumors less than 1 cm in size. Recent progress in the development of these instruments is reviewed. Pixellated CZT for single photon MBI imaging of 99mTc-sestamibi gives high detection sensitivity for early-stage tumors. The use of registered collimators in a near-field geometry gives significantly higher detection efficiency - a factor of 3.6-, which translates into an equivalent dose reduction factor given the same acquisition time. The radiation dose in the current MBI procedure has been reduced to the level of a four-view digital mammography study. In addition to screening of selected sub-populations, reduced MBI dose allows for dual-isotope, treatment planning, and repeated therapy assessment studies in the era of molecular medicine guided by quantitative molecular imaging.

  15. Molecular imaging in quality health care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Quality Health Care results from applying fundamental basic science and preclinical concepts as well as novel technologies to patient care within specific socio-economic frameworks. Cancer mortality has improved recently but outcomes of cancer patients are still unacceptably poor. Molecular Imaging has the potential to improve the outcome of cancer patients in several ways. In the preclinical setting, high resolution molecular imaging devices designed for small animal research have developed into valuable tools for drug evaluation and imaging probe design. These have enabled us to study drug effects in vivo by monitoring longitudinally their effects on tumor cell metabolism or proliferation. The success of Imatinib in treating chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) has demonstrated that targeted drugs can induce remarkable tumor responses and may even cure cancer patients. Targeted drugs have been used for treating various common solid human tumors, including breast cancer, colorectal cancer, and non-small cell lung cancer. However, diverse signaling pathways are involved in the development and progression of these genetically heterogeneous diseases. Consequently, inhibition of one specific pathway is likely to be efficacious in only in small subsets of patients with specific histological tumor types. It is unlikely that a single 'blockbuster' drug can be effective for all patients with a 'common' tumor. Rather, it will be necessary to develop multiple targeted drugs even for patients that share a single histologically defined tumor type. The inevitable consequence is a decreased revenue/cost ratio for the industry and increasing costs for patients and health care systems. It is therefore of paramount importance to identify drug failure as early as possible in preclinical and clinical trials. Human studies with positron emission tomography (PET) with molecular imaging probes targeting physiological processes such as

  16. Cardiovascular molecular imaging of apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolters, S.L.; Reutelingsperger, C.P.M. [Maastricht University, Department of Biochemistry, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Corsten, M.F.; Hofstra, L. [Maastricht University, Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, P.O. Box 616, Maastricht (Netherlands); Narula, J. [University of California Irvine, Department of Cardiology, Irvine (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Molecular imaging strives to visualise processes at the molecular and cellular level in vivo. Understanding these processes supports diagnosis and evaluation of therapeutic efficacy on an individual basis and thereby makes personalised medicine possible. Apoptosis is a well-organised mode of cell suicide that plays a role in cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Apoptosis is associated with loss of cardiomyocytes following myocardial infarction, atherosclerotic plaque instability, congestive heart failure and allograft rejection of the transplanted heart. Thus, apoptosis constitutes an attractive target for molecular imaging of CVD. Our current knowledge about the molecular players and mechanisms underlying apoptosis offers a rich palette of potential molecular targets for molecular imaging. However, only a few have been successfully developed so far. This review highlights aspects of the molecular machinery and biochemistry of apoptosis relevant to the development of molecular imaging probes. It surveys the role of apoptosis in four major areas of CVD and portrays the importance and future perspectives of apoptosis imaging. The annexin A5 imaging protocol is emphasised since it is the most advanced protocol to measure apoptosis in both preclinical and clinical studies. (orig.)

  17. Molecular genetics of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaert, Julie; Prenen, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 90% of colorectal cancer cases are sporadic without family history or genetic predisposition, while in less than 10% a causative genetic event has been identified. Historically, colorectal cancer classification was only based on clinical and pathological features. Many efforts have been made to discover the genetic and molecular features of colorectal cancer, and there is more and more evidence that these features determine the prognosis and response to (targeted) treatment. Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease, with three known major molecular groups. The most common is the chromosomal instable group, characterized by an accumulation of mutations in specific oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. The second is the microsatellite instable group, caused by dysfunction of DNA mismatch repair genes leading to genetic hypermutability. The CpG Island Methylation phenotype is the third group, distinguished by hypermethylation. Colorectal cancer subtyping has also been addressed using genome-wide gene expression profiling in large patient cohorts and recently several molecular classification systems have been proposed. In this review we would like to provide an up-to-date overview of the genetic aspects of colorectal cancer. PMID:24714764

  18. Synthesis and stability test of radiogadolinium(III)-DOTA-PAMAM G3.0-trastuzumab as SPECT-MRI molecular imaging agent for diagnosis of HER-2 positive breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hardiani Rahmania; Abdul Mutalib; Martalena Ramli; Jutti Levita

    2015-01-01

    Nonivasive diagnosis of cancer can be provided by molecular imaging using hybrid modality to obtain better sensitivity, specificity and depiction localization of the disease. In this study, we developed a new molecular imaging agent, radiogadolinium(III)-DOTA-PAMAM G3.0-trastuzumab in the form of 147Gd-DOTA-PAMAM G3.0-trastuzumab, that can be both target-specific radiopharmaceutical in SPECT as well as targeted contrast agent in MRI for the purpose of diagnosis of HER-2 positive breast cancer...

  19. Terahertz polarization imaging for colon cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doradla, Pallavi; Alavi, Karim; Joseph, Cecil S.; Giles, Robert H.

    2014-03-01

    Continuous wave terahertz (THz) imaging has the potential to offer a safe, noninvasive medical imaging modality for delineating colorectal cancer. The terahertz reflectance measurements of fresh 3 - 5 mm thick human colonic excisions were acquired using a continuous-wave polarization imaging technique. A CO2 optically pumped Far- Infrared molecular gas laser operating at 584 GHz was used to illuminate the colon tissue, while the reflected signals were detected using a liquid Helium cooled silicon bolometer. Both co-polarized and cross-polarized remittance from the samples was collected using wire grid polarizers in the experiment. The experimental analysis of 2D images obtained from THz reflection polarization imaging techniques showed intrinsic contrast between cancerous and normal regions based on increased reflection from the tumor. Also, the study demonstrates that the cross-polarized terahertz images not only correlates better with the histology, but also provide consistent relative reflectance difference values between normal and cancerous regions for all the measured specimens.

  20. Molecular oncology of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyooka, Shinichi; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Soh, Junichi; Aokage, Keiju; Yamane, Masaomi; Oto, Takahiro; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Miyoshi, Shinichiro

    2011-08-01

    Progress in genetic engineering has made it possible to elucidate the molecular biological abnormalities in lung cancer. Mutations in KRAS and P53 genes, loss of specific alleles, and DNA methylation of the tumor suppressor genes were the major abnormalities investigated between 1980 and the 2000s. In 2004, mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene that cause oncogene addiction were discovered in non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs), especially in adenocarcinomas. Because they are strongly associated with sensitivity to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs), a great deal of knowledge has been acquired in regard to both EGFR and other genes in the EGFR family and their downstream genes. Moreover, in 2007 the existence of the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene was discovered in NSCLC; and the same as EGFR-TKIs, ALK inhibitors are being found to be highly effective in lung cancers that have this translocation. These discoveries graphically illustrate that molecular biological findings are directly linked to the development of clinical oncology and to improving the survival rates of lung cancer patients. Here, we review the remarkable progress in molecular biological knowledge acquired thus far in regard to lung cancer, especially NSCLC, and the future possibilities. PMID:21850578

  1. Molecular imaging in myocardial fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the development of life science and medical technology, myocardial fibrosis is being increasingly recognized as a new therapeutic target for heart diseases. However, traditional methods for detection of myocardial fibrosis, such as myocardial biopsy and laboratory assay of serum metabolites or enzymes, are not satisfactory in meeting the clinical demands because of their intrinsic limitations. Molecular imaging may non-invasively and quantitatively evaluate the presence/absence, degree and turnover of myocardial fibrosis in vivo with good specificity, thus being useful for clinical assessment and intervention. Currently, the commonly used molecular imaging modalities for evaluation of myocardial fibrosis include SPECT, PET and MRI. It is hopeful that the molecular probe for targeted ultrasound technology may also be developed in the near future. This review highlights the current status and future trends of molecular imaging in myocardial fibrosis. (authors)

  2. Molecular imaging of human breast cancer xenografts in nude mice by epidermal growth factor labelled by near infrared fluorescent dye

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: This work was to determine the feasibility of using epidermal growth factor (EGF) labeled with a near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF) dye (Cy5.5) to selectively localize and image epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)of the human breast cancer. Methods: MDA-MB-231 of human mammary adenocarcinoma and MDA-MB-435S of human mammary ductal carcinoma were detected using a flow cytometry. Laser confocal microscopy was used to examine the intake of EGF-Cy5.5 by MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435S cells. MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB435S human breast cancer orthotopic xenograft nude mice models were established. In vivo NIRF imaging was acquired after intravenous injection of EGF-Cy5.5 (1 nmol/0.2 ml)immediately and different time intervals. The up-take of EGF-Cy5.5 in MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435S was detected using ROI technique. The blockage of the monocolonal antibody C225 to the EGF-Cy5.5 uptake were observed in viovo and ex vivo. Ex vivo tumor tissue fluorescent imaging was executed and the histological sections were stained by HE method for pathobiology assay. Student t test was used for statistical analysis with SPSS for Windows. Results: Flow cytometry indicated the EGFR expression percentage of MDA-MB-231 was 41.96% and the percentage of MDA-MB-435S was 0.12%. The fluorescence showed that the uptake of EGF-Cy5.5 by MDA-MB-231 cells could be observed by the laser confocal microscopy. There was no specific uptake of EGF-Cy5.5 by MDA-MB-435S. In vivo NIRF images showed mean fluorescence intensity in MDA-MB-231 tumors was (38 220±3 144)au, which was significantly higher than MDA-MB435S's ( 11 885 + 1 144 ) au (t = 17. 600, P < 0.01) or normal region' s (11 980 ±1 496) au(t=17. 491, P<0.01) at 24 h postinjection of EGF-Cy5.5. The mean fluorescence intensity was significantly reduced in MDA-MB-231 group with preadministration of C225, whose mean intensity was (10 472±842) au (t=16.772, P<0.01), while the mean intensity was not apparently decreased in MDA-MB-435S block group

  3. Molecular classification of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, N-Y; Tan, P

    2016-05-01

    Gastric cancer (GC), a heterogeneous disease characterized by epidemiologic and histopathologic differences across countries, is a leading cause of cancer-related death. Treatment of GC patients is currently suboptimal due to patients being commonly treated in a uniform fashion irrespective of disease subtype. With the advent of next-generation sequencing and other genomic technologies, GCs are now being investigated in great detail at the molecular level. High-throughput technologies now allow a comprehensive study of genomic and epigenomic alterations associated with GC. Gene mutations, chromosomal aberrations, differential gene expression and epigenetic alterations are some of the genetic/epigenetic influences on GC pathogenesis. In addition, integrative analyses of molecular profiling data have led to the identification of key dysregulated pathways and importantly, the establishment of GC molecular classifiers. Recently, The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) network proposed a four subtype classification scheme for GC based on the underlying tumor molecular biology of each subtype. This landmark study, together with other studies, has expanded our understanding on the characteristics of GC at the molecular level. Such knowledge may improve the medical management of GC in the future. PMID:26861606

  4. Two wavelength-shifting molecular beacons for simultaneous and selective imaging of vesicular miRNA-21 and miRNA-31 in living cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohländer, Peggy R; Abba, Mohammed L; Bestvater, Felix; Allgayer, Heike; Wagenknecht, Hans-Achim

    2016-06-14

    Two molecular beacons were designed as complementary fluorescent imaging probes for miRNA-21 and miRNA-31. Both beacons were prepared by a combination of solid-phase protocol and Cu(i)-catalyzed cycloaddition chemistry. The four photostable and bright fluorophores were attached to 2'-positions in the stem part of the two beacons. One beacon was labeled by a green-to-red emitting and the other by a blue-to-yellow emitting energy transfer pair. This two by two combination yields the four color emission readout. In vitro experiments demonstrate rapid and highly selective opening of both molecular beacons upon addition of the complementary target RNA and excellent green : red and blue : yellow emission color contrasts. Confocal microscopy of selected cancer cell lines provides evidence that a four color imaging of versicular miRNA-21 and miRNA-31 can be achieved both selectively and simultaneously upon transfection by the beacons, and that the fluorescent readouts track well with miRNA levels determined by PCR. PMID:27114268

  5. Advances in Multimodality Molecular Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multimodality molecular imaging is now playing a pivotal role in clinical setting and biomedical research. Modern molecular imaging technologies are deemed to potentially lead to a revolutionary paradigm shift in healthcare and revolutionize clinical practice. Within the spectrum of macroscopic medical imaging, sensitivity ranges from the detection of millimolar to submillimolar concentrations of contrast media with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), respectively, to picomolar concentrations in single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission 8 9 tomography (PET): a 108-109 difference. Even though the introduction of dedicated dual-modality imaging systems designed specifically and available commercially for clinical practice is relatively recent, the concept of combining anatomical and functional imaging has been recognized for several decades. Software- and hardware-based correlation between anatomical (x-ray CT, MRI) and physiological (PET) information is a promising research field and now offers unique capabilities for the medical imaging community and biomedical researchers. The introduction of dual-modality PET/CT imaging systems in clinical environments has revolutionized the practice of diagnostic imaging. The complementarity between the intrinsically aligned anatomic (CT) and functional or metabolic (PET) information provided in a 'one-stop shop' and the possibility to use CT images for attenuation correction of the PET data has been the driving force behind the success of this technology. On the other hand, combining PET with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in a single gantry is technically more challenging owing to the strong magnetic fields. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made resulting in the design of few preclinical PET systems and one human prototype dedicated for simultaneous PET/MR brain imaging where the first patient images have been shown late in 2006. This paper discusses the

  6. Radiolabeling and evaluation of 64Cu-DOTA-F56 peptide targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 in the molecular imaging of gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Hua; Zhao, Chuanke; Liu, Fei; Wang, Lixin; Feng, Junnan; Zhou, Zheng; Qu, Like; Shou, Chengchao; Yang, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1) remains a great challenge in early diagnosis of gastric cancer. Here we reported the synthesis, radiolabeling, and evaluation of a novel 64Cu-radiolabeled peptide for noninvasive positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of VEGFR1 positive gastric cancer. The binding of modified peptide WHSDMEWWYLLG (termed as F56) to VEGER-1 expressed in gastric cancer cell BCG823 has been confirmed by immune-fluorescence overlap....

  7. Molecular imaging with little anatomic information: combined scintigraphic-radiologic imaging of thyroid cancer and sentinel-lymph-node; Molekulare Bildgebung bei geringer anatomischer Bildinformation: Kombinierte szintigraphisch-radiologische Darstellung beim Schilddruesenkarzinom und Sentinel-Lymph-Node

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlemmer, H.; Jigalin, A.; Freter, B.T.; Gasthaus, K.; Langer, H.; Lerch, H. [Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, HELIOS Klinikum Wuppertal, Univ. Witten-Herdecke (Germany)

    2006-09-15

    The combined SPECT-CT examination is a procedure applied for acquisition, overlaying, and analysis of the scintigraphic functional data with the anatomic information in one single examination. This is considered especially for the molecular imaging with only little anatomic information. By giving examples, this elaboration demonstrates the advantages of the method of combining SPECT and radiologic presentation at the iodine-131-radio-nuclide imaging of differentiated thyroid cancer and the sentinel-lymph-node-scanning of different tumor entities. The possibility of combined imaging permits the examiner more diagnostic accuracy by better recognizing of pathologic processes with exact anatomic localisation. It is a simple examination which can be done in one process and hardly stresses the patient. (orig.)

  8. Imaging of multidrug resistance in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Dizdarevic, S.; Peters, A M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Primary intrinsic and/or acquired multidrug resistance (MDR) is the main obstacle to successful cancer treatment. Functional molecular imaging of MDR in cancer using single photon or positron emitters may be helpful to identify multidrug-resistant tumours and predict not only those patients who are resistant to treatment, with a clinically unfavourable prognosis, but also those who are susceptible to the development of drug toxicity or even certain tumours . Variations in the mdr1 ge...

  9. Molecular imaging in cardiovascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiovascular diseases remain the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in industrialized and developing countries. In clinical practice, the in-vivo identification of atherosclerotic lesions, which can lead to complications such as heart attack or stroke, remains difficult. Imaging techniques provide the reference standard for the detection of clinically significant atherosclerotic changes in the coronary and carotid arteries. The assessment of the luminal narrowing is feasible, while the differentiation of stable and potentially unstable or vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques is currently not possible using non-invasive imaging. With high spatial resolution and high soft tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a suitable method for the evaluation of the thin arterial wall. In clinical practice, native MRI of the vessel wall already allows the differentiation and characterization of components of atherosclerotic plaques in the carotid arteries and the aorta. Additional diagnostic information can be gained by the use of non-specific MRI contrast agents. With the development of targeted molecular probes, that highlight specific molecules or cells, pathological processes can be visualized at a molecular level with high spatial resolution. In this review article, the development of pathophysiological changes leading to the development of the arterial wall are introduced and discussed. Additionally, principles of contrast enhanced imaging with non-specific contrast agents and molecular probes will be discussed and latest developments in the field of molecular imaging of the vascular wall will be introduced.

  10. Molecular imaging. Fundamentals and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Jie (ed.) [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Intelligent Medical Research Center

    2013-07-01

    Covers a wide range of new theory, new techniques and new applications. Contributed by many experts in China. The editor has obtained the National Science and Technology Progress Award twice. ''Molecular Imaging: Fundamentals and Applications'' is a comprehensive monograph which describes not only the theory of the underlying algorithms and key technologies but also introduces a prototype system and its applications, bringing together theory, technology and applications. By explaining the basic concepts and principles of molecular imaging, imaging techniques, as well as research and applications in detail, the book provides both detailed theoretical background information and technical methods for researchers working in medical imaging and the life sciences. Clinical doctors and graduate students will also benefit from this book.

  11. Molecular imaging. Fundamentals and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Covers a wide range of new theory, new techniques and new applications. Contributed by many experts in China. The editor has obtained the National Science and Technology Progress Award twice. ''Molecular Imaging: Fundamentals and Applications'' is a comprehensive monograph which describes not only the theory of the underlying algorithms and key technologies but also introduces a prototype system and its applications, bringing together theory, technology and applications. By explaining the basic concepts and principles of molecular imaging, imaging techniques, as well as research and applications in detail, the book provides both detailed theoretical background information and technical methods for researchers working in medical imaging and the life sciences. Clinical doctors and graduate students will also benefit from this book.

  12. Imaging for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: During the last three decades, 3D imaging with X-ray computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were introduced to characterize tumour morphology for improved delineation of target volumes. At present, the time has come to also start the assessment and correction of the temporal alterations of the target volume. This is leading to 'image guided radiotherapy' (IGRT), which is characterized by the integration of 2D and 3D imaging modalities into the radiotherapy workflow. The vision is to detect deformations and motion between radiotherapy fractions (inter-fractional IGRT) and during beam delivery (intra fractional IGRT). Considering these changes and correcting for them either by gating or tracking of the irradiation beam is leading a step further to 'time adapted radiotherapy' (ART). Many institutions are currently addressing this technical challenge, with the goal of implementing IGRT and ART into radiotherapy as a faster, safer and more efficient treatment technique. Another innovation, which is currently coming up is biological adaptive radiotherapy. The background for this approach is the fact, that the old hypothesis of radiotherapy assuming that the tumor consists of homogenous tissue and therefore a homogeneous dose distribution has to be delivered to the target can no longer be sustained. It is known today, that a tumor may consist of various subvolumes with different radiobiological properties. New methods are currently being developed to characterize these properties more appropriately, e.g. by functional and molecular imaging using new tracers for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The challenge in radiotherapy is to develop concepts to include and integrate this information into radiotherapy planning and beam delivery, first by extending the morphological image content towards a biological planning target volume including subvolumes of different radiosensitivity, and

  13. Imaging for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last three decades, 3D imaging with X-ray computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were introduced to characterize tumour morphology for improved delineation of target volumes. At present, the time has come to also start the assessment and correction of the temporal alterations of the target volume. This is leading to 'image guided radiotherapy' (IGRT), which is characterized by the integration of 2D and 3D imaging modalities into the radiotherapy workflow. The vision is to detect deformations and motion between radiotherapy fractions (inter-fractional IGRT) and during beam delivery (intra fractional IGRT). Considering these changes and correcting for them either by gating or tracking of the irradiation beam is leading a step further to 'time adapted radiotherapy' (ART). Many institutions are currently addressing this technical challenge, with the goal of implementing IGRT and ART into radiotherapy as a faster, safer and more efficient treatment technique. Another innovation, which is currently coming up is 'biological adaptive radiotherapy'. The background for this approach is the fact, that the old hypothesis of radiotherapy assuming that the tumor consists of homogenous tissue and therefore a homogeneous dose distribution has to be delivered to the target can no longer be sustained. It is known today, that a tumor may consist of various subvolumes with different radiobiological properties. New methods are currently being developed to characterize these properties more appropriately, e.g. by functional and molecular imaging using new tracers for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The challenge in radiotherapy is to develop concepts to include and integrate this information into radiotherapy planning and beam delivery, first by extending the morphological image content towards a biological planning target volume including subvolumes of different radiosensitivity, and second by

  14. Information Systems - Cancer Imaging Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) represents an effort by CIP grantees in a consortium to create a database of spiral CT images of the lung for use in CAD (computer-aided detection) algorithm research. The Imaging Database Resources Initiative (IDRI) is extending the efforts of the LIDC, to create a larger database of spiral CT imaging of the lung for use in CAD algorithm research. Image Archive Resources contains links to Web sites related to the interests of the NCI CIP Image Archive Committee. The Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database (MICAD) is a database of research data on in vivo molecular imaging and contrast agents.

  15. Molecular Imaging Challenges With PET

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P

    2010-01-01

    The future trends in molecular imaging and associated challenges for in-vivo functional imaging are illustrated on the basis of a few examples, such as atherosclerosis vulnerable plaques imaging or stem cells tracking. A set of parameters are derived to define the specifications of a new generation of in-vivo imaging devices in terms of sensitivity, spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. The limitations of strategies used in present PET scanners are discussed and new approaches are proposed taking advantage of recent progress on materials, photodetectors and readout electronics. A special focus is put on metamaterials, as a new approach to bring more functionality to detection devices. It is shown that the route is now open towards a fully digital detector head with very high photon counting capability over a large energy range, excellent timing precision and possibility of imaging the energy deposition process.

  16. Advances in Lung Cancer Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Rahimi

    2010-01-01

    Imaging has a critical role in diagnosis, staging and monitoring of patients with lung cancer."nThe role of imaging in screening for malignancy has not been established."nWe discuss new concepts in staging also the early diagnosis and screening for lung cancer.

  17. Cancerology: to see and to treat with molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By allowing to visualize, beyond the organs and tissues structure, the molecules present inside cells and their action in cell functioning, to the genome level, the molecular imaging opens a new era in biology and medicine and creates the conditions for the perfecting of targeting and personalised treatments of cancers. The E.M.I.L. network is the only European network in molecular imaging for the cancer. It has been initiated and is coordinated by 'the genes expression in vivo imaging group' of the Cea at Orsay. The E.M.I.L network represents 43 organisms of 13 european countries with 6 technological platforms. (N.C.)

  18. Molecular imaging in neurology and neuroscience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular imaging in neurology and neuroscience is a suspenseful and fast developing tool in order to quantitatively image genomics and proteomics by means of direct and indirect markers. Because of its high-sensitive tracer principle, nuclear medicine imaging has the pioneering task for the methodical progression of molecular imaging. The current development of molecular imaging in neurology changes from the use of indirect markers of gene and protein expression to the direct imaging of the molecular mechanisms. It is the aim of this article to give a short review on the status quo of molecular imaging in neurology with emphasis on clinically relevant aspects. (orig.)

  19. Molecular Epidemiology of Female Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Seon-Hee Yim; Yeun-Jun Chung

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is still a leading cause of cancer mortality in the world. The incidence of lung cancer in developed countries started to decrease mainly due to global anti-smoking campaigns. However, the incidence of lung cancer in women has been increasing in recent decades for various reasons. Furthermore, since the screening of lung cancer is not as yet very effective, clinically applicable molecular markers for early diagnosis are much required. Lung cancer in women appears to have differenc...

  20. Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, M.C. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Lippman, M. [Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)] [comps.

    1992-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

  1. Use of Molecular Imaging to Predict Clinical Outcome in Patients With Rectal Cancer After Preoperative Chemotherapy and Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To correlate changes in 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (18-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) (18-FDG-PET) uptake with response and disease-free survival with combined modality neoadjuvant therapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Charts were reviewed for consecutive patients with ultrasound-staged T3x to T4Nx or TxN1 rectal adenocarcinoma who underwent preoperative chemoradiation therapy at Fox Chase Cancer Center (FCCC) or Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University with 18-FDG-PET scanning before and after combined-modality neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy . The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) was measured from the tumor before and 3 to 4 weeks after completion of chemoradiation therapy preoperatively. Logistic regression was used to analyze the association of pretreatment SUV, posttreatment SUV, and % SUV decrease on pathologic complete response (pCR), and a Cox model was fitted to analyze disease-free survival. Results: A total of 53 patients (FCCC, n = 41, RLCCC, n = 12) underwent pre- and postchemoradiation PET scanning between September 2000 and June 2006. The pCR rate was 31%. Univariate analysis revealed that % SUV decrease showed a marginally trend in predicting pCR (p = 0.08). In the multivariable analysis, posttreatment SUV was shown a predictor of pCR (p = 0.07), but the test results did not reach statistical significance. None of the investigated variables were predictive of disease-free survival. Conclusions: A trend was observed for % SUV decrease and posttreatment SUV predicting pCR in patients with rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiation therapy. Further prospective study with a larger sample size is warranted to better characterize the role of 18-FDG-PET for response prediction in patients with rectal cancer.

  2. Colon cancer - Series (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon cancer is the third most common cancer in the United States. Risk factors include a diet low ... The treatment of colon cancer depends on the stage of the disease. Stage I cancer is limited to the inner lining of the colon; ...

  3. Study on in vivo imaging of 99Tcm-hTERT mRNA as antisense molecular probe in breast cancer tumor-bearing nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Antisense imaging is one of the important modalities in the domain of molecular nuclear medicine. The purpose of this study was to design and synthesize an antisense oligonucleotide (ASON) molecular probe targeting human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) mRNA, and to validate the potential application value using animal model experimental study in early diagnosis of the tumor. Methods: Antisense and sense molecular probes targeting hTERT mRNA were radiolabeled with 99Tcm through bifunctional chelator N-hydroxysuccinimidyl derivative of S-acetylmercaptoacetyltriglycine (S-Acetyl NHS-MAG3). The BALB/c nu/nu nude mice were inoculated with MCF-7 mammary tumor cells in the right upper limbs. 99Tcm-hTERT mRNA ASON and 99Tcm-hTERT mRNA sense oligonucleotide (SON) with or without mediated by liposome was injected intravenously in mammary tumor-bearing BALB/c nude mice, respectively. Imaging it, vivo was performed periodically. All data were analyzed by the statistic software of SPSS 12.0. Results: The in vitro study showed that the labeling efficiencies of 99Tcm-hTERT mRNA ASON reached (76 ± 5)%, with radiochemical purity greater than 96% and specific activity of 1850 kBq/μg. The stability of 99Tcm-hTERT mRNA ASON in room temperature and serum incubation after 24 h was still above 93%. The in vivo study showed that tumor uptake of 99Tcm-hTERT mRNA ASON was high from 4 to 8 h after injection. On the contrary, there was little 99Tcm-hTERT mRNA SON accumulated in tumor within 8 h. The radioactivity ratio of tumor-to-nontumor (T/NT) of antisense probe group with or' without liposome mediation was 8.02 ± 0.03 and 7.55 ± 0.12, respectively (t=-1.99, P>0.05), and that of sense probe group with or without liposome mediation was 1.23 ± 0.06 and 1.33 ± 0.15, respectively (t=0.42, P>0.05). However, there was significant difference between antisense and sense probe groups with or without liposome mediation (t= 26.30, 28.71, both P99Tcm could be used as a

  4. Correlation of morphological and molecular parameters for colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shuai; Roney, Celeste A.; Li, Qian; Jiang, James; Cable, Alex; Summers, Ronald M.; Chen, Yu

    2010-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. There is great interest in studying the relationship among microstructures and molecular processes of colorectal cancer during its progression at early stages. In this study, we use our multi-modality optical system that could obtain co-registered optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fluorescence molecular imaging (FMI) images simultaneously to study CRC. The overexpressed carbohydrate α-L-fucose on the surfaces of polyps facilitates the bond of adenomatous polyps with UEA-1 and is used as biomarker. Tissue scattering coefficient derived from OCT axial scan is used as quantitative value of structural information. Both structural images from OCT and molecular images show spatial heterogeneity of tumors. Correlations between those values are analyzed and demonstrate that scattering coefficients are positively correlated with FMI signals in conjugated. In UEA-1 conjugated samples (8 polyps and 8 control regions), the correlation coefficient is ranged from 0.45 to 0.99. These findings indicate that the microstructure of polyps is changed gradually during cancer progression and the change is well correlated with certain molecular process. Our study demonstrated that multi-parametric imaging is able to simultaneously detect morphology and molecular information and it can enable spatially and temporally correlated studies of structure-function relationships during tumor progression.

  5. Sparse image reconstruction for molecular imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Ting, Michael; Hero, Alfred O

    2008-01-01

    The application that motivates this paper is molecular imaging at the atomic level. When discretized at sub-atomic distances, the volume is inherently sparse. Noiseless measurements from an imaging technology can be modeled by convolution of the image with the system point spread function (psf). Such is the case with magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM), an emerging technology where imaging of an individual tobacco mosaic virus was recently demonstrated with nanometer resolution. We also consider additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) in the measurements. Many prior works of sparse estimators have focused on the case when H has low coherence; however, the system matrix H in our application is the convolution matrix for the system psf. A typical convolution matrix has high coherence. The paper therefore does not assume a low coherence H. A discrete-continuous form of the Laplacian and atom at zero (LAZE) p.d.f. used by Johnstone and Silverman is formulated, and two sparse estimators derived by maximizing t...

  6. Molecular imaging of cholinergic processes in prostate cancer using {sup 11}C-donepezil and {sup 18}F-FEOBV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokholm, Morten Gersel; Bender, Dirk; Jakobsen, Steen; Froekiaer, Joergen; Borghammer, Per [Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Centre, Aarhus C (Denmark); Hoeyer, Soeren [Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Histopathology, Aarhus C (Denmark); Borre, Michael [Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Urology, Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2016-05-15

    High-grade prostate cancer (PC) displays parasympathetic neoneurogenesis. We investigated the binding of two PET tracers that visualize cholinergic nerves in PC tissue using autoradiography. Prostatectomy tissue was subjected to autoradiography with {sup 11}C-donepezil and {sup 18}F-FEOBV and correlated with Gleason scores (GS). Regions of interest on the autoradiograms were defined and quantified. Tracer binding in cancer tissue regions was compared with that in normal tissue. We included 13 patients with biopsy-verified PC. In particular, {sup 11}C-donepezil uptake was higher in ''high-grade'' PC (GS ≥4 + 3) than in ''low-grade'' PC and benign hyperplasia. {sup 11}C-donepezil uptake ranged from a mean of 56 % higher (GS 3 + 3) to 409 % higher (GS 4 + 4), and {sup 18}F-FEOBV uptake ranged from 67 % higher (GS 3 + 3) to 194 % higher (GS 4 + 5). The uptake of both tracers was higher in PC with a high GS than in PC with a low GS, but the difference was significant only for {sup 11}C-donepezil (p = 0.003). Uptake of PET tracers binding to cholinergic nerves was markedly higher in PC with a high GS than in PC with a low GS. This finding implies that {sup 11}C-donepezil PET/CT may be able to differentiate between low-grade and high-grade PC. (orig.)

  7. Molecular imaging of cholinergic processes in prostate cancer using 11C-donepezil and 18F-FEOBV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-grade prostate cancer (PC) displays parasympathetic neoneurogenesis. We investigated the binding of two PET tracers that visualize cholinergic nerves in PC tissue using autoradiography. Prostatectomy tissue was subjected to autoradiography with 11C-donepezil and 18F-FEOBV and correlated with Gleason scores (GS). Regions of interest on the autoradiograms were defined and quantified. Tracer binding in cancer tissue regions was compared with that in normal tissue. We included 13 patients with biopsy-verified PC. In particular, 11C-donepezil uptake was higher in ''high-grade'' PC (GS ≥4 + 3) than in ''low-grade'' PC and benign hyperplasia. 11C-donepezil uptake ranged from a mean of 56 % higher (GS 3 + 3) to 409 % higher (GS 4 + 4), and 18F-FEOBV uptake ranged from 67 % higher (GS 3 + 3) to 194 % higher (GS 4 + 5). The uptake of both tracers was higher in PC with a high GS than in PC with a low GS, but the difference was significant only for 11C-donepezil (p = 0.003). Uptake of PET tracers binding to cholinergic nerves was markedly higher in PC with a high GS than in PC with a low GS. This finding implies that 11C-donepezil PET/CT may be able to differentiate between low-grade and high-grade PC. (orig.)

  8. Functional imaging in lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Harders, Stefan Walbom; Balyasnikowa, S; Fischer, B. M.

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer represents an increasingly frequent cancer diagnosis worldwide. An increasing awareness on smoking cessation as an important mean to reduce lung cancer incidence and mortality, an increasing number of therapy options and a steady focus on early diagnosis and adequate staging have resulted in a modestly improved survival. For early diagnosis and precise staging, imaging, especially positron emission tomography combined with CT (PET/CT), plays an important role. Other functional ima...

  9. PET Imaging - from Physics to Clinical Molecular Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Stan

    2008-03-01

    From the beginnings many years ago in a few physics laboratories and first applications as a research brain function imager, PET became lately a leading molecular imaging modality used in diagnosis, staging and therapy monitoring of cancer, as well as has increased use in assessment of brain function (early diagnosis of Alzheimer's, etc) and in cardiac function. To assist with anatomic structure map and with absorption correction CT is often used with PET in a duo system. Growing interest in the last 5-10 years in dedicated organ specific PET imagers (breast, prostate, brain, etc) presents again an opportunity to the particle physics instrumentation community to contribute to the important field of medical imaging. In addition to the bulky standard ring structures, compact, economical and high performance mobile imagers are being proposed and build. The latest development in standard PET imaging is introduction of the well known TOF concept enabling clearer tomographic pictures of the patient organs. Development and availability of novel photodetectors such as Silicon PMT immune to magnetic fields offers an exciting opportunity to use PET in conjunction with MRI and fMRI. As before with avalanche photodiodes, particle physics community plays a leading role in developing these devices. The presentation will mostly focus on present and future opportunities for better PET designs based on new technologies and methods: new scintillators, photodetectors, readout, software.

  10. Molecular Diagnostic Applications in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Huth

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer, a clinically diverse disease, is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Application of novel molecular diagnostic tests, which are summarized in this article, may lead to an improved survival of colorectal cancer patients.  Distinction of these applications is based on the different molecular principles found in colorectal cancer (CRC. Strategies for molecular analysis of single genes (as KRAS or TP53 as well as microarray based techniques are discussed. Moreover, in addition to the fecal occult blood testing (FOBT and colonoscopy some novel assays offer approaches for early detection of colorectal cancer like the multitarget stool DNA test or the blood-based Septin 9 DNA methylation test. Liquid biopsy analysis may also exhibit great diagnostic potential in CRC for monitoring developing resistance to treatment. These new diagnostic tools and the definition of molecular biomarkers in CRC will improve early detection and targeted therapy of colorectal cancer.

  11. Molecular therapeutics in pancreas cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Vignesh; Weekes, Colin D

    2016-04-15

    The emergence of the "precision-medicine" paradigm in oncology has ushered in tremendous improvements in patient outcomes in a wide variety of malignancies. However, pancreas ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has remained an obstinate challenge to the oncology community and continues to be associated with a dismal prognosis with 5-year survival rates consistently less than 5%. Cytotoxic chemotherapy with gemcitabine-based regimens has been the cornerstone of treatment in PDAC especially because most patients present with inoperable disease. But in recent years remarkable basic science research has improved our understanding of the molecular and genetic basis of PDAC. Whole genomic analysis has exemplified the genetic heterogeneity of pancreas cancer and has led to ingenious efforts to target oncogenes and their downstream signaling cascades. Novel stromal depletion strategies have been devised based on our enhanced recognition of the complex architecture of the tumor stroma and the various mechanisms in the tumor microenvironment that sustain tumorigenesis. Immunotherapy using vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors has also risen to the forefront of therapeutic strategies against PDAC. Furthermore, adoptive T cell transfer and strategies to target epigenetic regulators are being explored with enthusiasm. This review will focus on the recent advances in molecularly targeted therapies in PDAC and offer future perspectives to tackle this lethal disease. PMID:27096032

  12. Fecal Molecular Markers for Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani Kanthan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite multiple screening techniques, including colonoscopy, flexible sigmoidoscopy, radiological imaging, and fecal occult blood testing, colorectal cancer remains a leading cause of death. As these techniques improve, their sensitivity to detect malignant lesions is increasing; however, detection of precursor lesions remains problematic and has generated a lack of general acceptance for their widespread usage. Early detection by an accurate, noninvasive, cost-effective, simple-to-use screening technique is central to decreasing the incidence and mortality of this disease. Recent advances in the development of molecular markers in faecal specimens are encouraging for its use as a screening tool. Genetic mutations and epigenetic alterations that result from the carcinogenetic process can be detected by coprocytobiology in the colonocytes exfoliated from the lesion into the fecal matter. These markers have shown promising sensitivity and specificity in the detection of both malignant and premalignant lesions and are gaining popularity as a noninvasive technique that is representative of the entire colon. In this paper, we summarize the genetic and epigenetic fecal molecular markers that have been identified as potential targets in the screening of colorectal cancer.

  13. The synthesis of a D-glucosamine contrast agent, Gd-DTPA-DG, and its application in cancer molecular imaging with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to describe the synthesis of Gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid-deoxyglucosamine (Gd-DTPA-DG) which is a D-glucosamine metabolic MR imaging contrast agent. We will also discuss its use in a pilot MRI study using a xenograft mouse model of human adenocarcinoma. Methods: This novel contrast agent was specifically studied because of its ability to 'target' metabolically active tumor tissues. In this study Gd-DTPA-DG is used to investigate how tumor tissues would react to a dose of 0.2 mmol Gd/kg over a 120 min exposure in a xenograft mouse model. These experiments used athymic mice implanted with human pulmonary adenocarcinoma (A549) as demonstrated by dynamic MRI. Alternately, another contrast agent that is not specific for targeting, Gd-DTPA, was used as the control at a similar dose of gadolinium. Efficacy of the targeted contrast agent was assessed by measuring relaxation rate in vitro and signal intensity (SI) in vivo. Statistical differences were calculated using one-way analysis of variance. Results: The synthesized Gd-DTPA-DG was shown to improve the contrast of tumor tissue in this model. Gd-DTPA-DG was also shown to have a similar pharmacokinetic rate but generated a higher relaxation rate in tumor tissues relative to the control contrast Gd-DTPA. In comparison to the pre-contrast imaging, the SI of tumor tissue in the experimental group was shown to be significantly increased at 15 min after injection of Gd-DTPA-DG (p < 0.001). The enhanced signal intensity spread from the edge of the tumor to the center and seemed to strengthen the idea that MRI performance would be useful in different tumor tissues. Conclusion: This preliminary study shows that this new chelated contrast agent, Gd-DTPA-DG, can be specifically targeted to accumulation in tumor tissue as compared to normal tissues. This targeted paramagnetic contrast agent has potential for specific cancer molecular imaging with MRI.

  14. The synthesis of a D-glucosamine contrast agent, Gd-DTPA-DG, and its application in cancer molecular imaging with MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Wei [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou, Sichuan 646000 (China); Chen Yue, E-mail: chenyue5523@126.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou, Sichuan 646000 (China); Guo Dajing [Department of Radiology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400010 (China); Huang Zhanwen; Cai Liang [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou, Sichuan 646000 (China); He Ling [West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China)

    2011-09-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to describe the synthesis of Gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid-deoxyglucosamine (Gd-DTPA-DG) which is a D-glucosamine metabolic MR imaging contrast agent. We will also discuss its use in a pilot MRI study using a xenograft mouse model of human adenocarcinoma. Methods: This novel contrast agent was specifically studied because of its ability to 'target' metabolically active tumor tissues. In this study Gd-DTPA-DG is used to investigate how tumor tissues would react to a dose of 0.2 mmol Gd/kg over a 120 min exposure in a xenograft mouse model. These experiments used athymic mice implanted with human pulmonary adenocarcinoma (A549) as demonstrated by dynamic MRI. Alternately, another contrast agent that is not specific for targeting, Gd-DTPA, was used as the control at a similar dose of gadolinium. Efficacy of the targeted contrast agent was assessed by measuring relaxation rate in vitro and signal intensity (SI) in vivo. Statistical differences were calculated using one-way analysis of variance. Results: The synthesized Gd-DTPA-DG was shown to improve the contrast of tumor tissue in this model. Gd-DTPA-DG was also shown to have a similar pharmacokinetic rate but generated a higher relaxation rate in tumor tissues relative to the control contrast Gd-DTPA. In comparison to the pre-contrast imaging, the SI of tumor tissue in the experimental group was shown to be significantly increased at 15 min after injection of Gd-DTPA-DG (p < 0.001). The enhanced signal intensity spread from the edge of the tumor to the center and seemed to strengthen the idea that MRI performance would be useful in different tumor tissues. Conclusion: This preliminary study shows that this new chelated contrast agent, Gd-DTPA-DG, can be specifically targeted to accumulation in tumor tissue as compared to normal tissues. This targeted paramagnetic contrast agent has potential for specific cancer molecular imaging with MRI.

  15. MR imaging of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since publication of the Radiologic Diagnostic Oncology Group Report in 1991, the clinical application of pulmonary magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to patients with lung cancer has been limited. Computed tomography has been much more widely available for staging of lung cancer in clinical situations. Currently, ventilation and perfusion scintigraphy is the only modality that demonstrates pulmonary function while 2-[fluorine-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography is the only modality that reveals biological glucose metabolism of lung cancer. However, recent advancements in MR imaging have made it possible to evaluate morphological and functional information in lung cancer patients more accurately and quantitatively. Pulmonary MR imaging may hold significant potential to substitute for nuclear medicine examinations. In this review, we describe recent advances in MR imaging of lung cancer, focusing on (1) characterization of solitary pulmonary nodules; (2) differentiation from secondary change; evaluation of (3) medastinal invasion, (4) chest wall invasion, (5) lymph node metastasis, and (6) distant metastasis; and (7) pulmonary functional imaging. We believe that further basic studies, as well as clinical applications of newer MR techniques, will play an important role in the management of patients with lung cancer

  16. MR imaging of lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu E-mail: yosirad@med.kokbe-u.ac.jpyosirad@kobe-u.ac.jpyoshiharuohno@aol.com; Sugimura, Kazuro; Hatabu, Hiroto

    2002-12-01

    Since publication of the Radiologic Diagnostic Oncology Group Report in 1991, the clinical application of pulmonary magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to patients with lung cancer has been limited. Computed tomography has been much more widely available for staging of lung cancer in clinical situations. Currently, ventilation and perfusion scintigraphy is the only modality that demonstrates pulmonary function while 2-[fluorine-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography is the only modality that reveals biological glucose metabolism of lung cancer. However, recent advancements in MR imaging have made it possible to evaluate morphological and functional information in lung cancer patients more accurately and quantitatively. Pulmonary MR imaging may hold significant potential to substitute for nuclear medicine examinations. In this review, we describe recent advances in MR imaging of lung cancer, focusing on (1) characterization of solitary pulmonary nodules; (2) differentiation from secondary change; evaluation of (3) medastinal invasion, (4) chest wall invasion, (5) lymph node metastasis, and (6) distant metastasis; and (7) pulmonary functional imaging. We believe that further basic studies, as well as clinical applications of newer MR techniques, will play an important role in the management of patients with lung cancer.

  17. Imaging of liver cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ben Ariff; Claire R Lloyd; Sameer Khan; Mohamed Shariff; Andrew V Thillainayagam; Devinder S Bansi; Shahid A Khan; Simon D Taylor-Robinson; Adrian KP Lim

    2009-01-01

    Improvements in imaging technology allow exploitation of the dual blood supply of the liver to aid in the identi-fication and characterisation of both malignant and benign liver lesions. Imaging techniques available include contrast enhanced ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. This review discusses the application of several imaging techniques in the diagnosis and staging of both hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma and outlines certain characteristics of benign liver lesions. The advantages of each imaging technique are highlighted, while underscoring the potential pitfalls and limitations of each imaging modality.

  18. Advances of molecular imaging in tumor angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor angiogenesis has a close relationship with tumor growth, progression, metastasis and the prognosis of tumor patients. Therefore, tumor anti-angiogenic treatment arouses great public interest. Molecular imaging can characteristically display and measure the biochemical process of organisms at cellular and molecular level in vivo,which is based on the specific binding of molecular probe with high affinity and target molecules. In recent years, molecular imaging has a certain progress on visual and quantitative research of tumor angiogenesis and it is expected to become an important technique in the efficacy evaluation and prognostic assessment. This article summarizes the new advances of molecular imaging technology in tumor angiogenesis. (authors)

  19. Molecular Biology of Esophageal Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuanXi; JanBrabender; RalfMetzger; PaulM.Schneider

    2004-01-01

    There have been many new developments in our understanding of esophageal carcinoma biology over the past several years. Information regarding both of the major forms of this disease, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, has accumulated in conjunction with data on precursor conditions such as Barrett's esophagus. Interesting and promising findings have included overexpression of proto-oncogenes,loss of heterozygosity at multiple chromosomal loci, tumor suppressor gene inactivation, epigenetic silencing by DNA methylation, and mutations and deletions involving the tumor suppressor gene p53. Important cancer pathways, the cyclin kinase inhibitor cascade and the DNA mismatch repair process, implicated in the genesis of multiple tumor types have also been inculpated in esophageal carcinogenesis. Alterations in the p16 and p15 cyclin kinase inhibitors including point mutations and homozygous deletions have been reported in primary esophageal tumors. Further developments in the field of molecular carcinogenesis of esophageal malignancies promise to yield improvements in prevention, early detection, prognostic categorization, and perhaps gene-based therapy of this deadly disease.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging for prostate cancer clinical application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing Li; Yong Du; Hanfeng Yang; Yayong Huang; Jun Meng; Dongmei Xiao

    2013-01-01

    As prostate cancer is a biologically heterogeneous disease for which a variety of treatment options are available,the major objective of prostate cancer imaging is to achieve more precise disease characterization.In clinical practice,magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one of the imaging tools for the evaluation of prostate cancer,the fusion of MRI or dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) with magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is improving the evaluation of cancer location,size,and extent,while providing an indication of tumor aggressiveness.This review summarizes the role of MRI in the application of prostate cancer and describes molecular MRI techniques (including MRSI and DCE-MRI)for aiding prostate cancer management.

  1. Integrated Molecular Profiling in Advanced Cancers Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-21

    Breast Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Genitourinary Cancer; Pancreatobiliary Gastrointestinal Cancer; Upper Aerodigestive Tract Cancer; Gynecological Cancers; Melanoma Cancers; Rare Cancers; Unknown Primary Cancers

  2. Molecular and Functional Imaging of Internet Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Yunqi Zhu; Hong Zhang; Mei Tian

    2015-01-01

    Maladaptive use of the Internet results in Internet addiction (IA), which is associated with various negative consequences. Molecular and functional imaging techniques have been increasingly used for analysis of neurobiological changes and neurochemical correlates of IA. This review summarizes molecular and functional imaging findings on neurobiological mechanisms of IA, focusing on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear imaging modalities including positron emission tomography (PET) an...

  3. Nuclear Molecular Imaging for Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Plaques

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Soo Jin; Paeng, Jin Chul

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease as well as a lipid disorder. Atherosclerotic plaque formed in vessel walls may cause ischemia, and the rupture of vulnerable plaque may result in fatal events, like myocardial infarction or stroke. Because morphological imaging has limitations in diagnosing vulnerable plaque, molecular imaging has been developed, in particular, the use of nuclear imaging probes. Molecular imaging targets various aspects of vulnerable plaque, such as inflammatory cell...

  4. An introduction to functional and molecular imaging with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been applied to many aspects of functional and molecular imaging. Many of the parameters used to produce image contrast in MRI are influenced by the local chemical environment around the atoms being imaged; these parameters can be exploited to probe the molecular content of tissues and this has been shown to have many applications in radiology. Diffusion-weighted imaging is a well-established method for measuring small changes in the molecular movement of water that occurs following the onset of ischaemia and in the presence of tumours. Exogenous contrast agents containing gadolinium or iron oxide have been used to image tissue vascularity, cell migration, and specific biological processes, such as cell death. MR spectroscopy is a technique for measuring the concentrations of tissue metabolites and this has been used to probe metabolic pathways in cancer, in cardiac tissue, and in the brain. Several groups are developing positron-emission tomography (PET)-MRI systems that combine the spatial resolution of MRI with the metabolic sensitivity of PET. However, the application of MRI to functional and molecular imaging is limited by its intrinsic low sensitivity. A number of techniques have been developed to overcome this which utilize a phenomenon termed hyperpolarization; these have been used to image tissue pH, cellular necrosis, and to image the lungs. Although most of these applications have been developed in animal models, they are increasingly being translated into human imaging and some are used routinely in many radiology departments.

  5. Genetic and molecular changes in ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Robert L; Gourley, Charlie

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer represents the most lethal gynecological malignancy in the developed world, and can be divided into five main histological subtypes: high grade serous, endometrioid, clear cell, mucinous and low grade serous. These subtypes represent distinct disease entities, both clinically and at the molecular level. Molecular analysis has revealed significant genetic heterogeneity in ovarian cancer, particularly within the high grade serous subtype. As such, this subtype has been the focus of much research effort to date, revealing molecular subgroups at both the genomic and transcriptomic level that have clinical implications. However, stratification of ovarian cancer patients based on the underlying biology of their disease remains in its infancy. Here, we summarize the molecular changes that characterize the five main ovarian cancer subtypes, highlight potential opportunities for targeted therapeutic intervention and outline priorities for future research.

  6. Imaging in early phase childhood cancer trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances made in the treatment of childhood malignancies during the last four decades have resulted in overall cure rates of approximately 80%, but progress has slowed significantly during the last 10 years, underscoring the need for more effective and less toxic agents. Current research is focused on development of molecularly targeted agents, an era ushered in with the discovery of imatinib mesylate for the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia. Since imatinib's introduction into the clinic, an increasing number of tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been developed and entered into clinical trials and practice. Parallel to the initial advances made in molecularly targeted agents has been the development of a spectrum of novel imaging modalities. Future goals for imaging in childhood cancer research thus include (1) patient identification based on target identification or other biologic characteristics of the tumor, (2) assessing pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) effects, and (3) predictive value with an early indication of patient benefit. Development and application of novel imaging modalities for children with cancer can serve to streamline development of molecularly targeted agents. (orig.)

  7. Imaging in early phase childhood cancer trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, Peter C. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2009-02-15

    Advances made in the treatment of childhood malignancies during the last four decades have resulted in overall cure rates of approximately 80%, but progress has slowed significantly during the last 10 years, underscoring the need for more effective and less toxic agents. Current research is focused on development of molecularly targeted agents, an era ushered in with the discovery of imatinib mesylate for the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia. Since imatinib's introduction into the clinic, an increasing number of tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been developed and entered into clinical trials and practice. Parallel to the initial advances made in molecularly targeted agents has been the development of a spectrum of novel imaging modalities. Future goals for imaging in childhood cancer research thus include (1) patient identification based on target identification or other biologic characteristics of the tumor, (2) assessing pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) effects, and (3) predictive value with an early indication of patient benefit. Development and application of novel imaging modalities for children with cancer can serve to streamline development of molecularly targeted agents. (orig.)

  8. Molecular Profiling of Prostate Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Nna, Emmanuel Okechukwu

    2009-01-01

    In the UK, more than 30 000 men are diagnosed annually with prostate cancer (PCa) and about 10 000 men die from it each year. Although several molecular markers have been associated with prostate cancer development and/ or progression, only few of them are used in diagnostic pathology. The current standard tests include serum PSA test, digital rectal examination and histology of prostate biopsy. Recently the PCA-3 molecular test was approved in the European Union, and it is now...

  9. Head and neck cancer imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermans, R. (ed.) [University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-07-01

    This book provides a comprehensive review of state-of-the-art imaging in head and neck cancer. Precise determination of tumor extent is of the utmost importance in these neoplasms, as it has important consequences for staging of disease, prediction of outcome and choice of treatment. Only the radiologist can fully appreciate submucosal, perineural, and perivascular tumor spread and detect metastatic disease at an early stage. Imaging is also of considerable benefit for patient surveillance after treatment. All imaging modalities currently used in the management of head and neck neoplasms are considered in depth, and in addition newer techniques such as PET-CT and diffusion-weighted MRI are discussed. This book will help the reader to recommend, execute and report head and neck imaging studies at a high level of sophistication and thereby to become a respected member of the team managing head and neck cancer. (orig.)

  10. Molecular Classification and Correlates in Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ogino, Shuji; Goel, Ajay

    2008-01-01

    Molecular classification of colorectal cancer is evolving. As our understanding of colorectal carcinogenesis improves, we are incorporating new knowledge into the classification system. In particular, global genomic status [microsatellite instability (MSI) status and chromosomal instability (CIN) status] and epigenomic status [CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) status] play a significant role in determining clinical, pathological and biological characteristics of colorectal cancer. In thi...

  11. Imaging prostate cancer: an update on positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter;

    2010-01-01

    molecular imaging information. Developments in imaging technologies, specifically magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT), have improved the detection rate of prostate cancer. MRI has improved lesion detection and local staging. Furthermore, MRI......Prostate cancer is a common cancer in men and continues to be a major health problem. Imaging plays an essential role in the clinical management of patients. An important goal for prostate cancer imaging is more accurate disease characterization through the synthesis of anatomic, functional, and....../CT imaging of prostate cancer. Among these, choline (labeled with (18)F or (11)C), (11)C-acetate, and (18)F-fluoride have demonstrated promising results, and other new radiopharmaceuticals are currently under evaluation in preclinical and clinical studies....

  12. Imaging prostate cancer: an update on positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter;

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common cancer in men and continues to be a major health problem. Imaging plays an essential role in the clinical management of patients. An important goal for prostate cancer imaging is more accurate disease characterization through the synthesis of anatomic, functional, and...... molecular imaging information. Developments in imaging technologies, specifically magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT), have improved the detection rate of prostate cancer. MRI has improved lesion detection and local staging. Furthermore, MRI....../CT imaging of prostate cancer. Among these, choline (labeled with (18)F or (11)C), (11)C-acetate, and (18)F-fluoride have demonstrated promising results, and other new radiopharmaceuticals are currently under evaluation in preclinical and clinical studies....

  13. Radiology Network (ACRIN) - Cancer Imaging Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ACRIN is funded to improve the quality and utility of imaging in cancer research and cancer care through expert, multi-institutional clinical evaluation of discoveries and technological innovations relevant to imaging science as applied in clinical oncology.

  14. Early detection of colonic dysplasia by magnetic resonance molecular imaging with a contrast agent raised against the colon cancer marker MUC5AC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossez, Yannick; Burtea, Carmen; Laurent, Sophie; Gosset, Pierre; Léonard, Renaud; Gonzalez, Walter; Ballet, Sébastien; Raynal, Isabelle; Rousseaux, Olivier; Dugué, Timothée; Vander Elst, Luce; Michalski, Jean-Claude; Muller, Robert N; Robbe-Masselot, Catherine

    2016-05-01

    Human gastric mucin MUC5AC is secreted in the colonic mucus of cancer patients and is a specific marker of precancerous lesions called aberrant crypt foci. Using MUC5AC as a specific marker can improve sensitivity in the detection of early colorectal cancer. Here we demonstrated that the accumulation of MUC5AC in xenograft and mouse stomach can be detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We used ultrasmall particles of iron oxide (USPIOs) conjugated with disulfide constrained heptapeptide that were identified using a screening phage display. To accomplish this, we employed positive selection of the phage display library on MUC5AC purified from fresh human colonic adenomas in combination with negative selection of the phage library on purified human MUC2, which is predominantly found in normal colorectal tissues. This conjugate was tested on human colorectal cancer cell lines that were either able or unable to secrete MUC5AC, both in vitro and in vivo. MUC5AC-USPIO contrast agent and USPIOs alone were not detected in cell lines unable to secrete MUC5AC. A combination of MRI and microscopy studies was performed to detect a specific accumulation of the contrast agent in vivo. Thus, the MUC5AC contrast agent enabled non-invasive detection of precancerous lesions and colorectal cancer, highlighting its potential use in diagnostics, in the early detection of colorectal cancer recurrences after treatment and in mechanistic studies implicating MUC5AC. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26762591

  15. Molecular imaging of mental disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) techniques have made it possible to measure changes in neurochemical components in living human brain. PET can be used to investigate various brain functions such as receptors, transporters, enzymes and various biochemical pathways; therefore, it could be a powerful tool for molecular imaging of mental disorders. Since the pathophysiology of schizophrenia has been discussed with a functional alteration of dopaminergic transmission in the brain, we have focused the dopaminergic components for the research target of schizophrenia using PET. Using high affinity ligand [11C]FLB 457, we found reduced D2 receptor binding in the anterior cingulate cortex of patients with schizophrenia, and a significant negative correlation was observed between D2 receptor binding and the positive symptom score. Subregions of interest were defined on the thalamus using individual magnetic resonance images. D2 receptor binding was also lower in the central medial and posterior subregions of the thalamus in patients with schizophrenia. Alterations in D2 receptor function in the extrastriatal region may underlie the positive symptoms of schizophrenia. On the other hand D1 receptor binding was found to be lower in the prefrontal cortex and a significant negative correlation was observed between D1 receptor binding and the negative symptom score. Abnormality of D1 receptor function would be at the bottom of the negative symptoms and cognitive impairment of schizophrenia. Regarding the effect of antipsychotics on dopamine D2 receptor, occupancy and it's time-course have been measured in a living body using PET. This approach can provide in vivo pharmacological evidences of antipsychotics and establish the rational therapeutic strategy. PET is a powerful tool not only in the field of brain research but also drug discovery. (author)

  16. Nanodiamond Imaging: a New Molecular Imaging Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Hegyi, Alex Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Nanodiamond imaging is a novel biomedical imaging technique that non-invasively records the distribution of biologically-tagged nanodiamonds in vivo, in two or three dimensions. A nanodiamond imaging system optically detects electron spin resonance of nitrogen-vacancy centers in nanodiamonds, a non-toxic nanomaterial that is easily biologically functionalized. Two systems were built to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique. Using the first system, we imaged 2D projections of multipl...

  17. Frequency Domain Fluorescent Molecular Tomography and Molecular Probes for Small Animal Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujala, Naresh Gandhi

    Fluorescent molecular tomography (FMT) is a noninvasive biomedical optical imaging that enables 3-dimensional quantitative determination of fluorochromes distributed in biological tissues. There are three methods for imaging large volume tissues based on different light sources: (a) using a light source of constant intensity, through a continuous or constant wave, (b) using a light source that is intensity modulated with a radio frequency (RF), and (c) using ultrafast pulses in the femtosecond range. In this study, we have developed a frequency domain fluorescent molecular tomographic system based on the heterodyne technique, using a single source and detector pair that can be used for small animal imaging. In our system, the intensity of the laser source is modulated with a RF frequency to produce a diffuse photon density wave in the tissue. The phase of the diffuse photon density wave is measured by comparing the reference signal with the signal from the tissue using a phasemeter. The data acquisition was performed by using a Labview program. The results suggest that we can measure the phase change from the heterogeneous inside tissue. Combined with fiber optics and filter sets, the system can be used to sensitively image the targeted fluorescent molecular probes, allowing the detection of cancer at an early stage. We used the system to detect the tumor-targeting molecular probe Alexa Fluor 680 and Alexa Fluor 750 bombesin peptide conjugates in phantoms as well as mouse tissues. We also developed and evaluated fluorescent Bombesin (BBN) probes to target gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptors for optical molecular imaging. GRP receptors are over-expressed in several types of human cancer cells, including breast, prostate, small cell lung, and pancreatic cancers. BBN is a 14 amino acid peptide that is an analogue to human gastrin-releasing peptide that binds specifically to GRPr receptors. BBN conjugates are significant in cancer detection and therapy. The

  18. Molecular Imaging Probe Development using Microfluidics

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Kan; Wang, Ming-Wei; Lin, Wei-Yu; Phung, Duy Linh; Girgis, Mark D.; Anna M. Wu; James S. Tomlinson; Shen, Clifton K.-F.

    2011-01-01

    In this manuscript, we review the latest advancement of microfluidics in molecular imaging probe development. Due to increasing needs for medical imaging, high demand for many types of molecular imaging probes will have to be met by exploiting novel chemistry/radiochemistry and engineering technologies to improve the production and development of suitable probes. The microfluidic-based probe synthesis is currently attracting a great deal of interest because of their potential to deliver many ...

  19. Molecular biology of the lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Lung cancer is one of the most common malignant diseases and leading cause of cancer death worldwide. The advances in molecular biology and genetics, including the modern microarray technology and rapid sequencing techniques, have enabled a remarkable progress into elucidating the lung cancer ethiopathogenesis. Numerous studies suggest that more than 20 different genetic and epigenetic alterations are accumulating during the pathogenesis of clinically evident pulmonary cancers as a clonal, multistep process. Thus far, the most investigated alterations are the inactivational mutations and losses of tumour suppressor genes and the overexpression of growth-promoting oncogenes. More recently, the acquired epigenetic inactivation of tumour suppressor genes by promoter hypermethylation has been recognized. The early clonal genetic abnormalities that occur in preneoplastic bronchial epithelium damaged by smoking or other carcinogenes are being identified. The molecular distinctions between small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as well as between tumors with different clinical outcomes have been described. These investigations lead to the hallmarks of lung cancer. Conclusions. It is realistic to expect that the molecular and cell culture-based investigations will lead to discoveries of new clinical applications with the potential to provide new avenues for early diagnosis, risk assessment, prevention, and most important, new more effective treatment approaches for the lung cancer patients. (author)

  20. Radionuclide molecular target therapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer harms people's health or even lives severely. Currently, the morbidity and mortality of lung cancer are ascending all over the world. Accounting for 38.08% of malignant tumor caused death in male and 16% in female in cities,ranking top in both sex. Especially, the therapy of non-small cell lung cancer has not been obviously improved for many years. Recently, sodium/iodide transporter gene transfection and the therapy of molecular target drugs mediated radionuclide are being taken into account and become the new research directions in treatment of advanced lung cancer patients with the development of technology and theory for medical molecular biology and the new knowledge of lung cancer's pathogenesis. (authors)

  1. Exploiting novel molecular targets in gastrointestinal cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Novel molecular targets are being discovered as we learn more about the aberrant processes underlying various cancers. Efforts to translate this knowledge are starting to impact on the care of patients with gastrointestinal cancers. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway and angiogenesis have been targeted successfully in colorectal cancer with cetuximab, panitunumab and bevacizumab. Similarly, EGFR-targeting with erlotinib yielded significant survival benefit in pancreatic cancer when combined with gemcitabine. The multi-targeting approach with sorafenib has made it the first agent to achieve significant survival benefit in hepatocellular carcinoma. Efforts to exploit the dysregulated Akt/mTOR pathway in GI cancer therapy are ongoing. These molecular targets can be disrupted by various approaches, including the use of monoclonal antibody to intercept extracellular ligands and disrupt receptor-ligand binding, and small molecule inhibitors that interrupt the activation of intracellular kinases.

  2. A novel SPECT camera for molecular imaging of the prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebula, Alan; Gilland, David; Su, Li-Ming; Wagenaar, Douglas; Bahadori, Amir

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this work is to develop an improved SPECT camera for dedicated prostate imaging. Complementing the recent advancements in agents for molecular prostate imaging, this device has the potential to assist in distinguishing benign from aggressive cancers, to improve site-specific localization of cancer, to improve accuracy of needle-guided prostate biopsy of cancer sites, and to aid in focal therapy procedures such as cryotherapy and radiation. Theoretical calculations show that the spatial resolution/detection sensitivity of the proposed SPECT camera can rival or exceed 3D PET and further signal-to-noise advantage is attained with the better energy resolution of the CZT modules. Based on photon transport simulation studies, the system has a reconstructed spatial resolution of 4.8 mm with a sensitivity of 0.0001. Reconstruction of a simulated prostate distribution demonstrates the focal imaging capability of the system.

  3. Molecular breast imaging with gamma emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillaci, O; Spanu, A; Danieli, R; Madeddu, G

    2013-12-01

    Following a diagnosis of breast cancer (BC), the early detection of local recurrence is important to define appropriate therapeutic strategies and increase the chances of a cure. In fact, despite major progress in surgical treatment, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy protocols, tumor recurrence is still a major problem. Moreover, the diagnosis of recurrence with conventional imaging methods can be difficult as a result of the presence of scar tissue. Molecular breast imaging (MBI) with gamma-ray emitting radiotracers may be very useful in this clinical setting, because it is not affected by the post-therapy morphologic changes. This review summarises the applications of 99mTc-sestamibi and 99mTc-tetrofosmin, the two most employed gamma emitter radiopharmaceuticals for MBI, in the diagnosis of local disease recurrence in patients with BC. The main limitation of MBI using conventional gamma-cameras is the low sensitivity for small BCs. The recent development of hybrid single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography devices and especially of high-resolution specific breast cameras can improve the detection rate of sub-centimetric malignant lesions. Nevertheless, probably only the large availability of dedicated cameras will allow the clinical acceptance of MBI as useful complementary diagnostic technique in BC recurrence. The possible role of MBI with specific cameras in monitoring the local response of BC to neoadjuvant chemotherapy is also briefly discussed. PMID:24322791

  4. Current state of molecular imaging research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent years have seen significant advances in both molecular biology, allowing the identification of genes and pathways related to disease, and imaging technologies that allow for improved spatial and temporal resolution, enhanced sensitivity, better depth penetration, improved image processing, and beneficial combinations of different imaging modalities. These advances have led to a paradigm shift in the scope of diagnostic imaging. The traditional role of radiological diagnostic imaging is to define gross anatomy and structure in order to detect pathological abnormalities. Available contrast agents are mostly non-specific and can be used to image physiological processes such as changes in blood volume, flow, and perfusion but not to demonstrate pathological alterations at molecular levels. However, alterations at the anatomical-morphological level are relatively late manifestations of underlying molecular changes. Using molecular probes or markers that bind specifically to molecular targets allows for the non-invasive visualization and quantitation of biological processes such as gene expression, apoptosis, or angiogenesis at the molecular level within intact living organisms. This rapidly evolving, multidisciplinary approach, referred to as molecular imaging, promises to enable early diagnosis, can provide improved classification of stage and severity of disease, an objective assessment of treatment efficacy, and a reliable prognosis. Furthermore, molecular imaging is an important tool for the evaluation of physiological and pathophysiological processes, and for the development of new therapies. This article comprises a review of current technologies of molecular imaging, describes the development of contrast agents and various imaging modalities, new applications in specific disease models, and potential future developments. (orig.)

  5. Spectroscopic Imaging of Bladder Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demos, S G; Gandour-Edwards, R; Ramsamooj, R; deVere White, R

    2003-01-01

    The feasibility of developing bladder cancer detection methods using intrinsic tissue optical properties is the focus of this investigation. In vitro experiments have been performed using polarized elastic light scattering in combination with tissue autofluorescence in the NIR spectral region under laser excitation in the green and red spectral regions. The experimental results obtained from a set of tissue specimens from 25 patients reveal the presence of optical fingerprint characteristics suitable for cancer detection with high contrast and accuracy. These photonic methods are compatible with existing endoscopic imaging modalities which make them suitable for in-vivo application.

  6. Molecular biology in lung cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalina, I.; Biroš, Erik

    Poland: Institute of Nuclear Physics, 2002. s. 32. [NATO advanced research workshop. 23.06.2002-27.06.2002, Krakow - Poland] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : cancer Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  7. Cancer imaging: is it cost-effective?

    OpenAIRE

    Miles, K A

    2004-01-01

    With expenditure on imaging patients with cancer set to increase in line with rising cancer prevalence, there is a need to demonstrate the cost-effectiveness of advanced cancer imaging techniques. Cost-effectiveness studies aim to quantify the cost of providing a service relative to the amount of desirable outcome gained, such as improvements in patient survival. Yet, the impact of imaging on the survival of patients with cancer is small compared to the impact of treatment and is therefore ha...

  8. Multidisciplinary Functional MR Imaging for Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jeong Kon; Jang, Yun-Jin; Cho, Gyunggoo

    2009-01-01

    Various functional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques are used for evaluating prostate cancer including diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging, and MR spectroscopy. These techniques provide unique information that is helpful to differentiate prostate cancer from non-cancerous tissue and have been proven to improve the diagnostic performance of MRI not only for cancer detection, but also for staging, post-treatment monitoring, and guiding prostate biopsies. Ho...

  9. PET-based molecular imaging in neuroscience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) allows non-invasive assessment of physiological, metabolic and molecular processes in humans and animals in vivo. Advances in detector technology have led to a considerable improvement in the spatial resolution of PET (1-2 mm), enabling for the first time investigations in small experimental animals such as mice. With the developments in radiochemistry and tracer technology, a variety of endogenously expressed and exogenously introduced genes can be analysed by PET. This opens up the exciting and rapidly evolving field of molecular imaging, aiming at the non-invasive localisation of a biological process of interest in normal and diseased cells in animal models and humans in vivo. The main and most intriguing advantage of molecular imaging is the kinetic analysis of a given molecular event in the same experimental subject over time. This will allow non-invasive characterisation and ''phenotyping'' of animal models of human disease at various disease stages, under certain pathophysiological stimuli and after therapeutic intervention. The potential broad applications of imaging molecular events in vivo lie in the study of cell biology, biochemistry, gene/protein function and regulation, signal transduction, transcriptional regulation and characterisation of transgenic animals. Most importantly, molecular imaging will have great implications for the identification of potential molecular therapeutic targets, in the development of new treatment strategies, and in their successful implementation into clinical application. Here, the potential impact of molecular imaging by PET in applications in neuroscience research with a special focus on neurodegeneration and neuro-oncology is reviewed. (orig.)

  10. Cancer Hallmarks, Biomarkers and Breast Cancer Molecular Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiaofeng; Xiang, Liangjian; Li, Ting; Bai, Zhonghu

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a complex disease encompassing multiple tumor entities, each characterized by distinct morphology, behavior and clinical implications. Besides estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, novel biomarkers have shown their prognostic and predictive values, complicating our understanding towards to the heterogeneity of such cancers. Ten cancer hallmarks have been proposed by Weinberg to characterize cancer and its carcinogenesis. By reviewing biomarkers and breast cancer molecular subtypes, we propose that the divergent outcome observed from patients stratified by hormone status are driven by different cancer hallmarks. 'Sustaining proliferative signaling' further differentiates cancers with positive hormone receptors. 'Activating invasion and metastasis' and 'evading immune destruction' drive the differentiation of triple negative breast cancers. 'Resisting cell death', 'genome instability and mutation' and 'deregulating cellular energetics' refine breast cancer classification with their predictive values. 'Evading growth suppressors', 'enabling replicative immortality', 'inducing angiogenesis' and 'tumor-promoting inflammation' have not been involved in breast cancer classification which need more focus in the future biomarker-related research. This review novels in its global view on breast cancer heterogeneity, which clarifies many confusions in this field and contributes to precision medicine. PMID:27390604

  11. Molecular imaging of movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarraga, Karlo J; Gorgulho, Alessandra; Chen, Wei; De Salles, Antonio A

    2016-03-28

    -to-rostral direction. Uptake declines prior to symptom presentation and progresses from contralateral to the most symptomatic side to bilateral, correlating with symptom severity. In progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and multiple system atrophy (MSA), striatal activity is symmetrically and diffusely decreased. The caudal-to-rostral pattern is lost in PSP, but could be present in MSA. In corticobasal degeneration (CBD), there is asymmetric, diffuse reduction of striatal activity, contralateral to the most symptomatic side. Additionally, there is hypometabolism in contralateral parieto-occipital and frontal cortices in PD; bilateral putamen and cerebellum in MSA; caudate, thalamus, midbrain, mesial frontal and prefrontal cortices in PSP; and contralateral cortices in CBD. Finally, cardiac sympathetic SPECT signal is decreased in PD. The capacity of molecular imaging to provide in vivo time courses of gene expression, protein synthesis, receptor and transporter binding, could facilitate the development and evaluation of novel medical, surgical and genetic therapies in movement disorders. PMID:27029029

  12. Clinical PET-MR Imaging in Breast Cancer and Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Samuel L; Friedman, Kent P

    2016-10-01

    Hybrid imaging systems have dramatically improved thoracic oncology patient care over the past 2 decades. PET-MR imaging systems have the potential to further improve imaging of thoracic neoplasms, resulting in diagnostic and therapeutic advantages compared with current MR imaging and PET-computed tomography systems. Increasing soft tissue contrast and lesion sensitivity, improved image registration, reduced radiation exposure, and improved patient convenience are immediate clinical advantages. Multiparametric quantitative imaging capabilities of PET-MR imaging have the potential to improve understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cancer and treatment effects, potentially guiding improvements in diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27593245

  13. Molecular imaging and therapy targeting copper metabolism in hepatocellular carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Wachsmann, Jason; PENG, FANGYU

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer worldwide. Significant efforts have been devoted to identify new biomarkers for molecular imaging and targeted therapy of HCC. Copper is a nutritional metal required for the function of numerous enzymatic molecules in the metabolic pathways of human cells. Emerging evidence suggests that copper plays a role in cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Increased accumulation of copper ions was detected in tissue samples of HCC and many ...

  14. Novel molecular imaging platform for monitoring oncological kinases

    OpenAIRE

    Ross Brian D; Nyati Shyam; Rehemtulla Alnawaz; Bhojani Mahaveer S

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Recent advances in oncology have lead to identification of a plethora of alterations in signaling pathways that are critical to oncogenesis and propagation of malignancy. Among the biomarkers identified, dysregulated kinases and associated changes in signaling cascade received the lion's share of scientific attention and have been under extensive investigations with goal of targeting them for anti-cancer therapy. Discovery of new drugs is immensely facilitated by molecular imaging te...

  15. Molecular nuclear imaging for targeting and trafficking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress of molecular biology, genetic engineering, and polymer chemistry provide various tools to target molecules and cells in vivo. In this paper, recent achievements in targeting receptors for hepatocyte or inflammatory cells and in trafficking bacterial, immune, and stem cells using molecular nuclear imaging techniques are introduced

  16. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Psychological Stress and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kyeong Jin; Lee, Yu Jin; Yang, Yong Ryoul; Park, Seorim; Suh, Pann-Ghill; Follo, Matilde Yung; Cocco, Lucio; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2016-01-01

    Psychological stress is an emotion experienced when people are under mental pressure or encounter unexpected problems. Extreme or repetitive stress increases the risk of developing human disease, including cardiovascular disease (CVD), immune diseases, mental disorders, and cancer. Several studies have shown an association between psychological stress and cancer growth and metastasis in animal models and case studies of cancer patients. Stress induces the secretion of stress-related mediators, such as catecholamine, cortisol, and oxytocin, via the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis or the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). These stress-related hormones and neurotransmitters adversely affect stress-induced tumor progression and cancer therapy. Catecholamine is the primary factor that influences tumor progression. It can regulate diverse cellular signaling pathways through adrenergic receptors (ADRs), which are expressed by several types of cancer cells. Activated ADRs enhance the proliferation and invasion abilities of cancer cells, alter cell activity in the tumor microenvironment, and regulate the interaction between cancer and its microenvironment to promote tumor progression. Additionally, other stress mediators, such as glucocorticoids and oxytocin, and their cognate receptors are involved in stress-induced cancer growth and metastasis. Here, we will review how each receptor-mediated signal cascade contributes to tumor initiation and progression and discuss how we can use these molecular mechanisms for cancer therapy. PMID:26916018

  17. Image guided prostate cancer treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bard, Robert L. [Bard Cancer Center, Biofoundation for Angiogenesis Research and Development, New York, NY (United States); Fuetterer, Jurgen J. [Radboud Univ. Nijmegen, Medical Centre (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology; Sperling, Dan (ed.) [Sperling Prostate Center, Alpha 3TMRI, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Systematic overview of the application of ultrasound and MRI in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the lower urinary tract. Detailed information on image-guided therapies, including focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, and microwave and laser ablation. Numerous high-quality illustrations based on high-end equipment. Represents the state of the art in Non Invasive Imaging and Minimally Invasive Ablation Treatment (MIAT). Image-Guided Prostate Cancer Treatments is a comprehensive reference and practical guide on the technology and application of ultrasound and MRI in the male pelvis, with special attention to the prostate. The book is organized into three main sections, the first of which is devoted to general aspects of imaging and image-guided treatments. The second section provides a systematic overview of the application of ultrasound and MRI to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the lower urinary tract. Performance of the ultrasound and MRI studies is explained, and the normal and abnormal pathological anatomy is reviewed. Correlation with the ultrasound in the same plane is provided to assist in understanding the MRI sequences. Biopsy and interventional procedures, ultrasound-MRI fusion techniques, and image-guided therapies, including focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, microwave and laser ablation, are all fully covered. The third section focuses on securing treatment effectiveness and the use of follow-up imaging to ensure therapeutic success and detect tumor recurrence at an early stage, which is vital given that prompt focal treatment of recurrence is very successful. Here, particular attention is paid to the role of Doppler ultrasound and DCE-MRI technologies. This book, containing a wealth of high-quality illustrations based on high-end equipment, will acquaint beginners with the basics of prostate ultrasound and MRI, while more advanced practitioners will learn new skills, means of avoiding pitfalls, and ways of effectively

  18. Image guided prostate cancer treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Systematic overview of the application of ultrasound and MRI in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the lower urinary tract. Detailed information on image-guided therapies, including focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, and microwave and laser ablation. Numerous high-quality illustrations based on high-end equipment. Represents the state of the art in Non Invasive Imaging and Minimally Invasive Ablation Treatment (MIAT). Image-Guided Prostate Cancer Treatments is a comprehensive reference and practical guide on the technology and application of ultrasound and MRI in the male pelvis, with special attention to the prostate. The book is organized into three main sections, the first of which is devoted to general aspects of imaging and image-guided treatments. The second section provides a systematic overview of the application of ultrasound and MRI to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the lower urinary tract. Performance of the ultrasound and MRI studies is explained, and the normal and abnormal pathological anatomy is reviewed. Correlation with the ultrasound in the same plane is provided to assist in understanding the MRI sequences. Biopsy and interventional procedures, ultrasound-MRI fusion techniques, and image-guided therapies, including focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, microwave and laser ablation, are all fully covered. The third section focuses on securing treatment effectiveness and the use of follow-up imaging to ensure therapeutic success and detect tumor recurrence at an early stage, which is vital given that prompt focal treatment of recurrence is very successful. Here, particular attention is paid to the role of Doppler ultrasound and DCE-MRI technologies. This book, containing a wealth of high-quality illustrations based on high-end equipment, will acquaint beginners with the basics of prostate ultrasound and MRI, while more advanced practitioners will learn new skills, means of avoiding pitfalls, and ways of effectively

  19. Quantification of mouse pulmonary cancer models by microcomputed tomography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advances in preclinical cancer models, including orthotopic implantation models or genetically engineered mouse models of cancer, enable pursuing the molecular mechanism of cancer disease that might mimic genetic and biological processes in humans. Lung cancer is the major cause of cancer deaths; therefore, the treatment and prevention of lung cancer are expected to be improved by a better understanding of the complex mechanism of disease. In this study, we have examined the quantification of two distinct mouse lung cancer models by utilizing imaging modalities for monitoring tumor progression and drug efficacy evaluation. The utility of microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) for real-time/non-invasive monitoring of lung cancer progression has been confirmed by combining bioluminescent imaging and histopathological analyses. Further, we have developed a more clinically relevant lung cancer model by utilizing K-rasLSL-G12D/p53LSL-R270H mutant mice. Using micro-CT imaging, we monitored the development and progression of solitary lung tumor in K-rasLSL-G12D/p53LSL-R270H mutant mouse, and further demonstrated tumor growth inhibition by anticancer drug treatment. These results clearly indicate that imaging-guided evaluation of more clinically relevant tumor models would improve the process of new drug discovery and increase the probability of success in subsequent clinical studies. (author)

  20. New molecular targets against cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duenas-Gonzalez A

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Alfonso Duenas-Gonzalez,1,2 Alberto Serrano-Olvera,3 Lucely Cetina,4 Jaime Coronel4 1Unit of Biomedical Research in Cancer, Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas UNAM/Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Mexico City, 2ISSEMyM Cancer Center, Toluca, 3Medical Oncology Service, ABC Medical Center, Mexico City, 4Division of Clinical Research, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Mexico City, Mexico On behalf of the Tumor Study Group Abstract: Cervical cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer worldwide and the fourth leading cause of cancer death in women. Major advances but still insufficient achievements in the treatment of locally advanced and high-risk early stage patients have occurred in the last decade with the incorporation of concurrent cisplatin with radiation and, lately, gemcitabine added to cisplatin chemoradiation. Despite a number of clinical studies incorporating molecular-targeted therapy as radiosensitizers being in progress, so far, only antiangiogenic therapy with bevacizumab added to cisplatin chemoradiation has demonstrated safety and shown encouraging results in a Phase II study. In advanced disease, cisplatin doublets do not have a great impact on the natural history of the disease with median survival rates not exceeding 13 months. The first Phase III study of bevacizumab, added to cisplatin or a non-cisplatin-containing doublet, showed significant increase in both overall survival and progression-free survival. Further studies are needed before bevacizumab plus chemotherapy can be considered the standard of care for advanced disease. Characterization of the mutational landscape of cervical cancer has already been initiated, indicating that, for now, few of these targetable alterations match with available agents. Progress in both the mutational landscape knowledge and developments of novel targeted therapies may result in more effective and individualized treatments for cervical cancer. The potential efficacy of

  1. Molecular Imaging of Chemokine Receptor CXCR4 in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Using 68Ga-Pentixafor PET/CT: Comparison With 18F-FDG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derlin, Thorsten; Jonigk, Danny; Bauersachs, Johann; Bengel, Frank M

    2016-04-01

    We report the case of a 62-year-old woman with a history of ST-elevation myocardial infarction who underwent Ga-Pentixafor PET/CT for characterization of postinfarct myocardial inflammation. Ga-Pentixafor PET/CT incidentally demonstrated marked CXCR4 expression in a space-occupying lesion in the right upper lobe. Corresponding F-FDG PET/CT showed increased metabolism, and subsequent biopsy revealed non-small cell lung cancer. Immunohistochemistry confirmed that CXCR4 was highly expressed on tumor cells. Ga-Pentixafor is a novel CXCR4-targeted probe for PET imaging of CXCR4-positive tumors and holds promise for tumor staging and prognostic stratification. CXCR4-targeted radionuclide therapy represents a therapy option in metastasized diseases. PMID:26756098

  2. Molecular markers for thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of the study of the thyroid nodule lies in excluding the possibility of a malignant lesion because the majority of lesions are benign but there is a malignancy risk of 5 to 10%. Most of them are well differentiated carcinomas originating in the follicular epithelium. In spite of the fact that the majority are benign lesions, distinguishing them from carcinomas is crucial to treatment and adequate follow-up. Fine-needle biopsy allows making the diagnosis in most of cases. However, this method is restricted, particularly when diagnosing follicular lesions. In an effort to improve the diagnostic accuracy of biopsy and to provide new diagnosing criteria, a number of molecular markers have been put forward, some of which has wide range of approval whereas others still awaits to be validated for further implementation. This article presented an updated review of molecular markers with higher number of evidence, more accessible and potentially usable from a methodological viewpoint for diagnosis of the thyroid nodule before surgery. The importance of the study of the thyroid nodule lies in excluding the possibility of a malignant lesion because the majority of lesions are benign but there is a malignancy risk of 5 to 10%. Most of them are well differentiated carcinomas originating in the follicular epithelium. In spite of the fact that the majority are benign lesions, distinguishing them from carcinomas is crucial to treatment and adequate follow-up. Fine-needle biopsy allows making the diagnosis in most of cases. However, this method is restricted, particularly when diagnosing follicular lesions. In an effort to improve the diagnostic accuracy of biopsy and to provide new diagnosing criteria, a number of molecular markers have been put forward, some of which has wide range of approval whereas others still awaits to be validated for further implementation. This article presented an updated review of molecular markers with higher number of evidence, more

  3. [Molecular bases of cancer immunology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Rodríguez, R; Peralta-Zaragoza, O; Madrid-Marina, V

    1995-01-01

    The immune system is a tight network of different types of cells and molecules. The coordinated action of these elements mounts a precise immune response against tumor cells. However, these cells present several escape mechanisms, leading to tumor progression. This paper shows several cellular and molecular events involved in the regulation of the immune response against tumor cells. The interaction of several molecules such as MHC, TcR, adhesins, tumor antigens and cytokines are discussed, as well as the most recent knowledge about escape mechanisms and immunotherapy. PMID:7502157

  4. Molecular and Functional Imaging of Internet Addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunqi Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Maladaptive use of the Internet results in Internet addiction (IA, which is associated with various negative consequences. Molecular and functional imaging techniques have been increasingly used for analysis of neurobiological changes and neurochemical correlates of IA. This review summarizes molecular and functional imaging findings on neurobiological mechanisms of IA, focusing on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and nuclear imaging modalities including positron emission tomography (PET and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT. MRI studies demonstrate that structural changes in frontal cortex are associated with functional abnormalities in Internet addicted subjects. Nuclear imaging findings indicate that IA is associated with dysfunction of the brain dopaminergic systems. Abnormal dopamine regulation of the prefrontal cortex (PFC could underlie the enhanced motivational value and uncontrolled behavior over Internet overuse in addicted subjects. Further investigations are needed to determine specific changes in the Internet addictive brain, as well as their implications for behavior and cognition.

  5. MR imaging of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate diagnosis and staging of prostate cancer (PC) is developing into an important health care issue in light of the high incidence of PC and the improvements in stage-adapted therapy. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview on the current role of MR imaging and MR spectroscopy in the diagnosis and staging of PC.Material and methods Pertinent literature was searched and evaluated to collect information on current clinical indications, study techniques, diagnostic value, and limitations of magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. Major indications for MR imaging of patients with supected PC are to define tumor location before biopsy when clinical or TRUS findings are inconclusive, and to provide accurate staging of histologically proven PC to ascertain effective therapy. Current MR imaging techniques for the evaluation of PC include multiplanar high-resolution T2-weighted FSE and T1-weighted SE sequences using combined endorectal and phased-array coils. Using these techniques, the reported accuracy of MR imaging for the diagnosis of extracapsular tumor extension ranges between 82 and 88% with sensitivities between 80 and 95%, and specificities between 82 and 93%. Typical MR findings of PC in different stages of disease, as well as diagnostic problems, such as chronic prostatitis, biopsy-related hemorrhage and therapy-related changes of prostatic tissue are discussed. In addition, the current perspectives and limitations of MR spectroscopy in PC are summarized. Current MR imaging techniques provide important diagnostic information in the pretherapeutic workup of PC including a high staging accuracy, and is superior to TRUS. (orig.)

  6. Molecular diagnosis of prostate cancer: Topical issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Knyazev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is the second most common cancer and the fifth highest malignancy mortality rate in men worldwide. Although PC is detectable in 15-20% of men during life, its death risk is only about 3%. This means that not all PC cases require the same management tactics. The given review analyzes the current investigations searching for molecular biological markers to predict the course of PC and to choose its treatment policy, including that in the development of resistance to androgen-deprivation therapy.

  7. Molecular diagnosis of prostate cancer: Topical issues

    OpenAIRE

    E. N. Knyazev; K. A. Fomicheva; K. M. Nyushko; Kaprin, A. D.; B. Ya. Alekseev; M. Yu. Shkurnikov

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the second most common cancer and the fifth highest malignancy mortality rate in men worldwide. Although PC is detectable in 15-20% of men during life, its death risk is only about 3%. This means that not all PC cases require the same management tactics. The given review analyzes the current investigations searching for molecular biological markers to predict the course of PC and to choose its treatment policy, including that in the development of resistance to androge...

  8. Molecular diagnosis of prostate cancer: Topical issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Knyazev

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is the second most common cancer and the fifth highest malignancy mortality rate in men worldwide. Although PC is detectable in 15-20% of men during life, its death risk is only about 3%. This means that not all PC cases require the same management tactics. The given review analyzes the current investigations searching for molecular biological markers to predict the course of PC and to choose its treatment policy, including that in the development of resistance to androgen-deprivation therapy.

  9. In vivo molecular imaging of colorectal cancer using quantum dots targeted to vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and optical coherence tomography/laser-induced fluorescence dual-modality imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbary-Ganz, Jordan L.; Welge, Weston A.; Barton, Jennifer K.; Utzinger, Urs

    2015-09-01

    Optical coherence tomography/laser induced fluorescence (OCT/LIF) dual-modality imaging allows for minimally invasive, nondestructive endoscopic visualization of colorectal cancer in mice. This technology enables simultaneous longitudinal tracking of morphological (OCT) and biochemical (fluorescence) changes as colorectal cancer develops, compared to current methods of colorectal cancer screening in humans that rely on morphological changes alone. We have shown that QDot655 targeted to vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (QD655-VEGFR2) can be applied to the colon of carcinogen-treated mice and provides significantly increased contrast between the diseased and undiseased tissue with high sensitivity and specificity ex vivo. QD655-VEGFR2 was used in a longitudinal in vivo study to investigate the ability to correlate fluorescence signal to tumor development. QD655-VEGFR2 was applied to the colon of azoxymethane (AOM-) or saline-treated control mice in vivo via lavage. OCT/LIF images of the distal colon were taken at five consecutive time points every three weeks after the final AOM injection. Difficulties in fully flushing unbound contrast agent from the colon led to variable background signal; however, a spatial correlation was found between tumors identified in OCT images, and high fluorescence intensity of the QD655 signal, demonstrating the ability to detect VEGFR2 expressing tumors in vivo.

  10. Advance of molecular imaging with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) is an important field of molecular imaging. This article summarizes the fundamental of PET molecular imaging technique and its application in protein function, gene expression and gene therapy, receptor imaging, and blood-flow infusion and metabolism imaging. (authors)

  11. Molecular imaging of atherosclerosis in translational medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrone-Filardi, Pasquale; Costanzo, Pierluigi; Marciano, Caterina; Vassallo, Enrico; Marsico, Fabio; Ruggiero, Donatella; Petretta, Maria Piera; Chiariello, Massimo [University Federico II, Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular and Immunological Sciences, Naples (Italy); Dellegrottaglie, Santo [University Federico II, Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular and Immunological Sciences, Naples (Italy); Mount Sinai Medical Center, Z. and M.A. Wiener Cardiovascular Institute and M.-J. and H.R. Kravis Center for Cardiovascular Health, New York, NY (United States); Rudd, James H.F. [University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Cuocolo, Alberto [University Federico II, Department of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences, Naples (Italy); SDN Foundation, Institute of Diagnostic and Nuclear Development, Naples (Italy)

    2011-05-15

    Functional characterization of atherosclerosis is a promising application of molecular imaging. Radionuclide-based techniques for molecular imaging in the large arteries (e.g. aorta and carotids), along with ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), have been studied both experimentally and in clinical studies. Technical factors including cardiac and respiratory motion, low spatial resolution and partial volume effects mean that noninvasive molecular imaging of atherosclerosis in the coronary arteries is not ready for prime time. Positron emission tomography imaging with fluorodeoxyglucose can measure vascular inflammation in the large arteries with high reproducibility, and signal change in response to anti-inflammatory therapy has been described. MRI has proven of value for quantifying carotid artery inflammation when iron oxide nanoparticles are used as a contrast agent. Macrophage accumulation of the iron particles allows regression of inflammation to be measured with drug therapy. Similarly, contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging is also being evaluated for functional characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. For all of these techniques, however, large-scale clinical trials are mandatory to define the prognostic importance of the imaging signals in terms of risk of future vascular events. (orig.)

  12. Correlating and Combining Genomic and Proteomic Assessment with In Vivo Molecular Functional Imaging: Will This Be the Future Roadmap for Personalized Cancer Management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Bhakti; Basu, Sandip

    2016-04-01

    Recently, there has been an increasing interest in personalized approach in cancer management. Two developments could be regarded important for realization of this concept: (1) new biomarkers and (2) in vivo molecular tracers for both positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography. Both approaches are successful in exploring tumor biology individually and can serve as tools to better stratify tumors for potential personalized medicine. The fundamental concept comes from the observation that one treatment does not work for all patients, even those with similar histopathology, essentially because of varying tumor genotype and phenotypic behavior pattern in each individual. Clinically validated biomarkers and tracers allow physicians to determine which patient may benefit from a particular therapy. Despite progress in the past decade, the concept is still in the early stages of clinical translation. In this review, the authors hypothesize the feasibility of integration of these two powerful techniques, which could lead to a faster translation and provide a more reliable basis toward the personalized approach in oncology. The authors believe that clinically validated biomarkers and tracers would allow physicians to determine which patients may benefit from personalized therapy. The logistics and implications of this combined approach for the day-to-day clinical oncology practice are discussed with special emphasis on neuroendocrine tumors, which demonstrates widely variable tumor biology. A logical way is also illustrated to explain how biomarkers and in vivo tracers could be complemented in a clinical workflow. PMID:27093341

  13. The developme nt of epidermal growth factor receptor molecular imaging in cancer%表皮生长因子受体-酪氨酸激酶肿瘤分子显像剂的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周晓靓; 王浩; 施培基; 刘鉴峰; 孟爱民

    2013-01-01

    In vivo epidermal growth factor receptor(EGFR)targeted therapy has great potential for cancer diagnosis and the evaluation of curative effects.Enhancement of EGFR-targeted therapy needs a reliable quantitative molecular imaging method which eould enable monitoring of receptor drug binding and receptor occupancy in vivo,and identification of the mutation in EGFR.PET or SPECT is the most advanced molecular imaging technology of non-invasively selecting responders,predicting therapeutic outeome and monitoring EGFR-targeted treatment.This review analyzed the present situation and research progress of molecular imaging agents.%目前治疗肿瘤最重要的分子靶向药物是以表皮生长因子受体(EGFR)为靶点的一类化合物,为了更好地实现靶向治疗效果,需要借助分子显像技术实现快速、定量地检测体内EGFR的分布及突变等情况.利用不同核素标记的分子探针实施PET或SPECT显像能够实现快速、无创地对患者进行遴选、疗效评价和监测EGFR靶向治疗,从而提高肿瘤治疗效果 该文介绍了 EGFR-酪氨酸激酶小分子显像剂及其最新的研究进展.

  14. Molecular Imaging with Small Animal PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, T.; El-Ali, H.H.; Skovgaard, D.;

    2011-01-01

    Small animal positron emission tomography (PET) and computer tomography (CT) is an emerging field in pre-clinical imaging. High quality, state-of-the-art instruments are required for full optimization of the translational value of the small animal studies with PET and CT. However, with this achie...... small animal PET/CT for studies of muscle and tendon in exercise models. © 2011 Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.......Small animal positron emission tomography (PET) and computer tomography (CT) is an emerging field in pre-clinical imaging. High quality, state-of-the-art instruments are required for full optimization of the translational value of the small animal studies with PET and CT. However, with this...... this field of small animal molecular imaging with special emphasis on the targets for tissue characterization in tumor biology such as hypoxia, proliferation and cancer specific over-expression of receptors. The added value of applying CT imaging for anatomical localization and tumor volume...

  15. Molecular nuclear imaging for targeting and trafficking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noninvasive molecular targeting in living subjects is highly demanded for better understanding of such diverse topics as the efficient delivery of drugs, genes, or radionuclides for the diagnosis or treatment of diseases. Progress in molecular biology, genetic engineering and polymer chemistry provides various tools to target molecules and cells in vivo. We used chitosan as a polymer, and 99mTc as a radionuclide. We developed 99mTc-galactosylated chitosan to target asialoglycoprotein receptors for nuclear imaging. We also developed 99mTc-HYNIC-chitosan-transferrin to target inflammatory cells, which was more effective than 67Ga-citrate for imaging inflammatory lesions. For an effective delivery of molecules, a longer circulation time is needed. We found that around 10% PEGylation was most effective to prolong the circulation time of liposomes for nuclear imaging of 99mTc-HMPAO-labeled liposomes in rats. Using various characteristics of molecules, we can deliver drugs into targets more effectively. We found that 99mTc-labeled biodegradable pullulan-derivatives are retained in tumor tissue in response to extracellular ion-strength. For the trafficking of various cells or bacteria in an intact animal, we used optical imaging techniques or radiolabeled cells. We monitored tumor-targeting bacteria by bioluminescent imaging techniques, dentritic cells by radiolabeling and neuronal stem cells by sodium-iodide symporter reporter gene imaging. In summary, we introduced recent achievements of molecular nuclear imaging technologies in targeting receptors for hepatocyte or inflammatory cells and in trafficking bacterial, immune and stem cells using molecular nuclear imaging techniques

  16. Imaging cellular and molecular biological functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shorte, S.L. [Institut Pasteur, 75 - Paris (France). Plateforme d' Imagerie Dynamique PFID-Imagopole; Frischknecht, F. (eds.) [Heidelberg Univ. Medical School (Germany). Dept. of Parasitology

    2007-07-01

    'Imaging cellular and molecular biological function' provides a unique selection of essays by leading experts, aiming at scientist and student alike who are interested in all aspects of modern imaging, from its application and up-scaling to its development. Indeed the philosophy of this volume is to provide student, researcher, PI, professional or provost the means to enter this applications field with confidence, and to construct the means to answer their own specific questions. (orig.)

  17. Quantitative cardiovascular magnetic resonance for molecular imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Lanza Gregory M; Caruthers Shelton D; Winter Patrick M; Wickline Samuel A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) molecular imaging aims to identify and map the expression of important biomarkers on a cellular scale utilizing contrast agents that are specifically targeted to the biochemical signatures of disease and are capable of generating sufficient image contrast. In some cases, the contrast agents may be designed to carry a drug payload or to be sensitive to important physiological factors, such as pH, temperature or oxygenation. In this review, examp...

  18. Molecular mechanisms of metastasis in prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Noel W.Clarke; Claire A.Hart; Mick D.Brown

    2009-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) preferentially metastasizes to the bone marrow stroma of the axial skeleton.This activity is the principal cause of PCa morbidity and mortality.The exact mechanism of PCa metastasis is currently unknown,although considerable progress has been made in determining the key players in this process.In this review,we present the current understanding of the molecular processes driving PCa metastasis to the bone.

  19. In Vivo Imaging of Molecularly Targeted Phage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A. Kelly

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapid identification of in vivo affinity ligands would have far-reaching applications for imaging specific molecular targets, in vivo systems imaging, and medical use. We have developed a high-throughput method for identifying and optimizing ligands to map and image biologic targets of interest in vivo. We directly labeled viable phage clones with far-red fluorochromes and comparatively imaged them in vivo by multichannel fluorescence ratio imaging. Using Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine (osteonectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 as model targets, we show that: 1 fluorescently labeled phage retains target specificity on labeling; 2 in vivo distribution can be quantitated (detection thresholds of ~ 300 phage/mm3 tissue throughout the entire depth of the tumor using fluorescent tomographic imaging; and 3 fluorescently labeled phage itself can serve as a replenishable molecular imaging agent. The described method should find widespread application in the rapid in vivo discovery and validation of affinity ligands and, importantly, in the use of fluorochrome-labeled phage clones as in vivo imaging agents.

  20. Pretargeted Molecular Imaging and Radioimmunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Goldenberg, Chien-Hsing Chang, Edmund A. Rossi, William J, McBride, Robert M. Sharkey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pretargeting is a multi-step process that first has an unlabeled bispecific antibody (bsMAb localize within a tumor by virtue of its anti-tumor binding site(s before administering a small, fast-clearing radiolabeled compound that then attaches to the other portion of the bsMAb. The compound's rapid clearance significantly reduces radiation exposure outside of the tumor and its small size permits speedy delivery to the tumor, creating excellent tumor/nontumor ratios in less than 1 hour. Haptens that bind to an anti-hapten antibody, biotin that binds to streptavidin, or an oligonucleotide binding to a complementary oligonucleotide sequence have all been radiolabeled for use by pretargeting. This review will focus on a highly flexible anti-hapten bsMAb platform that has been used to target a variety of radionuclides to image (SPECT and PET as well as treat tumors.

  1. CPFP Summer Curriculum: Molecular Prevention Course | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program (CPFP) one-week course on molecular aspects of cancer prevention follows the Principles and Practice of Cancer Prevention and Control course. It provides a strong background about molecular biology and genetics of cancer, and an overview of cutting-edge research and techniques in the fields of molecular epidemiology, biomarkers, multi-omic, and translational research. The following topics will be typically presented: |

  2. Molecular Markers with Predictive and Prognostic Relevance in Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Alphy Rose-James; TT, Sreelekha

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer accounts for the majority of cancer-related deaths worldwide of which non-small-cell lung carcinoma alone takes a toll of around 85%. Platinum-based therapy is the stronghold for lung cancer at present. The discovery of various molecular alterations that underlie lung cancer has contributed to the development of specifically targeted therapies employing specific mutation inhibitors. Targeted chemotherapy based on molecular profiling has shown great promise in lung cancer treatment...

  3. Molecular basis of the triple negative breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ayse Feyda Nursal

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women and more than 1 million breast cancer cases are diagnosed each year all over the world. Breast cancer is a complex and heterogeneous disease in terms of its molecular structure, mutation type, metastase properties, clinical course and therapeutic response. Breast cancer is divided into subtypes based on expression properties of molecular markers as estrogen receptor, progestron receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Triple-...

  4. The preliminary study of molecular imaging of colorectal cancer cells with superparamagnetic iron oxide-based MR targeting probe containing vascular endothelial growth factor in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To develop a superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-based MR probe containing vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGF) to investigate their biological and chemical properties and targeting effect of colorectal cancer cells in vitro. Methods: The anti-VEGF-SPIO probe was fabricated with VEGF antibody and SPIO through chemical method. Its biological and chemical properties and reflexivity were tested with SDS-PAGE and MRL The SW620 cells incubated with anti-VEGF-SPIO probe for 30, 60 and 90 minutes respectively and compared with marrow mesenchymal stem cell at 37 degree C. The comparison among groups was conducted by using analysis of variance and LSD-t test. The MRI results were confirmed by the Prussian blue staining. The comparison among groups was performed by analysis of variance and factorial experiment. Results: SPIO-based MR probe containing VEGF was successfully contributed and isolated. The reflexivity of anti-VEGF-SPIO probe was 0.0426 x 106 mol/s. The immunofluorescence and prussia blue stain proved high expression of VEGF in SW620 cells. Anti-VEGF-SPIO probe and SW620 cellscombined at 37 degree C in vitro MRI proved the SW620 cells incubated with anti-VEGF-SPIO probe appeared hypointense on T2WI and T2* WI. MR signal were 392 ± 7, 91 ± 8, 264 ± 10 for 30, 60 and 90 minutes respectively, which were statistically different from that before incubation 679 ± 12 (F=4735.489, P0.05). Conclusion: Nanoscale iron particles containing the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor molecular probe can evaluate tumor angiogenesis at the receptor level, which provides a new way of the tumor angiogenesis diagnosis and anti-angiogenesis therapy. (authors)

  5. Urinary bladder cancer: role of MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sadhna; Rajesh, Arumugam; Prasad, Srinivasa R; Gaitonde, Krishnanath; Lall, Chandana G; Mouraviev, Vladimir; Aeron, Gunjan; Bracken, Robert B; Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan

    2012-01-01

    Urinary bladder cancer is a heterogeneous disease with a variety of pathologic features, cytogenetic characteristics, and natural histories. It is the fourth most common cancer in males and the tenth most common cancer in females. Urinary bladder cancer has a high recurrence rate, necessitating long-term surveillance after initial therapy. Early detection is important, since up to 47% of bladder cancer-related deaths may have been avoided. Conventional computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are only moderately accurate in the diagnosis and local staging of bladder cancer, with cystoscopy and pathologic staging remaining the standards of reference. However, the role of newer MR imaging sequences (eg, diffusion-weighted imaging) in the diagnosis and local staging of bladder cancer is still evolving. Substantial advances in MR imaging technology have made multiparametric MR imaging a feasible and reasonably accurate technique for the local staging of bladder cancer to optimize treatment. In addition, whole-body CT is the primary imaging technique for the detection of metastases in bladder cancer patients, especially those with disease that invades muscle. PMID:22411938

  6. Lung cancer screening: from imaging to biomarker

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang, Dong; Zhang, Bicheng; Doll, Donald; Shen, Kui; Kloecker, Goetz; Freter, Carl

    2013-01-01

    Despite several decades of intensive effort to improve the imaging techniques for lung cancer diagnosis and treatment, primary lung cancer is still the number one cause of cancer death in the United States and worldwide. The major causes of this high mortality rate are distant metastasis evident at diagnosis and ineffective treatment for locally advanced disease. Indeed, approximately forty percent of newly diagnosed lung cancer patients have distant metastasis. Currently, the only potential ...

  7. Images of gastric cancer stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work has the objective to review the importance of the images in the preoperating stage of the gastric cancer. It has been emphasized in the modalities of transabdominal ultrasound as much as endoscopic and TAC since they are most valuable in the stage. Certainly the importance of conventional radiology (gastroduodenal series) is also valuable in the stage of the tumor, specially in considering the depth of the same one. In order to make this overhaul, the recent bibliography was consulted but, specially the published one by Japaneses since they follow a classification and methodology different from the used one in most of the countries that belong to the World-wide Organization of the Health. They made an overhaul of approximately 200 cases of patients who have been diagnosed and treated in the Center of Detection of Gastric Cancer of Cartago. In each case review the file, radiological, sonographic and pathological studies, and the cases were chosen that better illustrated the exposed subjects. (Author)

  8. Molecularly targeted drugs for metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng YD

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ying-dong Cheng, Hua Yang, Guo-qing Chen, Zhi-cao Zhang Department of General Surgery, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, People's Republic of China Abstract: The survival rate of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC has significantly improved with applications of molecularly targeted drugs, such as bevacizumab, and led to a substantial improvement in the overall survival rate. These drugs are capable of specifically targeting the inherent abnormal pathways in cancer cells, which are potentially less toxic than traditional nonselective chemotherapeutics. In this review, the recent clinical information about molecularly targeted therapy for mCRC is summarized, with specific focus on several of the US Food and Drug Administration-approved molecularly targeted drugs for the treatment of mCRC in the clinic. Progression-free and overall survival in patients with mCRC was improved greatly by the addition of bevacizumab and/or cetuximab to standard chemotherapy, in either first- or second-line treatment. Aflibercept has been used in combination with folinic acid (leucovorin–fluorouracil–irinotecan (FOLFIRI chemotherapy in mCRC patients and among patients with mCRC with wild-type KRAS, the outcomes were significantly improved by panitumumab in combination with folinic acid (leucovorin–fluorouracil–oxaliplatin (FOLFOX or FOLFIRI. Because of the new preliminary studies, it has been recommended that regorafenib be used with FOLFOX or FOLFIRI as first- or second-line treatment of mCRC chemotherapy. In summary, an era of new opportunities has been opened for treatment of mCRC and/or other malignancies, resulting from the discovery of new selective targeting drugs. Keywords: metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC, antiangiogenic drug, bevacizumab, aflibercept, regorafenib, cetuximab, panitumumab, clinical trial, molecularly targeted therapy

  9. Molecular structure by Coulomb explosion imaging of stored molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental scheme, which combines Coulomb explosion imaging (CEI) with storage of fast molecular ions, has been introduced recently at the TSR heavy ion storage ring facility in Heidelberg. CEI is an experimental technique that provides direct observation of the nuclear conformations within small molecules. The combination of CEI with the storage ring technique enables the control of the internal excitation of the measured molecules, which is an essential condition to the interpretation of CEI results in terms of ''structure'' assigned to specific molecular states. This structure is measured as a function of storage time, thus enabling one to study processes of slow intramolecular dynamics such as isomerization, metastable states, etc. Moreover in this scheme, CEI can be used as a diagnostic tool for the intramolecular excitation, while other molecular interactions (e.g. with electrons or photons) are investigated. In this report, the CEI principle and the new experimental setup are described with an emphasis on the new prospects for studies in molecular physics. CEI measurements of stored CH2+ and NH2+ molecular ions are presented. The study of the angular distribution in these molecules as a function of their vibrational relaxation to the ground state, reveals unexpected behavior near the linear conformation which is inconsistent with the current adiabatic theories

  10. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep S Hedgire

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In India, prostate cancer has an incidence rate of 3.9 per 100,000 men and is responsible for 9% of cancer-related mortality. It is the only malignancy that is diagnosed with an apparently blind technique, i.e., transrectal sextant biopsy. With increasing numbers of high-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI equipment being installed in India, the radiologist needs to be cognizant about endorectal MRI and multiparametric imaging for prostate cancer. In this review article, we aim to highlight the utility of multiparamteric MRI in prostate cancer. It plays a crucial role, mainly in initial staging, restaging, and post-treatment follow-up.

  11. Nanotargeted Radionuclides for Cancer Nuclear Imaging and Internal Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gann Ting

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Current progress in nanomedicine has exploited the possibility of designing tumor-targeted nanocarriers being able to deliver radionuclide payloads in a site or molecular selective manner to improve the efficacy and safety of cancer imaging and therapy. Radionuclides of auger electron-, α-, β-, and γ-radiation emitters have been surface-bioconjugated or after-loaded in nanoparticles to improve the efficacy and reduce the toxicity of cancer imaging and therapy in preclinical and clinical studies. This article provides a brief overview of current status of applications, advantages, problems, up-to-date research and development, and future prospects of nanotargeted radionuclides in cancer nuclear imaging and radiotherapy. Passive and active nanotargeting delivery of radionuclides with illustrating examples for tumor imaging and therapy are reviewed and summarized. Research on combing different modes of selective delivery of radionuclides through nanocarriers targeted delivery for tumor imaging and therapy offers the new possibility of large increases in cancer diagnostic efficacy and therapeutic index. However, further efforts and challenges in preclinical and clinical efficacy and toxicity studies are required to translate those advanced technologies to the clinical applications for cancer patients.

  12. Advance of Molecular Imaging Technology and Targeted Imaging Agent in Imaging and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Yi Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging is an emerging field that integrates advanced imaging technology with cellular and molecular biology. It can realize noninvasive and real time visualization, measurement of physiological or pathological process in the living organism at the cellular and molecular level, providing an effective method of information acquiring for diagnosis, therapy, and drug development and evaluating treatment of efficacy. Molecular imaging requires high resolution and high sensitive instruments and specific imaging agents that link the imaging signal with molecular event. Recently, the application of new emerging chemical technology and nanotechnology has stimulated the development of imaging agents. Nanoparticles modified with small molecule, peptide, antibody, and aptamer have been extensively applied for preclinical studies. Therapeutic drug or gene is incorporated into nanoparticles to construct multifunctional imaging agents which allow for theranostic applications. In this review, we will discuss the characteristics of molecular imaging, the novel imaging agent including targeted imaging agent and multifunctional imaging agent, as well as cite some examples of their application in molecular imaging and therapy.

  13. Three Dimensional Molecular Imaging for Lignocellulosic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohn, Paul W.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-06-09

    The development of high efficiency, inexpensive processing protocols to render biomass components into fermentable substrates for the sequential processing of cell wall components into fuels and important feedstocks for the biorefinery of the future is a key goal of the national roadmap for renewable energy. Furthermore, the development of such protocols depends critically on detailed knowledge of the spatial and temporal infiltration of reagents designed to remove and separate the phenylpropenoid heteropolymer (lignin) from the processable sugar components sequestered in the rigid cell walls of plants. A detailed chemical and structural understanding of this pre-enzymatic processing in space and time was the focus of this program. We worked to develop new imaging strategies that produce real-time molecular speciation information in situ; extract sub-surface information about the effects of processing; and follow the spatial and temporal characteristics of the molecular species in the matrix and correlate this complex profile with saccharification. Spatially correlated SIMS and Raman imaging were used to provide high quality, high resolution subcellular images of Miscanthus cross sections. Furthermore, the combination of information from the mass spectrometry and Raman scattering allows specific chemical assignments of observed structures, difficult to assign from either imaging approach alone and lays the foundation for subsequent heterocorrelated imaging experiments targeted at more challenging biological systems, such as the interacting plant-microbe systems relevant to the rhizosphere.

  14. Oral cancer: molecular technologies for risk assessment and diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan Tao Chen

    2008-01-01

    @@ Purpose: The effective biomarkers related to diagnosis, metastasis, drug resistance and irradiation sensitivity of oral cancers will help the pathologist and oncologist to determine the molecular taxonomy diagnosis and design the individualization treatment for the patients with oral cancers.

  15. Lung Cancer Detection Using Image Processing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhled S. AL-TARAWNEH

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, image processing techniques are widely used in several medical areas for image improvement in earlier detection and treatment stages, where the time factor is very important to discover the abnormality issues in target images, especially in various cancer tumours such as lung cancer, breast cancer, etc. Image quality and accuracy is the core factors of this research, image quality assessment as well as improvement are depending on the enhancement stage where low pre-processing techniques is used based on Gabor filter within Gaussian rules. Following the segmentation principles, an enhanced region of the object of interest that is used as a basic foundation of feature extraction is obtained. Relying on general features, a normality comparison is made. In this research, the main detected features for accurate images comparison are pixels percentage and mask-labelling.

  16. Molecular imaging using sodium iodide symporter (NIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Je Yoel [School of Dentistry, Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    Radioiodide uptake in thyroid follicular epithelial cells, mediated by a plasma membrane transporter, sodium iodide symporter (NIS), provides a first step mechanism for thyroid cancer detection by radioiodide injection and effective radioiodide treatment for patients with invasive, recurrent, and/or metastatic thyroid cancers after total thyroidectomy. NIS gene transfer to tumor cells may significantly and specifically enhance internal radioactive accumulation of tumors following radioiodide administration, and result in better tumor control. NIS gene transfers have been successfully performed in a variety of tumor animal models by either plasmid-mediated transfection or virus (adenovirus or retrovirus)-mediated gene delivery. These animal models include nude mice xenografted with human melanoma, glioma, breast cancer of prostate cancer, rats with subcutaneous thyroid tumor implantation, as well as the rat intracranial glioma model. In these animal models, non-invasive imaging of in vivo tumors by gamma camera scintigraphy after radioiodide or technetium injection has been performed successfully, suggesting that the NIS can serve as an imaging reporter gene for gene therapy trials. In addition, the tumor killing effects of I-131, ReO4-188 and At-211 after NIS gene transfer have been demonstrated in in vitro clonogenic assays and in vivo radioiodide therapy studies, suggesting that NIS gene can also serve as a therapeutic requires a more efficient and specific system of gene delivery with better retention of radioiodide in tumor. Results thus far are, however, promising, and suggest that NIS gene transfer followed by radioiodide treatment will allow non-invasive in vivo imaging to assess the outcome of gene therapy and provide a therapeutic strategy for a variety of human diseases.

  17. Molecular imaging using sodium iodide symporter (NIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioiodide uptake in thyroid follicular epithelial cells, mediated by a plasma membrane transporter, sodium iodide symporter (NIS), provides a first step mechanism for thyroid cancer detection by radioiodide injection and effective radioiodide treatment for patients with invasive, recurrent, and/or metastatic thyroid cancers after total thyroidectomy. NIS gene transfer to tumor cells may significantly and specifically enhance internal radioactive accumulation of tumors following radioiodide administration, and result in better tumor control. NIS gene transfers have been successfully performed in a variety of tumor animal models by either plasmid-mediated transfection or virus (adenovirus or retrovirus)-mediated gene delivery. These animal models include nude mice xenografted with human melanoma, glioma, breast cancer of prostate cancer, rats with subcutaneous thyroid tumor implantation, as well as the rat intracranial glioma model. In these animal models, non-invasive imaging of in vivo tumors by gamma camera scintigraphy after radioiodide or technetium injection has been performed successfully, suggesting that the NIS can serve as an imaging reporter gene for gene therapy trials. In addition, the tumor killing effects of I-131, ReO4-188 and At-211 after NIS gene transfer have been demonstrated in in vitro clonogenic assays and in vivo radioiodide therapy studies, suggesting that NIS gene can also serve as a therapeutic requires a more efficient and specific system of gene delivery with better retention of radioiodide in tumor. Results thus far are, however, promising, and suggest that NIS gene transfer followed by radioiodide treatment will allow non-invasive in vivo imaging to assess the outcome of gene therapy and provide a therapeutic strategy for a variety of human diseases

  18. Molecular markers′ progress of breast cancer treatment efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Dan Wang; Jingwei Xu; Guang Shi; Guanghao Yin

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a famous malignant tumor which is caused by varieties of mutation in multiple genes. In order to detect breast cancer in an earlier time and take appropriate treatment which includes  predicting treatment efficacy, we need a more accurate method of discovering the occurrence of breast cancer. With the development of molecular biology and biological detection technologies continue to emerge, molecular markers of breast cancer have gaining more and more widespread attention, an...

  19. Hybrid gold nanoparticles in molecular imaging and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metallic nanoparticles, because of their size, chemical and physical properties, are particularly attractive as therapeutic probes in treating cancer. Central to any clinical advances in nanoparticulate based therapy will be to produce hybrid nanoparticles that can be targeted to vascular, extracellular or cell surface receptors. Development of hybrid nanoparticles that specifically target cancer vasculature has received considerable attention. Most cancers have leaky vasculature and the defective vascular architecture, created due to the rapid vascularization necessary to serve fast growing cancers, in combination with poor lymphatic drainage allows increased permeation and retention effects. The leaky vasculature, because of higher porosity and permeability, serve as natural high affinity targets to metallic nanoparticles. Another attractive approach toward the application of nanotechnology to nanomedicine is the utility of nanoparticles that display inherent therapeutic properties. For example radioactive gold nanoparticles present attractive prospects in therapy of cancer. The radioactive properties of Au-198 (βmax = 0.96 MeV; t1/2 = 2.7 d) and Au-199 (βmax = 0.46 MeV; t1/2 = 3.14 d) make them ideal candidates for use in radiotherapeutic applications. In addition, they both have imageable gamma emissions for dosimetry and pharmacokinetic studies and Au-199 can be made carrier-free by indirect methods. Gold nanoparticles are of interest for treatment of disease as they can deliver agents directly into cells and cellular components with a higher concentration of radioactivity, e.g. higher dose of radioactivity, to cancerous tumour cells. This presentation will provide latest results on (i) the production of biocompatible hybrid gold nanoparticles; (ii) production, characterization and biodistribution of Au-198 nanoparticles and (iii) details on the utility of gold nanoparticles in molecular imaging using X ray contrast (CT) techniques. (author)

  20. Molecular imaging for the diagnosis of dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many radiotracers have been developed to visualize pathological protein accumulation and neurotransmitter deficits in the brains of patients with dementia using positron emission tomography (PET). Recent advances in the development of β-sheet binding agents enabled in vivo detection of senile plaques in Alzheimer's disease. Molecular imaging using these agents would contribute to the early and accurate diagnosis of dementia and monitoring therapeutic effect of anti-dementia drugs. (author)

  1. Quantitative Analysis in Multimodality Molecular Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET offers the possibility of truly quantitative (physiological) measurements of tracer concentration in vivo. However, there are several issues limiting both visual qualitative interpretation and quantitative analysis capabilities of reconstructed PET images that must be considered in order to fully realize this potential. The major challenges to quantitative PET can be categorized in 5 classes: (i) factors related to imaging system performance and data acquisition protocols (instrumentation and measurement factors), (ii) those related to the physics of photon interaction with biologic tissues (physical factors), (iii) image reconstruction (reconstruction factors), (iv) factors related to patient motion and other physiological issues (physiological factors), and (v) Methodological factors: issues related to difficulties in developing accurate tracer kinetic models, especially at the voxel level. This paper reflects the tremendous increase in interest in quantitative molecular imaging using PET as both clinical and research imaging modality in the past decade. It offers an overview of the entire range of quantitative PET imaging from basic principles to various steps required for obtaining quantitatively accurate data from dedicated standalone PET and combined PET/CT and PET/MR systems including data collection methods and algorithms used to correct for physical degrading factors as well as image processing and analysis techniques and their clinical and research applications. Impact of physical degrading factors including attenuation of photons and contribution from photons scattered in the patient and partial volume effect on the diagnostic quality and quantitative accuracy of PET data will be discussed. Considerable advances have been made and much worthwhile research focused on the development of quantitative imaging protocols incorporating accurate data correction techniques and sophisticated image reconstruction algorithms. The fundamental concepts of

  2. Single Institution Feasibility Trials - Cancer Imaging Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Within the CIP program, the current R21 mechanism provides potential funding for small, single institution feasibility trials. The current announcement is titled In Vivo Cancer Imaging Exploratory/Developmental Grants.

  3. Molecular profiling of childhood cancer: Biomarkers and novel therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Saletta

    2014-06-01

    General significance: The increasing recognition of the heterogeneity of molecular causes of cancer favors the continued development of molecularly targeted agents, and their transfer to pediatric and adolescent populations.

  4. Non-conventional imaging of lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bellomi, M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract This presentation discusses the optimum magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence for lung cancer assessment in a clinical setting, and the sensitivity and specificity of MRI (alone and in combination with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)-MR) compared with those of computed tomography (CT) and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET) for lung cancer staging. The role of perfusion studies (by CT or MRI), of DWI-MRI, blood oxygenation level dependent sequences and PET in d...

  5. Imaging strategy in differentiated thyroid cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phan, Thi Thanh Ha

    2007-01-01

    This thesis focuses on clinical dilemmas, which the clinician faces in the management of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) with a specific emphasis on the role of current and new diagnostic imaging. Thyroid cancer is a rare disease, but it is the most common endocrine malignancy of a

  6. Diagnostic Imaging of Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kemal Kara; Ersin Ozturk

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer related death in men and women. It is frequently seen among men than in women and male-female ratio is 1.5:1. Common epidemiological factors that increase risk of lung cancer is smoking. Early age to start smoking, high number of smoking cigarettes per a day and depth of inhalation increase risk of lung cancer. 25% of patients with lung cancer are nonsmokers that passively exposed to cigarette smoke. Occupational exposure to substances such as as...

  7. Molecular Breast Imaging Using Emission Tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopan, O. [University of Florida; Gilland, D. [University of Florida; Weisenberger, Andrew G. [JLAB; Kross, Brian J. [JLAB; Welch, Benjamin L. [Dilon Technologies

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Tour objective is to design a novel SPECT system for molecular breast imaging (MBI) and evaluate its performance. The limited angle SPECT system, or emission tomosynthesis, is designed to achieve 3D images of the breast with high spatial resolution/sensitivity. The system uses a simplified detector motion and is conducive to on-board biopsy and mult-modal imaging with mammography. Methods: The novel feature of the proposed gamma camera is a variable-angle, slant-hole (VASH) collimator, which is well suited for limited angle SPECT of a mildly compressed breast. The collimator holes change slant angle while the camera surface remains flush against the compression paddle. This allows the camera to vary the angular view ({+-}30{degrees}, {+-}45{degrees}) for tomographic imaging while keeping the camera close to the object for high spatial resolution and/or sensitivity. Theoretical analysis and Monte Carlo simulations were performed assuming a point source and isolated breast phantom. Spatial resolution, sensitivity, contrast and SNR were measured. Results were compared to single-view, planar images and conventional SPECT. For both conventional SPECT and VASH, data were reconstructed using iterative algorithms. Finally, a proof-of-concept VASH collimator was constructed for experimental evaluation. Results: Measured spatial resolution/sensitivity with VASH showed good agreement with theory including depth-of-interaction (DOI) effects. The DOI effect diminished the depth resolution by approximately 2 mm. Increasing the slant angle range from {+-}30{degrees} to {+-}45{degrees} resulted in an approximately 1 mm improvement in the depth resolution. In the breast phantom images, VASH showed improved contrast and SNR over conventional SPECT and improved contrast over planar scintimmammography. Reconstructed images from the proof-of-concept VASH collimator demonstrated reasonable depth resolution capabilities using limited angle projection data. Conclusion: We

  8. Diagnostic Imaging of Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Kara

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer related death in men and women. It is frequently seen among men than in women and male-female ratio is 1.5:1. Common epidemiological factors that increase risk of lung cancer is smoking. Early age to start smoking, high number of smoking cigarettes per a day and depth of inhalation increase risk of lung cancer. 25% of patients with lung cancer are nonsmokers that passively exposed to cigarette smoke. Occupational exposure to substances such as asbestos, arsenic, nickel, beryllium, mustard gas increases the risk of lung cancer. The well defined risk factor is exposure to asbestos. In addition advanced age, diffuse pulmonary fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and genetic predisposition are the risk factors that increases lung cancer. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(6.000: 749-756

  9. A Review of Tumor Specific Imaging Methods: A Glance at the Use of Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Oghabian

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Background: Conventional imaging modalities of CT, MRI, ultrasound, radionuclide, and even metabolic PET are insensitive to reveal tumor and metastasis of less than few millimeters containing not much fewer than 500,000 cells. At this size, a tu-mor has effectively undergone about 20 cell dou-blings, and is sufficiently stuffed with gene defects and likely to metastasize. New techniques generally known as molecular imaging lead to a patient-specific approach based on physiologic, antigenic, molecular, and genetic disease markers. In this article, Current and the near term trends and techniques in early de-tection of cancer using gene specific, cell specific, or even patient specific approaches are summarized. A number of markers are used for cancer imaging. Anatomic markers show cell morphology defects at the sub-10-µm level on CT, MRI, and OCT (Optical Coherence Tomography. These techniques often fail to provide accurate and basic information necessary to manage the patient’s disease such as true metastatic extent. Functional markers use dynamic features, such as capillary leak (using ICG, IndoCyanine Green, lymphatic transport (by colloid, or Tc-Sestamibi, blood oxygenation, and blood flow. The features provide signal by a bulk phenomenon, and hence are still insensitive. More specifically, anti-genic probes, such as targeted antibodies have been demonstrated effectively in vivo for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, such as PSMA in the pros-tate cancer, CEA in colorectal cancer, and HER-2/neu in breast cancer. Metabolic probes accumulate at the site of a specific metabolic activity, and rely on imag-ing agents involving certain enzymatic pathways or transport functions of the cell. Examples are 18FDG (18F-fluoroDeoxyGlucose in PET and 11C-thymidine. Recent spectroscopy techniques do not need such labeled probes. The common method for in-vivo spectroscopy is MRSI (Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy that can

  10. Gold Nanoconstructs for Multimodal Diagnostic Imaging and Photothermal Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Andrew James

    Cancer accounts for nearly 1 out of every 4 deaths in the United States, and because conventional treatments are limited by morbidity and off-target toxicities, improvements in cancer management are needed. This thesis further develops nanoparticle-assisted photothermal therapy (NAPT) as a viable treatment option for cancer patients. NAPT enables localized ablation of disease because heat generation only occurs where tissue permissive near-infrared (NIR) light and absorbing nanoparticles are combined, leaving surrounding normal tissue unharmed. Two principle approaches were investigated to improve the specificity of this technique: multimodal imaging and molecular targeting. Multimodal imaging affords the ability to guide NIR laser application for site-specific NAPT and more holistic characterization of disease by combining the advantages of several diagnostic technologies. Towards the goal of image-guided NAPT, gadolinium-conjugated gold-silica nanoshells were engineered and demonstrated to enhance imaging contrast across a range of diagnostic modes, including T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, X-Ray, optical coherence tomography, reflective confocal microscopy, and two-photon luminescence in vitro as well as within an animal tumor model. Additionally, the nanoparticle conjugates were shown to effectively convert NIR light to heat for applications in photothermal therapy. Therefore, the broad utility of gadolinium-nanoshells for anatomic localization of tissue lesions, molecular characterization of malignancy, and mediators of ablation was established. Molecular targeting strategies may also improve NAPT by promoting nanoparticle uptake and retention within tumors and enhancing specificity when malignant and normal tissue interdigitate. Here, ephrinA1 protein ligands were conjugated to nanoshell surfaces for particle homing to overexpressed EphA2 receptors on prostate cancer cells. In vitro, successful targeting and subsequent photothermal ablation of

  11. Synthesis and stability test of radiogadolinium(III-DOTA-PAMAM G3.0-trastuzumab as SPECT-MRI molecular imaging agent for diagnosis of HER-2 positive breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardiani Rahmania

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonivasive diagnosis of cancer can be provided by molecular imaging using hybrid modality to obtain better sensitivity, specificity and depiction localization of the disease. In this study, we developed a new molecular imaging agent, radiogadolinium(III-DOTA-PAMAM G3.0-trastuzumab in the form of 147Gd-DOTA-PAMAM G3.0-trastuzumab, that can be both target-specific radiopharmaceutical in SPECT as well as targeted contrast agent in MRI for the purpose of diagnosis of HER-2 positive breast cancer. 147Gd radionuclide emits γ-rays that can be used in SPECT modality, but because of technical constraint, 147Gd radionuclide was simulated by its radioisotope, 153Gd. Gd-DOTA complex has also been known as good MRI contrast agent. PAMAM G3.0 is useful to concentrate Gd-DOTA compelexes in large quantities, thus minimizing the number of trastuzumab molecules used. Trastuzumab is human monoclonal antibody that can spesifically interact with HER-2. Synthesis of radiogadolinium(III-DOTA-PAMAM G3.0-trastuzumab was initiated by conjugating DOTA NHS ester ligand with PAMAM G3.0 dendrimer. The DOTA-PAMAM G3.0 produced was conjugated to trastuzumab molecule and labeled with 153Gd. Characterization DOTA-PAMAM G3.0-trastuzumab immunoconjugate was performed using HPLC system equipped with SEC. The formation of immunoconjugate was indicated by the shorter retention time (6.82 min compared to that of trastuzumab (7.06 min. Radiochemical purity of radiogadolinium(III-DOTA-PAMAM G3.0-trastuzumab was >99% after purification process by PD-10 desalting column. Radiogadolinium(III-DOTA-PAMAM G3.0-trastuzumab compound was stable at room temperature and at 2–8 0C as indicated by its radiochemical purity 97.6 ± 0.5%–99.1 ± 0.5% after 144 h storage.

  12. Molecular diagnosis for personalized target therapy in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jae Yong

    2013-09-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In advanced and metastatic gastric cancer, the conventional chemotherapy with limited efficacy shows an overall survival period of about 10 months. Patient specific and effective treatments known as personalized cancer therapy is of significant importance. Advances in high-throughput technologies such as microarray and next generation sequencing for genes, protein expression profiles and oncogenic signaling pathways have reinforced the discovery of treatment targets and personalized treatments. However, there are numerous challenges from cancer target discoveries to practical clinical benefits. Although there is a flood of biomarkers and target agents, only a minority of patients are tested and treated accordingly. Numerous molecular target agents have been under investigation for gastric cancer. Currently, targets for gastric cancer include the epidermal growth factor receptor family, mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor axis, and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-AKT-mammalian target of rapamycin pathways. Deeper insights of molecular characteristics for gastric cancer has enabled the molecular classification of gastric cancer, the diagnosis of gastric cancer, the prediction of prognosis, the recognition of gastric cancer driver genes, and the discovery of potential therapeutic targets. Not only have we deeper insights for the molecular diversity of gastric cancer, but we have also prospected both affirmative potentials and hurdles to molecular diagnostics. New paradigm of transdisciplinary team science, which is composed of innovative explorations and clinical investigations of oncologists, geneticists, pathologists, biologists, and bio-informaticians, is mandatory to recognize personalized target therapy. PMID:24156032

  13. Molecular Imaging with Activatable Reporter Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Niu, Xiaoyuan Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging is a newly emerged multiple disciplinary field that aims to visualize, characterize and quantitatively measure biological processes at cellular and molecular levels in humans and other living systems. A reporter gene is a piece of DNA encoding reporter protein, which presents as a readily measurable phenotype that can be distinguished easily from the background of endogenous protein. After being transferred into cells of organ systems (transgenes, the reporter gene can be utilized to visualize transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, protein-protein interactions, or trafficking of proteins or cells in living subjects. Herein, we review previous classification of reporter genes and regroup the reporter gene based imaging as basic, inducible and activatable, based on the regulation of reporter gene transcription and post-translational modification of reporter proteins. We then focus on activatable reporters, in which the signal can be activated at the posttranslational level for visualizing protein-protein interactions, protein phosphorylation or tertiary structure changes. The applications of several types of activatable reporters will also be summarized. We conclude that activatable reporter imaging can benefit both basic biomedical research and drug development.

  14. Neutron imaging for inertial confinement fusion and molecular optic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scientific domains that require imaging of micrometric/nano-metric objects are dramatically increasing (Plasma Physics, Astrophysics, Biotechnology, Earth Sciences...). Difficulties encountered in imaging smaller and smaller objects make this research area more and more challenging and in constant evolution. The two scientific domains, through which this study has been led, are the neutron imaging in the context of the inertial confinement fusion and the fluorescence molecular imaging. Work presented in this thesis has two main objectives. The first one is to describe the instrumentation characteristics that require such imagery and, relatively to the scientific domains considered, identify parameters likely to optimize the imaging system accuracy. The second one is to present the developed data analysis and reconstruction methods able to provide spatial resolution adapted to the size of the observed object. Similarities of numerical algorithms used in these two scientific domains, which goals are quiet different, show how micrometric/nano-metric object imaging is a research area at the border of a large number of scientific disciplines. (author)

  15. Molecular probes for malignant melanoma imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Gang; Pan, Ying; Cheng, Zhen

    2010-09-01

    Malignant melanoma represents a serious public health problem and is a deadly disease when it is diagnosed at late stage. Though (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) has been widely used clinically for melanoma imaging, other approaches to specifically identify, characterize, monitor and guide therapeutics for malignant melanoma are still needed. Consequently, many probes targeting general molecular events including metabolism, angiogenesis, hypoxia and apoptosis in melanoma have been successfully developed. Furthermore, probes targeting melanoma associated targets such as melanocortin receptor 1 (MC1R), melanin, etc. have undergone active investigation and have demonstrated high melanoma specificity. In this review, these molecular probes targeting diverse melanoma biomarkers have been summarized. Some of them may eventually contribute to the improvement of personalized management of malignant melanoma. PMID:20497118

  16. Hormonal and molecular aspects of endometrioid endometrial cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, Vincentius Hubertus Willibrordus Maria

    2008-01-01

    This thesis concerns the expression and prognostic value of various hormones and molecular markers playing a role n endometrioid endometrial cancer. Especially we were interested in the enzyme aromatase, its expression and (prognostic) role in endometrioid endometrial cancer. Endometrial cancer is t

  17. Bioresponsive probes for molecular imaging: concepts and in vivo applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijnhoven, S.M. van; Robillard, M.S.; Langereis, S.; Grull, H.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imaging is a powerful tool to visualize and characterize biological processes at the cellular and molecular level in vivo. In most molecular imaging approaches, probes are used to bind to disease-specific biomarkers highlighting disease target sites. In recent years, a new subset of molecu

  18. The application of molecular nuclear medicine in imaging diagnosis and targeted treatment of thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyroid carcinoma is the most common malignancy of endocrine system. Different pathological classifications of thyroid carcinoma differ greatly in biological behavior and prognosis. As a newly-emerging subject, molecular nuclear medicine has made rapid advances in both diagnosis and treatment of thyroid carcinoma. With the application of new imaging agents and devices such as SPECT/CT and PET/CT, molecular nuclear imaging can demonstrate, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the alterations in specific molecules of thyroid cancer on cellular and molecular level. Meanwhile, it is capable of utilizing radiopharmaceuticals to target specifically to these molecules. Here we present a review on the latest progresses in this field. (authors)

  19. Optical imaging for breast cancer prescreening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godavarty A

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Anuradha Godavarty,1 Suset Rodriguez,1 Young-Jin Jung,2 Stephanie Gonzalez1 1Optical Imaging Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA; 2Department of Radiological Science, Dongseo University, Busan, South Korea Abstract: Breast cancer prescreening is carried out prior to the gold standard screening using X-ray mammography and/or ultrasound. Prescreening is typically carried out using clinical breast examination (CBE or self-breast examinations (SBEs. Since CBE and SBE have high false-positive rates, there is a need for a low-cost, noninvasive, non-radiative, and portable imaging modality that can be used as a prescreening tool to complement CBE/SBE. This review focuses on the various hand-held optical imaging devices that have been developed and applied toward early-stage breast cancer detection or as a prescreening tool via phantom, in vivo, and breast cancer imaging studies. Apart from the various optical devices developed by different research groups, a wide-field fiber-free near-infrared optical scanner has been developed for transillumination-based breast imaging in our Optical Imaging Laboratory. Preliminary in vivo studies on normal breast tissues, with absorption-contrasted targets placed in the intramammary fold, detected targets as deep as 8.8 cm. Future work involves in vivo imaging studies on breast cancer subjects and comparison with the gold standard X-ray mammography approach. Keywords: diffuse optical imaging, near-infrared, hand-held devices, breast cancer, prescreening, early detection 

  20. Narrow band imaging for bladder cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Y. Hsueh; Allen W. Chiu

    2016-01-01

    Narrow band imaging (NBI) is a newly developed technology aiming to provide additional endoscopic information for patients with bladder cancer. This review focuses on the diagnostic accuracy and treatment outcome using NBI cystoscopy for the treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. Current results showed improved sensitivity of NBI cystoscopy compared to conventional white light cystoscopy, although lower specificity and increased false-positive results were reported using NBI cystosc...

  1. On Sensitivity of Molecular Specific Photoacoustic Imaging Using Plasmonic Gold Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Joshi, Pratixa P.; Sokolov, Konstantin; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2009-01-01

    Functionalized gold nanospheres undergo receptor mediated aggregation on cancer cells that overexpress the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). This phenomenon leads to a red shift in the plasmon resonance frequency of the EGFR-targeted gold nanoparticles. Previously we demonstrated that highly selective detection of cancer cells can be achieved using the combination of multi-wavelength photoacoustic imaging and molecular specific gold nanoparticles. In this study, we use tissue models to...

  2. Molecular Dimensions of Gastric Cancer: Translational and Clinical Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Young; Noh, Sung Hoon; Cheong, Jae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a global health burden and has the highest incidence in East Asia. This disease is complex in nature because it arises from multiple interactions of genetic, local environmental, and host factors, resulting in biological heterogeneity. This genetic intricacy converges on molecular characteristics reflecting the pathophysiology, tumor biology, and clinical outcome. Therefore, understanding the molecular characteristics at a genomic level is pivotal to improving the clinical care of patients with gastric cancer. A recent landmark study, The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project, showed the molecular landscape of gastric cancer through a comprehensive molecular evaluation of 295 primary gastric cancers. The proposed molecular classification divided gastric cancer into four subtypes: Epstein-Barr virus-positive, microsatellite unstable, genomic stable, and chromosomal instability. This information will be taken into account in future clinical trials and will be translated into clinical therapeutic decisions. To fully realize the clinical benefit, many challenges must be overcome. Rapid growth of high-throughput biology and functional validation of molecular targets will further deepen our knowledge of molecular dimensions of this cancer, allowing for personalized precision medicine. PMID:26498010

  3. Head and neck cancer imaging. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermans, Robert (ed.) [University Hospital Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology

    2008-07-01

    This book provides a comprehensive review of state-of-the-art imaging in head and neck cancer. Precise determination of tumor extent is of the utmost importance in these neoplasms, as it has important consequences for staging of disease, prediction of outcome and choice of treatment. Only the radiologist can fully appreciate submucosal, perineural, and perivascular tumor spread and detect metastatic disease at an early stage. Imaging is also of considerable benefit for patient surveillance after treatment. All imaging modalities currently used in the management of head and neck neoplasms are considered in depth, and in addition newer techniques such as PET-CT and diffusion-weighted MRI are discussed. This book will help the reader to recommend, execute and report head and neck imaging studies at a high level of sophistication and thereby to become a respected member of the team managing head and neck cancer. (orig.)

  4. Current Progress of Aptamer-Based Molecular Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Andrew Z.; Farokhzad, Omid C.

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers, single-stranded oligonucleotides, are an important class of molecular targeting ligand. Since their discovery, aptamers have been rapidly translated into clinical practice. They have been approved as therapeutics and molecular diagnostics. Aptamers also possess several properties that make them uniquely suited to molecular imaging. This review aims to provide an overview of aptamers’ advantages as targeting ligands and their application in molecular imaging.

  5. IND Regulatory & Manufacturing Resources - Cancer Imaging Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Imaging Program has been creating Investigational New Drug Applications (IND) for imaging agents in order to engage in multi-center clinical trials of these materials. A subset of the documents filed is being made available to the research community to implement routine synthesis of tracers at their own facilities and to assist investigators with the filing of their own INDs. The first of these document sets is for F-18 fluorothymidine (FLT).

  6. Molecular hydrogen polarization images of OMC-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Michael G.; Minchin, N. R.; Hough, J. H.; Aspin, C.; Axon, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    An image of the polarization of the shocked H2 v = 1-0 S(1) line emission in the core of OMC-1 has been obtained. Along the molecular outflow of the source, the line is dichroically polarized by a medium of aligned grains located between the earth and the shock fronts. The polarization pattern traces the magnetic field direction, which is parallel to the outflow axis and to the large-scale field direction determined from far-IR continuum measurements. Close to the IR source IRc2, the likely source of the outflow, the aligned vectors twist, indicating that the magnetic field direction changes. Modeling the line ratios of scattered H2 lines in the reflection nebula, it is concluded that the size distribution of grains there is typical of the small grains in the diffuse interstellar medium. By contrast, the scattered continuum radiation from the core region suggests that the grains there are larger than this.

  7. Molecular imaging in Libman-Sacks endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Anders; Schaadt, Bente K; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric;

    2015-01-01

    cardiothoracic surgery and pathologic examinations showed characteristic morphology of Libman-Sacks vegetations. All microbiological examinations including blood cultures, microscopy, culture and 16s PCR of the valve were negative and the diagnosis of Libman-Sacks endocarditis was convincing. It is difficult to...... distinguish Libman-Sacks endocarditis from culture-negative infective endocarditis (IE). Molecular imaging techniques are being used increasingly in cases of suspected IE but no studies have previously reported the use in patients with Libman-Sacks endocarditis. In the present case, (18)F-FDG-PET-CT clearly...... demonstrated the increased glucose uptake caused by infiltrating white blood cells in the ongoing inflammatory process at the mitral valve. In conclusion, (18)F-FDG-PET-CT cannot be used to distinguish between IE and non-infective Libman-Sacks vegetations....

  8. Fluorescent nanoparticle probes for imaging of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santra, Swadeshmukul; Malhotra, Astha

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescent nanoparticles (FNPs) have received immense popularity in cancer imaging in recent years because of their attractive optical properties. In comparison to traditional organic-based fluorescent dyes and fluorescent proteins, FNPs offer much improved sensitivity and photostability. FNPs in certain size range have a strong tendency to enter and retain in solid tumor tissue with abnormal (leaky) vasculature--a phenomenon known as Enhanced Permeation and Retention (EPR) effect, advancing their use for in vivo tumor imaging. Furthermore, large surface area of FNPs and their usual core-shell structure offer a platform for designing and fabricating multimodal/multifunctional nanoparticles (MMNPs). For effective cancer imaging, often the optical imaging modality is integrated with other nonoptical-based imaging modalities such as MRI, X-ray, and PET, thus creating multimodal nanoparticle (NP)-based imaging probes. Such multimodal NP probes can be further integrated with therapeutic drug as well as cancer targeting agent leading to multifunctional NPs. Biocompatibility of FNPs is an important criterion that must be seriously considered during FNP design. NP composition, size, and surface chemistry must be carefully selected to minimize potential toxicological consequences both in vitro and in vivo. In this article, we will mainly focus on three different types of FNPs: dye-loaded NPs, quantum dots (Qdots), and phosphores; briefly highlighting their potential use in translational research. PMID:21480546

  9. [Molecular biological predictors for kidney cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vtorushin, S V; Tarakanova, V O; Zavyalova, M V

    2016-01-01

    The paper considers the data available in the modern literature on studies of potential molecular predictors for renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Investigations of cell death markers, namely; Bcl-2 as an inhibitor of apoptosis, are of interest. Its high expression correlates with a more favorable prognosis. Inactivation of Berclin 1 that is an authophagy indicator in intact tissues gives rise to t high risk for tumorigenesis. At the same time, high Beclin 1 expression in the tissue of the tumor itself results in the lower efficiency of performed chemotherapy. Excess annexin A2 in the tumor promotes the growth and invasion of cancer cells. Patients with tumor over-expression of SAM68 protein involved in cell proliferation have a lower overall survival rate. The lifespan of patients without distinct metastases survive significantly longer in the overexpression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM). High PD-L1 protein expression on the cell membrane is considered to be a potential marker of effective immunotherapy for RCC. PMID:27077146

  10. Molecular biology of breast cancer metastasis Molecular expression of vascular markers by aggressive breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During embryogenesis, the formation of primary vascular networks occurs via the processes of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. In uveal melanoma, vasculogenic mimicry describes the 'embryonic-like' ability of aggressive, but not nonaggressive, tumor cells to form networks surrounding spheroids of tumor cells in three-dimensional culture; these recapitulate the patterned networks seen in patients' aggressive tumors and correlates with poor prognosis. The molecular profile of these aggressive tumor cells suggests that they have a deregulated genotype, capable of expressing vascular phenotypes. Similarly, the embryonic-like phenotype expressed by the aggressive human breast cancer cells is associated with their ability to express a variety of vascular markers. These studies may offer new insights for consideration in breast cancer diagnosis and therapeutic intervention strategies

  11. Molecular Imaging of Conscious, Unrestrained Mice with AwakeSPECT

    OpenAIRE

    Baba, Justin S.; Endres, Christopher J.; Foss, Catherine A.; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Jung, Hyeyun; Goddard, James S.; Lee, Seungjoon; McKisson, John; Smith, Mark F.; Stolin, Alexander V.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a SPECT imaging system, AwakeSPECT, to enable molecular brain imaging of untrained mice that are conscious, unanesthetized, and unrestrained. We accomplished this with head tracking and motion correction techniques.

  12. Pancreatic Cancer Imaging: Which Method?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santo E

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the 10th most common malignancy and the 4th largest cancer killer in adults. Surgery offers the only chance of curing these patients. Complete surgical resection is associated with a 5-year survival rate of between 20 and 30%. The challenge is how to best select those patients for curative surgery. Early studies demonstrated excellent sensitivity of EUS in detecting pancreatic tumors in comparison to CT. Similarly, EUS showed an 85-94% accuracy rate for T staging and 70-80% accuracy rate for N staging. Later studies report on substantially less TN staging accuracy for EUS. Possible explanations and the problem of vascular involvement assessment by EUS will be provided. Considering the role of EUS in M staging and a comparison between EUS, MRI, and positron emission tomography, scanning will be presented. A diagnostic algorithm for the evaluation of patients with a suspected pancreatic mass will be offered, stressing the pivotal role of EUS.

  13. Ultrasound Biomicroscopy in Small Animal Research: Applications in Molecular and Preclinical Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Greco

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM is a noninvasive multimodality technique that allows high-resolution imaging in mice. It is affordable, widely available, and portable. When it is coupled to Doppler ultrasound with color and power Doppler, it can be used to quantify blood flow and to image microcirculation as well as the response of tumor blood supply to cancer therapy. Target contrast ultrasound combines ultrasound with novel molecular targeted contrast agent to assess biological processes at molecular level. UBM is useful to investigate the growth and differentiation of tumors as well as to detect early molecular expression of cancer-related biomarkers in vivo and to monitor the effects of cancer therapies. It can be also used to visualize the embryological development of mice in uterus or to examine their cardiovascular development. The availability of real-time imaging of mice anatomy allows performing aspiration procedures under ultrasound guidance as well as the microinjection of cells, viruses, or other agents into precise locations. This paper will describe some basic principles of high-resolution imaging equipment, and the most important applications in molecular and preclinical imaging in small animal research.

  14. Confocal Raman imaging for cancer cell classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Evelien; Van Dorpe, Pol; Stakenborg, Tim; Liu, Chengxun; Lagae, Liesbet

    2014-05-01

    We propose confocal Raman imaging as a label-free single cell characterization method that can be used as an alternative for conventional cell identification techniques that typically require labels, long incubation times and complex sample preparation. In this study it is investigated whether cancer and blood cells can be distinguished based on their Raman spectra. 2D Raman scans are recorded of 114 single cells, i.e. 60 breast (MCF-7), 5 cervix (HeLa) and 39 prostate (LNCaP) cancer cells and 10 monocytes (from healthy donors). For each cell an average spectrum is calculated and principal component analysis is performed on all average cell spectra. The main features of these principal components indicate that the information for cell identification based on Raman spectra mainly comes from the fatty acid composition in the cell. Based on the second and third principal component, blood cells could be distinguished from cancer cells; and prostate cancer cells could be distinguished from breast and cervix cancer cells. However, it was not possible to distinguish breast and cervix cancer cells. The results obtained in this study, demonstrate the potential of confocal Raman imaging for cell type classification and identification purposes.

  15. Molecular imaging of hypoxia with radiolabelled agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissue hypoxia results from an inadequate supply of oxygen (O2) that compromises biological functions. Structural and functional abnormalities of the tumour vasculature together with altered diffusion conditions inside the tumour seem to be the main causes of tumour hypoxia. Evidence from experimental and clinical studies points to a role for tumour hypoxia in tumour propagation, resistance to therapy and malignant progression. This has led to the development of assays for the detection of hypoxia in patients in order to predict outcome and identify patients with a worse prognosis and/or patients that would benefit from appropriate treatments. A variety of invasive and non-invasive approaches have been developed to measure tumour oxygenation including oxygen-sensitive electrodes and hypoxia marker techniques using various labels that can be detected by different methods such as positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), autoradiography and immunohistochemistry. This review aims to give a detailed overview of non-invasive molecular imaging modalities with radiolabelled PET and SPECT tracers that are available to measure tumour hypoxia. (orig.)

  16. Epigenetic: a molecular link between testicular cancer and environmental exposures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DavidHVOLLE

    2012-11-01

    Here we will review chromatin modifications which can affect testicular physiology leading to the development of testicular cancer; and highlight potential molecular pathways involved in these alterations in the context of environmental exposures.

  17. Epidermal growth factor receptor targeted molecularly therapies of cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been known to be a significant factor in the development and growth of many types of cancers. It is now accepted that the EGFR signal transduction net work plays an important role in multiple tumorigenic processes, contributing to cancer cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastasis, as well as protection from apoptosis. Recently, EGFR monoclonal antibodies (McAb) and epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase (EGFR-TK) inhibitors have been validated as new treatment approach for those EGFR-positive cancers and have shown activity aginst advanced, chemofractory cancers in clinical trials. This article focuses on three EGFR targeted molecularly therapies of cancers. (authors)

  18. Detection of early primary colorectal cancer with upconversion luminescent NP-based molecular probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunyan; Qi, Yifei; Qiao, Ruirui; Hou, Yi; Chan, Kaying; Li, Ziqian; Huang, Jiayi; Jing, Lihong; Du, Jun; Gao, Mingyuan

    2016-06-01

    Early detection and diagnosis of cancers is extremely beneficial for improving the survival rate of cancer patients and molecular imaging techniques are believed to be relevant for offering clinical solutions. Towards early cancer detection, we developed a primary animal colorectal cancer model and constructed a tumor-specific imaging probe by using biocompatible NaGdF4:Yb,Er@NaGdF4 upconversion luminescent NPs for establishing a sensitive early tumor imaging method. The primary animal tumor model, which can better mimic the human colorectal cancer, was built upon continual administration of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine in Kunming mice and the tumor development was carefully monitored through histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses to reveal the pathophysiological processes and molecular features of the cancer microenvironment. The upconversion imaging probe was constructed through covalent coupling of PEGylated core-shell NPs with folic acid whose receptor is highly expressed in the primary tumors. Upon 980 nm laser excitation, the primary colorectal tumors in the complex abdominal environment were sensitively imaged owing to the ultralow background of the upconversion luminescence and the high tumor-targeting specificity of the nanoprobe. We believe that the current studies provide a highly effective and potential approach for early colorectal cancer diagnosis and tumor surgical navigation.Early detection and diagnosis of cancers is extremely beneficial for improving the survival rate of cancer patients and molecular imaging techniques are believed to be relevant for offering clinical solutions. Towards early cancer detection, we developed a primary animal colorectal cancer model and constructed a tumor-specific imaging probe by using biocompatible NaGdF4:Yb,Er@NaGdF4 upconversion luminescent NPs for establishing a sensitive early tumor imaging method. The primary animal tumor model, which can better mimic the human colorectal cancer, was built upon continual

  19. Molecular concept in human oral cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Krishna, Akhilesh; Singh, Shraddha; Kumar, Vijay; Pal, U. S.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of oral cancer remains high in both Asian and Western countries. Several risk factors associated with development of oral cancer are now well-known, including tobacco chewing, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Cancerous risk factors may cause many genetic events through chromosomal alteration or mutations in genetic material and lead to progression and development of oral cancer through histological progress, carcinogenesis. Oral squamous carcinogenesis is a multistep process in...

  20. Molecular mechanisms of tamoxifen-associated endometrial cancer (Review)

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Rong; Hilakivi-Clarke, Leena; Clarke, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Tamoxifen has been prescribed to millions of females for breast cancer prevention or treatment. However, tamoxifen is known to significantly enhance the risk of developing endometrial lesions, including hyperplasia, polyps, carcinomas, and sarcoma. Notably, tamoxifen-associated endometrial cancer often has a poor clinical outcome. Understanding the molecular mechanism of tamoxifen-induced endometrial cancer is essential for developing strategies that minimize tamoxifen’s effects on the endome...

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging for detecting prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays an important role in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. However, some difficulties still exist. We retrospectively studied the pathohistological accuracy of MRI, comparing with that of transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS). We used AIRIS on a 0.3 tesla MRI unit with a body coil. 50 cases (prostate cancer: 30, BPH: 20) histologically diagnosed by sextant biopsy were studied. The accuracy of clinical diagnosis in MRI and TRUS were 76% and 72%, respectively. There is no significant difference. The prostate cancer in the peripheral zone was previously reported being as a low signal intensity on the T2 weighted image. But in the present study, over 85% of the cases did not revealed so-called typical appearance. There was no advantage clarified in diagnosing prostate cancer using MRI over TRUS. There is a certain limit to MRI in diagnosing prostatic cancer. But considering its ability of three-dimensional analysis, evaluating organs locally and generally, and MRI will be more advantageous. (author)

  2. Molecular Imaging and Therapy of Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Beylergil

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Several molecular imaging modalities have been evaluated in the management of Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC, a rare and aggressive tumor with a high tendency to metastasize. Continuous progress in the field of molecular imaging might improve management in these patients. The authors review the current modalities and their impact on MCC in this brief review article.

  3. Quantum dots for multimodal molecular imaging of angiogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Mulder, W.J.M.; Strijkers, G.J.; Nicolay, K.; Griffioen, A W

    2010-01-01

    Quantum dots exhibit unique optical properties for bioimaging purposes. We have previously developed quantum dots with a paramagnetic and functionalized coating and have shown their potential for molecular imaging purposes. In the current mini-review we summarize the synthesis procedure, the in vitro testing and, importantly, the in vivo application for multimodal molecular imaging of tumor angiogenesis.

  4. Targeted therapies in epithelial ovarian cancer: Molecular mechanisms of action

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroaki; Itamochi

    2010-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death in women with gynecological cancer. Most patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage and have a poor prognosis.Currently, surgical tumor debulking, followed by platinum- and taxane-based chemotherapy is the standard treatment for advanced ovarian cancer. However, these patients are at great risk of recurrence and emerging drug resistance. Therefore, novel treatment strategies are required to improve outcomes for women with advanced ovarian cancer. A variety of molecular targeted agents, the majority of which are monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule protein-kinase inhibitors, have been explored in the management of ovarian cancer. The targets of these agents include angiogenesis, the human epidermal growth factor receptor family, ubiquitinproteasome pathway, epigenetic modulators, poly(ADPribose) polymerase (PARP), and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, which are aberrant in tumor tissue. The antiangiogenic agent, bevacizumab, has been reported as the most effective targeted agent and should be included in the standard chemotherapeutic regimen for advanced ovarian cancer. PARP inhibitors, which are mainly used in breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene-mutated patients, and mTOR inhibitors are also attractive treatment strategies, either alone or combination with chemotherapy, for ovarian cancer. Understanding the tumor molecular biology and identification of predictive biomarkers are essential steps for selection of the best treatment strategies. This article reviews the molecular mechanisms of the most promising targeted agents that are under early phase clinical evaluation for ovarian cancer.

  5. Imaging probe for breast cancer localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High spatial resolution, small Field Of View (FOV), fully portable scintillation cameras are lower cost and obviously lower weight than large FOV, not transportable Anger gamma cameras. Portable cameras allow easy transfer of the detector, thus of radioisotope imaging, where the bioptical procedure takes place. In this paper we describe a preliminary experience on radionuclide Breast Cancer (BC) imaging with a 22.8x22.8 mm2 FOV minicamera, already used by our group for sentinel node detection with the name of Imaging Probe (IP). In this work IP BC detection was performed with the aim of guiding biopsy, in particular open biopsy, or to help or modify fine needle or needle addressing when main driving method was echography or digital radiography. The IP prototype weight was about 1 kg. This small scintillation camera is based on the compact Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tube Hamamatsu R7600-00-C8, coupled to a CsI(Tl) scintillation array 2.6x2.6x5.0 mm3 crystal-pixel size. Spatial resolution of the IP was 2.5 mm Full-Width at Half-Maximum at laboratory tests. IP was provided with acquisition software allowing quick change of pixels number on the computer acquisition frame and an on-line image-smoothing program. Both these programs were developed in order to allow nuclear physicians to quickly get target source when the patient was anesthetized in the operator room, with sterile conditions. 99mTc Sestamibi (MIBI) was injected at the dose of 740 MBq 1 h before imaging and biopsy to 14 patients with suspicious or known BC. Scintigraphic images were acquired before and after biopsy in each patient. Operator was allowed to take into account scintigraphic images as well as previously performed X-ray mammograms and echographies. High-resolution IP images were able to guide biopsy toward cancer or washout zones of the cancer, that are thought to be chemoresistant in 7 patients out of 10. Four patients, in whom IP and MIBI were not able to guide biopsy, did not show

  6. Developing imaging strategies for castration resistant prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in the understanding of castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) have lead to a growing number of experimental therapies, many of which are directed against the androgen-receptor (AR) signaling axis. These advances generate the need for reliable molecular imaging biomarkers to non-invasively determine efficacy, and to better guide treatment selection of these promising AR-targeted drugs. Methods. We draw on our own experience, supplemented by review of the current literature, to discuss the systematic development of imaging biomarkers for use in the context of CRPC, with a focus on bone scintigraphy, F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) and PET imaging of the AR signaling axis. Results. The roadmap to biomarker development mandates rigorous standardization and analytic validation of an assay before it can be qualified successfully for use in an appropriate clinical context. The Prostate Cancer Working Group 2 (PCWG2) criteria for 'radiographic' progression by bone scintigraphy serve as a paradigm of this process. Implemented by the Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Consortium (PCCTC), these consensus criteria may ultimately enable the co-development of more potent and versatile molecular imaging biomarkers. Purported to be superior to single-photon bone scanning, the added value of Na18F-PET for imaging of bone metastases is still uncertain. FDG-PET already plays an integral role in the management of many diseases, but requires further evaluation before being qualified in the context of CRPC. PET tracers that probe the AR signaling axis, such as 18F-FDHT and 89Zr-591, are now under development as pharmacodynamic markers, and as markers of efficacy, in tandem with FDG-PET. Semi-automated analysis programs for facilitating PET interpretation may serve as a valuable tool to help navigate the biomarker roadmap. Conclusions. Molecular imaging strategies, particularly those that probe the AR signaling axis, have the potential to

  7. Molecular markers for detection, surveillance and prognostication of bladder cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrooman, O.P.; Witjes, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Many markers for the detection of bladder cancers have been tested and almost all urinary markers reported are better than cytology with regard to sensitivity, but they score lower in specificity. Currently molecular and genetic changes play an important role in the discovery of new molecular marker

  8. New generation of breast cancer clinical trials implementing molecular profiling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dimitrios Zardavas; Martine Piccart-Gebhart

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of molecular profiling technologies in oncology deepens our knowledge for the molecular landscapes of cancer diagnoses, identifying aberrations that could be linked with specific therapeutic vulnerabilities. In particular, there is an increasing list of molecularly targeted anticancer agents undergoing clinical development that aim to block specific molecular aberrations. This leads to a paradigm shift, with an increasing list of specific aberrations dictating the treatment of patients with cancer. This paradigm shift impacts the field of clinical trials, since the classical approach of having clinico-pathological disease characteristics dictating the patients' enrolment in oncology trials shifts towards the implementation of molecular profiling as pre-screening step. In order to facilitate the successful clinical development of these new anticancer drugs within specific molecular niches of cancer diagnoses, there have been developed new, innovative trial designs that could be classified as follows: i) longitudinal cohort studies that implement (or not) "nested" downstream trials, 2) studies that assess the clinical utility of molecular profiling, 3) "master" protocol trials, iv) "basket" trials, v) trials following an adaptive design. In the present article, we review these innovative study designs, providing representative examples from each category and we discuss the challenges that still need to be addressed in this era of new generation oncology trials implementing molecular profiling. Emphasis is put on the field of breast cancer clinical trials.

  9. Use of molecular imaging to guide and assess radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging is intimately associated with radiation therapy (RT). Anatomical imaging is the standard of care for crucial components of the RT process such as tumor localization, treatment planning, and positioning verification. However, as disease progression and treatment response at the molecular and cellular level precede visible structural changes to tissue, applications of functional and molecular imaging are becoming increasingly more important. Use of molecular imaging in RTcan be divided into three phases: (1) Imaging for diagnosis and staging, performed during the initial phases of RT to establish the presence and progression of disease (2) Imaging for target definition, performed prior to RT in order to determine the spatial extent of the tumor and the position of normal tissue (3) Imaging for treatment response assessment, performed during or after RT to establish effectiveness, predict outcome, and potentially modify therapy. Following diagnosis and staging molecular imaging can help to define which type of therapy should be used, as well assess the spatial extent of the tumor, thus providing grounds for more reliable target definition. Molecular imaging has been shown to significantly reduce large inter-observer variability in target definition compared to anatomical imaging. This reduction leads to significant reduction in treatment margin, thereby enabling more accurate and precise tumor targeting. Furthermore, molecular imaging has the potential to characterize biological heterogeneity within tumors, providing foundations for so-called biologically conformal radiotherapy, or dose painting. Early treatment response assessment refers to the use of molecular imaging during the course of therapy, and late treatment response assessment refers to the use of molecular imaging after the therapy has been completed. While late assessment enables prediction of treatment outcome, early assessment, in addition, enables treatment adaptation

  10. Metabolic alterations in bladder cancer: applications for cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyard, Terry; Waltzer, Wayne C; Waltzer, Douglas; Romanov, Victor

    2016-02-01

    Treatment planning, outcome and prognosis are strongly related to the adequate tumor staging for bladder cancer (BC). Unfortunately, a large discrepancy exists between the preoperative clinical and final pathologic staging. Therefore, an advanced imaging-based technique is crucial for adequate staging. Although Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is currently the best in vivo imaging technique for BC staging because of its excellent soft-tissue contrast and absence of ionizing radiation it lacks cancer-specificity. Tumor-specific positron emission tomography (PET), which is based on the Warburg effect (preferential uptake of glucose by cancer cells), exploits the radioactively-labeled glucose analogs, i.e., FDG. Although FDG-PET is highly cancer specific, it lacks resolution and contrast quality comparable with MRI. Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) MRI enables the detection of low concentrations of metabolites containing protons. BC is an attractive target for glucose CEST MRI because, in addition to the typical systemic administration, glucose might also be directly applied into the bladder to reduce toxicity-related complications. As a first stage of the development of a contrast-specific BC imaging technique we have studied glucose uptake by bladder epithelial cells and have observed that glucose is, indeed, consumed by BC cells with higher intensity than by non-transformed urothelial cells. This effect might be partly explained by increased expression of glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT3 in transformed cells as compared to normal urothelium. We also detected higher lactate production by BC cells which is another cancer-specific manifestation of the Warburg effect. In addition, we have observed other metabolic alterations in BC cells as compared to non-transformed cells: in particular, increased pyruvate synthesis. When glucose was substituted by glutamine in culture media, preferential uptake of glutamine by BC cells was observed. The preferential

  11. Molecular Concordance Between Primary Breast Cancer and Matched Metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøigård, Anne Bruun; Larsen, Martin Jakob; Thomassen, Mads;

    2016-01-01

    receptors, transcriptomics, and genome aberrations in primary tumors and metastases. In conclusion, biopsy of metastatic lesions at recurrence of breast cancer is encouraged to provide optimal treatment of the disease. Furthermore, molecular profiling of metastatic tissue provides invaluable mechanistic......Clinical management of breast cancer is increasingly personalized and based on molecular profiling. Often, primary tumors are used as proxies for systemic disease at the time of recurrence. However, recent studies have revealed substantial discordances between primary tumors and metastases, both....... The purpose of this review is to illuminate the extent of cancer genome evolution through disease progression and the degree of molecular concordance between primary breast cancers and matched metastases. We present an overview of the most prominent studies investigating the expression of endocrine...

  12. Molecular epidemiology and the genetics of environmental cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shields, P.G.; Harris, C.C. (Laboratory of Human Carcinogenesis, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1991-08-07

    Environmental, occupational, and recreational exposures to carcinogens contribute to cancer risk in humans. Cancer formation is a multistage process involving tumor initiation, promotion, conversion, and progression. Carcinogens can affect any of these stages through genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. The association of a suspected carcinogenic exposure and cancer risk can be studied in populations with classic epidemiologic techniques. However, these techniques are not applicable to the assessment of risk in individuals. Molecular epidemiology, in contrast, is a field that integrates molecular biology, in vitro and in vivo laboratory models, biochemistry, and epidemiology to infer individual cancer risk. Carcinogen-macromolecular adduct levels, and somatic cell mutations can be measured to determine the biologically effective dose of a carcinogen. Molecular epidemiology also explores host cancer susceptibilities, such as carcinogen metabolic activation, DNA repair, endogenous mutation rates, and inheritance of mutated tumor suppressor genes. Substantial interindividual variation for each of these biologic end points has been shown and, therefore, highlights the need for assessing cancer risk on an individual basis. Given the pace of the last decade, it is feasible that the next 10 years will allow molecular epidemiologists to develop a cancer-risk profile for an individual that includes assessment of a number of factors. This will help focus preventive strategies and strengthen quantitative risk assessments. 96 refs.

  13. Novel approaches for the molecular classification of prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert H. Getzenberg

    2010-01-01

    @@ Among the urologic cancers, prostate cancer is by far the most common, and it appears to have the potential to affect almost all men throughout the world as they age. A number of studies have shown that many men with prostate cancer will not die from their disease, but rather with the disease but from other causes. These men have a form of prostate cancer that is de-scribed as "very low risk" and has often been called indolent. There are however a group of men that have a form of prostate cancer that is much more aggressive and life threatening. Unlike other cancer types, we have few tools to provide for the molecular classification of prostate cancer.

  14. Molecular imaging of macrophage enzyme activity in cardiac inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Muhammad; Pulli, Benjamin; Chen, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging is highly advantageous as various insidious inflammatory events can be imaged in a serial and quantitative fashion. Combined with the conventional imaging modalities like computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) and nuclear imaging, it helps us resolve the extent of ongoing pathology, quantify inflammation and predict outcome. Macrophages are increasingly gaining importance as an imaging biomarker in inflammatory cardiovascular diseases. Macrophages, recruited to th...

  15. Investigations on the usefulness of CEACAMs as potential imaging targets for molecular imaging purposes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Heine

    Full Text Available Members of the carcinoembryonic antigen cell adhesion molecules (CEACAMs family are the prototype of tumour markers. Classically they are used as serum markers, however, CEACAMs could serve as targets for molecular imaging as well.In order to test the anti CEACAM monoclonal antibody T84.1 for imaging purposes, CEACAM expression was analysed using this antibody. Twelve human cancer cell lines from different entities were screened for their CEACAM expression using qPCR, Western Blot and FACS analysis. In addition, CEACAM expression was analyzed in primary tumour xenografts of these cells. Nine of 12 tumour cell lines expressed CEACAM mRNA and protein when grown in vitro. Pancreatic and colon cancer cell lines showed the highest expression levels with good correlation of mRNA and protein level. However, when grown in vivo, the CEACAM expression was generally downregulated except for the melanoma cell lines. As the CEACAM expression showed pronounced expression in FemX-1 primary tumours, this model system was used for further experiments. As the accessibility of the antibody after i.v. application is critical for its use in molecular imaging, the binding of the T84.1 monoclonal antibody was assessed after i.v. injection into SCID mice harbouring a FemX-1 primary tumour. When applied i.v., the CEACAM specific T84.1 antibody bound to tumour cells in the vicinity of blood vessels. This binding pattern was particularly pronounced in the periphery of the tumour xenograft, however, some antibody binding was also observed in the central areas of the tumour around blood vessels. Still, a general penetration of the tumour by i.v. application of the anti CEACAM antibody could not be achieved despite homogenous CEACAM expression of all melanoma cells when analysed in tissue sections. This lack of penetration is probably due to the increased interstitial fluid pressure in tumours caused by the absence of functional lymphatic vessels.

  16. Molecular mechanisms of radioresistance: applications for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A significant part of head and neck cancers is clinically radioresistant. The mechanisms of acquired or intrinsic radioresistance of head and neck tumors are still unclear. More recently molecular research focused on alterations in cell cycle control and resistance to programmed cell death in tumor cells as possible mechanisms of radioresistance. Some molecular targets of radiosensitivity or radioresistance (e.g. specific oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes) are known in specific tumor cells or tumor model systems. Such key targets for head and neck cancer cells are also emerging in in vitro studies. However, it is unclear so far if the modification of such molecular targets in vivo leads to an increased tumor selective radiosensitivity. Nevertheless, selected molecular targets could be potential novel tools for modifying radiosensitivity through gene therapy in patients with radioresistant head and neck cancers. (orig.)

  17. Photoacoustic Image Analysis for Cancer Detection and Building a Novel Ultrasound Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Saugata

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a rapidly emerging non-invasive soft tissue imaging modality which has the potential to detect tissue abnormality at early stage. Photoacoustic images map the spatially varying optical absorption property of tissue. In multiwavelength photoacoustic imaging, the soft tissue is imaged with different wavelengths, tuned to the absorption peaks of the specific light absorbing tissue constituents or chromophores to obtain images with different contrasts of the same tissue sample. From those images, spatially varying concentration of the chromophores can be recovered. As multiwavelength PA images can provide important physiological information related to function and molecular composition of the tissue, so they can be used for diagnosis of cancer lesions and differentiation of malignant tumors from benign tumors. In this research, a number of parameters have been extracted from multiwavelength 3D PA images of freshly excised human prostate and thyroid specimens, imaged at five different wavelengths. Using marked histology slides as ground truths, region of interests (ROI) corresponding to cancer, benign and normal regions have been identified in the PA images. The extracted parameters belong to different categories namely chromophore concentration, frequency parameters and PA image pixels and they represent different physiological and optical properties of the tissue specimens. Statistical analysis has been performed to test whether the extracted parameters are significantly different between cancer, benign and normal regions. A multidimensional [29 dimensional] feature set, built with the extracted parameters from the 3D PA images, has been divided randomly into training and testing sets. The training set has been used to train support vector machine (SVM) and neural network (NN) classifiers while the performance of the classifiers in differentiating different tissue pathologies have been determined by the testing dataset. Using the NN

  18. Pitfalls of Imaging in Breast Cancer Diagnosis:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kalantari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available "nWith the introduction of mammography for early diagnosis of breast cancer a new horizon is created in breast cancer diagnosis. Instead of palpated easy-to-manage lesions, now the surgeon is confronted with non palpable findings on the mammogram, sometimes very difficult for decision, that highlight the importance of the role of the interventional breast radiologist in the team and surgeon-radiologist collaboration. "nThis close collaboration would eliminate many difficulties in correct cancer diagnosis, both for the radiologist and the surgeon. "nIn this study, reviewing interesting difficult cases during the last 8 years, we present all pitfalls in imaging that can be avoided in majority by team work collaboration.  

  19. SPECT imaging for breast cancer staging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate staging in breast cancer, including tumour sizing and the assessment of nodal and distant metastases, is required in order to plan surgery and post-operative therapy. Medical imaging techniques have made an important contribution to the diagnosis of carcinoma of the breast and the evaluation of local, regional and distant metastases. The study is aimed at establishing certain aspects of the diagnostic importance and priority of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging in breast cancer. SPECT was carried out just after planar scintigraphy and then after intravenous injection of different radiopharmaceuticals in 45 women with histologically confirmed post-operation breast cancer. In 21 patients under loco-regional control of the disease before and/or after surgery, planar mammoscintigraphy and SPECT were conducted after intravenous injection of 99Tcm-MIBI (methoxyisobutyl isonitrile) or 99Tcm-anti-CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen) monoclonal antibody (MoAb). Bone SPECT was carried out in 24 patients when whole body scintigraphy was unable to determine the exact localization of bone metastatic lesions in the skull, thorax and pelvis. The results suggest that SPECT with 99Tcm-MIBI and 99Tcm-anti-CEA MoAb has high sensitivity and improves the results of conventional planar scintigraphy for breast cancer detection. Breast SPECT is a preferable method for tumour and lymph node imaging because of the excellent separation of the deep breast structures from the myocardium in the left breast and of the right breast from the liver, thus improving the resolution of small, deep seated lesions. SPECT improves breast cancer staging, and determines the tumour, nodule and metastasis categories, which are important for the treatment strategy and prognosis of the disease. (author). 10 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs

  20. Molecular profiling of breast cancer: portraits but not physiognomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancers differ in response to treatment and may have a divergent clinical course despite having a similar histopathological appearance. New technology using DNA microarrays provides a systematic method to identify key markers for prognosis and treatment response by profiling thousands of genes expressed in a single cancer. Microarray profiling of 38 invasive breast cancers now confirms striking molecular differences between ductal carcinoma specimens and suggests a new classification for oestrogen-receptor negative breast cancer. Future approaches will need to include methods for high-throughput clinical validation and the ability to analyze microscopic samples

  1. Molecular Imaging of Tumors Using a Quantitative T1 Mapping Technique via Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Kelsey Herrmann; Johansen, Mette L.; Craig, Sonya E.; Jason Vincent; Michael Howell; Ying Gao; Lan Lu; Bernadette Erokwu; Agnes, Richard S.; Zheng-Rong Lu; Pokorski, Jonathan K.; James Basilion; Vikas Gulani; Mark Griswold; Chris Flask

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) with molecular imaging agents would allow for the specific localization of brain tumors. Prior studies using T 1-weighted MR imaging demonstrated that the SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA)3 molecular imaging agent labeled heterotopic xenograft models of brain tumors more intensely than non-specific contrast agents using conventional T 1-weighted imaging techniques. In this study, we used a dynamic quantitative T 1 mapping strategy to more ob...

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnosis of prostatic cancer is histological. Apart from rectal examination, only imaging techniques allow evaluation of the extension of the cancer. Magnetic Resonance imaging (MRI) was performed with a Magniscan 5000 (Thomson C.G.R., France) apparatus. Three types of sequences were used: a short RT sequence (30/500, a multi-echo sequence with a long RT (40/2500) and echo gradient sequences (12 scans in less than 3 minutes). The MRI study of the pelvis is favoured by the abundance of fat which gives good contrast, spontaneous visualization of the vessels and the presence of the bladder with a high signal for urine in T2. This provides a very good anatomical study in three planes. In prostatic cancer, the study of the long sequence signal reveals heterogeneity of the prostatic signal on the second echo, but this is a non-specific variation. The staging of prostatic cancer is facilitated by scans in three planes. Different examples are presented in relation to various stages of the disease. Three clinical cases demonstrate that Magnetic Resonance may become an important element in the choice of treatment

  3. Hyperspectral imaging of skin and lung cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zherdeva, Larisa A.; Bratchenko, Ivan A.; Alonova, Marina V.; Myakinin, Oleg O.; Artemyev, Dmitry N.; Moryatov, Alexander A.; Kozlov, Sergey V.; Zakharov, Valery P.

    2016-04-01

    The problem of cancer control requires design of new approaches for instrumental diagnostics, as the accuracy of cancer detection on the first step of diagnostics in clinics is slightly more than 50%. In this study, we present a method of visualization and diagnostics of skin and lung tumours based on registration and processing of tissues hyperspectral images. In a series of experiments registration of hyperspectral images of skin and lung tissue samples is carried out. Melanoma, basal cell carcinoma, nevi and benign tumours are studied in skin ex vivo and in vivo experiments; adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas are studied in ex vivo lung experiments. In a series of experiments the typical features of diffuse reflection spectra for pathological and normal tissues were found. Changes in tissues morphology during the tumour growth lead to the changes of blood and pigments concentration, such as melanin in skin. That is why tumours and normal tissues maybe differentiated with information about spectral response in 500-600 nm and 600 - 670 nm areas. Thus, hyperspectral imaging in the visible region may be a useful tool for cancer detection as it helps to estimate spectral properties of tissues and determine malignant regions for precise resection of tumours.

  4. SEGMENTATION OF LUNG CANCER PET SCAN IMAGES USING FUZZY CMEANS

    OpenAIRE

    Santhosh T; Narasimha Prasad L V

    2014-01-01

    Image segmentation plays a vital role in medical image processing. Eventually, the proposed work is subjected to classify the tumour and non-tumour parts, followed by the segmentation of tumour region in PET scan images. Lung cancer has been the largest cause of cancer deaths. This paper focuses on Fuzzy C means algorithm for Lung tumour part segmentation of PET scan images to diagnose accurately the region of cancer. A PET scan can often detect cellular level metabolic changes at the earl...

  5. Functional and molecular image guidance in radiotherapy treatment planning optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Shiva K; Ten Haken, Randall K

    2011-04-01

    Functional and molecular imaging techniques are increasingly being developed and used to quantitatively map the spatial distribution of parameters, such as metabolism, proliferation, hypoxia, perfusion, and ventilation, onto anatomically imaged normal organs and tumor. In radiotherapy optimization, these imaging modalities offer the promise of increased dose sparing to high-functioning subregions of normal organs or dose escalation to selected subregions of the tumor as well as the potential to adapt radiotherapy to functional changes that occur during the course of treatment. The practical use of functional/molecular imaging in radiotherapy optimization must take into cautious consideration several factors whose influences are still not clearly quantified or well understood including patient positioning differences between the planning computed tomography and functional/molecular imaging sessions, image reconstruction parameters and techniques, image registration, target/normal organ functional segmentation, the relationship governing the dose escalation/sparing warranted by the functional/molecular image intensity map, and radiotherapy-induced changes in the image intensity map over the course of treatment. The clinical benefit of functional/molecular image guidance in the form of improved local control or decreased normal organ toxicity has yet to be shown and awaits prospective clinical trials addressing this issue. PMID:21356479

  6. Theragnosis-based combined cancer therapy using doxorubicin-conjugated microRNA-221 molecular beacon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonghwan; Choi, Kyung-Ju; Moon, Sung Ung; Kim, Soonhag

    2016-01-01

    Recently, microRNA (miRNA or miR) has emerged as a new cancer biomarker because of its high expression level in various cancer types and its role in the control of tumor suppressor genes. In cancer studies, molecular imaging and treatment based on target cancer markers have been combined to facilitate simultaneous cancer diagnosis and therapy. In this study, for combined therapy with diagnosis of cancer, we developed a doxorubicin-conjugated miR-221 molecular beacon (miR-221 DOXO MB) in a single platform composed of three different nucleotides: miR-221 binding sequence, black hole quencher 1 (BHQ1), and doxorubicin binding site. Imaging of endogenous miR-221 was achieved by specific hybridization between miR-221 and the miR-221 binding site in miR-221 DOXO MB. The presence of miR-221 triggered detachment of the quencher oligo and subsequent activation of a fluorescent signal of miR-221 DOXO MB. Simultaneous cancer therapy in C6 astrocytoma cells and nude mice was achieved by inhibition of miRNA-221 function that downregulates tumor suppressor genes. The detection of miR-221 expression and inhibition of miR-221 function by miR-221 DOXO MB provide the feasibility as a cancer theragnostic probe. Furthermore, a cytotoxic effect was induced by unloading of doxorubicin intercalated into miR-221 DOXO MB inside cells. Loss of miR-221 function and cytotoxicity induced by the miR-221 DOXO MB provides combined therapeutic efficacy against cancers. This method could be used as a new theragnostic probe with enhanced therapy to detect and inhibit many cancer-related miRNAs. PMID:26454049

  7. Three-photon imaging of ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Jennifer K.; Amirsolaimani, Babak; Rice, Photini; Hatch, Kenneth; Kieu, Khanh

    2016-02-01

    Optical imaging methods have the potential to detect ovarian cancer at an early, curable stage. Optical imaging has the disadvantage that high resolution techniques require access to the tissue of interest, but miniature endoscopes that traverse the natural orifice of the reproductive tract, or access the ovaries and fallopian tubes through a small incision in the vagina wall, can provide a minimally-invasive solution. We have imaged both rodent and human ovaries and fallopian tubes with a variety of endoscope-compatible modalities. The recent development of fiber-coupled femtosecond lasers will enable endoscopic multiphoton microscopy (MPM). We demonstrated two- and three-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF, 3PEF), and second- and third-harmonic generation microscopy (SHG, THG) in human ovarian and fallopian tube tissue. A study was undertaken to understand the mechanisms of contrast in these images. Six patients (normal, cystadenoma, and ovarian adenocarcinoma) provided ovarian and fallopian tube biopsies. The tissue was imaged with three-dimensional optical coherence tomography, multiphoton microscopy, and frozen for histological sectioning. Tissue sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, Masson's trichrome, and Sudan black. Approximately 1 μm resolution images were obtained with an excitation source at 1550 nm. 2PEF signal was absent. SHG signal was mainly from collagen. 3PEF and THG signal came from a variety of sources, including a strong signal from fatty connective tissue and red blood cells. Adenocarcinoma was characterized by loss of SHG signal, whereas cystic abnormalities showed strong SHG. There was limited overlap of two- and three- photon signals, suggesting that three-photon imaging can provide additional information for early diagnosis of ovarian cancer.

  8. Inversion of Strong Field Photoelectron Spectra for Molecular Orbital Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Puthumpally-Joseph, R; Peters, M; Nguyen-Dang, T T; Atabek, O; Charron, E

    2016-01-01

    Imaging structures at the molecular level is a fast developing interdisciplinary research field that spans across the boundaries of physics and chemistry. High spatial resolution images of molecules can be obtained with photons or ultrafast electrons. In addition, images of valence molecular orbitals can be extracted via tomographic techniques based on the coherent XUV radiation emitted by a molecular gas exposed to an intense ultra-short infrared laser pulse. In this paper, we demonstrate that similar information can be obtained by inverting energy resolved photoelectron spectra using a simplified analytical model.

  9. Molecular genetics of breast cancer progression

    OpenAIRE

    Sigurður Ingvarsson 1956

    1999-01-01

    Somatic changes in the genome of breast cancer cells include amplifications, deletions and gene mutations. Several chromosome regions harboring known oncogenes are found amplified in breast tumors. Despite the high number of chromosome regions deleted in breast tumors the functional relationship to known genes at these locations and cancer growth is mainly undiscovered. Mutations in two tumor suppressor genes (TSG) have been described in a subset of breast carcinomas. These TSG are the TP53, ...

  10. Improved tumor identification using dual tracer molecular imaging in fluorescence guided brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaochun; Torres, Veronica; Straus, David; Brey, Eric M.; Byrne, Richard W.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.

    2015-03-01

    Brain tumors represent a leading cause of cancer death for people under the age of 40 and the probability complete surgical resection of brain tumors remains low owing to the invasive nature of these tumors and the consequences of damaging healthy brain tissue. Molecular imaging is an emerging approach that has the potential to improve the ability for surgeons to correctly discriminate between healthy and cancerous tissue; however, conventional molecular imaging approaches in brain suffer from significant background signal in healthy tissue or an inability target more invasive sections of the tumor. This work presents initial studies investigating the ability of novel dual-tracer molecular imaging strategies to be used to overcome the major limitations of conventional "single-tracer" molecular imaging. The approach is evaluated in simulations and in an in vivo mice study with animals inoculated orthotopically using fluorescent human glioma cells. An epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) targeted Affibody-fluorescent marker was employed as a targeted imaging agent, and the suitability of various FDA approved untargeted fluorescent tracers (e.g. fluorescein & indocyanine green) were evaluated in terms of their ability to account for nonspecific uptake and retention of the targeted imaging agent. Signal-to-background ratio was used to measure and compare the amount of reporter in the tissue between targeted and untargeted tracer. The initial findings suggest that FDA-approved fluorescent imaging agents are ill-suited to act as untargeted imaging agents for dual-tracer fluorescent guided brain surgery as they suffer from poor delivery to the healthy brain tissue and therefore cannot be used to identify nonspecific vs. specific uptake of the targeted imaging agent where current surgery is most limited.

  11. X ray imaging microscope for cancer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Shealy, David L.; Brinkley, B. R.; Baker, Phillip C.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA technology employed during the Stanford MSFC LLNL Rocket X Ray Spectroheliograph flight established that doubly reflecting, normal incidence multilayer optics can be designed, fabricated, and used for high resolution x ray imaging of the Sun. Technology developed as part of the MSFC X Ray Microscope program, showed that high quality, high resolution multilayer x ray imaging microscopes are feasible. Using technology developed at Stanford University and at the DOE Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Troy W. Barbee, Jr. has fabricated multilayer coatings with near theoretical reflectivities and perfect bandpass matching for a new rocket borne solar observatory, the Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array (MSSTA). Advanced Flow Polishing has provided multilayer mirror substrates with sub-angstrom (rms) smoothnesss for the astronomical x ray telescopes and x ray microscopes. The combination of these important technological advancements has paved the way for the development of a Water Window Imaging X Ray Microscope for cancer research.

  12. Molecular imaging: Bridging the gap between neuroradiology and neurohistology

    OpenAIRE

    Heckl, S; Pipkorn, R.; Nägele, T; Vogel, U; Küker, W.; Voigt, K.

    2004-01-01

    Historically, in vivo imaging methods have largely relied on imaging gross anatomy. More recently it has become possible to depict biological processes at the cellular and molecular level. These new research methods use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), near-infrared optical imaging, scintigraphy, and autoradiography in vivo and in vitro. Of primary interest is the development of methods using MRI and PET with which the progr...

  13. Robust Automatic Breast Cancer Staging Using A Combination of Functional Genomics and Image-Omics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hai; Shen, Yong; Xing, Fuyong; Qi, Xin; Hirshfield, Kim M.; Yang, Lin; Foran, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading cancers worldwide. Precision medicine is a new trend that systematically examines molecular and functional genomic information within each patient's cancer to identify the patterns that may affect treatment decisions and potential outcomes. As a part of precision medicine, computer-aided diagnosis enables joint analysis of functional genomic information and image from pathological images. In this paper we propose an integrated framework for breast cancer staging using image-omics and functional genomic information. The entire biomedical imaging informatics framework consists of image-omics extraction, feature combination, and classification. First, a robust automatic nuclei detection and segmentation is presented to identify tumor regions, delineate nuclei boundaries and calculate a set of image-based morphological features; next, the low dimensional image-omics is obtained through principal component analysis and is concatenated with the functional genomic features identified by a linear model. A support vector machine for differentiating stage I breast cancer from other stages are learned. We experimentally demonstrate that compared with a single type of representation (image-omics), the combination of image-omics and functional genomic feature can improve the classification accuracy by 3%. PMID:26737959

  14. Pomegranate Extracts and Cancer Prevention: Molecular and Cellular Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Syed, Deeba N.; Chamcheu, Jean-Christopher; Adhami, Vaqar M.; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    There is increased appreciation by the scientific community that dietary phytochemicals can be potential weapons in the fight against cancer. Emerging data has provided new insights into the molecular and cellular framework needed to establish novel mechanism-based strategies for cancer prevention by selective bioactive food components. The unique chemical composition of the pomegranate fruit, rich in antioxidant tannins and flavonoids has drawn the attention of many investigators. Polyphenol...

  15. Molecular epidemiology, prenatal exposure and prevention of cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Molecular Epidemiology was originally conceived as a preventive approach, providing a valuable tool for investigating risk factors for cancer in vulnerable populations. Biomarkers can be used as early indicators of risk for preventative purposes and risk assessment. The present contribution mainly refers to in utero exposures to carcinogens, since humans are especially vulnerable during fetal development. Environmental exposures in utero can increase risks for both childhood and adult cancers...

  16. Anaplastic thyroid cancer: molecular pathogenesis and emerging therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Smallridge, Robert C.; Marlow, Laura A.; Copland, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is a rare malignancy. While external beam radiation therapy has improved locoregional control, the median survival of ∼ 4 months has not changed in more than half a century due to uncontrolled systemic metastases. The objective of this study was to review the literature in order to identify potential new strategies for treating this highly lethal cancer. PubMed searches were the principal source of articles reviewed. The molecular pathogenesis of ATC includes m...

  17. Choline metabolism-based molecular diagnosis of cancer: an update

    OpenAIRE

    Glunde, Kristine; Penet, Marie-France; Jiang, Lu; Jacobs, Michael A.; Zaver M Bhujwalla

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal choline metabolism continues to be identified in multiple cancers. Molecular causes of abnormal choline metabolism are changes in choline kinase-α, ethanolamine kinase-α, phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C and -D and glycerophosphocholine phosphodiesterases, as well as several choline transporters. The net outcome of these enzymatic changes is an increase in phosphocholine and total choline (tCho) and, in some cancers, a relative decrease of glycerophosphocholine. The incre...

  18. Molecular mechanisms of TRAIL-induced apoptosis of cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Tumor Necrosis Factor-related Apoptosis-inducing Ligand (TRAIL) is a recently identified member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family[1]. Numerous studies indicate that TRAIL can induce apoptosis of cancer cells but not of normal cells, pointing to the possibility of de-veloping TRAIL into a cancer drug[2-4]. This review will summary the molecular mechanisms of TRAIL-induced apoptosis and discuss the questions to be resolved in this field.

  19. Integrated molecular portrait of non-small cell lung cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Lazar, Vladimir; Suo, Chen; Orear, Cedric; van den Oord, Joost; Balogh, Zsofia; Guegan, Justine; Job, Bastien; Meurice, Guillaume; Ripoche, Hugues; Calza, Stefano; Hasmats, Johanna; Lundeberg, Joakim; Lacroix, Ludovic; Vielh, Philippe; Dufour, Fabienne

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), a leading cause of cancer deaths, represents a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, mostly comprising squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), adenocarcinoma (AC) and large-cell carcinoma (LCC). The objectives of this study were to utilize integrated genomic data including copy-number alteration, mRNA, microRNA expression and candidate-gene full sequencing data to characterize the molecular distinctions between AC and SCC. Methods Comparative genomic hybridiz...

  20. Imaging the Breakdown of Molecular Frame Dynamics through Rotational Uncoupling

    CERN Document Server

    Zipp, Lucas J; Bucksbaum, Philip H

    2016-01-01

    We have observed directly in the time domain the uncoupling of electron motion from the molecular frame due to rotational-electronic coupling in a molecular Rydberg system. In contrast to Born- Oppenheimer dynamics, in which the electron is firmly fixed to the molecular frame, there exists a regime of molecular dynamics known as $l$-uncoupling where the motion of a non-penetrating Rydberg electron decouples from the instantaneous alignment of the molecular frame. We have imaged this unusual regime in time-dependent photoelectron angular distributions of a coherently prepared electron wave packet in the 4$f$ manifold of $N_2$.

  1. Designing an university-level module on molecular imaging chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Why do we need radiopharmacy, radiopharmacy, radiopharmacy training? In this post-genomic era, molecular imaging has gain tremendous interest not only amongst physicians but also from biologists, chemists, physicists, engineers, statisticians, pharmaceutical companies and even from governments. There is no doubt that nuclear medicine has been engaged in molecular medicine more than one decade ago. Positron emission tomography (PET) has reawaken interest in long forgotten radiopharmacy. Only major hospitals in the developed countries have invested in the development of dedicated radiopharmacy laboratory and training or recruitment of radiopharmacist. But PET has forced nuclear medicine to create a radiopharmacy unit and adopt radiopharmacy guidelines such as good radiopharmaceutical practice (GRPP) and good manufacturing practice (GMP). It is compounded by the fact that SPECT radiopharmaceutical chemistry has advanced significantly for both diagnostics and therapeutics, which calls for a high level of understanding on radiopharmaceutical chemistry and technical know-how. These factors eventually lead to introduction of tran ing program, courses and degree program. The most striking examples will be European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) radiopharmacy courses and a series of IAEA activities on GRPP, GMP and technologist training programs. Various forms of training or education program can be formulated for various levels, starting from basic radiopharmacy course to PhD program, depending on the following factors; (1) National interest and policies on bio/medical sector; (2) Size of the nuclear medicine community in the respective country; (3) Institution interest and policies; and (4) Existing infrastructure and programs. Current Radiopharmacy Education in Singapore: In Singapore, all of the major nuclear medicine centers are supervised by radiopharmacists with PhD degree. All of the nuclear medicine technologists in the major centers have got

  2. DNA aptamers as molecular probes for colorectal cancer study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwame Sefah

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding the molecular features of specific tumors can increase our knowledge about the mechanism(s underlying disease development and progression. This is particularly significant for colorectal cancer, which is a heterogeneous complex of diseases developed in a sequential manner through a multistep carcinogenic process. As such, it is likely that tumors with similar characteristics might originate in the same manner and have a similar molecular behavior. Therefore, specific mapping of the molecular features can be potentially useful for both tumor classification and the development of appropriate therapeutic regimens. However, this can only be accomplished by developing high-affinity molecular probes with the ability to recognize specific markers associated with different tumors. Aptamers can most easily meet this challenge based on their target diversity, flexible manipulation and ease of development. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: Using a method known as cell-based Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment (cell-SELEX and colorectal cancer cultured cell lines DLD-1 and HCT 116, we selected a panel of target-specific aptamers. Binding studies by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy showed that these aptamers have high affinity and selectivity. Our data further show that these aptamers neither recognize normal colon cells (cultured and fresh, nor do they recognize most other cancer cell lines tested. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The selected aptamers can identify specific biomarkers associated with colorectal cancers. We believe that these probes could be further developed for early disease detection, as well as prognostic markers, of colorectal cancers.

  3. Catalytic Molecular Imaging of MicroRNA in Living Cells by DNA-Programmed Nanoparticle Disassembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xuewen; Zeng, Tao; Li, Zhi; Wang, Ganglin; Ma, Nan

    2016-02-24

    Molecular imaging is an essential tool for disease diagnostics and treatment. Direct imaging of low-abundance nucleic acids in living cells remains challenging because of the relatively low sensitivity and insufficient signal-to-background ratio of conventional molecular imaging probes. Herein, we report a class of DNA-templated gold nanoparticle (GNP)-quantum dot (QD) assembly-based probes for catalytic imaging of cancer-related microRNAs (miRNA) in living cells with signal amplification capacity. We show that a single miRNA molecule could catalyze the disassembly of multiple QDs with the GNP through a DNA-programmed thermodynamically driven entropy gain process, yielding significantly amplified QD photoluminescence (PL) for miRNA imaging. By combining the robust PL of QDs with the catalytic amplification strategy, three orders of magnitude improvement in detection sensitivity is achieved in comparison with non-catalytic imaging probe, which enables facile and accurate differentiation between cancer cells and normal cells by miRNA imaging in living cells. PMID:26694689

  4. Molecular Concordance Between Primary Breast Cancer and Matched Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krøigård, Anne Bruun; Larsen, Martin Jakob; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A

    2016-07-01

    Clinical management of breast cancer is increasingly personalized and based on molecular profiling. Often, primary tumors are used as proxies for systemic disease at the time of recurrence. However, recent studies have revealed substantial discordances between primary tumors and metastases, both with respect to traditional clinical treatment targets and on the genomic and transcriptomic level. With the increasing use of molecularly targeted therapy, discordance of actionable molecular targets between primary tumors and recurrences can result in nonoptimal treatment or unnecessary side effects. The purpose of this review is to illuminate the extent of cancer genome evolution through disease progression and the degree of molecular concordance between primary breast cancers and matched metastases. We present an overview of the most prominent studies investigating the expression of endocrine receptors, transcriptomics, and genome aberrations in primary tumors and metastases. In conclusion, biopsy of metastatic lesions at recurrence of breast cancer is encouraged to provide optimal treatment of the disease. Furthermore, molecular profiling of metastatic tissue provides invaluable mechanistic insight into the biology underlying metastatic progression and has the potential to identify novel, potentially druggable, drivers of progression. PMID:27089067

  5. A review of molecular biomarkers for bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miakhil I

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Numerous molecular markers for bladder cancer have been identified and investigated with various laboratory techniques. Molecular markers are isolated from tissue, serum and urine. They fall into proteomic, genetic and epigenetic categories. Some of molecular markers show promising results in terms of facilitating early diagnosis and guiding treatment. Molecular markers or the so- called biomarkers can provide additional information alongside staging, grading and lymphovascular invasion, for better prognostication.Aim:This studyprovides an up-to-date review of the frequently studied and most important biomarkers that have shown consistent relevance in relation to bladder cancer. Methods: The key words were searched on the PubMed, Google scholar and NHS library search engines. Results: More than twenty biomarkers as per our methodology were identified but only half of them have shown consistence relevance in bladder cancer. Conclusion: It is envisaged that a combination of a few biomarkers, which are investigated frequently and have shown clinical relevance, could possibly provide useful information in predicting recurrence and provide useful prognostic information. So far none of the biomarkers for bladder cancer are adopted in the UK standard practice. Despite that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA had approved some of these biomarkers, none of the urology associations incorporated them in to their guidelines as yet. However, it won’t be long before a final consensus is reached to integrate molecular staging in to the current TNM staging system.

  6. Noninvasive brain cancer imaging with a bispecific antibody fragment, generated via click chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Haiming; Hernandez, Reinier; Hong, Hao; Graves, Stephen A.; Yang, Yunan; England, Christopher G.; Theuer, Charles P.; Robert J. Nickles; Cai, Weibo

    2015-01-01

    Given the success of combination therapies for the treatment of cancer, the use of bispecific antibodies targeting multiple cancerous molecular pathways is an attractive strategy to enhance the efficacy of current therapeutic paradigms. However, parallel development of companion diagnostic tools is essential for patient identification, stratification, and the early assessment of treatment efficacies. Herein, we describe the generation of a bispecific construct for noninvasive PET imaging of g...

  7. Nanoradiopharmaceuticals for Bone Cancer Metastasis Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Bianca Feliciano; de Souza Albernaz, Marta; Iscaife, Alexandre; Moreira Leite, Katia Ramos; de Souza Junqueira, Mara; Bernardes, Emerson Soares; da Silva, Emerson Oliveira; Santos-Oliveira, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Drug delivery systems are under intense investigation all around the world, especially in oncology research. Indeed, in some cases, like bone metastasis, nanodrugs may represent the last and best choice for both treatment and imaging of early cancer foci. Nuclear medicine has been using MDP labelled with 99mTc as radiopharmaceuticals for many years; however, their use as nanoradiopharmaceuticals is very innovative and creates a new way to establish radiopharmacy in this new scenario offered by nanotechnology. In this study we developed and tested nano-MDP-labelled with 99mTc in rats induced with bone cancer metastasis and the results showed that it may work in patients. However, some further experiments are required in order to initiate protocols in humans. PMID:25847010

  8. Diffusion tensor imaging of the prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the diagnostic value of DTI for prostate cancer. Methods: From October 2009 to December 2010,44 patients suspected of prostate cancer received MRI and DTI. The data of MRI and DTI were analyzed retrospectively. By histopathology, prostate cancer was proved in 16 patients,and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) was proved in 28 patients. Differences in ADC and FA values between prostate cancer and BPH were compared by independent samples t test. Diagnostic accuracy of FA value and ADC value for prostate cancer was analyzed by using ROC curve, and the diagnostic threshold of FA value and ADC value for prostate cancer was determined. Results: The mean FA value of the tumor regions and BPH were 0.308±0.084 and 0.203 ±0.029, respectively. The mean ADC value of the tumor regions and BPH were (0.883±0.192) × 10-3 mm2/s and ( 1.408 ±0.130) × 10-3 mm2/s, respectively. There were statistically significant differences in ADC and FA values between tumor regions and BPH (t values were 4.833 and 10.779 respectively, P<0.01). The ADC value area under curve of ROC was 0.996 (95% CI was 0.984 to 1.007); the FA value area under curve of ROC was 0.904 (95% CI was 0.812 to 0.996); Combined the FA and ADC value area under curve of ROC is 0.996 (95% CI was 0.984 to 1.007); Using the ADC value of 0.725 × 10-3 mm2/s as the ROC cut off point, the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were 100.0% and 96.0%, respectively; Using the FA value of 0.311 as the ROC cut off point,the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity was 100.0% and 68.7%, respectively. Conclusion: DTI imaging can provide valuable information for prostate cancer diagnosis and differential diagnosis, and improve the diagnosis ability of prostate cancer. (authors)

  9. Optical molecular imaging technology in genetically engineered mouse models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical molecular imaging technology has been rapidly developed to non-invasively, quantitatively and dynamically monitor the in vivo biological processes in real time. It is widely used in various fields of biomedicine and life sciences with advantages like easy operation, real-time study, high sensitivity and low cost image equipment. In recent years, the generation of transgenic animal models in combination with optical molecular imaging reporter genes has greatly facilitated the development of the imaging technology and expanded its application. In this article, we review the research progress by optical molecular imaging in genetically engineered mice (GEM) for 1) investigating tumorigenesis, growth or metastasis, 2) monitoring cell cycle, cell proliferation, apoptosis or angiogenesis, 3) evaluating the inflammation process and 4) providing a modality for pharmaceutical development. (authors)

  10. Molecular Imaging Approaches to Understanding the Roles of Hydrogen Peroxide Biology in Stress and Development

    OpenAIRE

    Dickinson, Bryan Craig

    2010-01-01

    The production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in biological systems is associated with a variety of pathologies including neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and the general process of aging. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that the reactivity of this particular reactive oxygen species (ROS) is also harnessed for physiological processes. Molecular imaging using fluorescence microscopy offers a valuable approach for deciphering the multifaceted roles of H2O2 in biological processes. ...

  11. Molecular Sensing and Imaging of Human Disease Cells and Their Responses to Biochemical Stimuli

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Lifu

    2015-01-01

    The overall goal of this dissertation is to develop noninvasive imaging techniques that allow us not only to detect diseased cells but also to study the molecular mechanisms underlying these diseases. Atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy are applied to measure cellular mechanical properties (e.g. Young’s Modulus, adhesion force) and biochemical composition of living cancerous vs. healthy (A549 vs. SAEC) human lung epithelial cells. These biomechanical and biochemical properties c...

  12. Appropriate Contrast Enhancement Measures for Brain and Breast Cancer Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suneet Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical imaging systems often produce images that require enhancement, such as improving the image contrast as they are poor in contrast. Therefore, they must be enhanced before they are examined by medical professionals. This is necessary for proper diagnosis and subsequent treatment. We do have various enhancement algorithms which enhance the medical images to different extents. We also have various quantitative metrics or measures which evaluate the quality of an image. This paper suggests the most appropriate measures for two of the medical images, namely, brain cancer images and breast cancer images.

  13. Novel imaging strategies for upper gastrointestinal tract cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Michael Bau

    2015-01-01

    Accurate pretherapeutic imaging is the cornerstone of all cancer treatment. Unfortunately, modern imaging modalities have several unsolved problems and limitations. The differentiation between inflammation and cancer infiltration, false positive and false negative findings as well as lack of...... confirming biopsies in suspected metastases may have serious negative consequences in cancer patients. This review describes some of these problems and challenges the use of conventional imaging by suggesting new combined strategies that include selective use of confirming biopsies and complementary methods...

  14. Endometrial cancer : from a molecular genetic perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Smid-Koopman (Ellen)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe first observations indicative of a role of genetic factors in carcinogenesis were made as early as 1912, when Rous demonstrated that a filterable agent (i.e. virus) could induce cancer in chicken (Rous 1965). In 1914, Boveri postulated a "genetic" theory on carcinogenesis by hypothes

  15. Tight binding description of the STM image of molecular chains

    OpenAIRE

    Calev, Yoel; Cohen, Hezy; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Nitzan, Abraham; Porath, Danny

    2004-01-01

    A tight binding model for scanning tunneling microscopy images of a molecule adsorbed on a metal surface is described. The model is similar in spirit to that used to analyze conduction along molecular wires connecting two metal leads and makes it possible to relate these two measurements and the information that may be gleaned from the corresponding results. In particular, the dependence of molecular conduction properties along and across a molecular chain on the chain length, intersite elect...

  16. Molecular markers as therapeutic targets in lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hsin-Hui Tseng; Biao He

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is responsible for 29% of cancer deaths in the United States and has very low 5-year survival rates of approximately 11% in men and 15% in women.Although the early diagnosis of lung cancer may increase the survival rate with adequate treatment,advanced lung cancers are often metastasized and receive limited benefit from therapeutic regimens.As conventional treatments for lung cancer reach their limitations,researchers have attempted to discover novel drug therapies aimed at specific targets contributing to the progression of tumorigenesis.Recent advances in systems biology have enabled the molecular biology of lung carcinogenesis to be elucidated.Our understanding of the physiologic processes of tumor development provide a means to design more effective and specific drugs with less toxicity,thereby accelerating the delivery of new drug therapies to the patient's bedside.

  17. The epidemiology and molecular mechanisms linking obesity, diabetes, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Rosalyn D; Gallagher, Emily J; Scheinman, Eyal J; Damouni, Rawan; LeRoith, Derek

    2013-01-01

    The worldwide epidemic of obesity is associated with increasing rates of the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Epidemiological studies have reported that these conditions are linked to increased rates of cancer incidence and mortality. Obesity, particularly abdominal obesity, is associated with insulin resistance and the development of dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, and ultimately type 2 diabetes. Although many metabolic abnormalities occur with obesity and type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia appear to be central to these conditions and may contribute to dyslipidemia and altered levels of circulating estrogens and androgens. In this review, we will discuss the epidemiological and molecular links between obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cancer, and how hyperinsulinemia and dyslipidemia may contribute to cancer development. We will discuss how these metabolic abnormalities may interact with estrogen signaling in breast cancer growth. Finally, we will discuss the effects of type 2 diabetes medications on cancer risk. PMID:23810003

  18. Molecular Targets of TRAIL-Sensitizing Agents in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Monteleone

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL, a member of the TNF superfamily, interacts with its functional death receptors (DRs and induces apoptosis in a wide range of cancer cell types. Therefore, TRAIL has been considered as an attractive agent for cancer therapy. However, many cancers are resistant to TRAIL-based therapies mainly due to the reduced expression of DRs and/or up-regulation of TRAIL pathway-related anti-apoptotic proteins. Compounds that revert such defects restore the sensitivity of cancer cells to TRAIL, suggesting that combined therapies could help manage neoplastic patients. In this article, we will focus on the TRAIL-sensitizing effects of natural products and synthetic compounds in colorectal cancer (CRC cells and discuss the molecular mechanisms by which such agents enhance the response of CRC cells to TRAIL.

  19. Potential of biological images for radiation therapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Recent technical advances in 3D conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy (3DCRT and IMRT) based, on patient-specific CT and MRI images, have the potential of delivering exquisitely conformal dose distributions to the target volume while avoiding critical structures. Emerging clinical results in terms of reducing treatment-related morbidity and increasing local control appear promising. Recent developments in imaging have suggested that biological images may further positively impact cancer diagnosis, characterization and therapy. While in the past radiological images are largely anatomical, the new types of images can provide metabolic, biochemical, physiological, functional and molecular (genotypic and phenotypic) information. For radiation therapy, images that give information about factors (e.g. tumor hypoxia, Tpot) that influence radiosensitivity and treatment outcome can be regarded as radiobiological images. The ability of IMRT to 'paint' (in 2D) or 'sculpt' (in 3D) the dose, and produce exquisitely conformal dose distributions begs the '64 million dollar question' as to how to paint or sculpt, and whether biological imaging may provide the pertinent information. Can this new approach provide 'radiobiological phenotypes' non-invasively, and incrementally improve upon the predictive assays of radiobiological characteristics such as proliferative activity (Tpot - the potential doubling time), radiosensitivity (SF2 - the surviving fraction at a dose of 2 Gy), energy status (relative to sublethal damage repair), pH (a possible surrogate of hypoxia), tumor hypoxia, etc. as prognosticator(s) of radiation treatment outcome. Important for IMRT, the spatial (geometrical) distribution of the radiobiological phenotypes provide the basis for dose distribution design to conform to both the physical (geometrical) and the biological attributes. Copyright (2001) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  20. MRI Reporter Genes for Noninvasive Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caixia Yang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is one of the most important imaging technologies used in clinical diagnosis. Reporter genes for MRI can be applied to accurately track the delivery of cell in cell therapy, evaluate the therapy effect of gene delivery, and monitor tissue/cell-specific microenvironments. Commonly used reporter genes for MRI usually include genes encoding the enzyme (e.g., tyrosinase and β-galactosidase, the receptor on the cells (e.g., transferrin receptor, and endogenous reporter genes (e.g., ferritin reporter gene. However, low sensitivity limits the application of MRI and reporter gene-based multimodal imaging strategies are common including optical imaging and radionuclide imaging. These can significantly improve diagnostic efficiency and accelerate the development of new therapies.

  1. Integrating tumor microenvironment with cancer molecular classifications

    OpenAIRE

    Becht, Etienne; De Reyniès, Aurélien; Fridman, Wolf H.

    2015-01-01

    Editorial summary The composition of the tumor microenvironment is associated with a patient's prognosis and can be therapeutically targeted. A link between the cellular composition and genomic features of the tumor and its response to immunotherapy is beginning to emerge. Analyzing the microenvironment of tumor molecular subgroups can be a useful approach to tailor immunotherapies.

  2. Molecular buckets: cyclodextrins for oral cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Calleja, P.; Huarte, J; Agüeros, M.; Ruiz-Gaton, L. (Luisa); Espuelas, S.; J.M. Irache

    2012-01-01

    The oral route is preferred by patients for drug administration due to its convenience, resulting in improved compliance. Unfortunately, for a number of drugs (e.g., anticancer drugs), this route of administration remains a challenge. Oral chemotherapy may be an attractive option and especially appropriate for chronic treatment of cancer. However, this route of administration is particularly complicated for the administration of anticancer drugs ascribed to Class IV of the Biopharmaceutical C...

  3. Enhancing contrast and quantitation by spatial frequency domain fluorescence molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jessica; Hathi, Deep; Zhou, Haiying; Shokeen, Monica; Akers, Walter J.

    2016-03-01

    Optical imaging with fluorescent contrast agents is highly sensitive for molecular imaging but is limited in depth to a few centimeters below the skin. Planar fluorescence imaging with full-field, uniform illumination and scientific camera image capture provides a portable and robust configuration for real-time, sensitive fluorescence detection with scalable resolution, but is inherently surface weighted and therefore limited in depth to a few millimeters. At the NIR region (700-1000 nm), tissue absorption and autofluorescence are relatively reduced, increasing depth penetration and reducing background signal, respectively. Optical imaging resolution scales with depth, limiting microscopic resolution with multiphoton microscopy and optical coherence tomography to skin and peri-tumoral tissues are not uniform, varying in thickness and color, complicating subsurface fluorescence measurements. Diffuse optical imaging methods have been developed that better quantify optical signals relative to faster full-field planar reflectance imaging, but require long scan times, complex instrumentation, and reconstruction algorithms. Here we report a novel strategy for rapid measurement of subsurface fluorescence using structured light illumination to improve quantitation of deep-seated fluorescence molecular probe accumulation. This technique, in combination with highly specific, tumor-avid fluorescent molecular probes, will easily integrate noninvasive diagnostics for superficial cancers and fluorescence guided surgery.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of anal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of primary and recurrent anal carcinoma, and to demonstrate the commonest patterns of local and distant disease spread. METHODS: A retrospective review was performed of 27 cases of biopsy-proven anal carcinoma, where MRI was used for primary staging (9 patients) or suspected recurrence (18 patients). Two oncological radiologists reviewed the MR images, following a standardized approach. The size, extent and signal characteristics of the anal tumour were documented. Metastatic disease spread to lymph nodes, viscera and bone was recorded. In all, 7 patients with recurrent disease underwent surgery and subsequent histological correlation was performed. RESULTS: Primary and recurrent tumours were of high signal intensity relative to skeletal muscle on T2-weighted images (T2WI), and of low to intermediate signal intensity on T1-weighted images (T1WI). Lymph node metastases were of similar signal intensity to the anal cancer. Recurrent tumours were more locally advanced than primary tumours and extended into adjacent organs and the pelvic skeleton. Recurrent lymph node disease involved perirectal, presacral and internal iliac nodes more commonly than did primary lymph node disease. CONCLUSION: MRI can be useful in the primary staging of bulky tumours or of those with a long craniocaudal extent. MR has a role in the preoperative evaluation and surgical planning of cases of recurrent disease following radiotherapy

  5. The development of nanobody probes for molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nanobody is a novel antibody fragment, which has beneficial biophysical and pharmacokinetic properties, such as the small molecular weight, high affinity and specificity for antigen. Nanobody is ideally suitable for molecular imaging as a targeting probe that could label antigen at nmol level in vitro. In animal models of xenografted tumor, atherosclerotic plaques and brain disorders, the target tissues were specifically and clearly detected and the high tumor-to-blood (T/B) ratios were obtained. Structural or chemical modified nanobodies will have higher affinity and retention to target tissues, and be convenient for the application of molecular imaging. With the development of the related research, nanobody-based molecular imaging will be gradually transformed into the clinical applications, and play an important role in early diagnosis and therapeutic assessment. (authors)

  6. Evaluation of 68Ga-Labeled MG7 Antibody: A Targeted Probe for PET/CT Imaging of Gastric Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bing Xu; Xiaowei Li; Jipeng Yin; Cong Liang; Lijuan Liu; Zhaoyan Qiu; Liping Yao; Yongzhan Nie; Jing Wang; Kaichun Wu

    2015-01-01

    MG7-Ag, a specific gastric cancer-associated antigen, can be used to non-invasively monitor gastric cancer by molecular imaging with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). In this study, we prepared and evaluated a 68Ga-labeled MG7 antibody as a molecular probe for nanoPET/CT imaging of gastric cancer in a BGC-823 tumor xenografted mouse model. Macrocyclic chelator 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-N,N0,N00-triacetic acid (NOTA)-conjugated MG7 antibody was synthesized and radiolabel...

  7. Novel approach to improve molecular imaging research: Correlation between macroscopic and molecular pathological findings in patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Ingrid, E-mail: i.boehm@uni-bonn.de [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, ZARF Project, Center for Molecular Imaging Research MBMB, Philipps University of Marburg, Baldingerstrasse, 35039 Marburg (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: Currently, clinical research approaches are sparse in molecular imaging studies. Moreover, possible links between imaging features and pathological laboratory parameters are unknown, so far. Therefore, the goal was to find a possible relationship between imaging features and peripheral blood cell apoptosis, and thereby to present a novel way to complement molecular imaging research. Materials and methods: The investigation has been done in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a prototype of an autoimmune disease characterized by multiorgan involvement, autoantibody production, and disturbed apoptosis. Retrospectively, radiological findings have been compared to both autoantibody findings and percentage apoptotic blood cells. Results: Two SLE groups could be identified: patients with normal (annexin V binding < 20%), and with increased apoptosis (annexin V binding > 20%) of peripheral blood cells. The frequency of radiological examinations in SLE patients significantly correlated with an increased percentage of apoptotic cells (p < 0.005). In patients with characteristic imaging findings (e.g. lymph node swelling, pleural effusion) an elevated percentage of apoptotic cells was present. In contrast SLE-patients with normal imaging findings or uncharacteristic results of minimal severity had normal percentages of apoptotic blood cells. Conclusion: This correlation between radiographic findings and percentage of apoptotic blood cells provides (1) further insight into pathological mechanisms of SLE, (2) will offer the possibility to introduce apoptotic biomarkers as molecular probes for clinical molecular imaging approaches in future to early diagnose organ complaints in patients with SLE, and (3) is a plea to complement molecular imaging research by this clinical approach.

  8. Novel approach to improve molecular imaging research: Correlation between macroscopic and molecular pathological findings in patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Currently, clinical research approaches are sparse in molecular imaging studies. Moreover, possible links between imaging features and pathological laboratory parameters are unknown, so far. Therefore, the goal was to find a possible relationship between imaging features and peripheral blood cell apoptosis, and thereby to present a novel way to complement molecular imaging research. Materials and methods: The investigation has been done in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a prototype of an autoimmune disease characterized by multiorgan involvement, autoantibody production, and disturbed apoptosis. Retrospectively, radiological findings have been compared to both autoantibody findings and percentage apoptotic blood cells. Results: Two SLE groups could be identified: patients with normal (annexin V binding 20%) of peripheral blood cells. The frequency of radiological examinations in SLE patients significantly correlated with an increased percentage of apoptotic cells (p < 0.005). In patients with characteristic imaging findings (e.g. lymph node swelling, pleural effusion) an elevated percentage of apoptotic cells was present. In contrast SLE-patients with normal imaging findings or uncharacteristic results of minimal severity had normal percentages of apoptotic blood cells. Conclusion: This correlation between radiographic findings and percentage of apoptotic blood cells provides (1) further insight into pathological mechanisms of SLE, (2) will offer the possibility to introduce apoptotic biomarkers as molecular probes for clinical molecular imaging approaches in future to early diagnose organ complaints in patients with SLE, and (3) is a plea to complement molecular imaging research by this clinical approach.

  9. Gastrointestinal cancers in inflammatory bowel disease: An update with emphasis on imaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barral, Matthias; Dohan, Anthony; Allez, Matthieu; Boudiaf, Mourad; Camus, Marine; Laurent, Valérie; Hoeffel, Christine; Soyer, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal cancers depending on the specific type of IBD, the extent of the disease and its location. Patients with IBD and extensive colonic involvement are at increased risk of colorectal cancer whereas patients with Crohn disease have an increased risk for small-bowel and anal carcinoma. These cancers preferentially develop on sites of longstanding inflammation. In regards to colon cancer, several key pathogenic events are involved, including chromosomal instability, microsatellite instability and hypermethylation. The risk for colon cancer in IBD patients correlates with longer disease duration, presence of sclerosing cholangitis, pancolitis, family history of colorectal cancer, early onset of the disease and severity of bowel inflammation. Identification of increased colorectal cancer risk in individual IBD patients has led to formal surveillance guidelines. Conversely, although an increased risk for other types of cancer has been well identified, no specific formal screening recommendations exist. Consequently, the role of the radiologist is crucial to alert the referring gastroenterologist when a patient with IBD presents with unusual imaging findings at either computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. This review provides an update on demographics, molecular, clinical and histopathological features of gastrointestinal cancers in IBD patients including colorectal carcinoma, small bowel adenocarcinoma, neuroendocrine tumors and anal carcinoma, along with a special emphasis on the current role of CT and MR imaging. PMID:26315381

  10. Molecular Imaging of Healing After Myocardial Infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Naresh, Nivedita K; Ben-Mordechai, Tamar; Leor, Jonathan; Epstein, Frederick H

    2011-01-01

    The progression from acute myocardial infarction (MI) to heart failure continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Potential new therapies for improved infarct healing such as stem cells, gene therapy, and tissue engineering are being investigated. Noninvasive imaging plays a central role in the evaluation of MI and infarct healing, both clinically and in preclinical research. Traditionally, imaging has been used to assess cardiac structure, function, perfusion, and viability. H...

  11. TCGA divides gastric cancer into four molecular subtypes:implications for individualized therapeutics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths in the world. The treatment of gastric cancer is chalenging because of its highly heterogeneous etiology and clinical characteristics. Recent genomic and molecular characterization of gastric cancer, especialy the findings reported by the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), have shed light on the heterogeneity and potential targeted therapeutics for four different subtypes of gastric cancer.

  12. Functional and Molecular Image Guidance in Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Shiva K.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2011-01-01

    Functional and molecular imaging techniques are increasingly being developed and used to quantitatively map the spatial distribution of parameters such as metabolism, proliferation, hypoxia, perfusion and ventilation, among others, onto anatomically-imaged normal organs and tumor. In radiotherapy optimization, these imaging modalities offer the promise of increased dose sparing to high functioning subregions of normal organs or dose escalation to selected subregions of tumor, as well as the p...

  13. Nuclear medicine - from physiology to molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The induction of Medical Imaging in clinical practice occurred through Nuclear Medicine in 1937 through the first application of 131-Iodine in tracer imaging. The concept translated rapidly into other areas of clinical medicine through the invention of newer radiopharmaceuticals over the next six decades. The growth of nuclear imaging acted as a catalyst for other imaging modalities like sonography, CT scan and MRI. In effect everywhere nuclear medicine was the stimulus and growth has taken place around its concepts. This in turn strengthened and stimulated further fascinating developments in nuclear medicine so much that today it is the fascinating era of 'FUSION IMAGING' in medical diagnosis. The CT and MRI succeeded in producing exquisite images of human organs with details as close to as a pathologist would see in histology room after the organ is delivered to him. Unfortunately the pathophysiological details of the disease how, why, when etc - remained unanswered. Hence the impact on treatment was not drastic as modulation of disease process is possible only if we know how and why and when it occurred. These searching questions continued to stimulate the research in nuclear medicine and outcome has been tremendous in the last few years

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in peripheral lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by comparison of MRI studies and pathological findings in lung cancer patients. From May 2005 to May 2006, 52 lung cancer patients underwent surgical operation in our division. Forty-five patients, each with a preoperatively recognized peripheral lung lesion underwent the MRI study. Short TI inversion recovery (STIR), high b-value diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with free breathing scanning and dynamic MRI studies were performed. There was no statistically significant difference between adenocarcinoma (n=35) and other carcinomas (n=10) on MRI findings. Twenty-seven adenocarcinomas (less than 30 mm in diameter) were histologically diagnosed as follows: 9 patients with bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC), 12 patients with advanced BAC, and 6 non-BAC cases (adenocarcinoma without a BAC component) group. When the lesions demonstrated a strong enhancement (steep type) on dynamic studies or showed a strong signal (score 4) intensity on DWI, we judged them to be positive (indicating invasion). Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 94.4%, 66.6%, and 85.2%, respectively. The MRI studies permitted the acquisition of more detailed information on peripheral lung adenocarcinomas, and high b-value DWI is valuable as a supporting tool in evaluating the grade of malignancy. (author)

  15. Molecular Optical Coherence Tomography Contrast Enhancement and Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenburg, Amy L.; Applegate, Brian E.; Tucker-Schwartz, Jason M.; Skala, Melissa C.; Kim, Jongsik; Boppart, Stephen A.

    Histochemistry began as early as the nineteenth century, with the development of synthetic dyes that provided spatially mapped chemical contrast in tissue [1]. Stains such as hematoxylin and eosin, which contrast cellular nuclei and cytoplasm, greatly aid in the interpretation of microscopy images. An analogous development is currently taking place in biomedical imaging, whereby techniques adapted for MRI, CT, and PET now provide in vivo molecular imaging over the entire human body, aiding in both fundamental research discovery and in clinical diagnosis and treatment monitoring. Because OCT offers a unique spatial scale that is intermediate between microscopy and whole-body biomedical imaging, molecular contrast OCT (MCOCT) also has great potential for providing new insight into in vivo molecular processes. The strength of MCOCT lies in its ability to isolate signals from a molecule or contrast agent from the tissue scattering background over large scan areas at depths greater than traditional microscopy techniques while maintaining high resolution.

  16. The motivations and methodology for high-throughput PET imaging of small animals in cancer research

    OpenAIRE

    Aide, Nicolas; Visser, Eric P.; Lheureux, Stéphanie; Heutte, Natacha; Szanda, Istvan; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, small-animal PET imaging has become a vital platform technology in cancer research. With the development of molecularly targeted therapies and drug combinations requiring evaluation of different schedules, the number of animals to be imaged within a PET experiment has increased. This paper describes experimental design requirements to reach statistical significance, based on the expected change in tracer uptake in treated animals as compared to the control group, the num...

  17. Optical and Functional Imaging in Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.H. van der Leest (Cor)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLung cancer is the second most common cancer in men and women, and is the leading cause of cancer related death. In industrialized countries the mortality rate of lung cancer is higher than the mortality rate of breast, colorectal and prostate cancer combined 1. When lung cancer is diagn

  18. Strategies to Optimize Molecularly Targeted Anti-Cancer Agent Combinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Erdogan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic agents which are used in cancer chemotherapy reduced several times the number of neoplastic cells but not fully. Therefore, usage of and ldquo;targeted therapeutics" which were developed with much more rational approach is increasing markedly in patients with solid cancer. Targeted therapeutics due to selective targets aims cancer cells with specific molecular defect thereby, kils the cancer cells, which makes it possible to continue normal cells in a healthy environment. The rapid emergence of hundreds of new agents that modulates ever-growing list of the cancer-specific molecular targets promise great hope for cancer patients. Evaluation of the target agent individually, in combination with standard therapy and other target agents bring about important development challenges. As possible combinations of drugs number is unlimited, the identification of the most promising combinations and giving priority to assessing their strategies are very important.In this article important elements of the development strategy of the target agent combinations will be considered. Difficulties in this kind of combinations of rational pre-clinical and clinical evaluation and possible approaches to overcome these challenges will be discussed. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(4.000: 432-451

  19. Evolving molecularly targeted therapies for advanced-stage thyroid cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Keith C; Ryder, Mabel

    2016-07-01

    Increased understanding of disease-specific molecular targets of therapy has led to the regulatory approval of two drugs (vandetanib and cabozantinib) for the treatment of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), and two agents (sorafenib and lenvatinib) for the treatment of radioactive- iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in both the USA and in the EU. The effects of these and other therapies on overall survival and quality of life among patients with thyroid cancer, however, remain to be more-clearly defined. When applied early in the disease course, intensive multimodality therapy seems to improve the survival outcomes of patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), but salvage therapies for ATC are of uncertain benefit. Additional innovative, rationally designed therapeutic strategies are under active development both for patients with DTC and for patients with ATC, with multiple phase II and phase III randomized clinical trials currently ongoing. Continued effort is being made to identify further signalling pathways with potential therapeutic relevance in thyroid cancers, as well as to elaborate on the complex interactions between signalling pathways, with the intention of translating these discoveries into effective and personalized therapies. Herein, we summarize the progress made in molecular medicine for advanced-stage thyroid cancers of different histotypes, analyse how these developments have altered - and might further refine - patient care, and identify open questions for future research. PMID:26925962

  20. Application of Proteomics to Cancer Molecular Diagnostics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sam HANASH

    2009-01-01

    @@ Strategies to achieve personalized medicine and improve public health encompass assessment of an individual's risk for disease, early detection and molecular classification of disease resulting in an informed choice of the most appropriate treatment instituted at an early stage of disease develop- ment. A major contribution of proteomics in this field is the development of blood based tests to achieve the goals of personalized medicine.

  1. In vivo medical imaging technologies: new possibility in diagnosis of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaretti, Manuela; Zarzavadjian LE Bian, Alban

    2016-08-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers with an important related-mortality worldwide. It is preceded by a multistage pathological state arising from environmental and dietary factors. These factors influence intracellular molecular changes associated with the gastric carcinogenesis. Gastroenterology imaging, such as endoscopy, is essential for an early diagnosis as patients are typically asymptomatic at the onset of gastric cancer. Recent technological advances have allowed the development of novel imaging devices such as narrow-band imaging or high-definition endoscopy. Their accuracy in determining early gastric lesions makes biopsy of tissue unnecessary. They may largely simplify early diagnosis and improved prognosis. We performed a qualitative review about endoscopic application of advanced imaging technologies. PMID:26837334

  2. Molecular imaging of angiogenesis with SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and position emission tomography (PET) are the two main imaging modalities in nuclear medicine. SPECT imaging is more widely available than PET imaging and the radionuclides used for SPECT are easier to prepare and usually have a longer half-life than those used for PET. In addition, SPECT is a less expensive technique than PET. Commonly used gamma emitters are: 99mTc (Emax 141 keV, T1/2 6.02 h), 123I (Emax 529 keV, T1/2 13.0 h) and 111In (Emax 245 keV, T1/2 67.2 h). Compared to clinical SPECT, PET has a higher spatial resolution and the possibility to more accurately estimate the in vivo concentration of a tracer. In preclinical imaging, the situation is quite different. The resolution of microSPECT cameras (1.5 mm). In this report, studies on new radiolabelled tracers for SPECT imaging of angiogenesis in tumours are reviewed. (orig.)

  3. Molecular imaging in neuroendocrine tumors : Molecular uptake mechanisms and clinical results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, Klaas P.; Neels, Oliver N.; Kema, Ido P.; Elsinga, Philip H.; Links, Thera P.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Jager, Pieter L.

    2009-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors can originate almost everywhere in the body and consist of a great variety of subtypes. This paper focuses on molecular imaging methods using nuclear medicine techniques in neuroendocrine tumors, coupling molecular uptake mechanisms of radiotracers with clinical results. A non-

  4. Molecular Imaging of Cyclooxygenase-2 in Canine Transitional Cell Carcinomas In Vitro and In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Cekanova, Maria; Uddin, Md. Jashim; Bartges, Joseph W.; Callens, Amanda; Legendre, Alfred M.; Rathore, Kusum; Wright, Laura; Carter, Amanda; Marnett, Lawrence J

    2013-01-01

    The enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is induced at high levels in tumors, but not in surrounding normal tissues, which makes it an attractive target for molecular imaging of cancer. We evaluated the ability of novel optical imaging agent, fluorocoxib A to detect urinary bladder canine transitional cell carcinomas (K9TCC). Here, we show that fluorocoxib A uptake overlapped with COX-2 expression in primary K9TCC cells in vitro. Using subcutaneously implanted primary K9TCC in athymic mice, we dem...

  5. Multispectral fluorescence imaging of human ovarian and Fallopian tube tissue for early stage cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Tyler; Baggett, Brenda; Rice, Photini; Watson, Jennifer; Orsinger, Gabe; Nymeyer, Ariel C.; Welge, Weston A.; Keenan, Molly; Saboda, Kathylynn; Roe, Denise J.; Hatch, Kenneth; Chambers, Setsuko; Black, John; Utzinger, Urs; Barton, Jennifer

    2015-03-01

    With early detection, five year survival rates for ovarian cancer are over 90%, yet no effective early screening method exists. Emerging consensus suggests that perhaps over 50% of the most lethal form of the disease, high grade serous ovarian cancer, originates in the Fallopian tube. Cancer changes molecular concentrations of various endogenous fluorophores. Using specific excitation wavelengths and emissions bands on a Multispectral Fluorescence Imaging (MFI) system, spatial and spectral data over a wide field of view can be collected from endogenous fluorophores. Wavelength specific reflectance images provide additional information to normalize for tissue geometry and blood absorption. Ratiometric combination of the images may create high contrast between neighboring normal and abnormal tissue. Twenty-six women undergoing oophorectomy or debulking surgery consented the use of surgical discard tissue samples for MFI imaging. Forty-nine pieces of ovarian tissue and thirty-two pieces of Fallopian tube tissue were collected and imaged with excitation wavelengths between 280 nm and 550 nm. After imaging, each tissue sample was fixed, sectioned and HE stained for pathological evaluation. Comparison of mean intensity values between normal, benign, and cancerous tissue demonstrate a general trend of increased fluorescence of benign tissue and decreased fluorescence of cancerous tissue when compared to normal tissue. The predictive capabilities of the mean intensity measurements are tested using multinomial logistic regression and quadratic discriminant analysis. Adaption of the system for in vivo Fallopian tube and ovary endoscopic imaging is possible and is briefly described.

  6. Molecular pathogenesis of sporadic colorectal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Hidetsugu; Kuroda, Hajime; Imai, Yasuo; Hiraishi, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) results from the progressive accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations that lead to the transformation of normal colonic mucosa to adenocarcinoma. Approximately 75% of CRCs are sporadic and occur in people without genetic predisposition or family history of CRC. During the past two decades, sporadic CRCs were classified into three major groups according to frequently altered/mutated genes. These genes have been identified by linkage analyses of cancer-prone families and by individual mutation analyses of candidate genes selected on the basis of functional data. In the first half of this review, we describe the genetic pathways of sporadic CRCs and their clinicopathologic features. Recently, large-scale genome analyses have detected many infrequently mutated genes as well as a small number of frequently mutated genes. These infrequently mutated genes are likely described in a limited number of pathways. Gene-oriented models of CRC progression are being replaced by pathway-oriented models. In the second half of this review, we summarize the present knowledge of this research field and discuss its prospects. PMID:26738600

  7. Advances of Molecular Imaging in Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galovic, Marian; Koepp, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a neuroimaging method that offers insights into the molecular functioning of a human brain. It has been widely used to study metabolic and neurotransmitter abnormalities in people with epilepsy. This article reviews the development of several PET radioligands and their application in studying the molecular mechanisms of epilepsy. Over the last decade, tracers binding to serotonin and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors have been used to delineate the location of the epileptic focus. PET studies have examined the role of opioids, cannabinoids, acetylcholine, and dopamine in modulating neuronal hyperexcitability and seizure termination. In vivo analyses of drug transporters, e.g., P-glycoprotein, have increased our understanding of pharmacoresistance that could inform new therapeutic strategies. Finally, PET experiments targeting neuroinflammation and glutamate receptors might guide the development of novel biomarkers of epileptogenesis. PMID:27113252

  8. Molecular Imaging in Stem Cell Therapy for Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahuan Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is a serious disease of the center nervous system (CNS. It is a devastating injury with sudden loss of motor, sensory, and autonomic function distal to the level of trauma and produces great personal and societal costs. Currently, there are no remarkable effective therapies for the treatment of SCI. Compared to traditional treatment methods, stem cell transplantation therapy holds potential for repair and functional plasticity after SCI. However, the mechanism of stem cell therapy for SCI remains largely unknown and obscure partly due to the lack of efficient stem cell trafficking methods. Molecular imaging technology including positron emission tomography (PET, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, optical imaging (i.e., bioluminescence imaging (BLI gives the hope to complete the knowledge concerning basic stem cell biology survival, migration, differentiation, and integration in real time when transplanted into damaged spinal cord. In this paper, we mainly review the molecular imaging technology in stem cell therapy for SCI.

  9. Self-assembled levan nanoparticles for targeted breast cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun-Jung; Bae, Pan Kee; Chung, Bong Hyun

    2015-01-01

    We report on the targeted imaging of breast cancer using self-assembled levan nanoparticles. Indocyanine green (ICG) was encapsulated in levan nanoparticles via self-assembly. Levan-ICG nanoparticles were found to be successfully accumulated in breast cancer via specific interaction between fructose moieties in levan and overexpressed glucose transporter 5 in breast cancer cells. PMID:25383444

  10. Molecular Signaling Pathways Mediating Osteoclastogenesis Induced by Prostate Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced prostate cancer commonly metastasizes to bone leading to osteoblastic and osteolytic lesions. Although an osteolytic component governed by activation of bone resorbing osteoclasts is prominent in prostate cancer metastasis, the molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer-induced osteoclastogenesis are not well-understood. We studied the effect of soluble mediators released from human prostate carcinoma cells on osteoclast formation from mouse bone marrow and RAW 264.7 monocytes. Soluble factors released from human prostate carcinoma cells significantly increased viability of naïve bone marrow monocytes, as well as osteoclastogenesis from precursors primed with receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand (RANKL). The prostate cancer-induced osteoclastogenesis was not mediated by RANKL as it was not inhibited by osteoprotegerin (OPG). However inhibition of TGFβ receptor I (TβRI), or macrophage-colony stimulating factor (MCSF) resulted in attenuation of prostate cancer-induced osteoclastogenesis. We characterized the signaling pathways induced in osteoclast precursors by soluble mediators released from human prostate carcinoma cells. Prostate cancer factors increased basal calcium levels and calcium fluctuations, induced nuclear localization of nuclear factor of activated t-cells (NFAT)c1, and activated prolonged phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in RANKL-primed osteoclast precursors. Inhibition of calcium signaling, NFATc1 activation, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation significantly reduced the ability of prostate cancer mediators to stimulate osteoclastogenesis. This study reveals the molecular mechanisms underlying the direct osteoclastogenic effect of prostate cancer derived factors, which may be beneficial in developing novel osteoclast-targeting therapeutic approaches

  11. Molecular photoacoustic imaging of follicular thyroid carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi, Jelena; Kothapalli, Sri-Rajashekar; Bohndiek, Sarah;

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the potential of targeted photoacoustic imaging as a non-invasive method for detection of follicular thyroid carcinoma. Experimental Design We determined the presence and activity of two members of matrix metalloproteinase family (MMP), MMP-2 and MMP-9, suggested as biomarkers...

  12. Molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Souček, Karel; Lincová, Eva; Staršíchová, Andrea; Pernicová, Zuzana; Vondráček, Jan; Machala, M.; Kozubík, Alois

    Brno, 2008. s. 11. ISBN 978-80-7013-474-0. [Aktuální problematika genetické toxikologie, 31. pracovní dny České a slovenské společnosti pro mutagenezi zevním prostředím Československé biologické společnosti. 12.05.2008-14.05.2008, Brno] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA310/07/0961; GA ČR(CZ) GA204/07/0834 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : prostate cancer * neuroendocrine differentiation * inflammation Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  13. Multifunctional hydroxyapatite nanoparticles for drug delivery and multimodal molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) is the most important constituent of biological tissues such as bone and teeth and exhibits several characteristic features. HAp nanoparticles (NPs) are good host materials and can be functionalized with various kinds of dopants and substrates. By endowing HAp NPs with desired properties in order to render them suitable for biomedical applications including cellular imaging, non-invasive and quantitative visualisation of molecular process occurring at cellular and subcellular levels becomes possible. Depending on their functional properties, HAp based nanoprobes can be divided into three classes, i.e., luminescent HAp NPs (for both down conversion and up conversion luminescence), magnetic HAp NPs, and luminomagnetic HAp NPs. Luminomagnetic HAp NPs are particularly attractive in terms of bimodal imaging and even multimodal imaging by virtue of their luminescence and magnetism. Functionalized HAp NPs are potential candidates for targeted drug delivery applications. This review (with 166 references) spotlights the cellular imaging applications of three types of HAp NPs. Specific sections cover aspects of molecular imaging and the various imaging modes, a comparison of the common types of nanoprobes for bioimaging, synthetic methods for making the various kinds of HAp NPs, followed by overviews on fluorescent NPs for bioimaging (such as quantum dots, gold nanoclusters, lanthanide-doped or fluorophore-doped NPs), magnetic HAp NPs for use in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), luminomagnetic HAp NPs for bimodal imaging, and sections on drug delivery as well as cellular imaging applications of HAp based nanoprobes (including targeted imaging). (author)

  14. Retinoic acid receptors: from molecular mechanisms to cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Masi, Alessandra; Leboffe, Loris; De Marinis, Elisabetta; Pagano, Francesca; Cicconi, Laura; Rochette-Egly, Cécile; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Ascenzi, Paolo; Nervi, Clara

    2015-02-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), the major bioactive metabolite of retinol or vitamin A, induces a spectrum of pleiotropic effects in cell growth and differentiation that are relevant for embryonic development and adult physiology. The RA activity is mediated primarily by members of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) subfamily, namely RARα, RARβ and RARγ, which belong to the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily of transcription factors. RARs form heterodimers with members of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) subfamily and act as ligand-regulated transcription factors through binding specific RA response elements (RAREs) located in target genes promoters. RARs also have non-genomic effects and activate kinase signaling pathways, which fine-tune the transcription of the RA target genes. The disruption of RA signaling pathways is thought to underlie the etiology of a number of hematological and non-hematological malignancies, including leukemias, skin cancer, head/neck cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, prostate cancer, renal cell carcinoma, pancreatic cancer, liver cancer, glioblastoma and neuroblastoma. Of note, RA and its derivatives (retinoids) are employed as potential chemotherapeutic or chemopreventive agents because of their differentiation, anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, and anti-oxidant effects. In humans, retinoids reverse premalignant epithelial lesions, induce the differentiation of myeloid normal and leukemic cells, and prevent lung, liver, and breast cancer. Here, we provide an overview of the biochemical and molecular mechanisms that regulate the RA and retinoid signaling pathways. Moreover, mechanisms through which deregulation of RA signaling pathways ultimately impact on cancer are examined. Finally, the therapeutic effects of retinoids are reported. PMID:25543955

  15. [Development of molecular targeted therapies in lung cancers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Kenichi; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2014-05-01

    Human cancers usually possess cumulative genetic aberrations. However, recent studies have revealed that the proliferation and survival of specific subsets of lung cancer depend on a few somatic mutation(s), so-called driver mutations. Representative driver mutations include the EGFR mutation and ALK translocation identified in about 40% and 3% of lung adenocarcinomas in Japan, respectively. These tumors are extremely sensitive to the respective tyrosine kinase inhibitors. This sensitivity has encouraged researchers and clinicians to explore novel driver mutations in lung cancers as future molecular targets. Driver mutations reported so far include the HER2 mutation, BRAF mutation, ROS1 translocation, RET translocation, and NTRK translocation in lung adenocarcinomas, and FGFR1 amplification, DDR2 mutation, and FGFR3 translocation in lung squamous cell carcinomas. However, despite initial dramatic responses, the acquisition of resistance to molecular targeted drugs is almost inevitable. Overcoming resistance to molecular targeted drugs, the key drugs at this time, is an urgent issue to improve the outcomes of lung cancer patients. PMID:24946519

  16. The molecular mechanisms between metabolic syndrome and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Wen, Ya-Yuan; Li, Zhi-Rong; Luo, Dong-Lin; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2016-03-18

    Metabolic syndrome, which is extremely common in developed and some developing countries, is a clustering of at least three of five of the following medical conditions: abdominal obesity, elevated blood pressure, elevated fasting plasma glucose, high serum triglycerides, and low high-density lipoprotein levels. It has been proved that there is a strong association between metabolic syndrome and breast cancer. Metabolic syndrome could increase the risk of breast cancer and influence the prognosis of the breast cancer patients. Some characteristic of metabolic syndrome such as obesity and lack of physical exercise are all risk factors for developing breast cancer. The metabolic syndrome mainly include obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypercholesterolemia and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and each of them impacts the risk of breast cancer and the prognosis of the breast cancer patients in different ways. In this Review, we focus on recently uncovered aspects of the immunological and molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the development of this highly prevalent and serious disease. These studies bring new insight into the complex associations between metabolic syndrome and breast cancer and have led to the development of novel therapeutic strategies that might enable a personalized approach in the management of this disease. PMID:26891869

  17. The implications of breast cancer molecular phenotype for radiation oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ShirinSioshansi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The identification of distinct molecular subtypes of breast cancer has advanced the understanding and treatment of breast cancer by providing insight into prognosis, patterns of recurrence and effectiveness of therapy. The prognostic significance of molecular phenotype with regard to distant recurrences and overall survival are well established in the literature and has been readily incorporated into systemic therapy management decisions. However, despite the accumulating data suggesting similar prognostic significance for locoregional recurrence, integration of molecular phenotype into local management decision making has lagged. Although there are some conflicting reports, collectively the literature supports a low risk of local recurrence in the hormone receptor positive luminal subtypes compared to hormone receptor negative subtypes (triple negative and HER2-enriched. The development of targeted therapies, such as trastuzumab for the treatment of HER2-enriched subtype, has been shown to mitigate the increased risk of local recurrence. Unfortunately, no such remedy exists to address the increased risk of local recurrence for patients with triple negative tumors, making it a clinical challenge for radiation oncologists. In this review we discuss the correlation between molecular subtype and local recurrence following either breast conservation therapy or mastectomy. We also explore the possible mechanisms for increased local recurrence in triple negative breast cancer and radiotherapeutic implications for this population, such as the safety of breast conservation, consideration of dose escalation and the appropriateness of accelerated partial breast irradiation.

  18. Environmental effects on molecular biomarkers expression in pancreatic and brain cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensah, Lawrence; Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Massodi, Iqbal; Anbil, Sriram; Mai, Zhiming; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2013-03-01

    A complete understanding of the biological mechanisms regulating devastating disease such as cancer remains elusive. Pancreatic and brain cancers are primary among the cancer types with poor prognosis. Molecular biomarkers have emerged as group of proteins that are preferentially overexpressed in cancers and with a key role in driving disease progression and resistance to chemotherapy. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a cell proliferative biomarker is particularly highly expressed in most cancers including brain and pancreatic cancers. The ability of EGFR to sustain prolong cell proliferation is augmented by biomarkers such as Bax, Bcl-XL and Bcl-2, proteins regulating the apoptotic process. To better understand the role and effect of the microenvironment on these biomarkers in pancreatic cancer (PaCa); we analysed two pancreatic tumor lines (AsPc-1 and MiaPaCa-2) in 2D, 3D in-vitro cultures and in orthotopic tumors at different growth stages. We also investigated in patient derived glioblastoma (GBM) tumor cultures, the ability to utilize the EGFR expression to specifically deliver photosensitizer to the cells for photodynamic therapy. Overall, our results suggest that (1) microenvironment changes affect biomarker expression; thereby it is critical to understand these effects prior to designing combination therapies and (2) EGFR expression in tumor cells indeed could serve as a reliable and a robust biomarker that could be used to design targeted and image-guided photodynamic therapy.

  19. Identification of early cancerous lesion of esophagus with endoscopic images by hyperspectral image technique (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Wei; Chen, Shih-Hua; Chen, Weichung; Wu, I.-Chen; Wu, Ming Tsang; Kuo, Chie-Tong; Wang, Hsiang-Chen

    2016-03-01

    This study presents a method to identify early esophageal cancer within endoscope using hyperspectral imaging technology. The research samples are three kinds of endoscopic images including white light endoscopic, chromoendoscopic, and narrow-band endoscopic images with different stages of pathological changes (normal, dysplasia, dysplasia - esophageal cancer, and esophageal cancer). Research is divided into two parts: first, we analysis the reflectance spectra of endoscopic images with different stages to know the spectral responses by pathological changes. Second, we identified early cancerous lesion of esophagus by principal component analysis (PCA) of the reflectance spectra of endoscopic images. The results of this study show that the identification of early cancerous lesion is possible achieve from three kinds of images. In which the spectral characteristics of NBI endoscopy images of a gray area than those without the existence of the problem the first two, and the trend is very clear. Therefore, if simply to reflect differences in the degree of spectral identification, chromoendoscopic images are suitable samples. The best identification of early esophageal cancer is using the NBI endoscopic images. Based on the results, the use of hyperspectral imaging technology in the early endoscopic esophageal cancer lesion image recognition helps clinicians quickly diagnose. We hope for the future to have a relatively large amount of endoscopic image by establishing a hyperspectral imaging database system developed in this study, so the clinician can take this repository more efficiently preliminary diagnosis.

  20. Molecular markers and targets for colorectal cancer prevention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naveena B JANAKIRAM; Chinthalapally V RAO

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most prevalent cancer in the world. If detected at an early stage, treatment often might lead to cure. As prevention is better than cure, epidemiological studies reveal that having a healthy diet often protects from pro-moting/developing cancer. An important consideration in evaluating new drugs and devices is determining whether a product can effectively treat a targeted disease. There are quite a number of biomarkers making their way into clinical trials and few are awaiting the preclinical efficacy and safety results to enter into clinical trials. Researchers are facing challenges in modifying trial design and defining the right control population, validating biomarker assays from the bio-logical and analytical perspective and using biomarker data as a guideline for decision making. In spite of following all guidelines, the results are disappointing from many of the large clinical trials. To avoid these disappointments, selection of biomarkers and its target drug needs to be evaluated in appropriate animal models for its toxicities and efficacies. The focus of this review is on the few of the potential molecular targets and their biomarkers in colorectal cancers. Strengths and limitations of biomarkers/surrogate endpoints are also discussed. Various pathways involved in tumor cells and the specific agents to target the altered molecular biomarkerin biomolecular pathwayare elucidated. Importance of emerging new platforms siRNAs and miRNAs technology for colorectal cancer therapeutics is reviewed.

  1. Molecular subtyping of breast cancer: opportunities for new therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullan, P B; Millikan, R C

    2007-12-01

    Evidence is accumulating that breast cancer is not one disease but many separate diseases. DNA microarray-based gene expression profiling has demonstrated subtypes with distinct phenotypic features and clinical responses. Prominent among the new subtypes is 'basal-like' breast cancer, one of the 'intrinsic' subtypes defined by negativity for the estrogen, progesterone, and HER2/neu receptors and positivity for cytokeratins-5/6. Focusing on basal-like breast cancer, we discuss how molecular technologies provide new chemotherapy targets, optimising treatment whilst sparing patients from unnecessary toxicity. Clinical trials are needed that incorporate long-term follow-up of patients with well-characterised tumour markers. Whilst the absence of an obvious dominant oncogene driving basal-like breast cancer and the lack of specific therapeutic agents are serious stumbling blocks, this review will highlight several promising therapeutic candidates currently under evaluation. Thus, new molecular technologies should provide a fundamental foundation for better understanding breast and other cancers which may be exploited to save lives. (Part of a Multi-author Review). PMID:17957336

  2. Rapid Cancer Fluorescence Imaging Using A γ-Glutamyltranspeptidase-Specific Probe For Primary Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hino, Haruaki; Kamiya, Mako; Kitano, Kentaro; Mizuno, Kazue; Tanaka, Sayaka; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Kataoka, Kazunori; Urano, Yasuteru; Nakajima, Jun

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We set out to examine the activity of γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT) in lung cancer and the validity of γ-glutamyl hydroxymethyl rhodamine green (gGlu-HMRG) for intraoperative imaging of primary lung cancer. METHODS: GGT activities and mRNA expression levels of GGT1 (one of the GGT subtypes) in five human lung cancer cell lines were examined by fluorescence imaging and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In vivo imaging of an orthotopic A549 xenograft mod...

  3. Molecular Scale Imaging with a Smooth Superlens

    CERN Document Server

    Chaturvedi, Pratik; Logeeswaran, VJ; Yu, Zhaoning; Islam, M Saif; Wang, S Y; Williams, R Stanley; Fang, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate a smooth and low loss silver (Ag) optical superlens capable of resolving features at 1/12th of the illumination wavelength with high fidelity. This is made possible by utilizing state-of-the-art nanoimprint technology and intermediate wetting layer of germanium (Ge) for the growth of flat silver films with surface roughness at sub-nanometer scales. Our measurement of the resolved lines of 30nm half-pitch shows a full-width at half-maximum better than 37nm, in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. The development of this unique optical superlens lead promise to parallel imaging and nanofabrication in a single snapshot, a feat that are not yet available with other nanoscale imaging techniques such as atomic force microscope or scanning electron microscope.

  4. Molecular imaging in myeloma precursor disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mena, E.; Choyke, P; Tan, E; Landgren, O; Kurdziel, K

    2011-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is consistently preceded by its pre-malignant states, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and/or smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM). By definition, precursor conditions do not exhibit end-organ disease (anemia, hypercalcemia, renal failure, skeletal lytic lesions, or a combination of these). However, new imaging methods are demonstrating that some patients in the MGUS or SNM category are exhibiting early signs of MM.

  5. Molecular imaging by single-photon emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cusanno, F. E-mail: cusanno@iss.infn.it; Accorsi, R.; Cinti, M.N.; Colilli, S.; Fortuna, A.; Garibaldi, F.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lanza, R.C.; Loizzo, A.; Lucentini, M.; Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Santavenere, F.; Scopinaro, F

    2004-07-11

    In vivo imaging of pharmaceuticals labeled with radionuclides has proven to be a powerful tool in human subjects. The same imaging methods have often been applied to small animal but usually only within the nuclear medicine (NM) community, and usually only to evaluate the efficacy of new radiopharmaceuticals. We have built a compact mini gamma camera, a pixellated array of NaI(Tl) crystals coupled to 3'' R2486 Hamamatsu Position Sensitive PMT; in combination with a pinhole collimator, which allows for high resolution in vivo SPECT imaging. Calculations show that reasonable counting rates are possible. The system has been tested and preliminary measurements on mice have been done. The performances of the camera are in the expectations. Improvements will be done both on the collimation technique and on the detector. Simulations have been performed to study a coded aperture collimator. The results show that the efficiency can be greatly improved without sacrificing the spatial resolution. A dedicated mask has been designed and will be used soon.

  6. Molecular imaging by single-photon emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vivo imaging of pharmaceuticals labeled with radionuclides has proven to be a powerful tool in human subjects. The same imaging methods have often been applied to small animal but usually only within the nuclear medicine (NM) community, and usually only to evaluate the efficacy of new radiopharmaceuticals. We have built a compact mini gamma camera, a pixellated array of NaI(Tl) crystals coupled to 3'' R2486 Hamamatsu Position Sensitive PMT; in combination with a pinhole collimator, which allows for high resolution in vivo SPECT imaging. Calculations show that reasonable counting rates are possible. The system has been tested and preliminary measurements on mice have been done. The performances of the camera are in the expectations. Improvements will be done both on the collimation technique and on the detector. Simulations have been performed to study a coded aperture collimator. The results show that the efficiency can be greatly improved without sacrificing the spatial resolution. A dedicated mask has been designed and will be used soon

  7. Radionuclide imaging and treatment of thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiu Juan; Li, XianFeng; Ren, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, the diagnostic methods and therapeutic tools for thyroid cancer (TC) have been greatly improved. In addition to the classical method of ingestion of radioactive iodine-131 (I131) and subsequent I123 and I124 positron emission tomography (PET) in therapy and examination, I124 PET-based 3-dimensional imaging, Ga68-labeled [1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane-1, 4, 7, 10-tetraacetic acid]-1-NaI(3)-octreotide (DOTANOC) PET/computed tomography (CT), Tc99m tetrofosmin, pre-targeted radioimmunotherapy, and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy have all been used clinically. These novel methods are useful in diagnosis and therapy of TC, but also have unavoidable adverse effects. In this review, we will discuss the development of nuclear medicine in TC examination and treatment. PMID:27100499

  8. Diffusion-weighted imaging of pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Riccardo; De; Robertis; Paolo; Tinazzi; Martini; Emanuele; Demozzi; Flavia; Dal; Corso; Claudio; Bassi; Paolo; Pederzoli; Mirko; D’Onofrio

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) is a reliable and accurate imaging method for the evaluation of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma(PDAC). Diffusion-weighted imaging(DWI) is a relatively recent technological improvement that expanded MRI capabilities, having brought functional aspects into conventional morphologic MRI evaluation. DWI can depict the random diffusion of water molecules within tissues(the so-called Brownian motions). Modifications of water diffusion induced by different factors acting on the extracellular and intracellular spaces, as increased cell density, edema, fibrosis, or altered functionality of cell membranes, can be detected using this MR sequence. The intravoxel incoherent motion(IVIM) model is an advanced DWI technique that consent a separate quantitative evaluation of all the microscopic random motions that contribute to DWI, which are essentially represented by molecular diffusion and blood microcirculation(perfusion). Technological improvements have made possible the routine use of DWI during abdominal MRI study. Several authors have reported that the addition of DWI sequence can be of value for the evaluation of patients with PDAC, especially improving the staging; nevertheless, it is still unclear whether and how DWI could be helpful for identification, characterization, prognostic stratification and follow-up during treatment. The aim of this paper is to review up-to-date literature data regarding the applications of DWI and IVIM to PDACs.

  9. Diffusion-weighted imaging of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Robertis, Riccardo; Tinazzi Martini, Paolo; Demozzi, Emanuele; Dal Corso, Flavia; Bassi, Claudio; Pederzoli, Paolo; D'Onofrio, Mirko

    2015-10-28

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a reliable and accurate imaging method for the evaluation of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a relatively recent technological improvement that expanded MRI capabilities, having brought functional aspects into conventional morphologic MRI evaluation. DWI can depict the random diffusion of water molecules within tissues (the so-called Brownian motions). Modifications of water diffusion induced by different factors acting on the extracellular and intracellular spaces, as increased cell density, edema, fibrosis, or altered functionality of cell membranes, can be detected using this MR sequence. The intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) model is an advanced DWI technique that consent a separate quantitative evaluation of all the microscopic random motions that contribute to DWI, which are essentially represented by molecular diffusion and blood microcirculation (perfusion). Technological improvements have made possible the routine use of DWI during abdominal MRI study. Several authors have reported that the addition of DWI sequence can be of value for the evaluation of patients with PDAC, especially improving the staging; nevertheless, it is still unclear whether and how DWI could be helpful for identification, characterization, prognostic stratification and follow-up during treatment. The aim of this paper is to review up-to-date literature data regarding the applications of DWI and IVIM to PDACs. PMID:26516428

  10. Breast cancer imaging by microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Minghua; Ku, Geng; Jin, Xing; Wang, Lihong V.; Fornage, Bruno D.; Hunt, Kelly K.

    2005-04-01

    We report a preliminary study of breast cancer imaging by microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography. In this study, we built a prototype of breast cancer imager based on a circular scan mode. A 3-GHz 0.3~0.5-μs microwave is used as the excitation energy source. A 2.25-MHz ultrasound transducer scans the thermoacoustic signals. All the measured data is transferred to a personal computer for imaging based on our proposed back-projection reconstruction algorithms. We quantified the line spread function of the imaging system. It shows the spatial resolution of our experimental system reaches 0.5 mm. After phantom experiments demonstrated the principle of this technique, we moved the imaging system to the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center to image the excised breast cancer specimens. After the surgery performed by the physicians at the Cancer Center, the excised breast specimen was placed in a plastic cylindrical container with a diameter of 10 cm; and it was then imaged by three imaging modalities: radiograph, ultrasound and thermoacoustic imaging. Four excised breast specimens have been tested. The tumor regions have been clearly located. This preliminary study demonstrated the potential of microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography for applications in breast cancer imaging.

  11. MicroRNAs as molecular markers in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Silva

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in the western world for both men and women. Lung cancer appears to be a perfect candidate for a screening program, since it is the number one cancer killer, it has a long preclinical phase, curative treatment for the minority of patients who are diagnosed early and a target population at risk (smokers and it is also a major economic burden. The earliest approaches to identifying cancer markers were based on preliminary clinical or pathological observations, although molecular biology is a strong candidate for occupying a place among the set of methods. In search of markers, several alterations, such as mutations, loss of heterozygosity, microsatellite instability, DNA methylation, mitochondrial DNA mutations, viral DNA, modified expression of mRNA, miRNA and proteins, and structurally altered proteins have all been analysed. MicroRNAs (miRNA are small RNA molecules, about 19-25 nucleotides long and encoded in genomes of plants, animals, fungi and viruses. It has been reported that miRNAs may have multiple functions in lung development and that aberrant expression of miRNAs could induce lung tumorigenesis. We review here the role of miRNAs in lung tumorigenesis and also as a novel type of biomarker.-----------------------------------Cite this article as:Silva J, Garcia V, Lopez-Gonzalez A, Provencio M. MicroRNAs as molecular markers in lung cancer. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2013;1(1:010111. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14319/ijcto.0101.11

  12. Molecular imaging with dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) is a quantitative technique that employs rapid sequences of CT images after bolus administration of intravenous contrast material to measure a range of physiological processes related to the microvasculature of tissues. By combining knowledge of the molecular processes underlying changes in vascular physiology with an understanding of the relationship between vascular physiology and CT contrast enhancement, DCE-CT can be redefined as a molecular imaging technique. Some DCE-CT derived parameters reflect tissue hypoxia and can, therefore, provide information about the cellular microenvironment. DCE-CT can also depict physiological processes, such as vasodilatation, that represent the physiological consequences of molecular responses to tissue hypoxia. To date the main applications have been in stroke and oncology. Unlike some other molecular imaging approaches, DCE-CT benefits from wide availability and ease of application along with the use of contrast materials and software packages that have achieved full regulatory approval. Hence, DCE-CT represents a molecular imaging technique that is applicable in clinical practice today.

  13. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noerenberg, Dominik [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); University of Munich - Grosshadern, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Ebersberger, Hans U. [Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Munich (Germany); Diederichs, Gerd; Hamm, Bernd [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Botnar, Rene M. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Makowski, Marcus R. [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    Molecular imaging aims to improve the identification and characterization of pathological processes in vivo by visualizing the underlying biological mechanisms. Molecular imaging techniques are increasingly used to assess vascular inflammation, remodeling, cell migration, angioneogenesis and apoptosis. In cardiovascular diseases, molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers new insights into the in vivo biology of pathological vessel wall processes of the coronary and carotid arteries and the aorta. This includes detection of early vascular changes preceding plaque development, visualization of unstable plaques and assessment of response to therapy. The current review focuses on recent developments in the field of molecular MRI to characterise different stages of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease. A variety of molecular MR-probes have been developed to improve the non-invasive detection and characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. Specifically targeted molecular probes allow for the visualization of key biological steps in the cascade leading to the development of arterial vessel wall lesions. Early detection of processes which lead to the development of atherosclerosis and the identification of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques may enable the early assessment of response to therapy, improve therapy planning, foster the prevention of cardiovascular events and may open the door for the development of patient-specific treatment strategies. (orig.)

  14. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular imaging aims to improve the identification and characterization of pathological processes in vivo by visualizing the underlying biological mechanisms. Molecular imaging techniques are increasingly used to assess vascular inflammation, remodeling, cell migration, angioneogenesis and apoptosis. In cardiovascular diseases, molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers new insights into the in vivo biology of pathological vessel wall processes of the coronary and carotid arteries and the aorta. This includes detection of early vascular changes preceding plaque development, visualization of unstable plaques and assessment of response to therapy. The current review focuses on recent developments in the field of molecular MRI to characterise different stages of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease. A variety of molecular MR-probes have been developed to improve the non-invasive detection and characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. Specifically targeted molecular probes allow for the visualization of key biological steps in the cascade leading to the development of arterial vessel wall lesions. Early detection of processes which lead to the development of atherosclerosis and the identification of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques may enable the early assessment of response to therapy, improve therapy planning, foster the prevention of cardiovascular events and may open the door for the development of patient-specific treatment strategies. (orig.)

  15. MMP-13 In-Vivo Molecular Imaging Reveals Early Expression in Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Salaün

    Full Text Available Several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are overexpressed in lung cancer and may serve as potential targets for the development of bioactivable probes for molecular imaging.To characterize and monitor the activity of MMPs during the progression of lung adenocarcinoma.K-rasLSL-G12D mice were imaged serially during the development of adenocarcinomas using fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT and a probe specific for MMP-2, -3, -9 and -13. Lung tumors were identified using FMT and MRI co-registration, and the probe concentration in each tumor was assessed at each time-point. The expression of Mmp2, -3, -9, -13 was quantified by qRT-PCR using RNA isolated from microdissected tumor cells. Immunohistochemical staining of overexpressed MMPs in animals was assessed on human lung tumors.In mice, 7 adenomas and 5 adenocarcinomas showed an increase in fluorescent signal on successive FMT scans, starting between weeks 4 and 8. qRT-PCR assays revealed significant overexpression of only Mmp-13 in mice lung tumors. In human tumors, a high MMP-13 immunostaining index was found in tumor cells from invasive lesions (24/27, but in none of the non-invasive (0/4 (p=0.001.MMP-13 is detected in early pulmonary invasive adenocarcinomas and may be a potential target for molecular imaging of lung cancer.

  16. Chemical mapping of tumor progression by FT-IR imaging: towards molecular histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petibois, Cyril; Déléris, Gérard

    2006-10-01

    Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectro-imaging enables global analysis of samples, with resolution close to the cellular level. Recent studies have shown that FT-IR imaging enables determination of the biodistribution of several molecules of interest (carbohydrates, lipids, proteins) for tissue analysis without pre-analytical modification of the sample such as staining. Molecular structure information is also available from the same analysis, notably for protein secondary structure and fatty acyl chain peroxidation level. Thus, several cancer markers can be identified from FT-IR tissue images, enabling accurate discrimination between healthy and tumor areas. FT-IR imaging applications are now able to provide unique chemical and morphological information about tissue status. With the fast image acquisition provided by modern mid-infrared imaging systems, it is now envisaged to analyze cerebral tumor exereses in delays compatible with neurosurgery. Accordingly, we propose to take FT-IR imaging into consideration for the development of new molecular histopathology tools. PMID:16935373

  17. Molecular imaging in cardiovascular diseases; Molekulare kardiovaskulaere MRT-Bildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botnar, R.M. [King' s College London (United Kingdom). Imaging Sciences; St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Ebersberger, H. [Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Munich (Germany). Dept. of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine; Noerenberg, D. [Charite, Berlin (Germany). Inst. for Radiology; and others

    2015-02-15

    Cardiovascular diseases remain the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in industrialized and developing countries. In clinical practice, the in-vivo identification of atherosclerotic lesions, which can lead to complications such as heart attack or stroke, remains difficult. Imaging techniques provide the reference standard for the detection of clinically significant atherosclerotic changes in the coronary and carotid arteries. The assessment of the luminal narrowing is feasible, while the differentiation of stable and potentially unstable or vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques is currently not possible using non-invasive imaging. With high spatial resolution and high soft tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a suitable method for the evaluation of the thin arterial wall. In clinical practice, native MRI of the vessel wall already allows the differentiation and characterization of components of atherosclerotic plaques in the carotid arteries and the aorta. Additional diagnostic information can be gained by the use of non-specific MRI contrast agents. With the development of targeted molecular probes, that highlight specific molecules or cells, pathological processes can be visualized at a molecular level with high spatial resolution. In this review article, the development of pathophysiological changes leading to the development of the arterial wall are introduced and discussed. Additionally, principles of contrast enhanced imaging with non-specific contrast agents and molecular probes will be discussed and latest developments in the field of molecular imaging of the vascular wall will be introduced.

  18. Development of molecular imaging in the European radiological community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent and concomitant advances in molecular biology and imaging for diagnosis and therapy will place in vivo imaging techniques at the centre of their clinical transfer. Before that, a wide range of multidisciplinary preclinical research is already taking place. The involvement of radiologists in this new field of imaging sciences is therefore absolutely mandatory during these two phases of development. Achievement of such objectives requires the refinement of strategy within the European radiological community and the European Society of Radiology (ESR) will have to drive a number of actions to stimulate the younger generation of radiologists and to facilitate their access to knowledge. For that purpose, a molecular imaging (MI) subcommittee of the ESR Research Committee based on a group of involved radiologists will be constituted to develop contacts with other constitutive committees and associated societies to provide proposals to our community. (orig.)

  19. Simultaneous molecular imaging of EGFR and HER2 using hyperspectral darkfield microscopy and immunotargeted nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Matthew J.; Marinakos, Stella; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Wax, Adam P.

    2009-02-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2) contribute to the regulation of cell proliferation, and when jointly over-expressed are associated with several types of cancer. The ability to monitor both receptors simultaneously results in a more accurate indicator of degree of cancerous activity than either receptor alone. Plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) show promise as a potential EGFR and HER2 biomarker over alternatives such as fluorophores and quantum dots, which are limited by their cytotoxicity and photobleaching. To observe immunolabeled NPs bound to receptor-expressing cells, our past experiments were conducted using a novel optical darkfield microspectroscopy system. We implemented an epi-illumination darkfield broadband light train, which allows for darkfield analysis of live cells in culture with enhanced NP contrast. Under this setup, molecularly specific binding of NPs immunolabeled with anti-EGFR was confirmed. We have since adapted our darkfield setup, which previously only obtained spectral information from a line imaging spectrometer, to incorporate hyperspectral imaging capabilities, allowing widefield data acquisition within seconds. The new system has been validated through observation of shifts in the peak wavelength of scattering by gold NPs on silanated cover glasses using several immersion media. Peak resonant scattering wavelengths match well with that predicted by Mie theory. We will further demonstrate the potential of the system with simultaneous molecular imaging of multiple receptors in vitro using labeled EGFR+/HER2+ SK-BR-3 human breast cancer cells with anti-EGFR immunolabeled gold nanospheres and anti-HER2 immunolabeled gold nanorods, with each scattering in different spectral windows. Additional trials will be performed to demonstrate molecularly specific binding using EGFR+/HER2- MDA-MB-468 and HER2+/EGFR- MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells.

  20. AN EPIDEMIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR GENETIC STUDY ON BREAST CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾卫华; 王继先; 李本孝; 李征

    2000-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the genetic susceptibility for breast cancer of Chinese, a hospital-based case-control study, pedigree survey and molecular genetic study were conducted. Methods. Logistic regression model and stratification methods were used in the risk factors analysis. Li-Mantel art and Falconer methods were used to analyze the segregation ratio and heritability. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were used to detect AI, G-banding technique was used to detect the chromosome aberration of peripheral blood lymphocyte. Results. Family history of breast cancer is related to enhanced breast cancer risk significartly, OR is 3.905 ( 95 % CI = 1.079 ~ 14.13), and it widely interacts with other risk factors. Accumulative incidence of breast cancer in first degree relatives is 9.99%, which is larger than that in second, third degree and non-blood relatives. Segregation ratio is 0.021, heritability among first degree relatives is 35.6 ± 5.8%. Frequencies of LOH at BRCA1 and BRCA2 loci in sporadic breast cancer are 6.12% and 5.77% respectively. In the sibs, both of them show LOH at D13S173 locus, and high frequencies of chromosome aberrations were observed. Conclusions. Genetic susceptibility contributes to breast cancer occurrence of Chinese, and its racial variation may be one of the important reasons for the large difference of incidence between western and eastern countries.

  1. AN EPIDEMIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR GENETIC STUDY ON BREAST CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾卫华; 王继先; 李本孝; 李征

    2000-01-01

    Obieaites. To investigate the genetic susceptibility for breast cancer of Chinese, a hospital-besed case-control study, pedigree survey and molecular genetic study were conducted. Methods. Logistic regression model and stratification methods were used in the risk factors analysis. Li-Mantel-Gart and Falconer methods were used to analyze the segregation ratio and heritability. Polymemse chain reaction (PCR) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were used to detect AI, G-banding technique was used to detect the chromosome aberration of peripheral blood lymphocyte. Results. Family history of breast cancer is related to enhanced breast cancer risk significantly, OR is 3.905(95% CI = 1.079—14.13), and it widely interacts with other risk factors. Accumulative incidence of breast cancer in first degree relatives is 9.99%, which is larger than that in second, third degree and non-blnod relatives. Segregation ratio is 0.021, heritability among first degree relatives is 35.6 ± 5.8%. Frequencies of LDH at BRCA1 and BRCA2 loci in sporadic breast cancer are 6.12% and 5.77% respectively. In the sibs, both of them show LOH at D13S173 locus, and high frequencies of chromosome abermtions were observed.Condusions. Genetic susceptibility contributes to breast cancer occurrence of Chinese, and its racial variation may be one of the important reasons for the large difference of incidence between western and eastern countries.

  2. Clinical Challenges to Current Molecularly Targeted Therapies in Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Gagan; Eggert, Ashley; Puri, Neelu

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is difficult to treat with a poor prognosis and a five year survival of 15%. Current molecularly targeted therapies are initially effective in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients; however, they are plagued with difficulties including induced resistance and small therapeutically responsive populations. This mini review describes the mechanism of resistance to several molecularly targeted therapies which are currently being used to treat NSCLC. The major targets discussed are c-Met, EGFR, HER2, ALK, VEGFR, and BRAF. The first generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) resulted in resistance; however, second and third generation TKIs are being developed, which are generally more efficacious and have potential to treat NSCLC patients with resistance to first generation TKIs. Combination therapies could also be effective in preventing TKI resistance in NSCLC patients.

  3. Imaging the molecular dynamics of dissociative electron attachment to water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adaniya, Hidihito; Rudek, B.; Osipov, Timur; Haxton, Dan; Weber, Thorsten; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C.W.; Belkacem, Ali

    2009-10-19

    Momentum imaging experiments on dissociative electron attachment to the water molecule are combined with ab initio theoretical calculations of the angular dependence of the quantum mechanical amplitude for electron attachment to provide a detailed picture of the molecular dynamics of dissociation attachment via the two lowest energy Feshbach resonances. The combination of momentum imaging experiments and theory can reveal dissociation dynamics for which the axial recoil approximation breaks down and thus provides a powerful reaction microscope for DEA to polyatomics.

  4. Gadolinium-containing phosphatidylserine liposomes for molecular imaging of atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Maiseyeu, Andrei; Mihai, Georgeta; Kampfrath, Thomas; Simonetti, Orlando P.; Sen, Chandan K.; Roy, Sashwati; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Parthasarathy, Sampath

    2009-01-01

    Exteriorized phosphatidylserine (PS) residues in apoptotic cells trigger rapid phagocytosis by macrophage scavenger receptor pathways. Mimicking apoptosis with liposomes containing PS may represent an attractive approach for molecular imaging of atherosclerosis. We investigated the utility of paramagnetic gadolinium liposomes enriched with PS (Gd-PS) in imaging atherosclerotic plaque. Gd-PS-containing Gd-conjugated lipids, fluorescent rhodamine, and PS were prepared and characterized. Cellula...

  5. Molecular imaging of vessels in mouse models of disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vascular imaging of angiogenesis in mouse models of disease requires multi modal imaging hardware capable of targeting both structure and function at different physical scales. The three dimensional (3D) structure and function vascular information allows for accurate differentiation between biological processes. For example, image analysis of vessel development in angiogenesis vs. arteriogenesis enables more accurate detection of biological variation between subjects and more robust and reliable diagnosis of disease. In the recent years a number of micro imaging modalities have emerged in the field as preferred means for this purpose. They provide 3D volumetric data suitable for analysis, quantification, validation, and visualization of results in animal models. This review highlights the capabilities of microCT, ultrasound and microPET for multimodal imaging of angiogenesis and molecular vascular targets in a mouse model of tumor angiogenesis. The basic principles of the imaging modalities are described and experimental results are presented.

  6. Clinical imaging of multidrug resistance in cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most well-characterized mechanism of multidrug resistance (MDR) involves P-glycoprotein (Pgp), a transmembrane protein acting as an ATP-dependent drug efflux pump. The recognition of 99mTc-Sestamibi and other lipophilic cations as transport substrates for Pgp provided the necessary tool for the clinical assessment of Pgp function in patients with cancer. Many clinical studies from different institutions and trials including variety of malignancies indicate that both tumor uptake and clearance of 99mTc-Sestamibi are correlate with Pgp expression and may be used for the phenotypic assessment of multidrug resistance. Although both parameters may predict tumor responsible to chemotherapy, the extraction of efflux rate constants appeared o provide a more direct index of Pgp function as compared tp tracer uptake ratio allowing to trace a continuous spectrum of drug transport activity. Preliminary studies the use of MDR imaging agents to monitor the modulating ability of revertant compounds. Although the results support the feasibility of this approach, the alteration of tracer pharmacokinetics induced by the modulators certainly constitute a challenge in the development of a simple functional test suitable in clinical practice. The extension of the acquired imaging methodology to tumors with redundant intrinsic resistant mechanism. Due to multifactorial nature of phenomenon, the development of new tracers with substrate specificity for other known the complex array of cellular mechanisms contributing to treatment failure

  7. Clinical imaging of multidrug resistance in cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Vecchi, S.; Ciarmiello, A.; Salvatore, M. [Naples Univ. Federico 2. (Italy). Medicina Nucleare. Dipt. di Scienze Biomorfologiche e Funzionali

    1999-06-01

    The most well-characterized mechanism of multidrug resistance (MDR) involves P-glycoprotein (Pgp), a transmembrane protein acting as an ATP-dependent drug efflux pump. The recognition of {sup 9}9mTc-Sestamibi and other lipophilic cations as transport substrates for Pgp provided the necessary tool for the clinical assessment of Pgp function in patients with cancer. Many clinical studies from different institutions and trials including variety of malignancies indicate that both tumor uptake and clearance of {sup 9}9mTc-Sestamibi are correlate with Pgp expression and may be used for the phenotypic assessment of multidrug resistance. Although both parameters may predict tumor responsible to chemotherapy, the extraction of efflux rate constants appeared o provide a more direct index of Pgp function as compared tp tracer uptake ratio allowing to trace a continuous spectrum of drug transport activity. Preliminary studies the use of MDR imaging agents to monitor the modulating ability of revertant compounds. Although the results support the feasibility of this approach, the alteration of tracer pharmacokinetics induced by the modulators certainly constitute a challenge in the development of a simple functional test suitable in clinical practice. The extension of the acquired imaging methodology to tumors with redundant intrinsic resistant mechanism. Due to multifactorial nature of phenomenon, the development of new tracers with substrate specificity for other known the complex array of cellular mechanisms contributing to treatment failure.

  8. Exploring molecular links between lymph node invasion and cancer prognosis in human breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sangwoo; Nam, Hojung; Lee, Doheon

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Lymph node invasion is one of the most powerful clinical factors in cancer prognosis. However, molecular level signatures of their correlation are remaining poorly understood. Here, we propose a new approach, monotonically expressed gene analysis (MEGA), to correlate transcriptional patterns of lymph node invasion related genes with clinical outcome of breast cancer patients. Results Using MEGA, we scored all genes with their transcriptional patterns ov...

  9. Exploring molecular links between lymph node invasion and cancer prognosis in human breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Sangwoo; Nam Hojung; Lee Doheon

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Lymph node invasion is one of the most powerful clinical factors in cancer prognosis. However, molecular level signatures of their correlation are remaining poorly understood. Here, we propose a new approach, monotonically expressed gene analysis (MEGA), to correlate transcriptional patterns of lymph node invasion related genes with clinical outcome of breast cancer patients. Results Using MEGA, we scored all genes with their transcriptional patterns over progression level...

  10. Molecular Targeted Therapies Using Botanicals for Prostate Cancer Chemoprevention

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Nagi; Chornokur, Ganna

    2012-01-01

    In spite of the large number of botanicals demonstrating promise as potential cancer chemopreventive agents, most have failed to prove effectiveness in clinical trials. Critical requirements for moving botanical agents to recommendation for clinical use include adopting a systematic, molecular-target based approach and utilizing the same ethical and rigorous methods that are used to evaluate other pharmacological agents. Preliminary data on a mechanistic rationale for chemoprevention activity...

  11. Molecular Imaging of Conscious, Unrestrained Mice with AwakeSPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Justin S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Endres, Christopher J. [Johns Hopkins, Baltimore; Foss, Catherine A. [Johns Hopkins, Baltimore; Nimmagadda, Sridhar [Johns Hopkins, Baltimore; Jung, Hyeyun [Johns Hopkins, Baltimore; Goddard, James S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Lee, Seung Joon [JLAB; McKisson, John [JLAB; Smith, Mark F. [University of Maryland; Stolin, Alexander V. [West Virginia University; Weisenberger, Andrew G. [JLAB; Pomper, Martin G. [Johns Hopkins, Baltimore

    2013-06-01

    We have developed a SPECT imaging system, AwakeSPECT, to enable molecular brain imaging of untrained mice that are conscious, unanesthetized, and unrestrained. We accomplished this with head tracking and motion correction techniques. Methods: The capability of the system for motion-corrected imaging was demonstrated with a ^99mTc-pertechnetate phantom, ^99mTc-methylene diphosphonate bone imaging, and measurement of the binding potential of the dopamine transporter radioligand ^123I-ioflupane in mouse brain in the awake and anesthetized (isoflurane) states. Stress induced by imaging in the awake state was assessed through measurement of plasma corticosterone levels. Results: AwakeSPECT provided high-resolution bone images reminiscent of those obtained from CT. The binding potential of ^123I-ioflupane in the awake state was on the order of 50% of that obtained with the animal under anesthesia, consistent with previous studies in nonhuman primates. Levels of stress induced were on the order of those seen in other behavioral tasks and imaging studies of awake animals. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the feasibility of SPECT molecular brain imaging of mice in the conscious, unrestrained state and demonstrate the effects of isoflurane anesthesia on radiotracer uptake.

  12. Molecular Imaging of Conscious, Unrestrained Mice with AwakeSPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Justin S [ORNL; Endres, Christopher [Johns Hopkins University; Foss, Catherine [Johns Hopkins University; Nimmagadda, Sridhar [Johns Hopkins University; Jung, Hyeyun [Johns Hopkins University; Goddard Jr, James Samuel [ORNL; Lee, Seung Joon [Jefferson Lab; McKisson, John [Jefferson Lab; Smith, Mark F. [University of Maryland School of Medicine, The, Baltimore, MD; Stolin, Alexander [West Virginia University, Morgantown; Weisenberger, Andrew G. [Jefferson Lab; Pomper, Martin [Johns Hopkins University

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a SPECT imaging system, AwakeSPECT, to enable molecular brain imaging of untrained mice that are conscious, unanesthetized, and unrestrained. We accomplished this with head tracking and motion correction techniques. Methods: The capability of the system for motion-corrected imaging was demonstrated with a 99mTc-pertechnetate phantom, 99mTcmethylene diphosphonate bone imaging, and measurement of the binding potential of the dopamine transporter radioligand 123I-ioflupane in mouse brain in the awake and anesthetized (isoflurane) states. Stress induced by imaging in the awake state was assessed through measurement of plasma corticosterone levels. Results: AwakeSPECT provided high-resolution bone images reminiscent of those obtained from CT. The binding potential of 123I-ioflupane in the awake state was on the order of 50% of that obtained with the animal under anesthesia, consistent with previous studies in nonhuman primates. Levels of stress induced were on the order of those seen in other behavioral tasks and imaging studies of awake animals. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the feasibility of SPECT molecular brain imaging of mice in the conscious, unrestrained state and demonstrate the effects of isoflurane anesthesia on radiotracer uptake.

  13. Molecular Imaging of Conscious, Unrestrained Mice with AwakeSPECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Justin S.; Endres, Christopher J.; Foss, Catherine A.; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Jung, Hyeyun; Goddard, James S.; Lee, Seungjoon; McKisson, John; Smith, Mark F.; Stolin, Alexander V.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a SPECT imaging system, AwakeSPECT, to enable molecular brain imaging of untrained mice that are conscious, unanesthetized, and unrestrained. We accomplished this with head tracking and motion correction techniques. Methods: The capability of the system for motion-corrected imaging was demonstrated with a 99mTc-pertechnetate phantom, 99mTcmethylene diphosphonate bone imaging, and measurement of the binding potential of the dopamine transporter radioligand 123I-ioflupane in mouse brain in the awake and anesthetized (isoflurane) states. Stress induced by imaging in the awake state was assessed through measurement of plasma corticosterone levels. Results: AwakeSPECT provided high-resolution bone images reminiscent of those obtained from CT. The binding potential of 123I-ioflupane in the awake state was on the order of 50% of that obtained with the animal under anesthesia, consistent with previous studies in nonhuman primates. Levels of stress induced were on the order of those seen in other behavioral tasks and imaging studies of awake animals. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the feasibility of SPECT molecular brain imaging of mice in the conscious, unrestrained state and demonstrate the effects of isoflurane anesthesia on radiotracer uptake. PMID:23536223

  14. Molecular Mechanism Underlying Lymphatic Metastasis in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwen Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As the most challenging human malignancies, pancreatic cancer is characterized by its insidious symptoms, low rate of surgical resection, high risk of local invasion, metastasis and recurrence, and overall dismal prognosis. Lymphatic metastasis, above all, is recognized as an early adverse event in progression of pancreatic cancer and has been described to be an independent poor prognostic factor. It should be noted that the occurrence of lymphatic metastasis is not a casual or stochastic but an ineluctable and designed event. Increasing evidences suggest that metastasis-initiating cells (MICs and the microenvironments may act as a double-reed style in this crime. However, the exact mechanisms on how they function synergistically for this dismal clinical course remain largely elusive. Therefore, a better understanding of its molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in pancreatic lymphatic metastasis is urgently required. In this review, we will summarize the latest advances on lymphatic metastasis in pancreatic cancer.

  15. Molecular imaging of rheumatoid arthritis by radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies: new imaging strategies to guide molecular therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malviya, G.; Dierckx, R.A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Conti, F. [Rheumatology Unit, I Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Chianelli, M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Unit of Nuclear Medicine, Regina apostolorum Hospital, Albano, Rome (Italy); Scopinaro, F. [Nuclear Medicine Department, Sapienza University of Rome, St. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy); Signore, A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Nuclear Medicine Department, Sapienza University of Rome, St. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy)

    2010-02-15

    The closing of the last century opened a wide variety of approaches for inflammation imaging and treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The introduction of biological therapies for the management of RA started a revolution in the therapeutic armamentarium with the development of several novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which can be murine, chimeric, humanised and fully human antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies specifically bind to their target, which could be adhesion molecules, activation markers, antigens or receptors, to interfere with specific inflammation pathways at the molecular level, leading to immune-modulation of the underlying pathogenic process. These new generation of mAbs can also be radiolabelled by using direct or indirect method, with a variety of nuclides, depending upon the specific diagnostic application. For studying rheumatoid arthritis patients, several monoclonal antibodies and their fragments, including anti-TNF-{alpha}, anti-CD20, anti-CD3, anti-CD4 and anti-E-selectin antibody, have been radiolabelled mainly with {sup 99m}Tc or {sup 111}In. Scintigraphy with these radiolabelled antibodies may offer an exciting possibility for the study of RA patients and holds two types of information: (1) it allows better staging of the disease and diagnosis of the state of activity by early detection of inflamed joints that might be difficult to assess; (2) it might provide a possibility to perform 'evidence-based biological therapy' of arthritis with a view to assessing whether an antibody will localise in an inflamed joint before using the same unlabelled antibody therapeutically. This might prove particularly important for the selection of patients to be treated since biological therapies can be associated with severe side-effects and are considerably expensive. This article reviews the use of radiolabelled mAbs in the study of RA with particular emphasis on the use of different radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies for

  16. Vitamin D and colorectal cancer: molecular, epidemiological and clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Ruoxu; Ng, Kimmie; Giovannucci, Edward L; Manson, JoAnn E; Qian, Zhi Rong; Ogino, Shuji

    2016-05-01

    In many cells throughout the body, vitamin D is converted into its active form calcitriol and binds to the vitamin D receptor (VDR), which functions as a transcription factor to regulate various biological processes including cellular differentiation and immune response. Vitamin D-metabolising enzymes (including CYP24A1 and CYP27B1) and VDR play major roles in exerting and regulating the effects of vitamin D. Preclinical and epidemiological studies have provided evidence for anti-cancer effects of vitamin D (particularly against colorectal cancer), although clinical trials have yet to prove its benefit. In addition, molecular pathological epidemiology research can provide insights into the interaction of vitamin D with tumour molecular and immunity status. Other future research directions include genome-wide research on VDR transcriptional targets, gene-environment interaction analyses and clinical trials on vitamin D efficacy in colorectal cancer patients. In this study, we review the literature on vitamin D and colorectal cancer from both mechanistic and population studies and discuss the links and controversies within and between the two parts of evidence. PMID:27245104

  17. Feature Selection and Molecular Classification of Cancer Using Genetic Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Yu

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite important advances in microarray-based molecular classification of tumors, its application in clinical settings remains formidable. This is in part due to the limitation of current analysis programs in discovering robust biomarkers and developing classifiers with a practical set of genes. Genetic programming (GP is a type of machine learning technique that uses evolutionary algorithm to simulate natural selection as well as population dynamics, hence leading to simple and comprehensible classifiers. Here we applied GP to cancer expression profiling data to select feature genes and build molecular classifiers by mathematical integration of these genes. Analysis of thousands of GP classifiers generated for a prostate cancer data set revealed repetitive use of a set of highly discriminative feature genes, many of which are known to be disease associated. GP classifiers often comprise five or less genes and successfully predict cancer types and subtypes. More importantly, GP classifiers generated in one study are able to predict samples from an independent study, which may have used different microarray platforms. In addition, GP yielded classification accuracy better than or similar to conventional classification methods. Furthermore, the mathematical expression of GP classifiers provides insights into relationships between classifier genes. Taken together, our results demonstrate that GP may be valuable for generating effective classifiers containing a practical set of genes for diagnostic/ prognostic cancer classification.

  18. Molecular mechanisms underlying progesterone-enhanced breast cancer cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Chen; Lee, Wen-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Progesterone (P4) was demonstrated to inhibit migration in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), but to enhance migration in T47D breast cancer cells. To investigate the mechanism responsible for this switch in P4 action, we examined the signaling pathway responsible for the P4-induced migration enhancement in breast cancer cell lines, T47D and MCF-7. Here, we demonstrated that P4 activated the cSrc/AKT signaling pathway, subsequently inducing RSK1 activation, which in turn increased phosphorylation of p27 at T198 and formation of the p27pT198-RhoA complex in the cytosol, thereby preventing RhoA degradation, and eventually enhanced migration in T47D cells. These findings were confirmed in the P4-treated MCF-7. Comparing the P4-induced molecular events in between breast cancer cells and VSMCs, we found that P4 increased p27 phosphorylation at T198 in breast cancer cells through RSK1 activation, while P4 increased p27 phosphorlation at Ser10 in VSMCs through KIS activation. P27pT198 formed the complex with RhoA and prevented RhoA degradation in T47D cells, whereas p-p27Ser10 formed the complex with RhoA and caused RhoA degradation in VSMCs. The results of this study highlight the molecular mechanism underlying P4-enhanced breast cancer cell migration, and suggest that RSK1 activation is responsible for the P4-induced migration enhancement in breast cancer cells. PMID:27510838

  19. Silica nanoparticle-based dual imaging colloidal hybrids: cancer cell imaging and biodistribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee H

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Haisung Lee,1 Dongkyung Sung,2 Jinhoon Kim,3 Byung-Tae Kim,3 Tuntun Wang,4 Seong Soo A An,5 Soo-Won Seo,6 Dong Kee Yi4 1Molecular Diagnostics, In Vitro Diagnostics Unit, New Business Division, SK Telecom, 2Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Korea University, 3Interdisciplinary Graduate Program of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University, Samsung Medical Center, 4Department of Chemistry, Myongji University, Seoul, 5Department of Bionanotechnology, Gachon Medical Research Institute, Gachon University, Seongnam, 6Medical Device Development Center, Daegu-Gyeongbuk Medical Innovation Foundation, Daegu, Republic of Korea Abstract: In this study, fluorescent dye-conjugated magnetic resonance (MR imaging agents were investigated in T mode. Gadolinium-conjugated silica nanoparticles were successfully synthesized for both MR imaging and fluorescence diagnostics. Polyamine and polycarboxyl functional groups were modified chemically on the surface of the silica nanoparticles for efficient conjugation of gadolinium ions. The derived gadolinium-conjugated silica nanoparticles were investigated by zeta potential analysis, transmission electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. MR equipment was used to investigate their use as contrast-enhancing agents in T1 mode under a 9.4 T magnetic field. In addition, we tracked the distribution of the gadolinium-conjugated nanoparticles in both lung cancer cells and organs in mice. Keywords: dual bioimaging, MR imaging, silica colloid, T1 contrast imaging, nanohybrid

  20. Image-guided radiotherapy and motion management in lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine

    2015-01-01

    In this review, image guidance and motion management in radiotherapy for lung cancer is discussed. Motion characteristics of lung tumours and image guidance techniques to obtain motion information are elaborated. Possibilities for management of image guidance and motion in the various steps of the...

  1. Terahertz imaging diagnostics of cancer tissues with a chemometrics technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Sachiko; Hoshina, Hiromichi; Yamashita, Masatsugu; Otani, Chiko; Miyoshi, Norio

    2007-01-01

    Terahertz spectroscopic images of paraffin-embedded cancer tissues have been measured by a terahertz time domain spectrometer. For the systematic identification of cancer tumors, the principal component analysis and the clustering analysis were applied. In three of the four samples, the cancer tissue was recognized as an aggregate of the data points in the principal component plots. By the agglomerative hierarchical clustering, the data points were well categorized into cancer and the other tissues. This method can be also applied to various kinds of automatic discrimination of plural components by terahertz spectroscopic imaging.

  2. Recent Progress in Molecular Recognition Imaging Using Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senapati, Subhadip; Lindsay, Stuart

    2016-03-15

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an extremely powerful tool in the field of bionanotechnology because of its ability to image single molecules and make measurements of molecular interaction forces with piconewton sensitivity. It works in aqueous media, enabling studies of molecular phenomenon taking place under physiological conditions. Samples can be imaged in their near-native state without any further modifications such as staining or tagging. The combination of AFM imaging with the force measurement added a new feature to the AFM technique, that is, molecular recognition imaging. Molecular recognition imaging enables mapping of specific interactions between two molecules (one attached to the AFM tip and the other to the imaging substrate) by generating simultaneous topography and recognition images (TREC). Since its discovery, the recognition imaging technique has been successfully applied to different systems such as antibody-protein, aptamer-protein, peptide-protein, chromatin, antigen-antibody, cells, and so forth. Because the technique is based on specific binding between the ligand and receptor, it has the ability to detect a particular protein in a mixture of proteins or monitor a biological phenomenon in the native physiological state. One key step for recognition imaging technique is the functionalization of the AFM tips (generally, silicon, silicon nitrides, gold, etc.). Several different functionalization methods have been reported in the literature depending on the molecules of interest and the material of the tip. Polyethylene glycol is routinely used to provide flexibility needed for proper binding as a part of the linker that carries the affinity molecule. Recently, a heterofunctional triarm linker has been synthesized and successfully attached with two different affinity molecules. This novel linker, when attached to AFM tip, helped to detect two different proteins simultaneously from a mixture of proteins using a so-called "two

  3. Tumor epidermal growth factor receptor molecular imaging research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the importance of epidermal growth factor signaling pathway in oncogenesis, maintenance, and progression of different types of tumors, there are great significance that non-invasive monitoring of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in the diagnosis and the judge of therapeutic efficacy. The studys of radioactive tracers for EGFR have provided a good basis for the molecular imaging of EGFR. (authors)

  4. Molecular imaging and the neuropathologies of Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cumming, Paul; Borghammer, Per

    2012-01-01

    The main motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) are linked to degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) fibers, especially those innervating the putamen. This degeneration can be assessed in molecular imaging studies with presynaptic tracers such as [(18)F]-fluoro-L-DOPA (FDOPA) and...

  5. Cancer Imaging at the Crossroads of Precision Medicine: Perspective From an Academic Imaging Department in a Comprehensive Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Abbeele, Annick D; Krajewski, Katherine M; Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Fennessy, Fiona M; DiPiro, Pamela J; Nguyen, Quang-Dé; Harris, Gordon J; Jacene, Heather A; Lefever, Greg; Ramaiya, Nikhil H

    2016-04-01

    The authors propose one possible vision for the transformative role that cancer imaging in an academic setting can play in the current era of personalized and precision medicine by sharing a conceptual model that is based on experience and lessons learned designing a multidisciplinary, integrated clinical and research practice at their institution. The authors' practice and focus are disease-centric rather than imaging-centric. A "wall-less" infrastructure has been developed, with bidirectional integration of preclinical and clinical cancer imaging research platforms, enabling rapid translation of novel cancer drugs from discovery to clinical trial evaluation. The talents and expertise of medical professionals, scientists, and staff members have been coordinated in a horizontal and vertical fashion through the creation of Cancer Imaging Consultation Services and the "Adopt-a-Radiologist" campaign. Subspecialized imaging consultation services at the hub of an outpatient cancer center facilitate patient decision support and management at the point of care. The Adopt-a-Radiologist campaign has led to the creation of a novel generation of imaging clinician-scientists, fostered new collaborations, increased clinical and academic productivity, and improved employee satisfaction. Translational cancer research is supported, with a focus on early in vivo testing of novel cancer drugs, co-clinical trials, and longitudinal tumor imaging metrics through the imaging research core laboratory. Finally, a dedicated cancer imaging fellowship has been developed, promoting the future generation of cancer imaging specialists as multidisciplinary, multitalented professionals who are trained to effectively communicate with clinical colleagues and positively influence patient care. PMID:26774886

  6. Appraisal of progenitor markers in the context of molecular classification of breast cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Haviv, Izhak

    2011-01-01

    Clinical management of breast cancer relies on case stratification, which increasingly employs molecular markers. The motivation behind delineating breast epithelial differentiation is to better target cancer cases through innate sensitivities bequeathed to the cancer from its normal progenitor state. A combination of histopathological and molecular classification of breast cancer cases suggests a role for progenitors in particular breast cancer cases. Although a remarkable fraction of the re...

  7. Molecular targets for the treatment of pancreatic cancer: Clinical and experimental studies

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuoka, Tasuku; Yashiro, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Although recent therapeutic developments for patients with pancreatic cancer have provided survival benefits, the outcomes for patients with pancreatic cancer remain unsatisfactory. Molecularly targeted cancer therapy has advanced in the past decade with the use of a number of pathways as candidates of therapeutic targets. This review summarizes the molecular features of this refractory disease while focusing on the...

  8. Multi-modality systems for molecular tomographic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingze; Bai, Jing

    2009-11-01

    In vivo small animal imaging is a cornerstone in the study of human diseases by providing important clues on the pathogenesis, progression and treatment of many disorders. Molecular tomographic imaging can probe complex biologic interactions dynamically and to study diseases and treatment responses over time in the same animal. Current imaging technique including microCT, microMRI, microPET, microSPECT, microUS, BLT and FMT has its own advantages and applications, however, none of them can provide structural, functional and molecular information in one context. Multi-modality imaging, which utilizes the strengths of different modalities to provide a complete understanding of the object under investigation, emerges as an important alternative in small animal imaging. This article is to introduce the latest development of multimodality systems for small animal tomographic imaging. After a systematic review of imaging principles, systems and commerical products for each stand-alone method, we introduce some multimodality strategies in the latest years. In particular, two dual-modality systems, i.e. FMT-CT and FMT-PET are presented in detail. The end of this article concludes that though most multimodality systems are still in a laboratory research stage, they will surely undergo deep development and wide application in the near future.

  9. Peptide-conjugated nanoparticles for targeted imaging and therapy of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chen-Yun; Hsiao, Jong-Kai; Wang, Yi-Ping; Lan, Chun-Hsin; Wu, Han-Chung

    2016-08-01

    While there has been extensive development of anti-cancer drugs for treatment of prostate cancer, the therapeutic efficacy of such drugs remains inadequate in many cases. Here, we performed in vitro biopanning of the PC3 human prostate carcinoma cell line to select prostate cancer-specific peptides by phage display. We successfully identified specific peptides targeting prostate cancer cells, and their specificity was confirmed by cellular ELISA and flow cytometry. Moreover, we found that the phage clones also recognize other prostate cancer cell lines and surgical specimens from prostate cancer patients. The tumor targeting ability of these phages was validated in a xenograft model, in which high accumulation of targeting phage was observed. To investigate whether selected peptides are able to target tumors and enhance drug delivery into cancer cells, we synthesized peptide-PEGylated lipids and post-inserted them into preformed liposomal doxorubicin and vinorelbine. The results of our cellular uptake and MTT assays indicate that peptide-conjugated liposomes exhibit enhanced drug intracellular delivery and cytotoxicity. The conjugation of targeting peptide to imaging agents, such as quantum dots (QDs) and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), results in more precise delivery of these agents to tumor sites. Furthermore, administration of liposomal doxorubicin and vinorelbine conjugated with targeting peptides was found to markedly increase the inhibition of human prostate tumor growth in mouse xenograft and orthotopic models. These results indicate that targeting peptide, SP204, has significant potential for targeted therapy and molecular imaging in prostate cancer. PMID:27209258

  10. Optical techniques for the molecular imaging of angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of angiogenesis, an essential hallmark for tumour development as well as for several inflammatory diseases and physiological phenomena, is of growing interest for diagnosis and therapy in oncology. In the context of biochemical characterisation of key molecules involved in angiogenesis, several targets for imaging and therapy could be identified in the last decade. Optical imaging (OI) relies on the visualisation of near infrared (NIR) light, either its absorption and scattering in tissue (non-enhanced OI) or using fluorescent contrast agents. OI offers excellent signal to noise ratios due to virtually absent background fluorescence in the NIR range and is thus a versatile tool to image specific molecular target structures in vivo. This work intends to provide a survey of the different approaches to imaging of angiogenesis using OI methods in preclinical research as well as first clinical trials. Different imaging modalities as well as various optical contrast agents are briefly discussed. (orig.)

  11. Inverse transport problems in quantitative PAT for molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Kui; Zhang, Rongting; Zhong, Yimin

    2015-12-01

    Fluorescence photoacoustic tomography (fPAT) is a molecular imaging modality that combines photoacoustic tomography with fluorescence imaging to obtain high-resolution imaging of fluorescence distributions inside heterogeneous media. The objective of this work is to study inverse problems in the quantitative step of fPAT where we intend to reconstruct physical coefficients in a coupled system of radiative transport equations using internal data recovered from ultrasound measurements. We derive uniqueness and stability results on the inverse problems and develop some efficient algorithms for image reconstructions. Numerical simulations based on synthetic data are presented to validate the theoretical analysis. The results we present here complement these in Ren K and Zhao H (2013 SIAM J. Imaging Sci. 6 2024-49) on the same problem but in the diffusive regime.

  12. Xenogeneic homologous genes, molecular evolution and cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田聆; 魏于全

    2001-01-01

    Cancer is one of the main causes for death of human beings to date, and cancer biotherapy (mainlyimmunotherapy and gene therapy) has become the most promising approach after surgical therapy, radiotherapy andchemotherapy. However, there are still many limitations on cancer immunotherapy and gene therapy; therefore great ef-fort is being made to develop new strategies. It has been known that, in the process of evolution, a number of genes, theso-called xenogeneic homologous genes, are well-conserved and show the structural and/or functional similarity betweenvarious species to some degree. The nucleotide changes between various xenogeneic homologous genes are derived frommutation, and most of them are neutral mutations. Considering that the subtle differences in xenogeneic homologousgenes can break immune tolerance, enhance the immunogenicity and induce autologous immune response so as to elimi-nate tumor cells, we expect that a strategy of inducing autoimmune response using the property of xenogeneic homologousgenes will become a new therapy for cancer. Moreover, this therapy can also be used in the treatment of other diseases,such as autoimmune diseases and AIDS. This article will discuss the xenogeneic homologous genes, molecular evolutionand cancer therapy.

  13. Molecular targets of cancer chemoprevention by garlic-derived organosulfides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anna HERMAN-ANTOSIEWICZ; Anna A POWOLNY; Shivendra V SINGH

    2007-01-01

    The medicinal benefits of Allium vegetables, especially garlic, have been noted throughout recorded history. The known health benefits of Allium vegetables and their constituents include cardiovascular protective effects, stimulation of immune function, reduction of blood glucose level, radioprotection, improvement of memory loss, protection against microbial, viral and fungal infections, as well as anticancer effects. Population-based case control studies have suggested an inverse correlation between dietary intake of Allium vegetables and the risk of different types of cancers. The anticarcinogenic effect of Allium vegetables in-eluding garlic is attributed to organosulfur compounds (OSC), which are highly effective in affording protection against cancer in animal models induced by a variety of chemical carcinogens. More recent studies have shown that certain naturally occurring OSC analogues can suppress proliferation of cancer cells in culture and in vivo. The OSC-induced changes in the proliferation of cancer Cellsare frequently associated with perturbations in cell cycle progression and induc-tion of G2/M phase arrest. The OSC have also been demonstrated to induce apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway by altering the ratio of the Bc1-2 family of proteins both in cell culture and in in vivo models. Anti-angiogenic activity for garlic-derived OSC has also been documented. This article summarizes current knowledge on molecular targets of cancer chemoprevention by OSC.

  14. PET molecular imaging in stem cell therapy for neurological diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis are caused by loss of different types of neurons and glial cells in the brain and spinal cord. At present, there are no effective therapies against these disorders. Discovery of the therapeutic potential of stem cells offers new strategies for the treatment of neurological diseases. Direct assessment of stem cells' survival, interaction with the host and impact on neuronal functions after transplantation requires advanced in vivo imaging techniques. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a potential molecular imaging modality to evaluate the viability and function of transplanted tissue or stem cells in the nervous system. This review focuses on PET molecular imaging in stem cell therapy for neurological diseases. (orig.)

  15. PET molecular imaging in stem cell therapy for neurological diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiachuan; Zhang, Hong [Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Zhejiang University, Medical PET Center, Hangzhou (China); Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou (China); Tian, Mei [University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Experimental Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Human neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis are caused by loss of different types of neurons and glial cells in the brain and spinal cord. At present, there are no effective therapies against these disorders. Discovery of the therapeutic potential of stem cells offers new strategies for the treatment of neurological diseases. Direct assessment of stem cells' survival, interaction with the host and impact on neuronal functions after transplantation requires advanced in vivo imaging techniques. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a potential molecular imaging modality to evaluate the viability and function of transplanted tissue or stem cells in the nervous system. This review focuses on PET molecular imaging in stem cell therapy for neurological diseases. (orig.)

  16. Optical and Functional Imaging in Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    van der Leest, Cor

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLung cancer is the second most common cancer in men and women, and is the leading cause of cancer related death. In industrialized countries the mortality rate of lung cancer is higher than the mortality rate of breast, colorectal and prostate cancer combined 1. When lung cancer is diagnosed at an early stage patients are considered to have the best overall survival rate 2. Unfortunately, only a minority of patients is currently diagnosed at a curable stage of disease. The lack of...

  17. The current status of imaging diagnosis of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, the incidence and the mortality rate of female breast cancer in our country is increasing, Early diagnosis of breast cancer is particularly important. Precious preoperative staging in the breast cancer is advantageous for the treatment planning. Evaluating the efficacy of chemotherapy is beneficial for adjusting the follow-up plan. Imaging examination has become an important role in breast cancer management. At present, commonly used equipment include mammography, ultrasound, CT, and MRI, etc. This article reviews the present study status of these tools in diagnosis of breast cancer. A reasonable and effective choice of those tools can facilitate clinic diagnosis and treatment. (authors)

  18. Image-derived biomarkers and multimodal imaging strategies for lung cancer management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauter, Alexander W. [Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen, Werner Siemens Imaging Center, Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Tuebingen (Germany); Schwenzer, Nina; Pfannenberg, Christina [Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Divine, Mathew R.; Pichler, Bernd J. [Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen, Werner Siemens Imaging Center, Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer is the most common type of lung cancer and one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. For this reason, advances in diagnosis and treatment are urgently needed. With the introduction of new, highly innovative hybrid imaging technologies such as PET/CT, staging and therapy response monitoring in lung cancer patients have substantially evolved. In this review, we discuss the role of FDG PET/CT in the management of lung cancer patients and the importance of new emerging imaging technologies and radiotracer developments on the path to personalized medicine. (orig.)

  19. Image-derived biomarkers and multimodal imaging strategies for lung cancer management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-small-cell lung cancer is the most common type of lung cancer and one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. For this reason, advances in diagnosis and treatment are urgently needed. With the introduction of new, highly innovative hybrid imaging technologies such as PET/CT, staging and therapy response monitoring in lung cancer patients have substantially evolved. In this review, we discuss the role of FDG PET/CT in the management of lung cancer patients and the importance of new emerging imaging technologies and radiotracer developments on the path to personalized medicine. (orig.)

  20. Molecular Imaging of Transporters with Positron Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Gunnar; Sörensen, Jens; Hall, Håkan

    Positron emission tomography (PET) visualization of brain components in vivo is a rapidly growing field. Molecular imaging with PET is also increasingly used in drug development, especially for the determination of drug receptor interaction for CNS-active drugs. This gives the opportunity to relate clinical efficacy to per cent receptor occupancy of a drug on a certain targeted receptor and to relate drug pharmacokinetics in plasma to interaction with target protein. In the present review we will focus on the study of transporters, such as the monoamine transporters, the P-glycoprotein (Pgp) transporter, the vesicular monoamine transporter type 2, and the glucose transporter using PET radioligands. Neurotransmitter transporters are presynaptically located and in vivo imaging using PET can therefore be used for the determination of the density of afferent neurons. Several promising PET ligands for the noradrenaline transporter (NET) have been labeled and evaluated in vivo including in man, but a really useful PET ligand for NET still remains to be identified. The most promising tracer to date is (S,S)-[18F]FMeNER-D2. The in vivo visualization of the dopamine transporter (DAT) may give clues in the evaluation of conditions related to dopamine, such as Parkinson's disease and drug abuse. The first PET radioligands based on cocaine were not selective, but more recently several selective tracers such as [11C]PE2I have been characterized and shown to be suitable as PET radioligands. Although there are a large number of serotonin transporter inhibitors used today as SSRIs, it was not until very recently, when [11C]McN5652 was synthesized, that this transporter was studied using PET. New candidates as PET radioligands for the SERT have subsequently been developed and [11C]DASB and [11C]MADAM and their analogues are today the most promising ligands. The existing radioligands for Pgp transporters seem to be suitable tools for the study of both peripheral and central drug

  1. Metaphors and images of cancer in early modern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolberg, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on learned medical writing about cancer and on nonmedical texts that used cancer as a metaphor for hateful cultural, social, religious, or political phenomena that warranted drastic measures, this article traces the metaphors and images that framed the perception and experience of cancer in the early modern period. It finds that cancer was closely associated with notions of impurity and a visible destruction of the body's surface and was diagnosed primarily in women, as breast and uterine cancer. Putrid, corrosive cancerous humor was thought not only to accumulate and eat its way into the surrounding flesh but also to spread, like the seeds of a plant, "infecting" the whole body. This infectious quality, the putrid secretions, and the often horrendous smell emanating from cancer victims raised fears, in turn, of contagion and were taken to justify a separation of cancer patients from the rest of society. PMID:24769802

  2. Low-Noise CMOS Image Sensors for Radio-Molecular Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Y.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis presents the development of low-noise CMOS image sensors for radio-molecular imaging. The development is described in two directions: firstly, from the technology point of view to reduce the pixel noise level, and secondly from the design point of view to reduce the pixel readout circuit

  3. Lung cancer and angiogenesis imaging using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Xiaoxia; Zhao Jun; Xu, Lisa X [Biomedical Engineering, School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Sun Jianqi; Gu Xiang; Liu Ping [Med-X Research Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Xiao Tiqiao [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai (China)], E-mail: pingliu@sjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: lisaxu@sjtu.edu.cn

    2010-04-21

    Early detection of lung cancer is the key to a cure, but a difficult task using conventional x-ray imaging. In the present study, synchrotron radiation in-line phase-contrast imaging was used to study lung cancer. Lewis lung cancer and 4T1 breast tumor metastasis in the lung were imaged, and the differences were clearly shown in comparison to normal lung tissue. The effect of the object-detector distance and the energy level on the phase-contrast difference was investigated and found to be in good agreement with the theory of in-line phase-contrast imaging. Moreover, 3D image reconstruction of lung tumor angiogenesis was obtained for the first time using a contrast agent, demonstrating the feasibility of micro-angiography with synchrotron radiation for imaging tumor angiogenesis deep inside the body.

  4. Lung cancer and angiogenesis imaging using synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Jun; Sun, Jianqi; Gu, Xiang; Xiao, Tiqiao; Liu, Ping; Xu, Lisa X.

    2010-04-01

    Early detection of lung cancer is the key to a cure, but a difficult task using conventional x-ray imaging. In the present study, synchrotron radiation in-line phase-contrast imaging was used to study lung cancer. Lewis lung cancer and 4T1 breast tumor metastasis in the lung were imaged, and the differences were clearly shown in comparison to normal lung tissue. The effect of the object-detector distance and the energy level on the phase-contrast difference was investigated and found to be in good agreement with the theory of in-line phase-contrast imaging. Moreover, 3D image reconstruction of lung tumor angiogenesis was obtained for the first time using a contrast agent, demonstrating the feasibility of micro-angiography with synchrotron radiation for imaging tumor angiogenesis deep inside the body.

  5. Image-guided Coring for Large-scale Studies in Molecular Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaser-Kouhsari, Laleh; Knoblauch, Nicholas W; Oh, Eun-Yeong; Baker, Gabrielle; Christensen, Stephen; Hazra, Aditi; Tamimi, Rulla M; Beck, Andrew H

    2016-07-01

    Sampling of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue blocks is a critical initial step in molecular pathology. Image-guided coring (IGC) is a new method for using digital pathology images to guide tissue block coring for molecular analyses. The goal of our study is to evaluate the use of IGC for both tissue-based and nucleic acid-based projects in molecular pathology. First, we used IGC to construct a tissue microarray (TMA); second, we used IGC for FFPE block sampling followed by RNA extraction; and third, we assessed the correlation between nuclear counts quantitated from the IGC images and RNA yields. We used IGC to construct a TMA containing 198 normal and breast cancer cores. Histopathologic analysis showed high accuracy for obtaining tumor and normal breast tissue. Next, we used IGC to obtain normal and tumor breast samples before RNA extraction. We selected a random subset of tumor and normal samples to perform computational image analysis to quantify nuclear density, and we built regression models to estimate RNA yields from nuclear count, age of the block, and core diameter. Number of nuclei and core diameter were the strongest predictors of RNA yields in both normal and tumor tissue. IGC is an effective method for sampling FFPE tissue blocks for TMA construction and nucleic acid extraction. We identify significant associations between quantitative nuclear counts obtained from IGC images and RNA yields, suggesting that the integration of computational image analysis with IGC may be an effective approach for tumor sampling in large-scale molecular studies. PMID:26186251

  6. Imprints of Molecular Clouds in Radio Continuum Images

    CERN Document Server

    Yusef-Zadeh, F

    2012-01-01

    We show radio continuum images of several molecular complexes in the inner Galaxy and report the presence of dark features that coincide with dense molecular clouds. Unlike infrared dark clouds, these features which we call "radio dark clouds" are produced by a deficiency in radio continuum emission from molecular clouds that are embedded in a bath of UV radiation field or synchrotron emitting cosmic ray particles. The contribution of the continuum emission along different pathlengths results in dark features that trace embedded molecular clouds. The new technique of identifying cold clouds can place constraints on the depth and the magnetic field of molecular clouds when compared to those of the surrounding hot plasma radiating at radio wavelengths. The study of five molecular complexes in the inner Galaxy, Sgr A, Sgr B2, radio Arc, the snake filament and G359.75-0.13 demonstrate an anti--correlation between the distributions of radio continuum and molecular line and dust emission. Radio dark clouds are iden...

  7. Molecular imaging of brown adipose tissue in health and disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has transformed from an interfering tissue in oncological 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to an independent imaging research field. This review takes the perspective from the imaging methodology on which human BAT research has come to rely on heavily. This review analyses relevant PubMed-indexed publications that discuss molecular imaging methods of BAT. In addition, reported links between BAT and human diseases such as obesity are discussed, and the possibilities for imaging in these fields are highlighted. Radiopharmaceuticals aiming at several different biological mechanisms of BAT are discussed and evaluated. Prospective, dedicated studies allow visualization of BAT function in a high percentage of human subjects. BAT dysfunction has been implicated in obesity, linked with diabetes and associated with cachexia and atherosclerosis. Presently, 18F-FDG PET/CT is the most useful tool for evaluating therapies aiming at BAT activity. In addition to 18F-FDG, other radiopharmaceuticals such as 99mTc-sestamibi, 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), 18F-fluorodopa and 18F-14(R,S)-[18F]fluoro-6-thia-heptadecanoic acid (FTHA) may have a potential for visualizing other aspects of BAT activity. MRI methods are under continuous development and provide the prospect of functional imaging without ionizing radiation. Molecular imaging of BAT can be used to quantitatively assess different aspects of BAT metabolic activity. (orig.)

  8. Molecular imaging of brown adipose tissue in health and disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauwens, Matthias [MUMC, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University, Research School NUTRIM, Maastricht (Netherlands); Wierts, Roel; Brans, Boudewijn [MUMC, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Royen, Bart van; Backes, Walter [MUMC, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Bucerius, Jan [MUMC, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Uniklinikum Aachen, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Maastricht University, Research School CARIM, Maastricht (Netherlands); Mottaghy, Felix [MUMC, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Uniklinikum Aachen, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has transformed from an interfering tissue in oncological {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to an independent imaging research field. This review takes the perspective from the imaging methodology on which human BAT research has come to rely on heavily. This review analyses relevant PubMed-indexed publications that discuss molecular imaging methods of BAT. In addition, reported links between BAT and human diseases such as obesity are discussed, and the possibilities for imaging in these fields are highlighted. Radiopharmaceuticals aiming at several different biological mechanisms of BAT are discussed and evaluated. Prospective, dedicated studies allow visualization of BAT function in a high percentage of human subjects. BAT dysfunction has been implicated in obesity, linked with diabetes and associated with cachexia and atherosclerosis. Presently, {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT is the most useful tool for evaluating therapies aiming at BAT activity. In addition to {sup 18}F-FDG, other radiopharmaceuticals such as {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi, {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), {sup 18}F-fluorodopa and {sup 18}F-14(R,S)-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-6-thia-heptadecanoic acid (FTHA) may have a potential for visualizing other aspects of BAT activity. MRI methods are under continuous development and provide the prospect of functional imaging without ionizing radiation. Molecular imaging of BAT can be used to quantitatively assess different aspects of BAT metabolic activity. (orig.)

  9. Imaging Pancreatic Cancer with Folic Acid Terminated Luminescent Silicon Nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erogbogbo, Folarin; Swihart, Mark T.

    2010-10-01

    Quantum dots have great potential for visualization of medically relevant targets such as cancer. However, potential toxicity, stemming from the use of heavy metal based semidonductor materials, has been a major impediment to use of quantum dots in vivo. Silicon is an inherently non-toxic element. By combining the unique optical properties of silicon quantum dots with fundamentals of cancer biology, we can develop probes that safely target and enable the visualization of cancer cells. Many cancer cells overexpress folate receptors, making the folate receptors a suitable target for cancer imaging evaluations. Here, we report the synthesis of folic acid coated silicon quantum dots for targeting pancreatic cancer cells. Folic acid on the silicon quantum dots improves selectivity and may decrease possible negative side effects. This demonstration adds to the evidence that silicon can be sucessfully used for biological imaging.

  10. Laser Illumination Modality of Photoacoustic Imaging Technique for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Dong-qing; Peng, Yuan-yuan; Guo, Jian; Li, Hui

    2016-02-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) has recently emerged as a promising imaging technique for prostate cancer. But there was still a lot of challenge in the PAI for prostate cancer detection, such as laser illumination modality. Knowledge of absorbed light distribution in prostate tissue was essential since the distribution characteristic of absorbed light energy would influence the imaging depth and range of PAI. In order to make a comparison of different laser illumination modality of photoacoustic imaging technique for prostate cancer, optical model of human prostate was established and combined with Monte Carlo simulation method to calculate the light absorption distribution in the prostate tissue. Characteristic of light absorption distribution of transurethral and trans-rectal illumination case, and of tumor at different location was compared with each other.The relevant conclusions would be significant for optimizing the light illumination in a PAI system for prostate cancer detection.

  11. IMAGE-GUIDED RADIOTHERAPY AND -BRACHYTHERAPY FOR CERVICAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh eDutta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT, and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy.Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron emission tomography (PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT, allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer.

  12. Image-guided radiotherapy and -brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Suresh; Nguyen, Nam Phong; Vock, Jacqueline; Kerr, Christine; Godinez, Juan; Bose, Satya; Jang, Siyoung; Chi, Alexander; Almeida, Fabio; Woods, William; Desai, Anand; David, Rick; Karlsson, Ulf Lennart; Altdorfer, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy. Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron-emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT), allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer. PMID:25853092

  13. Clinical study of imaging skin cancer margins using polarized light imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samatham, Ravikant; Lee, Ken; Jacques, Steven L.

    2012-02-01

    Skin cancer is most commons type of cancer in United States that occur on sun-exposed cosmetically sensitive areas like face, neck, and forearms. Surgical excision of skin cancer is challenging as more than one-third the actual margins extend beyond the clinically determined margins. Polarized light camera (polCAM) provides images of the superficial layers of the tissue with enhanced contrast which was used to image skin cancer margins. In a NIH-funded pilot study polCAM was used to image skin cancer in patients undergoing Mohs micrographic surgery for skin cancer. Polarized light imaging utilizes the polarization properties of light to create an image of a lesion comprised only of light scattering from the superficial layers of the skin which yields a characteristic "fabric pattern" of the putative lesion and the surrounding normal tissue. In several case studies conducted with a system developed for the clinic, we have found that skin cancer disrupts this fabric pattern, allowing the doctor a new means of identifying the margins of the lesion. Data is acquired before the patient underwent surgery. The clinically determined skin cancer margins were compared with margins determined by examination of the polCAM images. The true margins were provided by the dermatophathologist on examination of the frozen sections. Our initial data suggests that the contrast due to polarization changes associated with cancerous lesions can elucidate margins that were not recognized by the surgeon under normal conditions but were later confirmed by the pathologist.

  14. The pathology of familial breast cancer: Immunohistochemistry and molecular analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive studies of BRCA1- and BRCA2-associated breast tumours have been carried out in the few years since the identification of these familial breast cancer predisposing genes. The morphological studies suggest that BRCA1 tumours differ from BRCA2 tumours and from sporadic breast cancers. Recent progress in immunohistochemistry and molecular biology techniques has enabled in-depth investigation of molecular pathology of these tumours. Studies to date have investigated issues such as steroid hormone receptor expression, mutation status of tumour suppressor genes TP53 and c-erbB2, and expression profiles of cell cycle proteins p21, p27 and cyclin D1. Despite relative paucity of data, strong evidence of unique biological characteristics of BRCA1-associated breast cancer is accumulating. BRCA1-associated tumours appear to show an increased frequency of TP53 mutations, frequent p53 protein stabilization and absence of imunoreactivity for steroid hormone receptors. Further studies of larger number of samples of both BRCA1- and BRCA2-associated tumours are necessary to clarify and confirm these observations

  15. Image-guided focal therapy for prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sankineni, Sandeep; Wood, Bradford J.; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Diaz, Annerleim Walton; Hoang, Anthony N.; Pinto, Peter A.; Peter L. Choyke; Türkbey, Barış

    2014-01-01

    The adoption of routine prostate specific antigen screening has led to the discovery of many small and low-grade prostate cancers which have a low probability of causing mortality. These cancers, however, are often treated with radical therapies resulting in long-term side effects. There has been increasing interest in minimally invasive focal therapies to treat these tumors. While imaging modalities have improved rapidly over the past decade, similar advances in image-guided therapy are now ...

  16. Targeting Strategies for Multifunctional Nanoparticles in Cancer Imaging and Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mi Kyung Yu, Jinho Park, Sangyong Jon

    2012-01-01

    Nanomaterials offer new opportunities for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Multifunctional nanoparticles harboring various functions including targeting, imaging, therapy, and etc have been intensively studied aiming to overcome limitations associated with conventional cancer diagnosis and therapy. Of various nanoparticles, magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with superparamagnetic property have shown potential as multifunctional nanoparticles for clinical translation because they have been used...

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging for lung cancer screen

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yi-Xiang J.; Lo, Gladys G.; Yuan, Jing; Larson, Peder E.Z.; Zhang, Xiaoliang

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer related death throughout the world. Lung cancer is an example of a disease for which a large percentage of the high-risk population can be easily identified via a smoking history. This has led to the investigation of lung cancer screening with low-dose helical/multi-detector CT. Evidences suggest that early detection of lung cancer allow more timely therapeutic intervention and thus a more favorable prognosis for the patient. The positive relationshi...

  18. A novel spectral imaging system for use during pancreatic cancer surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peller, Joseph; Shipley, A. E.; Trammell, Susan R.; Abolbashari, Mehrdad; Farahi, Faramarz

    2015-03-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Most pancreatic cancer patients will die within the first year of diagnosis, and just 6% will survive five years. Currently, surgery is the only treatment that offers a chance of cure for pancreatic cancer patients. Accurately identifying the tumors margins in real time is a significant difficulty during pancreatic cancer surgery and contributes to the low 5-year survival rate. We are developing a hyperspectral imaging system based on compressive sampling for real-time tumor margin detection to facilitate more effective removal of diseased tissue and result in better patient outcomes. Recent research has shown that optical spectroscopy can be used to distinguish between healthy and diseased tissue and will likely become an important minimally invasive diagnostic tool for a range of diseases. Reflectance spectroscopy provides information about tissue morphology, while laser-induced autofluorescence spectra give accurate information about the content and molecular structure of the emitting tissue. We are developing a spectral imaging system that targets emission from collagen and NAD(P)H as diagnostics for differentiating healthy and diseased pancreatic tissue. In this study, we demonstrate the ability of our camera system to acquire hyperspectral images and its potential application for imaging autofluorescent emission from pancreatic tissue.

  19. Molecular Link between Vitamin D and Cancer Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William B. Grant

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The metabolite of vitamin D, 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (also known as calcitriol, is a biologically active molecule required to maintain the physiological functions of several target tissues in the human body from conception to adulthood. Its molecular mode of action ranges from immediate nongenomic responses to longer term mechanisms that exert persistent genomic effects. The genomic mechanisms of vitamin D action rely on cross talk between 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 signaling pathways and that of other growth factors or hormones that collectively regulate cell proliferation, differentiation and cell survival. In vitro and in vivo studies demonstrate a role for vitamin D (calcitriol in modulating cellular growth and development. Vitamin D (calcitriol acts as an antiproliferative agent in many tissues and significantly slows malignant cellular growth. Moreover, epidemiological studies have suggested that ultraviolet-B exposure can help reduce cancer risk and prevalence, indicating a potential role for vitamin D as a feasible agent to prevent cancer incidence and recurrence. With the preventive potential of this biologically active agent, we suggest that countries where cancer is on the rise—yet where sunlight and, hence, vitamin D may be easily acquired—adopt awareness, education and implementation strategies to increase supplementation with vitamin D in all age groups as a preventive measure to reduce cancer risk and prevalence.

  20. Molecular Endoscopic Ultrasound for Diagnosis of Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy is a safe and effective technique in diagnosing and staging of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. However its predictive negative value does not exceed 50% to 60%. Unfortunately, the majority of pancreatic cancer patients have a metastatic and/or a locally advanced disease (i.e., not eligible for curative resection) which explains the limited access to pancreatic tissue specimens. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy is the most widely used approach for cytological and histological material sampling in these situations used in up to two thirds of patients with pancreatic cancer. Based on this unique material, we and others developed strategies to improve the differential diagnosis between carcinoma and inflammatory pancreatic lesions by analysis of KRAS oncogene mutation, microRNA expression and methylation, as well as mRNA expression using both qRT-PCR and Low Density Array Taqman analysis. Indeed, differentiating pancreatic cancer from pseudotumoral chronic pancreatitis remains very difficult in current clinical practice, and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy analysis proved to be very helpful. In this review, we will compile the clinical and molecular advantages of using endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy in managing pancreatic cancer

  1. Molecular Endoscopic Ultrasound for Diagnosis of Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Cordelier

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy is a safe and effective technique in diagnosing and staging of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. However its predictive negative value does not exceed 50% to 60%. Unfortunately, the majority of pancreatic cancer patients have a metastatic and/or a locally advanced disease (i.e., not eligible for curative resection which explains the limited access to pancreatic tissue specimens. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy is the most widely used approach for cytological and histological material sampling in these situations used in up to two thirds of patients with pancreatic cancer. Based on this unique material, we and others developed strategies to improve the differential diagnosis between carcinoma and inflammatory pancreatic lesions by analysis of KRAS oncogene mutation, microRNA expression and methylation, as well as mRNA expression using both qRT-PCR and Low Density Array Taqman analysis. Indeed, differentiating pancreatic cancer from pseudotumoral chronic pancreatitis remains very difficult in current clinical practice, and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy analysis proved to be very helpful. In this review, we will compile the clinical and molecular advantages of using endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy in managing pancreatic cancer.

  2. Molecular Endoscopic Ultrasound for Diagnosis of Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bournet, Barbara [Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Center Rangueil, 1 avenue Jean Poulhès, TSA 50032, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); INSERM U1037, University Hospital Center Rangueil, Toulouse (France); Pointreau, Adeline; Delpu, Yannick; Selves, Janick; Torrisani, Jerome [INSERM U1037, University Hospital Center Rangueil, Toulouse (France); Buscail, Louis, E-mail: buscail.l@chu-toulouse.fr [Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Center Rangueil, 1 avenue Jean Poulhès, TSA 50032, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); INSERM U1037, University Hospital Center Rangueil, Toulouse (France); Cordelier, Pierre [INSERM U1037, University Hospital Center Rangueil, Toulouse (France)

    2011-02-24

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy is a safe and effective technique in diagnosing and staging of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. However its predictive negative value does not exceed 50% to 60%. Unfortunately, the majority of pancreatic cancer patients have a metastatic and/or a locally advanced disease (i.e., not eligible for curative resection) which explains the limited access to pancreatic tissue specimens. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy is the most widely used approach for cytological and histological material sampling in these situations used in up to two thirds of patients with pancreatic cancer. Based on this unique material, we and others developed strategies to improve the differential diagnosis between carcinoma and inflammatory pancreatic lesions by analysis of KRAS oncogene mutation, microRNA expression and methylation, as well as mRNA expression using both qRT-PCR and Low Density Array Taqman analysis. Indeed, differentiating pancreatic cancer from pseudotumoral chronic pancreatitis remains very difficult in current clinical practice, and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy analysis proved to be very helpful. In this review, we will compile the clinical and molecular advantages of using endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration-biopsy in managing pancreatic cancer.

  3. Molecular mechanisms of pharmacological doses of ascorbate on cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturelli, Sascha; Sinnberg, Tobias W; Niessner, Heike; Busch, Christian

    2015-06-01

    Intravenous application of high-dose ascorbate (vitamin C) has been used in complementary medicine since the 1970s to treat cancer patients. In recent years it became evident that high-dose ascorbate in the millimolar range bears selective cytotoxic effects on cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. This anticancer effect is dose dependent, catalyzed by serum components and mediated by reactive oxygen species and ascorbyl radicals, making ascorbate a pro-oxidative pro-drug that catalyzes hydrogen peroxide production in tissues instead of acting as a radical scavenger. It further depends on HIF-1 signaling and oxygen pressure, and shows a strong epigenetic signature (alteration of DNA-methylation and induction of tumor-suppressing microRNAs in cancer cells). The detailed understanding of ascorbate-induced antiproliferative molecular mechanisms warrants in-depth preclinical evaluation in cancer-bearing animal models for the optimization of an efficacious therapy regimen (e.g., combination with hyperbaric oxygen or O2-sensitizers) that subsequently need to be evaluated in clinical trials. PMID:26065536

  4. Structure-based optimization of GRP78-binding peptides that enhances efficacy in cancer imaging and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng-Hung; Lee, Andy Chi-Lung; Chen, I-Ju; Chang, Nai-Chuan; Wu, Han-Chung; Yu, Hui-Ming; Chang, Ya-Jen; Lee, Te-Wei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Yu, Alice L; Yu, John

    2016-07-01

    It is more challenging to design peptide drugs than small molecules through molecular docking and in silico analysis. Here, we developed a structure-based approach with various computational and analytical techniques to optimize cancer-targeting peptides for molecular imaging and therapy. We first utilized a peptide-binding protein database to identify GRP78, a specific cancer cell-surface marker, as a target protein for the lead, L-peptide. Subsequently, we used homologous modeling and molecular docking to identify a peptide-binding domain within GRP78 and optimized a series of peptides with a new protein-ligand scoring program, HotLig. Binding of these peptides to GRP78 was confirmed using an oriented immobilization technique for the Biacore system. We further examined the ability of the peptides to target cancer cells through in vitro binding studies with cell lines and clinical cancer specimens, and in vivo tumor imaging and targeted chemotherapeutic studies. MicroSPECT/CT imaging revealed significantly greater uptake of (188)Re-liposomes linked to these peptides as compared with non-targeting (188)Re-liposomes. Conjugation with these peptides also significantly increased the therapeutic efficacy of Lipo-Dox. Notably, peptide-conjugated Lipo-Dox significantly reduced stem-cell subpopulation in xenografts of breast cancer. The structure-based optimization strategy for peptides described here may be useful for developing peptide drugs for cancer imaging and therapy. PMID:27088408

  5. Pancreatic Cancer Gene Therapy: From Molecular Targets to Delivery Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillat, Cristina, E-mail: cristina.fillat@crg.es; Jose, Anabel; Ros, Xavier Bofill-De; Mato-Berciano, Ana; Maliandi, Maria Victoria; Sobrevals, Luciano [Programa Gens i Malaltia, Centre de Regulació Genòmica-CRG, UPF, Parc de Recerca Biomedica de Barcelona-PRBB and Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Raras (CIBERER), Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-01-18

    The continuous identification of molecular changes deregulating critical pathways in pancreatic tumor cells provides us with a large number of novel candidates to engineer gene-targeted approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment. Targets—both protein coding and non-coding—are being exploited in gene therapy to influence the deregulated pathways to facilitate cytotoxicity, enhance the immune response or sensitize to current treatments. Delivery vehicles based on viral or non-viral systems as well as cellular vectors with tumor homing characteristics are a critical part of the design of gene therapy strategies. The different behavior of tumoral versus non-tumoral cells inspires vector engineering with the generation of tumor selective products that can prevent potential toxic-associated effects. In the current review, a detailed analysis of the different targets, the delivery vectors, the preclinical approaches and a descriptive update on the conducted clinical trials are presented. Moreover, future possibilities in pancreatic cancer treatment by gene therapy strategies are discussed.

  6. Pancreatic Cancer Gene Therapy: From Molecular Targets to Delivery Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The continuous identification of molecular changes deregulating critical pathways in pancreatic tumor cells provides us with a large number of novel candidates to engineer gene-targeted approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment. Targets—both protein coding and non-coding—are being exploited in gene therapy to influence the deregulated pathways to facilitate cytotoxicity, enhance the immune response or sensitize to current treatments. Delivery vehicles based on viral or non-viral systems as well as cellular vectors with tumor homing characteristics are a critical part of the design of gene therapy strategies. The different behavior of tumoral versus non-tumoral cells inspires vector engineering with the generation of tumor selective products that can prevent potential toxic-associated effects. In the current review, a detailed analysis of the different targets, the delivery vectors, the preclinical approaches and a descriptive update on the conducted clinical trials are presented. Moreover, future possibilities in pancreatic cancer treatment by gene therapy strategies are discussed

  7. Dynamic infrared imaging in identification of breast cancer tissue with combined image processing and frequency analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joro, R; Lääperi, A-L; Soimakallio, S; Järvenpää, R; Kuukasjärvi, T; Toivonen, T; Saaristo, R; Dastidar, P

    2008-01-01

    Five combinations of image-processing algorithms were applied to dynamic infrared (IR) images of six breast cancer patients preoperatively to establish optimal enhancement of cancer tissue before frequency analysis. mid-wave photovoltaic (PV) IR cameras with 320x254 and 640x512 pixels were used. The signal-to-noise ratio and the specificity for breast cancer were evaluated with the image-processing combinations from the image series of each patient. Before image processing and frequency analysis the effect of patient movement was minimized with a stabilization program developed and tested in the study by stabilizing image slices using surface markers set as measurement points on the skin of the imaged breast. A mathematical equation for superiority value was developed for comparison of the key ratios of the image-processing combinations. The ability of each combination to locate the mammography finding of breast cancer in each patient was compared. Our results show that data collected with a 640x512-pixel mid-wave PV camera applying image-processing methods optimizing signal-to-noise ratio, morphological image processing and linear image restoration before frequency analysis possess the greatest superiority value, showing the cancer area most clearly also in the match centre of the mammography estimation. PMID:18666012

  8. Targeting and Imaging of Cancer Cells via Monosaccharide-Imprinted Fluorescent Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuangshou; Yin, Danyang; Wang, Wenjing; Shen, Xiaojing; Zhu, Jun-Jie; Chen, Hong-Yuan; Liu, Zhen

    2016-03-01

    The recognition of cancer cells is a key for cancer diagnosis and therapy, but the specificity highly relies on the use of biorecognition molecules particularly antibodies. Because biorecognition molecules suffer from some apparent disadvantages, such as hard to prepare and poor storage stability, novel alternatives that can overcome these disadvantages are highly important. Here we present monosaccharide-imprinted fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) for targeting and imaging of cancer cells. The molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) probe was fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) doped silica NPs with a shell imprinted with sialic acid, fucose or mannose as the template. The monosaccharide-imprinted NPs exhibited high specificity toward the target monosaccharides. As the template monosaccharides used are over-expressed on cancer cells, these monosaccharide-imprinted NPs allowed for specific targeting cancer cells over normal cells. Fluorescence imaging of human hepatoma carcinoma cells (HepG-2) over normal hepatic cells (L-02) and mammary cancer cells (MCF-7) over normal mammary epithelial cells (MCF-10A) by these NPs was demonstrated. As the imprinting approach employed herein is generally applicable and highly efficient, monosaccharide-imprinted NPs can be promising probes for targeting cancer cells.

  9. Molecular Markers of Lung Cancer in MAYAK Workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven A. Belinsky, PhD

    2007-02-15

    The molecular mechanisms that result in the elevated risk for lung cancer associated with exposure to radiation have not been well characterized. Workers from the MAYAK nuclear enterprise are an ideal cohort in which to study the molecular epidemiology of cancer associated with radiation exposure and to identify the genes targeted for inactivation that in turn affect individual risk for radiation-induced lung cancer. Epidemiology studies of the MAYAK cohort indicate a significantly higher frequency for adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in workers than in a control population and a strong correlation between these tumor types and plutonium exposure. Two hypotheses will be evaluated through the proposed studies. First, radiation exposure targets specific genes for inactivation by promoter methylation. This hypothesis is supported by our recent studies with the MAYAK population that demonstrated the targeting of the p16 gene for inactivation by promoter methylation in adenocarcinomas from workers (1). Second, genes inactivated in tumors can serve as biomarkers for lung cancer risk in a cancer-free population of workers exposed to plutonium. Support for this hypothesis is based on exciting preliminary results of our nested, case-control study of persons from the Colorado cohort. In that study, a panel of methylation markers for predicting lung cancer risk is being evaluated in sputum samples from incident lung cancer cases and controls. The first hypothesis will be tested by determining the prevalence for promoter hypermethylation of a panel of genes shown to play a critical role in the development of either adenocarcinoma and/or SCC associated with tobacco. Our initial studies on adenocarcinoma in MAYAK workers will be extended to evaluate methylation of the PAX5 {alpha}, PAX5 {beta}, H-cadherin, GATA5, and bone morphogenesis 3B (BMP3B) genes in the original sample set described under Preliminary studies. In addition, studies will be initiated in SCC

  10. Ultrasound molecular imaging of secreted frizzled related protein-2 expression in murine angiosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James K Tsuruta

    Full Text Available Angiosarcoma is a biologically aggressive vascular malignancy with a high metastatic potential. In the era of targeted medicine, knowledge of specific molecular tumor characteristics has become more important. Molecular imaging using targeted ultrasound contrast agents can monitor tumor progression non-invasively. Secreted frizzled related protein 2 (SFRP2 is a tumor endothelial marker expressed in angiosarcoma. We hypothesize that SFRP2-directed imaging could be a novel approach to imaging the tumor vasculature. To develop an SFRP2 contrast agent, SFRP2 polyclonal antibody was biotinylated and incubated with streptavidin-coated microbubbles. SVR angiosarcoma cells were injected into nude mice, and when tumors were established the mice were injected intravenously with the SFRP2 -targeted contrast agent, or a control streptavidin-coated contrast agent. SFRP2 -targeted contrast agent detected tumor vasculature with significantly more signal intensity than control contrast agent: the normalized fold-change was 1.6 ± 0.27 (n = 13, p = 0.0032. The kidney was largely devoid of echogenicity with no significant difference between the control contrast agent and the SFRP2-targeted contrast agent demonstrating that the SFRP2-targeted contrast agent was specific to tumor vessels. Plotting average pixel intensity obtained from SFRP2-targeted contrast agent against tumor volume showed that the average pixel intensity increased as tumor volume increased. In conclusion, molecularly-targeted imaging of SFRP2 visualizes angiosarcoma vessels, but not normal vessels, and intensity increases with tumor size. Molecular imaging of SFRP2 expression may provide a rapid, non-invasive method to monitor tumor regression during therapy for angiosarcoma and other SFRP2 expressing cancers, and contribute to our understanding of the biology of SFRP2 during tumor development and progression.

  11. Molecular biology-based diagnosis and therapy for pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mainly described are author's investigations of the title subject through clinical and basic diagnosis/therapeutic approach. Based on their consideration of carcinogenesis and pathological features of pancreatic cancer (PC), analysis of expression of cancer-related genes in clinically available samples like pancreatic juice and cells biopsied can result in attaining their purposes. Desmoplasia, a pathological feature of PC, possibly induces resistance to therapy and one of strategies is probably its suppression. Targeting stem cells of the mesenchyma as well as those of PC is also a strategy in future. Authors' studies have revealed that quantitation of hTERT (coding teromerase) mRNA levels in PC cells micro-dissected from cytological specimens is an accurate molecular biological diagnostic method applicable clinically. Other cancer-related genes are also useful for the diagnosis and mucin (MUC) family genes are shown to be typical ones for differentiating the precancerous PC, PC and chronic pancreatisis. Efficacy of standard gemcitabine chemotherapy can be individualized with molecular markers concerned to metabolism of the drug like dCK. Radiotherapy/radio-chemotherapy are not so satisfactory for PC treatment now. Authors have found elevated MMP-2 expression and HGF/c-Met signal activation in irradiated PC cells, which can increase the invasive capability; and stimulation of phosphorylation and activation of c-Met/MARK in co-culture of irradiated PC cells with messenchymal cells from PC, which possibly leads to progression of malignancy of PC through their interaction, of which suppression, therefore, can be a new approach to increase the efficacy of radiotherapy. Authors are making effort to introducing adenovirus therapy in clinic; exempli gratia (e.g.), the virus carrying wild type p53, a cancer-suppressive gene, induces apoptosis of PC cells often having its mutated gene. (T.T.)

  12. Advances in radionuclide molecular imaging of pancreatic β-cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus, β-cell mass (BCM) is lost.Various treatments are developed to restore or reconstruct BCM. The development of non-invasive methods to quantify BCM in vivo offers the potential for early detection of β-cell dysfunction prior to the clinical onset of diabetes. PET imaging with radioligands that directly target the pancreatic β-cells appears promising. The ability to determine the BCM has been investigated in several targets and their corresponding radiotracers, including radiolabeled receptor ligands, antibodies, metabolites and reporter genes. Therefore, we summarize the recent progress in radionuclide molecular imaging of pancreatic β-cells. (authors)

  13. Automated tumor analysis for molecular profiling in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Peter W; Wang, Yinhai; Boyd, Clinton; James, Jacqueline A; Loughrey, Maurice B; Hougton, Joseph P; Boyle, David P; Kelly, Paul; Maxwell, Perry; McCleary, David; Diamond, James; McArt, Darragh G; Tunstall, Jonathon; Bankhead, Peter; Salto-Tellez, Manuel

    2015-09-29

    The discovery and clinical application of molecular biomarkers in solid tumors, increasingly relies on nucleic acid extraction from FFPE tissue sections and subsequent molecular profiling. This in turn requires the pathological review of haematoxylin & eosin (H&E) stained slides, to ensure sample quality, tumor DNA sufficiency by visually estimating the percentage tumor nuclei and tumor annotation for manual macrodissection. In this study on NSCLC, we demonstrate considerable variation in tumor nuclei percentage between pathologists, potentially undermining the precision of NSCLC molecular evaluation and emphasising the need for quantitative tumor evaluation. We subsequently describe the development and validation of a system called TissueMark for automated tumor annotation and percentage tumor nuclei measurement in NSCLC using computerized image analysis. Evaluation of 245 NSCLC slides showed precise automated tumor annotation of cases using Tissuemark, strong concordance with manually drawn boundaries and identical EGFR mutational status, following manual macrodissection from the image analysis generated tumor boundaries. Automated analysis of cell counts for % tumor measurements by Tissuemark showed reduced variability and significant correlation (p tissue samples for molecular profiling in discovery and diagnostics. PMID:26317646

  14. Development of a protease-sensitive molecular imaging agent for optoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rivière, Patrick J.; Green, Anthony; Norris, James R.

    2007-02-01

    We are working to develop a molecular imaging agent that will allow for in vivo imaging of proteases by use of optoacoustic tomography. Proteases are protein-cleaving proteins known to be overactive in a number of pathologies, including cancers and vascular disease. Protease-sensitive "smart probes" have previously been developed in the context of pure optical imaging. These involve pairs of mutually quenching fluorophores attached to a backbone by protease-cleavable peptide side chains; cleaving of the side chains liberates the fluorophores and leads to increase in fluorescence. Optoacoustic imaging is sensitive not to fluorescence but to optical absorption and so a smart imaging probe for protease imaging would need to shift its absorption peak upon cleavage. Naturally, the absorption peaks of the cleaved (and, ideally, uncleaved) molecules should be in the near infrared for maximum tissue penetration. We have designed a molecule that should achieve these specifications. It comprises two active sites, derivatives of natural photosynthetic bacteriochlorophylls that absorb in the near IR, conjugated to a lysine backbone by peptide spacers specific to the protease being imaged. When these bacteriochlorophylls dimerize and stack in the uncleaved molecule, their absorption peak shifts about 20-30 nm. When they are cleaved from the molecule the absorption peak shifts back to that of bacteriochlorophyll monomers. We have performed a preliminary synthesis of the molecule and confirmed by use of a spectrometer that the pairing of the bacteriochlorophylls leads to the expected absorption shift.

  15. Tau PET: the next frontier in molecular imaging of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Chenjie; Dickerson, Bradford C

    2016-09-01

    We have arrived at an exciting juncture in dementia research: the second major pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD)-tau-can now be seen for the first time in the living human brain. The major proteinopathies in AD include amyloid-β plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) made of hyperphosphorylated paired helical filament (PHF) tau. Since its advent more than a decade ago, amyloid PET imaging has revolutionized the field of dementia research, enabling more confident diagnosis of the likely pathology in patients with a variety of clinical dementia syndromes, paving the way for the identification of people with preclinical or prodromal AD pathology, and serving as a minimally invasive molecular readout in clinical trials of putative disease-modifying interventions. Now that we are on the brink of a second revolution in molecular imaging in dementia, it is worth considering the likely potential impact of this development on the field. PMID:27334648

  16. Targeted imaging of EGFR overexpressed cancer cells by brightly fluorescent nanoparticles conjugated with cetuximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Meng; Su, Huifang; Lin, Gengwei; Li, Shiwu; Yu, Xingsu; Qin, Anjun; Zhao, Zujin; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2016-08-11

    To improve the treatment efficiency and reduce side effects in cancer therapy, accurate diagnosis of cancer cell types at a molecular level is highly desirable. Fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) are especially suitable for detecting molecular biomarkers of cancer with advantages of superior brightness, easy decoration and high resolution. However, the conventional organic fluorophores, conjugated polymers, and inorganic quantum dots suffer from the drawbacks of aggregation-caused quenching (ACQ), low photostability, and heavy metal toxicity, respectively, which severely restrict their applications in NPs-based fluorescence imaging. To overcome these limitations, herein, we have developed fluorescent nanoparticles based on a t-BuPITBT-TPE fluorophore derived from aggregation-induced emission (AIE)-active tetraphenylethene. Through encapsulating t-BuPITBT-TPE within biocompatible DSPE-PEG and further decorating with a monoclonal antibody cetuximab (C225), the obtained t-BuPITBT-TPE-C225 NPs can be used for targeted imaging of non-small cell lung cancer cells with an overexpressed epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The specific targeting ability of t-BuPITBT-TPE-C225 NPs has been well verified by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry experiments. The t-BuPITBT-TPE-C225 NPs have shown significant advantages in terms of highly efficient red emission, good bio-compatibility, and excellent photostability. This work provides a promising method for precise diagnosis of cancer cells by antibody-functionalized fluorescent NPs with high brightness. PMID:27468980

  17. Intelligent Design of Nano-Scale Molecular Imaging Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeaki Ozawa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Visual representation and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and subcellular levels within living subjects are gaining great interest in life science to address frontier issues in pathology and physiology. As intact living subjects do not emit any optical signature, visual representation usually exploits nano-scale imaging agents as the source of image contrast. Many imaging agents have been developed for this purpose, some of which exert nonspecific, passive, and physical interaction with a target. Current research interest in molecular imaging has mainly shifted to fabrication of smartly integrated, specific, and versatile agents that emit fluorescence or luminescence as an optical readout. These agents include luminescent quantum dots (QDs, biofunctional antibodies, and multifunctional nanoparticles. Furthermore, genetically encoded nano-imaging agents embedding fluorescent proteins or luciferases are now gaining popularity. These agents are generated by integrative design of the components, such as luciferase, flexible linker, and receptor to exert a specific on–off switching in the complex context of living subjects. In the present review, we provide an overview of the basic concepts, smart design, and practical contribution of recent nano-scale imaging agents, especially with respect to genetically encoded imaging agents.

  18. Ferritin as a Novel Reporter Gene for Photoacoustic Molecular Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Ha, Seung Han; Carson, Andrew R.; Kim, Kang

    2012-01-01

    Reporter genes may serve as endogenous contrast agents in the field of photoacoustic (PA) molecular imaging (PMI), enabling greater characterization of detailed cellular processes and disease progression. To demonstrate the feasibility of using ferritin as a reporter gene, human melanoma SK-24 (SK-MEL-24) cells were co-transfected with plasmid expressing human heavy chain ferritin (H-FT) and plasmid expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (pEGFP-C1) using lipofectamine™ 2000. Non-transf...

  19. Monitoring molecular, functional and morphologic aspects of bone metastases using non-invasive imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauerle, Tobias; Komljenovic, Dorde; Semmler, Wolfhard

    2012-03-01

    Bone is among the most common locations of metastasis and therefore represents an important clinical target for diagnostic follow-up in cancer patients. In the pathogenesis of bone metastases, disseminated tumor cells proliferating in bone interact with the local microenvironment stimulating or inhibiting osteoclast and osteoblast activity. Non-invasive imaging methods monitor molecular, functional and morphologic changes in both compartments of these skeletal lesions - the bone and the soft tissue tumor compartment. In the bone compartment, morphologic information on skeletal destruction is assessed by computed tomography (CT) and radiography. Pathogenic processes of osteoclast and osteoblast activity, however, can be imaged using optical imaging, positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission CT (SPECT) and skeletal scintigraphy. Accordingly, conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and CT as well as diffusion- weighted MRI and optical imaging are used to assess morphologic aspects on the macroscopic and cellular level of the soft tissue tumor compartment. Imaging methods such as PET, MR spectroscopy, dynamic contrast-enhanced techniques and vessel size imaging further elucidate on pathogenic processes in this compartment including information on metabolism and vascularization. By monitoring these aspects in bone lesions, new insights in the pathogenesis of skeletal metastases can be gained. In translation to the clinical situation, these novel methods for the monitoring of bone metastases might be applied in patients to improve follow-up of these lesions, in particular after therapeutic intervention. This review summarizes established and experimental imaging techniques for the monitoring of tumor and bone cell activity including molecular, functional and morphological aspects in bone metastases. PMID:22214500

  20. Prototype of Microwave Imaging System for Breast-Cancer Screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubæk, Tonny; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2009-01-01

    Microwave imaging for breast-cancer detection has received the attention of a large number of research groups in the last decade. In this paper, the imaging system currently being developed at the Technical university of Denmark is presented. This includes a description of the antenna system, the...

  1. Quantitative molecular phenotyping with topically applied SERS nanoparticles for intraoperative guidance of breast cancer lumpectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Kang, Soyoung; Khan, Altaz; Ruttner, Gabriel; Leigh, Steven Y.; Murray, Melissa; Abeytunge, Sanjee; Peterson, Gary; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; Dintzis, Suzanne; Javid, Sara; Liu, Jonathan T. C.

    2016-02-01

    There is a need to image excised tissues during tumor-resection procedures in order to identify residual tumors at the margins and to guide their complete removal. The imaging of dysregulated cell-surface receptors is a potential means of identifying the presence of diseases with high sensitivity and specificity. However, due to heterogeneities in the expression of protein biomarkers in tumors, molecular-imaging technologies should ideally be capable of visualizing a multiplexed panel of cancer biomarkers. Here, we demonstrate that the topical application and quantification of a multiplexed cocktail of receptor-targeted surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles (NPs) enables rapid quantitative molecular phenotyping (QMP) of the surface of freshly excised tissues to determine the presence of disease. In order to mitigate the ambiguity due to nonspecific sources of contrast such as off-target binding or uneven delivery, a ratiometric method is employed to quantify the specific vs. nonspecific binding of the multiplexed NPs. Validation experiments with human tumor cell lines, fresh human tumor xenografts in mice, and fresh human breast specimens demonstrate that QMP imaging of excised tissues agrees with flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry, and that this technique may be achieved in less than 15 minutes for potential intraoperative use in guiding breast-conserving surgeries.

  2. CT/FMT dual-model imaging of breast cancer based on peptide-lipid nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guoqiang; Lin, Qiaoya; Lian, Lichao; Qian, Yuan; Lu, Lisen; Zhang, Zhihong

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most harmful cancers in human. Its early diagnosis is expected to improve the patients' survival rate. X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been widely used in tumor detection for obtaining three-dimentional information. Fluorescence Molecular Tomography (FMT) imaging combined with near-infrared fluorescent dyes provides a powerful tool for the acquisition of molecular biodistribution information in deep tissues. Thus, the combination of CT and FMT imaging modalities allows us to better differentiate diseased tissues from normal tissues. Here we developed a tumor-targeting nanoparticle for dual-modality imaging based on a biocompatible HDL-mimicking peptide-phospholipid scaffold (HPPS) nanocarrier. By incorporation of CT contrast agents (iodinated oil) and far-infrared fluorescent dyes (DiR-BOA) into the hydrophobic core of HPPS, we obtained the FMT and CT signals simultaneously. Increased accumulation of the nanoparticles in the tumor lesions was achieved through the effect of the tumor-targeting peptide on the surface of nanoparticle. It resulted in excellent contrast between lesions and normal tissues. Together, the abilities to sensitively separate the lesions from adjacent normal tissues with the aid of a FMT/CT dual-model imaging approach make the targeting nanoparticles a useful tool for the diagnostics of breast cancer.

  3. Development of molecularly targeted agents and immunotherapies in small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Adam; Bhosle, Jaishree; Abdelraouf, Fatma; Popat, Sanjay; O'Brien, Mary; Yap, Timothy A

    2016-06-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a smoking-induced malignancy with multiple toxin-associated mutations, which accounts for 15% of all lung cancers. It remains a clinical challenge with a rapid doubling time, early dissemination and poor prognosis. Despite multiple clinical trials in SCLC, platinum-based chemotherapy remains the mainstay of treatment in the first line advanced disease setting; good initial responses are nevertheless inevitably followed by disease relapse and survival ultimately remains poor. There are currently no molecularly targeted agents licenced for use in SCLC. Advances in sequencing the cancer genome and other high-throughput profiling technologies have identified aberrant pathways and mechanisms implicated in SCLC development and progression. Novel anti-tumour therapeutics that impact these putative targets are now being developed and investigated in SCLC. In this review, we discuss novel anti-tumour agents assessed in SCLC with reference to the complex molecular mechanisms implicated in SCLC development and progression. We focus on novel DNA damage response inhibitors, immune checkpoint modulators and antibody-drug conjugates that have shown promise in SCLC, and which may potentially transform treatment strategies in this disease. Finally, we envision the future management of SCLC and propose a biomarker-driven translational treatment paradigm for SCLC that incorporates next generation sequencing studies with patient tumours, circulating plasma DNA and functional imaging. Such modern strategies have the potential to transform the management and improve patient outcomes in SCLC. PMID:27060747

  4. A feasibility assessment of automated FISH image and signal analysis to assist cervical cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingwei; Li, Yuhua; Liu, Hong; Li, Shibo; Zhang, Roy R.; Zheng, Bin

    2012-02-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technology provides a promising molecular imaging tool to detect cervical cancer. Since manual FISH analysis is difficult, time-consuming, and inconsistent, the automated FISH image scanning systems have been developed. Due to limited focal depth of scanned microscopic image, a FISH-probed specimen needs to be scanned in multiple layers that generate huge image data. To improve diagnostic efficiency of using automated FISH image analysis, we developed a computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme. In this experiment, four pap-smear specimen slides were scanned by a dual-detector fluorescence image scanning system that acquired two spectrum images simultaneously, which represent images of interphase cells and FISH-probed chromosome X. During image scanning, once detecting a cell signal, system captured nine image slides by automatically adjusting optical focus. Based on the sharpness index and maximum intensity measurement, cells and FISH signals distributed in 3-D space were projected into a 2-D con-focal image. CAD scheme was applied to each con-focal image to detect analyzable interphase cells using an adaptive multiple-threshold algorithm and detect FISH-probed signals using a top-hat transform. The ratio of abnormal cells was calculated to detect positive cases. In four scanned specimen slides, CAD generated 1676 con-focal images that depicted analyzable cells. FISH-probed signals were independently detected by our CAD algorithm and an observer. The Kappa coefficients for agreement between CAD and observer ranged from 0.69 to 1.0 in detecting/counting FISH signal spots. The study demonstrated the feasibility of applying automated FISH image and signal analysis to assist cyto-geneticists in detecting cervical cancers.

  5. Imaging hallmarks of cancer in living mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellenbroek, Saskia I J; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2014-01-01

    To comprehend the complexity of cancer, the biological characteristics acquired during the initiation and progression of tumours were classified as the 'hallmarks of cancer'. Intravital microscopy techniques have been developed to study individual cells that acquire these crucial traits, by visualiz

  6. PET-based molecular nuclear neuro-imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular nuclear neuro-imaging in CNS drug discovery and development can be divided into four categories that are clearly inter-related. (1) Neuroreceptor mapping to examine the involvement of specific neurotransmitter system in CNS diseases, drug occupancy characteristics and perhaps examine mechanisms of action;(2) Structural and spectroscopic imaging to examine morphological changes and their consequences;(3) Metabolic mapping to provide evidence of central activity and CNS fingerprinting the neuroanatomy of drug effects;(4) Functional mapping to examine disease-drug interactions. In addition, targeted delivery of therapeutic agents could be achieved by modifying stem cells to release specific drugs at the site of transplantation('stem cell pharmacology'). Future exploitation of stem cell biology, including enhanced release of therapeutic factors through genetic stem cell engineering might thus constitute promising pharmaceutical approaches to treating diseases of the nervous system. With continued improvements in instrumentation, identification of better imaging probes by innovative chemistry, molecular nuclear neuro-imaging promise to play increasingly important roles in disease diagnosis and therapy

  7. The development of nuclear medicine molecular imaging: An era of multiparametric imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medical molecular imaging is developing toward a multimodality and multitracer future. Abundant complementary data generated from different tracers in different modalities are successfully serving the biological research and clinical treatment. Among the others, PER-MRI has the greatest potential and will be a research of interest in the near future. This article focused on the evolution history on nuclear medicine from single modality to multimodality, single tracer to multitracer. It also gave a brief summary to the identifications, differences, pros and consofmultimodality, multitracer, multiparametric molecular imaging. Issues, problems and challenges concerned with her development and recognition are also discussed. (authors)

  8. Photoacoustic molecular imaging for in vivo liver iron quantitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccarinelli, Federica; Carmona, Fernando; Regoni, Maria; Arosio, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    A recent study showed that ferritin is a suitable endogenous contrast agent for photoacoustic molecular imaging in cultured mammalian cells. We have therefore tested whether this imaging technique can be used for in vivo quantification of iron in mouse livers. To verify this hypothesis, we used multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT) to image albino CD1 mice before and after experimental iron loading. Postmortem assays showed that the iron treatment caused a 15-fold increase in liver iron and a 40-fold increase in liver ferritin levels, while in vivo longitudinal analysis using MSOT revealed just a 1.6-fold increase in the ferritin/iron photoacoustic signal in the same animals. We conclude that MSOT can monitor changes in ferritin/iron levels in vivo, but its sensitivity is much lower than that of ex vivo iron assays.

  9. Novel Molecular Imaging Approaches to Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Risk Stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toczek, Jakub; Meadows, Judith L; Sadeghi, Mehran M

    2016-01-01

    Selection of patients for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair is currently based on aneurysm size, growth rate, and symptoms. Molecular imaging of biological processes associated with aneurysm growth and rupture, for example, inflammation and matrix remodeling, could improve patient risk stratification and lead to a reduction in abdominal aortic aneurysm morbidity and mortality. (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography and ultrasmall superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide magnetic resonance imaging are 2 novel approaches to abdominal aortic aneurysm imaging evaluated in clinical trials. A variety of other tracers, including those that target inflammatory cells and proteolytic enzymes (eg, integrin αvβ3 and matrix metalloproteinases), have proven effective in preclinical models of abdominal aortic aneurysm and show great potential for clinical translation. PMID:26763279

  10. The Analysis of High-Risk Molecular Markers for Cervical Cancer Patients under Thirty-Five

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Luo; Jian Wang; Changyin Zhao

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore molecular markers for cervical cancer in female patients below thirty-five years of age, so that the markers may be used to formulate a prognosis and to provide some useful targets for improving therapy.METHODS Pathological data were collected from 64 cervical cancer patients under the age of 35 from June, 1995 to June, 2000 in our institution.The data were retrospectively analyzed as a study group, and compared to data obtained from 90 cervical cancer cases over the age of 35 as controls who underwent treatment during the same time period. Immunohistochemical and quantified image analyses were conducted to look for differences between the two groups in expression of survivin, p27,CD44v6, MMP-2 and TIMP-2.RESULTS The overall 5-year survival rate (65.6%) of the study group was significantly lower (P<0.05) compared to the control group (84.4%). The expression of survivin, MMP-2 and CD44v6 was much higher in the younger study group compared to the older control group, but TIMP-2 displayed higher expression in the control group (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in p27 expression between the two groups (P>0.05).CONCLUSION Young women patients with cervical cancer have a poorer prognosis compared to old women. Our study reveals that survivin,MMP-2, TIMP-2 and CD44v6 expression have a correlation with shorter 5-year survival. Improvement in the prognosis for young cervical cancer patients can be expected using biomedical therapy which targets these molecular markers.

  11. Design and Synthesis of Near-Infrared Peptide for in Vivo Molecular Imaging of HER2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Bishnu P; Zhou, Juan; Pant, Asha; Duan, Xiyu; Zhou, Quan; Kuick, Rork; Owens, Scott R; Appelman, Henry; Wang, Thomas D

    2016-02-17

    We report the development, characterization, and validation of a peptide specific for the extracellular domain of HER2. This probe chemistry was developed for molecular imaging by using a structural model to select an optimal combination of amino acids that maximize the likelihood for unique hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions with HER2 domain 3. The sequence KSPNPRF was identified and conjugated with either FITC or Cy5.5 via a GGGSK linker using Fmoc-mediated solid-phase synthesis to demonstrate flexibility for this chemical structure to be labeled with different fluorophores. A scrambled sequence was developed for control by altering the conformationally rigid spacer and moving both hydrophobic and hydrophilic amino acids on the C-terminus. We validated peptide specificity for HER2 in knockdown and competition experiments using human colorectal cancer cells in vitro, and measured a binding affinity of kd = 21 nM and time constant of k = 0.14 min(-1) (7.14 min). We used this peptide with either topical or intravenous administration in a preclinical model of colorectal cancer to demonstrate specific uptake in spontaneous adenomas and to show feasibility for real time in vivo imaging with near-infrared fluorescence. We used this peptide in immunofluorescence studies of human proximal colon specimens to evaluate specificity for sessile serrated and sporadic adenomas. Improved visualization can be used endoscopically to guide tissue biopsy and detect premalignant lesions that would otherwise be missed. Our peptide design for specificity to HER2 is promising for clinical translation in molecular imaging methods for early cancer detection. PMID:26709709

  12. Molecular profiling of multiple human cancers defines an inflammatory cancer-associated molecular pattern and uncovers KPNA2 as a uniform poor prognostic cancer marker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh M Rachidi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Immune evasion is one of the recognized hallmarks of cancer. Inflammatory responses to cancer can also contribute directly to oncogenesis. Since the immune system is hardwired to protect the host, there is a possibility that cancers, regardless of their histological origins, endow themselves with a common and shared inflammatory cancer-associated molecular pattern (iCAMP to promote oncoinflammation. However, the definition of iCAMP has not been conceptually and experimentally investigated. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Genome-wide cDNA expression data was analyzed for 221 normal and 324 cancer specimens from 7 cancer types: breast, prostate, lung, colon, gastric, oral and pancreatic. A total of 96 inflammatory genes with consistent dysregulation were identified, including 44 up-regulated and 52 down-regulated genes. Protein expression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry for some of these genes. The iCAMP contains proteins whose roles in cancer have been implicated and others which are yet to be appreciated. The clinical significance of many iCAMP genes was confirmed in multiple independent cohorts of colon and ovarian cancer patients. In both cases, better prognosis correlated strongly with high CXCL13 and low level of GREM1, LOX, TNFAIP6, CD36, and EDNRA. An "Inflammatory Gene Integrated Score" was further developed from the combination of 18 iCAMP genes in ovarian cancer, which predicted overall survival. Noticeably, as a selective nuclear import protein whose immuno-regulatory function just begins to emerge, karyopherin alpha 2 (KPNA2 is uniformly up-regulated across cancer types. For the first time, the cancer-specific up-regulation of KPNA2 and its clinical significance were verified by tissue microarray analysis in colon and head-neck cancers. CONCLUSION: This work defines an inflammatory signature shared by seven epithelial cancer types and KPNA2 as a consistently up-regulated protein in cancer. Identification of iCAMP may not only

  13. Research progress of molecular diagnostics of lung cancer%肺癌分子诊断学研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛剑; 娄加陶

    2011-01-01

    As a complement to imaging and c tology-based screening strategies, molecular diagnostics of lung cancer include not only the early detection but also the prognosis index and prediction of target therapy. In this paper, gene mutation, prediction of target therapy, miRNA, cancer stem cells and methylation in molecular diagnostics of lung cancer are reviewed.%肺癌的分子诊断作为影像学和细胞学筛查策略的重要补充,其内容不仅包括早期诊断,还包括预后指标及靶向治疗的预测等.该文拟对当前肺癌分子诊断的研究热点基因突变与靶向治疗预测、miRNA、肿瘤干细胞、甲基化及相关检测方法进行综述.

  14. Molecular targeted treatment and radiation therapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) inhibitors confer clinical benefit in metastatic colorectal cancer when combined with chemotherapy. An emerging strategy to improve outcomes in rectal cancer is to integrate biologically active, targeted agents as triple therapy into chemoradiation protocols. Material and methods: cetuximab and bevacizumab have now been incorporated into phase I-II studies of preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for rectal cancer. The rationale of these combinations, early efficacy and toxicity data, and possible molecular predictors for tumor response are reviewed. Computerized bibliographic searches of Pubmed were supplemented with hand searches of reference lists and abstracts of ASCO and ASTRO meetings. Results: the combination of cetuximab and CRT can be safely applied without dose compromises of the respective treatment components. Disappointingly low rates of pathologic complete remission have been noted in several phase II studies. The K-ras mutation status and the gene copy number of EGFR may predict tumor response. The toxicity pattern (radiation-induced enteritis, perforations) and surgical complications (wound healing, fistula, bleeding) observed in at least some of the clinical studies with bevacizumab and CRT warrant further investigations. Conclusion: longer follow-up (and, finally, randomized trials) is needed to draw any firm conclusions with respect to local and distant failure rates, and toxicity associated with these novel treatment approaches. (orig.)

  15. Molecular genetic analysis of tumor suppressor genes in ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To examine the loci of putative tumor suppressor genes in ovarian cancers, we performed the molecular genetic analysis with fresh human ovarian cancers and observed the following data. Frequent allelic losses were observed on chromosomes 4p(42%), 6p(50%), 7p(43%), 8q(31%), 12p(38%), 12q(33%), 16p(33%), 16q(37%), and 19p(34%) in addition to the previously reported 6q, 11p, and 17p in ovarian caroinomas. we have used an additional probe, TCP10 to narrow down the deleted region on chromosome 6q. TCP10 was reported to be mapped to 6q 25-27. Allelic loss was found to be 40% in epithelial ovarian caroinomas. This finding suggests that chromosome 6q 24-27 is one of putative region haboring the tumor suppressor gene of epithelial ovarian cancer (particularly serous type). To examine the association between FAL(Fractional Allelic Loss) and histopathological features, the FAL value on each phenotypically different tumor was calculated as the ratio of the number of allelic losses versus the number of cases informative in each chromosomal arm. The average FALs for each phenotypically different tumor were: serous cystoadenocarcinomas. FAL=0.31 : mucinous 0.12 : and clear cell carcinoma. FAL=0.20. (Author)

  16. Molecular targeted treatment and radiation therapy for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquardt, Friederike; Roedel, Franz; Capalbo, Gianni; Weiss, Christian; Roedel, Claus [Dept. of Radiation Therapy, Univ. of Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    Background: EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) inhibitors confer clinical benefit in metastatic colorectal cancer when combined with chemotherapy. An emerging strategy to improve outcomes in rectal cancer is to integrate biologically active, targeted agents as triple therapy into chemoradiation protocols. Material and methods: cetuximab and bevacizumab have now been incorporated into phase I-II studies of preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for rectal cancer. The rationale of these combinations, early efficacy and toxicity data, and possible molecular predictors for tumor response are reviewed. Computerized bibliographic searches of Pubmed were supplemented with hand searches of reference lists and abstracts of ASCO and ASTRO meetings. Results: the combination of cetuximab and CRT can be safely applied without dose compromises of the respective treatment components. Disappointingly low rates of pathologic complete remission have been noted in several phase II studies. The K-ras mutation status and the gene copy number of EGFR may predict tumor response. The toxicity pattern (radiation-induced enteritis, perforations) and surgical complications (wound healing, fistula, bleeding) observed in at least some of the clinical studies with bevacizumab and CRT warrant further investigations. Conclusion: longer follow-up (and, finally, randomized trials) is needed to draw any firm conclusions with respect to local and distant failure rates, and toxicity associated with these novel treatment approaches. (orig.)

  17. Influence of low molecular weight heparin on cancer patients’ survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Ptushkin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available There is an evidence of interaction between the hemostasis system and tumor progression factors. It is known that in addition to the fibrin formation and platelets activation, thrombin can influence many cells function interacting with protease-activating receptors including tumor cells. These receptors are involved in the malignant cell phenotype formation (adhesion, proliferation, proteolysis. Thrombin can also affect angiogenesis by stimulating endothelial cells penetration through basal membrane and its migration with new vessels formation. Furthermore, it can cause the release of main neoangiogenesis promoter – vascular endothelial growth factor. All of the above and many other linkages of coagulation and tumor create a theoretical background of possible affecting tumor by regulation of the coagulation activity. Thepromise of this approach is controversial, but there is some clinical and experimental evidence of their effectiveness. The most used group ofdrugs for this purpose was heparins. Several retrospective studies have shown a benefit of low molecular weight heparins (LMWH over unfractionated heparin in cancer patient survival. The appearance of a new heparins group – ultra LMWH are of interest from this point ofview and their possible use in cancer patients. To date bemiparin and semuloparin are used in clinic. Both (bemiparin about 3600 kDa,semuloparin 3000 kDa have substancially reduced molecular weight as compared with the smallest of LMWH – enoxaparin (4600 kDa.Use of bemiparin in patients with small cell lung cancer receiving chemotherapy resulted in increased of 2-year survival rate compared to the control group (68.6 % vs. 29.4 %, p = 0.0042.

  18. Multimodal and three-dimensional imaging of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Zhenghong; Sodee, D Bruce; Resnick, Martin; Maclennan, Gregory T

    2005-09-01

    Accurate characterization of prostate cancer is crucial for treatment planning and patient management. Non-invasive SPECT imaging using a radiolabeled monoclonal antibody, 111In-labeled capromab pendetide, offers advantage over existing means for prostate cancer diagnosis and staging. However, there are difficulties associated with the interpretation of these SPECT images. In this study, we developed a 3D surface-volume hybrid rendering method that utilizes multi-modality image data to facilitate diagnosis of prostate cancer. SPECT and CT or MRI (or both) images were aligned either manually or automatically. 3D hybrid rendering was implemented to blend prostate tumor distribution from SPECT in pelvis with anatomic structures from CT/MRI. Feature extraction technique was also implemented within the hybrid rendering for tumor uptake enhancement. Autoradiographic imaging and histological evaluation were performed to correlate with the in-vivo SPECT images. Warping registration of histological sections was carried out to compensate the deformation of histology slices during fixation to help the alignment between histology and in-vivo images. Overall, the rendered volumetric evaluation of prostate cancer has the potential to greatly increase the confidence in the reading of radiolabeled monoclonal antibody scans, especially in patients where there is a high suspicion of prostate tumor metastasis. PMID:15893911

  19. Microwave Imaging for Breast Cancer Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubæk, Tonny; Fhager, Andreas; Jensen, Peter Damsgaard;

    2011-01-01

    Still more research groups are promoting microwave imaging as a viable supplement or substitution to more conventional imaging modalities. A widespread approach for microwave imaging of the breast is tomographic imaging in which one seeks to reconstruct the distributions of permittivity and...... conductivity in the breast. In this paper two nonlinear tomographic algorithms are compared – one is a single-frequency algorithm and the other is a time-domain algorithm....

  20. Molecular orbital imaging using attosecond pulses generated in N2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. The strong interaction of a molecule with a laser field frees by tunnel ionization an attosecond electron wave packet that probes its bound state half a laser cycle later as it re-collides with the core. Rich information on ths (possibly transient) electronic and nuclear configuration is encoded in the attosecond XUV burst emitted during recombination, a process called high-order harmonic generation (HHG). Complete characterization (intensity, phase and polarization) of this observable gives access to the transition dipole moment over a large momentum span. This transition dipole may allow direct imaging of the radiating molecular orbital using a tomographic procedure. For the first time we succeeded to characterize the intensity, phase and polarization of the XUV emission in aligned N2 molecules. Our measurements evidence multi-orbital contributions to the attosecond emission and also reveal the ellipticity of the harmonics. Recent experimental and theoretical studies have revealed that molecules could be tunnel ionized from several orbitals simultaneously. These different orbitals lead to interfering contributions in the attosecond emission. We were able to separate these contributions and by using the tomographic molecular orbital reconstruction technique, HOMO and HOMO-1 orbitals were reconstructed in N2. These reconstructions show remarkable agreement with theoretical simulations and also provide us with the sign changes in the orbital wave functions. An investigation was addressed to the validity of the plane wave approximation in our calculation. The coherent superposition of the HOMO and HOMO-1 orbitals provides time-resolved experimental images of the wave packet ('hole') left empty after coherent tunnel ionization from both orbitals. The recombining electron wave packet probes the 'hole' at the instant of recombination providing information about the electronic structure of the molecule at that moment. This imaging of